Old Bailey Proceedings, 2nd June 1813.
Reference Number: 18130602
Reference Number: f18130602-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND ALSO THE GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, HELD AT Justice-Hall, in the Old Bailey, On WEDNESDAY the 2nd of JUNE, 1813, and following Days;

BEING THE FIFTH SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF The Right Honourable GEORGE SCHOLEY , LORD-MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY JOB SIBLY, No. 4, CARTHUSIAN-STREET, ALDERSGATE-STREET.

LONDON:

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED (BY THE AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON,) By R. Butters, No. 22, Fetter-lane, Fleet-street.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON.

Before the Right Honourable GEORGE SCHOLEY , Lord Mayor of the City of London, Sir Nash Grose, knt. one of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir Robert Graham , knt. one of the Barons of His Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir Claudius Stephen Hunter, bart; Sir John Perring, bart; Sir Charles Flower, bart; Aldermen of the said City John Silvester , esq. Recorder of the said City; William Domville, esq. John Atkins esq. William Heygate esq. Aldermen of the said City; and Newman Knowlys, esq. Common Serjeant of the said City; His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City, and County of Middlesex.

London Jury.

Samuel Minten ,

Benjamin Standry ,

John Watson ,

Robert Baldy ,

Arthur Keats ,

Griffiths Thomas ,

William Child ,

George Gordon ,

David Adingham ,

Thomas Brickfield ,

William Burton ,

John Dennison .

First Middlesex Jury.

Erasmus Stannard ,

Joseph Mills ,

Robert Linnet ,

Robert Leader ,

James Roacher ,

William Taverner Read ,

William Payne ,

James Abraham Heron ,

Alexander William Mills ,

John Stevens ,

Joseph How ,

John Cox .

Second Middlesex Jury.

William Backoeken ,

Henry Morriell ,

Charles Wile ,

Richard Bradley ,

John Rider ,

Joseph Wilcox ,

Robert Banks ,

George Thomas ,

Thomas Mantell ,

John Clothier ,

James Linnei ,

Thomas Holden .

Reference Number: t18130602-1

516. WILLIAM MURPHY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of April , a portmanteau, value 1 l. the property of William Millard .

EDWARD GEE . I am foreman to William Millard, trunkmaker , 392, Oxford-street . On the 17th of April, about six in the evening, I saw the prisoner take this portmanteau from the door. I was at the back part of the shop. As I came forwards I saw him take it away. I pursued him, and took him, and brought him into the shop, and the portmanteau on him. He then wished me to let him off. This is the portmanteau; it is Mr. Millard's property.

GUILTY , aged 66.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130602-2

517. CHARLOTTE MARY STANLEY was indicted for that she, at the general sessions of the peace holden for the county of Middlesex; on the 17th of September, in the 50th year of His Majesty's reign, was tried and convicted of being a common utterer of counterfeit money, and sentenced to be imprisoned in the House of Correction, Clerkenwell, one year, and to find sureties for two years more; and that she after having been so convicted, on the 22nd of April last one piece of false and counterfeited money, made to the likeness of a good shilling, unlawfully did utter to William Bassett , she knowing it to counterfeited .

WILLIAM BASSETT . I live with Mr. Green, a tallow chandler, in Wardour-street . On the 22nd of April last, the prisoner came into the shop for a pound of candles. I served her. She paid for them one shilling and a halfpenny. I sounded the shilling, and Mr. Johnson came in and took it from me. He marked it, and gave it me again. I marked it, and after I had marked it he took it. The prisoner was in the shop at the time. He took the prisoner in custody, and searched her. I saw her searched; there were some shillings in her hand, about eight or nine, doubled up in paper, and there were a small parcel in a cloth or handkerchief, and in it there might be five or six shillings in halfpence.

JOSIAH GILL SEWELL . I am clerk to the solicitor of the Mint. I produce a copy of the conviction of the prisoner. I got it from the clerk of the peace's office, Clerkenwell. I examined it with the original: it is correct.

(Read.)

WILLIAM BEEBY . I am clerk to Mr. Newport, the keeper of the New prison.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. Perfectly well. I was present when she was tried and convicted, in the year 1810, September session. She was sentenced to be imprisoned in the House of Correction for one year. I delivered her to the governor of the House of Correction in execution of that sentence. I am positive she is the same person.

BENJAMIN JOHNSON , the officer, was called, and not appearing in court, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18130602-3

518. ROBERT SALMON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of March , fifty-six yards of printed cotton, value 3 l. and two yards of stuff, value 2 s. the property of Benjamin Bowen , privately in his shop .

BENJAMIN BOWEN. I live in Marybone-street . On the 13th of March, between the hours of eleven and twelve, I left my own house accompanied with two of my workmen, to carry some goods home. I had not to go with it; a messenger came to me, desiring me to return home. I returned home, and found a large assembly around my door. I entered the house. I was there met by a person of the name of Wilmot. He produced two pieces of wet printed cotton, and he wished me to say whether it was my property or not. I answered, I would inform him when I looked at the remainder of my stock. I looked at the remainder of my stock, and found the two pieces missing. I examined the wet cotton, and found it to be the same pattern and quality that I had lost. I then proceeded further through my house in the passage. I found the prisoner under charge of Mr. Wing. The prisoner, upon finding I was master of the property, begged for mercy. I then took him to Marlborough-street office, where he was committed. This is the property that was found upon the prisoner. I have no doubt it is my property. I had two such pieces at eleven o'clock in the day, when I left my house, and when I returned I had not these two pieces. I value them at about five pounds twelve shillings.

JOHN WILMOTT . I live at 26, Weymouth-street, very near Mr. Bowen. On Saturday, the 13th of March, I heard a cry of stop thief. I went out of doors, and the prisoner passed me. A witness of the name of Wing caught hold of him, and asked him what he had done with the furniture that he had stolen out of Mr. Bowen's shop. He begged not to be exposed, but to be taken into a private house, and he would pay for what he had done. I then went in search of the furniture; I found it at No. 6, Great Chesterfield-street, in the area, in a water-butt. I was directed there by several persons who saw him throw it away. It was all wet. He had thrown it over the rails. It had fallen into a water-butt. I then took the prisoner to Mr. Bowen's shop. He offered a silver watch for the injury the cotton had received, and not to be prosecuted. We took him to Marlborough-street; there he was committed.

MR. WING. On the 13th of March, I was coming past Mr. Bowen's shop, between eleven and twelve o'clock, I saw the prisoner come out of the shop. He appeared to be very much confused. He had a basket, and two pieces of print. I looked in the shop, and saw no person in it; that gave me more suspicion. The prisoner seeing me look at him. He set off running with the property. I gave the alarm in the street. A great many people followed him. He threw over the area rails the basket, and

the two pieces of print. I then got hold of him, and took him back to Mr. Bowen's shop; he begged we would not take him into a public-house, but to take him into a private-house. I took him back to Mr. Bowen's shop; he there begged to be let go, not to be prosecuted.

Q.to prosecutor. Is that your property - A. I have no doubt it is my property; they were in my shop for several days before.

GUILTY, aged 32.

Of stealing, but not privately .

Confined 2 years in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18130602-4

529. THOMAS BONTEIN was indicted for feloniously forging, on the 12th of November , an acceptance to a bill of exchange, for 19 l. 14 s. in the name of Thomas Scott , with intention to defraud Hannah Lawrence , spinster .

And TWO OTHER COUNTS, for disposing of, and putting away a like forged acceptance, with the same intention.

HANNAH LAWRENCE . Q. Are you a single woman - A. Yes.

Q. In October, 1810, did you live at Tottenham - A. Yes; I occupied the whole of a house, I intended to go away, and I advertised the house. I carried on dress-making, and millinery business. I saw the prisoner in October, 1810; I had not known him before; he was a perfect stranger to me. He came there to take the house; he said he had no objection to take the furniture if I meaned to dispose of it. I understood he had been there before, and had conversation with somebody about taking the house. I do not know what day it was in October; it might be the latter part of October. He took possession on the 20th; it was not long before the date of the bill; the bill was dated the day it was given, November the 12th, 1810. He told me, he would take the fixtures of the shop, and my furniture that I had to dispose of he was willing to take, if I would consent to take two bills in payment for the furniture. The fixtures of the shop, he said, he would pay me ready money for, which amounted to twenty-six pounds fourteen shillings; but instead of paying the twenty-six pounds fourteen shillings, he made a payment of twenty pounds, and the six pound fourteen shillings were added to the bills. He sent for the stamps, and when the stamps arrived, he wrote the bills; he did not ask me to write the body of the bills.

Q. Should you know the same bills again if you were to see them; look at the bill for nineteen pounds fourteen shillings, and tell me if that is the bill - A. Yes; the name to this bill, is my hand writing. He wrote the body of the bill, and I put my name to the bill, as the drawer; he wrote the acceptance across the body of the bill.

"Accepted Thomas Scott, No. 4, Staining-lane, London." He wrote the whole of it, except my name. He wrote Thomas Scott , at Terris and White, Staining-lane, London. He called Terris and White his agents. I understood from him that was the place to which the bill would be payable, both in six weeks, but he said if it would accommodate me in making one of the bills for two months, it would suit him the better, than paying both together. I agreed to that.

Q. He went at that time by the name of Thomas Scott - A. Yes; he wrote Thomas Scott . He said if I enquired at Terris and White's, I should find it all satisfactory; they were his agents. I did not see him after that, until he removed into the house.

Q. How soon afterwards did he come and take possession of the house - A. On the 20th of November.

Q. Now, what passed when he came and took possession of the house - A. I met him on the road, and gave him the key; he came to the Ship. I there gave him the key; he was in a chaise he asked me to get into the chaise with him, and to go to the Ship with him; I did so, I gave him the key of the house. He said his goods were coming down in the waggon; they were on the road. I staid some time with him, and then I left him. The stage called for me, and I came to town. I did not hear any more of it, until the first bill was due; I had paid the bill of nineteen pounds fourteen shillings to a Mrs. James, in Castle-street, a dress-maker.

Q. Are you quite sure that the bill that you had of the prisoner was the bill that you paid to Mrs. James - A. Yes, it was returned to me by Mrs. James as unpaid.

Q. Three days after it was due Mrs. James sent for you, to tell you that the bill had been returned - A. She sent to me to ask me whether I would let Mrs. Garlick take the bill to Terris and White, to get it paid. Mrs. Garlick is a person employed by me. I agreed to it. Mrs. Garlick had the bill, and went for the purpose of presenting it; Mrs. Garlick returned, and I found it was unpaid; the bill was returned to me; it was the same bill that the prisoner gave me that was returned to me, by Mrs. James; upon it being returned to me unpaid, I went down to Tottenham to see after Mr. Scott; Mr. Scott was not at home, his wife was; she asked me to walk in, and to wait until he returned. The prisoner returned in a little while; he said he was very sorry, he could not take it up; if Mrs. James would wait he would take it up in a few days. I told him, I would speak to Mrs. James about it; and hoped he would not fail to keep his promise. I came to town then. In a few days afterwards, the prisoner sent a man to Mrs. James, requesting further time; Mrs. James granted a week longer time. I heard nothing more of the prisoner until after the second bill was due, that was two months I think after the first. I went to Tottenham again, when I found the other bill was not paid I saw Mrs. Scott, at that time. Scott was not at home. Mrs. Scott never asked me to sit down, and as soon as I got out of the house, Mrs. Scott put up the shutters. I returned to town again. I never saw Mr. Scott as he called himself, until I saw him on horseback in Chiswell-street; it was on a Sunday I never spoke to him. After that I saw him at Union Hall; a period of twelve months had elapsed then. At a broker's shop, opposite of where I lived at that time, in Whitecross-street, I saw some of my furniture for sale; I think that was in the following summer, after I had left my house.

COURT. Did you ever receive any of your rent -

A. I assigned away my interest; the bills were my security.

Mr. Knapp. When you came to Union Hall did you recognise the prisoner - A. Yes. I went there to see whether it was the prisoner; I saw him; it was the Mr. Scott with whom this transaction had taken place, I am confident of it; he was called by many names there. He was called by the name in which he is now indicted, and by the name of Smith and Jones. I then made my complaint to the magistrate, my deposition was taken, and I was bound over to prosecute.

CHARLOTTE GARLICK. I assisted Mrs. Lawrence in carrying on her business at Tottenham.

Q. Were you present at the time of the bills being given in the way the last witness has described - A. I was; the prisoner at that time represented himself to go by the name of Mr. Scott.

Q. Take that bill into your hand, and tell me whether you know that to be the bill that he wrote - A. Yes, that is the very bill; he gave his name as there described, Thomas Scott , at Terris and White's. He wrote his name upon it as acceptor; he drew the body of it, and wrote the acceptance. Directed to Mr. Terris and White; he stated Terris and White to be his agents; the prisoner said he was employed in making purchases for Government.

Q. Do you remember being desired by Mrs. James to go to Staining-lane with this bill I put into your hand - A. Yes; on the day it became due I went to No. 4, Staining-lane, I there presented the bill for payment. I saw an elderly man; I did not get any payment; he said he had no property in hand whatever, belonging to any such person of that name, nor had not known anything of him for some time past. I was desired to call on the morrow. I went there on the morrow. I then saw no one but the servant maid, who gave no answer.

Q. Do you know the persons of Terris and White - A. No.

Q. Did you find there were such persons living there - A. I made no enquries but there. I returned the bill to Mrs. James, in Castle-street. I am sure it is the same bill. I had seen the prisoner write in my presence. I was with Mrs. Lawrence, when she went down to Tottenham; and afterwards went to Union Hall; I there saw the person of Scott, that I had seen write the bill; he was there called, Thomas Bontein, and several names. I was bound over to give evidence.

JAMES REEVES . Q. I believe you are the clerk at Union Hall - A. I am.

Q. Do you remember the prisoner being brought to Union Hall, and when was it - A. In February last; I asked the prisoner what his name was. He gave the name of Thomas Bontein , in the name he is now indicted. I took down that name from his own mouth; that is the only name that he gave himself.

JOHN MORRIS . Q. Do you know the prisoner, Bontein - A. I do, since about the 15th of January last. On the 14th or 15th of January last, he applied to me to take a house of mine, in Pratt-street, Lambeth; he gave me his name Thomas Bontein .

(The bill read.)

19 l. 14 s. Tottenham, November 12th, 1810.

Six week after date, pay to my order, the sum of nineteen pounds fourteen shillings, value received of H. Lawrence. To Mr. Thomas Scott , No. 4, Staining-lane, Wood-street, London. Accepted. Thomas Scott , Staining-lane, London.

JAMES GLANNON . I am one of the officers of Union Hall. I apprehended the prisoner in the middle of February last. I found in his lodging this paper; it states the name of Bontein, and which paper, he claimed afterwards; it is a certificate of a discharge under the insolvent act.

Q. Where was his lodging - A. In Lambeth-road. I found this paper, and a number of other writings for rent, and a variety of other things; by these I found out what his assumed name was Thomas Bontein ; none of them contained the name of Scott, as I recollect.

COURT. Prisoner at the bar, you have heard the evidence given against you, what have you to say in your defence.

Prisoner. I leave it entirely to my counsel.

WILLIAM THOMAS ALLEN. I live in St. John's-lane; I am a broker.

Q. In the year 1810, and 1811, did you know the prisoner - A. I first knew him on the latter end of August, 1810; I knew him continually in the name of Scott.

Q. Did you know him by any other name than Scott - A. Not positively, he used to have a nick name of Bout, and Bontein at times.

Q. Have you occasionally transacted business with him - A. To my sorrow, in the name of Thomas Scott , in the year 1810. I knew him continually in the name of Thomas Scott , and never by any other name.

Mr. Knapp. The latter end of August, 1810, was the first time that you became acquainted with the prisoner - A. Yes.

Q. You never knew him before that - A. No.

Q. Of course, you never knew whether he had gone by any other name than Scott - A. No.

Q. Since then have not you know that he has gone by other names - A. I know that he has from the public newspapers.

Q. Have you been very intimate with him from that time down to the present - A. No. I visited him in the jail, Horsemonger-lane.

Q. How many times have you been backwards and forwards here - A. I have not kept any account of it perhaps three times.

Q. Do you know the prosecutrix - A. No. I have seen Mrs. Garlick since the prisoner was in custody. The prisoner begged I would call upon her to know whether the prosecutrix had any thing to say concerning the bills in question. I asked Mrs. Garlick when Mrs. Lawrence would be in town. She said, in a few day I said I wanted to see her for what purpose I did not know, only that the prisoner wanted to see her.

Q. to Mrs. Garlick. Do you remember that man coming to you - A. Perfectly well. I think it was about a month or three weeks ago. He said, he came from the prisoner in Newgate; he came to Mrs. Lawrence's lodgings, 198, Whitecross-street. He

enquired for Mrs. Lawrence. I told him she was not in town. He said, he wished to know how the circumstance took place, and whether she was in possession of the bills against him; he said he had seen the prisoner that day; he wished to see Mrs. Lawrence. I said, she was not in possession of the bills, and if she was in town she would not visit the prisoner in prison. He expressed himself as sorry at the transaction of the prisoner defrauding an alone woman; he also said he had himself been a sufferer by the prisoner.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 33.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18130602-5

520. CHARLES REEVES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of February , two tables, value 12 l. the property of Harry Phillips .

WILLIAM HUGGINS . In February last I kept a horse and cart to remove some goods. I was employed by a person of the name of William Smith to remove goods from George-street, Hanover-square. I took my horse and cart to Hanover-square, and when I came to Hanover-square I saw the prisoner. I waited with my horse and cart at the side of the rails towards Oxford-street. It was dark, in the evening, between six and seven o'clock. I saw only one man; the prisoner is the man, to the best of my knowledge. He brought me three tables; they were covered up with baize and blankets. I did not see them uncovered. They were in my possession until the next day. Mr. Lawrence came for them, and took them to his house at Walworth. Reeves put them in my cart, and told me to go on; he would meet me. He helped them in my cart.

Q. Did you or not see one table uncovered in your house - A. Yes, one of the tables was, and that was one of the tables that I got from the prisoner. I had them all together. I kept the tables until the next day, then Lawrence came by the direction of Mr. Smith, the man that hired me. He said he sent him for them.

Q. You took the tables that you had of the prisoner to Lawrence's house, is that so - A. Yes.

Mr. Adolphus. Smith employed you - A. Yes.

Q. Where these tables came from, you do not know - A. No. By Smith's directions I gave them up to Lawrence, as I understood Lawrence said Smith had sent him for them. Reeves put them in the cart.

Q. Do you know a public-house, the sign of the Crown, Pie-street, Westminster - A. No. I know a public-house, the Crown, in Westminster.

Q. Where is that public-house in - A. It is called Pie-street, I believe.

Q. Do you know the landlord's name - A. No.

Q. Had not you a conversation with the landlord about the trial of last sessions. Perhaps you have not been there within this twelvemonth - A. No; it is not a place I use at all.

MR. PIPER. I am clerk to the prosecutor, Harry Phillips . He had a large quantity of household furniture at No. 8, George-street, Hanover-square. A large quantity of furniture was stolen; three tables were also stolen, two card tables, and a mahogany pembroke table.

Q. When did you last see them in George-street, before they were stolen - A. About three weeks before they were stolen I saw them in the house. The key of the house was kept in Mr. Phillips's office. In consequence of information I went to Huggins's house. I got a search warrant, and searched Huggins's house, on the 24th of February. I found the mahogany pembroke table in the one pair of stairs front room.

Q. When were these things missing - A. About a fortnight before. I afterwards went to Lawrence's house at Walworth. I found the tables that are now in court. I know the card tables to be the property of Mr. Smith. I have had them in my care.

Q. to Huggins. I understood you to say that you took these tables to your own house, all three - A. Yes. Then about four o'clock in the afternoon Lawrence came.

Q. Was Reeves there then - A. No. I saw Reeves the next day to that Lawrence came for the two card tables and two knive-boxes. Lawrence said the pembroke table was to be left until Smith called for it.

GEORGE BENNET . I am an officer. I produce two tables; I got them from Mr. Lawrence's on the 24th of February.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel.

WILLIAM FOWLER . I am a coal-heaver. I live in Old Pie-street, Westminster. On Thursday the 17th of April, I saw Huggins at the Crown public-house in Pie-street. He said he had been upon the trial of William Smith and two others. He was asked how he got on; he said very well; he had throwed all upon Charles Reeves . He said Reeves must keep out of the way; he had laid it all upon him on purpose to clear the other men, who were all three acquitted.

CHARLES JONES . I am the landlord of the Crown public-house. Huggins was in my house on Thursday the 15th of April. A man of the name of Green and several others were there. I heard Green ask him how they had managed it at the Old Bailey. He answered, very well; he said he had thrown it all upon Reeves, for the purpose of clearing the other three, and Reeves must keep out of the way.

JOB GREEN. I am a revenue officer in the Customs. On the 15th of April, I was standing at Mr. Jones's door. I treated Huggins with some gin. I asked him how he got on at the Old Bailey; he said, very well; the three men were acquitted. I then said, I supposed Reeves might come forward. He said, no, he must stay a little bit; he had put it all on Reeves's shoulders to get the men's liberty. I said to Mr. Jones that he ought to be subpoened, and several other persons that stood by, they also should be subpoened to declare what they had heard.

Q. How came you to take an interest in this - A. Why I had heard that Huggins was a very bad character; I thought it proper to represent what he said.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18130602-6

521. THOMAS STEVENS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of May , a great coat, value 5 l. the property of Nathaniel Barnordiston , esq.

NATHANIEL BARNORDISTON, ESQ. I live in Charlotte-street, Bedford-square. I lost my great coat on Sunday the 9th of May. My coachman set me down about five minutes after eleven, in the morning, at Doctor Reeve 's chapel, Jewin-street.

JOSEPH CALVER . I am coachman to Mr. Barnordiston. On Sunday the 9th of May, I took my master to Jewin-street chapel ; after setting him down one of the coachman asked me to have a drop of porter with him; I went with him into the Woolpack public-house, and drank with him. I returned to the carriage; I saw my master's coat was gone; I went to the first turning, which is Redcross-street. I saw a man going along with my coat, I called stop thief; I ran up to him, and told him he had stolen my master's box-coat. He said a man pulled it off the box, and he picked it up.

Q. Was any body with him - A. No. He returned to the public-house; a constable was fetched; he has the coat.

JAMES TAYLER . I am a constable. I produce the coat. I took the prisoner in custody. I received the coat of the coachman; I have kept it ever since.

Calver. I know the coat to be my master's property.

Prisoner's Defence. When the coachman said it was his coat, I said, I do not think it is; I will go back to see whether it is, or no. I picked up the coat.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY, aged 16.

Judgment respited .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130602-7

522. MARY BARRETT and MARY BENNETT were indicted for that they, on the 21st of April , three pieces of false and counterfeited milled money, each of them made to the likeness and similitude of a good shilling, feloniously did put off to Sarah Turner , at a lower rate and value than they were counterfeited for, that is to say, for one shilling and sixpence .

SARAH TURNER . In April last, I was a servant in Golden-lane. I know both the prisoners; they are mother, and daughter. On the 21st of April I met Joseph Prince , the headborough; Mr. Hutchins, and Lock, they were with him, at a public-house in Petticoat-lane. Prince marked two eighteen-penny pieces, and gave them to me; they gave me the money to buy bad money. I had no other money; they searched me, and gave me two eighteen-penny bank-tokens. I then went to Rosemary-lane, and bought the money; I saw Mary Barrett , the mother, at the corner of a street, in Rosemary-lane; Mary Bennett was sitting on the step of a door. I asked Mary Bennett if she would let me have three bad shillings; she said yes; and when I had that I gave her an eighteen-penny bank-token. I then asked her for three more; she said, as many as I wanted she would go and fetch them; she went to the girl at the step of the door. I saw her daughter give her the money out of a bag; she then gave me another three shillings, six in all, and I gave her the other marked eighteen-penny piece. Hutchins, and Lock were watching her. Upon her giving me the last three shillings, Hutchins and Lock took the good money out of her hands, and the bad money out of mine.

Q. Had they gone with you - A. Yes.

JOSEPH PRINCE . I am an headborough of St. Lukes. The witness, (Turner) gave me some information; on the 21st of April, she went with me, Hutchins, and Lock, into Petticoat-lane, into a public-house; we searched her; she had no money at all; we gave her two eighteen-penny bank-tokens. I marked them, so as to know them again; I delivered them to Mary Turner ; we then told her to go on. She took us to Sparrow-corner, in the Minories, for the purpose of purchasing of bad money. In a little while after we had been there, Mary Barrett came up; I saw Hutchins take out of Barrett's hands some money; an eighteen-penny bank-token, and some bad money out of Turner's hands; he snatched it out of her hands; we then took them to the watchhouse. I searched Barrett; in her pocket I found an eighteen-penny bank-token that I had marked; Hutchins and Lock searched the other.

RICHARD HUTCHINS . I went with Lock, and Prince upon this occasion to Petticoat-lane. I saw Barrett meet Turner at Sparrow-corner; I saw Turner give something into Barrett's hands; the prisoner Barrett went from Turner about twenty yards, to the step of the door, where the other prisoner was sitting. Barrett took something from the other prisoner out of a leather-bag. She then gave what she took from the girl to Turner, and Turner gave her something again. I then ran up, and took this eighteen-penny bank token out of Barrett's hands.

Prince. That is the eighteen-penny piece that I marked.

Hutchins. I marked these three counterfeit shillings that I took out of Turner's hand. I then left her in the care of Prince, while Lock and I ran and took the younger prisoner.

Lock. I searched the girl; I saw this bag in her hand; it contained seven bad shillings, three bad sixpences, and one eighteen-penny bad-token. They are all bad.

Prince. I found one eighteen-penny token in Barrett's pocket that I had marked.

CALEB EDWARD POWELL . I am an assistant to the Solicitor of the Mint.

Q. Look at these three shillings - A. They are counterfeits, and the other three shillings they are counterfeits, and the money in the bag, the seven counterfeit shillings, three counterfeit sixpences, and a counterfeit eighteen-penny token, they are all of the same make, and bad.

Barrett's Defence. I saw this girl pick up this bag as I followed her from Tower-hill.

Bennett's Defence. I was coming from my work in Rosemary-lane, I picked up this bag.

BARRETT, GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined 1 year in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

BENNETT, NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130602-8

523. WILLIAM CLOVER was indicted for feloniously

stealing, on the 18th of May , one pint of brandy, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of Charles Walsham , James Bishop , senior, James Bishop , junior, and George Bishop .

CHARLES WALSHAM . I am a distiller, and wine manufacturer . I live in Aldersgate-street. The prisoner was my porter , he lived with me five or six years. On the 18th of May, from suspicion we called our servants into the accompting-house; upon William Clover was found a tin can, containing a pint of British brandy: he acknowledged having it. It is our own property.

Q. What are your partners names - A. James Bishop the elder, James Bishop the younger, and George Bishop .

- EDMUND. I am clerk to Messrs. Walsham and Bishop. On the 18th of May, from suspicion of the men robbing them, we had all the men into the accompting-house, and upon William Clover we found this tin can. I took it out of his pocket. The prisoner said, he was very sorry for it.

GUILTY , aged 38.

Confined 3 months in Newgate , fined 1 s.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130602-9

524. MOSES PETERS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of May , eighteen pieces of billet wood, value 2 s. the property of William Johnson , Thomas Johnson , and Robert Johnson .

ROBERT JOHNSON . My partners names are William Johnson and Thomas Johnson ; we are coal merchants . I live at the Horse-shoe wharf, Upper Thames-street .

RICHARD RUST . I am a watchman. On the 12th of May, between ten and eleven at night, I saw the prisoner on my masters premises with four of these billets; he throwed them into an empty barge. I asked him how he came to take them. He said he had only taken four. I said bring them back again, or I will have you. He throwed them in the water. And in the water we found fifteen; I can only say he had four; and he owned having four.

Mr. Alley. He did not take any away - A. He took them off my masters premises.

MR. JOHNSON. I was alarmed by the watchman; I went down; I saw the prisoner; I asked him what he had been about; he said he had no billets in his own barge; fifteen we found in the water, and three in the barge.

Q. What is the prisoner - A. A west country barge-man.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 42.

Confined 1 month in Newgate , whipped in jail .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130602-10

525. SIMON MENDUS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22nd of April , a coat, value 5 s. the property of Stephen Hunter .

STEPHEN HARRIS. I am a groom. I live with Mr. Windsor, the gas-lighter. I lost my coat in Bishopsgate-street , on the 22nd of April; it was on the loins of a horse. I went into the next door to where the horse stood; I saw something move; I ran after the man. The man is here that stopped him.

MR. GREEN. I am a bank porter. On the 22nd of April, I was in Bishopsgate-street I heard the cry of stop thief; the prisoner was pursued by several people; a gentleman stopped him and left him. I then took him to the Compter, and I not being an officer, I tooked him to Mr. Leadbetter.

JOHN BURGESS . I heard the cry of stop thief. I saw the prisoner with the coat across his shoulders. I saw him drop the coat This is the coat, the prosecutor took it up immediately, and said it was his coat.

Prosecutor. That is my coat.

Prisoner's Defence. A man took the coat from the horse, and run away; I ran at the same time the man ran, they catched hold of me, and said I was the thief.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Confined 1 month in Newgate , whipped in jail .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130602-11

526. WILLIAM HORNER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of May , a pocketbook, value 1 s. the property of George Seal .

GEORGE SEAL . On the 26th of May, I was walking along the Poultry , and when I went home I missed my pocket-book. I only know I lost my pocket-book.

THOMAS ELLIOTT . I am a taylor. On this day week about twelve o'clock, I was at Mr. Peart's shop in the Poultry. I saw the prisoner pass the door of No. 13, in the Poultry, just as he passed the door he put his hand into the gentleman's pocket that passed. I immediately ran out, and seized him by the collar, with the pocket-book under his coat. I told the prisoner he had robbed the gentleman of his pocket-book; the pocket-book dropped on the pavement. I picked up the book, and secured him. I told him he should go before the Lord Mayor, before I should let him go. I dragged him towards the Mansion House. Two men came and said they were officers. I said I did not know; I should not let him go until I came before the Lord Mayor. I am sure the prisoner is the man that took the pocketbook. I never lost sight of him until I took him to the Mansion House.

JOHN TURNER . I am an officer. I saw Mr. Elliott collar the prisoner in the Poultry; I went to his assistance, and took the prisoner before the Lord Mayor. Mr. Elliott had this book in one hand, and the prisoner in the other; he gave me this book.

Prosecutor. That is my pocket-book; there are letters addressed to me in it.

Prisoner's Defence. In consequence of a male witness being out of the way, I have not the means of defending myself; I am not conscious myself, whether the book was in my possession or not; when the second witness caught me by the collar a multitude of people observed I had picket a gentleman's pocket; he said I should go with him before the Lord Mayor.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130602-12

527. MARY M'CABE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of May , a writing-desk, value 1 l. the property of William Russel Holman .

WILLIAM HARRIS . I am clerk to Mr. Holman; he is a barrister , No. 2, Pump-court, Middle-temple . On Saturday the 29th of May. I was sitting in my room adjoining Mr. Holman's, with my door shut, between three and four in the afternoon. I heard the door jar; I opened my door, and saw the outer door open; I then looked into the passage; I saw a gentleman going up stairs, and the prisoner on the stairs with something covered up. I went into Mr. Holman's room, and looked into Pump-court; and seeing the prisoner go out of the door, I looked round, and missed this desk off the table. I then suspected it must be her that had got it; I pursued her, and caught the prisoner in Temple-lane Whitefriars, with this aesk covered up in an old great coat. I uncovered it, and discovered it was this desk that I had missed out of the chambers. I then called out for an officer; nobody came. I took the desk from her. I tried to secure her myself; but my having the desk, she got away from me. I am positive she is the woman. This was on Saturday; she was apprehended in the Temple on Monday, for an assault.

THOMAS SHEPHARD. On Saturday, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, I was at No. 6, in Temple-lane. I saw the witness, Harris, and the prisoner coming by the Temple, with this desk. He was trying to take her into custody; he called out for an officer; no officer came. On Monday she came again. I am sure she is the same woman. She was taken on the Monday in the Temple. I told the officer that she was the same woman that stole the desk.

CHARLES MASTERS . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner on Monday, in the Inner Temple, for an assault, and by the description that, I had of her previous I thought she was the woman that did the robbery; on the Saturday I set an enquiry, on foot and discovered the prosecutor.

Harris. This is the desk; it is Mr. Holman's property.

Prisoner's Defence. I am a poor distressed woman; I buried my husband yesterday week. I sold all my goods to pay the funeral. I went to Mr. Broom in the Temple to try to get a petition. I am innocent of the affair.

GUILTY , aged 60.

Confined 1 one year in Newgate , fined 1 s.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130602-13

528. THOMAS LANE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of April , a saddle, value 15 s. a bridle, value 5 s. the property of Peter Ashley ; a coat, value 4 s. and a pair of gloves, value 6 d. the property of Benjamin Hatch .

BENJAMIN HATCH . I am a coachman to the Rev. Peter Ashley ; he lives at Southfleet, near Gravesend, in Kent . On the 9th of April we lost a saddle and bridle from out of the harness-room, the property of my master. I lost an old great coat, and a pair of gloves. On the 10th I went off very early in the morning to fetch my master from Blackheath; I missed nothing when I went out. When I returned the things were gone, the saddle and bridle. On Sunday evening two gentlemen came to Peter Ashley 's; they brought some articles that had been stolen, and I was sent up to Shadwell office on the Wednesday following, and there I found the prisoner in custody, and I saw my master's saddle and bridle; my old great coat and gloves, I left them safe in the stable on the night before I went to Blackheath.

WILLIAM HUMPHREYS. I am a broker. On Saturday the 10th of April, the prisoner came to my shop; I bought the bridle and saddle of him, for twenty-three shillings; he said he came very honestly by it. He pulled out a pair of shoes, which he sold to another man, and the man went away with them. I then had suspicion that he had stolen them. I sent for an officer.

RALPH HOPE . I am an officer. On the 10th of April I took the prisoner in custody; I searched him; on him I found a card-case, a pair of scissars, and some whipcord; the coat he had on, and the gloves were in one of the pockets.

Hatch. The great coat, and gloves, are mine. The bridle and saddle are my master's.

Prisoner's Defence. May it please your lordship, and gentleman of the jury, the humble petition of Thomas Lane, most humbly sheweth that he is an honest, industrious, hardworking man, to support a small family. The smallest charge of dishonesty was never alleged against him before, and it is with a heart-felt sorrow that it now is; he has great reason to believe, that the prosecutor will interfere on his behalf to your lordship, that your lordship will be pleased to take into your consideration, a wife and small family.

GUILTY , aged 39.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130602-14

529. WILLIAM JENKINS and JOHN BRIANT were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of May , three squares of glass, value 1 l. and a box-coat, value 1 l. the property of Benjamin Hutton .

EDWARD CARTER. I am a coachman to Mr. Hutton; he lives at Newington-green. On the 28th of May, about six in the morning, I found the coach-house doors broken open; we lost three glasses from the coach, and my box-coat.

RICHARD HUTCHINS . I am a constable. On last Friday morning about half past eleven, I was coming down Golden-lane, in company with Lock; I saw the two prisoners. Jenkins had three glasses under his arm, and the other prisoner the box-court. I asked them whose they were; Jenkins said they were his, he dealt in such kind of things. I took them into the Crown public-house, and handcuffed them together, and took them before the magistrate; and while I was giving my evidence before the magistrate, Edward Carter came in, and said Mr. Hutton's coach-house had been robbed that morning. This is the great coat and the three coach glasses.

Lock. I was present with Hutchins; I know no further than I took the coat off Briant.

Carter. That is the great coat; the glasses are out of the frames, I cannot speak to glass out of the frame the frames were left in the coach.

Jenkin's Defence. I did not tell the officer that I dealt in them things.

Briant's Defence. I am innocent of the robbery.

JENKINS, GUILTY , aged 21.

BRIANT, GUILTY , aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130602-15

530. GEORGE HAND was indicted for feloniously making an assault in the Kings highway, upon Penniston Topper , on the 13th of May , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, a watch, value 1 l. and a gold key, value 18 d. his property.

PENNISTON TOPPER. In the first week of May, I do not recollect the day of the week; I was passing along Crown-street, Finsbury-square , about four o'clock in the afternoon; I met the prisoner and another man with him; the prisoner was on my right side, and the other man on my left. He accosted me with the name of Simmons, or Wiggins, something to that effect; I cannot charge my memory which. The prisoner put himself in a fighting attitude with his thumb to my throat, but not with violence. The other man pushed me with force against the prisoner, and when I came in contact with him, the prisoner took from my person my watch.

Q. From what part of your person - A. I had it in my waistcoat pocket.

Q. Did he do it with violence - A. No, he did not; I did not perceive I had lost my property until he left me, he did it so quick; I did not perceive him take it. I missed my watch; from the appearance of the men it struck me that I had lost something. I immediately gave the hue and cry of stop thief. I could have easily have taken the other man, but being pretty positive the prisoner had my property. I conceived it necessary to follow him; and when he found I followed him, I saw him throw it away. I picked it up myself. This is the watch; I am positive it is my watch.

THOMAS BURN . I am servant to Mr. Miller. On the 13th of May, I was near the last witness at the time he has been speaking of. I heard the cry of stop thief; the prisoner was running; he passed me; I stopped him, and delivered him to Mitchell.

DANIEL BISHOP . I am an officer. I was in Finsbury-square, in company with John Armstrong , at the time spoken of; I heard the cry of stop thief. the prisoner was stopped by the last witness and another man of the name of Mitchell. I took the prisoner in custody, and took him to Worship-street office. The prosecutor picked up the watch. In taking the prisoner to the office, I told him he was charged with robbing a gentleman of his watch. He said he should not have taken the watch if he had not been lushey, meaning drunk. I took him to the office; he was committed.

Prisoner's Defence. I was tipsey; I did not know what I was doing off.

GUILTY, aged 20,

Of stealing from the person, but not with violence .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18130602-16

531. FRANCES DAVIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of April , a watch, value 2 l. a gold key, value 1 s. three seals, value 5 s. a gold pin, value 1 s. and two necklaces, value 1 s. the property of Mary Williams ; in the dwelling-house of Mary Smith , widow .

MARY WILLIAMS . Q. Look at the prisoner, do you know her - A. Yes. On the 28th of April last, between seven and eight in the evening, she came up stairs; I lodge up one pair of stairs. I saw her come from my bed-room door; she went up the second pair; I was in the front-room. On hearing a noise I came to the door, and went into the passage: I came outside of the front room door, I saw the prisoner come from the bed-room; she went up the second floor, and asked for a false name; she asked for the name of Clark. I went into my bedroom, and found my watch was gone; it hung in the pocket at the head of the bed; I had seen it about ten minutes before the prisoner came on the staircase. It was a metal gilt enamelled watch; I gave seven pounds for the watch; I think it is worth forty shillings. When I came out of the bed-room, the prisoner was coming down the second pair of stairs. The person of the house came up the first pair of stairs, and stopped her; she saw my watch in her hand.

Q. Did you ever see your watch again - A. Not till the next morning; a lamp-lighter picked it up, and brought it to me.

Q. When the girl was coming down stairs what did you do - A. She pushed by the person of the house, and went into the street; I ran after her, and Mrs. Smith ran after her; we cried stop thief: an officer came at the time, and took her. I saw her searched, nothing was found upon her, but a gold pin. The prisoner was taken in custody. That is all I know.

MARY SMITH . Q. You keep this house, do you - A. I do; I am a widow. When the prisoner was on the stair-case, I was below; I heard a noise like breaking of glass on the stairs. This was between seven and eight in the evening. I ran up stairs, and finding a strange girl there, I asked her how she dare take the liberty of going up stairs without knocking or asking. She said, she did. The lower room is a shop, there is a private door in the passage; she had opened the private door in the passage, and went up stairs. The prisoner passed me on the stairs; I saw a watch in her hand; I screamed out that she had got the watch. I saw the watch, seal, and ribbon. She pushed by me, and ran out into the street, through the passage; I and Mary Williams ran after her, and she was stopped and brought to my house. I saw her. A gold pin was found upon her.

WILLIAM HERBERT . I am a lamp-lighter. About eight o'clock on the same evening, I found a watch in Wood-street in the kennel, under the lamp. I delivered it to Wilson, the officer.

Q. When you was pursuing the prisoner, which way did she take from your house - A. She went along the Terrace, into Wood-street. I heard where the watch was found. I saw her run through Wood-street.

JOHN WILSON . I am an officer. The watch was given into my care by Herbert. I have had it in my care ever since.

GEORGE SANDELL . I am an extra constable. I apprehended the prisoner, and searched her. I found a gold pin in the lining of her hat. This is it; and here are three necklaces; she dropped them; they were brought up.

Prosecutrix. The watch, ribbon, and seals are mine, and the gold pin.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY, aged 12,

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Confined 1 year in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18130602-17

532. WILLIAM FOY was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Joseph Bates , about the hour of one in the afternoon of the 7th of March , no person therein being, and stealing a coat, value 6 s. a waistcoat, value 2 s. a pair of stockings, value 2 s. a shirt, value 2 s. a pair of shoes, value 3 s. a handkerchief, value 6 d. a loaf of bread, value 3 s. four pounds weight of bacon, value 3 s. and a knife, value 6 d. his property.

JOSEPH BATES . I live at South Mims in Middlesex . On the 7th of March I went out about half past twelve. I left nobody in the house; I made all fast. I came home again about six o'clock; I found the door broken open, and the windows broken all to pieces. The prisoner owned that he had done it, and that he would satisfy me for my loss.

Q. When was he taken up - A. On the 7th of March the robbery was done; he was taken up last Saturday. At the magistrate's he said he was guilty, and he would make it up with me again. When I went in my house I missed a half peck loaf, and part of my clothes. They were worth five or six shillings. I never found any part of my property again.

Prisoner. Did any one person tell you that he saw me with your property - A. Joseph Tatlin saw you with my coat on.

JOSEPH TATLIN . I am a gardener. The prisoner worked in the garden with me and Bates about two years ago. On the 20th of March I saw the prisoner with Bates's coat on. I was certain it was Bates's coat, and I had him taken up.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18130602-18

533. HARRIET COLLINS and HANNAH WRITTLE were indicted for feloniously making an assault upon James M'Gregor , on the 15th of April , and taking from his person and against his will, a three-shilling bank-token, two shillings, and a bill of exchange, value 10 l. 10 s. his property.

JAMES M'GREGOR. I live at No. 2, Church-yard-court, Fetter-lane. I am a printer .

Q. Do you know the prisoners - A. Yes. These are the women that I met on the 15th of April about five o'clock in the morning, as I was going to work at Paddington. I met the two prisoners in Drury-lane; they asked me to give them something to drink. I told them I would, and they took me to the Black Dog in Drury-lane. I gave them some warm porter as they requested.

Q. Were you sober - A. I had been tipsey the over night; I was sober in the morning.

Q. You had been in bed, I suppose - A. Yes, After they had this porter I was going up Drury-lane to work; the two prisoners followed me to Hudges-court ; they asked me to go into their house. I accordingly went in. They asked me to give them something to drink. I told them I would not. I had my hand in my left hand breeches pocket; one of the two prisoners, which of them I cannot say, shoved me down across the bed.

Q. You were in the house then - A. Yes, below stairs. The two prisoners and my falling, I had my purse in my hand, containing a three-shilling piece, two shillings, and a ten pound bill of exchange. Harriet Collins drawed my hand out, and snatched the bag away. I ran out after her to get hold of it. She flung it to Hannah Writtle , over my head. I expostulated with them to give me the purse and the bill of exchange, and they might have the money. I got nothing but abusive language; that they would not give it. This was from Hannah Writtle ; she was the most abusive one. When I found I could not get it I went away. I stopped the bill; it had eight or nine days to run. A cousin of mine gave me a bill on Bruce and Company; it had been accepted. I then went to Bow-street, and gave the officer information. Going to Bow-street I met Hannah Writtle , before eight o'clock; and had her taken. The officer went with me, and on Friday the 16th the other was taken.

ROBERT BOOTH . I am an officer of Bow-street. Between seven and eight o'clock I met James M'Gregor by the corner of Bow-street; he said he had been robbed; he gave me information about these women. I met Hannah Writtle ; I took her in custody, and on Friday morning I took the other. She begged not to be sent to prison where Writtle was. She said her life would be in danger, as she had told the truth to the magistrate.

Collins's Defence. I was going up to Drury-lane. On Thursday morning this woman met me; she said she had been in the watchhouse all night. I took her to a house where the prosecutor was sitting; there he asked us to have some beer and gin. We took some. He asked Writtle if she knew any house to take him to. She said, no, he might go home to her apartment. We all three went together to her home. He took something out of his breeches pocket, and gave it to Writtle; she throwed it on the bed. He went away. On her return to the bed she picked up a three-shilling piece. I am as innocent as a child unborn.

Writtle's Defence. He was in my room; he fell upon my bed, and flung down a three-shilling-piece to get something to drink; we offered him the change; he said, keep it. I never touched it.

COLLINS, GUILTY, aged 20.

WRITTLE, GUILTY, aged 28.

Of simple larceny only .

Confined 2 years in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18130602-19

534. JOHN GOODHALL was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of

John Day , about the hour of two in the afternoon, on the 12th of April , no person in the same dwelling-house being therein, and stealing a pair of boots, value 25 s. the property of John Day .

JOHN DAY . I live in Shoreditch . On Monday the 12th of April I went out about half past eleven, (about two I came home again); when I went out I left the key in the door. I came back and went out again, and returned again. The prisoner came up stairs to me, and said, John, you have plenty of work. I said, yes; he stopped about ten minutes. I went out with him. I locked my door, and went after him; I was going to treat him. I went with him to the public-house door. I said, we will go in here. He said, go in; I want to speak to a person in the street. I stopped about six or seven minutes; I did not go in. I went to him. He said, Day, go in and call for a pint of beer; I will come and pay for it. I went in then, and called for the beer. He never came near me at all. I stopped there an hour, and then went home. When I went home I found the door fast and the window fast. I did not perceive the house broken at all. I went up stairs, and missed two pair of boots.

MR. BLAND. I am one of the marshalmen. I was informed of the robbery on the 13th, and I heard the prisoner was expected that evening at the Warwick Arms, Warwick-lane. I went there, and slept there all night, expecting his coming there the next morning. On the next morning, the 14th, he made his appearance; I took him in custody, and found one pair of boots on his legs. These are the boots. I questioned him respecting the boots; he gave me three accounts: first, that he had them some years; secondly, that he had them some months; and lastly, that he had them a day or two. I shewed them to the prosecutor; he claimed them.

Prosecutor. These are the boots; and when I came home my house was as I left it.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought the boots in Hounds-ditch; the man is not here.

GUILTY , aged 50.

Confined 1 month in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18130602-20

535. CECIL PITT was indicted for feloniously assaulting William Chater , in the King's highway, on the 19th of May , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, six 1 l. bank notes , his property.

WILLIAM CHATER . I am coachman to Lady Slater, No. 1, Maiden-lane. On the 19th of May, I got leave to come out. I went into several public-houses and got very tipsey. I had twelve pounds with me. I changed a ten-pound note at a linen-draper's shop; I bought some linen; they gave me seven one-pound notes, and I had two more besides. I then went into the White Horse public-house; when I was there I fell asleep. I had nothing to drink for near three hours. When I awoke I called for a bottle of wine I had been sick, and dirted the room. I called for a bottle of wine to treat the company, to make apology. We had five bottles of wine.

Q. Were these people that you treated your acquaintances - A. No, I never saw the men or the house before.

Q. Look at the prisoner. Can you recollect whether he was there - A. I am sure he was in company with me at that public-house. He did not sit so near me as some others did. I took my money out to pay for the wine. I do not know how much I paid. I know I changed two one-pound notes at that public-house. A man that sat at the side of me I felt him meddling at my pocket. I got up, and came out. I was very tipsey then. There were two or three men at the door that had been drinking with me. The went out a little before. There were three or four of them. They took me into a dark passage. I cannot say the prisoner was one of them that took me to that dark passage. It was a dark night, and a dark passage.

Q. Do you remember what the men did - A. I know they did not hurt me. They took my money from me.

Q. Did you perceive them take your money from you - A. No. A gentleman or lady gave me my pocket-book; there were no notes in it. I called out murder when they took me down there, and I called out for the watch, and when some persons came to my assistance the men were gone.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

Reference Number: t18130602-21

536. WILLIAM WARKEN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of April , a pewter quart pot, value 2 s. and a pewter pint pot, value 1 s. the property of James Cock .

JAMES COCK . I keep the Westmoreland Arms in the City-road.

JAMES MIGGS . I am servant to Mr. Cock. On Sunday morning, the 25th of April, I was gathering my master's pots in; I saw the prisoner. The people put out the pots from their doors for me. I saw the prisoner take a pot and a pint from No. 80, Westmoreland-place ; they were standing on the iron rails. The prisoner took the pots, and put them into his apron. I walked after him. He saw me follow him; he threw them out of his apron. I cried out, stop thief, and picked up the pots. These are them; they are my master's pots. A gentleman stopped him.

GUILTY , aged 32.

Confined 1 month in Newgate , fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18130602-22

537. ELIZABETH WETHERALL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22nd of April , a shawl, value 3 s. and seven yards of printed cotton, value 7 s. the property of John Birkett Newton .

JOHN BIRKETT NEWTON. I live in Bethnal-green. On Thursday evening, the 22nd of April, between seven and eight o'clock, I went down Shoreditch, to a Mr. Shippens, a linen-draper there. I purchased a shawl and a piece of cotton for a gown, for which I paid fifteen shillings. I left the house, and went on to Webb-square; there I met the prisoner; she asked me to give her something to drink. I went to the sign of the Crown, in Webb-square; there we had some porter and liquor to drink.

Q. Were you intoxicated - A. I was as sober as I am now. I staid there till near ten o'clock. There was another woman in company which I know nothing of.

Q. Had you known Wetherall before - A. I never saw her to my knowledge before, and by the time I was leaving the house I was the worse for liquor; I told the prisoner. I would give her a shilling if she would see me home.

Q. Are you a married man - A. I am. I had the gown piece and shawl in my pocket. We went up Bethnal-green-road, as far as the turnpike, and at the turnpike she asked me for the shilling that I had promised her. I told her I was not at home; I had got to cross a field to go home. She refused going across the field, and left me. As soon as she went away I missed the gown piece, and the shawl. I did not go after her that night. The next day, about one o'clock, I went again to the house in Webb-square. I saw the prisoner and the other woman in the tap-room. I accused the prisoner of taking the parcel from me. She denied it. She said she saw it. I had it in my pocket when she left me. As I could not get any information from her I went home. On Thursday following I mentioned it to my wife and a young woman that lodges in my first floor. We all three went to the public-house in Webb-square. We mentioned the affair to the landlord; he sent for the prisoner. He said he knew if she had got it, he could get it; and when she came she was accused of it several times. She stedfastly denied it. I then left the house, and went to work.

SUSANNAH JONES. On Thursday, the 29th of April, I went to the public-house with Newton and his wife to Webb-square. When Newton was gone, Mrs. Newton and me we knew she had got it by her countenance. She denied it a great many times. The landlord came into the room; she told the prisoner to give up the duplicates if she had them; he said he hoped it would be the better for her. She gave me two duplicates. I looked at them, and gave them into Mrs. Newton's hand. Mrs. Newton was angry with her husband; she said she would not be seen in it. I gave them to Mr. Newton when he came home. The prisoner said she would not have done it had he given her the shilling that he had promised her.

Prosecutor. I got the tickets of Mrs. Jones when I returned home in the evening.

RICHARD WILSON . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner, and in taking her to the office she acknowledged to having pawned the things. She said she would not have done it if he had paid her the shilling he had agreed for.

MR. BARLOW. I am a pawnbroker. The prisoner pawned this shawl with me on the 23rd of April.

GEORGE HERRON . On the 23d of April, the prisoner pawned this remnant of cotton.

Prosecutor. The shawl and the cotton are the same I bought on that day.

Prisoner's Defence. I am a poor unfortunate woman. I met this man in Shoreditch; he said, I might have this parcel, and keep it until he came again. He did not come again, but sent his wife, and I denied it for fear of making words between the man and his wife.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Confined 1 year in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18130602-23

538. EDWARD PERRY and SARAH PERRY were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22nd of February , a sheet, value 3 s. and a tea-kettle, value 3 s. the property of Thomas Norwood , in a lodging-room .

LETITIA NORWOOD. I am the wife of Thomas Norwood . On the 2nd of November the prisoners came together and took a room at four shillings and three-pence a week. They continued in it until the 1st of April; they then left it. It was a ready furnished room. After they were gone I went into the room and missed a tea-kettle and a sheet.

RICHARD HUTCHINS . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoners at Islington workhouse on the 1st of April. I searched them. On Sarah Perry I found the duplicates of a sheet and a tea-kettle.

MR. STEWART. I am a pawnbroker. In December a sheet was pledged at my house in the name of Sarah Perry . I don't know either of the prisoners.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18130602-24

530. ANNE OLDFIELD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of May , a watch, value 5 l. the property of John Syre , from his person .

JOHN SYRE . I am a bookbinder . On the 21st of May, about a quarter after twelve at night, I was coming down Whitecross-street ; the prisoner accosted me; I bid her to go away, and to evade the object I went to go through Red Lion-market. I there saw two men. I did not wish to go through the market. When I returned to go to my place of abode the prisoner followed me. I then told her to go about her business. I turned round to make water; she took my watch immediately out of my pocket. The watchman came by at the very time. I told her to give me my watch, and to go about her business; I would have nothing to do with her. The watchman then took her to the watchhouse.

THOMAS BARNES . I am a watchman in Whitecross-street. On the night of the 21st of May, I saw the prisoner and the prosecutor in conversation about a watch. I heard Syre say, you have got my watch. I said to the prisoner, give the gentleman his watch, and then go about your business. She said, what was I, I was no watchman. I told her, I was a watchman. I took hold of her arm, and said, she should go to the watchhouse, and then I will see whether you have got the watch or no. I had got hold of her arm in Chiswell-street; I felt something touch my hand. I catched hold of the watch; I cried out to Syre, I have got your watch; and when I came to the watchhouse I laid the watch on the table. The officer of the night took the watch.

THOMAS WOOD . On the 21st of May I was officer of the night. The prisoner was brought to the watchhouse by the watchman. The prosecutor followed, and said, the prisoner had robbed him of his watch. The watchman laid the watch on the table; the prosecutor said it was his watch. The prisoner said he gave it her as a compliment. This is the watch.

Prosecutor. It is my watch.

Prisoner's Defence. I met this gentleman in Whitecross-street. He went into a house with me; they

asked him two shillings; he would not pay. He told me if I would come out a little while in a corner, he would speak to me. The watch fell out of his smallclothes.

GUILTY , aged 27.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18130602-25

540. ESTHER HICKS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of May , from the person of Charles Scott , a pocket-book, value 6 d. a 5 l. bank note, and two 1 l. notes , his property.

CHARLES SCOTT . I am a shipwright . I live in Brook-street, Ratcliffe. On Saturday the 8th of April, in the evening, I had been at my pay-table; two of my mates and I came together as far as Shadwell; by this means I got intoxicated. I fell in with the prisoner; she stopped me in the street; I told her to be gone; I would have nothing to do with her. A woman unknown to me asked her what she stopped me for. I was very much in liquor. The prisoner shoved the woman off the pavement, and told her to go about her business. The prisoner followed me through Shadwell-market; I turned round, and told her to go about her business again. I had not walked far before I fell sick. I walked to Pope's-hill ; I saw the prisoner behind me in a clandestine manner. I was sick, and laid my head against the wall, and sat down upon the stones, and I fell asleep. I looked up in about ten minutes, when I saw the prisoner standing over me. I told her if she was not gone I would give her in charge of the watchman as soon as he came past. She said, I was very bad, and she wanted to take care of me. I threatened her with the watchman again. She went away. I never saw her after that. I fell in a sound sleep. I had my property when I fell asleep I am confident.

Q. Did you fall asleep on the ground - A. Yes, on Pope's-hill. I continued asleep from between ten and eleven o'clock until between three and four in the morning. When I awoke I found my property was gone, another man's and my own.

Q. What property - A. A five pound note and two one's. They were in a pocket-book in my side pocket. From that I went home. I got home about five o'clock.

Q. How far was it from where you fell asleep to your home - A. About two minutes and a halfs walk from Shadwell-market to Ratcliffe-cross. As soon as I missed the property I went about to look who had got it. They took me to the officer, and Brown found the prisoner and the property.

ROBERT BROWN . I am an officer of Shadwell office. Mr. Scott, the last witness, came to my house on Sunday morning; he told me he had lost his pocket-book and seven pounds I told him to be quiet, and I would find out the woman if he knew her. In coming from my house I saw him and a young woman with him, and two or three more shipwrights. The young woman said, she saw Mrs. Hicks with him, and by information I apprehended Mrs. Hicks in Ratcliffe-highway. I told her she must go with me; she was very unwilling to come. I told her if she was not the person I wanted she should come back, there was a person waiting to see her. When we reached the house where the prosecutor was waiting, the prisoner put her hand into her pocket, and pulled out these notes, and was making away to the fire with these papers. I made up to her, and caught these papers out of her hand. I said, you shall not destroy him. Then I took her into another room along with another woman. I called the prosecutor, and asked him whether he knew the woman. He pointed out the prisoner. I then searched her, and found a five pound note.

Q. to prosecutor. Should you know the note that you lost if you were to see it again - A. No. I had two following numbers, five pound notes, from the bank. My master told me No. 5613 and 5614; the five-pound note and the other papers were altogether. I have never found the pocket-book. I believe that note to be mine; I will not swear to it.

Prisoner's Defence. On Saturday three weeks last I was going along Ratcliffe-highway; I saw the prosecutor and two women that he had with him; they walked into a house in Spring-street. I was going that way to Shakspeare's-walk. I was returning in about an hour afterwards; I saw the prosecutor and the same women again. When they saw me come up they bid him a good night, and went away. He took hold of me, and said he was very much intoxicated. I said he was a foolish man he did not go home; he said he had no home; he belonged to a ship called the Four Brothers, in Shadwell dock; the gate was locked; he could not get in to go on board of her, and while I was talking to him he dropped these papers. I picked them up, and gave them to him. He told me to take care of them for him till the morrow. He told me to come to him on board the ship the Four Brothers, and give them him; to ask for the carpenter. He had got some dirty linen I was to take home and wash for him. I never knew there was anything in these papers until the Sunday morning. I only saw the five pound note; I intended to take it to him on Sunday afternoon.

GUILTY , aged 53.

Confined 2 years in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18130602-26

541. FRANCIS DEWELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of May , a bushel of oats, value 5 s. and a sack, value 2 s. the property of James Holbrook .

JAMES HOLBROOK . I live at Tottenham-high-cross . Dewell was in my employ; he looked after my team. On the 5th of May I found a bushel of black oats tied up in a sack, hid under a barn of mine. I wrote my name upon a piece of paper, and Mr. Hodge divided the paper into three pieces; I put it in the bag. The next morning I found the corn gone from the place where I had seen it. I then looked upon a cart loaded with hay; I saw it there.

Q. Did the prisoner assist in loading this cart - A. No; the hay-binder generally loads the cart.

Q.Who had the care of your corn - A. The corn was generally given to him once a week; six bushels on a Monday morning; but suspecting the corn was misapplied I gave out two bushels. On the

Monday morning, preceeding this, and one on the Wednesday morning; and it was on Wednesday I found this under the barn; and on Thursday morning it was upon the cart, underneath the bottle truss of hay; it was the same sack, with the same quantity of corn. Our carman are not allowed to take any corn to town; they are allowed a bottle truss of hay, and no corn to take away with them. The cart set off to London under the carter's care alone. I followed him on foot at some distance, until I met Bishop, the officer, near the Bird-cage. I then returned. I value the bushel of oats at five shillings.

WILLIAM HODGE . I am a farmer, living at Tottenham. On the 5th of May, I was with Mr. Holbrook, he took me into the hay-barn, and shewed me a sack containing some oats, Mr. Holbrook wrote his name; I divided the paper; he put it into his corn sack.

DANIEL BISHOP . I am an officer. I met the prisoner in Kingsland-road, towards Stamford-hill. The team was going to London; the prisoner was driving it alone. I followed the prisoner until he came to the Bird-cage, Stamford-hill, and there he stopped. The ostler came out; they had a little conversation together; one of the Newington coachmen came by, and spoke to the ostler. The prisoner went into the public-house with the ostler. I then went into the public-house and took the prisoner into custody. I examined the cart in the presence of the prisoner; at the top of the load of hay covered over with the bottle of hay and a tilt, was this corn in this sack; I asked the prisoner how it came there; he said he put it there; he had brought it for his horses, his master knew nothing about it. On searching the corn, I found Mr. Holbrook's name on three pieces of paper; putting the pieces of paper together it was visible.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 35.

Confined 6 month in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18130602-27

542. JOSEPH EMMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of May , six silver tea-spoons, value 30 s. four silver table-spoons, value 3 l. a pair of sugar-tongs, value 7 s. a salt-spoon, value 2 s. a pearl broach, value 10 s. a gold seal-key, value 10 s. a coral necklace, value 10 s. and a caddy-ladle, value 2 s. the property of Samuel Jones , in his dwelling-house .

SAMUEL JONES . I am a silversmith , in Cheapside . The prisoner was my porter . In the month of April, I looked over my goods; I told the prisoner I missed four silver forks; and on the 15th of April I charged him with having those things that I had lost. I went to his lodgings with Jennings, a friend of mine; and Willoughby, the officer, also went with me. He lodged at 106, St. John-street. On searching his lodgings, we found six silver tea-spoons; they are worth about thirty shillings.

- WILLOUGHBY. At the prisoner's lodgings, I found these four silver table-spoons, six silver tea-spoons, a pair of sugar-tongs, a pair of salt-spoons, a gold seal, key, a silver watch, and a pearl broach, and a paste broach, a coral necklace, and a silver caddy-ladle. I produce them.

Prosecutor. They are all mine.

Mr. Knapp. These spoons might be taken at separate times - A. They might.

WILLIAM WILSON . I live at 106, St. John-street. The prisoner took an apartment of me. The watch he had given me to repair.

GUILTY, aged 20.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130602-28

543. JOSEPH EMMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of May , six silver forks, value 60 s. the property of Samuel Jones , in his dwelling-house .

SAMUEL JONES . I am a silversmith , in Cheapside .

WILLIAM BRAND . In consequence of information, I went to the house of Robert Peart , to enquire for some silver forks. He gave them me; he said he stopped them under circumstances of suspicion.

ROBERT PEART . I am a silversmith, 83, Whitechapel. These six forks were brought to me for sale, about six months ago; I asked the young man who they belonged to; he said from a gentleman in the City. I asked him why the gentleman did not bring them himself; he said he was confined in an office; he could not well get out. I told him I would rather see the owner of them. He left them, and promised to send the owner to me. The owner nor the young man never came. I believe the prisoner to be the man that brought them; he gave me the name of Emms, at a linen-drapers, in Cheapside; he gave me a number which turned out to be a linen drapers. I went to the number; they knew nothing of the name. These are the spoons; they are worth ten shillings a piece.

Prosecutor. These spoons are my property.

Mr. Knapp. As he had an opportunity, he might take one at the time - A. He certainly might.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel.

GUILTY, aged 20.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130602-29

544. JOSEPH EMMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of May , a gold chain, value 30 s. two gold seals, value 20 s. six tea-spoons, value 23 s. and a gold key, value 10 s. the property of Samuel Jones , in his dwelling-house .

SAMUEL JONES . I am a silversmith and jeweller , in Cheapside.

WILLIAM BRAND . I am a marshalman. I went to the place where Martha Hall lodged, No. 4, Northampton-street, Goswell-street. At her lodgings I found twelve silver tea-spoons, four salt-ladles, a pair of sugar-tongs, a gold watch-chain, two gold seals, and a gold key; Martha Hall delivered them to me, she took them from her box.

Mr. Knapp. to prosecutor. I presume the articles are under the same circumstance as the others; he

had an opportunity of taking one at a time if he was disposed - A. Yes. All the articles are my property.

MARTHA HALL . Q. From whom did you receive these things - A. From Joseph Emms .

GUILTY, aged 20,

Of stealing, to the value of 39 s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130602-30

545. JOHN WAYE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of April , twenty-pieces of leather, value 2 s. 6 d. and five pair of iron tipps, value 1 s. 8 d. the property of William Heath .

WILLIAM HEATH . I am a shoe-maker , 115, Minories. The prisoner was my shopman . I lost some leather, and iron tipps.

CHARLES MESSINS . I am a constable. I searched the prisoner's lodgings, I found this leather, and iron tipps.

WILLIAM BUTTON . I am a smith. I made these iron tipps for Mr. Heath; I never made any of this kind but for him.

Prosecutor. The chief part of this leather is mine; some of it is not.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel; called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Confined 1 month in Newgate , fined 1 s.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130602-31

546. WILLIAM FOY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of April , a silk parasol, value 13 s. one other parasol, value 13 s. one other parasol, value 13 s. a silk umbrella, 18 s. the property of Samuel Southall and Samuel Fossick ; in the dwelling-house of Samuel Fossick .

MR. CARTER. I live in Great Sutton-street, Blackfriars-road; I am a general salesman.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. I do; I have seen him four or five times. He stated himself to be an umbrella-manufacturer . On the 21st of April, he came to me, he brought several articles, which I cannot charge my memory; and among the rest he brought some parasols and an umbrella; he sold them to me; I suspected him, and sent my lad after him. The lad lost him in Exeter-change; he came back and told me had lost the prisoner. I then found out his master, and sent to a relation of Mr. Fossick. In consequence of that Mr. Fossick waited upon me, he saw the parasols, and the umbrella; which he claimed. These are them. I am quite sure they were brought to me by the prisoner. I gave the prisoner eleven shillings a piece, for the parasols and for the umbrella 15 s. 6 s. The prisoner had been at my shop selling umbrellas. When he came with the three parasoand the umbrella I bought them, as Mr. Fossick wished to detect him.

SAMUEL BARNES . I am warehouseman to Mr. Southall and Fossick, 63, Gracechurch-street . It is the dwelling-house of Mr. Fossick, and the trade-house of both. The prisoner was their porter.

Q. Look at the property produced, and tell me whether that is the property of your masters - A. They are, I am certain of it.

Q. What are their christian names - A. Samuel Southall, and Samuel Fossick. I heard Mr. Fossick tell the prisoner that he had every reason to believe he had been robbed by him to a considerable amount; wished me to go and see what was in his box; there were twenty-five duplicates delivered to me. The prisoner said he had delivered all the duplicates up he could find. Mr. Fossick sent for an officer; the officer found one other duplicate on his person.

MR. GANDY. I am a silk-manufacturer. Messrs. Southall and Fossick have all the silk I manufacture. I know this silk; I only make for them.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130602-32

547. JOSEPH FREEMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of May , a handkerchief, value 2 s. the property of Thomas Batt , from his person .

THOMAS BATT . On the 11th of May, as I was coming towards Newgate-street , in the middle of the day, a person tapped me on the shoulder, and said you have been robbed; I saw the man running on, across Cheapside; I put my hand to my pocket, and found that my pocket-handkerchief was gone; having some property about me I was greatly alarmed. A person in court pushed the prisoner, and took hold of him until I came up. On my coming up I took hold of the prisoner, and told him that he had got my handkerchief; he held out the handkerchief; I took it out of his hand; he was then taken to the Poultry Compter.

JOHN HUMPHREYS . I was coming along Newgate-street, in company with another man. As I turned my head round the handkerchief was stolen. The prisoner put his hand into the pocket of a gentleman A person came to me, and said he has done it. I saw the handkerchief in his hand; I said he has. I then pursued the prisoner, and caught him in the Old-change.

Prisoner's Defence. I told the gentleman that I picked the handkerchief up.

THOMAS CHEESEMAN . Mr. Batt gave charge of the prisoner. I searched him, and found this handkerchief, independant of the handkerchief he took of Mr. Batt. This is the handkerchief I received of Mr. Batt.

Prosecutor. That is my handkerchief.

GUILTY , aged 37.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130602-33

548. CHARLES GAMES was indicted for that he, on the 1st of May , feloniously had in his custody, two forged 1 l. bank-notes, he knowing them to be forged .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded.

GUILTY .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130602-34

549. CHARLES GAMES was indicted, for that he, on the 1st of May , feloniously did forge, dispose off, and put away, a forged 1 l. bank-note, with

intention to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England .

Mr. Knapp, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner of this charge was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130602-35

550. WILLIAM THOMPSON was indicted for that he, on the 20th of May, feloniously had in his custody and possession, four 1 l. forged bank-notes, he knowing them to be forged .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY .

Transported for Fourteen Years

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130602-36

551. WILLIAM THOMPSON was indicted for feloniously forging, on the 20th of May , disposing of, and putting away, a forged bank-note, value 1 l.

Mr. Knapp, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner, of this charge, was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130602-37

552. RICHARD WALKER was indicted for that he, on the 26th of December , had in his custody and possession, a forged 2 l. bank-note, he knowing it to be forged .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130602-38

553. RICHARD WALKER was indicted, for feloniously forging, disposing of and putting away, on the 26th of December , a forged, 2 l. bank-note .

Mr. Knapp, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner, of this charge, was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130602-39

554. CHARLES JAMES COOPER was indicted for that he, on 17th of April , had in his custody and possession, a forged 5 l. bank-note, he knowing it to be forged .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130602-40

555. CHARLES JAMES COOPER was indicted for feloniously forging, on the 17th of April , disposing of, and putting away a forged 5 l. bank-note, with intention to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England .

Mr. Knapp, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner, of this charge, was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130602-41

556. THOMAS LONG was indicted for that he, on the 24th of February , had in his custody and possession, a forged 1 l. bank-note, he knowing it to be forged .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130602-42

557. THOMAS LONG was indicted for feloniously forging, on the 24th of February , disposing of, and putting away, a 1 l. bank-note, with intention to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England .

Mr. Knapp, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130602-43

558. JAMES KEY was indicted for that he, on the 19th of May , had in his custody and possession, a forged 1 l. bank-note, he knowing it to be forged .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130602-44

559. JAMES KEY was indicted for feloniously forging, on the 19th of May , a 1 l. bank-note, with intention to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England .

Mr. Knapp, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner, of this charge, was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130602-45

560. WILLIAM MARLEY was indicted for that he, on the 26th of March , had in his custody, and possession, a forged 1 l. bank-note, he knowing it to be forged .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130602-46

561. WILLIAM MARLEY was indicted for feloniously forging, on the 26th of March , a 1 l. banknote, and disposing of, and putting away a like note, with intention to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England .

Mr. Knapp, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130602-47

562. THOMAS JONES was indicted for that he, on the 26th of March , feloniously had in his custody and possession, three 1 l. forged bank-notes, he knowing them to be forged .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130602-48

563. THOMAS JONES was indicted for feloniously forging, on the 26th of March , a 1 l. banknote, with intention to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England .

Mr. Knapp, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner, of this charge, was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130602-49

564. MARY ROBERTS was indicted for that she, on the 13th of March , feloniously had in her custody and possession, two forged 1 l. bank-notes, she knowing them to be forged .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130602-50

565. MARY ROBERTS was indicted for feloniously forging, on the 13th of May , a 1 l. bank note, with intention to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England .

Mr. Knapp, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner, of this charge, was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130602-51

566. THOMAS DAVIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of April , two one pound bank notes , the property of the right-honorable Thomas Earl of Wilton .

THOMAS EARL OF WILTON. Q. Was the prisoner in your lordship's service - A. He had been for several years. In consequence of having missed bank notes for a very considerable time, a year and a half I believe, I was convinced that some person in the house was dishonest. Not wishing to make this known to my family that I suspected them, I wished to find out the best mode, who was the plunderer. On the 5th of April, I put four or five bank notes marked in a particular manner, with T. E. there was one two-pound, and three one-pound notes. I put them into a silk pocket-book, which I have here; and put this into a travelling-box, which I have always locked up. The-travelling box is here if it is necessary to be produced. I examined that box from the 5th of April, to the 25th, every morning, and locked the box again until I missed them; from that time to the 28th; I did not look into it. On the 28th I looked into the box again; I found one of the notes gone, that I had so marked, a one-pound note. In consequence of that I sent to Bow-street office; Adkins came to my house at ten o'clock the next morning.

Mr. Adolphus. Had any of your servants access to that box - A. No, never, by my permission.

HARRY ADKINS . On the 29th of April, I went to Lord Wilton's house in Grovesnor-square. The male servants were all assembled in a room in his lordship's presence; it was announced to them, that they would be searched; as soon as the search was announced the prisoner left the room; he said he was very ill; I went out with him, and staid with him until he came into the room. I searched the butler first, and then the prisoner; I found in the prisoner's watch-pocket, a one-pound note. This is the one-pound note. I took a key from his pocket. He opened a closet in his room, in that closet I found another one-pound bank note in this pocket-book; and on the top shelf of the cupboard, I found these four skeleton-keys. I tried the large key to Lord Wilton's travelling-case, it locked it very easy.

Prosecutor. The two notes produced by Adkins have my mark on them.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel.

GUILTY , aged 36.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18130602-52

567. WILLIAM DUFFEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of April , from the person of Thomas Ball , a pocket-book, value 4 s. and a two pound bank note , his property.

THOMAS BALL . On the 24th of April, I was walking up Nightingale-lane ; I felt my left coat pocket touched. I immediately put my hand, and found my pocket-book wanting a friend of mine, Mr. Flasket, was with me; I said to him my pocket is picked, and looking round, I saw the prisoner running away, on which I called stop thief, and chased him; the prisoner dropped my pocket-book from under his coat, I saw it drop; I stooped and picked it up, and never lost sight of the prisoner until Mr. Flasket secured him; he caught him by the collar. I know the prisoner to be the person. I never lost sight of him. We then delivered him over to the constable.

Q. What was in the pocket-book - A. Two one pound notes.

WILLIAM FLASKET . On the 24th of April, I was with Mr. Ball. I saw the pocket-book drop from under the prisoner's coat. I never lost sight of the prisoner. I seized him, I am sure he is the man from whom the pocket-book fell.

JOHN TUNBIDGE . I am an officer. I produce the pocket-book.

Prosecutor. It is my pocket book; it contains two one-pound notes, the ships register clearance, and quarantine.

Prisoner's Defence. It is of no use giving the court any further trouble, I own my guilt. I hope to serve his Majesty either by sea or land.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18130602-53

569. EDMUND BIRKETT was indicted for that he, on the 1st of May, had in his possession, a certain bill of exchange for the payment of 50 l. and that he did falsely make in the said bill of exchange three endorsements, one of which false endorsements is Grant, Burby, and Company; another, pay William Whitehouse ; another, pay Messrs. Donaldson, and Sons, order; William Whitehouse , with intention to defraud Felix Calvert Ladbroke , Thomas Watson , and William Gillman .

And OTHER COUNTS, with intention to defraud Grant, Burby, and Company.

And OTHER COUNTS, for that he had in his possession, a like bill of exchange upon which was contained the several endorsements, made by Grant, Burby, and Company, that he did feloniously erase that endorsement with intention to defraud Felix Calvert Ladbroke , Thomas Watson , and William Gillman . And ROBERT BRADY , alias HAZARD ,

for feloniously inciting, causing, and procuring the said Edmund Birkett , the said felony to do and commit .

THOMAS BURBY . Q. Are you a banker - A. I am a partner in the house of Grant and Company. The names are William Grant , Richard Burby , George Grant , and Thomas Burby .

Q. On the 12th of April, 1812, do you remember making up a parcel to go to London - A. I believe it was Sunday the 12th; it was made up the Saturday, and sent off Sunday evening. The bills were all charged in the usual way, and made out to the amount given out in these bills to about two or three thousand pounds.

Q. Did you give a bank post bill to your clerk - A. I was not present at the time.

Q. Was the parcel made up in your presence - - A. No, sir.

ALEXANDER MACKLEAN . Q. Are you clerk to Messrs. Grant, Burby, and Company - A I am.

Q. Do you remember in April, 1812, making up a parcel for London, containing bank notes - A. I know a parcel was made up the evening of April the 11th. I did not make up the parcel. The parcel was made up in my presence, by another clerk, a Mr. Barrs, who usually makes up the parcels.

Q. Was there in that parcel a bank post bill of fifty pounds - A. I have no doubt it was. That bill passed through my hands for the purpose of being put into that parcel.

Q. Did you hand that bill to Mr. Barrs, in order for him to put it in that parcel - A. I am not positive whether I handed it or the partner. It is generally handed by one from him or by me.

Q. Look at that bill - A. This is the bill that passed through my hands; here is my endorsement; it passed through my hands on the 11th of April, 1812, it was handed to me by the partner for the purpose of endorsing it.

COURT. Did you see any body for Grant and Burby endorse that bill - A. I cannot say that I saw the gentleman, the partner, endorse it.

Q. Is their endorsement on it - A. No, there is not.

Mr. Adolphus. Was that bill in your possession on the 11th of April, in possession of the house of Grant and Company - A. It was.

Q. Was that bill endorsed by them to your knowledge - A. It has my writing on it, and I handed it to the gentleman, the partner. It has the writing of the firm of the house now.

COURT. It has your writing on it - A It has. I have written,

"pay Grant, Burby, and Company." That is my writing.

Q. Do you ever endorse bills for Grant, Burby, and Company - A. No, I do not. I have not a procuration.

Mr. Gurney. When you wrote that upon that bill what did you do with it - A. I made it payable to the house of Ladbroke and Company. That is taken out by appearance now. They are always endorsed to Ladbroke and Company. I have no doubt it was upon that occasion.

Q. Hold it up to the light, and see whether you can see that now - A. No.

Q. You say,

"pay Grant, Burby, and Co." is your hand-writing - A. It is. I have signed no name. After that, them gentleman sign their names for the purpose of saving trouble. There is the endorsement of Mr. George Grant . I can now see the remains of the indorsement of Mr. George Grant . I can see the G, and the flourish under it, it appears yellow now.

Q. Is there any number upon it, or anything to denote in what order it was in your house - A. Yes, 4780 the number in our books.

Q. Have you got these books here - A. No. This is the hand-writing of a clerk in the office, who copied the bill.

Q. In consequence of some intelligence you received did you issue some advertisements in London - A. Yes.

COURT. The number, 4780, is the hand-writing of a clerk of yours at Portsmouth - A. Yes. The number 4780 upon the bill is the hand-writing of Mr. Green, the clerk.

Q. You saw this bank post-bill either upon the 11th or 12th - A. I saw it in the custody of Grant and Co. upon the 11th.

Q. Now, look upon it, and say whether you saw the number 4780, when you handed it over to the clerk - A. I have no doubt but I did. When I handed it over to the clerk I saw the number. I have examined it by the bill-book; it agrees in other respects, my name and Macklean.

Mr. Gurney. Dismiss from your mind all considerations of the book, and attend to the question. Do you distinctly remember, independent of the book, that on the 11th of April last year, there went through your hands a fifty pounds bank bill without reference to your books - A. I cannot undertake to say so far as that.

Q. I scarce need ask you, as you cannot recollect that a fifty pound bank bill went through your hands; whether, independent of your books, you have recollection of any number or date upon such a bank post bill - A. I remember that there was a fifty pound bank bill passed through my hands that day, certainly, by reference at the moment. I recollect that.

Q. I ask you whether you now recollect that a fifty pound bank post bill passed through your hands except from reference to your books - A. I do not say that I can say as far as that.

Q. Will you look at that bill, and tell me whether you find any writing of your own indicating that went through your hands on the 11th of April, 1812 - A. I do.

Q. Now, what do you find that indicates that it was in your hands that day - A. I find the words,

"Grant, Burby, and Company, or order."

COURT. Is it your practice to put that kind of constructive endorsement upon it the day before it is sent to London - A. Only on those days that we charge it to be sent to London.

Mr. Gurney. Do you not very frequent upon bank post bills write

"pay Grant, Burby, and Company, or order" - A. It has been done.

Q. Have you not often done it - A. Yes, it has been done.

Q. Now, sir, will you shew me anything that indicates to be written upon the 11th of April, 1812 - The number being in our book.

Q. You are to dismiss anything from your mind in your books, which we cannot take. You told me you found something in your own hand-writing in that bill. How do you know that was written in your hand in April last year. What is there in the entry,

"pay Grant, Burby, and Company," which is written without any date, to enable you to say it was written on that day - A. The number of the bill in our book. I can trace it no other way.

Q.Now, sir, what is there in this endorsement unconnected with your book at Portsmouth, that leads you to say it was done on April the 11th, 1812 - A. That being there.

Q. You have written on other bills the same - A. Yes.

Q. This endorsement is without date, except assisted by your books you cannot say, and which we cannot look at. I find that enables you to say it was written on that day - A. If the bill was put into my hands at this distance of time I could not without reference to the books.

Mr. Lockhart. Q. You live with Grant, Burby, and Co. - A. I do, and have access to their books.

Q. Supposing you had gone away, and lived with any other merchant, and such bill had been put into your hand, could you have ventured to recollect it without reference to your books - A. No, I could not.

Mr. Adolphus. How soon after the 11th of April, was your particular attention called to the subject of a bank post bill - A. We had an account on the 13th, in the evening, of a bank post bill being missing on the following morning. I knew it at that time, my attention was turned to the circumstance of a bank post bill being missed. That bank post bill had passed through my hands on the preceding Saturday. I then recollected it by reference to the books, I recollected it.

Q. At that time your attention was called to it - A. Yes, and I recollected that it had passed through my hands.

COURT. Without the assistance of the book - A. Yes; I knew it was a fifty pound bank bill, because it came in on the Saturday, and I remembered how it was disposed of.

Q. You say you remembered a bank post bill by something particular attending it coming into your house; was that the bank bill that you handed to Mr. Grant to endorse - A. Yes, certainly. I handed it to Mr. Grant for his signature; and my memory was particularly called to it on the Tuesday. I particularly remember the bank post bill passing through my hands. If that bill was put into my hands a month afterwards I could not say that without reference to the books.

SAMUEL RICHARDSON . Q. Do you know the prisoners - A. I do.

Q. How long have you known Brady - A. About two years latterly. I knew him some years previous.

Q. How long have you known Birkett - A. About two years or rather more.

Q. I do not ask you particularly. You have been concerned with a great number of persons in robberies and forgeries - A. I have.

Q. And I think you stated upon those occasions the number of offences such as I have described were so great that you cannot tell the number of them - A. I will not be bound to answer that question unless the Court commands.

Q. Some time in April, 1812, did either of the prisoners make application to you - A. They did. Brady made application to me about the month of November, I should think. He told me that the Portsmouth mail had been robbed, and he thought he could procure me the property. The property afterwards was sent to my house.

COURT. What was the expression - A. That the Portsmouth mail had been robbed; that he could procure me the property. He said, it consisted of a great number of half bank notes, among other property.

Q. What other property did he describe - A. Bills of exchange, and halves of bank post bills, I believe.

Q. Were there any whole - A. I believe there was. I received a parcel containing a great quantity of property.

Q. Did he say how the mail had been robbed - A. He said the parcel had been stolen from the mail; he did not say by whom. I inferred by whom from the conversation.

Mr. Adolphus. Never mind what you inferred. In consequence of receiving this parcel did you see him again - A. I did.

Q. Look at that paper, and see if you can remember that - A. There was a bank post bill, which I believe to be this bill.

Q. Had Brady and you any conversation what should be done with that bill - A. We had. It was agreed that some of the property should be taken to James Cook. This bill I reserved myself, and took it to Birkett with other notes.

COURT. Was there any other bank post bill - A. Not that I know of, whole. I told him I should take the bill to Birkett, for Birkett to extract the endorsement.

Q. Have you any memory what the endorsement was that was to be extracted - A. I think it was Ladbroke and Company, and Grant, Burby, and Company. It was known to both of us that Birkett could extract these things. It was merely suggested at the time to shew it to Birkett, and to take his opinion on it, as to the endorsement whether it should be extracted or not. I should think that was the case, and what was proper to be done with it for the purpose of negotiation. I accordingly took it to Birkett, at his house, No, 1, Riley-street, Chelsea. I saw Birkett; he said he would extract it. I left it with him for that purpose; he afterwards produce the bill to me, with the endorsement extracted, some days afterwards, with the old endorsement taken out. This was at his own house in Riley-street. The old endorsement was taken out; I think a blank endorsement was substituted to it.

Q. Who had made that - A. Birkett I should suppose. I did not see him do it.

Q. By blank endorsement do you mean any name put on. By whom was it done - A. By Birkett, I should suppose. I did not see him do it; some name was put: I do not recollect it. There is another I believe on it.

Mr. Adolphus. Look at the bill. What has been altered upon it - A. I can speak positively the name of Ladbroker is extracted, Grant and Burby remains.

Q. That is not the original Grant and Burby - A. I think it is. I am not positive it is.

Q. He delivered it into your hands, with the alterations he made upon it - A. He did. That alteration was such as it now appears. He told me he would pay Brady a consideration for the bill. He admitted he had altered the bill, and he had paid Brady twenty-five pounds for this bill; twenty-five or thirty pounds. I think it was twenty-five.

Q. Did you ever see Brady upon that subject - A. They had one meeting at my house, in my presence.

Q.Where was your house - A.Winterton-place, Chelsea.

Q. Was anything said respecting this bill - A.There was a conversation ensued, but they did not come to any agreement at that time. Birkett told me afterwards that he had paid this.

Q.Was this bill particularly named in this conversation - A. That bill and other property was named; they did not agree at that time.

Q. Was that bill ever again produced from Birkett - A. When it was produced to me with the alteration I delivered it again to Birkett, and accompanied Birkett to a person of the name of Stanley.

Q. Where did you and Birkett and Stanley meet - A. I think in St. James's park. It was delivered to Stanley with other notes by Birkett, for Stanley to negotiate that and other property.

Q. Have you any knowledge from Birkett what became of that bank post bill afterwards - A. Birkett informed me it was paid away.

Q. Had you about this time frequent occasion to be in company with Birkett - A. I had. I met him sometimes at the Man in the Moon, King's-road, Chelsea, a house kept by a man of the name of Clark, I believe. I met him upon this and other business.

Q. You say you heard from Birkett that this bank post bill had been parted with; tell me the whole he said - A. Birkett told me, in company with Stanley, the bill was paid away with other notes to a Mr. Miller, a silversmith, in Whitechapel, for foreign gold; doubloons and other gold coin.

Mr. Lockhart. We have heard the character of you; have you been convicted before now and transported - A. I have.

CHARLES MILLER . I am a silversmith, in Aldgate High-street.

Q. About the month of May, 1812, did any body come to you to purchase gold coin - A.Stanley came on the 1st of June he purchased to the amount of three hundred and thirty pounds. He gave his name, Captain Henry Hunter. He paid in Bank of England notes that were joined, and a fifty pound bank post bill among them. I objected to the bill at first. I said I would rather have a bank note; he said he had received it in a remittance from Liverpool among other notes; he had no doubt it was regular; upon which I examined the endorsements, and found they were regular, apparently. I afterwards in consequence of what passed took the bill; I looked at it very particular; that is the same bill; I paid it away with the other notes.

Q. Have you seen Stanley since - A. I saw him in the presence of Brady, at Bow-street.

Q. Was that the same person that passed himself off as Captain Hunter - A. It was.

WILLIAM CLARK . I keep the Man in the Moon, King's-road, Chelsea.

Q. Do you remember about this time last year seeing either of these men in your house - A. I have seen Birkett in company with Richardson several times in the beginning of June, last year, and July, and I dare say in May. Richardson lived near me, and both of them within a short distance. I have seen them frequently together.

ANDREW MINCHIN. Q. Do you know the handwriting of Grant, Burby, and Company - A. I do.

Q. Is that endorsement any of theirs - A. I believe not, nor the usual character or hand-writing of any one in that house.

Q. to Macklean. Look at that endorsement of Grant, Burby, and Company; do any of the clerks endorse for the firm - A. Only the partners themselves, no other person.

Q. Do you know the endorsement of Donaldson and Company - A. No. I know nothing about these endorsements whatever.

COURT. Donaldson and Co. William Whitehouse - A. I know nothing of it.

(The bank post bill read.)

Mr. Garney. J. Fleetwood in the bill is torn off.

JOHN FLEETWOOD . Q. Look at that bank post bill - A. That is my signature.

Q. How came that name to be obliterated - A. When we received it in the bank in this manner, we suppose it has been paid. My name was perfect. I have not a doubt of it.

Birkett's Defence. May it please your lordship, gentlemen of the jury, the charge for which I stand before you is such which precludes me any defence. It is a charge of enormity. It is only to be defended by my appealing to my maker, and solemnly to you that I am innocent.

My lord, and gentlemen, this is not a charge of a robbery on a certain day, where I might prove my innocence. It is a charge of forgery, stated to be committed in April, a twelvemonth ago; were you gentlemen to be charged with forgeries of a twelvemonth ago, what could you say, you could only plead your innocence; what is to be expected from me, more than solemnly declaring before this court, that I am not guilty of any charge in this indictment, Gentlemen, the proof of guilt to any criminal must be established by the testimony of many persons, whose testimony cannot be doubted, before you are called upon to say whether I am guilty or not. Who is Richardson? Is he a man whose testimony cannot be doubted? He is a man who has been convicted at this bar; whose life has been forfeited a thousand times. This man tells you he brought the

bank post bill to my house to get the signatures eradicated; he might as well say he took it to his lordship. It is from these circumstances my innocence must be drawn. The circumstances are, that Sunday the 12th, or 13th, of April, 1812, a robbery was committed on the Portsmouth mail, and bills of exchange, and bank post bills to the amount of two or three thousand pounds were obtained. Gentlemen, it is acknowledged by Richardson, that as soon as he was in possession of the property he immediately took the same to Cook, his accomplice, who has acknowledged in his deposition before the magistrate at Bow-street office, that he extracted the above endorsements out of all the bills, after they were so extracted they sent to the bankers for payment. Now, gentleman, is it to be credited that Cook and Richardson extracted the above endorsements out of all the bills the day they were stolen, and then to bring this one to my house. Gentlemen, if such testimony is to be credited in a court of justice and such a man as Richardson is to be believed whose life has been forfeited a hundred times, it is better for a man to turn an assassin for an act in this way, no man could be safe in his bed, but he would be liable the next morning he rises of being charged with a forgery. Gentleman, let me remind you of Lieutenant Johnson; he was a man who impeached two innocent lives in order to save his own. Gentlemen, guilt ought to be so clearly established that every by-stander could not entertain a doubt of it. My lord, and gentlemen, I put my case into your hands, and commit myself to your reflection.

Brady's Defence. I know not why I am coupled with this man, any other man might be guilty; I know nothing of the robbery, therefore I can offer no defence.

BIRKETT, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 30.

BRADY, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 33.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18130602-54

570. WILLIAM BADCOCK , SILVESTER (alias JOHN) HILL , and ROBERT BRADY , alias HAZARD , was indicted for feloniously forging, on the 5th of September , a certain order for the payment of 590 l. with intention to defraud Abraham Robarts , Sir William Curtis , bart. Abraham Wilde Robarts , and William Curtis .

SECOND COUNT, for disposing of, and putting away a like forged order, with like intention.

THIRD COUNT, calling it a bill of exchange instead of a forged order.

AND FOUR OTHER COUNTS, for like offence, with intention to defraud Christopher Magnay , and William Pickering .

SAMUEL RICHARDSON . Q. Are you acquainted with the three prisoners at the bar - A. I am; I have known Badcock about a twelvementh, or rather more; Hill and Brady some years; two years latterly.

Q. Do you know a person of the name of Cook - A. I do; I have known him upwards of three years.

Q. Have you been engaged with these parties in various transactions - A. I have.

Q. In the month of August last year was it agreed between you to do anything respecting any bankers in the City - A. It was in the middle of August we agreed to commit forgeries upon the house of Robarts, and other bankers.

Q. Who were the parties in that agreement - A. Brady, Badcock, Hill and myself.

Q. For the purpose of concerting the mode had you various meetings - A. We had; we met at the Horn tavern, in Goodliman-street; and I think once at the Swan tavern, in Sloane-street; our principal place was at the Horn tavern.

Q. At the time you met at the Swan tavern in Sloane-street, do you remember what time of the day it was - A. I think it was in the morning part.

Q. Do you remember what refreshment you had - A. Some sandwiches, and sherry.

Q. You say your principal place was the Horn tavern - A. It was. It was agreed that Cook should forge the drafts and Hill should obtain the copies: that he should obtain small drafts for the purpose of copying the hand writing to obtain genuine checks.

Q. Did you afterwards meet and receive from Hill any genuine checks - A. We did; that was about the middle of the month of August; I cannot state the precise day; it was at the Horn tavern, Doctor's-commons. They were delivered to Cook by Hill, in my presence.

Q. Did Hill tell you from whom he obtained them - A. No, he did not; I understood that he was acquainted with a man of the name of Parsons by report only.

Q. You say they were delivered to Cook, what was Cook to do - A. Cook was to forge other checks from them.

Q. Was it understood further what was Hill to do in the business - A. It was understood that Hill was not to be present at all, at any future part of the business; not at the committing the forgeries, or at the uttering.

Q. Did he tell you what he intended to do with himself - A. He did not tell me, but I understood he was to be out of town at the time.

Q. Did you afterwards receive back the three checks which you saw Hill give to him - A. I did, with other checks.

Q. Did you go to the house of Robarts and receive the amount of these checks - A. I firmly believe I did; it was a day or two previous to the forgery being uttered; I went and received the amount of the genuine checks.

Q. Look at these, and tell me whether you believe these to be the checks - A. I believe these to be the checks.

Mr. Gurney. One dated 17th of August, 1812, Messrs. Robarts and Curtis, pay Messrs. Magnay and Pickering, nineteen pounds ten shillings, Priest Shrubb; another dated 12th of August on Robarts and Curtis, drawn by Walker, for six pounds; another 12th of August, nine pounds ten shillings, drawn for Burchall and Company; all three on Robarts and Curtis's house.

Richardson. I think I received twenty-five pounds in notes, and part of it I think I received a twenty-pound note.

Q. Had Brady and you in two or three days after any arching anything, any intercharge with paper -

A. I cannot recollect that; I met Brady afterwards, I do not recollect paying him any money.

Q. How soon did you receive from Cook the forged checks - A. On Friday the 4th of September; I received from Cook, a number of forged drafts at his house, King's-road, Chelsea.

Q. Was that one of the forged drafts that you so received of Cook - A. I have no doubt of it.

Q. After that did Cook and you come to the Horns tavern - A. Yes; I think Cook, myself, and Badcock, to the best of my recollection on the 4th.

Q. What was agreed between you to be done - A. It was agreed that various forged drafts should be uttered, and we agreed to meet there the next day that is Saturday. On the morning of the 5th, I met Brady, Badcock, and Cook, at the Horn, we met together to consult about uttering these, and other notes; we had very little conversation on the subject, as it had been previously arranged, that Badcock and myself were to go with these drafts, and negotiate them; that had been settled at that, and other meetings. When we met that day, after we remained a short time in the coffee-room at the Horn, Brady and Cook parted; I understood they went to Moorgate coffee-house, as I was told. I accompanied Badcock to Milk-street. I had the forged draft when I went out of the Horn, and in my way I gave it to Badcock. Badcock delivered the forged draft to a porter in Milk-street; I suppose then I was about twenty yards from him. I followed the porter to the house of Robarts and Curtis; I went into the banking-house; I had some country note to change, payable at Robarts's.

Q. What was the object of your going with the porter to the bankers - A. In case the check should be paid I was to come back and give notice to Badcock, who waited at a public-house in the neighbourhood; I think at the Bull's Head, in Bread-street. I saw the porter present the check at the compter, and receive the money. After having seen that, I returned to the public-house to Badcock, and told him the draft was paid; Badcock then went to Milk-street, and received the money of the porter, five hundred and ninety pounds. I was standing at the time he received it thirty or forty yards from him; after Badcock had received this of the porter Badcock and I joined in company, we went to the Bolt in Tun coffee-house, in Bouverie-street, and there we divided it; Badcock retained three fifth shares, and gave me two for myself.

Q. Who were these three shares for - A. Hill, Brady, and himself; he gave me two shares for myself, and Cook.

Q. What did you receive for your two fifths - A. I am not able to say.

Q. How much was the whole sum you divided - A. I think three thousand eight hundred pounds; that was the produce of this day, and the day preceding.

Q. In the course of the evening did you part any of this you so received - A. I did, to a man of the name of Birkett, the man that stood at the bar just now; I let Birkett have eleven one hundred pound notes at the rate eighty pounds for an hundred.

Q. I believe in the course of the last winter you were taken up - A. I was.

Q. When apprehended you disclosed this and other transactions - A. I did.

Q. I believe some years ago you were convicted here - A. Some years ago I was, sir; I think twelve years ago.

Mr. Serjeant Pell. About twelve years ago you went from there to the hulks - A. Yes; I was sentenced for seven years. I staid there the whole seven years nearly; I served seven years, from the date of my sentence.

Q. How long were you on board the hulks - A. Nearly the whole of seven years.

Q. How long have you been concerned in transactions of this most infamous nature - A. I never kept any account; a bad action needs not to be recorded. I am not able to say.

Q. Where did Hill live when you first knew him - A. I first knew him in Newgate-market.

Q. Do you happen to know whether at any time of his life he lived in Whitechapel, and kept a public-house - A. I have heard so.

Q. What is Cook - A. That is a difficult question for me to answer, except in being engaged in these transactions; he has gained his livelyhood in an honest ways, and some in dishonest ways.

Q. Can you give me the time you met Hill upon this business - A. I think towards the 20th. I do not know that I am correct; I only know by report that he was out of town.

Q. Where was that meeting on the 20th - A. I think at the Horn tavern. I was there about half an hour.

Q. Had you a private-room - A. I do not know that we had the day that Hill was with us. I had about three meetings with Hill himself, and others; they were previous to the 20th of August.

Q. Who was present at the next meeting before the 20th of August - A. I think Cook only.

Q. Who was present at the first meeting - A. I think Brady, but I am not positive as to that. We had one meeting in addition at the Swan tavern, Sloane-street.

Q. I think you told me you did not see Hill after the 20th of August - A. Not to my knowledge; I never saw him after that day, until I saw him here now.

Q. Did Badcock appear to know, or did you know the porter that was sent to Robarts - A. No, never.

Q. Did Hill know him - A. No, he was not present.

Q. Then according to your opinion Hill obtained the checks as copies, from which the forgeries were to take place - A. Yes.

Q. When was it you learned from Hill that he was to obtain these checks from Parsons - A. I never learned it immediately from Hill; I heard it at the first meeting, at the Horn tavern; it was generally stated in conversation, and well understood by the whole of us; I cannot recollect who stated it.

Mr. Lockhart. Q. You have stated that you have been in the hulks a considerable time, and that you served your time out there - A. Yes.

Q. You think you have atoned for your offence by serving your time out - A. No doubt, sir. I was discharged regularly.

Q. Was there no intermediate time in which you got out of the hulks - A. I believe there was. I was only absent from it not many hours, a night and a day, not more. It was an attempt to escape, it failed. I was on shore, it might be twelve or fourteen hours, out of custody.

Mr. Alley. to Mr. Fitzpatrick. What was the sentence of this man - A. To be transported for seven years; a Samuel Richardson, It of December, 41st year of his Majesty's reigh.

Q. to Mr. Newman. Were you jailer in the year 1801 - A. I know no person here that was in the jail in 1801; there was one in the debtor's side, he knows nothing about the matter.

JAMES COOK . Q. Have you been for some time past acquainted with Richardson - A. Yes, and I have been also acquainted with the three prisoners at the bar.

Q. In the month of August last year did you and Richardson, and these three persons meet together - A. Yes, at the Horns tavern in Godliman-street, and at the Swan, in Sloane-street.

Q. Did you meet Hill, Brady, and Richardson - A. Yes; I met them there two or three times.

Q. About what time in August - A. To the best of my recollection about the 20th.

Q. What was the purpose of the meetings - A. To commit forgeries.

Q. Whose was to be the hand to commit the forgeries - A. I, sir.

Q. By what means were you to be enabled to commit the forgery - A. By a draft that I understood was obtained by Hill.

Q. Did you at either of these meetings receive any draft from him - A. I am not certain, I think I received three from him. Richardson was present at the meeting, and Brady was there I think. I do not remember whether any other person was there at that time.

Q. Were these the three drafts so received - A. I think they are.

Q. One is drawn by Priest Shrubb, nine pounds ten shillings; assisted by that, did you forge the check that you have in your hand for five hundred and ninety pounds - A. I did.

Q. After you had forged it to whom did you give back the three genuine bills - A. To Richardson, and the forged draft for five hundred and ninety pounds I gave to Richardson.

Q. Do you remember meeting at the Horn tavern, in Doctor's Commons, in the beginning of September - A. Yes. I do not remember the day.

Q. Do you remember meeting there the day the forged check was uttered - A. We did. I then met Richardson, Brady, and Badcock; this forgery was to be presented by Badcock; I left the Horn, and Brady and I went to the Moorgate coffee-house. Brady and me left the Horn, and left Richardson and Badcock.

Q. How soon did you see any of the party again - A. The same day, I saw Badcock, and Richardson.

Q. Did you on that day or the next day receive any produce of the draft - A. I received part of the five hundred and ninety pounds on that day, or the next day, my share. I received the fifth part of Richardson.

Q. On the 20th of August, when you met at Doctor's Commons, was anything said what was to be done with Hill - A. I understood from him that he was to leave town.

Mr. Serjeant Pell. Where did you commit the forgery - A. At my own house, King's-road Chelsea.

Q. You have been concerned in many forgeries - A. I have.

Q. Have you had brought against you any charge of having committed a forgery - A. I acknowledged it. I do not recollect the time I was so charged.

Q. I wish you to state, if you can, who it was said Hill was to provide the genuine checks - A. Brady. I cannot tell what meeting that was.

Q. What is your occupation in life now besides committing forgeries - A. I cannot tell you. I was an hosier once; for the last twelve years I have supported myself by these depredations; I have forged instruments. I was a witness here last sessions.

Mr. Alley. Did you know Richardson in the year 1801 - A. I have heard him say he was convicted of larceny. I do not know the year nor the charge.

BENJAMIN PARSONS . I am a hay salesman, in Whitechapel.

Q. Do you know the prisoner, John Hill - A. Yes.

Q. In the month of August last year did you see him in Whitechapel-market - A. I cannot exactly say the date of the day of the month. I cannot say whether it was in August or not. I have seen him in Whitechapel-market.

Q. Look at these three checks - A. I have.

Q. Do you remember having a check for any hay sold to Messrs. Magnay and Pickering - A. Yes, and also of Birchall and Company, of Old Ford. I believe these transactions took place in the month of August.

Q. Did you receive upon these three transactions the three checks I put into your hand - A. Yes, two of them, one dated the 12th of August, and one the 17th.

Q. Do you remember Mr. Hill making applications to you for checks - A. He frequently used to give me change for checks, to save my trouble of going into the City.

Q. Where did he live at that time - A. He either did live at Newgate-market, or had just left it.

Q. Do you remember meeting him about this time that he had the checks of you - A. I dare say I might.

Q. Do you remember shortly after that, being taken up - A. I was.

Q. How long before you were taken up - A. I think within a month.

Q. Did you ever part with checks for cash to any other person - A. Yes, to Mr. Nash, the clerk of the market; and I have sometimes given four or five to the farmers.

Q. Can you identify these you had given to the prisoner - A. Upon my life, soul, and body, I cannot say that these are the checks that I gave to the prisoner Hill.

Q. You sometimes receive change at the bankers

house, yourself, do not you - A. Very seldom myself. I send my brother or a man.

Q. About that time did you receive three checks of Robarts and Curtis's banking-house - A. No, not myself.

Mr. Serjeant Pell. You having a great variety of these small drafts in your possession; you have, as has been most convenient, given them to Mr. Hill, or to Mr. Nash, to cash for you - A. Yes. Mr. Hill and me had many transactions together. Mr. Hill lent me money; he lent me one hundred pounds; I paid him twenty-five pounds; I am indebted to him seventy-five pounds. As we sell the hay we receive the checks of the buyers.

Q. And you are in the habit of giving these drafts to such persons as are going into the city, or that you have a good opinion of, to get cash for you - A. Yes. Sometimes I receive ten or a dozen in a day.

Mr. Gurney. Did Hill apply to you or you to him A. Sometimes he would say to me, have you got any business in the City? I would say in reply, I have got a check or two. I never applied to him, nor he to me.

THOMAS NASH . I am the clerk of Whitechapel market.

Q. Did you occasionally receive small checks of Mr. Parsons, and give him larger checks - A. I did.

Q. Did you receive any of Parsons between the 3d of August and September, last year - A. No, not any.

JAMES GOODWIN . Q. In the month of August and September, last year, were you waiter at the Horn tavern, Doctors' Commons - A. I was. I have seen there Richardson and Cook in company.

Q. Do you remember seeing them in August and September, last year - A. I cannot say. I left the tavern on the 23d of September.

Q. Do you remember a short time before you left the tavern of seeing them there - A. I think, as nigh as I can recollect, about a month. I saw them there more than once. They were in the coffee-room once or twice, and once they dined in the private room.

Q. Look at Cook, is that one of them - A. No.

Q. Look at the bar - A. I remember Badcock both in the coffee-room and in the private room at the Horn, with Richardson and with Cook. They took giblet soup at one time.

Q. Have you ever said that you thought Badcock was not the man - A. I said that I did not know him, wishing not to be troubled with him. When I saw him I had no doubt of his being the man.

Q Look at Richardson; is that the man that we have been speaking of - A. Yes.

ISAAC HACK . I am a ticket porter. I ply at Honey-lane-market.

Q. In the beginning of September last do you remember being applied to by any person to be sent to a bankers in Lombard-street - A. Yes, I do; Badcock, he was the person that sent me; he asked me if I knew Robarts, Curtis, and Company, Lombard-street; I told him, yes. He said he wanted me to go with that check, and to bring him the money for it. He gave me a check for five hundred and ninety pounds.

Q. Do you believe that to be the check that he gave you - A. I think it is. I was to bring the money to the same place where he stood. I was to bring the money back to Milk-street. I took the check to Messrs. Robarts and Curtis's; I received five one-hundred pound notes, a forty pound and a fifty pound. When I came he was waiting at Mrs. Williams's door. I gave Badcock the notes; I had a shilling paid me for my trouble.

Q. A few days after that you saw some hand bills about this business - A. I did, and directly upon that I went to Messrs. Robarts and Curtis and gave information. This is about nine months ago. I had never seen Badcock before. I have no doubt of his person. I made such satisfactory remarks to Mr. Robarts there was not the least doubt but I should know him again.

WILLIAM BLACKMAN . Q. Are you clerk to Messrs. Robarts and Curtis - A. Yes. The names of the partners are Abraham Robarts , Sir William Curtis , bart. Abraham Wilde Robarts , and William Curtis .

Q. Does Messrs. Magnay and Pickering keep cash at your house - A. They do.

Q. Was any person in their service in the habit of drawing for them upon your house - A. Mr. Priest Shrubb.

Q. On Saturday the 5th of September, last year, was that check presented at your house for payment - A. Yes, and I paid it. I do not know by whom it was presented. I paid in change five one-hundred pound notes, a fifty, and a forty pound.

Q. Was one of them No. 14114 - A. Yes, 18th of August, 1812, another 16710

JEREMIAH GOODHALL . I am a constable of Coventry. On the 7th of September, last year, I apprehended Birkett in Coventry; I found upon him four hundred pounds of what he had got change at banks, I found six notes for one hundred pounds each upon him, besides the four hundred pounds, the produce of the banks.

Q. Look at these, and tell me whether these are two of the six that you found upon him - A. Yes, both of them; there is my initials upon them; one is 14114, and 16710. I took them from Birkett, the man that was at the bar just now.

WILLIAM BLAKESLY . I am a clerk in the banking-house of Messrs. Robarts and Curtis.

Q. On the 3d of September, last year, did you pay these three genuine checks - A. Yes. I paid these checks at one time, a twenty-pound note, and five one's.

JOSEPH PARTRIDGE . I am a stockbroker.

Q. On the 7th of September, last year, were you applied to by either of the prisoners to purchase stock - A. Yes, Brady. I knew him by the name of Robert Hazard . I bought stock for him in that name.

Q. What stock did he come to you to purchase for him - A. Five hundred pounds Navy. That is my writing on the note. He desired me to buy it for a person of the name of William Swan of Suffolk-street, Manchester, gentleman.

Q. In payment did he among other things give you a twenty pound note - A. Yes.

Q. Look at that note. Was that the note that you received of him in part of payment - A. Yes. I wrote the name on it, Hazard, 7 and 9 month, and signed my own initials upon it.

JOHN MUNDEN . I believe now you are a comptroller of taxes at Manchester - A. I am.

Q. Does your situation give you a knowledge of residences at Manchester - A. Yes, particularly so.

Q. In the first place, was there any such street as Suffolk-street, Manchester - A. No, there was not. There was no such person as Swan that I know of. There is no such street as Suffolk-street, Manchester. If there was such a person of the name of Swan very probably I should have known him.

WILLIAM FOREST . Q. In the last year did you keep the Swan tavern in Sloane-street - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember in August last three persons being in your house - A. Yes, three men. I know Cook and Richardson particularly. I do not recollect either of the prisoners at the bar. I remember Cook and Richardson. I waited upon them myself. There was a third person; they had sandwiches and sherry. The sandwiches were either ham or tongue. I think ham. There was a pocket-book and paper produced at the time. I have no recollection of the third person.

ANN THOBURN . I live at Brighton.

Q. Look at the bar, and tell me whether you know either of them prisoners - A. Yes; I know Mr. Hill; he lodged at my house in August last. He came on the 27th of August; he staid with me three weeks in the name of Mr. Smith. He was dropsical or rheumatick; he came in ill health for the purpose of using the bath. He appeared to me to be very ill; his legs were swelled, and he frequently kept his bed.

PRIEST SHRUBB. I am clerk to Christopher Magnay and William Pickering .

Q. Look at that check for nine pounds ten shillings given for hay, was that drawn by you - A. It was, sir.

Q. Look at that five hundred and ninety pound, was that drawn by you or not - A. It was not; it is a forgery.

Q. Look at that genuine one, and tell me whether it appears to you the forged one is done by imitation of the genuine one - A. It has that appearance to me.

Q. Mr. Shrubb, the genuine one has written by mistake, punds, and it is so in the forged one - A. Yes.

(Read.)

"15, Lombard-street, September 4, 1812. Messrs. Robarts and Curtis, pay Magnay and Pickering five hundred and ninety pounds.

P. SHRUBB."

Mr. Gurney. That is the case on the part of the prosecution.

COURT. William Badcock , you have heard the evidence against you; what have you to say in your defence.

Badcock's Defence. I can say no more than I am innocent.

Brady's Defence. Respecting the twenty pound note that Mr. Partridge says he received of me, I purchased five hundred pound stock. I knew Mr. Partridge, and he knew me. I had five hundred and fifty pound standing at that time in the name of Hazard. Is it reasonable to suppose that I had the most distant idea that was part a forgery? and to part with it where I was likely to be criminated for it: had I known how it was obtained, can it he supposed that I would have gone to the stockbroker where I was known. The name of Swan, Manchester, I told him in the street; as for Suffolk-street I am not acquainted with: I only did it for a family motive; and how I came possessed of the twenty pound note I cannot say. I was in the habit of receiving and paying a great deal of money. The name of Brady I took of a second father; my father died when I was an infant.

Hill was not put on his defence,

BADCOCK, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 27.

HILL, NOT GUILTY .

BRADY, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 38.

London jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18130602-55

571. SUSANNAH DAVIS was indicted for that she, on the 10th of April , was servant to Catherine Thompson , and was employed and entrusted to receive money for her, that she did receive 4 l. on account of her mistress, and afterwards did embezzle, secrete, and steal the same .

CATHERINE THOMPSON . I keep the Green Dragon public-house in Half-moon-alley, Bishopsgate-street . Susannah Davis was my servant. I sent her to Sarah Harper to receive four pounds. Sarah Harper had the four pounds in notes. The prisoner was to bring the change for me to give to my customers. The prisoner was accustomed to receive money for me.

Q. What is Sarah Harper - A. She keeps a china-shop in Spitalfields market. The prisoner never returned with the four pounds of silver.

SARAH HARPER . I live in Spitalfields market.

Q. Do you know the prisoner, Susannah Davis - A. Yes. I know her to be Mrs. Thompson's servant. She came to my house on the 10th of April. I gave her four pounds in silver for her mistress. I had received the notes the week before.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130602-56

572. WILLIAM THOMPSON was indicted, for that he, on the 17th of March , was servant to Jacob Fernandez , and was employed and entrusted by him to receive monies for him, that he being such servant so employed and entrusted he did receive and take into his possession the sum of 6 s. on account of his said master, and that he afterwards feloniously did embezzle, secrete, and steal the same .

Mr. Alley, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130602-57

573. WILLIAM STEVENS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of May , eighty pounds weight of letter type, value 5 l. a piece of brass, value 1 s. five reams of paper, value 4 l. one hundred pounds weight of paper, value 5 l. the property of Thomas Blanshard .

THOMAS BLANSHARD . I manage the printing business for the Methodist society. The printing business is carried on at No. 14, City-road .

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. I do. He was a journeyman printer to me. I had missed types and paper belonging to my care. On Saturday the 1st of May I went to the prisoner's lodgings; the prisoner was not present at the first search. I afterwards told him what I had found, type and paper belonging to me. He made no reply respecting the types; the paper he said he considered as a perquisite.

Q. Do you allow any such perqisite - A. No, it is not our custom to allow taking any paper.

DANIEL BISHOP . I am a police officer. On the 1st of May I was sent by Mr. Blanshard to take the prisoner into custody. In his apartment I found three or four hundred weight of type, and about a coach load of paper, printed and unprinted. I brought the paper to the office, and shewed it to the prisoner. He said he took them at a sheet at a time; he considered them as perquisites.

Q. How many sheets are there - A. As many as would fill a coach.

Mr. Blanahard. This is part of the paper I took from the prisoner's apartment. These are books which are printed by our society for the use of the society, which nobody does but ourselves.

Q. How many reams of paper are there - A. About ten or twelve reams.

MR. FIGGENS. I have examined the type; I cast it for that printing office. The type is what we call Three nick; the face is No. 4, English. I never cast No. 4 upon this body for any other than the Methodist society.

Prisoner's Defence. These types I bought at sales. I had a license to be a master printer in the year 1801.

GUILTY , aged 32.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130602-58

574. JOSEPH RICHARDSON and JAMES SIMONS were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Mary marchioness dowager of Downshire, baroness of Sandys, in land, about the hour of twelve at night, on the 29th of March , and stealing therein, seven watches, value 220 l. four watch chains, value 5 l. forty gold seals; value 120 l. two pair of ear-rings, value 300 l. two neck chains, value 20 l. two broaches, value 8 l. two diamond pins with a locket, value 2 l. a gold chain bracelet with a lock and key, value 50 l. seventy rings, value 320 l. two miniature pictures set in gold, with diamonds, value 200 l. a musical box, value 50 l. twelve other boxes, value 30 l. a tooth-pick case, value 10 s. a gold bando, value 10 s. a silver bread basket, value 3 l. a pocket-book, value 2 l. two silver ink-cups, value 2 l. a smelling-bottle, value 1 l. a reading glass, value 1 l. two pieces of silk, value 10 s. thirty gold medals, value 100 l. one hundred silver medals, value 20 l. three hundred and twenty pounds in monies numbered, six bank notes, value 5 l. each, ten bank notes, value 2 l. each, forty-nine 1 l. bank notes , her property. And NATHAN SIMONS , SARAH SIMONS , and JAMES FRANKIL , for feloniously receiving the said goods, they knowing them to be burglariously stolen .

MARY HILL , MARCHIONESS OF DOWNSHIRE, AND BARONESS SANDYS . Q. Is your house situate in the parish of St. George, Hanover-square - A. It is.

Q. In the night of Monday the 29th of March last was your ladyship's house broken open and robbed - A. It was, and the property stolen was of the value of some thousand pounds.

JAMES HAZARD . I am groom and chamberlain to the Marchioness of Downshire. On the night of the 29th of March I shut the windows of the back drawing-room. There are three windows. I shut the first window and the second, and fastened them; the third window I put the sash close down; I did not fasten that; I let the Venetian blinds and the curtains down.

Q. Is that third window next to the bow window - A.It is.

Q. What time in the day was it when you fastened these windows - A. Between seven and eight o'clock.

ANN ORAM . I am housemaid to the Marchioness.

Q. On Tuesday morning did you go into the back drawing-room - A. I did, a little after seven. I was the first that came down stairs. When I went into the back drawing-room I found the window nearest the Bow window open; the Venetian blinds were half down, and the sash quite up. There is some leads underneath that window; I there saw one of these ink stands and a gold cup tied up in a pocket handkerchief. I afterwards examined that room; I saw the drawers open, and the papers about the floor. I went into the adjoining-room; the cabinet was open, and all the boxes.

Q. Did you observe whether the contents of the cabinet and boxes were gone - A. No, sir. I then went and communicated it to the man servant.

CHARLES BRIAN . I am porter to the Marchioness. On Tuesday morning I was called by the last witness; I went first into the anti-chamber, and then into the front drawing-room. Nothing was broken open in the front drawing-room. This was a little after seven o'clock. I then went into the back drawing-room; I found the cabinet broken open, the table drawer, and some boxes that were in the room were broken open. There were papers about the room. There were things gone out of the cabinet and drawer.

COURT, Q. to Marchioness. Was it in this cabinet and drawer that you kept your valuable things - A. Yes.

Mr. Pooley, Q. to Brian. Did you look out of the window of the back drawing-room - A. Yes.

Q. It adjoins the bow - A. Yes. There are leads under that window, the back drawing-room. That window was open. On the leads was a bundle tied up. I went down to it; there I found a bundle containing two ink stands, and on the top of the bundle some small ornaments of silver. I found a gold cup quite in the corner of the leads, under the window. It was pressed quite flat to make it portable.

Q. The ink-stands and cup you found there were the Marchioness's, I suppose - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know how the persons got in the window - A. Apparently by what I saw by a frame tied to the rails, and a lamp-lighter's ladder; the frame was used, and the ladder; the ladder upon the frame. That frame had been there perhaps for years.

Q. Did you afterwards procure the ladder which the lamp-lighter used to use - A. Yes.

Q. Was the ladder long enough to have got in the window without the frame - A. No; so it appeared by the tying of the frame.

Q. When you found the frame that morning was it tied - A. It was tied to the rails in three place.

COURT. What rails - A. At the back part of the house. That old window frame had been brought from the lumber-room, and fastened there.

Mr. Pooley. Did you see where the ladder was found the next morning - A. No; I did not see the ladder found. On my going up the area steps on the landing-place the lamp-lighter came; he asked me if there had been anything the matter. I said, yes. He said, because I found my ladder there this morning.

Q. When you went into the room how was the door between that and the stair-case - A. That door was open.

Q. Was the back drawing-room door fastened - A. I cannot tell. I did not go there last at night.

Q. to Hazard. How was the back drawing-room door at night - A. It was shut, but not locked. I shut it a quarter before one; the time that the Marchioness went to rest. I shut both the doors, but not locked them; I am sure of it. I shut the back drawing-room door, and the front drawing-room door.

Q. Do you know how the anti-room door was that night - A. I shut it at the same time. I think I was the last person up.

EDWARD BIGNELL. I am a lamp-lighter; I light the lamps for the Marchioness of Downshire; I fasten my ladder behind the rails of the stable wall with a padlock and a chain. It was a strong chain, like a brewer's chain.

Q. On the night of the 29th of March, do you recollect fastening your ladder there - A. I did, about six o'clock in the evening. In the middle of the night, about two o'clock, I go about for the purpose of re-lighting the lamps, and when I went to relight the lamps, the ladder and the chain were gone. I found the ladder about eight o'clock; it was standing upon the area steps of the Marchioness, inside of the rails.

JOSEPH BECKITT . I am a servant to Mr. Adkins, the Governour of the house of Correction.

Q. Do you know Richardson - A. Well, sir. I met him on the evening of the 6th of April, between nine and ten o'clock, in Little Earl-street, Seven Dials.

Q. Did Richardson see you - A. By his actions it appeared he did; by his turning down a street, and then running. He slipped off two great coats in running. I came up to him, and apprehended him in Little White Lion-street. I secured him. He asked me what I wanted. I told him not to talk to me in that way. He appeared as if he did not know me. He said, Mr. Beckitt, I shall be hanged. I took him into a back-room of a public-house, and searched him. I took from his person five hundred and twenty-three pounds in bank notes. He then asked me to get him a coat. He had not a coat or hat. I sent for a coach, put him in, and then he offered me the money to let him go. He said, I might keep the money for my own use, provided I would let him go out of the coach. In about ten minutes after that, in our way to the House of Correction, he acknowledged to me of robbing the Marchioness of Downshire; that he had been very lucky in respect of robbing the Marchioness of Downshire of a large property; he said he was one of the party that was concerned in it. I then declined having any further conversation until we got to the House of Correction. I then took him into the office in the Governor's house, to the Governor, and there I believe he made a confession to the Governor of the robbery. After that, me and the Governor and Richardson went to Reuben Joseph , and a person of the name of Wheeler. In our way we called upon Harry Adkins. We went under Richardson's directions, and knocked at Joseph's shop door, the street door being open.

Q. Where was this house of Joseph's - A. In Chandler-street, no great distance from the Marchioness's house. Richardson pointed out the house as we were going. We knocked at Reuben Joseph 's shop door, and got admittance. Reuben Joseph opened the door. We got a light and searched the place. The Governor and Richardson asked for a couple of rings; Joseph and his wife denied having them. Richardson said, they had them, and they might as well give them up. Then we took Joseph in custody, and left his wife in custody of Wheeler. Then we went to the Brown Bear , Bow-street, with Joseph and Richardson. I stopped with Richardson while the Governor and Harry Adkins went with Joseph to apprehend old Simons. They brought Simons and Frankil back.

Q. What day was this - A. This was the same night I apprehended Richardson. I took charge of old Simons and Frankil, and the Governor went away again, Then after that we took them to the House of Correction.

Q. Had you any articles delivered to you - A. Yes, on the 13th of April, by Levi Hart It was delivered to me at Levi Hart 's house, Monmouth-court, Seven Dials.

Q. Had you tried to find Simons - A. I have, when he was out of the way, over the water.

Q. How long have you been trying to find him - A. Two or three months, or longer.

Q. Did you know where Simons lived - A. Yes, well. I went there several times to find Simons. I searched his house, (that is in Crown-street, Soho), and I could not find him there. These rings I received of Levi Hart , at the house in Monmouth-court, a gold ring, a diamond ring, a serpent ring, and a small green smelling-bottle, and eight silver coins.

Q. Who has got the bando - A. I don't know. I have enumerated all the Marchioness can speak to. Richardson was the means of our recovering the property.

WILLIAM ADKINS . I am the Governor of the House of Correction. I know Richardson. On the 6th of April, Richardson was brought to the House of Correction by Beckett, one of my turnkeys; Beckett brought Richardson immediately into my office. I said to Richardson, I was very glad to see him back again; Beckett said he had taken a great deal of money from him; I said whatever you have taken. I said let me take an accompt down before Richardson; I then said to Richardson, from the manner in which the Marchioness's house had been broken open I had no doubt he was one concerned in it; he sat about a minute, and then he said, sir, I will not tell you an untruth; he said, I was concerned, and his part he sold to Simons's, meaning Simons and his wife, as I understood.

Q. You knew the Simons's, did not you - A. Yes. I asked him if he could give me information where I could find Simons; I meaned the father and son; he told me he could not tell me where they were at that time. I then asked him if he thought there was any chance of recovering any part of the property; he told me there were two rings, which he had given to a Mrs. Joseph, and that I might recover them again, for he was certain that she had got them; he then told me that old Simons and young Simons had lodged at Joseph's house, and by going to Joseph's house, I was likely to find some of the valuable boxes that had been stolen; he had seen them in a drawer in a bureau in a room in which the father and son had lodged; in a chest of drawers I believe; I am not certain whether he said in a chest of drawers, or a bureau; he then said that Joseph could give me the information where to find old Simons. I asked him the name of the street in which Joseph lived; he said he did not know the name of the street, nor the number of the house, but if I thought proper to take him in a coach he would take me to the place; I sent for a coach. I went with Richardson, Joseph Beckett , Wheeler, and Harry Adkins .

Q. Before you got to Joseph's house was anything said by Richardson to you, how he came by the five hundred pounds in notes - A. I omitted that in taking down the number of the notes, I asked Richardson if that was the produce of what he had stolen from the Marchioness of Downshire; he said part of it was, about three hundred pounds. Richardson took me to a house in Chandler-street, No. 13, he told me the house door would be open; I found it was, that Joseph had a shop and parlour. Richardson said, you had better knock at the door, and when Joseph comes, say it is Joe; Richardson's name is Joseph; I understood he meant the shop door; I did so. Joseph came and asked who is there; I said Joe. He opened the door, and when he found there was more than one, he then attempted to shut the door again; however I bursted it open again and got in; Joseph and his wife slept in the back parlour; they were both undressed; it was near twelve o'clock. I said to Joseph, do not make any resistance, it is of no use; I want two rings of your wife; Joseph said have you got two rings, give them to the gentlemen if you have got them; Wheeler then brought a light; I then said to Mrs. Joseph, I want two diamond rings of you, which have been stolen from the Marchioness of Downshire; she said she had got no rings, nor had she had any. Richardson then went up to her, and said you had better give them up, because you know I gave them to you. She positively denied knowing anything about it. We then proceeded to search the two rooms belonging to Joseph below, and found nothing. I then went upstairs to the second floor where Richardson, understood, had lodged. Richardson had described old Simons and young Simons had lodged there; I saw the drawer that Richardson had named to me, and found nothing. I came down stairs; I then told Joseph and his wife, that unless they gave up the rings I should take them in custody; said that she had not got them I took Joseph of oneside, I said do you know where old Simons lodges to night; he said he did not know. I told him I should take him to the House of Correction, and I should leave his wife at home with Wheeler; We got into the coach, and went to the Brown Bear , Beckett, myself, Harry Adkins, Richardson, and Joseph, five of us, went to the Brown Bear , and from the information, got at the Brown Bear , I went to No. 4, Seymour-court, Chandos-street. I went with Harry Adkins ; I knocked at the door several times; I could make nobody hear me; but a woman that lives at the house adjoining; to this opened the window she asked me what I wanted there; she said it was her house. She lent me a key, and we got into the house. I broke open the back room door below; I found the two prisoners, old Simons, and James Frankil , they were in bed, and as soon as we got the light in, I said to Simons, your name is Simons; he said his name was not Simons; I asked him what his name was; he refused to tell me his name; I desired them both to dress themselves; when Simons hod got his clothes on, then I recollected him; I told them both I should take them in custody. I said I knew you now, I shall take you in custody; I asked them if they had anything belonging to them in that apartment; they said no, they had not. I opened a drawer I found a small tea-caddy, and two purses, one a gold purse, the other beads and silk, they have been identified by the Marchioness. I asked Simons and Frankil if they belonged to them; they both denied it positively; Harry Adkins , my brother, and I took them to the Brown Bear .

Q. Before you took them to the Brown Bear , did you find anything else there - A. Not at that time. We locked the door and took the key with us; I left Frankil at the Brown Bear , and desired he might be put in a room at the Brown Bear ; and then conveyed Richardson and Simons to the House of Correction. Harry Adkins and myself went to Simons's lodgings again in Seymour-court, to search the lodgings of the same room that we had been at before, where we found old Simons and Frankil; under the bed that they were in, Harry Adkins found a box in my presence; he has had it ever since; I saw what it contained; it contained diamond rings, a gold watch, some silver coins, a pearl broach a black silk purse, some two guinea pieces, and three pieces of gold coin about the size of a shilling.

Mr. Knapp. to Marchioness. Look at these things - A. I have seen them all, they are my property; I had seen them in my house a day or two before the robbery; my drawer in the cabinet was broken open.

Q. to William Adkins. After you had found the box under the bed where Frankil and Simons laid, what took place - A. On the next day Richardson wished to speak to me; he told me that he had got two rings which were taken out of the Marchioness's house, and a pocket-book at his lodgings, No. 13, in the Colonade, Brunswick-square; he gave me two keys, and said if I would go to a chest of drawers, I should find two diamond rings, and a pocket-book. I went according to his direction and found the lodging; his wife was bed, this was Thursday the 8th, about eight or nine o'clock in morning. I there found two rings in a pocket-book, and this black silk purse.

Q. Did you find anything else there - A. No, except this iron crow; it is a new one, it has never been used; it is what they call a jemmy.

Q. to Marchioness. Look at the rings, and tell me whether they are yours - A. Yes, I know them; they were in my house at the time the robbery was committed, and I know the purse; it is mine.

William Adkins . On the 13th I received from a person of the name of Levy a number of articles which have been identified by the Marchioness; the first is a musical snuff-box, a blood stone box, a locket watch, and two keys, eleven seals, seven gold, five small seals, and a gold ring, a diamond and granet ring.

Mr. Hanly. I received these pieces of ivory from the witness Adkins; they are piece of ivory upon which eyes have been painted.

Mr. Knapp. to William Adkins . Where did you get these pieces of ivory - A. I received them from Levi I have a silver fillag ree box, I received it of Levi, and four gold purses, a gold breach, and part of a butterfly with the granets set in it, a neck broach, a watch-chain and slider, a necklace of Irish diamonds.

Q. to Marchioness. Has your ladyship seen these things before - A. I have; I have no doubt they are all mine; they were in my house on the night of the robbery.

Adkins. These are all the things delivered to me at the Green Man public-house, Bow-street. Levi was not in custody.

Mr. Andrews. From whose information was it, Adkins, that you wet to Seymour-court - A. Joseph I went there about two o'clock in the night.

Q. Frankil lived there - A. I found him there. This is the box that was found under the bed, on the side that Frankil was laying. Frankil said that Simons had only come there for a nights lodging. I have known Simons a good many years; he lived in Crown-street, with his wife; he left his home about eleven or twelve weeks previous to his being apprehended. The wife remained in Crown-street until she was apprehended.

COURT. Do you know the reason of his leaving his home - A. Simons had bought some stolen property of Richardson, and that was the reason of his leaving his home.

Mr. Adolphus. Richardson knew you, and you knew him. Was not his disclosure a desire to return the lady the property as far as he could - A. Yes. I found all correct. I do not think any part of the property would have been recovered had not it been for Richardson's discovery.

Q. He did every thing in his power to atone for the offence that he had committed - A. He did.

Mr. Knapp, Q. to Hazard. Did you observe a wax candle in the morning in a candlestick - A. They took a candle in the drawing-room; they did not use it; and there were some short pieces on the carpet. There was one piece that did not belong to the family.

Q. Was there a small candle of the marchioness's used - A. Yes. The next morning that candle was burnt shorter than it was the over night. I found that candle near the window where they got in. I left it the over night upon the writing-table in the same room. It was not on the writing-table the next morning; it was upon the other window.

HARRY ADKINS . I am an officer of Bow-street. On Tuesday night, the 6th of April, I went with William Adkins and Beckitt to No. 16, Chandler-street; there I found Reuben Joseph and his wife.

Q. Did you take Reuben Joseph away from there - A. I did, and left Wheeler there to take care of Dinah Joseph . We brought Reuben Joseph to Bow-street. I afterwards went to Seymour-court, Chandois-street.

Q. Did you there find old Simons and Frankil in bed together - A. We did. I assisted in taking them. I took these keys from them. One of these keys upon the ring applied to the tea-caddy. We asked Simons if the tea-caddy belonged to him; he said it did not. I then went to the windows to see if they were secure in the inside. I found they were. The prisoners then were taken to Bow-street. I locked the door, and put the key in my pocket. My brother went with the prisoners to the house of Correction, leaving Frankil. I waited until he returned, and when he returned we went back to Seymour-court. As soon as we got there we searched the room. I found that box under the bed, at the head of the bed, under that side of the bed upon which Frankil was laying. They were both laying in the same bed. All the things that I found have been in my custody or my brother's.

Q. to William Adkins . You parted with three boxes and a watch to Mr. Hanley - A. I did, and the thing I now produce are the things that I received from Mr. Hanley.

Harry Adkins . The other things I have in my custody.

Q. Did you go to Levy's house - A. I did, at Poplar. I found Joseph Levy at home.

Q. Who did you find there - A. James Simons; he was locked up in a back washhouse. I took him in custody. I told him I took him upon a charge of robbing Lady Downshire's house. He said he knew nothing at all about it. I took him into custody. James Simons had got on a long coat and a pair of pantaloons.

Q. After the robbery had been committed did you go to the Marchioness's house - A. I did.

Q. How had the thieves got in - A. By a ladder at the back window. There is an area, and there are pallisades, and a sash was tied with three strings to the pallisades. The ladder was put on the top of the sash. There were the marks of the sash upon the ladder. In the evening I got the ladder, and the ladder reached the window within four or five inches; any person so disposed, by the assistance of the sash and the ladder, might very easily get in the window.

Q. Now, what was the appearance of the room where you supposed they had been in - A. The first room I went into was the anti-room. As soon as I went in I observed a kind of a writing desk with a drawer for paper and pens; it appeared to have been cut by a knife, and to have been wrenched open. Upon this writing-desk I observed drops of a wax candle. Upon the floor I found the knife which is in that trunk; a clasp knife. This is the knife. I then went into the back drawing-room where they had entered. I found there the cabinet broken open, boxes broken open, paper and every thing throwed about the floor. I found an iron crow upon the floor and a small centre-bit, and a piece or two of dirty candle. In different parts of the room I found some spots occasioned by the droppings of a wax candle. I then went into the bow-room; I found that room in the same state; the sash was up. That is all I know.

Mr. Gurney. In searching old Simons did you find any money upon him - A. Fourteen pounds, sir. In the box under the bed was an hundred pound bank note.

Q. And how many guineas did you find also - A. Seventy-nine guineas, and two half-guineas.

SAMUEL SIMONS . I am an apprentice to Reuben Joseph ; he is a tailor in Chandler-street, Grovesnor-square. I usually sleep at my father's.

Q. Do you know old Simons - A. Yes; he came to lodge at my master's house before Christmas; he staid there until after Lady Downshire's house had been robbed, and James Simons came frequently to visit his father, and occasionally slept in the same bed, and I know Richardson; he came to my master's house. When he came he went into the parlour at the back of the shop, along with Simons and my master.

Q. Did Mrs. Simons visit her husband - A. Sometimes.

Q. On Monday evening the 29th of March, the evening before the Marchioness was robbed, do you remember who was at your master's house - A. There was Richardson, old Simons, young Simons, and Fanny Simons .

Q. Was your master and mistress there - A. My mistress went out in the evening about a bonnet, and returned. They were all in the house that evening.

Q. At what time did you go from your master's house that evening - A. About half past eight, and I returned there the next morning about half past seven. In about half an hour Mrs. Simons came to the house, and asked for her husband, and went up stairs to him. Her husband and her son came down stairs about eight o'clock; they went into the parlour. Richardson came in at the side door. Mrs. Simons gave me a shilling to get some rolls for breakfast. She came back again at three o'clock in the afternoon.

Q. Do you remember in the course of the day what became of Richardson and young Simons - A. About four o'clock they went up stairs. I cannot tell which room they went to.

COURT. James Simons is young Simons - A. Yes. Old Simons went up stairs and came down again; he told my master they were asleep, and he would not wake them.

Q. In the course of that day was there a good deal of going up and down stairs - A. Yes; they went up and down stairs several times. There appeared to be more than usual to do that day.

Q. On the Saturday afterwards do you remember standing against Simons, near the window - A. I was sitting on the shop-board, James Simons scratched the glass of the window with something on his hand. I asked him to shew it me; he said it was only a bit of glass; if I had a bit of glass I could do the same. It appeared to me to be a diamond, and from the appearance of the scratch I was induced to believe it was a diamond.

Q. In the course of that day did Fanny Simons come to your master's house - A. Yes, and Frankil with her.

Q. What is Frankil - A. I understood, the father of Mrs. Simons.

Q. Did you see either Simons or Richardson after that Saturday night - A. No.

Q. And down to that time Simons had been there for three months - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see any property - A. No, only a pocket-book. That pocket-book is like it. Young Simons gave it to my master to smell; he brought it out of the parlour in his hand.

Q. They only staid till the Saturday night - A. I cannot be sure. I think about Wednesday.

Q. Now, when young Simons shewed this to your master and desired him to smell, what was said - A. My master said there was a key to it. Young Simons tried to unclasp it; he took the pocket-book again.

Mr. Knapp, Q. to Beckitt. I asked you particular about a bando - A. I now produce it; I had not got it then. I received it of Levi Hart .

Q. And rings and silver coins - A. Yes.

Q. to Marchioness. Have you looked at these - A. I have; it is my property; it was in my house at the same time.

DINAH JOSEPH . I am the wife of Reuben Joseph .

Q. A little before Christmas last did Mrs. Simons apply to you for a lodging for her husband - A. Yes.

Q. In consequence of that application did you get a lodger out you had to take them in - A. Yes.

Q. Did his son James come with him - A. No. He came afterwards and continued to sleep with him. The son James came and often slept in the same bed with the father.

Q. Do you remember a few weeks before the Marchioness of Downshire's house was robbed his coming

to your house - A. Yes; he came on the Monday evening.

Q. Who brought him - A. I do not know. When I came back I found him there. I saw Richardson, old Simons, young Simons, and Fanny Simons .

Q. Between what time, and to the time of his being taken up, did he come frequent to your house - A. Yes.

Q. How long did he come before the Marchioness's house was robbed - A. I cannot recollect; some time.

Q. From that time until he was taken up was he frequent at your house with Simons - A. Yes, he was.

Mr. Gurney. Now, you remember this Monday night upon which the Marchioness's house was robbed - A. Yes.

Q. You heard of the house being robbed the next day,; on the next evening where did you and your husband go to - A. I and my husband went out to have a bonnet dressed. We came back at about half past eight.

Q. Who did you find there when you came back - A. Richardson, old Simons, young Simons, and Fanny Simons .

Q. How soon after did any of them go out, and who went out - A. Fanny Simons, young Simons, and Joe Richardson . James Simons returned about ten o'clock. When he came back he asked me to go for an ounce of coffee for him, and a three-half-penny candle. I refused getting it. Young Simons went out and old Simons went out. Young Simons came in again; he said he went as far as Russell-square; he appeared very much out of breath, and said he had seen the house of Correction.

Q. Did you see what became of him after that - A. No; I went to bed.

COURT. Then you do not know who slept in Old Simons's bed that night - A. No. I got up between seven and eight the next morning.

Mr. Gurney. Now, about eight in the morning who did you see - A. Mrs. Simons came in from the street.

Q. Did you see Richardson that morning - A. Yes. Richardson came down with old Simons and young Simons. Mrs. Simons asked me if it would be agreeable to have breakfast with me. I said, if she liked, and they breakfasted together; our apprentice was sent for the rolls.

Q. Had you known by what means Richardson and young Simons got up stairs - A. No, sir.

Q. After breakfast did you see any thing - A. Yes, while we were sitting together, a gold box.

Q. Do you believe that to be it - A. Yes; it is a musical box. Joe Richardson put it on the mantle-piece; I heard it play beautiful.

Q. Do you know the tune - A. No. I saw nothing else.

Q. Was a coach sent for - A. I cannot say.

Q. Do you remember Mrs. Simons going away - A. Yes. I cannot say whether she went in a coach or not.

Q. After she was gone do you remember old Simons, young Simons, and Richardson being in your parlour - A. Yes.

Q. Did young Simons and Richardson go up stairs to old Simons' bed room - A. I cannot say.

Q. Did you hear any talk about sleeping there from either of them - A. I cannot recollect.

Q. Do you remember their going up stairs - A. I remember they went out of my parlour. I do not know whether they went up stairs or not.

Q. After Richardson and young Simons had been gone some time did old Simons go up stairs - A. Yes.

Q. When he came down stairs did he say any thing respecting them - A. Respecting whom?

Q. Richardson and young Simons - A. I do no recollect.

Q. Do recollect yourself, and tell us the whole truth - A. I cannot recollect.

Q. You have been questioned about this before, about old Simons going up stairs; upon his coming down do you recollect what he said - A. He said they were all asleep.

Mr. Gurney. You see you can remember when you choose it. Do you remember who was present at the time that Richardson spoke of the musical box - A. Mrs. Simons and old Simons, and Simons being gone up stairs, Mrs. Simons had offered him three guineas for it; he swore he would not take it; he would keep it longer. He talked something of eighteen; what that was I cannot tell.

Q. In the course of the day did he give you any thing - A. Yes; he gave me two rings; one of them has a blood stone in the middle. I gave them to my mother in the street, to save for me.

Q. Is that ring one of them - A. It is like it; he gave me three; one with a stone, and one with a snake, and this smelling-bottle, and he gave me a pair of scissars and a thimble. Young Simons gave me a gold chain. He gave it me the same day, before he went up to lie down.

Q. Is that the chain - A. It is like it. I gave them all to my mother, Mrs. Hart.

Q. Did old Simons give you any thing - A. Yes, a bando, and some pieces of money, old Simons gave me

Q. Were them pieces of money like these - A. Yes, they were.

Q. A half-crown and Queen Ann shillings - A. Yes, and a ring of cut steel beads. I gave them altogether in a paper to my mother.

Q. Do you remember Fanny Simons producing any thing - A. Yes, a gold purse.

Q. Do you remember on Tuesday morning after the Marchioness's house had been robbed, do you remember seeing a piece of wax candle - A. Yes; young Simons pulled it out of his side great coat pocket; Richardson was in the parlour; young Simons said, Joe, that belongs to you. Joe swore at it, and said, yes. It was a piece of wax candle, about that size.

Q. Do you remember the night of the Marchioness's house being robbed, of any matches being bought - A. Old Simons bought a halfpennyworth of a little boy.

Q. Now, you say those things that you received of old Simons and Richardson you gave to your mother, Mrs. Hart, on the Wednesday - A. Yes.

Q. When did they leave your house after this - A. In a few days.

Q. Whether young Simons was in the house or out of the house - that night you do not know - A. No. All the lodgers had a key.

Q. to Marchioness. Do you know that chain - A. That chain belongs to me.

REUBEN JOSEPH . I am a tailor.

Q. We understand that old Simons lodged at your house for two or three months before the Marchioness's house was robbed - A. Yes

Q. And that for some reasons Richardson used to be there - A. Yes.

Q. The evening before the Marchioness's house was robbed did you go out - A. Yes, on Monday evening, to fit a bonnet for my wife.

Q. Who was at your house that evening - A. The Simons's when we returned. Old Simons, young Simons, and Fanny Simons .

Q. At what time did any of them go away - A. I was not present when any of them went away.

Q. After you came home did you go out again - A. Yes.

Q. How late did you see any of them - A. About eight o'clock, or a little after eight, I saw old Simons and young Simons; after that, old Simons came in before ten o'clock, and young Simons came in; his father asked him where he had been. He looked rather out of breath; he had been running or walking very fast. He said he was going up; meaning up stairs. His father said he was going to bed. That is all I saw of them that night.

COURT. His father asked him where he had been - A. Yes; he said as far as Russel-square or Bedford-square. I said he could not go that distance in so short a time. He said he had seen the prison, the house of Correction. I went to bed about half past ten.

Q. How early the next morning did you see or speak to either of the prisoners - A. About seven o'clock in the morning young Simons took the wash-hand bason. There was water in the kitchen.

Q. Did you afterwards go up stairs for the bason - A. Yes, up to Simons's room on the second floor. When I went up stairs I saw young Simons and Richardson. I asked Richardson what brought him there at that time in the morning; he said, nothing particular, and looked with his head down.

Q. Did he make use of the water - A. Not that I saw. The water had been used.

Q. Did you see Richardson take any thing out of his pocket while you were there - A. Yes, something like that box. I afterwards saw the inside of it. There was something parted off at one end; it was a musical box. I went down stairs.

Q. to Marchioness. Was that box, before it received a damage, a musical box - A. Yes, it was.

Q. to Reuben Joseph . While you were there did Mrs. Simons come in - A. Yes, and she went up stairs.

Q. Had she been there frequently in company with Richardson - A. Not frequently. She knew him seemingly, and they were familiar together.

Q. Now, did they all come down and breakfast after this - A. Yes, and Richardson shewed the musical box again. When he produced the musical box he wound it up by the key, and made it play. He put it on the table; he said Simons had offered three guineas for it, (I understood, old Simons) and from that to eighteen.

COURT. Did you understand eighteen guineas - A. Yes. He said he would not take it. Richardson also took out of his pocket a gold watch; he asked me what it was worth.

Mr. Gurney. Did Mrs. Simons go away that morning - A. Yes. She came back again in the afternoon.

Q. On that day did old Simons produce any thing - A. Yes, a black purse.

Q. Out of that black purse did you see him take any thing - A. Silver coins.

Q. Did Richardson give your wife any thing - A. Yes. I did not see him give it her; he told me a chain he gave her. I sold it to Mrs. Simons. The chain was something of gold, and pearl hung to it, and some stones on it that looked white, enamelled with blue.

Q. On what day did you sell it to Mrs. Simons - A. I cannot say whether it was on Tuesday or Wednesday.

Q. Was any body by when you sold it her - A. Only young Simons; old Simons was up stairs.

Q. Did you tell her at the time you sold it from whom you had it - A. Yes. I told her I had given Richardson twelve shillings for it, and she gave me thirty shillings. Young Simons said it was brass, and worth nothing; he had seen it before. She afterwards told me that she had sold it to Cohen, her son-in-law, and he had broke it up, and sold it; it was no other value than the pearl and gold.

Q. Do you remember on that Tuesday young Simons shewing you any thing - A. Yes, a pocketbook with a clasp to it.

Q. Was it like this - A. Yes; he desired me to smell it, it smelled like his father's prayer-book. He asked me if the lock was gold. I said I believed it was.

Q. Did you observe any thing about Richardson that you had not seen before - A. Yes; I observed two gold seals hanging to Richardson's watch that I had not seen before.

Q. A day or two after did you see that pocketbook in any other persons hands - A. Yes, Richardson's. I told him I had seen it in young Simons's hands; he said, yes, he wanted it, but I would not let him have it.

Q. Do you remember on the Monday, the day before the house was robbed, of any matches being bought - A. Yes, by old Simons, of a boy in the street.

Q. Did you see any other person take any of these matches - A. Yes, young Simons; he put them in his breast coat pocket.

Q. Before that night had old Simons usually had a fire in his room - A. No. In the morning when I got up he had a fire.

Q. Was that usual - A. No, I never saw one before. He breakfasted with us on the Tuesday.

Q. Did you see anything take place with respect to a wax candle - A. I saw young Simons take a piece out of his pocket. I saw Richardson take it

out of his hands, and some words passed. I do not remember them.

Q. How was your street door usually kept of a night - A. Sometimes shut and sometimes open.

Q. Could your lodgers go in and out of a night just as they pleased - A. Yes.

Q. You had not been disturbed by Richardson coming in - A. No. I do not know at what hour he came in.

Q. Might or might not young Simons go out and Richardson come in without disturbing you at all - A. Yes.

MARY HART . Q. Your husband's name is Levi Hart - A. Yes.

Q. Is Dinah Joseph your daughter - A. Yes.

Q. Do you recollect at any time Dinah giving you a parcel containing a ring - A. She gave me a paper containing something; I did not look to see what it was. She desired me to take it home, and take care of it; it was something that had been given her; her husband was angry at her having received it. I put the parcel into an old glove, and put it in the cupboard between the wall and a cross-bar of wood in a corner.

Q. You were afterwards taken in custody - A. Yes.

Q. While you were in custody did you give your husband any information where to find it - A. My son-in-law came up in the morning, and Mr. Adkins. I was apprehended on the Monday. On the next day my son-in-law told me I had two rings. My husband called; I told him to go home and fetch it, and told him where it was I had put it.

LEVY HART . I am the husband of the last witness.

Q. Did you go to her while she was in the house of Correction - A. I did. She directed me where to find a parcel in a glove; I went to the place she described; in that place I found an old glove behind the bar. Beckitt saw me find it. I delivered it to him.

Beckitt. The parcel was delivered into my hand; it has been in my custody ever since. I only delivered it to the Marchioness, and then it was delivered back to me. Levy Hart took it from behind a beam as Mrs. Hart described.

Q. to William Adkins . Look at these things, and tell me whether they are the things which Levy sent to you - A. These things came from Levy; they are all the things I had, except some glass I left at Lady Downshire's; I was afraid of breaking them.

HENRY COHEN . I am a slop-seller. I live in Rosemary-lane; Mrs. Simons is my mother-in-law.

Q. Do you remember your mother coming to your house on Wednesday, the 31st of March last - A Yes, about two o'clock.

Q. Was Levi there - A. Yes, when I got in we went up stairs together. I went into the front room.

Q. Do you remember your mother-in-law shewing you anything there - A. Yes, she shewed me some diamonds.

Q. Was James Simons there - A. No; she shewed me the top of a round-snuff, it was lined with gold, the outside was ivory, the frame of the picture; she shewed me a pair of diamond ear-rings, with a large diamond in the centre, there were some drop but they did not hang to them at that time.

Q. Did she shew you any diamonds like tops of pins, in gold - A. Yes, and a large cross set about in pearls, and a diamond; the pearls were large; that was all that she shewed me that time; she wished to know the value of them; I and Levi went to Benjamin to get them valued; I shewed him the diamonds; Benjamin said, they were worth two hundred pounds. I went back and saw Mrs. Simons; upon my return, Levi asked her what she asked for them; she said there are more at home, and she would sell them together. Mrs. Simons went home then, and left the diamonds with my wife, who is her daughter. About seven o'clock Mrs. Simons came with her son James, they produced a great many gold things; Mrs. Simons had some in an handkerchief; this box was shewed by Mrs. Simons; the musical-box was among them, and the watch; I cannot exactly say to the seals; I believe the seals before me may be the seals; I do not speak positively to them.

Q. What did the son produce - A. He produced a great many seals.

Q. Did he produce a tooth-pick case - A. I believe there was a took-pick case; I cannot swear that is the tooth-pick case, I believe it is. This large case I believe was produced by Mrs. Simons.

Q. Upon your oath do not you believe he produced the coin - A. Yes, I do.

Q. Do you remember this book - A. Yes.

Q. Was not there this book full of coin; upon your oath looking at the coin, do not you believe that to be part of the coin in the book - A. No, I do not; I saw him pull it out of his pocket.

Q. Where did you afterwards send them things that you had of Mrs. Simons - A. They were at home; Mrs. Levy had them.

COURT. You delivered all you had of Mrs. Simons, or of James, to Levi - A. Yes.

Mr. Knapp. Did not she say, that she brought these - A. No, she did say it in that way; she said when Mr. Levi offered her the money, she could not take it until she had told her husband, for fear she should do wrong.

COURT. Young man, look at that watch-chain - A. Yes; I remember seeing it; James, the son, produced that.

JOSEPH LEVI . I am a salesman and silversmith; I live at High-street, Poplar.

Q. You know Cohen - A. I do, and James Simons , and his mother; I was in company with them at Cohen's-house the last day of March, about three o'clock in the day time; I went there again between eight and nine in the evening; I stopped there till near ten o'clock. Mrs. Simons came with her son, she brought a bundle there in a handkerchief; I saw the bundle opened.

Q. Look at these articles - A. This is one; this musical-box, and this watch-chain another; this locket-watch was in this gold purse. These three purses I cannot say whether they were produced by her or by James; part of these seals I am most sure James Simons brought; this ring Mrs. Simons brought; James Simons produced a number of seals on a string, about forty; this chain James Simons

brought; this is the tooth-pick case, I cannot say by whom it was produced; this chain Mrs. Simons brought, Mrs. Simons asked thirty pounds for them; Henry Cohen , and I partly paid her twenty-eight pound for them; the musical-box was not sold, nor the locket-watch, we could not agree about them.

Q, What became of James Simons , did he come to your house - A. Not that time, he came down the week following; Henry Cohen his brother-inn-law asked me to let him stay there.

Q. Did you know that old Simons was apprehended - A. Yes, I did. This book, James Simons had it; it was full of large coins, he said he would not part with it; he said Joe must have it.

Q. Who is Joe - A. I don't know; the diamonds I would not purchase; I bid her twenty-eight pounds for the gold only.

FANNY COHEN. I am the sister to Henry Cohen . I received these things of Mr. Levi to take to his house; I was directed to deliver them to Mrs. Levi, and to desire her to put them safely.

FANNY SIMONS . Q. Did you at any time go to the lodgings of your father at Joseph's - A. Yes; I saw Richardson there.

Q. You have heard of the robbery of Lady Downshire - A. Yes; I went the day after; there I saw Richardson; he gave me a watch, a broach, and two rings, in my father's presence.

Q.From whom did you get these two purses - A. From Richardson; I think he gave them me in my father's presence; I gave them to my father to take care of.

JOHN ARMSTRONG . Q. Do you know Nathan Simons - A. No, sir: I have been at a house I believe to be his, and read a warrant to the woman at the bar, but I have never been able to find him.

Q. When was that you went - A. After October last, I went there to execute a warrant, and there I saw Mrs. Simons; I went there several times afterwards with Daniel Bishop , and my son, both officers; I never could find him.

Richardson's Defence. My lord, and gentlemen of the jury, a just sense of horror at my present awful situation, and being unwilling to attempt to justify my conduct, I plead guilty; which guilt originated in the dangerous acquiescence of most dishonest practices. Pardon my presumption; having only attained my twenty-six years, bred to a stonemason. I cannot be supposed to have transgressed the laws of my country, to that extent as I humbly acknowledge to be the case without wicked advice, by characters whose chief dependance were to trace the steps upon various mansions, for advising me, and other unfortunate persons like myself, to rob and plunder every thing to themselves, they acquiring the property; to such characters I have fallen a prey. I can assure you that my actions have never been that of a self-premeditated thief, and it is the only reparation I can make. Sorry I am to make my own condemnation, justice makes me do it; I never carried any offensive weapon about my person, and so far from doing violence on these occasions, upon the least noise or alarm sooner to risk violence I ran away rather than by violence endangering the lives of valuable subjects. I have too frequent fallen into and adopted the mode of systematical house-breaking. Mrs. Simons and her family, who are now indicted with me, they have been the chief persons that I have been connected with since my being in London three years, who have informed me what houses to break into, and when and what part the most valuable property was contained, which property I was obligated to sell to them at the sixteenth part of the value, and when I have so done there have been persons in the street to rob me of the same. My escape from Cold Bath-fields prison is too notorious, it is well known I escaped from there; when being moneyless I went to Mrs. Simons; Mrs. Simons then mentioned the robbing of the house of the noble Marchioness. I have pleaded guilty, and am therefore determined to tel of the Simons's family. They gave me instructions about the house; which after their giving me several times, they set me to rob the house, which I humbly beg pardon for the same. On my apprehension I acknowledged my guilt and contrition. I have been the chief instrument of restoring the property back again. Pardon me, my wife is only seventeen years of age, entirely without any protection by the recent loss of her father. I humbly implore your mercy; spare my life; I have transgressed in the extreme, yet as I have endeavered to discover the present robbery and to restore all the property in my power, I humbly hope you will save my life. Banish me wherever you please; I implore mercy, for which I and my family will for ever pray.

James Simons 's Defence. The things I sold to Henry Cohen I received of my father. I am quite innocent of the robbery.

Nathan Simons 's left his defence to his counsel.

Sarah Simons 's Defence. I acted under the directions of my husband.

James Frankil 's Defence. I am as innocent as his lordship I declare to God I know no more about it.

RICHARDSON, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 27.

JAMES SIMONS , GUILTY - DEATH , aged 16.

NATHAN SIMONS, GUILTY , aged 50.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

SARAH SIMONS , NOT GUILTY .

JAMES FRANKIL , NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

Reference Number: t18130602-59

575. PETER PATRICK ENNIS was indicted for feloniously forging, on the 22nd of February , a bill of Exchange for 100 l. with intention to defraud William Thomas and Timothy Gill .

SECOND COUNT, for disposing of, and putting away a like forged note, he knowing it to be forged, with the same intention.

Ann OTHER COUNTS , for like offence, only varying the manner of charging them.

WILLIAM THOMAS . I am in partnership with Timothy Gill ; we are bill brokers ; our accompting-house is in Lombard-street, in the City of London. In the beginning of March last, I saw the prisoner at my accompting-house; he applied to get the discount of the bill in question; I told him if it was addressed to a banker; seeing Letouch upon it, an Irish banker, and he being an Irish man, I had no doubt but the bill was in proper hands; at that time it was accepted by George Scholey and Co. not payable at any banker. I told him if he would go down to George Scholey and Company, to the Lord Mayor, and prevail on him to address it to a banker we would then discount it; he said he would go to

Messrs. Scholey and Company. That is all I saw of the prisoner, then he went away, and took the bill with him.

Q. Now, how soon after did Mr. John Burgoyne call upon you - A. On the 5th of March.

COURT. What day of the month was it the prisoner came - A. It might be two or three days before Burgoyne came.

Q. How long afterwards was it that Burgoyne called upon you - A. About two or three days; I then saw the bill in the hands of Burgoyne; that was on the 5th; when Mr. Burgoyne brought it it was payable at the house of Stevens, Rimington, and Smith, that had been added since the prisoner took it away. Mr. Burgoyne brought it in the state it now is. I discounted the bill for Mr. Burgoyne; he said he brought it for Ennis; I gave him the cash for it, and discounted it in the regular way.

Q. You gave Burgoyne the money - A. Yes.

JOHN BURGOYNE . I am a surgeon; I am a native of Ireland. I came here to improve myself in my profession.

Q.Had you known the prisoner in Ireland - A. I knew him about two or three years ago, a clerk in the mail-coach office in Dublin.

Q. In the month of February, or beginning of March last, did you meet him in Long-lane - A. He called on me the day before I went with the bill.

Q. That was the 4th of March - A. Yes. I was not at home; he left a note at my lodgings; in consequence of that note I called at his lodgings, agreeable to the desire of the note.

Q. Where was his lodging - A. No. 68, Long-lane, Smithfield. He asked me to take a walk out with him; he told me he had a bill of the Lord Mayor of London, for an hundred pounds; he said he had called a few days before with the bill at Messrs. Gill and Thomas to get the bill discounted, at the time he called there was only George Scholey and Company on the bill; they told him if he would get the bill made payable at a banking-house, they would discount it for him; he told me he was ill that day, he could not go back according to his promise. He then shewed me the bill.

Q. At the time that he produced the bill was it in the words "payable at Stevens, Rimington, and Company" - A. Yes, it was; he asked me to go with him to Gill and Thomas's to get it discounted.

Q. Did you and he go into any house together - A. Yes. I observed the bill was not endorsed by him, the prisoner; I told him if he would endorse the bill I would go; upon that he and I went into a public-house.

Q. Did he there endorse the bill in your presence - A. He did; P. Ennis.

Q. Where was the house in which he wrote the endorsement - A. Some place near Moorfields. After he had so written that, he gave the bill to me to go to Gill and Thomas.

Q. How near to Gill and Thomas did he go with you - A. He went with me nearly opposite of the house, and shewed me the house, he told me he would stop there until I came out again; I went there; they discounted the bill for me; I received one hundred pounds by the discount. Having received it I came to the place where I had left the prisoner. I did not find him there. I walked about nearly half an hour to find him; not finding him, I went to his lodgings in Long-lane, and gave the money to his wife.

Q. How soon afterwards did you see the prisoner - A. I did not see him for three or for days I think; he told me that he had received the money of his wife, and that he had been robbed of it.

Q. He had been to a house of a certain description and got robbed of it - A. Yes.

MR CRANE. Q. You are a clerk in the house of Scholey and Atkinson - A. I am; their names are George Scholey and Thomas Atkinson .

Q. Look at that bill, is that the way they accept theirs - A. No, it is not the way.

Q. How do they accept - A. They put payable at Stevens's, that is their bankers; that is the usual mode they accept; I do not know that they always describe the words of

"Rimington and Smith" and then sign George Scholey and Atkinson.

Q. This bill is George Scholey and Co. - A. That is not the way.

COURT. In short it is not the usual acceptance of that house - A. No, it is not.

Mr. Arabin. Now, is that any part of that writing the Lord Mayor's - A. Part of it I believe is his own writing, the word

" George Scholey " that is the only part I believe to be his writing, the address of,

"Stevens, Rimington, and Company" is not his hand writing.

Q. Is it the writing of any person in that house - A. It is unknown to me.

Q. If that bill had passed your house must you have known it - A. Certainly I must have known it.

Q. Do you know any person of the name of Spurrier as the drawer of that bill - A. I do not know any person of the name of Spurrier of Liverpool. I know no such person nor any such transactions.

Q. Do you know any such person as Wilson, the payee - A. No, I do not.

MR. HOBLER. Q. You are clerk to the Lord Mayor, attending him as Lord Mayor - A. Yes, sir.

Q. You must be therefore very familiar with his signature as a magistrate - A. I am.

Q. Do you believe the word

" George Scholey " to be the Lord Mayor's hand writing - A. I do; I believe it to be his hand writing; he sometimes writes Mayor himself; sometimes the party bringing the affadavit has written the word

"Mayor". He write his name over it, and sometimes a clerk in the office when the Lord Mayor is always out.

Q. Then the word

"Mayor" is always put under the signature - A. Generally, and sometimes at the end.

Q. Look there at that paper, do you observe under the word

" George Scholey " an erasure; is that paper signed by him as a magistrate - A. It is exactly about the distance of the name, and as the word would be written.

Q. Does it appear there is an erasure above the name - A. It is more plain than were the name

"Mayor" is taken out it is much larger, and the paper is destroyed.

Q. So that there must have been a great deal written above - A. I suppose the form of a jury.

JAMES PLATT . You are a merchant, residing in Coleman-street - A. Yes.

Q.Have you been a correspondent with Johanna Scott, of Dublin, for a very long time - A. Yes.

Q.You are acquainted with his hand-writing - A.Perfectly well.

Q. Look at that endorsement, and say whether it is his hand-writing or not - A. It certainly is not.

MR. BAMBRIDGE. Q. I need not ask you whether you are a merchant in London - A. I am.

Q. Have you correspondence with Latouch and Company - A. I have.

Q. All bills drawn by them upon you are made payable in London - A. All.

Q. Is that their endorsement - A. It is not.

(The bills read.)

Liverpool, February 22, 1812.

100 l.

Sixty-one days after sight, pay to the order of Mr. John Wilson , one hundred pounds sterling value of mine in sundry parcels of seed, consigned by your order as per cent, rendered, which place to account as advised. John Spuirier. To Messrs. George Seholey and Co. London. Payable at Stevenson, Remington, Smith, and Co. March 1st, 1812. George Scholey and Co. Endorsed to the order of Johanna Scott, of Dublin. John Wilson, Istock, and Delatouche and Co.

(The bill handed to the Jury.)

Mr. Gurney to the Jury. Gentlemen, If you look and compare the body of the bill with the endorsement you will see who drew it.

Prisoner's Defence. In consequence of my expectation to put off my trial I am not able to bring any person to speak in my behalf; I am now without any witness to come forward to prove that I am not the person, nor did I offer it with intention to defraud Messrs. Gill and Thomas. I went to Bartholomew coffee-house; I knew a number of Dublin gentlemen frequented there, and as I was sitting there I was telling some gentlemen my situation, and shewing them some letters that they might know who I was. One of the gentlemen asked me was I distressed. I said I was. He then asked me could I get a bill discounted. He said, if I could get a bill discounted, he would give me an hundred pound. He walked with me as far as Bartholomew's hospital; he gave me this bill. I went to a gentleman in Copthall-court; he could not discount the bill. I applied to Gill and Thomas. They told me if I got the bill made payable at a bankers they would discount it. I went to Bartholomew coffee-house, left the bill for the gentleman, and a note with it. On the next day I received the bill as it is now; and after receiving the money for the bill I went at nine o'clock to Bartholomew coffee-house; three gentlemen came in. I walked out with them to Blackfriars-road; they made me intoxicated. They sent four men after me, who robbed me of my watch and my coat; the produce of this bill was in my inside coat pocket. I have no doubt it was these men that gave me the bill that robbed me of the money. Mr. Mathers, if he is in court, he can say that I never acted in a dishonorable way.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 21.

London jury, before Mr. justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18130602-60

576. GEORGE PHILLIPS , JOHN DALTON , and SOLOMON LEVY were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of March , a watch, value 4 l. a gold seal, value 1 l. and a watch-key, value 1 d. the property of John Burton , from his person .

JOHN BURTON . At the time this watch was taken from me I lived with my father at No. 3, in the City chambers, Bishopsgate-street.

Q. Did you lose a watch on the 12th of March - A. Yes, between two and three o'clock in the afternoon the watch was in my fob.

Q. How long before you missed it did you perceive it safe about your person - A. About an hour. I was in a crowd in the Minories at a fire; I went to look at a fire.

Q. While you were standing looking at the fire can you tell me whether you saw the three prisoners about there - A. No. I felt a great crowd; they were pushing about me very hard, just before I missed my watch. While I was in the crowd I found my waistcoat lifted up; I missed my watch. That was just after I felt the pressure about me. It was a gold watch, worth about four pounds; a gold seal attached to a ribbon; the seal was worth a pound; the key was a metal key.

Q.How long after your perceived your watch missing was it before you saw either of the prisoners - A. About half an hour. I seized Phillips and Dalton myself, in consequence of information. When I had taken these men many cried, take this man and all, and then Levy was laid hold of. They were searched at the time; the watch has not been found.

Q. Did either of the men say anything to you when you laid hold of them - A. Phillips said he would knock me down, and dared me to take hold of him. Dalton said, mind you do not get in the wrong. That is all I know.

JAMES FOGG . I am a carpenter. I work for Mr. Moggeridge; I live in Bethnal-green. On the 12th of March I was at the fire; it was at the back of the Minories; the name of the place I do not know. I saw these three prisoners, and two more; they appeared to be in company, and acting together; all the five were near Mr. Burton. I saw Phillips take Mr. Burton's watch; then Phillips and Dalton went away, leaving Levy behind and the other two in the crowd. I informed Mr. Burton what I had seen. I afterwards saw Mr. Burton lay hold of Phillips and Dalton; I had pointed them out to him. Another man brought Levy to the office in Lambeth-street. I am quite sure Levy was one of the five. I had seen them all there about half an hour before they robbed Mr. Burton. I cannot be mistaken in their persons; after I saw the watch in Phillips's possession. I never saw how it was disposed of.

WILLIAM LION . I am a master-cooper in Seething-lane. The fire took place at a gun manufacturers in the city of London, near Glass-house-yard, Minories. I had been at the fire about an hour. I was informed that a gentleman had been robbed of his watch; I instantly went to the place where Mr.

Burton had got hold of Phillips and Dalton, in the crowd. I said, I was an officer. Mr. Burton gave them me in charge. They neither of them said any thing. Levy was brought to the office soon after I got there. The watch has never been found.

Phillips's Defence. I was coming along the Minories; the fire attracted my attention. I was not two minutes at the fire before I was charged with taking this watch. I am innocent of the charge.

Dalton's Defence. When Mr. Burton accused me I told him he accused the wrong man. I never saw the watch. I never knew either of the prisoners in my life.

Levy's Defence. I was at home at my mother's at dinner; there was an alarm came that there was a fire in Rosemary-lane; my mother said, for God's sake go and look whether it is near your sister. She lived in Rosemary-lane. I stopped and looked at the fire. Some of the persons said I had a suspicious look, having a yellow handkerchief on. I was taken to the office.

PHILLIPS, GUILTY , aged 22.

Transported for Life .

DALTON, NOT GUILTY .

LEVY, NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130602-61

577. JAMES SMITH was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Samuel Ray , Samuel Ray and others in his house being, about the hour of six in the forenoon, on the 17th of May , and stealing therein five keys, value 1 s. a dollar, value 5 s. 6 d. one eighteen-penny token, one shilling, and a one pound bank note , his property.

MARY RAY. I am the wife of Samuel Ray , No. 17, Poppins-court, Fleet-street, in the parish of St. Bride's . My husband does not rent the whole house; he has two rooms on the second floor; Mr. Eaton the landlord sleeps in one room in the house. About half past five on the 17th of May my husband got up to his work; it was quite light then; he missed a one pound note, a dollar, a shilling and an eighteen-penny token and five small keys.

Q. When had you seen any thing before you missed them - A. On the Sunday night at eleven o'clock the money was in a tea-caddy standing on a table in the room, and the keys were on the table; the tea-caddy was not locked. When my husband got up he went into the sitting room and missed the money.

Q. When you went to bed do you know whether the door was locked or not - A. Yes, it was locked; I had the key by the side of the bed. In the morning my husband went out of the bed-room; he touched the other room door; it was open. Whoever had taken this they had rumaged the room about. We did not find the room in the same order as when we went to bed.

Q. Upon your going to the door did you perceive the lock had been forced - A. There appeared to be no harm done to the lock; it must have been opened by a false key or a picklock key.

Q. Did you ever recover the money or the keys again - A. I have not recovered them. I saw a one pound note that was found upon James Smith . I do not know the number of the note. I never saw the prisoner until the present time.

MR. CRESWELL. I am a constable of St. Bride's. I received some information of a neighbour; I went to Griffiths, and in consequence of what Griffiths told me I counted thirty-nine keys that were found upon the prisoner. I found the prisoner in the Poultry Compter. Griffiths had apprehended him for the other robbery.

WILLIAM GRIFFITHS . I am a constable. About half after five on Monday morning I was sent for; I went to one Edwards, a milkman. I found the prisoner in Edward's room, in a court in Bride-lane. I took him in custody. I searched him, and found a one pound note upon him, a dollar, and an eighteen-penny piece, and a shilling. Edwards had taken the keys from him thirty-nine keys, and there was five keys that were afterwards owned by Mrs. Ray. The prisoner said he had no money in his pocket but what was his own. I told him I should search him, and if the alderman thought proper to return him the money upon the examination I should have no objection, and when I took him before the alderman the money was returned to him. I did not see Mrs. Ray until the next day. After I had heard that Mrs. Ray had been robbed I tried all the keys to the boxes in her apartment; they opened the boxes; and this key opened the door. These are the five keys that opened Mrs. Ray's boxes.

Prosecutrix. They are my keys. One of these keys I have had ten years. I cannot swear to the one pound note: I lost a one pound note.

Prisoner's Defence. There is many keys like that; the rest of the keys and the money I found them altogether in a bag; they laid in the street; why not another man throw them away, and I am charged with the robbery.

GUILTY, aged 22,

Of stealing only .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130602-62

578. JAMES SMITH was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of David Edwards , about the hour of five in the afternoon, on the 17th of May , Samuel Berry and others being therein, and stealing therein a pair of earrings, value 10 s. three tea-spoons, value 10 s. a three-shilling bank token, and an eighteen-penny bank token , his property.

DAVID EDWARDS . I live in Bear-court, Bride-lane, in the parish of St. Bride's . I rent the whole house. On the 17th of May I went out about half past four in the morning; the house was all safe then.

Q. Have you any lodgers - A. Samuel Berry; he was in the house at the time I found the prisoner in in the house. I returned and came in doors about twenty minutes past five; I heard somebody up stairs; I thought it had been my wife. I occupy the ground floor and the first pair of stairs. I heard the noise on the first pair of stairs; I supposed it was my wife. I am positive I latched the door when I went out.

Q. How did you leave the room door on the first pair of stairs when you went out - A. I shut it on a

spring lock. That is my bed room. I am sure I shut it when I went out I left my wife in bed; the bed room door lock caught.

Q. You heard a noise up stairs - A. Yes; I called my wife twice, and went up upon the second or third stair. I saw the prisoner coming from my bedroom towards the second pair of stairs. I went up to my bed-room door; I saw the door was open. I looked in the room; my wife was out. I saw the drawers open, and the clothes laid on the table. On seeing the clothes out I went up stairs after the prisoner; I saw him upon the second landing; he was looking to see if I saw him. I went up to him, and asked him who he wanted; he said he was looking for a person of the name of Robertson living there. I had no such person living there. I seized him by the collar, and asked him if he pleased to walk down with me. I took him into my own bed-room, and asked him how he opened the door. He wished me to let him go, and said he was a poor person, just come out of the country; it was distress that induced him to do this. I asked him how he could think of my letting him go, when he had got all my money. He said he would give me all the money he took to let him go. I asked him to hand the money out. and let me see what it was; he took out of his pocket a three-shilling piece, an eighteen-penny piece, three silver tea-spoons, and a pair of ear-rings. These tea-spoons were kept in my wife's trunk, and the three-shilling and eighteen-penny piece were put by for a keep-sake. When he gave me the money I told him he must have more silver of mine. He said he had no more about him. I clapped my hand upon his thigh; I said, you have more money. He said, that was his own; I should not have it. His waistcoat pocket was full of keys. I then said, what a pretty fellow you are to ask me to let you go; you will come before night and take all I have got. I called Berry; he went for a constable, and the constable came and secured him.

MARY EDWARDS . What time did you leave your bed-room - A. A little before five. I locked my door before I went out; I left the key on the shelf, down stairs. The prisoner was taken away before I returned. My husband found the key on the shelf, where I had left it. There were thirty-nine keys found on the prisoner; one of them opened my door. I tried it, and locked and unlocked it three times.

Prisoner's Defence. It is of no use of me saying any thing; my life is sold like a bullock at Smithfield. I am no scholar to speak for myself.

Q. to prosecutrix. What are the worth of the spoons - A. Ten shillings; these are them; they are my husband's.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 22.

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130602-63

579. DANIEL STEVENS was indicted for feloniously stealing stealing, on the 1st of May , twenty pounds weight of paper, value 20 s. the property of Thomas Blanshard .

THOMAS BLANSHARD . I carry on the printing business for the Methodist Society, at No. 14, City-road . The prisoner was a journeyman . On the 1st of May, in consequence of suspicion, I went to the prisoner's lodging in company with the officer; we found a quantity of paper, some sheets of printed books, and some unprinted paper that I knew belonged to my office.

JOHN ARMSTRONG . I am an officer. I took the prisoner with me to his lodgings. This paper was handed to my Mr. Blanshard, in the prisoner's room that night.

Q. to Mr. Blanshard. What does that paper consist of - A. In the first place, here is the history of Henry earl of Westmoreland, and here is a copy of the duodecimo hymn-book which we use; it is a gathered copy ready for the binder. Here is some sheets of a commentary of the bible; the rest consists of unprinted paper, and chiefly whole quires; altogether it is worth twenty shillings. Here are near twenty quires of unprinted paper; it has a particular smell from being bleached. The prisoner begged for mercy for his younger brother, whom he had been the occasion of bringing into that practice.

Prisoner's Defence. That paper that is there I will call a witness where I bought it; his name is Edge, in Barbican.

THOMAS EDGE. I am an auctioneer; I live in Barbican.

Q. Do you know the prisoner, Daniel Stevens - A. I cannot say I do; I think I have seen him. I believe I have sold such paper as this. I am not judge enough to say I have. About four months ago I sold such paper as this in my auction-room. The person that bought it gave his name Money.

Q. Who did you sell it for - A. I cannot swear that; it was not for the prisoner.

Q. Will you swear that he bought it - A. I cannot swear that. The person that bought it gave his name Money. I sell by catalogue. I have a regular license, but not from the court of alderman.

Q. What number do you live in Barbican - A. No. 44.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130602-64

580. ELIZABETH EVERTON was indicted for feloniously killing and slaying Ann Clark .

MR. HOUGHAM. I am a surgeon.

Q. When did you see the deceased, Ann Clark , and where - A. On the 27th of April she was brought to Pancras parochial infirmary; she was brought in a senseless state. She had fits at the time until the 2nd when she died. On the day following I examined the body and the brain. There were no external marks of violence whatever on the body, except a small wound on the arm and a black eye.

Q. The blow on the arm could not be the cause of her death - A. By no means. On the brain was an extensive inflammation, the blood vessels being considerably extended, besides which there was an organic disease, a kind of cheesey substance on the brain. The deceased had been subject to fits for four years past. She was a patient at the hospital for four months, in the house. I understood from herself that she had been subject to fits for four

years; I cannot take upon me to say what was the cause of this inflamation.

Q. Did there appear any external marks upon the deceased that could accellerate that disease - A. I think not; it could accellerate it in some measure.

Q. Was there any thing you discovered in the body after it was opened that could lead you to discover what was the cause of her death - A. I suppose the organic disease would ultimately kill her.

Q. That disease could have nothing to do with the blows that she had received - A. No, it could not.

Q. Is it possible for you to say whether any of the blows that was the cause of her death - A.No, the greater probability was that she met with her death through that disease.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18130602-65

581. JOSEPH NASH was indicted for feloniously forging, on the 3rd of February , a bill of exchange, for the payment of 489 l. 3 s. drawn by James Edmonds upon Thomas Cobb , with intention to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England .

SECOND COUNT, for uttering and publishing as true a like bill of exchange, with like intention.

And SEVERAL OTHER COUNTS, for like offence, only varying the manner of charging them.

THOMAS COBB . Q.You are a grocer, in Newgate-street - A. Yes, I am.

Q. How long have you been acquainted with the prisoner - A. Six or seven years.

Q. to Mr. Best. Is that the seal of the Corppration of the Bank - A. It is.

Q. to Mr. Cobb. The prisoner was in partnership with a person of the name of Thomas Nash - A. He was.

Q. And you had a partner of the name of Hicks - A. Yes.

Q. Did you enter into any arrangement for the purpose of discounting bills for the Nashes - A. Mr. Nash had drawn upon us in the name of himself upon myself and my partner before any of the bills of Edmonds's were drawn. He said he wanted a larger supply; he told me he had a friend that would draw.

Q. When was that - A. In the year 1807, or in 1808, they were drawn.

COURT. You say, he told you that he had got a friend to draw bills - A. Yes; it would be more convenient to get them discounted at the Bank, then so much of that we call town paper; that was bills drawn by himself upon me and my partner, they were drawn by Thomas and James Nash , upon Cobb and Hicks, because country bills could be discounted any day; whereas town paper only once a week; he brought a bill.

Q. Did you agree to advance for both - A. Yes, sir. Then he brought a bill drawn by James Edmonds, dated Banbury, and I accepted it; I asked who James Edmonds was; he told me he was a respectable young man, a friend of his.

Q. Did he say where he lived - A. I am not clear that he said he lived at Banbury; he brought a bill drawn Banbury, whether he mentioned Banbury I am not sure.

Q. But he brought a bill drawn from Banbury - A. Yes, dated Banbury, and them it went on for a considerable time in the same way.

Q. The drawing went on some time - A. Yes.

Mr. Knapp. The bills were drawn; and it continued on, were all drawn at Banbury, and in the same name - A. Yes.

Q.What length of time might it go on - A. Ever since the latter end of the year 1807, of the begining of the year 1808.

Q. Look at these bills, are these the bills - A. They are the bills.

Q.Now how long did that continue - A.It has continued ever since, down to the prisoner's apprehension. After a time I asked him particular to the drawer; James Edmonds ; whether he was not a young lad; in his house; he assured the he was not. I do not know any further conversation that went on about it; we certainly have had conversation about it; he always assured that he was a young man, a friend of his, that he would be always ready to serve him; but he never would let me see him.

Q. Take this in your hand; do you know that bill - A. I believe this to be one of them; this is my acceptance.

Q. Look at the endorsement, and tell me whose hand writing you believe that to be, I mean Nash, the last endorsement - A. I believe that to be Joseph Nash 's hand writing, I have seen him write several times.

Q. What was done with that, was that discounted - A. I believe it was.

Q. Had you, any part of the money procured by the discount - A. Not particular of this bill.

Q. Do you know who presented it for that amount. Who brought it to you - A. Joseph Nash, the prisoner.

COURT. The prisoner brought it to you for acceptance, did he - A. Yes.

Q.It has not been paid, has it - A. I offered to pay it, and the Bank refused.

Q. Take this in your hand; can you tell me whose hand writing you believe that to be - A Joseph Nash I believe it is.

Mr. Gurney. You just now said you offered to pay it, and the Bank refused - A. Yes, I went with the money to Mr. Kay's office.

COURT. When was it - A. There were two bills that were due.

Mr. Gurney. After it had been dishonoured, there were two of these bills due - A. Yes. I went with bank-notes in my pocket; Mr. Kemble went in and saw I had bank notes in my pocket.

COURT. That was after it was discovered - A. Yes.

Mr. Gurney. Was that after the prisoner was in custody - A. I think it was.

Q. From this connection that subsisted between you, you received mutual accommodation - A. In the first instance, we certainly did.

Q. The custom was that you accepted the bills, Mr. Nash discounted the bills at the Bank always, and a great many bills of the same description as these have been paid - A. A great many; never one dishonoured but these I think, from the latter end of

the year 1807, or the beginning of 1808, to the present time.

Q. The circumstance that occasioned the dishonor was the sudden stopping of payment - A. I thought it was best to stop.

Q. This bill was not paid owing to your sudden stopping of payment - A. Certainly.

Q. On what day - A. I believe, I proposed it on the 19th of April: there was no bill due until afterwards. I think the first bill was not due till the Wednesday; I am not certain.

Q. By your stopping payment the prisoner was suddenly called upon for payment of these bills - A. Yes.

Q. You say at the time that you stopped payment you knew that you and the prisoner were not insolvent - A. I knew I was, and I believe he was.

Q. Upon your stopping payment there was an arrangement made - A. There was an arrangement made with the Bank. I was not there; my trustees went to the Bank. I put my affairs into the hands of Mr. Warner.

Q. Nash put his affairs into the hands of Mr. Kemble, the tea broker - A. He did.

Q. Have you the least idea that the prisoner had the least idea of defrauding you, or the Bank - A. Not the least; I always believed him to be a safe man, a respectable and worthy man.

Mr. Attorney General. Who provided the money for the bills - A Mr. Nash, generally; if he was short I provided a part.

Q. To bills that became dishonored, it becomes necessary to make proposals to the Bank - A. Yes.

WILLIAM SCORE . Q. You are searcher at the discount office - A. Yes, I am.

Q. Now look at this bill, and see whether it was discounted - A. Yes.

Q. Now look at that bill, and tell me whether it was discounted at the Bank - A. No doubt it was, on the 16th of February, for Thomas and Joseph Nash

Q. What was the sum to be advanced upon all the bills discounted that day - A. six hundred and one pounds eleven shillings for that bill and three others.

Q. Did you give a warrant for credit - A. I signed a warrant for that sum, six hundred and one pounds eleven shillings, for that bill and three others. This is the warrant that I have in my hand.

MR. POWIS. You are clerk in the drawing-office in the Bank - A. I am.

Q. Do you know the person of the prisoner - A. Yes.

Q. Was he in the habit of drawing upon the Bank, on account of bills that had been discounted there - A. Frequently.

Q. Look at that check, is it drawn by the prisoner - A. It is.

Q. Did you pay it - A I did.

Q. The check is six hundred pounds, is that the ticket you gave to authorize the payment of the check - A. Yes, it is.

Q. Now look at that accompt, was this check drawn upon accompt of the sum mentioned there - A. No doubt of it.

WILLIAM TAYLOR . Q. You are one of the clerks at the Bank - A. Yes.

Q. Did you pay that ticket - A. Yes.

Q. Now look at these notes. I do not know whether you can speak to that - A. They appear to be the notes that I paid for the ticket; they are bank notes of one hundred, and one five hundred.

Q. They are the notes that you paid that ticket - A. They are.

MR. WYATT. Q. You are post master, at Banbury - A. I am; I have been in the post-office sixteen or seventeen years; for the last eight or nine years, I have been post master.

Q. Are you acquainted in your employ in the office with residences in Banbury - A. Yes.

Q. If any person has occasion to draw bills of exchange could they reside at Banbury without your knowing it - A. I should think not.

Q. Do you know any person of the name of James Edmonds that has resided at Banbury for that period - A. I do not.

Q.Had you a letter sir, that came to your post-office that came to that address - A. Four separate, the two first I delivered into the general post-office, the other two I detained to take copies of.

Q. Shew me the letters that you have got; could you find any body at Banbury answering this description that you could make the delivery - A. No.

Q. Besides post master, I believe you collect taxes - A. I was collector of the assessed, and land taxes, for about twenty years, but not for the last two or three years I have not.

Q. During all that time have you known any body of that name, and this description - A. No

MR. CURNEW. Q. In which of the offices of the Bank are you stationed - A. In the bill office of the Bank.

Q. Is it a part of your duty to give notice to parties of dishonored bills - A. It is.

Q. Look at that one, and see whether it was wrote by you - A. Yes, it is my writing.

MR. KAY. Q. You are solicitor to the Bank of England - A. I am.

Q. In consequence of the dishonour upon that bill and others, did you see the prisoner - A. I did.

Q. Be so good as to give the court an account of what passed between you and him upon the dishonour of that bill - A. On account of that, I sent to Thomas and Joseph Nash , and also to Mr. Cobb; upon the 13th of April, the prisoner, Joseph Nash , came, and also did Mr. Cobb; I saw Mr. Cobb first, and then I saw the prisoner, and I shewed them the bills that were over due, the bill in question, and another bill that was over due, and three other bills of the same description that were not due; I asked him who had the management of the discounts, whether he or his partner; he told me that he had the management of the house, and that Thomas Nash his partner lived at Chesham, in Bucks; that he had the chief management of the discounts, and upon my shewing him the bills, he said they had been discounted by him; I then told him in consequence of the dishonour of the two first bills, I had been directed by the directors of the Bank to apply to him, and Mr. Cobb, for information respecting of the drawer, James Edmonds . I told him that Mr. Cobb had represented to me, that he, Mr. Nash, said

James Edmonds was a respectable young man, a friend of his, Mr. Nash; he said James Edmonds is a young man, who is now out of the way; he said the bills were drawn for the accommodation of Mr. Cobb, and ourselves; meaning Thomas and Joseph Nash ; the bills first came to him, before they went to Mr. Cobb. I asked him whether James Edmonds lived at Banbury, and what business he carried on, and whether he lived at Banbury when the transaction commenced; I then asked him whether James Edmonds ever lived at Banbury; he answered I am not prepared to speak to that, he never lived at Banbury; I then urged him to let me know where he lived, saying, as he was the drawer of the bill, it was my duty to apply to him for payment, and that he had stated, that he received the bills before he took them to Mr. Cobb for acceptance, he must know where to find Edmonds; he said; I don't know the residence of James Edmonds, he brought the bills to me, he was in the habit of calling on me. I told him that as these bills had been drawn several times in a month for six or seven years, he must know the drawer, and where he was to be found, if there was such a man; I asked him if Edmonds had any of the money received for the bills; he said, no, he had none of the money received upon the bills. I then pressed him to inform me whether there was such a man as James Edmonds ; he seemed very much agitated, and confused; said there is such a man, as James Edmonds , but I do not know where he is, or what he is, I am bound in honor to keep him harmless, and the Bank will receive the full amount: then he stated to me the state of their affairs, the extent of our debts in clearing the business is about seven thousand six hundred pounds, that the Bank, and Mr. Kemble were the only creditors of any amount, the others were very small; the proportion of the bills that they were to pay, and Mr. Cobb together was from seventeen hundred to two thousand pounds; he said, the amount of their credits were sufficient, and to leave a surplus of from two to three thousand pounds; he then said he would send me a statement of their affairs; he did in two or three days afterwards, which shewed what proportion he was to pay, and what proportion Mr. Cobb was to pay.

Mr. Gurney. This was a day or two after the Bank and Mr. Kemble had been to his creditors - A. No, they went after; there never was any arrangement made: I was desired to investigate before they came to any conclusion. Upon my reporting to the Bank they came to a determination on the 30th of April. I sent to him; he came.

COURT. Upon your reporting this to the Bank you say they came to some resolution - A. Yes, they came to a resolution, and ordered a prosecution.

Mr. Gurney. He was not apprehended until the 14th of May, at that time he was in his own house - A. I believe he was in his business; I applied to the Lord Mayor for a warrant, the officer went to his house in Newgate-street, and found him I believe in his own public shop.

Q. One of the five bills has been paid since - A. Yes.

(Read.)

Banbury, 3d February, 1813.

489 l. 3 s.

Seventy-five days after date, pay to my order, four hundred and eighty-nine pounds, value received, James Edmonds; Mr. Cobb, grocer, acceptor, Newgate-street, London; James Edmonds, Thomas and Joseph Nash .

Prisoner's Defence. My Lord, I most solemnly declare, that I had no intention to commit a fraud upon any one; had I been so disposed, is it reasonable that I should put my own name after Mr. Cobb he accepted all my bills, and they have been all regularly paid, and this would have been paid had not Mr. Cobb failed at the moment, nevertheless my estate was fully able to pay my bills, and every shilling I owe; a little time was required to arrange my affairs, and get in my debts, and in order to shew that I had no intention to defraud, that after the bill became due I never absented myself from my business, or my home; I frequently went to the Bank to arrange the payments of the bill, one for five hundred pounds has been paid since my imprisonment, the other has been offered; I have nothing to add. I have a wife and four infants, wholly dependant on me.

The prisoner called thirteen witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 33.

[The prisoner was recommended very strongly to mercy by the jury, on account of believing he had no intention of fraud; and that he accompted on his own responsibility, and that of Mr. Cobb.]

London jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18130602-66

582. GEORGE HARMAN , alias PEARSON , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of May , three bed-curtains, value 10 l. the property of Peter Denys , esq.

WILLIAM EDMONDS . I am a carpenter. I work for Peter Denys , esq.

Q. Did you take down the state-bed - A. I did; I deposited the curtains in the concert-room, I was going to pack them to go into the country; I missed three of the curtains. This was on Friday I think the 14th, about eleven o'clock at noon. I cannot positively say it was the second week in May.

Q. How soon afterwards did you see them - A. On the Saturday evening. I don't know the prisoner. I do not remember seeing him about the house that day.

WOLF REES . I live at the King's-mews-gate, Castle street. I am a dealer in foreign linen; the prisoner came to my house and asked me if I wanted to buy any rich furniture, he produced three curtains, the outside rich damask, the inside rich sarsenet, and the border blue velvet; I asked him how he came by these curtains, I had suspicion they were not his own; he said he was a carpenter by trade, and he was in good circumstances. I said where these curtains were, there must be more; he said his wife had got the remainder of the curtains, he had got a bad woman for his wife, he had parted with her; he said I had no occasion to have suspicion if I would go with him to Westminster, I should find he had a good character. I went with him to the corner of Charles-street, there is an oil shop, he went into the oil shop and stopped ten minutes; he came out again; he said the people that I want

to give you a character of me are not at home. I went into the oil shop. I happened to know the oil shop-man. I asked him if he knew the prisoner; he said he did not know him; I took him of oneside, and said the prisoner had brought me some furniture, I thought it was not his own. In the mean time the prisoner ran off. I went home and found the prisoner at my house; I said, what did you ran away for, I think the curtains do not belong to you. I sent for a constable; the prisoner ran out; my son ran after him, and caught him in the mews; I went for a constable, and he was taken before the magistrate at Queen-square office. The prisoner asked me two pounds for the curtains.

MICHAEL REES . I was at home when my father and the prisoner went out about the curtains. The prisoner returned before my father came home; he said he could not agree about the price of the curtains with my father, and therefore wished to have them back. My father returned; he ran out of the shop. I ran after him, and took him in the mews.

PHILIP PILGRIM . I received these curtains of Rees's son; I have had them ever since.

PETER DENYS . I live in Han's-place, Sloane-street. We missed the curtains on the 13th or 14th they were the curtains of my bed; I have no doubt they are my property; I know nothing of the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I am perfectly innocent of stealing the curtains; I picked them up; there were two men before me at the time, I asked them if they had dropped anything; they said no; I went to advertize them; I had no money about me; I took them into this house at the King's-mews, and offered them for sale.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 26.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18130602-67

583. NORAH MURPHY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of May , a coat, value 30 s. a waistcoat, value 10 s. a pair of breeches, value 18 s. a hat, value 15 s. a gown, value 10 s. and a shawl, value 1 l. the property of Jeremiah Riley ; in the dwelling-house of Patrick Lahey .

JEREMIAH RILEY . On the 13th of May, after I went out to work in the morning, the prisoner came into my room, got a hammer, and broke open my chest. I was out at breakfast, and when I came home the prisoner was absent; I was then informed that she had broken open my chest, and taken away the things belonging to myself and my wife from the chest.

Q. Where was the chest - A. In the room where I slept, in Patrick Lahey 's house.

Q. Did you lose a coat - A. Yes, waistcoat, small-clothes, a gown, and a shawl.

Q. What are all these things worth - A. Seven pounds.

Q. What is the coat worth - A. Thirty shillings, the waistcoat, ten shillings; the breeches, eighteen shillings; the hat, fifteen shillings; the gown, seventeen shillings; and the shawl, one pound. I took Smith, the officer, with me; I searched after the prisoner until the 21st of May, I found the prisoner in White's-yard, Rosemary-lane. The pawnbrokers are here where she pawned the things.

MR. BROAD. The prisoner is the person that pledged these articles with me; she pawned this shawl, it is worth two pounds, and a gown, that is worth twelve shillings; one was pledged on the 13th of May, and the other on the 15th.

SAMUEL JAMES WOOLAT . The prisoner pledged with me a coat, and breeches, on the 13th of May; they are worth five pounds.

JOHN SMITH . I am a patrol. On the evening of the 21st, I took the prisoner into custody; she said she had lost the money that she had pledged the clothes for, and she had lost the duplicates.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence, nor called any witnesses to her character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 20.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18130602-68

584. THOMAS PARROTT was indicted for feloniously making an assault upon John Flentham , on the 4th of May , in the King's highway, putting him in fear, and taking from his person, three seals, value 3 s. part of a steal chain, value 1 s. and a watch-key, value 6 d. his property.

JOHN FLENTHAM. I live at No. 11, Suffolk-street . I am a carpenter. On the 4th of May, past ten o'clock at night, I was coming out of my own house, and found the prisoner lay at my door. I shut the door, and very civilly desired him to go away. I was outside; the watchman was coming by at the time I was entreating him to go away. I desired the prisoner civilly to go away; he was very abusive; he was an entire stranger to me; he swore many oaths in the course of abuse; he appeared to me to be drunk; he struck me with his right hand over my left breast, in consequence of my desiring him to go away, with his fist.

Q. What sort of a blow was it - A. A good smart blow on my collar bone; it drove me against the house; against the jam of the door. As soon as he had struck me he snatched at my watch and got three seals, a watch-key, and part of a steel chain. After he had got these he d - d my eyes, and said he would have my watch; with his arm he got me round the hips, while with his right hand he endeavoured to take my watch out of my pocket. The watchman was very near. When he endeavoured to get the watch out of my pocket I charged the watch with him. He held himself so fast by me I could not get myself disengaged from him until the watchman got hold of him, and then with his assistance I got into the house and got away from him.

Q. What became of the seals - A. I do not know. I never recovered them since.

Mr. Alley. Had you ever seen the prisoner before - A.I never spoke a word before to him in my life.

Q. Upon your oath, do not you know that he lives within two doors of you, perhaps six doors - A. I do not know that he lived in the street.

Q. You had seen him before - A. Very possibly I might.

Q. Do not give me possibly. Upon your oath had not you seen him - A. No. I was never in company with him.

Q. You said you keep this house - A. I keep it.

Q. Was not Mrs. Rainbow lately indicted. Upon your oath have you known this man and repeatedly seen him - A. I may have seen him. I cannot swear that I have never seen him.

Q. If you cannot swear that, my inference is that you have - A. I may have seen him. Yes, I have seen him before.

Q. How came you to say a while ago that he was a total stranger; that is the answer I took down from my lord. Do not you know that he is a wheelwright, a very industrious mechanic - A. From what he said at the watchhouse. I never knew it.

Q. You know there is a forty pound reward - A. I do not know it. I have heard it. I heard them talking about it in the yard.

Q. What is Mrs. Rainbow indicted for - A. For keeping a bawdy-house in the house that I live in.

Q. Are not you indicted for the same sort of thing - A. Not that I know of.

Q. Do not you know that man is a witness against Mrs. Rainbow - A. No. Yes, I know he is now.

Q. You have heard there is a forty pound reward, and this watch-chain and seals you have never seen - A. No, I do not.

Q. You did not break the chain yourself, did you - A. No.

Q. What business is Mrs. Rainbow; what business is carried on at that house - A. A lodging-house.

Q. Were there many other people there besides the watchman - A. None but the watchman.

Q. Upon your oath, was it you that called the watch first, or the prisoner - A. I did.

Q. Had the prisoner ever been in the house with you - A. Never to my knowledge.

Q. Was not the prisoner in the house with you that night - A. I never saw him until I saw him at the door.

Q. Now tell me what the prisoner first said to you. When he knocked at the door did not he say that he came after a girl that he had been with - A. He never spoke to me until I spoke to him.

Q. What distance was the watchman from you at that time - A. Just coming by the area rails when I first spoke to the prisoner.

Q. And so you want us to believe that this man offered you that violence; he knocked you down and held you round the waist while the watchman was so near - A. He did it.

Q. What distance did you live from the watch-house that night - A. Near a quarter of a mile.

Q. Did you look at the door where you say this offence was committed - A. Yes.

Q. You did not find the seals - A. No.

Q. Do you mean to swear you do not know where they are - A. No.

Q. What seals were they - A. A silver seal, two gilt seals; this part of the chain.

Q. Do you know whether the man was searched or not - A. I do; nothing was found on him.

Q. So at the next session your friend is to be tried at Clerkenwell - A. Yes.

Q. Might you be one of her bail - A. Yes, I am.

Q. Have you been taken up and called to give bail - A. Yes. No.

PETER FLANNAGHAN. I am a watchman. I went round Suffolk-street on the night of the 4th of May, I was calling half past ten; I was called by Mr. Flentham. I was about twenty yards off; he called watch. I went up, and the prisoner had him across the thigh. When I came up Mr. Flentham desired me to take him away. I took him by the breast, and dragged him out upon the flags.

Q. What did Flentham say when he desired you to take him - A. He desired me to take him away, that is all. When I got him on the flags he struck me with his fist; then I sprung my rattle. The prisoner appeared to me to be drunk. There was another watchman came to my assistance; we took him to the watchhouse. We searched him. I heard nothing of the seals until we got to the watchhouse.

Q. What did Flentham charge him with - A. Taking three seals and part of a watch-chain. That was at the watchhouse.

Q. Before you took him from the flags did you search to see if there was any watch-chain - A. No; I knew nothing of any watch-chain; nothing was said until he was brought to the watchhouse.

Q. So that when the prisoner had hold of Flentham all he said was, watch, take charge of this man -

Mr. Alley. The poor fellow was very drunk - A. Yes.

JURY. We are perfectly satisfied of the man's innocence.

COURT. It is a scandalous prosecution.

Prisoner. I hope I shall have a copy of my indictment.

COURT. Yes.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18130602-69

585. JOHN WILSON , WILLIAM CLARK , and FREDERICK SALMON , were indicted for feloniously making an assault upon Sarah the wife of Thomas Johnson , on the 12th of April , and taking from her person a watch, value 5 l. the property of Thomas Johnson .

THOMAS JOHNSON . On the 12th of April a watch was forcibly taken from Mrs. Johnson in Kensington Gardens . After it was taken from her I exclaimed there were thieves, and withdrew. I gave information to one of the constables, and the prisoners was immediately taken into custody.

Q. You did not see it taken, did you - A. No. I heard the rip at her side. The key dropped on the ground; I picked it up.

SARAH JOHNSON . I am the wife of the last witness. I was in Kensington Gardens with Mr. Johnson; there was a great crowd close to the palace; I found somebody trying to pull my watch from my side. I said, good God, my watch is gone; before really it was gone; still the hand gave it a sudden jerk, and took it away, but I cannot say who it was. I saw all the prisoners there. I should not have recollected them, only I saw them pass several times. I saw a great many of them there, and I was astonished that mechanical persons should be suffered to be there on such an occasion. On Thursday I saw the prisoners again; they were brought up at Bow-street

office all three. I knew their countenances again as men whom I had seen and having been near to me, and near to the palace, and at this time I remember the faces of them all, having seen them on that Monday in Kensington Gardens; the prisoners were so near me they could have taken my watch; they brushed me. I cannot speak to any one taking my watch.

JAMES BIRKETT . I am a printer.

Q. Were you near the palace on the day that Mrs. Johnson has been speaking of - A. I was in the crowd at the time; I heard Mrs. Johnson say she had lost her watch. I discovered I had lost my pocket handkerchief. Johnson, the officer, told me he knew who had got my pocket handkerchief; he pointed out Wilson to me; he was in company with the other two prisoners. I immediately told Johnson that I believed the person whose name is Wilson had got the watch. I saw all the three prisoners together. Wilson was close by Mrs. Johnson at the time.

BENJAMIN JOHNSON . I am a city officer. On the 12th of April the Lord Mayor went to address the Princess Regent in Kensington Gardens. I saw the three prisoners in the Gardens, facing the princesses windows, near the palace. I saw the three prisoner's altogether, and knowing Wilson I watched him closely. I saw Wilson and Clark attempt several people's pockets. I saw Mrs. Johnson, and heard her say she had lost her watch. I was not close enough to see which of the prisoners it was that took the watch, and seeing Wilson leave Mrs. Johnson I followed him. He had not got three yards before he picked Mr. Birkett's pocket. I told Mr. Birkett to keep his eye on him. I immediately went to Bacon's party at the front gate. I got Hooker and Westcoat to come and assist me; they are officers; and as I was coming to the mob I told George Bennett likewise to watch, as the prisoners were making away. I told Mr. Bacon I would thank him to give me some assistance, as there was a party of thieves, I suspected them to have a gold watch upon them, and several other articles. Westcoat and Hooker came with me; we overtook the prisoners just before they got out of Kensington Gardens, all three together. We searched them a little in the Gardens; we felt in their pockets, and found several handkerchiefs on Wilson, and then I told Wilson we had better take them to a place where we could search them strictly. We took them to the Nag's Head public-house, Knightsbridge; we searched Wilson first; we stripped him; in his breeches we found the gold watch.

- WESTCOAT. I produce the watch; I found it on Wilson, and this handkerchief in his hat. I said to Wilson, there has been a lady robbed of a gold watch, do you know any thing of it; he said, I do not. I then said, I must take the liberty of searching you. I found this watch up in his breeches fob. He said he picked the watch up in the gardens. I told him it was the watch that I wanted. I searched Salmon; I found nothing upon him. I searched Clark; in his pocket I found this gold seal; he said it was his own; he had it a long time. I then asked him what was the cypher upon the seal; he said, H. The cypher is S C upon the seal.

JOHN BANNETT . On this morning I was in company with Johnson in Kensington Gardens. At the time the princess appeared at the window the crowd was so great we were separated, during which time I saw all the three prisoners together. Wilson and Clark I had known before by sight, and when I came to Johnson again he told me a lady had been robbed of her watch, and Birkett of his handkerchief, and that Wilson was suspected to have them both. Considering that we were not able to secure the three, we agreed that he should go to Bacon's party to get assistance. I then followed the prisoners across Kensington Gardens until they came to the Mount, never losing sight of them, where they made a halt some little time, and just as they were proceeding to go out of the gardens, James Hooker and Westcoat came up. Westcoat said, which are the men. I immediately took Wilson in custody, and pointed out the other two. They were secured, and after searching them a little in the gardens they were taken to the Nag's Head. The property was found by Westcoat and Johnson.

THOMAS HOOKER . I am an officer. I can only confirm the other officers.

Q. to Mrs. Johnson Look at that watch and seal - A. This is the watch that I had in Kensington Gardens, and that I had taken from my side. It is a gold watch; it is mine, and the seal is mine. It is marked S C, my former name.

WILSON, GUILTY, aged 17.

CLARK, GUILTY, aged 23.

SALMON, GUILTY, aged 23.

Of stealing from the person only .

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex jury before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18130602-70

586. WILLIAM FELLOWS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of May , a pair of sheets, value 10 s. a tablecloth, value 3 s. seven towels, value 3 s. three shirts, value 6 s. four shifts, value 7 s. a pair of stockings, value 4 s. a pair of stays, value 3 s. an apron, value 6 d. and two frocks, value 2 s. the property of Henry Freeman , in his dwelling-house .

MARIA FREEMAN . I am a mangler. My husband's name is Henry Freeman ; we live in Mile-end-road .

Q. On the 13th of May had you any parcel for mangling - A. Yes, of linen. It laid in the shop on the basket by itself; I saw it there at twelve. While I was cutting some bread and butter for my children's dinner a girl knocked at the door, and informed me that a man had taken my bundle away. I ran to the door, and saw the man with the bundle. I ran after him; he was stopped by somebody else. I saw the prisoner drop the bundle; a witness picked it up. I have got all the things safe in the bundle. The bundle contained all the things in the indictment.

Q. Who was the person that took the prisoner - A. A carter in the road.

SARAH BAKER . I live facing Mrs. Freeman. A little after twelve I was cleaning the parlour in my mistress's house; I saw the prisoner go in Mrs. Freeman's house, and take the bundle out. When he came out of the shop he had the bundle under his

arm; he walked away. I went and told Mrs. Freeman that a man had taken her bundle away.

JOHN STETENS . On the day stated I was in Mile-end-road. I heard the alarm of stop thief. I laid hold of the prisoner; he dropped a bundle directly. I took the bundle up, Mrs. Freeman had it afterwards. I am sure the prisoner is the man that dropped the bundle; he ran away from me. A carter in the road stopped him; he was taken to the Fountain public-house.

THOMAS PRIGMORE . I took the prisoner in custody, and the bundle was delivered to me. This is it.

Prosecutor. Q. These are the things; I had mangled them myself, and pinned them up to send home.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence; called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY, aged 17.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Confined 1 year in the house of Correction , fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

Reference Number: t18130602-71

587. GEORGE BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of May , three shirts, value 30 s. and a neck handkerchief, value 1 s. the property of Robert Jones .

ROBERT JONES . I live in Curtain-road, Shoreditch. The prisoner worked for me, and lived in my house.

MR. NORGROVE. I am clerk to Mr. Jones. I heard that Mr. Jones had lost some linen. On Wednesday the 5th of May the prisoner was going out; I stopped him, and told him he must go with me; I took him to the public-house adjoining the office. I searched his person there; I found this shirt upon him. He said he knew it was Mr. Jones's shirt; Betty, Mr. Jones's cook, gave it him. This is the shirt; the mark has been cut out.

MRS. JONES. I know it is one of my husband's shirts.

Q. Might not one of your husband's shirts be given to him by mistake - A. No.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence; called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Confined 1 month in Newgate , fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18130602-72

588. JOHN DAVIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of April , two coats, value 32 s. a pair of breeches, value 5 s. a pair of drawers, value 1 s. a pair of trowsers, value 6 d. a shirt, value 1 s. a smock-frock, value 1 s. a neck handkerchief, value 6 d. the property of John Conner , in his dwelling-house .

JOHN CONNER . I live in a lodging in Gee's-court, Mary-le-bone ; the landlord does not live in the house. On the night of the 27th of April, I went to bed as usual. I did not bolt my room door. In the morning at four o'clock I found my door open, and all my clothes were gone; I told my wife to go down into the court, and see whether any body had dropped the things, the watchman was in the court; he told her he had got the man in the watchhouse. I went and saw my things in the watchhouse.

THOMAS GREEN . I am a watchman. On the morning of the 27th, between three and four o'clock, the prisoner was walking along Duke-street, Manchester-square, with the clothes under his arm; I asked him what he was carrying there; he gave me no answer; I asked him again; he said nothing but his own. I then asked him to let me look at them; he ran; I sprang my rattle, and ran after him. He ran about an hundred yards; he tried to throw them over the area rails; he could not; the clothes dropped on the pavement. Atkins, another watchman, stopped him. We took him and the clothes to the watchhouse.

- ATKINS. I am a watchman. I took the prisoner after he had dropped the cloaths. When I took the prisoner, Green was running after him; he dropped the cloaths in Edward-street.

MR. HEWITT. The prisoner was brought to the watchhouse on the 27th of April. Green gave me these clothes.

SARAH SMITH . Q. Do you know Conner - A. Yes, he lives in the same house that I do. On the night of the 27th of April, I was standing at the shop-door, I saw the prisoner walk up and down the court that night; the last time I saw him was about ten o'clock. He put his foot into the side door; I asked him what he wanted there; he asked me if our house was not No. 14. I said, yes. He then walked down the court.

Prosecutor. These are my clothes.

Prisoner's Defence. I was not in Gee's-court. I had them things of a man; he said he would give me a shilling to carry them for him to Portman-square.

GUILTY, aged 39,

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Confined 1 year in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18130602-73

589. MARY HALL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of May , in the dwelling-house of Joseph Shephard , a 50 l. bank note, two 5 l. bank notes, and two 2 l. bank notes , his property.

JOSEPH SHEPHARD was called, and not appearing in court, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18130602-74

590. ANN WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of May , four pair of stockings, value 7 s. fourteen napkins, value 2 l. 13 s. 6 d. a tablecloth, value 8 s. four shifts, value 2 l. 8 s. 6 d. and one shawl, value 5 s. 6 d. the property of Margaret Wright , in her dwelling-house .

MARGARET WRIGHT . I am a widow ; I live in Titchfield-street, St. Mary-le-bone . I employed the prisoner to wash for me. I lost linen at different times from Christmas to May. I did not know who to judge until Louisa Richards brought me some duplicates. On the 1st of May I took them all out of pledge. I told the prisoner I would take the things out with pleasure so as I got them, and never would trouble her.

Q. Are the pawnbrokers here - A. No.

COURT. There is not sufficient evidence here to make this a capital offence.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Graham.

Reference Number: t18130602-75

591. MARY HOOK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of April , in the dwelling-house of William Smith . a 5 l. bank-note , the property of Mary Blackburn , widow .

ARTHUR HEMMITT MILLS. Q. Are you a clerk in the dividend office in the Bank - A. I am.

Q. On the 9th of April last, did you pay Mrs. Blackburn any five-pound notes - A. Yes, three.

Q. Was one of the numbers 4,818, dated 11th March, 1813 - A. It was.

Q. Does that note correspond with the date and number - A. It does. I perfectly recollect paying Mrs. Blackburn.

Q. Of the number of the note you have no memory - A. No; but I have a copy of the transaction in my book here. I made the entery myself.

SARAH BLACKBURN . In the month of April where did you lodge - A. At Mr. William Smith , 33, Kenton-street, Brunswick-square.

Q. Did you on the 9th of April last, receive three five-pound notes of the last witness at the Bank - A. I did, sir; one of the notes I put in this pocketbook on the 15th of April and placed it on the mantle-piece, and left it there by accident, and went out the whole of the day; when I came home at night I did not go into the room not till the next morning. On Saturday morning I examined the book; the five-pound note was gone; upon missing the five-pound note I called my servant, and told her of it.

Q. The prisoner: believe at that time was in the service of Mr. Smith - A. She was.

Q. What parish is Mr. Smith's house in - A.St. Goorge's, Bloomsbury.

Q. That night did the prisoner leave her service - A. She did.

Q. In consequence of what you heard that night did you make enquiry after her - A. I did. In two or three days in the next week I found her lodging with a Mrs. Jacques, in Compton-street. I went there, and when she saw me she asked me what I wanted with her. I told her I knew she knew what I had lost, and that I had come to tell her that I believed she had taken it. She positively denied ever having seen it. Mrs. Jacques then came forward, and said that the prisoner had told her she had changed a five-pound note. The prisoner denied ever having told Mrs. Jacques any such thing, but on Mrs. Jacques persisting in it that the prisoner had so said, she said if I would excuse her she would tell the truth. I said I would make no condition with her, but I would wish to hear the truth. She then said she found it in the dust bin, but refused to tell me what she had done with it. She said, it is not thieving; you cannot hurt me. I told her I should take her before a magistrate.

MRS. SMITH. I am the wife of William Smith ; I live in Kenton-street, Brunswick-square, in the parish of St. George, Bloomsbury.

Q. When did the prisoner come into your service - A. She had been in my service about nine days.

Q. Did you learn that Mrs. Blackburn had lost a five-pound note - A. Yes. The prisoner told me that Mrs. Blackburn had lost a five-pound note; she said her conscience was clear, she had it not.

Q. That evening did she quit your service - A. Yes, she did, sir. I had given her warning on the Friday before, in consequence of improper behaviour.

Q. When she was going away on the Saturday did you pay her her wages - A. I did, five shillings in halfpence.

Q. Had you the means of knowing before you paid her the five-shilling paper of halfpence whether she had any money or not - A. I understood before that she had no money from herself. At the time she was going away she was going to a relation in Swallow-street; she said there was a child dying there.

Q. What time in the evening did she quit your house - A. Between seven and eight.

JOSEPH FRANCIS . Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. Yes.

Q. On the evening of Saturday, when she quitted Mrs. Smith's service did you go with her from Mrs. Smith's house - A. Yes.

Q. Did she go to any shop - A. Yes; she went to a shoemaker's shop. Mr. Linn in Tottenham-court-road; she bought a pair of shoes; she took five shillings in halfpence, with which she was going to pay for them, but that was not enough. I offered to lend her to pay for them. She said no; she must get change; she changed a five pound note.

Q. What was the price of the shoes - A. Five shillings and sixpence.

Q. Did you with her meet Mrs. Jacques - A. Yes. I left her with Mrs. Jacques.

THOMAS DREWRY . I am shopman to Mr. Linn. On the evening of the 17th of April a young woman came with the witness Francis.

Q. Is the prisoner the person - A. I am not positive. I did not take notice of her countenance.

Q. to Francis. Did you go there with any person but the prisoner - A. No.

Drewry. That young woman bought a pair of jean shoes for five shillings and sixpence; she offered me in payment a five pound note; she had got five shillings in her hand. Mr. Linn gave her change for the note. I wrote the name that she gave me upon the note. She gave me the name of Hook, 33, Kenton-street, Brunswick-square. Mr. Linn had the note, and gave her change.

DANIEL LINN . I received the five pound note.

Q. Do you know the person of the prisoner - A. I could not swear that she is the person; Francis was the person, I am positive, that came with the woman that uttered it; I think it was somewhere about seven or eight o'clock in the evening; while Drewry was writing the name upon it, I looked out the four one-pound notes; I kept the five-pound note by me one week, and then I got change of Mr. Fridley.

MR. FRIDLEY. Q. Did you give Mr. Linn change for a five-pound note - A. I did. This is the five-pound note, No. 4,818, 11th March, 1813.

SARAH JACQUES. Q. Did you live in Compton-street in April last - A. I did.

Q. The day after Good Friday, did the prisoner

apply to you for a lodging - A. Yes; she came to me at half past twelve at night, she was along with the young man Francis.

Q.Did she bring any clothes - A. No more than she had got on. On the Sunday morning she went out, and fetched some things.

Q. Did you see any shoes, and some trinkets - A. Yes; shoes, stockings, a shawl, and a bonnet, all new. She told me she changed a five-pound on the Saturday evening; she stopped at my place until Mrs. Blackburn came.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence, called two witnesses who gave her a character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 17.

[The prisoner was recommended to mercy, on account of her youth.]

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18130602-76

592. JOHN METCALF was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3rd of May , four silver tablespoons, value 2 l. 16 s. 6 d. and one silver tea-spoon, value 4 s. the property of John Robinson , in his dwelling-house .

MR. WEBSTER. I reside with my father, who is an Inn-keeper at Derby. On the 3rd of May, I was in the coffee-room of the Angel, St. Martin's-le-grand between eleven and twelve o'clock at night; I was sitting at supper with two gentlemen that came from Derby; one of the gentlemen observed to me, that the prisoner had been walking from where he sat to the upper end of the room two or three times, he thought it very singular; he asked me if I observed him; I told him I had. Shortly the prisoner went again; I looked over the screen to see what he was doing; I saw him at the cupboard, at the further end of the room, and away from any of the company; he put his hand in the cupboard, reached something out, and put it into his pocket, two or three times; I heard a tinkling noise like spoons. I went up to him, and collared him. I told him he was stealing spoons; he shuffled himself about, and took out of his pocket three table-spoons, and put them into a knife-tray. I told the prisoner to sit down; I told one of the company to call Mr. Robinson, the landlord; and Mr. Robinson came in the room. I told Mr. Robinson that I saw him take the spoons, and that I believed he had some still more upon him. Mr. Robinson sent for a constable; the constable came, and told him to get up to let him search him, and when the prisoner got up there was another spoon under the seat where the prisoner had been sitting, and during the time the officer searching him a tea-spoon was observed to be sticking out at the bottom of his galter which he pulled out, and threw across the room. He was then taken in custody. The prisoner said before the alderman that he was in liquor at the time; I did not observe it.

BENJAMIN ROBINSON . My father, John Robinson , is the landlord of the Angel Inn. I can only swear to the property being the property of my father. That part of the Angel inn is in the City.

- . I am a constable. I produce four table-spoons, and one tea-spoon.

GUILTY, aged 27,

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Confined 6 months in Newgate , fined 1 s.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder

Reference Number: t18130602-77

593. MARY WILLIAMS and MARY COOK were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of May , two pair of stockings, value 5 s. the property of Thomas Chauncer .

JAMES CHAUNCER . I am shopman to Thomas Chauncer , 47, Holborn-hill . We lost the stockings on the 25th of May, between four and five in the afternoon. The prisoner Williams came into out shop, asked for some silk stockings with cotton feet and tops; I shewed her some; she said she wanted some with silk clocks. In the mean time the prisoner Cook came in, and said she wanted some black worsted stockings at about eighteen-pence; I shewed her some; she asked for some about a shilling; I told Williams I had got none with clocks. She told me to shew her some plain, about nine shillings or half a guinea; I could not find any of that price; I shewed her some at fourteen shillings, and then looked for some black silk stockings for Cook; I found I had not got any. I told her I had got none at a shilling; she did not go out of the shop. A parcel of white cotton stockings were loose upon the counter, underneath the flap of the counter, which turns down, and while I was turning my back the prisoner Cook must have taken two pair.

Q. Why must she have taken it - A. She had got out of the shop, and the officer dragged her in, and took her into the parlour.

Q. Did they speak together while they were there - A. No.

THOMAS BLANSCOMB . I am an officer. On Tuesday, the 25th of May, in the afternoon I was going up Holborn in company with Brown; I observed the prisoner Cook looking in the gentleman's shop-window, with a bundle in her hand; immediately after I saw the prisoner Williams pass behind her, and go into the shop, and Cook followed her; we waited about five minutes, and saw Cook come out of the shop; she had one hand under her apron, apparently with something in it; I took hold of her, told her she must go back to the shop, I suspected she had something. I put my hand to take what was under her apron; she struggled to get away; I took these two pair of stockings from under her apron. I took her back into the shop; she denied knowing any thing about them. There are the two pair of stockings.

JOHN BROWN. I am an officer. On Tuesday, the 25th, I observed Cook standing at Mr. Chauncer's window with a bundle under her arm, and an umbrella behind her in her right hand; the prisoner Williams almost immediately passed her behind, took the umbrella from her, and went in at the door. Cook followed her into the shop; Cook came out, Branscomb followed her to Bartlett's-buildings, and finding her struggling with Branscomb I took her in custody, and took her back into the shop; Williams was then sitting there, and the umbrella leaning against the counter. I searched them, and on the prisoner I found this new silk handkerchief.

James Chauncer . These two pair of stockings are my brother's property.

Cook's Defence. I went into the shop to buy a pair of stockings; them stockings must have fallen on my feet as I walked out, I walked with the scockings before me.

William's Defence. I never saw Cook before in my life; I was buying for myself.

WILLIAMS, NOT GUILTY .

COOK, GUILTY , aged 20.

Confined one month in Newgate, fined 1 s.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130602-78

593. ELIZABETH SIMMONS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of June , a tea-kettle, value 7 s. the property of William Cummings .

WILLIAM CUMMINGS . I am a tin-plate worker ; No. 5, Beech-street, Barbican . On Tuesday the 1st of June, the tea-kettle hung inside of the door; it was there at four o'clock in the afternoon; I did not miss it till the next morning. I only know it is my property.

JOHN DOBSON . I am an officer. On Tuesday evening, between seven and eight o'clock, I saw the prisoner in Newgate-street: she had something concealed under her gown; she crossed over to Mr. Flemming a pawnbroker; I stopped her, and asked her what she had got; she had got a tea-kettle tied with a string under her gown. This is the tea-kettle.

Prosecutor. It is mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought the tea-kettle.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined six months in Newgate fined 1 s.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130602-79

594. MARY BRADLLY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2nd of June , twenty-eight yards of printed cotton, value 2 l. the property of John Gunn .

- . I am shopman to Mr. Gunn, linen-draper , 43, Bishopsgate-street, without . On the 2nd of June, a man called to us saying, that a woman had taken something from the door; I followed the prisoner, and took this cotton from her. I am sure it is my master's property.

JOHN HILL . On Wednesday, the 2nd of June, I was going down Bishopsgate-street; I observed the prisoner look at the prints that were on a bench opposite of the window; she took up one piece of cotton, and let it fall on the pavement; there were people passing; she put it on the bench, and went on, and looked into Mr. Gunn's shop: she retuned and took the cotton away; I went and told Mr. Gunn's people, and pointed out the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked the cotton up off the pavement, about two yards from the shop-window.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Confined one month in Newgate , fined 1 s.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130602-80

595. GEORGE RAWLINGS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of May , a ham, value 1 l. 1 s. the property of William Almond .

JAMES ALMOND . I am shopman to William Almond , grocer and cheesemonger , No. 41, Dowgate-hill .

WILLIAM BARRETT . I am a constable. On the 1st of May I saw the prisoner in Newgate-street, in company with another man. From suspicion I followed them to Dowgate-hill; they crossed the road to the prosecutor's window; they stopped and looked in the prosecutor's window; they passed and repassed three or four times. The prisoner went into the shop, pretending to buy a pennyworth of Spanish liquorice; the other man went and took the ham out of the window, and ran to Bloak-lane. He put the ham on his shoulder, and set off running. I ran after him, and thought I had got hold of his collar, instead of that I had got hold of the ham. He stooped down and made his escape. I took the ham back to the prosecutor's shop. The prisoner was there, not secured. I am positive the prisoner is the same that was with the man that stole the ham.

James Almond. It is my brother's ham.

Prisoner's Defence. Had I known any person had stolen a ham I should have made my escape.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130602-81

596. JOHN MEES and SARAH SAUNDERS were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3rd of June , a handkerchief, value 5 s. the property of a certain person to the Jurors unknown, from his person .

JOHN BROWN. I am a city officer. On Thursday last, the 3d of June, I was attending at the North gate of St. Paul's as the children were going in. I observed the prisoners following a gentleman, I immediately followed them through the crowd of about two or three hundred people, close behind them, with my head over their shoulders; I observed the woman (Saunders) with her hand close to a gentleman's pocket; the other closed to her, and the moment she took it out she put it into his hand, and he put it into his breeches; there was a sudden crowding at the moment, and I lost the gentleman. The prisoner Saunders went toward; the other turned round behind two gentlemen. I let them get as far as Bowles's picture shop; I then took hold of them both, and took them into a wine-vauls. In the passage they wanted to knew what I wanted; I told them to search them; Meers told me there was no occasion; he pulled it out for me. I searched her; I found nothing. I took them to the Compter, and the alderman thought proper to commit them

Mees's Defence. I was at work; a young man asked me to go with him to see the children at St. Paul's. I lost him; I accidentally met Saunders; she said, here is a handkerchief which I had of a gentleman that has been with me. She gave me the handkerchief; said the gentleman gave it her. I had it not in my possession five minutes before the officer came up; I gave it him. How she got it I know not.

Saunders's Defence. I am an unfortunate girl. I went down Ludgate-hill with a gentleman, he gave me two shillings, and that handkerchief to keep till night, and then he said he would give me more.

MEES, GUILTY, aged 20.

SAUNDERS, GUILTY, aged 19.

Judgment respited .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130602-82

597. GEORGE BECK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22nd of May , a handkerchief, value 4 s. the property of John Charles Partridge , from his person .

JOHN CHARLES PARTRIDGE . I am an articled clerk to a solicitor. I lost my handkerchief on the 22d of May. From information of a person passing I turned round and saw the prisoner running; I ran after him and collared him, and asked him what he had got of mine. He, with an oath, said, nothing; what did I stop him for. Mr. Marsh came out, and said, I had better take him into his shop and search him, and from the flap of his coat he dropped my handkerchief. The prisoner said, if I would do nothing to him he would go down upon his knees and ask my pardon. I took him into Mr. Marsh's shop and sent for an officer.

WILLIAM GILL . I saw the prisoner drop the handkerchief in Mr. Marsh's shop. The prisoner then did not attempt to deny taking the handkerchief, but said he would go down upon his knees and ask the gentleman pardon.

WILLIAM KIMBER . I am an officer. I produce the handkerchief.

Prosecutor. This is my handkerchief; it dropped from the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I was never near the gentleman, nor did I take the handkerchief; it might be dropped by somebody else; nothing was found on me. He picked up the handkerchief outside of the door; I do not know who dropped it.

GUILTY, aged 21.

Judgement respited .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130602-83

598. JOHN WILLIAMS and WILLIAM BROWN were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of April , a handkerchief, value 1 s. the property of William Jenner , from his person .

WILLIAM JENNER . On the 14th of April I was in the Exchange the day the Lord Mayor introduced the Cossack. There was a large concourse of people. I was in the crowd. The constable (Johnson) told me that the prisoner had picked my pocket of my handkerchief, and had given it to Williams. I felt in my pocket, and found my handkerchief was gone.

- JOHNSON. I am an officer. On the 14th of April I was in the Exchange, I saw the prisoner Williams close to the prosecutor. I saw him go away very quickly from the prosecutor, apparently to me, as if he had picked his pocket of his handkerchief. He went a few yards, and stood with Brown; he gave Brown a handkerchief, which I suspected was the handkerchief he had taken from Mr. Jenner's pocket. Brown put in his pocket, but left a good bit of the handkerchief hanging out of his pocket. I took Mr. Jenner, and asked him if that was the handkerchief that he had lost. He said, it looked very much like his handkerchief. I took them both in custody. Brown put the handkerchief down. This is the handkerchief.

Prosecutor. This is my handkerchief. I should not like to swear to it. It was just such a handkerchief as this; I cannot swear

Brown's Defence. I asked Williams to lend me an handkerchief.

Williams's Defence. The handkerchief is my own property, I assure you.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130602-84

599. WILLIAM BARTLETT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of May , two pewter quart pots, value 2 s. 6 d. and two pewter pint pots, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of William Coppard .

WILLIAM COPPARD . I am a publican ; I live at the Red Lion at Hack-bridge .

JOHN FORRESTER . I am an officer. On Sunday the 9th of May I stopped the prisoner in Petticoat-lane, between seven and eight in the morning. I found upon his person two pewter quart pots; they were squeezed flat. The direction upon them are, William Coppard, Red Lion, Hack-bridge. He could not give me any account how he came by them.

Q. to Coppard. You keep the Red Lion at Hack-bridge; where is that - A. Near Casharton. They are my pots. I have seen the prisoner in my house; he worked at the oil mill. The last time I saw him in my house was the 3d of May. This pot looks like one of my last new pots.

GUILTY , aged 48.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130602-85

600. WILLIAM SMITH was indicted for that he, on the 27th of January , was a person employed at the Post office in the parish of St. Mary Woolmot' London, in sorting letters and packets, and that a certain letter then sent to the Post from Sheffield in the county of York, to be sent to a person at Limehouse, John Bashier , containing a bank post-bill of 50 l. a bank note of 30 l. and a 1 l. bank note came to his hands, the said William Smith , while he was employed as aforesaid, and that he being such servant, so employed as aforesaid, feloniously did secrete the said letter containing the said bank post-bill and bank notes as aforesaid , the property of Francis Knowles and John Sawyer .

And OTHER COUNTS, for like offence, only varying the manner of charging them.

FRANCIS KNOWLES . My partner's name is John Sawyer . I live in Sheffield. I am a factor .

Q. On the 25th of January last did you send any letter to London - A. I did; it was directed to John Bashier , Copenhagen wharf, Limehouse, London.

Q. What was enclosed in that letter - A. A fifty pound bank post bill, a thirty pound bank note, and a one pound bank note.

Q. Can you tell me the number of the thirty pound bank note - A. This entry was made at the time; 14277, dated January 9th, 1813.

Q. Who put the letter in the Post - A. I myself. It was sealed, and I paid the postage.

Q. What time did the post leave Sheffield - A. I suppose about half past two in the morning.

DANIEL AYRE . Q. You are an assistant in the post office in Sheffield - A. I am, and I was so on the 25th of January last.

Q. Was the London bag made up in the usual course that evening - A. It was, and forwarded by the mail.

Q. When would the bag put in on the 25th reach London - A. On the 27th it would arrive in London.

WILLIAM PIMAR . Q. You belong to the General Post office in London - A. Yes.

Q. Did you belong to the Post office on the 27th of January last - A. I did.

Q. Now, sir, will you tell us whether the Sheffield bag arrived in the usual course that morning - A. It did.

Q. Now, sir, when would the letters which arrive in London on the 27th be put in the Post office at Sheffield - A. On the 25th.

Q. to Mr. Knowles. You said you paid the postage of this letter, to whom did you deliver it to - A. To Daniel Ayre , the last witness but one.

Q. to Mr. Ayre. Have you any recollection of receiving any letter on that day from Mr. Knowles - A. I do not. The paid letters are put into a different departments in the office.

WILLIAM FURLING. Q. Were you employed at the General Post office on the morning of the 27th of January - A. Yes.

Q. Was it your business to take from one part of the office, the Two-penny post department, the letters that had come by the General Post - A. It was.

Q. Is it your business to take all letters of every description from whatever mail they come - A. Yes, by whatever mail they come. I carry them in a locked box. I deliver them to the Two-penny post department.

Q. That is a distinct office, in the office Lombard-street - A. Yes. I deliver them over to the stampers, to Mr. Ellis or to Mr. Howlett.

JOHN ELLIS . Q. What is your department in the Two-penny Post office - A. I am a stamper in the Two-penny Post department. Mr. Howlett is the other.

Q. Were you so on the 27th of January last - A. I was, sir.

Q. Did the letters come into your office that morning - A. Yes; the box came over to me locked.

Q. Is there a key kept in your office - A. There is; either me or my partner keeps the key: one of us lock it every morning. When the box is unlocked we stamp them, and then we take them to Mr. Moss, he is a sorter.

Q. Were the letters so taken out, and sent to sort, on this morning of the 27th - A. They were.

JAMES HOWLETT . Q. You are the other stamper in that department of the Two-penny Post office - A. Yes.

Q. Did the letters that come by the General Post to go by the Two-penny Post, come into your office on the 27th of January - A. Yes; they came in a box, locked.

Q. Do you recollect whether you or Mr. Ellis had the key that morning, which of you - A. Sometimes one has the key and sometimes the other. The box goes backwards and forwards several times. All the letters that came to our office that morning were stamped, and afterwards sent to the sorter.

GEORGE MOSS . Q. Do you belong to the Twopenny Post office, in the General Post office - A. I do.

Q. Were you employed on the morning of the 27th to sort the Two-penny Post letters - A. I was.

Q. That is the letters that came by the General Post for the Two-penny Post delivery - A. Yes.

Q. In how many divisions are these letters sorted - A. Seven.

Q. Some of these are what you call country divisions and some town divisions - A. They are; Limehouse is a town division, called the East division.

Q. On the morning of the 27th of January was the Limehouse letters sorted for the East division - A. They were.

Mr. Alley. I suppose it very often happens that letters get into different divisions than they are intended to be put in - A. They may, but I should think not; they are examined before they are sent out. I never knew an instance of it.

THOMAS SKINNER . Q. Are you employed in the Two-penny Post office, Lombard-street - A. Yes; I am a charge-taker in the East division.

Q. What is the business of the charge taker - A. To take the letters of the East division from Messrs. Moss's office into another room; a general account of the charges are taken at my office, and to see that amount is right; Limehouse is in the Eastern division.

Q. How many persons are there who deliver letters in the East division - A. Five with me I have the delivering them out very often; there is only four besides me.

Q. Were you employed on that duty on the morning of the 27th of January last - A. Yes.

Q. Was William Smith , the prisoner, also employed upon duty that morning - A. He was.

Q. Is he one of the persons who delivers letters of this description in the East division - A. Yes, sir.

Q. Then when you bring the letter from Moss's office, what is done with them - A. I bring them out, and put them on a table in that place where we sort them, in order that they may be sorted into the different walks of the Eastern division.

Q. Was the prisoner there on the morning of the 27th of January, employed in sorting the letters to that division - A. Yes.

Q. Is Copenhagen-wharf, Limehouse, within the prisoner's walk - A. No; but it is within the Eastern division.

Q. Would a letter directed for Copenhagen-wharf come along with the general business at that table where the prisoner was employed in sorting - A. I all was right it would come there.

Q. Now, while a person is employed in sorting there, has he an opportunity of taking a letter if he is so inclined - A. Yes, if he is so inclined.

Q. Do you recollect the morning of the 27th of January - A. Yes; he was on duty.

Q. On the morning of the 27th of January, at what time would he leave the post-office with his letters - A. About ten o'clock, it may be a few minutes afterwards.

JOHN PLOMER . Q.Where you one of the letter

carriers of the Eastern division on the 27th of January - A. Yes.

Q.Copenhagen-wharf in you beat - A. No. The charge taker gives us the letters, we sort them among us.

Q. If you meet with one that did not belong to your beat, you would give it to the man to whom it did belong - A. Yes, chuck it into his box.

Q. Each of you, if you are so disposed, have an opportunity of taking a letter that does not belong to his own beat - A. Yes, sir.

Q. On the morning of the 27th, do you remember seeing any letter directed to Mr. Beshier - A. No, I do not.

WILLIAM STRINGER . Q. You are one of the letter carriers for the East division, I believe - A. Yes.

Q. Did you deliver letters on the 27th of January in the part of delivery, which would embrace Copenhagen-wharf - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know Mr. John Beshier there - A. Yes.

Q. If any letter had come to your hand that morning for Mr. Beshier it would have been your duty to have delivered it - A. Yes.

Q. And of course you would have done so - A. Yes.

JOHN BESHIER . You live at Copenhagen-wharf, at Limehouse - A. Yes.

Q. Did you on the 27th of of January last receive any letter from Messrs. Knowles and Sawyer, of Sheffield - A. I did not.

Q. Did you at any other time receive any remittance from them of a fifty-pound bank post-bill, a thirty-pound bank-note, and a one-pound bank-note - A. I did not; I never received any such remittance, or any such letter.

MR. DICKENSON. Q. You are a clerk in the Bank of England - A. I am.

Q. Were you upon duty on the morning of the 29th of January, of the present year - A. I was.

Q. Was the bank note, value thirty-pound, brought to you for change that morning - A. There was; that note is here I believe.

Q. Mr. Davis, just put the note into the other gentleman's hand.

(The note handed to Mr. Dickenson.)

Q. to Mr. Dickenson. Was that thirty-pound note brought to you for change - A. It was, No, 14,277, dated 9th of January 1813.

Q. I believe sir, it is not usual at the Bank ever to have in circulation two notes of the same number and date - A. No, they are never in circulation at the same time.

Q. At what time in the morning was that thirty-pound note presented to you for payment - A. From ten to half past ten o'clock, to the best of my judgment by the appearance of the day's work.

Q. Was the person who presented it to you a stranger - A. Yes, a postman.

Q. Why do you say he was a postman - A. Why it is unusual for us to put the name of persons upon the notes, and I see this is my writing, the name and address; the name and address of Jones, 23, John-street Minories, is written upon it by me; that is the name and place of abode given to me by the person who presented the note.

Q. Is it your practice to require persons who present the notes to write their names with their own hands - A. Yes, that is our usual practice.

Q. Then how happened it that you wrote that name - A. Because the person that presented it had his hand full of letters, and I wrote the name; he appeared to be a postman.

Q. He had post letters in his hand - A. Yes.

Q. Did he desire you to write his name - A. Seeing his hand full of letters I asked him his name and address, most likely I writ it voluntarily, seeing his hand being engaged.

Q. After that was done, do you hand the note to another person - A. I do hand it to another person; I enter the note in the cash book, and then hand it to Mr. Davis. My entry in the cash book is two ten's, and ten one's; the particulars of the notes are written down by me in another book; this entry is made by myself, two ten's, 1206, and 1209, dated 13, January, 1813, both of the same date.

Q. Now the ten one's - A.6357, to 6366, inclusive, all dated 7, January, 1813.

PETER DOWLING . I believe you are a clerk to a merchant - A. I am.

Q. Have you made enquiry for a person of Jones, in John-street, Minories - A. I have; I made the enquiry in the house of the last week; I could not find any such number as 23; there is no such number in that street.

Q. Could you hear from any house-keeper in the street of the name of Jones - A. None. I could not find either the number or name. The numbers go no higher than twenty.

MARY STARMAR . Q. Were you living in February last at the Two-penny post, receiving office, Whitechapel-road - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar - A. Yes, he was a letter carrier.

Q. Do you remember his calling there one day and giving you a bank note - A. Yes.

Q. Can you tell me what day that was - A. No.

Q. Was it in February - A. I cannot say.

Q. What did he say to you when he brought this note; what was the amount of it - A. I did not look at the note; he desired me to pay his charges with it. I was to give it to Plomer, the postman, for him to pay the prisoner's charges at the office. Plomer came in about five minutes afterwards, I gave it to Plomer; I am quite sure that I gave to Plomer, the very note that I received of the prisoner. The note had not been in my possession scarce five minutes.

Q. to Plomer. Did you receive any one-pound note from the last witness, Mary Starmar - A. Yes, I did; I think it was in February, I am not sure.

Q. For what purpose did you receive it - A. To pay the charge taker.

Q. Explain what you mean by the charge taker - A. He takes the accompt of letters to us, we pay him, and he pays into the office; I paid Skinner, the charge taker, that note. The charge taker is chargable with the whole of the division; he receives it in smaller sums of those that are under him.

Q. Skinner was the charge taker of that division - A. Yes, he was. I paid that one-pound note to Skinner on account of the prisoner. I paid it for the prisoner in about half an hour after I received it of Mary Starmar , on that same day; I am quite sure it was the same one-pound note I received of Mary Starmar . That was the only occasion that I ever received a loose note from Starmar.

Q. to Thomas Skinner . You told us just now that you were the charge taker of the East division - A. Yes; I am answerable for all the charges of that division; I collect from the different delivers the different charges.

Q. Do you recollect receiving a one-pound note from the witness Plomer, in the month of February - A. Yes, I wrote upon the note, Smith, February, 10th, 1813, and put my own name under it. I put the name of Smith upon it because I received it upon Smith's charge, as Plomer told me. I did not put Plomer's name on it.

Q. Why did you write his name and your own, is there any direction in the post office - A. It is the rule of the office for every person to write the name of whom he receives it, and also his own.

JOHN PARKER . I produce the note from the Bank.

Q. to Skinner. Now, sir, look at that note, and tell me whether that is the note that you received of Plomer for Smith - A. Yes, that is the identical note.

Q. to Mr. Shelton. Read the number and date - A.60,362, one pound, 7th of January, 1813; on the back of the note, Smith, carrier.

Skinner. I wrote Smith, denoting that I received it of Smith. It was in February, Mile-end was Smith's walk.

HENRY PARKINS . Q. Did you upon any occasion speak to the prisoner at the bar upon the subject of that one-pound note that has been produced - A. Yes; in consequence of that bank note having appeared to come from the Bank of England, a note was sent to me of it, that it was paid in by the receiver general of the Post office; I set on foot an enquiry, and ascertained it had passed from the hands of the prisoner, by what appears upon the endorsement of the note. I desired that the prisoner might be sent to me. I told him how the bank note had passed through the various stages; I asked him where he had received it; he admitted that he had received it for postage of letters I mentioned to him that he had not written his name upon the note; I asked him why he had not written it upon the note; I knew that was the order of the board; he said he had not written it, it was an omission, and he was sorry for it. I asked him from whom he received it; he named one or two persons; I do not recollect. He said it was received for postage of letters. I recommended him to apply to these persons; he said he would; and I desired him to call again upon me. After a few days he called again; he said he could not make out from whom he had received it, but certain he was it was for postage of letters. It must have been a day or two after, within the 14th of February, that I had this conversation with him, by a memorandum I have in my hand. The prisoner was not in custody at that time; he was not taken into custody untill the 1st of April.

EDWARD JOHNSON . Q. You are the comptroller of the Two-penny Post office; do you know when Smith was suspended - A. On the 22nd or 23rd, of February.

SIMON KENDALL . Q. You are shopman to Mr. Bly and Company, who are ironmongers in Whitechapel - A. I am.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar - A. I do.

Q. Do you remember his coming to your shop any time in February - A. I did not particularly know him; then he has been several times at our shop.

Q. to Mr. Parkin. Produce a one pound note 60,361, September, 7th, 1813, is the date upon the note.

(Mr. Parkin produced the note.)

Q. to Mr. Kendall. Now, look upon the note, and see if there is any thing upon that note your own writing - A. Yes, Smith, postman, 2. 13. 13.

Q. Now, explain what you mean - A.2. the second month, 13. the day, and 13. is for short 1813.

Q. Now, upon what occasion did you write that upon the note - A. The name was given to me by the person from whom I took the note, he had letters with therefore I put postman.

Q.Now, the day upon it, is the day upon which you received it - A. It is.

Q. Do you know whether you received that note from the prisoner - A. I believe he is the person; I have no doubt. I should not like to swear it.

Q. Had he been in the habit of dealing at your shop before - A. He had, but I did not know him.

Q. Though you did not know his name, was his person familiar with you - A. I had seen him in the shop prior to the time of his passing that note; I did not know his name.

Q. Had he ever delivered letters at your shop - A. That I cannot say.

BARNARD JACOB . I am a woollen-draper, in Cloth-fair.

Q. Do you recollect a person any time coming to your shop in February last, and tending you a ten-pound note in payment - A. I do.

Q. Did it so happen that you could not give change for the note - A. I could not give change for it.

Q. What did the amount of the article come to - A. About fourteen or fifteen shillings. Not being able to give change for the note I sent it to a neighbour's by my son.

Q. Do you recollect whether the person that brought that note brought any thing in his hand - A. To the best of my recollection he had something tied up in a belcher handkerchief.

Q. Was that person known to you before - A. No, he was an entire stranger.

Q. How long did he stay in your shop - A. While my son went to get change; he might be in my shop about ten minutes. I offered him a check upon my banker in the city. He refused, and said he was not going that way.

Q. Now look upon the prisoner at the bar, and tell me whether you have any belief whether he is the person that brought that note - A There is some similarity;

there is some likeness. I cannot positively say it is the same man.

Q. Do you believe that he is the man, or do you believe he is not - A. Accordingly to my belief he appears to be the man, but I cannot speak to that positively.

HENRY JACOB . Q. You are the son of the last witness - A. I am.

Q. Do you remember being sent by your father to get a ten pound note charged - A. Yes. Mrs. Mitchell changed it, who lived next door to us.

Q. Did you see the person who brought the note at your father's shop - A. Yes; I was there when he came in. He was a stranger to me.

Q. Upon your return did you deliver the change to him or to your father - A. I do not recollect.

Q. Now, look at the prisoner, and tell me whether you have any belief that he is the person or not - A. I cannot say for certainty; I think he is the man; he resembles the man. I think he is the man, but I cannot say with certainty.

ELIZABETH STEVENS MITCHELL. Q. I believe you live next door to Mr. Jacobs, in Cloth fair - A. I do.

Q. Take that note in your hand of ten pound, No. 1206, dated 13th January, 1813. Now, ma'am, look at that note; did you change that note any day - A. I did, on the 24th February. I wrote

"Jacobs 24, 2, 13." I received it of Mr. Jacobs's son.

JOHN GALBRAY . I am shopman to Messrs. Thellwall and Weeves, linen-drapers, St. John-street.

Q. Do you remember any person coming to your house and passing this note to you - A. Yes. I wrote on the back Harper Homerton, the person who passed that note gate that name and that description. It is a ten-pound note.

Q. Do you know the person that passed that note - A. No, I do not.

Q. Look at the prisoner - A. I think that is the person, but I cannot positively say.

Q. The person, whoever it was, purchased some articles and gave in that name - A. Yes. The amount of the articles was upwards of one-pound. Mr. Weves gave the change in my presence.

Q. to Mr. Knowles. Just look at that thirty-pound note - A. It agrees with my book in number and date.

Prisoner's Defence. On the day that Mr. Parkins sent me a letter to attend him; I went to him. He said he heard I was applying to get into the office again I answered yes, I had been so long suspended I had got another situation. He asked me if I knew a person of the name of Jacobs; I said no. He asked me if I changed a one-pound note; I told him I had. He then said, we will have these two gentlemen in, and in came two gentlemen, which proved to be Mr. Jacobs and son. They asked me if I knew them; I said, no. Mr. Jacobs asked me if I knew his son; I said, no. He took from his pocket a piece of breeches stuff, and compared to mine; he said I don't think this is the stuff I sold you for a pair of breeches; he took from his pocket a pen-knife, and cut a piece out of my breeches; he told Mr. Parkins he could not swear this to be the same that he sold for the ten-pound note. My breeches were ordered to be taken off by Adkins the officer; they were taken off. Then when I came back after searching my house, they were to be produced to shew to Mr. Parkins. The breeches were given to me again by Adkins; he said, here, take your breeches, they are of no use. Mr. Parkins knows that he had a piece of stuff to compare with the breeches, that I had on. As I am brought here, I call God to witness I am an innocent man. I think Mr. Parkins had the piece of stuff which he brought in his hand.

Mr. Parkins. Jacob had furnished me with a piece, the pattern of the stuff that he had sold.

The prisoner called six witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 25.

[The prisoner was recommended to mercy by the jury, on account of his former good character.]

London jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18130602-86

601. ELIZABETH ARNOLD and ELIZABETH MEAD were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of May , a watch, value 3 l. a seal watch-key, value 1 l. the property of William Cole , from his person .

WILLIAM COLE . I lost my watch on Friday night, the 11th of May, between ten and eleven o'clock. I was going from Shadwell to Limehouse: I met the prisoner Arnold in the street, she accosted me. I was very much intoxicated she drew my watch from my pocket, at which time I catched hold of the seals and part of the chain. I turned the chain round my finger with my left hand, by some means she forced the watch from me. She then said if I would go home with her she would give me the watch back again; I then went on with her a little way; she repeated the same, if I would go home with her she would give me the watch. She took me to the house of Mrs. Mead.

Q. Did not you pass some watchman - A. I believe I did, but I had not my regular senses although I knew what passed. Mead lived in Angel-gardens, Shadwell . I went up stairs with her, and Mead came in the room; some discourse passed between the prisoner, but what I do not know. Mrs. Mead went out of the room. The prisoner Arnold persuaded me to go to bed, and she would give me the watch in the morning. I went to bed and fell asleep, and when I awoke a candle was burning, and no one there but myself; I dressed myself and went down stairs. I saw some people down stairs, but not Arnold.

ROBERT BROWN . I am an officer. I saw the prosecutor; from his information I apprehended Arnold; she said she would not be transported by herself, Mrs. Mead had as much right to be transported as she, they went together to pawn the watch, and Mrs. Mead had one of the one-pound notes. I went back and took Mrs. Mead in custody. I found in a box a one-pound note, which the pawnbroker said he gave.

- . I am a pawnbroker. I produce the watch; Arnold pledged it with me on the 18th of May, in company with another woman, not Mead. I lent her two pound on it; the one-pound note produced by Mr. Brown is one of the one-pound notes.

Prosecutor. That is my watch; my name is upon the dial plate.

Arnold's Defence. I was coming home; I met Mr. Cole; he asked to come home with me; he came home with me; he had no money to give me; he said he would leave the watch until the morning. The prosecutor went away. I never saw him again until the Monday morning.

Mead was not called upon for her defence.

ARNOLD, GUILTY , aged 26.

Confined 1 year in the house of Correction , fined 1 s.

MEAD, NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130602-87

602. WILLIAM BULLEN was indicted for that he, on the 14th of May , upon Sarah Gibbs , spinster, violently and feloniously did make an assault, and her, the said Sarah Gibbs , did ravish and carnally know .

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18130602-88

603. MATTHEW CHAPMAN was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of James Mills , about the hour of two in the night of the 6th of April , and stealing therein a child's frock, value 3 s. four handkerchiefs, value 2 s. seven shirts, value 2 l. a bag, value 2 d. and 10 l. 0 s. 6 d. in monies numbered , his property.

JAMES MILLS . My country residence is at Ponder's-end, Enfield .

Q. Was your house at any time broken open - A. On the night of the 6th of April, from the hour of ten and six the following morning, which would be the 7th, the casement window of the washhouse, which was closely latched, was taken out, and some iron hooping nailed against it was pulled away; he then got into my washhouse, and into my premises; some person did; I do not mean to swear it was the prisoner, of course. From there to the dwelling-house by another window, from whence was stolen a writing desk, which was mine, and eight shirts.

Q. The desk is not in the indictment - A. He took it out in the garden and broke it open, and took away the silver in a bag, containing ten pound and sixpence in silver and the bag, and left the desk in the garden. Another bag with three shillings and sixpence in copper, the remains of the contents of the desk, was left in the desk in the garden, and from the house he took eight shirts; I value them at two pounds; one shift, six shillings; five pocket handkerchiefs, five shillings; a child's frock, two shillings; and one pair of child's shoes, two shillings. On the following day I was given to understand that a man was taken up at Hackney with a great deal of wet linen upon him, and a bag containing silver. He was taken at the Brook at Hackney. That is about seven miles from our house. This is the linen.

Q. Look at these things, and tell me whether you can identify them - A. There are seven shirts; they are mine; I can swear to the child's shoes, two shillings: and the frock, two shillings; and four handkerchiefs, two shillings. I recognise the silver particularly by two pieces of money in the bag. I will swear to a shilling and a sixpence; they were altogether in the bag in the desk. There is in the bag now nine pound eighteen shillings; when my house was robbed there were ten pound and sixpence, which with what was found in this bag and the other bag exactly makes up the same amount. They were found upon the prisoner.

THOMAS THACKER . I am constable of the night, in Hackney. On the 7th of April, a quarter before five in the morning, two patrols brought the prisoner into the watchhouse. I found all the linen on him, them articles that have been spoken to by Mr. Mills, and a screw-driver, a box with matches and phospharus, and a piece of candle. This screw-driver I fitted to many of the marks on the desk; it fitted the marks exactly.

- IVES. I am a patrol of St. John Hackney. I stopped this prisoner a little before five in in the morning on the 7th of April. I found this property upon him that is now produced before you. I asked him how he came by it; he said he brought it from Norwich; afterwards he said he bought some of it from Woodford.

Prisoner's Defence. When I was stopped Preston and Wells were with me; they came all the way in my company from Epping; they came in company with me to Lea-bridge; at Lea-bridge I found the property concealed in a sack in a ditch. Preston and Wells were with me; they are not here; they are the people I want. Pardon the presumption of an old weather-beaten sailor. I am in Greenwich hospital. Restore to me an old silver watch which I have been possessed of twenty years, a pair of spectacles, and a tobacco box, which articles have been detained from me.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 53.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18130602-89

604. JOHN HARPER and ANN HARPER were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of October , three copper-plates, value 39 s. the property of William Weaver .

WILLIAM WEAVER . I am a bookseller . I live in Warwick-square. All that I can say I lost three copper-plates, and I can identify them.

JOHN PITMAN . I am a printer. I live at No. 18, Warwick-square. On the 18th of May I found I had lost upwards of two hundred copper-plates. I mentioned the circumstance to Harper; he was in my employ; he is a copper-plate printer. On the Thursday, twelve days subsequent, I charged him with having robbed me of the plates that I had lost, which he confessed, and gave up a quantity of goods. About fifty were given up out of the two hundred. I then gave him in charge of the officer. The officer went to his lodgings, and found a quantity of duplicates; he found fifty out of two hundred. Among the duplicates were three out of date.

DANIEL CARTWRIGHT. I am one of the Marshalmen. On the 20th of May, Mr. Pittman came to me; I went to his house. The prisoner came down stairs from where he was at work. We went to his lodgings, and there found a quantity of duplicates. Three of the duplicates were out of date, so that we could not get the property at that present time. Mr. Sadler said, as being out he had sold them to another person; he found out the person, and said he had got the plates again that belonged

to Mr. Weaver. These were pawned by the woman prisoner. These are the plates; one has been cut in three pieces.

JOHN REEVES . I am a pawnbroker, shopman to Mr. Sadler. These plates I took in of the woman prisoner; they being out of time we sold them to Robert Ashton .

Q. to prosecutor. Now look at these three plates - A. They are mine.

John Harper's Defence. When I made the acknowledgment a promise was held out; Mr. Pittman said if I would make an acknowledgment he would not hurt a hair of my head.

Ann Harper was not put on her defence.

JOHN HARPER , GUILTY , aged 48.

Confined 6 months in Newgate , fined 1 s.

ANN HARPER , NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130602-90

605. WILLIAM JOHNSON and SIMON EMMS were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of June , a snuff-box, value 4 d. the property of John Henry Knight , from his person .

JOHN HENRY KNIGHT . Q. When did this happen to you - A. On Thursday the 3d of June I was at the North side of St. Paul's church-yard about a quarter before three in the afternoon. It was at the time the children were coming out of the church. I had been there about ten minutes, and my snuffbox was gone.

WILLIAM HARRISON . I am an officer. I was at St. Paul's; I perceived the two prisoners very handy putting their hands into people's pockets; knowing Johnson I followed him until I perceived the prisoner Johnson put his hand into Mr. Knight's right-hand pocket; he took out what I did not know; he he looked at it, and said to Emms; take it. I took them both to the Compter, and the next day they were committed. This is the snuff-box.

Prosecutor That is my snuff-box.

Johnson's Defence. I do not know the man no farther than seeing him stand at the railings. I did not put my hand into anybody's pocket.

Emms's Defence. I was not in this man's company. I never saw him before with my eyes.

JOHNSON, GUILTY, aged 17.

EMMS, GUILTY, aged 21.

Judgment respited .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130602-91

606. CHARLES MARSHALL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of August , four metal cock patterns, value 30 s. a metal boss pattern, value 3 s. a metal boss, value 8 d. and a brass bucket, value 6 d. the property of William Pontifex and James Wood .

JAMES WOOD . I am a coppersmith and founder . I am partner with William Pontifex .

Mr. Adolphus. Are there any other partners - A. Yes, a son of Mr. Pontifex, his name is William.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130602-92

607. JOHN DAVISON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of April , a handkerchief, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of Thomas Robins , from his person .

THOMAS ROBINS . On the 15th of April I was walking in St. John-street ; the prisoner came up to me and put his hand into my pocket, and took my handkerchief out. I turned myself round, and took the handkerchief out of his hand. This is the handkerchief; it is mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked the handkerchief up in the street.

GUILTY , aged 33.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130602-93

608. WILLIAM CLIFTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of May , nine pounds weight of raw silk, value 20 l. the property of Mary Meadows , widow , and Thomas Castle Meadows .

THOMAS CASTLE MEADOWS . I am a silk-dyer . I live in Princes-street, Spitalfields . I am partner with my mother, Mary Meadows . On the 29th of May, between nine and ten in the morning, I was desired by John Ives , one of my journeymen, to go up stairs and see that there was a parcel of silk concealed in a very curious situation. I went up stairs, and he took a parcel of silk out of a hopper of a mill. I saw him. That was while the men were at breakfast. I took the silk out of the handkerchief, and challenged ever one of the men with it when they returned, and asked who were the owners of the handkerchief. Every one denied it. I then sent for an officer. I was determined to find out the thief. Before the officer came, I suppose an hour, the prisoner acknowledged he was the thief that had taken the silk, and when the officer came I delivered it over to him, and he then again before the officer, in my presence, confessed that he had taken the silk.

Q. What induced him to confess - A. I said there was a thief on the premises; I was determined to find it out. After he knew I sent for an officer he came to me and trembled, and said, sir, I am the thief. He had been with me ten years, and till the time he confessed I had no reason to suppose he was a thief.

JOHN ARMSTRONG . I am an officer. On Saturday the 29th of May, I and Bishop were sent for to go to Mr. Meadows. When I arrived there this silk was on the table. I desired the prisoner might be sent for. He came. I said, young man, I have heard what your master has said, do not say any thing to me, I shall be obliged to report it. He said, sir, I am the thief; I took three pounds on the Saturday, and sold it to a Jew for three pounds. I have looked for the Jew; I have not been able to find him out. I believe he has been trepanned by the Jew to do it. I never saw a more artless thief than he is.

GUILTY, aged 23.

Judgment respited .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130602-94

609. JOHN COX was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of May , two pigs, value 28 s. the property of James Horrod .

The prosecutor was called, and not appearing in court, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130602-95

610. JOHN BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of April , a pewter quart pot, value 18 d. the property of William Scarlett .

WILLIAM SCARLETT . I keep the Sir Hans Sloane's Head public-house, Chelsea .

JOHN ORAM . I am a sadler. I live in Chelsea. I was in my own house when I saw the prisoner enter Mr. Overton's house, opposite of my own house. I saw the prisoner put two quart pots in his pocket; he then left the house. He got about sixty yards from the house when I overtook him and brought him back with these two quart pots in his pocket.

Prosecutor. This quart pot is mine.

Prisoner's Defence. Extreme distress drove me to do it.

GUILTY , aged 62.

Confined 1 year in the house of Correction , fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130602-96

611. MARY COLLINS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of May , a frock, value 1 s. a pair of boots, value 1 s. and a shirt, value 1 s. the property of William Foster .

HARRIET BAILEY . Q. How old are you - A. Eleven. I was in Bushy-fields , and Billy Foster was with me. The prisoner came up to me, and asked me whether I would not get some sorrel. I said, yes, and asked her whether it was far. She said, no. Then I said I would go, if it was not far; then I went up to that field; it was a good way. I said, Billy. She heard me say, Billy. She then said, let me have Billy. I said, no, I must not let him go. Then she said she would buy him a lollypop; she would be back in a minute. She left me in the fields, and went round a corner by some houses. She said she would come back. She did not. I saw no more of her nor of Billy until I saw her at the magistrate's.

MRS. FOSTER. I am the mother of this child. On the 27th of May I lost my little boy; I went every where to find him; I could not find him. A gentleman came to my house on Friday night, and let me know. I went to Wanstead. My little boy was taken away from a little girl in Bethnal-green. My child was lost in Bethnal-green. I found him at Ilford. I never saw the prisoner until I saw her at Ilford.

MR. WISEMAN. I was going through the village of Wanstead; I saw the prisoner with this little boy. She was dressed very wretched, without shoes and stockings. I asked her if the child was hers. She said, yes. I thought it could not be hers. She said, it was. I thought the child was certainly stolen. I told her, I should take the child. I detained her for an hour, and sent for a constable; the constable came; I gave him charge of her. and kept the little boy in my house. The child said he lived at Bethnal-green. At Laytonstone a woman informed me she was in London, and heard a child cried. This was about nine o'clock in the evening. I ordered my horse to be put to. I came to London, and after about two hours searching I found out where the parents lived.

Q. How old is the little boy - A. Three years old. When I saw the prisoner with the child what attracted my notice was, she had taken the flannel petticoat off, and tied it over a good frock. I saw a good frock underneath, that made me more positive in my opinion; I found she had torn the sleeves of the frock. I had her before the magistrate at Ilford. She had offered the flannel petticoat for sixpence. She said she took the child to go a begging with.

WILLIAM FOSTER . This is my little boy; we had lost him from Friday at four o'clock till the Saturday.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Confined 2 years in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130602-97

612. SARAH REEVE , alias BLAKEMORE , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of May , two sheets, value 10 s. a counterpane, value 5 s. and a window-curtain, value 1 s. the property of William Howell , in a lodging-room .

MARY HOWELL . I live at No. 80, Golden-lane . I let a two-pair back-room furnished to the prisoner at four shilling a week. She came to me in the beginning of February; she quitted on the 4th of January. She owed me five weeks when she left. After she was gone I missed the sheets, a counterpane, and one window curtain. One of the sheets she owned she cut up for her use.

JOHN JOHNSON . I am a pawnbroker, 92, St. John-street. On the 25th of September I took in a quilt for two shillings.

JOHN BEAL. I am shopman to Mr. Sadler, Aldersgate-street. I produce a sheet, pawned on the 22nd of September.

JOHN PRINCE . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner on the 19th of May; I searched her, and found the duplicate of a sheet and counterpane upon her. She acknowledged that she pledged the articles herself.

Prisoner's Defence. I did it out of distress; I hope the court will have mercy on me.

GUILTY , aged 37.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130602-98

613. CHARLES NORMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of April , a great coat, value 3 s. the property of the London Dock Company .

PETER GRIFFITHS . I am a constable. On the 30th of April I stopped the prisoner going out of the London dock gate; he had this coat with him. I asked him how he came by the coat; he said he found it in the docks.

RICHARD BUTTERFIELD . I am a watchman at the London docks. I had missed my coat a considerable time. I left it in my box when I came off duty. I never saw it again until I saw it on the prisoner's back. This is it. It is the property of the London dock Company.

Prisoner's Defence. I found the coat under a truck.

GUILTY , aged 58.

Confined 6 months in the house of Correction , fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130602-99

614. JANE RUTH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of April , in the dwelling-house of William Hall , fourteen silver spoons, value 10 l. his property; a watch, value 1 l. a watch-key, value 3 d. the property of Elizabeth Broad , spinster ; a watch, value 2 l. a seal, value 18 s. a watch-key, value 6 d. and a 5 l. bank-note, the property of Benjamin Wait ; two bank notes, value 20 l. a 2 l. banknote, and three 1 l. bank notes , the property of William Clayton .

WILLIAM HALL . I live in Berry-street, in the parish of St. James's . The prisoner was my servant ; she came into my service on the 27th of March.

Q. Do you rent the house that you live in - A. Yes. I have no lodgers in the house, only my own servants.

Q. How long did the prisoner stay with you - A.Until the 13th of April, and then she absconded from my service. I missed her about one o'clock in the day. She never asked me for her wages, nor to suffer her to go.

Q. When you found that she was gone was any thing missed in your house - A. I desired the servant to look over the things with me. We found six table-spoons missing, six dessert spoons, and two gravy spoons, all silver. I missed nothing else, my property. I immediately wrote to the sitting magistrate, and requested his assistance. He sent me an officer of the name of Godfrey. I sent a servant of mine to identify the prisoner in case he could find her.

Q. What servant was that - A. Benjamin Wait. In the course of that day they returned to me, and said they had found all the articles upon her. I recovered all that day.

ELIZABETH BROAD. I live servant with Mr. Hall. In April last, when the prisoner went away I missed a watch of my own, a watch-chain, and key. I got them again the same day.

BENJAMIN WAIT. I live with Mr. Hall. On the day that Jane Ruth went. I went in pursuit of her with Godfrey, and she was taken at Mr. Lightfoot's, the pawnbroker, in Marybone-lane. After she was taken I missed my watch; it had a ribbon, seal, and key to it. I also missed a five-pound bank note; I do not know the number of the five-pound note; I received it of Mr. Hall for wages about a month or five weeks before. It was in a small box within my large box; it was not locked.

Q. Did you ever recover your watch - A. Yes; the watch was pledged at the pawnbrokers in Chandler-street. I have never recovered the five pound note.

WILLIAM CLAYTON. I am a servant to Mr. Hall, and was so in April last.

Q. Do you remember the day when Ruth went - A. Yes. While the officer was in search of her I went up to any box; I found that fifteen pound was gone from there; two five-pound bank notes, one two-pound, and three ones. They were all brought back by the officer.

WILLIAM GODFREY . I am an officer of Bow-street. On the 13th of April I was sent to Mr. Hall. I received instructions from him, and went in search of the prisoner with Benjamin Wait . apprehended the prisoner at Mr. Lightfoot's, a pawnbroker, in Marybone-lane. Benjamin Wait said she was Mr. Hall's servant. I asked her what she had got in her pocket; she said, nothing but her own. I searched her; I found on her two five-pound notes, one two-pound bank notes, and three one-pound notes, all bank notes; twenty-eight shillings in silver, and twenty-five duplicates; two of them were for eight silver spoons, each of the duplicates for two table and two dessert; one was in Chandler-street and the other in Jermyn-street, and a duplicate of a watch I found. I went to the pawnbroker in Chandler-street, and in Jermyn-street, and I got six spoons at another place, which she had left for safe. I found a gold seal and a gold key upon her; the seal and key were owned by Wait; a silver watch I found in her pocket, that was owned by Broad, the servant girl; and in looking over the duplicates I found there was not the quantity of spoons that Mr. Hall had lost. I asked her where the remainder of the property was. She told me she, would take me to a shop where she had left it for sale. She said her master should have all his property back if he would forgive her. I told her it was not in my power to promise her that; I would tell her master of it. She took me to a cook's-shop, there she demanded a large bundle of wearing apparel of different description, which she had left there. I took the bundle under my care; then she took me to a shop in Marybone-lane; it is a kind of sale-shop where they buy second-hand plate. She went in, and asked Mrs. Manuel for the plate that she had left. I went in with her; six spoons were delivered to her; two table, two dessert, and two gravy spoons; she had them delivered to her. I took them out of her hand. No other property was found. These things have been in my custody ever since, all that is here present. I put her in the watchhouse a little before five. I apprehended her a little before four. I went down to Mr. Hall with the property that I had in my possession. Mr. Hall said his servant was robbed also. I did not know it then. Then William Clayton stated that he had been robbed of two five-pound notes. I produced the notes; he said he believed they must be his by the numbers. I went to the pawnbrokers the same evening, taking these spoons with me. These are the duplicates that I found on the prisoner. I recovered a watch by these duplicates. the property of Wait; a gold seal I found on her person; four silver table spoons and four silver dessert spoons I obtained by the duplicates. That is all I know.

Q. to Mr. Hall. Look at your own things - A. The spoons have my initials all of them; I believe them to be mine; they are worth ten pounds.

Q. to Elizabeth Broad. Look at that watch - A. That is my watch; I value it at one pound.

Q. to Clayton. Look at the note - A. I can only swear to one five-pound note. I took it at the bankers; I know. It by the number, it is in the bankers book; the book is here.

JOHN DOMAN . I paid this note as part of payment to Mr. Hall's servant, William Clayton ; it was paid on the 1st of March, 1813; I took the number

at the time I paid it, 646, five-pound. The rest I paid in one-pound notes.

EBENEZER ARNOTT . I produce a watch. I took it in of the prisoner on the 13th of April.

Tusti. This is my watch, I am positive of it.

Amitt. I produce four silver spoons, two table, and two dessert-spoons; cannot swear to the prisoner. They were pawned with me on the 8th of April.

Mr. Hall. These spoons are mine.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence; called two witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 20.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18130602-100

615. ISABELLA, alias ELIZABETH PHILLIPS , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of April , eight shirts, value 21 s. a piece of cloth, value 2 s. two childs caps, value 25 s. a frill, value 6 d. an ink-stand, value 1 s. a shawl, value 8 s. a gown, value 8 s. an handkerchief, value 8 d. a broach, value 3 s. and a watch, value 3 l. the property of Thomas Lambert ; in the dwelling-house of William Green .

THOMAS LAMBERT . I live at No. 19, Theobalds-road, Red-lion-square ; I am clerk to a barrister.

Q. Are you a house-keeper - A. No.

Q. Who is the landlord - A. William Green; he lives in the house; it is in the parish of of St. George the Martyr.

Q. When was it - A. On the 20th of April last. I do not know of the robbery, I was not at home.

ELIZABETH LAMBERT . On the 20th of April I was absent about twenty minutes, when I returned it was between four and five o'clock. I met the prisoner coming down stairs; I catched hold of her and made an alarm, and seeing my door open I charged her with robbing of me; she said she had not; a person of the first floor came to my assistance, and then Mr. Green came; when she found she could not get away she went up into my room and dropped the things there; Mr. Green went into the room. The prisoner got in by a false key. She had four keys two of them opened the door.

WILLIAM GREEN . I am the landlord of the house; I live in it.

Q. Do you let your floors in lodgings - A. Yes; the second floor I let to Mr. Lambert. On the 20th of April, between four and five o'clock in the afternoon, I heard Mrs. Lambert make an alarm; I asked her what was the matter; she said she had been robbed by the prisoner; I went into the room, and saw these things laying on the floor.

JAMAS BADCOCK. I am an officer. I was sent for; I took the prisoner in custody, and the things were delivered to me.

Q. to Prosecutrix. Now, Mrs. Lambert look at the things - A. They are eight shirts, they are mine; that is my watch; I have under charged it at three pounds; it is a silver watch with a gold seal; an ink-stand, they are all my husband's property.

Prisoner's Defence. Them keys belong to my own door.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 45.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18130602-101

616. WILLIAM MATHEWS was indicted for feloniously making an assault in the King's highway, upon William Hoskins , on the 27th of May , putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, a watch, value 25 s. a watch-chain, value 5 s. a seal, value 1 s. and a watch-key, value 6 d. his property.

WILLIAM HOSKINS . On the 27th of May, I was going down Whitechapel ; I had a child in my arms and another walking by the side of me; my wife was with me. It was about ten minutes past eight in the evening; the prisoner rushed up to me, and took my watch out of my pocket; I sung out stop thief. He ran about ten or twenty yards, he flung the watch back over his shoulder.

Q. Did you see that - A. Yes; the officer has got the watch. (The watch produced.) That is my watch; I value it at thirty shillings; it cost me three pounds. My wife pursued him; he was taken.

Q. Did you see him brought back - A. Yes, I stood fast with the two children until he was brought back; I am sure the person that was brought back was the person that took my watch; the prisoner is the person. I never saw him before.

Q. Did you resist his taking the watch - A. No. I could not; I had a child in my arms. It was taken by a mere snatch.

MARY HOSKINS . Q. Have you heard the account that your husband has given - A. Yes: I remember every thing to have happened that he has stated. The prisoner was brought back in less then a quarter of an hour. I know it to be my husband's watch. My husband had not time to resist; he had an infant in his arms.

EDWARD BUCHANAN . I was in Dog-row, Bethnal-green, I had been passing along Whitechapel-road. I perceived the a watch and chain in his hand; he was doubling the chain in his hand; the prosecutor sung out stop thief; I asked him if he had lost any thing; he said his watch; the prisoner was running up Bakers-row, I pursued him; he threw the watch over his head.

Prisoner's Defence. I hope you will take it into consideration; I am but a youth. I am willing to serve his Majesty either by sea or by land.

GUILTY, aged 16,

Of stealing, but not violently from the person .

Confined 2 years in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18130602-102

617. JOHN ARCHER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of May , a watch, value 4 l. a seal, value 1 l. the property of William Jackson , in his dwelling-house .

MARY ANN JACKSON. My husband's name is William Jackson ; he is a shipwright ; at sea. I live in Nelson's Terrace, City-road, St. Luke's ; I live at Mr. Normanton's manufactory. I am the forewoman. I live rent free, and have so much per week, I live in the house. On the 14th of May this watch hung at my loom, and then at another loom the prisoner and two sons worked in the factory. I slept in the same place that I work. I did not miss my watch until I went to bed at ten o'clock at night. On the next morning I enquired for my watch; I said I would have an officer, and have them all taken up.

The prisoner then said to his father, if you will make it up I will tell you where the watch is. I have never got the watch again. The prisoner said the watch was in pawn in Brick-lane, at Mr. Sowerby's; the officer, I, and the prisoner went there; Mr. Sowerby said he knew the boy; he had not brought a watch there.

HANNAH SWAIN . I work with Mrs. Jackson. On the 14th of May I had the watch in my loom: at nine o'clock in the morning the prisoner's fetched it from my loom; I heard Mrs. Jackson speak to the prisoner about it; the prisoner told her he had pawned it at Mr. Sowerby's; he told me he had not pawned it, nobody would take it in of him; he had thrown it in the New River.

ELISHA ARCHER. On the 14th of May; about nine o'clock in the morning, I took the watch from Mrs. Swain's loom; I hung it at my loom; I left it at my loom; between ten and eleven o'clock in the morning some men came there, we all went and had gin and porter together; we all got intoxicated: I and Mrs. Swaine were obliged to lay down, we could not work; Mrs. Jackson was also intoxicated. On the next morning Mrs. Jackson missed her watch; she asked my boy about it; he said he was innocent of taking it. Mrs. Jackson threatened to send him to jail; my boy cried, and said he pawned it.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18130602-103

618. JOHN RYAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of May , a watch, value 2 l. the property of Margaret Scetney , widow , in her dwelling-house .

MARGARET SCETNEY. I am a widow. I live at No. 6, in the City-road . The prisoner lodged in my house; my watch hung at the mantle-shelf, in the room where I was ironing. The prisoner on the 29th of May came into the room, and after he went I went to see what o'clock it was; my watch was gone; I called another lodger down stairs, his watch and mine were both gone; he went to the pawnbrokers, and there I found my watch.

ROBERT ARMSTRONG . I am a pawnbroker. On the 29th of May the prisoner pawned this watch with me; he said it was his own; I lent him thirty shillings on it.

Prosecutrix. That is my watch; it is worth a pound.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been out of employ a long time; I took the lady's watch, and pawned it.

GUILTY, aged 20,

Of stealing to the value of 20 s. only .

Confined 1 year in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18130602-104

619. GEORGE ROSS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of May , twenty yards of jean, value 2 l. the property of John Lipscomb , in his dwelling-house .

JOHN LIPSCOMB . I live in Everett-street, Russel-square, in the parish of St. George Bloomsbury ; I am a boot and shoe-maker , I rent the house myself; my wife is a stay-maker. On the 29th of May, between one and two o'clock in the day, I was in the back yard at the moment speaking to one of my workmen; my wife was in the parlour with her children; at that moment I was informed in the yard that somebody had robbed my shop; I ran out, and up Everett-street, into Great Cordin-street; there I saw my opposite neighbour, Samuel May ; we looked down Wilmott-street; we could not see the man at the moment, but a cheesemonger's boy said a man has run this may with a parcel; we went down Wilmott-street, the way the boy directed us, to a stone-mason's yard with a great pair of gates; Mr. May being a few steps before me; he looked in, and said, here he is, for me to advance: I followed Mr. May up to the gates; he laid hold of the man; he was behind the gates; he said this is the man: I went in and collared the man, and laid hold of the jean with the other hand.

Q. What man was it - A. The prisoner at the br.

Q. Is the jean an article that your wife uses in her business - A. Yes. it is.

Q. Where had he the jean - A. Mr. May, said he saw him drop it as he looked through the crack of the gates; when I laid hold of the jean it was close to the prisoner on the ground; we took him back to the door, and from thence to the watchhouse, and in the evening we took the prisoner and the jean to Hatten Garden office.

Q. Do you know the jean to be your property - A. Yes, it was on the counter in my shop.

Q. How long was it that you saw it there, before you was alarmed - A. About a quarter of an hour.

Q. You never saw the prisoner in your shop, did you - A. No, my wife heard a noise.

SAMUEL MAY . On the 29th of May I was standing in my shop, which is opposite of the prosecutor's, between one and two o'clock in the day, I saw the prisoner go into his shop.

Q. Are you positive that he went over the threshold of the door - A. I am positive.

Q. Was any person in the shop - A. None. I saw him take a parcel off the counter, and run up Everett-street with it, he put it under his arm. I immediately run across the road, and seeing no one in the shop, I called out to the prosecutor that he was robbed. I did not wait for any answer, but I pursued he the prisoner immediately, I kept him in my eye except in turning the corner he turned another corner into Wilmott-street; I there lost him, and seeing a boy, I asked him if he saw any one run with a parcel; he said yes, a man run down Wilmott-street, and looked in a gateway; Mr. Lipscomb was close behind me; I there saw the prisoner standing behind a gateway; he seemed very much confused at the sight of me, and I saw the parcel drop from him.

Q. I suppose there was no one behind the gate but the prisoner, was there - A. No; I saw it drop, and heard it; there is a vacancy between the gate, the post about five or six inches.

Q. You did not get sight of him in Wilmott-street - A. No, not till I came up to the gates, and then I saw the jean drop on the ground; I collared him immediately; Mr. Lipscomb came up at the time.

Q. Now, look at the prisoner, are you sure that is the man - A. I am positive of it, and I am positive that is the man that went into the shop. I had a perfect view of him.

MR. PARTRIDGL. The prisoner was brought to me at the watchhouse, and Mr. Lipscomb delivered me this parcel; it has been in my custody ever since.

Q. to Prosecutor. Is that jean your property - A. Yes, I can safely swear it is my property. The value of this is near four pounds; I have only valued it at two pounds; that is under the value of it.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to his character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 19.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Garham .

Reference Number: t18130602-105

620. THOMAS EDWARDS , alias SMITH , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on 27th of January , a trunk, value 4 s. a coat, value 30 s. six waistcoats, value 15 s. three pair of pantaloons, value 30 s. six waistcoats, value 15 s. two cravats. value 2 s. a german flute, value 1 s. six books, value 4 s. the property of George Darley , in the dwelling-house of Margeret Street .

GEORGE DARLEY . I live at No. 4, New-street. in the parish of St. Margeret, Westminster : I lodge in Margeret Street's house; the prisoner lodged in the same house. On the 26th of January, the prisoner went to bed about ten o'clock, and about half after ten I went to bed in the same bed. In the morning about four o'clock I awoke; the prisoner was dressed; I asked him where he was going; he said to work. I said it was too soon to go to work, and advised him to lie down again; he took off his coat and shoes, and laid down again; and between that and half after seven o'clock, when I awoke, he was gone, and part of the clothes I had taken off the over night was gone likewise.

Q. Did you find your clothes again - A. I went to my box to get some clothes to put on; I found that was gone likewise. I looked about that day, and the following day in the neighbourhood; I could not find him. On the 12th of April I saw the prisoner with a waistcoat, pantaloons, and a handkerchief of mine on him.

Q.Where did you meet with him - A. In Hyde Park; I spoke to him; he affected as if he did not know me. I told him I knew him by lodging at the house where I lodged; I gave him into Mr. Grose's hands a few minutes after. These are the pair of pantaloons, waistcoat, and handkerchief; found upon him.

Q.What are they worth all the whole together - A. I have made up the bill altogether; they are with upwards of forty shillings; I am sure the the hin s that are here are mine.

Q. Had you them on the day before, or they were in your box - A. Yes.

EDWARD GREEN . I am an officer. On the 12th of April this waistcoat, and this pair of pantaloons, were on the prisoner's back; I took them off in prison: I went to his lodgings, No. 17, I found this trunk there at his lodging; these boots belong to a person of the name of Carr; I took them off his feet.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to his character.

GUILTY - DEATH . aged 30.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18130602-106

621. JOHN DUNTHORN was indicted for that he, on the 5th of May , was servant to John Powell , and entrusted by him to receive money for him. and that he being such servant, and so employed did receive ten shillings for his master, and that he afterwards feloniously embezzled secreted and stolen it .

JOHN POWELL . I am a cheesemonger in Old-street. The prisoner was my servant; he was to carry out my goods and to bring me the money. On the 20th of April he took two cheeses out of my shop for Edward Brown, of Sydney-street, City-road; my son went with him, and at the end of the street he gave the cheeses to my son, and my son delivered them to Mr. Brown; I have never received the money for them.

JOHN POWELL. JUNIOR. I was sent by my father with the cheeses; I was to deliver them; I did not know whether I was to receive the money or no; I delivered the cheeses; I did not ask for the money. The money was sixteen shillings and ten pence; I was merely to deliver them.

EDWARD BROWN. I keep a chandler's shop, 17, Sydney-street, City-road. The prisoner offered me some cheeses. He called on me after that with the bill, sixteen and ten pence he owed me a shop bill of six shillings and eight pence; I deducted that off, and gave him ten shillings and two-pence.

Q. to Prosecutor. You did not know Mr. Brown before this, did you - A. No; the prisoner said he had an order from Mr. Brown; he took the cheeses, and the bill of parcels was made out; I never knew Mr. Brown. I trusted upon the prisoner's recommendation.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130602-107

622. THOMAS HODSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of May , a cart harness, value 3 s. two cushions, value 3 s. and two bridles, value 5 s. the property of John Eames .

JOHN EAMES. I am a coach-master ; I live at the Angel, St. Clement's. I lost the harness, and on the 11th of May the watchman came and gave information.

PATRICK CULTON. I am a watchman. I took the prisoner between three and four in the morning, on the 11th of May, in Drury-lane; he had these cushions, harness, and two bridles; I stopped him with all the things; he said he was going to take a Marl coach at half past three. I told him he must go to the watchhouse first.

JOHN SAMUEL ROBERTS . I was constable on duty that night. The prisoner and the harness were brought in the watchhouse; the prisoner said he was going with it to the White Horse cellar, Piccadilly. I produce the property.

Prosecutor. I can wear to the harness, and the cushions belong to my own gig; the bridles are so mutilated I can hardly speak to them.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130602-108

623. THOMAS LEE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of April , a tablecloth, value 1 l. and a sheet, value 10 s. the property of George Reid . esq.

CHARLOTTE NEVILLE . I am a servant to George Reid , No. 25, - street, Portland-square . On Sunday, the 25th of April, the prisoner came into Mr. Reid's house; I met him in the area; he was coming out he had a tablecloth, and a sheet with him; I asked him what he was going to do with them; he gave them to me, and told me not to tell; I called the cook; she came; the cook and the butler pursued him, and took him. I am sure he is the man.

JAMES LENS . I am an officer. I took the prisoner in custody. This is the property.

CHARLOTTE DAVIS . I am sure it is my master's property.

Prisoner's Defence. I am a poor man; I did it merely through poverty. I have three children, I had no victuals to give them.

GUILTY , aged 47.

Confined 1 year in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130602-109

624. JOHN SIMMONS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of May , a plane, value 2 s. and a handkerchief, value 2 s. the property of John Franklin .

JOHN FRANKLIN . I am a carpenter ; I was at work at a building in Edgeware-place . On the 26th of May, my partner took the prisoner with the planes under his arm.

THOMAS JONES . I met the prisoner between eight and nine o'clock in the evening; I saw the planes under his arm. These are the planes; one is mine, the other is Franklin's.

Prosecutor. That is my plane.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming across the fields, I found the planes on the grass.

GUILTY , aged 38.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130602-110

625. ELIZABETH OAKES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of May , a silk handkerchief, value 2 s. four shifts, value 8 s. a gown, value 10 s. and a pelisse, value 10 s. the property of William Proctor .

SARAH PROCTOR. My husband's name is William Proctor ; I keep a mangle. On the 11th of May, I lost four shifts, a handkerchief, a gown, and a pelisse, out of my back parlour, they were put there to be mangled.

ANN PROCTOR. I am daughter-in-law to Mrs. Proctor. On the 11th of May, the prisoner came into the kitchen, and asked me to mangle her apron; she had no bundle with her.

GEORGE BARRETT. I saw the prisoner come out of Mrs. Proctor's house, 54, James-street , with a bundle in her apron; there was another woman with her, they looked behind them, and run away. I went to Mrs. Proctor and asked her if she had lost any thing; she said, yes; we pursued after them and could not find them until half past nine at night; nothing of the property has been found I am sure I saw the prisoner come out of Mrs. Proctor's house about half after four in the afternoon; there was a dark coloured chocolate handkerchief, which hung out of her apron, she put that into her apron.

JOHN TAYLER . I am a watchman. I took the prisoner in custody; she said the other girl had the things; she said she knew where the things were, but she would not tell unless Mrs. Proctor would forgive her.

Prisoner's Defence. I heard Mrs. Proctor had lost some things, I went and resigned myself up.

Ann Proctor . No, she did not; I got the watchman to take her.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Confined 1 year in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130602-111

626. WILLIAM KAIN and JOSEPH HEARN were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of May , six hundred halfpence, the property of John Haycock .

MARY HAYCOCK . My husband's name is John Haycock ; he is a cheesemonger . I lost the halfpence on the 24th of May; the two prisoners came in for a rasher of bacon; Hearn asked me to cut it down the ribs, and while I was serving him the bacon Kain took some five shilling papers of halfpence.

Q. Did you see him take it - A. No, I did not. As soon as the two prisoners went out of the shop I missed the halfpence.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130602-112

627. JAMES KENNEDY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of April , sixteen guineas, the property of Mary Reynolds , spinster , from her person ,

Mr. Adolphus, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130602-113

628. EDWARD COOPER and WILLIAM ROBERTS were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of April , two iron grates, value 12 s. twelve pounds weight of lead, value 3 s. the property of William Norman Johnson , affixed to a house of his; and three mahogany blinds, value 3 l. his property.

WILLIAM NORMAN JOHNSON . I live in Charlotte-street, Fitzroy-square.

Q. Where was this building of yours - A. In Long Acre , a house of mine. I can only say the good charged in the indictment, are my property.

ISAAC PIKE . I am a constable. On the night of the 28th of April, the watchman came to me; I went with him to a house in Long Acre; I broke the door open, and I and the watchman searched the house; we searched every floor until we came to the top, and in the corner of the back garret we found the two prisoners; they said they come there because they had no money to pay their lodging; I asked them

who belonged to the porters knot; they denied it belonging to them. I saw some stones had been taken down, and some lead was taken from the first floor, and the lead all round the sides of the pump was ready to take away, and one grate stood at the door, ready to take away, and three mahogany window blinds were taken down and carried away.

GEORGE PHILLIPS . I am a watchman. At ten o'clock I found the door was not fastened. I got my brother watchman; we went all over the house; there was nobody in it. I tried the door again at twelve o'clock; it was then bolted inside. I got the constable, and we found the two prisoners at the top room in the house, laying with a knot under their heads.

Cooper's Defence. I had no intention of taking any thing off the premises.

Robert's Defence. The same.

COOPER, GUILTY , aged 25.

ROBERTS, GUILTY , aged 26.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , whipped in jail .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130602-114

629. JAMES CLAY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of April , two lamps, value 8 s. 4 d. a candlestick, value 2 s. and a spoon, value 1 d. the property of Thomas Owen .

THOMAS OWEN . I am a furnishing ironmonger in Great Russell-street. On Monday the 26th of April, in consequence of suspicion, I searched the prisoner's lodgings. Donaldson went with me to his lodging. We found a candlestick and a spoon. The prisoner was my porter . The lamp he had taken to Harris to repair.

- DONALDSON. I am an officer. On the 26th of April I went with Mr. Owen, in company with the prisoner, to his lodging. I there found this candlestick and a tea-spoon.

Prosecutor. These articles are mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I never was charged with a dishonest act before this. I leave myself to your mercy.

GUILTY , aged 32.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130602-115

630. MARY BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of May , three gowns, value 15 s. the property of George Lock .

FRANCIS LOCK . My husband's name is George Lock ; he keeps the Rising Sun public-house in Clement's-lane . On the 17th of May I hung my gowns and sheets out in my yard, and then I went to put the boiler on the fire, and after that I missed my gowns. I saw the prisoner going out of the passage. I ran after her, and said, you have got three of my gowns; she said, no. I pulled her into the passage. An officer was coming by at the time; the officer took them out of her lap.

ARTHUR RUTHWIN . I am an officer. I took these three gowns out of the prisoner's lap.

Prosecutrix. They are my gowns.

Prisoner's Defence. Distress was the cause of my doing it.

GUILTY , aged 45.

Confined 1 year in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130602-116

631. JAMES CONNER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of April, a waistcoat, value 3 s. the property of Edward Rubery .

EDWARD RUBERY. I keep a sale shop , 22, Brick-lane, Spitalfields . I lost the waistcoat on the 23d of April, about six in the evening, I was in the parlour; I perceived the prisoner snatch at a waistcoat that hung at the shop door. He did not succeed in running away with it. He only unfastened one of the pins. I went and fastened the waistcoat, and waited in the shop a few minutes, expecting the prisoner's return. He almost instantly returned, snatched the waistcoat away by force, and ran off with it. I cried stop thief. He dropped the waistcoat. I pursued him, and brought him back. This is the waistcoat; it is mine; I value it at three shillings.

Q. What age is he - A. About fourteen, I believe.

Prisoner's Defence. The man did not see me take the waistcoat. I am sure there were a many people in the street.

GUILTY , aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130602-117

632. SAMUEL HERRIDGE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of May , two sacks, value 5 s. and a bushel of barley, value 5 s. the property of John Shower .

WILLIAM BENSON . I am a constable of Feltham. On the night of the 8th of May a man brought the prisoner to me to put in the cage. It was past twelve. I confined him in the cage all night; he had with him some old iron in a sack. On the next morning I went to the prisoner's house; I took him with me to his house, and there I found a bushel of barley and two sacks with Mr. Shower's name upon them.

JOHN SHOWER . I am a farmer at Hanworth. The prisoner worked for me some years. In consequence of his being taken up his house was searched. I was present at the search. The sacks are mine; my name is upon them. I had such barley as this. I believe it to be my barley. I never lent him any of my sacks to take home.

Prisoner's Defence. I stand at this bar a guilty sinner. I committed the act I am charged with, for which I beg pardon. I am fifty-seven years of age, and have two children, whose mother is dead, therefore on account of my age and the children, I pray God to instruct you to pass such punishment as you may think proper, and your petitioner will ever pray.

GUILTY , aged 57.

Confined 1 year in the house of correction , whipped in jail .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130602-118

633. JOHN DANIELS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of June , a watch, value 4 l. the property of Richard Rampton , in the dwelling-house of Daniel Richard Harvey .

RICHARD RAMPTON . I am servant to Daniel Richard Harvey , No. 57, Rusell-square . I lost my watch on Friday morning, between seven and eight o'clock, I lost it out of the pantry. I was in the kitchen; I heard the area door go, I went to see what it was. John Chapman informed me that it was a man had taken my watch out of the pantry; he pointed the man out to me. I pursued him, and took him in New North-street; he dropped my watch in Little Ormond-street.

JOHN CHAPMAN . I am a servant to William Berney , 56, Russell-square. On Friday morning. I saw the prisoner Daniels go in at the area door, and then in at the pantry. He took the watch from off a nail at the fire place. Rampton came out; I told him what had happened; Rampton pursued him. I am sure he is the same man.

THOMAS ROGERS . I saw the prisoners running as I was coming by Queen-square-church; he dropped this watch; I picked it up.

Prosecutor. It is my watch.

GUILTY, aged 24,

Of stealing to the value of 30 s. only .

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130602-119

634. ELIZABETH LIVINGSTONE was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Levy Wolfe , about the hour of four in the afternoon on the 2nd of May , no person being therein, and stealing a pair of breeches, value 10 s. a waistcoat, value 3 s. and a shirt, value 3 s. his property.

LEVY WOLFE. I live in Saffron-hill . The prisoner lodged in my house. I suspected the prisoner. I found my property at Mr. Baxter, pawnbroker, Snow-hill. I missed the property on the 2nd of May.

JAMES SPURLING. I am shopman to Mr. Baxter, Snow-hill. On the 3d of May the prisoner pawned a pair of breeches and a waistcoat; I lent her ten shillings upon them.

MR. TILLER. I am pawnbroker. On the 24th of April the prisoner pledged this shirt with me for two shillings.

GUILTY, aged 52,

Of stealing only .

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18130602-120

635. HENRY GARRETT and THOMAS HATFIELD were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of May , four gowns, value 3 l. two spencers, value 1 l. three petticoats, value 18 s. a bundle of small pieces of calico, value 3 s. three pair of stockings, value 13 s. a shawl, value 4 s. five night caps, value 6 s. the property of Mary King , in the dwelling-house of Robert Aldred .

MARY KING . On the 25th of May I was servant to Robert Aldred ; he keeps the Old Fountain, City-road . I kept my clothes in a box there on the landing-lane; I kept the key of it; it was locked. The two prisoners lodged there six nights; they are soldiers in the London Militia. On the 25th of May I put my things in the box. I locked my box, and put the key in my pocket, and on the 26th I went to my box; my box was broken open, and all the things in the indictment were gone, and several more articles. I have never seen any of them since, except a small parcel the officer found.

Q. What made you suppose the prisoners had any hand in this business - A. Because I saw Henry Garrett go out on the Tuesday with a large bundle.

ROBERT ALDRED was called upon his recognisance.

PETER CLELAND. I am a constable. I searched the room the prisoners lodged in; I found a pair of lacers, and on moving the bedstead from the wall I found this bundle in this handkerchief.

Prosecutrix. That bundle is part of my things that I put in my box; that is part of my gown; the other things are trifling things. The handkerchief is mine.

Elland. I applied the pincers to the box that had been forced; it talked to the marks where the box had been wrenched.

WILLIAM BENTLEY. I am a lodger in the house where the robbery was committed. On Wednesday evening I saw the constable search the prisoners room. I have seen the prisoners go in and come out of that room, and Mr. Aldred said he let the prisoners that room.

Garrett's Defence. On Wednesday afternoon, as I came down with the bundle, the prosecutrix and the landlord stood in the bar; I had four leaves of bread in my haversack; I said it was of no use to keep them till they were mouldy. I took them to Bunhill-row, and sold them for seven pence a-piece.

Hatfield's Defence. At the watchhouse the landlord said he did not think I was guilty.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18130602-121

636. SUSANNAH BOWYER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of April , a watch, value 30 l. a seal, value 1 l. and a watch-chain, value 1 l. the property of James Champion , from his person .

JAMES CHAMPION was called, and not appearing in court, his recognizance was ordered to be estreated, and the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Graham.

Reference Number: t18130602-122

637. JOHN WHITFORD and THOMAS GILBERT were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of March , forty-eight steel lancets, value 5 s. the property of Thomas Pope Smith .

THOMAS POPE SMITH . I am a whalebone cutter and hair manufacturer at Hammersmith. The prisoners were in my employ. On the 6th of March I discharged them on account of having burned whalebone to a considerable amount. In consequence of information; on the 14th of April I went down to the side of the Thames, to where the prisoner Whitford lived, and there I saw both the prisoners. Tibbott, the officer, accompanied me, and there I found forty-eight lancets which I knew to be mine; Gilbert was using them.

Q. Upon your discovering this property of yours did you say any thing to the prisoners - A. I stated

it to the officer, and they began criminating each other; one saying to the other, you took as many as me, and the other saying, you took as many as me. The officer has the property. They were then taken into custody.

GEORGE TIBBOTT . I am an officer. I accompanied Mr. Pope Smith, on the 14th of April, to the house of these men; there I saw the lancets on the bench, These are the lancets.

Prosecutor. I have no hesitation in saying they are mine.

The prisoners left their defence to their counsel.

WILLIAM RISLEY . I am a whalebone cutter. No man can swear to such things as these without there is a private mark on them.

WILLIAN HOLMES. I manufacture these things. I have manufactured for Messrs. Smith, and for Whitford the prisoner; and these lancets, I should judge, are of no value no more than old iron.

The prisoners called seven witnesses, who gave them a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

Reference Number: t18130602-123

638. JOHN WHITFORD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of April , thirteen steel hackle teeth, value 2 s. the property of Thomas Pope Smith .

Mr. Reynolds, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18130602-124

639. JOHN KING and ELEANOR MURPHY were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Askew , about the hour of four in the afternoon, on the 20th of July , and stealing a diamond necklace, value 120 l. four gold rings, value 2 l. and two pair of gold earrings, value 2 l. a cloak, value 1 l. five guineas, a five-pound Banknote, a two-pound Bank-note, and one other two-pound Bank note , his property.

Mr. Knapp, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoners were

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18130602-125

640. MARY COUSENS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of April , three silk handkerchiefs, value 3 s. a gown, value 4 s. a coat, value 5 s. a waistcoat, value 1 s. 6 d. a shirt, value 4 s. a bed curtain, value 5 s. a shift, value 2 s. a shawl, value 1 s. and two bed-gowns, value 2 s. the property of Andrew Lewis . And THOMAS DAVIS and ANN RIDDLE for feloniously receiving the said goods, they knowing them to be stolen .

ANDREW LEWIS . Q. In the course of last spring did the prisoner come on purpose to nurse your wife - A. She did. My wife died on the 11th of March. She quitted my house on the 26th of March.

Q. At the time she went, had you and she been upon good terms - A. We had not quarrelled. I had a constable to see her out of the house. I sent for a coach to take her peaceably away.

Q. Two days after that were you well or ill - A. I was ill and in bed.

Q. While you were so ill on the 28th, did you know of the prisoner coming to your house - A. I did not know of it; I heard of it, and saw her there. She came into my room and asked me for her things; she had leave to take her own things and part of mine that were in the wash; none but what were in the wash. She had began to wash before she went away.

Q. Shortly after that did you discover that any of your property had been missing - A. I did, before and after too. I lost silk handkerchiefs and gowns, my wife's great coat, and a waistcoat of mine, and five shirts, and all the curtains of a bed, except the top and the vallance. I lost a shift, and a shawl, and bed gowns. I have lost a hundred times more than I have recovered.

Mr. Alley. How old are you - A. I am forty-nine.

Q. You lost your wife, poor man, in March - A. Yes.

Q. You did not like long to be single - A. Yes, I did.

Q. Did not you buy a ring for Cousens, and pass her for your wife to your servants - A. No, I did not. She asked me to lend her the money to buy her a ring to turn that man out of her house. I lent her the money to buy a ring, and I went with her to buy it.

Q. Have you not lived with her as your wife - A. No, never. I have acknowledged I was her husband.

COURT. Did you live with her as your wife - A. She certainly came to bed to me; I will not deny that. She wore a ring, as if she was my wife.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18130602-126

641. GEORGE LUCAS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of May , two shifts, value 5 s. three handkerchiefs, value 3 s. two caps, value 2 s. a pair of drawers, value 9 s. a cravat, value 6 d. the property of Francis Bacon ; two pair of pockets, value 1 s. a pair of socks, value 6 d. a pair of stays, value 2 s. 6 d. a shirt, value 10 s. three cravats, value 3 s. a waistcoat, value 4 d. five yards of bandage, value 4 d. two pillow-cases, value 2 s. a pillow, value 1 s. and three pounds and seven shillings, in monies numbered , the property of Thomas Singleton .

WILLIAM BAKER . I am a carrier from London to Mitchley. I put up my cart in the Horse and Groom yard, St. John-street . This happened on the 8th of May last. I lost a trunk and a box out of my cart in the yard about three o'clock; I had put them in the cart myself, and saw them in the cart about a quarter of an hour before I missed it. An alarm came that a man had run out of the yard with a box. I pursued, and saw the box again, and the prisoner with it, in Red Lion-street; I ran up and laid hold of him. I am sure the prisoner is the man.

WILLIAM MASON . I am a porter at the Horse and Groom. On the 8th of May I heard the alarm of the box being lost. I went in pursuit of the box; I found it in Red Lion-street, in the prisoner's possession. I asked him where he was going with it; he said, a lady had employed him to carry it. When he had got a few yards further he put it down; he said he would not carry it if I followed him. I held

him until Baker came up, and took him and the box. This is the box.

Baker. I know the box well. I have seen the box a great many times; it is the property of one of my employers; it was under my care.

Prisoner's Defence. I was hired to carry this box.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Confined 1 year in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18130602-127

642. GEORGE AIMFIELD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of May , a hat, value 5 s. the property of William Duck , from his person .

WILLIAM DUCK . On the 23d of May, about six o'clock in the evening, I was at the Adam and Eve, Tottenham-court-road , having a pint of beer; the prisoner came in with three others, and sat in the next box to me. After he drank what they had got he came and took my hat off my head; he wanted to put another hat on my head, but I would not have it. The prisoner went out of the tap-room with my hat on his head. I went after him; he said, I am not gone, you need not walk after me.

Q. Did you lay hold of him - A. No; I did not like for fear I might be ill-used. There was an officer on the other side of the way. I gave charge of one of the men that was with the prisoner; he told the officer where the prisoner lived. The officer went after the prisoner and took him.

- HOOPER. I am an officer. I received information that a person had lost his hat. I immediately ran over to the Adam and Eve. I apprehended a man on suspicion; I told him I should take him to the watchhouse; and as we were going along to the watchhouse, he told me if I would not take him there he would tell me where the hat was. He told me the hat was at Paddington; the person was gone there. I went to Paddington. I met the prisoner with the hat on his head. I asked the prisoner if that was his hat on his head; he said, no, it was not his hat, he had taken it from the prosecutor in fun; he was going to return it. I took him in custody. I asked him if he knew the prosecutor; he said no, he had never seen him before.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

Reference Number: t18130602-128

643. MICHAEL BURKE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of April , fifty pounds weight of tea, value 12 l. and a wooden chest, value 6 d. the property of Robert Sinfield .

JAMES NORRIS . I live in Brick-lane. On the 29th of April I saw the prisoner run past my house; he had a chest of tea on a knot; it was marked C. G. H. Sheerness. He pitched a chest of tea at a public-house on a block. I went after him and asked him if he knew of a situation, that he might not know I was following him; he answered, he did not, and then he said he did, at an ironmonger's. He then took up the chest of tea and carried it as far as Lamb-street. I then asked him whether he was not out of his way with it; he threw it down and ran away. I took him in custody, and gave him in charge of an officer. This is the chest of tea.

ROBERT SINFIELD. I am a carman to James Cousens, a tea dealer, in Coleman-street. On the 9th of April I went to Davis's wharf to deliver a chest of tea. I had two chests in my cart. I took one of them to deliver at the wharf. I left the other in the cart; it was marked C. G. H. Sheerness, and when I came back to the cart the cart was turned round, the tailboard was let down, and the chest was gone.

Q. Is the chest here - A. Yes, it is; that is the chest; it is marked C. G. H. Sheerness. I took the chest from Mr. Cousens.

JAMES COUSENS . I am a tea dealer. I have not the smallest doubt but that is my tea-chest, The real value of it is about 30 l.; it is full of souchong tea.

Prisoner's Defence. I am a general porter. I was hired to carry this chest of tea, by a man who appeared as a carman, to Whitecross-street.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Confined 2 years in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18130602-129

644. MARY FINCHAM and SARAH SMITH were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of May , a carpet, value 16 s. the property of Cornelius Norris .

CORNELIUS NORRIS . I am a broker , No. 2, Portpool-lane . On the 20th of May, the carpet was taken out of my passage.

ELIZA MURPHY . I live opposite Mr. Norris's shop. On the 20th of May I saw a woman go into the passage and take the carpet. There were three women together, two were near when one went in. I cannot say which of them took the carpet.

ABRAHAM LAPPEN . I am a cheesemonger in Brooks's Market. I saw Smith with the carpet in Baldwin's Gardens; Fincham was with her. Mr. Norris took the carpet from Smith; Fincham ran away. I followed and caught Fitcham in Grays Inn Lane.

Prosecutor. This is the carpet; it is mine. I took it from Smith. Fincham ran away.

Fincham's Defence. I ran away; I was in a hurry; that gentleman ran after me. I have been in confinement ever since.

Smith's Defence. I know nothing of this young woman whatever.

FINCHAM, GUILTY, aged 16.

SMITH, GUILTY, aged 17.

Judgement respited .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130602-130

645. STEPHEN HASSETT , FRANCIS BOSTON , and JAMES LOVELL , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of April , eight rabbits, value 8 s. the property of John White .

JOHN WHITE . I am an attorney ; I live in Philip-street, Kingsland-road .

Q. Did you keep rabbits on the 10th of April - A. Yes. I had rabbits in the yard, at the back of the house, I missed them on the 11th, I saw them safe in my own yard on the 8th or 9th, and on Friday I saw them in custody of an officer. I cannot swear to them.

JOSHUA ARMSTRONG . On the night of the 10th of April, I was on patrol duty in Kingsland-road, between nine and ten; we met the three prisoners

coming down towards Shoreditch church, each of them carrying rabbits; we stopped them; Hassett ran away, and threw down a handkerchief containing a doe, and five young ones; they were alive. Gleed secured the rabbits. I pursued Hassett, and catched him; the two other prisoners were in the custody of Valentine. On Sunday morning we found the rabbits belonged to Mr. White; when he saw them he said he had no doubt they were his.

Q. to Prosecutor. You lost eight rabbits, did you - A. Yes, five young ones, and three grown ones. I believed they were mine at the time I first saw them.

HASSETT, GUILTY , aged 17.

BOSTON, GUILTY , aged 17.

LOVELL, GUILTY , aged 15.

Judgment respited .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130602-131

647. WILLIAM JENKINS was indicted for feloniously stealing, from the person of Samuel Allen Balmer , on the 19th of April, two pocket-books, value 2 s. and a two-pound bank-note , his property.

SAMUEL ALLEN BALMER . I am a mason ; I live at 58, Wardour-street. On Easter Monday, about four o'clock, I went into the fair of Tothill-fields ; I had two pocket-books in my inside coat pocket, and one of the pocket-books contained a two-pound note. I did not perceive the pocket-book taken from me. I first missed them about five o'clock; a Bow-street officer came to me and said, have you lost any thing; I felt instantly, and said, I have lost two pocket-books. The officer then laid hold the prisoner, and said this man has got them. I saw the prisoner drop one pocket-book, the other was taken out of his breeches; the one that he had in his breeches contained the two-pound note. I was quite sure the pocket-books were mine when I saw them. My name is in both of them.

ARCHIBALD RUTHWIN . I was at Tothill-fair. I there saw the prisoner close behind the prosecutor, and from the prisoner's appearance I thought he was doing that which was not right, which induced me to watch him: I did not see him take the books; I stood at a little distance that he should not see me; I saw him so near the prosecutor's clothes as to suspect he was doing it; there was no one behind the prosecutor, but the prisoner. I saw him move a little way of one side; I thought he had something. I found he was going to leave the prosecutor; I tapped the prosecutor on the shoulder, and said; have you lost any thing, sir. The prosecutor said, a pocket-book. I then laid hold of the prisoner, and saw his hand throw something; I did not exactly see the book. I saw the book picked up; the prosecutor claimed that book. I searched him. I unbuttoned the flap of his breeches. I found the other pocket-book in his breeches. On examining it I found a two-pound note in it. I have kept the pocket-books ever since.

Prosecutor. I am sure they are my pocket-books.

Prisoner's Defence. I am a poor distressed young fellow; the books were pushed to me; I know nothing of the robbery, no more than you my lord.

GUILTY , aged 17.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130602-132

648. JOSEPH LEONI was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of February , a lanthorn, value 4 s. the property of Henry Spencer and Samuel Hodson .

THOMAS OSMOND. I am foreman to Henry Spencer and Samuel Hodson . The lanthorn was taken from the ground floor of No. 9, Clement's-inn . On the 5th of March, I was going along Tower-street, St. Giles's, I observed the lanthorn for sale at the door; I knew the lanthorn to be my masters, by a private mark; it was marked S. and H. I claimed it as my masters. It was lost from Clement's-inn on the 9th of February, and on the 10th I found the lanthorn missing; it is worth four shillings.

EDWARD COTTERALL . I am a broker, in Tower-street, St. Giles's. On the 11th or 12th of March, the prisoner brought this lanthorn to me for sale; he had a decent dress on then; he said it was his father's; I gave him eighteen-pence for it. In about two or three days after the lad was enquired for, he came by the shop; I took him in custody, and took him to Marlborough-street office.

Osmond. I am sure the lanthorn is my masters property.

Prisoner's Defence. I gave six-pence for the lanthorn to a lamp-lighter; I did not know where he got it from.

GUILTY , aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130602-133

649. ROBERT LATHAM was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of April , a book, value 2 s. the property of William Lindsall .

WILLAM LINDSALL. I am a bookseller ; I live in Wimpole-street . This book was stolen from within the house; I can only identify the book as my property; I can say I never sold the book.

PETER WRIGHT . I am a bookseller, in Broad-street, St. Giles's. On Saturday evening, the 10th of April, the prisoner came into my shop; he offered to sell me this book; it is Ovid's Metamorphosis; it is the last translation; he asked me seven shillings for it. I told him I thought it was handsomely bound for a man of his appearance; he said his son was a bookbinder, he got it from his son. I asked him is son's name; he said if I would let him go he would bring his son to prove that he had given it him. He was a miserable looking creature, and the book by no means corresponded with his appearance; however, I let him go for that time. On Thursday morning following he came into my shop while my boy was taking the shutters down; I came down half dressed; the prisoner was then in my shop demanding the book in a peremptory manner; I said have you brought the person that gave you the book; he said he had not. I took him to the watchhouse myself.

Q. to Prosecutor. What is the book worth - A. I have valued it at two shillings; it has ten shillings and six-pence marked in it, that is the selling price; the ten shillings and six-pence is my private mark; it was never sold by me or my people.

Prisoner's Defence. I told Mr. Wright I got it of a person to sell; I throw myself on the mercy of the court. I am past my labour.

GUILTY , aged 74.

Confined 1 year in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130602-134

650. MARIA RIX was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of May , a watch, value 2 l. the property of James Wyght , from his person .

JAMES WYGHT . I am a coach-maker ; I work for Mr. Cole; I lodge at the Crown in Thornaugh-street. I lost my watch on the 19th of April, about two o'clock in the morning. I had been at a friends, the other side of Russell-square; I stopped there, and when I came home to my lodging I was locked out. I then went down to Holborn, and there I met the prisoner; she was alone. This was about two o'clock, as nigh as I can tell; I went with the prisoner to No. 5, Charles-street, Drury-lane . I went with her up to the garrett of the house; my watch then was safe in my fob, and three shillings in money. I went in the room with her; I staid there about twenty minutes. I did not go to sleep; I accused her of taking my watch; I did not perceive the watch go from me; she denied having the watch. We were in the dark; she said she would go for a light; she went away to get a light, and did not come back. I stopped about five minutes; she did not return I found my way down into the street. I then saw Cuthbert, the watchman, in Drury-lane; I told him what I had lost, and described the person to him. On the 24th I saw the prisoner again; the watchman and me found her in the same room. My master was with me; she denied having seen me or my watch. I am certain the prisoner is the person.

MICHAEL CUTHBERT . I am a watchman: my beat is near Charles-street. On the 19th of April I saw the prosecutor; he told me he had been robbed, and told me the place; and on the 24th I found the prisoner in that garret. Wyght pointed her out to me; he said she was the woman that robbed, him: another woman opened the door to me; I found the prisoner in the cupboard; she denied having seen him or the watch; she was searched in my presence, nothing was found.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent; this night that he said I slept with him, I slept at the Bull and Gate, Holborn, with the waiter; his mistress would not let him come forward for fear it should be said, she kept a house for company; and the reason that I went into the cupboard, I was afraid it was young man of the name of George coming.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130602-135

651. WILLIAM SEELING was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of April , nine pigeons, value 9 s. the property of Joseph Parr .

JOSEPH PARR . I live private at Hackney . On the morning of the 28th April my dove-house was forced open, and nine pigeons were stolen; my pigeon-house is in my yard, enclosed by a wall seven feet high; I had seen the dove-house the night before, it was quite secured.

Q. How could they get at the pigeons - A. They got over the wall; the holes by which the pigeons entered are close to the ground almost; it was entered; they opened the lath-door, and forced open the wooden-door to get into the place; I lost nine pigeons; I got seven again, they are here; I can swear to them any where. I went to two shops, where they deal in these sort of things. I found four at George Ball 's shop in the morning in Church-street, Bethnal-green; I found the other three at William Bishop 's shop, Old-street, between five and six, the same day, and I saw the prisoner in custody the same night; Mr. Bishop delivered to me a pocket, I have had it ever since.

GEORGE BALL . I am a pigeon dealer; I live in Church-street, Bethnal-green. On the day the prisoner was taken up he came to my shop between eight and nine in the morning; he had a pair of black mottled tumblers, he asked three shillings and six-pence for the pair; I said I would give three shillings and six-pence. Then he asked me to buy a pair of nuns; he asked six or seven shillings for them; I said I would give four shillings for them; he said I should have them. In about an hour after Mr. Parr saw them and claimed them as his; I gave them up to him directly.

Prisoner. You only gave me two shillings and six-pence for them.

WILLIAM BISHOP . I am a bird and a pigeon dealer, in Old-street. On the 28th of April in the morning Mr. Parr came and gave information. The prisoner came to me about a quarter before five in the evening; he brought three almond pigeons, he asked nine shillings for them; I was considering which way I should detain him; I told him I thought that was too much. I endeavoured to stop him; I asked him if they were his own; he said yes, victuals was so dear he could not keep them; he wished to sell them. I locked the door, and locked him in; he made his escape from me; I laid hold of his jacket, and the pocket came off. I delivered the pocket to Mr. Parr; here it is. I was sent for in the evening when he was taken in custody; and the piece that same off his jacket made his jacket complete. Mr. Parr claimed the three pigeons that were left with me.

JOSHUA ARMSTRONG . On Wednesday night the 28th of April, I had information of Mr. Parr of the prisoner; he described his dress to me, and how it was torn. I went to the Robin Hood in Webb-square; I there found the prisoner between ten and eleven at night; when I saw him his jacket appeared to be torn, the part torn off fitted the jacket that he had on. At the watchhouse; I asked how he got these pigeons that he sold to Mr. Ball; he denied having any pigeons in his possession. I asked him how his jacket came torn; he said by the wheel of a cart. I then sent to Mr. Parr to come to the watchhouse for this piece; I matched it to his jacket, and it formed a jacket.

Q. to Prosecutor. What is the value of these pigeons - A. I would not take ten pounds for them.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought the pigeons of a man, and at Worship-street office I was willing shew them the man. Mr. Armstrong said take him away, that is enough.

GUILTY, aged 21.

Judgment respited .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130602-136

652. STEPHEN WATTS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of May , two rum puncheons, value 9 s. the property of Thomas Brown .

THOMAS BROWN . I deal in bottles and casks, and work in the wine business . I live in Jewry-street, Aldgate . On the 7th of May I lost two rum puncheons; they were taken out of the court where I live; they were under my window. I saw them safe there on the 6th of May at ten o'clock at night; the next morning at seven o'clock they were missing. I saw them again at Mr. Miller's, a cooper, Paternoster-row, Spitalfield, about a week after that. I am quite sure they are mine.

JOHN MILLER . I am a cooper, in Paternoster-row, Spitalfields. On the 7th of May, near nine o'clock in the morning, the prisoner brought me a rum puncheon; he brought me another in about twenty minutes afterwards; I gave him twenty-six shillings for them; and about the 18th Thomas Brown came and claimed them. On the 25th the prisoner came with another. I told him the two that he brought on the 7th were owned. I sent for a constable, and he was taken in custody.

Prisoner's Defence. A man asked me to sell them for him. I took them to Mr. Miller. I did not know they were stolen. The man said they were his own.

GUILTY , aged 36.

Publicly whipped and discharged.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130602-137

653. JOHN STEPHENS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2nd of May , a jacket, value 5 s. a pair of breeches, value 4 s. a waistcoat, value 4 s. a shirt, value 3 s. and a handkerchief, value 1 s. the property of John Riley .

JOHN RILEY. I am a lighterman ; I work for Mr. Phillips. I live in Crown-court, East Smithfield . I lost the articles from my own house in the middle of the day. I was at home at the time. I found them afterwards upon the prisoner. On the morning of the 18th of April the prisoner came to me; he said he had been in a French prison; he was in great distress. I gave him a breakfast, and after breakfast he said he was very tired, he wanted to lie down. I permitted him to lie down in my house. I had got to go about half after twelve o'clock, and when I came home he was coming down stairs again; he asked me to give him some beer. I gave him some. I thought he looked rather bigger than when he came in by bulk. I stopped him, and searched him; I found on him a jacket, waistcoat, a pair of breeches, and a silk handkerchief. The breeches belonged to me; the other things to a lodger of mine; they were left in my care. I gave him in the charge of Turnbridge.

JOHN TURNBRIDGE. I am a constable. I took charge of the prisoner. Mr. Riley gave me a handkerchief, jacket, and waistcoat. I searched him; I found the waistcoat and black breeches on him, under his trowsers, and the shirt he had on his person. I know it to be false about his coming out of a French prison; I know his person well before, and I have seen him in the neighbourhood.

Prisoner's Defence. I did come from a French prison. I came down the street groggy; this gentleman took me in. I have been eighteen years and eleven days in His Majesty's service.

GUILTY , aged 52.

Publicly whipped and discharged.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130602-138

654. THOMAS SUTHERLAND was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of April , one hundred and fifty-two books, value 76 l. five sets of the Abbey church of St. Peter, Westminster, value 16 l. and two sets of the Microcosm of London, value 2 l. the property of Rudolph Akerman .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY .

Fined 1 s. and discharged.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130602-139

655. MARTIN KIRBY was indicted for that he, on the 30th of January , was servant to William Morris , and was employed and entrusted to receive money for him, that he being such servant did receive 2 l. 3 s. for and on account of his said master, and that he afterwards did secrete and steal the same .

WILLIAM MORRIS. I am a smith , No. 37, Whitcomb-street. The prisoner was my servant; it was part of his duty to receive money of my customers for me, and to give it me as soon as he received it.

Q.Had you a customer of the name of Robert Long - A. Yes; he was indebted to me two pound three shillings for smith's work.

Q. Did you ever receive that two pound three shillings - A. No, it never came to my hands.

ROBERT LONG . I am a tobacconist, Princes-street, Leicester-square.

Q. Were you indebted to Mr. Morris for any smith's work - A. Yes; I owed him two pound three shillings. The prisoner brought me the bill, and I immediately paid him on the 30th of January last. This is the receipt he gave me in my counting-house.

(The receipt read.)

GUILTY, aged 21.

Judgment respited .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130602-140

656. ELIZABETH KING was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of April , two sheets, value 10 s. two bed curtains, value 10 s. and a counterpane, value 5 s. the property of Benjamin Lee , in a lodging-room .

BENJAMIN LEE . I live at No. 14, James-street, Manchester-square . On or about the 23d of March the prisoner took a furnished room of me on the second floor at four shillings and sixpence a week. On the 4th of May I asked her to let me in the room to see if my things were safe, and upon her refusing I got a constable and I went into the room, and found two shirts, two bed curtains, and a counterpane were gone. She was searched, and the duplicates found upon her.

EBENEZER ALDER . I am a servant to Mr. Mulcaster, pawnbroker, Chandler-street. On the 3d of

April the prisoner pawned a sheet with me, and on the 10th another sheet.

THOMAS NEATE . I am a pawnbroker, Bird-street, Manchester-square. I produce two curtains and a counterpane. I do not know the prisoner.

Prosecutor. These things are my property.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not pawn the things in Bird-street.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined 14 days in Newgate , fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130602-141

657. MARY RIDER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22nd of April , a pewter quart pot, value 2 s. and a pewter pint pot, value 1 s. the property of John Stocks .

JOHN STOCKS. I keep the Queen's Head, St. John-street . I lost a quart and a pint pewter pot.

WILLIAM WRIGHT . I live at the Queen's Head. On the 22nd of April I saw the prisoner there; she came in for half a pint of porter, and brought a pot with her with intention of taking the beer away. I drawed her the half pint of beer; she asked me to warm it; she went into the tap-room where no person was sitting. I saw her conceal a pint pot under her clothes. I sent for an officer.

WILLIAM TISSAKER . I am a constable. I took the prisoner to the watchhouse; I searched her; I found this pint pot in her pocket. I went to the lodging; there I found a quart pot concealed between the bed and the blanket. I knew it to be her lodging. I have known her a good many years. I never heard any thing against her character before.

Prosecutor. The pots are mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I cannot tell how I came by the pots.

GUILTY , aged 65.

Confined 1 month in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130602-142

658. WILLIAM GODDARD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2nd of June , four pieces of beech quartering, value 4 s. four pieces of oak scantling, value 10 s. and four oak posts, value 9 s. the property of John Thomas .

JOHN THOMAS . I am a carpenter at Hammersmith. I cannot say when I lost the timber. I know it is mine, and it was found on Goddard's premises.

GEORGE TIBBOTT . I am an officer. The prosecutor received information from the prisoner Waitman, that his property was at Goddard's premises; I went to Goddard's premises on the 2nd of this month; Mr. Thomas and Oliffe, a parish constable, went with me. We went to Shepherd's-bush; the prisoner lived there; we found thirteen oak posts, six pieces of oak scantling, part of them are here, and two pieces of beech quartering. The prisoner was at home at the time of the search; afterwards he absconded. I found the oak posts and the scantling in the ditch.

Q. What is this man - A. A journeyman carpenter . The prosecutor lives about a mile from there. The prisoner is building two cottages for himself; they are unfinished at this present time. We seized all the property on the premises which we were suspicious of being stolen, and during that time I saw the prisoner at a distance off in a field. I ran after him, overtook him, and apprehended him. I took him to his house; he asked my permission to put in some long boards that were standing outside of premises; as soon as he had got the last board in he locked the door; I jumped in the window, and ran up stairs after him; he jumped out of the window into the prosecutor's arms; he got away from the prosecutor. I jumped out of the window and ran after him, and secured him. The prisoner then said I will go quiet with you now; I am done.

- OLIFFE. I am the constable. I can only correspond the evidence of Tibbott. We found a quantity of timber under grass, and a parcel of dead branches laid over it. This is part of the oak scantling, and this is a piece of beech quartering; there is a considerable quantity of it.

Prosecutor. I am sure these are all mine; I bought it this time twelvemonth. The pieces of beech are all stamped at the end by the person that I bought it of.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought the stuff, and paid for it.

GUILTY , aged 57.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130602-143

659. JOHN WAITMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of May , thirteen elm boards, value 16 s. and ten pieces of beech quartering, value 16 s. the property of John Thomas .

JOHN THOMAS . I am a carpenter . On Tuesday the 25th of May I had information that ten pieces of beech quartering were put over the wall into Mr. Britton's premises. I went with a constable and found them.

JOHN BRITTON . I am a baker. I live at Chiswick. On Sunday morning, the 23d of May, the prisoner came into my shop to pay me for a quartern loaf. He said, well, master, I have brought you the upsets; he said, he had brought me ten upsets. I paid him sixteen shillings for them afterwards I cannot say exactly how they came into my yard; I should suppose they were put over the wall on the Saturday evening. The constable and Mr. Thomas came and searched my premises, and found them in my shed.

GEORGE HALLETT . I am a constable. I produce the pieces of beech found at Mr. Britton's; Mr. Thomas claimed them, and took them away

JAMES BATTERSLEY . I am a shoemaker at Turnham-green. I bought thirteen elm boards and two beech quarters of Waitman. I gave him twenty-four shillings for them.

Prosecutor. The upsets found at Barten's house are my property, and the elm boards found at Battersley's house are also mine. Waitman gave the information that led to the detection of Goddard. A person went to Waitman; he told me to tell Goddard that he wanted some money to buy a counseller.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of the affair.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130602-144

660. ELIZABETH MITCHELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of May , a gown skirt, value 6 s. the property of Eli Smith .

ELIZABETH SMITH . My husband's name is Eli Smith. I live in Hounslow-street, Clerkenwell . On the 15th of May the prisoner came into my room, and sat herself down in a chair. The skirt of the gown laid on the chair. She staid half an hour. I was cleaning my place; I paid no attention to her, and after she was gone I went to put my things away and the skirt was gone. I afterwards found the skirt at the pawnbroker's.

GEORGE WHITE . I am a pawnbroker, 17, Liquorpond-street. On Saturday afternoon, the 15th of May the prisoner pledged this gown skirt for three shillings.

Prosecutrix. It is mine; it is my own work.

Prisoner's Defence. I intended to return it on the Monday. At the watchhouse she said if I would confess my fault she would forgive me.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Confined 14 days in Newgate, fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130602-145

661. JOHANNA ROGERS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of April , a jacket, value 5 s. the property of Mary Robson .

MARY ROBSON . I make slop jackets . I live in Meeting-house-alley, St. George's . I lost the jacket on the 14th of April; it was taken out of my room; there was nobody in the room but she and me, and when she went away she took the jacket.

MR. NOON. I am a pawnbroker. On the 14th of April the prisoner pawned the jacket with me.

JOHN GILMAN . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner; she denied having pawned the jacket, and within three quarters of an hour I found the jacket. This is the jacket.

Prosecutrix. That is my jacket.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130602-146

662. PETER BROWN was indicted for feloniously receiving one hundred and fifty-two books, value 76 l. five sets of the Abbey Church of St. Peter, Westminster, value 16 l and two sets of the Microcosm of London, value 2 l. the property of Rudolph Akerman , whereof Thomas Sutherland has confessed himself guilty of stealing .

RUDOLPH AKERMAN . I am a printseller in the Strand,

Q. Did you publish the History of Westminster Abbey - A. I did, and the Microcosm of London.

Q. At what price were these books selling lately - A. The Microcosm at thirteen guineas, and the History of Westminster Abbey fifteen pounds. I have lost a great many of them. Sutherland is an artist. Hankey was my foreman; he has absconded.

THOMAS SUTHERLAND . Q. You are an artist in the employ of Mr. Akerman - A. Yes.

Q. Did you sell the prisoner Brown any sets of Westminster Abbey and Microcosm of London which you had taken away from Mr. Akerman - A. Yes, about five sets of Westminster Abbey; the first two sets at five pound each, and the others at four pound ten shillings. I swear positively to having sold from seven to ten sets; seven I am sure I have sold. The Microcosm was the same price, and about three sets at four pound ten shillings. I am sure I am speaking within compass of the number. I received money and goods both for them; the goods were furniture and birds. The agreement was to take part money and part goods.

Q. How long have you known the prisoner - A. From ten to twelve years; he has carried on the business of a green-grocet, print and picture dealer; his house is in Crown-street, Soho. The application for dealing in this was made by Brown; I was passing Brown's house; he asked me how I was, and where I was; whether I was still in the service of Mr. Akerman. I told him I was, but that I should shortly quit it. He then said, Mr. Akerman has published some pretty works, and that he should like to possess them if he could get them cheap; he asked me if I could help him to any. I asked him what price he would go to. He desired me to name my own price. I named eight pound or eight guineas; I would get him a set of the Westminster Abbey; he ridiculed the idea. I told him the trade price was ten guineas, and the price to the public was fifteen guineas; he said, that would not do; he could get them cheaper; he did not mind what the trade gave. I took him one set, which I sold him for five pound.

Q. When you afterwards took them what you sold for four pound ten shillings, do you remember his giving you any reason why he would not give more than four pound ten shillings - A. He said he could buy them cheaper at sales. I wished to rise the price on account of their being proof impressions; he said he did not care for that so that they were cheap; I could afford to let him have them a great deal cheaper than that, for in the way that he should dispose of them I need not fear any thing; he would take to any extent, and always pay ready money. On Thursday morning, the 15th of April, I saw Mr. Simpson come out of his door, and when I came up Brown was at the door; he asked me if I knew that gentleman. I said I did, it was Mr. Simpson, a friend of Mr. Akerman's. He then said he suspected all was not right, Mr. Simpson had been there the night before; his son had told him there were many copies in the house; he begged me to take away two sets, if I could deposit them safely. I took away two of the sets I had sold for four pound ten shillings.

Q. Had you deposited any pawnbrokers tickets with him - A. Yes, I sold him some duplicates of sets I had pawned. Brown told me he expected to get into trouble, but he would not give up my name, nor was I to mention his.

HENRY MORLAND . Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. Yes; I exchanged with him for one set of the Westminster for a leaden figure that stood in my yard. I communicated it to Mr. Akerman.

JOHN SIMPSON . Q. I believe you are acquainted with Mr. Akerman - A. Yes, and I at the request of Mr. Akerman went to Mr. Brown on the evening of the 14th of April. I saw the son as he represented

himself; he came to me in the shop; he shewed me two sets of Abbey; I told him I would call the next morning. I made an appointment to see the father. On the next morning I called between seven and eight, I saw the prisoner, I told the prisoner I called in consequence of seeing two sets of Westminster at his house the evening before, which his son had shewn me, that I had come to see these and ten or twelve sets that his son told me he had up stairs, that I wished to see them as well as the two sets that I had seen the night before; upon which he told me he had none. I told him that he could not be correct, for I had seen two the evening before; what had become of them. He then said a stranger left them; he would have nothing to do with them; he sent them away. I then told him that his son had told me that he had sold upwards of twenty sets before; then he declared to God as an honest man he never bought one set in his life. I then wished to see his son; upon which he told me he was a youth, subject to fits, and was silly, and did not know what he said. Not being able to make any thing more of him I went to Mr. Akerman and told him what he said.

JOHN GILLMAN . I am an officer. I produce an history of Wetminster given up by Mr. Morland, and these two were given up by Mr. Poplin. The prisoner told me Mr. Poplin was his attorney; he had sent them there.

PARR PERRY POPLIN. These two sets of Westminster were sent to me by Mr. Brown on the Thursday night for me to get an estimate of the value of them.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel; called fifteen witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130602-147

663. RICHARD RAYMOND was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of April , a silk handkerchief, value 2 s. the property of Thomas Henry Harbinge .

SECOND COUNT, the property of a certain person to the jurors unknown.

JOHN CARLISLE. I am a constable.

Q. Do you know the person of the prisoner, Richard Raymond - A. Yes.

Q. Did you know a person calling himself Thomas Henry Harbinge - A. I saw such a person at the watchhouse. On Sunday the 11th of April, I saw Mr. Harbinge and the prisoner, about a quarter before one, just at this end of Cow Cross; the prisoner had another with him; the other person looked older then the prisoner. I saw the prisoner and another following the gentleman, and just as they got two yards by me the prisoner put his hand into the gentleman's pocket, and pulled the handkerchief a little way out of the pocket, but not entirely out. I followed them; they passed by the end of St. John-street; they went up Charter-house-lane after the gentleman; the gentleman did not perceive what they were about at the time; when they got about half way down Charter-house-lane on the left side, the other man put his hand to the handkerchief and pulled it out; the prisoner was close to the other at the time; he put it under his coat, and away they both walked together. In consequence of my seeing this I made the best of my way to them, and as I passed the gentleman I made a nudge at the gentleman for him to follow me, and just as they got close to Charter-house-gate the one with the handkerchief ran through the square; I immediately then catched hold of the prisoner. I told the gentleman that he had lost his handkerchief; he said so I have; he said are you are an officer; I said I am. He gave me charge of the prisoner. I told him what I had seen.

Q. Did you know the person of the other man who ran away - A. He was a man I had seen before. I knew him to be an old thief. The other ran away with the handkerchief; it has never been found.

BARNARD COHEN. I am a constable. I saw a mob around St. Sepulchre's watchhouse, I went in; the gentlemen gave his name Thomas Henry Harbinge , esq. in Fenchurch-street, and when I went after him, he was not at home; and we went after the other man, we could not find him.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing about the handkerchief, nor do I know any thing of the young fellow.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130602-148

664. WILLIAM LACORD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 31st of May , five yards of canvas, value 2 s. the property of Samuel Corfe .

SAMUEL CORFE . I live in Bethnal-green-road. I lost my canvas between the 17th and 18th of May; I found it on the 31st. I lost it from off a stage that I had to cover some choice flowers. From information I got a search warrant and two officers, and went to the prisoner's house; one of the officers stopped below, the officer went up stairs and opened a cupboard; I there saw my canvas. I knew it; I sewed the seams myself. This is the canvas; there is five yards; it is not so much as I lost. I lost sixty yards.

FRANCIS FREEMAN. I am an officer. On the 31st of May, I went to the prisoner's house with a search warrant. I told the prisoner what I wanted; he said he had nothing of the kind in the house, I was welcome to search. I found the canvas in a cupboard in the one pair of stairs room.

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw the canvas in my life. I was not at home when it was brought in. I have a witness to prove it.

SAMUEL BARNARD . I keep the Gentleman and Porter public-house, Stoney-lane; sixteen days back the prisoner's wife came to my house for change of a one-pound note; she said she wanted four shillings to pay a jew woman at the door for some canvas.

The prisoner called two witnesses who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130602-149

665. JAMES LOVELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of May , two hundred and forty-two staves, value 1 l. the property of John Bailey .

JOHN BAILEY. I am a cooper ; No. 10, Bear-lane . The prisoner worked for me: I missed the the staves on the 25th of May. I found my pile diminishing; in the evening I marked the top of the pile, and the next morning; when I came they were gone. I got a search warrant; I went to the prisoners house; there I found some of the staves that I had marked.

SAMUEL MILLER . I went with a search warrant to the prisoner's house; I found a great number of staves; the prisoner said he had purchased them of different people. These are them they; are staves for small casks.

Prosecutor. They are the size that I lost. This stave has my mark on it; this is the instrument that I marked it with.

Prisoner's Defence. I purchased the staves of different times, and I bought two tobacco hogsheads of Mr. Jordan in East Smithfield.

GUILTY , aged 41.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction, fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130602-150

666. HENRY HANCOCK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2nd of June , thirty pounds weight of white lead, value 2 s. and a sack, value 2 s. the property of Sir Charles Price , bart. Richard Price , and Charles Price .

THOMAS WALKER . I am an officer. On the 2nd of June, a little past six o'clock, I met the prisoner; he had a basket on his shoulder; I asked him what he had got in it; he said, wood and chips. I told him I was an officer; it appeared to be heavier then wood, I would like to look in it; I then examined it, and wood was on the top. I took the wood out, and at the bottom of the basket was thirty pounds of white lead. I asked him where he got it; he said at Mill-wall. I told him he worked at some place, and I must go there; a gentleman standing by said it is at Price's manufactory, I had better go there. On my taking the prisoner along he told me not to go there, he did work there, if I took him there he should lose his bread. I took him to the manufactory. I asked a gentleman in the accompting-house if he knew him; he said, yes, he had been working there all day, I went to his room afterwards.

HENSHAW STEVENS ADAMS. I am clerk to the prosecutors. The prisoner was a labourer. On the evening of the 2nd of June, the prisoner was brought by two Police officers; I asked the prisoner where he got the lead, when, and what he took it for; he said nobody had given it him, he took it in the morning, he took it before the person employed in this department came to work; he took it with a view of painting some part of his house. He has been four years in our service; I never heard any complaint against him before.

Q. What are Mr. Prices names - A. Sir Charles Price , bart. Richard Price , and Charles Price .

GUILTY , aged 29.

Confined 1 month in Newgate , fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130602-151

667. ISABELLA LEWIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of May , a pair of trowsers, value 1 l. 5 s. a gown, value 5 s. two shawls, value 1 s. a handkerchief, value 6 d. and a tobacco-stopper, value 1 d. the property of Ann Banfield , widow .

ANN BANFIELD . I am a widow; I work at slop work to get my bread. The prisoner had lodged with me for four weeks. These things were all in my house on the 4th of May, and on the 5th of May, in the morning, they were all gone, and the prisoner was gone.

JOHN BARNLEY. I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner; she said she had done what she was very sorry for, she had left the things at Mrs. Everington's in West-street, and one pair of trowsers at Mrs. Sims in West-street. I went and found them, and a duplicate of a gown at Mr. Guest's in Fleet-market; I went and found the gown there.

MRS. EVERINGTON. The prisoner came to my house on Wednesday evening, between ten and eleven o'clock; she left two gowns, four aprons, two shawls, and a handkerchief; she asked to leave them until the morning. I gave the things to Mr. Barnley.

MARY SIMS . I keep a shop in West-street. The prisoner asked me leave to leave the trowsers until she called for them; I gave them to Mr. Barnley.

JOHN POWER . This gown was pledged at Mr. Guest's shop on the 6th of May. I have no knowledge of the prisoner.

Prosecutrix. They are all my things.

Prisoner's Defence. I am sorry for what I have done.

GUILTY , aged 29.

Confined 14 days in Newgate , fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130602-152

668. WARREN KERR , alias CARR , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of April , six pair of boot-tops, value 12 s. and one pair of bootlegs, value, 8 s. the property of James Phillips .

JAMES PHILLIPS . I am a boot-maker ; I live in Leicester-square . I know nothing further than to identify the property.

WILLIAM RAY . I am a boot-closer; I work for Mr. Phillips. On the evening of Good Friday the prisoner went into the garret in order to paint the house; he was a journeyman painter , at work at my master's house; he went up stairs; he said he was going to paint, and when he came down stairs he had got these boot-legs and tops under his arm. I stopped him; he said, he would go out; he was tipsy, and fell down.

- LIMBRICK. I apprehended the prisoner. These are the boot-legs and tops that he had.

Ray. I know them to be my master's; I had the working them.

Prisoner's Defence. I do not live by thieving.

GUILTY , aged 33.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130602-153

669. ELIZABETH HARE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of April , two pounds weight of mutton, value 18 d. the property of William Lindus .

WILLIAM LINDUS . I am a butcher in Whitechapel . On the 15th of April, about eleven in the forenoon, the meat was at the door, I was standing in the shop taking some money of a lady. I looked

round and saw the piece of mutton gone. I had seen it the moment before. I ran after the prisoner, she had the piece of mutton wrapped under the child. I did not wish to prosecute her; the magistrate bound me over.

MR. SIMMONDS. I am a constable. I took the mutton from the prisoner; Mr. Lindus claimed it; I searched the prisoner; she had about eighteen-pence about her.

GUILTY , aged 39.

Fined 1 s. and discharged.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130602-154

670. MARY HUGHES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of May , ten 1 l. banknotes , the property of John Flood .

JOHN FLOOD . I am a sea-faring man . I knew the prisoner before I went to sea. I lodged about three or four nights in her house; I met her by accident at Gravesend on Tuesday night, I do not recollect the day of the month; it was about a month ago; I came up to town with her in a Gravesend boat; on the Wednesday night I arrived in London between twelve and one in the morning; we shored at Limehouse; I went home to her house; she keeps a lodging house; I went to bed in a bed by myself. Last Saturday was a week I went to the India House and received money there; she would come with me; she saw me receive it; the last money I received was eighteen pounds; out of that I gave her a one-pound note, and when I came to her house at Poplar I had sixteen pounds. I am positive I had the notes at the time I was going up stairs She said stop for a light; I said I do not want a light. I went up stairs and went to bed. She came up stairs; I awoke; and said, who is there; she said it is me John; come down to supper; I said I do not want any supper; and when she was going away, she laid hold of my trowsers; I said let them alone. She said put them under your head; she went down stairs again. I told her I could take care of them.

Q. Did you examine them before you put them under your pillow - A. She went down stairs; what time she stopped I cannot say; she came up again and brought half a pint of beer; here, said she, I have brought you something to drink: I said I did not want any, however I will drink with you. I asked her where her husband was; she said down stairs. I said go to bed to him. I got up in the morning, the clock struck five; I found my trowsers had been removed from the place where I put them when I went to sleep, curiosity led me to examine the pockets, I thought the bulk was diminished. I examined them, and found only six out of sixteen; they were all one-pound notes; I dressed myself, and went in the kitchen; I said, what, are none of you up; she said no, came and lie down with me. I said, no; I am robbed, and I will have every one of you up in the morning; a man that slept in the parlour said, d - n it if I did not think so; she dug a pit for another, and she will fall in it, and I went to get a constable, and had her taken up; she was searched, and only one-pound note was found upon her. My notes have not been found. They offered me seven pounds of the money.

JOHN NEALE . I am an officer of Poplar. On the 30th of May, about five o'clock in the morning, I was applied to by Flood; he said that he had been robbed of ten-pounds, that Mrs. Hughes had been in his room, and had taken the ten-pound. I took Mrs. Hughes into custody. She denied having taken any. It was supposed that the husband went out with the money, as he went out unusually soon that morning. I afterwards took the husband, imagining her might have had it; no property being found upon him the magistrate discharged him.

Prisoner's Defence. I am clear of every thing. I know nothing about it.

GUILTY , aged 42.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130602-155

671. BRIDGET GOULDING was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22nd of April , a pair of sheets, value 4 s. a tablecloth, value 3 s. and a pair of ear-rings, value 4 s. the property of Michael Norton .

ELEANOR NORTON. The prisoner and her husband lodged in my house together. I missed a pair of sheets, and a tablecloth, and a pair of earrings.

JAMES WALTERS . I am a pawnbroker. On the 22nd of April, I took in a sheet; it was pledged in the name of Mary Sullivan . I advanced two shillings upon it. I cannot identify the person.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130602-156

672. MARIA CLARE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of May , a shawl, value 15 s. the property of Sophia Davis .

SOPHIA DAVIS . I live at No. 16, St Thomas's-street, Commercial-road The prisoner was servant in the house where I lodged. I lost the shawl on the 6th of May.

THOMAS PITTE . I am shopman to Mr. Killingsworth, pawnbroker, Brick-lane. The prisoner pawned this shawl with me on the 11th of May.

Prosecutrix It is my shawl; it cost me two-pound twelve shillings.

Prisoner's Defence. I never took the shawl.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130602-157

673. ANN CERBATCH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3rd of June , eight plates, value 1 s. two spoons, value 6 d. a towel, value 10 d. and a brush, value 8 d. the property of William Giles .

WILLIAM GILES . I am an publican . On the 3rd of June the prisoner asked leave to go into the back yard.

MR. FLYNN. I was desired to have an eye upon the prisoner. I sat facing the window of the back parlour. I saw the prisoner go into the kitchen and take eight plates; she put them into her apron; I took them from her, and two spoons and a towel; a scrubbing brush was in her pocket. She was very abusive.

Prosecutor. They are all my property; I saw them taken from her.

Prisoner's Defence. It is my first offence. I am a poor widow, with three small children.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130602-158

674. MARY BICKERSTAFF was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of April , two gowns, value 6 s. the property of Ann Pitman .

ANN PITTMAN . I lodge with my sister. On Easter Monday, between nine and ten in the morning, I left my sister in the room. I returned in the afternoon between three and four o'clock; my sister was not at home then. My sister came home between ten and eleven at night. On Sunday I had seen my things in the box; I did not look into my box again until Tuesday, and then my gowns were gone. I took a piece like my gown to Mr. Wright's, and found my gown there.

CHARLOTTE HARDING . I am sister to the last witness. I went out between eleven and twelve o'clock. I locked the room door. I had occasion to look in the box, and both the gowns were there. I returned between ten and eleven at night; I did not look in the box then. On the next morning my sister looked in the box; she said the gowns were gone.

MR. TILLER. I am a pawnbroker in Smithfield Bars. I produce a gown pawned by the prisoner on the 19th of April, about twelve noon-day.

SAMUEL WRIGHT . I am a pawnbroker, 137, Saffron-hill. I produce a gown pawned by the prisoner for three shillings and sixpence.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Confined 14 days in Newgate , fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130602-159

675. THOMAS BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22nd of May , an umbrella, value 5 s. the property of William Wilson .

ANN BADSON . I am a servant to Mr. William Wilson ; he keeps an umbrella shop , No. 8, Crown-street, Finsbury-square . On the 22nd of May the prisoner was brought to the shop charged with stealing an umbrella. This is the umbrella; it is worth five shillings; it is Mr. Wilson's property.

ROBERT FELL . I am a plumber; I live at Holloway. On the 22nd of May I happened to be going by Mr. Wilson's shop between twelve and one. I saw the prisoner coming down the steps with an umbrella; a man said to me, that fellow has stolen the umbrella. I halloaed out to the prisoner, young gentleman, stop. He began to run, and throwed the umbrella away. I pursued him and took him; I asked him what he did it for; he said, for bread.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Publicly whipped and discharged.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130602-160

676. ANN NASH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of November , a bolster, value 5 s. a pillow, value 3 s. three blankets, value 9 s. two sheets, value 2 s. a pair of bellows, value 2 s. a set of fire irons, value 2 s. a counterpane, value 2 s. and a looking-glass, value 2 s. the property of David Jones , in a lodging-room .

ELIZABETH JONES. In the beginning of November the prisoner took a one pair of stairs furnished room of me at five shillings a week. She staid with me until the 21st; she stopped away a week, and then she came one morning and said she should come home in the afternoon. I never saw her from that time, and when the door was opened I found all the things gone. I next saw the prisoner as I was going along Cripplegate-buildings. I brought her home to my house, and sent for the officer. He took her. She said she was very sorry for it. She was a quiet, civil woman, at the time she was in my house.

MR. CHAPMAN. I am a pawnbroker, 50, St. John-street. I produce two sheets pawned at different times and in different names, and two blankets.

THOMAS MILLER. I am an apprentice to Thomas Walker , Tabernacle Walk. I produce a pillow, blanket, and looking-glass, fire irons, counterpane, and bellows pawned by the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I leave myself to the mercy of the court. Distress drove me to do it.

GUILTY , aged 41.

Confined 1 week in Newgate , fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130602-161

677. GEORGE BROWN , alias JEREMIAH HEALLY , and JOHN OLIVER were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of May , two three-shilling bank-tokens, two shillings, and a farthing, the property of William Gavis , from his person .

WILLIAM GAVIS . On the 17th of May I was at Sadlers Wells door; the door had just opened as I missed my money. I was there about a minute before the doors were opened. I had eight shillings in my pocket; two three-shilling pieces, and two shillings. It was all safe when I came to the play-house door. I was going into the gallery.

Q. Before you went in did you observe whether the prisoners were there - A. Yes. I saw them there just before the doors were opened.

Q. Did you perceive the money go from you - A. No, I did not. As soon as I got upon the step I missed the money; it was in my breeches pocket; I found my pocket had been turned out. When the officer took the prisoners there were only seven shillings found. Both of the prisoners were near me. Heally was the nearest to me; Oliver was of his side. When I missed my money I laid hold of Heally; I said, you have robbed me. I saw nothing in his hand. I then laid hold of Oliver; I said, you have got my money. At the time I seized him he was not near enough to take my money without the other had handed it him. Oliver had seven shillings in his hand. When he was taken he said he had it of his master in the morning.

Q. What day of the week was it - A. Monday the 17th. I believe it was last Monday three weeks.

JURY. Did you lose a farthing likewise - A. That I cannot recollect.

THOMAS BROWN . I am a weaver. I went in company with the prosecutor to Sadlers Wells; I saw Gavis collar the two young fellows, and I collared Oliver. Gavis had hold of both. I found some money in Oliver's hands two three-shilling tokens and a shilling. When the officer opened his hand there were seven shillings in it. He said he had the money of his master in the morning.

JOHN FARREN . I am an officer at Sadlers Wells. When I was called Brown and Gavis had got hold of the two prisoners; Oliver had got some money in his hand; I saw it shine through his fingers; I told him to open his hand; he opened his hand; it turned out to be two three-shilling bank-tokens, a shilling, and a farthing. Garvis observed if it was his money there was orange-peel with it; he had some orange-peel in his pocket. On examining the hand there was orange-peel with the money. I looked at Oliver's hand and saw orange-peel. I then told the two prisoners they must go with me to Hatton Garden office. We searched them after they got to the office; Heally had two shillings about him and some halfpence. Oliver had nothing but halfpence in one of his pockets. Heally gave in his name as Brown, at the office.

CHARLES BROWN . I am an officer of Hatton Garden office. When the two prisoners were brought to the office I searched them myself; what money I found upon Heally I delivered to him; one of the shillings the prosecutor said he believed it was his, but he could not positively swear it. One of the shillings the constable had first he positively swore to.

Farron. This is the money I found in Oliver's hand.

Prosecutor. I cannot positively swear to the shilling.

Heally's Defence. I was going into the theatre; as soon as the door opened that gentleman collared me; I told him I had none of his money, and he let me go. I stood by him; I never offered to run away; and as they took me to Hatton Garden I said, do not collar me; I will go quietly.

Oliver's Defence. This money I took of my master on Monday morning. I had it in my hand for safety.

BROWN, GUILTY , aged 20.

OLIVER, GUILTY , aged 17.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130602-162

678. THOMAS HIBBERT and JOSEPH KAY were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of April , a handkerchief, value 5 s. the property of John Williams , from his person .

JOHN WILLIAMS . I live in Marybone-street, Golden-square. I am an haberdasher .

Q. Was you pocket picked of a handkerchief - A. Yes; about twelve o'clock in the day on the 18th of April. There was a crowd assembled to see the Prince Regent going to chapel.

Q. How lately before you missed your handkerchief had you seen it - A. About an hour or thereabouts.

Q. Did you see either of the prisoners there - A. I did not notice them. Johnson tapped me on the shoulder and said, that I had my handkerchief taken out of my pocket. I looked in my pocket directly, and my handkerchief was gone. I turned round directly, and saw the prisoners in custody of Johnson and Humphreys.

Q. Did they produce the handkerchief to you - A. They did, at the watchhouse; that was the handkerchief that I had in my pocket that day. It was a silk handkerchief, worth five shillings.

BENJAMIN JOHNSON . I am a city officer. On Sunday the 18th of April, I was in the park; the Prince was going to chapel. I saw Mr. Williams there. I was watching the prisoners; I saw them near Mr. Williams near half an hour. They noticed Humphreys; they were attempting some time; they saw Humphreys; they drew back to the wall; at last Kay backed himself towards the prosecutor, and put his hand behind, and pulled his handkerchief half out; Hibbert got close up to Kay, and finished taking the handkerchief out. They were a long time doing it. They were noticing Humphreys as much as the handkerchief. Hibbert put the handkerchief into his bosom. I laid hold of Hibbert. Mr. Williams claimed the handkerchief.

CHARLES HUMPHREYS . I am a Bow-street officer. I was in the park this day with Johnson.

Q. Did you know the persons of the prisoners before - A. I have seen them before. I watched them nearly half an hour. They saw me watching them, and when they saw me they drew back against the wall; I then got behind a tree to watch them. I laid hold of Hibbert, and Johnson took the handkerchief out of his coat. This is the handkerchief.

Prosecutor. This is my handkerchief.

Hibbert's Defence. I am willing to serve his Majesty by sea or land.

Kay's Defence. I am innocent of the charge.

Hibbert called five witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Kay called one witness, who gave him a good character.

HIBBERT, GUILTY, aged 16.

KAY, GUILTY, aged 14.

Judgment respited .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130602-163

679. JOSEPH SORTIN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of June , a handkerchief, value 2 s. the property of William Corby , from his person .

WILLIAM CORBY . I am a cheesemonger ; I live at No. 11, Old Cavendish-street, Cavendish-square. My pocket was picked on the 4th of June, on Westminster-bridge , near seven o'clock in the evening. I was looking at the rowing-match. There were a great number of people collected. I had perceived my handkerchief sale in my pocket shortly before it was gone. I did not observe it was taken until Cave and Humphreys told me it was gone, and on my turning round the prisoner was in then custody; they shewed me the handkerchief; it was my handkerchief; it is worth two shillings.

CHARLES HUMPHREYS . I am a Bow-street officer. On the 4th of June I was on duty on Westminster-bridge about half past six; I saw the prisoner coming over the bridge. I saw the prosecutor looking through the balustrades; the prisoner came up and stood close behind him. The prisoner was alone. I watched him. As soon as he came up behind the prosecutor he looked into his pocket, and then he put his fore finger into his pocket, and drawed the handkerchief out a little way. He looked

round to the right and left. I then got behind two horses in the road. I saw him take the handkerchief out of the gentleman's pocket. He was making off; I catched hold of him by the collar. Cave came-up and laid hold of him by the other side. Cave took the handkerchief out of his coat. Mr. Corby claimed it as soon as we informed him of it. The prisoner begged for God's sake to let him go. I told him I would not let him go in an hundred years.

- CAVE. I saw the prisoner go close to the gentleman; he looked backwards and forwards; soon after he turned out of the mob; Humphreys catched hold of him. I came up, and took the handkerchief from him. This is the handkerchief.

Prosecutor. It is my handkerchief.

Prisoner's Defence. I acknowledge myself guilty.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130602-164

680. CHARLOTTE PEARCE , alias HOPKINS , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of May , from the person of John Harwood , a watch, value 12 l. a purse, value 6 d. eight shillings, a 10 l. bank-note, a 5 l. bank-note, and two 1 l. bank-notes , his property.

JOHN HARWOOD . I live at 222, Piccadilly. I am a servant out of a situation. On the 26th of May, about half past eleven at night; I met the prisoner she was in company of two other young women; I was passing by when the prisoner ran up to me; she left her companions; she walked with me an hundred yards to where there is a passage that leads into Dover-yard . I only went with her to the end of the passage, and stopped there with her three minutes, not exceeding that; at the expiration of the three minutes she ran curiously away from me, up this passage, into Dover-yard. I had a watch with me in my fob. My purse was in my left pantaloons pocket; in it was a ten-pound note, a five-pound. and two ones, and a silver coin that I brought with me from Spain. On her running away from me I observed by the light of the lamps the seals hanging below her hand, not knowing that she had taken my purse. I immediately ran after her, and lost sight of her in a moment. I did not see any thing more of her that night. I then went to the spot where I met her, and saw her companions. In consequence of what I heard from them I did not proceed any further that night. On the morning of the 27th I went to my late employer; he gave me the number of the ten-pound note. On the 28th I went to the Bank to stop the note; and on the 28th, in the evening, I found the prisoner in the Three Compasses public-house. She was searched; nothing was found on her.

Q. When was it you perceived your purse was gone - A. When I lost her. The ten pound note has been traced.

Q. It is only from Mr. Brett's account that you can prove the number of the note, is it - A. There is nobody here that can prove that was the number.

Q. What is the worth of your watch - A. Twelve pounds. It is a gold watch.

Q. One hand could not take the watch and purse at one time - A. No.

Q. Were her hand about your person - A. Yes.

Q. You found a ten-pound note correspond with the number that Mr. Brett gave you - A. Yes, at the Bank.

WINNIFRED DONNOLLY . I keep the Feathers public-house in Oxford-street.

Q. Do you know the young woman at the bar - A. Yes, I saw her on the 27th, at five o'clock in the morning. She gave me a ten-pound note to change. I could not change it. I changed a one pound note for her; a little after that she sold a piece of foreign silver coin to a man of the name of Thomas. I saw her possessed of a piece of foreign coin.

SARAH THORP . I live in Duck-lane, Westminster. I know the prisoner perfectly well by seeing her in Piccadilly. On this night, at half after eleven at night, I was standing at the end of Dover-street. The prisoner passed by with her arm round Harwood's waist.

ELIZABETH SMITH . I was standing with Sarah Thorp . I saw Charlotte Pearce going up the street with her arm round Harwood. That is all I know.

JOHN PARKER . I am a clerk in the Bank of England. I only know that a ten-pound note came in the Bank; I do not know who brought it in.

MR. DUNN. I am a hosier. The note produced by Mr. Parker was changed at our shop for silk handkerchiefs. It was a man it was changed for, and I wrote upon the back of the note.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130602-165

681. THOMAS CASEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of May , three pecks of beans, value 10 s. the property of John Whitbread and Richard Morris .

RICHARD MORRIS . I am a farmer ; I live at Edmonton. My partner's name is John Whitbread . The prisoner was our carter ; we suspected he had been robbing us some time. On the 28th of May, at night, I watched him; he was going out with a load of cabbages. It was twelve o'clock at night. I watched him out of his father's house, there I saw him take something out in a sack, and get on the cart, and give it to his brother on the cart. I followed him about two hundred yards down the road. I asked him what he had got on the cart; he said, nothing. I told him I knew he had something, therefore I should examine the cart. I examined the cart, there I found the sack that I saw him put on the cart, besides what he had for the horses which was proper. I took it off, and found the sack contained split beans. The sack I am positive is our property, and I have no doubt the beans are our property. I took a sample from the saek, and a sample from the bulk in the granary: they correspond. This is the sack; it is our sack.

Prisoner's Defence. I took the beans for the horses without my master knowing it.

GUILTY .

Confined 14 days in Newgate , whipped in Jail .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130602-166

682. JOSEPH DAY , THOMAS THOMPSON , and BENJAMIN JONES , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of June , three shirts, value 15 s. fifteen pair of stockings, value 4 s. and a tablecoth, value 2 s. the property of Thomas Bass ; twenty-three towels, value 5 s. a handkerchief, value 6 d. seven pair of stockings, value 5 s. and a tub, value 5 s. the property of Ann Bradley , widow .

ANN BRADLEY . I live at No. 29. Palace-street, Pimlico ; I am a widow, and take in washing ; these things I had to wash.

Q. When did you lose them - A. On the 4th of June; I got up at six o'clock in the morning, and missed them; I had left them on the over night in the washhouse.

Q. How had they got into the washhouse - A. Over a wall. The door is always left open; it is in a small yard walled very high round.

Q. What is there on the other side of the wall - Gardens. My washhouse communicates with the house. They were all safe when I went to bed at night; the stocking I were boiling in the copper. I picked up a button in the yard where they had got over the wall; I gave it to the officer.

MRS. BASS. I wash for Mrs. Bradley; I was there at work, and had some of my own linen there; they were all safe at eleven o'clock at night when I left the washhouse.

JAMES GILLMORE . I am an officer. On the 4th of June, about two o'clock in the morning, Lee, the patrol, called me out of bed; in consequence of his information I went to Day's house in Pear-street; I broke Day's door open, and there I found these two bundles of linen, but not him. I expected I should find him either at Thompson's or Jones's lodgings; I went to Jones, and in Jones's garden I found Day. I took Day to his own lodging, handcuffed him, and went back to the same place, there I found Jones laying on the floor in the two pair of stairs. I thought at first it was a bundle. I kicked my foot so I thought against the bundle; his father said that is my son. I said I must have that bundle. I then went to Thompson's lodging; I broke open Thompson's door; there I found Thompson partly undressed, just going to bed; I told him to dress himself, which he did; and under his bed was another large bundle of linen; as soon as he had dressed himself he jumped upon the bed; he said now, Gillmore, I will show you something. He clapped his hand to a sword on the top of the tester; I told him if that was what he meaned to shew me, I had got another, and I would run him through as sure as he was alive, if he dared to take it down. He said no; I will not serve you so; but if these b - y charleys had been here by themselves there would be something the matter.

Q. That, was meaning the patrols - A. Yes; I have seen the whole three of these chaps together frequently; and I saw them all three together that evening.

ROBERT KING . On the morning of the 4th of June, I heard of Mrs. Bradley's robbery; I and Bradman went to Day's house; we saw Day, Jones, and Thompson come out. I told Bradman I thought the linen was there; I went to Gilmore, and told him of it; he came, and broke Day's door open, and found two bundles of wet linen; I went and told Mrs. Bradley to come to the office.

- POPE. I compared this button to Thompson's coat, it fitted the shank left on the coat.

Prosecutrix. This is my linen.

Day's Defence. A young man left them things in my room; he said he could not get into his lodging.

Jones's Defence. I never saw Day until Gillmore took me to his house.

Thompson's Defence. It is a hard things to swear a man's life away on account of a button, there are so many buttons alike.

DAY, GUILTY , aged 23.

THOMPSON, GUILTY , aged 20.

JONES, GUILTY , aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130602-167

683. EDWARD and JOHN BLAKE were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of May , three bullocks offals, value 3 s. the property of John Hickesman ; And RICHARD GEERING for receiving the said goods, he knowing them to have been stolen .

JOHN HINCKESMAN. I am a tripe-butcher , in Clare-street, Clare-market. The prisoner, Bellamy, was a servant of mine. On the 28th he left my house, and went with the cart to go his usual round, and he went to Mr. Jackson as usual to collect offal there. I am in an extensive line of business; I found my goods deficient; I believe Bellamy was in the habit of selling my goods. On the 28th, Baxter and Roberts were in Peter-street to watch; I was not with them.

Q. All you know that you lost some offal - A. Yes.

JOHN BAXTER . On the 28th I and Roberts were in Peter-street, we saw Mr. Hinckesman's cart; Geering was looking about; I saw Blake lift a bag on the cart; Bellamy filled it, and took it on his back to Geering's house; I and Roberts took the three prisoners into custody.

- ROBERTS. I know no more than Baxter.

Q, to Mr. Hinckesman. The offal never arrived at your house - A. No.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130602-168

684. BARBARA SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of May , two shirts, value 3 s. a waistcoat, value 1 s. a pair of stockings, value 1 s. two aprons, value 1 s. the property of Martha Hux, widow ; two napkins, value 2 s. and two pair of stockings, value 2 s. the property of William Hux .

THOMAS HUX. I am a pewterer. I live with William Hux , 77, Chiswell-street . On the 9th of May, between ten and eleven, I saw the prisoner go into the kitchen, and take these things; I stopped her in the passage with them.

MARTHA HUX. I saw the prisoner in the passage with these things; she had taken them off the horse by the kitchen tire. They are all mine, and my son's.

Prisoner's Defence. It is my first offence ever I was guilty of.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Confined 1 year in the house of correction , fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130602-169

685. ABRAHAM GILL was indicted for that he, on the 9th of April , one piece of false and counterfeited money, made to the likeness of good shilling, unlawfully did utter to Frederick Sutter , he knowing it to be false and counterfeited.

FREDERICK SUTTER. I live in Poland-street Oxford-road. On the 9th of April I was at the Royal Exchange, about o'clock in the day, I came round to the Bank in Bartholomew-lane; I saw the prisoner, he was selling oranges there; I bought six penny worth of oranges of him; I gave him a three-shilling piece, and in change he gave me two bad shillings and a good six-pence; I put them in my pocket. I afterwards saw the prisoner where he first accosted me; he was taken in custody by the constable; I gave the constable the two shillings.

HENRY MILLER. I am clerk at the Bank. On Friday the 9th of April, Mr. Sutter came to my house, he was there when I came home from the Bank. In the course of conversation it came out that I was going to London-road. He said he had some little business to do, and I could do it is well; among the other money he tended to me were these two shillings. I said they were bad; he said he should like to trace the jew that gave them to him. We went out and called on Sapwell, and when we went to apprehend him he put his hand behind him; Mr. Sapwell picked up another bad shilling. Take notice, the prisoner then said, I have not stirred from the place.

THOMAS SAPWELL . I am an officer. I went with Mr. Miller. I apprehended the prisoner; I found eight shillings and six-pence good money upon him, which I returned him at the Mansion House; behind him on the stones there lay a shilling, it was a base one. This is it; and these are the two shillings delivered to me by the prosecutor.

CALEB EDWARD POWELL. I am an assistant to the Solicitor of the Mint; I am acquainted with base money. The three shillings produced by Sapwell, are all counterfeits.

Prisoner's Defence. The gentleman knows I never gave him change of a three-shilling piece.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Confined 6 months in Newgate , and at the expiration of that time to find sureties for good behaviour for one year more .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130602-170

686. THOMAS GILL was indicted for that he, on the 30th of April , unlawfully did utter to one Jane Greenwood , a false and counterfeit one shilling and six-penny token, he knowing it to be false a and counterfeited token; and that he at the time so uttered it had in his custody and possession, one other counterfeit token .

JANE GREENWOOD . I am the wife of Joseph Greenwood; my husband keeps the Robin Hood in Skinner-street, Bishopsgate-street.

Q. Tell me whether you know the person of the prisoner - A. Yes, I do; he came to my house on the 30th of April, to pay me one shilling and ten-pence; he gave me two eighteen-penny bank-tokens; I gave him a shilling and three halfpence. I put these tokens in the till; I had no others in the till. The prisoner then went and sat in the tap-room; he called for half a pint of gin; there were more in company I served him the gin; it came to ten-pence. He gave me another eighteen-penny token; and I gave him the change. I put it in the till with the others. He called for a half quarten of gin; he gave me another eighteen penny token; I put that in the till. A woman, one of the party, called for three half quartens of gin, she gave an eighteen penny bit again; upon my looking at that, I said to my husband I thought it looked like a bad one; I said if that is a bad one they are all bad; I went to the till to look to see whether they were bad or not; I called the young man up, and told him he had given me four bad ones; I asked him if he meaned to change them; he said, no; he took them in change he could not think of changing them.

THOMAS SAPWELL . I was sent for. I received four eighteen penny tokens of the last witness. These are them. I searched the prisoner; I found three eighteen penny tokens on him, two turn out to be good, and one bad. These are the three I found on his person.

CHARLES CABORN . Q. Look at the four eighteen penny tokens produced by Sapwell, that were given to him by the prosecutrix, are they good or counterfeit - A. They are counterfeit; they appear to have been recently in circulation, and all appear to be of the same die, and one found on the prisoner and in the fire place they are the same description and same die.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in Whitechapel; I took change at a public-house, the woman could not give me change; a young person in the tap-room said young man I will give change; I took it, and thought it was good at the time.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Confined 1 year in Newgate , and at the expiration of that time to find sureties for good behaviour for two years then to come .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.


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