Old Bailey Proceedings, 7th April 1813.
Reference Number: 18130407
Reference Number: f18130407-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND ALSO THE GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, HELD AT Justice-Hall, in the Old Bailey, On WEDNESDAY the 7th of APRIL, 1813, and following Days;

BEING THE FOURTH SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF The Right Honourable GEORGE SCHOLEY , LORD MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY JOB SIBLY, No. 4, CARTHUSIAN-STREET, ALDERSGATE-STREET.

LONDON:

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED (BY THE AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON,) By R. Butters, No. 22, Fetter-lane, Fleet-street.

WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON.

Before the Right Honorable GEORGE SCHOLEY , Lord Mayor of the City of London; the Right Honorable Edward Lord Ellenborough , Chief Justice of His Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir Archibald Mackdonald , Knt. Lord Chief Baron of His Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir Alexander Thompson, Knt. one of the Barons of His Majesty's Court of Exehequer; Sir Alan Chambre , knt. one of the Justices of Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir John William Anderson, bart. Sir Charles Price , bart. John Ansley , esq. Aldermen of the said City; John Silvester , esq. Recorder of the said City; Sir Matthew Bloxam, knt. Christopher Smith , esq. George Bridges , esq. Aldermen of the said City; and Newman Knowlys, esq. Common Serjeant of the said City; His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

London Jury.

John Annis ,

John Sikes ,

Edward Brander ,

Joseph Barnes ,

James Forth ,

Thomas Smith ,

Edward Biggs ,

Samuel Cafe ,

Oliver Hall ,

Peter Williams ,

Charles Pendrill ,

William Andrews .

First Middlesex Jury.

William Cowling ,

Joseph Price ,

George Mitchell ,

George Mackey ,

John Craft ,

Thomas Gurney ,

William Bedford ,

George Sculthorp ,

Charles Dudly ,

John Biggs ,

Richard Webb ,

Thomas Wilkinson .

Second Middlesex Jury.

Robert Pearce ,

William Watherstone ,

John Trott ,

Joseph Watts ,

William Goodcheape ,

Nicholas Benson ,

William Greenap ,

Thomas Bromley ,

John Benton ,

John Reynolds ,

Samuel Haward ,

Richard Elsworthy .

Reference Number: t18130407-1

345. ELIZABETH PRICE was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Ann Pearce , spinster , about the hour of eleven in the forenoon, on the 18th of February , and stealing therein, two sheets, value 10 s. a blanket, value 4 s. a rug, value 1 s. and a tea-kettle, value 1 s. the property of Benjamin Wallis ; three bonnets, value 3 s. a cap, value 1 s. 6 d. a neck handkerchief, value 1 s. and a band-box, value 6 d. the property of Jane Pearce .

JANE PEARCE . I lodge at the house of Benjamin Wallis, 19, Charles-street, Drury-lane . He does not live in that house. He lives in the same street, at No. 40. On the 18th of February, about ten in the morning, I went out of my apartment. I locked the door with a padlock. I returned about six o'clock in the evening; the padlock was then off. I missed my landlord's things. I went to Elizabeth Price , and accused her of it. She said, that Benjamin Wallis had been in my apartment and had taken away the things. I went to Wallis. He came with me, and then the prisoner said the things were in her apartment, and she produced the articles.

BENJAMIN WALLIS . Q. You are the owner of this house in which the witness and the prisoner lived - A. Yes. I do not live in it myself.

Q. Do you remember the witness coming to you, and mentioning about the padlock of her door being taken off, and the things missing - A. Yes. I went back with her. I went to the prisoner's apartment. I saw my things in the prisoner's apartment. I have got my property.

Q. Have you them here - A. No, I have not. I had them here last sessions. I thought it was unnecessary to have them here again.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18130407-2

346. GEORGE WHITE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of March , six quarts of wine, value 1 l. 10 s. and nine bottles, value 2 s. the property of Mary Brodrick , spinster .

SAMUEL TAUNTON I am an officer of Bow-street office. On the 1st of March last, I went to the house of Miss Brodrick, in Grosvenor-place , to apprehend the prisoner with a warrant. I told him, I came to apprehend him on account of sedition, and I must search the drawers for some papers. This was in the butler's pantry. He opened a drawer where there was some wine in it.

Q. How much - A.Nine bottles; seven quarts and two pints. I asked him who that wine belonged to in the drawer. He said, that Miss Brodrick had given it out to him, and he must account for it. I told him, I must inform Miss Brodrick of it. I suspected it was not so. He said, he hoped I would not; that it was wine he had brought there; it was his own. I then sent up stairs for Miss Brodrick. Miss Brodrick came and examined the wine in his presence, and suspected it to be her's. We examined the inner cellar door, and found the patent lock locked. I then examined the partition over the inner cellar door; two pieces of boards were loose, and the nails which had fastened them were taken out; one of the boards fell down when these two boards were taken away. Any one, by the assistance of a ladder, might go in or out. The wine is here; seven bottles. It is Cape wine, two bottles; the rest is chiefly white wine.

MISS BRODRICK. Q. Has the prisoner been in your service as butler - A. Yes, about seven weeks before this was discovered.

Q. Where did you keep your wine - A. In the inner cellar. I had the key of that lock.

Q. Do you deliver out to the butler a certain quantity at a time for the consumption of the family - A. Yes.

Q. Had you, in your inner cellar, any Cape wine in pints - A. Yes.

Q. Since the prisoner had been in your service had you ever delivered out any Cape wine to him in pints - A. No, never.

Q. How lately had you delivered out any wine to the butler, not Cape wine - A. About three weeks or a month ago, other wine, Sherry or Port.

Q. When you went down to the inner cellar did you find in the outer cellar any wine such as you had delivered out to the prisoner - A. Yes, I believe three bottles of Sherry, and two of Port.

Q. Can you form any opinion whether the quantity you found there with the quantity that you had consumed was about the quantity that you had delivered to him - A. I think nearly so. But I am quite certain I never delivered to him any Cape wine.

Q. Did you see the cellar door opened - A. Yes, I did. There was a padlock to it, and another lock. I saw a board fall down on Taunton's shoulder, and was surprised where it came from. I never entrusted the prisoner with the key of the wine cellar.

Q. Upon your examining your cellar did you miss any wine - A. I missed twenty-four quarts and six pints.

JURY. What did the prisoner say to you respecting the wine - A. Not a word.

Q.to Taunton. Have you tasted whether any of that wine is Cape wine - A. This bottle is Cape wine.

Q. What is the value of the bottles of wine - A.Three shillings the white, and five shillings the red.

Prisoner's Defence. I had the care of the outside cellar, and in cleaning out that cellar the board fell down, just in the same manner as it did to the officer. I mentioned it to the coachman; he persuaded me not to tell my mistress of it, and by his persuasion I went in and took two of the bottles of wine that is here now; the others, the coachman put his hand in and took them. I did not break the premises. If I am suspected of sedition, let me be placed in the illustrious Wellington's army, and see

how I will stand in the day of battle. I have lived in respectable services all my life, and never was suspected before.

GUILTY , aged 27.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

Reference Number: t18130407-3

347. JACOB JACOBS was indicted for that he on the 13th of February , twenty pieces of false counterfeit milled money and coin, each of them made and counterfeited to the likeness and similitude of a good shilling, the same counterfeit pieces of money not being cut in pieces unlawfully did put off to Elizabeth Jackson, for two shillings and a three-shilling bank token .

SECOND COUNT, for feloniously putting off the like pieces of counterfeit milled money, for the sum of five shillings, being at a lower rate and value than they by their denomination did import to be counterfeited for.

ELIZABETH JACKSON . Q. On Saturday, the 13th of February last, were you at the Royal Oak public-house - A. Yes, in Back Hill, Clerkenwell I there met Herbert, Matthews, and Hancock, police officers. Herbert gave me two shillings, and a three-shilling bank token, to purchase a poundsworth of bad money of the prisoner, Jacobs. I afterwards went to Petticoat-lane, and went into the Red Lion public-house, and enquired for Jacobs, of a Jew that was there. I was directed to an opposite public-house, the sign I don't know. I there found Jacob Jacobs. I told Jacobs what I wanted. He told me to go to another public-house. I told him I come for five shillings worth more money.

Q. Had you had any previous transaction with him - A. I had seen him before, and bought of him twice. I mentioned the name of flats to him.

Q. What are flats - A. Bad shillings. I asked him for five shillingsworth of flats. That is a score. He told me that he would go and fetch them. I had had a score of him before, and I had the same quantity again. He desired me to go to another public-house, and he would come to me and bring them. He said, the public-house the left hand side of Petticoat-lane, the corner of a gateway. He had taken me to that public-house before, which made me know it again. I went there. He came to me in about ten minutes after I was there. He gave me wrapped up in a bit of paper twenty bad shillings. I gave him a three-shilling bank token, new coin, and two shillings. The three-shilling bank token, and the two shillings had been marked by Herbert. Herbert came into the public-house immediately almost after the money was given into my hands.

Q. What became of the score of money - A. The twenty shillings were taken from me by Mr. Matthews.

JOHN HERBERT. Q. Did you go with the last witness on the 13th of February - A. I did. I delivered to her one three-shilling bank token, the last coin, and two shillings. They were good, and marked. I marked the token with an X. I gave her the money to go and purchase bad money of the prisoner, which she had done before. She went first of all to the Red Lion, Petticoat-lane, on the right hand side going up out of Bishopsgate-street. The Jews directed her to a public-house across the lane, on the left hand side. I do not recollect the sign. There she went in.

Q. Did you go in - A. I did not at that house. She came out and said, all is right. I saw her go in another public-house. (I think it is the Flying Horse; it is just out of the City, in Middlesex), and the prisoner followed her. I went in and called for a pint of porter, and pulled down my hat. I saw the prisoner put into Jackson's hand, a paper. I saw her give him something. After seeing that, I turned upon my heels, and came out instantly. The prisoner came out of the door. I catched hold of him directly, and secured him. Matthews searched the prisoner, and found the two shillings, and the three-shilling token that I had marked.

JOHN MATTHEWS . I went in company with the first witness to Petticoat-lane, and I was present when this money was marked. The moment the prisoner came out of the public-house, I catched hold of his collar. In his left hand waistcoat pocket, I took out the money that I had formerly marked.

Q. Shew the money to Herbert.

Herbert. This is the money that I had marked. I searched Elizabeth Jackson at a tobacconist's shop in Bishopsgate-street; there I found the twenty counterfeit shillings under her left arm pit, in a paper as they are now. They are counterfeit.

(The counterfeited shillings handed to the Jury)

JURY. There are some good ones amongst them.

Matthews. If there are any good ones among them it has happened by mistake. I had them in a paper, and they have never been undone since they were shewn before the magistrate.

CALEB EDWARD POWELL . Q. You assist the Solicitor of the Mint - A. I do.

Q. You are well acquainted with coin - A. Yes.

Q. Look at these twenty shillings, and see if there are twenty counterfeit shillings - A. Here are twenty counterfeit, and six that are good that he mixed with it.

Q. to Matthews. How came the six shillings that are good to be amongst those that are counterfeit - A. I produced some good shillings, which I took out of my pocket before the magistrate. I can swear they are the twenty I produced before the magistrate, and they are the twenty counterfeit shillings I took from Elizabeth Jackson .

Q. to Mr. Powell. You have given evidence for many years in these causes, how long have you been acquainted with coin - A. About twenty-two or twenty-three years. Matthews produced twenty pieces of counterfeit milled money before the magistrate. I actually recollect he produced a paper containing twenty counterfeit shillings, as the purchase of the three-shilling bank token and two shillings. There were some more silver produced, which he gave the magistrate, and the magistrate put it altogether.

Prisoner's Defence. It was on Saturday night I went to the public-house to get a pint of beer. I had a gold broach. I wanted to dispose of this broach. She asked me, what I wanted for this

broach. I said, fifteen shillings. She said, she would give me five shillings. I said, you shall have it I was in distress for money, and when I went away from her I was knocked down by three men. I am quite innocent of what I am brought here for.

ELIZABETH JACKSON. I never saw any thing of the broach. I did not bargain with him for a broach.

Q. to Mr. Powell. You call this milled money, do not you - A. Yes.

Herbert. The two shillings are marked with a dot, and the three shilling token with an X.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Confined One Year in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18130407-4

348. ROBERT BARNES was indicted for feloniously making an assault upon Samuel Highfield . in the King's highway, on the 3d of April , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, a hat, value 5 s. his property.

SAMUEL HIGHFIELD . I live at 31, Ray-street, Clerkenwell. I am a watchmaker . On Friday night last, I was in Whitecross-street , at twelve o'clock. I had been to Whitechapel.

Q. Had you been drinking - A. I had. I was not so intoxicated but what I knew what I was doing. I was going through Whitecross-street. I went into a cook-shop, and had something to eat. After I came out of the cook's-shop, I had not been gone many yards before two men came up to me, one put his hand to my breeches pocket. I turned round, and seized him by the collar. They came up to me behind. I turned round, and caught hold of him by the collar. The same moment my hat was take off. The person that took it off my head ran away from me, and ran down a court.

Q. What did you lose - A. My hat. I had nothing in my pocket. The prisoner was the man that put his hand to my pocket. I am quite certain of it. I never let him go until the watchman came up and took him.

Q. What did you do after you laid hold of him - A. I called the watch; the watch came and took him.

Q. What became of the other man - A. I do'nt know; he took away my hat.

Q. I think you say you were walking along and the prisoner came behind you; he did not meet you - A. No, he did not. He came up towards me from behind. I felt his hand in my pocket, and turned round and seized him by the collar, and at that instant my hat was taken off, just as I turned round, and seized the man my hat was taken off and ran away with. That is all I know.

Prisoner. Were not you very much intoxicated - A. I certainly was intoxicated. but not so but what I knew what I was doing. I saw the man run away with my hat, and I called the watch.

ROBERT GOULD . I am a watchman. I know nothing further than I was called by Highfield to his assistance. As soon as possible I could get down Highfield had hold of the prisoner by the collar. I took him out of his hands, and took him to the watchhouse in Bunhill-row.

Prisoner. Was not the prosecutor very much intoxicated, and could not give charge of me at the time - A. He was not so much intoxicated. He gave charge to me at the time. The officer did not book it till the morning. I saw the one run down the alley with the hat the moment that I saw Highfield hold the prisoner's collar.

RICHARD HUTCHINS . Gould gave the prisoner to me at the watchhouse.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming home. I met the prosecutor coming out of an eating-house in Whitecross-street. He fell down. He asked me to lift him up, which I did. He laid hold of me, and called the watch. He was so intoxicated he could not give charge until the morning.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

Reference Number: t18130407-5

349. WILLIAM WEBB was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Abraham Israel , about the hour of twelve on the night of the 5th of March , and stealing therein, a set of bed furniture, value 5 l. a counterpane, value 1 l. and four chair covers, value 5 s. his property.

ABRAHAM ISRAEL . I am a housebroker . I live in Maiden-lane, Covent Garden, and I have a cottage at Fulham . I live there sometimes, not always.

Q. Does anybody else live there - A. No. My family go there now and then.

Q. How long before the offence was committed did anybody sleep there - A. A week before, I slept there. I have a bed, and every thing there comfortable. I slept in that bed a week before this happened.

Q. When did you discover these things taken away - A. Between five and six o'clock on the evening of the 6th of March. I discovered one of the shutters were open; a piece was cut out.

Q. When had you last seen it before that - A. I had been actually in the house a week before that, and on the 6th of March, when I opened the street door, I saw my kitchen door open. When I got on the stair-case, I saw the bed-room door open; then I saw the bed furniture was taken away.

Q. What reason have you for thinking it was done in the night time or day - A. That I cannot say.

Q. Then the burglary is out of the question. You saw some of your things that were taken away - A. Yes; the furniture of a bed, a counterpane, were taken from the bedstead, and three or four chair covers.

Q. Have you got the furniture here - A. Yes, this is it, it is mine, and the counterpane and chair covers are mine. I left them in my house when I had been there and slept there last, before I discovered the robbery.

MR. BURFORD. I produced the bed furniture, the counterpane, and chair covers.

Q. How did you come by them - A. The prisoner brought them to my house on the 6th of March, and said he wanted to pledge them for Mr. Battesby. I told him I could not take them in of him; Mr. Battesby must come himself. He said, Mr. Battesby could not come, but Mrs. Battesby would.

He went away to fetch one of them. He never came back again to claim the things for Mr. Battesby. I advanced him nothing upon them. He asked me two pound or guineas upon them. Mr. Israel came the same night, and took them away from my house. My wife went to Mr. Israel first, and then to Mr. Battesby. Mr. Battesby said, he knew where the prisoner lived. The prisoner came to me between four and five.

Prisoner's Defence. I am quite innocent.

Q.to Mr. Burford. What is the value of these things - A. Between six and seven pounds.

GUILTY - DEATH, aged 17.

Of stealing in the dwelling-house to the value of 40 s. but not of breaking and entering .

[The prisoner was recommended to mercy by the prosecutor on account of his youth.]

First Middlesex jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18130407-6

350. WILLIAM BOURNE and MARY BAIL were indicted for feloniously stealing, in the dwelling-house of Thomas Fisk , on the 18th of March, a coat, value 20 s. a pocket-book, value 3 s. and three one-pound bank notes , the property of Charles Fisk .

CHARLES FISK . My father, Thomas Fisk , keeps the Crown public-house, in Narrow-street, Limehouse .

Q. Did you see either of the prisoners there on the 18th - A. Yes; they came there about five o'clock. On the 18th of March, I went to my father's house. My father had met with an accident; he requested me to go into his cellar and to do some work, and at the time I went down the prisoner's were in the tap-room, and apparently very much intoxicated. Previous to my going into the cellar, I pulled off my coat and laid it in the bar, in the pocket of which was the pocket-book, and in the pocket were three one-pound notes, and sundry memorandums. When I came up from the cellar, the prisoners were gone and my coat also. My suspicion fell on the prisoners. I and Captain Christie went in pursuit of them. We overtook them on Cock-hill, Shadwell. The woman had the coat concealed under her cloak. We took them into Mr. Roger's, a grocer's shop. I then went in search of an officer. When I returned the pocket-book was discovered. The coat was in the possession of Mr. Rogers.

Q. Who took the coat from the woman - A. Captain Christie, in my presence.

JOHN ROGERS. I am a grocer, and a constable of the Thames police. On the 18th of March, about half past seven in the evening, the female prisoner came into my shop and asked me whether I could tell her of a pawnbroker in the neighbourhood. I told her there were two lower down. She said, she did not wish to go lower down. She wanted to know whether there were any further up. I told her there were several further up. As she turned out, Mr. Fisk came up. He said, this is the woman, and put her into my shop again. I saw Mr. Christie take the coat from her. I believe it was wrapped in her apron. Mr. Fisk said, there is the man that was with her. I took him and brought him in the shop and searched him. In his hat I found a pocketbook, containing three one-pound bank notes, and sundry memorandums, and a pair of gloves. This is the pocket-book.

Prosecutor. That is my pocket-book. I had three one-pound notes in my pocket-book, and no other money. This is my coat; I had it in November last.

Bourne's Defence. This woman is innocent.

Ball's Defence. This man brought me the coat, and asked me to pledge it. I did not know but what it was his own.

BOURNE, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 53.

BALL, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 40.

First Middlesex jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

Reference Number: t18130407-7

351. CATHERINE HENRICHS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of March , two shirts, value 6 s. the property of Henry Wells , privately in his shop .

HENRY WELLS. I am a slop-seller , No. 78, Cable-street, Whitechapel . On the 20th of March, the prisoner came into my shop. She offered a pair of leather breeches for sale. I told her I did not deal in such articles. She left the shop, and in about a minute she returned again. She asked me if I could tell her where she could sell them. I told her I thought Rosemary-lane was a likely place. She turned rather sideways from me, and held up the skirt of her gown to prevent me seeing what she took. I saw her make a grasp of something then on the shelves. She took two shirts; they are in Court. I rised from my seat instantly. I was in the back room. My son, a little boy of seven years of age, met me, and told me that she had stolen something, which I was sensible of myself. He rather interrupted me from going out of the house. I went out of the house as fast as I could. I pursued her, and took her in Rosemary-lane, near the Hampshire Hog, a public-house called by that name. I told her, that she had got two shirts of mine. I found them upon her. She acknowledged that she had been guilty of the crime, and begged me to forgive her. I told her I had been so often robbed, I was determined to punish her. I value the shirts at six shillings.

MR. MOSES. I am an headborough. I live near Mr. Wells, Mr. Wells gave me the prisoner. I took her in custody. I saw the shirts under her arm when I came up. I asked her how she came by the shirts. She fell upon her knees and begged for mercy. Mr. Wells gave charge of her.

Prisoner's Defence. My husband let me have them things. He told me he would meet me in the course of an hour; he has never come near me since. I thought I had a right to make money of them. I came to London on the 13th of January, from Dublin. He left me the shirts and the smallclothes. I never took the shirts out of the shop. I wanted to make money of them to go home to Dublin.

Q.to prosecutor. Are you sure you had these shirts in your shop on the 20th of March - A. Yes. I had them in my shop on that very day. I am sure they are my property.

GUILTY, aged 27,

Of stealing, but not privately .

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18130407-8

352. JOHN LINSEY was indicted for feloniously making an assault, on the King's highway, upon Thomas Read , on the 21st of February , and taking from his person and against his will, a seal, value 4 s. a watch-key, value 2 s. and part of a steel watch-chain, value 2 d. his property.

THOMAS READ . I live at No. 7, Charter-house-lane. On the 21st of February, I was going home, I was attacked in Charter-house-lane , about a quarter after eleven at night. I was attacked by three men; one of them laid hold of my neck handkerchief, and the other two laid hold of my collar and set my arms fast. They had one hand over each of my shoulders. They held my shoulders so that my arms was totally confined. I immediately called watch. They were at my pockets. I felt my watch go, as I thought, out of my pocket. I felt a pull at my watch-chain, and my watch-chain broke. Here is part of my watch-chain attached to my watch now. There was a metal seal and steel key, and the chain was steel. They took to their heels as soon as the chain broke. I pursued them, crying out, stop thief. I saw the prisoner when the patrol laid hold of him. I immediately told the patrol he was one of them that stopped me. He was taken about five yards from me. I had run with him about twenty or thirty yards or more. I was within a yard of him all the way down the lane, and the greatest distance I was from him was when he was taken; that might be nine or ten yards, or not so much. I never lost sight of him. It was a clear night. I am sure he is the same man that I pursued. There was no one else in the street that I saw, but the three men that stopped me.

Q. When had you last felt your chain and seal hang to your watch - A. I looked at my watch ten minutes before they laid hold of me. I looked at my watch to see what o'clock it was. I pulled it out by the chain.

Q. Were you sober - A. I was. I had not drank anything at all.

- MACKDONALD. I am a patrol. On Sunday night, the 21st of February, I was on duty in Cow-cross, and hearing a person crying out, watch, I ran up. I saw the prisoner running. When I got half way across the road, he stopped. I said, where are you running. He said, I am going home. I said, where are you running. He said, I am going home. I said, I must know first what they call watch for. I took him back to the prosecutor. He said, that is the man. He gave me charge of the prisoner.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 21.

First Middlesex jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

Reference Number: t18130407-9

353. DAVID WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of March , a mantle, value 30 s. the property of Joshua Griffen , privately in his shop .

JOSHUA GRIFFEN . I keep a shop in Oxford-street . I am a tailor and woollen-draper .

Q. On the 24th of March, did you see the prisoner in your shop - A. I did not see the prisoner in the shop. A short time after the mantle was taken away I missed it. Thomas Clark saw the prisoner in the shop.

THOMAS CLARK . I am a paper hanger. I was going home, and as I went by Mr. Griffen's shop, I saw the prisoner unhang the mantle at the side of the shop, at the door post. I saw him do it. He ran away with the mantle. I pursued him, and overtook him. I took him in custody, and the mantle was on him. I took the prisoner back to Mr. Griffen's shop. Mr. Griffen claimed the mantle. As soon as I went into the shop the prisoner asked me what I was going to do with him. I told him to take him back. He had run a good distance from the shop to the other side Russell-street. I never lost sight of him.

Prosecutor. I missed the mantle a short time after it was stolen. In a short time after that, Thomas Clark brought the prisoner into my shop with the mantle upon him.

Q. What is the worth of that mantle - A. One pound ten shillings. This is the mantle; it is mine.

JOHN MATTHEWS . I assisted Clark in bringing the prisoner back. The prisoner delivered the mantle into my hands as soon as I came up. I took him and the mantle back to the shop.

Prisoner's Defence. I was never in the shop.

GUILTY, aged 35,

Of stealing, but not privately ,

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18130407-10

354. THOMAS CLARK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2nd February , two pecks, of of oats, value 2 s. two pecks of chaff, value 4 d. the property of John Johnson , the elder and younger, and Alexander Brice .

ALEXANDER BRICE . Q. What is the name of your partners - A. John Johnson, the elder and younger. The prisoner was in our service in February last, as a carman : he drove three horses. The food for the horses is given out in the morning, when the horses go out to labour, in nose-bags; a nose-bag for each horse, which contains a peck and a half of corn and chaff. Our corn passes through rollers and it is bruised flat. The horses are old. The corn is bruised flat to save mastication. In consequence of suspicion, and from the appearance of the horses, we suspected the prisoner. I went to Goodenough. Goodenough took Clark a prisoner. We then went to Tyler's house. Tyler was not in the stable. Goodenough went into his stable, from thence he brought out the food on which the horses were feeding, which apparently were our own.

JAMES WEBB . Q. You are in the service of Tyler - A. Yes.

Q. On Tuesday, the 2nd of February, did you find that man at the bar - A. Yes; I saw him empty the three nose-bags full of oats and chaff, into Edward Tyler 's bushel bag, in Charles-street, by Westminster Abbey.

Q. Was your master there - A. Yes. My master is a coal hawker. He sent me home with the corn; I put it in the back kitchen, in a basket.

Q. What did your master do with the corn and chaff he bought of this man - A. He used to give it to his horses.

Q.Where is your master now - A. I don't know I am sure.

WILLIAM GOODENOUGH . I am a constable. I went to Tyler's house to apprehend him. I found his horse feeding upon some corn and chaff. This is what I took from the manger that Tyler's horse was feeding upon, and this is a sample that I took from Mr. Brice's bin.

Q. Were did Tyler live - A. In St. Ann's-lane, Westminster.

GUILTY , aged 41.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18130407-11

355. WILLIAM WRIGHT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22nd of March , eight pounds weight of beef, value 5 s. the property of Robert Hughes .

WALTER HUGHES . I apprehended the prisoner after the theft.

JOHN GARROD . I saw the prisoner take the beef from the shop-board. The shop is in Shepherds Market .

Prosecutor. I pursued the prisoner from information. We both took him together. When we came up to him we found the beef in his green apron. He begged for mercy, and said it was distress that drove him to it. We took him to the officer's house, which was close by.

- BALL. I am an officer. I found the prisoner and Mr. Hughes at my house. The prisoner said he had done it through distress. I searched him, and found four shillings in his pocket. I have known the prisoner eighteen or nineteen years. He was a coachman in different families.

Prisoner's Defence. I have a wife and four children. I was very much distressed. It is a thing I never did before.

GUILTY , aged 47.

Whipped and discharged.

First Middlesex jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18130407-12

356. CHARLOTTE STEVENS and SARAH FEATHERSTONE were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of January , a watch, value 10 l. a chain, value 3 l. two seals, value 3 s a key, value 7 s. the property of John Hardy , from his person .

JOHN HARDY . Q. Did you lose a watch and seals - A. Yes. On the 9th of February, I was returning home to Piccadilly, from Lord Townshend's house. About half past ten o'clock in the evening, I was crossing the end of Shepherd's-market . I was accosted by the two prisoners; they asked me to go with them. I said, no, it was too late to go any where but my own home. They pressed me very much to go with them. I stopped with the tall one, and spoke to her. She pressed me to go with her. I said, it is time for you and me to go home, and when I was talking to her, she said to Featherstone, Sall, come here. When the other prisoner came up they both instantly started, and when I had crossed the market I put my hand to feel for my watch; it was gone; I pursued them. I did not see them from that time until Saturday the 28th of February. We found Featherstone in a street behind Sloane-street, and as soon as she saw me she was very much alarmed. She said, there is a gentleman coming after me. I did not see Stevens until the 1st of March, at the watchhouse in Mount-street. I have never seen my watch again. I lost it entirely.

WILLIAM LEE . I apprehended the two prisoners: they denied any knowledge of the watch, an said they always walked Piccadilly.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18130407-13

357. JOSEPH PHILLIPS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of February , two seals, value 2 l. 8 s. and one key, value 2 d his property of Lionel Girling , from his person .

LIONEL GIRLING. I am a licensed victualler . On the 19th of February, about ten o'clock in the evening, the prisoner and two women came into my house. There were two other women there at the time they came in. The two women were quarrelling with the two other that were there. I desired the prisoner and the two women to walk out. A gentleman came in. I begged his assistance in turning the prisoner out. I took hold of the prisoner's arm. One of the women that came in with the prisoner caught hold of me and twisted me round I caught hold of her arm and twisted her round, to get at the prisoner. She took off both her pattens to strike me, but was prevented by another woman. I took hold of the prisoner. He took hold of the seals of my watch, and cut the ribbon. I saw him do it. I did not see any thing by which he did it. I immediately felt, and found my seals were gone. I charged the gentleman not to let the prisoner out; he had cut my seals off. I sent to the watchhouse for the constable, and on the constable coming the seals were found on the ground. The men and the women appeared to be drunk.

MR. WILLIAMS. I went into the house about a quarter past eleven. At that time there might be about a dozen women in the room. It appeared that one woman and the prisoner had a scuffle with the landlord. He in a moment turned round, and said to me, sir, secure the door, the villain has cut my seals off after the constable came. The seals were found and a knife under the bench.

MR. KENDAL. I am one of the men that came in the house last. We were all very much in liquor together, and the young women were all in liquor. I only know we were all very drunk.

- CRESWELL. I am a constable. I saw the prisoner sitting between two girls. I picked up the seals at one of the girls feet.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18130407-14

358. THOMAS BROADHURST was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of March , a patent lamp, value 8 s. the property of George Johnson .

GEORGE JOHNSON . I keep the King's Arms public-house, in Orchard-street, Westminster . On the 16th of March, the prisoner was in my tap-room; he asked me to give him a pipe. I went into my bar and gave him a pipe. In about two minutes after I heard the door go quick. I called my wife to ask whether the prisoner had paid for his pint

of beer. She said, yes. She went into the taproom, and said one of the patent lamps were gone. I went into the Broadway, Westminster; I saw the prisoner with the lamp under his coat. He was willing for me to take it from him. A constable was near; he took it from him.

WILLIAM MILLS . I am a constable. I took this lamp from the prisoner.

Prosecutor. It is mine.

GUILTY , aged 60.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

Reference Number: t18130407-15

359. WILLIAM CLARK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of March , a jacket, value 25 s. and a handkerchief, value 1 d. the property of William Smith .

JOHN NOCK. I am about ten years of age. My sister gave me the jacket in a handkerchief to carry to my brother, over the water. The prisoner met me, and sent me up a three pair of stairs room in Wild-street , in a court. I went up into the three pair room, and asked for the name of Smith, and as I was going up he took the bundle out of my hand. He had asked me for the bundle before. I denied him. The bundle belonged to William Smith . The constable found the handkerchief which contained the jacket. The prisoner took the bundle from me, and went up Wild-street. When I came down stairs I could not see the prisoner; I began to cry, and then John Russell, a young man, came up to me. I told him what had happened. After that, I saw the prisoner in Monmouth-street.

Q. Are you sure that the prisoner is the man that took the bundle from you - A. Yes, I am. It was a jacket in an handkerchief.

JOHN RUSSELL . Q. Did you see this boy in the street - A. Yes I was going down Wild-street; I saw the boy crying; I asked him what was the matter. He said, a man had sent him up stairs, and had ran away with his bundle. The boy described the man to me. I saw the prisoner in Monmouth-street. The boy said that was the man. I went over to him, and asked him for the boy's bundle. He said, he had not seen it; he had not seen the boy. I said you must go along with me. The prisoner said, I hope you will not hurt me. I said, I did not want to hurt him, but he must go along with me. He then said, if I would not hurt him, he would give me the jacket, and he wanted me to go into a court in Long Acre. I would not go. I took him into custody, and took him to Bow-street. The prisoner there was searched, and the handkerchief was found on him.

Q. The prisoner had not the jacket when you took him - A. No. This is the handkerchief that was found on him.

Nock. That is the handkerchief that contained the jacket; I am sure of it.

Russell. When the handkerchief was found, the prisoner said he gave three halfpence for it, to another boy that was playing in the street; and when I asked him if he had the boy's bundle, he said, he would give me the jacket or the money to make it up. As soon as ever the boy saw the handkerchief, he said, that was the handkerchief that the jacket was wrapped in. And the person that belonged to the handkerchief described the handkerchief before she saw it.

MRS. SMITH. I am sister to the little boy. I gave him the handkerchief to to carry to his brother-in-law. This is the handkerchief that the jacket was tied in. I value the jacket at twenty-five shillings. The handkerchief is of no value hardly.

THOMAS PRICE. I am a constable. I searched the prisoner, and took the handkerchief from him. He wanted to make it up. He told us the jacket should be forth coming. I refused.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of the crime.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and whipped in jail .

First Middlesex jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18130407-16

360. ELIZABETH MURRAY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of March , four yards and a half of linen cloth, value 6 s . the property of Mary Cawthorn , widow .

ESTHER DENNIS. I am servant to Mrs. Cawthorn; she keeps an haberdasher's shop in Chiswell-street . On the 24th of March, about five o'clock in the evening, I was sitting in the parlour, when the prisoner came into the shop. As I was going out of the parlour, I saw her take something off the counter, and put it under her petticoats. I asked her what she wanted. She said, she had a pound of butter to sell for twenty pence; we could not agree for the price; she went out of the shop.

Q. Had she any basket in her hand - A. Yes. I went and told my mistress that I suspected that the woman had taken something off the counter. We went directly after her, both of us. I saw her go into the Crown public-house, with her basket with her. I went in after her, and said, will you come back, we will buy the butter of you. She came a little way. She turned round. Miss Mary Cawthorn , my young mistress, we called for assistance. A gentleman came up, and took hold of her, and she was brought back to our house. The gentleman looked into her basket, and the cloth was found in her basket in my presence. She said she bought it.

MARY CAWTHORN . In consequence of information from Elizabeth Dennis , she and I followed the prisoner. We told her to come back and we would buy the butter. She came back a little way, then she struck me a violent blow on my breast and in my face. A gentleman assisted and brought her back.

- PRINCE. I am an officer. I produce the cloth; it was found in the prisoner's basket. I have had it in my custody ever since.

Prosecutrix. The cloth I can swear to its being mine, by the private mark that is on it.

Prisoner's Defence. I went into this shop and asked them if they wanted any butter; it was twenty-pence a pound. The young woman said it was too

dear. I came out of the shop. The young woman came after me and said she would buy the butter. I told her I would not let the basket go out of my hand. She said I had a piece of cloth. I then said, come along with me, I will shew you where I bought the cloth. She took the cloth and a gentleman marked it.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

Reference Number: t18130407-17

361. MATTHIAS FORWARD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of March , four pounds weight of flour, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of John Aris .

JOHN ARIS . I am a baker in Compton-street. The prisoner was my journeyman . In consequence of information I suspected the prisoner. On Thursday, the 4th of March, I observed the prisoner as he was going out with his bread. I stopped him, and told him he had got something of mine. He assured me he had not. I said, I shall see. He kept going forward. I said, you shall stop, and I see what you have got. I saw nothing in his hands, nor did he appear to have any thing in his pockets. He was still going forward to cross the street. I told him to stop. He came back at last, but very unwillingly. Then I laid hold of his hat. It was a high crowned hat. On my pulling it off, there was a bag of flour in it. I said, this is a pretty thing to rob me of my flour. He said, I am sorry; it is the first time I ever did it; he hoped I would forgive him. The bag I put upon the window, and when my back was turned be put the flour out of his bag into the bin in the shop. I sent for the constable. He came, and I gave him in charge. The flour is worth more than fourteen pence.

THOMAS BURRIDGE . I am a constable. I received charge of the prisoner. He said he had taken a little flour to make a pudding; it was the first time; he hoped his master would forgive him; he would never do so again.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence; called five witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Confined Two Years in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18130407-18

362. WILLIAM GREENBY , alias GREENHILL , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of March , four loaves of bread, value 6 s. 2 d. the property of William Senior .

EDWARD SEALY . I am servant to Mr. Jackson, of Kentish Town . On the 11th of March, I saw the prisoner take two loaves out of Mr. Senior's barrow; he put them under his left arm. The baker had left his barrow. He then took two other loaves, and put them under his right arm. He went the distance of about an hundred yards on the terrace at Kentish Town road. He then took a back passage from the town. I went and informed Mr. Senior. I and Mr. Senior went and took the man in the passage. I found upon him the four loaves. He had got them in a bag at the time we took him.

JAMES PECK . I am servant to Mr. Senior. After leaving my barrow at Mr. Jackson's door. I missed four loaves. The loaves were Mr. Senior's loaves

Prisoner's Defence. I was out of work. I am guilty. Distress induced me to do if, which has brought me to shame.

GUILTY , aged 37.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction .

First Middlesex jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

Reference Number: t18130407-19

363. SOPHIA BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of February a towel, value 1 s. and a pillow case, value 2 s. the property of Charles Sharp .

CHARLES SHARP . I am a bookseller . The prisoner lived servant with me. In consequence of improper behaviour, she was about to be discharged. On the 23d of February, I searched her box. The articles in question were taken out of her box by herself in my presence. There were several other things in her box, but on account of their not being marked I declined swearing to them. The value I fix to the towel and pillow-case is three shillings; these are them; they are mine.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence, nor called any witnesses to her character.

GUILTY , aged 16.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18130407-20

364. MARIA JOHNSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of March , a watch, value 3 l. the property of William Leach , from his person .

WILLIAM LEACH. Q. Did you lose a watch on the 23d of March - A. Yes, in Puckeridge-street , No. 11. I was going home along the street; I met with this woman between ten and eleven; she asked me to go home with her.

Q. Were you drunk - A. I was a little fresh. She took me in a back parlour, brought a candle, and came up to me, took my watch out of my pocket, and ran away. I went after her. I did not see anything of her. I then went home. I have seen my watch at Bow-street office since.

Q. When had you last seen the watch before you lost it - A. I looked at it about nine o'clock in the evening. I felt the prisoner drawing it out.

WILLIAM BENNING . I took the watch in, but not of the prisoner. It was pledged by a bricklayer's labourer in the name of John Smith , No. 2, Field-lane. I produce the watch.

Prosecutor. It is my watch.

Prisoner's Defence. The watch was left upon the drawers; I never took it from him.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

Reference Number: t18130407-21

365. ANN FINCHAM was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of March , three coats, value 15 s. two waistcoats, value 2 s. two pair of breeches, value 6 s. a brass extinguisher, value 1 s. and two copy-books, value 1 s. 4 d. the property of John Fincham .

JOHN FINCHAM . I sell sausages about the streets . On the 6th of March, I missed three coats, two waistcoats, and other articles. I have never seen them since. I missed them from the Bear and Ragged Staff, Whitecross-street . When I spoke to the prisoner concerning them, she acknowledged selling a brown coat in Playhouse-yard; the brass extinguisher and the two books she also acknowledged that she had sold. The coat she said she had sold for sixpence, the extinguisher for a penny, and the two books for five farthings a pound. The prisoner was so often with my daughter-in-law that I judged she and her had stolen them.

ANN FINCHAM . The prisoner told me she had sold the coat for sixpence, the extinguisher for a penny, and the two books for five farthings a pound. She said it was my daughter-in-law and her that took them. That is all she said.

RICHARD HUTCHINS . I took the prisoner in custody; she said that she sold one of the coats; the daughter gave it her.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18130407-22

366. WILLIAM CATLYN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of March , a silver spoon, value 1 l. the property of Thomas Harris .

ELIZABETH HARRIS . I am the wife of Thomas Harris . The prisoner's father was a bricklayer in our house. On the 17th of March, I missed the spoon, about ten o'clock in the morning. I looked over my spoons and saw there was a gravy-spoon missing. I cannot say he is the identical person that took it out of the house.

MR. HARRISON. I am a pawnbroker. On the 17th of March, between eight and nine in the morning, the prisoner offered me this gravy-spoon to pledge; he asked me five shillings on it. I asked him many questions respecting the spoon. I could not get any thing satisfactory from him, which led me to suspect him. I gave him in charge of an officer.

Prosecutrix. That is my spoon. I know it by the initials.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence; called six witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 17.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction .

First Middlesex jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

Reference Number: t18130407-23

367. SARAH EVANS was indicted, for that she, not having the fear of God before her eyes, but being moved and seduced by the instigation of the devil, on the 21st of February , in the parish of St. James, Clerkenwell, in and upon George Evans , an infant of tender years, to wit, about four years, that she with both her hands, a piece of handkerchief round the neck of the said George Evans did fix, tie, and fasten, and by such means, feloniously did choke and strangle him .

SECOND COUNT, she stood charged that she, on the same day, and in the same place, did make an assault upon the said George Evans , that she, with both her hands, into a certain stream and run of water, there called the New River, did then and there cast and throw, and by such casting and throwing the said George Evans in and with the said stream and run of water, she did then and there suffocate and drown the said George Evans , of which suffocation and drowning he did then and there die, and so the jurors say, that she the said George Evans did kill and murder. She also stood charged with like murder upon the coroner's inquisition.

The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.

CHARLES BALDWIN . Q. What are you - A. I am a cabinet maker. I live at No. 6, Baynes's-row, Cold-bath-fields.

Q. Were you at any time in March last on the banks of the New River - A. Yes, on Sunday; I think it was the 14th, between ten and eleven o'clock, opposite Sadler's Wells. I was in company with James Clark .

Q. Did you take any notice of any thing in the river - A. Yes.

Q. Did you find the body of a child - A. Yes. I laid it on the top of the rails.

Q. Was there any thing upon the body; any dress of any sort - A. Yes; a bed-gown on the body, a hat on its head, stockings and shoes on its legs and feet.

Q. Any thing else upon it - A. I did not perceive.

Q. What did you do with the body - A. I sent for Mr. Clayton, a grave-digger. I delivered the body and the dress that was upon it to Mr. Clayton.

Mr. Gurney. I believe the place in which you found the body was between the enclosure called the New River head and Islington-road - A. Yes.

Q. The space from the New River head to that road is about three hundred yards, is it not - A. Yes,

Q. Which is a very public path-way - A. Yes.

Q. One of the most public pathways I believe near London - A. Yes.

Q. And of a Sunday evening always crowded - A. Yes.

Q. You found the body, I understand, stopped by the grating where the water enters the reservoir of the New River - A. Yes.

Q. The body being stopped it could not go in on account of that grating - A. Yes.

Q. You know at the part above there, at Islington, there is another grating, is there not - A. I fancy not. There is one at Goswell-street-road - another grating.

Q. That is not above three hundred and fifty yards from where you found the body, is it - A. No.

Q. And there is as public a path all the way, as at Sadler's Wells - A. Yes.

Q. Therefore the body could not come through the grating - A. No.

Q. The body must have been thrown in between the two gratings, must it not - A. Yes.

Q. Now, at the time you found the body of this child was not part of the dress dirty and muddy - A. Yes, almost all the dress; the hat particularly.

JURY. We should be glad to know whether any handkerchief was about the neck of the child at the time it was found - A. I perceived none.

COURT. You did not observe whether there was or was not; you did not look, did you - A. No.

Q. You do not mean to say that there was none, do you - A. No.

Q. Who was with you - A. James Clark .

JAMES CLARK. I am a cabinet-maker. I live in Baynes's-row. I was in company with the last witness when the child was found.

Q. Do you recollect what was upon the body of the child - A. Yes, I can tell the clothes. There was a bed-gown on the body, a hat on its head, stockings on the legs, and shoes on the feet. There was a handkerchief round the child's body and a brick in it.

Q. Round what part of the body was the handkerchief - A. Round the loins. Me and Charles Baldwyn delivered the body to Mr. Clayton.

Q. Was there anything about the child's neck - A. Yes, a piece of handkerchief, or something; I could not tell what it was.

Q. Was this handkerchief close round the child's neck - A. Yes. I could not tell what it was; whether it was an handkerchief or a gown tail, or what. It was twisted round tight, like a rope. It was something round the neck. I could not tell what it was. It was either an handkerchief or a gown tail.

JURY Q. Do you know whether there is any grating between Goswell-street and Sadler's Wells - A. There is a grating at Sadler's Wells, and one in Islington-road.

WILLIAM CLAYTON . I am grave-digger of St. James's, Clerkenwell Parish. In consequence of being sent for by the two last witnesses, I went to where the child was. I found it laying by the path-way. I took a shell to take it to the vault of the church.

Q. Can you discribe what was upon the body of the child - A. Yes; it had a bed-gown on, a handkerchief was tied tight round its neck, with the knot under the left ear.

COURT. There was a knot was there - A. Yes, under the left ear; a black hat on and a small band.

Q. What sort of a hat was it - A. It was a hat formed with a peak in the front; a black beaver hat, and likewise a piece of a band that went part of the way round; it did not go round only just in the front of it. It appeared to be sewed. I did not examine how it was fixed on. A black silk cap under the hat, immediately upon the head, and tied with a string under the chin; a handkerchief round the body with part of a brick in it, about the half of a brick. The brick is here.

MR. JONES. I received the things from off the child's body. I employed a woman to wash the things. This is the half brick.

Clayton. These are the things that I saw on the body. This is the brick; it was in this handkerchief, round the body, and this handkerchief was round the neck, with a knot under the left ear. These are the stockings that were upon the legs; they are worsted stockings, speckled. This petticoat was on the body, under the bed-gown. This is the bed-gown; the sleeves were cut to get it off. This is the shirt. They were all cut off. These are the stockings; they were all cut off the legs. These were the shoes on his feet, and this is the hat.

JURY. We shall be happy to know what knot the handkerchief was in - Clayton. It was a knot in this manner; a single knot under the ear. These are all the things that were on the body. I took the body to the vault, and it remained there till Monday morning. On the Monday, a person was sent from the workhouse to wash the body, before it was exposed. It was not exposed till Monday morning, by ten o'clock, as near as I can guess. A vast number of people came to see it.

Q. Were you present when the prisoner saw it - A. Yes; she saw it in the vault after the body was washed. It was about three o'clock in the afternoon on the Monday.

Mr. Walford. What did she say about it - A. At first sight she remained mute for a minute or more, and then she said, that is not my George, or my child; that is too big for him. At this time the dress was upon the body; they were not taken off; they were in the situation as they were taken out of the River, except the handkerchief was loosened that was on the neck, on account of washing the body.

Q. Was anything said by her about the clothes - A. She was asked the question whether she knew the clothes. She said, no; there was nothing there that belonged to her child. She was asked generally first, and one by one afterwards.

Q. When she was asked one by one, what answer did she give - A. She denied the whole, except when she came to the shoes she made no answer. The shoes was the last question asked her. When she came to the shoes she made no answer.

Mr. Gurney. Now, the handkerchief was on the neck; you say it was tied round, and it was twisted round like a rope - A. Yes, quite twisted.

Q. The neck was swelled over it, as I understand - A. Yes, under the chin. It was in the front. It had been tied tight round the neck.

Q. Was not the body a great deal larger than you should expect a child of four years old to be - A. Yes, it had the appearance of being larger.

Q. You have bad experience of seeing bodies that have laid in the water - A. Yes.

Q. A person that knew the child when alive would not easily recognize the child so well - A. I should suppose not.

Q. When she was desired to look at the child, did not she say there was a mark upon my George by which I should know him - A. Yes, and she looked on the left side of the body, under the arm. The clothes were opened by her desire. We could not see a mark of the description that she gave. She spoke of it as a mark that raised on the surface. We could not find that mark.

Q. The child was in a putrid state. It was leading to putrefaction. I do not know whether you know that has a tendency to obliterate a mark of that kind - A. I don't know.

Q. You shewed the jury just now, a sort of knot that was tied under the left ear - A. Yes; it was only tied in one knot.

COURT. How soon after the child was exposed, which you said was ten o'clock on the Monday, did any person come that recognised it was George Evans - A. A person of the name of Blakey came. When she saw the child she declared it to be the same child that had been at her house.

Q. Did the prisoner live at her house -

Mr. Gurney. She had.

Q. to Clayton. What time in the morning was that - A. It was near two in the afternoon. Mrs. Blakey was fetched when the prisoner was there.

Q. Then at two o'clock in the afternoon was the first time the child was acknowledged - A. Yes, about that time.

ANN BLAKEY . Do you live at No. 18, Northampton-street, Clerkenwell - A. No. 16.

Q. Did the prisoner at the bar lodge at your house - A. Yes.

Q. How long had she lodged at your house - A. She lodged in the house before I took it. I took it at Midsummer. She lodged there until the 22nd of February.

Q. Had she any children - A. She told me that she had three. She had two that lived with her.

Q. Were you in the habit of seeing these children - A. Very frequent.

Q. Did you see the deceased, George - A. Yes, he was with me frequent, for days together.

Q.We understand he was about four years old - A. Yes.

Q. When was the last time you saw the poor boy, the deceased A. On Sunday evening, about the 21st of February, about half past five.

Q.About what time did the prisoner go out that afternoon - A. About half past six in the evening, I understood I was out at the time.

Q. Did you see George and the prisoner that evening - A. At the time I have stated, at that time I saw the prisoner and George. The prisoner told me that she was going to put him in the poorhouse. I went for the purpose of taking my leave of him. I bid him good bye, and told him I would come and see him, and give him some cakes. I expected, from what I learned from her, that he would be put in St. Pancras workhouse. I gave the child some cakes, kissed him, and told him I would come and see him. He had on a black cap, a frock with red and yellow figures. I do not recollect any other-part of his dress. He used in general to wear worsted stockings.

Q. Then, excepting the black silk cap and frock, you do not particularly recollect anything else - A. No.

Q. Had he any bed-gown on - A. Not unless he had it under his frock. He had not one as I saw.

Q.Had he any shoes on - A. He might, but I cannot say.

Q.You then went away out of the room, did you - A. Yes.

Q. When did you see her next - A. Between nine and ten that evening. I let her in when she returned. I asked her what she had done with the boy. She said, that she left him at the beadle of St. Pancras. He was to be sent the next morning in a coach, with some other children, to Brompton, to nurse; that he was to stop there until he was six years old. That was what passed at that time.

Q. Now, when had you any other conversation with her - A. In the afternoon. I was in my own/ parlour.

Q. When did you next see the prisoner - A. Not till Monday morning; but there was a conversation passed in the parlour, before I took leave of the child.

Q. You should have told us that before - A. Immediately after four o'clock in the afternoon she came down stairs, and I called her into my room. I asked her what she meaned to do with the child, as the time was drawing near when the prisoner was going to her place.

Q. Then you understood that before that time the prisoner was about going to some place as a servant - A. Yes. She then said she went out in the forenoon for some potatoes, and met with a person accidentally that she told her case to, and he desired her to bring the child to him in the evening, between six and seven, and he would get it in, or put it in, without any further trouble. She did not tell me who that person was with whom that conversation took place: I said, I thought it was a providence that she had met with that person. For some weeks she had talked of putting the child in Pancras workhouse.

Q. Was that the poor-house of the place where you lived - A. No. I live in the parish of St. James, Clerkenwell. I have been informed since, the child was born in St. Pancras.

Q. Now, I would ask you whether the conduct of the prisoner with respect to this child was of an affectionate nature, or otherwise - A. I never saw the contrary but an affectionate mother. At times she appeared very uneasy about the maintenance and and protection of the child. She expressed herself so to me.

Q. In what manner used she to express herself - A. She said she must get George in the house; she could not afford to keep them both.

Q. Is this all the conversation that you recollect having with her previous to the time of your going to see the child - A. Yes.

Q. Had you any conversation with her on the Monday that she went away - A. I do not recollect saying anything to her.

COURT. When did she go from your house - A. She went from my house on the Monday afternoon, and returned the Tuesday evening. On Tuesday I had no conversation with her about the child: on Monday before the child was found I had.

Q. That was a week before the child was found - A. Yes.

Q.Where was it you saw her - A. At Mr. Brookes's in Paternoster-row.

Q.She was servant there, was she not - A. Yes. I merely asked her if she had heard of George. She said, no. That was all that passed about him that time. I never saw her from that time until I saw her at Clerkenwell church. I said, when she was going to put him in the workhouse, that Mrs. Polly would go and see the child.

Q. Who is Mrs. Polly - A. A particular acquaintance of the prisoner. She said, no, she would not. I said, why? She said, because she was so partial to him; she could not leave him if she was to see him. I said then, I would go. She said, I could not see him any time, only from ten to one, on a Friday. I said, I was in business, and confined of a

week day; I would go on a Sunday. She said, they would not let any body see him on a Sunday, unless they came a great way. I said, what do you call this but a great way. I do not recollect any other words that passed that time. We have talked several times about the child going into the house. One time she said she would go to Mrs. Hudson to ask her to take him to the poor-house. She told me she did go, and Mrs. Hudson refused her, and she did not know who to get to go with him. On Monday, in March, I saw the child in Clerkenwell church, three weeks after the child went out of the house: on the 15th, I believe it was.

Q. What time of the day did you go to the church - A. I think it was a little after one. I went where the crowd was standing, and I requested to be let in. I saw the child. I said, I thought the features were not so much altered but I thought it was the same.

Q. Did you know the name of the child - A. George.

Q. Had any thing been said to you that induced you to ask to see the child - A. Yes, a person came into my shop in the morning; she asked me when I saw Mrs. Evans. I told her, on the Monday before. I had heard about the black silk cap; that drew my attention, and induced me to go there.

Mr. Knapp. When you went there you saw the child, and you thought it was the child - A. Yes.

Q. When you saw the child, at that time it had on a black silk cap and the hat - A. Yes.

Q. How was the black silk cap fastened - A. It was tied under the chin. It had a bed-gown on, stockings, and shoes.

Q. Had it on (that you saw) any speckled coloured frock in the way that you described - A. No, it had not.

Q. Had it any thing round its neck - A. Yes, but I did not take notice what it was at that time. It appeared of a grey colour to me. I took notice of its cap. The handkerchief round its neck appeared tied tight.

Q. When you saw the child the first time was it before it was washed - A. It was a little cleaned.

Q. The second time you saw it did you observe the handkerchief - A. Yes. The handkerchief had been a little removed; there was the appearance on the flesh as if a knot had been tied. The handkerchief was loose. The second time, I noticed the stockings and shoes. The prisoner was there then, and I was sent for.

Q. Did you examine the stockings and the shoes before the prisoner - A. Yes.

Q. What was your observation that you made in the prisoner's presence with respect to the deceased's cap - A. She denied the child, and said, it is not my child - it is not my George, it is larger. I said, death stretches, and the water swells. I saw she would not own it. Then I said, the cap? She said, he had not the cap on when he went away. I understood her to mean that he had not that particular cap on. I asked her what she had done with it. She said that she had destroyed it.

Q. Looking at the cap, you remembering what the cap was that he had on, was it, or not, the cap - A. It was the identical cap which he wore in my house. I then said, the hat? She said, it was not the same. She took hold of the rim. She said, it was like it, but it was not the same. I said, the band?

Q. Do you mean the band of the hat - A. Yes. I had observed the band; the band did not go round the hat. She said, the band that was on it was a little broader. I said, I could not say as to that particular. She then said, that she had taken the band off, and had put on a black ribbon. I then said, the stockings and the shoes? I do not recollect that she answered me any more.

COURT. As to the stockings and the shoes, were you certain that they were the same - A. Yes; I thought they were the same.

Mr. Knapp. Was that all the conversation that you had with the prisoner - A. I was called up to her before she left the vault. I asked her if I should see her again; yes, she said, she would call upon me as she went home.

Q. Did she do so - A. She was confined.

Q. Did she inform you ever of her circumstances - A. She frequently told me that she lived upon nothing but bread and tea: indeed that I knew to be true.

Q.Was she indebted to you - A. Yes.

Q. Look at that cap - A. This is the cap that was made for George Evans , and the cap that he wore in my house for several weeks.

Q. How came you to know that the cap was made for George Evans - A. I gave Mrs. Evans the silk to make it. The border is very particular, and the selvage I remember perfectly, and the strings as well.

Q. Do you know any other part of the dress if it was shewn to you - A. The hat. This is the hat he wore at my house when he went out frequently. It was given to him by Mrs. Turner. I think the band that is on it is the same band that always was on it. The hat was given by Mrs. Turner with the band upon it; and the shoes and stockings I believe to be the same.

Q.What sort of a child was it respecting its features - A. A fine boy of its age; fresh coloured.

Q. Were the features able to be traced in the dead child sufficient for you to know him - A. They were.

Q. We all know the features alter by death - A. Yes. I knew the child from its features. I have no doubt in the least of its being the child.

COURT. You have no doubt of that being the child George, as being the child of Mrs. Evans - A. Not in the least.

Mr. Knapp. Have you ever observed the child while it was at your house wearing a bed-gown - A. Only when he went to bed; he sometimes of a morning came into my room with a bed-gown on.

Q. You saw the bed-gown upon the dead body of the child - A. I did, but I did not take notice of it.

Q. Look at the stockings and shoes - A. I have not the least doubt of their being the same that he used to wear. The handkerchiefs I know nothing of them.

Mr. Bolland. You say this prisoner always held affection to this child, the boy - A. She did. She had also another little child, she was equally fond of that. At the time I went into her room she was preparing to wash it.

Q. Did you observe anything in this woman that indicated agitation and distress - A. I did not. She staid with me half an hour. I observed nothing of agitation. I thought she was satisfied with sending the child into the country.

COURT. She mentioned to you that she met with somebody that would take care of the child - A. Yes.

Q. Afterwards she said she left it with the beadle - A. Yes.

Q. Did she, when she came back, mention to you of having seen the person - A. She did.

Q. What did she say about the person - A. She said he gave her an order to take the child to the beadle.

Q. An order in writing to take the child to the beadle - A. Yes, I understood so.

Q. You are sure that she said she had left the child with the beadle of Pancras - A. Yes. She said it was to go with three or four more in the coach to Brompton.

Q. Did she say who told her that - A. Yes; this person that she met with, he assured her that it was not to go into the house until it was six years old.

THOMAS RAWLINSON . Q. What are you - A. I am a watchmaker. I live at No. 16, Northampton-street, Clerkenwell; in Mrs. Blakey's house.

Q. Did you live there in February last, at the time that the prisoner lived there - A. I did so.

Q. Do you remember the circumstance of the prisoner taking the child away - A. I do.

Q. On the evening that she took the child away, did anything pass between you and the prisoner - A. The prisoner knocked at my door about half past six.

COURT. You have an apartment in the house - A. Yes.

Mr. Walford. Was your wife at home at the time - A. Yes, she was. I stood with the door in my hand. The child was on her right side. She brought the child to bid my wife and I good bye. The child drove near to me. I said, come hither, George, and I gave him a penny out of my right hand waistcoat pocket. The child was dressed in a red ground frock, and some kind of a speckle on it, or a flower. I cannot describe it.

Q. Should you know the frock again if you were to see it - A. Yes, I should. It had a light coloured handkerchief, or a white, tied across his bosom, behind, neatly; and it had this black hat, and the black silk cap.

Q. Should you know it again - A. I should. I have seen it often.

Q. Look at that hat - A. That is the identical hat, and that is the cap. I never saw the child after that. I have seen the frock since, at Mr. Thisselton's, an officer of Hatton Garden office. I saw the frock there yesterday afternoon.

- THISSELTON. I produce the frock. I got it out of the prisoner's box, at her situation at Mr. Brooks's.

Rawlinson. That is the frock. I never saw any other.

Q. to Mrs. Blakey. Do you know that frock - A. Yes, sir, well. That is the frock he had on when I took leave of the child. There is one place here the child bit out, under the arm, and there is a piece under.

Rawlinson. I know the frock perfectly well. I am quite certain that is the frock the child had on when I took my leave of him.

Mr. Gurney. How long had you lodged in the same house with the prisoner. - A. I had been there about six or seven months.

Q. She had besides this one other child - A. Yes.

Q. Was not she an affectionate mother - A. I never knew any other ways, and also to the infant.

COURT. Had you any talk with her about the child when it was going away - A. I said to the child, George, you are going into the country. The child innocently said, yes. I do not recollect anything more.

ELIZABETH HUDSON . Q. Your husband's name is John Hudson - A. Yes.

Q. How long have you known the prisoner - A. Near upon fourteen years.

Q. Do you know how many children she had - A Three, sir.

Q. Did she appear to be an affectionate mother to all of them - A. From all that ever I saw, she appeared to be very kind.

Q. Do you know the children - A. Yes.

Q. Did you know the deceased child, George - A. I did, perfectly well.

Q. Had you seen George before February - A. I had not seen George since I nursed him in the small pox; that was the latter end of the year, before Christmas.

Q. Had he the small pox at your house - A. No, at the lodgings.

Q. Did you see him after he was found - A. No, sir, never.

Q. Do you remember seeing the prisoner on Sunday the 21st of February - A. I do, at my own house in Bird's-buildings, Lower-street, Islington. She came about half past seven in the evening; she was alone. I asked her what she had done with George. She said, that the child was taken to the beadle of the parish of St. Pancras, from whence it was to go with a great many more children to Brompton. She said it was gone very happy and comfortable with the rest of the children.

COURT. Do you mean that it already had gone - A. Yes, in the middle of the week.

Mr. Knapp. Was there anything different in her behaviour at that time to what there used to be before - A. I did not perceive it at all. She said she was going to her service, to Mr. Brooks's in Paternoster-row, on the following Monday or Tuesday, she could not say which. She called upon me to bid me good bye before she went to her place.

Q. Did you see the prisoner any time before the 21st of February - A. Yes, she called upon me on the week day before that, about a week before that, on the 21st was Sunday. About a week before that she came to my house to take tea with me; she

then asked me whether I could recommend any person to take her child to the beadle, or the parish workhouse. I am not certain which. I told her that I could not recommend her any one. The youngest child was with her at this time. She said she was in a deal of distress of mind what to do with the child; she could not get any body, to take it for her. I asked her why she did not take it herself. She answered, the people of the parish were so abusive to her that she did not like to be brow-beated by them. At the time that she was pregnant with the last child, she told me before she laid in, that her name was changed to Roberts. That was about a month before she laid in. The child was fifteen months old on the 30th of March; that she was married, and her name was Roberts. She said, the last child was by her husband, and her name was changed to Roberts.

Mr. Bolland. It was half past seven when this woman came to your house - A. Yes.

Q. There is a road by the New River that branches off into many foot paths - A. Yes.

Q. That road is very much frequented - A. Yes, it is.

Q. At the time that she came to you she conversed with you without any agitation, did not she - A. She appeared as comfortable as I always saw her. I never saw any harm of her. She seemed a very industrious person. She stopped with me until ten minutes after nine. There was nothing extraordinary in her appearance.

SARAH TURNER . I live at No. 8, Vineyard-street, Clerkenwell.

Q. Are you an acquainttance of the prisoner's - A. Yes. I have known her better than twelve years.

Q. Look at that hat - A. This is the hat that I gave her; it was my little daughter's and I gave her this piece of a gown that this frock is made with. I gave her one breadth of my gown to make George a frock. The shoes I likewise gave her; they were my little daughter's; the stockings I think were my son's. I gave her two or three pair. I think I recollect these to be one. The hat I gave her, and I am sure with the band. The band is very remarkable; it does not go all round the hat. The band is tinsel cord. When I bought the hat it was turned down; I did not see the band did not go all round. I turned the hat down; I said the hatter was very stinting in his band, not to afford it to go all round. I remember making the observation.

Q. Do you remember the prisoner going to Mr. Brooks's service - A. Yes. On Tuesday evening, she came to me; I think it was about the 22nd of February. I am certain it was a Tuesday evening. She said she was come to bid me good bye. I told her I was glad to see her so comfortable and clean; then I asked her where she had placed the two children. She said she had placed the younger one in the front of the road at nurse; she meaned to pay for it herself. Then I asked her how she had placed George. She said that she had taken him to the workhouse, to the sick-house, at Hackney, through the interest of Mr. Hougham he was to be farmed.

Q. Did she say who Mr. Hougham was - A. Yes, the doctor. The child was to be farmed, and from there to be nursed at Brompton. I told her it was a very good thing, as the child previous to that had been very ill. She said the parish would pay five shillings a week with it. I told her I thought it was a very great interest to have that privilege. She said she was very glad it was so. She wished my son to write a direction for her, for the nurses to come and see her, and to bring the child (George) to her. My son wrote two directions to leave with the nurses of each of the children. I understood it was to find her out. Nothing more passed about the child.

Mr. Gurney. I think you say you have known the prisoner better than twelve years - A. Yes.

Q. I believe, during part of the time she has lodged in your house - A. She has, within the last two years.

Q. You have had the opportunity of seeing what her conduct has been to her children - A. Yes; she was very affectionate, and extremely clean and neat in her manners. On account of her manners I liked her; a mild, affectionate, humane woman.

Q. George was a very fine boy; a fine, cheerful, playful boy - A. Yes; he was a very sensible boy; he was an acute boy. I always thought her an affectionate mother to him.

Q. At the time that she came to your house was not she as calm and as tranquil as a woman could be be - A. Just so.

JURY. Did you give the prisoner cotton enough to make two frocks - A. Not two frocks; to make the frock and more. There was not enough to make two frocks: there was enough to make an extra body, not more. The child came frequently with the frock on.

ANN POLLY . I live at Stones-row, Somers Town.

Q. Are you acquainted with the prisoner - A. I am. I have known her from seven to nine years.

Q. Do you recollect her son, George - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember the prisoner being with her son George at your lodgings - A. Yes, a little after Christmas.

Q. Did the prisoner then say any thing about her son George - A. Yes. I advised her to take him to the workhouse, for I knew that she was in want. She said she must.

Q. In what manner did she appear to conduct herself towards her children - A. In the most affectionate manner that she could do.

ELIZABETH LIGHTNING . I live at No. 1, Pool's-place, Mount Pleasant, Clerkenwell.

Q. Did you know the child George - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see the body when it was in the church - A. Yes. I have no doubt it was the same child.

Q. Have you ever had any conversation with the prisoner on the subject of that child - A. Yes, when she was in Cold-bath-fields prison. She was committed on the Monday night, and on Tuesday I had conversation with her.

COURT. That was on the 16th - A. Yes. I asked the prisoner what she had done with little George; she told me that she had sent him to Brompton to nurse, with her aunt. I said, do tell me the truth, and I will be at the expence, and fetch the child. She said she had.

Q.Did she mention the name of her aunt - A.No; she said it was the truth.

Q. Did she say where the person lived - A. Opposite of the church.

Q. The person with whom the child was, lived opposite of the church - A. Yes.

Mr. Walford. Was there anything else that passed between you at that time - A.No, sir.

Q. At the time of this conversation had you seen the body of the child in the vault of the church - A. Yes.

Q.Was there anything said about the child that you had seen in the vault of the church - A. Not to my recollection. I told her that I had been to see the child. I asked her, had she seen the child. She said, yes, she had. I said, is not that my dear George. She said, no, she did not think it was.

Q. Did she say why she did not think it was - A. No. I told her, if she would tell me the truth I would fetch him.

Mr. Gurney. How long have you known the prisoner - A. Better than five years.

Q. Did you ever see a more affectionate mother to her children than she was - A. No.

MELLOUGHBY TATAM. Q. You are the wife of Thomas Tatam - A. Yes, he is a sawyer, living in St. John-street, Clerkenwell.

Q. How long have you known the prisoner - A. Above a twelvemonth.

Q. Did you know George, her son - A. Yes. I saw her on the 8th of February, at my house. She asked me to take her youngest child to nurse. I said, I would.

Q. Had you any conversation with her respecting George - A. Yes; she told me that she was going to send George into the country, thirty miles off. She drank tea at my place. George was with her. I said to the little boy, George, shall not you cry when you go for to leave your brother Billy. The child smiled. The mother made answer, it was going where it would be taken care of, and want for nothing. The child had on a black silk cap: his hat I did not notice. He had shoes and stockings on when he played about the room with his brother. I saw the child on the Tuesday after it was taken out of the water. I saw it in the vault of Clerkenwell church.

Q.Upon your looking at the child were there remaining enough of the features of the child to enable you to say it is the child George - A. I believe it to be George.

Q. Did you observe whether it had any cap on - A. Yes, it had a black cap on. I believe it to be the same cap and shoes and stockings.

Q. Were you there when the prisoner was there - A. No, I was not.

Q. Did you see the prisoner on the 9th of March - A. I did, at the prison. I saw the prisoner last Wednesday week, the day that she was moved to Newgate. She sent for me. I did not say any thing to her about George.

Mr. Bolland. You have known her about a twelvemonth - A. Yes.

Q. Was her conduct that of an affectionate mother - A. She always appeared so.

JOSEPH RAYMOND. Q. You are the beadle of Clerkenwell parish - A. I am one of them.

Q. Do you remember seeing the prisoner - A. Yes, on Monday the 15th of March.

Q. What is the name of your brother beadle - A. Henry Jones .

Q. You went to Mr. Brooks's, did not you - A. Yes. I believe I went about one o'clock: there I understood the prisoner lived, and there I found her. She opened the door to me. I asked for Sarah Evans . I told her I wanted to speak to her.

Q. Do you know whether the prisoner knew you or not - A. I do not know; I was not in my beadle's dress. As soon as I found that was her, I walked inside and pushed the door too, not to stand and talk in the street. The first word that she said, before any words passed, are you come from the office, or, you are come from the office, I do not know which exactly. I said, no, I am come from the parish of Clerkenwell. Upon that, she walked away from the door, and walked along the passage. I followed after her, and as I went along the passage, I said, there was a child drowned at Clerkenwell.

Q. Was she near enough to hear you - A. Yes. She went straight into the kitchen, I following her. When I came into the kitchen, I saw a tall elderly lady, and she said to Sarah Evans , what does that man want. Sarah Evans said, that there was a child drowned, and that they said it was her George.

Q. Had you mentioned the name of George to her as she walked along - A. I said that there was a child drowned, and that they said it was her's; to that, she said not a word. I asked the lady whether she would let Sarah Evans go with me to see this child. She said, yes, to be sure. I then asked Sarah Evans to put her things on, and go along with me. She said, she would. The prisoner went up stairs to get her bonnet and shawl. I followed her out of the kitchen, and waited for her at the bottom of the stairs. She came down stairs directly with her bonnet and shawl. She was not gone two minutes up stairs, and we came out together. In Warwick-lane, a woman was coming down; we passed her. She called out, Sarah. We were in the road, and the woman was in the foot-path. Sarah turned round, and the woman crossed into the road to us; her name is Mrs. Howard, Mrs. Howard said to the prisoner, where are you going. She said I am going along with this man to Clerkenwell, to look at a child that was drowned, as they said it was her's. Mrs. Howard said, when I told you last night I thought it was, but then she was coming to her to tell her it was not George. I said to Mrs. Howard, if you know Mrs. Evans, you had better go along with us to see the child. She agreed to come, and we all three came on together to the church. I let them walk by themselves, and I followed close to their heels. We got to the church. The gravedigger was not there at that time. We went into Mr. Sheppard's, the Crown tavern, to get away from the mob. We went out the back way, and went into the vault; I, and Mrs. Howard, the prisoner, and Clayton. I took her up to the shell for her to look at the child. She stood and paused a little bit, a minute or so; at last she exclaimed, that was not her George. I told her to look at it over and over again. She still persisted it was not her George.

As she did not seem to own the child, I told her to look at the clothing, to see if she knew them. She said, no, there was not a bit of clothing upon the child that belonged to her George. I questioned her first with respect to all the clothing, generally, and then I was very particular with her to look at the hat. She stooped down towards the shell, and looked at the hat, but did not touch it. She said, that was not her George's hat. I then asked her if that was not the hat that Mrs. Turner had given her. She said, her George's hat had got a broader band than the band that was on the hat of that child. Mrs. Turner had given her George a hat, but she had taken that band off that was on that hat, and put on a broader, and therefore she knew that was not her George's hat. I asked her to examine the cap. She looked at the cap. She said, it was not her George's cap. I then asked her if that was not the cap that was made out of a piece of silk that Mrs. Blakey gave her. She said, no, that was not the cap. She said, she had made the child a black cap, but the child had more; and the child's hair began to grow, and it was going out to nurse; that she had burnt the cap. I then asked her where the child was. She said her child was at nurse at her aunt's at Brompton. I took my pencil then, and a bit of paper, to take a direction. I asked her what her aunt's name was. She said, Roberts; she lived facing of Brompton church. I wrote these particulars down in the vault, at the coffin. I asked her, whether her aunt was a lodger or a housekeeper. She said, she was a lodger. I then asked her the name of the person that kept the house. She said, she did not know. I asked her what number it was; that she did not know; she believed it was 14, 16, or 18, she could not tell what exactly, but her aunt was well known there; if I only asked for Mrs. Roberts, any body knew her. I then told her that I should go to her aunt's and see whether her child was there.

Q. Did she say anything to that - A. No. After that, we went into Mr. Sheppard's again, and there Mr Jones, my partner, came in and Mr. Voyce likewise; they two came in together. I then said to Mr. Voyce, I had got a direction; where the child was, and I thought it proper to go to Brompton and see it. I asked Mr. Voyce whether it would not be proper for me to go to Brompton. He said, yes, by all means. Then I left the two women in the care of Mr. Jones, and I went to Brompton, and made the best of my way there. When I came to Brompton I found Brompton chapel, but no church. I enquired at every house where the chapel was. The doors were numbered. I think 11 or 13 is the highest number in the place. I made diligent search. I found no such person as Roberts. I was an hour and a half enquiring all over the streets. I came back again. I saw Sarah Evans next at Hatton Garden office. I told her she might have saved me the trouble of going to Brompton; she well knew I should not find her aunt there. I had been enquiring all about there, there was no such person as Roberts to be found. She said, she did not know; her aunt told her she lived there. Then I asked her directly whether ever she had been to her aunts. She said, no. I asked her how her child came at her aunt's. She said, her aunt had sent a woman for it. I asked her then how long her aunt had lived at Brompton. She said she had not been there above three or four weeks. We then went into the office before the magistrate. I was sent off to find the boy that pulled the child out. I heard no more of the conversation. When I came back again the committment was made out.

BARBARA HOWARD . Q. Where do you live - A. At No. 3, Westminster-road.

Q. Do you recollect, on the day the prisoner was taken before the magistrate, meeting her in company of the beadle - A. Yes, in Warwick-lane. She passed by me. I said, Mrs. Evans, are you above speaking to me. She turned round, and said, that a man came and told her that a child was drowned in the New River. I told her I had seen the child on the Sunday night.

COURT. Had you seen the prisoner on the Sunday night - A. No, I had not.

Mr. Walford. Did you go with the man and the prisoner to the church - A. Yes. I there saw the body of the child.

Q. And was it shewn to the prisoner - A. Yes, and the prisoner said it was not hers.

Q. Did you know the child in its life time - A. Yes.

Q. Was the body of the child that you saw, the prisoner's child - A. I am not positive it was the child.

Q. Did you examine the body of the child - A. No. The clothes were cut down, because she said there was a mark.

Q. Was she desired to look at the child - A. Yes, and when she looked at it, she said it was not hers.

Q. Was she desired to look at the clothes - A. Yes, she looked at the clothes.

COURT. Did not you hear her asked to look at the hat and the cap - A. Not distinctly. I did not to my knowledge.

Mr. Walford. What did the prisoner say about the clothes - A. She said, none of the clothes were the clothes that her child had on.

Q. Was any thing said about the cap - A. Yes, a gentlewoman was there that said she had given the prisoner the stuff to make the cap. Her name is Blakey. The prisoner said that she had left off the cap before she had taken the child away.

Q. Was the cap shewn to the prisoner - A. Yes, at the vault, and the hat was shewn. She said, that she had left the cap off, and she had taken the gold band off the hat, and had put on a black ribbon; and the shoes and stockings were shewn to the prisoner. I don't know what she said about the shoes and stockings.

Mr. Gurney. How long have you known the prisoner. Was not she a kind and affectionate mother - A. Always, what I saw of her.

Q. You knew George - A. Yes, by her coming with him to see the person that I lived servant with. She had come to Mr. Brooks's house frequently.

Q. You lived servant with Mr. Brooks - A. Yes, and she brought the child with her when she came.

Q. Now, you told her when you met her in Warwick-lane

that you had been to see the child - A. Yes, and it was impossible to tell the child; the child was all over dirt.

Q. You did not tell her that you had seen her the night before, because you had not seen her the night before. The beadle is not correct in saying that, is he - A. I had not seen her the night before; he is not correct in that.

Q. Now, you went with her to the church, you saw the body of the child - A. Yes.

Q. Were you able to say that was the child - A. I was not indeed.

Q. Do you remember her looking for a mark on the left side - A. Yes; she could not see it.

Q. Could you see it - A. No. She said, if it is my George I shall know him by the mark on the left side.

COURT. Had you ever seen that mark - A. No, nor I never heard of it before.

Mr. Gurney. Was the countenance of the child altered by being swelled - A. Yes, so that I could not tell the least feature in the world of her child.

Q. You walked with her all the way from Warwick-lane to the church - A. Yes.

Q. Now, I ask you, did you ever see a person more calm and tranquil in their mind than what she was - A. No.

COURT. Where did you live at the time that you saw the child - A. I then lodged in Holborn. I was not at Mr. Brooks's.

Mr. Gurney. You did not see her at all on the Sunday - A. No.

Q. Where were you going when you met her - A. I was going over into the Borough; I met her by accident. I was not going to call upon her.

Q. On the Sunday evening, did any body mention that it was Sarah Evans's child - A. A man said, there was a child taken out of the New River, and they thought it to be a person's that lived at a chandler's shop. Mrs. Evans lived at a chandler's shop They did not mention the name of Sarah Evans .

Q. Knowing that, did it not occur to you to go to Mrs. Evans to tell her that they thought it was her child - A. No.

Q. Did you ever see the child with any of the clothes on - A. I have seen him with such a hat on as the child had that was taken out of the water. I had never seen the cap before.

Q. What led you to that part on Sunday night - A. I was invited to take a cup of tea in that neighbourhood, by Mrs. Webber.

HENRIETTA NEWMAN. I live at No. 51, Rawstorne-street, Clerkenwell.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. Yes, I have known her nearly a year and nine months.

Q. I believe you are the daughter of the housekeeper of Mr. Brooks - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember on any day seeing a child's cap in a vault at Clerkenwell - A. Yes, on Monday the 15th of March.

Q. Did you see any hat there - A. Yes. It was the cap and the hat that I had seen on George Evans , in my house, frequently. I have no doubt about the hat and the cap in the world.

Q. On what day did the prisoner go into Mr. Brooks's service - A. On the 22nd of February.

Q. Did the prisoner bring the child George to Mr. Brooks's - A. She had formerly.

Q. When you went to the vault on the 15th of March, did you see the prisoner there - A. I did. I saw the prisoner there; she seemed quite composed and calm. When she saw me she said, Mrs. Newman, they say this is my George. I replied, what do you think, Mrs. Evans. No, said she, it is not my George. She said, it was not her child; it appeared much too large. I then desired her to look at the hat and cap. She said she had taken the cap off before she had seen me. When she called at my house prior to this, she said that she was going to send this child thirty miles in the country.

Q. When was that when she said she was going to send it thirty miles - A. That was a few days prior to her returning to Mr. Brook's. She went to Mr. Brook's on the Tuesday. I asked her if she had heard of the child. She said that she had; he had got down safe, and was well. When I met the prisoner in the vault, and desired her to look at the hat and the cap, then she said in the vault that she had sent him into the country, and the child's hat had a broader band; she had taken the band off and put a black ribbon round. I then said, the shoes? Her answer was, that she had not sent him thirty miles in the country; he was with his aunt at Brompton. I then asked her if she thought it likely that her aunt would come from Brompton to drown this child in the New River. She said, she could not tell, for her aunt was a very bad woman. I then said, that I would not trust a child of mine with a person that I knew to be bad.

Q. Upon your view of the child did you think it was the child George - A. I thought it was; I would not swear it. As to the hat and cap, I am positive. I had told Mrs. Evans that I would give her a hat of my grandson's. She said, Mrs. Turner gave her that; it would do very well, and the child was to have a new one when he got down.

Mr. Bolland. The prisoner has lived with Mr. Brooks before - A. Yes.

Q. Your mother takes care of Mr. Brooks's house - A. Yes, and I always thought her a kind affectionate mother.

MR. BROOKS. Q. I believe you are a printer in Paternoster-row - A. I am. The prisoner, at the time she was apprehended, was in my service.

Q. Is that part of your premises so situated that if she had liked she might have made her escape - A. Certainly.

Mr. Gurney. When she was once up stairs if she had chose to evade the officer she might have done so - A. Yes.

Q. Mr. Brooks, the prisoner has lived in your service before - A. Yes. My housekeeper took her in again. I had a good opinion of her during the time that she was with us.

Q. I believe, from your opinion of her, you are at the expence of defending her - A. Yes. I have that opinion of her that she is innocent.

WILLIAM LEE . Q. I believe you are the overseen of the poor of the parish of St. Pancras - A. I am.

Q.Did the prisoner apply to you for the purpose

of being taken into the workhouse of St. Pancras - A. She applied to the committee for the purpose of her child being taken in the workhouse. That request was refused. She had two shillings per week. She had an allowance from last May to January. She then applied for the child being taken in. It was refused.

Q. Has the parish any place at Brompton in which they farm out the poor - A. No, they have not.

Q. Have you any place in which you farm out the poor within thirty miles of town - A. We do not farm any out. We have no place thirty miles off where we send them.

COURT. Which is the beadle - A. We have five; they are all here. The prisoner applied to me in the month of May or June.

Mr. Gurney. The father of the child, I believe, was Mr. Aris - A. Yes.

Q. It had been born in your parish, and therefore was settled there - A. Yes.

Q. Did Aris contribute anything to the child's support - A. He did not. On the 24th of December, there was an order made on Aris to pay three shillings and sixpence per week. That never was paid. He had been summonsed to attend before the magistrate. He did not attend.

WILLIAM BROWN . Q. Are you one of the beadles of St. Pancras - A. I am.

Q. You know Sarah Evans , the prisoner - A. Yes. In the month of May last, I took Sarah Evans to Hatton Garden office to swear to her examination, that it was the child of Thomas Aris .

Q. Have you ever seen the prisoner or the child since - A. Never, until I saw her at Hatton Garden.

Q. Have you ever had any application from the prisoner on the behalf of that child - A. No application at all made to me. She never brought the child on any Sunday.

MR. WHITEHAIR, MR. BROWN, MR. SANDEL, MR. PEEBALL. Q. Have you, or either of you, had any application made to you to have the child taken in the workhouse - A. Never.

Mr. Lee. No children go into the workhouse but by an order from me.

Q. Have you ever had any application in the name of Mr. Hougham - A. No.

SAMUEL STEPHEN HOUGHAM . I am medical attendant of the poor of St. Pancras. There has been no application made by her to me on account of the parish, for the admission of a child into the workhouse.

Mr. Walford. Did you ever make such an application - A. No.

Mr. Gurney. As you have known her, you have had an opportunity of knowing whether she is an affectionate mother - A. A very affectionate woman. She was anxious to have them well. A more tender mother could not be.

THOMAS WEBB . Q. I believe you are a surgeon - A. Yes, sir.

Q. Were you called on, on Monday the 15th of March, to see the dead body of the child - A. No; I was passing by accidentally, mere curiosity led me in. I went in. I saw the child. The child was in a very putrid state indeed; very much swoln, and very much disfigured.

Q. Did the body of the child appear to you that it must have lain in water some time - A. Most assuredly. I should suppose the body must have been in water a fortnight or three weeks. The features were very much disfigured at the time I saw the child. At the time I saw the child there was a quantity of bloody serum issuing from its nose.

COURT. I take it you did not know the child in its life time - A. No, I did not. The handkerchief round the child's neck had been removed when I saw it.

Mr. Gurney. You live in Clerkenwell - A. I do.

Q. We understand the body was found close to the road which turns up to Sadler's Wells - A. It was found nearly opposite of the Wells.

Q. Is that a road very much frequented - A. Very much.

Q. Is that a place more frequented on Sunday evenings than on other evenings - A. It is as public a road as I know any where.

COURT. Could you form any judgment whether the child died by suffocation or by drowning - A. The putrefaction had so far taken place, from the state of putrefaction, if the child had died of suffocation, if the handkerchief had been tied tight it would have gone through the integument. I cannot say from the appearance whether it was the one or the conjoint effect of both.

HENRY JONES . Q. Were you in the vault at the time the prisoner and the other persons were there - A. I was not.

Q. Were you present at any time when she was asked about the child's clothes - A. I was in Mr. Sheppard's public-house. After they came out, Mr. Voyce asked her whether that was her child. She answered, no, it was not. Mr. Voyce said, they say that these clothes, the cap and hat, are your boy's clothes. She said, that she had no knowledge of them at all. She denied any knowledge of the child, or of any knowledge of the clothes. She always denied the three first times, Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday morning, any knowledge of the child. On the Friday morning, as I was going with her to the magistrate, I asked her whether she had any thing fresh to communicate, and how she felt her mind. She said, perfectly easy and composed. She said, she had spoken the truth, and now I am easy. She said, she had declared all the truth, and whom she had given the child to. That the person she alluded to, as the person she met with on Sunday morning, was Mr. Aris, and that the child was to go into the country by his direction, that she was to meet him the same evening by his appointment in Gray's-inn-lane, but did not meet him, but met a person who said she came from Mr. Aris, to whom she delivered the child. The woman told her, as she returned back she would meet Aris. She told me that she did meet him some little distance off from where she parted with the child. He asked where the child was. She told him that she had delivered it up to a woman that he (Aris) had sent. He said, that was all very right; and that was all that

passed between them at that time. I asked her, why she did not make that confession at the first. I said, had you acknowledged the child at first, and made that confession, it would have taken a great deal of guilt off you. She said that Mr. Aris had desired her to say what she had. On the next day, Saturday, I fetched her from the House of Correction. She continued perfectly composed in her own mind. She said she had spoken the truth. I asked her every time in the morning I met her, how she was in her mind. She said she was perfectly composed in her mind, because she had spoken the truth.

Q. Did you know whether on the day before she had been examined privately by Mr. Capper and Mr. Webb - A. I understood she had divulged her mind the day before to somebody, and on Friday morning she was quite comfortable.

THOMAS CUTHELL . Did you happen to be in the vault at the time the prisoner was there - A. I was. She was asked whose child it was; she said it was not her child, her child was not so big; and the clothes that were shown her she said was not her child's clothes. The clothes were shown to her altogether, afterwards they were shown to her piece by piece. She still persisted in denying them.

MR. LEECH Q.You are a magistrate of the County of Middlesex - A. I am. When the prisoner was first brought to the office, I think was on Monday the 15th.

Q. Was any examination taken by you on the 19th of March - A. Yes. This I think was on the Friday. That is my name and hand writing, and the prisoner signed it. It was read over to her. It was voluntary on her part, without any promise or threat.

Q. She had been brought before you prior to that - A.She had. She was brought before me on the Monday, and what she said then was contrary to that examination. On Thursday, Mr. Capper went to the prison, and there he took the declaration of the prisoner.

MR. CAPPER. Q. You are a magistrate of the County of Middlesex - A. I am. On Thursday, the 18th, I went to the prisoner and took the declaration of the prisoner; she signed it. It is my hand writing. What she said was voluntary, and at herown request entirely. It was read over to her.

"The voluntary examination of Sarah Evans, taken before Robert Capper, one of his Majesty's justices of the peace of the County of Middlesex, who faith, the child said to be taken out of the New River, and which examinant saw on Monday evening last, is the child of this examinant; that she was delivered of the said infant on the 12th of April, 1809; that the father of the child is Thomas Aris, Senior, late Governour of the House of Correction for the County of Middlesex; that she has had five children by the said Thomas Aris ; that he had given to her at different times, sums of money for the maintenance of the said children; the said Thomas Aris allowed her half a guinea a week, until the time of his being displaced from his situation in the House of Correction; that he told her, (this examinant) that he could make her no further allowance, but he gave her a few shillings; that, about May last, she applied to the parish, went to Hatton Garden office, where she swore the said child; that the said Thomas Aris was the father of the said child; that, about three or four months after she met the said Thomas Aris , who abused her for swearing the said child, and said she was well paid for it. He desired her to meet him on the Thursday evening following, near the public-house called the Bull in the Pound, in the Spa-fields. This examinant went, on the Thursday evening, to the place appointed her, where she met the said Thomas Aris, that he enquired after the child, and said, why did not you bring it; meaning the child lately found drowned. This examinant asked him, what he meaned to do with it; when he replied, to send him into the country, to his sister's house. Examinant said she should not chuse to trust him with the child, except she saw the woman that was to take the child. The said Thomas Aris said, that a woman was to come from his sister to take the child, and if she would bring the child on the Friday evening he would bring the woman. She went to the place appointed; saw the woman. Another appointment was made to meet the said Thomas Aris . That this examinant met the said Thomas Aris in Northampton-street, Clerkenwell, on Sunday the 21st of February last, at eleven o'clock, when the said Thomas Aris desired her to bring the said child to the top of Gray's-inn-lane, and to wait there until she saw him. This examinant took the child to the place appointed, at the hour mentioned by the said Thomas Aris , which was half past six in the evening; that they walked down Gray's-inn-lane together, towards Battle-bridge, in order to meet the said Thomas Aris ; that they returned part of the way up Gray's-inn-lane, where the said woman took the said child, as it was growing late. The examinant asked her where the lodged; she said, down that street. This examinant left her, and proceeded in her way home. As she went across the fields from Gray's-inn-lane, she met the said Thomas Aris. He asked her, whether she had left the child. She replied she had, and she had given the woman three shillings. Aris said, he would return her the three shillings, but he had no money. He asked the examinant what she would say about the child when she went home. She said that she would say that she had sent the child into the country. He replied, do not say so, but say you have delivered the child into St. Pancras workhouse. She further saith, that the handkerchief tied round the child is not the property of the examinant, nor was it on the child when she delivered it to the woman in Gray's-inn-lane.

"The voluntary confession of Sarah Evans , taken before Thomas Leech, one of his Majesty's justices of the peace for the county of Middlesex, 1th of March, 1813, who saith, that at the time

that Thomas Aris told her he would send the child to his sister, she understood it to be the wife of his brother James, living in Buckinghamshire, whom she has heard him frequently speak of. He was once pointed out to her by a Mrs. Fincher, at the Sessions-house, Clerkenwell-green, about a twelvemonth ago last Christmas; that the reason she said in her former confessions that she would not trust the said Thomas Aris with the child, that she wished to see the woman to whom it was to be delivered and not with any apprehension or fear that he would do the child any harm; that on Sunday the 21st of February last, she saw Thomas Aris on that day, and that he is the same person to whom she alluded when she told her landlady, Mrs. Blakey, that she had met a person who would get the child into St. Pancras's workhouse. The woman to whom she delivered the child was dressed in a brown gown, and a black veil, but not over her face. The handkerchief mentioned in the concluding part of her former confession, that was found on the neck of the child, she now recollects is one that belonged to her, and which she lent the said Thomas Aris one evening, about two years ago last November, at her lodgings, with one Bittle, Stone's row, Somers Town. He asked her for it to tie round his neck. He never returned it to her. The bed-gown and worsted stockings, which her said child had on, nor the handkerchief to which the brick was tied, were no part of the child's dress at the time she delivered it to the woman, as she has before stated, and she had no knowledge of the said articles. That when she delivered the child he had the hat on, a white tipper, a dark blue frock with small spots.

THOMAS ARIS . Q. You were sometime ago Governour of the House of Correction in Cold-bath-fields - A. I was.

Q. From which situation you were discharged - A. Yes, I was.

Q. Where have you lived for the last three months - A. The last three months I lived over the water, in Surry, in Webber-row.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar - A. Yes, I do.

Q. Do you recollect the child George - A I do recollect such a child. The name I don't know.

Q. Did the prisoner at any time swear that child to you - A. I understood so, by Mr. Lee, ten or eleven month ago. I met Mr. Lee in Fore-street; he said, is that you, Mr. Aris. I said, it is. He said, do you know Sarah Evans . I said, I do. He replied, she has sworn a child to you at the parish of St. Pancras. I said, if that is the case I must do as well as I can. About three weeks after that, I was going up Clerkenwell, I met Sarah Evans; she called to me. I said, how do you do. I told her that I understood that she had sworn a child to me; she said that she had; she was forced to do it, or something to that effect. I said where is the child. She said, there it is. The child stood by her side. She had another child in her arms. I then said, what child is this. She said, this is a nurse child. What do you get a week? I think she said, seven shillings? What does the parish allow you. I think she said half-a-crown. I then left her. She said, I live in this street. I believe she mentioned the number in the street she lived. I met her in Northampton-street, Clerkenwell. I never saw her afterwards until I saw her at the police office in Hatton Garden. This is about ten months ago that we had this conversation. I heard of the child being drowned. On the 2nd of March, I saw her at Hatton Garden.

Q. Did you see her at all on the 21st of February - A. Never. I was at home then. I lived then where I do now, in Webber-row, St. George's-fields. I passed that day with my family, and a man of the name of Jones. It is my practise never to go out on Sundays.

Q. Have you any sister - A. Yes, her name is Mary. I believe she is seventy-four. She live in the town of Buckingham. She was in town three or four or five and forty years age. She never was in London since that time to my knowledge. The first that I heard of the child being drowned, I saw it in the paper, saying, the child of Sarah Evans . I was astonished. On Tuesday the 16th, I think it was the Daily Advertiser, and seeing Sarah Evans in the paper, it struck me, good God, it cannot be this woman that I have known. In the afternoon, a son of mine came and told me that Evans was taken up for drowning her child. On Friday I went to Hatton Garden office. A paper was read over to me, which I was astonished at it. I attended to every examination before Mr. Leech. I have been at liberty since. I am not under recognisance to appear. I came here voluntary to day.

Mr. Gurney. When you went to Hatton Garden office, the first thing done was to read the account of which the prisoner had given in your name, so that before you were asked what account you were to give you knew exactly what she charged you with - A. Not before it was read.

Q. Her account was first read over to you, and then you were asked questions. - A. I think I was.

Q. Do not you know it - A. I think I was.

Q. Do not you know it, as certain as you stand there - A. Yes, I do. I have no doubt that was the case.

Q. This young woman formerly lived in your service - A. She first was a prisoner.

Q. She was about the age of eighteen, and you took her into your service - A Yes, and she lived with me about a twelvemonth.

Q.And you have since that seen her pretty frequent at different lodgings she had - A. The first lodging she had, I saw her pretty frequent. For the last several years I have seen her but seldom.

Q.Did you ever know her at Mrs. Bittle's, in Kentish-town - A. Yes, that is seven or eight years ago. I have seen her seldom these last five years. In the course of the last five years I have

seen her once about six-months. I had not seen her for the last two years, only when I met her in Northampton-street, to the best of my recollection, but I cannot tell. I know nothing about dates. She lived in Vineyard-street. I believe she might have called once or twice.

Q. You had hardly ever seen the child - A. Yes, I had seen it half a dozen times.

Q. You did not know his name - A. I recollect his name now.

Q. You had never given her anything for the support of that child before she swore it to you - A. I had given her money for a long time.

Q. Since you have been discharged from Cold-bath-fields prison you have been distressed for want of money - A. Very much.

Q. How many children have you had to maintain - A. Seven or eight.

Q. Do you include this woman's children in the eight - A. No.

Q. Then that is eleven. Have you had the expence and burthen of maintaining any more besides these eight and this woman's three. Did not you send one to Yorkshire - A. Yes; it was sent at my expence to Yorkshire.

Q. Now, do you mean to swear that you had not the burthen of maintaining any more - A. I do not call it a burthen.

Q. You have had no intercourse with her to support that imputation - A. Not with the last.

Q. With George - A. I will not say that.

Q. You are a married man - A. Yes.

Q. You do not reckon these three in with the eight. Now, besides this woman's children, have you been called upon to maintain more - A.There has been another child sworn. I have not paid.

Q. Do you remember, Mr. Aris, visiting the prisoner one wet evening about two years ago - A. No, no such thing happened, not as I recollect.

Q. You have heard her examination. You do not admit that she ever lent you an handkerchief. Now look at that handkerchief - A. I borrowed no handkerchief of her, nor was I ever possessed of such a handkerchief in my life. I never, in all my existence; was possessed of such a handkerchief as that.

Q. You swear that - A. I will swear it five hundred times.

Q. Pray, sir, who washed for you in the month of January last - A. A person that slept with me.

Q. Not your wife - A. No.

Q. Did no other person wash for you. You were in the King's-bench last January - A. Yes. While I was there, there was a woman washed for me. I declare I don't know her name. I left the House of Correction for two years and a half, and the last six months I do not know that ever I stepped out of the house on Sundays.

JURY. Q. Is that child alive that you sent to Yorkshire - A. I understand it is.

Q. Who pays for it - A. I don't know that any body pays for it.

JOHN JONES . I am a green-grocer. I formerly lived in in Brook's-market. I live now in Turnmill street, No. 8.

Q. Did you know Mr. Aris in last February - A. Yes. I have known him a long time.

Q. Did you spend any Sunday with him in the course of February - A. I have been at his house every Sunday except two, in the dwelling where he is now. He went to Webber-street on Saturday, the latter end of January. I removed him there on a Saturday. The next Sunday I did not go, and the second Sunday I did not go there then.

Q. Do you remember the circumstance of Aris being sent for at the police-office, Hatton Garden - A. No. I know he has been there, because I have been there myself at the time.

Q. When you went to Mr. Aris's house of a Sunday, how long did you stay - A. I did not stay much after eight o'clock, and when I was there Aris was always at home. He staid at home during the time I was there.

Q. On what day was it you saw Aris at Hattont Garden office - A. I think it was Thursday that Aris was at Hatton Garden office.

Q. Do you recollect being at his house on the Sunday before the Thursday - A. I certainly was there, and I dare say he was there, but I do not recollect it.

Mr. Bolland. Were you ever servant to Mr. Aris - A. I had a key at the House of Correction.

Q. How long were you with him - A. About a twelvemonth. I cannot say exactly. When Mr. Aris went into the Bench, he sent to me. He had a house for a little time facing the Bench.

Q. Tell me why you, a green grocer, was always with Aris of a Sunday - A. I might go two or three days of a week, and always on a Sunday I went there to make him a garden.

Q. Could your shop afford you to go three times a week and always on a Sunday - A. I have gone at eight o'clock in the morning. I might have stopped there an hour; and I have gone there again in the afternoon. On Sundays in February I have been there both morning and afternoon. I have sometimes staid from five until past eight; seldom shorter.

Q. Aris could not go out on a Sunday when he was in the Bench, and when he was out of the Bench, Aris could only go out on a Sunday. What took your key from you in the House of Correction - A. They were reduced because there were too many, when Mr. Newport took it. I went in afterwards.

MRS. FINCHER. Q. Do you know the sister of Mr. Aris. Did you ever point out the sister of Mr. Aris to the prisoner - A. No; I never knew her at all.

Q. Do you know Mr. Aris - A. Yes.

Q. And you know the person of the prisoner - A. I saw her once. I never pointed out the sister to her. I never saw the sister.

Prisoner's Defence. My first defence was false; it was through the threats of Mr. Aris that I

made it; Mr. Aris was the cause of it. He has threatened to shoot me three times. The first time he threatened me was nine years ago, when I lodged in Cook's-row; and all I have repeated about Pancras parish was by his desire. I delivered the child to a woman by his desire; the woman that he brought to me before, for the purpose of going into the country. I saw the woman that he brought to me, saying, that was the woman that was going into the country to take the child. I had some conversation with the woman concerning her going into the country. I know nothing about the death of the child. I delivered it to the woman according to his desire, on Sunday the 21st of February. I saw Mr. Aris afterwards, and when I met him, he asked me what I would say to the people that knew I was going to get the child into Pancras house. I answered, I would go by his desire. He told me to say to the people that knew I tried to get it into the house, that I had delivered him to the Pancras people, and to those that did not know, I was to say that I had sent him to my own relations in the country. He said, if ever I told any person that he had taken the child he would surely be the death of me; and so he certainly would. He had threatened me many times; that made me make that first report, and that only,

COURT Q. to Thissclton. The prisoner was in custody when you found the child's frock - A. She was. I never had any communication with her about it.

MRS. SIMPSON. Do you know Mr. Aris - A. Yes.

Q. In the month of February last, when he was in the King's-bench-prison, did you do some washing for him - A. I did. I washed for him four pocket handkerchiefs; one was a shambray handkerchief. One of the ends of the handkerchief was pointed, and the other round. It was in the form of a half handkerchief.

Q. Look at this handkerchief - A. This is a shambray handkerchief; it answers the description of the handkerchief I washed for Mr. Aris. I believe it to be the handkerchief. One end of this handkerchief is round, and the other pointed. The colour is a little gone, and laying in water that time it would go. I know the handkerchief by a join in the corner, not by the colour; such things as these are apt to fade, and soaking it in water for three weeks I should think would reduce it to this appearance.

JOHN MATTHEWS . I am a police officer.

Q. Do you know the person of Thomas Aris - A. I do, well.

Q. Did you meet him lately out on a Sunday - A. I did, about a quarter or ten minutes before ten in the morning. I spoke to him. It was about a month or six weeks before this affair happened.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave her the character of an affectionate mother.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18130407-24

368. RICHARD WILLIAMS and JOHN HOLMES were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of March , three hundred and twenty yards yards of woollen cloth, value 140 l. the property of Samuel Sutcliff , in the dwelling-house of Michael Guest . And GEORGE HAND , for feloniously receiving the same goods, on the same day, he knowing them to be stolen .

AARON BROOKES . I am a porter to Mr. Sutcliff; he keeps a woollen warehouse , 49, Basinghall-street . Mr. Guest keeps the house. The warehouse is the ground floor of that house. On Saturday the 13th of March, I locked up the warehouse about half past six in the evening, and then left it. I returned to the warehouse on Monday morning the 15th of March. I found the door on a jar, which I had left safe on the Saturday night, and a considerable quantity of woollen cloth was gone; about ten pieces.

Q. How soon after you made this discovery, did Harrison, the officer, come to you - A. In about ten minutes or a quarter of an hour. I went with him to Grub-street, to a baker's shop. I went up one pair of stairs in that house. Harrison and me went into the room. I saw about five or six persons in that room. I saw Williams and Hand, and three or four more. When Harrison and I entered the door I saw the property. I saw Williams and another jump out of the window. The officer stopped Hand. The rest got by me and got down stairs.

Q. How was Hand dressed - A. He was dressed in a coat; his knees unbuttoned, his stockings were down and he had a night-cap on. He appeared like a man lately arisen from bed. He said, he did not know anything about it; he was obliged to get up in his shirt and to let them in.

Q. Did you find in the room any pieces of cloth that you had lost - A. I found nine pieces out of the ten I had lost.

Q. What is the value of the ten pieces - A. About one hundred and fifty pounds.

Q. In what state did you find these nine pieces - A. They were not in the same state as in our warehouse. They were unfolded, and pieces cut off; about four yards and a half in length. The marks were taken off, and hid between the bed and the mattress, in the same room.

Q. At the time they had been in your warehouse had the pieces of cloth any paper about them - A. Yes. I found them upon Hand, the tailor's shop-board. Hand being a tailor. The officer took care of Hand while I ran after Williams. I catched Williams. He ran down Grub-street, up a court, and tumbled, and I catched him. The others escaped from me.

Q. I do not know whether you know the person of any other besides Williams and Hand, that were there - A. No, sir.

Q. Did you ever know Williams before. A No long

Q. Williams jumped out of the window; how long was he in the room before he jumped out - A. Not many minutes. I am sure it was Williams.

JAMES BARDOLPH. I am a porter.

Q. On Monday the 13th of March were you in Basinghall-street - A. Yes.

Q. While you were there did you observe any person standing in the street - A. I observed Williams standing against the warehouse that I live in, opposite

of the warehouse that was robbed. He was in company with three others that I saw.

Q. Look at the bar, and see whether you saw him in company with any person there - A. I saw Holmes, Williams and others. I had suspicion of Williams. I saw Holmes with a great coat, which I have seen since. He went opposite to where I live, and spoke to two others. He returned back. I looked after him. I saw him on the opposite side of Mr. Sutcliff's. He took the great coat off his back, and another man put it on in the street, land the man that put it on was the first man that entered the house.

Q. You saw the man that put on the coat enter whose house - A. Enter Mr. Sutcliff's warehouse. He entered the house and brought out cloth on his shoulder, with paper wrapped on it. A second and third went in. They each brought out cloth. I saw Williams go in, but come out without any. I saw him in company with those that did bring out.

Q. After they had brought out the cloth which way did they go - A. They went down Basinghall-street, crossed Fore-street towards Grub-street.

Q. How near the lower end of Basinghall-street is the warehouse - A. It is the last house but one or two to London Wall, and from thence to Grub-street is a very few yards. I saw Harrison, the officer, and told him what I had seen.

Q. Did you the next day see either of the men that you saw do this transaction - A. I saw Holmes the next day near Smithfield, by Snow-hill. I saw Holmes with another man; they crossed over together, as though they were going towards Smithfield. I made all the haste I could to find Harrison.

Q. Now, when you saw Holmes the next day, were you positive that he was one of the men that was engaged in this transaction - A. I was very positive.

Q. How soon afterwards were you called upon to see him in custody - A. I cannot exactly say, a week or more; and when I saw him again I perfectly knew him. I am quite sure Williams and him were two of the party.

THOMAS ELKIN . I am a painter. I work with Mr. Alders, in Grub-street. On Monday morning, the 15th of March, I was going to my employ. I went through the courts in Grub-street, into Moor-lane, and then I crossed to Basighall-street. I observed a man of the name of Gill, and Williams, as I was crossing in Basinghall-street. I saw Gill in company with Williams and two others, crossing from the bottom of Basinghall-street. They had two rolls of cloth wrapped up in brown paper. Williams had one load and Gill another. They went through Honeysuckle-court, into Grub-street. I know nothing of this Gill. I followed Williams and the others, and saw them go into a baker's shop in Grub-street. That is the baker's shop that I afterwards went to with Harrison. After I saw them, I went and informed Harrison, and then I went with Harrison to the baker's in Grub-street. I saw Williams jump out of the window. He caught hold of the lamp iron. Harrison called, stop thief. I ran directly the young man came down stairs, and caught Williams. He was brought back.

ANTHONY HARRISON . I am a constable. From information, I went to Grub-street. Upon my entering the room, I found the prisoner Williams and two others, and as soon as I entered the room Williams pushed up the window and jumped out. I searched, and I found nine rolls of cloth in the room. Williams was brought back in two or three minutes. I found the marks cut off the rolls of cloth; and in searching the room I found it between the bed and the mattrass. Hand was in the room; he is a tailor. He said he did not know any thing about it; he was called out of bed to let some things be brought in there. I found two great coats in the room, a green and a blue one.

Bardolph. The blue great coat is like the great coat I saw on Holmes's back when he pulled it off, and another man put it on. The great coat was as like this as can be, with a cape.

Q. to Harrison. Did you find any paper with marks also - A. Yes. I found them under the shop-board.

JOHN SMITH . I keep the White Hart in Fetter-lane. The prisoner Holmes had lodged with me.

Q. Had he a blue coat - A. He had a blue coat.

Q. Upon your oath, had not Holmes such a coat as that - A. Yes; he had a blue coat similar to that.

SAMUEL SUTCLIFF . Q. Do you keep this warehouse for the sale of clothes - A. Yes, for Edward Alsling , John Sutcliff , and William Alsling . I am their agent, and dispose of their property in town.

Q. Whose dwelling-house is this of which your warehouse is a ground floor - A. Mr. Guest's. These clothes that are produced are all the property of me and my employers. They are of the value of one hundred and forty pounds.

MICHAEL GUEST . I reside in this house of which this warehouse forms a part. I sleep there. Mr. Sutcliff pays me for the warehouse. He is my tenant.

Williams left his defence to his counsel.

Holmes's Defence. The officer took my money from me; I wish to have it.

Hand's Defence. I am as innocent as a child unborn with respect to knowing the goods being stolen. I leave the rest to my counsel.

WILLIAMS, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 22.

HOLMES, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 37.

HAND, GUILTY , aged 54.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130407-25

369. JOHN WILSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2nd of April , forty-eight pair of gloves, value 1 l. 15 s. the property of John Nicholson .

JOSEPH EBURNE . I am warehouseman to John Nicholson , in Bread-street, in the parish of Allhallows . On the 2nd of April, I saw John Wilson enter the passage leading to the warehouse door, the door being a little a-jar. He pushed it further open. He took from a pile on the floor a paper containing four dozen of gloves. He then made off. I closely pursued him and took him in Friday-street, with the goods upon him. These are the goods; they are my master's property. They are of the value of thirty-five shillings.

Prisoner's Defence. I have nothing farther to say than I am a very distressed man. I had been out of work eight months. I have a wife and five children. I throw myself on the mercy of the court.

GUILTY , aged 59.

Confined Six Months in Newgate , and publicly whipped .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130407-26

370. JOHN BURNE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of February , a decanter, value 3 s. a water-ewer, value 3 s. 6 d. the property of Thomas Burnell and John Palmer .

THOMAS BURNELL . My partner's name is John Palmer . On the 19th of February, I received information that four of our servants out of five were robbing of us. I applied to Mr. Hawkins, one of the marshalmen to come and watch.

JOHN LACEY HAWKINS . I am a marshalman. On the 22nd of February, about half past five in the evening, I was watching along with Charles Matthews . I sent Matthews to the side door. I watched at the front. I saw the prisoner come from the front of the house, and the officer after him. The prisoner ran very fast, and looked behind him, and when he saw me he ran a deal faster. I pursued him, and stopped him. I observed something under his coat. I asked him what he had got. He answered, nothing. I told him, I could see something under his coat, and I would feel. I took the decanter from him. I then took him to Mr. Burnell. He begged of the prosecutor to let him go. I took him into custody. We then went to his house, where he lodged, in Labour-in-vain-hill, and we found this water-ewer, and six china cups, and eight saucers. The prisoner was in the Compter when I searched his lodgings. Charles Matthews saw me take the decanter from him.

Prosecutor. I have every reason to believe this decanter is ours. We have decanters similar to this in our warehouse, and I also believe all the things are ours. As soon as I saw the prisoner he begged for mercy.

CHARLES MATTHEWS . I was watching the side door. I saw the prisoner come out of the house. I saw Hawkins take the decauter from him.

Prisoner. We were hard at work. I took the decanter to fetch a drop of gin.

GUILTY , aged 41.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130407-27

371. THOMAS HANSELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22nd of February , two cruets, value 3 s. four bowls, value 8 d. a cradle, value 1 d. two plates, value 3 d. a milk jug, value 1 d. and one mug, value 1 d. the property of Thomas Burnell and John Palmer .

THOMAS BURNELL . My partner's name is John Palmer . While we were gone to search the lodgings of the former prisoner, the prisoner Hansell was taken in custody.

JOHN LACEY HAWKINS . On the 22nd of February, about eight o'clock at night, I seized the prisoner, and took from his person two cruets, one from his breeches pocket, and one from his coat pocket, and a glass coral from his waistcoat pocket. I took them from him in the presence of the prosecutor and Matthews.

CHARLES MATTHEWS . I went to the prisoner's lodgings after he was taken. I looked about his room. I found several things that Mr. Burnell owned, four bowls or basons, a tea-pot, a cradle, a jug, and other things.

Prosecutor. I have every reason to believe them to be our property. The two cruets I saw taken out of the prisoner's pockets.

Prisoner's Defence. That mug Mr. Burnell gave me himself. Them basons were given me by Mr. Palmer, junior. The cruets I took for my own use; I thought them a trifling thing.

GUILTY , aged 43.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130407-28

372. PHILIP DRESDALE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on 22nd of February , six dishes, value 2 s. three bowls, value 8 d. a pepper-box, value 2 d. and two salt-sillers, value 8 d. the property of Thomas Burnell and John Palmer .

THOMAS BURNELL . My partner's name is John Palmer .

CHARLES MATTHEWS . While Hawkins and Mr. Burnell were gone to search the other prisoner lodgings. I stopped about the door. I saw the prisoner come from the side door. I saw that he had dishes. I said, what are you going to make of them. He said, to make a little beer. I said, I will beer you. He replied, pray let me go, and I will satisfy you. I took him a little further. He then tried to get away. Then I handcuffed him, and took him to the Compter. I took from him these half dozen dishes; he had them in his apron before him. I saw him come out of the door with them.

JOHN LACEY HAWKINS. I searched the prisoner's lodgings. I found these six plates, two bowls, two salt-sillers, and a pepper-box.

Prisoner. The half dozen plates my wife bought them; the half dozen dishes were given to me by a man in the warehouse. They pressed upon me for my footing. They gave me these dishes. I was going to take them to a public-house for half-a-gallon of beer.

Prosecutor. I believe them to be mine. We have exactly similar in our warehouse. I had information that half a dozen dishes were taken away prior to the prisoner being detected.

GUILTY , aged 35.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130407-29

373. WILLIAM BORDER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of March , a quart of gin, value 3 s. 6 d. the property of David Pickitt and Thomas Pickitt .

HARRIOT PICKITT. My husband's name is David Pickitt ; he is a brandy merchant : his partner's name is Thomas Pickitt . On the 16th of March I went into the warehouse; it was near seven o'clock. I asked the prisoner to procure me a lemon. He seemed confused. The prisoner is a porter to us. He went out, and procured me a lemon. I took it up stairs. I then observed to my mother that I was afraid we had got a second dishonest man. I placed

myself on the top of the stairs, in such a condition that I could see all over the warehouse. I then observed the prisoner go to the gin vat, No. 3. He filled a bladder with gin, and put it into his small-clothes. I went down stairs into the cellar. I told Mr. Sheppard, the clerk, not to let the prisoner, William Border , go away without being searched. Mr. Sheppard brought the prisoner up stairs. I accused him of having spirits about him. He denied it. I told him, it was of no use denying it; I had seen him take it. He still continued denying of it. He went out of the warehouse into the back yard; Mr. Sheppard and myself followed him. Mr. Sheppard took from him the bladder containing the gin. We live at No. 5, Warwick-lane, Newgate-street.

GEORGE SHEPPARD. On the evening stated I was in the cellar. I said, William, you have something about you that does not belong to you. He said he had not. I told him I was certain that he had, because he had been seen to go to such a cask. He went towards the yard; I followed him. He drew from his smallclothes the bladder containing the gin. This is the bladder; it contains gin. It was more full at the time, but it was leaky, and it has wasted. It seems to have been made on purpose for the nosel of the cock to go in. He was afterwards taken in custody.

Prisoner's Defence. The bladder I found and the gin. When I went out of doors for this lemon at the public-house, I saw a man come in with a bottle; he set this down; I looked to see what it was. I took it up.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130407-30

374. ANN HAMILTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of March , two dollars, value 11 s. a three-shilling bank-token, an eighteen-penny bank-token, two shillings, and one sixpence, the monies of Joseph Newton , from his person .

JOSEPH NEWTON. I am a barge-man . I live at Bishop Stortford. I was walking along Cheapside , I made a slip on the side of the pavement. It was on the 4th of March, in the evening, about half past eight o'clock. The prisoner was near me; she said, countryman, do not knock me down. I said, I will not knock you down if I can help it, but I have made a little bit of a slip in walking along. She said, I believe you are a countyman by your look. I said, yes. She said, pray what countryman are you I said, I come from Ware in Hertfordshire, my native place. She said she knew some people down there. She said she lived at the back of the Mansion House; she kept a gentleman's house there, if I would walk a little way down with her to take a letter. I walked with her, and when I got into a court she said, Oh, my dear, I should like to go to bed with you all night. I said, if you want to sleep with me you must go to the Bull, at Aldgate. She said, no, I wish you would take a bed here. I said, no, you have taken my money out of my pocket. She said, if she had she would keep it. I called out, watch. The officer came and said, what is the matter. I said, this woman has robbed me of eighteen shillings. He took charge of her. I never felt her take it at all.

Prisoner. Did not you give me something to drink - A. I did. I gave you a glass of gin.

WILLIAM HOBBS. I am an officer. I heard the cry of, watch. I immediately ran. I saw this man hold the prisoner by her two shoulders. I asked him what was amiss. He said, that she had robbed him of eighteen shillings. He described the pieces of silver and the rest of the money that she had got in her pocket she was going to pay her rent with. I took her to the Compter. I found upon her the pieces of silver exactly as he told me. This is the money.

Prisoner's Defence. What money I had was my own. It was given me by a gentleman.

Prosecutor. It is the amount of my money. I cannot swear to it. I held the prisoner fast until the officer came.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130407-31

375. WILLIAM TAYLOR was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of March , three gold seals, value 1 l. a gold ring, value 2 s. and part of a steel watch chain, value 1 s. the property of Joseph Cradock , from his person .

JOHN CRADOCK . I am a working silversmith . On the morning of the 18th of March, about one o'clock, I was in Barbican. I went on St. Patrick's day to dine with a friend of mine. We staid until near one o'clock, and coming home my friend was about five yards before me. I was a little in liquor. I was perfectly collected. I was not far from Aldersgate-street . Some people came past me and snatched my seals. There were three or four went past me, and one of them snatched my seals, and part of my watch-chain was broken. They took part of the chain and seals. I immediately called out to my friend that I had lost my seals, and called, stop thief directly. I turned round, and ran after the people that passed me, and I believe the prisoner crossed over the way. I pursued the man that passed me, and I believe the prisoner was one of them.

Q. Have you any doubt of it - A. I cannot possibly swear to him. I think he is. Two of the seals were found afterwards.

Q. You believe that the prisoner was one of the men that past you, but you are not sure that he was the hand that took it - A. No, I cannot be certain of that. The prisoner was one of the men that passed me. I cannot be certain that he snatched the seal.

Q. You were sober before the Lord Mayor, were not you - A. Yes.

Q. You then swore that the prisoner was the man that snatched the seals - A. No, I do not know that. I am sure the prisoner is one of the men that passed me. Two or three passed me; two on one side, and the prisoner on the other side.

Q. Do not you know on which side the seals were snatched - A. I cannot swear to that. The seals were afterwards found.

ELIZABETH GAFFLEY . I was on the spot at the time the robbery was. I saw three men come round the corner of Aldersgate-street, into Barbican. I saw the prisoner jostle the gentleman against the wall. I saw him put his hand towards the gentleman's property. I did not see him take it. The prisoner run across the street. The gentleman followed him and cried, stop thief, and directly the officer of the night came up and seized him. The prisoner was in my sight all the time, until he was taken to the watchhouse.

THOMAS EADES . I was the ward beadle. I was going round with the patrol, and a man was giving information to the watchman that there were three or four men robbing of a gentleman. I sent the watchman about his business, and I and the patrol made the best of our way. I saw a mob, and I heard the cry of, stop thief; he has stole my seals. I took to the middle of the street. I saw the prisoner start from the mob, across the street, to a court where there was a gate to prevent anybody going up. The prisoner made a few steps at that spot. I laid hold of his collar, and I laid hold of his stick. He told me that the man was over the way. I wanted him to give up the stick. He struggled, and got over the way, and when he got over the way we got the stick out of his possession. He then cried out to the rest that were about him, d - n your eyes, mill away I told the patrol to draw his cutlass to keep them off, and we took him to the watchhouse.

Q. How many persons were there with him - A. There were three or four. We took him to the watchhouse, searched him, and found nothing. I afterwards went with the patrol to the spot where I took him, and there lay the chain and seals altogether. These are them. I found the whole of them at the gateway he was going up, and when the officer came to compare them, the officer said, it is not all right; there must be some part of the chain with it. He went back, and found some part of the chain.

JOEL MITCHELL . I am constable of Cripplegate Without. A quarter before two o'clock, on the 18th of March, the prisoner was brought in the watchhouse and charged by Mr. Cradock with robbing him of his two seals. I committed him to the Compter. We concluded that the seals might be throwed away. We took a lanthorn and the watchman with us, and after looking a short while Mr. Eades found the seals. I found part of the chain deficient. I went back again, and found this part of the chain. Mr. Cradock has got the other part it corresponds exactly.

JOHN COUZENS . On the 18th of March, as I was coming down Princes-street, in company with Eades, the beadle. We were informed by the watchman that there were some men following a gentleman. We immediately made towards Long lane. We had been but a short way before we heard the call of, stop thief; he has got my seals. I saw the prisoner by himself. We laid hold of him. He made a strong resistance in so doing; his partners came to his assistance. He said, d - n your eyes, mill away. The gentleman that had lost his seals came up. He said, that is the man that has robbed me of my seals. We secured him and took him to the watchhouse. The beadle and the officer of the night went back to see if he had dropped the property. They found the seals and part of the chain. The prosecutor said it was his property.

Prosecutor. These are my seals and chain also.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming home. I heard the cry of, stop thief. There were seven or eight people running down Barbican. The constable laid hold of me, and said I was the man that robbed the gentleman. I am innocent of what I am charged with.

GUILTY , aged 32.

Transported for Life

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130407-32

376. JAMES BOWDEN , DAVID WELLS , and WILLIAM HITCHCOCK were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of March , two bushels of beans, value 1 l. and two bushels and a half of beans and oats mixed, value 1 l. the property of Daniel Harrington and Francis Dancer .

FRANCIS DANCER . My partner's name is Daniel Harrington . I live at Harrow . I am a farmer . On Saturday, the 20th of March, I missed the oats and beans from the horse corn, in the stable. The beans and oats I give out twice a week for the horse corn. Two of the prisoners are my servants. Hitchcock was my carter , and Wells was carter's boy .

Q. Why do you accuse them of taking your horse corn - A. Because, on Tuesday the 23d, I found that I had lost beans out of my barn, and the beans and corn mixed I found that I had lost out of the carter's bin. I went into the loft. I found some beans in a sack, about three half pecks tied up in the sack, upon the beans. On the 27th, I opened the sack to satisfy myself that they were the beans that I had given out. Then I watched, and sat up for six nights, and on Tuesday morning, at half past one o'clock, Hitchcock and David Wells went into my stable. In about ten minutes after, I perceived a stranger go into the stable. I saw Hitchcock go into the loft, and deliver these beans down to Bowden and Wells. The both assisted in taking them down through the hole in the loft. After that David Wells came out of the stable, James Bowden came out with the beans, and put them down. I immediately charged them with stealing the beans and oats, and called for assistance. I have brought a sample of the beans. I had such beans in my place.

Mr. Reynolds. How long has Wells lived with you - A. Near six months.

Q. He was entirely under the controul of Hitchcock - A. Entirely. I looked upon him as a good lad. I believe he was drawn in by the other prisoners.

Bowden's Defence. I am innocent of the job. On Monday night I was at the Bell public-house, Hitchcock came in. He said, he was going to town. I said, I would go with him, and when I went into the stable he was putting these beans. He asked me to take the beans, and the boy was to show me where to put them.

Wells was not put on his defence.

Hitchcock's Defence. These beans I put by for

some new horses. My master promised me, when I went first to live with him, the team that I drove were poor old horses. I expected a new team every day.

BOWDEN, GUILTY , aged 30.

HITCHCOCK, GUILTY , aged 23.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

WELLS, NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130407-33

377. HENRY STEVENS was indicted for that he, on the 30th of January , about the hour of two in the night, being in the dwelling-house of Charles Sharpe , feloniously did steal one coat, value 2 l. the property of George Berry ; a pocket-book, value 6 d. and fifteen shillings, the property of Charles Sharpe ; and that he did afterwards, about the same hour, in the night, burglariously break the said dwelling-house, in order to get out of it .

CHARLES SHARPE . I keep the Three Suns in South Portman-mews, in Mary-le-bone parish .

Q. Did the prisoner lodge with you on the 30th of January, - A. Yes. He slept in the same room with me, but not in the same bed. George Berry and the prisoner slept in a bed by themselves.

Q. On the morning of the 31st of January did you miss anything - A. I missed a large watch, a small red morrocco pocket-book, and about fifteen or sixteen shillings. I cannot exactly say which. My watch was in my breeches pocket.

Q. Was your house locked up the night before - A. Yes. I was the last person up. The outer door of the house I bolted myself.

Q. How did you find the door in the morning - A. I was not the first person up. I do not know who went out first. There are lodgers in the house. When I awoke, the prisoner was gone.

Q. Have you found any of your things again - A. Yes, I saw my watch and pocket-book yesterday, at Hicks's Hall.

Q. Are you sure you had this watch and pocketbook the night before - A. I wound the watch up the last thing when I went to bed, and my pocketbook I took some notes out of it when I went to bed. I saw my pocket-book. I am quite sure that the prisoner went to bed at the time I did. He had lodged with me about a week.

Q. What is he - A. A groom, out of place.

GEORGE BERRY . I slept in the same room with the last witness. Mr. Sharpe awoke me about seven o'clock in the morning; the prisoner was then gone.

DAVID BERRY. I slept in the next room.

Q. Did you hear the prisoner go away - A. I heard the door open. I don't know who went out. He went out at the time the watchman went six. It was quite dark then. I heard him go down stairs.

THOMAS FOY . I am an officer. On the 20th, the prisoner was detained at Portsmouth. I went there and brought him up. Mr. Williams searched him, and found the watch.

MR. WILLIAMS. I apprehended the prisoner at Portsea for another felony. I searched him, and found a gilt watch and a pocket-book, which I produce.

Prosecutor. This is my watch and pocket-book.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to his character.

GUILTY, aged 40,

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only, but not of breaking out of the dwelling-house .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130407-34

378. GEORGE HERBERT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of March , a coat, value 2 l. the property of William Allum , in the dwelling-house of Sarah Lucombe .

WILLIAM ALLUM . I live at Hounslow .

Q. Who is Sarah Lucombe - A. She keeps the Nag's Head. I lodge there.

Q. Did you lose anything on the 23d of March - A. Yes, a drab coat. I value it at two pounds. The prisoner slept in the same room that I did.

Q. What time did you go to bed the over night - A. About eleven o'clock. The prisoner went to bed before me. On Tuesday morning I was up between five and six. I left him asleep in the bed. I hung the coat up on a nail. I had intelligence that it was him, and I pursued him to Staines. He was taken there.

Q. Have you seen the coat since - A. Yes; it was taken off his back by John Taylor .

JOHN TAYLOR . I met the prisoner at Staines, with the coat on his back. This is the coat, I have had it ever since.

Prosecutor. This is my coat; I am sure of it.

Prisoner's Defence. I took the coat, because I was drove to it by distress. I was lately discharged from the Militia.

GUILTY, aged 19,

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only

Judgment respited .

First Middlesex jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

Reference Number: t18130407-35

379. RICHARD STEVENS was indicted for that he, on the 10th of December, 1809, at the Parish Church of St. George, Hanover-square, took to wife one Elizabeth Life , that he afterwards, at the parish church of St. Andrew, Holborn, took to wife one Sarah Catherine Bailey , Elizabeth his first wife being then alive .

ALLEN DANCEY . Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. I have known the prisoner near four years.

Q. Did you know Elizabeth Life - A. Yes; I was present at the marriage of those two, at St. George's church, Hanover-square, on the 10th of December, 1809.

Q. Were you well acquainted with both of them - A. Not particularly acquainted with them, only seeing them at the Duke of Portland's.

Q. Did you know their persons so as not to make any mistake - A. Yes. I knew them a short time after they were married. They lived together as man and wife.

Q. Was she a single woman at the time - A. I believe so; she passed as such

SARAH CHATHERINE BAILEY . Q. Have you got

the certificate of the prisoner's first marriage - A. Yes. I got it at St. George's church, Hanover-square.

Q. Did you compare it with the register book - A. I did: it is an exact copy. That is a true copy of the register. The clerk of the church read the register to me. I looked at the copy. This is exactly what he read to me. (The copy of the register read) This is the certificate of my marriage at St. Andrew's church, Holborn, the 14th of December, 1812. I was positively married by Charles Price , by banns, publicly in the church.

Q. Who was present at your marriage - A. Nobody at all. The clerk gave me away.

Q. You never examined that with the book - A. No, I did not, because I knew that was true.

Q. to Allen Dancey . Do you know the person of the first wife - A. Yes; she was living on the 17th of last March.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence.

GUILTY aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18130407-36

380. JAMES JAMES was indicted for that he, on the 25th of January , about the hour of eight of the night of the same day, at the parish of St. Mary-le-bone, being in the dwelling-house of John Francois Mary de L'Horme de Lile , feloniously did steal a great coat, value 4 l. a pair of gloves, value 2 s. and a hat, value 8 s. his property; that he afterwards did break the said dwelling-house to get out of the same .

JOHN FRANCOIS MARY DE L'HORME DE LILE. I live at 17, Duke-street, Manchester-square . I rent the whole house.

Q. What do you know of the fact of the prisoner taking the things - A. My servant knows the fact. I lost the coat, hat, and gloves, on the 25th of January.

Q. Have you seen them again at any time - A. Only the pair of gloves. I saw the gloves at Queen-square office.

HARRIOT PARSON. On the 25th of January, the prisoner came to our house to know whether master's boots wanted mending. I went up stairs to my master for them; as I was coming down the drawing-room stairs I heard the door shut after him, and when I came down the person was gone. I missed my master's coat and hat; the gloves were in the coat pocket.

Mr. de Lile. I am sure the gloves were in the coat pocket. The coat hung up in the hall.

THOMAS PACE . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner on the 27th of January, and on searching his box I found these gloves.

Prosecutor. They are my gloves.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18130407-37

381. CHARLES SLATER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of February , two pair of stockings, value 2 s. and a shawl, value 2 s. the property of John Beaven ; two shirts, value 1 l. a neckloth, value 2 s. the property of William Drake ; a shawl, value 2 s. two shirts, value 1 l. and a neckcloth, value 2 s. the property of George Howse , in the dwelling-house of John Moss .

JOHN BEAVEN . I am a postillion .

Q. Where were you on the 9th of February last - A. At the White Horse, South Audley-street . I went in there to have something to drink. I had a bundle with me. It was about eight o'clock in the evening I laid the bundle on the floor by the side of the chair that I sat in, close to me. I went out, and as I was coming in I met Slater going out of the door. As soon as I got in the room, Williams said, Jack, mind your bundle. I said, is it gone. He said, yes. I saw it was gone. I went out directly after Slater. I returned again, saying, I could not find it.

THOMAS WILLIAMS . I am a postillion. I was at the White Horse. I saw Slater go out of the door with the bundle, as Beaven was coming in. I said, Jack, mind your bundle; there he goes with it. I saw the prisoner going out with the bundle. I did not see him take it up. He sat at the side of Beaven. He was sitting there full half an hour before Beaven went out.

Q. Had you seen the bundle lying on the floor - A. No. I saw Beaven come in with the bundle. We all came in together. The bundle was tied up in a shawl, and the bundle that the prisoner went out with appeared to be the same that I saw Beaven come in with.

WILLIAM DRAKE . I was at the White Horse in South Audley-street. I went in with Thomas Williams and Charles Slater to drink together. I saw Beaven put the bundle by the side of the chair he was sitting in.

Q. What was the outside cover of that bundle - A. A large printed shawl, black and white. As soon as Beaven went out of the room, I went and sat in the chair while he was out, and when Beaven was entering the door, Slater went out of it, passing Beaven with the bundle in his left hand. Thomas Williams said to Beaven, John, mind your bundle. He went after him, and returned in a few minutes, saying, he could not find him.

GEORGE COOPER . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner. I searched him, and found nothing on him but a latch key.

Prisoner's Defence. I went into this public-house with these young men. I never saw any bundle, nor did I take any bundle.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

Reference Number: t18130407-38

382. BENJAMIN HART was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Christopher Crook , he and others of his family being therein, on the 23d of February , about the hour of nine in the forenoon, and stealing therein seventy-six yards of linen cloth, value 9 l. his property.

WILLIAM HEMMINGS . I am shopman to Christopher Crook ; he lives in York-street, Covent Garden . On the 23d of February, about nine o'clock in the morning, I was in Mr. Crook's shop.

Q. Was your shop open at that time - A. The shutters were down, but the door was shut. The

door was upon the latch. There was no one in the shop at that time but me. The dwelling-house is over the shop, and there is a communication from the shop to the dwelling-house. It is all under one roof. I was standing in the middle of the shop; I heard a person in the shop, but not until he was going out of the shop.

Q. When you heard the noise of somebody going out, did you look to see - A. Yes, I did, directly. I saw the prisoner going out with two pieces of linen. I have here one under each arm. I directly pursued him, and did not lose sight of him until he was secured.

Q. What distance from the shop was he taken - A. He was taken from fifty to an hundred yards.

Q. What became of the two bundles that he had in the mean time - A. He dropped both the bundles on the pavement, within a few yards from where he was apprehended. One of the witnesses held him while I took the linen in my possession. I have had the linen in my possession ever since. I have kept them in the room that I sleep in. This is the linen.

Q. Did you give any alarm when you went out after him - A. Yes, I did. I called out, stop thief. This is one piece of linen, and this is the other. I knew them by my own mark, which I put on them when I took them in my possession. They are worth nine pounds, the two pieces together.

JOHN DAVIS . I am shopman to John Wilson , No. 4, Tavistock-street.

Q. Did you hear the cry of, stop thief, on this morning that we have been speaking of - A. Yes. I heard at the same time something drop by our shop door. I went to the door and saw these two pieces of linen laying by our door, and I saw the prisoner running a cross the street. I ran after him, and caught him at the corner of the street. I took him from there to Bow-street. There was no sitting magistrate there. I took him from thence to Covent Garden watchhouse. I knew William Hemmings . I saw him run after the prisoner. I ran after the prisoner. I saw him pick up the linen.

Q. You did not see the linen in the actual possession of the prisoner - A. I did not. I heard it fall by the door.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence; called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 22.

Of stealing to more than the value of 40 s. in the dwelling-house but not of breaking and entering the dwelling-house.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18130407-39

383. MARY GREEN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of February , forty-five yards of muslin, value 4 l. 10 s. the property of John Faulding , widow, and Richard Stratton , privately in their shop .

RICHARD STRATTON . I am partner with Jane Faulding .

Q. Where is your shop - A. In Coventry-street, in the parish of St. James, Westminster .

Q. Do you remember the prisoner coming to your house at any time - A. Yes, she came on the 20th of February to buy some trifling articles. Another person came with her and bought the articles. The other woman asked for muslin. William Baines , my young man, shewed her the muslin. The young man left the prisoner and was gone to some other part of the premises. I saw the prisoner in a great bustle with her cloak. She had a very large mantle on, and from that I suspected she had taken something. I saw her in the act of drawing her clothes together. I was on the opposite side of the counter, and stood before her. I went to where she was. I turned over the goods to try if I could miss anything. I could not. I looked hard at the prisoner, and was satisfied in my own mind that she had taken something. She after that sat down in a chair; I could see the goods stick out. I then was certain that she had something. I made up my mind. I was determined to search her before she left the premises. She got up from the chair, and went four or five yards. I told her I should like to look under her cloak before she left the premises. She then immediately dropped the goods from under her cloak. I picked them up. She wished me to let her go. I told her I could not. I sent for a constable.

Q. Had the other woman gone away - A. No, they were both detained, and taken to Marlborough-street office. The prisoner was committed. The other woman was discharged.

Q. What is the value of the muslin - A. Four pounds ten shillings.

WILLIAM BAINES . Q. Do you remember the prisoner coming into your master's shop - A. Perfectly well. On the 20th of February, the prisoner, accompanied by another woman, came in and asked for a piece of muslin. They were shewn her. The woman that was in company with the prisoner purchased a small quantity that came to three shillings. The prisoner purchased nothing. The other woman wished to see some Irish linen. I left them. I had farther to go in the shop for the Irish linen. When I came back, I found her sitting in the chair where I left her. At the time I was gone in the front shop, there was something in the prisoner's conduct that gave me suspicion. The prisoner retired from the counter towards the fire-place. It was plain to be perceived that she had something under her cloak, and when Mr. Stratton. said he wished to search her, she dropped the five pieces of muslin. The prisoner seemed very much confused. I saw it drop from her myself. This is the muslin; it is the property of Jane Faulding and Richard Stratton .

The prisoner said nothing in her defence, nor called any witnesses to her character.

GUILTY, aged 59,

Of stealing, but not privately .

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18130407-40

384. JOHN MOODEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of March , a coat, value 24 s. a waistcoat, value 14 s. a pair of breeches, value 12 s. a shirt, value 4 s. four pair of stockings, value 10 s. a pair of shoes, value 8 s. and a handkerchief,

value 5 s. the property of William Jones , in the dwelling-house of William Brent .

WILLIAM JONES . Q. Where were you on the 20th of March last - A. I lodged in Dog and Bear-yard, Tooley-street. I met the prisoner on the 20th of March. I asked him to shew me Whitechapel. He said, yes. We went into a public-house.

Q. Had you anybody in company with you - A. Yes, a young lad; his name is Joseph Mason .

Q. How long had you been in London before this happened - A. Only two days.

Q. Did the lad go with you - A. Yes; he came with me from Wales.

Q. Could the lad speak any English - A. No; we came from Cardiganshire.

Q. Did the prisoner give you any advice - A. Yes. He gave me advice to leave the things with the lad in the public-house while the prisoner went with me. The prisoner and me went out of the house. I left the lad and the clothes in the house. The prisoner and me went to enquire for a person of the name of Bellam.

Q. Were you at all acquainted with the prisoner before - A. No, he was quite a stranger. I asked him if he knew such a place where Bellam lived. He said, yes, he would shew me the place. We could not find it. I went into a public-house, and there he left me.

Q. Did you ever see him again - A. No, not until he was taken.

Q. Did you meet with the lad that night - A. No, not that night. I met with the lad on Sunday, at my house in the Borough.

Q. Have you ever seen the things since - A. No, only the handkerchief, and that was found round the prisoner's neck. When I saw the handkerchief at the magistrate's I claimed it.

Q. Where had the handkerchief been before - A. It was in my coat pocket in my bundle.

JOSEPH MASON . Q. Did you come to town with the prosecutor - A. Yes, and I was in his company on the 20th of March.

Q. Where did you meet with the prisoner - A. In the street. I do not know the name of the street.

Q. Were you left in charge any thing at a public-house by Jones - A. Yes, I was left in charge of two bundles: they contained wearing apparel, shirts, breeches, stockings, and a coat of the prosecutor's. After I was left in the public-house the prisoner came to me and said, that I must come to the prosecutor; that the had found the place out. The prisoner took up the prosecutor's bundle, and told me to come on with him. We went on. I could not walk fast enough for the prisoner. He took my bundle likewise, and told me to come along. We called for a pot of beer, and I paid for it. The prisoner gave the bundles to the landlady of the house, and then he took me to another public-house.

Q. How many public-houses did you go into - A. Three. The last public-house he called for a pint of beer, and left me there. I never saw him after until I saw him before the magistrate. I went to the second public-house, where the prisoner deposited the bundles. I have never seen the bundles again.

WILLIAM HALL . I am an officer. Jones informed me, and described the prisoner. I apprehended him, and found this handkerchief upon him.

Prosecutor. That is my handkerchief. It was in my coat pocket. I have had it in my possession five' years.

Prisoner's Defence. The handkerchief that the prosecutor swears to is the fellow handkerchief to the one I have got on my neck.

GUILTY, aged 30,

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling-house .

Confined Two Years in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

Reference Number: t18130407-41

385. WILLIAM WILLOUGHBY , JAMES TODMAN , COOK CLIBBON , and WILLIAM THOMPSON , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of March , from the person of John Mackdonald , a 5 l. bank note, and a 2 l. bank-note , his property.

JOHN MACKDONALD. I am a corporal in the London Militia. On the 16th of March, I was at the Eight Bells public-house, Ironmonger-row, St. Luke's , about two o'clock in the day. I went into the tap-room first. I was in liquor when I went into the house; and when I quitted the tap-room, I went into the parlour the four prisoners went with me into the parlour. We drank together. I fell asleep in the parlour. When I was asleep one of the prisoners absented himself his name is Willoughby.

Q. How soon did Willoughby came back after you awakened - A. I have been told in about three quarters of an hour. I do not know of my own knowledge. I had fourteen pound in bank notes; two two's and two five's.

Q. Had you so much as that when you awoke from your sleep - A. No, I had not when I awoke. I am sure that I had the notes when I went into the parlour, and some time afterwards, until I drank to that degree that I fell asleep. The landlord had got a five pound note and a two pound note; I gave it to him before I fell asleep to pay part of my reckoning. I know that I had got the other two pound and five pound in my pocket. They were in my pocket, in a piece of a rag. I am confident that I had them when I fell asleep, and at the time I awoke I was alarmed, and told that I had been robbed. I did not know, myself, that I had been robbed, until I was told.

Q. Were all the four prisoners in the room when you awoke - A. No, Willougby was not. I cannot say whether the other three were or not. When I awoke I was without the notes.

Q. Have you seen the notes since - A. No, I have not.

Q. When were the prisoners charged - A. That day; the 16th of last month.

MR. WICKHAM. Q. You keep this public-house the Eight Bells, do not you - A. I did, at that time.

Q. Do you know the persons of the four prisoners - A. Perfectly well. I remember their being in my house in company together on the 16th of March.

Mackdonald came to the outside of the bar. There were a number with him.

Q. Who were the parties that went into the parlour - A. The four prisoners and Mackdonald; those are the parties I saw there.

Q. How long were they drinking together - A. Mackdonald was drinking a long time. At one time I got a two pound note of him, and another time a five pound note. I wanted the whole of the money to keep for him, and I told him if he wanted to treat his comrades I would give him twenty shillings all in silver. When he gave me the five pound note I saw him have a one pound note and another note. I cannot swear to the value of it. He wrapped up two notes in a rag, and placed them in his right hand waistcoat pocket. He then went into the parlour.

Q. When he went into the parlour where were the prisoners - A. In the parlour.

Q. How long might they stay together after that - A. They were some time together in the parlour after that; an hour or two. It is impossible to be correct in stating to time.

Q. During that time was there any liquor - A. Yes, beer and half-and-half, and they were smoking together. They had half ale and half porter. I was backwards and forwards while they were together.

Q. Did you observe any thing particular - A. When I was in in the parlour I observed Willoughby put his hand into Mackdonald's pocket, and take out the tobacco and throw it on the table for them all to smoke. The left hand pocket, not the right hand.

Q. Was Mackdonald asleep then - A. No; he was quite drunk, and the last time I went into the room Mackdonald was asleep in the chair.

Q. Were all the prisoners there then - A. No, Willoughby was absent and Todman was absent, and whether Clibbon was about the door I will not swear. Thompson was present. When I went in, Thompson said, Wickham, I wish you had all that man's money. I said, I wish I had it all. I said, there is nothing like the time present; I shall, now he is asleep, take it from him, and take care of it for him. I put my right hand into his right hand waistcoat pocket, where I saw him deposit the notes and the rag, and neither the notes nor the rag were there. I then searched his left hand pocket; there was nothing there. I then said, Thompson, this man is robbed, and I will not stand it. By that time Clibbon came in. After that I went out, and met Todman coming in. I went to the parlour, and locked the door. I had all in the parlour but Willoughby. I said, that man has been robbed, and I will not let any of you go out. At that time the parlour door was locked, and I had the key. An officer came; I told him the circumstance. More assistance came, and they were taken. Then in came Willoughby. He said, what, is the parlour door locked? Yes, I said, it is, but I will unlock it. I unlocked it, and said, I will lock you all in. I gave them all in charge of the constable.

Q. What became of Mackdonald after that - A. He was put to bed. After that, they were all searched, and nothing was found on either of them.

JOHN GREEN . I am an officer of St. Luke's. On the 16th of March, I was sent for to take these prisoners into custody for robbing Mackdonald. I found Willoughby absent. The other prisoners were locked up in the parlour. I went for three other officers, and when I came back Willoughby had returned. They were all four there. Mr. Wickham then gave me charge of all four. I searched the prisoners. I found nothing upon either of them.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18130407-42

386. WILLIAM PUGH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of March , half a peck of flour, value 3 s. and two loaves of bread, value 18 d. the property of George Watkinson .

SECOND COUNT, for like offence, the property of William Turner .

WILLIAM TURNER . I am a baker . I was servant to George Watkinson on the 9th of March last. On that day I carried out flour. I left my barrow by the side of some alms-houses; when I came back the first thing that I missed was two half-quartern loaves. Pugh lived near that way. I saw him and his brother and another lad when I left my barrow, and when I came back I saw the prisoner running about an hundred yards from me. I made all the haste I could, because I was suspicious when I saw the prisoner running. I saw part of a loaf under his arm. On my searching further into the barrow, I missed two quarterns of flour. The prisoner got into his dwelling-house and came out again before I came up to him, and when he turned out he had nothing with him. I asked him to give me back the bread that he had taken from the barrow. He made use of bitter oaths, and said if I came there they would put me into trouble. I told him, he had better give it me back, and I would not take any trouble in it; if he did not I would inform my master, and have him taken up. I went away. They followed me all over Bow Common, calling me names. I went as far as Mile-end. I told my master of it. We got a constable, and we all went down together. We went to the prisoner's dwelling on Bow Common. They live in a caravan. I searched the caravan. There was a quartern of flour found in another bag. My bag I never found.

GEORGE WATKINSON . I am a master baker. I met my man in Mile-end; he told me he had been robbed. He said, on Bow Common, by Pugh's eldest son. I went to the constable, and we all went together. When we got there we charged him with stealing the bread and flour. The prisoner said, he knew nothing at all of it. We searched the place, and found some flour in a flour-bag, on the table.

MR. PRIGMORE. I am a constable of Mile-end. I went with Mr. Watkinson and his man. We saw some flour in a bag that was not a bag of theirs. I found nothing else.

Prisoner's Defence. I had a loaf of bread in the cupboard, which I fetched for my father's use the same day.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18130407-43

387. THOMAS NUTLER was indicted for feloniously

stealing, on the 16th of March , a painter's dusting-brush, value 3 s. the property of John Cull and William Wood .

THOMAS MARKHAM . I am a painter. I work for John Cull and William Wood . On the 16th of March, I was painting the door of a house in Ironmonger-row, St. Luke's ; I put the dusting-brush inside of the door-way, while I went to the next house for a pair of steps. I was not absent a minute and a half when the prisoner went into the house with this bag. As I came out of the next house with the steps he came out of the house where I was working. He said, there is no shavings here. He had another man in company with him. They walked away. I went into the house to get the dusting-brush; it was gone. I pursued the two men with the bag down Ironmonger-row. I asked them. if they had not got my duster. They denied it. The prisoner had the sack on his arm. He flung it down, and said I might search him. I took up the bag, and found the duster in it. This is it. It is my master's brush.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going down Ironmonger-row with intent to get shavings; this brush laid down by the door. I took it up. I did not know who it belonged to, nor did I see anybody to ask.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

Reference Number: t18130407-44

388. TIMOTHY COGLAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of February , nine copper rivets, value 3 s. the property of the London Dock Company .

SECOND COUNT, for like offence, the property of persons to the jurors unknown.

WILLIAM CLARK . I am a constable belonging to the Thames police. I was stationed in the London Dock as constable. The prisoner was employed there by the contractor, Mr. Hobbs. He was a bricklayer's labourer . I suspected he had got something in his hat, by the motion of his hat. I asked him, what he had got in his hat. He said, nothing at all. I said, I shall not be satisfied until I search you. I took his hat off. These rivets were inside of his hat. I found nine new copper rivets. I asked him how he came by them. He told me he picked them out of some rubbish down by the steam engine, where he was at work. There was not the least appearance of rubbish or dirt sticking to them when I first took them from him. When I took him in custody he said he was very sorry he had done it; he wished he had let the rivets alone. They are the property of the London Dock Company. They were brought in for the repair of the steam engine; it was under repair.

THOMAS PASHLEY . I am a carpenter. I was employed at the London Docks.

Q. Was the prisoner at work at the Engine-house at the London Docks - A. Yes, he was. On the 17th of February, I received eight dozen rivetts; they were cast in the London Dock by their own smith. I missed a dozen of them. I have seen the rivetts produced by the officer. I believe them to be a part of them.

Prisoner's Defence. I was ten days at work there as a bricklayer's labourer. I picked up these things. I did not know what use they were. I put them in my hat, and as I was going towards the gate, this man said, what have you got in your hat. I said, nothing. He took my hat off, and found these things. I picked them up out of the rubbish.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18130407-45

389. JOHN LAWRENCE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of February , one thousand one hundred and twenty yards of muslin, value 60 l. one hundred and twenty yards of woollen cloth, value 20 l. and two wrappers, value 7 s. the property of Friend Arthol Dawson , in the dwelling-house of William Minchin .

FRIEND ARTHOL DAWSON. I am a calenderer and packer . I live at No. 45, Little Moorfields in the parish of St. Stephen, Coleman-street , in the dwelling-house of William Minchin, our engineer; he lives in the house.

Q. When was it you lost the property - A. On the 26th of February last, about nine o'clock. The said warehouse, No. 45, Little Moorfields, was forcibly broken open. On the outside was a strong staple padlock that was forced by a crow, I suppose, or by an instrument of that description.

Q. When was the padlock fastened - A. About an hour and a half before it was done; when we shut up. Two packages were stolen, one package contained ninety-five pieces of cambric muslin, and the other bale contained ten pieces of woollen cloth. The muslin was worth sixty pounds, and the other twenty pounds and upwards. I have never found any of the property.

ANN SMITH . On the 26th of February, just before nine, I went down Little Moorfields. I saw a parcel come out of Mr. Dawson's warehouse, and the prisoner crossed over to me.

Q. Had he the package - A. No. He asked me the way to Fore-street. He took hold of my head, and turned my head towards Fore-street. I shewed him the way to Fore-street. He took hold of my head, and turned my head towards Fore-street. I could not see which way the package went.

Q. What kind of a package was it - A. A large package.

Q. Who was carrying of it - A. I don't know. I could not see the man's face that was carrying it.

Q. When the package came out of Mr. Dawson's warehouse where was the prisoner - A. He crossed over from the warehouse to me.

Q. Did you see whether he came out of the warehouse or not - A. No, I did not. He came right from the warehouse to me.

Q. Was the prisoner alone - A.There were seven or eight men altogether. They appeared to be in company together. I only saw one package.

Q. When he turned your head towards Fore-street did you go towards Fore-street - A. No; I crossed the way to go to the engineers.

Q. When did he leave you - A. As soon as ever the package was gone out of my sight, and then I

went into the engineers, and when I came out I saw nobody. The prisoner was gone.

Q. Are you sure the prisoner is the man - A. Yes.

WILLIAM MINCHIN. I am engineer to Mr. Dawson. My house is 45, Little Moorfields. I saw the prisoner two nights prior to the robbery walking to and fro before my house in Little Moorfields. I took particular notice of his person. I saw him between eight and nine at night. I am sure he is the man.

THOMAS WADMAN . I am a patrol. I have frequently seen the prisoner walk the pavement of Moorfields. He is a loose character. I know nothing of the robbery.

Prisoner's Defence. I was taken in custody five weeks after the robbery was committed. I am entirely innocent.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130407-46

390. RICHARD GRIFFEN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of March , one hundred and twelve pounds weight of saltpetre, value 1 l. 15 s. the property of John Eykin , Richard Eykin , James Browning , James Eykin , and William Hardwick Browning .

THOMAS WOOTTON . I keep the Bull's Head, public-house, Smithfield Bars . On Saturday morning, I saw Griffen and Smith walk up and down Smithfield Bars just by our house, and on my seeing them there some mornings before that I looked out of the window. I suspected them. I saw this prisoner open Messrs. Eykin's door.

Q. What is Mr Eykin - A. An oilman , at Smithfield Bars. The prisoner went in, and when he came out he brought a barrel out on his shoulder; then about half an hour after one the prisoner and Smith came together again. They then both went away together.

Q. Do you know where they went to - A. No, I do not. About half after one, they came again. Then Smith went into Mr. Eykin's; he brought out a barrel the same as the other. Two officers, Carlisle and Tillcock came up at the time. I spoke to them. They secured the property about three parts across the sheep-pens in Smithfield, where the prisoner pitched it. When Carlisle and Tillcock came up to him the prisoner attempted to run away. They took Smith; Griffen ran away.

Q. Are you sure the prisoner is the man that went in once - A. Yes, I am quite sure.

JOHN CARLISLE , SENIOR. I am an officer. On the 13th of March, I came into Smithfield, about half past one; Wootton told me there had been two men robbing Mr. Eykin. He said, there was one of them over the way with the tub on his shoulder. I went after them. There was only one man, Smith. I did not see the prisoner.

ROBERT GILLAM WILSON. I am warehouseman to Messrs. Eykin and Company.

Q. What are their names - A. John Eykin , Richard Eykin , James Browning , James Eykin , and William Hardwick Browning. Their warehouse is at Smithfield Bars.

Q. Did you lose any saltpetre any time - A. I received fifteen barrels in the warehouse, and on the 12th I sent out nine, and when the prisoner was taken there were three barrels missing from the warehouse.

Prisoners Defence. I was never nigh the place, nor do I know any thing about it.

GUILTY , aged 34.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130407-47

391. JOSEPH SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of March , one hundred and twelve pounds weight of saltpetre, value 1 l. 15 s. the property of John Eykin , Richard Eykin , James Browning , James Eykin , and William Hardwick Browning .

THOMAS WOOTTON . I keep the Bull's Head, Smithfield Bars . I observed these men about a week or ten days before coming of a morning or loitering about there, and sometimes down lower, backwards and forwards. On the 13th of March, about half after one, Smith crossed the way, and I saw Smith go into Mr. Eykin's warehouse; he brought out a barrel upon his shoulder. When I saw him come out, Carlisle and Tillcock come to my house. I told them, and they followed him. Smith went to the sheep pens and pitched it.

JOHN CARLISLE , SENIOR. I came there at half past one o'clock. From information of Mr. Wootton, I followed Smith in the sheep-pens, where he pitched it. I asked him what he had got. He said, a tub of saltpetre; he got it from Mr. Hilliker's, St. John-street; he was going to take it to No. 6, John-street, Bishopsgate-street. I asked him if he had got a bill of parcels. He said, no, and directly he put his hat on and run away.

- TILLCOCK. When Smith ran away I had the care of the cask it. This is the cask.

MR. WILSON. I have no doubt that is our cask. I lost three. The firm of the house is the same I mentioned in the other trial.

Prisoner's Defence. On Saturday morning I went into the Half Moon, Smithfield, and while I was having my breakfast one of Mr. Browning's porters asked me if I had got any employment. I told him I had not. He told me to come at half after one o'clock, and take a cask of saltpetre to No. 6, John-street, he would pay me. The porter's name is Freeman.

Mr. Wilson. Freeman left us and went for a soldier before this.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130407-48

392. JOHN OLIVER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of April , a handkerchief, value 5 s. the property of a certain person to the Jurors unknown, from his person .

CHARLES HUMPHREYS . I am an officer of Bow-street. On Sunday, between three or four in the afternoon, there was a fire in Skinner-street , I attended there. I saw the prisoner in the crowd following of a gentleman. I saw him make several attempts to pick the gentleman's pocket. He put his hand in

the gentleman's and took the handkerchiefs about three parts out. The gentleman feeling him he took his hand out. The prisoner followed him. He then clapped his eye upon another gentleman's pocket; the gentleman looked round; the gentleman had a friend with him. The prisoner pretended to look up at the fire when the gentleman looked round. He directly took the handkerchief out. I said, sir, to the gentleman, you have been robbed. I laid hold of the prisoner. He let the handkerchief drop. I put my foot on it. The gentleman said, he hoped I would let him have it. I said, no, you must attend before the alderman the next day. He said, he would not.

JOHN BROWN. I am an officer of the city. I took the prisoner to the Compter. He there took out a pane of glass, and made his way half out.

Prisoner's Defence. There was no glass in the place.

GUILTY, aged 15.

Judgment respited .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130407-49

393. SAMUEL JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of March , twelve pair of stockings, value 2 l. 10 s. and a piece of fustian containing fifty-six yards, value 2 l. 5 s. the property of Thomas Clark , Thomas Boyd , and Thomas French , in their dwelling-house .

THOMAS BOYD . The names of the partners are Thomas Clark , Thomas Boyd , (myself), and Thomas French : we are wholesale warehousemen and drapers , in Skinner-street.

Q. Which of you reside in the dwelling-house - A. None of the partners; the servants of the firm. There are thirteen or fourteen servants that sleep there. The house is in the parish of St. Sepulchre's, in the ward of Farringdon Without . The prisoner has been employed by us as porter for two years. On the 8th of March, I received information which induced me to have his room searched. The prisoner was present, and opened his box. We found in that box part of a piece of fustian, with the paper in which it had been wrapped, with the private mark of the warehouse on that paper. The officer who gave the information brought the remnants of that piece of fustian; his name is Forrester; and we also found a dozen pair of cotton stockings in his Sunday coat pocket, in his box.

Q. When did these stockings come into your warehouse - A. The Saturday before, and this was on Monday. They have the number belonging to the parcel that they came in, which number was missed, and when we added that dozen to the rest of the parcel, the parcel was complete.

Q. What is the value of that dozen pair of stockings - A. Fifteen shillings: they are worth more than that. I value the fustian at forty-five shillings; it is worth more than that. In the prisoner's box was long lawn woollen cord, diaper napkins, and stock receipts to the amount of four hundred pounds stock, one hundred and ninety pounds of which his father left him, and he certainly is a very careful man.

Q. What were his wages - A. Twenty-eight pounds a year and his board.

Q. After you had found these things what account did the prisoner give - A. He acknowledged they were our property.

JOHN FORRESTER . I am a constable.

Q. Did you go to the prosecutor on the 8th of March with part of a piece of fustian - A. I did.

Q. Did you assist in searching the prisoner's box - A. I did. I there found all the articles here. I was present at the finding of them.

Q. You have heard the account that Mr. Boyd has given - A. I have; it is correct.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 34.

[The prisoner was recommended to mercy by the prosecutor, account of his good character.]

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130407-50

394. THOMAS TEMPLER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of February , four silver snuff boxes, value 16 l. 12 s. the property of Thomas Phipps and Edward Robinson .

SECOND COUNT, the property of James Phipps only.

THIRD COUNT, the property of Thomas Phipps and Edward Robinson .

JAMES PHIPPS. I am the son of Thomas Phipps . Thomas Phipps and Edward Robinson are the partners. They are gold and silversmiths in Gutter-lane. I am their clerk . On the 15th of February, the prisoner came to our house; he said he came from Mr. Butt, of Bond-street, and said he wanted a few silver snuff boxes to show for gentlemen's waistcoat pockets. He looked out four.

Q. Had your house been in the habit of dealing with Mr. Butt, of Bond-street - A. Yes.

Q. Is it part of your business to send goods to other houses for show - A. Yes; we keep a regular shew for that purpose.

Q. If upon your sending any article for show, if not approved are they returned - A. Yes. We have been in the habit of dealing with Mr. Butt in this manner. I gave the prisoner four silver snuff-boxes. This was about half past nine in the morning.

Q. Were you present when he came back again - A. No.

THOMAS PHIPPS . My partner's name is Edward Robinson . We are working goldsmiths, in Gutter-lane.

Q. On the 15th of February last, did you see the prisoner - A. I did. He came back, and said that he had brought one snuff-box back that he had at our house in the morning, and that Mr. Butt kept the other three; that Mr. Butt had sold two to a customer, and the others he kept for the shop. I made out a bill of parcel in Mr. Butt's name, and gave the bill of parcels to the prisoner. There was a conversation took place between me and the prisoner, respecting his coming back so soon. I said, he had made good haste; I hardly supposed he could come back in the time. He said, that he had run all the way from our house to Bond-street, for the gentleman was waiting to see the articles. I asked if he lived at Mr. Butt's at the present time, for I had not recollected seeing him from Mr. Butt's house for a considerable time; some other person had been in

the habit of coming from Mr. Butt lately. He said, that person had gone away, and had gone to reside at Mr. Marling's, a goldsmith, in the Strand; and that now he lived with Mr. Butt, and had done so for two years. He took the bill of parcels and went away.

JOHN BUTT. I am a retail goldsmith and jeweller, 66, in New Bond-street.

Q. Have you been in the habit of dealing with Messrs. Phipps and Robinson. - A. Yes, I have.

Q. Look at the prisoner; do you know him. On the 15th of February did he live with you - A. No, he has not lived with me for these last three years. On the 15th of February last, I did not send him to Mr. Phipps, nor did he bring any things to my house for the last three years. He has no concerns with me in business. He was not authorised by me on the 15th of February to get any snuff-boxes from Messrs. Phipps and Robinson.

GEORGE MORRIS . I am a silversmith. I live in the Minories No. 19, and 20.

Q. On the 15th of February did you purchase any snuff-boxes of the prisoner - A. No; my servant, George Blaney , did.

GEORGE BLANEY . I am shopman to Mr. Morris. On the 15th of February, between ten and eleven in the morning, I purchased these three silver snuffboxes of the prisoner. I gave five pounds for the three.

JAMES PHIPPS . These are the snuff-boxes that the prisoner took away on the 15th of February. Twelve pounds sixteen shillings is the wholesale price of them. They are perfectly new articles.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not know the danger of what I was doing of at the time; a circumstance caused me to do it.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130407-51

395. SARAH WEST was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of March , two handkerchiefs, value 1 s. the property of Samuel Abbot ; two handkerchiefs, value 1 s. two caps, value 1 s. two bottles of wine, value 7 s. a bottle of rum, value 5 s. a sheet, value 5 s. and two blankets, value 10 s. the property of Elizabeth Thiot , widow .

SAMUEL ABBOTT . I am a merchant . I live at 15, Bucklersbury . I lost two neck handkerchiefs from the house that I lodge at, which is Mrs. Thiot's.

ELIZABETH MUNDEN . I am niece to Elizabeth Thiot ; she keeps the house, No. 15, Bucklersbury. Sarah West was her servant . On the 25th of March, the prisoner came out of the cellar with two bottles of wine, and one bottle of rum. She had them in a cloth. I asked her what she was going to do with these bottles. She said she did not know what she was going to do with them. When she went up stairs into the kichen I took the bottles from her. My aunt came and asked her where she got them. She said she found them. She went into the cellar, and shewed me the place, from the bottle rack. She said she found them. Then my aunt sent for an officer.

Q. Whose bottles were they - A. Mrs. Thiot's: The officer came, and she was searched. There was found on her one cap and a piece of muslin. She lived with my aunt about five weeks.

ELIZABETH THIOT . I keep the house. I sent for an officer. He came, and searched the prisoner.

JOHN BROWN. I am an officer. On Thursday, the 25th of March, I was sent to Mrs. Thiot's house. She stated to me that the servant had robbed her of two bottles of wine and one bottle of rum, and her cap. I searched the prisoner, and found on her two muslin handkerchiefs belonging to Mr. Abbott. I searched her bundle; I found a pair of stockings, stated by Mrs. Thiot to belong to a person that had left her house. I then asked the prisoner where she had been sleeping out on the over night. She said at Mrs. Mosely's, Bird-court, Philip-lane. I then, in company with Branscomb, went to Mrs. Mosely's. I there found a sheet marked in red ink, with Mrs. Thiot's name, a pair of blankets, and another cap sworn to by the prosecutrix, and several other articles belonging to other gentlemen who have left town. These are Mr. Abbott's handkerchiefs.

Mr. Abbott. Then two handkerchiefs are mine.

Mrs. Thiot. The sheets and blankets are mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not take the things out of the house.

SUSANNAH MOSELY . The prisoner came to my room, and brought the sheets and blankets to me herself.

GUILTY , aged 44.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130407-52

396. HENRY ISAACS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of March , from the person of John Cook , a pocket-book, value 6 d. and five 1 l. bank notes , his property.

JOHN COOK . I am a haberdasher , 103, Pall Mall. On the 6th of March, I was in the Court of King's Bench, Guildhall , listening to a trial that was going on. There was a great crowd. When I went home I found I had lost my pocket-book; it contained five one-pound bank notes. I know I lost it in the Court of King's Bench.

JOHN BROWN. I am an officer. On Saturday, the 6th of March, I, in company with Branscomb, was attending the bankrupts in Guildhall. I observed the prisoner coming down the steps under the clock, and seeing him rather in a bustle, and knowing of him, I told my partner that I thought something was amiss. We let him go down the steps by the Town Clerk's office, into Basinghall-street; I then followed him to the corner of the White Bear, Basinghall-street. I laid hold of him, and I unbuttoned his coat, and immediately perceived this book half way in his breast pocket. I asked him what he had got there. He immediately began to cry. I gave the book to Branscomb, and proceeded to search him. In his pocket I found a little silver, and a pair of scissars. I then took him to the Compter, while Branscomb went to Guildhall to look for the owner. This is the pocket-book.

Prosecutor. That is my pocket-book; I lost it in Guildhall.

- BRANSCOMB. I know no more.

Prisoner's Defence. Saturday being a leisure day I went to Guildhall to hear the trials. I came out of Guildhall, and picked up this pocket-book on the steps. I came out, and went into Basinghall-street. Mr. Brown tapped me on the shoulder with a cane; he said, Isaacs, what do you do at Guildhall. I said, nothing but to hear the trials. He opened my coat, and took the pocket-book away, and afterwards he took me into custody.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Transported for Life .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130407-53

397. JOHN OLIVE was indicted, for that he, on the 22nd of January , had in his custody and possession a certain forged bank note for the payment of 2 l. he knowing it to be forged .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130407-54

398. JOHN OLIVE was indicted for feloniously forging, on the 22nd of January , a bank note for the payment of 2 l. with intention to defraud the Governour and Company of the Bank of England .

SECOND COUNT, for disposing of and putting away a like forged bank note, with the same intention.

And SEVERAL OTHER COUNTS, for like offence, only varying the manner of charging them.

Mr. Knapp, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner, of this charge, was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130407-55

399. HENRY ADCOCK was indicted, for that he, on the 4th of February , without lawful excuse had in his custody and possession, a certain forged bank note for the payment of 5 l. he knowing it to be forged .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130407-56

400. HENRY ADCOCK was indicted, for that he, on the 4th of February , feloniously did forge a certain bank note for the payment of 5 l. with intention to defraud the Governour and Company of the Bank of England .

SECOND COUNT, for disposing of and putting away a like forged bank note, with the same intention.

And SEVERAL OTHER COUNTS, for like offence, only varying the manner of charging them.

Mr. Knapp, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner, of this charge, was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130407-57

401. JOHN CHAVE was indicted, for that he, on the 16th of February , had in his custody and possession, divers forged bank notes, he knowing them to be forged .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130407-58

402. JOHN CHAVE was indicted for feloniously forging, on the 16th of February , a 5 l. bank note, with intention to defraud the Governour and Company of the Bank of England .

SECOND COUNT, for disposing of and putting away a like forged bank note, with the same intention.

And SEVERAL OTHER COUNTS, for like offence, only varying the manner of charging them.

Mr. Knapp, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner, of this charge, was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130407-59

403. ROBERT BOGG was indicted, for that he, on the 16th of February , had in his custody and possession, divers forged; bank notes, he knowing them to be forged .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130407-60

404. ROBERT BOGG was indicted for feloniously forging, on the 16th of February , a bank note for the payment of 5 l. with intention to defraud the Governour and Company of the Bank of England .

Mr. Knapp, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner, of this charge, was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130407-61

405. EDWARD ABEL was indicted, for that he, on the 20th of February , had in his custody and possession, a bank note for the payment of 5 l. he knowing it to be forged .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130407-62

406. EDWARD ABEL was indicted for feloniously forging, on the 12th of February , a certain bank note for the payment of 5 l. with intention to defraud the Governour and Company of the Bank of England .

SECOND COUNT, for disposing of and putting away a like forged bank note with like intention.

And SEVERAL OTHER COUNTS, for like offence, only varying the manner of charging.

Mr. Knapp, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner, of this charge, was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130407-63

407. ELIZABETH JONES and JANE SMITH were indicted, for that they, on the 25th of February , had in their custody and possession, a certain bank note for the payment of 1 l. they knowing it to be forged .

To this indictment the prisoners pleaded

GUILTY .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130407-64

408. ELIZABETH JONES and JANE SMITH were indicted for feloniously forging, on the 25th of February , a bank note for the payment of 1 l. with intention to defraud the Governour and Company of the Bank of England .

And SEVERAL OTHER COUNTS, for like offence, only varying the charges.

Mr. Knapp, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoners, of this charge, was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130407-65

409. SAMUEL HILLARY was indicted, for that he, on the 23d of February , had in his custody and possession, a certain bank note, he knowing it to be forged .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130407-66

410. SAMUEL HILLARY was indicted for feloniously forging, on the 23d of February , a certain bank note for the payment of 2 l. with intention to defraud the Governour and Company of the Bank of England .

And SEVERAL OTHER COUNTS, for like offence, only differently stating the charges.

Mr. Knapp, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner, of this charge, was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130407-67

411. DANIEL HAMERTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of February , a coat, value 3 l. 12 s. the property of John Birdoe .

PETER HACKITT . I am a coachman to Mr. John Birdoe , 28, Golden-square.

Q. Had you a great coat that belonged to your master on the 13th of February last - A. Yes, I wore it on the evening of the 12th of February. I did not miss it until the next day. I left it in the stable; me and my wife live over the stable. On the 19th of February, as I came home through Temple-bar, I met the prisoner and another man in company. The prisoner had this box coat under his arm. I came up to them. I asked them if they had that box coat for sale; they said they had just bought it. I said, I will buy it of you if you will let me have it for a fair valuation. They said they wanted only one shilling for their bargain. I said, come into the next public-house and I will pay you for it. We went into a public-house; I told the landlady to bring in a pot of beer. I put the coat on and buttoned it up. I said it is a very good fit. I shut the door upon them. I said you are both my prisoners. They both said they bought the duplicate of the coat of a man; the men said they would go quietly with me any where. I took them to Bow-street. This is the coat. It is my master's coat.

Prisoner's Defence. I am not guilty of stealing the coat.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130407-68

412. JAMES TOFT was indicted, for that he, on the 26th of January , was clerk to Thomas Hankin , and was employed and entrusted by him to receive monies and valuable securities for him, and that he being such clerk, so employed and entrusted, did receive and take into his possession 21 l. on account of his said master, and that he afterwards feloniously did embezzle, secrete, and steal the same .

THOMAS EASTON . I am a baker; I live in Bermondsay-street.

Q. Have you been in the course of dealing with Mr. Hankin - A. I have; I know the prisoner as his clerk. In the month of January last, I was indebted to Mr. Hankin fifty pounds and upwards for flour that I had bought of the prisoner as Mr. Hankin's clerk. On the 26th of January, I paid to him twenty-one pound. I recollect making the payment very well.

THOMAN HANKIS. I am a mealman in Hertfordshire, my accompting-house is in Bishospgate-street; it is 108, and three or four doors from the church. The prisoner was employed by me, as clerk, in London, he was my clerk down to the 19th of February; he was employed to sell flour and receive the money.

Q. In the month of January last, was Mr. Easton indebted to you fifty pounds and upwards for flour - A. Yes, I attended in London every Monday and Friday, at my accompting-house, in Bishopsgate-street; I had other clerks besides the prisoner. When I came to town on the Monday my clerk should pay me the money they had received on the Friday and Saturday, and they were to pay on the Friday the money they received on Monday. On Friday, the 28th I was in London, he should have accounted to me for the money he received of Mr. Easton, he did not, until the 19th of February. I was not apprized by him of his having received any money of Mr. Easton. I questioned him about the money of another customer, after that I called upon that customer, and within two or three hours afterwards I saw the prisoner. I then told him there was something amiss, and I said, be cautious what you are at, he was flurried and acknowledged that things were not as they ought to be. Having other clerks at the desks I took him into another room. I then said, Mr. Toft, what have you been doing. He then told me that he had embezzled money to a considerable amount. He wished me to let it stand over till Monday, then he would settle the account to the amount of three hundred and twenty pounds. This sum of Mr. Easton's was part of it.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, called one witness who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 45.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130407-69

413. WILLIAM SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of March , twenty-seven

yards of linen cloth, value 38 s. the property of George Smith .

GEORGE SMITH . I am a linen draper , 88, Aldgate .

FRANCIS KENDRICK . I am shopman to George Smith . A woman gave the information of the prisoner stealing the cloth, about half past eight at night on the 20th of March.

Q. Where was this linen - A. At the corner of the window inside, close to the door; it was standing up in a whole piece. The prisoner crept inside of the shop on his hands and knees, and took the linen. I had seen the linen safe in its place about half an hour before the woman gave the information. In consequence of what the woman told me I ran out of the shop; the prisoner was half way down Jury-street. The door where the prisoner took it from is in Jury-street. I pursued the prisoner about ten yards from the shop, he was running when I caught sight of him; he dropped the linen while I was pursuing of him; he was stopped in the Minories by the officer, and the linen was picked up and delivered to Kinnersley the officer. I was quite sure it was the linen that had been in my master's shop shortly before.

MR. SMITH. I followed the prisoner as well as Kendrick, and I gave charge of the prisoner. When I saw the linen in the hands of the officer I saw my private marks upon it. This is the piece of cloth, it has my own shop mark upon it. The prisoner begged for mercey, hoped I would not prosecute him, but send him on board the tender. I value the piece of linen at about thirty-eight shillings.

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutor said he did not wish to punish me if I was willing to go on board the Tender. I begged for mercy, and said I was willing to go on board.

GUILTY, aged 19.

Judgment respited .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130407-70

414. WILLIAM CLARK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of March , twelve pounds weight of cheese, value 10 s. and seven wrappers, value 3 s. the property of John Stapp .

JOHN LACEY HAWKINS . I am one of the marshalmen of the City of London. I met the prisoner on the 30th of March, in the evening on Holborn-hill, this side of Field-lane; he had these wrappers on his shoulder, and seeing him go towards Field-lane I thought all was not right. I asked him where he got these wrappers, and where he worked. He said he worked for Mr. Stapp, the wrappers were is own property, they were perquisites. I told him I knew his master well, I would give him the trouble to walk back. I took the prisoner to Mr. Stapp's shop, and one of the clerks said they were no such thing as perquisites. The prisoner told a gentleman in my hearing where he lived, I think his apartment is in Cow-cross. I went to his apartment and found this cheese in a butter-flat, it weighs about eight pounds. One of Mr. Stapp's shopman asked him if he could account for that. He said he bought it of a young man in the street. I asked him if he should know the young man again. He said he did not think he should.

JOHN STAPP . I am a cheesemonger on Snow-hill; the prisoner was my weekly porter; I think he had been so for near twelve months. The wrappers are all mine, they are not perquisites belonging to my porters. I had a good character with the prisoner, he has a wife and one child.

ROBERT LEYIT. I am a servant to the prosecutor. I know the cheese by the figure 2 in the middle, it is a dairy mark. I have no doubt it is Mr. Stapp's cheese.

GUILTY , aged 31.

Whipped in Jail and discharged.

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130407-71

415. ROBERT KENNET was indicted for feloniously forging, on the 28th of February , in the 51st year of his Majesty's reign, a certain order for the payment of 2090 l. 11 s. with intent to defraud Sir Richard Carr Glyn , bart, Charles Mills , Thomas Halifax , Richard Plumptre Glyn , and Henry Parry .

SECOND COUNT, for feloniously disposing of a like forged order for the payment of money with the same intention.

THIRD COUNT, a like forged order with the same intention.

And THREE OTHER COUNTS, in like manner, stating his intention to be to defraud John Trower , and Hatches Trower .

And THREE OTHER COUNTS, the same as the former, only calling it a bill of exchange, instead of an order for payment of money.

SAMUEL RICHARDSON. Q. Are you acquainted with the prisoner - A. I am.

Q.How long have you been acquainted with him - A. Upwards of two years.

Q. Do you know a person of the name of James Cook . - A I do.

Q. How long has your acquaintance been with him - A. I think upwards of three years.

Q. At the time that you became acquainted with the prisoner, were you, Cook and the prisoner, on various occasions engaged together - A. Upon several occasions we were.

Q. Do you know a person of the name of John Birdett - A. I do, he lived in Ship-yard, Temple-bar, at that time, about two years ago I was in the habit of meeting the prisoner and Mr. Cook at that place, I think we met several times at that place.

Q. Did you meet at a coffee-house leading into Russel-square - A. Yes, I think it is called the Bedford coffee-house, Southampton-row.

Q. Did you with them concern together for the purpose of buying any stock - A. I and Cook did.

Q. Did you make known these intentions that you and Cook had to the prisoner before you purchased the stock - A. Not previous to the purchasing the stock, we purchased some of a person of the name of Brompton.

Q. Did it take you to Trowers - A. It did, some time in the month of February.

COURT, You became acquainted with Trowers - A. Yes, we went to Trowers to sell out some stock.

Mr. Knapp. Did you see Mr. Trowers upon that

occasion - A. I did; he gave me a draft upon that occasion.

Q. Take that in your hand, and tell me whether this is the original draft - A. This, to the best of my recollection, is the same draft.

Mr. Solicitor General.

"Dated 8th of February, 1811. 165 l. 2 s. 6 d. Pay Samuel Rivers , or bearer, one hundred and sixty-five pounds two shillings and sixpence."

Mr. Knapp, Q. to Richardson. What name did the stock stand in - A. In the name of Rivers; it went by that name for the transaction.

Q. What did you do with that check - A. I delivered it to Cook, and Cook forged the check from that.

Mr. Solicitor General. The forged check that we charge to be forged, it is dated 28th of February, 1811, addressed in the same printed form.

"Pay William Blunt , esq. or bearer, two thousand and ninety pounds eleven shillings." Mr. Cook having forged this check, which you now produce, in the name of John and Hatches Tower - A. Yes.

Mr. Knapp. What was done with the forged check which you looked at just now - A. I understood that Cook was to deliever it to Kennet, in order to send it for payment.

Q. What next then was done about this check - A. I took a furnished apartment in Francis-street, Bedford-square, for Kennet, as I understood that apartment was afterwards occupied by Kennet.

Mr. Solicitor General. How do you know it was occupied by Kennet - A. Cook informed me it was, and a clerk was hired.

Mr. Gurney. Were you present when the clerk was hired - A. I was not.

Mr. Knapp. Did you ever converse with Kennet upon the subject of the clerk being hired - A. I did. It was intimated by Cook to Kennet that he should hire a clerk for the purpose of negotiating the draft, and a clerk was hired and sent to Messrs. Glyn and Company with the draft.

Mr. Gurney. Did you see him sent - A. I saw the clerk afterwards when he had got the money. The first time that I saw the clerk I saw him in Newport-street: that clerk's name was Pollard.

Mr. Knapp. Had there any conversation taken place between you relative to the dress that Kennet was to be in - A. There had. We met at the house of Birdett, and also at the Bedford coffee-house, in Southampton-row. It was there agreed for Kennet to disguise himself in a suit of clothes, a coat of a drab mixed colour, a light waistcoat, and drab-coloured kerseymere pantaloons. It was agreed that he should have a wig and common green-glass spectacles. The clothes were procured by a person of the name of Hudson, a tobacconist, in Oxford-street.

Q. These clothes were to be obtained for this particular occasion, were they not - A. No, for another occasion of a similar nature. They were obtained for a forgery that was never committed.

Q. They were not the clothes that Kennet used to wear - A. No, they were not. We entered into an agreement that Kennet should hire a clerk, and send him for the money.

Q. Did you afterwards see that person act as clerk - A. I did, that person turned out to be Pollard.

COURT. Did you talk about the draft - A. In our conversation we talked about the forgery: we talked of it being committed by Cook. The clerk did so present the draft, and it was paid.

Mr. Knapp. When did you see that clerk - A. I saw him afterwards somewhere in Tottenham-court-road, and followed him to Holborn.

Q. Tottenham-court-road is near Francis-street A. It is.

Q. What day was that - A. On the 28th of February.

Q. When did you first see Pollard - A. I saw him on the evening of the 27th at the same lodging in Francis-street. He had been, as I suppose, with Kennet. I saw him in Francis-street, coming from a house. The next time I saw him was on the following day, previous to his presenting the draft. I saw him in Newport-street, previous to his presenting the check.

Q. Now, before you saw him the next day in Newport-street had you seen Kennet - A. I did, on the morning of that day.

Q. What did Kennet say - A. It was merely stated that Kennet was to send this clerk with this forged draft. Nothing else passed at that time, as I can recollect.

Q. Where on that day did you see the clerk - A. I saw him in Newport-street first about the middle of the day. I saw him go into a boot and shoemakers shop. He was coming in a direction from Francis-street. He went into the boot and shoe makers; there I left him for a time. I was watching him.

Q. Had it been agreed upon between you that you should watch him - A. It had.

Q. For what purpose were you watching - A. To prevent the possibillity of detection at the banking-house. I was to follow him into the banking-house, to see if the draft was paid, but I left him in Newport-street. I afterwards saw him in Holborn, in the neighbourhood of Tottenham-court-road. I met him there by design.

COURT. How came you to go from Newport-street and take your station in Tottenham-court-road - A. It was presumed by us that the money was paid, though we first thought it was not.

Mr. Solicitor General. Then you had seen him go into the shoe makers - A. I had.

Q. Why did not you go into the bankers as you had proposed - A. Because I did not think he was going to the bankers. I was to go to the bankers to see whether it was paid or not, and if it was paid I was to inform Cook of the circumstance, and if it was not paid I was to inform Cook that they might get out of the way.

Q. You supposed he was not going to the bankers - A. Yes.

Q. What made you go to Holborn - A. To see whether he came where he was ordered to come. I went to Cook, and informed him that I thought the money would not be paid; in consequence of which we went away. It was afterwards thought by the whole of us, comprising Kennet and Birdett, Cook

and me, that the money was paid. In consequence of that a note was sent to Francis-street, desiring the clerk to bring the money.

Mr. Knapp. Who wrote that note - A. I am not able to speak to that positively. One of us four wrote that note.

Q. Perhaps you will know when you see it. Look at that note; is that it - A. This is it. I cannot swear positively to the writing. If it is Kennet's it is disguised: it is not his usual writing. I believe it to be Kennet's. I cannot speak positively that it is his writing. The note read by

Mr. Solicitor General. Directed to Mr. Pollard, No. 13, Francis-street, Tottenham-court-road.

"Sir, I request you will come to me at the White Hart, the corner of Warwick-court, Holborn. This is marked C.

Mr. Knapp Q. to Richardson. That note was for the purpose of the clerk coming to the White Hart, the corner of Warwick-court to bring the money - A. Yes. I saw the clerk then near Tottenham-court-road, as if coming to Holborn.

Q. How came you to go to Tottenham-court-road - A. For the purpose to see if the clerk came alone with the money. It was settled by the whole of us that I should go and watch in Tottenham-court-road. I did, and when near Tottenham-court-road I watched him into Holborn, and in Holborn he accost-me, asking me which was the White Hart coffee-house. I went on the way to the White Hart. He asked me the way to the White Hart. I accompanied him to the White Hart, and went in the coffee-room with him, and staid a few minutes, and drank a gill of wine. I heard him enquire for Mr. Blunt in the coffee-room. I then returned to Chancery-lane, leaving him in the coffee-room. I returned to Chancery-lane, at the Six Clerks office; there I saw Cook in a coach. I informed him, that in my opinion the clerk was there with the money. I only saw Cook: Kennet might be in the coach; I did not see him. I informed Cook that I believed he had got the money. I then left Cook, having agreed to meet again at the house of Birdett some time afterwards on the same day, in order to share the money if it was obtained. I went then to Ship-yard, to Birdett's: the whole of us were present; Kennet, Cook, Birdett, and myself. I believe I got there first. I think Cook and Kennet came together, and Birdett.

Q. How was Kennet, at that time he came to Ship-yard, dressed - A. I think, previous to his coming there he had changed his dress. I am not able to speak positively whether he came in his dress or not. I think not.

Q. Had you seen him in this transaction with that dress on - A. I think I had. I know I had, some time before this transaction, seen him with this dress on. At Birdett's we divided the money. Three of us received six hundred pounds each; me, Cook, and Kennet received six hundred pounds each, and Birdett two hundred and ninety pounds. The eleven shillings was not brought in question, and I think some time after we divided the money we separated.

Q.How was this money produced - A. It was produced in fifty pound notes: they were in a pocketbook. I cannot recollect who produced the book. I think it was mentioned that the pocket-book belonged to the clerk. It was there agreed it should be sent back to the clerk with a little money in it for his trouble; what that sum was I cannot immediately recollect; it might be one or two pounds. I think Cook was to do that; I am not positive. We shortly after separated.

Q. What name did you go by - A. At that time in the name of Rivers in the purchase of stock.

Q. What name did the prisoner go by - A. I never knew him by any other name than Kennet. In this transaction he went by the name of Blunt, certainly.

Q. Did you ever know him use any other name - A. I have heard him called by the name of King, but not in any transaction.

Mr. Gurney. You seem very much at your ease in all this story. When were you taken up - A. For what, sir?

Q. You may well ask that question: When were you taken up last - A. Some time in January.

Q. Upon very many charges of forgery - A. Upon a charge of forgery.

Q. I believe, and I take it for granted, you thought you should not have the good luck to be transported this time. In short, you began to expect you should be hanged - A. What my expectations were I cannot state.

Q. You began to think your time was come - A. I cannot say that. I certainly felt aukward sensations, as any man in my situation must have done.

Q. I think so: whereupon you said you could tell a story - A. I did not say that.

Q. That was the bargain that you made at last - A. I do not know any thing of a bargain. It was agreed that I should be an evidence.

Q. You have, in point of fact, made many confessions of many forgeries that you have been concerned in - A. I have, in point of fact, admitted that I have been one in this forgery.

Q. You would much rather anybody else should be hanged than yourself - A. Any man in my situation would have done that.

BENJAMIN POLLARD. Q. I believe now you live clerk with Messrs. Lee and Company, wine merchants - A. Yes.

Q. In the beginning of the year 1811, were you in want of a situation - A. Yes.

Q. You put an advertisement in a paper - A. I did, sir.

Q. Look at that paper, and see whether that is your advertisement - A. That is the very identical one. (Read.)

"23d of April, 1811, wants a situation as clerk, a young man from the country; not particular as to confinement. Direct to B. P. No. 17, Great Newport-street, Long Acre."

Q. Who lived at that time at No. 17, Great Newport-street - A. Mr. Thomas Abbott , a boot and shoe maker. I occupied an apartment in that house.

Q. Was the advertisement inserted - A. It was.

Q. Look at that letter, and see whether that is the letter that you received - A. Yes; this is the very identical letter. This is a letter addressed to B. P. No. 17, Great Newport-street.

"If B. P.

will call upon Mr. Blunt to-morrow, in Francis-street, Oxford-street, he may meet with a situation that will suit him."

Q. In consequence of receiving that letter did you go to Francis-street - A. I did, on the following day, at the time appointed on the 27th. I there saw a person calling himself Blunt. He was dressed in a light drab coat, and also pantaloons of the same colour: they were kerseymere pantaloons. I think they were rather lighter than the coat. I cannot say any thing of the waistcoat, the coat was buttoned over it. He had on green spectacles; they were somewhat like goglers; they were tied with green silk to keep the dust out of the eyes; it was tied on with green silk, so as to go over the nose and eyes. He wore a carrotty wig. There was a great deal of hair upon the head; it strikes me forcibly that it was a wig

Q. Now, what passed between you and the person calling himself Blunt - A. He said he wanted a clerk. He asked several questions of me; with whom I lived. I told him that I lived with Messrs. Lee and Company, whom I am still living with now, at Bath, and that I was superseded by a nephew of Mr. Lee's, in consequence of which I came to London to get a situation. He stated to me that he was recently from the West Indies, where he had been living twenty-one years or thereabouts, and he was just returned; that he had a series of accompts to settle that he wanted me to do with him at his leisure, when he could have me with him. He enquired after my reference in town. He asked me what salary I should expect to have. I would not fix upon any salary until I knew his employment, by way of saying something. He asked me if an hundred guineas would do for me, and to dine with him occasionally, to which I said, I thought it would. He made an appointment for me to call on the morrow, about eleven o'clock.

Q. How long did you stay with him - A. Half an hour, or a little more. When I came in he asked me to sit in a chair. I stood instead of sitting. On the next day, the servant let me in. He said, his agent had been enquiring at my town reference, and my character proved to be satisfactory; then he told me he had got his boxes coming from Portsmouth or Liverpool. He seemed to be at a loss when I should commence employment with him. He said something about calling on the morrow, before he fixed any thing else. He asked me if I was engaged for the afternoon. I answered him in the negative. He said he had a little business that he wanted transacted in town, he should be obliged to me to do it for him, to which I readily consented.

Q. What was that business - A. He had then laying before him, on a table, a paper, pens, and ink, and on the paper there was something written on one part of it. He finished writing that. He broke a piece off, and wrote the whole of another. He asked me then if I knew where Birchin-lane was. I answered in the negative. He asked me then, if I knew the Royal Exchange, or Cornhill; to which I said I did know perfectly well. He then drew a piece of paper out of his pocket-book. This was on the morning of the 28th, as far as my recollection will allow.

Q. What was the paper that he drew from his pocket-book - A. He said it was a check upon the house of Messrs. Carr Glyn that he wanted to get cash for.

Q. Look at that paper - A. It corresponded with this, and the same date, and worded verbatim the same, and the same amount. I believe this check to be really the same. He told me that I should take it there to Birchin-lane; they would pay me; that the bankers clerks were in the office, acting; and that they would pay me in large papers.

COURT. That is bills of large amount - A. Bills of large amount. He said, large papers, for which I was to go to the Bank of England, and get them exchanged into smaller ones. I asked him what smaller ones. That he left at my option. He then took up a paper that he had furnished writing, which was that I was to go to Moorgate coffee-house, the corner of Fore-street, Cripplegate, near Moorfields.

Q. Now, sir, is that paper that you hold in your hand the paper that was part written that he finished when you went in - A. It is. He wrote another, which is William Blunt , esq. No. 13, Francis-street, Tottenham-court-road. The other paper he wrote entirely in my presence. After he gave me that I was to come to that house; I was to go directly into the coffee-room, and there I should find him, because he should dine there with a friend if it was a fine day. Then he put this in my hand. This he writ in my presence, William Blunt , esq. No. 13, Francis-street, Tottenham-court-road. This, I presume, he wrote merely that I should not forget the direction where he was. They were all the directions he gave to me at that time. I was with him about an hour, or three quarters of an hour; then I quitted there. He told me the direct way for me was through Holborn. On my going out of the room I could not open the door; he rung the bell for the servant. The servant came, and the door was opened, and the servant of the house asked me if I had agreed to come into his employment. I communicated to the servant of the house that I was going to Birchin-lane. When I came out it began to rain a little; I went to my lodgings at Mr. Abbotts. I staid there about an hour. I communicated to Mr. Abbott where I was going, and shewed also the check. I put on a great coat, and also took an umbrella with me, as it was rainy, and I went to No. 20, Brewer-street, Golden-square, to acquaint another friend with my proceeding, to tell him that I had employment. I also expressed my sentiment somewhat to Mr. Abbott; I thought it a great trust to be put into my hands before my new employer had my original character. I went from Brewer-street to the bankers, and presented the check to the clerk, and he paid me. I went to the bankers, Messrs. Carr Glynn and Company, presented the check; it was paid me in two notes of one thousand each, a forty, and a fifty pound note, half-a-guinea and a sixpence. I went from there to the Bank of England to get them changed.

Q. There, I believe, it is necessary for you to put your address - A. When I came there (I never was there before), I was a stranger which office I was to go

to. A gentleman there informed me that I was to write my name on the notes.

Q. Look at these notes, and say whether they are the notes that you received from Messrs. Glyn and Company - A. These are the two thousand pound notes. I wrote my name on them, and Blunt's address. I wrote no name on the smaller notes. I thought they were small enough. I only, changed at the Bank the two thousand-pound notes. I got twenty fifties, thirty-three thirties, and a ten. On one of the papers I made a calculation how many notes I was to have.

Q. What did you do with the notes that you received at the Bank - A. I put them in my pocketbook. In my way to the Bank, Mr. Abbott gave me a note to leave at a house in Leadenhall-street; that minute was put on at Mr. Abbott's. I put the notes in my pocket-book, and put the pocket-book in my breast pocket, inside. When I came from the Bank I went to Moorgate coffee-house, and when I came there, instead of doing as he directed me, I went and asked the landlord if there was such a person there. Instead of going into the coffee-room, I named a gentleman with green spectacles. He said, there was no such a person there, and it raining I was not urgent in my enquiry. I went from there directly to Francis-street. When I got to Francis-street he was not there. I arrived at Francis-street about twenty minutes after three o'clock. I rang the bell. The person of the house opened the door. Mr. Blunt was not there. I understood from the people of the house that he went out soon after I went. I sat there until half past five in possession of the money, in his room. I at last received a letter. This is the identical letter; it is marked C. This letter appointed me to meet him at the White Hart. In consequence of my receiving that note I left the house, and went directly through Gower-street, and in my way to the White Hart I met a person that since I know to be Richardson. He was walking the same way gently. I have seen him repeatedly to-day. When I came out in Holborn I rather gained upon him, and at Holborn I was at a loss which way to turn, either to the right or to the left. I asked another person passing by, the way to the White Hart; they could not tell me. Richardson stepped up, and said, who do you enquire for sir. I said, for the White Hart, Warwick-court, Holborn. He said, that he was passing by the house, and he would take me with him; and on his way there he asked me if I had been in the country, and how dirty it was. He said, he came from Brentford that day, where he had been on business. I asked him with respect of the house, the White Hart. He said, that it was a respectable house, that gentlemen resorted there. He asked me if I was going to meet a gentleman there, or going on business. I said I was going there on business to meet a gentleman. I expostulated with him that he was taking me too far from the house. I suspected him, and thought he was not an honest man. When he came to the White Hart he shewed me the White Hart. He said, there is the White Hart, sir. I went into the house, and enquired for Mr. Blunt, a gentleman in green spectacles. They said, there was no such person there. Richardson told the waiter to bring him a noggin of wine, and he heard them tell me that there was no such person there. He was present at the time; he called to the waiter to know what there was to pay. The waiter said, some pence under a shilling. He gave a shilling, and the change he said he would give to him, and he went off. I was very uneasy; what to do I did not know. I considered with myself whether it was not best to return to my lodging. I went out of the door, and stood waiting a little bit. I saw Mr. Blunt, my employer; he was coming across the street with one arm a-kimbo. He was the same person, and in the same dress. He was coming as if from Chancery-lane. He was in the middle of the horse-road, in Holborn, before I saw him. He came on to me. I stepped off the door, as if to meet him. He beckoned to me, and said, have you done that little business for me, continued walking, and told me to come round the corner, in Warwick-court. I told him that I had done the business, and told him how and in what manner I had the notes, saying, if he thought proper if he would have them there I could give them him in my pocket-book. I took my pocket-book out as I was speaking to him. He said, going into a coffee-house, he did not like to do it. He asked me, if it was convenient for him to keep the pocket-book until the morrow, until I came to him. I told him, that it was. I gave him also half-a-guinea in gold and a sixpence in silver, that made eleven shillings, and I gave him the pocket-book. Then I parted with him. He said then, I shall not want you now until the morrow at eleven o'clock. That was the last time I saw him in that dress.

Q. Now, sir, look at the prisoner, and say what you believe - A. I believe him to be the person.

Q. Have you any doubt - A. A trifling doubt. The green spectacles and the habit altogether makes a little difference, but I believe him to be the identical man, knowing by his side face from his cravat. There is a flagginess about his chin, and his handkerchief is over it. When he was writing for me the Moorgate coffee-house direction I took notice of his side face.

Q. How long was it before you saw him again - A. The last time I saw him in the habit and the green spectacles was on the 28th of February, 1811. I think it was the 3d of February, 1813, he was exhibited before me again.

COURT. Did you hear him speak enough so as to recollect whether it was the same voice - A. I did not hear him enough to say it was the same voice. After I gave him my pocket-book with the notes I went to see some friends. I went home to my lodgings between ten and eleven o'clock. When I came in there I received my pocket-book done up in a brown paper parcel, and a seal over it, and two one-pound notes were in my pocket-book, and I believe a few things that were in it prior to that. The note is;

"Sir, I found by a letter from my most particular friend at Liverpool, she is very ill, whom I must go to see; am not certain when I shall return. I am, sir, your friend.

WILLIAM BLUNT ."

This letter is marked B.

Mr. Bosanquet. Did you communicate this to Mr. Abbot - A. I opened the communication to him. The next morning, I went to Messrs. Carr Glyn and Company. I communicated the whole circumstance to Mr. Abbott, and by his advice, I went to the bankers.

Q. Did you the next day go to the banking-house where you received the notes - A. I did, and communicated the circumstance. I got them to write the drawers name, Mr. Trowers. When I went to Mr. Trowers. I found the bankers clerk there, before me. I communicated the circumstance and delivered over the papers to him.

Q. Did you communicate to Mr. Trowers, that you had lived with Lee and Company - A. I did.

Mr. Alley. Two years before February, 1813, you had seen somebody, that you now think is the prisoner - A. Yes.

Q. At that time you were a stranger in London - A. I was.

Q. Did you see more than one person at that house except the person that opened the door - A. No, only one.

Q. That person of course you had never seen before - A. I had never seen before.

Q. No doubt you took an accurate description of the man - A.Particularly so.

Q. On the next day you say you saw, as you suppose, the same person - A. Yes.

Q. After you had made this disclosure to the banker, you returned into the country - A. In September I returned to my father.

Q. Do you recollect how many examinations you underwent, at Bow-street - A. Only two that were put down; I was asked a few questions.

Q. How many days did you go to the office - A. Twice only.

Q. How often might you and Mr. Nares personally communicate upon the subject - A. Twice latterly; the first was in 1811.

Q. I am talking of examinations of this year, did that impression remain throughout the examination, or did you alter your opinion; on your looking round, you said Richardson was the man - A. I did.

Q. Was this man pointed out to you - A. He was, by Mr. Nares I think; I first thought he was not the man. My opinion before I left the room was, that he was the man. On the second examination, upon nature consideration, I believed him to be the man that I saw in Francis-street. I really believe now, that to be the man that I saw in Francis-street.

JAMES COOK . Q. Are you acquainted with the prisoner - A. Yes, his name is Robert Kennet , and I have known him by the name of King, and Blunt.

Q. We want to know at present of a draft, upon the house of Messrs. Carr Glyn and Company - A. I know that a draft was procured from Trowers for the purpose. It was procured by Samuel Richardson .

Q. Had you any conversation with Richardson and Kennet upon that subject - A. After procuring the draft, it was copied.

Q. I want to know what was the draft procured for - A. For the purpose of committing a forgery.

Q. You were to obtain the genuine draft for it to be copied - A. Exactly so.

Q. What transaction was he to have, in order that you might have the draft - A. He was to buy stock; he did buy in stock, and sold it out afterwards.

Q. Was that draft, when so obtained, brought to you - A. It was. That is the genuine draft, procured from Mr. Trowers.

Q. By what name did Richardson transact that business - A. By the name of Samuel Rivers .

Q. Who was present when that draft was brought for the purpose of being copied - A. I do not recollect any one but Richardson and myself Richardson gave it me. I made a copy from that draft, and filled up that check.

Q. How did you obtain the blank check - A. I had some by me. I do not remember how I obtained them. It was proposed that Richardson should hire an apartment for the prisoner, Kennet, and that the prisoner should go to the apartment and the next day the clerk should be procured. The clerk was procured: and I believe, the next day this draft was presented by the prisoner. Whether I gave the draft to the prisoner or Richardson, I have it not in my memory; we were all together. It was planned altogether that the prisoner should be at that apartment, and the prisoner was to go by the name of Blunt. He was to tell his own story, and his dress was settled. It was something of a drab coat, I do not exactly recollect the colour; drab pantaloons and hessian boots. It was a disguise for a purpose that never took place. He wore his own hair, but he had a wig and green spectacles. I saw him in this disguise at the Bedford coffee-house, Russel-square. The clerk was hired on the next day.

Q. Did you see him at the Bedford coffee-house the day before the clerk was hired - A. Yes; the clerk was hired and I think on the following day the draft was given to the clerk.

Q. Who gave the draft to the clerk - A. That I cannot say; I understood Kennet; Kennet was to deliver the forged draft to the clerk. Kennet was to transact the business with the clerk.

Q. How early upon that day, in which the draft was presented, did you see Kennet; I am speaking of the day in which he got the cash - A.Between eleven and twelve o'clock I saw him at the Bedford coffee-house: that was by appointment.

Q. You all knew that was the day upon which the draft was to be presented - A. Yes.

Q. When he came to the Bedford coffee-house, was he in his usual habit, or the disguise - A. In the disguise.

Q. What was the purpose of your meeting at the Bedford coffee-house - A. It was for the purpose of the prisoner taking the check, to give it to the clerk. I went with him, part of the way, from the Bedford coffee-house, to Francis-street.

Q. How soon after you dropped him, I saw soon on that day did you see him again - A. It might be in two hours afterwards. I beg your pardon, I am incorrect.

Q. You went part of the way with him to Francis-street, and there you left him - A. Yes.

Q. How soon did you take him up again - A. In

about half an hour; he came to me in Francis-street. I was to wait for him there, within sight of the house

Q. Did you see the young man come from the house - A. No, I did not. When Kennet came to me, he said, he had sent the note by the clerk. We agreed to take a coach, and go to the back of the Bank, Princes-street, and there to wait, to know whether the draft was paid, or not; we were to know that by Richardson, and a man of the name of John Birdett ; they were to go to the banking-house, there to see whether the money was paid, or not.

Q. How long did you remain in Princes-street - A. I suppose, three quarters of an hour. Richardson and Birdett came and said, they suspected the clerk suspected the transaction, they had seen him go into a house in Newport-street, and therefore suspected that there was a suspicion of the transaction.

Q. Did you know at that time, that Newport-street was the lodging of the advertising clerk - A. No. We went to a public-house, and concluded that the business was done away with, and all failed. It entered into our minds that the money might still be obtained. I thought it was a neglect in the man that was sent, for this purpose, that they had kept good look out, and at the Robin Hood , Robin Hood-court, Shoe-lane, at a public-house, it was agreed that a letter should be written. The prisoner wrote that letter, I think, (I am not confident,) for the purpose of giving it to a porter to carry to Francis-street.

Q. Did you or Birdett write a letter which was sent by a porter to Francis-street - A. There was no other than one letter written or sent.

Q. Did you see Kennet writing a letter to be sent to Francis-street - A. I did. I delivered the letter to the porter.

Q. Could any other letter go out without your knowledge - A. It was possible. I might be out of the way.

Q. Were you out of the way - A. I was not. I can have no doubt but that is the letter; I believe it to be Kennet's writing firmly. (The letter read, marked B.) It is a disguised hand writing.

Q. When you dispatched the porter, you, Richardson, Birdett, and Kennet, were at the Robin Hood - A. Yes, when this porter was dispatched, and the prisoner and myself waited at the end of Chancery-lane, and I believe Richardson was likewise there He got out of the coach, and returned, and said, he saw the clerk coming down.

Q. How long had you been in the coach, before Richardson returned, saying, he saw the young man come - A. About a quarter of an hour; when Richardson came to us, and said, he saw the young man go into the tap.

Q. How long had he been absent from you - A. Not ten minutes. We went from the Robin Hood together. I beg pardon, I believe the dress was changed by Kennet.

Q. Where did he change his dress - A. At Birdett's house, not of despoiling the money, he changed his dress.

COURT. Was he at the end of Chancery-lane, disguised - A. Yes, disguised; he put on this disguise again at Birdett's. He went from the Robin Hood to Ship-yard, and put on this disguise again. We took a coach in Fleet-street, from there we waited at the top of Chancery-lane. Richardson went out of the coach; he saw this clerk coming down Holborn. He was at a loss to find out this tavern.

Q. How long had Richardson been absent when he returned, and said he had found the young man Not ten minutes.

Q. When he reported the young man was just gone into the tavern, what was done then - A. When Richardson came back he took the prisoner, Kennet, from the coach.

Q. Did you actually see Kennet go into the tavern - A. I did. I saw Kennet and the young man come out together, and go up Warwick-court.

Mr. Solicitor General. How far did he go into the tavern - A. I don't know; I did not see.

Q. Did you there see Mr. Kennet go into the tavern - A.No, I did not.

Q. Did you lose sight of Kennet when you saw him go from the coach - A. I saw him go into the tavern, and some little time after I saw him come out of the tavern and go up the court. I beg your pardon, that was Richardson. Richardson got out of the coach; he was absent I suppose half an hour.

Mr. Solicitor General. I suppose upon your account the disguised figure has been put on, then you go into Chancery-lane. I want you to take up the transaction there; now the coach is stopped in Chancery-lane, who gets out there - A. Richardson gets out there.

Q. How long is he absent - A. Half an hour; and when he came back, he said, he had found the clerk, and that he seemed at a loss to know where he was going to. Richardson accosted him, and shewed him over to the tavern. Then after the young man had got into the tavern, he came to the coach.

Q. Who then got out of the coach - A. Kennet got out of the coach. I saw him go into the tavern. A little time after, I saw him come out of the tavern and go up Warwick-court.

Q. Had it been settled between you, where you were to meet again - A. I expected to meet them at the Robin Hood . I went there first, and did not meet them, and went from there to Birdett's. I saw them at Birdett's an hour after. I there saw the money divided in four shares. Three of us had six hundred pounds each; and Birdett had two hundred and ninety pounds.

Q. Who produced the money at Birdett's - A. Whether it was Richardson or Kennet I do not know. I think it was in a pocket-book.

Q. Was it mentioned whose pocket-book it was - A. I do not recollect the circumstance.

Q. Look at that last paper that I put into your hand - A. This hand writing is mine; it is a disguised hand. That is the answer to the clerk's advertisement.

Q. Who were the persons that settled that you should write that - A. Richardson and Kennet.

Q. After this, you got into some scrapes, and you told the same story that you have now, in the present year - A. Yes.

Mr. Walford. What was the colour of the wig

in which he was disguised - A. It was a brown wig.

Mr. Solicitor General. Do you know, by whose recommendation these clothes were obtained - A. By Hudson, of Mr. Levin a tailor, in Princes-street.

Mr. Walford. What were you originally brought up to - A. A hosier, about twelve years ago. I have been in various ways.

Q. What was the charge you were apprehended for - A.Forgery.

Q. This forgery - A. No, another.

Q. You thought yourself in danger; some time after, you thought you should be hanged - A. I really did.

Q. You told this story to save yourself - A. Yes, and I confessed a great many forgeries.

Mr. Solicitor General. This was an extensive plan - A. Yes.

Q.How long have you been acquainted with Kennet - A. Two years.

Q. The disguise was not for this particular transaction - A. No, it was not.

THOMAS HANDY. I am a clerk to Sir Richard Carr Glyn and Company.

Q.What are the names of the firm - A. Sir Richard Carr Glyn, bart. Charles Mills , Thomas Halifax , Richard Plumptre Glyn, and Henry Parry .

Q. Do you remember seeing the witness, Pollard - A. I do.

Q. Look at that draft, and tell me whether he presented it to you for payment - A. Yes, he did.

Q. How did you pay - A. In two notes of one thousand pounds each, one fifty, another forty, and eleven shillings in money. I have got my book here. Pollard came the next day, and made the disclosure which led to this prosecution.

MR. FRESHFIELD. Q. You are the solicitor of this prosecution, did you see that executed - A. Yes.

JOHN TROWERS. Q. You are in partnership with a gentleman of the name of Hatches Trowers - A. I am; we are stock brokers.

Q. Had you any transaction with a person of the name of Rivers - A. I had. That is a genuine check.

Q. The check you now hold in your hand purports to be drawn upon your house for two thousand pounds, is that drawn by you - A. Certainly not, nor my partner. It is to all intents and purposes, a forgery. My partner is here.

HATCHES TROWER. This is no part of my writing, it was not written by any means, by my authority, or direction. (The check read.) 28th of February, 1811, Messrs. Carr Glyn and Co. pay to William Blunt , esq. two thousand and ninety pounds eleven shillings. J. H. Trowers.

JOHN ALLEN . I married Mrs. Shrimpton's daughter. Mrs. Shrimpton lived at 13, Francis-street. A person of the name of Blunt took the parlour.

Q. How long was Blunt there - A. About three hours. He came I think, on the 28th of February, 1811.

Q. How was he dressed - A. In a mixed coloured coat, rather light, a slouched hat, green spectacles, and a light coloured wig. A person came as a servant, him in. He staid about half an hour. Mr. Blunt went out about half an hour after the servant went. The servant told me he was going to the Bank, for two thousand and ninety pound, odd money. I never saw Mr. Blunt at the apartment again.

Q. How long was it after, before you saw the person that you supposed to be Blunt - A. About two years afterwards.

COURT. What servant did you understand the servant to be - A. A clerk.

Q. Look at the prisoner, Kennet - A. That is the gentleman that passed at my mother-in-law's house, as Blunt. I have no doubt at all of it now.

MR. LEVIN. I am a tailor, in Princes-street, Hanover-square,

Q. Do you know a person of the name of Hudson - A. Yes, I have seen him here to day.

Q. Did you at any time, make any clothes by his recommendation, for a person of the name of King - A. I did, in February, 1811. This is the pattern of the coat, waistcoat, and pantaloons. These patterns are part of the cloth they were made off I made the clothes by the recommendation of Mr. Hudson.

Q. Who was the person that was to wear them clothes - A. I think the prisoner is the person that was measured in the name of King. He was measured by me, or my partner.

DANIEL DUFF . Q. Were you an assignee under a commission of bankruptcy, against the prisoner - A. I was.

Q. During the time that you were assignee had you frequent opportunities of seeing him write - A. Yes, and before that time.

Q. Look at that paper marked B - A. If I had picked up this paper by accident, I should have said it is a hand writing with which I am familiar. It is a larger character, then the prisoner's epistolary writing; but to my belief it is his hand writing, and this other paper is the same hand writing, in my opinion. I believe this to be his hand; the i a m the three final letters in William, I believe to be the hand writing of the prisoner, Kennet. The word Blunt the u and n, and is, the two concluding letters in Francis, I think are his. The word, street is the next word the double e in the word, street. The word Tottenham, the em the am is his. The whole of the writing I believe is the writing of Robert Kennet .

Q. I know put into your hand, the paper with the letter C - A. This is much larger, than that which I have seen the prisoner write. I do not believe it to be the writing of Kennet. There are several of the letters that I would say, are Robert Kennet 's.

Q. How long is it ago, since you have seen him write, is it less then ten years - A. No. I have not seen him write in that time to my recollection. My first acquaintance commenced with him in the year 1792, about the beginning of January it continued to the year 1800, 25th of February During that time he had four sons at my school I had frequent opportunities of seeing his writing.

THOMAS ABBOTT . I am a shoe-maker, in Newport-street. The young man, Pollard lodged at my house. He called at my house on the 28th

of February, in the morning; he after that went into the City.

Q. Did he receive a parcel that same evening - A. He did; his pocket-book, and other papers. I advised him to go to the bankers, the next morning; he did.

Mr. Solicitor General. That is the evidence on the part of the prosecution.

Prisoner's Defence. I am perfectly innocent of this charge.

JOSEPH JAMES. I am a lace and fridge weaver, in Newgate-street.

Q. Had you considerable transactions with Kennet when he was a tradesman - A. I had, and I was a creditor.

Q. Did your transactions in business give you an opportunity of seeing his hand writing - A. I have seen his hand writing, and have transacted business with him upon that hand writing.

Q. Have you been applied to by Messrs. Kay and Freshfield - A. I have.

Q. I show you the letter A first, do you or not believe the paper marked A to be his hand writing - A. I think not.

Q. Now, sir, making an allowance for disguise being used, and it is written larger, do you find any letters in his hand writing - A. Not any in the paper marked B. There is not any impression in my mind that is, his hand writing, and the paper marked C, to the best of my recollection, not any in that letter.

Q. The paper D next, look at that now sir, as to any part of any one of them, do you find the hand writing of Kennet - A. I do not alter my opinion in the least. They were shown to me, and that was the answer that I gave first. In my judgment there are none of them his hand writing.

Mr. Solicitor General. Did you know that Mr. Kennet was in custody, before the application was made to you; whom did you communicate to before you had been applied to by the solicitor of the Bank - A. Mr. Hill called upon me, to get me to make a claim, that I had of Mr. Kennet.

Q. What was the age of the claim - A. I have the note in my pocket. I think it must have been twelve years.

Q. Had you heard anything about liquidating the draft, until after your old friend was charged with a forgery - A. It was mentioned before. I think some debts were in the habit of being purchased a twelvemonth ago.

Q. What was the amount of your debt - A.Eighteen pounds two shillings and ninepence. Mr. Duff gave me to understand, that there was money lodged in the Court of Chancery, that would pay twenty shillings in the pound, about eighteen months or two years ago.

Q. You had heard nothing of it until about three weeks ago - A. It might be that time. I cannot be positive.

Q. Has your debt been paid - A. My debt has been paid. I received fifteen shillings in the pound.

Q. Who told you to keep your promissory note in your pocket - A. I was not asked for it; I gave a receipt.

Q. Now I should like to know, how a gentleman is approached under these circumstances - A. I think the solicitor for the prisoner saw me first, before the solicitor of the Bank.

Q. How soon after Mr. Kennet was sent to prison, did his solicitor wait upon you - A. I am sure I cannot say.

Q. Had you the honour of knowing Mr. Hill before Kennet was taken in custody - A.No, sir.

Q. Did not Mr. Hill upon his first introduction to you, tell you, that your old customer was in custody, charged with a forgery, and that you, and others would be applied to, to know whether it was his hand writing - A. Upon my oath, he did not. The first time was concerning the liquidation of this draft. He came to know what I would take. My answer was, that I had reason to believe the estate could pay twenty shillings in the pound, and that I would not take less.

Q. How came you to refuse to sell your debt, when your debtor found his way to Newgate - A. Because five shillings was offered. I took fifteen shillings in the pound.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 42.

First Middlesex jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18130407-72

416. THOMAS BUCK was indicted, for that he, on the 12th of March , feloniously and without any authority, did dispose of a certain paper, containing the word, number or figure, or character, five on a black or dark ground .

HANNAH BURTON . Q. I believe you lived in March last, at Mr. Carpenter's in Fleet-street - A. Yes. I quitted my place in March last.

Q. What money had you in your pocket, when you quitted your place - A. I had ten pound in the morning of that day, I left my place on the 11th of March, and on the 12th, I met the prisoner. I then had ten pound in my pocket. I saw the prisoner about half past seven, in the evening of the 12th. I met the prisoner just about Fleet-market, he passed me several times, he asked where I was going to; he pushed by my pockets, and asked me whether I had any money in my pockets. He went by me a good many times, and then came and took hold of my hand, and led me round the Old Bailey. He asked me if I had got any money; that was at the time that we were going round the Old Bailey. I told him yes, I had some money in my pocket. Then he said, we should go into some public-house, and have something to drink. I told him I could not; I had no time. He pressed me very much, and accordingly we then went into a public-house, in Newgate-street; there we had six penny worth of rum and water, and during the time we were drinking that, he pulled out a very large pocket book, with three folds, a black cover, it turned over three folds. There were a great number of notes, in this

pocket-book. He said, there were five pound, twenty pound, and thirty pound notes. He gave me one, and asked me for small change. He said, he had no small change. I told him he had better get change at the bar. He said he was a captain on board a ship, and that his ship laid in the East India Dock. He gave me a five pound note. He put the note in my dress, and said he wanted small change for it. He told me not to doubt his word; it was a five pound note. I told him to go to the bar. He said he would not go to the bar. I had got some money, and I was to give him my money for it. Then the prisoner paid for the rum and water, and we went out of the house. As soon as we got out of the door he asked me for my money. He gave me another five pound note, and told me to give him all the money I had. I gave him all I had except one shilling. He would not go any where to have it counted; he would have it out of doors. I had nine pound of silver in the morning when I went out, and a one pound note. I had spent about five or six shillings in the course of the day; I am not sure which. I gave him all my money but one shilling, and that he asked me for a great many times. I asked him to go in somewhere and put his name to the notes. He said he would not; I need not doubt his word; he had plenty about him. We went down Cheapside, and then he turned down St. Paul's church-yard, and then he went away. I do not know where he went to.

Q. Had you observed anything particular about his person - A. Yes. he had lost a little bit off his little finger on the left hand. I observed that when we were sitting in the public-house.

Q. What did you do with the notes he gave you - A. I put them into my pocket. I had no others. I had only those two that he gave me. On the next evening I went to a straw-bonnet shop in Leadenhall-street, a Mr. Bramwell's; there I went after a bonnet, and offered to pay for it with one of these notes. There it was perceived that the note was not a good one. They sent for an officer, and I was taken to a jail almost opposite of the Mansion House. When the officer said it was not a good one, I said if that is not a good one I have got another; I had them of a gentleman in the street, and I had given the full value for them.

Q. Did you describe the person that gave you the notes to the officer - A. I did not at first.

Q. Before the prisoner was brought into the Compter had you told anybody about his hand - A. I told Mr. Chamberlain about his finger, and as soon as I saw the prisoner I knew him.

Q.How soon was the prisoner brought there after you was there - A. I was taken about eight o'clock in the evening; I think the prisoner was brought in about two o'clock in the morning.

Q. How soon did you see the prisoner after he was brought in - A. About eight o'clock in the morning. I knew him as soon as I saw him, and I told the turnkey of the jail that he was the man that I was brought in for. The prisoner, soon after he saw me, he told me to go into the yard. I went with him. He told me when I should be taken up to have my hearing the next morning, not to say that I had been in service and had left my place. I was not to say that I gave money for these notes, if I did I should have fourteen years transportation; it used to be seven, but now it was fourteen. He told me to say that I was a girl of loose character, and that a gentleman made me a present of these to go and sleep with him.

Q. When you were before the Lord Mayor did you tell the story that the prisoner told you, or the story that you told now - A. I told the story I did now. I told the truth.

REBECCA WALKER . I am an unfortunate young woman. I met with the prisoner about eight o'clock on Saturday evening, this month. I met with him at a public-house by Fleet-market. He asked me if I was an unfortunate girl. I told him I was. He asked me if I would go in keeping with him. I told him I did not intend to go in keeping. I intended to go home in a short time to my relations.

Q. Had you any refreshment with him - A. Yes, two glasses of rum and water, and while we were drinking the liquor he produced a black pocketbook. I saw there were in it a number of notes, a great many like bank notes. He told me he was a captain of a ship, and had been abroad for a long time, and had been taken by the French, and was in prison a long time. He said, his ship was in the East India Dock. He held up his hand, and shewed me his finger where it had been shot. It was the finger next to the little finger; the first joint was off: whether right or left I could not tell. He then pulled out a great many notes. He said he was a money kind of a man. I told him it was not a proper place for him to expose his money. He said he had only three halfpence in change; he had a great many notes. I paid for the two glasses of rum and water, then we went to my room. He wished for more drink; I sent out for it. Then he told me that my place was not fit for a gentleman to stop in; he would rather go to an inn. There was three shillings and sixpence in liquor, making the debt from him to me five shillings and sixpence in the whole. Then we went out together. He asked me if I had any change about me. I told him I had none; I would get the landlord to change the notes. He told me not to go to the landlord; he should go to an inn and change the notes.

Q. Then you expected to pass some time together - A. Yes. My room is in Charles-street, Drury-lane. We went down Holborn, towards Fleet-market, and when we came up to the watchhouse in Holborn he struck me, and told me if I did not go about my business he would do for me.

Q. Had he shewn any disposition to quit you - A. Yes. I did not like to quit him without my money. He told me to stop a little; he was going to turn the corner a minute; he would return, and then he went to run away from me. I stood still until I saw him run, and then I went after him and caught hold of him by the coat. He called the watchman and gave me in charge. I was taken to the watchhouse. He made his charge at the watchhouse that I meaned to rob him, and that he had property about him. I could not afford to lose five shillings and sixpence. I stated my case to the constable, at the watchhouse.

The watchman said I was a likely girl, and he had better give me the money and let me go about my business. Then we were both turned out of doors. When we came out of the watchhouse I told him if he had a home I would follow him until I had my money. He would not let me catch hold of him. I followed him as far as Smithfield, and when I got near to a watchhouse he began to say he was sorry for what he had done. We went up a court; he said there was a house there we could go in. I saw no house, but a poor place. He conducted himself with impropriety. He took out his notes, and pretended to give me a five pound note for what had past: he asked me if I had any change. I had only a farthing in my pocket. The watchman came up and took us both to the watchhouse, because I began to make a noise. I staid in the watchhouse till the morning; the prisoner was taken to the Compter.

HOPE ALDRIDGE . I am shopman to Mr. Bramwell, in Leadenhall-street.

Q. Do you remember Hannah Burton coming to purchase a bonnet there - A. Yes; she gave me a note; I took it to Mr. Bramwell. The same note that I received from Burton I delivered to him.

MR. BRAMWELL. I live in Leadenhall-street.

Q. On the 13th of March do you remember Hope Aldridge delivering you a note - A. Yes; I looked at the note, and perceived it was a bad one. It resembled a bank note in its appearance. I sent for an officer, and when the officer came I made it known to her that it was a bad one. She said, if it was a bad one she had another. She immediately gave it to the officer. I asked her how she got them. She stated, of a man in Fleet-street.

WILLIAM CHAMBERLAIN . I am a constable. I took Hannah Burton in custody. I received one note from the last witness, and one from Hannah Burton .

MR. WOOL. I keep the Magpie and Stump public-house, Newgate-street.

Q. On the evening of the 12th of March do you remember the prisoner being at your house - A. A man like him in appearance was there, and I think Hannah Burton was with him. I saw a pocket-book on the table or in his hand. I have no recollection what it contained.

(The note read.)

Prisoner's Defence. The young person accosted me in the street; she asked me to give her something; I told her I had no money to give her; she said she would not leave me without. By these words a watchman came up. When I was taken to the watchhouse she stated that I had been with her, and that she had given me five shillings. I was so intoxicated I spoke more than what I ought to have done, by that means I was sent to the Poultry Compter. I never received a farthing in the world of the other girl, and what she has sworn against me is all false.

GUILTY , aged 36.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

London jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18130407-73

417. MARIANNE BRANCH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of March , a saucepan, value 2 s. the property of George Smith .

GEORGE SMITH . I am a tailor ; I live in Kingsgate-street, Holborn . I lost the saucepan from out of my yard on 6th of March, about eleven o'clock. I saw the prisoner with the saucepan under her gown, through the pocket-hole. I followed her. She went into an old iron shop, in the same street. I found her in the iron shop, selling the saucepan.

MRS. SMITH. From information I went into my yard and missed my saucepan. I went into the iron shop three or four doors off where I live, in the same street, and my saucepan was in the scale. The prisoner said it was not mine. She struck me. The constable came in and took her. The prisoner then said she met a woman and gave her four pence for it.

Prisoner's Defence. I gave four pence for the saucepan. I was going to sell it.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130407-74

418. ANN BAKER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of March , an eighteen-penny bank token , the property of William Creser .

JOHANNA CRESER. I live at 36, Baldwyn-street, City-road.

Q. What is the prisoner - A. I never saw her before this transaction. My little girl had the bank token given her the day before. On the 11th of March this woman was coming by, she took it out of her hand. I called to her, and told her I would forgive her if she would give it up. She would not. A constable was fetched; he searched her; he could not find it. He found it in her mouth afterwards. I am sure I saw her take it from my child.

JOHN GREEN . I am a constable. The prisoner denied having the eighteen-penny token. I felt her cheeks. She brought this eighteen-penny token out of her mouth.

Q. to prosecutrix. Look at that eighteen-penny piece - A. I could not swear to it.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130407-75

419. MARTHA BRAINWELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of March , a watch, value 36 s. the property of William Colton .

ANN COLTON . I am the wife of William Colton , I live in Marybone . On the 17th of March, between two and three in the afternoon, I left my room door open. I live in the front room, two pair. I went down one flight of stairs, to the person below. I looked out; I saw a strange woman coming down. I went up to my room, and missed the watch out of the case; it stood on the table. I directly went after the prisoner, and told her that she had got my watch. She said, she had not. The people came round her; she said, I had better take her in somewhere for a proper person to search her. The officer wanted to take her into a public-house; she said no; take me to your room. She dropped a three-shilling piece, and with the other hand she laid the watch down, on the chair in the room. This is the watch, it is my watch. I saw it in the prisoner's hand, and I am sure it was taken from off the table. It was not on the chair when I went out of the room.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not have the watch at all.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130407-76

420. FANNY BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of March , a shirt, value 5 s. the property of Ann Bull .

ANN BULL . I am a widow . I live at Chelsea. I lost the shirt from No. 11, Green's-row ; the shirt was in the yard, it hung out to dry. I had the shirt to wash, I hung the shirt to dry, between three and four o'clock. It was taken before five, on the 25th of March.

WILLIAM BUTTERWORTH . I am an officer of Bow-street. On the 25th of March, I was sent to the Queen-head, at Knightsbridge. The landlord told me he had got a woman that he believed had stolen a shirt, and the next morning the prosecutrix said the shirt was hers, and it proved to be taken from a line. It was very wet when it was found. She had taken it to the pawnbroker; the pawnbroker would not take it in, because it was wet. This is the shirt.

Prosecutrix. It is my shirt.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked up the shirt between Knightsbridge and Chelsea. I gave the officer four shillings and the duplicate, there is only one shilling deficient.

Butterworth. They were four bad shillings. The shirt was pledged in London.

GUILTY , aged 45.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130407-77

421. MARY ANN HOPKINS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of March , a watch, value 5 l. a gold chain, value 2 l. a gold seal, value 10 s. and a watch-key, value 1 s. a pencil case, value 1 s. a pair tweezers, value 2 d. the property of Charles Dawson , from his person .

CHARLES DAWSON . I am an attorney . This happened to me on the morning of the 19th of March. I had been dining with a party of gentlemen on the 18th of March. We sat very late. I had drank rather more wine than did me good. On my going home I lost my watch. I do not recollect what time it was, nor where I lost my watch, nor who took it.

MATTHEW KIDGER. I am serjeant of the watch. On the 19th of March, the prisoner and Mr. Dawson were going up Holborn. I saw Mr. Dawson was rather in liquor; I followed them, suspecting something might be the case. The prisoner and Mr. Dawson walked under a gateway; in two minutes the prisoner run out. I saw something shine in her hand. I took the prisoner, and took her up Fox-court, and took from her a silver hunting watch, with a gold chain, seal, and key. This is the watch.

Mr. Alley. Q. to prosecutor. You were so that you do not know whether you might not give it her - A. I cannot say.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130407-78

422. THOMAS COLLINS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of April , a pewter pint pot, value 15 d. the property of Peter Boyd .

PETER BOYD . I am a publican , No. 21, Clipstone-street. On Saturday morning, the 3d of April about eight o'clock, I went to Mr. Rackman. There I found my pot, and the prisoner; he had taken it off the rail in Charlton-street.

JOHN BURGESS . I am servant to Mr. Wells. As I came through Charlton-street, I saw him take Mr. Boyd's pot off the rail. This is Mr. Boyd's pot.

Prosecutor. This is my pot.

Prisoner's Defence. I was extremely distressed.

GUILTY , aged 51.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130407-79

423. ROBERT BRADY and JOHN WEBB, alias ATKINSON , was indicted for feloniously forging, on the 7th of September , a certain order, for the payment of 700 l. 16 s. with intention to defraud William Gillman , Felix Calvert Ladbroke , Henry Ladbroke , and Thomas Watson .

SECOND COUNT, for feloniously disposing off, and putting away a like forged order, with the same intention.

THIRD COUNT, for feloniously offering to John Harvey a like forged order, with like intention.

And OTHER COUNTS, in like manner, only calling the forged order a bill of exchange.

SAMUEL RICHARDSON . Q. In the month of September, 1812, were you acquainted with the prisoners - A. Yes, I knew them some years ago.

Q. Were you also acquainted with a person of the name of Cook - A. I was.

Q. Were you engaged with them in any transaction, with respect to Ladbroke and Company - A. I was engaged with them.

Q. I don't know whether you ever saw that check drawn - A. I possibly might, it was drawn by Cook. I received it from Cook; and after I had so received it, by appointment, I met the prisoners at the Horns tavern, Doctor's Commons. On the morning of the day, that the check was presented for payment, it was there arranged between me and Webb in what manner the business should be done. I think Brady was present at the first part of the conversation. It was arranged that Webb should go to the Angel inn, in Angel-street, St. Martin's-le-grand, and from there send the check for payment, by a porter.

Q. Was the check produced at the Horns tavern - A. I think not. I had it in my pocket. Webb and I left the Horns tavern for the purpose of carrying this into execution. We went together to the Angel, in our way there I gave Webb the forged check. Webb went into the coffee-room of the Angel first, and I after him. We took our seats in different boxes, to give the appearance of not knowing one another, as I was to follow the porter. That was preconcerted. I called for a glass of sherry.

Q. Did you see Webb, in the Angel, do anything

- A. I heard him desire the waiter to send the porter. The porter came in. I saw him give the check to the porter, and I think he desired him to go and get the money for it. The porter took the check and went out, and as soon as the porter was gone I left the room to follow the porter. I followed the porter as far as the Poultry. Webb quitted the coffee-room shorty after me, and joined me in the same street. He walked with me to a public-house in St. Martin's-le-grand; there I left him.

Q. You walked with the porter as far as the Poultry - A. I did. That was after I left Webb, and I think I saw Brady in the Poultry. I remained in the Poultry a few minutes, until I saw Brady.

Q. What part in the transaction was it agreed that Brady should perform - A. It was agreed that I should follow the porter into the banking-house, but I did not do so. Brady told me he had some business at Ladbroke's, and that he should go to the banking-house instead of me, and he followed the porter to the banking-house instead of me. I went into a house near the spot. He soon after came to me at that house. He told me that he believed the check was not paid. I left him instantly, and went to the house where I had left Webb. Webb and I went to the Horns tavern. At that time none of us were taken. After that, I was taken in custody upon some charge, and I made this disclosure.

JAMES COOK . Q. Look at that draft, do you know from whom you received that draft - A. I believe from Robert Brady .

Q. That is a genuine draft drawn upon Messrs. Ladbroke's - A. Yes; I believe I received it from Robert Brady . I cannot swear. I received it with others from three different persons.

Q. Who were the three persons from whom you received the three drafts - A. Samuel Richardson , Robert Brady , and John Hill. I believe I received this genuine draft from Robert Brady ; at all events, I received it from one of these three.

Q. Look at that draft, who wrote that - A. I wrote that. I copied it from the genuine draft. I made use of the genuine one to forge that, and after I drew the forged draft I delivered it to Samuel Richardson , at my house in King's-road, Chelsea. I left the draft with Richardson, on the 4th of September; the draft was past dated; it is dated the 7th. I left town soon after I had written this draft.

RICHARD DAVIS . In the month of September last, I was waiter at the Angel Inn, Angel-street.

Q. Do you remember in the beginning of the month of September, the witness Richardson coming into your coffee-room - A. I do. I think Webb came in first. Webb sat in the box next the door. Richardson sat in the third box. Webb called for a glass of sherry, and Richardson called for a glass of sherry. Webb asked me for the porter that we send of errands. I called the porter. I saw him speak to the porter and send him off. The porte went out of his errand, and after the porter was gone, Webb and Richardson paid me separate, and they both went out; and shortly after Mr. Gillman; the banker, came in with the porter. Richardson and Webb never returned again. This was on the first Monday in Bartholomew-fair time. I do not recollect the day of the month.

CHARLES STEVENSON . Q. You are a porter at the Angel inn, Angel-street - A. I am; I was acting as porter in September last.

Q. Do you remember being called in for any purpose on the 7th of September - A. Yes; it was on a Monday in Bartholomew-fair time. I think it was the 7th; I was called into the coffee-room; I went in. I told the gentleman who spoke to me, that I would get my hat and coat.

Q. Who is that gentleman - A. Positively I could not swear to him, I had but one minutes sight of him.

Q. Have you seen any person that you believe to be the person - A. This Webb, but he is so much altered that I could not swear to him. I think Richardson is more like the man that gave me the check than him.

Q. Did you see Richardson there - A. No, not at that time, not until I saw him at Bow-street. I think the man that gave me the check was more jolly than Webb. I never saw Richardson to my knowledge until I saw him at the office.

Q. This person whoever he was gave you a draft, did he - A. Yes, for seven hundred pounds sixteen shillings, and I went to the banker, Messrs. Ladbroke's, in Bank-buildings, it was handed from one to another, and at last refused. Mr. Gillman told me it was a forged one; he went back with me to the Angel, and the gentleman that gave me the check was gone.

JOHN HARVEY . I am cashier in the house of Ladbroke and Company.

Q. Give me the names of the partners - A. Felix Calvert Ladbroke, Henry Ladbroke , Thomas Watson , and William Gillman .

Q. On the 7th of September last, did the last witness present that check at your banking-house for payment - A. Yes, he did.

Q. Mr. Keene I believe keeps an account at your house - A. He does.

Q. Upon looking at the draft did you suspect its genuine - A. I saw there was a difference in the writing certainly. I believe it is not the hand writing of Mr. Keene. It is a good imitation; there certainly a difference.

WILLIAM GILLMAN . Q. You are one of the partners in the house of Messrs. Ladbroke and Company - A. I am.

Q. Was that draft, purporting to be drawn of Mr. Keene for seven hundred pounds sixteen shillings, handed to you - A. It was; and upon the examination of it, I believed it to be a forgery. I pressed the porter as to the person from whom he received it, and in consequence of his information, I went with him to the coffee-room of the Angel. I did not find the person that had sent him.

WILLIAM HENRY PROCTOR. I am a clerk in the banking-house of Ladbroke and Company. On the 7th of September last I was in the banking-house when the forged draft was presented for payment. Some little time was taken up upon the examination of it by the clerks and Mr. Gillman.

Q. While this was going on did you observe any

person in the banking-house that came for change of country bank notes - A. Yes; I think Brady is very much like the person, but he is very much altered. He is about the same size. He is like him, but I cannot say with certainty that he is the man. I saw Brady about two months ago. I then said he is like him, and I think now he is like him.

(The forged check read.)

Brady's Defence. I am utterly at a loss to make a defence, only to declare my innocence. I cannot charge my memory that I was in London on that day. Any other man in court might be charged in the same manner that I have been.

Webb's Defence. I beg leave to observe that at the time they swear to me I was in Nottinghamshire.

ROBERT WOOLMAN . I keep the White Horse at Wormley in Hertfordshire, in the road to Hertford. I have kept that house twenty-four years the 18th of this month.

Q. Do you know the person of the prisoner Webb - A. Yes; he was at my house at the latter end of March, 1812. He staid there three days. I saw him again at my house on a Wednesday on the beginning of September. He then slept at my house two nights. He went away on the Friday in the York Highflyer. He told me he was going into the North. I saw him at Wormley in the beginning of November.

JOSEPH BAYLIS . I am a malster at Wormley.

Q. How far is Wormley from town - A. Fifteen miles.

Q. Do you remember the prisoner, Webb, being there any time in the autumn of last year - A. Yes, he put up at Mr. Woolman's, the White Horse. He staid there from the Wednesday to the Friday. It was in the beginning of September. I cannot recollect the day of the month. It could not be later than the second week in September.

Q. Was it so late as the 11th or 12th of September - A. I believe it was not so late as the 11th.

THOMAS WADDINGTON. Q. Do you come here upon a subpoena - A. Yes. I keep the Granby's Head, at Redport, in Nottinghamshire, Redport is one hundred and forty miles and odd from London.

Q. How long have you known the prisoner - A. A little better than a twelvemonth.

Q. Do you remember his coming to you in the month of September at your inn - A. Yes. I suppose he came to my house in a coach. I found him in my house when I came down in the morning.

Q. Does the High Flyer come through Redport - A. Yes.

Q. What part of the month of September was it - A. It was very early in the month of September. I remember having a sitting dog of my brother-in-law's that I was to have taken home on the 1st of September, and something put me off, and I had the dog at that time.

Q. How soon after the 1st of September was it that you saw the prisoner - A. About two or three days. I cannot swear justly to a day.

Q. Was it a week - A. I think not. He came to me on a Saturday morning. He stopped and dined with me. I sent to the market; I saw his sister; she was standing there selling butter. I told her there was some person belonging to her at my house. His sister came to my house and when she came he met her in the gateway an kissed her. He went home with his sister. It is only about three miles from where the sister lived. I saw him on the Monday again. He continued in Nottinghamshire near two months, and on the latter end of October he paid me a score of five pounds and odd money.

SARAH LETTER . I am sister to the prisoner, Webb. I live at Haydon, near Redport, in Nottinghamshire.

Q. In last September were you spoken to by Mr. Waddington in the market-place - A. Yes; I was standing in the market-place selling my butter on the 1st Saturday in September to the best of my belief, on the 5th of September.

Q. Have you any reason for remembering that day in particular - A. The three first days in September my family were mowing of barley, and on the Saturday he went home with me from the market; he spent the sabbath at my home, and my husband observed if it was a fine day on Monday we all of us were to turn out to assist in turning the corn. When the morning came, it was a fine day; I mentioned it to my brother. He said he would walk out, and he walked out. I saw no more of him till the next morning. He returned to Mr. Waddington's, as we understood from him. He continued coming backwards and forwards to our house ever other day until the latter end of October.

Q. Now, ma'am, look at your brother and tell me whether he is different in person now to what he was then - A. He was poorly in health then, and thin as he is now.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson .

Reference Number: t18130407-80

424. ROBERT BRADY was indicted for the same offence .

Mr. Gurney, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

London jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson .

Reference Number: t18130407-81

425. RICHARD WHEELER , senior, and RICHARD WHEELER , junior, were indicted for that they, on the 6th of March , one cutting engine for cutting out of bars of gold or silver or metal, round blanks, by force of a screw, knowingly had in their possession, they not being persons employed by His Majesty's mint, nor being lawfully authorised by the Lords Commissioners of the Treasury, nor by the Lord High Treasurer of England for the time being .

JOHN ARMSTRONG . I am an officer. On Saturday the 6th of March, I went (in company with Leadbetter, Cartwright, and Wilson) to No. 14, Little Wild-street . We waited a few minutes below stairs, and then we proceeded up stairs into the front garret. When we came up there we found a key in the door, in the front garret door, on the outside, whether in turning it to open it we had locked it. I knocked at the door and heard a voice say, who is there? I knocked again. The voice again said, who

is there. I then said, Wheeler, it is me, or us, open the door. I had a warrant, and knew the name was Wheeler. I put my foot against the door, and open the door went. When we came into the room the younger prisoner's wife was in the room with a child in her arms, and the younger prisoner was in the room with a short jacket on, and a white apron before him. Wheeler, the elder, was not there. Wheeler, junior, was secured. Every one of the officers were then in the room. We then proceeded to search. The first thing that caught my eye was a cutting engine, in the corner of the room, which is here.

Q. Was it light in the corner. Could you see distinctly what it was - A. Yes, I could plainly see what it was from a window in that room. I am acquainted with a cutting engine. There was a lathe fixed in the middle of the room, or nearly opposite of the window. A bench was before the window, with a vice fixed to that bench. This is the cutting engine.

Q. Explain to the court the use of that cutting engine - A. This is called a dab; this was fixed in, and this is called a bolster; it was at the bottom, but not screwed. The top one is called a dab, and the bottom one a bolster; it works by the force of a screw. The piece of metal is put between the dab and the bolster; the dab forces into the bolster by the force of the screw, and cuts the metal into a round blank. On the same board were these other cutters, which are of the size of blank shillings. These are dabs and bolsters of the size of a shilling; here are three. This litter here was found in the engine. Here is the drawer that goes in undeneath; the blanks from the metal were found in that drawer, and these are the blanks that were found on the board close by the engine. On that day we matched a great number of these counterfeit blanks to the dab; they corresponded. These coppers in the drawer are cut into blanks. This drawer, they are copper, and in that there are more than thirty or forty of mixed metal. The waste of the metal is called sissel. The sixpences fits the round space in the sissel. The lathe is for the purpose of turning the edges. Here are sixty-three counterfeit blanks, with the edges turned by the lathe. This one was in the lathe at the time. I took it out.

Q. In what state of perfection is that and the others you have just now produced - A. They are towards conclusion. A very little thing to be used to them would bring them to the colour of silver; the edges are turned. On the top of the lathe, besides them sixty-three, were a great number of blanks with the edges apparently turned. These others were laying on the lathe; some of them appear not to be edged. After I had searched the room, and put the officers in possession, I went down stairs into the front two pairs. Young Wheeler owned the goods, and I have some receipts to show that the furniture is his in that room. He and his wife lived there. I searched the drawers in the two pair front room; I found fifty counterfeit shillings finished, and fourteen sixpences. Here they are. They are fit for circulation. To bring the silver to the surface aquafortis would be used. I found this pocket-book with two others, containing receipts of his landlord, and here are two punches for stamping letters on the counterfeit money. After I had searched the two pair of stairs front room, and secured the implements, I sent two officers down into the one pair, and when I went down there I found the elder Wheeler in their custody. That was in the back room one pair of stairs. He rented the one pair back room and the garret. I found the elder Wheeler without his coat. I searched the drawer in his presence. I found twelve counterfeit blanks of the size of a sixpence, and I found twenty that apparently appeared to be brace buttons. They were with holes in them, and too thick to be used in coining. The old Wheeler was secured, and so was the young one. These things I found, and all the things I found have been kept by themselves.

Q. How is the garret situated with respect to light - A. It has a window in the middle which lets in a good light. The cutting engine could not be viewed from without, because there was a parapet wall besides a curtain that hung on the nearest side of the window to the cutting engine, and there were a great number of stains on the cloth that hung at the window. This leather was nailed inside of the door, over the key-hole, with three tacks, so that nobody could see into the room.

Q. Is that the sort of cutting engine that you have seen used for the purpose of coining - A. It is. I have seen many like it where this kind of business has been carried on.

Q. Did either of the prisoners say any thing, as you recollect - A. Their behaviour was remarkably civil; no men could behave better.

DANIEL LEADBETTER. I am one of the marshalmen. I accompanied Armstrong and the other officers. I saw the things. I was not in the two pair where he found the things. I was up in the garret at that time. I found a quantity of punches and pots in a box. I found them in a lidge, close to the window. There was a bench also. This was in the garret, where the cutting engine was. I saw this cutting engine fixed there. I found some bags with two sorts of emery. I also found three or four crucibles, one with some white powder in it, and this one appears to have melted metal. I found thirty or forty blanks in the window in a paper marked, but I counted sixty-three blanks. I saw one blank fixed in the chops of the lathe, and on the top of the lathe was some file dust. This bottle, containing quicksilver, was given to me by Joshua Armstrong . There was a vice fixed to the board that went along the window, and in that vice was a large pair of shears.

Q. For what purpose would these shears be applied to - A. They would cut metal, certainly.

Q. Did you find any weights and scales - A. I did. I went into Young Wheeler 's room, down stairs. He went with me, and acknowledged it to be his room and his furniture that was in it.

Q. You have got a tea-caddy there - A. I have; it was on the top of a chest of drawers; it contained ninety-three blanks. I found this basket there; it was hanging over the tea-caddy; in it was eleven counterfeit shillings and two counterfeit sixpences.

I found some accompts that I did not understand, which the prisoner said would be material to them for their defence.

DANIEL CARTWRIGHT . I am one of the marshalmen of the City. I went into the front garret with the other officers; we all went in together, and after that I went into the one pair back room with Wilson. There was the elder Wheeler, his wife, and a daughter, and another man; they were coming to the door, hearing us come down stairs; I immediately pushed in and handcuffed him and the other man together. I searched them, and found nothing upon them; the elder Wheeler was in his shirt sleeves, without his coat, and his spectacles on his forehead, as if they were thrown from his eyes. After taking the elder Wheeler I went into the front garret again. We began to pack up the things that were found in the press, and which I now produce. I found this sissel upon which the blanks are cut out. On the floor, by the side of the press I found some files, and a winch to take the press down. They are all here. I conveyed the elder prisoner away in a coach. He said the officers had behaved remarkably civil, and had done their duty as men, and he said if people played at bowls they must take rubbers.

JOSHUA ARMSTRONG . On my searching the room where the cutting engine was, out of a cupboard in that room, I found a quantity of fissel, some leather rubbers, some crucibles, and some turnings. As I was going up stairs I heard the cutting engine at work in the garret. I believe instead of unlocking the door, I locked it. I immediately bursted the door open, and young Wheeler was at the door, and his hand appeared a little wet with oil.

THOMAS WILSON . I am the landlord of this house, No. 14, Little Wild-street. Wheeler the elder took of me the first floor, and the front garret. Wheeler the younger the front room second floor.

Q. Does the family live together - A. No, separate, in the same house, but in different rooms. They have lodged in my house between two and three years. I understood they were engravers and die sinkers. I have heard a knocking, I could not suppose it was such an engine as that. I always received the rent from the old man, for the first floor and the front garret.

WILLIAM MOTTON . I lodge in the house where the prisoners lodged. I lodge in the back garret.

Q. Did you ever hear any work going on - A. I have heard a noise, as if cutting sheets of tin at different times in the front garret. I never was inside of that room; the door was always kept locked. I never saw any stranger go into that room.

JOSEPH NICHOLS . Q. You are a monier of his Majesty's mint - A. Yes.

Q. Is that cutting engine an instrument that would be used for cutting out blanks by force of a screw - A. It would cut out blanks from bars of any metal, it would be a proper instrument to be used for that purpose. It is called a cutting engine, and it my be applied to a good purpose as well as a bad.

Q. Tell me whether this shilling, which is one of a great many, whether it is a counterfeit or not - A. It is a counterfeit shilling.

Wheeler, senior's, Defence. I originally rented the that room but I let it to my son.

JURY. Q. to Motton. Did you ever see Wheelar the elder go into that garret - A. Yes, but not so many times as the son.

Wheeler, junior's, Defence. I have to assert that every thing in the front garret belonged to me; I paid the rent to my father, four shillings a week; and these blanks that were found were represented to me to be for local token when they were brought to me.

GEORGE JUST. I am the watch-trade. I live at No. 22, Andrew's-buildings, City-road.

Q. Do you know Wheeler the younger - A. Yes, I have employed him to cut out blanks for watch wheels. I have give up into the garret and have seen him at work there with the engine. A varity of manufacturers have a cutting engine. I always understood Wheeler the younger had the garret. one time when I was waiting for a gross of week, the father came up and asked the son for six weeks rent. I think he paid his father twenty four shillings, for six weeks rent.

Q. Upon the various occasions that you have gone there, who did you find to be working at the engine - A.Young Mr. Wheeler. These are the wheels that cut for me.

Mr. Knapp. They are all brass - A. Yes.

Q. Is it usual to take these blanks that have been produced by the officers into watch wheels - A. No.

THOMAS DIX . I am a silversmith. I live at 36, Greenhill-ren. I know the elder Wheeler, and I also know that such a cutting engine as that is used by silversmiths to cut out the prongs of forks.

WHEELER, Senior, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 55.

WHEELER. Junior, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 25.

[The prisoner Wheeler, junior, was recommended to mercy by the jury, on account of his carrying on the business under his father.]

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18130407-82

426. THOMAS BIRCH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of March , nine pounds weight of honey, value 9 s. the property of John Luck .

JOHN LUCK . I am a chemist and apothecary , 56, Shadwell High-street. On the 3d of March the prisoner came to me under pretence of hiring an apartment; he requested that I would sell him some honey, as he was commissioned by a friend in the country to send him some. I agreed to sell him nine pound, and he wished to

take it without paying for it. I objected to that, and requested that he would let my boy go to his house, and if it was a respectable house I had no objection. He took the boy with him. That is all I know.

ROBERT WILLIAM PLAYFORD. I am servant to Mr. Luck. I went with the prisoner; he took me to a house in Union-street, in the Minories. He told me he lived there; he would not trouble me an further. I did not see him go into the house. He went into America-square, and then I lost him. I met him again in a few minutes; I believe he went into Crutchedfriars. I met him again coming over Tower-hill; I followed him into Old Gravel-lane, into the shop of Mr. Edmond's where he sold the honey for fourteen pence a pind, and when he came out of the shop I lost sight of him. I am sure he is the same man.

MR. EDMONDS I am a chemist and druggist, in Old Gravel-lane. T. Birch, as he signed the receipt; he came to my house and said that he had a little honey that came out of the country, that he was recommended, me by Mr. Bedford.

Q. What do you mean by T. Birch - A. The prisoner. I believe him be the man, I could not swear to him. I gave him fourteen pence a pound; for the honey This is the receipt he gave me for it. The honey weighed between eight and nine pounds. The boy came in and told me the circumstance. I told him to pursue the man, instead of that he kept talking, and the man got off.

GEORGE WILLIAM CORMACK. I am porter to Mr. Edmonds. The prisoner came into my master's shop with a jar of honey and offered it for sale. I weighed it; it eighed about eight pounds and a half, or three quarters, not nine pounds; they agreed about the price, and my master paid him; a boy came in and I went about my own business.

Mr. Edmonds. The honey has been used; the jar my man was to bring here.

Cormack. On my returning home from here last Thursday, I called in at a public-house in Aldersgate-street; I put the jar on bench; in the mean while I was taking some refreshment at the bar, some person took the jar and the handkerchief.

Prosecutor. I saw the jar at Mr. Edmonds. I am sure the jar was mine.

Prisoner's Defence. He debitted the goods to me.

GUILTY , aged 38.

Confined Three Months in Newgate and whipped in Jail .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130407-83

427. SARAH BARNES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2nd of April , five yards and a half of printed cotton, value 12 s. the property of William Wittle and Francis Workman .

THOMAS DUTTON . I am a linen-draper, on Holborn-hill. On the 2nd of April the prisoner came into my shop and asked me the price of a shawl at my door, and when she was gone I missed a shawl that was hanging by the side of the shawl that she asked the price of; I went out, and brought the prisoner into my shop. I sent for a constable; he took a print from out of her apron. I discovered that it belonged to Mr. Wittle and Workman. This is the cotton.

JAMES PRICHARD . I am shopman to William Wittle and Francis Workman . The cotton that was found in the possession of the prisoner at Mr. Dutton's, I missed from our door; it had our mark upon it. I know it is my employers property.

GUILTY , aged 36.

Confined One Month in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130407-84

428. THOMAS WAINWRIGHT and JOHN LEWIS were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of March , fifty-six pound weight of tallow, value 1 l. 10 s. the property of John Cattley and Stephen Cattley .

JOHN BLANKARN . I am a warfinger. On the 3d of March, I was passing Upper Thames-street, near the end of Bull-wharf-lane, about four o'clock in the afternoon; I met the prisoner Lewis with a mat on his shoulder. I watched him. He went about twenty yards down Kennet-wharf-lane, and there he put it down. The prisoner, Wainwright, came towards him in a similar direction very fast; he asked Lewis if all was right. Wainwright assisted Lewis with the mat on his shoulder. Wainwright proceeded in the direction that he came. Lewis proceeded to a public-house the corner of Couzens-lane. Dowgate-hill. I then procured two constables to watch, and I went to Messrs. Cattley's; they said they missed a mat of tallow. I pointed out the prisoners to the constables.

ROBERT PATTERSON . I and another officer, watched this public-house. On searching the public-house we found the tallow. I assisted in taking the prisoners. This is the mat of tallow.

JOHN CATTLEY . This is the same mat of tallow that was at our warehouse; it is our property. Both the prisoners were at work at our warehouse.

Wainwright's Defence. On the 3d of March, Mr. Cattley employed four soldiers in the house. He asked me if I knew the tallow chandlers at the corner of Distaff-lane. I said yes; he told me to go and tell him there was some tallow in the warehouse, and as I was going up a soldier asked me to lift him up with some tallow, which I did.

Lewis's Defence. I acknowledge my fault and leave myself to the mercy of the Court.

WAINWRIGHT, GUILTY , aged 46.

LEWIS, GUILTY , aged 36.

Whipped and discharged.

Reference Number: t18130407-85

429. HENRY JACOBS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of March , five three-shilling bank-tokens, a sixpence, and a penknife,

value 1 s. the property of Joseph Biron , from his person .

The prosecutor was called, and not appearing in court, his recognisance was ordered to be estreated.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130407-86

430. SOLOMON LEVI was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of February , two thousand yards of printed cotton, value 100 l. two pieces of calico, value l. fifty dozen of habit-shirts, value 50 l. and fifty muslin dresses, value 15 l. the property of Titus West .

ISAAC HACK . I am porter to Titus West ; his warehouse is No. 2, Castle-court, Lawrence-lane . On the evening of the 3d of February, I fastened up the warehouse; the warehouse is on the ground floor; out of which the property was stolen. I double locked the door; I put one key in the leather box, and the other I returned to Timothy West ,; a relation of my master's. The property was all safe then.

TIMOTHY WEST. On the 3d of February, about half after five o'clock in the afternoon, Hack delivered me the key of the warehouse; I went down stairs about half after six, and found the warehouse door wide open, and the warehouse had been robbed. Upon examination, I missed thirty-three pieces of printed cotton, about two thousand yards, value 100 l. two pieces of calico, fifty-five dozen and eleven habit-shirts, worth about 20 l. and between thirty and forty muslin dresses. Mr. West has no partner. I am only his clerk.

ABRAHAM COLLINS . I am a tailor. I live in Still-alley, Hounsditch. On the 3d of February last, the prisoner came to my house, be brought a sample of printed cotton, what I call mock marsello, for waistcoats. I did not deal with him on that day. On the 17th of February he came to me again, and asked me to buy some mock marsello. He said it cost him ten-pence; I gave him eleven-pence a yard. He offered me thirty pieces or more. He told me that I must cut them up into waistcoats. I told him that I should call for the patterns at his house. This house is the corner of Cutler-street, Hounsditch; and when I was at his house I asked him if I could get discount if I sent them abroad. He told me I could not, for all the fag ends were cut off. I took the patterns, and went with the patterns to Mr. Jeffery, in Cheapside, (where I deal,) and afterwards I shewed Mr. West the patterns. It was arranged between Mr. West and me that I should deal with the prisoner; I told him I had no money; he furnished me with bank notes for the purpose. I then went to the prisoner's house. I saw him in the evening; he gave me two pieces of goods that is one hundred and six yards; I gave him five pounds; I paid him with the bank notes I had been furnished with; I came out of his house with the two pieces; Mr. Davis stopped me with them. I gave Mr. Davis the memorandum that I had of the prisoner, and then the officers went immediately into the prisoner's house.

EDWARD DAVIS . I am a ward beadle of Aldgate. In consequence of information I went to the house of Levi on Thursday the 18th of February. I fixed Forrester at the front of the door, myself at the left; Collins stipped by me, and I passed him once; Kinnersley was in Still-alley. Collins came up the passage again, in company of a little girl of the name of Garcia; they were coming close together; the girl had a roll of cloth. I asked him what he had there; he said a piece of mock marsello; he told me he bought it of the prisoner; he took me to the prisoner's house. I went into the prisoner's house, into the back kitchen, there I found the prisoner's daughter, a girl about fifteen; I took the candle off the table. The prisoner's daughter, said you must not go up stairs sir I immediately went up stairs, Forrester close to my heels. I found Levi at the top of the stairs, endeavouring to pass me. Forrester cried, you cannot go by, and then I recognised him; I laid hold of him, he squatted down directly; each of his legs got between two broken bannisters; I used entreaties to get him up, and in a moment the front room door bursted open, there I saw in that room about a dozen women playing at cards; the whole body of the ladies came out of the room, and we were completely surrounded; the prisoner's wife got between me and the back door, in which room I saw a woman that turned out to be the nurse; the nurse threw herself immediately upon me, the prisoner's wife asked me what I wanted to do with her husband, did I want to kill him. I told her no, but I was determined not to loose him. The prisoner's wife began to holloa out in the Dutch language, throw it out of the window. I know the language. I said I will throw it out of the window for you. I told her I knew the language, it is the same that was used to the three reams of paper. I desired Forrester to draw his sword; at last the prisoner got up. I took him into the back room and searched him. He produced his pocket-book out of his side pocket, in that pocket-book I found a two pound note; I sent for Mr. Timothy West , who was down stairs. I shewed him that two pound note, he identified it; it has his initials on it. He said he had given it to Collins in the morning. I have it ever since. I then went to search his house; I went towards the bed; the prisoner's wife said, my bed is not fit to be touched; take care of my child. I told her I would not hurt the child. I turned up the bed clothes, there I found the bed compleately doubled in half, and the child lying upon the bed; the bottom part of the beadstead was quite vacant; it appeared as if a quantity of things had been laying there. Kinnersley came up and told me they were throwing goods over into the next yard. I sent Forrester and Kinnersley for them. They will give you the account of them. I had them all brought to my house, seven pieces of goods.

Mr. Timothy West. Q. Look at that note produced by Davis - A. This is one of the notes; I marked in the morning, and gave to Collins to buy the goods with.

WILLIAM KINNERSLEY . I am a constable. I accompanied Mr. Davis. When Collins came out of the house he passed me. The girl had got the marsello. He said to the girl, let us make haste and fetch another piece. After this I found Mr. Davis and the other officer had got into the house. I was at the bottom of the stairs, to see that nothing passed. When I had been there a quarter of an hour the nurse came down puffing and blowing, as if she had been at work very hard. At nine o'clock the watchman came and told me they were throwing the goods into another house. I went into the next house but one; in that yard one piece of goods came upon my head. I found seven pieces of marsello there that appeared to have been thrown out of some window. They appeared to me to come from the next yard adjoining to Levi's yard. I got upon the top of a shed there. I saw three women and a man carrying them. As soon as they saw me they cried, there is a man come in. They immediately went in, and I saw no more of them. There is something of a communication at the back of the houses. I saw them carrying a good way along. I brought away all the goods.

JOHN FORRESTER . I am an officer. I saw the girl with Collins go into Levi's house empty handed, and come out full handed. When they came out I entered the house. As I was going up stairs, Levi was making his escape down stairs. He said, let me go by. I said, no, go back. I took him up stairs on the landing-place, and there a parcel of ladies sallied out. The prisoner's wife sister asked me if I was going to kill him. I said, no, if they would be quiet it would all be settled. Levi sat on his backside, with each leg through the bannisters. The ladies began to lay hold of him. I was obliged to be resolute. Then he got up and said he would shew us all over the house. We went into the front room and the back room, and found nothing. We stopped a little bit. He had some refreshment. I went down stairs. Some of the people said, we shall all be taken up; they are throwing the goods into our yard; they said, we will not have them in our yard. Then they throwed them into another yard. I went through the second house and sat upon the goods. I sent for an hackney coach. I took them to the watchhouse and locked them up. They are here.

SOPHIA GARCIA. I went with Mr. Collins to Levi's house. Mr. Collins went into the house and brought me a piece of mock marsello to carry home. Mr. Davis stopped me the second time.

ESTHER DAVIS. Q. Do you remember going with Collins to Levi's house - A. I do; he went up stairs; I waited below. He gave me two pieces of mock marsello; I took them to Mr. West; he was waiting at Mr. Collins's.

Timothy West . Q. Do you remember the last girl bringing you any mock marsello - A. Yes, I was waiting for it at Mr. Collins's: at that time Davis and the officers were with me. I have not a doubt in my mind that they are the goods that we lost, They are Mr. Titus West's property.

COURT. How much have you got.

Davis. We have got about fifteen pieces. I produce them.

Timothy West . The last that are produced are also the property of Titus West. The fag ends are all now cut off. When we lost them every piece had the regular mark on it.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of the charge. The two-pound note Collins paid my girl that very day, for work done by her. He said he would pay the remainder the next week. I am innocent of the robbery.

GUILTY , aged 39.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130407-87

431. ELIZABETH ALDING was indicted for that she, on the 18th of May, in the 39th year of His Majesty's reign, was married to Henry Alding , that she afterwards, on the 2nd of December, in the 47th year of His Majesty's reign , feloniously did marry Robert Bowles , esq. the said Henry Alding being then alive .

HENRY ALDING was called, and not appearing in court, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130407-88

432. JOHN ROBERTS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of March , one hundred and twenty farthings , the property of George Lerimer .

GEORGE LERIMER . I am a cheesemonger , No. 13, Old-street-road . I know nothing of the fact.

JAMES MURRAY . I am a servant to Mr. Lerimer. The prisoner, with another boy, came into my master's shop. The other boy was standing by my mistress; he asked her to cut him a rasher of bacon, and while my mistress was doing it the prisoner was sitting on the counter; he reached his arm over to the back shelf, and took these farthings. When I saw him take the farthings I went to the door immediately to stop the prisoner from going out. He came to the door and knocked me down. He was pursued and taken. I am quite sure he is the person. I never lost sight of him.

Q. What became of the farthings - A. He dropped some at the door, and the others he chucked over the alms-houses. One hundred of them have been recovered. These are the farthings; they are my master's property.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not do any such thing; I never struck him.

GUILTY, aged 14.

Judgment respited .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130407-89

433. MARY BOWSTER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of March , a tub, value 4 s. the property of Anthony Salmon .

MARY ANN SALMON . I am the daughter of Anthony Salmon . He lives at 14, Hallifax-street, Mile-end . On the 9th of March I caught the prisoner with the tub in her hand. She had taken the tub out of the washhouse, in the yard. This is the tub; it is worth four shillings.

Prisoner's Defence. I kicked my foot against the tub. I never took the tub up. I thought the wash-house was a privy.

GUILTY , aged 51.

Fined 1 s. and discharged.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130407-90

434. JOHN SAMUEL ROWBRIDGE was indicted for killing and slaying James Matthews .

JOHN HALL . I am a farrier. My shop is in Street's-buildings, Upper Mount-street.

Q. Did you know the deceased, James Matthews - A. Yes; he was a coach-smith . He used to work in my shop.

Q. Did you know the prisoner - A. Only by seeing him bring work to the shop. The prisoner worked for Mr. Tilbury, of South-street, a coach-maker, and he used to bring work to the deceased from Mr. Tilbury. On Thursday, the 11th of March , at four in the afternoon, the prisoner came into the shop where the deceased was at work. He brought a lamp socket with him, a socket of a gig, that was for the prisoner to make a pair like it. The prisoner and the deceased had high words about some screw bolts. They each gave one another the lie. The deceased said he would not do anything for the prisoner, and desired him to go out of the shop. Very high words passed. The prisoner refused to go out of the shop, for which the deceased said he would give him a good hiding if he would not take the law of him. The prisoner replied that he would not take the law of him. They had still higher words. The deceased said he would give him a good punch of the head if he would not take the law of him. The prisoner replied again that he would not take the law. The deceased had the tongs, with hot iron in it, on the anvil. He put the hammer down, and reached over the anvil, making a sort of a push in a defensive way, to turn the prisoner out of the shop. At that time the prisoner was too far from him to receive any assault. At that moment the prisoner struck the deceased on the left temple with the iron lamp socket. The deceased staggered back senseless for some seconds. He came to, and followed the prisoner across the shop with the tongs, which he let fall by being struck, and when the deceased was going up to attack the prisoner a second time he fell. The prisoner only struck the deceased but once. I lifted the deceased up, and set him on a block. I took a pair of scissars, and clipped away the hair from the wound. The wound was just above the left temple; I washed it with a sponge. It appeared a sort of a confusion, not a cut, about an inch and a quarter in length. I was going to dress it; I thought it was something serious; I did not. I then tied it up with clean linen, and directed him to go to the surgeon. He did not go direct to a surgeon, but went directly to Marlborough-street office. He returned back within half an hour I should suppose; I asked him what the surgeon said. He said he had not been. I understood he had been to the office. I desired him to go immediately, and sent a boy with him to shew him the doctor's house. I followed after him. The surgeon was not at home. They immediately sent for Dr. Lee, the doctor of Mount-street work house, and Dr. Lee sent the deceased to St. George's hospital.

MR. STOCKWELL. I am the surgeon of St. George's hospital. On the 11th of March, the deceased was brought into the hospital about five o'clock in the afternoon. I discovered a small incissed wound on the left temple, as if given by some sharp instrument, about three quarters of an inch in length. I did not probe it. There was no appearance that indicated a fracture. I simply dressed the wound. About a quarter of an hour after his admission he had a strong convulsive fit, from which he was shortly relieved.

Q. Are you able to account for that convulsive fit - A. Yes. I conceive the brain sustained a deal of injury from the blow. He had no return of any injury in the head during the remainder of his life. About a week after he was brought in he was attacked with an inflammation of the lungs, and notwithstanding every means that was employed it increased, and his death took place on the 25th of March. After his death I opened his body. On examining the chest I found evident marks of inflammation of the lungs on the right side.

Q. What, in your opinion, was the cause of his death - A. From the inflammation of his lungs I should suppose, and in my judgment that inflammation could not proceed from that wound in the head.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson .

Reference Number: t18130407-91

435. REUBEN JEYNOUR was indicted for that he, on the 15th of March , feloniously did forge a certain bill of exchange for the payment of 63 l. with intention to defraud Robert Middleton Biddulph and others.

SECOND COUNT, for uttering and publishing as true a like forged bill of exchange, with like intention.

And OTHER COUNTS, for like offences, only varying the manner of charging them.

WILLIAM HARE. I am cashier to Messrs. Biddulph and Company. On Monday the 15th of March, the prisoner presented to me this bill of exchange for sixty-three pounds. I suspected it to be a forgery, and told him it was necessary to send to Mr. Thomas, the person that it purports to be accepted by, to make some enquiries respecting it. I desired him in the mean time to walk into the lane room. A person was sent to Mr. Thomas. In the mean time I asked him if he knew the endorser. It appears to be endorsed by Henry Gilbert. He said, he received it from Mr. Gilbert, who was a glover on Holborn Hill. I asked the prisoner his name. His answer was so indistinct. I am not sure whether he said John or Jeynour, that he was a glover, and resided in Berkshire. About this time Mr. Davis arrived, Mr. Thomas's partner. I put this draft into his hands. In consequence of what he said, it was found necessary to send for Mr. Tedbury, Mr. Thomas's clerk. Mr. Tedbury came. He said it was not the hand-writing of Mr. Thomas. The prisoner was then taken to Bow-street and committed. I am acquainted with Mr. Thomas's hand-writing; the name I do not think is his hand-writing.

Mr. Adolphus. You, of course, was not certain of Mr. Thomas's hand-writing by sending for somebody

else - A. I had no doubt in my own mind at that time.

JAMES TEDBURY . I am clerk to David Thomas . I am perfectly acquainted with his hand-writing. I do not believe that acceptance to be his handwriting.

HENRY GILBERT . - Mr. Adolphus. This is the endorser. He is not a competent witness.

(The bill read.)

COURT. Would the prisoner wish to say any thing in his defence.

Prisoner. Nothing.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18130407-92

436. CATHERINE RATCLIFFE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of March , a tablecloth, value 10 s. a shirt, value 10 s. a cravat, value 7 s. and a towel, value 2 s. the property of Charles Malton .

CHARLES MALTON. I live at No. 6, Burton-street, Tavistock-square . The prisoner came to live in my service on the 15th of last March. On my having missed the articles in the indictment I went to Bow-street, and procured a search warrant, and brought an officer home with me. I told the prisoner that I missed a shirt, tablecloth, and towel. The officer searched her, and found my cravat. The prisoner confessed she had pledged the other things at Mr. Barker's, in Holborn.

- BURGESS. I am shopman to Mr. Barker, pawnbroker, in Holborn. On the 18th of March, the prisoner pawned a shirt, and tablecloth, and a towel. I lent her ten shillings on them. These are them.

Prosecutor. They are all mine; they are marked with Indian ink, in full length, except the tablecloth. I can swear to them all.

Prisoner's Defence. The officer found some things; he said, if I confessed the rest it would be the better for me.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18130407-93

437. BRIDGET JOYCE was indicted, for that she, on the 1st of December , four pieces of false and counterfeit milled money and coin, resembling the current legal money of this realm, called a shilling, unlawfully did put off to Thomas Roach at a lower rate and value than they by their denomination did import to be counterfeited for; that is to say, for two shillings .

THOMAS ROACH . I am a labourer. On the 1st of December, Mr. Armstrong gave me two marked shillings and two three-shilling pieces. I then went to the prisoner's house, in Pump-court, Golden-lane. I asked her if she had any shillings or sixpences, bad ones. She told me that she had only four shillings. She gave me four shillings, and I gave her the two marked shillings that I had received from Armstrong. Then Mr. Armstrongs, the father and son, and Bishop came into the room, and the four bad shillings that I had from her Bishop took out of my hand.

Q. When you first went there had you any more money than was marked by Armstrong - A. Not any of any kind.

JOHN ARMSTRONG. I am an officer. On the 1st of December, I gave Roach these two marked shillings. They are marked with a P, a scratch, one is; and the other is marked with W B struck on the head. These marks were on them when I gave them to Roach. I searched Roach very particular before I gave them to him; he had no money of any kind. I then gave him the two marked shillings, and two three-shilling pieces. I, Bishop, and my son went with Roach to the prisoner's house. Roach went in. We had agreed with Roach before that; when he had purchased he was to cough, and after we had waited a few minutes we heard a cough. My son and Bishop went in. I went in last. When I came into the room my son had got hold of Mrs. Joyce.

Q. Did you know Mrs. Joyce before - A. I had seen her, but I was not acquainted with her. Roach was in the same room, very near her, and two men on the other side of the room. As soon as I went in, whether she caught my eye or not, her hands dropped these two shillings; they fell on the ground; I picked them up. They are the two identical shillings that I gave to Roach; they are two good shillings.

JOSHUA ARMSTRONG . I am an officer. I went with my father and Bishop to this house. I went into the house as soon as I heard the signal of a cough that was to be given by Roach for our coming in. I immediately laid hold of the prisoner's wrists, and out of her hands dropped two shillings, which my father picked up. I then told her to stand up, that I might search her, and when I got her in the middle of the room, from some part of her clothes dropped these three counterfeit shillings. There were two men in the room: nothing but good money was found upon them. On my searching the room, in a drawer I found two counterfeit sixpences.

DANIEL BISHOP . I am an officer. I was in company with John Armstrong and Joshua Armstrong . I searched Roach; out of his right hand I took four counterfeit shillings; I have had them ever since. I asked Roach where he got these. He said, of Mrs. Joyce. She exclaimed, not of me! These are the four counterfeit shillings.

JOSEPH NICHOLL . I am one of the moniers of His Majesty's Mint.

Q. Look at these four shillings that were found upon Roach, which were given him by the prisoner - A. They are counterfeit, and very bad.

Q. I put into your hand the three shillings that fell from the clothes of the prisoner, produced by Armstrong - A. They are counterfeit, and very bad, and the sixpences produced by Joshua Armstrong ; they are bad also.

MR. NEWMAN. Q. Produce the commitment of the prisoner, on which she came in custody on the oath of Thomas Roach , for having feloniously sold him, paid, and put off four counterfeit shillings, not having been cut in pieces, John Gifford is the committing magistrate. The original commitment is in the care of Mr. Newport, the keeper of the New Prison, Clerkenwell.

Q. to John Armstrong. Do you recollect the day she was committed - A. No; we took her on the 1st of December. We went with her to the magistrate; she has remained in custody ever since.

Prisoner's Defence. My lord and gentlemen of the jury, I am innocent of this charge that is against me. I know no more of it than a child unborn; I hope you will take it into consideration; it is a piece of spite against me. That man came into my house and spoke to a man. I know no more. As to sell him anything of the kind, I never did in my life; he is a man of infamous character; his character has not been enquired into as it out. He is purjured man; he will do anything for money. I have no God but one.

GUILTY , aged 56.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Mr. Shelton. Q. to Bridget Joyce . What have you to say why the Court should not give you judgment to die according to law - A. I pray the the benefit of the clergy.

Q. There is a courterplea put into the Court against your being allowed having the benefit of clergy, at the time you were tried and convicted in the year 1801, for that you one false piece of counterfeit milled money and coin called a half-guineaa, feloniously did put off to Ann Garton , at a lower rate and value then the same by its denomination did import to be counterfeited for that you on that occasion was allowed the benefit of clergy, and was sentenced by the Court to pay a fine of one shilling, and to be imprisoned in Newgate one year; it goes on farther to state that you, are the same person that was so convicted and received judgment; are you the same person.

Prisoner. I do not know.

Mr. Shelton. Gentleman of the Jury, you are to try whether she is the same person or not that was tried and convicted in the year 1801.

CALAB EDWARD POWELL . Q. Do you know the prisoner, Bridget Joyce - A. Yes. I produce a copy of her conviction at the Old Bailey, 1801. I had it at Mr. Shelton's office. I have examined it with the original; it is a correct copy.

(The copy of the conviction read.)

EDWARD KIRBY . I am the keeper of the Poultry Compter.

Q. Do you know the prisoner Joyce - A. Yes. I was present at the time she received sentence. I have no doubt about it.

Prisoner. Mr. Kirby, you know nothing at all about it.

Mr. Kirby. I am sure she is the same woman.

Mr. Shelton. Gentlemen of the Jury, is the prisoner the same person who was formerly convicted and received judgment or not.

Jury's Verdict. She is the same person.

GUILTY- DEATH , aged 56.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130407-94

438. JOHN CUNNINGHAM and LUKE MACK HUGH were indicted for that they, on the 18th of February , twenty pieces of false counterfeited milled money and coin, each of them made to the likeness and similitude of a good shilling, did put off to Elizabeth Jackson at a lower rate and value than they by their denomination did import to be counterfeited; for that is to say, for ten shillings .

ELIZABETH JACKSON . I live in Compton-street.

Q. Do you know a person of the name of Kelly. - A. Yes; he was in Newgate when I was first acquainted with him.

Q. Did you receive any direction from him, and when, to find out a person of the name of Luke Ash - A. I was to enquire for him at the Black Horse, George-street, Winfield-street, Whitechapel. This was on Monday the 15th of February. I went there and made enquiry; I then saw Luke M'Hugh: he went then in the name of Luke Ash ; I told him that I had a paper from Mr. Kelly, he could take me where I could get some shillings, and I shewed him that paper. Then he took me to Rosemary-lane. Mary Akers was with me; in Rosemary-lane I went to a public-house with Mary Akers and Luke M'Hugh; I called for a pint of porter and waited. Luke M'Hugh went at the same time to fetch John Cunningham ; he told me he was going to fetch him. He left me and Mary Akers at the public-house; he told me to stay there until he returned. I did; he returned in about a quarter of an hour, and John Cunningham , the other prisoner, with him. M'Hugh called Cunningham, Golding; when M'Hugh returned I went out of the public-house. M'Hugh told me Golding was at the door. Cunningham did not come into the public-house; I and Akers went out of the, public-house. We were then all four together. M'Hugh, Cunningham, me, and Akers. I told Cunningham I was informed he could let me have some shillings; he asked me whether Kelly had informed me what I could have them for. I told him no, but other people let me have them for five shillings the score; he said he did not let his go so, they were of a better sort; his were ten shillings a score. M'Hugh was present all this time. This was on Monday. On Thursday the 18th I went to M'Hugh and Cunningham at a public-house in Sun-street, Bishopsgate-street; they did not tell me the name of the public-house, but said it was a public-house with two fires in the tap-room. I was to meet them there to give them ten shillings for a score of bad money, they were to bring me a score, and Mary Akers a score. On Thursday I saw Matthews at the office; I communicated to him what had passed with the two prisoners on the Monday night. On the Thursday following I received from him two three-shilling bank-tokens and four shillings. Mary Akers was with me; I and Akers went to Sun-street and found the public-house out with two fires; the two prisoners were not there, I came out of the public-house, and saw the two prisoners in Sun-street; they told us to follow them into the square, and when I got against the railings Cunningham spoke first; he asked me what money we brought. I said ten shillings, and Akers the same; Cunningham gave Mary Akers two papers; he said one was for me. I gave him ten shillings; two three-shilling bank-tokens and four shillings. Cunningham put the money into M'Hugh's hand. Cunningham put another shilling into my hand; he told me to put a sixpence to it, and buy Kelly a quatern loaf and

take it to him in Newgate. Cunningham then told us how we were to wrap the shillings up, to keep them from rubbing; he shewed me how to wrap them up, and said it should be in brown paper. They both of them asked us to go and have something to drink. We went to the public-house in Sun-street the prisoner called for half a pint of rum. We stopped there about five minutes; we all four came out together. We were to meet them on Sunday night following for the purpose of purchasing again at the same house. The officers were at the door; we all parted. I went into the glass shop to tell Matthews, the officer, that we had purchased. The prisoners were going on when I came out. The officers went after them, and they were taken.

Q. What did you do with the paper of money - A. I put it into my pocket.

Q. What became of you when you saw the prisoners apprehended - A. I waited on the other side of the way a few minutes. Akers was with me. Herbert, one of the officers came and took us into a public-house.

Q. When you met Cunningham and M'Hugh had you any money but what the officer gave you - A. None of any sort, excepting a few halfpence.

MARY AKERS . I live in Peter-street, Saffron-hill. I went with a letter from Kelly with the last witness, on the 15th of February, to George-street, Winfield-street, to the Black Horse to enquire for Luke Ash ; that turned out to be M'Hugh; I, with Jackson, saw Cunningham the same night; he appointed us to meet them on the Thursday at a public-house in Sun-street; we went to the public-house, had a pint of beer, and came out again. The prisoners were not there. Mr. Matthews had previously given me ten shillings, a dollar, an eighteen-penny-token and three shillings; we returned to the same public-house; they were not there; when we came out, we saw them going down the street; we followed them; they told us to go into Finsbury-square, and there they gave me the money. Cunningham asked me how much money I had; I said ten shillings. Cunningham gave me two parcels, one for Jackson and one for me. I gave him the same ten shillings I had of Matthews. Cunningham then shewed us how to wrap them up in brown paper, to keep them from rubbing. I put my parcel in brown paper into my bosom, and Matthews took it from me.

JAMES HANCOCK . I am an officer. On Thursday the 18th of February, I marked four shillings and two three-shilling bank-tokens. I put them down on the table to Matthews. I assisted in taking Cunningham into custody; the two prisoners were together when the alarm was given; when I laid hold of Cunningham M'Hugh was behind him, two of us had Cunningham, and two officers M'Hugh. I heard something fall from M'Hugh. I stooped under M'Hugh's feet and I picked the money up, except one shilling, which was picked up by another man; it appears to be the money that I marked; I marked a dollar, four shillings, an eighteen-penny piece, and three-shilling pieces. I picked up three three-shilling pieces, an eighteen-penny piece, and two shillings; one shilling was lost, and a dollar. I suppose they ran into the kennel; all that I picked up was marked by me, and I gave all the marked money to Matthews.

JOHN MATTHEWS . I am an officer. I received the marked money from Hancock, and delivered it to Jackson and Akers. I went with Hancock, Brown, and Herbert, to apprehend the prisoners' in Sun-street; the signal was to be given by Jackson. After the signal was given I came up to Cunningham first, Hancock had hold of him at the time; M'Hugh ran across the road; I ran after him. We pushed the two prisoners into a public-house. I searched M'Hugh first, I found nothing on him. I searched Cunningham, on him I found six counterfeit shillings; then I searched Akers and Jackson, on Jackson I found twenty counterfeit shillings, and on Akers twenty counterfeit shillings.

JOHN HERBERT. I am an officer. I was with the officers in this business. Hancock assisted me in taking; Cunningham. I saw M'Hugh when he was taken, I saw him bring his hand from his breeches pocket, and throw some money down. Hancock had hold of Cunningham; he stooped and picked some of it up, and some were given him by another person.

CALEB EDWARD POWRLL . Q. I believe you have been for many years an assistant to the solititor of the Mint - A. Yes.

Q. Look at the twenty shillings found on Jackson, and tell me whether they are counterfeit - A. They are all counterfeits, and appear to be of the same sort, they are fresh now, and on the examination they appear never to have been in circulation; they are common metal; they are washed on the surface with a solution of silver; and the other twenty they are of the same description; they appear to be counterfeited in the same way.

Cunningham's Defence. The officer took an umbrella out of my hand.

M'Hugh's Defence. These women came to me with a paper. God forgive the officers; may they serv the women as they have me; they are false women to do with me so.

CUNNINGHAM, GUILTY , aged 45.

M'HUGH, GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined One Year in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18130407-95

439. BENJAMIN HEARN , alias KEARN , was indicted for that he, on the 4th of February , did receive five pieces of timber, value 40 l. the property of John Browning , Thomas Browning , Richard Browning , and George Martin Bird , lately before stolen by an evil disposed person .

JOHN BROWNING. Q. What are the names of the partners - A. John Browning , Thomas Browning , Richard Browning , and George Martin Bird ; they are timber merchants ; they have premises by the water side.

Q. In February last do you know whether they had any Swedish timber on their premises - A. Yes, at Stangate-dock; that is on the Lambeth side of Westminster-bridge, they had a large quantity there.

Q. Did you afterwards see these pieces of timber that were found upon Mr. Robinson's wharf - A. Yes, and I am sure they are my employers property. It was part of the timber that had been at Stangate.

Q. What was the value of the timber found on Robinson's wharf - A. About forty pounds; I speak within compass. That timber is still at Robinson's wharf.

ROBERT HOPKINS. I am lighterman to Messrs. Brownings, and looked after the timber; I had about two hundred pieces of timber under my care at Stangate-dock. On the 4th of February, I examined it; it was all safe then. On the morning of the 6th I observed the ropes had been cut, and six pieces had been taken away; I made every enquiry, and that afternoon about five o'clock I went to Mr. Robinson's wharf at Brentford, and there I found five pieces of the timber marked B and a star; Mr. Brownings mark which, I had put on. The five pieces I found at Robinson's wharf were five out of six that were stolen.

COURT. They had been no attempts to cut out the marks on the timber - A. No.

CHARLES ROBINSON . I am a wharfinger at Brentford. In February last I employed Mr. Watkins's barge to go to London; the prisoner navigated that barge, and Hoppey, a boy, was under him.

Q. Do you recollect this timber that the last witness has described being brought there - A. Yes; the boy with the timber followed the barge, the boy brought the timber as a raft. I saw Hearn he was in the barge; Hearn said he had got some timber for me. I asked him for the delivery note, he said he had no note, the person would be there as soon as the barge arrived.

JOHN HOPPEY. I belong to this barge. I work under Hearn.

Q. Do you recollect this timber that was owned at Robinson's wharf - A. Yes, it was brought to the barge by Whitefriars; our barge was laying by the New River wharf, delivering iron pipes, on the London side of the River; who brought that timber there I don't know; I was in the cabin, somebody called Hearn; he went out of the cabin to the man. I did not see the man that brought the timber until he was going away. Hearn came to me and said there was some timber. I said who is it for; he said it was going to Brentford with the barge, to go by Pool's boats. I asked Hearn if there was a note. Hearn said the note would be at Brentford as soon as the barge. We took it up to Brentford. I afterwards saw Honkins come and claim the timber.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before M. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130407-96

440. JOHN CHURCHILL HOWLET was indicted for that he, on the 17th of January , in the 47th year of his Majesty's reign, was clerk to William Critchley , and was employed and entrusted to receive money for and on his account, and that he being such clerk, so employed and entrusted, did receive and take into his possession, the sum of 2 s. 4 d. and that he afterwards feloniously did embezzle, secrete, and steal the same .

Mr. Gurney. counsel for the prosecution, declinging to offer any evidence, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130407-97

401. GEORGE REDDING was indicted for feloniously making an assault, upon George Pennington in the King's highway, on the 23d of February , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, a watch, value 5 l. two seals, value 3 l. two rings, value 10 s. a watch-chain, value 2 s. and a watch-key, value 6 d. his property.

GEORGE PENNINGTON. I am clerk to Jones, Lloyd, and Company, bankers, Lothbury. I live at 83, Greenfield-street, Commercial-road. On the 23d of February, about half past ten in the evening, I was going home, from the banking-house, down Leadenhall-street.

Q. Were you coming from business, or had you been with a friend - A. I had been with a friend. I had taken one glass of brandy and water with Mr. Hawksworth. I was acosted in Whitechapel by George Redding , the prisoner; I am positive he was the man; he asked me how far it was to Bow. I told him two miles.

Q. Was it light or dark - A. It was a fine evening, but the moon did not shine; there was a number of shops open with lights in them. I observed his person; he was conversing with me full ten minutes. He said it was a long way, was I going so far, he wished to have company. I told him I was not going there. I did not want to converse with him. I wished to avoid him.

Q. About what part of the town did he begin conversing with you - A. About the beginning of Aldgate.

Q. How far did he keep walking by the side of you, addressing you - A. For about half a mile beyond Whitechapel church. I had no idea that he was a thief, or anything of the kind.

Q. You did not pay particular attention to his person and features - A. I did not, still I am confident that he was the man that was walking so far with me. When I turned out of Whitechapel-road to go into Union-street I was going direct home from Whitechapel, down a street on the right.

Q. That would be your regular way home - A. Yes.

Q. If he was going to Bow, there you must part - A. Yes; I walked up the street some time; I looked behind me and saw him following me there, I then was alarmed.

Q. How far had you gone down this street before you observed that he was behind you - A. Not more than eight or ten yards, and I was then nearly within a few doors of my home. It is a narrow pavement there, on account of some iron rails. He pressed upon me very close there. I conceived as if he wanted to get by; I then felt his hand in my breeches pocket. I turned round and seized him instantly; at the instant I seized him I felt a blow. He took his hand out; I saw no person near me but the prisoner. I was kicked behind or struck; I had a blow on my belly also.

Q. Are you sure that no other person acted with the prisoner - A. I can't tell; I saw other person. If there had been any no other person, I think I must have seen him; as I fell he got my watch.

Q. You fell by that blow, did you - A. I fell on my knees and my hand.

Q. Are you quite sure that the watch was not taken

until you received the blow on your person - A. I felt the watch go as I received the blow on my person. I felt the watch go from my person; I immediately gave the alarm of stop thief.

Q. What became of the prisoner - A. He ran off, and I pursued him.

Q. As he ran off, you had an opportunity of seeing whether there was any other person - A. There was no other person. He was taken within fifty or sixty yards of the place.

Q. Had you ever lost sight of him - A. No, I do not think I did.

Q. Was your watch recovered again - A. No, nothing but some papers and receipts. I never saw the watch again; some papers of mine were found in the street. My watch had been in my fob, and my papers in my right hand breeches pocket, where I felt his hand. There was a boy that saw the prisoner throw the papers away; after the papers were found they were given to Mr. Nalder; Mr. Nalder gave them to me.

Q. Who stopped the prisoner - A. A young man that was passing by; at the moment a police officer came up. I gave charge of the prisoner to him for robbing me of my watch; the prisoner said nothing. The prisoner was searched; there was nothing found upon him. I have never seen my watch from that time to this.

THOMAS EDWARDS. I am an officer of the Thames police. On this night, I was at the sign of the Prince of Hesse; about sixty yards from Greenfield-street. I heard a noise; I went out; the prisoner was then just stopped; the prosecutor came up and gave him into my charge for robbing him of a watch, chain, and seals.

Q. to prosecutor. What watch was it - A. A gilt watch, two gold seals, a gold key, two gold rings, and a gilt metal chain; worth nine guineas altogether.

Edwards. I then took the prisoner into a public-house and searched him; I found nothing upon him.

Q. Who was the person that had hold of him when you first came up - A. James Tweed ; he is here.

Q. Did you find any papers upon the pavement - A. They were given to me by the prosecutor, which were found, as I understand, by a boy, which boy is here.

Q. Do you know the prisoner's person before - A. Yes.

JAMES TWEED . I am a cabinet-maker. I live at No. 11, Chamber-street, Goodman's-fields. On the 23d of February, I was going up Plummers-row, near Greenfield-street. I heard the cry of stop thief, and seeing the prisoner running, I run to him and stopped him. He said he was no thief and no murderer. Mr. Pennington came up about a minute. He told me to hold him fast, that he had robbed him. I then conveyed him to a public-house. Edwards came up, I delivered him up to Edwards.

ROBERT BAILEY. I am a watchman; my beat is in Greenfield-street. I heard Mr. Pennington call watch, and stop thief. The prisoner was running at that time. I sprang my rattle, and immediately followed the prisoner; I saw the prisoner stopped. I was within an hundred yards of him.

Q. When he was stopped was there any other person running at the cry of stop thief - A. No. At the time Mr. Pennington cried stop thief, I saw the prisoner strike him with his fist; he staggered, he did not fall. I was as near him, as I am to you.

Q. Then, as you were as near to him as you are to me, you can tell me whether there were any other person on the spot except the prisoner and the prosecutor - A. I saw another person near him when he struck the prosecutor. I do not know who he was nor which way he went. I followed up the prisoner until he was stopped. I never lost sight of him.

HENRY MUMFORD. I live at 88, Greenfield-street. I was eleven years old last November. I knew Mr. Pennington before this happened. I saw Mr. Pennington on his knee, and I saw a man run away.

Q. Did you see what occasioned him to be on his knee - A. No. The man that ran away ran round the corner of Fieldgate-street. He saw the watchman, and then turned back, I saw him stopped.

Q. Is the prisoner the man that was stopped - A. I do not know. The man that was running was stopped. I saw the man drop the papers, and I picked them up I gave them to Mr. Nalder.

MR. NALDER. These are the papers that were delivered to me by the last witness. I marked them, and returned them to Mr. Pennington. One is a bill of exchange for twenty-five pounds; the others are receipts.

Prosecutor. I had these papers about me at the time I was assaulted. I know them to be my papers.

Prisoner's Defence. I was standing in Greenfield-street, about twenty yards from a public-house door. I was talking to Elizabeth Jenkins . There was a cry of stop thief; four or five people passed me. The young man stopped me, and as soon as I was taken to the public-house the prosecutor said, that is the man that robbed me. In about half an hour they handcuffed me, and took me to the Thames police office. In the morning three young men came up. They would not let them speak. Mr. Nalder said he would send them on board the Tender.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 21.

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130407-98

442. JOHN IMBER and JOHN GARD were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Marr , about the hour of eight at night, on the 9th of March , and burglariously stealing therein, a bed quilt, value 5 s. his property.

THOMAS MARR . Q. Where did you live on the 9th of March last - A. In Montague Mews North . My brother is a builder; it is his house. It is a stable belonging to the house, No. 30, in the square. It is a new house; it was untenanted then. I had chair, tables, bed, and bedding, and every thing there.

Q. How do you go to this house - A. Through the stable. I have lived there eight months. I had seen my bed quilt safe in the house at dinner time. I left the house soon after twelve o'clock. I locked the

door, and put the key in my pocket. I returned a little after seven o'clock; it was dark then; the lamps were lit. When I returned I heard a rattling among the shavings. A person bolted out of the coach-house. I live in a room over the coach-house. I shut the coach-house doors, that nobody else should come out, and I called out for assistance, and I saw the two prisoners, Imber and Gard. I took Imber from behind a door in the stable, and John Gard was taken from behind some boards in the coach-house. The one that got away he is called Banbury Dick; he sold Banbury cakes at my pay-table, on a Saturday night. The first one that got away, Banbury Dick, I think was at the head of it.

Q. After you had laid hold of the prisoners where did you find the bed quilt - A. In the middle of the room. I gave seven shillings for it about eight months ago. It might be worth half-a-crown.

JOHN WHITE . I am a coachman. I live in this Mews. I assisted in taking the prisoners. They were taken in the coach-house. I heard Marr crying out, thieves. I ran with my pitchfork in my hand. We found a sack on the stairs; Marr said it did not belong to him. We went into Marr's bed room; the door was open. I catched Imber behind a door in the stable. I told him not to resist, if he did I would run him through with the fork.

Imber's Defence. I am innocent of this robbery. I have been acquainted with a young woman; I intended to make her my wife. I was well persuaded that the prosecutor had persuaded her to leave me and to live with him. On Sunday she told me she would leave me and go with the prosecutor. I told her if she did it would be at the hazard of her life. We went to the prosecutor's premises. I thought I heard her voice. I knocked; no one came. I wanted to get her away, and that is how I was found in the premises. I am no thief, and never had any intention of robbing any one.

Gard said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to his character.

Imber called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

IMBER, GUILTY , aged 22.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction .

GARD, GUILTY , aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130407-99

443. JAMES BROWN , SAMUEL WILLIAM AMOS , and WILLIAM MERRITT , alias MACKEY , were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Charles Logan , about the hour of nine at night, on the 9th of January , and stealing therein, a bed, value 3 l. a pair of sheets, value 5 s. two blankets, value 5 s. a pillow, value 2 s. and a rug, value 1 s. the property of Joseph Smith .

JOHN LOGAN . Q. Do you know Charles Royle - A. Yes; he and I live in Green's-court, Pulteney-street . I and Charles Royle pay the rent for the part of the house that we inhabit. I am a cabinet maker ; Royle is a porter. We pay two shillings and sixpence each of us for the rent of the room. I have a key of the room, and so has Royle, and Mr. Smith likewise has a key of the room. The other part of the house is let out in lodgings. We go in at the same door as all lodgers do.

Q. On the evening of the 9th of January did you go out - A. I left the apartment about ten minutes past seven. It was at that time I went out and locked the door. Royle returned first.

CHARLES ROYLE . On the 9th of January I returned home about nine o'clock at night: I found the door of the apartment wide open, and the bed missing, and a rug, pillow, blankets, and sheets.

Q. Whose bed was it that was taken - A. Mine.

Q. You hired the lodgings of Mr. Smith - A. Yes, and I have a key as well as Logan. The door had been opened by a picklock, or a key. The lock was not injured at all.

JOSEPH SMITH . Q. We understand you are the proprietor of this house and the goods - A. Yes, and I let it out to different people, except the kitchen, that I keep for myself. I sleep at the house opposite. Each of these men have a key, and each of them pay me two shillings and sixpence a-week.

Q. Were these things yours - A. Yes.

JOHN COTTON . On the 9th of January, me, Brown, Amos, and Merritt, met at the Coach and Horses, in Carnaby-street, kept by Mrs. Parkinson. I lodged there. We met about eleven o'clock in the morning the first time. Amos, asked Brown whether he had any picklock keys to unlock Mr. Smith's door, in Green's-court; he had been there twice before to look at this apartment. Brown said, he had; he would bring them in the evening. Brown went out of the house, and went to Paddington. We appointed to meet at five o'clock in the evening, at the same public-house. We met about six o'clock. About twenty minutes after eight we all went to Green's-court, to the house of Mr. Smith. We lifted up the latch; we proceeded into the passage; Brown opened the parlour door in about two minutes with two picklock keys. We all went into the room; me and Brown went in first. Brown brought out the sheets, and I brought out the bed, and gave them to Amos. I went in again to fetch the bolsters and pillows. I brought them out, and gave them to Merritt, and he went away with them. Merritt had the blankets and all. When we had taken these things, Brown told them to go to Saunders's, in Dudley-court, Crown-street.

Q. What is Saunders - A. He keeps a chandler's shop there. He is absconded. We went to Saunders. Saunders refused to purchase them. He told us to go to Mr. Whitfield, and he would buy them.

Q. Whitfield is the gentleman that is indicted for the receiver - A. Yes, he is a farrier; he lived in Crown-street; he is gone off too. We took them into Whitefield's yard, and opened them. Brown asked two pound for them; he said he would not give two pound, he would only give twenty-three shillings; he paid with a pound note and two eighteen-penny pieces. He paid me and Brown at the door. We then went to the Cart and Horse public-house, St. Giles's, and had a pot of beer. From there we went to the Coach and Horses, in Carnaby-street. We all four went back there, and Merritt slept with me all night in the same bed. We changed the one pound note with Mrs. Parkinson, and divided the money. We sat up till one o'clock there.

Q. How soon after this were you taken up - A. On the Monday following the Saturday I was taken for a deserter. I was a deserter from the West London Militia. I was in custody a week before I made this disclosure.

MRS. PARKINSON. My husband keeps the Coach and Horses, in Carnaby-market. The last witness was a lodger of mine. On Saturday night, the 9th of January, between nine and ten o'clock, the prisoners and Cotton came into my house, and Cotton had one of them to sleep with him all night, but which of them I cannot say.

THOMAS PACE . I am an officer. From information from Cotton, I and my brother officer found this property at Whitfield's.

Q. to Smith. Have you seen this property - A. Yes, it is the furniture I let to Logan and Royle; it is mine.

Pace. We took the prosecutor's sister to identify the property. I and another officer took Brown on the 13th, at Chatham, on the coach. Capel told Brown we took him for the burglary in Green's-court. He said, never mind; they cannot hang me; they can only lag me. Lag is transportion. We took Merritt; he was found in Clerkenwell prison, and Amos we found in the House of Correction.

Brown's Defence. I am innocent.

Amos, the same.

Merritt, the same.

BROWN, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 20.

AMOS, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 19.

MERRITT, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 17.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130407-100

444. JOSEPH BARKER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of March , two cows, value 20 l. the property of William Cole and Jesse Cullum .

WILLIAM COLE . I live at Mile-end-road. I am a cow-keeper . My partner's name is Jesse Cullum . On the 18th of March I lost two cows out the Marsh ground, at Stratford . I had information about three o'clock in the morning, that he went up the road with them. I followed him, and found my cows in New Inn yard, Shoreditch. They refused to let me have my cows.

Q. Who refused - A. A person of the name of Robert Young . I then applied at Worship-street office. An officer went with me, and he delivered the cows. I am sure they are my cows. One of them calved about a fortnight ago; the other died; it was over drove. They were both ready to calve. I know the prisoner very well; he lived with Hancock, a butcher, at Bow-bridge: he has gone by my marsh lands; he knew they were my cows, and he knew they were in that land all the winter.

CHARLES LAMBERT . I am a butcher. I saw the cows on the 18th of March, in Bow. The prisoner was driving them along, about five minutes after three in the morning. He was driving them toward London.

Q. Did you know the prisoner before - A. Yes. I spoke to him. He told me he brought them from Rumford, and they had strayed out of the drove into Handcock's Marsh; he was going to take them to Shoreditch. He told me he was going to take the money for the cows. He did not tell me what money.

Q. Did you know the cows - A. Yes.

Q. Whose cows were they - A. William Cole 's, I believe. I knew the cows, but I did not know whose they were.

Q. Have you seen them since - A. Yes, I saw them at Worship-street, and those are the cows that I saw at Mile-end on the 18th of March, and which Mr. Cole claimed as his own. They were red and white cows; they were in calf, and very pretty cows. When I saw them in Worship-street I knew them again.

ROBERT YOUNG . I am a butcher. The cows were brought to me about half past four on the same morning, in New Inn yard, Shoreditch.

Q. By whom were they brought - A. By the prisoner at the bar, and offered for sale.

Q. Were they in calf - A. Yes. He asked eight pounds for them. He said he brought them from Mr. Greenhill. The gentleman ordered him to bring them to me.

Q. Did you know Mr. Greenhill - A. No. I told him I should keep them and go to Mr. Greenhill. As I was going along I stopped at Bow-bridge, at Mr. Handcock's, and asked him whether he knew any thing about two cows that his drover brought down. He said, yes: there had been a gentleman enquiring about two cows that he had lost out of the marsh. I told him I had got them at home. The prisoner brought them in. Before Mr. Cole came the prisoner brought a bill to receive four pounds upon the two. It is put bullocks in the bill. I did not give him any money.

Q. They were not fit for the butcher, were they - A. No; they were too heavy in calf. I am sure the prisoner is the man that brought me the cows, and offered them for eight pounds, and they were the cows that were claimed by Mr. Cole.

Mr. Walford. You thought the prisoner a sensible man - A. I thought him a madman.

RICHARD WILSON . On the 18th of March last the prosecutor came to my house, he informed me he had lost two cows. I went down to New Inn yard. The witness, Young, delivered the cows to the prosecutor. They are the same cows that the prosecutor swore to at the office.

Prosecutor. I have no doubt about the two cows. I have had them since Michaelmas. I had them in the marsh all the winter. I saw them there every day. They were worth from fifteen to seventeen pound each if they had good luck in calving. They were small cows.

Mr. Walford. When had you seen the cows before you lost them - A. The day before I saw them in the marsh. I had a key of the marsh-gate. The gate was taken off the hinges to get the cows out.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 48.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130407-101

445. STEPHEN KIBBELL was indicted for feloniously receiving, on the 4th of September , in the 51st year of his Majesty's reign, eighteen pieces of linen cloth, value 56 l. thirty pieces of lace, value 30 l. one hundred pieces of ribbon, value 25 l. four pounds

weight of sewing silk, value 4 l. whereof Edward Roome was convicted of burglariously stealing, he, (the prisoner), knowing it to have been stolen , the property of Joseph Johnson .

JOHN LITTLE. Q. In September, 1811, you were shopman to Joseph Johnson - A. Yes, I was. His dwelling-house is in Watford, in the county of Hertford. Mr. Johnson is a linen-draper .

Q. On the night of the 3d of September did you fasten the dwelling-house up - A. I saw the house fast. I went to bed about eleven o'clock. I came down the next morning about seven. I found the street door open, and the things that are stated in the indictment were taken away.

DAVID WALLIS . I produce an office copy of the conviction of Edward Roome. I examined it with the original; it is a true copy.

(Read.)

JOEL WARE . Q. Do you know a man of the name of Norman - A. Yes, and the other man of the name of Roome, and I also know the prisoner. I was engaged with him in going down to Watford in September, the year before last. I was engaged with Norman and Roome, and I agreed to go. Stephen Kibbell also agreed to go. He is a butcher by trade. I was to go on horseback. Kibbell went in his own cart to bring the goods from the shop. I met with Norman between ten and eleven, just as I got in Watford. He told me that Roome and Kibbell were waiting at the last public-house in the town. I went with Norman to the Horns public-house. We found that Kibbell and the cart was gone, and we went down the lane to Rickmansworth. The cart stood by the pound, under some trees that is beyond Watford. After that, I, Roome, and Norman came into the town, to Johnson's house.

Q. What was Kibbell to do - A. He was to wait with the cart until Roome fetched him. I and the others broke into Mr. Johnson's house. We broke into the back part of the house a little after twelve. We took the shutter down. Roome got into the accompting-house. I went round to the front. He opened the door, and let me and Norman in at the front door. We then began to pack up the goods in the shop. Roome went out to fetch Kibbell and the cart. He was gone ten minutes or a quarter of an hour; he came back, and said he could not find Kibbell or the cart any where. We then broke open a stable in the Red Lion-yard, took out a horse, and took the cart by the stable door. Norman and me loaded the cart, and Norman and Roome went off with it. I staid behind with my poney, to acquaint them if there was any alarm. There was no alarm. I rode after them, and overtook them on Stanmore Hill, and when we got within a mile of Edgware we overtook Kibbell and his cart. I think that was about four o'clock in the morning. We drawed up the cart along side of his, and put the goods into his cart, and turned the horse and cart we had brought from Watford, down a lane leading to Hendon. Norman asked Kibbel what was the reason he left town. He said he was disturbed by some people, and was driven out of town. Then all went on to Crown-street, Soho, to one Solomon. We brought the cart up to the door, unloaded it, and sold the goods to him, I think for something better than sixty pounds.

Q. Had you a dark lanthorn with you - A. Yes; we left that in the house, and we also left a crow at the Red Lion, where we borrowed the horse and cart. In January, afterwards, I was taken up; I confessed this and many other transactions.

SARAH LATIMER . Q. You keep the Horns public-house at Watford - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember the two men coming to your house in a cart before Mr. Johnson's house was robbed - A. Yes, they came in between four and five o'clock. They went away at nine, and returned again between eleven and twelve the same night. They had a glass of gin, and went away directly with their horse and cart. I think the prisoner is one of the men, and I think Roome was the other.

GEORGE BURRELL . I lodged at Mr. Lattimer's at the time of Mr. Johnson's robbery. I recollect coming home between five and six; I saw Taylor in company with Roome and Kibbell. Kibbell had on a fustian jacket and a blue apron. I was in their company from six till nine. I went out, and looked at the cart; it had no name on it, nor number. It was a deep roomy cart, dark blue. I have seen the cart since at Worship-street; it then had a plate on, with Stephen Kibbell on it. I think that is the same cart that I saw at Mrs. Lattimer's. I went to bed before they came home and went away.

JOHN ARMSTRONG . In the month of October last, when the prisoner was apprehended, I went, in company of Bishop and Taylor, to Black Horse-yard, Whitechapel. I found the cart opposite of his stable.

DANIEL BISHOP . I had the key of the prisoner's stable. Kibbell's cart stood opposite the stable. I brought that cart to the office. I afterwards delivered it to his mother, by his desire.

CHARLES GROOM . I am groom to Lord Essex.

Q. Do you remember Mr. Johnson's house being broken open, at Watford - A. I do. On that night I was coming from Lord Essex's house to Watford; three persons were in company with me. When I came near the pound I saw a horse and cart on the other side of the road, by the trees. I went up to the cart; it had no name or number on it. There was a man inside; I asked him if he was going to St. Alban's. He made no answer. It was a deep roomy cart, like a butcher's cart. I thought he was a poacher. He asked me what o'clock it was; I told him past one. It was then about half past eleven. I told him one, in order to get him on the road. He then went gently on the road. I followed him five or six hundred yards through the town of Watford. He went on towards London. I thought he had the appearance of a butcher. I have seen the cart since at the office. It very much resembled the cart I saw then. On the next morning I heard of Mr. Johnson's house being broken open.

Q. Do you think the prisoner is the same person that you saw that night - A. I cannot swear to him.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel; called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130407-102

446. EDWARD JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of March , two silver gravy spoons, value 32 s. a silver table spoon, value 1 l. the property of the Reverend William Cloyne , bishop of Cloyne, in Ireland , in his dwelling-house .

GEORGE COTTLE . I am butler to his lordship the bishop of Cloyne; his house is No. 11, Montague-square, in the parish of Marybone . On the 9th of March, I was in the servants hall, busy, about a quarter before twelve, in the middle of the day. I heard the plates rattle in my pantry. I halloaed out, who is it in the pantry. I spoke loud enough for the prisoner to hear. Nobody answered. I ran to see who was in the pantry. He got to the side door, and in the passage, before I got to the area door, I heard the silver rattle. I ran up the area steps. I ran over two large gravy-spoons that had fallen from the prisoner.

Q. Did you see them fall - A. No, I did not. They were on the area steps. I saw one spoon fall from one step to the other. I pursued the prisoner; he ran very fast indeed. He had got about forty yards when I overtook him. I collared him, and took him to Marybone watchhouse.

Q. What did he say for himself when you laid hold of him - A. He said it was through want. I never lost sight of him from the area steps until I collared him.

JOHN PEARSON . I am an officer. I produce the spoons. I took this table spoon out of his pocket, and these are the two gravy spoons.

Cottle. They are the bishop's spoons.

Prisoner's Defence. I throw myself on the mercy of the court.

GUILTY, aged 39,

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130407-103

447. MARTHA GRAY and EMILY STONE were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2nd of April , four pair of silk stockings, value 3 l. the property of Samuel Bannister , privately in his shop .

SAMUEL BANNISTER . I live at 27, Middle-row, Holborn . I am a hosier . On Friday, the 2d of this month, about half past six in the evening, the two prisoners came into my shop, and asked to look at some black silk stockings. My young man shewed them several parcels; they had come for three following days for black silk stockings; I had suspicion. I gave the young man two fresh dozens of silk hose, that I might know what was in them; the price that we charged for the stockings was eleven shillings, and twelve shillings. I went to Stone; she said, I will take this pair; and in rolling the parcel up, there was two pair missing. The eleven shillings stockings were marked with two diamonds at the top; the twelve shilling were all marked with four diamonds at the top. Gray said she would take a pair of them; she did, and paid for them. I missed two pair out of that parcel. On the next morning I went to Hancock the officer; I gave him the address of the prisoners; about an hour after that, Hancock sent up for somebody to identify the prisoners; my young man went. The officer found part of the property.

JOHN HANCOCK . These pair of stockings the prosecutor owned to be his property. I received them of Herbert.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130407-104

448. JOSEPH SMITH was indicted, for that he, on the 20th of February , upon John Taylor , a subject of our Lord the King, unlawfully did make an assault, and with a certain sharp instrument, did cut and stab the said John Taylor in and upon the left side of his belly, with intention to do him some grievous bodily harm .

JOHN TAYLOR . I am a navigator . I work for Mr. Batts.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. Yes, he is a labouring man at Feltham; I have known him some years.

Q. Was there any quarrel between you before this matter happened - A. No quarral at all; he told me he owed me an old grudge. This happened on the 20th of February, about ten o'clock in the evening.

Q. Had you seen him before that time on that day - A. He was drinking at the public-house. I had been his company. About ten o'clock I came out of the public-house, to go to my home; I had been drinking with my father, my father and I drank about six or seven pints between us. I was quite sober, as I am now. The prisoner was in the public-house at the same time. I never spoke a word to him. I separated from my father; as soon as I came out of the public-house, I bid him good night, and he bid me good night; I was going home; this public-house, the Red Lion was about a quarter of a mile from my home. The prisoner was outside of the door of the public-house, before I got out, he was quarreling with another man, and in my way home, the prisoner overtook me; he pushed me out of the road with his elbow. I told him to be quiet, I did not want any words with him. Then he got before me, and stabbed me. He said, d - n your eyes, I owe you an old grudge, and I will pay you before I go. I looked up at him, and said will you? He said, d - n my eyes if I do not. I went to put my beer down; he stabbed the knife into me immediately, and when I had set my beer down he stabbed this left side of me. I did not then know that he had a knife in his hand. I can shew the wound now; it went through all my clothes. He said, come on. I said, you have done my business. When he said, come on, he had the knife drawn, stretching his arm out. I begged of him to let me go; I did not think I should live until I went home. I told him he had done my business. He said, if he had got his hedge bill he would cut my head off. Then he went along to his own gate. I followed behind him. My house is further than his. He stopped at his own gate. I said, are you not a pretty fellow; you have been falling out with other people. He said, if he had his hatched out of the house he would strike me dead.

Q. Do you think he was intoxicated - A. I am sure he was not. I got home without receiving any further injury from him. The blood flowed very fast from the wound; I found myself very weak. I

ed by for three weeks. I dropped down as soon as I got in doors. The doctor was sent for. I kept my bed for a fortnight. The surgeon is not here. He said it was within an hairs breadth of my life. The prisoner in the public-house had some words with my father. He accused my mother of taking a bundle of wood; my father took my mother's part.

Prisoner. Did not you strike me as I was eating my bread and cheese going along - A. No, I did not.

MARY ALDERS . I live at Feltham. I am a married woman. My husband is in the 2d Surry militia. I was in bed when I heard a great noise. I live over the prisoner, in the upper part of the house. I got up. I saw Joseph Smith and Taylor together. I heard Joseph say that John Taylor gave him a smack of the head first. I could not understand what Taylor said; he spoke faint. Smith said, if he had his little hatchet he would cut his head off, and he swore he would kill him if he could.

Q. Had you and Smith been upon good terms - A. I have had words with him since this happened, and I went before the magistrate last Saturday.

Prisoner's Defence. In the first place, the bundle of wood was taken from the door, and then, in the next place, they said that I should say that John Taylor 's mother had it. I said no such thing. John Taylor called me a rascal. I told him I never said such a thing of his mother. I went out of doors to go home. John Taylor went out at the same time. John Horley threatened to beat me. They all leaned of the same side. Horley struck me twice. I told him I did not want to fight. John Taylor put his pint of beer down to second Horley; then I went home, and John Taylor along with me. I told Taylor he was no neighbour to set another man to beat me, for that which I knew nothing about. He then struck me, and said he would lick me himself. I was eating bread and cheese. Taylor ran up against me. I had the knife in my hand; he said I had cut him. I said it served him right; he might keep his great fist to himself. We walked home together. He asked me to bring out the light to see whether he was cut or not. I told him I would not; he might have kept his fist to himself, he had no business to strike me, and then I went in doors.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130407-105

449. JOHN WILSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of November , twenty-five box locks, value 32 s. and eight desk locks, value 13 s. the property of Charles Bond and Charles Woodward . privately in their shop .

CHARLES BOND. I am an ironmonger , 44, Old Compton-street, Soho . On the 18th of November the prisoner came to my shop; I am sure of his person. He asked for a quarter of a pound of iron wire; that would be three-pence. I told him I would serve him directly. I was serving a customer at the time, and another was waiting. I left him at the counter. He was of one side, and I the other. There is a recess on the counter, about a foot high. There is some holes in that recess with locks in these holes. They were within reach of where he stood. I gave the drawer to the customer. I was first serving for him to take an article out. He asked me to get a handle to it. I went to get an handle to it, and then I went to the vice, to put the handle on. Mr. Read told me the prisoner had taken something. I asked the prisoner if he had got any thing of mine. He said, no. I observed his pocket bulky. I put my hand down, and felt something hard. I told him I insisted on seeing what was in his pockets. He pulled a paper parcel out of his pocket, and put it on the counter. I took the goods, and said, is not that my private mark. That parcel contained box locks. I told him, I thought that was not all. He pulled out another paper that contained box locks. He afterwards took out two more papers. Three of the papers contained twenty-five box locks and one paper of desk locks.

DAVID READ . I am a carpenter. On this day I was in Mr. Bond's shop. I saw the prisoner there. There is a place on all ironmongers counters, which we call pigeon-holes. I was at that place; I saw the prisoner take three papers out of the pigeon-holes, and put them in his pocket. I and Mr. Bond challanged him with it. He took the papers out of his pocket, and tried to shove them in the pigeon-holes. I did not see him take the fourth.

CHARLES DAWSON . I am a servant to Mr. Bond and Woodward.

Q. Was there any other person in the shop except Mr. Bond and yourself - A. No. I came into the shop; the prisoner had a little bit of wire in his hand. He asked me to serve him. I got a bundle down that was not exact the size. I was going to get another bundle down, and Mr. Read challenged him with a paper parcel.

Q. Did you see him move towards the pigeon-holes - A. While I was serving him he had his hand over the place. I did not see him move his hand into the pigeon-holes. I afterwards saw the papers taken out of his pocket. I am quite sure they are my master's property.

GUILTY, aged 57,

Of stealing, but not privately .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130407-106

450. JOHN WILSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of March , twenty seven box locks, value 12 s. 6 d. and thirteen drawer locks, value 7 s. 6 d. the property of Charles Bond and Charles Woodward , privately in their shop .

CHARLES WOODWARD . On the 12th of March I and Dawson were serving in the shop.

Q. Did you serve him - A. No. Between five and six o'clock I was called into the shop, saying, they had detected the same man that had been there before, taking something. They had taken several parcels out of his pocket before I got into the shop. He was stopped at that time. He was in the shop when I first saw him. I saw him take out of his pocket a paper parcel; that paper contained drawer locks. That is all I know of it.

CHARLES DAWSON . Q. You are servant to these gentlemen - A. Yes. I saw the prisoner come into the shop. I knew his face perfectly well, but I did not recollect that he was the man that was stopped before. I was the only person in the shop at that

time he asked for two sheets of glass paper. I had to kneel down behind the counter to get it. He was exactly in the same place he was before, with his arm upon the pigeon-holes; then he asked for a file handle, for which I had to go round the counter to get it, the glass paper was two pence, and the file handle; one penny. I went round to serve him the handle. I thought he jumped up to the counter very quick, which gave me suspicion. He gave me a shilling to pay for the glass paper, and the file handle, he laid out three pence. I went to the bottom of the shop to call the porter, as I had no halfpence to give change. The prisoner gave me the shilling; the porter went out to get change, and brought it back for a bad one. He gave him an eighteen-penny piece, for which he got change. The prisoner then pulled out a watch; he said the evenings drew in. I gave him the change, when the porter came in, and when the prisoner went out, I observed him stopping about the door; he did not go away. I looked round, and I missed one paper of locks from the pigeon-holes. I ran out of the shop: I saw him about three or for doors further on. I laid hold of his arm: I said, my friend I believe you have some paper parcels in your pocket, belonging to our shop. At the time I was speaking to him the mouth of his pocket was open. I saw the paper parcels in his pocket; he did not speak a word; he came back to the shop again with me, and when he was brought back to the shop he pulled out two paper parcels, and throwed them on the counter. I picked them up directly; they contained box-locks. These paper parcels have my masters private mark upon them; in another minute he pulled out another paper parcel, and after that Mr. Woodward came in, and at that time he pulled out another.

Q. Now, what did the four parcels contain - A. Box-locks, and desk-locks. They were counted at the office; the watchhouse keeper had them; he is not here; he is so ill he cannot get out of bed.

Mr. Woodward. The watchhouse keeper had them till Thursday morning, and when I received them of him I received the same paper parcels that were delivered to him. I produce them; there is twenty-seven box-locks.

Q. What would they cost you - A. Nineteen shillings.

Q. You have laid them at twelve and sixpence - A. And thirteen drawer-locks; they would cost seven shillings to sell again.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been drinking that day. I was in a state of intoxication. I did not know what I was about.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 57.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130407-107

451. GEORGE BATEMAN was indicted fo feloniously stealing, on the 5th of March , fifty-two yards of linen cloth, value 6 l. the property of John Patrick in his dwelling-house .

JOHN PATRICK . My house is 4, Upper-street, Islington , I am a linen draper , and rent the whole house. On Friday the 5th of March, between one and two o'clock, Mrs. Patrick thought she heard somebody in the shop; she went into the shop, and seeing nobody in the shop, she went to the door, and saw a man going along; she said we had been robbed. I went to the door, saw the prisoner. I pursued him, and cried stop thief; as soon as he heard my voice, he dropped the clothes; I picked them up. They are mine.

Q.Who was the person that dropped them - A. That I will not swear to. After I picked up the cloth, the prisoner got out of my sight.

WILLIAM LACK . I am a headborough. I heard the cry of stop thief; I pursued the prisoner, and took him in a cow-layer. I asked him how he came to take the cloth; he said he took no cloth, he came there to get some milk. Mr. Patrick same up, and charged him with stealing the cloth; the prisoner denied it.

The prisoner called three witnesses who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130407-108

452. THOMAS WHITTAKER and THOMAS COLE were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of April , four pounds weight of flour, value 2 s. the property of Sir William Curtis , bart. Richard Henry Clark , and Charles Curtis .

JOHN FORD . I am in the service of Messrs. Curtis and Company; they are biscuit bakers and flour merchants , at Wapping .

Q. What are the names of the partners in the firm - A. Sir William Curtis , bart. Richard Henry Clark , and Charles Curtis .

Q. Prior to the 3d of April, had you missed any quantity of flour - A. Not me, Mr. Curtis had. I concealed myself in the accompting-house; the window in that accompting-house commanded a view of the sack, and nine other sacks; that sack in particular. The two prisoners were in the employ of Messrs. Curtis; Whittaker was a furner; he stands at the mouth of the oven, and throws the biscuits in. Cole, the boy, is called a parting boy, to part the biscuits, for the furner; he is an assistant to the furner; they work a great part of the night usually, and when they have got a certain quantity, they carry the biscuits up into the warehouse.

Q. Does the place where you were command a view of the place where the biscuits were deposited - A. He must pass me. I saw him come up about a quarter before twelve, on Saturday night, bringing up each, what we call a cotchet of biscuits. Whittaker had a candle in his hand; they went to the left, and shot the biscuits out of their bags, but instead of going down stairs proceeded to a sack of flour.

Q. Was that a sack of flour, in which they had any lawful business - A. No, it was not the flour that we use for biscuits, it was fine flour, kiln dried; what we use for biscuits, is called middling; that is in a bin; it pours down a hole into the trough where they knead; another man kneads the flour, and the boy's business is to divide the biscuits to the furner, that chucks them into the oven. There are three men and a boy in every gang.

COURT. Out of them four, one kneads it into the trough, two mould it, then it gets to the furner, and

goes into the oven - A. Yes. When they were at the sack of flour, I saw Whittaker hold the candle while the boy, Cole, took out the flour; they came towards the accompting-house, in a manner that made us think they were alarmed, and thought they were discovered. Whittaker came to the accompting-house with the candle towards the window, to look in; I and Mr. Curtis drew back; we could see the candle not the man; after he had looked he went to the sack again; at that moment Mr. Curtis raised his head, and prevented me seeing what they did, but I saw them at the sack long enough to take some more flour; they then went down stairs and left this sack.

Q. Where did they put the flour that they took out of the sack - A. I thought it was a bag, but it proved to be the boy's apron, which had been part of an old sack; they took it down stairs with them. I and Mr. Curtis came out of our hiding place, and went after them. and when they had got down in the bake-house, Mr. Curtis asked them where the bag of flour was, that they had brought down; they pointed to some empty bags, and said, there: the flour was not there; the flour was on a table behind one of the men, in the boy's apron.

Q. What was the quantity - A. A little better than three pound and a half; it was fine kiln dried flour exactly the same as was in the sack that they had taken it from. Mr. Curtis expressed his indignation to him; Whittaker said it was only a little flour he had taken to make a cake for his tea.

Q. I believe, besides wages, allowance is made to each of the men for bread money - A. Yes, three halfpence per day.

JOHN SMITH . I am an officer. I was sent for, and the flour was given to me. I produce it.

MR. CURTIS. It is kiln dried flour; it is put on board of ships, for long voyages; it will keep a great length of time.

CHARLES CURTIS . Q. You, with the last witness, was watching - A. I was; I saw the boy take the flour, and the old man held the bag. I went down stairs and brought the flour up. Whittaker said it was only a triffing thing, if I would not take him in custody he would pay me for it. I said I certainly would not do that; he must go to the police-office, and I was certain it was not the first time that we had been robbed; he had been at the sack before. He declared it was only took to make a cake.

Q. Was that the sort of flour that he would take to make a cake of - A. He had no business with that flour at all; he had no business to take any flour to make a cake to eat; they all are allowed three halfpence a day bread money, besides their wages.

Q. Had you weighed the sack - A. The sack was weighed about three nights previous; we found the deficiency to be forty-seven pounds weight and a half of flour.

COURT. Forty-seven pounds weight and a half. Do you permit your men to take what flour they please, and make what bread they please - A.Certainly not. The door was not locked that night.

Whittaker's Defence. I worked fifty-three years for Mr. Curtis, and his grandfather; I never robbed them of one penny. I only took a bit of flour to make a cake. In the night locked up as we were, I told Mr. Curtis I only took it to make a cake. I had no intention of taking it away, not any thing of the kind; they never knew anything but honesty of me in my life.

Cole said nothing in his defence.

WHITTAKER, GUILTY .

Confined Two Years in the House of Correction,

COLE, GUILTY.

Judgment respited .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130407-109

453. WILLIAM SMITH and JAMES BARMBRIDGE were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of February , two tables, value 12 l. the property of Henry Phillips , And BENJAMIN LAWRANCE for feloniously receiving the said goods, he knowing them to have been stolen .

WILLIAM HUGGINS: I keep a horse and cart, and remove things for people that employ me. I live in Green's-court. About the 5th of February, the prisoner Smith came to me to hire my horse and cart, to move some goods; he told me to come to Hanover-square. I put the horse in the cart, and went to Hanover-square, between five and six in the evening. I stood up close to the rails of the square. Reeve came and brought me three tables, and I put them in the cart, and told me to go on. On the next day I went with my cart to the same place. Reeves brought me a card table, and a pembroke table; Reeves told me to take them to my house until the next day, and then he would send Mr. Lawrence for them. Lawrence came to me about four o'clock in the afternoon, and told me to bring the two tables to his house; and when I took the tables to his house, I met Smith by the Marsh gate. Reeves helped me to load the cart. Smith was not there at all.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130407-110

454. MARY DAVIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of March , twenty-five yards of bombazeen, value 3 l. one hundred and eighty-three yards of silk, value 38 l. 15 s. 3 d. seven yards of muslin, value 10 s. twenty-one yards of gauze, value 2 l. 9 s seven yards of shambray, value 4 s. 8 s. two yards and a half of silver tissue, value 10 s. 3 d. the property of Anselm Shears and Edward Layton , in their dwelling-house .

ANSELM SHEARS . I am a silk mercer ; I live in Henrietta-street, Covent Garden . The prisoner was our servant ; she lived with us about ten months. On Friday the 15th of March, I received private information that there were some silks in the possession of Mr. Dover, No. 26, St. John-street, Clerkenwell. I went to Bow-street office, got a search warrant, and went, accompanied with two officers, Mantz, and Donaldson, to No. 26, St. John-street; and in a closet in the garret we found some goods, which we have here, my property. We took the goods away with us. I produce them. Here are a variety of lengths of silk cut off.

MR. DONALDSON. I and Mantz took the prisoner

in custody. In the prisoner's box we found a silk handkerchief, and a towel, belonging to Mr. Shears. I asked her if she had not left some things at a place. She denied it. I then said, suppose we go to No. 26, St. John-street. She then said, send for my master, Mr. Layton, and I will tell you all about it. She told Mr. Layton that the other servant girl that had gone off, had taken as much as her. Mr. Layton, thought the prisoner had brought the other into it. Mr. Layton got the magistrate to discharge her, as I found a small portion upon her.

THOMAS MANTZ . I am an officer. I found a picklock key in the prisoner's pocket.

ELIZABETH DOVER . I live at No. 26, St. John-street. I have known the prisoner some years. This box was brought to me three or four months ago. I never saw the contents of it; it was not locked; it was nailed down. These are the things that she brought.

Mr. Shears. All the things that are in the indictment are here.

Q. Is there any one article that is worth more than forty shillings - A. Yes.

Prisoner's Defence. I want my wages. I have nothing to say to this charge.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 33.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130407-111

455 JOHN NORTHALL , WILLIAM BROWN , and THOMAS WHEELER , were indicted for feloniously making an assault upon John Newman , in the King's highway, on the 25th of March , putting him in fear, and feloniously taking from his person and against his will, two seals, value 56 s. a watch-key, value 5 s. and a watch-chain, value 5 s. his property.

JOHN NEWMAN . On the 25th of March, between ten and eleven o'clock at night, I was stopped by two men, as I was walking down Nightingale-lane .

Q. Now, which of the men stopped you, look at the bar - A. Brown and Wheeler; they said nothing to me, but pushed me against the wall; I looked in their faces, and said, gentlemen, I beg your pardon, let me pass. Northall then came; he laid hold of my watch and seals, and pulled it out with a jirk, and at the same time I received a blow under my right eye. I laid hold of Northall, and holloaed out murder, and thieves. One of them knocked me down. I think I received the first blow from Wheeler, and the second blow from Brown. They knocked me down, and pushed me about in the middle of the road; they gave me several hard blows upon my right arm, and told me to make no noise. I was obliged to let Northall go on account of the hard blows on my arm. Then Northall began to run, and I followed him; he ran into Swan-street, from there to Butcher-row; there is a place called Mountsgate-cooperage; he ran down there, there is no thoroughfare; the gates are shut up. He was there apprehended; he hid himself in a corner close to the gate he was taken by me; and William Knowles ; we brought him to the watchhouse.

Q. What became of the other prisoners - A. The other two ran away. At the watchhouse, I described what men they were. The patrol and William Knowles went out and brought in Brown and Wheeler, and immediately they came in, I knew they were the same people. I never lost sight of Northall. It was a star-light night.

CHARLES KNOWLES . On the night mentioned, I was passing through Swan-street; I heard a voice call out murder, and stop thief; I heard somebody running behind me, which proved to be afterwards the prisoner Northall. Mr. Newman came up without a hat, calling out stop thief; Mr. Newman and I was partly together; we continued the pursuit. The prisoner ran up Swan-street, turned round to the right, up East Smithfield; then he ran up Mount's-gateway, and put himself close into the corner, where the gate opens. Mr. Newman, and I seized the prisoner, and conveyed him to the watchhouse. I assisted in bringing in the other two prisoners.

Q. How did you find the others - A. When Mr. Newman got into the watchhouse, and Northall secured, he then gave a description of the other two prisoners. The two patrols, Lane and Brown, assisted in taking the prisoners into the watchhouse. Brown the patrol, came into the watchhouse; he informed us, that he had seen two men pass by, and seeing them apparently to be agitated; he followed them into the Seven Stars, in Swan-street. Brown the patrol did. That is what he told us, and in consequence of information given by Mr. Newman, we went in pursuit of the other two prisoners; we went and found them in the Seven Stars; the two patrols took hold of the two men, and we conducted them to the watchhouse. The prosecutor saw them when they were brought in, and said they were the men that assisted in knocking him down. After they was were secured, we got a candle and went to where he knocked down; first we found the stick laying in the mud; his hat was brought by a woman, and on the spot where we found Northall, Lane the patrol picked up the gold seals; I saw that. I was by the side of the patrol.

JOHN BROWN. I am a patrol. When first I heard of the robbery, I went to the spot. I saw the two prisoners, Brown and Wheeler, go into the Seven Stars public-house. I followed them in; I noticed their persons, and their dress. I then went to the watchhouse; Mr. Newman informed me, that he had been robbed by three or four persons; one he had got in the watchhouse. I then asked him whether he could describe to me any of the other parties. He told me, one was as tall as himself, the other was a shorter one. I told him I believed I could fetch them up. Accordingly Mr. Knowles, and a gentlemen, that had been hustled in Nightingale-lane, accompanied Lane and me to the Seven Stars. I asked the two gentlemen to point out any men in the room that they had any knowledge of; they pointed out Brown and Wheeler. I then with the assistance of Lane, took them to Mr. Newman, and he immediately, upon seeing them, said they were the men that assisted in robbing him. The prisoner said nothing to that.

WILLIAM LANE . I am a patrol. On the 25th of March, between ten and eleven in the evening, I was going my round; I heard the cry of murder,

and stop thief. I directly ran to where the cry was. Mr. Newman and Knowles had just then taken Northall into the watchhouse. I followed them into the watchhouse. We searched Northall; nothing was was found on him. After that I went with Brown, and brought up Brown and Wheeler to the watch-house; and after we had secured the whole three, we went down to Mount's-gateway. I found two gold seals, a gold key, and a metal chain. I shewed them to Mr. Newman; he said they where his. I produce them.

Prosecutor. They are mine.

Northall's Defence. It is no use my saying anything, they are swearing away my life as fast as they can.

Brown's Defence. I work for Mr. Brand, Dock-head; I had left my work. This young man came to see me; we went over the water together; we stepped into a public-house, the sign of the Spread Eagle; there we stopped together from half after eight till eleven, and then I asked him whether he was willing to go home, and on our return home we called at another public-house to have a pint of beer, there the watchman came in and took us. I am as innocent as a child unborn, so you may do as you please with me; if you hang me tomorrow, I care not.

Wheeler's Defence. On Thursday I went to see this young man at Dock-head; I stopped there until he came from work. We crossed the water, and went to the Spread Eagle to have a pint of beer. We stopped there from half after eight to eleven. In our way home we called in the Seven Stars. We had not been there five minutes before the patrols took us.

NORTHALL, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 23.

BROWN, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 25.

WHEELER, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 21.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130407-112

456. JOHN JOHNSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of March , a pair of boots, value 12 s. the property of Michael Morris , privately in his shop .

ANDREW MAHON . I am servant to Michael Morris , shoemaker , Middle-row, St. Giles's . On the 8th of March, between eight and nine in the evening, the prisoner came into the shop, took a pair of boots out of the window and ran out with them. I ran after; him and catched him; he dropped the boots within five or six yards of the shop; he was stopped by another man.

THOMAS GRIFFITHS . On the 8th of March, I was passing the end of Monmouth-street. I saw the prisoner and Mahon scuffling Mahon cried out watch the prisoner ran off; I pursued him, and deliver him to the patrol. The next door neighbour delivered the boots to me.

JOHN BROAD . I am a patrol. On the 8th of March, I was on duty. I heard the cry of stop thief. The boots were picked up in the street, and carried back to the shop. Mr. Griffiths delivered the prisoner to me.

Mahon. These are the boots. I am sure they are my masters property.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming by the shop at the time this man accused me; he holloaed out stop thief, and run after me.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130407-113

457. PRISCILLA TURPIE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of December , twenty yards of black lustre, value 2 l. the property of John Lively , privately in his shop .

JOHN LIVELY . I am a linen draper , No. 1, Finsbury-place . On Friday the 11th of December between the hours of five and seven, the prisoner came to my shop; she asked to look at some lace, at which time my shopman, Martin, was shewing some lustre, among which was a piece upon a roller containing twenty-two yards black. She had a child with her, which she put on the counter near to where the lustre was. She paid for the lace which she purchased, and some time after she left the shop, I missed the lustre in question; my suspicion fell on the prisoner. I went to the different pawnbrokers in the neighbourhood, giving the description of the prisoner; I went to Mr. Attenborough of Crown-street. He informed me that a woman answering the description had pawned ten yards of black lustre the preceding evening, and there were ten yards pawned at another shop, by another woman, answering another description. I asked him to let me see it, and when I saw it, I had no doubt it was mine. I lost twenty yards; he had ten. I desired him to detain the prisoner when she came to the shop again. She was detained on the 17th of February, by Mr. Attenborough.

SAMUEL MARTIN . I am shopman to Mr. Lively. I recollect the prisoner coming to the shop, and purchasing some lace: on Friday the 11th of December. I recollect the lustre was at the same place where the prisoner was standing. She dropped the child's shoe, stooped down to pick the child's shoe up, paid for the lace, and went out of the shop. I did not miss the lustre. I saw no more of her, until Mr. Attenborough sent, and said, the person that pawned the lustre, was there. That was on the 17th of February. I had seen the lustre five minutes before the prisoner came in; I had been shewing it a customer.

RICHARD ATTENBOROGH . I am a pawnbroker, No. 1, Crown-street, Finsbury-square. On Friday, the 11th of December, in the evening, to the best of my recollection between six and eight, the prisoner pledged with me ten yards of lustre, a remnant of cotton, and a pocket handkerchief. Mr. Lively called the next morning; the lustre was shewn him; he said, he believed it to be his property, and wished me to stop the party that pledged it, if they came again. On the 17th of February, the prisoner came to my shop again. I sent for Mr. Lively, and Samuel Martin came. I am certain she is the same person that pledged the lustre with me.

DANIEL BISHOP . I am an officer. I went to Mr. Attenborough. I took the prisoner in custody. I searched her apartment, No. 49, Paul-street, Finsbury-square. I there found a number of duplicates

in a pocket-book. One of the duplicates is for a piece of lustre, ten yards, pledged on the 14th of December, at Sadler and Mount's, 134, Bishopsgate-street, in the name of Mary Smith , Paul-street. The prisoner acknowledged it to be her pocketbook.

Q. to Seward. Is that your duplicate - A. It is.

Prosecutor. I have no doubt of their being my property. It was all in one piece when I lost it.

Prisoner's Defence. A woman of the name of Jones gave me these duplicates to keep for her. That ticket might belong to her.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 43.

[The prisoner was recommended to mercy by the Jury and the prosecutor on account of her family.]

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130407-114

458. WILLIAM SMITH was indicted for feloniously making an assault upon Alexander Smith , in the King's Highway, on the 4th of April , and taking from his person, a watch, value 40 s. a watch chain, value 2 s. and a watch key, value 6 d. his property.

ALEXANDER SMITH . I am a cabinet maker . I live at 22, Pitt-street, Tottenham-court-road. On the night of the 4th of April, four men came up to me, and began to shove me with their elbows, jostling me from one side to the other. They pulled my watch out of my pocket.

Q. Did they strike you at all - A. No, they did not. I was in company with two young men; they went away. I was following them. They came up to me, and said, these two gentleman wanted to insult you. I said, they did not want to insult me. They then hustled me about from one side to the other, and one of them took my watch from me. I immediately seized the man that took my watch from me, and I saw him give it into the prisoner's hand. It was not the prisoner that took my watch. I ran after the prisoner, and cried, stop thief. The prisoner ran up Oxford-road. I ran until I was stopped by a young man that picked up the case of a watch. I I lost sight of the prisoner. I have seen the watch since.

- HALL. I am clerk to Mr. Shuter, a barrister. On this night I was coming down Oxford-road; I heard the cry of stop thief. I perceived two people running very hard towards me. I stepped of oneside, and let the headmost one pass me. That was the prisoner. I turned, and ran after him. After getting the distance of seven or eight houses I perceived him put his hand down his right side, and threw something down the railing of an ironmongers shop; it ran on the pavement. The witness, Lewellin, who was running after him, turned back. I still continued after him, and seeing the prisoner was going to run up Hanway-yard, I seized him. A watchman came up. I led him to the spot where I saw him throw this something down. I still held him. Lewellin then shewed me the case of a watch. We knocked at the ironmonger's shop door. The prosecutor went down to see if they could find the watch in the area. I was standing outside, I saw Lewellin pick the watch up through the iron bars. The prisoner was then taken to the watchhouse.

WILLIAM LEWELLIN . I am a tailor. On Sunday night, the 4th of April, I heard the cry of stop thief, about eleven o'clock. I ran to the middle of the road. I observed a man coming as hard as he could run. He turned to Oxford-road. I ran after him, and about four yards in Oxford-road he fell down. He very soon got up, and run on. I ran after him until he got to the founders; I was then within a yard of him. I observed him put his hand in his pocket, take out the watch, and throw it down the area. I picked up the case. I pursued him, and I saw him stopped by Mr. Hall. I returned back to where I picked up the case. The watchman rang the bell. The watchman, I, and the prosecutor, went down. I found the watch in the cellar.

- NEWBURY. I am a constable. I took the prisoner into custody. The watch and case were given to me. I produce it.

Prosecutor. It is my watch.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY.

Of stealing, but not with violence .

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130407-115

459. WILLIAM GEORGE , JOHN JONES , and SAMUEL WEAVER , were indicted for feloniously making an assault upon William Raper , on the 18th of March , and taking from his person a watch, value 1 l. and a gold seal, value 15 s. the property of Lewis Goldsmith , esq.

WILLIAM RAPER . On the 18th of March, I was servant to Mr. Goldsmith; he lives in Bennet-street, Charlotte-street, Fitzroy-square. About nine o'clock at night I went with my mistress to a party in Brunswick-square. I was ordered to fetch her at four o'clock in the morning, and to take two coaches with me. I came back before ten o'clock, and just before eleven I went out. I thought if I went to bed I should not get up at the time. I went to the public-house the corner of Bennet-street . I went there to hear William George sing, as I had heard him sing before. I went into the tap-room where he was sitting, and several persons. I had a pint of porter; I drank it, and about twelve o'clock I had another pint. William George took the pot and drank out of it. After that, another young man paid for another pint. In about a quarter of an hour the lamp was put out, and then the candle on the other side of the room. They were the only lights in the room. I then felt four or six hands about my mouth and my pocket, as if to keep me from making a noise, and in an instant I felt the watch go from my fob. I called out to the landlord, whose name is Lancaster, not to let them out. The door was open, and they all went out, as far as I know. The landlord was at the door. I went out, and my hat was left in the room by some means of other. I called for my hat. The landlord went into the taproom; he throwed my hat out of the window.

Q. Did you ever get your watch again - A. I did. I went as far as the corner of Goudge-street, there a person of genteel appearance asked me what was the matter. He asked me if I

would come to Marlborough-street in the morning, and get a warrant, and he would put the warrant into execution. I went further; I met another man; he said, have you lost a watch. I said I had. He said, if I would meet him at the corner of Blenheim-street by seven o'clock in the morning, and a little further on I met Jones. He said, if I would come at seven o'clock in the morning I should have the watch. In the morning I went and met the man at the corner of Blenheim-street; he asked me for a guinea; I gave him a pound note and a shilling. He gave me the watch, but not the seal. He said somebody else was concerned in it; he had the seal. This is the watch; it is my master's watch.

Q. Were you sober - A. I was perfectly sober.

Q. Did you ever see George, Jones, or Weaver, have your watch - A. No; they were in the room at the time I lost the watch, and Jones put out the lights.

Q. How many persons were there in the room - A. Fourteen or sixteen persons.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130407-116

460. ELIZABETH RANDALL was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of David Smith , about the hour of five in the afternoon, on the 25th of February , and stealing therein, two yards of carpet, value 3 s. and a rug, value 2 s. his property.

ELIZABETH SMITH. I am the wife of David Smith . I live at 17, Chapel-street, St. George's in the East . On the 25th of March, I was sitting at my tea, I heard the kitchen door unbolt. I thought it was some of the lodgers; I afterwards found it was not. I saw the prisoner go through the passage; I thought she had taken something. I ran after her, caught her, and asked her what she had got. She said, nothing. I said, I know you have got something, and in a few minutes she dropped a carpet and a rug from under her arm. I picked up the property. She denied having taken them. I saw them drop from her. It is my rug and carpet. These are them.

Prisoner's Defence. I was not in her house, nor do I know anything of the carpet.

GUILTY, aged 49,

Of stealing, but not of breaking and entering .

Confined Two Years in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130407-117

461. SARAH PANNETT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of March , a watch, value 3 l. the property of Thomas Hale , in his dwelling-house .

SARAH HALE . On the 5th of March, the prisoner came in for five-penny worth of meat. I cut it her. She then asked me to cut her another five-pennyworth; she had a friend waiting outside; she would go and call her in, and as soon as she was gone from my house I missed my watch from off the mantle-shelf. We pursued her into the next street. She came back with me, and asked me what I wanted. I told her that she had taken my watch from off the mantle-shelf. My husband went for an officer, and before the officer came she delivered me the watch.

Q. Do you know any thing of her - A. No. I never saw her before.

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw the watch before the prosecutrix opened a cupboard and put it on the table. The officer took it off the table.

GUILTY, aged 27.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130407-118

462. ANNE BROWN , alias MULLEIME , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of March , five silk handkerchiefs, value 15 s. and four pair of silk stockings, value 3 l. the property of James Allen , privately in his shop .

MARY STALLARD . I am a servant to Mr. James len, mercer, draper, and hosier , 25, Cranbourne-street, Leicester-square . On the 8th of March, in the afternoon, when I first saw the prisoner in the shop, I saw her put something into her pocket-hole; it was something black. The young man was gone to the other end of the shop to fetch her some coloured silk handkerchiefs to look at. When the young man came back she asked to look at some black silk stockings. I fetched her some. She said they were not good enough. The young man went out, and fetched two parcels; they were not good enough. She desired him to go out and fetch her some better. She took one pair of black silk stockings, and put them under her handkerchief. She said, they were not good enough; she sent him out again. She then took another pair. She sent him to get some white silk handkerchiefs, and while he was gone she took the silk handkerchiefs from under her arm, and put them in her pocket. She looked out what she intended to purchase, and desired him to send them to to No. 17, Glasses-street, Piccadilly. She went out of the shop. I went after her. I asked her to walk back; there was something of a mistake. She said she would not. I told her she must. I brought her into the shop. I was going to take them from her. Mr. Allen said, I must not search her; I must send for a constable. Oh, no, said she, I will give you what I have got. She dropped four pair of silk stockings, and five black silk handkerchiefs. These are the stockings and handkerchiefs. They are the property of Mr. Allen.

Prisoner's Defence. I am totally innocent of taking them things.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY, aged 24,

Of stealing, but not privately in the shop .

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130407-119

463. WILLIAM QUICK was indicted for feloniously making an assault, on the 3d of April , in the King's highway, upon John Cogan , putting him in fear and feloniously taking from his per against his will, six three-shilling bank token and a box rule, value 8 s. his property.

JOHN COGAN . I am a journeyman carpenter . I

work for Mr. Copeland. I live at No. 1, Charles-street, Drury-lane.

Q. Were you robbed at any time - A. Yes, on the 4th of April, about one o'clock in the morning, as I was coming home. I was paid about eight o'clock, at the accompting-house. I boarded at a public-house all the week by Westminster Abbey. I went there to pay my reckoning. I was coming from that public-house. It was a light night. It was in Charles-street, Drury-lane , where I was assaulted. Just about the middle of Charles-street I met with William Quick and John Williams , at a public-house door. They stopped me, and asked me, would I have any gin. I said it was rather late. I wanted to go home to my lodging; if it had been earlier I would have no objection. Quick caught me by the right shoulder, and Williams by the left. They brought me into the Coach and Horses yard, from the public-house door; there was a light in the public-house, but the door was shut.

Q. How far is it from the public-house door to the Coach and Horses yard - A.About twelve yards.

Q. How could they drag you twelve yards. Did you resist - A. I did.

Q. You had an opportunity to cry out, had not you. Did you know them - A. They were quite strangers.

Q. Is that the way they do in your country, because it is an odd way in this country. Did you strike either of them - A. No.

Q. You were after consenting to their getting you there - A. No, not in the least, I assure you.

Q. You passed the watch box, did not you - A.No. William Quick gave me a dig, and tripped up my heels, and knocked me flat on my back. I came to the ground. He catched hold of me by the handkerchief, clapped his hand upon my mouth, and as I shifted my head to call out he shifted his hand, and when he got his hand upon my mouth, John Williams bound my knees. He put his head upon my belly. I had thirty-six shillings in my pocket. He took away from my pocket a two foot rule, and six three-shilling bank tokens. Then he and Quick ran away. I jumped up immediately after they left me. I ran after them. They ran down Charles-street, towards Newton-street. Charles-street goes into Newton-street. Williams was a little before Quick. I catched Quick by the breast at the corner of Charles-street, at the Newton-street end.

Q. Before you catched Quick had you called out watch - A. I was not able to cry out.

Q. You were quite capable of jumping up and running after them, then what should hinder you from calling out - A. I did not do it.

Q. That makes a little wonder in the transaction - A. I did not know that there was any assistance.

Q. That is a different story from what you told me a moment ago; you told me you were not capable of crying out - A. I thought I should come up to Quick before the watch came up to him. I cried for Mr. Orton; he came to my assistance, and lling was secured; then the patrol came up to my and I gave charge of Quick for robbing mor and Quick gave charge of me. The patrol took us both to the watchhouse to have it decided.

HUGH ORTON . I keep a chandler's shop, the corner of Newton-street. About one o'clock I heard Cogan call out for assistance, and said he was robbed. I opened my door, and ran to his assistance. I have known Quick a long time; he is a printer by trade. I never knew him work at it. Cogan is a carpenter; he works for a man in the Horse-ferry-road. Cogan has been a customer of mine a fortnight. He told me that Quick had robbed him of eighteen shillings and a two foot rule. Cogan was all over dirt. He told me the money was taken from him in the Coach and Horse yard: they got him down and fastened on him by the throat; his throat was scratched and bleeding. Oram, the patrol, came up; Quick said, I give charge of him.

JOHN ORAM . I am a patrol. I was coming my regular round; I saw Quick in custody of Cogan. A number of people were round him; some were persuading Cogan to let him go. The moment I came up they gave charge of one another. I think Cogan gave charge first. I took them both in custody, and took them to the watchhouse. I searched Cogan. I found his pocket torn, and his back all over dirt. He appeared as if he had been down. I think Roberts searched Quick. No money was found upon either of them.

SAMUEL ROBERTS . I am a constable. I searched Quick; I found one shilling and sixpence in silver.

JOHN BAXTER . I am the watchhouse keeper. At the office, Cogan took his handkerchief off, and shewed what manner his throat was in. Since then it has turned blue, and a little part scratched.

Prisoner's Defence. Last Saturday evening I went to a public-house to take a pint of porter with a few friends, with several of the trade that came from the house where I was an apprentice. I stopped until eleven o'clock. On my coming down Charles-street the prosecutor laid hold of me and asked me for his money. I asked him, what money, and told him I had no money. Mr. Orton came out; he insisted upon the prosecutor taking me to the watchhouse.

Q. to Oram. What is the sign of this public-house in Charles-street - A. The Bull's Head, it is about ten yards from the Coach and Horses yard. There is no watchman stationed in Charles-street.

Q. to Cogan. You did not indict Williams - A. Yes. On the Monday following I went before the grand jury for Quick. Williams was not taken at that time. On Thursday last I indicted Williams.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 21.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130407-120

464. THOMAS ANDREWS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of March , a tea-chest, value 30 s. the property of Emanuel Wooff .

MARY WOOFF. I am the wife of Emanuel Wooff ; he is a cabinet and chair maker , 23, Old-street-road . On the 25th of March, about six o'clock in the evening, I was sitting in the parlour behind the shop; I saw the prisoner lean over the chair in the shop, and take a tea chest away that stood on a table in the shop. I immediately followed him. He was stopped with it about an hundred yards from the shop. He wished the man that stopped him to take the

tea-chest, and let him go. This is the tea-chest; it is valued at thirty shillings; it would fetch twenty-six shillings.

BENJAMIN DOWSETT . I am a plaisterer. The prisoner passed me, with a tea-chest under his arm. In consequence of what Mrs. Wooff said, I laid hold of him; he asked me to take the chest, and let him go; we took him to Worship-street office. This is the chest.

Prosecutrix. It is my husband's property.

Prisoner's Defence. I was very much in liquor at the time.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY, aged 23.

Judgment respited .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130407-121

465. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously making an assault, in the King's highway, on the 3d of April , upon John Cogan , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, a box rule, value 3 s. and six three-shilling bank-tokens , his property.

JOHN COGAN . Q. On the morning, of the 4th of April this happened to you, you were returning from the public-house, in the Horse-ferry-road - A. Yes; I worked in that part of the town, for Mr. Copeland. Nothing happened to me until I got into Charles-street , by a public-house door. I saw Quick and Williams; I am sure as to the person of Williams; I took particular notice of him. They asked me, if I would take any gin. I said it was rather late; I wanted to go home; I said if it was not late, I would have no objection. They caught me on each side; Williams on the left, and Quick on the right. I looked at Williams; because he was the tallest; he is as tall as I am. When they first laid hold of me, I was at the public-house door; then they dragged me to the Coach and Horses yard. I kept my foot to the stones, as I went along, to prevent their dragging me along.

Q. Did you call out at this time - A. No, I did not. When they got me to the Coach and Horses-yard, Quick gave me a dig in the neck, and he tripped me up. I was no sooner on the ground, than he laid his hand on my neck, and his other hand upon my mouth. When I was down Williams bound my feet, and laid one hand upon my belly.

Q. You do not mean that he tied you with any cord - A. No, he put one knee on my knee, and the other knee upon the small of my belly; then he took eighteen shillings, and the two foot rule, and tore the pocket away at the same time. They ran away immediately. I jumped up, and pursued them both. Quick was the nearest to me; I laid hold of him; Williams got away. I saw Williams between eleven and twelve o'clock, in the yard of this Sessions-house; he was going to carry Quick a pot of beer, and a pipe of tobacco. I told the patrol he was one of the men. Williams was the man that took my money away. I described Williams to the patrol, and to Orton, to be a man of a sandy fair complexion.

JOHN ORAM . I am a patrol. Cogan was attending to prosecute Quick, he came to me in the Old Bailey-yard, and told me, (pointing to Williams,) that was the man that robbed him in Charles-street, in company with Quick. I and Roberts took Williams in custody. I searched him. and found nothing.

SAMUEL ROBERTS . I was constable at the watchhouse. Quick was brought to the watchhouse. Cogan said he had been robbed by two persons. Cogan said he should know the other man amongst a thousand; he was a tall thin young man, with long hair; he had a large brown surtout coat on. On Saturday, when Cogan was attending to prosecute Quick, he came to me in the Court-yard; he said he had seen the other man that robbed him, he was positive to him. He pointed out Williams to me. In consequence of that, I and Oram laid hold of him.

HUGH ORTON . I keep a chandler's-shop, in Charles-street.

Q. Do you know the prisoner Williams - A. On the Saturday that Cogan was robbed, I saw Williams twice on that day, in company with Quick, and on Saturday last, I saw Williams carrying a pot of beer through the Sessions-yard, to a prisoner. I told Roberts, I recollected that to be the man that I had seen twice with Quick; on the day that Cogan was robbed.

Prisoner's Defence. I went to see Quick. I asked him what he was in custody for. He said it was a row, between him and some man in Charles-street. He would not tell me the particulars of it. I came here, to hear the trial, along with four men that worked at the same office. I am innocent of the charge.

JOHN BUTLER . I am a printer. I work in the same office with the prisoner, at Mr. Auld's, Greville-street, Hatton Garden. On Saturday night, the 3d of April, after we had done work, the prisoner took a walk with me up to St. Giles's. It was about ten o'clock, when we went; we were paid late at the office. We went to the Cart and Horse, public-house, Tottenham-court-road; we stopped until twelve o'clock we then went to the Compasses, White-hart-yard; there we had two pints of ale; we stopped until one o'clock, and came away together, to the top of Gray's-inn-lane. We parted there. I saw him go towards the City.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130407-122

466. ROBERT MARR was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of February , sixty-four yards of carpeting, value 16 l. the property of Samuel Webb .

HANNAH WEBB. I am the wife of Samuel Webb . My husband is an upholsterer at Reading . The prisoner was foreman of the shop.

Q. On the 24th of February, did you happen accidentally to go the private front door of your house - A. Yes, and I saw the porter take a roll of carpeting; he turned towards the left. Upon seeing this, I called out stop thief; the prisoner told him to go on; he went on, and when he returned, I asked him where he had taken it; he said to Marr's, the prisoner's lodging. I desired the porter to bring it back; he did not bring it back, nor did I ever get

it back again, although I sent the porter back for it, nor I never saw the prisoner after he went away with the carpeting. In consequence of this, I wrote to my husband; he was in town; and informed him of the transaction. I never saw any more of the prisoner.

Mr. Gurney. Did not the prisoner give you a note of the goods that were taken - A. No, never.

Q. Nor stick it up in the shop - A. I never saw it. I know he took himself off.

SAMUEL WEBB . I am an upholsterer; I carry on business at Reading. In the month of February I hired the prisoner.

Q. At the time that you hired him, after you and he agreed for wages that he was to receive, was anything said about the mode of payment - A. Yes; the prisoner said he should like to take it when it was something considerable, once in three months: that he had a freehold estate of fifty pounds a year; therefore he should not want his wages but once in three months, but in the interim, if he should want a pound or so, he should always ask for it. He came into my employ on the 1st of January. I came to town on the 24th of February, and on the next day, I received a letter from my wife, which induced me to look out for the prisoner. I went with a coach to the corner of Sloane-street.

COURT. What was the amount of wages he was to have due to him - A. The balance was about six pounds. He was only five weeks in my service. I was to pay him two guineas a week.

Q. Before he left the country did he make any application to you to discharge the balance - A. None whatever. I went in an hackney coach to the corner of Sloane-street. I saw a gentleman's carriage go down he road; I saw the prisoner in that coach. I got out of the hackney coach; I then went to the gentleman's coach; there I found the prisoner, and the carpet; I immediately said, you infernal rascal, I have a letter in my hand, and it is just enabled me to stop you. I immediately pulled the carpet out of the coach, and the prisoner got out likewise. I then said, I would take him to the magistrate; he said he would not go. I went to a magistrate; and when I returned the prisoner was gone. I afterwards watched daily for the prisoner, at Basing-lane. I found him there on Monday, the 1st of March. Immediately as the prisoner came into the Inn-yard, I went up to him. I told him, he had given me a great deal of trouble, but now I hoped he would go with me, as I was determined to take him to Bow-street. At first he said he would not go. I told him I had that in my pocket, that would make him go, but I did not wish to make any noise in the street, if he would go quietly. I told him that to induce him. I had neither fire arms, or warrant. He agreed to go with me; and I wished to go the nearest way. I told him if he would go quietly with me, we would go to Bow-street; he broke off, into lanes, and narrow passages; that I had not been accustomed to. He said he wanted to call upon a person of the name of Taylor to accompany him to Bow-street. I went on with him as far as a court at Charing-cross. He went up the court; I followed him. About the middle of the court he turned round, and gave me two violent blows on my head, and knocked me down. I called murder. There were a great many persons came round at the bottom of the court. I went down to the bottom of the court, and asked the bye standers, whether they knew of an officer. An officer was procured. I went with the officer to the door of the house that was open, at the top of the court; I saw the prisoner, a man, and a woman. The officer took him in custody; the officer said, I had charged him with a felony. The officer took him to Bow-street; I accompanied them. The prisoner was examined before Mr. Read.

Q. Had the prisoner ever made any application to you for wages - A. Never for the balance. The 24th of February, was on Wednesday. On my coming to town for two or three days, I told him I should stop in town until Saturday. On account of the assizes being a busy time, I asked him whether he should want any money, between that and Saturday. He said no, he did not. I throwed down a pound note; I said you had better take that in case you should want any money, between that and Saturday. He said, no, he should not.

Q. Did he ever, before you came to town, apply to you to purchase a piece of carpet - A.Never; nor did he ever ask me to take a piece of carpet out of the house, nor did he ever mention his intention of coming to London, or that he ever meaned to leave my service. I never was so much surprised as on receiving the letter from my wife; I read the letter three times over; I could not believe it. I had just given him a fresh job to do, which would occupy him till my return. I value that piece of carpet by the invoice, at sixteen pounds.

THOMAS LYNE. I am a porter in the employ of Mr. Webb. On the 24th of February, I was porter to Mr. Webb, and on the 24th of February the prisoner desired me to take this carpet to his lodging. I took it out of the door, where the women work. He gave me no orders which door I was to take it out. I had no reason for taking it out that way.

Mr. Gurney. Did your mistress send you to get that carpet back - A. Yes I could not get it, because it was taken up stairs, and Marr had secured it.

Q. Were not you in the warehouse one day, when your master and Marr ever talking about this carpet - A. Yes. The prisoner said he could not give more than five shillings a yard for it.

GEORGE CLARK. I am coachman to Mrs. Crosssley, 67, St. James's-street. I had been out with my carriage, on the 26th of February. Some days I go twice a day to Kensington.

Q. Do you remember taking up any man, with a carpet - A. I do; the prisoner appears to be the man; he looks much elder than I thought he was. I cannot swear to the person. I drank with the man, he was in the tap-room, when I met with him. He said he wanted an hackney coach, and there was not one. I took him to Brompton; then my fellow servant called an hackney coach. At that time gentleman came up, and opened the carriage door; he said his property was there. The man said it was not his property. They both said it was their property. Mr. Webb pulled the carpet out, and desired

me to take care of it while he got a constable. The prisoner said it was his property, and then ran away.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130407-123

467. WILLIAM HAWKER and JOSEPH DOWNING were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of April , fifty pounds weight of flour, value 20 s. the property of Richard Wright .

MR. MONK. I am an officer of St. Luke's, and an acquaintance of Mr. Wright's. In consequence of suspicion I went to Mr. Wright's on the 10th of April, at half past four in the morning. I was let in privately by Mr. Wright's son. I placed myself on the top of the oven. The man in the bakehouse did not see me. I was laying on the top of the oven concealed. After I had lain there some time the watch went past five; some time after I heard a foot coming round towards the back of the oven, where I was. I saw a man get up a ladder to an upper warehouse, where the flour was kept. Then he came down again; then I heard a violent wrench, and a door opened. I saw the door open. The door then shut. The person went to the place from whence he came. I heard him say, he is not there, or is not come, to some person, but to whom I cannot say. In a minute or so he came back. I heard the footstep and I heard the door open. I saw the top of the door open and shut, and somebody looked out. It opened again, and I think shut again. I heard him say, where have you been? The other said, I am just come. I saw Downing come in. I looked up, and I saw Hawker and Downing with a bag. Downing took a bag up, and Hawker opened the door, looked out, and shut the door again. I then saw Downing go out with a bag under his arm, and as the door was shutting I caught hold of Hawker by the collar. I opened the door, and called to the officer outside waiting, to take hold of that fellow, Downing. Downing was brought back with the flour. The flour bag and all weighed fifty-five pounds. Hawker trembled and said, he was very sorry, and hoped his master would shew him mercy. Downing said not a word. Mr. Wright hearing me, he came. We were all in the bakehouse together. After that I took them to Worship-street office.

- GOLDSMITH. I am an officer. I was stationed opposite Mr. Wright's bake-house. I saw Downing go into the bake-house; he had no bag of flour when he went in. I saw him come out; he then had a bag of flour under his arm.

Q. Had you seen Hawker look out before Downing came in - A. Yes. I had seen him look up the street and down the street.

MR. WRIGHT. I am a baker . Hawker was my foreman . In consequence of information I received I stationed Mr. Monk as he has described. The value of that flour is twenty shillings. I believe it has been done a considerable time.

DOWNING, GUILTY , aged 62.

Confined Two Years in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

HAWKER, GUILTY , aged 32.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130407-124

468. WILLIAM CLARK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of February , a bag, value 1 s. a silver bread-basket, value 18 l. a silver candlestick, value 3 l. twenty silver table-spoons, value 12 l. twelve silver tea-spoons, value 3 l. and a pair of silver sugar-tongs, value 6 s. the property of William Barrett .

WILLIAM BARRETT . I am a silver polisher . I live at No. 3, Dean's-court, St. Martin's-le-grand. On the 20th of February, I sent Stephen Wilkins with a bag of plate to take to St. James's-street. He went out about a quarter before eight o'clock in the morning. He returned and said a man had robbed him of his bag.

STEPHEN WILKINS . I am just turned of eleven. I am servant to Mr. Barrett. He sent me with a bag of plate to St. James's-street, Piccadilly, about a quarter before eight in the morning. I met the prisoner in Castle-street, Holborn; I asked him the way to St. James's-street. The prisoner answered, he would shew me. He said he wanted two shirts fetched in Drury-lane, and if I would fetch them he would give me two-pence. I was to ask for the name of Mrs. Smith, at a house in White Hart-yard, Drury-lane, and if they said any thing I was to say they were for Mr. Smith, a coachman, at Temple-bar. He told me to give him the bag in his hand; he would hold it. I made answer, I will not give you the bag out of my hand; I will take it up stairs with me. The prisoner said, they will not give you the shirts if you go up with the bag; they will not think you come from me. I then said, I will leave the bag on the one pair, and go up to the two pair. I went to the house, and left the bag on the one pair of stairs, and when I came down I saw no bag. I went to the door, and saw no man stand there. I ran out, crying. A man asked me what was the matter. I told him a man had taken my bag. He asked me the description of the man and the bag. He told me he saw a man run up the court with a new damask bag. He took me to Bow-street; there they said it was of no use unless I went to my master, and got the description of the things. I went to my father first, and then to my master, and my master went up to Bow-street. None of the things have been found. I am sure the prisoner is the man.

Q. Did they give you the shirt - A. No. They said they knew no such person.

JOHN JAGO . On the 22d of February, I was in White Hart yard; I saw the prisoner come out of the house the boy has described, with a bag hanging down. He turned up Round-court, and in about two minutes I saw the boy coming out, crying; he said a man had run away with his bag. I took the boy up to Bow-street, and gave information there, and when the prisoner was taken they sent for me. I am sure that is the man that run out with the bag. He had a drab coat on. There was not a man passed but the prisoner.

CHARLES HUMPHREYS. The witness and boy came and gave information to me at Bow-street. I

was several days trying to apprehended him. I did not. After the prisoner was taken he was remanded for another hearing. I took the boy into the lock-up-house, and as soon as the boy opened the door he said that is the man that robbed me.

Prisoner's Defence. I was on duty that day at Greenwich. I belong to the 5th company of East London militia.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and whipped in Jail .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130407-125

469. JAMES KATHLEEN . CHRISTIANA KATHLEEN , and JOHN GAGE , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of February , seven hundred and eighty yards of bombazeen, value 78 l. the property of Archibald Bryson .

SAMUEL PORTLOCK . I conduct the dyeing business for Mr. Bryson. The dye-house is in Rose-lane, Spitalfields . On the 13th, we missed thirteen pieces of bombazeen from our drying room. James Kathleen was a labourer of mine. About three days after the robbery he came in the morning, and told me it was a pity the innocent should suffer with the guilty, and that he would then make a full disclosure of the whole affair to me. He said the prisoner Gage and a man of the name of Tilley, and Cliff, he discovered on the morning of the robbery with the goods in their hands; they there threatened him with his life if he made any disclosure of what he then saw, and by way of shewing their confidence in him they gave him one piece, and that piece he acknowledged to have pawned at different pawnbroker's. That is all that transpired. I do not recollect that he said any thing further at any other time. We took him to the office. He there said as before me. His examination was taken down in writing, and he would have signed it, but the magistrate would not let him.

Q. He did not confess that he stole it himself - A. No, one of them gave him a piece, which he afterwards pawned.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130407-126

470. SARAH WARING was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2nd of March , from the person of John Gregory , two 30 l. bank notes, and a bank note, value 2 l. the property of Sarah Gregory and Richard Gregory .

JOHN GREGORY . I am assistant to my brother, a potatoe merchant in Spitalfields. On the 2nd of March, about nine o'clock in the evening, I met the prisoner in Whitechapel. I walked some little distance with her. I walked up Angel-alley with her; I intended to go with her. After talking with her some little time she pushed against me, and ran off. I felt a piece of paper in my pocket, which I first thought were the notes, but on examining it, it was not.

Q. Had you that piece of paper in your pocket before - A. No. Finding that I had not taken the right, I ran out of the alley the same way that she did, but I did not find her. I saw nothing more of her until I saw her before the magistrate, and there the notes were produced. I am sure she is the same woman.

RICHARD GREGORY. I am brother to the last witness. I am in partnership with my mother. I gave notice of the number of the notes at the Bank of England. I produce a thirty-pound note which I received at the Bank of England. I traced this note to a person of the name of Hopps in Cranbourn-passage.

GEORGE HOPPS . I am a silk mercer, Cranbourn-passage, Leicester-fields. I took this thirty pound note of a woman that bought a pelisse. She gave me her name Mrs. Waring, Fiddletown, Dorsetshire. I should know the pelisse again.

WILLIAM HALL . I am a constable. I took this pelisse off the prisoner's back, and what the prisoner said to me was perfectly voluntary. I asked her what had become of the money. She told me if I would come home with her she would give me the remainder. She had paid some bills with part of it. I went home with her to John-street, St. George's. She delivered me a thirty-pound note, two two's, and three ones, and seven shillings and sixpence in silver. She told me that she had changed a thirty pound note to pay for this pelisse.

Mr. Hopps. That is the pelisse I sold to the woman that changed the thirty pound note.

Prosecutor. This thirty pound note is one of mine.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined One Month in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130407-127

471. THOMAS WATKINS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of March , a pewter pint pot, value 14 d. the property of Thomas Freeman .

THOMAS FREEMAN . I am a publican . I live at Knightsbridge . I lost the pot on Wednesday the 3d of March.

MR. MAYNARD. On Wednesday the 3d of March, while I was getting my breakfast, I heard the cry of stop thief. The prisoner was passing my dwelling at the time. I saw him throw a pot down a cellar. I pursued and took him. I am sure he is the same man. I brought the prisoner back to the cellar. That is the pot he threw down.

Prosecutor. That is my pot.

GUILTY , aged 45,

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130407-128

472. HANNAH WARWICK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of February , a watch, value 50 s. and a handkerchief, value 2 s. the property of William Fassett , from his person .

WILLIAM FASSETT . I am an upholsterer ; I live at No. 2, Clifton-street, Finsbury-square. On the 27th of February last, about twelve at night, I was going home; near Shoreditch turnpike I was accosted by a female; she requested me to give her something to drink. I went with her to the Robin Hood and Little John, Webb-square. The prisoner was in the room when I went in. She was not the person that I went there with. I treated them with a glass of gin and water. I then came away with

the young woman that accosted me. The prisoner followed me; she pressed me to go to her apartment. I went with her, as I supposed to her apartment, to a house in Cherry-tree-court, Shoreditch ; and in going up stairs the young woman said, I want some tobacco, out of your tobacco-box. As soon as I went into the room, I felt myself alarmed; I found it was an uninhabited place. I felt my watch go out of my pocket. The prisoner put the candle out. I said, you have robbed me of my watch and my handkerchief. I catched hold of the prisoner; she knocked the light out. She said, she did not care, the other woman had taken my watch. The other woman made her escape.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not blow the candle out; the other young woman knocked it out, and took his watch.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130407-129

473. CATHERINE WARD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of April , a watch, value 3 l. the property of Robert Stone , from his person .

ROBERT STONE . I am a tailor . I lost my watch on the 4th of April, in Hale-street, Poplar ; it was a little after twelve at night. I went up to the side of the wall to make water; I stood there, the prisoner came to me; she was with me two or three minutes; I gave her a shilling to get rid of her, and while I was buttoning up the flap of my breeches, I missed my watch. I directly said, you have got my watch. She denied it. I called to the watchman; he came up, and took her to the watchhouse. The officer found the watch in her bosom.

- GREGORY. I am an officer. I searched the prisoner, and found the watch in her bosom. This is the watch.

Prosecutor. It is my watch.

Prisoner's Defence. I am a girl of the town. He dropped his watch; I picked it up.

GUILTY .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130407-130

474. WILLIAM THOMAS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of March , from the person of William Bexon , a pocket-book, value 1 s. a 2 l. bank note, and three 1 l. bank notes, a bill of exchange for 28 l. 10 s. his property.

WILLIAM BEXON . On the 1st of March, I had been to the Nags Head, White-cross-street; a quarter before ten I left my friends; I was within one or two doors of my house, when I lost my pocket-book; and just as I got to my own window, four or five got round me; the prisoner was behind me. I found his hand in my pocket; I catched hold of his hand. I never parted with the prisoner, until I pulled him into the shop. I never let him go until Monk, the officer, took him. In my pocket-book, I had a two-pound bank-note, three one-pound bank-notes, a bill of exchange for twenty-eight pounds ten shillings.

WILLIAM MONK . On the 1st of March, I was coming up Golden-lane ; there were a number of persons standing at the prosecutor's door. The moment I came up, I heard a man say, I know nothing boy. The prosecutor accosted the prisoner; do you know them boys; the prisoner said no, nor you neither. The prosecutor took the prisoner in doors. I jumped into the house, that nobody should hand the pocket-book away. The prosecutor told his wife to fetch his coat down. She fetched it down he searched the pockets; he said, there is no pocket-book here. He then told the prisoner, he saw him give the pocket-book away. I will give you in charge of an officer.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130407-131

475. WILLIAM PRICE and SAMUEL ALLEN were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of October , a box, value 1 s. and three pair of boots, value 1 l. the property of John Thomas Fitzmaurice Deane .

COLONEL DEAN. I am Lieutenant-colonel of the 38th regiment. I lost my box on the 28th of October; it was taken from Hatchet's cellar in Piccadilly .

ALEXANDER WILSON . I am a shoemaker. I live on Holborn-hill. On the 29th of October, the prisoners brought three pair of boots to my shop for sale; the prisoners were both together. I asked their names; the tallest said his name was Jones, that he lived with Mr. Maxon, and that the boots were their perquisites, on my looking inside of them; I observed the name of Col. Deane, on them, that did not agree with their story; they said they were made some by one maker, and some by another. I observed they were all made by one maker, of the name of Powell. I put the boots of one side, and sent one of my men for Lee, the street-keeper, and sent the boots up to Mr. Powell, to know who they belonged to. The two prisoners ran away.

JOSEPH GREEN . I am a carrier from Putney, and Fulham. On the 28th of October, I stopped the cart at the White Horse. I had four boxes to take up for Col. Dean; the boxes stood close by the wheel. It was duskish. I put two boxes in the cart, the third being heavy, I got the boy to help me, and while we were in the act of putting the third in the cart, the fourth was taken away.

Q. Did you see any thing of the prisoners about your cart - A. I cannot say I did.

Prosecutor. They are my boots; there were six pair of boots in the cart altogether, and some silver spurrs, and a great quantity of accompts belonging to the War-office.

Price's Defence. I bought the boots.

Allen's Defence. I know nothing at all about it.

PRICE, GUILTY , aged 20.

ALLEN, GUILTY , aged 21.

Judgment respited .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130407-132

476. ROBERT BARNES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of March , a ladder, value 10 s. the property of John Mollard .

JOHN PEARSON . I am a waiter to Mr. Mollard, Old Drury coffee-house; it adjoins the Theatre. I know the ladder to be Mr. Mollard's.

WILLIAM BOND. I am an officer. I observed the prisoner in company with two others, walking

along Princes-street; when he came to the corner of Mr. Mollard's house, he drawed a ladder out of the area. I came out of the house I was in. The others said, here is Bond, and run away. I took the prisoner with the ladder on his arm.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not intend to steal it.

GUILTY , aged 16.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130407-133

477. MICHAEL MYERS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of March , a great coat, value 10 s. the property of William Rose .

WILLIAM ROSE . I am a scavenger . I lost the coat; on the 16th of March, out of a chaise it was standing in Dutchess-place, Portland-place , at one o'clock noon day. All I know, I lost it out of the chaise.

JOHN RAY . I saw the prisoner stand in Dutchess-street; he pulled the coat off the driving-box, and put it in a green bag that he had under his arm. I called out stop thief; a man in Cavendish-street took him in custody.

THOMAS READ . I heard the man cry out stop thief; I ran after the prisoner, stopped him, and secured him. I produce the coat.

Prosecutor. It is my coat.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw the great coat in the street; I put it in my bag, and as I was going along Portland-street the officer stopped me.

GUILTY , aged 38.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130407-134

478. WILLIAM HILL and ABRAHAM FERON were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of February , two chaise-cushions, value 30 s. the property of John Gower .

JOHN GOWER . I am a coach-maker , in the City-road . I missed the cushions on the 20th of February, from out of a chaise that stood in the shop for sale.

BENJAMIN VALENTINE . I am a patrol belonging to Bow-street. On the 20th of February, about noon, I was in company with Barnard Gleed , in Wheeler-street, Spitalfields; we saw the two prisoners in company with another person that is not in custody, coming towards us. The prisoner Feron and the other that is not taken, went from us; Hill advanced towards us; I took hold of him by the collar, and under his arm, he had these two cushions. I asked him how he came by them. He said, a man said to him, soldier, do you want a job; he offered him a shilling to carry them to Mr. Barber, in Whitechapel, a coach-maker. I made enquiry, there is no Mr. Barber, coach-maker, in Whitechapel. Barnard Glee took Feron in custody.

BARNARD GLEED . I was in company with Valentine. Feron went away from Hill; I followed him and took him into custody, he endeavourd to make his escape he took hold of the wheel of a cart; a scuffle ensued; I brought him back; in Hill's pocket, I found this strap.

Prosecutor. The chaise-cushions are mine.

Hill's Defence, A man in Church-street gave me shilling to carry these cushions to Whitechapel. I belong to the West London militia.

Feron's Defence. I belong to the same regiment with Hill.

HILL, GUILTY, aged 23.

FERON, GUILTY, aged 25.

Judgment respited

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130407-135

479. JOHN SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of February , four bushels, of wheat, value 3 l. the property of William Townshend and Samuel Lovejoy .

WILLIAM TOWNSHEND . I am a farmer ; I live at Cowling ; my partners name is Samuel Lovejoy . On the 19th of February, I lost about a sack of wheat from the barn; a board had been taken down, and the barn entered, and wheat taken away from the heap. After I lost the wheat, I got a search warrant, and searched the prisoner's house; his wife, and a child, were at home, and is lodger; the prisoner was not at home. We found about two bushels and a half of wheat in the inner room; a man was in the room, he ran away. Mr. Murray, the constable, took the prisoner about noon. The prisoner then said, the wheat was mine, he had got in the barn, and took it out.

CHARLES MURRAY . I am a constable. On the 2nd of March, I went to the prisoner's house with a search warrant. I found this wheat in a sack. There were two rooms in the prisoner's house, and a bed in each room. The wheat was in the lodger's room I should think. A man came out of the room and run away. The prisoner was brought to me at the public-house.

Prisoner's Defence. I told the truth before the magistrate, and I was to be admitted an evidence.

GUILTY , aged 27.

Fined 1 s. and discharged.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130407-136

480. JOHN WATSON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 19th of March , three cheeses, value 1 l. the property of William Larking and Henry Harben .

WILLIAM LARKING . I am a cheesemonger , in Whitechapel; my partners name is Henry Harben . The prisoner was our carman .

RICHARD WILSON . I am an officer. On Friday the 19th of March, I was standing at the Bulls Head tap, Petticoat-lane, about nine o'clock at night I observed the prisoner come in with something under his arm; he put it on the stairs; he called for a pint of porter; he stopped about five minutes. I thought there was something not quite right; I felt the parcel that he put down; it contained something heavy. I asked the prisoner, what he had put on the stairs. He said, cheese; he said he got it from his masters warehouse, in Whitechapel. I took him in custody. He took me to a warehouse belonging to his master; he knocked at the door; he said it is all shut up. I said, this not where your master lives; this may be the warehouse. He then dropped two of the cheeses against the door, and made an

attempt to get away; he still held one of the cheeses in the wrapper, and the other two a gentleman took up. I took him to Mr. Larking, and asked if he knew that man; he said yes, he was his carman. I asked him if he had sent him out with any cheeses. He said, no. These are the three cheeses.

Prosecutor. These are our cheeses, all of them.

Prisoner's Defence. The warehouseman gave me these cheeses, and desired me to take them to the Bulls Head tap, and to put them on the stairs; accordingly I did.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130407-137

481. WILLIAM HARRIS and BENJAMIN MOORE were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of January , a sow, value 10 l. the property of John Westmore . And JOHN IVE for feloniously receiving on the same day, the said sow, he knowing it to be stolen .

JOHN WESTMORE. I am a farmer . I live at Perrywell, near Ealing. On the 13th of January, I lost my sow I had seen my sow on the 12th. I received some information of the sow, but the sow I never saw any more. It was a sow with a very short tail.

HENRY STYLES . I am a dustman. I know William Harris ; he followed dusting, and Moore worked in the gardens. I live in Fulham-fields, about seven miles from Mr. Westmore's. Harris and Moore brought the sow to me; the sow had a short tail. It was put in my sty in the night. I got up about eight o'clock in the morning, Harris and Moore said they had put a sow in my sty; they asked me to let it stop there a day or two. They after that asked me to buy it. I refused. After that I saw Harris and Moore, and Ive, at the Crown public-house. Harris asked me to heat some water to scald the sow. Ive said he would satisfy me to heat the water. I said, if I do it, I will have ten shillings. I went home. Moore and Ive came to my place about four o'clock. Ive killed the sow, the others assisted him, and it was agreed that I was to cart the pig to Ive's house, in Ears-court, Kensington. About half past six o'clock the next morning we wrapped the pig up in cloths, to keep it clean; we put it in my cart, and I took it to Ive's house. Ive is a butcher. He and Harris took it out of the cart. I went to the public-house, Moore and Harris followed; Harris pulled out three one-pound notes; he changed one note, and gave me ten shillings.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130407-138

482. WILLIAM HARRIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of January , two live pigs, value 3 l. the property of John Arthur and Henry Somerset .

The prosecutor and witnesses were called, and not appearing in court, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130407-139

483. SARAH FELLOWES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of March , two pair of women's shoes, value 5 s. and five pair of men's shoes, value 25 s. the property of George Scrooby .

GEORGE SCROOBY . I am a shoemaker , 65, in Oxford-street . On the 9th of March I lost the shoes. I know they are mine. The prisoner was my servant .

MR. PEARSON. I am a constable. I took the prisoner in custody on the 9th of March. Mr. Scrooby gave me charge of her. I searched her, and found these two pair of shoes in her pocket. Mr. Scrooby claimed them as his. The prisoner begged for mercy, and said it was the first time.

WILLIAM BOUCHER . I am servant to a pawnbroker. The prisoner pawned these five pair of shoes at our shop.

Prosecutor. They are my shoes.

Prisoner's Defence. I had no intention of stealing the shoes that I had in my pocket. I meant to put them where I had them.

GUILTY , aged 37.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction . and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130407-140

484. JOHN CARTER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of February , a great coat, value 12 s. the property of John Walker .

JOHN WALKER . I am a labouring man . I live in Edgware-road, Paddington. On the 2d of February, I was at work on the first bridge; I missed my coat. The prisoner was on the bridge a good while, and when I missed my coat the prisoner was gone. I have never heard of my coat since. It was a light coloured coat.

THOMAS WELCH . I am a labourer on the canal. On the 2d of March I saw the prisoner running up the top path with the coat under his arm. I told Walker I saw him with his coat. The coat I saw the prisoner with was a light coloured coat.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of the charge.

GUILTY, aged 17.

Judgment respited .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130407-141

485. JAMES EATON and JOHN FAIRCROFT were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of March , seventeen pounds weight of mutton, value 4 s. and four pounds weight of beef-suet, value 2 s. the property of Samuel Summers .

SAMUEL SUMMERS . I am a butcher , near Somers Town. Eaton was my journeyman . The other was a young man out of place. On the 13th of March I lost a breast and a loin of mutton. They weighed seventeen pounds.

JOHN UPTON . I am a patrol. On the 13th of March, about half past six, I was passing down the City-road, I saw Faircloth with some meat on his shoulder. I asked him what he had got there. He said, some mutton; he brought it from Portpool-lane; it was a loin and a breast; he said it was given him; he then said, by Mr. Summers's man. I took him to Mr. Summers's; he then pointed out Eaton. I told Eaton I must take him in custody, and while I was tieing Faircloth's hands Eaton made

his escape. He was pursued, and brought back. I took them both to the office, and the meat also.

Mr. Summers. When I saw the meat I knew it was mine.

EATON, GUILTY , aged 30.

FAIRCROFT, GUILTY , aged 25.

Whipped in Jail and discharged.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130407-142

486. AARON WITHERS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of February , a piece of timber, value 7 s. the property of Thomas Willan .

GEORGE BALDOCK . I am a baker, 23, Lisson-grove. The timber was brought to me by George Cull . I had the timber. It was claimed by Thomas Willan .

THOMAS CULL . I am a constable. On the 9th of February, about half past one o'clock in the morning, I was going home from my benefit society; I saw two pieces of timber against the pales, and the prisoner was standing under the timber. I asked him where he got it. He said he picked it up. I said, it is an odd time of night to carry it. He came from under the timber, and lifted up a stick to make a blow at me, and another man made off with his piece of timber. I thought the timber did not belong to them. I called Mr. Baldock's man, and we secured both the pieces of timber. The prisoner and the man had left them on the green plot. I secured both the pieces of timber, and put them in Mr. Baldock's area. This was on the 9th of February. The prisoner, Withers, was taken on the 21st, and then at the watchhouse I asked him what was the reason he did not let the timber alone the second time.

Mr. Baldock. On the 21st of February I was alarmed by a noise. There had been two pieces of timber lodged in my area by Cull and my man twenty minutes before four. I got out of bed opened my window, and saw the timber moving up. I am a constable. I went out of doors with my staff in my hand, and turning into Portman-green I passed a man. I did not see the prisoner with the timber on his shoulder. He heard me coming, and threw the timber off his shoulder. I asked him what business he had to come to my area to take the timber out. I secured him, and told him to go quietly with me. He said, it is you, Baldock, is it? Then I lodged him in the watchhouse, and I and Langley, the constable of the night, took the timber to the watch-house. This is the timber.

- PAGE. I am foreman to Mr. Willan, cow-keeper . The timber is Mr. Willan's property. It was originally taken from Marybone park .

Prisoner's Defence. A man asked me to carry this timber. He said he would give a shilling.

GUILTY , aged 48.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130407-143

487. THOMAS RYAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of March , a seal, value 2 s. and a chain, value 1 s. the property of Richard Price , from his person .

RICHARD PRICE. I am a victualler ; I keep the Cooper's Arms, Crown-street, Finsbury-square . On the 8th of March, about half after eleven at night, the prisoner went into my house; he called for a glass of porter, and was served with it. After he drank it I stood with the door in my hand to let him out. He snatched the watch out of my pocket, and ran off. I pursued him, and called stop thief. The watchman stopped him, and took him to the watch-house. I am sure he is the same person. I had seen him several times before at my house.

GEORGE BARKER. I am a patrol. The watchman brought the prisoner to me. I took him to the watchhouse. He called me of one side, and told me where to find the watch. The watch was about thirty yards from the watchhouse, in the kennel, and there I found it. I then took it to Mr. Price. This is the watch.

Prosecutor. It is my watch.

Prisoner's Defence. Since I have pleaded not guilty, I have considered my situation. I am determined not to insult my maker nor the court. I joined the company of those which I thought to be my friends. I therefore implore the mercy of the court to send me as a marine, and it shall be the constant study of my life to be a useful member of society.

GUILTY, aged 19.

Judgment respited .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130407-144

488. CHARLES PAGE and ABRAHAM ALFRED were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of April , a bushel of oats, value 4 s. the property of Abraham Cocker .

ABRAHAM COCKER . I am a smith . I live at the Royal Oak-yard, Hatton Garden . I keep an hackney coach. On the 7th of April, about half past four o'clock, I got up on account of losing my corn three or four times. I concealed myself in my hay-loft. About a quarter past five, Charles Page came into the lost; he went to the corn bin and filled a bag. He then went down. I had put out the corn to feed my horses. He went out in the yard to wash the coach; then I went to Mr. Fox, the constable. Mr. Fox came with me, and took Page in custody, and Alfred was taken up. He I supposed to be the receiver.

Page's Defence. I never touched his oats. I gave a peck and a half of chaff away.

PAGE, GUILTY , aged 53.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and Publicly whipped .

ALFRED, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130407-145

489. MARY DAVIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of February , two pewter pint pots, value 2 s. 4 d. the property of Thomas Richardson .

JOHN THOMAS . On the 27th of February, I took the prisoner in custody in the Edgware-road; she had a basket under her great coat, with a quart and pint pot in it. I took her to the watchhouse, and delivered her to Flowerdeau, the constable.

JOHN FLOWERDEAU . I searched the prisoner's lodgings. I found two pint pots of Mr. Richardson's in a basket in a cupboard. These are them.

THOMAS RICHARDSON . They are my pots.

Prisoner's Defence. My children put them in the basket.

NOT GUILT Y.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130407-146

490. MARY DAVIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of February , a pewter quart pot, value 2 s. and a pewter pint pot, value 1 s. the property of John Larkin .

JOHN THOMAS . I am servant to Mr. Larkin. On the 27th of February, the neighbours gave me information. I took the prisoner in custody, and in her basket that she had under her great coat was a quart pot and a pint pot of Mr. Larkins's. I took them from her. She said, pray forgive me; I will never be guilty any more. These are the two pots.

JOHN LARKIN . The pots are mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going to take them home. I told the young man so.

GUILTY , aged 29.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130407-147

491. LUCY COOPER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of February , a bed, value 1 l. a bolster, value 6 s. a pair of sheets, value 5 s. a blanket, value 1 s. a tea-kettle, value 1 s. a looking-glass, value 1 s. and a flat iron, value 9 d. the property of Sarah Goodman .

SARAH GOODMAN . I live in Hatfield-street . I let lodgings . On the 13th of February, I let the prisoner a one pair of stairs back room, furnished; she was to pay me five shillings a week. She came into it on the 13th, and on the 15th she went away. After she was gone, I went into her room, and missed all the things contained in the indictment. She contrived to put the things out of the window.

- PRINCE. I am an officer. I took the prisoner in custody for another robbery. I found Mrs. Goodman's bed at Mr. Tuck's, in Whitecross-street.

MR. TUCK. I am a broker. My wife bought the bed. This is the bed.

Prosecutrix. It is mine.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130407-148

492. ELIZABETH CURTIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of March , a three-shilling bank-token, the property of John Hunter , from his person .

JOHN HUNTER . I am a toymaker . I sell my goods about the streets. On the 17th of March, I went into a public-house in Shoreditch to have a pot of porter with my friend. The prisoner sat down by my side in the tap-room; she said she was distressed. I said I had a wife and five children, and sooner than she should be distressed she might come and live with my children. She took a three-shilling bank-token out of my pocket.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked the three-shilling bank-token up, and took it to the bar, and had a quartern of gin in. We drank it, and the change I put in my pocket. I did not know whose it was.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130407-149

493. THOMAS WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of March , a jacket, value 10 s. the property of Richard Collins .

RICHARD COLLINS I am a labourer . I work in New inn yard, Whitechapel . I lost my jacket on the 30th of March, out of the hay-loft.

JOSEPH SCOTT . This is the jacket I found on the prisoner's back.

Prosecutor. It is my jacket.

Prisoner's Defence. I am a poor distressed lad. I will never do the like again as long as I live.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130407-150

494. SARAH SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of April , a tea-kettle, value 8 s. the property of Richard Hewitt .

JANE HEWITT. I gave the kettle out of the bar window to my nephew; he gave it to the girl.

GEORGE FOX. I am a servant to Mrs. Hewitt. My aunt gave me the kettle on the 6th of April; I gave it the maid; she put it down by the fire-place. The prisoner was in the house at the time; she went and stood by the fire-place. I did not see her take the kettle.

GEORGE VAUGHN . I am a broker. On the 6th of April the prisoner offered a kettle for sale. She said she lived in Drury-lane. I went and enquired; she did not live there. She then confessed that she had stolen it from Mrs. Hewitt's fire-place. She pointed out the house where she had taken it from. This is the kettle.

Prosecutrix. It is my kettle.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not take it out of the house; it stood on the step of the door.

GUILTY aged 43.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130407-151

495. ELIZABETH SIMMONS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of March , a pair of boots, value 10 s. the property of Alexander Wilson .

ALEXANDER WILSON . I am a shoemaker , on Holborn Hill . On the 23d of March I lost the boots; they were hung outside of the door for sale.

WILLIAM READ . I am an officer. I perceived the prisoner had something in her apron; I asked her where she had got these boots. She said, they were her husband's. I went to Mr. Wilson, and he claimed them.

Prosecutor. They are my property.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in liquor at the time. I know nothing of it.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Confined One Month in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130407-152

496. MARIA MANTELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of March , a shirt, value

6 s. a pair of stockings, value 1 s. and a yard of calico, value 1 s. the property of George Little .

MARY LITTLE . I am the wife of George Little . On the 18th of March the prisoner came to me, and said she was distressed for a lodging. I made her up a bed, and she staid all night. She came again on the 19th; she went away the next day. I missed a pair of stockings. I found the other things at the pawnbrokers after she was taken in custody.

WILLIAM VOUCHER . I am a pawnbroker. On the 20th of March the prisoner pledged a pair of stockings and a shirt. These are them.

Prosecutrix. They are mine.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130407-153

497. JOHN TAME and JAMES ROBERTS were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of February , three loaves of bread, value 4 s. 6 d. four pounds weight of mutton, value 4 s. 6 d. one pound and a half of butter, value 2 s. a veal pie, value 1 s. and a dish, value 1 s. the property of Henry Burrows , esq.

HENRY BURROWS. ESQ. I live in Caroline-place, Bedford-square. I am one of the registerors of the Court of Chancery . I can only prove that a certain dish that is found is mine.

GEORGE ORAM . I am a patrol. On the 20th of February, about half past three in the morning, I saw the two prisoners in Drury-lane; each of them had a bag. I asked them what they had got; they each answered, grub. I took them to the watch-house, and made them empty their bags. There were three quartern loaves, a leg of mutton roasted and cut, a veal pie, some fresh butter, and some cheese. Roberts said they were coming down Charlotte-place, some boys were before them, and dropped these things, seeing him in a watchman's great coat they ran away. They picked them up.

Prosecutor. It is my dish; there is my crest upon it. These things were taken out of a safe. I knew nothing of having lost it. I only know that my servants said they lost it.

Tames's Defence. We were coming down Charlotte-place, Fitzroy-square; we saw two boys; they dropped these bags; we picked them up.

Roberts's Defence. The same.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130407-154

498. DAVID JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of March , a flitch of bacon, value 2 l. the property of John Williams .

JOHN WILLIAMS . I am a cheesemonger , 26, High Holborn . I lost my flitch of bacon on the 17th of March. It was hanging up at the door.

JAMES HAYLAND. I am servant to Mr. Williams. I did not see the bacon taken off the hook. The prisoner dropped it down on the road. It was hanging at the door a minute before.

JOSEPH BECKETT . I belong to the House of Correction. I saw Jones take the bacon. I took him in custody, and then he dropped the bacon.

Hayland. I am sure it is my master's property.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming up Holborn; I saw a man with some bacon at his back; there was a scuffle between him and Beckett. Beckett charged me with stealing the bacon. I know nothing of it. I am as innocent as a child unborn.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130407-155

499. THOMAS COSGROVE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of March , four hundred and forty halfpence , the property of John Sheppard .

JOHN SHEPPARD. I am a painter . I live at 327, in the Strand . On the 17th of March, I had been counting my halfpence up to take to the pawnbrokers. They were all in five-shilling papers. I turned my back to go into the parlour; a gentleman came in; he said, have you lost any thing. I looked upon the counter, and said, I have lost some papers of halfpence. He said, he saw a man go out with them; his son and the officer had gone after him. I went out, and the officer had taken the prisoner in custody.

JOHN AVORY . I am an officer. From information I watched Mr. Sheppard's shop; I saw a man come out. He looked round, saw me, and then he mended his pace. Another man was with him. They both went up Drury-lane. I took the man that came out of Mr. Sheppard's shop, and searched him. He had nothing on him. I pursued the prisoner, and took him in Wych-street. Directly I laid hold of him he threw the halfpence in the street. I picked up seven shillings and seven-pence. Here they are.

Prisoner's Defence. I had nobody with me. I was going along about my business. The halfpence I had were my father's.

Mr. Sheppard. I believe I lost four papers. I am sure I lost two.

GUILTY, aged 17.

Judgment respited .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130407-156

500. JOHN READ was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of February , two wooden firkins, value 1 s. and one hundred pounds weight of butter, value 1 l. 5 s. the property of John Smith .

JOHN SMITH. I am a carrier . On the 22d of February, I lost two firkins of butter out of my cart. The rope was cut, and the firkins were stolen out of my cart as I was going along the road, between Mile-end and Bow church .

BARNARD GLEED . I am a patrol. On Monday the 22nd of February, I was in company with John Lines , in Wentworth-street, Spitalfields. I saw the prisoner in company with four other men, two were walking a head, without anything; the prisoner Read, had a firkin on his shoulder, and another man had a firkin behind him. I caught hold of Read; Lines came up; the other man chucked his firkin down. I asked Read where he got it from. He said he met a man just by Mile-end-turnpike, he asked him to carry it to the Catherine Wheel, Whitechapel. Read made a great resistance. This is the firkin that he was carrying; and this is the

firkin the other man throwed down; he made his escape.

Prosecutor. Them are the two firkins that were taken from my cart.

Prisoner's Defence. I met a man at Bow; he asked me to carry this firkin to Whitechapel. The officer took hold of me, and said I stole it.

GUILTY, aged 18.

Judgment respited .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130407-157

501. HENRY PULLEN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of March , five pecks, of oats, value 7 s. two trusses of wheat-straw, value 2 s. two chissels, value 2 s. a blunderbuss, value 14 s. and a pistol, value 6 s. the property of Charles Johnson .

CHARLES JOHNSON . I am an iron-founder ; I live in Old Gravel-lane . I lost these things on the 25th of March. The corn was taken from my corn-bin. I cannot swear to the blunderbuss, but I verily believe them to be all mine.

JOHN HERBERT. I am an officer. On the 25th of March, about five o'clock in the morning, I stopped the prisoner in Old Gravel-lane, with this bag of oats. I asked him where he had got it. He said unlawfully. I asked him where he worked. He said at Mr. Johnson's; he was a sand-moulder; he had been at work there from three o'clock in the morning. I asked him if he brought the corn from there. He repeated that he had got it unlawfully, and he hoped I should over look it. I told him I should take him into custody. He said if I did, he should be transported. I took him in custody; he made great resistance. I got him as far as Mr. Johnson's foundry-gates; he said he worked there. I took him in there with intention of putting a pair of handcuffs on him; he made his escape from me in the factory; he got over some gates, at the back of the premises. I then went to his house; his lodger told me that he had gone to work; his wife came down stairs; I told her I was an officer, and I had apprehended him for felony; and I must go up stairs to see whether he was in the house, or not. I was going up stairs; he stood on the top of the stairs, and swore if I offered to come up, he would blow my brains out. He pointed either a pistol or a blunderbuss at me; I am not certain which. On seeing fire-arms presented to me, I drew back. He told me all the officers in London should not take him, without killing some one. His wife went up to pacify him. He told me if I would take a one-pound-note and settle it, he would surrender to me. I directed a watchman of the office, to fetch me firearms. He then, by the intercession of his wife surrendered himself. I took him in custody again, and searched him. I found in his possession a key which unlocked Mr. Johnson's corn-bin. I then searched his house; I found about a peck of the same kind of oats in a tub in the washhouse, and two chissels for cutting iron. The blunderbuss and pistol were laying on the chest on the stairs.

Q. to prosecutor. Have you compared that corn - A. Yes; and it corresponds with the corn in my bin. We lost the lock and key of the corn-bin about three or four months ago. I had this lock put on it; and this key found on the prisoner, would open it, and I verily believe every article here is mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I went to call one of my shop-mates up, and as I came back, I found this bag of oats.

GUILTY , aged 42.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130407-158

502. GEORGE PHIPPS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of March , eight shoe brushes, value 12 s. the property of Robert Leach .

ROBERT LEACH. I am an oilman , in Compton-street . From information I pursued the prisoner, and took him; he dropped the brushes. These are the brushes; they are mine.

CHARLOTTE BARNIDGE . I saw the prisoner, and another passing Mr. Leach's shop. The prisoner took a bundle of brushes down from Mr. Leach's door, and Mr. Leach pursued him.

Prisoner's Defence. The brushes were laying at the door; I took them up, and ran away with them.

GUILTY, aged 21.

Judgment respited .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130407-159

503. RICHARD BUCKLE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23rd of February , sixty penny-pieces , the property of John Hall .

JOHN HALL. I am a poulterer , in Red-lion-passage . From information I saw the prisoner running; in Red-lion-square he was taken by the constable, and the penny-pieces were taken out of his pocket, This is the paper of penny-pieces, they are mine.

LUCY HEMPHREYS . I was coming through Red-lion-passage. The window was open; I saw the prisoner put his hand in, and take out a paper of penny-pieces. I ran and told Mr. Hall.

Prisoner's Defence. I have nothing to say for myself.

GUILTY, aged 16.

Judgment respited .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130407-160

504. RICHARD FISHER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22nd of March , a pair of shoes, value 9 s. the property of William Bonsfield .

WILLIAM BONSFIELD. I am a publican ; I keep the Cherry Tree, Whitecross-street . I lost my shoes on the 22nd of March. The prisoner came in and had a pint of beer, and a pipe of tobacco, he paid for it, and as he went out I thought he had something sticking out, more than what he ought to have. A short time after that, I missed my shoes. On the 7th of April, I met him, and took him into my house. I sent for an officer; he denied taking them; he afterwards conffessed to the officer and me, that he took them, and sold them in Field-lane. I have never seen my shoes since.

ROBERT LOCK . The prisoner confessed before the magistrate that he took the shoes, and sold them in Field-lane, for four shillings.

Prisoner's Defence. I am as innocent as a child unborn. I was frightened to confess it.

GUILTY, aged 20.

Judgment respited .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130407-161

505. JAMES DEIGHTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of March , ten pounds, weight of hemp, value 8 s. the property of Christopher Splidt .

JAMES SHEPPARD . I am clerk to Christopher Splidt ; is he a Russian merchent . In consequence of a letter. I pointed out the prisoner, in Church-street. The officers took him, and searched him, and found hemp concealed upon him. The prisoner acknowledged it was Mr. Splidt's hemp.

JOHN GRIFFITHS. This gentleman's master desired me to attend at six o'clock. The prisoner was pointed out. I took him into a baker's shop, and searched him; under his breeches, and under his waistcoat, were three pound and a half of hemp. I took him home to his lodging, and found six pound and a half. The prisoner said it was his masters's hemp. This is the hemp; it is some of the best quality.

Prisoner's Defence. I have worked thirty years for my master. I did not get the hemp from him; I got it in the street.

GUILTY .

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and whipped in Jail .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130407-162

506. MARY BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 11th of April , a shirt, value 2 s. a jacket, value 2 s. two waistcoats, value 3 s. a pair of breeches, value 2 s. and three handkerchiefs, value 3 s. the property of James Goddard .

WILLIAM KILLSBOY . I keep the Peacock, in Gray's-inn-lane. On yesterday week, I heard the dog bark, between eight and nine in the evening. I went up stairs, and searched about. I saw the bundle in a corner of the privy, and the prisoner was sitting on the seat. She had fastened herself in, in such a kind of a way that it was different to open the door where she was sitting. I asked her what she was doing there. She said, I have not been robbing. I have nothing upon me. I gave her in custody.

JAMES GODDARD . They are all my property, except the apron, and one handkerchief. I had left them in the garret.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130407-163

507. JOHN WELCH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of March , one hundred and twelve pounds weight of lead, value 16 s. the property of James Peas , affixed to a building of his .

JAMES PEAS . I am a builder . The prisoner was a labourer of mine. The lead was taken from two houses in Wood-street, Lucas-street, Gray's-inn-lane . It was taken from the gutters.

ROBERT ARNELL . I am a carpenter. On the 12th of March, about ten at night, I was going to bed; (I live opposite;) I saw the prisoner rolling up the lead. I asked him what he was doing there. He said putting the things to rights. I went down stairs, and called the watchman. We went to these houses; the prisoner came down by the rafters, and jumped out of the one pair window; we took him to the watchhouse. This is the lead. At the watchhouse, he said he had left his coat in the building; he came back and got it.

Prosecutor. It is my lead.

GUILTY , aged 29.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130407-164

508. ELIZABETH VALLENCE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of March , a tea-tray value 4 s. a glass goblet, value 4 s. and a jelly glass, value 6 d. the property of Isaac Cameron .

ISAAC CAMERON . I am a turner . I live in Great Queen-street, Lincoln's-inn-fields .

Q. When did you loose these things - A. On Sunday the 14th of March. They were taken out of the back kitchen; I had just had my dinner. My wife said she heard somebody go down stairs. I went after the prisoner; she had got all the glasses off the shelf, in her lap, and the tea-tray. These are the things, they are mine.

Q. Did you see her go out of the house - A. No. My wife heard somebody come up stairs. I went to the door, and saw the prisoner about twelve doors off, as if going from my house.

Prisoner's Defence. The things were given me by a woman. In the house I never was.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130407-165

509. TERENCE M'DOWELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2nd of March , a 1 l. note , the property of James Shuttelworth .

The prosecutor was called, and not appearing in court, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130407-166

510. MARY FARREL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of March , a watch, value 30 s. the property of Patrick Whitnell , from his person .

JOHN BOOSEY . I am a watchman. I was returning from duty, a quarter past five in the morning, on the 9th of March; I saw the prisoner and a sailor. I saw her take the watch from his pocket she immediately said, there goes captain Thompson. She went down Fox-lane with the watch in her hand. I went and took the watch from her; I took her to the Crown public-house; and the prosecutor did not seem willing to prosecute. I left the watch there with the publican. I have the watch. The prosecutor is gone away. The prosecutor was very drunk.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130407-167

511. FRANCIS BLAKE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of February , six pounds weight of hemp, and two pounds weight of flax, value 2 s. the property of Mary Cooper , widow .

JOHN FROST . I am a patrol of Bow-street. On the 21st of February, I was on duty in Ratcliffe Layer, and seeing the prisoner coming along with the bundle I asked him what he had there. He said,

some old rags that he had picked off the dung-hill; he said he was going to sell them. I examined the bundle, and found it to be hemp and flax. I asked him to shew me the dunghill. He took me to Mr. Cooper's ground. He went down to the bottom warehouse. He said he lifted up the bottom shutter, and got in there. I then went and informed Mr. Cooper of it. This is the hemp and flax.

JAMES EMERY. I am a flax and hemp dresser; I work for Mr. Cooper. I know nothing of the boy stealing the hemp. I keep the keys of the warehouse. The prisoner's father lives in the ground; he works for Mr. Cooper.

Q. Had you hemp and flax in that warehouse that Frost has described - A. Yes. It is Mr. Cooper's warehouse.

GUILTY, aged 15.

Judgment respited .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130407-168

512. GEORGE WOODWARD was indicted for a fraud .

HAGGERD HALE. Q. Do you know the prisoner, George Woodward - A. Yes, I knew him as the servant of Mr. Steele. On the 13th of February he came for six pounds of soap. I served him, and put it down to the account of Mr. Steele. He did not mention who he came from. I put it down to Mr. Steele's account. I always understood that he came from Mr. Steele. I thought it was for Mr. Steele.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130407-169

513. WILLIAM HODGES was indicted for a fraud .

Mr. Alley, counsel for the plaintiff, declining to offer any evidence, the defendant was

ACQUITTED .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130407-170

514. JOHN WOLLEY LESSINGHAM was indicted for a fraud .

Mr. Knapp, counsel for the plaintiff, declining to offer any evidence, the defendant was

ACQUITTED .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130407-171

515. RICHARD LUNNIS was indicted for a misdemeanour .

RICHARD FRIDAY . I am a lighterman. I carry on my business at Isleworth. I employ a number of sacks; I never sell them; I frequently miss them to a large amount; to the amount of two or three hundred pounds a year, by being stolen from the house. I lost a vast quantity last year. From information, I procured a search warrant, and took two officers to search the house of Lunnis, Queenhithe. I saw the defendant there; he said he expected us; a person came from Abingdon to tell him. We there saw a quantity of sacking under a great deal of rope. They were very good sacks: they were cut in pieces.

Q. How many sacks did you find these pieces to make up - A. Five or six.

DANIEL LEADBETTER . I am one of the marshalmen. I went with a search warrant to Lunnis's house. Mr. Lunnis met us at the door; he opened the door with a key. I told him that I had got a search warrant. He said he expected a visit of that sort. He said, a person came from Abingdon who told him that Mr. Friday had been to Abingdon in the sack mending room. We found these two pieces of sack, and several other pieces of sacks under some old ropes. These are the pieces of sacks. I asked the defendant if he kept an account of the persons he bought his goods of. He said, no; he brought them of people indiscriminately.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.


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