Old Bailey Proceedings, 28th October 1812.
Reference Number: 18121028
Reference Number: f18121028-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND ALSO THE GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, HELD AT Justice-Hall, in the Old Bailey, On WEDNESDAY the 28th of OCTOBER, 1812, and following Days;

BEING THE EIGHT SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF The Right Hon. CLAUDIUS STEPHEN HUNTER , LORD-MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY JOB SIBLY , No. 4, CARTHUSIAN-STREET, ALDERSGATE-STREET.

LONDON:

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED (BY THE AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON,) By R. Butters, No. 22, Fetter-lane, Fleet-street.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON.

Before the Right Honorable CLAUDIUS STEPHEN HUNTER , Lord Mayor of the City of London; Sir Alexander Thompson , knt. one of the Barons of His Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir Allan Chambre , knt. one of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir John William Anderson , bart. Sir Charles Price , bart. John Ansley , esq. Aldermen of the said City; John Silvester , esq. Recorder of the said City; George Scholey , esq. John Atkins , esq. George Bridges , esq. Aldermen of the said City; and Newman Knowlys , esq. Common-serjeant of the said City; His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

London Jury.

Thomas Ferry ,

Barnard Evans ,

Robert Swansborough ,

John Lewis ,

Samuel Huff ,

Matthew Kemp ,

John Powell ,

Thomas Cochrane ,

Francis Bassett ,

Vincent Smith ,

Thomas Stanton ,

Thomas Freeman .

First Middlesex Jury.

George Williamson ,

Henry Creddell ,

Richard Davis ,

Richard Gully ,

Daniel Hopkins ,

James Brown ,

Joseph Dockett ,

James Butterworth ,

Henry Macknott ,

William Woodland ,

John Brees ,

Edmund Stevens .

Second Middlesex Jury.

George Chaunes ,

Ralph Cook ,

James Pulteney ,

Thomas Gill ,

John Baker ,

Ellis Hanwell ,

John Fortnam ,

John Millward ,

William Taylor ,

John Webber ,

William Lees ,

Roger Southworth .

Reference Number: t18121028-1

843. GEORGE SIMPSON WHARTON and GEORGE MARTIN HUTTON were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of September , forty-six yards of Irish linen, value 10 l. six handkerchiefs, value 15 s. four tablecloths, value 2 l. fourteen yards of Nankeen, value 18 s. fourteen yards of calico, value 1 l. 15 s. the property of John Morgan , in his dwelling-house .

JOHN MORGAN . Q. Where do you now reside - A. No. 5, King's Arms-buildings, Wood-street, Cheapside. At that time I carried on business in Bond-street , and at Hastings, in Sussex.

Q. When did you leave Bond-street, to go to Hastings, to go to Sussex - A. On the 19th of August. I left Wharton and Hutton, the prisoners, to conduct my business in Bond-street, in my absence.

Q. Had you a valuable stock of goods in your shop at that time - A I had.

Q. In what parish was your house in - A. St. George, Hanover-square.

Q. Did you give any authority to either of them to make any payment, or to borrow money on account - A. I authorised them to pawn goods to the amount of sixty pounds, to pay the rent that was due the Midsummer before.

Q. Was that the extent of the authority that you gave them - A. That was the extent that time. I told them to raise that money upon Irish linens. I gave this direction to Wharton. Hutton was not present at the time.

Q. How soon after you left town did you hear from Wharton, or see him - A. I cannot say exactly. He wrote to me two or three days after this. I have not got that letter; I destroyed it. He said, in that letter, he had a deal of difficulty in raising the fifty pounds; the goods deposited for sixty pounds, amounted to upwards of two hundred and fifty pounds. There was nothing else material in that letter. I destroyed all his letters he sent me while I was at Hastings.

Q. Why did you destroy them - A. I thought them of no use. I had a great many other letters in my pocket.

Q. What is that in your hand - A. A memorandum of dates. I made it last night.

Q. Now tell me the contents of any letter you received after the first - A. On Saturday, the 5th of September, I received a letter from Wharton, stating, that there were a great many payments becoming due, and that it was impossible to raise money to satisfy them, and therefore I must be made a bankrupt; that he had thought of a plan by which eight hundred pounds might be put in my pocket; that he should come down by the Saturday evening mail, and let me know his plan. There was no mail to Hastings, but he came down by the coach on Sunday night. He then sent me a note by the porter, saying, that he had arrived at Hastings. I went to him. He then told me, as he had in the letter, that I must be made a bankrupt, and he wished me to conceal goods. I told him immediately, it was needless to ask me to conceal goods; I would not do it. He said, he had found so much difficulty in pawning the last goods, he thought it impossible to raise any more money in that way. I enquired the amount of the goods he had disposed of. His answer was, two hundred and fifty pounds. He told me he had pawned them in ten pound duplicates, as the Act of Parliament would not allow any more to be pawned at a time.

Q. Did you ask him to give the account of the goods he had so pawned - A. I did not. When I left London I directed him to enter them in the back part of the memorandum book, therefore I expected to find the account in that book, and there is no account whatever. I directed him to go home immediately, which he did not. He made an excuse that the coach was full, and on Monday he repeated his applications again, by sending me a note from the inn. in the morning. It was merely to say, that he had not gone out of Hastings. I saw him again on the Monday. He repeated the same intentions.

Mr. Gurney. Tell us what he said - A. He wanted me to conceal property, which I before stated I refused, and said, I would not. I told him, it was useless to ask me to do any such thing; I was determined not to do any thing of the kind. I gave him twenty pound to pay Messrs. Lowndes and Company, of Gutter-lane, which he never has paid. I told him, to go home, and take care of the shop in London.

Mr. Andrews. Did you, before you parted company with Wharton, give him any authority to dispose of any other part of your stock whatsoever - A. No, none, except to selling to customers in the shop.

Q. Do you know Wharton's hand-writing - A. I do. This letter is his hand-writing, which I received in London, on Monday, the 21st. It was directed to Hastings.

Q. Before you received this letter had you been to Bond-street - A. I had, with Perks, the officer. I went to get some goods that were secreted in a closet in the bed-room.

Q. When you came to the house was Wharton there - A. He was not. The shop was shut and sealed up. It was in the afternoon, between four and five, on Thursday, the 17th, after the examination of the two prisoners, at Bow-street. I found an officer in possession of the house.

Q. Did you go with Perks to examine the bedroom - A. I did. I found seven packages of goods there, in the closet of the bed-room where Hutton and Wharton slept. All the seven packages were in this one closet, in a wrapper, and some old clothes upon the top of the packages. Perks and myself took the packages to Bow-street. They were opened at Bow-street. The packages contained goods belonging to me. They are not the goods in this indictment. It was those in the trunk. Perks had taken

the trunk before. I saw the trunk at Bow-street. It was a trunk of Wharton's which I had seen before. That trunk contained two pieces of Irish linen, and some striped muslin handkerchiefs, (I do not recollect the quantity), four tablecloths, some nankeens, and some calico.

Q. Are you able to say that these things were yours, and formed a part of your stock in Bond-street - A. I am. They were produced in Wharton's presence at Bow-street. He gave no account of them.

(The letter read.)

Addressed to Mr. Morgan, Hastings, (with speed), 14th of September, London, and signed, George Simpson Wharton .

="DEAR SIR,

I am sorry to inform you of the dreadful circumstance that occurred last night. Our shop has been robbed of nearly every thing that is in it, or, at least, every thing that is valuable. You, of course, will set out immediately to come to London. If there be no coach, you had better take a chaise. I am very uncomfortable, having been absented by all your friends, but I trust my character and conduct is such to command your esteem. Your obedient servant,

GEORGE SIMPSON WHARTON.="

Mr. Gurney. Mr. Morgan, this indictment is not prefered by your creditors - A. No, by me, sir.

Q. Then, I am distinctly to understand you, the prosecution was not commenced by you, but by your creditors, and when your creditors abandoned it you took it up - A. The two prisoners were taken up by the direction of two gentlemen. I do not know who they were.

Q. Why, they were your creditors, you know very well - A. Yes, they were taken up by the direction of two of my creditors. Mr. Sowerby was one of them. I do not know who they were. I was led to understand it was Mr. Sowerby and Mr. Mears.

Q. We have got your creditors here. Do not be backward. This shop in Bond-street was originally belonging to Mr. Williams, was it not - A. It was.

Q. Mr. Williams put you in the shop to conduct it for him - A. Yes. Mr. Wharton was there for a week before I was. He put me in.

Q. Then it was agreed that you should take the stock and lease, and pay Mr. Williams in money, for which you gave him bills - A. Yes. This was on the 4th of May. I was to give two bills of two hundred and sixty-six pounds each, and one of four hundred pounds.

Q. In the month of August last you did not begin with any great capital, I understand - A. None whatever.

Q. And as you had no capital, you, besides this business in Bond-street, which required a good deal, you set up another shop at Hastings, and a third at Beck's Hill, I believe; and, upon the strength of your large capital, and great business, you lived like a gentleman - A. I lived like a tradesman.

Q. In September, bills were becoming due, and you had a deal of difficulty in raising money to pay them - A. Yes.

Q. Business rather dull, and there was no way of raising money, but by the pawnbrokers - A. I went down to Hastings to raise money, and left Wharton commission to pawn things in town to pay the rent.

Q. And when he wrote you word that bills had become due to about eleven hundred pounds, he said, you must become a bankrupt - A. Yes. He did not say the amount. He said, I must stop, or become a bankrupt. That letter I burnt directly. I was ashamed of his asking me such a thing. I went to him at the inn. I did not like any of my young men to see him there, his message was so altominable.

Q. So you went to him to the inn - A. I did, and he told me to secrete the goods, but I resisted him at once.

Q. Did not you knock him down on the spot for the proposal - A. No, I did not attempt anything of the sort. I told him, to go off to London directly.

Q. You thought him a great scoundrel, did not you - A. I thought him an honest young man to me at the time, therefore I sent him back with confidence to the shop in Bond-street. I told him, to go off to London immediately. I called the waiter into the room, and told him to call him up the next morning, to go off with the coach. I told him, to take care of the stock in Bond-street until my return, which would be on the Monday following.

Q. So he proposed to you to cheat your creditors, and therefore you thought him an honest man, did you - A. I did not suppose he would rob me as he has done.

Q. No, no, how could you suppose that. But you did not stay many minutes in his company - A. No. I ordered in a glass of wine and water, and drank with him, and told him to go home.

Q. Leaving him to go off by the coach - A. Yes.

Q. The next morning you had a note from him, begging to see you again, and you went to him - A. I went to him. I found that he wanted to rob my creditors.

Q. You found he was so bad company you went home, and did not see him again - A. Yes, I did; he was very ill, and that was the reason that I took such compassion on him.

Q. You took a walk out with him on the hills - A. Yes, I did, on the Monday. He wanted to see the place.

Q. How many hours do you think you were out together - A. About an hour and a quarter.

Q. Now, Mr. Morgan, I must put a question to you, to which I know what your answer will be. Did not you there instruct him to carry the goods from the house to different places, and then to pretend to your creditors that your house was robbed - A. No, I did not.

Q. Did not he and you ride together in a gig - A. I drove him eight miles to town in a gig. I secured him a place in the coach at Hastings, and drove him to Battle, eight miles on the road.

Q. So that he did not get the coach at Hastings - A. No, he did not. I took him on, because he was very unwell at the time, therefore I thought, as he had taken an outside place, it would be bad for him to get up early in the morning.

Q. When you came to town there was a bill of Mr. Sowerby's coming due, was not there - A. There was.

Q. And you instructed him to wait upon Mr. Sowerby, and beg for time - A. I did, at Battle; and I likewise gave him twenty pound to pay Lowndes and Son.

Q. I know you did. After he came to London you received another letter from him telling you that Mr. Sowerby would not give any longer time, therefore the plan that you had instructed him must be put in execution - A. I never instructed him.

COURT. The question is, whether you received a letter from him, telling you that Mr. Sowerby would give no longer time, therefore the plan must be put in execution - A. I did not receive any such letter, and that I swear.

Mr. Gurney. When did you receive the news of the supposed robbery of your house - A. On Tuesday the 15th.

Q. And very much astonished you was - A. I was.

Q. How soon does the post come in at Hastings - A. The letters are delivered about eleven or twelve o'clock.

Q. You got to London by that time - A. No, I did not; I got to town on Wednesday night. I did not go to my house in Bond-street, until the Thursday following, between four and five in the afternoon. The officers were in possession of the house.

Q. The most valuable part of your stock was gone out of your shop, to a person of the name of Neale - A. I don't know, there was some found in Northumberland court.

Q. I am talking of Northumberland-street - A. The prisoner informed me the greatest part of the goods were at Mr. Neale's, and there they were found.

Q. Then it became necessary to be acquainted who had concealed the goods, you or the prisoner, and you swore positively, at Bow-street, that you had given no instructions to conceal the goods - A. Certainly I did.

Q. Upon your first examination, did you say one single word of your giving Wharton authority to pawn any one thing - A. I did; sixty pound.

Q. To what amount were bills becoming due - A. To the amount of, altogether, three thousand five hundred pound.

Q. Now, I ask you, sir, except by deceiving creditors, or by any other means had you money to take up one-fourth of them - A. At the time I had not a single hundred to take them up with.

JOHN PERKS . I am an officer of Bow-street.

Mr. Gurney. Q. The prosecution was not set on foot by the prosecutor, but by the creditors, and the prosecutor is now carrying it on - A. Yes.

Mr. Alley. Q. Did you at any time search the house of the prosecutor - A. On Monday, the 14th of September, I went to the house, about the middle of the day; the two prisoners were in possession of the house. Finding the shop shut up, I asked the prisoner, Wharton, whether the house had been broken open or not, and what property was missing, and whether he could give me an account of the different articles lost. His answer was, he could not at that time. I asked him, if he could judge of the amount of the value that had been stolen from the premises? He said, he suspected that it was from one thousand to twelve hundred pounds. I examined the premises; I gave him to understand, that I could not discover that any forcible entry had been made, either outside or inside. I then left the premises, and had the house watched until the next day, and from the information which the creditors received on the Tuesday, Mr. Sowerby, Mr. Mears, and Mr. James, I accompanied them to Bond-street, with intent to take the prisoners into custody. On our arrival we understood, by some of the workmen on the premises, that they were gone out. I waited with two brother officers, and about nine o'clock the prisoners came home.

Q. Did they come together - A. I took Hutton, leaving Taunton and Townshend in the house; Wharton had not come in at that time. On the following morning, I was given to understand, that Taunton had taken Wharton into custody, and had lodged him where Hutton was, but separate. I searched Wharton, on him I found these three keys; this key opened a room-door of the house on the second floor; this key opens this box. At the office, I asked him if it was his box; he said, it was, And this key opened the door of the private entrance in the passage into the shop. On opening the trunk then, it contained the things it now does. There were a quantity of loose prints removed away by the order of the creditors I believe. I found on the prisoner, Hutton, two keys; this key opened, in another room, a cupboard, and on examining that cupboard, with the prosecutor, it contained nothing but Hutton's wearing apparel. On the following day, when the prisoners were in custody, this trunk was found in a room, in a cupboard, unlocked; this trunk was in the front room, in the two pair of stairs. In the same bed-room where the box was found, there was a cupboard in that room, which contained seven packages, the cupboard was not locked; we brought the packages away, and from the information I obtained, that a hackney-coach went away on the Saturday

COURT. That has nothing to do with these things.

Mr. Alley. Produce the box - A. These are the the things; they are in the state I found them.

Q. to Prosecutor. Look at the property - A. Here are two pieces of calico; they are of the value of one pound fifteen shillings. All the goods in the box are mine.

Mr. Gurney. Have you sent up any of your goods from the shop at Hastings - A. I have.

Q. Not in your own name, but in the name of your servant - A. I did not; I sold a parcel of goods to one of my servants.

Q. Which goods were found out by some of your creditors, at the Cross-keys inn - A. I believe they were.

Q. Are they worth a shilling or some pounds - A. They are worth one hundred and six pounds. I sold it to my servant, in payment of some money he had advanced for me. The servant bought them at Hastings, he sent them; they were not mine after he sent them. I told him to do what he liked with them.

Q. Upon being questioned upon the subject, have not you said that you let him have them for his wages. - A. No, I did not; I said part were for his wages,

and part a sixteen pound bill; and eight, and seventy-one pounds, which he advanced for me, and in return for that I sold him the goods.

JOHN SOWERBY . I am a linen-draper in Cheapside. On Monday, the 14th of April, the prisoner, Wharton, called at my house; he came to say, that Mr. Morgan's premises had been robbed on the Sunday night, or on the Monday morning.

Q. Did he describe what part of the premises the robbers got in - A. I asked him what part of the house he supposed they got in? He said, at the back part, it was then open. The roof of the house was open, and they had workmen in the house. He told me, at the same time, that nine-tenths of the property was gone. He said, when he came down stairs on Monday morning, he found the door in the passage, leading into the shop, half open; he went in, he was shocked to see the property gone, and the street door was also open, through which, he had no doubt, the property went. He asked me what I thought would be best to be done; my reply was, that I hardly knew how to advise him, as it then appeared to me that I was more shocked than he was; he did not appear to me to be affected. On Tuesday, the 15th, the next day after, he called upon me. I saw Wharton at a public-house in Bow-street, I think it was after the first examination; he told me, in the presence of Mr. James, he believed Mr. Morgan to be a very honest man. The chief thing that struck me in that conversation was, the discovery of the property in Northumberland court; he said, he believed Mr. Morgan would not hurt him, but he did not know what the creditors might do. I replied, that I thought he stood in a very awful situation, and I thought, to make the best of it, would be to disclose all he knew; he then told where the goods were in Northumberland-court.

Mr. Adolphus. At this interview you had not seen Morgan - A. I had; I think I first saw Morgan on Wednesday night, about eight o'clock.

Q. You, of course, hinted to him what had been done, and your suspicion on the shopman, Wharton - A. I did.

Q. You told him, of course, that a great many goods had disappeared from the shop - A. Yes.

Q. Did he, upon that, tell you that he had given authority to Wharton to pawn some of them - A. He did not; he never told me any thing about it, until Wharton mentioned it on the Thursday. Morgan and I were sitting together, at the office in Bow-street, and during the examination, there were a great quantity of goods brought from Parker, and there appeared many more than we expected. He then told me, that he had given orders to Wharton to pawn the goods to raise the money. Upon my seeing so many goods, I said I was very much surprised at it, and then, for the first time, he said, Oh! I had commissioned Wharton to raise money upon that property; he stated from sixty to seventy pound.

Q. Did not the goods appear very disproportionate to that sum of money - A. Very much, indeed.

Q. In your interview on the Wednesday night, had you any particular conversation with Morgan; did he tell you a word about Wharton ever being down at Hastings, persuading him to secrete goods - A. No, I don't think it was that night certainly not that night.

COURT. He did not say a word about Wharton persuading him to defraud his creditors - A. He certainly did not tell me a word of it at our first interview.

Q. At the time that Wharton told you he had lodged the goods at Neal's, you had no knowledge of that fact but from him - A. No.

Mr. Adolphus. What had led to an inquiry about that, was a free declaration of his own - A. I believe it was, and he said it was by his master's direction that he had deposited the goods at Neale's, and that the goods in the box and the closet, were to raise money to pay the bills, and that the pretence of the robbery was for the purpose of defrauding the creditors.

Q. Upon your first impression, you with other creditors, instituted this prosecution - A. Yes.

Q. In consequence of what you have since learned you have dropped it, and left Mr. Morgan to go on with it - A. Yes sir.

WILLIAM JAMES Q. Did you ever have any conversation with Wharton, on the subject of this robbery - A. Yes, I was with Mr. Sowerby, at the public house in Bow-street; when we went in the prisoner was crying. Wharton then said, it is a very unfortunate piece of business; I said, it appeared so to me on his part. I then asked him how he came to fill his trunks with Morgan's goods; he replied, that his intention was to go into the army, and that he had taken such things as would be useful to him; that Mr. Morgan allowed him to take any little odd matter that he wanted for himself, and I having no other idea than that he had committed this robbery, I put the question to him. I said, Mr. Wharton, you have committed this robbery yourself, you had better confess.

Mr. Gurney. This conversation that you had with him was prior, in point of time, to the disclosure that he made to Mr. Sowerby - A. It was at the same moment. I was with Mr. Sowerby, and this past before Mr. Sowerby, and before the examination. He confessed, after some little hesitation, that he himself had committed the robbery, and that Mr. Morgan knew nothing about it. He said, he had taken them to the house of a porter belonging to the Golden-cross, Chairing-cross, and Morgan knew nothing of the fact. He had done it entirely himself.

Q. Do you remember his saying, he was sure Mr. Morgan would not hurt him - A. He never said so.

Q. What is the amount of all your debts - A. To the amount of four thousand, three hundred pounds.

Q. What is the value of the effects to pay them - A. About one thousand, eight hundred pounds.

Q. I believe, Mr. James, you are Morgan's uncle - A. I am; and if the creditors had taken my advice, they would never let him have a shilling.

Wharton's Defence. May it please your Lordship, and Gentlemen of the jury. The witnesses brought against me at Bow-street office false swore themselves; and the evidence now brought against me, Mr. James, he states that I did not deny this robbery, and that Morgan knew nothing of it. At the time that Mr. Sowerby and Mr. James came to me, after the first examination, I stated to them, that Mr. Morgan gave me directions to commit this robbery, when I was

at Hastings, and I further desired that they would bring Mr. Morgan into me then, I would secure him of it, and in such a way, that Mr. Morgan could not deny it. I further told them where the goods were secreted, and that it was all by Morgan's directions. Mr. James got up and said, he would not believe that his nephew, Morgan, knew of it; he further said, if that was the case, that the goods were there, that Morgan should not proceed against me. On Mr. James leaving the room, I requested that he would bring in Mr. Morgan to me. Mr. Sowerby got up to leave the room. Prior to that, Mr. Sowerby said, in consequence of the circumstance I had stated, he was disposed to believe what I said was right, and that he would go immediately himself to the magistrate, and would endeavour to persuade him to put it off, and have it made up. My prosecutor has false swore himself, by stating, that he never received any letter at Hastings from me, after my interview with Mr. Sowerby. After I came from Hastings, from Mr. Morgan, by his direction, I went to Mr. Sowerby, to ask if he would provide for a bill becoming due to the amount of two hundred and forty-five pound; Mr. Sowerby refused to do it. I was then to put this plan in execution; it was settled between me and Morgan, at Hastings. I went to Mr. Sowerby the next day; he was not at home. I called on the following day; Mr. Sowerby refused to provide for the bill, saying that he could not take up the bill, nor was it to save Morgan's life he would not do it. I went home, and immediately wrote to Morgan, saying, that Mr. Sowerby would not provide for the bill, and that his plan of robbery would be put in execution the night after; I read the letter to my fellow-prisoner; Hutton sealed it and sent it to the post-office. We then put the plan of robbery in execution, on the Sunday night. Mr. Morgan false swore himself; he stated to the magistrate, at the time I was examined, he had given me authority to pawn goods to the amount of two hundred and sixty pounds, to meet a bill of sixty pound becoming due; and also, he desired me to pawn no more than sixty pound. At the time that Morgan left London, and gave me these instructions to pawn goods, he was obliged to borrow money to leave town. He sent me to my old master, Thomas Williams , No. 1, Piccadilly, to borrow thirty pound to set him out of town; which money I brought back to him. I then proceeded with Morgan to a stable-yard, where he had desired me to hire him a pair of curricle horses; he paid twenty pound for the horses for a month, and the other ten pound he put in his pocket for expences. He desired me to drive him a short distance out of town; at the same time two of his friends were to walk. During this time he requested, as a favour, that I would get a hundred and twenty-five pound, for half a year's rent due, as he was threatened with an execution for half a year' rent, due at Midsummer; he was then threatened with an execution in the house in Bond-street. I then proceeded home, and with a vast deal of trouble and fatigue, I got the money, by pawning and selling. I sent the money to the landlord's attorney, and obtained the receipt.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18121028-2

844. GEORGE SIMPSON WHARTON , and GEORGE MARTIN HUTTON were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of September , eighteen yards of sheeting, value 14 l. seventeen yards of huckaback, value 7 l. five shawls, value 5 l. the property of John Morgan , in his dwelling-house .

Mr. Alley, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoners were

ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t18121028-3

845. GEORGE SIMPSON WHARTON , and GEORGE MARTIN HUTTON were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of September , one hundred and fifty yards of Irish linen, value 15 l. two hundred yards of jaconet muslin, value 30 l. and two shawls, value 2 l. the property of John Morgan , in his dwelling house .

Again indicted for stealing, on the 15th of September , forty-six yards of Irish linen, value 10 l. six handkerchiefs, value 15 s. four table-cloths, value 2 l. fourteen yards of nankeen, value 18 s. and fourteen yards of calico, value 1 l. 15 s. the property of John Morgan , in his dwelling-house; and indicted for stealing on the 11th of September .

Mr. Alley, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoners were

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Thompsons.

Reference Number: t18121028-4

846. WILLIAM JACKSON was indicted for feloniously forging, on the 4th of August , a certain order, for the payment of 23 l. 10 s, with intention to defraud Joseph Christian , senior, and Joseph Christian , junior .

Second COUNT, for uttering a like forged order, with like intention, and other COUNTS for like offence, only varying the manner of charging them.

JOSEPH CHRISTIAN , jun. I carry on business with my father, in Wigmore-street ; his name is Joseph Christian , sen.

ANDREW CHITTENDON . I am shopman to Mr. Christians, in Wigmore-street. On the 3rd of August, in the afternoon, the prisoner came into their shop. He asked to see some fine shirts. I showed him some; he objected to the price. He ordered eighteen shirts, together with eighteen handkerchief, they were to be marked S. H. and to be sent the next evening to No. 38, Park-street, Baker-street. I took them myself the next evening, and presented the bill; he observed, as it was for ready money, I ought to let him have them lower, but if they were good he did not mind; and probably he would be a customer another time, and after cavilling, I agreed to take twenty-three pound, ten shillings; the bill was twenty three pound, seventeen shillings. He took a check out of his pocket book, and drew it to the amount of twenty-three pound, ten shillings, and gave it me.

Q. When he gave you the check, did he say any thing about the banker - A. Not as I recollect.

Q. Had you any knowledge of him before - A. I never saw him before in my life.

Q. How came you to take a check of a person you knew nothing of - A. I am so accustomed to take checks; it being a printed one, I had no suspicion.

He told me his name was Harper; I supposed him to be a gentleman, by his appearances. The next morning I gave the check to Mr. Christian, jun. he sent it to the bankers where it was stopped. The prisoner drew the check, and when he gave it me the letters were wet.

Joseph Christian, jun. This is the check; the last witness delivered it to me on the morning of the 5th of August. I gave it to my clerk, William Britton ; I desired him to take it for payment, and it was detained by the clerks at Prescott's. After the bill was refused payment, I made inquiries after him. I found he lived in Marlborough-street.

Q. What name did he go by before he presented that bill - A. I cannot say, only from report.

WILLIAM BRITTON . I am clerk to Messrs. Christians. I received the check from Mr. Christian. I took it to Prescott's banking-house; the clerks refused payment; they told me to leave it, I left it there.

WILLIAM HEATH . I am cashier in the shop of Messrs. Prescott and Co. the firm consists of George Grose , William Willongby Prescott , those are all the partners.

Q. Do you remember a check being presented in the name of Stephen Harper - A. I do; it was handed over to a clerk, he did not know the accompt. He asked me if I did; I said certainly not, I would refer to the books, and see if there was such an accompt; we had not. I kept the check a few days and then cancelled it, in order that it might not be made use of again; after that I returned it to Mr. Christian; or somebody making use of his name. I never saw the prisoner until the time he was put to the bar; we have no accompt of the name of Stephen Harper , or of William Jackson , a customer.

Q. to Mr. Christian. Was it you that called for that check at Prescott's - A. It was.

Q. Have you any witness that knows any thing of the prisoner - A. No; that is all the evidence I have.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18121028-5

847. LEVY BENJAMIN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of July , a bank-note, value 40 l. the property of Robert William Haye , Esq .

ROBERT WILLIAM HAYE , Esq. I am private secretary to Lord Melville, First Lord of the Admiralty .

Q. Did you, in August last, lodge in Warwick-street - A. I did, in the house of the prisoner. On the 19th of July, I missed a forty-pound note from my desk. I received it on the 10th of July, of Messrs. Drummonds, the bankers. Upon my missing it, I mentioned it to the prisoner that very night. On the 19th the prisoner appeared very much agitated, and said he had never seen a forty-pound note, he had, he said, been pressed for money lately, he was anxious to know if I knew the number, and offered to go to the Bank to shop it. I told him I did not know the number. I sent to Drummond's the following day, for the number. I sent for Foy on the 20th or 21st; in about ten days afterwards, Foy brought me a note from the Bank, of forty pound.

Q. You have no knowledge of the note, have you - A. No; I took no notice of it at the time. This is the note that Foy brought back.

Q. Was your desk locked - A. It was but I had a duplicate key; a new look had been put on the desk, and the old key opened the new lock also. I put the old key on the chimney piece, thinking it of no use; I did not know then that it would open the lock. I ought to have mentioned, that I sent the number and date of the note to the prisoner, the day after I missed it.

THOMAS GORNELL . I am a servant to Mr. Haye. My master lodged at the house of the prisoner. I have seen the prisoner go in and out of the room, several times, in which my master's writing desk was.

CHARLES DRUMMOND . I am in the house of Drummond and Co..

Q. Do you know the last witness, Mr. Haye - A. Yes, and on the 10th of July, I paid him a forty-pound bank-note; the entry in the book is my own writings a 40 l. number 2458 the date is in the day-book.

JOHN CUSANT . I am a clerk at Drummond's. There was a forty pound bank-note in the house, 2458, June 25, 1812, that note came in to our house on the 8th of July.

Q. Was there any other forty-pound note that came into your house that day - A. There was not.

DAVID MOSES . I am a slop-seller in Parsons-street, Ratcliff-highway. On the 9th of July I received a forty-pound note of Israel Barnard ; he was indebted to me, and I put my name upon it, D. Moses, when I paid it away to Mr. Hepburn, a baker. After I had paid it, a gentleman came down on the 22d, to the best of my recollection it was the prisoner. He asked me whether I had parted with the note; I told him I had. He asked me whether I could get it back again. I went to Mr. Hepburn, and asked him whether he had parted with it; he had not. The prisoner said, to keep it for him till to morrow morning. I did not see any more of the prisoner.

Q. Did you get the note from Hepburn - A. I did not; my wife did.

ABIGAL MOSES . I am the wife of the last witness.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. No; I saw him at Marlborough-street, but not before, to the best of my knowledge.

Q. Do you remember any person applying to you to get back a forty-pound note - A. Yes, on the same evening that Mr. Moses left town. In the morning, a person came to me about a forty-pound note, and said, they came from Mr. Barnard. He said, he had but thirty-three pound, if I could lend him the rest money to make it forty. I told him he was a stranger, I could do nothing of the kind. I took the thirty-three pound to Mr. Hepburn, the baker, of the opposite side. I gave him the thirty-three pound, and told him to keep it until the gentleman brought the rest of the money. The next day, or the day after, I saw the same gentleman; he gave me seven pound. I took it to Mr. Hepburn, and he gave me a forty-pound note. I gave

it to the same person that waited for it; I do not think the prisoner is the man.

WILLIAM HEPBURN . I am a baker. I gave change to Mr. Moses for a forty-pound bank-note; I put the date on it, the 7th month, 29th day. I wrote Mr. Moses's name upon it.

Q. Look at that note - A. This is the note, my writing is here, and when I gave it back I put Barnard's name on it.

Q. Did you change any other note of forty pound for Moses than that - A. No, this is the note. I never saw the prisoner until I saw him at Marlborough-street.

ABRAHAM ABRAHAMS . Q. Do you remember paying a bank-note to Barnard - A. I do; I paid him one hundred and seven pound, and to the best of my recollection, a forty-pound was part of that sum.

Q. Do you know from whom you received it - A. I do not know from whom I received the forty-pound note.

Q. Did you know the prisoner before this - A. Yes, he is a jeweller. I am a marshalsy-court officer; I know no more of him, than that I arrested him twice. I have received money from him, but never a forty-pound note.

ISRAEL BARNARD . Q. Do you remember receiving a forty-pound note from Abrahams - A. Yes, in July, I paid the forty-pound note to Mr. Moses; I paid no attention to it.

COURT. Q. to Moses. Who is the gentleman that came to you, and made that application - A. I think it is the prisoner; I cannot speak positively.

Prisoner's Defence. I am as innocent as a child unborn.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18121028-6

848. JAMES COLLET was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of October , nine ounces weight of tea, value 4 s. the property of Archdale Palmer , Thomas Palmer , and John Robert Delafosse .

JOHN ROBERT DEAFOSSE . I live in Fenchurch-street . I am a tea-dealer , my partners names are Archdale and Thomas Palmer .

Q. When did you lose this - A. On the 10th of October, it was stolen from our warehouse; the prisoner came there, with another porter, with seven sacks of coffee. I saw the prisoner upon his being detected.

THOMAS BUTT . I am shopman to these gentlemen. On the 10th of this month, the prisoner came with another man, with seven sacks of coffee. The man that came with him stood by the truck, and the prisoner caried all the coffee in, except one bag. The first sack he brought in, he put down by some chests of tea. I thought the prisoner was a longer time than was necessary, which induced me to look after him. The second sack he brought in, I observed the lid off the chest; and the third sack he brought in, he put his hand in the chest, he took the tea and put in his pocket; and the fourth time also, he did the same. After he carried the whole of it in, I accused him of the theft; he acknowledged it, and pulled off his coat with the tea in it.

Q. What quantity of tea was it - A. Nine ounces.

Q. He was not a servant of yours, was he - A. No, he was employed by the man that brought that coffee to our house.

Prisoner's Defence. I have been a soldier all the war. I have been in the city militia. I worked all the time I was allowed to work. I was never tried before, by the civil or military law.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY, aged 43.

Judgment respited .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121028-7

849. BENJAMIN HOOKER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of October , one half firkin, value 6 d. and twenty-eight pound weight of butter, value 1 l. 10 s. the property of George Wood .

GEORGE WOOD . I am a cheese-monger . I live in Bishopsgate-street . I lost this butter on the 9th of October. I can swear to the property being mine.

THOMAS HASLOR . I am shopman to George Wood . On the third of this month I cut that butter out of a Dutch cask, and about seven in the evening I took the cask and emptied it behind the counter; I then put the empty cask among the others. On Friday morning, the 9th of this month, I saw the prisoner cleaning this cask out, which I supposed had no butter in it. He came to me, at the counter, and delivered the number, saying, there were nine firkins, which I entered in the book. I did not see him take the cask out of the shop; I was busy. It is my duty to look into every firkin before it goes out of the house; I did not do it.

DAVID EVANS . I am a cooper; the prisoner was my porter. I bought the empty firkins of Mr. Wood, and among them the prisoner brought the half firkin to me. On the Friday morning I was looking over the empty firkins, and in an empty Dutch cask, I found this half firkin full of butter. I thought it must be stolen by being in my warehouse, it is a place for empty casks only. I had no other firkins that day, except from the prisoner. This is the Dutch cask; I found the half firkin in it, it being heavier than the others made me look into it. The prisoner denied knowing any thing of it.

Mr. Walford. If he had a mind to steal it, he might have gone from Mr. Wood's house to any other house than yours - A. Yes.

THOMAS SAPWELL . I found the half firkin in this Dutch cask; it has been in my custody ever since.

Prisoner's Defence. There was nothing in that cask when I took it out of the shop; I told Mr. Wood so at first. I know no more of it than a child unborn.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder

Reference Number: t18121028-8

850. BENJAMIN PALMER and DANIEL Mc PHERSON were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of September , thirty-seven pound weight of tobacco, value 5 l. and seven bags, value 7 s. the property of James Taddy , James Tomlin , and Alexander Hatfield .

ALEXANDER HATFIELD . I am a tobacconist . I live in the Minories ; my partners names are James Taddy and James Tomlin . The prisoner, Mc Pherson, was our private watchman , a man that we put great trust in; the house and premises were uninhabited not being finished. The other prisoner, Palmer, was employed as an engine man in the business. In consequence of our having received a letter, I set the next witness to watch. I was there at the time the prisoner, Palmer, was taken with the tobacco upon him.

GEORGE FRIEND . I am an apprentice to James Tomlin. I was ordered by Mr. Hatfield to watch. I concealed myself in the top room of the private house; they could not see me, - I could see them. On the 12th of September, about nine o'clock at night, I saw Benjamin Palmer and another man go up to the warehouse. There was a ladder standing in the yard, Palmer took it and put it up to the window. I saw him go up; I heard the window open, and saw him get in. As soon as he got in, I came down stairs; I stood between the house-door and the street-door, waiting for Palmer. While I was waiting there, Daniel Mc Pherson unlocked the door and came in.

Q. Unlocked what door - A. The street-door. I told him to walk out that I had caught him. He made excuse, that he went to get drink. I told him to wait until Mr. Hatfield came, and he would settle it. He then said he would not stay any longer, and ran away.

Q. You are sure he is the man - A. Yes; I ran after him and brought him back. Mr. Hatfield came up and took him to the watch-house. Then Kinnersley, the officer, came, and we searched the premises for Palmer. After we had searched for some time, we found Palmer in the dung-hole; he was sitting upon the bag of tobacco. That is all I know.

COURT. You say you saw Palmer and another man? who was that other man - A. I believe it to be Mc Pherson. No other man could get in the premises without him letting him in.

Q. No other man could get in the premises without Mc Pherson letting him in - A. No other man could get in the premises without Mc Pherson letting him in.

Q. You did not find a third person there, did you - A. No.

Mr. Knapp. Palmer was a servant, of course he had access to the premises - A. Not after the watchman came, without the watchman letting him in.

Q. At first you said Palmer and another man; you afterwards said that it was Mc Pherson - A. When I said Palmer and another man, I meant Mc Pherson. I knew Mc Pherson by his long coat.

Q. Upon your solemn oath, did you mean it was Mc Pherson - A. I did mean Mc Pherson, he opened the door by a key.

Q. He had the key by the authority of those that employed him - A. Yes. When I took Mc Pherson, he said he had been for some beer. I overtook him by the corner of Swan-street; he was running as fast as he could.

JOHN KINNERSLEY . I am an officer. From in formation that there were thieves in Mr. Faddy's warehouse, I went into the premises; we saw Palmer sitting on the tobacco bag. Palmer started up. Good God, Mr. Hatfield said, you are the last man that I suspected would have robbed me; who is concerned with you? I Palmer replied, there is nobody with me but Mc Pherson the watchman. We went to Mc Pherson's lodgings, we found 2 parcels of tobacco, and in Mc Pherson's box we found 3 bags that had been filled with tobacco. From there we went to Palmer's house, there we found 6 lb. weight of tobacco, and 7 bags with tobacco in them. Mc Pherson was taken to the watch-house by Forrester. Palmer told us where he lodged himself. I produce 7 bags found at Palmer's, and this 6 lb. weight of tobacco was found under Palmer's bed.

Q. to Mr. Hatfield. Are these bags yours - A. Yes, I believe them to be my own property, and the tobacco I believe to be mine.

Palmer's Defence. On Saturday I left work, about 7 o'clock. I had several pints of beer, and going by the dwelling-house where this watchman was, he asked me to have a drop of beer; he said come in, I went in the back yard to ease myself, and when I was going back I saw Mr. Friend. I thought he would be angry, seeing me on the premises. I went into the dung-hole to hide myself.

Mc Pherson's Defence. I am innocent of the charge I am here for.

Palmer called one witness who gave him a good character.

Mc Pherson called one witness who gave him a good character.

PALMER, GUILTY , aged 33.

Mc PHERSON, GUILTY , aged 46.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121028-9

851. JOSEPH SIMMONS WINTER , BENJAMIN ALLEN and WILLIAM TAYLOR were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of July , 10 wrappers, value 20 s. 1600 lb. weight of silk, value 2500 l. one trunk, value 10 s. a case, value 5 s and 200 lb, weight of ostrich feathers, value 200 l. the property of Robert Hotchen , in a certain hoy in the navigable river Thames .

SECOND COUNT, for same offence, the property of William Biley .

THIRD COUNT, for like offence, the property of Joseph Milner and Valentine Chapman , and the trunk, case, and the feathers, the property of Solomon Israel , and that he JOHN IVEY , on the 8th of July , feloniously did procure, direct, cause, counsel command and abet the said Joseph Simmons Winter, Benjamin Allen, and William Taylor, the said felony to do and commit, and JOSEPH KNOX for like offence, on the 4th of July , and ROBERT COOPER for feloniously receiving the aforesaid goods, he knowing them to be stolen ; and GEORGE HARRIS , for having received 190 lb weight of silk, value 280 lb. being part and parcel of the aforementioned silk .

JOSEPH MILNER . - Q. You are a merchant living in the city? - A. I am. My partner's name is Valentine Chapman

Q. Had your house any agent at Gibraltar? - A. Yes.

Q. Did you at any time, Mr. Milner, receive a consignment of these goods from Gibraltar? - A. I did, in

the early part of June I received these bills of lading and invoice.

MR. BOLLAND. The invoice is 10 bales of silk, shipped on board the ship the Velocity, William Biley , commander, consigned to Messrs. Milner and Chapman, Gibraltar, 15th of May, 1812, the marks on the bales are the letters M. H. and the bales are numbered from 1 to 10 inclusive, to be 900 l. The bill of lading contains the same description.

SOLOMON ISRAEL . Q. I believe you are a merchant in Cornhill? - A. I am.

Q. Did you at any time receive a consignment of feathers? - A. I did, about the month of June, consigning them to me in the month of July.

Mr. Bolland. This is the bill of lading:

="Feathers shipped by the grace of God, in and upon the good ship Velocity, now riding at anchor in the bay of Gibraltar; No. 2, one case of ostrich feathers, marked S. I. No. 3, one trunk of ostrich feathers, consigned to Solomon Israel, dated 17th of May, 1812, signed William Biley, commander .="

Q. To Solomon Israel . Did you ever receive these feathers? - A. No, never.

CHARLES SAUNDERS . Q. You are superintendant of the quarantine at Standgate Creek - A I am.

Q. Do you remember the brig Velocity performing quarantine there - A. I do, she arrived in the creek on the 13th of June.

Q. Was her papers regularly forwarded to London - A. They were.

Q. Did you receive any orders respecting the feathers - A. I did.

Q. What was that order - A. It was an order from the board of customs, it directed the feathers, cloth and silk should be taken out by an order of council; also, that the feathers and silk should perform quarantine. There were 10 bales of silk.

Q. Did you see the bales of silk - A. No, I did not.

Q. Do you know anything about their performing quarantine - A. I do; the ship only was to perform quarantine until the goods were delivered. I afterwards received an order from Mr. Bly. I saw him sign his name. I received that order from Mr. Bly to deliver to Mr. Hotchens, lighterman, the goods left on board the Lazaretto, or Velocity, William Bly , dated the 12th of June, 1812. I immediately wrote an order to the master of the Lazaretto, to deliver all the goods in the Lazaretto and Velocity, to the Sisters hoy , and they were delivered to Bampton; that is Bampton's receipt, signed, the Creek, received from on board the Lazaretto, 10 bales of silk, a case and a trunk of ostrich feathers.

Q. Were these goods delivered on board Bampton's hoy - A. I should suppose so, by the receipt.

Mr. Alley. Did you ever see the bales of silk, or the packages of ostrich feathers opened - A. No.

Q. Then all you can tell me is, that, according to the order you received from the Custom house, you delivered to a other person goods that you supposed were ostrich feathers and silk, by whether they contained crow feathers or wool, you know not.

JOHN MILES . Q. You are master of the Belle Isle Lazaretto - A. Yes, laying at Standgate Creek.

Q. Do you remember the Velocity coming to perform quarantine - A. Yes, Captain Biley was her commander.

Q. Did you take out any of her goods, and state what goods - A. I received an order of council to receive 10 bales of silk. I received 10 bales of silk and a case and trunk of ostrich feathers.

Q. How long had you been in the situation, that you came in there - A. Two years last July.

Q. Are you acquainted with packages of goods coming from the Mediterranean - A. Yes, during the time that I have been there.

Q. Did you at all, for the purpose of airing them, open the bales of silk - A. Yes, and the feathers. The silk and feathers performed quarantine 15 days, they were under my immediate inspection.

Q. Have you any book in which you make entry of the goods which you receive - A. Yes, this is my own entry, it is the account of all the silk, and ostrich feathers in the Belle Isle, from the ship Velocity, Captain Bly, master, June 17th, 1812; the mark is M. H. on the goods; the bales were numbered from 1 to 10 inclusive, the gross weights of each, and the observation upon them is in good condition.

Q. Did you examine the silk before you made that report - A. I did not see the silk, I only examined the packages, they were in good condition, there then goes on E. K. Y. H. one trunk of ostrich feathers, and one case, No. 2 and 3, marked S. and I. a case and a trunk of ostrich feathers; the feathers were opened to be aired. I had an opportunity of seeing that they were ostrich feathers, they were of different colours, some mottled and some black, those that I saw, I and two persons that were put there with me took the weights of the silk.

Q. You say that you did not see the silk yourself - A. I did not, but on my looking at the packages, I had not the least doubt it was silk, the packages were such as generally inclose silk, and the weight of the packages were the weight of that bulk that packages of silk are. On the 4th of July, I delivered these goods into the Sisters hoy, John Bampton was the master.

Q. Who was the mate of the hoy - A. There was no mate to her, as I know of. I do not know Knox, the prisoner.

Q. Was a trunk shewn you at the Thames Police - A. Yes.

Q. Can you say whether that trunk was one delivered from the Belle Isle to the Sister hoy - A. It corresponded with my mark. I have not the least doubt of it in the world.

Mr. Alley. You swear to what you have seen and to what you have not seen; you swear to feathers that you saw - A. Yes.

Q. And you swear to silk that you have not seen - A. No, I received it for silk.

Q. I take it for granted that the person that gave it you said that it was silk, and you delivered it for silk; are you acquainted with the Mediterranean trade; does no cotton come from there - A. Yes, there does.

Q. It might have been cotton for aught you know - A. I have not sworn to it. I cannot swear to any thing. I never saw.

Q. Therefore you do not mean to swear that it was silk - A. No.

Q. You do not know what it was - A. No.

MR. ANDREWS. Did you see these goods delivered yourself into the hoy - A. Yes, I was present in quarantine at the time.

Mr. Bolland. Are any two things so much unlike as a bale of cotton and a bale of silk - A. They are very unlike, Sir.

JOHN SOLESBY . I am a tide waiter belonging to the port of Rochester. Formerly I was a fisherman. I was placed on board the Sisters hoy; my partner's name was Read; there I and Read went on board at Standgate Creek; we were placed there on the part of the Customs.

Q. Who was the master of the hoy - A. James Bampton , and I believe Joseph Knox was the mate . I saw Bampton some time back at the Thames Police office.

Q. How far did you and Read come up with the vessel - A. To the Custom-house quay, and there we were relieved by two other Custom-house officers. I do not know their names.

Q. What day did you go on board the hoy at Standgate Creek - A. On Friday, the 3d of July. On the 4th of July we left Standgate Creek, we arrived at the Custom-house on Saturday, the 4th of July, at 11 at night. The hoy was made fast then to the Custom-house change. Read and I continued there until half past 8 the next morning.

Q. In your way up the river, did any of your crew board any other vessel - A. Yes, one, Bampton's mate as they called him. Knox boarded a sailing barge. Knox the mate boarded her at the lower Hope.

Q. Did she continue to sail with you, or did you lose sight of her - A. I lost sight of her, and where she sailed I do not know.

Q. Did you see whether Knox took any thing with him when he went on board - A. Yes, an empty bottle.

Q. How did he go on board - A. In the boat belonging to the hoy. He was not gone above ten minutes; he returned with the empty bottle.

Mr. Alley Why, my good fellow, I do not understand you; you said you did not know the man any further, than the person calling himself Bampton's mate was Knox; you do not mean to say the prisoner Knox, is the man - A. I am sure Knox is the man, I do not know whether he is the mate or not. I am sure he is the man.

Mr. Adolphus. The lower Hope is between Essex and Kent, is it not - A. Yes.

COURT. It is a good deal below Gravesend.

JOHN READ . I am a Custom house tide waiter at the port of Rochester. I went on board the hoy with Solesby, on July the 3d, at Standgate Creek, James Bampton was the master Knox looks like the man that sailed with Bampton, but I cannot be positive. On the 4th of July, in the morning, the hoy took in 10 bales of silk from the Lazaretto, and 4 cases of ostrich feathers. We counted them as cases. We sailed from Standgate Creek on the Saturday. I looked at my watch, it was a quarter past nine.

Q. On what day - A. On the 4th of July, and we arrived at 11 at night right opposite of the Custom-house quay. Solesby and I remained on board until the next morning, and then we were relieved by two other officers. I do not know their names, although I have seen them to day. When we left the hoy nothing had been disturbed.

Q. As you were coming up the river, did any of your crew go out of the Sisters hoy into any other vessel - A. Yes, the man that sailed with Bampton, he took an empty glass bottle, and went on board a sailing barge as we were bringing up near to the Hope point. Knox looks very much like that man, but I cannot rightly say I saw him return with the empty bottle. Bampton's wife was on board, and two children.

ROBERT HOTCHENT . I am a lighterman, residing in St. Catherine's-square.

Q. Did you, at any time in June, receive any order about fetching some goods from Standgate Creek - A. Yes, from Messrs. Taylor and Spry, brokers. I was to fetch 10 bales of silk, a case and a trunk of feathers, 6 bales of returned cloth, and 3 bales of mats.

Q. What vessel did you understand they were coming by - A. The Velocity. I sent the Sisters hoy for them, of which Bampton is the master. Joseph Knox was the mate. I knew nothing more of it until the return of the vessel. Bampton came to me on Sunday morning, the 5th of July, he told me the vessel was arrived in the Galley quay road.

Q. That is the same spot they call the Custom-house change; did you see Knox - A. I did not. Bampton gave me the vessel's certificate, and the weighable report I have.

Mr. Bolland. It is a copy of the officer's books. It appears that the bales are numbered and marked in the same way, and the feathers in the same way. Did you go down to see the vessel - A. I did, about 11 o'clock in the day. He was then on shore. According to my order, the hoy was then moored alongside of the Custom-house quay, according to my order. On Monday I went into her to examine her, I saw the 10 bales stood forward and the trunks of ostrich feathers, and all safe; and I believe I saw the vessel in the afternoon laying alongside of the Custom-house quay. On the Wednesday morning, Knox came to my house, between 8 and 9 in the morning, and told me that the vessel had been taken away from the quay, and robbed of the 10 bales of silk, and the case and trunk of ostrich feathers; I then went down to Hermitage-street, to Mr. Gotty, the police officer. I then went on board the vessel, there I found one of the locks gone, the lock of the fore-hatch bar off, and one or two of the hatches laying down in the hold.

Q. When you left her on the Monday, you say she was moored off Galley quay - A. Yes.

Q. Is that in the city of London - A. Yes. When I found her on the Wednesday, she was athwart of the ships in the doubling teer, that is on the north side, the London side, she was not moored there; then I came on shore, and from that went to Bow-street.

Q. Did you afterwards go to a stable in Woolpack-yard, Gravel-lane - A. Yes, from information, I did, on the Monday following.

Q. You of course know Baker's dock - A. Yes, this stable in Woolpack-yard is between two and three hundred yards from Baker's dock.

Q. Who went with you to examine the stable - A. Gotty, Friedd and Clark, officers. I found some silk

and ostrich feathers there; some inside wrappers, a table-cloth, and a black bag with same ostrich feathers in it. The ostrich feathers were put in the manger, part in the bin, part loose, and part in the black bag, and a trunk marked S. I.

COURT. Where was that all - A. In the stable.

Mr. Bolland. You say the trunk was marked S. I. Was there a number on it - A. Yes. When I went to this stable I found it locked. One of the officers forced it open. I took up Knox and Bampton before I went to Woolpack-yard; and the same evening, on the 9th, the prisoner Winter, and Brown. were taken up. The other prisoners were taken up after that.

Q. Were you present at the examination of the prisoners - A. Part of the time. I was of Knox, Bampton, the prisoner Winter, and Brown.

Q. Was there any body else taken up - A. Yes; William Allen . These men were all examined and and discharged, and Spriggs, the carman, was taken up.

Q. I believe you afterwards received some information that induced you to take these men up again - A. Yes.

Q. How long was it afterwards - A. I went to Bruton, in Somersetshire, to a Mr. Percival, a silk throwster. He has silk works there. I there found a parcel of silk; and some of the skeins were cut.

Q. How much was it - A. By his books, six hundred and thirty-three pounds weight. I saw some of it unthrown. There might be fifty or sixty pounds.

Q. You are not at all acquainted with silk, to speak to one silk from another - A. No, I am not. I returned to London, and I and the officer (Smith) met Brown and the prisoner, Winter, in Houndsditch, in the street. I secured Brown; Smith went to secure the prisoner, Winter. He did not succeed. Brown made resistance. Smith came to me, and helped to secure Brown. Winter got away while Smith was assisting me to secure Brown. Brown, Bampton, and Spriggs were all apprehended in the first instance, and were all discharged. Brown is now here, to be a witness to-day.

Q. Did Brown ever say a word about this until he had been apprehended a second time, and that with a great deal of resistance - A. Not to my knowledge.

WILLIAM UXTABLE . Q. I believe you are deal - A. Yes. I am an extra tide-waiter at the Port of London. I and Charles O'Neale went on board the Sisters hoy, on Sunday the 5th of July, about eight o'clock. The hoy was then laying at Galley quay.

Q. Did you know tho other officers that you were to relieve - A. No, I did not.

Q. When you went on board did you examine the cargo of the hoy - A. No. I was not the bookkeeper.

Q. What do you mean by book-keeper - A. The first man that is called always keeps the books of the cargo. The second man only goes by his direction.

Q. Did not you and Neale go together - A. Yes.

Q. How were the hatches - A. They were fasttened.

Q. Do you know Mr. Hotchon, the owner of the barge - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember Mr. Hotchon coming on board on the Monday - A. No. I was on shore by; leave of our tide-surveyor. I returned to my duty a quarter before four on the Monday.

Q. Was any part of the cargo unloaded while you were on board - A. They came on board on Tuesday afternoon to unload the cargo, about half past three. Fifty-six hides were taken out, one trunk, and one case.

Q. What was left on board - A. There was some hides left, and some bales of goods.

Q. What sort of bales - A. I did not go down in the hold to see.

Q. Did any thing happen to you on Tuesday night - A. Between three and four o'clock, while the vessel was delivering her cargo two men came to see Knox. They all three went into the cabin to drink. They remained in the cabin until five o'clock on the Tuesday night. They went over the lighter, seemingly to me to go to Tower-stairs. Knox went with them, and me and my partner were left on board. My partner, O'Neale, had the first watch until twelve o'clock. He called me at twelve o'clock. I took the watch at twelve o'clock, and he went to sleep.

Q. Did any thing happen during your watch - A. About five minutes past one I heard a noise upon deck, like a parcel of ropes going along the deck. I was then sitting upon the locker below. Upon hearing it I was going directly upon deck. A man met me upon the top of the cabin ladder. I asked him, who it was. He said, Jem.

Q. Who did you take that to be - A. I took it to be the captain of the lighter. The night was very dark just at that time. I asked him, what he was going to do with the vessel. He said, he was going off to the buoy with her. He put his hand into his pocket. He said, he had got a note from the owner; he was to go to the London Docks with her. There was another man on deck, forward: I asked him, who that man was. He said, it was Joe.

Q. Who did you suppose Joe to be - A. Knox. I remained upon the ladder.

Q. Did you remain long enough upon the ladder to see what they did with the vessel - A. No. The man that I supposed to be the captain, said, if the owner came there in the morning, that they would be there time enough to take the lighter into the dock. He said, they would see the hoy made fast; they would take care of the hoy, and I might go below. I went below, and they shut down the scuttle. I fell asleep. I awoke between three and four in the morning. I went to go upon deck. I found the scuttle fast. I tried the sky-light: that was fast too. We broke the sky-light open. I got upon deck, and we found the two middle hatches broken open.

Q. Did you examine for the cargo - A. No. I would not go below until I went to our surveyor, on shore, and left O'Neale on board. I returned about six o'clock. I did not go down in the hold at all.

Q. When you got through the sky-light in the morning, were was the hoy laying - A. Athwart a tier of ships that is moored opposite of the Custom-house quay.

Q. When you went down to rest on the night of the robbery, were all the hatches safe - A. Yes.

I felt all the locks before I went down, and all were safe.

Mr. Alley. You had a conversation with somebody you have been telling us, when you were on board the hoy: do you mean to say that either of the prisoners were the person that you conversed with - A. I never saw any of them but Knox.

Q. Have not you said, before the magistrate, that neither of the men were the prisoners - A. I thought it was at first, but it was so dark I did not see his face.

CHARLES O'NEALE . Q. Were you sent, on the 5th of July, on board the Sisters, hoy, in company with the last witness - A. Yes. I went on board in the morning about eight o'clock.

Q. You, we understand, was the first man, the book-keeper - A. Yes.

Q. What is your duty - A. To see that the cargo is safe that I was sent to protect. I took no account until it was delivered. I found the hatches were safe, on Sunday, when I went. On Sunday morning I went on board the hoy. I got leave of the surveyor to go on shore. I left my partner behind, and returned at four o'clock.

Q. Do you know Mr. Hotchon, the owner of that hoy - A. Yes; he came on board on the Monday with another gentleman, and looked at the cargo.

Q. Did you go with them - A. No. I saw two batches were open. I saw nothing of the cargo, but the hides, and two bales, which they said was cloth, and three bales of matting. That is all I saw when I looked down.

Q. Was not a delivery made from the hoy on the Tuesday - A. Yes; two cases and fifty-six hides. She began unloading at three o'clock, and closed at four. They began to open the hatches at three o'clock, and shut them at four.

Q. What part of the crew was on board while the delivery was making - A. The man they called Joe, not the captain. By Joe, I mean the prisoner Knox.

Q. Did you see any other persons come on board - A. Two men came to him on Tuesday, while they were at work. They drank a pot of beer together. They staid from half past three till five o'clock. They went away over the lighter, and Knox went with them.

Q. What did you and your partner do - A. We walked on the deck. On Tuesday night I went to sleep. At twelve o'clock my partner took the watch. When I left the dock I left the hatches all safe. I heard nothing in the night. I slept sound. My partner called me between two and three o'clock. God knows the hour. I cannot tell the hour. I was coming out of my bed-place. I dressed myself. The scuttles were fastened. We forced the skylight up, and got through. When I got upon deck I found the two hatches forward half up, and the tarpaulin laid just to cover the edge. The hatches were broken open.

Q. Where was the vessel laying - A. Athwart the tier of ships, laying at the Custom-house.

Q. Upon finding these hatches broken open what did Uxtable do - A. When Uxtable found them open he called a sculler, and went a-shore. I remained on board, and I was on board when Mr. Hotchon came on board on Wednesday morning. When Mr. Hotchon came on board, the vessel was laying in the same situation.

JAMES BAMPTON . Q. In the month of June and July last were you master of the Sisters, hoy, belonging to Mr. Hotchon - A. I was.

Q. Was Knox your mate - A. He was.

Q. Do you know the prisoner, Joseph Simmons Winter - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know the prisoner, Benjamin Allen - A. I do not. I have seen him.

Q. Do you know William Taylor - A. I think I have seen him, but I do not know any thing of him.

Q. Do you know a man of the name of Ingram, who is not here - A. I do not to my knowledge.

Q. Do you know the prisoner, Cooper - A. I have never seen him.

Q. Do you a man of the name of Brown, and Fenwick - A. I do.

Q. Do you know a man of the name of William Allen - A. Yes; that is not the prisoner.

Q. Do you know a man of the name of Winter, the brother of the prisoner - A. Yes, William Henry Winter.

Q. Do you know a man of the name of Armstrong, who is not here - A. Yes, I do.

Q. In the month of June last did you fetch a a cargo of bags from Standgate-creek - A. Yes, I did.

Q. In the course of that voyage did you see any of those persons I have mentioned to you - A. Yes. I saw the prisoner Winter, and William Henry Winter , and I saw Armstrong. It was in the month of June I saw Armstrong, William Henry Winter , and Joseph Simmons Winter , and a man of the name of Brown, and Fenwick also.

Q. Did you also see, in the course of that voyage, William Allen - A. I did.

Q. I believe nothing was done that voyage until you came to London - A. No, sir.

Q. You came to London, however, from that voyage - A. Yes.

Q. After your return to London, did you meet with either of these persons, Joseph Simmons Winter , and William Armstrong - A. Yes. The hoy was moored at Porter's quay, near the Custom-house. William Armstrong called me on shore: he told me he wanted to speak to me. I went on shore, and there was Joseph Simmons Winter in company with Armstrong. He asked me if I knew what goods were in Standgate-creek, in the brig meaning the Velocity. I told him, I did not know, but I believed there were some silk and some feathers. He asked me, if I knew who they belonged to. I told him, no. He asked me, whether they belonged to Mr. Hotchon or Mr. Mason. That is, who was to bring them up; Mr. Hotchon's hoy or Mr. Mason's hoy. I told him, I did not know. Armstrong said, would I let him knew. Winter was in company with him at this time. I told him, I would.

Q. Was it settled between you how you should let them know - A. Winter or Armstrong, one or other of them said, if I did not meet with either of them, I was to let Brown know. Brown is one of the party

that I before named. They gave me a direction. They could not remember the name of the court. I was to go to the next court to Chapel-court.

Q. How soon after this did you learn that you were to fetch these goods - A. I believe it might be four or five days. I think it was on the last Thursday in June.

Q. That was the 25th of June. Upon your learning that did you go to Brown's, to give him information - A. Yes. I came from Blackwall, and went to Brown. I found him according to the direction. On the Saturday after that I saw William Allen . I told him the same thing. The same evening I saw Armstrong and Joseph Simmons Winter . On the Saturday evening I saw them at the Sugar Loaf public-house, Dock-head. I had been home: my wife was not at home. I live in London-street, Dock-head: and going along the street, from my house, Winter tapped me on the shoulder. He asked me, if I was going down to Standgate-creek. I told him, I was. He said, Armstrong was in the public-house. I went with him into the Sugar Loaf public-house. Armstrong was there.

Q. When you all three were together did they tell you any thing about your having called upon Brown - A. I do not think they did. Armstrong asked me, when we were going down with the vessel. I told him, to-morrow morning; which was the Sunday. He asked, how many bales of silk I was going for. I told him, ten bales of silk, and four boxes of ostrich feathers. Winter commanded a a sailing barge. Winter said, he thought it would be the best way not to come down to Sheerness. in his barge. He thought it would be the best way to stop the barge at the Lower Hope, and walk over land, and see with a spy-glass when I came down to Standgate-creek. He said, he should see Brown and arrange with him what would be the best for to do. Armstrong asked me when the goods would be out: meaning when they would be out of quarantine. I told him, I expected they would be out on Tuesday evening. I think I left them then.

Q. Before you left them he said, he would meet with Brown, and settle what was to be settled - A. That was in regard of plundering the vessel.

Q. Where was it understood between you that the vessel was to be plundered - A. I did not, at that time, understand.

Q. Was it to be in the voyage up - A. Yes, it was.

Q. Had any thing passed before this, between you and Knox, what was to be done - A. I told Knox all that passed between me, Winter, and Brown. Knox consented to every thing. I saw Winter and Brown on the Thursday, and I communicated it to Knox on the Friday, what I had said to Brown on the Thursday.

COURT. What had you said to Brown on the Thursday - A. I told Brown that I was going down for ten bales of silk, and four boxes of ostrich feathers, and Knox consented to be one of the parties to do this. Knox consented to be of the party, the same as I was to be also.

Mr. Gurney. Was it agreed upon by you how they were to come on board and do it - A. Yes, it was. I told Knox, that I had been to Brown's house, and I had arranged with Brown, that Brown and the party were to come down along with Winter, in Winter's barge. The party were to be Brown, Fenwick, Joseph Simmons Winter , and Armstrong. I do not recollect hearing Brown mention William Henry Winter on the Friday. I told Knox and they were to come down in Winter's barge. They were to anchor in the river. It was not arranged where, but they were to come on board my vessel, and fasten us down, if we were below, and if we were not below they were to put us down below. They were to break the hatches open, and take the silk and feathers out of them.

Q. And where were they to take them to - A. I did not know at that time. That was settled afterwards.

Q. Did Knox agree to all this - A. Knox agreed that it should be so. Knox and I talked this over on board our vessel. Knox and I walked from London to Blackwall on the Friday morning, and I communicated the business to him as I went along. My vessel was at Blackwall. Then it was that I informed him of all this.

Q. Was that on the Saturday, as you have told us before, that you met Armstrong and Winter, was all this plan talked of then - A. Not all then. I told Winter and Armstrong that I had seen Brown. They said, they knew it.

Q. Were any body else on board the hoy besides you and Knox - A. Yes, my wife, and two children were on board.

Q. When you got to Standgate-creek were the goods ready for you or not - A. They were not ready. I understood they would not be ready till Friday.

Mr. Bolland. That is the 3d of July. Did you, while you were waiting there, see Winter's barge - A. I did; she was then laying on the Lappell, just above Sheerness. Knox and I went on board Winter's barge, I think, on the Wednesday.

Q. Who did you find on board of Winter's barge - A. William Armstrong , Joseph Simmons Winter , Ralph Fenwick , and William Allen . They were all in company together. Knox, as well as myself, was in their company. They asked me, whether I was coming out. I cannot say which of them spoke. We were altogether. I told them, the goods would not be ready till Friday night, seven o'clock, and that I should not take the goods in before Saturday morning. They said, that was a d - d bad job, as they had appointed people to be at Dagenham with conveyance.

Q. Did they say who they had appointed to be at Dagenham - A. They said, they had appointed people to be at Dagenham on Tuesday and Wedne-sday.

Q. This was Wednesday that you went on board - A. Yes. They said, they had appointed them to be there, because of my giving them intelligence that I expected the goods would be out on the Tuesday, and then it was arranged between the parties. They were all present but William Henry Winter; he was down below in the cabin. It was arranged, that Ralph Fenwick should go up in the Sheerness passage-boat to Chatham, and from there to Gravesend,

and from there to get the best conveyance he could, and go to Dagenham, to tell the parties that they had been disappointed of the goods, and for them to make it a little later. A little time after that William Allen put Ralph Fenwick on board a Chatham boat. William Allen then returned. I saw him return. I had left the barge then, and was on shore at Sheerness. Allen went on board the barge again. They asked me, how I would act in case I had a fair wind. I told them, I should make the best of my way up. They said, that would not do. If I made the best of my way up they should not be able to complete their design.

Q. Was any request made to you to do any thing - A. If I had a fair wind I was to put the vessel on shore.

Q. Who said that - A. We were all in company. I cannot say who said that.

Q. What do you mean by putting the vessel on shore - A. Run her a-ground. I agreed to it, and said, I would run her a-shore.

Q. At any particular spot - A. I did once hear it mentioned, that it was easy to put her upon the Fly. No place was finally determined upon. They asked one, how I would act in regard to the officers. They said, if the officers were all down below, I must keep them down below. I told them, I would.

Q. Was any time proposed, at which you were to run her a-ground - A. No time. They were to come on board as soon as it was dusk.

Q. Was any thing settled as to the sailing of Winter's barge - A. Winter's barge was to get the head of us.

Q. When did you sail - A. On Saturday morning, the 4th of July, the morning that I loaded.

Q. Now, Bampton, that is the wayable list that Mr. Hotehon said you gave to him; there is your own acknowledgement of the goods being on board, and there is an order from Captain Bly, directed to you; now you hold in you hand a letter directed to you from Captain Bly - A. Yes; he is captain of the Velocity; and in consequence of this letter from Captain Bly, I received the goods. They were delivered on board my hoy. I received eight hundred and eighty-one hides, ten bales of silk, six bales of cloth, three bales of mats, two cases, and two trunks of ostrich feathers. I saw these things put on board.

Q. What officers were put on board - A. Solesby and Read. They were put on board at Standgate-creek. I believe Solesby had been a fisherman.

Q. You sailed on the Saturday morning. Did you run her a-shore on the Fly, as you said you would - A. No. I made the best of my way to London. Winter's barge sailed after me.

Q. Do you know who was in Winter's barge - A. Not at that time I did not. Winter's barge was a stern of us all the way up the sea-reach.

Q. Did your hoy sail better than the barge - A. She would sail better than the barge, but the barge was light, and the hoy loaded.

Q. Did you run the hoy on shore - A. I did not. I conceived the business that I was upon was very dangerous, and for that reason I agreed with Knox that it should not be done. This agreement between Knox and me was after we had left the barge, when I had boarded her in the Lappell, when the conversation was.

Q. While you were at Sheerness do you mean - A. Yes; I thought it dangerous to do it at all.

Q. Did you inform Winter, or any of his party, your determination - A. I did not.

Q. Did you send any body then - A. I sent Knox on board the barge on Saturday afternoon. Our hoy was then at the Lower Hope. I told Knox to tell him that I could not put the vessel on shore; that I had got a man on board who was an officer, that knew the way up the river as well as I did. I told Knox to tell them, if they liked to do it, they might do it in the Custom-house-road, for there I should stop that night.

Q. When Knox was sent from your hoy to Winter's barge, did he take any thing with him - A. He took an empty bottle, by way way of excuse, because the officers should not know any thing of it. I told the officer, that Knox was going on board his uncle's barge, or his brother's, to get something to drink. Knox returned, bringing back the empty bottle with him. He said, they said I might stop the vessel at Blackwall. I did not attend to that. I arrived at the Custom-house at eleven o'clock. I was making her fast at the Custom-house road. I made her fast to a buoy that there is in the river on purpose.

Q. Did you remain on board her that night - A. I did.

Q. On the Sunday did you see either of the prisoners - A. I did. I saw Joseph Simmons Winter . Knox remained on board at that time: and I saw Armstrong on the Sunday morning, but I saw Winter. I never spoke to Winter. He passed me first. I saw Armstrong as I going home to dinner in the Folly, Dock head. Armstrong asked me how I came to deceive him in running the vessel up. I told Armstrong I conceived it dangerous. He said, he thought I was not agreeable it should be done; and to the best of my recollection I saw Joseph Simmons Winter on the Sunday afternoon. He came to me. Winter asked me also how I came to deceive them by running the vessel up. I told Winter, I conceived it to be a very dangerous job. He said, I had not only deceived him, but I had deceived the parties that were to have the property. I told Winter, that it was not my fault. I alledged it all to the officer that came up with us.

Q. You mean by that. his knowledge of the river that you did not stop - A. Yes. He asked me whether I did not think it possible that the hoy could not be taken away from where she was.

Q. Had you told him where she was - A. I believe Winter knew where she was. I told him, I conceived she could not be taken away from where she was, by reason there was a great many craft laying close to her. He asked me, whether I did not think it possible that he could run a rope from his barge, and make it fast to my hoy, and hawl the hoy off. I told him, I did not think it possible: there were two officers on board. He asked me how the hoy was made fast. I believe I told him every rope that was made fast, I told him it was a very dangerous thing, on account of it being moon-light nights.

Q. Was it a moon-light night - A. I will not exactly say it was moon-light. It was light nights. He did not say that he should do it, or should not.

Q. Was your wife present at this conversation - A. She was not.

Q. Did your wife see Winter - A. She did.

Q. Did you return to your hoy again - A. I did.

Q. Did you see Winter's barge - A. I did not in the course of the day. Oh, yes, I did. On the Monday she was laying off the Custom-house-road. My vessel was almost under the quay, and his almost in the middle of the river. When I saw the barge on the Monday I saw Winter and Armstrong on board. I was at that time rowing up in my own boat. I went alongside of Winter's barge. Winter asked me when the hoy was going to work. I told him I did not know. Armstrong asked me if I had not brought up a wrong bill of lading. I told him, yes, I had brought up a wrong bill of lading. The bill of lading that I bought from Standgate-creek, it was five instead of eight hundred and eighty-one hides. Winter asked me if the vessel was going to work down the road. I told him, I did not think I should be able to get her off to the road. Then I left the barge. I was in a boat, rowing.

Q. Did you see Winter or Armstrong on the Tuesday - A. I saw Armstrong on board a barge off the road. I cannot say whether it was Winter's barge or no. I asked him whether he was going to Newington. He belonged to a benefit club of mine at that time. He said, he did not know; his money was not paid; he should not be there. I told him, it was feast day.

Q. Did you yourself go - A. I did. Armstrong was not there.

Mr. Alley. Where do you live - A. In London-street, Dock-head, my wife does. For the last three months I have lived in the House of Correction. I gave information of some of the parties that actually did the robbery. They were in custody, and I was in custody. We were discharged, and were taken up a second time.

Q. You gave no information of Knox until after you were taken up a second time - A. I believe I did. Knox was discharged.

Q. Knox had neither act or part in what was done - A. Knox knew what was done, the same as I did, and I stated the same then as I have now.

Q. Then, after they were discharged they were again taken up - A. They were.

Q. You call yourself the captain of the vessel - A. I am, and Knox was the mate.

Q. How long has your master had the blessing of your service - A. More than three years.

Q. Has not he had any other charge of felony against you - A. Not to my knowledge.

Q. You must know whether you have committed any other robberies or not - A. I believe not. I do not mean to swear it.

Q. You agreed upon committing this robbery upon him - A. Yes, I did. It was me and Brown that first talked of this robbery.

Q. Brown is one of the witnesses, is not he - A. I believe he is.

Q. Knox was not present at that contract - A. Knox was on board the vessel at the time the conversation went forward.

JAMES HARMER . Q. You are the attorney concerned in the prosecution - A. Yes.

Q. Did you attend the several examinations before the magistrate against the persons now at the bar, and others - A. Against some that are now at the bar, and against others. On the 22d of August all the persons who had then been apprehended were discharged: Bampton, Knox, Joseph Simmons Winter, his brother, William Henry Winter , William Allen , and Spriggs, the carman, who had been employed.

Q. At that time had you any evidence against persons as principals.

Mr. Adolphus objected to the question.

Q. They had been examined before the magistrate - A. They had.

Mr. Gurney. Had you then got the witnesses that you now have - A. Certainly not.

Mr. Adolphus. It was the 15th of August they were discharged - A. They had been in custody about a month. The magistrate thought it not right to detain them more than a month. They were discharged on the 22d of August.

COURT. They were all discharged then, were not they - A. They were.

Mr. Alley. Winter was in custody - A. He was. The only evidence that we had then was Bampton.

EDWARD HART MASON . I am a barge owner. I am the owner of the barge called the Brothers. I live at Greenhithe; that is four miles this side of Gravesend.

Q. Has the prisoner, Joseph Simmons Winter , been the sailing-master of your barge, the Brothers - A. Yes, for twelve years past. He has half the profit arising. I find wear and tear. What we call sailing with shares. He devotes his service, and his apprentice, and frequently he finds freightage.

Q. Do you remember his going downwards from Greenhithe towards the end of June - A. I well know it. It was either the middle of the week, or the beginning, before the robbery. He said, he was bound to Sheerness for a freight.

Q. Did you afterwards see your barge go up towards London - A. I did. When the barge arrived at Greenhithe first, which might be twelve days previous to the robbery, I saw three men on board the barge. That is, when he arrived first from London to Greenhithe. I asked Winter, who the young man was; I expected him and his apprentice only. He replied, it was a young man of bad health; he was going to the Nore for his health: it was the same pale looking man that returned with him, William Henry Winter. On the Saturday following I saw the barge come up the river, on the North side, opposite of me. She appeared quite light. The wind was North; a favourable wind to London.

SARAH BAMPTON . Q. Do you know a man of the name of Armstrong - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know Joseph Simmons Winter - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember your husband going down to Standgate-creek to bring up silk and feathers - A.

Yes; the last voyage he made before the vessel was robbed.

Q. Do you remember Armstrong and Joseph Simmons Winter calling at your house - A. Winter called on the Friday, as my husband went on the Sunday, and he called again on the Saturday, my husband was not at home. I did not see Armstrong at all. I went on board the hoy on Saturday night; and sailed on Sunday morning. I went to Standgate-creek, and staid there till the Saturday afterwards? I staid on board my husband's hoy all the time.

Q. Do you remember your husband and Knox leaving the vessel while you were there. Was Knox the mate of the hoy that voyage - A. He was. At Standgate-creek my husband and Knox left the hoy. They went out in a boat. They said, they were going a fishing. Where they went I know not.

Q. Do you remember, as you were coming up, Knox quitting the hoy any where - A. Yes. I do not know where he went to. He went in the boat belonging to the vessel. He returned back again after some time.

Q. Did you go to your own house that Saturday night - A. Yes, and on the Sunday Winter called upon my husband. He staid with my husband about half an hour. I was not with them all the time. I went to my mother's. My children were there. I came back as they were going. I knew how long I had been gone.

GEORGE BROWN . I am a lighterman.

Q. Do you know a man of the name of Armstrong - A. Yes, a lighterman.

Q. In the month of June last did you and he agree to do any thing on the river - A. Yes, we agreed to go down to Standgate-creek, to go with Winter in his barge, to take some silk out of the craft.

Q. I believe you went down and that plan did not succeed - A. No.

Q. In the course of the voyage you met with Bampton, and concerted another operation - A. Yes.

Q. Was it agreed that Bampton should let you know when he should go to Standgate-creek again - A. Yes, it was. On Thursday, the 25th of June. Bampton came to my house. He told me that he was going down to Standgate-creek to load fine goods: ten bales of silk, and four cases of feathers. He asked me, what persons were going down to take it out of his vessel. I told him, myself, Winter, Fenwick, Armstrong, and William Allen . He said, that would do very well. He told me, that he had spoken to Armstrong and Winter; he had told them that he was to come to me, to let me know when he was going down, which would be on the Saturday. He was going to Standgate-creek on the Saturday.

Q. Now, you say that these were the persons who engaged to pluder the vessel; how was the thing to be done - A. In the voyage up, Bampton was to put the shuttle ready. Then we parted. This was on the Thursday. On the next day I met Armstrong, Fenwick, and William Allen , in the Borough.

Q. Did you go to any public-house - A. Not altogether, I believe.

Q. What public-house did you go to - A. The White Horse: the house is kept by a man of the name of Morgan. Joseph Simmons Winter said his barge was at Greenhithe; and him, and Armstrong, me, and Fenwick, and William Allen , were to go down to Gravesend. They were to be taken in by Winter.

Q. Was any thing settled for Fenwick to do before you went to Gravesend - A. Yes; Fenwick was to go to Dugenham, to let Ingram and his men know at what time they should be up with the goods.

Q. Before you went to Gravesend did Ingram come to your house - A. Yes; Fenwick brought him to me.

Q. Was any thing agreed between you what to do - A. Yes.

COURT. Who was present - A. Fenwick, me, and Ingram. It was settled that Ingram should be at Dagenham to receive the goods when we brought them on the Wednesday or the Thursday next.

Q. I believe you left London on Saturday. You and William Allen left town for Gravesend - A. Yes, we did.

Q. Did you call on Fenwick in your way to Greenwich - A. We did. We slept at Gravesend that night. The next morning we found the barge was not at Gravesend; we walked to Greenhithe.

Q. Whose barge - A. Winter's barge was not at Gravesend; we walked to Greenhithe.

Q. Did you see Winter - A. Yes, and Armstrong, at Greenhithe.

Q. What kind of a man was Armstrong - A. He was a sickly looking young man, tall, and thin. I saw Armstrong and Winter on the wharf. Armstrong came below the town to us, away from the vessel. We all three walked from Greenhithe to Gravesend. Armstrong said, they were all ready to come at high water, and take us in at Northfleet. That is about two miles from Greenhithe. The reason was, because the people should not have any suspicion that we were going to do any thing wrong.

Q. Did they come down at Highwater, and take you all three on board at Northfleet - A. Yes, and we sailed down to Sheerness. We got there on Sunday night: the same night.

Q. Did you go towards the mill - A. Yes.

Q. That is in the river Medway - A. Yes, towards Sheerness. We staid there, I think, till Tuesday morning. I think it was Tuesday that Bampton and Knox came on board.

COURT. Are you certain as to the day - A. I am partly sure it was Tuesday. They told us, the goods would not be out of quarantine before to-morrow. Towards Friday, Fenwick was to let Ingram and his party know that the goods would not be ready, that they might not be waiting without knowing what was the cause of that delay, and Fenwick was to let them know that we should be up by the Friday or the Saturday morning.

Q. Did Fenwick leave you for this purpose - A. He did, and he returned to us on the Saturday morning.

Q. Now, before Fenwick came on board, did Bampton's boy come out of the creek - A. Yes, and past our barge.

Q. There is something that we passed by. You told me the mode the boy was to be plundered was settled another time - A. That was settled between

Armstrong and Bampton, before I agreed with them, as I understood.

Q. Did any thing pass when Bampton and Knox came on board - A. She was laying off there.

Q. What was settled should be done when you came up the river - A. If the wind was easterly, Bampton should stick her on shore on the Fly.

Q. That is a fair wind - A. Yes. If the wind her down the river we should follow him until he got to an anchor, and Bampton was to lay the scuttle and the iron bars. so as to be ready to put on the iron bars, and we were to put the scuttle on over the cabin, where people go down: and when we came to an anchor we were to fasten him in, and Knox, and the officers.

Q. You were to go on board and fasten them all down below - A. Yes, when they came to an anchor, and then to break open the hatches, and take the silk and feathers out, and we were to take them to Dagenham bridge-house, to take them in Winter's barge to Ingram and Cooper.

Q. Now we come back to Saturday morning, when Bampton's hoy came out of the creek, and you followed down the river - A. Yes.

Q. Then, after Bampton's hoy had passed your barge you sailed up the Thames afterwards - A. Yes, we did.

Q. As you were coming up the river did any person come from Bampton's hoy - A. Yes. Knox came to us. We were then a little above Woolwich, above the Hope. When he came to us, he said, Bampton sent him to tell us it could not be done, as one of the officers was an old fisherman; if he lost tide in getting up to London, the old officer would have suspicion that there was something going on wrong, but it might be done at the Custom-house-road, where he should stop that night. Fenwick and William Allen declined it, and said, it was not safe, on account of the Police boats. We told Knox, if Bampton stopped any where below the Pool, that we would do it. Knox made no answer.

Q. That is, if he stopped short of the Pool you would plunder the vessel - A. Yes. Then Knox left us, and said, he would tell Bampton. I think Knox had a bottle in his boat. After this we continued to follow the hoy up. Bampton's hoy went right up to the Custom-house.

Q. When you got to Greenwich did you follow him all the way - A. No; we stopped in East-lane, about half a mile short. We put Fenwick and his wife on shore there, and at Rotherithe we put William Allen and Armstrong on shore. I, and the two Winter's remained on board.

Q. Where was the barge then - A. Near the passage of the London Dock. On the next morning (Sunday), Joseph Simmons Winter and I went on shore, and went home to get some clean things, and after that we went to the quay, to look for Bampton.

Q. Did you find him - A. No. The hoy was next the wharf; and as we were going through the Borough we met Fenwick and Ingram. We went and drank together, at the sign of the Black Horse. Ingram spoke about the voyage; how they had been deceived. We told him, we did not know but he might have it still.

Q. On the next morning did any persons come to your mother's house. You live with your mother-in-law, do not you - A. Yes. On Monday morning Armstrong and Winter came to me. Armstrong said to me and Winter, that he had seen a man of the name of Ivey, who could sell the silk if we got it, as we knew the tide would not suit to take the silk to Dagenham. I agreed to go with him to Ivey's house, at No. 1, Artillery-lane, Bishopsgate-street.

Q. What business is he - A. A toy-maker. I went with Armstrong and Joseph Simmons Winter. I saw Ivey. Ivey was an acquaintance of Armstrong's. The conversation was between them. Ivey told Armstrong that he could sell the silk if he had it, and the feathers. He asked, who was to be concerned in getting them. Whe told him, myself, Joseph Simmons Winter, and Benjamin Allen, the prisoners now at the bar. He said, if we wanted more help he could help us to two men, Benjamin Caddock , and a man called Uncle Dick.

Q. Did you ever learn who Uncle Dick was - A. No. I afterwards saw such a man. I do not know who he was. We agreed, when we parted, to meet at the Three Tuns, Upper Thames-street, in the afternoon.

Q. Did they come in the afternoon according to their appointment - A. At dusk in the evening they did.

Q. Who came - A. Armstrong, Joseph Simmons Winter , Benjamin Allen , and William Taylor . These were at the Three Tuns.

Q. Did they tell you any thing - A. No. We agreed to go out after we had one pot of beer, and to talk in the street. We then saw Ivey and Caddock.

Q. How do you know it was Caddock - A. I heard Ivey mention his name. I know him to be Caddock since. When we got into the street we stated the business to them that was not told of it before. We were altogether; Caddock, myself, Armstrong, Joseph Simmons Winter, Taylor; and Benjamin Allen . These men were all in the Three Tuns except Caddock and Ivey. They remained outside, in the street. We were altogether. We stated, that the Sisters, hoy, laid, at the Galley quay, and that she might be taken away from there, Armstrong said he had seen Bampton; he had told him he was going to his club on Tuesday night, and that the job might be easy done, what was proposed before. Armstrong said, Bampton said there would be no suspicion upon him.

Q. Did you agree to this proposal of theirs - A. Yes. They went on board the vessel from that on Tuesday night.

Q. Who went on boards the vessel - A. I went on board the vessel for one. This was Tuesday night; the night that the robbery was committed.

Q. Before you left the street to go on the vessel was any particular plan laid how the thing was to be done - A. Yes, three of us were to go on board. Myself, Taylor, and Caddock were to go on board.

Q. What was Ivey, Winter, Armstrong, and Allen to do - A. Ivey had left us.

Q. Had Ivey left you before you made the plan of business. Attend to the question. I ask you, whether, before you left the street, whether you had arranged among yourselves how the thing was to be done - A. Yes. Caddock, Taylor, and me, were to go on board.

Q. What was Ivey, Allen, and Armstrong to do - A. Ivey went away. I do not know when I missed him.

Q. Do you know whether you missed him before it was settled that you, Taylor, and Caddock, should go on board the vessel - A. I cannot be certain of that.

Q. What was Armstrong, Winter, and Benjamin Allen to do - A. To go round with a boat and meet us.

Q. What do you mean by us - A. Caddock, Taylor, and myself, with the vessel.

Q. What was to be done with the vessel by you - A. After we had cast a rope off to run the vessel off.

Q. You were to cast off the fastenings, a rope was to be run, and you were to hawl the vessel off - A. Yes. After Taylor, Caddock, and myself, had cast the ropes off, the other vessel was to run out a rope, and take a rope off the hoy, and hawl her off to Winter's barge.

Q. They were to lay hold of one end of the rope, the other end was to be tied to the hoy, and they were to run her off to the barge - A. Yes, that is the meaning of it.

Q. Did you each part to go about you respective employment - A. Yes, we did.

Q. Was any thing settled about what you, Caddock, and Taylor, were to do in case the Custom-house officers should be awake - A. Yes; Caddock was to speak to them in the name of Bampton; Taylor and me were to cast the ropes off.

Q. Now, you say it was agreed that you were to meet these men in the vessel, and they were to come in a boat - A. Yes, and to sheer her alongside of Winter's barge, and then to break open the hatches, and take the silk out, and the feathers, and to put them in Winter's barge, and Winter's barge was then to proceed to London bridge, and from there to the nearest place that we thought proper to land them. Caddock went with us. He was to go, and fetch carts. He went with us on board. He was to go with us to rob the hoy, and the plunder was to be put on board Winter's barge, and Caddock was to go with us in the barge, and to go and fetch the carts to take it out. Caddock said, two carts would be ready, and it was then to be housed by Caddock, and Ivey was to have the selling of it; but Ivey would have nothing to do with it when we got it up there.

Q. You say the party divided before you proceeded to business - A. Yes.

Q. Tell me their names - A. Myself, Taylor, and Caddock, went on board the vessel. We went down Sam's-passage, and we went on board the vessel.

Q. Which way did Winter, Armstrong, and Allen go - A. They went towards the Tower-stairs.

COURT. Did all three go on board the hoy - A. Yes.

Q. When got got down to the quay how did you get on board the hoy - A. We walked down a ladder, into a lighter; we stepped into two or three lug boats, and then we went into the hoy. She was laying very near the shore. When we got on board we began to cast the ropes out, and shoved her off. We were not long about it. Winter came on board to assist us. When we had cast off we shoved the hoy off to the teer, to Winter's barge.

Q. Did Winter remain on board, or did he leave you when you cast her off - A. He went in a boat. We chucked a line to him; that was the line that sheered the hoy alongside of Winter's barge.

Q. While you were sheering her off was there any people roused or awaked - A. One of the officers looked up the cabin hatchway. He came up about half way of the skuttle, and asked where we were going with the vessel. He said, where are you going with the vessel. Caddock told him to go below, and turn in. He was going into the road, and from there to the London Docks. The officer asked, if that was Jem. Caddock said, yes. The officer went below then. Caddock and I put the skuttle over, and made it fast by a short rope. It was not secured; it might be opened. The hoy was then sheered along side of Winter's barge.

Q. Where was Winter's barge laying - A. Athwart the Custom-house-road.

Q. When was the barge brought up there - A. The day before.

Q. What did you then proceed to do with the hoy - A. We took off the hatches. Armstrong and Winter went into the hold. Allen, Taylor, and Caddock were upon the hoy's deck, taking the bales and the cases from Winter and Armstrong. I was upon Winter's barge's deck, taking the bales and cases from Taylor and Caddock, and putting them in the barge's hold.

Q. What goods were landed out of the hoy into the barge - A. Ten bales, and two cases. The bales seemed to be the same sort of package as silk generally come in, and the cases the same as feathers come in. We then left the hoy, and shoved the barge away.

Q. Did all the men that you stated to be on board the hoy, come on board the barge - A. Yes, and then we shoved the barge away.

Q. You were the only man on board the barge while they were doing it - A Yes.

COURT. All those that were in the barge went on board the hoy. Armstrong, Winter, and Caddock were they on board the hoy - A. Yes; Allen and Taylor went into the hold of the hoy, and handed the goods up. They all returned on board Winter's barge and went away with her.

Q. What time of night was it when you had finished it - A. Near one o'clock We then proceeded to Baker's dock, on the Surry side of Blackfriars bridge. We there shoved the barge close on shore. Caddock went to fetch another

man, and a cart. He returned with the other man and the cart.

Q. How was Caddock landed - A. We put him ashore in the Cargo's boat. I do not exactly recollect who put him on shore.

Q. Was there any stoppage to his going on shore - A. Yes, a fisherman's boat was close to the shore; we shoved her of one side. Winter spoke to the fisherman from the barge, and ordered him to move.

Q. Did you see any man there who said any thing to you - A. There was a person on the coal craft who spoke to Winter.

Q. How many were they there - A. I believe there were more than one. One man sung out, shove the barge a stern, or else she'll be aground. Caddock was then gone for the cart. We got the goods up and put them in the boat. while Caddock was gone for the cart; some of them we put on shore.

Q. How many trips did you make to carry the goods on shore - A. Two, sir; when we put the second load on shore, the first load was carted and gone away. Caddock was on shore; I helped a hand and put them on shore upon the top of the stairs, and went with the skiff for the second load. I saw a cart back down; Caddock and Norman came with the cart. Two men came with the cart, whom I since knew to be Caddock and Norman; I did not know his person in the dark. Caddock was the person I spoke to at the Three Tuns. It got day light before I went away, and the other man was Norman.

Q. Now, look round close to you at Norman - A. I believe him to be the man.

Q. Now, attend to me, you told me, at the meeting at the Three Tuns, there was a man in the street with Ivey, who was that man - A. Caddock.

Q. Is that the Caddock that was on board the hoy, handing the goods up - A. Yes, that is the same Caddock that returned with Norman, and took the goods away; and there was a man of the name of Jones, who was raking the shore; he looked after the property after it was put on shore.

Q. That Jones is a watchman - A. I believe so.

Q. While you were going up the river to Baker's dock, was any thing done to the packages of the silk bales - A. They were all cut off the ten bales.

Q. What were done with the wrappers - A Some were put into coal barges stern-sheets, and the others were chucked over board.

Q. Now, you say a man of the name of the Jones was raking the shore, and he took charge of the property, was he so situated as to see at that was passing - A. Yes.

Q. Has Winter ever said any thing to you about that watchman - A. Once or twice be mentioned about giving him some money, merely to hold his tongue I gave him three three shilling pieces, at the Thames police-office. It never saw Winter give any; that was after I was apprehended.

Q. Was any thing settled, before you separated, about your meeting again - A. I was to meet Armstrong and Winter the next day, at Fanny Cisson 's, my mother-in-law's, where I lodge. Armstrong came. I do not recollect seeing Winter. We were to meet the others of the party, at the Royal Oak public-house, at four o'clock in the afternoon; I went there. I found there, Winter, Benjamin Allen , Fenwick, and Armstrong. I went into the Royal Oak tap-house I was down stairs when I first went in; the other parties were up stairs. I had a pot of porter. I then went up stairs, and there I found these men I have mentioned; they had had dinner there. They told me that nothing was done with the goods, they were all safe We agreed to meet the next day, at the tap of the Leaping-bar.

Q. How long did you remain at the Royal Oak, Vauxhall - A. I was not there above an hour. On the next morning I went to the Leaping-bar tap. I there saw Caddock and Norman. Two more came, others of the party; one they call Uncle Dick, and another person, I do not know his name, and Ivey was there. Caddock said the goods were all safe. Fenwick came in afterwards. I asked him to take a sample of the silk to Cooper; I think Norman fetched a skein and gave it him. Ivey said, he would have nothing to do with the silk. Before Fenwick came in, he said it was a dangerous concern; but he might be able to sell it, after the stench was blown over. Then Caddock said, he could get a man to have it, and named Cooper; he said Cooper would pay them for it when he took it away. Upon Fenwick coming in, I knew that he had been to Cooper, to speak to him about it. Caddock was acquainted with Cooper, as well as Fenwick. Ivey said, he should expect to be paid for his trouble. Caddock said he would pay him.

Q. For the purpose of disposing of the silk, was any of the party sent away with a sample - A. Yes, Norman was sent for a skein of silk, and Fenwick was asked to take it to Cooper. Fenwick took it to the prisoner; Cooper. Cooper was not to be seen at that time. We waited for Fenwick's return; Fenwick returned and Ingram with him. They said Cooper would come soon afterwards; and when Cooper came, Ingram and Fenwick were gone to look for him. When Cooper came, Caddock, Norman, Ivey, and myself, Uncle Dick, and another man were there. Caddock told Cooper what quantity of silk and feathers there were. Cooper agreed to take it. I think Caddock said there were ten or eleven hundred weight. Cooper said, he did not care how much there was, he would pay for it as soon as he took it away, at twenty shillings a pound. Cooper asked me if we wanted any money; I told him we did. I and Winter wanted some; Winter wanted some for the hire of his master's barge. I told Cooper so. Cooper then gave me 3 l. then I left them. I made an appointment to meet Caddock, Norman, and Cooper, at an old iron shop in Golden-lane. I was to enquire for Caddock by the name of Jackson. Ivey came away with me. Ivey and I went to the Black Horse, in the Borough, and Winter and Armstrong came to us there. Before I went to the Black Horse, I called at my mother-in-law's, her name is Fanny Cisson, and Winter, I believe, heard I was there by my mother-in-law, and when they came in we told them what had taken place at the Leaping-bar. After we told them that, me and Winter walked home, and going along we were met by Goff the officer, and Mr. Thompson. They apprehended us both, and Winter

and me were taken to Cold Bath-fields prison, first, and afterwards to New Prison, Clerkenwell.

Q. While you were in prison did George Harris come to you - A. Yes; I was in Clerkenwell prison then. The first that I saw was Samuel Harris , and then afterwards George Harris, his clerk.

Q. Had Samuel Harris been sent for by you or Winter - A. Neither. I and Winter were put in a separate place when we got to Clerkenwell prison Winter told me that Samuel Harris had been to him, but he did not know who sent him. After that it was that I saw Samuel Harris first; he called me out of the back yard in Clerkenwell prison, to between the gates. He told us, that he had orders from Mr. Cooper to assist us with money; we thanked him. I told Mr. Harris that Winter and me were in want of money; he said he would send some by his brother. The next day George Harris came and brought 20 l. He saw both me and Winter; he told us we should not want for any thing while we were there.

Q. Did he say who the money came from - A. His brother; he did not say who gave it his brother, he only told us to keep our own counsel, and no harm could come to us. We sent to him, I think in about four or five days. Winter and me asked Taylor to call there; Benjamin Allen was with him, they came together; we told them what we had received of George Harris . We asked Taylor to call at Mr. Harris's, and to tell him that we wanted some more money. George Harris came again and brought us 14 l. he said, he had brought it from his brother, his brother sent it to us. I gave it to Winter to take care of: George Harris came to see us again; he brought 8 l. then.

Q. During this time you were examined several times at the police office - A. Yes, I was.

Q. And at last you were discharged - A. Yes.

Q. You had not told them what you have told now, I take it for granted - A. No; at the time I was discharged at the office, Samuel Harris gave me 2 l. Winter was discharged at the same time with me. Shortly after we were discharged I saw Winter; we appointed to go to Cooper's house in two or three days afterwards. We went to Cooper's house, he lives in Ratcliffe-highway; he keeps a liquor shop.

Q. Did you find Cooper at home - A. He was denied at first. I went down stairs, saw him and spoke to him. We told him we wanted some more money. He told us he had paid a good deal away for the silk that he had received. He said he had paid 47 l. to Fenwick, that made 50 l with the 3 l. I had; and near 200 l. he paid to Caddock and Norman; and he paid seventy odd pounds to Armstrong. Cooper agreed to meet me and Winter at the William of Walworth, that is a public-house at Walworth, in the road to Camberwell.

Q. For what purpose were you to meet there - A. To settle the whole of the business. Winter and I went to this William of Walworth, according to appointment. I think it was the second day of Camberwell fair, it was a crowded day, and the houses were all full. We found a man there, one of Caddock's party; I do not recollect his name. Cooper and Ingram came. We went into the skittle-ground for the purpose of conversing; Cooper told us he had paid near 600 l.

Q. Did he tell you how much he was to pay altogether. - A. Nine hundred pound. Winter and I said it was not half enough. He said he would not give any more than 16 s. a pound for the silk, which amounted to 900 l. altogether. He said they were black feathers, and he had not received more than 20 l. for the feathers. He said he would give us 50 l. if Winter would go with him on that night, and he would settle the balance of 900 l on the Monday next.

Q. Was any accompt entered into, how the 600 l. was paid - A. No - yes it was mentioned at the William of Walworth, that he had paid near 200 l. to Caddock, and seventy odd pounds to Armstrong and myself, and Winter 100 l. and odd; but I do not recollect any payment but what I have stated. I received 20 l. 14 l. and 8 l. of George Harris , and 2 l. of Samuel Harris , and 3 l. I had received of Cooper, at the Leaping-bar.

Q. Were these reckoned as parts of the sum that you had received - A. Yes.

Q. When Cooper said that he had paid to you and Winter an hundred and odd pounds, was that stated? how did you reckon them - A. I never reckoned them at all, it was never made out; we were to settle the balance on the following Monday.

Q. Was any mention made of any other persons to whom Cooper had paid money - A. Cooper said he had paid Fenwick 47 l. Winter was to call that night at Cooper's house for 50 l. or near by.

Q. Did you go that night with Winter to Cooper's - A. No; a night or two afterwards I went to Cooper, and Winter came afterwards. I saw Cooper; he told me to go to the second public-house from where he lived, and wait there till he came. I went there, and Winter came in soon after.

Q. Did Cooper come to you - A. No; Ingram came, and said that Cooper was apprehended by Gotty and another officer.

COURT Had Cooper been taken up before - A. No. Ingram told us he would get us some money; he went out for that purpose - he brought back 20 l. he said, that was all Mrs. Cooper could spare. I divided that 20 l. with William Taylor , Benjamin Taylor , and the prisoner, Winter. I and the prisoner, after that, went to Samuel Harris 's house, in Houndsditch; Mr. Harris said, he would speak to Mrs. Cooper for us, and we were to call the next day at four o'clock for it.

Q. The next day did you and Winter set out to go to his house - A. Yes, we did; in our way there, about four o'clock, we met Smith, the officer, as we were going through the Minories to Harris's house.

Q. Had you stopped at any public-house in your way there - A. We did; I do not recollect the sign.

Q. Had you, at that public-house met with a man of the name of Beckett - A. Yes, I had drank with him in Moorfields.

Q. Now, who was with you, when you met at that public-house - A. Winter, Taylor, and myself. As we were going along the Minories, to Harris, we were

by Mr. Hotchon and Smith the officer; they apprehended me.

Q. What became of the other - A. They went away.

Q. Were you taken quietly, or did you make some resistance - A. Mr. Hotchon took me by the collar; I told him not to collar me, I would go quietly. Mr. Hotchon took hold of me first, and then Smith came; the others were not taken, I was. I was taken to the Thames police-office, and from there to the House of Correction. I found Cooper was in the same prison. A few days after I was there, Cooper spoke to me.

Q. Where were you when he spoke to you - A. Down in a yard, and Cooper was in another.

Q. What divided you - A. A brick wall and a gate. He spoke to me, the gate was left open. Cooper told me, that next Thursday, when we went up for examination, we should be alarmed at his evidence, but not to be frightened, for we should all be committed upon his evidence, and then afterwards he, Cooper, should get bail, and in eight and forty hours he should be out of the country. He gave me half a bottle of wine before that; a soldier handed it over the wall. Cooper said, he understood I intended to turn nose.

Q. That is, to be an informer against your friends - A. Yes; I told him I did not; I heard that he did. I then sent to Winter, Allen, and Taylor; they were in another part of the prison, telling them that Cooper meant to hang us all, and if either of them liked to give evidence the magistrate would accept them.

Q. Do you remember, on the Sunday before the hoy was robbed, being at the public-house called the Harp, in Harp-lane, on the 5th of July, after you came up the river - A. Yes, I do; Harp-lane is in Lower Thames-street.

Q. Who were you in company with, at the Harp in Harp-lane - A. In company with Winter, and a lighterman of the name of George Sears .

Q. Did any conversation pass between Sears and you and Winter, about the business you had been about at Sheerness - A. Yes, we mentioned that we had been down to Sheerness; I and Winter mentioned it, that we had been down after this silk; we told Sears so, that we had been after some silk in the Sisters hoy. We asked him to go on board the Sisters hoy, and see if Bamptom was in it; she was near us.

Q. Did Sears go on board for you - A. No; Winter went out to see if he could see Bampton; he said he had seen Bampton, but he could not speak to him. Winter, Sears, and me left the Harp together, we walked towards the Borough; Sears left us at the end of Tooley-street

Q. Then I believe you were admitted an evidence before the magistrate, and you come now from the House of Correction - A. Yes.

Jury. You stated, that coming up the river Knox came to you in the barge, from Bampton's hoy; that Knox said it could not be done, one of the officers was a fisherman, if they lost the tide the old officer would have suspicion there was something going on wrong; we wish to know, whether what Knox said was delivered as a message only, from Bampton, or from himself - A. I understand that Knox came with a message from Bampton.

Mr. Knapp. You know Samuel Harris to be a solictor - A I know no more than what I am told.

Q. He was to have been employed as your solictor in this business - A. So I understood from Winter.

Q. Did you know George Harris , the person who came to you, before that - A. No, I understood he was his brother's clerk .

Q. In all the conversation betwixt you and George Harris , did you suppose him acting by himself, or under the direction of his brother Samuel - A. Under the direction of his brother.

Mr. Alley. Now, Mr. Brown, do me the favour to attend to me, you have said, that on the 5th of July, Winter talked to you about the silk out of the Sisters hoy, at the time that Sears was with you, we are not to understand that was the first interview - A. No.

Q. Why, Mr. Brown, were not you the person sent on the 25th of June, to Bampton, to enquire what he was going into the country about - A. No, Bampton came to my house to tell me that he was going to Standy-creek, for fine goods.

Q. You know that he was captain of a hoy, or a lighter - A. I did, and I knew the master he worked for.

Q. It was not till after you were taken in custody the second time, that you told the story that you have today - A. Yes.

Q. Is this the first time that you have made your appearance in this court - A. No; I have stood at that bar for an offence that Mr. Harmer knows. I am not guilty of; it was only for the lending of a boat, and that was proved.

Q. Have you never been concerned in any thing with Fenwick, that led you into any trouble - A. No.

Q. Now, who had the honour of planning and designing the robbery of these cargos of fine goods - A. I understood it was settled all between Armstrong and Bampton; I never planned it.

GEORGE SEARS . I am a lighterman in the employ of Mr. Lucas.

Q. Do you remember the Sisters hoy being robbed of a quantity of goods, off the Custom-house - A. I heard of it the next morning.

Q. On the Sunday before that Wednesday were you in company with Winter and Brown, at the Harp, in Harp-lane - A. I was, on Sunday the 5th of July, in company with Winter and Brown.

Q. Did any conversation pass, either from Winter or Brown, as to where they had been the week preceding - A. Yes; on my going into the Harp, in Harp-lane, I saw Brown, whom I had known for many years, and not seeing him for a length of time, I asked him what he had been up to, meaning, what he had been about. Winter was in company with him; they were sitting close together in a box. Brown said, George, I hardly know; I have been down the river for this fortnight, I and this young fellow, with a barge, meaning Winter. There was no other person in the room; Winter heard him Brown then said, George, I can put you up to a good thing, I asked him what

it was; he told me, that Hotchin's hoy, the sisters, was loaded with silk, at Brewer's quay, that is close to the Custom-house. He told me, that she had a parcel of bales of silk, and cases of ostrich feathers. Brown said, George, you may as well have a hundred pound or two as not; he stated that it was better than all the chandler shop work,

Q. That is, better than little things - A. I imagine he meant so. I told him it was a hazardous concern, and that I would have nothing at all to do with it. Brown then told Winter that he would get George, meaning me, to go down to Brewer's quay, and tell Jem, meaning Bampton, that there was somebody here that wanted to see him. I told Brown that I would not go; that I would not be seen in any thing of the kind. With that, Winter got up, and said I will go Winter went out with an intent to go, whether he went I know not. Winter returned in about five minutes, and brought word that the officer told him that Jem, meaning Bampton, was gone to dinner. We all got up with an intent to go; we settled for the beer we had, which was two pots; we walked over London Bridge together into the Borough. When we came out of the house, Winter made use of a vulgar expression, saying, that he would think no more harm of shooting Bampton, than shooting a sparrow.

Q. What reason did he give for that - A. For deceiving him; for he had been down below a fortnight with his barge, and had spent all his money; Winter further stated, that if Bampton had not been a mind to bring up at the Old Haven, he might have ran the vessel on shore on the Fly.

COURT - Where is Old Haven - A. In sea reach. It is two miles of this side, out of the reach of Sheerness harbour.

Q. That is the Fly sands - A. Yes, and that there they should not have been above ten minutes about it, and that there would have been no suspicion upon Bampton whatever; he would have been fastened down, as well as the officers; and what was worse than all that, he took out the foggin, that is a thing that goes into the hasp to make the scuttle fast. Winter stated, that he sailed his barge by shares, that means, dividing the profit with the owner; and what account he said could he give to his employer for spending his time for the last fortnight. Winter further stated, that they could do it that night, meaning the Sunday night, if Bampton would shove along side of the quay, and put into the Custom-house road. We went into a liquor shop in the Borough. I had a glass of gin, and then we parted. On the Wednesday, I went to the Custom-house quay. I went to take away my barge, and then I heard of the robbery. After I heard of the robbery, I saw the hoy laying athwart of the doubling teer.

Q. You know Bampton very well, I suppose - A. I know him perfectly well.

Q. How soon after did you give information of what you had heard - A. On the following day. I told Mr. Lucas's foreman, I thought I knew the persons that had been guilty of the robbery. On the next day, I went to the West India Docks; I was ordered down to the office by Mr. Hotchins, I believe the owner of the barge. While I was talking to Mr. Lucas, Mr. Hotchins came in.

Mr. Adolphus. Q. You accosted your friend Brown, what had he been up to; you do not ask your honest friends that question, do you - A. That is the general phrase upon the water among lightermen.

Q. You objected, not because it was dishonest, but because it was hazardous - A. I thought it was unsafe. I persuaded Brown and Winter likewise not to have any thing to do with it. I should imagine that no person has a right to be concerned in a robbery without he likes.

Q. Winter and Brown communicated to you about a robbery, that they had been waiting about a fortnight and had not accomplished it, they could not go on with the robbery without they laid a new plan.

COURT. The witness has said nothing about a new plan.

SEARS. It might be the old plan new revived.

MATTHIAS PRIME LUCAS . Q. You are, we pretty well know, a lighterman - A. Yes. George Sears, was a lighterman in my employ. I was not on business that day the robbery was committed; on coming to town on Thursday morning, William Pope , my foreman informed me that George Sears could give some information who the parties were. Upon receiving that information, I dispatched a servant to the West-India docks to do Sear's work, and another servant to Mr. Hotchins, desiring them both to come to my accompting house. Sears came and stated what he had heard, and in consequence of what he stated, I desired them to attend at the office.

RALPH FENWICK . Q. I believe you are a ship chandler, residing at Greenwich - A. I am.

Q. Do you know George Brown - A. Yes.

Q. In the month of June last, did Brown propose to you to go down the river to become any party - A. He proposed to me to go down the river to get some silk.

Q. Did you agree to be one of the party - A. I did; and after Brown proposed it to me Winter called upon me. I immediately went in the barge with Winter to Gravesend.

Q. You did not succeed, that voyage did not answer - A. No.

Q. When was it that Brown applied to you a second time - A. I think it was the 29th of June.

Q. Was it then understood that you were to go for silk - A. Yes. I understood it so from Bown to go again. I told Brown when he wanted me, he knew where to find me.

Q. How long was this before you went to Sheerness by land - A. I suppose eight or ten days. When Brown came to me, he said in about a fortnight's time he was to go down for some silk; he asked me if I knew a person that would buy it. I told him I thought I did, and I went down to Chadwell in Essex, to a man of the name of Ingram I enquired for Ingram, he was not at home. I found him at Chadwell the next morning. I saw him there the next morning, at a public-house. I told him there was some silk to be had. I asked him if he could take it, he said he would, but he would talk to me the next day about it, when he brought his friend with him. I made an appointment to meet him the next day.

Q. When he came, what past - A. The prisoner, Cooper came with him; I told them both that there was some silk to be had.

Q. How did he introduce Cooper to you - A. It

was some time before I would say any thing to him. Ingram told me I might say what I had to say before him. I told them the plan that was to be pursued.

Q. What was that plan that you told them - A. I told them that there was a vessel going to take in a quantity of silk at Standgate Creek, and that a person of the name of Brown and others, were agoing to take it away from the said hoy. Cooper said, he did not care where it came from, he would find money for as much as there might be. I told Cooper and Ingram to come along with me into the Borough to see Brown and his party. Cooper said, he would rather deal with me, he did not like so many to know his business. I told them that one must go with me, I would not take the risk on myself. Cooper declined going.

Q. Did either of them go with you - A. Ingram did. I took him to Brown, in the Borough, to his mother-in-law's, Fanny Cisson .

Q. Was any arrangement made between Ingram, Brown and you - A. Not with me. Ingram and Brown. Ingram went apart from me to talk it together, and then I went away with Ingram.

Q. After they had done the conversation, did you learn from Ingram after he had parted from Brown, what the conversation was - A. I did. Ingram told me that Brown was to give him the earliest notice when to be at Dagenham to receive the silk; nothing more passed then. And as soon as Brown ascertained the time, he told me. I went to Ingram as soon as Brown ascertained the time when he was to fetch the silk. I went to Chadwell, to Ingram, I found him at the Coach and Horses, in my way to Chadwell. I told Ingram to be at Dagenham on the next Thursday or Friday, but to make sure, he had better be there both days. He told me, he would be sure to be there; then I came back.

Q. How soon after that did you go down by land to Gravesend - A. About a week. Brown and William Allen called on me, on Monday, the 29th of June, at my house at Greenwich, and I went by land to Gravesend the next morning. I walked over to Greenhithe; myself, Allen and Brown, Brown and myself stopped in 'Squire Wedlock's Park, it joins Greenhithe. Allen went to Greenhithe to see where Winter's barge was. Allen came back and told us that we must go to Gravesend; and we went back to Gravesend, where we stopped near a ship-builder's yard, at the upper part of Gravesend, until the barge came down.

Q. And when was it that the barge was to come - A. That night at high-water; at high-water, the barge came and took us all in.

Q. Now, when you and Brown, and William Allen went on board, who did you find - A. William Armstrong , Joseph Simmons Winter and his brother, the apprentice.

Q. Where did you sail to - A. Sheerness Sir, we laid at Sheerness, I believe, for three days and a half.

Q. While you were laying at Sheerness, did Bampton come on board Winter's barge - A. He did, with another man. Knox the prisoner, I believe to the other man, he looks like him, but I cannot swear it.

Q. Now when Bampton came, and Knox with him, what information did he give you - A. Bampton said, he was not going to take the goods out till Friday afternoon, four o'clock, as they were not out of quarantine till then. Brown and the rest on board the barge, thought I had better go to London, and acquaint Cooper of the delay of the goods.

Q. Why - A. Because they were not taken out so early as they expected. I came to London, and went to Chadwell. I did not know where Cooper lived.

Q. When you went to Chadwell, did you find Ingram at home - A. No, he was at Fairlop fair.

Q. That is a fair at Epping Forest, I believe - A. Yes. I went to Fairlop fair, and found him. I told him that he had no call to go down on the Friday night, that the goods would not be there; he told me very well, that Cooper and himself had been down at Dagenham waiting, expecting that we should come on the Thursday. This was on the Friday, I told him to be there on the Saturday night, he said he would; he told me, I might have saved that trouble. He told me where Cooper lived. I do not recollect where. I told him to be there on the Saturday. I came back to London, and went down to Chatham in the Chatham coach, from the Cross-keys Inn, Gracechurch-street. From Chatham, I went to Sheerness, in the Sheerness boat, and got on board of Winter's barge again on the Saturday. They were under weigh at the time. Bampton's hoy was not in sight. I learned from Winter and the others, that she was gone up towards London. Winter's barge made sail after her; while I got my breakfast, we came in sight of her, and caught her about the Old Haven. We got close to her within musket shot.

Q. While you were there, was there any man come on board your barge from the hoy - A. There was a man.

Q. Was that the man at the bar - A. I cannot swear, I have a doubt.

Q. Was that the person that came to you as you were sailing up the river, the same that came with Bampton at Sheerness - A. I believe it to be the man, I cannot swear. I had but a slight sight of him.

Q. Did you hear what the man said that come - A. I heard their account of it. They said it was a d - d bad job.

COURT, Did you hear the man say any thing that came on board - A. No, they talked forward, I was aft. I heard the men say, that the men said, if it could be done, they would shew a signal of some kind; one of them said, that one of the officers was an old fisherman, that he knew the ground as well, if not better than themselves; and that they could not stick her ashore according to their agreement; and that nothing could be done until they got to London, to the Custom-house road.

Mr. Gurney. Q. The party were very much displeased at this - A. Yes, they called Bampton a deceitful kind of a man, for deceiving of them as he had. We followed the hoy up the river, until we came to Greenwich notwithstanding. I came on shore, and the barge went on. This was Saturday, the 4th of July; the next day, Sunday, the 5th, I came to town, and as I came by St. George's Church, I saw Cooper and Ingram, they were coming into town, they hailed me, and got off the coach and came to me; they found themselves very much disappointed that I had not come to

Dagenham they said, as I had appointed; they told me that they had been down at Dagenham, Thursday and Saturday all night, and seemed to think that we were trifling with them. We were walking up the Borough, we met Brown and Joseph Simmons Winter. We went down an inn yard and had a pot of porter or ale, I do not know which, Brown, Ingram and Cooper talked together. I left them in the course of five minutes. I told them I had declined having any more to do with the business, and I was coming to Cooper to tell him so.

Q. You did not know where Cooper lived - A. Yes, I did, Sir.

Q. You saw no more of the parties until after the silk was stolen - A. I did not. On the Wednesday morning after, I was going over the quay, by the Custom-house, I saw a number of persons standing about the quays, I asked what was the matter. I heard that the hoy had been robbed. I saw the hoy there. Upon hearing that the hoy had been robbed, I went to the Borough to find Brown. I did not find him. I then went towards Lambeth to look after the prisoner Winter, he lives at Lambeth. I saw him at his door. I asked him whether he could tell me where Brown was.

Q. Did any thing pass about the silk - A. No, he told me, I should find Brown at the Royal Oak, Vauxhall, that afternoon. I went to the Royal Oak that afternoon with Winter. William Armstrong came in soon after, and Benjamin Allen ; and in the course of the afternoon, Brown came in after. Brown and Winter went out into the passage together, they came back into the room to me; they bid one another good day, and went. I went away with Brown. I went with Brown to Ivey's house, No. 1, Artillery-lane, Bishopsgate-street.

Q. Did you find Ivey at home - A. I did not, Brown was told by his wife, if we came the next morning by ten o'clock, we should find him at home. Brown and I went there the next morning, we found Ivey at home. Brown asked me to go with him for company, and Ivey went with us to the sign of the Leaping-bar, Blackfriars road, this was Thursday.

Q. At the Leaping-bar, who did you meet - A. Caddock and Norman.

Q. Is that the man they call Norman - A. Yes, it is I believe. Brown asked me if I would carry a sample of the silk to Cooper. I took a sample of the silk to the prisoner Cooper.

Q. Do you remember who brought that sample there - A. No, I cannot say who brought it; it was either Norman or Caddock that gave it me. I took the sample to Cooper's house. I saw Mrs. Cooper there. I gave her the sample, and she put it in the loop of a winter curtain.

Q. In the fold of a window curtain - A. Yes. I staid there until Cooper came in. Ingram came in with Cooper, they told me as soon as they heard of the robbery, they went to Dagenham, expecting the silk would come there; not finding the silk there, they had crossed at Greenwich, and gone to my house. I told Cooper that I had brought a sample of silk from Brown and some others; and that he was to go to the sign of the Leaping-bar, Blackfriars-road, to agree with the party for the silk; he told me that he would go, and asked me to dine with him.

Q. While you were with him, was the sample taken out of the window curtain - A Yes, he told me and Ingram to go on before him. Directly he came in, the sample was taken down, it was fetched from up stairs.

Q. How do you know? did you go up stairs to see it placed in the curtain - A. I was told, when I came in, to go up stairs, least an officer should see me.

Q. Did Cooper look at the sample - A. Yes; he said it was very good, and then, after dinner, he desired me and Ingram to walk on to Blackfriar's bridge.

COURT. You did dine there - A. Yes I did, and we were to wait at the bottom of the bridge for him. Ingram and I went to Blackfriar's bridge, and waited there some time; he did not come to us, and after waiting some time, we went to the Leaping-bar.

Mr. Gurney. When you got to the Leaping-bar, did you find he was there - A. No. I then went to his house to look after him, and remained there until he came back. Ingram was with me.

Q. When you got to his house he was not at home, there you staid until he came - A. I did, Sir, and Ingram waited with me.

Q. When he came home did he tell you where he had been - A. He did; he told me that he had been and seen Brown, Caddock, and Norman, at the Leaping-bar; he told me that he had settled the business with them about the silk.

Q. Did he tell you upon what terms - A. No, sir, he told me that he was going to meet them the next morning, at a house in Golden-lane, by ten o'clock, to arrange about taking the silk away. The next morning I met Cooper, Ingram Caddock , and Norman, at a public-house in Golden-lane; we were then going about moving the silk. I had not left the house above two minutes, when George Brown 's brother came and told me, that his brother and Winter had been taken in custody on the Thursday night, that was the night before; this was Friday. I then left them and saw no more of them. This was said to me privately. I went that afternoon to Cooper's house, and waited until he came home. I told him that Winter and Brown were taken in custody, and that I had heard, from my cousin, Evans the officer had been making enquiry after me. I asked him what I had better do? he said, I had better go down in the country along with Ingram, out of the way; if I was taken it would make the business look blacker. I told him I wanted money; he told me I should have what money I wanted. Caddock came in, in the meantime, and requested for 50 l. of Cooper; Cooper then gave him 50 l. first.

Q. Did he give you 50 l. - A. Yes, he did; he then told me he had given Brown 3 l. if I would give him 3 l. back, that would make an even 50 l. that is, 47 l. to me, and the 3 l. that he gave Brown, would make up an even 50 l. I gave him 3 l. back. Caddock then declined having any.

Q. Did you go with Ingram down to Chadwell - A. I did, and I staid there a fortnight or three weeks.

Q. At whose house did you stay chiefly - A. Thompson's sometimes.

Q. Where did you sleep generally - A. At the Greyhound public-house. Ingram was with me there frequently.

Q. He lived at Chadwell - A. Yes, he did.

Q. Did your wife come down to Chadwell to you - A. Yes, she did; she staid with me part of the time. After staying there a fortnight or three weeks, I came to London to see Cooper.

Q. Who did you find in his company - A. Caddock and Norman, and a stout man they call Uncle Dick. Upon my going into the room they seemed confused at my going in.

Q. You were thought to be in the country - A. Yes. They stopped their conversation, and Cooper and Caddock went out into the passage.

Q. After they came back did you speak to Cooper - A, No, Cooper and I, soon after, left the house together. This was at a public-house that belongs to Cooper, in Piccadilly. I asked Cooper, how long I was to stay in the country. He told me, in a few days time I might come home, and he should have the remainder part of the silk in his possession; but he had had a great deal of trouble with Caddock and Norman, as they were two bad characters. Then I went back to the country.

Q. How soon after did you return home to Greenwich - A. About a week, and after I got home some time, I was taken in custody. I was admitted an evidence by the magistrate, and have been kept in the House of Correction ever since.

Mr. Adolphus. You will not swear that the man at the bar is the man that you mean, Knox - A. No, I will not. I understand since that his name is Knox.

Q. If you had met him in the street, should you have gone up to him and called him Knox - A. No, I do not think I should.

COURT. The thing is, whether he is the man that came on board the vessel, supposing nothing had past, should you have gone up to him and spoke to him - A. It is as likely I should have past him as spoke to him, I had such a slight knowledge of him. All that I heard him say was, that he would make a signal on board his hoy, if the job could be done.

Mr. Adolphus. And if he did not make that signal, the job was not to be done.

COURT. How is that - A. I do not know that ever I heard the man say any more, than that he was to make a signal. That is all I heard the man say, if that is the man.

Mr. Knapp. I do not know, whether in your original examination you mentioned your business - A. A ship-chandler; I carry it on now.

Q. You come here in custody now, and you know, by giving your evidence here to-day, you save yourself from being tried - A. I suppose so, Sir.

Q I want to know whether your object, when you declined to have any thing more to do in the business, was fair on your part, in that it could not be done - A. Neither the one or the other, it was because I considered that Bampton would deceive us; I considered he was a villain.

Q. You considered that he was a villain, and that there was no honour among thieves - A. Yes, sir.

Q. After the robbery had been committed you were ready enough to join in the plunder - A. I wanted to know who it was that had done it.

Q. You gave it up, Bampton having deceived you, and when the robbery was committed, you took it up to partake of the plunder - A. No.

Q. Did you expect 50 l. - A. No, it was not the first 50 l. that ever I had; I took it on the part of the prisoners. I told you at first that they asked me to take the management of the business. Brown and Winter was the whole that ever I knew of them. I told Cooper so, at the time he paid me the 50 l.

Q. So that we are to understand you, you were angry when the robbery was not done, and when it was done, you were glad to partake of the plunder - A. I was glad when the robbery was not committed.

Q. When did that fit take you, supposing Bampton had not decived you, you would not have been sorry then - A. I am informed, that Cooper had formed a second connection, with Brown and others, to commit the robbery, after I had given it up, and it was Cooper's wish that it should be done.

Q. When did you, for the first time, give the first account of this transaction, upon your oath, would you have told any body if you had not been taken up - A. Upon my oath I would not.

RICHARD BROWN . Q. Are you the brother of George Brown - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember the circumstance of the hoy being robbed off the Custom-house - A. I remember hearing of it soon after it was done.

Q. Do you remember, after the robbery, being sent by your brother to Golden-lane - A. Yes; to inquire for a man of the name of Jackson. I went to Golden-lane. I saw Fenwick there; he was in company with other persons. I asked him if he knew Jackson. I saw him in the street. I told Fenwick that my brother had been taken in custody.

REBECCA FENWICK . Q. Are you the wife of Ralph Fenwick - A. Yes, sir.

Q. Do you remember, in the month of June last, your husband going from home to go down the river - A. Yes.

Q. Did he go twice - A. I do not recollect.

Q. About the time of his going, do you remember George Brown calling upon him - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember Cooper calling - A. Yes.

Q. Look at the bar, do you mean one of the prisoners - A. Yes, the middle one; he came on a Sunday. Ingram came with him; my husband was not at home.

Q. Did either Ingram or Cooper write any direction when they called - A. Ingram did; he wrote Cooper's direction. I gave the paper to my husband. Ingram said, it was merely a direction for my husband to call upon him; the said that in Cooper's presence.

Q. After that, did Brown and any other person call upon your husband to go any where - A. No. Brown and William Allen had called upon my husband before that. I think it was on the Thursday before, and my husband went out with Brown and Allen.

Q. Do you remember what day of the week your husband came back.

Q. A little time after that, did your husband go out of the way - A. Yes, he went to Chadwell, in Essex,

and I went down to Chadwell to him. I staid there two or three days.

Q. At whose house did you stay there - A. At a man's house, of the name of Thompson; and while I was there, I saw Ingram several times.

THOMAS JONES . Q. Are you a watchman employed on the premises near Baker's dock - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember hearing in July of a hoy being robbed off the Custom-house - A. Yes, I heard of such a thing in the course of the night the hoy was robbed.

Q. Did you see a cart come to Baker's dock - A. I saw a cart come in the morning, somewhere about 3 o'clock.

Q. Where did the cart come to - A. I saw the first cart by the dock. A one horse cart backed down from the bottom of Holland-street.

Q. That is near Baker's dock - A. Yes.

Q. Did you go down to the shore - A. I saw nothing in the cart more than a man. I then went down to the shore at Baker's dock, and at the shore, I saw three or four men with a boat, they took some things out of the boat, and put it on shore against some pig iron; one man went away, and the other three men rowed in the boat.

Q. Did you see any barge laying off the dock - A. There were two or three barges laying off the wharf.

Q. Was one of them a sailing barge - A. They were pretty nearly all sailing barges.

Q. Did you see the prisoner, Winter, on board the barge, look round - A. That is the man, or very much like him; he was out towards the middle of the river at a great way.

Q. Now where did you see that man who is much like Winter - A. Out in the middle of the river, in a barge.

COURT. The barge was a great way off you - A. Yes, it was a great way off.

Mr. Gurney. After this, did you see any cart come down the dock, down the passage to the dock - A. A cart came down the passage.

Q. What was done with the goods landed in the boat - A. They came and took it out.

Q. Who were the persons that came and took the goods in the cart - A. Two men.

Q. Did you see any more take place about it - A. No, I did not.

Q. Some time after this, you were examined at the Police office about this business - A. Yes, I was.

Q. While you were there did George Brown give you any thing - A. Yes. I sat on a chest, he came to me, and sat down by me.

Q. Did he put any thing into your hand - A. He put his hand behind me, and shoved three three shilling pieces into my hand, after Brown and Winter were discharged the first time.

Q. Do you remember meeting him at the Orange Tree - A. Yes.

Q. That is a public-house by Baker's dock - A. Yes, I saw him there.

Q. Is that house kept by Mrs. Conn - A. Yes.

Q. Did any thing pass between him and you - A. No.

Q. The next day did Mrs. Conn give you any thing - A. She gave me 15 shillings.

ELIZABETH CONN . Q. Do you keep the Orange Tree near Baker's dock - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know the witness, Jones - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember, in the month of July or August last, giving Jones any money - A. I first gave him fifteen shillings, and afterwards sixpence.

Q. From whom did you receive that - A. From Mr. Winter who stands at the bar.

Q. Did you give any other money to any other witnesses that were examined at the Police-office. - A. Fifteen shillings to Chandler and fifteen shillings to Swan.

COURT. These were all examined, were they - A. Yes.

Mr. Gurney. Had they all been examined before you received this two pound five shillings and sixpence of Winter - A. Yes, I believe they had.

Q. Did Winter give it to you to give it to these three men - A. Yes, he mentioned Jones, Swan and Chandler.

Q. How long was this after Winter had been discharged - A. On the Monday following.

HERCULES BULL . Q. Are you a lighterman in the employ of Horn and Devey, Bank-side - A. I am.

Q. That is close to Baker's dock, I believe - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember being off Baker's dock on the night between the 7th and 8th of July - A. I was at our own wharf with a barge. A sailing barge came up and made fast to our craft between twelve and one. We wanted to shift our craft, and my fellow-servant, Nathaniel Young , hailed the barge to cast off, or else we should let them go a drift. They did so; and hauled into Baker's dock.

Q. I suppose at this time it was dark - A. Very dark.

Q. Therefore you cannot say whose craft it was - A. No.

Q. Do you know Winter the prisoner - A. Perfectly well. I knew him an apprentice; and was a fellow-servant along with him.

Q. Did you know the barge he sailed in at that time - A. I knew the barge he sailed in before. On the next morning, I saw his barge, the Brothers, off the road the next morning, not knowing he was in her.

Q. Was there any other sailing barge off the road except that - A. No one.

Mr. Adolphus. You saw no one in the barge did you - A. No one.

NATHANIEL YOUNG . Q. Are you in the employ of Horn and Davey - A. Yes.

Q. On the night of the 7th of July last, were you with the last witness on board your master's craft - A. Yes.

Q. Did any sailing barge come up the river to that place - A. Yes, the sailing barge made fast to one of our craft; and after that they went up to Baker's dock: as they were going into Baker's dock, I hailed them, barge, oh hoy, whence come you? some man made answer, and said, from Gravesend. There were some men on board, how many I could not say. As they

were going to Baker's dock, I said to them, young fellow, you are going too far a head. I told them, they would get on a heap of dirt, where they were making a new wharf, if they hawled her far a head.

Q. Do you know Winter, and the barge he commanded, the Brothers - A. Yes; I know the barge. She was laying off our road. The next morning our foreman hurried her off. She was laying near.

Mr. Adolphus. There were many other sailing-barges in that road, were there not - A. No, I did not see them.

FANNY CISSON . Q. Are you the mother-in-law of George Brown - A, Yes.

Q. Do you remember Brown being taken in custody; in July last - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember Armstrong, Winter, and Fenwick, calling for Brown at your house - A. Yes.

Q. Now, to the best of your recollection, how long was that before your son-in-law was taken up - A. About a week or ten days, to the best of my memory.

THOMAS MORGAN . Q. Do you keep the White Horse, in the Borough, High-street - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know George Brown - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember of hearing of Brown being taking up - A. I heard of it afterwards, and I saw it in the newspaper, of the hoy being robbed off the Custom-house.

Q. Do you remember, about that time, Brown being in your house, in company with any men - A. I cannot say exactly what time. He might be there three weeks or a month before that.

Q. Do you remember his being in company with that man, Fenwick - A. Yes, I have seen him in company with Fenwick.

Q. Now, look at the bar, and tell me whether you see any other person who was at your house in company with Brown - A. I think I have seen Winter there with Fenwick and Brown.

Mr. Alley. This is a house of great resort: a great many people come there - A. Yes. I can recollect that I have seen Fenwick and Brown there.

Q. As to Winter, you do not know anything about him - A. I cannot say I do.

THOMAS BAYLISS . Q. Do you keep the Royal Oak tap, Vauxhall - A. Yes.

Q. In the month of July did you see Fenwick at your house - A. I rather think he was there, but I cannot swear it.

Q. Was there a man of the name of Winter there. Look at the bar. Did you see him there - A. Yes. There were three or four more in their company.

MARY BAILLY . Q. In the month of July last, did you live at the Leaping Bar, Blackfriars-road - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember, about that time, seeing George Brown at your house - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see any man of the name of Ivey with him - A. Yes, and a man of the name of Norman with him; and there were other men in company with him, but they are not here.

Mr. Andrews. Mary Bailey , had you ever seen these men before.

Q. How many times have you seen Ivey - A. A great many times. Ivey came to our house several times about July. I am quite sure Ivey is the man.

WILLIAM JOHN BANNISTER . Q. Do you live in Woolpack-yard, Gravel-lane - A. I do.

Q. Does Gravel-lane lay between Blackfriars-road and the Borough - A. Yes, it does. I suppose it is about three hundred yards from Baker's dock. On the 9th of July I saw a cart backed down to the bottom of the yard, to where I was at work.

Q. Did you see any thing put into that cart - A. I did; four black bags.

Q. How many persons, beside the carman were assisting in this - A. I think there were two, besides the carman.

Q. After the bags were loaded did the cart go away - A. Yes. This was Thursday, the 9th of July.

Q. On Saturday you saw a cart come again - A. I did. It was backed down to the same place.

Q. Were the bags full or empty - A. They appeared full; and the cart was taken away; and on Monday the cart came again. On Monday I came out of the yard; the cart was empty; and on my return I saw the cart go out of the yard, with the bags full, standing up.

Q. What did you see in the cart - A. Apparently potatoe or corn sacks full. The name on the cart was James Spriggs , Red Lion-court, Saffron-hill. On the Monday I told a friend of Mr. Hotchon's what I had observed.

Q. Do you know a man of the name of Norman - A. Yes, to the best of my belief he is the man that I saw put the sacks in the cart.

COURT. On which day did you see Norman putting these things in the cart - A. On each day, on Thursday and Saturday I saw him assisting and putting them in, and on the Monday I saw him go out with the cart.

Mr. Gurney. Did he occupy a stable at the bottom of the yard - A. Not as I know. There was a stable at the bottom of the yard belonged to a man of the name of Whitworth.

Q. Was the cart backed down to a convenient part for that stable - A. Yes.

EDWARD TOWNSEND WHITWORTH . Q. Are you a carrier - A. Yes. I live in Woolpack-yard, Gravel-lane.

Q. Do you know a man of the name of Norman - A. Yes. On the 4th of July he hired a stable of me.

Q. Did he continue to occupy that stable until the officers came and searched it - A. Yes.

THOMAS FRIEND . I am a constable.

Q. Did you search a stable in Woolpack-yard, Gravel-lane - A. I did. I found there a trunk, and a number of wrappers, a quantity of silk, and a large quantity of ostrich feathers in a corn bin. This is the bag of silk.

Q. How much weight is there - A. Above one hundred and twenty pounds. Here is a bag of ostrich feathers. This is the trunk; it is marked, S. I.

Mr. Gurney. It is S. I. in Solomon Israel's bill, and S. I. in the bill of lading, and in the officers bill.

Friend. The feathers that I found in the corn bin I put in the trunk. This trunk is full of black ostrich feathers. One bundle is white, and some are mixed. The bag of ostrich feathers were found in the hay-loft, over the stable. These are all black, of a larger description than the others.

Q. to Mr. Mills. Does that appear to be one of the trunks that were sent up on board Bampton's hoy - A. Yes, it does.

ROBERT THOMPSON . I am a lighterman.

Q. Were you at any time in company with Goff, the officer, when either of the prisoners were apprehended - A. Yes, I was, not expecting I should be called upon as a witness. I cannot speak to dates.

Q. Do you remember when you first heard of the robbery - A. Yes, I remember the time; I cannot say the date.

Q. How long after the robbery was it that you were in company with Goff - A. Two or three days. I was coming along the Borough, in company with Goff; we fell in with Winter, and George Brown; we apprehended them.

JAMES BUDGELL . Q. You live, I believe, with the keeper of the House of Correction - A. Yes.

Q. Were Winter, Brown, and Knox, in your custody - A. Yes, in custody of the governor. Winter, Brown, Knox, and William Allen , were in custody of the governor.

Q. Did you, at any time, see any other of the prisoners there, visiting them - A. Yes, Benjamin Allen and Taylor.

Q. How many times did you see them there - A. It was very seldom they missed above every other day.

JOSEPH BECKETT . Q. I believe you are employed in the House of Correction - A. I am.

Q. Do you know the persons of the prisoners - A. Yes; I know the whole of them, by having them in custody.

Q. Did you know any of them before you had them in custody - A. Yes; I knew Winter, and Brown, Benjamin Allen , and Taylor.

Q. Did you see them in company any where - A. I did. Before they were apprehended the second time I met Brown in Moorfields, and then Winter and Taylor came up. I was speaking to Brown when they came up. We went to the nearest public-house we could find, and drank together.

Q. How long did you continue with them - A. Not five minutes.

Q. Were either of them apprehended that day - A. Yes, Brown, a quarter of an hour afterwards; it could not be more. Brown was brought to the House of Correction that night.

Q. I believe you and Cook apprehended the others - A. Me and William Cook apprehended the others on Sunday night. Cook and me apprehended Joe Winter , William Taylor , and Benjamin Allen, at Allen's house, up one pair of stairs, in the bed-room, about a quarter to ten at night.

JAMES SPRIGGS . I am a carman. I live in Red Lion-court, Saffron Hill.

Q. About the 9th of July were you hired in Smithfield, and taken over Blackfriars bridge - A. On the 10th of July I was, between eleven and twelve in the forenoon.

Q. Who was it that hired you - A. A stranger. He took me to opposite of the Cross Keys, between the bridge, and Christ's church. The person asked me if I had any cords. I told him, no. He told me to go and buy some, and bring two-penny ones. I went away to buy the cords, and when I returned I saw my cart loaded with four or five sacks. When I left the cart the horse's head stood towards the Obelisk, and when I returned I found the cart loaded, and the horse's head towards the bridge.

Q. Did the man that hired you give you any directions - A. Yes. He said, I have done without your cords; you have stopped so long; follow that gentleman; pointing to a man that stood at some yards distance. I followed that person, to whom he pointed, with my cart. That person led me over the bridge, up Ludgate-hill, round St. Paul's churchyard; and the reason why, there was a stoppage in the Old Bailey. He kept walking forward, and looked with a side glance, to see that I was following.

Q. To what street did he finally lead you - A. To a street near the Curtain-road, Shoreditch. I saw him knock at a door, and go into a house in the street, near the Curtain-road. I backed my cart to that door.

Q. Did that man help you to unload - A. He did.

Q. Did he pay you - A. Yes, seven shillings: a dollar, a shilling, and a sixpence.

Q. Now, is that man that paid you the same person who guided you all the way from Blackfriars-road - A. Yes.

Q. In the course of your journey through the city were you stopped once or twice - A. Yes, by obstructions in the road, and when I stopped the man stopped just a head of me.

Q. Did he stop to wait for you - A. Yes. He went on first when he saw I could move.

Q. So that he kept an eye upon you - A. Yes.

Q. Now look at the prisoners at the bar, and tell me whether is any one there that is like the man - A. He was a lusty man. Cooper is like the man, by his bulk. His face I never saw. He is the same sort of person in bulk and height.

Q. You say, the face you did not see. The man paid you the money - A. Just so.

Q. He did not turn his back when he paid you - A. I was at the tail-board of my cart when he paid me. He came out of the door with a very swift walk, towards me, put his hand to me, gave me the money, and walked away.

Q. Do you remember being hired on the Monday afterwards to go over Blackfriars-bridge - A. Yes.

Q. Were you sent to buy cord A. No; I was ordered to get a pint of beer, when I got over the bridge.

Q. Was it the same person that hired you before - A. No; a man six foot high, nearly; a very tall man.

Q. When you got over the bridge the man told you to get a pint of beer - A. Yes.

Q. Where were you hired - A. From my own

yard, Saffron-hill. My name and residence is on my cart.

Q. A man told you to go into a public-house and get some beer - A. Yes.

Q. While you were in the public-house what was done with your cart - A. Taken away, as I suppose.

Q. When you came out of the public-house did you see the cart on the same spot - A. I found it not exactly in the same place. The cart was turned round, and loaded then with three or four sacks.

Q. Where did you take these sacks to - A. The man that hired me went with me. I went to near Water-lane, Fleet-street, then the man that engaged me took them out of my cart, and put them into another cart, and the man that hired me, paid me. This was on Monday, the 13th.

ALEXANDER GIBBS . Q. You are a silk manufacturer - A. Yes. I reside at 21, Compton-street. My manufactory is near the Curtain-road, Shoreditch.

Q. Do you know Mr. Cooper - A. I do. The first interview that I had with Mr. Cooper was about the middle of May.

Q. Did you see him any time in July - A. I did. On the 9th of July he called at my residence, and left a sample of silk. I was not at home.

Q. Somebody called, and left a sample of silk. Do not tell me what you do not personally know. Did Cooper call the next day - A. Yes; he called between six and seven o'clock. I produced the sample that had been left. Cooper asked me twenty-six shillings a pound. When I produced it, it was acknowledged to be left either by him, or his order. I do not remember exactly the words. Mr. Cooper then said, that he had about two hundred pounds weight, and asked me six-and-twenty shillings a pound for it. I told him, that I would consider of it, and let him know between that and ten o'clock.

Q. Did you see him again that morning - A. I did, at his house in Ratcliffe Highway.

Q. What house is that - A. A liquor shop, opposite of Old Gravel-lane. I offered him three-and-twenty shillings a pound for it. He said, it was too low a price for it. He said, there was a gentleman concerned with him; he would step down and ask his opinion. Accordingly Cooper withdrew, and returned in about two minutes, with a gentleman with him. He agreed to take the three-and-twenty shillings.

Q. When were you to have the silk away - A. The same day I went away, and the silk came, as I expected, on that day, between one and two o'clock. It was brought in one large, and three small bags, in a cart; a small open cart; not a heavy town-cart. I have seen the cart since at Hatton Garden office. Spriggs was the carman. I have seen him twice since, at the office.

Q. to Spriggs. Come forward.

Mr. Gibbs. Spriggs is the man.

Q. Was there any name on the cart - A. I cannot say. I was from home at the time that the cart arrived. As I came to the end of the street, the cart was with the tail at the door of my warehouse. I saw it turn round, and Spriggs jumped on the fore part of it; and when I got up to my door, Cooper was in the act of coming out of it. The prisoner, Cooper, said to me, it is all right. Spriggs was gone away then. Cooper returned with me into my house.

Q. When you went in did you find any silk - A. I saw these three bags, and one larger. We went then into the parlour. Cooper then informed me, that these bags contained, instead of two hundred, three hundred.

Q. Did you open the bags - A. Not at that time. I told him, I could not pay him then, but I would let him have part of the money in the evening, and Cooper went away.

Q. Did you keep your promise with him in the evening - A. I did; I took him an hundred and fifty pounds; and on the Monday or Tuesday following, Cooper called at my house. I paid him the remainder of the money: one hundred and ninety-five pounds.

Q. Did any thing then pass between you and Cooper, about any more silk - A. On that day, Mr. Cooper told me he had as much more, if I choosed to take it at the same price. I agreed to have it at the same price, and on the next day I received three hundred and twenty pounds more. Cooper called that morning and said, it was coming. That silk was brought in bags by a woman, and I called with the money at Cooper's house, and paid him three hundred and sixty-five pounds for it. Cooper was not at home. I saw Mrs. Cooper a bed. That was Thursday, I think, the 16th of July.

Q. Had you then ascertained what was the weight of the first parcel that you received - A. Yes. I weighed it. It was three hundred and six pounds. The second parcel weighed three hundred and twenty-three pounds. In the second parcel I found that there were two or three hanks cut.

Q. Did you claim any deduction on account of the cut hanks - A. I did intend to make the deduction, but not finding Cooper at home, I left three hundred and sixty pounds, intending to make the deduction for the two cut hanks, of Cooper, when I saw him. I do not think that I saw Cooper again until Mr. Grant called upon me; on the latter end of August that was. He called at my warehouse. He brought a sample. I saw it was silk. I declined having it. I think he asked me, if I knew any one that would buy it. I told him, no.

Q. What did you do with the six hundred pounds weight of silk - A. I sold the whole of it to a silk manufacturer of the name of Green, No. 1, Worship-square; in the neighbourhood.

Q. What did you get for it - A. Six-and-twenty and sixpence.

THOMAS GREEN . I am a ribbon manufacturer. I live in Worship-square, near Mr. Gibbs.

Q. On the 10th of July last, did you purchase any quantity of silk of him - A. Mr. Gibbs shewed me a sample on the next day. I agreed to buy it at twenty-six shillings and sixpence. I received it on the 11th.

Q. How much was there of it - A. Three hundred and six pounds, I believe, I afterwards purchased three hundred and twenty-six pounds of him at the same price.

Q. What did you do with these two parcels of silk - A. I sent them to be thrown, at Mr. Percival's, a silk throwster, at Bruton, in Somersetshire.

Q. to Friend. Produce one of the bags, and hand up one or two of the hanks. Mr. Green, was it that sort of silk - A. It was nearly the same as that. I never purchased any raw silk in my life before.

MR. BOOSFIELD. Q. I believe you are a silk-broker - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember, about the 10th of July, Mr. Green shewing you a skein of silk - A. Yes; a skein of Valencia raw silk. It is impossible to swear to silk out of the packages. It was the same description of silk, as is produced by Friend. Mr. Green asked me the value of this silk. I told him referring to the East India Company's silk, in August, there were three thousand seven hundred bales, and a further prospect of two thousand more in November following, I did not think that he ought to have ventured more than twenty-eight shillings and six pence. That is ten months credit. That is the common credit.

MR. PERCIVAL. Q. We understand you are a proprietor of silk mills, at Bruton, in Somersetshire. Did you, any time in July last, receive any silk from London, for the purpose of throwing - A. I did. I received a letter from Mr. Thomas Green. The letter was dated the 14th; and on the 20th, I received sixty pound weight of silk by the coach. On the 27th I received two hundred and forty-six pounds by the waggon. On the 31st, I received three hundred and twenty-six pounds more; making, in all, six hundred and thirty-two pounds, from Mr. Thomas Green. I throwed three hundred and fourteen pounds, and returned it to him in August, 14th.

Q. What had you done with the rest of the silk - A. The rest of silk was on the mill, in work, except forty-two pounds.

Q. Did Mr. Hotchon come down to Bruton to you - A. He came down on Tuesday, the 18th. I produced to him the remaining part of the silk that had not been thrown.

Q. Did you, upon examining the silk, find that it had been damaged - A. We found several skeins cut, as if by a razor.

Q. Could that damage in the silk have arisen from carriage at all - A. No. The silk is here. Gotty, the officer, has it.

Q. What did you do with the silk - A. I had an order from Mr. Harriett of the Thames police. I returned it to him.

Q. How did you send it up - A. Four packages by the Taunton coach, and two packages by the Taunton waggon. I put my seal upon the packages before I sent them away. This is the silk.

Q. Look at a hank out of Norman's stable - A. I have looked at that, and as far as I am a judge, I should perceive it to be the same, from the length of the reel. To the best of my knowledge they are alike as silk can be. I have been acquainted with silk seventeen years.

Q. Had you any other raw Valencia - A. I had not.

JOHN GOTTY . Q. You are a surveyor of the Thames police - A. I am.

Q. You have produced the silk that came up from Bruton, from Mr. Percival - A. I have.

Q. Did you apprehend any persons engaged in this transaction - A. I did, Cooper, at the White Swan, Ratcliffe Highway.

Q. Is that his own house - A. It is his residence, but the licence is in another name. That was his residence. I apprehended him on Thursday, the 20th of August.

Q. When did you apprehend Ivey - A. I think on the 31st of August.

Q. Cooper was confined in the House of Correction, Cold bath-fields - A. He was.

Q. Did you receive directions from Cooper, while he was in the House of Correction, to go to Chadwell - A. When Cooper was at the office he gave directions for me to go to Horndon-on-the-Hill, in Essex.

Q. What, near to Chadwell - A. No. Cooper gave me directions to go to Horndon.

Q. To go for what - A. A quantity of silk.

Q. Who did he send with you - A. Mrs. Cooper, his wife, went with me.

Q. Did you go to the place where he directed you to Horndon-on-the-Hill, the village, did you receive any silk there - A. There I took possession of five hundred pounds weight of silk. His wife went and pointed out the place to me.

Q. At whose house was it - A. It was delivered to me in a cart, on the road. We went together to Horndon. She came to me with a cart, and the silk in it.

Q. Have you the silk here - A. I have.

Q. Produce a part of it - A. This is a hank of it.

Q. to Mr. Percival. Look at that. Is that raw Valencia silk - A. To the best of my knowledge, it is. It corresponds with the silk I had.

LOUISA EWER . Q. I believe you are a feather-maker, residing in Cannon-street, St. George's in the East - A. I am.

Q. Do you know the prisoner, Cooper - A. Yes.

Q. How far is your house from the prisoner, Cooper's house - A. It is about ten minutes walk.

Q. Did you at any time, and when, receive a message to go to Cooper's house - A. To be positive I cannot say.

Q. How long was it before you were examined at the office - A. I said then, I believe, about two months. In consequence of that message I went to Mr. Cooper's, and he shewed me white ostrich feathers. He offered them to me at forty shillings a pound. There were about three pounds of them; and if I liked them perhaps there might be more, he said.

Q. Did you purchase them - A. I did not reckon myself a sufficient judge. I told him, if it would not be inconvenient to him to stop half an hour, I would return again. I went, and brought a Mrs. Bloomfield, a partner of mine. Upon my getting to Mr. Cooper, he was alone. This was on the Monday I went to him again. Mr. Cooper was then sitting in his bar. We both of us went in, me and Mrs. Bloomfield, into the back room, I think, the kitchen.

We looked at the feathers ourselves; Mr. Cooper was not present. He told us to go in. We then came out, and offered him 4 l: for them; he would not take it. He said they did not belong to him, he could not take the money. He then said he would take 5 l. for them.

COURT. Do you mean to be positive - A. Not to be positive; I do not.

COURT. Then you had better say nothing at all.

Q. to Friend. Produce the ostrich feathers you found in Norman's stable - A. These are them

Q. to Mrs. Ewer. These feathers are in an unmanufactured state, as they come from abroad - A. Yes.

Q. In what state were the feathers that were shewn to you by Ceoper - A. They were also in an unmanufactured state.

Mr. Knapp. The feathers you were talking about were white feathers - A. Yes.

Q. These that I observe, that are now produced, are not white, but brown and black - A. Yes.

Q. Still the conversation was about white feathers. Did Cooper, in the conversation to you, give you to understand that he was not selling them for himself, but for another person - A. Yes, for another person.

JAMES GEORGE . Q. Are you employed by Mr. Gibbs, the silk manufacturer - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know Mr. Green - A. Yes, I know where he lives.

Q. Did Mr. Gibbs, in July last, employ you to carry any silk to Mr. Green - A. Yes.

Q. Did you deliver the silk that you received from Mr. Gibbs, to Mr. Green, in the same state - A. Yes.

Q. to Mr. Gibbs. Is that man, George, the person by whom you sent that silk - A. It is.

Q. to Mr. Green. Is that the man that brought you that silk - A. It is.

ROBERT GRANT . Q. You are a partner in the house of Read, Bell, and Co. - A. I am.

Q. First look at that paper, and tell me whether your house paid the duties for that silk mentioned there - A. Yes, we did.

COURT. What are your employment - A. General merchants.

Mr. Bolland. Was the consignment of that silk put into your hands to go to London - A. It was.

Q. Did you send the money from your house to pay the duties, by Thomas Arnett - A. Yes, I did.

Q. In consequence of information of this robbery, did you cause either of the prisoners to be apprehended - A. I caused Cooper to be apprehended.

Q. Were you present at the Thames police-office, at the examination - A. I was.

Q. Was Mr. Gibbs examined - A. He was.

Q. Was what Mr. Gibbs said committed to writing - A. That I cannot recollect.

Mr. Bolland. I am now proposing to give the declaration of the prisoner, Cooper, which the magistrate is not bound to take down, and which he seldom does take.

EDWARD WILLIAM SIMMONS . Q. You are the head clerk of the Thames Police - A. I am.

Q. Take that book in your hands and turn to the 20th of August, and see whether Cooper was brought and examined at the office - A. He was; I do not find any thing taken down that he said.

Q. to Mr. Grant. You told me you were present at the Thames Police, on the 20th of August - A. I was.

Q. Was Mr. Gibbs examined that day - A. He was.

Q. Before Cooper was examined at all, did you hear Cooper say any thing about this silk - A. I heard Mr. Cooper declare, that he never sold the silk to Mr. Gibbs; Mr. Gibbs was present when Cooper made that declaration.

Q. Do you know what raw Valencia silk was worth, in July last; you have seen this silk before - A. I have seen it in various places. It was worth, in July last, thirty-four shillings a pound, if it came to our hands, we expected to get thirty-five shillings a pound for it.

Mr. Andrews Have you not had the opportunity of knowing, that a good deal of this silk is smuggled into this country - A. That I do not know. I think it is sometimes.

THOMAS ARNETT . I am a clerk in the house of Read, Bell, and Co.

Q. Were you sent by Mr. Grant, on the 6th of June last, to pay the duty - A. I was; four hundred and fifty pound was the whole of the duty, - I paid a deposit of the duty.

THOMAS FARROW . I am a silk-broker. I live at No. 36, Cornhill.

Q. In the month of July last, did you show any sample of silk to Mr. Prater - A. I did.

Q. What specie of silk - A. Valencia raw silk.

Q. How long before you delivered it to Mr. Prater, had you received it - A. George Harris , the prisoner, called on me on the 10th of July.

Q. How long before that had the sample been left at your house - A. I cannot answer; but on the 10th it was on my sample-board, with others. I cannot say when it was left. On the 10th, George Harris called; he said that he had left me a sample of silk, some days before. It was about ten in the morning, on the 10th, when he called on me. He first told me that he had got one hundred-weight, and afterwards he told me that he had another hundred-weight, in all, about two hundred weight.

Q. What price did he ask for it - A. Twenty-six shillings a pound, ready money, for it. He told me that he had refused twenty-five shillings of Mr. Ballard, of Little Love-lane.

Q. Had you seen the sample on the day before - A. To the best of my recollection, I never knew of it until the 10th of July.

Q. How are you able to recollect it was the 10th of July - A. I was then preparing two checks on my banker, for two lots of silk I had bought at the India-house. I have my book of checks here. I wrote upon the check, and that enables me to say it was the 10th of July.

Q. How soon after did you show that sample to Mr. Prater - A. I think, on the 14th of July I showed the sample to Mr. Prater.

Q. Did you tell Mr. Prater the price that Harris had put upon it - A. I did; twenty-six shillings a pound.

Q. To whom did you refer him as the owner - A. I mentioned George Harris.

Q. Had you before this time, known George Harris - A. I had known him about a year and a half, by reason of his brother working a commission where I was a creditor; I mean his brother Samuel, an attorney. I had known him as clerk to his brother.

Q. After you had delivered a sample of the silk to Mr. Prater, did you see George Harris - A. I did, at his brother's office; his brother was present. I told George Harris that Mr. Prater was to have it at twenty-six shillings. George Harris agreed to it. He said he could not deliver it for two days. It was delivered to Mr. Prater, on the 17th. I attended the delivery on the 17th; George Harris was present.

Q. Where was it delivered - A. At Mr. Prater's, in Noble-street.

Q. How was it brought to Mr. Prater's - A. In corn sacks, by a woman. The woman brought it at twice; the delivery took about an hour.

Q. Was the silk weighed - A. It was, while Harris was there. Mr. Prater was not at home; his clerk, Mr. Cottes, received it for him. The sack had I. I. Gaunt upon it.

Q. to Gotty. Is that name upon the sacks, that you had from Cooper - A. It is.

Q. to Mr. Farrow. Did you, the next morning, see Mr. Prater - A. I did, that was the 18th. He desired me to inform George Harris, that he would have nothing to do with the silk. Upon this I went to George Harris ; I saw him at his brother's. I told him the message I had from Mr. Prater. When I saw the sacks at Mr. Prater's, I said I would have nothing to do with it, it resembled the silk that I had seen at Union-hall. I told George Harris it was like the silk that had been produced at Union-hall, said to be stolen, and I would have nothing to do with it.

Q. I take it for granted, Mr. Farrow, that this robbery had made a great sensation in the silk trade - A. It had.

Q. Now, sir, after this were you applied to by Mr. Grant, to know who was your principal in this transaction of the silk - A. I was, and upon being so applied to I went to George Harris to know his commission. I told him, that Mr. Grant had applied to me to give up the name of the principal. George Harris said, he hoped there would be no necessity, as the silk belonged to very honourable people. Mr. Grant applied to me again and again. I applied to George Harris three time, at last George Harris consented to give up his name.

Q. For months before that period, had any raw Valencia silk been in the market - A. Not for five or six months.

Q. to Gotty. Produce some of the silk found at Mr. Perceval's a hank or two of it - A. Gotty produced it.

Q. to Mr. Farrow. Was it exactly like that as possible - A. Surely

Q. to Friend. Produce some silk found at Norman's stable, which was produced at Union-hall - A. Friend produced it.

Q. to Mr. Farrow. Was it such silk as that - A. This is similar to what I saw at Union-hall, and it resembles that I saw at Mr. Prater's, they appear to be alike; and this hank of Mr. Perceval's silk, this is a cut skein, it is the same specie of silk.

WILLIAM COTTY . Q. I believe you are clerk to Mr. Prater, a silk manufacturer in Noble-street, is that in the city of London - A. It is.

Q. On the 14th of July, did Mr. Farrow call upon Mr. Prater - A. He did, and he came on the 17th.

Q. On that day was any silk delivered - A. There were two parcels in sacks. It was Valencia raw silk. A woman brought it, who had the appearance of being a porter at market; she brought it in a basket. The silk was contained in a sack, like a sack of peas. It was such a sack as Gotty produced. There was I. and I. Gaunt on the sack.

Q. Who attended the delivery of them sacks - A. Mr. Farrow first came, and in a few minutes George Harris, the prisoner, came. One sack had been delivered before Mr. Farrow came. Mr. Farrow and George Harris were present when the woman brought the second sack. The silk was weighed in the presence of George Harris and Mr. Farrow; it weighed 190 lb. both parcels. George Harris came there as the principal, to see the silk weighed, as I supposed. Mr. Farrow was the broker, he took the weight.

Q. Did you then know that George Harris was an attorney's clerk - A. I did, I knew that before. The silk came in about eleven in the forenoon; the sacks were left in our warehouse. When Mr. Prater came in, I shewed him the silk, and informed him the manner they came. After that, there was some communication made to Mr. Farrow. George Harris came again to our warehouse. On the 18th, between ten and eleven o'clock in the morning George Harris said the silk was to go back, and he said it was requisite he should leave his signature with me; that if a person brought a note to correspond with that signature, I was to deliver the silk to them. This is the signature he wrote; then he left me. Shortly after, the same woman who had delivered it the day before, came; she brought with her the order for delivery. This is the order she gave me. It is directed,

'To Mr. Prater, Esq. Noble-street, Cheapside, Sir, please to deliver the goods to the bearer, signed, George Harris .' I delivered all the goods to the woman, and she took the two sacks away with her. I knew George Harris before, to be an attorney's clerk. I certainly considered the silk was not in right hands.

WILLIAM PRATER . I am a silk manufacturer in Noble-street. On the 14th of July, Mr. Farrow brought me a sample of raw Valencia silk; he asked twenty-six shillings a pound for it. I desired to see the bulk; it was sent in on the 17th of July. I was not present when it came in; I saw it there when I came home. I expected to see the bulk in the seller's warehouse, but when I got home I saw it in my warehouse. I desired my clerk to see Mr. Farrow, that he might send for it back again. The packages and mode of delivery were suspicious. I saw it was raw Valencia silk; I believed it to be part of the silk stolen out of the hoy.

COURT, to Mr. Farrow. The silk was delivered to

Mr. Prater on the 17th, did you on that day, receive any intimation that the silk was to be taken away - A. I believe it was the 18th Mr. Cotty brought the message, and desired it to be taken back.

Q. to Mr. Cotty. What day was it Mr. Prater said any thing to you on the silk - A. On the 18th I knew Mr. Farrow was out of town, and I took the message to him on the 11th.

WILLIAM BALLARD Q. Do you know the prisoner, George Harris - A. Yes, I have seen him; he is brother to Mr. Harris, the attorney.

Q. Before the 10th of July, had he offered you any sample of raw Valencia silk - A. No.

Q. Then I need not ask you whether you had offered him twenty-five shillings a pound for it - A. I never could, no such circumstance ever took place. I once had a transaction with him, in 1810. He shewed me a sample of silk; he had another person with him. He asked forty-six shillings for it; money, he said, -

Edward William Simmon . Q. You have told us you were chief clerk of the Thames Police - A. I am.

Q. Can you give me the day on which the persons charged with the robbery, were first examined - A. I can; on the 19th of July, the first day. James Bampton and Joseph Knox , were first apprehended, as well as William Allen , who is not now here. On the 10th, the prisoner, Winter, and George Brown were apprehended, and on the 11th, William Henry Winter , who is not here.

Q. The last examination that took place, on this subject, did Samuel Harris and George Harris appear as attorneys for the persons charged - A. The second examination took place on the 17th of July, and on that day Samuel Harris attended professionally, for the prisoners, but whether the prisoner, George Harris , was there on that day, I cannot recollect.

Q. After Mr. Cooper was apprehended, and Mr. Farrow had been examined, do you remember George Harris being asked any question respecting the silk that went to Mr. Prater's - A. There was no regular charge made against him. The magistrate told him, if he was willing to clear his character, he had an opportunity. I would explain to the Court, I cannot speak positive, but from what is taken down.

Mr. Harmer. Q. Were you present at the time Mr. George Harris was questioned upon this subject - A. I was Mr. Harriott, the magistrate, advised the prisoner, Harris of his situation. Mr. Farrow, Mr. Prater, and Mr. Cotty had been examined. The magistrate then said to George Harris, there was a quantity of silk, which appears to have been brought to your possession, do you chuse to offer any explanation? if you do I am ready to hear it. George Harris then consulted with his brother and Mr. Bellas, and after some little time, perhaps five or ten minutes, elapsed, he said he, he had made up his mind to inform the magistrate. Mr. Bellas said, the only hesitation that George Harris had, arose from professional educant.

Q. What reply was made to that - A. He was left to do as he pleased, not the least threat or promise was made to him; it was entirely a voluntary act of his own. He then began his narrative, sitting by the side of Mr. Simmons, the clerk, who took down what he said from his own mouth. I heard it, and Mr. Simmons frequently repeated the words that he had written, to see if he was correct.

Mr. Simmons. I took from his mouth what he said. About the latter end of last June, I received a sample of silk of the prisoner Cooper, which I was to sell at two-and-a-half commission; that sample I left at Mr. Farrow's. I saw him some few days afterwards, and asked him if he had a customer for it. He asked me how much it was. I told him twenty-six shillings. I saw him again a few days after, when he gave me the direction of Mr. Prater; he told me that Mr. Prater would purchase the silk, and that it was to be delivered to him the next day. I saw Mr. Cooper in consequence, and gave him Mr. Prater's direction. I understood it was not delivered on the next day, and called on Mr. Cooper again. Mr. Cooper then said it was some miles in the country, that it was smuggled silk, and he was obliged to bring it as privately as he could for fear it should be seized. I am most certain, that I intimated to Mr. Farrow of the silk being a few miles in the country; and being smuggled was the cause of it not being sent in. A few mornings afterwards, the prisoner, Cooper called at my brother's office, and told me the silk had been sent in. I went to Mr. Farrow, and told him, the person had sent the silk in; he said, go on, meaning to Mr. Prater's, and I will follow you. I went to Mr. Prater's, some of the silk had been delivered, and while I was there, an Irishwoman came in with the bag of silk. Mr. Farrow called on me, I think, the same afternoon, and said Mr. Prater did not approve of the silk, and therefore desired me to tell the person to fetch it back again. I immediately went to Mr. Prater, saw Mr. Cotty, and wrote my name, saying, that I thought it was proper to sign my name on paper; that if any person came with a note of mine appearing like that, the silk might be re-delivered. The note was then produced to him, and he says that is the note; and which I delivered to Cooper. I did not see any of the silk except the sample before or after I saw the bag sent to Prater.

Q. to Friend. Was the silk that Mr. Farrow saw at Union Hall, the silk found in Norman's stable - A. Yes, and the silk I produce here.

Q. to Mr. Saunders. Do you know any shoal or sand called the Lappell, in the river Medway - A. Yes, very well, that is, in the county of Kent.

RICHARD DE BEUFRE . - I am a silk-broker.

Q. Are you acquainted with Valencia silk - A. Perfectly. It is a silk much sought for, by being of a good texture. In the month of May, was the last consignment. I purchased it, and sold it for thirty-nine shillings a pound, ten months credit. In July last, it was worth thirty-three shillings a pound. I should have been very glad to have given thirty-four shillings a pound for it. I have seen the silk produced by Gotty and Friend, it is Valencia raw silk.

Winter's Defence. My Lord, and Gentlemen of the Jery. I stand in this unpleasant situation, charged with a robbery. I find myself incompetent to address this numerous assembly; I solemnly avow that I am innocent, and the witness, Brown, by screening himself, would wish to deprive me of my existence.

Allen's Defence. My Lord, and Gentlemen of the Jury. I most solemnly assert my innocence; I am innocent

of the robbery. I humbly trust, that you will weigh the evidence of the witness Brown, who, to screen himself, wishes to launch me and my wife and family into misery.

Taylor's Defence. My Lord, and Gentlemen of the Jury. I solemnly assert that I am innocent; and that I had not the least concern in the robbery; the witness, Brown, is the most abandoned character; he would not scruple to swear black is white; having stated this, I beg for mercy.

Knox's Defence. I am innocent of the charge laid against me. So help me God

Irey's Defence. I am innocent of the charge, and humbly pray that you will weigh the evidence of Brown, whose character will not bear the slightest investigation; who, to screen himself, would deprive me of life, and plunge my wife and family into misery. I beg for mercy.

Cooper's Defence. My Lord, and Gentlemen of the Jury. It is true, I bought 100 lb. weight of silk. I bought it for smuggled. It is true, I sold to Mr. Gibbs 706 lbs. I sold it to him for smuggled. I knew no otherwise. When I was taken up, I denied giving up the parties whom I had bought it of, for fear they should be exchequered. I was taken to Coldbath-fields; there Mr. Grant, the supposed owner of the silk came to me. He asked me if I had any more silk than what I sold to Mr. Stevens and Gibbs. I told him I had. He asked me if I would resign it up. I told him, my Lord, as I came down to the office, I would let him know. When I came to the office, sooner than have my name brought in question of a felonious transaction, I gave the officer an information where the remainder of the silk was, that I had in my possession. My wife went with Mr. Gotty, the officer, by my order, and brought the silk to the Thames Police. My Lord, and Gentlemen of the Jury, can you imagine a man placed in the same situation as I am, possessed of two houses, one in Ratcliffe higway, in which I was turning ten thousand pounds annually; and another in Piccadilly, which I was turning seven thousand pounds a year. Do you, my Lord, and Gentlemen, believe, that a man situated as I am, would have been guilty of any felonious transaction of buying this silk, knowing it to have been stolen. I have a wife and five small children, under the age of seven; I have another family to support, that is destitute to the world, with thirteen children; and, under these circumstances, I shall leave it to you. My Lord, and Gentlemen, I am not able to speak any more.

Harris's Defence. May it please your Lordship and Gentlemen of the Jury. I stand before you charged with feloniously receiving 109 lbs. of silk, being part and parcel of the 10 bales stolen from the Sisters, hoy. I therefore implore your attention to two or three circumstances; first, at the time I received the sample of silk, whether at that time I knew it to be a sample of the silk stolen, or whether I did not receive it under a false representation of it being smuggled silk. Gentlemen, at that time, I did not know that it was stolen. I am sure your Lordship and Gentlemen of the Jury will say, that is a small part of ten bales, is 190 lbs. and that I have been an innocent victim; and that at the time I shewed the sample, I thought it was smuggled. I was ignorant of the silk being stolen at the time; and I trust the Gentlemen of the Jury will say so.

Winter called six witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Taylor called six witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Allen called six witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Knox called six witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Cooper called two witnesses to his character.

Harris called six witnesses, who gave him a good character.

WINTER, GUILTY , DEATH , aged 30.

ALLEN, GUILTY , DEATH , aged 42.

TAYLOR, GUILTY , DEATH , aged 22.

IVEY GUILTY , aged 26,

Confined One Year in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

KNOX, NOT GUILTY .

COOPER, GUILTY , aged 36.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

HARRIS, NOT GUILTY .

Names of the Jury that tried this cause:

Thomas Terry .

Barnard Evans .

Robert Swansborough .

John Lewis .

Matthew Kemp .

John Powell .

Francis Bassett .

Thomas Stanton .

Thomas Freeman .

Thomas Fountaine .

William Burton .

Joseph Gunn .

London Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18121028-10

852. JOHN LALLIMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of October , one pound twelve ounces weight of cheese, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of George Wood .

THOMAS HASLOP . I am shopman to George Wood , 187, Bishopsgate-street .

Q. When did you lose this cheese - A. Last Saturday evening, about six o'clock, the prisoner came into our shop with intent as we supposed to buy a piece of cheese, and after picking and disfiguring as many pieces of cheese as he thought proper, he took the opportunity of putting this piece of cheese under the left side of his coat. I had nearly twenty customers in the shop at the time. I left the customers at the counter, and ran after him; he had gone about an hundred yards from Mr. Wood's house. I took him by the arm, and brought him back again; I then took the cheese from him, and sent for an officer; we should not have prosecuted him, but we have been obliged to turn him out of the shop so many times. This is the cheese, I can swear to the cheese by the marks that I made.

Prisoner's Defence. I was hungry. I had had nothing to eat from the Friday night to the Saturday.

GUILTY , aged 76.

Confined Two Years in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121028-11

853. JAMES FRANCIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of October , a handkerchief, value 10 s. the property of James Green , from his person .

JAMES GREEN . I am an attorney's clerk .

Q. Where did this happen to you - A. I was coming through Leadenhall-street . I met with Mr. Price, the attorney. I felt my pocket-handkerchief being drawn out of my pocket.

Q. You felt it did you - A. Yes, and said to Mr. Price, I have lost my pocket-handkerchief; and while I was taking to Mr. Price, the officer came up and asked me if I had lost any thing; I said, I had lost my handkerchief with my name on it. He said, follow me, I dare say I shall find it for you. The prisoner turned down St. Mary Axe. The officer took hold of him, and found the handkerchief in his bosom; that is all I know of it.

JAMES MARTIN . I am an officer. On the 16th of October, before twelve o'clock, I was in Leadenhall-street; I saw the prisoner stand by an engine; he was watching every gentleman that walked by: he touched a gentleman's pocket, left him, and followed Mr. Green. I was not certain that he had robbed him. I asked Mr. Green if he had lost any thing, he said, yes, his pocket-handkerchief. I pursued the prisoner. I said, I want you, my friend; and before I accused him of taking any thing, he said, here is the handkerchief; he dropped it, and I took it up. This is the handkerchief.

Prosecutor. It is my handkerchief, it is marked G.

Prisoner's Defence. The handkerchief was chucked to me, I took, and put it in my bosom. I did not know who it belonged to. I never took the pocket handkerchief from any one.

GUILTY , aged 46.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121028-12

854. WILLIAM JACKSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of June , three looking glasses value 30 l. and two blankets, value 1 l. the property of Thomas Colvill , in a dwelling-house .

THOMAS COLVILL . I live in Store-street. I am a taylor .

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar - A. I do.

Q. Did you see him in the month of May last - A. Yes, I did. I am the owner of a house in John-street, Fitzroy-square . On the 11th of May last, I let to the prisoner, the first and second floor, and the kitchen, furnished, at 3 l. 10 s. a week. There were three looking glasses in it, and three blankets. On the 13th of June, I went to the house, and found the premises stripped. I never found any of the things.

Mr. Alley. There was a woman in the lower apartment - A. Yes.

Q. Now tell me, and consider before you answer the question; I ask you, did not you let him the entire of the house - A. He never had the whole of the house.

Q. I am not contending for him, but for the law upon the subject; was not he entitled to the whole of the house for 14 l. a month - A. Yes, he was. I let him the whole of the house at the first contract.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121028-13

855. RICHARD PULLEN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of July , two stone bottles, value 3 s. and five gallons of brandy, value 7 l. the property of John Morris .

JOHN COTTON . I am a painter and glazier. I live at No. 5, Angel-court, Windmill-street.

Q. Do you know the prisoner Pullen - A. Yes, about a year and a half before, he lived with Mr. Morris, and I knew him while he lived with Mr. Morris; he was head cellarman to Mr. Morris. He left Mr. Morris's service about July, he then was taken up. Pullen and his wife were taken in custody first, and then I was taken in custody; they searched my house. I was not present at the search.

JAMES GILLMORE . I am an officer. I searched Pullen's house on the 12th of July, and Cotton's house likewise. I took Pullen and Cotton in custody, at a public-house near St. Martin's Church. I told Pullen what I wanted him for, he endeavonred to make his escape. I searched him, and took him to the watch-house. I then searched Cotton. In Cotton's pocket I found a key, he said it was the key of his own cellar. I then went to Cotton's house, and took that key with me, and with that key, I opened his cellar door; his house is No. 5, Angel-court, Windmill-street; and in Cotton's cellar I found several pieces of stone bottles, and two or three pieces of bottles had

="ris=" the last letters of Morris upon them, and

="merchant.=" That is all the letters I could make out.

Q. Did you find any thing at Pullen's house in Portpool-lane - A. I found this tin can. At that time, it smelled very strong of liquor. It is made to hold two or three gallons, and is handy to carry under the coat.

JAMES GROVES . Q. You were in the service of Mr. Morris at the time that Pullen was - A. Yes, I know of Pullen selling liquor to Cotton for about nine months; brandy he sold to Cotton at 14 shillings per gallon; rum, 10 shillings, and port wine at 2 shillings a bottle. Pullen was cellarman; the warehouse of which he had the key, was in Northumberland street; he had the key of the vault and the stable adjoining to it.

Q. What used to be done by you and Pullen - A, Pullen took it out of the cellar, and took it in the stable; that was at the time that Cotton came, and Cotton used to fetch it away at 10 o'clock at night.

Q. In what used you to deliver it in - A. In stone bottles. Cotton used to fetch it in jars of his own. I was taken up and then I accused Pullen. Cotton sometimes paid me for the liquor, and sometimes Pullen.

WILLIAM BOWEN . I am a taylor. I lodged with Cotton about twelve months ago. I have seen the prisoner at Cotton's; and I have seen jars come into the house, Mrs. Cotton brought them; and I have seen Mr. Morris's cart at the bottom of the court.

THOMAS MORRIS . I am in the employment of my brother John Morris . Pullen was his servant.

Q. When did he leave his service - A. On the 11th of July in the evening, he had cut his hand. Mr. Morris took compassion of him, he was to return with his lame hand. I assisted in the search of Cotton's premises, and Pullen's premises. We found two bottles in Cotton's cellar; this stone bottle contains brandy, two gallons and a half, the other bottle is at the office; it is larger. Grove was employed in the cellar as well as the stable. Pullen had access to the stable.

Q. (to Cotton) At the time the officers searched your house, was that bottle in your possession and another - A. It was.

Q. From whom had you that brandy - A. From Richard Pullen . I received it Mr. Morris's stables in Northumberland-street, on the 12th of July. Pullen brought it out to me early in the morning, when he let his wife out.

Q. Had you ever any bottles besides them - A. Yes, my wife and Mrs. Pullen brought them. I very seldom went. I was drawed into this, by Pullen and my wife.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to his character.

GUILTY , aged 32.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18121028-14

856. JAMES KENYON and GEORGE GREEN were indicted for feloniously making an assault, in the King's highway, upon William de Labertauche , on the 10th of October , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, six one pound bank notes his property .

SECOND COUNT, for like offence, only stating it be the property of William Amos .

WILLIAM AMOS . On the 10th October about halp past four o'clock. I was at the corner of Swallow street . I was going home, Kenyon the prisoner came up to me, and without any thing previous passing, he accosted me in this way, d - mn you, you informer, are you alive?

Q. Had you been a witness or an informer - A. None whatever. I asked him what he meaned by what he said? He said, I should know some day what he was, and then the other prisoner, Green, came up.

Q. Did you know any thing of either the prisoners - A. I had seen both the prisoners some time before in Oxford-street, but I did not know their names. When Green came up, he put his fist in my face, and challenged me to fight. I said, I did not get my bread by fighting, but by hard labour; but I thought I was as good a man as them. Green then left me; he came back again, and put his fist in my face. I tried to prevent him from hitting of me, but he knocked me down, and when he knocked me down the third time, I fell upon my hands and knees. Green then got hold of me by the waistband of my breeches. I then lost six one pound notes out of my pocket. I then cried out, that I was robbed, while Green was taking them out of my pocket I afterwards got into the Green Man. Green followed me in. I got away from Green, and got into the street again. I then saw the prisoner Kenyon; in about three minutes after, and at this time Leigh had the money in his hands.

Q. This was in Oxford-street, a crowded thoroughfare - A. At the time I was first accosted, there were very few people there at that time, if any passing. I do not know of any persons but the prisoners.

Q. Had you quarrelled with them, or done any thing so as to cause them to have any malice against you - A. No, neither of them had any cause to have any spite against me. The notes were in my left breeches pocket.

ROBERT LEIGH . At this time I was in Oxford-street. I heard the prosecutor, Amos, insulted by Kenyon, who charged him with being an informer. Amos asked him what he meant by saying that he was an informer. Kenyon said, he would tell him some time. Green came up and said he would serve him out. He said, you bloody b - r, I will beat your brains out; and after saying that he left Amos, and then Kenyon came up; he put his fist in his face, and said he would serve him out. Kenyon called to Green, Green came up again to Amos, and said d - mn your eyes, I will do it, or something of that sort, and the moment he said that, he struck Amos very severely. Amos said he would not fight and endeavoured to get away; and after being knocked down the third time, Amos endeavoured to get into the coffee house, he cried out he was robbed of six pound notes, and directly a roll of paper fell to the ground. I heard Amos hollow out that he was robbed. I likewise saw de Labertauche pick it up. Kenyon said to De Labertauche they were his partner's. De Labertauche refused to give them up, saying, they were not his, they were the butcher's; then Kenyon by force wrestled them from De Labertauche's hand, d - n your eyes, I will have the money, and if you say another word I will poke your bloody eyes out with the umbrella; pointing the umbrella to his eyes. A crowd was collected at that time. Kenyon got out of the crowd, I followed him. Kenyon crossed Oxford-street; and went up Bolsover-street, and then turned to the left, and went up Portland-street. I then perceived Kenyon go quicker. I ran after him, and asked him if he had not got notes that were not his own; he said, yes here they are. I received them in my left hand. I told Kenyon he must come back; and that I would not put the notes in my pocket until I had counted them; accordingly I counted them in the public-house, the sign of the Cock, but before I counted them, I gave Kenyon in the charge of an officer. The notes consisted of six one pound bank notes, the number of notes that Amos complained of being robbed. We came down to Marlborough-street; the magistrate was not sitting. The constable locked Kenyon up, and I went into a room and marked the notes, in the presence of two officers.

Q. You were sure they were the same notes that you received of the prisoner Kenyon - A. Yes, I kept them in my possession. I put them in a sheet of paper and sealed them up in the presence of Alexander and Petherick; and on Tuesday, I delivered them into the prosecutor's hands. This happened on Saturday.

Q. Did any thing pass in conversation between you and Amos - A. I never saw any of the parties before that night.

Q. Did the prisoner refuse being taken in custody - A. He offered me a one pound note, and a bottle of wine, if I would let him go.

WILLIAM DE LABERTAUCHE . Q. Were you in Oxford-street on the 10th of this month, in the afternoon - A. Yes, it was about four in the afternoon. Mr. Amos was standing there, and three or four men were abusing him. James Kenyon , George Green , and another man, were calling Amos names. George Green said he would fight Amos; then Amos said, he did not get his living by fighting, but he thought himself as good a man as either of them. Kenyon came

up and said he would fight him. George Green came back and struck Amos violently, and went away; and when he came back again, he knocked him down violently, three or four times. Amos crept into the Green Man, or some coffee-house, and I saw Green and Kenyon go after him; and then I saw some papers fall in the mob, I cannot say from whom the papers fell. When I saw the papers fall, I heard Amos cry out that he was robbed. I picked up the papers. A man came up to me, and said it was his partner's money.

Q. Was that man Kenyon - A. I cannot swear to Kenyon. The man took the money out of my hand by main-force. He swore, that if I said a word, he would knock my eye out with the umbrella. He took them out of my hand by main force; he held the umbrella to my eye, and snatched the money out of my hand.

Q. Did you see what became of Green - A. No. I saw Mr. Leigh bring Kenyon back; he said he had got the man. Mr. Leigh had got the notes in his hand, and the officer had got Kenyon.

Q. Could you distinctly see whether the person that was brought back, was the person that took the notes out of your hand - A. No, I cannot say.

WILLIAM MOGGRIDGE . I was passing the end of Swallow-street. I was going to Mr. Obey's in Oxford-street. I saw a mob, and I saw the prisoners, Kenyon and Green, accusing Amos of something; I do not know what. Green asked him to fight. He said he did not want to fight. Green knocked Amos down three or four times; then Kenyon came up and said he would serve him out. He called Green back; Green came, and knocked Amos down. Amos then went to crawl into the Green Man, and Green hauled him out by the waistband of his breeches. I saw some paper fall, it looked like tissue paper, or note paper; it fell from Amos's pocket, or somewhere that way. It fell when Green and Amos were together. De Labertauche picked it up, and said he would keep it for the butcher, it was his money. Kenyon said, it was his partner's, and if he did not give it up he would knock his eye out with the umbrella. Kenyon laid hold of his hand, and by wrenching it about, got it out of his hands. Kenyon, when he had got the money, rushed out of the mob; with violence he wrenched it out of his hands, the boy would hardly part with it. Mr. Leigh followed Kenyon and laid hold of him. Leigh told him, he had got some money that did not belong to him, and took it from him, and went into a public-house, and counted six notes. I went with him and saw it counted, and I went with him to Marlborough-street. I never had Kenyon out of my sight, until he was taken to Marlborough-street.

Q. Green did not go with Kenyon - A. I do not know where Green was; I was engaged in the pursuit of Kenyon.

Q. to Amos. Have you got the notes - A. No, I have not. I had the notes of Mr. Leigh. I paid them away; they were marked R. L.

Kenyon's Defence. The prosecutor and Leigh have received 3 l. of my wife, and the butcher received 2 l. over and above the money extorted from my wife.

Green's Defence. I was the man that was fighting with Amos, and that by his own wish. We had some words; he stopped Kenyon, and he had some words. I ran back again; we fought, and while we were fighting he dropped this money. I followed him into the Green Man; from there I followed them to Marlborough-street office; and from there I went home to Pimlico. I never had any intention of robbing him, nor did I know that Kenyon took any of his money. If I had picked up an hundred pound of his money, I should have taken it into the Green Man and Still, and gave it to the gentleman there.

Green called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

KENYON GUILTY , DEATH , aged 47.

GREEN NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18121028-15

857. THOMAS CALEY was indicted for feloniously forging, on the 12th of September , a bank-note, for payment of 1 l. with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England .

SECOND COUNT, for disposing of, and putting away a like bank-note, with the same intention; and other COUNTS, stating the instrument to be a promissory note, instead of a bank-note.

The case was stated by Mr Solicitor General.

SAMUEL FAGGARD . Q. Are you sworn - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know the prisoner, Caley - A. I do. I have known him since the 4th of June last, and since that time I have had transactions with him. The first meeting I had with him, was at the Noah's Ark public house, in Oxford-street .

Q. Have you been in the habit of meeting him at public houses, or at private houses - A. Public houses in general.

Q. Do you know the prisoner's residence - A. No, I never asked him; he always kept it a secret.

Q. Did he inform you his mode of dealing - A. Yes, he did.

Q. In the respect of the things that you purchased of him - A. He stated to me, on the 4th of June last, that if I was beginning to act upon his principles, he would serve me with forged notes, at half price; he, at that time, served me with twelve pounds worth.

Q. I do not want to hear that, I want to hear what he said - A. He said, in disposing of these articles he always acted with the greatest caution, and that he never carried these notes about him. That he had always had a person attendant upon him, to avoid detection. That person was to attend to carry the forged notes, and taking away the money that was paid for the forged notes, so that, in case of detection, neither the forged notes, nor the money that was paid for them, could be found upon the prisoner.

Q. I believe, about the beginning of September, you were taken up yourself - A. Yes, on the 6th of September.

Q. Now tell what past on the 12th of September - A. On the 12th of September, I met the prisoner at the Lord Nelson public-house, Trafalgar-street, Spitalfields.

Q. Previous to your meeting him there, had you

been searched - A. Yes, I had been searched by the officers of Shadwell Police. I was searched from top to toe, entirely; and, previous to my being searched, I had nothing but a few halfpence of my own. The money was given to me tied up in a handkerchief. I did not know exactly the amount; it was tied up in a handkerchief by the officers of Shadwell Police.

Q. What was the reason of your receiving that money - A. For the purpose of procuring forged banknotes.

Q. You said you met the prisoner at the Nelson public-house, had any appointment been made - A. Yes, it had by the prisoner, with me. We proceeded to the Lord Nelson public-house, where I met the prisoner.

Q. Who accompanied you - A. The officers of Shadwell Police. When I came I found the prisoner sitting in the tap-room of the public-house. I went in by myself; the officers were at a distance. I found the prisoner sitting in the tap-room. After sitting there the space of ten minutes, the prisoner told me to get up and follow him.

Q. Had you said any thing to him before he desired you to get up and follow him - A. I had not.

Q. Had you any thing with you - A. I had the marked money, nothing else, it was in an hankerchief.

Q. Was that the manner in which you carried the money upon former occasions, when you transacted business with him - A. Yes, it was. The prisoner told me to get up and follow him; I got up and followed him. We had proceeded about thirty or forty yards from the Lord Nelson public-house. He there asked me for the money that I had about me. He told me to wait near the spot where he took the money from me, and he would return in a few minutes. The prisoner asked me what quantity I would have. He said he had the usual quantity, which was 20 l. worth 40 l. of nominal value. He took the money from me in the hankerchief.

Q. This was about thirty or forty yards from the public-house in the street - A. Yes; the prisoner then left me, and told me to wait near the place where he took the money from me, but I, knowing the important business that I had to transact, followed him to know where he got the forged notes. I followed him about fifteen yards further; the prisoner turned the corner, and I lost sight of him. I waited at the corner of the street where I missed him, and the prisoner came out of a public house, situated at the corner of that street; I think it called the Golden Key, in Church-street. The prisoner came out of this public house and gave me the notes, two small parcels tied up in brown paper. We returned back to the Lord Nelson public-house, from whence we came.

Q. How long had you been absent from the Lord Nelson - A. About five minutes, from the first going out to the coming back with the notes. We there sat down. I called for six-penny worth of gin and water, to drink. After calling for the liquor, I went to the door, to give the appointed signal to the officers, that I had purchased the forged notes. One of the officers came up and apprehended the prisoner. When he was apprehended, the prisoner cried out, take that monster out of my sight, or else he would murder me.

Q. Before the prisoner made this expression, had any thing been said - A. Nothing whatever; he was not charged with any offence. The prisoner was secured, and taken into custody; I was likewise taken into custody. I was searched by the officer, and the notes that I had purchased were found in my left-hand breeches pocket.

Q. Were these parcels in the very same state that you had received them - A. The very same; they were the very parcels that I had purchased of him, and in the same state.

Q. Previous to your meeting at the Nelson, had you mentioned to any person the place that he resorted - A. I could not, I did not know. I pointed out the corner house to the officers.

Mr. Gurney. You were taken in custody and searched, and forged notes found upon you - A. I was, after the prisoner was taken in custody.

Q. I take it for granted, you had been in custody before, under a charge respecting forged notes - A. I had.

Q. You began to think your valuable life would be lost to the community - A. I did not give it a thought.

Q. I shall not waste much time with you, what had you been before this - A. A boot closer.

Q. Have you been no other occupation for the last two years - A. I have been no other occupation.

Q. Not a soldier - A. I have not been a soldier.

Q. Have not you been a militia man - A. I am not a militia man.

Q. Then, of course, you have not been in two regiments of militia. Were you never in the West Middlesex militia - A. I was not.

Q. Now, I am going to ask you a question that you may object to if you like, your having received bounty in one regiment of militia, did not you enlist in the second - A. I shall object to that question, it is not properly put.

MR. WESTWOOD. Q. I believe you have been for some years in the office of the solicitor of the Bank - A. I have.

Q. In consequence of Faggard being in custody, and from some communication that you had from him, did you see him searched - A. I did, on Saturday the 12th of September, between ten and eleven in the forenoon.

Q. What had he remaining upon him before that search - A Only a few halfpence; he had no other metal.

Q. Or paper - A. None at all.

Q. Was then any thing delivered to him - A. I delivered to him two 1 l. notes and four 2 l. notes, which I had previously marked. I also took an account, in writing of the dates and numbers of the notes, also the names by whom they were signed. I also delivered to him 5 l. in silver; it was all marked by me. Twenty three shilling tokens, each piece marked. Twenty eighteen-penny tokens, and ten shillings, in shillings. In paper and metal I delivered to him 15 l. altogether.

Q. What became of him after that - A. He went from the office with the officers. He was searched of

the office. I left him with Hewit and Butler, two officers.

Q. Did you give it to him in any handkerchief - A. I gave it to him tied up in this handkerchief.

Q. How soon, after he left the office, did you see the handkerchief again - A. I think I saw it on the Monday following.

Q. Have you examined that handkerchief which is now near you - A. I have.

Q. Is that exactly alike, in all respects, what you gave him - A. It is exactly the whole of what I gave him in the handkerchief.

WILLIAM HEWITT . I am an officer of Shadwell office.

Q. Do you remember, on the 12th of September last, being in company with Butler, and seeing Faggard - A. Yes, I do. I searched Faggard all over, very minutely Mr. Westwood was present at the time. Mr Westwood delivered to Faggard 15 l. in money and notes. I put my mark upon it as well as Mr. Westwood. The notes and the money were given to him in a handkerchief. After the money was given to him, I accompanied him to the Lord Nelson; when we got to the Lord Nelson I left him. Then Faggard went in; we were about. He had been in about ten minutes before he came out of the door, I think.

Q. Was there any body with him when he came out - A. I did not observe any body; he gave a signal to me, which we had agreed on. I then ran up to the Lord Nelson public-house. I saw the prisoner, Caley, sitting there. He was alone when I went in; Butler was with me. Faggard went in with me. Upon my securing him, he said, take that monster out of my sight, he wants to take away my life. I searched Faggard, and found upon him two bundles of notes, in his left-hand breeches pocket. I afterwards marked them before I parted with them.

Q. Look at these notes, and tell me whether these are your marks upon these notes - A. Yes, Sir.

Q. Upon your finding these notes, you then went to Crane's, did you not - A. We went to Cranes, in Red Cow-lane, in Bow-lane; it goes into Mile-end Road. It is a private house. After we had been there some time, a young woman, which turned out to be Crane's daughter, came. Mr. Hope, my brother officer, went to the door and let her in; he laid hold of her, and took a little bundle from under her arm; he took a handkerchief from her. I saw what was in the handkerchief; it contained silver and notes. It was the marked silver and notes that Mr. Westwood gave to Faggard. I accompanied them to the Lord Nelson. Faggard went in before. I came up, and saw the prisoner come out of the Lord Nelson public-house; they walked down the street, to near where I was standing. Faggard gave me a signal to stand back, and in about two minutes after that, Faggard gave me a signal, at the door, to come forward. I went into the Lord Nelson public-house, and secured the prisoner. He made a strong resistance. I desired Faggard to assist me, which he did. Hewitt came into me. The prisoner then said, take the monster out of my sight, otherwise I will murder him. He said he would swear his life away; he was come to swear his life away. He asked what he had done, for us to secure him in that kind of way; he was told, he would answer that another day. Faggard was searched then. I saw Hewitt take from Faggard them bank-notes.

Q. When Faggard went into the Lord Nelson, had he any such notes upon him - A. Certainly not, I had searched him myself. After that we went to Crane's.

Q. Were you there when a girl of the name of Crane came home - A. I was; she had a bundle taken from her.

Q. Had you ever seen any person come out of that house - A. I had, the prisoner. On the 11th I watched that house, in consequence of an information I received from a woman, a friend of Faggard's.

Q. This girl came home - A. Yes, she had a bundle with her; I saw it taken from her. I examined it, afterwards. I saw it marked before Faggard had it. It exactly corresponded with the marked money that Mr. Westwood gave to Faggard, and it was in the same handkerchief.

MRS. EMSON. Q. In the month of September last, did you keep the Lord Nelson public-house - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember, on the 12th of that month, any person being at your house, that you have seen since - A. Yes, two persons.

Q. Do you know the person of the prisoner, Caley - A. Yes, and I know the person of Faggard. These two persons were in company at my house on that day. When I first saw them they were in the tap-room, both together. They had been in my house about ten minutes before the officers came in. I have seen Caley and Faggard in company together at my house before, about four or five times, within a fortnight of the time of Caley being taken up, I have seen Caley and Faggard together.

RALPH HOPE . Q. Was you at the solicitor's office of the Bank, before the man was searched - A. I was not, - not upon that day.

Q. Had you seen the prisoner, Caley, before he was apprehended - A. I had not; I was waiting in the neighbourhood, for the purpose of apprehending him. He was in custody when I went into the Lord Nelson public-house, and when Caley was secured we went to the house of Crane. We had been there some time, when Susannah Crane came. I opened the door to her. I asked her if she was Crane's daughter; she said, yes. I observed her to have something under her arm. I secured her.

Q. Take that handkerchief, and see if that is it - A. This is the handkerchief, and this money was in it. I had seen this money marked, and I had seen it in that handkerchief.

Q. When was it you saw it marked - A. The day before.

Q. There had been an appointment made, which was disappointed - A. It was.

Q. What time of day did you take this handkerchief, with the money in it, from Susannah Crane - A. About two in the afternoon, on the 12th of September.

Q. to Mr. Westwood. Does the paper bear that mark that you marked them with - A. I marked each of the notes with a W, these bear that mark. I marked each of the tokens in the letter O, in token, and I find

that mark, and there is the quantity of money, precisely.

MARY LAZARUS . I am the wife of George Lazarus; he keeps the Golden Key, Church-street, Bethnal-green.

Q. Do you know the person of Susannah Crane - A. Yes, she is here; I have seen her.

Q. Do you remember her coming into your house, on the 12th of September - A. I do; it was between ten and twelve in the forenoon. It was on Saturday. She was in the back parlour, and I remember the prisoner coming to my house on that day. She stopped a good bit before he came. He came and went into the back room, to her.

Q. Had you seen the prisoner, Caley, at your house before - A. Yes; he did go to her in the back parlour. He did not stay there many minutes, and then went away.

Q. Were there any except these two in the back parlour, while they were there - A. No. I have seen the prisoner at my house, several times before that, and Susannah Crane was in his company.

SARAH FLOWERS . Q. You are servant to George Lazarus , at the Golden Key - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember Susannah Crane coming into your master's house, on the 12th of September - A. Yes, on Saturday. She had nothing with her when she came into the house. Afterwards I saw the prisoner, Caley, come into the house; he went to her, in the back parlour. The prisoner brought a handkerchief in his hand, it was such a looking handkerchief as that, but I cannot swear to the handkerchief; it was like that. The handkerchief was tied up, as if something was in it. The prisoner did not stay above two or three minutes. He did not take away the handkerchief that I saw him bring. I saw him come out of the parlour; he had no handkerchief in his hand. After he was gone, I saw the handkerchief in Susannah Crane's hand. She was opening it, and I saw some three shilling pieces fall to the ground, as she was opening the handkerchief and looking in it, to see what was in it. She staid about half an hour after the man was gone away, and when she went away, she took the handkerchief under her arm. I have seen the prisoner, Caley, and Susannah Crane together at our house, several times. They have dined together at our house, in the same parlour.

SUSANNAH CRANE . Q. What is your fathers name - A. John Crane , he lives in Devonshire-street, Globe-lane, Bethnal-Green.

Q. How long have you lived there - A. Better than a quarter of a year.

Q. How long have you known the prisoner, Caley - A. Better than a twelve month.

Q. Do you know the public-house that Mrs. Lazarus keeps - A. I do; I have been there two or three times.

Q. Have you taken refreshment there, what is called lunching - A. Yes, I have done that. I have been in company with other people at that public house, and I have been there with the prisoner, Caley.

Q. Were you there on the 12th of September, and what time was it - A. In the forenoon; I cannot say exactly.

Q. On that day, where had you met Caley - A. I met him in Brick-lane.

Q. How long before you went to the Golden Key - A. No great length of time. He asked me where I was going; I told him I was going into Bishopsgate-street, to take a walk, not upon any business at all. He desired me to go to the Golden Key, and there to wait, and he would come to me. I had been at that house before. I went accordingly, and went into the back room.

Q. Was that the room that you resorted to before, upon former occasions - A. Yes, I had been in that room before, and I might have been in the room a quarter of an hour before Caley came. Caley did not remain in the room any time. He said, you stop a bit, I will come again.

Q. Did he bring any thing with him - A. Not as I know of, he came to me in that room.

Q. What did he bring with him, have a care what you are about - A. He brought nothing with him as I know of.

Q. How long did you remain in that Golden Key after he came in - A. I remained something near an hour.

Q. Did you carry any thing away from that Key when you went to your father's house - A. I took in with me that bundle contained money, notes and silver tokens. I opened the bundle, after the prisoner left me, the bundle was a handkerchief, there were notes and tokens in the handkerchief.

Q. Did you open it, and while you were opening it, did you drop any of the tokens - A. No, I did not, sir. I carried it home with me. He told me he would come to me again; he did not. I waited near upon an hour, and then I went from that public house to my father's house, and when I came to the door it was opened by a stranger, and my bundle was taken from me.

Q. Now, ma'am, where did you get that bundle - A. I had that bundle given to me by a man just beyond Bethnal-Green workhouse, in the street.

Q. Who was the man - A. Why, I had seen the man before; I did not know his name, nor where he lived. I had seen the man by being out in company. I fell in his company.

Q. Have you ever been in company with him and and the prisoner together - A. I have not.

Q. Do you know what business this stranger carried on - A. I do not know what business he carried on. I had not known him long; I had seen him two or three times.

Q. What was the nature of your business that you transacted with him before - A. I never transacted any business with him before.

Q. Had you been accustomed to meet him in the street - A. Sir.

Q. You had better tell the truth, it will do no good to any body. What was the business that you transacted with the prisoner - A. I never transacted any business with him.

Q. What had you to do with him, how came you to be meeting with him, and taking a lunch at public houses - A. By being acquainted with him; by knowing him.

Q. Where does he live - A. I know not.

Q. Used he to be at your father's house. Now take what time you like to answer that - A. I have seen him at my father's house, and at public houses. I may have drank with the man at other public houses, but I cannot particularly point them out.

Q. Do you mean to swear that the Golden Key was the only public-house that you met - A. No, I do not.

Q. What was the nature of the business that you did for him upon former occasions; had you carried any bundles for him upon former occasions - A. I never carried any bundle for him.

Q. What did that man say to you that gave you the bundle at Bethnel-green - A. He desired me to take care of it for him.

Q. Did you know where to find him - A. No, only on the Sunday. I should have met him there if had not been taken in custody.

Q. Be so good as to tell us, as you did not know the prisoner's place of residence, nor the business that he followed, and as you had met him frequently at this public-house, what was the purport of your meeting; what did you suppose he desired you to wait there for - A. I cannot say for what. I have spent different hours with him.

Q. Have you ever seen the stranger that you met at Bethnal-green that gave you the parcel - A. No.

Q. Have you many acquaintances of these sort of gentlemen whose occupation you do not know - A. I have no more, only these two gentlemen.

WILLIAM GARROD . Q. Do you know that young woman who has left that place where you are now standing - A. I saw her at the Golden Key on the Saturday; she was there sitting drinking porter. I called for a pint of porter, and sat in the same room. I saw her with a bundle, containing some kind of coin, as I supposed, by the jingling in her lap; she was alternatively changing it from one side of her lap to the other, which caused it to jingle. She went out, and carried the bundle with her. I saw nothing of her afterwards.

THOMAS GLOVER . Q. You are one of the inspectors of bank notes. - A. I am.

Q. Be so good as to look at that note first, is that a genuine, or a forged note - A. It is a forged note throughout in every respect, the paper, ink and impression, that is a one pound note.

Q. Now look at the two pound - A. That is also a forgery in every respect throughout.

Q. Now look at the remaining notes, there are seven two's and three ones - A. These are all forged; all the one's are from one plate, and all the two's from another.

(The note read.)

Prisoner's Defence. My Lord, and Gentlemen of the Jury. I am perfectly innocent of this offence. No person deserving of credit, can prove that I was possessed of a forged note; my person, and my house was searched, and no notes were found; and if I am to answer the accusation of Faggard, then no one of his Majesty's subjects can walk the streets sale, and the most innocent person may be consigned to death. I again repeat that I am free from this guilt.

GUILTY DEATH , aged 54.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18121028-16

858. MARY HARRIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of October , 36 yards of ribbon, value 30 s. the property of John Flint , and John Ray , privately in their shop .

WILLIAM NICHOLL . I am shopman to John Flint and John Ray , Grafton House, Grafton-street, Soho Mr. Andrews brought thirty-six yards of ribbon to our shop on the 24th. I knew it to be our property, it was worth thirty shillings. In a few minutes afterwards I saw the prisoner. Whether she was in our shop that day, I cannot say. I made enquiry about the article in our shop, and none of the people had sold it.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18121028-17

859. MARY HARRIS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 24th of October , 18 yards of ribbon, value 10 s. the property of Griffen Andrews , privately, in his shop .

GRIFFEN ANDREWS . I am an haberdasher ; my shop is at the corner of Greek-street, Compton-street . On the 24th of October, the prisoner, and I think another woman, came into the shop; she asked to see some ribbons. I served her. She bought some ribbon; she paid for them. I gave her change; and I thought she was gone. I had done with her, and had gone to other customers. A young woman gave some information. I accused her of the ribbon; I requested her to walk up stairs; I sent for an officer to have her searched; my wife went up stairs first, I sent the prisoner in the middle, and as I was going up stairs, she dropped a piece of ribbon from between her gown and petticoat. I saw it fall, and picked it up, it was eighteen yards of ribbon. I said to her, you wicked woman, I am convinced you are a shop-lifter. She then begged for mercy.

Q. What is the colour of the ribbon that fell from her on the stairs - A. An olive. The white ribbon was not found upon her. A window on the staircase was open, a young man found the white ribbon in the yard; and after I had given charge of her at the watch-house, it was shewed to her, she denied it, and owned to the olive; the young man that found it is not here. I know the ribbon to be mine.

WILLIAM GOSLING . I am a constable. I took charge of the prisoner. I searched her, and did not find the white ribbon. I told Mr. Andrews, the prisoner must have thrown it out of the staircase window; and after I had taken her to the watch-house, a young man came in with the ball of white ribbon.

Prosecutor. The olive ribbon I saw drop from her, she owned that she stole that, and wished me to let her go. She did not own to the white ribband.

GUILTY, aged 35.

of stealing, but not privately .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18121028-18

860. FRANCES SAGE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of September , two seals, value 5 l. and a ring, value 1 l. the property of John Baykett Jarman .

JOHN BOYKETT JARMAN . I am a goldsmith and jeweller , No. 25, in the Strand , it is between Hungerford-street and Villiers-street, in the parish of St. Martins-in-the-fields, on the 29th of September, between nine and ten o'clock at night, the prisoner came into the shop.

Q. Was any one else serving in the shop - A. None. She asked me if I could charge a ring that she had, she produced the ring. I then shewed her some rings out of the window. She looked over the rings, and then produced hers, and asked me the price of a ring which laid in the tray, I told her, two guineas.

Q. Were there any seals in that tray - A. None. She did not particularly approve of any of the rings that were there; and I in noticing her ring, seeing it so new, gave me suspicion that she had stolen it. She then asked to see an amethyst seal. I put the rings away, but became very suspicious of her, and watched her very narrowly. I shewed her the seals. She looked them over, but did not approve of any of them; and yet, from the tumbled appearance of the tray, I suspected that she had stolen one. She was going away. I stopped her, and told her I suspected she had stolen a seal, and if she would not produce it, I would send for an officer. I directed the boy to go for the constable. She then produced a seal from out of her bosom.

Q. Are you quite sure that was one of the seals that was in the tray - A. I am positive of the seal, it had the shop mark on it itself; she begged that I would let her go. I refused letting her go. I said, as she had deceived my eyes so far, I would not let her go. The watchman came and took her in custody. When the watchman laid hold of her, a ring and a seal dropped from her.

Q. Did you know these to be yours - A. I did, they had my shop mark upon them.

Q. What was the worth of these - A. They cost me about 4 l. from the manufacturer.

JOHN PITTS . I am a watchman. I was called in about ten o'clock. The young woman was in the shop. Mr. Jarman charged her with having stolen seals; after I laid hold of her, a seal and a ring fell from her bosom. Mr. Jarman said they were his property.

ISAAC PIKE . I know no more than the seals were delivered to me. I searched the prisoner, and found no money upon her. I produce them.

Prosecutor. They are mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I was so much in liquor, I did not know what I did.

Prosecutor. She was the cleverest person of that description that ever I saw.

GUILTY , DEATH , aged 17.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18121028-19

861. JOHN SHEHEY was indicted for feloniously making an assault, in the King's highway, upon John Townshend , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, a hat, value 2 s. 6 d. his property .

JOHN TOWNSHEND . I am a pork-butcher . I live in Poplar . On the 20th of October this happened, I came home about eight o'clock in the evening. I understood there had been three men in the shop, and they had taken goods away, and had not paid for them. I went after them, and found the prisoner in a baker's shop, and two of his comrades, as I supposed, were standing at the window. I saw the prisoner take a muffin out of the window and eat it, and then he was coming out without paying for it. I stopped him at the door, and asked him what he had got in his pocket, I found eight Bologna sausages, and three pieces of black pudding. I asked him how he came by them, he told me that he had bought them, and paid for them. I asked him to come home with me, and clear up that point. He refused. I then insisted that he should go, and took him about twenty yards, when two of his comrades come up. I then sent my brother for a constable, the prisoner knocked me down, and his companions struck me, and my hat was taken away. Whether he took my hat off, or it was on the ground, I cannot say. I ran home for another hat, and when I came back, I found the prisoner in Cottage lane. I conveyed him to the watch-house, the prisoner said a woman had got my hat.

SARAH BLUNDELL . On the 20th of October, about eight o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner knock Townshend down, the prisoner took his hat off his head, and run up Cottage-row; I ran after him, and took the hat from him. I am sure it was the prisoner, I know his person; I saw him flogged once for stealing a seaman's chest, and a bed. This is the hat.

Prisoner's Defence. I am as innocent as a child unborn.

Prosecutor. That is my hat.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121028-20

862. JOHN SHEHEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of October , three black puddings, value 2 s. 6 d. and two Bologna sausages, value three halfpence , the property of John Townshend .

MRS. TOWNSHEND. My son keeps a pork-shop . I live with him. On the 20th of October, the prisoner and two other men came into the shop for some pork. I served them with the pork, they paid me for it; in the mean time I saw the prisoner put some black puddings in his pocket. I am sure he is the man. I desired the prisoner to take them out of his pocket, he said he had nothing belonging to me. This was about eight o'clock at night; my son came home about five minutes afterwards, I told him of it, I saw the prisoner take them from the window, and put them into his side pocket.

JOHN TOWNSHEND . As soon as I came in, my mother told me of it. I followed the prisoner to the watch-house, the night-officer being hungry, he cooked the black puddings, and ate them. They would not keep.

Prisoner's Defence. I went into the shop. I bought two shillingsworth of pork, and I had the sausages in my handkerchief that I bought at the next shop; they dropped down, and I picked them up. This gentleman pursued me, he swore that I stole the sausages. I did not.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121028-21

863. THOMAS BROWN was indicted for feloniously making an assault, on the 5th of October , upon William Jefferies, and that he did stab the said William Jefferies , in and upon his belly, with intent in so doing to kill and murder him .

SECOND COUNT, to disable him.

And THIRD COUNT, to do him some grievous bodily harm.

WILLIAM JEFFERIES . I live in Ivey-lane, Hoxton.

Q. When was this that you are now going to relate - A. Last Monday three weeks. I was going towards home. I was in Finsbury , just by Lackington's. I there saw a quantity of people standing. I went to see what was the matter. I found a hackney coach had broke down. The coachman had been thrown off his box. I asked him, if I could render him any assistance. He said, that he had lost the plates from his coach. I saw a man take the plates from under his coat. I told the man, he was a shabby fellow to act in that way. I told the coachman, if he would come after me I would take the man to the office. He said, it would cause a great deal of trouble, and I had better let him go. I then said to the prisoner, if I let you go, you shall not go without something. I directly struck him two or three times.

Q. Where did you hit him - A. In the mouth. He went away from me for three minutes, I dare say.

Q. Do you know who that man was - A. No. I heard a man saying, where is the man that struck me. I went to the person that called out. He put himself in a posture to fight. I acted in the same manner, and struck him first. I struck him several blows. He made several blows, but never hit me once. I hit him several times with my blows, and as I followed him, he kept falling back. I followed him, hitting him again. I found something prick me on the left side. I followed him about three yards farther, hitting him. I then felt something run into me like an instrument. I directly cried out, I was stabbed. I believe the man was secured directly, and I was taken to a surgeon's. I was wounded just under the short ribs.

Q. Who was the man you was so engaged with - A. I cannot say whether it was the prisoner or not; I was so engaged, and it was a very dark night.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18121028-22

864. SARAH ALLEN was indicted for feloniously breaking, and entering the dwelling-house of Mary Lowry , about the hour of eleven in the forenoon, on the 21st of October , and stealing therein, a waistcoat, value 2 s. the property of Thomas Jones ; a counterpane, value 4 s. a sheet, value 4 s. a pillowcase, value 6 d. a shift, value 1 s. a pillow, value 2 s. two gowns, value 2 s. and an handkerchief, value 6 d. the property of Mary Lowry .

MARY LOWRY . I live in Smart's-gardens, Bethnal-green . I have a whole house there, and my grandson lives with me. On the 21st of October I went out about half after ten on the forenoon. I locked my door, and left the key in the window of the lower room, expecting that my grandson would come, and want to go in. When I returned home I found my door locked. The prisoner was taken to Worship-street office. Mr. Armstrong has got my things now.

SARAH THORN . I live in Smart's-gardens, next door to Mrs. Lowry. On the 21st of this month, about eleven o'clock in the forenoon, I saw the prisoner coming out of Mrs. Lowry's, with a bundle under her arm. She locked the door, went round the corner, and dropped the bundle. I took the bundle up. The bundle was wrapped up in a counterpane. I knew them to be Mrs. Lowry's things. I then applied to the neighbours, and they took her in custody. The prisoner said, she found the things by the door, and she was going to put them inside. When I first saw her she was inside of the house, and the bundle under her arm. I asked her, where she was going to take the key. She made no answer, but gave me the key.

JOHN ARMSTRONG . I am an officer. I produce the bundle. I received it when the prisoner was under examination. The prosecutrix and the last witness were present.

Prosecutrix. The things are all mine, except the waistcoat; that is my grandson's.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going by this door; I saw these things lay. I picked them up. A woman said, these were Mrs. Lowry's things; and another woman said, she was sure it was Mrs. Lowry's gowns.

GUILTY, aged 40,

Of stealing only, but not of breaking and, entering the house .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18121028-23

865. MICHAEL LYNCH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of September , two bushels of barley, value 14 s. four bushels of oats, value 1 l. 12 s. and a pint of tares, value 1 s. the property of William James Roberts .

BENJAMIN WEBSTER . I am a servant to Mr. Roberts. I have the care of his granary, Dorset-wharf, Whitefriars . I know the prisoner. He has a stable by my master's granary. He keeps horses there.

Q. In the beginning of the month of September had you any corn come in - A. Yes, several times.

Q. Did you, before you laid the corn in the granary, spread any black oats on the floor - A. Yes, about six bushels of black oats, and on the 8th of September I received thirty quarters of white oats, and ten quarters of foreign barley, with a mixture of tares in it. I mixed the black and white oats, and the barley, altogether.

Q. What night were you robbed - A. Between the 9th and the 10th. On the 9th I left the granary between six and seven. I made my corn up in a regular heap, and mixed the corn together. The next morning, about six o'clock, I went to the granary. I found the corn in a different state. I marked the boards where the corn came to. I missed a great quantity. I informed Mr. Roberts of it.

WILLIAM CHAMBERLAIN. On the morning of the 11th of September I went to search the prisoner's stable. The prisoner was in the stable. I told him, I had a search warrant to search his stable for corn that had been stolen from Mr. Roberts's granary. He told me, I was welcome to search where I pleased. He said, he had got no corn, nor never had, of Mr. Roberts's, in his life. Mr. Roberts then came up. The prisoner told Mr. Roberts he never had any corn of his. He said, he would shew me what he had. He brought a sample out of the bin, for Mr. Robert's inspection. Mr. Roberts said, there was some of his corn in that sample. I went to the bin and thrust my hand down. I brought out a considerable quantity of corn. Mr. Roberts saw it. He declared it to be his corn. I asked the prisoner how he came by it, and told him, I must search his loft, and in his loft I found two sacks full, which Mr. Roberts said he would swear to. In these sacks was a mixture of black and white oats, barley, and tares. This is one of the sacks I found in the prisoner's loft.

WILLIAM JAMES ROBERTS . The officer went first to the prisoner's stable. Sometimes after I was called forward. Michael Lynch denied having any corn on his premises whatever, and particularly that he never had any of my corn, not so much as a bushel; that was his expression. He went to a corn-bin, and brought a double handful of chaff, with some corn mixed with it. The officer searched the corn-bin, and I know it to be my corn, because there were three sorts of corn, with chaff. In the loft we found two sacks completely full of my corn, of the same mixture. I have no doubt of it being my corn. The barley is foreign barley, and the tares came in it: and in a hog-trough we found this quantity of corn; and at the price of seventy shillings a quarter, no person could feed geese. It would cost a great deal of money to fatten geese upon oats.

Prisoner's Defence. I am quite innocent of stealing these oats. On the evening they were stolen I came home very tipsy. My wife undressed me, and put me to bed. She can prove that, and that the man ringed me up at five o'clock in the morning on being obliged to put five horses in the stable. Any person could put any thing in my stable; the door was open.

GUILTY , aged 35.

Confined Six Months in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121028-24

866. ANN JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of October , six yards of printed cotton, value 8 s. the property of David Wiseman , privately, in the shop of George Swaine and Robert Swansborough .

DAVID WISEMAN . I live servant with Swaine and Company, 77, Cornhill . They are wholesale linen-drapers. On the 13th of October, between twelve and one o'clock, I saw the prisoner in the warehouse. I asked her, her business. She said, she wanted something of the church-wardens. I took no notice of what she said, but went up stairs, and came down soon afterwards, and went into the warehouse. Soon after, I heard a noise at the door. Price was at the door with the prisoner. He called out, you let people rob your warehouse; and threw a parcel into the warehouse. On my taking the parcel up, I found it to be my own. The property belonged to me; I had purchased it of my employers. The prisoner said, she hoped we would not commit her. We took her before the Lord Mayor. He committed her for trial.

Q. This is no part of your master's goods - A. It is not. It is my own property, and no one's else.

THOMAS PRICE . I am a servant in St. Paul's church-yard. On the 13th of this month I was going upon business to Swaine's and Company, Cornhill. I saw the prisoner and another woman standing at the door, which gave me suspicion. I saw the prisoner go into the warehouse, and come out with something under her apron, I followed her about forty yards from the door, and brought her back, and she then gave me the parcel. We took her before the Lord Mayor.

- SMITH. I am a constable. This is the parcel. The prisoner said, one of these gentlemen gave it her.

Prisoner's Defence. I am sorry I have done it. I have not a friend in the world.

GUILTY, aged 50,

Of stealing, but not privately .

Confined Six Months in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121028-25

767. JAMES SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of September , a wrapper, value 6 d. thirty-six pair of stockings, value 2 l. 17 s. 6 d. and thirty-six pair of stockings, value 24 s. the property of Ann Sykes , widow .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY .

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121028-26

668. MARY PUDDIFOOT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of October , two aprons, value 5 s. a shift, value 5 s. a handkerchief, value 1 s. and a tablecloth, value 3 s. the property of James Hood .

JAMES HOOD . I am a ribbon manufacturer in Gutter-lane . The prisoner was my servant . She came to live with me in July last. On the 2d of October, from suspicion, I looked over my property, to see if she had robbed me; and when the prisoner found that was the case, she ran away. On the 8th of October I met her in Bishopsgate-street. I secured her, and brought her home to my house. I gave her in charge of Shepherd, the officer. She then confessed of this property being in the hands of Mrs. Twyning.

ELIZABETH TWYNING . I am a washer-woman. I char for Mr. Hood. The prisoner delivered me the things to wash, and I delivered them to the prisoner in the presence of Mr. Shephard.

WILLIAM SHEPHARD . I am an officer. These things I received from the prisoner. I saw her take them from the washerwoman. The prisoner would not tell me whose they were.

Q. How came you to take them into your

custody - A. Mr. Hood gave the prisoner into my charge.

Prosecutor. They are all my property. When I brought her along the street, she said, she was sorry for what she had done.

Q. to Shephard. What did you say to her - A. She would not tell where the things were at first, and going along to the Compter, she said, she had got some things at the washerwoman's, and these are the things that she received at the washer-womans.

Q. to prosecutor. Where were the things kept in your house - A. In the chest of drawers. She had the whole of the keys of the house.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121028-27

869. ISAAC WISE was indicted, for that he, on the 30th of September , had in his custody and possession, two forged bank-notes for the payment of 2 l. each, and a certain other forged bank-note, he knowing them to be forged .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121028-28

870. CATHERINE WATSON was indicted for feloniously having in her custody and possession, a forged bank-note, for the payment of 2 l. she knowing it to be forged .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121028-29

871. ISAAC WISE and CATHERINE WATSON were indicted for feloniously forging, on the 30th of September , a bank-note for the payment of 2 l .

SECOND COUNT, for feloniously disposing of, and putting away, a like forged bank-note, with intention to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England .

And THIRD and FOURTH COUNTS, for uttering and publishing as line, a certain promissory note for the payment of 2 l. with the same intention.

And OTHER COUNTS, for like offence, only varying the manner of laying the charges.

Mr. Knapp, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoners, of this charge, were

ACQUITTED .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121028-30

872. JOHN GEORGE EYRESON was indicted, for that he, on the 28th of September , had in his custody and possession, two forged bank-notes, for the payment of 1 l. each, he knowing them to be forged .

SECOND COUNT, that he, on the same day, had in his custody and possession, another forged banknote.

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121028-31

899. HANNAH EYRESON was indicted, for that she, on the 1st of August , feloniously had, in her custody and possession, a forge 1 l. bank-note, she knowing it to be forged .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121028-32

873. HANNAH EYRESON was indicted for feloniously forging, on the 1st of August , a bank-note for the payment of 1 l. with intention to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England .

SECOND COUNT, for disposing of and putting away a like forged note, with the same intention.

And OTHER COUNTS for like offence, only varying the manner of charging them.

Mr. Knapp, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner, of this charge, was

ACQUITTED .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121028-33

874. HENRY TUBBS was indicted for feloniously making an assault, on the King's highway, upon William Gorman , and stealing from his person, a watch, value 4 s. 10 s. a watch-chain, value 1 s. two seals, value 1 s. and a watch-key, value 2 d. his property .

WILLIAM GORMAN . I am a labouring man .

Q. Where were you robbed - A. I was in Shoe-lane, on the 11th of this month, about a quarter before ten at night, at the corner of George-alley, in Shoe-lane . Two young fellows there told Tubbs to pitch it into me; to strike me. The lamp is at the corner of the alley. I looked at the prisoner, Henry Tubbs , because he came from the two others, to make a blow at me. He struck me in the mouth, and loosened one of my teeth. He struck me with his fist, and the two other men came up, and struck me likewise; and when I was falling back with the blows, Tubbs took hold of my watch-chain, and pulled my watch out. He snatched it out of my pocket. I fell with the blows, and my eye was cut, by falling on the curb-stone.

Q. Did you ever find your watch again - A. No.

Q. How do you know the prisoner is the man - A. Because I could know him in two years. I am positive sure he is the man. I took notice of the man when he struck me. When the other men told him to strike me, I noticed him so as to know him again. When he took my watch he made away. This was on the Sunday. I saw him again on the Tuesday, at the Two Brewers, in Shoe-lane. I was sure he was the same man. I told the publican, as soon as I saw him, that he was the man that knocked me down. The publican told me to go for an officer. I went for an officer, and gave charge of the prisoner.

Q. Had you been drinking - A. No, not at all. It was a dark night. I saw his face. The lamp stood over his face, and I looked under his hat. I shewed the officer where I was knocked down. My mistress was with me.

Q. Who is your mistress - A. My wife. We are

not lawfully married, but I make her my wife. We live together.

Mr. Barry. Did not you tell the magistrate that she was your wife - A. I suppose I did. I told the magistrate she was my wife.

Q. And you were examined upon oath - A. I was.

CATHERINE FLYNN . On the 11th of this month, at night, I was with William Gorman . I saw three men come up, and strike at William Gorman , and as soon as I saw the prisoner in the public-house, I knew him. Three struck at him at first, and after the three struck him, one of them came and held my arms back. Tubbs followed Corman across the street, and knocked him down there, and whatever they took from him I did not see.

Mr. Barry. You say, they all three came up to him and struck him - A. They did.

Q. That is true - A. It is. Three came up and struck him together.

Q. Then, it is not true the prisoner came up at first, and struck him alone - A. Yes, I believe he struck him first.

Q. You were examined at the justice, what name did you give there - A. My name is Catherine Flynn.

Q. You answered there to Catherine Gorman , did not you - A. And so I would now, if I was called so.

THOMAS SMITH . I am a constable of St. Dunstan's. On the 13th of this month I was sent for at the Two Brewers. When I came there, Mr. Gorman gave me charge of the prisoner, for robbing him of his watch on Sunday night. I took the prisoner to the Compter. I searched him, and found only a few halfpence.

JAMES WHITE . I am a grocer and chandler. I live at 84, Shoe-lane. On Sunday evening, about ten o'clock, I found the prosecutor laying in the kennel. I picked him up. He appeared lifeless when I first rose him up. He bled profusely. I went in for a candle. I was with him ten minutes. I never heard of any loss that night. On the following morning I did. I do not know the prosecutor nor the prisoner.

Q. If the man was lifeless, and could not speak, he could not tell his loss.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121028-34

875. SARAH BARNES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of September , six dishes, value 7 s. twelve plates, value 5 s. three pair of salts, value 13 s. six cups, value 1 s. six saucers, value 1 s. two japaned waiters, value 1 s. 6 d. a tea-tray, value 7 s. seven wine-glasses, value 5 s. four ale-glasses, value 2 s. two goblets, value 2 s. a mustard pot, value 1 s. three egg-cups, value 1 s. five mugs, value 1 s. a galli-pot, value 1 s. and two muffineers, value 8 s. the pro- property of John Thorn , in his dwelling-house .

MRS. THORN. My husband's name is John Thorn . At the time the property was stolen I lived in Liquorpond-street . I left there on Michaelmas Day last. The prisoner had lived servant with me from the 9th of April up to the 22d of September. I then discharged her. I kept a shop. I sold japan-ware earthenware and haberdashery. On the 22d of September I was determined to discharge her. The bills due to her were settled, and I sent her off to the present lodging, to sleep with my daughter, as usual. I intended to keep her as a char-woman for two or three days. On the 21st I saw a bonnet; that increased my suspicion. I asked her, where she got that bonnet. She said, from her aunt's. That increased my suspicion. We sent then to Diana Cutler's house, and had some private information. We found at Cutler's house, on Saffron-hill, half-a-dozen plates, that were missed on the 12th of September. The prisoner was then at work in Diana Cutler 's room, where we found the things.

JOHN LIMBRICK . I am an officer. I searched Diana Cutler 's room. I there found all these things I now produce, directly I and Mrs. Thorn went in. On Mrs. Thorn seeing the plates and dishes on the shelves, she said, that is all my property. The prisoner was there. I asked Mrs. Cutler, how she came by all these things. She said, the prisoner had brought them in at different times, saying, that her mistress was going to leave off business, and her mistress gave them to her. Mrs. Thorn took all the things down. Sarah Barnes said nothing to all this.

Prosecutrix. I believe them all to be my property.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing at all about them things. They were not found in my lodging, or about me.

GUILTY, aged 38,

Of stealing to the value of 5 s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121028-35

876. MARY FOWLER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of October , a pier glass, value 30 s. the property of John Mears .

JOHN MEARS . I keep a lodging-house in Covent-garden . On Monday night, about twelve o'clock at night, I was robbed of a looking-glass. I do not know who took it.

DENNIS BOURBANK . I am a watchman. On Tuesday last, between one and two o'clock, I met a woman; she had something with her. I asked her, what she had got. She said, it was her property. I looked at it, and it was a looking-glass. I took her to the watchhouse, and she was examined by the constable. I took her to Bow-street office. Mr. Mears was there before us; and when I went in with this glass, he said, it was his property. At the office, the prisoner said, a man gave her the glass. This is the glass. I stopped the prisoner with it opposite of Southampton-street, in the Strand.

Prosecutor. I know the glass to be my property.

Prisoner's Defence. I am an unfortunate woman. A man gave it me to hold. I do not know where he gave it me, nor who he was, I was so much in liquor.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121028-36

877. MARY SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of September , two bed-curtains, value 6 s. the property of Robert Mordey , in a lodging-room .

MARY MORDEY . My husband's name is Robert Mordey . I live at No. 11, Old Pie-street, Westminster . I let a lodging to the prisoner in the middle of September, I let her a front parlour, ready furnished, at four shillings, a week. She is a soldier's wife. Her husband is gone abroad. She continued a few days in the lodging, and some days afterwards I missed the curtains.

Q. Did she ever pay you any money - A. She paid sixpence earnest.

EDWARD GREEN . I am an officer. On the 5th of October, I apprehended the prisoner. She told me that she had made the curtains into a bed-gown.

Prisoner's Defence. Two men came into the room, and made me tipsey. They took the curtains down, and I made it into a gown. I was sorry for it the next morning.

GUILTY .

Confined Fourteen Days in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121028-37

878. WILLIAM SMITH was indicted for feloniously making an assault, upon Robert Batchelor , on the 23d of September , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, a watch, value 5 l. a watch-chain, value 3 l. a watch-seal, value 30 s. and a watch-key, value 5 s. his property .

ROBERT BATCHELOR . On Wednesday night, the 23d of September, a little after seven in the evening, I was coming into Lincolns-inn-fields, from Little Turnstile, as I was going to cross to Covent Garden . I was on that side of the square on which Newcastle-street stands. The prisoner met me at the corner of Gate-street, as if coming from Queen-street. He met me as I was going to cross the coach way. He came plump against me. I had not an opportunity of getting out of his way, and that moment he seized my watch, he ran against my breast.

Q. So that he hit you against your breast - A. Yes, and at the same instant he seized my watch, and took it from me.

Q. At this time did he say anything to you - A. Not a syllable. He took my watch from my watch-pocket. I perceiving my watch instantly gone, I took hold of the prisoner. I felt it going. I laid hold of him, and prevented him from going towards Little Turnstile, which seemed to be his direction.

Q. Did you say any thing to him - A. I merely uttered that he had got my watch. I saw nobody just at that moment. I very shortly saw two or three men. They were so near me. When I saw them they appeared to be stationary. I did not see them come up. One of these men asked me what was the matter. Expecting for they were my friends, I told him, that the prisoner had got my watch. The instant I had mentioned that, one or two of these men up with their fist, and aimed to strike at me. I did receive some slight blows, but I warded off blows that might have been more unpleasant to me. I received a blow upon upon my thumb, that caused me a deal of pain; but with what that was given me, I know not. Finding myself thus surrounded by enemies, I made use of my voice, as strong as I could, to call assistance, and I was obliged to relax that hold that I had of the prisoner.

Q. What obliged you to do that - A. The fear from the persons who surrounded me. The prisoner also caused a great fear of him, he being one of the gang. When he got from me he did not take the direction towards Little Turnstile. He got from me, and I kept a great cry of stop thief, pursuing him that side leading to Clare-market.

Q. That is the West side - A. I think it is. At this time I saw several people collected round, but having exhausted myself, I was obliged to relax my pace of walking. I have two witnesses here that pursued him, when I could not. He took down Duke-street, and his party also.

Q. Did you see him turn down Duke-street - A. I did not. I went on after him in that direction. The persons who were in pursuit of the man, they stopped him. He was stopped when I came up. He was stopped by the Romish chapel.

Q. That is about turning into Duke-street - A. Yes. Just about that place I saw a great quantity of people collected there. When I came up I went immediately up to the prisoner. I recognised his countenance and person also. I am quite certain he is the man. I do not know whether Limbrick was there from Bow-street, but immediately after I came up he was soon charged.

Q. Had any body hold of him - A. Yes; the witness that you will soon hear. Limbrick took him over to a public-house.

Q. Limbrick, the Bow-street officer, happened to be there - A. Yes. He took him to a public-house opposite, but there was no watch or property of mine found upon him. One of my witnesses can account for that. He was taken to Bow-street that night, and the persons that stopped him went with him.

Q. Did you see any more of the persons who had come up to you while you were with the prisoner - A. There were two brought to me at Bow-street, but I could recognise neither of their persons.

Q. Now, you say, as soon as you came up to the prisoner, you immediately recognised his countenance and person: at the time he was stopped what sort of light had you - A. His hat was thrown backwards, so that I had a full sight of his countenance.

Q. That was when he pulled at your watch - A. Yes.

Q. His hat was not pulled over his face - A. No, it was thrown backwards rather.

Q. What light was there - A. It was a little after seven, on the 23d of September, and certainly light enough to discriminate his person. It could not be a quarter after seven, I believe. I am positive to his person and face.

Q. What time did it take up before he ran away - A. When he first seized my watch?

Q. Yes - A. It might be a minute.

Q. Did you ever see your watch again - A. No. It had a chain and seals to it, I had got hold of this man; whether it was the first time, or when

I got hold of him again, I am certain his coat was torn.

Q. You are satisfied then, that the man that you had hold of, his coat was torn - A. Yes.

Q. Now, when the prisoner was in custody was anything observed about his coat - A. Mr. Read desired one of the officers to look at his coat; and his coat was torn. He was asked if he could account for that. He said, it had been so several days.

SAMUEL GREEN . I live at No. 30, Berwick-street, Soho.

Q. On this night, the 23d of September, where were you - A. I was on this side Lincolns-inn-fields, between seven and eight at night.

Q. Whereabouts were you when you first heard or saw any thing of this - A. About fifty yards from the corner of Great Queen-street. I was coming in that direction towards that place. I saw several men at the further corner of Queen-street. I heard a cry of, help; stop thief. I then saw one man run towards me very fast, with his hat in his hand. I instantly laid hold of him.

Q. Where was he then - A. He was going towards Duke-street, down the square.

Q. Had he turned Duke-street - A. No.

Q. You laid hold of him in Lincoln's-inn-fields - A. Yes. I heard something drop from his hands.

Q. You did not see any thing drop - A. No; I only heard something drop, apparently from his hands. It appeared to me to rattle like a watch on the stones.

Q. It was such a sound as a watch, dropped, would make - A. I thought so at the time. I was meeting him, in fact, at the time when I stopped him. I endeavoured to keep my hold, but was prevented by another coming up, and striking me on my breast.

Q. Did he come in the same direction - A Yes. I let go of him, and he instantly ran towards Duke-street. I then looked about, to see if I could see the watch; not finding it I went on towards Duke-street, as I heard that he had turned in there.

Q. You did not see him turn there - A. I did not. I went into Duke-street, where I found him, and the other witness had hold of him. I asked the prisoner to take off his hat.

Q. You had spoken of a man before. Do you mean that man is the prisoner - A. Yes. As soon as he took off his hat I was convinced it was the same man that I had laid hold of in the square. Limbrick, the officer, came up, and took him in custody.

Q. You say, you searched the spot where you heard something full - A. Yes.

Q. Can you say the reason why you searched, and nothing was found - A. The man that struck me was on the spot the whole time.

Q. That is the spot where you had hold of him - A. Yes.

Q. Then, I understand you to say, that you had such a view of the prisoner, that you can undertake to swear positively to his being the man - A. Yes. I went to Bow-street with the other witnesses.

Q. Did you hear any thing said about tearing his coat - A. Yes. Going along to Bow-street, Mr. Batchelor said, there was one particular circumstance that would convince him, that he had hold of him, he felt his coat tore in the inside, somewhere by the flap. Then he went to Bow-street, and the coat was examined. It was torn.

MR. WEAVER. Q. On this night, the 23rd of September, where were you - A. I was coming out of Great Queen-street, and just as I had passed the corner, I heard a cry of, help, stop thief, and seeing the prisoner running across the fields, going towards Duke-street, I immediately ran after him. He turned down Duke-street; that is where I came up to him.

Q. Did you, before that, see anything of Mr. Green, the last witness - A. No, no more than seeing him come after him. When I came up to him, I immediately laid hold of him. I had not stopped him long before I was opposed by three or four. They were swearing at me, you be d - d, how dare you stop the man. Then I was convinced they were a gang of pick-pockets around me.

Q. It gave you that impression - A. Yes, and I let go my hold then.

Q. What made you do that - A. Because I was struck once or twice by one or two of them. I still kept myself about the prisoner. Soon after, Mr. Batchelor came up, and requested to look at the man. He identified him being the man that had robbed him. I laid hold of the prisoner again, a second time. I was obliged to let go my hold after that. I was afraid of being knocked down.

Q. This was after Mr. Batchelor came up - A. Yes. I was afraid of the people about: I then perceived the prisoner, as if he was going straight off, on the other side. I got hold of him again, and I sung out, an officer. I said, there was an officer or two come, to frighten them. It had the desired effect.

Q. Had you seen an officer then - A. No. Very fortunately, Limbrick came up soon after.

Q. But an officer was there, though you did not see him - A. Yes. Limbrick came up soon after, and took him over to a public-house, and from thence to Bow-street.

Q. Had you ever lost sight of him until he was secured by an officer - A. No. I went with Mr. Green and Mr. Batchelor, to Bow-street, and when I was there, Limbrick and another officer asked me, if I should know any person that struck me. They went, and brought two persons. I could not identify them.

- LIMBRICK. I am an officer of Bow-street office.

Q. On this night, the 23d, where happened you to be - A. I lived then at 33, Duke-street. Upon my hearing the cry of, stop thief, I ran down stairs. I found the prisoner in custody. Mr. Green had hold of him at that time, I believe. Mr. Batchelor said, he had been robbed of his watch. He was there at that time. I took the prisoner into a public-house, and searched him, but there was no watch on him. Then I took him to Bow-street.

Q. Did you hear anything said at Bow-street, or

before you came there, about the taring his coat - A At Bow-street, Mr. Batchelor said, he thought he had his coat torn. He told the magistrate, he heard his coat tare at the time he had him in custody. I searched his coat, and it was torn at the back part of his pocket.

Prisoner's Defence. May it please your lordship, I never saw the prosecutor until he came up to me in Duke-street. I was wrongfully taken into custody; and Mr. Batchelor, when he saw me in Duke-street, said, I was not the right man.

Prosecutor. I never said so. I never had any doubt of his being the man.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 20.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18121028-38

879. THOMAS SLATER was indicted, for that he, on the 22d of June , feloniously, and without lawful excuse, had in his custody and possession, a certain forged bank-note, for the payment of 1 l.

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121028-39

880. THOMAS SLATER was indicted for feloniously forging a bank-note for the payment of 1 l.

SECOND COUNT, for disposing of, and putting away, a like forged note, with intention to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England .

THIRD and FOURTH COUNT, for publishing and uttering as true, a like forged 2 l. note, with the intention;

And ANOTHER COUNT, for like offence, to defraud Joseph Jones .

Mr. Solicitor General, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner, of this charge, was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18121028-40

881. RICHARD POTTER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of September , one head of hemp, value 14 s. the property of James Briant .

JAMES BRIANT . I live in Lower East Smithfield. I am a carman . The prisoner drove a waggon for me. On the 17th of September the prisoner went to load a load of hemp from Burr-street. I sent a good covering with the waggon, to keep the hemp dry. I told him, to take particular care of it. He was to take it to Chester's quay, near the Custom-house. I sent my clerk to watch that it went safe.

DAVID MITCHIE . I am clerk to Mr. Briant. I saw the prisoner drive the waggon away from Burr-street. At Dunstan's-hill the prisoner got on the hind part of the waggen, and lifted up the hind part of the tilt, and drew the head of hemp from the load. He threw it on the tilt, and covered it with the corner of the tilt. He went to Chester's quay. He got on the top of the waggon, and rolled up the tilt with the head of hemp in it. He delivered the load of hemp according to order, except the load of hemp in the tilt. After he had delivered the hemp, he drove up into Thames-street. I asked him on Chester's quay, and likewise in Thames-street, if he was sure he had delivered all his load of hemp. He said, he had delivered the whole.

Q. What was the quantity of hemp the whole load - A. Six or seven hundred pounds weight. The gentleman that employed us to cart the hemp, and had informed him what I had seen. He was waiting on the quay to receive it. I asked the prisoner, if he had anything in his tilt. He said, no. I made him undo it. He was very loth to undo it. The head of hemp was then found in the tilt.

Q. What was the weight of the head of hemp - A. Fifteen pounds all but two ounces. He said, he did not know how it came there. The value of the head of hemp is thirteen or fourteen shillings. I made him drive the waggon home. I then informed my master, and then he was taken in charge by the constable.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to his character.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Publicly whipped One Hundred Yards near to Chester's quay .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18121028-41

882. JOHN BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of September , a watch, value 1 l. a steel chain, value 6 d. and three watch-keys, value 6 d. the property of Mary Daniels , widow .

MARY DANIELS . I am a widow woman. I live in America Mews . On the 9th of September, between twelve and one, the prisoner came to my apartment. The prisoner was a stranger to me. He enquired for a young man of the name of Gibbs. I knew John Gibbs very well; he is at sea. The prisoner told me he was a shipwright, and that he had been to Botany bay with this young man. I told him, it must have been a good many years ago. I am sure the prisoner is the man. My watch was in a case like a time-piece, over the mantle-piece, and I am sure it was there when the prisoner was in the room. He told me, that he was in a starving condition; he had not broke his fast from Monday morning, and this was Wednesday. I gave him bread and cheese. I told him, it was the best that I had for my father-less family. Mr. Steward's coachman called me out of the room. The coachman lives in the Mews. I returned; and as I was coming into the room I heard the sound of glass. I called out, George Davis , come up. George Davis came into my room. I saw the prisoner's hand upon the mantle-piece. The prisoner ran by me very swift, and got down stairs as quick as possible. I missed my watch immediately. I followed him, and kept him in sight to America-square. He turned into John-street, and there I lost eight of him. He got away entirely then. On the 1st of October I met him in Cornhill. I asked him if he had heard of the man that he was enquiring about. He said, what, John Gibbs . He said, had I. I said, I had, and I have got you. I laid hold of him by the collar. I told him to give me the ticket of the watch, or tell me where it was, It was my

husband's watch. I would as soon lose my life as the watch. He broke from me but he was stopped and brought back.

Q. When did you find the watch again - A. The watch was found, in consequence of what passed between my Lord Mayor and him. It was produced before the Lord Mayor by the pawnbroker.

JAMES LAWSON . I am a pawnbroker's servant, at 81, Cable-street. On the 9th of September a watch was pledged with me by a man, in the name of John Prown , for ten shillings. I believe the prisoner to be the man. This is the watch.

Prosecutrix. It is my watch. It was my husband's watch.

THOMAS BRANSCOMB . I am an officer. The prisoner was stopped, and given into my charge. The prisoner denied the watch to me. I made enquiry, and found the watch.

Prisoner's Defence. I am a sea-faring man .

GUILTY, aged 26.

Judgment respited .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18121028-42

883. CHARLES JOHNSON and GEORGE DOVE were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of October , from the person of Michael Duffield Slater , a pocket-book, value 1 s. a bank note, value 10 l. a 10 l. promissory note, a warrant for the payment of 78 l. 3 s. and a warrant for the payment of 3 l. 16 s. his property .

MICHAEL DUFFIELD SLATER . On the 3d of October I was passing through Eastcheap , about two in the middle of the day. I felt a pull at my pocket. I immediately clapped my hand upon my left hand coat pocket; I missed my pocket-book. I turned round, and discovered the two prisoners close behind me. They were walking together, as if they were in company together. Upon my turning round they both crossed the road. To make quite sure, before I pursued, I searched all my pockets, and as soon as I found my pocket-book was gone, I gave the alarm of, stop thief. The prisoners then both ran down Love-lane, towards Thames-street. I pursued them. Dove was stopped in Love-lane, and Johnson was stopped in Botolph-lane. They were both taken without my losing sight of them at all.

Q. Before Johnson was taken did you see him throw anything away - A. I did not. My pocketbook was produced afterwards. In about ten mi- minutes Mr. Fielder produced it to me. I am sure it was my pocket-book. It contained a ten-pound note, a Warwick ten-pound note, and two drafts; one of seventy-eight pounds three shillings, and the other for three pounds sixteen shillings; and I found the same memorandums that I had in my pocketbook.

GEORGE FIELDER . I live at No. 20, Eastcheap. At the time of this transaction I was in Little Love-lane; I met two men, which I have not the least doubt are the prisoners. I did not hear the cry of stop thief, at the time, therefore I proceeded home, and as I turned round, seeing them run, I turned again, to see which direction they took, and as I turned I saw the pocket-book laying on the ground, nearly opposite of the gates of Brown's warehouse. It was in the direction where they had run over. I picked it up. I afterwards gave the pocket-book to Mr. Slater, with the contents. Mr. Slater claimed it as his. I have not the least doubt of either of the prisoners.

GEORGE STEVENS . I am a tallow-chandler. I live at No. 20, Little Eastcheap. I was standing at my door. When I first went to my door, Eastcheap was quiet, and when I had been there a few minutes, two men ran across the road, and a gentleman was following them, crying, stop thief. That gentleman was Mr. Slater. They ran down Love-lane, and I after them. My house is at the corner of Love-lane. Mr. Slater, and others, pursued them. I saw Johnson drop the pocket-book, as if he was throwing it behind him. I was not two yards behind him. I was going to stoop for it, but Mr. Fielder happened to be coming by. He picked it up.

Q. Did you see either of them taken - A. No. I saw them going to the Compter about ten minutes after. The two men that I saw going to the Compter, were the two men that run down Love-lane.

GEORGE DUFFY . The two prisoners were given into my charge, and this pocket-book.

Prosecutor. That is my pocket-book.

Johnson's Defence. I am innocent.

Dove's Defence. The same.

JOHNSON, GUILTY , aged 20.

DOVE, GUILTY , aged 19.

Transported for Life .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18121028-43

884. JAMES GRAHAM was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of October , a handkerchief, value 7 s. the property of John Barnet , from his person .

JOHN BARNET . I am a surgeon in St. John-street. On the 28th of October I was passing from the Strand into Fleet-street, and as I was passing through Temple Bar , a man, who was carrying a basket before me. His basket was knocked down by design, more than by accident, and as I turned round I saw the prisoner and his companion behind me. I recollected that I had some papers and valuable things about me. I pursued my way home. When I got near the corner of Fetter-lane, happening to look about accidentally, I saw the prisoner again, and his companion. I considered then that they were suspicious characters. I endeavoured to get before them. I wished to get further from them. I went off the pavement, and just at the corner of Shoe-lane, supposing I was out of their reach, I felt a sudden tug at my pocket. I immediately turned round. The prisoner was at my right hand. I saw my handkerchief drop from him on the ground. His companion at that moment was rather before me. I instantly collared the prisoner, and I picked up the handkerchief off the prisoner's feet. I took him myself to the officer in Poppins-court. He made no resistance. His companion followed me to the officer's door. I found the officer, and I gave him in charge, and I gave the officer the handkerchief.

EDWARD CRESWLLL . I am an officer in the City. The prisoner was delivered in charge to me, by Mr. Barnet. He charged him with picking his

pocket. The prisoner declared he was innocent. I took the prisoner to the Compter. I have kept the handkerchief ever since. This is the handkerchief.

Prosecutor. This is the handkerchief. It was taken from my pocket. It cost me fourteen shillings.

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutor accused me of picking his pocket. I saw the handkerchief drop from a person's hand. I told him I was not the person. I had no companion with me.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Transported for Life .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18121028-44

885. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of September , sixty-nine pounds weight of brass, value 3 l. and two pounds weight of lead, value 6 d. the property of John Lee .

JOHN LEE . I am an ironmonger . I live in Three Fox-yard, Long-lane . The prisoner was my carman . On the 5th of September, me and my son packed up this brass. There was one hundred and sixty pounds in weight. We tied up the bag, and put a label on the bag, of the weight of the metal. The bag remained in my warehouse from that time until the 21st of September, and on the 21st of September we examined the bag. We found this sixty-nine pounds missing, and weighed the other with the remainder, and found it would make up one hundred and sixty pounds. I saw the sixty-nine pounds weight of brass before the sitting alderman, and the prisoner was then in custody. I knew the brass to be part of the one hundred and sixty pounds that we packed up. It is worth forty shillings, and that is under the value.

JOSHUA LEE . I only know that I assisted in packing up this brass, with my father, and I put the label on the bag. I knew the brass which I saw before the sitting alderman to be part of the one hundred and sixty pounds that I packed in the bag.

JOB BRIGGS . I am a watchman of Cripplegate Without. I took the prisoner in custody facing the new brewery in Golden-lane, in the City, at one o'clock at night, on the 11th of September. I saw him with this parcel of brass. I asked him, what he had got in the handkerchief. I saw he had something in his waistcoat pocket. I took a piece of brass out of his pocket. He had thirteen pieces in all. I asked him where he got it. He would not tell me; so I took him to the watchhouse, and gave the brass to the officer of the night.

ROBERT ALEXANDER . I am a constable. I was present at the watchhouse at the time the prisoner was brought in by the watchman, with three ingots of brass in a handkerchief. I assisted in taking out the other pieces of brass from about him. He refused to inform me how he came by it. I took him to the Compter. He was examined the next day before the alderman. The brass was then advertised. It went on to the fourth examination, and then the prisoner was discharged. The brass was at last claimed by Mr. Lee, and the prisoner was re-taken, and committed. I have had the brass in my custody ever since.

Prosecutor. The brass that the constable produces is part of the one hundred and sixty pounds weight of brass that I had in my warehouse. I am sure of it.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence; called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18121028-45

886. THOMAS ABREY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of October , a pair of half boots, value 15 s. the property of Henry Barton .

HENRY BARTON . I am a shoe-maker , in Sun-street . On Saturday, the 3d of October, I lost the half boots from my shop. I had made them for the prisoner, and he being a stranger, when I measured him for them, I had taken a deposit of four shillings. The prisoner came in between nine and ten o'clock at night, and asked me whether the boots were done. I told him, not quite, I had to punch the holes in them, and I would do it in a few minutes. The boots were on the counter. He took up one, and said, is this one. I said, yes; and while he was standing with the boot in his hand, I waited on a customer, and when I had served the customer, I missed the prisoner out of the shop. He had gone away with the pair of half boots. It being Saturday night I did not go out after him. I never saw him until I saw him before the Lord Mayor. I then charged him with stealing the boots. He said, he had left them in the shop. He offered me the rest of the money, which was fourteen shillings. I made the boots for him, from his measure.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of taking them.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18121028-46

887. THOMAS BEAZLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of September , in the dwelling-house of Samuel Beazley , three 5 l. bank notes, and a 30 l. bank note, his property .

SAMUEL BEAZLEY . I live at No. 2, Whitehall-place, in the parish of St. Martin in the Fields .

Q. Do you know anything of this fact of having lost any bank-notes - A. Yes; they were upon Mrs. Beazley's dressing table, on the second floor. I had put them there. They were taken on the 16th of September. I left them there about twelve at noon. Directly I put them on the table I told Mrs. Beazley. They were missed on the 17.

Q. That is not your sleeping-room - A. No. It is the dressing-room, adjoining the sleeping-room. You must go through the sleeping-room to go to that room. I was out of town all Thursday. I did not hear of it till the next evening. The prisoner came to the house twice on the 16th. He had formerly been a servant, and had come to ask me to come back again. I left them on the table, and told Mrs. Beazley that they were there.

Q. Have you ever seen these notes again - A. Yes. I had changed a two hundred pound note at the Bank, and in consequence of the loss, I got the numbers of the notes. I had received them at the

Bank of England. I got change on the 11th of the month. I saw the notes again on the 18th, in the custody of Samuel Taunton , and they corresponded with the numbers I had received of the clerks of the Bank. The prisoner was then in custody.

Q. Can you be certain that these four notes that you charge the prisoner with, that you had not paid them away - A. Yes, because I can recollect the payments that I made. All the notes except the four five-pounds, and the thirty pound, I had paid away. The prisoner, when he lived with me, behaved well, was honest. I meaned to take him again, had not this occurred.

THOMAS WRAGG I am a clerk in the Bank, in the bank-note pay-office On the 11th of September, Mr. Beazley brought me a two hundred pound pound note. I changed it for him. I gave him three forty's, one thirty, and ten five's. The thirty pound note was No 11,347. That entry is made by Hancock. I paid the notes. Date 29th of August, 1812. Ten five-pound notes; they were numbered from 13,967, following numbers, to 13,976, inclusive; all dated 5th of August, 1812. I gave the notes, and Hancock posted them.

JOHN HANCOCK . At the time the two hundred pound note was changed I entered the numbers.

SAMUEL TAUNTON . I am an officer of Bow-street. I apprehended the prisoner on the charge of Mr. Beazley. I searched him, and found no thing on him. I went up stairs to his box. He went with me. He opened his box with a key that he took out of his pocket. I searched the box, and while I was searching it, the prisoner was standing close at my side. He put his hand privately into the box, and put something into his coat pocket. I searched his coat pocket immediately. I found three Bank of England notes, and twenty shillings in silver, wrapped up in one parcel. One thirty pound note, No. 11,347, 29th August, 1812; a five pound note, No. 13,974; the other five pound note is the following number, 13,975, 5th of August, 1812. No other note, and twenty shillings in silver. I asked him, what he had done with the other five pound note. He said he had paid for some shoes, and some other articles, and the twenty shillings were the remaining part of it. These are the notes. I then took him in custody.

Q. to prosecutor. What time did he come on the 16th - A. He came early in the morning. He was to return at four. He returned at four.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 17.

[ The prisoner was recommended to mercy by the Jury, and the prosecutor, on account of his good character .]

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18121028-47

888. CHARLES WILLIAMS was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Matthew Govett , about the hour of eleven at night, on the 6th of October , and stealing therein, two watches, value 2 l. twenty-four watch-cases, value 12 l. and eighty ounces of silver, value 20 l. his property .

MATTHEW GOVETT . I am a watch-case maker . I live in Ironmonger-row, St. Luke's . The prisoner was my apprentice . He left me in Whit-Monday. He had not resided with me since I rent the whole house. I and my family sleep in it. The shop is attached to the house. We can go to it without going into the street.

Q. Is Hardcastle an apprentice of yours - A. Yes, and Miles. They sleep in the shop, in the same bed.

Q. On the night of the 6th of October, did you see any of your property that were put under the bed - A. I did; there were two ingots of silver, about eighty ounces, in a drawer, with watch-cases finished and unfinished, and two watches also.

Q. Were they entire watches - A. No, only parts of watches. There was a drawer with silver watch-cases, and a box of silver cuttings, and different descriptions of silver. This was all safe on the 6th of October. The value of all was nearly eighty pounds.

Q Did you see Hardcastle and Miles in bed that night - A I did. I looked through the window and saw them in bed. They went to bed before I did. They usually go to bed about half after ten, seldom later.

Q. I believe you never found any of your property again - A. No, except some little silver pendants in the morning. I went to bed a little after eleven, and my house was perfectly secured.

Q. Were you the last person in the shop - A. No. A lad of the name of Baldwin locked up the shop. I locked the street door myself. Before I went to bed the house was fast in all respects, as to the front of the street.

Q. How could any person get into the shop without getting in the front way - A. By the back way it opens into a place where there are new buildings.

Q. Could any person get into your shop without getting into some part of your premises - A. They must get into my yard. The yard is fenced from a public passage, by a wall. In the morning, a little after six o'clock, I was called up by Hardcastle. I went into the shop. I perceived the drawers were all gone excepting two. They had taken the contents, and the drawers. There was no appearance of violence to the shop. I found a window open in the shop. I went to the window to see if I could see any footsteps outside. I found none. There was missing four or five boxes, which were emptied. The drawers, with two ingots of silver, and the watch cases, were all taken away. Hardcastle then went out of the shop, over a wall, and brought back an empty box, belonging to the shop. That is all I have recovered except four pendants. In consequence of that Hardcastle and Miles were taken up on the Wednesday morning.

ROBERT BALDWYN . Q. You are an apprentice to the prosecutor - A. Yes. I slept in the

house. I left the shop on the 6th of October, about half past ten at night. The men were gone from the shop, only Hardcastle and Miles were in it. I put seven or eight boxes under the bed. Them boxes contained the work, and the ingots of silver. I locked the shop door, gave the key to my master, and then went to bed. I got up in the morning, about half past six. It was light then. Hardcastle knocked me up. I unlocked the shop door. I found the shop window open, with two boxes near the window. I had seen them boxes under the bed on the preceding night. I saw George Hardcastle go down the yard, and get upon the ruins. He got over the wall. He brought over four or five boxes with him. Them boxes had been under the bed the preceding night.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. Yes. I remember his absconding on the Whit-Monday.

Q. Between the time of his absconding, and the robbery have you seen Hardcastle and Williams together - A. I have seen Williams talking to Hardcastle once in Ironmonger-row.

Q. to prosecutor. Had this practice of putting the boxes with the work and silver, under the bed, been by your direction - A. Yes, I had directed it about a week before.

GEORGE HARDCASTLE . Q. How old are you - A. I am eighteen. I am an apprentice to Mr. Govett. The prisoner was my fellow-apprentice. He absconded on Whit-Monday. I continued my acquaintance with him after he left my master's house.

Q. Do you recollect, the night of the 6th of October, your master lost some boxes - A. Yes. I saw Williams on the Saturday and on the Monday night before this robbery happened. Williams told me, that the party that were to come to rob the place, were not there that night. Williams told me, a month before that, that he would get a party to come and to rob the place, and I was to come and to meet them at the Grapes, Bridgewater-gardens, on the Saturday night before. I met Williams a week before this happened. He asked me where the work was put of a night. I told him, under the bed; and I gave him the impression of a key on soap. On the Sunday morning, I saw George Thorn , one of the party. Thorn, alias Buchanan, asked me, if I had the impression of the key. I told him, I had not. On the Monday night, I gave the impression of the key, on soap, to Williams. On the Tuesday night, Miles, my fellow-apprentice, and me went to bed a quarter before eleven. The shop door had been locked by Robert Baldwin , and then John Miles and I went to bed directly.

Q. What happened in the course of the night - A. Then these boxes were taken away. I heard nothing. I was not awake all night. At six o'clock in the morning I looked for the boxes. They were gone. I called my master, and told him all the boxes were gone. I did not see or hear any body come in that night.

JOHN LAWRENCE TRING . I apprehended the prisoner on the 8th of October, at the Weaver's Arms, Angel-alley, Bishopsgate-street. At the magistrate the prisoner acknowledged having the impression of the key, but as to the robbery he said he was innocent.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18121028-48

889. JOSEPH YOE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of October , a plane, value 3 s. the property of Thomas Chapman ; a plane value, 4 s. the property of John Dents ; a screw-wrench, value 6 d. the property of George Smart ; and two planes, value 3 s. the property of David Webley .

THOMAS CHAPMAN . I worked for Mr. Smart at the time I lost these tools. I missed them on Tuesday. The prisoner was a fellow-workman . We suspected the prisoner. Many of our shop-mates missed their tools. I saw my plane afterwards in the hands of the officer.

Q. What is the value of your plane - A. Four shillings and sixpence.

DAVID WEBLEY . I worked for Mr. Smart. I lost two planes.

JOSEPH SAUNDERS . I am a servant to a pawnbroker, in Charles-street, Westminster. I produce six planes, and a screw-wrench. I took them in of a woman.

JAMES GILLMORE . I am an officer of Queen-square. I searched the prisoner's lodgings, and found the duplicates, that relates to this property, in a drawer. I apprehended the prisoner. He denied pledging them. The tools were produced before him, and then he said he took the tools to do a job, and afterwards he sent his wife to pledge them, and if he had not been drunk he should not have taken them.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Publicly whipped .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18121028-49

890. USHER HARWOOD and WILLIAM SEARLE were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of September , a handkerchief, value 10 d. the property of a certain person to the Jurors unknown .

JOHN MAYHEW . I am an officer of Bow-street. On the day the eagles were taken into Whitehall I saw Searle pick a gentleman's pocket of a handkerchief. He gave it to Harwood. I took them both in custody.

Searle's Defence. I never had the handkerchief in my hand, nor never attempted to do such a thing.

Harwood's Defence. I know nothing at all about the handkerchief.

SEARLE, GUILTY, aged 20.

HARWOOD, GUILTY, aged 17.

Judgment respited .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121028-50

891. REBECCA COLLINS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of October ,

a watch, value 4 l. the property of James Potter , from his person .

The prosecutor was called, and not appearing in court , the prisoner was

ACQUITTED.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121028-51

892. JOHN CRANE was indicted for that he, on the 12th of September , feloniously had in his custody and possession three forged bank notes for payment of one pound each, he knowing them to be forged .

SECOND COUNT, that he had in his custody one forged bank note, he knowing it to be forged.

THIRD and FOURTH COUNTS, that he had in his dwelling-house, like bank notes; and

TWO OTHER COUNTS, that he had, without lawful excuse, in his lodgings, like forged bank notes, and

ANOTHER COUNT, in his apartment like bank notes.

JOHN BUTLER . I am an officer of Shadwell-office. I accompanied Hewitt and Hope to the prisoner's house, Devonshire-street, Bethnal green , on the 12th of September last. I found the prisoner at home. Susannah Crane came home soon afterwards.

Q. How do you know it to be the prisoner Crane's house - A. He told me so. I watched Caley out of it. On the 11th we proceeded to search the house. Hewitt had got the prisoner in his custody. Hewitt told me, in the prisoner's hearing, that he had some silver that he found upon Crane. I then went up stairs to search for more, and just as I was up stairs I heard a scuffle ensue below. I immediately ran down. I found Crane in the act of getting out at the back door, and the wife ran out of the front door. Hewitt secured Crane and I secured the wife, they had got out of the house. We brought them back, and they were secured; and I proceeded to search. In searching I found an hundred pound bank-note, in a trunk. In the front room one pair of stairs I found twenty pound in silver. In a back room we found fifty-eight pound in forged bank-notes, five, twos and ones. in this tin-case. I knew these notes. I marked them all directly. I found them. Hewitt found three or four notes in a drawer under a shoemaker's seat. The prisoner is a shoemaker by trade; and in the same room Hewitt found a quantity of base silver. Crane said they belonged to a man of the name of Thompson.

- HEWITT. I found these three notes in a drawer under a seat that a shoemaker uses.

Mr. GLOVER. Q. Look at these three notes - A. They are in all respects forged; and that bundle of thirty-eight in number they are forged in every respect. They are fives, twos, and ones,

(The note read.)

Prisoner's Defence. They were found in my possession. I am guilty.

GUILTY , aged 47.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18121028-52

933. CHARLES CARLISLE was indicted for that he, on the 5th of October , had in his custody and possession three pieces of paper apparently to resemble bank-notes with the words, five hundred, pounds, in white letters, on a black ground .

ANTONO BENNIA . I am a Italian and a sailor. One day I was going to see a messmate of mine. I went into a public house. I saw the prisoner there, he was having a glass of gin. Then we went to another public house; another man came in, the prisoner and that man began playing, tossing up tokens, and after they had been playing some time they asked me to play, and to put down five pounds. Carlisle asked me to play, he had won once or twice of the other man. They put down paper that had the appearance of bank-notes, and when I put down five one pound notes, the other man took up the notes and ran away. Carlisle attempted to run away, but he was stopped and brought back again; then Carlisle walked round to the fire-place: he took up a red pocket-book from the grate; there was no fire there; he put the pocket-book into his pocket.

WILLIAM ALLEY . I am a constable, I searched the prisoner. I found upon him six hundred and eighty pounds in bad notes. This is the pocket-book and the bad notes called Fleet notes; they have my mark upon them.

(The notes read.)

Q. to Mr. Shelton. Is there any thing there in a white letter on a black ground - A. Yes, five hundred.

Prisoner's Defence. Them things I had as a toy, and as they have been exposed to sale, I never knew there was any harm. As a proof that I did not mean to pass them, I wrote upon them, of no value. At the Trafalgar hosiery, in the City road, they have them in the window. I never intended to pass them.

GUILTY , aged 35.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18121028-53

894. WILLIAM BLADEN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 14th of September , ten shillings in monies, numbered , the property of George Dunman .

GEORGE DUNMAN . I live at 38, Aldgate High-street . The prisoner was my porter . He lived in the house.

Q. What facts can you relate that the prisoner stole the money - A. On the 13th, I marked some halfpence; and placed them on a shelf near the shop window; and on the morning of the 14th, I went down to see that all the half pence were safe. On the pile there were nine five shilling papers in the pile of five shillings each. I watched the prisoner while he was sweeping out the shop. I saw him take two five shilling papers from the top of the pile, and put them in his left hand pocket, and while he had swept the shop, he went into the warehouse. After he had gone up to breakfast I searched the warehouse, expecting to find his board in a rice barrel, containing saw dust. I found the two papers of halfpence, and four other papers of halfpence: thirty shilling worth of halfpence in the whole.

Q. Did you find any silver mony - A. No; I did not lose any shilling pieces.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18121028-54

895. SARAH BOWER and SARAH GHRIMES were indicted for feloniously making an assault upon John Lewin , on the 22d of September , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, a handkerchief, value 5 s. a watch, value 3 l. a silver pencil-case, value 4 s. a pair of spectacles, value 7 s. a bank note, value 5 l. four one pound notes, and 17 s. 6 d. in monies numbered, his property .

JOHN LEWIN . I live in Well-street, Oxford-street. On the 22d of September, about nine o'clock at night, I was coming up Holborn; I was quite sober. In Holborn, at the end of Bow-street, I slipped down. There had been a deal of wet, and I daubed myself; the two prisoners came up to me. I had never seen them before in my life; one of them said, you have been in the mud. I said I had. They said they had a room at a public-house just by, and asked me to go with them, and if I would give them something to drink, they would clean me. I went with them; they took me to a private house. It was quite dark. I went up a few stairs. There was no person in the room but myself, and the two women. When they got me in the room, they asked me to take my coat and waistcoat off. I took my handkerchief off my neck, and emptied my waistcoat pocket into my handkerchief of some halfpence, a knife or two, and a spectacle case; then I gave them the waistcoat to clean. I had nothing in my coat pocket, but a handkerchief. They wanted to have my small-clothes off. I was not willing. I pulled my shoes off. I then took my watch out, and put into my handkerchief; I then took out four one's, and a five pound bank note, and nineteen shillings in silver. I put that into my handkerchief; as soon as I had done that, they did not want my small-clothes, they wanted me to send for something to drink. I took out a eighteen-penny-piece to send for something to drink. Ghrimes went for something to drink. They drank, and I drank once. She brought some gin in a half pint pot, and a pot of beer. I drank once of the pot of beer; as soon as I had done that, I was knocked on the bed. I cannot say who struck me; Ghrimes had hold of my feet. They took my handkerchief away; and as they went away, they took the candle. I could not find my coat.

Q. Had you told them that you were lame - A. They could see that they could hardly get me along.

Q. Have you round any of your property since - A. Not a farthing of it. I remained in the room, I could neither find shoes, hat, or coat. I pulled the clothes off the bed, and covered myself as well as I could, and remained there till the morning, Ghrimes came to the top of the stairs. I knew her voice. She came in the dark; she was a good while at the door. She wanted me to let her in. She said, she could get my property again if I would go with her. The landlord came to me in the morning, and took me to his house. I was robbed on the Tuesday, on Thursday I saw Bowyer at Marlborough street.

Q. Did you know her again - A. Yes, I knew her to be one of the two women that robbed me. She was committed; the other, Ghrimes, was taken on Thursday night. I saw her at the watch-house on Thursday night. They never delivered up any of my property.

JOHN HAWKINS . I am the landlord of the house. I let it out in tenements.

Q. Did you see Lewin in the house - A. Yes. I believe it was between eight and nine o'clock on Wednesday morning, the 23d. I found him in the one pair of stairs front room.

Q. Had he a coat and waistcoat on - A. I am pretty sure he had at that time.

Q. Who occupied that room - A. Sarah Bowyer. She is a married woman, her husband is at sea; she was my tenant, and no other person. I know Ghrimes was an acquaintance of Bowyer's. Bowyer came to me in the evening at the King's Arms. I took her up on suspicion of having robbed John Lewin , and as soon as I gave charge of her. I went away to Lewin, he came the next morning.

Q. Where is this house of yours - A. At the back of Drury lane; the house that Lewin was robbed in, is in Charles-street, Drury lane .

JOHN BAXTER . I am watch-house keeper and constable of the parish. Bowyer was brought to the watch-house by Mr. Hawkins, and in her defence, she implicated Ghrimes. Ghrimes was brought to me the next night; and when Ghrimes was brought to the watch-house, I sent for Lewin. There were a number of people in the watch-house. As soon as Lewin came in, he went to Ghrimes, and accused her of being the other person. Lewin was perfectly certain of the persons of both of them.

Bowyer's Defence. About half after ten o'clock, me and a young woman were coming up Holborn, that good man fell in the mud; he was very much intoxicated. He told us, if we would go home with him, he would give us some money for us to wash him; he pulled off his coat, waistcoat, and breeches. He gave us money for drink. I brought gin three times, and changed different pieces of money; one in a room at a time, he said was enough, he gave me two shillings to go out. I went out, and did not return till the next day.

Hawkins. What she says is wrong, they had one half pint of gin, and a pot of beer, that is all. Lewin was perfectly sober the next morning, when I saw him.

Ghrimes' Defence. I saw him come in the wine-vaults. I was standing in the wine-vaults, he was very much intoxicated in liquor. I never saw any more of the gentleman until I saw him on Thursday night.

BOWER, GUILTY , DEATH , aged 39.

GHRIMES, GUILTY , DEATH , aged 30.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18121028-55

896. FRANCIS ANTONIA , BATESTA LOPEZ , and SARAH LOPEZ , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of October , a hat, value 10 s. 6 d. the property of Nathaniel Ruth , privately in his shop .

NATHANIEL RUTH . I am a hatter in Norton-Falgate . On the 6th of October in the evening, I returned home about nine o'clock. On my return, I found there had been some foreigners in the shop, two men and a woman, and that they had behaved in a comical kind of a way, by attempting to put the light out; that they had purchased a hat, and ordered another to be got ready again they came back. I had not been many minutes in the house, when they did return, and asked for the hat they had ordered to be got ready for them.

It was shewn them, and they made a murmuring that the lining was not put in well enough. Lopez put himself in a passion about it. I then told them to recollect that they had a man to deal with, and not two women to frighten, as they had done before; and then I missed Antonio out of the shop. I asked where he was; they said he had gone home. They paid me for the goods, and then went away, they had not been gone many minutes, when I missed a hat from out of a case that I had just opened. I went after them. I came up to the, men and the woman within an hundred yards of the house, and as an excuse to endeavour to see if they had got any more goods than they had purchased, I said if they did not like the hat, I would change it for them on the next day. I found they had no more than the two boxes which they had purchased, and just as I was going to leave them, Antonia came up, and said in broken English, I have got a hat; he came behind the woman to tell her. She put her hand back for him to get out of the way. I ran to him and secured him, and took the hat that he had stolen, from him, which hat I knew to be my property. I gave him in custody, and went after the other two, and took them to the watch house. This is the hat, it is worth 10 s. 6 d. It cost me eight shillings. I will swear it is mine, by the private mark.

Batesta Lopez's Defence. I and the woman are entirely innocent.

Antonia's Defence, I went into the Ship with these people. I took the hat and went out to make water. I said, here is the hat, I intended to buy it.

ANTONIA, GUILTY, aged 28.

BAPTESTA LOPEZ, GUILTY, aged 29.

Of stealing to the value of 4 s. 6 d. only,

Judgment respited ,

SARAH LOPEZ , NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121028-56

897. JOHN BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of October , four pounds weight of leather, value 10 s. the property of John Swift , privately, in his shop .

JOHN SWIFT . I am a shoemaker , No. 15, Crown-street, Finsbury-square . On the 20th of October, about half after one, I was stooping down at my shop-window; I heard some one go across my shop, I lifted up my head, and saw the prisoner; he ran out of my shop. I pursued him, and brought him back. This is the leather I took from him. It is mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I have it to your mercy. It was entirely through distress I did it.

GUILTY, aged 52,

of stealing, but not privately .

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121028-57

898. JAMES BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of October , 4 silver table-spoons, value 2 l. and a silver tea-spoon, value 2 s. the property of Hypoliti Joseph Da Costa .

JAMES IRWIN . I am servant to Mr. Da Costa; he is the editor of the Courier . He lives at No. 1, New Inn, in the parish of St. Clement's . The prisoner came several times under pretence of seeing my master; and the spoons were taken at different times.

THOMAS MARTIN . I produce a spoon pledged at my shop. I cannot say whether the prisoner is the man that pawned it or no.

MR. OAKLEY. I bought three spoons of the prisoner, at three different times.

WILLIAM HOMAN . I apprehended the prisoner, he confessed to me that he had stolen the spoons; he said he had pawned one. He went with me to Mr. Oakley's, where he had sold the other three.

Prisoner's Defence. I confess that I took them.

GUILTY , aged 29.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121028-58

899. MARTHA BAILEY and BRIDGET BAYS were indicted for feloniously making an assault in the king's highway, upon John Macklin , on the 2d of October , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, a watch, value 3 l. his property .

JOHN MACKLIN . I am a plaisterer I live in Short's Gardens, Drury-lane. On the 2d of October, about half past nine in the evening, I was coming home from my work coming down Dyot-street . I met the prisoner Bays on the foot pavement; she took hold on my arms, and Bailey came before me, and took the watch out of my pocket. I extricated myself from the woman that held my arms, and ran after the woman that took my watch she went into No 4 I followed her in, and the woman that keeps the house asked me where I was going. I told her that a woman had gone into that place that had robbed me of my watch. She told me there was no such thing. I left the house, and took the number of the door; there was a crowd, and some one asked me if I knew the woman, and they would make a search. I said, wanted to know the house, to get a proper officer to make a search.

Q. Did you know these women before - A. Yes, by eye-sight. I go by Dyot-street three times a day, sometimes to go to work. I am quite sure these are the two women.

Q. Did you ever find your watch - A. No. I went to Bow-street, and reported it to the officers. I watched for two or three days to see it I could see them. On Tuesday evening, I went into the Maidenhead public-house. I saw both the prisoners in the tap-room I went directly for an officer, and we took them in custody.

THOMAS MANTZ . On the 5th of October, Macklin came to the office; he gave information that two girls had robbed him of his watch on the 2 d. I went and took them in custody at the public-house in Dyot-street.

MICHAEL LEA . I was with Mantz. The prosecutor pointed out the prisoners, we took them in custody.

Bailey's Defence. I never saw the prosecutor before. I am innocent of the charge.

Bay's Defence. The same.

JOSHUA FEME . I am a patrol. I was sent for; the prosecutor said a woman had run into the house. I asked him if he knew the woman if I searched the

houses; he said, it was of no service to search the house, he should not know the woman; and when he gave up the search, I went about my business.

Q. How came these women to find you out - A. I know nothing of it, until the Tuesday following; and then I heard the two women were taken up.

Q. Did either of the women live there - A. I do not pretend to say whether they did, or did not. I have seen them many times in Dyot-street. The prosecutor was very drunk; he said she had run out of the back door, and there is no back door to the house.

Prosecutor. I was not drunk. I told him I did not know them, because I would get a proper officer, that would do me more justice than he would, and that is the reason.

BAILEY, GUILTY DEATH , aged 24.

BAYS, GUILTY DEATH , aged 25.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121028-59

900. MARY PRICE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 20th of October , 56 yards of sheeting, value 4 l. the property of John Thwaites , in his dwelling-house .

WILLIAM ROSE . I am shopman to Mr. Thwaites, linen-draper , Holborn . On the 20th of October, between eight and nine in the evening, I was called by Elizabeth Thwaites , and turned round to see what was the matter. I saw a woman go out with something in her arms. I immediately pursued her, and stopped her about two or three doors from our shop; she dropped the sheeting. I brought her back to the shop; some of our young men assisted me. The prisoner was carrying the sheeting in her arms before her. This is the sheeting, I can swear it is my master's property. It has his private mark upon it. It is of the value of 4 l. It is fifty-six yards of Russia sheeting. The house is in the parish of St. Andrew's, Holborn.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence, nor called any witnesses to her character.

GUILTY , DEATH , aged 27.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121028-60

901. ELEANOR MORGAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of September , a watch, value 50 s. and a gown, value 5 s. the property of Lawrence Notley , in the dwelling-house of James Whiffen .

LAWRENCE NOTLEY . I am a journeyman pawnbroker . I lost my watch on the 27th of September, from my apartment, No. 13, King-street, Westminster . John Whiffen keeps the house.

ELIZABETH NOTLEY . I am the wife of the last witness. On the 27th, I missed a black gown out of my drawer.

ANN BRAMLEY . I am sister to the prosecutrix. I was going of an errand for my brother, I heard a good deal of talk of Bartholomew fair. I went to the fair. I saw the prisoner; she asked me if I would go into a show; I said I did not care if I did. The prisoner fainted away in the show, and I came out to get her some water. The prisoner asked me to go home to tea with her. I did; and I asked her to come to tea with me; she did, and while I went down to put water in the pot, I suppose she stole these things.

WILLIAM SIMPSON . I am a pawnbroker. I produce a watch pawned by the prisoner, I believe.

WILLIAM SALMON . I am an officer. On the 28th of September, I went to the prisoner's lodgings. I told her what I had come about. I asked her what she had done with the watch, she said she had pawned it. She gave me the duplicate; the silk gown she took out of the drawer, and gave it to me. This is the gown.

Prosecutor. This is my watch.

Prosecutrix. That is my gown.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence, nor called any witnesses to her character.

GUILTY, aged 22,

Of stealing only .

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121028-61

902. WILLIAM GRIFFIN was indicted for feloniously making an assault in the King's highway, on the 9th of October , upon Sarah Cannon , widow , and taking from her person, an umbrella, value 4 s. her property .

SARAH CANNON . I am a widow. I wash and iron, or any thing that I can get to do. On the 9th of October, the prisoner met me in Oxford-street , about eleven o'clock at night. It rained very hard; and he offered to hold the umbrella up. I refused him, and he took the umbrella out of my hand, and ran away with it. I ran after him, and cried out, stop thief. He was stopped with the umbrella, in Stratford place.

Q. He committed no violence to you, did he - A. No. He was tipsy at the time, or else I believe he would not have done it.

FRANCIS STEELE . I am a constable. About twelve o'clock, I heard somebody cry out, stop thief. I saw the prisoner running, and Mrs. Cannon running after him. I turned up Stratford-place, and stopped him; he hit me once with the umbrella. I took the umbrella out of his hand. At the watch-house, the prisoner said he had been out of place three months. This is the umbrella.

Prosecutrix. That is my umbrella.

Prisoner's Defence. I asked Mrs. Cannon to let me carry the umbrella, she gave it me. We walked down Oxford-street together; she hollowed out stop thief. I did not mean to steal the umbrella.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121028-62

903. WILLIAM FINNEY was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Spear , about the hour of four in the afternoon, on the 4th of October , and stealing therein 3 lb. weight of cake, value 5 s. his property .

JOHN SPEAR . I am a gingerbread and biscuit-baker , Kingsland-road . On the 4th of October, at four in the afternoon, I was going to the back part of my house to set the sponge for the next day's bread. A young person, that is with me, and one of my family, came to me and said that three boys had stolen a cake. I pursued after them across the fields, towards Hackney. I saw the three boys together in a farm-yard, they

apparently were eating the cake, two of them turned and saw me coming; they dropped the cake, and away they ran; the prisoner was not quite so quick of hearing. I took him, and conveyed him to a place of confinement.

Mr. Knapp. And then from there he was committed to take his trial of a capital charge; what cake was it - A. A plumb cake.

Q. All boys are fond of plumb cake - A. They are not to have always what they like.

Q. Do you know there is a forty-pound reward - A. I want no reward; if I was a counsellor, or solicitor, I might answer you. This is the cake. I believe it is mine.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121028-63

904. WILLIAM ALLCOCK and GEORGE GILL were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of October , a shirt, value 1 l, two frocks, value 6 s. two shawls, value 4 s. two caps, value 4 s. a gown, value 6 s. a petticoat, value 4 s. a child's frock, value 2 s. a pinafore value 1 s. a pillow-case, value 1 s. a handkerchief, value 1 s. 6 d. a pair of stockings, value 1 s. the property of Margaret Irwin , widow .

WILLIAM GREEN . I am a constable. I only know, that I took the prisoners in custody at the Bunch of Grapes, Bridgewater-square.

ANN LYDIA . I live at the Bunch of Grapes, Bridgewater-square.

Q. Do you know the two prisoners - A. Yes, they use my house sometimes. The prisoner Gill asked me leave to hang a pair of stockings in the kitchen to dry them, I gave him leave.

Q. What day was this on - A. The day he was taken in custody, Thursday.

Q. Was the other prisoner with him at the time he made this request - A. No, he was not.

Q. Were they together in company when they were taken - A. I cannot say. I was not in the tap-room.

Q. I wish you to be cautious; this is the fourth person that has been taken out of your house. You have spoken of the prisoner Gill. Was not Allcock upon your oath, in company with Gill - A. I was not in the room. I was in the bar.

Q. Upon your oath, as you were in the bar, do not you know that both these persons were in your house together - A. Yes, they were.

Margaret Irwin, the prosecutrix was called, and not appearing in court, her recognisances were ordered to be estreated.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18121028-64

905. ANTONIO ALVER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 19th of October , a pair of shoes, value 6 s. the property of John Parvis .

JOHN PARVIS . I am a shoemaker , No. 192. Bishopsgate-street . On the 19th of October, three foreigners came into the shop. I was up stairs at the time. When I came down stairs from breakfast, I saw the prisoner and his companions in the shop, they were looking at shoes. I only saw two pair of shoes, my young man said there had been three pair, he could only see two. I then asked them if they had the other pair of shoes; they denied having them. My young man said, he was sure there were three pair, when he went into the back shop, and one of them must have taken a pair. I observed the prisoner have something under the left side of his jacket. I opened his jacket, and the shoes were in the inside pocket. One of the men had run out of the shop, then a second ran out, and the prisoner wanted immediately to follow his companion, saying, his companion had got his money.

JOSEPH THORNTON . I am an apprentice to Mr. Parvis. I saw the three men come in; I shewed them three pair of shoes. The prisoner was one of them. They asked to look at woman's shoes, and when I went backwards for the women's shoes, I saw the prisoner actually conceal these shoes. My master took them from him; they are my master's property.

Prisoner's Defence. The Portuguese put the shoes in my pocket, and then they ran away.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Fined 1 s. and to be Discharged at the end of the Sessions.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18121028-65

906. MARY STOREY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of July , eight window-curtains, value 8 l. and part of a set of window-curtains, value 4 l. the property of John Hallet Sherwood .

JOHN HALLET SHERWOOD . I am an upholsterer , No. 42, Bartholomew-close . I lost these things on the 14th of July, from the woman's work-room. The prisoner came into my employ on the 30th of June, and worked for me till the middle of October. On the 13th of October, I employed another woman, and in the press were found thirteen duplicates; Mary Cotterell found them and gave them to me. I have ten of the duplicates in my hand. Some of the goods I was obliged to take out to send home.

MARY COTTERELL . On the 13th of October, I come to work for Mr. Sheerwood. I looked over the things in the press, in the workshop. There were a quantity of chintz curtains missing, and in a box in the press, I found these duplicates of the curtains. I gave them to Mr. Sherwood. The duplicates bear the name of Mary Storey .

WILLIAM MOTT . I am a pawnbroker, servant to Mr. Harrison, Tottenham-court-road. I produce a remnant of cotton, pledged for 3 s. on the 13th of August. I do not know the prisoner.

WILLIAM ROBERTS . I am a pawnbroker, No. 3, Turnmill-street. The prisoner, I believe, pledged this cotton with me for 3 s. on the 24th of July.

JOHN LANGLEY. I am an officer. I found two duplicates upon the prisoner. I took the goods out.

Prosecutor. I used the goods and sent them home. All that is here in my property.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in great distress. I am a widow, left with three small children.

GUILTY, aged 41,

Of stealing to the value of 6 s.

Confined One Year in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18121028-66

907. SARAH PARRY, alias JACKSON , was indicted

for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of September , twelve pair of sandals, value 12 s. 6 d. and one pair of stockings, value 2 s. 6 d. the property of Benjamin Woodcock .

BENJAMIN WOODCOCK . I am a hosier , No. 117, in the Minories . On the 24th of September, between seven and eight in the evening, the prisoner came into the shop, and asked for a pair of socks, and while the man was showing the socks, another woman came in to inquire for black stockings, which she said she must have in great haste, and while he was turning his back, the prisoner was looking at the socks. I was coming out of the parlour into the shop. I went behind the counter. The woman that looked at the black stockings, she went out dissatisfied with the price. The prisoner brought a pair of socks, and paid 6 d. for them, and immediately went out. My young man said he had suspicion of the prisoner. I went out after the prisoner; she was alone. I asked her to step back; she stepped back with me. She had a basket with her. I looked in the basket, and in her basket I saw one dozen pair of sandals, and a pair of worsted stockings. I sent for an officer and had her searched. She said she did not know how they came in her basket. These are the sandals and stockings; they are mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I have six small children. My husband has left me a great while, and has taken up with another woman. I had been to Rag-fair; I had about eight shillings in my pocket. I purchased an old coat, two pair of stockings, and several articles, which cost me fourteen pence, for my children; it was not in my power to buy any thing new. My eldest child is but six years old. My little boy had the measles; I bought him a pair of socks, which cost me sixpence. I came out of the gentleman's shop; he brought me back. He said I had got something; I said I had nothing. I knew I had nothing to my own conscience. He turned several things out of the basket. He took up two parcels in his hand; he said they were not my own; he said, send for a constable.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave her a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18121028-67

908. BENJAMIN CHILD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of September , a pocketbook, value 7 s. a stamp, value 1 l. 10 s. and a bit of parchment, value 1 d. the property of Edward Evans , from his person .

EDWARD EVANS . I live at No. 8, King's Arms yard. On the 23d of September, I was in Friday-street , in my way home. There were four persons came against me, and broke the hold of the person that had got hold of my arm. The prisoner got hold of my coat, and the other persons hustled me. I catched the prisoner directly; he took my pocket-book, the other three ran away.

Q. Did you ever find your pocket-book again - A. Yes, by advertisement. The prisoner is the very person that took my pocket-book, and when I had got the prisoner, the pocket-book was handed from one to the other. About four days after I got it again.

Q. At the time that it was in your pocket, what was in your pocket-book - A. A press-warrant and a thirty shilling stamp, and there was on the stamp, a receipt for the burying of my wife. My pocket-book cost me seven shillings, and when my pocket-book was returned, there was the same in it as when I lost it. I am sure it was the same pocket book. The person that brought me the pocket-book, said he was a porter in Gutter-lane. I took the prisoner within five yards where I was robbed. I was robbed at the top of Friday-street, Cheapside, and the prisoner went with me to the constable, and from there to the Compter. I found nothing on him.

Mr. Alley. After you had confined him, you called upon him - A. I did. I went there to see if he had the pocket-book. He told me, if I would not appear against him, he would get the pocket-book for me.

Q. What brought you to prison to him - A. To see how he got on, to be sure. He took the pocket-book out of my pocket, and then they hustled it from one to the other.

MARGRAET EVANS . I live at No. 16, New Milman-street. I am in service there. I had been to Mr. Evans's house, and Mr. Evans was coming to see me home. It was near the top of Friday-street. I had hold of his arm, at the time four men came and hustled us. The young man, which Mr. Evans took up that night, parted his arm and mine.

Q. Did you see whether he did any thing or not - A. I was very much terrified, and I got as much out of the way as I could. I turned back, and Mr. Evans had just caught him, when I got sight of him again.

Q. You did not see him do any thing, did you - A. No more than having hold of Mr. Evans's coat. They came upon me quite unexpectedly. I am sure the person that he laid hold of, is the person that had hold of Mr. Evans's coat.

JOSHUA BRAY . I am a constable. I saw no part of this transaction. The prisoner was delivered to me in the Compter passage.

Q. Did you know his person before - A. Yes. I received him on the charge of Mr. Evans.

Prisoner's Defence. I was searched, and nothing found on me.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Transported for Life .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18121028-68

909. EDWARD EDWARDS was indicted for feloniously assaulting, in the King's highway, John Lackey , on the 18th of August , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, a bag, value 2 d. and fifty-four guineas, his property .

WILLIAM CROSTICK . I am a constable of St. Bride's. The prisoner was brought into the watch-house by two patroles; Mr. Lackey accompanied them. He charged him with having taken from his person, fifty-four guineas and a canvas bag. He was in a good deal of confusion by the rough usage he had received. This was about 12 o'clock at night. We searched the prisoner; he had nothing about him but a few shillings. The prisoner denied the charge very strongly.

JOHN BAXTER . I am a patrol of St. Bride's. On the 18th of August, me and my brother patrol were

stationed at the corner of Fleet-market, to see if we could take improper persons. We heard the cry of, a robber, stop him. We went up to the place where the sound appeared to come from. We saw Mr. Lackey having hold of the prisoner by the collar. I said to him, what is the matter. He said, this man has robbed me of a deal of money. Me and my brother patrol caught hold of him directly. The prosecutor was an elderly man; he did not like to let him go. I showed him my cutlass; he then let him go. We had a great deal of trouble in taking him to the watch-house. There were a vast many thieves about at that time. The mob hustled me and my brother patrol a good deal, and the prisoner himself, fought with us, and tried to get from us. I went out of the watch-house and brought the prosecutor in; he had lost his hat. As we were going along Cheapside, to the Compter, the mob swore they would have a rescue; they cried out, a rescue. We drew our cutlasses, and said, the first that offered to come nigh us, we would cut them down, and I had like to have the prisoner rescued, as he was coming from Guildhall, after he was committed. I and the constable were desired to take him to prison. Me and Crostick, soon after, went to take him to the Compter. After we had left Guildhall door, I got fast hold of him on one side, and the constable on the other, he slipped his arm from the constable, and said, d - n my eyes, if I go any further with you, if you do not let me go. He pulled me into a public house, the gang hustled me into the parlour, his father was there. I said, Mr. Edwards, if you use me ill, you shall suffer for it. A man said, it is my son, he shall not go any further, if you hold him so. The father sent for a coach, and then he went quietly with me to the Compter.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18121028-69

910. EDWARD SYLVESTER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of October , five promissory notes, value 10 l. each, and nineteen promissory notes, value 5 l. each , the property of Thomas Hudson , Robert Harvey , jun. and Anthony Hudson .

SECOND COUNT, for stealing the same promissory notes, the property of different persons.

The prosecutor and witnesses were called, and not appearing in court, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18121028-70

911. JOHN HINDE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 24th of October , seven pound weight of tobacco, value 15 s. the property of our Lord the King .

SECOND COUNT, the property of the London Dock Company , and

THIRD COUNT, the property of persons, to the Jurors unknown.

WILLIAM FOLDER . I am an officer of the London Dock Company. On the 24th of October, I was stationed in one of the tobacco warehouses, within the London Docks , between one and two o'clock in the day. I observed the prisoner going down the warehouse. He was looking at the tobacco, with a memorandum-book in his hand; and, in consequence of my suspicion, I directed the gate-keeper to stop him, and seven pound of tobacco was found on him. This is the tobacco. It is in the care of the revenue officers, of the London Dock Company. It is worth 15 s.

Prisoner's Defence. I got that tobacco from the mate of a ship. He took it out of his chest, and gave it me in lieu of money.

GUILTY , aged 59.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18121028-71

912. JOHN HOPLEY was indicted, for that he, on the 14th of October , one piece of false and counterfeit money, made to the likeness of a good halfpenny, unlawfully did make, coin, and counterfeit .

JOHN LIMBRICK . I am an officer. On the 14th of October, I went to No. 30, Great Peter-street, Westminster . It was between six and seven in the evening, a person of the name of Conger was with me. There is a corkshop at the lower part of the house. We got a light, and proceeded up into the front garret, which is two pair of stairs high. The door was fastened; we burst it open. We found the prisoner standing at the bench, and this mould was upon the bench, and another mould ready to put the copper in. He was dressed in this soldiers jacket, a leather apron on, and a cap.

Q. What were the moulds for - A. To make halfpence, these are the halfpence made of them; these moulds are for good halfpence. There was a furnace red hot. I found some copper, and this bag of halfpence, and this crucible was in the furnace, red hot. I asked him what he thought when we broke in. He said, I am never easy in my mind, when I am making them. This is the mallet to beat the earth in the mould, and these are the screws that keeps the moulds together. Every thing we found there to complete the business.

CALEB EDWARD POWELL . Q. You assist the solicitor of the mint - A Yes.

Q. You are acquainted with this sort of article, are they counterfeit, or are they genuine - A. They are counterfeit. I have seen all the things that are produced; they are complete, and necessary for coining.

Prisoner's Defence. I was employed by a man to make them.

GUILTY , aged 52.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121028-72

913. JOHN ROBINSON was indicted for burglariously breaking, and entering the dwelling house of Matthew John Burr , about the hour of twelve, on the night of the 2d of October , and stealing therein a copper, value 1 l. affixed to his dwelling house, and a sheet, value 5 s. and two table cloths, value 10 s. his property .

MATTHEW JOHN BURR . I am a heraldry chaser . I live at No. 14, Camden Town . I keep the house. I did not know of the robbery until 7 o'clock. Mary Cotterel , my house-keeper, was up first.

MARY COTTERELL . I am house-keeper to Mr.

Burr. I went to bed at 10 o'clock. I was the last person up. I made the house all fast, and in the morning I got up at 6 o'clock, it was light. I opened the yard door, and I found the wash-house door open. I left it shut. The wash-house is in the yard; it is an inclosed yard, and when I went in I found the copper down, and taken away, I looked at the line; there was a sheet gone, and two table-cloths. They were all carried away.

Q. How did they get in - A. They got over two walls. The wash-house was not locked; I am sure it was shut.

Q. Was any other part of the house broken open - A. No; the wash house door was not broken, - only opened.

JOHN COUZENS . I am a labouring man. On the morning of the third of October, I was mowing for Mr. Francis, near Kentish Town Road. I heard the sound of chopping; I went to see what it was. I saw the prisoner chopping a copper; I saw one copper lay chopped up, and he was chopping the other. It might be about a quarter to seven. I looked round; I saw some linen lay in the ditch. I asked him, if that was his property; he said, yes. I told him he must go along with me. He dropped his axe, and run away from the property. I pursued him, and took him. He begged and prayed me to let him go. He said he had a wife and family. I secured him and the property.

WILLIAM READ. I produce the property. There was another copper stolen from the next door; the man will not come forward.

Prosecutor. I believe that to be my copper, and my linen.

GUILTY, aged 21,

Of stealing, but not of breaking and entering the dwelling house .

Confined Two Years in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121028-73

914. ESTHER TODD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of October , a watch, value 5 l. the property of John Dempster , Timothy Leach , and John Latham , in the dwelling house of Elizabeth Potticary ; and other COUNTS for the same offence, only varying the manner of charging them.

ROBERT BENNET DARNLEY . I live in the Harrow-road , with my mother, at present, in Paddington parish.

Q. Who keeps the house - A. Elizabeth Potticary , widow. The prisoner was a lodger in the house. The watch was hanging over the mantle-piece, in my mother's room, at half past eight o'clock on the 23d. My mother died on the evening before, at half past eight o'clock, on the 22d. On the 23d, I went to Pimlico, and from there I went into the city, and when I went up stairs, on my return home, the nurse told me the watch was gone from off the mantle piece.

Q. Who is Dempster, Latham, and Timothy Leach - A. Executor s, and Edmund Bennet Darnley is my son. My mother left the watch to him.

SARAH HUNT . I lived with the lady sixteen years ago, and when she was taken ill, she sent for me to come and take care of her and her property. She died on the 22d of October. I asked the prisoner to help me in laying the body out. About one o'clock at night I called her, and she helped me in laying her out. I gave her half-a-crown, and discharged her. Between three and four in the afternoon, she came to me very tipsy; that was the next day. I asked her what she wanted; she said, would I give her a pot of water for her tea. I looked at the watch, and said, I would give her a pot of water, when I had done tea. She then went to the fire place and took the watch.

Q. You did not see her take it, did you - A. No. I did not miss it until she went down stairs. The undertaker came, and I did not see any more of it until the undertaker was gone. As soon as the undertaker came, she ran out of the street-door. I then called out to Mr. Darnley, and said, Oh! Mr. Darnley, that wretch has taken your mother's watch. Mr. Darnley is the lady's own son. We pursued her, but could not find her.

FRANCIS WILKINSON . The prisoner came, on Friday night, the 23d, about half past four. She said she had been laying a woman out, and she had got a watch to pledge for her son, in the name of Thomas Smith , and if I would pledge it for her, she would give me a few half pence. The same watch I took to the pawnbrokers for her.

THOMAS NEATE . I am a pawnbroker. I live in Bird-street, Manchester-square. This is the watch, the last witness pledged with me, on the 23d. I lent her 2 l. upon it.

SAMUEL MILES . I am a constable. On the 23d of October, Mr. Darnley came to me. He said the prisoner had robbed him of his mother's watch. I know the prisoner; she was tried here last April sessions. I took her in custody.

Q. to Prosecutor. Now look at the watch - A. I am sure it is mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing at all about the watch.

GUILTY , DEATH , aged 33.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121028-74

915. JOHN MARRIOTT and CHARLES REEVES were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Richard George Ward , about the hour of 11 in the forenoon of the 18th of October , and stealing therein a drawer, value 1 s. a poker, value 1 s. and an accompt-book, value 6 d. his property .

RICHARD GEORGE WARD . I am a butcher . I live in Great Chapel-street, Soho . On the 18th of October, previous to my wife and self going to church, I gave orders to my man, William Knott , not to open the door to serve any body with meat, and while I was at church, I was fetched home. I then found the prisoner, Marriott, in my shop. I went into the parlour; I saw the poker lay across the chairs, and the brass handle of the till drawer was pulled off, and laid on the top; they had attempted to force the drawer open. I went out to church between nine and ten; I was sent for before twelve.

WILLIAM KNOTT . I am journeyman butcher to Mr. Ward. On the 18th of October, I was left at home to take care of my master's house. About eleven o'clock I was down in the kitchen cleaning myself. I heard some person rap at the door twice. I did not

answer the door; I looked through the area window. I saw John Marriott standing at the door; he stood at the door a few minutes, and then passed up Chapel-street. About ten minutes after that, I heard somebody come into the house. I heard the door open by a key. I went up stairs into the shop; I found the street door open. I saw the drawer open; it was not taken out; they had drawed it as far as they could. The book was taken out of the accompting house, and laid on the block. I directly opened the street-door. I saw two-men run out of the parlour into the street. I directly ran after them, and John Marriott was taken. Reeves made his escape. They had removed the poker from the parlour fire-place, and laid it acros two chairs, just at the entrance of of the parlour door. I had seen all the things safe in their places, about a quarter of an hour before.

WILLIAM BADCOCK . On the 18th of October, I was in Dean-street. I heard the cry of, stop thief; I saw three men running; I followed John Marriott ; he attempted to strike me. I collared him, and took him back to Mr. Ward's house.

JAMES SNOW . I searched Marriott. I found four skeleton keys in his pocket. A stranger picked up two large keys that were thrown in the street; one of them opens the street door.

WILLIAM LOCKLEY . I am a white-smith. On the 18th of October, I was coming down Dean-street. I heard the cry of, stop thief. I saw three men running; Reeves crossed Dean-street, and ran down Crane court. Marriott was stopped by Badcock. I saw Reeves afterwards at Marlborough-street. I am sure he is the man.

Marriott said nothing in his defence; called three witnesses who gave him a good character.

Reeve's Defence. I was not running.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121028-75

916. JOHN MARRIOTT was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Richard George Ward , about the hour of eleven in the forenoon, on the 18th of October , William Knott then being in the house, and stealing therein an acccompt-book, value 6 d. two brass handles, value 3 d.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121028-76

917. ANN PATTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of October , in the dwelling house of Bridget Clarke , a sheet, value 5 s. thirteen shillings and sixpence, in monies numbered, and three one pound notes, the property of Bridget Clarke .

BRIDGET CLARKE . I am a widow woman. I live in John's-court, George's-square . Mrs. Patton was a lodger of mine; she had a child. She said she was a married woman. I don't know how she got her bread. I lost the things on the 20th of last month; I lost 3 l. 13 s. 6 d. that I had for my landlord. It was stolen out of my drawer.

Q. Why do you accuse the prisoner with taking of it - A. Because there was nobody but she and I in the house, and when I went out I left the prisoner in possession of the house.

Q. Did you ever find your notes - A. No. I lost a sheet, that is at the pawnbroker's.

JAMES BIRDWELL . This sheet was pledged with me on the 17th, for 5 s. I don't know who pledged it.

WILLIAM PETHERICK . I am an officer. I found the duplicate of the sheet in the prisoner's shoes, and 4 s. 6 d.

Prosecutrix. That is my sheet.

Prisoner's Defence. Mrs. Clarke had a young girl in the house, and a woman from the parish. I neither took the sheet or pledged it. I know myself innocent. My poverty will not permit me to have assistance of counsel. I hope your Lordship will see justice done by me. No one can say I ever did a wrong or immodest act.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave her a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121028-77

918. MARY LEWIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of September , a shift, value 3 s. and a petticoat, value 5 s. the property of Patrick Crane .

MARY CRANE . I am the wife of Patrick Crane. I live at No. 67, King-street, Golden-square . On Friday morning, the 25th of September, my landlady asked me, if I had taken my petticoat off the line, in the yard. I said, no. She said, a woman had gone out of the yard with it. I pursued the woman; she was stopped.

ELIZABETH WILD . I saw the prisoner go out with a bundle, and then I missed Mrs. Crane's things off the line.

MARY YOUNG . On the 25th of September at ten o'clock in the morning, the prisoner brought me these things to mangle.

Prosecutrix. This is my petticoat, and my shift.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not take these things.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Confined Fourteen Days in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121028-78

919. WILLIAM SHERIFF was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 24th of September , a sheet, value 3 s. two cups, value 2 d. and two saucers, value 2 d. the property of William Ralph .

WILLIAM RALPH . I am a boot-maker . I live in Charles-street, Drury-lane . I keep a lodging house. A young woman in my house brought the prisoner home with her, and during the time the young woman went out, he stripped the bed of a sheet, and tied it round his middle; my little girl stopped him as was going out of the house, and told him he had a sheet with him. He said he had not. I ran after him, and stopped him, he threw the sheet in my face, he said there is your sheet, you old b - r.

MARY RALPH . I am the daughter of the prosecutor. I saw the prisoner going out, I said you have got a sheet, sir. I laid down my work, and pulled a piece of the sheet from his coat; he knocked me down, and ran away.

Prisoner's Defence. My Lord, and Gentlemen of the Jury, I am unfortunately blind. On the 24th of September, I had some business to transact at the west

end of the town, and in the course of the day, I took a little more liquor than did me good. A lad told me he would conduct me home, instead of that, it turned out to he a house of ill same. Shortly after I was there, he hurried me out of the house; and as soon as he saw somebody coming after us, he ran away, he put the sheet into my pocket. I was taken and committed. I have fought the battles of my country. I was wounded at Egypt.

GUILTY , aged 34.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121028-79

920. PATRICK ST. LEDGER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of October , one piece of canvas, containing 43 yards, value 4 l. the property of William Neale , and WILLIAM BRICE , for feloniously receiving on the same day the same goods, he knowing them to have been stolen

JOSEPH MADDICK . I am a labourer in the service of Mr. Neale, the prisoner, Patrick St. Ledger was a labourer too. He was at work on the 8th of October, in Mr. Neale's warehouse in Goodman's-yard, in the Minories .

Q. Had you any canvas in the warehouse belonging to Mr. Neale - A. Yes.

Q. About seven o'clock in the evening, was the prisoner there - A. No. About ten minutes before seven I went up in the middle of the warehouse to fasten the windows, the canvas was in the middle of the warehouse. When I came down stairs, I called for the prisoner. I could not find him. I found he was gone. I did not see him until I saw him at the Police office. After the prisoner went away, I missed two or three bolts of canvas, and afterwards I saw some canvas produced at the Police office that I knew.

WILLIAM NEALE . I am an hemp and flax merchant . Mr. Nevill, of East Coker, in Somersetshire, deals with me for hemp, and he has sent me up lately, two parcels of canvas.

Q. On the 8th of October, had you any canvas in your warehouse - A. We missed some canvas after the 9th of October, three pieces.

Q. Had they any mark - A. Yes, they were stamped John Nevill , East Coker, that is in Somersetshire. The three missing pieces were numbered 5, and the number of yards besides; each bolt runs 43 yards and a half, or 43 yards. I saw two of them at the police office, and one bolt had the maker's name upon it; the other bolt had the maker's name cut off. The maker's name was compleat on one, and cut off the other.

JOSEPH HARDING . I am one of the Thames police surveyors.

Q. Where did you see the prisoner St. Ledger - A. In East Smithfield, going into Brice's house in East Smithfield . He had something with him covered over with a great coat. I asked him what he had got there, he said I might see. He knocked at the door, a woman opened it; which I have since found to be the housekeeper of Brice. I took St. Ledger into the back parlour, examined the coat, and found it contained a bolt of canvas.

Q. What mark was upon it - A. I. Nevill, East Coker, No. 5, 45. I enquired of St. Ledger where he got it. He told me, that he was to take it to East Smithfield, and there to wait until the man came; he did not know who the man was, that gave it him to carry.

Q. Was there any body in that room - A. Yes. I found since, her name is Jane Richardson . She said, she knew nothing about it. I looked round the room, and in a cupboard in the same room, I saw a bolt of canvas corresponding with that I saw on St. Ledger; the mark was cut out, the mark that remained on it was 5, 42 yards. I enquired who Richardson was, she said she was a servant; she knew nothing at all of Brice's transactions, it did not concern her, I took the canvas and St. Ledger in custody. I found Brice at the office. I told him that I had stopped a man in his house with the canvas, and that I had likewise taken a bolt of canvas out of the cupboard; and I found ten new sacks laying about the room. I told him I had seized the sacks and the canvas; he said, he could give me an account of them. He never did. I kept him custody till the next day; then he went before the magistrate.

GEORGE WEBSTER . I am an officer. I was with the last witness at Brice's.

Q. Did you find that bolt of canvas in the cupboard - A. I did.

Q. What is Brice - A. He sells candles, starch, blue and soap, and such like as that.

Q. Did you find any canvas to be sold in the shop - A. No, I found a bolt of canvas in the cupboard. Brice said, the bolt of canvas he could clear that. It was in the house the last time it was searched; when we pointed out the bolt of canvas that St. Ledger had he said no more. When we asked him how many sacks he had, he said there were six. I was in company with Mr. Harding, when he seized the prisoner in the passage.

JANE RICHARDSON . I live servant with Mr. Brice. I have lived with him near a twelvemonth.

Q. Do you know the prisoner St. Ledger - A. No, I never knew any thing of his coming to the house.

Q. Do you remember his coming in - A. I saw a man like him in the court-yard; he was without a nose, and if I was to take an oath, I could not swear whether he was the man or not. I pointed out the man to Mr. Neale's labourer.

Q. Did any other man bring a bolt of canvas, that the officer, Harding, seized - A. No, only one person; the two officers and the man come in altogether.

Q. What did that person bring in with firm - A. A bolt of canvas.

Q. When the officers came in did they find a bolt of canvas in the cupboard - A. Yes, they did; that was brought the night before, and put down on the floor, and it was in the cupboard the next night, when the officers came.

Q. And that was brought by the man the night before - A. Yes, it was; Mr. Brice was not at home when that was brought. I told him of it; he said, he would have nothing to do with it, if the man came again to let him take it away. The man called again the next morning before Mr. Brice was up. I told him what Mr. Brice told me to tell him, that he would have nothing to do with it to take it away, this he said he

wanted to see Mr. Brice. I went up myself and told Mr. Brice that the man had called that came with the canvas the night before. Mr. Brice said he should be down by and by; but he would have nothing to do with it. The man went away. He called again at night. The man went away in the morning, and I never saw him until he was brought by the officers.

Q. Then it was the same man - A. I take it to be the same man.

Q. It was the same man that Harding took to the office - A. Yes.

Harding. These are the bolts of canvas.

Q. to Mr. Neale. The outside fold has been cut off - A. Yes, but at the corner there is the remaining I. N. of the maker's name.

COURT. This has been cut off and 5 put on again and forty-two yards and a half, instead of 43; this is the part that has been cut - A. I have no doubt. It is my property. Mr. Nevill never sent any to London, before he sent me these, and the cloth answers in quality. The number 5 denotes the quality.

Q. From the quality, and the mark inside, and one end being cut off, are you able, from mere observation, to say you believe it to be your property - A. I have no doubt but it is.

Q. to Jane Richardson . Have you any doubt that St. Ledger brought it - A. I could not positively swear that he was the man.

Q. Did you never swear that he was the man - A. No.

Court. I will read what you said,

="I am sure that Brice on the evening the prisoner, St. Ledger, brought the bolt of canvas found in the cupboard, Brice was not at home. St. Ledger said, Brice knows of it, he put it down in the parlour.=" Why here you had no doubt of the man - A. I cannot have any doubt of the man.

St. Ledger's Defence. My Lord, and Gentlemen of the Jury. On the night of the 7th of October, I was going home from my work, I was accosted by a man in the street, he asked me to carry a parcel to No. 64, in East Smithfield. I agreed to take it there for a shilling. On the night following I met the same man and carried a parcel to the same place. As I was going into the passage, I was met by an officer. I am 44 years of age. I have served my King and country, in Spain and Holland; and have done my duty as a soldier, and for my universal good conduct I was recommended to the Board of Ordnance, and they have been pleased to grant me a shilling a day.

Q. to Mr. Neale. How many bolts of canvas did you miss - A. Three.

Brice's Defence. I declare myself innocent of the charge. I was not at home when the goods were brought, and when I was informed of it, I immediately told Mrs. Richardson, to tell the person when he called to take them away. I never saw the man or goods in my place.

ST. LEDGER, GUILTY , aged 44.

Transported for Seven Years .

BRICE, GUILTY , aged 51.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121028-80

921. JANE BARNES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 31st of August , a pelisse, value 7 s. and a handkerchief, value 6 d. the property of Edward Howard .

EDWARD HOWARD . I am a taylor . I live in Bath-street, City-road . The prisoner came to my house, and asked for a pelisse for her mistress; and if I would send a person with her, and she would either return the money or the pelisse. I sent my eldest son with her with the pelisse.

JAMES HOWARD . The prisoner came in and asked my father for a pelisse for her mistress to look at, and my father sent me with it; she called at No 8, Howard-place. City-road, knocked at the door, a little girl answered it; then she came to me, and asked me to give her the bundle, and told me to come in an hour afterwards. I went in an hour afterwards, and there was no such a person lived there. I never saw her again until the day she was taken up. I am positive she is the person.

JAMES GERRY . I am an officer. On the 30th of January, I took the prisoner into custody. As we were going along, she said Mr. Gerry, let me send to my friends, that I may pay them so much a week. The robbery was done in 1811.

Prisoner's Defence. I would wish them to be positive to my person.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121028-81

922. MARGARET KIRK and ELEANOR BRIEN were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of September , a watch, value 2 l. a handkerchief, value 3 d. a pocket-book, value 6 d. a 2 l. bank note, and 14 one pound bank notes, the property of Frederick Burkart , from his person .

FREDERICK BARKART . I am a Prussian. On the 24th of September, I was going to see one of my shipmate s, who lived at Shadwell. When I came back again, the two prisoners came round me, they asked me to go with them into a public-house. I went with them both, one had hold of one of my arms; the other prisoner the other arm. I was in the public-house with them half an hour, and when we came out it was dark, about half past six, and when I had walked a little way I missed my pocket-book and my watch. I know I had my pocket-book in my pocket at the public-house; my watch was in a handkerchief. I laid it on the table at the public-house. When I missed my property. I sang out, I was robbed, and then they ran away. I am sure they are the women, one was of one side of me, and the other on the other side. I lost my pocket-book in the street; my watch, I cannot say, I might have left that in the public house; the pocket-book I never had out of my pocket. I was not quite sober.

JOHN JENKINS . On the 24th of September, I was coming home from my work, between seven and eight o'clock. On my going into New Gravel-lane. I heard him say he was robbed. I asked Parka if he should know them if he was to see them. He said, yes. The old woman took snuff, and her daughter was with her. I took the man to Shadwell office. I went with the prosecutor, and Mr Brown the officer, and shewed them the house where the prisoners lived.

THOMAS BROWN . I am an officer on the 24th of

September, I was applied to by the prosecutor, and the last witness saying, that Mrs. Brien and her daughter had robbed him. I went and found the mother; searched her, and found nothing upon her, and I went and apprehended Kirk. I told her I had come for the man's watch. She said, she could say nothing about it until she saw her mother. I told her I must have the notes, pocket-book, and watch. She went and took the pocket-book, notes, and watch; they were wrapped up altogether. I found fourteen 1 l. notes, and a 2 l. note. She said, she found it under the table, in the public-house, wrapped up as it was.

Prosecutor. They are my notes, my pocket-book, and my watch. I never tied up my pocket-book in my handkerchief, it was in my trowsers-pocket.

Kirk's Defence. Eleanor Brien knows nothing of my picking it up.

Brien's Defence. I know nothing of it; the man has only swore to me out of spite.

BRIEN, GUILTY , aged 78.

KIRK, GUILTY , aged 27.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121028-82

923. GEORGE BARBER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of September , a handkerchief value 5 s. the property of Edward Mackdowall , from his person .

EDWARD MACKDOWALL . I live with my father, a linen-draper , in Sun-street. On the 30th of September, about 12 o'clock at noon, I was in the Park. I had my pocket picked; I did not know of it till Humphreys told me.

CHARLES HUMPHREYS . I am an officer of Bow-street. On the 30th of last month, I was in the Park , looking out for pick-pockets. I saw the prisoner sounding a gentlemen's pockets. I saw the prisoner shift about. I asked the gentleman if he had been robbed. I went to the prisoner, and took this handkerchief out of his breeches, and another in his hat. The gentleman said it was his handkerchief.

Prosecutor. This is my handkerchief.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence; called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY, aged 17.

Judgment respited .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121028-83

924. JOHN REPATH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of September , a pair of sheets, value 1 l. 10 s. the property of Thomas Whitehead , in a lodging room .

The prosecutor was called and not appearing in court , the prisoner was

ACQUITTED.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121028-84

925. ELIZABETH GADSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of September , a watch, value 3 l. two seals, value 2 l. a gold chain, value 2 l. and two watch keys, value, 10 s. the property of James Thomas , from his person .

JAMES THOMAS . I am a servant , out of place. I live in Sloane-street, Chelsea. I lost my watch in Park-lane , on the 22d of September. About two o'clock in the morning I was going home, down Seymour-steps. As I was going down Park-lane, I looked round and saw two people talking by the watch-box, and at the end of the street the prisoner came after me, and walked a little way with me. We stopped at a coach-house, and at the moment we stopped, she unbuttoned my waistcoat, and then my small-clothes. She snatched the watch from me, and went to her companion; she gave the watch to her, and as soon as I could, I catched the prisoner. I never lost sight of her.

JOSEPH PETTY . I am a watchman. I took the prisoner to the watch-house; the prisoner was searched when I was in my box. There were two women with the prosecutor; when he called me there was only one, but when he passed me, there were two.

- BALL. I am a constable. I searched the woman; I found nothing upon her. The prosecutor told me that he had lost his watch; he was possitive that this woman took it, and gave it to a woman in a black pellise. I took her before the magistrate the next morning. Going to Tothill-fields prison, the prisoner told me to go to a waiter.

Q. Did you find the woman in the pelisse - A. I did; I took her before a magistrate. I had a search-warrant, and searched the waiter's apartment, and I had him before the magistrate. He was discharged; there was nothing found about him.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence, nor called any witnesses to her character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121028-85

926. WILLIAM JANNINGS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 5th of September , a basket, value 6 d. and five dozen of pears, value 4 s. and six pound weight of filberts, value 5 s. the property of William Davis .

WILLIAM DAVIS . I am a green-grocer and fruiterer , Mount-street, Grosvenor-square. These pears and filberts were taken from me at Covent-garden .

WILLIAM ALLEN . I saw the prisoner take the pears and filberts from Mr. Davis's stand in Covent-garden. I stopped him, and asked him who they belonged to. He said, Mr. Davy, and by his saying that, I let him go. He had not been gone above three or four minutes, before there was a hue and cry, that the pears and filberts were lost, and that day three weeks, I saw the prisoner again under the plazza's; he was taken in custody.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of it.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 68.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121028-86

927. DANIEL REORDEN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of October , a pair of half-boots, value 3 s. the property of John Gibbons .

JOHN GIBBONS . I am a cordwainer , No. 71, Brick-lane, Spitalfields . I lost the half-boots on the 8th of October, from off a line outside of the shop.

JOHN PULLEN. I saw the prisoner lurking about. He took down the half boots from off a line outside of the shop. I went after him, and brought him back These are the half boots.

Prosecutor. They are mine.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY, aged 16.

Judgment respited .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121028-87

928. HENRY CHAPMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 6th of October , two hats, value 18 s. a loaf of bread, value 1 s. 6 d. and a window curtain, value 3 d. the property of Thomas Hobbs .

MARY HOBBS . My husband's name is Thomas Hobbs . I live in Wellington-square, Pancras ; I lost these things on the 6th of October. They were taken out of my parlour.

Q. How did the prisoner get in the parlour - A. The door was left open.

MRS. NATLEY. I met the prisoner in Wellington-square. I laid hold of his coat; he dropped the bundle, I saw what was in it. I picked it up. It is my curtain; it was in Mrs. Hobbs' house. The bundle contained two beaver hats and a curtain.

MRS. HOBBS. The beaver hats are my husband's.

JAMES BAKER . I am a constable. I searched the prisoner. I found on him a three shilling bank token, and eight-pence three farthings, and this key.

Prisoner's Defence. The lady asked me for the things. I gave them into her hands.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121028-88

929. CAROLINE MARSHALL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of October , two gowns, value 12 s. a petticoat, value 1 s. two pair of stockings, value 4 s. two caps, value 2 s. a shift, value 2 s. a hat, value 7 s. a bonnet, value 6 s. a habit shirt, value 2 s. and one half shawl, value 2 s. the property of Sarah Layton .

SARAH LAYTON . I live at No. 4, Carnaby-market . I am a single woman . I go out to work for two fatherless children. I left them in the room with the prisoner. The prisoner was with me three days. I went down to Turnham Green, and when I came home my things were all taken out of the box.

JOHN RYDER . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner. This half handkerchief, the prisoner had pledged at the wine vaults for some liquor. I took this apron off the prisoner.

Prosecutrix. This is my apron and handkerchief, and the prisoner had my petticoat on.

Prisoner's Defence. I have the petticoat on now, that she charges me with robbing her.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121028-89

930. LYDIA NUNNALY , and ANN HASLAM were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 24th of September , 10 handkerchiefs, value 8 s. the property of Jeremiah Beech .

JEREMIAH BEECH . I am linen-draper , No. 10, Grafton-street , on the 24th of September, I lost a number of handkerchiefs from outside of the door.

SOPHIA HIGGS . I stood at the corner of Grafton-street, and while a person was talking to me, Nunnaly took the handkerchiefs. I cried out; Nunnaly said, what is it to you? hold your tongue, damn your carcase. I knew both the prisoners for a number of years, they were both together.

NUNNALY, GUILTY , aged 21.

HASLAM, GUILTY , aged 24.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121028-90

931. ELIZABETH THOMPSON , and ELIZABETH SPENCER were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of September , a one pound bank note , the property of Mary Yates , widow .

ANN YATES . I am the daughter of Mary Yates . She is a widow; she lives in Charles-street, Westminter. On the 29th of September, I went out to get change of a one pound note for my mother. I asked Spencer if she could tell me where to get change. She said if I would go with her, she would get change. She took me into a wine-vaults, called for a glass of gin, the man drawed it, she drank it, and put the one pound down. The man said he could not change it. I said, you must, what shall I do, he said, he should look to the woman that drank the gin to pay him. Thompson took up the one pound note.

Q. What are the prisoners - A. Unfortunate girls.

Q. Are you so too - A. No.

ISAAC PIKE . On the 29th of September, I was passing New Round-court, in the Strand, I saw a crowd I went up. I saw Spencer and Ann Yates together. Yates was crying. I asked her what was the matter. She told me. I asked Spencer for the note, she said, Thompson had got it. I put Spencer in the watch-house; and went and found Thompson. I knew Thompson very well. I was rather doubtful of getting the one pound note.

Q. Did you ever find the note - A. No. Both the prisoners lodged in one house.

Thompson's Defence. I know nothing of the note or the woman.

Spencer's Defence. I know nothing of the woman.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121028-91

932. JAMES HANKINSON was indicted for that, he on the 28th of August , was clerk to Joseph Hale , George Hale , William Wiggens and Wall Lynn , and was employed and entrusted by them to receive monies, and valuable securities for them; and that he by virtue of his employment did receive 25 one pound bank notes on their account, and afterwards did embezzle, secrete, and steal the same.

SECOND COUNT, stating that he received twenty-four one pound bank notes and thirteen shillings in monies numbered, and that he did afterwards embezzle, secrete, and steal the same.

PETER WORKMAN . Q. In the month of August last did you keep the Blue Anchor, in Fenchurch-street - A. I did.

Q. Were you indebted to Messrs. Hale and Co. for beer - A. I was.

Q. Did you know the prisoner - A. Yes. He came to me as their collecting clerk. In the beginning of August I paid him twenty-five pounds. I cannot say whether there was one, two, or three, five-pound notes. I paid that sum to him. He signed that receipt. I cannot say they were all one-pound notes.

GEORGE HALE . Q. You are a brewer . What are the names of your firm - A. Joseph Hale , George Hale , William Wiggens, and Wall Lynn : four partner's.

Q. In the month of August last, and long before, was the prisoner in your employ - A. He has been two years in my employ as collecting clerk, and two years before that as accompting-house clerk.

Q. Was it part of his duty to receive money of your customers, and to pay it you - A. To pay it into the firm, to the receiver of the house. He quitted my service on the 5th of September.

Q. Has he paid you the twenty-five pounds which it appears that he received from Mr. Workman - A. Certainly not.

Q. Did you ask him particularly whether his acaccompts were all right - A. We did. He said, certainly it was.

Q. On the next day did you receive that letter - A. That letter is his hand-writing, certainly. I did not see it for some days afterwards. It came to one of my partners, who shewed it me. It is signed, James Hankinson . There is no address: that is tore off.

WILLIAM WIGGENS . Q. You are of the partners of that house - A. I am.

Q. Did you receive that letter - A. I did. I tore the address off. It was addressed to me.

(Read.)

="SIR,

I am sorry to be under the necessity of informing you, that I have acted in a manner of which I am ashamed of, and most dreadfully shocked. I have been led by those I considered my friends, which will place a stigma upon my character all my life. I have used that in right, which was not my own. I have quitted town in hopes of procuring money, to replace that which I have so unjustly made use of. Oh, my good sir, if you have the kindness not to let this come to the ears of no one, and particularly my injured friend, J. Hale, you may be assured I will replace every penny I have made use of; and believe me, sir, I remain,

your humble servant, JAMES HANKINSON .

Pray, sir, do not let this be known, or I shall for ever be ruined, although I know I deserve every thing bad.="

Q. to Mr. Hale. On the 25th of September was your firm the same as it is now - A. Yes, and some months before that.

Prisoner's Defence. My lord, and gentlemen of the Jury, I must trust to your kind indulgence a few minutes. I lived with my late employers five years, during which period I served them with the utmost integrity. I was informed, a fortnight before I left them, by the senior partner, that they had no further occasion for me: the reason was, William Wiggens intended to collect my department himself; Mr. Hale handsomely saying, it was on that account he parted with me. I did all I could to induce every one of my friends to continue their favours to my late employers, which they promised me the would, on my account. The day after I quitted their service, (as appears by that letter), I informed them that I was going to Northumberland, there to try my friends to assist me to balance my accounts. I now solemnly declare I never intended to rob or defraud my employers. I assure you, my not being able to balance my accompts was owing to my expences being considerably more than I had, or could charge them. Mr. Wiggens can testify for my conduct: when I was at Northumberland he promised me that Mr. Hale, and the rest of the gentlemen, would accede to my balancing my accounts. When I arrived there I was left in the accompting-house, in an unlocked room, and at that time Mr. Wiggens went, and returned with an officer. I hope you will excuse me, and I will trust to your just decision.

The prisoner called six witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18121028-92

933. JAMES HANKINSON was indicted for that being clerk to Joseph Hale , George Hale , William Wiggens , and Wall Lynn , and was employed and entrusted by them to receive monies, and valuable securities for them, and that he, by virtue of his employment, on their account, on the 18th of August , did receive and take into his possession, twelve bank notes, value 1 l. each, and that he afterwards did embezzle, secrete, and steal the same .

ANOTHER COUNT, that he did receive eleven 1 l. notes, and seventeen shillings in monies, numbered, and afterwards did embezzle, secrete, and steal the same.

THOMAS NEWMAN . Q. Do you keep the Fountain public-house in Redcross-street - A. I do.

Q. Did you pay the prisoner any money as their collecting clerk on the 18th of August - A. On the 18th of August I did, and the prisoner gave me that receipt. I saw him sign it.

Q. How far is your house from the brewhouse - A. About fifty yards.

GEORGE HALE . Q. What are the names of the partner's in your firm - A. Joseph Hale , myself. William Wiggens, and Wall Lynn: we are brewer s. In August last the prisoner was our collecting clerk: he was employed and entrusted to receive money on our account.

Q. Did he pay you ever that twelve pounds that he received from Mr. Newman - A. He did not.

MR. WIGGENS. Q. You received that letter, and is it the prisoner's hand-writing - A. It is, certainly.

Q. to Mr. Hale. Is that the prisoner's hand-writing - A. Certainly.

COURT, to Mr. Wiggens. Have you since collected the monies - A. Yes.

Q. Pray what did the prisoner receive - A. Three guineas a week.

Q. to Mr. Hale. What sum did the prisoner charge for his usual expences a week - A. From two pound to fifty shillings, and a variety of charges. He was not limited to any sum: if he had charged five pound he would have had it.

Q. to Mr. Wiggens. What do you find to be the expences - A. About thirty shillings a week.

Prisoner's Defence. I never, during my service to Mr. Hale, received three guineas a week: the utmost was two guineas and a half. I am sure you must see the difference between a clerk and a master's expences. Mr. Wiggens might only spend a shilling. and I might spend five shillings, and not succeed. I am sure there are many publican's present that can give evidence how I exerted myself in their behalf, and were I at liberty I would serve them now.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18121028-93

934. JOHN MITCHAM was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of September , a watch, value 2 l. the property of William Luke , from his person .

WILLIAM LUKE . I am a gardener . I work in Dock-street. I lost my watch on the 20th of September. I was in St. Catherine's-lane. I got in a quarrel with a girl. I was a little in liquor. A man came to me, and said, he would see me home. I went into East Smithfield , into a house. I thought it was a public-house. The prisoner pulled my watch out of my pocket. I laid hold of him, and called out, watch. The watchman came and took him in custody.

WILLIAM PILCHEY . On the 20th of September I was going my round. I heard the call of, watch. I saw two men struggling together. The prosecutor said, the man had got his watch. I took hold of the prisoner, and took the watch from him, and took him to the watchhouse.

- KING. I was constable of the night. I produce the watch.

Prosecutor. It is my watch.

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutor asked me to go home with him. Going up the lane he gave me the watch to keep for him. He turned up a court, and then he laid hold of my coat. The watchman came up. I gave him the watch.

GUILTY, aged 28.

Judgment respited .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121028-94

935. SARAH WILLIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of October , a handkerchief, value 6 d. a seal, value 1 s. a purse, value 6 d. a dollar, value 5 s. 6 d. an eighteen-penny bank-token, and two shillings , the property of Jane Mackenzie , spinster .

JANE MACKENZIE . I live at Mrs. Cook's, at Hampstead.

Q. What is the prisoner - A. I do not know. I and my fellow-servant came to Drury-lane theatre. We asked the prisoner if she could recommend us to a lodging. It was too late to go to Hampstead.

Q. What is she, a common street-walker - A. I believe so. She took us to a house she called her own. We went to lay on the bed. She put the candle out. She took out two letters, and a seal out of my pocket, a purse, and a pocket handkerchief.

Q. Are you sure that the prisoner was the person - A. Yes.

Prisoner's Defence. When I met her it was between twelve and one. She gave me a eighteen-penny piece to get some bread and cheese and beer. After that I met a gentleman. I went, and slept with him.

WILLIAM GODFREY . I apprehended the prisoner on the 22d of October. I found this handkerchief upon her. I did not find the purse.

Prosecutrix. That is my handkerchief.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121028-95

936. JOSEPH WILLIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of September , a sack, value 2 s. and four bushels of wheat, value 35 s. the property of Thomas Jordan and Robert Heath .

THOMAS JORDAN . I am a farmer , at Stanwell . My partner's name is Robert Heath . On the 29th of September I had in my barn ten sacks and three bushels of wheat, called Chatham wheat. It growed upon black ground. We had sowed on that ground, three years before, French wheat.

Q. Was there anything in this wheat particular - A. Yes, black ground. I saw it in my barn on the Tuesday. On the Wednesday morning I missed some of this wheat. My barn was broken open. I took a sample of the same wheat to Staines, on Friday, the 2nd of October. Mr. Saunders was there; he shewed me the wheat. I saw the wheat, and inspected it. I had no doubt it was mine. This is the sample of my wheat, that I missed.

Q. Was any French wheat grown in your neighbourhood - A. No, none.

THOMAS DAVENPORT . I am a meal-man. I reside at Staines. On the 2d of October I saw the prisoner at Staines market. He standing by a sack of wheat, that was for sale in the market. I asked him the price. He asked sixty-five shillings. I bid him fifty-five. He at last took it. He said, he had been standing there all the morning. He lived at Colnbrook, and he grew the wheat at Colnbrook. He wished to have the sack shot immediately. He wanted to get home to dinner. I took the wheat home. I am sure it is the same wheat. This is a sample of the wheat I bought. That has been in my possession ever since.

JOHN GIBSON . I am brother-in-law to the prisoner. On Wednesday morning he came into my little room. He brought something in a sack. He put it down. Me and my wife were a bed. He said, he had some gleaned wheat; he was going to take it to market. On Thursday the prisoner took it away. He said, he was going to Staines market, to sell it, to pay his rent. My wife went to Staines, on Friday morning, along with him.

ANN GIBSON. This sack of wheat was brought just as my husband has related. I went with the prisoner to Staines. He asked the sack carrier to fetch it on the ass. Joseph Willis came to me and asid, there was a piece of work about the sack of wheat, in the market, and I was to say it belonged to me; it was leased wheat or gleaned corn.

THOMAS CLARK . I am a constable. I took the prisoner in custody on the 2d of October. Mr Jordan said to him, he could not have done it all by himself.

MR. JORDAN. I said to him, Willis, this is a hard job. I think it might be as well, if you are the thief that robbed me, to tell me. He said, I am the thief that robbed you. I told him I could shew him no favour, it must be as Sir William Gibbons directed. The constable was by his side, and he was in his power.

Q. to Clark. Did you see the prisoner sign that - A. I did.

(Read.)

The voluntary confession of Joseph Willis , who saith, a person at Stanwell Moore, met him. They agreed to go together on the 20th, at night, to the barn of Thomas Jordan ; that they went and took a sack of wheat from there, which they hid in a field until the 1st of October, when they took the sack of wheat from the field, and carried it to Staines market. Taken before me, Thomas Gibbons , October, 2d, 1812. Signed, Joseph Willis .

Q. Now, Mr. Jordan, look at that wheat produced by Mr. Davenport - A. It is the same as was in my granary.

Prisoner's Defence. Mr. Jordan and the constable told me, if I would tell them they would clear me. I told them the truth. I am very sorry for it.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Transported for seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121028-96

937. BENJAMIN SHERWOOD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of September , four coach glasses, value 2 l. and a pole-piece, value 10 s. the property of Edward Jenkins .

EDWARD JENKINS . I am a stable keeper . The prisoner drove a job for me.

Q. When did you lose your glasses, and how - A. I lost them on the 28th, out of a coach house. The glasses belonged to a chariot. I lost the glasses and the pole-piece that same morning. The pole-piece belonged to the same carriage.

JOHN KNOTT . I am a watchman. On the 28th of September I was going my round, between four and five in the morning, I saw two men come out of a mews, with bundles under their arms. It was in the Edgware-road. I called after them, what have you got there. They made no answer, but went on quicker. One took through Tyburn turnpike, the other took the Bayswater road. I followed the prisoner, and called out, stop thief. The prisoner dropped a bundle. I did not stop to pick it up. I ordered another watchman to pick it up. The prisoner found I was getting ground of him; he took to Hyde park wall: he jumped over the wall. I followed him over the wall. I saw the prisoner running towards Pimlico. I then called out, stop thief. A young man stopped him, and then I took charge of him, and brought him to Marybone watchhouse. I never lost sight of the prisoner.

PETER SULLIVAN . On the morning of the 28th I heard the rattle spring. I picked up the property that was dropped on the road, and took it to Marybone watchhouse. This is the property.

Prosecutor. It is my property.

Prisoner's Defence. I never had the bundle; another man had the bundle.

GUILTY , aged 33.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121028-97

938. MARGARET MINCHIN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of September , the furniture of a bedstead, value 30 s. the property of Charles Faulkner .

CHARLES FAULKNER . I am a furniture broker . I live in East Marybone. On the 25th of September I lost the furniture from the shop door.

ANN BENNETT. I made the furniture for Mr. Faulkner.

REUBEN LIONS . The prisoner brought the furniture to me to sell. I stopped her with it. This is the furniture.

Prosecutor. It is mine.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence.

GUILTY , aged 55.

Confined Fourteen Days in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121028-98

939. THOMAS HAMMOND was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of October , a shawl, value 3 s. the property of Henry Gudgeon and Thomas Hames .

HENRY GUDGEON . I am linen draper , in Gray's inn-lane . My partner's name is Thomas Hames . On the 6th of October, about eight o'clock in the evening, the prisoner ran into my shop, and snatched a shawl that was pinned up at the further end of the shop: he ran off with it. I pursued him, and cried out, stop thief: he was soon stopped, and the shawl was in his possession. This is the shawl: it is mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I was very much in liquor.

GUILTY, aged 19.

Judgment respited .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121028-99

940. JAMES POWELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of October , and umbrella, value 10 s. the property of Thomas Hearn .

THOMAS HEARN . I am a ship owner . I live at Kingsland .

SARAH - . This poor boy came to see the mistress of the house: he said he had something particular to say to her: he had a petition. He would not give the petition to me. I went up one pair of stairs, and told my mistress, there was a boy wanted to speak to her. I came down stairs, and he ran away with this umbrella. I pursued him, and took it from him; It is my master's umbrella.

Prisoner's Defence. I went with a petition to the house.

GUILTY, aged 12.

Judgment respited .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121028-100

941. CHARLES CARLISLE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of October , from the person of Antonio Bennie , five one-pound notes, his property .

ANTONIO BENNIE . I am an Italian sailor . I lost my notes on the 5th of October. I went to see my shipmates at the London docks . He asked me to take a glass of gin with him. I said, yes, and we went into a public-house. He began to toss up with a man. They tossed a few times, and then the prisoner asked me to toss with him. He asked me to put five one-pound notes down. I put five one-pounds down on the table. The prisoner took up the five one-pound notes, and ran out. I told the landlord; he fetched Carlisle back again. Carlisle gave me a one-pound note. He said, he would send me the other four pounds; and at seven o'clock a man came and asked me if I would take the five pounds. I said, I would.

Q. Then he did not take it out of your pocket - A. No. I put it on the table. I got my money again the same night.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121028-101

942. CHARLES CARLISLE was indicted for a similar offence, only stating it to be the property of William Jones .

WILLIAM JONES was called, and not appearing in court , the prisoner, of this charge, was

ACQUITTED.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121028-102

943. MATILDA BARRY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of September , a neckcloth, value 1 s. a handkerchief, value 1 s. and two waistcoats, value 10 s. the property of William Haines .

WILLIAM HAINES . I am a musical instrument maker . I live in Ratcliffe-street . The prisoner was employed by me on the 23d of September, as a charwoman . I had laid out the articles in the indictment for the purpose of changing my dress; and when I wanted to go out I found the things were gone. I applied to an officer. He took the prisoner with the things on her.

GEORGE PARTRIDGE . In consequence of Mr. Haines calling upon me, I apprehended the prisoner in a public-house in Parson's-street with this bundle with her.

Prosecutor. They are my property.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going by the prosecutor's door. He asked me how I did. I answered him. He said, come in, I have something particular to say to you; and when I went in he shut the door, and locked it. He forced me up stairs, threw me on the bed, and did as he thought proper. He gave me these things. He said he had no money.

Prosecutor. That defence is an abominable falsehood.

GUILTY , aged 42.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121028-103

944. JOHN ADAMS was indicted for that he, on the 3d of October , was servant to William Coslet , and was employed and entrusted to receive money for him, and being such servant, and so employed, did receive, and take into his possession, the sum of 2 l. for his said master, and that he afterwards did embezzle and secrete the same .

WILLIAM COSLETT . I am a flax-maker . I live in Wentworth-street, Spitalfields . The prisoner was in my employ.

Q. Was he entrusted to receive money for you - A. He was upon special orders. I had given him no special order to receive this. I did not know of the goods being sold. He had not power to receive this money.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121028-104

945. THOMAS ALEXANDER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of October , an umbrella value 7 s. the property of Alexander Flemming .

ROBERT REEVES . I am a pawnbroker . I live at Mr. Flemming's, 35, Whitechapel . On the 12th of October, about three o'clock in the afternoon, a lady came into the shop, and said, a man had taken an umbrella from the door. I jumped over the counter, and overtook the prisoner with the umbrella in the street. It is Mr. Flemmings's umbrella.

Prisoner's Defence. The umbrella was laying on the ground. I picked it up, and when the gentleman came up I gave it to him.

Reeves. He had the umbrella under his coat.

GUILTY , aged 48.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121028-105

946 MARY BARBER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of October , a shirt, value 4 s. and an apron, value 1 s. the property of Thomas Pelton .

MARY PELTON . My husband's name is Thomas. I missed these things on the 8th of October.

Q. What is the prisoner - A. She came to see me. I gave her a cup of tea, and when my back was turned I lost my property. I found the apron at Mr. Barker's, in the Commercial-road. The shirt was brought to me to be washed on the Monday morning.

JOHN JAMES . On the 14th of October the prisoner brought the apron to our house, and pledged it. I am sure it is her.

FRANCIS JACKSON . I am an officer. I took the prisoner in custody; and on her I found the duplicate of the apron.

Prosecutrix. It is my daughter's apron.

GUILTY , aged 29.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121028-106

947. MARY BARBER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of October , a sheet, value 4 s. the property of Jane Bakeman , widow .

JANE BAKEMAN . On the 8th of October the prisoner came to me. She went out, and I never saw her from that day, until I saw her at Shadwell-office. I am sure she took the sheet.

FRANCIS JACKSON . I could not trace the sheet.

Prisoner's Defence. I went to this woman as a servant; as I found the things I left them.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121028-107

948. JOSEPH BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of September , fourteen pounds weight of bacon, value 13 s. the property of Thomas Edwards .

FRANCES EDWARDS . My husband's name is Thomas Edwards; he is a cheesemonger , 67, Rosemary-lane . On the 25th of September, about eight o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came into the shop. He took the bacon out of the shop, and walked out with it. I saw him take it out. I ran, and called, stop thief.

WILLIAM LAWSON . I was passing by Mrs. Edwards's shop. I saw the prisoner running. I followed him. He was stopped by some gentleman. I took the bacon from him. This is the bacon.

Prosecutrix. It is my bacon.

Prisoner's Defence. I am not guilty.

GUILTY, aged 20.

Judgment respited .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121028-108

949. LUCY COOPER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of October , a shift, value 2 s. and a bed gown, value 2 s. the property of John Moorman .

MRS. MOORMAN. My husband, John Moorman , keeps the Cow-heel, public-house, Cow-heel-alley, St. Luke's . I lost my shift and bed gown on the 26th of October. The prisoner came in between nine and ten; my shift and bed gown were in the drawer, in the parlour. I missed them in the morning.

MATHEW JONES . I am a watchmaker. I was drinking a pint of beer there, and in the passage that leads to the street door, I saw the bed gown. I asked the prisoner whose it was. She said, it was her's. I gave it her. On the next day the prisoner owned to the bed gown, but denied any knowledge of the shift.

- . I am a pawnbroker. I produce a bed gown, and a shift. The prisoner pledged them with me for two shillings.

Prosecutrix. It is my bed gown and shift.

GUILTY , aged 18,

Fined 1 s. and discharged.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121028-109

950. MARIA COVALY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of October , three gowns, value 10 s. two petticoats, value 4 s. and one apron, value 1 s. the property of James Smith .

MRS. SMITH. My husband, James Smith , is a leather pipe maker . We live in Castle-Court, Castle-Street, behind Shoreditch Church .

Q. When did you lose these things - A. Come next Saturday it will be a fortnight. I left the prisoner in charge of my place. I went out a little before eleven, and I returned before one; and found the prisoner at the bottom of Wildegate-street.

RICHARD HUTCHINS . I took the prisoner in custody. She confessed to Lock, the officer of the night, that she took the property, and that she would see the procucutrix d - d before she should have them.

Q. to Mrs. Smith. How long have you known this woman - A. Only the Tuesday before. I hired her at Spitalfields market.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121028-110

951. JOHN DAVIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of October , two brass lamps, value 38 s. the property of John Carrol .

JOHN CARROL . I am a brass founder and lamp maker , No. 13, Change-court at the back of Exeter-change . The prisoner came to my house on the 3d of October, between one and two o'clock, to purchase two lamps. I shewed him two. He said; if I had any body to send with them, he would pay for them. I sent William Woodward with the lamps, with him. He returned, and said he was defrauded of the lamps.

WILLIAM WOODWARD . I am a servant to Mr. Carrol. The prisoner took me to a private house in Hoxton. He told me to put the lamps down. He took me to a public house, and asked me what I could drink. He called for a pint of beer. The prisoner went out at the back door. I went to the house where I put the lamps down. I there could get no account of him. On Monday morning I met the prisoner. I collared him. I am sure he is the man. I left the lamps on Saturday, and took him on the Monday. I have never found the lamps again. The prisoner would give no account of them.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121028-111

952. THOMAS ELLIS and JOHN THOMPSON were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of October , a brass microscope, value 19 s. and a book, value 1 s. the property of James Cormack , from his person .

JAMES CORMACK . I am a boot-closer . I live at No. 9, Brewer-street, Golden-square. I went to the chapel in Tottenham-court-road , on Sunday night, a little after eight. I was nearly opposite of the fire. I got in the crowd. I could not get out again. I missed the microscope out of my pocket, and the book. It was Thompson's Seasons. I do not know who took it.

JOHN PRIOR . I am an officer. I was in Tottenham-court-road. I had Johnson with me. We apprehended Ellis and Thompson. On Ellis were found the microscope, and on Thompson, Thompson's Seasons. I knew them both.

BENJAMIN JOHNSON . I am a constable. I was at the fire on the 11th. I watched the two prisoner's for an hour. They were attempting to pick people's pockets. I particularly watched them out of the mob, and then I took them in custody. I asked Thompson, how long he had had the book. He said a fortnight; he bought it at a bookseller's window a fortnight ago. He brought his mother to prove that he had been reading the book all the afternoon. He said, it was a prayer-book; and it is Thompson's Seasons; and from Ellis I took the microscope.

ELLIS, GUILTY, aged 16.

THOMPSON, GUILTY, aged 17.

Judgment respited .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121028-112

953. JOHN HARRIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of October , a tin can, value 1 s. and two quarts of oil, value 3 s. the property of Henry Spencer and Samuel Hodgson .

THOMAS DISSON . I am in the employ of Hudson and Spencer, lamp-contractor s. On the 22d of October I left this can of oil in a watch-box, in Little Portland-street , and when I returned it was gone.

MARTHA BEAZLEY . I did not see any person take the can of oil. A young person in our house said it was another boy that took it.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121028-113

954. SARAH HOLMES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of October , a pair of shoes, value 5 s. the property of William Welch .

WILLIAM WELCH . I live at 63, Gray's-inn-lane . I keep a shoe-maker's shop On the 5th of October the prisoner came into my shop, and said, did I not leave two shillings earnest for a pair of shoes? I said, no. I saw her with a pair of my shoes under her apron, but I did not see her take them. These are the shoes: they are my shoes.

Prisoner's Defence. I put the shoes outside of my apron. I meaned to call the next day, and pay for them. I was born in Dublin. I have no friend but God in his country.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121028-114

955. ELEANOR BRIEN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of October , ten Spanish dollars , the property of John Julian .

JOHN JULIAN . I am a German sailor . I lost the dollars on the 30th of October. I put them in a chest. The prisoner lived in the house. She asked me for three shillings to buy a pair of shoes. I took a dollar out of my chest and gave it her, and locked the chest. At five o'clock I went out. I returned home at one o'clock at night, and my chest was broken open. I said to the prisoner, mistress, my chest is broken open. She said she knew nothing of it, and laughed at me.

Q. She is accused of taking dollars - A. Yes; she took them out of the chest.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121028-115

956. JANE WHITE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22nd of October , a watch, value 2 l. a seal, value 5 s. and a watch key, value 5 s. the property of James Potter , from his person .

JAMES POTTER . I am a painter and glazier . I live at No. 5, Ogle street. On the 22nd of October, between one and two in the morning, I was in Princess-street, St. Ann , I was returning home. Two women came by me; I felt my watch go. I catched at the watch, and got it. I struck both the women. The prisoner was not so close to me as the other woman. I took the prisoner. The other woman escaped.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121028-116

957. JOHN FREDERICK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of October , a hat, value 7 s. the property of John Baxter .

JOHN BAXTER . On the 7th of October I was working in my shop; a person came and told me that the prisoner had taken a hat from the door. I pursued him. I took the hat from him. This is the hat. It is mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I had nothing to eat. I was very poor.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121028-117

958 HENRY PARDO was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of July , twenty-six yards of linen cloth, value 2 l. 11 s. the property of Joseph Johnson and John Vickers .

JOSEPH JOHNSON . My partner's name is John Vickers ; we are linen draper s, 75, High Holborn . On the 1st of July, the prisoner brought me this note, proporting to be a note from Mr. Glendening. Mr. Glendening printed for me at that time. I delivered the Irish linen to the prisoner, upon the face of the note.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121028-118

959. SARAH STEWARD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of October , a shirt, value 18 d. the property of James Lewis .

JAMES LEWIS . I am soldier in the East London militia . On the 6th of October I took my shirt to Mrs Mason, to wash.

ELIZABETH MASON . Q. You are a washer woman - A. Yes. I lost the shirt on the 6th of October. The prisoner came to me a little after eight in the morning. She asked for a little water to wash her her hands, and a brush to brush her petticoat. I went down stairs to borrow one, and during that time she took the shirt off the drawers. I found the shirt where she sold it.

MRS. MAY. I keep a clothes-shop. The prisoner sold the shirt to me. I gave fifteen pence for it. This is the shirt.

Prosecutor. It is my shirt.

Prisoner's Defence. I have nothing to say.

GUILTY , aged 27.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121028-119

960. MARIA MIDDLETON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of August , two pillows, value 12 s. a blanket, value 7 s. a candlestick, value 6 d. and a pair of snuffers, value 1 s. the property of Elizabeth Brown , in a lodging-room .

ELIZABETH BROWN . I live at No. 8, Knowles-buildings, Islington . I let lodgings. I let a front two pair of stairs room to the prisoner, furnished. She continued with me seven weeks. She went away on the 18th of August.

Q. What did she owe you - A. There was two pounds due to me for her lodging. I searched the room soon after she was gone. I missed two pillows and a blanket. She professed to be independant. Mr. Green, a young man that came to see her, said she had sixty-five pounds a-year.

Q. What age is she - A. Twenty-five, I believe. She never had a female friend during her stay in my house.

Q. Did Mr. Green live with her - A. No. I always called him down when I went to bed.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in great distress at the time.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121028-120

961. WILLIAM COLLINS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of September , a handkerchief, value 10 d. the property of a certain person to the jurors unknown .

The witnesses were called, and not appearing in court, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121028-121

962. ELIZABETH OWEN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of October , a watch, value 5 l. the property of John Long .

The prosecutor was called, and not appearing in court the prisoner was

ACQUITTED.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121028-122

963. RICHARD NORTHOVER and EDWARD MERRITT were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of October , two pair of stockings, value 6 s. the property of Michael Mitchell .

GEORGE VAUXHALL . I am a butcher, in Union-street, Somers-town . I saw the prisoners take the stockings off the line.

MR. PRICE. I was coming by at the time. I searched the short prisoner, and found two pair of stockings on him. These are the stockings.

MARY SHANNON . These are Mr. Mitchell's stockings. They were taken off a line in the garden.

NORTHOVER, GUILTY, aged 16.

MERRITT, GUILTY, aged 19.

Judgment respited .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121028-123

964. ELIZABETH EVANS, alias LOVEMORE , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of October , a pair of sheets, value 10 s. a counterpane, value 7 s. a pillow, value 4 s. and two pillow-cases, value 3 s. and a flat iron, value 1 s. the property of Thomas Hollis , in a lodging-room .

ISABELLA HOLLIS . I am the wife of Thomas Hollis . We keep a house, No. 13, Monmouth-street . On the 22d of September the prisoner took a two pair back room of me, furnished, at five shillings and sixpence a week. She left my lodging on the 28th of October. I then found a pair of sheets gone, a counterpane, a pillow, two pillow-cases, and and a flat iron. I found these things again.

GUILTY , aged 39.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121028-124

965. JAMES LEIGHTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of October , two coach glasses, value 3 l. the property of John Jones .

JOHN JONES . I am a coach-maker . I only know that the glasses are mine.

WILLIAM ROUND . On the 10th of October I was driving Mr. Jones's coach, and when I set off from my master's house. The glasses were safe, and as I was going along Charles-street I saw the coach door open. I saw nothing done to the coach. From information, I came up to the prisoner in Union-street. He had one glass with him. I saw another man before him with the other coach glass.

EDWARD OBDELL . I am a watchman. I stopped the prisoner. He let the glass fall. I took it up, and another watchman stopped the man with the other glass. These are the two glasses.

Round. They are Mr. Jones's glasses.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18121028-125

966. SARAH CHESHIRE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of October , two razors and case, value 2 s. a shaving-box and brush, value 1 s. a razor-strap, value 6 d. and a looking-glass, value 6 d. the property of George Martin .

GEORGE MARTIN . On the 18th of October the prisoner came to me, and about a quarter of an hour after she was gone, I missed my razors, case, brush, and looking-glass. I saw them again at the house where the prisoner sold them.

ANN SIMS . I live in Chick-lane. The prisoner sold me the two razors, and the shaving things. I gave her sixpence for them.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in great distress indeed; that caused me to take them.

GUILTY , aged 51.

Fined 1 s. and discharged.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18121028-126

967. GEORGE HAWKINS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of September , a tea-chest, value 3 s. a watch, value 2 l. two spoons, value 10 s. the property of Joseph Salmon , in the dwelling-house of James Maud .

JOSEPH SALMON . I was a patient in the Westminster Infirmary .

Q. At the time that you were there had you a tea-chest, a watch, and two spoons with you - A. Yes. They were on a table by my bed. The prisoner was a patient there. He was brought back to the hospital, and he had my watch in his pocket, and the duplicates of the spoons.

JAMES GILLMORE . I apprehended the prisoner at the hospital. The watch then was laying on the prosecutor's bed, together with two duplicates. I asked the prisoner if that was the watch that was taken from him. He said, it was. He said, he had

pawned the spoons; the tea-chest he had broken open on Westminster-bridge. He had throwed the tea-chest over the bridge after he had taken the watch and spoons out.

- FOILE. On the 5th of September the prisoner pledged the spoons with me.

Prosecutor. It is my watch and spoons.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121028-127

968. MARY DOWNHAM was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of October , a shift, value 6 s. the property of Joseph Lawrance .

ELIZABETH LAWRANCE . My husband's name is Joseph Lawrance . I lost these things on the 8th of October. I had the prisoner washing for me. I missed them the next morning. I did not see the prisoner take them. The officer searched the prisoner; he found nothing on her.

NOT GUILTY

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18121028-128

969. WILLIAM WOOD was indicted for a misdemeanor .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY.

Judgment respited .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18121028-129

970. MARY BLACK was indicted for wilful and corrupt perjury .

MR. SHELTON. Q. Is that the record of the conviction of John Kennedy - A. It is James Kennedy for stealing two coats, value 4 l. the property of James Rose , on the 16th of September, in the 52d year of his Majesty's reign; and so the Jurors say, upon their oath, that he, the said James Kennedy , two coats, value 4 l. the property of the said James Rose , feloniously did steal and carry away.

SAMUEL LEWIS . Q. You are an officer of this court - A. Yes.

Q. Were you so upon the trial of James Kennedy - A. Yes.

Q. Do you recollect the defendant, Mary Black - A. Yes, I perfectly recollect her. I administered the oath to her before she gave her evidence.

- Q. Are you the clerk to the magistrate at Hatton Garden office - A. I am. I recollect seeing Mary Black at the office, upon the examination of John Kennedy . I took down her evidence on that paper. She signed it. Mr. Leach was the sitting magistrate.

Q. Who was the person brought before the magistrate - A. John Kennedy . (The copy of commitment.)

=" John Kennedy committed by Thomas Leach .="

JOHN BARNLEY . Q. Are you a constable and beadle of the Liberty of Saffron-hill - A. Yes.

Q. On the 25th of July last, where were you - A. About half after two in the afternoon I was going down to the lower end of Saffron-hill. I was by myself. I saw two men go into Mrs. Broadfield's house, or Gilingham's house. It goes by both names. I saw two men go into her house in Field-lane They were together. I stopped until they got into the house, and then I went after them. I went into the back room. They were standing by a table, and the coats were laying on the table, and Mrs. Broadfield was looking at them.

Q. Were there any other man there - A, No, none but the two which I saw go in with this bundle. Mrs. Broadfield was looking at the coats on the table.

Q. Were those the coats that were sworn to upon the trial of Kennedy - A. Yes. I asked Mrs. Broadfield, or whatever her name is, who brought the coat there.

Q. Where was the prisoner - A. Why, she was at the outside door, and this was in the inner room.

Q. Did you learn from her wether she belonged to the house, or not - A. I knew she did; she acted as servant in that house. I took the two men in custody. They were fighting and strugling with me. I called to a man standing at the door to come and help me. This Mary Black struck him, and shoved him back.

Q. You seized the two men; what became of them - A. One of them I secured, and the other ran away. I secured Kennedy, he was tried here last Session for stealing these coats. He was one of the two men that I saw go in. I took Kennedy to Hatton Garden, and he was brought here upon that charge, and Mary Black was brought to Hatton Garden office, and what she said was taken down in writing, and read over to her, and I saw her sign it, but I did not read it. This is the same paper. My name is upon it.

Q. You were here upon the trial of Kennedy; was Mary Black an evidence for the prosecution or the prisoner - A. For the prisoner, I should think. John Kennedy was asked by the Court what he had to say in his defence, he said call Mary Black . (The information of Mary Black read.) Mary Black , servant to William Killingham , sworn, saith, that between two and three o'clock the prisoner, John Kennedy , and another man that made his escape, came into the shop, and while her mistress was looking at the coats Barnley came in and seized them; one of them made his escape, and the other he kept in custody.

Q. to Barnley. That man whom you took up, is his name John Kennedy - A. He was tried here in the name James Kennedy . He had it altered by his own request.

JOB SIBLY . Q. You are short hand writer to this Court - A. Yes.

Q. Do you take down the whole of the evidence, or that which you think the most important - A. In this case I was told by the Court to be particular in Mary Black 's evidence, and I believe I can safely say, I took every word of her evidence.

Q. Read the evidence of Mary Black , upon the trial of John Kennedy .

(The evidence of Mary Black read.)

MARY BLACK . I live in Field-lane, No. 9. It was not James Kennedy that brought these things into the shop; it was another man. He ran away.

Q. They were together, were not they - A. The prisoner came into the shop half an hour before, for a pair of shoes, before the other man came in.

Q. Were you examined before the justice - A. Yes.

Q. Did you never swear that this man brought it in - A. Never.

Q. Upon your oath did you never swear that this man brought the bundle in. Now mind what you say, and be cautious; it will be taken down - A. No.

Q. Now, you mean to swear that he never did bring it in - A. Yes.

Q. Do you mean to tell me that the man who brought these things was in the shop half an hour before the prisoner - A. No. The prisoner was in the house half an hour before the other man came in with the coat.

Q. What was your mistress about - A. She was in the other house, washing.

Q. Did not she look at, and bargain about these things - A. No.

Q. You swear that this man had been in the shop before the other man came in - A. I do.

Mr. Alley addressed the Jury in behalf of the defendant.

The defendant called three witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18121028-130

971. THOMAS RUSSELL was indicted for a misdemeanour .

JOSEPH KEATES . I am a hat manufacturer. The prisoner was employed by me in the manufacturing of hats .

Q. What quantity of materials at a time are you in the habit of giving out to your workmen - A. I usually give them the materials for a dozen hats, and if any workman applies to me to shop another man, I deliver out materials for a dozen, to the person that applies, if I have a good opinion of him. On the 27th of June Russell applied to me, to shop a man of the name of Horsman. He applied to me for the materials to make a dozen of hats, for Horsman. I delivered to him the stuff to make a dozen of hats. He took away the materials for two dozen; one dozen for Horsman, and one dozen for himself. The defendant brought home his own dozen, and denied ever taking the work for Horsman. I have never seen the materials or the hats since.

GEORGE DICKENSON . I was present in the accompting house. I saw Russell take the materials for two dozen hats.

THOMAS LACKEDELL . I saw Russell take away two dozen of materials for hats. I have made enquiry: there is no such a man as Horsman.

GUILTY , aged 36.

Confined in Newgate Three Months .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.


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