Old Bailey Proceedings, 17th February 1813.
Reference Number: 18130217
Reference Number: f18130217-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND ALSO THE GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX. HELD AT Justice-Hall, in the Old Bailey, On WEDNESDAY the 17th of FEBRUARY, 1813, and following Days;

BEING THE THIRD SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF The Right Honourable GEORGE SCHOLEY , LORD-MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY JOB SIBLY, No. 4, CARTHUSIAN-STREET, ALDERSGATE-STREET.

LONDON:

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED (BY THE AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON,) By R. Butters, No. 22, Fetter-lane, Fleet-street.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON.

Before the Right Honorable GEORGE SCHOLEY , Lord Mayor of the City of London; Sir George Wood , knt. one of the Barons of His Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir John Bailey , knt. one of the Justices of Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir William Curtis , bart. Sir John Eamer , knt. Sir William Leighton , knt. Aldermen of the said City; John Silvester , esq. Recorder of the said City; Joshua Jonathan Smith , esq. Matthew Wood , esq. Christopher Magnay , esq. Aldermen of the said City; and Newman Knowlys , esq. Common Serjeant of the said City; His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

London Jury.

James Starke ,

William Proudman ,

John Davis ,

Joseph Waybrand ,

John Elliott Rowland ,

Benjamin Dobson ,

Richard Wilson ,

Joseph James ,

Nicholas Badley ,

Nicholas Lathey ,

Glles German ,

Joseph Twig .

First Middlesex Jury.

Jonathan Thompson ,

James Powell ,

Thomas King ,

George Dobson ,

John Williams ,

James Driver ,

Richard Hallett ,

Ralph Webb ,

Henry Seabourne ,

Roger Peatfall ,

Charles Cradock ,

James Foster .

Second Middlesex Jury.

Richard Cattle ,

Joseph Hayes ,

John Williams ,

Abraham Gold ,

Daniel Wells ,

John Knight ,

Thomas Fortune Harris ,

Thomas Barnard ,

David Young ,

William Horton Coleman ,

John Hawes ,

John Hart .

Reference Number: t18130217-1

237. ELEANOR CONDON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of December , in the dwelling-house of James Griffiths , thirteen shillings and sixpence in monies numbered, and ten bank notes, value 1 l. each, and a 2 l. bank note, the property of James Griffiths .

JAMES GRIFFITHS . I live in Church-street, St. Giles's . I keep a dwelling-house there. It is in the parish of St. Giles in the Fields. I am a publican, and keep a provision warehouse . The prisoner was our servant .

Q. Do you know the prisoner, Eleanor Condon - A. Yes.

Q. Did you lose any money out of your house any time - A. Yes, on the 19th of December.

Q. How much money did you lose - A. Twelve pounds in notes. The silver I cannot say how much she took: thirteen and sixpence was found.

Q. Where was it kept - A. Up stairs in our bedroom. I had seen the money and the notes on the morning of the 19th. The door of my bed-room was locked, the notes were in a drawer, and the silver was on a table.

Q. What time of the day did you miss it - A. Between five and six in the evening.

Q. How do you know whether the prisoner took it or not - A. My wife went to buy some sugar. The prisoner was in the bar before my wife went out. She went up stairs into this room to get what she wanted. She came down stairs, and hung the keys of the room by the fire place in the bar. The prisoner was then in the bar; after that I missed the prisoner out of the bar, immediately after my wife went out. My wife came in again in about half an hour. A woman that lodged up stairs, said your door is open. My wife ran up stairs immediately, and coming back again she catched the prisoner going into the kitchen window from the yard; she pulled her back. She heard a noise as she was going down stairs. I went and found the key of the room in the yard. I was present when the silver was found: ten shillings were picked up in the kitchen, and three shillings and sixpence outside. The prisoner acknowledged that she had taken the money, and said that the girl that lived with us before that encouraged her to do it.

HANNAH GRIFFITHS . I am the wife of the last witness. On Saturday night, the 19th of December, I went out to the grocer's. I left this girl in the bar. When I came home my husband said, where is Nell. I said, I did not know; I left her here. He said, he had not seen her since she was gone. When I came back a woman came down stairs, and said my room door was open. I ran up stairs, and found it just to. I came down stairs, and was speaking to the woman, I heard a noise in the yard. I went to it, and catched this girl going into the kitchen window. She was almost in. I took hold of her legs. I asked her where she had been. She said she had been to Mrs. Neale's with half a gallon of beer. I asked her where was the money. She said in her fright she had dropped it from her hand in the yard. She then said, give me the candle, and I will pick it up. I gave her the candle. She picked up a three-shilling piece, and gave it me. I said, I will go with the change of the half gallon of beer, and know what kept you so long. I went into the kitchen and found thirteen shillings and sixpence. It lay on the kitchen floor.

Q. I thought your husband stated that he found three shillings and sixpence in the yard, and ten shillings in the kitchen - A. No. I picked the money up in the kitchen.

Q. to Prosecutor. I understood you that you picked up three shillings and sixpence in the yard - A. I picked up nothing but the key of the room in the yard. My wife did.

Q. Were you present when the money was picked up in the kitchen - A. Yes; I thought it was ten shillings. I do not know rightly where it was picked up.

Prosecutrix. I picked up thirteen shillings and sixpence in the kitchen; the prisoner picked up a three-shilling piece in the yard and gave it me.

Q. Had she been out with any beer - A. No. She said she had, but she had not. I asked her, where she got that three-shilling piece. She said, she picked it up on the stairs. Then we went to look for the keys, and found them in the yard, and then my husband went up stairs and missed the money.

Q. Did you know how much money was there - A. No. I knew there was money there. I did not know how much it was. She did not own to taking it until the next day at the watchhouse. In the watch-house, the next day, I asked her whether she had any money. She said, she found the thirteen shillings and sixpence on the stairs. I asked whether she had any more with her, and where. She told me she had, it was up the chimney; she did not know how much it was. She said, when I got home I should get it. I had Lae, the officer with me. He put his hand up the chimney into a hole; he found ten one-pound notes, and one two. They were all bank notes.

JOHN JENKS . I am a parish officer. I took the prisoner in custody on Saturday night. When I went to Mrs. Griffiths's house the prisoner acknowledged taking the silver; she did not say how much I locked her up in the watchhouse.

MICHAEL LAE . I went with Mrs. Griffiths to the watchhouse. The prisoner acknowledged the notes were up the chimney. I found up the chimney ten one-pound bank notes, and a two-pound bank note. I have had them ever since. I produce them.

WILLIAM GOODMAN . I am a step-son of the prosecutor. I can prove to the two-pound note found up the chimney. I took it of a sailor on the 7th of December. I gave change for it about eleven o'clock at night. I wrote the sailor's name on it, and gave it to my mother.

Q. to prosecutrix. Your son gave you a two-pound

note - A. Yes; I put it in the drawer. I know nothing of the other notes.

Q. to prosecutor. Do you know any thing about the notes - A. Yes. I counted them on the morning of that day, sixteen pounds. Twelve one's and two two's.

Prisoner's Defence. My mistress told me if I would tell her the truth she would take me back.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 14.

[The prisoner was recommended to mercy by the jury on account of her youth .]

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18130217-2

238. HENRY HITCHMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of January , two casks, value 5 s. four gallons of rectified spirits, value 2 l. two bottles of gin, value 6 s. a wooden can, value 5 s. and a gallon and a half of gin, 15 s. the property of Benjamin Hodges , Benjamin George Hodges , and Thomas Chamberlain .

JAMES CANNON . I am a clerk to the prosecutors.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. Yes, he was a carman it their service.

Q. Did you see him on the 8th of January last - A. Yes, in the evening, at the time he was leaving his work. I took from the prisoner a quart bottle of gin, as he was going off the premises of his employers; he had the bottle of gin under his smock-frock, near his breast. I had before locked the door, and stopped him from going off the premises. From this discovery I asked him for the key of his corn bin, which he gave me. I then went to his stable where his corn bin was; he wished to go with me. I would not suffer him. I went to the corn bin alone. I found it locked, and the key I took from him unlocked it. I found in the corn bin a wooden can, containing about a gallon of gin. This is the can. I also found a quart bottle nearly full of gin, and one empty bottle. We sent for a constable, and after he was taken in custody he acknowledged that he had been robbing his master for the last two years.

Q. Did you go to Sinfield by his directions - A. Yes.

Q. What is Sinfield - A. A publican, living in Wood-street, Westminster, about a quarter of a mile from the prosecutors premises. At Sinfield's we discovered about twenty gallons of rectified spirits, concealed in a box, in stone jars, in his bed-room up stairs.

Q. Did you see Sinfield on the premises at that time - A. Yes. I saw Sinfield and saw him go up stairs.

Q. What become of Sinfield - A. He escaped while the officer was in the house. The officer stated to him what we had come about. He absconded.

Q. Was this spirits such as the prosecutors had - A. Yes. The prisoner stated that he had been selling to the publican, Sinfield, for the last two years.

Q. Could you tell whether these spirits were your masters - A. No, not to swear to them; they were such spirits that we had.

Q. Now, with respect to this corn him, the key of which the prisoner gave to you - A. Yes.

Q. Had any other person access to the corn bin except the prisoner - A. No other person.

Q. In searching at Sinfield's, did you find any casks of the prosecutors - A. Yes, there were two casks concealed in the bed-room, in the same room where the spirits were. They had not been sent out of the house in the regular course of trade.

Q. When you found that quantity in the corn bin did you tell the prisoner what you had found there - A. Yes. He said the bottle of gin was for his wife, and he said that he had drained the pipes and collected this gallon of gin.

Q. What was that gin in the can - A. Strong rectified gin.

Q. Was that the draining of pipes - A. Most likely it was the draining of the pipes. Our men are not allowed to take the draining of pipes for themselves. In consequence of that we are obliged to allow many customers for short measure, which this circumstance accounted for.

BENJAMIN GEORGE HODGES . Q. You are one of the partners of this distillery - A. Yes; my partners names are Benjamin Hodges and Thomas Chamberlain.

Q. Were you one of the persons who went the next day to the house of Sinfield - A. Yes.

Q. Were any of the spirits which you found at Sinfield's house, spirits which you can speak to with certainty - A. Yes, it was a particular strength. It was an illegal strength. It was 44 per cent. It must be sent out at a lower strength than that; 20 per cent under, or 20 per cent. over.

Q. On your examining that at Sinfield's could you undertake to say it was yours - A. The strength corresponded to the spirit then in our house. I know it by the flavour in particular, and the strength corresponded. It was very strong.

Q. Were these drainings - A. I do not think they were.

Mr. Knapp. You were in Court when your clerk was examined, you heard him state that they might have been drainings - A. Yes; his imagination and mine might not correspond. I cannot swear that they were or that they were not.

WILLIAM GOODENOUGH . I am a constable of the parish of St. John's. I was sent for to take the prisoner in custody. Mr. Hodges charged him with concealing a quantity of liquor. The prisoner said he was sorry for it; he was not the only one as had taken it. He mentioned others, by which his master was enabled to detect others. I produce the spirits found in the corn bin. I have kept it ever since.

JAMES GILLMORE . Q. You searched Sinfield's house with Mr. Hodges - A. I did. I found the spirits that Mr. Hodges has mentioned, and two casks with Mr. Hodges name on it. These are the casks.

Q. to Mr. Hodges. Look at the marks on the cask, are they your casks - A. They are.

Q. Did you serve Sinfield's - A. We did. These casks never went from our house in the regular course of trade. We keep account of the casks the same as we do of cash. They are always entered and set down.

Q. I take it for granted the publicans keep the casks in their cellars, not in their bed-rooms - A. Yes.

GUILTY , aged 33,

Of stealing that in the corn bin, not of that which was at Sinfield's.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18130217-3

239. EDWARD DUTCH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of January , eleven bottles of gin, value 32 s. 6 d. the property of Benjamin Hodges , Benjamin George Hodges , and Thomas Chamberlain .

BENJAMIN GEORGE HODGES . My partner s are Benjamin Hodges , and Thomas Chamberlain . The prisoner was one of our carmen, and each of the carman had a key to their corn bin.

Q. After you had apprehended the last prisoner did you go to the house of the prisoner - A. Yes; he lived about an hundred yards from the distillery. The constable knocked at the door and demanded the key of his corn bin. I desired the constable to ask for the key of the corn bin. While we were waiting at the door, which I thought a considerable time, I heard a noise as if bottles were being removed. I thought I heard a bottle break. When we got in I desired the constable to search the house, and in one cupboard he found four quart bottles full of gin; in another cupboard he found three bottles, two of gin and one of rum. The constable then proceeded to search the bed. At the bolster of the bed the constable found two bottles of gin. The constable desired the wife to get out of bed. She got out. He discovered six more bottles in different parts of the bed. We took the prisoner to the distillery, and placed the bottles before him. He said he must confess that he was an old rogue, and that they were his masters property. The constable had the key of his corn bin. He opened the corn bin. We found one bottle nearly full of gin. We told him of it afterwards; he said that he had taken a bottle for his own drinking.

Q. I need not ask you whether your servants have the liberty of taking gin for their own drinking - A. None whatever. I have examined the whole of it; I believe it to be our property.

Q. You give your servants a bottle of spirits at Christmas I believe - A. Yes.

Prisoner's Defence. Mr. Chamberlain gave me a bottle of gin at Christmas, and these were the savings of three Christmas's.

Q. to prosecutor. Did he tell you then that they were the savings of three Christmas's - A. Yes, he did. I can confute him; the four bottles of gin that were given to him by Mr. Chamberlain were cordial sweetened gin; this is not the sort.

Q. How many bottles are here - A. Eleven. We never give our men any of this description.

WILLIAM GOODENOUGH . I am a constable. I went with Mr. Hodges to the house of the prisoner. His account is correct. I produce eleven bottles and one piece.

GUILTY , aged 63.

Confined Two Years in the House of Correction , and whipped in Jail .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18130217-4

240. WILLIAM STOREY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of February , in the dwelling-house of Martha Stokoe , two promissory notes, value 5 l. each, her property .

MARTHA STOKOE . I am a widow . I live at Hampton Court, in the parish of Hampton . I keep a house there.

Q. Do you carry on any business there - A. Yes, a chandlers shop.

Q. Is that a part of your dwelling-house - A. It is not; it is detached from the dwelling-house.

Q. Did you lose any notes out of your shop - A. I lost three, on the 9th of this month, three five pound notes, on the Kingston bank.

Q. Where had they been put - A. They were in the till of the shop, in a pocket-book. I missed them that evening, between seven and nine o'clock.

Q. How long before they were missing had you seen them - A. I had seen them in my pocket-book about two hours before. I received them from my daughter, Sarah Stokoe . When I missed them I sent to the bank to get the number of them. I had sent my daughter for them at the bank to get a draft paid of twenty pounds; she brought three five-pound notes, and five small notes. My daughter brought them to me in the pocket-book from Kingston. When my daughter delivered me the pocketbook I saw what it contained; it contained three five-pound notes, and I took the five small notes out of the pocket-book, and left the others in. I went to fetch the pocket-book in as I generally do of a night, and it was gone. I have two doors to my shop; one door I go in myself to let customers in, and that was always kept bolted, and another door for the customers to come in.

Q. Could any body come in without your seeing them - A. Yes, if I was busy writing they could.

Q. Where was your daughter - A. She was in the parlour with me.

Q. Had you seen the prisoner in your shop or about your shop - A. No, I have not seen him any where that I can recollect, before this information.

SARAH STOKOE . Q. Were you sent, on the 9th of this month, by your mother to Kingston bank to get change of a twenty pound draft - A. Yes. I took a pocket-book with me. I got change three Kingston five-pound notes, two two's, and a one. I put them into the pocket-book and gave it to my mother.

Q. Did you take the note directly home to your mother - A. No, I had two or three places to call at. I kept the pocket-book in my hand. I never parted with it until I gave it my mother.

Q. Should you know the notes if you were to see them - A. No.

Q. Had you seen the prisoner in the shop that night - A. No, nor any part of the day, nor any where near the shop.

JOHN BIGBY . I keep the Toy tap, Hampton Court. The prisoner came to me on Thursday night, the 11th instant, for a quartern of rum. He gave me a Kingston five-pound note to take for it. Mrs. Stokoe had sent me the numbers of three Kingston notes that she lost. This note was one of the numbers. I asked him how he came by the note.

He told me that he found it in Hampton Court Green. I told him I must detain the note, and him. He staid. I sent for the constable, and gave him in charge. I never saw him before as I know of. He is a soldier , and belongs to the barracks of Hampton Court. The number of the note was 6,735. The constable took the note from me.

ARTHUR GROOMBRIDGE . I am a constable. I know no more than I had the note delivered to me. I searched the prisoner. I only found a knife, a purse, and a ring upon him. I asked him if he knew anything about the rest of the notes. He told me that he bought the ring at Kingston, which I found in his possession, with one of the five-pound notes he found. He found two five-pound notes together on Hampton Court Green. I think he said he found them on Wednesday evening, after his parade. He told me that he found them in a piece of paper, or that they were wrapped up in paper, I do not know which. I went to the jeweller's shop at Kingston, and got that note. The number of that note is 6736.

ROBERT FRANCIS LAMBERT . I am a clerk in the Kingston Bank. On the afternoon of Tuesday, the 9th, Sarah Stokoe came and got change of a twenty pound draft. I gave her three five-pound Kingston notes, numbers 6146, 6735, 6736, two two's, and a one pound Bank of England note. The girl put them into the pocket-book herself.

Prisoner. The note I offered the landlord of the tap was a Guildford note, I believe.

Bigby. It was a Kingston note; 6735 was the note he offered me. This is the note he offered me, and no other.

Prisoner's Defence. I have been thirteen years, and never was brought to a suspicion of this in my life before. I found the notes on Wednesday last on my return from the old barracks to the new barracks, my quarters.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18130217-5

241. WILLIAM NORRIS was indicted for feloniously making an assault, on the 8th of February , in the King's highway, upon Matilda Ryan , widow , putting her in fear, and feloniously taking from her person and against her will, a mantle, value 1 l. and a handkerchief, value 2 d. her property .

MATILDA RYAN . I live at No. 1, Russell-place, Bow-street, Covent Garden. I am a widow.

Q. Were you out on the 8th of February last - A. Last Monday week I was, from a quarter to half past eleven in the evening. I was coming from Whitechapel. I was in the Strand, near the bottom of Newcastle-street . I was going along the Strand quite alone. I heard some persons come after me; I turned my head, I looked, I saw three men follow me. I had no sooner put one foot before the other, I received a blow on the back of my neck. I was knocked down.

Q. Could you tell by whom the blow was struck - A. I could not. I was knocked down. I saw two men run before me. I arose up immediately. Another man I found by my side. I had my pocket handkerchief twisting round my hand. I found the prisoner by my side; he was trying to take the handkerchief out of my hand. The moment the handkerchief let go I laid hold of the man by the skirt of his coat.

Q. He succeeded in getting your handkerchief from you - A. Yes. I laid hold of the skirt of his coat, and called out, watchman, stop thief. The watchman and patrol came up, and took him. He was taken to the watchhouse.

Q. When the watchman and patrol came up had he got away from you - A. No; they came up before he got away from me. He was taken to the watchhouse, and the handkerchief was found on him.

Q. Did you lose anything else - A. Nothing else than the mantle and pocket handkerchief.

Q. Did you ever get your mantle again - A. No, sir. I lost the mantle the instant. I was knocked down. It was only pinned. They took hold of the hood, and it was gone instantly. It was not tied.

Q. Did the prisoner say anything when he was struggling with you for the handkerchief - A. Not a word, as I heard.

Q. How came you to be out so late - A. Sometimes I am out as late as twelve o'clock.

Q. You are usually out late of nights, are you - A. Not always, sometimes, generally within these two months.

Q. What way of business are you - A. Sometimes I take in needle work, sometimes I go out washing, and if I do not get enough to pay my rent I go out. I have a ready furnished room at four shillings a week.

Q. How long had you been out - A. All day almost.

Q. Was it a light night - A. It was lamp-light; whether the moon was up I cannot say. It was near the bottom of Newcastle-street. It is not a light part. I cannot swear to the two men, nor can I swear that this man was going with the other men. I can only speak to him as the person that I found by my side, I was knocked down. I was a good deal alarmed and flurried by the blow. I soon recovered. I arose up, and found the men were gone from my shoulders. I saw two men running away. I found this person by my side.

Q. When did you say you lost your mantle - A. When I was knocked down. It was only my handkerchief that was found upon the prisoner.

Q. Did he use any violence to get the handkerchief from you - A. Not as I perceived. He over-pulled me to get it from me. The watchman came up in two or three minutes after he got my handkerchief. I keeping hold of him he did not endeavour to get away as I perceived. I was in a flurry at the time.

THOMAS PEARSON . I am one of the patrols of St. Clements Danes. On the night of the 8th of February, I heard the cry of, stop him. I went immediately towards the place where the voice came from. When I got up, I and the watchman took the prisoner in custody. The prosecutrix had hold of the prisoner. We took him to the watch-house.

house. She charged him with robbing her of a mantle. She said nothing else at that time.

Mr. Reynolds. You know there is a forty pounds reward, do not you - A. Not as I know of.

Q. Will you swear that - A. No.

Q. Have you the least doubt of it - A. No.

PETER REDDICK . I am a watchman. On the 8th, I was out; I heard a cry. I got up as fast as I could. I saw the prosecutrix had got hold of the prisoner by the skirt of his coat. She said she had been knocked down and robbed, and the prisoner was one of them. She said she had lost her mantle. My partner and me took him to the watchhouse. Mrs. Ryan said he was one of them that knocked her down and robbed her. He told me she had knocked him down. I said, come to the watchhouse and settle it.

Q. Had he the appearance of being down - A. Yes, he had. As we were going to the watchhouse I observed him busy with his hand under his coat. I said, what is this you are at. He said, it is only my handkerchief; so I took the handkerchief from him. He made no objection to my taking it. The prosecutrix and my partner were before me. When I went in the watchhouse I said I found a handkerchief. The prosecutrix described the handkerchief. She said there was a burnt hole in it; it had been darned up. I said she had described the handkerchief pretty well. I have had the handkerchief in my custody ever since. This is the handkerchief.

Prosecutrix. This is my handkerchief.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence; called five witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY, aged 16,

Of stealing, the handkerchief but not violently.

Judgment respited .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18130217-6

242. MARY BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of January , twelve papers of pins, value 4 s. one pound and half a pound weight of thread, value 5 s. a quarter of a pound weight of cotton thread, value 1 s. and two pieces of tape, value 1 s. the property of Thomas Flint and John Ray , privately in their shop .

ALEXANDER GIBSON . I am shopman to Thomas Flint and John Ray , haberdasher s, 15, Grafton-street, in the parish of St. Ann's, Westminster . On the 20th of January, I was in the shop about five o'clock in the afternoon. The prisoner came in the shop. I did not see her come in the shop. I was told by Miss Pearson that a woman had been in the shop and had taken something with her. I went after her, and overtook her in Grafton-street, about fifty yards from the shop. I told her that she was wanted in the shop where she had gone out of. She asked me what I wanted. I told her she would be told when she came back. She came back with me to the shop, and produced the articles out of her apron. She had twelve papers of pins in her apron, one pound of thread, a quarter of a pound of cotton thread, and half a pound of thread besides, and two pieces of tape, they were worth eleven shillings, the selling price was fourteen shillings. She then said these articles she got for half an ounce of thread. She said she asked for half an ounce of thread, and got these articles for which she paid eighteen shilings, that she gave a pound note, and received two shillings out of it, and that asked for half an ounce of thread, and had these articles besides, and by her account she paid eighteen shillings for these articles.

Q. Eighteen shillings was more than the selling price of these articles, was it not - A. Yes. When she produced these articles I took her into the warehouse; then she took out half a pound of thread while the constable was being sent for. The constable was sent for. He came and searched her, and found nothing else.

SARAH PEARSON . Q. Were you in the shop on the 20th of January when the prisoner came in - A. I saw her in the shop, but I did not see her come in.

Q. Did you hear what she asked for - A. No. I was serving a gentleman with a variety of haberdashery articles. I went to another counter to fetch something that was wanted. I had left these goods on the counter that I was serving the gentleman with. On turning my head, I saw the prisoner, Mary Brown , handling one of the parcels of cotton thread. I made what haste I could back to the place, and by that time she was going out of the door. I asked the witness that spoke last, if he had been serving her with anything. He said, no. I then mentioned the circumstance of the cotton, and said she must have stolen it, and requested him to go after her, which he did.

Q. Had not she given you a note - A. No; I had not spoken to her, nor had she given me a note. I received no money of her at all. She returned back to the shop with the young man I sent in pursuit of her. She opened her apron of her own accord, and took out a quarter of a pound of cotton thread that was missing, twelve papers of pins, and a pound of thread. She was taken into the warehouse, and then she took out half a pound of thread besides. She said that she bought that thread, and gave me eighteen shillings. That was not so. She said nothing respecting the other articles. She said that she gave me a one-pound note, and I gave her two shillings in change. She pretended to have bought only the thread; the price of that thread would be two shillings. I said she had not given me a note. She persisted she had. These are the articles; they are my master's property. I saw her handling the thread, but I did not see her move it from the counter.

Prisoner's Defence. It was really through distress that I did it. I had not earned above two shillings for two months.

GUILTY, aged 28,

Of stealing, but not privately in the shop .

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18130217-7

243. THOMAS INGRAM was indicted, for that he, on the 4th of July , feloniously did procure, direct, counsel, aid, and abet Joseph Simmons Winter , Benjamin Allen , and William Taylor , feloniously to

steal ten wrappers; value 20 s. one thousand six hundred pounds weight of silk, value 2500 l. a trunk, value 10 s. a case, value 5 s. and two hundred pounds weight of ostrich feathers, value 200 l. the property of Robert Hotchen , in a box upon the navigable river Thames .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY , aged 25,

Confined One Year in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130217-8

244. HENRY SCHOOLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of January , two hundred and eighty-four prints, value 5 l. the property of James Merigot . in the dwelling-house of Samuel Turner .

JAMES MERIGOT . I live at 33, Frederick-place, Hampstead-road, in the parish of St. Pancras . I am an engraver, and teach drawing . I lodge in the dwelling-house of Samuel Turner. The property that I missed was deposited in a back garret; it is a store room belonging to me. The prisoner lodged in the same house. I afterwards saw the property that I had missed at Mr. Colnatty's, a parcel of prints, the ruins of Rome. That parcel contained two hundred and eighty-four. They were my property, except about twenty; they belonged to a Mr. Edwards. All that are not tinted are mine.

Q. Was that part of your property that you saw in Mr. Colnatty's possession, that had been in your store room - A. Yes.

Q. What room in the house did you occupy - A. The front room on the second floor. The prisoner occupied the room above me.

Q. Had he any right at all to go into your store room - A. No. That room door was more open than shut, because it served to dry linen in. My store room was next to the prisoner's room.

Q. You had no knowledge of missing any of your property until Mr. Colnatty produced them, had you - A. Not at all. The prints that are not coloured are all my exclusive property. Mr. Edwards had a share before we parted.

MR. COLNATTY. I live at 23, Cockspur-street, Charing-cross. I know Mr. Merigot, the prosecutor. On the 26th of January last, I purchased two hundred and eighty-four prints at Mr. Dodd's auction in St. Martin's-lane; I knew them to be Mr. Merigot's property. I shewed them to Mr. Merigot; he claimed them. These are the prints that I bought at Mr. Dodd's sale.

GEORGE JONES . I am clerk to Mr. Dodd, an auctioneer. Mr. Colnatty purchased prints of me. On the 20th of January last, the prisoner brought me four hundred prints of different descriptions, ancient and modern; he left it to our best judgment to sell them for him. Mr. Colnatty bought a part of them four hundred which the prisoner brought to me.

Prosecutor. The whole of the prints were in my possession, and all that are not coloured are mine. They are worth five pounds.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence; called five witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY, aged 21,

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling-house .

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18130217-9

245. HENRY SAYER was indicted, for that he, on the 6th of February , did falsely pretend to Alexander M'Creery , that he was clerk to Messrs. Preston and Co. and that a certain paper writing was prepared by the said Messrs. Preston and Co. and that he was authorised by them to produce the same for the sum of 7 l. 6 s. and by means of such false pretence he did obtain 4 l. 10 s. 6 d. with intent to cheat and defraud him thereof .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded,

GUILTY , aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130217-10

246. JOHN JOBBINS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of February , two yards of cotton, value 2 s. the property of Samuel Favell , William Bousfield , and John Rickarby Bousfield .

WILLIAM BOUSFIELD . I am a slop-seller , and live at No. 12, St. Mary Axe . My partners names are Samuel Favell and John Rickarby Bousfield . The prisoner was one of our servant s that we employed in manufacturing our goods. On the 1st of February, on account of suspicion, I took him into the accompting-house and asked him if he had any objection to be searched, upon which he answered he had no objection. One of my servants did search him, and found on his person two yards of cotton, value two shillings. He mentioned where he had sold property, and there we found it. I believe he is not an hardened man. This is the cotton; it is our property. He had wrapped it round his body, under his shirt.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence; called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 47.

Fined 1 s. and discharged.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130217-11

247. JOHN CLOSSY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22nd of January , a gown, value 5 s. the property of Thomas Mapp .

THOMAS MAPP . I am a publican . I keep the George, in Fenchurch-street . The prisoner secreted himself in a back-room up one pair of stairs, on the 22nd of January. He removed a gown that was hung up to dry on a line; he took it down. My servant was going up stairs about a quarter before seven in the evening, in order to change her clothes. She found the prisoner in the back-room. She ran down stairs, holloaing out, murder. The prisoner followed her very rapidly. He was stopped in the passage. We sent for an officer, and had him taken up. I never saw the prisoner before.

MARY DELAY . I am servant to Mr. Mapp. I was going up stairs about a quarter before seven, to change my dress. I looked into the back-room to shut the window down. I saw the prisoner standing in the room with the gown in his hand. I ran down stairs, and the prisoner ran after me down stairs. A man caught him at the bottom of the stairs. He left the gown up stairs in the room.

He had taken it off the line. I am sure I saw him with the gown in his hand.

PETER MUNT . I am an officer. I took the prisoner into custody. He had nothing but a pair of breeches tied up in this handkerchief. He said, it was his own property. This is the gown.

Prisoner. When I was taken in custody was anything said about the gown.

Munt. Not at that moment. The gown was brought down about two or three minutes after.

Prisoner. The charge given against me was for robbing the club-room. The girl said I had a knife in one hand and a bundle in the other.

Q. to Mary Delay . Look at that gown - A. This is the gown that he had in his hand. I pinned it up with four pins in a back club room. I am sure I hung the gown up, and pinned it up with four pins.

Prisoner's Defence. I went into the house to get a pint of beer. I asked the boy if I might take the liberty of going into the privy, and as I was just bracing myself up the girl came down stairs. I never saw the club-room, nor did I ever see the gown until it was produced before the Lord Mayor.

GUILTY, aged 29.

Judgment respited .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130217-12

248. WILLIAM BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of February , two glass bottles, value 8 d. and two quarts of wine, value 4 s. the property of John Bumpstead .

JOHN HODGSON . I am a porter to John Bumpstead , wine-merchant , Bishopsgate-street. On the 6th of February, about six o'clock in the evening, I was going up Barbican . I had got the truck, and three dozen of stout, and a dozen-basket with nine bottles of wine in it. I looked back; I saw the prisoner take out two bottles of wine. I let the truck down, and seized the prisoner. A gentleman assisted me in holding the prisoner. He told me to secure him; the prisoner had put the bottles in his pockets. I told the prisoner he had robbed me. He said, no. I took the bottles of wine out of his pockets, and the officer was sent for. These are the bottles; they are my master's property.

Prisoner's Defence. I own that I was wrong. I throw myself on the mercy of the court.

GUILTY , aged 33.

Confined One Month in Newgate , and whipped in Jail .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130217-13

249. ISAAC JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of January , a three-shilling bank token, an eighteen-penny bank token, a shilling, and a sixpence, the property of Mary Coombs , spinster , from her person .

MARY COOMBS . I am a single woman. I sell fish. On the 26th of January, I was at Billingsgate . I had just done buying my fish. I was going to call a porter. A woman said that the boy had picked my pocket. I went after him, and told him that he had picked my pocket. He said he had not. He said if I would let him go he would return it me. He put his hand into my pocket I had before me. I took the money out of his hand; a three shilling token, an eighteen-penny token, a shilling, and a sixpence. This was about nine o'clock in the morning. This is the money; I have no doubt it is mine.

MICHAEL HEARN . I am clerk of the market. I saw the woman and the boy. I took him in custody.

Prisoner's Defence. I stood seeing the sprats come up, and thinking no harm. A man took me in custody.

GUILTY, aged 13.

Judgment respited .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130217-14

250. WILLIAM COLLINS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of February , a pocket-book, value 1 s. a pencil case, value 5 s. and two bank notes, value 2 l. the property of William Luton , from his person .

WILLIAM LUTON . I am a hatter . I was at the Auction Mart, Threadneedle-street , and while I was holding my hand out to take a catalogue, I felt a hand in my pocket, and when I put my hand down I found my pocket-book was gone. I then looked round, and saw the prisoner standing close by me. I looked at him very earnest. On my looking at him, he moved to another part of the room. I followed him, and still kept my eye on him, and after looking at him some time I tapped him on the shoulder, and told him that I would thank him for a pocket-book that he had on him that did not belong to him. His answer was, that he had none. A gentleman that was standing by the side of him said he had dropped a pocket-book. I picked it up, and saw it was my own pocket-book. This is the pocket-book. It is mine.

JOHN NICHOL . I was at the Auction Mart. I saw the prisoner drop the book directly Mr. Luton tapped him on the shoulder.

GUILTY , aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130217-15

251. ABRAHAM SHAW was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of January , a miniature case, value 2 l. and fourteen miniatures, value 3 l. the property of Charles Miller , in his dwelling-house .

CHARLES MILLER . I am a jeweller in Aldgate High-street . I keep the house, and live in it myself, in the parish of St. Botolph, Aldgate . On the 23d of January last, I was sitting in my shop, my dog barked that I have chained at the end of my counter. I went immediately into my shop, and two or three persons that were standing about the door said I was robbed. I did not miss anything. My lad had just gone over the way, and was returning again. The prisoner, as he went out of the shop, ran against my lad as he was coming in, and knocked the money out of my lad's hand. I heard the money fall. I did not see the prisoner when I went into the shop. My boy ran after him, and called out, stop thief. He was taken.

Q. You do not know him to be the same man at all - A. I do not. I never saw the man.

GEORGE HUGGITT . I live with Mr. Miller. I

was coming from over the way. I saw the prisoner in the shop.

Q. What day was it - A. The 23d of January, about six o'clock in the evening.

Q. You saw a man in the shop - A. Yes. I saw him lay hold of the miniature case. He stood a little while in the shop, and the dog barked at him, and as the prisoner returned he knocked some halfpence out of my hand. I ran after him down Houndsditch, and halloaed out, stop thief; and just as he got by Mr. Groves's, the oil shop, I saw him drop the case. He run on. I lost sight of him before he was stopped.

Q. How soon was he stopped - A. In little better than a minute afterwards. I am sure he is the same man that passed me, by having an oil-skin on his hat. I observed the oil-skin on his hat as he stood in the shop; it did not fit his hat well. I am sure he is the same man, and a great coat he had. A young lad at Mr. Groves's picked up the case. I am sure I saw the prisoner drop the case. The case contained the miniatures.

WILLIAM JENKINS . I am a clerk in the Navy office. On the night stated in the indictment I was going home down Houndsditch. I saw a person running violently. The prisoner throw down the miniature case; it struck me on the leg. The prisoner passed me. I picked it up.

FRANCIS KINNERSLEY . On Saturday, the 23d of January, I was watching four or five people, near upon six o'clock in the afternoon, in Aldgate High-street, opposite of Three Nuns Heads. I followed them as far as Fenchurch-street; being out of the ward, I left them. I then returned down Houndsditch. I went down to the bottom as far as our ward went. On my returning up again I heard the prisoner crying out, stop thief, and before I could get up, a man had laid hold of him by the collar. I laid hold of him and this gentleman gave me the miniature case.

Prosecutor. This is my miniature case and my miniatures. They are fancy articles. The worth of them depend merely on fancy.

Prisoner's Defence. On Saturday afternoon, I was walking along Leadenhall-street, and down Houndsditch, home, I heard a sudden call of, stop thief. I ran the same as other people did. I saw a short man with a parcel under his arm; I knocked him down. He made his escape. I ran after the man down Houndsditch. A gentleman said to me, you are the thief. I said, no, he is gone down Duke's-place. I was stopped for it.

GUILTY, aged 22,

Of stealing to the value of 30 s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130217-16

252. WILLIAM GARRETT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of January , two shawls, value 1 l. 10 s. three pair of stockings, value 4 l. and three yards of cambric, value 5 s. the property of John Spicer Fisher .

JOHN SPICER FISHER . I am a linen-draper ; I live on Holborn-bridge . The prisoner was my porter ; he had lived with me between four and five years. On the 23d of January, from information, I went into the kitchen and asked the prisoner where he got some brown Holland and calico from. He said, in Holborn. I then said he must go up stairs and open his box. I went up stairs with him and two of my young men, and asked him to give me the key of his box. He gave me the key. I opened the box, and found the things that are laid in the indictment, two shawls, half a yard of cambric, and three pair of stockings, all my property. I asked him how he came by them. He said, he took them while I was at dinner. I sent for an officer, and had him taken up. I sent one of my men with an officer to his mother's, where they found a number of things belonging to me.

Mr. Bolland. A number of things were taken from him at the time he was taken up - A. Yes.

Q. Clothes, and about thirty pound in money - A. His box certainly was in my possession.

Q. Do not you know that there was thirty pounds taken from him - A. I do not know. I did count the money. I do not know how much there was. There were many things in the box that I could have indicted him for.

Q. Was there any gold in the prisoner's box - A. There was some silver. I cannot say how much.

JOSEPH BROWN . I am shopman to John Spicer Fisher . On the 22nd of January, a pair of breeches was brought home by a woman for the prisoner, and with them a remnant of calico and brown Holland. On Saturday morning, when Mr. Fisher came to town, he was acquainted with what had taken place. He immediately went and charged the prisoner with having taken it out of the shop. Mr. Fisher then thought he had more property in his box. Mr. Fisher took him up stairs. He gave Mr. Fisher his key. Mr. Fisher opened his box, and there he found the articles laid in the indictment. I was along with him. He found two shawls, a remnant of cambric, and three pair of stockings, two pair of silk and one cotton. There were other things in the soner's box which were not marked, such as silk handkerchiefs.

GEORGE WORRALL . I am an officer. I took the prisoner in custody. I produce the things which were put into my hands by Mr. Fisher; two shawls, a remnant of cambric, two pair of silk stockings, and one pair of cotton.

Brown. The shawls are my master's, and the stockings they have my master's marks; the cambric is marked also.

Prisoner's Defence. What is alleged against me is false.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY, aged 19.

Judgment respited .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130217-17

253. SAMUEL RICHARDSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of October , nine hundred and eighty-nine silk handkerchiefs, value 225 l. 12 s. one hundred and thirty yards of mode, value 54 l. 19 s. and sixty-one yards of sattin, value 15 l. the property of James Masters .

JAMES MASTERS . I live at No. 4, Primrose-street, Bishopsgate without . On the night of the 5th of October, my work-shop was broken open and robbed of goods specified in the indictment. It is a detached work-shop, and no part of my dwelling-house, not under the same roof. When I discovered the robbery in the morning, my suspicion fell upon a lad whom I employed about two years in my service, of the name of Thomas Jenkins . I sent for him to my house. We went before a magistrate and got a warrant to apprehend the prisoner.

Q. Did you find any property - A. No; none at all.

WILLIAM WILLIAMS . I am foreman to Mr. Masters. On the 5th of October, Monday night, when we left the premises at seven o'clock, the premises were all safe; when we came on Tuesday morning, the 6th, at six o'clock, the room door was forced open that led into the middle of the shop. I went and acquainted my master. He came with us, and all the goods were gone; nine hundred and eighty-nine silk handkerchiefs, one hundred and thirty yards of mode, and sixty-one yards of sattin. They were all gone.

GEORGE PAGE . I am a silk-dresser. I work for Mr. Masters. I was the person that fastened up the premises at seven o'clock in the evening; in the morning I found them broken open. The door had been double locked, and the lock lay on the stairs; another door was broken open.

Q. Did you ever find any of the property - A. No, none at all.

Q. Do you know any thing of the prisoner - A. I have seen him often. I know very little of him.

Q. to Williams. Do you know any thing of the prisoner - A. No further than seeing him at the back of the premises. He lived at the back of the premises.

THOMAS JENKINS . I am a silk-dresser to Mr. Masters. Samuel Richardson , the prisoner, asked me often how my master's place was situated. He asked me whether there was any thing in the premises. I told him I did not know.

Q. When was this - A. He asked me on the Sunday, as the place was broken open on the Monday. We met at a place in Skinner-street, about eleven o'clock in the day. He asked me how the place was situated. I told him there was a private bolt. We went to Mr. Emlin's wine vaults, and had some rum together. There was another person with Samuel Richardson when we had the rum together; he called him Dick. I do not know his other name. After we had some rum we went to Hare-street; then I went home.

Q. What do you know about this robbery - A. I cannot say that Richardson did it, only that Richardson questioned me about it. I never saw him after that, excepting facing the window when I was at breakfast.

Q. Do not you know what became of all this property - A. No.

Q. to prosecutor. Have you any other witness - A. No.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130217-18

254. JAMES PARSONS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of January , a plough, value 5 s. a plane, value 5 s. a great coat, value 8 s. and a saw, value 8 s. the property of William Gardner .

WILLIAM GARDNER . I am a carpenter . I work at Mr. Smart's, at Chelsea .

Q. When did you lose your tools - A. On the 21st of January, about twenty minutes after four. I went to my partner to another part of the premises, and during the time I was gone I lost my tools.

JOSEPH WITTICE . I am a labouring man. I was at work in the yard getting a foundation out. I was going into the building for a basket of chips: I met Parsons coming out of the building with the tools; he had a jack plane and a saw.

Q. Did you lay hold of him - A. No; he drawed back. He threw away the jack plane, and the great coat; and the saw he put in his bosom. The plough and the plane and the coat he threw under the step. I went to tell the prosecutor, and in the mean time he walked out of the gate. I and the prosecutor followed him, and just as the prosecutor came up to him he pulled the saw out of his bosom, and put it between some pales.

JOHN LISCOMBE . I am a carpenter. The prosecutor and me were taking dimensions of the adjoining house. The last witness, Wittick, gave us an alarm that a man had got his tools. We pursued the prisoner. On taking hold of him he dropped this saw in between some garden pales, just at the moment we took him in custody, and the other things were under the stairs when we came back, where he had dropped them. When we laid hold of the prisoner he said he was distressed.

Prosecutor. The coat is mine; the saw, plane, and plough, they are all mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been out of work two months; I could not get any employ. I had burried my wife a few days before. There were nobody in the building; I was tempted to take them through necessity and hunger.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130217-19

255. THOMAS SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of November , three fowls, value 5 s. the property of William Hodgson .

WILLIAM HODGSON . I am an inn keeper at St. Ann's, Limehouse . On the 27th of November, about nine o'clock in the morning, I was sitting by my window looking in my yard. My fowls were in my yard. I saw the prisoner in the yard just by the privy door. The prisoner was in the habit of buttoning his small clothes up. He had got one fowl in his breeches, and one in his apron. I saw him with another fowl, one he put his head under his wing; he put that under his jacket. I saw him do this. They were all alive. I opened the window, and called out to John Hall, a man that belongs to the docks. The prisoner then bolted himself in the privy. I called out to the ostler to bring me a pitchfork. The prisoner said, do not break open the door, I will open it. He opened it, and there were three fowls then on the bottom of the floor.

Q. Were they your fowls - A. Yes; they were alive. Then I took the prisoner to the watchhouse. I gave two shilling and eleven-pence for each of them. These are two of them; they are mine. One has been stolen since.

JOHN HALL . Mr. Hodgson called me as I was standing at the yard gate, and said a man was stealing his fowls. I immediately looked down the gateway, and saw the prisoner pick one of the fowls up from off the ground. He put it into his apron and walked with it into the privy, and bolted himself in. I went and stood at the privy door, waiting for the man coming out. I looked through the hole at the top of the privy door, and saw the prisoner in the act of putting one of the fowls into his smallclothes. I called out to him, and told him not to kill the fowls. He then threw that fowl on the ground. I then saw him take another from behind his coat. He had two coats on. He threw that down on the floor. He then pulled another fowl somewhere from his person; somewhere under his coat. Immediately upon that Mr. Hodgson came down. He held that fowl in his hand until the door was open. Mr. Hodgson was going to break the door open with the pitchfork. The prisoner then said he would open the door. He at first refused to open the door. The prisoner opened the door, and immediately he let that fowl go out of his hand, the fowl flew into the yard. He still remained in the privy, until we requested him to come out. He came to the door. We took him in custody, and took him into the house. A constable was sent for; he came and conveyed him to the watchhouse. The prisoner told us he was a carpenter.

Q. Were they game fowls - A. I believe not. He said one of the fowls was his own.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in the habit of fighting and feeding a few cocks for some gentlemen. That morning I was taking my fowl for a little walk. It got from me and went into this yard. I went in the yard and catched it. I was not going to take these fowls away. The other fowl was my own property.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18130217-20

256. JOHN WAINWRIGHT was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Samuel Maginie , about the hour of nine in the night, on the 13th of January , and stealing therein four silver caddy-spoons, value 1 l. 2 s. three silver tea-spoons, value 12 s. a pair of sugar tongs, value 6 s. a silver desert spoon, value 14 s. and a table-spoon, value 6 s. his property .

SAMUEL MOGINIE . I live at No. 1, Princes-row, Pimlico, St. George's, Hanover-square . I am a watchmaker and jeweller .

Q. Was your house broken into on the 13th of January last - A. Yes, about ten minutes past six in the evening.

Q. What part - A. The shop window; the third pane from the door was broken; the lower pane of all.

Q. Were you in the shop at the time - A. No.

Q. Had you observed that pane to be whole in the course of the day - A. Yes, I had, two or three hours before that time.

Q. What articles do you expose in the window for sale - A. It is a corner window. One window watches and clocks, and the other window more particularly jewellery.

Q. Were you at home at the time - A. I was in the upper room, in the first floor. I was at tea at the time, and in returning from tea to the shop, on my entering the shop I went to that window to turn a lamp. I heard a rattling noise in the window. I perceived a man's hand in the window, and one of the silver spoons in action. I immediately opened the door, and in opening the door he drew his hand back and ran away. I immediately pursued him. I overtook him about an hundred yards from my shop.

Q. Did you ever lose sight of him - A. No, never from the time that he had his hand in the window. I brought him back to my shop.

Q. Did you find anything on him - A. Not of my property.

Q. Was any of your property taken away - A. Yes. I never got it again. I do not know what became of that property.

Q. What was taken away - A. Four silver caddy-spoons, value one pounds two shillings the selling price. I gave eighteen shillings for them; three tea-spoons, about three shillings and sixpence a piece; the selling price five shillings each; a pair of sugar-tongs, ten shillings and sixpence or eleven shillings; one desert spoon, twelve shillings; and one plated table-spoon, six shillings.

Q. When you went out of the shop was the prisoner running - A. He was.

Q. Was any other person running - A. Not any. I do not know that anybody else was near the spot. When I took the prisoner he asked me what I wanted with him. I said, you rascal you are the person that robbed my shop. He said nothing to that. I collared him and brought him to my shop, but I did not find any of my property.

Q. Could you see when he was running whether he threw anything from him or not - A. I do not think that he had time. I did not perceive that he did.

Q. You did not hear the window break did you - A. No.

Q. How long after you came down was it before you saw his hand in the window - A. It was immediately.

Mr. Adams. The last time you observed this window whole, was two or three hours before - A. Yes.

Q. For anything you know or perceived the window might be broken while you were up stairs - A. I cannot say.

Q. You heard no breaking. If the window had been broken when you came down stairs you must heard it, must you not - A. Yes.

Q. For anything that you know the window might be broken while you were up stairs - A. No doubt it was.

Q. You cannot say that the prisoner broke it - A. Yes, by his hand being in.

Q. You also say you found no property upon him - A. No property of mine.

Q. For anything you know the things might be taken away while you were taking of tea - A. No such thing. I do not imagine they were.

Q. Was it not possible that the window might then be broken - A. Yes.

Q. And, of course, if the window had then been broken it is also probable that the person that broke it might take the things away - A. It is probably. I do not believe that the window was broken. I believe it was cut.

Q. It might be cut while you were up stairs - A. Yes, no doubt it was.

COURT. Did you find anything about the prisoner that would have cut a window - A. No.

EDWARD CLARK . I am a parish constable. I know nothing more than taking the prisoner in custody. I searched his person, and as I was searching him I found the fore finger of his right hand bleeding. It appeared to have been cut with glass. I asked him how that was done. He said, that was an old wound. I am sure it was not an old wound. There were a few drops of blood on the floor where he stood. I found nothing on him but his own property.

JURY. Was there any blood on the glass - A. I did not see that. The prisoner's finger was cut length-ways.

COURT. What time was it when you got there - A. Between six and seven. Nearer seven than six.

Mr. Adams. Are you a surgeon - A. No.

Q. How can you distinguish a cut from glass from a cut of anything else. Can you distinguish a cut from glass from a cut from anything else - A. I cannot.

JAMES GILLMORE . I am an officer of Queen-square office. On the 26th of January, I met the prisoner in custody at our gaol, I asked him what brought him there. He said, you need not say anything, my crime is heavy enough. I said, what have you been up to; why, said he, I have been breaking a window at Pimlico.

Q. What were the words - A. I asked him, what brought him there. He said, you need not say anything at all about me, my crime is heavy enough. I said, what have you been at. Why, said he, I have been breaking a window at Pimlico.

COURT, Q. to prosecutor. Which way did the prisoner run when you came out of your house - A. Towards the Queen's house.

Q. Did you, when you came out, look the other way to see whether anybody was running, or not - A. No, I did not. I did not lose sight of him after seeing his hand in the window.

Q. Did you see his person until you got out of the door - A. Yes, I saw his person, but not so as to distinguish the features of his face. I saw his body.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of the crime that is alleged against me.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 22.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18130217-21

257. JAMES JAMES and THOMAS JAMES were indicted for that they, about the hour of seven in the night, on the 26th of January , being in the dwelling-house of William Busby , esq one coat, value 10 s. the property of Henry Busby ; one coat, value 10 s. the property of George Busby ; and one coat, value 10 s. the property of Robert Burns , feloniously did steal, and that they afterwards burglariously did break to get out of the same house .

ROBERT BURNS . I am a clerk in the Stamp office, and private teacher of the mathematics .

Q. You are a tutor of Mr. Busby's family - A. I am.

Q. Tell us what you know of the stealing any great coats - A. On the 26th of January, I went to Mr. Busby's house, about a quarter before five, and when I came down I found my coat was gone. I took a great coat with me. I laid my coat on the bench in the hall. There were other coats there at the time; I do not know how many. I came away at half past six; my coat was gone. It was dark when I came away.

HENRY BUSBY . I am the son of William Busby .

Q. What parish is your father's house in - A. Marybone .

Q. Did you lose any great coat on the 26th of January last - A. Yes. I had put it on a bench in the hall about four o'clock. I missed it about half past six, when I went to let Mr. Burns out. He lost his coat, and mine was gone also. I have seen my coat again at Queen-square police office.

- . I am footman to Mr. Busby. On the 26th of January, I let one of the prisoners in. I think it was James James . I could not swear to the man. It was a tall man. He came to the door either with a rap or a ring. I opened the door, and let him in. He asked me if we wanted a pair of boots to go down to Mr. Hoby's, St. James's-street. I said, no person of that name worked for the family. He said, he was quite right; this was the house. He said, he did not know the name. I asked him if he should know the name if he heard it mentioned. He said, no. I told him to wait, and I would go down and ask the butler. I left him in the hall, and went and asked the butler, and the butler went to the man in the hall.

Q. Were there any coats in the hall at the time the man was in the hall - A. I cannot swear to that. I did not observe any great coats.

Q. One man came - A. Yes. I did not see any other person with him, and when I let the man in, I put the door to, I am certain it was locked. I had let Mr. Burns in before that. I let nobody else in but Mr. Burns and the man that came for the boots, nor can I recollect that any other person did.

ROGER BATEMAN . I am butler to Mr. Busby. The last witness came to me about the boots; in consequence of that I went to the hall. There was a man standing in the hall then.

Q. Should you know that man again - A. No. I cannot swear to either of the prisoners. I asked the man what he came for; his answer was that

he came from Hoby's for boots. At that time there had been a young man in the house that had boots and shoes from Hoby's, a few days before that, which led me to suppose that he came for the boots, as they did not fit the gentleman. They were to be returned back again. I went to my master, and asked if I was to give the boots up. He said, no. I returned back to the hall, and found the man gone and the door open. I had assisted in taking off Mr. Henry Busby 's coat and master George's coat. They both came in together. I left their great coats in the hall, on the bench.

Q. Had you seen them any time afterwards - A. Not to my recollection.

Q. Had you opened the door to anybody else - A. Not to my recollection.

GIDEON WOLFE . I am a salesman, and keep a sale-shop, No. 16, Dean-street Westminster.

Q. Do you know the prisoners, or either of them - A. Not particularly, only by offering me the three coats for sale, on the 27th of January, about half past one at noon. On the 22nd, Sir William Lovett 's butler came to me, and said they had lost three coats. I pretended to make a purchase of the coats; I thought they were Mr. Lovett's coats. I had not taken the particulars down. I went to the office in Queen-square, and brought two officers with me, and they apprehended the two prisoners.

Q. Did the prisoners say how they came by the great coats - A. The tallest of the prisoners said he purchased the coats. That is James James . James James had two coats and Thomas James one. The officers, Pace and Pope, took the coats to Queen-square office, and the prisoners.

THOMAS PACE . I am an officer of Queen-square office. I produce three coats. I took them off the counter in Wolfe's shop. James James told me he purchased them of a man in the Strand, and gave forty shillings for them. He said, the man was a stranger to him. I advertised the property. Mr. Henry Busby came and owned his coat and his brother's coat, and Mr. Burns came and claimed his coat. In searching the prisoners apartment I found a great number of gloves and pocket handkerchiefs.

Mr. Burns. This is my coat.

Mr. Henry Busby . This is my coat, and this is my brother's coat. My brother's name is George.

The prisoners said nothing in their defence.

THOMAS CLEVERLEY . I am a coal porter. I live at the sign of the Hampshire Hog, in the Strand. On Tuesday, the 26th of January, I was at home from about twelve until seven in the evening. I had no work to do. I was most part of the time in the tap-room. I went into the tap-room about two, and I was not five minutes away until seven.

Q. Do you know James James - A. I know him by eye sight, nothing further; he was in the habit of using the house. James James came in the taproom about three. I am certain he remained there until after five.

Q. Mr. Busby's house is in Cumberland-place, how far is that from the Hampshire Hog - A. That is two miles.

THOMAS HART . I keep the Hampshire Hog. The last witness lodges with me. I recollect this Tuesday. On the following day, I heard James James was taken up. When I heard that, I said he was in the house the day before, drinking. I was not at home when the prisoner came in. I came home at four, and the prisoner was sitting in a box, drinking with two others. I went into the tap-room at half after five. I was making toast. I drank some gin and water with him. I think it was later than half past five.

The prisoners called three witnesses, who gave them a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18130217-22

258. THOMAS WRIGHT was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Alexander M'Masters and William M'Masters , about the hour of six in the night, on the 19th of January , and burglariously stealing therein a pair of pantaloons, value 1 l. 15 s. the property of Alexander M'Masters and William M'Masters .

ALEXANDER M'MASTERS . I live at No. 11, Tavistock-street, in the parish of St. Paul's, Covent Garden . I am a tailor . My partner's name is William M'Masters . We both live in one and the same house.

Q. Did you lose a pair of pantaloons on the 19th of last January - A. We did, about six in the evening. I was at home. I lost them out of the shop.

Q. Was your shop fastened up before that time - A. It was. I had seen it fastened.

Q. Did you examine afterwards to see how it was broken - A. It was not broken, only the latch turned. The shop door is an outer door.

Q. Had you tried the door in the course of that afternoon to try whether it was fastened - A. I saw the door shut before I went in to tea. It was not bolted. The latch had caught, I am certain. An alarm was given. I pursued the man, and took him and the property. My lad informed me. I overtook the man in Charles-street, Covent Garden, about two hundred and fifty yards from my house. He had the pantaloons under his great coat, on his left side; they were concealed. When I overtook him he was walking. I perceived something bulky under his left arm. I laid hold of him. I asked him to let me see what he had got; I suspected it was my property; a pair of pantaloons. He said, what do you want. I pulled back the breast of his coat, and took the pantaloons out. I knew them to be mine. I took the prisoner directly to Bow-street office. The prisoner was delivered to the officer. I have had the pantaloons ever since. These are the pantaloons; they are my property, and William M'Master's.

- . Q. Were you at Mr. M'Masters shop that night - A. I was; I had shut up the shop. I latched the door; I tried it, and the latch had caught. Nobody could come in without lifting up the latch.

Q. How long was that before any body came in - A. More than a quarter of an hour after I had shut up the shop.

Q. When you had shut up the shop did you leave

it, or not - A. I staid in the shop. I was at work in the shop behind a partition.

Q. Was there any other person that came in during that interval - A. There was not. As I was sitting at work I heard the door open very softly; as I was getting off the board I heard some one move, and when I came to see who it was, there was no one in the shop, and the door was left open. I immediately alarmed Mr. M'Masters; he went out directly, and I pursued after. This was about six o'clock. I had not heard the clock go six; I had heard the clock go five. The postman generally goes by at half past five, and he had gone round, and I believe he was coming round again. I know the pantaloons. I had seen them in the shop that afternoon, about two hours before. When I came into Tavistock-street I took towards Charles-street. I saw this man. Mr. M'Masters came up to him. I told him I suspected the man. I saw Mr. M'Masters take the pantaloons from under his coat.

JOSEPH TURNER . I am an officer of Bow-street office. I know no more than taking the prisoner into my custody. On searching him, I found four bad shillings, a watch, and a one-pound note.

Prisoner's Defence. My lord, and gentlemen of the Jury I as was returning home from Drury-lane, going out of York-street into Charles-street, crossing the street, I picked up a pair of pantaloons, when a person came up and accused me of taking them out of a shop in Tavistock-street. I had not been in that street that night. I am a plaisterer ; I was out of work. I have a wife and two children. I hope your lordship will take my case into your consideration, as I am an innocent man.

GUILTY, aged 46,

Of stealing, but not of breaking and entering the dwelling-house .

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18130217-23

259. HIMEY FRANKS was indicted for feloniously making an assault, in the King's highway, on the 14th of February , upon Jeremiah Perry ; putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, a dollar, value 5 s. 6 d. and a three-shilling bank token, his property .

JEREMIAH PERRY . I live at 55, Curtain-road Shoreditch. On the 14th of January last, on my returning home, near twelve o'clock, from the Crown and Magpie tavern, in Whitechapel. It was very near twelve. When I came out I came down Houndsditch as quick as I could; I turned to my right along Bishopsgate-street. I came along Bishopsgate-street until I came to the corner of Union-street, on the right hand side of the way. I then crossed from the right hand side to the left hand side in the same street, Bishopsgate-street; just at that time there were several persons at the corner of Angle-alley. I had not gone many yards further; I perceived a man by the side of me. I turned round to look at him, and then I saw two more behind me. I kept walking on as fast as I could down Bishopsgate-street. He kept close to my arm, and spoke to me two or three times. They spoke about the night. I seemed in an hurry; I gave them a slight answer, and took no notice. I went on until I came to the bottom of Hog-lane. I was thinking of turning down there, but as they followed me I kept straight on, and went down Norton Falgate . As I was going to turn up Hog-lane, the one at my right hand jostled up against me. I suspected then what they were after. I then said, you must not come that with me, my lads, it will not do. Recollecting there was a watch-box a few doors lower down Shoreditch, I was then thinking to find the watchman in this watch-box. When I came to the watch-box the watchman was not in it; he had gone his round. The watch-box stands at the corner of King's-head-court, Shoreditch . One of them directly seized my right arm, and the other on the left. These two pulled me, and the third put his hand to my mouth. They pulled me about twenty-five or thirty yards up the court, and the other man held his hand over my mouth. They shoved me behind. They then throwed me down, and all three fixed upon me; the one at my right shoulder kneeled on my right breast, stopping my eyes. He held my head down, stopped my eyes and mouth; he thrust something dirty into my mouth. My mouth was very dirty when I got up. He put his knuckles to my eyes,; my eyes was very sore the next day, and for two or three days afterwards. He thrust something into my mouth; my mouth was thrusted open, so that my jaw was sore for two or three days. Another one was at my right side, lower down; he was kneeling upon my ribs, and rifling my pockets. At the same time one on my left side, kneeling upon me likewise, just by my side, near my goin. In that situation I felt one on my right hand put his hand into my breeches pocket. At the same time I felt the one on, my left feeling for my pocket-book, and I think, at the same time I heard him on the left hand, say, d - n him, kill him. He repeated that twice. I felt myself agitated in mind. I struggled as much as I could. I was very much alarmed in consequence of my family. At that instant the one that was kneeling on my breast sprang up, and the other one on my right side too. The watchman came past, crying the hour of twelve. At that time, I was struggling very hard. I catched hold of the third man's leg. I saw the other two run away out of the court, the same way that they took me in.

Q. And the left hand man, you laid hold of his leg, did you - A. Yes, and his hand was at the same time in my right hand breeches pocket. I took hold of the ham of his right knee, just here. His hand was in my pocket, and as I rose up he drew it out, and the silver dropped on the pavement.

Q. Did he pull the silver out of your pocket - A. I can hardly distinguish that. He drew his hand out of my pocket, and I heard the silver drop upon the pavement, and I saw it at the same time. I saw it in consequence of my laying hold of him by the leg. He drawed me over on my face. I saw the silver, and I picked up a three-shilling piece with my hand, that had come from my pocket.

Q. How much money had you - A. I cannot say. I had been out collecting that day. I had, I dare

say, about seven or eight pounds of silver in my pocket. I can only swear I lost a five-shilling-and-sixpenny-dollar, and a three-shilling bank-token. I cannot say how much more, not knowing exactly how much I had.

Q. Were you sober - A. I had taken a little wine after supper, but not more than did me good. I was collected, and knew as well as I do this morning. The prisoner, in striving to get away from me, he drawed me a few yards on the pavement. He then fell down. I got him down by the time the watchman came up, and saw him and laid hold of him while I was still holding his leg.

Q. That was the prisoner at the bar, was it - A. Yes.

Q. You do not know whether you lost more money than a dollar and a three-shilling token - A. Yes, I know I lost more. I cannot say how much. I reckon I lost two pound, as near as I can guess. There was a three-shilling piece found on the prisoner, and the one I picked up. The officer has one. The prisoner had his hands in my pocket. He took it out and put it in again. I suppose he took some silver out, by taking his hand out.

Q. Did you hear any jingling of money - A. I did not hear the money rattle until it fell on the ground.

Q. It was the prisoner that had his hand in your pocket at the time that the silver fell on the pavement - A. Yes, it was.

Q. You are sure that more money besides the five-shilling-and-sixpenny-dollar and the three-shilling bank token was taken from you, are you - A. Yes, I know I lost more.

Q. Perhaps you lost it before they came to you - A. No, I had not. I had seven or eight pounds of silver in the whole, as near as I can guess.

Q. Can you swear you had five pounds about you - A. Yes.

Q. How much had you left - A. I cannot say exactly the sum that was left. The officer can tell you. The money was taken out of my pocket directly the man was taken to the watchhouse, and an account was taken of it.

Q. You then delivered all the silver to the officer, did you - A. Yes, and the notes likewise, and the notes were in my right hand pocket.

Q. Then you gave to the officer all the silver that you had left, did you - A. Yes. What makes me know I lost a five-shilling-and-sixpenny-piece, I took three of a person; I had two remaining; one was gone. That makes me swear to a five-shilling-and-sixpenny-piece.

THOMAS WHEELER . I am a watchman in Cumberland-street, Shoreditch. I was going my round, crying the hour of twelve, and Nag's Head-court is the last of my beat. When I came to the corner I found two men upon the ground. The prosecutor gave charge of the prisoner for robbing him. They laid both on the ground. I called out to the next watchman that was coming by the corner of the court, and bid him spring the rattle. The watchman and patrol came to my assistance when he sprang the rattle I took him to the watchhouse. The watchman and patrol lifted the prosecutor up. I took hold of the prisoner. We took them all to the watchhouse.

Q. The prisoner is the man, is he - A. Yes; I never let him loose. He was searched at the watch-house by the officer of the night.

JOHN SHIRLEY . I was officer of the night. I searched the prisoner. I found upon him one three-shilling bank token. The prosecutor brought in a three-shilling token all over mud, which the prosecutor said he picked up on the ground after I had searched the prisoner. I asked the prosecutor whether he knew what he had lost. He said he could not tell, he had a deal of money about him when he came out. I told him I thought he had better look and see whether he might not miss something particular. He then pulled his money out on the table, and trusted to my counting it. I counted it. There was one five-pound note, two five-shilling-and-six-penny dollars, fourteen three-shilling bank tokens, five eighteen-penny tokens, twenty nine shillings, and nine sixpences, and there was ten pounds in notes besides that. As soon as I counted the two five-shilling-and-sixpenny dollars, he said, if there was not three, one was lost; he had taken three from one person.

CHARLES BOND . On the 14th, (Thursday evening), I was passing the end of King's Head-court, when they called for assistance. I went and assisted the watchman, and went with them to the watch-house.

Q. to Prosecutor. Shirley has said that he had of you four pounds fourteen shillings in all; are you sure that you had more money in your pocket - A. Yes, I think I had about eight or nine pounds in silver in my pocket.

Q. Can you swear that you lost more than the five-shilling-and-sixpenny-piece and the three-shilling piece - A. Yes. I saw more than that lay on the ground when I was pulled over by the prisoner at the same time that I catched hold of one three-shilling piece. I saw two or three others. I can only swear by the bulk I had in my pocket, and I know it was a great deal lessened. I know I lost one five-shilling-and-sixpenny-piece.

Q. You know nothing of the other two persons, do you - A. No. One was a tall slim lad, in a brown coat.

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutor is a baker ; he resides in Charles-street, Curtain-road. On the night the prisoner is charged with committing the robbery he was coming through Crown-court, in Still-alley, and just as the prisoner got into Crown-court he heard a man cry out, just as if some man was ill-using him. The prisoner went on when a a man and the prosecutor were on the ground. When the prosecutor got up the prosecutor got hold of him and cruelly used him. The prosecutor's conduct was as if he was mad drunk with liquor. The prosecutor gave charge of the prisoner. The prisoner was searched, and on him a three-shilling piece was found, which was his own property. The prosecutor's conduct towards the prisoner will be best proved by the patrol. The prisoner has an aged father and mother, which he supports by his honest industry.

Prosecutor. The patrol came with the other watchman. The patrol, when he got me up, said, if I did not loose the prisoner he would break my arm with his stick. I was determined not to loose the prisoner, as the prisoner was the person that was kneeling on me when I caught hold of him. The patrol has called on me, and abused me because his name is not on the bill. Mr. Moser did not think there was any occasion of more witnesses than what he had called, I am determined to indict the patrol at the Sessions for an assault.

GEORGE LEWIS . I am the patrol of Shoreditch, I came here merely because of what this gentleman has said of me. Me and John Knowles , the other watchman, were the persons that lifted them both up. I heard the watchman, Wheeler, he called out, John Knowles . Me and John Knowles got up the court together, and as soon as we picked them up, this Mr. Perry struck at me. I said, holloa, sir; mind what you are about. He said, who are you. The watchman said, he is an officer. I said, I am a patrol; do not you see two watchmen here, loose the man. He would not for some time. I said, if you do not loose the man I will rap your knuckles, I did say that in order to part them.

Q. Did the prisoner say that he came up to assist the other - A. No, he did not.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 17.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18130217-24

260. MARY TILSTON was indicted for feloniously making an assault, in the King's highway, on the 3d of February , upon Joseph Hornsby , putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, a 10 l. bank note, and a knife, value 2 s. his property .

JOSEPH HORNSBY . I am a builder and surveyor . I live in James-street, Lisson Grove.

Q. Where were you on the 3d of February, and were you robbed - A. Yes, in the New-road, just at the top of Quebec-street , about half past eight. I was by myself. I had just turned out of Quebec-street, and got into the New-road. I was met by prisoner, and no one else that I saw. She asked me where I was going, I said, I was going home. She asked more questions, which it is needless to mention. She handled me very rudely. Presently I felt her hand, and she walked off.

Q. Did you answer the questions that she asked you - A. Yes. I felt her handling my left hand breeches pocket, and then she left me directly. My pocket was turned to the top, and my ten-pound note was gone. The ten pound note was loose in my pocket. As soon as I found I had lost my note I said, stop. She said, come along. She was not far from the cricket ground. I ran after her, and hit my foot against a raking post of a garden ground.

Q. When did you see her again - A. It might be eleven o'clock the same night, when I took her in custody.

Q. Was your note found upon her - A. No. She had changed it with a publican near to where she lived, at Mr. Good's, at the bottom of Homer-street. Mrs. Hornsby knew the note very well. I had the note of my wife a day or two before. I went with the watchman and took her in custody at her apartment that night.

MR. GOOD. I live at the corner of Homer-street, New-road. On the 3d of February, I gave the prisoner change of a ten-pound note. I put her name upon it, Mary Tilston . I delivered the note to Call, the constable. This is the note; it has my writing upon it. She ordered half a gallon of porter and half a pint of rum, and change of a ten-pound note.

CHARLOTTE HORNSBY . I am the wife of Joseph Hornsby. I remember giving my husband the note in January last, a day or two before he lost it. I remember the note again by the endorsement of Harrison upon the face of it, and there is the mark of 1 1/2 upon it, I had observed that upon it before I gave it to my husband. I had it nearly a month by me. This is the note produced by Mr. Good and the constable. I went out the same evening that my husband came and said he was robbed by a woman. I went to two public-houses, and the last that I went to was Mr. Good's, I said, very likely it might be changed in the neighbourhood. Mr. Good shewed me the note. As soon as he shewed me the note I told him that was the note. I went to the prisoner's lodgings along with the watchman. I found my husband's knife on the mantle-piece. She said she had got more knives than that; it was not my husband's knife. She said, that she had got the money, if the watchman would go out she would give it me, but she did not. She said she had changed the note, and had taken five poundsworth of halfpence, and when she looked for them under the bed, she said they were gone.

Q. to prosecutor. Did you lose anything else out of your pocket - A. Yes, three three-shilling bank-tokens and a pen-knife from the other pocket.

THOMAS JONES . I am a watchman. On the 3rd of February, near eleven o'clock, Mr. Hornsby told me he had been robbed. I went to Mr. Good's house. He sent his man with me to shew me where the prisoner lived, and in the prisoner's room I found the knife laying on the mantle-piece. No money was found at that time.

GEORGE CALL. I am a constable. I produce the ten-pound note; I received it of Mr. Good on the 4th of February, and Mr. Hornsby delivered up the knife at the watchhouse. The prisoner told me where the change was. I went to her apartment, and found part of the change in her lodging. I found four pounds ten shillings worth of halfpence. That is all I found.

Q. to Mr. Good. What did you give the prisoner in change - A. Three one-pound notes, and a two and five pounds worth of new halfpence.

WILLIAM NEVILL . I am the watchhouse keeper. I took some notes from one Connor, that lived with the prisoner; a two-pound note and two one-pound notes. He came to the watchhouse, and I took him in custody. He came to see Tilston.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked up this gentleman in the New-road; he asked me if I would go and get anything to drink; he gave me fourpence. I brought out a quartern of gin, and at Baker-street

he fell down. I picked up his hat and put it on his head, and I picked up this note. If I had stolen it I should not have changed it in the neighbourhood. I did not rob Mr. Hornsby. He behaved very rude.

GUILTY, aged 36.

Of stealing from the person, but not violently .

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18130217-25

261. JAMES MAGGS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of February , two hundred and twenty-eight yards of cambric muslin, value 28 l. the property of Robert Kerry .

JOHN WEVILL . I am shopman to Mr. Kerry; he keeps a Manchaster warehouse in Bucklersbury .

Q. When did you lose this muslin - A. On Wednesday morning, the 3d of February, about nine o'clock. The prisoner came in and took it.

Q. Did you see him - A. I did. About nine o'clock a young man came into the warehouse; he enquired for a porter's situation. I told him we did not want one. The prisoner came in, and took a bundle of cambric muslin; he ran out with it, and I after him. I pursued the prisoner; he threw the muslins into a box-maker's shop, and when I came back a third person took another bundle of cambric. That man escaped. The prisoner is the man that took the first bundle. I never lost sight of him until he was taken.

JOSEPH BRAND . I am a box-maker. I work at the next door to Mr. Kerry's. I saw the prisoner run by; he threw a parcel into my master's cellar. I looked out, and saw him go up Bucklersbury. The prisoner returned, and run towards the Mansion House. Our apprentice pursued him, and took him in my sight. The young man, Wevill, was not able to pursue him, because there was another person coming out of his house. I saw the prisoner throw the bundle down the cellar, and I saw him taken. He was never out of my sight.

BENJAMIN COOMBE . I am the apprentice at the box-maker's. I pursued the prisoner, and took him.

WILLIAM LEWIS . I am an apprentice at Hale and Finning's, oliman, in the Poultry. I saw the prisoner throw a parcel out of his arms into the box-maker's cellar. I saw the prisoner run to nearly opposite of our back door, and as soon as the prisoner returned, there was a cry, here is another. I saw the second come out of Mr. Kerry's house. He threw a bundle down in Bucklersbury. I picked it up, and carried it into Mr. Kerry's. I am sure I saw the prisoner throw a bundle down the box-maker's cellar.

Wevill. These are the nineteen pieces of cambric; they are my master's property.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming up Bucklersbury; I heard the cry of, stop thief. A young man came out of the box-maker's and took me, and the young man of the name of Wevill said I took it out, and he said there was another young man like me had taken another out.

GUILTY, aged 21.

Judgment respited .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130217-26

262. WILLIAM ALLEN, alias THOMAS ELDRIDGE , was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Moore , about the hour of one in the night, on the 29th of January , and burglariously stealing therein, nineteen pounds weight of soap, value 17 s. two stone bottles, value 4 d. and two pints of sheep wash, value 4 s. his property .

WILLIAM MOORE . I live at 82, West Smithfield, in the parish of St. Sepulchre . I am an oilman . I live in the house. On Friday morning, the 29th of January last, about the hour of one, the door was broken open. The head of the bolt was knocked off, and the remaining part was left in. Between eight and nine o'clock, the patrol of Clerkenwell called on me to know if I had lost any thing. At the time that he asked me that question I did not know that the cellar had been entered. I went directly to examine the cellar windows. I found this piece of the bolt broke, and the bar gone. I looked into the cellar bin, where I keep the soap in general, in which I expected to find about three hundred weight of soap. When I looked in it was all taken out; there were none. I found there had been casks in the cellar broken open, to see what were in them. The patrol told me that he had stopped a man at two o'clock in the morning, and that he was in custody at the watchhouse; and when I got to Clerkenwell watchhouse I saw the man, and I saw the soap and two stone bottles containing sheep wash, with labels attached to the bottles with my name on them, by which I could ascertain them to be my own. The prisoner was asked how he came by these articles. He did not give a true account; the place that he gave reference to no person had bought such a thing as the soap.

SAMUEL MILLARD . I am a patrol. I was going my round about two o'clock in the morning, in St. John-square, Clerkenwell. I met the prisoner with something in his apron. I asked him what he had got in his apron. He said, seven cakes of soap, he had bought it of a Mr. Martin, an oilman; he gave nine-pence a pound. I told him, that was not the price of soap, I did not think he came by it honest. He said, he had, and if I would go with him to Bottle and Hay-yard, St. John-street, I should see it was all right. I told him it was off my duty to go there, but he must go with me to the watchhouse. He told me his name was Thomas Eldridge. When I got him into the watchhouse, he then pulled two bottles out of his pocket, and told me they contained blacking; that he had them where he worked, at Mr. Robertson's, a plumber in Gray's-inn-lane. My superintendant told me to go to Bottle and Hay-yard, to enquire for Mrs. Eldridge, to know whether she had got a son. I did so. I could not find a person of the name of Mrs. Eldridge that had got a son. In the morning I went to Mr. Moore, of Smithfield, seeing his name upon the bottles. I asked Mr. Moore whether he had lost anything. He told me, he could not tell. I asked him whether he did not sell sheep wash. He said, yes. I then went to Mr. Robertson, of Gray's-inn-lane, to know if he knew any such person as Eldridge. Mr. Robertson knew him by the name of Allen, and he had worked there by

the name of Allen, and was discharged a twelvemonth before.

JOSEPH WILSON . I am the superintendant of the watchhouse. The patrol brought this man in the watchhouse, about two o'clock in the morning, with the soap. He said, he had seven cakes of soap in his apron. When we came to pull them out there were but six. He said, he had lost one. He said he bought it in Gray's-inn-lane. He told me his name was Thomas Eldridge ; he lived with his mother in Bottle and Hay-yard; his mother was a washer-woman; it was soap that he had bought for her; he said he gave nine-pence a pound for it. A little while afterwards, he said he gave fifteen shillings. I sent the patrol to Bottle and Hay-yard; he went and found out a Mrs. Eldridge, she said she had not got any son, nor expected any thing home with any one. After that, I thought him a suspicious character. I searched his person; I found this screw-driver, and a key, some matches, and a bit of wax taper.

WILLIAM READ . I am an officer. The prisoner was brought to the watchhouse. I took him into custody. I examined Mr. Moore's premises; the cellar door was over the flap. I found marks on the door to correspond with this screw-driver. I compared it; it seemed to fit the place. I knew the prisoner by the name of Allen; his name is not Eldridge. As soon as he saw me he said, I am done now. This is the soap and the two stone bottles.

Prosecutor. The soap I have every reason to believe it is mine; I had such kind of soap. It is a common sort of soap, but made particular. It is soap that is not handsome, but good and useful. I lost a great deal more than is here. The sheep wash is my property; my name is upon them. There were more bottles gone than these two. I found two bottles the next morning, near the house.

Prisoner's Defence. I am a plumber . I worked for Mr. Robertson, in Gray's-inn-lane; there came a new act up, no man could work except he served a seven years apprenticeship, so I was discharged. On this night I tumbled over a coarse sack; I undid my apron and put the soap and bottles in. I was going home, the patrol stopped me. He said, what have you got here. I said, soap. My mother kept a house in Bottle and Hay-yard for many years.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 29.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130217-27

263. MARY MOORE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of January , from the person of James Pool , four three-shilling bank tokens, and a sixpence, and four one-pound bank notes, his property .

JAMES POOL . I am a servant .

Q. When did you loose this property - A. On Friday, the 15th of January, about a quarter past ten o'clock at night, as I was going by Bishopsgate church, Mary Moore took hold of my arm; she asked me where I was going. I told her I was going home. She asked me to go home with her. She took me to No. 9, Lamb-alley, Bishopsgate-street , in the front parlour. When we came into the room there was a woman in the room; then Moore asked me for some money; I gave her a three-shilling piece; she gave it to the other woman to go out for liquor; and then Moore came close to me and unbuttoned my breeches. In about five or ten minutes I lost a purse, containing four one-pound notes, and twelve shillings and sixpence; four three-shilling tokens and a sixpence. I accused her of taking of it. She said that she had not. Then the other woman came in, and another woman with her, they abused me very much. Moore ran out of the room as far as the corner of the house, and I after her. I brought her back. I took a candle and looked about the room to see if I could find my money. I could not find it. I have never found my money or my notes. The next morning I went to the constable; he said he knew the girl.

Q. Are you sure it is the same girl - A. Yes; he took her in custody on the evening following.

THOMAS SAPWELL . I know no more than apprehending the prisoner, on the 16th of January. I brought her to the watchhouse; I then sent the prosecutor into the watchhouse. I went into the watchhouse after him, and said, do you know anybody here. He said, I do, Mary Moore . I searched her, and found nothing on her. She sells fruit at the corner of Houndsditch.

Prisoner's Defence. When this gentleman accused me of taking the money, I said, send for an officer. He said, he would not. I said, search. The watchman was coming round; I said, call the watchman, and you give charge of me. I am quite innocent of it.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130217-28

264. WLLLIAM LEELAND was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of January , five silver table-spoons, value 1 l. three punch-ladles, value 19 s. a pair of breeches, value 5 s. and two waistcoats, value 01 s. the property of James Jasper .

JAMES JASPER . I am a publican . I keep the White Lion, Fleet-lane, in the parish of St. Sepulchre's . The prisoner's father and mother lodged in my house about two years, and he lodged with them. On the 27th or 28th of January, I missed the plate, spoons and different articles. I sent to the Mansion House, to Mr. Nalder, for him or one of his men to come and look after my property. Mr. Cartwright came. I told him what I had lost. I gave him a spoon, the same make as the others, with my name upon them.

Q. How many spoons did you lose - A. Five, and three silver punch-ladles, breeches, and all the different articles in the indictment. The breeches and waistcoat I lost on the 27th.

DANIEL CARTWRIGHT . Q. You are a marshalman. Yes. On the 28th, Mr. Jasper came to the Mansion House. Mr. Nalder being poorly, I went to Mr. Jasper's. He took me into his bed-room; he shewed me the cupboard from where he had lost the plate; he told me five spoons and three silver punch-ladles. He gave me this. I went to Mr. Baxter's, Snow-hill, and there I found five spoons and three punch-ladles, pledged.

Q. Did you find any thing else there - A. Not

that day. I went the next day; I found one waistcoat at that time, and two pair of breeches. The other things were found afterwards. They are in the other indictment.

JAMES SPURLING . I am a servant to Mr. Baxter, Snow-hill. I produce the things that the prisoner pledged. The prisoner pawned those five spoons on the 23d of January. I asked him who he brought them from. He said, a Mr. Jones, a housekeeper in Fleet-lane; he was not his father; he lived in the same house with him, and Mr. Jones gave him these things to pledge. On the 27th, he pawned a punch-ladle for eight shillings.

Prosecutor. The spoons and ladles are mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I have nothing to say.

GUILTY, aged 18.

Judgment respited .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130217-29

265. GEORGE RUSSELL was indicted, for that he, on the 8th of January , feloniously, and without lawful excuse, had in his custody and possession, a certain forged bank note for the payment of 1 l.

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130217-30

266. GEORGE RUSSELL was indicted for feloniously forging, on the 8th of January , a bank note for the payment of 1 l. with intention to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England .

SECOND COUNT, for disposing of, and putting away, a like forged bank note, with the same intention.

And TWO OTHER COUNTS for like offence, only varying the manner of charging them.

Mr. Knapp, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130217-31

267. ROBERT JOHNSON was indicted, for that he, on the 28th of December , feloniously, and without lawful excuse, had in his custody and possession a forged bank note for the payment of 1 l.

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130217-32

268. ROBERT JOHNSON was indicted for feloniously forging, on the 28th of December , a bank note for the payment of 1 l. with intention to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England .

And OTHER COUNTS, for like offence, only stating the intention to be to defraud other persons.

Mr. Knapp, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130217-33

269. JOHN WILSON was indicted, for that he, on the 11th of January , feloniously, and without lawful excuse, had in his custody and possession a forged bank note for the payment of 1 l.

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130217-34

270. JOHN WILSON was indicted for feloniously forging, on the 11th of January , a bank note for the payment of 1 l.

SECOND COUNT, for disposing of, and putting away, a like forged note, with the same intention.

And TWO OTHER COUNTS, for like offence, only stating it to be a promissory note, instead of a bank note.

And FOUR OTHER COUNTS, stating his intent to be to defraud Mary Groves .

Mr. Knapp. counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130217-35

271. JOHN DAVIS was indicted for that he, on the 8th of January , feloniously, and without lawful excuse, had in his custody and possession divers forged bank notes, that is to say, three forged bank notes, for the payment of 2 l. each .

SECOND COUNT, for having in his custody and possession a certain other bank note for the payment of 1 l. he knowing them to be forged and counterfeit.

And OTHER COUNTS, stating that he had them in his dwelling-house.

And OTHER COUNTS, in his lodging, without lawful excuse, he knowing it to be forged and counterfeited.

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130217-36

272. JOHN DAVIS was indicted for feloniously forging, and uttering and publishing as true, a forged bank note for the payment of 5 l. with intention to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England , he knowing it to be forged .

Mr. Knapp, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130217-37

273. WILLIAM HUNTER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of January , a pair of boots, value 4 s. the property of Thomas Loveluck ; and a coat, value 10 s. the property of Edmund Phipps , esq .

THOMAS LOVELUCK . I am General Phipps 's coachman . He lives at 64, Mount-street. His name is Edmund Phipps . On the 16th of January, I was in the coach-house, cleaning the inside of my carriage, in Wood's-mews ; another coachman said to me, that man has got your coat under his arm, do you know it. I ran after him, and took the coat from under his arm, and the boots fell out of the coat. He had not got out of the mews then. The prisoner said he had taken them out of the stable; he did it merely through want and distress.

Q. Has he the use of his limbs, so that he can work - A. I believe so. I never saw him before that time. This is the coat and the boots. The boots are mine, and the coat is my master's livery.

Prisoner's Defence. I never committed such an error before. I am willing to serve in any of his Majesty's ships that your lordship shall be pleased to send me to.

GUILTY, aged 22.

Judgment respited , to go for a Soldier .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130217-38

274. JOHN JARVIS was indicted, for that he, on the 15th of January , at the parish of St. Bartholomew the Great, a certain pistol, loaded with gunpowder and leaden bullets, feloniously did present at Thomas Illedge , a subject of our Lord the King, and that he then and there did attempt, by drawing the trigger of the said pistol, so loaded, as aforesaid, to discharge the said pistol at the said Thomas Illedge , and by means thereof, to kill and murder him .

And THREE OTHER COUNTS, for like offence, only varying the manner of charging them.

THOMAS ILLEDGE . I live at No. 6, Bartholomew-close, West Smithfield, in the parish of St. Bartholomew the Great . I am the church-warden of that parish .

Q. Do you know the prisoner, John Jarvis - A. I know him well. I have known him about ten years. He has been a pensioner of that parish .

Q. Has he applied to you lately for that pension - A. On the 15th of January, he applied to me, as he had done many times before. He came to me about half past nine o'clock in the morning. I had just done breakfast.

Q. Did anybody come with him - A. I believe not. My eldest son opened the door to him. I went into the passage where I met the prisoner, nearly three parts down the passage. I have no recollection to any former period that he ever entered my passage at all. On this occasion he had advanced four or five yards in the passage. I went up to him, and enquired his business. He then stated, that he came to know if I was now prepared to do that for him; without saying what. I enquired, what. He replied, to pay me that which is due to me, which now amounted to between six and seven pounds. He said so. I told him, that I had frequently informed him before that his pension was now stopped, in consequence of his being in a good situation, being able well to provide for himself. I then stated to him, that I could by no means, on my own authority, grant him what he applied for. I also expressed myself surprised at him that he should apply to me personally, on a Friday morning, as he knew the officers of the parish met in the Vestry-room every Friday afternoon, at three o'clock. I advised him, if he had any case to state to the gentlemen, it would be better to apply to them at three o'clock that afternoon. I stated also, that I was by no means friendly to his claim, and considered that I should be robbing the poor people, many of whom paid the taxes, if I was to pay him his arrears; yet, if the overseers, when they heard his case in the afternoon, would recommend it to me, what they advised I would comply with. In reply to which, he said he thought it was of no use applying at the Vestry in the afternoon, that he had as little chance of redress from them as from me. I, in reply, said, that there were magistrates continually sitting in the City of London every day to defend the cause of the poor, and if he thought the officers of the parish dealt unfairly with him, he would be able to state the case to the magistrate, who would see that the point of justice should be done. He seemed not to know, at least I thought he seemed to be in a considerable state of agitation, what reply to make. I stated to him, that I really could not spare so much time as he wished I should devote to his case. I had been conversing with him about ten minutes coolly in the passage; finding that he hesitated, I said it was necessary that he should make his election whether to apply to the overseers in the afternoon, at three o'clock, or to the magistrate at Guildhall, at noon. He hesitated again. I shuffled up rather closer to him, supposing that good manners would induce him to retire from the passage. I stood as close to him as possible I could; he then retired towards the door.

Q. Did you touch him - A. Not in the least. He retired, stating, that he would come to the Vestry-room at three o'clock in the afternoon. He advanced towards the street door, which had been quite shut until the present time. I followed him with intention of shutting the door after him, supposing he was about to retire. When we came to the street door he took the street door in his hand, as if about to shut it, instead of which he placed it half to. Suppose the door open, leaving half the space of the whole, he stood in the open part, so as completely to fill it up; the wainscot of the passage was so near, when the door is placed half to, there is but room for a person to stand between the door and the wainscoting. When he had placed the door in that position he stood in the open part, and turned himself round towards me, in the passage, who was close behind him.

COURT. He turned towards you - A. Towards me. He stood in the open part of the door, so as to prevent persons in the street from seeing into the passage, and when he turned towards me he put his hand of the side of his great coat pocket, to the best of my recollection a large brown great coat, and to the best of my belief the same coat that he has on now. I do not know whether it was a pocket; he took the pistol from his side; and while in the act of putting his hand to it, he said, in a low voice, as you will do nothing for me, I will do something for you, and that minute he took his aim. He took the pistol from under his coat and rested it on the other hand.

Q. Now, how was it with respect to your person - A. It stood about eight inches from my heart, in that direction. I observed him carry his eye distinctly along the barrel of the pistol. He pointed it at my left breast, I think about eight inches at the most from me.

Q. When he had so presented it, what did he do - A. When he first put his right hand behind the

lock, his hand trembled exceedingly. At that moment I really thought it was some little diversion of his; after his hand trembled so much I observed almost the next instant that he got a steady purchase. I observed his finger towards the trigger, and when I really saw it really was a pistol, (I at first thought it was not), I uttered a cry of horror, and seized the pistol in the direction that I have stated. I saw his fingers at the trigger. He appeared to be making a great purchase. At that moment I seized the barrel with both hands, and with the greatest difficulty, finding he was a powerful man, I was enabled to turn the nozel of the pistol, so that it would not wound me mortally. I turned it of one-side. After I laid hold of it, it might have grazed my side. I do not apprehend it would have done more. A great scuffle ensued in perfect silence, between me and him. He retained his hold at one end, and I the other. He still kept using all the ability of which he was possessed, counteracting my power, and counteracting my endeavour of turning it away from me. He kept forcing it towards me, and still appearing to make a great purchase with his right hand behind the cock, as if he was disappointed on some account.

Q. Did you eventually succeed in getting the pistol from him - A. As the struggle was in the passage, and as I could not get it from him, I endeavoured to point it downwards, so that it might hit me in the extremities rather than in the body; at length, I worked him out of the passage into the street, both of us having hold of the pistol, and finding that I had not power of preventing him from pointing the pistol, for fear he should murder me, I cried out, murder, as soon I passed over the threshold, both having hold of the pistol. Several neighbours came up to my assistance, and the pistol was taken from him.

Q. You afterwards attended before the magistrate, and produced the pistol - A. I did. I saw the pistol examined; there was priming in it, and a heavy charge of powder in the barrel, and two leaden bullets. The whole charge occupied near three inches of space in the barrel.

JOHN ILLEDGE . I am a son of the last witness. I heard my father cry out, murder. That was the first I saw.

Mr. Gurney. Q. to Prosecutor. Was any other person in the passage with you - A. No other person; I believe both my daughters passed me at the time the prisoner and me were struggling with the pistol.

MILDRED ILLEDGE . I heard my father holloa. I went into the passage. My father and the prisoner had hold of the pistol. I went and called for assistance.

Prosecutor. Mr. Brand has part of the charge, and part of the powder was destroyed.

WILLIAM BRAND . Q. Were you present when this pistol was unloaded - A. I was. I put the ramrod down first to see if it was loaded; it appeared to be heavily loaded. I then turned the screw down, and drew up with difficulty some paper. I found two leaden bullets and a quantity of powder. It was not primed. The balls appeared to have been rolled up in a cartridge.

Q. to prosecutor. Brand says the pistol was not primed - A. I laid it down on the dresser, and in my laying it down a considerable quantity of powder fell out of the pan.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18130217-39

275. GEORGE WINTLE was indicted, for that he, on the 6th of October , feloniously did forge and counterfeit a certain impression used by the Company of Goldsmiths, in London, in pursuance of a certain Act of Parliment, made and passed in the 4th year of our Lord the King, entitled an Act for granting to his Majesty certain duties on all silver plate, made and wrought in Great Britain, and for the making and stamping of silver plate, to wit, the mark of the King's head, upon divers silver plate, to wit, one silver table-spoon and one silver fork .

And THREE OTHER COUNTS, charging him with the like offence, only varying the manner of charging.

DANIEL LEADBETTER . Q. You are a marshal-man of the City of London - A. I am.

Q. Did you, on Friday, 16th of October, go to the house of the prisoner - A. I did, in Bell Savage-yard, Ludgate-hill . Hawkins had the warrant. It was about two o'clock, or a few minutes after. I went up stairs to the third pair of stairs, to the shop. I passed the accompting-house; the door was shut.

Q. You did not see who was in the accompting-house - A. Not till I came down.

Q. You went up to the manufactory - A. I did, up three pair of stairs. I went directly to a man that was at work at a wheel; he had a spoon in his hand he appeared to be polishing. That man's name I believe to be Dickens. I have not seen that man since, until lately. I took the spoons from him; these are them. I afterwards went to a man at work opposite, at a trough; I took these eight forks and three spoons; one was in the man's hand, and the other two laid close by, opposite of him. There was a man at work with these forks. I took them out of the trough. Other officers took other articles from this manufactory. Cartwright took some articles. I did not see, from where he took them. I saw the prisoner in the accompting-house, and Hawkins and Fogg were both there.

DANIEL CARTWRIGHT . I was in company with the last witness. I went up into the same shop; I found nine spoons. A man was in the act of polishing one, and the other eight were laying by him.

JOHN LACEY HAWKINS . Q. You are a marshal-man of the City of London, and you are a working silversmith - A. I am. I went to the house of the prisoner on this day. I went up stairs into the top shop. I went first into the accompting-house. I found the prisoner there. I left Fogg in the accompting-house, to see that the prisoner touched nothing nor any body else.

Q. In what dress was the prisoner - A. He had his coat on in the usual way. He was in the accompting-house.

Q. Was he in his working dress with his sleeve

tucked up - A. I think he had his coat on, I am not positive whether he had or not. I then went up with my fellow-servants, thinking I might assist them, knowing the nature of the business. I saw them take the things as they have just mention. I took one dozen of salt-ladles and one dozen of tea-spoons from the top shop, and another dozen of tea-spoons not polished. There are two dozen of tea-spoons. I took from the top shop, and one dozen of salt-spoons The son was up in the top shop. I immediately returned to the accompting-house.

Q. When you returned to the accompting-house, who was in the accompting-house - A. Fogg and the prisoner. I brought the son down from the top shop to the accompting-house, and we proceeded to search the accompting-house. I took then these spoons from different parts of the accompting-house. There are about eight or ten dozen of tea-spoons, mustard-spoons, and caddy-ladles, and tea-tongs. I found two punches with the initials of the prisoner, in the accompting-house, with an anvil, which is proper to mark this work, and another punch, with somebody else initials; it is so badly done I can hardly tell the letters. There was an anvil, or a test. I found the punch close to the anvill. There was a fork-press that could be used for any purpose.

Q. Was there any thing that could be used for putting the forged stamp upon plate - A. The fork-press could be used for that purpose better than the test, or anvill.

Q. Have you the fork-press here - A. No; it is a fixture; it is a heavy thing, similar to a fly. That tool is a common tool in the trade, but it would be more useful to put the stamp on than the hammer and anvil.

Q. Did you say anything to the prisoner - A. He seemed to be alarmed, and asked what we all wanted. I said, you must know; you know me; I have a warrant; there is an information that you are marking your own work. He then said, if that was all he cared nothing about it. The table-spoons were shewed to him; they were held to him and he was asked if they were his own make. He said, they were. He said, every thing was right as far as he knew.

Mr. Alley. You did not find any die for the forged mark or stamp in any place, by which any impression could be made - A. No, I did not expect I should. I looked a long while very minutely and very diligently. It is a small thing; it might be very easily concealed.

- FOGG. Q. You were with the last witness, we understand - A. I was. I went into the accompting-house; I there found the prisoner; he was sitting at his desk without his coat, with his sleeves tucked up, quite in a working state.

Q. What was before him - A. This ladle I hold in my hand was laying before him, and one spoon. Hawkins merely locked in, and left me with him; he did not stop.

Q. Did anything pass between you and Wintle - A. I do not know that I spoke one word to him.

THOMAS DICKENS . I am a silver polisher.

Q. Have you been for some time past in the employ of the prisoner - A. Yes, on and off about three years.

Q. Were you working at the time the officers came to make search - A. I was. I was going to get the lathe to brush the plain table-spoons. I had three in my hand when they came in.

Q. Where were the other nine - A. The other officer found them. They were in the wheel-box, near me.

Q. Now, these spoons, had you seen them before in the course of that week - A. I had seen them the day before. I had them given out to me to smooth fine, to make ready for the hall.

Q. Did you smooth-fine them on the Thursday - A. Yes; I took them up stairs, and after I had smooth-fined them I took them down, and delivered them to James Wintle , to take to the hall.

Q. How long had you them out - A. I had them out before eight o'clock; and I took them down a little before nine in the morning. I suppose it was about ten minutes as near as I can guess. I delivered them back to James Wintle . He assisted his father in the business. He used often to give work out; and take it in, and pay us sometimes.

Q. Did Mr. Wintle conduct his business, or leave it to others - A. He used to be there almost always; he was there that week.

Q. Before you delivered them back to James Wintle , did you put a mark upon them - A. I did.

Q. I believe it is customary for each workman to put a mark upon them that he might know them, to finish them - A. It is. I put a X upon them. Them nine have my mark, and them three have my mark.

Q. And next morning, Friday morning, when you came to work, where did you find them - A. I found them in my box a little after seven in the morning, and I was at work upon them when the officers came.

Q. Now, at the time these spoons were delivered to you to smooth-fine, on Thursday, did James Wintle deliver out any other work to the other workmen - A. Yes, he delivered out eight forks to James Cook ; and to Green, one dozen salt-ladles; to Nicholson, twelve tea-spoons.

Q. Were these smooth-fined by these several persons to whom they were delivered - A. Yes, and they went down at the time I did, and delivered them to James Wintle .

Q. Then they were all of them in a state in which they should go to the hall to be stamped - A. Yes.

Q. And at that time there was no stamp upon them, such as now appears - A. Oh, no, sir.

Q. The next morning, when you found the twelve table-spoons ready for you to go on with, were they stamped - A. Yes.

Q. You know the hall stamp, do not you, when you examine it - A. Yes.

Q. Now, the day after that, did you leave your home the day after Mr. Wintle was apprehended - A. Yes, on the Saturday night I did.

Q. By whose desire - A. By James Wintle 's desire.

COURT. That is the son, is it not - A. Yes.

Mr. Gurney. His father being in custody, you left your home on the Saturday night, and you staid out of the way - A. Yes, until I was found.

Q. Before you went out of the way had you seen Mr. France, the clerk of the stamps - A. Yes.

Q. Did you know that you should be wanted as a witness - A. Yes.

BENJAMIN PRESTON . Q. I believe you are the weigher at Goldsmiths hall - A. Yes.

Q. Is it your duty to receive the plate which comes from the manufacturer to be stamped - A. Yes; I enter such plate in the books at the time I receive them, and the name of the manufacturer.

Q. You have two books, the one in which you enter large work, and another that you enter small work - A. Yes. I only keep one in the small work.

COURT. When plate is brought to you, if it is to be stamped with the hall stamp, do you always make an entry in that book - A. When it is sent to be stamped then we make the entry. We do not take it in if it comes without a ticket.

Mr. Gurney. He makes the entry before it is marked, it passes to another man to be marked; is that so - A. It is.

Q. Now, look at your book of the smaller work - A. This is the book for small articles only, not a book for the table-spoons. October 15, there is no work from the house of George Wintle ; no, none, on the 15th. There was no small work sent on the 15th, nor any on the 16th.

COURT. Preston, does small work include silver forks - A. No, nor table-spoons.

GEORGE MILES . Q. I believe you are the marker of silver plate at Goldsmiths hall - A. I am.

Q. When plate is sent by the manufacturer to the hall who receives it - A. Mr. Barrow, at that time, received it. It is delivered over by Barrow to Preston, or to Mr. Labor, who has large work, who weighs and enters it; it is then handed into another office, where I draw an assay of it.

Q. That is, you draw a small piece from each article to make an assay - A. The assay is made, and if found right it is marked by me.

Q. I believe all plate that comes from the manufacturer must have the initials of that manufacturer - A. It must, sir. We receive from every manufacturer the impression of his own stamp.

Q. Produce the impression you have of the prisoner's stamp - A. Yes, this is it.

Q. Now, sir, have you examined the punches which the officer found in the prisoner's house - A. I have; two of them correspond with the mark I have.

Q. The genuine stamp of the hall is, first the lion, then the leopard's head, the variable letter, which is changed every year, and then the King's head, that is the duty mark. You receive the duty at Goldsmiths hall, and pay it over to the commissioners of the stamps - A. We do.

Q. Look at that stamp upon these nine tablespoons - A. I have examined them all before.

Q. On each piece of plate the officers found at his house, do you find the prisoner's own stamp - A. I do.

Q. Do you find anything upon them to represent the hall stamp; the four ones that we have mentioned; that is, the lion, the leopard's head, the variable letter, and the King's head - A. I find the same.

Q. Is that stamp you find representing the hall mark, genuine or forged - A. It is forged on these nine table-spoons.

Q. Look at the three other table-spoons, is there the prisoner's initial mark upon them - A. There is, and they all apparently have the hall stamps. They appear to be the same forged stamp.

Q. Look at these two gravy spoons - A. The two gravy-spoons are a forgery, and the third I believe to be a forgery. There is on them a mark to represent the hall mark. They are every one of them forged.

Q. Now, the forks are the prisoner's initials upon them - A. There are, and they all have the hall stamps upon them apparently. They appear to be the same forged stamp.

Q. Now, look at these salt-spoons - A. These I am confident, are forgery. They have the whole of them the prisoner's mark as the manufacturer.

Q. Look at these dozen of spoons that are unpolished - A. These are genuine; the twelve teaspoons that are not polished, they are genuine.

Q. Look at these tea-spoons - A. The whole of there are forgeries, containing the prisoner's mark, and the salt-ladles, the whole of these are forgeries, containing the prisoner's mark.

Q. Now, look at these found in the accompting-house, one tea-spoon and a number of salt spoons - A. The whole of these are forgeries. Every thing there is marked by the manufacturer the prisoner.

Q. Now, can you recollect the circumstance of the prisoner being taken up on the 16th of October - A. Yes.

Q. I believe you were spoken to before he was taken up - A. I was.

Q. Are you able to say that none of the goods came from the prisoner either on the day he was taken up or the day before - A. I am.

Q. You have the hall impression and stamp in your pocket - A. I have.

Q. Give me the impression. You are the marker with the genuine stamp - A. I am, and I am confident that no one of these have been impressed with the genuine stamp. When the prisoner was committed I took an impression of the stamp; the whole four is made by one blow.

COURT. Miles, did you see a fly in the prisoner's possession - A. I did.

Q. Would the fly have enabled the forged die to have given the impression on silver plate - A. It would, and without a great deal of noise. The fly is a thing used by the trade.

LEWIS PINGO . Q. Are you the chief engraver of his Majesty's mark the Kings head, denoting the duty - A. I am.

Q. Have the goodness to look at that stamp, the die; is that your impression - A. Yes, it is the King's head. I only engrave that.

Q. Look at this plate, and see whether the King's head is a genuine stamp or a forged one - A. It is forged. I have seen the plate before. They are all forged marks.

Q. You are the die sinker of the King's Head - A. I am.

Q. In that die, or any other die, will not the constant use and application make an alteration in the die - A. The parts will appear more blunt; they will not appear so sharp and striking.

Q. to Miles. You told me the letter varied every year - A. Yes.

Q. What is the letter for the present year - A. The letter R. Our year commences on the 30th of May.

Q. Then that was the proper letter in October last - A. It was.

Q. And that stamp only had been used from the 30th of May - A. No. It appears quite perfect now.

Q. And this is the impression you have made after the prisoner was taken - A. Yes.

COURT. Upon looking at that stamp, is it done so as to impose on people - A. Yes, any person almost, except they are very much used to it.

MR. SMITH. Q. Are you engraver to the Goldsmith's company - A. I am.

Q. Did you engrave the lion, the leopard's head, and the letter, upon that stamp - A. I did.

Q. Are the impression of the lion, the leopard's head, and the letter, upon that plate made from your die - A. No, they are forged.

MR. LABOR. Q. You make the entries of all the large work you receive - A. Yes.

Q. Look in your book, and see whether you received any large of Wintle after the 8th of October - A. No, there is none.

Q. to Mr. Miles. Is this all wrought plate of English manufacture - A. It is.

Prisoner's Defence. I do most solemnly declare I am in no ways guilty of what I am charged with For the last three years and a half I mostly resided in the country; my business has been left to my son and my servants. I do declare, if any forgery has been committed, it has been done without my knowledge.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18130217-40

276. WILLIAM THOMPSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of February , a watch, value 10 s. the property of Sarah Broadhurst , widow .

SARAH BROADHURST . I live at No. 6, Silver-street, in the parish of St. Luke, Middlesex .

Q. Did you lose a watch in February - A. I did, from off the nail in the parlour, where it hung up, just inside of the door that parted the shop from the back room. The house is let out in tenements.

Q. When did you see it before it was lost - A. About half an hour before.

Q. What is the prisoner; do you know him - A. I never saw him before that night. I think it wanted about a quarter to seven at night when he took it away.

Q. Did you see him take it away - A. I heard him draw it off the nail. I was drawing some beer.

Q. Were you in the room - A. No, I was in my chandler's shop, drawing some beer.

Q. You saw him take it off, did you - A. No. I was stooping at the barrel; I heard the chain rattle and he run out.

Q. Who run out - A. The prisoner. He came into the shop for some beer. I looked and saw the watch was gone.

Q. Was there anybody else there that saw it besides you and him - A. A little girl that is here saw it. I called, stop thief, and my neighbours followed him and stopped him. The constable has got the watch.

ROBERT MORTIMER . I stopped the prisoner about one hundred yards from Mrs. Broadhurst's shop.

Q. Was he running - A. No. He had his hat in his hand. It appeared to me that he had dropped his hat, or that he had tripped. I heard the cry of, stop thief. I laid hold of him and stopped him. I told him I would take him back and have him searched. I heard something drop from him. I called to a young man that came out of the house with me, to look and see what was dropped. I am certain it was the watch. The young man picked up the watch.

JAMES WOOTTAM . Q. Were you desired by the last witness to look for the watch - A. Yes. I was there when the prisoner dropped the watch. I picked up the watch in the street. I gave the watch to the constable; his name is Johnson.

PETER JOHNSON . I am a constable. I produce the watch.

Prosecutrix. It is my watch. I have had it near thirty years.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing about the watch. I am as innocent as a child unborn. I never before was in confinement, nor never had a key turned on me before now.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Confined one Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18130217-41

277. MARY MANNING was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Eleanor Grummell , about the hour of ten, on the night of the 21st of January , and stealing therein, two counterpanes, value 10 s. part of a set of bed-furniture, value 1 l. one towel, value 1 d. and one handkerchief, value 1 d. her property .

ELEANOR GRUMMELL . I live at No. 6, Church-street, St. Giles's . I rent the whole house.

Q. Was your house broken open on the 21st of January last - A. It is a room. The prisoner lodged with me. I lost the things mentioned in the indictment out of the back parlour. The prisoner had no business with that room. She slept up stairs.

Q. When had you seen these things - A. About three days before she took them.

Q. Was the door of that room fastened or not - A. It was fastened with a string outside. I went for a pail of water. A young man saw her coming out of the room between nine and ten at night; he asked me whether the prisoner had left any bundle with me. I searched, and then I missed the things.

Q. Did you ever find your things again - A. Yes, I found the bed furniture and counterpane.

JOHN LIMBRICK . I got part of these things from Michael Lea , and part from Harper, the landlord of a public-house. Here is the part of the bed furniture that she dropped in the passage.

Q. You did not see her drop it, did you - A. No.

MICHAEL CLARK . I am a sailor. I lodged at Mrs. Grummell's. On Thursday night, between nine and ten at night, I met the prisoner coming out of Mrs. Grummell's; she had a bundle wrapped up in her apron.

Q. When did you see her again - A. The next morning, in Belton-street, Long Acre. She then had a towel and a counterpane in her apron. I took her to Mrs. Grummell's.

THOMAS HARPER . I keep a public-house in Belton-street. On the 21st of January last, the prisoner came to my house about a quarter before eleven at night; she had two bundles in her apron, and seemed exhausted. She asked me to let her have a glass of liquor to revive her, for she came all the way from Gravesend, and she had not a farthing of money; she was going to lodge at the next door, and if I would let her have a little liquor she would leave the small bundle with me till morning, to secure me for the money for the liquor. What liquor she had that night came to two shillings and a penny. She left one bundle. She came in the morning, she said she was going to part with the things. The officer came and demanded the bundle. These are the things, to the best of my knowledge.

MICHAEL LEA . I am an officer. I delivered the things to Limbrick. I got them from Mrs. Grummell. I took the handkerchief out of the prisoner's pocket.

Prosecutrix. The counterpane is mine, the bed furniture and the handkerchief. The prisoner lodged with me about a week; she came on the Thursday and on the Thursday night following, she did this. They were in the chest; the chest was not locked.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not take the thing out of Mrs. Grummell's apartment. I saw the bundle lay between the parlour door and the stairs. It was distress made me do it.

GUILTY, aged 28,

Of stealing only .

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18130217-42

278. ANN HINES and HANNAH SMITH were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of January , twenty-five yards of printed cotton, value 2 l. 16 s. 8 d. the property of John Harris , privately in his shop .

THOMAS PHILLIPS . I am shopman to John Harris , linen-draper , in the Strand, in the parish of St. Clements Danes . On the 25th of January, Ann Hines came into the shop, about six o'clock in the evening; she asked to look at some printed cottons. I shewed her some. She bought three yards, which, came to four shillings and sixpence. She gave me two three-shilling pieces to give change for them. I turned round and was the other woman push something up her petticoats. I immediately accused Hines of stealing some property of John Harris 's. Hines immediately let the print drop. This is the cotton: it was folded up. There were about forty prints folded up on the counter. It has our shop mark upon it.

Q. How long before had you seen it, before they came in - A. I had seen it in the course of the day. Upon her letting it drop I sent for an officer. Then there was a lad at that time serving Hannah Smith . Hannah Smith stepped forward and held me by the arms, and said she knew Ann Hines . She held me by the arms, so that Ann Hines might make her escape. I held both of them fast, so that neither of them could go until the officer came.

Hines's Defence. There were things on the floor and on the counter. I am quite innocent. I went into the shop to buy three yards of cotton, which I wanted for a bed-gown.

Smith's Defence. I hope you will shew mercy upon me, for God's sake.

HINES, GUILTY , aged 19.

SMITH, GUILTY , aged 48.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18130217-43

279. ANTONY JOSEPH and JOZE FRANKS were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of January , a cheese, value 27 s. the property of Rebecca Hemmings , privately in her shop .

REBECCA HEMMINGS . I keep a chandler's shop , 15, Norton-street, Rosemary-lane . On Wednesday, the 27th of January, the two prisoners came in for different penny worths of beer.

Q. You are sure it was the two men, are you - A. Yes. They came in for two penny worths of beer at different times. They were in five or six times from seven o'clock until the time I lost the cheese. When I missed my cheese, I did not make any enquiry that night about it.

Q. When had you seen it - A. I saw it at nine o'clock; it was gone before ten.

Q. Do you know who took it - A. One of these men. They were both together.

Q. There might be twenty people in your shop between that time, from seven until ten - A. No, there happened to be none come that night.

Q. Did you see it before the prisoners came in - A. It was there at eight o'clock, and it was there at nine o'clock; and they were in soon after nine. I missed it before ten.

Q. When they came in about nine o'clock was your cheese there - A. Yes, and I missed it before ten. I had nobody in before I missed it but the prisoners.

Q. Did you miss it that night - A. Yes, I did. I went to Mr. Christopher; I told him I had lost a

cheese; I asked him if such a thing had been brought into his house. I described the men to him. He asked me to come into his house that day.

Q. What is Christopher - A. He keeps the Crown public-house.

Q. When you went there, who did you see - A. The first man I saw I picked out Antony Joseph . I am sure Antony Joseph was one of them.

Q. When did you see the other - A. On the Friday. I picked the other out in the same room. We took the shortest, Franks, up first.

Q. Why, you go backwards and forwards. I thought you told me when you went in first you saw the tall one - A. He was not taken up on that day; he was taken up on the next day; the same day I saw the short one. They were both taken up on the Friday.

Q. Are you sure these are the two men that were in your shop - A. Yes I have seen my cheese since.

JOSEPH CHRISTOPHER . I am a publican. I keep the Crown public-house. On Thursday morning, the prosecutrix came to me and said she had lost a cheese, and she suspected some foreigners had stolen it which used my house. She went backwards into the room. She came in the evening again. She saw the tall prisoner, I took him over to her house. I charged him with stealing the cheese. He said he knew nothing about it, and finding nothing on him I let him go. The next day the prosecutrix came into my house and saw the short one. She told me that was another of them. I took him over to her house, and accused him of it. He denied it. An officer was sent for, and he was taken in custody, and the same afternoon the other prisoner was apprehended.

FRANCIS FREEMAN . I am an officer. On the 29th, I apprehended both the prisoners, Joze Franks first, and Antony Joseph afterwards. In the evening I received the cheese of Turnbridge. I produce the cheese.

JOHN TURNBRIDGE . I am a constable. I found this cheese at Mr. Watts's, in East Smithfield. I delivered it to Francis Freeman.

JAMES WATTS . I am a Custom-house officer. Antony Joseph came to my house and asked me if I would buy a cheese. I cannot recollect the day. It was in the middle of the day. Mr. Newness agreed to take part of it. Antony Joseph brought it into my house under his arm. There were two men together.

ANTONY NEWNESS . I live at No. 8, East Smithfield. I am an hair-dresser. The two prisoners brought the cheese into my house on the 28th of January, about one o'clock. Joseph brought the cheese; he said he wanted me to sell the cheese for him, because he did not talk English. He asked me nine Pence halfpenny a pound. I told him I could not give that; I could buy it for ten pence at the cheesemonger's.

Q. What had Joze to do with it; were they together - A. Yes. Then he offered it for eight pence. I said I would give seven pence for all of it. Joseph said, do you think I stole it. He went away, and came back again, and said, well, take it for seven pence a pound. I went to Mr. Watts. He said, he would have half of it. Antony Joseph carried it to Watts. The two prisoners were together the whole time.

Prosecutrix. That is my cheese; I know it by this cracked mark.

Antony Joseph 's Defence. The cheese was given to me to go and sell it. I did not know where the cheese came from.

Jose Frank's Defence. A man gave him the cheese to sell.

JOSEPH, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 25.

FRANKS, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 18.

Tried by a jury of half English and half foreigners, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130217-44

280. RICHARD ROBERTSON and THOMAS BLADE were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of February , three hams, value 3 l. the property of Joseph Stiles , privately in his shop .

JOSEPH STILES . I am a cheesemonger . I live at No. 108, East Smithfield . On Monday week, the 8th of this month, between eight and nine o'clock, I received some information that I had lost some hams.

MARY CHURCHLOW . On the 8th of February, I was coming along East Smithfield, between eight and nine o'clock at night, I saw a man lay down by Mr. Stiles's door.

Q. Did he lay down on the ground - A. No, on the steps. A young woman and I stopped to see what he was doing of. We watched him, and saw what he did; he took one of the hams off a shelf that was near the door.

Q. What the man that was laying down - A. Yes, sir. He took it away and gave it to Blade, and Blade gave it to another.

Q. Who was the man that was laying down - A. Robertson.

Q. And then the other, Blade, received it of him - A. Yes, and he gave it to another.

Q. Where was Blade standing - A. Not by him within two or three doors of the house. He got up and put it under his coat, and then gave it Blade. Then he went back again and did it again. He went and laid down a second time, and he went and he gave that away a second time, and we stopped him with a ham. There was a young woman with me. He told us if we would say nothing he would give us something to drink. We went and told Mr. Stiles, and just as we went in two patrols came up and stopped him. They brought them into Mr. Stiles.

ESTER ROBERTS . Q. You were with Churchlow, were you - A. Yes. I saw Robertson lay down at the door, as if he was intoxicated with liquor.

Q. You thought he was drunk at first - A. We did; we thought some one would tumble over him, and when he saw some people busy in the shop he turned upon his side, and took one of the hams from off the bench in the shop. He went away with it, and gave it to Blade. That was just above him he crossed over the street, and went to the door again, and laid down in the same manner as before. He took another ham, and gave it to the same man, and that man gave it to another. Then he came back the

third time in the same manner. He laid down at the door, and took another ham away. We followed him. I asked him if he was not ashamed. He told me to hold my tongue; he would give me something to drink.

JAMES SIMMONS . I am a patrol. On Monday, the 8th, I was going my round, accompanied by John Bull ; I saw five men running. I catched hold of Blade, he being the first to me. I asked him, where he was running to. He said, he was running after the people that stole the hams. I said, my fine fellow, I shall keep you until I get the man that stole the hams. He seemed in great agitation to get away. I kept him, and took him into Mr. Stiles. I told my partner to proceed after the others. He went and brought Robertson.

Q. Had Blade any hams about him - A. No, the hams have never been found.

JOHN BULL . I am a patrol. My partner said, you pursue after the rest. The first man I took was Robertson.

Q. Had he any hams - A. No. The other three escaped.

Q. You could not see what they had, could you - A. No. I brought Robertson back to the shop.

Q. Where did you find the shop - A. Close on the spot. We took them back to the prosecutor. As soon as we took them in the shop the young women swore to them.

JOHN TURNBRIDGE . I am a constable. I took the prisoners into my charge. Blade, in going along to the watchhouse, declared that he was running after the man that stole the hams. I searched them. I could find nothing upon them.

Robertson's Defence. I am entirely innocent of the charge. I was going home on Monday last, I was stopped by the patrol. I am sure I never saw the men nor the women. I have been at a house where the women were common prostitutes. I have four small children, and get my bread by hard work.

Blade's Defence. On Monday, the 8th instant, as I was going up East Smithfield, I saw a man come out of a door with something under his arm. A man came from the other side of the road, and challenged me with stealing a ham. I immediately ran across the road to the patrols.

ROBERTSON, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 23.

BLADE, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 34.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130217-45

281. ABRAHAM MOSES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of January , two silver candlesticks, value 4 l. the property of Judah Cohen .

JUDAH COHEN . I am a merchant . I live at 17, Lemon-street, Goodman's-field, Whitechapel parish . It is my house; I live there, and am the housekeeper. I know nothing of the robbery. I only come to prove the property.

FRANCIS PALMER . I am an apprentice to Mr. Buckliss, a gun-maker; he lives at the corner of Dock-street, Rosemary-lane. On the 25th of January, about two o'clock, I saw the prisoner in the tenter-ground. The tenter-ground is close to the back premises of Mr. Cohen. I saw the prisoner watching the back doors in the tenter-ground in Goodman's-fields. On the 25th of January, I saw the prisoner go in at the back door of Mr. Cohen. Then, after that, the prisoner came running out of Mr. Cohen's back door; he had got something before him. I could not discern what he had got. He kept running on until he almost got out of the tenter-ground; something dropped from him; he stooped and put it into his pocket, and ran out of the tenter-ground, across Aliffe-street into Half-moon-alley, and just before he got out of Half-moon-alley, he stooped and wrapped something up, and after he had wrapped it up, he ran into Whitechapel, into Castle-alley. When he got up Castle-alley, he ran until he got into Castle-street. He ran to the top of Castle-street, and got into some house in Castle-street, on the right hand side; then when I came up to the house it was Mr. John Price 's, the pawnbroker. I turned round on my left hand into Winfield-street; I went into a potatoe-shop and asked for a constable. He could not tell me any one. He asked me what was the matter. I told him, there was a person gone into Price's house, that had robbed Mr. Cohen's house in the tenter-ground, Goodman's-fields. He told me to go and keep my eye on the door, which I did. He sent Mr. John Isaacs , a man that kept a shop opposite John Isaacs came up to me. He told me to keep my eye upon him, then I should be sure to see the person come out with the property in his left hand. I told John Isaacs that was the man that had robbed the house. When I said that, the prisoner ran two or three yards and dropped the property, and I stooped and picked the property up. I put it under my arm, and one of the nobs of the candlesticks flew off. John Isaacs stooped and picked up the nobs. The prisoner run, and I run after him, halloaing out, stop him. He ran down an alley right opposite of John Price 's. I lost sight of the prisoner. I returned home to Mr. Cohen's when I had lost sight of the prisoner. I delivered the property to Mr. Levy, the servant of Mr. Cohen.

Q. Did you know Moses before - A. I had seen him on Saturday.

Q. What day was this - A. Monday, the 25th of January, when it happened, and on the Saturday before the Monday, and the Sunday before, he was watching about the back doors. I thought he was after no good.

Q. You have no doubt then as to his person, have you - A. That is the prisoner. I am sure of his person.

SAMUEL LEVY . I am a servant to Mr. Cohen. I was in the warehouse, on the 25th of January, taking some goods in, Francis Palmer came in and asked me if my master had lost any property. He opened a bundle containing two candlesticks. I said, the candlesticks were my master's property.

JOHN ISAACS . I am a shop-keeper. On the 25th of January, I was in my shop. I saw the lad at my window asking for a constable. I went with him and watched. I saw the prisoner come out.

Q. Who is the man - A. I think it is the prisoner.

Q. Do not you know - A. I think it is the man.

Q. Have you any doubt - A. But very little doubt.

Q. Why did not you take him - A. Why, he did not stand above a minute and a half before he ran away.

Q. Did you follow him - A. A very little way. He ran up an alley; we lost sight of him. When we picked up the property he gained ground of us. I think he is the man.

Q. Did you know him before - A. I have seen him several times.

BENJAMIN SKINNER . I am shopman to John Price , 121, Winfield-street. On the 25th of January, the prisoner came and offered me these candlesticks. I told him to go and send the owner of the property. He went away immediately. I think the prisoner is the person.

WILLIAM HALL . I am an officer of Lambeth-street. On the 25th of January. Levy and Palmer brought these candlesticks, and said Mr. Cohen had been robbed. Palmer described the person to me. I thought it was the prisoner. I was after the prisoner eight or nine days. My brother officer took him on the 4th of February. These are the candlestick. They have been in my possession ever since.

Prosecutor. I have not a doubt of their being mine. I have a fellow pair to them in court now.

Prisoner's Defence. Gentlemen of the jury, I know nothing about this business, what I am taken for. I am quite innocent.

COURT. Q. to Prosecutor. What is the value of them candlesticks - A. About four or five pounds. They are silver candlesticks.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 18.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130217-46

282. ANN COVEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of January , a fowl, value 4 s. the property of Christian Mason , junior.

CHRISTIAN MASON . I live at Hackney . My mother keeps a cheesemonger's shop in Church-street. I keep a poulterers shop , as a perquisite to myself.

Q. When did you lose this fowl - A. On the 27th of January, the prisoner came into the shop between five and six in the evening. She asked for some butter, and during the time I was serving her she went to a shelf where the fowls laid. There was three on one shelf, and four on the other. She took one from the shelf.

Q. You did not see her, did you - A. I did not. I missed it, and I accused her of taking of it. She denied it. I looked under her cloak. I heard it fall behind her. I immediately went round. There I saw it lay by the side of her. We then sent for the constable. She offered to pay four shillings and sixpence for it if we would let her go.

JOHN GAILER . I am a constable at Hackney. On the 27th of January, I was sent for to take the prisoner into custody. When I went in the prisoner said she had not taken the fowl. They had the fowl in their hand, and insisted upon my taking charge, saying, she had stolen it.

Q. Do you know anything of her - A. Yes, she has been here before. She lived at Temple Mills.

Prisoner's Defence. I never touched the fowl, nor saw it until it was shewn me.

GUILTY , aged 54.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130217-47

283. JACOB DENNY was indicted for that he, on the 20th of December , in the 52nd year of his Majesty's reign, feloniously and voluntarily without his Majesty's licence, or the licence of his Majesty's Privy Council, or his Majesty's principal Secretary of State, or the first Lord of the Admiralty, did proceed and sail in a certain vessel called the Minus, into the road of Dunkirk , with intent to take on board certain spirits, that is to say, brandy and geneva .

And OTHER COUNTS, in like manner, that he, on the 20th December, did sail in a certain vessel called the Minus, into the road and harbour of Gravaileans, with the same intention.

And OTHER COUNTS, charging the offence in different ways.

ROBERT MOBBS . Q. In the month of November, 1811, did you embark on board the Minus - A. Yes; at Broad stairs.

Q. How many guns did she mount - A. Six carriage guns.

Q. Where did you first go to - A. To Dunkirk, and from thence to the Lands End.

Q. After you had been to the Lands End; to what place did you go to - A. To Gravaileans.

Q. Who was the master of your vessel - A. James Southworth .

Q. Who was the mate - A. Jacob Denny acted as mate.

Q. What were you - A. I was gunner. Our crew consisted of seven or eight men, besides us three.

Q. How long were you at Gravaileans - A. We laid there a fortnight. We went into the harbour. We laid within line of the batteries. It is a small harbour, and there are jetties. We were within the jetties We laid there a fortnight.

Q. Did you take anything on board - A. Rum, geneva, brandy, and spirits. We took them in half anchors; that is four gallons. We took upwards of a thousand casks, half anchors.

Q. When you had completed your lading, did you leave Gravaileans - A. Yes, and were bound to the Lands End.

Q. Do you remember on what day you left Gravaileans - A. About the 3d of February, 1812. We quitted Gravaileans in the evening, and in the morning we found ourselves off Beechy Head. The prisoner, Denny, was then acting as mate of the vessel, he was then on board.

Q. He continued to act as mate, and on the morning of the 4th you found yourselves off Beechy Head - A. Yes.

Q. Did you find any other vessel near you - A. Yes, three King's brigs.

Q. Did either of them make a signal to you - A. Yes.

Q. Did your vessel answer the signal - A. We answered the Bergee. That is the signal of the Custom-house

cutter. We hoisted a flag with a swallow sail. That was to deceive the King's brig.

Q. This was in the day. Did you lay a considerable time in calm - A. Yes, all day, until about two or three in the afternoon.

Q. During all this time the King's brigs had done nothing to you at all - A. No. There were three in the morning; they did not meddle with us. About two or three in the afternoon we found a fourth. She reached in the shore.

Q. On seeing the man-of-war-brig coming near you in the afternoon, what did you do - A. When we found them drawing near us we got out our sweeps: that is, our long oars. The brig made sail after us, and after some time I heard a gun. After firing a gun, as I supposed to bring us to, they put a boat out after us directly. The captain then ordered me to leave pulling my sweep, and to get the guns loaded. I went and loaded one six-pounder and a blunderbuss. He ordered me down to get the magazine ready.

Q. That was to get more ammunition for the other guns - A. Yes. I heard the carriage gun and the blunderbuss both fire while I was down below.

Q. When you went below where did you leave the prisoner, Denny - A. I cannot say where he was exactly. When I came up again I do not know whether it was he or some other person that said they had beaten the boat off.

Q. Did you find the boat had been beaten off, and had gone back - A. Yes; she was gone back, and got alongside of her own brig.

Q. I suppose you made all the sail you could, did the brig chace you - A. Yes. We got away as quick as we could. We lost her about ten o'clock at night.

Q. In the course of your chace did you lighten your cargo - A. Yes; we hove five or six hundred half anchors overboard.

Q. After you had lost sight of the brig that chased you, which way did you go - A. We then kept steering on the southward, to the coast of France, until we came near Lala, and then from there to the Lands End. We there landed the remainder of the cargo.

Q. You did not make use of any ceremony of going into the harbour of Falmouth, or any Custom-house port - A. No, to the place called the Cow and the Calf, two rocks at the Lands End.

Q. Of course, without paying any duties - A. Yes.

Q. How long have you known the prisoner, Denny - A. Eight or nine years. I understood he was an Irishman. He served his apprenticeship in the sea service at Liverpool, and his family resided at Brighton.

ROBERT THATCHER . I am in the service of the Customs. I reside at Newhaven. I have been in the service of the Customs since the 20th of February last.

Q. Did you happen to be at Gravaileans in January, last year - A. I did. I remember the Minus coming there perfectly well. The master was James Southworth . I saw her in the harbour. Denny, I understood, was the mate of the crew. I saw him come on shore and the captain together.

Q. Did you see Mobbs there - A. I saw Mobbs cleaning the small arms on board of her.

Q. Did you converse with the prisoner - A. I just spoke to him on the sands. I have known him ever since the year 94.

Q. How long did she lay there - A. I cannot possibly say. I saw her there four or five days.

Q. Did you see them put any thing on board - A. No. I left before they loaded her. I came from there the 23d of January.

ALEXANDER BROWN . Q. On the 2nd of January, last year, were you a sailor on board His Majesty's brig, the Royalist - A. Yes.

Q. In the course of the day, the 4th of February, were you off Beachy Head - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember a boat being put out to chase a vessel - A. Yes. I was one of the persons in that boat. There were five sailors in that boat, and a sailing master. We pulled after the cutter. After we got near to her we fired musquestry to bring her to. The cutter fired a carriage gun; to the best of my knowledge it was a four-pounder, as I thought it was. We found we were not strong enough to take her. We returned to our vessel.

Q. And she escaped you - A. Yes.

Q. Gravaileans, in Flanders, is under the dominion of France - A. Yes.

Prisoner's Defence. My lord and gentlemen of the Jury, in the month of July, 1811, I was engaged by James Southworth , master and part owner of the cutter called the Minus, in the Newfoundland trade. We took in a cargo of fish, and after performing quarrantine several days, we proceeded to Southampton, the master being on board the same time. I then went home to my family at Brighton, a wife and four children. In a few weeks after the vessel came into the Brighton-road. I was obliged to sail, and went another voyage. We sailed for Broad-stairs, at which place a letter of the Lords of the Admiralty was produced, and which was read by the master, together with the Custom-house certificate. We sailed to the coast of France. I, therefore, having faith in the master that the license and certificate was proper, I sailed with the same James Southworth , as master, under his command and controul, thinking that the vessel was properly licensed to go to the coast of France. I did not know who was the owner of the vessel, neither did I read the certificate. I have obtained by a friend a copy of the license and certificate, signed by the churchwardens and gentlemen of the first respectability, if it is consistent to your lordship's judgment to have it read to the jury.

Mr. Gurney. The license is dated for another year and another master. It must not be taken for a license in this case.

GUILTY , aged 39.

Confined One Year in Newgate .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18130217-48

284. THOMAS BUSHNELL , JAMES BROMLEY , MARY FREEMAN , and HANNAH TILLING , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of December , a mantle, value 10 s. the property of John Brettell .

JOHN BRETTELL . I keep a shop in Hayes's-court, in the parish of St. Ann, Westminster .

Q. Have you any partner - A. Yes, Elizabeth Laycock . We sell mantles, and pelisses. The mantle was my property and Elizabeth Laycock 's.

COURT. That will entitle the prisoners to an acquittal. In the indictment it is the property of John Brettell alone.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18130217-49

285. ANN WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th February a shawl, value 24 s. the property of William Price , privately in his shop .

JOHN CHURTON . I am shopman to William Price , he keeps a linen-drapers shop , in Oxford-street . On the 9th of February, the prisoner came into the shop with another woman; she asked to look at some prints. I shewed them some. The woman that was with her bought three yards and a half of print, and paid for it. The woman stood by me, and the prisoner left her and went to the window, and put something under her left bosom.

Q. Did you see what she took - A. No, I did not. She took something, and run out of the shop with it.

Q. Did you follow her - A. No. Two women outside of the door saw her take it as well as me. One of our young men came into the shop; he ran after her and brought her back. We sent for an officer; he searched her and found nothing. The shawl has never been found.

Q. Did you look in the window and see what was gone - A. We did. We searched the window and we missed a shawl.

Q. How long before had you seen that shawl - A. I had seen it about three days before.

Q. Were there many shawls in the window - A. Yes, perhaps twenty or thirty.

Q. You cannot say whether she took any thing or not; you saw her put her hand in the window - A. Yes, and I afterwards saw her put her hand into her bosom; what she took I cannot say. This happened on the Tuesday to the best of my knowledge. I saw the shawl on the Saturday night before.

Mr. Bolland. This young woman went to the window, put her hand forward; what she took you do not know. You cannot say that she had any thing in her hand - A. No.

WILLIAM TAYLOR . I am shopman to Mr. Price.

Q. Were you in the shop when the prisoner come in - A. No, I was down stairs drinking tea. Some women came in and said they had seen a woman go out that had put a shawl under her cloak. I went after her to John-street; a person told me that was her. She crossed the road, stood at a gin shop, and turned round.

Q. You overtook her in John-street, did you - A. Yes; that is about forty or fifty yards from the shop. I asked her if she was not the person that was in our shop. She said, yes. I asked her to come back with me. She did. She was quite alone. Jackson, the officer, came and searched her, and found nothing on her. She was taken to Marlborough-street office.

Q. You did not see her have any shawl - A. No.

Q. Do you know what shawls there were in the window - A. There were a great many shawls in the window, of different kinds.

Q. You, perhaps, do not know that any was gone - A. I examined myself and found that one was gone.

Q. When had you seen that one before - A. About a week before. I remember that particular one. We had two long shawls of the same description. The value of the shawl was twenty-four shillings.

Prisoner's Defence. I am entirely innocent of doing it, or intending to do it.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave her a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18130217-50

286 JOHN M'DOWELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of February , in the dwelling-house of Elizabeth Kinnard , widow, a pocket-book, value 6 d. a knife, value 1 s. a comb, value 6 d. a bill of exchange, value 42 l. 15 s. a two-pound bank note, two one pound bank notes, two other bank notes, value 2 l. each, two promissory notes, value 10 l. and three other promissory notes, value 3 l. the property of Henry Byrom .

HENRY BYROM . On the 17th of February, I was in town, at the Old Hummins .

Q. That was last Wednesday, was it not - A. Yes.

Q. Who keeps that house - A. Elizabeth Kinnard . I understand she is a widow.

Q. Did you lose any property there - A. Yes, I did; I lost a pocket-book, in which there was a bank post bill. I was in the room, and apprehended the man at the time.

Q. Were you up or in bed - A. I was in bed; I heard a noise. It was near two o'clock in the morning. In my bed-room the noise was. I listened some time, conceiving it might be in the adjoining room, and after listening some time, I found it was in my room. I got up immediately, and went towards the direction from whence I heard the noise. I seized the prisoner. I had no light in the room when I had seized the prisoner. I heard somebody coming up stairs; I called out for assistance. Several people came in, and a light was brought. Mr. Hewitt came up, whom I understood to be Mrs. Kinnard's nephew. He searched the prisoner in my presence.

Q. And was anything of your's found upon the prisoner - A. The pocket-book, containing my notes, a knife, a comb, and two tokens.

Q. The tokens are not in the indictment; where were they found upon him - A. I believe in one of his pockets. I saw them taken from his person.

Q. What did the pocket-book contain - A. A bank post bill for forty-two pounds fifteen shillings; two five-pound Grantham notes, value ten pounds; one two-pound bank note; two one's, and three one-pound country notes. The prisoner was secured.

Q. To whom was your pocket-book delivered - A. Mr. Hewitt kept it.

JAMES HEWITT . I produce the pocket-book and its contents.

Prosecutor. The notes are all mine, and the pocketbook also.

Q. And, as far as you know, they are all good and genuine notes - A. I believe them to be such.

Q. to Mr. Hewitt. Are you any relation to Mrs. Kinnard - A. Son in law. She is the proprietor of that house. Her name is Elizabeth.

Q. Do you remember being alarmed on Wednesday morning - A. Yes. I went into the room in which Mr. Byrom was. The prisoner was there. I searched him. I took this pocket-book out of his right hand jacket pocket. All these things were in it. I have kept them in my possession ever since.

Q. Did you know the prisoner before - A. No; he had nothing to do about our house. I don't know how he got in.

Q. In what parish is your house - A. St. Paul , Covent Garden.

Q. Did the prisoner say anything at the time - A. He muttered, but spoke nothing.

CHARLES HILLIER . I am a waiter at the Hummins. I attended Mr. Byrom to bed. I fetched the candle away and shut the door.

Q. to Prosecutor. Where did you put that pocketbook - A. It was in my coat pocket, and when I went to bed my coat was on a chair.

Prisoner's Defence. I was very much distressed. I had been some days without anything to eat. I had no place to put my head in. I saw this gentleman's door open; I stepped in.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 42.

[ The prisoner was recommended to mercy on account of his being a seaman , and that he would be able to serve his country.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18130217-51

287. MARY PRICE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of January , thirteen yards of printed cotton, value 17 s. the property of John Ivory , privately in his shop .

ELIZABETH IVORY . I am the wife of John Ivory ; he keeps a shop, and sells linen-drapery, haberdashery and hosiery , Church-lane, in the parish of St. Luke, Chelsea . On the 23d of January, the prisoner, Mary Price , came to my shop, and a man with her. They desired to look at some printed cotton. She did not like the first I shewed her. I shewed her more. She then fixed upon a piece of green cotton. She bought a piece, and the man paid for it; six yards of green cotton; it came to ten shillings. They went away. In about half an hour after they were gone, I missed thirteen yards of cotton, of a pink ground.

JOHN DYSON . I am a parish constable. On Saturday night, the 23d of January, I saw two men under the gateway; they were talking together. I took particular notice of them. One of them followed me. I went through Justice-walk, and just about the centre, I saw the prisoner put something under her petticoats. I said, holloa, mistress, what are you at there. She said, sir, I dare say you are a family man, women cannot do as men can; as if she was making water. She had a green gown piece under her arm. I asked her, what she had got. She said, she bought it; she would go back with me, as I seemed to dispute it. Oh, no, said I, good woman, I do not wish to go back with you upon that business. I kept by the side of her, and followed her all the way down the town, and a man and another woman passed her. I kept on until I saw my brother constable. I said to him, there is something going forward. They went on, and this gown piece was brought to me. They said, it was thrown into a butcher's passage.

Q. Did you see her do any thing with it - A. No. I did not. I went and brought the man back, and we took all three before the magistrate. This is the thirteen yards of printed cotton, a pink ground.

Q. Did you see that thirteen yards of printed cotton brought out of the butcher's shop - A. No, I did not. I was going after the man.

Q. How near to the shop did you see the woman - A. She had past it. I saw her just near it. She was taken in custody when she had passed the butcher's shop, and the other man and woman too at the same time. I had gone forward to apprehend the man.

Q. Who gave you the cotton - A. Thomas Hill .

Prisoner. I told him I gave ten shillings for the gown piece, and told him where I bought it.

Dyson. You did; that was a green piece.

Q. Had she any other piece about her - A. I did not know that she had; there seemed to be something about her that caused my suspicion. I watched and followed her. There seemed to be something bulky about her petticoats. I cannot say what it was; it was that caused my suspicion.

WILLIAM PEARSON . I am an apprentice to William Maynard , butcher, Paradise-row, Chelsea. On the 23d of January last, between three and four o'clock, I was in my master's shop; I went to the passage door, and as soon as I opened the door I saw the gown piece lay down in the passage.

Q. What was the colour of it - A. Pink. It was laying near the door.

Q. Was the passage door locked - A. No; only latched. It could be opened by any body outside; by pushing it it will come open. I had been in the passage about a quarter of an hour before; it was not there then.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. No. I saw her afterwards, in about half an hour she was then higher up in the street. Mr. Dyson had taken her in custody. I delivered the pink gown piece to Mr. Hill; he took it out of my hand.

THOMAS HILL . Q. You took the gown piece from the boy - A. I am not certain whether I took it or whether it was handed to me. I delivered it to the constable.

Dyson. This is the gown piece that Mr. Hill delivered to me.

Prosecutrix. That is my property.

SARAH STRANGE . I live in Paradise-row, Chelsea. On the 23d of January, between three and four o'clock, I saw the prisoner push the butcher's door open.

Prisoner's Defence. I am entirely innocent of the charge.

GUILTY, aged 59,

Of stealing, but not privately .

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18130217-52

288. EDWARD STAPLES and SAMUEL SMITH were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of January , a pair of women's boots, value 5 s. the property of George Lowther , privately in his shop .

THOMAS CANTRILL . I live with George Lowther , pawnbroker , 23, Tottenham-court-road, in the parish of St. Pancras .

Q. Were you at home on the 19th of January last - A. Yes.

Q. Did the prisoners come to your shop - A. I only saw the prisoner Smith in the shop. I saw him come in; I was in the shop. He asked me the price of a pair of smallclothes. I asked nine shillings and sixpence; he bid me eight shillings. I told him I could not take less than nine shillings. In the mean while I was talking about that, the constable brought in Staples. The constable's name is Smith. The constable brought a pair of boots in his hand; he asked if the boots were ours. I told him they were.

Q. They were, were they - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know from what part they were taken - A. They were taken from the inside of the shop door. I hung them there myself.

Q. How long before this had you seen them there yourself - A. I suppose it was about twelve o'clock in the day that I had counted them.

Q. What time was this - A. About three o'clock in the afternoon. They were women's boots. They have our private shop mark on them.

Q. How long was Smith talking with you - A. About five minutes.

Q. Was Smith afterwards searched - A. Yes.

Q. Did the constable find any money upon him - A. Yes, he did. I cannot say how much.

JOHN SMITH . I am a Bow-street patrol. I saw Staples and Smith together go up Tottenham-court-road. That was before they came to Mr. Lowther's. I saw them together about three o'clock; they went towards Mr. Lowther's shop.

Q. Did you watch them - A. I walked after them, and when they had got an hundred yards I missed them all at once, and in about three minutes Staples returned back again, running, with something under his coat. I catched hold of him by the collar, and he threw these boots down. I took him back to the shop, and I saw the prisoner Smith there in the shop.

Q. When you saw him return back running he was running as if from Lowther's, was he - A. Yes. I searched Smith when I went back. He had got about seven or eight shillings in his pocket. I did not take it from him. He told me he was going to buy a pair of breeches.

Q. to Cantrill. How many doors are there to your shop - A. Two doors.

Q. Is yours a corner shop - A. No.

Q. Did these boots hang at the door that Smith came in - A. Yes, at the door that Smith came in.

Q. Were they in sight of you in the shop (the boots) or not - A. They were in sight of me, only Smith was standing before them.

Q. Then if it had not been for Smith you should be able to see them - A. Yes.

Q. to Smith, the patrol. How long were they in your sight altogether - A. Not hardly a minute. It was not above an hundred yards from where I stood.

Q. to Cantrill. What is the value of them boots - A. Five shillings. We gave five shillings and sixpence for them; that is the cost price.

Staples's Defence. I was going up Tottenham-court-road after work; I saw these boots lay between that gentleman's shop and a butcher's shop. I picked the boots up, and carried them openly under my arm.

Smith's Defence. My lord and gentleman of the jury, as I am before the Court, and if I may not too far transgress upon your time, I must humbly hope you will indulge me with hearing my case, being placed at a bar of justice, to answer a charge of felony, for the first time in my life. My lord and gentlemen, I have it not in my power to retain able counsel in the law. The candour which marks the proceedings of this solemn Court, whose wise discernment will not let conviction meet upon such evidence which this day appears before your lordship, and do beseech I may be permitted to state that on Tuesday, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, I went to Tottenham-court-road to purchase a pair of breeches which were for sale, hanging against the door. I enquired the price. I was answered nine shillings and sixpence. I offered eight shillings, and during the time I was agreeing about the purchase, an officer brought in the other prisoner. The officer searched him, and found a pair of half boots. The officer came there to enquire if they were their property. The shopman said, they were their property; and in consequence of the officer saying he had seen me with the young man, I was taken as an accomplice, whereas I came in the shop to purchase a pair of smallclothes in a fair and open way. The officer insisted upon doing his duty in taking me in custody as an accomplice. I beg leave to state in the presence of the Court, I have no knowledge whatever of the prisoner, Staples, nor to my knowledge had I seen him before. I had left my father's house half an hour before, for the express purpose of buying a pair of smallclothes. Will the officer say that I was in the company of Staples; that I knew that he had the boots. No. He stopped him, and searched him, and found the boots, and the merely saying that we were together, I am brought to a bar of justice. Your lordship's goodness and great capacity I trust will say I am perfectly innocent in this case. I always have borne in life the character of a hard working lad.

Staples called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Smith called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

STAPLES, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 15.

SMITH, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 17.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18130217-53

289. WILLIAM THOMPSON and WILLIAM PERKINS were indicted for feloniously stealing, on

the 23d of January , eighteen pounds weight of soap, value 17 s. the property of Thomas Pickard and Samuel Morgan , privately in their shop .

THOMAS PICKARD . I am a soap-maker . My partner's name is Samuel Morgan. We have a shop in Tottenham-court-road, in the parish of St. Pancras .

Q. Did you lose any soap on the 23d of January - A. Yes. I was from home at the time. I returned home about six in the evening. There was a quantity of soap then missing, about twenty-two pounds out of the same box that I had assisted in packing it up in the morning. It was sold, but not delivered. It was packed up for the purpose of being sent off.

Q. Had you seen it before that day - A. Yes. I put it up myself principally, or assisted in putting it up, in the morning, about ten o'clock. I went from home about eleven o'clock. That is all I know about it.

Q. What is the value of the soap - A. The quantity that was brought into our house was about eighteen pounds. We value it at seventeen shillings.

HENRY COLLIER . I am an officer of Bow-street office. On Saturday, the 23d of January, I saw the two prisoners in company with another walking about the door of Mr. Picard's shop, (it was about a quarter before six), and knowing them, I watched them. The prisoner, Thompson, went in, and stopped in about five minutes; the other two stood on the steps of the door. Thompson came out and crossed the road. The other two followed close behind. Perkins said, go it, here are two pigs. (The thieves call the officers pigs.) I pursued them, and caught Thompson with the bundle of soap in his arms. He threw the soap down, and endeavoured to get from me. I took him back to Mr. Pickard's shop. I gathered up the soap. I had my brother with me; he was running after the other men. When I got the soap back to the shop I tied it up tight, and took Thompson and put him in security. We then took him and the soap to the office.

Q. To whom did you shew the soap at the shop - A. To Mr. Morgan. He said, Mr. Pickard packed it up, and he should come down to the office. Mr. Pickard came to the office and owned the soap.

Q. When you saw him come out of the shop, did you observe whether he had anything with him or not - A. He had a bundle in his arms when he came out of the shop.

Q. Was that the same parcel that he threw from him - A. Yes. I was not thirty yards from him all the way.

Q. What became of the soap - A. I was ordered to take care of it, and I have had it in my custody ever since. This is it.

WILLIAM COLLIER . I was with the last witness. I saw the prisoners; there was a third in company with them; they were walking near Mr. Pickard's door. In the course of a few minutes I saw Thompson enter the shop.

Q. Who was in the shop - A. There was no person in the shop as I saw.

Q. Is it a shop where they expose their goods to sale - A. Yes, it is. He was in a few minutes; he came out again with a parcel in his arms, and crossed the road. He had something tied up in a blue apron, which he carried in a bundle before him the other two followed him. I observed Perkins to speak, and he and the other ran away.

Q. Did you hear what he said - A. No. I pursued the two that run, but I lost them. When I lost them I returned back to my brother, and found him scuffling with the prisoner, Thompson. They were in the road. I assisted my brother. The soap was then laying on the pavement. I took up the soap, and carried it back to Mr. Pickard's. My brother took the prisoner back. Mr. Morgan said it was his soap, and pointed out the chest where he said it was taken from. He was then taken to Bow-street, and the soap was delivered to my brother.

Q. to Henry Collier . Who was it that gathered the soap up - A. I do not know. The soap was on the pavement, whether I gathered it up, or my brother, I cannot say. The man was tustling with me to get from me. I had got hold of him by the collar.

Q. to prosecutor. Look at that soap, and see whether it is your soap - A. I have no doubt but it was our soap. There is no particular mark on the soap. I have not a doubt in my own mind but it is the same soap that I had packed up. When it was brought back I was not at home. I was soon after. The soap was taken from an open chest in the shop, with a cloth over it. The cloth might easily be removed.

Thompson's Defence. I was coming down Tottenham-court-road on the left hand side, I saw that bundle lay; I picked it up. Mr. Collier came and stopped me. He asked me what I had got. I said, soap. He said, I must come back with him. He said he saw me take it out of the shop. I know nothing of Perkins.

Perkin's Defence. I know nothing of that man. I was at my work at the time.

Q. to Henry Collier . Are you confident Perkins was one of the three - A. Yes. I knew them all three.

Q. to William Collier . Are you confident as to Perkins - A. I am not confident as to Perkins. I have seen Perkins in company with Thompson before; I am certain of that.

THOMPSON, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 16.

PERKINS, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 20.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18130217-54

290. GEORGE HANNAN , THOMAS FOSTER , and WILLIAM PRICE , were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Faulkner , about the hour of eight in the night on the 4th of February , and burglariously stealing, a hat, value 5 s. his property .

MARGARET FAULKNER . I live at 83, Long Acre . My husband's name is John Faulkner ; he is a hatter , and he rents the whole house.

Q. Were you at home on the 4th of January - A. No, I was not at home. My son was at home. I went out a little after six in the evening. I came home a little before eight.

Q. Did you find anything amiss - A. No. I did not miss the hat at all.

BENJAMIN JOHNSON . I am a constable. On the

4th of February, between six and seven o'clock, I was passing along Long Acre. I saw four boys together; the three prisoners and another. I saw two of them stand at the hat shop, and two at the butter shop, next door to it. I saw two of the least prisoners standing against the window, Foster and Price. I saw Price go up and down, as if he was cutting the putty, which induced me to stop, though they are so little boys. I drew back and watched, and then I saw Foster and Price run to the other two. In about a minute the other two went, and the former two remained behind. The other two went to the window where they came from, and I saw them pull something from the window, as if they were pulling glass from the window; then they started off again, and came back to the window. They then had their hands to the window, as if they were jobbing something at the window. The other two returned, Foster and Price. Then I saw them draw something out of the window. When I saw that, I ran up to them: they ran away as fast as they could. I saw that they had got a hat in their hand.

Q. Which of them had a hat - A. The little one, Foster. I believe they made a stop in Queen-street. Foster gave Hannan something wrapped up in a handkerchief.

Q. You did not see what it was - A. No. That was in Queen-street. Foster gave something to Hannan, and instantly, as it was tied up, they ran into Holborn.

Q. What was tied up - A. The hat. When they got to the corner of Little Turnstile they began to cut the putty away from a cracked window.

Q. Who was that - A. Price. They started from there, and went lower down Holborn, and they sent Foster to pawn the hat. I stopped Foster. I asked him, what he had got there. He said, he had got a hat that his mother sent him to pawn for a shilling. I then took him into Berrison's shop, and detained him there until I fetched the other two. There were three more outside. I fetched the other two prisoners in. One got off. I took Hannan and Price. Upon Hannan I found one pair of new stockings. I asked him how he came by them. He said, they were his mother's. On searching Price I found a bit of a knife that they cut the putty away to get the hat out. I kept them in custody. I told him, I knew where he brought the hat from out of Long Acre.

Prosecutrix. It is my hat. I know it by the trimming. It is my own trimming. The hat was drawed through the window, and the stand left naked. The square of glass was broke before, and a paper put over it.

Hannan and Foster said nothing in their defence.

Price's Defence. The knife was not to cut the putty. I never cut the putty with it.

HANNAN, GUILTY, aged 11.

FOSTER, GUILTY, aged 10.

PRICE, GUILTY, aged 10.

Of stealing, but not of breaking and entering.

Judgment respited .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18130217-55

291. GEORGE WINTLE was indicted for feloniously forging a certain stamp or mark used by the Goldsmith's Company of London .

Mr. Arabin, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130217-56

292. JANE SMITH and MARY WHITE were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of January , thirty yards of muslin, value 5 l. the property of George Vipond and George Rimington , in their dwelling-house .

GEORGE RIMINGTON . I am a linen-draper . My partner's name is George Vipond , 29, Ludgate-hill, in the parish of St. Martin, Ludgate .

THOMAS ROBINSON . I am one of the servants to George Vipond and George Rimington . On the 22d of January, both the prisoners came into the shop together. Smith asked for sprigged muslins. I shewed them some. I asked six shillings a yard; they bid me five shillings a yard. They one asked the other, and they said five shillings was enough. I told them I could not take that price. They left the shop without buying.

Q. Was there a number of pieces of muslin on the counter - A. Yes, there were. After they were gone I counted the muslins over. I missed two pieces. I told one of the young men. He desired me to go after them. I looked out at the door; I could not see anything of them, and after I turned round they came into the shop again. They asked for the muslins they were looking at before. I shewed them the muslins, and while they were looking at them I saw the prisoner, Smith, take something off the counter, and put under her cloak.

Q. Did you actually see her removing them - A. I did. They each of them bought, and paid for what they bought. Smith bought four yards at six shillings, and White bought half a yard at five shillings. After they had paid for what they bought they left the shop.

Q. How near was White to Smith when you saw her in the act of putting something under her cloak - A. She was close by her.

Q. When you left the shop did you go after them - A. Mr. Kirby left the counter, and went after Smith, and as soon as Kirby stopped Smith, I stopped White. He took the muslins from Smith, and we brought them into the shop. White said, she had nothing at all to do with the other person, and she knew nothing of Smith taking the muslins. They were searched, and nothing was found upon White.

Q. Did you know the things that were taken from Smith to be your master's property - A. Yes.

Q. You said Smith had only bought four yards - A. Yes.

Q. What was the quantity that was taken from her - A. Three pieces, from twenty-five to thirty yards in a piece.

Q. Which of your masters live in the house - A. Mr. Rimington lives there. Mr. Vipond has a house in Ely-place, Holborn.

WILLIAM KIRBY . I am one of the shopmen of Messrs Vipond and Rimington. I was serving in the

shop on the 22d of January, I saw the two prisoners come in the first time.

Q. Did they appear to behave to each other as companions in every respect - A. Yes.

Q. Were you serving at the same counter with the last witness, Robinson - A. No, I was not.

Q. Did you observe anything while they were in the shop the first time - A. No, I did not. After they went out, Robinson mentioned his suspicion to me.

Q. How long after Robinson mentioned his suspicion to you was it you saw them again - A. About half an hour, not more. They both came in together again.

Q. Did you, in consequence of what Robinson told you, keep an eye upon them - A. Entirely so. My whole attention was attracted by them. While in the act of purchasing. I saw the prisoner, Smith, take three pieces of muslin, and put it under her cloak.

Q. Where was the other at the time - A. Close by her. They both went out of the shop very shortly after. Smith was going out of the shop first. Smith apparently walked quicker. I got over the counter, and followed her into the street.

Q. Then White was behind Smith - A. Yes. I asked Smith if she had not got something that was not her own. She said, me? and seemed suprised, and answered, no. I turned her mantle of one side, and took the three pieces of muslin from under her arm, in the street. I brought her back, and immediately sent for an officer.

Q. Did you see her searched - A. I believe nothing else was found.

Q. What may be the worth of these three pieces of muslin - A. They are valued in the indictment at five pounds. That is short of the value of them.

CHARLES BOLLAND . I am a constable. I was sent for to take charge of these two prisoners. There were three pieces of muslin delivered to me by Mr. Kirby. He said, Smith stole it. He charged me with both of them. I searched both of them. I found nothing upon them. I have had the muslins in my possession ever since.

Kirby. They are the property of Messrs. Vipond and Rimington. They have the shop-mark on them.

Smith's Defence. On the 22d of January, I was going to purchase some muslin to make me a gown; I asked the prisoner, White, to go with me. We went there, and I asked to look at some muslin. I bid five shillings. He said, he could not take it. I went out of the shop, and we went to the corner of Fleet-market and had a small glass of peppermint. We came back, and there was two or three pieces of muslin laid on the floor. He said, he was sure I had taken them.

White's Defence. I know nothing of it.

SMITH, GUILTY, aged 20.

WHITE, GUILTY, aged 31.

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling-house .

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130217-57

293 WILLIAM BRITTLEBANK was indicted, for that he, on the 6th of January , in and upon Joseph Eades , a subject of our Lord the King, feloniously did make an assault, and that he, with a certain sharp instrument, did stab and cut the said Joseph Eades , in and upon his left arm, with intent, in so doing, to kill and murder him .

And TWO OTHER COUNTS, for like offence, only varying the manner of charging them.

JOSEPH EADES . I am an ostler , and being out of a situation I was helping at the King's Arms, in Leadenhall-street . The prisoner was a stranger to me. On the 6th of January, between two and three in the afternoon, I heard a great noise in the kitchen. I went into the kitchen to see what was the matter. The prisoner and the servant were contending together. I returned out of the kitchen. I did not hear what it was about. He came out of the kitchen. I saw him go down the yard. I never interfered at all. I returned to my employment. In the course of ten minutes after I had to go into Leadenhall-street. I saw the prisoner standing at the bottom of the gateway. As soon as he saw me he drew a sharp instrument, saying, d - n your eyes you b - r, I will murder you. I run towards the kitchen door for assistance. He made after me, and on my opening the kitchen door, he stabbed me on the left arm. He threw me down on the kitchen floor, and bruised my body. He might have cut me again; he did not He had the power of doing it. The boy that was putting on a pair of wheels in the yard, he came to my assistance.

Q. Before the boy came up he might have done it, might he not - A. Yes, he might. He did not.

Q. Had you said anything to him - A. Not a word. I never saw the man in my life before. There were two in the kitchen, with whom he was quarrelling. I was there a minute. I returned momentary, without speaking a word.

Q. What injury did this do to you - A. He stabbed me in my left arm. I was taken to Mr. Hopkins, and from thence I was taken to St. Thomas's hospital. Mr. Hopkins is a surgeon; he lives at the corner of the gateway, in Leaden-hall street.

Q. What was the size of the wound - A. He held it in this position.

Q. Like a jobbing it in your arm - A. Yes.

HANNAH COWLEY . I was chamber-maid at the King's Arms. The prisoner came about eleven o'clock in the day, on the 6th of January; he asked me if he could have a bed. I asked, who recommended him. He said, the coachman he came by, recommended him; but I forget the name of the coach. I shewed him up into a room, and told him his bed was eighteen pence. He paid me in the room for his lodging. He left his bundle in the room. He asked me if he could have any thing to

eat. I told him, yes; he could have either cold beef or a beef stake. The waiter was busy, and I laid a cloth for him in the kitchen. He had cold beef, and a pint of porter, and while I went up stairs he had a glass of rum and water, that came to a shilling. He would not pay the girl that served him with the victuals that he ate; he would insist upon my coming down, to pay me for it. When I came into the kitchen I told him it was eighteen pence. He said, he had paid me. He had not paid me. He had only paid me for the bed. He said, he had paid me; he should not pay any more. I went to the kitchen, and I went out for about twenty minutes, and when I returned I met the cook coming to me to shew him to bed. This was eleven o'clock in the morning.

Q. Did he represent that he had been travelling all night - A. Not to me. I understood so. I was to shew him his room, and during that time he had another glass of rum and water, which was another shilling. I asked him to pay the half-crown before he went up stairs. He refused. He said, he would not pay any more. He desired me to fetch the bundles down from the bed-room, which I did. As soon as I came into the kitchen, he run and met me by the door. He pushed me up by the side of the fire place. He bent his fist, and swore he would murder me if I did not give him the bundles. Two young men saw him; they pulled him back. They saw him going to strike me; they pulled him backwards. He asked me what was in the bundles. I asked him, if he thought I had robbed him. He said, he did not know. I told him, I would shew him the contrary. I untied his bundles in the kitchen, and told his things out one by one on the floor, to convince him that I had taken nothing, and this instrument fell out of the bundle. The constable has got the instrument, and a sheath of razors. The razors he picked up instantly, and put into his pocket. The sharp instrument, he said it belonged to nobody but him. He tied up his bundles, and bid me defiance to touch them. He said, any body touch them if they dare. Then he went to endeavour to get to the bar, and my mistress had been ill for some time, she came down that day for the first time, and I held the door, and the porter held him to prevent him from getting in. I said to the porter, now, if you do not mind, he'll go away without paying. I was in the kitchen all the while. I was going to take the bundle again until he had paid his reckoning. He was going to strike me. The porter interfered, and would not let him strike me. In the scuffle the prisoner fell down. The prisoner holloaed out, murder.

Q. Did the porter strike him - A. No, he did not. The porter put him out of the kitchen door into the yard.

Q. Were there any other men in the kitchen that assisted in turning him out - A. No; there was only the porter, none of the other men touched him. This was between two and three o'clock in the afternoon when this happened. The prisoner run down to the gateway, and I saw him stand there about five minutes.

Q. Did he take his bundle with him - A. No; that was in the kitchen.

Q. Had he his hat with him - A. No. I believe that fell in consequence of the scuffle; during that time I went into the bar, and the next thing I heard the cook say, was knife or knives. That was about five minutes after I saw him at the bottom of the gateway. The next thing that I saw was Joseph Eades standing by the tap door, bleeding in his arm. I saw two men take Joseph Eades to the surgeon. The blood was running very fast from his arm. That was all I saw. I did not hear the prisoner say any thing after this. I did not go into the kitchen. I was frightened, and kept away.

JURY. Q. Previous to this man taking the rum and water he was quiet, was not he - A. Yes. He seemed a decent countryman.

COURT. Q. did it appear to you that the liquor that he had taken had any effect upon him, so as to intoxicate him - A. No, not at all. The only reason that occasioned his conduct was wanting him to pay for what he had. He appeared to have been up all night.

Q. Did you hear the prisoner give any account who he was, or what he was - A. No.

JAMES BALL . I am porter at the King's Arms. The first I saw of this business was, when I saw the prisoner holding the girl up against the mantle-piece. He appeared to be using her rough at the time. I did not interfere in it then. My young master and the bookkeeper they pulled him back; then he went up to the table. He said he wished the chamber-maid to bring the bundle down. She fetched it down, and counted them on the floor before him, one by one, and as she counted them this instrument fell out. He said that belonged to him, and nobody else. He put it into his pocket. What it was I do not know. I saw it after he had stabbed the man. After he tied up his bundle he held his bundle in one hand, and bid defiance to any body touching it, and the chamber-maid made to get hold of his bundle, because he had not paid his reckoning. He strove against it. He began, as I thought, to ill use the girl. I interfered to take the bundle from him to assist her. I took the bundle from him with her assistance. We told him he should have his bundle if he would pay his reckoning. Then he strove to get to the bar. My mistress was in the bar, and the chamber-maid held the door. He appeared very violent in his manner. It was the first day my mistress had come down from her illness. I held the prisoner to prevent him from getting to the bar. I only held him; I did not ill use him at all, because I thought he was in liquor. In the scuffle he fell down. There were no blows from me. He fell down in the struggle, and as we were struggling, some person at the door said, porter, the best thing you can do is take him into the yard. I took him into the yard, and left him there. As the prisoner was down he got hold of my legs, so I walked out into the yard. When I got him into the yard he ran to the bottom of the gate into Leadenhall-street. I followed him down the yard, and went to St. Mary Axe. I said nothing to him, and in the mean while I was gone to St. Mary Axe he stabbed this man. When I returned, Joseph Eades was at the surgeons. I saw the prisoner laying in the kitchen after he had stabbed

Eades. He was asleep. He remained there until the officers came and took him away upon this charge.

JOHN FARMER . I was putting a pair of hind wheels on the Mitcham and Tooting coach, in the King's Arms yard. I heard the prisoner cry out, murder, in the kitchen. I saw him come out of the kitchen. He had hold of the porter's legs, and after he came out of the kitchen he said he would go and get a constable. He ran down to the bottom of the gateway. He remained there without his hat, and his waistcoat was unbuttoned. Then I went to my work. Joseph Eades was in the middle of the yard. I saw the prisoner run after Eades with this instrument. It is four square, with two springs at the end. Eades was going into the kitchen then, and as soon as the prisoner came against the kitchen door it came open, and then the prisoner stabbed Eades on the left shoulder, and as soon as I saw that I went and laid hold of the prisoner's ears, and pulled him down to the ground. A coachman took the instrument from the prisoner, and I tied the prisoner's hands behind him.

WILLIAM LEWIS HOPKINS , I am a surgeon. I live at 123, Leadenhall-street. On my return home the prisoner was brought into my house by the Woodford coachman. I found he had received a punctured wound about three inches from the top of his shoulder. The wound bled freely; but upon examining it, I did not see any of the arteries were wounded. I believe the man was under the influence of fear and alarm. He was bleeding when he was brought to me. While he was with me he might have lost four or five ounces of blood. I first of all brought the edges of this wound together; it appeared to me to be done by an angular instrument. It was very likely this instrument had four sides or four edges. I stopped the bleeding, and dressed the wound. I recommended the man to go to the hospital. He said he had no one to take care of him.

WILLIAM ELDRIDGE . I am an officer. I was sent for to take charge of the prisoner. I took him in custody. I produce the instrument.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been over to my own country to settle some private business of my own, and I had sold all my tools that I had, and this instrument is a chissel that I made to fit up some brass work, and the springs were made to fit up some brass work. I turned the brass, and was bringing it with me in order to give it to my serjeant-major. I brought it and my shirts and things with me, and came to London. I put up at the sign of the Grapes, in Ratcliffe Highway. I had two one-pound bank notes. I had a bed there, and was very well accommodated. I asked the landlord what I had to pay. He said, a shilling for my bed. I had one pint of beer made warm, with a little purl in it. I desired the landlord to give me change. This woman said I was at their house at eleven o'clock. I do not know whether their clocks might he right; it was dinner time when I was at the Bunch of Grapes, Ratcliffe Highway. I paid a shilling to an hackney coachman to draw me up to the India house. The coachman said it was about half past twelve. I attempted to go my journey. A man asked me if I was a Lancashire man. I told him, no; I had worked in that country a long while. I told him, I never had been over since July. He asked me to go and drink with him. I do not know the sign; he pointed to the entry, saying, go into the house, and in a few minutes I will come in. I had not been long in this house before a man came in, and asked me if I would go for a sailor. I had two glasses of rum, I asked the girl if I could have a bed. She took me up stairs and shewed me the bed. She charged me eighteen pence. I came down to my liquor. I had not been long there before this young man asked me if I would be a sailor, I thought I was in a wrong place. We hear of kidnapping in the country. I insisted upon my clothes. She fetched them, and said I had not paid my reckoning. I asked for the landlord. She said he was not in. I asked for the landlady. She said she was in the bar. I immediately attempted to go to the bar door. They tore my coat right down my back, and the young man struck me in the face. I received a violent punch on my private parts; I cannot tell by whom. The surgeon knows, ever since I have been in prison it has been a great injury to my health. The man tore my bundle open, and took out a pair of pepper and salt stockings, a sermon book, and a Ready Reckoner. These have never been returned to me. The charge she lies against me is two shillings and sixpence. I sent a friend for them, this gentleman. The officer brought me them. I had my breeches pocket tore, and I lost a one-pound note. I am quite a stranger. There never was one of the name before a bench of justices in the world.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130217-58

294. SAMUEL ROBGENT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of January , a pair of shoes, value 5 s. the property of John Bartlett and John Sutton , privately in their shop .

JOHN BARTLETT . I keep a shoe warehouse , the corner of Denmark-street, St. Giles's .

Q. When was it you lost the shoes - A. On the 18th of January last. I cannot say exactly what time of the day they were taken. I found them on the prisoner. About nine o'clock in the morning, I was going up St. James's-street, I met the prisoner with something under his arm, and as he had been drinking the week before, I asked him how he could keep drinking for a week without working. I took the shoes from under his arm. He used to assist me in opening my shop of a morning. I gave him in charge of a constable. He acknowledged that he had taken them. These are the shoes. They are mine. I had only had them on the Saturday before from Northampton.

GUILTY, aged 56,

Of stealing, but not privately .

Fined 1 s. and discharged.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130217-59

295. GEORGE GOBLE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of January , a watch, value 4 l. the property of Robert Holding , from his person .

ROBERT HOLDING . I am a gentleman's servant .

I lost my watch on Friday evening, the 15th of January, between ten and eleven at night, at the King's Head in Great Portland-street . Samuel Bradwell , me, and the prisoner were drinking together. Samuel Bradwell seemed to like my watch. I said he should have it for four pounds. George Goble also looked at it. He returned it me again. I was ordered to go to No. 15, Portland-place, with an hackney coach, between ten and eleven. Finding myself unwell, when it came half past ten o'clock I said I would give any man sixpence that would call me a coach. The landlord sent a man for the coach. The man returned to the public-house and said the coach had gone to No. 15, Portland-place. I pulled out a shilling. The prisoner said, he would get me two sixpences. I gave him the shilling, and just as I gave him the shilling I was taken very unwell. I was obliged to go to the door.

Q. You were taken very sick, I suppose, at your stomach - A. Yes. After I had been there a short time, George Goble brought me a sixpence, and the other to the man that brought the coach. He put the sixpence in my pocket. I was leaning forward, and as I suppose he took my watch at the same time. I did not perceive the watch go. I got better in a short time, and going along the passage I missed my watch. I went in and asked Samuel Bradwell if he knew where George Goble lived. He was then gone home. I told Bradwell I believed he had taken my watch. I went to Mr. Lett's house, where the prisoner was servant. Mr. Lett sent me and the prisoner to the watchhouse.

SAMUEL BRADWELL . I am a gentleman's servant. I was at this public-house.

Q. What is Goble - A. He was servant at that time.

Q. You got drunk, all of you - A. No, I do not believe I was drunk. I knew what I was about. I was in the company of the prosecutor and George Goble . We were drinking together from between eight and nine to between ten and eleven. Robert Holding was sick. He went out, and George Goble too. Holding came in, and asked me if I knew where Goble lived. I said, at Mr. Lett's, in Devonshire-street. We went to Mr. Lett's. We knocked at the door. Mr. Lett came down. Mr. Lett called the watch, and I made my escape. I did not want to go to the watchhouse. The other men were taken to the watchhouse.

MARY TAYLOR . I live servant with Mr. Letts. I only know that I took the watch out of the coal-cellar. The other servant was so timid she could not take it. This is the watch.

SARAH BROWN . I am a servant to Mr. Letts. I found the watch in the coal-cellar.

Q. You could not touch it, so you called Mary Taylor .

Prosecutor. That is my watch.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130217-60

296. CORNELIUS CONNELLAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of January , two wooden barrels, value 2 s. and three hundred pounds weight of pork, value 10 l. the property of Benjamin Phillips .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY , aged 43.

Confined One Month in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130217-61

297. MARY WALKER, alias BOND, alias SMITH , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of February , nineteen handkerchiefs, value 5 l. 5 s. and one artificial flower, value 1 s. the property of John Franson , privately in his shop .

MRS. FRANSON. I am a haberdasher and milliner . I live at 26, Pimlico-terrace . The prisoner came to my shop on Thursday the 18th of February, about three in the afternoon; she asked to see some silk handkerchiefs. I shewed her a paper of Barcelona handkerchiefs, of different colours. She looked at them for some time; then she said there were none of the right sort. She opened one, and spread it over the others to look at it. She then said she wanted to see some Belcher handkerchiefs. I shewed her a paper. She desired me to cut her one off, and she would call for it in half an hour with another article, and then she would pay me. Upon her not buying anything I was rather suspicious of her. She went out of the shop. I looked over the handkerchiefs, and I missed a piece of silk handkerchiefs. I clapped the handkerchiefs on the counter, and looked on the floor. There were no handkerchiefs there. I went to the door, and saw the prisoner five doors off. I seized her, and as I seized her some of the handkerchiefs fell from under her clothes. I instantly said, you have robbed me. She said, no, ma'am, I have not robbed you, child; I have paid for every thing I have got. I brought her back to the shop, and shook her, and nineteen handkerchiefs fell from her person. These are the handkerchiefs; they are mine. My husband's name is John Franson . I missed this piece of handkerchiefs; that being gone I found the others.

Q. Who was in the shop besides you - A. These two young girls.

MARY ELLIOTT . I saw Mrs. Franson pull the woman by the cloak, and the handkerchiefs fell from her. I had seen the prisoner stoop in the shop.

Q. You suspected something, did not you - A. Yes.

ELIZABETH WOODFORD . I saw the prisoner drop an handkerchief when she was out of the shop.

- . I was going by, I saw a handkerchief drop from the prisoner.

EDWARD GREEN . I am an officer. On searching the prisoner I found these handkerchiefs. On this handkerchief there was a mark. She took the mark off and swallowed it.

Prisoner's Defence. I have six small children. I hope you will be merciful to me. I have no husband.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 53.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130217-62

298. BARSILLA BEAZLEY , THOMAS KEMP , ELIZABETH NORGATE , and ELIZABETH

STARLING were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of January , a violin and bow, value 5 l. the property of Archibald Nichols , from his person .

ARCHIBALD NICHOLS . I am a musician . I lost my violin on the 13th of January.

Q. Are you quite blind - A. Yes.

Q. You do not know who took it, do you - A. I suspected the prisoners.

Q. Where was it taken from you - A. At Mr. Underwood's, Shoreditch. I went in a little after eleven to take a little refreshment.

ELIZABETH NICHOLS . I am the wife of Archibald Nichols . I and my husband went to Mr. Underwood's, the Gun public-house, Shoreditch , on the 13th of January, a few minutes before eleven o'clock. My husband wished to take a little porter before we went home. I went in and my husband called for a pint of porter. The prisoners all were in discourse with us; the subject of the discourse was concerning a dance that was to be the next day. When my husband finished his pint of porter, he put on his hat to return home. and feeling for the violin, he found it was gone. I had put it down by the side of him. I made every enquiry, but could get no intelligence of it whatever. It was gone. On the next day, I found the violin at a pawnbrokers in Whitechapel. There were other persons in the room, but there were none that were in discourse with us. I did not see it taken. Whether it was taken while I went for the pint of beer, or afterwards, I cannot say. I sat my husband down on the box, and put the violin by the side of him.

THOMAS HUDSON . I am shop boy to Mr. Needes, pawnbroker, No. 7, Paternoster-row, Spitalfields. On the 14th of January, the two men prisoners came to our shop; they brought a fiddle with them, and asked me if my master was at home. I said, yes, he was at breakfast. I called him. They said they were sorry to give him so much trouble; they would be glad if he would tell them the worth of the violin. Master looked at it, and said he thought it was worth about a guinea, but he said it was according to people's fancy. They said they were much obliged to him; they had bought it for fifteen shillings. Master said it was cheap. They went out of the shop. That is all I know. I am quite sure they are the same men; I took particular notice of them.

GEORGE YOUNG . I am shopman to Mr. Fleming, Whitechapel, a pawnbroker. On the 14th of January, about nine o'clock in the morning, a young man brought me the violin to pledge. I believe it to be Kemp. He had a blue apron on. I lent him nine shillings on it. On the evening of the same day, Mrs. Nichols came to our shop to know if we had taken in a violin. I told her I had taken one in in the morning. I shewed it her; it was her's. At Worship-street office, the blind man swore to the fiddle by the crack in it, and to the bow.

Prosecutor. That is my bow, and this is my violin. There is a particular edge to it, and it has a particular tone. I have had it two years.

Beazley's Defence. I am innocent.

Kemp's Defence. The same.

Norget's Defence. The same.

Starling's Defence. The same.

Kemp called six witnesses, who gave him a good character.

BEAZLEY, GUILTY , aged 18.

KEMP, GUILTY , aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

NORGATE, NOT GUILTY .

STIRLING, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130217-63

299. MORRIS ISAACS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of January , a pair of boots, value 5 s. the property of William Bunce Davis .

WILLIAM BUNCE DAVIS . I am in no business at present.

Q. When did you lose your boots - A. About the 15th or 16th of January. One of these days. I cannot tell which day it was.

Q. Who knows about the boots being taken - A. My little girl; my wife and me were from home.

Q. What was the prisoner - A. He was in the habits of crying old clothes down the street where I lived.

SARAH DAVIS . The prisoner came in took up the boots and never spoke to me. They laid on the floor. A little boy had been playing with them. Our house is a private house. It was in the parlour where the little boy had been playing with them. The man came in and put them in his bag, and went off. He never spoke a word to me. I am sure he is the same person. The prisoner came in a few days after that. My mother said he was come upon the same occasion. He asked where the little girl was; he pulled out sixpence. He then offered eight-pence for the boots. He said I had sold him the boots for eight-pence. I had not.

Prosecutor. I saw the prisoner in two or three days after this. When he came, I asked him where my boots were. He said he had come to pay my little girl for them.

Q. What were they worth - A. I had not agreed to sell them. I would not sell them for eightpence.

Prisoner's Defence. On Wedensday, the 13th of January, I was calling clothes in Noble-street, Goswell-street; his daughter said, master, my father has got some clothes to sell. I went up stairs. He sold me to the amount of three shillings and sixpence. I called again on the Friday. The girl said, her father was not at home, She said a clothes man offered her nine pence for the boots. She said, you take the boots and bring me the money as you come by. On Monday following, I went again. I said, Mr. Davis, I come to pay you nine-pence for the boots that I bought on the Friday. He said, I want my boots back. I said, how is it possible for me to bring them back, when I have sold them. Mr. Davis said I will not take a farthing less then five shillings. He charged an officer with me. A little while after he came into the public-house, and said, young man, you had better settle it before you go into custody. The officer said, no, I will not settle it; I have got charge of him. I said I would sooner go to jail than pay him five shillings for the boots.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130217-64

300. EDWARD WATSON and JOHN BREZE were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of February , from the person of John Tipler , a pocketbook, value 1 d. a promissory note, value 1 l. and a one-pound bank note, his property .

JOHN TIPLER . I am a lime burner . I lost my pocket-book on the 4th of this month, about one o'clock in the morning. I had been to Covent Garden play-house. I was quite a stranger to that part of London. I was lost; and I asked the watchman to put me into the road to Holborn. I took him into a house, and treated him with a pot of beer. I think it was the Marquis of Granby public-house, in Charles-street ; and after I had been there a little while, the watchman left me. I fell asleep in the public-house. I felt my pocket-book; it was safe in my under coat. I buttoned my great coat over it, in order that it might be safe. I dozed or sleeped about twenty minutes, and when I awaked it was gone.

Q. What did it contain - A. One Bank of England note, dated January 8, 1813. When I got up out of my seat, I told the landlord I had lost my pocketbook, and what was in it. He said, he was very sorry; he saw nothing of it. I went out of the house, and into the street, and two girls directed me to Bow-street-office. I went to Bow-street office, and staid all night.

Q. Do you know any thing of the prisoners - A. I think I saw the prisoner with the light coat on; I am not certain.

GEORGE DONALDSON . I am a constable of St. Martin's. On Thursday, the 4th of this month, I was called up by one of the patrols of Bow-street to go to the Duke's Head, in St. Martin's-street, Liecester-fields. I went there, and as I was going along I had some information give me. I went into the house. I searched the prisoner, Watson, and in Watson's right hand breeches pocket I found a one-pound bank note. I asked him where he got this note. He told me, that he had given change for it to a fare that he had carried. This was about a quarter to three in the morning. I found some silver. I took that away from him. I then asked the landlord, where was the man that came in along with Chaffy; meaning Watson. Watson goes by the name of Chaffy. Breze was pointed out to me. I went to Breze; he was sitting seemingly asleep, by himself; and on searching Breze I found this pocket-book in his pocket. I then said to Lewis, search the remaining part. Breze said he got that pocket-book from Chaffy.

- LEWIS. I am a patrol of Bow-street office. I was on duty on the morning of the 4th of this month. John Tipler came and gave information of his robbery. I went to the Granby's head. He told me that he had been robbed there. The landlord of the Granby's head gave the description of the men that had been there. Edwards and I traced them to a house in St. Martin's-street. Edwards went for Donaldson. We all three went, and Watson was sitting by the fire. Breze was asleep in another box. I searched Breze after Donaldson found the pocketbook, and found this one-pound promissory note in his breeches pocket.

EDWARD GRIGS . I keep the Granby's head watering-house. Mr. Tipler came into my house and called for a pot of porter, about one o'clock. He had two watchman with him. Breze the prisoner was there, and Watson came in soon after.

Q. Did you see Tipler fall asleep - A. I did not. When I had an opportunity I awoke Tipler. He said, he had lost his pocket-book. I said you cannot have lost it here. He said, he was sure he had it in his pocket before he fell asleep; he had lost it there. I directly sent to Bow-street office for an officer. Lewis came. I stated the case to him that Tipler had lost his pocket-book in my house. I said, if you go to a house in St. Martin's-street it is very likely you will find them. They went there and found the two prisoners and the property.

Prosecutor. This is my book and two notes.

Watson's Defence. I took that note of a fare from Charles-street, to set down in Picadilly.

Breze's Defence. I picked up this book as the prosecutor lay along the bench, asleep.

WATSON, GUILTY, aged 27.

BREZE, GUILTY, aged 21.

Judgment respited .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr.Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130217-65

301. GEORGE GRIMALDY and THOMAS EATON were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of January , a silk handkerchief, value 2 s. the property of Christopher Richmond , from his person .

CHRISTOPHER RICHMOND . On Sunday the 24th of January, I was in Hyde park about four o'clock. I was walking with two or three gentlemen to Hyde-park-corner, towards Stanhope-street gate. When I got to Stanhope-street gate , and was turning round, a gentleman met me and said your pocket is picked, and pointed to a man that was walking towards Stanhope-street, from me. I immediately went towards him, and immediately I saw the man give the handkerchief into the hand of another man almost close to him, I immediately seized him by the collar. I looked on the ground, and saw my handkerchief drop from under his coat. I picked it up and held him by the collar. Eaton was the man that I laid hold of. I never quitted him until he was taken into a public-house. I sent for a constable, and he was taken into custody.

Q. What became of the other man - A. He went away some where. He was not apprehended till the next morning. I am sure I saw my handkerchief in Eaton's hands.

Q. Are you sure Grimaldy was the other man - A. I never saw either of them until they were pointed out to me.

ROBERT MARSH . I am a silk broker. On Sunday the 24th of January, I was walking in the park, a little behind Mr. Richmond, and between us the prisoner Grimaldy was in company with others, among whom was the prisoner, Eaton; the other prisoner. I saw Grimaldy take the handkerchief one of Mr. Richmond's pocket, what became of it I do not know. Afterwards I saw it on the ground. When Mr. Richmond had got hold of Eaton, Grimaldi

got away. I am sure Grimaldy was the man that took the handkerchief out of Mr. Richmond's pocket. I distinctly saw Grimaldy take the handkerchief.

WILLIAM LEE . I am an officer. I took the prisoner, Eaton, in custody at a public-house, for picking a gentleman's pocket in the park. I apprehended Grimaldy the next morning.

The prisoners said nothing in their defence, called one witness, who gave them a good character.

GRIMALDY, GUILTY, aged 20.

EATON, GUILTY, aged 20.

Judgment respited .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130217-66

302. ELIZABETH COLEMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of February , nine shirts, value 4 l. fourteen handkerchiefs, value 8 s. a pair of stockings, value 5 s. the property of James Mitchell ; seven shirts, value 3 l. 10 s. and three pair of stockings, value 10 s. the property of Benjamin James Mitchell ; two handkerchiefs, value 4 s. the property of Mary Standich Mitchell , spinster ; and four handkerchiefs, value 10 s. the property of Robert Jones Mitchell , in the dwelling-house of James Mitchell .

SUSANNAH ALBERT . I am sister to Mr. James Mitchell . I was in his house in February last.

Q. Was the prisoner, Elizabeth Coleman , in your brother's service - A. She was as house maid . She had the care of the linen. She had lived with him about three years.

Q. Did you learn before the 13th, what had become of her boxes - A. On the Tuesday evening, I found they had been moved on the Monday, and when I found they had been removed to the next house, I desired her, with another woman, to bring them back again. The boxes were brought back again immediately. Her boxes were searched in the presence of Robert Mitchell , Mrs. Henry, and myself. One of her boxes was locked, the other had no lock. The prisoner unlocked the box herself, and as the things were taken out of the box she said they were given to her.

Q. Did you find any thing in either of the boxes that belonged to any part of your brother's family - A. Certainly. There were a great number of shirts, and two fine muslin handkerchiefs, which I recognised to belong to my family, and some tablecloths and dusters, which she confessed to have taken away. After having searched her boxes, I searched the prisoner's drawers, and found two shirts. She told me all these things had been given to her.

ROBERT JONES MITCHELL . Q. Were you present when these boxes were searched - A. Yes; in them were four waistcoats; two yellow and two white; and one flannel one. There were other articles; shirts, handkerchiefs, and stockings, that I knew belonged to myself.

BENJAMIN JONES MITCHELL . Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. I do. She was a servant in my brother's family. I left my brother about August last. The prisoner had general orders to send my linen up with an inventory.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence.

GUILTY, aged 26,

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Confined Two Years in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130217-67

303. JAMES CARTER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22nd of January , eight stone bottles, value 4 s. and six quarts of oil, value 13 s. 6 d. the property of John Mackey .

JOHN SMITH . I am shopman to John Mackey . oilman , 176, Piccadilly . The prisoner was porter to Mr. Mackey. Having suspicion that he stole some oil, I watched him. He took two quarts of sperm oil. On the next day I missed two quarts more. That is all I know. I heard him move the tray out of its place, and there were the marks on the board where it stood, and he had it in his basket, and I helped the basket on his shoulder.

- SAMS. I am a servant to Mr. Mackey. John Smith got me to watch the prisoner. I saw the prisoner go into M'Kone's house, in Bond-street. He run there in about five minutes. From there he went home. I saw him take the basket into M'Kone's.

- . I am a constable. I took the prisoner into custody. I went to M'Kone's house; I found five empty bottles and three full ones. They were found under the dresser, where Mr. M'Kone keeps the oil.

Mr. M'KONE. I live in Old Bond-street.

Q. Did you see the prisoner on this day that Sams followed him to your house - A. No, I did not see him that day at all. I know nothing at all about the oil.

JOHN MACKGUIRE . I am a servant to Mr. M'Kone.

Q. Who brought the oil in - A. I do not know.

Q. You are upon your oath, you know; now speak the truth. Upon your oath, from whom did you receive that oil - A. I don't know. I received two bottles. I do not know who is the person. The person that gave me the last bottles is like the prisoner.

Q. Did you never say it was him - A. I don't know that ever I said it was him, that I knew him.

Q. Look at the prisoner, do you know him - A. I don't know that ever I saw him before.

Q. Did you never say that he delivered the oil bottle to you, upon your oath - A. I never said so to my knowledge. I said, he was like the man.

Q. Did you ever say that you believed him to be the man - A. I did not.

Q. Did you ever say that he delivered one, and went away without it - A. No. I don't know that he delivered it to me.

Q. What passed when the man delivered the botttle of oil to you - A. I don't know.

Q. Did he say any thing - A. I don't know.

Q. Did you never say that the man who delivered the bottle to you he went away and said nothing - A. I never said that he was the person.

Q. Did you ever swear that the man delivered it to you - A. Yes.

Q. Can you write - A. Yes.

Q. Look at that; is that your hand writing - A. It is.

Q. Were you examined before the magistrate - A. Yes, and I was sworn.

Q. Hear what you have swore.

" John MackGuire saith, that the man, whom he believes to be the prisoner, put one of the bottles now produced into the deponent's hand, without saying any thing; deponent took the bottle and put it in the place where the bottles for the oil are always kept, for the use of the house. The deponent saith, brought another bottle the week before. He took and deposited that in the same place." Did you ever swear that - A. No. I could not swear that.

Q. Then you mean to say, that you never swore what is contained in this information - A. I don't know that I did.

Q. Did you never swear that you believed the prisoner to be that man - A. No, I could not swear he was. I am in the habit of taking parcels by persons leaving them, of taking parcels of different persons. I don't know one person from another.

Q. You swear, that you never swore before the magistrate that you believed the prisoner was the man - A. I swore that he was like the man.

Q. Did you never say that the same man brought another bottle - A. No. I got one bottle a week afterwards.

Q. You heard this paper read, and you was sworn before the magistrate. Are the contents of this information true or false - A. I don't know. What I told the magistrate was right. I don't know the person that gave me these bottles. I swore that he was like the man. There was a paper read over to me.

Mr. Alley. They put this down at the magistrate's a little stronger than you swore to - A. I said he was like the man.

Q. They have said, that you believed he was the man - A. Yes. I said he was like the man.

Sams. These four bottles have labels upon them. They are Mr. Mackey's property.

COURT, Q. to Smith. When the prisoner returned had he anything in his basket - A. No, neither of the two bottles he had with him when he went out.

GUILTY , aged 35.

Transported for Seven Years .

The witness Mackguire was taken into custody for wilful and corrupt perjury.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130217-68

304. ELIZA LEE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22nd of January , a bolster, value 5 s. a pillow, value 3 s. a piece of patch-work, value 5 s. a blanket, value 4 s. two curtains, value 4 s. and a candlestick, value 6 d. the property of Samuel Drabble , in a lodging-room .

ANN DRABBLE . I am the wife of Samuel Drabble ; he is a surgeons instrument maker . We live in King-street, Golden-square . I let a lodging to the prisoner at the latter end of April last. She lived with me until the 22d of January.

Q. Did she pay you your lodging - A. Pretty well until latterly. She had the back room two pair, at five shillings a week, furnished. On the 22nd, she left her lodging. I went up into her room the next morning and found every thing was gone away almost. I afterwards found them all at the pawnbrokers. The prisoner is a boot-closer.

JAMES ALDERS . I am a pawnbroker. I produce a bolster, pawned by a person of the name of Ledger, not the prisoner.

MR. DEAN. I am a pawnbroker. I took in the patch-work of the prisoner, and two other articles of a different person. I produce them.

Prosecutrix. The patch-work I made myself. It is my property, and the other articles are my property.

Prisoner's Defence. My landlady knew of my pawning the things. She said she would wait until my work came in and she would not hurt me. She has got my working things in her possession now.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130217-69

305. WILLIAM ING was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of January , a hat, value 3 s. and a leather cap, value 18 d. the property of Maria Salter .

SECOND COUNT, the property of James Salter .

ROBERT YOUNG. I am shopman to Maria Salter ; she carries on the business of a hatter , in Norton Falgate . She is a married woman . Her husband is abroad. She lost the hat and cap on the 11th of last month.

Q. Why do you accuse the prisoner of taking it - A. I was going out of the shop; a man here informed me that there was a cap and a hat taken out of the shop.

JAMES SAWRY . I am an headborough of Shoreditch parish. On the 11th of January, at night, I was going down Holywell-street, I saw the prisoner in the custody of another person. The prisoner had the hat on his head, and the cap in his left hand. This was about half after seven at night. I produce the hat and cap.

Young. The shop was robbed about that time. The hat and cap are the property of Mrs. Salter.

SAMUEL GRUNDY . I saw the prisoner go into Maria Salter 's shop and take a hat. I afterwards saw him at the office. I said I believed him to be the man.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence; called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 35.

Confined Fourteen Days in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130217-70

306. MARY ANN CHAPMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of February , six three-shilling bank tokens, and one eighteen-penny bank token, the property of Thomas Lines , from his person .

THOMAS LINES . I am a soldier . I belong to the 27th regiment of foot. I was sitting in a public-house; the prisoner came into the public-house. I went home with her to a room. I sat on the side of her bed. She took this money out of my pocket, and put it into her bosom. I went to take it out of her Bosom; she called for assistance; two more came up and knocked me down stairs.

Q. Did you ever get your money again - A. No.

Prisoner's Defence. He asked me if I would have anything to drink. I said, no. He took me into a public-house and gave me a glass of spirits. I wished him good night, and went away. He came to me in the morning, and said I had robbed him. He said, if I did not give it him he would put an end to my existence.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130217-71

307. WILLIAM BLAKEMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of February , six loaves of sugar, value 16 s. the property of Samuel Ritherdon and Frederick Suthmier .

FREDERICK SUTHMIER . I am a sugar-baker , in Thames-street . My partner's name is Samuel Ritherdon .

Q. What do you accuse this man of - A. I do not accuse him.

Q. Did not you lose any sugar - A. No.

BENJAMIN HARRIS . I am a watchman. I stopped the prisoner in Smithfield. On the 7th of February, about twenty minutes before five in the morning; he had a bundle. I asked what he had got. He said, what is that to me I told him I insisted upon seeing what he had got. He had got six loaves of sugar. He offered me one of the loaves to let him go. I took him to the watchhouse.

THOMAS HART . I am a constable. When the prisoner was brought to the watchhouse he first said he brought the sugar from Greenwich; afterwards he told me he lived at 202, Upper Thames-street. I said, what are your friends. He said sugar bakers. I said I am afraid you got that from there. He said, he did; he took it out of the warehouse.

Q. to Prosecutor. Is that your sugar - A. I don't know.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130217-72

308. THOMAS WHITE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of January , a great coat, value 1 l. the property of Francis Adalid .

ELIZABETH PAMPLING . I am housemaid at Mr. Sultana. Francis Adalid is a visitor at Mr. Sultana's, from Spain. On the 30th of January, at half after eight o'clock in the morning, the cook was cleaning the door; she went out to change a pail of water; she left the door wide open. As I was coming out of the parlour into the lobby I met the prisoner with the coat. I said, holloa, sir. He said, holloa, ma'am, and whipped the coat on his left arm. He walked from the lobby, and directly he got into South-street he ran. I ran after him, and called out, stop thief; with the coat under his arm. He dropped the coat before he was stopped. I am sure he is the man.

WILLIAM COVEY . I am a green-grocer in Cross-street. I saw the prisoner running with the coat under his arm. I took the prisoner in custody, and gave charge of him.

THOMAS KIRBY . I am an headborough. This is the great coat.

Elizabeth Pampling . This is Francis Adalid 's coat.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming along upon my business; stop thief was called out. I had as just right as any other man to stop a thief. I knocked the man down. I had a right to knock a thief down at any time, and the second companion of the thief, he pretended to be a constable. He collared me.

GUILTY , aged 31.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130217-73

309. JOHN PRIOR was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of January , forty-three yards of printed cotton, value 2 l. the property of John Williams .

JOHN WILLIAMS . I am a linen draper , in the parish of St. George, Bloomsbury . I was not at home at the time this happened.

GEORGE JACOBS . I am servant to Mr. Williams. On the 20th of January, I was going out, about five at night, to take the prints in. I saw the prisoner turning the corner with the print in his hand. They were two pieces pinned together outside of the shop. I ran after him, and cried out, stop thief. I took hold of him, and a young man assisted me and brought him back.

WILLIAM PARTRIDGE . I am a beadle. On the 20th of January, about four in the evening, I saw the prisoner with another. I took notice of him. I thought I should hear something of this nature, and when I came round the street again there was the cry of, stop thief. This is the linen that was gave me, saying, it was the linen that he took from the door. There is twenty-one yards in one piece, and twenty-two in the other piece.

Jacobs. Them prints were taken from our shop. The shop mark is on both of them.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to his character.

GUILTY, aged 19.

Judgment respited .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130217-74

310. MARGERET NEALE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of January , a tin can, value 2 s. and four quarts of milk, value 2 s. the property of Caleb Whitbread .

CALEB WHITBREAD . I am a cow-keeper . I live in Church-lane, Mile-end-old-town . By frequently missing my can on the evening of the 19th of January, I searched and found the can in my cow-house, secreted. The can contained rather more than four quarts of milk.

Q. You did not see who took it, did you - A. There was no other person in the premises to take it. I saw her coming out of my premises with the can I had seen secreted. I sent for an officer. He took her in custody.

WILLIAM COLE . I am an officer. I was sent for. I took the prisoner in custody, and this is the can I found upon her. It contained four quarts and a pint of milk.

Prosecutor. It is my can.

Prisoner's Defence. My mistress gave me the milk to take home for my supper.

Prosecutor. My wife did not give her milk. I

gave her fourteen shillings a week. She has worked for me six years.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130217-75

311. EDWARD HARWOOD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of January , a coach glass, value 30 s. the property of Henry Davidson .

JOHN LANE . I am a coachman to John Curry , 17, Bedford-square. On the 16th of January, about nine at night, I saw the prisoner come down the yard in Lower Gower's-mews, Gower-street ; he opened the coach door, and drew the glass out. He ran away. I ran after him, and holloed out, stop thief. I never lost sight of him. He was stopped in Gower-street.

Q. Whose coach was it he took it out - A. Henry Davidson 's, No. 10, Bedford-square. I am sure he took it out of his carriage. He threw the glass down before he got out of the yard, I pursued him so close.

JOHN TEWNEY . I am a watchman. I stopped the prisoner. This is the glass.

THOMAS KELLY . I am coachman to Mr. Henry Davidson . It is my master's glass.

Prisoner's Defence. I am a coachman. I drive for Mr. Ware, Black-horse-yard, Leather lane. The wheel had broke; I went down the yard to get another wheel. I never touched any glass.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130217-76

312. SAMUEL HATFIELD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of February , seventeen pounds weight of beef, value 10 s. the property of James Kill .

JAMES KILL . I keep the Waggon and Horses public-house at Ealing . On February the 8th, I lost part of a rump of beef. I was in the kitchen very busy; a boy came in and said, you have lost your beef. I went and saw it was gone. It was hanging up in the house. I turned out of doors as fast as I could. I catched the prisoner with the beef about half way from there to Old Brentford. I brought him back, and charged a constable with him. He had the beef and the hook too. I believed it to be my beef.

WILLIAM GORE . I am a constable. I took charge of the prisoner. The prisoner said he was in great distress; he had a wife and six children. He lived at the further end of Ealing. His family has been troublesome to our parish six months.

JAMES SHARP . I saw the prisoner go out with the beef. I went and told Mr. Kill of it. Mr. Kill ran after him.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going along, and the beef was hung to my coat by another man as I was going along.

GUILTY , aged 33.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130217-77

313. MARY JONES and ELIZABETH WILLIAMS were indicted for feloniously stealins, on the 17th of February , five yards of muslin, value 25 s. the property of Robert James Shields .

ROBERT JAMES SHIELDS . I am a linen-draper . in Barbican . On Wednesday evening last, about a quarter past six o'clock in the evening, the two prisoners came into my shop together; they asked for some sprigged muslin. I shewed them some muslins myself; at the same time I was shewing another customer some handkerchiefs. I left the customer to shew them the muslin, and while I turned round to fell the price of the handkerchief, Jones took the muslin. I missed the muslin in about five minutes after.

Q. What was the quantity of that piece of muslin that was missed - A. Five yards. That was sprigged muslin. I asked them six shillings a yard for it. Jones went out of the shop, telling Williams that they were cheap.

Q. Had you perceived that any muslin was missing before Jones got out of the shop - A. Mrs. Barker told me Jones had got a piece of muslin, and had taken it away, but I did not miss it myself. By that time Williams was going out. I saw Williams go out. I followed her. I stopped Williams, and brought her back. I told her she might have the muslin. I then asked her who the other woman was. She said she did not know the other woman. I told her I must detain her until I got the other woman. In about half an hour, Jones came in again. She asked Williams what was the reason that she staid. She said she had heard that Williams was kept a prisoner. I sent for an officer. They were both searched, and nothing but money was found upon either of them. I have never seen the muslin since.

SARAH BARKER . I live at No. 2, Ironmonger-row, Old-street. On the 17th of February, I was in Mr. Shields' shop; I was bargaining for a coloured handkerchief. I saw the two prisoners come in together. Mr. Shilds leaving me and serving them, made me look at them more than what I should have done. They looked at several pieces of muslin; they did not like any on the counter. Mr. Shields turned round to get some more muslin to shew them. I saw Mary Jones draw a piece of muslin from off the counter and put it under her gown. She then said to Williams, take that piece of muslin, it is cheaper than the others. I immediately called out, and said, that woman has taken a piece of muslin off the counter. Mr. Shields followed her, and could not find her. Williams continued in the shop a little time, and said she did not know her. I said to Elizabeth Williams , how can you say that, you came in together. She immediately said, do not be too hard. When Jones came back she said to Williams, d - n you, you bitch, what keeps you so long, to make me come after you. Williams said, I am here for a piece of muslin that you have taken; this woman says you have taken it. Jones said, search me then, if you think I have got any thing. I said, it is not a time to search you, when you have been out of the shop, and may have got rid of it. She put herself in a posture to strike me. I am certain I saw her take the muslin.

ROBERT JONES . I am a constable. I searched the two prisoners. I found nothing on them but money.

Williams said nothing in her defence.

Jones's Defence. I am innocent of the charge.

JONES, GUILTY , aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

WILLIAMS, NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130217-78

314. JOHN BROWN, alias ROBINSON , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of January , twenty-eight pounds weight of copper, value 20 s. the property of Samuel Rhode .

SAMUEL RHODE . I am a ship-chandler ; I live at Limehouse. I lost the property on the 10th of last month, from a warehouse in Narrow-street, Limehouse . On the Thursday following, it happened I received a letter from the office, saying an officer had stopped a man with copper. I went the next morning to see the copper. Bendell is my warehouseman.

ROBERT BENDELL . On the 10th of January, Mr. Rhodes warehouse in Narrow-street, Limehouse, was broken open, between seven and nine o'clock in the evening. On the 11th, I missed twenty-eight pounds of copper, and two bolts of canvas.

JOHN FORRESTER . On the 17th of January, I met the prisoner with a cake of copper on his back; I asked him what he had got. He said, it was no business of mine. I told him, I was an officer, and it was my business. He said, I should not see it. He threw it into Aldgate-church-yard. I seized hold of him. I got the copper out. I asked him, how he came by it. He said he could not tell. I asked him, what he was going to do with it. He said, he did not know. He said, he wished I would shoot him. I told him, I had no authority to do that.

Q. Did you find any other pieces - A. No. This is the piece.

Bendell. That is my master's copper. This is the only piece that is found.

Q. What is the prisoner - A. He had a constant situation at Preston's lead manufactory. He worked there about eight or nine months, but not for the last seven years.

Prisoner's Defence. The copper I found under some pales. I knew no more of stealing the copper than a new born babe.

GUILTY , aged 45.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130217-79

315. THOMAS BUSHNELL , JOHN BROMLEY , MARY FREEMAN , and HANNAH TILLING were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of December , a spencer, value 2 s. the property of Mary Ball , spinster .

MARY BALL . I am a milliner . I live at No. 18, Cranbourn-street . On the 21st of December, I lost a spencer; it was hanging at the door.

Q. Do you know who took it - A. No.

Q. At what time of the day was it taken - A. I cannot say. I am sure there was one snatched from the door on Christmas Eve.

MARY SAYERS . I am employed by Mrs. Ball. I made the spencer.

Q. How was it taken - A. I don't know.

JOHN COTTON . I am a painter and glazier. On the 21st of December, or the 22nd, I cannot say which, Bromley, Bushnell, Mary Freeman and Hannah Tilling and me, were at the Coach and Horses in Cranbourn-street, and coming along Cranbourn-street Bromley snatched a spencer from Mrs. Ball's door; he gave it to Tilling, and Freeman turned off with it, and I met them at the Coach and Horses public-house.

Q. How came you to tell of it - A. I thought I should be taken for it, and I surrended myself to the officer. I am now in the East London Militia.

- . I am a pawnbroker. On the 21st of December, I took this spencer of Hannah Tilling. I lent her two shillings upon it.

JOSEPH COOPER . I am an officer. We received the information from Cotton. We went and apprehended the prisoners at the Coach and Horses; Cotton sent word to us. He was in custody for desertion at the time.

- POPE. I am an officer. On the 27th of last month I searched Freeman's room, I found eleven duplicates.

Prosecutrix. I cannot swear to the spencer.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130217-80

316. ANN COCKERELL was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 16th of January , a silk handkerchief, value 1 s. a shirt, value 5 s. a gown, value 2 s. and a pillow case, value 6 d. the property of Samuel Ames .

MARY ANN AMES . My husband's name is Samuel Ames ; he is a broker at Islington . I lost these things on the 16th of January. I employed the prisoner as a charwoman . I lost a handkerchief, shirt, gown, and stockings.

THOMAS KNIGHTLEY . I am a constable. On Tuesday evening, the prisoner was brought in the watchhouse by Mr. Ames. I searched the prisoner, and found eight duplicates upon her. We went to Mr. Wildman's, the pawnbroker, and found all the things mentioned in the indictment.

WILLIAM LAKE . I am shopman to Mr. Wildman, pawnbroker, Islington. Master's daughter took in these things in pledge. I produce them. I am sure it is the prisoner.

Prosecutrix. They are all mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I was rather in liquor at the time. I am very sorry I have done it.

GUILTY , aged 49.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130217-81

317. MARIA GILL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of December , three shifts, value 10 s. a sheet, value 4 s. and two stockings, value 2 s. the property of Ann Dupree , spinster .

ANN DUPREE . The prisoner was a servant in the house where I lodged. I live at 20, Princes-street, Spitalfields .

WILLIAM WILSON . I am an officer. On the 11th of this month, I apprehended the prisoner. I went to her lodgings in Tewksbury-court, Whitechapel, there I found these stockings and two duplicates, one for a shift and the other a sheet. The prisoner then acknowledged that she had stolen the property, and pawned it.

SAMUEL PETO . I produce a shift; I took it in pawn of the prisoner.

JOHN NEADES . I am a pawnbroker. I produce a sheet. I took it in on the 23d of November, of a person calling herself Mary Ray ; whether it was the prisoner I cannot say.

Prosecutrix. The things are all mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I did it through distress.

GUILTY, aged 15.

Judgment respited .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130217-82

318. DAVID LOVELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of January , a handkerchief, value 4 s. the property of a certain person to the jurors unknown, from his person .

HENRY COLLIER I am a Bow-street officer. On the 18th of January, I saw the prisoner in company with five others, in Great Queen-street, Lincoln's-inn-fields , behaving very improper to females, as they passed. I followed them until they got to a picture-shop in Queen-street. The prisoner then drew a yellow silk handkerchief out of a gentleman's pocket, and they all ran off. I followed the prisoner and lost him. On the Friday following, I saw the prisoner again with the gang about eight in number. I then followed him and took him. I searched him, and found these two handkerchiefs on him.

Q. Where is the handkerchief that you saw him take out of the gentleman's pocket - A. I lost him on that day.

Q. You do no know that he stole them two handkerchiefs, did you - A. No.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130217-83

319. MARIA MANSFIELD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of January , a watch, value 4 l. the property of William Johnson , from his person .

WILLIAM JOHNSON . I am a servant .

Q. When did you lose your watch - A. On the 29th of January, as I was coming from Soho-square , I met the prisoner; she asked me to give her some halfpence to get her a glass of drink. I gave her some, and while I was taking the halfpence out of my waistcoat pocket, she took my watch.

Q. Did nothing else pass between you - A. No. When I left her I missed my watch. I ran back; I could not find her.

Q. Did you ever find your watch again - A. Yes. I found my watch the next day at the pawnbroker's.

MRS. M'CARTY. I sent my servant to pawn a ring for me, and she pawned the watch for the prisoner. The prisoner returned with my servant, and offered me the duplicate for five shillings.

JOHN LANGLEY . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner. I went to the pawnbrokers, and the watch was produced. The pawnbroker was not here with the watch. His name is Nelson.

THOMAS NELSON was called upon his recognizance.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130217-84

320. JOSEPH WILSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of January , a wooden box, value 3 s. and seventy-four glass flint bottles, value 3 l. 2 s. the property of Benjamin Wadman .

BENJAMIN WADMAN . I am a baker . I live at Bow, Middlesex . I lost the wooden box on the 13th of January. The prisoner was found with it. It was not taken away from the premises, and having lost a great deal of property, my father was watching. I went into the warehouse, and saw the prisoner with the box. He threw it down, ran away, and I followed him.

MR. WADMAN, SENIOR. I saw the prisoner out of the back room, passing out of one loft into another. It is an open door that looks into the yard. I ran directly to my son, and told him there was somebody in the loft. I know what was in that box; seventy-four capillaire bottles. I saw him with the box in his hand. They were empty bottles.

JOHN START . I am an officer. I took the prisoner in custody. I produce the box and the bottles.

Prosecutor. They are my property.

Prisoner's Defence. This gentleman has got a back way into the premises and into the shop. My dog, he ran in after a cat. I went into the premises after my dog. I put that box against the hole where the dog ran in. It was not my intention to rob or take anything.

GUILTY , aged 27.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and whipped in Jail .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130217-85

321. THOMAS GRIFFEN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of January , six dozen of saw-files, value 16 s. the property of David Courley .

DAVID COURLEY . I am a smith and ironmonger . I live at 24, Ryder-street, St. James's . I lost the files on the 20th of January. The prisoner came into my shop. I was sitting in my parlour; my wife answered the door of the shop. He asked a question, and before he could receive any answer my wife said, the man has stolen the files. I pursued him, and he was stopped with the files.

JAMES KENDALL . I am a corporal of the Royal Marines. As I was coming along Oxford-street, I saw the prisoner running. I immediately stopped him. He put a dozen of files into my hand. Another man came up, and said, you have got the property. I said, yes. He said, that is all I want, let him go. I did not give him the property. He was only his companion. These are the files.

Prosecutor. They are my files.

Prisoner's Defence. In pleading guilty to the indictment

I am well aware of the consequence, yet I am induced to pursue this line of conduct, and will bear that punishment your lordship thinks fit. I hope your lordship will, in the painful duty allotted to you, assign to me the same punishment as to every unfortunate criminal as to the first offence. I am, my lord, a young man, by trade a blacksmith , and having been out of work some time, and having a wife and two children, I went to this house to ask for work, and in one unguarded moment, I was induced to do this. I acknowledged my guilt before the magistrate, and must before your lordship.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130217-86

322. THOMAS ALDERMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of February , a cask, value 8 s. and thirty gallons of beer-grounds, value 10 s. the property of Harvey Christian Combe , Joseph Delafield , Sir Charles Flower , bart . Harvey Combe , William Packer , and Joseph Delafield , junior.

WILLIAM LAWRENCE . I am foreman cooper to Messrs. Combes and Company.

Q. What are the names of the partner s - A. Harvey Christian Combe , Joseph Delafield , Sir Charles Flower , bart. Harvey Combe , William Packer , and Joseph Delafield , junior. On the 5th of the present month, the patrol came and told me that a man had rolled a barrel out of the yard. I went with him to the watchhouse where it was lodged, and looked at it. I saw it was my employer's cask. I went down to the brew-house and told the clerk. We examined it together, and found it contained beer grounds. I went in the yard, and fastened the men in the yard. I questioned the men upon it, and one of the men confessed.

Q. What was the prisoner - A. I knew him by sight; he had worked there some time before.

JOSEPH HOBBS . I am a brewer's servant. The man came to me, and asked me if I could get him a barrel of grounds. He said, he would stand ten shillings in the course of the night. The man did not come for it, and so the watchman started the ground vat over again. The next morning the man came. I assisted in rolling the cask down the yard, and the prisoner took it by the gate.

Mr. Alley. You rolled it across the yard; he was there ready to receive it - A. Yes. He was not with me when I took it out of the ground vat.

Q. You rolled the cask down the yard; where was the prisoner - A. He was in the yard by the stable door; he took it of me before it got out of the gate, and he rolled it out, and the patrol stopped him with it.

ROBERT LAVAT . Q. You are a brewer's servant too - A. Yes. On Thursday night I was in my master's employ. Mr. Lawrence asked me if I had any objection to remain in the yard as a watchman. I was informed by Joseph Hobbs , that the prisoner had been to enquire to get a barrel of grounds. He said, that he had made an agreement with the prisoner to let him have a barrel for ten shillings. He was to come at five o'clock in the morning. He did not come. The gate was locked. About half after five, the draymen came into the yard. I took and started the grounds into the vat. I went into the stable to look after the horses. Joseph Hobbs filled the barrel, and the prisoner and him took it out.

RICHARD BAKER . I am a patrol. A little better than half after five in the morning of the 5th, I was going past the gate of this yard. I saw the prisoner rolling this cask out of the gate, and I saw him rolling it down Drury-lane. He rolled it into the coal-yard, and he placed it behind a cart. I then watched him. He went to the top of the coal-yard and looked about, as if he was watching somebody. I and my partner took him to the watchhouse. He at first said he bought it at the other end of the town; at last he said he bought it of Combe's stock. I saw him come out of the gate.

ABRAHAM MOORE . I am a patrol. I told my partner to conceal himself, very likely he would come and take another. He returned to the Duke of York. He said, if I give you and your partner five shillings a piece, that will satisfy you. I said, that will not do. We took him to the watchhouse. I returned to enquire if any such thing had been stolen from there.

Mr. Lawrence. That is the cask of my employers.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to his character.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130217-87

323. DOROTHY LAWSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of February , two sheets, value 24 s. the property of James Haye .

HANNAH HAYE . My husband's name is James Haye . I am a laundress. The prisoner worked for me in the laundry. I missed two sheets. I applied to the prisoner. She said she knew nothing of them. The officer found the sheets at the pawnbrokers.

JOHN GEORGE . I produce two sheets, pawned by the prisoner. I lent her five shillings upon each.

Prosecutrix. They are my sheets.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence, nor called any witnesses to her character.

GUILTY , aged 47.

Confined One Month in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130217-88

324. BENJAMIN HEARN, alias KEARN , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of February , five pieces of fir timber, value 40 l. the property of John Browning , Thomas Browning , and others, trading under the firm of T. R. W. and John Browning , and G. M. Bird .

THIRD COUNT, for stealing like property, the property of the same persons, only not stating the trade to be under any firm.

JOHN BROWNING . Q. You are a timber merchant at Bankside - A. Yes.

Q. You have premises in Windmill-street, St. James's - A. Yes.

Q. What is the firm of this house - A. T. R. and W. Browning and Company. The names of the partners are, John Browning , Thomas Browning , Richard Browning , William Browning , and George Martin Bird.

Q. In the month of February, had you purchased any timber - A. Yes.

Q. You lost some in February - A. Yes; it was lying at the time loose at Sand reach. It is above Westminster-bridge, near Chelsea .

Q. Whose care was it under at Sand reach - A. Robert Hopkins . He is a lighterman employed by our firm.

ROBERT HOPKINS I am a lighterman employed by Messrs. Browning's. They had ten floats of Swedish timber, each float, containing eighteen pieces. It was under my care.

Q. On Thursday the 4th of this month, did you examine the timber - A. I did, about eight o'clock in the morning. At that time it was all safe in there, at Sandy Dock.

Q. Did you examine it the next day - A. No, I did not. I was passing and repassing the wharf on the next day; I did not miss any of it. On the next morning, I missed six pieces from the outside. That was about eight o'clock. On the Friday, they were fastened with four ropes, three single ropes and one double. The ropes were cut. I have no hesitation in saying they were cut; it plainly appeared so. In the forenoon I enquired about London. In the afternoon, I went towards Brentford. In my passage up, I received information that a barge had passed by early in the morning, belonging to Mr. Watkins, with some timber a stern, which answered the description of that stolen. I got that information about half after four o'clock on the Friday. In consequence of that information I went up to Robinson's wharf, on the Brentford cut. On his wharf, I found five pieces of timber that I had lost, fastened to a ring on the wharf.

Q. Did you know that the timber that you found at Mr. Robinson's wharf, was the timber that you lost from your master's premises - A. Yes, I am perfectly sure it was. I went to Mr. Watkins's house, and there I found the prisoner was his bargeman . I found out the barge boy, and had him apprehended.

Q. Did the prisoner, when he was charged with this, say where he got the five pieces of timber - A. Before the magistrate he stated that a man had brought him the timber, within Battersea reach, about three o'clock on the morning of the Friday. The magistrate told him it was an unsatisfactory account; be should commit him. He said that the man told him to take it to Mr. Robinson's wharf, Brentford-cut, and leave it there for Pool's boats. Pool is the owner of boats employed for the inland navigation.

CHARLES ROBINSON . I am a warfinger at Brentford.

Q. Had you employed Watkins's barge on the 4th or 5th of February, to bring any goods from London - A. No; he took some goods from my wharf to London.

Q. On the 5th of February, did the barge arrive at your wharf - A. He arrived at my wharf on Friday, about nine o'clock. On Friday, in the morning, he had nothing in the barge, nor to the barge. When he came to my wharf, he told me that he had some timber for me. I understood him that it came from Bow-bridge.

Q. You had not at that time employed him to bring any timber had you - A. No, I had not. The raft was five pieces; the boy was upon the five pieces. He brought it along side of my wharf, and made it fast. He said it was for Pool's boats. I asked him for a note. He said he had none, but the person that gave him the timber would be at my wharf about the time that the barge arrived.

Q. Did the last witness, Robert Hopkins , see the timber on your premises - A. He saw it adjoining my premises, not on my premises.

JOHN HOLBY . Q. You worked on board this barge under the prisoner - A. Yes.

Q. On the 3rd and 4th of February were you at White-friars with the barge - A. Yes; we left Whitefriars on Thursday, between five and six in the evening. The timber was brought to the barge at White-friers, about ten o'clock on the Thursday morning. It was brought by a small boat. I don't know the man that brought it. At that time there was not water enough to bring it up to the barge; it was fastened to some coal barges that lay outside.

Q. How many pieces were they - A. Five pieces. I saw it in the morning, at day-light. Between five and six in the evening, we came out of White-friers. We took the timber astern, and went to the Temple, and there lay for the tide turning. On Friday morning, we went up to Brentford with the timber.

Q. This timber you brought from London and took down to Brentford - A. Yes.

Q. Then is it true, that about Battersea reach this timber was delivered by some man, and fastened to the barge - A. No, sir, it was not delivered within the reach at all.

Q. to John Browing. What is the value of these five pieces of timber - A. About forty pounds.

Prisoner's Defence. This man brought this timber to me in Whitefriars, to my barge. He asked me whether I worked for Mr. Robinson. I told him, I did. I asked him, whether he had got a note with the timber. He said, he had not, but a note would be there as soon as the barge. I took the timber in the barge to Brentford, to Mr. Robinson's wharf. He asked me whether I had got a note. I said. I had not. I am innocent of this felony you may depend upon it. I did not know of the timber being stolen. I took it up as carriage.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130217-89

325. ANN ANDREWS was indicted for feloniously stealing; on the 14th of January , a shawl, value 10 s. the property of Joseph Wisedale .

MARY WISEDALE . My husband's name is Joseph Wisedale; we live in Hatfield-street, Goswell-street . I lost my shawl on the 14th of January, about twelve o'clock at noon. I was cleaning my door. I went from my door to get a halfpenny worth of sand,

When I came back the prisoner was inside of my passage. I asked her what she wanted. She said, she understood that I had a room to let. I took her up stairs, and shewed her the room, and after she was gone I missed my shawl from off my dining table.

Q. Did you ever find your shawl - A. No.

Q. Then you only accuse her because there was nobody there but her, that you saw - A. Yes. I was up stairs with her a quarter of an hour. The door was fastened that while.

Q. Had you ever seen the woman before - A. No, never.

MARTHA ROBERTS . I bought a shawl of the prisoner. I sold it. She gave me a description of her place of abode. It was an old shawl. I gave her eightpence for it. I have sold it.

JOHN LIMBRICK . I am an officer. I took the prisoner in custody. She confessed of taking the shawl, and that she had sold it to this person. I went there, and they said they had sold it.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of the shawl. I never saw it in my life.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130217-90

326. WILLIAM HELSEY BARDELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of February , a sack, value 3 s. and five bushels of flour, value 5 l. the property of Giles Deane .

GILES DEANE . I am a baker , No. 5, Commercial-row, Poplar . The prisoner was my servant . On the 13th of February, between the hours of five and seven, he had to put up my barrow, and after he put up the barrow he brought the keys. He said, he had put the padlock on the stable, he had forgot to lock it. Soon after, he came for his wages; he received them and went about his business. I went into the warehouse, and missed a sack of flour. I returned to my son, and asked him if he had lent a sack of flour. He said, no. We looked for the sack; we could not find the sack any where. We proceeded to a neighbour's, a coal-shed adjoining our warehouse; there we found the flour deposited between the sugar casks, which were in a row in the Commercial-row, now a road that joins the back of our premises. We concealed ourselves and watched. At eleven o'clock the prisoner and another man came to where the flour was; they stopped a short time and then went away. At one o'clock a coach came down the Commercial-road; the prisoner jumped from behind the coach. He immediately went to where the flour was deposited. He took out the flour from behind the puncheons. We saw him move the puncheons and take the flour out. He then had got it on the path. We rushed upon him The prisoner tried to make his escape; my son followed him and took him.

JOHN DEANE . I was watching with my father. I saw him take the sack from being the sugar hogsheads; we rushed upon him. He ran; I pursued, and took him. This is the sack.

Prosecutor. That is my miller's sack. I can swear to that sack by different marks, that I can prove it was in my possession.

- LEVY. I am a constable. The prisoner was brought to the watchhouse at one o'clock in the morning; he told me that he was teased by a man out of employ, to rob his master. That is what he told me.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of it.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130217-91

327. DENNIS LOOBEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of February , five hundred pounds weight of iron, value 2 l. the property of the Company and Proprietors of the West Middlesex water-works .

JOHN KNIGHT . I am a builder. I live in Brunswick-square, in the parish of St. Pancras . On Sunday, the 7th of February, I was in my dwelling-house, looking out of the window; I could see over the fields where he Company of the West Middlesex water-works have pipes lay there. I saw some person busy at something. I went out of my house. The prisoner was standing with a sledge hammer in the attitude of striking the pipe, and a quantity of pieces broken off the pipe were laying by the prisoner.

Q. He was in the act of breaking these pipes - A. Yes, he was.

Q. You did not wait to see whether he carried them, away did you - A. No.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130217-92

328. JOHN NICHOLS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of February , two bushels of coals, value 3 s. two bushels of oats, value 12 s. and a sack, value 5 s. the property of Thomas Meux , Andrew Reid , John Reid , and others.

JAMES BEAL . Q. You are in the house of Meux, Ried, and Company - A. Yes. The names of the partner s are, Thomas Meux , Sir Robert Wigram, William Wigram , Andrew Ried , John Ried ; there are eighteen of them in all.

ROBERT CARTER . I am horsekeeper to Messrs. Meux and Co, and the prisoner was horsekeeper . On the morning of the 4th of February, about a quarter past six, I saw the prisoner with a sack on his back; he was going from Mr. Meux's premises towards his own house. I asked him what was in the sack. He said, potatoes. I said they were rumish potatoes. Then he said they were coals. I ordered him to take them back to where he took them from. He then carried them to Mr. Meux's premises. This is the sack. It is Mr. Meux's sack; it has coals in it now.

Prisoner's Defence. I purchased the coals of a man. I went to the stable and got a sack. I was carrying the coals home, and Mr. Carter stopped me.

GUILTY , aged 29.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and whipped in Jail .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130217-93

329. HANNAH MAHONY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of February , fourteen yards of flannel, value 7 s. the property of Thomas Walker .

THOMAS WALKER . I am a linen-draper , 18,

Marchmont-street, Russell-square . On the 9th of February, about nine o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came up to the door and enquired the price of some handkerchiefs. The boy told her the price of the handkerchiefs. She stepped a few paces back, returned, and took the flannel. I pursued her, and saw the flannel under her cloak. I brought her back, and when I put the flannel on the counter, she made her escape. She escaped four times, and I took her again.

Q. Where was the flannel - A. It stood against the door-port, part inside, and part out. I am sure the prisoner is the woman. This is the flannel; it is mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent. I am a poor hard-working woman.

GUILTY , aged 44.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130217-94

330. THOMAS SHERIDAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of January , a ham, value 11 s. the property of Thomas Gamage .

THOMAS GAMAGE . I am a cheesemonger . I live 24, King-street, Seven Dials .

Q. When did you lose your ham - A. On the 23d of January. I did not see this man take it. I only come to prove it is my own property.

WILLIAM PARRATT . I was serving in this shop for Mr. Gamage, about eleven o'clock. The shop was full of people. I saw the prisoner come in and reach down the ham from the window. He took the ham off, and made his escape. I pursued him, and overtook him. He threw the ham at me when I was within reach. I called out, stop thief. The watchman followed him.

Q. Did you ever lose sight of him - A. I did, just round Short's-gardens. I have not the least doubt he is the man. I took the ham back to the shop. This is the ham.

Prosecutor. It is my ham. It has my mark on it.

JURY, Q. to Parratt. Did you lose sight of him before he threw the ham at you - A. No. I am sure he is the person.

Prisoner's Defence. This gentleman said he saw me come in and take the ham out of the window; why did not he apprehend me at the time.

Parratt. I was in the act of going to lay hold of his coat when he threw the ham at me.

GUILTY , aged 50.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130217-95

331. ISABELLA WILCOX was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of January , a tablecloth, value 5 s. and a pail, value 1 s. the property of John Watson .

ELIZABETH WATSON . My husband's name is John. He is a day-labouring man . I lost my pail and tablecloth on the 24th of January, about four o'clock in the afternoon. After I had missed it, one of my neighbours came and said, Mrs. Wilcox had taken a pail out of my yard, and she would shew me where the prisoner lived. I went to her house. I knocked at the door; nobody came. I went in. I said, one of my neighbours said you took a pail out of my yard. She said, no such thing. I took a pail up. I said, this is my pail. I told her I had missed a tablecloth. I said, I shall be obliged to you to give it me. I said, I saw it under your petticoats. Oh, no, she said, that is my ragged smock. A constable came. He said, he would search her. The tablecloth fell from her clothes. The constable picked it up.

THOMAS HUNT . I am a constable. This is the pail and the tablecloth. I went to the prisoner's room. I said, if you do not give up the tablecloth I will search you. She pulled a pin out from her bosom, and down fell the tablecloth.

Prosecutrix. The pail and tablecloth is mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked up the cloth in the afternoon, on the road. As to the pail, I brought it home full of water, being in liquor.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130217-96

332. THOMAS BLACKWELL and WILLIAM M'CARTHY were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of February , one hundred and forty-seven pounds weight of iron, value 10 s. the property of John Lamb , Francis Nicholson , and John Carrick .

WILLIAM BOWYER . I am clerk to John Lamb , Francis Nicholson , and John Carrick . They are manufacturers of ship hearths for his Majesty's navy . On Wednesday, the 10th of February, I had information that the prisoner had taken some iron out of the factory. I went out, and met the two prisoners coming out of the iron shop. I went into the iron shop, and there I found a parcel of iron in the scale; about one hundred pounds one quarter and seven pounds.

Q. Where is that iron shop - A. In Pell-street. His name is Phillips.

THOMAS HALL . I am a smith. I was going into Mr. Lamb's factory; I met the prisoner, Blackwell, coming out with two pieces of iron in his hand. I walked after him. He went to the top of Pell-street, and when he came opposite of Phillips's gates, M'Carthy was standing resting a tub of iron on the post. Mr. M'Carthy said, I am here first, I have beat you. Blackwell went into the gates. I walked on twenty yards. I then saw M'Carthy ten or a dozen yards from the gates. I walked past. I did not see where the tub went to. The tub was not with him then.

WILLIAM TWINKLER . I am a servant to Mr. Phillips, who keeps an old iron shop.

Q. Which of the prisoners came in first - A. Blackwell. He brought a tub of iron with him. It weighed one hundred one quarter and seven pounds.

Q. What did you pay for it - A. I saw no money pass. My master was not in the way. Nobody came in but Blackwell. Mr. Hall came in afterwards and saw the iron there.

SAMUEL MILLER . I apprehended the prisoner

on the 10th, between six and seven o'clock; they then both denied taking the iron. I went to Phillips's the next morning, and brought the iron away. Phillips has since been out of the way. In the lock-up-room, Blackwell told me that M'Carthy had given him four baskets of iron, and that they had something for it there. This is the iron.

Mr. Hall. It is the property of Messrs. Lamb and Co.

Blackwell's Defence. What Miller says is false.

M'Carthy said nothing in his defence.

BLACKWELL, GUILTY , aged 60.

M'CARTHY, GUILTY , aged 36.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130217-97

333. WILLIAM BAKER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of February , a ream of paper, value 18 s. the property of Charles Thornton .

CHARLES THORNTON . I am a carman . I lost the ream of paper out of my cart, on Wednesday evening last. My cart was just by St. Clement's church . I was looking back. I saw the prisoner claw hold of a ream of paper out of the cart. I catched him. He made his escape from me. I holloaed out, stop thief. He was soon stopped. I never lost sight of him.

Q. How far had he removed it from where it was - A. About a foot and a half.

SAMUEL HOLMES . On the evening of the 17th of this month, I was in Clement's inn, coming out of the gate, towards the Strand. I saw the prisoner making towards Clement's-lane. As soon as I got out of the gate, I stepped across, and stopped him. A second person came up and laid hold of him by the other side. He said, what do you stop me for; I have done nothing. I said, my friend, if you have done nothing, you can have no objection to go back. Thornton came up, and said, that is the man that robbed me.

Prisoner's Defence. I was making through Clement's inn to go to Westminster. The prosecutor said, I was the person that took the paper. He never saw me before.

GUILTY , aged 34.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130217-98

334. ALEXANDER CLEELAND was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of February , one eighteen-penny bank token, two shillings, and one sixpence , the monies of Richard Attenborough .

RICHARD ATTENBOROUGH . I am a pawnbroker .

Q. How old is the boy - A. He is sixteen. The prisoner was my errand boy . Sometime previous to the 8th of February, I marked my money. I looked in the prisoner's box; I found some of the money I had marked.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130217-99

335. CHRISTOPHER HUNT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of January , a pig, value 4 l. the property of Edward Cooper .

EDWARD COOPER . I keep a chandler's shop in Brunswick-street, Hackney-road . I lost the pig out of my yard. The yard door was secured with two bars. The pig could not go out without it was let out. I missed the pig on the Saturday. I heard of it on the Sunday. Bishop, the officer, produced to me the pig that I had lost.

Q. Whereabouts is the worth of the pig - A. It is worth four pounds. It was a large hog.

DANIEL BISHOP . I am an officer of Worship-street office. On the 13th of this month, I stopped the prisoner in Hackney-road, about half past seven at night. It was then dark. He was driving the pig towards Shoreditch church. I crossed the road to meet him. He turned, and went as if he was going towards Hackney. I then ran up to him, and asked him how he came by that pig. He said, he met a man, and the man said he would give him sixpence to drive the pig to Shoreditch church. The next day Mr. Cooper owned the pig.

Prisoner's Defence. A man asked me to drive the pig to Shoreditch, and as I was coming along the officer stopped me.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130217-100

336. JOHN JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of February , fifteen brass rods, value 17 s. the property of George Long .

GEORGE LONG . I am an auctioneer . I live in Pridoux-street . I lost the brass rods on last Wednesday. I had a sale on Thursday and on Friday last, and the thing were in view on the Wednesday. A number of people came viewing the furniture. I heard a voice say, there was a thief in the house. I went down stairs. I found a man had got hold of the prisoner.

JOHN HAYMOND . The prisoner came in, in the middle of the day to view the property. He went up into the garret. He brought the rods from the garret under his coat. I went up stairs to see whether the rods were gone or not. He ran into a court. Another person stopped him. On seeing him, he threw the rods down an area.

JOSEPH BRAMBLE . I was going down Bedford-court. I saw the prisoner throw the rods down a window. I seized him, and brought him back.

Haymond. I heard the brass rods rattle as he passed me. These are the brass rods that belonged to the sale.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in extreme distress. I have a wife and three children starving. I humbly beg your lordship's mercy.

GUILTY , aged 56.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130217-101

337. TOUSSAIAT LEVIN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of January , three pair of trowsers, value 1 l. the property of Robert Kennedy Dickman .

JOHN DICKMAN . I am the son of Robert Kennedy Dickman . On the 23d of January, I was sitting in the parlour when I received information that some person had stolen a pair of trowsers. I went

out, and asked which way the person had gone. A man told me down King David's-lane. I went down King David's-lane. I saw the prisoner with a bundle under his arm. I took him back to my father's shop, and delivered him to an officer. These are the trowsers; they are my father's property.

Prisoner's Defence. A man told me to take them trowsers, and go along with them.

GUILTY , aged 45.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130217-102

338. CATHEINE M'CAWLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of February , a basket, value 1 s. and three pecks of apples, value 6 s. the property of Mary Ashley .

The prosecutrix was called, and not appearing in court , the prisoner was

ACQUITTED.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130217-103

339. MARY SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of December , a gown, value 10 s. a petticoat value 10 s. a shawl, value 5 s. the property of John Mills .

ELEANOR MILLS . My husband's name is John Mills.

Q. When did you lose these things - A. On the 28th of December, I lost them out of my room. Nobody was about the place but the prisoner, I lost a gown, a petticoat, and a shawl. I taxed her with it; she strongly denied it.

JOHN BARNLEY . I am an officer. I took the prisoner in custody. These duplicates were about her. She said, they were her own things. I told her, I should enquire about them. I took the prosecutrix to Mr. Guest, pawnbroker, Fleet-market. She saw the articles, and claimed them.

MR. GUEST. I am a pawnbroker. I produce the gown, petticoat, and shawl.

Q. Of whom did you take them in pawn of - A. I do not know.

Prosecutrix. These are all mine.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130217-104

340. PEDRO JOZE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of January , four one-pound bank notes, the property of Henry de Mells , from his person .

HENRY DE MELLS . I am a sailor . I lost my four one-pound bank notes at the Red Lion public-house, close to the London Dock . The prisoner was with me. I sent for a pot of beer. I took a shilling out of my pocket to pay for the beer. After that, he put his hand into my pocket, and took four one-pound notes, and run away. I ran after him. He ran out of the room; I could not catch him. When he took out the four one-pound notes he took some silver and copper with it, and then ran away.

MARY FLEMMING . I was in the Red Lion, where the prisoner and the prosecutor were drinking together. The prosecutor gave me a shilling, and the prisoner took the money out of his pocket with silver and halfpence; how much, I cannot say.

ELIZABETH STONE . Q. Were you in the public-house - A. Yes. I saw Mary Flemming bring the prosecutor the beer. The prosecutor gave her a shilling to change. I saw the prisoner put his hand into the prosecutor's pocket; he took out four one-pound notes, some silver, and halfpence. He ran out with them.

SAMUEL MILLER . I am an officer. I took the prisoner in custody. I asked him about the robbery. He said, he knew nothing about it.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not rob him. I played it cards with him in the morning, and as he had lost the money he fetched two women to swear that he had the money stolen from him.

GUILTY , aged 33.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130217-105

341. MARY PARKINS was indicted. for that she, on the 24th of August, in the 51st year of his Majesty's reign , unlawfully, by false pretences, did obtain from Robert Wall Eyles , twelve yards of bombazeen, value 2 l. 13 s.

ROBERT WALL EYLES . I am a haberdasher , 23, Ludgate-hill . On the 24th of August, 1811, the prisoner came into my shop. She brought a note, as if from Mrs. Curtis of Stretham, Surry. This is the note.

"Stretham, Surry. Mrs. Curtis will be oblidged to Mr. Eyles to send me by the carrier, twelve yards of strong bombazeen; likewise will thank you to send two patterns of double twilled sarsenett. I think I paid you four shillings and sixpence per yard for some bombazeen, am not certain." I gave directions for the bombazeen to be cut off, and it was cut off, as many yards as were ordered, twelve yards. The prisoner represented herself to be the carrier. The bombazeen was delivered to her.

Q. What was the worth of that bombazeen - A. Two pounds seventeen shillings. I think the note speaks of her intention to pay for it very soon. I never was paid for it. In consequence of my not receiving the money at Christmas, I sent the bill to Stretham. No person could be found answering that description. There was a Mrs. Curtis living at Stretham, in very low circumstances. It could not possibly be for her. She disowned having sent for them. I packed up the parcel myself, and delivered it to the prisoner. I have never seen the silk or the money since.

Q. When did you see this woman again - A. I saw her at Guildhall, on her examination, about three weeks or a month ago, just after the last sessions.

GUILTY , aged 35.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130217-106

342. JOSIAH NIGHTINGALE, alias LILLEY , was indicted for unlowfully breaking and entering the warehouse of Samuel Thorp , Alfred Thorp , Robert Thorp , and John Thomas Thorp , on the 10th of February , with intent the goods and marchandize therein being, feloniously to steal .

AND OTHER COUNTS, only varying the manner of charging them.

ALFRED THORP . My partner's names are Samuel Thorp, John Thomas Thorp , and Robert Thorp . I have no other partner s. I merely know I was called up and informed of it ten minutes after six. It was the 10th of January.

WILLIAM HAYDIN . I am employed by Messrs Thorp's, No. 18. corner of Jewry-street, Aldgate .

Q. What ward is that in - A. In the ward of Aldgate, St. Catherine's Creed.

Q. On the 9th, in consequence of some previous occurrence, did you and some other person set up to watch in them premises - A. We did.

Q. Who was there first there - A. James Pratt . We went in about half past five or a quarter to six in the evening. We remained there until six in the morning. About five minutes past six in the morning, I heard a key or a pick-lock enter the lock of the warehouse door. I proceeded from the place we were concealed to the door, and placed myself where in such a situation as to be behind the door it opened. I heard the bolt of the lock distinctly forced back twice. I observed when I got to the door that I had left a light burning. I sent Mr. Pratt to put it out. Before Mr. Pratt could get to the light, I saw the door open. I saw a person enter the warehouse about three feet. There were some packages all round the door, so that it did not open immediately. I saw a person enter about three feet in the warehouse. He stood and looked round him. to see if all was safe, as I supposed. I could see that he had a dark coat on. I attempted to lay hold of his collar, and at the same time to close the door, but I could not succeed in either. I found the door was held fast It was held tight by somebody, that any person that I attempted to seize might run out. He ran out. I followed him close across the street. He turned the corner of Mitre-street. I recovered sight of him immediately round the corner.

Q. The same person that you followed was the same person that came out of the warehouse - A. I could not swear to him.

Q. Was it the same body that was moving before you, that you caught sight of immediately you turned the corner - A. It was. He ran down Mitre-street, (it is very short) through a gateway, into Little Duke's-place, down a narrow passage into Great Duke's-place. He turned the corner into King-street. I there caught him just recovering from a fall, as I supposed. The moment that I laid hold of his collar, he said, I am not the man; he has run that way; pointing down the street, in a different direction from the person I pursued. I kept fast hold of his collar. I brought him back the same way that we run. He said nothing. There was a person came up in a light drab coat. He said, all is right. After the prisoner was taken he gave his name Josiah Lilley ; he afterwards admitted his name was Nightingale.

COURT Q. There were goods in this warehouse was there not - A. Yes, the property of Messrs Thorp's.

JAMES PEATT . Q. You sat up with the last witness - A. I did. I saw the door open in the manner he has described.

Q. Were you so situated as to see the colour of the coat of the person that entered - A. I could not see any person at all. I saw the door open. Upon the alarm, I ran out immediately. I was twenty yards behind. I saw the person before he turned into Mitre-street, and I saw him before he entered the passage that leads into Duke's-place. Mr. Hayden had hold of his collar. We brought him back to the warehouse, I saw only one person before, until Hayden fastened upon him.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Confined Two Years in Newgate , and publickly whipped .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130217-107

343. MARY PARKER was indicted, for that she, on the 23d of January , a piece of false and counterfeited money, made to the likeness and semilitude of a good half-crown, as and for a good half-crown, unlawfully did utter to James Fisher , and that she, at the time of so uttering it, had about her, in her custody and possession, another piece of false and counterfeited money, made and counterfeited to the likeness of a good shilling .

JAMES FISHER . I am a stationer . I live with Mr. Richard Jones , 103, Leadenhall-street . On the 23d of January, the prisoner came into Mr. Jones's shop. She asked for half a quire of white and brown paper. I told her that was threepence. She said, if she took another half quire could not she have it for five pence halfpenny. No, I said, we make no abate meat at all. She then asked for a quire. I gave it her. She gave half a crown. My sight not being so cleaver, I took it to Mr. Jones. Mr. Jones said, it was a very base half-crown. He came with me, and asked her where she got that half-crown. She said she found it in the street. He said, he would send for a constable, as she had bad money about her. When the constable came, he took her backwards and searched her. The constable has the half-crown. I was not present when she was searched.

WILLIAM JONES . Q. You are the master of the shop - A. I am.

Q. Do you remember a half-crown being brought to you by the last witness - A. I do. On the 23d of January, in consequence of the half-crown, being presented to me. I went forward into the shop, where I saw the prisoner. I asked her how she came by that half-crown. She said she found it. I said, I believed her to be a bad woman, and I would send for a constable. I accordingly did send for a constable, and in the interim my son came into the shop, and in the passage leading to behind the counter, he picked up a something, and gave it me. It was a paper, containing six counterfeit shillings. When the constable came, I gave him the half-crown and the six shillings. The six shillings were picked up by my son after I said I would send for a constable, and charged her with being a bad woman of that description. He picked them up about two yards distance from the place where the prisoner was standing. I delivered precisely the some shillings to the constable, as my son delivered to me.

THOMAS JONES . Q. Were you in the shop on the 23d of January - A. Yes. I picked up six shillings,

folded up in paper, about two yards from where the prisoner stood. I gave them to my father. The prisoner said she never saw the shillings until she saw them in my hand.

THOMAS PINNER . I am a constable. I was sent for, I went and apprehended the prisoner. I searched her in Mr. Jones's accompting-house. I found on her person this pocket-book; inside of it was a new two-penny stamp and some duplicates. I found in her pocket, besides, ten-pence in copper. I asked her, how she came by that half-crown. She said, she slept with a gentleman; he gave her that half-crown, and she knew nothing of the shillings. I produce the half-crown and the six shillings.

CALEB EDWARD POWELL . Q. You assist the Soliciter of the Mint - A. Yes.

Q. Look at that half-crown, is it base or good - A. It is a counterfeit. It is merely washed. There is no silver in it; and the six shillings, they are all counterfeit.

Prisoner's Defence. When I came into the shop, I asked for a quire of paper. I gave him half-a-crown, and in about half an hour after the young man picked up these six shillings, several people came in the shop. I told them I never saw the shillings until I saw them in his hands.

GUILTY , aged 19,

Of uttering a counterfeit half-crown.

Confined Six Months in Newgate , and at the Expiration of that time to find Sureties for Six Months to come .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130217-108

344. JOHN HART was indicted, for that he, on the 15th of January , one piece of false and counterfeited money, made to the likeness and similitude of a good shilling, as and for a good shilling, unlawfully did utter to Thomas Hancock .

THOMAS HANCOCK . I live at Waltham-abbey . On Friday the 15th of January, I happened to be near the bank, between two and three o'clock; John Hart, the prisoner was there selling oranges . I made a bargain with John Hart to buy twelve oranges for sixpence, and the sixpence I offered him he refused, saying it was a bad one. I gave him an eighteen-penny piece, and he gave me a shilling in change. The shilling I got from him was a bad one. My brother was standing by the side of me. He said, we may as well have another dozen. The prisoner had only nine left in his basket. He borrowed three oranges of a brother Jew, and made up a dozen. My brother offered him sixpence for them. The prisoner said to me, if you will give me a three-shilling piece, I will give half-a-crown change. I gave him a three-shilling piece. He gave me an eighteen-penny piece and a shilling. I gave the whole of the money to the constable. A boy came up and said something, and in consequence of what the boy said I went back to the corner of the bank, and from there I went to the side of the Exchange. The prisoner was there selling oranges. I told him he had given me bad change. He offered to change them. He said he was very sorry for it. I said, no, if I let him change them I should be as bad as he was. I led him along as far as the counter. A parcel of Jews kept round him; they said I was no constable, I had no right to take him. Then I let him go. He ran up the Old Jewry as fast as he could run. I ran after him, and my brother. I cried, stop thief. A man stopped him. Mr. Fenner came up and took him to the Compter. I went with him.

WILLIAM HANCOCK . I was with my brother. I bought sixpennyworth of oranges. I gave him sixpence. He refused it. He said, it was a Frenchman. He asked if we had a three-shilling piece. We told him, yes, and gave him one. He gave us an eighteen-penny piece and a bad shilling. My brother took the shilling, and afterwards gave it to Fenner. After we brought the oranges we went on to the Bank, a boy stopped us, and told us something. In consequence of what the boy said, we went back to the prisoner, and told him he had given us bad-change. He told us he would change it. My brother told him he would not let him. We took him as far as the Compter, and then he ran away. I ran after him and halloaed out, stop thief. He was stopped. A constable came and took him to the Compter. He was searched, and a few halfpence was found on him, perhaps enough to buy him a pot of beer.

- . I was walking past. I saw the prisoner dealing with these gentleman. I was going towards Cheapside. I had seen the Jew selling oranges before. One of the gentlemen offered him a sixpence. He said, I do not think this sixpence is a good one. The gentleman then gave him an eighteen-penny piece. He gave him a shilling; it had a black circle round it. He had a great deal more silver. I dare say he had two pounds worth. He selected this shilling, took one out, and gave it him. He had more shillings marked in the same way as that was. The other gentleman wanted a dozen oranges; he had only nine left; he borrowed three of another jew. He gave him a sixpence. He refused that. He said, give me a three-shilling piece, I will give you half-a-crown. I went to these gentlemen and told them the Jew had given them bad money, and pointed out the prisoner at Sweeting's-alley. I said, the Jew is selling there. I am positive he is the man. I have known him for two or three years.

JOHN FENNER . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner, and searched him. I found a good eighteen-penny piece upon him, and some halfpence. I gave it him before the Lord Mayor, I produce the shillings and the sixpence, and the eighteen-penny token. The two shilling and the sixpences and eighteen-penny token were produced to me by Hancock. I have had them ever since.

CALEB EDWARD POWELL . Q. Look at the two shillings, are they new manufactured - A. They are quite fresh counterfeits. They have never been in circulation. The eighteen-penny token is a good one; both the sixpences are good ones. One is a French sixpence.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Confined Six Months in Newgate , and at the expiration of that time to find sureties for Six Months then to come .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.


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