Old Bailey Proceedings, 2nd December 1812.
Reference Number: 18121202
Reference Number: f18121202-1

WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND ALSO THE GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, HELD AT Justice-Hall, in the Old Bailey, On WEDNESDAY the 2nd of DECEMBER, 1812, and following Days;

BEING THE FIRST SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF The Right Honourable GEORGE SCHOLEY , LORD-MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY JOB SIBLY, No. 4, CARTHUSIAN-STREET, ALDERSGATE-STREET.

LONDON:

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED (BY THE AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON,) By R. Butters, No. 22, Fetter-lane, Fleet-street.

WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON.

Before the Right Honourable GEORGE SCHOLEY , Lord Mayor of the City of London; Sir Nash Grose , knt. one of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir Robert Graham , knt. one of the Barons of His Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir Claudius Stephen Hunter , bart. Sir Richard Carr Glyn , bart. Sir John Perring , bart. Aldermen of the said City; John Silvester , esq. Recorder of the said City: William Domville , esq. John Atkins , esq. William Heygate , esq. Aldermen of the said City; and Newman Knowlys , esq. Common-serjeant of the said City; His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

London Jury.

William Smith ,

Edward Hardcastle ,

William Frocham ,

Stephen Grestock ,

William Creed ,

Edward Grant ,

William Simpson ,

Thomas Levin ,

George Dowse ,

William Stratton ,

Henry Gall ,

John Luke .

First Middlesex Jury.

John Stock ,

King Thorn ,

Robert Towers ,

James Price ,

George Branbergh ,

Robert Akers ,

Alexander Storey ,

John Sutton ,

John Parker ,

John Barkley ,

Joshua Spivey ,

John Breenan .

Second Middlesex Jury

William Allen ,

James Swan ,

John Harris ,

Joseph Ball ,

James Goff ,

John Cart ,

Philip Saxby ,

Richard Oliver ,

Alexander M'Mellan ,

Samuel Smith ,

William Smith ,

William Elibrough .

Reference Number: t18121202-1

1. WILLIAM BUCKLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of September , a hat, value 5 s. the property of Nevill Silverlock .

NEVILL SILVERLOCK. I am a hatter in Grace's-alley, Wellclose-square . On the 24th of September, I was up at my dinner. My neighbour, Mrs. Hanson, called me down, and said, I had lost a hat. I looked and saw there was one missing from the door. Mrs. Hanson told me that Mr. Hanson was gone after the prisoner; and soon after Mr. Hanson brought me back the prisoner, and the hat. This is the hat; it is a new hat; it is mine.

MR. HANSON. I am a shoe-maker. I live opposite of Mr. Silverlock. On the 24th, a gentleman of the name of Easted came to my door, and informed me, that the prisoner had taken a hat from Mr. Silverlock's door. I pursued the prisoner, and overtook him about two hundred yards from the place, with the hat upon him. This is the hat I found upon the prisoner. I asked him how he came to take the hat away. He said he had done nothing. I took the prisoner to Mr. Silverlock's house. A constable was sent for, and he was delivered into the hands of the constable. I took the hat from under the prisoner's coat. I delivered it to Mr. Lee.

WALTER LEE . I am a constable. I took charge of the prisoner at Mr. Silverlock's.

THOMAS EASTED . I saw the prisoner at Mr. Silverlock's door. He was fingering the tape that confined the hats. He went away, and returned and took down the hat, and clapped it under his coat.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming along the alley I picked up the hat, not knowing whose it was.

GUILTY , aged 27.

Confined One Month in Newgate , and whipped in Jail .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18121202-2

2. MARY WELCH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of September , from the person of William Kennedy , a pocket-book, value 5 s. an eighteen-penny bank token, and a 1 l. bank-note , his property.

WILLIAM KENNEDY . I am a paviour . On the 26th of September, I met the prisoner at the corner of Marybone-lane, about eight o'clock. She enticed me home to her lodging. I gave her two shillings; a shilling in silver, and a shilling in copper. I took the shilling out of my pocket-book. I stopped about a quarter of an hour in her room, and then came down stairs, and when I had gone about five yards from the door I missed my pocket-book. I returned back to the door, and the door was locked.

Q. Had you been drinking - A. Only one pint of beer, and a glass of gin. When I returned to the door, and found the door shut. I did not wish to make any alarm, because I was known in the neighbourhood. On my finding the door shut I went away, and did not return till the next morning, which was Sunday morning. I then went into her lodging. She was not there. I did not find her till the Friday following. I then met her, about eight o'clock, at the corner of Gee's-court, Oxford-road. I then gave her in charge of the watchman. She was searched in my presence, and nothing found on her.

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw the man before he charged the watchman with me.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18121202-3

3. HENRY STAPP , HENRY PALMER , and JOHN PALMER , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of October , seventeen pounds weight and a half pound weight of tea, value 30 s. the property of William Beckitt .

SECOND COUNT, for like offence, stating it to be the property of different persons.

RICHARD DALBY . I am a Thames police officer. On the 29th of October, between four and five in the morning. I was in a boat in the river Thames. The moon shone at the time. I saw the three prisoners jump out of a tea lighter, that lay along side of a barge, at Lady Parson's stairs. The name of the lighter was the Nell. The three prisoners jumped out of the lighter into a skiff, and immediately, as the boat passed me, I discovered something floating on the river, which I picked up. It was two bags; they contained tea. I then shoved after the skiff, wherein was Stapp, the watchman. He had put the two Palmers into a boat. I left Stapp in the skiff, in charge of James White , and pursued Palmer, in another boat. I came up to them, and searched them. I found in John Palmer 's hat and pockets about two pounds of tea, and about half a pound of loose tea in Henry Palmer 's pockets. I took them in custody, and took them all to the police office. Stapp was searched, but not in my presence. Two shawls were found on Stapp, and a ripping chissel, a sail needle, and a case. I afterwards went to Mr. Beckitt, the prosecutor, and I accompanied him to the lighter, where I saw the prisoners come from. I found there a chest of tea had been broken open, and some tea had been scattered about in the hold of the lighter. The chest of tea is here, and this is the tea that I took from them. The tea appears to be the same sort as the tea in the chest.

JAMES WHITE . I am a Thames police officer. I was in company with the last witness, when the prisoners were apprehended. I searched the prisoner Stapp, and on him I found a chissel, a packing needle, and case, and two keys belonging to the hatches of the Nell, lighter.

JAMES BECKITT . I am a lighterman. The prisoner, Stapp, has been a servant of mine for several years, and Henry Palmer was my servant.

Q. Had you a lighter called the Nell, laying off Parson's stairs - A. I had; she had tea in her, and among the tea was that chest produced here to day. Stapp was my watchman. I saw him go away with the lighter, and these keys produced now he had at

the same time about him. He was in charge of the lighter, as my watchman.

Q. Examine the tea taken from the pockets of the prisoners, with that in the chest, and say, so far as you can judge, whether they are the same tea - A. I have no doubt but it is the same that was taken from the chest.

Q. Parson's stairs is in the county of Middlesex - A. It is.

Stapp's Defence. I was in the craft by my master's orders. When the two other prisoners came on board, asked who that was. He said it was Harry, and Jack was with him. They said they had been out drinking, they could not get in.

Henry Palmer 's Defence. I got up soon in the morning to get the lighter out. The tea that was found on me I bought of a seaman, he said, it was his sea stock.

John Palmer 's Defence. I have nothing to say but what these men have said.

STAPP, GUILTY , aged 39.

HENRY PALMER, GUILTY , aged 25.

JOHN PALMER, GUILTY , aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18121202-4

4. JOHN CLONY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of August , five shifts, value 15 s. a gown, value 5 s. two petticoats, value 7 s. and a frock, value 2 s. the property of Elizabeth Pilben ; a pair of breeches, value 5 s. and two jackets, value 4 s. the property of James West .

JAMES WEST . In August last I was servant to captain James Webber Smith . The captain was in Yorkshire, and the family was in the Isle of Wight. I had a box delivered to me at Brighton, by my fellow servant , Elizabeth Pilben. On the 10th of August the box was delivered in my care. I put it in my bed room, over the stable. The box was locked and corded.

Q. Do you know what was in it - A. I do not. I had the care of it. On the 21st of August, about half after six in the morning, I saw the lock of the stable broken off. It was swinging by one nail.

Q. When had you seen the stable door before - A. At eleven o'clock on the over night, on the 20th, I locked it myself, and at half past six on the 21st, I came and found it open. I then went up stairs, and found the box broken open. The cord was broken in three places. I took off the cord, and opened the box. I examined my own box, which was not locked. I missed a pair of patent cord new small-clothes, a pair of leather breeches, and two jackets.

Q. How lately before had you seen these - A. Upon the afternoon before. I had one of the jackets on, the day before. I had put them into the box on the 19th.

Q. Did you know the prisoner at that time - A. On the 15th or 16th of August the prisoner was brought to the stables by his friend, James Moring .

Q. Whereabouts were these premises - A. Near Brighthan pstead, near the New Stein. The prisoner's friend brought him there. He had been at this stable.

COURT. He was never up stairs, was he - A. Not to my knowledge. I went to where the prisoner lodged. I did not find him there. I came to town immediately. I applied at the Blossoms inn, where he had left two bundles.

Q. You did not see the bundles did you - A. No. I there obtained some information. I did not find him at the Blossoms inn. I searched for him from place to place, at last I found him in Bristol. I got a warrant, and went for him myself. The prisoner was then in prison. I told him I was happy to see him there. He asked me for what reason. I told him, because he was secure. I brought him up to London by the mail. He asked me, what it was about. I told him, for robbing the stable. He said, he was not the man. I told him that we thought that we had satisfactory proof of it. He then made no answer. I brought him to town, and took him to Marlborough-street office. When I got him to town, being early in the morning, we went into the Marlborough Head, to have a pint of beer. He asked me, if it would be any satisfaction to me to hang him, or transport him. I said, it would be no satisfaction to me. He then said, that the only thing he could do to make me a recompence was to enlist in any regiment. I then asked him where my things were. He said, if he informed me where they were he could see my intention was to throw him into prison. If I would permit him to enlist he would make every thing comfortable. He then wanted me to take his handcuff off. At that moment the officer came in. I told him to take him away, and lock him up, and he was committed for this. I found part of my things at Mr. Turner, pawnbroker, John-street, Golden-square. I found one bundle pledged in the name of Bennett; a pair of leather breeches, and two jackets my own; and I also found another bundle, the property of Elizabeth Pilben .

ELIZABETH PILBEN . Q. Were you in captain Smith's service in August last - A. Yes. On the 10th of August I left my box locked and corded in the care of West.

Q. What property was in it - A. Four gowns, five petticoats, eight shifts, four pair of cotton stockings, one black silk cloak, a pair of boots, a pair of shoes, a fur tippet, and several other things; and on the 21st, when I saw my box again, it was then stripped of every thing, except a pair of cotton stockings and a pocket handkerchief.

Q. How long before the 10th had you seen them - A. I put the things in the box on the 9th, and I delivered the box locked and corded into the custody of West. I had the key of the box myself. West, the coachman, had the box.

WILLIAM SIMPSON . I am servant to Mr. Turner, pawnbroker, John-street, Golden-square.

Q. Look at the prisoner; do you know him - A. No, I do not. I produce some property. I took it in pledge on Saturday evening, the 22d of August. I took them in of a man. I think there was another person with him, but I am not certain. Two jackets and a pair of breeches; they were pledged in the name of Clark. The prisoner is the size of the man that I took them in of.

FRIEND LAWRENCE. I live with Mr. Turner. I produce a gown, a white frock, two petticoats, and

five shifts. They were pledged at our shop on the 24th of August, by a man in the name of Bennett. I have no recollection of taking them in, only by writing of the ticket.

MICHAEL BENNETT . Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. Yes. I am a servant with colonel Golding. On Saturday, the 22d, the prisoner called at my lodging in Gloucester-court, St. James's. I was out when he called. I saw him when he called again, about half past nine. I asked him if he had been at Mr. Todd's. He said, no. I told him there was a letter there for him. He asked me if I would walk up with him. I said, yes; and I walked up with him, and he got the letter. There was an enclosure in it, but what I do not know. On Sunday, I went to the Blossoms inn with the prisoner. He had nothing with him. When he went there he called for some parcels that he had left, and he paid his fare with a Bristol note. They were two bundles wrapped up in handkerchiefs. He carried one bundle, and I the other, as far as St. James's-square. I then gave him his bundle. I went to my lodging, and I saw no more of him. I do not know what was in either of the bundles. I did not go with him any where on the Monday,

WILLIAM LOCK . I am a servant to Mr. Thomas, Jermeyn-street: the Union. On Saturday evening, the 22d of August, between nine and ten o'clock, I saw the prisoner offer some things for sale in the parlour, to William Deacle . It appeared to me like a frock. He found that he would not buy it, and then he offered it to me. He told William Deacle , he being a new married man, he might have occasion for such things. He had a bundle with him, and that was the only thing that he shewed.

WILLIAM DEACLE . I am a servant to George Grant , esq. On the 22d of August, I saw the prisoner at my lodgings about half past nine o'clock at night. He took this frock out of the bundle, and offered it to me for sale. I had seen him before. I believe he was a servant out of place. He offered me this frock. He said, as I was a new married man, it might be useful to me. I did not purchase it of him. I told him I should leave that for my wife to do. This is the frock. I know the frock by the lace. When he offered it me for sale I took it in my hand, and looked at it, and when I saw it at Marlborough-street I had no doubt of it being the same frock he offered me. I am sure it is the same frock.

Friend Lawrence. The person that brought that frock brought the other things, and he pledged them all together.

Elizabeth Pilben. The frock is mine. The petticoats and the shifts are all mine. I made them, and marked them, and these things were in the box, that I entrusted in West's care, and a great many more.

Prisoner's Defence. I came from Brighton with intention of getting a situation. I lived with captain Fraser, at Gibralte. At the time I was in Brighton, looking out for a situation, I met with a friend. He took me to the prosecutor's stable. The prosecutor accuses me of taking the things out of the stable. I never went up stairs, nor was I there unless some person was with me. On the night of the robbery. I was in the prosecutor, West's, company, until eleven o'clock, and then I went to bed, and then I came from Brighton to London, and then I understood there was a letter for me at Mr. Todd's. I called on Mr. Bennet. He went with me for the letter. I took a Bristol note out of the letter, and went and paid my fare, and received my bundles. I went down to Bristol, and got a situation on board a ship. One day I came on shore, two officers took me; they said, for a forgery. The prosecutor wanted me to go into the artillery. I am totally innocent.

GUILTY , aged 27.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

Reference Number: t18121202-5

5. JAMES KELLY was indicted, for that he, having been convicted of uttering counterfeit money, on the 16th of September, in the 51st year of His Majesty's reign, that he afterwards, on the 14th of November , one piece of false counterfeit money, made and counterfeited to the likeness and similitude of a good shilling, did utter to James Bailey , he well knowing it to be false and counterfeit .

JOSIAH GILL SEWELL . I am clerk to the Solicitor of the Mint. I produce a copy of the record of the conviction of James Kelly . I got it from the clerk of the peace's office, Clerkenwell. I examined it. It is a true copy.

(Read.)

WILLIAM BEEBY . I am clerk to the keeper of New Prison. I know the prisoner perfectly well. I was present when he was tried and convicted, with another prisoner of the name of John Cunningham , for uttering counterfeit money, and he was ordered by the court to be imprisoned in New Prison, Clerkenwell, for one year, and to find sureties for two years to come. He was imprisoned for one year, and found sureties for two years, and when this offence was committed he had not been out of prison any more than three months.

JOSEPH MOREN. I live at Walham Green, near Fulham. On Saturday, the 14th of November, I first observed the prisoner at Little Chelsea, about a quarter before twelve o'clock. I observed him go into every shop almost he came to, public-houses and chandler's shops, and appearing like a traveller I suspected him to be passing bad money, I went forward to the next public-house, expecting he would come in the same as he had at the other houses. It was the Queen Elms public-house, kept by a person of the name of Easton. He came in as I expected, and called for a pint of beer. He offered a shilling. I took particular notice of the shilling, because I had suspicion of him. It was a crooked shilling. The woman refused the shilling. The prisoner said, he had no other money, therefore he could not have the beer, or would not. I cannot be sure which word he said. She delivered him back the shilling, and took the beer from him. The prisoner went out down the road, towards London. My suspicious were increased, and I followed him. I saw him go into the next chandler's shop, kept by a Mrs. Vincent. He went in, and staid there a very short time. Upon his coming out of that shop I went into Mrs. Vincent's. I there saw a shilling

which Mrs. Vincent shewed me. It was a similar shilling to the one I saw in the public-house. It was evidently a bad one. I desired her to put it in paper, and to keep the man in her recollection that had just gone out. I continued to follow him until he went into another chandler's shop, not far distant from Mrs. Vincent's. I endeavoured to avoid his seeing me. The next chandler's shop he went into was opposite of the Admiral Keppel . I went into the Admiral Keppel . I told the landlord my suspicion. I then came out, and went into the chandler's shop. I found a shilling had been offered there. The woman told me that he had offered a bad shilling. I then went over to the Admiral Keppel again. I then saw a shilling in the landlord's hand, (his name is Bailey), which perfectly resembled the other shilling I had seen, from its being crooked, with a hole in it.

Q. Had the other shillings that you have been talking of, each of them a hole in them too - A. The one at the chandler's shop had; the first. Mr. Bailey has kept that shilling ever since. I believe I saw it at Marlborough-street. The prisoner was in the tap-room of the Admiral Keppel . I detained the prisoner, and sent for a constable. He wished to go into the yard. I said, I could not object to that. I said, I would go with him. I did; and during our stay there, he said he would give me all the money he had got, if I would let him escape.

Q. Had you previous to this made him acquainted with the charge you had against him - A. Yes. I told him that I had observed his actions for some distance along the road, and that I was determined to stop the passing any more bad money. I believe the words I made use of were, to stop him in his career. The officer came in near two hours. I was with the prisoner all the time. I never took my eye off him. As soon as the officer came I beckoned the prisoner out of the tap-room, where he was sitting in. I had brought him from the yard into the tap-room, and then I took him into the back parlour to search him. I took off his hat, and in it I found fifteen bad shillings. There was in his hat a woman's huswife, what women keep thread in, a dirty bit of a brown bag, and some tobacco. Twelve of the shillings were wrapped up in a paper parcel, tied round with a string, and the three others, making the fifteen, were in a bit of paper, by themselves. The twelve shillings were wrapped up in paper, with paper between them, so as to prevent their rubbing. The three had no pieces of paper between them. I then took him to Marlborough-street office. He was there searched in my presence, I having searched no farther than his hat. There were forty sixpences found upon him, good money. I deliver the shillings that I took. The fifteen I found upon him are exactly similar.

JAMES BAILEY . I am a publican. I keep the sign of the Admiral Keppel . On the 14th of November the prisoner came to my house, between twelve and one, alone. He called for a glass of ale. He asked me what it was. I told him, two-pence. He then made an attempt to put his hand into his pocket, and produced a shilling and a penny. He said, one penny would not pay two-pence. He then pretended to feel in his pocket for more halfpence, as I supposed. He then gave me a shilling. I took it, and turned away to go to the bar for change. The last witness, Moren, was just coming in the front door. He said, has he called for any thing. I said, yes. The prisoner was in the tap-room. I looked at the shilling, and the shilling was a bad one I knew. It was a crooked shilling, with a hole in it. That shilling has never been out of my sight. I am sure it is the same shilling that I received of the prisoner. There is a bit of silk I tied in it five minutes after I received it.

THOMAS MARSDEN . I am the gaoler at the office in Marlborough-street. I searched the prisoner. I found forty good sixpences in his breeches pocket, and in his other breeches pocket two shillings and four-pence in copper. In his coat pocket I found a leathern bag, containing about fourteen shillings in copper, a small bit of cheese, and a bit of tobacco.

JOHN NICHOLL . Q. I believe you are one of the moniers of His Majesty's Mint - A. I am.

Q. I am putting into your hand the shilling with the silk in the hole, the one uttered to Mr. Bailey - A. That is counterfeit.

Q. I am now going to put into your hand the fifteen found in his hat. They were wrapped up in paper, separate - A. They are; they are all counterfeit.

Prisoner's Defence. I throw myself on the mercy of the court. I wish to go for a soldier or sailor.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 30.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18121202-6

6. ANDREW TIFFEN was indicted, for that he, at the delivery of the King's gaol of Newgate, holden for the county of Middlesex, on Wednesday the 4th of April, in the 49th year of His Majesty's reign, was, in due form of law, tried and convicted, for that he, on the 4th of March, the dwelling-house of William Salmon did break and enter, with intent the goods therein being, feloniously to steal and carry away, and was ordered and adjudged by the court to be hanged by the neck until he was dead, and that he received his Majesty's pardon on condition of being transported for life; and that he afterwards, on the 22d of October , feloniously was at large within this kingdom of Great Britain before the expiration of the term of his natural life .

DANIEL BISHOP. I am an officer of Worship-street office.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. I do. I produce the copy of the record of the conviction of the prisoner from Mr. Shelton's office. I saw Mr. Shelton sign it.

(Read.)

EDWARD VINGE. I believe you are one of the turnkeys of Newgate - A. I am.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. Perfectly well.

Q. Was he in your custody in the year 1809 - A. He was there under sentence of death.

Q. I believe he was respited upon condition of being transported - A. He was.

Q. Were you in court at the time he was tried - I was not. I remember his being sent up for trial, and his being returned, having received sentence of

death, and I searched him when he was taken out of prison to be taken to the hulks.

RICHARD SMITH . I am chief mate of the Ceylon hulk, at Sheerness.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. Perfectly well. He was received on boards the hulks, at Woolwich, in June, 1809. I received him at Woolwich, from which he was removed to Sheerness. I saw him on board the hulk at Sheerness, after being removed from Woolwich. I remember his being delivered from the hulk at Sheerness, to go abroad. He was shipped off our vessel on board a ship, to go to New South Wales. He was sent by the name of Andrew Tiffen . I have not the least doubt of his being the person. He was with me about a twelvemonth and a day, from the time that we received until we shipped him off. He behaved well as a man and a prisoner.

Prisoner. Did you deliver me yourself - A. No, I did not. He was delivered by the second officer. I am the chief officer. I saw him go into the boat to go into the ship. I did not go with him.

JOHN ARMSTRONG . I am an officer. I, in company with Bishop, Joshua Armstrong , and William Armstrong , on the 22d of October last, apprehended the prisoner at a house in Checquer-alley, St. Luke's, Middlesex. I had seen him. We told him our charge. He behaved very well. We took him in custody.

Prisoner's Defence. I am not able to express myself properly. I hope you will read this appeal. This paper will shew that it was unavoidable, my coming back to this country.

COURT. To his Majesty, hereafter, this may be of service to you; it cannot be here.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 34.

[ The prisoner was recommended to mercy by the Jury, on account of Mr. Smith's recommendation .]

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

Reference Number: t18121202-7

7. GEORGE ANSTEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of November , seven penny pieces, and one hundred and eight halfpence , the property of George Brown .

GEORGE BROWN . I am a linen draper , in Shoreditch . The prisoner was my servant . I had suspicion that he robbed me, and I marked fifteen pence in copper halfpence, on the 9th of November. After I had marked them I put them in the all, and on the next morning there was seven pence missing. I sent for Bishop, the officer. He searched the prisoner. He found some loose copper in his pocket, and I picked out the seven pence that had marked, among the loose copper. After that, Bishop searched his bed room. In his coat pocket I found a five shilling paper and some more loose copper.

DANIEL BISHOP . I am an officer. On the 10th of November the prosecutor sent for me. I took the prisoner in custody, and searched him, and from his different pockets I took three shillings in penny pieces and halfpence, and from them Mr. Brown picked out six penny worth of halfpence and a penny piece, which he said he had marked the night before. I kept them separate from that time to this. I observed the pencil mark up all of them. I went up into the prisoner's bed room. The prisoner accompanied me there, and shewed me his bed. I there found a coat, which the prisoner said was his coat. In the coat pocket of that coat I found a five shilling paper of halfpence. The prisoner said, them halfpence were given him by a young man, to send into the country, to a friend. I took the halfpence, and showed them to Mr. Brown. The prisoner said, he hoped his master would take no advantage of him I then took him to Worship-street office. He then said it was the first thing that ever he did in his life.

Prosecutor. This copper is the same that I marked. It has the pencil mark on them now. I do not know any halfpence in the five shilling paper.

GUILTY, aged 20.

Of stealing to the value of 7 d. only .

Confined Three Months in Newgate , and whipped in jail .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

Reference Number: t18121202-8

8. JOHN RICKARDS was indicted, for that he, being clerk to Abraham Robarts , Sir William Curtis , bart. Abraham Wilde Robarts , and William Curtis , and was employed and entrusted by them to receive monies, and valuable securities for them, and being such servant, so employed and entrusted, did receive, and take into his possession, the sum of 240 l. on their account; and afterwards feloniously did embezzle, secrete, and steal, out of the said sum of 240 l. one hundred pounds; part of the aforesaid sum .

To this Indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121202-9

9. JOHN RICKARDS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of May , in the dwelling house of Abraham Robarts , and Sir William Curtis , bart. a bank note for the payment of 100 l. the property of Abraham Robarts , Sir William Curtis , bart. Abraham Wilde Robarts , and William Curtis .

Mr. Gurney, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner, of this charge was

ACQUITTED .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121202-10

10. JOHN RICKARDS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of May , in the dwelling house of Abraham Robarts, a bank note for the payment of 100 l. the property of Abraham Robarts , Sir William Curtis , bart. Abraham Wilde Robarts , and William Curtis .

And ANOTHER INDICTMENT, charging him with stealing and embezzling the said bank note, for payment of 100 l.

Mr. Gurney, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner, of these charges, was

ACQUITTED .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121202-11

11. RICHARD MOSS and SARAH MOSS were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of September ,

a bottle, containing half a pint of anchovies, value 2 s. 6 d. five pounds weight of soap, value 4 s. six pounds weight of candles, value 6 s. 8 d. two brushes, value 1 s. 8 d. and one broom, value 1 s. 3 d. the property of John Duddell and George Glover .

Mr. GREENAWAY. I seside in Bishopgate-street. On the 16th of November as I was in my chambers, a few minutes before seven o'clock, I observed the two prisoners in conversation together. The man prisoner pulled the street door bell of Messrs. Duddell and Glover for admission, I presume. The door was not immediately opened, and the conversation continued. He rang again, and upon the second ringing the street door was opened. Previous to the door being opened, I observed the man had a small bundle in his hand. The woman had no bundle, and when the door was opened she moved to the door of the adjoining house. She stood there during the time he went in, When he had been in the house a minute or two he came out and made a signal to her for her to come to him. She did. She went within side of the shop, and the man not having light enough, took down two shutters of the window. I considered there was something improper going forwards, and come down stairs. I opened the door of my own house, and observed them. In a short time the woman came out with a large bundle. That bundle, or part of it. I understand, will be produced here. I looked at the bundle, and considered there was a bar of soap in it. I looked round and saw John Ward , the constable. I beckoned him to me, and told him what I had seen, and begged he would bring the woman back to Mr. Duddell, saying, I would gurrantee him. He took her into custody. Upon her being taken to Mr. Duddell's, they sent for me desiring I would come over. I did so, and when I went into the shop, the man informed me that he had taken the bundle and throwed it behind the counter. I looked behind the counter and desired Mr. Duddell might be called, and when he came down he owned all the property. When they were stopped, the man prisoner called the woman his sister, on Monday, he said she was his wife.

JOHN WARD . I produce the bundle I found upon the two prisoners.

GEORGE GLOVER . My partner's name is John Duddell . These articles are all my property. I knew the brushes.

Richard Moss said nothing in his defence.

RICHARD MOSS , GUILTY , aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

SARAH MOSS , NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121202-12

12. SARAH MOSS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of September , a brush, value 1 s. 6 d. a tea-kettle, value 1 s. and half a pound weight of candles, value 6 d. the property of John Duddell and George Glover .

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121202-13

13. ANN LOCK and SUSANNAH FOSTER were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of November , eight pair of leather gloves, value 14 s. and three pair of worsted stockings, value 4 s. the property of Matthew Broughton , privately in his shop .

MATTHEW BROUGHTON. I am a hosier and glover , in Bishopsgate-street Without .

ISAAC NICHOLSON . I am an apprentice to Mr. Broughton. On the 9th of November, between one and two o'clock, the two prisoners came into the shop, and asked to look at some worsted stockings, which were shewn them. They said, they were too small; they asked to look at a size larger. One of the prisoner went to the further end of the counter, and took up some black veils.

Q. Do you know which - A. Foster, I believe. The gloves were laying under the veils, which I had put out of my hands about five minutes before the prisoner came in. After the prisoners went out of the shop a gentleman came in for gloves. I looked for these gloves. I could not find them. I had my suspicions then, as no other person had been at that end of the counter.

SAMUEL SHEPPARD . I am an officer. On the 9th of November I was sent for at Mr. Stiles, a linen draper, in Bishopsgate-street. He gave me charge of the two prisoners, for having robbed him of oambric. That was about two o'clock. I searched the prisoners, but found nothing on their persons. There were at that time two large bundles standing on the counter. I told the prisoners, they must go with me. They said, the must take their bundles. They each of them took a bundle. I asked them, whose bundles they were. They said, they were their own bundles. I asked them, what was in them. They said, they were some clothes that they had brought from home; they were going to carry to a friend in the Borough. I told them, I would take care of the bundles, and I took them into custody. At that moment Sapwell, the officer, came up. I desired him to take the bundles. We then proceeded, in company with the prisoners, to the Compter. When we returned we found the gloves and the stockings in the bundle. Sapwell has had the bundles ever since. Mr. Stiles's is opposite of Mr. Broughton's.

THOMAS SAPWELL. I produce the bundles. I went, on the 9th, to Mr. Broughton's to ask him whether he had lost any gloves and stockings. The stockings and gloves were all in one bundle.

Q. Do you know who claimed that bundle - A. No. They both said, it was their bundle.

Q. What else was there - A. A number of other articles, cargo; no clothes. I received the bundles of Mr. Stiles shopman. They have never been out of my custody.

Prosecutor. The gloves and stockings are my property. I had every reason to believe the stockings are mine. The gloves being in paper, I know they are mine by mark on the paper.

Lock's Defence. I have nothing to say in my defence.

Foster's Defence. I have five small children, and an aged father. It is the first crime I ever did in all my life.

LOCK, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 55.

FOSTER, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 36.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121202-14

14. ANN LOCK and SUSANNAH FOSTER were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of November , twenty-five yards of muslin, value 1 l. 18 s. the property of John Stiles .

JOHN STILES . I am a linen draper in Bishopgate Street without ; I was in the shop when the prisoners came in.

JAMES PATRICK . I am an assistant to Mr. Stiles. On November the 9th, between the hours of one and two, the prisoners came into the shop, and requested me to show them a small piece of muslin; accordingly I did, and being particular in the choice, I shewed them several pieces. I went to the other side of the counter to put the small pieces of muslin up, on which I saw the pieces of muslin lay on the ground. I observed their intention, I let them go on, as though I had no knowledge of it. I asked them whether they wished for any thing else; they told me yes, they would wish to see a small piece of jaconett muslin for borders of caps; and during the time I was getting the jaconett muslin down, it being in a seperate wrapper, I saw Susannah Foster conceal three seperate quantities of cambric muslin under her clothes, after which she sat down upon a stool which was close by her, and the other prisoner, Ann Lock , asked her whether she took the three-shilling piece off the other counter in the last shop that she was at; Foster put her hand into her pocket hole to see if the three-shilling piece was in her pocket, which gave me reason to suppose she was concealing the goods; I let her go to the other end of the shop, and they were going away, I rang the bell, Mr. Stiles being up stairs. He came down, and I acquainted him of the circumstance. He sent for an officer. I detained them, and before the officer came Mr. Stiles asked me which was the offender. I pointed out Foster. She went from one side of the shop to the other and released the goods from her. I got of one side of her, and found three quantities of cambric, and one on Lock.

THOMAS SAPWELL . I have the muslin; there are three quantities in this parcel, and one in this.

Prosecutor. The witness told me that the women had stolen something. I asked him which it was that took the property. As soon as he said Foster, I observed the motions of Lock. I saw a piece of muslin drop from her clothes. This is the one that dropped from Lock, and these are the three pieces that dropped from Foster; they have my mark on all four of them.

Lock's Defence. I am ashamed of the transaction on account of my age. I am sorry for what I have done.

Foster said nothing in her defence.

LOCK GUILTY - DEATH , aged 55,

FOSTER GUILTY - DEATH , aged 36.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121202-15

15. ANN LOCK and SUSANNAH FOSTER were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of November , forty-two yards and half a yard of calico, value 1 l. 15 s. 5 d. the property of Nathan Merry , privately in his shop .

NATHAN MERRY . I am a linen draper , I live at No. 21 Bishopgate Street without.

Q. How far is that distant from Mr. Stiles - A. About an hundred yards. On the 9th of November, between one and two, they came into my shop and made a small purchase of calico which they asked for, and offered a three-shilling piece to pay for the article, it came to two pence; I was obliged to leave them to go to the further end of the shop, to go for change; they went away. That is all I know.

THOMAS SAPWELL . I have the bundle. I found it in Mr. Stiles's shop.

Prosecutor. One piece contains twenty-four yards, and the other eighteen and a half, together forty-two yards and a half. They are my property; they have my own private marks upon them.

LOCK GUILTY - DEATH , aged 55.

FOSTER GUILTY - DEATH , aged 36.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121202-16

16. JAMES GURNIER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of November , a watch, value 4 l. the property of James Quilter .

JAMES QUILTER . I am a solicitor . I lost the watch on Sunday the 20th of November, from my house in Castle-street, Holborn . I had agreed to take the prisoner into my service that morning, his mother being a servant of mine; about twelve o'clock on that day the prisoner came to my house. I let him in. I had sent his mother out half an hour before that to see if she could got him released from the tender; he had been taken there, as I understood, for some misdemeanor that he had been guilty of.

Q. Who had sent him there - A. I understood the day before he had been sent from Hatton Garden office. I asked him how he got his release from the tender; he informed me he was taken up without any proper charge. I told him I was afraid he had got into bad company and idle habits, I therefore would take him into my employ, and keep him out of harm's way for the future. I sent him down stairs, and he went into the kitchen. Shortly afterwards I sent him on one or two errands, which he executed; and returned about two o'clock. I told him I had occasion to go out, desired him to stay and take care of the house until his mother returned. I went out and returned about four o'clock; the door was opened to me by a carpenter whom I had left in the house doing some jobs. I asked him where the boy was; he said he went out shortly after I did, and had not returned. I dismissed the carpenter, and shortly after the prisoner's mother came; in two minutes after a lady from Fetter-lane came and told me, that she had been informed that I had been robbed of a watch by my maid's son, and he had taken the watch to a pawnbroker's in Fetter-lane. I then said, it is not my own watch which I had about me, it was another watch which I had entrusted to me, which I had lent to the mother, and she had been entrusted with it two or three days previous. I went down and asked the mother where the watch was; she said she had left it hanging up in the kitchen. It was not there then,

EDWARD BROWN . I am a pawnbroker, I live at 39 Fetter-lane. On Friday the 20th of November, between two and three o'clock, the prisoner brought a gold watch to me, for which he asked ten shillings, he told me it was his mother's, his mother was cook to Mr.

Quilter, and that his grand-mother had left it to his mother. I told him I must make enquiry and send for an officer, and when the officer came I thought it prudent to enquire of Mr. Quilter whether it was correct, and when I went there his mother nor Mr. Quilter was not at home. The constable has got the watch.

SMITH. I am an officer. I have had the watch ever since his commitment.

Prosecutor. This watch is the property of a lady in the West Indies. I have had it in my care some time.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not take it with intention to keep it. I wrote a note and left it on the table or dresser, saying to my mother that I wanted ten shillings, for her to take it out that night.

Prosecutor. I believe there was such a note on the dresser.

GUILTY , aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121202-17

17. STEPHEN ADAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of November , a hamper, value 2 s. 6 d. two dozen bottles, value 6 s. and five gallons of wine, value 10 l. the property of Alexander Smith .

ALEXANDER SMITH . I am a wine-merchant, I live in Mark-lane. I knew nothing of the prisoner before. On Saturday the 28th of November I received an order from Mr. Best, of Greenwich, for four dozen of Hermitage, two dozen were packed in a hamper, and when the two hampers were packed they were put into Mr. Best's cart, which stood at the gate; after the hampers were put in, Mr. Best's man went up the yard to get his hat, and my cellarman went up the yard with him to give him a little straw to put in the cart, and when they went down to the cart again one of the hampers were stolen out of it. This was about half after three, what follows my cellarman will tell you better than I can.

ALEXANDER DAY . I am cellarman to Mr. Smith. On the 28th of November Mr. Best sent to our house, for four dozen of Hermitage in two hampers. The man carried one hamper down, and I the other; we carried them down to the cart, which stood at the gate, the man pitched his hamper first, and the one which I pitched was at the tail of the cart; he had left his hat in the cooperage, and he asked me for a little straw to put in his cart, which I told him he should have. We immediately left the cart, and went up to the cooper-age; we were absent from the cart not more than three minutes; when we went down to the gate the man said one of the hampers were gone. I looked in the cart and saw that it was. I told him to go one way, and I would run the other. I ran up Fenchurch-street and looked up the street, but I could see no one. I then directly went towards Aldgate pump. I could see no one then, I looked up Leadenhall-street. I could see as far as Billeter-lane. I saw the prisoner with a hamper on his shoulder coming towards Aldgate. I went and met him and passed him, and turning short followed him, Before we got out of Leadenhall-street the prisoner turned a side-face and looked at me. I said nothing to him all this time. I was ascertaining whether I could positively swear to the hamper if I stopped him. At the end of Jewry-street I said, my friend, what are you going to do with the hamper; he said, I am going to take it to White-chapel. I said, what are you going to do with it there; he said, Mr. Anderson's cellarman, who had a dozen of wine in Leadenhall-street, desired him to carry it. I said, my friend, you must set your load down here; where is this cellarman; he said, go along with me, and I will shew you the cellarman; stop, said I, until I get some one to watch the hamper. Fortunately there was a man coming towards Aldgate, I desired him to mind it. I said, that fellow that is running has robbed the cart of this hamper. I pursued him immediately; he ran up Leadenhall-street. I took him at last he ran up Creed-church-lane, and at the time he had got at the bottom I entered the lane; on his turning round I lost sight of him. I was informed that he had run into the second door. I knocked at the door half a dozen times. I heard an altercation with the prisoner and another. I ran up stairs; I said to the man of the house, you have got a man there; he said, yes. I ran up stairs to the top. I said, that is the man I want; he said he was an officer.

Q. Are you sure the prisoner is the same man. - A. I am positive of it.

JOSEPH. I am an officer. About half past two o'clock on Saturday last my wife told me there was a man run up stairs at my house in Duke's-place. I ran up after him, that moment I found the prisoner on the two-pair stair-case, I asked him who he wanted; he could not give me any answer. I told him I was an officer, and asked him what business he had to run up my house; then this man ran up stairs and said, this is the man that robbed the cart. He gave charge of him, and I took him to Mark-lane; the master then gave charge of him, I took him to the Compter.

DAY. I can positively swear to the hamper being the property of Mr. Smith.

Prisoner's Defence. I was a soldier in the guards . I have six children.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121202-18

18. CATHERINE BIRD , senior , and CATHERINE BIRD , junior , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of November , twenty-eight yards of woolen stuff, value 1 l. 8 s. the property of William Gillman and Thomas Clay .

WILLIAM PITT . I am foreman to William Gillman and Thomas Clay , linen drapers . 22, Barbican . On Monday evening, November the 2d, between six and seven in the evening, the prisoner, accompanied with her daughter, came into the shop to purchase a piece of stuff; they asked for a stuff that the colour was in the window. I took the piece I thought they meant; it was not right. I got another piece; they objected to that, and three or four more afterwards. We have a screen to go round the window to prevent thieving, which I was obliged to throw back, I was obliged to go behind it to get the stuff that was wanted; when I came back again I observed the daughter endeavouring to conceal a piece of stuff under her petticoats, which being so large, she could not accomplish. I took no notice of that; the

daughter complained that she had lost her garter. The daughter then asked for a piece of string that was laying on the counter, and the mother, with a pretence to assist the child to tie up her stocking, took the stuff from the child into her own possession, and placed it between her legs under her petticoats; she then fixed upon one piece of stuff, and ordered me to cut six yards of it, which came to nine shillings. She gave me a three-shilling bank token, and I was to give her one shilling's worth of half-pence. She left two shillings upon it earnest: she was to call at eight o'clock and pay the rest of the money. She was a long while counting the shilling's worth of half-pence. I was holding her the while, she could not walk at all. I suffered her to go to the step of the door, I then called her back, and she instantly dropped the piece of stuff, and the piece of stuff was standing up between her legs when I stopped her, I sent for a constable, and gave charge of her and her daughter. This is the piece of stuff; it is the property of William Gillman and Thomas Clay .

Catherine Bird , senior's, Defence. I went into the gentlemen's shop. I bought a piece of stuff, I paid two shillings earnest off it; my little girl took up the wrong piece of stuff to what I had bought. I was returning to give it back.

Catherine, Bird junior, was not put on her defence.

CATHERINE BIRD, sen. GUILTY , aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

CATHERINE BIRD , jun. NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121202-19

19. RICHARD BOLD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of November , one peck and a half of beans, value 4 s. the property of Nicholas Brown and Algernon Wallington .

JOHN LACEY HAWKINS. I am one of the marshal-men. On the 20th of November I was in Aldersgate-street a little after six in the evening, I saw the prisoner come out of the Castle and Falcon gateway, with a rough great coat under his arm, with something bulky in it. I thought he came out of the gateway rather sly; he appeared to be looking at his shadow I touched him on the arm, I said, my friend, I do not wish to be troublesome, I should like to know what you have got; he said, come along with me to the public-house, and I'll shew you; I said, why not give it a name, say what it is, and I dare say I shall be satisfied; he said, come to the public-house. I said, why give that trouble, I dare say it is your own; I am an officer. He went into a public-house in Little Britain and I followed after; he sat himself down by a table, and chucked this bag on the further side of him. I reached over and felt the bag. I then said, I am afraid there is something wrong, he said there was not; I said, you work at the Castle and Falcon, do not you; he said he did, for Mr. Wallington. He sent a person out for Mr. Wallington, he did not come. I said, I will go with you; I went with him, and going to the accompting-house, he said he was going to send them down to Egham. I told him I thought Mr. Wallington's concern was too large to send two pecks of beans down to Egham.

EDWARD WARREN . I work for the Castle and Falcon.

Q. Is there a delivering clerk there to deliver out the grain for the horses. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know of any grain being given out for the horses of the Leicester waggon - A. Yes, my partner, Richard Bold , took it out, we went into the granary, where we always have it, Mr. Smith, the bookkeeper, gave us the key. Richard Bold had two peck of beans at the bottom of the sack, and twelve pecks of oats on the top of these two pecks of beans, and two pecks of beans on the top of the oats.

Q. Where were these oats and beans to be taken to - A. To the stable; he carried them, and I shot them off his back. I gave them to the horses the next day, what I found in the bin.

Q. You mixed the oats and the beans together in the bin - A. Yes, they were four peck of beans, and they were all put in.

JOSEPH ALEXANDER . I am clerk to Algernon Wallington and Nicholas Brown .

Q. Have you examined the beans in that bag. - A. Yes, there is about two pecks or a peck and a half, we measured them over in the bin; there were about fourteen pecks and a pint in the bin instead of sixteen pecks. The oats and beans were mixed when we measured them. The prisoner said he was going to send the beans down to Egham, to a team drove by George Marsh .

Q. Did he say where he got them from - A. I do not recollect exactly.

Q. How many beans had been delivered in the course of that day - A. John Smith is the only person that delivers out the beans and the oats. There are three waggon-house keepers; the prisoner is one, Edward Warren is another, and the third a person of the name of John. They each have separate bins. We have a sample of beans from the bulk, and they correspond with the beans found on the prisoner.

ALGERNON WALLINGTON . I was not at home when the prisoner was brought in. I attended the magistrate the next morning.

Q. Have any of the horse-keepers any authority to take corn out - A. Nothing of the kind. In my judgment I believe these beans are our property. They are clean beans. He stated that he had selected th beans from the refuse in the stable.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121202-20

20. JOHN GREENWOOD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of October , nine deals, value 3 l. the property of Thomas Smith , Thomas Harrington , and Thomas Smith .

THOMAS SMITH . My partner's names are Thomas Smith and Thomas Harrington . The prisoner was in our employ for many years as a millwright . We are maltdistillers , at Brentford.

Q. Had you been purchasing any deals of Osborne and Cordwell - A. We had, and when they came into our premises, part of them would be sawed up under the prisoner's direction. We missed several deals. We

searched the premises of the prisoner, we went to his premises, it consists of a shed, it is between eighty and ninety yards from our back gate, he cannot get into my back gate without going into the public street. In that shed I found three deals; and I found some deals on the premises of Wright, which I claimed as my own.

Mr. Bolland. Which of the partners gave order for the deals - A. I did not.

Q. You are a malt-distiller - A. Yes.

Q. And therefore not particularly conversant with deals. When you found them they were cut up, were they not - A. Some were sawed and some were not, two were not cut.

Q. The shed that you found the deals, is it not in the yard of the public-house, and not the prisoner's yard - A. I believe not.

Mr. Gurney. This shed was locked you say, who had the key - A. Greenwood.

Q. You stated that two were not cut up - A. One of the three were cut up, the other two were not. I asked the prisoner how long he had had possession of them deals, he said, two of them two or three years, and then he said two years.

WILLIAM WAIGHT . I live in the market-place, New Brentford.

Q. In the month of October last did you purchase any deals. About what time in October - A. I cannot exactly say. It was about a fortnight before it was found out.

Q. What did you buy of the prisoner - A. Six deals and a board. One was white and the other was yellow. I fetched them from Mr. Greenwood's shop, I fetched two, the labourer fetched two, and my brother fetched two. On the morning it was discovered, just as the search was about to take place, the same morning I had three. Six of these deals were found on my premises. I agreed to give the prisoner eight shillings a board for the deals.

Q. Did a man of the name of Keene assist in bringing them - A. Yes.

Mr. Alley. This was a public open dealing with the prisoner - A. Yes, In an open public tap-room yard, the Bull yard.

JOHN BRADLEY. I am in the employ of Osborne ordwell. We sent thirty yellow deals, three inch k, twelve feet. They were all of one quality, and while deals we delivered subsequent to that. On the 8th of September, thirty yellow deals were sent. I ha seen the whole of those found, one of the three-inch y deals I know. This is the one. I know the lot w particular bright lot, we had no others in the yard what came out of that cargo.

Q. Had you sold any to the prisoner - A. No, They were delivered to Messrs Smith and Harrington.

Mr. Bolland. Other timber-merchants may have bright deals as well as yourself - A. Certainly.

Court. From your observation, are you able to speak to the deals - A. No.

WILLIAM KEENE . Q. Do you remember carrying any deals from the prisoner to Waight - A. Yes. I was a-bed when Waight called me to go to Bull-yard and fetch a deal. I took one deal the very morning he was taken up. I afterwards saw the deal that I carried, one of them, and one I carried a fortnight before.

JOHN LEWIS . Q. You are an apprentice to a sawyer, and work for Smith and Harrington - A. Yes.

Q. In the course of the month of October did you cut on their premises any deals - A. Yes.

Q. Did you afterwards see any deals that were found at Waight's - A. Yes, and one of those deals I assisted in cutting. That is the one here outside, there is a dead knot in the deal, a piece flew out and hit my face. I am perfectly sure that is the deal that I assisted to cut; that is cut with a long saw.

Mr. Alley. I suppose you never cut deals with knots in them before - A. No.

Q. And you are the only apprentice in Brentford - A. Yes.

Jury. How long have you been an apprentice - A. About three months, and since then I have been continually employed in sawing.

JOHN HIGGINS. I am a sawyer. I had been sawing deals on the premises of Messrs. Smith and Harrington, I saw the deals found in Waight's building, I know one in particular, that I can speak to. This is the deal, it is free of knots, it is a little stained. I am certain that is the deal, I cut it on the 26th, I set it on the end of the pit, and while I was gone to breakfast it was gone.

Mr. Bolland. How many deals have you cut without knots - A. Thousands.

Q. I believe when you were first called upon you were not so certain - A. Yes I was.

Q. Do you know Mr. Clewney - A. Yes, and Thomas Burrows a sawyer.

Q. Did not you between the first and second examination, tell Mr. Clewney and Mr. Burrows that you could not swear to the deals, that you must do it, or else you should be discharged - A. I am certain to that deal, because it is stained.

RICHARD DENTON . I live at Brentford.

Q. Do you remember the prisoner being taken up on Thursday the 9th of October - A. Yes. Two days before that I saw him going out of the back-gate of Messrs. Smith and Harrington, and turn towards his own shed, he had a deal on his shoulder, it was between eleven and twelve in the morning. At noonday he went out of the back-gate across the lane.

Q. to Mr. Smith. Was the prisoner authorized by you to take deals - A. Certainly not. I gave twelve shillings a piece for these yellow deals.

Mr. Alley. Q to Denton. You did not take particular notice of that deal, did you - A. No, I did not.

Prisoner's Defence. I am not guilty.

RICHARD CLEWNEY . Q. Do you know Higgins a sawyer - A. Perfectly well. I met him on the 1st day of November, he said to me,

"good morning Sir," I asked him whether he was going to Bow street to swear to the deals. That was after the first examination, and before the second; he said, master, I am afraid I shall be obliged to do it. He told me it was a hard case that he should be forced to swear to the deals, in case that he did not he should lose his bread.

Q. How long have you known Greenwood - A. All my life.

Q. Was it an extraordinary thing for him to have deals in his shop - A. No; it was customary.

JURY, Q. to Higgens. Are you confident that no one had access to the saw-pit but the prisoner - A. Here is one John Anderson here that saw him take it from the pit.

Q. to Denton. What time did you see him take it away - A, Between eleven and twelve.

Q. In Higgens. What time did you go to breakfast - A. Between eight and nine I went to breakfast, and when I returned from breakfast the deal was gone from the pit.

Q. to Denton. Did you observe where the prisoner took the deal - A. I saw him come out the yard with a deal on his shoulder. He went towards the shed. I did not see him set it down any where. I saw him coming out of the gate: he was going towards his shed.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121202-21

21. ANN WALKER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of September , twelve pounds weight of lead, value 4 s. and a dutch clock, value 10 s. the property of Charles Reynolds .

CHARLES REYNOLDS . I am a calico-printer . I live at Staines, in the country of Middlesex .

Q. Was the prisoner your servant - A. No. On the 4th of September, I lost lead, a clock, and three brass cocks. I lost them out of one of the outbuildings. I found part of the lead at Mr. Butler's.

THOMAS ROBINSON . I am a watch and clock maker, at Staines. The prisoner came to my shop about three months back. She offered a few wooden clock wheels for sale. They were part wood and part brass. I told her, they were scarce worth anything. I gave her sixpence. That is all I know of it. These are the wheels.

Prosecutor. The lead is here, as well as the wheels of the clock. The lead I can swear to. It was made on purpose for the copper. I found the lead at George Butler 's. He has met with an accident, and is not here.

JOHN HOLT . I can swear to the wheels belonging to Mr. Reynolds clock. I have been in the habit of taking the clock to pieces to repair it.

Prisoner's Defence. The lead I found among some coals, in my coal-hole, and the wheels my little girl had them to play with.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18121202-22

22. MARTHA HUGHES , ANN PARKER , and ELIZABETH HENRY , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of November , two pair of gold ear-rings, value 21 s. a cornelian top and drop, value 4 s. the property of Joseph Thomas , privately in his shop .

JOSEPH THOMAS . I am a jeweller . I live in Hanway-street, Oxford-street, in the parish of Mary-le-bone .

Q. Look at the prisoners. On the 21st of November did you see any of them in your shop - A. Ann Parker came to my shop, and asked for a thimble. I asked her what price she wished to go to. She said, about a shilling or eighteen-pence. I reached the tray of thimbles. It had a great number of them in. She tried most of them on, and then said there was none that fitted her. I was persuaded there was her size, because there was all sizes. She then asked for a clasp, and several other articles, and after looking at them she said there were none that suited her.

Q. Were there any ear-rings in her sight - A. Not then; afterwards.

Q. Did she buy any thing - A. No. She said, there was none that suited, and went outside, and looked in the window, and about two minutes after she came into the shop again. The prisoners, Henry and Hughes followed her. They asked me to let them look at some ear-rings. I told them, if they would wait a few minutes I would wait upon them. I was attending upon Parker at the time. Parker went out. I reached the tray of ear-rings out. Parker came in again. They were looking at the ear-rings, and Henry, which is the least, said that her aunt had sent out there, or else she should not have known where to come. She said, that her aunt had bought a pair there a little while ago, and gave fifteen shillings for them. They then examined the ear-rings. Parker was bye during this time, and after looking at them some time, they said, there were none such as they wanted. They then asked me for clasps. Parker said, she would have a comb. She looked at what I had got, and said, there was none that she liked, and after looking at a variety of articles they said, there were none that suited, and Hughes said so too.

Q. Now, at this time were you behind the counter - A. Yes, they stood before.

Q. Were they near the tray where these things were - A. Yes, quite near them. They pulled the things about a great deal.

Q. Were there anybody else in your shop, but you - A. No. My wife was in the parlour; she is not here. Hughes and Henry said, that their aunt had sent them to buy a pair of ear-rings. Henry said, she did not think it would matter if she had any thing else. Hughes said, no, your aunt will not like you to have anything else. I then said, if you do not want anything but ear-rings, I have none that will suit you, so do not give me any further trouble. Hughes then asked me, if I thought I should have any such ear-rings as they represented, on Tuesday, Wednesday, or Saturday. I said, very possible I might. They then said, they would come on of those days. They came on the following Tuesday. They all went away then together. They all three came again on the Tuesday, the same way as they did on the Saturday.

Q. What do you mean - A. On the Saturday, Parker came first; Hughes and Henry came in first on the Tuesday. Parker came in about two minutes after, but before they left the shop, while Parker went out, I told Hughes and Henry, that after they went away, on the Saturday, I missed things, about half an hour after they were gone, two pair of ear-rings and a cornelian drop.

Q. Did you miss them from any of the trays that you had shewn the prisoners - A. Yes, from the very tray that I had shewn them.

Q. Had you shewn the tray to anybody else to the hour that you found out your loss - A. No.

Q. How long before they came in had you seen these things safe in the tray, before they came - A. I had seen them the same morning. They were in the tray at the time I was shewing it them. I had but six pair of ear-rings. I am quite sure that when I shewed them the tray, they were in the tray.

Q. When you missed these things did you make any enquiries after these girls - A. No, I did not. They were strangers to me. They said they would come on the following week. They did. I then accused them. They strongly denied it, until I threatened to send for a constable, and then they acknowledged it. Hughes said, if I would let her go home she would go and fetch them; which I did. She was gone about an hour, and the other two remained with me. I asked Parker and Henry where they lived. They directed me to No. 4, Drury-lane. I went there and there were no such persons lived there. I kept them at my own house. They sent me there as to their mothers, and as I was coming out of the shop where they had directed me, I saw Hughes coming along on the opposite side of the way, in Drury-lane. I then went over, and tapped her on the shoulder, and asked her if she had got the ear-rings. She said, that she had been, but her mother was not at home. I then said, go with me, and tell me where your mother lives. She said, she lived at No. 2, Coal-yard. Drury-lane. I had a friend with me. I sent him over to the place where she directed; there he found the mother of Henry. He brought Henry's mother and father to me in the street. I said to the mother, you must go with me; your daughter has robbed me. Hughes was present. Henry's mother and father came with me to my house, and Hughes also. I immediately sent for a constable, and in the mean time that I sent for a constable, Hughes's sister came in, and brought a duplicate of the ear-rings.

Q. Then you did not know the sister before, did you - A. No. She brought the duplicate. I gave it to the officer. His name is Langley I went with him to the pawnbroker's. The pawnbroker produced two pair of ear-rings. He asked me if that was my property. I said, yes.

Q. Was there a drop - A. No. That was sent to me the next day, by the mother. The mother works with a gentleman. She sent him with it for fear I should stop her. The pawnbroker has the ear-rings in his possession. The drop I have in my possession. I produce it. The top of it I lost. There is the drop which matches with the one they left behind. I have no doubt it is mine. That is all I know it by.

DAVID PERRYMAN . I am a pawnbroker. I live in Compton-street, Soho. I produce two pair of ear rings. They were pawned at my house on Saturday the 21st of November, by the prisoner, Hughes. I have seen once; before that day. I lent her seven shillings upon them. She came in, and said, she would pledge two pair of ear-rings; that her aunt had given her them to buy a pair of ear-rings. She shewed me a top and drop.

Prosecutor. The ear-rings are my property. They are the very identical patterns that were taken from me. I had no others of the same pattern.

Q. Did you find in your tray any vacant place for them - A. No. They had been tumbled together, so that I could not see. I can say they were in the tray before they looked at the tray, and I missed them about an hour after they were gone. I described them to the constable, before I went to look at them.

Q. What is the value of these ear-rings - A. About seventeen shillings the ear-rings, the top and the drop altogether.

JOHN LANGLEY . I am an officer. I went to Mr. Thomas's. The girls were there. They confessed that they had taken the property. Parker and Henry said, that Hughes enticed them to take them. I apprehended the prisoners. Mr. Thomas gave me the duplicate. He had it from Hughes's sister. I went with Mr. Thomas to the pawnbroker, and the moment he saw the ear-rings, he said, they were his.

Hughes said nothing in her defence.

Parker's Defence. I know nothing about it.

Henry's Defence. The same.

HUGHES, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 15.

PARKER, NOT GUILTY .

HENRY, NOT GUILTY .

[ The prisoner, Hughes, was recommended to mercy by the Jury on account of her youth .]

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18121202-23

23. SAMUEL HUGHES was indicted for feloniously making an assault upon John Ellis , on the 11th of November , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, two gold seals, value 34 s. and a watch-key, value 7 s. his property.

JOHN ELLIS . On Wednesday evening, the 11th of November, a few minutes after six o'clock, I was going home to my apartments in Brianton-street I was hustled by five men, just by the watchhouse, crossing Oxford-street . I made way for the men to pass, but one of them was at my right side. He rushed me back into the middle of them, and immediately I found the prisoner pull my watch, chain, and seals.

Q. Did you see him - A. I did. I immediately called for the assistance of the watchman, and told him that I had lost my watch-chain, and seals.

Q. One of them pulled your chain, did he - A. Yes; the chain and seals were broken off the watch.

Q. What was the consequence of pulling your chain - A. It came off from the watch. I called the watchman to my assistance. The person that hustled me stepped between the prisoner and me, as meaning to release him.

Q. Now, sir, did you see the prisoner distinctly at that time - A. Distinctly. I never left him.

Q. You did not collar him, did you - A. No. I called the watchman. The watchman came. They were just coming out of the watchhouse. The watchman took the prisoner from me. I said, that is not the

right man; this is the man that robbed me; meaning the prisoner. The watchman took the prisoner. I went with him to the watchhouse. The prisoner was searched at the watchhouse. There were neither chain or seals found upon him.

Q. You say, you saw the prisoner - A. Yes, distinctly.

Q. You say, the chain broke, and the seals were gone - A. Yes; the chain broke close to my watch. I never saw the seals afterwards.

Q. Tell us what way these people came - A. They came quite close, altogether, and seeing them in the way I made way for them.

Q. Now, sir, in this sort of business were you under any sort of apprehension or fear - A. I certainly was, because I gave way for them to pass me.

Q. Did you at all comprehend what their purpose was - A. It struck me, seeing so many together, that they were pick-pockets. I made no resistance. I put my hand upon my watch, or else my watch would have gone.

Q. Then, by putting your hand in that manner, you secured your watch - A. Yes, and the chain broke from the watch.

Q. This must have been done with some strong force - A. Very strong force indeed. The top of the watch-pocket was a little tore. I know nothing more than taking the prisoner to the watch-house.

Q. Are you sure that the prisoner was the person that took your seals - A. I am quite certain of it. There were three that stood behind him.

Mr. Arabin. You say, you kept your hand upon your watch all the time - A. It was my arm. I shewed you how I put it.

Q. Why did you say your hand if you meant your arm - A. It was my arm that I put upon my watch-pocket.

Q. What are you - A. I have been a servant. I have been out of service four or five months.

Q. The young man was searched - A. He was. There were two five-pound notes found upon him, and a handkerchief, but none of my property.

RICHARD JONS . Q. Were you present at the time the prosecutor has been speaking of - A. No; I came up. I was going to cry the hour of six, on the 11th of November. I was crossing Marybone-lane, in Oxford-street. As I came up, Mr. Ellis said, watchman, take charge of this man. There was a second person stood by Mr. Ellis. He was coming in between Mr. Ellis and the prisoner. I seized that man. Mr. Ellis said directly, watchman, that is not the man that robbed me. Directly I let the other man go, and seized the prisoner. Mr. Ellis had hold of the prisoner by the arm, and he gave him me in charge. I laid hold of the prisoner in like manner, and took him to Marybone watchhouse. He went very willingly. He said, he was sorry that we did not take the rest of the men as well as himself. I put him safe in the watchhouse. The constable searched him in my presence; no seals or key were found upon him.

JOHN LANGLEY . I was constable of the night. I searched the prisoner. On him I found two five-pound notes, a three-shilling taken, and a Spanish sixpence.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been at my uncle's in Paddington. He asked me to stop, and drink tea with him. I left his house at six o'clock, and was going home to my father. When I arrived at the end of Marybone-lane, a mob got me in the centre of them. I told them, they had better be off; and instantly I spoke, that gentleman said, that is the man that robbed me. I have a better way of getting my bread than picking pockets. So help me God the gentleman did not lay hold of me until the watchman did.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18121202-24

24. WILLIAM DAVIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of November , a bag, value 6 d. and one hundred and twelve pounds weight of sugar, value 5 l. the property John Toms , senior , and John Toms , junior .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121202-25

25. EDWARD BURKE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of November , twenty-eight yards of printed cotton, value 40 s. the property of William Stirling , Walter Stirling , and Margeret Coates , spinster .

WALTER STIRLING . The names of my partners are William Stirling , Walter Stirling , and Margeret Coates. We are warehousemen . The prisoner was our porter for eight or nine years.

GEORGE GRAHAM . I am in the employ of Messrs. Stirling.

Q. On the 4th of November, in consequence of any order that you received, did you conceal yourself in the warehouse - A. I did. This transaction took place about half past seven in the morning. I saw the prisoner in Messrs. Stirlings warehouse when he came into the warehouse in the morning. I observed a basket in his hand. He put the basket down on the counter. He then went up stairs, and swept the place up stairs, and come down to this warehouse again, and went to a pile of prints. He went first to one pile of prints and then to another.

Q. Now, when he had gone to the second pile of prints did he do any thing to them - A. He took off the top piece; he carried it to where the basket was. He then removed the basket and the piece of print to another part of the warehouse; where I could not see him.

Q. How long was he in that part of the warehouse in which he was out of your sight - A. About a minute, I saw him again. He came backwards and forwards once or twice. He went then out of my sight for about five minutes. I do not know where he went for that five minutes he then came to about the same place where he had put the basket in the morning, he brought the basket back from the back part of the warehouse, apparently full of wood he than went to the front of the warehouse and got the keys of the back door, and went towards the back

door. Then I got from my place of concealment, and acquainted John Macklen what I had seen. The prisoner was then at the back door.

Q. At the time that you so informed Macklen, where was the basket - A. It was placed near the counter where he had been. I sent the prisoner out for water, and then Macklen examined the basket. I afterwards saw the prisoner apprehended in Watling-street, a little way from our warehouse. He had then the basket. He was stopped by a constable; and when he was stopped by the constable, the basket was apparently full of wood, and in searching the basket, at the Poultry compter, we found a piece of print, with an handkerchief round it.

Q. Was that the property of Messrs. Stirling - A. It was.

Mr. Adolphus. How many of you sleep in the warehouse - A. About eight in the whole. I sleep in the warehouse for one. He rung a bell to get in. One of the young men in the house opens the door to him.

Q. When he came that morning were the young men about - A. They were not about, they were in the warehouse. It was about half past seven. They do not get up until later than that.

Q. In your warehouse you do not deal in retail - A. No.

Q. Is it at all within your knowledge that people have taken things on sale or return, and if not sold return them - A. I do not know that it has been done.

JOHN MACKLEN . I am a clerk in the prosecutors employ. In consequence of information, I examined the basket. The basket was at the back part of the warehouse. It contained fire wood, to appearance. Under the wood I found a piece of cotton, wrapped up in an handkerchief. At that time the prisoner had been sent out. I replaced the cotton as I found it. Afterwards I saw the prisoner go out of the warehouse. I followed him, The constable was in Watling-street; there he was stopped and taken to the compter.

- BYROM. I am a constable. This is the basket, and wood, and piece of cotton. This handkerchief was at the bottom, concealed under the wood. This piece of cotton has been in my possession ever since. The prisoner was carrying the basket when I apprehended him.

Macklen. The piece of cotton is my master's property. It is of the value of about two pounds.

Prisoner's Defence. My Lord and gentlemen of the Jury, feeling due contribution for my unwarrantable presumption in taking the article without the consent of my employers. During the nine years I have been in their service I have been entrusted with a piece of goods to show my wife, which was entered in the book in the name of Wilson. What I state I call God to witness is a fact. My wife wished me to bring home some patterns. I had my prosecutors permission to take home some shavings, and no one being about to ask the favour to enter this piece of cotton, I intended to make known to Mr. Marriott the ultimate purchase of what I wanted. I knew too well the consequence of the unwarrantable liberty of taking a piece of cotton without my employers consent. I have a wife and five children to support. I humbly pray your honourable Court will look upon my general character. I rely upon an acquittal.

WILLIAM DENNING . I am a warehouseman in Mr. Stirling's employ. The prisoner was a porter in the warehouse. I never knew of the prisoner ever taking any piece of goods without it first being entered in the name of Wilson.

Prisoner. Do not you recollect letting me have some shawls upon the approbation of my wife - A. Yes, I do think I did.

Q. Was any memorandam made untill I returned - A. Certainly. If I had suffered that I did not deserve to hold my situation. I never could have suffered it.

MR. MARRIOTT. Q. You know of the prisoner being in the employment of Messrs. Stirling - A. I do.

Q. Do you know of the prisoner taking any goods out of the shop upon a sale of return - A. Not without being entered. I understood he was permitted to take fragments of old wood.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 35.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121202-26

26. MOSES LEVY was indicted for feloniously stealings, on the 20th of November , two three-shilling bank tokens, and four shillings, forty-eight penny pieces, and one hundred and forty-four halfpence , the property of Thomas Stacey .

THOMAS STACEY. I am a baker . I live at No. 4, Old Fish-street-Hill. I only knew one of the shillings to be my property.

SARAH STACEY . Q. You are the wife of the last witness - A. Yes. On Friday evening, the 20th of November, the prisoner came between the hours of six and seven. I was not then in the shop, but I was presently after. I saw my sister in conversation with the prisoner. My sister asked me if I had a pounds worth of change. The prisoner, at the same time, said, he should be exceedingly obliged to me if I had got change. I looked, and I had only two-three shilling bank tokens, and four shillings, in silver, and one of the shillings I can swear to. The prisoner then tendered a ten-pound note. I could not give him change for the note, but said if he would leave the note with me, I would send the remainder of the change, by the man, in the morning. He rather hesitated, and said, he would send the servant girl with a one-pound note, saying, he should want a half quartern loaf. He afterwards seemed as though he recollected himself, and said, I will take a quartern loaf with me. He also took ten shillings in copper, to make up the money one pound. I then asked him again for the ten-pound note. The prisoner replied, I am very well known to Mr. Stacey, and was he at home he would not doubt a moment. He also said, he lived in Godliman-street, and should be a great customer to my husband. He was then retiring from the shop; I again asked for the ten-pound note, not knowing the prisoner. He hesitated a few seconds, and said, I will leave this parcel with you, Mrs.

Stacey, which is more than double the value of what I have taken away. The prisoner then quitted the shop, having laid the parcel on the desk. He quitted the shop in an instant. I immediately went to a neighbour.

Q. Did you open the parcel - A. No, I did not. I informed the neighbour what had transpired, and begged he would trace out the offender.

Q. You desired he would take him into custody - A. Yes. He had not proceeded more than fifty yards, when we saw the prisoner coming out of another shop. Me and my neighbour were both together. When we got near, he got close up to the side of the wall, as though wishing not to be seen. We were on the dark side of the way. I then said, that is the man, and the prisoner ran away. He had not run above a dozen, or ten yards, before he was overtaken by my friend. He had then a quartern loaf in his hand. A constable was called, and he was given in charge. That is all I know.

Mr. Alley. The prisoner was a stranger to you, I understand - A. Yes, a perfect stranger.

Q. He wanted change of this ten-pound note, you were not willing to give it - A. I had it not to give.

Q. He wanted a loaf; he took a loaf, and he was to send you a one pound note - A. He had both the change and the loaf.

Q. He told you a lie, and said, that he lived in Godliman-street - A. Yes, he did.

Q. Relying upon that statement you gave him the loaf - A. Yes.

Q. You expected that he would act as an honest man, and send you the one-pound note - A. He promised to do so. I wished him to leave the ten-pound with me, and the moment he went out of my shop I went to my friend. I went to the door to pursue him. He shut the door after him, and went away. I desired him not to leave the shop with my money. I gave him credit for the loaf, not for the money. He left the shop without my consent.

Q. I ask you upon your oath, did you or your sister make any effort to stop him - A. He was nearest the door. I had no opportunity.

JAMES ELLIOTT . I live at No. 1, Old Fish-street-hill, Doctors Commons, within two doors of Mr. Stacey. On Friday evening, the 20th of November, between the hours of six and seven, Mrs. Stacey came to my door, and called out. I was at that time writing in my accompting-house. I came forward. She acquainted me that she suspected that she had been robbed, and that the person had left the house. She requested me to assist her in finding the man. She described his person, a short man, with a bundle. I immediately accompanied her, she directed me the way the man went. I went up the Old Change; there I observed a man coming out of the house of Mr. Russell, a stationer. From the description I had received I suspected him to be the person. I immediately turned to Mrs. Stacey, and asked her the question. She replied, that she had no doubt of it. She had asked the moment before a passenger whether he had met a person of that description. Levy was at that time in hearing, and immediately upon the words having passed, he then gained a few paces of us. He throw the coppers on the ground, in the street, he threw the best part of the copper in the street, and ran away. I was then convinced he was the prisoner. I pursued him and gave the cry of, stop thief. After running some small distance I came up to the prisoner, and collared him. He immediately asked me what I wanted with him. I told him he was the person I wanted; I would tell him presently. He seemed inclined to make some little resistance. I told him it was of no use to do that with me; he had got into the wrong hands for that fun. He then again wished to know what I wanted with him. I told he should go back with me; and as I took him back, I met Mrs. Stacey coming after me. I then turned his face to the light, and asked her if that really was the person. She said it was; she would swear to him. I told her it was all right, I would take care of him; and after stepping a few paces the constable met us, and assisted me. We then took him back to the house of Mr. Russell, and after getting him in. I picked up some of the copper, about seven shillings or eight shillings and ten-pence. The constable picked up some in the street. I was present when he was searched: from his person was taken to the amount of twenty-four pound in notes, two-three shilling tokens, and four shillings, and three pieces of course muslin, bearing similitude to that parcel left with Mrs. Stacey. There was also taken from his person a pedlar's license, a gold seal and chain, but no watch, that having been sowed to the waistband of his breeches. One of the shillings taken from his person is a remarkable shilling.

ELIZABETH DEER. I am sister to Mrs. Stacey. On Friday, the 20th of November, between the hours of six and seven, the prisoner came in, and desired the man to call the next day, No. 21, Godliman-street, to leave some bread. I asked him, what bread he should want. He said two quarterns and a half; desiring me at the same sime to inform the man that he was never to leave the bread without having the money. I asked him his name. The prisoner gave me the name of Simpson. I asked him if we should send any that evening. He answered, that he was not certain that he wanted any; if he did he would send the girl for it. I took down his address. Nothing more transpired. He then left the shop, and shut the door. I only was present. He presently returned, to ask if I could oblige him with some change. Mrs. Stacey was then entering the shop. This is the first of her seeing the prisoner. I asked her, if she had a pounds worth of change, or silver, or something to that effect,

Q. Did he ask for change of a ten-pound note - A. I believe he asked if we could oblige him with some change. I put the question, supposing it to be a one-pound note, understanding that he wanted silver for it. I asked Mrs. Stacey. Mrs. Stacey said she did not know that she had so much silver. Mrs. Stacey came into the parlour, and he followed her. On looking, she had only ten shillings. He opened rather to hesitate. He afterwards took copper to make up the amount of one pound. I assisted in counting the penny-pieces, and gave the prisoner at least twelve penny-pieces. He put them in his handkerchief. On recollection, he said he would take a quartern

loaf. Mrs. Stacey then went into the shop, and he followed her. He took the quartern loaf.

Q. Did he give you the one-pound note - A. No. I asked Mrs. Stacey if he had left the one pound note. I saw him lay the ten-pound note in the parlour on the table, but he held the corner. I was not near enough to see whether it was a ten-pound note, or no. I heard him ask the question, if she could change a ten-pound note, and saw more notes in his hand. I know nothing about the parcel. I remained in the parlour. I did not follow them into the shop. I was engaged with a little girl of Mrs. Stacey's. After the prisoner was gone my sister suspected she had been defrauded. She said, she would endeavour to take him. She went out after him, and did not return until he was taken in custody.

- . I am constable. I produce the halfpence that were picked up about the street, and the handkerchief which contained the loaf. This is the property that I found upon his person; twenty-four pound in notes; one ten, one two, twelve ones, thirty shillings in silver, and two shillings and four-pence farthing in copper. This was found on his person, independant of what he had in the handkerchief. There was eight shillings and ten-pence picked up in the street, besides what was in the handkerchief. The handkerchief was torn, and this is the piece of muslin I had of Mrs. Stacey; it is about three yards; and this the remarkable shilling found on the prisoner.

Prosecutor. That shilling is my property.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121202-27

27. JOHN JATER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of October , a handkerchief, value 5 s. the property of Edward Pollack , from his person .

EDWARD POLLACK . I live in the City-road. On the 24th of October, about mid-day, I was walking down Ludgate-hill. Very near Stationers-alley , it seemed to me as if somebody was busy at my pocket, or something similar to that. I put my hand to my pocket. I said to my friend, my handkerchief was gone. I immediately turned round. A man, who was very near, said, there he runs up Stationers-alley. I looked up Stationers-alley. I saw the prisoner running with all his might. I pursued him as swift as possible, and called, stop thief. The crowd then began to increase, and when in Warwick-lane I lost sight of him. They told me that he had gone up a street leading to the Oxford Arms; and on my coming into that yard I saw some people detaining the prisoner.

Q. You lost sight of the prisoner in Warwick-lane - A. I did. He was stopped in the Oxford inn, I believe it is called. I only know the man by seeing him run. I am sure the prisoner is the same man that was running up Stationers-alley.

MR. TRERY. I am beadle of Castle Baynard ward. The prisoner was brought to me. I took him to Guildhall. I searched him, and found on him two or three shillings, and a duplicate of a broach.

WILLIAM YATES. I was loading a load of dung down the Oxford Arms; the prisoner ran by me, and got up into a waggon, and after he came out of the waggon I got up in the waggon and found the handkerchief. The gentleman came and owned it.

Prosecutor. This is the handkerchief. It is mine. I received it out of Yates's hands.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of the crime.

GUILTY, aged 13

Judgment respited .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121202-28

28. WILLIAM MASON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of December , twelve sacks, value 3 l. the property of Thomas Brown .

THOMAS BROWN . I am a sacking-manufacturer , in Mark-lane . On Tuesday morning last, as I was in my accompting-house; two or three of my men came in, and said, I had been robbed, and that the thief was taken in Hart-street. I immediately went these, and found the prisoner standing by a dozen of my sacks, which he had throwed down. I took him into my warehouse, and sent for an officer.

ABRAHAM CHAMBERS . I was passing through my master's shop. I saw the prisoner looking over the sacks. I went up stairs, and put down the things that I had in my hand. I returned down stairs, and I saw the prisoner go out of the shop. I pursued him. He was taken with the sacks upon him. The twelve sacks are my master's property.

Prisoner's Defence. I leave it to your mercy.

GUILTY , aged 69.

Confined Two Years in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121202-29

29. DANIEL MALONEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of November , thirty-two pounds weight of lead, value 5 s. the property of Sir Joseph Banks , bart.

JOHN PHILLIPS . I am butler to Sir Joseph Banks . 32, Soho-square . On Friday, the 13th of November, very near three o'clock in the afternoon, I was sitting in my pantry. I saw the prisoner go up a flight of wooden steps, which led from the area to the back yard. He had something wrapped up in his great coat, which was under his arm. It gave me a suspicion that he was doing something wrong. I immediately followed him across the yard, into Dean-street; there I stopped the prisoner, and found upon him one of these pieces of lead, which is here in court. I brought him back, and kept charge of him, until the return of the master, who was from home at the time, until Sir Joseph returned, to take his advice what to do in the business. He told me to get a constable, and take him up for the public good.

JOHN PALLISER . I took the prisoner in custody, and took him before the magistrate. This is the lead the prisoner stole. This had been cut off, and this piece was found in Sir Joseph Banks's house; it fitted as nigh as could be. There is forty pounds missing. It is a leaden cistern.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to his character.

GUILTY , aged 34.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121202-30

30. EDWARD HYATT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of November , a pair of pantaloons, value 8 s. the property of John Saunders .

JOHN SAUNDERS . I live at No. 12, New-road, St. George's in the East . I lost the pantaloons on the 14th of November. I called the prisoner out of the room to assist me to serve a customer, and to watch that no one robbed me. I left him and my other servant in the warehouse. I had not been down stairs many minutes before I heard that he had left the warehouse. I went up stairs into the workshop, where I had called him down. I searched about the room, and on the ground, by the side of the shop-board, I found these pantaloons, which I had just been shewing to a customer in the warehouse. I let the pantaloons lay. In the evening he came down, and told me he had a favour to ask of me. I asked him what that was. He said, he wanted to go out for money that a man owed him. I told him he had better go up, and work, it was so early in the evening, when he returned he would be fit for nothing. He said, he must go out, let the consequence be what it would. I told him, if he was determined to leave his work, he must: he was not an apprentice that I could hold him. That gave me a suspicion there was something going away. Then I went up stairs, and saw the pantaloons were gone; and when I came down I challenged the prisoner with it. I took him into the parlour, and searched him, and in his hat I found these pantaloons. The prisoner is a young man of respectable connections.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Fined 1 s. and discharged.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121202-31

31. JOHN MANDWELL was indicted, for that he on the 7th of October , about the hour of four at night, being in the dwelling house of Richard Henry Thomas , one hat, value 5 s. two coats, value 5 s. and two pair of stockings, value 5 s. the property of the said Richard Henry Thomas , did steal; and having committed the said felony, in the same dwelling-house, about the hour of four on the said night, burglariously did break to get out of the same .

RICHARD HENRY THOMAS . I live in Charles-street, Drury-lane, in the parish of St. Giles .

Q. Look at the prisoner, and tell me whether you recollect his being at your house on the 7th of October - A. Yes, I do. I conveyed him there. He came to sleep at my house with my permission. He went to bed along side of me. He got up early in the morning, between four and five.

Q. Was it light - A. No, it was not.

Q. And after sleeping there what happened - A. He got up, and took two coats, and a hat, away, and two pair of stockings.

Q. Were they your property - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see him get up, or was it without your knowledge - A. I was asleep. When I awoke in the morning he was gone. I went in search of him. I did not find him until eight days after. I apprehended him myself, going up Holborn. I charged a constable with him: and when I got him to the watchhouse I told him it was for robbing me. He owned to it.

Q. How long had you been acquainted with him - A. I never saw him before that night. This is the hat. He delivered the hat at the police-office. I am sure it is mine. There is a mark in it.

Q. He left the room without your knowing it, did he - A. Yes. he did.

Q. How did he get out of your house - A. I should suppose he opened the door; it locked inside. I locked it myself. He saw me lock it.

Q. Do you know what time he went out - A. I am sure he went out between the hours of four and five.

BENJAMIN WYATT . I am a patrol in Bloomsbury parish. On the morning after Henry Thomas was robbed, he said he had been robbed by a black man. I could not find him. He gave me every discription of him, told me if I saw him to take him up. Eight days after I heard the cry of, stop thief. I ran, and stopped the prisoner. He had the prosecutor's hat on his head. I took the hat to Marlborough-street office, and marked it. The stockings he had on his feet, and the coats he said he had sold over the water, and found the man that had bought the coats, his name is Henry Waymark .

HENRY WAYMARK . I bought these things of the prisoner in the beginning of the month of October.

Prosecutor. I have looked at both the coats. They are mine. These things were in my house when I took the prisoner home with me. This coat was on my back when I took him home. I put it on the bed, and it was taken away.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to his character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 25.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18121202-32

32. JOHN CHAPLIN was indicted for the wilful murder of Elizabeth Chaplin ; and also stood charged for like murder upon the Coroners inquisition.

THOMAS FLETCHER . I am ward-beadle of St. Andrews. On the 11th of November, about six o'clock in the evening, I was called upon, and told, that Chaplin had murdered his wife at last. I immediately went to the place where the deceased lay, in Eagle and Child-alley , and on the ground floor I found the deceased laying on her back, with her throat cut in a most shocking manner.

Q. Was it on the ground floor - A. On the ground floor.

Q. Was the door open or locked - A. The door was open when I was introduced. There were some people within; they let me in; they are here. This was within a few minutes of six o'clock in the evening. I then immediately made application to the coroner of the City of London, to hold a jury, which was immediately granted. The coroners jury was held the next evening; and the next day, hearing the dreadful instrument was not found, I went in with the undertaker. The body was in a tolerable

state to be measured for a coffin. I then requested the undertaker to shew me a light, as it was a very small, dark place. Nobody lived in the house. In searching I found a razor with blood on it. This is the razor. (Witness producing it.) I found it in a drawer in the next room to where the corpse lay. It was a small drawer, that draws out of a small deal table. That is all I know, and that is the razor I found.

Q. You never know any thing of the man yourself, did you - A. I never saw him but once before, that was a few nights before.

Mr. Gurney. When the intelligence was brought to you that Chaplin had murdered his wife at last did not you know that he had been in a deranged state for some time - A. Indeed I never knew Chaplin.

Q. Had not you seen him shortly before confined for some strange, wild, mad conduct - A. No. I did not. I never saw him confined, only in the watch-house on the Saturday previous to the murder. The murder was on Wednesday. On the Saturday before I saw him and his wife in the watchhouse together.

Q. That was, I believe, for attempting to cut her throat - A. I do not know what it was for.

JURY. Did you find the woman dead when you went in the house - A. Yes.

WILLIAM BENFORD. I am beadle likewise of the parish, and under overseer. I cannot say any thing to the present business; a former part I can.

Q. You have known this poor man, and his unfortunate wife, some time - A. I have.

Q. I believe, as assistant beadle and overseer, you have been called more than once upon his strange conduct - A. I have.

Q. Were you called in on occasion of some violence he had committed in January last - A. It might be January or February I was called in.

Q. I believe you found him quite mad, and in a straight waistcoat - A. The first time I was called I did not find him so. I did not find him in a straight waistcoat.

Q. Did you find him mad - A. That I cannot say. I am not a man of faculty. A complaint being laid to me that the man had attempted to murder his wife. I immediately went down to his house; there I found the man seated in a chair, and several persons about him. It might be in the month of January. I am not positive to the day. I went close to him, and took hold of his hand. I said, poor man, you are ill I am afraid; I will go and fetch a doctor. The doctor came, and spoke to him. He asked him how he was. He then leaned his head upon his hand, and said, he was very poorly. The doctor thought it was the effect of liquor.

Q. My question was, about January last did you or not find him in a straight waistcoat - A. Yes. I did. He was spread upon his bed. with his arms spread out, and in a straight waistcoat, on the bed.

Q. In what condition did he appear to you to be in - A. I should have told you, I brought the doctor. I undid his hand, and he made a snatch with his hand. I then left him to the doctor.

Q. Did he appear out or in his senses - A. I cannot say. The doctor would not pronounce him out of his senses.

Q. Did any of you, that day, cause him to be sent to a mad-house at Hoxton - A. The doctor, with some persons, went down to consult about it. I took him that night to Mrs. Burrows's, at Hoxton, and there left him, and after a short time he was out at large.

Q. How long did he continue there - A. About three weeks. His wife requested he might come out, and he came out.

Q. In the month of August last did the wife make any further application to you - A. Mr. Taylor made the application. He is the landlord of the premises.

Q. Has she at different times made application to you - A. Yes, she has.

Q. Upon any of these occasions that she has applied, has she represented him to be mad - A. I know but little of the man; every one supposed him to be mad.

Q. Have you ever observed him to be much in liquor - A. I cannot say I ever saw him in liquor. I never was with him. About four days before the murder, his wife applied to me, on account of his offering violence. I said to her, Mrs. Chaplin, what is the matter now. She said, I shall be murdered. She said, that he had threatened to murder her. I desired her to go immediately to Guildhall, and I followed her. I advised her to go, and swear the peace against him, and when we came there the alderman was gone. We could not be heard. She pulled the razor out of her pocket, signifying that he had threatened to murder her with that instrument.

Q. Independant of the act itself, before the hour on which you heard of the death of this woman, was not he uniformly considered as a madman - A. Yes. In short, I took a jacket with me, but I did not use it. I put the jacket behind me, and gave it to a person that he should not see it. That was the first time I was called in.

JOHN BEDFORD . I keep the Eagle and Child, Shoe-lane. On the 11th of November the prisoner come into my house, about six o'clock in the evening, and asked for a pint of porter, which I refused to serve him at first. I told him, his wife before had had some for him, about three minutes before. His answer was, he knew that she had had it. Then he said he must have a pint of beer, for he had just murdered his wife. I told him that he must be joking, he could not mean what he said. He said, he had done it. I immediately told a person to draw him the porter, while I went into a back room to inform two or three people that were there, what he said Two of them that knew him came out immediately, and heard him repeat the words again, that he had done it; and while I was left with him the two men went out of the door, to see if it was the case. His house is directly opposite of my side door; and while they were gone I asked the prisoner in what manner he had done it. He told me, that he gave her a violent blow at the back of her head, with a roller belonging to a mangle is the next room.

COURT. What she took in washing, did she - A. Yes, and mangling. Immediately after he took the razor from his pocket and cut her throat; during this time I had no answer from the party that had gone whether it was true or not what he said. With that he requested to to have a glass of peppermint. I said, I thought he would have known better, or something similar to that effect; he made answer that she was a good woman, he could not help it; I hesitated serving him with a glass of peppermint some time, but thought by serving him the glass of peppermint might be a way of detaining him until I knew whether he had done it or no; he gave me a shilling to take for what he had had, and went out.

Q. Did you give him the peppermint - A. Yes; I then did not know whether he had done it or not; he went about six or seven doors further, to the Two Brewers. I understood that by other witnesses; he went towards Fleet-street. I heard, in a minute or two after he was gone, that he had come back and opened the door himself of his own house. I went myself down to the house, and there were some people in doors with him. I immediately got a constable to take him.

Q. You did not perceive what was in the house before you got a constable, did you - A. No; the constable took him directly away out of his house.

Q. Did the prisoner say any thing about being taken up - A. I cannot say any thing to that. I did not hear him. I immediately went to Mr. Fletcher, the ward beadle, to tell him what had happened, that somebody might take care of the house. Mr. Fletcher came down, and took charge of the house.

Q. When you went to the house did you see the body of this unhappy woman - A. I immediately searched it before Mr. Fletcher; in the left hand pocket was a small knife and comb, in the right hand pocket was a pocket handkerchief, nothing but these things. She was quite dead.

Q. Did you examine her head - A. I cannot say I did; her throat was cut in a shocking manner.

Q. What was the course of living of the prisoner - A. He had been in the Guards.

Mr. Gurney. Fifteen years - A. He was an out Pensioner in the Guards at Chelsea.

JURY. Do you know whether he had ever been wounded - A. I cannot say.

Court. Was he often at your house - A. Not very often; he has been at our house two or three times very troublesome, and I did think him out of his mind.

Q. Could you say from your own observations whether he was given to drinking at all - A. He used to be very steady for about a month or six weeks together, during that time he would not touch a drop of porter; after that time he would break out in a violent manner, he would make his wife fetch him porter at that time.

Q. Had he any children - A. None at all.

Mr. Gurney. When he came to you and told you that he had murdered his wife, he was quite cool and calm; was he not - A. He was as composed as ever I saw him in my life.

Q. And told you of having murdered his wife with as much indifference as any common occurrence; as composed as if he had told you his wife had drank her tea - A. Yes; that is the reason I did not think it so.

Q. Nothing of that kind of manner which you would have supposed a man had committed a horrid crime - A. Far from it. His wife was a very industrious good woman, as could be; no woman could be more industrious or more prudent.

Q. And a kind woman, who gave her husband no provocations of any kind - A. I do not think she did; she was a quiet, well-behaved woman, as could be.

Q. I believe your wife said to him, how could you do such a thing to such a woman as she was - A. I rather think she did. I believe he said in reply, he was obliged to do it; I can almost say it to a certainty that it was so; he answered with as much composure as if he had been doing her a kindness.

Q. I believe you were called in last winter when they were obliged to put a straight waistcoat on him - A. I was; that was the time he went to the madhouse; the very same night the wife came to me and wished to have assistance.

Q. Whenever he had these mad fits it was always directed to her - A. Whenever he had these fits she came to me, living near; she complained of his behaving in an improper way, that she did not know what to make of him; and he has twice come into my house and behaved in an improper way; he behaved very much like a madman certainly; I thought he behaved in a very strange way. When I got the straight jacket, I took a person with me not much in the habit of doing such a thing; I put it on secure that he could do no mischief. Dr. Davis examined to see if he had any wound on his head; he could not see that he had any.

Q. That was the same night that he was taken to the madhouse - A. Yes, the very same night.

JURY. Were you aware, after you were called in by the deceased, that he was overpowered with liquor - A. I cannot say; I looked upon him as deranged; he never was in the habit of drinking spirits; when he broke out he used to drink beer.

Q. Do you think it was the effect of liquor - A. I cannot say.

Q. You say he gave you the shilling on the night that he did the murder, and after that he took the change as a rational man - A. Yes, he took it very coolly indeed and counted it over; and that is the reason I did not think that he had done it.

WILLIAM WINSTER . On the 11th of November I went into the Eagle and Child public-house, I and my brother, to have a pint of porter, merely to look at the evening paper; this was between the hours of 5 and 6; we had one pint; my brother said we had better have another pint; we had another pint; I started to come out; I met the landlord of the Eagle and Child public-house coming into the tap-room, and in consequence of what he said to me I immediately went into the bar where the prisoner was drinking a pint of porter; I spoke to Chaplin; I said, how do you find yourself, Chaplin; he said, middling, Winster, I have done it.

Q. Had you known him before - A. Yes, I had long known him: I have been in the army with him for several years. I said, what have you done; he said, I have killed my wife; I said, I hope not; he said, I have indeed, and he had done it to perfection, he said. I saw him put his hand into his pocket to pay the landlord for the porter that he had had, and as he held his hand to give the landlord the money I saw the blood on his wrist; then I made a motion to the landlord to keep him in hesitation while I ran to his house.

Q. I suppose he did not appear to you to be in liquor, did he - A. He was as sober as any person here. I went to his door; my brother got there before me; my brother was knocking at the door; he could not get in; I knocked at the door very hard; I was for breaking the door open; my brother said, do not, get a constable; I said, no, wherever there is murder we have a right to break the door open. I went to my wife; my wife was very intimate with the prisoner's wife, and then returned to the prisoner's house, and when I came there I saw some person going into the door, and when I came to the door I found my brother and the prisoner returning from the corpse; Chaplin said to me, there she is, I told you so. When I saw the corpse I was shocked for a moment until I came to myself; I then said to him, do not you call yourself a pretty fellow; he said, it is of no use to say any thing, for, said he, I have saved many a life by doing that to some thousands; nothing further passed in conversation. He walked to and fro along his wife a considerable time; he did not seem to be affected at all. We waited there till the constable came.

Q. How many were you - A. Me, my brother, and him, only us three. The deceased lay upon her back on the floor. The constable came. I said to the prisoner, come, get your hat; we went up stairs into his bed-room; he took his hat out of a corner-cupboard; I had the light in my hand; the prisoner put his hat on his head; he had a jacket on; he took his coat off the bed and put it on; he then went to the chest of drawers; he said, he must see if there was any money; when he could not find any he put in the bottom drawer with his knee; he said, I must have something, for, said he, I shall want some victuals when I get in prison. He took out a handkerchief, and a gown, and another article. I then said, Chaplin, you have got plenty, you shall not have more. I turned round with the candle to come down stairs. I came down stairs nearly to the bottom step, the prisoner was about on the centre of the stairs; he said, Winster, stop, I forgot; forgot what, said I; why, said he, some silver spoons; he said, they would fetch him something; I said, no, you have got plenty, you shall not have any more; we came into the room where the deceased lay; he took a handkerchief out of his pocket to tie the articles up in that he had taken out of the drawer; then the patrol came to the door; the patrol said to the constable do you want me; he said, yes; the prisoner, the constable, and the patrol then went out, and the prisoner, when he was out, gave me the key of the door; he said, you are the only friend I know, you take care of the key. I have never seen any thing of him from that time until this.

COURT. You told me that you had served in his Majesty's service with the prisoner - A. Yes, I have.

Q. In this last service that you have been with him how has he been in his understanding - A. He was as well as any soldier in the regiment.

JURY. Q. In good health you mean I presume - A. Yes.

COURT. But you have known him since he was a Chelsea pensioner - A. Yes.

Q. With the same intimacy as when you were in the army together - A. Yes, but not so much in the habit of being with him.

Q. You often saw him at his own house, I suppose - A. Yes. I saw him on the Saturday before this dreadful affair happened; I had no conversation with him then.

Q. Have you conversed with him intimately for the last three or four months - A. No.

Q. When he conversed with you did he appear to be in his right senses - A. Yes, at all times. One time in the last summer he called upon me about half past five in the morning; he said he wished to speak to me; I went to him; I walked some yards with him; he said, Winster, you are the greatest friend I have in London; said he, I am going to dispose of my goods; I said, what is the matter; he said, oh, the devil has got me, he is coming for me; I said, you are talking foolish; I said, what is your wife to do when you have disposed of the goods; oh, he said, she is provided for. I left him and went to my work. I do not know where he went to at that time.

SAMUEL WINSTER . I am brother to the last witness. On the 11th of November I and my brother went into the Eagle and Child public-house to have a pint of porter. I went at first and knocked at the prisoner's door; I knocked several times, no one answered; my brother came down, he knocked at the door, and likewise kicked at the door, no one answered; he went away; I stopped in the passage, it was very dark; I heard somebody coming down the passage, I said, is that you, brother; he replied, is that you Winster. I said it is; he came down; he had the key in his hand, he unlocked the door; Winster, he said, I have done it, I have murdered my wife; I did not then think he had done it; he told me to come in; I went in; I saw the deceased laying upon her back; there was a light upon the mantleshelf; the deceased was laying upon her back, with her head against the jam of the chimney-piece, with her throat cut, her throat was cut nearly so as I could put in a half-pint pot; Chaplin, said I, how could you murder your wife, such a good creature that she was; his answer was, she was a good wife; I said, Chaplin, how could you do such a thing; he replied, I was obliged to do so to save others. I immediately came to the door of the house, saying, that she certainly was murdered; with that my brother came in immediately, he said, how could you do such a thing; the prisoner said, I have done it and it is no use saying any thing about it. The constable came in immediately, and one of them told him to get his hat; the constable told me or my brother to go to the watchhouse to get a pair of handcuffs and to fetch the patrol; Chaplin, the prisoner, said, I do not want any handcuffs, he said he would go along with him; he went up stairs with my brother and the constable; he came down stairs near to the bottom saying, he had forgot the silver spoons, that will bring me something; my brother said he had enough; then the prisoner said he hoped they would let him take some things to pawn; he was going out of the door, the constable told him he should not go out with the things so open in his hand. He went and tied them up on the table. That is all I know.

Q. Were you in the habit of knowing Chaplin any time - A. Yes. I had not seen him for four or five months before this happened, perhaps.

Q. At the time he was talking to you did he appear to be in liquor - A. Not to me; at certain times I know that he would drink a good deal.

MR. CORBY. I am a constable of St. Andrew's, Holborn. I took the prisoner in custody.

Q. You heard the two Winstens examined; have they given a true account of it as far as passed until you apprehended the prisoner - A. Yes.

Q. Had you any conversation with the prisoner in taking him to jail - A. Yes; the first thing we went to a pawnbroker's in Fleet Market by his desire; he put down the bundle on the counter; he untied the handkerchief and pushed the clothes to the man; Mr. Guest's man said, how much do you want on these; he replied, as much as you can let me have; and while the pawnbroker was looking at the things, I said, if he has any thing a shilling or two will be quite sufficient, as he is going to prison, but the better way will be to take him to prison and to send somebody with the things; the pawnbroker said, I will have nothing at all to do with it. Chaplin said nothing at all to this. In going along I asked Chaplin how he came to do it; he said, he had done it and it was what he meant to do; he was right enough, and he hoped she was happy; he wanted to stop at several places to have beer; I would not grant him liberty of doing that. When he got to the Compter I searched him; he had nothing in his pocket except a shilling, some halfpence, and a farthing, and a botkin case.

JOHN DAY . Q. You are a surgeon by profession - A. Yes; I was called on the same night by somebody about a quarter of an hour after the thing happened, and I found her laying on the floor with her throat cut.

Q. You of course have no doubt at all that was the cause of her death - A. No; the corotted artery on the left side was divided.

Court. Prisoner at the bar, you have heard this evidence that has been given against you; what have you to say in your defence; I am ready to hear any thing you have to say; have you any witnesses that you wish to call.

Prisoner. I have no witnesses to call only those that saw it.

RICHARD TAYLOR . Mr. Gurney. Q. I believe you are a printer, residing in Shoe-lane - A. Yes.

Q. How near is your house to the house in which the prisoner lived - A. Only separated by a small yard; his house is between my dwelling-house and printing-office, which is down a court. The prisoner was a tenant of mine.

Q. Do you remember in the month of January last this poor woman making application to you respecting her husband - A. About that time, or rather earlier, some time in last winter, perhaps a month before, he was sent to Hoxton. She told me that she was afraid her husband was deranged, and wished that I would come and see him and speak to him; that he had taken no food for some days, and slept very little at night. I went to see him and found him sitting up in bed, occasionally reading out of a hymn book which he had in his hand; he was not outrageous; he was quite in a dejected low state; he said he was going to die in a day or two. I began to talk to him, and tried to compose his mind; he talked to me in a wild incoherent manner, and he spoke of seeing things which were not real; he talked of the sky being in flames and a great many things. After talking to him some little time, what I thought might be of service, I left him. After that I enquired occasionally after him of his wife; she told me that he was in the same state, and sometimes better. After that he was better for a while, and after some interval she applied again. I understood from her application that he was then in an outrageous state; she then told me that she feared that he would attempt something against her life or his own; the wife said, she thought it necessary for him to be confined; that she had borne with him as long as possible, and she wished me to apply to the parish-officers to procure his confinement as a lunatic. I went with the parish officers, and he was put in a straight waistcoat; he had the straight waistcoat on, some of the neighbours put it on before I went there, and he was sent to the madhouse. I am persuaded that he was deranged.

Q. On Saturday preceding the transaction did his wife make any application to you - A. She had applied to me before that; she always represented him to be insane to me, and I questioned her whether it might not be the effect of drinking; she assured me that he had had no liquor at the time she applied to me.

Q. On Saturday night the wife made a complaint to you - A. Yes, she did. On Saturday night word was brought to me at the printing-office that she had escaped out of the window and taken refuge in my dwelling-house. I found she had. I saw her there. In consequence of the alarm I went from my printing-office to my house, and there I found her. After that I went to the prisoner's house; I saw him, but I did not see much of him; I thought he was deranged; he was then in the custody of the officer; he seemed quite wild.

Q. Now, Mr. Taylor, give to me what complaint she made to you that Saturday - A. She told me that he had fastened the door of the room in the house that she and he was, and that he made an attempt upon her life with a razor.

Q. I believe, Mr. Taylor, he was kept in confinement till the Tuesday - A. I understood so.

COURT. Do you know of your own knowledge, that he was kept in confinement until Tuesday - A. I saw him taken away. I saw him at Guildhall on the Tuesday, when he was before the Alderman.

Mr. Gurney. Q. to Mr. Fletcher. Do you know what day he was set at liberty after he was taken up on Saturday night - A. On the Tuesday, and on the Wednesday this unfortunate affair took place.

Mr. Taylor. On Tuesday I persuaded the poor woman to go and swear the peace against him, as all attempts of confining him did not avail to have him permanently confined; she said she could not bring her mind to do that; she said if that was the only thing that could be done, she never would do that, whatever might be the consequence.

GEORGE BURROWS . Q. I believe, Sir, you keep a house at Hoxton, for the reception of lunatics - A. Yes; I am in partnership with my mother.

Q. At the latter end of the month of January was the prisoner brought to your house - A. Yes, on the 27th of January; he was confined there three weeks and four days; he went out the 20th of February.

Q. In what state was he when under your care - A. Sometimes quiet and sometimes outrageous; we were obliged to put a straight waistcoat on him frequently.

Q. Have you the smallest doubt that at that time he was deranged - A. Not the smallest.

Q. At whose instance was he set at liberty - A. By his wife.

Q. In your judgment was he at all cured - A. No, he was very near as bad as when he came in the house. I told her that.

Q. Now, Sir, would it be the course of a person afflicted with that kind of malady to do strange things when they appeared to be very calm - A. Yes; they are most full of mischief when they are calm.

Court. How old are you - A. Three and twenty.

Q. How long have you been in the habit of being with mad people - A. Fourteen years. I have been constantly among them with my mother.

Q. Were you in Court when this happened - A. Yes, I was. I was aware that it was coming upon him; it is the way he always broke out.

MARTIN NOLAN . Q. At the time that the prisoner was at Mrs. Burrows' you were the keeper - A. Yes, I was called up to the door to take him in. I attended him continually while he was in the house.

Q. Were you ever obliged to put a straight waistcoat upon him - A. Yes.

Q. Now during the whole time he was there what opinion had you of his mind - A. I was confident he was an insane man. I have assisted in the care of insane persons near four years.

Q. Did you think it fit to set him at liberty - A. No. I was very much surprised when I got a note to bring him out. He refused his victuals; he said it was of no use; he said there was a black man behind him, waiting to take him to hell.

ANTONETTA MAY. Q. I believe you were acquainted with the prisoner's wife - A. I have been acquainted with her about a twelve-month.

Q. On Saturday, the 7th of November, did the prisoner's wife come to you at Mr. Taylor's house - A. She did; she came very much agitated and cried; she said her husband had attempted to murder her with a razor on that afternoon.

Q. Did you go with his wife into his room - A. In the afternoon I went up into his room; he was lying on the bed; he appeared in a very wild deranged state; I asked him how he could attempt such a wild act upon his wife; he said the devils were tempting him night and day until he made away with her; he must do it. He said by so doing he should save the life of thousands; he had every appearance of being a deranged man.

Verdict of the Jury - Guilty of the act for which he is indicted, and guilty upon the Coroner's inquisition, but insane at the time of committing the act .

To be kept in prison .

London Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18121202-33

33. JANE GRAY and MARY GRAY were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 31st of July , a printed book, value 2 s. the property of the Governors of the lands, possessions, and revenue of the Hospital of King James, founded at Charter-house , at the humble petition of Thomas Sutton , esq.

EDWARD BAKER TRISTAM. Q. I believe, Sir, you are in the school of the Charter-house - A. Yes.

Q. When you went home last Bartholomew tide were your books all in the study - A. They were all in the study; the study is on the second floor. I went home on the 17th of July, and I returned on the 14th of September, and the day after I returned I missed this book; it is the Delphin edition of Virgil. On the Saturday before I left school I saw it safe in the study. I know both the prisoners; they came twice a week to clean out the rooms; they had access to the study, the prisoners always came together.

CHARLES BROWN. I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoners in company with William Read . I searched Jane Gray ; I found between twenty and thirty duplicates upon her, and among them was one that relates to this charge.

EDWARD WEDDEL . I am a pawnbroker in Turnmill-street. This book was pawned with me on the 31st of June last in the name of Gray. It is a Delphin edition of Virgil. I know the daughter Mary Gray , she was in the habit of coming two or three times a day.

Mr. Tristam. That is my book.

Jane Gray 's defence. I know nothing at all about it.

Mary Gray 's defence. My mother knows nothing of it.

JANE GRAY , NOT GUILTY .

MARY GRAY , GUILTY , aged 37.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18121202-34

34. JANE GRAY and MARY GRAY were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 31st of October , a prayer-book, value 2 s. the property of the Governors of the Charter-house .

CHARLES ANTHONY HUNT . Q. You are in the Charter-house - A. Yes.

Q. Do you recollect, in October last, leaving your prayer-book in Gownboys Hall - A. I did. The prisoners had access to Gownboys Hall. They were to clean it from time to time. They always came together. I missed my prayer-book the next morning after I left it in Gownboys Hall.

WILLIAM READ . I searched the prisoners lodgings. I found this prayer-book in the bed-room of both of them.

Mr. Hunt. That is my prayer-book.

JANE GRAY , GUILTY , aged 62.

MARY GRAY , GUILTY , aged 37.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18121202-35

35. WILLIAM SLOW was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of September , three bushels of coals, value 6 s. the property of John Prentice .

JOHN PRENTICE . I am a bricklayer . I live at End-field. My wife keeps a chandler's-shop. The prisoner was Mr. Sparrow's bailiff . I have a barn in Old-lane; the prisoner lives about five hundred yards from that barn. On the 28th of September I employed Mr. Slow to cart coals for me; I delivered to him twelve sacks filled with coals, six were going by my order to my barn in Old-lane, and six to Mr. Wells, in Endfield town; I saw him set off.

Mr. Gurney. This took place on the 28th of September last. - A. Yes.

Q. And from that time the prisoner continued to live where he did. - A. I saw him often, and employed him.

Q. When did you go to Marlborough-street to obtain a warrant; upon your oath did you ever do it until he threatened you with an action for defamation? - A. No, I never did.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121202-36

36. JOHN PATERSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of November , two coach-window glasses, value 5 l. and two other glasses, value 5 l. and a horse-cloth, value 10 s. the property of John Knight , privately in his coach-house .

SECOND COUNT - the property of William Jay , privately in his coach-house.

AND ANOTHER COUNT - stating it to be the property of James Conatty , Thomas Rowley , George Mansfield , and William Cook .

JAMES CAVE . I am coachman to Mr. John Knight . On the 6th of November I went up to my master's house with the carriage in Portland-place.

Q. Had he borrowed a carriage of Messrs. Conatty and Co. Liquorpond-street - A. Yes, my master kept the carriage in Grosvenor Mews, in the parish of St. George's, Hanover-square. On the evening of the 6th of November, I put it in the coach house near upon twelve o'clock. The coach-house and stables belong to Mr. William Jay . The glasses were all secure then, and the blinds up. I put my horses up then, I locked the door up and went to the public-house. I took the key with me. I returned about one to the coach house. The watchman was going the hour of one when I returned. The first thing that I missed was the horse-cloth. I missed it from the box where I left it. The coach-house door, I put the key in, it went round easy. It appeared to me that the lock had been turned. I went in and observed that the horse's cloth was not there, on the box of the lantelet. I searched the coach-house. The watchman was going by, I asked for a light. I went into the stable, and then I went into the coach-house. I perceived my horsecloth under another carriage, it was laying on the ground spread open; and as I was stooping down to my cloth I observed my own carriage door open, and the prisoner was getting out of my carriage.

Q. Did you observe the other carriage at the same time - A. Yes. I observed the other carriage door open, and the blinds let down, and the steps down. I had also left the door of that other carriage shut. I asked the prisoner what brought him there; he told me the coachman of the other carriage let him in. He said he was shut out of his lodging. I asked him what clothes the other coachman wore; he told me that he had a drab coat on with a green collar. I then seized him, and called the watchman, and gave him in custody.

Q. What was found upon him - A. Nothing but a clasp knife. I then looked into my master's carriage. I observed the glasses upon the seat of the carriage.

Q. How many glasses - A. Two, and the frames of the glasses were broke. They were not in the state I left them. I left them perfectly secure. The glasses were given to Mary Coombs .

MARY COOMBS . I am servant to Mr. Jay.

Q. On the morning of the 7th, or night of the 6th of November, were any glasses given to you - A. Yes, I got the glasses out of Mr. Knight's coach.

Q. Whose coach-house was it - A. Mr. Jay's. I delivered the glasses to John King , the watchman.

JOHN KING . I am a watchman. On the 6th of November I was watchman at Grosvenor Mews. The prisoner was given into my charge. I took him to the watch-house. The last witness delivered to me two coach-glasses, I delivered them to Samuel Plank , the constable of the night.

SAMUEL PLANK . On the 6th of November I was constable of the night. The last witness delivered to me two coach-glasses. These are them. They have been in my possession ever since.

CAVE. These are my master's glasses.

Prisoner's Defence. A coachman said I might sleep in the carriage, he gave me a horse-cloth. I had not been long in the coach when I saw another coachman coming in. I said, who is there; he made no answer. He went out for about a quarter of an hour, and then came in with a light. He called the watchman, and gave me in custody.

GUILTY, aged 23.

Of stealing, but not privately .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18121202-37

37. WILLIAM M'KONE , JOHN DOGGERTY , and WILLIAM NORMAN , were indicted for feloniously making an assault upon William Bunting , on the 31st of October , in the king's highway, putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, a hat, value 10 s. and two shillings , the property of William Bunting .

WILLIAM BUNTING. I am a journeyman baker . On the 31st of October last I was crossing the bottom of Golden-lane about a quarter past twelve at night.

Q. What parish is Golden-lane in - A. St. Luke . I was stopped by five or six men.

Q. Were there other people that you could see - A. The watchman was about ten yards off. I saw no other person that I knew. The watchman was going his round.

Q. You say you observed four or five people. Were they coming as if to meet you - A. They were standing at the bottom of Golden-lane, and several of them put their hands to my waistcoat and breeches pocket. Two or three did.

Q. Describe the manner of their coming up to you - A. They came all round, shoving me about, and shoved their hands in my pockets. When I found that, I endeavoured to get away from them. I turned back towards Finsbury-square; I was followed by one of them, who began conversation with me. He wanted me to go and have some gin with him.

Q. I suppose it was very dark - A. I could perceive the faces of the men.

Q. Should you know the face of the man that asked you to drink some gin - A. Not possibly to swear to him. Upon his asking me to have some gin, I refused, saying, I had seen enough of his company before. He began to abuse me. He told me he could get as good a character as I could. He kept me in conversation until I had a man behind me at my left elbow.

Q. Until you heard a man at your left elbow - A. Yes. I turned my head round to let him pass; he

struck me across the back of my neck with his fist, and put his foot against my toes, and threw me on my face.

Q. Where was the watchman then - A. I did not see the watchman then. On my fall I had both hands in my breeches pocket, and in the fall my hat came off.

Q. Did you fall with violence - A. Yes, and with my fall I pulled both of my hands out of my pockets, and along with it some silver.

Q. The silver then came out unintentionally through the fall - A. I had hold of the money on purpose to save it, and pulling my hands out, the money came out.

Q. How much money had you in your pockets - A. Four shillings and two eighteen-penny pieces; and as I fell my hands came out, and the money along with it. I lost two shillings, and two eighteen-penny pieces came out. I picked the two eighteen-penny pieces up again. The man who kept me in conversation ran away with my hat.

Q. At this time did you observe any body else but him and the man that gave you a blow upon the neck - A. No. The man that struck me stooped and picked up the silver.

Q. How much silver did he pick up - A. I lost two shillings. I saw him stoop and scramble for the silver. I picked up the two eighteen-penny pieces. I saw him attempt to pick up the silver.

Q. You did not actually see him pick up any shillings, did you. You saw him attempt to pick them up - A. I did not actually see him pick them up, but attempt. I caught hold of him by the leg. I called out for the watch. Mr. Webb, the headborough of St. Luke's, came up to my assistance the same time. He came up instantly as soon as I caught hold of the man.

Q. Now look at the bar, and tell me who that man that you caught hold of his leg was - A. William M'Kone is the man. Upon Mr. Webb coming up, he took him into custody. M'Kone was searched in the watch-house, but not in my presence.

Q. You lost two shillings - A. Yes. I believe Doggerty to be the man that ran away with my hat, I cannot swear it.

Q. His countenance is remarkable - A. I cannot positively swear to him; and Norman, I cannot swear to him.

Q. You do not recollect him - A. I cannot swear to him.

Q. When these men, four or five of them, surrounded you, did you call out - A. I spoke to the watchman about it. He ordered them off.

Q. Is he here - A. No.

Q. He ordered them off - A. Yes, and they separated.

Q. Can you take upon yourself to say, that the man that ran away with your hat, or that the man that you laid hold of, was one of the men that you saw first - A. William M'Kone was one of them, I am positive of. When we got into Bunhill-row, part of the gang came and attempted to rescue the prisoner M'Kone.

Q. You were there, were you - A. Yes, and Webb, and the watchman.

Q. How many do you think there were of them - A. Perhaps five or six.

Q. They came up and attempted to rescue M'Kone - A. Yes. M'Kone retended to be in fits, or was in fits. The men that came up cursed us, and asked us what we were taking him to the watch-house for.

Q. Had any of them any arms - A. Not as I saw, I observed none.

Q. Upon their asking you what you were taking him to the watch-house for, what answer did you make - A. I made none. Webb and me went on first, and they had taken M'Kone out of the possession of the watchman. Upon that we ordered the watchman to spring his rattle; several watchman came to our assistance, and M'Kone was secured. Richard Hutchins , he came out of the watch-house and laid hold of M'Kone, and the other two were brought in the same time.

Q. Do you think the number was more about you at the bottom of Golden-lane, or when they attempted the rescue - A. There were about the same number when they attempted the rescue as there were at the bottom of Golden-lane.

Doggerty. The prosecutor said at Worship-street that he could not swear to me, that he did not see me there.

Prosecutor. I said I could not positively swear to him, he had got his coat changed; and when I heard him speak, I said I thought he was the man that kept me in conversation.

JOHN WEBB . On the 31st of October I was head-borough. About half past twelve at night William Bunting called out for the watchman as I was at the corner of Whitecross-street. I saw Doggerty in discourse with Bunting, M'Kone was behind. M'Kone put his foot between his legs.

Q. You saw this yourself, did you - A. Yes.

Q. M'Kone put his foot where - A. Between his legs, I believe, and struck him upon the back part of his neck. He fell upon his hands and face.

Q. Do you think Doggerty or M'Kone saw you - A. No, I believe not. I was behind them when Bunting fell on his face. He called out for assistance. I went up and collared M'Kone.

Q. What became of Doggerty - A. He ran away, I believe.

Q. Did you see him run away - A. Yes, and I believe he had the hat in his hand when he ran away. I cannot positively swear it. Upon my collaring M'Kone I took him to the end of Bunhill-row.

Q. While you were taking him there did you observe any body else in the street - A. There were several others, but they ran away. Three or four more. I took M'Kone to the end of Bunhill-row; and in the mean time Doggerty came back in order to rescue the prisoner M'Kone.

Q. Did any body else come back but Doggerty - A. There was one or two, but I do not know them positively. Doggerty came up to me and asked me what business I had to take M'Kone; I told him I was an officer, I had a right to take him. I immediately struck him with a mace that I had in my pocket.

Q. You struck Doggerty - A. Yes, and I called out for assistance. Richard Hutchins came up to my assistance.

I directed the watchman to spring his rattle, and Richard Hutchins came up. He is an officer. I told him that a man had been robbed in the street. He immediately took hold of Doggerty. Doggerty struck Richard Hutchins once or twice with his fist. We then got both of them to the watch house.

Q. You do not recollect seeing any body that you knew but Doggerty and M'Kone - A. No. There were others there, but I cannot positively swear to them.

Q. You took them to the watch-house, did you - A. Yes, and Robert Lock the officer of the night searched them. I did not. I was all over mud. They throwed me down a great many times in getting them there. They said they would report me at the office for striking them.

RICHARD HUTCHINS . I am an headborough. On the 31st of October I was on duty at the watch-house. I heard the rattle spring. I ran out of the watch-house, and saw Webb and Bunting had got hold of M'Kone, and the prisoner Doggerty trying to rescue M'Kone out of their hands.

Q. Did you observe any others about them - A. There were several, but I did not take notice. I laid hold of Doggerty, he struck me several times. He said, you have taken several of my pals, and I'll be d - d if you shall take me. I then, with the assistance of Robert Lock , got him to the watch-house.

Q. During this time you saw a good deal of Bunting - A. Yes, he was there all the time.

Q. Was he perfectly sober - A. Yes.

ROBERT LOCK . On the 31st of October I was officer of the night. I am an headborough. I heard the rattle spring. Me and Hutchins ran out to the assistance. I saw M'Kone in the custody of Webb.

Q. to Hutchins. Do you know Norman by sight - A. I never saw him until he was brought to the watch-house. I knew the other two very well.

LOCK. I saw Webb having hold of M'Kone, He told me to assist in bringing him to the watch-house. I did. Hutchins had hold of Doggerty. I saw Doggerty strike Hutchins several times in the watch-house. He had Hutchins down on the seat in the watch-house.

Q. Did you see him strike him in the street - A. Not in the street, I cannot say. He had Hutchins down on a seat in the watch-house. I laid hold of M'Kone. M'Kone appeared to be in a fit as they said. We got them both into the watch-house.

Q. Did you see any thing of Norman - A. I did not see him until he came in the watch-house.

Q. Who brought him there - A. He came in of his own accord.

Q. What was his pretence for coming in the watch-house - A. I do not know.

Q. When M'Kone was in the watch-house, did he appear to be in a fit - A. Yes, for about five minutes.

Q. What sort of a fit was it - A. Kicking and struggling about. I do not know how long he was in the fit. I left him there, He remained there all night, and Doggerty and Norman with him.

Q. This was on the Saturday night - A. Yes. I searched M'Kone. I found on him a one-pound note, a three-shilling piece, an eighteen-penny token, and two shillings.

Q. Did you shew the shillings that you found on him to Bunting - A. No. There was no much confusion in the watch-house. I put the whole into his pocket again as he was kicking in the fit.

Q. Did not Bunting see the two shillings - A. No. Doggerty was fighting Hutchins and Webb. I was obliged to run to their assistance.

M'Kone's Defence. I work for Mr. Caslon in Salisbury-square. I left off work at half after seven. I went to the gin shop the corner of Fleet-street. I had a glass or two of gin I got intoxicated, not being in the habit of drinking. I did not know what I was about; and how I came to affront Mr. Bunting I cannot say. I am subject to fits, and being in liquor, I went into a fit. I know nothing of it.

Doggerty's Defence. In Bunhill-row I saw M'Kone in a fit. Hutchins struck me on the face He said, I will have you; I said, you want me to strike you. I will not.

Norman was not put on his defence.

M'KONE GUILTY - DEATH , aged 19.

DOGGERTY GUILTY - DEATH , aged 23.

NORMAN NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18121202-38

38 JOSIAH NIGHTINGALE , BENJAMIN WILLIAMS , and JOHN NEWBANK , were indicted for feloniously making an assault in the king's highway upon William Nesbit , on the 7th of November , putting him in fear, and taking from his person seven seals, value 7 l. his property.

WILLIAM NESBIT . Q. Will you state to the court what you know of the charge against the prisoners at the bar - A. I cannot swear to these men at the bar. I do not know their persons, nor that they robbed me. On the 7th of November I was going through the Temple with a gentlewoman. We were talking about business. It was about a quarter past eight, or thereabouts; and as I was going along a number of men surrounded me. Just at the entrance of the Temple, by the first block, by the fountain; some man struck me on the chest, and another man took hold of my seals of my watch, and broke my chain. It was gone in a moment; and by my falling against the lady, she fell against the wall, and before I could recover myself from her, my seals were gone. I have never seen my seals since.

Q. You cannot swear to the persons of either of them that you saw that night, that probably took away your seals - A. No, I cannot.

Q. Now look at the prisoners at the bar - A. I know them full well by seeing them at the justice's.

Q. Look at them again, and tell me whether they are any of the persons that you saw that night - A. I cannot swear that they are either of them.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18121202-39

23 CATHERINE RYAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of November , a ham, value 12 s. the property of Thomas William Hodgson , privately in his shop .

THOMAS WILLIAM HODGSON . I live at the corner of Great Queen-street, in Drury-lane . I am a cheesemonger .

Q. Look at the prisoner; do you know her - A. I have seen her a great many times. She came to my shop on the 22d of November last. At the time that she came into my shop, I was in the accompting house, which is attached to the shop.

Q. Was any body in your shop - A. No. A clerk of Mr. Baker was in the accompting house with me. As soon as I saw the prisoner in the shop, I left him, and went up directly to the prisoner. She had a very large band box with her, which laid on the ground, which created some suspicion. I walked to her in the front of the counter, and asked her what she wanted; she answered, a quarter of a pound of butter, at sixteen pence a pound. She had a large cloak on her, and appeared agitated. I suspected her, from her appearance; and I asked her if she had done any thing wrong, and why she was agitated. She said, she had not. I then moved her left arm; and when I lifted up her left arm, the ham fell from under her arm. This is the ham; it is mine. It has been in my custody ever since.

Q. How do you know it is your ham - A. I have many hams laying in the front of my counter. I am positive it is my ham. I challenged her, how the ham should fall from under her arm; she said, it fell from off a pile of hams.

Q. Was there a pile of hams near where she stood - A. No; a few feet off, not directly near. The ham did not fall until I lifted up her arm. It is a Westmoreland ham. It is peculiar in my trade. It is different from a Yorkshire ham; and every factor cuts them in a different way. I think, positively, that this ham stood upon that pile of hams in the morning. I did not miss the ham until it fell from under her cloak. I shewed her the place where she took it from. I said, this ham you took off this pile. She said, she never saw the ham until I touched it.

Prisoner's Defence. I was carrying a band box. I was moving my things. I went into this gentleman's shop. I saw he had a suspicion of me. I opened the band box. He lifted up the side of my cloak. I stood up to let the gentleman see I had nothing. The hams were all laying close; he took up a loose ham, and said, d - n your eyes, you have got a long cloak on. He kicked me, and made great riot. He sent for a constable. The constable came and took me.

Prosecutor. I did not kick her. She made a great riot. I only pushed her, when I saw the ham fall from her.

JOSEPH GODDARD . I was with Mr. Hodgson in the accompting house. I saw the ham drop from under the prisoner's arm.

Q. Did you see Mr. Hodgson go up to her - A. Yes.

Q. Did he strike her - A. No; he pushed her two or three times after the ham fell. I saw the ham fall from under her cloak.

Q. to Prosecutor. What is the value of this ham - A. It cost me twelve shillings.

GUILTY, aged 52,

Of stealing, but not privately in the shop .

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and whipped in jail .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18121202-40

39 MICHAEL HART was indicted for that he on the 16th of November , seventeen pieces of counterfeit milled money made to the likeness of a shilling, and six pieces of counterfeit money made to the likeness of a sixpence, the same not being cut in pieces feloniously did put off to Samuel Dickens at a lower rate and value than they were counterfeited for, that is to say, for ten shillings .

SAMUEL DICKENS. I am one of the patrols of Bow-street . On the 9th of November I was in company with the prisoner at the Red Lion, Petticoat-lane for three or four hours. Briant was with me. I was to see the prisoner again on the 16th of November. I went to the Red Lion, Petticoat-lane. I saw the prisoner there again. I went about half past one. Briant asked him if he had got any papers, meaning banknotes; he said, no, he had got some shillings. He pulled one out of his breeches pocket and shewed us for a sample. I told him I would have a pound's worth for ten shillings. He said he would fetch them me; but, said he, I must have the money first, which I paid him before the witness, Briant. I paid him ten shillings. He went away for about ten minutes. He came in and beckoned me out of the parlour. He gave me seventeen shillings, and six sixpences; and at the same time he put his hand into his breeches pocket and took out a three-shilling token, for which I gave him one shilling.

Q. What did you do with the seventeen shillings - A. I put them into a private pocket, where there was no more money. They have never been out of my sight, only while Mr. Powell sealed them up.

ODDY. I am an officer of Bow street office. On the 9th of November I saw the prisoner, Briant, and Dickens at the Red Lion public house, Petticoat-lane. I have seen the prisoner two or three times about the Red Lion public-house. On the 25th I apprehended the prisoner. Dickens brought him to me; he said, here is Bullock. I took him in custody, and searched him. I found on him nineteen shillings in good money, and a bad bank token.

CALEB EDWARD POWELL . Q. You are an assistant to the solicitor of the mint - A. Yes. Dickens brought me seventeen shillings and six sixpences. I sealed them up and delivered them to him again. These are the seventeen shillings and six sixpences. They are all counterfeit.

Q. Was this a voluntary act of Dickens, or was it under your direction - A. It was under my direction.

Q. Now, Mr. Powell, I put the two three-shilling tokens into your hand - A. The three-shilling tokens are both counterfeits.

Prisoner's Defence. I am entirely innocent. I never saw the parties before in my life.

GUILTY , aged 46.

Confined One Year in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121202-41

40. WILLIAM CHALLON and WILLIAM TAYLOR were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of November , eighty-four pieces of leather, value 6 l. and seven dozen of sole leather, value 7 l. the property of Robert Wyatt , Robert Burkitt Wyatt , John Covey Burkitt , and Clement Wyatt .

JOHN BARTLETT . I am porter to Messrs. Wyatts, leather-cutters and leather-sellers , Coleman-street . I live in the house where the business is carried on. The prisoner, Challon, was their carman . Taylor is a porter in the neighbourhood.

Q. Messrs. Wyatt do not sleep on the premises - A. None of them. I do, with my family.

Q. Did Challon bring in the keys of the stable of a night - A. Yes, he did.

Q. On the 27th, in the morning, when he came for the keys had you examined the stable on the over night - A. I went as soon as I came down stairs, the first thing, and examined the doors. I found the door unlocked. Challon came to work a little before seven in the morning. On the morning of the 7th, I recollect his coming for the keys. He took the keys from their place. I took up the dust tub, and I followed him, and put the dust on the dung-hill. When I went out of the door I saw the prisoner, Taylor, on the spot adjoining our premises. He was walking by our premises. He made a stop, as if he wished me not to see him. I went on with my tub to the dung-hill. I did not see Challon go into the stable. I heard the door. I returned back immediately. I saw Taylor had gone past the alley that goes up to the stable; I placed myself in a situation where I could watch him. In a few minutes I saw Taylor came back, and go up towards the stable. He was gone about three or four minutes. I saw him come down with this bag upon his shoulder. I followed him immediately down Coleman-street. I walked behind him a few yards. I was satisfied what was in the bag. I laid hold of the bag. I said, what have you got here. He said, a parcel that a man gave me to carry up the street a little way for him. I told the prisoner, Taylor, it would not do, I must have the parcel. I brought the parcel into my master's premises, and went to my master. Mr. Burkitt came immediately. I told him what had happened. He ordered the carman into his accompting-house. Challon came into the accompting-house, where master and the bag was. Master asked Challon whether he had any knowledge of that bag. He said, he did not know that he had. Master said, you do know, and you know that we know, and it is useless for you to secrete it. I was then ordered to fetch a constable, which I did.

Q. At the time that you saw Taylor on your master's premises, with the bag upon his back, was he ever out of your sight - A. No, not until I took him. I am sure he is the same man.

Taylor. Where did I go to when you took the bag from me - A. You went off towards the Dolphin public-house.

COURT. Had he any bundle or bag with him, when you first saw him - A. No.

JOHN COVEY BURKITT. The names of my partners are Robert Wyatt , Robert Burkitt Wyatt, and Clement Wyatt , and myself. We are leather sellers, in Coleman-street. On the morning of the 27th, in consequence of information from the last witness, I sent for Challon, and when Challon came in I asked him if he knew any thing of that bag. He denied all knowledge of the bag. I than sent Bartlett for a constable. When Bartlett was gone out of the accompting-house, Challon fell on his knees, and begged that I would pass it over. I said that was impossible; the law must take its course, for I suspected a long time we had been robbed. I told him it was near two years. He replied it was not more than twelve months. The man returned with a constable. The bag was opened, and I was positive the property was ours. I then locked Challon in the accompting-house, went into the street, and saw Taylor, the other prisoner, opening the shutters of the adjoining premises. I cought hold of him by the collar, and brought him into our warehouse. This was about half past seven. I sent the officer and Bartlett to search Taylor's lodgings. Nothing was found. Challon was confined in the accompting-house and Taylor in the parlour. The sole leather is marked by my partner, Clement Wyatt . It is of the value of between six and seven pounds. Challon lived with us two years the last time. He had lived with us previous. He was our carman.

CLEMENT WYATT . Q. You are one of the partners in this house - A. Yes.

Q. What time in the morning did you see Challon - A. About a quarter before nine. I can swear to that sole leather. It is chiefly of my own mark. I saw the bag in the accompting-house, and Challon, I said, well, William, so this game is out at last. I said, you need not hesitate; I have been aware a long time that you have robbed us, and I said, that as a proof to you that I have been aware of it I have reason to believe you left a parcel some time since at a public-house in Little Britain, for a cobler to call for it. I asked him, if that parcel did not contain dressed leather. He said, no, he had never taken any thing but sole leather. He told me the way he got into the house was from the stable into the loft, from the loft into the adjoining shed, from the shed down two ladders, into our warehouse, and he had taken this leather off the shelves were we customary put this leather; that he had given it to Taylor to carry to the Dolphin public-house for him, and that he had done it frequently before.

Challon's Defence. I asked the prisoner Taylor to carry it. He did not know what was in it.

Taylor's Defence. I have been a porter in Coleman-street for ten years. On this morning, I was coming up the street, this man asked me to carry this parcel, as far as the corner of White's-alley: he would pay me for carrying it; and there would be a person to take it of me of the name of Robinson: and do you know, I was stopped before I got there. The man that took the bag from me, he carried if home. As to know that the goods in the bag were stolen, I did not. I am innocent, in that respect, as a child unborn.

CHALLON, GUILTY , aged 35.

TAYLOR, GUILTY , aged 52

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121202-42

41. WILLIAM ADAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of November , sixty pounds weight of vendigrease, value 10 l. and a bag, value 1 s. the property of Thomas Wilson , Sampson Hodgkinson , William Minshall , Thomas Ashmore , and Thomas Hodgkinson .

JOHN LACEY HAWKINS . I am one of the marshalmen. On the 23d of November last, I was going by Messrs. Wilson and Hodgkinson's; I observed a man standing at the prosecutors house; as I passed him I thought I knew him. I turned back.

Q. Where is the house - A. Opposite of Fleet-market, the corner of the King's Arms gateway. I came back again, and was quite sure he was the man that I saw in company with a man, the week before last, at Guildhall.

Q. You came back and suspected - A. Yes, and in consequence of that man's appearance I went into the shop, I watched that man a considerable time, before I went into the house, and informed them what I suspected. I, in company with Mr. Minshall and Wilson, went into the warehouse. The gentleman that is here, told me to mind how I came down, and as he just got down, Mr. Wilson ran against something, which turned out to be the prisoner. He said, who is that, and held the lanthorn up to his face. This was a little after six o'clock. He said, holloa, who is that. The prisoner said, me. Mr. Wilson said, who. He answered, Adams. What are you doing down here. The prisoner seemed very much confused, he muttered something. He seemed desirous of saying something, but did not say it. I spoke to him, and said, you have got cats eyes you came down to work in the dark. He said, he had knocked his light out. I said, we have got one, we can find it if you had one. Mr. Wilson said, where is your lanthorn. He said he had not one. I said, where is your candle. Then after a second or so, he said he had no candle. I said, I thought it looked a little awkward, or singular. I observed him rubbing his hands on his cloaths. He had an apron on. I asked him, what was the matter with his hands. He said, nothing. I laid hold of his hands, and showed them to Mr. Minshall. He said, they were all over verdigrease. I than begged Mr. Minshall to hold him still, and I would apprehend the other man. When I returned, Mr. Wilson said, his suspicious were satisfactory. He took me to the further part of the warehouse, where the verdigrease was deposited, where the bag was deposited tied up up with this string, and when I got to the place where the verdigrease was deposited, this bag was a foot and a half out of the hole. There is a little plank to keep it in. This bag was a foot and a half from where the general bulk was. The prisoner said, he knew nothing of the verdigrease in the bag. Nothing more passed untill he came into the accompting-house. I then asked where he lived, and some one in the accompting-house took it down, I live in Thomas's-court. I told him, I had travelled in those errands, and begged he would not give me a wrong direction, to where he lodged at that time. I went there. He had left that lodging; and when I came back, I said, he was a scoundrel to send me there; he said, you fool, did you think I was going to send you to a right place. I said, now I have a worse opinion of you then at first.

Q. Could you form any judgment, from the appearance of his hands that you saw that night, being all over verdigrease, to you did it look as if it was recently so - A. Yes. When I got him in the coach I saw he was a strong fellow, and very saucy. I said, I am afraid you are an old thief. He said, I knew you as soon as I saw you come down the cellar; poor Bill for that. That was a man that I convicted the sessions before last. His name was William Lewis , for a burglary. I said, do you know him; I am sorry for that. He said, porters know porters, you know that; in an impertinent manner. He said, you stuck pretty close to him. I said, how do you know that. He said he was in court. He then said, you think to get a forty pound of me, do you. I said, it is not in a dwelling-house; the biggest rogues get the best luck. He said, you will get nothing by the prosecutors. He said, I have done nothing; I know nothing about the bag. I said, I do not say you did. He then said, if you behave like a gentleman forty pound will be no object to me; that is more than you will get out of the prosecutors. I told him, he had better say no more about it. Then that part of the conversation dropped.

WILLIAM WILSON . I am warehouseman to Messrs. Hodgkinson and Minshall. The prisoner was their porter.

Q. Did you on the evening of the 23d of November go down in the warehouse in company with the last witness and Mr. Minshall - A. I did. It was about six o'clock. I was lighting Hawkins down, he being a stranger, and as I was lighting Hawkins down I heard something at the bottom step. I cried out, holloa. Going a little further I perceived it was the prisoner, with the light that I had. I asked him what he was doing there in the dark. He said, he had knocked his light out. He immediately was rubbing his hands upon his apron. Hawkins said, halloa, what are you doing of, and desired him to let him see his hands. On my looking at his hands they had verdigrease upon them. It was fresh as if he had been recently handling verdigrease; quite recently. I then proceeded further in the cellar. I looked for his light; no candle or lanthorn was to be found. On my coming to the place where we keep our stock of verdigrease I perceived that bag tied up. I felt of that, and I observed there were four sacks of verdigrease. This is called a sack of verdigrease. It is in leather. We never keep them in these bags.

Q. Whereabout was that bag laying - A. I have measured the distance. It was about four feet and a half from where the stock was kept. On Mr. Minshall coming into the cellar I observed to him that it was tied up, I have no doubt to convey away. We told the prisoner of it. He said he knew nothing of it at all.

Q. What is the value of these four bundles - A. About fourteen or fifteen pounds.

JURY. Does that canvas bag belong to the warehouse - A. Certainly it does; there is the name of Wilson on the bag. It belongs to the proprietors

of the house. I heard the conversation pass in the coach, that Hawkins has been stating. The prisoner said to Hawkins, I know you well; you mean to come the same rig with me as you did with Bill Lewis . He abused Hawkins very much, and behaved very impertinent all the way to the Compter.

MR. WILSON. Our firm consists of Thomas Wilson , Sampson Hodgkinson, William Minshall , Thomas Ashmore , and Thomas Hodgkinson . I was present all the time that passed which Mr. Wilson has related. I sent for him with respect to the candle and lanthorn. I was not perfectly satisfied. I told another person to go down, and to look after this candle, thinking that he might, to secrete himself, have throwed it somewhere, and that an accident might happen by fire. The prisoner said, all was safe; he had left it on a sulpher barrel. I believe it was found there.

Mr. Adolphus. Did not he tell you, at the same time, that he had gone down to fasten the warehouse windows, and that he had put the candle there - A. He said no such thing.

JURY. How long has the prisoner been in your service - A. About three months. I know nothing about him. The porters are under the direction of the last witness.

JOHN NASH . I am a porter to the prosecutors.

Q. On the 23d of October last were you employed in washing bottles - A. Yes, in warm water. I began in the morning. The prisoner was employed with me in washing bottles from two o'clock till five in the evening.

Q. If he had come there with verdigrease on his hands must it not have come off - A. Yes; it is an easy thing to come off.

Prisoner's Defence. On that evening I had just been up five pair of stairs, craneing goods up with a candle and lanthorn. I came down stairs, and went into the cellar, to fasten the cellar windows. I put my lanthorn on a sulpher cask. I thought I heard my name called, I was going up the cellar stairs. I believe I went up two steps. I met Mr. Wilson, and the officer, and Mr. Minshall. He asked me, what business I had there in the dark. I went down with a light. My light went out. He said, it looked very comical, and took me to the verdigrease heap. He said I see what you are, your countenance looks like a thief. The officer said, let me look at your hands. One hand was a little verdigreasy; he did not look at both. Mr. Wilson said, I know how your hands came so, you have been putting this verdigrease into the bag. I said, I had not. He said, the man that had been convicted of stealing verdigrease, was waiting out of doors for me to bring this to him. I said, no, I had no knowledge of the verdigrease at all.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121202-43

42. JOHN COLLINS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of August , six shirts, value 4 l. a pair of boots, value 30 s. a pair of trowsers, value 10 s. a pair of pantaloons, value 1 l. four pair of stockings, value 8 s. four half handkerchiefs, value 8 s. one half-guinea, three bank dollars and two French sixpences, the property of James Riley , in the dwelling-house of John Evans .

JAMES RILEY . Q. Where do you live - A. I live in Carnaby-street , in John Evans 's house, in the parish of St. James, Westminster . The prisoner slept four or five nights with me. On the night of the 3d of August I went to bed about half past nine o'clock. The prisoner came to bed after ten o'clock. On the 4th of August I got up a few minutes before six in the morning. I went out to my work, and left him in bed, behind me, and I returned at one o'clock. I had occasion to go up stairs into my room. I found my things taken away; six shirts, a new pair of boots, a blue silk purse, with money in it, half-a guinea in gold, three dollars, an eighteen-penny piece, two three-shilling pieces, and two French sixpences, a new pair of nankeen trowsers, four pair of cotton stockings, and four half handkerchiefs. I missed all these things when I came to my box. They were the clothes that I had on the Sunday before. I had put them in my box. I saw them safe in my box in the morning, before I went out. I did not see the prisoner for three months after that. It was on the 31st of October I saw him after that. He had then one of my neck handkerchiefs upon him, and one of my shirts. My landlord took him up. He took him home to his own house, and then sent for me, and when I came into the room the landlord asked if I knew who that person was. I answered, yes, that was the young man that slept with me, that I supposed had robbed me.

Q. Did you identify any thing of yours upon him - A. The handkerchief and shirt. I asked him the reason why he robbed me. He said, he had not robbed me. I sent my landlord out for an officer. The prisoner then asked me what my loss was, and if I would go with him, he said, to a friend, to pay me for the things. I told him I would not go with him, but as soon as soon as the officer came I would give him in charge to him. An officer came. I told the officer to take him in charge. He did. The officer took him to Marlborough-street office, and I went with the officer and the prisoner.

Q. Have you got the things here that you found on him - A. The shirt was not taken off him. The officer has the handkerchief. I know the handkerchief by a mark of paint on it, and it matches with those I have at home.

Mr. Reynolds. There were other lodgers all over the house, were there not - A. There were other lodgers. When I left the room in the morning I shut the door. I did not lock it. The key of the door used to hang up in the shop, and when I came there at one o'clock, I found the key these. I saw my things in the box that morning, before I went out. I took six shillings out, and left the purse in the box.

JOHN EVANS . I am the landlord of the house. I know the prisoner to be the man that lodged with Riley on the night of the 3d of August. On the morning of the 4th, Riley got up about six o'clock, and went out to his work. I had occasion to go out a little before seven, and on my returning home

about eight o'clock I met the prisoner in Peter-street, with a bundle in his left hand. He had on a pair of boots. He passed by me without speaking. That passed on until Riley came home, about one o'clock. Riley went up stairs. He returned down, telling me that he had been robbed, that his box had been broke open, and desired that I would go up to see the nature of the robbery. When I got upstairs I saw the box had been forced open. We searched several pawnbrokers, and found nothing. I took the prisoner on the 1st of October, near the end of Newport-market. I observed him standing at the corner of St. Martin's-lane. I took him by the collar, and asked him if he remembered ever lodging in Carnaby-street. He denied that ever he lodged there. I told him, I was certain as to his person, and that I would not let him go unless he would go home with me, and further satisfy me that he was not the man. He went home with me, and when I got in my house I asked my wife whether she had ever seen that person before. She said, he was the man that lodged with Riley, in his hearing. I sent for Riley, and he said he was the man. The prisoner denied it.

Q. Now, are you sure that he was the man - A. I am sure he was the man.

Q. Was anything found upon him - A. Marsden, the officer, found upon him a handkerchief and a shirt. Riley claimed them, and said they were his. The prisoner had the shirt on his body. The officer has the handkerchief. The prisoner was my lodger; he and Riley paid me jointly for the room.

JOHN MARSDEN . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner on the 1st of October last. I found a neck handkerchief upon him, belonging to Riley. There was a shirt on his back, but having no mark that he would swear to, I would not take it off. This is the neck handkerchief

Prosecutor. I know it to be my neck handkerchief.

Prisoner's Defence. I never was in the house at all. I know nothing about his things.

JURY, Q. to Evans. Did the prisoner bring the key down - A. Yes, he brought the key down. My wife hung it upon a nail, and the key was found in its place when Riley wanted to go up stairs.

Q. to Riley. Was the door locked when you went up at one o'clock in the day - A. Yes, it was.

GUILTY, aged 25,

Of stealing the handkerchief only, value 1 s.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18121202-44

43. CATHERINE CAZELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of November , five pair of sheets, value 30 s. five table cloaths, value 30 s. the property of Elizabeth Jenkins , and a pair of shoes, value 2 s. the property of Edmund Appleyard , in his dwelling-house .

ELIZABETH JENKINS . I live with my daughter; her name is Harriett Appleyard; she lives at No. 23 Crown-street, Soho; in the parish of St. Ann, Westminster .

Q. Now look at the prisoner, do you know her - A. Yes. She lived servant with my daughter. She quitted my daughter's service on the morning of the 17th of November, I believe, between seven and eight in the morning.

Q. Did she give your daughter any notice of her going - A. No. When she was gone we missed a piece of beef out of the pickling pan, and some tobacco and a pair shoes of her mistresses. On the next morning I missed the linen out of a box in the room where she slept.

Q. Was that box locked - A. Yes, and when I went to search, it was locked. I missed five pair of sheets, and five tablecloths. I value the sheets at six shillings a pair, and the tablecloths at six shillings each. My daughter missed nothing but a pair of shoes to my knowledge.

Q. How long had the prisoner been in your daughter's service - A. Near five weeks, and I am sure the sheets and tablecloths were safe in the box when the prisoner came to her service. The box was in the room where the prisoner slept.

Q. Had you seen them in the box during the five weeks - A. No. I live with my daughter, to assist in the bar. They keep a public-house. The sheets and tablecloths belonged to me. I did not see the prisoner until Tuesday, the 24th of November. My daughter saw her in the street, and brought her into the house.

HARRIET APPLEYARD . On the 24th of November I saw the prisoner in the street. I asked her, how she came to take the things. She trembled, and said, she was very sorry. She said, she should not have done it, if she had not been persuaded, and she had never been happy since. That was all that passed on the subject. I desired her to go with me to my house, and there, before my mother, she repeated the same thing again.

Q. Your mother told us that you missed nothing else but your shoes - A. We missed a piece of beef, and about five pounds of tobacco. I value the shoes at two shillings.

Q. to Elizabeth Jenkins . When the prisoner was brought to your daughter's house there was a conversation was not there - A. Yes. I asked her how she came to take the things. She said, that she had been persuaded to take them. I said, Kitty, when did you take them. She said, a few at a time, and she took them down stairs in the morning when she got up. I asked her, when she began to take them. She said, on the Friday before the 9th of November; the 6th of November that was when she first began to take them. There are three tablecloths, and a sheet, found at Mr. Hughes's, Drury-lane.

GEORGE SLATER . I am shopman to Mr. Hughes, in Drury-lane. I produce three tablecloths, a sheet, and a pair of shoes, pawned in the name of Sarah White . I lent twelve shilling on two tablecloths, and six shillings on the other tablecloth, and three shillings on the sheet.

SARAH WHITE. Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. Yes. On the 9th of November I met her. She asked me to go with her to Belton-street, and when we came to the corner of Bull-yard, she desired me to wait there a few minutes. I waited there about a quarter of an hour, and she returned with

these things in her apron, and I went with the prisoner to pawn them. On the 9th of November, I pawned two tablecloths for twelve shillings, and on the next day, a sheet and tablecloth for nine shillings. The shoes I did not pledge. She told me her mother was dead in the country, and her sister had sent her half the things. She brought me these things to pawn.

Prisoner. Sarah White left her service; she asked me to assist her. I told her, I had nothing to assist her, without I did a wrong thing. I told her, there was a box in my room. She desired me to let her have anything.

BENJAMIN WELCH. I am an officer. I took the prisoner in custody. I found the shoes at Mr. Hughes's.

GEORGE SMEDLEY. I am a servant to Mr. Hughes. The woman that pawned the things gave me her name as White. The shoes were pawned on the 17th, eight days afterwards. I do not know who pawned them.

Q. to Mrs. Appleyard. Do you know Mrs. White - A. Yes, by coming to see the prisoner.

Q. Did she ever go up stairs into the room where the box was - A. Never, to my knowledge.

Q. What room were your shoes in - A. The little parlour below.

Prisoner's Defence. That woman came to me at different times, and asked me for property. I told her what was in the box. I gave her these two tablecloths to pledge, to assist her. I gave her a sheet and tablecloth. I asked her what she had done with them. She said, she was stopped at the watchhouse.

GUILTY, aged 25,

Of stealing to the value of 20 s. only .

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18121202-45

44. WILLIAM BLADEN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of September , two hundred and forty halfpence , the property of George Dunman .

GEORGE DUNMAN. I am a grocer . I live at 38, Aldgate High-street . The prisoner was my porter . After he had been with me about a month I saw him in different situations in the back warehouse, as though he was hiding of something or other, and on Sunday morning particularly, instead of going to church, he was lurking about in that warehouse, among the empty casks and tea-chests, and in other circumstances I was led to believe he was a dishonest man. I found, likewise, a quantity of currants laid by, and from losing cocoa-nuts, and other things in the shop, I was convinced there must be a thief in the house. I kept a large quantity of halfpence in a recess opposite of my till, behind the counter. I missed them at different times, and in order to detect the prisoner I went down one evening and marked some halfpence, and the next morning I watched him narrowly, while in the act. I went down early in the morning, before any of them got up, and saw that the halfpence were all in the same situation that I left them the over night. I watched the prisoner while he was sweeping out the shop behind the counter. He put his hand down, and took up two papers of halfpence from the pile. He put them into his coat pocket, two five-shilling papers, and almost immediately went into the back warehouse. I watched him as narrow as possible, and hesitated in my own mind, whether I should detect him while the halfpence were upon him. As soon as possible I went down, and sent him up to breakfast, during which time I made every search I could for these halfpence, in the warehouse. His coat was off. I examined the coat, to see whether the halfpence were in his coat or no. They were not. After searching an hour and a half I found the halfpence in a tub of saw dust, with about twenty shillings more, about a foot down, under the surface. I sent for a constable, and gave charge of him directly.

Mr. Adolphus. You were here last sessions, and prosecuted the same indictment in a different form - A. Yes.

Q. How many apprentices have you - A. Two.

Q. Were you always so clear that you saw the prisoner taking these halfpence - A. I wanted no other evidence than my eyes.

Q. Did you ever charge your apprentice with these halfpence - A. No, I did not.

Q. Was the prisoner by when you found the halfpence - A. Yes. I gave him no hint that I suspected him, for fear he should run away.

Q. In the last case, I think you dropped, that you received a false character with him - A. I did. I received it from Mr. Roebuck; after that, he said he turned him away for theft. I saw Mr. Roebuck at a wholesale house, Messrs. Warner and Company. Another man, when I went to the house, gave him the character, who, it appears since, was not the master. I believe it was the shopman, whom I understood since to be his brother.

FRANCIS KINNERSLEY . Mr. Dunman sent for me. He said, his porter had robbed him. The copper money was found in the sawdust.

Q. Has he sawdust in the warehouse - A. Yes. I was in the shop two hours. The shopman, and indeed the whole of them, said it is very likely Mr. Dunman put them there himself. When the halfpence were brought here last session, Mr. Dunman charged me and Mr. Holland as two rascals, that we had received a bribe of four pounds to make a flaw in the indictment.

Prosecutor. I said, it looked as though there was a bribe given to the officer, or to persons that had the drawing up the indictment in order to save the prisoner.

Kinnersley. There is another circumstance I wish to mention. When we came out of the Lord Mayor's justice-room, he said, Mr. Kinnersley, I'll thank you if you will let me look at the halfpence; he said, he wished to count how many good and how many bad ones there were. Oh, said he, I made a mistake, this is not the paper. He went into a shop and bought a stick of sealing wax, to seal them up again.

Q. He told you first, that he had information that this man stole the halfpence - A. Yes. He took me up stairs, and opened a trap that is made along the ceiling and the floor. There is a long window, to watch the movements of what was done in the

shop. He opened the trap, and shewed me the manner in which the prisoner took them. I think, says he, he turned round after he took them.

Mr. Adolphus. How many examinations were there before there was mentioned any eye-sight robbery - A. Two, I believe.

Q. What mark did he put upon the halfpence - A. I really cannot say.

Q. Were you with him when this search was for the halfpence - A. I was.

Prosecutor. The halfpence were found before Kinnersley was sent for.

Kinnersley. I was there ten minutes before the halfpence were found, before he led me to the cask, and then he took the halfpence out.

Prosecutor. May I explain what this officer has been saying of this money, what was said at the Mansion House. It was a busy time; the Lord Mayor had a great press of business on his hand. We were there three times. The first time, his Lordship's clerk said there was sufficient evidence to convict this man. He asked for Thursday to bring forward his friends; and, with respect to my having any doubt of seeing the man take the halfpence, I will positively declare it is all false. I represented that I saw him take the halfpence.

COURT. There is another thing, he says you accused the officer and him of having four pounds - A. With respect to bribing the officer, it was nothing more than a joke, what I said.

COURT. Shew the halfpence that you marked - A. Yes.

Q. What mark did you put - A. A private mark. I found them a long time before the officer came.

Q. Why did not you take the officer there first -

Kinnersley. He took me all round the warehouse, at last he went to the barrel.

Prosecutor. These are the two marked papers.

JURY. I understood you that you marked the halfpence - A. No.

JURY. We heard you say so.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121202-46

45. HENRY ROGERS was indicted for that he, on the 22d of October, feloniously had in his custody and possession three forged bank notes, value 1 l. each, he knowing them to be forged, and also having in his custody and possession one other forged bank note .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121202-47

46. ELIZABETH LESUREE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of November , a feather bed, value 2 l. a bolster. value 7 s. two blankets, value 2 s. a pair of sheets, value 2 s. and a coverlid, value 5 s. the property of Thomas Pocock , in a lodging-room .

SARAH POCOCK. My husband's name is Thomas Pocock ; he is a plaisterer . I live at No. 10, Turk-street, Bethnal-green . He keeps the whole house. He lets out two rooms in lodgings. I let the prisoner a furnished room. She is a married woman . Her husband is at sea. She has one child. She is a weaveress. She said, she had no work. She worked at her brothers, winding of quills . She had the front room, one pair. She was to pay five shillings a week. She came on the 10th of November.

Q. How long did she stay - A. She was in the room about three hours.

Q. Did she ever lay there - A. No. The feather-bed, bolster, a pair of sheets, blankets, and cover-lid, was part of the furniture in the room let to her. She came about the room on the 10th of November, She agreed for the price five shillings a week. She did not stay in the room above three hours, and all the things were gone. I had been out to my mothers, and on returning home I saw the window open. We opened the door, and found the things gone. By enquiry I found her at Bethnal-green poor-house, and she owned that she took the things. She came in about half after four o'clock in the afternoon, and between ten and eleven we entered the room.

MARIA CRANE. I was in the house at the time that the prisoner took the room. She went up in the room; she liked it exceeding well. She said, she would go, and let her husband know. She came on the Thursday following. She said, her husband was a narrow weaver. She went and fetched an old tea-chest. She said, she brought a small parcel to begin with. Her husband would bring the rest. We gave her clean sheets. When it came dark she came down, and said she was going for a candle. We lent her a brass candlestick. She came down at seven o'clock.

Q. Which way did the things go - A. Through the window. I was in the house the whole time. The things did not come down stairs; they went out of the window. Nobody could come in without we let them in and out. I am positive no person was in there at all but the prisoner. She left the door fastened when she went out.

JANE HARPER . I went to the poor-house, and asked the prisoner to own to the bed. I asked her whether it was pledged. She said, no; she sold it for two pounds. I am not positive whether she said she sold altogether for two pounds, or the bed only.

MRS. DRAKE. I heard the prisoner say that she parted with the bed in Winfield-street, for two pounds.

Prisoner's Defence. Mrs. Drake promised to forgive me if I would own to stealing the bed.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121202-48

47. JOHN LEMERE was indicted for feloniously forging, on the 19th of November , a bank-note, for the payment of 2 l. with intention to defraud the Governour and Company of the Bank of England .

SECOND COUNT, for disposing off and putting away, a like forged bank-note, with the same intention.

THIRD and FOURTH COUNTS, for feloniously forging, uttering, and publishing as true a promissary note for the payment of 2 l

SAMUEL DICKENS . I am one of the patrols belonging to the police office, in Bow-street.

Q. How long have you been employed in that capacity - A. About three years.

Q. In consequence of any directions that you received, did you see the prisoner on or about the 19th of November last - A. That is the first time I saw him. I met him at Harris's, Kings Arms-court, Whitechapel. I went to the house alone. I met with the prisoner. I was with him some time. We drank together in Harris's house. In the course of ten minutes the prisoner went out, and called me after him. I followed him. We walked up Whitechapel, and our discourse was talking about horses. I told him I was a dealer in horses. I asked him if he had got any one's. He said, no; he had got two's. I said, that will do. We walked on to the Queen's Head. He left me there for two hours. He told me the people in the house they were his partners. He told me, if I could find any place out, where there was plenty of property, to break into, that was worth breaking into, to let him know, I should have my regular share, and I need not be seen in it myself. Then he left me in the tap room for near two hours. He came back, and beckoned me out. We drank some gin together. He took me about forty yards from the public-house, under some palings, and there he gave me four two-pound notes. I gave him four one-pound bank notes.

Q. Was any thing said about the price - A. I was to give him four pounds seven shillings, for the four two-pound notes. That was agreed upon before; we made that agreement going along.

Q. Then pursuant to that agreement you gave him four bank of England one pound notes - A. Yes, and then I gave him one more. I gave him five altogether. He went and got change of the one pound note, and brought me the change. He gave me thirteen shillings; then we walked together to Harris's house, and I was to have some more notes in a day or two. It was so agreed between us.

Q. Did you mark the notes that you received of the prisoner - A. I did, before I parted with them to any body.

Q. Look at these - A. These are the four notes, with my name upon them.

Q. How soon after this did you see him again - A. I saw him on the 21st in Whitechapel-road.

Q. You first saw him on the 19th - A. Yes, and on the 21st I passed him. He came back, and overtook me. He asked me, if I had got shot of them. I told him, only two. I asked him if he had any more. He said, he had got plenty of all sorts. I told him, I would meet him on the Sunday morning, at eleven o'clock. I was rather beyond the time, and he was gone. I was to meet him at Harris's.

Q. Then you did not see him on that day - A. No. On the 25th I saw him again. I saw him then in Whitechapel-road. I asked him if he had any notes. He said, he had plenty of all sorts. He told me, I might have them then. I gave the signal to my brother officer, and he was that moment taken into custody.

Mr. Gurney. Upon your telling him you were a horse dealer he sold you these things - A. He did.

Q. Were you introduced to him by any body - A. I was, by a person of the name of Harris; by the person at whose house I met him.

THOMAS GLOVER . I am an inspector of bank notes, at the Bank of England, and have been for twenty years.

Q. Therefore you are perfectly conversant with bank notes - A. I am.

Q. Take these notes into your hand. Now, Mr. Glover, looking at the first note, a part of the four, is that a genuine note or counterfeit - A. It is a counterfeit note, forged in every respect; plate, signature, paper, and ink; all is forged. The whole throughout, in every respect, is forged.

Q. Now, looking at all the rast of them, are they of the same manufactory, and the same plate - A. They are, even in every respect, the same as the first, a forgery. The signatures appears to be filled up by the same person, though different names. They are all the same hand writing. (The note read.)

GEORGE ODDY . I am one of the Bow-street office patrols also.

Q. Did you go for the purpose of apprehending the prisoner, in consequence of any direction from any person - A. Yes. The apprehension I took upon myself. I received the information from the officer of the Bank, Mr. Westwood. I went part of the way with Dickens, and kept an eye upon Dickens all the way. I got into a public-house to hide myself, the King's Arms. I had a good sight of the court to watch Dickens.

Q. Had you agreed upon any signal - A. Yes. I waited along time before the prisoner came. As soon as I saw Dickens in company with him. I got the signal in a minute or two; and as soon as I got the signal I got out of the house as fast as I could, and took him. They walked some distance, and were shewing some penny pieces, or pieces of coin to each other. I got the signal, and apprehended the prisoner. I searched the prisoner, and found on him one bank-note, and a knife. I was told the bank-note was a good one, when I showed it to the people of the Bank.

Mr Knapp. That is the case on the part of the prosecution.

COURT. Prisoner at the bar, you have heard the evidence against you; what have you to say in your defence.

Prisoner. I leave it to my counsel.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

JURY, Q. to Dickens. What language did Harris introduce you to the prisoner - A. He introduced me, and said that I should have notes of Long Jack. I was introduced to the prisoner by Harris, and Harris's wife.

Prisoner. He would swear my life away falsely. I never had the notes, nor could any body say it of me.

COURT. Prisoner, that is quite irregular: you have been called upon for your defence.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 29.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18121202-49

48. ELIZABETH HUGHES , alias BROOKS , and JOHN BROOKS , were indicted for feloniously stealing,

on the 4th of November , a feather-bed, value 2 l. 5 s. a bolster, value 8 s. two pillows, value 12 s. two sheets, value 3 s. a quilt, value 7 s. and some cotton furniture, value 7 s. the property of Thomas Shepherd , in a lodging room in his dwelling-house .

DOROTHY SHEPHERD . I live at No. 14, Wharton's-place, Poorhouse-lane, Ratcliffe . My husband's name is Thomas Shepherd . On the 30th September the prisoner, Elizabeth Hughes , alias Brooks, came to our house to enquire after a ready furnished lodging, for her and her husband. I showed her the apartment; she was to pay five shillings a week ready furnished. She took possession of it that afternoon, the 30th. Both the prisoners slept there that night. On the 3rd of November, John Hughes left the house. He went out about two, and the same day Elizabeth Hughes went out about ten, saying, she would be back in a little time, if her husband came in I was to tell him she would not be long; she was gone only to the Highway. Neither of them came back. The next morning we broke open the door, and my husband and I went into the room. They had plundered the room of every thing; the feather-bed, and two sheets, a quilt, two blankets; all these things had been let to the prisoner in the lodging.

AMBROSE BRAHAN. I am a pawnbroker, 152, Shadwell High-street. On the 17th of October, Elizabeth Brooks pledged a pillow with me; on the 19th another; and on the 30th of October she pledged a bolster, a sheet, and part of a window curtain.

JOHN HEDGE . I am an upholsterer and auctioneer. I live in Shadwell High-street. The prisoners came into my shop, and asked me if I could buy a bed. I said, I had no objection, provided we could agree about the price. The bed was tied up like a porter's bag. I gave him three pounds for it. I took a stamp out of my desk, and wrote a receipt. The prisoner said he could not write. He made his mark to that receipt. He had the money, and he went away.

John Brooks's Defence. I know nothing of the things. I only lay there one night.

Elizabeth Hughes 's Defence. My husband knows nothing of it; he had nothing to do with it.

ELIZABETH HUGHES , GUILTY , aged 27.

Confined Two Years in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

JOHN BROOKS , GUILTY , aged 28.

Judgment respited .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121202-50

49. CHARLES BASSAGE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of November , a shirt, value 5 s. the property of Gerhard Ohlsen .

GERHARD OHLSEN . I am a German sailor . I lost my shirt from the King of Prussia public-house . I told Mrs. Parsons, the landlady, I wanted a clean shirt that day. She went up stairs, and fetched it down to dry. I went out, and came back again between twelve and one. I asked her for the shirt; she said it was missing. She sent for Mr. Freeman, the officer. I had seen my shirt hanging at the fire.

Q. Was the prisoner there at that time - A. I do not know.

MR. HOLLINGS. I was in the tap-room having a pint of porter. The prisoner and another came in. They drank together. The prisoner had no money to pay for the beer. I said I would let him have money to pay the landlord. In the mean time the landlady came in, and said the shirt was missing. The landlord locked the door, and said nobody should go out. I looked round, and saw the shirt under the prisoner's waistcoat. I am sure I saw the shirt under his waistcoat, because there was a piece hanging out, and the shirt he had on was dirty.

FRANCIS FREEMAN. I am an officer. On the 10th of November I was sent for at this public-house. The landlord pointed out the prisoner. I went to him, and between his feet, in the box, there was this shirt.

Prosecutor. It is my shirt.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of taking the shirt.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 39.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121202-51

50. JAMES GODDARD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of October , a cart, value 6 l. the property of William Herbert .

WILLIAM HERBERT . I am a rope-maker I live in Nightingale-lane, Limehouse. I lost the cart on the 18th of October, I lent the cart to Mr. Wilson, a publican, Gravel-lane, Shadwell. On the 20th I went to him; he informed me that the cart had been taken from Glass-house fields, opposite of his door.

SAMUEL WILSON . I am a publican, St. Paul's Shadwell. On the 10th of October, in the morning, the cart was taken away from opposite of my door, by whom I cannot say.

STEPHEN YATES . I am a dealer in marine stores. The prisoner brought the cart to me, and asked me if I would buy the cart. I told him, I would have nothing to do with it. He left it on another man's premises. The prisoner is a patrol.

JOHN PHILLIPS . I am a wheelwright. Mr. Stephen Yates asked me if I would buy a cart. I went and saw it. The cart was not a saleable cart. I saw the prisoner and Stephen together. Stephen told me he supposed it was stolen. I went and told the officer, and by that means the cart was produced.

FRANCIS FREEMAN . On the 5th of November, from information, I went and saw the cart. I gave it into the care of Mr. Phillips, to advertise it.

Prosecutor. It is my coat.

Prisoner's Defence. Mr. Wilson knows I was on duty at the time the cart was lost.

Yates. I am sure he is the man that brought the cart to me.

Phillips. I am sure he is the man. He drawed the cart himself.

GUILTY , aged 43.

Judgment respited .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121202-52

51. SARAH ARMSTRONG and SARAH BUTLER were indicted, for that they, on the 28th of November , one piece of base coin, resembling a shilling, falsely and traiterously did colour with materials producing the colour of silver .

And SEVERAL OTHER COUNTS for like offence, stating that HENRY ISAACS feloniously did counsel and abet the said Sarah Armstrong and Sarah Butler , the said felony to do and commit.

And OTHER COUNTS, that Sarah Armstrong and Sarah Butler a round blank, of fit size for a sixpence, traiterously did colour with materials producing the colour of silver, and that Henry Isaacs did counsel and abet the said Sarah Armstrong and Sarah Butler the said felony to do and commit, against the duty of their allegience.

SARAH BARTON . I am the wife of William Barton , I live at No. 26, Church-street, Bethnal Green. On the 13th of November, Sarah Armstrong came in the afternoon, she asked for three pound of potatoes; they came to three pence, she paid me for them; she gave me a sixpence, I gave her three pence change; she went away. Then a person of the name of Sheppard, a constable, came; he asked me to let him look at the sixpence. I shewed it him; he told me to take care of it until he saw me again. I did so; I marked it. The second time I saw him was when he brought Armstrong in with him. I am confident it is the same sixpence. Shepherd the officer has it.

ELIZABETH SAUNDERS . I am the wife of Robert Saunders , I keep a tin shop, 164, Church-street, Bethnal Green. On Saturday the 28th of November, Sarah Armstrong came to my house for a small tin cannisfer, it came to four pence; she gave me a shilling. I refused it, I did not like it. I sent my daughter out to get change, my daughter brought me a shilling's worth of halfpence, I gave the prisoner Sarah Armstrong eight pence change.

CHARLOTTE SAUNDERS . I am daughter to the last witness.

Q. Do you remember on the 28th of November last your mother giving you a shilling to go out and get changed - A. Yes.

Q. Do you happen to recollect either of the women at the bar - A. Yes, that gentlewoman with the child in her arms, Armstrong; that woman was in our house when the shilling was given to me to get changed.

Q. Did you see her give any shilling to your mother - A. Yes, my mother gave me that shilling to get changed.

Q. Do you know a Mr. Lucking - A. Yes, he is a Chandler, I got change of him. Mrs. Lucking gave me the change for it. I gave the shilling to Mrs. Lucking first, the same shilling.

Q. Was Mr. Lucking by - A. No he was in the other room at work; I went and took the shilling to him. Mrs. Lucking told me to go to Mr. Lucking, and ask him whether it was a good one. I went to Mr. Lucking, he said it was a good one; he kept it; he told me to go to his wife for the change.

Q. In whose hands did you leave the shilling - A. Mr. Lucking.

Q. Are you sure that the shilling your mother gave you in order to get change is the very shilling that you left in Mr. Lucking's hand - A. Yes, I had no other shilling; Mrs. Lucking gave me change for it, and I carried the change back to my mother.

DAVID LUCKING . I am a ship chandler. I live in Church-street, Bethnal Green.

Q. Do you remember on the 28th of November that girl coming into your shop - A. Yes, about one o'clock she came in for change of a shilling. I took the shilling of her, my wife changed it.

Q. What became of that shilling - A. I gave it to Mr. Sheppard.

Q. Are you sure the shilling that you gave to Mr. Sheppard is the same shilling that you received from that little girl - A. Yes, I am. I took it for a good one. I thought it was a good one when I took it. I put it into my pocket, in which pocket was two shillings, be- besides.

Q. How came you to distinguish this - A. Because I took particular notice of it. It was a plain shilling, and much larger then the other two shillings. I am confident to the shilling.

MARTHA WHITE . I am an haberdasher in Bethnal Green Road.

Q. Do you remember any day either of the women prisoners coming to your shop - A. On last Saturday Armstrong, the young one, came, she came for a skein of black silk. I served her with it, it came to two pence; she gave me a shilling, she took out two or three halfpence from her pocket not sufficient to pay for it, she threw down the shilling. I said, have not you got halfpence enough; she said, no. I changed the shilling, and gave her change all in halfpence, and soon after she went away Mr. Sheppard came in. I shewed him the shilling.

Q. Did you keep the shilling apart before you shewed it him - A. No, I put it into the till with two others.

Q. What enables you to say that the shilling that you gave to Sheppard was the shilling that you took of her - A. I noticed it particular. I had some doubts about it.

Q. Did you make such observation of it that made you easily to know it - A. Yes, it shone particularly. I can swear positively that I gave Mr. Sheppard the same shilling. I marked it when I gave it to Mr. Sheppard.

SAMUEL SHEPPARD . I am a constable.

Q. Did you receive from Mr. Lucking any shilling - A. I did; that is it.

Lucking. I am certain that is the shilling.

Q. to Sheppard. Did you receive one from Mrs. White - A. Yes, this is it.

Mrs. White. That is the one I gave to Mr. Sheppard; it is the one I received from Armstrong. I noticed the stamp.

Q. to Sheppard. In consequence of information that you received, have you got a sixpence too - A. This is the sixpence I received of Mrs. Barton.

Mrs. Barton. That is the sixpence Mr. Sheppard had of me.

Sheppard. On Friday the 13th of November, I saw Armstrong and Butler together. I saw them in Bishopsgate-street first. I followed them into Church-street, Bethnal Green, to a Mrs. Barton's, the person that I have heard examined. I did not observe Armstrong go in. I saw her coming out of Mrs. Barton's. I had watched them all the way down the street, from the time that Armstrong came out of the shop. She had gone about twenty yards forward. I went into Mrs.

Barton's, and got some information relative to a sixpence. This is the sixpence I produce now. I desired her to mark it, and to lay it by. This was on the 13th. I received the sixpence of Mrs. Barton on the Saturday the 28th. I did not see the prisoners any more on that day, it rained very hard. On Saturday following, on the 28th, in the afternoon, between one and two o'clock, I was in company with Sapwell. We went down Bethnal Green Road. I saw the prisoner Armstrong go into the house of Mrs. Saunders by herself. When she came out I went in and made some enquiries.

Q. Did you give any directions to Mrs. Saunders - A. None.

Q. Did you give any directions to Lucking - A. None at that time. I saw her come out. I followed her further down Bethnal Green Road, then I saw her go into the house of Mrs. White. I saw nothing of Butler then. When she came out, I went in and asked to look at the silver she had taken. I saw a shilling, and told her to mark it, she did so; that is the shilling I now produce to-day. Sapwell and me immediately took her into custody. We took her to Mrs. White's. Sapwell searched her.

Q. Upon your taking her did you make it known for what you took her - A. As soon as we got her into the shop we did; we told her, we apprehended her for passing bad money. She said, for God's sake forgive me, she was a ruined woman. Then Sapwell searched her. I saw her searched.

Q. Well, what was found - A. She had some bad silver in her hand, I think two shillings; her hand was closed.

Q. Had you any difficulty in getting the shillings from her hand - A. Yes. In her pocket we found some more, and some halfpence.

Q. More what - A. Bad silver, and a quantity of halfpence was in her pocket. We then proceeded to her lodgings; she told us where she lived. She went with us, and we proceeded to search her lodgings. No 6, Skinner-street, Bishopsgate-street. She took us up stairs, it was a one pair back-room, in her lodgings in that room we found a quantity of bad silver.

Q. At the time that you are speaking of was Butler there - A. No, she was not at that time. In that room Sapwell found a quantity of bad silver, to what amount I do not know rightly the number, and fifteen shillings worth, I think, in copper money, in halfpence and penny pieces; in a table drawer a quantity of cream of tartar, a bag of copper dust, and a black ball; it is a composition. In a corner cupboard we found a bottle containing aqua fortis; in another cupboard was found a quantity of scouring paper. After finding these, Sapwell put them in the drawer again. Joshua Armstrong came at that time. Sapwell then desired Joshua Armstrong to take them into his custody, and during that search Butler came in. Sapwell took her in custody and searched her. I do not know what he found on her. I went down stairs.

Q. Did you know that Butler lived there before - A. Yes, I did. I knew that Butler and Armstrong lived together, before I understood they were mother and daughter.

Q. Did Bulter say any thing in your presence - A. what she was taken for.

Q. Do you know of Armstrong having any husband living - A. I do not know. That is all I know.

Q. Had you, in the course of the morning that you apprehended the two women, seen the other prisoner Isaacs - A. No, I had not.

THOMAS SAPWELL . I am an officer.

Q. You were with the last witness, were you not, on Tuesday the 28th - A. I was. I went to Armstrong. I took Armstrong in custody in Bethnal Green-road. After she came out of Mrs. White's, I seized her by both her hands. I never loosed them until I brought her back into the shop. In her left hand I found two base shillings wrapped up in this paper, just as they are now; both her hands were closed. The shillings are in paper now, in the state I found them. I searched her and found an eighteen-penny piece in her pocket, good. I then found a base shilling and a base sixpence in her pocket, loose, and one shilling and seven pence in halfpence in her pocket, loose. I then proceeded with her to her room. Upon searching the room, in this bag, it is a kind of a sleeve of a coat, I found thirteen base shillings and fifteen base sixpences. In this pocket-book I found thirteen sixpences, twelve bad and one good sixpence, one base shilling, and one bad half-crown, and sixteen shillings in copper penny pieces and halfpence in different things about the room, some in one thing and some in another, almost all in a box, and nine shillings and six pence in good money belonging to Armstrong, that I gave to her, I returned the amount to her. I have got the money here. When Mrs. Butler was brought in, I searched her; she had nine shillings, good money, in her pocket, and one base sixpence in her pocket. I then proceeded to search the room in the presence of Sheppard. In a cupboard on the left side of the room I found a bottle with a small quantity of aqua fortis in it, and in the table drawer there was cream of tartar and copper dust, it appeared to me to be filings. I then put them all into the drawer, and sent for Mr. Armstrong, sen. Joshua Armstrong came. I delivered all to him, and on further searching the room I found a piece of sand paper and a flannel rag. When I found the aqua fortis bottle in the cupboard, the prisoner Armstrong begged and prayed very hard of me not to produce that bottle, and she cursed the day that she was let into it, or she cursed the man, which I cannot say. That is all I know.

Mr. Alley. Isaacs was not there at this time - A. No, he was not,

Sarah Armstrong . When Mr. Sapwell went home to my lodging my door was open, there was no lock or bolt. I know nothing of these things.

Sapwell. Sheppard went into the room first.

COURT. None of these things were under lock, were they - A. No, they were not.

Sheppard. I do not recollect whether she unlocked the door or not.

Mr. Knapp. Q. to Sapwell. In consequence of information that you received, did you place Miller to be there on Monday morning - A. I did, I directed him to be there on Monday morning. Miller apprehended Isaacs. I came up on the 30th, and found Isaacs in the custody of Miller. I searched the prisoner, Isaacs, and found this handkerchief, and these three bad shillings were tied up in the corner of this handkerchief, and a small bit of chalk; he said I was welcome to go and search his lodgings.

JOSHUA ARMSTRONG officer. In consequence

of a message from Sapwell, on the 28th of November, I went to the prisoner's lodgings in Skinner-street. I found the two women prisoners there, and Sapwell. I searched a drawer. I found a bottle containing aqua fortis; that is the bottle that the last witness mentioned.

Mr. Knapp. He need not go over that again.

Sapwell. The things that Armstrong found in the drawer were the things that I put there, I bid him look there, and there they were.

Joshua Armstrong . I asked whose apartment it was, the prisoner Armstrong said it was her apartment.

Q. to Sapwell. Do you know whether Armstrong has any husband alive - A. No, I never saw any man there.

Joshua Armstrong. I believe he is dead. I asked Armstrong whose goods they were, she said the furniture was hers. I then proceeded to Worship-street Office. In going towards the Office, she said she had not been at this business long, but she had been at it ever since her baby was four months old, the child that is in her arms now. She said that she had left it off once, and had taken it up again, on account of her being in a most distressed state that a woman could be in. I then took her to the office.

Prisoner Armstrong. It is a misunderstanding of Mr. Armstrong. My mother rented the room, the room is hers.

Joshua Armstrong. She locked the door and gave me the key. She said, take care of the room, for there, she said, is all the property she had in the world for her child and herself.

THOMAS MILLER . Q. On the 30th of November did you go to the lodgings of the prisoners - A. I did; I went there for the purpose of waiting for the prisoner Isaacs, to apprehend him if he came. I stopped there in the bottom room below until two o'clock, and then I went out in order to get some dinner, and returned about three o'clock. At three o'clock the prisoner Isaacs had not come. Then I went to the next door to Mr. Sheppards', and in the mean time I was there Isaacs came to the house, and was apprehended by some women in the house. They had closed the door upon him. They sent to the next door for me. Mr. Sheppard and I came. The prisoner was in the street in the custody of two men. I laid hold of him, and told him that I was an officer, and me and the other two men got him into the house. He struggled a good bit. I got him in and told him that I wanted to search him; upon him I found three three-shilling Bank tokens, good, and a good shilling, and twopence halfpenny, and I found one three-shilling token, five shillings, and five sixpences base. I have got them now. Sapwell came to my assistance. I have had them in my possession ever since.

ANN NICHOLS . I am the wife of John Nicholls . My husband keeps the house No. 60, in Skinner-street.

Q. Did the women prisoners lodge with you - A. Yes, they occupied the one pair back room; I let it to them weekly at 2 s. 3 d. a week; the old lady, the mother, paid it always; she paid me in copper; one week she paid me in a eighteenpenny piece.

Q. Do you know the prisoner Isaacs - A. Yes; he was in the habit of coming to the other prisoners. He used to come more.

Q. How long had they lodged with you - A. Five weeks.

Q. On Monday, the 30th of November, do you remember his coming - A. Yes; and when he came there I shut the door, and detained him until Miller came.

Q. Before Miller came had Isaacs gone up stairs - A. Yes, he went up stairs and tried whether the one pair stair door was open; that was the door where the prisoners lodged; he tried to get in; it was locked; and while he was gone up I fastened the street door. He threw himself down into the passage and holloaed out murder; he said we were going to murder him.

Q. Was there any body to murder him - A. No, there was only two women. He went to the other door in the yard; he jumped over the pales; they caught him outside, a man of the name of Smith, he is not here. Miller took him in custody.

Mr. Alley. This man came and courted, which, the old lady or the young one, the young one I should think - A. I do not know.

Q. Had this woman any husband living - A. I do not know; I am told he is at sea.

Q. Did you speak loud enough for him to hear you - A. I spoke as I do now.

MARTHA CAMPION . Q. Are you a lodger also in Mrs. Nicoll's house - A. Yes. I have lodged there a good while. I know the two women prisoners very well, they lodged in the one pair of stairs over me.

Q. Do you know the prisoner Isaacs - A. I do, very well; he visited the two women. I have seen him a great many times. He used to go up in the room where they were, he stopped but a little time indeed. The two women have lived there about two years. I believe Mrs. Nicoll's has only been there about five weeks; for the last two or three months the prisoner has been there a good many times, staying a little time and then going away.

Q. to Mrs. Nicolls. You have been there only five weeks - A. No; the prisoners I found there, and they have been lodging there about two years.

Q. to Martha Campion . Do you remember being there on the 30th - A. Yes, I was there.

Q. At any time before the 30th have you heard any noise that struck your attention. - A. I have heard money like halfpence rattling while he was there, and on last Monday was a week I heard his pockets rattle with halfpence as he came down stairs. He came in a great hurry that day, when he went out I noticed him looking at his money.

Q. Could you see what money it was - A. I only noticed him looking at money out of his pocket.

COURT. You did not see the money, you saw him take something out of his pocket - A. Yes, out of his breeches pocket, and out of his coat pocket. I heard the jingling when he came down stairs, and he was counting the money after he came out of the door.

Mr. Knapp. On the day of his apprehension do you remember his coming to the house - A. Yes, I was at home, it was between three and four. When he came he went up stairs in a great hurry to the prisoners room. He tried the door; it was locked; he came down again directly. I said, you shall not go out here. Mrs. Nicolls was with me, and then he hollowed out murder. He said he was going to be robbed and murdered, and fell backwards; then he soon recovered himself, and ran

to the back door; he jumped over the palings; then two men came and caught hold of him, and Mr. Miller and another person brought him into my room.

Q. Did you see him searched - A. No, I did not.

SARAH WESTWOOD . I am the wife of William Westwood .

Q. Do you remember our husband living at No. 60, Skinner-street - A. Yes.

Q. Did you transfer your lease to Mrs. Nicolls - A. Yes. I had them as lodgers of the people I took the house on.

Q. Do you know Isaacs the prisoner - A. I have been in the habit of seeing him coming backwards and forwards to Mrs. Blay and her daughter. I always understood her name was Blay.

Q. You mean Butler? - A. Yes. I always understood his name was Blay.

Q. You say that Isaacs used to come frequently - A. For the last three months previous to my going away I have seen him frequently.

Q. How often in the course of a week used he to be coming - A. I cannot say, as I have been sitting in my room I have seen him go up stairs, perhaps once a week, but he never stopped long. I asked the old lady what he used to come for. She said he brought her some old clothes to sell in the lane.

Q. Did you know what was going on in the room - A. No. I smelled very often a disagreeable smell; one morning in particular when I went for a light, about eight o'clock in the morning.

Q. What time did they generally use to rise - A. About six o'clock.

Q. What sort of a smell was this - A. It smelled like campher. I smelled afterwards the bottle of aqua fortis at Worship-street office, it smelled the same. It is the same kind of smell.

Q. Do you know whether the prisoners carried on any business in your house - A. I do not know what the young woman did. I do know that the old woman used to make soldiers breeches at twopence farthing a pair, either twopence halfpenny or twopence farthing, I do not know which.

JOHN NICOLL . Q. You are one of the moniers of his Majesty's mint - A. I am.

Q. I put into your hand the sixpence uttered to Mrs. Barton - A. It is a counterfeit.

Q. Look at the one uttered to Mrs. Saunders produced by Lucking - A. That is a counterfeit.

Q. This is the one uttered to Mrs. White - A. A counterfeit.

Q. I am going to put in your hands what was found in the prisoners lodgings on the 28th, thirteen shillings and fifteen sixpences - A. They are all counterfeit, they are not so highly coloured as the two shillings and sixpence; they are changed from being kept long, or from not being completely finished.

Q. These are what was found in her hand - A. They are both counterfeits, they are in a state for circulation.

Q. Look at them found in the prisoners pockets - A. They are both counterfeits.

Q. Look at them found in that pocket-book Sapwell found in the prisoners room - A. There are thirteen shillings and sixpence there, they are all bad, except one sixpence, and the half crown is bad too.

Miller. I produce those I found, some out of Isaacs' breeches pockets and some out of his coat pocket.

Mr. Nicoll. They are all very bad, not fit for circulation, five shillings, four sixpences, and a three shilling piece.

Sapwell. These three shillings was found in the handkerchief.

Mr. Nicoll. They are very bad.

CALEB EDWARD BOWELL. Q. You are assistant solicitor of the mint - A. Yes.

Q. You have been a great many years - A. Yes.

Q. You are well acquainted with the usual materials that are produced in trials of this sort, and what their operations are - A. I am.

Q. Is paper a useful material - A. It is for preparing the blanks for colouring, and cream of tartar is also necessary for colouring. This sand paper is of a particular sort, which is used in the manufacturing of counterfeit money.

Q. Is aqua fortis likewise of use in the process - A. Yes, it is. Aqua fortis is a particular ingredient, destroying the copper, and leaving the particles of silver which is mixed in the body of the metal, and bringing the particles of silver which are in the copper to the surface, and giving it that white colour; and after the colour of silver is given to the piece, it being too bright for circulation, the blacking ball, being a particular composition, is used to rub over it, to take off that brightness, which makes it appear as if it had been in circulation, and a flannel like this is often found in cases of this sort, to wipe off this blacking when it is used. The several things that have been described and produced are used in colouring metal, and they are sufficient to produce the colouring.

Sarah Armstrong's Defence. The people that have already declared the visitation of this man at my apartment, I declare to be false. I never saw the man before with my eyes.

Butler's Defence. I know nothing of the man, he is an entire stranger to me.

Isaacs' Defence. My Lord and Gentlemen of the Jury, I am as innocent as a child unborn. I am as innocent as a lamb. I told them where I lived when I was apprehended.

ARMSTRONG, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 34.

SARAH BUTLER , GUILTY - DEATH , aged 76.

HENRY ISAACS , GUILTY - DEATH , aged 36.

London Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18121202-53

52. SARAH JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of November , a watch, value 30 s. the property of Edward Murphy .

ELIZA MURPHY . My husband's name is Edward. I lost the watch on the 9th of November. I had the prisoner to nurse my child. The watch hung under the mantlepiece. I hired her in the market; she was with me all day. In the evening I went out and left the prisoner and two young woman in the room. I was not out above half an hour.

CHARLES THOMPSON . I am a pawnbroker. I live with Mr. Morris, 32, York-street. On the 10th of November I took in pawn this watch of the prisoner.

Prosecutrix. The watch is mine.

Prisoner's Defence. It is my first offence.

GUILTY , aged 15.

Judgment respited .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121202-54

53. LAWRENCE PITT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of November , two pewter pint pots, value 18 d. the property of John Howse .

JOHN HOWSE . I am publican . I keep the Hampshire Hog , Rosemary-lane . I lost my pots out of the tap room on the 2nd of November. I had information that he had them in his trowsers. I let him go out, and then I asked him what he had got; he said, nothing. I took a pint pot out of his trowsers, and a pint pot out of his pocket. These are the pots; they are mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in liquor. I laid my head on the table; somebody in the room put a pint pot in my pocket, and placed another between my legs.

GUILTY , aged 70.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121202-55

54. JOHN DELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of December , a cask, value 10 s. the property of John Nicholson and William Nicholson .

JAMES NICHOLSON . I am clerk to John and William Nicholson , distillers , Woodbridge-street, Clerkenwell. We lost a cask on the 3d of December, from our warehouse in Woodbridge-street .

SARAH NORRS. I keep a chandler's shop, No. 9, Woodbridge-street. I saw the prisoner in an hurry coming along. I thought he was not one of Mr. Nicholson's men. I saw him with another man. He said to the other man, take that cask and go off with it.

Q. Are you sure the prisoner was the man - A. Yes.

WILLIAM HASELTON . I am an officer. I took the prisoner in custody. He confessed the crime, and said he never would do the like again. There was another man behind the prisoner; he ran away when I took the prisoner. This is the cask.

James Nicholson . This cask was in our warehouse.

Prisoner's Defence. The man behind me said he would give me a pot of beer if I took the cask to Northampton-street. He ran away when the gentleman owned the cask.

GUILTY , aged 41.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121202-56

55. PETER SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of November , a watch, value 4 l. a watch chain, value 1 s. two metal seals, value 1 s. and three watch keys, value 1 s. the property of Joseph Loader , from his person .

JOSEPH LOADER . I live at 22, City-road.

Q. Did you lose your watch any time, and when - A. On the 9th of November, in Bridge-street , a little after three in the afternoon, I was looking at the procession, a crowd came against me, and I felt my waistcoat unbuttoned. I was looking at the procession. I looked round, and saw the prisoner and my watch in the hands of the officer. Before that I had observed the prisoner lurking about me. The officer secured the prisoner, and the watch I saw in the officer's hands. I knew it to be mine. I gave four pounds for the watch.

HENRY JOHNSON . I am a constable. On the 9th of November I was attending in Bridge-street, to prevent plunder. I saw the prisoner leave the prosecutor in a great hurry, which gave me suspicion. I followed him immediately. The prosecutor was standing in Chatham-place. I laid hold of the prisoner. The watch was then dropped. I picked up the watch, and laid hold of the prisoner again. I pulled the prisoner away from the crowd. There was a gang of them; they tried to rescue the prisoner. I took the prisoner to Giltspur-street compter. The prosecutor followed me; he owned the watch. This is the watch.

Prosecutor. This is my watch.

Q. to Johnson. Could you see from whom the watch dropped - A. The prisoner was standing close by another man. It fell between the prisoner and him. The other man got away from me. I had hold of him as well as the prisoner. I did not see the prisoner take the watch.

Prisoner's Defence. In Bridge-street we were drove by the mob. I saw the watch picked up two or three yards from me.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18121202-57

56. WILLIAM PRICE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of November , a handkerchief, value 1 s. the property of Thomas Faulkner , from his person .

THOMAS FAULKNER . I am an oil-man . I live in St. John-street. I lost my handkerchief on Monday, the 16th of November. I was going home. There were two calves being put into a cart in Smithfield, which occasioned me to stop. A porter of the name of Brooks, asked me if I knew of a situation. I said, I did not at present, if you look into my house at any time, if I do, I will tell you. At that time I felt something at my pocket. I put my hand into my pocket. My handkerchief was gone. I instantly turned round, and seized the prisoner with my handkerchief in his hand. The prisoner said he had found the handkerchief.

THOMAS BROOKS . I am a porter out of place. I was in Smithfield when Mr. Faulkner lost his handkerchief, on Monday the 16th of November, I was going through Smithfield. There was a stoppage occasioned by putting some calves in a cart. Mr. Faulkner came up. I asked him if he knew of a situation. He put his hand in his pocket; he said, he felt something at his pocket. He turned round. I saw him take the handkerchief from the prisoner.

STEPHEN CAPMAN. I know no more than taking the man in charge. I have kept the handkerchief ever since.

Prosecutor. That is the handkerchief I took from the prisoner. It is mine. It is worth five shillings.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked the handkerchief up, and when the gentleman said it was his I resigned it up to him.

GUILTY , aged 36.

Confined One Year in Newgate , and Publicly whipped .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18121202-58

57. SUSANNAH WOODWARD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of November , a silver watch, value 18 s. a pair of breeches, value 3 s. 6 d. a shirt, value 2 s. 6 d. a handkerchief, value 2 s. 6 d. a spencer, value 5 s. three gowns, value 12 s. a pair of stays, value 4 s. a pair of pockets, value 6 d. three napkins, value 1 s. two pillow cases, value 1 s. one yard of dimity, value d. and a box, value 1 d. the property of Joseph Jackson , in the dwelling-house of Robert Patterson .

JOSEPH JACKSON. I am a brush-maker . I live at 159, Upper Thames-street , in Robert Patterson 's house, in the parish of Allhallows the Great . I occupy the first floor.

Q. Did the prisoner live in the house - A. No, she is an entire stranger to me. On Saturday, the 14th of November, I went out about one o'clock. I left my wife in the room. I saw my watch hanging up by the mantle-piece.

ELIZABETH JACKSON . I am the wife of Joseph Jackson . I went out about two o'clock.

Q. Was the prisoner known to you - A. No, she is an entire stranger. I never saw her in the house. It is a private house; the door is generally open. When I went out I double locked my room door.

Q. At the time that you went out was your husband's watch on the mantle-piece - A. It was, and in the room were all the things mentioned in the indictment. The articles were all safe in the room when I went away. I went out about two o'clock; I was not absent an hour; when I returned I found my door open. The lock was not injured. Whoever it was that entered the room must have got in by a false key, or a picklock. When I entered the room I first missed my husband's watch. Upon my looking round the room I missed all the other articles I had an hundered hand bills printed, and I distributed them to the different pawnbrokers for them to stop the things. On the Monday following I was going down the Strand to deliver them bills, I saw the prisoner walking before me in the street, with my gown on, my black velvet spencer, and the silk handkerchief tied round her neck. I took hold of her by the arm and took her into a shop I told her that she had robbed me; she denied it, excepting the clothes that were on her back. She could not deny that they were mine. I was positive they were mine before I laid hold of her. She said that she knew the things were mine, if I was the person that belonged to the room. I sent for a constable; Mr. Westwood came and took charge of her.

WILLIAM WESTWOOD . I am a patrol of Bow-street. I was sent for to take charge of this woman. The clothes that she had on were claimed by Mrs. Jackson. I searched the prisoner; I found a small box with a duplicate of a pair of stays. The stays were delivered to me by the duplicate. Mrs. Jackson claimed the stays. The prisoner then told me that she had pledged the watch in Watling-street. She took me to the pawnbroker's shop, and Mrs. Jackson claimed the watch. The prisoner then told me that she had sold the other things in Play-house-yard. She took me to Mrs. Price's. There I found some petticoats, a gown, a pair of breeches; they were all claimed by Mrs. Jackson.

SARAH PRICE . I keep a clothes shop, No. 18, Play-house-yard. On the 14th of November, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner sold me two white petticoats, a gown, and three napkins, and a pair of breeches. I asked her if they were her own. She said, no, they were a young woman's clothes that died in the Hospital of a bad knee. I gave her four shillings for them, and when Mr. Westwood came I instantly showed the things.

RICHARD EASTON . I am a pawnbroker's servant to Mr. Watson, Watling-street. I produce a watch, pawned on the 14th of November, about four o'clock in the afternoon, for twelve shillings, I believe by the prisoner.

Prosecutrix. the watch and all the things are my husband's property.

Prisoner's Defence. I throw myself on the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Common Searjent

Reference Number: t18121202-59

58. ANN BIRD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of November , one pound two ounces weight of silk, value 3 l. the property of Richard Briant and Richard Delaney , privately in thier shop .

JOHN FEAR. I am a boot-closer; I live at No. 2, Angel-court, in the Strand. On the 6th of November, about two in the afternoon, I was going past the prosecutor's shop, between Foster-lane and Newgate-street . I was looking in the shop. I saw the prisoner standing with her back against the counter. I saw her take the silk up, and put it under her shawl. There were several people at the other counter. I was going past with a parcel; I happened to stop and look in at the window; and when the prisoner came out of the shop I went in and told of it. Mr. Delaney came out of the shop, and went after her. I saw Mr. Delaney take the silk from her in Foster-lane.

RICHARD DELANEY . My partner's name is Richard Brant . I was in the back part of the shop; my son and two others were serving in the shop.

Q. About what time did you receive any information of this - A. About three o'clock in the afternoon. I immediately went to the door, and asked who could point out the woman that took the silk. John Fear said, I will. He pointed out the prisoner down Foster-lane, saying, that is the woman. I followed her, took her by the hand, and requested that she would come back with me. At this time John Fear came so near as to point, there is the silk. The silk at that moment was falling from her shawl. This is the silk; it weighs one pound two ounces it is my silk; it is worth about three pounds.

JOHN COCKMAN . I produce the silk; it was given me by Mr. Delaney.

Prosecutor. That silk is my property and my partner's.

Prisoner's Defence. I leave myself to the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY, aged 52,

Of stealing, but not privately .

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18121202-60

59. JAMES RYDER and THOMAS REYNOLDS were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of November , a silk handkerchief, value 3 s. the property of a certain person to the jurors unknown.

WILLIAM BARRETT . I am a constable of the City of London. On the 9th of November, I was on my duty on Blackfriars-bridge; Richard Mills , my brother officer, was with me. I had been partly over the bridge, and was returning back again. It might be a little after two in the afternoon. I saw the two prisoners follow a gentleman close; I suspected them, and followed them. I saw Ryder go to the gentleman. Reynolds was behind Ryder, covering him, because he should not be seen committing the depredation. Ryder put his hand into the gentleman's pocket, took the handkerchief half out; the gentleman stepped off the curb, and walked on the horse pavement, about three yards. He did not perceive him. He got on the curb again. Reynolds went up to the gentleman and took it completely away. I seized Reynolds by the collar; the gentleman did not perceive the handkerchief drawed out until I told him. Reynolds threw the handkerchief down when I seized him. I picked it up, and holloaed after the gentleman. I said, sir, you have been robbed of your handkerchief. He said give it to me. I said, no, I cannot give it you; you must go with me. I told Mills to go and bring Ryder back. He brought Ryder to me. I kept them both in custody. The gentleman that was robbed followed me about two yards, no further; the multitude of people being so great I lost sight of him in the crowd. I have not seen him since. Some gentleman brought me these two handkerchiefs; he said, the prisoner Ryder had throwed them under a gentleman's carriage. Ryder said, he knew nothing about it, or what he was brought back for. That gentleman is not here. I took both of the prisoners to the Poultry Compter, and searched them both. I found this cotton handkerchief in Reynolds's hat, and this silk handkerchief in Ryder's hat.

Q. Now, the gentleman from whom the handkerchief was taken, are you quite sure that he did not perceive the handkerchief was taken - A. I am quite sure of it. He did not know that he had lost it untill I told him of it.

Q. Have you any knowledge who that gentleman was - A. No; he was a stranger to me, and remains so. This is the handkerchief; it is a silk handkerchief; it is worth three shillings.

RICHARD MILLS . I am a constable. I was with Barrett. I saw the fact as he has stated; what he has stated is correct.

Ryder's Defence. I slipped off the curb. I might catch hold of the gentleman. The constable catched hold of me, and said I picked the gentleman's pocket.

Reynolds's Defence. I was going to see my Lord Mayor take water. I ran past the middle of the bridge; this gentleman catched hold of me. I said, what is the matter. He said, you have picked a gentleman's pocket.

RYDER, GUILTY , aged 27.

REYNOLDS, GUILTY , aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18121202-61

60. RICHARD DRAKE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of October , seven shirts, value 6 l. twenty handkerchiefs, value 2 l. six gowns, value 3 l. two petticoats, value 10 s. three pinafores, value 5 s. and three towels, value 3 s. the property of Nathaniel Brownell .

ELIZABETH BROWNELL. My husband's name is Nathaniel Brownell ; we live at 81, Castle-street, Tottenham-court-road. I am a laundress. I employed the prisoner in fetching and carrying out my linen. On the 17th of October I sent him to the linen home to Mr. Walker, in Brunswick-square, out of the first basket he took a gown and some other articles. He returned again; I gave him another basket to take to Gloucester-place. He took all that linen. He returned, and said he had delivered them. On the Monday morning I went to my customers; they informed me the things had not come. I found some of the shirts pledged. I delivered them to the owner, on account of his going abroad. I delivered the things to the prisoner, to carry to the gentleman, and his wife pawned them.

Q. Is there any body here to prove that he pawned them - A. No, the wife pawned them.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121202-62

61. THOMAS NORMAN and WILLIAM HASELDON , alias MOSS , were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Hodder , about the hour of twelve at night, on the 25th of September , and burglariously stealing therein a silver cruet stand, value 2 l. a silver punch ladle, value 5 s. three silver table-spoons, value 34 s. a silver castor, value 1 l. four silver salts, value 5 l. a silver tea-spoon, value 5 s. a silver skewer, value 10 s. a silver waiter, value 2 l. a silver caddy-spoon, value 5 s. two watches, value 20 l. a gold watch chain, value 2 l. three great coats, value 3 l. twenty five pounds in monies, numbered, a bank note, value 10 l. a promissory note, value 2 l. and a promissory note, value 1 l. the property of the said William Hodder .

WILLIAM HODDER . Q. Have you a house in the country - A. Yes, in Uxbridge, in the county of Middlesex, in the parish of Hillingdon .

Q. Was your house broken open - A. It was on Wednesday night, the 25th of September, I believe it was, or early in the morning. I retired to rest about half after eleven.

Q. Was your mother unwell in the house at that time - A. She was indisposed, and had been indisposed in the house a considerable time. My sister attended her. There was a light burning in the house in consequence of my sister being unwell.

COURT. She was indiaposed - A. She was.

Mr. Alley. When you went to bed was your house safe - A. To the best of my knowledge it was.

Q. When did you first learn that your house had been broken open - A. About six o'clock the following morning I received the information from my groom. I went into the room which had been broken open, at the back part of the house, looking into a garden. The first thing, I observed the window up and down. It is a sliding window; the lower part was up, and the upper part down, with one or two panes of glass broken. A desk, close to the side of the window, was broken open, and the papers scattered under the desk. I missed two gold watches; one was a hunting watch, the other was a lady's watch, with a gold face, and a gold chain. I also missed from fifteen pounds to twenty pounds of silver.

Q. What kind - A. Dollars, half-crowns, shillings, and sixpences, and about the same quantity in gold, in a separate bag. The silver was in a bag, and the gold in a small bag in the large bag, with the silver. I then opened a blank pocket-book, in which I kept a number of private papers, in which I had, I believe, fifteen hundred pounds, in bills of different description, but I only missed a ten-pound bank-note, and five or six Uxbridge country bank notes. That was chiefly the property that I missed out of that book. I then went into the dining-room, from the parlour door I went in. It had been broken. When I got into my dining-room I perceived the whole of the plate was taken from the sideboard, and a candle left burning in the room; it was burning then. I omitted to state that there were three great coats taken out of the passage.

Q. Did you miss the key of the street door - A. Not then, I afterwards did. It has never been found since. I have never recovered any of the property whatever since. I think it was the most dreadful stormy night that we had the whole season.

Mr. Knapp. You was not the last person up at night, were you - A. I was not.

COURT. You lost property out of the house to a considerable amount - A. To the best of my belief to about two hundred pounds.

ELIZABETH BROWN. Q. You are a relation to Mr. Hodder, by marriage - A. I am. I and the late Mrs. Hodder were the last persons up in the house. Before we retired to rest we examined the fastenings of the house. That was at half past eleven.

Q. Was the house secure - A. That part I am sure it was.

Q. You mean the part that you found broken open, can you speak to it being fastened - A. Yes.

Q. By what part did the robbers cuter - A. They entered the back part, by the garden.

Q. That you found was broken open - A. Yes.

COURT. Did you see that was fast at night - A. Yes.

Mr. Knapp. I understood you to say, that you and Mrs. Hodder were together - A. Yes; we went up to bed immediately, we only examined the room.

Q. Then, as far as you know, the other part of the house might not be secure - A. I examined the back parlour, and all the way leading to the hall was secure.

Q. The other part you did not examine - A. No.

COURT. The other part was the front of the house - A. And the back door, I did not look at them.

Q. Then that part which you speak to is the parlour which you found broken open the next morning - A. Yes. With respect to the back window, I saw it was secured.

Mr. Knapp. With respect to the back door and the front part of the horse, you did not - A. No. I made no observation on it.

Mr. Gurney. Did you and Mrs. Hodder go to bed at the same time - A. Yes; Mrs. Hodder and myself went up to bed together, and went in bed together.

Q. Do you recollect in the course of the night hearing any noise in the house - A. None in the least.

Q. In what part of the house did you sleep - A. In the front two pair of stairs.

JAMES MOBBS. Q. I believe you are a groom to the prosecutor - A. Yes.

Q. Do you recollect the night in September last year, in which the house was broken open - A. Yes. I sleep in the house, in the top part of the house. I went to rest about a quarter past ten o'clock. I got up in the morning about six o'clock. First of all, when I got out of bed, I felt a strong wind come underneath my bed-room door. There is a large sky-light, I thought it was broken. I found it was not broken, but I still perceived the wind as I went down. When I got to the bottom of the stairs on the right hand I perceived the parlour door. I then looked in the parlour, and there I saw the parlour all littered over with books and writing. I saw the window open; on the other side of the window I saw the gardener through the window coming to his work.

Q. Did you perceive how the glass of the windows were - A. Two squares were broken of the back parlour window, the window that looked into the garden. I let the gardener in. I then went up stairs, and told my master. My master and I came down stairs together. My master sent for the constable of the parish; his name is Murray.

Q. Did you go into the dining-room - A. Yes; there was a candle alight upon the top of the table, and the plate was gone from off the sideboard. When Mr. Murray came I went to the stable to my work. It was quite light when I came down stairs.

CHARLES MURRAY. I am high constable for the Uxbridge division. On the 17th of September I was sent for to the prosecutor's house. I went there between six and seven o'clock in the morning. I saw the window had been pushed down in the back parlour. It is a circular top window; the shutters go no farther than the spring of the arch. I found the window had been pushed down, the top sash. The fastening was broken.

Q. The catch of the sash was broken - A. Yes. It would admit of a person getting over the shutters themselves. I found the mark of two feet upon a chair that stood under the window. I observed Mr. Hodder's desk broken open; it appeared to have

been broken open with a chisel. It had the mark on the top. A part of the lock had been forced up from the desk. I found a bit of a wax candle and matches; the matches have been used; and a mother-of-pearl button was laying on the floor. The button has no shank to it. I found the door that comes into the parlour from the passage broken open. It had been forced away, and open. I told Mr. Hodder to enquire if any people had been about the town of that description. I went to the Ram inn and made enquiry there. I enquired of Todds; he said, the ostler could give me information.

JURY. We wish to know whether the inside shutters appeared to have been made fast - A. There is no doubt of it, because the fastenings were broken.

JOEL WARE. - Mr. Gurney. This man has been convicted, and has received a pardon under the King's seal.

Q. In September, last year, were you acquainted with the prisoners - A. Yes.

Q. At that time where did Moss live - A. In a court in Fleet-market. Norman lived in Plumb Tree court, Shoe-lane; I lived at 24, Mitchell-street, Lisson-green, Paddington.

Q. Did either of them make any proposal to you to go to Uxbridge - A. A few days before we went to Uxbridge, Norman and Moss came to my house, and we were talking about going in the country, and on the next day I went down to Norman's house, Plumb Tree-court, and Moss came there to Norman and me. They asked me if I would go with them to Uxbridge. Moss said, that he knew of a place that could be served very easily. I agreed to go with him. We agreed to meet at the Key in Fleet-market, at seven in the evening. We met there all three of us at seven o'clock in the evening,

Q. Do you recollect on what evening it was that you all met there. How long was it before you went to Uxbridge - A. The night before we went off to Uxbridge we agreed to start the next day morning to go to Uxbridge.

Q. How was it settled that you should travel - A. I was to ride with Moss in his cart, and Norman was to ride the poney. The poney was a borrowed poney. We had borrowed the poney a day or two before. I knew the poney to be borrowed for that purpose. The next morning we started from Plumb Tree-court.

Q. Did you go in the cart - A. No. Moss was known by the Bow-street officers, and very likely, if they saw us go over the stones together, they might stop us, and search the cart, and enquire where we were going.

Q. If the officers had searched the cart, what would they have found in it - A. The house-breaking tools, and therefore Moss went in the cart himself. It was not fit for me and Moss to be together, therefore it was settled that I should ride the poney, and that Norman should walk. In Oxford-road we met. Norman got up in the cart, and I followed with the poney. Then we went on towards Uxbridge.

Q. Did you stop and bait on the way - A. Yes, at the Green Man, at Ealing common. It is a public-house just out of the way. We did not take the mare out of the cart; we stopped, and gave the mare and the poney their corn in a bin at the door, and then we went on to Uxbridge.

Q. When you came opposite of Mr. Hodder's house did anything pass - A. Moss and Norman, at Mr. Hodder's house, were in the cart; I was behind on the poney. They pointed out Hodder's house to me. The house was on the left hand side from town. It was too soon to do business; it was in the afternoon, quite soon, between three and four o'clock. Then we went to a public-house on the right hand side, just on the other side of the bridge. We put the horses in there, and gave them some corn. We returned up the town on foot. We went on towards the market-house. We passed Mr. Hodder's house. I went and bought some walnuts. After we had seen the house we returned back to the inn, and asked if we could have tea. We went and took the horses and cart, and went to Rickmansworth. We went to a public-house just by the caual, kept by one Hubbard. We got there just before dusk, between six and seven o'clock. We put up there; we asked to to stay all night. They said, yes. We staid there all night. We had tea and supper together.

Q. Now, how did you sleep - A. We were all three to sleep in one bed, but when we got up to bed Norman and Moss went to bed together; they objected to my sleeping with them. I went into another room, where there was a bed. I slept in a bed in the other room. The house-breaking tools were in a handkerchief; we brought them in the house.

Q. What did they consist of - A. A dark lantern, a little japan case of phosphorus, and two little crows, (they go by the name of jemmys), and some skeleton keys. These were brought in the house in an handkerchief. Moss, when he went to bed, he took them up stairs; he had the care of them. We got up in the morning, and had our breakfast. In the course of the forenoon I took the poney and went about three miles to a sister of mine, and returned back to dinner. They remained there both of them, and when I came back we staid there till about six in the evening.

Q. Do you remember having any conversation with any person of the house - A. The landlord asked us what was our business, and where we were going to. We told him we were going to see the fight with the Black and Crib.

Q. That is Molineanx and Crib - A. Yes; that took place at Stamford on the Saturday following.

Q. When you set off in the evening, was it said by any person which way are you going - A. There was a gentleman that came out of the door and said to us, we better stay, it being wet and windy. Moss said we would go on to St. Albans, and when he got there he knew the country well; and when we quitted the house we went over the bridge, as if we were going the St. Albans road. After we had got over the bridge there is two roads; we turned to the left, towards Uxbridge, the back way. We went to the Ram inn, Uxbridge. We arrived there a little after seven. We all staid there till about eleven, or a little after. There we had refreshment. Norman and Moss had mutton chops; I could not eat any.

We all drank rum and water. Then we all went out; Norman and Moss in the cart, and I on the poney, and turned as if going towards the bridge, and then turned round. When we saw the inn gates shut up we came back again, through Uxbridge, through a lane at this end of the town. We turned down the lane; a little way to the right. I rode up to the horse in the cart, and held the horse's head, while Moss and Norman got out of the cart, and broke open the gate, that led into a paddock. We took the cart into the paddock, took the mare out, and tied her to one of the wheels of the cart, and the pony to the other. Then we all went down she town, taking the tools with us. When we came to Mr. Hodder's house there was a light in the upper chamber, in the front of the house. We walked about a bit. We saw the light did not move, therefore we thought it was a night-light. Then Moss said, we had better go to the back of the house, as the light was in the front.

Q. How did you get into the garden - A. There was a little iron garden gate; we took the skeleton keys out of the handkerchief. Norman and Moss fitted one of the keys out of the handkerchief. They fitted the key to the lock of the garden gate, while I looked at the top to see that nobody came down. Then we went into the garden.

What part of the house did you go to - A. The lower parlour window, at the back of the house, a very large window. Norman took out his knife, and cut a little away of the putty, to take out the glass, to push the catch back that fastened the two sashes together.

Q. Did you push the catch back - A. Yes; we pushed the catch back and the top sash was throwed down.

Q. Were there inside shutters - A. Yes, but they did not come to the top of the window. It is an arch top; a kind of an oval top. The shutters did not come up to the top. There was room for one to get in over the shutters. When the sash was pulled down, after we got the window pulled down, Moss got up and broke a pane or two of glass with his feet, stepping over. Then we all went away. This made a great noise.

Q. What sort of a night did you say it was - A. A very dark, wet, windy night.

Q. You say you quitted the window - A. We all went out of the garden, and pulled the gate to. We went into the street, across the road, on the opposite side of the house. We waited there a few minutes, and the watchman was crying one o'clock. There is a turning by the side of the house. The watchman went down the turning. Moss said, give me the pistol. The watchman went down the turning; he took no notice of the gate; he did not try whether it was fast or not, and then he went away. He went up towards the market house. Then we found the people of the house were not alarmed, they did not come down, and the light did not move, we went back again into the house, at the window. Moss stooped down; they helped me up. I got over the top of the window shutters. I was leaning over: they held my legs while I was unfastening the catch of the bar. I then opened the shutters and then Norman and me got over. We got a light from the phosphorus, and then we went to the parlour door that opens into the passage. We bursted the lock open with a gimblet. We opened the street door, and let Moss in.

Q. That is the front door - A. Yes; it opens into the turning, not into the street. We shut the front door again. Moss bid us stand a bit, and he went up two or three stairs to listen if any body was moving up stairs. He come down stairs, said it was all right. We then went into the back parlour, where we got into, and went to a little desk that stood by the side of the window. We broke it open with a crow. We found a pocket-book with notes in it; there was one ten-pound bank note, I believe, and some Uxbridge notes. There was a bag with some silver, foriegn dollars, half-crowns, three-shilling pieces, and silver of all descriptions to the amount of, I believe, fifteen pounds. There was another bag, a little bag, in that bag, with about fourteen guineas in it, two gold watches, one a lady's watch, with a gold face, the other a hunting watch. We opened a drawer in the table in the same back parlour; we found nothing there. We then went to the front parlour; the door was locked, but the key was in it. We opened the door, and went in, and the plate stood on the sideboard, and such as were silver we put in the bag that we had taken with us. I held the bag open; Norman and Moss examined the articles, and such as were silver we put into the bag.

Q. What were they - A. A pair of silver butter-boats, n skewer, salts, some spoons, and a punch-ladle, and several articles of plate. These we put into the bag. We came into the passage and took three great coats, and then we opened the street door and went out. We pulled to the street door, locked it, and took the key away. We all went to the cart.

Q. Before you got into the window did either of you have an accident with a waistcoat - A. I lost part of a mother of pearl button from my waistcoat. The button broke off the shank, my wife afterwards put on a new button.

Q. Look at this pearl button does it match with the other buttons on your waistcoat - A. It does.

Q. You say you took a light in the house from the phosphorus - A. Yes.

Q. What had you afterwards to light you in the house - A. A wax candle; they are two-pence a piece. We had two or three with us.

Q. I suppose, whether there was any left behind you do not recollect - A. No, I do not recollect. We went to our cart, and found it in the place where we left it. We put the mare into the cart; they two got up. I got on the poney, and rode on towards town. When we came about half way to town the mare knocked up. We took the mare out of the cart, and put the poney in. I rid the mare. We got into town just by five o'clock. We got into St. Giles's about five o'clock; it was just day-light. We went to Simons's house, in Crown-street, Seven Dials. There is a string left on the door to pull the lock back, so we can get in any time. We got in, and went up to Simons's bed room.

Q. Was he up - A. No, in bed. We knocked at

his bed-room; he came into his dining-room to us; he brought his scales and weights, and he weighted the silver.

Q. What was the price - A. Plain silver he gave five shillings an ounce for; if there were crests and cyphers on them he gave four shillings and sixpence. I forget what it fetched altogether. We sold him some coin, and the three coats for one pound.

Q. What became of the ten-pound note - A. Simons looked at the ten-pound note, and I think he offered seven pound for it. We objected letting him have it, and I think Norman had it. He allowed something more than Simons would. It was reckoned about eight pounds. Simons bid ten pounds for the two gold watches; we would not let him have them. Moss said he would give more himself. Moss had them; he gave eleven pounds for them; he gave one pound more than Simons would give for them. Simons's boy took the mare to the Angel inn, St. Giles's.

Q. How long did the mare remain to your knowledge at the Angel - A. Why, two or three days; that day and the next I know.

Q. While she was there did you or either of the prisoners go to see her - A. We all three went in the morning. The ostler found fault, and said, that she had been used cruel. She came in without shoes, and looked very bad; her knees were broken, her bag was swelled. I milked some milk out of her; her bag was diseased.

Q. I believe, about the month of January, after this you left London - A. Yes, with Norman, and Norman and me were apprehended at Cheyneys. We were taken at a public-house in Cheshunt.

Q. While you were there do you remember Mr. Hubbard, at whose house you had been at Rickmansworth, seeing you and Norman - A. Yes.

Q. Now, when you were so in custody, did you make a confession of this and other transactions to Mr. Bailey, the high constable, and then to the magistrate - A. I did.

Q. Now, you have told me before that you had known for some time Moss and Norman - A. Yes.

Q. Did you ever receive from Moss any information about tools - A. Yes; I heard him say that he had a little set of tools that fixed into one stock, but I never saw them.

Q. What kind of tools do you mean - A. Centre bits, for house-breaking, that would cut a bit out of a shutter.

Mr. Knapp. I observe you have got a good memory - A. Middling.

Q. You are speaking of a transaction now, in the month of December, of a transaction that took place in September twelvemonth, that you know - A. Yes.

Q. How many times have you been examined to it - A. Twice. I do not understand you.

Q. How many times have you told this story to different people - A. To two magistrates. I do not recollect mentioning it to any body else.

Q. Perhaps you may recollect how many times you have been tried, as your memory is so good - A. Twice. I have been in jail three times.

Q. How do you get your livelihood - A. I am a wheeler; I was brought up to be a wheeler. I worked for my father in Shoreditch. I could not do a great deal of business lately; I have been in trouble and confinement. I worked for my father just before I was apprehended; three years ago. I was then apprehended for house-breaking.

Q. And was brought here and tried - A. Yes.

Q. And you had sentence of death passed upon you, had not you - A. Yes.

Q. And you were also tried again for being at large - A. Yes.

HANNAH LITTLEBOY. Q. Your father keeps the sign of the Green Man, on Ealing common - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember the night the robbery was committed at Mr. Hodder's - A. Yes.

Q. On the day before the robbery was committed did any men call at your house - A. Yes, three men. They had a one-horse cart and a poney.

Q. What time of the day did they call - A. Between two and three o'clock; they might be half an hour at our house.

Q. Do you recollect Mr. Murray calling on you after the robbery - A. Yes. I recollected there then, so as to give Mr. Murray a description of them. I have forgot since. I do not recollect them now.

JOHN HUBBARD . Q. You keep the Bear inn - A. Yes, at Patchworth, in the parish of Twickenham.

Q. On the evening of the 24th of September do you recollect any men coming to your house - A. I cannot be positive to the day. On the next day after the men left my house I heard of the robbery, and these men were at my house the day before the robbery. They came to my house on Tuesday evening, two of them in a chaise-cart, and one on a little black poney. They came in my house on the Tuesday evening, and went away the next evening.

Q. Did they stay with you all the next day - A. They were in and out of the house. They slept in my house on the Tuesday night. I asked them when they were going, where they were going. They were in company altogether. Their answer was, that they were going to the fight between the Black and Crib, down in the north.

Q. Did either of them ride out the next day - A. Yes, Joel Ware rode out. He returned again between one and two o'clock, and they all dined together.

Q. During the time they were with you did you observe any bundle - A. Yes, a small square bundle, tied up in an handkerchief, about the size of a bible that a child might take to school. That was in Norman's care. He kept it in his possession.

Q. What time did they leave your house on the Wednesday evening - A. I think about six o'clock in the evening. The weather was very bad; it rained very hard and blowed. They took up into the town on the left hand from my house, which is the road towards St. Albans. The mare was a little brown mare, about fourteen hands high. I believe the poney was a little black stallion. I saw neither name or number on the cart.

Q. In the month of January last did you see Norman

any where - A. In the winter I saw Ware and Norman at Cheshunt. They were taken up. I then remembered that they were two of the men that had been at my house.

Q. How far is Patchworth from Uxbridge - A. Seven miles.

JOSHUA PELE . Q. Where do you live - A. At Rickmansworth.

Q. Do you remember in the month of September last year hearing of Mr. Hodder's house being broken open - A. Yes.

Q. On the evening before that was broken open were you at Mr. Hubbard's at Patchworth - A. Yes. I was at a club there.

Q. Do you remember seeing any persons there with a poney and a cart - A. Yes, three men. I have seen them three men since.

Q. Ware, stand forward. Is that one of them - A. Yes; he was upon the poney and the other two men were the two prisoners now at the bar. They are the persons that were there that night.

Q. What time in the evening was it that you went to Hubbard's house - A. Why, it was not quite six o'clock.

Q. Had you any conversation with them - A. Not that evening, I saw them all three both evenings; the night they came in and the night they went away.

Q. Did you hear from any of them where they were going to - A. The night Mr. Hodder's house was broken open it rained very hard, and they ordered the horse and cart out, and the poney. It was then pretty near six o'clock. I went out and said, gentlemen, it is a wet-night, you had better stop another night, as you were here last night. They told me they did not mind the wet they were going to see the battle between Crib and Molineaux, and if they could reach as far as St. Albans that night they should do very well. They went towards Rickmansworth, and I saw no more of them.

Q. Then they quitted Mr. Hubbard's, as if they were going towards St. Albans - A. Yes.

HANNAH TALKS. Q. Your husband keeps the Ram Inn, at Uxbridge - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember on the night of Mr. Hodder's house being broken open any men coming to your house - A. Yes, about seven in the evening, three men came, I did not see them come in; I saw them go. They had a chaise-cart and a little poney. They went out about eleven at night, Wednesday night, on the next morning I heard of the robbery. Mr. Murray came and made some enquiries.

JOHN BIRCH . Q. Were you ostler at the Ram Inn Uxbridge - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember Mr. Hodder's house being broken open in September, last year - A. Yes.

Q. On the evening of that night did any persons come to your house - A. Yes, three men came about seven o'clock; two of them rid in a cart, and one on a black poney. They staid there till about eleven o'clock.

Q. Have you since seen these persons again - A. I do not recollect that I have.

JOHN RAMSAY. I keep the Angle Inn, at St. Giles's.

Q. About the month of September last, year do you remember a mare coming to your stables that had a diseased bag - A. I perfectly recollect a brown mare with a swollen bag being there a day or two. She was broken down, and very poor indeed, in a deplorable condition. What leads me more particular to remember her was, my ostler being out. On the day, a man called, and I fed this mare myself.

Mr. Gurney. Ware, stand forward.

Q. Do you recollect that man coming to see her - A. I perfectly recollect this man, and I think Norman. I do not swear that Norman was the man.

JOHN ARMSTRONG . I am an officer. On Monday, the 5th of October, I was at Croydon-fair, in company with Bishop. We there saw the prisoner Moss, and took him. I told him then that he was charged with different robberies, in company with Norman, and others. He said directly, he knew he was in my custody, he should behave himself as a man, but he knew nothing of the charge of felony. On the Thursday following, I, in company with Bishop and my son, went to a back one pair of stairs room. I had every reason to believe it was Moss's lodging. The house was No. 8, I think. The door was locked. My son went in, and opened the window before we proceeded to search that room. I and the other officers brought the things away that we found there.

MARY MACKLEWIN . I live at No. 7, John-street, Commercial-road.

Q. Do you remember the room that was searched by Armstrong - A. I do, the back room, a ready furnished room.

Q. The question is, whose lodgings were they that Armstrong searched - A. Mr. Haseldon's. It is a small house. I had no other lodgers but him.

Armstrong. I found this pistol, tinder-box, and this little square box, it contains a number of implements; they go into one and the same stock. This is what they call a goudge; after the gimblet has been in, this goudge will make the hole bigger, by working round; this is a larger goudge, and this is a screw-driver. This is another screw-driver, and if the screw should be sunk it would go in. This is a chisel, it goes into the same stock. This is a parcel of counterfeit shillings. The other bag consists of plyers and nippers.

Mr. Knapp. Did you find any centre bit - A. No. There is a gimblet and a saw; there wants no centre bit.

DANIEL BISHOP . Q. I believe you were with the last witness at the search of Moss's lodging - A. I was, when these things were found.

Q. On the 21st of October did you apprehended Norman - A. I did, in company with Joshua Armstrong .

Q. Where was it - A. Near the Green Man, on Ealing common. He was then on horseback. We took him off his horse, and took him into the Green Man public-house; the house kept by Littleboy. I searched him, and from his waistcoat pocket I took a brace of double barelled pistols. The barrels were loaded with one ball each. In the other pocket I found a paper parcel of gunpowder. I told him my name was Bishop, I was an officer. He looked,

and said, I know you, I shall make no resistance. He made none.

MR. GIFFORD. Q. You are one of the police magistrates - A. I am. I asked Moss whether he knew Joel Ware . He denied ever knowing him. At first he denied either knowing Norman or Ware. I cannot recollect what Norman said.

RICHARD WILSON . I am an officer of Worship-street office. During the time the prisoners were under examination at Worship-street I had the care of Joel Ware . When Ware was sworn the prisoners, Norman and Moss, declared they knew nothing at all of him. I heard them say so.

MARY ANN WARE . I am the wife of Joel Ware .

Q. In the summer and autumn of last year do you remember living in Mitchell-street, Lisson-green - A. I do.

Q. Do you know the two prisoners, Moss and Norman - A. Yes. They came to my house in Mitchell-street several times, and I remember my husband going with them to Uxbridge. I did not go with them, but I understood so.

Q. Do you remember when your husband came back anything having happened to his waistcoat - A. Yes, the button of his waistcoat, the pearl button, came off the shank. I sewed another button on.

Q. After you had lived in Mitchell-street, you moved to Artillery-street, Higlers-lane - A. Yes, No. 1.

Q. Was this going to Uxbridge before or after you went to Artillery-street - A. Before.

ANN ARNOLD . Q. Did you keep the house in Mitchell-street, Lisson-green, in which Ware lodged - A. Yes.

Q. Look at the two prisoners, did you ever see them come to that house - A. I am positive to Norman, and to the best of my knowledge I have seen the other, but not so as to swear to him. I have seen him either at the street door or in the passage.

Norman's Defence. My lord, and gentlemen of the Jury, it is not possible for me to make any defence. I appeal to you whether I could recollect where I was a twelvemonth ago, and if I could how am I to find evidence to prove it; therefore I am at the mercy of Joel Ware , who will say what he pleases without any contradiction. I rely on your mercy, and the Jury, and hope you will take my case into your consideration.

Haseldon's Defence. The same.

NORMAN, GUILTY , aged 35.

HASELDON, GUILTY , aged 43.

Judgment respited .

Second Middlesex jury before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18121202-63

62. JOHN COX was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of October , a deck-stopper, value 4 s. one strap for a cross-jack yard, value 3 s. a main truss, value 1 s. a foot truss and rope for a top-sail yard, value 4 s. a pair of top-sail sheets, value 20 s. main stays, and main spring sail and yard, value 10 s. and two joints of old rope, value 5 s. the property of John Carr , William Davis , and John Edwards ; and WILLIAM BELLAMY for receiving the said goods, he knowing them to be stolen .

JOHN CARR . Q. Are you one of the owners of the ship Lord Forbes - A. I am. My partners are William Davis and John Edwards . Our ship was sent into the East India dock to be unloaded. William Ritchie was the overseer of the ship.

WILLIAM RITCHIE. I was the overseer of the ship, the Lord Forbes. She was sent into the East India dock to be unloaded. I appointed a place for the depositing her rigging, while she was unloading of stores at Ashton's wharf. I sent an order to Mr. Grainger to take care of the stores.

SAMUEL GRAINGER. I am a lighterman, in partnership with my father.

Q. Were you employed as lighterman to convey the rigging of the Lord Forbes to Ashton's wharf from the East India dock - A. We were.

Q. Who did you direct to do it - A. John Cox , our lighterman; he was master of our lighter, the Medway.

Q. Who assisted him - A. A boy employed by him, his name is Benfield. Cox has lived with me two years. I never had occasion to find fault with him before; he bears a good character.

JOSEPH BENFIELD . Q. Are you employed under Cox to navigate the Medway - A. Yes.

Q. On Thursday, the 22d of October, did Cox receive any rigging on board the Medway from the Lord Forbes - A. We received it from the Lord Forbes at the East India docks, and we were going with the rigging to Ashton's wharf, Blackwall.

Q. Now, as you were going along did Cox do any thing with any part of the rigging that you had from out of the Lord Forbes - A. Yes.

Q. When you received the Lord Forbes rigging where did you put it - A. In the main hold, and on our way to Ashton's wharf, Cox removed some of it from the main hold into the fore peak, and he bid me to assist him. I said, master, does this belong to you. He said, yes, it was given to him by a person. I am sure it all came from the Lord Forbes. We got to Ashton's wharf about four o'clock in the afternoon, and after she was moored Cox went on shore. I staid on board all night. Cox came on board the next morning at five o'clock, and between five and six Mr. Bellamy's man and son with a horse and cart, and the rigging that was put in the fore peak we put on shore, and from there into the cart, and the cart was drove off. In about three quarters of an hour after, I saw Mr. Walker; he came about these things.

BENJAMIN PHILLIPS . I am a servant to Mr. Bellamy. I went with the cart to Ashton's wharf. On the evening before, Cox came to my master's house about five o'clock; he asked if Mr. Bellamy was at home. I said, yes, and called Mr. Bellamy. Cox and Bellamy spoke together, and I walked away.

Q. What does your master deal in - A. Marine stores. I heard Cox say he had some rope and rubbish. I knew Cox was a lighterman in Mr. Grainger's employ. On the next morning, when the horse was in the cart, my master told me I had better take some string to tie the rubbish up. He told

me to go with the cart. I went to Ashton's wharf.

Q. In short you there received in your cart the things that Walker, the officer, found in the cart - A. Yes, and as Cox and I were proceeding to my master's ground, Mr. Walker, the officer, stopped the cart. My master never saw the old rope until it was stopped. I have lived two years with him. I always saw him carry on his business in an honest way.

THOMAS WALKER . I am one of the Thames police surveyors. On the 23d of October, between six and seven in the morning, I met with Bellamy's cart near Bellamy's house; in the cart was about six hundred pounds weight of rope. I stopped the cart, and sent for Bellamy. He came to me. I asked him how he got that rope; had he any document to shew for it. He said, if I go to his house he would shew me. I went with him to his house. He turned over a number of papers. He said, he had no document for this present transaction. I told him, I would go down to Ashton's wharf. He said, he would go with me. He went with me. I asked him a great many questions about the rope. He said, he had got the rope from Cox, the lighterman. He told me that Cox said he had got some old shakings and old shakings and old stuff, instead of being old stuff it is serviceable rope. He then said, if he had known it had been such rope as that he would not have sent for it.

Mr. Knapp. I believe you knew that Bellamy surrendered this morning to take his trial - A. Yes, he has been attending here every day since I have been here.

ANDREW MARTIN . I am boatswain to the Lord Forbes. I have looked over all the things that Mr. Walker seized. They are part of the rigging of the Lord Forbes.

Cox left his defence to his counsel.

Bellamy's Defence. I have been in business many years. I never had any fault laid to my charge before. I do not think I am blameable whatever in this instance.

Cox called six witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Bellamy called five witnesses, who gave him a good character.

COX, GUILTY , aged 32.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

BELLAMY, NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121202-64

63. JOHN JOHNSTONE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23rd of October , two leather shoes, value 10 s. the property of William Arrol , privately in his shop .

WILLIAM ARROL. I am a boot and shoe-maker in Pall Mall . About the beginning of November two odd shoes were missing from my shop; from information I went to Marlborough-street office, and saw two odd shoes, and they were fellows of the two shoes I had. I know nothing of the prisoner; I never saw him before.

DAVID MASSEY. I live with Mr. Harrison, pawnbroker, No. 12, Dean-street, Golden-square. The prisoner came into our shop and offered two shoes to pledge; when Mr. Harrison looked at them he said they were two odd ones; he sent for Foy, the officer; he took the prisoner in custody.

JOHN FOY . I am an officer. On the 23rd of October I was sent for to Mr. Harrison's shop. Mr. Harrison detained the prisoner until I came. I asked the prisoner how he came possessed of them shoes. He said he had bought them for eighteen shillings, in Holborn. I asked how it came that he did not buy fellows, one is half an inch longer than the other. He then said, that he had the fellows to them.

Prosecutor. Them shoes are for the right foot, and these in my possession are for the left, and they are the fellows to them.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Of stealing, but not privately in the shop.

Judgement respited .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121202-65

64. WILLIAM OLIVER and JOHN LLOYD were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of November , five trusses of hay, value 20 s. and a truss, of straw, value 18 d. the property of John Hammond and Richard Morley .

RICHARD MORLEY. I am in partnership with John Hammond ; we are wholesale tea dealers in St. Paul's church-yard. The prisoner, Oliver, was our carman ; our stable was in a yard on Addle-hill . Oliver had the care of the horses and the carts in that stable entirely to himself. The hay and the straw in that stable belongs to me and my partner.

WILLIAM KIMLEY . I am a carman in Mr. Griffiths's employ.

Q. On last Monday night did you go to this stable - A. Yes, about seven o'clock. It was dark At the entrance of the yard I saw a cart standing with a horse, and a man standing at the head of the horse. I was going to Mr. Frith's coachman; that is the middle stable. I then saw the two prisoners and another man standing at Mr. Hammond and Morley's stable door. There was a truss of hay and a truss of straw down in front of the door. I called Mr. Frith's coachman, and rattled his door. The prisoner Lloyd came and asked me wether I wanted Hammond and Morley's carman. I told him, no; I wanted Mr. Frith's coachman; and just as this passed the coachman sent his son down, and I was let in. What I had observed caused suspicion in my mind. I went up stairs and opened the window; I looked out. I saw Messrs. Hammond and Morley's hay loft door open. I saw four more trusses of hay throwed down from the left door, and then the left door was pulled to, and the light was put out. Lloyd and the strange man took up each a truss, and went towards the gateway. Lloyd returned, and the strange man, and took up a truss of hay each; then Oliver took up a truss of straw. He bid them be alive. They all went towards the gateway. The strange man returned. He took the other truss of hay that remained, making altogether five trusses of hay and one of straw. The next morning Mr. Frith's coachman told of it. If I had time I should have gone and told

myself. They were regular cut trusses of hay and straw what I saw taken away.

JOHN ODDY . I am groom to Mr. Hammond. On Monday evening last I went to Oliver's stable. I called, carman. I pushed the stable door open, and there were two strange men in the stable. They told me Oliver was above. I said, it was of no consequence. I left the stable immediately. In about ten minutes I went to the cart stable again. My stable are at the top of the yard. I called, carman, again, Oliver came. I asked for some nails; he gave them me. I did not go in. There was a truss of hay and straw at the door, what I saw. I had suspicion. I desired my wife to watch. I did not watch, because I am near sighted. This was past seven o'clock.

JOAN ODDY . In consequence of my husband desiring me to look out, I did. I saw two or three trusses of hay throwed out of Oliver, the carman's loft window. I heard them bounce down as trusses. I kept back a minute or two; I did not like to be seen in it. I stepped forward again. I saw two man cross the yard, each with a truss of straw or hay upon their heads. I saw the trusses, but not the mens faces. They were cut trusses.

WILLIAM BALL . I am carman to Mr. Gillchrist. My master has a stable in this yard. On last Monday evening I went to do up my horses. I had a candle in my hand, alight. It was half past seven o'clock.

Q. Did you see any horse and cart - A. Yes. I met the prisoner Lloyd. I knew him before. I met him at the corner of the yard; he had a truss of hay with him. He spoke to me, and I to him. After he had turned the corner of the yard I blew my candle out, and I watched him. I saw him put it into a cart on the top of Addle-hill. I saw the cart waiting there before that, and I had seen two men put trusses into the cart before that; they each of them put a truss into the cart.

Oliver's Defence. The rubbish that was disposed of was three bundles of hay hands.

Lloyd said nothing in his defence; called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Oliver called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

OLIVER, GUILTY , aged 27.

Judgment respited .

LLOYD, GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined Six Months in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121202-66

65. ANN LOCK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of November , four napkins, value 5 s. a pair of smallclothes, value 7 s. six papers of needles, value 1 s. a comb, value 1 s. two bone scoups, value 6 d. and twelve balls of cotton, value 6 d. one smelling-bottle and case, value 1 s. the property of Philip Phillips .

PHILIP PHILLIPS . I live at No. 6. King-street, Bartholomew close . I keep a wholesale toy warehouse and general merchants . The prisoner was a servant , and when she was quitting the service her mistress observed that her pockets looked bulky. Mrs. Phillips desired to know what she had got in her pockets. She observed she had lost a great many things lately. On the prisoner pulling a handkerchief or cap of her own out of her pocket, out fell some pewter toys. This led to a further enquiry. The prisoner then produced an ivory comb, some gilt rings, a smelling bottle and case, and some cotton balls, and when the officer came she produced the duplicates of the things she had pledged.

JOHN PEARCE . I am a pawnbroker, servant to Mr. Sadler. I produce two napkins, pawned on the the 2d of September, for one shilling, by the prisoner.

WILLIAM JAMES BURROWS . I am a pawnbroker in Barbican. The prisoner pledged with me two napkins and a pair of breeches. Mr. Phillips produced the duplicate to me that I gave the prisoner upon that pawn.

Prosecutor. All the things are mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I have a husband and five children; the eldest sailed with his father, and is now a prisoner in France. I have brought up a large family in great respect until the capture of my eldest son and my husband's separation.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY , aged 29.

Fined 1 s. and discharged.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18121202-67

66. ELIZABETH CROMER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of October , 5 s. 6 d. in monies numbered, and a 1 l. bank note , the property of John Thorn .

JOHN THORN . I a cheesemonger , Broadway, Blackfriars . On the 10th of October, about two in the afternoon, the prisoner came into my shop represented herself to be a cook in a gentleman's family at No. 50, Wood-street. She purchased cheese and butter to the amount of fourteen shillings and sixpence, and requested change for a two pound note. I laid the change for a two-pound note on the counter. The prisoner took it up. She said, my man was to go with her to get the two-pound note at her master's house, as she described it, and to take the butter and cheese. My man and the prisoner set off from my house. I expected my man to get the two-pound note. I saw them go out of my shop together. My man returned without the two-pound note.

Q. Was the woman brought back at the same time - A. No. I did not see the woman any more until I saw her at Hatton Garden office about six weeks after she got the money.

Q. Did you know her to be the woman that played you this trick - A. Yes. I knew her again. I have never got my money. My servants name is William Trip .

WILLIAM TRIP . Q. Do you recollect this woman coming to your shop - A. Yes. I was to carry the cheese and butter that she had bought, the prisoner said, to No. 50, in Wood-street, and I was to receive a two-pound note back. The prisoner left me on Ludgate-hill; she told me that she was to go to the grocers to buy some tea and sugar, and she said she would overtake us.

Q. Was there anybody with you then - A. Yes, a

butcher; he was to carry a piece of beef to No. 50. The prisoner never overtook us. I went to No. 50. I did not find the woman at all, nor did I get a two-pound note at No. 50.

JOHN LIMBRICK . I am an officer of Hatton Garden office. I apprehended the prisoner upon another charge.

Prisoner's Defence. I ask for mercy.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18121202-68

67. ROBERT BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22nd of November , six guineas, the property of Johan Gotlieb Schlicht , in the dwelling-house of Joseph Hellman .

JOHAN GOTLIEB SCHLICHT . I am a Prussian sailor . I lodge at Mr. Hellman's.

Q. When did you lose your money - A. On a Sunday afternoon. I went out and left six guineas in my chest, and when I came home in the evening I went up stairs, and found my chest broken open, and the six guineas were gone. I found them on the morning afterwards. When they took the prisoner he heaved them away in the sink.

MARY ANN HELLMAN . My husband's name is Joseph Hellman, he keeps a house, No 4, Totteridge-place, East Smithfield .

Q. Did Schlicht lodge at your house - A. He did, and Brown; they both lodged on the same floor, but not in the same room. They had lodged in my house a month. They came together. They both belonged to the same ship. On last Sunday fortnight, I went out of my dining-room a few minutes before three, and they were only three lodgers in the house, myself, my husband and two female servants. The prisoner was not there. At the time I left the dining-room I heard the catch of a lock. Brown had no clothes in the house; they were on board a ship. I left two sailors in the dining-room; they were smoking. The prisoner came in and went up stairs. I heard a knocking, and at the time I thought he had no business with a chest. I heard a lock pass and repass. I went out in the afternoon, and when I returned the other lodgers were at supper, but the prisoner. The other lodgers went to bed about eleven o'clock. I heard some one cry out my chest is broken open. I went up stairs, Schlicht said he had lost an old pocket handkerchief, which held six guineas as he said. I never saw the guineas. He said, Brown had done it. The next morning my husband got an officer to take Brown. My husband said to him, give up the money; I will not hurt you. He said, Mr. Hellman, I have got the money. He came home with my husband; a constable was sent for. The prisoner went into the kitchen to wash his hands. I saw the man take up three guineas. I did not hear it fall. Brown was washing at the sink, and no one else. The sink was too dark for any one to see it. The constable asked the girl to bring a light. She brought a light and the constable took it out.

GEORGE PATRIDGE. I went in the kitchen. I saw the prisoner, and the prosecutor standing along side of him. The prosecutor said, he had found two guineas in the sink. I said, fetch a light. I found one more in this pocket-book, and sixteen shillings and sixpence in this pocket-book. There is a protection belonging to Schlicht.

Q. to Prosecutor. Is that your protection - A. Yes. When I was on board a ship I had no pocketbook, I gave it to the prisoner to keep for me.

Q. Did you hear the money drop - A. Yes. As he was washing himself at the sink I heard something fall. I went to the sink and found two guineas. The constable called for a candle, and found one more. The prisoner said, do not be hard with me; I will give you your money back again.

Q. You cannot swear to the money, can you - A. No.

Prisoner's Defence. I said, Schlicht, you are a villain; you have spent your money, and you want to replenish yourself with my purse. I asked the officer that took me not to manacle my hands, and to take me through the streets like a felon, because I am not one. He manacled my hands, and I was taken through the streets like a felon. The money, I assure you, is my own. This woman that stands there, said, if I would run, no one would run after me. I said, was I to run from my own property. On Saturday, the prosecutor had four guineas in his chest. He has made a mistake. He thought it was six instead of four. I really think he wishes to do me out of my money, and nothing else.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121202-69

68. MARY ALLEN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of November , a coat, value 4 s. a cloak, value 5 s. a tea-spoon, value 1 s. one quilt, value 8 s. two shifts, value 6 s. a gown, value 5 s. a pawnbrokers ticket, value 1 d. and a 1 l. bank note , the property of Mary Denberry .

MARY DENBERRY . I go out washing and charing . The prisoner came to lodge with me on the 9th of November. I happened to go out. I lost my silver spoon. I took a young woman, out of place, as a lodger, and that evening I lost my coat and quilt. On Saturday I went out to Temble-bar, and when I came home I missed a one-pound note that I had for my rent. I also missed my silk cloak, petticoat, tablecloth, and two shifts. I told the prisoner, it lay with my lodgers. The prisoner persuaded me to send for a constable. She went for a constable, and had the young woman, out of place, searched, and at last my property was found on Mary Allen .

Q. What was found on the prisoner - A. The duplicate of my gown, bed quilt, and shifts. The one-pound note was not found on her, eleven shillings was.

JOHN BARNLEY . The prisoner fetched me. I searched the other young woman, at last I searched the prisoner. I found these pawnbroker's tickets.

- . I am a pawnbroker. I produce a quilt, pawned by the prisoner on the 29th of November.

Prosecutrix. That is my quilt.

Prisoner's Defence. It is my first offence.

GUILTY , aged 34.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121202-70

69. JUDA POLOCK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of October , a watch, value 5 l. a gold chain, value 1 l. a gold ring, value 1 l. a gold watch key, value 3 s. a silver snuff-box, value 1 l. and 12 s. in monies numbered, the property of Samuel Sampson , from his person .

SAMUEL SAMPSON . I am an auctioneer . I reside in Charles'-square, Hoxton. On the 15th of October I had been dining at the White Horse, Fetter-lane, with some friends. I had at that time taken too much wine, I certainly was intoxicated. A coach was sent for to take me home. It was a quarter past eight, within a few minutes. I asked the waiter what o'clock it was; I took hold of my watch chain, but I did not take my watch out. My intoxication was so great that I fell a sleep in the coach. When I got to my house I perfectly came to myself; almost as soon as I came into the parlour I looked for my snuff-box, I then found it was gone. About an hour and a half afterwards, I was going to bed, I found my watch was gone. The instant I left the Inn I asked the landlord for change of a one pound note; I lost twelve shillings out of that. I had in my right hand breeches pocket a gold ring; I missed that the next morning. It was a gold ring with an amethyst; it was tied with some string, it being too large for me.

Q. Have you any recollection of the prisoner Polock being the person who drove you home - A. I have not. The coach was drawn up to the gate of the Inn, in Fetter-lane. I walked through the passage with the landlord and the porter; I think I had hold of Mr. Richards' arm. The intoxication was not so much upon me as my sleep. I was in a stupor before I went into the coach. I remember asking the waiter what o'clock it was; he said, a quarter past eight, Sir. I took hold of my watch chain, I know, but I did not take it out. The landlord handed me to the coach, and the porter likewise; whether there were any other persons there, I do not recollect.

JAMES RICHARDS . Q. I believe you are a friend of the prosecutor's - A. Yes.

Q. Do you recollect the prosecutor's snuff-box - A. Perfectly well.

- STEWART. Q. Do you recollect giving the prosecutor change of a one pound note - A. I gave him nineteen shillings, he gave me a shilling out. I recollect his having his watch chain hanging out. Ten minutes before he went out he asked me what o'clock it was; he took hold of his watch chain, but did not take it out; I told him.

CHRISTOPHER KILBY . I was a servant to Polock. On the 16th of October I was upon the box, going out with the coach, Polock went out on the box with me; he pulled out of his pocket a watch, a snuff-box, and a ring, whether it was gold or metal, I do not know; the box was white, like a silver box, the watch was yellow; and the ring yellow; I saw a bit of thread or tape tied round the ring. He said, I lived upon the squares; he said, he would live as he could.

CHARLES LUCK . I live in Charles'-square, Hoxton. The coach stopped at my door, they knocked at my door. I was called upon by a gentleman, who lived in the neighbourhood, to accompany the gentleman in the coach; I went to the corner of the square; a light was brought from the adjoining house; I saw it was Mr. Sampson, who certainly appeared then indisposed. I desired the coachman to shut the coach door, get on his box, and follow me round the square, and I could direct him to the prosecutor's house. I knocked at the door to apprize Mrs. Sampson of his coming home, that he was unwell, and, I believe, the coach door was opened there. I said to the prisoner, you had better get in and assist the gentleman out of the coach. He said, he did not choose to do that, it was more proper for the friends or relations to do so.

Q. Do you know the coachman again - A. Yes, the prisoner is the coachman.

DANIEL BISHOP. I am an officer of Worship street Office. When the prisoner was in custody, he said he drove Mr. Sampson, but denied any knowledge of the robbery; and Kilby gave me a description of the ring.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing about the robbery.

ROBERT ROMAINE . I am a hackney coachman. I drive for myself. My number is 1286. I put up my coach in Curtain-road, Shoreditch. About four weeks ago Kilby was a waterman at Moorgate; he told me then, the wooden legged boy had made another noise; I said, about what; he said, the old affair. I said, what is the matter now. He said, he has been using me very ill, and threatened to strike me. I said, what of that. He said, I am determined to have satisfaction of him, he would go to the justice to morrow, and have him taken up. I said, what for. He said, he promised me two pound for a watch that I have seen in his hands. I said, if you had been an honest man you would have gone to the justice before. He then said, the reason that he did not go, because he lived with him; but since he had not given him the money that he had promised, he was determined to go. I said, you may depend upon it the Justice will have you both in jail, for you are as bad as he is.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Confined Two Years in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121202-71

70. THOMAS SIMMONDS was indicted for feloniously making an assault, on the 10th of October , upon William Delabertauche , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, six one pound Bank notes, his property .

SECOND COUNT for the like robbery, only stating the notes to be the property of William Amos .

WILLIAM DELABERTAUCHE . I am an upholsterer . I live at No. 4, Noel-street, Oxford Road.

Q. When did this happen - A. On the 10th of October, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I was passing the Green Man and Still, the corner of Swallow-street, in Oxford-road.

Q. What parish is that in - A. I believe it is in the parish of St. James's . I was coming along down Oxford-road . I saw two or three men quarrelling with Amos, a butcher . Green came up to Mr. Amos; he said he would fight Amos. Amos said, he would not fight. Green said, he would fight him.

Q. Green is a man that was tried here at the last Sessions and acquitted - A. He is.

Q. Green said he would fight him - A. Yes. Amos said he would not fight, he did not get his living by

fighting. Then Kenyon came up and squared; he said he would fight Amos then. There was Simmonds along with Kenyon and Green. Green came up again and knocked Amos down; he knocked him down two or three times. I saw some papers fall down, some papers fell out, of whose pockets I cannot say. I saw it fall on the ground; I picked it up; I had it in my hands two or three minutes. Kenyon and the prisoner at the bar came up to me. Kenyon said it was his partner's money. The prisoner came to the right hand side of me, he held my right arm with his right arm; he put his left arm round my neck, then he closed my right arm with his right arm. He gave Kenyon an umbrella; then Kenyon passed the umbrella at my eye, and swore if I would not give him the money he would knock my bloody eye out with the umbrella.

Q. You mean the Bank notes - A. Yes, the Bank notes. I said I would not give it him; then Kenyon took my hand and rushed it out with main force.

Q. Had the prisoner hold of you all this time - A. Yes, he kept hold of me all the time, until Kenyon got the money out of my hand, then they went. Then Mr. Leigh and a young man here traced after the prisoner Kenyon. They took Kenyon and brought him to Marlborough-street office. He was examined there and fully committed to take his trial.

Q. What became of the prisoner - A. He got away for that day.

Q. Are you sure he is the man - A. Yes, Sir, I can swear to him, because I shewed him to my father twenty times after that.

Mr. Alley. Why did you not take him, an old man like that. One man is convicted, there is a forty pound reward, there is another forty pound reward now - A. I do not want to convict any man.

Q. If that old man had been assisting in the robbery why did not you call your father - A. I would not go to take any man or hurt any man.

Q. You have been already here a witness against the others - A. I have.

Q. Upon the oath you have taken, if you knew this man assisted in robbing you why did not you call upon your father to assist in taking him - A. I would not take him.

Q. You could run as fast as he could - A. I dare say I could.

Q. If he was one of the men that assisted in robbing you, why did you not call for assistance - A. I do not like to hurt any man, I would not have done it at all.

Q. In the first place was this your money - A. No, it was not.

Q. There had been two men fighting, and some money dropped from some or other which you picked up - A. I did.

Q. And Kenyon claimed the money as belonging to his partner - A. He did. I refused to give it Kenyon I did not know at the time that Kenyon demanded it whose it was, untill Amos cried out that he was robbed.

Q. Did you in your evidence last Sessions say that the man at the bar assisted - A. I did not.

Q. Was not you sworn to give the whole evidence, and you never mentioned this old man, did you - A. No, I did not, because he was not at the bar.

Q. So now you give your evidence for the first time that this old man held you - A. There was two came up to me, and Kenyon demanded the money. Simmonds had the umbrella.

Q. I ask you whether you did not last Sessions say that Kenyon put the umbrella to your eye - A. He did. The prisoner said not a word to me about any thing; he never offered the least violence at all.

Q. Kenyon was taken on the spot, was not he - A. He was.

Q. This old man was there - A. I did not know where the old man was gone to.

Q. Now, you said this man did not do any thing to you - A. He never offered to knock my eyes out, he offered no violence to me at all.

WILLIAM AMOS . I am a butcher. On the 10th of October I was in Oxford-street. I always go to the Coffee-house on Saturday afternoon. The prisoner Kenyon and Green met me at the corner of Swallow-street. Kenyon came up to me along with the prisoner at the bar, damning and insulting me very much. The prisoner called Kenyon his nephew; he did not say anything to me. That is all I heard the prisoner say; Green proposed to fight me.

Q. You had no previous quarrel had you - A. No. I had seen the three before in Oxford-street in the middle of the summer.

Q. You are sure as to the person of the prisoner, are you - A. Yes.

Q. Green wanted to fight, you refused - A. Yes; after some little time I was knocked down two or three times. I tried to make my escape into the Coffee-house; they drawed me out by the waistband of my breeches, then I lost my money. I cried out that I was robbed of six one pound notes, how the notes were drawed out I cannot say; I missed the money when I was drawn out by the waistband of my breeches; the notes were three new ones and three dirty ones. After I got up they said two of them had gone over the way; I made after them, and when I had crossed the road I met them coming back with Kenyon.

Q. Kenyon was taken immediately with the property - A. Yes, the prisoner went by the name of Owen. I did not know his right name. A gentleman persuaded me to search Owen and Green. When Kenyon was brought back we could neither find Green nor Owen the prisoner.

Q. You could not find the other two. Are you sure that the man called Owen, now called Simmonds, was one of the three - A. Yes, that is the man; he had on a black wig then, and he has on a brown one now. I indicted Green and Kenyon last Sessions.

Mr. Alley. You do not mean to say that he took your money - A. No. I was knocked down and senseless, and in a bad state for two or three days. I have had the money back to travel with, it was all the money I had in the world.

ROBETT LEIGH. I am a servant. I was going up Oxford-street. I saw Kenyon, Green, and the prisoner, Simmonds, together. Green began to abuse Amos, and threatened to strike him with very abusive language. He offered to fight him from five pounds to a bottle of wine. Amos told him he would not fight; he went away directly. Kenyon came up and called back Green, and informed Green that he would fight him. Still Amos insisted that he would not fight. I saw the prisoner come up to Kenyon; the prisoner was

on the right hand side of Delabertouche, and Kenyon on the left. I heard the words d - n it, go it. The prosecutor was knocked down three or four times. Amos was. I saw Amos down upon his hands and knees, creeping into the Green Man and Still; he was pulled back by George Green, by the waistband of his breeches, I believe. I saw a roll of paper fall. Amos cried out, I am robbed. I saw Delabertouche pick the roll of paper up; Kenyon told him it was his partner's. The boy made answer, it is not, it is the butcher's, and I will keep it for him. The umbrella was passed out of the prisoner's hand into Kenyon's hand, and Kenyon told Delabertouche he would poke his bloody eye out if he did not give it up to him. He said he would not. Kenyon twisted his hand open, and I saw him take the papers.

Q. What was the prisoner about then - A. The prisoner was standing on the right hand side of Delabertouche. I was watching Kenyon. I cannot say whether the prisoner touched Delabertouche or not; I am sure he was one of them. The moment Kenyon had got the papers he made a start off, out of the crowd. I thought it very odd for him to leave his partner in that confusion. I directly followed him. He made up Balsover-street very fast, turned up Castle-street, into Portland-road; he mended his pace.

Q. What became of the other men - A. I never saw the prisoner until I was sent for to indentify him.

WILLIAM MOGGERIDGE . I am a wire drawer. I was going into Cavendish-square with a bundle. At the corner of Swallow-street there were three men quarreling with Amos; Green said he would knock his bloody eye out, and called him an informer. Green asked him to fight; Amos said he would not, he thought himself as good a man as him. Green struck Amos three or four times, and knocked him down. I saw some papers fall. Amos cried out he was robbed. Delabertouche picked the papers up. Kenyon ran across the street.

Q. Did you see who attacked Delabertouche - A. No, I did not; I ran after Kenyon.

GEORGE RUTHWIN . I, in company with Humphreys, apprehended the prisoner in Oxford-street. He wished to make it up. Humphreys told him he could not make up other people's business. On our taking him to the Office we found one hundred and forty pounds concealed at the bottom of his knees, and fifty-four pounds in his pocket-book; he was then in company with George Green.

CHARLES HUMPHREYS . I was in company with Ruthwin when we apprehended the prisoner. The money that was found about the prisoner we were ordered to keep in our possession.

Prisoner's Defence. George Green, Kenyon, and me, we came from King-street; we stopped at the Green Man and Still to have something to drink. I said to George Green, come. I went on. I looked back. I saw there was a quantity of people at the Green Man and Still; as for any fighting I never saw. I heard one man say there were six one pound notes stolen or picked up. Kenyon took the umbrella from George Green, and away I came. That is all I know. I want my money; I have nothing to support myself with.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 70.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121202-72

71. GEORGE ELLIS , EDWARD LLOYD , and ELIZABETH LINDSEY were indicted for feloniously making an assault, on the 23d of November , upon Henry Fitchberg , and taking from his person and against his will a watch, value 1 l. a chain, value 1 s. and a watch key, value 1 d. his property .

HENRY FITCHBERG . I am a Prussian sailor .

Q. When did you lose your watch - A. When I came on shore I went to look after a young man, they called him John. I went into a public-house, and then I fell in with this girl, Elizabeth Lindsey . I enquired for the long room. She said, she would shew me the long room. From there she took me into another house; then she told me to sit down by the fire; then these two men came down and dragged me about; the little man took the watch from me, and the big man said, if I was not quiet he would take a blanket and choak me. The big man told me to go to bed; I undressed myself and went to bed. I was frightened for fear they should kill me. I sprang out of bed and sang out murder; the big man pulled me by my shirt, and said, if I would not be quiet I should not see any more daylight.

Q. Did the woman lodge in the house - A. I do not know; it was the house the woman took me to. The little man took the watch from me and ran away with it; the big man held me all the while; he told me to be quiet.

Mr. Barry. What countryman are you - A. A Prussian. I came from Memmel.

Q. What time of night was this - A. When I went on shore it was ten o'clock. I first saw the girl in a public-house; I staid there about five or six minutes.

Q. Where had you been drinking before you went to this public-house - A. I had been in a public-house on the other side of the river. I drank two glasses of grog. I was neither drunk or sober.

Q. Had you any money about you - A. Yes, twenty-five shillings. I lost two three-shilling pieces. I do not know where I lost them.

Q. Where did you go to after you left the public-house - A. She took me to a house; I don't know the street. She took me up stairs into a room in another house; I was there a little while; the big man made me go to bed.

Q. Had you done any thing to the girl - A. No.

Q. Who broke the panes of glass - A. I did. When I jumped out he took my watch and ran away.

Q. He did not take your money - A. That I cannot say, I was so frightened.

Q. Upon the oath you have taken were not you beating and striking that woman - A. No. When I called the watchman I charged the little man with taking my watch. I never saw either of these men before in my life; they came directly in the house after me; and the moment they got into the house they got hold of me; the little man took my watch and ran away out of the house. The big man told me if I did not do what he pleased I never should see any more daylight.

JONATHAN BLANCHARD . On Monday, the 23d of November, I saw the prosecutor before he was robbed. I saw him about a quarter before five; he had his watch with him. At the Globe stairs he took out his watch. At half after eight he said he would go and see John; John was mate of the prosecutor's ship. He had been

drinking two or three glasses of grog with me.

DAVID SAUNDERS . I am inspector of the watch at the parish of Shadwell. I was going through the parish between twelve and one o'clock. I was speaking to one of our men, who is here present, and while I was speaking to him we heard a noise in the street. We went towards the noise. We observed two or three women standing in the street; we asked them who had made that noise; they said there had been a cry of murder, and the window was broken to pieces. We went in and went up stairs; on the first floor were Flitchberg, and the woman prisoner, and Ellis; the man that had lost his watch was crying; he said, that he had been very ill used, and the man that had beat him and robbed him of his watch was gone away; it was not Ellis, he said. I observed his head swelled; he had received a blow on the right side of his face. I asked Ellis had he struck Fitchberg; he said he had. Fitchberg said it was the man who had got his watch that had struck him. I asked him how the window got broken; he said, he broke the window in endeavouring to save his life. We took Ellis, the girl, and the prosecutor to the watchhouse. We locked the two men in the watch-house, and took the girl back to the house. Not being satisfied but that the watch might be safe somewhere we searched the room all over; we could not find it. We went into the adjoining room, that was open; in that room Lloyd was in bed with another girl. I asked Lloyd how long he had been there; he said he came in about ten o'clock. I told him to get up that we might search the bed; we searched the bed and all about; we found nothing. We took him to the watch-house. Fitchberg, when he saw Lloyd, said he was the man that had robbed him and beat him. Ellis said he was the man that beat Fitchberg, he had been beating the girl and threatened to cut her throat with a case knife; he shewed me the knife; he said, that was the reason he beat him. The girl had no appearance of having been beat; she complained of having been beat.

- BERRY. I am a patrol of Shadwell. On this night I was patroling Spring-street, about half-past twelve at night. I was in company with Saunders. I heard a noise in the street; we approached towards it. I went up stairs; I saw Ellis and Lindsey, with the prosecutor, in the room. I asked him how the windows came broken; he said, he tried to escape out of the window; Ellis would not let him; he pulled him back. We took them to the watchhouse. Ellis said he was the man that struck him; the prosecutor denied it, said it was a little man that struck him and took his watch. We detained the prosecutor and Ellis, and went back to the room to search it, and in the adjoining room there was a bed with Lloyd and a girl in it. At the watch-house Fitchberg said, Lloyd was the man that had taken his watch. Lloyd denied it.

Ellis said nothing in his defence, called two witnesses who gave him a good character.

Lloyd's Defence. I was in bed. I never heard any thing at all of it.

Elizabeth Lindsey 's Defence. I first came in company with the prosecutor at the Coach and Horses, in Old Gravel-lane. He asked me to shew him the long room; he said he had given an old woman six shillings to shew him the long room, and she had run away. He wanted to lock me in the room; I would not be locked in, and he struck me several times. I called for assistance. Ellis came in and struck him; then he ran to the window. I called out watch first. Ellis would not let him jump out of the window. His watch I never saw.

ELLIS, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 30.

LLOYD, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 21.

LINDSEY, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 19.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121202-73

72. ANN CLARKE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of November , two sheets, value 5 s. the property of Robert Cooper , in a lodging room .

ELIZABETH COOPER . My husband's name is Robert Cooper ; he is in the India warehouse. I live at No. 5, Union-place, Curtain-road . On the 11th of November I let the prisoner a front room at seven shillings a week, furnished. She came into the lodgings on the 11th; she quitted it on the 13th. I did not see her after the 13th until I saw her at the Office on the Tuesday following. I saw the sheets at the Office when the prisoner was there. She took the sheets on the 13th.

THOMAS MILLER . I am a pawnbroker. I produce two sheets. The prisoner pledged one on the 12th of November for two shillings, and the other on the 13th. I am sure the prisoner is the person.

Mrs. Cooper. They are my sheets.

JOHN KENNEDY . I had the prisoner in custody for robbing the lodgings of Mrs. Goudge. On the second examination Mrs. Cooper came and said that she had robbed her. The prisoner said she had pawned Mrs. Cooper's sheets, and left the duplicates in the tea-pot, in the closet of her room. I went there and found them.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in great distress.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121202-74

73. SARAH COOK and ANN VINCENT , alias DALE , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of November , a loaf of bread, value 1 s. 6 d. and a quarter of a pound of cheese, value 3 d. the property of Elizabeth Goring .

ELIZABETH GORING . I keep a chandler's-shop , No. 5, George-street, Brick-lane . On the 4th of November, between eight and nine o'clock in the evening, the two prisoners came into my shop. Cook came in first and asked for a loaf of bread, I took the loaf off the shelf; and she asked for a quarter of a pound of cheese; I cut the cheese off, and then Vincent came in; she said, Sarah, your mother wants you, she has been asking after you this half hour. Cook said, is she, I am coming. Vincent said, shall I take the loaf and cheese; Cook said, yes. Cook said, do you sell onions, she looked round the shop, and said, I see you do. They both ran away. I pursued Cook, and took her. I lost the loaf and cheese.

Cook's Defence. I went into the shop, she gave me the loaf and cheese. I had two shillings in my hand. I asked her to give me a halfpenny-worth of onions, and while she was serving me the onions, somebody came and took the loaf away, who it was, I know not.

Vincent's Defence. I never saw the girl before I was taken to the lock-up room.

COOK - GUILTY , aged 15.

VINCENT - GUILTY , aged 16.

Fined 1 s. and discharged.

First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18121202-75

74. ELIZABETH THOMPSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of August , one hundred and thirty-nine dozen of patten ties, value 40 l. the property of John Brand ; and REBECCA CROCKETT for feloniously receiving the said goods, she knowing them to have been stolen .

JOHN BRAND. I live in Birmingham. I am a patten tie-maker .

Q. Do you know the prisoner, Thompson - A. I never knew her until the morning of the 11th. On the 10th I left my warehouse completely locked up. I locked it myself about nine in the evening, and left it locked. On the morning I was alarmed by a young man coming to my house. I was informed that my warehouse was robbed. I went to the warehouse immediately. I found it broken open. I found the property stated in the indictment gone, and more. There were different goods gone, and a great many patten ties, finished and unfinished. There were about eighty pounds worth of gone. When I went to my warehouse I think the first person I saw was the prisoner, Thompson. She was at the warehouse door. She began a conversation with me; she said, how sorry she was such a circumstance occurred, and what a pity it was honest people could not sleep in their beds. She was a total stranger to me. I went to the police office, and gave information, and a week afterwards I heard that she had gone to London. I wrote to a Mr. Davis, and as soon as I received his letter I came to London. I went to Mr. Davis, and from there to Mr. Felix, a patten-maker, Wild-street, Lincoln's-inn-fields. Mr. Felix was in possession of a considerable quantity of patten ties, that I had missed out of my warehouse. I found there about half the patten ties that I had missed. It turned out that he had them from Mr. Mendes. I then went to Mr. Mendes. He lives in the Borough-road. He is an army accoutrement maker. In consequence of what Mendes told me, I went to Richard Percy , a patten-maker, St. John-street, Clerkenwell, and then I went to Mr. Saunders, in Grafton-street, Soho, and from there to Mr. Cotterell, patten-maker, Holborn. Mr. Saunders said he had purchased them of Mrs. Crocket. I found she was the daughter of Thompson.

Q. When Mrs. Thompson said, what a pity it was honest people could not sleep in their beds, did she say how the robbery was effected - A. No further than she said she put her head out of the window. She lives opposite of my warehouse, in Wharf-street, Birmingham, and when she put her head out of the window she heard a voice that damned her, and bid her to put her head in. She said, she saw two men opposite the warehouse, who pretended to be drunk, who damned her, and told her to put her head into the window again.

MR. ROGERS. I am a sadler. I live in the Strand, at the front of Exeter change. On the 27th of August, the prisoner, Thompson, came to my house. Before that, Crocket brought some patten ties as a sample. Thompson came to my house two days afterwards, and Mendes came to my house to purchase the ties. Mrs. Thompson asked Mendes twenty pounds for the ties. Mendes bid her eighteen pounds. She agreed that he should have them. I assisted Mrs. Thompson in carrying the patten ties to Mendes; ninety-six dozen I believe, and Mendes paid Mrs. Thompson for them. Mrs. Thompson said, they were of her own manufacture, she lived at Birmingham, and the reason she wanted to sell them she had a bill to pay, and she would rather suffer some loss than have her credit exposed.

DAVID MENDES. I am an accoutrement-maker, No. 15, Borough-road.

Q. Do you know Thompson - A. I saw her four months ago; she was sent for at Mr. Rogers's for me to see her. Mrs. Crocket was with Thompson at the same time. Mr. Rogers brought me a parcel of patten ties for me to sell for her, three days before I saw her. I then took the samples of them, and shewed them to the regular shops in the trade. I am in the habit of selling leather for the same thing. When the sample was left with me I went to Mr. Davis in Houndsditch, and left a sample. I saw Mrs. Thompson at Mr. Rogers's, two days after. I had the sample of goods. I passed Mr. Rogers's. I called in Mrs. Thompson was sent for; than another sample was given me and the price.

Q. What was the price - A. Twenty pounds for an hundred dozen. I told them, I could not get a customer for them directly, but, I said, if I could get a pound or two by them I would buy them. I offered eighteen pounds for the goods. They agreed to take the eighteen pounds. I was to give Mr. Rogers ten shillings, and Mrs. Crocket was to give the same. Rogers and Thompson agreed to bring the goods to my house on the Friday, and the same day they brought the goods to my house. I paid for them within two pounds. I paid them the remainder afterwards. Crocket was with Thompson when the goods were brought. I sold the whole parcel to Mr. Felix.

Q. What quantity was delivered to you - A. Ninety seven dozen and a half.

Q. Did you ask either of them how they came by them - A. No; I dealt never in any thing but what is honest. Mrs. Thompson told me that she was the maker of them, that she lived at Birmingham; as such she brought them up to make up a bill.

PETER FELIX . I am a patten-maker, No. 70, Wild-street, Lincolns-inn-field. Mrs. Rogers came to my house on the 24th of August; she brought five or six dozen patten ties as a sample of a larger quantity. I at last bought them of David Mendes . I gave him four and sixpence a dozen for ninety dozen. I delivered them up to Hancock the officer.

RICHARD PERCY. I am a patten-maker, No. 79, St. John-street. The prisoner, Crocket, came to me alone, on the 28th or 29th of August. She brought me four dozen patten ties. She said they came from Birmingham, or they belonged to a person in Birmingham; they wanted money, and they must be sold. I bought four dozen, at four shillings a dozen. She brought a gross more. I gave her three shillings and eightpence for them. I bought twenty-eight dozen in the whole of Mrs. Crocket.

HENRY COTTERILL . I am a patten-maker, No. 25, Holborn-hill. About the latter end of August, the prisoner, Crocket, came to my house alone; she asked me to buy patten ties of her. What she

brought was black bound. I wanted some red bound. She went away, and came again in about an hour. Mrs. Thompson was with her. They then shewed me some red bound. I bought five dozen. I paid the eldest prisoner; she seemed the most concerned. I paid a one-pound note for four dozen patten ties. The elder prisoner told me she was in that line; she lived in Birmingham. I mentioned Mr. Brand's name to her; she said, she knew him very well. About three weeks afterwards, Hancock, the officer, came, and the next morning I took the ties to the office.

THOMAS SAUNDERS. I am a patten-maker, in Grafton-street. The prisoner, Crocket, came to my house sometime in August; she came with her mother. They brought me some patten ties. On the next day I bought two dozen of Crocket. I gave eleven shillings for them. I used a part, and the rest I gave to Hancock, the officer.

JAMES HANCOCK . I apprehended Crocket on the 12th of September, in Brydges-street, Covent-gardon, at the sign of the Two Spies. I told Crocket what I apprehended her for; she said, she had come to the public-house on purpose, she heard that I had been after her. I produce the patten ties that I had of Mr. Saunders, and these are what were left at Mr. Cotterill's.

JOHN LIMBRIC . I am an officer. I produce some patten ties that I received of Mr. Felix, and these are what I received from Mr. Herbert. Thompson was brought up to town by a Birmingham officer. Mrs. Crocket lives in Benjamin-street.

Prosecutor. I have seen all the patten ties that are produced; they are my property.

Q. Did you ever see Crocket at Birmingham - A. Thompson, the mother, lived opposite of my warehouse in Wharf-street.

Thompson's Defence. Mr. Brand said, I was the first person that he saw; there were a great con- course of people there. Mr. Brand came in amongst them; he asked what was the matter. I told him. It was some time after Mr. Brand was robbed that I bought these patten ties of Mr. Baylis. I had removed from that house when I bought these ties, and I told the officer in Birmingham who I sold them to. I am as innocent as a child unborn. I never knew, they were Mr. Brand's ties, and my daughter is as innocent as a child unborn in regard of thinking they were stolen, as well as myself.

Crocket was not put on her defence.

THOMPSON, GUILTY , aged 42.

Transported for Seven Years .

CROCKET, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18121202-76

75. JOHN ROWE was indicted for that he, on the first of November , one sheep, value 2 l. the property of Chetwood Jones , feloniously did kill with intent to steal the carcase of the said sheep .

HENRY LAWFORD. I am a carpenter; I live at Holloway. On the 1st of November I went to Finchley to see my father and my friends. I was in company with James Benyon , George Norfolk , and James Norfolk . This was on the 1st of November, about twelve o'clock at noon. When we saw the prisoner we saw him in the field. There was a great disturbance, that the dogs had killed the sheep. We went out to shoot the dogs. We went down to Mr. Jones's field. James Benyon discharged his piece at a blackbird, and as soon as the gun was fired at the blackbird I saw the prisoner, John Rowe , jump over the hedge from a sheep of Mr. Jones's. His hands were covered with blood up to his wrist. As soon as we examined the sheep we ran after him. Its throat was cut, and life was hardly out. It was quite warm, bleeding fresh, the entrails were out of it, and laying down by it, at the time that we saw it.

Q. Had the sheep been cut open - A. Yes, it was, and we pursued the man directly. As soon as he saw us he ran away. We bid him stop. He ran away; he would not stop. We told him we would shoot him if he did not stop. He went into the wood, and we lost sight of him. Then I sent my brother home to alarm the neighbourhood. A great many people surrounded the wood until almost night. We could not find him. Then we went over to Mr. Jones, and gave a description of the man, and Mr. Jones advertised the man. He was taken on Saturday, the 8th of November. I am sure the prisoner is the man, and I knew it was Mr. Jones's sheep by the mark.

JAMES BENYON . I live at Finchley. I was with Henry Lawford on the 1st of November. I saw the prisoner rise up from the sheep, and jump over the hedge. I am certain the prisoner is the man.

GEORGE NORFOLK . I was with my brother. There four of us, Henry Lawford , James Benyon , and James Norfolk . I saw the prisoner rise up from the sheep and come over the hedge. I am quite positive he is the man.

JAMES NORFOLK . I was with my brother. I saw the prisoner come up from the hedge. I am sure the prisoner is the man.

GEORGE BANKS . I am shepherd to Mr. Jones. The sheep was C. I. His name is Chetwood Jones. I saw the sheep that the man had killed; it had my master's mark. The throat was cut across, and the entrails were laying out by the side of it. The field was four fields off my house. We had eight sheep in that field. We had another flock. I put some in one field, and some in another. I parted them.

Q. Did you know anything of this man - A. No.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel; called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 30.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121202-77

76. ISAAC JAVENS was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Nathaniel Nathan and Moses Haines , about the hour of eleven in the forenoon, on the 13th of November , the said Moses Haines then in the dwelling-house being, and stealing therein seven pokers, value 7 s. a pair of tongs, value 1 s. a double skewer, value 1 s. a tinman's stake, value 5 s. and a piece of brass, value 2 s. the property of James Hope .

JAMES HOPE . I am a lock-smith and bell-hanger . On the 13th of November I lost all the things in the indictment. They were taken out of my shop, 63, Marybone-lane . I had been out, taking two locks

home. I left the shop door locked, and left the key in a secret place, where I always do. When I came back the door was on the latch, and the key in the door, and these things were gone. Joseph Cooper , the officer, found the property.

JOSEPH COOPOR . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner. On Sunday, the 15th of November, he told me he had sold the tinman's stake, the brass, and the screw-wrench, to Mr. Wright for five shillings, and the six pokers, the double skewer, and a pair of tongs, to Mrs. Parker, the broker. I asked him how he got into the premises. He told me he put his arm in the hole over the door, opened it, and let himself in. There are holes over the door to let light into the passage and stair-case.

WILLIAM WRIGHT . I brought the brass, the tinman's stake, and the screw-driver of the prisoner.

MARY PARKER . I bought the tongs and the pokers of the prisoner.

Prosecutor. They are my property.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been out of work some time. I was in distress.

GUILTY, aged 43,

Of stealing, but not of breaking and entering the dwelling-house .

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121202-78

77. WILLIAM WOOD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of November , a bearing-rein, value 5 s. a kicking-strap, value 7 s. and an iron screw-wrench, value 2 s. the property of Charles Kent , privately in his coach-house .

JOHN FODDER . I live with Mr. Charles Kent , at Fulham. On the 10th of November, I shut the coach-house door, but I did not fasten it. I can only prove the property. I had only left the coach-house about ten minutes.

GEORGE TIBBOTT . I am a horse-patrol, belonging to Bow-street. On the 10th of November, in the morning, between nine and ten, I was passing through Fulham on my way to Putney. I saw the screw-wrench sticking out of his pocket. I challenged him with thieving it. He promised to take it back to where he had taken it. He said he had found it. Some conversation ensued between the prisoner and a gentleman. The prisoner went on his way. I hailed him back. I said, Wood, I have not done with you yet, and on searching him I found the bearing-rein and kicking-strap buttoned up under his coat. I took him to Bow-street. He confessed to me that he had taken them from Mr. Kent's coach-house. This is the property.

Fodder. The kicking-strap, bearing-rein, and screw-wrench, are my master's property. The kicking-strap is new; it is worth seven shillings.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent, please your honour.

GUILTY, aged 70,

Of stealing, but not privately in the coach-house .

Confined Two Years in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121202-79

78. JAMES FISHER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of November , a sack, value 2 s. and thirty pounds weight of potatoes, value 2 s. 6 d. the property of Charles-Frederick Townsend , and William Windmell .

CHARLES FREDERICK TOWNSEND . I am a potatoe merchant . I live in Paternoster-row, Spitalfields . William Windmell is my partner. I lost a sack I know. I could not miss the potatoes. I did not know they were gone until the prisoner was stopped. The prisoner lived with me six years; his character was fair.

DANIEL BISHOP. I am an officer. On the 18th of November, I was passing through Spitalfields. I saw the prisoner coming from Mr. Townsend's yard. I followed him, and asked him what he was carrying. He said, potatoes. I took him to Mr. Townsend's accompting-house, and there he was recognised as Mr. Townsend and Mr. Windmell's carman. The sack had their name on it. I saw him come out of their yard. He crossed the yard into a court.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121202-80

79. WILLIAM LITTLE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of November , a fowl, value 18 d. the property of William John Arabin , esquire .

WILLIAM JOHN ARABIN , Esq. Q. I believe you are a Lieutenant-General in his Majesty's service - A. Yes. I reside at Drayton.

Q. Do you recollect that one of your fowls was lost - A. I had information that such a fowl was gone. I got a search warrant, and took the cook with me to the prisoner's house. The fowl was missing on the Saturday, and on the Tuesday I went to the prisoner's house; I saw a fowl there which turned out to be mine.

Q. How long have you known the prisoner - A. I knew him when a young man. I have nothing to say against him.

Q. Did you find the prisoner at home - A. No; I knew he was in the barn. I saw his wife. I saw the fowl alive in the house.

SARAH GIBBINS. I am cook to General Arabin. I have the care of the fowls. I knew this fowl in particular. I used to feed it twice a day. I missed it on the Thursday or Friday, and it was on the Wednesday in the next week that I saw it in the prisoner's house. It was walking about the kitchen floor. I am quite certain it was General Arabin 's fowl. After I had been to Little's house he came to me. He asked me what I had been down to his house for. I told him about some ducks. He said, does that fowl belong to you. I said, yes. He said, it might be the General's for ought he knew, but a boy had given it him.

Q. Was not the prisoner in Mr. Betts's service, close to Mr. Arabin's house - A. Yes; I have seen him there.

THOMAS WYATT . I am a constable of West Drayton. I went with a warrant to the prisoner's house. I saw the fowl in the kitchen. I took it to General Arabin 's house. The cook said it was their fowl. I knew the prisoner was at work at Mr.

Betts's. I have known him eleven or twelve years. I heard a good character of him by Dr. Tomkins, and his general character is an honest man. I saw Little in about two or three days after. He said, the fowl was given to him by a boy. I did not apprehend him until the 20th.

JAMES GOODWIN . I am servant to General Arabin . I am sure the fowl is General Arabin 's fowl.

Prisoner's Defence. I was returning home from my work, a lady came along; he said, I have picked up a chicken: he said, he would give it to me if I was a mind to have it. On the Wednesday following General Arabin came to my house, and enquired for some ducks. The officer of the parish came and took the fowl away. I said, if it is General Arabin 's, he is welcome to it. After that, Mr. Wyatt took me to Dr. Perry. He was not at home, and then I went to my work. On the Sunday following he took me to General Arabin's house. He committed me to prison, and there I have been ever since.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18121202-81

80. ANDREW SWANSON and GEORGE PARROTT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of November , thirty pounds weight of rope, value 1 l. the property of Alexander Sivewright , Benjamin Linthorn , and James Hare Joliffe .

CHARLES TROTT . I am a labouring man. On Wednesday morning, about a month ago, Parrott and I went down to Blackwall to get some work, and coming along back by the canal, Parrott said, he would go on board a ship to see Swanson. He went on board the Fame. The Fame was in the canal. Parrott went on board, and I stepped on shore.

Q. Did you know what he was going on board for - A. No, I did not. He called me on board. Swanson was on the half deck.

Q. Did Swanson belong to the Fame - A. He was ship-keeper. Parrott told me that he had got some old rope. He asked me to lend him a hand to get it on shore. I went with him, and Swanson went under the half deck at the same time.

Q. Did Swanson see this - A. Yes. We both went on shore with the rope.

Q. How much rope was there - A. I do not know. It weighed more than a quarter of a hundred. Some of the rope had been worn, and some of it had not been worn much, and as we were going along Mr. Walker stopped us in Poplar. He took us both to the office.

THOMAS WALKER. I am a Thames police officer. On Wednesday, the 11th of November, I saw Parrott; I stopped them both. It was between eight and nine in the morning. I asked where they came from with the rope. They said, from a ship in the canal. I took Trott down with me, and he pointed out the ship. This is the rope; it is very useful rope. When I got to the Fame, Swanson said, he was ship-keeper. I asked him, if he had sent any rope along with these men. He said, yes; he found it is the fore peak among with some wood.

ALEXANDER SIVEWRIGHT . I command the Fame. Swanson was ship-keeper. The ship was for sale. I never gave Swanson leave to have any old rope.

Swanson's Defence. I was left in charge of the ship. When I came to the police office, Trott told the magistrate I give him this rope, and when Parrott was put to the bar, he said, I gave them both the rope. He committed us both for trial.

Parrott said nothing in his defence.

SWANSON, GUILTY , aged 35.

PARROTT, GUILTY , aged 54.

Judgement respited .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18121202-82

81. WILLIAM LONG was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of November , one hundred and twenty halfpence, value 5 s. the property of George Payne .

GEORGE PAYNE . I am a grocer , in Charles-street, Marybone . On the 4th of November, about four in the afternoon, the prisoner came into the shop, and enquired the price of treacle. I told him. He went away. There was a five shilling paper of halfpence on the counter. A woman was standing next to where the halfpence were. In about three minutes the prisoner returned into the shop again. He asked for an ounce of barley-sugar. My man served him. I suspected and watched him. He went out of the shop, and I missed the halfpence. I desired my man to go after him, saying, that he had taken the paper of halfpence. My man went after him and brought him back. The halfpence were found upon him.

- ANTHONY. In consequence of what my master told me I went after the prisoner. I overtook him. I brought him back to the shop. I desired him to take the halfpence out of his pocket. He produced them. These are them. They are my master's property.

Prisoner's Defence. My father sent me to get some money. I have worked for Mr. Gallaway and my father all my life.

GUILTY , aged 14.

Judgement respited

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18121202-83

82. WILLIAM SHEPHERD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of November , a feather-bed, value 8 l. a pillow case, value 2 s. a blanket, value 6 s. and a pair of sheets, value 12 s. the property of Adam Reed , in a lodging room .

ADAM REED . I live at No. 8, Broad-street, Carnaby-market .

Q. Do you let lodgings - A. Yes. I let the prisoner a back garret, on the 31st of October, furnished. On the 30th of October, the prisoner was making a bargain with my wife for a lodging. He wished me to go along with him to enquire his character. I told him it was not convenient, I was going to have my dinner. The next day he came in the character of a groom. I enquired his character. He came into the lodgings on Saturday night. He came and enquired of me whether or no he might come. I told him, I was not satisfied with his

character. He said he should pay me early on Monday morning. He came in about nine or ten o'clock. On the next day the servant found all the things gone, bed bolster, blanket, and sheets, that were on the bed. On November the 1st, a lodger of mine picked up a duplicate of a waistcoat on the stairs. I went to the pawnbroker and told him to stop the person that came for the waistcoat.

Q. Are you sure he is the man - A. I am. There was no Colonel Green to be found.

SARAH - . I am servant to Mr. Reed. The prisoner came in on the Saturday night. I lit him up stairs. The next morning the things were missed. No one had been there but this man. The prisoner said, I shall not trouble you another night.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of the charge. I did not take the things, nor did I say I should not trouble her another night.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121202-84

83. ELIZABETH ALLEN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of November , one hundred and twenty halfpence, value 5 s. the property of John Shirley .

SUSANNAH SHIRLEY. My husband's name is John Shirley; he lives in Hoxton. I lost these halfpence on the 16th of November, at the corner of Saunder's gardens, Kingsland-road . I went to buy some herrings of the prisoner. My halfpence were tied up in paper, and while I was picking my herrings out I laid the five shilling paper of halfpence on the prisoner's stall. I went away, and forgot them. I had not gone far before I returned for them, and the prisoner was gone from the stall. She returned. I asked her whether she had seen the halfpence. She said, no, she knew nothing of them. She went into her room, and asked me to get something to drink. She ran away. This woman brought her back, and when she came back she had a great quantity of halfpence in her pocket, loose. She had thrown the paper away, and the string. A little boy brought it to me. When I felt her pockets she had a very few halfpence before, and when I took her she had six shillings and sixpence in her pocket.

HANNAH PURCELL. On my seeing a mob, I stepped up. I heard the prosecutrix accusing her of having the halfpence. She came and took her herrings in. I ran after the prisoner, and put my head in her door. I saw her take something out of a dark cupboard. She then went up to the street where she sat. I ran after her, and brought her back. I told her, if she had the halfpence to give them to the woman. She said, she would see her d - d first; if she had them she would keep them.

WILLIAM WILSON . I am an officer. On the 16th, I took the prisoner into custody. I produce six shillings and sixpence I found in her pocket. She said she could account for one shilling and nine-pence. I asked her how she came by this money. She would not tell me.

Prisoner's Defence. I never said what Hannah Purcell said. I said, she may say what she pleases. I sold an hundred herrings; I gave five shillings for them.

GUILTY , aged 66.

Confined Fourteen Days in Newgate , and whipped in Jail .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121202-85

84. JOSEPH BLAKE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of September , a saw, value 5 s. the property of Edward Kelly .

EDWARD KELLY. I am a brick-maker , at Kensington . On the evening of the 26th of September, I put my tools into an out-house when I had done work, and the saw also. I looked the out-house door with a padlock; the next morning I found the staple off the door. The prisoner worked for me. I found the saw in the prisoner's room.

JAMES STONE . I am an officer. I found this saw in the prisoner's room. The prosecutor described the saw. He said, there were two teeth broke out in the middle, and a piece was broke out of the handle, so I found it.

Prosecutor. It is my saw.

Prisoner's Defence. I am a brick-moulder. A fellow lodger of mine, Richard May, came home, and said he had bought a saw. It cost five shillings. His father is a brother-moulder. He desired me to take care of it. A little while after he desired me to lend him a trifle upon it. I have endeavoured to maintain myself by hard labour. I have made the strictest search for Richard May, and have not been able to find him. I am innocent, let the result be what it may.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Judgment respited .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121202-86

85. WILLIAM COX was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of November , two model cocks, value 10 s. and two pounds weight of pot metal, value 2 s. the property of Thomas Allen , George Cropley Allen , and Thomas Allen .

GEORGE CROPLEY ALLEN. I am a founder in Banner-street, St. Lukes. I lost the metal on the 27th of this month. The prisoner was in my employ. My partners names are Thomas Allen , the elder and younger.

ALICE SALMON . I keep a iron shop, in Golden-lane. On the 27th of November, a little after one, the prisoner came to my shop; he offered two pattern cocks for sale, and another piece of metal. I do not know what it is called. My son was in the shop. He told me privately that it was not proper for me to buy them. I told the man that I had not change to pay him. I told my son to go out for change. He went to Mr. Barrett, the founder, and told him the circumstance. When my son returned, he told me that Mr. Barrett recommended me to buy the metal, and to put off paying the man. On my son's return the prisoner was gone. He told me he would return in half an hour for the money. I then sent my son to several founders, and found it to be the property of Messrs. Allen. Mr. Allen came to my house with an officer, but the prisoner did

not return for the money. The officer asked me to go to Mr. Allen's. I went, and the prisoner was called I am sure he is the same person. This is the property.

Mr. Allen. These two cocks are pattern cocks, what we mould from.

Prisoner's Defence. I did it out of distress. I have one child, and my wife was ready to lay in with another.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Judgment respited .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121202-87

86. JOHN CURRAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of November , a wooden wine pipe, value 1 l. the property of Joseph Collier .

JOSEPH COLLIER . I am a cooper , No. 5, Little Ayliffe-street, Goodmans-fields . On the 28th of November, between three and four in the afternoon, when I went out of my house, a rum puncheon and a port pipe were standing at my door. I returned in about ten minutes, I saw the prisoner rolling the pipe away. I immediately followed him; I asked him where he was going to roll this pipe. He said, down to the docks. I then said who gave you authority to roll it there. He said, a gentleman had told him to take it from there, and to roll it down to the Docks. I asked him where the puncheon was that was gone. He said, he did not know any thing about the puncheon. In the mean time the headborough crossed the way; he said, Collier, are you going to put up with this. I said, no, it is very lucky you are come up. I then said to the prisoner, if you please to roll it up to where you took it from. He said, he would be d - d, if he did. I then gave him in charge of the officer.

GEORGE COLLIER . I was passing by at the time. I saw the prisoner rolling the pipe from the door.

Q. You did not see the puncheon go, did you - A. I did not.

Prisoner's Defence. I met a gentleman. He asked me if I wanted a job; I said, I did. He replied, go to Ayliffe-street, you will see a pipe; take the pipe to the London Docks. I was innocently brought into it.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined Fourteen Days in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121202-88

87. SAMUEL ABRAHAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of November , a cask of butter, value 3 l. the property of Alexander Leslie .

ALEXANDER LESLIE . I live at Mount-terrace, Whitechapel-road. I am a merchant . In the middle of last month I had thirteen casks of butter upon the wharf. I wrote a direction, and put it upon two casks. I called on the Monday morning after and the clerk told me one of them had been stolen. I left them at Hoare's wharf, Hermitage-bridge .

JOSEPH POWIS . On November the 21st, in the evening, I stopped the prisoner carrying this firkin of butter, in Rosemary-branch-alley. I asked him what he had got there. I am an officer. He told me it was a cask of olives, he was taking it to Duke's-place. I took it into a shop, and borrowed a hammer. I knocked the hoops off, to see what it was. He then said, it might be other pickles. On finding it to be butter, I asked him where he brought it from, or how he got it. He would not give me any account whatever. I told him I must take him in custody. He resisted. I took him in custody by force. On the head of this cask was these directions; two pieces fastoned by three tacks. I made enquiries, and found it belonged to Mr. Leslie. This is the cask.

- . I am a clerk at Hoare's wharf. This is one of the firkins that we had on our wharf. We sent the casks to Botolph wharf about three o'clock in the afternoon.

ROBERT BEVAN . I am a carman. I took these casks to Botolph wharf. I lost one at the bottom of Crutched friars, in the broad way; that is where I supposed I missed it. I believe this to be the cask.

Prosecutor. This is my cask. This is one of the two that I wrote directions, and put it on the cask. A. L. is on the cask; an ink mark, with a brush.

Prisoner's Defence. I get my living by portering. A man asked me to carry it for him to Duke's-place. I have witnesses that saw him put it on my shoulder. They are not here now. They would be here next sessions, that is the reason I wished to put my trial off.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121202-89

88. HENRY HAWKINS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of November , a leg of mutton, value 4 s. the property of John Toplis .

THERESA TOPLIS . My husband's name is John Toplis . He is a surgeon and apothecary , No. 2, Queens-row, Pimlico . I lost the leg of mutton between one two o'clock on Sunday morning, the 15th of November. The watchman awoke us. He detected the man taking it out of the area.

GEORGE GOLD . I am a watchman. I was going by Mr. Toplis's. I rested myself by the pastry-cooks. I saw a person come up to Mr. Toplis's area, and made a stop. It is an area, barred over. I heard a breaking like glass. I went into the middle of the road. I saw the prisoner draw a leg of mutton out from between the bars. The prisoner ran away. I called to him to stop. He threw the leg of mutton up against the next house. I called out stop thief, I apprehended him. He had this whip with a butcher's hook to it, with which he drawed it out.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming along, the watchman stopped me. I had no leg of mutton about me.

GUILTY , aged 42.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121202-90

89. JAMES HAYWOOD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of November , two flat irons, value 3 s. and an handkerchief, value 6 d. the property of John Bailey .

MRS. BAILEY. My husband's name is John Bailey; he is a soldier in the Royal Artillery .

Q. When did you lose your flat irons and handkerchief - A. On the 9th of November. I was in Lisson-green-road, I am an milk woman. I went into a public-house to serve the milk. I put the handkerchief down; in that handkerchief was two flat irons. I asked for half a pint of beer. I went into the tap-room to warm it, and when I returned into the passage the bundle was gone.

THOMAS YATES . I am a painter. I was having a pint of beer while this man was there. When the prosecutrix was warming her beer this man went out; he came back again. They accused him of it. He denied it. I saw him pull the handkerchief out of his breeches pocket; he heaved the irons away. This is the handkerchief.

WILLIAM COLTON . I am a waiter in the public-house, I found the irons about an hundred yards off the house, near a bunch of stinging nettles. I went out and found them. The prisoner went out and returned. I was sure he had not gone far. These are the irons.

Prosecutrix. The handkerchief and irons are mine.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Judgement respited .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121202-91

90. JAMES GOLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of November , one hundred and twenty halfpence , the property of John Atkinson .

JOHN ATKINSON . I am an oilman , No. 302, Oxford-street . On the 5th of November, the prisoner came into the shop for a trifling article. He went out, and returned in two or three minutes with a little boy. They then applied for another trifling article. They said it was not quite enough, they wished to have a little more.

Q. What was it they wanted - A. A salt pickle. On my rising to the drawer a second time, I observed the prisoner go round to the end of the counter, where he had no business to have been. I went towards him. He had got my desk open, and took a five shilling paper of halfpence out. As soon as he observed me come towards him he ran out of the door. I followed him a few yards, and brought him back to the door, and took the five shilling paper of halfpence from him. These are them; they are mine. The other boy ran away.

GUILTY , aged 12.

Judgement respited .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121202-92

91. ANN EBATT , alias IBBOTT , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of June , a shift, value 4 s. the property of Anthony Allom .

ANTHONY ALLOM . I am a gardener . I live in Kentish Town. My wife is a laundress. The prisoner worked for me at the time the shift was lost. The shift was taken away on the 4th or 5th of June, and pawned on the 6th in the prisoner's name.

WILLIAM ANDERSON. I am a pawnbroker. On the 6th of June last, I took in a shift of the prisoner. This is the shift.

GEORGE COLLINGWOOD. I apprehended the prisoner. On her I found this duplicate of a shift.

Q. to Mr. Anderson. Is that your duplicate - A. It is.

Prosecutor. The shift is mine.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence, nor called any witnesses to her character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121202-93

92. ANN EBATT, alias IBBOTT , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 31st of October , a shift, value 4 s. the property of Adam Richardson .

MRS. RICHARDSON. I am a laundress, I employed the prisoner as an ironer . She had worked for me about six months. I lost the shift from my house on the 26th of October. I saw the shift on the prisoner's person on the 24th of November.

WILLIAM READ . I am an officer. I produce the shift. I made her pull it off her back at Hatton Garden office.

Prosecutrix. This is the shift. The mark is picked out. I am certain it is the shift.

GUILTY , aged 42.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121202-94

93. MARTHA NAGLE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of November , a coat, value 2 s. two waistcoats, value 2 s. a pair of pantaloons, value 10 s. a pair of half-boots, value 5 s. the property of Samuel Whiterow : and PHOEBE JACKSON , for feloniously receiving the said goods she well knowing them to have been stolen .

SAMUEL WHITEROW . I am a revenue officer . I live at No. 10, King-street, in the Borough. On the 12th of November, I had been to Astley's Pavillion, Newcastle-street. I had these things on me as articles of my dress at Astley's Pavillion. After he had finished I picked up with Martha Nagle , about eleven o'clock. She asked me if I would give her any thing to drink. I said, yes. She took me into the Black Dog, Wych-street, and after I had treated her she asked me to go home with her to No. 45, Charles-street, Drury-lane. We went into a two pair back room.

Q. Was any other person in the room besides your two selves - A. Yes, another girl went home with me at the time I picked her up. She is not here.

Q. How came you to lose your clothes - A. I went to bed first, and she undressed herself and came in too. About a quarter of an hour after she got up, and went down stairs, and returned again in about a quarter of an hour.

Q. Did the other girl leave you when you went to bed - A. She said, she had no bed to sleep in; this girl offered her part of the bed. They had a dispute, and I saw her go out of the room. She had nothing with her. I missed my clothes about six o'clock in the morning. She awoke me between twelve and one, and said my clothes were gone. The door at that time was bolted. I bolted the door after she had gone out of the room and returned. I got out of bed and bolted the door. I was in the dark then.

Q. You did not know then whether your clothes were gone or no - A. No.

Q. This house was full of disorderly people - A. I do not know; very probably it is. Between twelve and one, she said all my clothes were gone. I said, it is all nonsense. I did not believe her. At six o'clock in the morning I found they were all gone. The constable has found my clothes since.

THOMAS PAINE . I am an headborough. I was sent for to 45, Charles-street. I went up into the two-pair back room. Whitrow charged Nagle with having his clothes. She said she had lost her clothes likewise. I found her clothes in the same house, in Phoebe Jackson's room, and after I had taken Nagle to the watchhouse I returned and found Whitrow's clothes in Jackson's room, under the bed. Before I took Nagle to the watchhouse she was obliged to borrow some things to go the watchhouse.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18121202-95

94. JOHN WOOD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of November , a watch, value 1 l. the property of Richard Andrews , from his person .

RICHARD ANDREWS . I am an undertaker , in Compton-street.

Q. Did you lose a watch on the 18th of November - A. Yes; I lost it for about a minute. It was near one in the day. It was a silver hunting watch. The watch was in my fob at the time I was in Church-lane, St. Giles's . It so happened, on the day stated in the indictment, we had an order for two coffins. My man took the big coffin, and I took the child's coffin, and where it happened was opposite where the man lay dead. It became me to guide the man in with the coffin. I was giving a Mr. M'Carty the little coffin until I came down stairs again. I felt the watch leave my pocket. No person was near me but the prisoner within five or six yards. I immediately turned round, and saw the prisoner with the watch in his left hand behind him. No person was standing near him but my man with the coffin. I seized hold of the watch and got it away from him. He parted with it rather reluctantly. I then guided the man up with the coffin, and when I came down again the prisoner was in the custody of eight or nine people. I am fully positive he is the man. I never saw him before to my knowledge.

Q. What was the value of your watch - A. I value it at one pound it cost me five pounds.

CHARLES M'CARTY. I took in the child's coffin of Mr. Andrews; (I keep a potatoe warehouse); and on my turning round I saw Mr. Andrews take the watch from his hand. The prisoner said he found the watch among the potatoes.

ISAAC BOWYER . I am a journeyman to Mr. Andrews. I saw the prisoner standing next door to Mr. M'Carty's house. Mr. Andrews was putting the coffin in M'Carty's window. He came and took Mr. Andrews's watch out. Mr. Andrews said, come give me that watch. What watch, he said.

Prisoner's Defence. They all swear so hard against me, it is of no use for me to say anything.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18121202-96

95. ANN MORRIS and ANN M'DEMAW were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of September , four three-shilling bank tokens, and one shilling, the property of Javey Jagger , from his person .

JAVEY JAGGER. I am a journeyman linen-draper ; I live in Great Rassel-street, Bloomsbury. I was crossing Covent Garden market , the prisoners sack thrusted an arm into mine. This was between twelve and one o'clock. They took my money out of my pocket. I saw Morris's hand pass to the other, and I heard the money jingle. Morris was the person that took the money from my pocket. I did not fell her hand in my pocket. I had four three-shilling pieces, and a Queen Ann's shilling. Directly the prisoners loosed me I felt in my pocket, and found my money was gone. I laid hold of Morris, and called assistence. The watchman came up, and took hold of the other. They were taken to the watchhouse, and my tokens were found upon them, and the Queen Ann's shilling likewise. I can swear to there being a Queen Ann's shilling.

JAMES BARTLETT . I was constable of the night. The prisoners were brought to me. Jaggers charged Morris of taking his money, and handing them over to M'Demaw. M'Demaw handed me out of the four three-shilling tokens, and a Queen Ann shilling.

Morris's Defence. The prosecutor said he had got no money to treat any girl with. He asked me if I knew Mrs. Gray. I said, no.

M'Demaw's Defence. I was in Covent Garden; the prosecutor asked me if I knew a young woman of the name of Gray. I said, I did. It was a cold night; I asked him to give me something to drink. He said, come into the Garden and he would give me a shilling. He then went away.

MORRIS, GUILTY , aged 25.

M'DEMAW, GUILTY , aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18121202-97

96. SARAH M'DONALD and SARAH SMITH were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of November , from the person of Richard Dawson , a watch, value 5 l. a gold key, value 2 s. four bank notes, value 1 l. each, and a 2 l. bank note , his property.

RICHARD DAWSON . I am a shoe-maker ; I live in Evesham-buildings, Somers Town.

Q. On the 16th of November did you lose any bank notes and your watch - A. Yes. It was about a quarter after one on the ensuing morning. On the 16th of November I was going home, I met Sarah Smith . I had been drinking; I was not altogether sober. The tallest prisoner (Smith) I met in Holborn, near Newton-street. She was alone. She asked me if I would give her something to drink. I said, there was no house as I past that she could get anything. I went with her to treat her, as she said she could find a house open. I went into a house, No. 6, Charles-street, Drury-lane. She knocked at the door, and the other prisoner let her in.

Q. You were both let in by the other prisoner, were not you - A. Yes, both.

Q. What money had you, and had you the watch

about you - A. I had the string of the watch in my fingers at the same time that I went in at the door, and I believe I had my money about me, four one pound notes and one two pound note.

Q. Did you fall in company with women of this discription before you met Sarah Smith - A. None whatever; that I am positive of. I came from my friends in Newport-alley, Nowport-market. I went into a room with this woman. The other secured the door, I think, with a bolt. The door of the room was about a yard from the street-door. I was not a minute with them. When I found they secured the street-door, I wanted to go out. I was robbed within a minute. Then they hustled me to keep me inside. They both went in the room with me, and both hustled me. I wanted to go out; then they pressed upon me with persuasions to stop; then I felt the seal of the watch. Smith pulled the watch out of my fob. I felt it, and likewise saw her hand give it to the other. I challenged her with it. I tried to catch her hand, to get the watch back again, and then they began in the most blasphemous manner to say that I had not got a watch. When I found my situation that way I went out of the door, and procured a watchman.

Q. Before you left the room, did you perceive any thing about the notes - A. No. My watch I felt go, and saw it go, and at last I got out and called the watch. The watchman came up, and I got him to come in doors. His name is Butler. He followed me into the house. He would have nothing to do with them. He told me I had as much lost a watch as he had. I desired him to search, I was positive it was there, and I thought about the bed. They rushed towards the bed. He took up the counterpane; he held it up. He said, there is no watch here; he said, search yourself, if you are not satisfied. I told him then, if he would not search I insisted upon him taking them to the watchhouse. He told me, I must mind what I did, if I did not prove that these women had my watch, they would work me for it.

Q. Had the conduct of these women towards you; had that sobered you - A. I was a little elevated with liquor; this rouzed me more. He took charge, and the constable of the night was very kind, he took the charge. He made every enquiry, but nothing came forward. I departed, and when I went out of door I found my notes were gone. I returned to the watchhouse; I told Mr. Paine. He asked me the description; I told him.

Q. What number of notes do you think you lost - A. Four one's and one two, Bank of England notes.

Q. Did Paine search them - A. I believe he did. They were found afterwards, but not while I was present.

Q. Were these two women laid hold of in the house in which Smith took you - A. Yes. On going to the watchhouse they told the watchman where they throwed the watch. He acknowledged it. I did not hear it.

Q. What was the value of your watch - A. About five pounds. It has never been found since. It was a silver hunting watch, with a gold key.

ANN MITCHELL . Q. Where do you live - A. At Hammersmith. I gave Mr. Dawson the one pound notes between seven and eight in evening; four one's and a two pound bank note. I paid them to him at Hammersmith for children's shoes that he served us with; then Mr. Dawson left us to go to London.

WILLIAM GODFREY . I am an officer of Bow-street office. I heard of the robbery on the 17th of November, from Mr. Paine, the night constable. I asked him if he had found the property. He said, no; they were on suspicion. He said he had got the key of the room. I said, let us go and have a thorough search. It is a room on the ground floor, No. 6, on the right hand side, next the street door.

Q. to Prosecutor. Is that the room to which you were taken - A. It was.

Godfrey. At the further part of the window, as you go in from the door, the notes were found, between a child's bonnet and a woman's bonnet in a hat box. I found the notes. Under the bed the hat box was. I found four one's and a two, Bank of England notes.

Mrs. Mitchell. The two pound note I knew it to be the note; it came to me with the name of Ladford on the back of it. When I took the note I observed the name upon it, and there is Mrs. Salter upon one of the one pound notes. Mrs. Salter was upon it when I took it.

THOMAS BUTLER . I am a watchman of St. Giles's. I live in New-street, Cross-street, Bloomsbury. I have been a watchman for three years and half. I was crying two o'clock in the morning; this gentleman was standing at the door; he called me in. He said, I have lost my watch. I said, that is a bad job. He said, I give you charge of these two women. The woman with the child, she had nothing on but her smock.

Q. Did you tell him he had as much lost his watch as you had - A. That was afterwards. I do not know whether I did or not.

Q. Did you find any women in the room - A. Yes. I went in the room. I found both the women there. He charged them with having robbed him of his watch. One of these women had nothing on but her smock. The child was stripped as well as she was. I told the women to put on her clothes, as he had given me charge. He told me to stop, and search the room first. I said, sir, very well. I searched the room. I thought I was doing my duty very correct. I took the covering off the bed and shook it.

Q. Do you mean to swear that - A. I do; I declare I do.

Q. You have heard what he has said - A. Yes. I am innocent of what he has said. He was very much liquor when he called me in.

Q. What means did you take further to search for the watch, upon your oath - A. Upon my oath I searched every thing that I thought proper.

Q. Upon your oath did you lift up any other clothes but the coverled - A. I did, the blanket and sheets, and then the bed; he was not satisfied. I said, if you think it is in the bed, search it, and I will leave you. He did search it himself, and pulled it out in the middle of the floor. I searched the tea

cups and sauce pans, and every thing I could find in the room.

Q. Did you look under the bed - A. No, I did not. He was in such an hurry to take them to the watchhouse.

Q. How came you to say he had lost a watch as much as me - A. He said he would give charge of me. and then I, in a passion, said, you have lost a watch as much as me.

Q. You did not believe that he had lost a watch - A. I did not, I declare. Directly he told me he insisted upon my taking them. I told them to put on their clothes.

Q. Do you mean to say that the women said nothing until they got to the watchhouse - A. At the watchhouse the constable took the charge. The prisoner were both going up stairs. They said it was in the dust hole. I cannot say which of them said that. They said it one to another.

Q. Did you tell the constable of the night what you had heard - A. I did not. I did not recollect it till afterwards.

Q. Have you ever enquired in the house whether there was a dust-hole - A. No.

Q. The watch has never been found, has it - A. Not as I know of.

MR. PAINE. Q. You were the constable of the night, we understand - A. Yes.

Q. These women were brought in charge to you - A. They were. Mr. Dawson charged them with robbing him of his watch.

Q. Did Dawson appear to you to have senses about him - A. He was very correct. The prisoners pleaded innocent. I searched them. I could not find anything about them.

Q. At the time that Dawson came in the watchman came in with them - A. He did. He complained of ill treatment of the watchman not persevering in doing his duty, in searching for the watch. He made that charge at the time.

Q. Did you hear either of the prisoners say any thing about the watch - A. No, I did not. The watchman followed them to the stair foot, into the lobby. What passed there I don't know. I was not in hearing.

Q. Did the watchman tell you that he heard one of them say where the watch had been put - A He never did. After the prosecutor had made the charge I entered it; he left the watchhouse, and in the course of four or five minutes, Mr. Dawson returned. He then complained that his notes were gone, four ones and one two. I bid him stop, while I went up stairs and made a research. I found no notes. I found the key of the room. M'Donald had the key of the room about her. That key opened the padlock of the door. I went down to the room, and made a further search. I found no notes. I kept the key. In the morning, I and Godfrey went together. We made a search, took the clothes off the bed, and the bed off the bedstead, and under the bedstead was a hat-box. I pulled the cover off the hatbox. I pulled a little hat out of the bonnet, and out fell the notes. Godfrey picked them up.

Q. Did you search the cinders at all - A. I never heard a word about the dust-hole. There is a dust-hole under the stairs, if I had heard of the dust-hole at that time I should have searched it; no doubt but the watch would have come forth, if he had mentioned it.

Godfrey. He told me the watch was in the dust-hole: that was after all search would have been fruitless.

Prosecutor. The watchman told me that my watch was in the dust-hole since I have been in attendance here.

COURT, to Butler. Your conduct has been most infamous indeed. Let that man stand committed.

( Thomas Butler was immediately taken into custody.)

Smith's Defence. I was coming up Holborn, he asked me to take him home. I said, I would take the man into this woman's room, and as soon as the door opened he said he had lost his watch. First he said he had, and then he said he had not. This woman knows nothing about it.

M'Donald's Defence. This woman came home about two o'clock. I asked who was there. She said, Sarah Smith . The moment I opened the door the gentleman said he had lost his watch. I never moved, but stood with the door in my hand, least any body should say I had it. Mr. Paine has known me four years; he never knew any thing dishonest of me.

Mr. Paine. She has been given in charge of me before.

SMITH, GUILTY , aged 25.

M'DONALD, GUILTY , aged 27.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18121202-98

97. JOHN ROBINSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of November , a bank note, value 5 l. the property of George Linsley .

GEORGE LINSLEY . I am the master of the brig Alcean . On the 19th of last month I lost a five-pound note out of a drawer in the cabin. The brig was laying near King James's stairs, Shadwell . The prisoner was mate of the ship. The five-pound note I missed from the drawer, and a five-pound note the officer found on the prisoner.

Mr. Knapp. At the time the mate left the ship you gave him two twenty-pound notes - A. Yes.

Q. Might not the five-pound note be between the two twenties - A. It might be by mistake. The note was afterwards produced by the officer. I do not know the number.

THOMAS WALKER . I am an officer. I searched the prisoner. I found this five pound note. He said, the captain gave it him between the other two notes.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18121202-99

98. HENRY WESTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of November , a print framed and glazed, value 35 s. the property of Thomas Crawley .

THOMAS CRAWLEY . I am a carver and gilder , Clare-street, Clare-market . On Sunday, the 15th of November, I stepped out to a friend on the opposite side of the way. There are two doors to my house,

a private door and a shop door. I was not gone more than fifteen minutes, and on my return I saw the prisoner come out of a door with my print under his arm; which door he came out of I cannot say. I seized him by the cellar with one hand, and with the other hand the print. I left him in care of my neighbour, and I went for an officer. This is the print; it is worth thirty-five shillings. I am sure it is mine. There are two doors to my shop. I cannot say which door he came out of.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of the robbery. A gentleman told me he would give me a shilling to carry it for him, and when that gentleman detected me he made his escape through the courts.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Judgment respited .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18121202-100

99. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of September , one hundred and twenty halfpence , the property of William Bolton .

WILLIAM M'LEAN. At the time the offence was committed I was shopman to William Bolton , grocer ; his shop is 480, Oxford-street . On the 9th of November, the prisoner came into the shop; he asked for an ounce of candied lemon-peel. We were making up five shilling papers of halfpence. I served him; he went out. The prisoner returned; he asked for another ounce of candied lemon. I turned round to get the glass, I heard a paper of halfpence fall. I turned my head round sharp; he had one of the papers in his hand. I took not the least notice of that. He went out of the shop. I went after him. He had not gone above twenty yards from the shop door before he was stopped. I received information that he had thrown them into a shop. This is the paper of halfpence. It is one of the papers that I had been making up.

GEORGE BENNET . I am an officer. As I was going through Hanway-yard I heard the cry of stop thief. I saw the prosecutor in pursuit of the prisoner. A man coming in contact with the prisoner tripped him up. I searched the prisoner, and found the candled lemon-peel he had bought, and by the information of some people in the crowd I heard he had thrown the halfpence into a shop, as he run. I found this paper of halfpence in a linen-draper's shop.

M'Lean. I know the paper of halfpence. I made them up.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of the charge. I know nothing of the halfpence.

GUILTY , aged 17.

Fined 1 s. and discharged.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18121202-101

100. MARY SENNETT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of November , half a yard of cambric, value 8 s. a shirt collar, value 1 s. and two pair of sleeves, value 2 s. the property of Esther Young .

ESTHER YOUNG. I am a single woman . I live at No. 17, Rebecca-court, Marybone . I work at my needle. The prisoner lived in the same house with me. I occupied the one pair front room. She had formerly lived with the person in the two pair. I lost these things on Sunday the 1st of November.

Q. Had you left your room - A. I had. I went out between two and three o'clock in the afternoon. The sleeves and shirt collar were safe in my room when I left it. The prisoner was in my room when I went out. I did not miss the things till Monday.

ELEANOR HARVEY . I was in the room when Mrs. Young went out, and Mary Sennett was in the room.

Q. Did you see Mary Sennett do any thing - A. She took two pair of sleeves, a shirt collar, and half a yard of cambric out of the drawer. She rolled them up in paper, and put them in her pocket. I told Mrs. Young what I had seen.

Prisoner's Defence. What she has said is very wrong.

GUILTY , aged 11.

Fined 1 s. and discharged.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18121202-102

101. ANN OVER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of November , four pair of pattens, value 2 s. 8 d. the property of James Page .

JAMES PAGE . I keep a haberdasher's shop , No. 8, Brick-lane, Whitechapel . On the 12th of November, in the morning, I lost the pattens. They were hanging outside of my door-post. I saw the prisoner pass and repass the shop. I saw her put them in her apron, and walk away with them. I followed her and found the pattens on her.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw these pattens lay under the window. I did not know who they belonged to or else I would have given them to him. I am a weaveress, out of work.

GUILTY , aged 53.

Fined 1 s. and discharged.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18121202-103

102. WILLIAM MUTFORD , alias RICHARD FOY , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of November , a shirt, value 4 s. the property of William Coleclough ; and a hat cover, value 1 s. the property of Evan Evans .

WILLIAM COLECLOUGH. I am a lighterman. I lodge at the Two Brewers, Ratcliffe Highway.

Q. Did you lose a shirt any time - A. Yes, from my chest. The prisoner slept in the same room with me. I lost the shirt on the 28th of November, out of my chest. My chest was not locked.

Q. What was the prisoner - A. I don't know. I had seen the shirt in my chest about ten minutes before it was found on the prisoner. I came down stairs. I asked him if he had got my shirt. He said, no. We found it on his back. I am quite sure it was my shirt. It had on it the initials of my name. It is a new white frilled shirt.

EVAN EVANS . I am a block-maker. I lodge in this public-house, in the same room with Coleclough and Mutford. I had seen the hat-cover safe in the room the night before. It was taken away the same day that Coleclough's shirt was. I found it in Mutford's bundle.

- . I am an officer. This is the shirt and hat-cover. I took the shirt off the prisoner's back. It is marked W. C. 3.

Prisoner's Defence. The property was my own. I have been in the habit of having presents made me by gentlemen.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Judgment respited .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18121202-104

103. WILLIAM KEENAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of November , a coach-glass, value 30 s. the property of James Hunter .

JAMES HUNTER . I am a coach-maker , Upper Berkley-street, Portman-square . On the 3d of November I detected the prisoner taking this coach-glass out of a coach in my shop. This coach was exactly in the middle of the shop; it was the distance of three carriages from the door. He had got the glass from the carriage before I got to him. He left it in the bottom of the body when he saw me. I seized him. This glass is worth thirty shillings. It would cost more to replace it. When the constable searched him the string that pulled up the glass was found in his hat.

Prisoner's Defence. What he says is all perfectly right.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18121202-105

104. MARY HOBBS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of November , a great coat, value 9 s. a pair of pattens, value 6 d. a petticoat, value 4 s. and a handkerchief, value 1 s. the property of Mary Sullivan .

MARY SULLIVAN . I am a single woman . I sell muffins and crumpits . On the 30th of November I slept at No. 13, George-street, Bloomsbury, at Mr. Henniss's. Mary Hobbs had to go through my room to get into her room. I only was there one night, I went to bed about eleven o'clock; she came up about one. She took my things and put them on I suppose.

Q. Did you perceive the prisoner came through the room - A. No. I did not miss my clothes untill I got up, about eight o'clock. I heard the door go about one o'clock. I heard some one come in and go out. I did not see the prisoner. When I awoke at eight o'clock all my things were gone. I have never found my clothes again. She was taken up at one o'clock at a public-house near there. She had none of my clothes then about her.

MARY JONES . I am servant at this house. Mrs. Sullivan slept there on the 30th, and Mary Hobbs slept there that night. She is an unfortunate girl in the street. I am sure that Mary Hobbs slept there. She came home rather before one.

Q. How many lodgers might there be lodging in that night - A. There was so many I can hardly say; six, eight, or ten. There is no fastening to the door, only a latch. I saw Mary Hobbs when she came down that morning; she had a woman's cloth coat on. She had on the same coat that Sullivan came in with. Hobbs had on the same dress at night that she has on now.

Q. Did you hear that morning of Mrs. Sullivan having missed her clothes - A. Yes, and I saw Mary Hobbs with her coat on her back, and when Mary Hobbs was taken up she had not the coat on then. The coat has never been found.

MICHAEL LEA . I am an officer of Bow-street. I apprehended the prisoner. I found nothing on her that led to a discovery of Sullivan's property.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of it, before your Lordship and my maker. It is a house that receive all sorts, and there are no fastenings to the door.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18121202-106

105. JOHN CLARK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of November , nineteen pounds weight of hemp, value 5 s. the property of James Briant .

JAMES BRIANT. I am a carman , Lower East Smithfield. I know nothing of the robbery. I am the only person engaged in the carting business.

JOHN PRIEST . I am a porter at Hoare's wharf.

Q. Do you know Mr. Briant's carts - A. Yes. There came a waggon that day with a load of loose hemp, between four and five in the afternoon. Mr. Briant's waggon came to our wharf with hemp. The prisoner was unloading hemp. I knew him us Briant's carman. He unloaded the hemp, and he called to us to unload the flax. We took the mats of flax as he set them out of the waggon. I afterwards went in the waggon, I found some hemp under the tarpaulin in the waggon. There was a bead of hemp under the tarpaulin, and some loose. I went and told Mr. Hoare. The prisoner backed the waggon out of the wharf, and when Mr. Hoare accused him of having stolen the hemp instead of delivering it on the wharf. The hemp was taken out of the waggon, and then Mr. Briant was sent for.

PETER HOARE . I have the management of the wharf. Mr. Briant's waggon came to our wharf, and I thought it had delivered all the hemp that was in it. I heard Priest say there was some hemp under the tarpaulin. Clark came to the head of his horses. I asked Clark if he had delivered all the hemp he had. He said, yes. I then went to the gateway of the wharf, waiting for the waggon coming out, to see whether he would take the hemp away. My gate opens into Wapping-street. After he had backed into the street I desired him to go into the waggon, and turn his tarpaulin of one side. He went up reluctantly; he turned it of one side, and in the fore part of the waggon was this hemp concealed under the tarpaulin.

Q. Could it have happened by accident - A. I certainly think not. The weight of the hemp was nineteen pounds, near a pound in value. He said he did not know that it was there. I told him to hand it down. I then sent for an officer, and his master came and gave him in charge. This is the hemp; it is part of the same load, I have no doubt. The hemp laid in the waggon in such a way I am sure it could not have come there by accident.

Prisoner's Defence. I knew nothing of the hemp being there at all.

GUILTY , aged 43.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and Publickly whipped .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18121202-107

106. MOSES DAVIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of November , 50 guineas, the property of John Rowe , and 14 guineas , the property of Jesse Peake .

JOHN ROWE . I am a labourer. I live at Norwood, in Surry.

Q. Last Friday week were you in company with two persons of the names of Peake and Dimmock - A. Yes. Dimmock and Peake went out with me to a house in Petticoat-lane. I had fifty guineas in my pocket. I went into the house; I pulled out these guineas along with some silver. Davis came in and saw the guineas in my hand; he asked me to go to his house; he said he would give me a pound note and a shilling for every one of the guineas, and something to eat and drink.

Q. Did you go with him to his house - A. Yes; and Jesse Peake and Dimmock went with me. Mr. Davis went with us. I put down the fifty guineas on the desk; he looked at them, and then he put them into a bit of paper. Jesse Peake put some guineas down. I do not know how many; Davis, the prisoner, put them in a bit of paper also. Davis took a key out of the cupboard by the side of the fire-place. He took them up stairs, and said, he would bring down the notes directly for them. He went out of the room; he left me; Peake, and Dimmock, in the room.

Q. How long was it before he came back - A. He was gone three hours, I dare say. When he came back, he said he had been to the Bank, he could not get change; he said he was very sorry he had been so long. He asked us to eat and drink; we had some beer. There came in another gentleman; he could not give change; then he went out; he was to meet us at a public-house in Mitre-court. Davis went with us to Mitre-court; the other man said he would go and get change, and come to us.

Q. You three, and the prisoner, went to Mitre-court; he treated you with some liquor - A. We had some beer there.

Q. How long did you and the prisoner stay together at the house in Mitre-court - A. Half an hour, I dare say, Davis waited there; he found this man did not come; Davis said, he would go and see for him; he went, and never returned.

Q. Have you ever seen your guineas again - A. No, not a farthing. A letter came at the Mitre; he sent a note in his name. The next day we went for the warrant. Saturday evening he was taken up and brought to the office.

Mr. Adolphus. When did you come from Norwood - A. That day I was going to Smithfield to buy a horse and cart. Peake and Dimmock were going with me.

Q. What time of day was it you first saw Davis, and had this refreshment in Petticoat-lane - A. About eleven o'clock in the forenoon.

Q. Are you sure of that - A. About one, I believe.

Q. Had you dined - A. No.

Q. You pulled out your guineas, and Davis said he would give you a dinner, he would give you a one-pound note and a shilling for each of them, that you are sure of - A. Yes.

Q. He went out with a note in his hand - A. I did not see the note.

Q. You saw him hand it to the other man to get change for it, did not you - A. When he came back; and then the other man went away to get money for the note.

Q. You saw him give the man the note to get change for it - A. Yes.

Q. He took you from the first public-house he met you to his own house - A. Yes; and there he kept me some time waiting.

Q. And then he took you to another public-house, and waited there half an hour. In consequence of that note sent there, did not you go to his own house the next morning, and not finding him there you went to Worship-street Office - A. We went there twice or three times, in Petticoat-lane, and waited about, and then we went to Worship-street.

Q. On Saturday morning you went to his house, and not finding him at home, went to Worship-street Office. There was a message left for you, if you called at three o'clock you should have your money; you went to Worship-street by eleven - A. Yes.

Q. What was it brought you and your friends to Petticoat-lane - A. Jesse Peake had something the matter with his child; he went to Petticoat-lane to buy a medicine for the worms.

Q. You never heard that guineas would fetch a great deal more than twenty-one shillings, did you - A. No.

Q. Upon your oath had not you asked twenty-eight shillings a-piece for your guineas before you spoke to Davis - A. No; nor did any person, in my hearing, offer them at any price, and that upon my oath.

Q. Do you know the sign of the house - A. No; I did not take any notice.

Q. Now mind you are upon your oath. Did you never offer the landlord the guineas, or hear any person offer any, at any price from twenty-eight shillings to a guinea - A. I never heard any body, upon my oath.

Q. You never heard Peake, or any man, offer guineas for more than twenty-one shillings - A. No. We went to Davis's house and counted them out. He said he would give us something to eat and drink.

Q. What was your reckoning - A. We had a glass of liquor each.

Q. And to pay that reckoning you pulled your guineas out - A. I did.

Q. What may be the price you were going to give for your horse and cart in Smithfield - A. I do not know how much they would ask. I would have given twenty pound, or fifty pound if it had been a good horse and cart. I fetched this money from a person that kept it for me at Norwood.

Q. Did not the man offer to pay you thirty-five pound in part, and say he would give you the remainder in the morning - A. No. Nor offer it as I saw.

Q. Now, Sir, I ask you again, was not the bargain between you and the prisoner entirely for the purchase of guineas for more than one pound and a shilling - A. No; I never offered any guineas to the landlord, or ever saw or heard any offered to the landlord.

JESSE PEAKE . I am a labouring man. I live at Norwood. On last Friday week I came to town with Rowe and Dimmock. I went with them to a public-house in Petticoat-lane. Rowe took out his money to pay for the liquor; he took out guineas and silver. I saw Mr. Davis there. Upon Rowe taking out the guineas Davis called us out, then we went into his house;

he asked Rowe were he was going to with them guineas; Rowe said, he was going to lay them out at Smithfield; then he called us into the warehouse, when we got there, he said if we would let him have the guineas, he would give us what we liked to eat and drink, and give us the change in notes; he would give us a pound note and a shilling for each guinea. Upon this Rowe took out of his pocket fifty guineas, he told them down on the desk, before Mr. Davis. Davis took them up, counted them, and looked at them very precisely, to see whether they were good; he wrapped them up in a bit of paper. I produced fourteen guineas; I told them down on the desk, he picked them up and looked at them, and put them in paper to the others, and kept them just the same as he had done with Rowe's guineas.

Q. He never delivered them to you, or put them down on the desk again - A. No, he took them away.

Q. Now had you any intention of parting with them without a one pound note and a shilling - A. No; and something to eat and drink.

COURT. You never expected to give him credit - A. No. I did not mean to part with them without a note and a shilling for them. He said, he had to go up stairs and fetch the notes down, in a few minutes he left the room, and I suppose he was gone three hours, or more. When he came back he said he had been to the Bank; he could get no change. He asked us whether we had any thing to eat and drink; we said, no. He said, it was our own fault, there was plenty of victuals; so there was, but there we were waiting for the money to come. He asked us if we could go out and have any thing to drink; he took us out and gave us a glass of rum each, and asked us if we would have any more; we said, no. He brought us into his house again. He said there would be a gentleman in presently, he dare say, he would bring the change. The gentleman came in, and said, he could not get change; he pulled out some kind of paper, he gave it to Mr. Davis's man to go out and get change; the man went out, came in again, and said, the gentleman that he had been to could not give change, he had sent all his money to the Bank; that was about five o'clock in the evening.

Q. What time did you first meet him at the public-house - A. Between twelve and one.

Q. About what time did he get the guineas from you, and left his house - A. About a quarter to one. When the servant came back, and said he could not get change, then he said he would make another try; he took us to the Mitre, at Aldgate. The other gentleman went out of the house, he promised Mr. Davis that he would meet us at the Mitre. We went with the prisoner to the Mitre; he desired us to call for something to drink, and he would pay for it; we did. He stopped in the room half an hour with us. I asked him whether he would give me change, or else give me the guineas back again. He then said he would go out and have another try about it, and he would not be gone half an hour; he looked up at the clock, then he left us, and sent a letter. In consequence of that letter I went the next morning with the other men to his house, about five minutes before ten o'clock. Ten o'clock was the time appointed. He was not at home, and the servant said he had not slept at home since his wife had been there.

Q. Was any thing said about three o'clock - A. No, I never heard a word about three o'clock.

Q. How long did you and the other men stop - A. One man stopped in the house about two or three hours. I stopped with Rowe half an hour; we went into a public-house and got some beer; we went back again; I left Rowe in the house. I and Dimmock went as far as Gracechurch-street, and came back again, then we got something to eat and drink at Aldgate market. Rowe and Dimmock went to Worship-street. I bought some things and went home to my wife. The prisoner was taken up and taken to the Justice. I have never seen the money since.

Mr. Adolphus. What business had you in Petticoat-lane - A. We all came to London together. I was going to Smithfield to buy pigs; I was going to get some worm-cakes for my children. We went into the Black Lion, Petticoat-lane; we stopped at this house and had some gin.

Q. How came the conversation about guineas - A. I do not know.

Q. Did you speak to the landlord about your guineas - A. No, not a word; I never mentioned it to the landlord.

Q. Do you live in the village of Norwood - A. I live upon the common.

Q. Have you never heard that guineas were sold in London at a high price - A. No; I never heard any thing of the kind.

WILLIAM DIMMOCK . I live in Norwood. I formerly used to drive the Norwood coach; I since drove the Greenwich coach. Last Friday week I came with Rowe, and Peake, to London. Rowe said he was coming to town to buy a horse and cart. We called at a public-house, in Petticoat-lane, and drank; Rowe was going to pay for it. Rowe took a sixpence out of his pocket; he might with it take a few guineas; I cannot say how many. As soon as Rowe paid for the liquor, I then saw Davis, the prisoner; he said, come here, my friends, follow me to my house, I live at the next door, I want to speak to you. We followed him; he went into his back room. He said, young men, you have got a few guineas, if you can let me have them I shall be obliged to you, it would be of service to him, we shall have a good dinner. He said he would give us change in notes. Jesse Peake said, Sir, I am going to lay them out. Davis said, if you will let me have them I will make you comfortable. Peake took out fourteen, Rowe took out fifty, they took them out and put them on the desk. Davis took them up and put them in a bit of paper; he then wrapped up Peake's fourteen; he wrapped them up in a bit of paper and put them in his pocket; he then said, I shall not be above half a minute going up stairs; he left the room. He was gone three hours, he then came in, all in an hurry, wiping his face; he said, have you had something to eat and drink. I said, no, we have no money. He said, come along with me and have a glass of liquor, I am sure you must want it. He said, a gentleman would be in presently. The gentleman came in, all of a hurry, he said, he had been running about every where, he could get no change in all the world. - Davis said, you follow me.

Q. Was any body sent out while you were there - A. No. He told us to follow him; we followed him through courts and alleys, and at last we found ourselves

at the Mitre, at Aldgate; he staid with us about twenty minutes there. I and Rowe said, I wish you would be so kind as to get the money; he said, do not make yourself unhappy, I will be back in half an hour. He did not come back; we staid for his coming back. We had some note sent us. We went to his house the next day; we waited there from ten o'clock, all day, until dark. We went to Worship-street at five o'clock. He was taken on Sunday morning.

Mr. Adolphus. How did you come to town - A. We walked. We got to Petticoat-lane between twelve and one.

Q. What business led you to Petticoat-lane - A. To call at a shop where they sell horse medicines and worm cakes. I told them where to go. Rowe, I believe, wanted the horse medicine, and Peake the worm cakes.

Q. Do you know the sign of the public house that you went into to drink - A. No; I had two glasses there, Rowe had one. Rowe took some money out. The landlord served us. I do not think I should know him again if I was to see him.

Q. The prisoner was not there while you were drinking - A. If he was there I did not see him; I think it must be somebody else to tell him. Not a word about the guineas were said in that public house, or at the door, that I saw or heard.

Q. When Rowe took his money out he said nothing about it; you did not see the prisoner until you came to the door - A. I am sure I never saw the prisoner in the house. Davis said in the street, come, my lads, here is the house, I want to speak with you; I only live next door. We never knew what we were going about, nor till after we went into his house. What I tell you is a fact.

Q. Whose service were you in when you came to Petticoat-lane - A. None. I had been out of employ above three months.

Q. Have not you heard that guineas were sold for more than twenty-one shillings - A. I have heard that such things have been done. I never sold any. I should be afraid to do it least I should get into trouble.

Q. Was it not mentioned about selling guineas in the public house - A. I never heard it mentioned to the landlord. I never heard the guineas mentioned. In the public house there was a Jew boy that comes about Gracechurch-street; he knew me; he had a glass of gin on my account. There was nothing passed about buying guineas in the public house.

Prisoner's Defence. My Lord and Gentlemen of the Jury, these people agreed with me at the rate of one pound seven shillings and four pence each guinea. I never meaned to give any more than one pound one shilling for each guinea. I did not seem inclined to give any more than the real statute mentions for each guinea, and that I was ready to give. They would not take less than one pound seven shillings and four pence.

EMANUEL MOSES . I keep the Black Lion in Petticoat-lane; it is within six or seven doors off where the prisoner lives.

Q. Do you remember, about a fortnight ago, three men coming to your house - A. I do not remember; but one Dimmock, I remember him; it was between two and three, to the best of my recollection; he came in with another man; it was not either of these men. Dimmock had a glass of gin. The other man had not money enough to pay for one. Dimmock was the only man that had the glass of gin. It was last Friday was a week, I believe; it was the 27th. Dimmock took his gin; he said, will you give me twenty-eight shillings for a guinea.

Q. Had you ever known the man before - A. I never saw him before with my eyes. Said I, guineas; he said, yes. I said, I do not do any thing in that way; I have enough to mind my own business. He said, have you no man in your house that deals in this kind of way. I said, I know nothing at all of it. I saw him go out afterwards with Mr. Davis, and I saw no more of them. That is all I know.

Mr. Gurney. Did you attend at the office when the prisoner was examined - A. No, Sir, I did not.

Q. Then Rowe and Peake were never in your house - A. Never, in my life. I was in the bar when Dimmock was there. I am in my bar eleven months out of twelve; if you were to come you would see me there.

Q. I shall not come, you may depend upon it, therefore if the others came before or after him you must have seen him - A. To be sure I must. I poured out the glass of gin for Dimmock myself. The other persons, they were never in my house, and if any person has sworn it, I do not know any thing about it.

COURT. Was Dimmock a stranger to you at that time - A. Yes; I saw him before that time, but I recollect his person; and the man that came with him goes by the nick name of Gatchey. Gatchey paid for a glass of liquor for Dimmock. I heard Dimmock say to Davis, I want you. Gatchey went out and stood at the window; he paid for the gin. Dimmock took Mr. Davis out with him, and I saw no more of them. Dimmock was in company with no other person but Gatchey, if he had I must have seen it; my bar is not big enough for three persons. Gatchey goes out with an old clothes bag; I lend him money to get his living; he has three or four children at home.

GODFREY HARRIS . Q. Do you go by the name of Gatchey - A. Yes, that is my Hebrew name. When I went to an English school my master gave me the name of Godfrey. I get my living in the clothes way. I was in the glass way; now times are hard I cannot afford to be in the glass way.

Q. Do you know the landlord of the Black Lion - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember a man coming there - A. Yes, Dimmock; I paid for a glass of gin for him there; two pence halfpenny. When I came from Greenwich I used to come by his coach. I met Dimmock as I was going out of the Black Lion.

Q. Was there any body with him - A. There was one man, but if I was to see him I should not know him; there was one person with him. Dimmock asked me to treat him with a glass; he said to me, Joe, do you buy guineas; I said, no, I do not. He said to the landlord, can you afford to give twenty-eight shillings for a guinea; and then he said in the house to me, do you buy guineas; I said, no. The landlord said he did not deal in this kind of money at all. Dimmock said, may I go and look if there is a purchaser in the place. He went towards the tap-room door; I did not go with him; he opened the tap-room door. I saw nothing more but Mr. Davis coming out with him. That is all I saw.

Q. Does Mr. Davis live in the neighbourhood - A. He does.

COURT. Davis lives close by - A. Yes, he does. This was between two and three, to the best of my knowledge.

Mr. Gurney. Your Hebrew name is Gatchey, and the name you go by on the road is Joe. You met Dimmock; he asked you to give him a glass; you had two pence halfpenny in your pocket - A. Yes; I had not more than a shilling. I am sure Dimmock was only in company with one man. I am quite sure that the person that I saw was in company with Dimmock; he was left at the door when Dimmock went in and drank with me. I am positive he did not go in.

Q. Did not Samuel Harris come and speak to you about the evidence that you were to give - A. Not as I know of. I do not know Samuel Harris .

Q. Not the attorney that brought you here - A. I do not know the name of Samuel Harris .

Q. He has been out of Court twenty minutes. Look towards the Jury. Repeat, upon your oath, that you do not know Samuel Harris , the attorney - A. There are many Samuel Harris 's.

Q. Do you know Samuel Harris , of Houndsditch, the attorney - A. He may go by another name.

Q. Do not you know him, and know him by that name. Now take whatever time you like to consider it, I will wait for your answer - A. I know one Harris, a lawyer.

Q. Have you not seen him here to-night - A. Not as I know of.

Q. Have you seen Harris, the lawyer, while you have been attending here this evening - A. I might have seen him. Yes, I have.

Q. Have you not spoken to him - A. I have spoke to him, but no harm; he might have spoke to me, but nothing privately. He spoke to more people than me. He said nothing about this suit at all.

COURT. What did he say - A. He said, you have no occasion to go away from the door, for you will be wanted immediately.

Q. Did you ever see this Harris at his house in Houndsditch in your life - A. He lives in Castle-street, Cammomile-street. I never was in his house; but I did not know his name was Samuel Harris .

Q. Now you will answer me. Are you quite sure that you saw Dimmock with one man at the time that he asked you to treat him - A. Only one man as I saw, if there had been two I must have seen them.

Q. Did Dimmock leave the man at the same door that you and he went in to have the glass of gin - A. That I cannot say. I don't know what became of that man. I never saw him afterwards.

Q. Do not prevaricate. That is a straight forward question. You said you left the man at the door when you and Dimmock went in to have the glass of gin - A. Yes, at the street door, Dimmock and I went in at the street door. I did not see him there when I came out. I went away directly. I went to get my living for my family.

Q. You are quite sure that you did not stay and look in at the window - A. No, I did not stay about the house. I went to get my living. I went away directly about my business.

DAVID LEVY . I am in the service of the prisoner at the bar. He lives in Petticoat-lane; he keeps a house there.

Q. Do you remember his coming home last Friday week with three persons in his company - A. Yes, I do, about four o'clock in the afternoon; it was near Sabbath. I was present while he was talking to these persons; here is one of them, and there is the others. They were talking about guineas; my master was to give one pound seven shillings and four pence for each guinea; the person my master was talking to agreed for that. No other sum was mentioned. Fourteen old guineas and fifty old ones were produced. I am quite sure they were old ones; upon my oath. I just cast my head round; the fourteen were old and the fifty were old; I heard my master count them. I turned my head to look at the guineas. I was sorting of metal. I had not seen so many guineas for a long time together. My master examined them and put them in his pocket, and asked one of the men if they could give him the balance of a hundred pound note; they said, they had not change about them. My master went out to get change for them. He was gone about twenty minutes. He came back and did not get change. He sent me out with an hundred-pound note. I went to the Black Lion, Mr. Moses keeps it. I could not get change. I went to a butcher's shop; they could not give me change. I came back immediately. After I had shewed the note to these persons to whom I applied to get change I read the note; it was a good one. When I came back these persons were still with my master; then my master went with them, where I know not. I saw no more of the men till the next morning; it was then near eleven o'clock, when I saw them all three; they asked for my master; I said, he is just stepped out, he will be at home about three o'clock. I said that by my master's direction; when he went out he said he would be at home at three o'clock.

Q. How long did the men stay after they came to his house - A. One stopped about half an hour. All three of the men said, they would go and get something to drink, and stop with me half an hour after they had something to drink; they said they would call, at three o'clock. My master was at home at three o'clock; he dined at home at two o'clock. I informed him that these persons had been there. I told him that they were coming again; he stopped at home till about six o'clock in the evening. He was at home that night and the next morning. He gave no orders to be denied to any body. He was as public at home for time as for the fourteen months that I have lived with him. He was as easy to be found then as at any time in his life.

Mr. Gurney. What is your master - A. He deals in iron, marine stores, and rags.

Q. They did not stop in the house above half an hour - A. Yes, they did; they stopped and had something to eat and drink. They stopped altogether about three quarters of an hour, not more; I am sure not an hour.

COURT. Witness, recollect you were not here; three persons have been examined before you; all the three men were in the house; their evidence has been heard; therefore be cautious what evidence you give; do not give evidence without full consideration - A. No, not with a word of falsity.

Q. Another thing, two persons have been examined on the part of your master - A. I will give nothing but the truth.

Mr. Gurney. You all notice when the sabbath comes in, and leave off work - A. I left off at four. They came in just before four, and I left off work in a quarter of an hour. I am quite sure I did not work more than a quarter of an hour after they came in, and I am sure that is as true as all the rest I have sworn. They were shewn into the kitchen; the back room; the room behind the shop. The female servant was there; her name is Eldah Hart.

COURT. Are you quite sure that no friend of your master's came in while you were there - A. Yes, no other person was there all the time.

Q. Then, if any person has said that another person came in with a note in his hand, and said that he he tried to get change, that is all false - A. Yes, it is; mine is the truth. Eldah was in the room, lighting the candles and cooking the victuals. No other person was there all the time in my presence. I only went out to get change. There was no other person there, that I can say, and Eldah was cleaning the place. She cooked fish and meat. The fish was cooked for my master's supper.

Q. What time did he and the men go out - A. I have told you before. About half after four, and he came in again about ten minutes before five. Then he got his supper.

Q. Who subpoened you - A. My master. Mr. Harris came to me.

Q. Do you know his first name - A. I cannot say I do.

Q. Do you know him by Harris the Lawyer - A. Yes.

Q. He has examined you - A. No, he has never said a word to me nor I to him. He has never spoke to me about the business at all. I have not seen the gentleman until now.

COURT. Was not the men paid for the guineas - A. No. They stopped until master came back. They were not paid while my master was there; they were not paid in my sight. The men were strangers to me; I had never seen them before. My master treated them with civility. He gave them victuals, and drink.

Q. What did they come about the next day - A They asked if master was at home. They did not complain at all. I told them he had left word he would be home at three o'clock.

Q. No friend whatever came in about the business - A. No.

Q. You heard this bargain about one pound seven shillings and four-pence for the guinea - A. Yes. I am quite positive.

JOHN SCRIVEN. I am a waiter out of employ.

Q. Were you a waiter on the 27th of last month - A. I was, at the Mitre, Mitre-court, Aldgate.

Q. Do you remember the prisoner coming there last Friday week with any persons - A. Yes; here are the three persons on my right. These three persons came in first, Mr. Davis came in afterwards. I did not see Mr. Davis until I saw these men. I was sitting in the tap-room when they came in. Peake and Rowe came in first, Dimmock next, Davis came in last; it may be ten minutes. I cannot say to two or three minutes. There was a pot of half and half called for; that was when Davis came in. That is the first order I know of. Davis had a glass of rum and water. Mr. Davis went out twice during the time they staid, and when he came back I was sitting in my seat where I was in the first instance. When he came back the second time he said you may have part to night, and the remainder to-morrow morning. What it was I know not. I did not hear any answer.

Q. Do you recollect what time of day it was when they came - A. It was between four and five when they first came in, to the best of my recollection, and between seven and eight they went away.

Q. Did they all go away together - A. That I cannot say; I might be called away.

Q. How long did Davis stay out the first time he went out - A. About fifteen minutes; not so long.

Q. You are quite sure that he did not stay to dine any where while these people were about. He could not have dined at five o'clock, in the time he was absent from the Mitre - A. He could not.

Mr. Gurney. He was there from between four and five until between seven and eight; he could not go and dine in the short time he was out It is a falsity if any body said he was staying at home at dinner this time - A. I do think it is. I have no doubt at all of it, because the men were there present.

Q. to David Levy . You have heard what this man has sworn - A. Yes.

Q. Do you mean to swear now, your master came home at ten minutes before five, and staid to dinner, and never went out again - A. I did not say he never went out again; he came home ten minutes before five, took a something, and then went out again.

Q. to Scriven. Did you hear Davis say when he when out and looked at the clock, he would be back presently - A. I did not hear him.

Q. Who paid for the liquor, these men or Davis - A. Mr. Davis paid for one pot of half and half, and he paid for a glass of rum and water. They wanted more half and half; Dimmock said, Davis would pay for that. Mr. Shears said, I do not know Davis; you shall have what you like till to-morrow morning.

Q. Were these men quite strangers to your master - A. I don't know. I had never seen them in the house before.

Q. Your master said they might have what they liked on Dimmock's account - A. I beg your pardon, my lord. Dimmock said it was to be put down to Davis. Master said, he did not know Davis: Dimmock might have as much as he liked till the morning. I was there as a customer.

COURT. Every body understood you called Shears your master - A. I beg your pardon.

JURY. He did say so - A. I was taking a pint of porter there.

COURT. If I had known you were not a waiter there I should have asked you where you lived - A. I lived there at the time. I was taking a pint of porter there.

Q. Do not give me that answer; we know where a man is drinking porter he must be alive. Where was your place of residence - A. No. 2, Ship-inn-yard, Borough. I went first to the Mitre on that

day, between ten and eleven in the morning. I was never waiter there. The last I had as waiter was the Star tavern, Nags-head-court. Gracechurch-street. That is more than six months ago. I never saw Mr. Davis before to my knowledge.

Q. to David Levy . When your master went out with these people did you learn where he was going to - A. No.

Q. How long was it before he came home - A. He came home in about five or six minutes; he took a bit of fish, and went out again. He returned about eight o'clock in the evening.

Dimmock. Please you, my lord, give me leave to speak a word. David Levy has given evidence concerning the money; he never came in the room. The gentleman was not in the room five minutes. He left us there three hours. Levy never came in the room.

Prisoner. It was never my intention to wrong these men. Dimmock in the case was the broker, and I hope, as a man, he will not fly in the face of God to swear as a falsity.

COURT, Q. to Dimmock Did you ever go to the prisoner as agent to these men to get the money for them - A. No. I never saw the gentleman before.

Q. Did you go there to get more than twenty-one shillings - A No, nothing else. I should not have gone there if he had not taken us in.

Prisoner. Did not these people give the guineas into your hand, and you gave them to me.

Dimmock. No, I did not.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18121202-108

107. RICHARD LEE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of November , a gallon of rum, value 5 s. the property of our Lord the King .

JOHN HERBERT. I am an officer. Last Saturday se'nninght I observed the prisoner in a wherry. I boarded the wherry. He was about fifty yards from the Wapping shore. There was only the prisoner and the waterman (Smith) on board. I observed the prisoner wit a great coat under his arm. I searched the great coat, and in the two pockets I found one bladder in each pocket. The two bladders contained about five quarts of rum, and in the coat that he had on I found a pewter half-pint pot; it had rum in it, by the smell. The prisoner said, he was an Excise watchman; he had been watching a craft. I directed the waterman to row back to the place where he had it from. Smith rowed me back to the craft.

Q. Did you learn from the prisoner whether he had been watching it - A. He said it was the craft. The craft was loaded with casks of rum. I examined the cask of rum. On Tuesday. I attended the Excise officers guaging. I found that rum had been spilled over the cask very lately. I took him to the Thames police office. It was a lighter that had hatches, and there was a communication from the hatches to the scuttle. These are the bladders; they leak.

JURY. The bladders seem to have had a deal of use.

COURT. When you went to the craft did you find any person belonging to the craft there - A. There was another watchman on board, his name was Edwards.

Prisoner. You searched me twice, did you find any tools upon me - A. No.

JOHN SMITH . I am the waterman that took Edwards from the lighter, and going towards shore the officers in the police boat called to me to stop. I stopped immediately. I told the prisoner. He said, I am done. That was just before the officer came on board of us. The prisoner had got a great coat under his arm. I saw one of the bladders taken from the great coat. I shewed the officer where I took the prisoner from.

JOHN EDWARDS . I am an Excise watchman.

Q. On Thursday, the 26th of November, did you receive these puncheons into your charge - A. Yes, in the craft belonging to Mr. Rawlinson. I received the puncheons about three in the afternoon. We went to the sign of the Marquis Cornwallis, by the side of Fountain stairs, laying off Hermitage stairs. I staid from eight o'clock till nine, and then I was relieved by the prisoner.

WILLIAM RAWLINSON . My father, John Rawlinson , is my partner. The lighter belonged to me, and my father, from whence this run was taken. There were fifty puncheons on board. It is five shillings a gallon without the duty, and fifteen shillings with the duty.

JOHN SKIPPEY . I am a cooper. On Tuesday, last week, I examined the rum puncheon, marked W and a diamond, No. 28. I found the cask had a spill in it, near the bung, and not properly cut off. It appeared to be newly put in. The cask was a very sound cask. I took out the bung, and there was deficiency of upwards of a gallon.

Prisoner's Defence. I am very certain I never took any rum out of the cask. Seaby had the same charge as I had; he was with them two days the same as I was. A little before day-light in the morning a man throwed something up on the lighter as I was standing on the deck; it was rum, in these bladders. I should have carried it to the office if I had not been stopped.

MR. MANDER. Q. I believe you and your partners are the proprietors of these rums - A. Yes.

Q. Have the goodness to taste this rum. This is a sample taken out of the bladder, and this is a sample taken out of the cask - A. From the taste, I should think them both the same.

GUILTY , aged 59.

Confined Two Years in the House of Correction , and whipped in jail .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18121202-109

108. CATHERINE WARD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of November , two sheets, value 12 s. a bolster and case, value 4 s. and two pillow cases, value 1 s. the property of James Elliott .

JAMES ELLIOTT . On Saturday evening, the 21st of November, I was robbed by somebody; I do not know by whom. The things were in my bed-room.

Q. Did the prisoner live in the same house - A.

No; she came in and pretended to take the kitchen of me. A few minutes after she was gone these things were missing. On the next morning the officer came and asked me if I had lost any thing.

JAMES LANGLEY . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner on the 21st of November, on suspicion, finding these things upon her, about nine o'clock at night. She had got a bundle with her. She said they were her own things. I detained her on suspicion. She said she was going to pawn the things to pay a chandler shop score. I asked her her name; she said it was Davey; she lived at No. 7, Brentford-mews. I put her in the watchhouse. I went and enquired; they knew no such person. I came back, and took charge of her in my own name, and locked her up. Some time in the night she said she was very cold; she asked me to let her come out to the fire to warm herself; at last she said that some other woman and she had stolen the things, and pawned the bolster. After this she confessed that she pawned the bolster, and she had torn the duplicate to pieces.

JAMES RUST . I am a pawnbroker. This bolster and case was pawned by the prisoner.

Prosecutor. The bolster is mine, and the sheets are marked with my own mark.

Q. What time in the evening was she with you - A. About half after eight.

Langley. This was soon after nine that I stopped the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence My husband sent me out to pay the shop score, for the things that I owed; I met a woman; she had two bundles in her hand, she said, take hold of this bundle, while I go and make some money to pay my rent. When she came out she gave me the ticket. Not knowing how to read I put the ticket in my bosom. She said. she would treat me with a pint of beer. She asked me to pledge the sheet. I went in to pawn the sheets for six shillings. Immediately the pawnbroker took me up, and the women ran away from me. I told them I brought the things from Mr. Elliott. I told my husband to go up to Mr. Elliott. I was locked up in such a place, I did not know what to do, I was in such a fright. I leave it to your decision. This child is dying in my arms. My prosecutor can give me a character if he likes.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121202-110

109. FRANCES DONNELLY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of November , eight coach-glasses, value 12 l. and one leather knee-band, value 1 l. the property of James Walker .

JAMES WALKER . I am a stable-keeper , Burleigh-street, in the Strand. On the 20th of November, I lost eight coach-glasses from two carriages, which stand at a coach-house that I hold under his Majesty, in the Savoy, in the Strand , and a knee-band of a one horse chaise. I do not know how they were taken. The watchman found them on her in the Strand, in the way they are now in.

WILLIAM FLOWERDEAU . I am a watchman in the Strand. On Friday morning, the 20th of November, between one and two o'clock, a woman passed me with a bundle, just fastened on her gown. I looked at the woman; what have you got there. A little glass. I said, stop. It seemed bulky and heavy. It was a small trifle, she said; she had passed many watchman, and why should not you let me pass. At the watchhouse, she said a strange man gave her two shillings to hold them while he got a coach. I charged her at the watchhouse, and afterwards found out the prosecutor had lost these glasses.

Prosecutor. The glasses and knee-boot is mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I was walking in the street, a gentleman asked me to have something to drink, being an unfortunate girl. I said, I did not mind. I was taken with the glasses.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121202-111

110. JAMES HANKS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of November , from the person of Thomas Tate , a 10 l. bank note , his property.

THOMAS TATE . I am an hair-dresser , No. 82, Golden-lane . On the 13th of November, in the evening, near seven o'clock, I was sitting in my own shop, by the fire. I was sitting by the right hand side of the fire, and Hanks, the prisoner, sat opposite of me; his knees touched my knees. I have known him forty years; I employed him as a journeyman. Before that I was in the public-house; he came in by accident; he told me that he had been out of employ seven weeks; he said he had never done better than when he was in my service. I said yes, you might have done well, if you had been steady. I had some trifle of reckoning to pay; I had no money but a ten-pound note, and somebody said you have not got a ten-pound note. I took it out of my pocket-book, and put it in the pocketbook again. I went out of the public-house; the prisoner followed me. I sat down by the fire in my shop; he sat down; his knees touched mine. He said, you will fall asleep. I said, no, I shall do very well. I am apt to be heavy at that hour of night. Before that I had put my hand down, and felt whether I had the pocket-book, and after he was gone I took out my pocket-book, and the ten-pound note was gone. I went to his sister, to enquire where he lodged. He lodged at the Golden-horse, Aldersgate-street. I went to the Golden-horse; the landlord said he had not laid at home from the Friday night.

Q. Did you ever find your property - A. No. I should know the note again if I were to see it; the number is 25, 925. I know he robbed me while I was asleep, because no creature was sitting near me but the prisoner.

THOMAS FLETCHER. I am journeyman to the prosecutor. The prosecutor had been over to the public-house; he came home to the shop; the prisoner soon followed him. I was walking about the shop; the prisoner asked me to fetch him a pint of beer. I did.

SAMUEL PULLETT . I am a butcher. I changed the ten-pound note for the prisoner. I paid the note to Mr. Hunt, the salesman, at Leadenhall.

- . The prisoner came to our house, saying his addresses to a woman in the house. He said, he left a ten-pound note at the butchers.

JOHN CLARK . The prisoner asked me to lend him a halfpenny. He said it was not for want of money. He showed me a ten-pound note.

MRS. CLARK. On the 13th of November, I went to Mr. Tate; he was sitting by the fire. I went to pay him his rent. The prisoner said he did not want money. He had been over the way at the public-house, shewing a ten-pound note. He told me not to pay him; it was safe in my hands; he would lose it.

JAMES HANCOCK. I apprehended the prisoner at a public-house in Kingsland-road. I searched him, and found two-pound in notes, and nine shillings and sixpence in silver, a new silver watch, and a new coat that he had recently bought.

Prosecutor. I have been offered ten-pound over and over not to prosecute.

Hancock. And he has been threatened by some of them.

The prisoner called five witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 51.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121202-112

111. MORRIS ISAACS and HUMPHREY MORRIS were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of November , a silver snuff-box, value 3 l. the property of William Tipler , from his person .

WILLIAM TIPLER . I went to Covent Garden Theatre . It was after the half price had commenced. Before I got into the theatre the pit was very crowded. I had been in a few moments before I saw the prisoner. After the play was over a number of people came out, which made room for me to get near the orchestra. The prisoner followed me. Between the play and the entertainment there was a disturbance in the pit. I stood on one of the seats, the first from the orchestra. After I had been standing a little while there I felt something squeeze against my pocket. I thought something was going forward that was not quite right. From the appearance of the prisoners I could not charge them at the time I suspected them, but their genteel appearance prevented me. After I felt something push against my side I got down from the seat. I put my hand in my pocket, and found there was a hole cut through, and my snuff-box gone. After I had got down Morris went out. I went out after him, as soon I could. I told the man at the pit door what had happened. He said he would go and fetch an officer. Lack and Donaldson came. Lack went into the pit with me, and I pointed out Isaacs. Isaacs then had got a seat. I told the officer to look at him, to see whether he was a suspicious character or not, and then I gave charge of him. I described the other, and Donaldson brought him. They were searched in the lobby of the theatre, nothing was found upon either of them. The property has not been found at all.

Isaac's Defence. I am as innocent as a child unborn.

Morris's Defence. The same.

The prisoners called two witnesses, who gave them a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121202-113

112. WILLIAM DOVEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of November , a tin tea-kettle, value 2 s. 6 d. the property of Thomas Taplin .

THOMAS TAPLIN. I am a tinman , 35, Liquorpond-street . I lost my tin tea-kettle on the 21st of November. I found it on the prisoner, about an hundred yards from my premises.

JOHN LIMBRIC . I am an officer. I produce the tin tea-kettle.

Prosecutor. It looks very much like the tea-kettle. It has no mark on it.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121202-114

113. WILLIAM GLOVER was indicted for that he, on the 9th of November , was servant to James Watts , and was employed and entrusted by him to receive money for him, that he did receive into his possession the sum of 1 l. for and on account of his said master, and that he afterwards did secrete and steal the same .

JAMES WATTS . I am a baker in Southampton-street. I employed the prisoner to carry out my bread, and entrusted him to receive my money. He received one pound of Ann Swan , on the Monday.

ANN SWAN . I deal with Mr. Watts. I paid the prisoner one pound on the Monday. This is the bill. He signed his name to it.

Prosecutor. He did not account to me that one-pound. He left me. I saw no more of him until the officer took him in custody. I never received the money.

Prisoner's Defence. That night I went away I got a friend to go to Mr. Watts to tell him I took the money, I was very willing to work it out.

GUILTY , aged 44.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121202-115

114. JOHN SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of November , eleven pounds weight of leaden pipe, value 2 s. the property of Thomas Lewis and Thomas Croft , affixed to a certain building of theirs .

THOMAS LEWIS . I am a stable-keeper . My partner's name is Thomas Croft . Our stables are opposite Whitechapel church . On the 25th of November, about half after five in the evening, I saw the prisoner in the act of breaking the pipe off. After he had broken it off I let him go to the distance of you to me. I went and took it on his person, then I took him to Lambeth-street office. This is the pipe; it was affixed to a wall leading to the house.

Prisoner's Defence. It was through real distress I took it.

GUILTY , aged 44.

Judgment respited .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121202-116

115. JAMES WHEELER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of November , from the person of Samuel Bathcot , a promissory note for the payment of 10 l. his property.

SAMUEL BATHCOT . On the 24th of November, near twelve at noon, I was going up Holborn. The prisoner came up to me; he said it was slippy. I said it was. I turned up Brook-street; I was going to Brooks'-market. He came up to me, and said, you took no notice of me. I said, I did not know him. He said he came from Durham, and I said I came from Scotland. He said, he had been there a few months back. He said he was left an executor: he was come up to receive some money for a family; he was going to buy some land in Scotland. He said he was going down in the same stage I was. I said I was going down in a Berwick ship. He said he knew the captain; he was going down in the same ship. We came to the top of the street, and talked a little while. I told him I was going to a friend of mine, at No. 1. He then asked me to have a pint of beer in a public-house. I went in with him. We had a pint of beer; I was going to pay for it.

Q. What sign was it - A. I cannot say. It was in Gray's-inn-lane. I was going to pay for it. He said I have too many halfpence; I want to get rid of them. I told him I had got a ten-pound Suffolk and Essex note. I asked him where the bankers was in London. He asked me to see the note. I shewed it him. He said, it was a very good one, and returned it to me. There was another man came into the room; he asked if we had seen a woman in the room. I told him, no, there had been none in since we came in. He said he had given the woman a ten-pound note to get a suit of clothes, and she had not come back; he was going to marry her. We asked him what sort of a woman it was. He told us, and the prisoner and I told him it was some girl of the town. Then he told us that he had been with some soldiers the night before, and had been playing at cards, and different gambling with them; he had met with this girl there; he had brought her up with him; he was going to be married to her that day. He said he came from Coventry; he came up and had taken a good deal of money that was left to him. He put his hand into his pocket, and pulled out a great many notes, and a purse with some guineas in it. The prisoner looked at them, and said they were large notes, some were fifty's, and some hundred's. After that, the prisoner, on talking about gambling, said, how foolish it was; perhaps, he said, you will like to gamble with me. He said he would, if he would not tell his wife.

Q. Did they pretend to be acquainted with each other - A. No, quite strangers. Then the prisoner put down a guinea first, and the other man put down a guinea. I think the prisoner put down a halfpenny on the table. The guinea each was the stake, and the halfpenny to play with. They put it under the hat. They asked me to turn the halfpenny over, which I did; then after that I turned it over two or three times. The prisoner said he had won the guinea. They called head and tails. The other man put down another halfpenny; he called whatever he thought it was. I was to turn the halfpenny; then after that he gave him the guinea again; he said, go home and have no more to do with that woman. The prisoner then said, suppose you play with this man for twenty pounds. I said, no, I work too hard for my money. He took the note out of my hand, and laughed, and said it was only to shew the other man how foolishly he had lost his money. He then asked me to turn the halfpenny over, which I did; then after I had turned it two or three times; he said that the other man had gained it. He took it from the table, and gave it him. I said, I was not going to lose my money so. He then proposed that me and the other man should shew him a sum of money in a few minutes. I told him I had got no money to shew. He laid some great sum. I cannot say what. He got up, went to the door. I went after him to the door. He told me not to be afraid of my money. He went perhaps ten yards or more from the door. I thought I had been in bad company, and that I should be done out of my money; recollecting that the other man had got the money, I went back to secure him. On my going into the room the other man was gone, and on my return in the street the prisoner was gone. I asked in the public-house if they saw that man go out; they said, no.

Q. Did you ever get your money again - A. No, I have not got it.

Q. How soon afterwards did you see the prisoner - A. This was on the Tuesday, I saw him at Bow-street on the Thursday.

Q. Are you sure the prisoner was the person - A. Yes, I am sure of that. I have never seen the other man since.

JAMES HODGES . I am one of the beadles of St. Andrews, Holborn. On Tuesday morning, the 24th of last month, I was coming up Grays-inn-lane, between twelve and one at noon. I met the prisoner and his brother just coming from the Marquis of Granby public-house, Grays-inn-lane. As soon as the prisoner passed me he sat up a run, and ran down Portpool-lane. His brother followed, and spoke to me as he passed: - how do you do, sir. When I came to the door of the public-house I saw the prosecutor come out, apparently very agitated and frightened. I asked him, what was the matter.

Q. Did you know the prisoner before - A. Yes, I have known him twenty years. I am certain of his person. I learned of the prosecutor that he had been robbed. I took him to the police office, Hatton Garden. He gave information of his being robbed. I requested that they would send off immediately to the bankers and stop payment of the note, which I understood they did.

JOHN LOW. I am a clerk to Messrs. Barclay and Co. The prosecutor and a police officer came to our house, I think about two o'clock, to stop a note.

Q. Have you got the note here - A. Yes, I have. A jew woman brought it to our house. It has been in my possession ever since.

Q. Did you stop the person - A. I did not. I had not get the number or date when it came in. The prosecutor came in about half an hour. The

prosecutor described the note, and from the description he gave I have kept the note ever since. This is the note.

Q. to prosecutor. Do you know the note - A. I have no reason to doubt it is my note. My note was cut across, and paper pasted over it, and this is the same. I went to the bankers, and saw the other notes that came in. Some of them were cut across, but I did not know them. This I did. There is a name upon this note like the name on my note.

CHARLES HUMPHREYS . I am an officer of Bow-street. I apprehended the prisoner. I found guineas upon him. There were two other men with him. When I told him my name, and who I was, the other man ran away. I found a purse of guineas on the prisoner, and a two-guinea piece. The prosecutor described what was put on the table looked like a two-guinea piece.

Prosecutor. I cannot say that two-guinea piece is the same, it is similar.

WILLIAM MANN . The prosecutor and the prisoner came into my house, and called for a pint of beer. After that, the prisoner's brother came in, and called for a pint of ale. I knew them both by sight for years, in the neighbourhood. After I had served them I was down in the cellar. I saw nothing more. They paid me for what I brought in. I keep the Marquis of Granby, Gray's-inn-lane. The prosecutor had been to the door: he came to me, and asked me where the gentleman in the parlour was. I did not know he had gone out.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of the charge of stealing the note. It was a gambling transaction, and voluntary on that man's part. He had two ten-pound notes, and it was with difficulty I persuaded him not to play with them both. He said, let me put a ten-pound note on the table first, and when he put his ten-pound note down I will run away with it. I told him if we took that man's ten-pound note we should get into trouble; if he won it fairly it would be all right.

GUILTY , aged 54.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121202-117

116. JONATHAN SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of November , two window sashes framed and glazed, value 30 s. the property of John Nightingale , and George Paine Cox .

JOHN NIGHTINGALE . I am a carpenter . My partner's name is George Paine Cox . We are assignees. I only know that the sashes were fixed in the window.

JOHN KILBURN. I am a carpenter. I made the sashes.

- CARROL. I am a watchman. On the 23d of November, about seven o'clock, a gentleman told me the prisoner had some sashes; he did not think the prisoner came by them honest. I went after the prisoner, and asked him how he came by them sashes. I sprang my rattle. He ran away, and left the sashes with me. A watchman brought him back, and at the watchhouse he said he got them in that house.

JOHN LANGLEY . The prisoner was brought to me at the watchhouse. I found on him an instrument for getting sashes out, a knife, and a key. He denied his name. He would not say who he was, nor where he came from.

Q. to Kilburn. Where were these sashes taken from - A. They were taken from Kilburn-place; there is my writing on them. I wrote that on them before they were taken to the house. I am sure they belong to the building. I made them.

Prisoner's Defence. The sashes were standing at the corner of a street; a man told me if I would take them to a public-house he would satisfy me for my trouble, and as I came along he told the watchman to stop me. I do not know any reason for it.

GUILTY , aged 47.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121202-118

117. JAMES SHEPPARD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of November , a tub, value 3 s. the property of William Bennett .

WILLIAM BENNETT . I am a cooper . I live at Cow-cross . I lost my tub on Friday the 13th of November. It was in my gateway.

GEORGE MILES. I live opposite of Mr. Bennett. On the 13th of November, about half past twelve, I noticed the prisoner going up the gateway. I saw him take a tub up and walk away with it. I informed Mr. Bennett of it. We went after the prisoner and catched him by the Sessions'-house.

Prosecutor. This is the tub; it is mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked up a tub at Checquer stairs; I took it home, and put it down by my own door. It was taken away. I went up this gateway. I thought that tub looked like it. I took it up.

GUILTY , aged 53.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121202-119

118. THOMAS RIPPOTT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of December , seven pounds weight of hogs-bristles. value 20 s. the property of George Mashiter , George Byng , Octavian Mashiter , Thomas Platt , and Robert Hulme .

WILLIAM JUDAH . I am clerk to the prosecutor's; they are wharfingers . These bristles were taken from the warehouse belonging to the wharf. On the 1st of December, I received information that there were some bristles concealed in a coat in the warehouse. I went and found the bristles were there. I sent for an officer, and when the men came out of the warehouse I pointed the man out to the officer. The prisoner had got the coat under his arm. I gave him in charge of the officer. He is a soldier .

THOMAS PAINE. I am an officer. I took the prisoner in custody. He had the property concealed in his coat.

Prisoner's Defence. I have been a soldier twelve years. I have been fighting under Lord Wellington in Spain and Portugal. I was going to my work; on seeing some rubbish I kicked it up, and took up them hairs. There were no bristles where I was at work, only flax and hemp.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121202-120

119. MARY GROVES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of November , a watch, value 30 s. a gold seal, value 5 s. and two watch keys, value 1 s. the property of William Spinks , from his person .

WILLIAM SPINKS . I am a journeyman baker . On Saturday evening, the 28th of November, I lost my watch. I met the prisoner in Whitechapel; she asked me to give her something to drink. I took her into three public-houses; at the two first houses we had gin together, at the third, beer. From there I went to the Angel, at Shadwell. She pushed me into the door and went off. I felt for my watch; it was gone. I am sure I had my watch when I came out of the third public-house. I found my watch at the pawnbroker's shop on the Monday following.

CHARLES WILLIAMSON . The watch was pledged with me on Saturday the 28th of November, and on Monday morning, the prosecutor came and asked me if I had taken in a watch. I shewed him the watch. I lent one pound on it.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121202-121

120. JAMES FLETCHER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of November , a sheet, value 2 s. the property of John Cordis .

ANN CORDIS . My husband's name is John Cordis . I lost the sheet from off the bed, where the prisoner slept. When he went out I missed the sheet from off the bed, and when he returned I told him I must send for an officer. He said, do not be alarmed; I will tell you where your sheet is. He went up stairs, unbuttoned his clothes, and took the sheet off his body.

Prisoner's Defence. I belonged to the Royal Oak, man-of-war, a seventy-four. I deserted her. I have nothing to say about the sheet. I was short of money at that time.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Judgement respited .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder

Reference Number: t18121202-122

121. EMANUEL EVANS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of November , a handkerchief, value 18 d. the property of Lewis Lyon , from his person .

LEWIS LYON . I am a taylor ; I live at 22, Lamb-street, Spitalfields. On the 9th of November, I was in Palace-yard . I had the handkerchief in my pocket when I saw the procession go into Westminster Hall. I had been in Palace-yard about five minutes when Ruthwin tapped me on the shoulder; he asked me if I had lost any thing. He pulled my handkerchief out of his breast pocket. I immediately said, that is my handkerchief. Ruthwin told me that he had got the prisoner. He took me to the public-house where he had taken the prisoner.

ARCHIBALD RUTHWIN . I am an officer of Bow-street. I was at Palace-yard. I saw the prisoner.

Q. Did you know his person before - A. I did not. I watched him, and saw him attempt several gentleman's pockets. I saw him take this handkerchief out of Mr. Lyon's pocket. I immediately laid hold of him, and took it out of his hand. I gave the prisoner to my brother officer, and sent him to the Mitre public-house until I went to the gentleman, and told him of it. I found Mr. Lyon in the crowd: I asked him if he had lost any thing. He said, a handkerchief. I said, is this yours. He said, Yes This is the handkerchief.

Q. Did the prisoner appear to be in company with any body - A. No, none whatever; he was alone.

Prosecutor. It is my handkerchief; it is worth more than eighteen-pence.

Prisoner's Defence. Somebody put the handkerchief on my arm. I was looking at the handkerchief when the officer laid hold of me.

GUILTY , aged 16

Judgment respited .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant

Reference Number: t18121202-123

122. WILLIAM CLARK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of November , a game cock, value 7 s. the property of Thomas Schofield .

THOMAS SCHOFIELD . I live on Finchley Common , by the Bald Face Stag. I had a game cock, I kept him in my cellar of a night, and in the day he walked about the Common. Last Monday was a week, I missed him at eleven o'clock at night, from the roost. On the next day I saw him before the Justice; I know it to be mine.

JOHN COX . I live on Finchley Common. I was making a garden. I observed the prisoner walking about a hay-rick; then Joe Woodward frightened the fowls up to the Common. I saw the prisoner part the bushes with his feet, and sprinkle something to the fowls. I saw him stoop, as if a man was snatching up a fowl. I had suspicion of that. He was taken, and brought to the Bald Face Stag. He had two fowls found upon him.

- FROST. I am a constable. I took charge of the prisoner, and the fowls. Mrs. Schofield saw the cock in the evening; she said it was her fowl. I searched the prisoner. I found a bag with some wheat in it and bread.

Prisoner's Defence. On Monday, the 30th of November, I went to Finchley; I was told there were some new buildings going on there. I was out of employ. I went to get work. I saw two cocks fighting; I took them up, I do not deny. One was nearly killed. I had no intention of committing a felony. I hope you will decide a favourable punishment.

GUILTY , aged 36.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and Publicly whipped .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18121202-124

123. ANN ADAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of November , two silver spoons, value 15 s. and six pounds weight of rags, value 5 s. 6 d. the property of Edward Leesham .

JANE LEESHAM . My husband's name is Edward Leesham ; he is a baker , No. 2, Windmill-street, Finsbury-square . The prisoner was my servant . On the 27th of November I missed the spoons. I asked the prisoner where they were. She answered

me that one of the spoons were in the kitchen that morning, and the other was in the parlour. I found one of the spoons in the kitchen, among the dirty dishes, and the other spoon I found in the water cistern. The tea spoon she said she threw through the kitchen window. I never found that spoon again.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18121202-125

124. RICHARD BRITTEN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of November , five silver tea-spoons, value 10 s. and a pair of silver sugar-tongs, value 10 s. the property of Lewis Blair .

WILLIAM RUMBALL. I am shopman to Mr. Saunders, slop-seller, New Road. St. George's in the East. My master's shop is opposite of the prosecutor's house. On the 20th of November, about three in the afternoon, I saw the prisoner go inside of the prosecutor's door, in the habit of a chimney-sweeper. I saw a young fellow standing about the door; after the prisoner had gone in, he went past the door. He was a suspicious character in my eye. He went up and down by the door, while the prisoner was inside; immediately the prisoner came out of the prosecutor's door, he said to the other, come along.

Q. How long was he in the house - A. About two or three minutes. I crossed over to the house immediately. Mrs. Blair was sitting in the back room; she said she had lost some spoons. I went in pursuit of the prisoner. I overtook the prisoner in Church-street, Whitechapel. I took the prisoner by the collar; the other man ran away. I asked him what he had done with the spoons; he said, what spoons. I took him to a public-house in Lambeth-street. The officer, on searching him, found five silver tea-spoons in the lining of his breeches, and a pair of sugar-tongs. They were afterwards claimed by Mrs. Blair.

SAMUEL MILLER . I am an officer. I searched the prisoner; I found five spoons inside of his breeches, and a pair of sugar-tongs.

Prosecutrix. They are mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming down the Commercial road; I saw a boy running. He dropped something, and I picked it up. I saw they were spoons.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Judgment respited .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18121202-126

125. FRANCES INCH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22nd of November , a pail, value 15 d. the property of Samuel Fisher .

SAMUEL FISHER . I am a stable-keeper ; I reside at Chapel-mews, Portland-chapel . I can only speak to the pail.

JOSEPH GODDEY . I am a watchman. On the 22nd of November, I saw the prisoner at six o'clock in the morning, near Portland-chapel; she had a pail with her.

Q. Did you know the woman before - A. Yes; I have had her in my custody four times before. I took her to the watchhouse. I enquired at the mews, and Mr. Fisher owned the pail. This is the pail.

Prosecutor. It is my pail.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in great distress, that caused me to do it.

Goddey. She does nothing else but this business.

GUILTY , aged 35.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18121202-127

126. MARY JONES was indicted for wilful and corrupt perjury .

JOHN WESTCOATT . Q. Is Mr. Brathwaite here that administered the oath - A. No, nor any one from his office that I know of.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18121202-128

127. JOHN POLLACK was indicted for a libel .

JOSEPH JOHNSON . Q. In June last were you clerk to Mr. Lake - A. Yes.

Q. Is Mr. Lake an attorney - A. Yes, he lives at No. 4, Dowgate-hill.

Q. Did you receive that letter - A. Yes, on the 12th of June, it came to No. 4, Dowgate-hill.

MR. LAKE. Q. How long, Mr. Lake, have you been an attorney - A. About seven years.

Q. You say you received that letter by post - A. I did.

Q. I do not know whether you know the defendant's hand-writing - A. No, I do not.

THOMAS HANFIELD . I am a clerk in Coleman-street to a merchant.

Q. Do you know Mr. Pollack's hand-writing - A. I do; I have seen him write frequent.

Q. Do you belive that to be his hand-writing - A. I believe it is.

(The letter read.)

Addressed to Mr. Thomas Lake, 4, Dowgate-hill, London.

Mr. Thomas Lake.

"SIR,

THE savage brutality which you have thought proper to act towards me, truly justifies me to inform you, that I consider you as a scoundrel; that you disgrace your profession; that you would be more in character at a plough tail; at the same time I shall take occasion to observe, that the manner in which you have involved your client, betrays the most consumate ignorance. It ever must be lamented, that such petty-fogging attonies, as yourself, should be permitted to soil so honourable a profession. And some circumstances to reflect that you will (on this occasion) get your well merited reward the first opportunity, namely, a horse-whip.

JOHN POLLACK ."

1812.

Mr. Alley, Q. to Mr. Lake. Have you ever been employed by the defendant - A. I was not. I was employed by Mr. Brooks as an agent. Mr. Brooks was his attorney. I know the defendant.

Q. How long was Mr. Brooks his attorney - A. About a year.

Q. Did you at any time write a letter, calling on the defendant for a payment of some money - A. Yes, twenty pounds. I did not know at that time that Mr. Brooks was concerned for him.


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