Old Bailey Proceedings, 13th January 1813.
Reference Number: 18130113
Reference Number: f18130113-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND ALSO THE GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, HELD AT Justice-Hall, in the Old Bailey, On WEDNESDAY the 13th of JANUARY, 1813, and following Days;

BEING THE SECOND SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF The Right Honourable GEORGE SCHOLEY , LORD-MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY JOB SIBLY , No. 4, CARTHUSIAN-STREET, ALDERSGATE-STREET.

LONDON:

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED (BY THE AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON,) By R. Butters, No. 22, Fetter-lane, Fleet-street.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON.

Before the Right Honorable GEORGE SCHOLEY , Lord Mayor of the City of London; Sir Archibald Macdonald , knt. Lord Chief Baron of His Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir George Wood , knt. one of the Barons of His Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir John Bailey , knt. one of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir Watkin Lewes , knt. Harvey Christian Combe , esq. Sir James Shaw , bart. Aldermen of the said City; John Silvester , esq. Recorder of the said City; Thomas Smith , esq. Samuel Birch , esq. Samuel Goodbehere , esq. Aldermen of the said City; and Newman Knowlys , esq. Common-serjeant of the said City; His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

London Jury.

Thomas Hunt ,

David Price ,

John Crichton ,

Robert Hopcroft ,

William Haseltine ,

Thomas Herbert ,

Thomas Fenton ,

Joseph Barnes ,

Adam Dennis ,

Samuel Pinder ,

Henry Chapman ,

Thomas Goudey ,

First Middlesex Jury.

Jacob Yellowley ,

James Whisken ,

George Scarlett ,

Joseph Wood ,

Jesse Schofield ,

William Medland ,

John Sheppard ,

William Wiley ,

Thomas Stone ,

Richard Chard ,

Clement Beckwill Jones ,

James Baker .

Second Middlesex Jury.

Charles Briant ,

John Brooks ,

Thomas Courtney Lancefield ,

John Hodgkinson ,

Joseph Coles ,

John Geale ,

William Sadler ,

George Phillips ,

John George Holden ,

Thomas Smithers ,

William Hawkins ,

Charles Thomas Pratt .

Reference Number: t18130113-1

129. JAMES BAINBRIDGE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of December , forty pair of stockings, value 10 l. the property of William Ward , in the dwelling-house of Robert Ward .

WILLIAM WARD . I am a stocking cleaner and dyer ; I live in the house of Robert Ward, Swallow-street, in the parish of St. Ann .

Q. Did you lose any stockings on the 15th of December last - A. Yes, forty pair of silk stockings.

Q. When had you last seen the stockings before you missed them - A. On the 14th, in the evening, they were on the counter, in the shop. I saw them there about eight o'clock. After that, I did not see any more of them until I saw the prisoner and them in the watchhouse, on Tuesday morning, the 15th of December.

JANE WARD . I am the daughter of William Ward. On Tuesday morning, the 15th, about nine o'clock, I was in the shop; two men came in; they asked me if Mr. Ward was at home. I said, I did not know. They asked me, if Mrs. Ward was at home. I said, I would see. I went up stairs, looked over the bannister of the stairs, and called out, mother. I heard the parlour door slap to. I went back into the shop, and saw the men were gone. My mother came, and went into the shop.

WILLIAM WARD , JUNIOR. Q. You are the son of Mr. Ward, the elder, are you not - A. Yes. I was in the kitchen. I heard a noise up stairs, about nine o'clock in the morning, as if somebody was screaming, and when I went up stairs I heard my mother say we were robbed. She was in the shop then. I ran out after the two men, and when I got as far as Broad-street. I heard the cry of, stop thief. I ran very hard, and when I got as far as Portland-street the prisoner was taken. He threw the stockings away.

Q. Did you see that - A. No.

RICHARD HARVEY . I was coming up Broad-street; I saw two men running. I heard the cry of stop thief. A chap stopped the prisoner. I saw the prisoner throw the stockings away. I picked up the bundle, and I gave the bundle to a young man of the name of Moor. The prisoner was taken to the watch-house, and I and Moor went with him to the watch-house. I am sure the prisoner is the person that threw the bundle away.

Mr. Arabin. You do not know where the prisoner got the bundle from - A. No.

Q. to Jane Ward . Is that the man that came into the shop at nine o'clock on Tuesday morning - A. Yes, I am sure of it.

ROBERT MALDY . I am the beadle. I produce the bundle; I received it at the watchhouse; it was there with the prisoner. I have had it ever since.

Q. to Robert Harvey. Is that the bundle that you picked up - A. Yes.

Prosecutor. They are my property. These are the stockings that I left upon the counter; they are all marked with the marks of my customers. These are all marked C.; that is Lord Castlereagh's; they are all patent stockings, and all marked.

Prisoner's Defence. The lad says I chucked them stockings down in Broad-street. I was taken in Portland-street. Another man was taken in custody before me.

Prosecutor. At the watchhouse he asked me to shew him lenity, and acknowledged that he had done the deed, and at Marlborough-street office he asked to serve his Majesty.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

Reference Number: t18130113-2

130. JAMES HAMILTON was indicted for feloniously making an assault, in the Kings highway, on the 9th of December , upon James Payne , putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, a watch-chain, value 6 d. a watch-key, value 1 s. and a seal, value 3 s. his property .

JAMES PAYNE . On the 9th of December, about a quarter after four in the evening, I was coming up Crown-street , just at the bottom of Sutton-street; the prisoner shoved me round; he laid hold of my watch-chain, and broke it off, and then ran away. I went after him. He left my watch behind, in my fob. I followed him into a public-house, and took him. When I took him he went down on his knees; he asked my pardon, and said, he would leave all his money with me, if I would let him go. I am quite sure the prisoner is the person that snatched my watch-chain. It was a steel chain, and I am certain he didnot run against me by accident. He turned me round to rob me. I have never seen the watch-chain since.

JAMES ALEXANDER . I am a constable. The prisoner was given in my custody. I searched him, and found nothing. This is the prosecutor's watch.

Prisoner's Defence. I ran up the street, and had a glass of peppermint in the public-house, and when I came out, he said, you have got my watch-chain. He took me to the watchhouse, and searched me. I shewed him every thing I had about me, and then he was satisfied that I had not got it.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18130113-3

131. JANE, alias MARY, NOWLAND was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of December , a watch, value 5 l. a gold chain, value 6 l. and a seal, value 20 s. the property of Samuel Wymer , in his dwelling-house .

SAMUEL WYMER . I live at No. 2, Great Chapel-street, Soho, in the parish of St. Ann, Westminster . On the 24th of December, I lost a silver watch; I value it at five pounds, a gold chain, value six pounds, and a seal, one pound. It was taken from my front room two pair, in my own house. I had seen the watch in my room about twenty minutes before seven. I took it to see what o'clock it was.

I laid it on the chest of drawers. I missed it about eleven o'clock in the evening.

Q. What time did you come out of the room - A. A few minutes before seven. I did not see the watch after that time.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. Yes; she was a lodger in my house. On the 26th, I had a quantity of bills printed, and sent them about to the different pawnbrokers, and in about half an hour after the bills were distributed, word came from Mr. Everett, in Berner-street, that the watch was at this shop, pledged for four pounds. On the same evening I changed a one pound note for the girl's mother, and I changed her another on the 27th. On Monday morning, I took these two notes to the pawnbrokers. The lad he proved them to be two of the notes that he paid to the person that pledged the watch.

Q. He told you so - A. Yes. After that I came home to my own place, and asked the mother whether she had any more notes. She gave me another note, with the same date on it. I asked the mother, how she came by these notes. She told me, that the daughter brought the notes. I then took them to Malborough-street office. The daughter said, she took the notes of Mr. Goddard, a pill-box maker, in Noel-street, and when the prisoner found that Mr. Goddard denied given her the notes, she confessed that she went in the room and took the watch, and pledged it at Mr. Everett's, in Berner-street, for four pounds.

Q. Was the prisoner encouraged by you, or any body else, to confess - A. No.

Q. Do you rent the house that you live in - A. Yes, and live there with my family.

WILLIAM NORRIS . I am a servant to Mr. Everett. I believe the prisoner pledged the watch on the 4th of January. I took it in myself. Four pounds was lent upon it, in four one-pound notes. I took the watch, I believe. Mr. Everett paid the notes. After she was in possession of the notes, she said, she believed there was only three. Mr. Everett said, he could see four as she held them in her hand. The prisoner told me she brought the watch for her master, John Winfield ; he wanted money upon it, and her name was Sarah Long . This is the watch.

JAMES STONE . I have the notes that the pawnbroker gave for the watch; two of them I had from Mr. Wymer. I produce three one-pound notes. The third note Mr. Wymer got from prisoner's mother.

Prosecutor. It is my watch.

Q. to Norris. Do you know any thing about these notes - A. Yes, one I took on the 19th of December, and the other on the 24th.

Prisoner's Defence. I leave myself to the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 13.

[ The prisoner was recommended to mercy by the jury on account of her youth .]

First Middlesex jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

Reference Number: t18130113-4

132. JOHN CHARLES WOOD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 31st of December , a cloth pelisse, value 1 l. the property of John Clark , privately in his shop .

THOMAS NORMAN . I am foreman to John Clark , his shop is 44, Holywell-street, Shoreditch . On the 31st of December, while I was serving a customer behind the counter. A gentleman came in, and said a person had taken a pelisse, and run out with it

Q. Who was there in the shop at that time - A. Myself, a lady that was serving, and two customers.

Q. Did you miss the pelisse from the shop - A. I missed it from the door immediately upon being told. I had seen it at the door five minutes before. It is a blue cloth pelisse; it is worth one pound. The door opens inside. The pelisse was hanging on the door, part inside of the shop, and part out. I pursued the prisoner without effect on my part. I did not see him until he was brought back.

Q. You did not see the pelisse snatched away did you - A. No, I did not.

THOMAS HAMPTON . On the 31st of December last I was crossing Holywell-street, Shoreditch, opposite of Mr. Clark's house, and just as I got upon the curb-stone I saw the prisoner take the pelisse from the door. He ran away with it under his left arm. I called out, stop thief, and pursued him; a man named Constable stopped him. The prisoner threw down the pelisse. I picked it up, and seized hold of the prisoner. I saw him throw it down, and with assistance I brought him back to Mr. Clark's shop, and while a constable was gone for, the prisoner tried to make his escape out of the shop, but the mob being at the door he could not get out. I marked the pelisse with a needle and thread, and then I delivered it Thomas Norman .

WILLIAM WAKE . I am a constable. On the evening of the 31st of December, I took the prisoner into custody. The pelisse was in the possession of the last witness. I searched the prisoner, and found on him a duplicate, half of a one-pound bank note, and a play card, with writing and figures on it. This is the pelisse.

Hampton. That is the pelisse I saw the prisoner throw down; my mark is on it.

Norman. This pelisse is the property of John Clark . I hung it up myself about half an hour before it was taken down.

Prisoner's Defence. When I was taken into custody the constable took from my person part of a one-pound note; I should be glad to have it again.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18130113-5

133. JOHN CHARLES WOOD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of December , a cloth pelisse, value 1 l. the property of John Clark , privately in his shop .

There being no evidence adduced, the prisoner, of this charge, was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18130113-6

134. ELIZABETH CARR was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of November , a shirt, value 5 s. a waistcoat, value 1 l. three tablecloths, value 6 s. a waistcoat piece, value 3 s. and a pair of

shoes. value 6 s. the property of John Greatorex Marshall ; three waistcoats, value 4 s. and a pair of shoes, value 5 s. the property of John Ibrooke .

JOHN GREATOREX MARSHALL . I live in Moffatt-street, City-road, in the parish of St. Leonard, Shoreditch . I rent the house.

Q. Did you lose anything on the 24th of November last - A. Yes, a black silk waistcoat. I value it at twenty-five shillings. I do not recollect whether two or three tablecloths, and a waistcoat piece; I value that at five shillings, and John Ibrooke lost something. Mrs. Marshall can speak to them.

Q. When did he loose these - A. About the 27th. I did not miss them until we received the duplicates from the prisoner. She was a servant to us. The prisoner absconded from us. These articles were taken at different times from us, as the duplicates will specify. On the 23d of November, I was informed by Mr. King, who keeps a tavern in the street, that our servant had been running up a bill for liquor to the amount of one pound. On the 24th I have reason to apprehend that she discovered that we had found out that she had been running a bill, by her leaving the house the next morning; and as I found that she had run that up at the public-house, I enquired at other places in the neighbourhood. I discovered that she had ran up other bills. I found out where her sister lived. I went to her sister, and after I left the sister I went home. I had not long been at home when her sister came with a letter, and fourteen duplicates. I heard, after I received the duplicates that the prisoner was in the workhouse. I sent the officer to take her.

THOMAS MILLER . I am an apprentice to a pawnbroker. I produce two pair of women's shoes, three shirts, two waistcoats, two tablecloths, and a child's pelisse. I advanced a guinea and three-pence upon these goods. The prisoner is the person that pledged these things with me. I perfectly recollect the woman; she frequented our house two or three times a-day.

Q. to prosecutor. Where were these things kept - A. In different parts of the house. Some of the things were dirty linen. One of the pair of shoes is mine, and one my brother-in-law's.

MRS. MARSHALL. I have examined these goods. I had seen them in the house before the prisoner was apprehended. I know Mr. Marshall's goods, and the other property I know to be my brother's.

Prisoner's Defence. I throw myself on the mercy of the Court. It is my first offence.

GUILTY, aged 32,

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

Reference Number: t18130113-7

135. ELEANOR the wife of Patrick HANNAM was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of December , a great coat, value 50 s. the property of John Stevens , in his dwelling-house ; and ELEANOR the wife of James HANNAM , for feloniously receiving the same coat, she knowing it to have been stolen .

JOHN STEVENS . I am a wax and tallow chandler . I live in Drury-lane . I keep a house there. It is in the parish of St. Martin in the Fields .

Q. Did you lose a great coat on the 14th of December last - A. I did, from off a peg in the passage. I had seen it about half an hour before I discovered my loss. I found my coat at the pawnbrokers. One of the prisoners offered it to pledge, and was stopped. The coat cost me five guineas. I had had it about a year and a half.

MARY DEAN . I am a servent to Mr. Stevens. The prisoner, the wife of Patrick Hannam , came to to my master's house, between six and seven o'clock, on the 14th of December. She said, a lady had sent her with some cheap butter. She knocked at the door; I opened it. I asked her the lady's name. She said, she could not remember the lady's name. I then went to enquire of my mistress, leaving the door open, and when I had got halfway up the passage she called me back again. She asked me to remember the name for her. I told her I could not repeat the name unless she spoke it, perhaps I might know the name if she would tell me. She then hesitated, and said, some name, but what name I cannot say. I then asked her if it was Grace, a relation of my mistress. She said, it was. I then left her to acquaint my fellow servant, that she might tell my mistress. I saw no more of her after that. I acquainted my fellow servant, and went down into the kitchen, leaving the woman outside of the door, with the door open. My fellow servant went up immediately to acquaint my mistress. My mistress was up stairs. About half an hour previous to the woman's coming, I saw the coat hang in the passage; it was a good distance from the door. My master discovered the coat was missing, about ten minutes after the woman was gone.

EMILA - . Q. Do you remember the prisoner, the wife of Patrick Hannam , coming to the house - A. Yes, I bought some butter of her; two pounds, at seventeen pence a pound.

Q. Did you see her do any thing - A. No, I did not.

Q. Do you know any thing about the great coat - A. I did not see it that day in the passage. She was there at the door only a few minutes before. I went up to her.

Q. How long did you stay with her - A. Only a short while. She had a large basket. I saw nothing in it but two lumps of butter and straw. I told her to come into the passage. I shut the door. I went and told my mistress; she delivered me the butter. I paid her for it, and then let her out. I shut the outer door, and then went down stairs. I saw no more of her. I left her in the passage when I went up stairs to acquaint my mistress about the butter, and when I came down I found her in the passage; then she gave me the butter.

Q. At that time did you see what was in the basket - A. I did not see what was underneath the straw. It was a very large basket.

Q. How long did you leave her alone in the passage - A. About three minutes. My mistress was sitting up two pair of stairs. I had to go up there.

SAMUEL ROSSITER . I am a pawnbroker. On the 15th of December, Mr. Stevens called on me,

told me that he had lost a great coat; that he had a person in custody. He left me a description of the coat. In about two hours afterwards the prisoner, the wife of James Hannam , brought the coat to me; she asked me to lend her thirty shillings, on it. I looked at the coat, and suspected it was Mr. Stevens's coat. I told her my suspicion. I sent one of my boys for a constable. She staid in the shop: the boy came back, and told me he could not find a constable. In the mean time she went away, and came back in a short time and wanted the coat. I then went out myself and brought in a constable, and gave her in charge. I desired the constable to tell Mr. Stevens I had detained such a coat. He brought me word to bring it up to Bow-street, the next day; which I did. I marked the coat in the office. The magistrate ordered the coat to be given up to Mr. Stevens. I had the coat in my custody until it was given up. This is the mark I put upon it, and then it was delivered up to Mr. Stevens.

Q. Do you know any thing of the value of it - A. Between thirty and forty shillings.

SARAH STEPHENS . I am a publican. The woman came to me one night; the prisoner with the child. She is the wife of Patrick Hannam . I do not know the day of the month; it was a Monday evening. about a month back. She asked me to let her leave a great coat. She said she had been fetching it out of pawn, to leave it with me that night, until Tuesday morning, and she would fetch it. I took the great coat of her. After she and her husband drank their beer they went away.

Q. Who fetched that coat from you - A. The wife of James Hannam . She asked for the great coat that her sister had left there on the Monday evening. She took it away with her.

Q. to Prosecutor. What day of the week was the 14th of December - A. Monday.

Q. to Mr. Stephens. Should you know the coat again if you were to see it - A. No, I believe it was the colour, but I cannot say any thing about it being the same.

JOHN LUCK . As I was in the shop, on the 14th of December, at the time the woman was in the passage, I heard a rustling with the straw; at the same time I heard a gentle rapping at the door with the hand. The door was shut. The woman was alone in the passage, no one answered the door. I went and answered the door myself. There was a man standing at the door, I asked him his business. He returned me no answer. He spoke to the woman in the passage. He told her a lady over the way wanted some butter; her answer was that she had not more than would supply that house; she would serve them the next week. He then left the house and I shut the door after him. One of the maids at that time, I believe, was gone up for the money for the butter.

Q. to Prosecutor. Look at that great coat - A. It is my great coat; it is the same coat that was lost out of my house on the 14th of December.

Mr. Rossiter. That is the great coat that was brought to me by Eleanor the wife of James Hannam .

Eleanor the wife of Patrick Hannams Defence. When I went with the butter there was a man at the door; he told me he would be half-a-crown in my way; he gave me a great coat, and told me to leave it at a public-house, the corner of Wild-street. It was a man that had been buying soap or candles in the house, and my selling butter there, Mr. Stevens was positive, he said, I was the person that had taken the coat. I never saw the coat until the man give it me.

Eleanor the wife of James Hannam's Defence. This woman told me to go to Mrs. Stephens's to ask for a bundle my sister had left there. We are both married to two brothers. Mrs. Stephens gave me the coat. My sister told me to pawn the coat, and to bring her the money; accordingly I went to Mr. Rossiter's. I being known there, I thought I could get more money there than at any other place. Mr. Rossiter had some suspicion of the coat; he stopped it. He told me to go. I thought it was too bad to go back to this woman, she being in custody, without money or coat. I went back to Mr. Rossiter, and he gave charge of me, as I would not go without either money or the coat.

ELEANOR the wife of Patrick HANNAM ,

GUILTY , aged 29,

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

ELEANOR the wife of James HANNAM ,

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18130113-8

136. THOMAS SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of December , two plate glasses, value 2 l. the property of Henry Brougham , esq .

JOHN JONES . I am coachman to Mr. Kinley, Long Acre. I was then coachman to Henry Brougham , esq. On Tuesday the 15th of December, about eleven o'clock in the evening, my fellow servant and me were going to put the horses to; they were job horses. Mr. Brougham's footman was going to put a great coat into the carriage; he called to me, and said both doors were open, and the steps were let down. Immediately I run to look for the door glasses, and found they were both taken out, and as I was going to tell Mr. Kinley, the hackneyman of the yard, I saw the prisoner walk from the carriges directly. I run, and laid hold of him. I asked him, who he was. He said, what is that to you. I asked him, where the coach glasses were that were taken out of my carriage. He said, he knew nothing at all about them. I said, I think you are a thief, and I will secure you. He had both his hands at liberty; he pulled his breeches down. He said, he had been to ease himself.

Q. You saw him take his breeches down, did you - A. Yes. I asked him, where. He pointed towards the carriage where the glasses had been taken out. I then got more help. I got him well secured. I took a candle to look whether there was any such thing done, where he pointed to; there was not; and as I returned back I found the two glasses standing by the off side of Mr. Brougham's carriage, and the strings were cut off. These are the strings; I found them in the yard. There was nobody in the yard, when I collared the prisoner, but me, my fellow-servant,

and the prisoner, nor had there been for some time before. It was in the back yard. It is no thoroughfare.

THOMAS COLVER . I am Mr. Broagham's footman. On the 15th of December, I was in the further yard, assisting the coachman in putting the horses to; I saw the coach doors open, and the steps down. I told the coachman. He said, he would see whether the glasses were gone. He came, and saw they were, and he saw the prisoner going away from the carriage. The coachman went and took hold of him; he asked him, who he was. He was very impertinent. He said, he was a gentleman. The coachman asked him, where his glasses were. He said, he did not know. He said, he had been in the yard to ease himself. He had not got his breeches down when the coachman took hold of him. He unbuttoned them afterwards. The coachman took the candle and lanthorn, to see if he could find any such thing done. He could not find any such thing. There was only me, the coachman, and the prisoner, in the yard.

Prisoner's Defence. I was taken short; I went down that yard to ease myself. A man came and asked me whether I had been stealing his glasses. I told him, no. He beat me and cut my mouth.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

Reference Number: t18130113-9

137. MARY WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of January , a great coat, value 3 l. the property of James West .

JAMES WEST . On last Sunday week, between eleven and twelve at night, I met the prisoner in Drury-lane; she asked me to go home with her; she said it was only a little way down Charles-street . I went with her. When I got to her lodgings she asked me what I would give her. I told her, four shillings. She agreed for four shillings, and I was to stop with her. I sat down in a chair. She asked me to take off my top coat. I took my coat off, and threw it across a chair, which was a little distance from me, and in a minute or so after, the prisoner said she wanted to go out. She went out. She said she would return in the course of a minute. I waited in the room half an hour. She did not return. I then took my hat to go home. I went to the chair to look for my coat; it was gone. I looked all over the room; I could not find it. I staid in the room two or three hours, and then went home. The next day I went to Bow-street for an officer. The officer told me to look out early of a morning. On Tuesday morning, between six and seven o'clock, I saw the prisoner come to her door. I told her she was the woman that had taken my coat from me on the Sunday evening. She said that she never saw me nor my coat before that morning. She said, she had been at Wapping on the week before, and she did not return home till Monday night. I took her myself to Bow-street. She afterwards told me she had pawned the coat.

GEORGE GIDEON . I am servant to Mr. Armstrong, pawnbroker, Baldwin's-gardens. On last Monday week, the prisoner pawned a great coat with me for one pound. I am sure the prisoner is the woman. This is the coat.

Prosecutor. It is my coat. I made the coat myself.

Prisoner's Defence. When the young man came up in my room I asked him, what he was going to give me. He said, he had no money. I said, I am an unfortunate girl, I must have money. He then said, he would leave me his coat. He took his coat off, and said he would call in a day or two. On Tuesday morning he came and said, come along with me to Bow-street. I took him to the pawnbrokers, where I had pawned the coat. I am innocent of robbing him of his coat.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18130113-10

138. WILLIAM SABERTER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of December , a pair of shoes, value 8 s. the property of James Coleman .

JAMES COLEMAN . I keep a shoe-maker's shop in Whitecross-street . On Saturday evening, about half past seven in the evening, in the beginning of December, I cannot say the day of the month, the prisoner came into my shop, and asked me if I had a pair of second hand shoes. He looked at two or three pair of shoes. He paid me four shillings for a pair. I had just put out of my hand a pair of new shoes to serve him, and as soon as the prisoner went out of the shop I missed them. I had nobody in the shop but a bricklayer and a carpenter that were doing work for me. On the Sunday following the prisoner came past my shop. I asked him where he lived. He said, if I followed him I might see where he lived. I followed him. In the course of ten minutes afterwards, the prisoner and his wife came to my door. The prisoner abused me very much. I then told him, if he abused me much more, I would charge an officer with him. I was almost sure that he took them, though I did not see him take them.

WILLIAM NICHOLLS . I am a carpenter. I was in the prosecutor's shop at the time that the prisoner came in to purchase a pair of shoes. I observed Mr. Coleman put a pair of new shoes at the further end of the counter. I saw the prisoner take them up with his left hand, and take them away. I thought they had been the shoes that he had been purchasing of.

WILLIAM MAY . I am a bricklayer. I was standing by the fire side, waiting for my money. The prisoner and his wife came in to buy a pair of shoes, and as soon as the prisoner and his wife had gone out, Mr. Coleman missed a pair of shoes.

RICHARD HUTCHINS . I am a constable. I took the prisoner in custody; I searched him, and found nothing on him.

Prisoner's Defence. I know myself clear and innocent of what is sworn against me.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

Reference Number: t18130113-11

139. MICHAEL CUNNINGHAM was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of December , five

pieces of brass, twenty-three pounds weight, value 5 l. the property of Charles Hammond .

JOHN JAMES . I am foreman to Charles Hammond, proprietor of the saw mills , Bankside . On the 21st of December last, the prisoner came to work at Mr. Hammond's premises, as a bricklayer's labourer . He did not come to work on the 22nd or 23rd. On the 23rd, in the afternoon, his master informed me that the prisoner had been stopped with some brass upon him. I have seen the brass it belongs to the premises where I am foreman.

WILLIAM MYATT . I am a constable of the city of London. On the 21st of December last, I was in West-street, West Smithfield, about half past five in the evening, I saw the prisoner. I was in company with another constable; that constable is since dead. The prisoner passed me. I perceived that he had something concealed under his coat. I stopped him, and asked him, what he had. He replied, nothing. Yes, said I, you have nothing. I opened his coat, and found these pieces of brass underneath his coat. I took him into a house, and searched him. He had one of these two pieces of brass-in his breeches pocket, this piece of brass in his waistcoat pocket, and this piece of brass in his hat, wrapped up in his pocket handkerchief. I immediately took him in custody, and found out where he worked, and where the property was stolen from.

Mr. James. Every piece of this brass is the property of Charles Hammond .

GUILTY, aged 23,

Judgment respited .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130113-12

140. ALEXANDER ANTROBUS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of January , a great coat, value 1 l. a hat, value 6 s. and an umbrella, value 10 s. the property of Nathaniel Ponder .

NATHANIEL PONDER . I am a carpenter and builder . About two o'clock at, noon, on last Sunday, I heard a violent knocking at the house door. When I came down stairs I found the prisoner in the custody of the witness.

- CHESLEY. I am gate-keeper to the East India Company's warehouse, Fenchurch-street . About half past two at noon, on Sunday last, I saw the prisoner go up a gentleman's gateway; after being there about five or six minutes, he came out, and went up Mr. Ponder's gateway. After being there about five or six minutes, I shut him in. He was there about seven or eight minutes. He, by some means, got the gate open again; he came out with the great coat under his arm, and the hat and umbrella in his hand. I collared him, and took him up the gateway, to Mr. Ponder's private door. I knocked at the door, Mr. Ponder came down to the dour, and owned the property. This is the great coat, hat, and umbrella.

Prosecutor. That is the hat, umbrella, and great coat.

Prisoner's Defence. I never opened any door or lock, nor did I go up stairs.

GUILTY , aged 36.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130113-13

141. WILLIAM PRICE and JOHN BROWN, alias HOLDER , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of December , twelve hen fowls, value 24 s. and a cock fowl, value 6 s. the property of Jacob Hans Busk .

- ISLES. I am a patrol at Hackney. On the morning of the 27th, I met with the two prisoners in Hare-street, Hackney. They were coming towards London. They had each of them a bundle. I asked them, what they had got. They said, it was their own property: they had bought it at Woodford. I took them to the watchhouse. I examined what the propety was. One bundle contained nine fowls, and the other four.

JOHN GARDENER . I am the beadle. The prisoners and the fowls were brought to me.

GEORGE ISLES . I am servant to Mr. Busk. On the 27th of December, in the morning, I found my master's hen-roost had been robbed, and in consequence of information I went to the cage, at Hackney. I saw the fowls there. There were thirteen fowls in all. These are the heads. I can swear to every one of them. I fed them.

JACOB HANS BUSK . I know the fowls perfectly well. I am sure they are mine. I have a country house at Chingford, in Essex . The prisoner, John Holder , had been a servant to me. I discharged him about two years ago.

Price's Defence. We bought the fowls at two and sixpence a head, not knowing they had been stolen.

Brown's Defence. I lived with Mr. Busk. I was discharged without a character. I worked in the summer at hay making. In the winter I could get nothing to do. I had pawned almost every thing.

PRICE, GUILTY , aged 25.

BROWN, GUILTY , aged 36.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130113-14

142. JAMES QUIRK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of December , eighteen yards of floor cloth, value 6 l. the property of Rebecca Hayward , William Gilman , and Robert Hayward .

ROBERT HAYWARD . I am a floor-cloth painter . I live in Mile-end-road . My partner's names are Rebecca Hayward and William Gilman . I had information from Benfield, the broker, that he had the property in his possession. I went and saw it. I did not miss it until it was found.

WILLIAM BENFIELD . I am a furniture-broker, Castle-street, Long Acre. The prisoner applied to me to purchase this piece of oil-cloth, on the 23st of December. I went and looked at it, and purchased it. He applied to me a day or two after, to know whether I could purchase another piece. I told him, I could not, unless I knew where it came from, to know whether it was stolen property. A person was sent with it. The prisoner told me he brought it from Whitechapel-road, and on the second piece of cloth coming to my house, I went down to Mr. Hayward, and asked him if he had lost any property. I am sure the prisoner is the man. He delivered the second piece, but not personally. This is the piece of floor-cloth I paid for; and I received it of the prisoner.

SAMUEL MILLER . I apprehended the prisoner at Mr. Hayward's manufactory. I asked him where he had sold the floor-cloth that he had stolen. He first said, he had not stolen any, and then he said he had stolen three pieces, and sold two of them in Long Acre, and one of then he had not got the money for. He said, he took them out of the manufactory in the day.

Q. to Hayward Was the prisoner a servant of yours - A. Yes; he had worked for me about seven months. I am sure the floor-cloth is my property. He had eighteen shillings a week. He is the last person that I should have supposed would have robbed me. He behaved very well indeed.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence.

GUILTY, aged 25.

Judgment respited .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130113-15

143. WILLIAM RUDD was indicted for that he, on the 30th of December , upon Elizabeth Lepine , spinster , feloniously did make an assault, and her, the said Elizabeth, against her will, did ravish and carnally know .

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

Reference Number: t18130113-16

144. ELEANOR EATON was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Alexander , about the hour of four in the afternoon, on the 16th of September , Mary the wife of Thomas Alexander , and others, being therein, and stealing therein a pair of stockings, value 1 s. 6 d. a frock, value 1 s. four handkerchiefs, value 1 s. a window-curtain, value 6 d. three caps, value 18 d. a shift, value 6 d. the property of Thomas Alexander ; a great coat, value 8 s. a coat, value 6 s. a shirt, value 6 d. a cap, value 6 d. a wine glass, value 6 d. and a pair of gloves, value 6 d. the property of John Riddell .

MARY ALEXANDER . I am the wife of Thomas Alexander . My husband and I live in Church-lane, Whitechapel . I never saw the prisoner until I found my clothes, which I had lost out of my dwelling-house on the 16th of December; two coats, a pair of stockings, a frock, a window-curtain, two half handkerchief, and two night-caps. The other things belonged to John Riddell ; he was a lodger in my house.

Q. When were these things taken from the house - A. Upon the 19th of December, a little after four.

Q. Did you see them taken - A. Yes. I was in the shop, and the woman came through the shop with the bundles in her apron, and went out in the street.

Q. Is that the woman - A. I did not see the woman's face in the shop; I only saw her go out with four bundles. My sister, Ann Evans , was in the shop. I asked her who that stranger was that went out of the shop. She said, she did not know. Mary Ann Beaumont , my lodger came down stairs. I asked her, if she knew her. She said, no. Then I went after her, and two or three more. We found the prisoner. She had got in a house, up two pair of stairs. A young man of the name of Shore went up to her. I was called up. I saw the prisoner. I am sensible that is the woman; I saw her upon the stairs. The bundles were upon the landing place. Mr. Coombes, the officer, has the bundles; they contained the things I have mentioned. I had seen the things in three different rooms that day, before they were taken.

Q. Were the room doors open - A. John Riddell's bed-room door was upon the latch; my room door was not broken open neither.

Q. How did she get into your house - A. The private door was left upon the latch. One of the young man went out and did not pull the door to. There is a spring lock; it was only left upon the latch.

JOHN RIDDELL . I lodge at Mrs. Alexander's; I had one room, on the 16th of December, up one pair of stairs. I lost two coats, a shirt, night-cap, gloves, and handkerchief. I had seen them all safe in the room before I went out. I shut the door, and left the key in it when I went out.

JAMES SHORE . I was going through Mill-yard at the time; Mrs. Alexander asked me if I had seen any woman with any bundles. I said, I had not. A woman, close by said, she had gone in her house. I went in the house, No. 4, Mill-yard; the prisoner was coming down stairs. I laid hold of her, and asked her what bundles she had. She said, a woman gave them her. I saw the bundles on the landing-place, up stairs. The were not touched till Coombes, the officer, came. He took the bundles away.

MARY ANN BEAUMONT . I lodge with Mrs. Alexander. I met the prisoner on the stairs; she had four bundles with her. I asked her, who she was. She said, she had been after the men's washing.

ROBERT COOMBES . I am an officer. I took the prisoner into custody, on Wednesday, the 16th of December, between four and five in the afternoon, at No. 4, Mill-yard. There were four bundles; they were taken from the landing-place; I found them there. The prisoner said, a woman gave them to her to take to that house. I picked them up together.

Prisoner's Defence. A woman gave me these things; she said, she lived in a one pair room, No. 4, Mill-yard. She told me to take them up two pair of stairs, and leave them there for her. I did. I told the woman in the two pair, the woman in the one pair ordered me to leave them. She would not take them in. A young man came up stairs; they kept me in custody till an officer came.

GUILTY, aged 30.

Of stealing only .

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18130113-17

145. WILLIAM LINTON was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Stephens , about the hour of six, on the night of the 17th of September , and stealing therein, four pair of shoes, value 1 l. and three odd shoes, value 10 s. his property .

WILLIAM STEPHENS . I live at 23, King-street, Seven Dials . On the 17th of December, I lost two pair of men's shoes, and two pair of women's shoes,

and three odd ones. The two pair of women's shoes were hanging up against two panes of glass in the window, and the two pair of men's shoes were in the window.

When did you miss them - A. About six, or a few minutes before six o'clock, on the 17th of December last.

What reason have you to suppose that the prisoner was the person that took the shoes - A. I was at work in my shop. I was alarmed by a woman coming in, and saying there were three persons-lurking about my shop; one of them, she said, was a big man; he sat at the end of the window, and the other were two lads. There is a place outside of my shop where you may rest a bundle. I got up and looked, and then I set down to my work again; then my little boy cried out, father, father, there is a man's hand in the window. I looked round, and saw my wife take the prisoner in custody; she said, you are the man I want. I went and took him by the collar, and dragged him into the shop. I immediately went to the window to search for what shoes were missing. I found those missing that I have mentioned, and three odd shoes.

MRS. STEPHENS. I am the wife of the last witness. On the 17th of December, between five and six o'clock, in consequence of the alarm made by the woman, I stood on the step. I heard my son say, father, the man's hand is in the window. I then saw the prisoner's hand in the window.

Q. Did you hear any noise of breaking of the glass - A. No; the window was cracked. As soon as my child spoke to his father, I saw him draw his hand back. He dropped the shoes, and when he drawed his hand back; I took him by the collar, and I said, you are the man I want, and with the assistance of my husband I got him into the shop.

Q. Was any more than one shoe found - A. Not by the window. We have got that shoe here; it is one of the odd shoes.

- TOWNSHEND. I am an officer. I took the prisoner in custody. I searched him, and found nothing on him.

Prosecutor. These are three odd shoes; they were found in the window. The fellows of these three were taken and gone. The shoe that the prisoner dropped fell in the window. The two pair of men's shoes, and two pair of women's shoes, and the three odd shoes, were entirely gone. I can speak to these three odd shoes; they are mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I was stopping by the window to see a man strike a light; this woman came out, and said, where are the shoes. I said, what shoes. She said, the shoes that I took out of the window. She directly collared me, and took me into the shop.

GUILTY, aged 15,

Of stealing, but not of breaking and entering .

Confined One Month in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

Reference Number: t18130113-18

14. ABRAHAM SHEPHERD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of December , a great coat, value 30 s. the property of Isaac Vousden

ISAAC VOUSDEN . Q. Did you lose a great coat on the 10th of December last - A. Yes. The prisoner, on the 9th came to my landlady, and enquired for a lodging. He went to bed about eight o'clock, on the 9th, in the same room with me, but in another bed. He got up the next morning about six o'clock; I got up a few minutes before seven o'clock. I returned to breakfast about eight o'clock, and I missed my great coat from off the bed. The prisoner told me that he had pawned my coat at Islington. I went to his mother's on the Sunday, and there the prisoner gave me the duplicate. The constable took him in custody. The pisoner owned to me that he did the robbery.

JOHN TAYLOR . I am a constable. I went with the prisoner to the pawnbrokers with the duplicate. The pawnbroker delivered me the coat. This is the coat. I have had it ever since.

ANN DORRINGTON . I was with Vousden when the prisoner gave him the duplicate. The prisoner said, the great coat was at Islington, at the pawnbroker's.

Prosecutor. It is my great coat.

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutor said if I confessed he would forgive me, and he came to me in prison the day before yesterday. He told me, if I could find money to make it up he would not appear against me.

GUILTY, aged 20.

Judgment respited .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18130113-19

147. JAMES KING was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of January , a basket, value 4 s. and eleven loaves of bread, value 12 s. 4 d. the property of James Gadd .

JAMES HOLMES . I am a servant to Mr. Gadd, a baker , 14, Crown-street, Piccadilly. On the 16th of February, I lost five quartern loaves and six halves, and the basket. I put my basket off my shoulder at Hyde-park-gate, Piccadilly . I took two loaves out of my basket, and went to my customers at Knightsbridge, and when I returned my basket was gone and the bread.

ROBERT RUXTON . I saw the prisoner with the basket in Bond-street; I followed him to King-street, there I met a young man with a barrow of bread; he and I went up to the prisoner. The prisoner seemed frightened; he asked, if we wanted the basket. We said, we wanted him and the basket too. I asked him, where he was going with it. He said to a chandler's shop a long way off there. There were five quartern loaves in the basket, and six halves.

Holmes. I saw the basket and the bread at the magistrate's. The magistrate told me I had better take them home; they would be spoiled. I have one of the loaves here. The basket had my master's name on it, and the bread my master's mark, all of it.

Prisoner's Defence. Please you, my lord, as I was going across Hanover-square, a young man of the name of William Thomas asked me if I was out of place. I said, I am. He said, he would thank me to carry this as far as Carnaby-market; he would meet me. I took the basket, and went very fast with it. Two young men stopped me. I am as innocent

of the theft as a child unborn. I have never seen William Thomas since. I have lately come from the East Indies. I kept a shop before I went to the East Indies, near Mr. Gadd.

GUILTY , aged 31.

Confined Three Months in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

Reference Number: t18130113-20

148. JOSEPH HARMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of December , two wooden lasts, value 8 d. and two pieces of leather, value 4 s. the property of John Gotch .

BENJAMIN HOLWELL . I am shopman to Mr. Gotch. The prisoner had been ostler to Mr. Gotch. He had been discharged about three weeks. On the morning of the 29th of December, he came in, and asked to see the horse. I permitted him to see the horse. The horse was in a stable at the back of the house, and when the prisoner returned I was in the back parlour with my master's son, and on the prisoner's passing through the shop I observed him put something into a bag. A woman came into the shop; the prisoner then came to me; he said, a woman is in the shop; I think you had better serve her; and while I served the woman, he quitted that part of the shop where he had taken the lasts, and got to the further end of the shop, and after I had served the woman I told the prisoner I did not like his transactions; I was entrusted in Mr. Gotch's shop as a confidential servant, and that he had put some of my master's property into his bag. He said, he had not. I ordered him to empty his bag. At first he hesitated, and afterwards he turned out of his bag these two pieces of leather and five wooden lasts. Three lasts out of the five were thrown among the new lasts. These two I can speak to. And after he turned them out of his bag he denied they had been in the bag. He had these two pieces of leather, five lasts, and a pigs head, and two small-clothes in the bag. The lasts and the pieces of leather came out first.

Q. You say he denied that - A. Yes, but I saw him turn it out.

Q. How do you say they are your master's property - A. Only by his taking them from the new lasts by the side of my master's cutting-board, and my master has a great deal of leather like this.

EDWARD GOTCH . I am the son of John Gotch . I saw the prisoner turn the lasts and leather out of the bag. He had a hog's head and two smallclothes in a bag, which he brought in his bag.

Q. Did you say anything when they were turned out - A. I did not. When he had turned them out of his bag, he said he had not any thing in his bag.

Prisoner. If you saw them turned out of the bag why did you say, never mind the shopman, he is a fool - A. I never said any such thing.

Prosecutor. The leather is mine, and the lasts I believe to be mine.

Prisoner's Defence. When I went in to see the horse I threw my bag down by the parlour door; the shopman said, I had something in my bag. I said, I know it; I have a hog's head, which I have bought. Edward Gotch came out; he said, do not mind that fool, he has lost three or four games at cards, and now he is mad with every one. I took out the hog'd head; I said, is that your master's. The pig's head fell on the lasts and leather, I do not deny, as to say they were in the bag, it is false.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18130113-21

149. JOHN BROOKS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of January , a pewter pint pot, value 14 d. the property of James Bailey .

JAMES BAILEY . I am a publican . I keep the King's Head, the corner of Chiswell-street . On the 8th of January, the prisoner came into my tap-room, between seven and eight in the evening. He called for a pint of porter, which I took him, and he gave me the money. He gave me a sixpence instead of a farthing. I returned it him. In a little time a person came and informed me that the prisoner had put one of my pint pots in his pocket. I sent my boy for a constable.

WILLIAM POCOCK . On the night of the 8th of January I was at the King's Head; the prisoner came in and called for a pint of porter. He placed himself down in a box, and put a pint pot behind him. Not the pot he was drinking out of. The landlord brought him a pipe of tobacco. He gave the landlord the money for the pint of beer and the pipe of tobacco, and in mistake he gave the landlord a sixpence for a farthing, which the landlord returned, and on my seeing him put the pot behind him I took up the newspaper, and while I was reading the newspaper I saw him put the pint pot in his pocket, under his great coat. I went and informed the landlord of it. I thought he had not used the landlord well, after he returned him the sixpence to put a pint pot in his pocket. The prisoner observed me tell the man of it; then he got up to the further corner of the box, against the window. He took the pint pot out of his pocket. I told him he had used the landlord ill. I called the landlord in, and told him the man that I had told him had put a pint pot in his pocket, he had taken it out, and had put it behind him. I saw him put it behind him. The prisoner said, the pot is behind me, but it was here before I came in. I saw he wanted to take the pint pot out of his pocket, as he moved, and I moved on purpose to see him take the pint pot out of his pocket. The pot was delivered to the officer.

Prosecutor. The pot was delivered to me; it has my own name upon it. The magistrate asked me if I saw the pot taken from his person. I said, no; the pot was on the table when I came in. The prisoner said he took it from behind him. The magistrate then said he had better hold his tongue. It is my pot. It is worth fourteen pence.

Prisoner's Defence. About six o'clock I went into the Nag's Head, I had a pint of beer and a pipe of tobacco. Pocock said to me, are not you a villian. What for, said I. He said, I had a pint pot of the landlord's. I am innocent of the charge. I did not know that the pot was behind me at all.

GUILTY , aged 21

Confined One Month in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

Reference Number: t18130113-22

150. JOHN WILD was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 24th December , two pair of stays, value 12 s. the property of William Marston .

WILLIAM MARSTON . I am a stay-maker . The prisoner was my second foreman .

Q. Did you lose two pair of stays on the 24th of last month - A. I did not know that there were two pair lost, but they were found upon the prisoner. They were taken off the counter, where he was in the habit of working.

WILLIAM CARR . I am a constable. On the 24th of December last, about half past nine in the evening, I saw the prisoner come out of Mr. Marston's house. I watched him into a public-house, the corner of Wych-street. He did not stay there. When he came out he crossed over to Newcastle-street; I tapped him on the shoulder; I told him, I wanted to speak to him. He ran away from me; I ran after him, and catched him by his collar. I then took him to the watchhouse. He then confessed that he had two pair of stays about him. I searched his person, I found two pair of stays inside of his breeches, and about three quarters of a yard of calico in his coat pocket, which he confessed to be his master's. He said, he had been robbed himself a few days before, of nine shillings, and that he had taken his master's property to replace that. These are the stays.

Prosecutor. They are my stays; they have my private marks.

Prisoner's Defence. These stays are my own goods; I cut them out at my leisure hours at my lodgings. I took the stays to my master's shop to prop them off with the hot irons, having no opportunity I withdrew my attention. At the watchhouse I was so confused I did not know what I said.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18130113-23

151. JOSEPH NICHOLSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of January , a carcase of a sheep, value 1 l. 5 s. the property of Robert King .

ROBERT KING . I am a butcher in Leadenhall-market . I only know that we lost a carcase of a sheep.

ROBERT LEE . I am a butcher in Leadenhall-market. On the 12th of December, between six and seven o'clock, I met the prisoner with a sheep on his shoulder. I saw him coming from Mr. King's. I turned round, and saw the sheep had a head on it. It is not usual to sell a sheep with the head on. I thought he had stolen it. I ran after him, and a little way down Lime-street I caught him. I asked him, where he had got it. He said, he had found it on the ground. I brought him towards Mr. King; supposing it was stolen from him, and Mr. King's man owned it.

MARTIN POWELL . I am a journeyman butcher to Mr. King. Between six and seven o'clock, Mr. Lee brought the prisoner and the sheep. This is the sheep; it was hanging at the door, on our premises. I know the sheep; it has our private mark. It is Mr. King's.

Prisoner's Defence. I hope your honour will have mercy on me. I was sold by the French to Tippoo Sulton, for refusing to fight against the English. On that day, at Blackwall, he told me to meet him at Leadenhall-market, and when I came to him, this sheep laid on the ground. I said, what have you got here. He said, a sheep; will you have it. I said, I did not care. They came and caught hold of me.

GUILTY , aged 52.

Confined One Year in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130113-24

152. WILLIAM HILL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of January , five one-pound bank notes , the property of Edward Baker .

EDWARD BAKER . I am a chemist . I live in Long Acre.

Q. When did you lose these notes - A. Last Friday, the 8th. I lost them out of my pocket-book, in Bride-lane. The prisoner lived in Bride-lane, Fleet-street ; he is a hair-dresser . I have been in the habit of having my hair cut at the prisoner's shop. I went there on the 8th, about twelve at noon. I took five one-pound notes in my pocket-book, which was in my inside pocket, in the lower part of my coat. I particularly marked the notes with my initials, and on my return I found they were lost.

Q. How came you to mark them - A. From my suspicion that I had of the person, having lost notes three times before. I went up stairs to have my hair cut. I sat down with my back to the fire. I took off my coat, as usual. I had been there many times before. After having my hair cut and dressed, I put on my coat again, and on my return down stairs, I found my pocket-book was in the same place, but no notes. The pocket-book was in my pocket, but the notes were taken out. I communicated it to the officer, who was below, and my friend. I had an officer below, who saw me place the notes in my pocketbook, and waited my return. The officer immediately proceeded up stairs with me, and charged the prisoner with having taken the notes, which he denied for some time. The officer began to search him and declared he would find the notes if they were in the house after his denying some little time he pointed to a box near the fire, which a cat was sitting upon. The officer opened the box and found the notes exactly as they had been in my pocketbook. They had never been opened. The officer took him in custody.

WILLIAM YOUNG . I accompanied Mr. Baker to the house of Mr. Hill. After endorsing the notes I saw Mr. Baker go up stairs. I waited out side of the house, I saw him come down stairs. He searched for the book, and found it, but the notes were gone. He went up stairs. Mr. Brown searched the prisoner. The notes were found in the box. I saw them found. They are the same notes that he marked.

JOHN BROWN . I am an officer. I produce the box that I found the notes in. The box was before the fire, near the fender, and I found the notes in the form that they were put in the pocket-book, I saw the gentleman put them in the pocket-book.

Q. What are the notes - A. Five one-pound notes, with the initials of the prosecutor, the witness, and my own name. These are them.

Q. to prosecutor. Are them your notes - A. They are: there is my initials on them. Nothing was in the box but the notes.

JURY. Did any person come in the room during the time you were having your hair cut - A. Not to my knowledge.

Q. Did the prisoner cut your hair - A. He did.

Q. Did he leave the room - A. No, he did not My coat was near the fire at the time he was warming the irons.

Q. to Mr. Young. When you entered the room; tell us all that past - A. When I went into the room Mr. Baker challenged Hill of robbing him of five one-pound notes. Hill denied it. After some little time Brown searched him. After searching him, the prisoner said the money was in the box by the fire.

GUILTY , aged 35.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130113-25

153. JAMES TAYLOR was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of December , a pair of shoes, value 6 s. the property of Alexander Wilson .

ALEXANDER WILSON . I am a shoe-maker , on Holborn-hill . I have no partner.

THOMAS VINCENT . I am shopman to Mr. Wilson. On the 10th of December, about four in the afternoon; the prisoner came into the shop. I saw him take a pair of shoes off the shelf; he put them behind him, and when he had an opportunity he put them into his pocket. I then acquainted my fellow servant of it, and he acquainted my master; then he sent for an officer.

Q. Did not he come in for something - A. About a fortnight before he left a deposit for a pair of boots he frequently came to see if the boots were ready, but he never thought proper to take them away. When the prisoner was going out of the door I secured him, and held him until the officer came.

- LEE. I am an officer. I searched the prisoner. In his great coat pocket I found these shoes. Mr. Wilson said, they were his shoes. I produce them.

Prosecutor. These are my shoes.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to his character.

GUILTY, aged 24.

Judgement respited .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130113-26

154. JOSEPH OSLING was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of James Gwyer , about the hour of two in the night, on the 17th of December , with intent the goods and chattels of the said James Gwyer burglariously to steal .

JAMES GWYER . I deal in tobacco and snuff . I live at No. 51, Long-lane, West Smithfield, in the parish of St. Bartholomew the Great .

Q. Have you the dwelling-house - A. Yes.

Q. When did this happen - A. On the 17th of last December, at the hour of near two at night. My wife awoke me, and I was some time insensible. I was between sleeping and awaking. She said, she heard a noise as though some one was breaking in; being market morning I gave no credit to what she said. I believed it to be the horns of the cattle, which struck against the shutter bar. I was going to sleep again. She prevailed upon me to rise. In about a quarter of an hour she heard a crack in the shop. I arose in bed, and saw a light in the shop.

Q. Where was your bed then - A. In the back parlour. I coughed, thinking it might alarm whoever it was, had the light, I expected, would be put out in consequence, and my wife coughed. The light was not extinguished by our coughing, as I supposed it would be. I thought it not prudent to go out, on account I did not know how many there might be there, therefore I drove my fist through the window, in the frame of the parlour. The light, by that alarm, was extinguished, and I immediately went through the parlour door, towards the shop door, and on opening the street door I brushed the prisoner's clothes near the door. I took hold of the prisoner by my right hand by his left collar, and not knowing whether there were any others in the shop I believe I went out first, dragging the prisoner with me. We were struggling together between five and ten minutes; I calling watch. We got just on the entrance of Smithfield when the watchman came up. I gave the prisoner into custody of two officers, who are here, who conveyed him back into the shop, and on searching the premises no one else was found. We looked to see where he got in. He got in under the window, where we put the shutters in day time. It is wood work where he got in; the outside is a small door, a bolt at the top and bottom, and a lock in the middle. He forced it by punching back the lock. He by that means contrived to secret himself in the cavity, between that door and the other door. My wife thought she heard him for three quarters of an hour. When I got out of bed I was quite naked, except my shirt.

Q. How far is your house down Long-lane - A. I believe it to be five or six houses.

HENRY FOLKES . I was night constable. On the 7th of December, the prisoner was brought in by the watchman and the prosecutor. I took the charge, and put him in the Compter. I went back to the house, and saw the place where he broke into. The outer door had a lock in the middle, and a bolt at the top and bottom. He had forced the wood work all away.

JOHN INGRAM . I am a watchman. I was going round my beat, a quarter before two. In coming through the close I had a pair of gates to open, to let myself into Smithfield. I heard the cry of, watch. The cattle being on the pavement. I made the best of my way to Long-lane, and at the end of Long-lane, I saw the prosecutor and the prisoner. The prisoner was endeavoring to get away. I catched hold of the prisoner. I conveyed him back to the premises he had broken in. I searched the place. He broke in underneath the window, where they put the shutters in the day time, in a kind of a box, There is a kind of a door to it outside. He

forced open the door, and got into the shop by forcing the partition right off. I detained him in the shop until the prosecutor dressed himself.

Q. Had any thing been taken in the shop - A. Nothing had been taken. Then I conveyed him to the watchhouse, and gave him into the charge of the constable

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming past there between one and two o'clock, going to Smithfield-market. The prosecutor was at the door: as I went past he catched hold of me. I know nothing more about it.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 46.

[ The prisoner was recommended to mercy by the prosecutor on account of his offering no violence .]

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130113-27

155. RICHARD PALMER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of December , fifty-six pounds weight of butter, value 3 l. the property of William Grigg .

WILLIAM GRIGG . I am a carrier .

Q. When did you lose this - A. On the 17th or 18th of last month, I lost it out of the cart while I was in the act of loading, in Thames-street , between five and six in the evening. I was loading butter and cheese. I missed a cask of butter. From information I ran up Miles's-lane, and I overtook the prisoner with the cask of butter on his shoulder. He threw the cask off his shoulder, and ran off. Messrs. Reynolds and Coventry's man followed him and caught him. I picked the butter up.

WILLIAM GREEN . I am porter to Messrs. Reynolds and Coventry, cheesemongers, Thames-street. I overtook the prisoner at the top of Miles's-lane. He had a firkin of butter on his shoulder, in a bag. I asked him, what he had got on his shoulder. I took him back to my master's house, and gave him in charge of the constable.

- HAWKINS. I am a constable. I took charge of the prisoner. This is the tub the butter was in; there was fifty-six pounds.

Grigg. That is the firkin; it was in my charge.

Prisoner's Defence. I beg for mercy. I am very sorry for what I have done. I never will be guilty of any thing of the kind any more so long as I live. Distress brought me to this bad way of life.

GUILTY , aged 33.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130113-28

156. HARRIET WOOD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of December , a gown, value 3 s. and twenty-five shillings in monies numbered , the property of James Andrews .

JAMES ANDREWS . I keep a public-house in Turnmill-street . The prisoner lived servant with me three weeks and four days. She left me about eleven o'clock on the 21st of December. She was putting up the shutters. She put up four, and left one not put up. On the next morning, we found twenty-five shillings in copper gone. We heard of her in the evening, and took her, and found the gown on her at the same time.

- HASELTINE. I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner in Shoe-lane. I found this gown on her back. She was wearing of it. She said, going down to Peter-street the strings of her pocket broke. The prosecutor was with me. She wanted to know how much she had taken. She said she was drunk when she took it; she did not know how much it was. This is the gown.

CHARLOTTE ANDREWS I am the wife of James Andrews . That is my gown. I missed it on the Sunday night.

Prisoner's Defence. I do not remember taking any money at all. I did not spend it. I must have lost it.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130113-29

157. JAMES MILLARD was indicted for burglarously breaking an entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Beadle , about the hour of six, in the night of the 11th of January , and burglariously stealing therein a key, value 1 s. the property of Thomas Beadle .

THOMAS BEADLE . I live at No. 9, Seacoal-lane . I am a butcher . It is in the parish of St. Sepulchre . I keep the house. On Monday morning, the 11th of January, I heard a knock at the door. I got out of bed; I shoved up my window. A person that lived in the market told me that my shop door was open. I opened my room door; the first thing that I saw was a square of glass taken out of a casement at the back of my house. I went down stairs with a light in my hand, and found my street door open, and my back door also. I looked for the key of my shop; that was gone from the place where I generally left it. The shop is not at my house; it is in Fleet-market. I went to my shop. I saw this bundle of halfpence in this apron, which apron I believe belonged to the prisoner. It is not mine. It had a tablecloth covered over it. I went into the little room behind my shop, and found these tools, which tools belongs to the prisoner. They say he is a cabinet-maker. My cupboard that we left the halfpence in; that was broken open, and a drawer likewise that had halfpence in it.

Q. How do you know that the prisoner broke open your house - A. I suspected that the prisoner had done it, by finding him in the shop, and I found the key of my shop at the shop, which I had left in my house. I found the key taken out of my house and carried to the shop.

THOMAS HORN . I am a ticket-porter at Fleet-market. I perceived the shop door open. I saw Mr. Hornden going across the market. I told him, I saw the shop door open. He told me, he would inform Mr. Beadle. He went into the shop. He said he thought it was very odd that a weight was put against the door. He went to Mr. Beadle. I never left the shop until Mr. Beadle came. Mr. Beadle and I went into the shop. There were these chissels and halfpence, and a cloth over them. We could not find the prisoner for a quarter of an hour; after all the prisoner was found in the saw-dust bin, and the key of the shop was inside of the shop, laying on the block.

Prosecutor. The chissels were not in my shop on Sunday evening. I cannot swear to the halfpence.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming down Fleet-market at five o'clock in the morning. I am troubled with fits. Mr. Beadle's door was open. I went in to see if any body was there. I was afraid to come out again for fear the watchman should take me, and when they said the door was open, I hid myself for fear they should find me in the place.

Q. to prosecutor. How did they get into your house - A. By taking a square of glass out, and burning the handle of the casement.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130113-30

158. JAMES MILLARD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of January , 2 l. 13 s. 1 d. in monies numbered , the property of Thomas Beadle .

THOMAS BEADLE . I am a butcher . I keep a shop, 29, Fleet-market . On Sunday night, about eight o'clock, I went and tried the shop door and shutters. It was all safe then. On Saturday night, I left some halfpence in the shop, in a corner cupboard, and in a drawer. I do not know the exact quantity. He had not got quite the whole of them. When I came there on Monday morning, I found the cupboard door bursted open, and likewise the drawer. I found these four chissels close by the cupboard on the bench. They had used one of them to force open the cupboard and the drawer. I found the halfpence against the door, propped up in this apron to the amount of two pounds thirteen shillings and a penny. The apron is not mine. I never saw it before. I found the prisoner in the saw-dust bin.

Q. What did the prisoner say for himself when you found him - A. He said nothing.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130113-31

159. ELEANOR TOMLINSON was indicted, for that she, on the 21st of November , feloniously, and without lawful excuse, had in her custody and possession divers forged bank-notes, that is to say, two forged Bank notes of 2 l. each, she knowing them to be false and forged .

SECOND COUNT, that she had in her possession a certain other forged note, for the payment of 2 l. she knowing it to be forged.

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130113-32

160. ELEANOR TOMLINSON was indicted for feloniously forging, on the 21st of November , a bank-note for the payment of 2 l. with intention to defraud the Governour and Company of the Bank of England .

SECOND COUNT, for disposing of and putting away a like forged note, she knowing it to be forged, with the same intention.

Mr. Knapp, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner, of this charge, was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130113-33

161. ZENOPHON HEARN BASHAM was indicted for that he, on the 29th of May, at the Sessions for the delivery of Newgate, holden at Justice-hall, Old Bailey, in the City of London, in the 51st year of his Majesty's reign, was tried and convicted of felony, and was sentenced to be tranported beyond the seas for the term of fourteen years, and the indictment further states, that he, on the 4th of December last, was at large in this kingdom, before the expiration of the said term for which he was ordered to be transported .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded.

GUILTY - DEATH .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130113-34

162. JOHN CADWELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of January , five pieces of timber, value 4 l. 10 s. the property of William John Bailey and Edward Brookes .

FRANCIS CUTTS . Q. Are you constable employed at these works at the Strand bridge - A. Yes.

Q. In these works are any pieces of timber used in that work called wayling timber - A. Yes.

Q. Messrs. Bailey and Brooks are the contractor s of the Strand bridge - A. Yes.

Q. Had these gentlemen lost any of these wayling pieces - A. Yes. The wayling pieces of timber are tied together with ropes. We missed several of them. I went to Shears's. At Shears's I found three pieces of wayling, one piling, and one pile-head. Shears's premises, where I found these things, is No. 9, Shire-lane.

Q. In consequence of anything Shears said to you did you go to a man of the name of Denny - A. Yes; and in consequence of what Denny said, I went to the prisoner. The prisoner said, they were small pieces floating on the river, and he thought them not of much consequence.

- DENNY. Q. Did you sell any pieces of timber to Shears - A. I did; the pieces of timber that were produced at Bow street. I bought them of the prisoner about a week, or better, before they were in possession of Shears. I live in Shire-lane, Temple-bar. In the morning, a little after eight, this timber was put up against my place. The prisoner was with them. He asked me, whether I would buy them. I asked him, whether they were his property. He told me, that he took them up in the river, and that they were his privilege. I gave him two pounds sixteen shillings for the five pieces. There were two more pieces. I gave three pounds five shillings and six pence for the whole.

Q. to Shears. There were five pieces of timber found at your house - A. Yes. I bought them of the last witness, Denny. I am quite sure of that.

- EDWARDS. I am a Bow-street office patrol. I apprehended the prisoner on last Sunday, about three o'clock. I told him, I apprehended him for selling some timber to Mr. Denny. He said, he picked it up somewhere about Blackfriars-bridge.

JAMES BROWN . I am in the employ of these gentlemen who are making the Strand-bridge. Their names are William John Bailey and Edward Brookes . They are the proprietors of this work. I am one of the agents who superintend the works.

Q. What is the value of this timber - A. From four to five pounds. These were rafts of timber. We find them out, and they float off. Sometimes it may happen in a high wind they will float off without being out.

Prisoner's Defence. The piece of timber that I owned to were muddy, and a fisherman washed it for me.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 29.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130113-35

163. JAMES SMITH was indicted for that he, on the 11th of November , at the parish of Christ-church, feloniously did set fire to and burn a certain house there situate, in his possession, of which house the Mayor and Commonalty of the City of London were possessed in fee, with intent to injure the said Mayor and Commonalty .

And OTHER COUNTS, for like offence, with the same intention.

And OTHER COUNTS, for setting fire to a certain other house, with intention to injure different persons.

ZACHARIAH FINCH . I am a fringe-maker, and at the time the fire happened I lived in the prisoner's house.

Q. Who was your employer - A. Isaac Wright.

Q. What apartment had you in the house - A. I had two front rooms on the second floor in the house.

Q. What family had you - A. A wife and three children - the eldest is six years old, and one child was four months. They were all in the house on the night of the fire. Mr. Wright rented one half of the shop of the prisoner, and a small parlour, or accompting-house, behind that room. Mr. Wright's shop was parted from the prisoner's shop by a wooden partition. There was only one common stair-case

Q. There were some rooms under the shop I suppose - A. Yes, a kitchen, and a coal-cellar. The kitchen was in the occupation of Mr. Wright, and I had the privilege to use it. Mr. Wright did not had in the house.

Q. But he rented these apartments for the use of and your family and his business - A. Yes. Nobody slept in the kitchen. There was a pantry adjoining the coal-cellar, which was in the prisoner's possession, and the coal-cellar was in the prisoner's possession.

Mr. Alley. The accompting-house behind the shop was in the prisoner's possession - A. Part of it. It was decided by a wooden partition. Mrs. Wright occupied me part, and the prisoner the other. There was stove in the part occupied by the prison in. The prisoners accompting-house had in skylight in it and a stove,

Q. What part of the up stairs did the prisoner occupy - A. He occupied, one of the front garrels, and be back in the two pair of stairs

Q. The room that was to your accepting-room; who occupied that - A. Mr. James Smith That was his and his wife's sleeping-room. It was on the same floor, but a back-room.

Q. Who lived in the next house, on that side near Giltspur-street - A. Mr. Plummer; and in the house next to Cheapside, Mr. Wool.

Q. Were you acquainted with the names of the prisoner's servants that used to sleep in the house. Do you know a man of the name of Praston and a man of the name of Whitehead - A. Yes.

Q. Was there a man of the name of Bennett ever living in the house - A. I do not know.

Q. Had he a son that slept in the house - A. There was a boy about eight years old that used to sleep there.

Q. Are you able to tell me whether that little boy and the men slept in the house - A. They might occasionally. I cannot say whether they did that night. Whitehead, and a man, whose name I do not know, they used to sleep in the house.

Q. Can you tell me whether they slept in it any part of the week preceding the fire - A. No; I cannot. On the 11th of November, the day the fire happened, I went to bed about half after eleven o'clock. I had not left any fire in any of my apartments. We generally have a fire in my front room two pair of stairs, and that was out before I went to bed. My children were in bed before me; my wife and I went to bed together. About a quarter before three in the morning, the first thing that called my attention was the cry of fire, and the rattles. On my being disturbed, I opened the front window and looked out, and saw the sparks came over the house. The sparks seemed to come from the back of the house into Newgate-street . After I had opened the window and saw the sparks come over the house, I then went and opened my sitting-room door which leads to the staff-case. There is a window there that you can see the back part of the house. I could see the fire from the landing-place, from Mr. Smiths accompting-house. It came right through the sky-light of the accompting-house. It broke through the glass. Then I went into my bedroom, and told Mrs. Finch the house was on fire. She took two children and I took one. I went to get out at the top of house; that was fastened. I did not succeed. Then I went to the front garret door, where Miss. Rose lodged. I found I could not get out there; then I came down stairs. On my coming down stairs I saw Mrs. Smith, she opened her bedroom door; she had a lamp in her hand. She was dressed with a bonnet and gown on. She appeared dressed in her usual way.

Q. Could you judge from her appearance whether her clothes had been hurried on in haste - A. They had not appearanes of that. She appeared in her usual dress as in the day. I then proceeded down stairs, and opened the front door.

Q. Was it - A. Not at all, it was shut to with a common spring lock; no bolts were shot. As soon as I opened the street door, the people came in and took the children. I then went back, up stairs, and the men followed me up stairs, but who they were I cannot tell.

Q. What became of the prisoner's wife - A. She came down stairs nearly the same time with my wife.

The fire was very rapid at the time that we came down stairs.

Q. How soon after you got down stairs did the stairs tumble in - A. It might be ten minutes or a quarter of an hour after I was down.

Q. How long might it be from the time you discovered your danger and made your escape - A. Not more than twenty minutes when the stairs fell in.

COURT. Between your being alarmed and the stairs falling in - A. Yes; I think, about twenty minutes.

Mr. Alley. When first you came down stairs did you discover where the fire came from - A. I think through the window. I could see the flames coming right through the sky-light, in Mr. Smith accompting-house.

Q. Did you afterwards see the shop on fire - A. Yes. I was on the spot. I saw the whole of it consumed.

Q. I asked you before, I believe, since you know who was in the house - A. No, I do not.

Q. Had you seen the prisoner's child in the course of the day - A. No.

Q. Had you any opportunity of knowing whether the child slept in the house that night - A. No, I had not. I had not seen the child in the course of that day.

Mr. Knapp. The first alarm that you had of fire was somewhere about three o'clock in the morning - A. A quarter before three.

Q. Now the fire you observed was a very rapid fire - A. Yes.

Q. Therefore the probability would be that the fire would been it down in half an hour - A. Not so soon at that; about an hour and a half.

Q. How long had you lived in the house - A. About thirteen months.

Q. You know that Mr. Smith had another house in Hounsditch - A. I understood that he has.

Q. Do you know whether he slept at that house sometimes, and sometimes at home - A. I cannot say. I do not know whether he slept out, nor do I know whether he was at home that night.

Q. You know Mrs. Smith - A. Yes.

Q. She we understand is since dead - A. Yes, she is. I saw her come out of her bed-room with a lamp in her hand, alight. I knew very little of Mrs. Smith; she was sometimes sober and sometimes intoxicated.

Mr. Alley. In what state was Mrs. Smith that night - A. I think she was in liquor that night. The fire was backwards, in Mr. Smith's accompting-house.

CHARITY FINCH . Q. You lived in this house of Mr. Smith's, we understand - A. I did. I went to bed between ten and eleven.

Q. In what room had you any fire in the house - A. In our sitting-room; the front room two pair of stairs, adjoining our bed-room. We raked that fire out before we went to bed.

Q. At what time in the night were you awoke - A. Half past two, or thereabouts. I cannot exactly say. I was awoke by the alarm of fire.

Q. Now, ma'am, when you came out of your chamber, did you see Mrs. Smith - A. Mrs. Smith came out of her chamber nearly at the time we opened our bed-room door. She was dressed completely. I was in a great fright. She did not appear alarmed as I saw. We went up stairs first; we could not make our escape up stairs; we came down stairs and escaped, and as I came down stairs I saw the fire in Mr. Smith's accompting-house. That room projects beyond the upper part of the house. It is behind the stairs.

Q. As you came down in the passage did you find the shop on fire - A. I did not. I made my escape.

Q. Was there any fire in your room, or on your story, when you were alarmed - A. None in the least. I saw no fire, but as I passed down stairs there was no fire higher than the ground flour, as I could judge of from the stairs. I saw no appearance of fire in Mrs. Smith's chamber.

Q. Then the persons in the house that night was Miss Rose, in the room over you; yourself, your husband, and three children, in your own room - A. Yes, and Mrs. Smith in the room behind mine. I know of no other persons being in the house that night. I was not intimate with Mrs. Smith. I never entered her apartment. She had the appearance of frequently being intoxicated.

JOHN WOOL . Q. Did you live next door to the house that the prisoner occupied, at the time of the fire - A. Yes; not on the Giltspur-streeet side. I have a yard at the back of my house; it is separated from the prisoner's yard by a wooden fence. On the night on the fire I went to bed about twelve o'clock, and between two and three I was alarmed by the noise in the street. I slept in the front of the house, in the three pair. On my being alarmed, I looked out of my window, and saw the fire flying over the top of the house. I afterwards went to the back part of the house; I observed the fire come from the back part of Mr. Smith's house, from the place where he used to keep the coals; the cellar underneath the parlour, or accompting-house, he had; immediately underneath the sky-light parlour. I alarmed my family.

Q. How long after that was it before the house was entirely distroyed - A. About an hour.

Q. On the morning after the the fire did you see the prisoner any where - A. I did, in my own house. He came there betwixt eight and nine; a man came in with him. They were talking together. The prisoner sat down, and seemingly affected. He burst into tears. The prisoner asked me whether I could give him some breakfast.

Q. You say your house is next door to his house; are you the tenant of that house - A. I have a lease on my house.

Q. At any time before the fire-happened had you observed any thing taken away from the prisoner's shop - A. I saw a bundle taken away between eleven and twelve at night. It might be two or three weeks before the fire. The bundle was as large as a man could carry.

Q. By whom were these things removed - A. By two of his men. One of the men's name was Whitehead. I cannot say the name of the other.

Q. You keep a public-house - A. I do.

Q. Do you let out beds at any time - A. I do.

At the time the fire happened, Whitehead slept at my house.

Q. How long before the fire happened did he cease to sleep at his master's house - A. Three weeks or a month.

Q. How long had he been in the habit of sleeping at his master's; was it two or three years - A. I cannot say. He had been a long time there; how long I cannot say.

Mr. Knapp. You lived next door to Mr. Smith. Did you know Mr. Smith and his wife - A. Yes, very well. Mrs. Smith would drink a little. I have seen her a little intoxicated five or six times, and I have seen a lamp burning in her passage, and I have put it out. I did not think any danger in the lamp burning, but I always put it out.

Q. You say the fire was about half after two - A. Yes, somewhere about that time. The fire was not very rapid when I first saw it. I suppose it had not long broke out. When I first saw the flames they were bursting through the windows in the area at the back part of the house. Where the fire first began I cannot tell.

Q. Was the prisoner carrying on a pretty extensive business - A. Apparently he did. He had a large stock for a tailor , I believe. He did a great deal of business.

WILLIAM ABEL . I am a lamp-lighter in Newgate-street, and in that neighbourhood.

Q. In the night of the 11th of November, or rather the morning of the 12th, were you in Newgate-street - A. About a quarter before three in the morning I was in Newgate-street; I saw the appearance of fire behind Mr. Smith's house. I knocked at Mr. Plummer's door first, Mr. Smith's door next, and then at Mr. Bull's. I got first into Mr. Bull's house. I went backwards. I found the fire coming out of a kind of an area in Mr. Smith's house.

Q. Had it set fire to any thing of Mr. Bull's - A. Yes, the wooden partition that was between Mr. Bull's premises and Mr. Smith's was on fire. I throwed about two pails and a half of water on it; then I asked for more. I took a poker, and went to Mr. Smith's house. I broke one of the pannels of the shop door. I got the door open. At first, the shop was full of smoke; the smoke dispersed on my opening the door. I found four patent lamps on the counter, which I took away. They were not alight. There was a great fire at the back of the house. The fire was burning very rapidly. I got my fellow-servant to get me a ladder, and as I was going up to the one pair of stairs window the ladder fell. I fell down and broke the bone of my arm. That is all I know about it.

MRS. LONDON. I was employed as a char-woman by the prisoner. I was employed by him some time before the fire. I used to light the fires. I usually fit two fires; one in the shew room, and the other in the kitchen. I sometimes lighted the fires with turpentine wood, and sometimes plain wood. I bought the bundles of wood at Mr. Newman's, in Newgate-street. My mistress gave me the money. I had seven bundles for sixpence.

Q. Did you use shavings - A. Never. I never saw any shavings in the house in my life.

Q. Were you there the day before the fire - A. I was. I lit two fires on the Wednesday morning.

Q. What time did you quit the house on that day - A. I quitted the house twenty-five minutes after ten, exactly.

Q. This shop of Mr. Newman's, where you bought the wood, is a regular oil shop - A. Exactly so.

Q. How large was the kitchen below stairs, where you lit the fire - A. A good sized kitchen.

Q. Was it a safe grate - A. Very, so far as I know. I left a good fire in the morning. I left the house about twenty-five minutes after ten.

JAMES PELHAM . Q. Were you at work in Newgate-street at the time the fire happened - A. Yes. I am a carpenter. At the time the fire happened, that very day, I was at work in Newgate-street.

Q. Within a few days before the fire happened, had you sold any shavings to Mr. Smith - A. I sold him one sack in the fore part of that week. I put them in the cellar, in the back part of the house.

Mr. Gurney. The fire happened on the Wednesday, then that must be on the Monday or Tuesday - A. Yes. I sold him one other sack the night before the fire happened. I took the second sack into the cellar where I took the first. I did not see any of the shavings that I had taken before. The last sack I took was between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, before dark. Mr. Smith ordered the shavings, and he paid me. He asked me the first time for two. I had but one, and therefore I took the second afterwards. I was at work at Dr. Ford's house. I never sold any shavings to Mr. Smith before. I used to sell them to the pastry-cook. Mr. Smith asked me to let him have some shavings to light his fire with, as soon as I had made them. I told him I would let him have them.

MATTHEW BULL . I keep an oil shop in Fleet Market.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. I do.

Q. Do you recollect the fire that happened in Newgate-street - A. I do. On the evening of the 10th of November, the prisoner called at my shop, between eight and nine, after dark. He desired to have a gallon of turpentine. He brought with him a stone bottle. I told him the price was fifteen shillings per gallon. He said, he knew it was high, but he had given more. The turpentine I measured myself, and put it in the bottle. He told me to tie a leather over the cork, and then he enquired if we sold pitch. I told him, we did. He then enquired if we had any in seven pounds bags. I told him, we had not; I would put it in seven pound bags; if he wished to have it put up in that manner I would do it for him. He then ordered three seven-pound bags, and while the pitch was cutting up he took the bottle of turpentine, and went away with it. He said, he would return for the pitch. I asked him, if he would allow me to send the turpentine home. He said, no, there was no occasion for that; he was tolerably strong; he would carry it himself He then went away. He was gone about ten minutes or a quarter of an hour. When he returned for the pitch I was not quite ready. He was waiting in the shop; he saw some links in the shop; he then said, do you

sell links. I said, we did. He said, he would take two of them. He took two, and desired to have them cut in half, which was done. He had three bags of pitch; and four half links tied up together in a coarse cloth.

Q. I take it for granted you would have made no charge if one of your servants carried them home - A. Oh, dear, no.

Q. Do you know the fact, whether he was acquainted that you knew him - A. I recollected him, from frequently seeing him standing at his own shop door. He might know me. I have no reason to suppose that he knew me. He had never dealt with me before, to my knowledge.

Q. You know Mr. Newman perhaps, that keeps a shop in Newgate-street - A. I do.

Q. I should think that oil, and such sort of things might be purchased thdre - A. There is no doubt of it.

COURT. Do you know whether he deals in pitch and links - A. I do not know, but it is customary; most oil and colourmen do sell them.

Q. What is the length of one of them links - A. About eighteen inches.

Q. Is it not extraordinary to have them cut in half - A. I think not, sometimes; for the little boys, who cannot raise money enough for a whole one, we cut them in half.

THOMAS BOX . I go by the name of Box, at the coach stand in the Old Bailey; my right name is Thomas Emerton .

Q. Do you remember Mr. Smith's house being burnt down - A. I do.

Q. On that night did you see Mr. Smith - A. I did, within a few minutes before eleven o'clock. I opened the coach door, and let him into a hackney coach. The coachman was directed to drive to 62, East Smithfield. He went away in that coach. I think the clock struck after the coach was gone; therefore he went away before eleven.

EDWARD GOULD . I am shopman to Mr. Newman, the oilman, in Newgate-street.

Q. Your master's house is nearly opposite to Mr. Smith's - A. Nearly.

Q. Did he use to deal at your house for wood - A. Not as I know of. When persons pay we never ask their names nor residence, or anything about it.

Q. Do you deal in pitch, turpentine, and links - A. We do.

RICHARD THORN . I live in Butcher-row, East Smithfield.

Q. Have you been acquainted for some time with the prisoner - A. About two years.

Q. Did you belong to the same lodge of Masons that he did - A. I did.

Q. Did that lodge occasionally meet at the Horns, Doctors' Commons - A. Some of the members, not the lodge. It is called the Royal Arch-chapel. It is a branch of the lodge.

Q. Had you made an appointment before the 11th of November to meet the prisoner on the night of the 11th - A. I had seen Mr. Smith on the night of the 11th. I believe I told him that the chapel would assemble on the 11th. I told him if it would be convenient for him to attend he would receive that part of masonry that he had not received before. Mr. Smith replied, he did not know that it would be convenient to attend; he would, if possible.

Q. Did you, yourself, go to the Horns that night - A. I did. The prisoner did not attend. I left the Horns a little after one o'clock in the morning. The prisoner was at my house that night. I found him there when I returned, about nine o'clock. I learned from one of his men that he would be at my house. When I went home I found the prisoner at my house and two men, Gardner and Pratton. The prisoner had a small dog with him, a white curly French dog.

Q. How long did they stay at your house - A. I believe until four in the morning. They had taken rump steaks and oyster sauce. Mr. Smith drank a good deal. He was rather tipsey. He wanted to sleep in the house. I told him, I had not a bed empty; I would send the patrol to see him home. I called the patrol, and told him I would give him half-a-crown to see him home. Mr. Smith was so drunk. I sent the patrol home with him. I have known Mr. Smith two years. I have heard him spoken of as a man of character and good repute.

THOMAS PRATTON . I am a servant to the prisoner. I was shopman.

Q. And you are subpoenaed by him as a witness, and by the Fire office too. How long have you been in his service - A. About a twelvemonth.

Q. Before the time of this fire had any persons in his shop slept in Newgate-street - A. Yes, John Whitehead . He slept in the parlour, behind the shop with the sky-light.

Q. For what length of time had Whitehead slept there - A. For the space of half a year.

Q. How long before the fire did he cease to sleep there - A. About three weeks or a month; then he slept at next door, at Mr. Wool's.

Q. Had Mr. Smith a son - A. Yes, about ten or eleven years old. He went to school somewhere in Hatton Garden. He had slept in the house in Newgate-street about three weeks before the fire took place. He was sent to his grandmother's in Houndsditch. That is Mr. Smith's other shop. There was a bed and bedding sent for him from Newgate-street.

Q. Then at the time that the fire took place was there any servant of Mr. Smith's sleeping in that house in Newgate-street - A. No.

Q. Where did you sleep - A. I lived in New-street, Bishopsgate-street, at a lodging of my own.

Q. On the night of the fire at what time was the shop shut up - A. At ten o'clock, the usual time. I then left the shop, and James Gardner , he went with me. We went to the Horns, Doctors' Commons, and from there to Mr. Thorn's, East Smithfield.

Q. For what purpose did you go there - A. I went to purchase some rump steaks, and to have them cooked against Mr. Smith came.

Q. Who gave the treat - A. Mr. Smith.

Q. What did you go for to the Horns, in Doctors' Commons - A. To make some excuse about Masonry.

Mr. Gurney. How far is it from Newgate-street to East Smithfield - A. About a mile and a quarter.

Q. How long have you been shopman to Mr. Smith - A. Rather better than a twelvemonth.

Q. Has he often taken you out to supper - A. Not suppers like that. He has treated us with drink. What we eat we generally paid for ourselves. On Saturday nights he used to treat us with drink.

Q. This was Wednesday night - A. Yes, it was.

Q. At about what time did Mr. Smith come to you - A. About eleven o'clock. He came in a hackney coach.

Q. Did he bring a dog with him - A. Yes, he did

Q. He supped there we understand - A. Yes, and after supper he was sent by Mr. Thorn to his house in Houndsditch.

Q. Do you remember a few days before this any tar wood being purchased - A. About a week before there was half a hundred bought of a boy that goes about with a cart. It is a kind of tarry wood, to light fires.

GEORGE METCALFE . I am a watch-maker, in Newgate-street. My house was within two doors of the prisoner's. Two or three days after the fire, he sent his servant to my house. The prisoner and me met at the King's Head by appointment. He wished to have the bottom part of my house. He said, he had heard I was going to leave it. I told him, I could not treat with him, for it, because the reports in the neighbourhood were very unfavourable. I told him, the reports in the neighbourhood were, that he had been buying pitch and turpentine of Mr. Bull in Fleet-market. He hesitated for some time. I concluded by that hesitation, that it was no such thing. I said, you had better go to Mr. Bull, and explain this thing, and clear up your character, He said, we would go to Mr. Bull's. I told him by all means so to do.

Mr. Gurney, Q. to Mr. Bull. Did the prisoner afterwards call upon you - A. No, he did not.

HENRY THOMAS BARRY . I am secretary to the Atlas insurance office.

Q. On the 20th of November did the prisoner call at the office - A. He did. He first gave notice of the fire, and he called on a subsequent day, and wrote the under part. (Read.)

"I do hereby give notice, that the premises occupied by me, 119, Newgate-street, were consumed in the night by fire, between the 11th and 12th day instant. I have thereby lost the full sum I have insured at your office." (The subsequent.)

"I do hereby make my claim of two thousand six hundred pounds, insured by me, James Smith.

Mr. Gurney, Q. to Barry. When he came the second time was he called into the parlour in the presence of the directors - A. He was, both the first and second time.

Q. I believe you made minutes to assist your memory - A. I did, at both times. He mentioned the nature of his stock. We were very much surprized at the rapidity at the fire, being woolen goods Mr. Thomas Turton was present. We asked him if he could accout for the fire, whether he suspected any body owed him a grudge. He said, nobody did owe him a grudge. He was pressed very closely whether there was any thing of a combustible nature on the premises. He said, he would now mention what he had never done to any soul before, that he had bought a night or two before the fire a gallon of turpentine, and twenty-one pounds of pitch; that was all. A little after that I was left alone with him; pressed him further about the fire. He said, he had bought two links; after that, he said, he bought them of Mr. Bull, in Fleet-market. I asked him for what purpose he could have bought these things, and having them in the house. He said, they were on the premises at the time of the fire, and the turpentine was to mix up with paint, to paint his back parlour and back bed-room of Newgate-street, and his houses at Bow. The pitch was to pitch a trough, and some spouts at Bow, and that they were put in the coal-hole the pitch, turpentine, and the links. The links were to give a light while the work was done in the cellar at Bow. They were for some work which he intended to do at Bow.

Q. Did you ask him whether there were any other combustibles - A. I told him these things would not do it of themselves, without there were something else applied to them. He said, there were a few shavings in the coal-hole, and in the pantry.

Q. Did he mention how the shavings were placed with respect to the trupentine - A. He said they could not communicate together.

Q. Did you ask him whether there was any fire in the kitchen, below, that afternoon - A. He said there was not any in the kitchen the whole afternoon. That was as Mrs. Smith told him.

Q. Did he say at what time he had left his home that night - A. About half after nine at night. He said, when he went out there was not sufficient fire to warm a little milk or beer for his wife. He said, that Mrs. Smith was the only person belonging to him that was at home at the time of the fire. He put the lamps out before he left home. He also said, that his policy and all his papers were burnt.

Q. You said, the prisoner said that he would mention one thing that he had not mentioned to any soul before; what was the day that he mentioned that - A. The 20th of November; nine days after the fire.

Q. Did you ask him where he supped that night before the fire - A. He said, he supped at Mr. Thorn's, Butcher-row, East Smithfield; and that he usually spent his evening out. He went to Mr. Thorn's to treat two of his men with a supper. He frequently treated his men with a supper; he had done it twenty times.

Q. Did he say why he went to that house - A. He said he went there to serve his friend. He had never spent three evenings before at Mr. Thorn's. I asked him the name of his tenant at Bow. He said, Nelson.

COURT. Are you quite correct in his saying, I will now tell you what I never told any soul before - A. I am. Them were his very words, as if he was conveying information that was not known before.

RICHARD PAYNE . Q. You are a surveyor at Bow, are not you - A. I am.

Q. Do you known the houses that the prisoner has at Bow, occupied by a person of the name of Nelson - A. I know them all.

Q. Do you know the trunk, or spout, in the cellar - A. I do; it is lined with lead. It is about twenty feet long, six inches wide, and five and half inch deep.

Q. Would it be right to put any pitch to it - A. I should think not. It is a light cellar when the window is open.

Q. If people were at work there, would they want torch light - A. No. They have done work without.

COURT. Supposing, it were right to pitch that trunk, what quantity of pitch would it take to pitch it - A. I suppose ten pound of pitch would do it. This trunk takes the water from the back part of the house. There is water in the cellar, which requires a brick drain to carry it of.

JOHN THORNTON . I am a painter. I live in Wilson-street, Finsbury-square.

Q. Have you been employed by the prisoner to paint these houses at Bow - A. Yes. I painted the house in which Mrs. Nelson, lives, outside and inside, and the front of all three houses. I found the colour and the oil in the usual way of painting.

Q. How long was this ago - A. About the middle of October.

COURT. What proportion of turpentine do you use in paint, and how much would be necessary to paint the outside of them house at Bow - A. Three pints of turpentine, and three pints of oil. A gallon would not be necessary.

MR. HUMPHREY. I am a clerk in the Atlas insurance company.

Q. In the month of November, did you receive instructions from the prisoner to prepare a policy - A. I did. This is my entry from his instructions: household furniture, two hundred pounds; fixtures, fitting up the shop, including shelves, and drawers, and counter, two hundred pounds; on china and glass, one hundred; wearing apparel, one hundred; stock in trade, two thousand; altogether, two thousand six hundred pounds. The policy was to be sent to Mr. Williams, Oxford-street.

MORGAN GEORGE NEEDLE . I am also a clerk in the Atlas insurance company.

Q. Was a policy made out pursuant to these directions - A. Yes, and I made a copy of that policy before it was sent out, by order of the directors. The policy was made out. This is a correct copy.

Mr. Gurney. The policy is for two thousand six hundred pounds.

DANIEL TOOMBES . I am the messenger of the office. I delivered the policy at Mr. Williams's, Newman-street, Oxford-street.

Mr. Gurney. That is the evidence on the part of the prosecution.

COURT. Does the prisoner choose to say any thing for himself.

Prisoner. There are a few remarks I have here, if your lordship will permit the officer of the Court to read it.

(Read.)

My lord, and gentleman of the jury, I stand here accused of a crime of the greatest magnitude and enormity, and of which, if I am guilty, it must be under circumstances of the greatest atrocity; for, if I am guilty of setting my house on fire, I must at the same time have contemplated the murder of my wife, a woman to whem I had been married nearly twenty years, and who was the mother of my child. That I am not this monster, I trust I shall be able to satisfy you of, by the most convincing evidence.

In cases of this nature, one naturally looks to the inducement of the commission of the crime. In my case there could not be any inducement for my committing it. My circumstances and situation were flourishing, no one ever clamoured at my house for money, and I was always prepared to meet every demand on me, long before the day of payment arrived; and it is a fact, that the whole of the demand I had to meet, from the time this unfortunate accident happened, until the Christmas following, (a space of upwards of six weeks), did not exceed three hundred pounds; and the probable receipts of my shop, during the same space of time, upon a comparison with the receipts of the preceding year, during the same period, would have amounted to three times that sum. The fire happened on the 11th of November. On the 4th, I made a payment of one hundred pounds; on the 5th, I paid my rent to Michaelmas, amounting to thirty-five pounds. At the time I made this latter payment, I was in possession of several hundred pounds, in money; which my landlord's clerk noticed, and is here ready to prove, but I am sorry to add, that this fell a prey to the flames. The time of year at which the fire happened was most particularly unfortunate, for the two months previous to Christmas may be considered as the harvest of our business, you may judge then, whether I would have chosen such a time of the year to effect my purpose, had I intended to set fire to my house.

My prosecutors affect to throw a suspicion as to the amount of the property on my premises, because, previous to my removing my insurance to the Atlas office, I had been insured to the amount of one thousand pounds only, on my stock in trade, at the Globe office; whereas, I increased my insurance on stock, in the Atlas office, to two thousand pounds. This can be only an affectation on the part of the prosecutors, because they had every opportunity of satisfying themselves on the subject. They have examined my servants as to my property, and they are here now to be examined by you, and from their examination it will appear, that at Christmas, 1811, my stock in Newgate-street was taken, and amounted to upwards of four thousand pounds. That stock was always kept up, and in the two months preceding the fire, my purchases did not amount to less than fifteen hundred pounds. My prosecutors say, that on looking over my stock in Houndsditch, they found it come very far short of the sum insured upon it, and they therefore draw an inference that the stock in my house in Newgate-street was equally short. My answer to this is a very plain one: previously to the insurance being effected, the stock in this shop was also taken, and amounted to about thirteen hundred pounds; but being advised by my friends to confine my business to my house in Newgate-street, I had given notice of quitting my house in Houndsditch, at Christmas. My business there was breaking up, and the shop was barely supplied with stock necescary to keep it open. Had the prosecutors found an excess of stock there, they might have said, that I had removed my stock from the other shop in contemplation

of the fire, and which would have been a very natural conjecture. But I shall be able to shew that there was not a removal of stock from Newgate-street, but on the contrary, that at the time of the fire my shop was fully stocked. It may be proper for me to observe here, that previously to the failure of Mr. Shoel, my principal dealer, the balance of my accompt with him stood generally at about three thousand pounds; besides this, my dealing with other persons were very considerable. What then could have been my inducement for my setting my house on fire? I could not have contemplated a fraud on the insurance office, because it appears that I was not insured at above one half my loss. Moreover, if I had contemplated a fraud on the office, it must have been contemplated from the time of making the insurance. Is it probable that I should have given notice to quit my house in Houndsditch, if I had intended to set fire to the Newgate-street house? I think you will say, no. I trust I shall also be acquitted of any intention of destroying my wife, who, notwithstanding her failings, I tenderly loved. She was, moreover, the mother of my child. By her death I have lost a comfortable income from property at Bow, which she was entitled to for her life; the loss of which I could have guarded against, by purchasing the interest of these persons who were entitled to the property in reversion, and who were desirous of selling, if I had had the gift of prescience. What inducement could I then have had for committing this heinous offence. I trust you will say, none. The fact is, that the dreadful calamity has put a stop to a most flourishing business, destroyed all my prospects, and reduced me from a state of affluence to a state of beggary; for the remnant of my property, including the amount of my insurance, would not enable me to satisfy the demands of my creditors. It must, therefore, be evident that I could not be benefitted by this calamity.

The prosecutors have said that they wished to avoid this prosecution, but that they were compelled to it by the popular clamour of the neighbourhood. A man who is unfortunate seldom wants calumniators. I have not deserved ill of my neighbours, for my conduct towards them was marked by acts of kindness. They have, however, circulated a story to my prejudice, respecting my purchasing some pitch, turpentine, and links, or torches, of Mr. Bull, an oilman, in Fleet Market, the evening preceding the fire, and that I refused to let Mr. Bull send them home for me; and they have added that I made the purchase with the view of using these articles in the conflagration of my house. The latter part I most solemnly deny, but that I made the purchase of these articles, is true, and also, that I chose to take them home myself. This may, at first, to you appear extraordinary; but, when you are informed (and it will be proved), that it was almost my constant habit to be my own porter, bringing home my own joint of meat from market, bringing my two or three gallons of oil from my oilman's, and, indeed almost every thing consumed in my house, it will no longer appear so. Pitch and turpentine are things that when they are set fire to, are very active in their operations. Now, it will be proved that I left my house in Newgate-street, about ten o'clock, in the evening of the fire, for the purpose of supping at Mr. Thorn's, who keeps a public-house in East Smithfield, and that I was there about a quarter before three in the morning, when the fire broke out. Would pitch and turpentine, if set fire to, have smothered for four or five hours? I think you will say they would not. Had the fire proceeded from these articles they would have emitted a strong smell. Now, the lamp-lighter, who was the first person to discover the fire, says, that he smelt no particular smell; and, moreover, that if he had had half a dozen buckets of water he could have extinguished the fire. Could he have done so if the flames had proceeded from pitch and turpentine? I think you will say, no. Besides, had I intended to set my house on fire, I need not have gone from home for materials; for the quantity of oil consumed by me in my shop would at any time have afforded me the means of combustion. It is, however, necessary that I should state for what purpose this pitch, turpentine, and links, were purchased. I before mentioned that my wife was entitled for her life to three houses at Bow; by some means or other the water found its way into the cellars of these houses. The person who acted occasionally as my clerk, in keeping my accompts, had been formerly in the employ of a surveyor, and went with me in the latter end of the summer to examine into the matter. He recommended an efficient drain, or sewer, to be constructed, which would operate as a drain to the neighbouring houses, as well as my own; but as the neighbours did not very readily come into this plan, it was thought adviseable to carry a trough, or trunk, through the cellars of my own houses, to drain off the water, and which trunk it would be necessary to pitch well for its preservation.

This was resolved on, and it was at the same time resolved that an arris gutter should be placed round the eves of one of the houses for the purpose of conveying the rain water into a butt for domestic purposes. That it would also be necessary to pitch. Pitch was also necessary for the repairs of one of the flaps that opened into the cellars of one of the houses, from the street, and it was for these pur- purposes that the pitch was purchased. The torches were for the purpose of lighting the cellars when the work to the trunk was doing, as candles had been found not to give sufficient light. As to the turpentine, that was to be used in painting at Bow, and also a part of my back shop in Newgate-street. I have been informed, that since I have been here, the prosecutors have caused the premises at Bow to be surveyed, and have found a trunk lined with lead in the cellars. It may be so; but that was a matter not within my knowledge; for, at the time Mr. Pether and I went to Bow, the water in the cellars was up to our knees, and prevented us from finding out the actual state of the place, and what Mr. Pether and myself had concluded upon, was the result of conjecture only. Coupling this explanation with the want of inducement to my committing the offence charged against me, will, I trust, prove satisfactery; and the more especially, when it is corroborated by the circumstance of one of my tenants

having, within two or three days of the fire, been very pressing for the repairs being set about. It may appear strange, that I should purchase these articles in Fleet Market, which were to be used at Bow; but it will no longer appear so, when you are informed, that the Bow errand cart used to call for parcels at the next door to me. I might also observe, that if I had intended these articles for the purpose of conflagration, and wished for concealment, I should have gone a greater distance from home for them than Fleet Market, where I am known almost by every one, and which is within three hundred yards of my late house in Newgate-street, and the persons resident there are in the constant habit of passing my door, and I believe few people are better known than myself.

It has also been stated as a supicious circumstance, that I purchased a considerable quantity of chips from a journeyman carpenter, who was at work repairing a house opposite to me. It is true that I did so; it was done in the face of day. Several of my neighbours had availed themselves of the opportunity of doing so, and I was equally entitled to do so with them.

It is also stated, that I denied having bought the combustible articles. This I must beg leave to contradict I never did deny that I purchased the articles; but when Mr. Metcalfe informed me that it was circulated in the neighbourhood, that I had purchased the articles for the purpose of setting fire to my house, I denied that; meaning to deny that they were purchased for such purpose. Mrs. Smith too was seen, when the alarm was given, to come out of her room ready dressed, with a candle in her hands. I am sorry to say that it was too often the case for Mrs. Smith to lie down with her clothes on. She had a propensity for drink, which she too often indulged, and was very frequently in a state not to help herself. Whether the accident of the fire was occasioned by her carelessness, in a moment of inebriety, or not, I cannot venture to say; and indeed it does not, I submit, appear very clear that the fire began on my premises; but this much is certain, that she was not prepared for the accident, as there is very little doubt but that her death was occasioned by the fright.

The prosecutors, before the Lord Mayor, stated, as a ground of charge against me, that I made a claim as for a total loss, without stating the particulars; this is a matter for Mr. Anbrey, my solicitor, to answer; as the claim was made under his directions. I can only repeat here that the gentleman of the insurance office had every means afforded them of satisfying themselves on the subject of my property.

It may appear strange that I should be from home at the time the accident happened, and that it was an unseasonable hour for a person to be out. I do not mean to justify it; but when a man has been closely confined to his shop from eight o'clock in the morning till ten at night, he wants some relaxation; it certainly might be taken more moderately; and as to my going home that night to Hounsditch, instead of to Newgate-street, there was nothing extraordinary in it. I had spent the evening and part of the morning at that part of the town, and it was no uncommon thing for me to sleep in Hounsditch on such occasions. It has also been observed that my son had also been removed from Newgate-street to Hounsditch. There cannot be any thing extraordinary in that. My mother lived in the house at Hounsditch, and surely there cannot be any harm in his visiting his grandmother. It was a thing he often did. But the mention of these matters only serves to shew how eager people are to catch at every trifling circumstance, that may throw the slightest suspicion on another.

Gentlemen, I leave myself in your hands.

COURT, to Mr. Finch. You saw Mrs. Smith come out of the room with a candle a light in her hand - A. Yes. She went down stairs with Mrs. Finch.

Q. Did you see upon her any marks of intoxication - A. Not then. When she was at the Old Bailey she seemed very heavy; whether it was for want of sleep, I cannot say. She appeared perfectly steady when she came down stairs.

ROBERT SIMS . I keep the watering-house in the Old Bailey.

Q. Do you know the prisoner and his wife - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember Mrs. Smith coming to you on the night of the fire - A. Yes; she was dressed, and she seemed to be very much in liquor.

ANN NELSON . I occupy one of the houses belonging to the prisoner, at Bow.

Q. Had you made any application to him respecting any repairs of the house - A. Yes; the repair of the cellar, on account of the water. I made the application as soon as I went into the house. I found the cellar wet. Mr. Smith promised he would put it in repair. It has never been done. I applied to Mr. Smith a few days before the fire. I saw the man; he told me he would tell Mr. Smith.

JOHN APPLETON . I keep an oil shop on Ludgate-hill. I have known Mr. Smith about three years; he has been in the habit of dealing with me the greatest part of the time. He bought his oil and lamps of me; he frequently took it home himself.

The prisoner called fifteen witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

The NAMES of the JURY that tried this cause.

Samuel Lee .

Robert Day .

William Bentley .

Samuel Barber .

Richard Reeves .

James Harding .

Joseph Davis .

James Wardy .

John Paddingham .

Nathaniel Grace .

Peter Devey .

Alexander C. Johnson .

Reference Number: t18130113-36

164. THOMAS BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of December , a mare, value 5 l. the property of John Scoones .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY - DEATH .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130113-37

165. DANIEL GRANT was indicted for that he, on the 21st of January, in the 50th year of his Majesty's

reign, at the delivery of the King's goal of Newgate, holden for the county of Middlesex, was tried and convicted of horse stealing, and received sentence of death; and that afterwards his Majesty had been graciously pleased to pardon him on condition of being transported for seven years, and that he, afterwards, on the 11th of January last, in the parish of St. Giles, in this City , was at large before the expiration of the term for wich he was ordered to be transported .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY - DEATH .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130113-38

166. STEPHEN WATKINS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of December , two pair of shoes, value 1 l. the property of Thomas Hemsley .

THOMAS HEMSLEY . I am a boot and shoe-maker , in Tower-street .

Q. When did you lose these shoes - A. I did not know any thing of these being taken.

DANIEL COX . These shoes were brought to me by James Morrison ; directly I saw them I knew they were my own cutting, and they were manufactured under my direction. I was servent to Mr. Hemsley about eight months ago. He said, he had them of the prisoner. I told him the shoes belonged to Mr. Hemsley. These are the shoes.

JAMES MORRISON . I am a butcher. I bought the shoes of the prisoner. I gave him a great rough coat for them. He took measure of me for the shoes, and I delivered him up the coat. I valued the coat at sixteen shillings, but I let him have it for fourteen shillings.

Q. What is the prisoner - A. He is a shoe-maker ; he worked for Mr. Hemsley. I am sure them are the shoes I had of him.

WILLIAM FILLINGLEY . I am a butcher. The prisoner had dealt with me for a long period, and after long importuning on his part for a job, I gave him a pair of shoes and boots to mend. The boots, he said, were not worth mending. He said, he could make me a pair of shoes of them, for eight shillings. When the prosecutor came to me, my man was disatisfied with the shoes he made for him. I brought the shoes down, and shewed him them. The prosecutor claimed them. I am sure these are the shoes I had of the prisoner. The prisoner acknowledgd to having stolen them, and wished me to intercede with his master. I told the prisoner the only way for him was, candidly to tell every thing he had done. I have not a doubt both pair are Mr. Hemsley's property.

Prisoner's Defence. With contrition I acknowledge my guilt. It was distress drove me to do it.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined Two Months in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130113-39

167. WILLIAM DAVIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2nd of January , seventy-two pounds weight of pork, value 2 l. 5 s. a waistcoat, value 1 s. a pair of pantaloons, value 1 s. six pounds weight and three quarters of a pound of salt, value 1 s. 6 d. and one wrapper, value 1 s. the property of James Read .

JAMES READ . I am a Greenwich carrier . On the 2nd of January, I sent my lad with my cart from Gracechurch-street into Lombard-street. His name is Charles Armsworth .

CHARLES ARMSWORTH . I am a servant to Mr. Read. I had the care of his cart on the 2nd of January; it was about three o'clock I got to Nicholas-lane. I wanted to go to Mr. Scholey's, for some tongues. I could not go there with the cart. I desired Mr. Edney to take care of it, and when I came back Mr. Edney had got the pork on the foot-board. He asked me, whether I had sent any body for it. I said, no. He said, a man had just been there, that said, he had been sent for it. He gave me a description of the man. I pursued and took the prisoner. By his description I had seen the prisoner lurking about the lane, when first I came with the cart. I took the prisoner in Lombard-street. I brought him back to the cart. A gentleman sent for an officer; he took him in custody.

WILLIAM EDNEY . I am a carrier. I was standing just at the entrance of Nicholas-lane, Lombard-street , waiting for the money of a parcel. Charles Armsworth drawed up with Mr. Read's cart; he asked me to give an eye to it while he run down the lane. The person came to the door to pay me. I looked round, and saw the prisoner in the cart. I saw him take a bundle out. He jumped from the cart with the bundle in his arms. I went to him, and took hold of the bundle, and asked him, what he was going to do with it. He said, he was going to Sam's coffee-house. I told him he must not take it until the man came that belonged to the cart. He then laid the bundle on the foot-board, and turned down a court that leads into Nicholas-lane. He called out to his mate. Armsworth came to the cart directly afterwards. I told him. He persued him, and brought him back.

Q. to Armsworth. What did that bundle contain - A. Pork, seventy-two pounds weight, and six pounds weight and three quarters of salt, a pair of pantaloons, a waistcoat, and a pair of gaiters. These are the things.

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw the cart, nor did I ever see the bundle, until I saw it in the Poultry Compter.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130113-40

168. BENJAMIN ROGERS was indicted, for that he, on the 17th of September , was clerk to John Gainford , and was employed and entrusted by him to receive money and valuable securities for him; that he being such servant, so employed and entrusted, did receive and take into his possession, on account of his said master, eight shillings in money, thirteen two-pound bank-notes, and eleven one-pound bank-notes, and that he afterwards did secrete and steal the said eight shillings, and seven one-pound bank-notes .

JOHN GAINSFORD . The prisoner received several sums for me in 1811. He received thirty-seven

pounds eight shillings, of Jenkin Jones , a customer of mine. He gave me thirty pounds of it. He embezzled seven pounds eight shillings. He kept a memorandum-book, in which he entered all the sums he paid me, and I signed my name to it. This is the memorandum-book. It is his handwriting.

JENKIN JONES. I am a woollen-draper, and man's mercer. I live in Bedfordbury, St. Martin's-lane.

Q. Are you a customer to Mr. Gainsford - A. Yes.

Q. Did you pay him any money in September, 1811 - A. Yes, I did. I have got the receipt here. " 17th of September, 1811. Received of Mr. Jenkin Jones, thirty-seven pounds eight shillings. Benjamin Rogers ." I paid the prisoner that money, and I saw the prisoner write that receipt. I have known the prisoner for years; his character was a very good one.

Prisoner's Defence. My lord, and gentlemen of the jury, I can assure you I had no intention of wronging my employer, but faithfully returning to him every shilling. I have served several gentlemen of the city, who will testify my character when I had the honour of serving them.

The prisoner called five witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130113-41

169. JAMES BRETT and LEWIS GREEN were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of January , a handkerchief, value 18 d. the property of a certain person to the jurors unknown, from his person .

BENJAMIN JOHNSON . I am a city constable. On the 6th of January, I was passing through Cheapside , about a quarter past eight in the evening. I saw the prisoners very active in rifling gentlemen's pockets. They were standing at the pastry-cook's shop where the large cake was. I saw Brett put his hand into a gentleman's pocket; the gentleman turned round, and the prisoners run off into Cornhill. I followed them. They stopped at Mr. Bish's shop, in Cornhill, a short time. They turned round, and saw that I was watching them. They went from that shop to Mr. Angel's, the pastry-cook, at the top of Cornhill , and there Green, the littlest prisoner, put his hand into a gentleman's pocket, drawed a handkerchief out, and Brett held the bottom of the pocket while Green drawed it out. The gentleman found that he had lost his handkerchief. The two prisoner saw that the gentleman noticed it. They both ran off. I pursued them into Bishopsgate-street. I laid hold of Brett. Green ran from me. I called out, stop thief. I searched Brett; I found a handkerchief on him. Green was stopped by a witness in court, and was searched by him. I only found one handkerchief on Brett. Though they were young, it was with difficulty we secured them. There was a gang of thieves got round us, and wanted to rescue them from us.

WILLIAM PULLEN . I am a city constable. I was passing by Cornhill in Bishopsgate-street; I heard the cry of, stop thief. The prisoner, Green, ran; I stopped him. I searched Green, and on him I found four handkerchiefs. The silk handkerchief was in his bosom; the other three are cotton; they were in his hat. The silk one is marked G. M. No. 3. One of the cotton ones is marked G. A. No. 1. The other two are without marks. These are the handkerchiefs.

Johnson. When I took them to Newgate, Green acknowledged that he and Brett had been picking pockets, and that Brett had led him into it.

Brett's Defence. I was going of an errand for my mother. This officer catched hold of me. He took one handkerchief from me, which is my father's.

Green's Defence. That red handkerchief is my father's. He pulled it off my neck, and said he found it in my bosom.

BRETT, GUILTY, aged 14.

GREEN, GUILTY, aged 13.

Judgment respited .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130113-42

170. JOSEPH EWBANK was indicted, for that he, on the 25th of July , was clerk to William Owen , barrister at law , and was employed and entrusted by him to receive money for him, and being such servant, so employed and entrusted, did receive the sum of 2 l. 2 s. for and on account of his said master, and that he afterwards did secrete and steal the same .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be a two-pound bank-note, and two shillings.

HALE WORTHING . Q. I believe you are a nephew and clerk to Mr. Worthing, the attorney - A. Yes.

Q. What is his name - A. James Worthing .

Q. On the 25th of July last, did you take a papers to Mr. Owen's chambers - A. Yes. I delivered the answer to Mr. Owen's clerk, the prisoner. I paid him two guineas. I gave him a two-pound note and a dollar, and he gave me a shilling.

WILLIAM OWEN . Q. You are a barrister - A. Yes.

Q. Has the prisoner been for some time your clerk - A. He has, for years. He was entrusted with the utmost confidence.

Q. When the prisoner received fees how often did he hand them over to you - A. It was his duty to hand them over to me every Saturday. He, on a separate piece of paper gave me the account of the fees of the week referring to the fee-book, as to such fees of clients whose names were entered in the book.

Q. You have a client of the name of Worthing - A. Yes. The 25th of July, I believe, was on a Saturday; it so happened that he made no account that week either on Saturday the 25th, or on the Monday. I distinctly asked him, as I had no account rendered, whether he had received any fees in that week or not. His answer was, that he had not. I particularly asked him this question, what, has not Mr. Worthing paid his fee for the answer. His answer was, no. I did not see the book that time. On the Saturday after I looked at the book.

Q. At that time was the entry in the state it is now, with the exception of Pd. Wo. - 4. It was with the exception of Pd. Wo.

Q. At that time there was no note of it being paid to you - A. Certainly not. I left town for the long vacation, on Saturday, the 20th of August. I came to town on the Monday following, and was in town until the Saturday. On Friday, the 28th of August, when he rendered me the account for that week; not seeing Worthing in it, I asked him if Mr. Worthing had paid. He said not. I asked him this question in consequence of my suspicion, and fixed my mind on Worthing. I returned to town on the 1st of October. I looked in the book in the course of that week.

Q. In the course of the week did you find the entry in the book exactly remaining so - A. Yes.

Q. In consequence of some discovery you made in the month of November, did you question the prisoner, in consequence of some fees received by him not accounted to you - A. I did; particularly on Monday, the 23d, or on the Tuesday. On my turning to the entry, I observed the entry had, Pd. Wo. In the first place, I asked him if that, Pd. Wo. was his hand-writing. Neither the, Pd. nor, Wo. is my hand-writing; that never was paid to me by the prisoner, or by any other person. I asked him then, when this fee had been paid. His answer was, about the time the paper was left. I then said, that is on the 25th of July. He said, yes, or thereabouts. I then asked him, whose writing that was: putting my finger to the Wo. He hesitated, and rather faintly said it was mine. He did not say distinctly, but rather hesitated about it, and then intimated that it was mine. I then made this observation; I know, and can swear positively, that this fee was never id by you to me; I have had my eye upon this particular case; I have recorded this in my memory per m; I am confident it is your's. I told him, that I had placed himself in an awkward situation. On Thursday, the 26th, he acknowledged that was his hand-writing.

GUILTY , aged 36.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130113-43

171. JOHN LANSHORNE was indicted, for that he, on the 12th of September, in the 52nd year of his Majesty's reign , feloniously did utter and publish as true, a certain forged order for payment of 770 l. with intention to defraud our Sovereign Lord the King , he knowing it to be forged .

SECOND COUNT, for like offence, with intention to defraud John Ridge .

And THIRD COUNT, to defraud William George Daniel .

The case was stated by Mr. Solicitor General.

WILLIAM GEORGE DANIEL . Q. You are paymaster of the Maidstone recruiting business - I am.

Q. Was the prisoner a clerk of your's under that district - A. He was.

Q. What was his establishment - A. He was a serjeant upon the staff. He had been a clerk to me six or seven years. He is now in the seventh year.

Q. Of course, he had the opportunity of seeing your hand-writing - A. He wrote in the same office.

Q. I will put that question again to you. Having been with you so long, had he the opportunity of knowing your hand-writing, and knowing how, you conducted that business, he became familiar with that business, did not he - A. Certainly.

Q. Were you in the habit of drawing bills upon Mr. Ridge, at the War-office; when there was occasion for it - A. I was.

Q. What is Mr. Ridge - A. General agent of the recruiting service . Mr. Ridge lives at 44, Charing Cross .

Q. Were you in the habit of drawing bills in the course of your department upon Mr. Ridge frequently - A. I was.

Q. Was the prisoner perfectly acquainted that you were doing so - A. He was.

Q. Was the prisoner at all engaged in filling up these bills of exchange which you drew upon Mr. Ridge - A. He frequently assisted me.

Q. Did anything occur to make it necessary to go to London to make enquiries concerning some irregularities, and when was that - A. On the 20th of September, 1812, I received some information from the Receivers office of Military accompts.

Q. In consequence of some communication you went to London - A. I did.

Q. Did you find there Mr. Ridge had received several letters as if from you - A. On the 5th of September, I found it, sir.

Q. Did you look at any letters and papers - A. I looked at them that time superficially.

Q. Did you look at them afterwards - A. I did.

Q. Did they appear (I mean the signatures) as if they came from you - A. They were not letters, but notes. They imported to be written by me.

Q. They were notes to Mr. Ridge, as if from Mr. Daniel - A. Yes, sir.

Q. Among these papers do you see any one particular bill which you noticed - A. Yes, sir, I do; I see this bill which I have in my hand. This purports to be drawn upon John Ridge , esq.

Q. Is that your hand-writing, sir - A. It is not.

Q. Has the money been replaced - A. It has, by Mr. Ridge.

Mr. Gurney. So that whether a bill turns out to be genuine or forged you neither gain nor lose - A. Neither the one nor the other.

Mr. Solicitor General. They one release the other.

Mr. Knapp. Now, Mr. Daniel, I think you told me that is not your hand-writing - A. It is not my hand-writing.

Q. Was that bill drawn by your authority, or do you know anything about it - A. I know nothing about it, nor was it drawn by my authority.

Q. Now, take that letter in your hand, and tell me whether you know anything about this letter - A. This letter is not my hand-writing, nor was it written by my authority. It is the prisoner's handwriting, there is not a shadow of doubt of it.

(The letter read.)

"Maidstone, September 11, 1812.

"Mr. Daniel presents his compliments to Mr. Ridge, agreeable to his wish, expressed in his letter

of the 28th. In consequence of the clerk who made up the accounts being absent a few days, begs leave to enclose him a draft of seven hundred and seventy pounds, on account of drafts being omitted in last year's accompts, the receipt of which Mr. R. will be so good as to acknowledge. The other parts of the letter will be attended to in a day or two.

Q. to Mr. Daniels. Did you ever receive that letter of the 28th ultimo - A. I never saw the original; no such letter came to my hands.

(The bill read.)

C 7 Depot, September 11, 1812.

770 l.

At three days after sight pay to the order of John Ridge, esq the sum of seven hundred and seventy pounds, on account of drafts omitted to be credited in Ge. States, for 1811.

W. G. Daniel, paymaster.

Thomas Pritzler , lieutenant-colonel, inspecting field officer of the Maidstone district.

To John Ridge , esq. agent for the recruiting service in London.

Mr. Gurney, to Mr. Daniel. How many years have you known the prisoner - A. About eight years; during that time he behaved well, and bore an excellent character.

LIEUTENANT-COLONEL PRITZLER. Q. You were inspecting officer of the Maidstone district during this transaction - A. I was.

Q. Was it part of your duty to countersign bills drawn by Mr. Daniel for the ensuing month - A. It was.

Q. That bill purports to have your signature - A. It does.

Q. Is that your hand-writing - A. It is a good resemblance. I am positive it is not my hand-writing. It is very closely imitated.

Q. Do you make any memorandum of bills that you receive for your signature - A. I was in the habit of having it done.

Q. Any genuine bills which have your signature - A. I should believe so. The entries are not mine until latterly.

Q. Are they all regular entered in your book - A. They should.

Q. Do you find any entry of this - A. I do not.

Q. Does that confirm your opinion upon view of the bill that this is not your hand-writing - A. It does, and upon my inspection of the bill itself I am sure I did not sign it.

ALEXANDER MACKAY . I am one of the clerks at the War office.

Q. What is the course of business at the office for Mr. Ridge's letters from Mr. Daniel for public service - A. If not sent open they are permitted to be uncovered, and sent to the Secretary of War.

Q. Was it part of of your duty to open these letters for the Secretary of War - A. It was.

Q. Was it your duty to do so upon the 12th of September last year - A. It was.

Q. Where is the War office situated - A. At the Horse Guards.

Q. That is the place where you used to receive them and open them - A. It was.

Q. Having found that they were letters to Mr. Ridge, what was done with them - A. They were given to the messenger, or give them to Mr. Ridge's messenger, if he happened to be at the War office at the time.

Q. I apprehend that you have some other place to which letters are sent - A. Yes.

Q. Are these letters distributed to places appropriated to each office - A. When the messengers are not there they are.

Q. They have different departments and repositories for the letters; what are they, boxes - A. Drawers for the different departments. The name of the the office is painted upon the compartment of the letters.

Q. That is except by accident Mr. Ridge's letters would be in another place - A. Certainly.

Mr. Alley. Have you any particular recollection of that particular letter - A. Not of that particular letter.

CHARLES BILLINGS . Q. On the 12th of September last, were you messenger to Mr. Ridge - A. I was.

Q. Did you attend at the war office to receive the letters that arrived for him; have you any recollection whether you were at the office - A. I cannot say I have. I have no doubt of it. It was my duty to do it, and I have no doubt I did my duty.

Mr. Gurney. Are you there every day - A. Yes, except I was out upon leave of absence.

Q. And you are out sometimes on leave of absence - A. I was, in the month of September.

Mr. Garrow. Have you the least imagination that you was out on leave of absence on the 12th of September last - A. No, I have not.

JAMES ASHLEY . Q. You are the first clerk at Mr. Ridge's office - A. Yes.

Q. Look at this bill and the letter, was the last witness attending at the war office to receive the letters for Mr. Ridge for you - A. Yes.

Q. Did you receive that letter, enclosing that bill of exchange - A. I did.

Q. Was it at the office at Charing Cross that you received it - A. It was.

Q. What writing is there first upon the letter of your own, that you are capable of ascertaining the fact of you having received the letter - A. There is no part of it my writing.

Q. Is that acceptance your's - A. It is not.

Q. That is the letter that came with the bill, is it not - A. It is.

Mr. Alley. Do you never receive letters at any other place than at Charing Cross - A. No, sir. If they came through Ramsbottom I might have received them.

Q. Have you received letters from Ramsbottom - A, Not as I know of.

COURT. Do you know of ever receiving any letters from Ramsbottom - A. I never recollect ever of receiving of any one.

Mr. Alleys Bills - A. I have received bills, certainly. I am certain this letter was not received from Ramsbottom. I perfectly recollect receiving this letter, and this bill. I am certain it was not received from Ramsbottom. This bill, if it came through Ramsbottom, Ramsbottom's endorsement would be upon the bill. I perfectly recollect receiving

this bill, and, namely, at the office, another clerk entered it. It was received with several others, no doubt, that day. It is made payable to John Ridge . I am certain it came enclosed in this very note. I perfectly recollect receiving this bill and this note. The letter was laid on my desk; probably I was not there, in the office, at the time he brought it.

Q. Then you cannot recollect it - A. I recollect opening the letter. I open all letters in Mr. Ridge's absence.

COURT. That letter came to your hands at Mr. Ridge's - A. It did.

Mr. Garrow. If that came as a bill of acceptance from Mr. Daniel, through Ramsbottom, or any other way, to the war office, when he sends his letters to you does he send his letters through Ramsbottom - A. I never recollect it.

Q. Whether the messenger delivered it into your hands at the office, there it came into your hands - A. It did.

GEORGE DOZELL . I am a clerk at Mr. Ridge's.

Q. Look at that bill of exchange, and see whether there is any number upon it your own writing - A. There is 8,724, and there is my signature on the back. There is my receipt on the back, received at the Bank.

Q. That is a subsequent transaction - A. Yes. I put the number upon it after it was paid. It was accepted, and afterwards paid at the Bank. I went and received it. Mr. Ridge has refunded back the seven hundred and seventy pounds. The prisoner got no money. It was to carry on the deception. It was replaced by some other bills to the amount of seven hundred and seventy pounds.

Q. Was that seven hundred and seventy pounds alledged to be improperly drawn - A. It was alledged to be improperly drawn, not by Mr. Daniel's authority, and was replaced by bills of Mr. Ridge's account; bills of a former year.

JOHN CHAMP . I am a clerk in Mr. Ridge's office.

Q. Be so good as cast your eye upon that bill of exchange - A. Yes.

Q. Is there any thing of your writing - A. Yes, 12th of September, 1812. That imports the day of acceptance.

Q. You accept by a printed stamp, a red stamp of the Bank of England - A. Yes.

Q. Whose writing is that - A. Mr. Ridge's hand writing; John Ridge .

GRIFFEN SWANSTON . Q. You are a clerk in the office of Mr. Litchfield - A. Yes.

Q. Did you serve any notice upon the prisoner to produce any papers - A. Yes; I served it yesterday upon the prisoner, John Langhorne .

(The notice read.)

Mr. Solicitor General, Q. to Mr. Daniel. Look at that letter, Mr. Daniel, it bears your name; is that letter written by you - A. It is not, any part of it, nor by my authority.

Q. Whose hand writing is it - A. It is the prisoner's.

Q. Part of it are observations in red ink; are they as the rest, the prisoner's hand writing - A. They are.

Q. Look at the introductory part; it supposes to be an answer to a letter; what date is it - A. The 17th instant.

Q. What is instant - A. July, 1812.

COURT. What is the date of that - A. 21st of July, 1812. It purports to be an answer to the 17th instant, and dated the 21st.

Mr. Solicitor General Had you, upon the 21st of July, seen or had any letter of the 17th refered to, by it - A. Certainly not.

Mr. Solicitor General. Now, I propose this being proved to be the hand-writing of the prisoner, and not by the authority of Mr. Daniel. I mean to give by Mr. Ridge's book the letter of the 17th. I do not mean that as a proof by itself; that letter came to the hand of the prisoner, it shows that the prisoner, by some means, was the principal that became acquainted with that letter. I therefore propose to give your lordship, by Mr. Ridge's book, that letter of the 21st.

Mr. Gurney. The original must be produced.

Mr. Solicitor General. Where is it. Captain Daniel said he received no such letter. This must be the prisoner's hand-writing, and this must have been in the posession of the prisoner. I gave him notice to produce it; he does not produce it. My learned friend says, I admit it. Supposing this letter came to the hands of Mr. Daniel, before I could go into the copy I must shew the original was destroyed or lost, that is enough. If Mr. Daniel say, I received a letter on the 17th, I have destroyed it or lost it, than the copy becomes evidence here. I do not want it in this case, because of that letter. The prisoner raises all the inference that I want I do not want to press that he opened that letter; it is enough that such a letter was known to the prisoner, and if it appears to the Court that the original is not produced, then I will read the prisoner's letter to Mr. Ridge, in the name of Daniel, 21st of July.

Q. Mr. Daniel. Look at this; this is a letter of the 15th of July; it is writen in Mr. Daniel's name. Is that the prisoner's writing - A. It is. It was not written by me, or by my authority.

(The letters read.)

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 29.

Second Middlesex jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

Reference Number: t18130113-44

172. JOHN HENRY GOODINGE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22nd of December , a chimney glass, value 5 l. and a carpet, value 3 l. the property of William Hervey .

WILLIAM HERVEY . Q. Did you find the prisoner in the house at the time you went there - A. No.

COURT. It seems to be not to any purpose to go through this case. The counsel cannot prove that the prisoner was present when the things were taken away.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18130113-45

173. SAMUEL TILHAM was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of September , two pieces of timber, value 5 s. the property of William John Jolly and Edward Banks .

GABRIEL PORTER . I am a watchman at the works of the Strand bridge . On the 17th of September, I was stationed there. I saw the prisoner come through the Savoy sutling-house. He came down the steps to the Strand bridge. This was about five o'clock in the evening. He took up two pieces of timber that were laying on the abutment. I followed him until he got near to the Savoy church-yard, going out into the Strand. I asked him, what he was going to do with it. He said, he was taking them for a use. I asked him, for what use. He then said, he did not know where he was going to take them to; he was going to make a trifle of money; he was short of money. These are the pieces of timber. He brought a man to take one of the pieces.

MR. BROWN. I am one of the agents superintending these works.

Q. Who are the persons to whom these logs, and the other property belongs to, of the Strand bridge - A. To William John Jolly and Edward Brooks . They are the proprietors of the Strand bridge .

Prisoner's Defence. I was going to take these pieces of timber to put up a cart that was broken down in the street. I asked a man in the public-house to help me to take it down to the cart. I meant to return these things again when I got the cart up.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined One Month in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

Reference Number: t18130113-46

173. WILLIAM OLDFIELD, alias YEOVILL , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of November , eight trusses of hay, value 24 s. the property of John Moodey .

JOHN MOODEY . I live at No. 4, Boar's Head-court, Fleet-street I am the proprietor of the Windsor and Reading coaches . The prisoner was my horse-keeper .

Q. Was Pugh also a horse-keeper - A. He was, during the year 1811.

Q. Did you miss any great quantity of hay and straw - A. I did not miss it particularly. I thought the consumption large. I should never have known that I was plundered, except from information. I went to the Maidenhead. I taxed Pugh with it. He owned it. I then went and consulted with Rivett and Dowset. I sent for the prisoner to come to London. As soon as he came I charged the officer with him. The prisoner then owned to selling eight trusses. Pugh, the accomplice, was present at the time. I never promised or threatened him. He owned every thing to me.

Q. Where was the hay kept - A. In the loft, over the horses, at Hounslow, in the parish of Isleworth.

OWEN DAVIS . I live at Hounslow; opposite of the prosecutor's stable.

Q. Do you remember, on the 1st of November, seeing Pugh and the prisoner together - A. On the 2nd, I do. I saw them taking away nine trusses of hay, and giving it over a wall to a man of the name of Young.

Q. Where did he take it to - A. Young took it into his stable.

Q. What time of day was it - A. About nine at night. It was not very dark. I could see him very plain.

Q. Where were you when you saw them - A. I was in another loft in the same yard. The stables are in a back lane.

THOMAS PUGH . I was a servant to Mr. Moodey in 1811. On the 2nd of November the prisoner let Mr. Witney have eight trusses of hay.

Q. Where is Witney - A. He has destroyed himself.

Q. What did you get for this hay - A. Sixteen shillings. I told Mr. Davis of it a twelvemonth ago. I did not tell my master.

Q. Whose hay was it - A. Mr. Moodey's.

Q. to prosecutor. Whereabouts was the value of hay at that time - A. I gave six pounds a load. They were worth about three shillings a truss. It was my property, and no one else.

Q. to Mr. Davis. Did Pugh tell you this a year ago - A. Yes. I did not mention it for this reason, the prisoner and the landlord came to me, and begged and prayed I would not say anything about it. They said they would take the property back again, and Witney said he would never be guilty of anything of the kind any more.

GUILTY, aged 36.

Judgement respited .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18130113-47

174. MARY ANN LLOYD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of September , a yard of lace, value 15 s. two pair of stockings, value 4 s. a decanter, value 2 s. a tablecloth, value 3 l. and a pencil-case, value 5 s. the property of George Deering .

ELIZABETH DEERING. My husband's name is George Deering ; we live in Upper Berkeley-street, Grosvenor-square .

Q. Did the prisoner live in your service any time - A. Yes; she came, I think, on the 31st of March, and continued with me six months.

Q. In the month of September had you occasion to search her box - A. Yes.

Q. Did you and Mr. Deering, and some of the servants, go into her room for that purpose - A. Yes. She was surprised at being suspected, and was very reluctant of opening any thing that belonged to her. Mr. Deering and I both insisted in her opening her drawers, and the first thing that we found was about half a yard of black lace. It is here. One of my children's stockings was found in another drawer, locked up, and another piece of lace was in the drawer. I then required to search her box. On the top of the box was a decanter inside. The box was locked, and when she came to her letters, she said this is my property; no one shall see them; they are my letters. She put all the things in the box again, and locked it up. I then insisted upon searching further. Under the letters I found a tablecloth, some pieces of dimity, and a pencil-case.

Mr. Knapp. This young woman was taken up to

Marlborough-street office - A. She was not taken up. She attended there to be discharged.

Q. I believe you consented to her discharge - A. We did.

Q. Am I to understand you that no sum of money was paid by the prisoner - A. I say there was, but it was not to make good the things that were stolen. When I hire a lady's maid , I tell her I give her charge of my wardrobe, that she is answerable to it.

Q. How much was there paid - A. Two ten-pound notes.

Q. That was upon her being discharged at Marlborough-street, was it not - A. No; when her wages was paid. I do not know when she took these things. We found them upon the 28th of September, 1812.

Q. When you discharged her, and when you took the money for the loss of the things in the inventory, I believe, after that she brought an action - A. An action was brought by her.

Q. And is now pending - A. It is.

Q. And now, having given up the charge in Marlborough-street, and the action now pending, you bring her here. You thought fit to take her up again, during an action that is pending upon you for false imprisonment - A. Yes.

Mr. Alley. Why did you forego the charge at first - A. Because Mr. Baker told Mr. Deering and me, that for that charge she must die, and when we came to town this copy of writ was taken out against us. We went before the same magistrate and had his advice, and pursued his advice; and Mr. Conant said it was for the good of society.

GEORGE DEERING . Q. Did you attend at the time the box was searched, and the drawers - A. I did. The prisoner shewed her box very reluctantly. I saw the lace and the stockings found. When she came to her letters she shut her box, and said no one should open them.

Q. What was the reason that you did not proceed when you went to Marlborough-street - A. Because the charge would affect her life, a young person like her, had come with a good character.

Mr. Adolphus. How long had she been in your service - A. About six months. She was lady's maid, and acting as housekeeper.

Q. Therefore when things were used in your house, it was her duty to see the safe custody of them - A. Exactly so.

Q. Did you ever think of charging her here until the action was brought - A. Certainly not.

Prisoner's Defence. May it please your lordship, gentlemen of the jury, the tablecloth was not used in common; it was used only when we had company. I had not put this tablecloth in its proper place. I put the tablecloth there for safety until I returned from Bath. I knew I should not have Mrs. Deering's keys to put it away before.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave her a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

COURT, to prisoner. I hope your appearance at the bar to-day, will be no disparagement to you. It will be high injustice if any one imputes any thing to you.

Second Middlesex jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

Reference Number: t18130113-48

175. WILLIAM HALE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of December , an ass, value 2 l. the property of Richard Parsons .

RICHARD PARSONS . I live at Tring, in Hertfordshire .

Q. Did you miss an ass in December last - A. Yes, the 18th.

Q. When had you seen it - A. I had seen it on the Friday. I missed it before seven, out of the stable.

Q. Have you seen it since - A. Yes, on the 4th of January. I saw it at Marlborough-street. I knew it to be my ass; there is a particular mark on it, on the off side, under the saddle, and on the off ear.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. Yes, he lived about a mile off me. I live in Easter-green, in Tring parish.

GEORGE WROMWELL . I am a dealer in animals. I live in Rupert-street, Piccadilly. On the 19th of December, about three in the afternoon, the prisoner brought me some pheasants to sell; they were in hampers. He had an ass with him. I bought twelve pheasants of him, and I paid him for them. On the 31st, I saw him again; he had some pheasants with him. They were in hampers, upon an ass. He said he was come before his time.

Q. When had you seen him before - A. On the 19th. He then said, he should see me that day fortnight.

Q. Did you ask him where he came from - A. Yes; he said he came from Chesham Bottom. When he said he had come before his time, I told him, it did not make any difference about that; I was quite prepared for him. We went into a two pair of stairs room. I made an excuse to go down stairs to get a wire to fastern the window, to prevent the birds from flying away; instead of getting the wire to fasten the window, I went to get a person to keep the prisoner in conversation, while I sent a person to Marlborough-street office, as I had a suspicion the pheasants were stolen. The officer came and I gave the prisoner in charge.

Q. To whose custody was the ass delivered - A. To Bennet the officer.

GEORGE BENNET . I am an officer of Marlborough-street. I took the prisoner into custody. He had an ass with him, the ass was delivered into my charge. The ass was claimed by Parsons. The ass that I took from the prisoner, is the ass that Parsons saw and claimed.

Q. to Parsons. Do you know Chesham Bottom - A. Yes, very well.

Q. How far is that from where the prisoner lived - A. About five miles.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought the ass at Uxbridge. You have taken me at non plus; my friends will not be here till Monday.

GUILTY, aged 23.

Judgment respited .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18130113-49

176. JAMES LAWRENCE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of January , two books,

value 7 s. the property of Francis Clark , privately in his shop .

FRANCIS CLARK . I live at 33, Piccadilly . I am a bookseller .

Q. Did you loose any books on the 7st of January - A. On the 7th of January, Mr. Sampson, a bookseller, in Oxford-street, came to me, and asked me if I had Lord Littleton's and Grays poetical works. I told him I had. I went to the shelf where they should have been placed, I found they were missing. I then told Mr. Sampson, I thought they were missing. Mr. Sampson took them out of his pocket; he said, he had just bought them of a man who had offered them for sale, and he had given eight shillings for them; that the man was to come again in half an hour to sell him some French books; and towards the evening. Mr. Sampson's boy came and said they had detained the prisoner. I went to Mr. Sampson's shop, and challenged the prisoner as being the person who had been in my shop. The last time he was in my shop was on Thursday week. He came into the shop at the time I was engaged. He asked for two sets of Cowper's poems, the small edition. I told him, I had not got the small edition, but I could get them. He walked backwards and forwards in the shop, and said he would call again. He called no more. I did not see him after that, until I saw him in Oxford-street; I then accompanied him down to Marlborough-street office. He waited by me, and ran into the street. I followed him, and overtook him at a considerable distance, and brought him back.

Mr. Arabin. Who was in your shop when the prisoner came in - A. Three elderly women and some young ladies, and the maid servant.

MR. SAMPSON. When the prisoner came in my shop I was shewing some pocket-books to a lady. The prisoner asked me whether I purchased books. I said, I did. He produced Gray's and Lord Littleton's poetical works. He asked twelve shillings for them. I bid him eight. He refused it; at last, he took it. He then asked me if I bought foreign books. I said, I did. He said, he had purchased some at the Auction Mart; he did not read foreign languages; if I bought them, and would be at home in an hour and an half, he would bring them to me. After he was gone I examined the books that I had purchased. On the first leaf of Littleton's works was, plates, fourteen shillings. I recognised the writing to be Mr. Clark's, of Piccadilly. I went down to Mr. Clark. The officer has the two books. The prisoner came again to my shop on the Saturday evening, and Mr. Clark was sent for.

GEORGE PAYNE . I am an officer. I was in Mr. Sampson's shop when the prisoner came. Mr. Sampson's boy asked him if he was the person that sold Mr. Sampson some books in the early part of the week. The prisoner said, he had. The boy went to fetch Mr. Clark. Mr. Clark came, and the prisoner was taken to Marlborough-street office. The books were given into my custody. These are them.

Prosecutor. They are my books.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought them two books of two men, who were at the Auction Mart, in Cheapside. I gave five shillings for them.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

Reference Number: t18130113-50

177. JOHN BENNET was indicted, for that he, on the 4th of December , about the hour of one in the night, being in the dwelling-house of Thomas Turner , feloniously did steal a watch. value 5 l. the property of Thomas Turner ; a shirt, value 7 s. the property John Turner ; and two pair of stockings, the property of William Earl ; and that he, about the same hour, in the night of the same day burglariously did break to get out of the same .

THOMAS TURNER . I am a labourer . I live at Stanwell, in Middlesex .

Q. Did you at any time, last month, lose any property out of your house - A. Yes, a new watch. On Sunday morning, the 5th of December. I am not certain whether it was done night, or on Sunday morning. I lost the watch from my sleeping chamber; it hung up at my bed's head. I hung it there when I went to bed, and two other young men lost property at the same time. I have not seen my watch since. The prisoner slept in the same room with me, and another young man. The watch cost me five pounds; I had not had it long.

Q. Were you alarmed in the night or not - A. No. When we awaked in the morning we found the prisoner gone, and my doors undone.

Q. How long had the prisoner lodged with you - A. About a month. He had not said any thing about his going away.

Q. When did you see the prisoner again - A. At the end of a fortnight. I saw the said Bennet coming towards my own door. I spoke to my lodger. My lodger spoke to him, and he ran away. We pursued him. I took him myself near Cranford-bridge, towards London. That is about six miles from my house. When I overtook him. He was walking very fast. I charged him with taking the things. He denied it at first. I charged the constable with him. He then confessed that he had pawned the watch in the Borough for thirty shillings. He said, he had lost the duplicate.

WILLIAM EARL . I slept with Thomas Turner . On the night of the 4th of December, I went to bed the same time that he did, and Bennet also. I awoke in the morning between six and seven; it was getting light then. I found the door unlocked and unbolted.

Q. What did you miss - A. Four shillings and six pence in money, and two pair of stockings. I gave six shillings for the two pair of stockings.

JOHN TURNER . Q. Had you a shirt at Thomas Turner 's - A. Yes. I am a cousen to Thomas Turner . I left it there for my aunt to wash. I gave seven shillings for the shirt I had never worn it. I saw my shirt on the prisoner's back, when he was examined before the magistrate.

EDWARD COX . I am an officer. I took the prisoner before the magistrate. He told me he had pawned the watch in the Borough. I went to Mr. Wilson, No. 9, in the Borough. I saw the duplicate. It was pawned on the 8th, and taken out on the 9th. The prisoner said he lost the duplicate.

Mr. Wilson said, no, he had sold it. He owned to taking the shirt. He had the shirt, and one pair of stockings on. The other pair of stockings he said he had left for a loaf.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing at all about it.

GUILTY, aged 40.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only, not of burglariously breaking to get out of the house .

Confined Two Years in the House of Correction , and whipped in jail .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey

Reference Number: t18130113-51

178. JAMES JENKINS was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Joseph Aquilar , esq . about the hour of nine, in the night on the 22nd of December , and burglariously stealing therein, three pair of blankets, value 50 s. his property .

SECOND COUNT, for like stealing in the said dwelling-house, and that he afterwards burglariously did break to get out of the same,

JOSEPH AQUILAR, ESQ. I live at 22, Baker-street. The robbery was not committed in that house. The robbery was committed in Grafton-street, Fitszroy-square . I know nothing of the transaction. The furniture at the house in Grafton-street was furnished by my order. We never occupied that house at all.

THOMAS - . I am servant to Mr. Aquilar.

Q. I understand he had taken a house in Grafton-street, and some part of the furniture had been sent in: did you reside there - A. I did.

Q. What servant are you - A. I am a footman.

Q. You slept there, did you - A. I did. On the 22nd of December, between the hours of eight and nine at night, I was coming from Baker-street, to Grafton-street house. Our house being a corner house, I observed a man leaning over a post. I did not like the looks of him. I had a little boy along with me, between ten and eleven years old. I said, Thomas, come along with me. I went by the house, took the little boy along with me, and went to the bottom of the street, and came back on the opposite side; and when I came opposite of the house I saw the street door open, and a man came out with the six blankets. I ran after him immediately, and catched the prisoner, and took the blankets from under his arm. The other man ran away. I had a little bit of a tustle with the prisoner. He ran away. The watchman took him to the watchhouse. I took the blankets from him. They were in a bag under his arm. The bag was searched at the watchhouse; it contained six blankets, and the prisoner had some matches in his pocket, and some twenty-penny notes, and one-penny notes. I left him in the care of the watchman, and the blankets also. They are here. They are quite new. I left the house in the morning, between six and seven. I fastened the house when I left it.

WILLIAM WALLIS . I am a watchman. On the 22nd of December last, I happened to be in Harford-street, crying the hour of nine o'clock; I heard the cry of, stop thief. I saw the prisoner run. I immediately laid hold of him. I kept hold of him until the last witness came up with the bag. He said, that was the man that I had secured. I took him to the watchhouse, and gave him to the watchhouse keeper. The watchhouse keeper examined the bag before me. I saw six new blankets counted out of the bag.

HENRY HOWARD . I am the watchhouse' keeper. The prisoner was brought in to me, and the bag. I examined the bag, and found six blankets.

Q. Are you a judge of blankets - A. Not particularly. I should not refuse to give three pounds ten shillings for them.

Prisoner's Defence. I am quite innocent.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 38.

[ The prosecutor recommended the prisoner to mercy on account of his good character .]

Second Middlesex jury, before the Lord Chief Baron

Reference Number: t18130113-52

179. ROBERT RANSOM was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of January , a pewter pint pot, value 2 s. and a pewter pint pot, value 1 s. the property of James M'Milian .

JAMES M'MILLAN . I am a publican in St. Martin's-lane. I live at the sign of the Coach and Horses.

BENJAMIN JOHNSON . I am a city constable. On the 5th of January, about nine o'clock in the morning, I was passing in the Strand; I saw the prisoner, Robert Ransom , go down Adam-street, Adelphi. Knowing the prisoner to be a reputed thief, I followed him. I watched him, and saw him go into different passages in Craven-street, in the Strand. I watched him into Northumberland-court. I saw the prisoner take a quart pot and a pint pot, from the door of No. 3, (Mr. Jones's), Northumberland-court . They were outside the door. He put the quart and pint pot under his coat. He came down the court, crossed over to St. Martin's-lane, went up Exchecquer-court. He took the quart and pint pot, and put it into a bag. Then I stopped him. I asked him what he had got. He kicked my shin, and ran off into the Strand. I cried out, stop thief. He was knocked down by a guard, and stopped. I examined the bag, and took the prisoner in Bow-street. These are the pots.

Q. to Prosecutor. Does Mr. Jones, in Northumberland-court, have beer of your - A. He does, and the pots are mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I acknowledge my fault in this instance. I should take it a favour to be sent to sea.

GUILTY , aged 29.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130113-53

180. FRANCIS PEACOCK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of January , a bucket, value 2 s. four pieces of pork, value 3 s. and a frying pan, value 1 s. the property of Robert Stanhope ; two jackets, value 2 s. two pair of trowsers, value 4 s. four shirts, value 6 s. one waistcoat, value 1 s. the property of Henry Hann ; a jacket, value 4 s. and one pair of trowsers, value 4 s. the property of Alexander Magneson .

ROBERT STANHOPE . I am the master of the ship Commerce , a trading vessel . She was lying at Stone-stairs. I lost the pork, the pail, and the frying-pan. They belonged to the ship. The jackets and trowsers belonged to the boy s.

WILLIAM STRONG . I am a Thames police officer.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. On Monday, the 4th of December, before day light. I was keeping watch on the river; I saw a boat coming from towards the tier in Shadwell dock, about four tiers from where the Commerce laid. I rowed after that boat. I saw the prisoner in that boat when I over-took it. The first thing I saw in the boat was a bucket, and four pieces of pork in it. There was nobody in the boat but the prisoner. I asked him how he came by that pork at that time in the morning. He said he was a Greenland man, and he was going to carry it on shore to a poor person where he lodged. He said, he took it from the ship William. He pointed and said, there she lies, off there. He pointed to the tier where I first saw the boat.

Q. Was he on the Middlesex side when you first laid of hold him - A. Yes. After that, I saw two bundles of clothes in the boat. I then said, whose are these. He said, one is mine, and the other belongs to a lad that was going to make his escape from the vessel that day. I knew it could not be legal for them things to come on shore to a poor person, where he said he lodged. I lodged the prisoner in the office. Then, after that, I went over to the tier where he said the ship, named William, laid. I could not find any ship of that name laying in the tier. There was no vessel at that time of that name laying in the tier. I went further down, and then I learned that the ship Commerce had something stolen from it. The goods were afterwards claimed by Mr. Stanhope. This is the frying-pan, the bucket, and the pork.

Prosecutor. The bucket, the frying-pan, and the pork, belongs to the ship; they were under my charge as master. The two boys are here that belong to the clothes.

HENRY HANN . Q. Were you one of the crew of the Commerce - A. Yes. I lost two jackets, two pair of trowsers, and four shirts. These are mine.

ALEXANDER MAGNISON . I am one of the crew of the Commerce. I lost a jacket and a pair of trowsers; they were worth eight shillings. They were taken from the ship. About half past one in the morning, I was awoke by hearing some persons foot on board. I asked who it was. He told me, he came to enquire for George Wood, belonging to the True Free Briton.

Q. Did you see that person - A. I did. It was dark; I could not discover his countenance.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not commit the fact myself. I was employed by one George Wood . Wood and me took a boat, and went on board a ship. Wood gave me the things charged in the indictment, and when the officer came on board the boat, Wood knowing what he had done, left the boat, and the officer took me.

GUILTY , aged 31.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130113-54

181. JANE CRICKWELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of December , two sheets, value 10 s. and a waistcoat, value 5 s. the property of Samuel Bitmead .

MARY BITMEAD . My husband's name is Samuel Bitmead ; he is a bricklayer . These sheets were hanging up in the passage, below stairs, in the area, under ground.

Q. Did the prisoner lodge there - A. No; she is a washerwoman. She had washed these sheets the day before.

Q. She had washed for you had she - A. Yes, and the day before that she had washed for a lodger of mine. She came to me the day after, and in the course of that evening the sheets were taken away.

Q. Why do you accuse her of taking them away - A. I found them in her premises. I went to her apartment, and found them there. These are the sheets: I found them in the prisoner's lodgings. They are mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of the sheets.

GUILTY , aged 48.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130113-55

182. THOMAS DARTNELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 31st of December , five paving stones, value 10 s. the property of the Commissioners for paving of Wapping-street .

And OTHER COUNTS, for like offence, the property of different persons.

COURT. There is no evidence.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18130113-56

183. THOMAS CLAYTON was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Esther Bullwinkle , about the hour of seven, on the night of the 11th of December , and burglariously stealing therein, a cheese, value 7 s. the property of Esther Bullwinkle , widow .

NICHOLAS BULLWINKLE . My mother's name is Esther Bullwinkle ; she is a widow; she lives in the parish of St. Mary, M'Fellon, Whitechapel . On the 11th of December, Mr. Reed brought the prisoner in with the cheese.

Q. You did not see it taken yourself - A. No; it was taken from the front of the window.

Q. Does your mother keep a cheesemonger's shop - A. Yes. I examined the window after Mr. Reed brought the prisoner back. I found the casement open.

Q. What was the fastenings of the casement - A. Only a catch.

Q. Had you examined the catch of the casement that day - A. I thought it was shut. There was an handle outside; they could open it. This is the cheese that Mr. Reed gave me. I then looked in the window, and saw that such a cheese as that was gone.

THOMAS REED . I am a broker. On the 11th of December, I happened to be coming by Mrs. Bullwinkle's shop, about seven in the evening; I saw the prisoner and another boy lurking about the shop window of Mrs. Bullwinkle. I saw the other boy

put the prisoner up to the square of glass that is made to open in Mrs. Bullwinkle's window. This square of glass was made to open and shut. In consequence of that some person came down and moved them. I was on the opposite side of the way. They were alarmed, and went away, and when they came back again the other boy opened the window, and took the cheese out, and gave it to the prisoner. I seized the prisoner, and took the cheese. The other boy ran away. I took the cheese into Mrs. Bullwinkle's shop, and delivered it to her son.

JOHN HALLETT . I am an officer. I produce the cheese. It was delivered to me by Mrs. Bullwinkle's son.

Mr. Reed. That is the same cheese.

Nicholas Bullwinkle . The cheese is my mother's property.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence.

GUILTY, aged 10.

Of stealing but not of breaking and entering.

Judgment respited .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18130113-57

184. MARY BRIANT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of December , a watch, value 40 s. the property of Andrew Morison , in his dwelling-house .

ANDREW MORISON . I live in Aldgate, Lower Precinct . On the 30th of December, I was ill a-bed. It was between eleven and twelve in the day that the prisoner took the watch away, The prisoner had worked with me about a fortnight before she took the watch off the mantle-piece. She ran out of the door instantly with it. I being in bed, called to my mother. I told her that Mary Briant had gone off with my watch. My wife came in, and as soon as she came in I sent them both in quest of her. They returned; they could not find her. I went myself in quest of her. I saw the prisoner in the Minories; I took her in custody. That was about half after two o'clock.

Q. Have you seen your watch again - A. Yes, at Mr. Baxter's, in Snow-hill.

ABEL GARNHAM . I am a servant to Mr. Baxter, pawnbroker. This is the watch I took in pledge of the prisoner.

Q. What is the value of the watch - A. About thirty-six shillings.

Prosecutor. That is my watch.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence; called two witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY, aged 49,

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

Reference Number: t18130113-58

185. JOHN CHAMPION was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of December , sixteen yards of Brussels carpet, value 5 l. the property of Samuel Keen and John Darley , in their dwelling-house .

JOHN DARLEY . I am in partner ship with Samuel Keen. We live at No. 5, Upper Marybone-street, in the parish of St. Mary-le-bone . We both live in the same house, and carry on our business there.

Q. Did you lose anything out of your dwelling-house - A. Yes, at near eleven o'clock in the morning, on the 9th of December, we lost about sixteen yards of Brussels carpetting.

Q. Were you at home at the time - A. Yes. I did not see it taken.

Q. How soon afterwards was it brought back - A. In about five minutes time. I cannot say who brought it back.

Q. Was anybody bought back with it - A. Yes. Ann Keen.

Q. Is the person here that brought it back - A. No. I do not think he is.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. Yes.

Q. Had he anything to do about your shop - A. No.

Q. Did you know him before - A. No.

Q. Have you any other partners - A. No.

AGNES CORNWALL . I was sewing in Mr. Keen's back parlour. I was in the employ of Keen and Darley. I work for them. I saw the prisoner in the shop. Mrs. Keen was sitting sewing by the the side of me in the back parlour. The prisoner took the piece of carpetting and went out of door with it. I called to Mrs. Keen. She ran after the prisoner as far as Ogle-street.

Q. Did you pursue the prisoner - A. No. I staid in the shop.

Q. Was the prisoner brought back - A. Yes, and the carpet was brought back.

Q. And the prisoner with it - A. No.

Q. Did you know the prisoner before - A. No. I never saw him before. The same day I saw the prisoner in the watchhouse about one o'clock.

Q. While the prisoner was in the shop had you such an opportunity of taking notice of him, so as to say that the person you saw in the watchhouse was the same person - A. Yes.

Q. How long was he in the shop - A. He was not two minutes in the shop.

Mr. Knapp. Is the shop a pretty large shop - A. It is.

Q. Is the shop as large as from the bench to the prisoner - A. I suppose it is.

Q. You were in the back parlour - A. Yes, and the carpet was in the middle of the shop.

Q. You had not the opportunity of seeing him more than two minutes - A. I do not think it was less than that. He came into the shop, and took the carpet from among the rest.

Q. That was all the opportunity you had of seeing him - A. Yes.

COURT. Did he pass by the room in which you were sitting - A. No. The window where I was sitting sewing looked straight to the shop door.

ANN KEEN . Q. Where you at home on the 9th of December - A. Yes.

Q. Do you recollect any body coming in - A. No. Mrs. Cornwall gave me an alarm. I ran after the person immediately.

Q. Had you seen the person before Mrs. Cornwall gave you the alarm - A. No. I pursued him to Ogle-street. I overtook him. When I got close to him

he dropped the carpet. I stood by it while some person picked it up, and brought it home for me. The prisoner run on. The prisoner got away from me. I only saw the side of the face of the person that I pursued, which was like the prisoner.

Q. How soon did you see him again - A. I saw him again at Marlborough-street the same day, about an hour afterwards.

Q. Was the prisoner, when you saw him in Marlborough-street, dressed as the person that you pursued out of the shop - A. Yes.

Q. Did you say anything to him at Marlborough-street - A. No.

Q. Was the carpet carried back to your shop - A. Yes, it was put down in the shop.

Q. Was John Darley there - A. He was about the door. I do not know exactly where he was.

JOHN HARRIS . I am a shoemaker. On the 9th of December, I was going along Ogle-street. I met the prisoner, and all of a sudden there was a cry of stop thief. He had got a carpet on his shoulder. He threw the carpet off his shoulder, and ran away as hard as ever he could. I pursued him, and never lost sight of him until he was taken into custody.

THOMAS HATCHETT . I am a bedstead-maker. I was at work in Messrs. Darley and Keen's yard. I heard somebody run along the shop. I thought there was something amiss. I immediately went out of the yard into the street. I saw Mrs. Keen stand with the carpet. I then pursued the prisoner into Union-street. The prisoner stopped there against a public-house.

Q. When you saw Mrs. Keen stand by the carpet was the prisoner in sight or not - A. No.

Q. Was it in pursuance of what Mrs. Keen told you that you went towards Union-street - A. Yes.

Q. When you got into Union-street where did you find the prisoner - A. He was standing against a public-house window.

Q. Was he at large - A. There were about a dozen people about him. When I got up I asked which was the man that was stopped. They pointed to him as the person that had been stopped.

Q. Was John Harris the person that had stopped him - A. I cannot say. I went and took hold of the prisoner directly. I never let him go out of my hands until he was in Marybone watchhouse.

Q. to Harris. Where was it he was taken - A. Against a public-house in Union-street.

ROBERT FLOWERDEAU . I am an officer. The carpet was brought to the watchhouse by Thomas Hatchet .

Hatchet. I fetched the carpet from my master's shop, and delivered it at the watchhouse.

Q. to Mrs. Keen. Do you remember Hatchet carrying the carpet - A. Yes. That is the same that was brought back.

Q. to John Darley . Is that your carpetting - A. Yes. This is the piece I cut out.

Q. What is the value of it - A. Five shillings per yard. We gave seven shillings a yard for it. There is sixteen yards of it.

Q. to Mrs. Keen. You saw it brought back. You told me that the carpet that Hatchet had was the same that was brought back - A. Yes.

Q. Suppose you had seen the carpet any where else, should you have been able to swear to it - A. No, I do not know that I could. When the carpet was brought back it was set down in the shop. Hatchet took it away.

Q. to Darley. Have you any shop mark to it - A. No, there is none.

Q. Will you venture to swear that you had not sold any of it before - A. No, not before that twelve yards that I cut off. That, with this, makes a whole piece. I sold none before that.

Prisoner's Defence. I was passing by that gentleman's shop, a young man came out of the shop. He asked me which way I was going. I said, to Oxford-road. He said, if I would take the piece of carpeting, he would give me a shilling. I carried it as far as Ogle-street. I heard the cry of, stop thief. I turned round, and the young man that gave it me ran away.

Q. to Hatchet. When you took hold of him did he say anybody gave it him - A. No. I asked him, why he should do such thing as this. He said, he did it through distress.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 17.

[ The prisoner was recommended to mercy by the Jury on account of his good character .]

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18130113-59

186. JOHN SPICER , SARAH SPICER , JOHN BUTLER , FRANCES BUTLER , and JOHN PAMPHLET , were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of the Rev . John Ousby , clerk, about the hour of one, on the night of the 30th of December , burglariously stealing therein ten sheets, value 4 l. three tablecloths, value 1 l. two shifts, value 10 s. two neckcloths, value 2 s. six pin-cloths, value 6 s. fourteen cloths, value 2 s. 6 d. a pair of trowsers, value 1 s. a pair of pillow cases, value 3 s. a pair of stockings, value 1 s. his property .

REV. JOHN OUSBY . I am a clergyman. I live at 15, Slone-terrace, in the parish of St. Luke, Chelsea . On the morning of the 31st of December, my woman servant informed me that the things were taken out of the washhouse. I desired my wife to take an inventory of the things that she supposed were taken away. I went down to examine the place. I found the window had been actually opened. It appeared it had been forced, by marks on the under side of the window itself. After day light. I saw the marks of feet in the garden; many feet marks at the end of the wall, between Mr. Lane's and my garden. I observed there the marks of feet. I saw the marks of another kind over in a nursery garden. I observed there the marks of feet. These marks I traced them to King's-road.

Q. Did you observe any marks of any feet in the washhouse - A. No. That is all I know.

Q. Who is the maid servant that came and alarmed you - A. Elizabeth Williamson . I was up in my study. I had been up about an hour. It was about six o'clock in the morning.

Mr. Knapp. Did you go out at the time that you were alarmed - A. Yes. At the time my servant mentioned it, it was very dark.

Q. It was the washhouse window, was it not - A. Yes.

Q. The washhouse adjoins the house, does it - A. At the side of the house.

Q. Is there any communication from the house to the washhouse - A. None. We are obliged to go out of the house to get into the washhouse.

COURT. Is the whole enclosed by a wall, the washhouse in the yard - A. Yes. There is a brook on one side. There is a wall between my garden, and Mr. Lane's garden. The brook forms a fence; it is between my premises and Mr. Allen's premises.

ELIZABETH WILLIAMSON . I am a servant of Mr. Ousby's, When I got up in the morning I found the things gone.

Q. What time did you get up in the morning - A. A little after five. It was between five and six that I went into the washhouse. As soon as I went into the washhouse I found the greatest part of the things gone.

Q. What were the things that you misssed - A. A great parcel of wet linen; tablecloths, gowns, shifts, and a great many sheets lost; I cannot tell how many; handkerchiefs, neckcloths, several cloths, a pair of trowsers, and pillow-cases.

Q. Was it your business to fastern the laundry window on the over night - A. Yes. I fastened the door on the over night, about twelve o'clock. The window was shut close. I did not examine it. I was the last person up.

Q. Were there any fastenings to the window - A. Yes, a small bolt. I did not shut that bolt. I am quite sure the window was shut down.

MARY OUSBY . I can speak to the linen that is found being mine.

ROBERT PAAS . I am a constable of Queen-square office. On Friday evening, the 1st of January, I was sent for to a pawnbroker's. Sarah Spicer was detained there until I came, with a pair of sheets and a tablecloth. I saw the sheets and tablecloth. On my examining the sheets, I found the traces of I. M. O. The thread had been taken out, but there were the marks left.

Q. Was there any marks upon the tablecloth - A. No, there was not. Mrs. Ousby has sworn to it. I then took Sarah Spicer in custody, and I brought the sheets away. I told my brother officers of it, Bly and Lavander. We conducted the woman to Chelsea, to where she lived, to her husband, John Spicer . We secured them, and on searching the premises we found a quantity of wet linen, marked corresponding to this hand bill. I found two shirts, marked I, with blue thread. We lodged them in Tothill-fields bridewell. In the morning me and Bly went down to Tothill-fields bridewell again. In searching, I found another cloth, marked with O, belonging to Mrs. Ousby. We afterwards went to the premises that had been robbed, and under the frame of the washhouse window it appeared that some sharp instrument had been used. There were several notches in the under part of the frame of the window. The notches appeared to be cut clean, as if by a sharp instrument. Mr. Ousby said he found this hatchet in the brook. I took the hatchet to Butler's house, and Butler's son said it was his father's hatchet.

Mr. Knapp. Was the father present - A. No, he was in custody then. On Saturday, the 2nd, I searched the premises of Butler. I found some odd stockings, which is the property of Mrs. Lane.

Q. You took up this woman first - A. I did.

Q. You found at the lodgings of Spicer that he was her husband - A. She said so.

Q. You have no reason to doubt it have you - A. By no means.

JANES GILLMORE . On Friday the 1st of January, I accompined my brother officer the last witness, to Spicer's house, and just behind the chair where Spicer was sitting, I observed a quantity of linen.

Q. Was it wet or dry - A. It was in a damp state; some of it quite wet, others not so. While the rest of my brother officers were searching the house, Spicer came in. We secured them. I saw my brother officer find a cloth in the hat of Butler, and while we were continuing to search the house of Spicer, the wife, Frances, made her escape out of the room.

Q. What lane do they live in - A. The adjoining street, No. 7. Me and the others pursued her, and we met her as she was coming out of the door, No. 7, with a bundle under her arm. We secured her, and also the bundle. We took her up stairs into the room that she lodged in; there I found some towels and some knife cloths, and from some enquiries we had some reason to suspect Pamphlet, and on Sunday morning we apprehended him. In searching his lodgings a handkerchief was found by my brother officer, Paas.

Q. In Pamphlet's house did you find anything but the handkerchief - A. No.

JAMES BLY . I am an officer. On Friday evening, the 1st of January, I went with the other officers. We secured the prisoners. I searched the lodgings of Spicer, after the other officers had taken away the principal part. I looked among the fragments. I found some things which have since been sworn to, in the house of Spicer, and two trifling things in the house of Butler, which have been given up to the servants.

- LAVENDAR. I accompanied my brother officers to Spicer's house at Chelsea, and found a number of things I produce now. In the mean time, Butler's wife had got away. Gillmore and I went in pursuit of her. We met her coming out of her house with a bundle in her hand, which I observed Gillmore took possession of. That is here. We accompanied her to her apartment in the upper story. I found some trifling things there belonging to Mr. Ousby, which are now present.

ROBERT LEWIS . Q. Whose servant are you - A. Mr. Nelson's. On the 1st of January, Sarah Spicer offered me two sheets and a tablecloth to pledge. We had the hand bill in our shop. I looked at the bill. The marks on the sheets were the same as on the hand bill. I stopped the sheets and the woman. We took her into our back parlour until I fetched a constable. When Paas came into our parlour he compared the sheets with the hand bill. He saw they were right.

Q. so prosecutor. Have you examined these things - A. Yes. This sheet is mine; the mark I. M. O.;

there are the traces of it. This pocket handkerchief is marked I. M. O. and a child's shift is also marked. This tea-cloth is marked, and No. 12, it is my mark; a napkin is mine, a pillow case marked I. M. O.

Paas. These were all found in Spicer's house, hanging up wet in the pigsty.

Prosecutrix. A tea-cloth, a pair of stockings, marked O.

Paas. This pocket handkerchief I found in Pamphlet's lodgings.

Prosecutrix. That is my little boy's.

Gillmore. This bundle was found at Spicer's.

Prosecutrix. A boy's shirt, without a mark; it is my boy's shirt.

Gillmore. These were directly at Spicer's back, where he was sitting in the chair.

Prosecutrix. That is my sheet; it is marked I. M. O. 10; a towel, I. M. O. A sheet, the mark nearly cut out.

Gillmore. This parcel is what Frances Butler had in her hand when I stopped her.

Prosecutrix. A brown pin-cloth and a shirt, with the marks picked out. Two tea-cloths, marked T, No. 12. This is a sheet; the traces of I. M. O. remain. Two coarse cloths, a knife-cloth; and a round to mine.

Bly. These were found at Spicer's.

Prosecutrix. neckcloth, a towel, and a pair of trowsers, they are mine.

Q. When had you seen these things - A. About the middle of the day. I saw them in the wash-house on the 30th.

Q. to Elizabeth Williamson . Were these things in the washhouse between eleven and twelve, when you were there - A. Yes, they were, and in the tub, quite wet.

Q. to prosecutrix. What is the value of these things - A. I do not know. I have no idea of the value of them.

Mr. Knapp. Gillmore has been a pawnbroker, he can tell the value of them.

Q. to Gillmore. What is the value of these things altogether - A. I suppose they are worth between three and four pounds.

Q. Are you confident that they are worth more than forty shillings - A. Yes.

John Spicer 's Defence. These things that were found in my possession. On Thursday morning, about half past six o'clock, I was going to Covent Garden market to buy some greens and potatoes, for my wife to sell. On my going up by the Five Fields, I saw by the side of the bank, a bundle. I went to it, and picked it up. I took it home to my wife. She said, what have you got there. I said, a bundle. This was about half past six o'clock, on Thursday morning. I left it at home until I came back from market. We took the things out of the bundle; it was very dirty. My wife's sister took some of it home to wash. My wife had not time to do it being busy in her shop. These things were hanging up in the out-house which the officer called the pigsty; it is an out-house, which any body can see what is in it, passing along the road; and these things, which my wife took to pledge, thinking they were her own, as I picked it up on the highway. She thought it was her own, as I had told her that I picked it upon the highway.

John Butler's Defence. I work at the new Strand bridge. On Thursday morning, my brother called on me to go to Covent Garden, to bring home greens and potatoes. I was behind. He went forward. He said he picked up a bundle. He took it home to his own house. That is all I know about it.

Pamphlet's Defence. I have got witnesses to say where I was at the time of the robbery.

Sarah Spicer and Frances Butler were not put on their defence.

WILLIAM PAMPHLET . I am the father of John Pamphlet . For two months past my son comes home, and goes to bed every night, at nine o'clock at night.

JOHN SPICER , GUILTY - DEATH , aged 34.

SARAH SPICER , NOT GUILTY .

JOHN BUTLER, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 28.

FRANCES BUTLER, NOT GUILTY .

JOHN PAMPHLET , NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

Reference Number: t18130113-60

187. THOMAS TURNER , JOHN SILVESTER , WILLIAM ALLEN , and ELIZABETH FOX , were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of David Manning , about the hour of four in the night of the 29th of November , and stealing therein thirteen gallons of rum, value 10 l. eight gallons of brandy, value 8 l. a cheese, value 10 s. and six bottles of wine, value 1 l. 4 s. the property of Charles May .

SECOND COUNT, for like offence, only stating the dwelling-house to be the dwelling-house of Charles May .

CHARLES MAY . Q. Have you the charge of the Peacock public-house, Grays-inn-lane - A. I have. I am a servant to Mr. Manning, and I am answerable for all the property that comes to that house.

Q. What is Mr. Manning's name - A. David. The house is in the parish of St. Andrew's, Holborn. On Sunday night, the 29th of November, Allen and Turner came into the house, and two women with them. They called for a quartern and a half of gin. They did not set down at all; they staid a quarter of an hour. Allen went out of the house, and Elizabeth Fox and John Silvester came in, and Allen likewise; they appeared to be well acquainted with each other. They remained in my house half an hour altogether. They were looking about, and going in and out, quite in a remarkable manner. They left the house about five minutes before eleven o'clock. I began to shut up my house. The last two shutters that I put up Allen came out of Charlotte-street. My house is at the corner. At five o'clock in the morning the patrol called me up, and told me that the cellar flap was broken up. I came down stairs. It was dark. I found my cellar flap broken open. It had been secured by two bolts. It is a heavy flap; it is as much as two brewers servants can raise up. Considerable force had been applied to get it open. I lost thirteen gallons of rum, ten pounds value; four gallons of brandy worth six pounds; and four gallons of brandy was moved from one part of the cellar to the other.

Q. Then all the things that they intended to be taken was not gone - A. No. There were six bottles of wine taken away, that is worth one pound one shilling.

Q. In what manner was Turner dressed the night before - A. In a white coarseish apron, a frock-coat, with pockets at the sides. Allen was dressed with a crape hatband round his hat. Silvester had got an ash coloured stick with him.

Q. Did you go to Elizabeth Fox that morning to learn who the men were that she was in company - A. Yes. I asked her if she could give me any information of the parties that she was with in my house, last night. She said, no, she did not know them.

ELIZABETH MAY . Q. Do you remember seeing the prisoners at your house the night before it was robbed - A. Yes, they were half an hour in the house. They conversed together like persons well acquainted.

SAMUEL CAGER . I am a patrol. About five o'clock, on the morning of the 30th of November, I was in Grays-inn-lane; when I came near the house of Mr. May. I passed the cellar flap, a quarter before five; the flap then appeared to be safe; I walked over it. In about a quarter of an hour, I passed by again; I perceived a man holding the flap up. He was standing holding the flap up. That was the prisoner, Turner. He had on a loose blue coat. hanging open, with metal shining buttons, and pockets outside, a white apron on, hanging down. There was a lamp directly over his head, that gave me light to see him. It was a lamp with two burners. There was another person with him; the other person was down upon his hands and knees, appearing to me to be coming out of the cellar. He had a fustian jacket and trowsers, and a black hatband on his hat. On my coming so near them, they seemed to be very busy at the time. I took it to be the landlord of the house at first. On my proceeding near to them, they dropped the flap, and I heard something rattle, which I supposed to be a bottle of wine. They immediately run away very fast. I then endeavoursd to pursue them. On my stepping over the flap, it tripped me down. As soon as they got into Fox-court, there is a turning on both sides. I lost them. They made their escape. I went to the nearest watchman, and the watchman and I alarmed Mr. May. We examined the cellar. I had seen Elizabeth Fox two or three times about these courts.

Q. Did you know Turner before - A. I know him by sight, not by name, by seeing him in Holborn. I had often seen him in Holborn.

Q. You known the landlord, did not you - A. No. There is a new landlord in the house.

Q. How long was it after you first saw Turner that he run away - A. About two minutes.

Q. How far were you from him when you first saw him - A. Perhaps five or six yards.

Q. Did you see Turner's face - A. Yes; he looked very hard at me, so that I saw his countenance. I had my cutlass under my coat; he could not tell who I was. I speak to him both by his dress and by his countenance.

Q. Had you ever known where he lived - A. He has lived in Cross-lane. I saw him again at Hatton-garden office three or four days afterwards. I know him again as soon as I saw him.

Q. Had you any opportunity of seeing Allen's face - A. Not so particularly his face as this dress. I speak to him now by his dress than his countenance. There was nothing particular in his dress, except he had on a crape hatband, a fustian jacket and trowsers, and he was a stout person.

Q. Had you known Allen before - A. No.

Q. Have you ever said, in Allen's presence, that you recollected that he had a crape round his hat - A. Yes, and after he was examined the crape was produced. It was taken out of the privy.

JOHN MATTHEWS . I am an officer of Hatton Garden office. On the 2nd of December, I apprehended Allen. He had this jacket on him, and in company with Silvester. I apprehended him in Parker's-lane. He had a crape hat-band on. I took him first to a public-house, and searched him, and then I took him to a place that we have at the office. He then had the crape on his hat, and when I brought him up at night to the magistrate. I missed the crape off his hat. I took a candle, and went to a place where he was locked up, and found it down the privy, in the place where he was locked up. I apprehended Turner on the Saturday following, at a public-house in Chick-lane. He had on a large blue frock coat, and white metal buttons, and outside pockets.

Turner's Defence. My lord and gentlemen of the Jury, I most happily embrace the privilege of speaking for myself and fellow prisoners in this case, and do hope and trust, not withstanding our inability to retain counsel, amidst the host of evidence adduced this day, will appear a circumstancial matter, and that your lordship's wisdom will not suffer any unhappy subject to receive conviction upon mere suspicion only. On Sunday, the 29th of November, about half past ten o'clock at night, William Allen and Turner called at the prosecutor's house, and took a glass of spirits. While we were at the bar, John Silvester and another person came in. The prosecutor said, before the magistrate, that in consequence of some ill language made use of, it gave rise to the suspicion that we were bad characters, and one of the girls was known to the landlord, according she was taken into custody. He offered the girl five pounds, if she would tell who she was in company with that night. She denied knowing us. The landlord said he lost eight gallons of rum and brandy: was any found or traced to us?

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18130113-61

188. JOSEPH JEFFERSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of December , seventeen pounds weight of cheese, value 14 s. the property of John Roper , privately in his shop .

JOHN ROPER . I am a chandler , at Marybone .

Q. Did you lose any cheese on the 18th of December - A. Yes. I was not in the shop at the time it was taken.

CORNELIA ROPER . On the 18th of December, about a quarter after six in the evening a man came in my shop and asked for a pennyworth of tobacco, and I not liking the looks of him, I cast my

eyes round the shop, I missed a double Gloster cheese. I called my husband, and I told him I had missed a cheese. He considered a minute or two, and went out, saying, he would see if he could find the cheese.

Q. Where was your husband - A. In the back yard. I sent my little girl to him. He came and went out immediately, and in about two minutes my husband brought the prisoner in with the cheese under his arm, tied up in a dirty apron.

Q. Is the prisoner the same person that came for the tobacco in your shop - A. No. My husband charged the watch with the prisoner.

Q. What part of the shop was the cheese laying in - A. It was laying near the door.

Q. You did not see any body take it, did you - A. No.

Q. Your attention was taken with the person you were serving - A. Yes.

Q. Was the shop door open - A. No, it was latched.

John Roper . My wife called me in, told me that she had lost a cheese. I went out, and went to the corner of the street, where I saw three men standing together, a little distance from the corner. I waited the space of a minute. The prisoner and two others came by me. The prisoner was walking in the middle of the other two. Having got past me I jumped at him, and catched hold of him by the collar. The cheese was in a dirty apron, under his arm. The moment I seized him by the collar he said, he had never seen my shop in his life. I told him, I would soon shew it him. I took him back to my shop with the cheese. This is the cheese. It had my name on it when it was lost. It is there now; R for Roper. I had seen the cheese in my shop about ten minutes before my wife called me into the shop. I am certain that is my property. The cheese cost me ten-pence halfpenny a pound.

WILLIAM HUSON . I am a constable. The prisoner was brought in first to the watchhouse. I searched him; there was nothing about him. I locked him up. I enquired for the cheese; the cheese was brought in by the watchman.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming down High-street, Marybone, about six in the evening, at a pawnbroker's window, in the corner. I saw the cheese wrapt up in an apron. I instantly picked it up. Two young men saw me pick it up; they said, I picked up a prize. I put it under my arm. Coming by Marybone-lane, Mr. Roper took me in custody. That is all I have to say. I never saw the two young men before in my life.

Q. to Mrs. Roper. Was any body in the shop when the man came in for the tobacco, but yourself - A. No.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 21.

First Middlesex jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

Reference Number: t18130113-62

189. JAMES DORSET and GEORGE MANNERS were indicted for feloniously making an assault, in the King's highway, upon Rachel Seawood , on the 26th of December , putting her in fear, and taking from her person, ten shillings in monies numbered, the property of Richard Seawood .

RACHEL SEAWOOD . I live in Tash-street, Gray's-inn-lane. My husband's name is Richard Seawood .

Q. Did anything happen to you on the 26th of December last - A. Yes, between three and four o'clock, I was standing in Old-street . I had some pies to sell. I kept a little tin dripping pan before me.

Q. Did anybody come up to you - A. Yes. I had sold almost all my pies at different times in the day, and there came three or four boys past. There was a constable standing by three or four boys came up, and said, do you toss. I said, no. I had not made pies long; distress had drove me to it. I said, I do not toss. The constable standing by said, that is right, mistress, do not toss. Then some other boys came up, and said, do you toss. I said, what is tossing. He said, I will hold an halfpenny so, and you cry head or tail. I begged them to go. One of them said, I should cry. I cried, head. Then I said, go along. Some boys came up, and knocked my tin up; they gave me a push; I went against the pump, or else I must have gone right back.

Q. How many boys were there - A. Seven or eight. One of them knocked the tin up; I tried to save the money, and I tried to save myself, and in my falling I got upon my hands and my knees. My hands was very much trod upon; they bled very much. They tore my apron off my sides. I cried out for mercy. I did not think anything of the money. The people came round me; they were very kind, and picked up some of the halfpence that laid under feet.

Q. Now, how much had you taken from you - A. I think, about ten shillings, the best part of it in silver.

Q. Did you see either of the prisoners there - A. I saw Dorset there. I did not see Manners there. I saw Dorset pick up some of the silver. I was close to him all the time he did it. Dorset was one of them that knocked my tin up, and that tried to push me down.

Q. Did Dorset say anything - A. I cannot say he did. When the people came around me, the boys were gone. Some boy shewed me where the constable lived, and told me the boy's name. This happened on Saturday; on the Tuesday following, I saw Dorset again; I knew him.

JAMES MUCKLOW . I am an headborough. On the 26th of December, the prosecutrix came to me; she seemed to have been used very ill, and from the information she gave me, I apprehended Dorset. I asked him how he came to rob the poor woman. He answered, b - r her, we only made a scramble.

Dorset's Defence. The prosecutrix was tossing; she cheated a boy of a penny. There were a great many boys about her; they shoved me upon her; my hat came off. I went to pick up my hat. There is a gentleman in court of the name of Green, that has seen her tossing.

JOHN GREEN . I have seen the prosecutrix toss frequently, and she is frequently intoxicated with liquor.

Manners was not put on his defence.

Dorset called one witness, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18130113-63

190. HENRY HOWELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of January , a bottle, value 7 s. and two pound weight of liquorice, value 3 s. the property of Richard Bartlemore .

RICHARD GRANDEY . I am servant to Richard Bartlemore, surgeon and man-midwife . He keeps an apothecaries shop.

Q. Does he sell medicines there - A. Yes.

Q. Do you recollect seeing the prisoner in his shop any time - A. I do not. I never saw him until I apprehended him on the 12th, at eight o'clock in the evening. I was extreme busy near eight o'clock; I had occasion to go into the back parlour. When I thought I heard a footstep I went into the shop. There was no person in the shop at that time. I returned to the back parlour, and when I got as far as the fire place, I saw a man standing with a child in his arms. I immediately ran out of the shop, end pursued as far as the church.

Q. Where is this shop - A. It is opposite of Compton-street, near St. Giles's church, in the parish of St. Giles in the Fields .

Q. You went out, and what did you see then - A. I saw the prisoner go under a gateway, which is five doors from our house. I did not follow him under the gateway: I did not like to run the risk, knowing that part of St. Giles's. I then proceeded straight up, until I came to Lawrence-lane. The prisoner came out of Lawrence-lane, and by the description the man gave me, I put my hand inside of his coat. I perceived then there was a bottle. I secured the bottle, and took it out from under his coat, and laid hold of him.

Q. What bottle was that - A. It is my master's shew-glass; it stood on the counter; it is full of refined liquorice. I had this bottle in the shop; it was taken from the counter.

Q. How lately before you heard this footstep had you seen it on the counter - A. Not five minutes before I saw it. The value of the bottle is seven shillings, and the contents worth five shillings and four-pence. The prisoner said he had bought it for sixpence at the corner of the gateway. The bottle and the contents are my master's property.

Prisoner's Defence. As I was coming along a boy overtook me; he asked me if I would buy that, and before I had time to look at it he ran up the gateway. I ran after him, and on my coming out of the corner of the gateway the gentleman catched me.

GUILTY, aged 19,

Of stealing, but not privately.

Judgment respited .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130113-64

191. MARTHA COX and CATHERINE OLIPHANT were indicted for feloniously assaulting Mary Downes , on the 5th of January , putting her in fear, and taking from her person, a silk handkerchief, value 9 s. her property .

MARY DOWNES . I live at 45, Checquer-alley, Whitecross-street. On the 5th of January, about twenty minutes to six, in the dusk of the evening, I was going through Bull-yard, Golden-lane; it leads into Aldersgate-street. I went in the Crown and Sceptre, public-house , to have half a pint of beer.

Q. Had you any other refreshment before - A. No, I had not. The two prisoners were in the taproom; they were sky larking with a young man, one of them flung a pint pot at his head, instead of the pot hitting him it hit me. I got up, and asked the prisoners what business they had to throw the pot at me. They then said, did not I like it. I said, no, I did not. They then came both of them and struck me. I did not offer to strike them, but as soon as I had drank up my beer, I went away. They followed me out of the public-house into Ball-court. They knocked me down there, and knocked my cap off my head, and this handkerchief was round my cap. My cap I picked up myself, and run away. I saw one of the prisoners pick up my handkerchief. That was Martha Cox ; she ran away with it. I cried out, stop thief.

Q. Which was worth the most, the cap or the handkerchief - A. The cap was worth a shilling, the silk handkerchief cost me nine shillings. She picked up the handkerchief and cap, and separated the cap from the handkerchief.

Q. Did you see her separate the one from the other - A. No. I picked up the cap in the street, and after I had lost the handkerchief I went to an officer. I told him what public-house I had been in. I went with the officer, and as soon as I came into the passage I met Oliphant; she knocked me down in the sight of the officer. Cox was not with her then. She tried to run away.

RICHARD HUTCHINGS . I am a constable of the parish of St. Luke. Me and my brother officers were coming from Worship-street office; the prosecutrix came and told us, she was knocked down by two women, and robbed of a silk handkerchief. The prosecutrix appeared as if she had been drinking, but not much. She had her understanding. She seemed as if she had drank more than half a pint of porter. We went with her to the corner of Brackley-street, Golden-lane. Martha Cox was sitting there with a basket of sprats. The prosecutrix pointed her out, and said, that was one of them that run away with her handkerchief. Cox said she would not go until the other one was taken. We took Cox to the watchhouse. Oliphant was not taken untill the next day.

ROBERT LOCK . I am an officer of St. Luke's. When I saw the prosecutrix, she was rather intoxicated. Downes told me she had been knocked down, and robbed of an handkerchief. Downes was with me when I saw Oliphant, and as we were going by, Oliphant struck her on the face, without, Downs saying any thing to her. I went up to Oliphant; I said, you did not know that an officer was so near. I did not know that she was one of them that had done the robbery. I told her there would be a warrent for her in the morning.

Q. How long was it after Oliphant struck Downes

that she charged her with the robbery - A. About an hour afterwards.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130113-65

192. HANNAH DARKIN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of December , a shawl, value 5 s. the property of James Allen , privately in his shop .

JAMES ALLEN . I live at 25, Cranbourn-street, Leicester-square ; I am a linen-draper and mercer . On the 10th of December, I lost a shawl. I believe it was soon after twelve, but before two in the afternoon, I was in the back part of the shop when the prisoner and another person came into the shop. I did not come into the front of the shop to attend them. William Gouch was serving in the front shop.

WILLIAM GOUCH . I am an apprentice to Mr. Allen.

Q. Did you see the prisoner come into your master's-shop, and when was it - A. On the 10th of December, about half past one, the prisoner came in with another, to buy a shawl. The prisoner had a child in her arms. The prisoner came in with her mother, as she called the other woman.

Q. Who was it asked for the shawls - A. The prisoner. I had three shawls on the counter. I opened three; they were all separate. She bought a red shawl, and paid ten shillings for it. She looked at two more, and took them to the door to see them by the light.

Q. Did she return them - A. No. She came back again and put them down. She then went out of the shop with her mother. I saw a shawl hanging from under her shawl. The shawl that she bought and paid for, she gave to her mother and when the prisoner went out of the door, I told my master that I thought she had got a shawl. My master told me to go and fetch her back. I pursued her, and fetched her back. I found the shawl that I missed underneath her shawl, and when I brought her into the shop I took it from her, and when I took it from her she wanted to pay for it. She was searched at Marlborough-street office; there was a five-pound note found upon her.

Prisoner's Defence. I thought I had the shawl that I paid for when I was coming out of the shop.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY, aged 38,

Of stealing to the value of 4 s. 11 d. only .

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130113-66

193. MARY GILBERT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of January , a shawl, value 1 l. the property of Griffith Foulkes , privately in his shop .

GEORGE BANKS . I am an apprentice to Griffith Foulkes ; he keeps a linen-draper's shops , No. 2, Little Russel-street, Covent Garden . On the 12th of January, the prisoner came to our shop, and asked to look at some stockings. I shewed her some black and white silk stockings. She looked out two pair of each. After she had looked out the stockings she asked to look at some silk shawls.

Q. Did she purchase the stockings - A. No. Mr. Stevens shewed her the shawls; she looked out one ordered a bill to be made out of the stockings and the shawl to Mr. Baxter, of Long Acre. She said she was going further. I understood she was Mrs. Baxter, from what she said. She left the shop. I then suspected her, and went after her.

Q. Did you yourself see her take any thing - A. No, I did not. I told her we must take the parcel with her to Mr. Baxter. She said, very well. I and Mr. Stevens went with her. I attacked the prisoner, and took this shawl from her. It is called a skarf or a shawl. She rang at Mr. Baxter's bell; nobody came. I afterwards went to Mr. Baxter's; nobody knew her there. When the prisoner was in our shop there was another young man serving in the shop; his name is George Atkinson . I have had the shawl ever since; it has the shop mark; it is Mr. Foulkes's property.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence; called two witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130113-67

194. MARY ARCHER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of December , a silver gravy-spoons, value 35 s. two silver table-spoons, value 38 s. and a tablecloth, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of Robert Turner , in his dwelling-house .

ROBERT TURNER . I live at Stepney-green, in the Hamlet of Mile-end Old Town, in the parish of St. Dunstan, Stepney .

Q. Was the prisoner your servant - A. She was occasionally, for a week or two. We had a deal of sickness in the house; we sent for her occasionally. In consequence of information, I found the articles missing. I went to her parents, whom I have known a number of years. Her parents are of good character. On the 14th of December, I found the things again at Mr. Dexter's, a pawnbroker, Whitechapel; the gravy-spoons, two table-spoons, and tablecloth; they were all at Dexter's. I know them to be mine.

THOMAS BARNES . On the 9th of December, I took in two table-spoons of the prisoner. The gravy-spoons was pawned on the 14th; the tablecloth was pawned with us in the name of Catherine Thompson .

EBENEZER DALTON . I am an officer. The prisoner was given into my charge on the 14th of December. I went to the pawnbroker and found these things.

Prosecutor. They are all my property.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence.

GUILTY , aged 16.

Fined 1 s. and discharged.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130113-68

195. SARAH WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of December , from the person of Meshac Hobbs , a pocket-book, value 3 s. and a 5 l. bank note, his property .

MESHAC HOBBS . I am a footman to Mrs. Best, in Little Dean's-yard, Westminster.

Q. Did you lose a pocket-book, and a five-pound bank note - A. Yes. On the 15th of December, about half past nine in the evening. I was in the Coach and Horses public-house, drinking with the prisoner. The prisoner was in the tap-room with two men. I sat down in the same box with her.

Q. Were you next to her while you setting there - A. Yes, part of the time.

Q. When did you perceive your pocket book was gone - A. On the morning following.

Q. How long before you went into that public-house did you perceive your pocket-book about you - A. I had it in my pocket in the tap-room. The prisoner went part of the way home with me. I had never seen her before that night.

Q. Did you stop any where with her - A. Yes, in the Cloisters, near Dean's yard . I parted with her in the Cloisters. I did not feel my pocket-book taken. I was rather intoxicated with liquor. I have seen the note again at the office in Queen-square.

JOSEPH COOPER . I am an officer of Queen-square office. I apprehended the prisoner on the 17th of this month, in Orchard-street, Westminster. I told her for what I apprehended her. She denied knowing anything of the transaction. I searched her, and found two dollars upon her person, and upon enquiry I found she had changed a five-pound note.

WILLIAM LUCAS . I am a publican. On the 15th of December, I gave the prisoner change for this five-pound note. She had three others with her at the time. I put the name of William Hayes upon the note. He was with her. They were all tipsey.

Prosecutor. William Hayes was one of the party that she was with. He is a drummer, and so is his brother that was with him.

Prisoner's Defence. I know I got charge at Mr. Lucas's. I met one of the brothers; I asked him to go with me. He knows nothing of it.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130113-69

196. GEORGE BLACKAWAY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of December , two shawls, value 28 s. and one yard of crape, value 5 s. the property of Richard Powell , privately in his shop .

GEORGE STAPARD . I am an apprentice to Richard Powell, linen-draper , 180, Oxford-street . On the 7th of December, about nine o'clock in the morning, the prisoner came to our shop. I had occasion to go through the shop. When I came back again the prisoner was gone.

Q. Who was in the shop - A. Mr. Powell served him with a handkerchief.

RICHARD POWELL . On the 7th of December, about nine o'clock in the morning, the prisoner came into my shop; he asked me to shew him some pocket handkerchiefs. I shewed him some. He purchased one, and then he went away. In about five minutes afterwards, George Stapard came in the shop, and asked me where a piece of black crape was that he left on the counter. I did not miss any thing. I told him, I saw it just before I served the customer, meaning the prisoner. We made search for the crape, and could not find it. There had been no other person in the shop. My young man pursued the prisoner, and in ten minutes he brought him back. and when the prisoner was brought back he had two shawls and a remnant of crape. We had not missed the shawls until the prisoner came back.

Stepard. When I went through the shop, I saw the prisoner purchasing a handkerchief of Mr. Powell; when I returned I missed a piece of crape that was laying on the counter. I went out in pursuit of the prisoner, and found him near three hundred yards from our house. I desired him to come back with me. I told him there was a mistake in the things that he had bought. He would not come back, but run away; I followed him, and overtook him when he had run about sixty or seventy yards. He had a small bundle under his arm, which I wished him to give me. He would not. I insisted upon his going back with me. He attempted to untie the bundle. When I saw that he endeavoured to untie the bundle, I snatched it away, and took it to my master. The bundle contained two shawls, and the crape that I had missed.

Q. You got him home - A. Yes, and I went for a constable, and gave him in charge. These are the shawls, and the craps; they are my master's property.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 38.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130113-70

197. JOHANNI COLSTER was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Joseph Garcia , about the hour of three in the afternoon, on the 14th of December , and stealing therein, a flock bed, value 20 s. the property of Joseph Garcia .

SARAH GARCIA . My husband's name is Joseph Garcia ; he keeps a lodging-house , No. 3, Prospect-place, in the parish of St. George, near the London Docks .

Q. Does your husband keep the whole house - A. Yes.

Q. When was it you lost this bed - A. On the 14th of last month. It was near upon two o'clock when I went out.

Q. Who did you leave in the house - A. Not any person. I am sure they were all out, and when I returned it was just dusk. I saw my shutters broken open. My shutters were bolted inside.

Q. How had he got them open - A. I cannot say. I saw a piece of the bolt broken off.

Q. Had anybody got in - A. Yes, the prisoner.

Q. How do you know that - A. We took him, and he told us where the property was. It is a sailor's flock bed.

Q. Was anything else gone - A. Not anything else.

Q. It was not a new bed, was it - A. It was just upon a new ticking. I saw the bottle-screw laid on the table, which fastened down the sash, and a part of the bolt laid on the table also, and a paper which

had been pasted on the window, laid in the middle of the house.

Q. Was there nothing gone but this flock bed of yours - A. No.

Q. Have you ever found your flock bed - A. Yes. I found it at Mrs. Levi's the next morning. The prisoner came the next morning, and owned it to me, and took me to Mrs. Levi's.

Q. Did not the prisoner lodge in your house - A. No.

Q. How came he to own it to you - A. I do not know. He came to me and my husband the next morning; he took me and my husband to Mrs. Levi. He said, that he had sold it for eight shillings. On Tuesday morning he came and told me he had taken it. I did not know him before the Sunday morning before that.

Q. Was there anything of more value besides the flock bed, in the house - A. There was a watch on the mantle-piece. He never touched anything but the bed.

Q. Do you know anything about him, what he is; Did he visit your lodgers - A. No. I never knew him before the Sunday, that he came on the Monday, and took the bed. The bed laid on the ground, tied up as it was brought. A countryman of the prisoner brought it there, and we had bought it.

Q. How long had it been in your house - A. Near upon two or three days. It was not untied.

Q. Did he say it was his property - A. No, he did not, and he came and owned it himself.

HANNAH LEVI . I live in Rosemary-lane. On the 14th of December, the prisoner came in and offered a bed for sale, about half past three on the Monday. He asked for the bed twelve shillings.

Q. What country man is he - A. An Italian. He speaks broken English very well to be understood. I offered him eight shillings. He said he could not take it. He took it on his shoulder and walked away. He stopped about an hour and a half away, and then returned, and said I might have it. Then I gave him eight shillings for it. On the 15th, the prosecutor came and claimed it. The officer came and took the bed. They came, and the prisoner along with them. He shewed them the house where he sold it.

MRS. MARTIN. I live four doors off Mrs. Gracia. I saw the prisoner knock at Mrs. Gracia's door about half after two o'clock. I saw no more of the prisoner till the next morning.

JOHN GRIFFITHS . The prosecutrix came to me on Tuesday, the 15th. She said, that she had her house broken open, and she had found where her bed was; it was at Mrs. Levi's, in Rosemary-lane. I went there, and found the bed. I produce it. I went back to the prosecutrix's house. The prisoner came in, and I took him in custody. I asked him, how he came to do it. He said, he believed the devil occasioned him to do it.

Prosecutrix. I know the bed by the piece of red cloth being put on as a mettrass bed. I am quite certain it is the same bed.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence: being a foreigner he was allowed an interpreter.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 29.

[ The prisoner was recommended to mercy by the Jury, they thinking he was insane in his mind .]

Tried by a jury of half English and half foreigners,

Before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130113-71

198. CHARLES WILLIAMSON WASKO was indicted for that he, on the 17th of December , being in the dwelling-house of Martha Griffiths , spinster , feloniously did steal six sheets, value 30 s. two gowns, value 16 s. one piece of patch-work, value 4 s. four yards of cotton, value 4 s. two curtains, value 6 s. a valence, value 1 s. a cotton shawl, value 3 s. a silk shawl, value 15 s. a pellise, value 15 s. a tablecloth, value 18 d. her property; and afterwards, to wit, about the hour of ten, in the night of the same day, burglariously did break to get out of the same . And MARY TREADAWAY , for feloniously receiving on the same day, four sheets, value 20 s. one piece of patch-work; value 4 s. four yards of cotton, value 4 s. two curtains, value 6 s. and a cotton shawl, value 3 s. being part of the aforesaid stolen goods, she well knowing them to have been stolen .

MARTHA GRIFFITHS . I live at No. 42, Spring-street, in the parish of St. Paul, Shadwell . I am a single woman. I keep the house.

Q. When did this happen - A. On Thursday, the 17th of December, the prisoner came into my lower room; he said he was going to stop all night. He gave me a shilling.

Q. Do you let lodgings - A. Yes, but I had no lodgers in the house at that time. He came in between nine and ten at night.

Q. What did he come in for - A. He came to sleep all night there; he gave me a shilling to go for a pot of stout. I went out for this pot of stout, and I locked the door after me. When I went out, my property was in the drawers. I might be gone about ten minutes or a quarter of an hour to the most. When I came back, I found my door open, and, when I came in I saw the man was gone. I looked round my room, I saw there was nothing missing in the room. I put the pot of stout on the table, and I looked over my drawers. I missed six sheets, two cotton gowns, a piece of patch-work, four yards of cotton, bed-curtains, a cotton shawl, a silk shawl, and a black velvit pellise, and a tablecloth, two side curtains, and a cotton top to the bed.

Q. Had you know this man before - A. He came into my place; that was the 15th he came in and set down, and asked me how I did. He might set down ten minutes, not longer, to the best of my knowledge.

Q. You have no doubt he is the person that came on the 17th, have you - A. He is the person that came on the 17th. He said, he would sleep with me, and pay me for sleeping with me.

Q. Did you ever find your things - A. Part of them. I found them in an old clothes shop, in Poplar.

Q. How soon afterwards - A. Last Wednesday week; on the 6th of January. I found them at Mrs. Treadaway's. She lives at Poplar; she keeps a clothes shop. I found four linen sheets, two cotton gowns, patch-work, four yards of cotton, bed-curtains, a

cotton sheet; but I cannot say that is mine; it is like it. The officer found them.

Q. What countryman is the prisoner - A. He is a Prussian.

ROBERT BROWN . I am an officer. I was applied to by Mrs. Lindsay. I went with Butler and Mrs. Lindsay's servant to Hounsditch; we met the prisoner between nine and ten o'clock at night, on Tuesday the 5th of January. The servant spoke to him, and called him by his name. She took hold of his shirt, and seized him by the collar. After a great deal of resistance, we got him into a public-house, and secured him. On coming along he tried to make his escape out of the coach; he threw himself out of the coach. He was handcuffed. He attempted it again the second time. We brought him to the office, and then we enquired of different people that had been robbed in the neighbourhood. The different people came up, and Mrs. Griffiths among the rest, and when we brought him before the magistrate he confessed the different robberies, and from his information we searched for Mrs. Griffiths's property. We found one gown and one shawl in Mrs. Treadaway's back room. I then went up stairs. We found the curtains hung up at the bed, the patch-work that was on the bed, and one gown. Butler found four sheets.

Q. Where does Treadaway live - A. In High-street, Poplar.

GEORGE BUTLER . I am an officer. I was at Treadaway's. I found four linen sheets, and one cotton one, in the front-room. The things are all here.

Prosecutrix. The four sheets; the cotton sheet I am not sure it is mine. The gown, the curtains, and the patch-work, are mine.

Wasko's Defence. I had slept with this woman about two months before. It was eleven o'clock at night, she catched hold of my arm. She asked me if I would sleep there. I said, no, I must go home. She said, I must sleep there. I asked, what I must give her. She said, two pounds. I agreed to give her one pound. I gave her some money to fetch some things for supper.

Treadaway said nothing in her defence; called three witnesses, who gave her a good character.

WASKO, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 23.

TREADAWAY, NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder

Reference Number: t18130113-72

199. CHARLES WILLIAMSON WASKO was indicted for that he, on the 29th of December , being in the dwelling-house of Jane Castle , feloniously did steal one set of bed-furniture, value 2 l. 10 s. one bed, value 2 l. one piece of blanket, value 1 s. a gown, value 14 s. three petticoats, value 10 s. and that he afterwards, to wit, about the hour of nine, in the night of the same day, burglariously did break the said dwelling-house to got out of the same . And MARY TREADAWAY , for feloniously receiving, on the same day, a set of bed-furniture, value 2 l. 10 s one piece of blanket, value 1 s. one gown, value 14 s. and three petticoats, value 10 s., part of the aforesaid goods, she well knowing them to have been stolen .

JANE CASTLE . I live at No. 2, Trotter's-court, New Gravel-lane, in the parish of St. Paul, Shadwell . On the 29th of December, the prisoner came to my apartment.

Q. Are you a single woman - A. Yes.

Q. Wasko came to your house. You are a housekeeper, are you - A. No, I do not keep the house, I have only an apartment in it. The landlord does not live in the house; the house is let out in tenements.

Q. He came to your house on the 29th of December, about what time - A. About six o'clock in the evening, and about seven o'clock the prisoner went to bed. I locked the door, and went out to a little needle, and between ten and eleven o'clock I returned. I found the door broken open, and the lock broken off, and on my looking round, I missed the things out of the apartment; a bed, a bolster, a sheet, a blanket, two quilts, the bed furniture, a gown, two linen petticoats, and one flannel petticoat. All these things were in my apartment when I went out. Part of them things were afterwards found at Mrs. Treadaway's, by the officers, Brown and Butler.

Q. Did you go with the officers to Mrs. Treadaway's - A. Yes.

ROBERT BROWN . I am an officer of Shadwell office. On the 6th of January, I went to Mrs. Treadaway's. I took Wasko up on Mrs. Lindsay's charge. Mrs. Castle came before the magistrate. She said, Wasko was the person that broke out of the house. Wasko then said, before the magistrate, that the woman might have the things again. He acknowledged the several robberies he had committed. He acknowledged this, and told us where to go and fetch the things. I found the things where he told me at Mrs. Treadaway's. As soon as I went into Mrs. Treadaway's shop, the prosecutrix told me that Mrs. Treadaway had got her gown on her back, and looking over some flannel petticoats in the shop, Mrs. Castle pointed out one of her flannel petticoats, in the shop. We searched about the shop. I found this bed furniture in the shop; and locked up in a box in the cupboard in the back room, we found two white petticoats. The prosecutrix said, one of the petticoats had some lace on. I told Mrs. Treadaway, I had found the petticoat, and she must give me the lace. She said, she could not tell me where it was; at last, she pulled it out of her pocket. In the cupboard, I found the piece of old blanket. Then she sent her niece out in the yard; she fetched in a quilt in a wet state. It was hanging out to dry I asked her how she came by them. She said, she had bought them of a man, he said he took them away from a girl's house that had made away with above seventy pounds of his money. I told Mrs. Treadaway she had done wrong in buying these things; some of them were new. I said, how came you to buy them of such a man. She said, she had bought of him three times; she did not know what she was buying of; it was early in the morning, hardly light; she did not know but what they were old things until she came to look at them in the day. Wasko said, she gave fifteen shillings for them. She said she did not give so much. Butler was with me all the time.

Wasko's Defence. I have slept in the house, and I have lost seventy-five pounds there.

Prosecutrix. He never lost a single farthing in my house. I never saw him before.

Treaddway's Defence The first thing I ever bought of him was two sailor's jackets. He told me he need not sell his clothes, but a woman had robbed him of seventeen pounds; and the second time he came was about ten days after.

WASKO, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 23.

TREADAWAY, GUILTY , aged 60.

Confined Two Years in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130113-73

200. CHRISTIANA INVERARIRTY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of December, two pair of breeches, value 10 s. a ring, value 10 s. and a pair of shoes, value 6 the property of James Aldous , senior, and James Aldous , junior .

JAMES ALDOUS , JUNIOR. I am a pawnbroker , I live in Berwick-street . My father, James Aldous, is my partner.

Q. When did you lose these things - A. I cannot say when I lost them. The prisoner was servant with me at my house. On the 10th of December the box was searched at my house, and we found these articles mentioned in the indictment.

Q. What are these articles - A. Two pair of breeches, a pair of ear-rings, and a pair of shoes.

Q. What did she say for herself when they were found - A. She said they were her property. I am confident they are mine. These are the articles. I am sure they are the joint property of me and my father.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence; called three witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130113-74

201. JAMES NIDDRY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of January , two pair of half boots, value 30 s. the property of William Cranmer .

WILLIAM CRANMER. I am a boot and shoemaker , No. 10, George-court, Piccadilly . On Tuesday, the 5th of this month, I heard the cry of, stop thief. I ran out of the shop, and saw a man of the name of M'Cormack bringing the prisoner up with two pair of half boots. He immediately gave them into my hands, and we conveyed the prisoner to the watchhouse. The half boots stood outside of the shop, on a board, for shew.

WARREN M'CORMACK . On Tuesday, the 5th of this month, I was going up George-court, towards my lodgings. I saw the prisoner looking at some boots and shoes that were outside of Mr. Cranmer's. I observed he looked as much at the people that passed as he did at the shoes; that gave me suspicion. I watched him. I saw him take the half boots. I followed him down the court, and going across Piccadilly I saw him drop them. I picked them up, and catched him before he went ten yards further. I am certain the prisoner is the man. I never had him out of my sight.

- JONES. I am an officer. I produce the boots. I took charge of the prisoner.

Prosecutor. They are my boots.

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutor wishes to take my liberty away. I wish to go to sea if you please.

GUILTY, aged 18.

Judgment respited .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130113-75

202. GEORGE WALL and WILLIAM ARCHER were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of January , a leg of pork, value 2 s. and three pounds weight of cheese, value 2 s. the property of George Spalding .

MRS. SPALDING. I am the wife of George Spalding . We live in Bethnal-green-road . We lost this pork last Monday week, about a quarter before nine in the evening, I was sitting in the back parlour. I was alarmed with a great noise in the passage. I saw the prisoner, Archer, with the pork in his hand, as he lay on the ground, and the officer was there. I had left the pork in the window, hanging on a rail inside of the window where we hang the meat on. I sell offal, butter, and cheese, and now and then a bit of pork.

JOHN DAY . I am a city officer. On Monday evening, I was going down Bethnal-green-road; I saw the prisoners, Archer and Wall, standing at the prosecutrix's window. I passed by them twice. I went about half a dozen doors further on. I stood in a door way. I saw the prisoner, Archer, ascend the steps, and go into the shop. He then brought out the half cheese. He gave it to Wall. Wall took the cheese, and went and secreted it in Harp-lane, Bethnal-green-road. Then Archer sung out, George. George would not answer until he had secreted the cheese. Archer came to the shop with Wall; he looked to see that the coast was clear. I saw Archer go up the steps again. He took a leg of pork out of the window. I ran over the way, and just as Archer was coming out, I knocked him down in the passage. Wall was outside at the time; he ran off. I took Archer to Bethnal-green watchhouse. On my return back to the prosecutrix's house, I saw Wall just coming out of Harp-lane. I went to him, and asked him where he was going. He said, home. I said, what have you got here. He said, nothing. He had the cheese in the handkerchief that had been round his neck. He said, he had picked up the cheese. I said, I thought so, I was looking for it. I took them before the magistrate the next day. Archer had been in the House of Correction for robbing the toll-gate of some halfpence.

Wall's Defence. I never was in such a thing before.

Archer said nothing in his defence.

WALL, GUILTY, aged 14.

ARCHER, GUILTY, aged 19.

Judgment respited .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130113-76

203. RICHARD WEST was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of December , three yards of cotton, value 4 s. 6 d. the property of William Halse .

WILLIAM HALSE . I am a taylor , 120, Church-street, Bethnal-green .

Q. When did you lose this cotton - A. On Saturday, the 19th of December, as my wife was looking over the prisoner's bed, she felt something hard; she put her hand in, and pulled out this cotton. The prisoner is my apprentice . I had such a piece of cotton in my drawer. It was three yards exactly. No man had access to the cotton drawer.

Q. Might not somebody else have put it there - A. The prisoner acknowledged his fault.

WILLIAM WILSON . I am an officer of Worship-street. On the 19th of December, the prosecutor came to the office to fetch me. I went with him into his workshop. A man was on his work-board. The master said, his apprentice had robbed him of some callico. I asked the prisoner, where it was. He went to the bed, and took it out from between the tick and the feathers. He had cut it off a piece of between thirty and forty yards. His master took the piece out of the drawer. It matched exactly.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not know where it was until my mistress told me.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130113-77

204. JOHN PHILLIPS was indicted for feloniniously stealing, on the 14th of December , one hundred and twenty halfpence , the property of John Briggs .

JOHN BRIGGS . I keep a cheesemonger's shop , in Peter-street . I lost the halfpence on the 14th of December, about a quarter past seven in the evening; I was in the back-parlour. I had not been in the parlour a minute when I saw two boys; one of them was on the counter. I came out, and asked them what they wanted. They made an excuse. I said, I suspected they wanted to rob me. They said, no, they did not. I opened the door for them to go out; one of them ran away. I catched hold of the prisoner. He dropped a paper of halfpence on the door way. I took him to the watchhouse.

Prisoner. I should like to know whether the halfpence belonged to him.

Prosecutor. The halfpence belonged to me. I missed three papers of halfpence.

Prisoner's Defence. The halfpence belonged to me. My father gave me fourteen shillings in halfpence, and I had a shilling in my pocket.

JOHN BAXTER . The prisoner was brought to the watchhouse, and at Marlborough-street office the prisoner's father claimed what property the prisoner had. The magistrate ordered me to deliver it up to him. The prisoner has been at our watchhouse before.

ROBERT KIMBER . While I stood at Mr. Briggs's door, I saw the prisoner drop a five shilling paper of halfpence.

Prisoner. I took the property out of my pocket to shew what I had got.

Kimber. He could not take it out of his pocket to shew, because he throwed it behind him.

GUILTY, aged 19.

Judgment respited .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130113-78

205. JOSEPH DOYLE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of December , a pair of trowsers, value 2 s. a shirt, value 4 s. a jacket, value 3 s. two pair of stockings, value 6 d. a towel, value 6 d. and a coffee-barrel, value 2 d. the property of John Stockfort .

JOHN STOCKFORT . I am an apprentice to Mr. Clark, a ship owner. I lost these things on the 8th of December from Mr. Dawson's yard. I lost a jacket, trowsers, shirt, stockings, and a towel, and a coffee mill-barrel. The prisoner did not belong to the ship.

Q. Were they lost on board a ship - A. Yes. they were. The prisoner came on board a ship as it lay in the dock. About two o'clock in the morning, he found he could not open the half deck; he opened the chest, and took a bundle out; he took a wine-glass also, he hunted all over the half deck, to see what he could take. I could but just discern him. When he went on the top ladder I went in deck; the prisoner struck me, I sung out for the watchman, the watchman came and found the prisoner laying at the foot of the boy's bed, and all the things with him.

Q. How did he come on board - A. She was laying in the bason.

Prisoner. Did you see me at the cabin door - No; I heard you. The other boy awaked me, then I heard you making a noise.

JOHN PETERS . I am a patrol. I was going on at two o'clock. on the 8th of December. I heard this young man cry out; I made all the haste I could. I went on board the ship. The prisoner was laying by the foot of the boy's bed, and all the things were scattered on the deck. I took him to the watch-house, and as I was taking him to the watchhouse, he said, he had left his shoes under the wind lass. After I had taken him to the watchhouse, I found his shoes where he told me.

JOHN LISLE . I am a constable. I searched the prisoner. I discovered this coffee mill-barrel on him He had been working it with some iron; it was quite bright. I went on board the ship. I discovered these articles scattered about.

Prosecutor. They are my property.

Prisoner's Defence. A man in the dock told me I might go and lay down there.

GUILTY, aged 21.

Judgment respited .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130113-79

206. BRYAN CARRIGAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of December , a copper tea-kettle, value 4 s. the property of Isaac Morey .

ISAAC MOREY , I am a victualler . I live in Golden-lane, St. Luke's . On the 25th of December, at eleven o'clock at night, the shutters being put up, I retired to bed. My wife was fastening them inside. The prisoner came to the door and begged for a pint of beer. My wife told him that he could not sit down to drink it; and by the description that my wife gave me, I took the prisoner the next morning,

with the kettle in his possession. This is the kettle. He had it in a bag at his lodgings. It is my tea-kettle.

Prisoner's Defence. I have been twenty-four years in his Majesty's service, and I am willing and able to go again.

GUILTY , aged 58.

Confined Fourteen Days in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130113-80

207. ALEXANDER BROUGHTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of December , eight chairs, value 6 l. 12 s. the property of James Eyles .

JAMES EYLES . I am a chair-maker , in Edgware-road.

Q. When did you lose these chairs - A. A man of the name of Buckley came into my shop, and ordered these chairs to be sent up to Northumberland-street, New-road , accordingly these were sent up. The next witness will tell how they were delivered.

WILLIAM EYLES . I superintend Mr. Eyles's business. I sent these chairs up by the porter, to 53, Northumberland-street, New-road. The porter took the chairs, and when he returned I asked him if he had received the money. He said, he had not.

- . I am porter. I took the chairs to Mr. Buckley, 53, Northumberland-street, New-road. The prisoner took them in, I presented him the bill. He told me to call the next morning, I should be paid. I was sent up on four o'clock the same day. The prisoner was at home. He said, Mr. Buckley would call at my master's and pay before he returned to his own house.

William Eyles . The prisoner stated himself to be the servant of Mr. Buckley. I called for the money. The prisoner told me his master was out.

Q. There is a man of the name of Buckley that ordered the chairs - A. Yes.

Q. The prisoner may be servant to Mr. Buckley for what you know - A. I do not know. I suppose they join together to cheat my master.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder

Reference Number: t18130113-81

208. JOSEPH MILTON GREEN was indicted, for that he, on the 6th of May , was servant to Charles Briggs , and was employed and entrusted by him to receive money for him, and that he being such servant, so employed and entrusted, did receive and take into his possession the sum of 1 l. 18 s. and that he afterwards, feloniously did embezzle, secrete, and steal 1 l. 4 s. part of the said sum .

CHARLES BRIGGS . I deal in feathers and flowers . The prisoner was my servant .

Q. Did you employ and entrust him to receive money for you - A. Yes; he was employed by me to sell feathers, and he was to bring me the money home every night. On the 6th of last May. Mr. Robson bought of the prisoner, feathers to the amount of one pound eighteen shillings. He was to sell the feathers at six shillings a pound. They cost me five shillings and six-pence. I gave him twenty-five shillings a week, and no commission.

MR. ROBSON. Q. In May last did you buy any feathers of the prisoner on account of the last witness - A. I did. This is the bill of parcels the prisoner gave me, and the receipt.

"London, May 6th, 1812.

Bought of Messrs. Briggs and Co. No. 3, Warwick street, Oxford-street,

Feathers, 4 Swansdown, at 6 s. - 1 l. 4 s.

2 Grey blues, at 7 s. - 0 14 s.

Received the contents, 1 l. 18 s.

JOSEPH MILTON GREEN ."

Q. to Mr. Briggs. What is the meaning of that word

"Co." in that bill - A. I have no partners. That word is very common.

Q. Did he ever account to you for that money - A. No. I did not know that he had sold six feathers. He only accounted for two articles. He paid me only fourteen shillings.

Prisoner's Defence. With respect to the one pound eighteen shillings, on the 6th of May, that I am charged with, sorry would I be at all to attempt to to injure mortal being. I could not, by any means whatever, attempt to destroy my fellow man in any respect. I never was arraigned at the bar of justice before. I appeal to that Great and Almighty being, before whom I shall one day appear to answer for all the sins I ever have committed, and before whom all the ends of the earth must stand and tremble, at the vengeance of the Almighty. I never did attempt to injure any man whatever. I appeal to him who judgeth the hearts of all men. I have only to say that as I have been sworn against, my punishment, with Cain, of old, is greater than I can bear. I know in whom I have believed. I know that he is able to save to the uttermost. In him I believe, in him I trust. He will never leave me. I therefore commit myself humbly into his hands. If I am transported, my punishment will be death itself. I cannot bear it. My health is in a delicate state. I throw myself at your mercy. These gentlemen, who are to try me for death itself, and therefore, I know, I have an advocate with the father, Jesus Christ the Righteous, and he is the propitiation for my sins. He has made an atonement for me. I have poured out my soul in prayer to him, who is able to save to the uttermost. I commit myself to your mercy, and look to him on whom you shall look at the great and terrible day of judgment; when all nations of the earth shall stand before him, at whose bar have I pleaded guilty. I know nothing of the transaction of the 6th of May, merely only that all accounts of the 6th of May were settled with Mr. Briggs. I call on Mr. Briggs now, whom, perhaps, in some respects, I may have injured. I am sorry that ever I have injured him. With gratitude I must say in some respects I am indebted to him. Let him go to the utmost extremity, I forgive him freely, for all he has done or said, and brought against me. Man is but a creature of the day, that cannot foresee future events. When left to himself, he becomes fiercer than any beast that roves the woods of Africa or America. Oh, when the spirit of Christ departs from him, what a desperate state must he be in, and I will say, with David of old, let him who thinks he stands, take

heed least he fall. Surely wee see with our eyes; the sword is going through the nations of the earth and why are not we awakened. It is our sins we all see, though we are not brought to the bar of justice; for our sins we are securged. Pardon me for taking up your time. I only plead, and ask for mercy. I was tenderly brought up, and lost my father and mother in the infancy of my youth. They were snatched from me. In my situation I have no friends to come forward here in this country. I am friendless and desolate, cast upon a miserable world. I can say no more. I am quite overcome. Let your judgment be tempered with mercy, I beseech it. My prosecutor has not stated what I have done with the one pound four shillings. I kept an accompt in my pocket-book. I don't think I saw him produce that book to see whether there is, on the 6th of May, goods entered. If so, then I must have actually have handed him over the sum. He has not produced the Book to satisfy the gentlemen of the jury.

Prosecutor. This is the memorandum-book.

Q. Is there any entry on the 6th of May, of one pound eighteen shillings - A. No. Two grey blues, at seven. That is all. (The memorandum-book, bill, and receipt, handed to the jury.)

GUILTY , aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years,

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130113-82

269. JAMES MILLS was indicted, for that he, on the 3rd of September , was servant to Sarah Puryer and William Umney , and was employed and entrusted to receive money for them, and being such servant, so employed and entrusted, did receive and take into his possession the sum of 1 l. 1 s. 3 d. on account of his employers, and afterwards did embezzle, secrete, and steal the same .

SARAH PURYER . I am a mat-maker ; I live in Wilkes-street, Spitalfields . My partner's name is William Umney. The prisoner was our porter. On the 3rd of September, he took some goods to Mr. Hewitt, of Leadenhall-market, with a bill and receipt. When he returned, he said ma'am, here is the receipt; Mr. Hewitt was very busy, and could not pay it. He desired me to call again in a day or two. I said, very well. In the course of a fortnight or three weeks. I desired him to call, for fear Mr. Hewitt should forget it. When he returned, he said, he was gone out of town; he could not have it until he returned. I then began to think that all was not quite right. I went to Mr. Hewitt's the next day; I said, I think you owe me a small bill for baskets. He said, no, I do not; I paid your porter. Mr. Hewitt shewed me the bill and receipt, and gave me leave to take it away. This is the bill and receipt; I received of Mr. Hewitt. It is for one pound one shilling and three-pence.

WILLIAM HEWITT . This is the bill the man gave me that delivered the goods, dated 3d of September, 1812. He was not paid at the time. He was paid the next day, or the day following, one pound one shilling and three pence. Received, J. Mills.

Q. to Mrs. Puryer. Did you ever receive that money - A. No, I did not.

Q. Whose hand-writing is the name of Mills on the receipt - A. The prisoner's hand-writing.

Q. Now, Mr. Umney, look at that receipt, whose writing is that - A. I have every reason to believe it is the prisoner's. I never received the money. I was upon a journey at the time, in the country.

JOHN KENNEDY . I am an officer. When I took the prisoner in custody, I told him the charge that I had against him. He told me that he had received the money, but had lost it in the way to his master's house, and on the day he was committed he wished to speak a few words to the magistrate. He then said that he had paid the money to Mr. Umney. Mr. Umney was called. He was asked if he had received that money. He said, no, there was a man called, but he would not receive the money. The magistrate desired me to go to Mr. Umney's house and take possession of the money. It was two pounds odd that was left for the discharge of the prisoner's debt.

Prisoner's Defence. I received the money of Mr. Hewitt. I lost it at Billingsgate. I was fearful of telling of it. I thought I should be able to pay it by my industry, but was prevented. I offered to pay it at five shillings a week. About eight days after that I was taken in custody. My brother went to the prosecutor's, and offered to give security. This was refused. The prosecutors said, the money must be paid. My brother borrowed the money, and went to the prosecutors. They informed him all was settled. The officer went to the prosecutors, and took the money that was paid by my brother, and I was fully committed for trial.

Q. to prosecutrix. How long from the time that he received this money was it that you saw Mr. Hewitt - A. I believe, the first week in November.

Q. Therefore from September to November you never heard anything from him that he had lost it - A. Not a word of it.

GUILTY , aged 27.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130113-83

210. JOHN HARVEY and BENJAMIN VALENCE were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of December , one hundred and twenty halfpence , the property of George King .

ELIZABETH KING . My husband's name is George King . He is a grocer , 23, Homer-street . I lost the halfpence on the 28th of December. The prisoner, John Valence , came into the shop, and asked for some lemon peel that was in the window. After that, he went out of the shop, and returned again with John Harding with him. Benjamin Valence asked for coffee. I went on the other side of the counter to grind the coffee. Valence set himself on the counter, and took a five shilling paper of halfpence. They both ran out of the shop. They were both brought back. I told Valence he had taken a five shilling paper of halfpence, which he denied, and in a few minutes he owned it. The constable has got the five shilling paper of halfpence.

JOHN TURNER . I was passing through Homer-street. I heard Mrs. King call out stop thief. I

I saw the two prisoners running. I pursued them, and caught hold of Harvey. He said, he had not stolen anything. I then said, you can have no objection to go back to the woman's shop. I took him back, and some other person took Valence back. A constable was sent for. Some person said, let us search them. Upon Valence was found five shillingsworth of halfpence. A woman came in, and said, here is the paper the boy has dropped in the street, and one or both of the prisoners went down on their knees, and asked forgiveness.

Valence's Defence I had four shillings and seven-pence farthing of my father when I came out. I went into the gentlewoman's shop for announce of coffee. She accused me of taking a five shilling paper of halfpence.

Harvey's Defence. I know nothing of taking the halfpence. I went in for some horehound for my cold.

HARVEY, GUILTY, aged 16.

VALENCE, GUILTY, aged 16.

Judgment respited .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder

Reference Number: t18130113-84

211. SARAH BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of September , three bottles of wine, value 8 s. the property of Elizabeth Esdaile , widow .

WILLIAM GREEN . The prisoner lived with my mother as cook for eight or nine months. My mother's name is Elizabeth Esdaile ; she is a widow.

GGORGE MARK RATHBONE . I am a nephew of Mrs. Esdaile's: she lives at 72, Baker-street, Portman-square . On the night of the 21st, the footman mentioned that he suspected the cook of having a false key to her cellar. On the 22d, I came down stairs in the morning, about four o'clock; and saw the prisoner, Sarah Brown , in the passage leading from the cellar to the kitchen. She went towards the street door. I suspected she was going to make her escape. I shut to the street door. I made her go down stairs again. I heard Mrs. Esdaile ask her how long she had had the key of the wine cellar. She replied, only that morning. I said, that was false, as I had locked the key of the cellar up myself the night before. I went up stairs to get the key of the cellar, and when I came to the closet where the key of the cellar was kept, I found a false key in the closet door, and the closet open. The cellar key was not there. I found the key sticking in the cellar door. The footman came upon her too quick; she had not time to take the key away.

JAMES EVANS . I am footman to Mrs. Esdaile. I saw Sarah Brown , on the 22d of November, at four o'clock in the morning, go into my mistress's wine-cellar, and bring out a bottle of wine. My mistress came down stairs, and saw the same.

Q. Had she only taken one bottle out - A. She had only one bottle with her then. Mr. Rathbone stopped her.

JAMES STORER . As I was going upon my master's business by Mrs. Edaile's door, the prisoner called me in; she said, she wanted a key to the closet in the parlour. I took the lock off, and fitted a key to it.

ELIZABETH HOLLETT . I am a soldier's wife. The prisoner called me in to help to clean the kitchen. She knew me by washing for the footman. She put two bottles into my apron. I said, what is this. She said, never mind, go and take it away; I shall see you again; and as she gave it me, so I delivered it up to the constable.

JOHN LANGLEY . I am a constable. I produce the two bottles I received of Mrs. Hollett

Prisoner's Defence. It is my first offence.

GUILTY , aged 61.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130113-85

212. JOHN MYERS and FREDERICK SMITH were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of November , two jackets, value 3 l. 19 s. two pair of trowsers, value 3 l. 16 s. two waistcoats, value 3 l. and two pair of braces, value 7 s. the property of Solomon Levy .

SOLOMON LEVY . I am a tailor . I live at 31, Catherine-street, Tower-hill . On Friday, the 20th of November, the two prisoners called at my house. They bespoke, each of them, a suit of clothes. They told me they had just come from sea, and they must have the clothes on Sunday morning following. I told them, I could not promise them, the time was so short, but I had a suit of clothes would fit one of them. I fitted them on one of them; he liked them, and I was to make for the other by Sunday morning. On Sunday morning they came, they bought various other articles of wearing apparel. They told me they had no money about them, they would thank me to go to their landlord with them, and as soon as the clothes were delivered the clothes would be paid for. I made out the bill and receipt according to their request. I sent my foreman with them to the place where they lodged. That is all I know.

Q. The things that you made for them were two waistcoats and two jackets - A. Yes. They bought various things besides, and I was to send them to their lodgings, and the landlord was to pay for them. I sent my foreman with them.

DAVID MARKS . I went by the order of my master to take them two suits of clothes. I went with them two prisoners to a house in Artichoke-lane. Their pretended landlord asked me if I had made them men's clothes. I said, yes. He said, walk up stairs after me. I had the clothes with me. I went up stairs. The prisoner Myers said, I shall go and clean myself. The landlord asked me if I had got the bill. I said, I had. The other one took the bundle to go and clean himself. After they were gone, the landlord took a pocket-book out of his pocket. I expected he was going to pay me my bill. In the course of two or three minutes, I asked him where these men were gone. He said, he did not know. I then said, where is the clothes; my order is not to leave the clothes without the money. He said, I cannot pay you to-day, call to-morrow. I went the next day. I knocked at the door; a woman opened the door to me. I expected the woman that opened the door was the daughter of that fictitious

landlord. She told me, in short, that this man that pretended to be the landlord did only lodge in the house; he was only a fictitious landlord; he had only a furnished room. He had ran away, and had handed them things out of the house that night. The landlord of the house told me so.

Q. That is not evidence. You know nothing at all, only that you went there, you delivered to one of the men the jackets and trowsers. Why, did not you lay hold of the man - A. I did not suspect that he was not the landlord of the house. I never was paid for them clothes. I am certain these are the men.

Q. Have you ever found your clothes again - A. No. I asked them what they had done with the clothes. They made a jeer of me.

FRANCIS JACKSON . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoners.

Myers's Defence. On the 20th of November, I went to this man's house; he asked me what clothes I wanted. I told him I wanted some clothes; I had no money; I would shew him a man that would be answerable for mine. He took measure of me for a suit of clothes. He said, he could get them ready; he would send them to my house on Sunday. I called at nine o'clock; he then said they would be ready in half an hour. He told me he should send his foreman with us to the man that would be answerable for us. When the foreman came in, Mr. Wright stood on the stairs; he said, these young men have bespoke the clothes, will you be answerable for them. Mr. Wright said he would. He asked him to sit down, and to take anything to drink. He said, he was in a hurry, he would call again. He did not call till Tuesday. He was very well satisfied. The next day, Mr. Wright was very ill, and so he was all the week. Then Mr. Wright went out. We never knew that he was moved until the Monday fornight following. Then Mr. Levy said, in case we did not pay him or give another security, he would swear our lives away. Then he should have security for his money.

Smith's Defence. The same.

MYERS, GUILTY, aged 33.

SMITH, GUILTY, aged 42.

Judgment respited .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130113-86

213. ISAAC SOLOMONS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of January , two pewter pint pots, value 2 s. the property of William Cox .

WILLIAM COX . I am a publican in Petticoat-lane . I keep the King of Prussia public-house . On Thursday, the 7th of January, I lost two pint pots; they were taken from my house. The prisoner was in my house several times that day. It was in the evening part that he stole the pots. The first pint pot that I missed was about half after nine at night. It was taken from the tap-room. The next pint pot I missed was about a quarter before eleven.

Q. Now, between the time that you missed the first pot and the time that you missed the second, had the prisoner been in your tap-room - A. Yes, he had. I did not see him take the first pint pot; I heard he did. I watched him to his own lodgings, which he occupied of me in a court behind my house. I followed close behind him. It was dark; he could not see me, and he is deaf, he could not hear me. When he unlocked his door, I heard him put something down, which sounded like a pewter pot. He came out of his room. I went down. He followed me down into my own house. He called for a pint of beer. I served him myself in a pint pot, which he took into the tap-room. The prisoner was sitting at a table where another man was drinking a pint. The man that was drinking a pint, he went, and left the pint pot there. I had seen the pots on the table; I would not let the maid fetch them out. I went to a secret place, and watched him the while. I was watching him an hour and a half. He did not touch the pots. I thought it would be prudent for me to go into the bar. I had not been in the bar ten minutes before I saw the prisoner go out. I sent my servant girl into the tap room to see whether there was one or two pint pots left on the table. In consequence of what she told me, I went out after the prisoner had overtook him by the end of the court. I took the watchman that I had in waiting I stopped him at the end of the court. I searched him and found my pint pot in his pocket. I then gave him in charge of the watchman, and went to the watchhouse with him. The officer searched him, and found the key of his own room. I went back, and searched his room. I there found the first pot that I mentioned, and likewise found two pans fit to be used for the purpose of melting pots. There was solder at the bottom, which induced me to think they had been used for the purpose of melting pewter pots, and that pint pot that I found there had my name and sign on it.

ROBERT BROWN . I am a watchman of Whitechapel parish. Mr. Cox gave me charge of this prisoner about a quarter before eleven o'clock. I searched him, and found upon him a pint pot; it had the name and sign of Mr. Cox upon it. After I took the prisoner to the watchhouse, I found two keys upon him. I took the prisoner with me to his room. One key opened one room, and the other key another room. One was a bed-room, and the other a lumber room. In the prisoner's bed-room I found a pint pot; it had the prosecutor's name and sign, and I found two pans there underneath the bed; they bear the appearance of having melted metal. As I was taken the prisoner along, he asked me to let him go. I told him it was as much as my place was worth to let him go.

Prisoner's Defence. The pint pot they found in my room, I had half a pint of beer in it, and the pint pot they found upon me they lent me to get a halfpenny worth of milk, in the morning.

Prosecutor. I never lent him a pot at all.

GUILTY , aged 29.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130113-87

214. THOMAS MILLIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of December , six pounds weight of flour, value 2 s. and four loaves of bread, value 6 s. the property of George Howell .

GEORGE HOWELL . I am a baker ; I live in Church-street, Chelsea . The prisoner was my foreman .

Q. Did you lose any flour and bread any time - A. I found some flour and bread in Millis's basket.

Q. What reason have you to charge him with stealing this flour and bread - A. From the evidence of the watchman. I found it in his basket about half past nine in the morning. He took his bread from the shop, in a barrow. My brother manages my business; he sent him out with the bread. I was not in the shop. On the 5th of December, about eight o'clock, I was sitting at my desk, opposite the shop window. William Radford came in and told me his father wanted to speak to me, the sooner the better. In a few minutes afterwards, I went up to Mr. Radford. He said, he wanted to see me. In consequence of what he told me my brother watched Millis's barrow.

WILLIAM RADFORD . I am a baker. I live near Mr. Howell. On Saturday morning, the 5th of December, about twenty minutes before three o'clock, before day-light, hearing some footsteps in the street, I went out. I observed the watchman coming up the lane with a quantity of bread under his coat. I asked him how he came out so soon in the morning. He said, I have got some of the bakers bread below, but you must not take any notice. The watchman's name is Wyegate. I watched Wyegate to his door, about four doors from our house. He tapped three times with a stick upon the pavement, and the door was opened. He went into the house occupied by Mrs. Carter, where he lodged.

Q. Did you tell Mr. Howell what you had seen - A. I did, about eight o'clock in the morning. Mr. Howell followed the prisoner about half past nine, up to the Queen Elms.

Q. Did you see Mr. Howell follow the prisoner - A. Yes, and Wyegate, the watchman, was talking to him at the Queen Elms. When Mr. Howell came up to look at his bread, he found four quartern loaves, and this flour, more than the prisoner had out of the shop.

Q. Did you see what Wyegate had - A. He had a great quantity of bread under his great coat. I saw the top of two quartern loaves; it made a great bundle.

Q. Did Mr. Howell charge the prisoner with having more loaves and flour than the fair delivery - A. Yes. Millis said, the flour that he had in his basket, Mr. Lockey's young man gave it him.

Q. Who is Mr. Lockey - A. A baker, in Lisle-street, and when the young man was fetched, he denied it; in the hearing of the prisoner, he denied giving him the loaves and the flour. He then said, a stranger gave it him, and he was to leave it at the Queen Elms public-house for the stranger, and he was to have a glass of gin for leaving it. Wyegate was in custody a week before he said anything about the prisoner.

NICHOLAS WYEGATE . I am a watchman.

Q. Where does Mr. Howell live - A. In Church-lane.

Q. Do you know the prisoner, Millis - A. I have known him two years, I suppose.

Q. Did you ever receive any articles of him - A. No further than three loaves I had them of him. I do not know where he got them from.

Q. You had three loaves given you by the prisoner; what time - A. About ten minutes before three o'clock, before daylight in the morning. The prisoner is a baker.

Q. Do you know Mr. Radford - A. I do. He saw me at the time I had the three loaves in my possession.

Q. Had you nothing else than loaves in your possession then - A. No.

Q. Do you know anything of any flour - A. No.

Q. You had three loaves given you by the prisoner - A. Yes.

Q. Where were these loaves given to you - A. They were given me over the posts.

Q. Whose posts were they - A. I cannot say. I believe they belong to the parish.

Q. How far were you from Mr. Howell's door when the loaves were given you - A. Not a yard.

Q. Where did Millis come out of when he gave you the loaves - A. I cannot say where he came from. I cannot say whether he came out of Howell's at all

Q. Was Mr. Howell's door open - A. No, I did not see it open at all.

Q. Was the baking business going on - A. I cannot say.

Q. You can smell, cannot you - A. I cannot say anything about it.

Q. You have been in custody - A. I have.

Q. You are sworn to speak the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth - A. I have.

Q. What other house could this man have brought these loaves from than Mr. Howell's house - A. I don't know he could. I did not see him come from there.

Q. Was there any other house from which these loaves could be brought than Mr. Howell's house - A. I cannot say any other.

Q. Was Mr. Howell's house open - A. I cannot say whether it was open or not.

Q. How was the loaves, hot or cold - A. They were not cold.

Q. Were they warm, as if they had just come from the oven - A. They were warm.

Q. How dare you prevaricate - A. I do not prevaricate.

Q. Upon your oath, could these loaves have come from any other place than a baker's shop, warm as they were - A. I cannot say that they did.

Q. Do not you know that they could not come from any other place than a baker's shop at that time - A. I cannot say indeed.

Q. But they were warm - A. Yes.

Q. The loaves were warm, and delivered to you within a yard of Mr. Howell's shop - A. Yes.

Q. Nothing else delivered to you than that - A. No.

Q. Did you see Mr. Radford - A. I met him in the lane.

Q. At the time that Millis gave you these loaves what did he give them to you for - A. He did not say anything. He said, he would call in the morning.

He did not call. I carried them down to him in the morning.

Q. What did he desire you to do with them - A. I put them into his basket.

Q. What did you do with the loaves after he gave them to you - A. I carried them home.

Q. Only three loaves. Are you sure that he gave you no more than three. Now, what did you do with them three loaves - A. I carried them back to him.

Q. What did he desire you to keep them for - A. I cannot say.

Q. What did he desire you to do with them - A. I cannot tell anything about it.

Q. Where were you to give him the three loaves back again - A. I met him in the King's-road, going to Queen Elms.

Q. Did not he give you some flour at the time he gave you the loaves - A. No.

Q. Did you tell Mr. Radford who gave them to you - A. I did.

Q. Do you generally keep goods that are delivered to you about three o'clock in the morning - A. I cannot say any more than I have.

Q. You came from prison here, do not you - A. I have been at large.

Q. How long have you been in prison on this account - A. Eleven days.

Q. Does the parish trust you as a watchman now - A. No. I have not worked as a watchman lately.

JOHN DYSON . I am a constable of the parish of St. Luke, Chelsea. On Saturday, the 5th of December, I went along with Mr. Howell to the Queen Elms. Mr. Howell took the bread out of Millis's basket, and underneath there were two parcels of flour tied up in one bag, and a string between the two; underneath there was a bill of parcels where to take the flour to. Millis came back. Mr. Howell asked him how he had come by that. Millis said, that Lockey's man had given it him. Dick at Lockey's was produced before the prisoner. Dick said he knew nothing at all about it. Millis then said, some other person had given it him to leave at the Queen Elms until called for. Then Mr. Howell gave charge of the watchman. I took Wyegate to Queen-square office. He was committed.

Q. What became of the prisoner - A. He was at large, and then in the afternoon, I was ordered to see after Millis. I searched the watchman's lodgings with an officer. We found a quartern loaf there; it was taken to Queen-square office. One of the men came forward, and said he believed it to be Mr. Howell's. Millis was brought forward. He was asked if he had anybody to speak for him. He said, he knew Mr. Dyson. I took him home with me until Tuesday, and then I resigned him up. Wyegate was in custody eleven days. He was released to give evidence against Millis.

JAMES GILLMORE . I am an officer of Queen-square office. On the 5th of December, I searched the lodging of Wyegate, there I found concealed a quartern loaf behind the curtain. It was a new one. I went along with Dyson in search of Millis. I found Millis at a public-house, at Knightsbridge. I took him out, and told him I had a charge against him at the suit of his master, for stealing bread and flour. He seemed at first astonished, and denied it. He said, that Wyegate had been assisting him in removing the bread from the bakehouse to the shop. Wyegate was in custody. He was discharged on purpose of becoming an evidence against Millis.

The prisoner was not put on his defence.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130113-88

215. JAMES SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of December , a cask, value 10 s. and thirty gallons of vinegar, value 3 l. the property of Andrew Munro .

ANDREW MUNRO . I am an oilman , in Cock-hill, Ratcliffe . On the evening of the 5th of December, I missed a cask, containing thirty gallons of vinegar. It was safe on my premises about seven o'clock in the evening.

Q. Was the vinegar in your shop - A. No. The cask and its contents were under my window of my shop. I had seen it at seven o'clock, and about nine in the evening I perceived it gone. I went that evening to give information at the watchhouse that such a cask of vinegar was lost. I saw it again about twelve o'clock that night in Kelly's house.

Q. What is Kelly - A. I believe he is a lumper. He lives in West's Gardens; that is about half a mile from Cock-hill. I saw the prisoner on the Monday following. The 5th, was Saturday. On Monday, I saw the prisoner in custody at Shadwell office, and when I saw the cask at Kelly's, I knew it to be mine that had been standing under my shop window.

GEORGE CLEUGH . I am a beadle of Shadwell. On Saturday, the 5th of December, I saw a man rolling a cask about two hundred yards from Mr. Munro's premises; it was about nine o'clock in the evening. When the prosecutor came to the watch-house, and said he had lost a cask of vinegar from underneath his window, I told him what I had seen. I saw the way the man went down. I took a candle and lanthorn. We traced the marks of the cask to Kelly's house, and we found the cask at Kelly's house. The prosecutor claimed the cask. He took the cask and Kelly to the watchhouse.

Q. What sort of a man was it you saw rolling this cask - A. I could not observe. It was in the dark. It was a man with a long jacket on.

THOMAS KELLY . I live in West Gardens, New Gravel-lane, Shadwell. I am a lumper.

Q. Was there any cask of vinegar found at your house - A. There was a cask of vinegar rolled to my house. My wife was in labour. I was at home. It was rolled to my house about nine o'clock in the evening. Jame Smith and another man brought it. They asked me liberty to leave it in my yard until morning. I said there was not room in my yard; he might leave it in the room until morning.

Q. Who was the other man - A. I do not know. He was taken, and admitted an evidence, and then run away.

Q. How long after it was in your room was it that any body enquired after it - A. I saw Mr. Munro,

Mr. Cleugh, and another gentleman. I asked them what they were looking for; they said, what is that to me.

Q. Did they see the cask of vinegar - A. Not till I told them where it was. Mr. Munro said it was his. I directed him were to find Smith in the morning. I believe he lived at Limehouses.

Q. Are you quite sure that the cask that they found in your room was the cask that was brought by Smith and the other man - A. Yes, I am. They took me up about it. They kept me in prison until the Monday following. I had Smith taken on Sunday morning. Smith told me that he was employed by a cook of a ship to roll it down to King James's stairs. He was not able to roll it any further, so he rolled it to my place, to leave it there till the morning.

Q. to Prisoner. Do you wish to ask any questions of Thomas Kelly - A. Thomas Kelly speaks the truth.

GEORGE PARTRIDGE . I am an officer of Shadwell office. I took Carter in custody upon Kelly's information. He is not forthcoming. I have got the cask

Prosecutor. That is the cask that was taken from underneath my window. The vinegar is worth three pounds.

Prisoner's Defence. They all speak very true as far as I know. I was employed to roll or carry it in the best manner I could, to King James's stairs, and when I had rolled it four or five yards, he desired me to roll it back again. I said, I suppose it was New Crane stairs he meaned. He said, it was. I rolled it to Kelly's house. I met the other man. He said, where are you going. I said, to New Crane stairs. I looked round, and the man that hired me was gone. I went into several public-houses to look for him. I said to Carter, you must assist me in rolling it back. He said, what must you do with the cask. I said, I did not know; I know a man of the name of Kelly, near here, he will let me leave it in his place. I left it there. Carter and me went down to Three Crane stairs; we enquired of the waterman, and at the public-houses; we could not find the man. I went home until the morning. I was going down in the morning again, I met a man; he told me the officers were looking after me. He said, I had better keep out of the way. I replied, I shall not keep out of the way; I shall call at Shadwell office; and as I was going to the office, I met with an officer. He said, is your name James Smith . I said, yes. He then said he wanted me to come along with him; very well, said I. I am a stranger in the country. I am mostly at sea.

GUILTY , aged 33.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130113-89

216. MARY HARRIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of January , a pair of sheets, value 6 s. two blankets, value 6 s. four curtains, value 12 s. a pillow, value 1 s. a tablecloth, value 2 s. and two-pillow-cases, value 1 s. the property of Thomas Colwel , in a lodging room

ELIZA TAYLOR . I am housekeeper to Thomas Colwell, 67, John-street, Fitzroy-square .

Q. In the month of December last, did you let the prisoner a lodging - A. I did, the parlours; they were both ready furnished, at two guineas a week. On the 18th of December last, she took possession of the apartment, and she left on the 6th of January, and took the key with her. On Friday she left the apartment; on the Tuesday following I had the door opened. I missed a pair of sheets, pillow-cases, and two blankets, and a pillow, tablecloth, and four curtains. These things were let to the prisoner with the lodging. I missed them. On the next morning, I saw them at Mr. Wadmore's, the pawnbroker in Tottenham-court-road, where I found the prisoner's char-woman, Lydia Ann Morris , pledging a pair of blankets.

LYDIA ANN MORRIS . I go out a charing.

Q. Did the prisoner employ you to pledge any articles for her - A. Yes, during the time I was with her, when she was at 67, John-street, I pledged for her four curtains, a tablecloth, two pillow-cases, one pillow, and two blankets; and several other things that are owned by Mr. Colwel. I pledged them at Mr. Wadmore's, Tottenham-court-road, and the money that I obtained on these articles I gave to the prisoner. Some I pledged in my own name, and some in Mr. Colwel, and some in the prisoner's name. Mr. Wadmore detained me. I then said who employed me to pawn them. I then had the possession of the tickets. I gave them to Mr. Wadmore, with several other tickets that were not owned by Mr. Colwel. The prisoner gave me the tickets on the morning that I pledged the blankets.

THOMAS WADMORE . I am a pawnbroker, in Tottenham-court-road. I have the duplicates. They are pledged in different names. Two are pledged in the name of Harris, 67, John-street. The sheets are pledged in the name of Morris. They were all claimed by Mr. Colwel. The blankets were not pawned: I stopped them. I asked Lydia Ann Morris whose blanket it was. She said, Mrs. Harris's.

WILLIAM CHILD . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner on the 6th of January.

Prisoner's Defence. I have not seen these things at all. I have been out frequently from twelve o'clock in the day until five o'clock in the evening. I should not have sent that woman if I had intended to pledge them.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130113-90

217. THOMAS KENNEDY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of December , forty-one halfpence , the property of John Shearman .

MARY SHEARMAN . I am the wife of John Shearman; we keep a green-grocers shop , Leader-street, Chelsea-common . On the 17th of December, the prisoner came into the shop, and asked me if I wanted to buy any wood. I told him, I did not. He asked me then if I had got any such halfpence as he had in his hand. He told me if I had, he would give me a penny for it. I told him I did not want a penny for it, if I had any he should have it. I opened the till, and showed him one that was not thin enough. I shewed him the second and the third, they would not do. He reached his hand

over the counter, pretending to point to some halfpence that would do, and with that he put his hand in the drawer and clasped as many halfpence as he could, and put them in his pocket. I said, he had robbed me before my face. He said, he had not robbed me. He said he had twenty-two halfpence about him. He pulled the money out of his pocket, and shewed it me. I told him, I was sure he had robbed me, and asked him if he would let me look in his pockets. He would not. I tried to reach over the counter to feel his pockets; he dodged back, he would not let me. I went round the counter. He went to the door, and went out. He crossed the way, and run. I went to my neighbour, and told him of it. I shewed him the prisoner; he was running; and my neighbour pursued him. I am sure the prisoner is the boy that took the halfpence.

WILLIAM ABEL . I live next door to the prosecutrix, No. 1, Leader-street, I am a grocer. On the 7th of December, Mary Shearman came to my shop door, and informed me that she had been robbed. She pointed to the lad, and said, there he runs. The prisoner was then about sixty yards from my door. I pursued him. He turned the corner, and then I saw two. The other lad had on a blue coat. The prisoner a white one. The prisoner ran into a brick field. I got pretty near to him. I saw some people before; I called out, stop thief. He ran round by the heap of earth in the brick field; he made a bit of a stoop. I could only see his head as the earth was between him and me. I then ran round the contrary way, and caught him, and took him to John Shearman 's shop. He then declared to me that he had but one halfpenny about him. I delivered him into the hands of the beadle of the parish. I immediately ran back as fast as I could to the heap of earth, supposing he had thrown the money there. I met a man of the name of David Bott , with a hand full of halfpence, which he had taken out of the cart house, behind this heap of earth. He told me that a woman looking out of the window saw the prisoner throw the money away, when I cried out, stop thief. Her name is Lucy Cole .

LUCY COLE . On the 7th of December, I heard the alarm of, stop thief. I looked out of my window, and saw the prisoner throw the money into the cart house. I told Bott of it.

DAVID BOTT . I was at work in the brick field. I heard the cry of, stop thief. I saw the prisoner run, and the witness after him. Lucy Cole said, he threw the money in the cart house. I picked up one shilling and eight-pence halfpenny. I took it back to the prosecutrix.

Prisoner's Defence. I would wish to go to sea.

GUILTY, aged 15.

Judgment respited .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130113-91

218. CARL ANHOLT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of December , eighteen pounds weight of rope, value 5 s. the property John Blackett , senior, and John Blackett , junior.

THOMAS COUZEN . I am superintendant at the dock at Poplor. On the 30th of December, in the morning, about half past seven, the watchman sent a boy to acquaint me that he had a man in custody. I went and saw the prisoner in custody, with the rope that he cut. I asked the prisoner, why he had cut that rope. He told me, for hunger. I replied, there were several ships fitting out, they had not their complement of men, there was good provision there for him, and good pay.

- BALL. I am a watchman in Blackett's yard. I saw the prisoner cut this rope from the bridge, and he ran away with it.

Q. What is Mr. Blackett's name - A. John: father and son.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in great distress. I had had nothing to eat for two or three days scarce. I took the rope. I was going to sell it to get a bit of bread.

GUILTY, aged 30.

Judgment respited .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130113-92

219. JOHN BENSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of December , a pair of trowsers, value 5 s. the property of John Bannister .

JOHN BANNISTER . I am a pawnbroker . I live in Broad-street, Ratcliffe . On the 10th of December, I was sitting in the parlour, when the witness, Mr. Welsford, called to me, saying, I was robbed. I went to the door, and on my looking out, I saw Mr. Welsford bringing the prisoner back, with a pair of trowsers under his arm.

JAMES WELSFORD . On the 16th of December, I was standing in my own shop. A person came to my door, and said my neighbour was robbed. She pointed to a man running by the door I immediately pursued the prisoner and caught him. He had a pair of trowsers under his arm. He asked me to let him go. I took him back to Mr. Bannister; he claimed the property. These are the trowsers.

Prosecutor. They are mine; they were cut from the door.

Prisoner's Defence. I was not going to steal them; I was only looking at them.

GUILTY , aged 63.

Confined One Month in Newgate , and whipped in Jail .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130113-93

220. RICHARD VENNING was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of January , a gown, value 6 s. and a pair of breeches, value 5 s. the property of Cornelius Riley .

CORNELIUS RILEY . I live at No. 6, Stewart's-rents, Drury-lane . I am a shoemaker . I lost the gown and breeches two months ago. The prisoner lodged with me. I suspected him to be a thief. Last boxing day I met him in Rosemary-lane. I then saw the breeches upon him.

JOHN MURRAY . I am a pawnbroker. I produce a gown pawned by an Irish woman.

JOHN TURNBRIDGE . I produce the duplicate of the gown. I found it in the prisoner's lodging.

Prosecutor. The gown and the breeches are mine.

Prisoner's Defence. The woman that I lived with brought me these breeches.

GUILTY, aged 28.

Judgment respited .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130113-94

221. SARAH ANN DRAYTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of January , a hat, value 10 s. a great coat, value 10 s. and a handkerchief, value 6 d. the property of Richard Baines .

RICHARD BAINES . I am a mariner . On the 4th of January, the prisoner met me in Ratcliffe-highway . I afterwards went home with her. I put my great coat on a chair in the room. She ran away with it, and my hat, and my handkerchief. When she disappeared, two young women came in the room. I told them, I wanted my great coat and hat. They said, I must look for the woman that had got it. I came down stairs.

Q. Are you sure this is the woman - A. I applied to the watchman the next day. The watchman knew her by my description. I went and got an officer; he took her up.

JOHN DALTON . I am an officer. The prosecutor came to the office; he said he had been robbed of a great coat, a hat, and a pocket handkerchief. I found the handkerchief in a pail of water, in the prisoner's room. This is the handkerchief. She said she knew nothing of it.

Prosecutor. This is my handkerchief. It was in my coat pocket.

JURY. Did you see the prisoner take the coat and hat from the room - A. I did. There was no other person in the room then but she and me.

GUILTY , aged 31.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130113-95

222. MARGARET DORSET was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of January , a shawl, value 10 s. the property of Thomas Warren , from the person of Mary his wife .

MARY WARREN . I live at No. 8, Golden-lane, opposite the New Brewery. My husband's name is Thomas Warren . On Sunday evening, the 10th of January, me and my sister went to see an acquaintance as far as the Tower. On coming back, the prisoner accosted us, and said, she would see us home as far as Whitecross-street, where she was going to. My sister had drank too much. I was sober enough to protect myself. I saw my sister safe into Sun-street . The prisoner said she would see us as far as Whitecross-street. My sister said, she would treat her with a glass of liquor for her kindness. We went into a public-house, and as soon as my sister had drank a glass of liquor she fell down, and directly we came out of the public-house this woman took my shawl off my neck.

Q. Did you ever find your shawl again - A. Yes; on Wednesday my husband found the shawl on her neck. Mr. Prince took it off her neck.

JOHN PRINCE . I took the prisoner in custody. Upon her I found this shawl.

Prosecutrix. It is my shawl.

Prisoner's Defence. I am as innocent as a new born baby. I never saw the prosecutrix before.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130113-96

223. WILLIAM GRAY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of September , seven wire drawing plates, value 3 l. and three copper rings, value 18 d. the property of James Schofield .

JAMES SCHOFIELD . I am a gold and silver wire drawer . I live in Clerkenwell-close . The prisoner was my apprentice ; he has four years now to serve. I trusted him with the tools mentioned in the indictment, to draw silver wire for me; a part of which he brought home. He had left me previous, and had been in bad company. He got into Tothill-fields. I made him an out-door apprentice, in a kind of a way that he might keep himself in credit, and not finding all the wire come home, I got a search warrant, and when I went I found all my tools missing, and never could find what he had done with my silver wire. My tools are here; they are plates and copper rings. I trusted him with the complete tools, altogether worth between ten and fifteen pounds.

CHARLES STANTON . The prisoner came to my master's house, and enquired for work. I went up to my master, and asked him whether he could give him any work to do. Master told me he had not work enough to give his own men; he could not give him any. The prisoner then brought his tools to sell to Mr. Stillwell. He bought them, as he said he was in want of bread.

EDWARD STILLWELL . Stanton brought these things into the shop. I bought them. I delivered them to the office.

THOMAS PACE . I am an officer. These are the things that Mr. Stillwel delivered to me.

Prosecutor. They are mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I would wish to go to sea, if they would accept of Plea.

GUILTY, aged 19.

Judgment respited .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130113-97

224. DAVID JENKINS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of January , two pieces of timber, value 15 s. the property of John Evans , esq .

JOSEPH FOULKES . I am a builder. I live at 15, London-terrace, Hackney-road .

Q. What is the prisoner - A. I do not know.

Q. When did you lose this timber - A. Between ten and eleven o'clock at night, on the 1st of January, the watchman knocked to my door; he asked me if I had lost any timber. I said, I did not know. He said, he found a piece upon the shoulders of a man; he had brought it to me to look at. He brought it up to the pile where it was taken from. I went out, and compared the piece that he had brought back with the piece that had been cut that day. It was the piece that had been sawed that afternoon. One piece corresponded with the other.

Q. Whose property is it - A. The property of John Evans , esq. I am the builder for him. I am the agent on the estate. He has a great many houses, and a good deal of land. I have no doubt it is his property.

Q. When had you seen it before the watchman came - A. I saw it that very afternoon. It was then upon No. 16, the next door. It was upon the arch

walks, neither in the road nor in the path-way. I am sure I had seen it that afternoon.

HENRY STRATFORD . I am a watchman, in Hackney-road. I was crying the hour of ten. I saw the prisoner tumbling something near the saw-pit. It was after ten. I asked him, what he was doing. He said, it was nothing to me. I said, I was ordered to take care of the timber. He shewed me a piece of a bedstead. He seemed to be in liquor. He said, he lived in Coal-harbour-street. He came with me as far as Nelson-street. He went away, and instead of my going into the box, I went to the other end of the street. I heard a person coming down. I met the prisoner with a piece of timber on his shoulder. He put it down by his own door, I said, this is a comical piece of bedstead. He knocked at the door; his wife let him in. I knocked at the door. I said, tell your husband to come out. He came out, and at the corner of the street, I lost him. I went back, and secured the property that I had seen upon him. I took it to Mr. Foulkes, and Mr. Foulkes believed it to be the piece that was near the saw-pit. I took Mr. Foulkes with me to shew him where he lived, and there was another piece of timber before his door, who brought that I do not know. I am certain that he is the man.

WILLIAM BAINE . I am a sawyer. I know the timber; it is Mr. Evans's property.

Prisoner's Defence. I have lived in some of the most respectable families in the kingdom. I am totally innocent.

GUILTY , aged 64.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130113-98

225. CATHERINE LACEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st December , a blanket, value 3 s. a bolster, value 1 s. a sheet, value 3 s. and two pillows, value 2 s. the property of Thomas Fairfax , in a lodging-room .

HARRIET FAIRFAX . My husband's name is Thomas Fairfax ; he is a steward of a ship . I live at No. 6, Noble-street, Goswell-street . I let the prisoner a back room, one pair. She came into it on the 1st of December. She quitted it that day week. I suspected that she was leaving, I sent a boy to watch her where she went. I found her in Golden-lane. The officer found the duplicates. I lost a pillow, bolster, and a counterpane. I was present when the duplicates were found in her new lodgings. The constable brought her back to my house. I found the things were gone afterwards.

WILLIAM PALMER . I am an officer. I went to the prisoner's room in Golden-lane. I apprehended her. I took these duplicates from her person; they belong to three different pawnbrokers.

RICHARD WILLIAMSON . I am a pawnbroker, 20, Barbican. On the 7th of December, the prisoner pawned a pillow with me.

EDWARD DAVIS . I am a pawnbroker. I took in pawn a bolster, a blanket, a sheet, and a flat iron. The prisoner pawned them.

WILLIAM GADSDUN . I am a pawnbroker in Whitecross-street. I took in a patch-work quilt of the prisoner on the 3d of December.

Prosecutrix. It is all my property. I have seen it before.

Prisoner's Defence. I was out of employ. I did it through distress. I have got two children.

GUILTY , aged 36.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130113-99

226. WILLIAM NEVILL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of January , a silver tea-spoon, value 2 s. a gold ring, value 10 s. a pair of stays, value 5 s. and a pair of gold ear-rings, value 2 s. the property of John Immay .

MRS. IMMAY. My husband's name is John Immay ; we live in Lizard-street, Old-street-square .

Q. What is the prisoner - A. A plaisterer and white-washer . He was sent into the house to do some work. On the 5th of January, I missed a gold ring, a pair of stays, and a pair of ear-rings. On the 14th, I lost a silver tea-spoon. My husband found the the tea-spoon in the white-wash pail. I found my ring at the pawnbrokers, and my stays likewise. I have never found the ear-rings.

THOMAS ALLEN . I am a carpenter. I was writing in the accompting-house, Mrs. Immay came and told me that the prisoner had stolen a silver spoon. I went and accused the prisoner of taking the spoon. He denied it, and said we might search him; he never saw the spoon. I took the silver spoon out of his white-wash pail. He said, he did not know how it came there. This is the spoon.

ROBERT MULLIN . I am a pawnbroker. I produce a ring and a pair of stays. The stays I took in of the prisoner, and the ring of the prisoner's sister.

Prosecutrix. That is my ring, stays, and spoon.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence; called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY, aged 15.

Judgment respited .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130113-100

227. THOMAS SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of January , twenty-six pounds weight of lead, value 2 s. the property of Mary Bankes , widow , affixed to her dwelling-house .

ZACHARIAH ROGERS . I am a servant to Mary Bankes , at Fulham . On the 10th of January, we were disturbed by the patrol who took the prisoner.

JAMES SWINNEY . I am a patrol at Fulham. On the 10th of January, I was going my round, between three and four in the morning, I heard a noise at Mrs. Bankes's house. We went close to the house. We thought we saw some one on the house. It was not light enough to discern him. He slipped down when he saw us. He had got this pipe off, and had doubled it as you see it now. It was affixed to Mrs. Bankes's house.

GUILTY , aged 65.

Confined Two Years in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130113-101

228. THOMAS VICKERS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of December , five deal boards, value 20 s. the property of John Holland .

JOHN HOLLAND . I am a builder , London-terrace. Hackney-road .

Q. What is the prisoner - A. A carpenter and builder .

THOMAS FOULKES . On the 26th of December, a man came to me, and said, a man was stealing the deals. I did not see the prisoner take the deals; I saw him standing against the deals. It was about two o'clock in the day; and by the man saying he stole the deals, I took him in custody.

Q. Had he the deals in his possession - A. No, they were laying down.

Q. How far had they been removed - A. Two streets.

Q. Did any body see him remove them - A. No more than the man said he was stealing the deals.

Q. Where is that man - A. I do not know; he is a stranger to me.

Q. All you know, you saw him standing by the deals; whether he stole them you do not know - A. I do not.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130113-102

229. THOMAS BARR was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of December , a cask, value 3 s. 6 d. and two gallons of gin, value 32 s. the property of John Deacon , Daniel Deacon , and John Nixon .

DANIEL DEACON . I am a carrier .

Mr. Alley. This man is indicted at Hicks's Hall, as the receiver - A. Yes.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130113-103

230. WILLIAM HICKS and THOMAS HICKS were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of December , three bundles of straw, value 5 s. the property of Charles Newman .

CHARLES NEWMAN . I am a farmer at Laneham . The two prisoners worked as thrasher s for me. On the 15th of December, in the afternoon, I assisted my man, he being unwell, in bundling up the straw. I put it in a shed adjoining the barn.

Q. What sort of straw was it - A. It was oat straw; it grew upon an half acre, near 'Squire Littleton's. There is a rookery there. It was cut before it was ripe, in consequence of the rockery, or else it would have stopped a fortnight longer. On the 15th, I was going my round, I saw a trace of straw from my house to these men's premises. I traced it across the road, up to their doors, and when I got there, I saw two pig sties, and two hogs in each sty. One of the sties belonged to one of the prisoners and the other to the other. The hogs were feeding on oats, with chaff. I found one bundle of straw in each of their sheds. The oats were not cleaned to send to market; they had been thrashed. They always stand in the barn until we clean them up. The oats that the hogs were feeding on where like oats just thrashed. I clean them up every week, and send them to market. They had one bundle of straw in each of their sheds, and they had some oat straw in each of their sties; a very good bed for the hogs. I took samples out of each. I took it home and compared it with my straw at home. I found three bundles of straw missing. I do not sell straw. I use it all up on my farm.

Q. These were bundles of straw, not trusses for sale - A. No; there were three bundles for my own use. I bound them myself, my man being unwell. I am sure that these bundles of straw in the hog sties were my property, and that they had growed upon that half acre. I enquired of William Hicks whether he had got any hogs in his sty. He answered, no, he had not get any; then I enquired of Thomas. He said, he had got two. Then I enquired of William who the other two belonged to; he said, what is that to you. I then said, who feeds them; they are feeding upon my corn. He made use of bad words; he said, d - n and blast your eyes, if you swear we stole your property, we'll do for you.

William Hicks 's Defence. I found the straw on the road.

Thomas Hicks said nothing in his defence.

WILLIAM HICKS GUILTY , aged 25.

THOMAS HICKS GUILTY , aged 27.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130113-104

231. JOSEPH FULLER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of January , one hundred and twelve pounds weight of potatoes, value 6 s. the property of Daniel Beale ; and ISAAC BROWN for receiving the said goods, on the same day, he well knowing them to have been stolen .

JOHN MAYER . I am bailiff to Daniel Beale , at Edmonton .

Q. What is Joseph Fuller - A. He was carter to Mr. Beale; he was employed to carry vegetables to Mr. Beale in town, to 28, Fitzroy-square. On Saturday the 9th of January, between six and seven in the morning, I saw him set off with a sack of potatoes, and a sack of chaff. On the Sunday morning I had occasion to go to Fitzroy-square; I saw the sack of potatoes was not taken. On Monday morning, I saw Joseph Fuller ; I asked him what he had done with the sack of potatoes. He said he had taken them, and the sack was in the shed. He then went to work. At dinner time, I called him into my house; I told him there were no potatoes delivered in town. He begged my pardon, and told me that he did not carry the potatoes.

Mr. Walford. I believe you told him if he did not tell, you would send him on board a man of war - A. I told him if he did not tell he should go before the justice, and if he did tell he should go to work; instead of going to work he run away.

DANIEL CLARKSON . I am an officer. On Wednesday, the 13th, I apprehended Brown, the ostler , at the White Hart, Newington, for receiving a quantity, of potatoes of Fuller. Joseph Fuller said in his examination, that he delivered the potatoes to Brown. The examination was read over to both of them. The magistrate signed it, and I signed it also. Isaac Brown said he never received the potatoes.

(The examination read.)

Fuller said nothing in his defence.

Brown was not put on his defence.

FULLER, GUILTY , aged 19.

Confined Two Months in Newgate , and whipped in Jail .

BROWN, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130113-105

232. THOMAS SHORTLIFFE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of January , a wooden can, value 5 s. three quarts of gin, value 10 s. a pewter pot, value 2 s. and one pint and a half of gin, value 2 s. the property of Benjamin George Hodges , and Thomas Chamberlain .

BENJAMIN GEORGE HODGES . My partner's name is Thomas Chamberlain . We are distiller s, at Mill-bank. The prisoner was one of our car-men .

Q. Has each of your carman a bin appropriated to their own use - A. Yes, and each man keeps his own key.

Q. On the evening of the 8th of this month were you present when Goodenough broke open the prisoner's corn bin - A. I was. The corn bin was in the stable. It was locked; and when I had it broken open, I discovered this wooden can, containing three quarts of gin. It is a kind of a pail. We use them wooden cans in the distillery. The men take out gin sometimes with them.

Q. Did you find a pewter pot - A. No, there is a mistake in that. I found nothing else in the corn bin. The prisoner was not on the premises at the time. On the next morning, when he came to work, I had him taken up by Goodenough, and two quart bottles were found upon him. I then went with Goodenough to the prisoner's lodgings. I found there four quart bottles full of gin. I asked the prisoner what he brought the empty bottles for. He said, he had borrowed one of Mrs. Smith, who keeps a public-house, within a few yards of our house. He said he had some gin in a quart pot, underneath the manger of one of the horses. I told him I would go and search for it. I did. I could not find anything there. I returned, and told him I had not found what he described. We then told him what we had found. He said, he thought no harm of taking a drop to drink. He was then taken before the magistrate.

WILLIAM GOODENOUGH . I am a constable. I was with Mr. Hodges; his account is correct. This is the gin I found in the bin, and these empty bottles I found in his pocket, and this one of the bottles I found in his cupboard at home.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence; called two witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130113-106

233. WILLIAM BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of January , a wooden can, value 5 s. a gallon of peppermint, value 15 s. two bottles of gin, value 5 s. and a glass bottle, value 6 d. the property of Benjamin George Hodges and Thomas Chamberlain .

BENJAMIN GEORGE HODGES . The name of my partner is Thomas Chamberlain . We are distiller s, at Mill-bank . The prisoner was a carman in our employ. He had a key to lock up his bin. He kept the key in his own possession. On the night of the 8th of January, I broke open the lock of the prisoner's bin. I found therein a wooden can, and a gallon of peppermint. On the next morning, when the prisoner came, the constable searched him, and found three empty quart bottles upon him. We asked him how he came by this peppermint. He said, he thought no harm of taking a drop of drink. His house was searched. We found three bottles there, two of gin, and one containing water.

WILLIAM GOODENOUGH . This is the peppermint, and here is one of the bottles of gin I found at his house.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18130113-107

234. HYAM MOSES was indicted for that he, on the 25th of December , one piece of false and counterfeited money made to the likeness and similitude of a good shilling, unlawfully did utter to Isaac Gray , he knowing the same to be false and counterfeited .

ISAAC GRAY . I am a servant to Mr. Romanis in Cheapside. On Christmas day last, between five and six o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner selling oranges , in Leadenhall-street , near the opening that leads to the market. I agreed to purchase fourteen oranges of him for a shilling. I took out of my pocket an eighteen-penny piece, some halfpence, and three sixpences. I gave him two sixpences to pay for the oranges, Upon my offering him the two sixpences, he refused one of the sixpences; he did not like it; if I would give him the eighteen-penny piece he would give me one of my sixpences and a shilling. I said, you want to give me some bad money. He said, he would not. He gave me a shilling and a sixpence, and I gave him the eighteen-penny piece. I looked at the shilling he gave me; I told him it was a bad one, directly, and I threatened to send him to the Compter for putting a bad shilling upon me. I called out to the waterman that attends the coaches, to know where I could get a constable. The prisoner, upon my calling out, run into Leadenhall-market as fast as he could. I ran after him. I believe I called out, stop thief; some person in the market stopped him, and I came up to him. He was never out of my sight. The constable came by, and I gave charge of him.

Q. Was Draper that constable - A. Yes.

Q. Did you deliver the shilling that he gave you to the constable - A. I did, the next morning. I am sure the shilling that the prisoner gave to the constable. The prisoner was taken to the Compter, and at the Compter I agreed to purchase all the oranges he had for a shilling. I paid him for them with two sixpences. One of the sixpences was the sixpence that he had objected to, and then he made no objection to it.

BUSBY DRAPER . I took the prisoner in Leadenhall-market; he had been stopped before I came up.

I took him to the Compter, and searched him. It was all good silver I found upon him. This is the shilling Mr. Gray gave me; I have kept it ever since.

CALEB EDWARD POWELL . Q. I believe you assist the soliciter of the mint - A. Yes.

Q. Tell us whether that is a counterfeit shilling or not - A. It is a counterfeit. It is quite a fresh one. It does not appear to have been in circulation. It is merely coloured, not plated.

Prisoner's Defence. On Christmas day, I was standing in Cornhill, selling oranges. This gentleman bought fourteen oranges of me for a shilling. He gave me two sixpences; one of them did not appear to me to be a good one. I refused it. He gave me an eighteen-penny piece. He said, give me a shilling. I took my shillings out of my pocket; I said, take one. He took one; he said, it was a bad one. I did not know it. I had just taken it. I said, I would change it for him. He said, I will not have it changed; he would give charge of me.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Confined Six Months in Newgate , and to find sureties then for Six Months to come .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130113-108

235. MARGERET LAIDLER was indicted for a misdemeanour .

STEPHEN MUTT . I am a poulterer in Leadenhall-market .

Q. Did the prisoner, and at what time, come to your shop - A. On the 18th of December.

Q. Did you know her before - A. Yes, she was in the service of Mr. Cock, a customer of mine. On the 18th of December, about noon, she came; she said, she wanted a large turkey for her master to make a present, and she was going to take it down to the Custom-house to him.

Q. How long had you known her to be actually in the service of Mr. Cock - A. I cannot say. She had left him for a twelve month, as they tell me. I supposed her to be Mr. Cock's servant ; upon that I delivered her one of the largest and finest turkeys I had. She came the next day for a turkey, two fowls, and four pounds of butter. I delivered that to her, as I thought for Mr. Cock. She came in the evening of the same day for a goose and two rabbits. When she went out of the shop, my man said she was a little drunk. I did not see her afterwards, until I saw her before the magistrate, on Monday.

Q. Have you seen Mr. Cock since - A. I do not know that I ever saw him in my life. I never knew him. His servant came and paid for what he had.

ANN HOCKING . I am housekeeper and cook to Simon Cock . I have lived with him about nine or ten months.

Q. On the 18th of December, did you send this person for a turkey on Mr. Cock's account - A. No, I did not. He, nor any of his family, was in town at the time.

Q. All you know is, that this turkey was not for Mr. Cock - A. No, it was not.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18130113-109

236. THOMAS HATFIELD was indicted for a misdemeanour .

JOSEPH ORD . I am a haberdasher in St. Paul's Church-yard . On the 3d of December last, the prisoner came to my house; he represented himself as the Stretham carrier. He called, he said, for a parcel for Mrs. Cater. I had previously received a letter from a person calling herself Mrs. Cater, on the morning of the same day.

(The letter read.)

"Mrs. Cater will be obliged to Mrs. Ord to send her on Thursday by the carrier, six yards of twilled sarsenet, and the widest you have. I think I paid you for the last I had seven shillings per yard. I wish to have it of the same quality, and a bill of the same, and the carrier shall bring you the money on his return; also will thank you to send me two or three skeins of purple silk. Stretham, December 3, 1812. Addressed to Mr. Ord, St. Paul's churchyard."

Q. to Mr. Ord. You had no such customer - A. No; that excited my suspicion. I gave orders to my people that if the carrier should call, the goods should not be sent. They were to state to the carrier if he called, that the lady was not known to me. About five in the evening, the prisoner called as the carrier. He said, he was the Stretham carrier, that he called for Mrs. Cater's parcel. I went to the prisoner from curiosity. I asked him what Mrs. Cater was. He said, she was a lady of great respectability, and kept her carriage. He had been her carrier for four years. I asked him where he went from in London. He said, the Old Bailey, Bishopsgate-street, and the Borough. He held in his hand a pocket-book; it appeared to contain letters, as carriers commonly have directions and orders and patterns of goods that he had got to match. I was determined to risk it. I thought she might have been a lady that came to my shop. I was present when the goods were delivered, six yards of sarsenett, at eight shilings a yard, and three skeins of purple silk at ten-pence a skein. They were put up in a paper parcel, by a young person who is in court, directed to Mrs. Cater, Stretham.

Q. It was your property, and you expected to be paid for them, did not you - A. I did. I have not receive the remittance as promised. I did not receive the money on the following day. I became suspicious that the carrier or Mrs. Cater had deceived me. I waited a reasonable time for the money to arrive, I sent a young man down to Stretham, to ascertain the fact. They ascertained that there was no Mrs. Cater, at Stretham.

Q. You never received the money or had the goods returned - A. No.

MARY FIELDER . I assist Mr. Ord. I was in the shop at the time that Mr. Ord described, that the prisoner came in. The prisoner came in, and asked for the parcel for Mrs. Cater. I went and told Mr. Ord that the carrier had come for the parcel for Mrs. Cater. Mr. Ord came to the prisoner; he asked him whether he knew Mrs. Cater. He said, yes, he knew her perfectly well; he said, she was a lady that kept her carriage, and that he had carried parcels for her for four years. Mr. Ord then went and cut off the sarsenet, and gave it me to pack up. I packed it, and enclosed a note with a bill of parcels. I directed it to Mrs. Cater, Stretham; and while he

was at the counter he pulled out his pocket-book, and in his pocket-book there were several papers; on one was a bit of muslin. He said, it would be eleven o'clock before he got home. Then I gave him the parcel. He asked for a pint of beer. He never returned the next day. On the 21st, I went with the officer for the purpose of taking the prisoner. He was taken at the Dog and Bear public-house, in the Borough, at half after ten at night. The moment I saw him I knew him. I have no doubt he is the same person.

WILLIAM BROCKWAY . I am the postman at Stretham. I have been so between twelve and thirteen years. I know Stretham very well.

Q. Do you know such a person as Mrs. Cater - A. No, I never heard of the name; there is no such person at Stretham.

THOMAS CARR . I am clerk to Mr. Ord.

Q. Did you make enquiries at Stretham for such a person as Mrs. Cater - A. I did. I could not find her.

ROBERT BAKER . I am the Stretham carrier. There is no other Stretham carrier than me and John Lane.

Q. Do you know the prisoner; is he John Lane.

A. I think I have seen him. He is not John Lane. The prisoner is not a person employed as a Stretham carrier.

HENRY KELLIDGE. I apprehended the prisoner in the Borough, at the Dog and Bear. I took him to the White Horse, and searched him. On him I found this pocket-book; the pocket-book contained four letters. The Lord Mayor broke them open the next day; they all contain orders for goods.

(The letters read.)

EDWARD MILLS . I keep the Dog and Bear public-house, in the Borough. I know the prisoner very well, and I know his neice. I have seen them both write; they write so much alike I cannot tell one writing from the other. I have know the prisoner four years; his uncle had the Ching cart; his uncle sold the Ching cart to Smith. The prisoner has worked for Smith in the Ching cart.

PETER BRANSCOMB . I am a City officer. On the 4th of January, I went to the cousin of the prisoner, and I got the direction where the prisoner lodged from the cousin. She said, this box belonged to the prisoner. In this box I found the bill of parcels, proporting to be writ by Mr. Ord. This is it; and here are the three skeins of silk.

Mr. Ord. That is the bill of parcel that was given to the prisoner with a note directed to Mrs. Cater.

Prisoner's Defence. I never knew any body call me Bateman but Mr. Mills. I am innocent of the crime imputed to me.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.


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