Old Bailey Proceedings, 16th September 1812.
Reference Number: 18120916
Reference Number: f18120916-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND ALSO THE GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, HELD AT Justice-Hall, in the Old Bailey, On WEDNESDAY the 16th of SEPTEMBER, 1812, and following Days;

BEING THE SEVENTH SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF The Right Hon. CLAUDIUS STEPHEN HUNTER , LORD-MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY JOB SIBLY, No. 4 CARTHUSIAN-STREET, ALDERSGATE-STREET.

LONDON:

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED (BY THE AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON.) By R. Butters, No. 22, Fetter-lane, Fleet-street.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON.

Before the Right Honorable CLAUDIUS STEPHEN HUNTER , Lord Mayor of the City of London; John Heath , esq. one of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir John Bailey , knt. one of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir Vicary Gibbs, knt. one of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of Common Pleas: Sir William Curtis , bart. Sir John Eamer , knt. Sir William Leighton , knt. Sir Matthew Bloxam , knt. Aldermen of the said City; John Silvester , esq. Recorder of the said City: Christopher Smith, esq. Christopher Magnay , esq. Aldermen of the said City; and Newman Knowlys, esq. Common-serjeant of the said City; His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

London Jury.

Joseph Thornhill ,

Edward Stilliard ,

Thomas Boyds ,

John Prince ,

Alexander Wallis ,

William Ward ,

Jeffry Ludlow ,

Thomas Oliver ,

William Freeman ,

Samuel Hayes ,

Richard Williams ,

Jonathan Thomas Sweet .

First Middlesex Jury.

William Wallis ,

John Cutting ,

Robert Gordon ,

William Burn ,

Thomas Smither ,

Dalby Williams ,

William Collins ,

Robert Greaves ,

Thomas Garrett ,

Charles White ,

John Pilcher ,

Andrew Wilson .

Second Middlesex Jury.

Edward Jones ,

John Fothergill ,

Samuel Gittins ,

John Hone ,

Richard Smith ,

Thomas Pattenden ,

James Purdy ,

James Osborne ,

Martin Millett ,

William Grundy ,

Richard Brown ,

John Beamont .

Reference Number: t18120916-1

625. RALPH MANNING and ELIZABETH DAVIS were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of May , a counterpane, value 1 l. a set of bed-furniture, value 1 l. a pair of sheets, value 10 s. a picture, value 5 s. a table-cloth, value 5 s. a flat-iron, value 1 s. and a candlestick, value 1 s. the property of Robert Crook , in a lodging-room .

SOPHIA CROOK . I am the wife of Robert Crook . I let the lodging to the prisoner Manning. He took the lodging for himself and the other prisoner, as his wife, on a Tuesday in the month of May. I think Elizabeth Davis came into the lodging first, and Manning came afterwards, on the same day. They came in on a Tuesday, and on the Monday following I missed some of my property.

Mr. Adolphus. Captain Manning was a good deal from home at times - A. Yes, I believe he was.

THOMAS CASTLE . I am a pawnbroker. On Thursday, the 21st of May, Mrs. Davis pledged a pillow, on the 22nd a picture, and the bed-furniture on the 25th of May. I am sure as to her person. I saw nothing of Manning at all.

JAMES RAMSEY . I am a pawnbroker, 17, Liquorpond-street. I produce a counterpane, pledged on the 21st of May, and a pair of sheets on the 20th of May, and a tea-tray on the same day. Two of the articles were pledged by Elizabeth Davis . I do not know who pledged the others: and a tablecloth four shillings, pledged by the woman prisoner.

WILLIAM READ . I took both the prisoners in custody, and on searching the premises I found the duplicates.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18120916-2

626. RALPH MANNING and ELIZABETH DAVIS were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of May , a counterpane, value 20 s. a pair of sheets, value 20 s. a tablecloth, value 2 s. a window-curtain, value 2 s. a candlestick, value 1 s. a rummer, value 8 d. a pair of decanters, value 3 s. a brush, value 1 s. a tea-spoon, value 2 s. the property of William Parry , in a lodging-room .

WILLIAM PARRY. I live at 23, Duke-street, Bloomsbury . My wife let the lodgings.

MRS. PARRY. I am the wife of William Parry . Ralph Manning took the lodgings of me on the last day of March. He was by himself. He had the front parlour, ready furnished, at twelve shillings a week. He brought Mrs. Davis with him.

Q. How long did they continue there - A. Seven weeks. I gave them a week's notice, and they went in pursuance of that notice.

Q. Have you since seen any part of your property - A. Yes; they sent part of it by strange people. Mr. Manning was gone out, and I pressed the woman prisoner to go out.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18120916-3

627. JAMES WESTBROOK , ELIZABETH PHIPPS , SUSANNAH PHIPPS , and SAMUEL WESTBROOK , were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Joseph Covington , about the hour of eight in the forenoon, on the 1st of April , and stealing therein, eighteen gowns, value 3 l. seven petticoats, value 1 l. six pair of blankets, value 3 l. a feather bed, value 3 l. a bolster, value 5 s. two pillows, value 5 s. a time-piece, value 6 l. a silver cup, value 1 l. and five yards of muslin, value 5 s. the property of Joseph Covington .

JOSEPH COVINGTON . I am a licensed hawker . In April last I lived in Angel and Porter-court, Golden-lane, in the parish of St. Luke, Old-street . I am the occupier of the house. It consisted of three rooms. Two rooms I let out. I let the ground floor to Corcoran, and I occupied the one pair of stairs. Susannah Phipps and her daughter lived in the two pair of stairs room.

Q. Did you know that any other person lived with her - A. No, not to my knowledge.

Q. On what day did you leave town - A. On Monday, the 1st of April, between six and seven in the morning, I fastened my door with two padlocks, and a common lock. I left my door quite secure.

Q. At the time you left were all the property which is stated in the indictment in your room - A. Yes.

Q. Were there eighteen gowns in the room - A. Yes, and seven petticoats, six pair of blankets, two pillows, twelve waistcoats, a time-piece, a telescope, eight yards of muslin, four table-spoons, and seven silver table-spoons.

Q. What is the value of them altogether - A. About one hundred and twenty pounds. I returned on the 1st of May.

Q. When you came home in what state did you find the door of your room - A. My wife was there first. She sent to me. I came immediately. I found all the locks of the room door broken. My wife sat in the chair crying, and every thing was gone in the boxes and the drawers.

Q. On that day did you receive some information from your lodger, Corcoran - A. Yes, the same night, and in consequence of that information I went to Wayman's.

Q. Afterwards did you receive from Wayman any of your property - A. I did. I received the timepiece and the muslin. He promised to bring the telescope, but he did not.

Q. Did you then cause Corcoran to be apprehended - A. I did; and afterwards the prisoners were all four taken up.

Mr. Adolphus. What are you - A. A licensed hawker. I deal in lace. The gowns were my wife's: The telescope was for my pleasure.

Q.Where do you live now - A. At Bedford. I am going to throw up the house in Angel and Porter-court.

MRS. COVINGTON. Q. When you returned to town in May, in what condition did you find the door - A. I found the door was broken open, and the top hatch was entirely gone. The door was open, and the property was all gone.

Mr. Adolphus. Were these all your own gowns - A. Yes. I had eighteen left behind.

PETER CORCORAN. Q. You lodge, we understand, at the prosecutor's house - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember his going out of town on the 1st of April - A. Yes.

Q. Did you know whether any person besides Mrs. Phipps lived in the two pair of stairs room - A. I did. James Westbrook and the daughter lived there with the mother.

Q. Now, at what time in the morning did you first observe any noise up stairs on the 1st of April - A. Mrs. Phipps awoke me at seven o'clock. She told me to get up, and I got up. She went up to her daughter, and she and her daughter was scolding. She afterwards came down, brought a small bundle, went out, and came back again. She always called me every morning.

COURT. Who went out with the bundle - A. Susannah. That was a bundle belonging to herself, I supposed. After that she came back at eight o'clock. She said, she should go to work. In a little while after she went out I heard a noise up stairs. I heard a creaking, and after the creaking, I heard a person walking, as if they had no shoes on, in Covington's room, over my head.

Q. At that time did you know that Covington and his wife had gone out of town - A. I did not know. In about half an hour afterwards I observed James Westbrook going out with some bundles. I observed the daughter going out with the time-piece. She said, she was going with it to a person of the name of Smith. She came back. I saw her go out with another bundle. Her mother and Samuel Westbrook were standing at the corner of the court.

Q. What was done with the bundle the daughter last carried out - A. She gave it to Samuel Westbrook .

Q. How near was the mother to Samuel Westbrook when the bundle was given to him - A. She might be a dozen yards from him.

Q.She gave the bundle to Samuel - A. Yes.

Q. Was there any more bundles taken out after that - A. There was, by James Westbrook and the daughter, Elizabeth Phipps .

Q. How long did this taking out of bundles continue - A. Some time after eight o'clock, until near one.

Q. When these bundles were all gone, what became of James Westbrook - A. He and Elizabeth Phipps locked the door of Susannah Phipps , and wanted me to have the key. I refused. The child with them had the key. Elizabeth Phipps said, if my mother comes home and makes a noise, she would do for her mother and somebody else. Elizabeth Phipps and James Westbrook went away. They never returned again that night.

Q. Did Mrs. Phipps, the mother, complain to you, that she had been robbed by James Westbrook and her daughter - A. Yes; and the next day, about twelve o'clock, she looked at Covington's door. She said, he was robbed as well as she, and that his property was at Wayman's, in the City-road. She said, she knew where there were a good deal of property, shirts and linen, and if I could spare six or seven pounds, I might buy a bargain, if I could keep a secret, and not tell Mr. Covington; that nothing could hurt her. I said, I had no money to spare. After that time there was no peace in the house. She was always scolding me, as she knew I knew all.

Q. When Covington came to town did you tell him all you knew respecting it - A. I gave him the information I have given you. About a week after he took me up.

Mr. Adolphus. What are you - A. A labouring man at any thing that I can catch.

Q. What were you on the 1st of April last - A. A porter in the green market.

Q. How came you to stay at home that morning - A. I was not well.

Q. You got up, I suppose, when this old lady called you - A. I did. She called me between six and seven. I got up immediately, and sat down by the fire. I went out for tobacco, and eggs for my wife; when I saw these people at the corner of the court I went out for the air. I told Mrs. Phipps I was ill when she called me.

Q.You were a witness here last sessions, were not you - A. I was.

Q. Were you never tried here - A. No.

Q. What is your name? Cochrane or Corcoran - A. Corcoran.

Q. You saw all these people going out with bundles - A. As I told you. Elizabeth Phipps and James Westbrook took the bundles out of the house. I saw nobody else.

Q. You never told any body a word of this until Covington came home - A. I forget whether I did or not.

Q. You were taken up as the thief - A. Exactly so.

Q. And being taken up you told all this - A. I did.

Q. The old woman called you up to hear all this - A. She called me up at different times.

COURT. Did Samuel Westbrook live in the house - A. No.

Q. Did you ever see him in the house - A. I did.

Q. When you went out you saw Samuel Westbrook and the old woman at the corner of the yard - A. Yes.

Q. What distance is that from the house - A.Forty-nine yards.

Q. And there you saw Elizabeth deliver the bundle to Samuel - A. Yes.

Q. Can you tell me whether she saw her deliver the bundle to Samuel - A. I do not suppose she did. Her back was turned.

Q. At what time was it you saw this - A.About eleven o'clock.

MARY CHISWELL . I live at No. 14, Wood's-buildings, Whitechapel.

Q. Did the prisoners, James Westbrook and Elizabeth Phipps, come to lodge with you - A.Yes. He came in the name of James Smith : she came and

his wife, on Thursday, the 2nd of April, and that day eight weeks they were taken in custody.

Q. During the time they lodged with you, did Elizabeth Phipps offer you any thing for sale - A. Yes, a red flowered gown, and a dimity petticoat.

Q. to Mrs. Covington. Had you any gown like that that you lost - A. No.

Q. to Mrs. Chiswell. Did she offer to sell you any thing else - A. Yes, When I was taken ill she offered to lend me a blanket, and a great many bed-clothes, as she thought I was in want of them at that time.

JOHN LIMBRIC. I am an officer. I found James Westbrook in custody. I searched him at the Poultry Compter. I found nothing on him, except an handkerchief I took off his neck. In the mean time Elizabeth Phipps came in. I took her with me to Mrs. Chiswell's house, and searched their lodging. In James Westbrook 's hat-box I found this letter, addressed for Samuel Westbrook , No. 8, James-street.

(The letter read.)

="Dear brother, This comes, with my kind love to you, hoping to find my sister and you in good health, as it leaves me. I shall take it a great favour, if you will let me know how things are settled, for I have heard that James Wayman has been with him, and is letting him have the things back again. I will meet you at the Bricklayers Arms. Do not fail coming.

JAMES WESTBROOK .="

Limbric. I found also in Westbrook's room a duplicate in the name of Smith for a shirt pawned at Mr. Dexter's, on the 25th of May. I found also a chisel in Mr. Covington's house. I tried the chisel to the drawer. It fitted the marks.

THOMAS DEXTER . I am a pawnbroker in Whitechapel. I produce a shirt. The duplicate produced by Limbric is my duplicate. The shirt was pawned in the name of Mrs. Smith, in Wood's-buildings.

Prosecutrix. I know that is my husband's shirt. I made the button holes. I did not make the shirt. My husband had the time-piece and the muslin from Wayman. He delivered them to Hutt the officer. The muslin is mine.

Prosecutor. It is my time-piece.

James Westbrook 's Defence. I am very innocent of what I am indicted for. I was hard at work when I was taken.

Elizabeth Phipps' Defence. On the morning that Mrs. Covington left town, she called me down stairs, between six and seven. She said, where is your mother? Why does not she live at home? Mrs. Covington gave me a five-pound note, and two lace caps. I was rather fearful. I would not take them until I went up to Westbrook. I was to deliver them to my mother in Fetter-lane, where she then was. They all deal in stolen property. The things that were moved out of the place were my own.

Susannah Phipps 's Defence. The man that lives in Covington's house deals in bad-notes, and stolen property. That is how he gets his living.

Samuel Westbrook left his defence to his counsel.

ANN PRICE . I live at No. 8, James-street, St. Luke's. Samuel Westbrook lodged in the house I did. He lived in the one pair. I occupy the second floor. He had been out of work a good while, and on on the 1st of April, he was glad he had got work. I heard him at work all that morning. He is a watch motion-maker. I can safely say he was at home all that morning.

JAMES WESTBROOK , GUILTY DEATH , aged 22.

ELIZABETH PHIPPS , GUILTY DEATH , aged 20.

SUSANNAH PHIPPS , NOT GUILTY .

SAMUEL WESTBROOK , NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Gibbs.

Reference Number: t18120916-4

627. THOMAS CUTTER was indicted, for that he, on the 26th of July , in and upon Thomas Hedges , a subject of our Lord the King, feloniously did make an assault, and with a certain sharp instrument did stab and cut the said Thomas in and upon his head and face and left hand, with intent to kill and murder him .

SECOND COUNT, for like offence to disable him.

THIRD COUNT, to do him some grievous bodily harm.

THOMAS HEDGES . I am a gardiner , at Hampstead .

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. Yes; he is a labouring man at Hampstead. I had known him for some years. On the 26th of July, when I went into my garden, that I rent, it was near ten o'clock at night. I saw the prisoner in the garden.

Q.What was he doing there - A. Stealing of cucumbers. I spoke to him. He ran away. I ran after him. He was going to get over the pales. I pulled him down. We had a scuffle for some time. He cut my hand twice.

Q. Had you recourse to a surgeon - A. Yes; Mr. Heathcote.

Q. Did you apprehend the prisoner that night - A. Yes; he was apprehended by Thomas Boyce . I have no doubt of the prisoner's person. He cut me three or four times. He cut me twice on my hand and twice on my throat, and two or three stabs on my head. I hope you will be merciful to him.

THOMAS BOYCE. I apprehended the prisoner, on the Sunday night, at his mother's house. I told him it would be better for him to come to Mr. Hedges. I thought he might make it up with him. I searched the prisoner, and found a clasp knife.

Prisoner's Defence. He knocked me down first.

Q. to Hedges. Did you strike him first - A. I belive I might. I hit him with a stick.

Q. Had he taken some cucumbers - A. I do not know that he had.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18120916-5

628. WILLIAM MOTH was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Mary Tyler , widow , about the hour of twelve, on the night of the 25th of July , and stealing therein a cloak, value 5 s. two pair of stockings, value 2 s. and a basket, value 1 s. the property of Mary Tyler . A gown, value 6 s. and a pelisse, value 5 s. the property of Catherine Tyler ; and a pelisse, value 5 s. the property of William Tyler .

ANN TYLER. I am the wife of William Tyler . We live in the parish of Isleworth , in my mother's house, Mary Tyler . She is a widow.

Q. Was your husband at home - A. No; he went

out about nine o'clock. We went to bed before he came home. Before I went to bed I saw that all the house was safe; the door was latched safe; I tried it. We went to bed just after eleven o'clock. We left the door on the latch for my husband to come in.

Q. In the indictment there is a pelisse and different articles, and a cloak. Where were these things when you went to bed - A.They hung up behind the door of the second room; that room is on the ground floor, near the street door. I had seen them just before I went to bed The cloak was my mother's. One pelisse belonged to me. The gown and the other pelisse belonged to my sister, Catherine Tyler . Before my husband came home I heard the street door open about a quarter before twelve, and I heard a walking about in the room where these articles were, as if the person was walking on his toes. I heard the door open. I heard a creaking. My husband came home about a quarter past twelve; that was not many minutes after I heard the door open.

WILLIAM TYLER . I live in my mother's house at Isleworth. On the 25th of July I returned home. It had gone twelve. I saw the prisoner near Brentford bridge, as I was coming over the bridge. He was coming as if from my mother's house. The bridge is about an hundred yards from my mother's house. He asked me which was the nearest way to Acton. I told him.

Q. Did you know him before - A. No. I proceeded home. I found the door open. I went to my wife She said, she heard somebody in the house. She asked, if it was me. I searched the house, and missed the things from behind the door, two pelisses, a black gown, and a cloak. I pursued after the man. I overtook him about three quarters of a mile from the house.

Q. When you saw the prisoner about an hundred yards from the house, did you see whether he had a bundle or not - A. Yes. I overtook him in Brentford. I asked him, if he would let me look in the bundle. I told him, I thought it was some property belonging to me, or my friends. He made no answer, but knocked me down. I got up, and followed him. He knocked me down five or six times, and kicked me when I was down. A man of the name of Smith came to my assistance.

Q.Before Smith came up, did he say any thing to you - A. He said, he would murder me if I did not loose him. I hung to him. I had hold of him each time he knocked me down. He extricated himself each time from me. Then I got up and pursued him again, and upon Smith coming up he was taken in custody. Smith examined the bundle he had. It contained two pelisses, a black gown and a red cloak. There was a basket and two pair of stockings thrown over the bridge. The watchman found them. These things were given to Addely, the constable, the same night.

Q. Are you sure that the same man that you afterwards stopped, was the same man you spoke to when you were going home to your mother's house - A. Yes.

WILLIAM ADDELY . I am a constable of Brentford. I was called up to take charge of this man. These things were delivered to me by Tyler; two pelisses, a black gown, and a red cloak. They have been in my custody ever since.

Mrs. Tyler. This is my pelisse; this is my mother's cloak; the black gown is my sister's, and this pelisse.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked up these things as I was coming through Brentford. I was going to Deptford to see my daughter

GUILTY, aged 36,

Of stealing only .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18120916-6

629. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of September , twenty eight yards of printed cotton, value 42 s. the property of Andrew Laurie , upon a certain wharf, adjacent to the navigable river Thames .

JAMES PATTERSON . I am clerk to Andrew Laurie . He is a wharfinger , Lower East Smithfield. On Saturday, the 5th of September, we received four bales from the house of Richard James, in Bishopsgate-street. One of them bales, No. 4, was cut open on Saturday night, and two pieces of printed cotton were taken out. On Saturday morning I saw that it had been cut open.

JONATHAN MURRAY. I am a pawnbroker, 99, Upper East Smithfield. On Saturday evening, the 5th of September, about a quarter past eight o'clock, the prisoner offered a piece of cotton to pledge I looked at it, and asked him if it was his own property. He said, it was, and that he had just returned off a voyage. I did not believe him. I detained the property. I am positive he is the man.

THOMAS JONES . I am a servant to Mr. Richard James . On Saturday, the 5th of September, I assisted in packing up four bales of cotton, to go to Laurie's wharf.

Q. Look at that cotton that is now before you - A. I am confident of putting a piece of this pattern into the bale. It was sent to Mr. Laurie's wharf, on the side of the river Thames.

Q. What is the value of that piece - A. About two guineas.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing about the cotton. I went about with a shipmate of mine. His bed and blanket were in pawn in that shop. I was taken in possession for the cotton.

GUILTY, aged 27,

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Confined Two Years in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Gibbs.

Reference Number: t18120916-7

630. ANN BURNHAM was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of June , three silver table spoons, value 30 s. and two silver desert-spoons, value 20 s. the property of Francis Gladwin , esq. in his dwelling house .

SARAH GLADWIN . I am the wife of Francis Gladwin . The prisoner was my servant .

Q. Did you miss any table-spoons - A. Yes,

three silver table-spoons, and two silver desert-spoons.

Q. When had you seen them before they were taken - A About three weeks before, when they were delivered into her possession. I did not see them afterwards until I saw them at Bow-street.

Q. How long had the prisoner lived with you - A. About three months.

Q. Do you know of your own knowledge that she took them - A. Only by her confession at Bow-street office.

JOHN TINDELL . I am a pawnbroker, at Mr. Nicolls's, in Old Brentford. I produce the spoons. They were pledged on Saturday, the 6th of June by whom I cannot say, in the name of Ann Burnham. They have been in my possession ever since.

SAMUEL TAUNTON . I am an officer. I was sent for to Mrs. Gladwin's house, at Hanwell Heath, in consequence of the robbery. From the circumstances I heard there I took the prisoner into custody. She acknowledged that she pledged the spoons at Mr. Nichols's, a pawnbroker, at Old Brentford.

Prosecutrix. They are my spoons. There is S upon them. My name is Sarah, and my husband is in India. I was married in Calcutta.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence; called one witness, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY, aged 19,

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Confined Six Months In the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18120916-8

631. CHARLES BULLOCK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of July , a bag, value 6 d. eight bank-dollars, five three-shilling bank-tokens, six eighteen-penny bank-tokens, and six shillings, the property of James Bailey , in his dwelling-house .

JAMES BAILEY . I keep the Gold Chain public-house, in the Liberty of the Tower within. On the 13th of July last, between the hours of three and four in the afternoon, I lost a bag, containing silver and other things.

Q. What time in the day had you seen it - A. I saw the silver in the bag ten minutes before the prisoner went out of my house. It was in a small chest of drawers, in the bar. The drawer was not locked. The prisoner had been sitting in the bar. He came to ask me how I did. I knew him four or five years.

Q. Had you left the prisoner alone while the prisoner was sitting in the bar - A. Yes, I went over the way once.

Q. How soon after the prisoner was gone was it that you missed it - A. I missed it before he went out of the house. He got up, and said, he had got three friends that had gone round to see the Tower; he would go and see the Tower with them, and he would return with them in a few minutes. As he stepped from the bar I perceived that his pocket hanged heavy I saw a glimpse of the bag in his pocket. I turned round and looked in the drawer, and the bag of silver was gone. I ran out of the house after him, to see if I could see him. I could not find him. I did not see him until the officer brought him, about seven days after I lost the silver. The bag was brought to me.

Q. Do you know how much money was in the bag - A. There were seven pounds in the bag, eight dollars, about five three-shilling pieces, about six eighteen penny pieces, and six shillings.

Q. From the time when you saw him come in until the time you saw him go out, had there been any person in the bar that could have got to that drawer - A. Nobody.

Q. I think you said, the prisoner said he would come back again - A. He did.

Q. Did he ever come back - A. No. The prisoner had two glasses of gin and water, and as he went out he threw down a shilling. I said no, Charles, I shall not take any thing. He was then stepping out of the bar. I saw his right hand coat pocket hang heavy. After he went out of the house I pursued him directly to a corner house; where there were several ways. I could not see him, nor which way he took. That is all I know.

JOHN DRUCE . I am a storehouse-man belonging to the Tower. On Monday the 13th of July, I had been into the stone kitchen to drink a pint of porter, and between three and four o'clock, on my going out, I saw this man go behind a centry-box; he stooped down and dropped this bag. The centry-box was close by the Spur gate.

Q. How far is the Spur gate from the public-house that Mr. Bailey keeps - A. Not many yards. I do not know the length.

Q. Is it in sight of Mr. Bailey's house, or not - No, it is not He stooped behind the centry-box, and put something down. He went out of the Spur gate, and went over the hill.

Q. How soon did you know what it was that he put down there - A. I went immediately and picked up this bag.

Q. Did you know the prisoner before - A. I had seen him some years ago, when he lived at the Cross Keys, Gracechurch-street.

Q. Had you sufficient knowledge of the prisoner's person, so as to be sure it was the prisoner that put that thing behind the centry-box - A. Yes. I took the bag home to my lodging that same afternoon, and left it at home that night. The next morning I was informed that Mr. Bailey had been robbed. On Wednesday morning I carried it to Mr. Bailey, and shewed it him. He took it in his hand, and returned it to me again, and I have kept it in my possession until this present time. This is the bag; there was no money in it when I found it; it was just as it is now.

Prosecutor. I know the bag to be mine; there is a small hole at the bottom; and I know it by that opening, just as if it was a double bag.

Prisoner's Defence. I throw myself on the mercy of the court.

GUILTY, aged 35,

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18120916-9

632. CATHERINE DREW was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of July , two pieces of ribbon, value 35 s. the property of Sophia Pullett and Hannah Good .

HANNAH GOOD . Q. You and Miss Pullett keep a milliner's shop - A. Yes; No. 2, Somer's Town, in the parish of St. Pancras .

Q. Do you know the prisoner, Catherine Drew - A. Yes. On Monday, the 17th of July, she came to our shop, she had strawberries to sell. She purchased two yards of ribbon, and at the time she was in the shop there came in a man. He bought about a yard and a half of galloon, and while we were serving it I saw her take her hands from the drawer, and put them under her coat, but there being no one but me and my sister in the shop, we suffered her to go from the door, and on looking over the drawer we found that she had taken two pieces. We sent my little boy after her to the end of the street, and the same man that was in our shop was talking to her. She had not seen the little boy before. She came back with him, and when we taxed her with it she said, she had not got it. We sent for a constable. She said, that if we would suffer her to go she would send the ribbon back; instead of which she brought some money, which we did not chuse to take. She said, the ribbon she could not get, but if we would excuse her, if it was six pounds she would pay.

Q. How much ribbon was taken - A. In one piece about eighteen yards, in the other upwards of twenty. One piece was worth about fifteen shillings, and the other about twenty.

Prisoner's Defence. I was discharged by the magistrate, and she sent me to prison again.

SOPHIA PULLETT . Q. You are partner with the last witness - A. Yes. I saw the prisoner take her hand from the drawer, and put something in her pocket.

Q. Was this while the man was in the shop - A. Yes.

Q. Were you present when the boy was sent to her - A. Yes. I told her, if she would bring the ribbons back I would forgive her. She went with the constable for the ribbons. She brought money. She said, she could not get the ribbons.

Q. Are you sure of the person of the prisoner - A. Yes.

Q. When had you seen these ribbons in your drawer - A. At the same time that she was in the shop I saw both the pieces in the drawer, but one of them she had in her hand, and looked at it.

GUILTY, aged 48,

Of stealing, but not privately in the shop .

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Gibbs.

Reference Number: t18120916-10

633. WILLIAM CHEESEMAN and ROBERT JEFFERIES were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of July , a watch, value 1 l. the property of Edward Martin , from his person .

EDWARD MARTIN . On Sunday, the 12th of July, between seven and eight in the evening, I was in Bagnigge Wells . I went into a small place to make water.

Q. Had you been drinking - A. No. I had not been in the gardens above a quarter of an hour. Cheeseman and Jefferies were making water there. The place being small I stopped to let them come out. When Jefferies past me I was undoing my breeches. He was close to me; and I suppose I lost my watch then. Before I went into this place I was confident I had my watch in my pocket. I had it out a quarter of an hour before I went into this place. Jefferies passed me close. I never felt my watch go at all. When Cheeseman passed me I was buttoning up my small clothes again. Cheeseman and Jefferies were in company together. After he passed me going out of the place he was detected with the watch in his hand.

Q. You did not see that - A. No. The watch is in court. I never missed the watch until I was apprized of it.

THOMAS PILES . I am a fireman, of the Sun-fire office. I was in Bagnigge Wells on this Sunday evening. I was going in a small place to make water, and as I was going in I saw Cheeseman with a watch in his hand, with a red ribbon to it: he was holden it up, as if to shew Jefferies. He said it is all right; and held it towards Jefferies. He was in company with Jefferies. On my seeing a watch in his hand, and a watch in his pocket, I had suspicion. I went into this place. I saw Martin. I said to him, have you lost a watch with a red ribbon to it; if he had, I should know the people if he would come with me. I immediately ran out of Bagnigge Wells. I turned towards Gray's Inn Lane. I overtook the prisoner. I took hold of Cheeseman's coller. I said, where is the watch. He said, what watch. I took the watch out of his hand, and gave it to the constable. When we came to the watchhouse, Jefferies said, that Cheeseman came honestly by the watch, and he could prove it. Martin after that said, I will prove the contrary, here is my name at the back of the watch. He turned the watch up, there was E. M. for Edward Martin . This is the watch.

Prosecutor. I am certain it is my watch.

Cheeseman's Defence. I am placed here to answer a charge for which I call God to witness my innocence. I am a native of Hull, in Yorkshire, and after serving my apprenticeship to my master's satisfaction I came up to London, in hopes of improvement. Robert Jefferies was not suspected until he was seen following me to the watchhouse. He was not charged, nor even accused. And I call God to witness, I picked the watch off the ground and went through the gardens with the watch in my hand, to see if any body would own it. If not, I intended by the advice of Jefferies to advertize it. Jefferies would not have been taken in custody had not he stood up and said I was an honest man. I firmly hope for your acquittal that I may return to honest industry.

Jefferie's Defence. I became acquainted with William Cheeseman at Hull in Yorkshire, at which place

his character stood honourable for honesty and industry. On this Sunday he called upon me at my lodgings, and having heard of Bagnigge Wells, we took a walk there; and after walking two or three times round the garden we agreed to return home. We went to the place called the water-closet. Cheeseman stooped down and observed to me, that he was very fortunate, he had found a watch. We agreed to advertize. We walked through the gardens. Cheeseman held the watch up in his left hand. On our return out the prosecutor and witness both collared Cheese-man. When Pile took the watch out of his hand, and having maltreated him, I told them they were mistaken as to his being a thief, he had found it in the gardens. When they took him to the watch-house, Cheeseman desired me to come into the watchhouse, from a conviction of his innocence. I consented; they never accused me of being concerned with him.

Cheeseman called six witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Jefferies called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18120916-11

634. JAMES ASHTON was indicted, for that he, on the 18th of July , feloniously, and without lawful excuse, had in his custody and possession, a forged bank-note for the payment 10 l. and that he had another bank-note for the payment of 10 l.; and that he had, on the same day, another bank-note for the payment of 10 l.

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120916-12

635. JAMES ASHTON was indicted, for that he, on the 18th of July , feloniously did forge and counterfeit a bank-note for the payment of 10 l. with intention to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England . And

SEVERAL OTHER COUNTS for like offences, only varying the manner of charging them.

Mr. Knapp, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, was the prisoner of this charge

ACQUITTED .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120916-13

636. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of August , a calf skin, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of John Aylwin .

JOHN AYLWIN . I am a wharfinger . I lost the calf-skin on Saturday, the 9th of August, from off the wharf, in Lower Thames-street .

JOHN SHEPPARD. I am a servant of Mr. Aylwin. I found the calf-skin in the prisoner's apron. He was on the quay. It was a little after twelve. I took it out of his apron. He was turning round to go away with it.

JOHN BAXTER . I was in the crane. The prisoner came along the wharf. He looked up. He did not see any one. He did not see any one. He did not see any one. He took the skin up, and put it in his apron.

Prisoner's Defence. I took the skin up, and looked at it. I never put it in my apron.

Sheppard. This skin was on Mr. Aylwin's wharf.

GUILTY , aged 64.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120916-14

637. WILLIAM DAVIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of July , a pocket-book, value 1 s. the property of Thomas Dobson , from his person .

THOMAS DOBSON . I am a corn-factor . I lost the pocket-book on the 24th of July, about two o'clock in the day, as I was entering Jack's coffee-house at the Corn Exchange . As I entered the door I felt an interruption in my pocket. I put my hand into my pocket, and missed my book. I immediately looked round, and saw the prisoner turn down stairs with his hand in his coat. I accused him with having taken my pocket-book. He made no reply, but made all the haste he could down stairs, and ran across Mark-lane, up a gateway, nearly opposite. I cried, stop thief, and as he was returning back, down the same gateway, I met him, and took him by the collar. The pocket-book was handed to me immediately by Mr. Redman. I took the prisoner into the coffee-room, and delivered him into the custody of the officer.

WILLIAM SMITH. I am a corn-dealer. On the 24th of July I was at Mark-lane. About two o'clock I heard the cry of stop thief. I saw the prisoner run down Mark-lane. He turned up a gateway. I lost sight of him. He turned back again. He ran by me. He had his hand upon the pocket-book in his side pocket. I am sure he is the same man.

ROBERT REDMAN . I saw the prisoner coming down stairs. Mr. Dobson cried out, stop thief. I pursued him to the gateway. He took the pocket-book from his coat, and put it under some rubbish, which turned out to be Mr. Dobson's pocket-book. I gave it to Mr. Dobson. The prisoner retreated and endeavoured to illude the party that was pursuing him. He called out stop thief, and said he had ran that way. I told him he was the man. They took him.

RICHARD CLARK . I am a millwright. I was at work up this gateway. The prisoner ran up the gateway, and throwed the book down. I took it up, and delivered it to Mr. Redman.

JOHN WISE . I am an officer. I produce the book.

Prosecutor. It is my book.

Prisoner's Defence. I leave it to the mercy of the court. I am a soldier in the seventh fusiliers. I am just come home from Spain. I am wounded in the left arm.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Confined One Year in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120916-15

638. WILLIAM YOUNG and WILLIAM LEWIS were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Edward Holwell , about the

hour of two, on the night of the 4th of August , and stealing therein, two girandole candlesticks, value 40 s. a wire-work of a girandole candlestick, value 2 d. two glass shades, value 40 s. a nassal of a girandole, value 1 d. an earthen candlestick, value 6 d. and two brass knobs, value 1 d. the property of Edward Holwell ; and HENRY HOLWELL for feloniously receiving one nassal of a girandole, value 1 d. an earthen candlestick, value 2 d. a wire-work of a girandole candlestick, value 2 d. and two brass knobs, value 1 d. he knowing them to have been stolen .

EDWARD HOLWELL. Q. You keep a china and glass-warehouse , in Falcon-street, Aldersgate - A. I do, in the parish of St. Botolph, Aldersgate Without. I am the housekeeper. I have a warehouse there. The warehouse is a part of the dwelling-house. On, the night of the 4th of August I was alarmed by Pearce. There is a communication from the dwelling-house to the warehouse. It is under the same roof. I was alarmed by Pearce between three and four o'clock. In consequence of Pearce's alarm I came down stairs, and discovered that my warehouse window was thrown quite up.

Q. Had you seen that warehouse window the night before - A. I had. That window was quite down and safe. I immediately looked round. I missed two girandole glass candlesticks, one earthen-ware candlestick with a gold edge. There were also two glass shades of a girandole candlestick taken out of the warehouse. They were outside. There were two glass trifle-dishes removed from a table, to a table close by the window. I did not miss any thing besides that. The next morning I went to my neighbour, Mr. Deputy King, and I ordered Hawkins to seek out the parties. I had strong reason to suspect William Lewis . He lived with me upwards of two years, as my porter. He had the care of my place. He had left me about two or three months. Lewis was taken on Thursday morning. When he was brought to my shop I saw him. He denied every thing to me. I told him he would not let me alone. I had forgave him before. I was willing to make him a good man again. Young was taken in the City-road. I was afterwards with Mr. George King ; when he spoke to them they confessed it.

COURT. Before they said any thing to you, did either you or Mr. King, or any body else, tell them it would be better for them - A. No promises of any kind, or threats, were made use of. Lewis said that he was quite tipsy, and that he did not know what he did. He had not been on this side of the water for three weeks before. Lewis said, he got up and took the things out of the window and gave them to Young.

Mr. Bolland. Did Young hear this - A. Yes.

Q. Did Young say any thing - A. I do not immediately recollect. I do not think he said any thing at that time. After that we took them to Guildhall. There they were examined.

Q. Did you accompany Mr. King and the constable to the house of Howell - A. I did, That was on the Thursday, the next day after the robbery. Howell lived in Stonecutter-street: he keeps a kind of a rag and glass-shop. Deputy King and Hawkins accompanied me. We told Howell our business. Howell said, I might look round I looked round the shop; I saw wine glasses about the shop, like mine. I saw nothing there respecting of this charge. I went up stairs. I discovered the stand of one of the girandoles that was on the mantle-piece when I found it. This is a nassal to a girandole. This wire-work, that the drops are suspended to, there were two drops with it; and this candlestick, an earthenware candlestick. They are all mine. I know they are mine by corresponding with the other pieces. I have not the least doubt whatever. These glass shades I marked them as soon as I found them. I told Howell they were mine; he said, they might, he did not know how he came by them: he afterwards varied the story, and said, if they were mine Lewis had given them to him.

Q. Did he say when he had them of Lewis - A. He said, he did not know: his daughter might buy them, perhaps; he could not tell.

Q. Look at that letter, and tell me, whether that is Lewis's hand writing - A. I have no doubt it is his hand writing. I have his writing in my books. It is a letter addressed to me.

(The letter read.)

="Respected Sir,

="The necessity of my writing this letter to you, is, if you send me out of the country, it will be my destruction, together with my wife and children. I rely on your mercy; and pray consider, Sir, you are a father of children; and what a shocking thing it would be if you were torn away from your family. I hope you will not appear against me. The bearer of this is my wife. I entreat you will pay attention to her entreaties for my preservation.="

Mr. Alley. Q. to prosecutor. I understand, what you found at Howell's were parts of a broken girandole. Did not he say, that they were given to him by Lewis; that they were found in the street - A. I believe he did.

Q. To be kept till he called for them. I take it for granted, that the candlestick, if it was whole, it is worth something; but, in the state it is now, it is worth nothing - A. No, it is not.

Q. And the other pieces of a girandole are not worth twelve pence - A. No, not now.

JOHN PEARCE . I am a watchman.

Q. Were you on duty on the night of the 4th of August - A. I was near Mr. Holwell's premises. I was going my round, calling the hour of three o'clock, there I discovered the top of the lamp off, which made me think there was something done that was not right. I looked round, and could not see any body. I picked up the top of the lamp, and carried it to my stand: not being satisfied, I returned to the spot, where I discovered two men standing under the premises.

Q. Do you know who either of these two men were, or both of them - A. One of them was Lewis, the little man. I asked him the reason, why he was there at that time in the morning. I told them, they must go to the watchhouse and give an account of themselves. They condescended to go. In going along I discovered the back part of Lewis's coat, or jacket, that he had had a fall; his coat was dirty, and likewise his pantaloons, which gave me suspicion. I called to my brother watchman, Clark; at the instant

I called, Lewis ran towards St. Martin-le-grand, and Young ran the other way, Aldersgate-street way

Q. Was a man of the name of Fowler with you - A. No, not at that time; he was afterwards. I pursued Lewis, and lost him, and returned back again; then I met the patrol, Fowler; Fowler asked me what was the matter. I told him, and the description of the men; that they had got out of my hands. We then went to Mr. Holwell's, and told Mr. Holwell what I saw, and the description of the party that I saw. I saw Lewis, the next morning, at Mr. Holwell's house. Lewis denied being in Mr. Holwell's house; but, afterwards, in the presence of Mr. King, he confessed, and said, he got in at the window after he threw the sash up.

Q. Did you, at any time, hear Young say any thing - A. He made several excuses to Mr. King. First, he said, that Lewis gave him the handkerchief, with some glasses, in order for him to keep till the next day.

Q. I am asking you now, whether Young said any thing; not Howell - A. I do not recollect.

Q. What did you hear Howell say - A. I heard Howell say, that Lewis gave him the glasses, tied up in a handkerchief, to keep for him until the next day.

="Another time he said, he or his daughter had bought them. He did not know how he came by them.

THOMAS FOWLER . I am a patrole of Aldersgate. I was on duty, on the 4th of August. When I came down Aldersgate-street, I saw two lanthorns running, and just as I came along he called out, Bill! I turned round, to look at him, to see who he was; and when I came up to Pearce, he told me he thought there was something the matter in Falcon-street. Young is the man I saw; he had an umbrella in his hand, holding over his head. I am sure he is the man. I could pretty well swear he is the man. He was a tall thin man, pitted with the small-pox; it was about a quarter or twenty minutes past three when I saw him.

JOHN LACEY HAWKINS . Q. You are one of the marshalmen - A. Yes; Mr. King gave me the first information. From there I went to the prosecutor, and from there I went to King-street, in the Borough, to Lewis's apartment. The first day I went, I could not find him. A little before six I took him out of bed from his wife. I told him I wanted him. I asked him where he had been after he had been at his club-house last night. I asked him, if he could tell where he was from two till four: he said, I was at home. The landlord of the house where he lodged came and asked what was the matter. I said, I am come to take this man up for robbing his master's house. The landlord said, he was not at home until four o'clock in the morning. I asked him if he could shew me what coats he had on his back. He shewed me one; I found this coat wet and dirty. His pantaloons were a little dirty. I took Lewis in custody, and took him to Mr. Holwell's house. He denied every thing. After I had heard there were two in company, the prisoner told me his club-house was the Rose and Crown, in Monkwell-street. I went there to find the other young man's name. I could not find his name for a long while. We were recommended to the prisoner, Howell, respecting of Lewis, by another person. I began to think it was very strange that he knew both the prisoners, he keeping a glass shop. I told Howell that Mr. Holwell's house had been broken open, and I understood he had bought the property. He said, No. I asked him if he knew a man of the name of Lewis, and a man of the name of Young. He said he knew them. I asked him if he could tell me where Young lived. He said, No. I told Howell I had come to search the place. I pulled out my staff; he said he had no objection, I might search any where. I searched, found nothing; particularly, after we had done searching below, I thought I might as well search up stairs. His wife made a little objection. I went up stairs with Mr. Holwell; and the moment I went up stairs Mr. Holwell found them things. I asked Howell, what he could say now; he was in a pretty mess. He said, he did not know how they came there. I said, you must have bought them. He said, No. At Guildhall, he said, Lewis gave them to him at a house in Red-cross-street; he gave them to him to carry home. While I was leaving Howell's house, that instant I heard where I could find Young, if I would go to the Bun-house, in the City-road, I should find him making of buns. In Mr. King's accompting-house, I heard Young tell Mr. King, that it was Lewis got up. He said, we were all drunk; it was done in a lark; Lewis got up and handed down the things. Young pointed out one that he had not received; the other things he said he had received. After we went in the coach, Lewis said, they will hang us for this. Young shook his head, and said to Lewis, I will take care how I go out a larking with you again.

Mr. Alley. Nothing was found upon the man they charge to be the receiver - A. Nothing; but these things were found at Howell's house. In the prosecutor's house some things were only moved, and some were found on the leads.

GEORGE KING . Q. Where did you first take the transaction up - A. On Wednesday, the 5th of August, in the morning, being informed that my neighbour Holwell had been robbed, as deputy of the ward, I sent for the watchman: and when he informed me the nature of the robbery, and the description of the parties, I had no hesitation of the criminality of the prisoner Lewis. I knew him for two years. He had committed a theft on my premises. I recommended that Mr. Holwell should take steps to apprehend Lewis. He was apprehended on the Thursday morning. On the Thursday morning I saw Lewis at Mr. Holwell's.

Q. What passed between you and Lewis - A. I interrogated him very closely on the subject, on the company that he was in at that time in the morning. He denied any knowledge of the man, except having seen him twice before.

Q. Who was the man you mentioned - A. The man that appears to be the other prisoner. He said, that he had only seen him twice before. I requested that he would take his shoe off his foot, and deliver it to me. He did so. I then went up stairs to Mr. Holwell's warehouse, and measured

the print of the foot on the counter. It exactly corresponded with the size of the shoe. I made my observations of the marks of fingers, very small, on the window. Afterwards I returned to Lewis, and requested that he would go with me into my accompting house. I pressed him, on all sides, in vain, to confess. I was led to ask him, how he became acquainted with whom he was seen. He told me that he had first seen him playing at a game of skittles. I asked him, where his recollection did not serve him. I asked him, if it was not at Plowman's, in Redcross-square. He answered in the affirmative. Mr. Plowman came, in consequence of my request, to my accompting-house. I asked him, if he knew a man of the name of Young. He said, no, he knew no man, a baker, but a man of the name of Harvey, who had lived in Redcross-street. I then sent for Lewis. Plowman said, that was one in company. I further pressed, in Lewis's presence, who the others were. He said, one was a stranger to him, but the other was a man that bought glass, meaning Howell. Howell was with Lewis on the Wednesday evening, the night after the robbery. Plowman could not recollect Howell's name. He said, he lived some where in Fleet-market. I requested that he would accompany me and the officer in the search of this man's premises, and, after some difficulty, Howell's house was found, in Stonecutter-street. I went into the house, and asked Howell, if his name was Howell, and if he was the master of the house. He answered in the affirmative. He was then told by the officer that a robbery had been committed, and that these parties were suspected. I then asked Howell if he he had seen Lewis lately. He answered, no, not for some time. Have you bought any thing of him lately? No, not for some time. Have you received any thing of him of any description? No, not for some time. Hawkins then said, you have no objection to our searching your premises? No, I have no objection, search where you like. Finding nothing that the prosecutor could identify, we proposed going up stairs. We were in the lower shop. An objection was made to our going up, as the room was in a disordered state. I do not not know by whom, whether it was the wife or Howell. I said, that we were married man, we had no idle curiosity to satisfy. We then entered the room, and found the things. Mr. Holwell challenged the nassal of the candlestick and stand, and the wire work of the girandole. I then said, Howell, what have you to say now? I know nothing about them. I will state to your lordship, that previous to my first interrogation I told Howell that it was necessary for him to be explicit that he might be upon his guard. At one time he said, he supposed his wife might have received them with broken glass. He first denied them. The wife denied, in Howell's presence, and said, the transaction was with himself. He afterwards stated, that Lewis brought them there, throwed them down, and said, take care of them for me. I left him in the custody of the officer, and returned to the accompting-house, and sent for Lewis. I told Lewis, that it required now that he should be very cautious and tell the truth. I asked him, how he came in possession of the things that were found at Howell's, namely the girandoles and the brass-work. He said, that he climbed up the water spout, and entered the window; that the fastening was not turned; that he pushed up the window, and got easy entrance. The first thing that he removed was the girandole; that he handed them off the leads, and gave them to Young. Young was not present; he was in custody then. He said, that on the Wednesday evening he had been at Plowman's with Young and with Howell; that Young returned to him part of the glass and brass-work which, with what he had in his own possession, he delivered to Howell as they came out of Plowman's house. I then had Young brought into the accompting-house. Young confessed that Lewis entered the window and handed down the things to him. He acknowledged that it was done in a bit of a lark, he being in liquor. I then had Howell in, who denied how they came in, in strong and positive terms. He said, when he arose in the morning he found them there, tied in an handkerchief, but by what means they came there, he knew not. I then put the question to him. In Lewis's presence, who had charged him with receiving them coming out of Plowman's house; to which he said, if I did I was drunk. We then proceeded to the magistrate.

Mr. Alley. It turns out that this man received these things of Lewis, but he gave nothing for them.

SARAH WIGAN . Q. Does a brother of yours keep the Rose and Crown, in Markwell-street - A. He keeps the Rose.

Q. Was Lewis and Young at your house on the 4th of August - A. They were. They came about half past ten, and staid till two. I knew Lewis. I never saw Young before that night. They both went out together. I never saw Howell with them.

Young's Defence. I was along with Lewis so late as two o'clock. I was going home. Lewis said, stop. When I came to Mr. Howell's window, he said, he should not be a minute. He got up to the window. I did not know for what purpose. He threw these pieces of glass out. I picked it up. On the ensuing evening I gave it to him. I did not know what do with it, nor do I know what he did with it afterwards.

Lewis's Defence. I cannot deny what he says. I delivered them to Howell.

Howell left his defence to his counsel.

COURT, to Mr. Holwell. You have no partner, I suppose - A. No.

Young called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

YOUNG, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 37.

LEWIS, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 23.

[The prisoner, Young, was recommended to mercy by the Jury, believing it to be his first offence,

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120916-16

630. THOMAS ISAACS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of August , sixty penny-pieces, and four hundred and eighty halfpence , the property of Thomas Higgs .

THOMAS HIGGS . I am a drayman . The money that I lost was in the dray-box; the box was fastened to the dray; the dray was at the top of the King's Road - A. all I know is, I lost five papers of copper money, value 5 s. each.

EDWARD TURNER . I am a servant to Mr. Alderman Coombes.

Q. Was this Alderman Coombe's dray - A. No, I was coming up the King's Road. I saw the dray standing on this side of James-street. I saw Isaacs under the dray; he went from the dray and looked down James Street; he came back to the dray again under the box, and took five papers of halfpence, and on his running into Theobald's Road, he let one of the papers of halfpence fall, he took it up, and put it into his hat; I pursued and took him, just before he came to Green-street. I said you have been robbing this dray. He had one paper in his hat, and four papers in his bosom. I made him take them out of his bosom, and put them into his hat. I took him back to the dray. He took a spike out of his pocket, and threw it among the people. He was never out of my sight from the time he took them out of the box until I took him.

WILLIAM READ . I produce the money and the spike. When I took him in custody, he said he did it for want. He broke the box open with the spike.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to his character.

GUILTY, aged 12.

Judgment respited .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120916-17

640. ANN WATTS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of July , three pieces of muslin, value 2 l. 7 s. 6 d. one piece of cambric, value 58 s. and a piece of cotton, value 3 l. 4 s. the property of William Bedford and John William Liddiard , in their dwelling-house .

JOHN WILLIAM LIDDIARD . Q. Have you any partner - A. Yes, William Bedford ; our house is 61, Friday-street. We are wholesale linen-drapers ; our house is in the parish of St. Matthew . The prisoner was quite a stranger to me.

JOHN SMITH. I am a servant to Messrs. Bedford and Liddiard. On the 17th of July, between five and six in the afternoon, the prisoner came to our warehouse, she asked for a person of the name of Atkins; no such person lived in the house; she was told, no, there was no such person. She returned. I saw her take the parcel and put it under her cloak; that parcel was in the warehouse. The warehouse is the lower part of the dwelling-house, and under the same roof. I went to the packing-board where it laid, and pursued the prisoner into the street.

Q. Then finding it was not there, you went after the prisoner immediately, did not you; how far had the prisoner gone from the door before you overtook her - A. About twelve yards. She was walking. I pulled her cloak aside, and told her she had something that she had no business with. She said she had not.

Q. When you pulled her cloak off one side, did you perceive the parcel - A. I did, under her arm, I stopped her and brought her back, and examined the parcel, it contained three pieces of worked muslin, and one piece of printed cotton.

Q. Was there any cambric besides - A. Yes, one piece of cambric. I took her to the warehouse and called assistance.

Q. I hope you called louder than you now speak to us; who came - A. The warehouseman. The warehouseman took the things in my sight. Willis the constable was sent for, the goods were given to him, and she was given in charge.

Q. Was there any person in company with the prisoner - A. No.

JOHN WILLIS . I am a constable. I was sent for to take charge of this woman. I took the woman in charge. I have kept the goods ever since.

MR. LIDDIARD. The printed cotton, twenty-four yards, is our property. They are all the goods of me and my partner. They cost us about 6 l.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in great distress when I went into the shop. I beg for mercy.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 40.

The prisoner was recommended to mercy by the jury, believing it to be from necessity.

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120916-18

641. THOMAS WATTS was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Richards , Mary Todman and others being therein, about the hour of seven, on the afternoon of the 5th of July , and stealing therein a carpet, value 1 l. and a sheet, value 3 s. the property of John Richards , and a coat, value 5 s. the property of William Belcher .

JOHN RICHARDS . Were your house broken in July last - A. Yes, the door was broken open, and I lost some property; I was not in the house. Me and my wife were gone to Putney. There were three or four people in the house, Mr. and Mrs. Todman; they are not here, Mrs. Smith and Belcher is here.

Q. Were they in the house at the time of it being broken open - A. No, they were not. I left the house at eleven o'clock in the morning, and left a carpet, and a sheet in it; they were missing when I returned.

WILLIAM BELCHER . I am a lodger in the house, I left the house about three in the afternoon, my coat at that time was in the back-parlour.

MRS. SMITH. I live next door. I saw the prisoner come out of Richard's with a carpet under his arm, I immediately ran into the passage of Richard's house, and when I came there, there was another young man in the room, he had a pair of pantaloons, he brushed by me and went away, I pursued Watts, and catched him in the next street. He had a carpet with other things in it. I took it from him.

DANIEL ROBERTS. This carpet, sheet, and coat, were brought to me with the prisoner, at the watch-house.

Prosecutor. This is my carpet and sheet.

Prisoner's Defence. I had occasion to go into that

house to inquire for a person of the name of Crab, and going into the house, a man rushed out; he dropped that carpet, I picked it up.

GUILTY, aged 30,

Of stealing only .

Confined Two Years in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18120916-19

642. THOMAS SIMMESTER alias DAVIS was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of James West , no person being therein, about the hour of twelve at noon, on the 12th of August , and stealing therein two coats, value 10 s. a waistcoat, value 2 s. a pair of breeches, value 5 s. and a pair of stockings, value 2 s. the property of James West .

JAMES WEST . I live at Witton , a little village in the parish of Twickenham.

Q. On the 12th of August last, were you at home or not - No, I went out at five o'clock in the morning. I left my wife and two children in the house. My wife returned home first.

MRS. WEST. Q. What time did you go out - A.On the 10th of August, I went out about ten o'clock. I locked the door, and took the key with me. I left nobody in the house. I fastened the window with a wooden-pin. I returned home about half after three in the afternoon, I found the window broken, and set wide open. It was a little sash that goes back, sliding in a groove.

Q. In what respect was it broken - A. One of the panes were broken. I secured the window that morning with a wooden-pin.

Q. Would the pin prevent the window from being opened - A. Yes, without the pane had been broken, and they had taken out the peg. The window was on the ground floor. The window was large enough to let a man get in.

Q. When you got into your house, did you miss any of your property - A.As soon as I got into the door, I found my house robbed, my property was gone, and my box standing open; that box was in my bed-room; there was no lock to the box; there was gone out of the box, two coats, a pair of breeches, a waistcoat, and a black pair of stockings; they were my husband's property. I saw all these things in the morning before I went out.

Q. When did you see them again - A. When they took the prisoner. I have got them here. I saw them on the Wednesday, after the 12th of August, at Isleworth, in Sarah Denyear 's house. The prisoner confessed that he sold them there. The things were delivered to me; these are them. They are the same things that I saw at Mrs. Denyear's. They are my husband's property.

SARAH DENYEAR . I buy and sell old clothes at Brentford. On Tuesday, the 12th of August, about the middle of the day, the prisoner brought me these clothes. He said his name was Davis, his brother was gone in the Militia, he said in the 6th division. His brother was a brick maker, and lived at Cooling. He had left him these clothes. He offered them for sale. I gave him 20 s. in silver for them.

GUILTY, aged 30,

Of stealing, but not of breaking and entering .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18120916-20

643. THOMAS SIMMESTER alias DAVIS was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Robert Gunnell , no person being therein, about the hour of twelve at noon, on the 11th of August , and stealing therein a cloak, value 15 s. a tea-spoon, value 1 s. a pair of breeches, value 5 s. a shawl, value 5 s. a handkerchief, value 1 s. and two waistcoats, value 5 s. a pair of stockings, value 1 s. and a shirt, value 5 s. the property of Robert Gunnell .

MRS. GUNNELL. My husband's name is Robert Gunnell .

Q. Do you remember any thing happening at your house - A. On last Monday, I went out on my business, selling things. There had been a grand review. The prisoner broke into my house; he took the tiles off, and broke through the ceiling. I went out between nine and ten o'clock; every thing was safe in the house then, I returned between four and five o'clock; my things were all tossed about, and the plaster and mortar was all on the floor; it appeared that somebody had come into the house at the top, by taking the tiles off, and breaking through the lath and plaster, they got into the house.

Q. Did you miss any of your property - A. Yes, there is some part of it here. I missed a red cloak, an apron, a shawl, and an handkerchief of mine; of my husband's a small tea-spoon, two waistcoats, a pair of leather breeches, and a shirt.

Q. What was your cloak worth - A. Fifteen shillings, an apron one shilling, the shawl five shillings, the handkerchief one shilling, the tea-spoon nine pence, two waistcoats five shillings, the breeches five shillings, a pair of stockings, value one shilling, and the shirt five shillings. I could not replace them for that money. I saw the property the next day, at a woman's at Brentford, where he had sold it; not all the property, only what I have got in my basket. The prisoner was present at the time I saw it in the woman's custody; her name is Crockett. The prisoner owned that he took the property before my face. They said it would be better for him, if he confessed.

Q. Then you must not tell any thing he said after he confessed; was your husband at home - A. No, he was along with me helping to sell the things.

Mr. Reynolds. You do not know what terms your husband has the house upon - A. I took the house, and pay the rent for it. It is in the parish of Easton.

JOHN OLIVER . I know nothing, but from the prisoner's confession. He confessed the day after the robbery he committed upon Mrs. West.

THOMAS WYATT . I took the prisoner in custody at his own house, at Hounslow. I had a search warrant to search the house. I found nothing in his house. He confessed. I went with him to Mrs. Crockett's.

Q. Had you told him it would be better for him to confess - A.No, I did not; he said voluntary to me, as we were going along the road, that he took the things, and sold them to Mrs. Crockett. These are the things that I took from Mrs. Crockett. I have had

them ever since, and he said he got into the house at the back part. He took off the tiling, and broke through the cieling, and he entered the house.

Q. Were these things shown to the prisoner at Mrs Crockett's - A. They were. He said these were the things that he took from the house.

Q. Did either of the other person say any thing to him - A. I cannot say; they might make a promise.

Q. to Mrs. Gunnell. Look at these things, and say which of them are your's, and your husband's - A. This red cloak is mine, and the shawl, and this apron. The two waistcoats are my husband's.

Prisoner's Defence. I confessed to Mr. Cook, the high constable. I was taken up for something else, and then I confessed.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 30.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Gibbs.

Reference Number: t18120916-21

644. JOSEPH WAYLAND was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of July , six penny-pieces, and one hundred and eight halfpence, the property of John Vicary Broughton , privately in his shop .

WILLIAM EVERED . I am servant to John Vicary Broughton ; he is a woollen-draper . The prisoner came into his shop on the 18th of July, about seven in the evening; he came in under pretence of purchasing, and while I was looking for the article, he came about three feet behind the counter, and took a five shilling paper of halfpence that were marked J. V. B.

Q. Did you see him do it - A. I did not see him take them, but found them upon him with the mark.

Q. What made you suspect that he had taken them - A We had missed about three pounds before, and suspecting that this lad come in under false pretence, I looked at the papers of halfpence, and missed one. I seized him, and found them upon him. I immediately sent for Stone, the constable, and had him taken in custody.

STONE. I produce the parcel of halfpence.

Q. to Evered. Was this the parcel of halfpence - A. Yes, it is marked J. B. V. I found them upon the prisoner. The parcel contains penny-pieces and halfpence, one hundred and eight half pence, and six penny-pieces, exactly five shillings in the whole.

Prisoner's Defence. I was never in the shop before.

Jury. Upon looking at the copper, we find a great many bad.

GUILTY, aged 14,

Of stealing to the value of 4 s. 10 d. only .

Transported for Seven Years

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Gibbs.

Reference Number: t18120916-22

645. WILLIAM CONNOR was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of July , a coat, value 25 s. the property of John Lackington Simmons , privately in his shop .

GEORGE EDWARD . I am shopman to John Lackington Simmons, pawn-broker , in Holborn, near Middle row . We did not miss the coat, until the officer brought it, about three o'clock in the afternoon. I had seen it hanging up inside of the shop at eight in the morning. I had seen the prisoner lurking opposite of the window.

WILLIAM MATTHEWS . I am shopman to Mr. Lamb, pawn-broker, Stanhope-street, Clare-market. On the 30th of July, the prisoner brought the coat to pledge, he asked a guinea on the coat. I asked him, whose coat it was? he said his father sent him; he said his name was Johnson, he lived in Fore-street, Holborn. I examined the coat, and saw Mr. Simmon's ticket on the collar, I concluded it was taken from Mr. Simmon's door. I gave the prisoner into the custody of a Bow-street officer.

THOMAS MANTZ . I am a constable. I produce a coat, I received it at Mr. Lamb's, of the last witness.

GEORGE EDWARDS . It is Mr. Simmon's property. It cost us sixteen shillings, that was lent on it.

Prisoner's Defence. There was a young man waiting outside, he gave me the coat.

GUILTY, aged 12,

Of stealing to the value of 4 s. 10 d. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18120916-23

646. THOMAS EDWARDS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of August , 8 lb. weight of bacon, value 5 s. the property of Dennis Weley , privately in his shop .

DENNIS WELEY . I live in Red Lion-street, Holborn , I keep a grocer and cheesemonger's shop .

Q. On the 15th of August last, were you at home in the shop - A. I was ill, Mrs. Pavey was serving in the shop She is not here.

WILLIAM SALMON . I am an officer. I met the prisoner on the 15th of August; he was endeavouring to put the bacon under his coat. He was standing when I met him first, about five hundred yards from Mr. Weley's shop. I heard a whistle, and he crossed the way to two other men. I followed him. I went round the other two men, and laid hold of the prisoner; he threw the bacon down, and I received a violent blow on my head from one of the other two men. I could not see who gave me that blow, the party was behind me. Michael Lea picked the bacon up. I secured the prisoner with some difficulty. The other two men ran away. It was about eleven at night. I afterwards sent round to see if any body had lost the property; Michael Lea found the prosecutor. He said it was his property. This is the bacon; I have had it in my possession ever since.

Q. to Wiley Do you know that bacon - Q. I do; I cut it myself; it is cut in an unusual manner. I saw it three or four days before in the shop. I am sure of that, and Mrs. Pavey declared to me, that she had not sold it.

SALMON. At the watch-house, I asked him how he came by it; he first said, he had it; he afterwards said, he had not had it; he could not possibly deceive us. I saw him throw it down.

MICHAEL LEA . I am one of the patrols of Bow-street. I was out with Salmon. I saw Salmon lay hold of the prisoner; he threw the bacon down; he struggled to get away. I weighed the bacon, it weighed nine pounds.

WILEY. The prime cost of the bacon is eight-pence per pound.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY, aged 22,

Of stealing, but not privately .

Confined Two Years in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18120916-24

647. CATHERINE FORESTER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of August , a cheese, value 8 s. the property of Thomas William Hodgson , privately in his shop .

THOMAS WILLIAM HODGSON. I keep a cheese-monger's shop at the corner of Queen-street . I only know that the cheese is mine.

ROBERT PASCOE . I am a servant to Mr. Hodgson. On the 12th of August, between five and six o'clock, the prisoner came into my master's shop, she bought a pennyworth of cheese, and after that she went out of the shop, I perceived something under her clothes. I ran and stopped her. I called somebody in to hold the cheese, while I called my master down.

Q. You found the cheese, and you called your master, did you - A. Yes.

Q.Until you saw the cheese under her cloak, had you any reason to suppose that she had taken any thing - A. No.

Q. Did you see her take it - A. No.

Q. Was the seeing it under her cloak the first thing that gave you suspicion that she had stolen any thing - A. Yes, I had no suspicion until I saw it under her cloak.

Q. to Prosecutor. What is the value of this cheese - A. More than eight shillings; it weighs about twelve pounds. This is the cheese. I gave eight-pence per pound for it.

Prisoner's Defence, I was in distress.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 46.

The prisoner was recommended to mercy by the jury, in consequence of her distress.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Gibbs.

Reference Number: t18120916-25

648. JAMES HUNTER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of September , a pair of shoes, value 7 s. the property of Thomas Matthews Redaway , privately in his shop .

THOMAS MATTHEWS REDAWAY . I am a shoemaker in the Strand . On Tuesday, the 9th of September, I was alone in the shop; the prisoner and another man came into my shop to purchase a pair of shoes. I gave him a pair of shoes that stood in the window, to try on; he said, take out five or six pair, you have a good many in the window; I said, sir, I will take them out. I was so doing; a person came in for a pair of boots. The moment that he came in, the prisoner went away; he said you have nothing at all to fit me; when I went up to the window to put the shoes in, I missed a pair of shoes that I had made for Mr. Campbell, expecting he would want them in two or three days. My daughter found the prisoner again in about two days; he had the shoes on his feet. Salmon apprehended him. Salmon has got the shoes.

JOHN SALMON. I produce the shoes. I took them off the prisoner's feet.

Prosecutor. I can swear they are my shoes.

Prisoner's Defence. I only just come on shore the other day. I had leave of my captain to come on shore. He is at the Isle of Wight. If he was here he would give me a good character. I can have a good character from the officers of the ship. I was wounded. I was in Malta three months; how I came here, I know not. I told the man, if I had done him any harm, I would give him a five pound note.

Q. to Salmon. Have you any thing with you that you found upon him - A. I had his absent ticket; it extended to the 8th of next October.

GUILTY, aged 26,

Of stealing to the value of 4 s. 10 d. only .

Whipped in jail , and then discharged

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18120916-26

649. SARAH BAKER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of August , in the dwelling house of Thomas Masson , two broaches, value 2 s. a ring, value 5 s. an umbrella, value 3 s. a pair of shoes, value 3 s. three one pound bank notes, and a ten pound banknote , the property of Thomas Masson.

THOMAS MASSON . I live at 51, Great Portman-street, in the parish of Mary-le-bone . I am the housekeeper there. The prisoner lived in my service three weeks all but two days; she left my house on Sunday morning, the 9th of August, about half after six in the morning, as near as I can guess.

Q. Did you know, before hand, of her intention of going - A. She had been insolent some days before, and on the Friday, I told her she should go when her month was up. I did not know of her going on that day. I missed her on the 9th of August, about half past seven; and about 11 o'clock the same day, I missed a ten pound note, and I think three one pound notes, from the cabinet in the parlour, out of my pocketbook.

Q. Was your pocket-book gone, or only the notes - A. Only the notes; the cabinet was usually kept locked; I had unlocked it two or three times in the morning, before I missed it. After I missed the notes, I saw some little splinters; then I saw that the lock had been forced, and shoved back again. I went for an officer.

Q. Did you afterwards take the prisoner - A. I did. I found her on the top of the coach at Aldgate; she was going into the country, I told her that she must come down. She delivered up to Mr. Jackson the two broaches and the ring. I asked her for the notes; she delivered me a one pound note; she said she had not got the ten pound note; she had not taken the ten pound note, it was a five pound note.

Q. Was there any five pound note in your pocketbook - A. No. I am certain of that.

Q. When had you last seen that property - A.Between four and six o'clock on the Saturday. We got a coach and took her to Bow-street. I asked her how she came to do it; she said she did not know. She said she had laid out four pounds, and had got one-pound out of the five pound note, at Monmouth-street; she passed it for a five pound note. That person is not here.

The broach and ring were in the cabinet. I had not seen them for a week or ten days. I am not positive of seeing them in the course of the week.

Q.Therefore, whether they were in the cabinet on the Saturday night, or whether they had been taken before, you cannot say - A. I cannot, and the great coat was certainly taken before the Saturday; she had a great coat, and this umbrella was with her on the coach. I had seen the umbrella on the Saturday night. I have got the broach and ring here, the ring is marked S. M. that is my wife's initials. I know the broach and ring to be my wife's.

Q. Had you a character with her - A. No, I had not.

THOMAS JACKSON. I was with Mr. Masson, I asked the prisoner about the broach and how she came to take them; she said she did not know; she said she got the place open with an old knife. She gave up to me the broach and the ring and a one pound note; she said she had not a ten pound note, it was a five, she gave it to a woman in Monmouth-street that she had bought some gowns of.

THOMAS LIMBRICK. I am one of the patrols of Bow-street. I apprehended the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I would wish to have the property I am going to suffer for.

GUILTY, aged 16,

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18120916-27

650. MARGARET HARRISON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of February , one thousand and eighty halfpence, the property of Patrick Myler in his dwelling house .

SARAH MYLER. I am the wife of Patrick Myler , we live in the Broad-way, Westminster . We deal in bacon . I saw the prisoner open the cupboard door where the money was.

Q.When was the money put into the cupboard - A. About an hour before we went to the club. The prisoner, me, and my husband, went to the club together.

Q. What had you put into this cupboard - A. Four pounds five shillings in copper, in five shilling papers put up; my husband put it there in my presence, and in her presence; she took two pounds five shillings in halfpence and pence both.

Q. You went together to the club, and came home together - A. Yes, and a man of the name of Powers came home with us from the club, but he had never been at our place before.

Q. When you came home from the club did you miss them - A. No, me and my husband had some words, and she went out.

Q. Did you see her open the cupboard - A. Yes.

Q. How soon did you find that any thing was taken - A. In about half an hour after we came home.

Q. How long after you saw her open the cupboard did you miss it - A.About ten minutes; we found it out by seeing a handkerchief with the remainder of the halfpence that she did not take away. She took the handkerchief with the four pounds five shillings from the cupboard, and those that she did not take away laid on the floor where she had been sitting.

Q. Then you found the handkerchief in which the whole four pounds five shillings had been in, and in which there was two pounds in five shilling papers - A. Yes, the prisoner quitted her lodgings the next morning quite early; she lived near me, within a few doors. She came to my house last Monday five weeks, and my husband sent for an officer and she was examined at Queen-square office.

Q. There were none of the halfpence found on her - A. No, we did not see her until we took her up.

PATRICK MYLER . I am the husband of the last witness. I missed eight five shilling papers. I saw the prisoner in my house. I know no more than my wife.

MARY SIMMONS . Q. Were you in Myler's house at the time that these halfpence were taken - A. I saw the prisoner take out a bundle from the cupboard, in a blue and white handkerchief.

Q. Did you say any thing - A. No, until I heard the man say he was robbed. I then said the prisoner was the person that did it; she put the bundle down by her, and put her hand over it. I saw her go out, she went out sideways holding her pocket.

WILLIAM POWERS . I came from the club with Mr. and Mrs. Myler. I saw the prisoner go to the cupboard; she took out a bundle from the cupboard; I saw her put five shilling papers into her pocket; the bundle was wrapped up in a handkerchief; I saw her put it down by her; she was sitting on a stool. I saw her three times take something out of the bundle and put it into her pocket. After she went out of the house Myler complained of being robbed.

Q. to Mrs. Myler. Have you got the halfpence here that remained - A. No, none of them.

Q. Were they good halfpence or bad - A. They were passable halfpence, new and old together.

Prisoner's Defence. It is all malice; on this day this woman came to me to pawn a petticoat for her; I did, for three shillings and sixpence; she asked me to go to the club with them; we were all in liquor; she was not able to stand. I had always a suspicion that she went with my husband, and when my husband informed me that she accused me of taking two pounds worth of halfpence, I went to her and said I would have it settled; I know nothing of the halfpence; she lodged with me all the time my husband was abroad. I never saw her with a halfpenny.

Q. to Mrs. Myler. Did she pawn any thing for you to raise three shillings and sixpence that day - A.She did, for the purpose of lending it to her unknown to my husband. I dare not to have touched these halfpence.

GUILTY, aged 24,

Of Stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Confined Two Years in the House of Correction and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Gibbs.

Reference Number: t18120916-28

651. HENRY LANGHAM was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of August in the dwelling house of John Morris, a three shilling Bank token and

two one pound Bank notes , the property of Robert Jones .

ROBERT JONES. Q. In the last month did you lodge in the house of John Morris - A. Yes, he is a publican at Hackney .

Q. You lost two one pound notes and a three shilling token, did not you - A. I did, from out of my box in my bed chamber. I had seen it on Monday and I missed it on the Sunday night following; my box was locked, and when I missed my money I found it unlocked. The prisoner lodged in the same house with me, but in another room; I was not present when the prisoner confessed. I saw a one pound note and a three shilling piece he put behind the sand-tub in Mr. Morris's kitchen, he owned he put it there.

Q. Did you hear him say so - A. No.

- PETHEW. I am the headborough of the parish; I challenged the prisoner with taking the money; he strictly denied it.

Q. You told him it would be better for him to confess - A. I did.

WILLIAM MILLER. I am a private in the Tower Hamlet militia. I changed a one pound note for the prisoner at the Cat and Mutton public house.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18120916-29

652. WILLIAM MORRIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of July , ten pounds weight of bacon, value 10 s. the property of William Anderson , privately in his shop .

WILLIAM ANDERSON . I live at Bromley . I keep a chandler's shop . On the 25th of July, a little past nine in the evening, the prisoner and another soldier came into my shop; the other soldier I served with a quarter of a pound of cheese at the counter, the prisoner stood on the door-sill; they went away. In a few minutes after the prisoner was brought back by a man, and the man charged him with stealing bacon out of my shop window; the prisoner said he was very sorry for it. The bacon was brought back in about five minutes after the prisoner. The prisoner was there when the bacon was brought back.

GEORGE BENNETT . I work for Mr. Cutling, a cheesemonger at Bow. I was coming by Mr. Anderson's house a little after nine at night, I saw two soldiers standing at the window. I saw one open the door and go in; as soon as he was got to the counter the other ran in and took hold of a small piece of bacon, put it into his cap and put it upon his head; in the course of two or three minutes he took up another piece, and put it under his arm and marched out of doors with it; when he got out of the shop he walked away, I pursued him and took him an hundred yards off from where he stole it.

Q. Was he ever out of your sight - A. No further than while I called for the constable, that might be about two minutes I then found him standing still in the same place where I left him; his comrade was not with him

Q.Had he the bacon with him at that time or not - A. No, he had dropped it. I saw the bacon afterwards, it was on the ground, about two yards behind him. I told a young lad to give it me up. I took the prisoner back to Mr. Anderson's, and the boy followed with the bacon. I told the constable to take his cap off; he took it off himself, and the bacon fell out of his cap on the ground; the constable took charge of the bacon; his name is Starke. The prisoner was very much in liquor.

JACOB STARKE . I am a constable. I was with Bennett when he stopped the prisoner. I picked up a bit of bacon that dropped from the prisoner's cap; this is it, and this is the other piece which the boy brought up.

Prosecutor. I believe the bacon to be mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I was very much intoxicated. I did not know that I took it.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY, aged 37.

Of Stealing to the value of 1 s. 10 d. only .

Whipped in Gaol and Discharged.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18120916-30

653. JOHN HOLLAND and CHARLES THOMAS STITCHENER were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 17th of August , a pocket-book, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of John Hepburn , from his person .

JOHN HEPBURN . I am a serjeant in the Marines . On the 17th of August, about half past twelve at night, I was returning home to Spitalfield, Holland came and gently laid hold of my arm; I said he was too civil; he said let us be jovial together. I had a blue coat on and my uniform. I clapped my hand to my pocket and missed my book.

Q. Had you any suspicion before - A. No, I asked him if he had my book, he said no; the watchman was coming up at the time, I took him to the watch-house.

Q.Was the other man with Holland - A. I do not know; I was so much in liquor that the next morning I did not know Holland.

MRS. HEPBURN. Q. You are the wife of the last witness - A. Yes, I was with him when he lost his pocket-book; my husband said he had lost his pocketbook; the watchman came up at the time, and he charged the watch with the man he had hold of I did not see the other man's face I observed there were two men; the other man ran away.

Q. How lately before he lost the pocket-book had you seen it in the morning - A. I put it in his blue coat myself.

JAMES KENNEDY . I am a constable. I took Stitchener on the 18th of August. I had information that Stitchener was in company with Holland the night before. I asked him for the pocket-book; he said he knew nothing of it. I took him to a public house; he then told me that he had found a pocket-book the night before, and if I would go along with him he would give it me; I went with him to the house where I found him at work; he took me up a ladder into a lumber room, and from behind some boards he pulled up the pocketbook; he said he found it under the window of a baker's shop, in Hope-street, Spitalfields; he said he had not opened it. I shewed it to the prosecutor, he said it was his pocket-book.

Prosecutor. It is my pocket-book, there were all the papers in it when it was restored to me.

Holland's Defence. I am innocent of the robbery.

Stitcher's Defence. I picked up the pocket-book on my return home.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Gibbs.

Reference Number: t18120916-31

626. JOSEPH BOOTH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of August , a gelding, value 25 l. the property of William Powel and Thomas Powell .

The case was stated by Mr. Gurney.

THOMAS POWELL. I live at Bristol. I have a partner, my brother, William Powell .

Q. In the month of July last were you and your brother in possession of a gelding - A. We were; I sent the horse to a field by our servant; the field was about a mile from Bristol ; I sent it on Monday evening, the 27th of July, and on the Saturday I heard it was missing. There was W. & T. P. on the off foot before.

JEREMIAH PARRY. Q. Are you a servant to Messrs. Powell - A. I am. I took the horse to the field at Knowle, and put it in the field towards Monday evening.

Mr. Alley. Did you see it after the Monday - A. No

JOHN NOSTER . I am a servant to Titus Deane, at Knowle, about a mile from Bristol. I saw the horse the day after it was put in the field. I missed it on Thursday morning

SAMUEL PALMER. I live in the parish of Sison, five miles from Bristol and six from Knowle. I keep a public-house. I saw the prisoner at my house on Sunday evening, the 26th of July he staid about an hour in my house, I am quite sure he is the man.

Mr. Alley. He went down to an election, did not he - A. I do not know that; there was an election there about a fortnight before that.

DAVID SADLER. I keep a repository in Goswell-street, on the 11th of August the prisoner brought a bay gelding to my repository for sale I asked him to walk in and book the horse, which he did.

Q. In what name did he tell you to book it - A. Jerry Booth. I asked him what he had to say about the horse with regard to soundness; he said he wished it to be sold to the best bidder. I put the horse up at the auction and sold it for seventeen guineas. I got a friend to buy it; after the sale was over I saw the horse was only three years old. I told my servants to be careful before they paid him to get his address. On the Thursday I saw him again; he put an address into my hand I told him that would not do, he must go and get the publican to come to me; he walked away directly, he went out of the yard; my friend took the horse home with him. The prisoner never had the money.

Q. Is that the horse that has been since claimed by Mr. Powell - A. Yes, the prisoner was at last taken up and charged by my son.

WILLIAM STEVENS . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner. On the 13th of August, I asked him how he came by this horse; he said he bought this horse of a person of the name of George Woods . I took him home and examined him further. I asked him what he was; he told me he was a copper smith; he said he was to give sixteen pounds for the horse. I asked him if he had so much money about him; he said he had not, he had given six pounds in part. I asked him where George Woods lived, he said he did not know, he had paid him the remaining ten pounds at the Frying-pan. I asked how he came to meet him there, he gave no direct answer, but affected to be in liquor. He appeared to me to be sober. He said George Woods was an entire stranger.

Q. Did he attempt to get from you - A. Yes, he seemed to wish to go out several times.

Prisoner's Defence. I am as innocent as a child unborn of what I am indicted for. I bought the horse of a man in an honest way as I thought, to support my family.

CHARLES JONES . I am book-keeper at the Saracen's Head, Snow hill.

Q.Does the Bristol coach run from that inn - A. Yes.

Q. Is that the original way-bill of that coach that day A. Yes.

Q. Twenty seventh of July, it comes into London on the 28th, what hour do they leave Bristol - A. About eleven or twelve o'clock, and arrive in London about eleven or twelve o'clock.

Q. Look at that name, Hazle, there, is that ticked by you - A. No, the name is not ticked in London; the name of Hazel appears there as passenger that came up in that coach.

JOHN HAZEL . Q. What business are you - A. A coppersmith's tool-maker.

Q. Were you and your wife at Bath in the month of July last - A. Yes, we left it on the 27th; we came by the coach to the Saracen's Head, Snow-hill; we left Bath between the hours of four and five, and arrived in town on the 28th between one and two the next day. We came outside.

Q. Your wife was with you - Yes.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - Yes.

Q.Where did you see him - A. At the Greyhound at Bath, on the 27th me and my wife came on the outside of the coach with him; the coach sets out from Bath, at the Greyhound, that is the house where I saw him.

Q. You say he left Bath and came up to London with you - A. Yes, he never parted with me on the journey.

Mr. Gurney. Did you know the prisoner before Mr. Hazel - A. No, I did not know him before; he called on me two or three days after to know how I was after my journey.

Q. Did he go by the name of Harris when he came to you - A. Yes.

Q. How came he to find you out - Because I gave him my address. I live at 52, Turnmill-street. I work for my brother-in-law, he keeps the house and carries on the business.

Q. Did the prisoner send for you when he was examined at Hatton-garden office - A.No, he did not.

ELLIS HAZEL . I am the wife of the last witness.

Q. Did you travel from Bath with your husband a while ago - A. Yes, on the 27th we left Bath, we arrived in town at the Saracen's Head, Snow-hill, on the 28th.

Q. Look at the man at the bar and tell me whether you saw him before - A. Yes, at the Greyhound at Bath, he came up to town all the way with me.

WILLIAM WATKINS . I am a shoemaker, I live in Booth-street, Spitalfields.

Q. Do you know the man at the bar - A. Perfectly well.

Q. Did you see him any where on the latter end of July - A. I saw him at his own house, King's Arms-yard, Whitechapel, on the evening of the 28th of July. I saw him after that on the 29th in the morning.

JANE HOW. I am sister-in-law to the prisoner. I am married to his brother. I saw him on the 31st of July; his brother and me were at work together. I perfectly recollect seeing him; my house is No. 30, Rose-lane, Spitalfields.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18120916-32

627. WILLIAM VERNON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of August , six pounds weight of lead, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of Edward Austin , affixed to a building of his .

SECOND COUNT, for like offence, only varying the manner of charging it.

BENJAMIN AUSTIN . I keep the George Yard, Leather-lane . On the 5th of August, from information, I observed the leaden cisen out of which the horses drink, which is affixed to the wall, some of the lead was gone.

Q. Is that wall part of your house - A. It is not part of the dwelling house, it is a wall that surrounds the building.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18120916-33

628. JOHN SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of August , a sheet, value 4 s. a pair of butter-boats, value 1 s. a snuffers-stand, value 1 s. a pepper caster, value 6 d. and three iron spoons, value 6 d. the property of George Shillitoe , in a lodging room .

GEORGE SHILLITOE . Q. You keep a public house - A. I do. The sign of the Swan. If there are two signs of the Swan I do not know it. My house is 384, Strand, in the parish of St. Martin in the Fields .

Q. Did the prisoner lodge in your house on the night of the 16th of August last - A. August last.

- EDWARDS. I am a constable.

Q. How long have you known the prosecutor - A. Only since the 16th of last month, and when he was examined he was perfectly in his senses.

JOHN SALMON. Q. Do you know Shillitoe - A. No. This morning saw his general conduct. Since nine o'clock he has been unruly and irregular.

Q. Do you know whether he has been drinking - A. I do not.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Gibbs.

Reference Number: t18120916-34

629. JOHN HOWELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of July , one pound weight of wool, value 4 s. 6 d. the property of Charles Martin , Spark Moline , and John Gester .

CHARLES MARTIN . I am a warehouse-keeper . My partners are Spark Moline and John Gester. The prisoner has been occasionally employed by us a year and a half; he was in out employ at the time he was detected. On the 7th of July, about a quarter before six in the evening, from suspicion, I directed the officer to search the prisoner. He found a pound of wool concealed in his trowsers. The prisoner pleaded guilty.

Q. Did you say it would be better for him if he confessed or worse if he did not - A. No.

Q. Was it your wool - A. It was in my charge, and the same sort we had remaining. I never found any thing against him until that moment.

Prisoner's Defence. I beg for mercy.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Whipped in Gaol and Discharged.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18120916-35

630. THOMAS HUDSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of August , a quilt, value 2 s. a petticoat, value 4 s. a pair of breeches, value 1 s. and a shirt, value 5 s. the property of Ann Arnold , widow .

ANN ARNOLD. I am a widow. I live in Angel Alley, Little Moorfields . I go out a charing.

Q. Did you lose any of this property on the 1st of August last - A. I did, a bed quilt, a shirt, a pair of breeches, and a petticoat. I lost them out of my room; they were all in my bed.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. I do not.

Q. Did you see the prisoner near your house on the 1st of August - A. No. I did not.

WILLIAM STROUD. I live within two doors of Mrs. Arnold. I saw the prisoner go into Mrs. Arnold's house, with a sack or bag on his back, and when he came out of the house, there was something in the bag. It was empty when he went in; this was on Saturday.

Q. When did you see him again after this - A. Not till I went up to his house on the Tuesday evening I am sure the prisoner is the person I saw on the Saturday.

RICHARD WRIGHT . I am an officer of Worship-street. I went with Mrs. Arnold to the prisoner's room. On Tuesday, the 4th of August, the prisoner was at home and his wife with him. I found this quilt, it was hanging over a turn-up bedstead on which the prisoner said he slept. I took the prisoner in custody, and the quilt I brought away. I have had it ever since. This is it.

Prosecutrix. It is my quilt.

Prisoner's Defence. I am a chimney-sweeper. On Tuesday the 4th of August, I had been out the whole day; on my return home I found a man and a woman had been there. The prosecutrix went towards my bed and took off my quilt, which she threw on the floor, my wife having purchased the article at Rosemary-lane, for eighteen pence and which, if it was stolen, I am sorry as we has astonished. My room was searched and no other property found. I am an honest industrious young lad, who lives honest on the produce of my labour, and never

did an act of dishonesty, and hope to prove the same in court. I am perfectly innocent of any felony, and hope to be restored to my wife by an acquittal.

Q. to Prosecutrix. Did the prisoner say how he got that quilt - A. He said he bought it in Rag-fair for eighteen pence.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Confined Two Years in the House of Correction and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18120916-36

659. JOHN LATHAM was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of July , a saddle, value 2 l. a bridle, value 1 l. and a set of chaise harness, value 7 l. the property of Peter Payne

JOHN NICOLLS . I am a labouring man. I work for Peter Payne , at Tottenham . The bridle, saddle, and harness were taken on Friday night; I left it safe in the stable at nine o'clock.

WILLIAM HACKET . I am a servant to Thomas Pitty , Union-row, Minories. On the 19th of June the prisoner brought two saddles and a girth, which I bought of him. I was informed that they belonged to Mr. King, and on the 4th of July, he offered me these things. I did not purchase them. I sent for an officer. He was taken in custody. The officer took the things. I know him to be the man.

WILLIAM HOLMES . I am an officer. I was sent for to Mr. Petty's house. The prisoner was offering these things for sale when I went in. I took him in custody. The goods have been in my possession ever since.

Nicholls. The saddle, bridle, and chaise harness are my master's property.

Prisoner's Defence. I was employed as a porter, to carry these things to this house. I am a poor friendless man.

GUILTY , aged 64.

Confined Two Years in the House of Correction and fined 1 s.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120916-37

660. THOMAS WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of August , fifteen yards of silk, value 4 l. the property of Robert Andrews Clarke , in his dwelling house .

ROBERT ANDREWS CLARKE. I am a silk mercer , on the pavement, Moorfields. I lost the property on the 25th of August. The prisoner stood on the step of my door, and with his hand he reached a roll of silk out of the window, between eight and nine in the evening. I saw him and called to him, and he immediately dropped the silk about two yards from the door. I immediately collared him, and brought him back. I have no partner. My house is in the parish of St. Stephen, Coleman-street . I occupy the house myself.

Mr. Knapp. How near was this silk to the door - A. About a yard from the door. I never expose any thing outside, it was all inside of the window.

- . I was coming down the pavement, Moorfields. I saw the prisoner put his foot on the step of the prosecutor's door. He took a roll of silk and dropped it at his companion's feet. I never lost sight of him until he was taken.

JOEL WINFIELD . I am an officer. I produce the silk; the silk was given into my possession.

Q. to Prosecutor. Look at that silk - A. It is mine. There is fifteen yards and a quarter, the cost price is 4 l.

Prisoner's Defence. My lord, and gentlemen of the jury, I am not guilty of the offence with which I am charged; the witnesses may be mistaken. I had been in town a few days previous to my apprehension, and provided I could find a favourable opportunity I would go into his Majesty's service. I trust the court will grant me that indulgence.

GUILTY , DEATH , aged 23.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120916-38

661. THOMAS TAYLOR was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of August , six gallons of geneva, value 30 s. the property of our Lord the King , and two other Counts for the like offence, only varying the manner of charging them.

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded.

GUILTY, aged 25.

Judgment respited .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120916-39

662. ROBERT PLOMER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of July , nine yards and three quarter of muslin, value 5 l. and three yards of printed cotton, value 3 s. the property of Thomas Douton , in his dwelling-house .

ROBERT PATISON . I am a shopman to Thomas Douton , linen draper , 52, Holborn-bridge . On Sunday evening, the 5th of July, a few minutes after ten, I was coming home in the evening, I found the street door open. I went up stairs, and when I had been sitting there a few minutes I heard a noise in the shop. I ran down stairs, and saw one man run out and shut the door after him, and shut the prisoner at the bar in. I immediately ran up stairs and gave the alarm; and the watchman came and secured the prisoner.

Q. Why, he might have got away. Did you leave the door open. When you came in you found the door open, walked coolly up stairs and sat down. You never looked to see if any body was there - A. No, I did not. I saw the prisoner examined at the watch-house, and a remnant of print was found in his hat. That is all I know.

Q. You do not know whether the prisoner was in doors when you went in first - A. I don't think he was.

Q. How did they get in - A. I don't know.

Q. Was the key-hole on the outside - A. No, not the outer door. They picked the lock of the shop door to get into the shop. The street door is about two yards from the shop door.

Q. Is the shop part of the house - A. Yes, it is.

Q. Has Mr. Douton any partners - A. No, he has not; he keeps the house. It is in the parish of St. Andrew.

BENJAMIN GURNEY . I am a watchman. As I was coming on my duty, I met a boy running; he said come quick watchman, there are thieves in the house.

It was a few minutes after ten. I made all the haste I could. I went up the private passage. I saw two ladies at the garret window. They cried murder, watchman break in if you can, there's thieves in the house. I forced myself in a window opposite to the area, and so got in, and found the prisoner on the stairs. I took him to the watch-house. He was there searched. There was some muslin found in his hat.

Q. Did you examine which way he got in - A. No, I did not.

GEORGE WATTS . I am a patrol. I assisted the watchman in taking the prisoner. I stood at the door and took him down to the watch-house. The watchman got in at the window; he took the prisoner, and I assisted in taking him to the watch-house.

THOMAS FLETCHER. I was constable of the night. A few minutes after ten the two last witnesses brought the prisoner into the watch-house. On examining the prisoner, in his hat was this remnant of cotton and this silk handkerchief. I went afterwards to Mr. Douton's house. I went into the shop, and on the counter there were these two bags. The bags had been filled with property, they were filled with muslins.

Q. How many yards of muslin - A. I do not know myself. After that I sent the prisoner to the compter.

Q.to Patison. Look at that piece of cotton found in his hat, and the muslin - A. That is my master's property, three yards of printed cotton. The three yards of printed cotton found in his hat is worth six shillings.

Q. Now, as to the other articles found in the bags, does the bags belong to you - A. No, they did not. This muslin is a sample of what was found in the bags; it is nine yards and three quarters. Both the bags were filled with muslins. One of the bags was drawn to the shop door, the other bag was in the middle of the shop, on the counter.

Q. When had you seen these muslins - A. The day before; they were on the shelves when we left the shop on the Saturday evening.

Q. What may be the value of these muslins found in the bag - A. Between three and four hundred pounds. I am sure they are Mr. Douton's property.

Q. When you said you had brought a sample, you meant a part of that muslin - A. Yes. These two are whole pieces, about five yards in length. The value of this part that I have brought is about five pounds.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming from my lodgings in Sun-street, Bishopsgate. I heard the cry of thieves from out of the window. A man came out of the house, and shut me in. I was called up for trial last night, my witnesses were then here, they cannot attend to night.

GUILTY , DEATH , aged 25.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120916-40

663. PHOEBE FARRELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of August , three shirts, value 1 l. a silver spoon. value 5 s. a pair of braces, value 6 d. and a towel, value 1 s. the property of William Young .

WILLIAM YOUNG . I live in Bush-lane, Cannon-street . I am a solicitor . The prisoner lived with me as a servant .

Q. How long did she live with you - A. She came in the month of February or March, I cannot say which. During the time she so lived with me, I have at various times missed quantities of linen.

Q. Are you a married man - A. No, I am not. Of course nobody in the house but her and her husband could take it. He resided in the house with her.

Q.What is her husband - A. I believe he was formerly a soldier. I discharged her on the 22d of last month for some irregularities. On the Thursday following, the 27th of the same month, the prisoner came to my house to fetch the remainder of the things that she had left behind her. After some conversation that relates to other matters I charged her with having robbed me. She confessed that she had robbed me. Afterwards I found some of the goods. I sent for a constable, and she was taken to the compter.

Mr. Adolphus. You indicted the husband - A. I did.

Q.Now, whether the husband or the woman took the things, certainly you cannot tell - A. Certainly, I cannot

JOSEPH CUMBERLAND . Mr. Young gave me charge of this prisoner, and the prisoner gave me the key, and told me where to find the things; and I was to take them to Mr. Young. She said they belonged to him. He had promised he would forgive her if she would bring forward every thing that she had robbed him of. I found two shirts, one towel, one glass, a plate, and a silver spoon. These are the things. The prisoner I had taken to the compter.

Prosecutor. The shirts are mine and the spoon.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120916-41

664. MARGARET PALMER , MARY TURNER , and SARAH SWAN , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of July , forty-eight yards of calico, value 5 l. the property of Richard Terrington , privately in his shop .

RICHARD TERRINGTON . I am a linen draper . I live in the Minories . On the 16th of July, about nine o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came into my shop, I was engaged in the back part of the shop with a gentleman. The three prisoners came in altogether. I saw my young man shewing them some cottons, and after they had been in the shop about ten minutes, they bought a yard; it came to half a crown. They all went out of the shop together. They had not been long gone before one of my neighbours came in and said they were taken up and were in the watch-house, and some goods were found upon them. I went up to look at them, and found it to be my property. I never missed it at all; the goods were not put away. I did not wait upon them myself, my young man waited upon them.

Mr. Gurney. Have you any partners - A. No.

Q. How many people were in the shop - A. Two. The one that waited upon them is here, the other is

not. I have no doubt but all the three women were in my shop.

ISAAC JOHNSON . I am shopman to Mr. Terrington. On Thursday, the 16th of July, near nine o'clock in the evening, the three prisoners came into the shop, they wished to look at some prints; upon which I showed them a good mans, at last they fixed on one, and had a yard, and paid half a crown for it, and then they went away.

Q. Did you suspect them - A. No, I had no suspicion whatever. In about ten minutes a linen draper came in, and said they were in the watch-house, and there were some property found on them. I saw them the next day when they were brought to the Mansion-house.

FRANCIS KINNERSLEY . I am an officer. From an information of an inhabitant that there were three shop lifters, I watched them, seeing them in Mr. Terrington's shop. Forrester was along with me. I saw the three prisoners come out of the shop, and I and Forrester watched them until we came between the five lamps at Aldgate. I stood just by Duke's-place. They all three made a stop, and had a little conversation together. We stood on the opposite side of the way looking at them. Forrester said to me, it will do. I saw Mrs. Palmer hand over to Mrs. Turner, something bulky and heavy from under her silk pelisse, and Mr. Palmer put something into Mrs. Turner's lap. Forrester secured Turner, and I secured Palmer and Swan. We then took them to the watch-house, and in Mrs. Turner's lap we found these two pieces belonging to Mr. Terrington. Nothing was found on Swan nor Palmer, except some bank-notes.

JOHN FORRESTER . I received information, and traced the three prisoners to Mr. Terrington's shop. Kinnersley and I stopped opposite, and saw them come out. We followed them near to the five lamps at Aldgate, where they all three stopped and had some conversation together. Mrs. Palmer put her hand under her pelisse. The two pieces of muslin hanged under her pelisse longways. Mrs. Turner stood in the front of her, held up her gown and received the two pieces of muslin. Mrs. Palmer and Mrs. Swan walked away towards Whitechapel, and Mrs. Turner went towards the city. I told Kinnersley to go and secure them while I went after the woman that had the property. Kinnersley secured Palmer and Swan, and I secured Turner with the property in her lap. I produce the property.

Prosecutor. There are twenty-four yards in each piece. My mark is on both of them.

Swan's Defence. I am innocent of it. I went into the shop with the other prisoners.

Turner and Palmer said nothing in their defence. Called two witnesses, who gave them a good character.

Swan called six witnesses, who gave her a good character.

PALMER, GUILTY , DEATH , aged 28.

TURNER, GUILTY , DEATH , aged 41.

SWAN, NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120916-42

465. JOHN HAYWARD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of August , two pewter pint pots, value 3 s. the property of Robert Graves .

HENRY BALDWIN . I am a carpenter. I know the two pint pots are Mr. Graves's, they were deposited in a closet in Sadler's Wells . The prisoner was a scene shifter . He was in the habit of going to undress himself in the closet at the back of the stage, after he had done his work. I saw him take these two pint pots and put in his pocket one at a time; and soon after I had seen the prisoner put the pots in his pocket, I followed him down stairs, when he returned upon the stage on the opposite side. I thought he had been gone, not seeing him when I came down. I went out of doors, and soon after the prisoner came out. He went up the yard, and I followed him. A coach at that time was passing the yard. I lost sight of him. Soon after I saw the prisoner coming out of the door again. There was another person with me. I told him that Hayward was coming up; we waited to see whether he was going towards the Clown, knowing that he had the pots in his pocket. He went past the Clown. I saw him pass the door. A witness and I followed him. The witness that is here with me felt at his pockets, and found that he had got two pint pots, one in each pocket. We took him, one on each side, after he had got some distance from the Clown, and asked him to go with us to Mr. Graves, he keeps the Clown, and said he wanted us as well. He asked what we all wanted with him. We told him we would tell him when we got to the Clown. When we came to the door he made great resistance. We were forced to call out Graves, and a gentleman that was in the house at the time, came to our assistance; by that means we got him into the house. We took into the bar. We told Graves that we had got a man that had got pots in his pocket. The prisoner said he had no pots in his pocket. We had suspected him a long time, and I had marked each of the pots.

Prisoner's Q. Was not I in the act of crossing to the Clown - A. No, you had passed by the Clown.

WILLIAM GARLAND . I am the master carpenter at the Theatre. M young man watched the prisoner. When I saw the prisoner go past the Clown, I went and seized him. I had previously before that rubbed him down, and found something hard in his pockets. We forced him into the Clown. A gentleman in the bar took a pint pot out of his left-hand pocket, and another out of his right-hand pocket. These are the pots.

MR. GRAVES. These pots are mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I trust, with the indulgence of the court, I can explain in a satisfactory manner the circumstance which seems to involve me in an act of shame. I am a labourer in the East India Company's service, and also a scene-shifter at the Theatre, which brought me eight shillings a week. I told the girl, I would bring the pots home as soon as the Theatre closed. I have ever maintained an unblemished character, and with honesty alone endeavoured to maintain a large family.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 33.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120916-43

666. BENJAMIN CLIFFORD was indicted for the wilful murder of Patrick Doyle , and also charged upon the Coroner's inquisition.

The case was stated by Mr. Gurney.

THOMAS WOOD . I am a watchman of Poplar. On the night of the 6th of August , a quarter before eleven, I was in the New Road ; I found two men there, the prisoner and the deceased, fighting. I saw them strike each other. I crossed the road, and laid hold of the deceased. They struck at each other, while I held the deceased; I parted them. I said what are you fighting about. A woman made answer, that man has been ill used, speaking of the deceased. I went up to the prisoner, and said, what do you mean by kicking up a row, you rascal; you are an officer, instead of making peace you break it. I gave him a shove, and when he recovered himself, he started and run from the deceased. I laid hold of the deceased; I said, you go this way, the contrary way, this is your way home; he said, no, this is my way, that man has ill used me; and if I can overtake him, I will give him a wapping. I held him until the prisoner had got fifty yards, and then he went after the prisoner, and he turned the corner; they were both out of my sight. I heard a noise. I walked on until I came to the corner, and then I heard a great noise near the Globe; when I came within twenty yards of the mob, there was the deceased. I found the deceased falling against some pales. I went up to him, knowing him to be the person that caused this row; I said, it is of no use your shamming drunk, I have seen enough of your sort. I laid hold of him, and put him on his back.

Q. How soon did this man die - A. About a quarter of an hour, or half an hour after, he dropped. We carried him from that place to the Globe public-house, and there the surgeon came. I was not five yards from him until the surgeon came.

Q. While you were there, did you see the prisoner that night - A. I saw the prisoner come to the Globe steps. After we had taken the deceased to the Globe steps, the prisoner came up; he said, I have got into a pretty rig. I said, it serves you right, if you have done this; the man is dead. I had got hold of the captain then.

EDWARD ELAM . Q. On the night in question, were you in Poplar High-street - A. I came out of the Globe public-house; the deceased came running by me as I was coming out. He cried, stop thief. I ran immediately a-head, and the deceased ran a-head of me.

Q. Did you see any person before you running - A. No, I saw no person until I came up to captain Williamson. The prisoner was behind me.

Q. You, I believe, laid hold of captain Williamson - A. I did.

Q. You were engaged in a conflict two or three minutes with captain Williamson - A. Yes, I was down, and when I got up again, captain Williamson knocked me down; and when I got up, I looked round, and saw the deceased had fell down; he never rose again. Seabrook was with me.

JOHN GAGE SEABROOK . I was with the last witness; the account he has given is correct.

FRANCIS HENRY BEAL . Q. I believe you were called after this mischief had been done - A. Yes, I was.

Q. Where did you find the deceased - A. They had just laid him on the steps of the Globe. I found him dead. He had expired apparently a few minutes On examining him. I found him warm, and a wound under the left eye of no consequence The mortal wound was under the left breast, passing between the second and third rib; the wound had penetrated the heart: it had been inflicted by a sharp instrument.

Q. Was a knife produced to you - A. Yes, by the constable, it corresponded exactly with the size of the wound. It was only a common sailor's knife.

JOSEPH GATES . I believe you were one of the keepers of the West India dock gates that night - A. I was, and on that night the prisoner came to our watch-house, about ten minutes or a quarter past eleven. He asked who had got the watch or holloa. Who is there? I do not know which; he said, is that you Joe. He said he had been in a row by the New Road, and he had escaped by jumping over pales and ditches; and he had pulled his hat and jacket off, and laid them upon Mrs. Cardell's bench: and there was, he also said, a noise at the Globe; did I hear it. I said, no, and would I go with him. I said, yes. I went with the prisoner to the Globe I found the deceased laying on the steps.

Q. Did the prisoner there say any thing - A. I did not hear him.

WILLIAM GILL . I am a watchman. I went to the prisoner's house that night, and took him into custody. I told him he must come to the watch-house. He said what for. I said here is a man murdered. He said what good can I do. I said it would look much better, as he was an officer, to come without fetching. I took him to the watch-house. Going along, he said tomorrow I suppose, I shall be hanged.

Mr. Alley. All this conversation passed between you and him, before that he had been to see the deceased with the last witness - A. Yes.

- HAMPSTEAD. I saw the knife picked up by Preston on the table where his night cap was.

- PRESTON. I produce the knife. It is duller now than it was then; it had the appearance of being fresh rubbed upon a stone or something of that kind.

Q. Mr. Alley. Do not you know that there had been a riot that day with the Irish - A. Yes, and at ten o'clock it was all quiet.

CAPTAIN WILLIAMSON. Q. I believe you are a master of a vessel at Blackwall - A. I am.

Q. On that night, as you were walking along, did you hear the cry of stop thief - A. Yes; Elam and the other person came up and laid hold of me while the cry of stop thief was behind.

Q. Had you and the deceased any quarrel whatever - A. No.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18120916-44

667. SARAH PENNY was indicted for the wilful murder of her own female child .

The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.

LUCY BAILEY . I am a midwife. I reside at Hackney.

Q. Did the prisoner live at Hackney - A. Yes, at the house of Mrs. Wildsmith. On the 29th of August last, about half after eight in the morning, Mrs. Guthrie, who lives in the one pair of stairs, in Mrs. Wildsmith's house, came for me to attend the prisoner. I went immediately. I found her in the garret, sitting up in the bed; I desired her to lay down. Mrs. Wildsmith was in the room. She said, Mrs. Bailey, the child is here.

Q.Recollect, and tell me whether before she said there was the child, you perceived any thing - A. No. I searched for the child, and found it as she was sitting up, rather below her knees.

Q. Was the child separated from the mother - A. No, it was not, it was alive. I separated the child. I took it out, and laid it on the bed; then I observed to her, that she had been using the child ill. I said you good-for-nothing creature, you have been using this child ill. I said, what is this you have done. I observed that the child was bruised very much; it was black and blue all over the chest, the lips were swelled very much, and a kind of bladder on the top lip, and it bled violently at the nose and mouth.

Q. You have been a midwife, how long - A. Twenty-five years.

Q. Do you know that the bruises that you saw were occasioned by impression at the time of its birth - A. I never saw such marks before in my life. I examined the inside of the mouth; I was not satisfied. I went to Dr. Reynolds.

Q. What appearances were there on it - A. I could not tell any thing The blood came; so it was a full time child. A very fine child indeed; a female child.

Q. Had you seen any child that had been delivered without assistance - A. Many, without any person being present at the time of its birth.

Q. Supposing the birth to be difficult, can you say whether the marks were such as the child might have by the mother attempting to deliver herself - A. I cannot say.

CORNWALL REYNOLDS. I am a surgeon; I reside at Hackney.

Q. Were you examined before the coroner - A. I was not.

Q. Do you remember being called upon by Mrs. Bailey, on the 29th of August - A. Mrs. Bailey brought an infant to my house on the Saturday morning. I looked at the child. I perceived the child very much bruised upon the chest, and a lacerated wound under the tongue; blood issuing copiously from that wound as well as from the nostrils. The general conformation of the child seemed to be healthy and vigorous; a female child. It appeared to me to have attained its full maturity; but from its appearance, I could perceive ample ground for the cause of the child's death.

Q. To what do you attribute the child's death - A. I believe it to be from the injury it had received, and which I have already stated.

Q. Which of these injuries - A. That under the tongue mostly contributed to its death.

Court. It occasioned the death - A. Yes.

Mr. Knapp. Do you apprehend it to be caused by the laceration under the tongue, or from the consequence of that wound - A. By the effusion of blood. The wound under the tongue was sufficient to effect the child's life.

Q. Have you been much used in cases of this sort to attend upon women - A. If you mean in cases of midwifery, I have.

Q. Was there any other appearance about the child that could have occasioned the child's death except that - A. I should think not.

Court. But the laceration - A. My lord, I conceive the laceration contributed to it.

Q. You should have thought that there was nothing that could occasion the child's death but the laceration - A. Yes, from he laceration.

Mr. Knapp. You have heard that this woman was delivered when she was alone - A. Yes.

Q. I now ask you, whether from the delivery of the child under the present unfortunate circumstances, those appearances, the laceration, and the issuing of blood therefrom; whether that could be attributable to natural causes, supposing a woman to be delivering herself. And from the appearances that you describe could it have proceeded from violence - A. To answer that question particularly, I should like to go into a detail, if I may be suffered; - there is a term in midwifery called face-presentation, in which case the mouth of the child might have presented itself. And if the woman from pain and anxiety to draw the child, might have put her fingers into the mouth of the child, she might have produced in haste such a laceration. I mention the case as a possibility.

Q. In such a possible case, how would the child be with respect to its face - A. The face would present itself first.

Court. And then in the anxiety, from pain to deliver herself, it is sometimes done - A. It is sometimes done.

DOCTOR FORD. If I am allowed to speak, I have seen three cases similar.

Court. When you are called upon, then is your time.

MARY GUTHRIE . Q. Did you go into the prisoner's room - A. I did. I was the first person that went to her. I came instantly down, and went to the landlady of the house.

Q. Do you know whether the landlady went up stairs before you went for the midwife - A. I went up with her. The landlady accused her of the child being born.

Court. That is Mrs. Wildsmith - A. Yes, the prisoner said, no I immediately went for the midwife, that was all that past at that time. I left the landlady in the room with her when I went for the midwife.

MRS. WILDSMITH. Q. You are a married woman - A. Yes.

Q. Were you the landlady of the house in which the prisoner lodged - A. Yes. On Saturday, the 29th of August, Mrs. Guthrie called me up stairs. I went up to the prisoner; I said Sally your child is born. She said it is not. I said, Sally, how can you do so. The child cried, when I answered the second time. I said nothing else to her. I stopped in the room the whole of the time until the midwife came.

Q. Did you see any blood any where - A. Yes, I

did not see the child until the midwife came. When the midwife came, she parted the child from the mother. The blood came out of its mouth and nose. I saw the prisoner no more that day.

WILLIAM HARE . I am a surgeon and man-midwife. I live at Hackney.

Q. Did you see the child on the 29th of August - A. Yes, I met the nurse in the street with it, about nine hours after it had been born, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon. I went to the prisoner's residence; I inspected the child there.

Q. Did you administer any thing to the child - A. Yes, I tried it with a little gruel; it swallowed about a tea-spoon full. The child was in a feeble state; the extremities were cold, and every appearance of death fast approaching.

Q. Did you observe any blood. - A. Not at the time. The gruel that the child returned was a little streaked with blood.

Q. Was the tongue of the child in its natural state - A. Yes, it was rather large and turned back a little.

Q. Can you say whether the injury was done accidentally or wilfully - A I cannot say.

Q. It might have been done while the woman was attempting to deliver herself, might it not - A. Yes.

The prisoner was not put on her defence.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18120916-45

668. THOMAS HEATH was indicted for the wilful murder of Elizabeth his wife .

DAVID DAVIS . I am a labourer. I went to the house of Mrs. Heath; she was my aunt.

Q. I believe you know nothing of the matter, but what she told you - A. No more.

SARAH COX . On Sunday the prisoner beat his wife, and on the Monday morning, I went in and asked her how she did; she said she was very bad indeed.

Q. You must not tell what she told you, but any observations you made yourself is evidence - A. I saw she had a violent blow on her breast, it looked to me to be very bad. She shewed me a bruise on her arm, and a bruise on her thigh; she appeared very poorly. This was on the Monday. I saw her on Tuesday morning in bed. She died on the Wednesday morning. I asked her on Tuesday morning, what sort of a night she had; she said very bad. I asked her now her pain was in her breast; she then said she had got her fatal bane.

Q. What did you understand by that - A. That she had got her blow very bad.

JOHN DEERING . Q.You are a surgeon and apothecary - A. Yes, I was sent for, on Monday the 20th of July, between six and seven o'clock.

Q. In what state did you find her - A. She was sitting in a chair, conversing with two women in her own room. She got up and told me her name was Heath, and that her husband had used her very. She shewed me the bruises; there was one on the left breast, one on the arm, and one on the lower part of the loins.

Q. Did it appear to you upon examination of these bruises, that they were likely to produce her death - A. No. I bled her that evening, and saw her the following day. On the next day she was up, and doing her domestic work. I did not see her after that. She died on the Wednesday morning.

Q. When you saw her on the Tuesday, was there any thing about her that indicated a speedy dissolution - A. No indication of danger on the Tuesday.

Q. I take it for granted, if you had thought there was any danger, you would have visited her again - A. Certainly, I should.

Q. You did not visit her until you heard of her death - A. No, I saw her on the Wednesday.

Q. Did you see her opened - A. No, Sir, that is all I know of it.

Mr. Alley. Had you an opportunity of knowing whether she was in liquor - A. When I visited her she was not; neither the first or second time.

Q. What is the name of the surgeon who opened her - A. Mr. Spry, Sir.

MR. SPRY. Q. Had you seen the deceased, Mrs. Heath, before she died - A. I had not. I saw her on the Thursday. I examined her; there were no outward marks sufficient to produce her death. I opened the body; I found within the ventricle of the brain a quantity of serum.

Q. In an healthy subject, Sir, that would not have been the case - A.Certainly not.

Q. In your judgment was that sufficient cause to produce death - A Quite sufficient.

Q.If you could by any possibility know that any such cause existed, you would be certain that death would follow - A. Certainly there were several marks of violence on her body, on her left breast, but of no importance. I examined the body very carefully; I found no cause of death, but what I have described.

Q. You can say that these outward marks of violence did not produce any effect to cause her death - A. They certainly did not.

Q. The effusion of blood upon the brain could not have been produced by any of this violence - A. Certainly not, we should have had other appearances.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Gibbs.

Reference Number: t18120916-46

669. WILLIAM PERKINS , JOHN ROBERTS , and MARY LIPSCOMB , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 31st of August , a deal box, value 4 s. a coat, value 14 s. a pair of breeches, value 8 s. a pair of stockings, value 3 s. a hat, value 8 s. a waistcoat, value 5 s. three gowns, value 1 l. 8 s. a shawl, value 4 s. an habit shirt, value 6 d. a frock, value 2 d. three pair of worsted mitts, value 4 d. a pocketbook, value 6 d. four pounds in monies numbered, and two one pound Bank notes, the property of Abraham Bates , in his dwelling-house .

ABRAHAM BATES. I am a white smith . I live at 50, Charles street, Drury-lane .

Q. You lost some of your property last month, did not you - A. Yes, out of my house On Thursday, the 9th of August, between nine and ten o'clock, I went to bed. I left my wife by the fire; in a short time, she began to cry and make a noise and said, that somebody had stolen the box out of the place.

Q. Where was your property kept - A. In a box.

The box was locked; the box was kept in the back kitchen. I rose up in the bed, and there I sat, amazed, that any body could take the box while I was in bed. My wife ran into the street, and said she was robbed and ruined. Directly John Roberts came into my back kitchen.

Q.Did you see him - A. Yes, he talked to me; pitied my case; he said he was very sorry to think that any body should do that to me, a hard working man with a family. I said, I think so; it will be the ruin of me. Straitway my wife came in with the box, it was broken open and empty. All the property had been taken out. She went into the street again, to see if she could find the property. I jumped out of bed, and John Roberts left me, and went up stairs, I went into the passage, and there I stood facing of the street. My wife was inquiring for the rest of the property. In the mean time the watchman came, and my wife, to search in my own rooms.

Q. Why should he search the rooms - A. There was a suspicion, that some in my house had done the robbery.

Q. Who lived in your rooms - A. John Roberts , Perkins, and Mary Lipscomb, they all lodged with us in different rooms. They went up to search the room, and when they went into the second floor the patrol called me; he asked me if I knew that pocket-book.

Q. What was the patrol's name - A. Oram. He called me up, and produced a pocket-book to me.

Q. Was that pocket-book your property - A. Yes, I lost it from the bottom of the box; it contained two one pound notes and some silver, for the rent that my wife had put in it. I saw my wife put it in two one pound notes, and four pounds worth of silver. I asked Mary Lipscomb, what made her and her men do such things to me. She denied it. I went up into the three pair.

Q. Who lodged there - A. Roberts. I charged them all to the watch-house. Me and my wife and the patrol took them to the watch-house; and then I and my wife went to bed. The patrol came the next morning at four o'clock; me and my wife jumped out of bed; he asked me to go and look into the yard. I went and looked into another person's yard through the boards; I saw a boot-top lay, and a great bundle besides. The patrol and me fetched the bundle, and examined it.

Q.What was in it - A. My property and my wife's, both. I found in it a pair of boot tops, a waistcoat, a hat, and a handkerchief; the other things belonged to my wife.

Q.Could any person take it out of your room, and put it into the yard - A. From the top window of the house from Roberts's window.

MRS. Q. Are you the wife of the last witness - A. Yes. I was in the back kitchen; my husband was in bed I was sitting by the fire about ten o'clock I heard the watchman go past ten. I went and shut the outer door, and locked it with a spring-lock. I went to the back kitchen, shut the door, but did not lock it, and I saw a candle, burning, upon the box, go to bed directly, and before I happened to go to bed, I fell asleep and when I awoke, the place was in darkness. The candle was out. I put my hand out. I could not feel the box or the candlestick. I alarmed my husband. The kitchen door was wide open, and the street-door wide open. I ran out, and found the patrol; he was enquiring for the owner of the box. I told him I had lost a box; the box was mine. Oram and me and another watchman made a search in several rooms of lodgers in neighbours houses; we found nothing there. We came to our own rooms next. I was present when the patrol found the pocket-book in the second pair, Perkins's lodging. He had lodged in the house eight months. I went immediately up into Roberts's room, at the top of the house; when I came there, the window was wide open, and Perkins was sitting by Roberts's fire. Seeing the window open, I went up to it. John Roberts was out of the window on the house. I asked him what he did there, he said he was coming in; he came in. I put the window to. William Perkins seemed to be fast asleep when I went into the room; he jumped up, and put the table by the window. When Roberts came in, we searched round the room; we could not find any thing. When Roberts was out of the window, I saw him put his arm out. I saw nothing in his hand. I saw him put his arm out towards where the bundle was found the next morning. The patrol took Roberts, Perkins, and Lipscomb, to the watch-house; and on the next morning the patrol came and knocked at the door. He said get up, here is something in the yard. I saw the things in the yard.

Q. What property did you observe of yours - A. One gown, three pair of mitts, a spencer, a child's frock, and a habit shirt.

Q. Did you put any money in this box - A. I put the money into the pocket-book in the box, four pounds in silver, and two one pound Bank notes.

- ORAM. On the 31st of August, I was going through Charles-street, patroling I saw a large deal box standing in a coach-yard. The box appeared to have been broken open; it was empty. I made inquiry about the box. The prosecutrix came and said she had lost her box. She owned the box immediately. I then searched the lodgers apartments. In the second floor was a pocket-book laying by the bed side of Perkins and Lipscomb. The watchman attempted to pick it up. I said, it should not be picked up until Bates came there and owned it. I went upstairs into Robert's room Perkins and Roberts seemed to be in a great confusion; the window appeared just shut to, and by Perkins pushing the table, they seemed to be in confusion about it. On the next morning, I saw something in Mr. Glover's yard, the next yard. I gave notice to Bates. I went up stairs and got out of the window. Bates owned the bundle.

JOHN BAXTER. I was constable of the night at the watch-house; that night Oram brought this pocketbook to the watch house. It is the same; I have kept it ever since.

Q.to Prosecutrix. Do you know that pocket book - A. Yes, and this is all my property; but it is not all that was lost. The pocket book was found in Perkins's room. He and Mary Lipscomb took the room as man and wife The patrol found it in Perkins's room. Perkins and Roberts were together in Roberts's room.

Q. You never saw Perkins in his room - A. No, not then; but his wife, as she passed for.

Perkins's Defence. I know nothing about it, nor how it came there.

Roberts's Defence. On Monday night, about half after ten, Mrs. Bates came into my apartment; she said Roberts, for God's sake, come down, I am robbed I said, is it true. I went to her apartment, where her husband was in bed. I staid there until her husband dressed himself. She went out in the street, and when I heard the box was found, I went up to my apartment and smoked a pipe. The watchman came in, he said he would insist upon taking me and Perkins to the watch-house. They searched all the apartments in the house, and found nothing. This good lady's door, a child of three years old can open her lock any hour of the day or night; it pulls open with a string.

Prosecutrix. When I locked the door, I pulled the string in.

Perkins called one witness, who gave him a good character.

PERKINS, NOT GUILTY .

ROBERTS, GUILTY , DEATH , aged 28.

LIPSCOMB, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18120916-47

670. JOHN GRIFFITHS was indicted for feloniously making an assault in the king's highway upon William Hill , on the 27th of July , putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will a snuffbox, value 6 d. the property of William Hill.

WILLIAM HILL . I live in Clare-market.

Q.Where was it this happened to you - A. In George street, Bloomsbury . I was speaking to a young woman; I had missed my road I wanted to know the name of the street, and the nearest way to Drury-lane; and while the young woman and me were talking together, Griffiths and his companion came up to me. Griffiths said, you must not answer, if you do you will be served; so he pushed me against the wall, and put his hand into my waistcoat pocket, and took from thence a snuff-box; there was nothing in it but a little snuff.

Q. What might it be worth - A. Six-pence; it was a tin-japanned box.

Q. Did you know Griffiths before - A. Never; when he got away the box, he turned from me. I said you have robbed me of my box. He said, no, he had not. I replied you have; and if you do not deliver it up, I shall call the watch. He turned round, and threw the snuff-box away under a gate-way. He said to his companion, strike him; his companion directly up with his fist, and knocked me down. Griffiths struck me six or seven times after I was down I called watch, and his companion ran down the street, and Griffiths ran under a gate-way. The watchman came up; I told him I had been knocked down and robbed. I described the prisoner. The watchman found the prisoner up the gate way; up the same gate-way he had chucked the snuff-box.

Q. Did you see him run up the gate way - A. Yes, and told the watchman. I saw he was lame as he ran away. He was without hat or coat.

TIMOTHY LANE . I am watchman in George-street. I heard the call of watch; I ran immediately, I saw Hill; he said he was robbed of a snuff-box. He said the man that robbed him was lame. I went into the Phoenix yard. I found the prisoner there; he had no coat or hat on. He is lame, and I found the snuffbox just under the gate-way. I afterwards took the prisoner to the watch-house.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence The prosecutor states of my having assaulted and robbed him; whereas I was only passing by near where this unfortunate accident happened. I wish to ask the watchman, whether he has not known me as a quiet inhabitant of that place.

Lane I have known the prisoner two or three years; I never heard any thing against him until this time.

The prisoner called two other witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18120916-48

671. JOHN JOHNSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of July , two pair of shoes, value 12 s. the property of William Gray , privately in his shop .

WILLIAM GRAY . Q. You keep a shop - A. Yes, I am a shoemaker . I keep a shop in Saint John-street, Clerkenwell .

Q. Did you ever see the prisoner on the 21st of July - A. Yes, he came to my shop on the 21st of July. I was washing myself in the kitchen; there were several customers in the shop. The prisoner stood by the horse of shoes; he looked very earnest, as if he wanted to be served; and seeing him go out of the shop with his hat to his face, I went after him; and when I came up to him, I said, my friend you have got something I believe of mine. He said, I have got none of your shoes; he threw the shoes down, and said d - n your shoes. I said, if you do not want them, I do; and I will have you as sure as ever you have got a head on your shoulders.

Prisoner. I would wish to know, whether any one else sells shoes in his shop during his absence.

Prosecutor. Yes, my wife and daughter. These are the shoes; I saw him throw them down. I was close by the side of him: I picked them up. They were given into the custody of Read, the officer. I marked them before I gave them to Read. I am sure they are my property. And they are the shoes the prisoner threw down. I marked them on the bottom, at my first appearance at Hatton-garden, just before I gave them up to the officer.

Q. Was your wife in the shop at the time - A. I don't think she was.

ANN GRAY . Q. Were you in the shop at the time the prisoner came in - A. I was.

Q. Did you see him take them - A. No, Sir.

Q. to Mr. Gray. Q. What are the shoes worth - A. Twelve shillings is the wholesale price.

Prisoner's Defence. I was entirely intoxicated in liquor. I did not know what I was doing. I promised to buy a pair of shoes or two for a young woman; she was my wife. I spent the money, and had not a farthing in my pocket.

GUILTY , DEATH , aged 35.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Gibbs.

Reference Number: t18120916-49

672. JAMES ALLEN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the the 22nd of August , twenty files, value 1 s. the property of Thomas Wright .

THOMAS WRIGHT . I am a warehouseman . I live in Smithfield . The prisoner was my porter until he was taken up. He had lived with me about six months. On the 22nd of August, in consequence of information, I called him to me, and told him to take out all the property of mine that he had got in his pocket. He produced thirty old files. I gave him into the hands of the constable. That is all that past.

WILLIAM PARKINS. I produce thirty pieces of old files.

Mr. Gurney. Then they are not files.

Prosecutor. I can swear to the property.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120916-50

673. WILLIAM SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of July , two pieces of mahogany, value 28 s. the property of Matthew Taylor .

MATTHEW TAYLOR . I live in Sun-street, Bishopsgate . On Thursday, the 23rd of July, about noon, my apprentice gave me information that a man was taking some mahogany from my back door. I went to the back door, and found the man tieing up two pieces of mahogany. I asked him, what he was going to do with it. He pointed to a man, and said, that man told him to tie them up, and follow him. While he was telling me that I looked at the rest of the mahogany, and found that some had been gone before. I asked him, where he had carried what he had taken away before. He said, he had not been there before. He saw that man sell two pieces of mahogany for bed posts. He took them to the place where they were sold, which was Mr. Mullett's shop in Moorfields.

Q. What is Mr. Mullett - A. A broker. I went and looked in Mr. Mullett's shop, and saw the two pieces of mahogany stand. I told Mr. Mullett that he had goods that were stolen from me. While I was talking to Mr. Mullett my lad came and informed me, that they had got the other man. I asked Mr. Mullett to go with me, and see if that was the man that he had bought them of. Mr. Mullett came and saw the man. He said, he gave him a pound note for the mahogany.

PAUL MULLETT . I am a broker. I live in Moorfields. On the 23d of July, between eleven and twelve in the morning, the prisoner came and asked me if I should like to purchase the bed-posts. I said, no, I was not in the want of any. After some little time he asked me if he should bring them, and let me see them. I said, he might if he pleased. He and some other man brought, I believe, the two pieces of mahogany that is here.

Q. Look upon the prisoner, is he the man - A. Yes. I paid him for them. He brought one, and some other man brought the other.

Q. Are these the same bed-posts that you shewed to Mr. Taylor - A. I cannot say exactly that they are.

Q. You know it was the same day - A. Yes. Mr. Taylor came within half an hour after. I did not take particular notice of them.

Q. Do not shuffle. You must know where they were put - A. Mine is an open shop, and they were put against the story post.

Q. Upon your oath have you any doubt - A. I have not much doubt.

Q. Have you any doubt - A. I certainly have no doubt, but I cannot undertake to say they are the same posts.

Q. Had you bought any other posts that morning - A. No, sir.

THOMAS SAPWELL . I am an officer. I went with Mr. Taylor to Mr. Mullett's, on the 23d of July, near one o'clock, I caused the two bed-posts to be brought away. I put my mark on them, and took them home. They have been in my custody ever since. These are the posts.

Prosecutor. I know them to be my posts.

Prisoner's Defence. I am guilty in selling the posts. I did not know that they were stolen. A man asked me to sell them. I knew him ten years ago.

GUILTY , aged 56.

Confined One Year in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120916-51

674. MARIA MURRAY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of August , four yards of lace, value 27 s. fifteen yards of ribbon, value 6 s. eight yards and three quarters of a yard of silk, value 30 s. and ten yards of muslin, value 10 s. the property of Mary Collis .

MARY COLLIS. I live at No. 16, in the Poultry . The prisoner was my servant . On the morning of the 22d of August I missed some sarcenet. I immediately taxed the prisoner with it.

Mr. Knapp. Did you tell her she had better confess - A. No. I said, I must search through the house. I sent for a friend, a Mr. Blundle, and proposed to search her box, to which she agreed. When I went to search her box, she told me she had the sarsnett, and she would give it me. I searched her box. In her box I found ribbon and some grey sarcenet, which I had lost three weeks before. The lace was found in her linen, and afterwards fifteen yards of ribbon in her box, and the muslin I found in her dirty linen. The prisoner said they were mine.

GEORGE BLUNDLE . I live in Bishopsgate-street. I am a haberdasher. On the 22d of August, Miss Collis came to my house. I accompanied her home. I saw the prisoner. Miss Collis told her, she suspected that she had robbed her; it was necessary she should search her box, as well as every other box in the house. In my presence the prisoner's box was opened. The prisoner produced the key. We found some figured sarcenets and ribbon. The prisoner said to Miss Collis, that is your's. We then sent for the officer.

MISS GREGORY. After the prisoner was taken to the Mansion House I found some lace and ribbon. The officer has them.

- DRINEWATER. I am an officer. I searched the prisoner's box. I found a bit of blue silk, and this bit of grey sarcenet. The prisoner and Miss Collis were present. Miss Collis said to the prisoner, you had better tell me. The other articles were delivered to me. I produce them.

Prosecutrix. They are mine; they are worth 39 s.

The prisoner left her defence to her counsel. Called two witnesses, who gave her a good chaacter.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Confined One Month in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120916-52

675. FRANCIS EVANS was indicted for the wilful murder of Sarah his wife .

JOSEPH HUGHES. Q. On the night of Saturday, the 29th of August, were you at the Crown public house, in the Minories, the night that this transaction took place - A. Yes; I was, having a pint of beer about nine o'clock.

Q. Did you see the prisoner there - Yes; he was quarrelling with two men when I went in; one was a shopmate of his, his name was Scott; the other man's name I do not know.

Q. What was the ground of his quarrelling with Scott - A. Scott said, that the prisoner's wife borrowed things and pawned them. There were many words; but I do not recollect all Evans said to Scott; have you any more to tell me, for I will have revenge. Evans then said, the first time that ever I catch your wife in my room, I will push her down stairs. I happened to go out and assist; as I came in Evans went out.

Q. In what state did he appear to go out in; cool and calm, or how - A. He did not seem to go out in a passion, as I saw. When he went out, a man went out with him. He came in again; he said nothing more at that time.

SARAH ELIZABETH MAYORS . Q. Do you lodge in the same house with the prisoner - A. No, my mother keeps the next house.

Q. On the night of Saturday, the 29th of August , did you hear any thing pass in the prisoner's room - A. I did; I think it was a little past ten o'clock. I heard Mrs. Evans shriek very violently. I heard her say, Frank, my dear, do not beat me; he said, I will.

Q. Did you hear any blows take place - A. I cannot say I did. She said, how can you believe what every one says, and come home and ill use me for it. She said, I have not borrowed any money of any one. He said, she was a liar. I heard her scream again, and something fell to the floor. In about a moment she shrieked again. I heard no more. She approached the window and came out.

Q.Where were you standing - A. At my mother's door, at the bottom of the steps.

Q. Did you then see her at the widow - A. Yes, I did, I saw her at the window for the space of a minute.

Q. While she was at the window-sill, did you see him at the time you saw her - A. No, I did not. I saw her; she was very quiet at the window; she made no noise whatever, but a kind of a groan. I put my hand up and screamed out, not to do it for God's sake.

Q. To do what - A. Not to jump out. She got up in the window; first with one knee and then with the other, and turned her feet outwards. She extended her arms three times, and came down.

Q. Was the extension of the arms three times before she quitted the window - A. The third extension of her arms she came down.

Mr. Alley. At the time that she was sitting at the window she was very quiet - A.Yes, only groaning.

Q. Did you request her more than once - A. No, I had not time: she put both her feet outwards, extended her arms, and came down.

MARY ANN BRIGHT . Q. Do you live near the prisoner, in the Minories - A. Yes, opposite of the door.

Q. On the night of Saturday, the 29th of August, did you observe any noise - A. About a quarter past ten I heard a violent scream while I was in my own apartment.

Q. From whence did that screaming come - A. From the apartment of Evans.

COURT. Were you in the same house - A. No, opposite.

Mr. Gurney. What is the width of the place from your house to theirs - A. About three or four yards across.

Q. Was the screaming the voice of a man or a woman - A. A woman. I heard it the second time. I then came out of my apartment. I heard the third scream. I came to the street-door and turned my eyes up toward Evan's window. I saw Mrs. Evans come to her window; she put up one knee first and then the other, and turned her feet out, and came out; she put her legs out and then came with her arms extended.

Q. How high was this - A. Two-pair of stairs.

Q. Did you see the prisoner - A. I did not; I saw her afterwards, when she was carried up to her own apartment. I did not see the prisoner that evening.

SARAH BEAVER . Q. Do you live near the prisoner, Evans - A. Yes, underneath, in the same house. I live in the one pair, and Evans in the two pair of stairs.

Q. On the night of Saturday, the 29th of August, did you hear any noise in their room - A. I heard a great noise. I saw nothing. I was in bed. I heard two screams and two falls down. I went to the window, half undressed. I heard somebody say, she is out of the window.

Q. How long had the prisoner lodged in that house - A. Fifteen months, the 27th of this month. I have not heard them quarrel since last April.

JOSEPH SCOTT . Q. Were you on the spot the night that this happened - A. I was within fifty yards.

Q. Did you assist in carrying the poor woman up into the chamber - A. Partly. I afterwards took the prisoner into custody, in the passage of the same house. I took him to the watchhouse. On the following day, Sunday, he gave me a letter. I accompanied the deceased to the hospital. She had several bruises about the head and face.

EDWARD BAYNES . I am a pupil at the London hospital.

Q. This poor woman was brought to the hospital,

we understand - A. Yes. When she was brought to the hospital she had several bruises about the head and face, her scull was like wise fractured on the right side; the thigh on the left side also was broken.

Q. Were there any bruises on the temple - A. Yes, on the left side. She lived about nine days. She was brought in on the Saturday night, and she died on the Monday week following. I examined her head; when it was opened, the appearances on the brain were marks of inflammation; and, from the contusion, the fluid on the brain was in a great quantity.

Q. That is the consequence of inflammation - A. Exactly; the injury on the temple was the principal cause of her death.

WILLIAM OSMAN . Q. I believe you are clerk to the magistrate - A. Yes; on the 31st of August the examination of Mrs. Evans took place. The prisoner was present at the examination. This is my hand writing, the magistrate took it from her mouth, and I put it down on paper; after I had taken it down I read it over to her; the magistrate signed it. The examination read.

="Middlesex. The information of Sarah, the wife of Francis Evans , of Swan-yard, Minories, sawyer, taken before Sir Daniel Williams , knt. one of his Majesty's justices of the peace for the said county; who being sworn, faith, My husband, who is now present, struck me; on that day he also kicked me. He said, damn your eyes, you bitch, I will kill you. He threatened me when he had a knife in his hand, but did not attempt to use it. He came up to me: the window was open, and swore he would throw me out of the window. I fell out. He did not push me, as I know of. His conduct towards me has been ill-usage, and often beating me. My husband locked me in the room that I should not get out.

Signed, SARAH EVANS .

Taken before me, at the London Hospital, August 31, 1812. Daniel Williams .="

Prisoner's Defence. My Lords, and gentlemen of the jury, trembling under the awful situation in which I am now charged with a crime of the most brutal enormity, appearing before this Honourable Court with all the mischievous consequences created against me by public prints/, &c. I most humbly appeal; confident, however popular clamour may condemn me, a conviction of my innocence, to which I call God to witness, and of your humane and impartial hearing, that you will permit me to submit to your consideration those matters irresistibly attached to the case, which will convey to the Court the impossibility of my guilt. On the contrary, satisfactorily convince you, that so far from committing the horrid act with which I now stand accused, I have uniformly endeavoured by every pacific persuasion to calm the perturbed state of mind under which my late unfortunate wife laboured, and to convey to her feelings, notwithstanding her innumerable faults, attachment to her person. Permit to represent, since my infancy, I have pursued a life of honesty and industry; the former part of which was devoted to the service of my country, in his Majesty's ship, Ville de Paris; since which I have pursued every means of procuring an honest livelihood. With solemn grief do I state, I unfortunately married the deceased eight years back, and, for a period, lived happy, enjoying an uninterrupted means by my honesty, confining myself to the humble following of a sawyer; of providing every comfort any well disposed couple might expect, for which I feel grateful to my Maker; when, unfortunately, my wife launched into extravagances impossible for me by my labour to support, continually pledging what few articles I had worked hard for, and contracting debts in every quarter unknown to me, which, however distressing to my feelings, I have, by the most pacific persuasion, painted out the inevitable destruction awaiting such conduct, which, however, only tended to kindle the flame of disaffection, and produced in her new inventions to plunder. Upon various occasions, after having pledged every thing she could move, she has, under various false pretexts, borrowed articles of my neighbours, which she has systematically consigned to the same fate; and, to avoid public detection, she has left her home, and, at the moment when we were entrusted with an infant to nurse, she has carried with her the child's apparel, which she had likely taken from its person a few minutes before, on putting it to bed, when staying out sometimes until one, two, and three o'clock in the mornings, intoxicated, after rolling about the streets, completely disfigured with mud and dirt, she would return; not withstanding all which, I have silently submitted to the same, and afforded her admittance, when she has declared she has lost her pockets, with their contents, amounting sometimes to twenty or thirty shillings; a wilful pretext to enable her to redeem part of the property borrowed of the neighbours, and pledged; a glaring instance of which will be satisfactorily proved by an industrious woman, the mother of the child, who upon some occasions she has actually called from her bed, and persuaded her to accompany her home, to plead in her behalf; who cannot deny, instead of my maltreating her, I have kindly signified my distress of mind at her staying out, and kindly invited her to my polluted bed. Detection upon detection of her infamy followed When at a moment of self-conviction she has absconded, plundering me of every article, not leaving me any thing except the clothes on my back. While at work, instances of which I shall prove by a work-mate of mine, and who unfortunately gave her to me in marriage eight years ago, at Christ Church, Newgate-street, of whom she has repeatedly borrowed money, under various pretexts, to whom, after roving about in a state of whoredom, for a week or so, she has applied to ask forgiveness, and persuade me to receive her; which, upon all occasions, I have, be it known to my weakness, readily complied with, and by other industrious and respectable persons, who have commisserated my fate, to whom she has boasted her finesse in deceiving me about her pockets, and

acknowledged her pleasure in my weakness, in believing her. These desertions, with other acts of profligacy, reduced me to a state of wretchedness beyond human conception. My humble home repeatedly deserted, applications upon applications for money she owed, and articles she had pledged unknown to me; incapable of supporting it, although I worked like a horse to support an honest character, in which assertion, thank God, every one that knows me will gladly bear me out; imprisoned, as it were, on the Sunday, by her; as often as I might redeem them, pledging my decent clothes, and often deprived of but one shirt for weeks, I was compelled to form a resolution to restrict her from purchasing our necessary food, &c. by performing such offices myself. This added to her fury; and incapable, by her repeated falsehoods, to deceive her neighbours or acquaintances, as heresofore, she gave way to immoderate passions, and became ungovernable, as often when no person was in her room as otherwise, and I absent at work all day. She would indulge such flagrant passions, often screaming and tearing herself, as one would suppose, to pieces. She would open the window of the room, when she has been known to alarm the neighbours, fearful she might throw herself out. One instance of the latter act can be proved by my landlord and landlady, on which occasion they were induced to rush up and persuade her to descend to her parlour. Sorry am I to repeat these instances of ungovernable passions, but my situation imperiously demands it; and I hope, as my miserable life depends upon your decision, you will humanely forgive me.

Suspecting her, a few weeks before this fatal catastrophe happened, of having spent the trifle I had given her to pay the rent, I, on Saturday, made known my intention of paying my rent that evening myself, and went down stairs to my landlord accordingly, when in lieu of having six shillings to pay, which I conceived was this due, which he himself supposed was my opinion, he informed me, in lieu of my wife having paid him the money he knew I had given her, that she had spent it in inebriety and debauchery, and that he had a claim upon me for twenty-four shillings, when, on my return, I discovered she had decamped with every moveable, however trifling they were; upon which occasion she secreted herself from me from Saturday to the ensuing Friday, when she again returned, nearly naked, when I again, with the most kind intention towards her, received her, although I detected her. During such absence she applied to a Mr. Smith, in Charterhouse-street, in an apparent state of agony, and informed him, that I had that moment been brought home, by two persons, in a dying state, shewing him an old out-patients ticket for the hospital; under pretext of just having obtained such, and to buy me indispensible and immediate nourishment, borrowed six shillings, and of Thomas Cherverton , a one-pound note. To guard against her organized schemes of deception was impossible; to repeat her actions for the last two years would astonish the most profligate, while it would claim from the dispassionate and philanthropist the tear of compassion and pity. On Saturday, the 24th of August last, as was my invariable custom, I returned home at four o'clock in the afternoon, when my deceased wife being out, I commenced shaving myself. I had scarce finished doing so when she returned, and as if pleased to see her, as I supposed, thoroughly collected, I addressed her by saying, my dear girl, if you continue this way we shall soon overcome our difficulties, and still live happy, when she informed me she had been taken ill in the street, and had reached in her apron, shewing it me at the same time; upon which I expressed my regret, and in as tender a tone as I was capable of, requested her to lay down on the bed, which she did, and to the best of my belief, fell asleep; upon which, having a lock and key to purchase at a neighbouring ironmonger's, for a box I was then having made by my workmate, and also to attend for my wages, I left her three shillings in silver and in halfpence, and went quietly out of the room, fearful of disturbing her.

I purchased the lock and key, and on going to the sign of the Crown public-house, at which house the sawyers who worked for master regularly met on a Saturday, to make out their bills for the week's work, I called on Mr. Strachan, butcher, in in the Minories, and agreed for the aitch-bone of beef for our Sunday's dinner. At the Crown public-house I met my fellow-sawyer's mate, to whom I gave the lock and key, who, as he regularly did, made out our joint week's bill for work, which bill I took to my employer, who, about half past eight o'clock, paid me, when I returned to the Crown, and paid my mate his portion of the said work-bill. A few minutes conversation passed, when my shop-mates enquired how my wife conducted herself; upon which I informed them we agreed very well, and that I was in hopes, if she continued as she now behaved, I should, I flattered myself, I should by hard-work, be enabled ere long, to relieve myself from difficulties created by her improprieties. Upon which, one and all expressed their conviction. I did not know half she owed. She had borrowed money of every one she could. Amongst the number was my workmate, of whom, during her flight, and about the same time she borrowed six shillings. Of Mr. Smith, she had persuaded him, to lend her one pound, begging him not to acquaint me of the same for a time, intimating, she had pledged my Sunday clothes unknown to me; she wanted to redeem them, and replace them the next day, (Sunday); the whole of which she squandered away during her exile from home, from the Saturday to the following Friday before mentioned. Inclined to be home by my regular hour; called at the butchers, and paid for the aitchbone of beef, which I immediately took home, it being then near ten o'clock. On my going home, to my utter astonishment I beheld my wife intoxicated, and discovered, notwithstanding I had left her three shillings, she had taken the gown off her back, and had put on an old bed gown, which, upon enquiry, she acknowledged she had pledged. Disappointed in my hopes of any reformation, I, as well as I could, with a sorry heart, expostulated with her of her innumerable acts of treachery, and the difficulties she had plunged me into; besides acquainted her of the information afforded me by my shop-mates,

and very likely chided her in a harsh manner for obtaining the one pound of my mate. Chagrined at my unexpected dectection, she first began to cry, and deny the whole, which hurt me the more. I call God to witness I never struck her. She permitted her passion to overcome her, and most completely terrified me by her screaming, jumping, and knocking about, exclaiming, dear Frank, don't believe them. Upon which she made a desperate attack upon the room door, no doubt to fly out to avoid further animadversions, which I prevented by placing myself before it, in which I believe a scuffle might ensue for two or three minutes, in which I let fall on the floor the aitchbone of beef, having been from the moment of my entrance into the room, and missing the gown off her back, struck, as as it were, senseless. Observing her in such a violent rage, and persuaded my continuing speaking to her would only add to it, I silently set myself on a chair, with my back to the window, at the opposite side of the room, reflecting with silent grief, at my wretched situation; still determined not to let her go out of the room, especially as I was convinced she had been drinking. After screaming and jumping about the room, as if mad, she, unknown to me, flew to the window, which unfortunately was opened, and raised herself upon the sill of the window, and precipitated herself into the yard, paved with sharp pointed stones. Casting my eyes round I first saw her flying down out of the window. Distracted, I rushed down stairs; how, I know not; but, when collected, I found myself assisting my unfortunate victim of self-destruction, from the fatal spot where she alighted, to the step of our street-door. When I discovered blood gushing out of her head or face, suffice it to say, I was completely senseless for a few moments. When she held out her hand to me I embraced it for the last time. She wished me to accompany her up stairs, but Scott, the constable, denied me so doing and took me in custody.

My Lords, and Gentlemen of the Jury, I once more appeal to God that I have set forth the truth, and nothing but the truth, and hope, when you consider the case fully, which I rest satisfied you will, you will easily convince yourselves of the improbability of my being her murderer. God forbid. Were I so, the sooner I quit this earthly career the better. Pardon me. I must disclose one more act to prove how bent to every species of advantage she was, even during the short time I left her to buy the lock and key, and obtain my wages. She had not only pledged her gown, but had actually borrowed a pair of flat irons of the landlady, and pledged them also: and more wonderful, after she had jumped out of the window in a state, dreadful as may be expected, told her of the same, gave her the duplicate, and requested her to keep this act from my knowledge, and privately gave a number of duplicates to Mr. Smith to keep for her unknown to me.

The prisoner called twelve witnesses, who gave him the character of a tender, humane, and kind husband.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18120916-53

676. THOMAS NEWPORT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22nd of July , a handkerchief, value 5 s. the property of the Reverend George Croby , from his person .

GEORGE CROBY. I am a clergyman . I lost my handkerchief on the 22nd of July, between eight and nine, I was coming from the Strand, walking on to Temple Bar. I had used it in the Strand. As I came near Temple Bar I felt a sensation, as if something was taken from me. I turned round, and the person near me said, the man forward has got your handkerchief. I found my handkerchief was gone.

Q. Were you in the city when he took your handkerchief - A. No, on the other side Temple Bar. I was coming from Westminster into the city. At the time I was told my handkerchief was gone; was on the Middlesex side of Temple Bar. I followed him and stopped him. That man was the prisoner. I recollected his person, that he had been near me. I asked him for my handkerchief. He said he had not got it. I opened his coat, and took out the handkerchief from under his left arm pit, stuffed in very close. I took the prisoner to the watchhouse, and gave the handkerchief to the officer. I saw the prisoner pick up something, and when I went home I found three amlets in my pocket. I saw them lay on the ground. They made a noise. The prisoner picked them up, and when I went home I found them in my pocket. I am not conscious how they got in. This is the handkerchief. I have had it ever since. It is worth seven or eight shillings.

Prisoner's Defence. I was returning home between eight and nine. I dropped my handkerchief and stooped to pick it up. The amlets were in my handkerchief.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY, aged 17.

Judgment respited .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120916-54

677. RICHARD THOMAS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of July , a shoulder of veal, value 15 s. and an aitchbone of beef, value 12 s. 7 d. the property of William Briant .

WILLIAM BRIANT . I am an auctioneer . I live in Playhouse-yard, Little Eastcheap .

JANE HOLTON . I am a cook at Mr. Briant's. The shoulder of veal and the aitchbone of beef were kept on the top of the house, on the leads. I saw the veal and beef safe at ten o'clock in the morning, and about twenty minutes after the butcher brought it there was a ring at the bell. The prisoner was at the door. He said, our lad has left you the wrong meat. I fetched down the shoulder of veal. He then said, the beef was wrong. They were both of them to go back. He said, I will return directly with your beef and veal. I put the beef and the veal in his tray myself. I never got any meat in exchange for it.

THOMAS HIGGINBOTHAM . I am a butcher. I serve Mr. Briant with meat.

Q. Did you authorise the prisoner to go to Mr. Briant's for the meat - A. No.

- ROBERTS. I am servant to Mr. Higginbotham. I took the beef and veal to Mr. Briant's.

Q. Did you send the prisoner to Mr. Briant's for the meat - A. No. He came and asked me if I knew of any place. I told him, no.

Q. Whereabouts is the value of this beef and veal - A. Fifteen shillings.

FRANCIS KINNERSLEY . I apprehended the prisoner. He had got the tray under his arm.

Prisoner's Defence. I am as innocent as a child unborn.

GUILTY , aged 16.

Publicly Whipped and discharged.

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120916-55

678. RICHARD RICHARDS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of September , a seal, value 7 s. and a watch-key, value 6 d. the property of William Angel , from his person .

WILLIAM ANGEL. I live at 21, Bear-lane, Tower-street. I am a journeyman painter and glazier . On the 1st of September, between one and two o'clock at noon, I was in Smithfield , near the Hope engine-house. I lost my seal and watch-key. It was fastened to a black ribbon to my watch. The black ribbon was cut with a pair of scissors.

Q. How long before you missed the seal and key had you seen it safe - A. A few minutes before I saw the prisoner I was passing through Smithfield. Miles's caravan was coming in with the wild beasts. The caravan was drawn by eight grey horses. The caravan stopped, and I stopped to look at the caravan.

Q. Did you see the prisoner near you - A. No. I had my hand on my watch, in my fob. I felt a little tug at my watch. I cast my eyes down. I saw the prisoner's hand pass from my fob, and I missed my seal and key. The prisoner turned round to make off. I seized him. I saw the prisoner throw the seal, key, and scissars on the ground. A witness here picked them up. In the mean time an officer took the prisoner out of my hands. It was a family seal. I valued it at seven shillings, and the key sixpence.

RICHARD PRITCHARD . I am a porter at the King's Arms, Holborn-bridge. I happened to be standing in the crowd in Smithfield. Angel had hold of the prisoner. I saw the prisoner throw the things down just at my feet. I picked them up.

WILLIAM BRANSCOMB . I am an officer. I saw the last witness pick up the seal and key and scissars. In taking the prisoner to the Compter, the prisoner threw a scissar-sheath away. I picked it up. It fits the scissars; and the ribbon which remains on the prosecutor's watch corresponds with that cut off. I produce the seal and key.

Prosecutor. It is my seal and key.

Prisoner's Defence. I was standing by at the time as the mob of people were. It is true I was at the side of the gentleman there. When I was walking away he came after me, and said, he had lost his seal. I said, I did not know any thing of it. A tall man passed me, and made a rush, which almost knocked me down, and then these things were found.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Transported for Life .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120916-56

679. PETER NOKES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of September , a handkerchief, value 4 s. the property of Robert Campbell .

ROBERT CAMPBELL. I am a servant to Mrs. Wilson, 86, Norton-street, Portland-road. I was in Smithfield on Sunday, the 6th of September, about five o'clock. I missed my silk handkerchief by Miles's caravans. There were a great many people about the caravans. I had seen my handkerchief about five minutes before I missed it. I put it safe in my pocket again.

Q. Do you know whether the prisoner took it or not - A. I did not see who took it. It was taken privately from my person, without giving me any alarm. A witness here saw him take it. His name is Greenwood. He told me. I felt, and found it was true. The prisoner then made off. Greenwood overtook him, and I saw the prisoner give the handkerchief up. I knew it to be mine.

- GREENWOOD. I am a servant. I was in Smithfield with Campbell. I saw the prisoner take the handkerchief out of his pocket. I told Campbell, and the prisoner ran off. I pursued him, and told him, he had got Campbell's handkerchief. He went down upon his knees, and delivered the handkerchief up. This is the handkerchief.

Prosecutor. It is my handkerchief.

Prisoner's Defence. I am as innocent of it as you are. I will be upon my oath that man never see me take it out of his pocket.

The prisoner called six witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 16.

Confined One Month in Newgate , and Whipped in Jail .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120916-57

680. JOSEPH OWEN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of August , a wooden till, value 3 s. a book, value 1 d. two keys, value 6 d. and thirty-six shillings in monies, numbered , the property of Nathaniel Jones .

NATHANIEL JONES . I keep the Hussar's Head, Tower-street . On the 3d of August, between eight and nine in the evening, I had just stepped out of the bar to serve a pint of porter. I heard the back door shut.

Q. Do customers come in at the back door - A. Yes; that drew my attention. I went back to my bar, and missed my till; in it was about thirty shillings in copper money. The back door goes into a passage that leads into Thames-street, and the passage comes round to the corner of my house, in Tower-street. I ran out of the front door, and saw the prisoner with my till, and when he got as far as Barking-alley he threw the till down with the money in it. I ran after him, and laid hold of him. This is the till and halfpence. They are mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I was running down Tower-street.

A man knocked me down. That gentleman came and said I had robbed him.

JOHN DERBIT. I am a servant to Mr. Holmes, of the Royal Exchange. I was passing by Mr. Jones's house. I saw the prisoner with a box under his arm. I heard some halfpence rattle. The prisoner ran. Seeing Mr. Jones he threw the till down, and I instantly picked it up.

GUILTY , aged 16.

Judgment respited. To go to Sea .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120916-58

681. WILLIAM CUMBERLAND was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of July , seventeen pounds weight of beef, value 10 s. the property of George Bramwell .

JOHN RICHARDS . I am a journeyman butcher. A servant to Mr. Jordan, Thames-street.

Q. Did you know the prisoner before this happened - A. I have seen him before. He appeared as a butcher. I was sent with the meat to Mr. Bramwell's, 22, Pinch-lane, Cornhill. He is a customer to my master. As I was going I saw the prisoner in Cornhill . I delivered the meat at Mr. Bramwell's house between eleven and twelve, and at five o'clock in the afternoon I met the prisoner with the meat in a tray on his shoulder, and I knew the meat again. I stopped him, and gave him in charge of a constable. The beef was in two pieces: part of a half buttock, and a sirloin.

AMELIA SCRAGG. I am a servant to Mr. Bramwell.

Q. Had you any meat delivered at your master's house on the 27th of July - A. Yes, the porter took it in.

ROBERT LOCK . I am a porter to George Bramwell . The meat was delivered to me by Richards.

Scragg. A young man came with a knock at the door. I went down. The prisoner said, he had come for the meat: it was brought wrong. I told him the beef was in the pantry; to take it. He took it. I thought he came from Mr. Jordan's. He said, he did. I asked him, if Mr. Jordan kept two men. He said, he did.

Q. to Richards. Was the prisoner in the employ of Mr. Jordan - A. No.

Q. What was the value of this meat - A. Twelve or thirteen shillings.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Whipped in Jail and discharged.

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120916-59

682. JOHN LATHAM was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John King , about the hour of twelve, on the night of the 18th of June , and stealing therein, three saddles, value 40 s. a chaise-harness, value 12 s. a pair of boots, value 4 s. and a pair of sheets, value 3 s. his property.

JOHN KING . I am a housekeeper in Grove-road, Mile-end, St. Matthew, Bethnal-green . On the 18th of June I was the last person that went to bed. On the 19th, in the morning, I discovered my stable had been broken open, and three saddles, three bridles, and a chaise-harness, were missing. They could come to the stable without coming to the house, by getting over a pair of gates. I also missed a sheet, old shoes, and old boots. On the 19th I was informed that Mr. Pitley had bought a lot of saddlery. One of my saddles was a new saddle. I never found the new saddle. I found two old saddles, and three bridles. I saw the prisoner afterwards at the office, Lambeth-street.

THOMAS HACKET . I am a servant to Mr. Pitley, Union-row, Minories. On the 19th of June, between eight and nine in the morning, the prisoner brought to my master's shop two old saddles, two bridles, and a pair of girths. The prisoner gave his name, William Lee , of Tottenham High-cross. He said, he had the goods to sell for his son, John Lee . His son was a saddler: he bought and exchanged old saddles. I heard that Mr. King had a loss. On the 4th of July the prisoner came again. I then sent for an officer. I produce the saddles and the bridles.

Prosecutor. I know the property to be mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I was hired as a porter by Charles Lee , to carry these things, and I was to have two or three shillings.

GUILTY , aged 65,

Of stealing to the value of 30 s. only .

Confined Two Years in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120916-60

683. PIETRO TOLONI was indicted for feloniously stealing, in the dwelling-house of Michael Rau , on the 10th of July , a jacket, value 1 l. three waistcoats, value 26 s. six pair of trowsers, value 2 l. 12 s. five shirts, value 2 l. three pair of stockings, value 6 s. an handkerchief, value 2 s. a pair of braces, value 1 s. and a broach, value 16 s. the property of Michael Rau .

ROSANA RICH . I am sister to Mrs. Rau; she is the wife of Michael Rau ; he keeps the Seven Stars public-house, Nightingale-lane, Aldgate , where the prisoner lodged.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember his coming to the house - A. Yes; he lodged in the house.

Q. You live with your sister - A. Yes, and the prisoner lodged there. The clothes were seen upon the prisoner, but not by me.

Q. These clothes were not the property of Rau - A. No; they were left in my care by George, a carpenter on board a ship. He has gone to sea. I have got the inventory of the things. I took the inventory myself. I compared the inventory with the things myself. I am sure the things in the inventory is correct. I had seen the things about a fortnight before I missed them. They were all right then. I missed them on the 8th of June, or the 9th.

Q. Did the prisoner quit your lodgings - A. Yes, the day after we spoke to him concerning the clothes.

Q. Who spoke to him - A. Mr. Rau. He slept in our house that night. He went away in the morning.

Q. Do you know where he went - A. No.

Q. Did you compare what was left with the inventory - A. There was nothing left but a hat.

Q. What were the things left in - A. In a chest. I saw the person lock the chest.

Q. The chest was locked - A. Yes.

Q. Was the chest found unlocked - A. Yes.

WALTER CHRISTOPHER . I am a publican. I keep the sign of the Crown, White's-yard, Whitechapel. A bag was brought by the prisoner. He desired me to take care of it for him. I took care of it for him. They were at my house about a fortnight before the officer came. On the 5th of August the officer came and took it.

SAMUEL MILLER . On the 9th of July I received information that the things were at the Crown. I went and took them. They have been in my possession ever since. I produce them.

MARY RAU . I am the wife of Michael Rau .

Q. Look at the things - A. This is the property that was left in the chest of George, the carpenter. One jacket, worth one pound; five shirts, twenty-four shillings; six pair of trowsers, two pounds; three pair of stockings, three shillings; three waistcoats, one pound six shillings; a broach, sixteen shillings; a pair of braces, sixpence; and a silk handkerchief, three shillings. This is the property that was left in the possession of my husband.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence.

GUILTY - DEATH .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18120916-61

684. CONRAD PATRE was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Willoughby Cotton , esq. he and others of his family being therein, about the hour of eleven, on the forenoon of the 28th of July , and stealing therein three silver table spoons, value 30 s. his property.

JOHN SUTCLIFFE . Q. Do you live with Cotton - A. Yes; his name is Willoughby Cotton; he is a colonel ; he lives at 6, Slone-street, Chelsea, in the parish of St. Luke's . On the 28th. of July, about eleven o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner come down the area steps and open the kitchen door. I heard the spoons rattle in the scullery. I saw the prisoner shut the door. I immediately went to look for the spoons I saw they were gone. I followed the prisoner and brought him back into the kitchen. I searched him, and found the spoons in his waistcoat pocket.

Q. How does that kitchen door open - A. With a bolt; it was only shut; it was not bolted, it was latched.

Q. Had you tried the door yourself in the course of the morning to see whether it was latched or not - A. I had just shut the door about ten minutes before that I tried the door, and the latch had caught.

Q. Had you continued in the kitchen from the time you shut the door to the time that the prisoner came - A. No; there was nobody in the kitchen; the three maids were in the washhouse. I was sufficiently near to see that none of them had been to the door. The prisoner could not come in without the latch being lifted up by him.

RICHARD MAYBACK . The prisoner was delivered into my custody, and the spoons I produce them.

Sutcliffe. These are my master's spoons. I know them by the colonel's crest upon them. They are silver; they are worth twenty or thirty shillings.

Prisoner's Defence. I went in to ask for charity.

GUILTY, aged 57.

Of stealing, but not breaking and entering the dwelling-house .

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and Whipped in Jail .

Tried by a jury of half English and half foreigners, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18120916-62

685. ANTONIO GONSALES was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Solomon Moses , about the hour of one, on the night of the 4th of July , and stealing therein a jacket, value 6 s. twelve handkerchiefs, value 2 l. 8 s. a pair of shoes, value 6 s. and a waistcoat, value 6 s. his property.

SOLOMON MOSES . I am a slop-seller , 98, East Smithfield, in the parish of St. Botolph, without, Aldgate . On Friday morning, the 4th of July, I was alarmed by my servant, between six and seven o'clock, that the house had been broken open. I came down, and saw a square of glass had been taken out of the parlour window. The square was big enough for a middling sized man to get through, by which they had made their entrance; and they had broken the parlour door and made their entrance into the shop. I missed a dozen silk handkerchiefs, a waistcoat, a jacket, and a pair of pantaloons. There was about four pounds of cash in the till; that was also taken; that is not in the indictment.

Q. What was the value of the jacket - A. Six or seven shillings; the dozen handkerchiefs, two pounds ten shillings; the shoes, six shillings; the waistcoat, five shillings; and I lost a spotted handkercheif.

Q. Who has the spotted handkerchief - A. The constable.

Q. Now, look at that spotted handkerchief; do you know that - A. Yes, that was not one of the twelve handkerchiefs, it is a bundle-handkerchief, in which there were some things tied up on the counter; the twelve handkerchiefs were in one piece the spotted handkerchief is my property; it was part of the property that I missed at the time I am speaking of.

JONATHAN MURRAY . I am a pawnbroker.

Q. Have you any articles here that was offered to pledge by Marks - A. On Tuesday, the 7th of July, Marks offered a waistcoat to pledge. It being in an unfinished state I suspected that he had not honestly come by it. I detained him, and sent for a constable. This is the waistcoat.

JOHN DANBRIDGE . I am a constable. I apprehended Marks, and from Marks's information I apprehended the prisoner. The first thing I found on the prisoner was chisel, concealed inside of his trowsers. This was on the 7th of July. And this spotted handkerchief was round the prisoner's neck. I also found a knife upon him, and a pocketbook.

Q. Do you know what countryman he is - A. A Portuguese. After that I went to his lodgings in St. Catherine's-lane: there I found a new shirt, and a pair of check trowsers.

Q. How do you know that they were his lodgings - A. The prisoner told me they were his lodgings. He spoke tolerable English then. I had been there in the course of the day before, and the girl that he lived with told me that he lodged there, but he was not at home. I went there again after I confined the prisoner, and found a new shirt, and a pair of trowsers. I produce them.

Prosecutor. That shirt and trowsers belonged to my son. I had seen them in the shop two days before they were taken away.

Prisoner's Defence. I am quite innocent. That handkerchief and the waistcoat I bought of a lad. I came from Madeira as a sailor, and I was going away again.

GUILTY, aged 21,

Of stealing, but not of breaking and entering .

Confined Two Years in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Gibbs.

Reference Number: t18120916-63

686. STEPHANO HASKET was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of July , a watch, value 3 l. a chain, value 1 l. two seals, value 1 l. and a waistcoat, value 10 s. the property of Savery George , in the dwelling-house of Antonio Corsetto .

SAVORY GEORGE. Q. Did you lose any property in July last, in the house of Corsetto - A. Yes.

Q. Did you and the prisoner lodge there - A. Yes, both of us. The prisoner slept in another room to what I did.

Q. When did you see your property last before it was taken away - A. About three weeks ago.

Q. How long before the theft - A. About seven o'clock in the morning. They were in a hat. I left my lodgings about three minutes past seven. They were in the hat at that time.

Q. When did you return - A. About ten or twelve minutes after they were gone.

Q. Have you seen them since - A. Yes; about three weeks after I saw them again, in the possession of the witness that is here.

FRANCIS JACKSON . I am beadle of St. George's in the East. Mercury has got the property. He apprehended Paresedo, and gave him into my custody, and through information I took the prisoner into custody on suspicion. Paresedo is admitted an evidence. The prisoner confessed that he sold the property to Johanna Paresedo . At the prisoner's lodging I found the seal belonging to the prosecutor.

EMANUEL MERCURY. I apprehended Paresedo. I found upon him a watch, a gold chain, a gold seal, and a blue waistcoat, trimmed with gold cord.

JOHANNA PARESEDO. Q. The last witness says he got from you a watch, chain, a seal, and a blue waistcoat - A. Yes. After I had received my money from my captain I met the prisoner. He asked me to buy them of him. I gave him four pounds five shillings for them.

Prisoner. It is true.

Q. to prosecutor. What did you give for these things - A. I gave seven pounds for the watch, of my landlord, Antonio Corsetto . The watch, chain, and seals, cost me nine pounds ten shillings. I bought the chain and seals in the Brazils.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 27.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18120916-64

687. MARY ROGERS was indicted, for that she, on the 20th of August , one piece of false and counterfeited money, made and counterfeited to the likeness and similitude of a good shilling, as and for a good shilling, unlawfully did utter to William Smith , she knowing it to be false and counterfeit; and that she having been before convicted of being a common utterer of counterfeit money .

JOSIAH EDWARD SEWELL. I am clerk to the Solicitor of the Mint. I produce the copy of the record of one Mary Mackdonald. She was convicted in December sessions, 1800. I got it from the clerk of the Peace, at the office, Clerkenwell. I examined it attentively. It is a correct copy.

(Read.)

WILLIAM BEEBY . I am clerk to the keeper of the New Prison.

Q. Look at the prisoner, do you know her - A. I know her very well.

Q. Were you present at the Court in Clerkenwell, in December, 1809 - A. I was. She was tried for uttering had money, and convicted, along with a person of the name of Allison. They were sentenced to be imprisoned in the House of Correction, for one year, and to find sureties for two years to come.

Q. What was Allison's Christian name - A. I think, Thomas, but I am not sure. We had only one Allison in custody at that time.

COURT. Whether his name was Thomas or not, the Allison that you had in custody was the Allison that was tried - A. It was.

LION EARLE GIRLING. I keep the White Bear public-house, Newport-street, Leicester-fields. On the 20th of August the prisoner and another woman came to my house. The prisoner ordered two glasses of gin. The gin came to five pence. The prisoner offered me a bad shilling. I returned it to her, and told her, it was bad. She said, she had just taken it of a butcher in Newport-market. She said, she had no more money, and asked the other woman if she had any money to pay for it. She said, she had not enough, only a one-pound note. The prisoner then said, she would go and change the shilling at the bu. They both went out for that purpose. I knew the prisoner, Rogers, before; that gave me suspicion. I followed her. She went to the window of Mr. Cole, a linen-draper, in the same street. They stood some time at the window. They went in. I went and got Creswell, the constable. I returned to see if they were there. I saw them there. I left the constable there. I told the constable what to do. I went home. I returned to the shop window of Mr. Cole. I saw some money fly against the window in the shop. There was something fell on the glass in the

linen-draper's shop window. I went to the watch-house with the prisoner.

Prisoner. I wish to know the reason you knew me - A. I do not know that ever I saw the prisoner until that time. The other woman I had seen.

Q. When you said you knew Rogers before, did you mean this prisoner or the other woman - A. I meaned the other woman.

HENRY CRESWELL . I am a constable.

Q. Did you go to the house of Mr. Cole - A. Yes. I saw the prisoner there, and another woman. I went into the shop, and saw Mr. Cole's man return a shilling to Mary Rogers . I then insisted on seeing what she had in her possession. She refused. A struggle ensued. I got hold of her left wrist. The shilling was in her left hand. I opened her hand, and got the shilling from her, not knowing that she had any more; but finding her right hand clenched, I insisted upon opening that. She wanted to get towards the door, which I prevented. In the struggle she threw a parcel of money in the window. I saw her do it. I believe the money was done up in a bit of paper. I distinctly saw her throw it. The shillings she threw in the window were picked up by Smith, Mr. Cole's shopman. He gave them to me. They have been in my possession ever since. I produce them. In all, eleven.

Prisoner. Can you swear that you saw me throw them away - A. I am upon my oath. I do swear it again; and I saw Mr. Cole's shopman pick them up.

Prisoner. You swore before the magistrate that you picked them up, and now you say Mr. Cole's shopman picked them up.

Creswell. I did not. I produce the shilling offered to William Smith . This is it. It is marked with an S.

WILLIAM SMITH . I am shopman to Mr. Cole. On Thursday the prisoner and another woman came into Mr. Cole's shop. I shewed them a large medallion, with a border round it. The prisoner said, she had one like that at the door, but it had not a border. She should like to have a border. I shewed her a remnant, and I agreed to take eightpence for it, for which she gave me a shilling. I told her, I thought it was a bad one. They wished to persuade me that it was good, which gave me suspicion. I took my scissars, and marked it before them. I then threw it back, and told them, I was positive it was bad. The prisoner took it up. She offered me no other. I saw some halfpence as her hand. I asked her if she would leave that in part of payment, and call again in the morning. She refused; and while I was discoursing with her Creswell came in, and as she was leaving the shop Cresswell seized hold of her hand, and told her he wished to see what she had in her possession. A struggle ensued. He had hard work to search her. He took a shilling from her hand. She threw from her other hand a number of other shillings, among the goods in the window. After she was secured I got into the window. I picked up all I found. I think, eight shillings.

Q. Had there been any shillings in the window before she throwed them - A. None; that I am positive there was not. The shillings that I took out of the window I gave to Cresswell. I gave him eight that time, and two I found the next morning. I gave him them also.

Q. When did you see the shilling that was taken from her hand - A. That was the one I marked with an S. I saw it again directly; Cresswell took it out of her hand. I know the shilling. This is it.

JOHN NICOLL . Q. You are one of the moniers of His Majesty's Mint - A. Yes.

Q. Is that a counterfeit shilling - A. It is; and it is marked with an S.

Q. Look at the other shillings. How many are there - A. Ten. They are all counterfeits.

Q. to Cresswell. Did you find, in searching the prisoner or the other woman, any more money - A. On the prisoner I found a battered sixpence. I think it is a good one.

Mr. Nicoll. It is a counterfeited one.

Cresswell. On the other woman I found three eighteen-penny pieces, ten shillings, and ten bad sixpences.

Mr. Nicoll. They are of the same manufactory. They are marked in the same way, with the letter T and A. Some are straight and some are bent. They are nearly of the same composition, and very little silver in them. They are all counterfeits.

Prisoner's Defence. I had but that one shilling I offered. Not one of them that they found belonged to me; neither can they say truly that they saw me throw any away.

Q. to Smith. Did you see her throw the shillings - A. I did. I was an eye-witness to the whole transaction.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 34.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18120916-65

688. JOHN BABBITT was indicted for feloniously making an assault, on the 5th of August , in the King's highway, upon Olof Ljangerantz , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, a pocket-book, value 6 d. a dollar, value 5 s. 6 d. and three three-shilling bank-tokens, four five-pound notes, and two one-pound notes , his property.

OLOF LJANGERANTZ. In August I lived at No. 18, Cross-street, Limehouse. On going home, on the 5th of August, I was robbed in Broad-street, Ratcliffe . I was going home with two of my companions.

Q. Look at the prisoner - A. That is the man I saw that night.

Q. Were there any other persons with him - A. There were three or four coming along. They stopped me. The first word they spoke to me they said, what are you shoving me about for. I cannot tell which man it was that said that. I said, I do not shove anybody. Then they laid hold of my arm. One of them was standing before me. He tried to get my watch out, and then they shoved me against the wall. Then I found somebody's hand in my pocket. I could not tell which it was. When they got my pocket-book out they left me. As soon as they left me I felt for my pocket-book. I sung out, I had lost my pocket-book.

Q. You say you were going home with two of your companions - A. Yes.

Q. They said to you, what are you shoving me about for; one of them did - A. Yes. I cannot say who it was among them all.

Q. Did you hear the prisoner say any thing, or do any thing - A. I cannot tell which of them spoke.

Q.Did the prisoner lay hold of you - A. One of them laid hold of my arm. They seemed to be all acting together.

Q.One of them took your pocket-book, you cannot say who it was - A. No.

Q. You sung out, you had lost your pocket-book - A. Yes, and this man ran across the street, and ran straight up. A woman cried, stop thief.

Q.Was he pursued - A. He was stopped directly.

Q. Can you tell, what was in the pocket-book - A Yes, twenty-three pounds in notes: four five-pound notes, and two one's, and the rest was silver, and my protection.

Mr. Knapp. You had never seen the prisoner before that night - A. No, never.

Q. What time of night was it - A. A quarter past eight o'clock. It was in the dusk of the evening.

Q.Have you always said that you knew the prisoner - A. Yes. He was the man that was stopped for it.

Q. Have you ever heard that there is a forty pounds reward if you convict this man - A. No.

Q. Had you been at any public-house that evening - A. Yes. I had two glasses of rum. I was sober, and had my senses.

COURT. Did they all appear to you to be acting together, and to be one party, the prisoner and those that were with you - A. Yes.

Q. Have you been drinking this morning - A. No more than one glass of gin.

Q. What countryman are you - A. I am a Swede.

JOHANNA HURLEY . I live at No. 7, Cross-street, Limehouse.

Q. How far is that from Broad-street, Ratcliffe - A. I cannot exactly say the distance, not a great way.

Q. Do you remember passing through Broad-street, Ratcliffe, on the 5th of August - A.On the 5th of August my business led me in Rag-fair. I was passing along. I heard one say to the other, it is my man, and the other said, it is my man. It being dusk, it made me stop. I thought it was a press gang. I saw two or three men leave the man who had lost his money.

Q. You saw them go away from him - A. Yes. I heard the man say, you have got my pocket-book. I saw one depart across the road. I only said, if you have lost your pocket-book this man has got it; and then this man ran off. I called out, stop thief.

Q. You heard a bustle, and you were attentive - A. Yes.

Q. You saw two or three men leave the man who had lost the pocket-book: he said, you have got my pocket-book - A. Yes. I saw one go away. I cried, stop thief.

Q. You said, stop thief. That man you say crossed the way, and ran, that is all you know - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know whether that man that was stopped afterwards, and secured, was the prisoner - A. I do not know who it may be. It was about half after eight o'clock. I cannot say whether the prisoner was the man or not. I have no recollection of the person of the prisoner, no farther than seeing him at the justices. I did not say that I know him then.

JAMES CORMACK . Q. Do you remember being in Queen-street, Ratcliffe - A. Yes.

Q. How far distant is it from London-street - A. Not above one hundred yards.

Q. Do you remember, on the 5th of August, seeing a number of people together - A. Yes. I heard some person cry, stop thief. I do not remember it was the last witness. I saw the prisoner running. I pursued after him, and stopped him, a little way up Schoolhouse-lane.

Q. Before you got up to him did you observe him do any thing - A. I observed him swing his hand, as if he had throwed something.

Q.Supposing he had throwed any thing in that motion, in what place would it have been thrown - A.In the school-garden. I desired the gentleman that stood at the gates, to shut up the gates, and make a search. I laid hold of the prisoner. We had a scuffle. Another man came up, and assisted me. He took the prisoner.

WILLIAM ROBINSON . Q. I believe you keep a school in this lane - A. I do. On suspicion that somebody had throwed something over the wall, I searched the yard and garden. I had a little girl, who was inside of the wall, who was walking backwards and forwards. She told me, that she heard something jink like money. The child found the pocket-book. She pointed out the place to me where she stood when something came over her head. I saw her pick up the pocket-book in the garden. The child delivered it to me, and I delivered it to Hope, the officer, and the child picked up three three-shilling: pieces. They were given to the officer.

JOSEPH CORDERAY . Q. Did you, on the 5th of August, see any thing happen about the wall of the saltpetre warehouse - A. I did. I saw the prisoner walk up and down the wall of the saltpetre warehouse, with two or three others. Before they made the end of the wall they were met by three sailors. The middle sailor stopped. He was pushed against the wall by the party. In the space of five minutes his pocket-book was drawn. They released him. I afterwards heard the cry of stop thief, and the prisoner was stopped by Cormack. He delivered him into my hands. I took him to Shadwell office.

RALPH HOPE. I am an officer. Corderoy delivered the prisoner into my custody on the 5th of August. Mr . Robinson, in about five minutes afterwards brought in this pocket-book. The pocket-book has the same contents now as it had then.

Prosecutor. That is my pocket-book. It has my protection, and the notes are in it: four five-pound notes, and two one-pound notes, and six three-shilling tokens, and a dollar.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 21.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Gibbs.

Reference Number: t18120916-66

689. JOHN BUZAR was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of James Kenney , about the hour of five in the morning, on the 5th of August , George Kenney being

therein, and stealing two sheets, value 12 s. two shirts, value 6 s. a gown, value 6 s. and two handkerchiefs, value 3 s. the property of James Kenney . And SARAH BILLINGS , for feloniously receiving, on the same day, two sheets, value 12 s. and a gown, value 6 s. she knowing them to have been stolen .

JOHN KENNEY . I rent a room on the ground floor, at three shillings a week. There are three different families live in the house. John Bacon is my landlord. He does not live in the house. On the 5th of August last I went out about twenty minutes after five in the morning. I left my son in the room. He is not here. He is sick a-bed. On my going out I saw the prisoner, Buzar, I asked him, what o'clock it was; he said, twenty minutes after five. It was quite light then. I returned home about nine the same morning. I lost two sheets, two shirts, an handkerchief, an apron, and a gown; some were in a basket and some were in a box. I had seen them all before I went out in the morning. The property is here but the gown. I know they are my property.

ZACHARY GRUB. I am a flax-man. About five o'clock on the 5th of August, in the morning, this man came in, after being out all night.

Q. Who came in - A. Buzar, the prisoner. He lodged with me in my house.

Q. Did he bring any thing with him - A. Not that time. Afterwards he came down, and asked me to lend him three halfpence. In about a quarter of an hour afterwards he came in with a bag, and had the three halfpence. He went out of my house with a bag. He returned very shortly, and went up stairs. I said, is that you, John. He replied, yes, softly. I went out to the bottom of the court to get a dram for me and my wife. I met him at the bottom of the court. He said, I have been into your room to borrow a halfpenny. He said, make it up sixpence. I lent him the fourpence halfpenny. He did not return until between four and five in the afternoon. He said, take the key of my door. There was an alarm that Mrs. Kenney had been robbed. I went in his room, and found two handkerchiefs and an apron. Mrs. Kenney owned the handkerchiefs and apron directly. The prisoner told me to go to Sarah Billings 's house, and there was the other property. Mr. Brown, the officer, and I went, and asked Sarah Billings for it. She denied having the property. Brown looked about the shop. He could not find it. I found the property down the privy. I took them up out of the night soil, very dirty indeed: one sheet and two shirts. The other sheet I found in the shed, wet. Mrs. Billings said, she would sooner transport her husband than herself.

ROBERT BROWN . I am an officer. I received two handkerchiefs of the witness, Grub, and an apron. I got the other at Mrs. Billings's, with Grub.

Q. Do you know whether Mrs. Billings is a married woman or not - A. I know she has had several husbands. She keeps a clothes-shop. I never saw any husband transact business. I did not know that she had one until now.

Mr. Knapp. Have not you been after her husband, and has he not run away - A. No. He is in court now I believe. She carries on the business. The man knows nothing about it, that you may be satisfied of.

Buzar's Defence. I went out in the evening. I do night-work, and when I came house in the evening I found my door unlocked. In the morning I took my empty bag home. I met Mr. Grub, and borrowed sixpence of him.

Billings's Defence. I bought two coloured shirts and a sheet of the prisoner. I gave him ten shillings for them, what he asked me.

Prosecutrix. I have pawned the sheets for ten shillings. The whole of the property produced is mine.

BUZAR, GUILTY, aged 43.

Of stealing, but not breaking and entering .

Transported for Seven Years .

BILLINGS, GUILTY , aged 59.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18120916-67

690. WILLIAM WILKINS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of August , one pound eight ounces weight of tea, value 3 s. the property of the United Company of Merchants, trading to the East Indies .

MR. SELLMAN. I am an elder in the East India Company's warehouse, Cutler-street . The prisoner was a labourer in that warehouse. He was employed there that day. It was a part of my duty to rub the labourers down. In consequence of suspicion I searched the prisoner. I found tea in his hat. I took out the tea. It was underneath the lining of his hat, in an handkerchief. He said, that was all. I found in his hand a glove full of tea. I desired him to unbutton his breeches, and I found a pound of tea between the lining of his breeches and his shirt. I put my hand in and found some more tea between his thighs. Altogether I found about a pound and a half. This is the tea. It is the same upon which he was at work in Cutler-street, in the city of London. It is worth about three shillings.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence; called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 63.

Confined One Month in Newgate , and Whipped in Jail .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120916-68

691. SARAH SEARS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of August , two penny-pieces, one hundred and twenty-six halfpence, and six farthings , the property of John Stabler .

JOHN STABLER . I am a publican . I live in Worship-street . The prisoner was a servant of mine. The prisoner took these halfpence out of the till.

Q. How do you know it - A. I detected her.

Q. What quantity - A. One hundred and twenty-six halfpence, two penny-pieces, and two farthings.

Q. What did she say for herself - A. She said, she had taken them. She had lived with me a month.

WILLIAM TURNER . This copper was delivered into my hands by the prosecutor, and these are the halfpence I took from her. She owned that she, took them out of the till. She said, she was short of money.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

GUILTY , aged 15.

Confined Fourteen Days in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120916-69

692. WOLF LINSTROM was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of August , a jacket, value 2 s. two shirts, value 2 s. a waistcoat, value 1 s. a pair of boots, value 2 s. and a hammock, value 1 s. the property of John Frederick .

JOHN FREDERICK . I am a sailor . I live on board the Tobago. I was on shore; I saw the prisoner go on board a ship. I went directly after him. I found him on the forecastle; there was nobody there but the prisoner. He was cutting down a hammock. He cut down the hammock, and took it on his arm. He took a pair of trowsers, and a pair of boots; he tied up the trowsers and the boots in the hammock. I asked him what he was going to do with the things. He said he came from another ship. I said, no, you came from the Tobago. He said, pray forgive me, I will never do so again. I gave him into the constable's charge. I produce the things; they have been in my possession ever since. They are mine.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to his character.

GUILTY , aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18120916-70

693. RICHARD PERRY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of September , two shirts, value 2 s. and two shawls, value 18 s. the property of Catherine Duggan .

CATHERINE DUGGAN . I live in Golden-lane ; I keep a public-house .

Q. Did you lose any property on the 3d of September last - A. I lost two shirts and two shawls out of the kitchen; they were taken at different times.

Q. What was taken first - A. One of the shawls; next, the other shawl, and then the two shirts. I missed the first about ten o'clock in the morning, and the next about half after three in the afternoon. I caught the prisoner with the two shirts about five o'clock in the afternoon, about an hundred yards from my house. I pursued him. I pulled part of a shirt out of his breeches, and Mrs. Lloyd pulled the other.

MRS. LLOYD. The man was brought to me. I took the shirts out of his breeches.

JAMES PAYNE . I am an officer. The prisoner was delivered to me, and the shirts likewise.

Prosecutrix. They are my shirts; they are worth two shillings.

Prisoner. I have nothing to say in my defence.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined Two Years in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18120916-71

694. EDWARD REECE and JOHN STURGES were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of August , two pieces of marble, value 1 l. the property of Robert Blower .

ROBERT BLOWER . I am a statuary in Knights-bridge . On the 17th of August, I lost the two pieces of marble, between six and seven o'clock in the morning.

Q. How do you know that they were lost at that time - A. I was watching; I saw them taken. Edward Reece came into the yard; he worked for me. He walked about a little while, and presently John Sturges came to the gateway. He came into the yard. They joined in conversation. Reece took up one piece of marble, and brought it to the sawyer's box, where he worked upon; he put it down. Reece took the tub and the pail, that he had water in. He took up another piece of marble, and took it to the box. Reece and Sturges met again, then Reece took the marble to put in the tub; it would not go in. He broke it and threw it in the tub. Hudson, one of my sawyers, was coming in at the gate. Sturges walked up the yard with Hudson. Reece took up the tub with the marble. I immediately ran down stairs, and desired my men to pursue him; and they caught him about an hundred yards off. He was brought back with the tub, with the two pieces of marble in; they were my marble. Reece said, he hoped I would forgive him. I told Sturges, I had been watching them for some time. Sturges said, he had nothing at all to do with it.

EDWARD GATTEN . I was sent by Mr. Blower to pursue Reece.

Q. How far was he from the yard - A. About an hundred yards off. He had the tub, and the two pieces of marble in it. I brought him back. He said he wanted it for an iron-stand.

The prisoners said nothing in their defence.

Reece called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Sturges called five witnesses, who gave him a good character.

REECE, GUILTY , aged 37.

Confined Two Years in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

STURGES, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Gibbs.

Reference Number: t18120916-72

695. THOMAS BARNES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of August , thirty-nine yards of canvass, value 9 l. the property of Edward Gray .

WILLIAM WILTSHIRE . I am bailiff to Edward Gray . His country house is at Hernsey. He holds two hundred acres of land. I know the canvass to be my master's property; we lost it out of the rick-yard on the 3d of August.

WILLIAM SMITH . I am one of the patrols of Bow-street. On the 3d of August, I met the prisoner in the City Road, with these two bundles. I asked him what he had got there. He said it was cloth, he had brought it from Cambridge. This is the canvass.

Wiltshire. I know it to be my master's property.

Prisoner's Defence. On the 4th of August last, on my return home from trying to get work in getting in the harvest; I took up some canvass I saw in a ditch by Hernsey; coming home, I was met by the officer. He asked me what I had; I said canvass. He took me in custody.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY, aged 33.

Judgment respited .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18120916-73

696. ELIZABETH CLARKE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of July , a pair of pantaloons, value 5 s. the property of Martha Roberts .

MARTHA ROBERTS . I live at 20, Marshall street, Carnaby-market. On the 28th of last July, I lost a pair of pantaloons, the property that I had to wash. I saw them the next day at Mr. Perryman's, the pawnbroker.

DAVID PERRYMAN . I am a pawnbroker. On the 28th of July, two women came; the prisoner was one of them. I was induced to look at the pantaloons by one of the women saying, they were well washed. The prisoner appeared to be the owner of them. They were pledged in the name of Mary Evans . I have had them in my possession ever since.

Prosecutrix. These are the pantaloons that I lost; they were taken out of the yard, at the back of the house. They were wet. The prisoner came into the house to inquire for a relation of hers.

EDWARD FOX. I am a porter. I live in Ham-yard, Great Windmill-street. On the 28th of July, near two o'clock, the prisoner came to my apartment; she had something in her lap. I went down stairs, and came up again. I saw a pair of pantaloons at the fire. I asked whose pantaloons they were. The prisoner said they belonged to William; the man that she was in the habit of being with. They were the same colour as these. They appeared to be wet.

ROBERT MEDAM . I am a constable. I took the prisoner in custody. She put a duplicate in her mouth. I endeavoured to get it out; I could not.

Prisoner's Defence. An acquaintance of mine that I had known five years, asked me to pledge the pantaloons. I went to this man's; she presented them to the pawnbroker. I never stole them at all, and the other woman I have never heard of again.

GUILTY , aged 32.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18120916-74

697. MARY BRUCE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of September , an apron, value 6 d. two towels, value 6 d. a shift, value 2 s. and two pillow-cases, value 2 s. the property of Sarah Downes .

SARAH DOWNES . I live at No. 12, Road-side, Whitechapel-road . The prisoner was my servant .

Q. Did you lose an apron and towels - A. Yes, and one shift and a napkin.

Q.When did you lose them - A. I missed some in June, and some I did not miss until a fortnight back. The prisoner left my service on the 7th of September. I promiscuously went into the room, where her box was; I saw in it some muslin, which I believe to be mine; but it was not marked. I could not swear to it.

DELANEY. I am a pawnbroker. I produce a frock, a pair of gloves, a pin-cloth, and two towels.

Q. Do you know who pledged the towels - A. The towels were wrappers about other parcels, which Mrs. Downes saw in the shop.

Q. Is there an apron there - A. Yes, that also was a wrapper. I do not recollect the person of the prisoner at all.

- DRAKE. I am an apprentice to Mr. Peart, pawnbroker, Whitechapel. I produce a shift, two pillow-cases, and a napkin. I think it was the prisoner that pawned them on the 29th of June; but I am not exactly sure.

Prosecutrix. The two towels, apron, and shift, are mine. I made them myself, and the pillow-cases.

SAMUEL MILLER . I am an officer. I took the prisoner in custody. I searched her box; I found one duplicate in her box; the other Mrs. Downes gave me. I found in her box a quantity of halfpence and a handkerchief, which Mrs. Downes said was her property. The duplicate I found is for the napkin and pillow-cases, two shillings and sixpence, Pearts, Whitechapel. Drake is the apprentice.

Q. to Drake. Is that the duplicate you made out for these things - A. Yes.

Q. Mr. Downes. Where did you see that other duplicate - A. In the prisoner's pocket-book in her box. I took it out, and went to the pawnbrokers. I asked him to let me see the things; he did. Then things are in another indictment.

Prisoner's Defence. Some of the articles belong to me.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Gibbs.

Reference Number: t18120916-75

698. THOMAS OAKLEY was indicted for killing and slaying Elizabeth Matthews .

The witnesses were called, and not appearing in court, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18120916-76

699. WILLIAM LEWIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of February , two saltcellars, value 2 s. 6 d. the property of Edward Holwell . And HENRY HOWELL for feloniously receiving, on the same day, the said goods, he knowing them to have been stolen .

The case was stated by Mr. Bolland.

EDWARD HOLWELL . Q. You are a glass manufacturer , residing in Faicon-street, Aldersgate - A. Yes. The prisoner lived with me about two years; he left me in May last.

Q. In consequence of information that you received, did you and Mr. Deputy King go to the house of Howell - A. I did. I found there a pair of saltcellars, that I had missed about six months. They had been a pair of square cruets cut down for saltcellars; they were intended for sale. These I found at the house of Howell.

Q. Was any thing said to Howell - A. He was asked, where he got them. He said he bought them of William Lewis .

Q. What is Howell - A. He keeps a glass-shop, sells rags, and old iron, in Stone-cutter Street.

Q. Was Lewis afterwards taken up - A. On the same day.

Q. Were you present when Lewis said any thing about the saltcellars - A. No.

JOHN LACEY HAWKINS . Q. You are a marshal-man of the city - A. I am.

Q. Did you in consequence of directions given to you, go to the house of Howell - A. I did; accompanied with Mr. Deputy King, and Mr. Holwell. I there found these two saltcellars.

Q. Was any thing said to Holwell, about these salt-cellars - A.There was; I did not hear what. Mr. Holwell said, it was another case, it did not belong to the robbery of that night.

Q. to Prosecutor. Just look at these saltcellars; and say, whether they are the saltcellars, cut out of the cruets - A. They are.

Mr. Alley. Old customers they are; I suppose, they are not worth a shilling - A. They are worth half-a-crown.

GEORGE KING . Q. In consequence of a burglary being committed in the house of Mr. Holwell, you were led to an enquiry - A. I was, and that enquiry led me to the house of Howell; he deals in old rags, iron, and glass.

Q. Did you find there any saltcellars - A. I found the saltcellars in the one pair of stairs in Howell's bed-room. I found nothing in the lower part that could be identified.

Q. Before you went up stairs, was there any obstacle made by the wife or Howell - A. Howell or his wife, stated, that the room was not fit for us to go into. I replied, that we were married men; we had no idle curiosity to gratify. And in the one pair bedroom, these salt cellars were found. Mr. Holwell exclaimed; Oh! dear; these are the saltcellars that we have lost so long. Howell said he bought them of Lewis some months ago.

Q. Had you spoken to Howell before about Lewis - A. I had. I told him to be very cautious what answers he gave, as Lewis and Young had been suspected of a burglary. I asked, if he had seen them lately; he answered, no. Have you bought any thing of them lately? No. Have you received any thing of them lately? No. Then he stated, that he had bought them of Lewis.

Q. Did he state any thing of the price he had given for them - A. No.

Q. Did you afterwards inquire of Lewis about these saltcellars - A. I did; I asked him where he got the saltcellars that he had sold to Howell. He said he had taken them from Mr. Holwell's, while in his service.

Q. Was any thing said by him in the presence of Howell about them - A. I do not recollect.

Howell's Defence. I purchased the salts. I gave a fair price for them. I kept these salts for my own use; on my own mantle-piece

COURT. Mr. King, had Howell any shop - A. Yes, rags in a basket, bottles and glass, and various articles exhibited; and on the other side of the way, where the buildings are pulled down, is a table with things set on it.

Howell called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

LEWIS, GUILTY , aged 23.

HOWELL, GUILTY , aged 42.

Confined Six Months in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120916-77

700. THOMAS LELEIN was indicted for feloniously making an assault on the king's highway upon Robert Hall Price , on the 12th of July , putting him in fear and taking from his person, and against his will, two seals, value 4 s. and a watch-key, value 6 d. his property,

ROBERT HALL PRICE . I am an apprentice to a watchmaker.

Q. When did this happen - A. On the 12th of last July, about half after nine o'clock at night.

Q. Where was it - A. In Holborn; between Brook-street and Holborn Bars . I was coming down Holborn from Oxford-street. I met the prisoner; we both met one another: we were both coming contrary ways. He made a rush towards me, and at the same instant he seized my watch seals. My watch being tight in my pocket the chain broke; the prisoner went off with the seals, and I followed him.

Q. He went off with the chain and seals did he - A. Yes, he crossed towards Middle-row, and I followed. He seeing that I was pursuing him, he crossed over again; he turned down Gray's Inn Lane; when he had got down Gray's Inn Lane, he made a stop between two or three people. At that instant, I came up and seized hold of him, and I held him until a watchman came up. He was taken to Eagle-street watch-house. The constable did not search him there. He sent him down to St. Andrew's watch-house, and in that time there was an hour and a half elapsed.

Q. Hand over your watch; so the other part of your chain you lost - A. Yes. I had two seals to it, and a watch key. I never lost sight of the prisoner. When I laid hold of him, he said I was going to rob him; he was perfectly innocent.

Mr. Pooley. Did not you say that the man who run against you you lost sight of him, and you only saw his hat when he turned the corner of Gray's Inn Lane - A. I think I did say so to the officer as we were conversing together.

WILLIAM HOARE . I had been up to Oxford-street with Price, to see his sister home; and on our returning home, in Holborn, a man made a snatch at his watch. I did not see the man snatch the watch. I heard the chain break; he ran away, and Price after him. I lost sight of him. I could not keep up with them. I saw him turn the corner of Gray's Inn Lane, and when I came up, Price had got hold of him.

ALEXANDER ROSS . I am a patrol. I saw the prisoner examined at St. Andrew's watch-house, Holborn Hill. The prisoner was given into my charge to take him to the Compter; in going along he endeavoured to make his escape. He was stopped by a watchman in St. Paul's Church-yard; I came up to him, and took him to the Compter. At the watch-house, the prosecutor said the prisoner had made a charge against him in Gray's Inn Lane; and if he had not done that, he would not have given himself so much trouble. He said, they had charged each other.

Q. to Price. When you stopped this man in Gray's Inn Lane, what did he say - A. He said, what do you mean by this behaviour, by laying hold of me. I said,

you have robbed me of my watch chain. He called me a villain, and said, I will charge the watchman with you; and after I had made the charge, he made a charge; and the watchman took one in one hand, and the other with the other.

Prisoner's Defence. On Sunday afternoon, I took a walk to Houndsditch. I met some friends; I walked with my friends to Holborn, where we separated, and just as I turned down Gray's Inn Lane, I was stopped by this man. I was going up to Mr. Perkin's, in Gray's Inn Lane, to receive twenty-four shillings. I gave charge of the prosecutor for stopping me.

The prisoner called ten witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120916-78

701. JAMES HOLDER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of September , a silk handkerchief, value 2 s. the property of James Bruce , from his person .

ROBERT METCALFE . On this night I was in Chancery-lane with Mr. Bruce, a little beyond Serjeant's Inn gate. I felt some one at my pocket, which induced me to turn round; when I saw the prisoner with his hands behind his back, and on his approaching me to pass, I discovered a pocket-handkerchief in his hand. I seized the pocket-handkerchief; I thought it was mine. The prisoner gave me a blow on my head, and ran away up Chancery-lane. Mr. Bruce pursued him.

JAMES BRUCE . Q. Were you walking in Chancery-lane with Metcalfe this evening - A. I was; upon his being struck by the prisoner, the prisoner ran away. He ran into Star-yard. I gave him into the hands of Mr. Dawson. Mr. Metcalfe shortly joined us, and the prisoner was taken to the watch-house. Mr. Metcalfe produced the handkerchief, which was my property. This is the handkerchief; it is my property. I never lost sight of the prisoner. He confessed the theft.

Prisoner's Defence. I leave myself to the mercy of the court.

GUILTY, aged 20.

Judgment respited .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120916-79

702. JAMES HOBDELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of June , a pair of boots, value 2 l. and five upper leathers, value 5 s. from the person of Samuel Moore , jun. the property of Samuel Moore , senior.

SAMUEL MOORE , sen. I am a shoemaker . I live in Paul-street, Finsbury-square. On the 17th of June, about half past three o'clock in the afternoon, I sent my son with a pair of boots, and five upper leathers, to the shop I work for, No. 21, Butcher-hall-lane.

SAMUEL MOORE , jun. I was going with these boots to No. 21, Butcher-hall-lane, and going through Falcon-street , a man pushed me down, and took the bundle off my arm.

Q. Who is that man, do you know him again - A The prisoner is him; he ran down Noble-street. I pursued him; I could not see him. I went home to my mother; I told my father, that a boy had ran away with the boots.

Q. How soon after did you see the man - A. I saw him once before; he watched me into my uncle's shop, 21, Butcher-hall-lane; and after I lost the boots, I saw him at Hatton-garden office, before the justice. I am sure he is the same man.

GOODMAN SOLOMON. I am an officer. I live in Field-lane, Holborn. I was informed that the prisoner and another were coming constantly in our neighbourhood, offering stolen goods. I saw the prisoner stand in Union-court, with this bundle under his arm. Union-court leads towards Field-lane. I went towards the prisoner, and they halloed out, run. The prisoner took to running; I followed him into Charles-street. He ran across Charles-street to the neighbourhood where his father resides, to Bull-head-court. I then lost sight of him; he chucked these boots, and upper leathers, and handkerchief, down. I knew the prisoner, and he knew me; and I know his father and mother. I picked the handkerchief up containing the boots and upper leathers. These are them.

Q. What day was this - A. The 17th of June, about five o'clock in the afternoon. On the 4th of August, I went to the House of Correction, and identified the prisoner. He had leave then to go to sea. I am sure he is the man that dropped the boots. I advertised to get the owner for the boots.

JOSEPH MARTIN . I am one of the city constable. On the 22d of August, in the evening, I saw the prisoner in company with another, sounding peoples pockets. I did not see him take any thing out. I took him in custody to prevent him committing any depredations that night. On the following morning, I took him to Hatton-garden office. He was sent to the House of Correction, as being a known thief, for a month. The next day, I was passing the house of the last witness; he asked me if I had not taken two boys in custody. I told him I had; we went to the House of Correction together directly. He saw this one. Goodman Solomon said, that is the boy; I know him well. We then went after the prosecutor. The child came to the office, with his father and mother. Directly he saw the prisoner, he said, he was the boy that throwed him down, and took the boots.

Samuel Moore , sen. These are my boots, and the handkerchief that they were tied in. I tied them up myself.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going of an errand for my father, for an ounce of tobacco; and returning home, a boy came up George Alley, Union Court; he chucked a bundle at my feet. The boy ran off; presently, I heard somebody call out, stop thief. I ran after the boy, and could not find him. I know nothing of the boy, or the bundle, or what was in it.

GUILTY, aged 15.

Judgment respited .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120916-80

703. MATTHEW O'BRADLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of September , two shirts, value 6 s. three handkerchiefs, value 3 s. a razor, value 1 s. a razor-strop, value 6 d. a pair of boots, value

4 s. and a pair of breeches, value 3 s. the property of William Clarke .

WILLIAM CLARKE . I am a post-boy ; I lived at Brighton last. On the 9th of September, about four in the afternoon, I went into the Magpie and Stump public-house, Fetter-lane . I called for a pint of beer; in a few minutes the prisoner came in, he called for a pint of beer. I had my bundle alongside of me; I was looking out of the window into the coach yard. He saw me very busy looking out of the window. He had an opportunity of taking my bundle; he went out with it. When I turned my head he was gone, and the bundle was gone. The landlord found him, and my bundle at his lodgings.

WILLIAM PERCH . I am son to the landlord of the Magpie and Stump. I was not in the house when the things were taken; I came in after the young man had lost his bundle. They gave me a description; I guessed by the description, who he was. I went down to a house in Plow Court, and found him.

Q.What is he - A. A tailor, I believe. I went into the house; I found the prisoner sitting in the room, and the bundle laying at the door, at the step of the stairs. I told him, I wanted him to go along with me. He got up directly. I asked him to bring his bundle with him; he said it did not belong to him. I told him, he should have known that an hour and a half ago. I brought him home to my father, and fetched Mr. Fletcher, the officer, to him. The prisoner was rather intoxicated at the time.

FLETCHER. I produce the bundle. I took the prisoner in custody.

Prosecutor. They are all my things. I recollect the man sitting alongside of me.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not know what I was doing at the time; I was in liquor.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120916-81

704. PETER CORMACK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of August , a wooden kit, value 6 d. and a kit of salmon, value 9 s. 6 d. the property of Thomas Stickley .

THOMAS STICKLEY. I live in Great Windmill-street, Piccadilly. I lost the kit of salmon on the 24th of August, in the morning, about seven o'clock it was taken from Mr. Austin's cart

WILLIAM AUSTIN. Q. You carry fish for the fishmongers - A. Yes; the salmon was put in my cart by Mr. Stickley. I got into the cart, and moved these kits. I got out of my cart again. I had not been out of my cart five minutes. They said, a man had been caught for thieving a kit of salmon. I ran back to my cart. I saw it was the kit belonging to Mr. Stickley.

THOMAS ROGERS . On the 24th of August, I saw the prisoner take the kit from Mr. Austin's cart. I thought it was not his own property. I pursued him, and took him back to the cart, and a constable was sent for. The prisoner said, that Mr. Martin had sent him for the kit. This is the kit.

Stickley That is my kit.

Prisoner's Defence. I was a porter . This morning I came over London-bridge; a man asked me if I wanted a job, I said I did. He said, if I would carry that kit of salmon on in his cart, he would give me sixpence. Mr. Rogers followed me; he said, where are you going with that. I said, I am going to Mr. Martin; he said, it does not belong to you or Martin; directly I took it back. He did not give me time to stop and find the man. I have been led into this very innocently.

GUILTY, aged 29.

Judgment respited .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120916-82

705. JOSEPH DAVIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of September , a handkerchief, value 1 s. and a glove, value 6 d. the property of Henry Davis , from his person .

HENRY DAVIS . I am copying clerk to an attorney. I was going across Smithfield in fair time, between five and six o'clock; I happened to turn round, and saw my glove and handkerchief in an officer's hand.

WILLIAM BARRETT . I am an officer. I was in Smithfield on Saturday, the 5th of September; Martin, my brother officer, and I were in the fair. We saw the prisoner coming towards Long-lane. Martin said, there goes a pick-pocket. I immediately said, what, is it that old man; he said, yes. I proceeded after him from the time I first saw him to the time we took him. He walked about fifty yards; I saw him put his left hand into the gentleman's pocket, and take this glove out, which he threw down. I immediately stooped, and picked it up. I saw his hand in the same gentleman's pocket; he took out an handkerchief. I immediately seized the arm with the handkerchief in his hand, which he threw down. I immediately stooped, and picked it up. On my stooping for the handkerchief, I lost sight of the gentleman. I was under the necessity of holding it up in the fair, and asking, what gentleman had lost an handkerchief.

Q. Are you sure it was the prisoner - A. Yes. I never let him go from the time I seized him. This is the glove and handkerchief.

JOSEPH MARTIN . I was in company with the last witness; we watched the prisoner. I can only corroborate his evidence. I saw him throw the glove down. I did not see him take the handkerchief. I was behind the last witness.

Prosecutor. This is my handkerchief, and my right hand glove.

Prisoner's Defence. I was at the fair looking at the shows, and wild beasts I stooped to pick up a handkerchief, and two gentlemen laid hold of me. I have not a friend higher here than one hundred and fifty miles, only God.

GUILTY , aged 55.

Confined One Year in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120916-83

706. JAMES POLITT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 31st of July , five hundred nails, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of our Lord the King .

AND ANOTHER COUNT for like offence, the property of persons to the Jurors unknown.

THOMAS FARRELL . I am a carpenter employed by the ordnance in the Tower. The prisoner was employed as a journeyman carpenter at the Tower. On

the 30th of July, in the afternoon, the prisoner applied three times to me for nails. On the 31st, it struck me as extraordinary, that he should want so many nails. I went to his box to see whether he had the nails, and there were none in his box, and he was not at that sort of work that he could have used them. I communicated my suspicions to Mr. Hall. Before I told Mr. Hall, I placed myself in a situation to observe the prisoner. I heard him rattle the nails in his box, and put them in his pocket.

Q. Where were the nails then - A. In his nail-box. I walked by him; he then came out of the place where he was taking these nails I then took the opportunity of looking in his box; there were no nails left, but a few old ones, I then told Mr. Hall.

MATTHEW HALL . I am foreman of the carpenters in the ordnance employ. I followed the prisoner outside of the spur-gate. I called to him, and asked him if he had heard my body or seen any body taking any nails out of the boxes from the work; he answered, he had not heard any thing of it, he was sure he had not got any. He repeated it two or three times. The last thing I asked him, if he had taken any; he said, no. I put my hand into his pocket, and took out forty or fifty. I asked him, how he could tell me that wilful lie so many times, He said, I know I told you a lie, what of that; it was only for a job he had got to do. I then took him to the clerk of the work's office, in the Tower; there I made him turn the nails out, and he turned out about five hundred. These are them; they are nails furnished by the ordnance. There are seven different sorts.

Prisoner's Defence. With regard to what they swore against me; I was at work at a public-house in Princes-street, Westminster, doing a job for myself two or three days before this happened. I had occasion to buy nails for the job; and when I had completed the job, I put the remainder on his bar. He said, take them, they may be of service to you; you have got a large family. I put the nails he gave me in my basket. I went to work at the Tower, and these nails I took there, they being with my tools; some I made use, and some of those nails, the nails I had in my pocket, I found among some old sail-cloth. I certainly did put some in my pocket; I was wrong in so doing.

GUILTY , aged 66.

Confined One Month in Newgate , and Whipped for the space of 100 yards on Tower hill .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120916-84

707. FRANCIS SHIPMAN was indicted for feloniously forging, on the 23d of June , in the 57th year of his Majesty's reign, a bill of exchange, for 145 l. 10 s. with intention to defraud our Lord the King .

SECOND COUNT, for publishing and uttering as true, a like forged bill, with the same intention. And several other Counts for like offences, only varying the manner of charging them.

JOHN CUFFY . I live in the Old City chambers.

Q. What are you by business - A. A general agent.

Q. On or about the 2d of June last, did the prisoner come to you - A. Yes.

Q. Had you known him before - A. No; I never knew him before.

Q. In what name did he come by - A. I cannot say, whether it was Shipman or Sheppard.

Q. On what business did he call - A. To discount a bill of exchange.

COURT. Did he produce it - A. No; he wanted a bill of exchange discounted, accepted by General Phipps , payable at the Bank of England.

Mr. Gurney. Did he tell you where the bill was then lying - A. At the Marine Pay office. I said, I would make the inquiries at the Marine Pay office, and if I liked the bill, I would get it discounted. He said, I might at the same time get the bill at the Marine Pay office.

Q. Did you go to the office, and get the bill - A. I did.

Q. Is that the bill, Sir - A. Yes, Sir, this is the bill.

COURT. Did you or not say, to the best of your knowledge - A. I meaned to say, to the best of my knowledge.

Mr. Gurney. Have you any doubt of that being the bill - A. No; I have not.

Q. After you had got the bill, did the prisoner come to you again - A. I met the prisoner at my office, on the same day or the next day. I told him it was not in my power to discount it. I would take it to Mr. Sears, close by.

Q. Did the prisoner accompany you to Mr. Sears - A. Yes.

Q. Did you apply to Mr. Sears for the discount - A. Yes.

Q. Did you discount it - A. No.

Q. Why - A. Because, I would not sign my name to it; he would not discount it unless I endorsed it.

Q. Upon that did the prisoner have the bill again - A. Yes.

Q. Look at the back of the bill, and tell me, whether at that time, both the endorsements were there, or whether there was only one of them - A. Andrew Whitehead was there I know. Whether the one underneath the name of Sheppard was there, I cannot say.

Q. You did not endorse the bill yourself - A. I wrote one letter upon it.

Q. What letter is that - A. J, at the back, under F. Sheppard. I was going to endorse it, but I stopped.

Mr. Arabin. I think you told my lord, that you only speak to the best of your knowledge of the bill - A. Yes.

COURT. Does the circumstance of that J, at the back of that bill, enable you to speak with certainty to the bill - A. Yes.

Q. Because, at one time you said this was the bill to the best of your knowledge; have you any doubt of it being the bill - A. I have not any doubt of it being the bill.

WILLIAM ROBINSON . Q. Are you a clerk in the Marine Pay office - A. I am.

Q. On the 19th of June last, was that bill and that letter left at your office - A. Yes; I have no doubt of it.

Q. Did that bill come to your office as accepted - A. Yes.

Q.Was it accompanied by that letter of advice - A. Yes; the letter of advice was attached to it.

Q. Did you wrote upon that acceptance for the signature of General Phipps - A Yes.

Q. You wrote the words, accepted 19th of June, payable 20th of July next, at the Bank of England; that you wrote - A. I did.

Q. General Phipps is now the paymaster of the royal marines - A. He is.

Q. When did he become so - A. In the early part of 1810.

Q. Who was the paymaster before General Phipps - A. The honourable George Villiers .

Q. You observe, this bill is addressed to the honourable George Villiers, as paymaster of the royal marines - A. It is; that did not strike me, when I wrote the acceptance. Many drafts come addressed to the honourable George Villiers , as paymaster of the royal marines, after he was out of office.

Q. After you had written the acceptance, did you lay it before General Phipps for his signature - A. I cannot say I laid it before him; that is his signature.

Q. By that was the bill called for - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember the day - A. No.

Q. Do you remember Mr. Cuffy coming for it - A. No. The bill was given out upon giving a proper description of it.

Mr. Arabin. Do I understand you to say, he wrote that - A. I did. I am acquainted with General Phipps 's hand-writing; and I in all probability laid the bill before him, but I cannot say.

THOMAS GLADSTANES . Q. You are a silversmith, living in Well-street, St. Mary-le-bone - A. Yes.

Q. Have you any knowledge of the prisoner at the bar - A. I have seen him two or three times. On the day he brought the bill, he called to get a bill discountted, not to purchase.

Q. Was that the bill, that he put into your hands for the purpose of getting discounted - A. Yes.

Q. Did you make any remark upon any peculiarity that you observed upon the bill - A. I observed, that the bill was directed to the honourable George Villiers , and accepted by Phipps; he said, Phipps accepted it in lieu of the other. Isaac Fisher discounted it.

Q. Did you look at the endorsement upon it - A. I did not pay any attention, there was an endorsement upon it.

FRANK BRATHWAITE . Q. You are clerk to Isaac Fisher , a silversmith in Cockspur-street - A. Yes.

Q. Take that bill in your hand, and tell me whether it came into your hands from Thomas Gladstanes , for the purpose of being discounted - A. Yes; it has every appearance of the same. I cannot speak with certainty to it. It was in Mr. Fisher's custody until it was paid into the bankers hands.

COURT. You cannot speak with any certainty, that that is the bill - A. I cannot, not having marked it.

Q. What did you do with the bill that you received from Gladstanes - A. I discounted it; and it was kept in Mr. Fisher's hands, until he paid it to his bankers, Messrs. Biddulph and Cox. I merely discounted it for Mr. Gladstanes, and then it was given to Mr. Fisher. It was put in the place where our bills are usually kept, and then paid into the bankers.

Q. Did you pay it yourself - A. I cannot say I did. I have Mr. Fisher's book in my pocket, where it is credited

WILLIAM TULLY. Q. Your are clerk in the accompting-house of Messrs. Biddulph and Cox - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember that bill being paid at any time in Mr. Biddulph's house - A. Here is my handwriting; that was paid in our house. And that bill was afterwards paid to me by the Bank of England, and afterwards I credited Mr. Fisher's accompt

Mr. Arabin. All you know it was in your house - A. Yes.

Q.How it came there you cannot say - A. It is credited in our books.

Q. to Mr. Gladstanes. Look at that bill, and tell me what enables you to say, that is the same bill that the prisoner produced - A. The principal thing in this bill, that makes me believe it to be the bill, it is addressed to the honourable George Villiers , and accepted by General Phipps I made no mark at the time. I made a mark here; but that was before the justice.

Q. You cannot say with certainty, whether that is the bill or not - A. To the best of my belief it is; I cannot say with certainty.

SAMUEL KEENE . Q. You are one of the clerks of Bow-street office - A. Yes.

Q. Were you present at the examination of the prisoner for the crime of forgery of this bill - A. When he was first examined I was. A bill was produced at that time.

Q. Look at that bill, Mr. Gladstanes, is that the bill that you produced at the office - A.(Mr. Gladstanes) Yes, the first time.

Mr. Keene. I saw the gentleman there, and I writ down the substance of the answers that the prisoner made to the charge. The bill was produced at that time.

COURT. Before that which you are now going to read, certain informations were read in the prisoner's presence, to which he answered - A. Yes; I wrote them down from the prisoner's mouth. He says, he received the bill in question of Mr. Whitehead, in Hobart-town. It was endorsed previous to discounting it. He did not know that it was necessary for him to endorse it. The reason he put F. Sheppard to it, was, Mr. Cuffy, to whom he went to get the bill discounted, thought his name was Sheppard. He says, he knows Freeman, the drawer of the bill, and has seen him write. The bill was produced to him by Mr Whitehead, by the post. That he went at Vandeaman and Calcutta by the name of Francis Shipman .

LIEUTENANT EDWARD LORD. Q. I believe you are a lieutenant in the royal marines - A. Yes.

Q. Did you go out to New South Wales to Calcutta - A. I went out in 1803, in the Ocean, to New South Wales. The prisoner went out at the same time.

Q. Were you afterwards stationed in Vandeaman's Land - A. Yes; and the prisoner was stationed there.

Q. Did he act as clerk in the three offices in Hobart-town, in Vandeaman's Land - A. Yes; several years.

Q. Did he afterwards officiate as store-keeper and surveyor - A. Part of the time as store-keeper, and the other as surveyor.

Q.Would he in that situation acquire a mode of which the bills were drawn - A. Yes, on the treasury.

Q. During part of the time that you and he were there, were you the officer of marines acting - A. Yes.

Q. At what time did you quit the settlement - A. In February 1811.

Q.At that time were you apprised that General Phipps had succeeded Mr. Villiers - A. Yes; I had drawn bills upon Mr. Phipps before I quitted.

Q. At the time that you quitted the settlement, did you leave the prisoner there - A. No; he came away before me. I think in August 1810, to go from Vandeaman's Land to Port Jackson.

Q. At the time that you quitted Vandeaman's Land, who succeeded you in that settlement - A.Lieutenant Breedon .

Q. Are you well acquainted with the hand writing of lieutenant Breedon - A. I have seen him write frequently.

Q. Look at that bill, and tell me whether you believe it to be the hand-writing of lieutenant Breedon - A. The signature I don't think is his hand-writing.

Q. Look at the body of the bill, do you believe the body of the bill to be Breedon's hand-writing - A. No.

Q.What was lieutenant Breedon's name - A. Joseph Edward ; of late years he has signed Joseph Edward Breedon .

Q. In what manner is that signed - A. Joseph Edward (in full) Breedon. The surname would have passed for his hand-writing, but not the christian name. The surname, the characters are like his writing. Joseph Edward is not. The body of the bill is very much like the hand writing of the prisoner. I have seen the prisoner write often; I am well acquainted with his writing.

Q. Do you believe the body of that bill to be the prisoner's hand-writing - A. Yes, the characters of the writing. The only thing that makes it doubtful with me, there was another clerk in the settlement wrote very much like the prisoner. I think it is the prisoner's.

JAMES RIPMAN . Q. You, I believe, are a surgeon of the 4th regiment of royal marines - A. I am.

Q. Do you know lieutenant Joseph Edward Breedon - A. I have known him twenty years.

Q. Lieutenant Breedon is an officer in that division - A. He is.

Q. During your acquaintance with Breedon, have you seen his hand-writing - A. I have not seen him write often; I knew him from his birth.

Q. Now, Sir, is that or not the hand-writing of lieutenant Breedon - A. I do not believe this is his hand writing.

Q.Take that letter in your hand - A. I think he writes a straiter character.

Q. to Mr. Lord. From your recollection of the prisoner's hand-writing, and also the hand-writing of the other clerk in the office, have you a conviction it is the prisoner's hand writing - A. I should rather take it to be the prisoner's hand-writing.

Q.Have you any doubt in your mind - A. There is a little doubt; they resemble so much alike.

Q. You believe it to be the prisoner's - A. Yes.

The letter of advice read -

="Hobart Town, Vandeaman's Land, 27th August 1810, addressed to the honourable George Villiers, paymaster of the royal marine forces. Sir, I beg leave to inform you, that in the absence of lieutenant Lord, I have this day drawn a bill in favour of Mr. Whitehead for 145 l. 10 s. sterling, for the subsistance of a detachment of royal marines. I have the honour, Sir, to be your most humble servant, Joseph Edward Breedon , first lieut. of royal marines.="

The bill of exchange read. -

="Hobart Town, Vandeaman's Land, 145 l. 10 s.

Pay to Mr Whitehead, or order, the sum of one hundred and forty-five pounds ten shillings, to your most obedient servant, Joseph Edward Breedon, lieut. of royal marines. To the honourable George Villiers , paymaster of royal marines. Accepted 19th June, 1812; payable 22d July next, at the Bank of England - E, Phipps.="

Prisoner's Defence. I received this bill of Mr. Whitehead, in Hobart-town, in June last, and left it for acceptance at the Marine Pay office, in Parliament-street. After the bill was accepted, I took it to Mr. Cuffy, to have it discounted; which he would not do. I afterwards went to Mr. Gladstanes, he did accept it.

Q. to Mr. Lord. When you came away in 1811, was the other clerk there - A. Yes; he was remaining in the office then.

GUILTY , DEATH , aged 30,

Of uttering the bill knowing it to be forged.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18120916-85

708. WILLIAM HARRISON was indicted for that he, on the 1st of October, feloniously did transpose and remove, and caused to be transposed and removed, a certain mark and stamp impression, used and directed to be used by the Company of Goldsmiths in London, for the marking and stamping of silver plate, to a certain other silver plate, whereby a certain duty to our Lord the King was denoted to be paid, with intention to defraud our Lord the King .

SECOND COUNT, for selling a piece of plate with a like stamp upon it, with the same intention.

The case was stated by Mr. Gurney.

HENRY DORSON. I am a silversmith, not a working silversmith.

Q. Do you reside in the City-road - A. About a twelvemonth ago I did.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. I do. He is a polisher ; he lives in North-street, City road. About a twelvemonth ago, he came to my house, and asked me if I wanted any milk ewers; he took them out of a parcel and shewed them me.

Q. How many did he produce - A. I think three; but two I can swear to.

Q. Cream jugs - A. Yes; I purchased two. I paid him for silver, fashion; and duty; the two came to 2 l. 6 s. I marked them, and put them in my window. I afterwards sold one to Mr. Davis, Crown-street. Finsbury-square, about eleven or twelve months ago; the other one is in my window. I purchased the lease of No. 30,

and in consequence of the removal, I sent most of my plate to be coloured up at Mr. Field's, of Hoxton Mr. Field found out the fraud; and in consequence of his information, I got the cream jug I sold to Davis. This was the cream jug I sent to Mr. Field to be coloured up; and on my breathing on it, I discovered the stamp let in. I believe it is one genuine stamp of a smaller piece. When the prisoner sold it me, I believe he said it was of his own manufactory. I have no doubt about it.

JAMES DAVIS . Q. Did you at any time purchase a cream jug of Mr. Dobson - A. I did, in November 1811. I wrote upon it 1811. I kept it in my custody until I gave it up. It has not undergone any alteration while in my custody whatever.

ALEXANDER FIELD. I am a working-silversmith.

Q. Sometime ago did you receive a cream jug of Mr. Dobson for the purpose of polishing - A. Yes, I did. I saw that the mark was let in Mr. Dobson came to my house; I told him of it. I gave that jug up to the gentleman who carries on the prosecution for the Stamp-office. This is the one I received of Mr. Dobson, there is the appearance of a stamp being let in.

GEORGE MILES . Q. Do you hold any situation in Goldsmith's-hall - A. Yes. I am the person appointed to mark and draw plates.

Q. Did the prisoner or his son bring plate to your office to be essayed - A. The prisoner's son; he lives in North-street, City-road.

Q. Did the prisoner frequently come to the hall - A. He has been there.

Q. Now, look at that cream jug sold to Davis, has that been essayed and marked at the hall - A. It never has.

Q. How many stamps do you observe upon that cream jug - A. Three; the king's head, the lion, and the letter of the year, four years ago being the letter P, for 1810; that is a genuine stamp of a bottle label. If it had been stamped at Goldsmith's hall in the shape of a cream jug, the stamp on it would have been the lion, the leopard's head, the variable letter, and the king's head.

Q. Then there is not only one more in number, but the order of the line is varied; does it appear to you that the stamp has been transposed from another plate to that - A. It does. I am confident of it, and from a bottle ticket. The duty of a bottle ticket would be two or three pence, subject to the weight; and the duty upon a cream jug, would be somewhere about five or six shillings. I have seen this essayed; it is not standard fineness: it is about two penny-weights worse in the pound. There is a stamp W H, corresponding to the mark I have here.

COURT. You have a plate before you, how do you get that mark - A. At the time that a workman comes to enter his mark at Goldsmith's-hall, he shews his punch to denote his work. We take an impression of it. He writes his name and place of residence; and we have a copy of the punch.

Q. I believe William Harrison , who was entered as the maker, was the prisoner's son - A. Yes; not the prisoner.

Q. Now, Sir, you have told me that this was transposed; could any person conversant with the making or polishing of this see this on examination - A. Upon examination I have not a doubt.

Q. to Mr. Field You have told me that you are a working-silversmith - A. I am.

Q. How far do you live from North-street - A About an hundred yards I live at Haberdasher's Alm houses. The prisoner worked for me; I employed him as a polisher.

Q. I dare say, you understand the working part of the business - A. I do.

Q. Could any person perform the act of polishing without seeing this was let in - A. The prisoner might, for this reason, he is a hard working man; he will do as much work as two men; he hardly gives himself time to look; he drives away. I know that he is the most bustling man in London. I have heard that character from every body where he worked.

JOHN VICKREY . Q. Did you at any time execute a search warrant against the prisoner - A. I did, at No. 14, North-street, City-road. The prisoner was just out of bed when I went into the house, there I found him. I have always understood it to be his house; I searched his house. Perks and Taunton were with me. This is the punch I found at his house. I marked it before I gave it the solicitor. I think the son was not out of bed.

Mr. Arabin. Q. Do you know that he, the father and the son, lived there - A. So I understood, that the son lived with him. He told me that his son was the maker, and he was the polisher. I have always understood, that he could not make a milk-pot.

Prisoner's Defence. I am in the habit of selling goods in the silversmith line for many silversmiths. It is so long ago, I cannot call to mind any thing of the transaction; and if I had known there was any thing wrong in it, I should not have taken it to Mr. Dobson. He knew my residence; and when Mr. Dobson informed me, I told him, I knew nothing of it. It was a month before I was taken up, that he informed me of the danger. I did not go away; I staid with my family.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Gibbs.

Reference Number: t18120916-86

709. JOSEPH VIZER was indicted for feloniously receiving, on the 15th of June , thirty-seven musket-barrels, value 17 l. whereof William Griffin , at the last assizes holden for the county of Kent, was convicted of feloniously stealing; he the said Joseph Vizer knowing them to have been stolen , the said musket-barrels being the property of our Lord the King .

JOHN WATSON . Q. I believe you are clerk to the solicitor of the ordnance - A. I am. I produce a copy of the record of the conviction of William Griffin . I examined it with the original; it is a true copy (read).

THOMAS WOOLLEY . I am a labourer employed in the royal armoury at Lewisham.

Q. On the 10th of June, were you employed in loading a waggon - A. I was.

Q. Did you know a person of the name of William Griffin - A. I did; he was master of the proof-house.

Q. Before you set out had you any directions with

regard to that waggon - A. I had. Griffin desired me to leave a box, directed to Mr. Vizer, Chamber-street, Whitechapel, at any public house on Tower-hill, till called for. I left the box at Mr. Finch's public house, the sign of the George, Tower-hill; and I left word that it was to be left till called for.

Q. On the 15th of June, did you learn any thing afterwards - A. I understood the box was not delivered. I went to the George, on Tower-hill; and on Monday the 13th, when I came to the George, I found the box in the street, at the door of the George; two men were heaving it on another man's back.

Q. Did you see Vizer there - A. Yes; he was in the tap-room. I asked him if his name was Vizer, he said it was; I told him I came from Griffin concerning a box which I left on the 10th of June, which was not delivered to him. He told he me, had got the box now; it was all right. I went away then.

Q. When you saw the box which was heaving upon a man's shoulder, was it the same box that Griffin had desired you to take to town to Vizer - A. It was. No doubt of it.

JOHN FINCH . I keep the George public house on Tower-hill.

Q. Woolley left a box at your house on Monday the 10th of June, directed to Mr. Vizer, Chamber-street, Whitechapel - A. It came in on Wednesday. On Friday I sent a man to Chamber-street, to let the man know the box was there. In about a quarter of an hour afterwards, on the Friday, I saw the prisoner; I shewed him the box; he acknowledged it was directed to him; he said he had got no advice of it. Then, on the Saturday evening, a person of the name of Griffin came, and called for a plot of ale. On the Monday following, about a quarter after ten, the prisoner called again with a letter. I delivered him the box in consequence of the letter. I delivered it to Vizer, and the soldier he got to carry it.

SAMUEL MILLER . I am an officer. I went to the prisoner's house, in company with Coombes, on the 17th of June, at Chamber-street, Whitechapel. I found this box of gan-barrels in his yard. The end of the box was broken; I lifted it up and saw the gun-barrels. I counted the gun-barrels at the office; there were thirty-seven.

Q. What business did Vizer carry on there - A. A Gun stock maker.

ROBERT COOMBES . I am an officer.

Q. Did you, with the other witness, go to the prisoner's house - A. I went in first. When I went into Mr. Vizer's room, I told him I wanted him, and I asked him where the box was that he had from Tower-hill, with the gun-barrels? he put his head out of the door into the passage and said, there they are in the yard. I asked him if he dealt in them? and what he had given for them? he said he had not bought them. Miller and a gentleman came; they took him in custody.

MR. STOKES. Q. You belong to the ordnance. Are them gun-barrels the property of the ordnance - A They are.

Q. Does the ordnance sell rejected barrels - A. Not unless they sell them at public sales. These are not rejected; they are good barrels.

Q. You knew Griffin - A. Yes; he had been master of the proof-house about eight months. These barrels are the property of the king; they are worth 5 s. each.

Prisoner's Defence. My Lord, and gentlemen of the jury, on the 13th of June I received a letter from Mr. Finch, stating, that a box was left at his house, supposed to contain some gun-barrels. I said to the person that brought the letter, that I had not ordered any of any body, not had I received any advice. I said the same to Mr. Finch as I did to the messenger. I received a letter from Griffin, saying, that he had sent thirty-seven gun-barrels; he would call on the Saturday night to know if I would have them. He did call. I told him, no; I did not want them. I saw no more of Griffin. After Griffin left my house, my wife informed me, that when I went out to be shaved he returned, and wished me to fetch the box, as Mr. Finch wanted it out of the way. I went, and had the box pitched in my yard. The letter I received from Griffin, I gave to the officer as a proof of their being sent not to my order.

COOMBES. This is the letter the prisoner gave me voluntarily. The letter read:

="Sir, you may receive a box, containing seventeen India muskets, and plenty of short ones, by going to the George, Tower-hill; and if you do not want them send me word; if you do not send to me I shall call on the Saturday night. I am, sir. Direct, to Wm. Griffin, Proof-house master, Lewisham. Addressed to Mr. Vizer, Chamber-street, Whitechapel.="

The prisoner called five witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Gibbs.

Reference Number: t18120916-87

710. JAMES GIBBONS and ANN GIBBONS , alias Stewart , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of August , a watch, value 1 l. a chain, value 6 d. and two seals, value 14 s. the property of Andrew Grub , from his person .

ANDREW GRUB . I live at Bow-common, Bromley. On the 20th of August I lost my watch, chain, and seals.

Q. Where did you lose them - A. I don't know; I came from the East India tap; I got intoxicated; I went home; and between that and home I lost the property.

Q. Do you know whether before you left the East India tap you had them - A. I know I had them before I went in.

Q. Did you go into any public house before you arrived at Bromley - A. I went into the Mulberry-tree; there I fell asleep; and when I awoke I was perfectly sober. I did not miss my watch then.

MR. LETTER. I am a pawnbroker; I live in Broad-street, Ratcliffe. On the 22d of August, the prosecutor's wife informed me that her husband had been robbed; and, before that, the woman prisoner had pawned a silver-watch with me, in the name of Ann Stewart ; and on the 22d, in the evening, the man prisoner came to redeem some goods. I asked him if he had not heard of a man being robbed at Bromley. I told him that his wife had pledged a watch, and it was the watch that was lost. I sent for an officer; the prisoner

ran away. I called, stop thief; he ran about two hundred yards before he was taken. I have kept the watch from that time till now.

Prosecutor. That is the watch I lost; it is mine. I am not sure where I lost it.

Prisoner's Defence. I found the watch in the open road, Bromley. I took it home, saying, I had been fortunate by finding a watch. Being a poor man, my wife pledged it for one pound. I am innocent of any felony. The prosecutor knows me; I had not seen him for more than a week before he lost the watch.

Prosecutor. I know the prisoner; he bears a very honest character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Gibbs.

Reference Number: t18120916-88

711. ANN OWEN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of September , a gown, value 7 s. the property of John Hulme , privately in his shop .

JOHN HULME . I keep a pawnbroker's shop , 181, High-street, Shadwell .

Q. Were you present when Ann Owen came into your shop - A. Yes. On the 4th of September, in the afternoon, when she came to the shop, she said, that she had lost the ticket of a gown, pledged for four shillings, in the name of Ann Owen . I desired my lad to look for it; there was no gown of that description. I immediately called the eldest lad, thinking the young lad might omit looking for it. He could not find any thing to answer the description; and then he went round the shop door; and said, Sir, there is a gown gone from the door. I had never left the shop at all.

Q. How soon was that after the prisoner had left the shop - A. About seven or eight minutes; I immediately sent him in search at a neighbouring pawnbroker's. He found it at Mr. Bradley's. I am sure it was within the door,

MR. BRADLEY. I live about twenty doors from Mr. Hulme. About two o'clock in the afternoon, on the 4th instant, the prisoner pledged this gown for five shillings. I am positive to the prisoner's person. I produce the gown.

Mr. Hulme. It is my gown; it has my mark on it now.

Prisoner's Defence. I was very much in distress. I applied to the parish to take my child; they refused. I have a bad state of health, and am very poor. I am not able to go to service.

Q. to Prosecutor. What is the prime cost of the gown - A. It stood me in nine shillings. I value it at seven shillings. It pledged at the next shop for five shillings.

GUILTY , DEATH , aged 25.

The prisoner was recommended to mercy by the jury, on account of her being distressed.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18120916-89

712. WILLIAM SMITH and ABEL MACKDONALD were indicted for feloniously making an assault, on the 30th of August , upon Robert Brown , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, a watch, value 3 l. and a seal, value 3 d. his property.

ROBERT BROWN . I am a servant at the Fox public-house, Islington . On the 30th of August, the watch was forced out of my pocket.

Q. Where were you at that time - A. I was in my room; it was near twelve o'clock at night.

Q. Was it in your bed-room - A. Yes; at the Fox. First I heard a noise at the door. I had been a-bed three quarters of an hour. The master gave me orders to let a man sleep with me, that he had given leave; the prisoners forced themselves in after I had let the man in.

Q. Was your master gone when the prisoners forced themselves in - A. My master was in the passage.

Q. Who was the man to sleep with you - A. A coachman. When the prisoners came in the coachman flung himself on my bed; and Mackdonald flung himself upon me.

Q. Did you know Mackdonald before - A. Yes; he had slept in the room above me four months or better.

Q. Mackdonald threw himself upon you - A. Yes; and Smith himself upon him. They put the bolster near my face, and they used me ill.

Q. In what respect - A. With their hands, beating me on my side. I took a stick to defend myself; they took it away from me the second time.

Q. Did they take any thing away from you - A. My watch, and my purse.

Q. Where was your watch - A. Under my head under the bolster. My purse was in my left hand pocket.

Q. You had not any of your clothes on I suppose - A. No; only my shirt. They turned out the room the minute I missed the watch. I felt for it; I could not find it. I got a light, and could not find it then. I dressed myself and went into the street, and got the officer of the night; they came in and searched. My purse was found in Mackdonald's hat, and the watch was found in the yard, hid under an ale-barrel. I was present when the purse was found in Mackdonald's hat.

Q. What money was there in your purse - A. There was no money in it. I had no money about me that night.

Q. You knew Smith and Mackdonald before very well, did you - A. Yes.

Q. When they came into your room, was there a light with them or not - A. They brought a light with them.

Q. So that you had a full opportunity of seeing who they were - A. Yes; they lodged in the room over me.

Q. Had there been any quarrel between you and them - A. No.

Q. How long had they lodged in the room over you - A. Smith had lodged there about three weeks, and Mackdonald about four months.

Q. Did they say any thing while they were in your room, that they had got your watch and your purse - A. No; they turned out, and took the light with them, and stopped in the landing place.

Q. Then, after leaving your room, they went up into the room above, did they - A. Yes.

Q. What was the coachman's name - A. I do not know his name; he is not here.

Q. Was there any body besides you and the coachman in the room - A. Philip White , who slept in the next bed.

Q. How soon after this happened was it that you found your watch - A. An hour. The officer and the watch found it in the yard, hid.

Q. After Smith and Mackdonald went out of the room, did they go down stairs - A. I heard one of them go down. They stopped on the landing place some time, and then I heard one of them go down stairs.

Mr. Arabin. After they tumbled you about in this odd way, you say they went to their room - A. Yes.

COURT. Are you sure that Smith was one of the two - A. Yes.

Q. How soon was it after Mackdonald got the pillow over your mouth, did he get your watch - A. As soon as Smith threw himself upon him, in about a minute.

Q. Why did not you call your master as soon as he had got your watch - A. I did not think they meaned any harm.

Q. When Mackdonald first threw himself upon you, you say he struck you - A. Yes, he struck me violently.

Q. Did he give any reason - A. No.

Q. When Mackdonald struck you, that was before Smith threw himself upon Mackdonald - A. Yes.

Q. When Mackdonald struck you with the violence that you have mentioned, you could not suppose that he meaned no harm; why did not you cry out then - A. I tried to assist myself.

Q. When Mackdonald threw himself upon you, and Smith upon him, where was the candle - A. The candle was alight; it stood upon the table. He put the candle down before he threw himself upon me.

Q. How many blows did Mackdonald strike before Smith came upon him - A. He struck me twice; they were more than small blows.

Q. Had Smith and you any words - A. No.

Q. Had Mackdonald and you any words - A. No.

Q. Were they in liquor - A. They had been drinking a small quantity; I had been in the room to attend.

Q. Had any thing passed between them and you in the room - A. No.

Q. They had not been joking with you at all had they - A. No.

PHILIP WHITE . Q. Did you sleep in the same room with Brown - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember somebody knocking at the door - A. Yes; Brown opened the door after the master ordered it. The master said, Brown open the door, and let the man come in and sleep with you. Mackdonald then came in, and the other coachman. There were three came in in all; the third man was Smith.

Q. You knew Mackdonald and Smith before, did not you - A. No; I was quite a stranger.

Q. Did you remark the persons of Smith and Mackdonald in such a way, so as to be sure that Mackdonald and Smith were two of the persons that came in - A. Yes.

Q. When they came in, did either of them bring a light - A.Mackdonald brought the light. The coachman threw himself down on the bed without undressing. Mackdonald set the candle down. He threw himself three or four times on Brown; then he took up the bolster and throwed it on Brown's face. Brown begged him to leave the room.

Q. Did you see any blows - A. I saw Mackdonald strike Brown with his fist. I thought it was in fun; I being a stranger I did not know.

Q. After Mackdonald had struck him several times, you say, he took the bolster and put it on Brown's face - A. Yes; and Smith threw Mackdonald upon Brown, and threw himself upon him; that was after Mackdonald put the bolster on Brown.

Q. How long did they continue there - A. Five or six minutes; and when they went away, Mackdonald said, Brown have you any candle. I begged them to leave the room.

Q. Did they leave the candle that Mackdonald had brought - A. No, they took it away; they could not find any other.

Q. Could you hear whether they went up stairs, or down stairs - A. They stopped some time on the landing place. I heard some person go down.

Q. What did Brown do upon this - A. Brown got out of bed, and struck a light. I saw him searching for his property. He got up and endeavoured to get a watchman; when he got the watchman, he then got the master of the house.

Q. When you saw Mackdonald and Smith using Brown in this way, why did not you call the master - A. I being a stranger, thought it might be fun. I begged him to leave the room.

Q. Are you quite sure that Smith was one of the two - A. Yes.

Mr. Arabin. It appeared to you to be a frolic - A. Yes.

THOMAS SEAMAN . I keep the Fox public-house, Islington. On Sunday night, the 30th of August, I lit one of the prisoners and the man Brown, out in the yard to go to bed. The stairs that leads to their apartment has no concern with the house.

Q. You lit Mackdonald and the coachman out into the yard, that they might go into their apartment - A. Yes; Smith went out before. In about half an hour I bolted the passage door; I and my wife and family we went to bed. We had not been in bed half an hour; we heard three going up stairs, and in about five minutes they returned down stairs. Mackdonald, Smith, and Stockings, (it is a nick name) they returned down stairs; saying, that Brown would not open the door to let him sleep with him. I saw Smith and Mackdonald on the stairs. I called to Brown twice, to open the door, from the landing place; he opened the door. I said to Smith and Mackdonald, whatever you do, do not go into his room. I said, that is the reason he would not open the door for the man that was to sleep with him; because you were near the door. Mackdonald was in the habit of using Brown ill; I had seen him do it frequently. I then went to bed, and bolted the passage door. In the course of an hour I went to sleep; I was awoke again by a knocking at the door. I got out of bed and opened the passage door; there I saw the constable of

the night, and patrol, and watchman, standing with Brown on the staircase. I asked them, what was the matter. Brown said, they have now taken my watch from me. The prisoners were in bed at that time. We went up and searched the premises; we found the purse in Mackdonald's hat. I put on my things, and went up stairs. I said, Mackdonald, rise yourself, what have you been about; he said, nothing. I said, you have, and you are sensible of it. I asked Mackdonald, where was Brown's watch. He said, he knew nothing of it. Then said I, how came Brown's purse in your hat. He said, he knew nothing about the purse. I then said, how came you in his room, after I so strictly told you not to go; directly upon that, Brown came into the room with Mackdonald's hat. Mackdonald said, what do you want with my hat; you shall not have my hat. Directly the officer came up stairs, and secured him; and then called Smith. Smith got up without any abuse; the constable, patrol, and watchman, took them to the watch-house. They returned back again to search for the watch. I stopped on the stairs until they returned, to see that nobody went down stairs until they returned. We then proceeded up stairs, four of us, we searched all the rooms; we found nothing. In the yard, I saw the watch shine under an ale-barrel, which stood in the yard; the officer picked it up. Brown said, it was his watch.

Mr. Arabin. Mackdonald had been accustomed to larking with Brown - A. Yes, and beating him.

Q. Mackdonald was taken in custody in his room - A. On the landing place He was following Brown down stairs. His clothes were brought him; he was dressed on the stairs, and then taken to the watch-house.

THOMAS IZZARD. I am a patrol, belonging to Bow-street office When I came into the room, Mackdonald and Smith were asleep. I awoke both of them. I told Mackdonald, Brown had lost his watch, and I insisted on having it. He made use of very profane language; saying, that he knew nothing about it; I might o to hell: he laid down again. I proceeded to search the soom; I said to Mackdonald, how came Brown purse in your hat. He said, he knew nothing of the bag, nor how it came there. Brown had not been near the hat before I found the bag. We took the two prisoners in custody. I went down stairs along with the constable of the night; we made Mackdonald dress himself on the landing place. He swore, d - n his eyes, if we took him to the watch-house; and if he did go, the first time he came out, he would murder Brown. After we had taken him to the watch-house, we came back again. We made a search. We afterwards found the watch. I have had the watch in my possession ever since. The prisoner, Smith, was very willing to go to the watch house; he never said a word. Mackdonald was very much out of humour.

THOMAS HARROD . I am a constable. I and Izzard were together. I have heard his account, it is correct. I have nothing to add to it.

Mackdonald's Defence. On the 30th of August, I was acting as waterman, at Seaman's house; there came a gentleman, he called for a dozen bottles of wine between some gentlemen, Smith, and me. Thomas Stockings, the post boy, came and asked to sleep there that night. Mrs. Seamen said, he might sleep with Brown. Mrs. Seaman said, as you are going up stairs, you can shew Stockings the way up. I went over to the Pied-bull; there Smith and me had two or three glasses of peppermint. Smith and I, when we came back, found Stockings standing on the stairs. I went down to Mr. Seaman; I said, he will not let the man in. Mr. Seaman called to Brown, to open the door. Brown opened the door, he had a mop-stick in his hand. He said, you shall not come in here. I said, I do not want. Stockings shoved my face against Brown's face; he threw himself on the bed. I said, give me my handkerchief; he picked up my handkerchief, and put it in my hat. I was charged to go to the watch-house. Brown came up stairs, he had my hat; I said, what do you want with my hat; they said, if I did not like to go to the watch-house dressed, I should go naked.

Smith's Defence. I was in bed asleep. I was intoxicated.

COURT. Q. to White. Brown opened the door for the coachman to come in - A. Yes.

Q. Had he a broom stick in his hand - A. No, he had not. The door was fastened with a stick; he put the stick by his bed-side. He did not hold it up to Mackdonald, and tell him he should not come in.

Mackdonald called one witness, who gave him a good character.

MACKDONALD, GUILTY , DEATH , aged 30.

SMITH, NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18120916-90

713. ELIZABETH WILLIAMS , alias SIMMONS , and ANN SMITH, alias NEWMAN , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of September , five yards of muslin, value 8 s. 9 d. the property of John M'Pherson and Rees Rees , privately in their shop .

EVAN EVANS . I am shopman to John M'Pherson and Rees Rees , 268, High Holborn, and 253, in the parish of St. Giles's in the fields . On the 10th of this month, the prisoners both came into the shop together. They desired me to shew them some cambric muslin. I shewed them some; they bought a quarter of a yard. A lady came in while they were looking at the muslin; she desired me to shew her some flannel, and while I was shewing the lady the flannel, I saw Williams, as if she was drawing something up under her dress. I suspected that she had taken something. They bought a quarter of a yard of cambric muslin. Smith paid for it. They went about two doors from our shop; I followed them, and desired them to come back, and when they came in the shop, Williams dropped a piece from under her dress. An officer came in, and they were taken in custody. This is the piece, it is five yards, worth about eight shillings. It is my master's property.

JAMES HANCOCK . I am an officer. I was passing by, a gentleman came out of the shop, and told me what had happened. I went into the shop, and took the two prisoners into custody. I knew the short one.

William's Defence. I am innocent of the crime, and I deny stealing the property.

WILLIAMS, GUILTY, aged 20,

But not of privately stealing in the shop .

Transported for Seven Years .

SMITH, NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Gibbs.

Reference Number: t18120916-91

714. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Susannah Simons , widow , about the hour of three in the night, of the 11th of August , and stealing therein, a pair of stockings, value 6 d. a handkerchief, value 3 d. two jackets, value 6 s. and a bag, value 2 s. the property of John Farrington ; a shirt, value 1 s. the property of John Smith ; a shift, value 1 s. and a petticoat, value 1 s. the property of Susannah Simons .

SUSANNAH SIMONS . Q. Are you a housekeeper - A. Yes, and I keep a coal-shed .

Q. Was your house broken open last month - A Yes. On the 11th of August, near four o'clock in the morning, we were all a-bed. I was the last person that went to bed. I have lodgers in the house; no servant at all. I was alarmed near four o'clock by the patrol, it was then day-break.

Q. Was it light enough to distinguish the features of a man's countenance - A. Yes, it was. I got up and observed my kitchen door open, and the outer door was open; that was the door that I had bolted on the over night.

Q. Did you lose any of your property - A. Yes; I lost two jackets, a petticoat, a pair of stockings, and a shift. out of the kitchen. I had seen them on the over night, the last thing before I went to bed.

Prisoner. The door was only shut; the window was open.

Prosecutrix. The door was bolted, and the window was not open.

JOHN FARRINGTON . I am a sailor. I lodge in Mrs. Simons's house. I was called up about a quarter before four; I lost one waistcoat, and two jackets, and a bag, out of the back kitchen. I saw them there before I went to bed.

PETER FAGAN . I am a watchman; about a quarter before four o'clock, on the night of the 11th of August, I saw a ladder against a wall; I found the prisoner there, round the corner. I asked him, what he did there; and seeing no bundle, I let him go. I went up the ladder and examined the premises. I saw the window and the door open. I gave the alarm to the people of the house, and in searching, I found a bag of clothes. I saw the prisoner again, I took him into the yard and searched him. I found on him a jacket, and a waistcoat, which Farrington said, was his. I took the prisoner to the watch-house. The property produced and identified.

GUILTY, aged 46,

Of stealing only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18120916-92

715. JOHN CARR was indicted for feloniously assaulting Robert Eagleton , on the 8th of August , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, a watch, value 2 l. 10 s. his property.

ROBERT EAGLETON . On the 8th of August last, I was at the King's-arms public-house, Mary-le-bone ; the prisoner was there when I went in. I had my watch with me when I went in the house. As I was passing out, this John Carr immediately followed me; and as I got up, he put his hand and joggled the table. I immediately said, my friend, it is nonsense for you to throw the table down. He put his left arm against my breast, and drew my watch out with his right hand. Robert Windham was present; he saw it. He was sitting by the prisoner.

Q. It was plain that he must be discovered - A. Yes.

Q. Was he drunk - A. I cannot say; he did not appear to me to be drunk.

Prisoner. I never was near him. I was sitting by myself.

Prosecutor. I am quite sure he took my watch out of my pocket after he disturbed the table, and endeavoured to throw the things down.

ROBERT WINDHAM . I was with the last witness in the public-house; we had been there near an hour; we had a pint each man. We were going home then to go to bed.

Q. Where was this - A. In the public tap-room.

Q. Did it appear to you that the prisoner was in liquor or not - A. I could not perceive that he was in liquor; the time the prosecutor got up to go home, he said, Windham, I am going home, are you. I said, yes; directly the prisoner got up, he made a great racket with the table; a rummer stood on the table, and two or three pots; the prosecutor said, do not do any mischief at this time of night. The prisoner put his left arm against the breast of the prosecutor, and with his right hand the prisoner took the watch out of Eagleton's pocket; then he tried to conceal it by grappling it up between his sleeve. The prosecutor caught him by the collar. Then he threw the watch down on the stones, and the glass was broken.

JOHN - . I was the night constable. The prisoner and the watch were brought to me by the prosecutor.

Prosecutor. It is my watch, and it is the watch that the prisoner took from me.

Q. He offered no violence to you - A. No; he put his left arm against me, and instantly drew my watch out.

Prisoner's Defence. I was at this house, and this young man, and six or seven came in, and played at domino's. I got up and was going out; I bid them good-night. That young man said, he had lost his watch. I said, they should search me, and under the table they found the watch. They said, I put it there.

GUILTY, aged 18,

Of stealing from the person, but not violently .

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Gibbs.

Reference Number: t18120916-93

716. MARY ANN DAID was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of August , three gowns, value 1 l. four petticoats, value 10 s. a hat, value 10 s.

two shawls, value 2 s. 4 d. a handkerchief, value 1 s. three frocks, value 1 s. three habit shirts, value 1 s. five yards of lace, value 10 d. two pair of stockings, value 10 d. and an umbrella, value 1 s. the property of Jeremiah Barrett , in the dwelling-house of Timothy Breslar .

MARGARET BARRETT . I am the wife of Jeremiah Barrett; I lodge in the house of Timothy Breslar . I lost the property out of his house. The prisoner was a lodger in the house.

Q. Do you know any thing of your own knowledge of the prisoner taking the property - A. Yes, I detected her with it at her lodgings, The prisoner came in, and sent me out after a letter from my husband; who is at the East Indies. I was to go to Pimlico for the letter. I went to Pimlico for the letter, where she sent me. I found no letter there; I returned back home. I found my things gone. I detected the prisoner with my clothes upon her, and the rest in my lodgings.

Prisoner. Q. to Prosecutrix. Did not you put the clothes in my trunk yourself - A. No, I did not.

JOHN BARNLEY . The prosecutrix brought the prisoner to me, and part of the property. The prisoner had on an apron, which I took off, which Mrs. Barrett swore to be her property; and this petticoat I found at the pawnbroker's pawned in her name.

Prosecutrix. The petticoat is my mother's. The rest of the property is mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I gave six shillings for the petticoat and gown to this woman.

John Barnley . The prisoner said, they had lent her the things; she did not say, she gave any money for them.

MRS. BRESLAR. Q. Did you sell the clothes to her - A. No; they are my daughters clothes.

GUILTY, aged 21,

Of Stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18120916-94

717. MARY EDWARDS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of September , a pair of ear-rings, value 2 l. the property of Elizabeth Alexander , in the dwelling-house of Robert Abbott .

ELIZABETH ALEXANDER . At the time this robbery was done, I lodged at No. 2, Harford-place, Fitzroy-square , at Robert Abbott 's house, in Pancras parish. The prisoner came to that house on the Wednesday, and she robbed me on the Thursday.

Q. How do you know that she robbed you - A. She confessed it. I told her she had better confess.

Q. Then I cannot hear what she said

HENRY EWER. I am a pawnbroker; I live with Mr. Dobree, in Oxford-street. On the 10th of September, I advanced two pounds on these ear-rings to the prisoner. These are the ear-rings; she said, she brought them for Mrs. Wilson.

Prosecutrix. They are the ear-rings that I lost.

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutrix lives by prostitution. She lent me the ear-rings to go to Vauxhall.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Gibbs.

Reference Number: t18120916-95

718. WILLIAM KENNETT was indicted for that he, on the 15th of July , in and upon James Lawrence Lyon , a subject of our Lord the King, feloniously did make an assault, and with a certain sharp instrument, did cut and stab him in and upon his breast, with intent in so doing, to kill or murder him, or to disable him, or to do him some grievous bodily harm .

JAMES LAWRENCE LYON . I am a soldier in the East London Militia.

Q. Had you any quarrel with the prisoner Kennett - A. No; I received an injury from him on the 15th of July. I went into the Wheatsheaf public-house, Tothill-street, Westminster . I had been sitting there near two hours. William Kennett came in about three o'clock in the afternoon, and without speaking to me, he struck a knife into me. We had no words. I had no complaint against him.

Q. Had he against you whether right or wrong - A. No; he came and stabbed me in the breast.

Q. Had you had no words with him before - A. No; I had not seen him for the day, nor the day before.

Q. What sort of a knife was it - A. A table knife. After he had done; he said, he would have my bloody life. He made a second attempt; the landlord prevented him from stabbing again.

Q. What is the landlord's name - A.Manning.

Q. Did he assign any reason for this - A. I quitted the house immediately.

Q. What sort of a wound did he give you - A. A very slight wound. I am not under the care of the surgeon.

Q. You say you had no quarrel or words - A No; I never gave him any cause of complaint against me.

Mr. Arabin. Had not you a quarrel with the prisoner a few days before; did not he accuse you of living with his wife - A. No.

Q. A few days before the 15th of July, had not there been a quarrel between the prisoner and you - A. No.

Q. Did not his wife live with you - A. No.

JOHN MANNING . I keep the wheat-sheaf public-house; on the 14th Lyons came in with Kennett's wife, he was with her about two or three hours; Kennet came in and they had a quarrel about Lyons being with Kennet's wife. On the 15th, Lyons came in and asked for a glass of gin and peppermint; I served it him, he had it and went to sleep; he slept until a quarter past three. Kennet came in about half past one, he called for a pint of porter, he drank that and called for another; he said, Who is that lying on the bench asleep? Kennet went out directly he came back again; he had a knife in his hand when he returned; I did not see him stab it until I saw the blood come from Kennet's hand.

Q. Do you know whether Lyon was stabbed? - A. There was a bit of a mark on his breast not as big as the black of your nail; there was no blood as I saw.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18120916-96

719. WILLIAM JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of August , a watch, value

30 s. and a watch key, value 5 s. the property of John Nicholls , from his person .

JAMES NICHOLLS . I live in Mile-End Road. On the 22d of August I lost my watch and key, it was between eight and nine o'clock at night; I was going to the further end of Paul's Chain, and just between the post and the corner of the house, the prisoner came up to me and looked me full in the face; he put his hand to my pocket and pulled my watch out.

Q. Are you sure of his person - A. I am quite sure of his person. I called out stop thief, and the prisoner was taken in Sermon Lane. Baily, the officer, took him in custody; when the prisoner was I came up to him; I was quite sure he was the person that took my watch out of my pocket. It was a moon-light night; I saw the prisoner's person plain.

SAMUEL BAILEY . I am a constable. On the cry of, stop thief, the prisoner was stopped; I came up and took him to the watch-house; the prisoner, at the watch-house, said he knew nothing of the charge. I searched him and found nothing. The watch was picked up by a boy, his name is Harrowsmith.

HARROWSMITH. I picked up the watch in Sermon Lane, near where the prisoner was stopped; I gave it to Mrs. Bailey.

SARAH BAILEY . Q. You are the wife of the constable. - A. Yes; I heard the cry of, stop thief; I found the watch in the possession of Harrowsmith; I gave it to my husband.

Prisoner's Defence. I am a tailor ; I heard the cry of, stop thief; I ran with the rest of the people; I was detained. I am quite innocent of what I am accused of.

GUILTY, aged 20.

Judgment respited .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120916-97

720. SAMUEL ANDREWS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of August , a handkerchief, value 5 s. the property of Thomas Tipper , from his person .

THOMAS TIPPER . I live at 33, Wimpole-street; I am a servant to the Honourable Mrs. Fortesque. On Sunday evening, the 23d of August, between eight and nine o'clock, I lost my handkerchief, near Furnival's Inn, Holborn . Martin, the constable, told me that I had been robbed; I put my hand to my pocket and found my handkerchief was gone. I saw the prisoner searched, and my handkerchief was taken from his pocket; I knew it to be my handkerchief, it is worth 5 s. The prisoner said, he was sorry for what he had done, and hoped I would forgive him. I told him the constable saw him rob me; I had nothing to do with it.

JOSEPH MARTIN . I am a constable. On Sunday night, the 23d of August between nine and ten, I saw the prisoner at the bottom of Holborn, he appeared to be alone; I watched him. I saw him sounding peoples' pockets; he went up Holborn; when he got near Leather-lane he put his hand in Mr. Tipper's pocket, and drawed the handkerchief out; he then put the handkerchief into his right-hand pocket; I then catched hold of him, and called to Mr. Tipper, told him he had been robbed. I took the prisoner into the porter's lodge. Furnival's Inn, and searched him, and found this handkerchief in his right-hand pocket. I have kept the handkerchief ever since.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence.

GUILTY, aged 26.

Judgment respited .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120916-98

721. JOHN WELLS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of September , a pound weight of horse-hair, value 3 s. the property of Caleb Welch Colling , and Richard Wells .

RICHARD WELLS . My partners name is Caleb Welch Colling , we are horse-hair manufacturers ; our manufactory is in Fleet-street . On the morning of the 10th of September, I was in the manufactory, I saw the prisoner going out of the manufactory; I asked him where he was going, he said, to breakfast. As he went out of our premises, I thought his pockets seemed rather bulky; I followed him into Fleet-market, and requested him to step back to the accompting-house; he did: I told him I suspected he had been robbing me, and in his pockets I found some horse-hair, worth about 3 s. 6 d.; he said he had done wrong; it was the first time; he asked for mercy. I asked him if he had any more hair at his lodging; he said no; I then went to his lodging and found three pound and a half of horse-hair at his lodging.

ABRAHAM CRESSWELL . I am a constable. I received this horse-hair of Mr. Wells, and I took the prisoner in custody.

MR. WELLS. I believe it is our property.

Prisoner's Defence. I never was guilty of a criminal action in my life.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 38.

Confined One Month in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120916-99

722. CHRISTIAN FREDERICK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of September , a silk handkerchief, value 10 d. the property of James Cressland , from his person .

JAMES CRESSLAND . I live at 23, Ratcliffe-row, City-road. On the 14th of this month, I was informed that my pocket was picked. I saw my handkerchief produced; I am not positive it is mine. It is a silk handkerchief; I did not want to have any thing more to do with it, as I did not know the handkerchief.

JOHN BROWN. On Monday, the 14th of September, I saw Mr. Cressland on London-bridge. I had followed the prisoner from the Pewter-platter, Gracechurch-street to Tooley-street. I then saw him return back after Mr. Crossland; he was coming towards the city. The prosecutor on the middle of London-bridge was looking through at the shipping, and the prisoner drawed part of the handkerchief out. He then followed the prosecutor to the corner of Monument-yard; the pipes being up, and a crowd to pass, made some little obstruction. The prisoner there drew the handkerchief out with his right hand, and put it under his left arm. I took him in custody.

Prisoner's Defence. I was starving for six or seven days. I saw these gentlemen following me. I did it on purpose for them to take me. I cannot do any strong work; I am broken all over.

GUILTY , aged 62.

Confined Two Years in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120916-100

723. WILLIAM BIRCH was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Wilkins , about the hour of twelve, on the night of the 7th of November , and stealing therein four feather beds, value 20 l. seven blankets, value 1 l. and six window curtains, value 10 l. the property of William Wilkins.

WILLIAM WILKINS. In November, 1810, I had a house, No. 37, Upper Berkley-street, in the parish of St. Mary-le-bone .

Q. Did you occasionally sleep in the house - A.Either me or my servent hardly ever missed sleeping there, for protection to the house. I now reside in Edward-street, Cavendish-square. This house, in Upper Berkley-street, I generally let furnished. It was uninhabited at that time.

Q. On what night was the house robbed - A. On the 7th of November, 1810. On the morning of the 8th we discovered it.

Q. On the night of the 7th did you sleep in it - A. No, nor my servant. I intended to sleep there again, but on that night it did not suit my convenience, and it was left without protection. I believe the other man that was tried for this burglary was Thomas Robinson, he was capitally convicted.

Q. On what time, on the 7th, were you at the house - A. About half after eight in the evening; it was then dark.

Q. At that time did you leave the house secure - A. I did. I double-locked the door. My house was then safe. On the next morning I went to my house at half after seven. I received information that it had been robbed. I went and found the door a jar, and the people that surrounded the door went in with me.

Q. Altogether, what did you lose - A. A carpet, four feather beds, seven blankets, two counterpanes, and six window curtains.

Q. What was the value - A. The value to me, altogether, was seventy pounds.

JOHN FARR. I am a watchman.

Q. On the morning of the 8th of November did you apprehend the prisoner - A. I did, just at seven o'clock in the morning. It was day-light then. It had been day-light about half an hour then. I apprehended him in Short's-gardens, near Drury-lane. He had a bed upon him very carelessly tied up in a blanket, and seeing it was a new bed, and a new blanket, and he not a porter, it gave me suspicion. I asked him, where he came from. He said, he brought it from No. 5, Wardour-street. Where are you going to take it? To No. 6, King-street, Drury-lane, to Mrs. Glover. I said, you will not take it to Mrs. Glover this morning. I do not think you came honestly by it. I guarded him to the watchhouse. The watchhouse was very full, and the watch were relieving. He laid the bed down on the table. He was sent out with me to go and enquire of Mrs. Glover. He took to his heels, and away he ran. I could not catch him. I never saw him since that morning, until I saw him in Marlborough-street office. I am positive he is the man. I know his father and mother. They live opposite of me, and I had known the prisoner some time.

JOHN BAXTER . I am watchhouse-keeper. The prisoner was brought to the watchhouse by Farr, at the time he mentioned, and the feather bed, blanket, and bolster. These things were claimed by Mr. Wilkins the next day, and they were delivered up in this court, on the trial of Robinson, the other man. He was brought to our watchhouse a fortnight afterwards. I am sure the prisoner is the same person.

Prisoner. I would wish to ask Mr. Baxter if he has not been convicted of perjury since - A. No. I have never been convicted of any crime.

Q.to prosecutor. Were the bed and the blanket delivered up to you here - A. Yes. I am sure they were my property. The bed was worth ten pounds, and the blanket, found on the prisoner, five shillings.

Prisoner's Defence. I am not guilty of the charge that is laid against me. I have worked for my father the two years past.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 22.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18120916-101

724. THOMAS WILSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of July , twelve pounds weight of sugar, value 14 s. four pounds weight of soap, value 4 s. fifty-five plates, value 15 s. fifteen saucers, value 5 s. fourteen coffee-cups, value 5 s. a bowl, value 1 s. and four jugs, value 3 s. the property of James Pickford , Matthew Pickford , Thomas Pickford , and Matthew Pickford .

THOMAS HOLBROOK . I am clerk to Messrs. Pickfords; they are carriers .

Q. What are their names - A. James, Matthew, Thomas, and Matthew. On the 22d of July, Jones Pickford came to me, and, from his information, on the 23d of July, I set James Hannam to watch the prisoner. The prisoner was one of our porters .

JAMES HANNAM. I am a porter in Messrs. Pickford's yard. On the 23d of July I was placed in the loft, in the warehouse, to watch the prisoner. I saw the prisoner break open a chest of soap. He took a cake of soap out of the chest. His wife came with his breakfast. She kept watch while he was doing it. She said, Thomas, make haste, you will have somebody come. He said, do not be in a hurry, He knocked the tin plate off a hogshead of sugar, and took out, as near as I can guess, twelve or fourteen pounds weight of sugar. He came to his wife with it. He asked her, whether she had brought a basket: she answered, no. He seemed quite hurt because she had not brought the basket. He went so some lump sugar that we had tied up in the accompting-house: he untied one of them and broke a great lump off it; he delivered the soap and sugar to his wife, and she went away with it. He went to the accompting-house and got some nails out of the desk: he took up one of the small weights and nailed the chest of soap up again. He went to the hogshead of sugar and nailed the tin plate on again: he put the weight down in its place again; he tied up the lump of sugar again, what he had broke a piece off; then he sat down and began his breakfast.

JOHN LACEY HAWKINS. On the 23d of July,

Mr. Holbrook came at an early hour for an officer. The prisoner lodged in Fleet-court, Fleet-lane. I went there in company of one of Mr. Pickford's men. I searched his room. I found two quantities of moist sugar, and a little bit of lump sugar, and about three or four pounds weight of soap, and a quantity of allspice and ginger that is not in the indictment. I left the prisoner in the custody of Prestow.

- PRESTOW. I am an officer. On the 23d of July I went, in company with Hawkins, to Pickford's warehouse. I took the prisoner to the Compter while Hawkins searched his apartment. After Hawkins came back it was said to me, that they missed a great quantity of earthenware. I went to the prisoner's lodging. I found twenty-two dishes. I took an inventory of them: thirteen small ditto, thirteen large ditto, three white dishes, seventeen coffee-cups, and fifteen saucers, a large bowl, and four jugs. They are all here.

Q. to Holbrook. Had you any sugar in your warehouse - A. Yes, and soap. I have a sample of the soap, and of the sugar. I believe the soap produced, and the sugar, to be my master's property, and all the earthern ware. We have two crates of this ware. Half of one crate is gone, of the same pattern with these now produced.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of the charge.

GUILTY , aged 37.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120916-102

725. THOMAS DOLAND was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of July , fifty-six yards of printed cotton, value 11 l. forty-four yards of baize, value 35 s. twenty-six yards of bombazet, value 33 s. and one hundred and thirty yards of dimity, value 9 l. 6 s. ninety pocket-handkerchiefs, value 4 l. sixty-five yards of corderoy, value 5 l. twenty yards of check cloth, value 20 s. and two yards of canvas, value 2 s. the property of John Pate .

JOHN PATE. I am a carrier: the proprietor of the Cambridge waggon .

Q. On Friday, the 5th of June last, did you see a bale put in your waggon, directed to J. Emson, Barkway - A. I saw it in the waggon at the Catherine Wheel inn, Bishopsgate-street, and I saw the waggon set off.

JOHN NORBURY . I am warehouseman to Messrs. Clarke, Boyds, and Marsh, Skinner-street. They are wholesale linen-drapers.

Q. Did you send a bale of goods to Mr. Emson, Barkways - A. Yes, I sent them. They consisted of dimities, printed cottons, and baize. I sent them by the Barkway waggon.

Q. Have you been shewn since a piece of dimity after the prisoner was apprehended - A. Yes, that was part of the dimity I had sold. I knew that was in the bale, by the private mark on it.

LEONARD BROOK . I am a porter to Messrs. Clark, Boyd, and Marsh. I packed the bale to go by the Barkway waggon. It was directed, J. Emson, Barkway. It contained dimities and sundry pieces of goods. I packed it on the 4th of June. The man that delivered it is not here.

PHILIP MABBOTT . I am a porter at the Catherine Wheel inn, Bishopsgate-street. The Barkway waggon inns there.

Q. What day did you put the truss in question in the Barkway waggon - A. I put it in the waggon on the 5th of June. It was directed, J. Emson, Barkway.

SEPTIMUS STEVENS. I am warehouseman to Thomas Pedley , Union-row, in the city of London. On the 8th of June the prisoner brought two pieces of dimity. I bought them of him. I gave him ten-pence a yard for them. I afterwards sold them to a person at High Wickham. On the 15th of June, Armstrong and Norbury called at our house. I produced to Armstrong the dimity that I had bought of the prisoner.

Q. Then you were acquainted, for the first time, that the dimities had been stolen - A. Yes: and in consequence of directions I stopped the prisoner on the 15th of July; he came with a piece of calico, as a sample of twelve or thirteen pieces more. I desired the prisoner to bring the remainder by three o'clock. He came about half past three, and I gave him into Armstrong's custody. He told him that the two pieces I had bought of him were stolen, and I gave the two pieces of dimity into Armstrong's possession. I am sure that the two pieces of dimity I gave to Armstrong were the pieces I bought of the prisoner.

JOSHUA ARMSTRONG . I am an officer. In consequence of information from Stevens, I went to Mr. Pedley's, in company with Norbury.

Q. Did the last witness deliver to you two pieces of dimity - A. He did.

Q. Upon the delivery of the pieces, how long after did the prisoner come in - A. About three quarters of an hour. I told the prisoner that they were the two pieces that he had sold to Mr. Stevens; they were stolen. I asked him, how he came by them. The pieces were then laying on a drawer. He said, he had bought them of a man of the name of O'Hara. I asked him, if he had any bill of them. He said, no; and if he knew where to find O'Hara. He said, no. I then told him, as the things were stolen we must take him to Worship-street office. I took him there, and the two pieces. I took the thirteen pieces I have now in court. I produce the two pieces of dimity.

- NORBURY. I can swear to one of the pieces of dimity, having my mark on it, and the other to the best of my belief. I am sure one of the pieces of dimity I sold to go to Mr. Emson. It is worth about three pounds.

JOHN EMSON . I live at Weldon. I have a shop at Barkway. I never received the truss that was to come by the Barkway waggon. It was lost.

Mr. Alley, Q. to Mr. Pate. You are the man that drove that waggon, that night, to Ponder's End - A. No, I am not. I saw the waggon safe out of the yard, in the care of the waggoner. The waggoner is not here. I am sure it was safe in the waggon at five o'clock. I saw the chain over it in the waggon on the 5th of June Mr. Pedley's man brought it to me on the morning of the 9th.

Prisoner's Defence. I was at home, and in my own house at the time this robbery was committed. I

am in the habit of buying goods, that I can get something on by commission.

JAMES SHEWSBRIDGE. I am a journeyman smith. I work for my brother. On the 5th of June last I went to the prisoner's house. I went there between five and six in the afternoon. My brother had an order to make him two racks, a trivet, and a spit. I carried the things to Doland's house. I found the prisoner in the front parlour. I presented the things to him. I fitted them. He said, sit down. I gave him the bill. The amount was three shillings and sixpence. This is the bill. He took a pipe and some porter. He asked me to take a pipe. I remained with him until eleven o'clock. He was not out of my sight five minutes.

Q. Where is the prisoner's house - A. No. 5, Domingo-street, Old-street.

Q. What day of the week was this - A. Friday, to the best of my belief.

COURT. How far is it from Domingo-street to Shoredith church - A.Seven or eight minutes walk.

Q. Then the prisoner might have been there, and returned home, before you went there.

The prisoner called five witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120916-103

726. JOHN DARCY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3rd of September , a silk handkerchief, value 7 s. the property of Robert William St. John .

ROBERT WILLIAM ST . JOHN. Q. What are you - A. I am in the Secretary of State's office . On the 3d of September I was going to my office in Downing-street. I stepped into the palace in my way. The guard were marching out.

Q. What time of the day was it - A. About a quarter past eleven. As I was coming out again, a man, who was near me, asked me if I had lost any thing out of my pocket. The moment I laid hold of the prisoner I found the handkerchief upon him. I took him to the office in Queen-square.

Q. Where was it he put the handkerchief - A. In his pocket. He said, it was given to him. I believe the prisoner is respectably related.

JAMES SIMMONDS . I am a serjeant in the 10th regiment of Hussars. On the 3d of September I was in St. James's palace , at the time the guard were relieving. A person informed Mr. St. John that he saw the prisoner take a handkerchief out of his pocket.

JAMES GILLMORE . The prisoner was brought to the office and delivered to me, and the handkerchief. This is the handkerchief.

Prosecutor. It is my handkerchief.

GUILTY, aged 17.

[The prisoner was recommended to mercy by the Jury.]

Judgment respited .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120916-104

727. THOMAS HITCHINSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of March , two hundred guineas, fifty-six half-guineas, and sixty seven-shilling pieces , the property of Joseph Wicks .

SECOND COUNT, for stealing two hundred guineas only, the property of Joseph Wicks .

JOSEPH WICKS . I am a watch-case manufacturer , at Coventry.

Q. On the 24th of March did you make out any parcel of fifty-three ounces five pennyweights of light golden guineas - A. On the 24th of March, fifty-three ounces and five pennyweights of light gold. I put them in a tin case, and a sheet of brown paper over the case. It was directed to John Silvester , Goswell-street, London. I delivered it to my son. I gave him directions to take it to Thomas Hitchinson . He was guard of the Balloon coach at that time.

WILLIAM WICKS . I am the son of Joseph Wicks.

Q. On the 24th of March last did you carry any parcel to the prisoner at the bar - A. Yes. The parcel contained to the amount of two hundred guineas, in guineas, half-guineas, and seven-shilling pieces. I weighed them myself, and put them in four paper parcels, fifty in each. I delivered them to Hitchinson. They were directed to John Silvester, 33, Goswell-street, London. I saw the prisoner by the Broad gate. I there delivered them to him, the parcel, so directed. I told him, if that person did not satisfy him for his trouble, my father would. That is all I said to him. He said, very well; that is all right. I went away, leaving the parcel with him. He was standing in the street.

JOHN SILVESTER. I am a butcher. I live in Goswell-street.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. Yes, very well. Towards the latter end of March I received a letter. I saw the prisoner pass the door on a coach. I called him. He came into my shop, and asked me if I expected a parcel from Mr. Wicks, of Coventry. I told him, no; I had no advice whatever to expect any. He said, he had some recollection of receiving a parcel, but he was not certain. He was rather malty. I told him to enquire of Mr. Wicks, whether he had or not. He said, he would. In two days time I saw him again. He said, he had been to Mr. Wicks. I am not certain whether he said they were not at home, or Mr. Wicks was not at home. Two days following the coach stopped at the Maidenhead, Goswell-street. He put a passenger down. I asked him, whether he had made another enquiry. He said, he thought it must be nothing but a letter, or else he must have heard of it, I understood.

Mr. Gurney. Do not tell us what you understood, tell what he said - A. I cannot. He gave me sixty guineas in a bag. I gave him bank-notes for them. I bought them by weight. Some were light, and two or three that were heavy. I am not able to recollect the conversation between him and me.

Q. I will endeavour to remind you what he said. Did not he tell you, when he first got down, that a passenger got in the coach at Highgate. He saw the packet was safe at Daintry, that he had taken up a stranger at Highgate, and put him down at the Three Cups. He searched for the parcel, and could not find it.

Q. How long was it after he brought you the sixty guineas - A. That must be the latter end of March, or the beginning of April.

Q. Do not you know that the sixty guineas came from Mr. Southgate - A. I cannot recollect. He did tell me who the sixty guineas came from, but I cannot recollect the name.

JAMES SOUTHGATE . I live at Coventry.

Q. On the 31st of March last did you give the prisoner any quantity of guineas to bring to London, to Silvester - A. I gave him sixty in a bag.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Gibbs.

Reference Number: t18120916-105

728. GEORGE BELL , alias GEORGE WILLIAM PORTER , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of July , a mare, value 10 l. a chaise, value 10 l. a chaise-harness, value 2 l. the property of John Richards .

JOHN RICHARDS . I am a ship-builder . I live at Gosport . On the 6th of July I lost a mare and a chaise out of my stable. I heard of it at eight o'clock in the morning. I afterwards saw it in the possession of the officer at Bow-street, in Ruthwin's possession. That was the same horse and chaise that I lost.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. Yes. He was a master of one of my vessels, employed in taking beer and water to his Majesty's navy and transports. I have known him near two years.

Q. Had you seen him near the place about that time - A. Yes, two or three days before.

Mr. Barry. Where did you keep the horse and chaise - A. About two hundred yards from my dwelling.

Q. The prisoner, I believe, had nothing to do with your horse and chaise - A. Not by my consent.

Q. Did he ever drive the horse and chaise for you - A. Never that I know of.

Q. Nor have you any reason to believe he knew that to be your horse and chaise - A. I believe he did. When he had occasion to draw stores to the vessel he used the horse.

Q. What colour was the horse - A. Bay.

Q. Is your name on the chaise - A. My initials are, and on the harness, J. R. When I had lost my horse and chaise I pursued it. I came up to London, and then went to Bow-street office, and a week after I was sent for to identify the horse and chaise.

JOHN TAYLOR . I work at Fulham. I bought the chaise and harness on the 9th of July. I gave six guineas for them. I bought them at the sign of the George, Walham Green. It was publicly offered for sale. I bought it of George Bell .

EDWARD JENKINS . I am an hackneyman and stable-keeper. I bought the mare of the prisoner on the 8th of July. The prisoner told me he lived at South Mins: that he was a farmer: he could not keep the mare in the field for want of grass. I gave fourteen pounds for the mare. Here is the receipt. He put the name on the receipt; George William Porter of South Mins. I went down to South Mins. There was no such a man there.

Mr. Barry. You considered you gave a fair price for that mare - A. I do.

WILLIAM RUTHWIN . I am an officer. I found the chaise at Fulham, with Mr. Taylor, and I took the mare at Mary-le-bone, from Mr. Jenkins, the last witness. I apprehended the prisoner also.

Prosecutor. The horse, chaise, and harness, I know to be mine. The horse and chaise I could speak positively to.

Mr. Barry. Where is the horse and chaise now - A. In London.

Prisoner's Defence. Having failed yesterday in putting off my trial to the next sessions, by which time I had hopes that James Mason, of whom I bought the horse and chaise, would have returned from Yorkshire, which must have procured me an honourable acquittal, I am now deprived of procuring the evidence of a man that would have saved my life. Should he have stolen the horse and chaise he would prove that I purchased it of him, as his receipt is now in court. Gosport is the place of my nativity. I did not know that the horse and chaise belonged to my prosecutor. When I arrived at London I slept at the Bull Inn. James Mason came to the door of the Bull Inn, and entered into conversation with me. On the 5th of July I slept at Fulham, and that morning I purchased the horse, which, unfortunately, sailor-like, flushed with hopes to have a horse and chaise to ride about for a time, thinking I should not lose much when I sold it. The chaise was sold publicly at the cross-roads. I then came to Paddington, the White Lion; and after riding the mare up and down the road, I sold the mare to Mr. Jenkins, for fourteen pounds, and gave him the receipt, that I had just bought the mare. I am deprived of putting my trial off. I had lived with my master from fifteen to eighteen months.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 26.

[The prisoner was recommended to mercy by the prosecutor, believing it to be his first offence.]

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18120916-106

729. JOHN PRICE and GEORGE HUMPHREYS were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of August , a bag, value 6 d. two three-shilling bank-tokens, and ten 1 l. bank-notes, the property of Sophia Greatwood , in the dwelling-house of William King .

SOPHIA GREATWOOD . Q. Do you live in the house of William King - A. Yes, I have lodgings there.

Q. Where is his house - A. In the City-road, in the parish of St. Leonard, Shoreditch .

Q. Do you know any thing of the prisoners, John Price and George Humphreys - A. John Price lives next door to where I do. He has the house there himself; and I have seen Humphreys pass.

Q. On the 15th of September did you lose any property from your lodgings - A. Yes. I lost a black bombazeen bag, containing a purse, with two three-shilling bank-tokens, and ten one-pound notes.

Q. How came Price to be in the room with you - A. He came about half past nine in the morning. Humprhreys was with him. He came to remove a sofa-bedstead, and during the time that he was with me, he told me that he had two shillings

to pay the porter, to carry the bedstead. I told my daughter to fetch my purse. She did, and I asked him to change me a one-pound note. He said, he could not. I said, I remember I have some silver. I gave him a three-shilling bank-token. He was to send me a shilling in by Humphreys. I then laid my bag down. I asked him if he would remove the drawers into the place where the sofa was. I left my bag in the room, on the table. I went out of the room. Price came out and assisted the man in removing the drawers.

Q. The drawers were not in that room, were they - A. No, not in which I then was.

Q. You then all went out of that room - A. Yes. Price might be about a minute in that room after I left it. Humphreys went out first, I followed, and then Price followed.

Q. Then you went into this room where the chest of drawers were - A. Yes. Humphreys went first, and I followed. Price entered into a conversation with me, respecting the drawers, and during this time Humphreys had not time to take the bag.

Q. When did you first miss your purse - A. After the men left the house.

Q. Did you miss it before Humphreys returned with the shilling - A. No. He did not come in. He gave it to my daughter. After that, a person called for a small bill, about five minutes after the prisoners had left my apartment a person called for a small bill. I then called for this bag. The mistress of the house with whom I lodge, she locked in every part of the room, and could not find it I then went immediately to Worship-street office for an officer. There I gave my evidence.

Q. You say Humphreys brought back this shilling and gave it your daughter - A. Yes.

Q. Where had you remained after they went out - A. In the same room where the sofa had been, and where I laid down my purse. Humphreys returned with the shilling, and took the remaining part of the sofa, but he did not go into the room.

Q. Where had you been while Humphreys was away the last time - A. I had been in the same room. I did not quit the room any more than a minute. I was in sight of the room the whole time.

Q. Had any one gone into the room - A. No. My little daughter was remaining in it the whole time.

Q. Price and Humphreys came to you upon some business you sent your daughter for the bag, in which bag was a purse - A. Yes.

Q. Mr. Price wanted two shillings to pay the porter, you took your purse and laid it on the table in that room, where you got in conversation with him about a pair of drawers in that room; you went out of the room, and Price followed. You are quite confident that you left the purse on the table - - A. Yes.

Q.Were the drawers immediately removed into the room - A. Yes.

Q. How long did it take - A. Not more than half an hour.

Q. But during the time that the drawers were removing, where were you - A. In the other room, in the front room.

Q.Could any one during that time go into the room where the sofa was, without your seeing them - A. No person could go into the room, I am confident.

Q. How can you he sure that no one went in the room - A. The person with whom I lodged can prove that she was in the kitchen.

Q. Could not any person go up stairs, and go in without your seeing them - A. No. There is no servant there, only the mistress of the house. A person called for a a small bill, which was the occasion of my missing the bag. I went to Worship-street immediately.

Q.Was any thing found upon the prisoners - A.Not any thing.

Mr. Adolphus. You knew the prisoner, Price - A. Yes.

Q. You took out your bag to pay him the two shillings for carrying the sofa - A. Yes.

Q.Where was the room where the drawers were to be removed - A. One door is opposite of the other. Price and myself were together in the room.

Q. I ask you, whether you can at all times command a view of that room from where the sofa was taken out - A.Before the drawers were removed, and the drawers were put where the sofa was, my daughter was in the room the whole time.

Q. Now, Humphreys and Price were in the room half an hour, how much of that time had gone when you paid the two shillings - A. Price had scarcely finished taking the sofa to pieces when I put the three shillings down.

Q. He remained a full quarter of an hour taking the sofa to pieces - A. No. Humphreys came back the second time, and took the remaining part of the sofa, and he brought me a shilling. When Price went away, he said, Humpreys, I shall not return again, you can bring the rest away, and bring the shilling back.

Q. Before you asked him to remove the drawers you had paid him - A. Yes. I had the bag on the table. I took out a three-shilling piece. Humphreys went first, and I and Price followed. Knowing the man, I felt no hesitation in leaving him in the room.

Q. How old is your daughter - A. My daughter is five years old. I left her in the room.

Q. Might not she have played with it, or have throwed it out of the window - A. My child, if she had seen any thing belonging to me, she would have taken care of it. She would not have played with it, or have throwed it out of the window.

Q. Where did you get the ten one-pound notes - A. I received them in change at a linen-drapers, the corner of Chiswell-street.

MATILDA GREATWOOD . Q. Do you know, when you are sworn you must tell the truth - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know that God will punish you if you speak falsehoods - A. Yes.

Q. Were you with your mother at the time that Price and Humphreys came to move a sofa - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember after the sofa was removed, that your mother went into another room, there was a

chest of drawers that were to be brought into the room where the sofa was - A. Yes.

Q. Did your mother go into the room where the chest of drawers were - A. Yes; Humphreys went first; I remained in the back room all the time.

Q.Are you sure that you staid in the back room until the men came back and brought the chest of drawers in - A. Yes.

Q.During the time you were in the room, did say one else come into the room - A. No, no one at all.

Q. Are you quite sure, that after your mother went out of the room, into the front room, that no one came into the room where you were until they came back - A. Yes.

Q. Did you take up any purse, or any thing that laid in the room - A. No; I was doing something else, I was washing up the tea-things. I did not touch any purse laying on the table, and I am quite sure that nobody came into the room.

Mr. Adolphus. Do you remember your mamma taking out any ridicule - A. Yes, I brought her the bag; the purse was there.

Q. You brought the bag into the room yourself - A. Yes.

Q. You recollect your mamma laying it down - A. Yes; I saw it lay there.

Q. Who was in the room with you when the bag was laid down - A.Humphreys and Mr. Price; then Humphreys went out; my mother followed; Mr. Price staid a little while in the room with me.

Q. What was he doing at that time - A. I dont know, I did not attend to him.

Q. Was the bag laying on the table where you were washing up the tea-things - A. Not at the same table where I was washing up the tea-things. The bag was a great way off.

Q. What was Price doing - A. I do not know, I did not take notice.

Q. Whereabouts was he - A. Somewhere up at the window where the sofa was.

Q. Whereabouts was the table that you were washing the tea-things on - A. That was at the door, and the other table was under the window; there is one window in the room.

Q. Where were the drawers removed to - A. To the same place where the sofa was.

Q. And it was about that place where you observed Mr. Price. You did not see him go towards the table, did you - A. I did not see him. He went then into the room with my mamma, to help move the drawers. I went out when the man came back with the shilling; I then went and opened the door to him and brought the shilling to my mother.

Q. At that time she had not missed the bag - A. No; she was in the front room then, not in the room with me.

Q. How long was it before she came into the room with you after they both were gone - A. She came in after he went from returning with the shilling, then she came into the room.

Q. You had done washing up the tea-things before Price and Humphreys went away - A. No, I did not. When I had done washing the tea-things up I took them into the pantry.

Q. Then you went out of the room then - A. Yes, but nobody was in the house but mamma and me, and the mistress of the house.

Q. Did not you stop and talk with your mamma after you had put the things into the pantry - A. No.

Q. Did not you stay a little while with your mamma - A. No.

Q. Did you take notice of this bag any time - A. I saw it on the table when I was doing the tea-things.

Q. Did you see it on the table when you had done the tea-things - A. No, I did not look then.

Q. Who came to ask for any money - A. A girl came for a little money; she told me to go and take it off the table. I went and missed the bag.

COURT. You first was sent by your mamma to get the bag, which was in the drawer; you got it. - You saw her give the three-shilling piece to Price - A. Yes; she put it on the table.

Q. She put it on the table. How large is the room - A. A good sized room.

Q. After this time you were washing the tea-things, you observed the bag laying on the table - A. Yes.

Q. Did you take any notice whether the purse was there or not after Humphreys, your mother, and Price, went out of the room - A. No, I took no notice.

Q. You say, when you had done washing up the tea-things you carried the tea-things into the pantry - A. Yes.

Q. You went with the tea-things into the front room - A. No, I took the tray into the pantry; then I came back into the back room before my mother came to me.

Q. You were in the front room when the person came for a small bill - A. Yes; I was then shaking the cloth in the pantry; and then my mother sent me into the front room for the purse. I told her, it was not there.

JANE KING . I keep the house in which Mrs. Greatwood lives. She is a lodger of mine. My husband, William King , rents the house. He was not at home at this time. After Price and Humphreys left the house there was no one in the house but Mrs. Greatwood, her daughter, and me. I let Price and Humphreys in myself. I was sitting in my kitchen. I remember them going out; and I remember Humphreys coming back again, and Matilda coming down to let him out to save my trouble. Up to the time that the young woman came to ask for the bill, no one was in the house but Price, Humphreys, Mrs. Greatwood, and her daughter. I let the young wowan in. She stood at the bottom of the stairs. She never went up stairs. I called to Mrs. Greatwood, here is a young woman called for a small bill; when Mrs. Greatwood said, come up stairs Mrs. King. I want to speak to you. I went up stairs, and then heard her complaint.

Q. You know nothing of any property being found, do you - A. No, I do not.

Mr. Adolphus. What is your husband - A. A painter.

Q. Does he sleep at home every night - A. Yes.

Q. What time did he go out that morning - A. At six o'clock.

Q. What time did these men come in the morning - A. About ten o'clock.

Q. What sort of a bag was this - A. A bombazeen bag.

Q. Do you know any thing of her changing a banknote - A. She told me that she changed a ten pound note. I saw nothing of any bank-notes. I saw a ten pound note which she had taken a few days before.

Q. What day of the week was this - A. The Tuesday week.

Q. You had often seen the bag - A. I had; and often had it in my hand.

Q. to prosecutor. What money did you lay out at the linen-draper's where you got the ten pound note changed - A. I took a one pound note besides, in case the linen-draper could not change the ten pound note, therefore I carried eleven pounds. I laid out about seven shillings and sixpence.

Humphreys's Defence. I never saw the purse nor the money.

Price's Defence. I have witnesses of the first respectability that will give me a character.

SARAH MITCHELL . I keep an upholsterer and broker's shop in Crown-street, Finsbury-square. I have known Mr. Price near three years. This last three years I have trusted him with three hundred pounds, and would trust him with five hundred. His general character is honest and industrious. About three weeks ago, Mrs. Greatwood said, Mr. Price has lent me an old sofa which was buggy; my husband could not die upon it. She put her hands together and said, I will never forgive him so long as I live. I will have revenge. Her little girl, over and over, said, Oh, how can you say so.

Q. to prosecutrix. Sarah Mitchell says, about three weeks ago, before this loss, you complained that you had a spite against Mr. Price; that he sold you a buggy sofa your husband could not die upon it, therefore you would be revenged - A. That is not true. I told her I was extremely angry. I said, I did not think I could forgive him; that is all I said. I owned him no spite. I thought no more of it afterwards. My little daughter is here; she could say, whether I felt angry. I never said I would be revenged.

Price called four other witnesses, who gave him a good character.

PRICE, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 28.

HUMPHREYS, NOT GUILTY .

[Price was recommended to mercy by the Jury, on account of his former good character, and the prosecutrix recommended him to mercy on account of his wife and children.]

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Gibbs.

Reference Number: t18120916-107

730. THOMAS WRIGHT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of August , a copper pot, value 12 s. the property of Robert Lewis , privately in his shop .

ROBERT LEWIS . I keep a broker's shop in James-street, in the parish of St. George, Hanover-square . On the 5th of August I left home. I was returning homewards about a quarter after ten, in the morning part, I met the prisoner coming out of my shop, carrying away my pot before him. This is the pot. The pot was within the shop, under a table; it was within the shop for sale. After he had gone one hundred and fifty yards from the shop, I called to my wife, and, from her information, I pursued him. I asked him, what he was going to do with the pot? he said, it was his. I told him, it was mine, and I would take him to Marlborough-street. The prisoner said, do not keep me here among a mob of people; take me away somewhere. I gave him in charge of Cobham, the officer, and I delivered the pot to the officer.

Q. When you got to your shop, was there any body in the shop - A. No person at all.

Q. You called your wife; from what room did she come - A. From a room in the yard.

Q. How far was the prisoner from the door when you first saw him - A. He was just coming out of the shop. When I saw him coming out of the shop I was as far from him as I am from you.

Q. How long had you had that pot - A. About three months. It stood me in about six shillings: it is worth about twelve shillings for copper.

JOHN COBHAM . The prisoner and the pot were delivered into my custody. The pot has been in my possession ever since.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of taking the pot. The pot was given me to carry.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 22.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18120916-108

731. JOSEPH SNIPE , RANDELL BECKWORTH , and WILLIAM BOLTON , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of August , an handkerchief, value 1 d. two three-shilling bank-tokens, and seven shillings , the property of John Berry .

JOHN BERRY , the prosecutor, was called, and not appearing in court, his recognizance was ordered to be estreated.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120916-109

732. EDWARD JOHN YATES was indicted, for that he, on the 14th of February , was clerk to Thomas Meux , Andrew Read , William Wigram , George Hobson , and David Hunter , and Co. and was employed and entrusted to receive money, for and on their account, did receive, and take into his possession, the sum of 55 l. 4 s. 6 d. for his said master, and that he afterwards did secrete, and embezzle, and steal the same .

CAPTAIN GEORGE SMITH . Q. In the beginning of the month of February were you indebted to the house of Meux and Co. any sum of money - A. Yes, upwards of fifty pounds.

Q. Did you authorise any person to pay that - A. Yes, a person of the name of G. H. Fowler.

GEORGE HORN FOWLER . Q. Did you pay any sum of money in February last to the house of Meux and Co - A. I did, to Mr. Yates. I paid fifty-five pounds four shillings and sixpence. I saw the prisoner write that receipt, and he gave it me.

(Read.)

="February 14, 1812.

Received of Captain George Smith the sum of

fifty-five pounds, four shillings, and sixpence, for Meux, Reid, and Co.

EDWARD JOHN YATES .="

55 l. 4 s. 6 d.

MR. BEALE. Q. I believe you are cashier in the house of Meux, Reid, and Company - A. I am. They are brewers in Liquorpond-street. The prisoner was a clerk in their employ.

Q. Was it part of his duty to receive money on their account - A. It was. He was the principal clerk in that department; to receive money he was.

Q. When he received the money in what mode was he to make the entry - A. In the money journal.

Q. Look at that money journal, 14th of February, in the present year. Is there any entry of the receipt of fifty-five pounds four shillings and sixpence, of Captain Smith - A. No, none on that day, nor on any one day there is not.

Q. Is that the book in which he should have made the entry - A. Certainly. If the entry had been there it was his duty to pay the money to me, and I should have put my initials in that money journal, and then the entry would be transferred to the ledger.

Q. Have you ever received that sum of money of the prisoner - A. No, I am quite sure of that.

Q. In consequence of this was the prisoner sent for from Portsmouth - A. He was, about three weeks ago.

Q. Upon that occasion was he charged with having received sums that he had not accounted for - A. He was.

Q. Did he, upon being so charged, tick a list of sums of money he had so received - A. This is the list he gave to me, a list that he had by him, of his own hand-writing.

Q. Does that list include the sum in question - A. It does include the sum of one hundred and seventeen pounds seven shillings and sixpence, of Captain Smith. The sum in question in this and other indictments.

Q. Do you know the partners in your firm - A. I do. There are nineteen.

Mr. Alley. Did not you communicate to him, that if he would let you know the sums that he had received he might pay it when he could - A. Certainly not.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel.

GUILTY , aged 35.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120916-110

733. ISAAC CRANE was indicted for feloniously receiving, on the 25th of January , sixteen bushels of oats, value 3 l. the property of John Willan ; where of Thomas Dutton has been tried and convicted of feloniously stealing, he knowing them to have been stolen .

(The record of the conviction of Thomas Dutton , read.)

JOHN TAPLIN . Q. On Saturday, the 25th of January last, were you in the service of Mr. Willan - A. Yes: his name is John Willan . Thomas Dutton was a servant to Mr. Willan, at Whetstone. He was in the habit of coming for oats that he wanted for Mr. Willan's horses, at Whetstone; and on that day he came for some oats. I measured for him twenty-four sacks of oats. The sacks were produced by him.

Q. What sort of oats were they - A. Black and white oats. I delivered them to Dutton, for the purpose of giving them to the horses belonging to Mr. Willan. The cart was brought back the same night. There was four sacks deficient.

ROBERT SHARP COLVILL . I am a printing-ink maker, living in Clerkenwell.

Q. On Saturday, the 25th of January last, did you see a cart loaded with sacks, containing something, in Smith-street, Clerkenwell - A. Yes. I supposed the sacks to be loaded with corn. The cart was driven by a man of the name of Dutton. I saw a small jockey-cart drawn up by the side of it. That jockey-cart, I believe, was driven by the prisoner. I was some distance at the time. I believe the prisoner to be the young man.

Q. What did you see then done - A. Dutton immediately got out of his cart, and took four or five sacks, (four sacks I am sure of), and put them in the cart, driven by the prisoner. Dutton delivered them from his cart to the prisoner's cart.

Q. Upon this your suspicions were rouzed - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see the name on the cart - A. I did not. I went out for the purpose of taking the name. I could not do it without being noticed. I went to the Turnpike gate, and gave notice to the toll collector. He told me the first cart coming was Mr. Willan's.

Mr. Alley. You do not mean to say now, that you are sure that the prisoner was the man that drove the jockey-cart - A. I believe he was the man.

Q. How long is this ago - A. Last January.

Q. How long is it from the time that you saw him in the cart to the time you saw him in custody - A. I think I saw the prisoner before he was in custody. The prisoner came to my house in company with two others, to know the description of himself.

Q. Did not he go and ask you, whether you thought he was like the person that took the oats, hearing that you had an imputation upon him, and you said, no - A. No. The question that was put to me was, they wished to know the description of young Crane. They knew where he was. They knew where he was working; and if I knew Crane they would go and take him. I told them, I had nothing at all to do in it; it was Mr. Willan's concern, and if I could give the description of young Crane, they could take him that night, as they knew where he was at work. I told them, they should go and enquire of Mr. Willan. I had nothing to do with the business.

Q. How long was this after Crane had been reported to be the receiver. Again I ask you, whether you did not say, that the person who spoke to you was not the person that you supposed to be Crane, he was some inches taller - A. I said, he was about his height. The prisoner had a drab great coat on, and held his head down.

Q. Do you know that to be the prisoner - A. I

believe it to be so, by the manner of his conducting himself.

Q. Where did they come to you - A. At my own house in Goswell-street.

Q. Do you mean to say that you were under any alarm at that time - A. It did not look well for three men to come up; one of them with a thick stick. If I had interfered I dare say I should have had my head broken. I believed him to be the man, but I did not intend to run any risk.

- HEATH. I was the toll-collector in Goswell-street in January last.

Q. Do you remember being applied to by Mr. Colvill for looking at the names of two carts - A. I do. They were coming towards my gate. One of the carts belonged to Mr. Willan, loaded with corn, and another small jockey cart of the name of Crane upon it, Hampstead-road, drawn by a poney.

Q. Who was driving that cart - A. The prisoner. I believe the prisoner to be the man, but he is very much altered in his dress. He had a velveteen jacket on at that time.

HENRY BELLAS . I am a servant to Mr. Willan.

Q. Did you go by the direction of Mr. Willan, after the cart drove by Dutton - A. Yes. I overtook it at Finchley, by the Bald Faced Stag. I brought Dutton and the cart back to the Bull and Mouth. The cart then contained twenty sacks of oats, and one sack of bran. On the next day I went into Crane's premises, Camden Town, Hampstead-road. I found in Crane's stable about two bushels of oats, which is now here, and there was some in the manger, which the horse was then eating of. I believe them to be the same oats, as near as I can tell oats. I compared the sample of oats with those in the granary, and they answer to the sample exactly.

Q. Dutton was in the service of your master - A. He was. He was in the habit of coming to town for the oats that he wanted for the horses at Whetstone and Barnet.

Q. Do you know Smith-street, Clerkenwell - A. Yes.

Q. Is that the direct road from your master's to Whetstone - A. By no means.

Q. Whose property were these oats - A. My master's, John Willan . I have had the oats and the sacks over since February sessions. I know it is the same sack, because the sack has been locked up.

Q. Did you see this young man at that time - A. No. I saw the father had a bed.

JOHN CLARK. I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner on the 14th of September, between twelve and one at night. He was coming out of the Bedford Arms. I catched hold of Crane by the collar, and Hale, the constable's son, knocked me down, and I pulled Crane; and when Hale found he could not extricate Crane from me another man came up. I never had so much trouble in taking any man. The prisoner made all the resistance he could. He said, nobody would have taken him but me.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of the transaction.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120916-111

734. JAMES NOONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of August , four pounds weight of flour, value 18 d. the property of Thomas Hill .

THOMAS HILL . I am a miller at Bromley . I lost the flour from my mills on the morning of the 5th of August; the prisoner was going to breakfeast. I examined his hat, and found about four pounds of flour there.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Fined 1 s. and discharged.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120916-112

735. WILLIAM RAWLINSON was indicted for feloniously making an assault in the King's highway, upon James Taylor , on the 21st of August , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, a seal, value 1 s. a watch-key, value 1 d. and a ribbon, value 1 d. his property.

JAMES TAYLOR . I am the master of a ship in the coal-trade. On the 21st of August, I was, passing through Lower Chapman-street , between nine and ten at night. A man came past me on the right side, and snatched at my watch ribbon. I immediately called out, stop thief. He had not ran more than twenty yards before he was stopped by the patrol, and taken to the watchhouse. The seal, key, and ribbon, were picked up close by where the prisoner was taken.

THOMAS NORTON . I am a patrol. I heard the cry of stop thief. I stopped the prisoner as he was running. This is the property.

Prosecutor. It is my property.

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutor was so drunk he could not give charge of me. A woman did. I rely on the mercy of the Jury.

GUILTY, aged 20,

Of stealing from the person only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120916-113

736. THOMAS GIBBONS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of September , a pair of boots, value 8 s. the property of William Appledon , privately in his shop .

WILLIAM APPLEDON . I live in Bath-street, City-road . I am a shoemaker . I lost the boots on Thursday, the 10th of this month. I was at work in the shop until half past eight. I went into the back parlour to have my supper, and about nine I heard a noise at the shop window. I immediately pursued it. He ran off. I took him, and brought him in doors. One of my children found the boots at the door. These are boots. They are mine.

Q. What had he done with the boots - A. He flung them away, because I pursued him close. They were picked up by the children, and given to me. I am sure the prisoner is the man.

JAMES GEARY . I am an officer. As I was taking the prisoner to the watchhouse to lock him up, he said, it is dirty work; they may transport me, and do what they like.

Prisoner's Defence. The gentleman asked me what I had got about me. I said, nothing I went in immediately. He searched me, and found nothing.

GUILTY, aged 49,

Of stealing, but not privately in the shop .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120916-114

737. THOMAS HURST was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of April , one hundred and forty-eight pounds weight of raw silk, value 210 l. the property of Matthew Pickford , James Pickford , Thomas Pickford , and Matthew Pickford .

GEORGE BILLING . Q. I believe you are a silk broker - A. Yes. I reside at 5, Bates's-buildings, Hoxton. I have an accompting-house, 22, Cateaton-street.

Q. Did you, on the 1st of April, purchase a bale of the Company's raw Bengal silk, for Messrs. Phillips and Co. at Leek, in Staffordshire - A. I did. The weight of the silk was one hundred and forty-eight pounds. I paid for it two hundred and thirty-eight pounds and eight-pence. I ordered my man to take it to the White Bear, in Basinghall-street. Messrs. Pickfords sent to me several days afterwards. I then found it was lost. I went to Messrs. Pickfords. My correspondents told me that the bale had not arrived. It was to go to Messrs. Phillips and Company, Leek, in Staffordshire.

Q. Did you go to Mackray's lodging in Maiden-lane, Wood-street - A. I did. I was there shewn a parcel of silk in a bag.

Q. Was it the sort of silk that you had packed up to go by Pickford's waggon - A. Exactly similar to what I had bought for Phillips and Company, marked C. L. signifying the city of London; and under that is a dot, 1207, there is M, then a stroke under that 12, and under it the letter E, in capital. I believe that is the East India Company's mark. All silks that come from Bengal must be sold by the Company's candle. I could not swear that the silk produced to day was a part of that silk.

- PORTER. I went with the last witness. I cleared two bales of silk from the India-house, and afterwards I took them to the White Bear, Basinghall-street. The bales were directed to Phillips and Co. Leek, Staffordshire. This is the receipt. (The receipt read.)

- GROSVENOR. I am book-keeper and porter at the White Bear, Basinghall-street. I signed that book for an acknowledgment of the receipt of these bales.

SAMUEL PORTER . I am a porter at the White Bear. I put the three bales on the waggon. They went on the waggon instantly.

MATTHEW PICKFORD . Q. What are the names of your partners - A. Thomas, James, and Matthew. We are proprietors of the Leek waggon. I do not know any thing of the package being brought.

Q. Did you go to the house of Mackray - A. I did, with Mr. Tatlock. We went to Mr. Hammersley afterwards. He lived in Maiden-lane, Wood-street, at that time.

JOHN WALKER . I am the waggoner. I lost the hale of silk while I was feeding my horses at Colden, which is seventeen miles from London. I missed it about two o'clock in the morning.

ALEXANDER MACKRAY . In the beginning of April last I resided in Maiden-lane. I acted as silk broker. I purchased a parcel of silk of Mr. Hammersley. He brought me a sample of it. I did not understand the nature of the silk. I took one or two heads before I would buy it to several persons in the trade. They informed me they thought it would not suit the trade. I afterwards shewed a sample of the silk to Mr. Tatlock.

Q. Should you know the silk again - A. When a man has lost silk it is impossible to identify it again.

GEORGE HAMMERSLEY . I am a silk-weaver. On the 5th of April I lived in Maiden-lane. On the 18th of April last the prisoner brought me a sample of silk. He told me he was very much distressed for money. He wished me, if it suited me, to purchase it, or to lend him twenty pounds. I went that evening to the prisoner's house with twenty pounds, and agreed to take forty pounds worth of silk. I went on Monday, and took twenty pounds worth of silk from his house in Montague-street, Spitalfields, and on the next day I took twenty pounds worth more. I gave him twenty shillings a pound; forty pounds for the whole. I afterwards sold the silk to Mackray for fifty pounds.

Q.Had you a bill of parcels given you by the prisoner - A. I took the first away without. Finding it would not answer the purpose, I asked him for a bill of parcels, as I should have to sell it. He said, as you have got to sell in you ought to get something by it. The bill of parcels is made out at thirty-two shillings a pound, but twenty shillings was the price.

JAMES TATLOCK . I am a silk-broker. I met Mr. Mackray, I think, on the Saturday this took place. He shewed me a skein of silk. He said, he could not afford to sell it for less than thirty-two shillings, which I thought cheap. I immediately took it to Daintry and Rye, the first in our line, and they only offered me thirty shillings for it. I took the skein away, and going up Trump-street I saw the advertisement of this felony. I was persuaded it was the same silk, but no man can swear to silk. I went and shewed it to Mr. Beardmore. I told him I had got some silk that would suit him exceeding well, but I had some doubt how it was come by; I must look into that first. I went to Mackray in Maiden-lane, and desired to know how he came by it, as I had some suspicion of it being stolen. He told me he bought it of Hammersley. In the evening I saw Hammersley. He told me he bought it of the prisoner; he either gave twenty-four or twenty-eight shillings, I cannot say which; one or the other, upon my oath. I then told him, the prisoner must be seen. I sent for Mr. Nalder. Mr. Nalder, and a constable, Mackray, and myself, went

to the prisoner's house. I went up stairs, and he came to me I went up stairs. There are looms in his manufactory. He is a narrow weaver. The prisoner seemed much agitated in seeing me. I took that agitation to arise from this, because I appeared against him before. I then said, I am afraid you are again in a bad thing. He said he was not. I said, I have seen some silk at Hammersley's, which he says he bought of you Does he, said he, and what price did he say he gave for it. I said, either four or eight-and-twenty, I did not know which. His answer was, he only gave twenty. I told him, I had the City marshall with me. He said, you know I have been true to my word once, and I will be so now. I hope you will not take me up. I said, be honest, and I will not. I then advised him to let the whole of it fail upon the right shoulder. I did not see him from that day until I saw him in custody.

Q. Did the prisoner tell you who he bought it of - A. No, he did not. He said, he had a bill of parcels, and there he stopped

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120916-115

738. ELIZABETH CONNOLLY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of July , a gown, value 5 s. the property of Samuel Kitely .

SAMUEL KITELY. I live in London-street, No. 5 . This gown was missed from off the horse in the sitting-room. I turned the prisoner away on suspicion that she had taken it. On the 30th of July my wife met the prisoner with the gown on her back. The prisoner brought the gown, with the watchhouse-keeper to my house. This is the gown. It is my wife's, and here is the habit-shirt to match it.

Prisoner's Defence. I was out on bail. I surrendered myself for the trial.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120916-116

739. ANN DAVIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of July , two loaves of bread, value 3 s. the property of Robert Moseley .

The prosecutor was called, and not appearing in court, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120916-117

740. JOHN BARBER and THOMAS DUPROY were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of July , four shirts, value 14 s. and two waistcoats, value 16 s. the property of William Wilson .

WILLIAM WILSON . I am a labourer in the East India Docks. I live with Edward Boston , Potter's-row . On the 22nd of July last, before I went to bed, I went into the washhouse. I saw my clothes in a basket. They had been washed that day. In the morning I found a pane of glass had been taken out of the washhouse window, and my things had been taken out of the basket. I went in search at the pawnbrokers, and found my property.

SARAH BOSTON . I am the wife of Edward Boston. Mr. Wilson has a part of the house. I left the clothes in the washhouse, and the next morning I missed them.

ROBERT DRAKE . I am a pawnbroker. These three shirts were pawned by Duproy on the morning after the house was entered.

Q. Was Barber with him - A. No, he was by himself.

Duproy. I did pawn them.

JOHN DEAN . I produce a pair of trowsers and two waistcoats. They were pledged by Barber. I am positive he is the man.

Wilson. The shirts and waistcoats are mine.

Barber's Defence. I solemnly declare my innocence. I did not pawn any thing at all. I was at home when the offence was committed.

Duproy's Defence. A gentleman gave me a shilling to pawn these things.

BARBER, GUILTY, aged 21.

DUPROY, GUILTY, aged 19.

Judgment respited .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120916-118

741. JOHN STEWART was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of July , from the person of Henry Fase , a 40 l. bank note , his property.

HENRY FASE. I am a tailor . On the 26th of July I was going for a walk towards Mary-le-bone fields . There was a man preaching. I stopped to hear his discourse. I lost a forty pound note out of my pocket. How it was taken I cannot say. On the 27th of July the prisoner brought a forty-pound note to our shop, and bought some cloth. I gave him the difference. I wrote upon the note myself. I know he offered that note in payment for three pounds fifteen shillings. I saw the note afterwards. I knew it was the same note.

Q. You do not know whether you lost it or he took it. You did not see him hearing the preaching, did you - A. No.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120916-119

742. JOHN ALLEN and JAMES MOREING were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of May , fifty pounds weight of lead, value 5 s. the property of James Smith , affixed to his house .

JAMES SMITH . I am a refiner of sugar, and capillaire-maker , No. 8, Charles-street, Drury-lane .

SOPHIA SMITH . I am the wife of the last witness. On the 21st of May, between nine and ten at night, a lodger of mine informed me that somebody was on the top of the house. I went up stairs, and heard somebody running from one house to the other. I directly went to the next house, and the landlord went up stairs with me. He forced the garret door open, and the lead was on the table, and Allen and Moreing were sitting in the room.

Allen lived in that room. The prisoners both ran out of the room.

JAMES BILBY . I live next door to Mrs. Smith. She came and informed me there was somebody on the top of the house, taking the lead off. I went up stairs, and knocked at the garret door. Nobody answered. I forced the room door open. Allen was with a young woman that lived there. He was sitting on the bed, and Moreing was sitting on the other side of the table, where the lead was.

WILLIAM SALMON . I am an officer. I received information of the robbery. I apprehended the two prisoners on the 9th of July.

Allen. Mr. Salmon apprehended me for being a deserter. He said, if he could not do for me for a deserter, he would do for me for other things.

Allen and Moreing's Defence. We beg leave to trouble the court with this written statement, and submit to his lordship, and the gentlemen of the Jury, that we are charged with a robbery. If false witnesses come in a court of justice, who can stand against them. On that day we had been to Bow-fair. We got in company with two girls of the town. We went with them, and laid ourselves down to sleep. Shortly after the door of the room was broken open, which much alarmed us, Allen having been absent from the regiment that day, was fearful of being taken to the guard-room. Finding this was not the case we ran down stairs. The prosecutor and his wife are of the most disgraceful stamp. Smith and his wife keeps a house for the prostitution of women, and Bilby is the same description.

ALLEN, GUILTY, aged 22.

MOREING, GUILTY, aged 21.

Judgment respited .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120916-120

743. EDWARD HARPER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of July , a handkerchief, value 4 s. the property of Samuel Moorey , from his person .

SAMUEL MOOREY . I am a revenue officer . On the 18th of July I was robbed of my pocket-handkerchief, in Bond-street , as I was standing and looking in a silversmith's shop. I felt a hand in my pocket, I turned round, and a constable had hold of the prisoner.

- COLLIER. On the 18th of July I was coming down Bond-street. I saw the prisoner, in company with two others, and knowing the other two, I watched them. The prisoner put his hand into the prosecutor's pocket. I ran and got hold of him. He had his hat off his head, ready to put the handkerchief in.

Prisoner's Defence. I wish to go to sea.

GUILTY, aged 18.

Judgment respited .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120916-121

744. DAVID MARKS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of September , six teapots, value 9 s. the property of Humphrey Isaacs , and MARY WILSON for receiving the same, knowing them to be stolen .

HUMPHREY ISAACS. I live in Great Queen-street. Lincoln's Inn Fields. I keep a glass and earthenware shop . On the 10th of this month I lost the tea-pots; they were taken from my warehouse. David Marks was my apprentice .

Q.How long before had you seen these tea-pots in your warehouse - A. I cannot say exactly how long.

Q. Are you quite sure that any were gone - A. I did not miss them at that present moment.

Q. You did not know that you had lost them until you received some intelligence - A. I did not know until Thursday. Between seven and eight in the morning, I was standing at a neighbour's door, I saw David Marks . I followed him; he went into Mrs. Wilson's shop. I saw him in conversation with her. I went to Bow-street; got an officer; returned home and gave David Marks in charge, on taking goods on suspicion. I did not say what goods. We went to get a search-warrant. I had lost glass, china and earthen-ware, to the amount of sixty or seventy pounds. I went to Mrs. Wilson's, with the search-warrant, I found six tea-pots there; the tea-pots seemed to have been just taken out of a paper, they were so fresh and clean. That is all I know.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120916-122

745. DAVID PEERS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of August , fifty-two sheets of paper, value 2 s. 6 d. the property of the United Company of Merchants, trading to the East Indies .

GEORGE WOOLGER . I am in the employ of the East India Company, in the Stationary office. There was a deficiency in the office of twenty-five reams of fool's-cap, and twenty dozen of pencils, and something of every thing that was in the office. I went to a school at Finchley, where the prisoner teached the children to write. I was there informed, by the mistress, that the prisoner found stationary for the school. The prisoner told me he was the writing-master . I looked at the books of that writing-school, and found that it was the Company's paper, by the water marks.

Mr. Gurney. You do not know that the prisoner ever sold the paper - A. No.

DANIEL BISHOP . I am an officer of Worship-street. On the 18th of August last I went down to the Sunday school at Finchley. Mrs. Castle opened a cupboard, and in that cupboard I found these thirteen copy-books. I apprehended the prisoner on the same night, as he was coming across Hackney fields. I told him he was charged with taking paper belonging to the East India Company. He said, he had taken the books there, and they were perquisites. They were outside sheets.

MRS. CASTLE. Q. You keep this school at Finchley - A. No. I attend there occasionally. These books were there, in the cupboard. I gave them to the officer. Who took them there I do not know.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel; called five witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120916-123

746. MARY JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of September , twenty-one yards of printed cotton, value 20 s. the property of Griffith Foulkes , privately in his shop .

GRIFFITH FOULKES . I am a linen-draper , No. 2, Russel-street, Convent-garden, in the parish of St. Martin in the Fields . On the 1st of September, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I saw the prisoner come into my shop; she was alone. She asked to look at some printed cottons. George Banks served her, and Thomas Richardson was in the shop; they are here. They were all the persons who were serving in the shop. When the prisoner got to the door, I observed, she was walking in a singular manner. I suspected that she had something about her. George Banks went after her, and brought her back. And when Banks brought her back, she dropped a piece of print, containing twenty one yards, at the door.

Q. Did you see her take it - A. No; I had no idea of it. She was a long time being served. The piece of printed cotton had my shop-mark on it.

Q. Had you sold it to her - A. No; nor I had no idea that she had taken any thing. I have valued it at twenty shillings. I have no partner.

GEORGE BANKS. I am a servant to Mr. Foulkes. I served the prisoner when she came into the shop. She asked to look at some printed cottons to make frocks. Thomas Richardson shewed her some; she was twenty minutes at the counter. There were a great many pieces shewn to her; she bought two quantities, it came to four shillings. I was not aware that she had taken any thing, when she went out of the shop. I suspected her by her walk; I went after her and brought her back. She had got about a yard from the door; I told her to come back; that she had got something that did not belong to her. She dropped the piece of printed cotton on the sill of the door as I brought her back; it dropped from underneath her petticoats. It was only from her manner of walking, that I suspected her. I received no information from any one. There was nobody in the shop but Richardson, myself, and master, and another young man. He was at the other counter.

Mr. Foulkes. There was another shopman in the shop; he was not serving.

THOMAS RICHARDSON . I assisted in serving the prisoner at the counter. I did not perceive her take any thing.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not take the cotton at all. When I was at the door, the cotton dropped off a chair at the door.

GUILTY, aged 21,

Of stealing, but not privately .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120916-124

747. THOMAS COSGROVE and MARGARET COSGROVE were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of August , two shirts, value 10 s. two sheets, value 14 s. two gowns, value 10 s. two shifts, value 6 s. and two shawls, value 6 s. the property of Michael Clarke , in his dwelling-house .

MICHAEL CLARKE . I am a coachman ; I live in Broad-yard, Brunswick-street . I let lodgings. On the 13th of August, I lost the property mentioned in the indictment. The woman prisoner slept one night in the room on a mattress that I had in the room. She gave my wife four-pence for that night; the next night she was there again. I told her I was not agreeable to let her sleep there for the money my wife had agreed on. She stopped there that night, and brought her husband; who afterwards agreed to have the lodgings at half-a-crown a-week: in the course of half an hour I heard them both come down. I met them at the foot of the stairs. I said to them, you told me that you were going to stop all night. They made answer, they were going to fetch their bedding; they should not be long. They never returned; I lost a pair of sheets, two gowns, two shirts, two shifts, and two shawls. They took the things away on the Thursday night. We missed the things on the Saturday morning. I have never seen them since.

CATHERINE CLARKE . I am the wife of the last witness. The woman prisoner took the lodgings on the 13th, for two shillings a-week; and when my husband came to find that she had a husband and a child, he would not let her sleep there under half-a-crown a-week. I lost these things on the 13th of August; they were in a closet in the room that she was to take. They were locked up in the closet. This robbery was done on Thursday night, the 13th. There were no person up in the room besides them. They were both there.

JOHN LAMBERT . I lodge in this house, in the middle apartment. I went home about eight o'clock. I heard somebody over head. I sent my little boy to see who it was; he came down, and the woman prisoner followed him. I told her to stop. The landlady came up. She gave the landlady a shilling earnest for the room. I heard a man up in the room.

MARGARET LAMBERT . I was the person that helped Mrs. Clarke to put these things in the cupboard, on the 13th of August, at night. I wanted to go up stairs to see who was in the room; my husband would not let me. I saw the man prisoner come down stairs with a bundle. I saw both the prisoners go dow stairs; and I am sure I saw the man with a bundle. The things were not missed till Saturday morning.

- I am an officer. I apprehended the man prisoner. I searched him; I found a duplicate on him, and this knife. I went and took the woman prisoner. I knew her of old. The man said, it was not him, it was his wife. The woman said, her husband did not do it, it was her.

THOMAS COSGROVE , GUILTY, aged 39,

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

MARGARET COSGROVE , NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120916-125

748. JAMES BULL and WILLIAM MACKDONALD for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Daniel Munro , about the hour of twelve, on the night of the 15th of May , and stealing therein, eight pair of boots, value 16 l. seven pair

of shoes, value 5 l. and thirty pounds weight of leather, value 5 l. the property of Daniel Munro .

DANIEL MUNRO . I am a boot and shoemaker ; I live at No. 3, St. Martin's Church-yard .

Q. When was your house broken open - A. On the 15th of May, between eleven and twelve at night.

Q. Were you at home - A. No, I was not; I went out to get a pint of beer. It is a double house. I live in the shop. The shop was broken open; it is part of the dwelling-house. They came in the passage; there is only one passage to both dwelling houses. The door of my parlour leads into my shop. That door had a padlock on.

Q. If I understand you right, they came into your passage, and broke open the door that leads into your shop - A. Yes, that door was fastened with a padlock. I found the staple drawn.

Q. What time did you leave the shop - A. Between eight and nine. I did not find it out until the morning, at seven o'clock.

Q. Then, from between eight and nine at night until seven in the morning, you cannot tell when it was done - A. No; when I came at seven in the morning, I found the staple drawn. I went to Bow-street, and got an officer. We searched the house I live in; we found none of the effects there. I lost eight pair of boots, seven pair of shoes, and some leather.

Q. You know nothing of the robbery - A. I don't know either of the prisoners, only my boots being found in their room.

THOMAS MANTZ . I am an officer of Bow-street. On the 4th of August, I apprehended the prisoner Bull. Limbrick and I searched him, and found a duplicate of one boot, pawned at Mr. Lamb's, Stanhope-street, Clare-market. Mumford was in company with Bull. He said, that Bull had sold him a duplicate of a pair of shoes. Bull was present when he said that. I took him in custody, and went to the office, that is all I know respecting Bull. On the 7th of August, I apprehended Mackdonald. He ran away from us; we got him afterwards. I took him to the office, and searched him. In his pocket I found this centre-bit, and the model for making it; and a gimlet in his pocket. At his lodging I found the stock for it. The centre-bit is so high tempered, it will cut through iron. He had a new pair of shoes on his feet; I took them off. I went to find out his lodging. A little girl came out of the door; she said, I know whose shoes they are. They are my uncle's. I said, I wanted to know where he lived, for we wanted an old pair of shoes for him. That little girl went and shewed me his lodging. I searched his lodging; I found one boot hanging up, and another in a basket; they were both new boots. The one that is in pawn is the fellow to this one. They sent a one legged man to pawn it.

Mackdonald. Q. Has the shoes been owned that were found on my feet - A. No, they are your own.

RICHARD LIMBRICK . On the 4th of August, Mantz had Bull in custody when I went into the public-house. I asked him if he had searched him; he told me he had not. I searched him; in his pocket I found this duplicate of a boot, pawned for a shilling at Mr. Lamb's, Stanhope-street, Clare-market. On the 8th of June, he told me it was a duplicate of a waistcoat; I and Mantz and Mumford was there at the time. Mumford said, he had given him a pair of shoes to pledge on the 7th of June. I and Mantz went in pursuit of Mackdonald; we were sitting in a public-house waiting for him. When he came in I laid hold of him; he struck me a violent blow in my mouth. He escaped for that time, and ran from the house; we pursued him. He was stopped in Exeter-change; we brought him to the Brown-bear in Bow-street. Mantz searched him, and in his pocket he found the model, the centre-bit, and gimlet. The stock of the centre-bit was found at his lodgings; and Mantz found there also the two new boots.

Mr. Munro identified the two new boots.

Q. What is he - A. He says, he is a carpenter.

JOHN SMITH . I am shopman to Mr. Brown in Fetter-lane. I produce a pair of shoes pawned at our house by a woman, and the duplicate was afterwards renewed by the witness, Mumford, in company with Bull.

JOHN COLLIS . I am a coach-smith. I met Bull, the prisoner, in Drury-lane, towards the latter end of May. He told me he had got an odd boot that would fit me. I have but one leg. I asked him how much I was to give for it. He said, six shillings. I gave him one shilling, and part of a pint of porter towards it. The next time he met me, he asked me for the remainder of the money. I told him, I had not got it. He said, he must have the boot, he could make more money of it. The next morning, I pawned the boot for one shilling, and returned him the ticket.

Mantz. That duplicate was found on him when he was taken.

WILLIAM MATTHEWS . I am shopman to Mr. Lamb, pawnbroker. I produce a boot pawned by the last witness.

RICHARD MUMFORD . I am a porter. In June I was at a public-house with Bull; he told me that he had a ticket of a pair of shoes, pawned for four shillings. He told me, if they fitted me, and I gave four shillings more, I should have them. I went with him to the pawnbroker's. I tried the shoes on; they were too little for me. I paid the interest, and left the shoes behind.

Mantz. I produce the boots and shoes.

Prosecutor. These are my shoes; I can swear to them. This single boot is part of the property I was robbed of, and so are the boots found in Mackdonald's room.

Q. What was the value of all the things you found - A. Sixteen pounds. Bull told Mumford that he had taken a sack of boots, shoes, and leather.

Q. to Mumford. What did Bull say to you - A. Bull said, if he had known that I wanted a pair of shoes, he could help me to a pair, he had plenty. He did not say where he got them.

Q. to Prosecutor. Do you sleep in the house - A. No, I do not.

Bull's Defence. I will say no further than the truth The tickets of the shoes and boot I had on purpose for these men. The man whom I got them from, I did not know where he got them.

Macdonald's Defence. To this hour I never had the misfortune to be brought to a bar of justice; for this

reason, I never deserved it. Where the boots were found was not my lodging, I only called there to have a little washing done. I am acquainted with a number of men in the coach making trade. John Crawley , who lives at Greenwich, he had spoke to me for a a tool to bore out the back-light, in either coach or post-chaise body; he told me, whatever it cost for the forging it, he would pay me. He sent me the draft to town; this is the sketch on paper, that is the original design of it; two circles will make an oval.

BULL, GUILTY, aged 54,

MACKDONALD, GUILTY, aged 38,

Of stealing only .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120916-126

749. ALBION GUMMES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of September , in the dwelling-house, of John Morris , two twenty-pound bank notes, and two five-pound notes , the property of Joseph Beretto , jun.

JOSEPH BERETTO , jun. I am a merchant . On Monday week I arrived from Cheltenham, by the mail, and thinking that my lodgings would not be ready for my reception, I put up at Morris's hotel, in Oxford-street . The prisoner was a servant of mine, and I being very unwell, went to bed immediately after dinner. The next morning, between seven and eight, my servant awoke me, and inquired whether I had removed the portfolio? I said, no, and told him to inquire of the waiter, and the chamber-maid. The portfolio was not to be found by that inquiry. It was found afterwards, but not by me.

Q. How long had the prisoner lived with you - A. Ever since last Christmas. When I left the Indies he came to England with me.

MRS. SMITH. My husband is a hair-dresser. The prisoner came to our house on Monday week. I was going to get this man to a charity-school, to learn him to read. I went with him; and as I was going with him, he took a note out of his pocket. He asked me if it was one pound? I said, no, it was a ten pound note; he folded it up. He said he had it of his master to buy some things: we returned to our house. He came again, about half after eight o'clock in the evening; he brought a portfolio, requesting it to be taken care of until the morning. We took care of it, not having any suspicion. The next morning, when I had heard what had happened, I delivered it into Mr. Beretto's hands.

MARGRET SMITH. I received the portfolio of the prisoner: I locked it up. He desired me to take care of it. It is the same portfolio that my mother delivered into Mr. Beretto's hands.

THOMAS - . I am a waiter at the hotel. On Monday week, as I was standing at the door, I saw the prisoner come out of the house; he had a bundle under his arm, it appeared to me to be like a book.

THOMAS FOY . I received the portfolio of the prosecutor. I went to the prisoner's lodging; I found a pocket-book, containing two 10 l. notes, and two 5 l. notes. The pocket-book was concealed in the prisoner's room, among some rubbish. There was fifty pound lost; I found thirty pound, in notes, in the pocket-book, and some silver.

Prosecutor. It is my portfolio and my pocket-book. I lost fifty pound, in notes. I cannot swear to the notes.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence.

GUILTY, aged 25,

Of stealing only .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120916-127

750. MARGARET GRAHAM was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of August , four shirts, value 3 l.; two table clothes, value 5 s. the property of Stephen Moore , Earl of Mountcashell, in the kingdom of Ireland .

WILLIAM HEALY . I am a servant to the Honourable Robert Moor , second son to the Earl of Mountcashell; he lives with the Earl.

Q. Was the prisoner a servant in the house - A. No; she was brought into the house by a servant in the house; the family were out of town.

Q. Who was left in the care of the house - A. Charlotte Ebroll .

CHARLOTTE EBROLL . I am house-maid to the Earl of Mountcashell. The prisoner was recommended to me by some of the fellow-servants, to do some washing for us. The prisoner came about the latter end of June, and continued in the house until the 19th of August. We missed two pair of sheets, four tablecloths, and other things. I found a duplicate of a tablecloth in the pantry, by the side of the bed where the prisoner slept; and, on the next morning, William Healey got a constable, and searched and found the duplicate of a shirt.

HENRY HOWARD . I am a constable. I took the prisoner in custody. I searched her pockets and found nothing. I then took her to the watch-house. I went to the pawnbrokers and found the table-cloth. I returned to the watch-house again, and searched her again. I found three duplicates pinned inside of her stays. I searched her further, and found two duplicates under the inner sole of her shoe.

- HOSKINS. I am a servant to Mr. Mulcaster, pawnbroker, Chandler-street, Grosvenor-square. I produce a shirt belonging to William Healey, a sheet belonging to the Earl of Mountcashell.

JOSEPH LUPTON . I am shopman to David Cameron , pawnbroker, 318 in the Strand. On the 15th of August, the prisoner pledged a sheet; and on the 17th another sheet; and on the same day another sheet.

Charlotte Ebroll. The sheets I can swear to are the Earl's property, and this is the shirt of my fellow-servant.

Prisoner's Defence. I took them out of a basket. She went to Vauxhall. She desired me not to put the chain across the door. I did She could not come in, so we had a falling out. I had neither tea or sugar. I went to get a friend to take them out; they would not give me time. I am a relation to the old Lord; he is not in town.

GUILTY, aged 28,

Of Stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120916-128

751. WILLIAM WHITE and WILLIAM

BEST were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of July , ninety-eight pieces of nankeen, value 30 l. the property of the East India Dock Company , and two other COUNTS for like offence, only varying the manner of charging them.

PRESTON WILSON . Q. I believe you one of the second officers of the Earl Balcarras , East Indiaman - A. I am. I had the command of the ship on the 11th of July last; she was lying in the docks, Black wall. In consequence of information, I went into the hold to make a search; I discovered pieces of nankeen chests throwed about.

Q. Did you find any nankeen - A. I did not. I afterwards made another search with Captain Saunders , the two prisoners, and Bushel; this was between eleven and one. We searched in the hold, and in the hawl-up-deck. I told the prisoners I had found the papers that wrapped up the nankeens. We found the papers in the gun-room.

Q. What was the prisoners - A. White was an officer of the excise, and Best is an officer of the customs. They were sent there to take charge of the ship.

Q. You found nothing on that day - A. No.

Q. Now, how much nankeen ought to be on board - A. I cannot say. There ought to have been seventeen chests in that ship, and there was one missing.

Q. What were the contents of nankeen - A. Generally an hundred pieces. On Monday we searched again, Captain Saunders, Mr. Harwood, and Brown and Bell. I only searched on the gun-deck. I was present when two pieces were hauled out from under the half-quarter, on the starboard side; they were in a bag, and the bag appeared to be a birth-bag; it had a broad arrow mark upon it, and two letters. It was concealed behind the pinnacle, in some ballast which had been knocked down.

Q. Was that spot where the nankeens were found any body's birth - A. No; but abast Best's, the custom-house officer's birth. The prisoners were both there when it was found.

Q. Did they say any thing about it - A. No.

Q. Who was the captain of this ship - A. Mackintosh; he was killed the day we left China. Mr. John Crocket brought the ship home; he was the chief officer, and brought the ship home.

Q. How many chests of nankeen were in the ship - A. There should have been seventeen; we only found sixteen.

Mr. Gurney. Q. The two prisoners were officers of the revenue - A. Yes.

Q. The officers of excise and customs are considered as troublesome fellows on board an Indiaman, are they not - A. Sometimes.

WILLIAM HARWOOD . I am the second officer of the Earl Balcarras ; Mr. Wilson was the first officer. The Earl Balcarras unloading at Blackwall; it had nankeens on board, in the hold. On Saturday morning I went into the hold, between ten and eleven o'clock. by myself; I found the pieces of a chest; a chest had been broken and the contents gone. I communicated it to my superior officer; after that communication, Mr. Wilson, myself, Captain Saunders , and White, assisted in the search.

Q. Was Best there - A. Not to my knowledge. On our search we found some papers in the gun-room; the papers were such as usually nankeens are wrapped in. White said, that he had nailed a piece across part of the bulk-head, which had been broken.

Q.Where was that part which he described he had nailed a piece across - A. In the hawl-up-deck.

Q. How was the hawl-up-deck in respect to where the nankeens were placed - A. The hawl-up-deck was in the hold. You go against the hawl-up deck to go into the hold.

Q.Were the prisoners made acquainted with this loss - A. They must; it had been a public talk.

Q. You repeated your search again on the Monday - A. Previous to which, Best informed me, in the presence of White, that they had seventy-two pieces in their possession; pointing to a place where I understood they had found them.

Q. Where was that place - A. Between the mainmast and the pump-well, in the hold. We do not stow nankeens there; we stow them in the aft part of the ship.

Q. When they pointed to this place, could any nankeens have been seen there, if that quantity had been there - A. It must have been seen there before.

CAPTAIN SAUNDERS. I am the deputy dock-master of the East India Docks. On the 11th of July I was on board the Earl Balcarras ; on the 11th of July Best was there. I am not certain whether White was or not.

Q. Was it known to White what the subject of that search was - A. Undoubtedly it must. We searched in the hawl-up deck, and in the hold. We searched the aft part of the hawl-up-deck, in the gun-room, which is part of the hawl-up-deck.

Q. Was the hold completely searched - A. No; by no means completely searched.

Q. Do you recollect whether you searched between the main-mast and the pump-well - A. Not particularly; it was superficially searched on the Saturday. Nothing was found on that day, except the packages; there were a great deal of lumber and no people to move any thing.

Q. Did White make any observation during the time - A. There was a hole through the bulk-head into the gun-room, which had been stopped by a board, and nailed over.

Q. Could any person have access to where the nankeens had been deposited, through that hole - A. No; there was no regular way through; they might have got through that way. It was stopped at another part; there was no communication. The nankeens were in the hold; this was on the deck. They said they had nailed it up themselves.

Q. Did you attend the search on the Monday - A. I did; both the prisoners were present while the search was making that day. There was a pretty good search on that day; and, before the search began, it was known that the seventy-two pieces were in their possession. I did not hear it first from them. I asked them both if they had found the seventy-two pieces. They said they had found it near the pump-well; that they had taken the opportunity of the people being at breakfast to hand them up the hatch-way, and conveyed them to their cabins, as a seizure, on the

Monday. Clark reported it to me. I went to the spot and saw them taken out; when they were taken out, White and Best were present. It was at a place close to the bulk-head; at a place where the seventy-two had been deposited. I asked them where they found it, and where the remainder could be. They told me they had got them up the hatch-way; no one saw them take them up.

MES CLARK. I am in the employ of the East India Company; I was present when the nankeen was found. I found it, as described, in the cabin that Best lodged in; both the prisoners were there before I hauled them out. When we came on board, Best asked me what we were come to do? I said, to look for the nankeens, He said, he had seventy-two in his possession, and he hoped they would be all found.

Q. Were there any more pieces found - A. There were four pieces found afterwards.

THOMAS BLOSSOM . I was one of the coopers on board the Earl Balcarras . I was at breakfast at the table between the pump-well, and the half hatch-way.

Q. Did you see any person pass up or down the half hatch-way - A. I did not.

Q. Did you see White or Best there - A. I did not; I remember the first search, and the second. I was breakfasting on Monday morning on the same spot. I saw nobody go up or down the hatch-way.

Q. Did you see White or Best there - A. No.

WILLIAM BUSHELL . I am one of the Company's surveyors. I was present in the search on the Saturday. On the Monday following seventy-two pieces were found in the cabin of the custom-house officer.

THOMAS BROOK . I am one of the superintendants of the East India Company. I was present on the search on the Monday. A communication was made to me, that some of the pieces of nankeen were found; we made a further search, and found twenty-two pieces in the cabin; there were afterwards four pieces more found.

White's Defence. I did no more than my duty.

Best's Defence. I conceived I did no more than my duty, on seizing these seventy-two pieces. I told my surveyor of it; I had no right to tell any body but him, as a king's officer.

The prisoners called three witnesses, who gave them a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120916-129

752. SAMUEL PEARMUND , alias WEST , was indicted, for that he, on the 7th of July, 1805, was married to Mary Capon ; and that he afterwards, on the 13th of January, 1811 , did marry and take to wife, Elizabeth Tiffin , his former wife being then alive .

JOHN CAPON . Q. I believe your sister was married to the prisoner - A. Yes; her name was Mary Capon . She was married to Samuel West , at Isleworth, on the 7th of July, 1805. My sister is at Richmond now; I saw her last night, and her two children; they and her were all alive.

Q. How long did they live together - A. Five years; he has left her two years last April.

Q. How was she married - A. By bans, 13th of January, 1811.

GEORGE COLE . I am a painter.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. Yes; I was present at the marriage of the prisoner and Elizabeth Tiffin, at Edmonton; I was one of the witnesses at the marriage. I am positive sure he is the man.

Q. What was Elizabeth Tiffin - A. A servant . He was a painter ; he pretended to be a bachelor; he married her in the name of Samuel West .

Q. to Capon. Are you sure he is the same man - A. I am.

Prisoner's Defence. I am not the same man; my name is not West; my name is Pearmund.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Judgment respited, to go for a Soldier .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120916-130

753. WILLIAM WATFORD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of July , four sheep skins, value 4 s. the property of John Shore .

JOHN SHORE . I am a farmer , living at Hamworth, Middlesex. The prisoner worked for me a little while. I was called up by Mr. Marsh's keeper; he told me that he had taken a man with four sheep skins, and a sack of mine. I sent my man with the keeper to put him in the round-house. At day light I saw the prisoner and the skins; the skins and the sack were mine; he had taken them from off a beam in the fowl-shed.

GEORGE BLISS . I am Mr. Marsh's park-keeper. About ten minutes before one, on the 28th of July, I met this man in the park. I told him to stop; he would not. I told him, if he did not stop I would shoot him. He said, he hoped I would not shoot him; he had not got any thing of any harm, only three or four bits of sheep skins; he said he got them from farmer Shore; he said his name was William Lawrence . I took him to my home, and got a light. I knew him; his name is William Watford ; these are the sheep skins.

Prosecutor. The skins are mine.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to his character.

GUILTY , aged 59.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and publicly whipped .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120916-131

754. JOHN BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of September , two waistcoats, value 5 s. the property of Moses Barnard , privately in his shop .

MOSES BARNARD . I keep a clothes shop . On the first of September, the prisoner came into my shop, and asked me if I could tell him of a ship. I told him if he would wait a minute or two, I would give him an answer. In the mean time, I was speaking to a gentleman, he was sitting on the counter, the prisoner was near the waistcoats. The prisoner went out of the shop; he told me he would call again, and when the other man was gone I missed the waistcoats. In about five minutes my lad found the prisoner.

ABEL VALENTINE . I am a servant to Mr. Barnard. I ran after the prisoner. I saw him come out of a clothes shop in East Smithfield, with two waistcoats in his hand. I collared him, and said the property was mine. I left the prisoner in the care of Marks, and fetched my master. These are the waistcoats I found in his hand.

Prosecutor. They are my waistcoats, there is my name on both of them.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought the waistcoats of the man that came out of the shop. I gave four shillings and sixpence for them.

GUILTY, aged 28,

Of Stealing to the value of 4 s. only.

Judgment respited .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120916-132

755. JAMES KINCHIN was indicted for feloniously making an assault upon Elizabeth Sims , on the 14th of September , putting her in fear, and taking from her person a dollar; a three shilling bank token; a shilling; and a two pound bank note , her property.

ELIZABETH SIMS . I live at Kempton , two miles from Edgeware .

Q. On the 14th instant, in what parish were you - A. In the parish of Harrow.

Q. Is Kempton in the parish of Harrow - A. Yes; I left home at one o'clock in the day. I went across the fields.

Q. How far had you got from home before you were overtaken by any body - A. I had walked about two miles, therefore it must be about half past one.

Q. Were you overtaken by any person - A. By this person.

Q. What person do you mean - A. The prisoner; I am quite sure he is the man. When I was just going out of the field, I saw a man entering the field; as I went through the gate of the field I held the gate with my hand, seeing him so near. I did not turn round to look at him. I had not gone many steps from the gate before he caught hold of my arm; he did not speak. He dragged me down; I begged he would not hurt me. I said I had money about me; I would give it to him. He told me to hold my tongue. I screamed out. He said, blast you, I will murder you. He kneeled on my stomach, and with one hand he held my throat; I pulled the hand away from my throat. Then he put that hand into my mouth to prevent my screaming. Several times I dragged his hand from my mouth and throat. I bled at the mouth a great deal. He tore my gown to get at my pocket. He took a silk knitted purse, containing a two pound note; a dollar; a three shilling piece; and one shilling.

Q. When he had got them what did he do - A. He then dragged me round upon my face, and left me instantly. I never saw him leave me.

Q. You were a good deal overpowered and overcome with this - A. Very much; I could not speak. I walked back to the gate, but fearing he might be gone that way, I went towards Edgeware.

Q. How soon afterwards did you see the prisoner - A. Not till last Saturday. I have not the smallest doubt he is the man.

Q. What are you - A. I am the daughter of a farmer; my father lives at Kempton.

Q. It is about two miles from Kempton to Edgeware, and you had got about half way - A. I had got rather better than half way.

FRANCIS CHAPMAN. I am a constable of Stanmore. I apprehended the prisoner in a stable, at the Crown in Stanmore, last Friday evening. On the next day he was taken to Miss Sims, and as soon as she saw him, she exclaimed, you are the man.

Prisoner's Defence. I can give a true account of myself, where I was all that day.

WILLIAM GREEN . I am a publican, at Mill-hill. On the 14th of this month the prisoner came into my house, about ten o'clock, and about half past eleven I left him in my house, drinking. He was very much in liquor. I am sure he is the man.

Q. Are you sure as to the time - A. I am sure as to the time, within two minutes. I left my house afterwards, and was not at home afterwards that day. On Monday week he was at my house, the Plough, at Mill-hill.

Q. How far is it from your house, at Mill-hill, to Edgeware - A. Three miles across the fields.

WILLIAM KITCHONER . I am a shop-keeper at Mill-hill. On Monday morning, the 14th of September, about ten o'clock, this man came to my house. He inquired for Mrs. Butler, a woman he formerly lodged with; he owed her a few shillings, he was to pay her. He said he had some boots he left there when he left his lodging. Mrs. Butler is my wife's sister; she came into the shop. He said, I ran after you to pay you. She said, I am going home; they both went out. He came into the shop a little after one. He bought a handkerchief; he was tipsy then.

WILLIAM STILLMAN . I am a carpenter at Mill-hill. I saw the prisoner twice on the 14th of September. I saw him twice from a quarter before two, to half-past two. The last time I saw him he was asleep in Upper-lane; I awoke him. Two mile from Hendon church, I passed him with my wheel-barrow. The first time I saw him was before two. I ascertained the time by Mr. Justice Le Blanc's carriage passing. I asked the coachman the time, he told me.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120916-133

756. THOMAS BAYLISS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of September , a pocketbook, value 6 d. a silver medal, value 2 s. and a shilling, the property of Thomas Latimer , from his person .

THOMAS LATIMER . On the 3d of September, I was in Bartholomew-fair , between five and six o'clock. The officer tapped me on the shoulder, and asked me if I missed any thing; I put my hand into my pocket and missed my pocket-book; it contained a shilling and a silver medal.

BENJAMIN HARRISON . I am an officer. I was at the fair. I saw the prisoner there, in company with two others. I watched him, seeing him very busy feeling peoples' pockets. I saw the prisoner put his right hand into Mr. Latimer's pocket, and take out this pocket-book. I laid hold of him and took the pocket-book out of his hand, tapped Mr. Latimer's

shoulder and asked him, whether this was his book; he owned it.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw the pocket-boot falling. I was going to touch the gentleman's shoulder. The officer got hold of me, and swore that I had picked his pocket.

JOSEPH CHAMBERLAIN . I saw the prisoner put his hand into Mr. Latimer's pocket, and take out the pocket-book.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY, aged 18.

Judgment respited .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120916-134

757. JOHN ROGERS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of September , a wrapper, value 1 s. and twenty-eight yards of worsted cord, value 5 l. 10 s. the property of Walter Pickerton , Francis Hepdon , and Walter Hepdon , in the dwelling-house of Walter Pickerton .

WALTER PICKERTON . I am a warehouseman in Cateaton-street, Cheapside . My partners names are Francis Hepdon and Walter Hepdon. The prisoner was our porter .

Q. Have you a man of the name of Richard Gegg - A. Yes.

Q. Did Gegg and the prisoner come to your house on the morning of the 17th of September - A. They did. About seven o'clock in the morning, one of my men servants let them in, and I gave them the key of the warehouse, and I went into King-street. I returned in about ten minutes there, with a customer, and on my going into the warehouse, I observed Rogers skewering a wrapper which I supposed contained straw.

Q. Is straw one of the perquisites that you allow to your porters - A. It is; I let him finish what he was about; after he had skewered it up, he threw it on a pack of calico. I thought then it was straw only. He went down stairs about his work; and when he was gone, suspicion came across my mind. I looked into it. I took it from where he put it, and trod upon it; and heard the sound of paper. I opened it, and found a piece of worsted cord wrapped up in paper in the centre of the straw.

Q. What is the length of it - A. Twenty-eight yards three quarters, the value of it is 6 l. The prisoner was not there when I opened it. I put the goods where it was before, upon the pack of calico. I called him, and told him to call Gegg, the other porter. They both came up. I then asked the prisoner what there was in that straw. I then called the other porter, Gegg, to look at the straw in the prisoner's presence, from whence he pulled the piece of worsted cord. The prisoner seeing it, he then asked for mercy. He said, it was the first piece that ever he had stolen. I told him it was the first piece that ever we had found, and asked him, how many more he had taken. He said, it was the first, and asked for mercy. I told him he must be punished, and placed the other porter between him and the door, to prevent him from going out until I had served a customer; and then I sent Gegg for an officer, to whom I gave the prisoner into custody.

Q. Whose dwelling-house is it - A. It is my dwelling-house; the other partners do not reside in the house.

RICHARD GEGG . I am a porter to Mr. Pickerton. The prisoner was my fellow servant.

Q. You have heard your master's account of this, did that happen that he has stated - A. Yes; I took the cord out of the straw in the wrapper. The prisoner said, it was the first time that ever he had done it.

JOHN TANNER . I am a constable. I took charge of the prisoner, and the cord also.

Mr. Pickerton. It is our cord.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence; he called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , DEATH , aged 27.

The prisoner was recommended to mercy by the prosecutor, on account of believing it to be his first offence.

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120916-135

758. JOSEPH AURORA was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of August , a pair of stockings, value 14 s. the property of Robert Butler , privately in his shop .

ROBERT BUTLER . I am a hosier and glover , 23, in the Poultry, in the parish of Mildred, in the Poultry . I can only speak to the property.

JOHN DAY . I am foreman to Messrs. Baldy and Watson, coal-merchants, Bell-alley, Coleman-street. On the 5th of August, I was at 24, in the Poultry. I saw the prisoner and another person with him go into Mr. Butler's shop. I saw the lad handle a parcel of black stockings on the counter to shew them to the prisoner; and the other man went to the window where there were some white silk stockings: and during the time he was at the window, the lad had his back to the prisoner. The prisoner took a pair of black stockings from off the counter, and put them into his hat before the lad could turn round. He put his hat on his head. I went to the Compter to get some person to take him; I saw nobody. I waited until the prisoner came out; I then went into the shop, and asked the youth, whether they had bought any property.

Q. How many persons were in the shop when you went in - A. Only the youth. I told him what I had seen. I went and stopped the two men. The prisoner made use of terrible language, and offered to knock me down. He said, d - n your eyes, I have no property. The two men separated, and the one that I had no suspicion of, he delivered up a pair of white stockings to the shop-boy. I knew the other had black ones. I had not seen the other man take the white ones. I suppose he got them while I was gone to the Compter. They both went away into Grocer's-hall-court, and then into Grocer's-hall-yard. I knew the place, and then I thought they were secure. I bolted them in the yard. The beadle came to assist me; the other man made his escape after being let out. I traced the prisoner for ten minutes after that, and when I got into Basinghall-court, I saw a ticket porter. I knocked the prisoner's hat off. The stockings were in the hat; I gave them to Ward, the constable.

JAMES BIRD . I am shop-boy to Mr. Butler. On the 5th of August, the prisoner and another man came into my master's shop; he asked to look at some black and white stockings. I opened them several parcels, and while I was shewing them black stockings on the counter, he desired to look at some white stockings in the window. I went to the window to get them to shew him them. They looked out two pair of stockings; but when I told them the price, they said, they were too dear. They went out of the shop without buying any thing. They had scarce left the shop, when John Day came in and said what he had seen. I went after them, and stopped one of them; I cannot say which. I said, he had some of our silk stockings. He immediately pulled a pair of white stockings out of his pocket, and gave them me. I left them, and they walked on. John Day immediately went after them. I did not see the stockings taken from the prisoner. I afterwards saw the stockings in the care of the constable. I can swear to the stockings. I know I opened such a parcel of stockings to shew to them on the counter.

Q. Therefore, except for what Day told you, you should not have known that a pair was gone - A. No.

SAMUEL WARD . I am a constable. The stockings and the prisoner were delivered into my possession.

Prosecutor. They are my stockings. They are worth fourteen shillings.

Prisoner's Defence. I went into the shop to buy a pair of stockings; another man came in. I asked the price of stockings; they were too dear. I went out, and the other man followed; and said, he would sell me a pair for eight shillings. I bought them. If they had taken him, the justice would have found him the guilty man and not me. When they stopped me, I told them I bought them of that man; to lay hold of him. They would not.

GUILTY , DEATH , aged 42.

The prisoner was recommended to mercy, on account of being a foreigner, and not acquainted with the law of the land.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120916-136

759. JOHN BOWLES was indicted for that he, on the 19th of May , thirty-one counterfeit shillings, and six counterfeit sixpences, did put off to John Herbert , at a lower rate and value than they by their denomination did import; that is to say, for one pound .

JOHN HERBERT . I live at No. 2, White-horse-alley, Cow-cross; I am a silversmith. On the 14th of May last. I went to the house where the prisoner lodged, in Fleet lane.

Q. What is the prisoner - A. A coiner. I found him at home, and his wife. I asked him, if he had got any paper, which I had spoke to him about before. Paper, forged Bank notes. He said, the party would be in town soon. I asked him, when he would let me have a pound's worth of shillings; he promised to meet me on the 19th of May, at the Red-lion, the corner of Plum-tree-court, Shoe-lane On the 19th of May, I went to the Red-lion, according to appointment. When he came in, he said, he should have been there before, but he had been busy finishing some money for people that attended the market soon in the morning. He and his wife, he said, in fact. He pulled a dirty rag from his breeches pocket, and gave me thirty-one shillings and six sixpences in paper; and I gave him a two pound note. He went and got change, and gave me twenty shillings in good silver. We drank a little gin together, and we left the house together.

Q. What did you do with the silver after you received it of him - A. I gave it to Hancock, the officer. I gave the very same thirty-one shillings and the six sixpences, that he gave me for one pound, I gave to Hancock, the officer. The other twenty shillings I kept myself.

Q. Did you see the prisoner afterwards - A. Yes.

Q. Had you any other acquaintance with the prisoner than for that purpose you have been speaking of - A. No; only for notes and money.

JAMES HANCOCK . I am an officer of Hatton-garden.

Q. In consequence of information you received you employed Herbert - A. I did; and I received from Herbert the thirty-one shillings and six sixpences. I have had them ever since. He delivered them to me on the 19th of May. This is the parcel. I apprehended the prisoner after that. I think, on the 15th of July. There was an appointment made to meet him in the county at my desire. I met the prisoner at the Red-lion, Red-lion-street, Clerkenwell. I cannot exactly say the hour me and Herbert had agreed. I received information that he was gone out of the house. I followed him, and overtook him in the confines of the city. I told him, that his wife had fell down, and sprained her ancle; on purpose to get him in the county. I then searched him, and found the money I had given Herbert upon other occasions; and I found upon him a great quantity of bad money, shillings, sixpences, some three shilling pieces. I found twenty-seven counterfeit shillings, a cast pewter dollar, one metal Spanish dollar, cast. I also found upon him a stick, it had been described to me before; there was a little black grease stuffed in a hole in it. I also found a little quill that he picked it out with. He admitted the transaction of the 19th of May; he could not deny it.

CALEB EDWARD POWELL . Q. You are the assistant of the solicitor of the mint - A. I am.

Q. You are well acquainted with this sort of counterfeit coin - A. Yes.

Q. Look at that paper of thirty-one shillings and six sixpences - A. The thirty-one shillings are all counterfeit, and the six sixpences are all counterfeit. I saw them on the examination; they were much brighter then than they are now. They were new coloured, as if they had not been in circulation before; and I saw the stick on the examination. I firmly believe, that it had the composition which is used by coiners, on purpose to take off the freshness of the silver colour, to make it look as if circulated; and I saw all the unfinished money that Hancock produced on the examination.

Prisoner's Defence. My lord and gentlemen, your petitioner begs for mercy. I am seventy-one years of age, and in a low and feeble state.

GUILTY , aged 71.

Confined One Year in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120916-137

760. RICHARD BARNARD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of September , a basket, value 4 d. and half a bushel of pears, value 7 s. the property of Philip Cambridge .

PHILIP CAMBRIDGE . I am a salesman at Covent-garden market . On the 10th of September, the porter saw him steal half a bushel of pears. The porter took them from him. I sold the pears for seven shillings afterwards, and the basket is not here.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence; called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120916-138

761. JOHN PATTERSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of August , two coats, value 3 l. the property of William Gates .

WILLIAM GATES. I am a coachman to a lady at Fulham. On the 22d of August, I put my carriage up in Mr. Wells's yard, Bond street . I left the coats in the carriage, and when I came back they were gone.

THOMAS WALKDEN . I am a pot-boy. I saw the prisoner coming down the yard with two coats under his arm.

Prisoner's Defence. I was never there.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120916-139

762. JAMES MOULD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of September , two tubs, value 5 s. and a wooden clock, value 4 s. the property of Richard Eyre .

SARAH EYRE . My husband's name is Robert Eyre , not Richard.

Q. Are you sure of that - A. Yes; the clock and tub is mine.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120916-140

763. MARGARET GROGAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, a copper boiler, value 4 s. the property of George Macarthy .

The prosecutor and witnesses were called, and not appearing in court, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120916-141

764. ANN SPENCER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of August , forty-three dollars, one three shilling Bank token, and a sixpence , the property of James Dawson .

ELIZABETH DAWSON. My husband's name is James Dawson. We keep a fruiterer's shop in Covent-garden market . The prisoner was an out door servant of ours. On the 20th of August, from out of a cupboard in the shop, we found seventeen dollars at Ann Spencer 's mother.

JOHN DONALDSON . On the 25th, I went to the prisoner's mother's room, No. 12, Parker's-lane, and at the back of the grate, the brick had been broken away, or had burnt away. I found some coals had been put on there. I looked behind the fire, and found these seventeen dollars. Mrs. Dawson said, she should know one of the dollars, it was marked with a jackasses foot, or a T. This is that dollar. I think it was the mother that induced the poor young creature to do this action. I said to the mother, are not you ashamed to bring your daughter into this. She then said, she must suffer for it.

Prosecutrix. I knew that dollar.

GUILTY , aged 14,

Fined 1 s. and discharged.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120916-142

765. ELEANOR CALLAGHAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of July , two garden pots, value 2 d. a mortle, value 9 d. and geraniums, value 3 s. the property of William Duthie .

WILLIAM DUTHIE . I am a gardener in Catharine-place . I lost the geraniums and a mystle, on the 21st of July.

EDWARD KATE . I am a watchman. I stopped the prisoner after I had called the hour of two o'clock. She had the pots on her head in a basket. I took her to the watch-house, and then I went to the place where I stopped her; I saw a hole in the fence of Mr. Duthie's nursery. She was outside of the fence when I took her.

JOHN KNIGHT . I am foreman to Mr. Duthie. I know them to be my master's property.

Prisoner's Defence. I brought them from Hammersmith. They took me on suspicion; that is all.

GUILTY , aged 44.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120916-143

766. ANN WEST was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of August , two yards and a half of lace, value 10 s. a handkerchief, value 1 s. and a broach, value 4 s. a dress, value 1 l. and five yards of muslin, value 10 s. the property of Ann Richardson , spinster.

ANN RICHARDSON . Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. I do; she lived servant with me. I had a good character with her from Mrs. Barton, whom she had lived with. When the prisoner had been with me about ten or eleven days, I missed some of my property, a piece of lace. Some days afterwards, in the night, I heard a noise. I rang the bell; she came and said, she heard somebody over head, getting in at the trap-door. We had the watchman in. She had been up the ladder, and in coming down she fell; she seemed very much hurt. I sent for a surgeon; he attended her four days, and she kept her bed; and after a few days, she got up early in the morning, ran away, and left the door of the house open. In about a fortnight after, she sent me a letter; desiring her wages, and her box. I should have paid her her wages, if she had come herself. In about three weeks, I learned she lived with Mrs. Barton. I went to Mrs. Barton's, and a servant that lives with me now. The prisoner opened the door to me; she appeared to be

agitated, and Mrs. Barton hearing me, called me up stairs. I went up stairs to Mrs. Barton. I observed a cap and handkerchief of mine on the prisoner. I charged her with taking them; she replied, she wondered at my taking the liberty of coming after her. I told Mrs. Barton, in the presence of the prisoner, that I suspected her of taking my things. Mrs. Barton said, she had seen several things about the girl, that she suspected did not belong to her. Mrs. Barton went into an adjoining room, and brought out some caps and handkerchiefs that had been made out of my dress. I knew the muslin. I went into the room where Mrs. Barton went, and out of a drawer, I took out a shirt; it was one that I had given to my sister. I asked the prisoner, whether she would give me up the other things, before I sent for an officer. She denied that she knew any thing about it. An officer was sent for; he made a search in my presence. The prisoner wished to go up stairs; he followed her. I did not go up stairs.

Q. In consequence of information, you went to a house at Paddington - A. I did. I there found a dress, which I missed, cut up into caps and handkerchiefs. I am certain they were mine.

Q. Had you given any of these things to the prisoner - A. Never, nor lent them her.

Q. You are a single woman, are you not - A. Yes.

MARTHA RICHARDSON . I am sister to the last witness. I went to Mrs. Barton's.

Q. Did you find at Mrs. Barton's any property that belonged to your sister - A. I did, in the drawing-room, two habit-shirts and caps.

Q. Had you given her muslin belonging to your sister - A.Never, nor lent it to her for any purpose.

Q. Do you remember her being hurt by the tumble from the ladder - A. Yes, and the surgeon being called to attend her; and a chair-woman and I attended her myself.

Q. Had you any reason to suppose that she meaned to leave the house - A. I had suspicion that she meaned something bad.

MARY BARTON . I live at Somers-town.

Q. I believe, previous to the prisoner living with Miss Richardson, she lived with you - A. She did; and I gave her a character to Mrs. Richardson.

Q. Were the things that have been spoken off by Mrs. Richardson, found by you and produced - A. I asked her, when she came, how she came by these things. She said, they were given to her; and these things I produced to Mrs. Richardson when she came.

THOMAS MAYHEW . I am a constable. I was sent for to Mrs. Barton, on the 18th of August. When I went up stairs Mrs. Barton produced these things in the prisoner's presence. I took the prisoner in custody. She wished to go up stairs; I followed her, and when she got up stairs, she put her hand into a bureau, and drew something out. I told her, I must see what it was; it turned out to be ten duplicates, a two pound note, a one pound note, and four-three shilling pieces. I took the duplicates from her, and the money, and two keys, from her pocket. She said, one of the keys belonged to a box she had in Homer-street, Paddington. I took her to Bow-street office the next day. I went to the different pawnbrokers along with Mrs. Richardson, and then to Paddington; there I found the box locked. I opened the box with the key she had given me. I found these articles which Miss Richardson said was hers.

THOMAS NELSON . I am a shopman to Mr. Winfield, High-street, Bloomsbury. On the 14th of July, the prisoner pledged a cap; on the 18th a cap and handkerchief.

JOHN PINDER CHEESE . I am an apprentice to Mr. Folkard, London-road. I produce a remnant of lace, pledged by a woman in the name of Mary Williams ; that is my duplicate the constable produced. I do not know the person of the prisoner.

Prosecutrix. The lace is mine, and all the articles are mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I left my box at Miss Richardson's house; how these muslins came in my box I can't say. The lace and the broach, she told me she thought the other servant had taken it out of the house before I came there.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120916-144

767. ELIZABETH PALLEN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of July , a stone bottle, value 1 s. 6 d. and three gallons of rum, value 1 l. the property of John Morris .

JAMES BLY . I am an officer. On the morning of the 12th of July, I was coming along the Strand, I saw the prisoner; she had a basket in her apron; it appeared that she had something heavy. I asked her what she had got. I observed a large stone bottle in the basket, and the liquor in it was rum; I am sure of that. She said she had nothing at all. I told her I was an officer, and with violence I took the bottle from her, and I put it down on my right side; she came round my left side and gave the bottle a kick, and broke it all to pieces. I afterwards picked up the pieces of the bottle. I produce two pieces of that bottle; Northumberland-street, Strand is one of the pieces. I made inquiry, and that inquiry led me to Mr. Morris. I searched the prisoner, and took her before a magistrate. I took some duplicates from her; she said her name was O'Donnel. I looked at the duplicates, and said, it is Pullen. I think she said she lived in Portpool-lane.

Mr. Knapp. Did not the woman say, that she had received it from her husband - A. No, she said she bought it.

JAMES GILLMORE . I am an officer. I went with Mr. Morris to the watch-house; Mr. Morris recognized the prisoner as one of the wives of his servant. I asked her where she got the rum; she said she bought it at the Hole-in-the-Wall. She said, she lived in Portpool-lane. I went to her house, and found this can; it smelled strong of spiritous liquor; that made me bring it away.

MR. MORRIS. I went to the watch-house. When I saw her I knew her immediately; her husband is Richard Pullen . I had given him notice that he should leave me. He had been lame for a fortnight; he had been of no use; he was to be paid up to the Saturday.

These pieces of the bottle correspond with every mark of our bottles.

Mr. Knapp. This woman had no access to your house - A. No; the husband had.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120916-145

768. JOHN BRAMES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of September , a copper, value 1 l. 15 s. the property of Leah Lock , affixed to her dweling-house .

JAMES LLOYD . I am a broker, No. 20, Old-street-road.

Q. Do you know Mrs. Leah Lock - A. Yes; her house is in Hackney-road . I had the house to let; it was empty. I had an information. I went to the house in the morning; I found the copper had been taken out of the brick-work.

Q. What day was this - A. On the first of September; I saw it the day before, safe in its place, and when I found the copper out of its place, I applied to an officer.

RICHARD WILSON . I was in the house watching. The prisoner came in the house. He drew the copper from under the dresser, and threw it against my knee. I collared him in the room. He said, Oh! my God, what have I done; I am a ruined man for ever. Going along Kingsland-road, the prisoner said, he knew what his punishment would be; it would be a long while before he should go that road again. The prisoner lived near that place; he said he was a locksmith and bell-hanger. I found a great may pick-lock keys in the house.

Q. to Lloyd. What is the worth of this copper - A. Thirty shillings.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in the Nag's Head public-house the same evening. A bricklayer there said, he worked at a gentleman's house over the way; he said the gentleman wanted some smith's work done; he asked me to go over the way with him to the house. Going along, he said, he had got the copper out of the brickwork; he wanted to take it to the braziers to have it tinned; he helped me over the wall into the house, in the dark.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 44.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and whipped in jail .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120916-146

769. BENJAMIN LONG was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of July , two gowns, value 2 s. the property of Harriet Taylor .

HARRIET TAYLOR . I live at No. 4, Chandois-street, Cavendish-square . I am a servant . I lost my gowns on the 9th of July; I had seen them safe at half after three at night; I missed them at six o'clock in the morning. They are quite old gowns, worth about 2 s.; they had been washed, and were in the area. I saw my two gowns in the watch-house, and the prisoner.

ANN RASPBERRY . I live at No. 54, Queen Ann-street, East. On the 9th of July, about half after five in the morning, I saw the prisoner and another man walking about; soon after, I saw the other man get over the area gate. The prisoner walked about, and when the other man got over the area gate, he gave the gowns to the prisoner. I told my fellow-servant of it.

WILLIAM BOWLES . In consequence of Raspberry's information, I saw the prisoner come out of Queen Ann Mews. I accused him of having stolen the gowns; he ran ten or twelve yards; he then threw the gowns over Sir Charles Poole 's area; he turned back and I took him. I rang the bell at Sir Charles Poole's area; the footman came up. I asked if there had been a bundle throwed over the rails. He said, yes; he had taken it in. He brought it to me, and I took it to the watch-house; these are the gowns.

Prosecutrix. They are my gowns.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence. Called five witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and whipped in jail .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120916-147

770. ANN WALKER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of August , a pair of stockings, value 1 s. a gown, value 5 s. and three handkerchiefs, value 5 s. the property of Mary Harrington .

The prosecutrix and witnesses were called, and not appearing in court, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120916-148

771. ISABELLA THOMPSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of July , a frock, value 2 s. the property of Maria Arnold , from her person ; and another COUNT, the property of William Arnold .

ANN ARNOLD . I am the mother of Maria Arnold. My husband's name is William Arnold. I live at No 4, Barton-buildings, Shadwell .

Q. Where was your child on the 15th of July - A. Playing at the door, near ten o'clock in the morning, when I saw the child, and in about a quarter of an hour I could not see the child. I went and looked after her. I was very much alarmed and uneasy. The child was brought to me, from Shadwell office, by James Perry ; when the child was brought back, it was dressed in the way it had been.

Q. What was the frock worth that it had on - A. worth 2 s.

JAMES PERRY . Q. Did you see this woman with this child. - A. Not till I saw her in White-horse-street, Stepney; I was sent for.

HENRY TAYLOR . I am a pipe-maker. I live in Monkwell-street, Cripplegate.

Q. About what time of day was it you saw that little child - A. About one o'clock I saw her in Stepney church-yard, on a tomb-stone; the child was without its frock. The woman was asleep, with the young child in her arms, and the eldest child was crying. When the woman got up, I saw something blue in her pocket, which turned out afterwards to be the child's frock. We let her go; I gave information of her. A gentleman came up as I was talking to the children;

him and I went up to her and stopped her. She said, I had no right to take her, I was no officer. I asked the child what her name was, in the prisoner's presence, she said, Maria Arnold ; the prisoner was asleep then. I asked the prisoner what her name was; she said, Mary Ann .

MRS. ARNOLD. My child's name is Maria Arnold, never was Mary Ann .

Taylor. I saw the frock on the prisoner's arm.

Q. to Mrs. Arnold. How far is Stepney church-yard from your house - A. Better than a mile.

SARAH BELL . As the prisoner passed me I saw the frock in her pocket. I put the frock on the child; it fitted, and I saw the children taken home to Mrs. Arnold.

Q. to Mrs. Arnold. What became of the young child - A. They are brother and sister; they both belong to me.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence.

GUILTY , aged 34.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120916-149

772. JOHN ROACH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of July , two blankets, value 12 s. and a shawl, value 3 s. the property of Richard Stripp , in a lodging-room .

RICHARD STRIPP . I am a housekeeper in Henrietta-street, Bethnal-green . On a Saturday evening the prisoner took a lodging at my house; he took it by the week; he went away before the week was up. He staid till Friday morning; he went away between four and five. I heard him go out in the morning.

Q. Did any body else lodge in that room besides the prisoner - A. No; and on my going into the room, the blankets and the sheet were gone; I have never seen them since. It was four weeks after this before I saw the prisoner; I then sent for a constable and had him taken up.

Prisoner's Defence. I am quite innocent, I know nothing of it.

GUILTY, aged 35.

Judgment respited .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120916-150

773. ESTHER PEELE and SARAH GLOVER were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of August , a watch, value 7 l and twenty shillings in moneys, numbered, the property of Ralph Bailey , from his pesson .

RALPH BAILEY . I live in Haberdashers-square, Grub-street. I am a labourer . I lost my watch on the 7th of August, about eleven o'clock at night, in Broad-arrow-court , up two pair of stairs, in a house there. I went up stairs with the two prisoners; I am sure I had my money and my watch in my pocket. I gave them a three-shilling piece, and then I had twenty shillings in my pocket.

Q. How long were you in the room with them - A. Half an hour; Glover went out of the room, Peele got me on the bed, and then I felt her hand in my pocket. She took the twenty shillings out of my pocket, every shilling. I was afraid to speak a word, thinking there might be some ruffians in the house. I found my watch was gone also. In two or three hours after, I got a constable and had them taken up; they were searched, but no money or watch was found.

The prisoners said nothing in their defence.

PEELE, GUILTY , aged 26,

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction and fined 1 s.

GLOVER, NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120916-151

774. SARAH PALMER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of May , eight knives and eight forks, value, 8 s. the property of Jasper Sylvian Bray .

JASPER SYLVIAN BRAY. I live in Brooks-row, Tottenham . On the 20th of July I missed eighteen knives and forks. The prisoner had left our service about three weeks before. I can only swear to the knives and forks when they are produced.

MARIA BRIDGEMAN . Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. Yes; I have known her about two years. I never knew any harm of her. I live at Edmonton. The prisoner brought eight knives and eight forks. She had been out of place: she brought them for an acknowledgment. The prosecutor took my husband up and confined him. Me and my husband kept a booth at the fair, and these knives were publicly used in the booth.

The property produced and identified.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence. Called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120916-152

775. THOMAS NEWTON was indicted for that he, on the 24th of July , feloniously did receive two pieces of timber, value 12 l. being part and parcel of the goods and chattels stolen by Charles Hoade , he knowing them to have been stolen .

JAMES EVANS . I produce the copy of the record of the conviction of Charles Hoade ; I got it from Mr. Knapp, clerk of the assizes. I examined it; it is correct.

JOHN HOWARD . I am a servant to Mr. Brockelbank; he is a lighterman and timber merchant.

Q. In the month of July last, had Mr. Brockelbank any timber - A. A great quantity floating in the river. We missed five pieces of it. On the day before I saw it safe. I missed it between twelve and one o'clock. I saw that the ropes had been cut, and the timber taken away. I made a search, with John Reader , the same day I missed them.

Q. How soon did you find it - A. About a quarter past four, in East-lane, Greenwich.

COURT. Five pieces were gone; what were they worth - A. I cannot say exactly. We found three pieces laying close to Hoade's saw-pit. I came to London to acquaint Mr. Brockelbank, and left Mr. Evans there. The next morning, I went there before eight o'clock; they were remaining where we left them by the saw-pit, and Hoade was taken into custody.

Mr. Gurney. Were all the marks upon the timber - A. No; they had been cut off with an adze;

still there were some of the marks remaining, and the marks that had been cut off were laying down quite perfect.

Q. Did you trace any other piece to London - A. Yes, on the next day, at the premises of Mr. Newton, Charles street Hatton-garden. I found the timber there cut into planks; two pieces had been cut into planks; they were adjoining the saw-pit; some of them had the marks, and some were cut off. I found the prisoner Newton there; I asked him who the timber belonged to; Evans was with me; he asked him for the master of the premises; he said it was him he supposed we wanted, he was the master sawyer, his name was Newton, and the planks he said came there a day or two back. Evans gave him to understand that they were stolen. Newton said he had them of a man of the name of Flowers; he had been in business and he had failed.

Q. Did he tell you where Flowers lived - A. I did not hear that.

Q. Did he ever give you any assistance for the apprehending of Flowers - A No.

JOHN READER . I am a servant to Mr. Brockelbank; I saw the raft safe on the Thames at twelve o'clock; and, after I missed it, I went in search of it. I found three pieces disfigured a-long side of Hoade's saw-pit. There is a slip there that leads down from the river Thames, and it there shewed the track as if something had been drawn to Hoade's.

Q. Did the tide serve so that after they had cut the raft, they might have flooded it down there - A. Yes, they must have cut it between twelve and one o'clock on the 23d of July.

JAMES BRIAN . I am a carman, living at Greenwich.

Q. On the morning of the 24th of July, did Hoade employ you to draw any timber up from the river - A. Yes, five pieces; the clock just struck six as I drawed the last piece. I drawed them close to the saw-pit. About twelve o'clock he employed me to take twelve planks to London.

Q. I believe twelve planks are two pieces cut up - A. Yes. I delivered them in a yard in Hatton-garden. I saw Newton there; Hoade came there; and Newton was there when they was delivered, and another man besides; Newton said his name was Flowers. I never saw the man in my life before Newton called him Flowers.

Q. Did you hear Newton call him Flowers then - A. No, that was the next day. Hoade and Newton helped to take the timber in, and the other man, they all assisted.

Q. What was the other man - A. A kind of a labouring man in a short jacket, like a sea-faring man; I don't know what the man was.

JAMES EVANS . Q. What day was it you went to Hatton-garden - A. On Saturday, the 24th, in company with Mr. Brockelbank, about eleven o'clock in the day. When I went into the yard, I asked for the master of the yard; the prisoner said he was up stairs, pointing to a little loft; he was called by some person, and as he was coming down the prisoner said, perhaps it is me you want.

COURT. Had he heard you say before upon what business you came - A. No; he said, perhaps it is me you want; I am the master sawyer. I then pointed to this timber, laying on the saw-pit; it was cut into twelve planks. I asked him to whom that belonged; he said to him. I asked him who he got it of; he said he did not know the person. I then told him that the timber had been stolen, that I was a police officer, and he must consider himself in my custody. He then said he had it of a man of the name of Flowers, who was a sawyer.

Q. This is a second account - A. Yes; Flowers, a sawyer, came to him a little time back.

Q. Did he say what time - A. I don't recollect that he did; and asked him to sell some timber for him; Flowers said the timber belonged to a man in distressed circumstances, a little timber merchant in the Deptford-road. On the twelve pieces of timber I found on the premises in the saw-pit, they had the mark there a T upon it, and a P. I think it has an entire mark, which I cut off on purpose of producing on the former trial.

Q. Did you show them that mark - A. No.

Q. Did the prisoner tell you where this Flowers lived - A. No; he sent some person in search of him; he did not know at the time where he was to be found.

THOMAS BROCKELBANK . This timber is my property; it is marked T; the ship's name was Trio; and there is B K, the first and last letter of my surname.

Q. What is the worth of two pieces of those five - A. Twelve pounds; one was forty feet, and the other forty five; it is Quebec yellow, fine.

Prisoner's Defence. On the 22d of July, I was at work at Mr. Greathead's yard, Leather-lane. I went into the White Hart to have a pint of porter; and, as soon as I got into the tap-room, I saw Peter, George, and John Flowers , drinking together. Flowers asked me how I did, and asked me to drink, which I did; he said, you are in the habit of working for a great many cabinet makers and carpenters, do you know any body that wants to buy any fine timber; I said I did not. He told me that he had a friend that had a large quantity of it in the Deptford road; he could not get a customer for it, therefore he must go to the King's Bench in a short time. I asked him if any of it was fit for Venetian blinds; he said some was, and some was not. I then told him I was in the habit of working for a person that used a great deal, if he would call on him he lived in Gray's inn lane, perhaps he would buy some of it. He asked me to buy it. I asked him the price; he said he could not tell then, he should see a friend of the owner of the timber, and he would call and let me know. He called the next day and said, his friend said the timber cost twelve pound a load; he told his friend I kept a yard. His friend said, if I could make it convenent he would satisfy me for the room, and for the selling of it. He then told me, that his friend would come along with it, and set a price to the timber himself, if I would consent to it; I consented. The next day, as I was coming from Greathead's yard, I met this Flowers at the corner of Baldwin's-gardens; he told me the timber was at the bottom of Holborn-hill. I told him we should be at the yard by the time the timber got there. As soon as the carman brought the timber to my house, Flowers said, here is my master

with it. The carman, Hoads and I, unloaded the timber and got it in the yard. I then asked him how many feet there were of this timber: he said, eighty-three; I set it down on a piece of paper. He said he had made a mistake, there was eighty-four feet; then I altered the figure. The lowest, he said, was ten pound a load, and sixpence a foot superficial. He then told me he would send the remainder to make it up three load the next day: and, if I could sell it, he should be glad: he wanted money very bad, and he expected to be arrested as soon as he went back. The carman, and he, and I, and Flowers, went and drank two pots of porter, and they went away. The next day, about three o'clock, the carman, Mr. Brockelbank, and the officer, came; I was sharpening my saw before they got to the saw-pit; there were four of them. The carman asked me if Mr. Norden was in the shop. I called Norden to come down; he answered me. I asked the officer whether he wanted Newton or Norden. I told him I was the master sawyer. He said, he hoped Mr. Newton and Mr. Norden would behave like gentlemen; I said by all means. He then asked me whether I had not some timber come in yesterday; I pointed to the timber, and shewed him where it was. He said that timber is stolen; I told him I did not know it. He asked me where I got it, or whether it was mine; I told him I did not know the proprietor of the timber; I knew the man who solicited me for yard room for the timber, his name was John Flowers , he was a sawyer, and lived somewhere in the Mint, but where I did not know. He then asked who this man was that I called the proprietor of the timber; I told him a jolly faced man, with sandy whiskers. Mr. Brockelbank made answer, we have got him. They sent for a cart, and I helped to load it; I went with them to the Thames Police. I never saw the man but when he brought the timber, and before the magistrate, in my life.

The prisoner called ten witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 41.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120916-153

776. SARAH GORDON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of August , a sheet, value 10 s. three handkerchiefs, value 7 s. two napkins, value 4 s. a shift, value 4 s. a pair of trowsers, value 1 s. a napkin, value 1 s. a pair of stockings, value 1 s. three shirts, value, 30 s. the property of John Keely .

SECOND COUNT for like offence, the property of different persons.

CATHERINE KEALY . I am the wife of John Kealy . I live in Hart-street, Bethnal-green.

Q. You had the things contained in the indictment to wash for Mrs. Buxton - A. Yes. I hired the prisoner as a washerwoman to assist me. On looking over my things, I missed a shift, and a napkin, and several other things. On the 28th of July, I went to Armstrong and gave him information; he went out and brought the prisoner into his room; I was with him; he searched her and found a handkerchief on her, the property of Charles Buxton ; he gave it her on Saturday to give to me when she took home the clean linen, and the servant gave her seven shirts; these things were all entrusted me to wash; they were taken from me and found at the pawnbrokers.

JOHN STEVENSON . I am a pawnbroker; I live at No. 1, Old-street. I produce three shirts, a shift, five handkerchiefs, and three napkins; the prisoner pawned them on different days in her own name.

Prosecutrix. They were all left in my care to wash.

Prisoner's Defence. If I have done any thing, it was through necessity.

GUILTY , aged 32.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120916-154

777. BENJAMIN HOBLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of July , a silk handkerchief, value 5 s. the property of a certain person to the jurors unknown from the person.

ANTHONY WEAD . I am a constable. On the 10th of July, I stood at the end of Middle-row, Holborn . A gentleman passed me; the prisoner and his companion followed the gentleman; the prisoner picked his right-hand pocket of this handkerchief. I called out to the gentleman, you are robbed; the gentleman turned round as soon as I laid hold of the prisoner; he threw the handkerchief behind him; it fell on the ground; a boy picked it up and gave it me. I took the prisoner to Hatton-garden office. William Reed searched him there, and found three other handkerchiefs. I saw him take the handkerchief out of the gentleman's pocket.

GUILTY, aged 20.

Judgment respited .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120916-155

778. JAMES WAUGH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of September, six pounds weight of flour, value 3s. the property of Samuel Dolphin , John Burger , and Nicholes Burger .

SAMUEL DOLPHIN . I live at Hampstead; my partners names is John Burger and Nicholas Burger ; the prisoner was our carman . On the 16th of September I came to town very late, after the men had left their work; I brought home a strange horse, that had never been in the stable before; and in the manger, among some horse-cloths, I found a bag of flour concealed in the manger; I throwed it into an adjoining wash-house. I wrote upon a bit of paper: Samuel Dolphin , John Burger , and Nicholas Burger , and put it in the flour and left it for that night. The next morning, Nicholas Burger was watching at the window; he saw the prisoner come in; he went into the stable; saw a strange horse there; he went down to the bottom of our premises, and looked found to see if any body was up; he went into the wash-house, and brought that bag of flour which I have described; he took it into the stable; and, from that time to this, we never could find it. When the officer came, he acknowledged to having taken it out of the wash-house into the stable. I am confident he took it out of the wash-house; we kept a constant watch at our windows to see that nobody went out. I asked the prisoner, what he had done with the flour that he had concealed in the stable. He told me that he had taken it for fig-dust to Colonel

Ponaonby's house at Hampstead, and finding his error, he had brought it home and concealed it in the stable; and, the morning we apprehended him, he had taken it and emptied it in the big drawer in the shop. We searched for the paper I had wrote upon, and did not find it; he said he took the bit of paper and tore it in pieces on the horse dung.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120916-156

779. THOMAS AVORY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of September , a knife, value 18 d. the property of William Remish .

The prosecutor was called, and not appearing in Court, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120916-157

780. THOMAS GURNEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of September , a shawl, value 5 s. the property of William Nicoll , from the person of Abigal, his wife .

ABIGAL NICOLL . On the 10th of September I was coming from a friend's house. I had my shawl taken from me. Who took it from me, I do not know

JOHN LISLE . On the 16th of September, between one and two in the morning, I was passing Mrs. Nicholl. I saw five or six men coming upon her; I put my hands out to keep them off. This was in Kingsland-road , in Edmonton-fair time. I saw the prisoner take her shawl off. Mrs. Nicoll said: he has taken my shawl. I instantly took him. This is the shawl.

Prosecutrix. It is my shawl.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence; called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Publicly Whipped and discharged.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120916-158

781. THOMAS JONES and THOMAS JEFFERIES were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of August , a handkerchief, value 18 d. the property of Jacob Allen .

The prosecutor was called, and not appearing in Court, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120916-159

782. THOMAS GRIFFITHS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of July , one ounce of sewing silk, value 1 s. the property of Henry Ogbun .

HENRY OGBUN . I live at 14, Crown-street, Finsbury-square. I am a haberdasher ; the prisoner is my apprentice . On the 10th of July, in the morning, I thought he had put something in his pocket. I sent for the officer; he searched him, and found this silk in his pocket.

Q. Can you swear to the silk - A. No, I cannot.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120916-160

783. SARAH SIMONS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of August , a 20 l. bank-note, and a 10 l. bank-note , the property of Thomas Bullock .

THOMAS BULLOCK . I am a smith . I lost the banknotes at the sign of the Blue Post, Bread-street, Carnaby-market , on the 26th of August last, about twelve at noon. I paid the man four shillings and sixpence halfpenny. I went to pay the money if he would change a pound note. I took my book out of my pocket; there were no women in the room; there were two men there, one was a blind man.

Q. How came you to accuse this woman of taking the notes, when there was no women in the room - A. I do not say that she has robbed me of them. I have traced the 20 l. and 10 l. note to her. I asked her how she came by them, she said a strange man came in and bought fifty pounds worth of goods, and gave her the notes; he brought his own cart and took the goods away. I am sure she was never in the room; she never stole them from me.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120916-161

784. JOHN POWELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of August , a gold ring, value 4 s. the property of Simon Bandy .

The prosecutor was called, and not appearing in Court, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120916-162

785. ANN MATTHEWS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of September , a three shilling bank token, an eighteen-penny bank token, and a shilling , the property of Thomas Claridge .

THOMAS CLARIDGE . I met the prisoner in the street; we had a glass of liquor at the watering-house, and then we walked down Ropemaker-street, and Mary Pryer was with her; which took the money from me, I don't know.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120916-163

786. SARAH MARTIN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of July , seven yards of printed cotton, value 7 s. the property of John Field and John Jackson .

The prosecutor was called, and not being in Court, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120916-164

787. DENNIS MURPHY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of September , ninety-one pounds weight of lead, value 15 s. the property of James Coune .

WILLIAM COUNE . I am a pawnbroker in Clarendon-square, Somer's-town. My father was dangerously ill in the country. I received a notice that a house of his in Suffolk-street had been plundered; I sent word to my father, and Mr. Conant bound me over.

JOHN TURNER . I am an officer. I went to the house, 26, in Suffolk-street; I saw the prisoner coming down stairs with the lead on his shoulder; it was about eight o'clock in the morning.

Q. Were you present when it was affixed to the house - A. Yes; it belonged to Mr. Coune's house, and it appeared to have been taken off his house; I fitted the lead; it fitted exactly.

William Coune. This house belonged to my father; we found two nails in the gutter he had drawn.

Prisoner's Defence. I never took the lead.

Q.How came it on your shoulder - A. I had been out of work for six weeks; I went up to this house to ask for a job. The bricklayer told me to come at eight o'clock and take this lead to Earl-street. I went; and they took me. I said where I was going with the lead.

GUILTY, aged 29.

Judgment respited .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120916-165

788. SARAH LONGHURST was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of September , four shirts, value 20 s. the property of Richard English , second COURT for like offence, the property of John Patterson .

MRS. ENGLISH. My husband's name is Richard English . I live at No. 6, Ratcliffe-square, Stepney . I take in ironing.

Q. What was the prisoner - A. I know nothing of her. I lost my shirts on the 10th of September; they were in my front parlour wrapped up in a cloth, on a chair. I missed them about three o'clock in the afternoon. I desired my lodger to go to Mr. Bannister the pawnbroker; she went and found one of them. I lost four shirts.

MARY RAPP . I was a-bed and asleep when Mrs. Longhurst came into my place; my sister's little girl came up and awoke me. The shirts were left in my place when I was asleep; that is all I know.

MR. BANNISTER. I had information that four shirts were lost from Ratcliffe-square. The prisoner came and offered one to pledge; that is all I know; and the other three were found at Mrs. Rapp's house.

ANN GREG . I am a servant to Mr. Patterson. I carried the shirts to Mrs. English to iron.

GEORGE PARTRIDGE . The prisoner was brought to me by Mr. Bannister. The prisoner told me the other shirts were at Mrs. Rapp's; I went and found them there.

Q. to Mrs. Rapp. You say these shirts were brought to you by the prisoner - A. They were. She appeared to take one from, as if to pawn it.

Prisoner's Defence. This woman asked me to pawn this shirt. I have known her for years. I said, Mrs. Rapp, is it your own; she said, what do you ask for; do you think I stole it.

Prosecutrix. Mrs. Longhurst has lived with an inmate of mine formerly.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120916-166

789. CHARLES LAXTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of August , two sheets, value 6 s. two shifts, value 18 d. and a pin-cloth, value 6 d. the property of John Erhley .

SUSANNAH ERHLEY. My husband's name is John Erhley . I keep a gingerbread shop. I went into the yard to hang some things up; somebody came into the shop and took the things out.

THOMAS PLANK . I saw the prisoner come out of Mrs. Erhley's house with the property in his lap. I am sure he is the person that came out of the shop with something in his lap; he was running; there were people that could run faster than I could; he was taken. This is the property.

Prosecutrix. I may have property similar to that, I cannot swear to it.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120916-167

790. JOHN KENNEDY was indicted by the name of James Kennedy , for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of July , two coats, value 4 l. the property of James Rose .

JAMES ROSE . I am a provision-merchant . I live in Tooley-street. About the latter end of July I lost the coats from the livery-stable, at Newington . I reside at Norwood. I carry on my business in Tooley-street. I am in the habit of stopping at Newington, and putting up my horse and chaise.

JOHN BARNLEY . I am an officer. On the 25th of July, I was going down Saffron-hill. I saw the prisoner and another man with a large bundle. They were in Field-lane; I was in Saffron-hill. I saw them go into a house, where they bought things of this kind; I followed them. It was about half-past two o'clock. I went into the back room; I there saw the woman of the house looking at the coats. I asked her who brought the coats; she said she did not know. I told the men, I knew they had brought them there. They said they did not. I took hold of the two men; one of them tore out of my arms. I kept the prisoner. I saw him with the coats before he went into the house.

- I am a hostler at Newington. I took these coats of Mr. Rose, but of the chaise, on Wednesday at nine o'clock. I live at Newington Butts.

MARY BLACK . Q. Where do you live - A. In Field-lane, No. 9. It was not James Kennedy that brought these things into the shop. It was another man; he ran away.

Q. They were together, were not they - A. The prisoner at the bar came into the shop, half an hour before, for a pair of shoes.

Q. What o'clock was it? Barnley, stand up. Did you see that man there, Barnley - A. Yes.

Q. How soon did you follow afterwards - A. About ten minutes.

MARY BLACK . After he came in, Barnley came in. The prisoner came into the shop, half an hour before the other man came in.

Q. Were you examined before the justice - A. Yes.

Q. What is the woman's name that keeps the house A. Sarah Brookfield .

Q. Did you never swear that this man brought the bundle in - A. Never.

Q. Upon your oath, did you never swear that this man brought the bundle; now mind what you say, and be cautions, it will be taken down - A. No.

Q. Now, you mean to swear that he never did bring it in - A. Yes.

Q. to Mr. Rose. Look at the coats, and say if they are yours - A.They are both mine.

Q. to Mary Black. Do you mean to tell me, that the man who brought these things was in the shop half an hour before the prisoner - A. No; the prisoner was in the house half an hour before the other man came in with the coat.

Q. What was your mistress about - A. She was in the other house, washing.

Q. Did not she look at, and bargain about these things - A. No.

Q. What does your mistress deal in - A. Clothes.

Q. She deals in clothes - A. Yes.

Q. Do you mean to say you ever swore before the magistrate, that this man had not the bundle - A. No.

Q.You swear this man had been in the shop half an hour before the other man came in - A. Yes, I do.

COURT. I will tell you what you swore; the prisoner, John Kennedy , and another man, came in with two coats, when the two coats were produced, and which her mistress was at when, Bernley the constable came in and se one of them escaped and the prisoner was secured.

COURT. Let that woman be committed. Mary Black was immediately taken into the custody of Mr. Newman.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120916-168

791. THOMAS COLLARD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of September , from the person of John Green , an eighteen-penny stamp, and a bill of exchange for twenty-one pound, ten shillings and four pence , his property.

JOHN GREEN . I am a dealer in cottons . I live in Field-lane. I lost a stamp paper and a bill of exchange from my pocket. I believe it was on the 6th of September.

Q. What day of the week was it - A. I rather think it was the seventh; it was on the Monday. In September I was in Bartholomew-fair ; that was the last day of the fair, about eight in the evening. When I went into the fair I had a bill of exchange of twenty-one pound, ten shillings and four pence, and an eighteen-penny stamp paper, in my pocket-book.

Q. Are you quite sure that you had it when you set off from your own home - A. I am.

Q. How long had you been in the fair, when any thing happened to you which induced you to suspect your pocket had been picked - A. About an hour. When I got out of the mob, I felt in my pocket and found my pocket-book was gone. There was a great mob by Bartholomew coffee-house, just by the Hospital. I was very much crowded there, and when I got to Long-lane, the end next to Smithfield, I felt in my pocket and missed my pocket-book.

Q. Now, being in the crowd, were you able to distinguish the person of the prisoner. - A No; I do not recollect seeing him.

Q.Did you ever see your pocket-book again - A. No; I saw the bill of exchange and stamp paper since, in the hands of the constable; his name is Hutchins. I knew the bill of exchange when I saw it again.

- HUTCHINS. I am a constable of St Luke's, Middlesex. I took the prisoner to custody for stealing a watch on the 12th of September. I found in the room that he lodged this bill of exchange, and the eighteen-penny stamp paper. I took him out of bed; in that room there were two young women, one was in bed. I knew it was his lodging; the landlady said it was. I rent the bottom part of that house. I knew that was his room; I have seen him there all hours in the day, and night likewise. I found the bill of exchange and the stamp paper under a tumbler-glass on the mantle-piece. One of the young women constantly lived with him there, and has done for three weeks.

Q. Did the other young woman, who was in the room, lodge in the house - A. No.

Q. Did you say any thing, to him about these papers - A. I asked him whether they belonged to him, he said, they did. I asked him what he called them; he said, waste paper. I then took him in custody. I was not in the fair at the time he was there. I afterwards shewed them to Mr. Green; he claimed them.

JAMES MILLER. I am an officer of St. Luke's. I was present when the prisoner was apprehended. I was with Hutchins. We took him in bed. I was present when Hutchins found the papers in the same room, under the glass on the mantle-piece.

Q. Did you know his person before - A. I cannot say I did.

ROBERT GOULD . I am a watchman. I was with Hutchins when the prisoner was taken. I have heard what they said, it is correct. I have nothing further to add.

Prisoner. As for me keeping the room; it is false. I only slept with that young woman two or three times. The papers are not mine.

SARAH ANN FREEMAN . I am a shoe-binder.

Q. Were you present at the time the officers came to take up that young man - A. I was.

Q. You are not the young woman that he was in bed with - A. I am sister-in-law to the prisoner. My mother had two husbands. I am by the first; my name never was Collard.

Q.You were present at the time the officers came - A. I was. They came about half past seven in the morning. I was going to my work. The officers came in and took my brother out of bed.

COURT. Recollect, this young man is your half brother - A. Yes.

Q. Be sure you speak nothing but the truth - A. I will not.

Q. Who was in the room when your brother was taken - A. A young woman.

Q. Whom did the room belong to - A. The young

woman to whom I gave the night before some duplicates to take care of.

Q. What is that young woman's name - A. She goes by the name of Mary.

Q. How long have you known her - A. A fortnight or three weeks, by sight. I only know her name is Mary. My brother used to go to her sometimes.

Q. What is your brother by business - A. A jeweller.

Q. Where was your brother's home mostly - A. At his father's.

Q. Had he any room to himself - A. Not to my knowledge.

Q. You must know one way or the other - A. He slept in the same room with his father; they had but one room: that was his constant home. He had no other room.

Q. Is your mother living - A. Yes, she is.

Q. And he sleeping in the same room with your father and mother - A. No, my mother does not live with him.

Q. Then your mother married this young man's father - A. Yes.

Q. Where do you live - A. I live in the next court to Gloucester-court in White-cross-street.

Q. Do you mean to swear that the prisoner slept in the same room with his father - A. Yes.

Q. And was your father's place of abode his place to work and sleep - A. Yes.

Q. Where do you live - A. I cannot really tell the name of the court; it is the next court to Gloucester-court in White-cross-street. I lodge with a young woman, her name is Taylor. I have lived there a fortnight or better.

Q. You were in the room when these papers were found by the officer - A. I was; they were found on the mantle piece by the fire-place. Hutchins, the officer, found them.

Q. When he found them, were there other papers by them - A. Not to my knowledge.

Q. Where was your brother when he found them - A. Getting out of bed to put on his clothes. When the officer opened the papers, he asked my brother, what they were. My brother said, he did not know what they were; they were waste paper for what he knew.

Q. Did your brother make any observation - A. None.

Q. Do you know whether your brother can read or write - A. He cannot. He has a very bad father.

Q. Whom he lives with still, aye - A. Yes.

Q. You know for certainty, that your brother cannot either read or write - A. No, he cannot. The officer that found them; he said, if you do not know what they are, I do, and I shall take them into my possession.

Q. Now, young woman, did not the officer ask him whose papers they were - A. No, he did not.

Q. Do you swear that no one of the officers asked him, to whom them papers belonged - A. They did not.

Q. Do you mean to swear that he did not say, they did not belong to him - A. He did not.

Q. This was half past seven in the morning - A. Yes.

Q. How long had you been in that room - A. I had been in the room the space of three minutes before they came up.

Q. Did you see this young man and woman in bed together; is that the sort of young women you go to visit - A. No, Sir, I did not go to visit. I left my tickets with her the over night, because I could not get into my lodgings after I come home from my work.

Q. Had you been out all night - A. No.

Q.Where had you been - A. When I first went home I could not get in. I went home at nine o'clock, they were out; and I left the tickets with her for fear I should lose them.

Q. Does not the young woman go by the name of Collard - A. No.

Q. Have not you heard her called by the name of Collard - A. No.

Q. Will you swear that - A. Yes.

Q. Did you expect to find your brother there - A. No.

Q. You were quite surprised - A. I was not surprised. I knew he did go there.

Q. Who paid the rent of that room - A. I don't know.

Q. Do not you know that was your brother's room, and he rented it of Mrs. Ford - A. No.

Q. Where did you say was the court you lived in - A. I told you I cannot recollect the name of the court. I live in the next court to Gloucester-court.

Q. You know the name of the court surely; what part of the town is it in - A. In White-cross-street, the next court to Gloucester-court. I live in the three pair of stairs.

Q. What is the name you go by there - A.Sarah Ann Freeman . I have been called by several names.

HUTCHINS. She lived with a man of the name of Thorn, a noted thief.

Q. to Sarah Ann Freeman . Have not you been called by the name of Thorn - A. I have been called by the name of Thorn; but he is not my husband. I am not with him.

Q. How many times has Thorn been in custody short of half a dozen - A. I cannot say.

Q. Has he been in custody twice - A. I know he has been once; I cannot say for twice.

Q. Has he been in the room which you inhabit - A. He has been in it; but he has not slept in it.

Q. I did not ask you that. How could you possibly dare to come into a court of justice. How long have you been called by the name of Thorn - A. No great while.

Q. How long - A. I suppose six or seven or eight months.

Q. Now, Collard is your half brother; besides, Freeman, Collard, and Thorn, how many other names have you gone by - A. No other.

Q. Where is Thorn now - A. I do not know.

Q. Where was he yesterday - A. I don't know. I have not seen him since this day week; then I saw him in White-cross-street. He was in my company in the street. The young woman that I live with, her name is Taylor.

Q. Does not she go by any other name - A. No; we both sleep in the same bed.

Q. Do not you know that your brother was frequent in the room where this young woman was; this room that the officers came into - A. No.

Q. You say your brother had a bad father; how do you know that he slept there - A.Because, I have seen him come out of the house; it is about a fortnight or three weeks ago since I saw him come out.

Q. Do you mean to say of your own knowledge that you know he slept in your father's room - A. I am sure he has; because, when my little sister came to me, I have said, is your brother up; and she said, no.

MARY FEATHERDAY . I live in White-cross-street, Chequer-alley.

Mr. Adolphus. Of whom did you take that room - A. Of Mrs. Pool. I took it about five weeks ago.

COURT. Q. to Hutchins. Is that the place you have been speaking of - A. Yes.

Q. to Featherday. Do you know Hutchins - A. Yes, his shop is under.

Q. You took the room of Mrs. Ford - A. I took the room, and paid the rent. He did not take the room.

Q. Now, young woman, be careful, this will be taken down. Do you mean to swear that you bargained with Mrs. Ford, and that you paid the rent out of your own pocket, and out of your own earnings. You took the room, when was it.

Mr. Adolphus. About five weeks ago, she said.

Mr. Adolphus. You say you paid for it out of your own earnings; part of your earnings came from good-natured gentlemen - A. Yes, sir; I am an unfortunate girl, I get my living by going with gentlemen.

Q. Did you, at any time, lately happen to meet with a gentleman who gave you a paper instead of silver - A. Yes, I did, in fair time.

Q. What did you do with the paper he gave you - - A. I took it.

Q. Did he give you a thing that you thought to be a bank-note that turned out to be a Fleet-note, did it not - A. Yes; and I found some papers at the door. The young man slept with me that gave me the note.

Q. Had any body else been in the room besides that young man - A. No.

Q. He left you, and you thought it to be a one pound note - A. Yes.

Q. What did you do with the papers when you found them - A. I picked up the papers. I did not think them of any consequence; I left them there in case he should call again.

Q. Where did you put them, under a beer-glass, or any thing - A. No; they were behind a vinegar-cruet.

COURT. Not behind any glass - A. No.

Mr. Adolphus. Had they been there some days before the officers came and took the young man - A. They had been there about two or three days before.

Q. How long have you known that young man - A. I only know him by sleeping with him sometimes, a night in a week.

Q. How long has that intercourse been - A. Several weeks.

COURT. Do you mean to say that you have not been acquainted with him more than several weeks - A. No, sir, I have not.

Q. He was in bed that night the officers came with you - A. Yes; but he had not been there before since the Saturday night before.

Q. Did he know any thing of these papers on the mantle-piece - A. No; he knew nothing at all about them.

Q. Were you in the room when the officer challenged him about them - A. Yes.

Q. Be very cautious what you say; three officers were present.

Mr. Adolphus. They may contradict you, therefore be very cautious. Then, what did the officers say when they went up to the young man - A. The officers asked him, what they were; he said, he did not know, they were some waste papers.

Q. Did they ask him what they were - A. No, they did not; the officer said, if he did not, he did.

Q. Did the young man say they were his - A. No, he did not.

Q. Did you claim them as yours - A. No, I did not say a word about them.

COURT. Now, young woman, how long have you been acquainted with the last young woman, Ann Freeman - A. I have not been acquainted with her no more than going along the street.

Q. What is she? is she an unfortunate girl like yourself - A. I don't know what she is.

Q. I ask you, whether she is an unfortunate girl like yourself; you do not know the meaning of an unfortunate girl do you - A. Yes I do; more is the pity.

Q. Is she of that description - A. Yes.

Q. Perhaps you visit her - A. No.

Q. Where does she live - A. I don't know.

Q. Do you know where her room is - A. No.

Q. Do you know a man of the name of Thorn; have not you seen him - A. I do not know whether I have or not.

Q. I mean the man that she lived with, do not you know that she goes by the name of Thorn - A. No, she does not go by the name of Thorn, I never heard her called Thorn.

Q. What is the name she goes by - A. Sarah Ann Freeman .

Q. Have you not seen him - A. I cannot say but I have seen him, and spoke to him; I have seen him in her company.

Q. How dare you tell me before that you had not seen him - A. They have been in my room.

Q. They have been in your room have they. Where was her brother at the time they were in your room - A. I do not know where her brother was at the time they were in my room; he was not there when she was in the room with Thorn. I did not know Thorn by that name.

Q. By what name did you know Thorn - A. I knew him by the name of George.

Q. How came you to know that George meant Thorn then, aye? How often have you known him to be in jail - A. I never knew him to be in jail; I never heard that he was taken up.

Q. What was Thorn - A. I do not know.

Q. Now, young woman, when did you take these lodgings of Mrs. Ford - A. About five weeks ago; I was to pay four shillings and sixpence a week.

Q. Upon your oath, did not the prisoner give you the money to pay for it - A. No, he did not.

Q.He did not know that you had taken it of Mrs. Ford, did he - A.No. but he has been with me there.

Q. Upon your oath, was he not there when it was bargained for - A. No.

Q.Nor never spoke to Mrs. Ford about it - A. Not to my knowledge.

Q. Upon your oath, did not he sleep in your bed between the Saturday and the Monday - A. No: yes, he was in on Wednesday evening, before the Monday he was taken up.

Q. How long did he stay there - A. Not half an hour.

Q.What day was it that you picked up these papers that the officer found - A. On Tuesday morning.

Q. Can you read - A. No, I cannot.

Q. Did you ask the prisoner to read them for you - A. No.

Q.Who read them for you - A. It was a young woman that read them, who is a stranger to me; she said, she did not know, she could not make them out. I asked her to read the Fleet-note; I did not ask her to read them, they were upon the shelf there all the time, and the only papers we kept there.

Q. Now, young woman, I ask you, attend now, the time is not too late. Do you mean to say, that none of the officers ever asked the prisoner whether these papers belonged to him - A They did not.

Q. Nor any thing to that effect - A. Nor any thing to that effect; he did not say they were his papers.

Q. As this man and you were intimate, perhaps you knew what he was - A. No, I did not know what he was.

Q. Did Sarah Ann Freeman tell you what he was - A. She told me that he was a jeweller.

Q. How long had she been there that morning - A. She had not been in the room many minutes.

Q. Was she in the habit of coming into your room - A. No, she was not.

Q. How came she to know your room, had she been there the night before - A. She had been there twice before.

Q. She was once there with Thorn - A. Yes

Q. How many other times - A. She was there once before; that was the only time, and the time she was there with Thorn.

Q. She knew the way to your room, and left these duplicates with you - A. Yes.

Q. Did the officer leave the duplicates - A. No, they took them away.

REBECCA FORD. Q. What is your Christian name - A. Rebecca.

Q. Are you the owner of the house in which this young man was taken up - A. Yes; I live in it myself. I live and sleep in the one pair; I let out the two pair.

Q. Does Hutchins occupy any part of the house - A. The bottom part as a shop.

Q. How long have you known the young man at the bar - A.Not more than a month.

Q.Had you any conversation with him at any time respecting a room in your house - A. Yes; about the two pair room. I live in the one pair, and he in the two.

Q.When was it that he had any conversation with you about the two pair room - A. The day after he came in.

Q. Did any body, at the time that he came into the room, live in that room - A. There had been people in that room before, but nobody when he came.

Q. What people were they last before this young man came there - A. A people, I am very sorry to state, of very bad character, the woman is in confinement.

Q. Do you know the girl of the name of Featherday; did she occupy the room before this man first came - A.No; they both came at one time; the woman came first; I made an agreement for four shillings and sixpence a week.

Q. With whom - A. With her, and her husband, Thomas Collard.

Q. Was her husband, Thomas Collard , present when the agreement was made - A. No, he was not; she represented him as her husband.

Q. Did you know Thomas Collard before at all - A. I have heard of him, my husband being in the trade.

Q. Did you know his person at all, until you had heard Featherday represent him as her husband - A. No.

Q. You made the bargain with her for four shillings and sixpence a week - A. Yes; and the next day they came into the place as man and wife together, between nine and ten o'clock.

Q. You saw him the next morning you say - A. Yes.

Q. Did you mention to him the terms that you had let the room to his wife for - A. No; no further than respecting the rent that I expected. I had enquired into them; I heard the family had been respectable, but had become reduced. I had two shillings; I requested to have that in my hand.

Q. Where was it that you made the agreement - A. In their own room, in the two pair room; they paid me regular, and kept good hours.

Q. If any other men came to the room to sleep there, was it unknown to you - A. It was unknown to me; I would not have permitted it; for I had no benefit in it. I understood, from Mrs. Featherday, that her husband was very particular about men visiting her. I would not have allowed it; I let it to them, and to them only.

Q. Did you hear or see him coming home pretty often - A. I dont't know that he had any meal at home, except a breakfast or a supper, to the best of my knowledge, together.

Q. Except the time he was out at work, did you ever know him to be absent a week together - A. I could almost take an oath, that he was not absent a night out of my house. I was in the habit of going into the room to borrow a pair of bellows, mine being at the mender's, therefore I was a true judge that he was there.

Q. Do you think if the room had been a resort of different men, you must have known it - A. I must I can take an oath that it was not suffered, nor would have been suffered by her husband. I am very confident that different men did not come.

Mr. Adolplus. The woman took a lodging of you - A. Yes; but the next day I went and saw her husband. I related the circumstance to him myself: the circumstance of the agreement; and I did see Collard the next day in his own room.

Q. Was that the only time that you bargained about the lodging - A. That was not the only time; I had to go up to him about the rent; chiefly he paid me.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Transported for Li fe.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120916-169

792. THOMAS COLLARD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of September , a watch, value 5 l. the property of Thomas Goodwin , from his person .

THOMAS GOODWIN . I am a stage coachman ; I drive the Ramsgate coach. On the 11th of September, about eleven at night, I was walking in Whitecross-street; I was the worse for liquor. I was going home to bed. I was going to a house where they let beds out; my wife was with me, and another woman, who came to fetch me home. As I was going along White-cross-street, a boy came up to me and said, there are two thieves; they are behind you now. I made answer: never mind thieves, they will not rob me I know. The watchman came up to me; he said, let me go home with you, I know where you are going to sleep. I said no, I did not want to be exposed if I am a little fresh; you stay behind. And while the watchman was with me I pulled out my watch; it was past eleven. The watchman walked on with my wife; I went on and turned into Chequer-alley . and the two men who had been behind me, they turned down Chequer-alley; they met me in Chequer-alley; they ran against me, and I lost my watch. Sarah Holmes had hold of my arm at the time, and instantly she said, where is your watch; you have lost your watch. I instantly put my hand to my small-clothes; I missed my watch; I ran to the top of the court, where I saw the watchman; he was at the top of the court. The watchman said, you are done, are not you; I said, yes, I am. He said, he thought so when they ran down the court.

Q. Did you see who was the man that took it - A. No; one of the men came by me and looked under my hat. I knew him again the next morning, when I saw him, instantly.

Q. Did you find your watch again - A. No; I asked the watchman which way they had gone. My watch has never been found since.

Q. What was the worth of the watch, seal, and key - A. Seven pounds; the watch 5 l.; a gold seal and gold key.

SARAH HOLMES . I was going home with Thomas Goodwin on the night that he lost the watch.

Q. Did you see any person near him before he lost his watch - A. Two men were behind us; I saw them behind us. Goodwin had been drinking a good deal. They followed us some way. A boy gave him a description. He said, they were two thieves; I would have you take care. I said, Mrs. Goodwin, where are you going to sleep to night, it is getting late, I wish to go home. We went down Checquer-alley, where this man and wife were going to sleep. His wife was a little way before him. I had hold of his arm. His wife was a little distance from him; a man came up and pushed his wife against the wall; and pushed against Goodwin, and almost knocked him down; and another man was behind me; he drove against me, and almost drove me down. He made a pull at Goodwin's small-clothes, which I supposed to be at his watch.

Q. You did not see whether he drew his watch or not, did you - A. No; I saw no face, but an arm, that passed. I said to Goodwin, good God; where is your watch; he says, in my pocket I said, be so good to feel; he felt down his small-clothes, and missed his watch immediately. I said, there are the two men, run down the court. One had a brown coat on.

Q. Do you think you should know either of these two men - A. No, I could not swear to their faces; one had a brown coat on. I saw none of their faces. On the next day, a person brought another watch to Goodwin.

ISABELLA GOODWIN. Q. What did you see of this transaction - A. It was on a Friday night; Mr. Goodwin, and I, and Sarah Holmes, were coming home; I saw two men in Grub-street, in a chandler's shop, and I saw two men behind us in White-cross-street.

Q. Did any thing happen after you got into Checquer-alley - A. Yes; after we got into Checquer-alley, one shoved me against the wall, the other pressed me against my husband and Mrs. Holmes.

Q. How long was it after a man had pressed against your husband and Mrs. Holmes, that you heard that your husband had lost his watch - A.Not a moment.

Q. Do you know either of the men - A. Yes; the next morning I saw the prisoner at the watch house, about eight o'clock; I pointed him out; I said, that is the man that made a snatch at my husband's pocket; there were more people with him at the watch-house, and I singled him out. I saw him snatch at my husband's pocket; I did not see him take any thing out; I am positive he snatched at something; I am positive he is the man; I cannot swear that he stole the watch.

Q. This woman, that was to sleep at the house with you, says, that some person brought another watch to your husband; did they - A. Yes.

Q. Was that the prisoner - A. No, the prisoner was not there.

ROBERT GOULD . I am a watchman.

Q. About the middle of White-cross-street, did you see Goodwin and his wife, and Sarah Holmes , on the night that he was said to be robbed - A. Yes, I did.

Q. Did you know the person of the prisoner - A. Yes, for three months, by seeing him.

Q. Had you seen the prisoner at all, the night that Goodwin complained he had been robbed - A. Yes, I saw him after Goodwin said he had been robbed, about a minute.

Q.Was he alone, or in company, when you saw him - A. He was first of two men, one was about two yards behind the other; he was the first coming out of Checquer-alley. I was against the alley, with the light in my lanthorn. I saw both their features, as they came out of the alley. I stood there and Goodwin came up to me; he said that he had been robbed of his watch. The men had got nearly out of my sight then. I did not pursue them; I was sure it was useless.

Q.Were you present when the prisoner was apprehended - A. Yes; I took him out of his bed in Checquer-alley.

Q. Out of this Chequer-alley where Goodwin said he had been robbed - A. Yes; and the other man used mostly to sleep in a house in the alley, close to where the prisoner lodged. I did not find the other; we searched the house, he was not there. I was present when the prisoner was under examination. Mrs. Goodwin saw him when he was under examination; she said she knew he was the man; she was positive then.

Q. You say you saw the prisoner immediately after Goodwin had been robbed - A. Yes, immediately; Mr. Goodwin had been gone down the alley about two minutes before these men ran up.

Q. Did you take the other man - A. No; I have not been after him. I have not power to take him.

Q. You have authority enough to take him whereever you see him.

- HUTCHINS. Q. Were you in White-cross-street on the night that this man had been robbed - A. No, I was not; I did not go until the next morning.

Q. Were you present when Mrs. Goodwin was in the watch-house - A. No; I was present at the examination. She said, that was the man that shoved her husband of one side; she swore to him, and Goodwin said, that was the man.

JAMES MILLER . Q. Were you present on the night that this man was robbed - A. No; I saw the prisoner at the watch-house.

Q. Did you see Goodwin there - A. No, not till they came before the magistrate. Mrs. Goodwin said she was positive that was the man; she swore to the man before the magistrate, and Goodwin said the same. Goodwin said, he was sure that was the man that robbed him of his watch.

ELIZABETH JANE LONG . I live at No. 45, in Checquer-alley.

Q. Did Mr. and Mrs. Goodwin sleep at your house on the night of this robbery - A. Yes; they lived at our house this two months past.

Mr. Adolphus Had they any other place of abode - A. Not to my knowledge.

Q. Do you remember his coming home the night he lost his watch - A. Yes.

Q.In what state was he - A. Very much in liquor; the whole three of the people were very much intoxicated, so much so, that they could but stand on their legs and that is all. They have never come to our house since.

COURT. Were you in the alley at the time the man said he was robbed - A. No; I only heard the alarm. I was in doors; I heard the man say he had lost his watch.

SARAH JONES . Q. Do you live in Checquer-alley - A. I do; I am servant to Mrs. Thornton, No. 3, Checquer-alley; she keeps the house. At the time of this robbery I was in White-cross-street. The first I saw was in White-cross-street. I saw the two women and the man opposite Playhouse-yard, and they being so tipsy, the watchman asked to see them home; he held the lanthorn up to the woman's face. The woman said, do you know me full well. Yes, he said. I returned down to my own door; I stood a few minutes; they came down. They asked me if it was Checquer-alley; I said, yes. They stood against the wall in the alley. They were so tipsy they could not support themselves scarcely. The wife said something to her husband; he seemed angry. He said he would strike her. I had not stood there many minutes, before there came a man with a light coat and a stripped waistcoat; he took something from the prosecutor.

Q. Did not you see a second man - A. No, there was only one man. He went up the court, running into White-cross-street; up came another man, with his coat buttoned and his hands in his coat pockets.

Q. Was that the same man that robbed him - A. No, another man.

Q. That was five minutes after the robbery - A. Yes; they had not called the watch till after that man passed me.

Q. Did not you call, watch - A. No; I did not know until the man said he had lost something.

Q. Did not you see him take something - A. Yes, but I did not know what it was. The woman asked him if he had his watch. He said, no, that man that passed me has taken my watch.

Mr. Adolphus. Have you been in court while this trial has been going on - A. I have been out of court; I have not heard a word.

Q. Then another man came up the court, the wife said to her husband, have you got your watch? Did this man that came last run - A. No, he did not run at all; he walked by him.

Q. Then, when this man came by with his coat buttoned, they said they lost the watch - A. Yes, they did; it was as much as five minutes, a minute over or under.

Q. Did two men, at any time, come into the court together? Did two men ever go out of the court together - A. No, they did not. The man that took the watch from him had a light coat on; the other man had a brown coat on. The man with the white coat did run.

Q. Pray, what house do you live in - A. A lodging-house.

Q. For such ladies and gentlemen as frequently come in Chequer-alley - A. The price of a room in that house is from a shilling to three shillings; I have lived there six weeks.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at all - A, I know him by passing and repassing through the alley. I have spoke to him once or twice, that is all. I never ate or drank with him, or sat in his company.

Q. Do you know the woman that was here just now, Fetherday - A. No, I know nothing of her; I never kept company with her.

Q. Have you any sort of connection, either direct or indirect, with the prisoner - A. Never, Sir.

Q. You never saw two persons in the alley together, during the time you were there - A. No; I did not.

COURT. Could any two persons, together, have gone by you, from the time the man was robbed, until the second man made his appearance - A. No two persons could have gone by without my seeing them.

Q. How long have you known him to live in the alley - A. About a month.

Q. You thought him an inhabitant in the alley, did not you - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see him come home regularly - A. Yes, some evenings, and then it would be two or three evenings, and sometimes a week. He used to go down the alley to a lewd girl; that was not a constant home for him; he used to go with other women. I am perfectly sure he did not live there.

Q. When did you know this lad was in custody - A. The next morning after the watch was taken.

Q. When were you applied to to come here - A. I have not told any body.

Q. How came they to know it - A. I went to the top of the alley; the watchman asked me if I knew them both. I said, I did not know the first that robbed the man, he was an utter stranger to me; the other young man that came out about five minutes after, I knew his name; his name was Thomas Collard .

Q. Which is Thomas Collard - A. The young man that was taken up on suspicion; the prisoner.

Q. Who was the man you spoke to - A. Mr. Gould, the watchman. I told him that I saw the man that came out first, take the watch from the man.

Q. to Gould. Did this woman tell you that she had seen the robbery - A. Yes, and told me both prisoners' names.

Q. What did she tell you was the name of the other man - A. Billy Slammer ; that is the name he goes by in general.

Q. to Sarah Jones . Did not you tell the watchman the name of the other man was Billy Slammer - A. I did not, upon my oath, if I was dying this minute.

Q. to Gould. You saw the three parties? Did the woman appear to be as intoxicated as the men - A. No, I cannot say but they were rather fresh; they had been drinking, but not so intoxicated as the man.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120916-170

793. ANN HUDSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of July , a sheet, value 6 s. the property of Sarah Morgan , and other COUNTS for like offence, laying the property to belong to different persons.

SARAH MORGAN . I am the matron of St. Giles's work-house The prisoner was a pauper, employed as a nurse. On the 24th of July, she came to me and asked me leave to go out. She looked bulky. I searched her, and found his sheet under her stays. I am sure it is the parish sheet; it is worth four or five shillings.

Prisoner's Defence. I am sorry for what I have done.

GUILTY , aged 66.

Fined 1 s. and Discharged.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120916-171

794. THOMAS JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of July , three candlesticks, value 3 s. the property of John Chivers .

JOHN CHIVERS. I am a publican in Brydges-street, Covent-garden ; the Yorkshire Grey.

Q. On the 21st of July, did you lose any candlesticks - A. I did; they were at the back of the bar. The prisoner came in the tap and called for half a pint of beer, and when the prisoner left the house, my man said, that man has got some candlesticks. I pursued him and brought him back; he took the candlesticks out of his breeches. These are the candlesticks; I am sure they are mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in distress.

GUILTY , aged 56.

Confined One Week in Newgate .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120916-172

795. MARY HUGHES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of August , a pewter pint pot, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of George Taylor .

GEORGE TAYLOR. I am a publican . I keep the Stationers' Arms, St. John-street . On the 15th of August, the prisoner came into my house and called for a pint of beer, and after she went out I received some information.

JOHN LANGWORTH . On the 15th of August I was in Mr. Taylor's tap-room. I saw the prisoner cover the pint pot over with her apron, and go out. I told the servant of it.

THOMAS HUDSON . I am a constable. I searched the prisoner's room, and found this pot; she denied having it.

Prisoner's Defence. I was very much in liquor. I took the pot home in a mistake.

GUILTY , aged 47.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120916-173

796 JOHN FREDERICK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of August , a shirt, value 3 s. the property of Lyon Marks .

JOSEPH SIMONS . I am shopman to Lyon Marks, No. 21, Butcher-row, Lower East Smithfield . On the 10th of August I was in the shop, and between eleven and twelve o'clock, I was talking to a neighbour, outside of the shop, I saw the prisoner come out of the shop, with the property under his arm. He was going across the road with the shirt; I stepped and took the shirt from him. This is the shirt; it is my master's.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to his character.

GUILTY , aged 63.

Fined 1 s. and discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120916-174

797. JOSEPH NEALE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of September , a brass cock, value 3 l. and fifty pound weight of brass, value 1 l. 10 s. the property of William Bradley , Henry Ledger , Charles Augustus Edwards , Joseph Piel , Robert Barra , and Robert Lawson .

WILLIAM BRADLEY . I am a linen-draper in Newgate-street.

Q. Does this brass cock and brass belong to you - A. It belongs to me jointly with others; it was assigned to me, Henry Ledger , Charles Augustus Edwards , Joseph Piel , Robert Barra , and Robert Lawson ; I only come to prove the property. It was stolen from Booth-street, Spitalfields . There was a brass cock, and a quantity of brass affixed to the building; it belonged to the steam-engine.

SAMUEL HERRINGHAM. I live at No. 41, Booth-street; I was in charge of this house. There was a quantity of brass, and a brass cock, affixed to the building; the most part of it belonged to the steam-engine that belonged to the premises. On the 3d of September, I saw it all safe; on the 4th I found it out, about five o'clock in the morning. It appeared they got in through the sky-light. I found all the brass taken from the engine, and a large brass cock; they were in a bag, and the bag was close to the door.

Q. Finding it there, did you keep watch to see who came for it - A. I was back wards and forwards all the day watching, and about half after six, in the evening, I got a friend to go in with me; we found the prisoner in the stoke-hole.

WILLIAM WESLEY . I live in Booth-street. I assisted in this search; I found the prisoner in the stoke-hole. I saw the brass in the bag. When I took him, he told me he came in by the sky-light, and here is a small cock I found upon his person; it belongs to the lead pipe to let the foul air out of the engine.

Prisoner's Defence. I am a young man; I hope you will shew me mercy.

GUILTY, aged 19.

Judgment respited .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120916-175

798. WILLIAM BROWN , and WILLIAM MANNING was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of July , two hundred and eighty-four pound weight of lead, value 5 l. the property of George Payne .

GEORGE PAYNE . I am a builder .

Q. Have you lost any lead from any building of yours - A. Yes; on the 15th of July I was informed that there were two men taken up for stealing of lead. It is a stable on the east side of Grays-in-lane-road . I went to the stable, and found the lead was nearly all gone from the gutter. I saw it on the 14th of July; it was safe then. I saw the lead again, it was taken to Hatton Garden.

Q. What quantity of lead was there lost - A. I should think as much as three hundred pound weight; it cost me about 15 l. I went to Hatton Garden; in looking over the lead, I found one piece was marked with blood, as if the party who had cut it had met with an accident.

RICHARD GILES . I am a gardener. I work for Mr. Smith, at Dalston. On the 15th of July, between four and five in the afternoon, I saw the prisoners; they came to a place where I was loading dung. The lead was discovered to be in the dung.

Q. What place was it in - A. In Grays-inn-lane. One of the prisoners went round the cart where I was loading the dung; he kicked the stuff over the lead.

Q. Could you perceive that there was lead lying there - A. Yes; I found the lead among the dung as I was loading the cart; he was kicking the dung over the lead, as if to hide it.

Q. Did they stay there till you had loaded the cart - A Yes, I left them there. I acquainted the head groom of it.

WILLIAM HAMDEN. I am a groom, close to the light-horse volunteers. I received information respect- the lead. In consequence of that I spoke to Mr. Woolger; he keeps the gate of the light-horse volunteers stables. I saw the prisoner very near the spot. I went to Hatton Garden, and got an officer. Woolger watched the place, to see that nobody took the lead. I returned with Read the officer; the prisoners were then down in a field, behind the Welch-school.

Q. How far is this dunghill from the prosecutor's stables - A. About a hundred and fifty yards, close to the spot.

LUKE WOOLGER. I am gate-man to the horse volunteers. On the 15th of July, Hamden informed me that there were two suspicious characters. I saw the two prisoners sitting down upon a bank, near where the lead was. I saw one of the prisoners tossing the dung, as if to cover the lead, and before Read, the officer came, the prisoners removed from the dunghill, and went behind the Welch-school.

WILLIAM READ . I am an officer. I took the two prisoners in custody; I knew Manning before. I saw the lead before I saw the prisoners, just by the light-horse livery-stables, covered over with some dung. I found the prisoners behind the stables, in a field that runs down by Bagnigge-wells; they were lying under the brow of the hill. I took them to the place where the lead lay. I asked them if they knew any thing of the lead; they said, they did not. I searched them; I took a knife from one of them. There was some blood upon the lead; the prisoner, Brown's, small-clothes were tore, and his thigh was cut.

Prosecutor. I went to the stable, and found the part that was not cut off, it matched with that which was cut off. I believe the lead to be mine.

Brown's Defence. I met Manning; we walked down Grays-inn-lane. I sat myself down on a bank; he said, did you ever make hay. I said, no. He tossed the dung about. I went away in the fields and sat down.

Manning's Defence. I was with Brown. I went and laid down in the fields. I knew nothing of the lead. I was taken upon suspicion only.

Brown called one witness, who gave him a good character

Manning called one witness, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120916-176

799. THOMAS LEACH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of August , fifteen pounds weight of copper, value 40 s. the property of Thomas Lewis , and John Giles , affixed to their dwelling-house .

JOHN RANNES . I am a coachman to Thomas Lewis and John Giles , coach-masters , Leman-street, Goodman's-fields . On the 10th of August I went down their yard; I heard a noise. I crossed the yard, and saw the prisoner ripping the copper over the accompting-house. My fellow-servant came out of the bed-room, over the accompting-house, and the prisoner made his escape into an empty house. I went and met him coming out of the empty house.

THOMAS DAVIS. Between four and five in the morning I heard a knocking. I got on the gutter, and saw the prisoner ripping the copper up. I said, halloo, governour, what are you at there. He got into the window of an empty house; my fellow servant and I went and catched him coming out of the empty house. We found this knife about him, and this hammer. This is the copper; he had rippid it up.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

GUILTY , aged 45.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120916-177

800. THOMAS NORTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of August , a chaise-harness, value 4 l. a saddle, value 5 s. and ten yards of brown Holland, value 8 s. the property of William Payne .

WILLIAM PAYNE . I am a toy-maker , 224, High Holborn. The chaise, harness, and saddle, were kept at the Green Dragon yard. I only know the property is mine.

WILLIAM WOOD . I am a saddle and harness-maker, in Tothill-street, Westminster. The prisoner came to me on Thursday, the 23th of August, in the evening, between seven and eight o'clock, he asked me if I bought harness. I told him, I did. On Saturday morning, at three o'clock, he came again, and knocked me up. He brought the harness, and saddle, and brown Holland, in a sack, altogether. He made an appointment to call for the money, between one and two. I appointed for him to come at eight o'clock. He never came. I had an officer to take him. There was a man came with him on the Thursday; that same man came on the Saturday night. I gained some information from him, and the prisoner was apprehended on the Monday. This is the harness and the other property.

Prosecutor. They are mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw the saddle.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 27.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120916-178

801. JOZE SEBAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of September , from the person of Thomas Peck , a coat, value 20 s. a waistcoat, value 6 s. and a bank note, value 10 l. his property.

THOMAS PECK . I am a captain of a ship . On the 10th or 11th of September, I cannot say which, I was on board a ship. The ship lay at Iron-gate . I went on board in the evening, about ten o'clock, and went to bed, and on the morning my coat and waistcoat were gone. I had laid my coat and waistcoat close on the bed-side. A ten-pound note was in my pocket-book. The note was found in the Bank of England, and my coat and waistcoat in the prisoner's lodgings, and a bill of exchange. My pocket-book was left on board the vessel.

JOHN GOTTY . I am an officer. On Friday evening last, between seven and eight o'clock, I apprehended the prisoner in the house of Mr. Shaw, in East Smithfield. I took him to the office, and searched him. In his pocket I found a bundle of keys. He said, they were the keys of his chests. I asked him how many chests he had. He said, he had four; they were in the house that I had taken him from. I returned to that house, and found these keys opened all the trunks. Captain Peck was with me. In one trunk I found a black silk waistcoat. Captain Peck said it was his. In another trunk I found a coat; in the third trunk I found a purse, containing nine guineas, a Spanish piece of gold, and fourteen Spanish dollars, the bill of exchange was in the trunk, where the money was, and two one-pound notes.

Q. How came you to take up this man - A.From information that I had received of the ten-pound note being traced to him.

Prosecutor. The coat, waistcoat, and bill of exchange are mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in a ship, and bought a coat, and changed a twenty-pound note, and that ten-pound note was given me in exchange, and as to the bill of exchange I found in a pocket-book on Tower-hill.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120916-179

802. MARY RYDER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of August , two silver tablespoons, value 18 s. and a silver tea-spoon, value 2 s. the property of Edmund John Eyre .

EDMUND JOHN EYRE . I am an actor in the dramas. The prisoner was a cook in our service. She had been in our service about five weeks. We missed a shirt of mine, a black silk gown, two silver table-spoons, a silver tea-spoon. Some of the articles have been found. She confessed to taking the spoons, and directed us where they were to be found.

JOHN PRIDEAUX . I am a pawnbroker, in Rathbone-street. On the 14th of August the prisoner pawned one table-spoon, and on the 17th the prisoner pawned the other silver table-spoon, and the tea-spoon was taken in on the 20th of August.

Prisoner's Defence. I did pawn the spoons. I asked my mistress for some money. She refused me. I was obliged to pay money that day. My master told me, if I would tell him where they were

he would never do any thing to me, and the constable said the same.

GUILTY , aged 37.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120916-180

803. ROBERT OATES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of August , seven pounds weight of sugar, value 7 s. the property of Richard Anson .

RICHARD ANSON. I keep a chandler's shop , in the City-road . I was not at home.

ELIZABETH ANSON . The prisoner and another man came in the shop between two and three o'clock. The prisoner took a lump of sugar, and gave it to the other boy. I am positive he is the person.

GUILTY , aged 16.

Judgment respited, to go to Sea .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120916-181

804. GEORGE TRUEMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of June , a pair of breeches, value 3 s. a pair of breeches, value 3 s. a pair of stockings, value 1 s. a shirt, value 2 s. four shillings, and one hundred and twenty halfpence , the property of Edward Herbert .

EDWARD HERBERT. I am a labouring man . I live in George-alley, Field-lane . The prisoner lived with me about three months. On the 20th of June the prisoner went to my wife for the key. He said, he wanted something of his; instead of that he took nine shillings, a pair of breeches, a pair of stockings, and a shirt. He left the lodging for about a fortnight, and then I found him with the things on his carcase. I took him up.

MRS. HERBERT. The prisoner came to me at the Market. He asked me for the key. I gave him the key. He left his lodgings for a fortnight.

- COOK. I am an officer. I saw the clothes on his back. He went to the jail in the clothes. I cannot find them now.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought the breeches of the prosecutor; I gave him sixpence for them, and the stockings he gave me. I drank a pint of porter with the prosecutor. He rifled my pocket with force. A gentleman passing liberated me. He has been twice to Newgate, and agreed to compound felony for twelve shillings.

GUILTY , aged 48.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120916-182

805. JAMES TAPLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of September , a tablecloth, value 3 s. the property of George Harper .

SUSANNAH SMITH. I am a servant to George Harper ; he keeps an Eating-house in Grays-inn-lane . The prisoner came into the shop. He asked me, if I had got any cold meat. I told him, we had; mutton, veal, and pork. He said, he would go, and get some money, and return. He did return. He said, he would have a quarter of a pound of each. I told him, he stole something when he came before. I took the tablecloth from under his arm.

Prisoner's Defence. When I came in she pulled something off the counter. She said, I thought you had the tablecloth. She said, now you have. I took it from under your arm.

GUILTY , aged 52.

Confined One Year in House of Correction , and Whipped in Jail .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120916-183

806. JOHN WALKER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of August , three ounces of sewing silk, value 1 s. the property of Joseph Marshall .

JOSEPH MARSHALL. I am a master tailor . The prisoner was my journeyman . I had missed sewing silk, which occasioned me to write on small bits of paper my name, and tied them up to knots of sewing silk. The prisoner came into the cutting-room, and took a quantity of sewing-silk, and put it in his pocket, and went into the work-room. I got an officer. I told him to search his pockets. He did; and took the sewing-silk out of his pockets.

- ROSS. I am a constable. I produce the silk out of the prisoner's pockets.

Prosecutor. It is my silk.

Prisoner's Defence. It is the first thing that ever I was charged with in my life. I did not take it intentionally. I took it to work with.

The prisoner called seven witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 32.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120916-184

807. SARAH PATTERSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of September , a pewter pint pot, value 18 d. the property of William Giles .

WILLIAM GILES . I am a publican . I keep the Spotted Dog in Clare-market . On the 2d of this month I lost the pot. It was taken out of the taproom.

ANN CARTER . I am a servant to Mr. Giles. On the 2d of September the prisoner came into our house to have a pint of beer, and when she went out I followed her, and took the pint pot from under her arm, wrapped up in a coarse cloth. This is the pot. It is my master's.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been drinking. I was not in my senses.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120916-185

808. WILLIAM KIRBY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of August , four bushels of oats, value 30 s. the property of John Humphrey Billings , senior, John Brooks , and John Humphrey Billings , junior.

JOHN HUMPHREY BILLINGS, SENIOR. I am a wharfinger at Paddington . My partners are John Brooks , and John Humphrey Billings , my son. I lost the oats between the 15th and 16th of August. They were taken out of our corn-loft. The prisoner worked for us occasionally.

WILLIAM BUTTERWORTH. On the 16th of August, about half after twelve, I met the prisoner with a sack of oats on his back, just by the Bell, at Paddington. He said, he brought them from Chelsea-reach; he gave thirty shillings for them. I put him in the watchhouse, and sent a man to the wharf, and there was a sack of oats missing at the wharf; and when the prisoner came to the office he confessed that he took the oats from Mr. Billing's wharf.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to his character.

GUILTY , aged 32.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120916-186

809. ELIZABETH KING was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of August , a counterpane value 2 s. the property of James Carr .

JAMES CARR . I am a shoe-maker . I live in Red Lion-street, Holborn. I lost my counterpane on the 18th of August. The prisoner came up and asked for a name I did not know. I told her there was no such person there. She went back. I thought I heard her on the stairs, and I heard a room door shut to. I jumped down stairs. I saw a counterpane on her arm. I looked in the room. I saw the counterpane was gone. I took the counterpane from her. This is the counterpane. It is mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in liquor. I did not know how I came by that counterpane.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120916-187

810. DAVID HOLLY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of September , a pair of shoes, value 8 s. the property of William Parker .

WILLIAM PARKER . I am a shoe-maker , in King-street, Westminster . On the 1st of September the prisoner came into my shop. He said, he wanted a pair of shoes. There were none to fit. On the Friday he came again, and while my back was turned he took a pair of high-quartered shoes, and put them in his pocket, and as he was going out I told him he had a pair of my shoes. These are the shoes. I took them from him. They are mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I have nothing at all to say.

GUILTY, aged 30.

Judgment respited .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120916-188

811. MARY SQIRES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of August , a pewter pint pot, value 14 d. the property of William West .

WILLIAM WEST . I live at the Montague Arms , Manchester-square. I can only say it is my pot.

- . I am a pot-boy. I saw the prisoner take the pot from 16, in Montague-place . I asked her, what she was going to do with the pot. She flung it down. I went and told my master. She was taken. She had two pint pots on her then, one my master's, and one the prosecutor's. This is my master's pot.

Prisoner's Defence. I lost my way. I do not know any thing about it.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120916-189

812. THOMAS SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of July , thirty pounds weight of bees-wax, value 3 l. the property of Christian Splidt .

JOHN SUNSHINE. I am a watchman in Whitechapel. On Sunday, the 28th of July, I came up to the prisoner in Golston-street, Whitechapel. There were two other men before him. Smith crossed to me. I was immediately knocked down. I got up again, and found the prisoner behind me. He had an empty sack in his hand. I picked up the beeswax as soon as I got another to assist me. I asked the prisoner where he was going. He said, to Spitalfields-market, to buy cabbages. This was Sunday, morning, two o'clock.

WILLIAM PATRIDOR. I am a beadle of Whitechapel. I saw the bees-wax by the side of the prisoner. I asked him, whose property the bees-wax was. I said, Mr. Splidt dealt in articles of that sort. He said, it might be his master's for what he knew.

YOUNG BOLTON . I am clerk to Mr. Splidt. That bees-wax is his property. The prisoner was a carman to the prosecutor.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120916-190

813. FRANCIS JARVIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of April , four hats, value 3 l. the property of Nathaniel Ruth .

NATMANIEL RUTH. I live in Norton Falgate . I lost the hats on the 18th of April. The prisoner came to me. He is a hatter himself. He asked me to let him have some hats to sell. I did. I let him have four of the best hats in the shop. They cost me a pound each. He said, if I would send my servant with the hats, the money should be returned, or the goods. I sent a man and a boy with him. The man came back as if he had been drinking, and the boy crying, said, he had lost the four hats.

JOHN TOMS. The prisoner took the hats from me, and went into a public-house, called for a pint of beer, and went out with the hats. I did not see him for some time, and when I did I brought him back to my master.

- . I and the boy went with the prisoner with some hats, and at the Nag's Head the prisoner and the boy went out together. I never saw the prisoner afterwards.

Prisoner's Defence. I took four hats, and went from one public-house to another to dispose of them. I found myself the worse for liquor, and finding that I had not sufficient money to pay Mr. Ruth I did not return, and may God, of his infinite mercy, direct you to do what is right.

GUILTY , aged 41.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120916-191

814. CATHERINE DUNN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of August , a child's pelisse, value 4 s. the property of Richard Mount .

The prosecutor and witnesses were called, and not appearing in court, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120916-192

815. THOMAS MASON was indicted, for that he, on the 1st of February , was servant to Joseph Day and John Roberts , and employed and entrusted by them to receive money on their account; and being so employed did receive and take into his possession the sum of 8 l. 5 s. for and on account of his said masters, and that he afterwards did secrete and steal the same .

JOSEPH DAY . My partner's name is John Roberts .

Q. Did you employ the prisoner to receive money for you - A. Yes; it was part of his duty. The money that he is charged with is the money he received from Jeremiah Pilcher .

JEREMIAH PILCHER. I am a colourman. In 1799 I lived in Tooley-street. I bought some window lead of Messrs. Day and Roberts. On the 1st of February the prisoner called; I paid him eight pounds five shillings, and he gave me a receipt.

Mr. Day. The prisoner never accounted for that money. He left our service in 1805. I have not known where he was since.

Mr. Arabin. Did not you know this young man had a house in Russell-street, Bloomsbury - A. His wife lived there. I did not know where he lived. I understood he was an nsher at a school.

Q. Why did not you prefer the bill before - A. I should have thought he would have come and paid it.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel. Called five witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120916-193

816. EDMUND WHITE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of August , two planes, value 6 s. a screw-driver, value 1 s. an hammer, value 6 d. the property of John Patterson ; a plow, value 4 s. a plane, value 2 s. the property of Richard Powell ; and one plane, value 2 s. the property of Thomas Mackness .

JOHN PATTERSON. I am a carpenter . I was at work in the East-India building, and on Saturday night I left the tools at Mr. Franklin's.

JOHN RAYMOND . I stopped the prisoner near Bridewell. He had a bag. I asked him, what was in it; he said, tools; he was a carpenter. I asked him, who he worked for. He did not know his master's name, nor the foreman.

MR. FRANELIN. These tools were brought to my house by the carpenters.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to his character.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120916-194

817. JOHN GRIFFITHS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of August , a saw, value 1 s. a grindstone, value 6 d. and a brad-awl, value 3 d. the property of George Highley .

GEORGE HIGHLEY. I am a carpenter . I worked at Limehouse-hole when these things were taken.

Q. When were these things taken - A. On the 1st of August. About five o'clock in the afternoon I took the prisoner, with the tools, in Mr. Robertson's yard. We had just finished the building. I had put the tools in a room until I went home. I heard a man in the room. I catched this man, at about six feet from the back door, with the tools in his apron. They are my tools.

Prisoner's Defence. I was hired to carry these tools. I showed the prosecutor the shilling that I had for carrying the tools.

GUILTY , aged 29.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120916-195

818. ELIZABETH PARSONS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of August , five yards and a half of printed cotton, value 10 s. the property of George Dowell .

GEORGE DOWELL . On the 14th of August the prisoner came into my shop, and asked to look at some printed muslins. I observed her stooping down. I saw her cover a piece of print over in her basket. I shewed her some muslins: none of them would do. She went out of the shop. I called her back. I took the print from her. This is the print. It is mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I laid my cloth on the counter, and I must have taken it up with my cloth in a mistake.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Fined 1 s. and discharged.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120916-196

819. ELIABETH HENLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of August , a pewter pint pot, value 1 s. the property of George Whetstone ; and one other pewter pint pot, value 1 s. the property of William Stanhope .

WILLIAM STANHOPE . On the 7th of August I heard a noise at the water butt; I looked down the court, and saw the prisoner running. She looked back, to see if any body saw her, or was coming after her. I overtook her, and took these two pots from her. One of the pots is mine; it stood on the water butt, and the other is Mr. Whetstone's.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence, nor called any witnesses to her character.

GUILTY , aged 34.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120916-197

820. JOHN HOLMES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of September , two shawls, value 1 l. the property of John Massey .

JOHN MASSEY . I lost the shawls last Wednesday fortnight, in a house in Darkhouse-lane . I had nine shawls I left there in the care of the prisoner, and when I returned two of them were missing, and the prisoner was gone. I afterwards found one of the shawls at Mr. Matthews's.

JOHN MATTHEWS . On the 9th of September I took this shawl in pledge of a woman.

EDWARD FURZE. I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner. He took me to two pawnbrokers. At one the shawl had been taken out. We got the shawl at Matthews's.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of the shawl.

GUILTY , aged 32.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120916-198

821. ELIZABETH GREAVES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of July , sixteen yards of ribbon, value 8 s. the property of William Mackereth and George Mackereth .

WILLIAM MACKERETH . I am an haberdasher in Crown-street, Finsbury-square ; my partner's name is George Mackereth . On the 21st of July, the prisoner came into my shop, alone; she looked in the black ribbon drawer, and when I had taken it away she asked for it again, and took a piece out; I saw her do it. I took the ribbon out of her apron; this is the ribbon, it is worth 8 s.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence.

GUILTY , aged 22.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120916-199

822. JOHN STANCLIFF was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of August , nine books, value 5 s. a pocket-book, value 1 s. a wafer-box, value 1 d. a snuff-box, value 6 d. a comb, value 1 d. and an umbrella, value 3 s. the property of Hugh Mackenzie .

CHARLES STRACHAN . I live at No. 23, Devereaux-court, in the strand. Mr. Stancliff came to Mr. Mackenzie's chambers, in the Temple, he was not at home. I am a servant to Mr. Mackenzie, No. 2, Brick-court. The prisoner asked, if Mr. Mackenzie was at home; I told him, no, he was out of town. He asked me, whether he could write a note, I told him, yes; I showed him into Mr. Mackenzie's sitting room to do that. I left him by himself; he sat about two or three minutes. While he was writing, he asked me if I could get him a glass of water; I went and got the water, and gave it to him. He was sitting in the chamber, he drank the water, and when he was going out of door, I asked him whether he had left the letter on the table; he was going away with the note in his hand. I asked him to leave it; he gave me the letter then. When he had got down I opened the letter, if was not sealed; I found there was nothing in the letter. I ran after him, and detected him in New-court, in the Temple. I told him there was nothing in the letter, and he said there was, it was done in pencil. I told him, I should be glad if he would come back and see; and going up stairs one of the books fell from him. I knew the book; I said it belonged to my master, he said it did. He was going down stairs again; I told him I must have him searched before he went any farther. He then walked down with me into Devereaux-court, from the Temple. I got Smith to get a constable. There were found nine books, a pocket-book, and a number of other things on him.

ROBERT SMITH . I am one of the Temple porters.

Q. Where did you first see this boy and Stancliff - A. Near about the middle of Essex-street; he was following of him. The lad gave me charge of him; he said he had been robbing his master's chambers. He took all this property out of his small-clothes and hat, and gave it to me and the boy, without a constable; there are nine books, and a pocket-book, and other things.

Struchan. These books are my master's books; they were in the chamber before he came, his name is written on them.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel; called five witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120916-200

823. BENJAMIN WELLINGTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of July , two sheets, value 14 s. the property of John Mullett .

JOHN MULLETT Q. Do you keep a house - A. Yes, the King's Head, Bloomsbury . On the 28th of July, the prisoner came in and asked for a lodging. I agreed to let him have a lodging. He had sheets to his bed; he slept there that night, in a bed with another man.

Q. Do you know the other man - A. Yes; he continues to lodge with me now.

Q. Who went out first - A. The other man went out about eight o'clock; I was up. In about a quarter of an hour after, the prisoner came down. I saw him leave the house. I observed nothing particular about him. I sent up my servant to see that all was safe; she came down and said the sheets were gone. I pursued the prisoner, and took him in Bear-street; he had the sheets in his breeches. These are the sheets; they are mine. He stripped the sheets off him, while I sent for a constable.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to his character.

GUILTY, aged 26.

Judgment respited .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120916-201

824. SARAH SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of September , two blankets, value 15 s. a pair of sheets, value 15 s. and a coffee-pot, value 1 s. the property of Ann Taylor , in a lodging-room .

ANN TAYLOR . I live in White-cross-street . The prisoner came to lodge with me in the beginning of April, at 4 s. per week; she lodged there until the latter end of August.

Q. Had she any blankets, a pair of sheets, and a coffee-pot for her use in the lodging - A. Yes; she left the lodging in the beginning of September. About five weeks after she came, I went up stairs and missed the sheets. I asked her what had become of the sheets; she said she had been in a little trouble, and had been obliged to part with them; she would get them in a week or two. I overlooked that, and she continued in the lodging. About a fortnight afterwards, I went and missed a blanket. I asked her where that was; she said, if God gave her strength, I should have every thing in my place soon. I went up another time and missed my pillow. I gave her warning several times. The things are still with the pawnbroker.

CHARLES TAYLOR . I am a servant to James Steward, Chiswell-street. I produce two sheets, a blanket, and a coffee-pot; they were pawned by a woman of the name of Mary Smith , sister to the prisoner.

JOHN BEAI. I am an apprentice to Mr. Sadler, in Aldersgate-street. I produce a blanket, pawned on the 14th of May.

Prosecutrix. The things are all mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not leave the apartment. I went out one morning, Mrs. Taylor went into my room, and took what things I had in my room. I should have got the things, according to agreement, if she had given me time.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Confined One Month in Newgate .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120916-202

825. FRANCES LONGHURST was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of September , a child's cap, value 8 s. the property of Samuel Brown .

MARY BROWN. I am the wife of Samuel Brown .

Q. Did you lose a child's cap at any time - A. Yes, in October, three years ago, the prisoner lived at my house, the same time I often said to the prisoner that I had lost the cap. On last Saturday night, a child came into my shop. I said, you have got on my cap, I could swear to it. It is particularly worked; the young lady that worked it is in court. I value the cap at 18 s. she sold it for 9 s.

ANN WINDSOR . I live at No. 48, Paul-street, close by Mrs. Brown.

Q. There was a cap in your possession that was claimed by Mrs. Brown - A. Yes, I had it of Frances Longhurst , in the month of February. She said she had a cap in pledge for 5 s. I gave her 4 s. for the duplicate.

MARY ANN GILBERT. Q. Do you know the cap - A. Yes, I made it for Mrs. Brown's child; the work I can swear to.

Prisoner's Defence. I lived in the prosecutrix's house three years ago. Her servant had a child, and I had the cap of her, not knowing it was Mrs. Brown's.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave her a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120916-203

826. NICHOLAS PHILLIPS and SARAH ALLEN were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of May , an iron pot, value 4 d. a pair of sheets, value 3 s. and a flat-iron, value 6 d. the property of Rebecca Ford , in a lodging-room .

REBECCA FORD. I live at No. 4, Checquer-court, Chequer-alley . I let the lodgings to Sarah Allen , in March last twelve month. She described herself as a widow; I afterwards understood she was married to Phillips.

Q. Then you let the room only to her - A. No.

The property produced and identified.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120916-204

827. TIMOTHY FOLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of September , a gown, value 4 s. the property of Dennis Driscoll .

The prosecutor was called, and not appearing in court, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Reference Number: t18120916-205

828. TIMOTHY FOLEY was again indicted for the same offence .

The prosecutor was called, and not appearing in court, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120916-206

829. JANE POWELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of August , a sheet, value 10 s. the property of Margaret Anderson .

MARGARET ANDERSON. I am a widow woman. I keep a mangle. I live at No. 8, Edon-street, Pancras parish . On the 19th of August, I lost a sheet out of my kitchen window. I saw the prisoner in the street with a bulk under her petticoats; the wind blew, I saw it and took it from her. My daughter had taken it in to mangle; it belonged to Mr. Broderick, a pastry-cook. The prisoner lived in my house.

Q. How did she get her living - A. She did nothing at all, which gave me suspicion.

JOHN HARVEY . I produce the sheet.

Prosecutrix. This is the sheet; it is marked with B. I. A. No. 6.

Prisoner's Defence. I leave myself to the mercy of the court.

GUILTY , aged 64.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120916-207

830. THOMAS KETTLE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of August , four shells, value 5 s. two glass salts. value 5 s. four images, value 2 s. and a flower-jar, value 6 d. the property of Sarah Lawson , widow .

ELIZABETH BROWN . Q. What do you know of the loss of these articles - A. I stood at my own door, Mrs. Lawson's little girl said, stop that man, he has taken all the things from my mother's mantle-piece; the prisoner was coming as if from Mrs. Lawson's house. I live at No. 56, Great Saffron-hill ; Mrs. Lawson's yard adjoins my house. I stopped the prisoner; he heard the charge of stripping Mrs. Lawson's mantle-piece. Upon searching him I found four shells, two salts, four images; he threw them into a water but.

JOHN HUTT . I am an officer. I took the prisoner in custody; he confessed the robbery. His master came forward and offered the prosecutrix a pound note to do it away. I was obliged to indict the prisoner myself.

Prisoner's Defence. I had not the least reason to expect that I should be called upon to answer this charge.

Q. to Mrs. Brown. Is Mrs. Lawson a widow woman - A. She is.

GUILTY , aged 55.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120916-208

831. MARY QUIN was indicted for feloniously

stealing, on the 14th of September , a washing-tub, value 2 s. the property of Peter Duffy .

PETER DUFFY. I live at No. 48, Turnmill-street . On the 14th of this month, between eight and nine at night, the washing-tub was in my cellar. William Chalmers came and asked me if I had sent any person for the washing-tub. I said, no; and pursued the prisoner, and found her on Mutton-hill. I said, this is my tub; she said, it is not. I sent for a constable, and the tub was taken from her; I am sure it is mine.

WILLIAM CHALMERS . On the 14th of September, I saw the prisoner go out of the cellar with a tub. I asked Mr. Chalmers if he had sent a tub; he said not. I then said, a person has gone out with it.

Prisoner's Defence. A woman gave me the tub; she said she had just bought it. A gentleman came up to me; he said, this is my tub. I said, is it; take it.

GUILTY , aged 69.

Fined 1 s. and discharged.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120916-209

832. JOHN SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of July , 120 halfpence , the property of Richard Ford .

RICHARD PERRY. I am shopman to Mr. Ford, a grocer , in Smithfield-bars. On the 27th of July the prisoner came in between eleven and twelve; he asked for an ounce of coffee; it came to two-pence; and while I was counting it, he took a paper of halfpence from off the counter; the five shilling of halfpence were behind the candlestick, I seized him and took the halfpence from him; he had put them under his arm, under his coat.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not mean to take the halfpence away.

GUILTY, aged 13.

Judgment respited .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120916-210

833. ANN THOMAS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of September , a pewter pint pot, value 15 d. the property of Philip Price .

PHILIP PRICE . I am a publican ; I keep the Duke of York in Great Mary-le bone-street . On the 20th of September I lost the pewter pint pot, about eight in the morning.

JOSEPH PEACHEY . I was coming from North Westmoreland street I saw the prisoner leaning against a post, endeavouring to conceal something under her clothes. I asked her what she had got there; she said, nothing. I could see through her clothing that it was a pot. I laid hold of her, and took the pot from her; it had Mr Price's name upon it; this is the pot; she had another pot besides this

Prosecutor. It is my pot; it is worth fifteen pence.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence.

GUILTY , aged 59.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120916-211

834. JOHN WALLIS and THOMAS RANDALL were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of September , two brass cocks, value 4 s. a copper ball, value 6 d. and twenty-eight pounds weight of lead, value 6 s. the property of William Bowman Hornbuck .

WILLIAM BOWMAN HORNBUCK . I live at No. 1, Sharpes-place, Bethnal-green .

Q. Had you any parcel of lead stolen from your house at any time - A On Monday last, between four and five in the morning, I was in bed. I was alarmed by a knocking; I thought they were breaking into my house. I got out of bed, and saw the prisoners coming out of my shed. I knew them. I had seen them before. I dressed myself and went down to see what was gone. I perceived some leaden pipe cut off from the shed; it was affixed over all the water buts; it was taken away. The next morning, between eight and nine, I saw the lead again, and the prisoners were in custody.

JOHN ALLEN . I am a patrol. About half past five I saw the prisoners in Hare-street-fields; I saw them with a bundle under their arms; I suspected them, and stopped them; I conveyed them to Whitechapel watchhouse I asked them what they had got; they said, they found the parcel. I examined the bundle at the watchhouse; it contained brass cocks and leaden pipe.

Prosecutor. They are all my property.

Wallis's Defence. In the morning, about five o'clock, I met Randall, and going to Hare-street-fields, we saw a parcel lay: we picked it up, and before we opened it the officer took us in custody.

Randall's Defence. I met Wallis; we picked these things up.

WALLIS, GUILTY , aged 19.

RANDALL, GUILTY , aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120916-212

835. WILLIAM THREADER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of September , eight pieces of wood, value 3 s. the property of Hugh Watkins .

HUGH WATKINS. I am a carpenter at Mill-hill, Hendon.

Q. What is the prisoner - A. A labouring man .

Q. Did you lose any wood from your carpenter's yard any time - A. Yes, on the 21st of September. The yard is fenced in, and part of it with pales. I lost eight pieces of wood. I saw the prisoner take them at one o'clock in the morning. I saw the prisoner before he went into the yard; and I saw him gather them together, and I saw him take them away. And I found the pieces of wood on his premises afterwards. This is the wood; it is mine.

Prisoner's Defence I got up that morning. I got over the stile. I reached these pieces of wood out; I am very sorry for it.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Fine 1 s. and discharged.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120916-213

836. JOSEPH HYAMS was indicted, for that he, on the 27th of May , unlawfully and injuriously against the will of John Cadogan , did pot and force his hands into the coat pocket of the said John Cadogan , with intent the goods and chattels therein feloniously to steal and carry away .

JOHN CADOGAN . I live in Water-street, Albemarle-street, in the Strand. I am a surveyor and builder . On the 27th of May I was passing the end of Bride's passage , Mr. Taylor had hold of my arm, It was about a quarter before ten in the evening.

Q. What had you in your pocket at that time - A. In my left hand coat pocket I had a pair of leather gloves, a bunch of keys, and some halfpence: I believe about two-pence; and, in the inside pocket, was my pocket-book. On my passing Bride's passage. I was surrounded by four women and by four men. The prisoner was passing my left hand; he put his right hand into my coat-pocket: finding his hand in my pocket, I turned sharp round, and in turning sharp round, he was unable to get his hand out. I seized him with my right hand; and, at the time of my seizing him, his hand was in my pocket; he could not get it out. I then charged the watchman with him, whose box is at the end of Bride's passage, and he took him immediately to the watchhouse in Fleet-market.

Q. This was on the 27th of May - A. Yes.

Q. How was it that he was not prosecuted sooner - A. It was put off by the prisoner.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Confined One Year in Newgate .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120916-214

837. WILLIAM FOLKARD , JAMES FOLKARD , JOHN FOLKARD , THOMAS NUGENT , and GEORGE HUMPHREYS , were indicted for a conspiracy .

The case was stated by Mr. Gurney.

RICE PRICE. Q. You are an attorney - A. I am.

Q. What is that you have got in your hand - A. The commission of bankruptcy against John Folkard .

Q. You are the attorney under the commission - A. We had it since the commission had been acted upon. We had it in our hands after the election of assignees.

(The proceedings under the commission read.)

Q. to Mr. Price. Turn to these proceedings and tell me, whether Nugent and Humphreys prove debts under that commission - A. James Bond appears to have proved one hundred and thirty-eight pound, seven shillings and sixpence, for goods sold and delivered, and for money lent and advanced by the deponent to the bankrupt. John Folkard, on the second meeting on the 17th of February, 1812. Jacob Grick one hundred and fifty-nine pound, fourteen shillings, for goods sold by the deponent to the bankrupt. Thomas Nugent , on the same day, one hundred and twenty-five pound, ten shillings, against the bankrupt, as acceptor of a bill of exchange, as described underneath, drawn by one John Scott Byerley , the drawer of the bill.

Q. How does it appear that John Folkard is indebted to Thomas Nugent - A. In as much as John Folkard , is the acceptor of the bill, John Scott Byerley the drawer of the bill. Thomas Nugent, of Newport-market, gentleman, further saith, that John Folkard is still indebted to this deponent in the sum of one hundred and twenty-five pound, ten shillings, as described by this acceptance of a bill drawn by John Scott Byerley, endorsed J. S. Byerley, accepted by the bankrupt. George Humphreys, he proves for the sum of one hundred and fourteen pound for goods sold and delivered by the deponent to John Folkard before he became a bankrupt.

COURT. Does he describe the goods - A. No, he does not; all these debts are on the 15th of February; John Edward Kelly , linen-draper, proves the sum of ninety-seven pounds, sixteen shillings, as the drawer of a bill of exchange, the consideration of the said bill was linen-drapery goods sold and delivered.

Q. Who was the drawer of that bill - A. The drawer of that bill was the bankrupt, the acceptor was John Shehey .

Q.Before what commissioners does it appear that these several debts were proved - A. Before Mr. Burrow, Mr. Taunton, and Mr. Burrell.

Q. Who were the assignees chosen that day - A. Mr. Powis, Mr. Hemmings, and Mr. Taylor.

COURT. Who are the three that declared him a bankrupt - A. Mr. Morris, Mr. Taunton, and Mr. Burrell.

MR. POWIS. I am a watch manufacturer; I live in Rosamon-street, Clerkenwell.

Q. In the month of February last were you a creditor of John Folkard 's; did you attend at the first public meeting of the commission - A. I did not. I did the second, at the time of the choice of assignees.

Q. We have just learned that you, Mr. Hemmings, and Mr. Taylor, were chosen assignces - A. We were.

Q. Was any attempt made to your choice for assignees - A. A very strong attempt. There w