Old Bailey Proceedings, 1st July 1812.
Reference Number: 18120701
Reference Number: f18120701-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND ALSO THE GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, HELD AT Justice-Hall, in the Old Bailey, On WEDNESDAY the 1st of JULY, 1812, and following Days;

BEING THE SIXTH SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF The Right Hon. CLAUDIUS STEPHEN HUNTER , LORD-MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY JOB SIBLY, No. 4, CARTHUSIAN-STREET, ALDERSGATE-STREET.

LONDON:

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED (BY THE AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON.) By R. Butters, No. 22, Fetter-lane, Fleet-street.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GAOL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON.

Before the Right Honorable CLAUDIUS STEPHEN HUNTER , Lord Mayor of the City of London; Sir Simon Le Blanc , knt. one of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir Vicary Gibbs , knt. one of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir Watkin Lewes , knt. Harvey Christian Combe , esq. Sir James Shaw , bart. Aldermen of the said City; John Silvester , esq. Recorder of the said City: Thomas Smith , esq. Matthew Wood , esq. Samuel Goodbehere , esq. Aldermen of the said City; and Newman Knowlys , esq. Common-serjeant of the said City; His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of Gaol Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

London Jury.

William Ball ,

Thomas Wollard ,

William Holliman ,

Samuel Naggs ,

Joseph Thimbill ,

Joseph Kimpton ,

James Cross ,

Thomas Fitch ,

William Ballard ,

Thomas Kidar ,

Francis Jewen ,

William Wild .

First Middlesex Jury.

John Wade ,

William Watson ,

John Sempel ,

Thomas Gillchrist ,

Jonas Wigley ,

William Irvine ,

William Crowther ,

George Roberts ,

Richard Jackson ,

Alexander Williams ,

James Butters ,

Alexander Marshall .

Second Middlesex Jury.

Alexander Forest ,

John Headson ,

James Hewson ,

William Harvey ,

Joseph Ireland ,

Alsop Winney ,

Stephen Cox ,

Joseph Curtain ,

William Richardson ,

John Morer ,

William Ferver ,

Benjamin Hobson .

Reference Number: t18120701-1

517. PARMENTER DE TYRRELL and JOSEPH LEE were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of June , a silk handkerchief, value 10 s. the property of Mark Edward Poskett , from his person .

MARK EDWARD POSKETT. I am a surgeon . I live in Bateman's-buildings, Soho-square. On the 8th of June, about half after seven o'clock, I was returning from the city. I was walking up High Holborn . I stopped and looked into two or three shop windows; and when I was stopping at one I heard the cry of stop thief. I looked back and saw a crowd collected. I enquired the meaning of it. The officer (Martin) stepped up to me immediately, and told me I had lost something out of my pocket. I put my hand into my pocket, and found my handkerchief was gone. The handkerchief was immediately held up by the officer, and I recognised it to be my property. I had the handkerchief in my hand a short time before, but I did not feel the handkerchief taken out of my pocket.

JOSEPH MARTIN . I am one of the city constables. On the 8th of June, a little after seven, I saw the two prisoners in company with another youth, about seventeen years of age, at the corner of Hatton Garden. I first saw the prisoners and the other youth. I suspected they were there for the purpose of picking pockets. I watched them. I saw them follow a gentleman. They tried his pocket. I do not think he had any thing in his pocket. They turned round again then, and were in conversation together. I then passed them, and saw them follow another gentleman. They attempted his pocket five or six times, but they did not succeed there. They walked along together until they came to where the prosecutor and a lady were standing together at a shop-window. They all three surrounded this gentleman, and pretended to look in at the window; and the one that is not in custody went up close to the prosecutor. These two prisoners went close in, to prevent any person from seeing what he was about. The prosecutor moved away from the window, and the boys likewise. When the prosecutor first moved away, his handkerchief was out of his pocket about two inches. The boys had got on before the prosecutor: they stopped until he had passed them again. The one that is not taken drew up: the two prisoners covered again. He drew the handkerchief half out, and then the prosecutor walked on again. They then followed up as they had done the time before, and the one that is not taken drew the handkerchief clean out with his hand. The moment he drew it out he threw it behind, and the prisoner Lee caught it with his hand. I ran across the road: Lee saw me coming: he began to cry, and attempted to get away. I catched hold of him by the collar. The other two ran away immediately. I called out, stop thief. Tyrrell, after he ran a little way up the road, stepped on the pavement a little way, and walked. I dragged Lee, and ran and caught Tyrrell by the collar likewise. It was all done momentary.

Q. Had you lost sight of Tyrrell - A. No, not at all. I was in the road calling out, stop thief. The other boy got away. This is the handkerchief.

Q. to prosecutor. Is that your handkerchief - A. I believe it is.

Q. Have you any doubt about it - A. No.

The prisoners said nothing in their defence; nor called any witnesses to their characters.

TYRRELL, GUILTY , aged 16.

LEE, GUILTY , aged 14.

Judgment respited.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120701-2

518. MARY JEUDWINE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of June , two silver table-spoons, value 1 l. four tea-spoons, value 16 s. two shifts, value 8 s. two table-cloths, value 4 s. two yards of printed cotton, value 2 s. a shirt, value 1 s. a sheet, value 2 s. two shawls, value 2 s. a gown, value 5 s. a petticoat, value 3 s. a pair of stockings, value 2 s. and a handkerchief, value 6 d. the property of George Mitchell , in his dwelling-house .

SARAH MITCHELL . My husband's name is George Mitchell ; he lives in Crown-street, Finsbury-square , in the parish of St. Leonard, Shoreditch. We carry on the brokery business . I and my husband keep the house, and live there ourselves. We have the whole house. The prisoner was my servant . She came to live with me in March last. She left me the 5th or 6th of June. I gave her no warning, nor did she give me any warning. I did not know of her going.

Q. Do you know at what time she went - A. I believe she went that night. I saw her about eleven at night taking her supper in the nursery. I missed her at six o'clock the next morning. When I got up I did not find her in the house. I went up into her bed-room, and found that she was not in her bed. I was alarmed. I missed some of the property a few days before shewent: a sheet, a table-cloth, and two shifts. I missed the silver table-spoons the morning after she had left.

Q. How many - A. I missed three tea-spoons and two table-spoons. On the Saturday morning I missed them. I saw her on the Sunday following, between two and three o'clock, at Worship-street office. She had then one of my gowns on, a petticoat of mine on, and a shawl. Part of my other property was shewn me by Joshua Armstrong , on the same day. I can speak to the things when I see them.

WILLIAM GOODWIN . I am a servant to Mr. Mitchell, a broker in St. Leonard's, Shoreditch.

Q. Do you recollect the prisoner Jeudwine living servant in the house - A. Yes.

Q. Do you recollect the time of her quitting his service - A. As nigh as I can recollect, between five

and six o'clock in the morning.

Q. You were not at home at that time, were you - A. No. I was there on Saturday, the 6th of June, and saw her at my master's house.

Q. Are you sure it was Saturday - A. It was either Friday or Saturday.

Q. How late in the day had you seen her - A. About three o'clock.

Q. On the next day do you recollect seeing your master - A. Yes. He said she had eloped then.

Q. She was not there then, was she - A. No.

Q. Then it must have been the Friday that you must have seen her - A. Yes. I went in pursuit of her to find her out. My master informed me that she had robbed him. I found her on the Sunday, in New-court, Nicoll-street, in Mr. Higgs's house. When I saw her there she had got my mistress's gown on I knew the gown by the description they had given me. I asked her what she had been doing. She said she was very sorry for what she had done. Then I fetched Mr. Armstrong, the officer. He searched her in my presence, and found eleven duplicates in her pocket. He then took her to the office, and I informed my mistress that she was taken to the office.

Q. Were you present when your mistress came to the office and saw her - A. Yes. She had not changed her dress then. She had the same clothes on as when I took her.

JOSHUA ARMSTRONG . I am an officer. On Sunday, the 7th of June, I took the prisoner in custody. I searched her. I found ten duplicates, and a ticket in the shape of a duplicate. I asked her whether the articles these duplicates applied to were her's; she said, yes. I took her to the office, and had the gown taken from her.

Q. Do you mean those things that she had upon her - A.Yes.

Q. You took her to the office in the same dress you found her - A. Yes, I did.

Q. Were you present when her mistress came there - A. Yes. That was before the things were taken off her. She had something in her apron, in a kind of bundle, at the time I apprehended her. I have had them ever since. Here is the stockings. I went round to the different pawnbrokers with the prosecutrix, and found the different articles that the duplicates applied to. One of the pawnbrokers is here, the other is not.

MR. BURGESS. I am a pawnbroker, at Mr. Edinborough's, Crown-street, Finsbury-square, I produce a sheet. The ticket was written by our boy; he is not here. I have the counterpart of the ticket that Armstrong produces. It corresponds with the ticket that Armstrong produces. Armstrong brought the ticket to me.

Q. to Armstrong. Did you produce that ticket found on the prisoner to Mr. Burgess - A. Yes.

Q. to prosecutrix. Look first at those things which you saw on the person of the prisoner, when you first saw the prisoner at Worship-street - A. This is the gown that was upon her person. I saw it upon her person. It is mine. I value it at about five shillings. The dimity petticoat is mine, value about two shillings; and the shawl I value about one shilling. These are my stockings, they were in a bundle in a pocket handkerchief; and other trifling things. They are worth three shillings altogether; and this sheet I had given it to the prisoner about a week before for her to mend it. It is worth about two shillings. The other articles were brought to the office. I saw them there. There was nothing said about them. Chapman had the clothes, and produced them at the magistrate's.

CHAPMAN was called, and not appearing in court, his recognizance was ordered to be estreated.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence, nor called any witnesses to her character.

GUILTY , aged 51,

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18120701-3

519. DIANA LOVELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of April , in the dwelling-house of William Wilcox , two silver thimbles, value 2 s. four guineas, one shilling, one sixpence, a 5 l. bank-note, four 2 l. bank notes, and twenty-seven 1 l. bank-notes, his property .

WILLIAM WILCOX . I am a baker . I live at No. 36, Orchard-street , in the parish of St. John's.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar - A. Yes. She was recommended to us as a nurse . She came to nurse my wife on the 29th of March. She continued in our service four weeks.

Q. I believe you have since lost your wife and child - A. Yes.

Q. You carry on the business of a baker. Did your wife assist you in the trade - A. Yes; a good deal. Sometimes she carried the money that she had received up stairs, and put it in a drawer, and the money that I received I put in the till. The day before my wife died I had occasion to go up stairs and open the drawer. I missed some gold.

Q. By gold, do you mean guineas - A. Yes, and in course my missing the gold, led me to look after the notes. The notes were deposited in a silk bag, and on my putting my hand into the bag I found the notes were gone.

Q. How lately had you seen the money and the notes previous to your missing them - A. About five days before she was discharged; and about three days before I discharged her, she said, I think my mistress has lost her hearing. I said, I hope not. She said, if I open the drawers, or speak to her, she cannot hear me.

Q. When did your wife die - A. On the 26th of May. The prisoner was discharged on the 26th of April.

Q. You saw the money about five days before she was discharged - A. Yes.

Q. Were there any notes there with any marks by which you should know them again - A. Yes; perfectly well. There was on one of the one-pound notes, Slaughter and Co.; and on a two-pound note, Retten, August 12, at the back of the note: and on the back of one of the one-pound notes was Bersdell, that is my wife's hand-writing. I lost a new shilling

and a sixpence. There was a hole through both. They were tied together with a blue ribbon, and there were three thimbles in the drawer. I lost two of them.

Q. Did you go with the officers to the lodgings of the prisoner - A. I sent for a friend. My wife lay dead at the time. The officer went to the prisoner's lodgings, by his direction.

Mr. Alley. You are a baker, I think you said. Have you been long in business - A. Yes.

Q. It was a good deal of money your wife had - A. It was.

Q. I suppose you keep the cash you take in the shop - A. Yes; what we want for the usual business; sometimes we carried it up-stairs, in case of an immergency, that we might want it.

Q. Did you, or did you not, leave the money that you took in the shop under your own immediate observation, downstairs - A. No; I carried it up stairs, and put it in the drawer when it was more than was likely to be wanted for the usual concerns of the shop. When I missed the money, I sent for my friend, Mr. Day.

Q. You spoke to a shilling that had a blue ribbon in it - A. Yes; I think it is mine; I have not a doubt of it.

Q. Pray, had you told your friend, before you found your notes, that there were written upon them such a name, and such a name, and your wife's mark - A. When the officer brought the notes to me at the office.

Q. You had not mentioned to your friend, that there was a name to them, not till you saw them at the Police-office - A. Just so.

EDWARD GREEN . I am an officer of Queen-square office. I went to the prisoner's lodgings, in Peter-street, Wardour-street, on the 8th of May. I went with Scofield and Mr. Day. We found her at home. On going up stairs Mr. Day asked her, how she could do such a trick as she had done? She said, she knew nothing at all what he was talking about. When we got into the room, he then asked her about some gold, and some bank-notes. He told her, if she had got it, for God's sake to give it up. She said she had got none, neither notes nor gold. I went into the room that she had taken us up to. I told her I had got a search warrant. I said, do not be foolish, give up those guineas. She said, I have got none. I have got no money at all. I then began to search her: in her pocket I found a three shilling piece, a shilling, and a sixpence. I said, you have got some notes as well as guineas. She said, she had got none. I put the question to her several times; she always denied it: we began to search upon some little band-box; in this band-box there were twenty or thirty little parcels, tied up; we opened them; they contained rags. We afterwards came to a large chest, the key we could not find. We tried several keys; they would not fit: after that we found a key, in a little box, that opened the chest. We searched this chest, and in a pocket-book in this chest, that I produce, I found thirty-five pounds, consisting of ones, twos, and one five-pounds, in all thirty-five pounds.

Q. Upon finding the notes, what did she say - A. She said they were her's. I said, why did not you tell us this at first, without giving us all this trouble? The other officer searched a bit further, he found some more notes.

Mr. Alley. You have spoken positively, that she said she had neither money or notes. Did not she accompany the observation, that she had none but her own - A. She said she had no notes at all.

GEORGE SCOFIELD . I am an officer. When we first went to the house, where the prisoner lived, she was called down stairs; she answered, what was the matter? Mr. Day, he replied, there is nothing the matter particularly; we asked her which room she lived in? She said, up stairs. She went up stairs, into the one pair of stairs back room. We asked her if that was her room? She said, yes. We told her we had a search warrant to search for Mr. Wilcox's property. She said, she had no money at all. We told her, he had lost bank-notes and gold. She said she had neither. We searched her person and found four shillings and sixpence.

Q. Confine yourself to what you yourself found - A. I searched the tea-caddy. I found that bag, containing four one pound notes. We searched several boxes. We came to a large box, which was locked; the key at last was found. I found in the box this book, containing a one pound note and four guineas. I have had them in my possession ever since. On searching further, I found, in a drawer, a small box, containing two thimbles, a shilling, and a sixpence. This ribbon runs through them both. When we found these things, the prisoner first said, she saved them up; after that she said, she had them given to her.

GABRIEL PORTER DAY . Q. You are a friend of the prosecutor, I understand - A. Yes; and I know the prisoner by nursing my wife before. I was with the officers, and saw these things found. When the officers found the money, I said, let it be counted over, and if it be her property let it be given to her.

Mr. Alley. Had you known that she had been in possession of thirty or forty pounds before - A. No, not to my knowledge.

ELIZABETH GILBERT . Q. I understand the prosecutor's wife was your daughter - A. Yes; during her lying-in I visited her often.

Q. Did you, by your daughter's desire, resort to any place where any notes were deposited - A. Yes; I think there were two ten pound notes. I gave her the bag; she took the notes out: there were a bundle of them; I cannot say how many. She folded them up in the ten pound notes. She then said, my husband does not know of any of these notes. I said, it would be a pretty surprise to acquaint him of.

Mr. Alley. Have not you said, that they were all new notes - A. No. I never saw them opened. I saw the two ten pound notes lay open in the drawer. I gave them to my daughter: she put them in the bag that contained the other notes. She drew the other notes out of the bag: there were nearly a handful.

MARGARET BARKER . Q. I believe you were acquainted with the prosecutor's wife, who has lately died - A. Yes; I lived in the same house. I saw her once a day.

Q. Did you ever see any notes in her possession - A. No.

Q. to prosecutor. Will you look at any of the one pound notes, which you happen to know from the marks you have described.

Q. to Scofield. Shew what you found. You found four one pound notes. - A. These are them.

Prosecutor. Here is one indorsed

="Tom,=" that is one that was in my possession. I think it is my wife's writing. I cannot speak to the guineas. I believe the shilling and sixpence to be mine, produced by Scofield. I have seen them frequently about the child's neck. I believe them to be mine. Latterly we took them off. We missed two thimbles: we had three: I lost two out of the three. I cannot swear to them.

Q. to Green. What have you got in your hand now - A. Thirty-five pounds in bank-notes. I found them in the large chest in this book.

Prosecutor. One of them, a one pound note, is marked Slaughter and Co. I think it came from Mr. Slaughter, at the corner of St. Martin's Lane: it is one that I had seen several times with that name on it: on another one pound Bank of England note, is the name of Bersdell: it is my wife's hand-writing. I had seen that note once or twice previous to my loss; and here is a two pound note, with the name of Retten, August 12, on it: I had seen it once, previous to my loss.

Mr. Knapp. Q. to prosecutor. Whereabout is the value of all the property you lost - A. Upwards of forty pounds.

Prisoner's Defence. I went out to service at the age of sixteen years. I was in my first place five years. I was at another place two years; from there I went to another, and continued eight years in this place. I purchased a quarter of a hundred in the 3 per cent. stock, in the Bank. I had a profitable place of it. I had money in the Bank. I sold it out to the amount of more than was found upon me.

JOHN CASLICK . I am own brother to the prisoner.

Q. Do you know whether your sister had any money by selling out stock - A. I know that she had as much as forty pounds, for above a month ago; and I know she added to it instead of reducing it.

ELIZABETH GIFFORD . Q. Did you know the prisoner at the bar when she kept a chandler's shop - A. Yes; that is about four years ago. I at that time purchased a loaf of her, and paid for it with a new shilling, with a hole and a ribbon tied to it. I paid her that shilling, because I had no other.

WILLIAM CRANFIELD . I live at No. 33, Great Pultney-street. I am nephew to the prisoner.

Q. Do you recollect seeing any money with her at any time - A. Yes; in November, last, I saw four guineas and one five pound note, and ones and twos to the amount of thirty-six or thirty-seven pounds.

SARAH CRANFIELD . I am wife to the last witness.

Q. Do you recollect seeing any money with your aunt - A. Yes, about thirty-seven pounds. I saw it in March, last, and four golden guineas.

The prisoner called five witnesses, who gave her a good character.

JURY. Q. to prosecutor. What money did you pay her - A. Seven three shilling pieces, and no other money; that was the amount of her wages.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 42.

The prisoner was recommended to mercy, by the jury, on account of her good character.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Gibbs.

Reference Number: t18120701-4

520. JOSEPH SANDERS , was indicted, for feloniously making an assault in the king's highway, on the 14th of June , upon Richard Robbins , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, a watch, value 2 l. a dollar, value 5 s. 6 d. and an eighteen penny Bank token, his property .

RICHARD ROBBINS . On the 14th of June, about a quarter to two, in the morning, I was returning home, from the George public house, in St. Mary Axe; it is a house of call for tailors. I was going to No. 7. Glocester-place, Commercial-road. I live there.

Q. How long had you been at the George that night - A. I went there, and stopped till rather better than half past one.

Q. Were you sober at the time of going home - A. Yes; I had drank but two pints of stout.

Q. Now, what happened to you as you were going home at that time - A. As I was going past the corner of Union-street, in the Commercial-road , in Stepney parish, three men rushed upon me, from the corner of Union-street: one of them held my hat over my eyes, while the others robbed me.

Q. Were you alone - A. Yes. They tripped me up, and dragged me on the stones to Mr. Whitbread's milk-house.

Q. How far was that from the place where they first came up to you - A. About twenty yards: they never spoke a word. I felt one of their hands in my trowser's pocket. I had a dollar, a sixpence, and an eighteen penny piece in that pocket I felt a hand there.

Q. Had you a watch at the time - A. Yes; that was in my fob. They all ran away. They had got my watch when they ran away.

Q. You did not perceive them take it, did you - A. No; two of them went away together, and the prisoner happened to be the last, and I never lost sight of him from the time he left me until he was taken by the watchman.

Q. Were you on the ground when they left you - A. Yes: I rose up as quick as I could, and ran after him, and got a gentleman who helped to secure him. I was a little way behind when he was laid hold of. I saw him laid hold of. He was never out of my sight from the time he ran away until he was laid hold of.

Q. Was it light - A. Yes; I could see him very plain; it was day-break.

Q. Did you know him before - A. No; I never saw him before. When he was laid hold of, he was

taken to Whitechapel watchhouse.

Q. At the time that he was laid hold of did he say any thing - A. Not as I heard.

Q. When did you find that you had lost your watch - A. At the time I got up I put my hand to my fob: I found I had lost my watch. I did not perceive my money was gone until I returned home.

Q. How long had you perceived your watch before you had lost it - A. It might be a quarter of an hour. I looked at it in Whitechapel, and put it back again. It was a metal watch. I had it four years and a half. It was given to me by my grandfather.

Q. This was in the public street that you were walking along that this happened - A. Yes.

Mr. Gurney. You say you were coming along Whitechapel - A. Yes.

Q. When you saw your watch how far might that be to where this happened - A. About four hundred yards.

Q. I suppose before this happened you saw some women - A. Yes.

Q. Might not they take the watch from you - A. No. I am certain I had the watch when I was knocked down.

Q. You told my lord, as I understood, that you never felt your watch go from you - A. I cannot say that I did at the time.

Q. You could not feel it at any other time - A. No.

Q. Nor did you perceive your money go from you - A. No: only one of their hands in my right-hand trowsers pocket. I missed my watch immediately they rose from me.

Q. How far from the place where you were down did you see the prisoner stopped - A. I saw him stopped in Lambeth-street: that might be about two hundred yards.

Q. You never saw his face - A. No.

Q. Do not you know, if you convict the prisoner of a robbery, there is a forty pounds reward - A. I have heard such a thing.

COURT. You say there was a corner which the prisoner had turned - A. As soon as he let go my head I got up, and ran after him, and called, stop thief. I kept him in sight until I came to the corner.

Q. When he turned the corner you lost sight of him at the time. Did you catch sight of him again when you came up to the corner - A. Yes. I saw him catched by the watchman and another gentleman.

Q. What street was that the corner of - A. The corner of Lambeth-street.

JAMES LENNARD . I am a watchman. I was on duty on the 14th of last month. At half past two in the morning I was going my round. I heard the call of stop thief. I was coming up Lambeth-street. I saw the prisoner running round the corner as hard as he could. He ran out of Little Ailiffe-street. I was coming the contrary way. The prosecutor and this gentleman was running after him. I stopped the prisoner, and they came up in about a minute and a half. The prosecutor said he had been robbed of his watch, and that he had been very ill treated. The prisoner said nothing. I had a hard matter to stop him. He crossed the road two or three times. Then I took him to the watchhouse.

Q. What sort of a night was it - A. It is light now at two o'clock, and it was so that morning.

Q. Was the prosecutor sober - A. Yes. He was very much exhausted with running.

WILLIAM CANNON . I was going home this Sunday morning. About two o'clock I was going to No. 16, Gloucester-street, from Lower Thames-street. I heard the call of stop thief as I was coming up the opposite side of the way, nearly opposite of Whitbread's milk-house. I was walking on. I saw four men together; at the moment I took one of them to be intoxicated, and the others helping him up.

Q. You saw four men, and one of them down - A. Yes, I think the other men took down towards Gower's wharf. They went part of the way the same as the man that went last. I missed them. Robbins called, stop thief. The prisoner was about three yards from me. The prisoner was running quite fast. I pursued the prisoner; and Robbins followed me as fast as he could. I never was more than three yards from the prisoner until he got to the corner of Lambeth-street, and then I got hold of him. I laid hold of him before he turned the corner. We turned the corner together, and then he got away from me. I am lame in one arm. I could not hold him. I saw the last witness lay hold of him.

Q. Are you sure that the man that the last witness laid hold of was the person that you pursued - A. I am quite positive.

Prisoner's Defence. My lord, and gentlemen of the jury, As I was coming down the Commercial-road to my lodging in Sun-street, Bishopsgate-street, on the morning mentioned in the indictment, some person was calling out stop thief. A person called to me, do you hear the cry of stop thief? I answered, what is that to me? He said, I was pertinent: he would charge the watch with me. The prosecutor came up when I was stopped. He said, he had been robbed of his watch. He said nothing about losing money at that time.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 19.

First Middlesex jury before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18120701-5

521. ROBERT WELLS , JOHN WELLS , JOHN IVES , and SAMUEL FROST , were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Forsyth , no person being therein, about the hour of five in the forenoon, of the 4th of June, and stealing therein, five iron axletrees, value 5 l. and three coach springs, value 1 l. his property .

JOHN FORSYTH . I live in Stable-yard, St. John's-square, Clerkenwell . I am a hackney-man . On the 4th of June, at seven o'clock in the morning, the witness Norgan sent up to know whether I had lost any thing out of my coach-house. I sleep over it myself, and my children.

Q. Have you any servants - A. Robert Wells was my servant . I discharged him on the Monday morning. He lived with me four months.

Q. Is there any communication between your sleeping rooms and coach-house - A. The stairs goes up between the coach-house and stables into my dwelling-house.

Q. So that going down you can go into either your coach-house or your stables - A. Exactly.

Q. Now state what you lost on the 4th of June - A. My son came to me on the 4th of June. I went down stairs and found missing five axletrees, four with boxes on, and one without. I missed them from where Wells had placed them. He placed them by my order. I had seen them two days before.

Q. What time in the day did you miss them - A. At seven o'clock in the morning, on the 4th of June. My coach-house opens into the yard. The door of the stairs, and the door of the coach-house, is all in one line. The door of the stairs opens into the yard. The bottom stair into the yard level exactly.

Q. Had the doors of the coach-house been locked the over night - A. Yes. I tried them all; and the man had locked them up at eight o'clock at night. I tried all the doors, and found them safe.

Q. What was the value of all the things that you missed - A. Three pounds. I could not replace them for ten pounds.

Q. You have two coach-houses and stables - A. Yes.

Q. Between the coach-house and stables there is a flight of stairs that comes into the yard - A. Yes: it leads up into my dwelling, which is over my coach-house and stables.

Q. From your dwelling you must go into the yard, and then there is a door that goes into the coach-house and stables in the yard - A. Exactly so. The coach-houses have been parlours formerly; but there has not been a way to go into the house from them this eight years. The middle part is a dwelling, and the upper part over mine is a printing-office. It is assessed and rated as art house.

Q. Do you remember them ever parlours - A. I do not.

Q. Then that is only as you have heard - A. From the nature of the building I conceive it. It is not a mews; it is an open yard with no other dwelling before it nor beyond it.

Mr. Knapp. There is no internal communication to the coach-house from the stairs - A. There is not.

- NORGAN. Q. Do you know the prisoners - A. Yes, all four. On the 4th of June last I was at Mr Blackman's, St. John's-square, Clerkenwell, near Mr. Forsyth's. I saw all the four prisoner's come into the square. They all came in empty handed about half after five. I saw Robert Wells go down the yard. He brought an iron axletree with a box, and Frost he went down the yard: he brought an iron axletree likewise. I did not know Wells had left Mr. Forsyth, or else I should have stopped him at the time. Ives was talking with them at the top of the yard. They stood talking five minutes. John Wells I cannot say did any thing. Ives did not go down the yard. They were along with them in the square.

THOMAS MAYNARD . I was with the last witness (Norgan) on the 4th of June. I only saw Samuel Frost come out of the coach-yard with an iron axle-tree on his shoulder. The others I did not see.

JOHN MATTHEWS . I am an officer. Cook and I apprehended the four prisoners at the Britannia, in Islington Fields. They were all playing at skittles together.

The prisoners said nothing in their defence; called four witnesses, who gave them a good character.

ROBERT WELLS , GUILTY , aged 18,

SAMUEL FROST , GUILTY , aged 17,

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only, but not of the burglary.

Judgment respited.

JOHN WELLS , NOT GUILTY .

JOHN IVES , NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Gibbs.

Reference Number: t18120701-6

522. ELIZABETH CORCORAN , alias COCHRANE , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2nd of June , two shawls, value 12 l. the property of James Davis , privately in his shop .

JAMES DAVIS . I live at No. 50, in Oxford-street . I keep a linen-draper's shop there. On the 2nd of June, in the afternoon, about seven o'clock, I was in the shop: I saw the prisoner come into the shop with another woman. The other woman asked for calico for a gown lining. I shewed her several. The prisoner stood between her and the door. The other woman purchased calico to the value of ten pence, and the other woman paid me. The prisoner was going out. The other woman kept speaking to me as she went out. After the prisoner was out in the street she ran towards Berner-street. Upon my seeing her running I ran out and laid hold of her by the shoulder. I saw the shawls fall from her, from under her shawl. I saw two shawls fall from her.

Q. Are you sure they fell from under her shawl - A. I am certain. I picked one up, and a person who is here picked the other up. The prisoner then made off into Berner-street, and then I laid hold of her completely, and gave her up to some one else to bring her back to the shop, and she was brought home; and when the prisoner was brought back she said she had not taken them.

Q. Had you seen these shawls in your shop before - A. They were in the window. I had seen them in the window when I looked, within three quarters of an hour before they came in. They were articles that we deal in.

Q. Was she near that window when she was standing in the shop - A. Very near that window.

Q. Who else was in the shop at the time that you was serving this woman with the calico - A. No one but myself. There was nobody near her but the other woman that was near her.

Q. Had you any of your family, or any of your journeymen in the shop - A. There was nobody in the shop but her and the other woman and myself. I have no partner.

Mr. Arabin. You said, she said she had not taken them - A. Yes; she said so.

COURT. At the time that the woman came into the shop, you were alone - A. I was alone.

GEORGE PAYNE . A. Were you in Oxford-street, near Mr. Davis's shop, at any time - A. I was coming down Berner-street. As I was coming along, I saw Mr. Davis take hold of the prisoner by the shoulder;

her shawl came off, and the two shawls came from under her shawl. I picked one up, and Mr. Davis picked up the other. Mr. Davis took the shawl out of my hand immediately. I took the woman back to Mr. Davis's shop.

Q. Are you sure that it was the same woman that he first laid hold of, and that you saw drop the shawls - A. Yes.

WILLIAM JACKSON . I took the prisoner to the office. Mr. Davis gave me these shawls at the office.

Prosecutor. They are the shawls that I gave to Jackson. They are mine. They cost seven pounds eight shillings the two. My private mark is on each of them.

COURT. Q. to prosecutor. You said your shop is in Oxford-street. What is your parish - A. It is in the parish of Mary-le-bone.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 18.

The prisoner was recommended to mercy by the jury, on account of her youth.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18120701-7

523. SARAH MOAY and ISABELLA CAMBELL , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of May , five stockings, value 18 s. and ten pair of gloves, value 10 s. the property of Edward Warren , privately in his shop .

EDWARD WARREN . I live at 269, Oxford-street , St. George's, Hanover-square. I keep a hosier's shop . On the 5th of May, between eight and nine, the prisoners came into my shop, and asked for some thread. I told them I did not sell it. In about ten minutes after, they came into the shop again. I only know from what the lad told me in the morning. I was not at home at the time. On the next morning I missed five stockings, two pair and an odd one: they were Angola stockings. I saw them in the shop. When I went out of the shop I did not return to the shop again until the shop was shut up.

Q. You missed them the next morning - A. Yes.

Q. Then you are certain they did not take them when they came in the shop and asked for thread - A. No, they did not. I saw the stockings in the shop when I went out. I only know, from information, that they came in again.

EDWARD HUTCHINS . I am a constable. I apprehended the two prisoners on the 6th of May, between eight and nine o'clock in the morning, at Mr. Peacock's shop. I went to Cambell's mother's lodgings. I found in that lodgings these five stockings and eleven pair of gloves. I asked the prisoners who they belonged to; they said, a linen-draper in Oxford-street. I told them it would be better for them to confess.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Gibbs.

Reference Number: t18120701-8

524. SARAH MOAY and ISABELLA CAMBELL were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of May , eleven pair of stockings, value 20 s. the property of John Peacock , privately in his shop .

JOHN PEACOCK . I keep a haberdasher's shop in Great Mary-le-bone street .

Q. In whose custody is the property - A. The officer has it. I believe it is mine.

Q. Did you lose property of that description - A. I believe I did. The prisoners said they had stolen it from me. I heard them say so.

Q. You did not know that they were in your possession shortly before they were missing - A. No, and there is nothing about them by which I can identify them.

Q. Who was the person that was in your shop at the time when they came - A. Edward Trace .

EDWARD TRACE . I am shopman to Mr. Peacock.

Q. Do you remember the prisoners coming to your master's shop - A. Yes; on the 6th of May. They came for a ball of cotton. I gave it them, and they paid three halfpence for it. They went out. In about five minutes after they were gone I missed eleven pair of stockings from off the counter. I had laid them on the counter about five minutes before they came in.

Q. Had other people been in the shop during that time - A. Yes; but I knew them. As soon as I found the stockings gone, I suspected the prisoners had taken them; and the next morning, when they were passing in the street, I had them taken up. I brought them into the shop, and they confessed that they had taken them.

Q. Did they confess to you before the officer came - A. No.

EDWARD HUTCHINS . I am a constable. I found these stockings at the time I examined the lodging of the girl's mother, and found eight pair of stockings. The prisoners would not confess until I got them at the watchhouse.

The prisoners said nothing in their defence, nor called any witnesses to their character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Gibbs.

Reference Number: t18120701-9

525. SARAH MOAY and ISABELLA CAMBELL were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of May , ten pair of gloves, value 15 s. the property of John Favell , privately in his shop .

JOHN FAVELL . I keep a shop , No. 2, Clay-street, Marybone .

Q. Do you remember the prisoners coming into your shop - A. No. It is from their confession to the officer that I know they came in.

Q. Did you lose any thing out of your shop - A. Yes. I missed that property. I cannot say the day. I had not seen the prisoners in the shop.

EDWARD HUTCHINS . Q. You know nothing of this case, but from what the prisoner confessed, and they did not confess until after you told them it would be better for them - A. I did tell them so.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Gibbs.

Reference Number: t18120701-10

526. JOHN LALLIMENT and SUSANNAH LALLIMENT were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of May , in the dwelling-house of John Newton , a 10 l. bank-note, his property .

JOHN NEWTON. I live at No. 2, Temple-street, White Friars .

Q. You have no partners in that house - A. No.

It is in the precinct of White Friars.

Q. What are you - A. A chandler . I am the house-keeper. I have no partner.

Q. When did this happen to you - A. On the 1st of May the note was taken out of a cash-box which I had.

Q. Why do you accuse these people of it - A. I thought it could be nobody else but this girl. The note was in a tin cash-box, in my room, up stairs. I left the box locked, and I found it locked in my bedroom. The woman prisoner was a servant to me. The ten-pound note was the undermost note in the box. There was fifteen pounds in the box in notes. The prisoner had lived with me ten months.

Q. What does your family consist of - A. Three children, my wife, myself, and my mother.

Q. And why do you accuse her of taking of it - A. I thought it was impossible any body else could take it. Nobody else was in the room but herself.

Q. Did you ever find your note - A. Yes. I knew the address of the note. I had it stopped at the bank, and traced it home to the father of the girl, with his name on it. The number of it was 5,567, a ten-pound; dated, 25th of February, 1812.

SUSANNAH LALLIMENT. My father is quite innocent.

JOHN KNIGHT. I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoners. I searched them, and found nothing at all; but I have got part of the produce of the ten pound note. I found a gown and a petticoat that they had purchased: this is it: I found it in the apartment where both of the prisoners lodged.

JOHN TOMLINS. I am shopman to Savage and Lemming, 333, Oxford-street. On Friday, the 23rd, of May, John Lalliment came to our house and bought calico to the amount of five and sixpence. I am sure he is the man. He tendered a ten pound band-note in payment. I wrote his name on the back of the note. There was no one with him.

JOHN PARKER . I am a clerk in the Bank. I produce the note, number 5567, dated 25th February, 1812, 10 l. Tomlin. That is the same note the prisoner passed to me.

Q. to Newton. Is that your note - A. Yes: I think the daughter must have given the note to the father. He was at our house on the Sunday. I think he must have taken it away then. He seldom would come to the house and ask for the girl in a proper manner. He used to come about the house and make a motion to her to come to him. He seldom came into the house: she never went up stairs.

Susannah Lalliment's Defence. My father is not guilty. I brought away the note to him. I asked my mistress leave to go out. She gave me leave. She said I should go out after tea. My mistress told me, if I did not give her the note, she would have me searched. I was searched; and I went home to my father. He said, what brought you here? I said, I have left my place. I asked my father for four shillings and a halfpenny; he gave it me. I took it to my mistress; and, on my coming back, I gave my father the note. I told him I found the note in the street.

Prosecutor. She left me on account of the note. Mrs. Newton did not think proper of keeping her on account of this note.

Susannah Lalliment . I often found money in the lodgers rooms. The last money I found was three shillings. I told my mistress. She said, you put it up on his drawers. I said, if I thought he put it there to try me, I would keep it. She said I should be much to blame if I did not. I did not put it on the drawer. I kept it. When I saw the young man, I told him. He said, put it on the table. When I saw this note, I could neither read nor write. It struck me it was put there to see whether I would take it.

JURY. Q.to prosecutor. She says the note was put there. She does not say where.

Prosecutor. I am certain it was locked up in my tin box, in my bed-room.

John Lalliment was not put on his defence.

JOHN LALLIMENT , NOT GUILTY .

SUSANNAH LALLIMENT , GUILTY - DEATH , aged 18.

[The prisoner was recommended to mercy, on account of her youth.]

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120701-11

527. THOMAS BOWLER was indicted for that he, on the 30th of May , at the parish of Harrow , with a certain blunderbuss, loaded with gunpowder and divers leaden bullets, did shoot at William Burrows , a subject of our Lord the King, with intent in so doing, and by means thereof, to kill and murder him .

SECOND COUNT, for shooting at the said William Burrows , in like manner, with intent, in so doing, and by means thereof, to maim and disfigure him.

THIRD COUNT, for like offence, to disable him.

FOURTH COUNT, to do him some grievous bodily harm.

FIFTH and SIXTH COUNT, that he, on the same day, and in the said parish, with a certain blunderbuss, loaded with gunpowder, and divers bullets, did shoot at the said William Burrows .

The indictment was read by Mr. Adolphus, and the case was stated by Mr. Pooley.

WILLIAM BURROWS . Q. What are you - A. I am a farmer and salesman . I live at Alperton, in Middlesex.

Q. How long have you lived there - A.Most of my life.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar - A. Perfectly well.

Q. How long has he lived there - A. A good many years: most of my life.

Q. What is he - A. A farmer .

Q. Have you been in the habit of transacting business one with another lately - A. Very little.

Q. Were you so situated, that he knew your business of going to market - A. He knew my time of going to market certainly.

Q. On the 30th of May last, early in the morning, where was you going to - A. Coming to town.

COURT, Were you in the habit of coming to market at any particular time - A. Three days a week, to the Hay-market, St. James's.

Q. Did you generally go the same road - A. Yes;

mostly; because the prisoner's son-in-law mostly rid with me.

Mr. Adolphus. On the 30th of May last, were you coming to the London Market - A. Yes.

COURT. What day of the week was that - A. It was the 30th of May.

(Witness paused.)

Q. Never mind, if you cannot recollect.

Mr. Adolphus. How were you coming - A. In a chaise cart.

Q. Is there a blacksmith's shop in your road - A. Yes, newly erected; just over the canal bridge from my house.

Q. Who keeps it - A. One Henry Jones .

Q. As you were going along did you observe any thing - A. I thought I observed a leg or a thigh of something by a tree at the corner. I thought it to be the prisoner.

Q. It struck you that it might be him - A. Yes. As I advanced I saw perfectly it was him. I stopped the horse and chaise cart; then instantly he presented the blunderbuss, and I saw that he meant to shoot. He said, d - n your eyes. I saw he prepared to shoot.

Q. Tell what the preparation consisted in - A. He presented the blunderbuss, and by his saying so, I dropped myself.

COURT. You lowered yourself in your cart - A. Yes. He fired; and instantly my horse drew full speed

Mr. Adolphus. Were you wounded, and where - A. Oh, yes. I was wounded here and here. (Witness pointing.) I was wounded in my neck and in my back.

Q. Were any of the bullets or any thing extracted from you - A. There were some found.

Q. Did you observe any person near the prisoner at the time that this took place - A. No; I cannot say I did at that time; it was done so momently.

Q. Did any thing pass between you at the time he exclaimed, d - n your eyes - A. No.

Q. Had you lately before had any intercourse with him, either friendly or contrary - A. On the Wednesday before that happened he and I were talking very friendly.

Q. Perhaps your recollecting the Wednesday you can tell us now the day that happened - A. No, I cannot.

Q. What was the subject of any thing that passed between him and you; what was that about. Had any thing been done by you with respect to the prisoner or his property, or something that he claimed - A. I never considered that it was his property. Why, a few trees I had lopped.

Q. How long before was that - A. About the middle of March, in this year.

Q. You had lopped some trees - A. Yes.

Q. Had there been any difference between you and the prisoner about these trees -

COURT. Had you spoken to him, or he to you, about these trees - A. No.

Mr. Knapp. How long have you been acquainted with the prisoner - A. Most part of my life.

Q. You have had frequent opportunities of observing him and his conduct - A. Not lately. I saw him on the Wednesday before that happened.

Q. Had you observed any thing particular about his conduct which induced you to attend to his conduct or behaviour - A. I saw nothing the matter with him that Wednesday.

Q. But any time before - A. I saw nothing myself.

Q. Have you not been consulted. Have you observed any thing particular respecting his conduct and behaviour previous to this unfortunate accident - A. Myself, sir.

Q. Yes. You saw him on the Wednesday, had you seen him several times before the Wednesday - A. Oh, yes; several times pass in a chaise-cart.

Q. Did any thing strike you considering the state of his mind - A. I had not conversation enough with him to know.

Q. Was there any thing from his appearance to make you suppose whether he was in his right mind or not - A. I cannot pretend to say that.

Q. Had there been nothing in you that begat a suspicion that he was not in his right mind - A. He spoke to me very well at the time.

Q. Did you ever say at any time that you thought a commission of lunacy should be taken out against him - A. Me, sir. I have heard his son-in-law say so.

Q. Attend to me, Mr. Burrows. Have you never said that you thought that a commission of lunacy should be taken out against the prisoner - A. I do not think it is in my power to answer it.

COURT. Do you hear the question - A. Yes.

Mr. Knapp. Have you never said that it was your opinion he ought to have a commission of lunacy taken out against him - A. If I did I have forgot it.

Q. Then you will not swear you did not - A. No, I will not.

Q. You have been speaking about the lopping of the trees, since March, was it - A. I do not know.

Q. Oh, yes, you must know. Has not he lent you two hundred pounds - A. That was before that.

Q. Are you quite sure that he has not lent you the money since the lopping of the trees - A. I believe not.

Q. You believe not - A.Surely not.

Q. Was it paid since the lopping of the trees, and he refused to take interest. Did you pay him since March - A. I have the receipt at home. I cannot exactly tell now.

Q. Did he refuse to take interest after March, when you paid him - A. At the time I paid him he refused taking interest.

Q. Was not that since March that he refused taking interest - A. I cannot say that exactly.

Mr. Adolphus. On the Wednesday when you saw him before, was there any thing in his conduct then that led you to suppose that he was not

in his right mind - A. Not that I saw.

Q.Can you remember any time saying that you thought he was a mad man - A. About two years ago, when he sell off his horse. I saw him one morning; he said, I have been all under here; I have seen all the churches.

Q. How long ago is that - A. I cannot say. He certainly said, that he had seen all the churches.

Q. How long is that ago - A. I cannot pretend to say exactly.

Q.Is it about two years ago - A. I believe it is.

Q. About this money that you borrowed and returned; about what time did you borrow it - A. I cannot pretend to say.

Q. Was it in the course of this year - A. To the best of my knowledge it was in March.

COURT. What, last March - A. Yes.

Mr. Adolphus. Did he then give you a receipt for the money himself - A. Not himself. He sent it up by his son-in-law.

Q. Did you see him - A. No.

Q. Now, concerning the returning the money. Did he give you any reason why he would not take the interest - A. I was very angry. He sent me short notice to return the money. I throwed the money down, and said, I did not mind a thousand pounds no more than he did. He said, he would not have the interest. I throwed it down in the house, and afterwards his son-in-law brought it back to me.

Q. About how long had you had the money - A. I cannot say. It is immaterial, I think, of going on in this way. I cannot pretend to say how long I had had the money.

Q. You can tell whether it was one year or more - A. It is of no use I think.

Q. You certainly can tell me whether it was a year, or more than a year - A. It was not a year.

Q. What was the amount of the interest - A. Three or four pounds. I threw it down for him to receive.

Q. What was the principal - A. Two hundred pounds.

HENRY JONES . I am a blacksmith. I live at Alperton.

Q. How near is your shop to where Bowler lives - A. About one hundred and fifty yards.

Q. How near do you live to where Mr. Burrows, the prosecutor, lives - A. Above three hundred yards. My house is on one side of the green, and the shop the other. My shop is about sixty yards from the bridge.

Q. On market days does Mr. Burrows come by in that direction - A. Always.

Q. On the 30th of May about what time did you see the prisoner - A. About five o'clock, a little before or after he was coming along the canal side.

Q. What distance from your shop - A. About an hundred yards.

Q. How far was it from Bowler's house - A. About the same distance, or a few more yards.

Q. When you saw Bowler, was there any body in company with him - A. No, not at that time.

Q. How soon after did you see him again - A. About a quarter before seven; at that time I was at my own shop.

Q. Now, when he came up to your shop had he any thing with him - A. Mr. Bowler was coming over the bridge, with John Barnjam , his grandson, upon Mr. Bowler's horse. Mr. Bowler was on foot. I was going over the bridge to go to some barges. At that time Mr. Bowler had the blunderbuss in his hand; as I was going up the hill Mr. Bowler hailed me, and wished me to go back again, saying, this thing does not hold prime; meaning the blunderbuss that he had in his hand. I returned back with Mr. Bowler, and we came back to the shop together.

Q. Was Kidney with you - A. No; he had passed Kidney. When Bowler said so to me, Kidney said, master, is your fire arms out of order. Bowler, I think, said, yes. I will not be quite confident. Kidney walked on. When I came up to the shop, Mr. Bowler said, there is nothing the matter. I am going to shoot a dog. I do not want this boy to know it.

Q. This boy? Who did he allude to - A. John Barnjam , who was riding the mare. I went into the shop, and Mr. Bowler followed me into the shop. Mr. Bowler laid the blunderbuss behind the vice, and said it was full cocked. I then took it up, and looked at it, and said, this will fetch him down. He said, yes, that it will.

Q. Did you examine the pan - A. No, sir, not at all.

Q. Do you know any thing from what you saw at that time, whether it was loaded or not - A. No further than by him saying, it was full cocked.

Q. Was it full cocked - A. Yes. Mr. Bowler then left the shop, leaving it behind the vice. He went into the road, and stood for about half a minute, and then walked up and down the road several times. He returned to John Barnjam , and said, that he wanted to see Mr. Burrows about buying some straw, as it would save him a journey.

Q. Was John Barnjam at that time mounted - A. Yes; he was standing close to my penthouse door. In a few minutes afterwards Bowler came and fetched out the blunderbuss and placed himself opposite of a tree, which stands in the road.

COURT. He placed himself where - A. Opposite of a tree; in the shade of a tree, that he might not be seen.

Mr. Pooley. What kind of a tree? has it much branches - A. No great deal.

Q. A large trunk - A. Yes.

Q. Now, in the position he stood by the tree, did it appear to you as if it was to hide himself - A. Yes. He stood so as to conceal himself until a person came within twenty yards of him coming over the bridge. He might stand perhaps two minutes and a half. It could not be more.

Q. How far is the bridge from the spot where he was standing by the tree - A. About sixty yards.

As Mr. Burrows approached nigh Mr. Bowler, I saw Mr. Bowler present the fire arms in a position to fire.

Q. How near was Mr. Burrows to Bowler, when Bowler put himself in a position to fire - A. Within twenty yards. He presented the blunderbuss, and stood about half face, and exclaimed, d - n your eyes, and fired instantly.

Q. Were you in a situation to see whether he took aim - A. Yes; I was looking out of the window all the time. After that I left the shop window; and on coming out, John Barnjam got off the mare, and Bowler was getting on. At that time Bowler's hat flew off; he took his foot out of the stirrup, picked it up, and mounted the mare, saying to the boy, d - n your eyes, follow me. He rode away as hard as he could gallop.

Q. Was it a mare of speed - A. Yes. Then I saw no more of him. Mr. Burrows fell across the shafts, forward. I thought he was dead. His horse rode away with the cart as hard as he could gallop.

Q. As soon as you saw the boy get off the horse, and the prisoner get on, where was the blunderbuss - A. It was in the ditch. I did not see him throw it in. Mary Church picked it up. It was the blunderbuss that I had in the shop. It appeared to have been recently fired off: the powder dust was all in the pan. I looked in the cart; there was blood in it.

Q. How long did you converse with Bowler - . He talked about the fine growing weather; he said, it was a fine growing time. He said, nothing prevented our business; meaning the weather did not. I said, no, nothing but want of business.

Q. Had you worked for him - A. Yes, and I generally took in the bill myself; sometimes my wife. The Sunday before that he paid me my bill, and left eleven pence unpaid.

Q. Now, between the former Saturday and Sunday, to the 30th, had you seen him about - A. Sometimes he would come into the shop without saying any thing.

Q. Did he, in the course of that week come in your shop - A. Yes; and talk as he had done before.

Q. On this morning did you observe any thing about his manner that struck you as singular - A. No; it was always as it had been. He seemed very cool and deliberate. He talked to me as such.

Mr. Gurney. Did you do any thing to the blunderbuss to improve the priming - A. No. The blunderbuss was left down there.

Q. Neither did you, nor did he ask you, to do any thing to improve the priming - A. No.

Q. You were going away if he had not called you back - A. Yes; I was going over the bridge.

Q. And therefore if he had not called you back you would have been a considerable way - A. Yes; I should have passed Mr. Burrows's house a good way.

Q. He called you back; you went in the shop; he kept you in conversation; he kept you there a good while - A. Yes.

Q. If he had not called you back you would have been away; by which means he had the opportunity of your seeing him shoot Mr. Burrows - A. Yes.

Q. You did go away: he bringing you back, you were an eye-witness to it - A. Yes.

Q. He stood, you say, as not for Burrows to see him, but where you could see him - A. Yes.

Q. Just between your cottage and house - A. Yes.

Q. Where you and your family could see him, within an hundred yards of his own house - A. Yes.

Q. And within two hundred yards of Burrows's house - A. Yes.

Q. A mile and a half on towards London there might be a more private place than that - A. I do not know.

Q. Might not there be a more private place, without a blacksmith to look on - A. Certainly.

Mr. Pooley. You told me you were going down to the boats - A. Yes.

Q. You said you were going down in a direction towards the barges when he desired you to come back - A. Yes.

Q. How far was the spot from the canal where the barges lay - A. Sixty yards.

Q. Did you tell him that you were going down to them - A. Yes.

Q. Was the spot to which you told him you were going, in sight of the place where the blunderbuss was fired, and could it have been as easy heard and seen as in the shop - A. Yes, and sooner.

Q. Now, when you were coming up towards the shop, and talking about the priming, was his grandson, Barnjam, near you - A. Yes; within five or six yards.

Q. Was he near enough to have heard what Bowler said - A. I cannot say exactly. Mr. Bowler did not speak over loud. I cannot say whether he did or did not.

MRS. JONES. Q. You are the wife of the last witness - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember the morning that this took place Mr. Bowler coming to your husband's shop - A. I saw him go in and out about seven o'clock.

Q. When last he came out had he any thing in his hand - A. The last time I saw him I was going towards the bridge; I passed my husband's shop. I saw him come out with a blunderbuss in his hand. He placed himself opposite the tree, as I saw; but I passed him then.

Q. I think you say you were going towards the bridge - A. Yes; I saw Mr. Burrows and spoke to him.

COURT. When was it you first saw Mr. Burrows; was it on the bridge - A. He had passed the bridge, and was coming towards our shop, as I passed the shop to go to the bridge.

Mr. Adolphus. Had Bowler placed himself by the tree - A. Yes.

Q. When Mr. Burrows came near the tree, what happened - A. I heard the report of the blunderbuss, that made me turn round, then I saw smoke proceed from the blunderbuss.

Q. Did you see Bowler at that time - A. No, not

exactly at that time. I saw Mr. Burrows fall down in the cart. He laid on the shafts. The horse in the cart took fright, and ran down the road.

COURT. When did you see Bowler next - A. I looked round, and saw the smoke. I saw Bowler instantly afterwards, and Barnjam standing by holding the horse. Mr. Bowler throwed the blunderbuss into the ditch.

Q. Did you see this - A. Yes. He put his left foot on the stirrup, and his hat fell off. He dismounted, and picked it up; and when he was mounted on the horse he said to Barnjam, d - n your eyes, never mind; follow me. He went over the bridge as hard as he could go. I gave a loud scream. He came round, and gave me a very angry look.

Q. What did you scream - A. I do not know exactly.

Q. He turned round, and gave you an angry look - A. Yes, and rode away as hard as he could. I found a ball close by the side of some blood that came from Mr. Burrows.

Q. About how soon was that afterwards - A. About a couple of hours.

Q. Did you find any thing else - A. I was present when the hat was found. Mrs. Barnard picked up the hat and wig, and Mrs. Barnard picked up a ball. Her ball, that she picked up, was near the hat and wig, mine was near the blood.

Q. Did Mr. Bowler speak to you that morning - A. No, not at all.

MRS. BARNARD. I live in Mr. Jones's house; I have part of it. I am a married woman. On this morning, about a quarter before seven, I saw Mr. Bowler, in company with Mr. Jones, coming towards the bridge, and young Barnjam with them on horseback; they were going to Mr. Jones's shop; and at that time Mr. Bowler had the blunderbuss in his hand. I saw him several times after that walk in and out of Mr. Jones's shop.

Q. Did you see him go into Mr. Jones's shop with the blunderbuss - A. Yes; and I saw him afterwards walk in and out Jones's shop without the blunderbuss. I saw nothing more until I heard the report. I saw Bowler come out. I could not see where he stood. As soon as I heard the report of the blunderbuss I looked out of the window. I saw Mr. Burrows fall. I saw Barnjam get off the horse at that time, and Mr. Bowler got on, and ride away very fast towards the bridge. I then went into the road, and saw the hat and wig.

Q. At the time you heard the report of a gun you looked out of window - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see any smoke at that time - A. The smoke, as he fired, came direct to my window; I instantly went into the road, and picked up this hat and wig. As I saw Mr. Bowler ride away I picked up this hat and a wig and a bullet. The bullet was as close to the hat as it could lay.

Q. Is there any hole in the hat - A. Yes; two. I took the hat and wig down to where Mr. Burrows was sitting in a room.

Q. Had you known Bowler before - A. Yes; ever since I could remember.

Q. You are a native of that part of the world - A. Yes. I delivered the hat to Mrs. Street. I am sure it is the same.

ROBERT WARWICK . I am a blacksmith. I live at Alperton. On the morning of the 30th of May I was standing in Mrs. Street's garden; I heard the voice of murder. I ran out of the garden into the lane. I saw Mr. Burrows coming down the lane: he was sitting on the front board of the cart; one of his feet was hanging over the near side. We stopped Mr.Burrows's horse. He was running very fast. He said the rascal shot him. I asked him, who? He said, Mr. Bowler.

Q. Did you know Mr. Bowler - A. I have known Mr. Bowler six years. I had seen him a fortnight before this; he was coming by the shop where I was at work. I said, it is a windy morning. He said, yes: have you seen my shepherd boy. He seemed as well as ever I knew him.

MARY CHURCH . Q. You live at Alperton common, do not you - A. Yes.

Q. Do you recollect, on the 30th of May last, early in the morning, seeing Mr. Bowler and Mr. Burrows - A. Yes.

Q. Now state what was the first thing that you saw - A. I saw Mr. Burrows coming out of his own farm-yard as I was going to work. I followed him; and opposite of the timber I heard the report of a gun. I saw the smoke on the left hand side of the road.

Q. Was there any body standing on that side where you saw the smoke - A. I could not see, because there was a tree. I was going over the bridge: I met Mr. Bowler coming over it; he was riding very fast. I was going to speak to him. I did not, seeing him anxious of going his journey. I went up to Mr. Jones's shop. I looked about, and on the left hand side I saw the blunderbuss; I took it down to Mrs. Street.

COURT. Where was the blunderbuss laying that you took up - A. On the side of the ditch.

Mr. Pooley. Can you tell from the appearance of it whether it looked like a blunderbuss that had been recently discharged - A. I cannot tell that.

COURT. Is that a matter of dispute, Mr. Pooley.

Mr. Knapp. No, sir.

Mrs. Church. These are the clothes.

Mr. Pooley. Never mind the clothes.

Q. to Jones. Look at that blunderbuss; is that the same - A. This is the same gentleman.

Q. to Mr. Burrows. Is that your hat that you had on that morning - A. Yes.

Q. Had it any holes in it before it was shot at - A. No, not in that part.

JOHN WESTMORE . Q. From whom did you receive them bullets - A. I received one from Mrs. Barnett, and the other two were left at Mrs. Street's. I took them in my care.

Mrs. Jones. That is the bullet that I picked up; I delivered it to Mrs. Westbrook.

WILLIAM SHEPHARD . I am a stable-keeper in Balsour-street, Oxford-street.

Q. Do you know Bowler - A. Yes; I have known him some years. I bought some hay of Mr. Burrows, on the latter end of March, or the beginning

of April. Mr. Woodbridge asked me if I was hay-buyer. I said, I had bought some of Mr. Burrows. Mr. Bowler said, damn that Burrows, I will burrow him before long. I will be the death of him if I am hanged for it the next minute, so sure as my name is Bowler. I said, for God's sake, Mr. Bowler, do not take life away, because you cannot give it again. He said, I will be d - nd if I will not be the death of him before the middle of June, if I am hanged for it the next minute, so sure as my name is Bowler.

Q. Where did this conversation take place - A. Nearly in the middle of St. James's Hay-market.

Q. Did any thing more pass at that time - A. I immediately went to Mr. Burrows. I said, for God's sake, Mr. Burrows, what have you offended Old Tom Bowler in. Said I, he swears he will be the death of you before the middle of June.

Mr. Adolphus. What business was Bowler transacting there that day - A. He had a rough stick, cut out of the hedge, in his hand.

Prisoner. That is a false witness.

JOHN EAMER . I live in Perrywell parish, near Alperton. I am a farmer. I went to Mr. Burrows's house. I heard Bowler was come home.

COURT. Tell us when that was - A. On the 6th of June. I immediately went away down to Bowler's house. I sent for Payne, the constable. I went and took him. Before he came, I sent for a crow to break the door open. I went into the house, and there I saw Mr. Bowler. He was sitting in a chair: the constable came directly afterwards, and I gave him in possession. The constable's name is Payne.

COURT. Did any thing pass before the constable came - A. Yes; I went up to him, stript and searched him, to see whether he had any fire arms about him.

Mr. Pooley. Did any thing pass between you and him before the constable came - A. He begged me not to take him away from home. He said he would give himself up. I said, very well; I would consider of it: in the mean while I sent after the chaise. When the chaise and constable came, I asked him if he was agreeable to go along with me. He said he would. He went into the chaise with me and the constable; and, as we were going along in the chaise, he said to me, pray consider my family, and let me come back again. He said, you being a relation to Mr. Burrows, you can do a great deal for me. He said, if you will let me come back again to my daughter and grandchild, let me come back again and be confined there, I shall be satisfied. I will give you ten, twenty, or thirty, thousand pounds. I said, I have only got one voice: I will do what I can for you. My meaning was, to bring him where he is. We had no more conversation until we got to Marlborough-street. I gave him up there, and I had no more conversation afterwards. I have known him thirty-five years. His grand children live with him. He has a woman keeps his house. He has not a wife living.

MICHAEL PAYNE . I am the Ealing constable, the upper side. On the evening, of the 6th of June, I was sent for. I went to the prisoner's house, and saw the prisoner. I assisted in taking him in custody. I said to Mr. Bowler, you will consider your self as my prisoner. I was taking the handcuffs out of my pocket. Bowler said, d - n my eyes if I have them on: however, I charged Mr. Eamer to aid and assist me. I rode, to oblige Mr. Eamer, along with the post-boy. I did not ride in the chaise.

WILLIAM WITHERS . Q. We understand you are an attorney - A. I am. I am son-in-law to the prisoner.

Q. Do you recollect any dispute between Mr. Burrows and Mr. Bowler, respecting the cutting or lopping of some trees - A. There was some trivial dispute between them.

Q. About some trees that were cut by Mr. Burrows - A. Yes.

Q. In consequence of that, were you sent by Mr. Bowler to Mr. Burrows about it - A. I went. I told Mr. Burrows, that I thought there were little damage done. That Mr. Bowler meant to bring an action against him. I stated to Mr. Bowler, that I had delivered the message. He said, never mind; I shall not think any more about it.

Mr. Wetherall. What relation are you of the prisoners - A. A son-in-law. I married one of his daughters, about ten or eleven years ago.

Q. Since that period, have you been much in the habit of being with your father-in-law, the prisoner - A. Yes; a great deal.

Q. Do you recollect his having a fit - A. Perfectly well: a fit of apoplexy, about a year ago, July, 1811; I saw him on the night of the fit; perhaps about seven o'clock, in company with Mr. Burrows.

Q. Was he attacked with this fit in his own house - A. No, sir, I believe in the hay-field. I rode home with Mr. Burrows, from London: that evening he went with me to Mr. Bowler's house, to see how he was. We heard of the fit.

Q. I presume, at this time, Mr. Burrows was friendly with the prisoner - A. Perfectly so.

Q. When he was attacked with the fit, was he in a state of insensibility - A. Yes; I conceived he was so.

Q. That evening of the fit, was there any medical person with him - A. I think Dr. Hyatt.

Q.Now, sir, at that time, did you perceive any alteration in the state of your father-in-law's mind - A. A great deal at different times.

Q. Have you known instances in which his memory has failed - A. Yes.

Q. Have you seen him in a passion without any cause or reason - A. Yes, I have seen it.

Q. Have you heard him talk nonsense and incoherent - A. Yes.

Q. Have you heard him quarrel with his relations and servants without any apparent cause - A.Yes: d - ning their eyes without any provocation that I knew of. I saw none. I have seen it three or four times since he has been attacked with this fit, when he has been playing at cards with his house-keeper.

Q. Now, I ask you, since the month of March last, have you seen these symptoms increase upon him - A. Yes; particularly as to losing his memory; he could not count money rightly.

Q. Do you recollect his telling you, that he was exchequered, and was going to lose his estate - A.

Yes, several times. The last time I heard about that was in March last, or a month before.

Q. Was there the least foundation as you know of for his being exchequered, or losing his estate - A. Not the least.

Q. Did you know the prisoner had purchased his land-tax - A. I heard of it; and I enquired at the land-tax-office, and found it was right. He said, several times, that he was certain his land-tax was purchased wrong; in consequence of that he was sure he should be exchequered, and further than that, he was certain he should lose his estate.

Q. Did you enquire at the Land-tax office - A. I did, in Lincoln's Inn Fields. I found that he had purchased it right. I told him so when I went back. He then gave me a blank check for me to fill it up with the sum, that he might have done it wrong. I could not persuade him that he had done it right. I gave him the check again. He said, he was sure it was not all right; he was satisfied he had done it wrong; that his estate would be forfeited.

Q. Do you remember his writing you a letter about his insanity - A. Yes.

Mr. Pooley. How did you receive that letter - A. It was sent up to me. That letter is destroyed.

Q. Are you positive that it is destroyed - A. Yes.

Mr. Wetherall. Was not the purport of that letter for you to advertise that he, the prisoner, was a madman - A. Yes; that was it.

Q. How long is that ago - A. About four months ago.

Q. Had you any conversation with him about receiving that letter - A. I received another letter sometime afterwards. That other letter is not destroyed. I have not got it with me.

Q. Do you recollect his threatening to destroy himself - A. Yes. That is about four or five months ago. That was at his own house. He asked me, what would become of his property if he destroyed himself, and if I ever knew any one that had destroyed themselves.

Q. Did he state how he would destroy himself - A. No. He wanted to know if ever I knew any person that had destroyed themselves.

Q. Do you recollect his asking you to dance once - A. Yes. That may be about four months ago. That was at his own house. I was at his house about three or four o'clock in the afternoon. He said, I had had a good education; he wondered I could not dance; and if I would get up and dance he would play upon the gridiron.

Q. Do you recollect this unfortunate man talking to you about the subterraneous cavern - A.Yes: that he had been under ground. That is about four or five months ago.

Q. Where did he say he had been the under ground travels to - A. He had been under Perrywell and Harrow. He had seen people that were dead forty years ago. He had seen them that were happy, and them that were not; and he has mentioned it at other times.

Q. Were you often at his house, to know when the prisoner arose, and when he went to bed - A. Yes; sometimes he got up between three and four o'clock in the morning. Before he had the fit he would get up about five or six in the morning, and after the fit he would get up between two and three; he would breakfast in half an hour, and then sit down to cards. I have seen that several times.

Q. Have you observed him several times playing at cards - A. I saw him once playing at all-fours: he said he should like to play at all-fours; at the same time he was not conscious that he was playing at cards. He would dine at half after eight in the morning. He would eat his meat half done, sometimes raw. I have seen it on the table raw, so that I could not eat any when he asked me.

Q. When he had dined what would this unfortunate man do - A. He would walk out. He wandered about his yard generally; sometimes in the street. He has talked to me very incoherent, so as to appear quite absent.

Q. What time would he take his tea - A. About two or three o'clock in the afternoon; and he has left me when I have been talking to him; when he has done tea he has left me in a very abrupt manner.

Q. Was this his general habit - A. Yes: since he had the fit. When I have been in the house I have generally seen him in bed by four o'clock, sometimes between two and three. I considered him as deranged all the time since the fit. It increased upon him since April and March.

Q. Did you ever consult with any person, and when, of taking out a commission of lunacy - A. I did, with Mr. Burrows himself, at the Angel in Oxford-road. Mr. Burrows and I have been in the habit of riding together to London. I met him at this house where his horse was put up. I told him I thought my father was in a strange way; I thought it proper that a commission of lunacy should be taken out against him.

COURT. When was this - A. This was between three and four months ago. Mr. Burrows agreed with it; that he thought it was right. I had mentioned to him several times that he was in a strange way. I thought that a commission of lunacy should be taken out, but I thought it a matter of delicacy; and the only motive that I did not do it was, that the world should not say that I had my father-in-law locked up for the sake of getting his property. About two months ago I went up to Mr. Bowler's house one morning. His father has been dead several years. He asked me if I knew his father. He was dead before I was born. I said, no, I did not. He said, he was a strong man; perhaps he was the strongest man in the kingdom; he could carry three sacks of beans at once; and that he could carry half a load of deals up a ladder.

Q. Do you ever recollect the prisoner ever taking you to the window, and telling you that it snowed - A. Yes; and that it rained when it was fine sunshiny weather. That is about two months ago. I was in the habit of attending him two or three times a week, and sometimes in the course of a day, he would send for me, and then would forget that he had sent for me to come.

Q. Do you recollect, a short time before this unfortunate affair happened, his telling you that he was going to leave the country - A. Yes. He said, that his property would be exchequered; that he must leave the country; or, that he should leave the country.

I considered him to be in a total state of insensibility. When he was in a sober state he was shy; he would not let me have a pound; and when he talked about being exchequered he would let me have any sum.

Mr. Pooley. When he said he should leave the country this surprised you - A. Very much.

Q. He was what is called a stingy man - A. Yes, quite so.

Q. How long is it ago that he told you he was going to leave the country on account of his going to be exchequered - A. The first time is about four months ago, and the last time between two and three months ago.

Q. Did he tell you why he expected to be exchequered - A. That he had not purchased his land-tax right. I could not get it out of his head that it was not so.

Q. Did he accompany the expression that any person had threatened to exchequer him. Have you any doubt that he told you that Mr. Burrows said he should be exchequered - A. I think he said it was in consequence of Mr. Burrows and his neighbours that he should be exchequered.

Q. Did he say that Mr. Burrows said he should be exchequered, or threatened him - A. No, I cannot swear that.

Q. Do you happen to know, Mr. Withers, whether that was after you had carried the message to Mr. Burrows about lopping the trees - A. I think it was before, but I am not positive.

Q. Were you in the habit of borrowing money of Mr. Bowler - A. Not for myself.

Q. Did you borrow money for Mr. Burrows more than once - A. Only once I borrowed the money for Mr. Burrows. I think that was about four or five months back. I applied for it to Mr. Bowler. I took the draft up from Mr. Bowler to Burrows for two hundred pound upon Mr. Bowler's banker.

Q. Do you know whether he kept a large account - A. Sometimes he did. I do not think he has drawn any drafts himself within these two months. I have not seen him draw them. I used to receive the money of the salesmen, and pay it over to Mr. Bowler. We settle the commission since, once every three weeks; and I have been in the habit of receiving his rents: last quarter-day I received some: at lady-day I received thirty or forty pounds.

Q. The farm of two hundred acres, where he lives, is his own - A. Yes.

Q. You say that he threatened to destroy himself. He consulted with you what would become of his property - A. Yes.

Q. What woman has he to take care of his house - A. Elizabeth Hagan .

Q. Who manages his farm - A. He himself employed his men. It is a meadow farm. He superintends his hay-making, and sometimes he left it to an old man, who rode about, and gave directions. He used to pay his men chiefly. When I have been there I have observed that he paid his men. I live about three quarters of a mile from him.

Q. This last five months have you been much at his house - A. I have, perhaps, every day, and sometimes I have not been there for a fortnight. I used to walk up there every day, knowing him in this situation.

Q. You say you have heard him use this expression, d - n your eyes, and that, to his housekeeper - A. He was a man of course expressions.

Q. What near relations has he - A. The nearest relations are me and my wife, and Mr. and Mrs. Barnjam.

Q. Do you recollect who used to shave this man - A. I believe he used to shave himself.

Q. After he mentioned of destroying himself, how came you to permit him to use a razor - A. I do not know. I was not always there. I could not help it.

Q. Why did you not take some step of having his person taken care of - A. For the reason that I before said: a delicacy. That is the reason we had, or we should have taken out a commission of lunacy against him. I saw him shave himself once. I was not in the house at the time he shaved himself then.

Q. After having told you that he meant to destroy himself, you permitted him the use of such a dangerous weapon. Do you mean to state that it was from motives of delicacy that prevented you from having his person taken care of - A. Nothing but that. I was afraid the world would have said that we had taken his property improper.

Q. Did your wife know that he had made that threat of destroying himself - A. I think she did, and I think she mentioned it to Dr. Hyatt.

Q. I want to know, why you did not take some steps to secure this man - A. Only for the reason that I have stated; from motives of delicacy; that the world might not say that we had locked up the man for the sake of taking his property; I being only one. There are two more brothers.

Q. Now you say, that he used to rise at an early hour in the morning - A. Yes. He used to rise sometimes at three in the morning, within these last three or four months. He used to send for me as soon as he was up, two or three times in an hour. I have seen him at seven o'clock, and at six o'clock, playing at cards. I found them playing at cards when I went there. After playing at cards he has walked with me down the road; he would leave me by myself, and return home to his own house.

Q. Have you not seen him superintending his farm the same as other farmers would do, who had farms of the same description - A. I believe he did.

Q. Down to the 30th of May - A. I have seen him in the fields, walking across, but I cannot tie myself to any time.

WILLIAM WHEATLEY . I live at Harrow on the Hill. I am a schoolmaster there.

Q. You also draw wills - A. I do, sometimes.

Q. Have you lately made a will for Mr. Bowler - A. Yes; on the 28th of May. I took the instructions from Mr. Bowler, verbally. I went to him to receive the instructions. He called on me the day previous.

Q. What did he say the first day he called upon you - A. He said he wished to make an alteration in his former will. I told him, I would wait on him in the evening. I waited on him in the evening. I cannot recollect the alteration. I waited on him after five o'clock. I took down the alteration that he

wished to be made. I have destroyed it, as I always do when I make the will.

Q. Did he give you the instructions without embarrassment - A. Certainly; and I made a new will.

Q. Did you attend him to execute that will - A. I did, on the following day, the 28th, I read the will over to him, he approved of it.

Q. Did he appear to you perfectly to understand the contents - A. Certainly.

Q. Have you the will about you - A. Yes. It is sealed up in a paper by me, in the presence of the witnesses. It was his desire that I should take care of it myself.

Q. Open the will. Look at the signature of the testator. Was there any body else in the room besides the witnesses - A. There was a person of the name of Foster; he was present when the will was read.

Q. Were the witnesses present - A. They were not.

Q. How long were you transacting, that time, with the testator, with Foster and the three witnesses - A. An hour perhaps.

Q. In all that time, in your opinion, what was the state of the prisoner's mind - A.He seemed very collected at that time. I had seen him some time previous.

Q. I am not asking you of some time previous. One thing at a time. Was he in that state of mind a man ought to be when he makes a will - A. Certainly.

Q. You stated that nobody but Foster and the three witnesses were with you at the time that you presented the will - A. There was Mrs. Withers in the house nearly about the time; Mrs. William Withers , the wife of the last witness.

Q. Was any body there when he gave you instructions - A. Mr. Foster.

Q. Did Mrs. Withers know what you were going to do - A. Yes. She said, I was coming to make an alteration in the will. She said, she thought he was not in a state fit to do it. I think that was after the execution of the will. Mr. Foster heard me take the instructions.

Q. From all that you observed at that time have you any doubt that he was perfectly capable of executing his will - A. I thought he was in his proper senses at that time.

Mr. Alley. What do you mean by

="that time:=" do you mean that he was not, or had not been, in a fit state, when you made use of that expression

="that time=" - A. Yes.

Q. When you speak of a former period that he was not fit to do it, when was that - A. Near two months before.

Q. Mrs. Withers thought he was not in a fit state at that time - A. Yes. I said, I thought he was quite correct. Some time before that he appeared in a low desponding way. He told me that he had made some mistake on the subject of his land-tax. He had considerable property about his abode.

Mr. Adolphus. Did that low state that you describe give you any caution about him - A. None.

Q. You had made wills for him before - A. Yes, one.

Q. Before this desponding state that he was in. You were a collector of taxes - A. Yes.

Q. Had you received any of him about two months before - A. I received some on the 5th of April, and about the 16th of May.

Q. At these times did he appear capable of conducting his own business - A. Yes.

Q. Did he count out, himself, the bank-notes with which he paid you - A. Certainly. He asked me the amount the last time he paid me, and he gave me the amount.

JOHN FOSTER . I live at Harrow on the Hill. I am a farmer.

Q. Do you know Thomas Bowler - A. Yes, for thirty years.

Q. Have you during that time been in the habit of transacting business together - A. I have been at parish business with him. I have been at parish meetings. He was not there at Easter. He was in a low desponding way. On the 28th of May last I was at Bowler's house.

Q. Do you recollect hearing of Mr. Burrows being shot - A. Yes, on the Saturday. It was Thursday when I heard the instructions. Mr. Bowler said he wished to make a fresh will. Mr. Wheatley prepared it the day before, and he read it over by the desire of Mr. Bowler. I was present when Bowler first gave instructions about the will. It was at Bowler's house. I heard him tell Mr. Wheatley what he wished to do with his property.

Q. Did you observe Wheatley writing of what he said - A. I did. I was there until Wheatley had taken the whole of the instructions. I went to retire, but Bowler desired me to remain there.

Q. Was the whole of the instructions given by Bowler himself - A. By Bowler himself.

Q. At that time when he was giving these instructions how did Bowler appear - A. He appeared to be very well, to what I have seen him since Christmas. From what past, and what he said, I thought he was in a perfect state to do business. I attended the next day, when the will was executed. I heard the will read over. No one was in the room but Wheatley, and Bowler, and me; no one else. The three witnesses came in at the desire of Mr. Bowler. Mr. Bowler opened the door, and called in the witnesses; and even Bowler sent his servant for Mr. Oby and Kidney. I was present. He went part of the way for one, and returned again, and said, that Oby would be there in a few minutes, and Mr. Kidney too. He mentioned the names of both of them.

Q. You were present when he executed the will in the presence of these two persons - A. Yes. They all three came in, and they were all three in the room when the will was executed by him.

Q. When they came in, and when Wheatley read the will over to him, was there any thing in Bowler's manner that induced you, in your mind, to believe that he was not capable of executing his will. Was there any thing about him that he appeared to be a man not sound in his senses - A. Not that day, but before there had. Two months before that time I thought the man would drown himself. I thought

him in a poor low way.

Q. How lately, before he gave the instructions, had you seen him - A. About a fortnight. I called at his house to know how he did. He seemed to be mending very fast. I saw him, at one time, laying on a bed in the kitchen. I persuaded him to go into the country. I told him I thought it would be a great benefit to his health. He said, he was going to Mr. Penfold, in Oxfordshire, 60 or 70 miles off.

Q. How long, before the execution of this will, was the conversation about Penfold - A. About a fortnight or three weeks. He did not tell me what he wanted to see him for. After the will was executed, I should think I remained there about an hour. He told me that Mr. Lovett, his banker, was in the same way that he was in, his low desponding way. A conversation took place, concerning farming; Mr. Bowler joined in conversation; he talked rationally, and very well collected in his mind to what I had seen him before. I saw nothing wrong; if I had, I certainly should have mentioned it to Mr. Wheatley about the will not being executed.

Mr. Adolphus. Q. to Mr. Wheatley. Shew Mr. Kidney the signature in that will.

MR. KIDNEY. That is my signature and handwriting. I am a farmer. Mr. Bowler sent a boy after me, and I went up to Mr. Bowler: when I came there I found Bowler and Foster together, and Kelsey, another subscribing witness. Mr. Wheatley told us what we were wanted for, in Bowler's presence. Mr. Wheatley asked me to witness the will. Bowler said nothing to me: it was all prepared and laid down. I saw Bowler sign and deliver it as his last will and testament. He appeared to me calm and collected. At that time I saw nothing the matter with him. I saw him the morning he shot Mr. Burrows: he walked up to me, in the road by Jones's shop: he asked me to tell Daniel Redford to buy him a load of straw, and to send it to Lord Canarvon: I told him I would: that was all that passed between us. This might be ten or twelve minutes before the blunderbuss went off. He had not the blunderbuss in his hand at that time.

Q. Where were you when the blunderbuss went off - A. Some way on towards London.

Q. At that time that he was talking to you to send the straw to Lord Canarvon, was another man, of the name of Kidney, with him - A. No, not when I was.

MR. OBY. I live in Ealing. I am a victualler. I have known the prisoner twenty years. I have seen him frequently pass my house, as it is between his house and London. On Thursday night I went to his house to attest a will. Mr. Bowler sent a boy for me. When I went, Mr. Bowler met me in the yard; he told me, he found himself in a middling way. He said he would trouble me to witness his will. I told him I would do it certainly. When I went into the room Mr. Foster was there, and Kelsey.

Q. Did you see Bowler write his name, and put the seal to it. Yes.

Q. Did you hear him declare it to be his will - A. After he had put his seal to it, he sealed it, and delivered it as his last will and deed. Mr. Wheatley recalled it, and then he delivered it as his last will and testament.

Q. Now, when you first saw him in the yard, and when he executed his will, how did he seem in his mind - A. I did not notice him out of the regular way.

Q. Did he appear a man capable of performing so serious an act - A. Yes: I was particularly attentive in consequence of a circumstance. I met Mr. Bowler about a month before: I asked him how he did; he said he was quite well. I found myself surprized, and told him, I was glad to hear it. When we were parting, he put his hand to his head. He said, I have a complaint in my head. I have frequently a giddiness coming in my head. It struck me from the report that went about the neighbourhood, there might originate his disease. I considered him in a fit state to make his will. If I had had any reason to suppose that he was not, I should have objected to it.

JOHN KELSEY . I am a carpenter, at Harrow.

Q. You know Bowler - A. Yes.

Q. By whose desire did you attend the execution of that will - A. By Bowler's. Mr. Bowler opened the door, I believe. The door was opened; I went in: Bowler might say, sit down; if he did, that was all. I waited for Oby and Kidney.

Q. Was there any conversation with Bowler during that time - A. I do not recollect any.

Q. Do you remember his executing the will - A. I remember his signing the will: at that present moment he appeared to me to be perfectly in his senses.

Mr. Gurney. You say, at that present moment, he seemed to be in his senses. You knew before that he was not - A. I only knew that by report.

COURT. Would the prisoner, Bowler, say any thing for himself to the jury, he is now at liberty to do it.

Prisoner. No, I leave it to my counsel.

MR. HYATT. Q. You are a surgeon and apothecary, living at Ealing - A. I am.

Q. I understand you have known the defendant full twelve years - A. Full that time. I have been in the habit of seeing him frequently, by attending a servant of his. On the 9th of July I was sent to him: he was taken in a fit, as he was on horseback, in an hay-field.

Q. At the time that you first saw him, was he in a state of sensibility - A. He was in a complete state of insensibility. I attended him for that about ten days: he recovered by slow degrees; but his memory never was perfect from that time.

Q. What effect did the fit produce upon the body - A. It left a very serious effect upon the head.

Q. How was he when first you came to him after the fit? Did he foam at the mouth - A. Yes; there was a slight portion of saliva at his mouth.

Q. You bled him, I believe - A. I bled him largely. In consequence of that bleeding he recovered, by degrees; in a few weeks he got tolerably well, so that he could walk about.

Q. Have you seen him frequently since - A. Frequently. I don't think he has ever perfectly recovered his memory.

Q. From his complaint, he had a considerable injury in his head; did that continue - A. He complained of a something in his head; from that time, until this unfortunate business took place, he complained that he had an uneasiness in his head: but, he was so positive a man, I could not prevail upon him to take any thing.

Q. Do you remember being called to him in March - A. On the 19th of last March I was sent to him by one of his daughters, unknown to him. I saw him. I found him labouring under a great depression of spirits, and his head was seriously affected. I told him I wished him to let me do something to relieve it. He put himself in a violent passion, and swore he would take nothing. On the 30th of March I was sent for again. I found him labouring under a severe affection of the head, and a great depression of spirits. His pulse was small at ninety. I said, friend Bowler, what is the matter with you? He said, I do not know; my head is not well. He said, they want to take my estate from me. I said, you must endeavour to rouse from the idea of their taking your estate; who can touch your estate, or a guinea, or a shilling that you have in the world? but he still persisted in the notion. I endeavoured to free him from that affection, but without effect. I saw him on the following day. I sent him a blister. I found that gave him some relief, but still he had this idea.

Q. Did you continue seeing Bowler from the 31st of March - A. I was in the habit of calling upon him after I had done attending him. I had a number of patients in that village, and frequently called upon him, almost three times a-week, until the time of the unfortunate accident.

Q. Was his symptoms a continuing sort, as that which you have described - A. Either more or less. He was never entirely free from that lowness of spirits, and the affection of the head.

Mr. Pooley. You say, when you left attending this man, you were in the habit of seeing him two or three time a-week - A. Almost every week.

Q. Did you see him riding about his fields - A. Yes; but not lately. He has entirely neglected his business for the last eight or nine months. He has always neglected every thing. When I saw him I met with him at his own house. Sometimes I have met him walking over the bridge of the canal, walking about carelessly as if about no business. I went to him at his house at first. During the whole time I have known him he never was at my house. I have asked him years ago.

Q. In July, when you first attended him in that fit, his head was affected - A. Yes.

Q. Do you mean to state that the appearance of this person was such that he was incapable of transacting his own concerns - A. He certainly has, latterly.

Q. In July, 1811, and a little time after that, do you mean to state from that time, until the month of March in this year, that he was a person, and you considered him incapable of managing his own affairs - A. That is my opinion; and I beg leave to state as to his insibility from the disordered state of his mind and intellects. One morning I went in, he had a small bit of paper with figures on it. He said, Hyatt, sit down, in a few minutes I will speak to you. It was a very trifling thing. He threw it down, and said, Withers must do it.

Q. My question is this: from July, 1811, to the 30th of May, do you think he was in a fit state to be trusted - A. I do not think he was.

Q. Thinking he was an unsafe person to be trusted did you ever recommend to his relations to have him put under restraint - A. We had a consultation upon this subject prior to the unfortunate accident. I did not give a positive opinion. I said, I would see him again in the course of a few days. It had been in agitation some days to take out a commission of lunacy against him.

Q. My question is this: during that period, when you think it was unsafe his going about, on account of his own hands, did you, during that period, recommend him being put under restraint or confinement - A. I unfortunately did not. I am very sorry for it.

Q. Then the first time you had some consultation was the Wednesday before this unfortunate affair took place - A. We had some consultation, not particularly on the Wednesday, about a fortnight or ten days before.

Q. You say there was some conversation at that time - A. There was.

Q. Was it proposed by other persons - A. It was proposed to me; it did not originate with me. I then intended, the first opportunity, to give my opinion to the family. It was my full intention to recommend him being put under restraint, the next time I had seen any of the family.

Q. Do you know any thing whether he was a violent man or not - A. I always considered him a positive and violent man, both before the 11th of July, and more particularly since.

COURT. Do I understand you right? At the time that you ceased to attend him as a medical man, you saw him down to the month of May every week - A. I think I can safely say I never missed a-week without seeing him.

Q. Can you say, during that time, you think he never perfectly recovered the lowness of spirits, and the affection of the head - A. It is my firm opinion that he never did.

Q. Do you think he was in such a situation he did not know what he did - A. I do not think he did at times. He acted under a wonderful depression of spirits.

Q. My question is: during the whole of that time whether he was not in a state to exercise his mind, to know whether he was doing right or wrong - A. I do not think he was, perfectly. His recollection was much better at times than others.

Q. Then you do not think, at any part of that time, he was a man that knew what he was about - A. Not entirely.

Q. He might have a complaint in his head: do you mean to say that it was to that extent that he was incapable of acting as a rational being - A. I think he was, a greater part of the time.

Q. Can you distinguish what part he was, and what part he was not - A. At times, as I observed

before, he was better than at others, but never had his intellects perfectly clear.

DR. AINSLEY. Q. I need not ask you whether you are a physician - A. I am.

Q. Are the symptoms that the last witness has described the symptoms of an apoplectic fit. He saw Mr. Bowler at the termination of the fit - A. The symptoms of apoplexy and epileptic are so much alike, being a kind of a stupor, that I cannot say which it was.

Q. Insanity is sometimes the consequence of fits of this kind - A. Very frequently.

COURT. From both kinds - A. From both kinds, but not so frequently from apoplexy; from epilepsy very frequent.

Mr. Gurney. I believe you were called upon to attend this man after he was in confinement - A. I was, on the 11th of June. I found him in a deranged state, that derangement arising from false conceptions, from preceding events. Perhaps I should give you the account I received before I saw him myself.

Q. We cannot hear that. Was he violent at that time - A. By no means so; very quiet; extremely so.

Q. Did you continue to visit him a good many times - A. I visited him four times, I think four successive days, then I omitted one.

Q. Did you see him the two following days. Did the continuance confirm or shake your opinion of derangement - A. Confirm it.

Q. In the course of your practice you must have seen a great number of persons deranged - A. Certainly, a great number.

Q. From the experience that you have acquired did it appear to you that his derangement might have been of a considerable standing - A. I have no doubt about it.

Q. And in the fit of last July, you find the adequate cause of it - A. I have no doubt it proceeded from that moment.

Mr. Adolphus. You had never seen him before the 11th of June last - A. Never.

Q. Was the nature of his derangement at that time such as to act constantly, or subject to lucid intervals - A. Not to lucid intervals, but subject to various acts of violence, where there is a delusion on the subject; upon all other subjects the man can act as well as any person. Upon all subjects, except the subject of delusion they would think rationally and clearly. In the present state these parts of intellect are considerably weakened, and his memory imperfect, so that, perhaps, he has not a sound mind upon any subject, in any case where the derangement remains.

Q. This man fell in this state from a fit in last July. Go into what you have observed. Your observation began upon this man on the 11th of June, last month - A. On the 11th, 12th, 13th, 15th, and 1st of July, I was with him. I was with him long enough to satisfy my own mind he was precisely the same. The second visit I was alone with him. I found he was perfectly quiet.

Q. You could not believe, at any time previous to that, he could have given instructions for making a will with a perfect cognizance - A. If I had seen him the day before he made that will I should have said that he laboured under derangement.

Q. On the day that he committed this act, from what you observed on the 11th of June, should you have supposed that on the 28th of May he had been executing his will - A. No, I should not. I conceive the disease to be in a regular progress.

Mr. Gurney. The old delusion, acting on his mind, will lead him to do any act - A. Undoubtedly it will; and you will find the person, though he may mention it, yet will put his purposes into execution.

COURT. Not conscious that he is doing wrong - A. Most likely.

ELIZABETH HAGAN . Q. You are the housekeeper of the prisoner - A. Yes. I have lived with him many years. He keeps another female servant besides me. Her name is Charlotte Pearce .

Q. Do you remember your master being attacked with a fit - A. Perfectly well. He was brought home, as I thought, a dead man.

Q. Now, describe what happened in this fit. You will answer upon these general questions. Since that fit has his faculties and reason been affected - A. Ever since.

Q. Have his habits of life been altered since that fit - A. Very much indeed.

Q. Before this fit, what time used he to get up in a morning - A. Four or five o'clock in summer. Since he had the fit, this summer, he has been up at two o'clock in the morning, or three o'clock in the morning. He has, for these three or four months past, got up at three in the morning. I do not recollect he did in winter.

Q. Has he done so constantly, or has it only been once or twice - A. Constantly. He has his breakfast sometimes by five o'clock.

Q. Before he got his breakfast how used he to employ himself - A. He used to go in and out of doors, wandering about his premises.

Q. Did he appear as if his mind was occupied about any business - A. He appeared to stare about, as if his mind was absent.

Q. When he had got his breakfast what did he use to do then - A. He used to order me to bring the cards to him about six o'clock, after he had breakfasted.

Q. Had he played at cards with you at that early hour, before he was visited with that fit - A. Oh, no; he was attending to his business then.

Q. In the course of playing at cards did he express any words of irritation - A. Yes, he did. One morning he told me that I was a d - d liar, and took up his stick, and went out. I had said no words to provoke him.

Q. Was it his general habit of playing at cards every day after breakfast - A. Every day.

COURT. Do you mean since July last, every day - A. For two or three months past.

Mr. Wetherall. Now, what time did he order his dinner to be got ready - A. Sometimes between eight and nine in the morning, and sometimes ten o'clock. This was constantly his habit the last two or three months. He would have his meat taken up when it has hardly been warm through.

Q. I ask you whether that was his mode of eating his victuals before this fit - A. Oh, dear, no; nobody

was more particular than him.

Q. Did he actually eat it in that state - A. Very hearty.

Q. Was it in that state that the rest of the family would eat - A. No; we were obliged to eat bread and cheese.

Q. Was it his habit, before the fit, to have short commons - A. No; none kept a better house than he did.

Q. Do you remember his going to walk out when it was going to rain - A. Yes. He would go and lay in the yard. I have frequently found him laying on the wet grass.

Q. Had you ever seen any thing of this sort before the fit - A. Never. I would not let him lay down. I watched him narrowly for the last three or four months. I expected he would do some mischief to himself; then I used to watch him. When he laid down I used to go to him, when the grass has been as wet as it could be.

Q. Now, since he has had the fit was your master in the habit of singing - A. Yes: psalms and songs. He very seldom sung before except when he was tipsy; and since the fit it has been common for him to sing psalms or songs in the morning. I never knew him do it before, except when he was tipsy.

Q. Did you ever hear him say any thing with respect to his destroying himself - A. He very frequently said he would come it thus. He made a motion with his hand to his throat. I heard him say he should like to get on the top of the house to have a very nice jump.

Q. Where was he to jump - A. Into the yard, I believe. I understood that was what he meant: and he said, he had written a letter, to put in the newspaper, that he was mad.

Q. Do you recollect at any time taking a rope from him - A. I saw him coming out of the parlour with a rope in his hand. I took it out of his hand. He took a rope out of his pocket, and put it in the kitchen drawer. Soon after he took it out again. He said, he was going to wring some pigs. There were no pigs to wring at the time.

Q. Did you secure the rope afterwards - A. Yes; I took it out of his pocket. I went into the shed. He kept looking up at the beams. He said nothing at all, but walked out.

Q. Was this about the time that he had the rope - A. Yes; the very day that he had taken the rope.

Q. Did you and your fellow servant watch him of nights - A. Yes. We have set up for weeks together. We were fearful that he should do some harm to himself. I have gone to his bed-room and taken away his garters and his knife. That was the last time I thought he would murder himself. My master's own daughter desired me to do this.

Q. What is her name - A. Mrs. Withers.

Q. Do you recollect the Thursday before Mr. Burrows was shot at - A. Yes.

Q. What state was your master in on the Thursday - A. Much in the same state that he was in for the last two or three months. I did not see much difference.

Q. Did you happen to know whether on that day he was wandering about, and laid down on the grass - A. Yes; and he played at cards a good part of the day. I believe he went to London in the morning: I would not positively swear it. On the Friday he was playing at cards nearly the whole day, and nearly at night he played with his daughter. He expressed a wish that he should like to play at all-fours; and he was actually playing at all-fours at the time. He went to bed between two and three, and on the Thursday and on Wednesday the same.

Q. On the Saturday morning how did he set off - A. He got up in the morning: he ordered his chaise-cart, and about an hour afterwards he altered his mind, and ordered his horse.

Q. How long before that morning had he ever rode to London on horseback - A. Not for four or five years. He always went to London in a chaise-cart.

Q. Did you see him set out in the morning - A. No. I was backwards, feeding the fowls.

Q. Was any blunderbuss in the house - A. Yes; this blunderbuss laid in the corner of the room.

Q. When your master went out did you miss this blunderbuss - A. No, I did not. I was busy. I did not take notice.

Q. Were you aware of his taking the blunderbuss with him when he went out that morning - A. No, I was not.

Mr. Pooley. On that morning, when he went out, do you recollect his leaving the premises - A. I was not in the house; he got up about four o'clock that morning.

Q. Did he sleep alone - A. Yes.

Q. How long is it since you had the first apprehension of his cutting his own throat - A. About three months ago.

Q. Who was in the habit of shaving him - A. He did it sometimes himself. At the time that he was ill he had a man to shave him.

Q. After he recovered, for this last twelvemonth, has he shaved himself - A. Yes. He kept the rasor in his own drawer.

Q. How often did he use to shave himself - A. Sometimes once a-week. When he was well he shaved three times a-week.

Q. Did you communicate to the family, to his daughter, that he made that threat - A. Yes; and he said the same to his daughter. She gave us instructions to take care of him.

Q. Where was it he kept the razor locked up - A. In his bureau.

Q. Where did he keep the key of that bureau. You went into the room and took out his knife and garters, why did not you take the key where he kept his razors - A. Because I did not like to go to the bureau, where the money was.

Q. Why did not you take the key, and take his daughter, or some of the family, to his bureau, to see what you did - A. It ought to have been done.

Q. But you did not do it - A. No.

Q. Why did not you put the fire arms away - A.I ought to have done it. I did not do it.

Q. You say, that after he had the fit, July 1811, he was in the habit of going to bed about two or three o'clock nightly - A. Yes; for the last three or four months past, that was his constant habit; and sometimes

he would get up at two o'clock in the morning.

Q. And you say, on the Thursday, before this happened, he went to bed at the same time, and got up at the same time. Did you see him go to bed on Thursday - A. I did.

Q. What time did he get up the next morning - A. At four o'clock.

Q. You are sure he was in the room all that time - A. I am positive; and, on the Friday, he went to bed between two and three.

Q. Perhaps, after he went to bed, on that day, you went in his room - A. No; I did not, as I recollect.

Q. Did you see him get up the next morning - A. No.

Q. On Thursday, between two and three o'clock, where were you - A. About the house.

Q. Where were you on the afternoon of Friday - A. At home.

Q. If any body came in or out, could they come in or out without your seeing them - A. No.

Q. Could he come down stairs without your seeing - A. No.

Q. You are quite sure of that - A. Yes.

Q. He went to bed, on Thursday and Friday, at what time - A. Between two and three o'clock, and was up stairs till four o'clock in the morning.

Q. Are you positive to that time - A. Yes; and I will swear it.

Q. You have mentioned, in the hearing of the Court, that, for the last two or three months, it has been his daily habit: do you mean, that he did that on the Wednesday, before Mr. Burrows was shot - A. He did; and there he was until the morning.

Q. And your business keeps you to the lower part of the house - A. It does.

Q. No person can come in without your seeing it - A. No; I am sure of that.

Q. So, that if your master had been down stairs, with any person, transacting business, you must have seen it - A. I must have seen it.

Q. Now, to the questions I put to you, you are sure of all this - A. I am.

Q. The fact of Mr. Burrow's being shot, on the Saturday, brought to your mind, and that makes you so sure of it. You know Mr. Wheatley, the man who has been examined here, and you know Mr. Foster - A. I do.

Q. Were they in the habit of seeing your master - A. Yes, frequently; I know their persons well.

Q. Do you recollect Mr. Wheatley coming there on Wednesday - A. I do; he was there on the Wednesday afternoon. My master did not go to bed so early.

Q. What time did he go to bed - A. I cannot positively say what time he went to bed, on account of Mr. Wheatley and Foster being the.

Q. Are you quite sure that he went to bed so soon on the Thursday - A. Yes; I am.

Q. That you are sure of - A. I am: Mr. Wheatley and Foster were there on Wednesday afternoon. There was Mr. Oby there, and Mr. Henry Kidney , and Mr. Kelney.

Q. Where was your master at that time - A.At home.

Q. You are sure of that - A. I am.

Q. Now, recollect what time he went to bed the time of night you have been stating, positively - A. Yes; I have; but I did not recollect their being there. I ask pardon.

Q. I asked you the question, whether he went to bed at the usual hour? you told me, over and over again, that you were positive, at the usual hour. How came you to tell me, when I put these questions to you, over and over to you, that on Wednesday and Thursday you recollected that he went to bed between two and three o'clock - A. If no one was there he was certain to go to bed at that hour. He usually used to go to bed if nobody was there.

Q. Do not you know what they came about - A. They came about some business. I did not see them do it.

Q. Did you go into the room while they were there - A. I did.

Q. Did you see any papers there - A. I did not.

Q. Did you observe Foster and Wheatley there on Thursday - A. I did, on Thursday or Wednesday.

Q. You said, it was the day that Mr. Oby was there. Did you see them there the day before that - A. Yes; my master was in bed when they came, and I called him up. I had hard work to prevail upon him to get up.

Q. How came you to tell me, that your master went to bed at the usual hour, and never got up until that early hour. How came you to tell me so positively; and now you tell me, that on Wednesday he was gone to bed? Why did not you mention that before - A. I did not think of it. My master has been in the habit of going to bed, for two or three months past, so early, I did not recollect them people coming when you asked me.

Q. During the last two or three months, who paid the bills - A. Mr. Withers has been in the habit of paying the bills.

Q. How many day labourers has he - A. Three, I believe.

Q. Has not he employed so many as five, six, or seven men - A. Not in winter time.

Q. Who paid them men weekly - A. Himself.

Q. Who ordered them to go to work - A. He ordered them himself.

Q. Who gave orders to them to where the hay was to go to - A. Master; and sometimes he told them wrong.

Q. Do you recollect your master giving orders to bind hay for particular customers - A. No.

Q. During these three months, was not he walking about his grounds as usual - A. No; he did not.

Q. Did he appear, on those days, to know what he was about - A. No; he did not. I think he did not know the difference between right and wrong.

Q. Who went out with him on Saturday morning - A. I do not know that any body was with him.

Q. Who went out with him - A. I was not in the house when he went out, so I could not see any body go out when I was not in the house.

Mr. Wetherall. Has he appeared for the last three or four months to know his business - A. No; he

has not. He went into the rick-yard, and ordered them to bind clover, when there was no clover in the rick-yard.

COURT. Have you any recollection what your master did, and how he conducted himself for the four or five days previous to this day the fact took place with Mr. Burrows - A. I saw no difference in him, to what it was for the last four or five months.

Q. You said that he used to go to bed about three o'clock in the afternoon. You first said he did so on the Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday, before this happened to Burrows; since, you recollected - A. Yes. I ask your pardon.

Q. Do you perfectly recollect - A. Yes.

Q. You spoke of one day, when Foster and Wheatley came, your master went to bed; you called him up again. Did you shew them into the house - A. I did.

Q. What room did you shew them into - A. Into the parlour.

Q. Did you tell them that your master was gone to bed - A. Yes.

Q. Is that correct. Have you a perfect recollection of it - A. I have a perfect recollection of it.

Q. How long was it before he came down - A. A little while.

Q.He staid to dress himself, I suppose - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know what time Wheatley and Foster came to him - A. No, I cannot say.

Q. Was your master gone to bed the other day, before they came - A. No; only one evening. The day that Mr. Foster and Wheatley came by themselves my master was in bed, but not the other day; he had nobody with him the second day.

Q. When Oby and Wheatley came - A. No.

Q. What time did they come - A. I cannot positively say what time they came.

Q. What kept him up - A. His daughter was with him I believe, but that would not have kept him up.

JOSEPH WITHERS . Q. Do you remember the time the man at the bar had a fit - A. Yes.

Q. In what state of mind has he been in since - A. I have considered him to be in a very agitated state of mind, and particularly at the times I have seen him.

Q. Do you recollect seeing him on the 26th of May - A. Yes. I saw him at his own house, or rather in his garden. He appeared extremely agitated. He was laying on a bench, under an oak tree. His hand was under the bench. He did not appear to see us, or take any notice, and on one of the gentlemen speaking, he jumped off the bench in a wild and agitated way, and he came and shook hands with us. I asked him, how he did. He replied, very well, and he immediately left me. He walked down his garden. He made some ridiculous observation. A short time afterwards he came in doors, took up his hat, and left us. He said, he had given one of the carriages in the yard to Dr. Hyatt. I said, what is the good of it; it is a rotten one. He said, oh, no, it is a good one. He was going to have it new mounted, and hung round with Morris bells: and, in our walking down to the bridge, I observed that Jones's was a good house. He observed, it was a good house, but he built it for a ballad-singer. At that time, Jones, the blacksmith, was living there. I was satisfied in my own mind that he did not know what he said, or what observations he made to me.

Q. After he was taken in custody, and was taken to prison, did you visit him - A. Yes. I visited him on Sunday morning, after he was committed. He appeared to be in the same state of mind as when I saw him before he was in custody. He told me that he had shot a cow, and a sow, and a child; and he should have shot me if he saw me; and he had shot Burrows.

Q. Had he shot any cow or sow - A. Not one.

Mr. Adolphus. You are the brother of a son-in-law of the prisoner - A. I am.

Q. And you were there on the Tuesday - A. Yes. It was then near two o'clock.

Q. And you talked about going to see his daughter - A. I asked him if he would go and see his daughter; and when we had walked about an hundred yards beyond this blacksmith's shop he went back again.

Q. When did you dine with him last - A. Perhaps two or three years ago.

Q. Have you ever been at his house - A. Only that Tuesday, since Christmas, I believe, not for a length of time, I was not at his house. I have been there since Christmas, certainly.

Q. What time of day used you generally to call - A. I called very seldom. If I looked in by chance it was in the morning.

Q. On these occasions did you observe any thing particular in his behaviour - A. One morning I had my gun in my hand; he said, he had a good deal of game in his fields. He wished me to go round them. He did not offer to go with me. I did not go. I knew there were no hares there.

Q. Did he ever ask you to dine with him - A. No; not at that time.

Q. Have you seen him in prison - A. I saw him twice in New Prison, and I think once in Newgate.

Q. Who went there with you - A. Mrs. Barnjam and his other daughter.

Q. When you saw him in his house, was he walking about - A. Yes; mopeing by himself.

Q. Were you at his house on the 30th of May - A. Yes; I called there. I did not see him. I don't know where he was. I was at his house the next day. I did not see him then.

JOHN READ . I am a farmer, and neighbour of Mr. Bowler. I have known him forty years.

Q. Have you seen him within the last two or three months - A. Yes; once or twice a-week.

Q. Have you made any observation upon the manner he has conducted himself; was it like a sensible man, or otherwise - A. Not like a sensible man at all. He talked as though he was out of his senses. He complained of his head being bad. He laid across two or three chairs at his own house, before a large fire.

Mr. Pooley. Have you seen him in the rick-yard with his men - A. No, I have not.

Q. What time of the day did you usually go there - A. When I had an opportunity: sometimes in the morning and sometimes in the afternoon.

Q. Have you gone as late as four or five o'clock - A. I have.

Q. Within the last three months, previous to the 30th of May, have you been there at four o'clock - A. Very seldom at that hour. Sometimes he has been gone to bed. I seldom called so late as four o'clock.

Q. Did you ever see him an horseback within the last two or three months - A. I do not think that I did.

CHAREOTTE PEARCE. Q. You are a servant to Mr. Bowler - A. Yes. I have lived with him upwards of seven years.

Q. Do you remember that he fell off his horse, and had a fit - A. Perfectly well.

Q. Was his conduct before that time the same as after the fit - A. No, sir, not at all like it.

Q. After the fit he was attended by the doctor - A. Yes.

Q. When he was attended by the doctor, what used to be his way then - A. He talked in a very wild way. He said, that he went under ground to Harrow church, and he saw the angels.

Q. Do you remember his saying any thing about going up to the top of his house - A. Yes: he said, he should like to go to the top of the house, and have a jump down. Within this last three or four months he has talked about leaving his home. He mentioned, that something was the matter at the office about his land-tax. He has gone to bed by three o'clock, and from that till four.

Q. For the last three or four months how has he employed himself in the morning - A. Sometimes walking about, and sometimes playing at cards with his housekeeper, Mrs. Hagan.

Q. Was he attending his business when he was walking about - A. No, he was not. He was walking about like one quite lost, and sometimes he would sit down, and sometimes lay down in the wet grass until we called him. He has got up at three o'clock in the morning. He has dined at half after eight in the morning; and he has provided two pounds of meat for half a dozen people.

Q. Did he use to stint you before he had the fit - A. No, nobody kept a better house. After the fit he has had it taken up raw. I heard him talk about cutting his throat

Q. Within these last three or four months you frequently saw him playing at cards; did it appear to you that he knew what he was about - A. No; he seemed quite ignorant. One day, when he was playing at cards he said he should like to play at all-fours; he did not know he was playing at all-fours. Sometimes he would sing psalms, and sometimes songs.

Q. Are you of opinion that he was in his right mind - A. No, sir, I don't think he was in his right mind. He always appeared, since the fit, to me to be in a state of derangement.

Mr. Adolphus. You have lived with him how long - A. Upwards of seven years.

Q. You would not prefer living with a madman more than living with a man in his senses, would you - A. No.

Q.Notwithstanding you have not left him to go in another situation - A. We did not think him so bad as he was. In March we sat up with him a week, and several times, when we found him at the worst, we never went to bed and left him

Q. You never had such an opinion of him as that he did not know good from evil - A. I knew he did not know what he was about very often. I don't think he knew good from evil.

Q. Was not he always a passionate man, and always a scolding - A. He was as most other people are. He did not scold so much since he had the fit as he did before.

Q. How often did he talk of going under ground and seeing angels - A. Frequently.

Q. Was that at the times that you sat up with him - A. It was during these last three and four months.

Q. When he was in bed, and could not sleep, he used to talk about angels - A. Yes; ever since the time he had the fit, at nights and days too.

Q. Have you ever put your candles out of nights since he has been in this strange way - A. Sometimes we have burnt a light all night.

Q. Then how long has it been since you have burnt a light all night - A. This three or four months.

Q. With respect to the meat; he got it, did not he - A. No, he sent for it.

Q. How long is it ago since he talked about cutting his throat - A. Ever since the beginning of March; and about his hanging himself.

Q. You never put the razors out of the way - A. They were locked up in a drawer.

Q. Who kept the key - A. I do not know: mistress I believe.

Q. Do you call the housekeeper, Mrs. Hagan, your mistress - A. Yes. We took the razor away; and when he was ill we sent for some one to shave him.

Q. He could not take the key, and got the razor any time he pleased - A. No; and there was always one by when he did.

Q. With respect to his singing psalms and songs, what time of the day was this - A. Eight or nine o'clock in the morning.

Q. That was dinner time - A. Yes. He did not take long to eat his dinner.

Q. With respect to his playing at cards with your mistress; did that happen every day - A. Not every day.

Q. Sundays excepted - A. He would ask for them on Sunday, sometimes.

COURT. Do you mean to say, that you have seen him shave himself - A. Yes, I have seen it.

Q. And you have seen the housekeeper give him the razor - A. Yes.

Q. Do you mean to say that was the constant course - A. Yes; when we thought him at the worst.

Q. When was it you thought him at the worst, and the housekeeper used to give him the razor - A. I cannot tell you the particular day we used to give him the razor.

Q. How was it; the days that he was better, had he the care of the razor then - A. Not within the last three or four months.

Q. Then within the last three or four months he

never had the charge of the razor - A. No; not when we thought he would hurt himself.

Q. And then the housekeeper kept the key - A. Yes.

Q. That you have seen done - A. Yes.

MRS. WITHERS. Q. You are the daughter of Mr. Bowler - A. I am.

Q. Do you remember your father having a fit in July last - A. Perfectly. I was sent for. I live about half a mile off my father.

Q. What state was he in when you arrived at his house - A. He appeared to me lifeless. He remained so for some time, until Dr. Hyatt let him blood; then he shewed symptoms of life.

Q. Now, from that time has his mind been in the same state it was before, or in a different state - A. Very different. Before the fit he had the perfect use of his understanding.

Q. Has he ever been in his right mind since - A. I don't think he has.

Q. Do you remember, shortly afterwards, seeing him with a relation of your's - A. Yes. He came after me. He produced a lock. He said, it was a lock the shepherds used to look the sheep with, in the time of our Saviour. He conversed in a very incoherent way. He said, he had been under ground, to the different church-yards. He had been to Perrywell and Harrow. He had seen people whom he had formerly known. He knew who were happy, and who were otherwise.

Q. Was this conversation once or twice, or many times - A. Many times.

Q. In the course of this last spring what state has he been in - A.Apparently getting worse. He appeared less capable of looking after his business.

Q. Was he low - A. Yes, very at times. He has distressed me very much. About the 26th of March he said, he was very ill. He said, I must come this. I begged him not to distress me by so talking. He said, he should not live long, and he was fearful that I should not enjoy the estate. He wished me to come and take possession of the estate. He has another daughter and grand children. He told me at another time that he wished to have a ladder placed to reach the top of the house; he thought it would be a very nice jump. He first said, he wished to be buried at Perrywell, and then he again said it was of little consequence, he would be buried at Harrow. He would have a stone, but they would break it, and if they did he would hang them for it. I sent for Mr. Hyatt, and gave orders to the servants to take every thing out of his way, knives, &c. I thought he would make away with himself.

Q. How lately before this unhappy business did you recommence your visits to him - A. I think the first time I saw him again was a week or ten days before the 30th of May. His mind then was very confused and disordered. He did not appear to be in his right mind then.

Q. Were you there on the day it happened - A.No. I saw him on the day before. I called on him on the Friday, and staid there a short time. He did not appear to be in his right mind then. I saw him on the Thursday.

Q. That is the day he executed his will, we understand - A. I believe it was.

THOMAS FILBY . I am a farmer. I live in the parish of Ealing. I have known Mr. Bowler forty years.

Q. Do you recollect his having a fit about a year ago - A. Perfectly well. I found him altered within this seven or eight weeks back. At this time, that I have been with him, I have been doing a job for him. On the Thursday before this unfortunate business happened, Bowler said to me, are you going home, Filby. I said, yes. He said, stop a bit, and I will go with you. When he came to me, he said, I have altered my will. So I find, said I. He then said, what do you think I have left Will Withers? I have left him Drury-lane, St. Giles's, and the Pantheon in Oxford-street. I said, you are a joking. He said, if it is a joke, it is a true joke. A few days before, he said, Filby, I must leave my home: they are going to hang me. He said, I can live an hundred miles off as well as I can here; and I have chose you to look after my business. I have seen him playing at cards three times in one day.

Mr. Adolphus. You had worked for him, in the course of your long acquaintance, before this time, I take it for granted - A. I worked for him twenty-eight years ago.

Q. Did he himself give you any orders - A. No other than the first day he asked me if I would come and bind some hay. He had discharged his hay-binder. He would ask me what I had done. I said, I had bound so much; he would say, very well.

Q. How did he pay you - A. I was paid so much per load.

Q. Who did you accompt to - A. Mr. Barnjam, after this affair happened. I was only there about seven days. Mr. Bowler gave me victuals. I dined with him one day. We had a shoulder of mutton for dinner. It came on the table at half after ten in the morning.

Mr. Wetherall. After you came to him did he give you any orders - A. No: the foreman.

WILLIAM WEEDON . Q. Are you acquainted with the prisoner - A. Yes. On the 26th of May I went into his house. I found him in the garden, laying on a bench, under a tree. He appeared agitated. I mentioned it to other people, that if he was not taken care of, he would do himself, or somebody else, a mischief.

MR. PARNELL. I am a brewer at Isleworth. I have known Mr. Bowler twenty years, or upwards. I have been very intimate with him. On the 27th of May I saw Mr. Bowler at his own house. I was desired to see him by both his sons-in-law. I understood they wanted a deed of trust. When I went into the house, he came to me, and said, I was going to send for you next Thursday. I was going to make my will. I said, I was very happy to hear it; a had will was better than no will at all. I told him, I should be glad to speak to him in the parlour. He went into the parlour, and I followed him. I said, Mr. Bowler, I understand you are going to settle your affairs by way of deed of trust. I wished him to consider what he was going to do, and to be thoroughly satisfied, as Mr. Withers was a relation, and he was

interested. I wished him to let some friend, or gentleman, examine it, before he signed it. He assured me he would, or he never would speak more.

Q. It was not Mr. Withers, the attorney for the prosecution - A. No. The prisoner said he should not sign it without I was present, and suddenly he started up in the chair; he said, I have left one Hedge-lane, and the other St. Giles's. I said, what did you say? Why, said he, I have left one Hedge-lane, and the other St. Giles's: what do you think of that?

Q. What did you think of that conduct - A. I certainly thought he was not right in his mind.

THOMAS WARBURTON . Q. I believe, for many years, you have had the care of insane persons - A. Yes, I have seen many thousands in my time.

Q. After the prisoner was in confinement, you visited him - A. I first saw him on the 9th of June. I then had a long conversation with him, from which it appeared to me, that he laboured under mental derangement. I saw him every day, up to the time of the commission of lunacy being taken out, from the 9th of June to the 18th. I saw him daily. I had sufficient opportunity to confirm my first impression of his being a lunatic.

Q. From the observation that you made, did it appear to you that this had been of some standing - A. It had the character of derangement arising from epilepsy.

Q. You have the account, from the witnesses, of his state for some months past - A. Yes.

COURT. Supposing him to have had that fit, described in July, would these appearances have been the consequences of that fit - A. Certainly.

Mr. Gurney. Does his derangement consist in delusion of mind - A. Yes.

Q. Is it common for deranged persons to conceive a dislike against some particular persons - A. It is the character of mental derangement, brought on by epilepsy. In that it is more characteristic than any other.

Q. It is very common for them to conceive that enmity to the most dear friend - A. Frequently.

Q. Whereas, had they been in their right mind, they would do them the greatest good they could - A. Yes, certainly.

Mr. Adolphus. In that kind of mental derangement, they would do the particular person the greatest injury, but not to another - A. Yes. I think it is very common for them to express it prior to the committing the act, expressing resentment towards the person, even, perhaps, that they would do the act. That is very common.

Q. You apprehend that he did labour under some particular delusion - A. I am satisfied it applied particularly to Mr. Burrows. He imagined Burrows to be his secret enemy; that he had instigated the whole country against him; that he could not pass from his own house to the next village without being insulted by the women and children, in order, as he imagined, to deprive him of his property.

Q. In ten days you found that - A. He was uniformly in that story, and stating a number of instances wherein Burrows had injured him; and I think it more likely that he would mention this circumstance, the injury and cure; more especially as he was under that delusion. I should have been surprised if it had not been mentioned. He never went into particulars. He did not state them as causes for shooting him. He stated, uniformly, that Burrows was the only person to whom he had resentment.

Mr. Gurney. From the opportunity you have had many years of observing insane persons, have you any means of discerning whether they they are deranged, or whether they are not - A. I have not the least doubt, in this instance, that he is insane. He is uniformly the same, since the commission of lunacy as before, from all my observations. I am quite satisfied he has not imposed upon me.

Q. Is it not a common symptom of derangement of one man to suppose that another man means to deprive him of his estate, and, under that delusion of mind, they would proceed to vengeance - A. No doubt, they uniformly do, if not taken care to prevent it.

MR. WEBB. Q. You are the surgeon of Clerkenwell prison - A. Yes.

Q. When were you called in to see Bowler - A. On Sunday, the day after his being committed: he was brought there on the Saturday night; and on the Sunday I saw him. From that time I have seen him from one to three times a day. At all the times I have seen him, his mind laboured under delusion, and that very strongly. And the first time I saw him he was in an irritable state. He was very obstinate. I desired that he might be removed to a room, and a person placed to have the care of him; and that no person should go near him. After that violent irritation went off, on Monday, he was more quiet: the delirium continued at that time even to the present.

Q. You concur with Mr. Warburton, that he is in a state of insanity. That he is now insane - A. Perfectly.

COURT. You have no doubt that he continues in a state of insanity. You mean, that he labours under that delusion - A. I do.

Q. You have stated your opinion, that he still continues in a state of insanity. Is that from your being of opinion, that he labours under delusion of one particular subject, but not so upon others - A. On that one subject.

Q. So as to be persuaded that certain persons have used him ill - A. His chief conversation was about Burrows; that he had been doing all that he could to get him in a jail.

Q. In other respects, did he appear to know the consequence of his actions, and to know whether his actions were right or wrong - A. I should suppose he did at times.

Q. From the examination and conversation you had with him, do you know whether he was sensible of his killing and shooting Mr. Barrows was a wrong thing - A. I don't think he had any idea he had shot Mr. Burrows, or, that he had been doing a wrong thing. He said, he had not seen Burrows; he had shot his cow, a sow, and a child. I said, you must have loaded your piece a good many times. He said, no; he had done it all at one shot.

CHARLES ALISCAMP. Q. What have you got in your hand - A. The commission of lunacy of Bowler.

Mr. Pooley. Does your Lordship mean to allow that to be given in evidence.

COURT. The authority goes to allow it being received in evidence as a public inquest, under the great seal of the crown, to inquire into the lunacy of this man. It may be given in evidence; and there are instances in which it has been given in evidence. Upon this authority we cannot refuse to receive it.

(Read.)

=" George the Third, by the grace of God, of Great Britain and Ireland, King, defender of the Faith. 18th day of June, 1812. An inquisition taken at the house of William Shephard , situated in St. James's, Clerkenwell, in the county of Middlesex, commonly called and known by the sign of the Crown, before Thomas Durant and Henry Burroughs , Esqrs. Commissioners of our Lord the King, under the great seal of Great Britain, directed to inquire into the lunacy of Thomas Bowler , late of Alperton, in the parish of Harrow on the Hill, in the county of Middlesex, farmer, upon oath of James Mansfield , George Baxter , George Griffiths , John Newport , and John Russell , Esqrs. and others, good and lawful men of the said county, say, the said Thomas Bowler , at the time of taking this inquisisition, is a lunatic; and, that the said Thomas Bowler has been in the said state of lunacy, from the 30th day of March last; and how he became so to the jurors is not known, unless by the visitation of God. And the jurors, upon their oath, further say, that Rebecca, the wife of Thomas Barnjam , and Mary, the wife of William Withers , being the only surviving daughters, and William Weedon , the eldest son of Judith Weedon , deceased, are the near of kin and heirs to the said Thomas Bowler . The Commissioners have to this inquisition set their seal.

Signed, THOMAS DURANT , H. BURROWS.="

COURT. They find him a lunatic from the 30th day of March last.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 65.

[The prosecutor recommended the prisoner to mercy, on account of his being a neighbour, and knowing him for a series of years.]

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18120701-12

528. DANIEL ASHLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of May , three hundred and seventy pair of braces, value 80 l. one hundred and twenty-seven knives, value 15 l. and twenty-eight razors, value 2 l. the property of John Andrews .

SECOND COUNT, for stealing the same goods, the property of John Shoer .

WILLIAM BERKEX. I am a clerk to Mr. Andrews; he is an insurance broker . He has an accompting-house in Great Winchester-street . I have been in his employ a year. The prisoner was engaged in March-last.

Q. Had you a chest that you kept these goods in that you charge to be stolen - A. Yes; I packed them up about the 15th of February, all the articles, thirty-one dozen of braces. On the 26th of May, I found it opened, and only one pair of braces was in it, instead of thirty-one dozen. It must have been forced open, because, I had fastened it with nails. The nails had been drawed, and the braces taken out.

Q. Did you miss any other of your master's property - A. Yes, 120 knives and 28 razors; they were in the custody and care of Mr. Andrews.

Q. The chest remained in your master's accompting house, to be sent to Mr. Shoer of Birmingham - A. Yes; I acquainted my master of the loss. I offered to my master to come and search my lodgings.

Q. Were the braces, knives, and razors, produced to you any where - A. Yes: and they were my master's property that I had missed.

JOHN ANDREWS. I am an insurance broker and agent. I had the care of these things for Mr. Shoer, of Birmingham. I told the prisoner and Berkey, that the goods were missing; they could not go without hands, and that it laid between them; that they had better acknowledge the fact; it was the only means to let me know what became of the goods. The prisoner denied that he knew any thing of the goods. Berkey voluntary offered to have his lodgings searched. I went to the prisoner's house, with an officer, in May. Vickrey, the officer, searched the prisoner's premises: he did not find any thing. He desired the prisoner to go with us to Purse's, London-wall. The prisoner there acknowledged that he had taken the property. I went to Mr. Purse's, before we took the prisoner there, and there I found the things. It was in consequence of that I took the warrant out against him.

WILLIAM MILLS . I am a servant to Mr. Purse, pawnbroker. I knew the prisoner. I am sure he is the person. He pledged near thirty dozen of braces. Part of them has been redeemed by Mr. Solomon: these are the braces that I shewed to Mr. Andrews: he claimed them. The prisoner pawned them in the name of John King .

JAMES BROOKES . I am a servant to Mr. Folkard, pawnbroker, Surry-road. The prisoner pawned at our house one hundred and fifty-two knives, and forty razors, in the name of John King .

Q. Do you know Moses Solomon - A. I have seen him.

MOSES SOLOMON . I know the prisoner. I saw him several times since last February. He sold me the duplicates of pen-knives, braces, and razors. I took them out. Part of them I produce. The others I have sold.

Prisoner's Defence. I beg leave to state that I have served a number of years in His Majesty's service. I have left that situation only a year, and I have been a purser in an East Indiaman.

GUILTY , aged 35.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120701-13

529. JAMES DODD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of April , six hundred sacks, value 100 l. the property of Michael and James Constable .

WILLIAM THOMPSON . I am a servant to Messrs. Constables, flour factor s. They have premises at Shad-Thames . I have the management of their sack warehouse. On the 6th of April my master lost six hundred and twelve sacks out of the warehouse, on the inner area, at the top, there was a hole made large enough to admit a man, and, on the outside of the door, on the battens, there were marks of dirt, as if from a man's foot.

Q. I believe you have seen these sacks - A. I have examined six hundred and two; ten are still missing; we lost six hundred and twelve: these six hundred and two are my master's property.

REUBIN CATLIN . Q. Did you assist in landing any sacks at Queenhithe - A. Yes; on the 4th of April; it was a large quantity. I cannot say how many. Mr. Dodd, the prisoner, paid for bringing them.

Mr. Alley. Q. You were not employed by the prisoner - A. No; a young man employed me, down by the water side, and the prisoner paid me for it.

MR. DREWITT. I live at 75, Upper Thames-street. I am a sack merchant.

Q. Did these six hundred and two sacks come to your premises - A. They did. The prisoner brought me a sample sack, on the beginning of April: he said he was recommended to me by Mr. Barrett, of Queenhithe.

Q. For what purpose did he bring this sample sack - A. As a sample of six hundred and upwards. I told him I could not buy sacks by sample. I asked him, whether it was to be by money or credit; he told me, it was for money. I told him, I must see the bulk. He told me, he had had a very good character of me: he would send me the remainder of the sacks; and, if I had any objection, he would pay me for warehouse-room. On the 4th of April, in the morning, Mr. Dodd came in; he said the sacks were now landed at Queenhithe: he desired me to send my cart for them. I sent my cart to bring part: they came, twenty in a bundle; they were dirty, as though they had come up in a coal-barge. The sacks all came to my premises.

Q. Now, sir, were the sacks packed in an ordinary way that sacks are - A. No; I asked Dodd the quantity; he told me, there were six hundred and twenty-four, or six hundred and twenty-six, I cannot tell which. I was going out of town that morning. I asked Dodd, if he would call on Monday morning; he came on Monday morning; I asked him the price: we agreed for three shillings and sixpence. I told him, I was not quite satisfied in the sacks; there were twenty-two short of the compliment that he sent them in for: he said, twenty-two was no object; I might pay for what I had got, and no more. I then had doubts in my mind. I turned to Mr. Dodd and said, I wanted to know from whom they came from. I hope they are perfectly right. He said, they are perfectly right, and he should have two or three tons at least, in a week or two, and you shall have the first offer: he said, there could nothing happen in the parties for six months; so I got them marked and sent away: I pressed for the name; he told me, I knew the party. He pulled out a bill of parcels: he said, this is the gentleman the sacks belongs to, Benjamin Cleaver , of Miles's Lane. I believe it was a printed bill he shewed me. He went away and fetched Mr. Cleaver to me; after he had gave me the bill of parcels he had put J. Cleaver instead of Benjamin Cleaver. When he brought Mr. Cleaver, I asked Mr. Cleaver if they were his property; he said, no. I asked Dodd, where he had this property from. I really, said he, so help me God, know not. I sent for a constable and had him apprehended. These sacks have laid in my premises ever since.

THOMPSON. I have seen them all, and swore to them; here are six or eight here. They are the property of Michael and James Constable .

MR. CLEAVER. Q. You live in Miles's Lane - A. Yes; I followed the prisoner to Mr. Drewitt's; he came to the wine-house; he told me, he had such a quantity of goods. He said, if I came forward and said, all was right, he would give me five pounds. I went to Mr. Drewitt; I there learned that he had sold sacks in my name: they were not my sacks; I knew nothing at all of the transaction.

Prisoner's Defence. I have lived with Mr. Parson's, a wholesale grocer, for a number of years, and innocent I came to this bar, with respect to the charge; and when I go I shall go innocent. I was only employed as a broker. I know no more of the robbery than a child unborn. The barge-man brought the sacks to me; his name is Cooper. After I was in custody, he came to my house, to hear if I had sold the sacks. He was informed that I was in custody; and, since that time, I have not seen nor heard any thing of him.

GUILTY , aged 32.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120701-14

330. SARAH FOSKEW was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of June , two gowns, value 10 s. and one candlestick, value 4 s. the property of Mary Ward , widow .

MARY WARD . I am a widow. I keep the Saracen's Head, Snow-hill . On Friday morning, the 19th of June, about six in the morning, the porter saw the prisoner in the coffee-room. I can only speak to the property.

GEORGE TAYLOR . I am porter to Mrs. Ward. On Friday morning, about a quarter before six, it is usual to call the passengers for the Exeter coach. When I came into the coffee-room, I saw the prisoner walking from the side-board. I asked her what she wanted. She asked me if she could get any thing to drink. I told her, no; the waiter was not there. She asked me if she could get any thing at the tap. I asked her where she was going: she said, Exeter. She went out of the coffee-room towards the tap. Instead of going into the tap, she went out of the wicket at the gate. I did not much like the look of the woman. I went into the kitchen I had seen six or seven pair of boots there; on the evening before they were all right. I looked at the clothes-horse; I recollected there were some clothes there on the evening. I missed some of the clothes. I pursued the prisoner; on Snow-hill I saw her talking to a watchman. I laid hold of her arm and

took her to the watchhouse. I found these two gowns upon her; and after searching her some time a candlestick dropped from her clothes. These are the gowns, and this is the candlestick.

WILLIAM CHALLIS . I am a patrol of St. Sepulchre's. On the 19th of February, a quarter before six, the last witness made application to me to take the prisoner into custody, to search for some property that he suspected she had taken from the Saracen's Head, Snow Hill. On searching her, in the tail of her gown, I found these two gowns, and the candlestick dropped from her clothes.

Prosecutrix. These two gowns and the candlestick are my property.

Prisoner's Defence. I went down the gateway. I was going to see two persons off by the Exeter coach. It was better than half after six in the morning. As I went down the yard I met a man with a load. He offered me the bundle. I know no more of it than you do.

GUILTY , aged 27.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120701-15

531. CHARLES WATKINS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of June , a pocketbook, value 1 s. 6 d. from the person of Jacob Youngman , his property .

JACOB YOUNGMAN . I am a letter-carrier in the General Post-office . On the 8th of June, between one and two o'clock in the afternoon, in Oxford-road, as I was returning from my duty; on my going Dean-street I saw several people passing Dean-street; and when I got into Oxford-street I passed the right hand; there was a crowd: and at the time I was standing there, which was not above eight minutes the outside, I heard a person say, there is a man has got a pocket-book. I did not know that I had been robbed at that time. I turned round, and saw Lloyd, the officer, and the prisoner in a scuffle, and the prisoner had got the pocket-book just between his knees. He dropped the pocket-book from between his legs down to his heels. A young man there, a stranger to me, picked it up. I claimed it as my pocket-book, and he delivered it to me. Lloyd took the prisoner into a shoe-maker's shop. He said he was an officer. I told him it was my pocket-book. I delivered the pocket-book to him.

Q. Are you sure the prisoner is the man - A. Yes. I never lost sight of him.

- LLOYD. I am an officer. On Monday, the 8th of June, between one and two o'clock, I was passing along Oxford-street, I saw a crowd collected together. I went up to see what was the occasion of the mob. I saw a man in a naval uniform taking a chair from a chair-maker's shop. He set down on the chair and brandished a large stick.

Q. Was he drunk - A. Apparently: but it was done for the purpose of picking pockets, I have no doubt. I then looked round the ring to see if I could see any suspicious characters. I saw the prisoner in company with two persons; one I knew to be a reputed thief. I watched them. I saw the prisoner at the bar, together with the others, feel the outside of several peoples pockets: at last the prosecutor came into the crowd. Their attention seemed to be turned to him. The prisoner put his finger to one of his associates. They then followed the prosecutor into the crowd. I closely followed them. I saw the prisoner take up the flap of his coat, and put it over one of his hands. He tried with his hand under the flap of his coat once or twice, and could not get the pocket-book out. He made two attempts before he did get it: at the third attempt he did get it. He moved it from his left hand into his right. His great coat being buttoned I did not see it was a pocket-book that he had got. I then immediately seized him in the crowd, pinioned his arm in that manner that he could not give it to his accomplices. He struggled to get from me. He got his hand, and dropped the book down between his legs. A young man, a stranger, picked it up. The prosecutor exclaimed, I have lost my pocket-book: that is my property. I then took the prisoner into a shoe-maker's shop, and the prosecutor delivered the book up to me. I have had it ever since. I never lost sight of the prisoner from the time that he had the pocket-book until that pocket-book was given to me.

Prosecutor. That is my pocket-book.

Prisoner's Defence. On Monday, the 8th of June, as I was passing along Oxford-street, I observed two sailors much intoxicated, surrounded by a number of people. Curiosity induced me to go along with the rest; among whom there was a gentleman who had lost his pocket-book. A gentleman, seeing a crowd he inquired the cause. He was informed a man was taken with a pocket-book. He had no more suspicion of me than any other person. I was taken to Marlborough-street. I can only attest, before your lordship, I am entirely innocent. I never was before a court of Justice in my life before. I am a stranger in London, and not succeeding in business in the country, I came to London, where it did not answer my expectation. I had firmly made up my mind to enter into His Majesty's service. I rely upon the candour of an impartial jury.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Judgment respited.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120701-16

532. JOHN BOWMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of June , in the dwelling-house of Thomas Watkins , a bank-note, value 2 l. the property of Samuel Smith .

SAMUEL SMITH . I live at No. 13, York-street, Covent Garden , in Thomas Watkins 's house, in the parish of St. Paul, Covent Garden.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. Yes. He has worked for me two years. He quitted my service about two months ago. I turned him away at that time.

Q. Did Ann Robinson live with you as a servant - A. Yes.

Q. Did you deliver to Ann Robinson any thing while the prisoner was in your employ - A. Yes, on the 24th of June last a two pound note.

Q. For what purpose - A. For the purpose of giving it her mistress to go and buy linen. Her mistress was then gone to market.

Q. Was the prisoner present - A. No, he was not present.

Q. After you had given this note to Ann Robinson , did you go out - A. Yes. I was going out in the street at the time I gave it her.

Q. Is that all you know of the matter - A. That is all. The prisoner was working in the house at the time.

Q. What are you - A. I am a carver and gilder .

Mr. Arabin. You said that you discharged him - A. Yes.

Q. You had not discharged him when you gave Ann Robinson this note - A. He had been discharged two months before, and was taken back again by me.

Q. I believe you gave him handsome wages - A. Thirty shillings a-week I gave him.

Q. Did not he claim upwards of forty pounds, which you refused to pay him - A. Never to me.

Q. You had no hatred against him - A. No, never at all.

Q. Do you know a man of the name of Denham - A. Yes; he worked for me, the same as he did. He was a carver and gilder.

Q. Now, I ask you whether you never said that you would some day or other contrive to hang or transport him - A. I never thought of such a thing. I never used language of that description at any time.

Q. This house, you say, is Mr. Watkins's: is his name John or Thomas - A. Thomas, I believe. He sleeps in the house. He is the landlord. He has got the lease, I believe, of it. I occupy the first floor, and one room below. I pay him forty pounds a-year, and he pays the rent and taxes. We both go in at the common street door.

ANN ROBINSON . Q. Do you remember, any time, Mr. Smith giving you a two-pound note - A. Yes, it was between twelve and one, on the 24th of June last. It was yesterday week he gave me a two pound bank-note to give to my mistress.

Q. What did you do with it when he gave it you - A. I put it into the table drawer, up stairs.

Q.Where were you at the time that your master gave you this note - A. In the passage.

Q. Where was the table - A. In the first room on the first floor.

Q. Was that a room that your master occupied - A. Yes.

Q. Was the prisoner in the house at the time - A. Yes, he was in that room.

Q. Did you miss this bank-note note afterwards - A. Yes. My master came in in about ten minutes, and my mistress came in about ten minutes after my master. My mistress asked master for the money. I was coming up stairs then. My master and mistress were in the front room, where I had put the note. They rang for me. I went into the room.

Q. After you had put the note into the drawer of this table did you go down stairs - A. Yes.

Q. Had you been up again before they came home - A. No. When they rang for me I went into the room. I looked in the drawer for it. It was gone.

Q. You say the prisoner was in the room at the time you put it in - A. Yes.

Q. Was the prisoner gone at the time that you missed it - A. Yes. He had just gone out.

Q. How soon did you see the prisoner again - A. My master went after him, and took an officer with him.

Q. to prosecutor. Did you find the prisoner when you went out to seek after him - A. I went to Bow-street, and took an officer with me, and I found the prisoner at No. 14, Crown-street, St. Giles's.

Q. What was the officer's name - A. Hatfield. I had sent the prisoner there to one of the workmen. The prisoner was searched. A two-pound note was found in his hat. The officer has got it. The officer found it among some papers, that he had got in his hat. He said, he put it there.

- HATFIELD. Q. Did you go with the other witness to search the prisoner - A. Yes. I found him in Crown-street, St. Giles's. I found the two-pound note in his hat. This is the note.

Prosecutor. This is the note I gave the maid. Here is my own writing upon it, and the man's handwriting that I took it of, and the day of the month, and a Jew's signature inside. I took two of them of Mr. Davis, a jew, an auctioneer. He used occasionally to sell for me; and there was a balance of accompt between Mr. Davis and me. He gave me two two-pound notes. He wrote, Herries and Co. I wrote on the two two-pound notes,

="of Mr. Davis.="

Mr. Arabin. Did not the prisoner say that the officer had put the note in his hat - A. The officer had searched him, and found it. He said, you put it there to the officer.

Q. Had you been in the room after the girl put the note in the drawer - A. No. I went out when I gave the girl the note.

COURT. Q. to Hatfield. Did you put the note in his hat - A. I am quite certain I did not put the note in his hat. I found it in his hat.

Prisoner's Defence. The man's name is not Smith, in the first place. I came to his service after coming out of trouble. I have been in trouble upon a vexatious point of his. He sent for me to return, and I did return. I was under necessity. I had to attend Westminster Hall for him, upon the name of Lovell. An action was brought against him in the name of Lovell. He wanted me to swear that it was Smith. I went to Westminster Hall. I was subpoened by him in his own home. I went there to say what he directed me. He wrote down that which I was to swear; and because I did not swear that he wanted me, when I came home on the Thursday he found himself aggrieved: notwithstanding that, he said, I must come to work. I did go back; and on the Wednesday following this circumstance happened. He then attended with the officer, and said, he had lost the two-pound note. It is very unlikely I should go to Mr. Coward, the maker of gold size, and going there I met Mr. Bell, the frame-maker. He asked me to go into the Black Horse, Tottenham-court-road. After I left Mr. Bell I went to Crown-street, for pencils. Master came there with an officer. In consequence of that I was taken to the Justice, and afterwards was committed. When I went down stairs to work, as here I am, I put my hat under the bench; and at that period the note

must have been put in my hat. Had I known of the two-pound note being in my hat, it is very unlikely that I should have left it there. I know no more about the note than a child unborn. The spite is because I lost him the trial. He has been arrested since in consequence of it. His name is not Smith, but Lovell.

The prisoner called five witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 47.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Gibbs.

Reference Number: t18120701-17

533. SUSAN BURROWS was indicted for the wilful murder of her infant child .

The case was stated by Mr. Adolphus.

CHARLOTTE - . Q. Are you in the service of Mrs. Plasco - A. Yes. Mr. Plasco is an oil-man, and wine-merchant, in Pall-Mall. I went there three weeks before the prisoner. She came on the 3rd of February.

Q. Was she your bed-fellow - A. Yes. When she came first, her size was large. I accused her of being with child, but she denied it. On Saturday she was very ill. I do not think she knew what a situation she was in. On Sunday morning I went to Mr. Green's, at the next door, an apothecary.

Q. Do you mean that it was in March or May - A. I cannot say the month. It is five or six weeks ago. I asked his advice. He gave her some hartshorn. I returned to her. She was then in the privy. I gave to her and told her what Mr. Green's man said to rub her back with it. I then went to do my work, leaving her in the privy. I returned in about a quarter of a hour. This was about eight o'clock in the morning.

COURT. What situation are you in - A. Housemaid. The prisoner was a cook . Two of the Miss Plascos came into the kitchen, and asked me for some bread and butter. Susan was then in the privy, about half a dozen steps from the kitchen. After the young ladies were gone (before that I went into the area to get the butter) I saw the situation of the prisoner.

Mr. Adolphus. And you saw the floor discoloured - A. I told her to come in, for fear she should get cold. I then went, and gave the two Miss Plascos some bread and butter. She remained in the privy. I then got my master and mistress's breakfast.

Q. How long did that take you - A. About twenty minutes. I then went up into my room to fetch some things for Susan, that I thought necessary: some linen. I returned, and she was still in the privy. I told her to come in, and led her into the kitchen. I then went to clean the privy up, and I heard the baby cry. I screamed out, and said, oh, my God, Susan come here; here is something. She came to me, and bid me not to frighten myself; there was nothing there. I went and lit a candle. She took it out of my hand. I took it from her again, and looked down the privy, and saw the child. I ran up stairs to the young man, the porter, whom I have since married; I told him that she had miscarried. I went down stairs again.

Q. Who took the child out of the privy - A. She must have done it. I went down stairs again. She was then taking the baby from the dust-hole, which is close to the privy. The child then appeared to me almost covered with dust from the dust-hole. She had got hold of the middle of the body of the child. The legs were hanging downwards. I then went to the top of the kitchen stairs, in my fright, and came down again, and I missed her. I said, Susan, where are you. She said, I am here. I went to the coal-cellar, and she had got the baby in her hands, holding like a ball. The child was stark naked. I then went up to my mistress, and told her. My mistress told me to run down, and tell her to save the baby, and she would forgive her. I ran down and met her on the first landing. I told her to come up stairs to my mistress. I led her up stairs to my mistress's room.

Q. You did not deliver to her any message - A. I did not. As I met her on the stairs I told her to come up. My mistress threw a flannel petticoat down the bannisters, to put the baby in: and when she got into my mistress's room my mistress talked to her of her cruelty. Mistress asked her if she would not like to go to bed. She said, she would, if she would let the baby go with her. My mistress said, no, she would not suffer the baby to go out of her sight. The baby then was delivered into my care. In the mean time my master went for Dr. Barry; and Mrs. Hockley, a female assistant, came. She came and looked at the baby, and then went up stairs to Susan. She came down again, and took the baby from me; she washed it and dressed it.

Q. How long did the child live - A. Until one o'clock. Mr. Sandell, the apothecary, came.

Q. Had you an opportunity of seeing the state of the child while it was naked - A. No, not in my fright.

Q. Did you, after this, make any search in the prisoner's closet - A. Yes. I looked to see whether there were any baby things there. There were none. She sent me to her box. I did not see any baby things. On the same day, (Sunday) between twelve and one o'clock, I asked Susan, why she did such a rash act. She said, she did not intend to do it until that morning, and then she had made up her mind.

COURT. The child was alive then - A. The child died at one o'clock.

Mr. Alley. When did the prisoner first come to the service - A. On the 3d of February.

Q. You accused her of being with child - A. Yes.

Q. This poor girl did not increse in size as woman generally do - A. No; she being so far gone.

Q. On this day you first discovered her in the privy - A. Yes.

Q. She made no concealment of the pains that she was in and you were so kind as to get her something to assist her - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see the child directly after it was taken out of the privy - A. I did not. When I heard it in the privy I ran away. I was very much frightened indeed.

Q. When the girl was talking to you on the subject, did not she attribute the pain to another cause - A. No, she did not. I can recollect every thing

that passed, though I was very much alarmed.

Q. Who bid you examine whether there were any child-bed linen in the box - A. Nobody desired me. She sent me to the box.

Q. As your recollection serves you, you can tell us whether she had not a fall down the kitchen stairs from the top to the bottom - A. She did fall from the top to the bottom: she hurted her elbow, and no where else.

Q. I take it for granted, the privy, like all other privies, had a good deal of soil - A. No. It is a pan there. It runs off like a water-closet.

COURT. Therefore it could not be got rid of that way - A. No, it could not.

MRS. HOCKLEY. Q. You are studying midwifery under Dr. Barry - A. Yes. I live in the family, and assist in that department; and I have practice of my own. I was sent by Dr. Barry to this young woman.

Q. When you came to Mrs. Plasco's, did you see this child - A. I went up stairs, and went into Mrs. Plasco's room, and it was in the servant's lap, in a flannel dress, as she described. The child was then crying.

Q. Was it by your observations a full-grown child, or not - A. A full-grown child. I went up to the mother, to see if she was safe. I found her quite safe. I left her, and went down to the infant. I washed it. It was voiding blood from its mouth. It was a god deal bruised. There were several bruises: one on the temple, and another on the back: and there were small coals on it, particularly on its head, eyes, nose, and mouth. I washed it all over. I could not get the coals out of its eyes.

Q. How long did it live after you came - A. I came a little after nine; it died a little after one.

Q. Can you, from your judgment, ascribe now the cause of the death of that child - A. Doubtless, one or other of these bruises on the temple. There were two or three bruises on the temple; and one of them was the cause of that bleeding. The child seemed to die quietly and slowly.

Mr. Alley. When you saw the child, was it a premature birth - A. It might be two or three days.

Q. Might not a premature birth be occasioned by a fall - A. It might have that effect. There was a bruise on the child's forehead.

Q. Supposing the child's head happened to beat against the pan, might not that occasion a contusion - A. It might have that effect.

WILLIAM SANDELL . I am surgeon, apothecary, and man-midwife, to St. James's infirmary. I was called, and I went to Mr. Plasco's. I saw the child while it was alive. On Sunday, the 24th of May , I was called to Mr. Plasco's for the purpose of ascertaining the situation of the child of Susan Burrows , who had been recently delivered. On my entering the drawing-room I found the child in the possession of Mrs. Hockley. Having understood the nature of the birth of the child, I looked at the child, and found it bleeding copiously at both nostrils. I requested Mrs. Hockley to undress the child, that I might examine the child. Having so done, Mrs. Hockley attempted to give the child some warm milk: it could not swallow it. I examined the child very minutely. I saw no particular marks of violence upon the child that should occasion its speedy death. Having understood the nature of its birth, I was then led to an opinion how the child might find its death. The child, upon coming into the world, received a little pressure, a blow upon the head, from which I was led to believe one of the minute small vessels of the brain had given way, from that pressure, which was the cause of that effusion of blood from each nostril, and from that circumstance convulsive motions were produced, that lastly ended in the death of the infant. That is all the circumstances that I know of the death of the child. To the best of my belief, the effusion of blood from the brain occasioned the blood both coming out of the nostrils and out of the mouth, which blood naturally congealed in the throat. I laid hold of the baby, and put it in one position, and then in another, and then it did not bleed. I think the child was a full nine months child. I am of opinion that the bruises were occasioned by the fall of the child, which might arise by the act of accident, and not by design. I believe so: and I think it was the first child.

The prisoner left her defence to her counsel.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120701-18

534. MARY MULLETT was indicted for feloniously receiving, on the 20th of March , fourteen coats, value 14 l. twenty-seven waistcoats, value 17 l. one pair of pantaloons, value 10 s. the property of Matthew Swift , whereof Joseph Molloy stands indicted for feloniously stealing the said goods .

MATTHEW SWIFT. I am a salesman , Sparrow-corner, Minories .

Q. Did you lose any articles from your shop - A. Yes; a great quantity. About the latter end of March, 1811, I lost them from my shop and warehouse, No. 3.

Q. Do you know a person of the name of Joseph Molloy - A. Yes; he was a servant in my employ. He left my service at the end of March, 1811. I discharged him, having strong reason to suspect him.

Q. Now, what have you to state, in order to shew that he stole any of these articles - A. I missed, a few days before I turned him away, a variety of coats, waistcoats, and other things. About two months ago I received a letter from a person under confinement. I went to Hatton-garden. I got a search warrant against some of the pawnbrokers, where I found a great deal of property. I went to Mrs. Denham's house, 24, Jewin-street; I found no property there. The prisoner had lodged there.

Q. Did you find any of your property in the possession of the prisoner - A. I found a duplicate of a pellisse, which property I had got out, previous to my taking the prisoner.

Q. Where did you find the prisoner - A. At the Bell and three Mackerel, Mile-end Road, where she was in service. One of the officers charged her with it. She denied knowing any thing of it or the parties, in my presence. She stated, that she knew no such person as Molloy. She wished very much to get out of the room, but the officers would not submit to her going. One of the officers brought

down a box, with the duplicates, into the room where I was.

Q. Who were the officers that went with you - A. Cook and Matthews.

CHARLES COOK . I am an officer of Hatton-garden office. On the 16th of April, the prosecutor came to the office for some search warrants, to search the different pawnbrokers for several articles. I and Matthews went with the prosecutor to the Bell and three Mackerel; we found the prisoner in service, at that public house. Matthews searched her in my presence. He found nothing that led to any part of the property about her. I left her in Matthew's care, and asked the landlord which apartment she lived in. The boy shewed me her apartment, and, under the head of the bed, in the same room, I found a little box, with a parcel of duplicates in it. I brought the box down, into the room where the prisoner was. I told her where I found it, and asked her, whether it was her box; she said, yes. The box was locked; I unlocked it. Matthews took the key from her person. When I opened the box, I found a great quantity of pawnbrokers tickets. We had the property prior to having the tickets. I said to Mr. Swift, here are the tickets of your property. Mr. Swift said, yes, I have no doubt of it. The prisoner said, the tickets were her own property. We got some more of the property from the duplicates.

JOHN MATTHEWS . I am an officer. I was in company with Cook when he apprehended the prisoner.

- PALMER. I am a servant to Mr. Hawkins, pawnbroker, No. 116, Drury-lane. Some coats and breeches were pawned at our shop by a man. I did not take them in myself. The goods have been pledged a year and a half.

GEORGE CLEE . I am a pawnbroker. I live with Mr. Sadler, in Aldersgate-street. Two waistcoats were pawned at our shop. I do not know by whom.

- BUTTON. I am a pawnbroker. A jacket and a pair of breeches were pawned at our shop by a man.

- WILLIAMSON. I am a pawnbroker. I have a waistcoat pawned by a man.

MRS. DENHAM. Q. Did the prisoner lodge at your house - A. She did, at 24, Jewin-street.

Q. How long did she lodge there - A. At different times, better than a twelvemonth. She took the lodgings of me; and she said, a man, that went by the name of Morris, or Mullet, was her own brother. She took first the parlour. She said, that was not big enough; she had a great deal of property. She said, her brother was never to sleep there. She continued in my house until she went to service.

Q. Did you know this Morris, or Mullet - A. I do not know who he was, or where he lived.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18120701-19

535. ANN TOWHEY and MARGARET M'GINNIS were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of June , seven yards of cambric, value 4 l. the property of William Presser , privately, in his shop .

WILLIAM PRESSER . I am a linen-draper . I live at 47, Banner-street , in the parish of St. Luke's. I have no partner. The shop is mine. On the 23d of June, the two prisoners came into my shop together. I was standing near the window. They passed me, and went to the lower end of the shop, where my young man was serving. As soon as I had served my customer, I went down to them, and asked them what they wished to look at; they said, they wanted to look at a bit of print. There were a good many things on the counter. I immediately began to clear them away to show the print. In clearing away these things, there was some trifling thing amongst them which one of them asked to look at: I shewed it them, and told them the price, two shillings and two pence a yard: she looked at it; and one of them was rather surprized at the price of it. I turned round, and heard a rustling of paper. I looked over the counter and said, I hope you have got nothing under your feet; they both drew back and said, they were sure there was nothing under their feet. On their drawing back together, and the manner they answered me, gave me suspicion that they had got something. I immediately ordered my young man to look. He hurried to them; and before he came they both drew back.

Q. Did you see this yourself - A. Yes. I saw one draw back from the other, and take a piece of cambric from her pocket.

Q. Who was it that drew back and took the cambric from her pocket - A.M'Ginnis, she held it up, and throwed it down on the floor. I asked her, what business she had with it; she said, she had nothing. It was laying on the floor at the time. I then sent for an officer.

Q. Now, are you sure that, upon your sending your young man round, you saw her take it out of her pocket. - A. Yes; and I am sure it was not on the floor before she threw it.

Q. Now, what was that - A. A piece of cambric. This is the piece. I have had it ever since; there is seven yards of it. I knew it to be my cambric by the private mark upon it. I had taken it out of the box about a quarter of an hour before; and it was laying upon the counter with the things that I was removing. They were all laying together.

Q. So that, according to your account, it was upon the counter, near to where they were standing - A. Within half a yard. The piece of cambric cost me more than four pounds.

Q. Are you sure you saw her pull the cambric from her pocket - A. Yes; she had hard work to get it from her pocket, and then she threw it on the ground.

Q. I think you said, from the manner in which they were standing, you suspected they were about something. Did you see them take any thing - A. No; I heard a rattling of paper.

Mr. Arabin. How many persons were there in your shop - A. Two; a boy and a young man; the boy is not here.

SAMUEL SMITH . I am a shopman to Mr. Presser. I saw the prisoners come into the shop. I was serving two young ladies at the bottom of the shop. They passed me, and were standing near the

two young ladies I was serving.

Q. Did they apply to you to serve them with any thing - A. No. Mr. Presser came. I saw him clear the counter. I heard them ask the price of trimmings. Mr. Presser was turned half round to reach something off the shelf for them. He turned back again, and said, what have you got under your feet? or something to that effect. They both drew back, keeping close together. The right hand of Towhey, and the left of M'Ginnis were out of sight. There was nothing on the floor then. Mr. Presser desired me to go round to them. He said, he was afraid they had got something that did not belong to them.

Q. Did he say that for them to hear - A. Yes. I ran round. I saw M'Ginnis pull the cambric from her pocket. She threw it on the ground. Mr. Presser asked her, what business she had with the cambric. She said, she had it not: it was laying on the floor before. Then I went for an officer.

Q. Did you see either of them take it - A. No. I had seen the piece of cambric not ten minutes before. I saw Mr. Presser take it out of the box. It was laying on the counter, just by where the prisoners were standing. I am positive the cambric is my master's property. It cost ninety-four shillings.

Towhey's Defence. I asked my prosecutor to cut off a yard and a half of trimmings.

M'Ginnis's Defence. I went into the shop by myself. There were several people in the shop. I asked my prosecutor for a piece of print, before he accused me of this cambric; and when the young man came round me, he found the cambric on the floor.

Towhey called five witnesses, who gave her a good character.

TOWHEY, NOT GUILTY .

M'GINNIS, GUILTY , aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18120701-20

536. MARTHA HODSON and SOPHIA GILES were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of June , a watch, value 3 l. a gold ring, value 10 s. a gold watch key, value 5 s. a shawl, value 5 s. ten neck-handkerchiefs, value 2 l. 12 s. a coat, value 6 s. and three waistcoats, value 9 s. the property of Dennis O'Conner , in his dwelling-house .

MARY O'CONNER. I am the wife of Dennis O'Conner: he lives at No. 6, Hare-street-hill , in the parish of St. Andrew's.

Q. Do you know the two prisoners - A. I do. Hodson rented a furnished room in my house for three weeks, and while she lived in my house I missed a silver watch, two gold seals, and a gold key, a shawl, a coat, and three waistcoats, several neck-handkerchiefs, and four elegant silk handkerchiefs.

Q. Were any of these articles found upon the prisoners - A. Some small articles have been found upon her.

Q. Did the other prisoner, Giles, come to the house - A. She was there mostly every day.

Q. When you missed these things did you charge the prisoners with taking them - A. No, I did not.

HARRIET GRITTON . I purchased of Mrs. Giles a handkerchief, and a pair of stockings. I delivered them to the officer.

WILLIAM READ . I am an officer. I took the two prisoners into custody. I was searching the prisoners lodgings, and the last witness brought this handkerchief, and the stockings. I found out Hodson's box, at her mother's, in Feathers-court. I found out the other half handkerchief.

Hodson's Defence. On the first Saturday I went there, on the Sunday Mrs. Conner went out: she came home at eleven o'clock at night intoxicated. She left a person in care. I went to bed at eleven. She said, this woman she left in her house was her first cousin: that she had got her watch and pelisse.

Giles's Defence. I did not know where Hodson lived. At the time this property was taken the prosecutrix never accused me. She said, Hodson, the fellow you live with has robbed me of a watch. She wanted me to get money, and then she said she would set us at liberty.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Gibbs.

Reference Number: t18120701-21

537. LYDIA SPENCER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of June , a pair of sheets, value 10 s. the property of Ann Chausse .

ANN CHAUSSE . I live at No. 11, Queen-street, Oxford-street , in the parish of St. James.

Q. Did you lose a pair of sheets at any time - A. I lost a pair of sheets from off the two pair of stairs landing-place.

Q. When was the last time that you saw them upon that landing-place - A. On the morning of the 18th of June, they hung up to dry. I put them there myself. On the morning of the 18th I heard somebody on the landing-place. I opened the door and missed the sheets. I saw the prisoner going out of the door.

Q. Did she live in the house - A. No. I followed her out of the door. She ran, and I ran after her; and when she got to the end of Queen-street she flung one away. I saw one of the sheets hanging about her. A little boy stopped her. She dropped that sheet. I picked up the sheet. It is my sheet. The officer has got it. I took the woman back with the assistance of the boy.

Q. Is that the prisoner now at the bar - A. Yes, I put her into the hands of the constable. I took both the sheets to the watchhouse. One sheet I picked up, and the boy the other.

JOHN KNIGHT . I am a constable. The prisoner and the prosecutor were both at the watchhouse, waiting for me to put the charge down. The sheets were both brought to the watchhouse, and put into my care.

Prosecutor. They are both my property. They cost me ten shillings the pair.

Prisoner's Defence. I beg for mercy.

GUILTY , aged 35.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18120701-22

538. JEREMIAH DONNOVAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of June , a bundle of laths, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of William Toosey .

WILLIAM TOOSEY . The prisoner worked for me. I did not see the transaction. The laths are mine.

FREDERICK SPARKS . I work for Mr. Toosey. I was at work at Newson-square, New-road , and the prisoner worked there. I saw the prisoner coming down with these laths; he planted them in the front parlour. I saw the prisoner go away with the laths towards Tottenham-court-road; and when I returned the laths were gone out of the parlour. I went to the prisoner's room, as he did not come to work. I saw the same quantity of laths in his room. The prisoner told me, if I would not give a proper information I should not want for money.

CHARLES HUMPREYS . When I went to apprehend the prisoner he tried to make his escape. I catched him, and asked him, what made him run away. He said, because he did not like to be locked up till Monday. He meant to surrender on Monday.

Prisoner's Defence. Sparks and I had some words on the 20th of June. We struck one another. I got rather the better of him. He said, he would either transport or hang me.

Sparks. I never said such a thing until his wife struck me, and then I said I would transport him if possible.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Gibbs.

Reference Number: t18120701-23

539. JOHN PARKER and ELIZABETH BLAKE , alias LINGUARD , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of June, two waistcoats, value 4 s. two candlesticks, value 2 s. five doyles, value 2 s. two books, value 1 s. and four yards of stair carpet, value24 s. the property of William Toosey .

WILLIAM TOOSEY . I am a builder . I live in Duke-street, Bloomsbury . The female prisoner was servant with me, in the name of Eliza Linguard . She left my service about a month ago. I placed great confidence in her while she lived with me. The prisoner, Parker, came frequently to see Linguard. My clerk left my service, and went into partnership with Parker, in the coal and potatoe business: and Linguard lived with Parker, at 21, John-street, Commercial-road.

Q. That was the house where your clerk lived, and where Parker lived - A. Yes. I went there with two officers, and found some of my property, about five or six yards of stair-carpet, some doyles, and some napkins. I asked Linguard whether I deserved such treatment from her. She said, no. The officer then opened a table-drawer. There was a petty ledger, and two or three memorandum books. I asked her, who brought the stair-carpet away. She said, she did.

JOHN MATTHEWS . I am an officer. I went with Mr. Toosey to the house where the prisoner lived. These are the things that I found there. The woman prisoner confessed to me of taking the things away, except the two candlesticks. I asked her, how she came by them. She said, she gave them to Parker, because they were dirty; and they were of no use to Mr. Toosey.

Parker's Defence. The prisoner, Linguard, gave me the candlesticks.

Linguard's Defence. The napkins I took by oversight; not with intent to steal them.

PARKER, NOT GUILTY .

LINGUARD, GUILTY , aged 22.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18120701-24

540. ANN SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of May , two silver spoons, value 22 s. the property of John Henshaw ; and one spoon, value 2 s. the property of Mary Chapman , the elder, since deceased.

JOHN HENSHAW . I live in Camden-row . I can only speak to the spoons when they are produced.

JOHN WILLIAMS . I am a pawnbroker. On the evening of the 15th of May, the prisoner brought these spoons, I now produce, into my shop; two table-spoons, and one tea-spoon, to pledge. She only asked six shillings on them. I asked her, whose they were. She first said, her mistress's. I pressed her further. She then said, it was a man had sent her with them to pledge, whom she met at the corner of Willmott-street, Bethnal Green. I then told her, it would be the better for her to confess the truth.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Gibbs.

Reference Number: t18120701-25

541. SAMUEL MYERS and ISRAEL SANDERS were indicted for feloniously stealing, from the person of John Smith , on the 13th of May , a pocket-book, value 6 d. a bank-note, value 30 l. a bank-note, value 10 l. and seventeen 1 l. bank-notes, his property .

JOHN SMITH . I am a sailor . I received a check for my wages. I left it at the place where it is directed, and got change. They gave me two thirty-pound notes, four five-pound notes, and twenty-one ones, and thirteen and eight-pence besides. That is the amount of the bill. I received this money in Fleet-street, and the money. I had in my pocket-book.

Q. When you received the money of the bankers what did you do with it - A. I put it into my pocket-book. That was on the Thursday, the 11th of June. I discharged some little bills with it, and the rest of the money I kept in the pocket-book.

Q. Did you go to the Yorkshire Grey, in Whitechapel - A. On Saturday, the 13th, I went there between three and four o'clock in the afternoon. I took a coach at Whitechapel, and went to the Bank, and got small notes for the large notes and afterwards went to the Yorkshire Grey, in Whitechapel. I lodge at 38, Church-row, Commercial-road. I asked the coachman his fare. He said, six shillings. I went into the Yorkshire Grey, to get change. I had fifty pounds in notes left. I took a one-pound note out of the pocket-book. I paid the coachman, and paid for a glass of rum and water at the bar. There was a man came up, and

stood, with a whip, across the passage. The prisoner, Sanders, came up and stood between the man and me.

Q. Did you see Myers there - A. No; I did not take notice of any thing. When I settled with the coachman, and paid the landlord for his liquor, I walked out. I did not want any money. I had change that I got there. I did not want the pocketbook till the morning, and then, in the morning, I missed it.

Q. Have you ever found the pocket-book, or any part of the property since - A. No.

CATHERINE BRIANT . I lived servant at the Yorkshire Grey public house, on the 13th of May last.

Q. Do you know the two prisoners at the bar - Yes. They used to come to my master's house. I have seen them there about four times.

Q. Do you remember the prosecutor, Mr. Smith - A. Yes; he came in for change of a pound note. to pay the coachman. The two prisoners were having a pint of beer.

Q. Was any body with them. - A. Yes; a man of the name of Mordecai Julian .

Q. Smith came in for change of a pound note. Did he have any thing to drink - A. A glass of rum and water.

Q. Did you see any thing done by either of the prisoners - A. Julian stood across, with a whip, and Smith was between them. Myers stood behind Mr. Smith. He put his hand into Mr. Smith's pocket, and attempted to take out the pocket-book. I looked round, and he brought out his hand again. Mr. Smith moved forwards; he followed him up; Myers then put his hand into his pocket and took the pocket-book out. Myers pushed Smith of one side, and went out of doors. Julian staid in, and Smith went out of the house. Smith came the next day and stated his loss.

Mr. Gurney. What, you let Mr. Smith go out, and did not tell him that he had lost his pocket-book - A. Yes.

COURT. How soon did Smith go out after this had passed - A. In about five minutes.

Q. And where were you at that time - A. In the passage.

Myers left his defence to his counsel.

Sanders's Defence. I went into the house to have a pint of beer; when I drank the beer, I handed the pot over to the landlady in the bar.

MYERS, GUILTY , aged 21.

Transported for Life .

SANDERS, NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18120701-26

542. ELIZABETH BUSH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of June , a pair of sheets, value 12 s. three blankets, value 15 s. a quilt, value 2 s. a bolster, value 18 s. and two flat irons, value 2 s. the property of Anthony Potts , in a lodging room .

ANTHONY POTTS . I live at No. 15, Stacey-street, Saint Giles's in the Fields .

Q. Did the prisoner ever lodge with you - A. Yes, about thirteen or fourteen months. She quitted my lodging on the first of June, 1812. She went off without settling with me at all. She sent me back these duplicates by a man, who said, she said she was very sorry for what she had done. I received the duplicates from the man on the same day that the prisoner quitted; and, as soon as I got the key of the room, I missed every article specified in the duplicates, and two articles that I cannot find.

WILLIAM KING. The blankets and the looking-glass were pledged with me, either by the prisoner or her daughter, I cannot say which, it is so long ago.

JAMES DALTON . A bolster and a pair of sheets were pledged with me, either by the prisoner or her daughter.

[The prisoner said nothing in her defence, nor called any witnesses to her character.]

GUILTY , aged 44.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Gibbs.

Reference Number: t18120701-27

543. LEWIS ALEXANDER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of May , twenty-two pounds weight of paper, value 9 s. the property of Andrew Strahan and William Preston .

ANDREW M'SELLAN. I am a bookbinder. I live at No. 11, Poppin's Court, Fleet-street.

Q. Do you know Mr. Steel, a cheesemonger - A. Perfectly well for many years; he keeps a cheese-monger's shop in Cloth-fair, West-smithfield. I went there on the 17th of June, in the evening to purchase some bacon. I observed Mr. Steel take from his counter a sheet of printed paper to wrap this bacon up. I observed some more sheets on the counter. On examining them I saw the last sheet of volume 21. I observed Strahan and Preston printed at the back of it. I knew then that it was Ree's Encyclopedia. I asked Mr. Steel if he had any more sheets; he said, yes. On the next day, I waited upon Mr. Steel, and told him it was my intention to inform Mr. Longman, who was the publisher of that work. I requested Mr. Steel to shew me the rest of the work: he shewed me some sheets in volume 22 of the same work. There were about four or five bundles. I took one of the sheets to Mr. Longman, the bookseller. They sent to Mr. Spottiswoode, who is the manager of Mr. Strahan's concern. I took Mr. Spottiswoode to Mr. Steel's house; there he recognized the property to be Mr. Strahan's.

GEORGE STEEL. I am a cheesemonger. I live at 29, Cloth-fair, West-smithfield.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. I do. I have known him a twelvemonth at least. He has been in the habit of coming to my house for that time. He came to offer me waste paper. I gave him five pence per pound for it. This is the same paper I bought of him. Mr. Spottiswoode came to my house and claimed it. It was afterwards put into the hands of the constable. I went to Mr. Strahan's warehouse. I pointed out the prisoner, as being the person that brought the paper to me. I knew his person very well.

ANDREW SPOTTISWOODE . Q. I believe you are

the manager of Mr. Strahan's concern - A. I am. Andrew Strahan and William Preston are the names of the partners. They are the King's printers . They live in the parish of St. Bride's.

Q. In consequence of information that you received, did you go to Mr. Steel's shop - A. I did. I found there some paper of Messrs. Strahan's and Preston's. The paper I saw there was their property. The work has never been published. We publish it in parts. Some parts have been published. They are waste sheets of vol. XXI. and vol. XXII. of the Encyclopaedia by Rees.

Q. Were any of this the perquisites of any of your men - A. None. The prisoner was an apprentice to Mr. Preston, in that house. He had been engaged in printing this particular work between five and six years. I appointed Mr. Steel to come to me. He came, and pointed the prisoner out as the person from whom he had bought this paper. Upon that I ordered the constable to take him in custody. The prisoner desired I would not be hard with him: he had a wife and child; and that had induced him to purloin this property.

Mr. Reynolds. Has Mr. Strahan a concern in another printing-house - A. Yes.

Q. Do not you receive a profit from what is sold - A. I am not a partner. I do not receive a regular salary.

Q. Do not you receive a profit or loss upon the work, more or less, done - A. Yes: and I have some capital embarked in it also.

Q. Are you answerable for this. Does it add, or diminish - A. Diminish, certainly. My profit is in proportion to the profit of the whole.

COURT. Then you are a partner.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120701-28

544. JOHN CASEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of June , fifteen pounds weight of iron, value 1 s. the property of William Thomson , William Forman , and William Hanfray .

JOHN JONAS. I am foreman to William Thomson , William Forman , and William Hanfray . They are iron-merchant s. The iron was taken from the wharf. I met the prisoner about the middle of the day. I saw him coming from the wharf. He had the iron under his coat. I stopped him, and took him down to the accompting-house. I searched him, and found this iron. He said, he took it for want of bread. There is a great quantity of iron on the wharf. This is the iron. It is my master's property.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to his character.

GUILTY , aged 63.

Whipped in Jail and discharged .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120701-29

545. ROBERT JOHN GRIFFITHS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of May , six three-shilling Bank tokens, and a shilling , the property of Thomas Lock .

THOMAS LOCK . I am an umbrella-maker , 181, Fleet-street . On the 13th of May, a little before eight o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came into my shop. My wife was in the shop. He asked for a bit of sponge. She served him with a piece of sponge. It came to ten-pence. He asked for change of a one-pound note. She counted out the change; six three-shilling Bank tokens, and one shilling and two-pence. She rang the bell for me as I was going across the counter. He threw the note across the counter, as I was coming behind the counter. I took up the note. I said, I do not think this is a good one: we cannot see by this light: I will go to the light. He had got the sponge. I was returning from behind the counter to go to the door. I went to the door, and perceived it was a bad one. He took the six three-shilling tokens, and the shilling, leaving the two-pence behind him, and ran off. I pursued him to Shoe-lane, into Holborn. I told him it was a bad note he had given me. He said, he thought it was a good one. I took him, and put him into Mr. Skinner's, the tobacconist, shop. I saw it was a false note. The three ones were turned into ="pound=" with writing. The prisoner put the note into his mouth, and tried to swallow it, and he did swallow it. We took him to St. Andrew's watchhouse, and when we searched him we found only one three-shilling token upon him. I have every reason to believe that his associate had got the sponge, and the other property from him.

Prisoner's Defence. I leave it to the mercy of you, my lord, and the gentlemen of the Jury.

GUILTY , aged 29.

Judgment respited.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120701-30

546. HENRY PITT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of June , from the person of John Myte , a watch, value 20 s. a watch key, value 2 d. and a piece of ribbon, value one halfpenny, his property .

JOHN MYTE . On the 7th of June I was going down to Greenwich.

Q. Where did this happen - A. In a coffee-room, at the George and Gate, Gracechurch-street .

Q. A public-house, is it not - A. Yes: Mr. Earle's. It is a place where the passengers generally stop, to go by the Greenwich-coach. It was a quarter after nine when I went into this coffee-house. The coach that I intended to go by was gone. There was a Deptford coach at the door. The coachman said, he should go at ten o'clock. I went into the coffee-room, and he was to call me.

Q. You were so drunk you do not know any thing about the matter, how it was done - A. I cannot recollect any thing.

MR. EARLE. I keep the George and Gate, Gracechurch-street. About half past nine the prosecutor came in, and the prisoner followed him. They seemed both in liquor. The prosecutor was considerably in liquor. The prosecutor asked for change of a ten-pound note. Seeing him in liquor I refused, and desired him to put the note in his pocket. He said to the prisoner, will you have something to drink: and when we get to Greenwich, if you want money, you shall not want for eight or nine shillings. They went in doors. In about a quarter of

an hour the prosecutor came, and said, the person that had been with him had robbed him of his watch. The prisoner then was gone out. A person in the bar said, he thought he knew where to find him. He went up the next inn, (the Cross Keys), and my friend laid hold of the prisoner up the gateway of the Cross Keys. He brought him back. We challenged the prisoner with taking the watch from the prosecutor. He denied it. I sent for a watchman. The watchman would not take charge of him, until I sent for an officer. The officer came. He took the watch from his waistcoat pocket, and laid it on a box in the passage.

- IRVIN. I am a lighterman. I saw the watch taken out of the prisoner's pocket.

WILLIAM ALDER . I am the officer that took him in custody. The watch was given into my custody.

Prosecutor. That is my watch.

Q. Did you give it him, or did he take it out of your pocket - A. The watch might slip out of my hand, or I might put it on the table. That is the watch I had. I was very drunk.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder

Reference Number: t18120701-31

547. SARAH JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2nd of July , from the person of James Purcell , two shillings, and two 1 l. bank-notes, his property .

JAMES PURCELL. I am a boot-clicker .

Q. When was it you lost these two notes - A. Between twelve and one o'clock this morning I was coming home from the west end of the town. I was on the pavement of Moorfields . The prisoner catched hold of me. She said, she hoped I would not be so hard-hearted as the man she had met before. She lugged me along until she got me into Ropemaker-street.

Q. You went with her into Ropemaker-street - A. Yes. She slipped her hand down, and I thought she had hold of my watch-chain, instead of that she slipped her hand into my pocket, and took the money out.

Q. How much was it - A. Two pounds two shillings. I had the two one-pound notes of my master, in the afternoon, to go and buy three pair of boot legs. Immediately she parted with me I found my money was gone. I ran after her, and said, give me my money: you have got my money. She denied it. There was another girl alongside of her; and when she came to the watchhouse she was searched, and only two shillings were found on her. I suppose she had conveyed it away to the other girl. I saw her speak to the other girl. The other girl went away.

Q. Were you sober - A. Yes.

MR. RAVENHILL. I was officer of the night. I searched the prisoner in the watchhouse. I found nothing on her but two shillings.

Prisoner's Defence. Between twelve and one I was talking to a gentleman in the square. That gentleman came and took hold of me by the arm, and gave charge of me. I never insulted him at all, so help me God.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120701-32

548. THOMAS DARDIS was indicted, for that he, knowingly, wittingly, and without lawful excuse, having in his custody and possession, two forged bank-notes, and one forged Bank 2 l. note; he knowing them to be forged .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded GUILTY .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120701-33

549. THOMAS DARDIS was indicted for disposing of, and putting away, a like forged banknote, with intention to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England .

Mr. Knapp, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner, of this charge, was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120701-34

550. JAMES BROWN was indicted, for that he, on the 9th of May , feloniously, knowingly, wittingly, and without lawful excuse, had in his custody and possession, a forged bank-note, for payment of 2 l. and another for the payment of 1 l .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded GUILTY .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120701-35

551. JAMES BROWN was indicted for feloniously disposing of, and putting away, a forged bank-note , with intention to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England .

Mr. Knapp, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner, of this charge was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120701-36

552. GEORGE GREENAWAY was indicted, for that he, on the 19th of June , feloniously, knowingly, wittingly, and without lawful excuse, had in his custody and possession three forged bank-notes for the payment of 1 l. each, he knowing it to be forged .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded GUILTY .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120701-37

553. GEORGE GREENAWAY was indicted for feloniously forging, on the 19th of June , a bank-note for the payment of 1 l. with intention to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England .

SECOND COUNT, for disposing of, and putting away, a like forged bank-note, with the same intention.

Mr. Knapp, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner, of this charge, was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120701-38

554. JOHN DAVIS SAINTSBURY was indicted, for that he, on the 30th of May , feloniously, and without lawful excuse, had in his custody and possession

two forged bank-notes, for the payment of 10 l. each, he knowing them to be forged .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded GUILTY .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120701-39

555. JOHN DAVIS SAINTSBURY was indicted for feloniously forging, on the 30th of May , and disposing of and putting away a forged bank-note, for the payment of 10 l. with intention to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England , and with intention to defraud Jeremiah How .

Mr. Knapp, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner, of this charge, was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120701-40

556. MARGARET MOORE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of May , a pair of sheets, value 5 s. three aprons, value 1 s. a shift, value 1 s. two veils, value 1 s. a pair of shoes, value 1 s. and two bonnets, value 4 s. and a pair of gloves, value 6 d. the property of Moses Levy .

MARY LEVY . I am the wife of Moses Levy . We live in Thomas-street, Newington-causeway , Surry. I lost these things on the 26th of May.

Q. What is your husband - A. A tailor .

Q. How did you lose them - A. I being tired, I went to rest in my house, and while I was asleep I lost these things. I am positive there was no one in the house but the prisoner. She must have left my house that instant she did the robbery. On the next day I found upon her a bonnet and a pair of gloves.

MARGARET WILLIAMSON . All I know is, the prisoner came to me with a bundle. She left it with me, and came and took it away.

WILLIAM READ . I am a constable. When I apprehended the prisoner I found this bonnet on her head, and this pair of gloves in her pocket.

Prosecutrix. That bonnet is mine, and the gloves are mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I went to her as a lodger. I was to give her two guineas a-week. There were two more ladies in the house. They left the house two days before I left.

Q. to prosecutrix. Before, you stated the bonnet to be the property of Samuel Davis - A. That is a mistake.

Q. You must have said it - A. I gave it to my mother: she would not take it. She thought I could not afford to give it away. It is mine, I can assure you.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120701-41

557. RICHARD READ was indicted for feloniously forging, on the 31st of July , a bank-note for the payment of 5 l. with intention to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England : and with feloniously disposing of, and putting away, a like forged bank-note .

Mr. Knapp, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120701-42

558. MARY MILLER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of April , in the dwelling-house of Sarah M'Kew, a pocket-book, value 1 s. four shillings, a bank-note, value 100 l. a 20 l. banknote, four 10 l. bank-notes, a 2 l. bank-note, and four 1 l. bank-notes, and a promissory note for payment of 1 l. the property of William Whiten : and SARAH M'KEW and WILLIAM BROWN for feloniously receiving the said goods and monies, knowing them to have been stolen .

WILLIAM WHITEN. I am a drover . On the 27th of April, about half after ten o'clock at night, I lost my pocket-book. Miller is the person that took the pocket-book from me. I met with her in Aldgate High-street. She came up to me in the street, and said, it is a fine evening. I said, yes. She then said, will you give me something to drink. I said, I wanted nothing but rest: I was very tired. She told me, that she had a room of her own: I might sit down and be very comfortable, if I would give her something to drink. I went with her to a room in Still-alley, Houndsditch , to a one pair of stairs room. I went with Mary Miller , and sat down there.

Q. Before you got to this house are you quite sure that you had your pocket-book with you - A. Yes; and in the pocket-book there were one hundred and twenty-two pounds in notes, all done up in one parcel.

Q. What were the notes - A. A note of one hundred pounds, a twenty-pound, and one two-pound, and four one-pound in that one parcel. I had them in my hand about five minutes before she took it. I saw my pocket-book when I was in the house. I had five ten-pound notes, and I do not know how many ones. I think about four one-pound banknotes.

Q. How long were you in this room - A. About an hour and a half, I dare say.

Q. Did you fall asleep while you were there - A. No. The prisoner, Mary Miller , blew the candle out. She then fell upon me, and took the book away. She ran out of the room, and said, she would go, and light the candle. I was going to bed. My pocketbook was in my coat pocket. I took it out, and put it in my breeches pocket, and put my breeches under the bolster.

Q. You were then getting into bed, after she had blowed the candle out - A. Yes; she came to me, and fell on me, and took the pocket-book away. I felt for it, and found it missing. She then said, she was going to light the candle, and left the room. I ran down stairs after the woman, into a room below, where Brown was, and three women were there.

Q. Did you find Sarah M'Kew there - A. No. I told them I was robbed of about eleven hundred pounds in bank-notes and checks. The three young women that were there, said, if I was robbed I had brought the thief in with me. Brown never spoke to me. This was Monday evening. About a fortnight afterwards the prisoners were taken in custody.

I have never seen my pocket-book again, nor any of the notes. I lost more than I am worth.

Q. Were you quite sober at this time - A. Yes.

Mr. Knapp. You have never recovered any of the notes, or the pocket-book - A. Never.

Q. You met Miller in the street - A. Yes; she told me I should get no harm if I went home with her.

Q. Then away you went with her - A. Yes; foolish enough. I have repented enough of it since. When a man grows old, he grows foolish. It is so with me, I assure you.

MARY SIMONS . I live in Still Alley, Houndsditch; and Mrs. M'Kew lives in Still Alley. About eight o'clock in the evening I met this farmer and Mary Miller going into M'Kew's house. A little while after this I went up into my two pair of stairs room. Mary Miller came down stairs, and went into the back yard to M'Kew. Miller said, she had got a twenty-pound note. M'Kew and Miller were in the yard together. I looked out of my window and saw their persons. Miller said, she had got a twenty-pound note out of the farmer's pocket-book. M'Kew said, is there a pocket-book? go up stairs, and take his pocket-book, and leave us, go! About a quarter of an hour after it was done, I met Mr. Brown, in the Alley. I knew Brown; he used to come backwards and forwards to M'Kew's house. I said to Mr. Brown, do not go home, there has been a robbery in Mrs. M'Kew's house. He said, it cannot hurt me. I said, I hope not: go to your own home. I know no more.

LYDIA SHOEL . I live in Still Alley, No. 3. I know no further, than I saw Mrs. M'Kew go by my house, in great haste, about half after ten o'clock at night; and I also saw Miller, and some other woman with her. I heard of the robbery in about ten minutes after they had gone by my door.

JOHN FORRESTER . I am an officer of the city. About ten o'clock I heard of the robbery. I went down to M'Kew's house. I ordered one of the patrols to keep the door. I went into the house. I saw Brown sitting in an arm-chair by the fire. I had some recollection of his face. I asked him if his name was not Brown: he said, it was not. There were two or three women, and another man in the corner of the room; and there was some private transaction between them. I went to see what they were after, and Brown then got out of the chair, and left the house.

Q. Have you ever found the pocket-book, or any of the notes - A. Nothing of the kind. That is all I know.

FRANCIS KINNERSLEY . I am an officer of the ward of Aldgate.

Q. Is this house of M'Kew's in the ward of Aldgate - A. It is; and it is in the city, in the parish of St. Botolph, Aldgate. I apprehended M'Kew and Brown. On the next day, in the morning, I took Mrs. M'Kew, in the same house. Brown I took; he was secreted between the tiling and the lath, in a house in a street in Shoreditch. I found nothing upon him or M'Kew.

HENRY DAVIS . Mary Miller surrendered herself at the Poultry Compter. She told me, that she had taken the pocket-book: and that she gave the book to M'Kew, and that M'Kew ordered her to call on the following day, and she would divide the property with her, and that she had never seen M'Kew from the time she delivered the book into her hands. I saw M'Kew in the Poultry Compter; they were kept separate. M'Kew told me, that she saw Mary Miller going out of the house; that she suspected she had been robbing. That she went with Miller to a house in Harrow-alley, behind the Three Compasses, kept by a man of the name of Jemmy Davis, and there the book was opened; and after Miller had turned over a great many notes, gave her eleven pounds: I think she stated, two fives and a one; and Miller said, that was her whack. I stopped payment of the notes at the Bank: the hundred-pound; a twenty-pound, and a two-pound. The numbers I had of the prosecutor. This is the hundred-pound note; and

="Jemmy Davis=" wrote upon the back of it.

COURT. Q. to Kinnersley. Were you present when Mary Miller was examined before the Lord Mayor - A. Yes; I saw her sign the paper and witnessed it. (Read.)

="The voluntary confession of Mary Miller ; taken before me, Claudius Stephen Hunter , Esq. who voluntary saith, that she was with the prosecutor; that she picked his pocket of his pocketbook, which was in his breeches-pocket, underneath his pillow; without opening the same, she gave it to M'Kew. That M'Kew did not open it in her presence; and, that, after she came the next day to her, at the other house, she said she should have equal share; and this examinant saith, that she has not received any part of the property. Mary Miller .="

M'Kew and Brown were not put on their defence.

MILLER, GUILTY , aged 21,

Of stealing only.

Confined Six Months in Newgate , and fined 1 s .

M'KEW, NOT GUILTY .

BROWN, NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120701-43

561. WILLIAM NORTON was indicted, for that he, on the 5th of May , feloniously did make an assault upon Elizabeth M'Coy , spinster, and her, the said Elizabeth M'Coy, feloniously did ravish and carnally know, against the form of the statute .

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant

Reference Number: t18120701-44

562 RICHARD THOMAS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of June , a bell, value 5 s. and half a pound weight of copper wire, value 1 s. the property of John Patton .

JOHN PATTON . I live in the parish of Walthamstow , Essex. All I know, I lost a bell from my house; it led to the kitchen. I saw the bell in the possession of Ives, the patrol, he had taken the prisoner.

JOHN IVES . I am a patrol, of Hackney. I stopped the prisoner in Willsend Lane, in the parish of Hackney. I asked him, what he had got; he said, some old wire, he had bought it. He was going to town with it. I took him to the watch-house.

I found upon him two bells. This is one of the bells; it belongs to Mr. Patton.

Prosecutor. It is my bell.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been out of work a long while. I wanted a bit of bread, and that was the instigation of my doing it.

GUILTY , aged 59.

Confined Two Years in the house of Correction , and Whipped in Jail .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120701-45

563. ANTONIO ROZE was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling of Robert Bolingbroke , about the hour of one, on the night of the 24th of June , and stealing therein a wooden drawer, value 1 s. seventeen copper penny-pieces, and one hundred and forty halfpence, his property .

ROBERT BOLINGBROKE . I keep a public-house in East-smithfield , in the precinct of Aldgate, without the city. The prisoner is a Portugueze sailor .

Q. Did the prisoner lodge at your house - A. No; he did lodge there two or three nights, one week before the robbery. Having been robbed, on the night of the 23d, of a box like that, and all the halfpence, I went to Lambeth-street office, they advised me to set a watch. I did; and, on the 24th, about half past one, I was alarmed by the man that I had set to watch. I went down stairs and unlocked the door. I called to the man that I had set to watch. I found him in the yard: I went to him; I asked him what was the matter? he said, he had got a bird in the cage. I found the prisoner in the parlour, with the box with the halfpence in it, by his feet. He was at the back part of the premises, about ten or twelve yards from where the box was taken from; he within the house: in that room there was a window broken. He had got the drawer about twelve yards from the bar, where it was kept. The drawer contained halfpence and pence. I immediately seized the prisoner and took him to the watchhouse, and gave charge of him.

Q. How had he come in - A. On the night before there was a smaller window broken. On this night the frame of the window was cut, and the glass was broken out; that is the way he came in.

Q. Now, was that window safe on the over night - A. Yes.

Q. Was this your tap-room - A. No, the back kitchen.

- I am a Portugueze sailor. Master Bolingbroke told me to keep watch in the parlour. I kept watch. A window was broken. Some person came in: that person that broke the window came in, and went to the bar, and took the till out. I heard the shaking of halfpence. I opened the parlour door, and went out. The man put the till close to his feet, down on the floor: he brought the till to go out the same way. He left his jacket outside. He went to reach his jacket. I asked him what he was going to do; he answered me, he wanted to go out. I told him he could not go out to stop. I knocked against the house, for the master to come down, and I left it to him.

Q. You did not see him come in at the window - A. No. I stood close back. I heard every thing from first to last.

Q. to prosecutor. This window; where was it - It shews a light into the kitchen and tap-room; it is a window in the yard.

Q. Then, the person got into the yard first, before he got in at the window - A. Yes. This is the drawer; it is my drawer. I found it near his feet.

Prisoner's Defence. I had not got hold of the drawer; a boy had taken it, and put it by my feet.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 22.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120701-46

564. FRANCISCO PERARI was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of June , two watches, value 4 l. a jacket, value 7 s. a pair of trowsers, value 2 s. a shirt, value 2 s. three pair of stockings, value 6 s. the property of Joseph Francisco , in his dwelling-house .

THEODOSIA FRANCISCO . I am the wife of Joseph Francisco . We live in Butcher-row, East-smithfield , No. 5, in St. Botolph, Aldgate. He is a slop-seller and lodging-house keeper . He keeps the house. On the 14th of May the prisoner came to my house.

Q. You lodge foreign sailors - A. Yes; and till the 14th of June, during which time we hired him as cook . On the 14th of June, I saw a pair of stockings, on his legs, that did not appear to be his own. I called him into the parlour. I asked him to let me look at them. I asked him, how he came by them. He said, that I gave them to him. I desired him to pull the tops down. I told him, that they were mine, and that they were new. I said, well, cook, if I gave you the stockings, they were given in a mistake; at the same time I saw a waistcoat on him, of my husband's, return them me at night. I was afraid of making an alarm (it being Sunday) among the foreigners. He said, very well, mistress: with that he went out. After he went out, I was very uneasy, recollecting I had lost two silver snuffboxes within the time that he had been in the house. I said, to a person in the house, I suspect this black man is a thief; and, as soon as the house was shut up, I would search his things. He had the key of his bed-room in his possession. The door of his bed-room was locked. The child searched and found the key on the top shelf, among the saucepans, in the kitchen, hid away. I went up stairs and opened the door, and I saw some small things, belonging to me, on the bed.

Q. What did you find - A. A shirt, and a pair of blue nankeen trowsers. I opened his box, and the first thing I found was a paper of new stockings belonging to my shop, two new shirts, jackets and trowsers, and fourteen white handkerchiefs. I was so much frightened, that I locked the door and came down stairs, and kept the key in my pocket. It being church-time I did not know how to act. I told one sailor, in the house, the affair; that, as soon as the black man came in I must have him taken. He came in at tea-time, and said, mistress, I have

been on board my ship, and I am going on board tomorrow morning; and, at the same time he was talking to me, I saw a shirt on his back that I had in my hand at eleven o'clock on Saturday night. At that time I had not power to apprehend him, having only one sailor in the house. He went out, saying, he should be in soon to give the people their suppers. I said, very well. He came in after supper was over, rather in liquor. I called him in the parlour. My husband was sitting there. I desired my husband to go for the officer. The officer came, and I identified the property on his back.

Q. What you identified on his back was the shirt, waistcoat, and stockings - A. Yes. I called him, with some others, up stairs. On entering the room with the officer, the officer took the things, and took the prisoner to the watchhouse.

JOHN TURNBRIDGE . I am an officer. I was fetched from the watchhouse by Mr. Francisco. I went to his house, and when I came there Mrs. Francisco informed me, that she had been robbed of these things. I went up stairs with her. These things were laying on the bed. Mrs. Francisco said, they were her's. I tied them up, went down, and took the prisoner in custody. I searched him, and found a pocket-book with four duplicates; one for a watch pawned for a pound; another, a watch, twenty-seven shillings; another for things pawned at Mr. Morris's, for twelve shillings; the fourth was for a blanket: she did not own that.

OBADIAH COOPER . I am a pawnbroker, 163, Ratcliffe-highway. The prisoner pawned with me a silver watch for one-pound seven shillings, on the 11th of June.

JAMES ROBERT CASSELL . I am a pawnbroker, 34, Shadwell. On the 29th of May, a black man pawned with me a watch for a pound. I think it was a taller man than the prisoner.

THOMAS HILL . I produce a jacket, trowsers, shirt, and three pair of stockings, and a pair of stockings. I took them in pawn of the prisoner on the 4th of June, for twelve shillings.

Prisoner's Defence. I do not know what to say in my defence. I am a stranger here.

GUILTY , aged 28,

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120701-47

565. JAMES DOBSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of June , three pieces of printed paper, value 1 l. one pound weight of Dutch pink, value 1 l. the property of William Toosey .

WILLIAM TOOSEY . I am a builder . I live in Duke-street, Bloomsbury . The prisoner was my clerk . After he left my service he went into the coal and potatoe trade. I took two officers to his house. On my going into his bed-room I found two or three pieces of paper that belonged to me.

JOHN MATTHEWS . I am an officer belonging to Hatton Garden office. I went with Mr. Toosey and my brother officer, to No. 6, John-street, Commercial-road. There I found three pieces of paper, and this Dutch pink. I waited until the prisoner came home, and then I took him in custody.

Prosecutor. I can swear to the paper positively.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence: called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120701-48

566. CHARLES HARDING , alias DEANE , was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Fleming , about the hour of twelve at night, on the 25th of May , and stealing therein a coat, value 10 s. a hat, value 10 s. three silver table-spoons, value 2 l. 5 s. a pair of shoes, value 5 s. one boot, value 6 s. a pair of stockings, value 4 s. two handkerchiefs, value 4 l. two table-clothes, value 8 s. two aprons, value 3 s. a shawl, value 25 s. a dress, value 30 s. a pelisse, value 4 l. a tippet, value 10 s. a pistol, value 1 l. a silver-top pepper-caster, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of Thomas Fleming .

THOMAS FLEMING . I live at No. 6, Friendly-place, Mile-end-road . On the night of the 25th of May, or the morning of the 26th, my house was broken open. Elizabeth Deacon was up last. She is my wife's sister.

Q. How soon did you discover your house was broken open - A. Between five and six in the morning, I found that I had lost the articles mentioned in the indictment. It was broken open at the back part of the house, by taking up a wood curb over the coal-cellar, which held the iron bars which led into the coal-cellar. The glazed part of the kitchen window was taken off, and laid upon the coals, and one of the iron bars bent, so as to admit a person in. They got into the back kitchen. The kitchen-door was bolted with two iron bolts, and locked, and had this spring bell upon it in the passage. The box, where the lock shot into, was taken off the door-post, and then the door was taken off, leaving one hinge on the door, and one hinge on the post. The door was put in the back kitchen, on the other side of the fire-place; and this bell was found in a basket where there were some greens. The pistol was taken off the mantle-piece in the front kitchen. Only this pistol was found. It was my wife's property before I married her. I have not the least doubt about the pistol. I am sure it is mine.

Mr. Challenor. That appears to me to be a common pistol - A. It is.

Q. You do not know the time when the house was broken open - A. From the noise that took place it must have been when we were asleep.

ELIZABETH DEACON . Q. You are the sister of the last witness - A. I am.

Q. Were you, on the 25th of May, the last up in the house - A. I went to bed about twelve o'clock. I saw the house was quite secure.

Q. Do you remember the pistol being in the kitchen - A. Yes, I do. I came down in the morning about six o'clock.

Q. I suppose, upon the discovery of this, you communicated it to Mr. Fleming - A. Yes. I went down into the kitchen and saw the door had been removed. They had cut a candle down, and put it in the candlestick. There was a great deal of the candle left.

It had burnt about two inches. The candle was left in the washhouse, not burning.

TROMAS LABRAMS. I am a patrol in Globe-lane field, Mile-end-road, at the the back of Mr. Charrington's, the brewer. On the 1st of June, between eleven and twelve at night, I saw two men. I hailed them, and they ran away. The prisoner was one. They were in the fields. I ran after them, and took the prisoner. He had a bag under his arm. I called assistance, and we took him to the watchhouse. The prisoner was searched there. I saw the pistol taken from him, from behind his ham, under the bend of his knee; and I saw a box of phosphorus taken from him, and some keys of different sorts, and a picklock key among the rest.

CHARLES JACQUES . I am the watchhouse-keeper. When the prisoner was brought into the watch-house I searched him, and found this pistol secreted under his ham. I unbuttoned the knee of his breeches, and took it out. I searched his pockets. He had got pockets all about him. This picklock key was down in the skirt of his grrat coat, and the remainder of the keys were some in one pocket, and some in another. The phosphorus was in his waistcoat pocket. This is a purse, two knives, a tailor's thimble, and some needles. He said, his name was Charles Harding , of London, and his residence was the watchhouse. At the magistrate's, he said, he bought the pistol at the other end of the town: he did not rightly know the man. He had pockets in different parts of his coat, different from any body else. He had pockets almost for every thing.

ROBERT COOMBES . I am an officer of Lambeth-street office. I first saw the prisoner at the office. I knew his face very well. Before the magistrate he said, he bought the pistol of a man at the other end of the town. The pistol was loaded. I unloaded it. It was loaded with shanks of buttons, and wadded down with paper.

Q. It is a screw-barrel pistol - A. Yes. It was not loaded as screw-barrel pistols are.

Prosecutor. It is my pistol. It was not loaded when taken.

Prisoner's Defence. The charge that is laid against me I am entirely innocent of.

JOHN ASHTON . I live at 16, Dowson-place, Chicksand-street, Osborne-street, Brick-lane, Spitalfields. I am a tailor. On the 25th of May last I was in company with the prisoner from seven o'clock in the morning until half past one the next morning. He was never out of my sight.

Q. What is the prisoner - A. He is a tailor. At half past one we parted company. He left me and my wife at my father-in-law's house.

Q. Your wife was in company with him - A. Yes.

Mr. Knapp. You are sure it was the 25th of May - A. I am.

Q. Have you been long acquainted with him - A. He has worked with me at different times within this last seven months.

Q. How came you to be so long in company with him - A. It was my wedding-day.

Q. Had you any other friends - A. Yes, seven or eight: my brother, my wife's father, mother-in-law, brother, and sister-in-law.

Q. The prisoner, then, was the only one that did not belong to your family - A. Yes.

Q. What, did you keep it up until half after one on your wedding-day - A. Yes.

Q. How far is Clicksand-street from Mile-end-road - A. I do not know Mile-end-road. I never was in it in my life, to my knowledge. I never went so far as Whitechapel church.

Q. Have not you been to Bow-fair - A. No, never.

Q. You do not know Mile-end-road at all - A. No. I never lived at that part of the town. I lived in Charterhouse-street, and St. John's-lane, and in Middle-street, Cloth-fair.

Q. How lately before, for the last seven years, have you seen the prisoner - A. I have not seen him for eight years.

Q. Did you ever know him carrying on the business of a tailor. Where does he live - A. At No. 72, Golden-lane, he lived for the last seven months. He kept a house in George's-court, St. John's-lane. That is all I know of him.

Q. Were you ever at Woolwich - A. No. I do not know where it is.

Q. Do you know such a place as they call the hulks - A. I have heard of such a place.

Q. Upon your oath, do not you know that that man was there - A. No, I do not.

Q. Can you give the Jury the name of any one master that employed the prisoner for the last seven months - A. He worked for me different days.

Q. Was he the subscribing witness to your marriage - A. Yes. He put his name down. I have got the certificate here. He gave my wife away.

Q. Where did you breakfast together - A. At my father-in-law's. He is a bricklayer and plasterer. We drank tea, and dined together. We dined about three o'clock.

Q. Where were you married - A. At Bishopsgate church, a little after ten in the morning. After we came from church we went to the Hope, in Field-street, Battle-bridge. The prisoner went to my father to let him know his son was married. He returned to me and my wife a little after three.

Q. Who did you say was in company - A. My wife's father and mother, my own brother, and Louisa Johnson , a young woman that he keeps company with, my sister-in-law, and my wife's brother, John. That was all.

Q. What had you for dinner - A. Roast beef and boiled cabbage.

Q. I suppose they all went to church with you - A. No; only me and my wife, and her eldest sister, and the prisoner at the bar. Only four of us went to the church.

Q. How came not her father to go with her - A. He could not write, he said.

SARAH ASHTON . I am the wife of the last witness.

Q. Do you remember the prisoner being in your company on the 25th of May last - A. Yes; he came at seven o'clock in the morning, and staid all day, until half past one.

Q. Why do you recollect it was the 25th of May last - A. I was married on that day. He was my father,

and gave me away.

Mr. Knapp. What was your name before you were married - A.Sarah Lane. I live at No. 3, Dowson-place, Chicksand-street.

Q. Do you know Mile-end - A. I do.

Q. When was it you and your husband went to Bow fair - A. At Whitsuntide. We walked there from our house. At Whitsuntide we walked down Mile-end road, and went to Bow-fair.

Q. You are quite sure you and your husband went to Bow-fair at Whitsuntide - A. Yes; and Harding.

Q. to John Ashton . I asked you, whether you had been to Bow-fair - A. I have heard of Bow-fair. I was never there in my life, either with my wife, or with Charles Harding . I do not know Mile-end road.

SAMUEL ASHTON. I live in Albemarle-street. I am a goldsmith and jeweller.

Q. On the 25th of May last, do you recollect being in company with the prisoner - A. Yes; he came to my house in company with my brother and his wife; and I called upon them, in the evening, at my brother's wife's mother's. I staid there until between one and two o'clock. The prisoner and I came out together. It was a fine moon-light morning.

HANNAH LANE . Q. Were you in company with the prisoner on the 25th of May last - A. Yes; he came about seven, in the morning, to breakfast. He left my house about ten o'clock, and returned about four in the afternoon; and he left my house about half past one the next morning.

Q. Why do you remember it was the 25th of May - A. My daughter was married that day.

M. Knapp. You went to church with your daughter - A. No, I did not; and my husband did not; he was very bad, and could not get out of bed.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120701-49

567. GEORGE WILLIAM MORRIS and THOMAS COULSON were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of May , a gelding, value 70 l. the property of John Foster .

JOHN FOSTER. I live at 27, Addison's Buildings, City-road . On the 27th of May, Morris came to look at a horse that I had for sale. I led the horse out, and shewed it him: he said, it was a very fine horse; he liked it very well: he asked me the price. I told him, seventy guineas. He, said, if he bought the horse he would pay the cash down. When he took him away, he asked me, if I would allow him to ride the horse, to shew his partner, Mr. Coulson. I allowed him to do so. When he got upon the horse, he went the wrong way to go to Bread-street. He said, is not this the way to Finsbury square. I said, no: he then rode towards Finsbury-square, with my saddle, bridle, and horse. He had not gone far before I heard that I had got into very bad hands.

Q. Have you ever got the horse again - A. Yes; he rode off with the horse, and sold the horse for forty pounds to Mr. Abel, of the Borough.

Q. Was Coulson present when the horse was taken away - A. No, he was not.

Mr. Adolphus, Coulson was not present - A. No,

Q. He never mentioned a wish to buy a horse of you - A. No, he did not.

Q. After that, Coulson said, he would give an acceptance for the horse - A. Yes. I did not sell Morris the horse.

Q. Have you never said, that you sold and delivered this horse to Morris - A. I never did.

Q. Is that your hand-writing - A. It has every appearance of being my hand-writing.

Q.Have you never said, and sworn, that you delivered this horse to Morris - A. I wanted my horse or my money. I do not think there was any horse mentioned in that oath.

Q. Was there any gelding taken out of your possession, except the very gelding that is now in question - A. No, none.

Q. If ever you sold and delivered to him a gelding, it must be that gelding: must it not.

COURT. Answer the question, whether you ever swore that you sold this horse - A. No.

Q. What did you swear - A. It was for obtaining. I did not want to lose my horse, if I could obtain it in a fair way.

COURT. I will tell you what you swore; you swore, that George William Morris is justly and truly indebted to this deponent in the sum of seventy pounds, for a gelding sold and delivered by this deponent to George William Morris . And this deponent further saith, that no tender of this has been made to the bearer, on demand. Sworn the 27th of May, 1812. Which are the jury to believe, this oath, that you sold it to Morris; or, that he has stolen the horse - A. I swore to the writ.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120701-50

568. ELLIS WALLIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of June , fifty yards of ribbon, value 55 s. the property of Richard Green , senior, Richard Green , junior, and Charles Green , privately, in their shop .

CHARLES GREEN . My partners are Richard Green, senior, and Richard Green, junior. Our shop is No. 6, Mary-le-bone Street, Golden-square . We are haberdasher s. On Tuesday, the 2d of June, I was coming from the warehouse. I looked through the window to see if they were busy in the shop. I saw the prisoner with a handkerchief in her hand, which she then drew towards her pocket. I went down stairs, and mentioned the circumstance to my father; and when the prisoner was going out of the shop, I stopped her. I desired her to walk into the back room, that I might know what she had got. She went readily with me. I then called Mr. Wright, to see what she had taken. She took from her pocket then a piece of ribbon, which is in the possession of the constable. The ribbon was on a block, about eighteen yards. I then left her in the care of Wright, while I went and consuited what I should do with her. I know no more of my own knowledge.

Q. Who were the persons serving in the shop - A. Wright and Robinson.

Q. What parish is your house in - A. St. James's , Westminster.

- ROBINSON. Q. Did you see the prisoner come into your master's shop - A. No; I was there serving behind the counter. There were a drawer of ribbons, from which she took out a piece of ribbon, from which I cut her off two yards of ribbon, and she paid me for it. She turned to go out. We did not suspect that she had taken any thing.

JOHN WRIGHT . Q. You are a shopman in this shop, are you - A. Yes. I was called into the back room. I saw nothing of the transaction until I was called in. Mr. Green then told her, that she had something in her pocket of his. She pulled a piece of ribbon out of her pocket, and gave it me; that piece contained eight yards. Mr. Green then left the room. The prisoner said, she hoped he would forgive her. I then asked her, if she had any more ribbon. She said, she had not any more. I told her to sit down. She had not sat down above four or five minutes, before I heard something fall upon the floor, immediately under her. I looked round, and saw it was a piece of ribbon. I picked it up, and there was nothing else on the floor. That was on the block, the same as the other. There were fifteen or sixteen yards of it. I asked her, if that was all. She said, yes. I watched her close. Another piece fell from her that was on the block. I suppose there is thirteen or fourteen yards in that piece. Mr. Green came into the room, and I went for the officer. He came and took charge of her.

Q. What would be the worth of this quantity of ribbon - A. Thirty shillings or upwards.

Prisoner's Defence. My Lord, I humbly implore you to extend your mercy to an unfortunate female. I came to London to get a place of servitude; not succeeding in my endeavours has been the cause of my being brought here. It being my first offence, I beg for mercy of the court, and I shall be ever bound to pray.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury. before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120701-51

569. ELIZABETH SPIRKS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of June , a silk cloak, value 15 s. the property of Thomas Windsor Allen , and John Page , privately, in their shop .

THOMAS WINDSOR ALLEN. I am a pawnbroker . My partner's name is John Page . My shop is No. 6, Little Russell-street, Drury-lane , in the parish of St. Martin, in the Fields.

Q. Did you, at any time, lose from your shop a silk cloak - A. Yes; on Saturday, the 6th of June. It was hanging at the door, but not outside; the door opens inwards; it was pinned to two coats. It hung on the door, inside, for sale.

Q. The door, you say, was inwards - A. Yes.

Q. Might not some part of the cloak be outwards No, it was not by twelve inches from the story-post.

Q. About what time of the day was this taken. About half past five. I was at home at the time; me and my apprentice were serving in the shop. I had seen the cloak about a quarter of an hour before I missed it. When I missed it, I recollected the prisoner was the last person that had looked at the goods. When I missed it she was gone. I judged that she must be the person that took it. I went out of doors. I saw her. I pursued her, and she dropped the cloak when I laid hold of her arm, going to question her. I saw it drop from her.

Q. Was there any other woman so close by her, that it might have dropped from them - A. There were people standing by her at the time To a person that did not observe, it might be an uncertainty; with me it was a positiveness. I value the cloak at fifteen shillings. I lent a pound upon it about two years ago. It is an article now not in fashion. There was a label upon it, at the time; it is my writing.

Prisoner. Q. Was I ever in your shop - A. You were inside of the door. I am positive to your person.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing at all about it. The gentleman laid hold of me, and the cloak laid on the ground.

GUILTY , aged 56.

Of stealing, but not privately.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120701-52

569 JOHN MITCHELL and JOSEPH DAVIS were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of June , from the person of James Willit Lyon , a pocket-book, value 2 d. and five 1 l. bank-notes .

SAMUEL LACK . I am an officer of Bow-street office. On the 24th of June I was in company of Smith. I first saw Mitchell and Davis, in Fleet-street, together, by St. Dunstan's Church; it was between twelve and one. I saw Mr. Lyon there. I pursued the prisoners. They followed Mr. Lyon up Chancery-lane . Mr. Lyon crossed over, to get into Carey-street, under the pillars, and there they followed him. I walked on, to the end of Carey-street. The prisoners returned. I said, the trick is done. They met me. Mitchell was thrusting something down into the back part of his coat. I supposed it was the pocket-book: he turned his head, saw me, and ran away.

Q. Did you know him before - A. I did. I took Davis into custody, and Smith followed Mitchell.

Q. Are you quite sure that he knew you were an officer - A. Yes.

Q. Had you said any thing to Mitchell before he ran off - A. No, I had not. I laid hold of Davis, and took him to the office. He pressed me very much to let him go, and he would walk with me: he said he was very ill. I knew he had been ill for some time. At the office I searched Davis; in his right-hand coat pocket I found a letter directed to Mr. Lyons; a pair of scissars, a knife, bottle, and a tailor's measure, and this book; that is all. Davis said, he did not know the other man at all: he never saw him before; he never was in company with him.

Q. Did you know the other man before - A. I knew him to be a bailiff's follower, but I always suspected him to be a pick-pocket.

Q. Had you ever seen these men before together - A. Never, to my knowledge. I have known Davis for years.

Mr. Arabin So, because you saw them gaping at a picture-shop, you imagined they were in company together - A. No; they were hustling Mr. Lyon, and I think this letter was taken from him in Fleet-street.

Q. You have reason to think Mr. Lyon's pocket was picked near St. Dunstan's Church - A. I cannot say that.

Q. You think they were hustling, in Fleet-street, at the pocket-book - A. No; this letter alone. I think this letter was taken in Fleet-street, and the pocket-book, I am positive, in Carey-street.

Q. Your expression to the jury, was

="the hustling.=" Mr. Lyon was in Fleet-street. Now you only think the letter was taken in Fleet-street - A. I am convinced the pocket-book was not taken in Fleet-street.

Mr. Knapp. These two prisoners were together, and near a print-shop in Fleet-street - A. I do not know as to a print-shop.

Q. You do not say absolutely any time when the pocket-book was taken from him - A. I do not. The letter was found upon Davis, but Mitchell had the pocket-book on him in Carey-street. He was hustling it up his back.

JAMES JOHN SMITH . I was with Lack in Fleet-street, and Carey-street. I saw both the prisoners were close to the prosecutor in Fleet-street. Mr. Lyons crossed into Chancery-lane, and they followed close to him. He crossed facing Carey-street, and went under the pillars. They kept close to the prosecutor. When he crossed, they crossed. I ran immediately to the corner, thinking they might do it, and I not have an opportunity to apprehend them. Mr. Lyon went two or three yards under the pillars. They returned, saw me and Lack. I followed sharp after Mitchell. He saw me following. He ran up Chancery-lane, towards Holborn. He took a turning which leads into Lincoln's-inn-square, on the left hand side. He turned right into Star-yard. There I saw him throw this pocket-book into a coach-house. I stopped, and told a person to pick it up. The man, who is here, happened to be in the coach-house. This is the pocket-book that he throwed away. It contained five one-pound notes, and a little bill, with Mr. Lyons' address upon it. I took him to where the pocket-book was thrown. He there said, he knew nothing about it.

Q. Was the book delivered to you in his presence - A. No. I believe it was delivered to me at the office.

PHILIP GARNELL . I am a ostler in Star-yard. I picked up the pocket-book, and delivered it to Smith.

JAMES WILLIT LYON . Q. You are in partnership with Mr. Edwards, Bloomsbury-square - A. I am.

Q. You were coming up Fleet-street on the 24th of June, between twelve and one o'clock - A I was; and then I went up Chancery-lane, from Fleet-street. I had a pocket-book and a letter in my pocket. I am quite sure that I had them when in Fleet-street.

Q. Were the letter and pocket-book together - A. They were in the same pocket. The letter was not enclosed in the book. The letter is addressed to Edwards and Lyons. The pocket-book contained five one-pound Bank of England notes. The pocket-book now contains five one-pound Bank of England notes. I can swear to the notes, because four of them are marked with initials. I have no doubt about them. The pocket-book I am quite sure is mine, and the letter I know to have been in my pocket that morning in Fleet-street. I fancied my pocket was picked, and turning into Chancery-lane I put my hand into my pocket, and felt the pocket-book. When I lost it I don't know.

Prisoner Davis, Q. to Lack You do not pretend to say, you saw me speak to Mitchell - A. I saw you both in company, and I saw you speak to Mitchell several times.

Davis's Defence. I have been ill a long time. I live over the water I was passing from Fleet-street into Clare-market. I was by myself, as I hope to be saved. I turned up Chancery-lane, up towards Carey-street. I was taken hold of by Lack. I was going about my own business. I was not running. I never had any acquaintance with Mitchell, nor did I ever speak to him in my life

Mitchell said nothing in his defence.

MITCHELL, GUILTY , aged 24.

DAVIS, GUILTY , aged 40.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120701-53

570. SAMUEL SHERMON , alias BROWN , was indicted, and the indictment stated, that he, on the 1st of November, in the 43d year of His Majesty's reign, by the name of Samuel Shermon , did marry Sarah Archer , and had her for his wife; and that he afterwards, on the 20th of May, in the 51st year of his Majesty's reign , by the name of Samuel Brown , did marry Maria Palmer , spinster , his said wife, Sarah, being then alive .

WILLIAM FREEMAN . I live at Great Hasley, in Oxfordshire.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. Yes.

Q. Did you ever see him married in your parish church - A. I was present at the marriage. He married Sarah Archer on the 1st of November, 1803. He lived some years with her, and had two children, and then he ran away, and left her and her children. He was married by banns. I am sure he is the man.

HOWARD BIGNELL . Q. Did you see that copy examined with the register of marriages at Great Hasley - A. Yes, it is a true copy.

(Read.)

Mr. Bignell. Sarah, his former wife, is living. I saw her yesterday.

MARIA PALMER . Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. Yes. I knew him about two years ago. I was married to him at Briant Barnet , in May last year. He represented himself to me as a single man. Sometimes he said his name was Shermon, and sometimes Brown. This is my child, by him.

Q. What are you - A. I was a servant . He used to cry fish about .

Q. Did you inquire how he went by two names - A. No, I did not. I knew him for two years before he was married.

Prisoner's Defence. I was very young when I married the first wife. I was just turned of fifteen. The parson shut the books up. I thought I was not married. I married again. I did it innocently.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120701-54

571. MARK SINNOTT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of August , eight carpets, value 30 l. and twenty yards of printed cotton, value 33 s. the property of Edward Loader , junior, in his dwelling-house ; and SUSANNAH PHIPPS for feloniously receiving the said goods, she knowing them to have been stolen .

EDWARD LOADER , JUN. I am a cabinet-maker and upholsterer . I live in Broker-row, Moor fields . All I know is, the articles were taken from my warehouse, and it is my property.

PATRICK COCHRANE . I am a labourer. I was at Mrs. Phipps's when Sinnott came with the carpet, on the 12th of last August. Mrs . Phipps lived in the garret in the house I lived in, in Angel and Porter-court. Golden-lane. I was up stairs with her when Sinnott came in with two pieces of bed-furniture. He threw them on the bed. He said, that is for you. Mrs. Phipps told me to go down, and come up again by-and-by. I went down immediately.

Q. How long did you stay down - A. Half an hour; until she called me up again. I bought one piece of her, and I brought it down stairs with me, and in the course of a fortnight I wanted money; my wife and me went and pawned it, about thirteen days afterwards. I bought it for my own use.

Mr. Alley. How long have you been in custody - A. Six weeks.

COURT. What were you taken up for - A. A house being broken open over my head, they thought I knew something of it.

Mr. Alley. There are four others to be tried for a burglary; you are to be a witness against them - A. Yes.

COURT. You have been taken up about another robbery, upon suspicion - A. Yes, and I went forward.

JANE COCHRANE . Q. You are the wife of the last witness - A. Yes. I only know I pawned eighteen yards of printed cotton, for one pound, at the corner of Widegate-alley, Bishopsgate-street. My husband bought it of Mrs. Phipps, and brought it down stairs. I gave the ticket to Mr. Hutt.

JOHN HUTT . I am an officer of Hatton Garden office. I had private information that Mr. Loader had been robbed by Sinnott, his porter. In consequence of that information I went to Mrs. Phipps's lodging, in Angel and Porter-court, Golden-lane, in the garret. Previous to that I had apprehended Mrs. Phipps, and three others, for a burglary. Limbrick was in company with me. We searched a box in her room. It was nailed. We found these two pieces of cotton, and a quantity of other pieces. In consequence of that I apprehended Mark Sinnot , at Mr. Loader's shop. He took us to his lodging, in Sun-street. We searched his box. In an old shoe, in his box, Limbrick, in company with me, found eleven guineas in gold, and seventeen pounds in notes. We brought him to the office, and Mrs. Cochrane gave me this ticket of a piece of cotton, pawned for a pound, on the 23d of August, 1811. I have matched these two pieces with the piece in pawn. It makes twenty yards altogether.

JOHN LIMBRICK . I know no more than what Hutt has stated. In searching the prisoner's box, I found eleven guineas, and seventeen pounds in notes.

ROBERT MERCHANT . I am shopman to Mr. Perks, pawnbroker, 52, Bishopsgate-street, the corner of Widegate-street. I took this cotton in on the 23d of August, for one pound. It was pawned in the name of Ann Cocking . It is so long ago I cannot recollect the person.

Q. to Mr. Loader. Have you any partner - A. No. The prisoner was my porter for four years and a half. He had twenty-two shillings a-week. We keep the cottons in our dining-room, in our dwelling-house. The dwelling-house and the warehouse is all one. The cotton is my property. There should have been twenty yards of it. I did not know that I lost it. I should have had no suspicion of the prisoner if it had not come from the officer. The carpets, stated in the indictment, are not found.

Sinnott's Defence. Not guilty, my lord.

Phipps's Defence. Them bits of cotton I bought in Rag-fair. I am a poor widow, and work early and late for my living Cochrane lives by buying stolen goods.

SINNOTT, GUILTY , aged 30,

Of stealing, to the value of 33 s. only.

Transported for Seven Years .

PHIPPS, GUILTY , aged 52.

Judgment respited till next session.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120701-55

572. TIMOTHY GROOM was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Smith , about the hour of two, on the night of the 20th of May, and stealing therein a table-cloth, value 3 s. an umbrella, value 5 s. a counterpane, value 5 s. two shirts, value 5 s. a pair of stockings, value 1 s. a bed-gown, value 2 s. a set of bed-furniture, value 1 l. and a sheet, value 2 s. the property of William Smith; a tablecloth, value 4 s. two gowns, value 9 s. and six handkerchiefs, value 6 s. the property of Austin Cook .

JANE SMITH . I live at 48, Golden-lane , St. Luke's parish. My husband's name is William Smith . I was the last person that went to bed. I went to bed at half past eleven o'clock, on the 20th of May, When I got up in the morning, I

found my house had been broken open in the night. They got in, by taking the lead-light out of the kitchen window. The window was safe on the over night when I went to bed. I lost an umbrella, and other things.

Q. Has the things ever been found - A. Yes, they are all here.

JOHN SWINNOT . I am a watchman, in the parish of St. Luke's. I stopped the prisoner, a quarter before four in the morning, in Playhouse-yard. When I went to stop him, he ran into George Green's house. I catched him, and took him on the landing of the one pair of stairs. I am sure he is the same person I pursued. I never lost sight of him.

Q. Now, how far is Smith's house from Playhouse-yard - A. About thirty yards. I took the prisoner, and delivered him into the charge of my brother watchman; and I took care of the property. This is the bundle I took from him, and this is what was found afterwards, when we went back, on the landing-place, and part of a shoulder of murton. The smaller bundle and the larger we afterwards went back and found on the landing-place, and the shoulder of mutton we found on the stairs. I asked him, where he got it. He said, he found it in Playhouse-yard, on a dunghill. The bundle was quite clean.

MRS. SMITH. This bundle is my property. This table-cloth was over the shoulder of mutton, in the window. I keep a small eating-house. These are all my things in this bundle.

MRS. COOK. The small bundle is mine.

Q. to Mrs. Smith. Did it appear that there had been any candle used - A. No.

GUILTY , aged 18,

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only, but not of breaking and entering the dwelling-house.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120701-56

573. GEORGE WILLIAM MORRIS was indicted for feloniously forging, on the 26th of June , a certain order for the payment of the sum of 25 l. in the name of Thomas Hurst , with intention to defraud Robert Kew .

SECOND COUNT, for feloniously publishing and uttering as true, a liked forged order.

And, another COUNT, for disposing of, and putting away, a like forged order for payment of money, with intention to defraud Robert Kew .

ROBERT KEW. I am a horse-dealer . I live in Newcastle-street, Whitechapel . On the 26th of June the prisoner came into my stables. He said, he wanted to buy a horse. He said, he lived at Lamb-farm, Kingsland-road. He said, he had been selling a poney to a man of the name of Hurst, upon Tower-hill. He said, that he wanted a cart-horse for himself. I shewed him different horses. He fixed on one; the price was thirteen guineas. In payment he offered this check, which he said he look of Mr. Hurst for the poney that he had been selling. He requested me to give him the difference. I took the check in my hand, and looked at it: he asked me if I could not get the difference at the public-house I used. I told him, I would not try. I told him, if he would give me any sum of money in part of payment, I would send the horse to him at any given time, to any place he chosed, or keep it to any time. He gave me a one-pound note, and agreed for me to send the horse, the following morning, to the Fox, in Kingsland-road, where my man went to receive twelve pound thirteen shillings. After this, I have only by hearsay. The man's name is Towerson, that took the check for me. The officer has got the check.

Q. Is it the same check - A. It is the same name. My man took it on the 27th of June. The man is dead that took it.

DANIEL BISHOP . I am an officer of Worship-street office. I received this check of the prosecutor, July 15th, 1809. I have had it ever since. It was then the transaction took place.

Q. You know nothing of the prisoner - A. I do not: he was brought from the city, and a warrant was granted.

Q. to prosecutor. This was the 26th of June, three years back. Why did not you take this man up - A. I could not hear of him before.

Bishop. I went with Mr. Kew to apprehend him. I could not find him. I went to Lamb-farm, and Smithfield-market, and could not apprehend him. I never could meet with him. I have been after him several times.

Q. Now, Mr. Kew, look at that check - A. I cannot swear that is the same check. I made no particular mark upon it. I can swear that I took one of the same name and the same number.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder

Reference Number: t18120701-57

574. SARAH GRANT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of June , in the dwelling-house of James Bilby , two 10 l. bank-notes, a 2 l. bank-note, and seven 1 l. bank-notes, the property of John Davidson .

JOHN DAVIDSON . I am a sailor . On the 24th of last month I was going home, to Berkeley-square, to a house where I lodged. I met with the prisoner. I went with her to a house, No. 10, Charles-street, Drury-lane . When I went into the house she told me, the bed would cost four shillings; I gave her a five shilling and sixpenny piece, out of my pocket; afterwards I asked, what would be the demand for sleeping with her: she told me, there was no occasion for that; it should be settled for in the morning. In the morning, when I awake, she was gone, with all my money, and my silk handkerchief.

Q. Where was your money - A. In my pocketbook, in my jacket pocket, and my jacket was under the pillow, under my head. In the morning I got up; I inquired of the landlady, where the young woman was that I had come in with last night. She said, she did not know; she would inquire. I told her all my money was gone. The landlady searched the room.

Q. What was the money - A. Two ten-pound notes, a two-pound note, and seven one-pound banknotes.

Q. Did you ever find any of your money - A. Two pounds the magistrate gave to me, at Bow-street,

to pay my expenses, as I had no money.

Q. Are you sure that she is the woman - A. Yes, I am sure she is the woman.

Q. Were you sober - A. I was a little merry. I was sensible. I am sure she is the woman.

FRANCES BILBY. I and my husband keep the house, No. 10, Charles-street, Drury-lane. I let the rooms all out, ready furnished.

Q. Do you remember this young woman coming there - A. Yes; about a month ago.

Q. Who did she come with - A. Her husband, she told me. I know nothing further than, that she occupies the room that the prosecutor was robbed in. She lodged with me not quite a month.

JAMES SMITH. I am an officer. I had information of the robbery. In the morning I took the prisoner in custody. On my bringing her along, she put her right hand into her pocket, and took out this Morocco case. I thought she was going to drop it. I took it out of her hand, and brought her to Bow-street office. I searched the case; in it I found two ten-pound bank-notes and one two-pound.

Prosecutor. I can swear to one of the ten-pound notes; it has a blue mark. I do not know the number.

Prisoner's Defence. Last Wednesday, was a week, I was going home. I was going home in the morning, between two and three o'clock. I met that man: he asked me, where I was going. I said, home. I went home, and took a candle with me. He said, could I get any thing to drink. I said, yes. I took a bottle and got a quartern of rum. He asked me, if I should like to go on board a ship. I said, yes. He took out a pocket-book, and two watches. He told me, if I wanted any thing he had plenty of money. He said, how much will get your clothes. I said, about three pounds. He said, take all; buy what you want, and take care of the rest. He said, take care of the money, and make haste back. I went to Westminster, and spent four pounds buying me things. I was coming home with the two ten-pound notes: if I had intended to rob him, I could have taken the two watches. He was very tipsy.

Q. to prosecutor. Is this true, that you gave her the money to rig herself out with - A. No.

GUILTY , aged 27,

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling-house.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120701-58

575. ANN ROGERS and JANE JONES were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of James Caperton , about the hour of one, in the night of the 16th of May , and stealing therein four loaves of bread, value 5 s. five eggs, value 3 d. a saucepan and cover, value 2 s. a pound weight of butter, value 1 s. 6 d. half a pound weight of cheese, value 5 d. two knives, value 6 d. two forks, value 6 d. two plates, value 2 d. a basin, value 2 d. a spoon, value 1 s. a tinder-box, value 6 d. a wooden drawer, value 1 s. one hundred and forty penny pieces, two thousand one hundred and twenty-four halfpence, and four hundred and sixty-three farthings, the property of James Caperton .

JAMES CAPERTON . I am a publican . I live in Charles-street, Manchester-square , in the parish of St. Mary-le-bone. I am the housekeeper.

Q. Did you make the house fast - A. I did not; it was fast to the best of my opinion. The house was broken open through a window. I went to bed about half past twelve. I did not get up before seven, on the Sunday morning. The maid-servant discovered the robbery. She found the bar-door open. She was alarmed. She came and apprized me of it. I came down stairs, and found the till was missing out of the bar. When I came I found the till was gone.

THOMAS BELLAMY . I am beadle of St Giles's in the Fields. Going from the watchhouse, about fifteen minutes after five o'clock in the morning, in company with Mr. Brown, I saw these two girls in possession of something. I asked them, where they were going: they said, to number seven, Grafton-street, Tottenham-court-road. I asked them, where they came from. They said, one of their mothers kept a chandler's shop, close to Monmouth-street; but could not tell the name of the street where the mother lived; but they were going to number seven, Grafton-street. They had a fowl; I asked them, where they got that fowl from: she said, her mother had bought that fowl in Leadenhall-market the night before. I put my hand upon it, and found it quite warm, as if recently killed. I gave it into the hands of Mr. Brown, that he might feel it was quite warm. I told them, they must go down to the watchhouse, and if I found what they said was correct, they might proceed on their journey, and every thing would be returned to them; but I doubted it. While I was speaking to Mr. Brown, he lifted a check apron off the till; and he said, you don't see what is here. I looked in the till, and I took them down to the watchhouse. I believe there was in the till five pounds ten shillings in copper penny-pieces, halfpence and farthings. The chief part of them is here. All the things they had with them is mentioned in the indictment.

JOHN BROWN. I am constable of St. Giles's. I know nothing more than what Bellamy has stated.

JOHN BAXTER. I am the watchhouse-keeper. I have the property. I produce it. These things were brought in with the women about a quarter past five o'clock. They confessed, that they got in at the window, and staid in there until three o'clock, and went out at the back. Rogers got up, by the help of the other. When she got up to the window, she put the side of the shutter down; opened the window, and put her hand in it, and helped the other up. It is in consequence of their confession that we found out from where it was lost. We examined the premises where they got in. The window goes into a mews. The window is five feet from the ground; but there is a dunghill under it. They got in there. I never saw them before. The bread and cheese, I gave them myself at the watchhouse, to eat.

Prosecutor. I lost a fowl, and the fowl the prisoners had was mine; and that is my till; the saucepan, I believe, is mine; the till I can positively swear to. I do not know exactly the quantity of copper there was in the till.

Barter. There were twelve shillings in penny-pieces, four pounds and odd, in halfpence, and nine shillings and odd in farthings.

Roger's Defence. We were in great distress.

Jones's Defence. The same.

Rogers called three witnesses, who gave her a good character.

ROGERS, GUILTY , DEATH , aged 15.

JONES, GUILTY , DEATH , aged 17.

[The prisoner were recommended to mercy by the Jury and the prosecutor, on account of their youth and good characters.]

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120701-59

576. AUGUSTIN DOREICE was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Myers Lazarus , no person being therein, about the hour of three in the afternoon, on the 24th of June , and stealing therein two jackets, value 10 s. and two pair of trowsers, value 10 s. the property of Louis Elias .

LOUIS ELIAS . I am a Frenchman, and the prisoner is a Frenchman. I live with Mr. Lazarus.

Q. When did you lose these things - A. Thirteen days ago to-day. The prisoner lodged in the same house.

Q. You lost your two jackets and two trowsers - A. Yes.

Q. All you know is, you lost them - A. Yes.

Q. Can the prisoner speak English - A. Yes.

MYERS LAZARUS. I live at No. 2, Back-lane, Rose-street . The prisoner lodged in my house. About four o'clock I went out to Billingsgate-market. I hawk fish. When I went out the prosecutor's bag was full of clothes, and when I returned I found it three parts empty, to what I saw it in the morning. I went to Mr. Brown, and had the prisoner apprehended. He confessed that he took the things. He was drunk and hungry. He sold them for twenty-six shillings, in the highway; and a pair of trowsers he put on himself, he said, before he went out.

THOMAS NEW. I am a slop-seller. I bought a pair of trowsers and two jackets of the prisoner. I gave him twenty-six shillings for them.

ROBERT BROWN. I was in company with Butler in apprehending the prisoner. He confessed that he got into the house, and sold the clothes to a gentleman in the highway; a pair of trowsers and two jackets, to Mr. New, for twenty-six shillings. He said, he put the window back, and got in. I went to the slop-seller. He produced the property.

Q. to Lazarus. How many lodgers have you got in the house - A. I had two, that is all. I was the last person that went out. At this time the key was fixed in the door. He was to get in at the next door, and I got in at the next door. I got over the next yard myself, that day, to go in at the kitchen window.

Prisoner's Defence. I was drunk and hungry when I did it.

GUILTY , aged 28,

Of stealing, but not of breaking the dwelling-house.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120701-60

577. JUDITH HOLLY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of May , three yards of muslin, value 7 s. the property of George Howell , privately, in his shop .

GEORGE HOWELL . I am a linen-draper , at St. Catharine's . On the 20th of May, about six o'clock, the prisoner came into my shop. She asked to look at some calico, at fifteen pence a yard. I was then busy with two other customers. I left them to serve her. She bought as much as came to eight-pence. I asked her, whether she wanted any thing else. She said, no. I then went to the lower part of the counter, to get some paper; and while I was getting the paper, I observed her go to the muslin wrapper. I suspected her then. I came to her. She was looking over the wrapper, and her apron was laying over the counter. I was then confirmed in my suspicion. She said, that she wanted some spotted muslin. I took down the spotted muslin wrapper. There was none that suited her. On her going out of the shop I stopped her. I sent my boy for an officer. He returned. He said, he could not get an officer. He exclaimed, there! I looked into the parlour, and saw a piece of muslin lay down on the parlour floor. I am sure it was not there before.

Q. Why, you suspected the whole of it - A. Yes, from the beginning of it.

WILLIAM THOMAS HART . I am an apprentice to Mr. Howell. I was sent for an officer, and when I came back I saw her take her hand out of her apron, and throw the muslin into the parlour.

GEORGE PARTRIDGE . I am an officer. I produce the muslin.

Prosecutor. It is mine. There is my private mark on it.

Prisoner's Defence. I went into this shop to buy callico. I bought it. I put my hand into my pocket to pay for the calico, and instead of putting the calico into my pocket I put the muslin, and when I found it I knew it did not belong to me. I threw it down.

GUILTY , aged 30,

Of stealing, but not privately in the shop.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120701-61

578. THOMAS GENTRY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2nd of July , three shovels, value 6 s. the property of Rose Price , privately in her shop .

ROSE PRICE . I live at Mile-end . I keep an ironmongery and tin-shop . On last Thursday the prisoner came into my shop to buy an article. It did not suit him. In about a quarter of an hour after I heard a noise of moving of shovels.

Q. Where were these shovels - A. Inside of my door, by the side of the passage. A young woman came by and said, Mrs. Price, that man has got three of your shovels. I ran after him, and took them away from him. These are the shovels. There is no private mark upon them. I have no doubt they are my property. I missed them, and found them upon him.

Prisoner's Defence. A man gave me a pot of beer to

carry the shovels. I had the halfpence in my hand when she stopped me.

GUILTY , aged 38,

Of stealing, but not privately.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and Whipped in Jail .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120701-62

579. ROBERT RICHARDS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of June , twenty pounds weight of soap, value 15 s. the property of John Slaymaker .

EDWARD SHERRY . I am a labourer to Mr. Slaymaker. I saw the prisoner take a cake of soap, and lay it behind the copper-chimney. I watched him until dinner hour, and then I saw him take it away home. I saw six cakes of soap but behind the soap copper-chimney.

Q. You do not know who laid the six cakes of soap there, do you - A. No. I saw him take one cake of soap away.

GEORGE - . There was no other person in the warehouse but the prisoner. I looked and saw six cakes of soap. I saw him take one piece of soap away: and after the dinner hour Sherry did not go in until I went in.

WILLIAM WILSON . I am an officer. I took the prisoner in custody at his house, and in his house I found these pieces of soap.

JOHN SLAYMAKER . I am a soap-manufacturer . I live in Redcross-street . I have no doubt that these pieces were of the same boil that I was drawing out.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing about the soap.

GUILTY , aged 39.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and Whipped in Jail .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120701-63

580. MARGARET CRESSWELL , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of May , a coat, value 9 s. the property of Jane Pugh , widow .

JANE PUGH . I live at 95, Saffron-hill . I keep a clothes-shop . I lost my coat on the 5th of May. It was hanging outside of the door for sale. It was pulled off the nail. I saw the prisoner standing in the passage with something in her apron. She came into the shop, and asked me if I had a coat that would suit her, cheap. I said, I dare say I had. She said, she would call in an hour, and buy it of me. She said, it would be of no use to shew her any: she had no money. In about half an hour after I went to my door and missed my coat.

Q. Did you find your coat afterwards - A. Yes. Mrs. Beza said, she saw a woman take it down: she thought she was a fish-woman. Then I recollected seeing the prisoner with something in her apron, like a coat. I went out, and saw the prisoner in Ray-street, Clerkenwell. She seemed affrighted when she saw me in her room. I asked her, if she knew me. She said, yes. What, the devil, do you want here. I said, I have come for the coat you have taken away. She denied taking it. I sent for an officer; and, the next day, she said, she took the coat, but she was drunk.

ELIZABETH BEZA . I live on Saffron-hill. I saw the prisoner take the coat down. She examined it in the street. She went into the shop. I thought she went to buy it.

JOHN BURGESS . I am a pawnbroker. I took the coat in pawn of the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. It is my first offence. I was very much intoxicated at the time I took it.

GUILTY , aged 37.

Confined One Month in Newgate , and fined 1 s .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120701-64

581. JOHN BOOTH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of June , a watch, value 3 l. the property of John Bennett , from his person .

JOHN BENNETT . I am a bricklayer . On Saturday evening, the 6th of June, I lost my watch. I was at the Lyceum theatre . I went there about eight o'clock in the evening. I had occasion to return out of the theatre between that and half past eight, and when I had got to the bottom of the stair-case there were a quantity of people assembled, to get in at the half-price. I was obstructed by the prisoner. I could not get past him. I, from that, supposed there was something going on which ought not to be. I put my hand down, and found my watch gone. I then took the prisoner by the collar. He had then got the ribbon of the watch in his hand. I saw him let it fall on the pavement. I took him across to the public-house, and when I got to the public-house I reflected, and I thought I should get into a great deal of trouble, as I had got my watch again I let him go.

Q. Are you sure he is the same man - A. I have no doubt but he is the same person.

Q. How came he to be taken up afterwards - A. He was met by the constable. Though I let him go he was taken upon my charge.

MR. HAZARD. I was in the passage of the Lyceum theatre, in order to go in with the half-price people. I perceived Mr. Bennett coming down stairs. Some people asked him if there was any room. The prisoner thrusted him back towards the gallery stairs. I took notice of the prisoner's transactions. I was close at his elbow. I saw him take the watch from the prosecutor, and hold it in his hand. He had it in his hand when I laid hold of the collar of his coat; upon which he dropped the watch from his hand instantly. The prosecutor and me took him to a public-house opposite, in order to procure a constable. It was some few minutes before a constable came. The prosecutor let him go, as he had his property; and about the middle of Catherine-street the boys were crying out, thief. The constable took him. I am sure he is the same man. I did not lose sight of him from the corner of Exeter-street, until I saw him taken in Catherine-street.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex jury before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120701-65

582. THOMAS BENTLEY , JAMES BEVAN , RICHARD BEVAN , and GEORGE ELLIOTT ,

alias Bowen , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of May , one hundred and twenty-three weight of lead, value 30 s. the property of the mayor and commonalty and citizens of the city of London , governors of the house of the poor, commonly called St. Bartholomew's hospital .

And OTHER COUNTS for like offence, only varying the manner of charging them.

RICHARD HUTCHINS . I am a constable. On the 20th of May last I saw three of the prisoners at the corner of Bunhill-row. Elliott, he might be fifty yards from them. He was in sight of them. The other three were with the truck, and some lead in it. I then said to Webb, knowing them to be thieves, we would watch them. I did watch them. Elliott called out to them, and told them to go to the bottom of Lower Whitecross-street, and he would come to them. I watched Elliott into Old-street-square. He brought out of a house there another piece of lead in his apron. We then ran for another officer, and proceeded to the corner of Whitecross-street, where Elliott desired them to go. We saw the truck empty of the lead. I then saw Elliott come out of Mr. Banner's house, a plumber and glazier, in Cripplegate. We stopped Elliott, and asked him what he had been selling of. He said, some lead. We then took him to Mr. Banner. Mr. Banner said, he had bought some lead of him. I asked him, where he got it from. He said, his father's. I told him, I did not believe him, but I would go with him to his father's and see. I then went to his father and mother. His mother said, he had not been at home all night, nor yet for a week. He was at the door. I told him afterwards what his mother said, that he had not been at home for a week. I then told him it was of no use to tell a lie. He had taken the lead from the square. I had watched him. He then told us that he would not tell us any further lies about it: he would take us, and shew us where he had taken it from the square.

Q. What square - A. Old-street-square. The house stands in the square. We then went into the door that was open. He took us into a cellar, and opened another door. He took us out into a back yard. He knew the way of the house. He pointed to the top of the house from whence he had taken it, and then at the next house, where he had hid it for a month. He said, that they had not an opportunity to take it before that morning. The lead is here.

JOHN WEBB . I am a constable. I know no more than the last witness has stated.

JOHN BANNER . I live in Cripplegate-buildings. I keep a plumber's shop. On the 20th of May I bought some lead of Elliott; one hundred and twenty-three pounds. I gave him twenty-nine shillings for it. He came in the name of his father. I have known his father sixteen years.

STEPHEN DAVIS . Q. I believe you have some houses of the governor of Bartholomew's hospital - A. I had. They are sold to be pulled down. I had them until Lady-day last. Thomas Creaton was the auctioneer that sold them. I am not positive to the time when they were sold. These houses are in Old-street-square . They belong to St. Bartholomew's hospital.

Bentley said nothing in his defence.

James Bevan's Defence. I never saw any of the prisoners before I was taken in custody.

Richard Bevan and Elliott, alias Brown, said nothing in their defence.

BENTLEY, GUILTY , aged 17.

JAMES BEVAN , GUILTY , aged 21.

RICHARD BEVAN , GUILTY , aged 19.

ELLIOTT, GUILTY , aged 17.

Judgment respited till next sessions.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120701-66

583. WILLIAM HOWORTH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of June , a set of harness, value 4 l. the property of Alexander Duke .

SECOND COUNT, for like offence, stating it to be the property of Jeremiah Briant .

JEREMIAH BRIANT . I am a stable-keeper . I keep one stable in the Hay-market, and another in Swallow-street.

Q. When did you lose your harness - A. In June.

STEPHEN HOLLY . I am the hostler of the yard in Swallow-street . I lost the harness on Saturday night, the 6th of June. It was locked up safe on the Saturday night. It was missed on the Sunday morning.

JOSEPH SNOW . I am a constable. The harness is in my possession. On Sunday morning, the 7th of June, about five o'clock, I observed the prisoner coming down the London-road. It leads towards the Kent-road, from St. George's Fields. I went over and stopped him, and asked him what harness he had. He had the whole set of a chaise-harness, tied up with the halter. He said, it was a chariot-harness. He was going to take it to the Green Man, upon Blackheath. I asked him, who had sent him with the harness. He said, Mr. Hardy's coachman, a person of the name of Thomas, in Sackville-street. He had it out of Briant's yard. He said, he was a strapper in Briant's yard, and had worked for him some months. He said, Mr. Hardy had drove four horses. The fore horse had broken the harness, and he had borrowed that harness of the Green Man. I asked him if he had any note to receive the broken harness, or any note to deliver with this. He said, no. I told him, I could not believe him. This is the very harness I took from the prisoner, and two keys I found on his person. I went to Mr. Briant's stables, and there I found they had broken the bolt of the lock.

Holly. This harness was in my master's custody. It is Mr. Duke's harness.

GUILTY , aged 29.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120701-67

584. ROBERT ROOK and THOMAS PURPLE were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of June , a hen, value 2 s. and twelve eggs, value 1 s. the property of John Lund .

JOHN LUND . My country-house is at Haverstock Hill . I keep poultry there.

CHARLES COTTON . I am a labouring man. On

the 8th of June, at four o'clock in the morning, I was going into the field to mow. I saw the two prisoners stand by Mr. Lund's garden pales. I watched them, and saw Rook get over the pales. The other stood on the outside.

Q. Did you see him bring any thing - A. I saw him go into the hen-house. He catched the hen. I heard the hen make a noise; he pulled his coat off and wrapped the hen up in his coat; he gave it to Purple. Rook had the eggs in his hat: he got over the pales again. I came round and met them. I asked them what business they had there; they said, it was no business to me. I ordered them off the premises, and desired my brother to watch them, and went for an officer. The officer laid hold of them.

Q. Had they the hen and the eggs when the officer laid hold of them - A. No; they dropped them when they saw me coming towards them. I am sure they are the same men.

WILLIAM READ. I am an officer. I went with Cotton and my son up to the prisoners, about a quarter of a mile from Mr. Lund's house. I charged them with stealing the hen and the eggs. We took them to the watchhouse.

WILLIAM READ , junior. I went with my father in pursuit of these two men. I found the hen and the eggs, about two hundred yards from Mr. Lund's house. The hen's head had been wrung off nearly. Mr. Lund saw the hen, and claimed it. The prisoners were in liquor.

Prosecutor. I know it to be my hen; she was sitting on ten eggs, and two small Bantum eggs.

ROOK, GUILTY , aged 19.

PURPLE, GUILTY , aged 19.

Confined Fourteen Days in Newgate , and Whipped in Jail .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120701-68

585. PHILIP COLLINS , JOSEPH KEPPEL , and CHRISTOPHER KELLY , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of May , five tin tobacco-boxes, value 3 s. the property of Robert Sanders , and WILLIAM WHITE , for feloniously receiving, on the same day, the said goods, he knowing them to have been stolen .

ROBERT SANDERS. I keep a tin-shop . I live at 164, Church-street, Bethnal-green.

Q. Did you, at any time, lose any tin tobacco-boxes - A. Yes, on the 13th of May, from my other shop, in Holywell-street .

CHARLOTTE CONNER . I am the daughter of the last witness. I was in the shop, in Holywell-street, on the 13th of May. There were four boys about the door. There were four tin tobacco-boxes in the window. There was a pane of glass broken the night before. I saw the boys go away from the window, and, in about five minutes after, I missed the tobacco-boxes.

Q. How far do you think the tobacco-boxes were from the cracked pane of glass - A. About a foot. One of the boys had his sleeves tucked up. His name is Isaac Arnold .

Q. Do you know White - A. No. I saw him when he was taken in custody. I have only seen one of the tobacco-boxes since. I cannot speak particularly to the tobacco-box; it is like one of the tobacco-boxes I lost. There was no private mark upon it. I cannot swear to it.

CHARLES CLITHEROW . I am a bookbinder. I live at No. 13, Trafalgar-place, Bethnall-green. I gave ten pence for this tobacco-box, of White. He was offering tobacco-boxes for sale, at a hair-dresser's shop, in Holywell-lane. I paid the money to White.

ELIZABETH LAMBETH . I live in Old Nicoll's street. On the 13th of May, I saw the boys loitering about the window. I did not see them do any thing. On the next day they were loitering about the shop in the afternoon. Charlotte Conner and me took them within doors. We questioned them, and Isaac Arnold confessed that he had taken them. He said, that he tucked his sleeves up, and took the five tobacco-boxes out, and he hoped that we would forgive him.

Isaac Arnold . I am twelve years old. I was taken up the next day after the tobacco-boxes were stolen. These two young women were in the shop.

Q. Who was the person that took them - A. I took three of them, and Joseph Keppel took two.

Q. Had you any boys with you when these were taken - A. Keppel, Collins, and Kelly. They saw what we did. We tucked our sleeves up, and put our arms in. I sold the tobacco-boxes to the prisoner, White, for sixteen pence.

Mr. Knapp. You come here to save yourself - A. Yes.

Q. to prosecutor. Look at that box; is it yours - A. It is one of the same pattern that I had in the shop. I cannot swear to it.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120701-69

586. CHARLES BULLOCK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of May , a pair of silver sugar-tongs, value 10 s. the property of Elizabeth Virgin .

ELIZABETH VIRGIN . I live at the Oxford coffee-house, in Oxford-street . I missed the sugar-tongs on the 13th of May, about three o'clock in the afternoon.

Q. How lately before had you seen them - A. On the Saturday before, the 13th of May. On the 24th or 25th, I saw them at the pawnbrokers, and I knew them to be mine. They were quite new. I kept them in my box.

JAMES SMALLBOXES. I am a pawnbroker, 23, Tottenham-court-road.

Q. Did you, at any time, take in a pair of silver sugar-tongs - A. I did, which corresponds with a ticket the prosecutrix produced. I received them myself, but not of the prisoner: it was pledged in the name of Jane Hancock. They were claimed by the prosecutrix.

MR. SANDERSON. I keep the Oxford coffee-house. Elizabeth Virgin lived with me as a servant . I am consequence of some things being lost by Elizabeth Virgin , and several of the gentlemen, I requested every servant to pay attention to endeavour to discover the robbery. I particularly desired the prisoner

to be attentive to find out the thief. He begged that he might go for an officer. I declined, and said, I should like to have better proof before I sent for an officer He had suspicion of another person in the house. Elizabeth Virgin informed me, that her box was locked, as she had left it. I concluded, it must have been false keys which was the cause of it. The prisoner was in the habit of going out in the morning, and then returning to his work. I inquired at the locksmith's, if any application had been made there for keys at Mr. Horton's. I found a mould, in soap, for the formation of a key, which had been carried there by Charles Bullock. I returned home, and found this mould fitted Virgin's key; in consequence of that I concluded Charles Bullock must be the person who had done it. In a week after that I had Bullock taken up. I wanted to find the person that was in the habit of holding communication with Bullock in the passage and gateway. Her name was Jane Hancock: she was in the habit of calling upon him. Not being able to find where she lived, I sent for an officer of Marlborough-street. The two Foys came, and searched the boxes and persons of every servant in the house. The prisoner very reluctantly informed us where Jane Hancock lived, and, on searching Hancock. we found the duplicate of the tongs: this is the duplicate.

MR. SMALLBONES. This is the duplicate that I gave to the person that pawned these tongs.

JANE HANCOCK was called, and not appearing in court, her recognizance was ordered to be estreated.

Prisoner's Defence. These tongs, in question, I never saw; they never were in my possession.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120701-70

587. FRANCES WILKINSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of July , fifty yards of ribbon, value 20 s. the property of William Walker , privately, in his shop .

WILLIAM WALKER . I live at No. 18, Marshall-street, Brunswick-square , in the parish of St. George, Bloomsbury. The prisoner came to my shop, on Saturday, the 4th of July; she asked for ribbon. My wife was serving in the shop, as well as me. I took out the drawer. The prisoner bought three different lengths, of three quarters of a yard each. As soon as she had bought the ribbon, she asked to look at some bobbin; and that was kept in a bundle behind. I went to get the bobbin for her. The ribbon remained in the drawer before her. I turned about to get the bobbin, and when I came to the drawer I missed two pieces of ribbon, which I charged the prisoner of having in her possession.

Q. Was she the only customer in the shop - A. No, there were two in the shop at the time: my wife was serving them. The prisoner denied having them, and wanted to go out of the shop. I jumped over the counter and stopped her: in presenting her from going out of the shop, they dropped out of her apron. I saw them drop from her apron.

Q. What number of yards did these pieces of ribbon contain - A. Fifty yards; twenty shillings in value. A constable came by. I gave her in charge of the constable. He has the ribbons in his possession.

PETER WHITEHAIR . The prisoner and the ribbons were given in my charge. I searched the prisoner, she had no money at all.

Prisoner's Defence. I had sixpence farthing about me. I was searched when I was at the office.

GUILTY , aged 30,

Of stealing the goods, but not privately.

Confined Eighteen Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120701-71

588. SAMUEL REYNOLDS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of June , seven curtain pieces, value 2 l. 4 s. two pound weight of horsehair, value 3 s. and forty yards of cotton furniture, value 2 l. 14 s. the property of George Capon , in his dwelling-house .

GEORGE CAPON . I am an upholsterer , No. 13, Greek-street, Soho , in the parish of St. Ann, Westminster. The prisoner was my servant ; he had lived with me six months.

Q. On the 13th of June did you lose these articles - A. It might be before that. On the 13th, I found them on him. On the 11th of June, I missed a quantity of horse-hair. I sent him out: I found there was horse-hair concealed in one corner of the shop, under some packing mats and wrappers. I then sent him out, and called my nephew, Henry Colvin , in to watch him. After the prisoner was gone out, I sent my nephew to go to this hair and see if any of it was gone. He told me, there was a quarter of the horse-hair gone; about three pound was gone. He came back again. I sent him out again, and gave my nephew instructions to watch if any thing was gone.

Q. At that time, did you miss any thing but horse-hair - A. Yes, there were other things missed. When the prisoner was out, my nephew looked; he found there was more horse-hair gone. The prisoner came back. I sent him out a third time. My nephew then found more hair was missing. I then applied to Bow-street office for a constable. The constable came, and some horse-hair was found on his person, about two pound, or from that to three pound. When the horse-hair was taken from his person, he went and searched the prisoner's premises. In the front attic we found his bed there, and his daughter in bed; there was some horse-hair in one of the sides of the fire-place. I found a hearth-brush, I believe to be mine. In a large deal box there was a quantity of printed furniture, different patterns, and various pieces. I knew them to be mine, from the patterns. I had missed articles of them patterns from my shop. The curtain pins, which I have here, there had been on them a private mark when they were taken from me. In the box with the furniture, I found the curtain pins. He had rubbed the marks off. They were such curtain pins as I had lost. I value the whole of the articles that I lost, at four pounds, fourteen shillings. The prisoner was present; he said, he hoped I would forgive him.

Mr. Alley. They were not all taken at one time;

one at one time, and another at another time - A. Yes.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to his character.

GUILTY , aged 50,

Of stealing to the value of 39 s only

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and Whipped in Jail .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120701-72

589. THOMAS KING and ELIZABETH KING were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of June , two handkerchiefs, value 1 s 6 d. a cotton bag, value 6 d. and a pellisse, value 15 s. the property of Hannah Paternoster , spinster .

HANNAH PATERNOSTER . I have been a servant . I am now living with my sister, at Rumford.

Q. When did you lose these things - A. I left the articles in a box, with the prisoner, Mrs. King

Q. What is King - A He is a horsekeeper at Mr. Whitbread's brewhouse.

Q. What day was it you left them - A. On the 16th of May the Kings lived in Crown-court, Grub-street . I called for the box on the 20th of May. She told me, that she had sent it down to Rumford. I had every reason to suspect she had not. I went to the magistrate at Worship-street. Bishop, the officer, went with me, and I found some of the property under the bed. I found these articles, a pellisse, and various pieces of cotton, and two handkerchiefs.

Q. Had you left other things besides that - A. Yes, the box was full. I never had the box, nor the other articles. When I went to the house she would not let me in. The neighbours told me that she was in the house, but she would not let me in. Her husband was not at home. I found him at work.

Elizabeth King . She left these things by the side of the box.

Prosecutrix. They were in the box.

DANIEL BISHOP . I went in company with the prosecutrix. I found the woman prisoner in the lodging. The woman prisoner said, they were not in the box The prosecutrix said, they were. She denied having the box at all. Afterwards she said, she sent the box to the inn, to go down to Rumford.

Elizabeth King 's Defence. I sent the box away to go to Rumford. The box went out of my house, corded up, and locked.

Thomas King was not put on his defence.

SOPHIA PINNOCK . I saw the box open at the prisoner's house, about a fortnight after the prosecutor was gone. She said, she was lifting the box up. It was very heavy, and she supposed the lid flew open.

THOMAS KING , NOT GUILTY .

ELIZABETH KING , GUILTY , aged 36.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120701-73

590. ELEANOR BLAKE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of June , a watch, value 10 l. a seal, value 10 s. and two watch-keys, value 6 d. the property of Phineas Taytasac , in his dwelling-house ; and ELIZABETH CASSDAY for receiving, on the same day, the said goods she knowing them to be stolen .

PHINEAS TAYTASAC I am a merchant . I live at 71, Great Prescot-street, Goodman's-fields . I lost my watch on the 4th of June. I missed it from the parlour. It was hanging at the mantle-piece. Immediately I missed it I had a number of hand-bills printed, and distributed them among the silversmiths and pawnbrokers without any effect. On the Sunday following I called Eleanor Blake , my servant, into a room, and told her, that I suspected she had taken the watch, and that I was well convinced that nobody else could have taken it. She then denied it very strongly. I said, if you have taken the watch, I will forgive you, on condition that you return me the watch. She said, if I would forgive her she would confess.

Q. Did you find it afterwards - A. I did, in the box of Elizabeth Cassday .

Prisoner Blake. You know very well that you gave me that watch, and what for; so you need not go on no more.

Prosecutor. I did not. She said, if I would forgive her she would disclose the circumstance. I answered, I would, provided I got the watch back again. She then said, that she had taken it from the parlour, and gave it to Elizabeth Cassday to save. I immediately applied to the headborough of the parish. The prisoner Blake, the headborough, and myself, went to Cassday, and asked her for the watch. Cassday denied having the watch. I immediately gave her in charge of the headborough. He took both the prisoners to the watchhouse. Cassday, previous to her being brought before the magistrate, she said, if you will not do any more to me I will acknowledge it. She immediately took the key of her house out of her pocket, and gave it me. We went to her house. She took us up stairs into the first floor. She said, that is the box where the watch is in. She looked for the key. Not being able to find it she broke it open. We took the watch from the bottom of the box.

Prisoner Blake. He gave me the watch for having connexion with me.

Prosecutor. Upon my oath, I never did.

Blake's Defence. He gave me this watch at the time he was ill. I was lighting him to bed. He took the opportunity of ill using me. He gave me a dollar. I would not have it. I knew it was a bad one. He then said, take my watch. I consented, and took it in keeping until the next morning I had no place to keep it. I gave it to this gentlewoman, for fear I should lose it. This woman is innocent. She knows nothing at all about it.

Cassday's Defence. Blake came to me one day when my husband was at dinner. She said, Mrs. Cassday take care of this, and give it to nobody

but me. The officer broke open my box. I was so frightened I could not find the key. I know nothing about how she got the watch. I am quite innocent indeed.

JAMES KING. I am an officer. I apprehended the two prisoners. Blake confessed that she had taken the watch, and given it to Cassday to keep. She shewed us Cassday's house, Cassday denied having the watch. I took her down to the watch-house and confined her two hours and a half. She told us in the watchhouse, if we would forgive her she would take us back to her house, and give us the watch. We went back and found the watch in the bottom of her box. This is the watch.

Prosecutor. It is my watch.

Cassday called four witnesses, who gave her a good character.

BLAKE, GUILTY , aged 22,

Of stealing to the value of 39 s.

Transported for Seven Years .

CASSDAY, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120701-74

591. MICHAEL ANTONY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 16th of June , a watch, value 30 s, the property of Andries Matthias ; and two handkerchiefs, value 1 s. the property of Islos de los Santos .

ANDRIES MATTHIAS. I am a seaman . I was robbed about three weeks ago of my watch. It hung over my cot where. I slept on shore, in the East India Company's house . The prisoner, when he came from the East Indies, he was too proud to come in company of us. He had plenty of money. After his money was gone he was glad to come and be with us. I received my pay at the India House. I bought this watch. After the prisoner had been in the house eight days, I put my watch over my cot, to see the hour. The prisoner got up in the morning before any of us got up. He took the key, and took the handkerchiefs out, and then went out of the Company's house. When I got up I looked for my watch; it was gone, and the key was not there. We searched, and could not find Antony. We looked for Antony in every public-house, and every woman's house. We could not find him. One of my comrades took him in Ratcliffe Highway, and brought him to the Company's house. He there said, he had no watch. He would not tell the truth. Then we took him to Shadwell office, and gave him in charge of the constable. The Justice sent an officer to the lodgings of the prisoner. He had lodged there eight days. They said, he had nothing there belonging to him. I said, to the mistress, the young man gave you a watch. She said, he gave me the watch to pawn. I pawned it for a pound note. I said, that is what we are looking for. I went to the pawnbrokers, and saw it. I said, that is my watch. It was taken from over my cot.

MR. RUTTER. I am a pawnbroker at Ratcliffe Cross. I received this watch of Mary Murray , for a pound, on Saturday, the 20th of June.

MARY MURRAY . Q. From whom did you receive that watch - A. From Michael Antony .

Q. to prosecutor. Is that your watch - A. It is.

Prisoner's Defence. I gave that watch to Mary Murray .

- BROWN. I am an officer. I produce the two handkerchiefs I received from Mrs. Murray.

Mrs. Murray. These are the two handkerchiefs Antony brought into my room. I washed them for Antony.

ISLOS DE LOS SANTOS. They are my handkerchiefs. They were taken from my chest.

GUILTY , 19.

Confined Fourteen Days in Newgate , and Whipped in Jail .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120701-75

592. JONATHAN ATKINSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of May , a waistcoat, value 3 s. a pair of stockings, value 1 s. a pair of breeches, value 10 s. two handkerchiefs, value 3 s. a three-shilling bank-token, and an eighteen-penny bank-token , the property of William Bunting .

WILLIAM BUNTING. I am a ostler at Mr. Mountain's, in Wood-street. On Saturday I left my things safe in my box, and on Sunday morning they were all gone. The prisoner slept in the same room with me.

MARTHA GREEN . I keep the house where the two young men slept. I catched the prisoner on Monday, at Worship-street. He had a pair of the prosecutor's stockings on his legs. The other things were not found. The prisoner went out on Saturday morning. He only lodged there two nights.

RICHARD HUTCHINS . I am a constable. Mrs. Green gave me charge of the prisoner for robbing the lodgings. I searched him, and found these stockings upon his legs. The prosecutor swore to them.

Prosecutor. My stockings were just like them. I will not swear these are them.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120701-76

593. MARY BANKS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of May , a shawl, value 2 s. an apron, value 1 s. and a gown, value 6 s. the property of Diana Weller .

DIANA WELLER . I am a servant to Dr. Courtney, No. 8, Park-place, New-road . The prisoner chared there. The prisoner told me she had pawned my gown for six shillings. She said, she did not care.

MARGARET FERRENDER . The prisoner owned to me that she had taken the apron, and upon that I forbid her coming to my place. I took her up to Dr. Courtney's.

HENRY CROCKER. I took the prisoner in custody. I produce a gown, apron, and shawl. The pawnbroker gave them up at the office.

Prosecutrix. They are all mine.

Prisoner's Defence. Distress drove me to do it.

GUILTY , aged 39.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120701-77

594. THOMAS GANNON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of May , two time-pieces, value 5 l. the property of Francis Bryant Adams .

FRANCIS BRYANT ADAMS. I am a watch-maker in St. John-square. On the 29th of May, I packed up the two time-pieces, and fifteen watches. I delivered them to my boy, and desired him to deliver the watches to Mr. Farmer, of Oxford-street, and the two time-pieces to Mr. Camp, No. 2, in the Strand. This was about half after five in the afternoon.

JOHN JOWERS . I am errand-boy to Mr. Adams. About five o'clock Mr. Adams told me to take the watches to Mr. Farmer in Oxford-street, and the time-pieces to Mr. Camp, No. 2, in the Strand. He told me to go to Mr. Camp first. I made a mistake, and was going to Oxford-street first, and when I got into Holborn I asked my highest way into the Strand. The gentleman I asked, said, he was going into the Hay-market; he would shew me; and when he got me into Lincoln's-inn-square , just under the archway, he stopped to read a book, and I lost him. The prisoner came running up to me. He said, where are you come from. I told him, from Mr. Adams's in St. John's-square. He said, that work is wanted. I told him, I was going to Mr. Camp in the Strand. He said, that is right; you must give them me directly. So I gave him them. He put one of them up his bosom, and the other in his coat pocket.

Q. You gave him both the time-pieces - A. Yes, I did. Then he said, where else are you going. I said, to Mr. Palmer's, Oxford-street. He said, he was going to the very same place, for half-a-crown due there, that the young man owed him. He said, if he got it he would give me half. When he got me to the corner of Argyle-street, in Oxford-street, not far off the place I was going to, he said, now give me the bag. He coaxed it away from me. He made an attempt of going into the house I was going into, and ran down Holly-street. I ran after him, and cried out, stop thief, and then this gentleman caught him. His name is Mr. Room. Directly he saw he was pursued he dropped the time-pieces, and the bag, and this young lad picked them up, and give them to a gentleman on horseback. The prisoner and the things were taken to Marybone watchhouse.

Q. Are you sure the prisoner is the man - A. Yes. I never lost sight of him at all.

MR. ROOM. I heard the cry of stop thief. I saw the prisoner run. I stopped him. I saw him pull one time-piece out of his bosom, and drop it. I saw him put his right-hand into his coat-pocket, and dropped the other time-piece, or else I should not have known the prisoner, there were so many running.

HENRY HOWARD . I am the watchhouse keeper of St. Mary-le-bone. I produce the time-pieces.

Prosecutor. They are the time-pieces I delivered to my boy.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence; called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120701-78

595. ELIZABETH HART was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of May , a pewter pint pot, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of William Forest ; a pewter quart pot, value 1 s. 6 d. and a pewter pint pot, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of Samuel Gray .

WILLIAM FOREST . I am a publican . I keep the sign of the Prince of Wales's Feathers, in Exeter-street, Sloane-street, Chelsea .

WILLIAM BANNISTER. On the 29th of May I put the pot out in the door-way, about five o'clock in the morning. I heard the door open, and the pot rattle. I went out, and saw the prisoner. As soon as she saw me she put the pot down. I laid hold of her. She asked forgiveness. I told her, I could not forgive her, she had come into my premises and taken the pot.

MR. MAYBANK. The prisoner was brought to me, with the pots, at the watchhouse.

SAMUEL GRAY. Mr. Maybank called me up at six o'clock in the morning. The prisoner had a basket, and in her basket were these pots. These are my pots.

Mr. Forest. This is my pot.

Prisoner's Defence. Them pots were laying in the mews two days before I touched them, and very dirty they were.

GUILTY , aged 58.

Confined Two Years in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120701-79

596. JAMES HESSE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of June , twelve pounds weight of paper, value 1 l. the property of William Smith and John Young .

WILLIAM SMITH . I am a printer . John Young is my partner. The prisoner was my journeyman . We were printing Campbell's Lives of the Admirals. We had been employed on it two months, and we had missed a great quantity of the work, to about one hundred and sixty pounds in monies worth. I watched the prisoner. I sent for an officer. He was stopped going from my house, and upon him was found two quires of copy paper; and on enquiry I was led into Oxford-road, to a cheesemonger's there. I found a great quantity of the Lives of the Admirals. I was there told, that an hundred weight had been sold there for four-pence a pound. The paper that I took from the prisoner's person I took from him before he went out of the house. He denied having stolen the other property at first.

THOMAS BROOKS , I am a servant to Mr. Haydon, a cheesemonger, No, 3, Oxford-street. The prisoner brought several lots of Campbell's Lives of the Admirals to my master's shop, about fourteen or sixteen pounds at a time. He asked four-pence halfpenny a-pound. It was clean paper.

BENJAMIN WEBB. This is the paper I found on him.

THOMAS MANTZ . I am an officer of Bow-street office. I got paper from Mr. Haydon's, the cheesemonger.

Prosecutor. This is part of the work we are printing. They are not damaged sheets. I am now sending the work home to the booksellers, and I must reprint these at my own expense. We missed many complete books.

Prisoner's Defence. Being unexpectedly called on my trial, I throw myself on the mercy and protection of the court, and the gentlemen of the jury.

GUILTY , aged 49.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120701-80

597. WILLIAM HOLLIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of May , seven pound weight of metal, value 4 s. and 2 l. 10 s. in moneys, numbered ; the property of John Hartwell .

JOHN HARTWELL . I go about the country buying rags, metal, and vials . On the 15th of May, I sent up three bundles of rags in an hamper; each bag was directed for Mr. West, Whitechapel, to be left at the Cherry-tree, Shoreditch . I gave the waggoner a letter to Mr. West, of Whitechapel.

Q. What is the prisoner - A. A porter to the waggon, at the Cherry-tree; and, when the waggon returned, I asked him if he had any return from Mr. West; he said, no.

Q. Where is the waggoner that brought these goods - A. He is gone for a soldier.

Q. You do not know that he delivered the goods - A. Only from his word.

THOMAS WEST . On the 16th of May, the prisoner brought me two or three bags of rags, from Mr. Hartwell; and when the bags came by the porter, I always gave him the money.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120701-81

598. JANE SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of June , one hundred and twenty-seven halfpence, and one penny piece , the property of James Ralph .

JAMES RALPH. I live in Baker-street, Mary-le-bone . The prisoner was my servant . I received information, from a neighbour, that the prisoner was in the habit of laying out a great deal of money, in halfpence, at his shop for goods. We paid her in no halfpence. She was ordered to scour the top of the counter, which she did every day; and this she did with her left hand, and dropped her right hand into the till. My son saw her doing it. He came and accused her. She seemed to hesitate. I followed him into the shop, and told her, if she had done it, to deliver up the halfpence immediately. She took one handful out and laid it on the counter. She then took another handful out. I took the halfpence and put them into a measure, and sent for an officer. I asked her, if she had taken any more halfpence? she said she had, and spent them. The officer searched her box, and found a great many things which had been purchased with my halfpence. Seven shillings of halfpence, and one penny, she took out of her pocket herself.

ALEXANDER JOHN RALPH . I am the son of James Ralph . I was sitting in the parlour in a situation that I could see the prisoner. I saw, that while she was scouring our counter with her left hand, she put her hand twice into the till, drew it out and put it into her pocket; then I heard the jingle of halfpence, as if two handfuls had fallen into her pocket. She shut the till. I went into the shop, and told her, she had taken halfpence. She seemed agitated. I called my father; he came, and the prisoner took the halfpence out of her pocket.

Prisoner's Defence. May it please your Lordship, I have but little to say in my defence. I, therefore, beg to throw myself on the mercy of the court. I feel bitter sorrow and repentance for the disgrace I have brought on myself, and can say, I was never suspected of being guilty of the like. I lived seven years in my last place. I humbly beg to assure your Lordship, that if I should experience the lenity of the court, I shall labour to regain my character, and never offend more.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY .

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120701-82

599. MARY TAYLOR and SARAH SPENCE were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of June , three brass lamps, value 30 s. the property of Frederick Guielack .

FREDERICK GUIELACK . I am a publican . I live in Silver-street, Clerkenwell . I lost these three brass lamps on the 21st of June, from out of a back room in my house. There came five of them togegether, between five and six in the morning. They went into the tap-room and called for a pint of beer. The two prisoners were of the party: after being there some minutes, Taylor came and asked me to let her go back wards. I went and opened the door for her, and, after some little while, she went out in the street, and a woman came and told me, she had taken something out with her. I sent a man out after Taylor; he brought back Spence. He turned her apron down, and there were a brass lamp. He went out again and brought back Taylor.

JOHN JAGGERS . I am a patrol of Clerkenwell. I was in the house at the time the two prisoners were there. I noticed Taylor to ask Mr. Guielack to go backwards. She did so. I saw her go out, and come back again. Soon after that, Mr. Guielack asked me to step out. He said, this good woman has told me, that I have been robbed. In about 20 or 30 yards from the place I overtook Spence. I brought Spence back, and took a lamp out of her pocket. The prosecutor said, it was his. She said, a woman gave it her. I then went into Love-court, Mutton-hill; I there saw Taylor: I took her to Spence, and Spence said, that was the person that gave her the lamp. A man in Love-court said, Taylor had been in the privy there. We found this lamp there. I took one lamp from Spence, and the other lamp was taken from between them both, as they sat in the parlour; and this one in the privy, after Taylor came out of the privy.

JOHN CAREY. I saw Taylor come out of the privy, in Love-court, Mutton-hill. I went into the privy and found this lamp.

JOHN HUTT. I know these lamps to be Mr. Guielack's property. I bought them, and fixed them for him.

Taylor's Defence. I asked the landlord to let me go backwards; he did, and after that I went out of the house. I never had any lamp.

Spence's Defence. A person gave me the lamp.

TAYLOR, GUILTY , aged 28.

SPENCE, GUILTY , aged 39.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120701-83

600. ROBERT WEBB was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of May , two hundred and forty halfpence , the property of Patrick Burke .

MARY BURKE . I am the wife of Patrick Burke : he is a sailor . I keep a chandler's shop. On the 27th of May, three men came into my shop; they asked me if I wanted any wood. I told them, no. They asked me for a halfpenny worth of table-beer. I gave it them. They pulled out a halfpenny. They asked me, if I had any like that. I put the till before them. They began to grasp at the halfpence. I said, do not rob me. I am an alone woman, and I have got a child to maintain. The others made a grasp, and gave them to another, and then they ran away. And the prisoner, he took some of them. I stopped him, and said, he should answer for the whole. They took fourteen or fifteen shillings of halfpence. I only swore to ten shillings, for fear I should do wrong.

MARY FULLER . I was standing at my own window, which is facing of Mrs. Burke's, these three men came up to her door; they asked her if she wanted any wood. She said, no. They asked for table-beer. One of the men took out a halfpenny; he went in with the other men, and asked her, if she had any halfpence like that, he would give her a penny a piece for them. They grasped at the halfpence, and ran away.

JOHN HUTT . I took the prisoner in custody. He being an old acquaintance of mine, I searched him, and found upon him these cups and balls.

Prisoner's Defence. These lads came in. I did not know them. They asked for halfpence, and presently they went out of the house. She ran, and catched hold of me. I said, she was welcome to stop me. I am innocent of it.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120701-84

601. MARY WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of May , a pewter quart pot, value 18 d. and a pewter pint pot, value 14 d. the property of James Harrison ; a pewter pint pot, value 1 s. the property of John Pinnock ; two pewter pint pots, value 2 s. the property of Anthony Wilson ; and a pewter pint pot, value 1 s. the property of John Jackson .

JAMES HARRISON . I keep the sign of the Monster .

WILLIAM HOMAN . I am an officer of Bow-street office. I went to the Monster public-house . The prisoner was stopped by Mr. Pinnock. He had got this pot and three others from her, in my presence. She was given into my custody. I found these other five pots after them four. She had got the whole nine upon her at one time. After I put her in Tothill-field's prison, I went to her lodging, and found this frying-pan. It has melted pewter.

JOHN PINNOCK . I met the prisoner with a spouted pot in her hand. She appeared to me to be a stranger in the neighbourhood. I asked her, whose pot it was. It belonged to Mr. Harrison. I took two pots from her bosom, and one from under her cloak.

MR. HARRISON. These two are my pots.

MR. JACKSON. This is my pot. I keep the Compasses, at Chelsea .

MR. PINNOCK. This is my pot.

MR. WILSON. This is my quart and pint. I keep the King's Head, Chelsea .

Prisoner's Defence. I was going to get my child from school. I met a woman; she desired me to take care of them pots, and not to let any body see them. She said, the man was coming out to fetch the pots in himself; she did not want him to see them.

GUILTY , aged 38.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120701-85

602. WILLIAM WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of June , a pewter pint pot, value 1 s. the property of William Beer ; a pewter pint pot, value 1 s. the property of Thomas Teer , and a pewter pint pot, value 1 s. the property of William Peer .

SARAH LEDCHER. I am a servant to Mr. Beer. On the first of June I was gathering my pots in they were put out to me at 63; and while I was going up to 59, the prisoner took one away and left the other. A milkman saw him take it, and, form the description the milkman gave me, I saw the prisoner come and peep about, to see if any body observed him. He went down Adam-street mews, and came back again into Adam-street. He dropped the pint pot. I said, this is my master's. He said, make no noise, mistress, I will go back with you. I took him and delivered him to my master.

MR. BEER. When he was delivered to me, I took two pint pots out of his pocket. This is my pot.

MR. TEER. This is my pint pot.

MR. PEER. This is my pint pot.

Prisoner's Defence. I was very much reduced in poverty by the losing the use of my arm two years back.

GUILTY , aged 63.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120701-86

603 JOHN JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of June , two counterpanes, value 1 l. a pair of blankets, value 12 s. a saw, value 2 s. a bed-gown. value 1 s. and three yards of cotton, value 1 s. the property of John Sheeby .

CATHERINE SHEEBY . I am the wife of John Sheeby. He is a carpenter . I lost these things on the 4th of June. We keep a lodging-house, in Holywell-street, Shoreditch . The prisoner lodged in

our house, about five or six weeks; he had the articles on the bed, and no one lay in the room but him.

Q. What was he to pay a week - A. Eighteen pence a week. He took the counterpane off the next bed. He took a counterpane, and the blankets off his own bed. The woman in the court saw him go out with them, between five and six in the morning. She tapped at my window and asked me, whether Jones had paid his way. I said, no. She said, he is gone away. I ran up stairs, and missed the things.

JANE JONES. I live in Holywell-lane. I saw the prisoner go out of his lodging, in the morning, with a bundle on his arm. I rapped at Mrs. Sheeby's window. I said, has Jones paid his way. She said, no. I said, he is off, with his bundle. She said, he has no bundle. She ran out of her bed, and said, he had robbed her.

WILLIAM ALLEY. I apprehended the prisoner. I took him to Worship-street office. He confessed before Mr. Mosez, that he had taken the things. He would not give up the duplicates.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120701-87

604. JOHN PARSONS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of June , a pair of gloves, value 1 s. and a three shilling bank-token , the property of Thomas Smythe .

THOMAS SMYTHE. I am a haberdasher , 104, Ratcliffe-highway . In consequence of information, I suspected the prisoner's honesty. On the morning, of the 10th of June, I marked some money, with a punch. I went into the shop and emptied the till of the money, and put in this marked money, amounting, altogether, to twenty-six shillings. The prisoner returned. I took up the paper, and went up to breakfast: after breakfast I went into the shop and examined the till; and found there was a three shilling bank-token gone. Upon the inquiry I made, and in consequence of there being no larger money in the till, I ordered the prisoner up stairs. I asked him, what money he had in his pocket. He gave it me. Among it I found a three shilling token that is mine. I sent for the officer; he was taken in custody, and his box was searched: in his box I found a pair of gloves of mine.

GEORGE PARTRIDGE . I am an officer. I produce the gloves and the three shilling bank-token.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence; called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120701-88

605. MARY PERRY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of May , a cloak, value 5 s. the property of Mary Pheby .

MARY PHEBY . I keep a house in Tottenham-street . On the 13th of May I saw the prisoner come out of my passage, with the cloak, and then she ran away.

MR. WARWICK. I keep a coal-shed, No. 20, Tottenham-street. I saw the prisoner come out of the house, with the cloak. I pursued her, and took her. This is the cloak I took form her.

Prosecutrix. This is my cloak.

Prisoner's Defence. I pray for the mercy of the court.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY , aged 16.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120701-89

606. FRANCIS COUZENS and THOMAS SAUNDERS were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 31st of May , a coat, value 10 s. a waistcoat, value 2 s. a handkerchief, value 1 s. and a cork-screw, value 6 d. the property of James Williams .

JAMES WILLIAMS . I am an apprentice to Mr. Thomas Wiseman ; he keeps the Artichoke public-house, Kensington . On last Sunday week, about ten o'clock, I was cleaning my master's boots and shoes. I let the prisoners in; they called for some beer. I put my bundle of clothes on the dresser, on the right hand side of the tap-room, the coat, waistcoat, handkerchief, and a cork-screw. Mrs. Wiseman would not let them have any beer. She was angry with me for letting them in. I persuaded Saunders to go out, because it was church-time. Couzens went out, and then Saunders went out. In about ten minutes time I missed my clothes. In the evening I met my grandmother: she told me, there was a coat sold at the Coach and Horses, in James-street, Kensington. I saw it again in the evening; the coat is here.

JAMES SHEARS . I am a labouring man. On the 31st of May, I was at the Coach and Horses public-house. Couzens came in with the coat on. He asked if any body would buy the coat. He asked eight shillings for it. He being in liquor, I told him, I would give half-a-guinea. I gave him five shillings, and was to give him five shillings and sixpence the Wednesday night following.

Q. Who was in company with Couzens - A. Saunders. Couzens said, we have got a waistcoat between us. He took it out of Saunder's cap. I did not buy the waistcoat. The coat I gave into the landlady's hands; and, while I was drinking part of a pot of porter, the prosecutor's grandmother came in. I told her, the coat was to be seen in the bar, if any body owned it.

- I am an officer of Kensington parish. I took the prisoners into custody. I found some of the articles in Couzen's possession. This cork-screw was in his pocket; this waistcoat in his cap, on the side of his bed, and the handkerchief under his pillow. This coat I found in the bar.

Prosecutor. They are all mine.

Couzon's Defence. On the 31st of May we had been drinking at the Dun Cow. We went down the town, and went into the Artichoke. We called for some beer; they would not serve us with any. The prosecutor let me out of the house. A young man that was with us brought the bundle away with him. He said, he would give us this bundle. I instantly wore the things to the Dun Cow public-house. I

then came down to my quarters. I had no money. Shears told me he would buy the coat. The waistcoat I put in my hat.

Saunder's Defence. I was at the Dun Cow, where my quarters is. After that, we went into Kensington to get something to eat. We called into the Artichoke public-house. I saw no person take the bundle away. I did not know of it until the afternoon.

COUZINS, GUILTY , aged 20.

SAUNDERS, GUILTY , aged 26.

Judgment respited.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120701-90

607. MICHAEL HARRINGTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of June , in the dwelling-house of Edward Kenny , seven 1 l. banknotes, the property of John Lochlane .

JOHN LOCHLANE. I am a carpenter . I live in Edward Kenny 's house, Camden-court, Grub-street . On Wednesday, the 24th of June, I left eight one-pound bank-notes in these breeches pocket. I went out to work about five o'clock in the morning. The prisoner had left the lodgings about eight days before.

Q. Are you quite sure that they were safe in the small-clothes when you left the room in the morning - A. I am positive they were locked up in my chest. I had seen them safe in my small-clothes on the over night. On the Saturday following, I had occasion to took after my money, and seven of my notes were gone. I had kept my box locked all that time. I have never seen my notes again.

EDWARD BENNY. I rent the house. Lochlane is my lodger.

Q. Did the prisoner ever lodge in your house - A. Yes, he did. He left the house on the 20th of June. He slept in the same room with Lochlane.

Q. After he ceased to be a lodger of yours, do you know that he ever came to that room again - A. Yes, he did.

MARY KENNY . Q. Do you recollect the prisoner leaving your lodging on the 20th of June - A. Yes, he came, on the 24th of June, to our house, between three and four o'clock. He asked me leave to go up stairs. He owed me five shillings. He told me, that his sister was coming, in order to pay me. He said, he had the bad headach, and wished to lie down on the same bed that he had lodged in before. I gave him leave. He remained in the room about three quarters of an hour, and, during that time, I heard him on the floor, moving about. I went up stairs, and lifted up the latch, softly. I perceived that he had Lochlane's trowsers in his hand. He was between the box and the bed. I asked him, why he did not lie on the bed, if he was bad, and tie a handkerchief on his head, and that I would make some tea for him. He dropped the trowsers, and laid on them. I did not suspect any thing in the least. He went away. I saw him, and asked him to have some tea: he went away without having tea.

Q. When was it Lochlane missed any thing - A. On the Saturday, Lochlane called my husband up stairs; he said he had been robbed. My husband called me up stairs, I asked him, what he had been robbed of: he said, seven one-pound notes out of these trowsers; and then I recollected seeing Harrington have the trowsers on Saturday, in Whitecross-street. I had him brought to my house, and then he was taken in custody. After Harrington left the room there was nobody in the room but Harrington, until I went up to make the bed.

Q. There were other persons that had access to this room besides the prisoner - A. Yes, my husband slept in the room, and Richard Wright .

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing at all about it.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120701-91

608. GEORGE COCK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of June , a silk handkerchief, value 5 s. from the person of a certain person, to the jurors unknown .

WILLIAM WESTCOATT . I am a patrol of Bow-street office. On the first of June, I saw the prisoner in Palace-yard , at the installation of the knights of the bath; there was a considerable crowd at that time. It was at the time that the procession of the knights were going on, I observed the prisoner; and I saw him attack a gentleman at his pocket. I made up to the prisoner; I saw this handkerchief a little way out of the gentleman's pocket. I saw the prisoner draw this handkerchief out of the gentleman's pocket, in an easy way.

Q. Did the gentleman appear at all to notice him - A. No, not in the least. I saw him take it completely out. He held the handkerchief in his hand. I seized his right hand, that had the handkerchief, I took it out of his hand. I told the gentleman, that this man had picked his pocket of this handkerchief. The gentleman made answer, that is my handkerchief. The prisoner could not avoid hearing that. The prisoner said, for God's sake, let me go. I will never do the like again. I said, no; I shall not let you go, by any means whatever. I told the gentleman, that I was an officer of Bow-street; and desired the gentleman to attend at Bow-street. I brought the prisoner out of the crowd, and the gentleman followed me, and four or five men followed the gentleman, out of the crowd, persuading the gentleman to let him go, and not to prosecute. Two or three of the faces of them men I knew. We came as far as Whitehall. The gentleman seemed to make a stop. I then took the prisoner back to the gentleman. I told the gentleman to take care of them fellows, for they were thieves, and to take care of his pockets, or else they would rob him of more than he had been robbed of, and to keep as close to me as he could. We came as far as Bedford-street, in the Strand. I having hold of the prisoner, I spoke to the gentleman, and said, this way, if you please. This gentleman followed, and the other men, all the way up. I crossed up Bedford-street; one of the men ran up to me, and said, d - mn you, let the prisoner go, the gentleman does not want to prosecute. I then said, the first man that comes near me, to rescue him, I will lower him immediately. The prisoner said, what have you to do with me, now the gentleman will

not come forward. I told the prisoner, if he offered to resist, I would give him the contents, as well as them. The prisoner then said, if you will put up your staff I will go quietly with you. I searched the prisoner, and found this silk handkerchief in his hat. He had a silk handkerchief round his neck; and this little knife, I believe, is his own property. I know nothing further.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not take the handkerchief out of the gentleman's pocket. The star-pattern handkerchief belongs to me.

Westcoatt. The star-pattern handkerchief I took out of his hat.

The prisoner called six witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Judgment respited.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120701-92

609. JAMES ADAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of June , a pair of breeches, value 7 s. the property of Samuel Richardson .

SAMUEL RICHARDSON . I live in Lower-street, Islington . I lost the breeches on last Saturday week, from the gateway of the house. They hung up to dry.

Q. How lately before had you seen them safe - A. They were safe about twenty minutes before they were missed.

Q. Did you see the prisoner with them - A. I did. I did not see him take them. Mr. Reynolds, the sadler, gave me information of it. In consequence I went out. I saw the prisoner running away with the breeches. I stopped him; and just before I came up to him he threw the breeches away. I delivered him to Lack, the officer.

Prisoner. Are you certain you saw me with the breeches.

Prosecutor. Yes, I did.

SAMUEL LACK . I am an officer of Bow-street. The prisoner was delivered into my custody, in Colbrooke-row, Islington. I said to the prisoner, where is the breeches. He said, I know nothing about them: and as I was taking the prisoner along I picked up the breeches.

MR. REYNOLDS. I live opposite of Mr. Richardson. I saw one man take the breeches down. He gave them to this prisoner. He went one way, and the prisoner went the other. I went over the way, and told the breeches-maker of it.

Prisoner's Defence. A young man gave me them breeches.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and Publicly Whipped .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120701-93

610. WILLIAM CLAYTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of June , a watch, value 2 l. the property of Thomas Best , from his person .

THOMAS BEST. Q. Where were you when your watch was taken from you - A. At Millbank, at the mail-coach manufactory .

Q. What was the value of your watch - A. Three pounds.

Q. Did you perceive your watch taken from you - A. I perceived it go out of my fob by a sudden snatch. He put his right hand down by his side, and I immediately collared him, and he dropped the watch out of his hand. A man that stood by picked it up. It was shewn to me. It was my watch. The prisoner denied he had taken it.

Q. Are you quite sure the prisoner was the man that conveyed the watch away - A. Yes.

RICHARD WESTWOOD. I am a constable of St. Margaret's, Westminster. I was employed by the proprietor to keep the mob off the gateway, on the King's birth-day. There was a great quantity of people collected, when the watch was taken away. I had seen the prisoner about five minutes before in the crowd. I kept my eye upon him. I saw him drop the watch among the crowd, and put his right foot upon it. I directly jumped up to him, and collared him, and the prosecutor collared him at the same time. The prosecutor said, he had lost his watch. Bodwell picked the watch up. I took the prisoner into custody. I have had the watch ever since.

ROBERT BODWELL . On the 4th of June I was looking at the mail-coaches coming out of the manufactory. Mr. Best cried out, you have got my watch. He spoke to the prisoner. He had got him by the collar. The moment he spoke the word I heard something fall on the ground. I looked, and saw it was the watch. The prisoner's foot was upon it. I shoved his foot off, and took this watch up.

Prosecutor. This is my watch.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been at Millbank to see a boat-builder. The mail-coaches were coming out. One of the coachmen's hat fell off, and the horse pranced up. That gentleman laid hold of the horses heads, to prevent them from running into the crowd. And that gentleman accused me of robbing him of his watch. I immediately said, if he thought I had his watch I would go any where where he thought fit. They then said, the watch was under my foot.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120701-94

611. ELIZABETH JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of June , a stump bedstead, value 5 s. a flock bed, value 4 s. a deal table, value 1 s. and a deal box, value 1 s. the property of John Hyatt .

JOHN HYATT . I live in Carnaby-street, Carnaby-market .

Q. Did you lose these things from your house - A. Yes, on Saturday was a fortnight. The prisoner had been a lodger in the house.

Q. About what time of day were these things taken - A. In the morning I went to St. Paul's, for a load of wood for the turner. After that I went into the public-house, for a pint of beer. The prisoner followed me into the public-house. She said, she had a favour to ask of me, to borrow my key, to write a few lines. She said, she was very much distressed. I told her, she could do it at the public-house. She said, that would not do so well. I gave her my key, and when I returned home, and got into my room, I found every thing was gone; nothing was left but

the bare floor. The broker is here that bought the things, while I was out at hard labour.

MRS. HYATT. Q. Did you give the prisoner liberty to take these things - A. No. I was not at home.

THOMAS MARTIN . I am a broker, No. 5, Monmouth-street. On the 20th of June the prisoner came to me. She asked me to buy some furniture: I went with her, and looked at the furniture. I bought the furniture of her in Carnaby-street, at Hyatt's room. I did not know whose apartment it was. I bought a stump-bedstead, a flock-bed, a deal table, and a deal box, of the prisoner. I gave her half-a-guinea for the lot. I asked her, whether they were her's. Yes, she said, and if I thought they were not, she would go to Marlborough-street, and swear it. I fetched the bed away at eleven o'clock, and at four o'clock I fetched the others away. I paid her before Mr. Berry, a publican, in Berwick-street. I sold the bed-stead immediately to a jack-ass man, going by. It was near a fortnight before I knew it was stolen. The officer came to me. I told him I had bought such things.

Prisoner's Defence. I became acquainted with the prosecutor, through his wife washing some linen for me. When I met with him I was a little distressed. I wrote to a friend, who knew me in better circumstances. My friend sent me a two-pound note. The prosecutor asked me to lend him fifteen shillings; and the few things he had in the room, he said he would put in my possession. He told me, if he did not pay me the fifteen shillings by the Saturday following I might do with the things as I liked: and I seeing him spending money on the Friday, I asked him if he could pay me the money on the next day. He said, no, he had not a shilling. On the Saturday morning I told him I must have the money. I fetched Mr. Martin, the broker. He gave me half a guinea for the things. I waited the whole day. The prosecutor did not come in. Two or three days after, I went to look for the prosecutor. I could not see him. Afterwards the prosecutor took a warrant out against me. He claimed two pounds for his furniture. The broker came before the magistrate, and declared that he gave a fair price. He only gave half a guinea. After that he followed me to this prison, and said, if I would give a pound, he would let me free. I wrote to a friend for a pound. The friend would not lend it me. I have now to lament that ever I became acquainted with them.

Prosecutor. I never owed her a shilling.

GUILTY , aged 50.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120701-95

612. THOMAS JAMES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of July , nine brushes, value 7 s. the property of James Bailey .

SAMUEL ARMSTRONG. I am chief mate of the Prince Regent . James Bailey is the captain of the ship. On the 3d of July, I saw the man deliver the brushes on board the ship. After that, I saw the prisoner go on board the ship. He did not belong to the ship at all.

Q. What time of the day was it - A. Two o'clock in the afternoon. I first saw him on the quarter dock. I was on shore at the time. There were no mariners on board. This man was coming out. I overtook him, and took the brushes from him.

Q. What part of the ship were these brushes in - A. They were just sent on board for the use of the ship. They are worth about seven shillings. When I took them from the prisoner he told me that when he went on board he saw the brushes: he was afraid they had been stolen. He intended to put them on board another ship.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not intend to make any property of them.

GUILTY , aged 44.

Publicly Whipped and discharged .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120701-96

613. WILLIAM MOSS and JOHN JONES were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of May , two pair of stockings, value 4 s. the property of John Rogers .

JOHN ROGERS. I live at 78, Chiswell-street . I am an hosier . From information I pursued the prisoners, and brought them back. I know the stockings that they flung away to be mine.

JAMES CHAPMAN . I saw the two boys take the stockings from the door post. I told Mr. Rogers of it.

JAMES TAYLOR . I was coming along Chiswell-street. I saw the prisoners throw the stockings away. I picked up these stockings, and said, Mr. Rogers, here are the stockings.

Prosecutor. These are my stockings. They are worth four shillings.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120701-97

614. DAVID KELLY was indicted for feloniously receiving, on the 8th of December , two pigs, value 8 l. the property of Matthew Ashton ; whereof John Rayson at the sessions holden for the county of Middlesex, on the 9th of February, was tried and convicted of feloniously stealing; he knowing them to have been stolen .

MATTHEW ASHTON. Q. I believe you are a cow-keeper , living at Bagnigge Wells - A. Yes.

Q. Did you, on the 18th of December, 1810, lose two sow-pigs - A. I did, out of Spa-fields . I saw them about eleven o'clock in the day, as I came home from Smithfield. I saw the sows grazing in the fields; and between eleven and twelve o'clock one of the sows came home flurried, as if somebody had been driving them. I missed them about twelve o'clock, and desired somebody to go and look after them.

Q. When did you hear of them - A. Some few days afterwards. I saw them afterwards, in Worship-street office. They were then dead; and the pigs that I saw at the police office were the sow-pigs that I lost from my field. I am sure of it. I have no doubt upon it.

Q. You prosecuted Rayson, did not you - A. I did.

JURY. Were the bristles upon them when you saw them at the office - A. No.

Mr. Knapp. Were there any particular marks upon them, by which you knew they were your pigs - A. There were some black places, where the hair was. We could tell them as well when dead as when alive; and by the make and shape, as well, they were my pigs. The man, William Adams , can say the same. He had the bringing them up. I am quite sure they were mine.

Q. to Mr. Fitzpatrick. Produce the conviction of John Rayson - A.

=" John Rayson was indicted, for that he, on the 18th of December, in the 51st year of the reign of George the Third, with force and arms, did steal and drive away two sows, the property of Matthew Ashton . The judgment, guilty. Transported for seven years.="

ROBERT ADAMS . I am a labourer to Mr. Ashton.

Q.Did you know these two sow-pigs of Mr. Ashton - A. I did. I fed them from the time they were pigged and reared up, and lost. On Saturday, the 18th of December, I saw them about ten o'clock. They were feeding upon turnips with the beasts. They afterwards were ordered to be turned out into the Spa-fields. The Spa-fields is the place they usually used to be in. There were three. About twelve o'clock one of the sows came home wild. I thought somebody might have been dogging her, as they often do, in the field. On Sunday I went in search of the two sows. I did not find them. On the Monday I went with Bishop, and found them at the Basing-house, in Kingsland-road. The two sows were killed, and hanged up. I knew the sows again by the marks in the skin. The marks in the skin remained.

COURT. Had they been killed then - A. Yes, and the bristles scalded off. The marks remained across the shoulders. I knew they were Mr. Ashton's property. I brought them up from their birth. I assisted the officer, and we brought them to the office.

Mr. Adolphus. You bred three - A. Yes, They came from three different sows.

Q. What particular marks were they - A. The water does not take the marks out, but the marks were across the shoulder, and down the legs.

Q. Must every pig that had that mark be your master's pigs - A. No. I would not swear that. I knew they were my master's pigs. I can swear that very well. I knew them by the features, and by the four feet that were not scalded; and the ring was not cut out of the sow's nose; and if it had I should have known the sow. One of the sows was knock-knee'd; and I knew it by the features.

Q. What do you mean by the features - A. There is a difference in that, as well as a man. The large sow I knew by the toes, as well as the knock-knee. The four feet were all white.

COURT. Were you examined upon the trial of Rayston - A. Yes. I spoke to them upon that occasion.

SHEDRAOH JACKSON. Q. You were examined upon the trial of Rayson - A. Yes. I was ostler then at the Basing-house in Kingsland-road.

Q. Did you know Kelly - A. Yes. He has a slaughtering-house in the Basing-yard. He rented it of my master.

Q.What is Kelly - A. A carcase, and retail Dutcher.

Q. Were you in the Basing-house on Saturday the 18th of December, 1810 - A. I stood against the gate. I saw two sow-pigs drove into Mr. Kelly's stable. There were no other pigs with them at the time. They were driven in by Rayson, who was convicted.

Q. Had you ever seen Rayson before with Kelly - A. Once before; about a fortnight before. On the same evening they were killed. Dexter and Kelly was killing them.

Q.Having seen this did you communicate it to your master - A. Yes, directly.

Q. Did you go to the police-office - A. No. Mr. Armstrong sent to me from his house. I communicated to him what I had seen, and on Monday, Bishop took me with him to Mr. Aston's. I then told him what I had seen. I asked him, whether he had lost any pigs.

Q. Did Mr. Ashton describe to you the marks of his pigs - A. Yes. He said, they were black and white.

Q. Did you find that the marks that Mr. Ashton described, corresponded with the marks of the pigs you had seen - A. Yes, I did. Then Dexter was taken to the office, and the pigs likewise, and Mr. Ashton spoke to his property.

Q. Did you see the pigs at the office afterwards - A. Yes.

COURT. Were they the same pigs that you saw taken into the yard alive - A. They were the same pigs, and they were the same pigs that I saw hang up, in the slaughter-house, dead.

Q. Were there the same marks that you saw upon the pigs at the office, as upon those that were drove into the yard - A. They were similar the same. The black mark was visible then.

Q. Did you ever see Kelly after that day - A. No; not after the Saturday night.

Q. Did not Kelly ever come back to the slaughterhouse - A. No, not as I saw.

Q. How long did you continue at the Basing-house after the Saturday - A. I left it last Christmas.

Q.Then, from the Saturday that you have been speaking of until last Christmas, did you ever see Kelly - A. No.

- DEXTER. I am a butcher. I live just by the Basing-house.

Q. Do you know Rayson - A. Never before that time. I never spoke to him in my life before. On Saturday, the 18th of December, I saw him about two o'clock in the afternoon. I was coming down Kingsland-road. I was employed by old Mr. Kelly.

Q. Were you sent for - A. I saw Rayson drive the two sow-pigs into the Basing-yard. He employed me to kill them, the same as you or any other gentleman did. I cannot say any more about him.

Q. Where was young Kelly at the time - A. I suppose about his business.

Q. Was not he in the yard - A. He came down Kingsland-road along with me. I do not know whether he did not go to his father.

Q. Who dressed the pigs - A. I dressed the pigs.

Mr. Kelly and I killed them both together, and afterwards we dressed them together. Mr. Kelly knocked it down to a certainty, and I stuck it.

Q. How dare you to prevaricate in that way - A. That is the truth.

COURT. I expect you to tell the whole truth - A. That is the whole truth that I know.

Q. It is not. Now, sir, tell the whole truth that you know - A. Please you, my lord, there is so many people come into a common slaughter-house.

Q. Do you mean to say that you do not know whether Kelly was present when the pigs were dressed - A. He was, to be sure. I told you so. I asked him to assist me. Nobody employed me but the man that is convicted. I know nothing about the pigs, no more than you. Kelly knocked down one of them. I asked him to lend me a hand. That is all I know He knew about them to my certain knowledge, as I stand here.

Q. Who bought them - A. Who bought them!

Mr. Knapp. Who bought them - A. I cannot tell who bought them, because every thing was taken out of the slaughter-house.

Q. Now, they were driven into the yard. Who bought them before they were put into the slaughter-house. Who paid you for killing them - A. I said to the man, leave the money with Mrs. Kelly, in case you be absent when I have killed them. Mrs. Kelly gave the money to my wife. I received no money. I was not there.

COURT. Were you present when the money was delivered - A. No.

Mr. Adolphus. You never saw Rayson before that day - A. No.

Q. When you saw him he was driving some pigs down Kingsland-road - A. Yes.

Q. Which he drove into this place, which is a common slaughter-house - A. I did not see him drive them into the slaughter-house. I saw him drive them into that yard.

Q. Did other butchers come there, and butcher in a small way - A. Yes, as I have.

Q. When the pigs were driven into the yard, you say, young Kelly was not there - A. I know that he was coming down Kingsland-road along with me. I had been at work for his father ever since three o'clock in the morning. I was employed by Rayson, and nobody else. I was in the habit of assisting Kelly, and he me, when we were employed in any business whatever. It was by my desire that he knocked down one of the pigs. Rayson employed me to kill the pigs, and nobody else. I said, I would not dress them, unless I was paid for it. This I said in the open street.

Q. Did you see any thing done about selling these pigs at all - A. Not a word at all from Rayson to Kelly. I never heard one single syllable about buying in my life.

Q. How long have you known Kelly - A. Ever since he was a child. Twenty years, I dare say.

Q. You kill for his father - A. Yes. I had been killing for his father that day. I had worked for his father a long time.

Q. Do you know that the young man was in embarassed circumstances at that time - A. I believe he was.

Q. Do you know that he was out of the way sometime before, on account of debt - A. Yes, he was.

Q. Did he absent himself then on account of debt - A. He came home again shortly. His father settled his debts.

Q. Do you know that he has been at home since the time that Rayson brought these pigs - A. When he lived over the water, the second time, I know nothing about.

Q.You do not know when he ceased to appear there - A. No, I do not, indeed.

Q.Now, about this money that was left with Mrs. Kelly, did you see that money - A. No.

Q. What passed from Rayson to Mrs. Kelly, or from Mrs. Kelly, to your wife, you know nothing of - A. No.

Q. I understood you to say, that you told Mrs. Kelly to pay your wife - A. I did. I told Rayson to leave the money with Mrs. Kelly, provided he should be out of the way.

Q. What time did you slaughter the pigs - A. It might be four o'clock in the afternoon. I cannot tell what time it might be when I had done.

COURT. When you kill a pig for a man he takes it away, does not he - A. It is left there, until a proper time to take them away. I did not know whether the man would come, and take them away.

Q.When you kill for another man, does he leave it there or take it away - A. He comes and takes it away.

Q. Did Rayson call for this - A. Not as I know of. I never saw him before.

Q.When was Rayson taken - A. I think the Tuesday night following the Saturday.

Q.Then the pigs were not fetched away - A. They were taken away by Mr. Bishop and Mason.

Q. When did young Kelly leave the place - A. I cannot tell you that. I saw him on the Sunday, as the pigs were killed on the Saturday. I have not seen him until lately since.

Q. Has he been upon the spot since - A. I never saw him since, until last Saturday.

Q. Did he hold any conversation with you before he went away - A. No.

Q. Did you call upon him - A. No.

Q. Was Rayson by when the pigs were slaughtered - A. No.

Q. Did you see old Kelly at all upon the subject of these pigs - A. I did not.

Q. Was young Kelly with you at the time the pigs were driven in - A. Yes. I took notice of the pigs.

Q. Was old Kelly by at the time the pigs were driven in - A. He was coming down the road. He might not see the pigs driven in. I came by the gates at the time the pigs were driven in.

Q. Were you and young Kelly together at the time the pigs were driven in - A. We were, just before.

Q. At the time the pigs were driven in, were you and young Kelly together - A. I had been with him just before. I cannot say whether it was just at the time.

Q. How near were you to young Kelly at the time the pigs were driven in - A. I cannot tell. It

might be a couple of hundred yards. He went one way and I the other.

Q.Did he go into the yard - A. I cannot say; I did not take any notice where he went. I was about my business.

Q.Who followed Rayson into the yard - A. I did not follow him. I cannot say who did. There was a boy with Rayson when I saw him.

Q.Who was Rayson to speak to - A. He sent for me at the shop-door.

Q. Upon your oath, where was young Kelly when you went into the yard to speak to Rayson - A. Upon my soul I cannot tell you. He might be in the yard for what I know.

Q. You must know - A. I do not, indeed.

JOHN BINGLEY . You are an errand boy, I understand - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember seeing him, on Saturday, the 18th of December - A. Yes; I lived with him at that time.

Q. Do you know Rayson. Do you remember seeing Rayson - A. I have seen Rayson twice, with Mr. Kelly, at his house.

COURT. Did you know, at all what Rayson was - A. No; I was not there when he first came, on Saturday. When I came, back, I saw them together, at his own shop, the butcher's shop, in Kingsland-road, the corner of the Basing-house.

Q. Was Dexter there - A. I did not see him there.

Q. Was that young Kelly's shop - A. For what I know, it was.

Q. Did you see Rayson bring any pigs. - A. Yes; I met him in Huntingdon-street, Kingsland-road. I saw him with two sows; one of the sows was black and white. I afterwards saw the same pigs in the slaughter-house.

Q. Who was there at the time you saw the pigs in the slaughter-house - A. Me and Kelly, the prisoner, and Dexter. I saw them killed, and held the candle. Kelly knocked one down, and Dexter stuck it.

Q.Were these pigs that you saw driven, and that were killed, the same that the officers took away - A.Yes, there were no other pigs there.

Q. Did you hear the conversation that took place between Rayson and Kelly - A. No, they did not talk above two minutes; they did talk together. I do not know what they said.

Mr. Knapp. Was that conversation before or after the pigs were killed - A. The pigs were killed in the evening, after the conversation.

COURT. You met the pigs in Huntingdon-street - A Yes; and after I met Rayson with the pigs, I saw Rayson and Kelly in conversation in the shop.

JAMES EDWARDS. Q. I believe you are the landlord of the Basing-house - A. I am. The prisoner, Kelly, is a tenant of mine. The old gentleman was the first tenant, Young Kelly had a shop just by, and when the rent was advanced, they were both present at the time. I received rent of both of them.

Q. Have you seen any thing of Kelly, the prisoner, since the 18th of December, 1810 - A. I have seen him twice; the first time might be two or three months after the business with the pigs. I asked him, how he did? He said, I behaved like a man; as, for my servant, if I kept him I must take the consequence; he had given false testimony.

Q. Who was that servant - A. Jackson. When I met him again, he was in custody of the officers, leading him from my house.

DANIEL BISHOP . I am an officer of Worship-street office.

Q. Did you, on Sunday, the 19th of December, go to Kelly's slaughter-house - A. I did, in company with John Armstrong . I saw two pigs hanging up. On the next day we brought the pigs away, in company with Adams, Mr. Ashton's man. We took the pigs away, from the slaughter-house, to Worship-street. Mr. Ashton recognized the pigs, and claimed them. We have tried all we could to apprehend Kelly, down to the present time.

JOHN ARMSTRONG. Q. In consequence of information that you received, did you use all your endeavours for the purpose of finding Kelly - A. I did. I went to Mr. Edwards's, one night, to apprehend Kelly: he was gone before I arrived. I had been to his wife. I desired her to send her husband to me about these pigs. I have never seen him until he was brought in custody by my two sons.

JOSHUA ARMSTRONG . On the third of July, I apprehended Kelly, in a loft of a stable, covered over with some hay. I told him, I must search him. He said, I must do my duty. He would go with me where I pleased. William Armstrong was with me.

Q. to prosecutor. Whereabouts is the value of the pigs - A. I would not take nine pounds for one of them.

Prisoner's Defence. I am totally innocent of the crime that I am charged with.

The prisoner called nine witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 27.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120701-98

613. JOSEPH SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the first of June , five handkerchiefs, value 35 s. the property of Edward Woodhouse .

Mr. Alley, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner was acquitted .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120701-99

614. MARY SHEARS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of July , ten pounds weight of fat, value 2 s. the property of Thomas Aldridge .

THOMAS ALDRIDGE . I am a navy agent . I live in Howard-street, in the Strand .

Q. What do you accuse the prisoner of - A. Of having stolen fat meat, and fat ham, out of my house.

Q. This is what is called, kitchen-stuff - A. I call it meat, such as my children would be glad to eat. The prisoner said she had a right to it.

Q. You call it fat in the indictment; that excludes the idea of meat - A. I was not aware of all these quibbles of the law.

Q. A person must know the difference between fat and lean - A. There was some lean lamb among

the fat. I do not allow my servant the kitchen-stuff.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120701-100

615. WILLIAM GRUNDY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of July , three loaves of wheaten bread, value 4 s. 2 d. the property of John Read and John Knight .

JOHN READ . I am a baker . My partner's name is John Knight . I live at 20, Gwyn's Buildings, City-road.

THOMAS HAMILTON . I am a servant to Mr. Knight and Read. On Saturday afternoon, the 4th of July, I put down my basket at York-place . I took a smaller basket into Nelson-place, with four loaves in it. I looked round, and saw the prisoner take three loaves out, two quarterns, and a half. I pursued him, and stopped him at Sadler's Wells. I took him to my master's shop. These are the three loaves that he took out of my basket.

Prisoner's Defence. I was out of employment a long while. I did it through distress.

GUILTY , aged 38.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and Whipped in Jail .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120701-101

616. MARY DAWSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the first of June , four penny pieces, seventy-four halfpence, and four farthings , the property of Enoch Cohen .

JUDITH COHEN . My husband's name is Enoch Cohen . He makes barley-sugar, and pepper-mint drops . On Sunday evening I packed up two pounds worth of halfpence, to pay for my milk; and, on Monday evening, when I came home, my husband said, I had been robbed. I found these halfpence in Mary Dawson's pocket.

Q.What was the prisoner - A. She portered for me. My husband told me she took the halfpence. I went after her, and found her at her house. I said, Mary, you have done very pretty, you have taken a pound worth of halfpence out of my till. She said, she had not. I packed the money up with these four farthings, and that halfpenny. I swear to that halfpenny. I took them out of her pocket.

Prisoner's Defence. I worked for that woman three or four years. She often paid me in farthings. I had been some time gathering that money up to buy me an apron.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120701-102

617. THOMAS COLLY was indicted for feloniously stealing a waistcoat, value 3 s. the property of Haseldine Sharplin .

HASELDINE SHARPLIN. I am a grocer , in Castle-street . The waistcoat was taken out of my yard. It was hanging upon a line to dry.

JOHN PERRY. I am a patrol of St. George's in the east. On going my round, about half past 12, I saw the prisoner coming off Mr. Sharplin's wall. I took him to the watchhouse, and in the crown of his hat was this waistcoat.

Prosecutor. This is my waistcoat. It was hanging in the yard to dry.

Prisoner's Defence. A young man that deals in birds gave me that waistcoat. He was going down in the country to settle.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and Whipped in Jail .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120701-103

618. MARTIN MACK and ANN MACK were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the third of June , a stone jar, value 2 s. an earthen dish, value 3 d. and a tea-pot, value 1 d. the property of John Freame .

JOHN FREAME. I keep the Carpenter's Arms, in Berry-street, Clerkenwell . Martin Mack took a ready furnished room of my wife, in the name of Johnson.

MRS. FREAME. Q. You let lodgings to this man and woman - A. Yes; the man took the room in the name of Johnson. At the time they lodged with me I was continually losing things. I went to Mrs. Turner's, on Saffon-hill, and found my dish.

JAMES HANCOCK. I am an officer. I went to the house of one Turner, that keeps an iron-shop on Saffron-hill; I found a dish and an old tea-pot.

Q. Does any body know that this man or woman took it there - A. I know no further than finding these things there.

Prosecutrix. These were taken out of my back kitchen where they went through to get water.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120701-104

619. MARTIN MACK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the third of June , a thousand nails, value 3 s. the property of Anna Thompson .

WILLIAM THOMPSON. I am a corn and coal measure-maker .

Q. Did you lose any nails at any time - A.Yes; I cannot exactly say what day. The prisoner was a servant to my mother, Anna Thompson . It is her business. I carry it on.

JAMES HANCOCK . I was in Mr. Freame's taproom: we sat there until the prisoner came home. The prisoner went up stairs. I went up softly after him, and I heard him take out these nails, in parcels, and put them into a table-drawer. I went into the room directly, and asked him where the nails were. He said, there they are. I saw them. As he pointed them out he said, they were his employer's property.

JACKSON. I followed Mr. Hancock into the room. He asked the prisoner, where the nails were. His master went into the room at the same time. The master said, I have thought something of this a long time. He said, master, I am sorry for it. I hope you will forgive me.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of the nails I never said they were my master's.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Judgment respited.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120701-105

620. LEIGHTON HALL was indicted for feloniously

stealing, on the 17th of May , two dollars, value 11 s. the property of Alexander File , from his person .

ALEXANDER FILE . I am a carpenter and joiner . I live at No. 2, Pinder-street, Brunswick-square. I lost my dollars at Mr. Craxford's public-house, the Carpenters Arms, Kensington . On the 17th of May, I went in about twelve o'clock. The prisoner came in. A little discourse passed between him and me about joining. I did not study much what he said. I was reading the paper. The print was small. I fell into a sound sleep. I had two pounds worth of silver in my pocket. I suppose the prisoner took it out About two o'clock, I went from Mr. Craxford's, to go home, and when I got into the street, I missed the whole two pounds, except sixpence. I ran back to Mr. Craxford. I told him I had been robbed. One of the dollars that I had lost, I had refused of Mr. Craxford's daughter. She said, her father would change it when he got up. There was another dollar which I received in change for another pound note. The constable was going to search the prisoner: he said, it is of no use your searching me. This is all I have got. In a few minutes after that he went to the bar: he said, he could shew a dollar with any person. I went and saw the dollar; it was the dollar I had refused in the morning. I gave the description of the other dollar. The constable found that upon him likewise.

Prisoner. When I came into the tap-room, were not you very much in liquor. - A. No; I was not.

Q. Do not you recollect falling under the fireplace - A. I never fell once at all.

THOMAS WILLIAMS. I searched the prisoner; on him I found three dollars and two three shilling pieces.

Q. to Martha Craxford. Pick out the dollar you gave to File - A. This is the dollar I gave to File.

Prisoner's Defence. Please to take notice, one of the dollars I own to picking up in the tap-room. We were all there together. The dollar that I picked up, the die has not struck the Spanish marks out. When I pulled a dollar out of my pocket, the girl that is there, she said, that is the five shilling piece.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120701-106

621. FRANCIS CHAMBERS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of May , four pair of shoes, value 10 s. a cup and saucer, value 3 d. a piece of bees-wax, value 1 d. and a pair of gloves, value 3 d. the property of Robert Gray .

ROBERT GRAY . I am a shoemaker .

Q. What is the prisoner - A. A coal-porter . On the 22d of May, the prisoner came into my room, and emptied my master's bag of work out, and took the shoes. From the description of my landlady, I pursued him and took him, about an hundred yards from the place. He had this cup and saucer, and a bit of bees-wax, my own property, and a pair of gloves that I wore all the winter. They were taken out of my cupboard.

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutor owes me for a bushel and a half of coals that I carried to him.

GUILTY , aged 51.

Confined Six Months and publicly whipped .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120701-107

622. WILLIAM JOHNSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of July , a saddle, value 2 l. a bridle, value 7 s. and a sack, value 3 s. the property of William Lambeth .

WILLIAM LAMBETH . I am a brick-maker in Somerstown . The prisoner worked for me five days last week.

SAMUEL COFFIN . I am a watchman of Somers-town. On Sunday morning, about a quarter past three, I met the prisoner with a sack. I took him to the watchhouse, and there I found the sack contained a saddle and bridle. I produce it.

Prosecutor. That is my bridle and saddle.

Prisoner's Defence. On Saturday night I was half tipsy. There was another man with me.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and whipped in Jail .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120701-108

623. ANDREW THOMPSON was indicted for a misdemeanor .

SAMUEL SPRAT STRONG , I am a rope manufacturer at Hamworthy, near Pool, Dorsetshire. My partner's name is William Carter .

Q. Have you a letter dated, 27th September, 1811 - A. Yes; this is it. It is signed, M'Dougell and Co. No. 51, Great Hermitage-street. I received it the day after, I believe. Here is another letter dated, London, October 1st, 1811, signed A.M'Dougell and Co. Great Hermitage-street, London Docks; and another letter, dated 5th of October, addressed to Messrs. Carter and Strong, signed M'Dougell & Co. London.

COURT. Q. Did you receive these letters by the medium of the post - A. We did.

ROWLAND DOBEY . Q. Do you know that handwriting - A. To the best of my belief it is Joseph Thompson 's.

Q. Now, look at the signature of this letter, and tell me, whether you believe it to be his hand-writing - A. The same; they are No. 1, and No. 2. I believe the signature to be Joseph Thompson 's hand-writing;

(the letters read.)

WILLIAM CHATTERIS. I live in Cateaton-street. I am a pawnbroker.

Q. Do you know Andrew Thompson - A. I do. This letter, signed Beckwill & Co. I believe it to be the defendant's hand-writing: (read.)

''London, Oct. 5th, 181

Messrs. Carter and Strong,

Respected Sirs,

In reply to your letter, of the 2d instant, respecting our opinion of Messrs. M'Dougell and Company. We beg to observe, that we

feel proud in executing any commission that these gentlemen wish to forward with us, and doubt not you will be pleased in doing business with them, and are, obedient Sirs, M. Beekwill & Co.="

MR. CURWOOD. Q. to Dobey. Look at that letter; is that the same hand-writing - A. It is the hand-writing of Joseph Thompson .

Q. What is the number of that letter - A. No. 5.

(read.)

Q. to Mr. Strong. Did you receive the two letters by due course of post - A. I did.

Q. In consequence of the character that you received of the supposed house of M'Dougell and Co. signed Beekwill and Co. did you furnish the things required by the second letter - A. We did, to the amount of 118 l. 8 s. 4 d.

Q.Upon having furnished the first parcel, you received another letter, furnishing you with another order - A. Yes; which goods amounted to 119 l. 18 s. 4 d. We furnished these goods.

Q. Is that the second invoice and bill of exchange - A. It is. The bills were dishonoured. I received a subsequent order. I did not execute it.

MR. STRONG. I have had the cordage returned that Mr. Chatteris speaks of.

MR. CHATTERIS. I have always paid Andrew Thompson a commission for every thing I purchased of him. His regular employment was a broker. He always dealt with me in his own name. On this occasion he gave me the name of his principal, M'Daugell and Co. He never gave me a broker's note.

Q. Did he mention to you that he was concerned for Beckwill & Co. - A. No; he had an accompting house in East-cheap. He never represented to me where his residence was.

JOHN BROOK . I am a clerk to Messrs. Esdaile and Company, bankers.

Q. Look at those two bills, and tell me whether, after they were due, you presented them for payment - A. I presented them, myself, for payment, they were not paid. A Mrs. Badden said, they were gone away; they were a pack of swindlers.

MR. - . I live in Hart-street, Crutchedfriers. I am a warehouse-keeper. In March, 1811, at No. 5, in Hart-street, where I reside, the prisoner took an accompting-house of me. He represented himself to be a merchant. I requested a reference, and he paid me down a quarter's rent in advance. I let him the accompting-house, and he took possession. He took it in the name of Andrew Thompson . Bills came in rapidly, in the name of Thornton. I have seen some; not all of them.

Q. Did you see bills addressed Beckwill & Co. - A. I did, repeatedly.

Q. What name was on the door - A. The last names on the door was Moffatt and Brothers.

Mr. Adolphus addressed the jury on the behalf of the defendant.

GUILTY .

Confined Eighteen Months in Newgate , and to stand in and upon the pillory, one hour, between twelve and one, in the Old Bailey .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120701-109

624. THOMAS NUTT was indicted for a misdemeanor .

JOHN WEAVER . Q. In the month of April you were out of employ - A. Yes.

Q. Have you a paper, the Morning Advertiser, of the 3d of April - A. I have.

Q. In consequence of any advertisement, did you go to No. 22, West-smithfield - A. I did. I went first into an outer office, from there I was shewn into an inner office.

Q. Were there any persons waiting in the outer office - A. Yes, clerks and grooms. After waiting in the outer office I went into the inner office. I found there Thomas Nutt , and a person of the name of Smith. I told them I had come in consequence of an advertisement of a clerk's place. They asked me then, whether I could obtain a good character from my last place. I told them I could have the best of characters. They then asked me to give them a specimen of my writing, which I gave them, my address.

Q. Did you write it there - A. Yes. The specimen that they asked I gave them, which was my address. Smith took it up, and looked at it, and said, it would do very well. He said, I had better go home, and write a letter, and bring it them directly.

Q. Was Nutt present all the time - A. He heard all that passed. He told me to go and write, as if I was writing to persons at Norwich. I went home and wrote the letter, as if I was writing to persons at Norwich. I went home, and wrote the letter, and brought it to the office. I saw both in the office when I brought it. Smith opened it, and read it. He said, it was a most masterly hand, and he had no doubt I should gain the place. Nutt was there when he took the letter. They both spoke at the time, and said, I should have to pay the postage. Smith directed the letter.

Q. Did you see how it was directed - A. Yes. Messrs. Jones and Co. He wrote something in the middle, which I suppose was, merchants. I paid eleven-pence for the postage of a letter. I threw down a shilling. Smith took the shilling up, and said, I have no change, sir: I suppose, you have no objection for a penny to the porter; those that carry the letter. I said, no. He put the letter in a desk, and the shilling he put in a drawer. There were more letters inside. I could see them.

Q. Were there many - A. Yes.

Q. While you were there these times did you see many persons assemble as enquirers - A. Yes. I suppose ten or twelve. Two or three would go out, and more come in.

Q. After you went with the letter, you were induced to go back, were not you - A. Yes. I went into the inner office. I saw both Smith and Nutt. I told them that I had met a merchant in the city, and I had engaged myself. They looked at me, and said, sir, your letter has been gone ever since two o'clock. He said, a great many letters had gone to the Post office, with mine, which I knew was false. They both said, my letter was gone, with a bundle of other letters, which I knew to be false, because it was past two o'clock when I went. I only thought it was false.

Q. Were you present when Nutt was apprehended - A. I was.

THOMAS JOHNSON . Q. I believe you have lately come out of Yorkshire - A. Yes.

Q. Did you make any application to Nutt and Smith, for a place - A. I did, in West Smithfield.

Q. What led you to make that enquiry - A. I saw the Morning Advertiser, at the Black Swan, in the Borough, where I lodge.

Q. When you got to No. 22, West Smithfield, did you see the defendant - A. Yes, I saw him and another gentleman. Mr. Nutt was sitting at the side of a desk. I told them, I had called there in consequence of an advertisement I had seen in the Morning Advertiser. I handed over the reference for a clerk's place, in a wholesale concern, in the county of Norfolk. I gave them a reference for my character. Mr. Smith asked me, whether that was my writing. I said, it was. I knew book-keeping, both single entry and double entry. Nutt and Smith both told me I must return and write a letter, and they would address it. I went and wrote a letter, I brought my letter and gave it to Mr. Nutt. I thought it necessary to tell Nutt that I was born in the neighbourhood of Boston. Mr. Nutt said, he would befriend me, as he was a Lincolnshire man. He certainly would recommend me. I asked him, what was the business. He said, bankers and corn-factors. My department at the accompting-house would be in the corn-business. Smith asked me, whether I was a married man. Nutt said, what matters that, the salary was sufficient to support a wife and family. Nutt said, the salary was two hundred pounds a year. They said, they would use every interest in their power, as I was a Lincolnshire man. They both promised to interest themselves in my interest. They told me that they were people that transacted business with respectability. They were not like the Echo-office.

COURT. They represented that their office was more respectable than the Echo-office - A. That was what they said to me. Mr. Smith then said, Mr. Johnson must pay the postage. I said, what is it. He said, eleven-pence. I gave a shilling. Smith said, God bless me, I have not got a penny: I will give it Mr. Johnson on Tuesday. I saw them address the letter. I cannot tell what. He took the shilling and put it into a small box. There were more letters where he put mine.

Q. Did you ever have an answer from your letter to Norwich - A. No.

Q. to Weaver. Did you ever hear any answer to your letter - A. No.

GEORGE GILLSON . I served a notice on Nutt, the 30th of June. I saw a woman, who said, she was Mrs. Nutt. I went to No. 22, West Smithfield.

Q. Did you see the man at the bar - A. I did not. He was not at home. I served that notice at Mr. Harris's, No. 6, Gloucester-street, Houndsditch. I knew he lived there, and I served the notice upon Mr. George Harris , his brother.

SAMUEL BOLTON . Q. I believe you were out of employ on the 3d of April last - A. I was.

Q. Now, sir, did any circumstance call you to Smithfield that day - A. The Morning Advertiser, to No. 22.

Q. When you went there what time of the day was it - A. About half past eleven. There was nothing at all in the shop. It was empty. There were four persons there besides myself. These four were in the outer room. They were there before me. I waited for my turn about twenty minutes. I went into the inner office. I saw Nutt and Smith. I said, I was come with respect to an advertisement in the paper. They said, oh, yes, sir, you are right. It is for a clerk, to go down to Norwich. They both said, to go into the corn trade. I told them that I had not been used to the corn trade. Nutt replied, you can write down an hundred quarters of wheat, as well as an hundred pounds. Smith asked for a specimen of my hand-writing. I wrote my name there. He said, it would do very well. I told him, if he wished to have my address, I would give him a friend or two that I knew at Norwich. He said, that would be in my favour. He said, I must go and write a letter, and return by four o'clock. I returned with the letter about half past three. It was directed, 22, Smithfield. Smith said, I should not have directed it there. He dashed the address out, and opened the letter, and began to read it. Nutt requested to see it. He read it. He said, he thought that my stating the person I did, in the letter would be something in my favour. He put it then in the desk. I was going out, and Smith called me back, and told me I must pay the postage. I asked him, what that was. He said, eleven-pence. I threw him down a shilling. He said, he was sorry he had got no change: he would give me the change when I called again on the Tuesday. This was on Thursday. I went there on the Tuesday, between nine and eleven in the morning. I saw Mr. Nutt in the shop, and another gentleman. I told him, I was come respecting a situation. Nutt said, he was very sorry it was engaged the night before. I told him, I believed he was indebted to me a penny. He rang, and a boy came. He told him, to fetch a penny. The boy fetched me a penny. I wished him good morning.

Q. Did you ever receive any answer to the letter you had wrote - A. I did not.

DANIEL LEADBETTER . I apprehended Smith, at No. 22, Smithfield. I apprehended Nutt in the Crown public-house, Smithfield. Nutt said, that he had taken no money. Smith said, the warrant was illegal. I said, I should chance that. I should take them in custody. There was some conversation about the business, between themselves. Nutt said, there had been as many as three hundred applications, and he wished to have done with it after the first day. They wished me to take their word, which I could not.

CHARLES VINCENT BARNARD . I am a clerk in the paid letter office, in the Post office.

Q. Were there any letters that came on the 3d of April, post paid, directed to Messrs. Jones - A. I can speak that no such parcel came, as ten or twelve, or upwards. All the paid letters take the regular course in the Post office.

MR. JONES. I am a hatter. I live in Norwich. I have lived there five years.

Q. Do you know any name-sake of your's there,

cornfactors and bankers there - A. I never heard of such. There are none there.

GEORGE LITCHFIELD . Q. I believe you are the post-master at Norwich - A. I am. I have been so for five years.

Q. Do you know of any house, Jones and Co. bankers and cornfactors, at Norwich - A. No, sir.

Q. If any letters came from London by the post, so directed, on the 3d of April, must you not have seen them - A. I do not remember, at any time whatever, any letters came so directed. I have no such letters as unclaimed. My clerks have made the search.

Mr. Gurney addressed the Jury, on behalf of the defendant.

The defendant called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY .

Confined Eighteen Months in Newgate , and to stand in and upon the Pillory one hour, between twelve and one o'clock .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: o18120701-1

The Opinion of the Judges upon Thomas Ransom 's case, delivered by Mr. Justice Le Blanc, the purport of which was as follows: -

Thomas Ransom , you were convicted at the last sessions held in this place, and that indictment charged you with secreting a letter, which had been brought to the Post office, to be sent from London to Tamworth, which letter contained thirty promissory notes, value five pounds each, and that letter did not arrive at Tamworth till the 19th, and bore the London post-mark of the 18th, and contained only twenty-eight notes, whereas it ought to have contained thirty, and one of the missing notes (4,123) was proved to have been tendered in payment by you, on the 21st of April. You then having produced one other five-pound note. The jury, on the evidence that was adduced on your trial, was satisfied of your guilt. But the doubt mentioned at the time of your trial, was, whether there was any proof of your secreting that letter. Upon that there can be no doubt. Another objection was, that these notes contained in the letter, were not to be considered as promissory notes, the money having been paid to the holders by the bankers in London. The majority of the Judges are of opinion, that the notes fall within the meaning of promissory notes. They are valuable to the possessors of them. The consequence of their decision is, the verdict in your case is warranted in point of law; and, of course, judgment must be pronounced upon you.


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