Old Bailey Proceedings, 8th April 1812.
Reference Number: 18120408
Reference Number: f18120408-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE OYER AND TERMINER, AND GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND ALSO THE GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, HELD AT Justice-Hall, in the Old Bailey, On WEDNESDAY the 8th of APRIL, 1812, and following Days;

BEING THE FOURTH SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF The Right Hon. CLAUDIUS STEPHEN HUNTER , LORD-MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY JOB SIBLY, No. 4, CARTHUSIAN-STREET, ALDERSGATE-STREET.

LONDON:

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED (BY THE AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON.) By R. Butters, No. 22, Fetter-lane, Fleet-street.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON.

Before the Right-honourable CLAUDIUS STEPHEN HUNTER , Lord Mayor of the City of London; the Right-honourable Edward Lord Ellenborough , Chief Justice of His Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir Alexander Thompson, knt. one of the Barons of His Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir Robert Graham , knt. one of the Barons of His Majesty's Court of Exchequer: Sir George Wood , knt. one of the Barons of His Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir John Bailey , knt. one of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir John William Anderson, Bart. Sir Charles Price , bart. John Ansley , esq. Aldermen of the said City; John Silvester , esq. Recorder of the said City: George Scholey , esq. John Atkins , esq. George Bridges , esq. Aldermen of the said City; and Newman Knowlys, esq. Common serjeant of the said City; His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of Goal Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

London Jury.

George Frederic Merryman,

Nathan Spingall ,

William Bontse ,

Joseph Birch ,

Gilbert Kerr ,

Joseph York Haddon,

Samuel Simmons ,

David Price ,

Samuel Wilson ,

Henry Dismore ,

Valentine Smedler ,

Charles Smith,

First Middlesex Jury.

Edward Baldock ,

Richard Reynolds,

George Pitt ,

Joseph Rawlinson ,

James Spring ,

Stephen Law ,

Thomas Baldwin ,

John Bealby ,

Thomas Lodge ,

Thomas Millsom ,

William Hayward ,

John White .

Second Middlesex Jury.

Joseph Dale ,

William Berridge ,

Joseph Patterson ,

Thomas Gardener ,

David Ross ,

John Thorn ,

George Rawlinson ,

Samuel Harding ,

Joshua Mayston ,

Richard Biddle ,

Mark Marley ,

John Dodd ,

Reference Number: t18120408-1

312. JOSEPH THOMPSON , alias JOSEPH WOOLMAN THOMPSON , was indicted for feloniously forging, on the 3d of October , an acceptance of a bill of exchange for payment of 90 l. 2 s. in the name of A.M'Dougall and Company, with intent to defraud Harold Daniel .

SECOND COUNT, for feloniously uttering and publishing as true a like forged acceptance of a bill of exchange, with the same intention.

HAROLD DANIEL . Q. You are a coach-builder , I believe - A. Yes, my warehouse is in Old Bond-street.

Q. At the beginning of October last did some person come to your warehouse and cheapen a gig - A. A card was left in my absence respecting the gig on the 1st of October. In consequence of that I went to No. 51, Great Hermitage-street, I there saw the prisoner, I asked for Mr. M'Dougall, I told him in consequence of the card being left I called upon him, the prisoner said, Mr. M'Dougall was not at home, that they had seen a gig of my manufacture; he said we wish to purchase the gig, as if he himself was one of the party. He and I agreed for the price of the gig, it was to be ninety guineas.

COURT. Ninety pounds or ninety guineas - A. Ninety guineas. I agreed at last it should be eighty-five guineas. He observed that their payments had been very great that quarter, and that it would be a great accommodation to him if I would take a bill at three months.

Mr. Adolphus. Who was to accept that bill - A.Mr. M'Dougall and Company.

Q. That was mentioned, was it - A. Yes, by the firm, at three months. He gave me reference of their responsibility, he referred me to Mr. Thompson of Clark-lane, he said he had dealings with that house, and that Mr. Thompson would satisfy me as to their character.

Q. Did you in consequence of that apply to this Mr. Thompson - A. I did, I saw a person in the accompting-house; I said, I came from M'Dougall and Company in Hermitage-street, and said that they referred me to him; he observed that he had dealings with him to the amount of fifty gigs, and that they were perfectly safe; upon that I directed the gig to be delivered, and it was delivered.

Mr. Gurney. The house that you went to in Mark-lane was the house of Messrs. Moffatt's, you know Moffatt's is a respectable house, do not you - A. I do not recollect. I saw the name written on the door, Moffett, some time after.

Q. Have not you arrested the prisoner for this bill upon the gig. You understood from the prisoner that he was one of the firm of the house to which you went - A. Yes, trading under the name of M'Dougall and Company. The prisoner did not state himself to be M'Dougall; the prisoner said, M'Dougell was not at home. I arrested the prisoner for the gig as goods sold and delivered.

ALFRED DANIEL . I am the brother of the last witness.

Q. In consequence of directions that you received from your brother did you on the 3d of October go to No. 51, Great Hermitage-street - A. Yes.

Q. Did you enquire there for the house of M'Dougall and Company - A. At the London Docks I did.

Q. From some enquiry you found M'Dougall was not at home. Was your brother with you - A. No. it was two days after; I enquired for M'Dougall and Company; I found they were not at home. I was introduced into a room, I saw a man which I verily believe to be the prisoner at the bar; I said to him sir, I am come for a bill for the gig which the servant has had, and I enquired if the gig had arrived, I think he made enquiry in the house if it had of some person and the person of whom he enquired said, no. It was very rainy afternoon, and the person which I verily believe to be the prisoner said that as it rained hard the servant would not come round with it to day; I then asked if he would procure a stamp for me to draw the bill. I said the harness was sent with the gig, and I should be glad to know if he would consent to take it as it was particularly ordered; he replied Mr. M'Dougall was not at home, and therefore he could not take upon him to say, notwithstanding Mr. M'Dougall and he were like two brothers. I then said I would draw for the amount of the gig if he would procure a stamp; I said the harness was sent with the gig, and if the harness was not returned in a day or two I should conclude that he had agreed to take it, and should send in a bill according, which I did, about the harness, I then gave a pound note, either to him or his clerk, the clerk went out and brought in a stamp.

Q. What stamp was it - A. I did not look at it at the time.

Q. Did he give you the difference - A. No, he replied he could not get change; I proposed, and it was agreed that the difference should be added to the gig. I drew the bill. That is the bill of exchange, I drew a bill, and the person which I very believe to be the prisoner took it into another room, he remained there a short time or staid away from me a short time however and brought this acceptance. This is the bill which I gave to him, and he returned it accepted, it is for ninety-pounds two shillings, the acceptance is in red ink.

Q. Did any conversation take place upon the bill - A. Yes, he replied Mr. M'Dougell had no bankers as he had lately lost three thousands by the failure of Brickwood's house.

Q. Has the bill ever been paid - A. Not as I know off.

Q. Look stedfastly at the prisoner and tell me whether you have any doubt whether he is the person - A. I can only repeat what I have before observed, I verily believe it to be the man.

(Read.)

"1811. 90 l. 2 s. Please to pay Mr. Harold Daniel

ninety pounds two shillings, value received in a carriage of Harold Daniel to Messrs. M'Dougall, Great Hermitage-street, London Dock."

Mr. Gurney. Is it dock or docks, let the jury see whether it is dock or docks.

JURY. We are not of opinion that it is an s.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18120408-2

313. CHARLES GIBSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of January , a watch, value 1 l. the property of Richard Wiley , the elder. And DEBORAH SOLOMONS for feloniously receiving the said watch, she knowing it to have been stolen .

RICHARD WILEY , JUN. I live in Hull-street, City-road , I am the son of Richard Wiley ; I am fourteen years old.

Q. Whose watch was that that you lost - A. A watch my father gave to me; it was only given me to wear, I left it in the privy on the 17th of January between three and four o'clock; I missed it about a quarter before five.

Q. Had you seen the prisoner Gibson at your father's house that day - A. No, I had not.

Q. Have you ever seen your watch - A. No.

MARY BACON. Q. Did you live with Mr. Wiley on the 17th of January - Do you remember the prisoner being at your house - A. Yes, between three and four, he came after his Christmas box; there was another person with him; I saw Gibson go into the necessary, he stooped as if he picked up something, he turned round and the other man laughed; what it was he took up I do not know.

Q. How soon after that did you understand that your master had lost a watch - A. He came home between four and five, and asked me if I had got the watch that was in the privy.

Q. to Robert Wiley . Do you know what time of the day that you left it there - A. A little after three; I went to school at half after three.

Q. Was it before you went to school - A. Yes, it was.

Q. to Mary Bacon. Was it after the young man was gone to school that you saw the prisoner - A. Yes, it was after he was gone to school.

Q. Where you at home from the time that your young master went to school till he came back again - A. I was.

Q. Were you particularly near to know whether any other person went into the privy during that time - A. No, I cannot tell.

Q. Who was there at home that day as well as you - A. My mistress, and three children.

CHARLES YATES. I am a constable; I was sent for to Mr. Wiley's, the prisoner was there.

Q. What day were you there - A. On Saturday the 18th; they accused him of the watch, he denied it; I searched him and found nothing on him.

Q. Did you search Mrs. Solomon - A. No. I went to Mrs. Solomon; I took Gibson to Worship-street office on the Friday following, the 24th; I went to Gibson and enquired which way Mr. Wiley could come by his watch; he told me to go to Dowde, if I met with his mate he would inform me where he lived.

Q. Did he mention his mates name - A. Yes Wall; and Wall went with me to Dowde's.

Q. Was the watch ever found - A. Not as I heard of.

WILLIAM WILEY . I went to Mrs. Solomon with Yates the constable on the Friday following the 24th of January, I saw Mrs. Solomon, Yates asked her if the name over the door was her husband's name; she asked him what reasons he had for making the enquiry; he told her that it was nothing very particular, she said she was sure it was, he had come about the watch and if he would stop till Monday or Tuesday she would get him the watch; she then clenched my hand in her's, and hoped I would not go further in it.

Mr. Alley. The husband is indicted, and not the wife, for receiving the watch, is not that so - A.Yes. The husband cannot be found.

JAMES DOWDE . I work at brick-making.

Q. Do you know any thing of Gibson having any watch - A. Yes. I was going into the Bell public house the corner of Saunders's gardens, Kingsland road in January, I cannot say what day exactly, I believe it was Friday; he said he had picked up an old bit of a watch in the dust, he asked me whether I could sell it for him; he said the money should be spent in beer; I asked him to let me look at it; it was an old gilt metal watch with the glass cracked; I went to Mr. Solomon's house in Hackney-road.

Q. Who did you see there - A. Mrs. Solomon; I asked her if she would buy this watch.

Q. Was there any body else bye in the shop - A. Mr. Solomon was in a room backwards; I asked he if she would buy that watch; she said, yes; I asked her ten shillings for it; she said she would give me five shillings and sixpence for it, I said no, I did not think that was the value of it; she said she would give me another shilling; I let her have it; she gave me a five shilling and sixpenny piece, and told me to call on the next evening for the other shilling; I gave the money to Gibson, he gave me a shilling, and told me to go on the next evening and get the shilling and keep it.

Q. to Wiley. Do you know what the watch is worth - A. No.

Gibson's Defence. I am innocent of the charge; what that young man has sworn is as false as God is true, and what I have been in prison for I do not know.

Solomon's Defence. I am innocent. I was always instrumental to help my neighbours to their property, but never to buy it.

Gibson called one witness, who gave him a good character.

Solomon called nine witnesses, who gave her a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18120408-3

314. SOLOMON HYAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, from the person of Morris Defriez , a promissory note for the payment of 2 l. 17 s. 8 d. his property.

Mr. Alley, counsel for the prosecution, declining to

offer any evidence, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18120408-4

315. ELIZABETH BURN and MARY SMITH were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of March , two bonnets, value 10 s. and two hats, value 10 s. the property of Sarah Dunn , privately in her shop .

SARAH DUNN. I live at No. 27, Titchbourne-street, in the parish of St. James's ; I am a widow ; I keep a shop there, a straw-hat warehouse.

Q. You sell, I suppose, by retail - A. Yes.

Q. It is a shop as well as a warehouse - A. Yes, a haberdasher's shop. On the 30th of last March, a quarter before eight at night, I saw three women come into the shop, and I came out of the parlour to serve them as I thought; the prisoners are two of the three women. When I came out of the parlour the other woman, who is not here, said she wished to purchase a straw bonnet; I called one of my workwomen out of the parlour to fetch one down; I had suspicion of the women, they all appeared to be in liquor. We had bonnets in the shop, as well as in the room up stairs, but they were old ones for shew. When the bonnets were brought down the woman who is not here wanted to purchase one of those that were brought down, they looked at several.

Q. Did the other woman try the bonnet on - A. Yes, and these two women stood by at the time, they appeared to know each other by their Christian names; Elizabeth Burn had a shawl on, and having her shawl a little back the woman who was trying the bonnet on had a bonnet secreted under her arm, and when the other woman was trying the bonnet on I perceived Elizabeth Burn pull her shawl over her arm; I perceived the prisoner Burn having a ribbon twisted over her arm, which ribbon was pinned to the bonnet, and the bonnet was in the pocket-hole of her gown; I threw the shawl back and took the bonnet and the ribbon away from her, I asked her how she could be guilty of coming into a shop, and doing such a thing, she had come in to thieve, and not to buy. This one that was in her pocket was one of those brought down stairs; she told the other that is not present to put on her bonnet and come along.

Q. Did you see her take it up and put it under her shawl - A. No.

Q. You saw some part of it before you took it from her - A. Yes; I saw the ribbon over her arm and part of the bonnet in the pocket hole; it was the other woman pulling the shawl over her arm that made me suspect.

Q. Then she did not completely cover it by pulling the shawl - A. No, not quite. She put her bonnet on, and told the other woman to come along.

Q. What followed - A. The other woman put her bonnet on, and went out, Elizabeth Burn followed her; I went after her, Mary Smith followed me and turned her back; I caught hold of Burn's clothes, and brought her back into the shop; the other woman ran away. I laid hold of Elizabeth Burn , I brought Burn back with an intention of having her searched, and laying hold of her; she dropped a beaver hat, a child's hat and feather; I picked it up, as I held her with one hand, a man in passing picked up another black beaver hat, he is not here.

Q. When you had got Elizabeth Burn into the shop what passed then when you came back - A. Then another straw bonnet had been secreted somewhere, it fell in the shop, as Elizabeth Burn stood in the shop it fell from her, I saw it drop. I do not know from where, I believe it dropped from her person, it dropped from where she stood.

Q. Did you see it drop - A. No; I found it only where she stood, it was one of the old bonnets in the shop. After I had got into the shop Mary Smith said it was a bad Easter Monday for her; I sent for the constable and gave charge of them; I asked Elizabeth Burn her name, and where she lived: I do not recollect the name she gave me, she gave me an Irish name, very different to the name she gave to the constable; she said she lived somewhere in Field-lane; I believe she was a widow; she gave her name Elizabeth Burn to the constable; I am sure she did not give me that name. At the watchhouse the prisoners were searched by the constable of the night, there was nothing more found.

Q. Are you sure that you saw that beaver hat drop from her in the street - A. Yes.

Q. You did not see the bonnet drop from her - A. No.

Q. Was the beaver hat in the shop before you brought the bonnets down - A. Yes, it was laying by the door on the right hand coming into the shop; I had seen it after candle light.

Q. Can you say where the old straw bonnet was - A. That laid upon the counter.

Q. Where were the better bonnets laid when they were examining the bonnets - A. On the counter, on the others, as I took them out of their hands I laid them on the counter. The woman that brought them down gave them into my hands.

Q. In fact had they purchased any of these things - A. No they said they were too dear, they asked me the price, the one that is not here was the spokeswoman.

Q. You did not see any of these things taken did you - A. I did not, nor did I see Mary Smith touch any thing. The other woman that is not here she tried on the bonnets.

Q. Had the prisoner Elizabeth Burn , the handling of these things - A. She took them out of the other's hands, and put them down, and I was afraid of their falling, which caused me to take more notice. The constable has the bonnets and the hats.

Q. Then for any thing you know the old bonnet might have fell from the counter - A. No, it could not, because it was crushed up so, it was not in the same state that they laid on the counter.

ELIZABETH DUNN . Q. You are the daughter of the last witness - A. Yes. On the evening of this Easter Monday, I was in the parlour at the time. I saw nothing of the transaction at all; I saw them come in; my mother was in the parlour when they came in, and she went to them; I heard my mother speak very sharp to one of the women which caused me to go and see what was the matter; I saw her turn

Mary Smith back into the shop, I saw my mother pulling Elizabeth Brown in, after my mother brought Burn in, a man passed by and picked up a black beaver hat, and brought it into the shop, he gave it to one of the shop-women, I saw him pick it up from where Elizabeth Burn had stood before my mother pulled her in.

JOHN WRIGHT . I am a constable of the parish of St. James; the bonnets and hats were delivered into my care at the watchhouse, by Mrs. Dunn's son.

Q. to Prosecutrix. Look at the bonnets and hats - A. This is the bonnet I took from her, it is one of the bonnets that my work-woman brought down to shew them; the shop-mark is upon it. This is the brown beaver hat I picked up in the street, it is a child's hat, I know it is mine; there has been lamp oil spilt on the crown by accident. This is the black beaver hat that the man picked up in the street, with the gold band, I know that hat, it is finished in a particular manner that many hats are not. This old bonnet was in my care to be altered, I had the altering of it.

Q. What is the value of all these - A. At the lowest rate, I value them at one guinea, which is considerably under the value.

Q. Did your work-woman stay in the shop while the women were examining the things - A. No, she waited to see whether I wanted her to fetch any more, she returned to the parlour, when I told her I did not want any more.

Q. You are very positive that you did not see her in the act of taking the bonnet - A. I saw her do nothing until the other woman, who was trying on the bonnet pulled the shawl over Burn's arm.

Q. Did Elizabeth Burn stand next to that woman - A. Yes, she did.

Q. Then before the woman pulled the shawl over her arm you had not perceived the bonnet - A. No, and then I perceived it, and upon my perceiving this I turned the shawl back, part of the bonnet was in the pocket-hole of her gown.

Burn's Defence. I had been to the fair on Easter Monday, and as I was coming home I met the young woman who is not here, and this young woman with her; the other said she was going to buy a bonnet, and was going to Greenwich the next day; she asked me to go with her, which I did. We went into the shop, she tried on several bonnets, I did not try on any, she tried that one on, and gave it to me to hold, she said she liked it the best of any. I had not it in my hands many minutes till she laid down another bonnet that the prosecutrix gave her to try on; and the two bonnets that fell upon the floor, I pointed them out to the lady. There were a good many bonnets on the counter, I did not take any of them myself. And the bonnets that were found at the door, the woman that went out was as likely to have them as me.

Smith's Defence. I was coming down Titchbourne street, I met the woman that is not here; she said she was going to buy a bonnet to go to Greenwich fair on the next day. About a year and a half ago she lived next door to me, that is how I came to know her, she asked me to go into the shop with her to buy a bonnet and I went in. I saw nothing of the transaction, but the gentlewoman stopped me coming out of the shop, that is all I know, I did not take any thing.

COURT. Q. to prosecutrix. Did Elizabeth Burn point out to you two others as having fallen on the floor - A. No.

BURN, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 26.

SMITH, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18120408-5

316. ELIZABETH HATHERELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of March , in the dwelling-house of William Baker , a spencer, value 2 l. a coat, value 1 l. six gowns, value 1 l. 16 s. four petticoats, value 17 s. two shifts, value 12 s. nine handkerchiefs, value 1 l. 12 s. seven pair of stockings, value 1 l. two aprons, value 4 s. six habit shirts, value 6 s. a guinea, a 3 l. bank note, a 2 l. bank note, and two 1 l. bank notes , his property.

WILLIAM BAKER . I live in Fore-street, Lambeth ; the things charged in the indictment were taken from me in that house.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. Yes, she is a married woman , not living with her husband, she came into my house on the 9th of march last, my wife took her in out of charity, by my knowing her.

Q. How long have you been married to your wife - A. My wife lived in my house before I married her, the prisoner came to me before I was married and continued with me after I was married.

Q. Do you remember the 27th of December last - A. Yes. The prisoner came in and asked for the keys; she told my wife not to get up then, she would get the breakfast and call her in the course of ten minutes, I heard a noise at my brother-in-law's door, that is opposite of mine; I got out of bed to let him out, the door was locked, and the key outside; I was called to come down and let Bet in, my wife said Bet was down stairs, I went down, and then I found no Bet there.

CHRISTIAN BAKER . I am the wife of the last witness. The prisoner came to me on the 9th of November. On the 27th of December I was awoke by the prisoner, seeing her in the room, I said is that you Betcy, she said yes, she said she wanted the keys to open the shop, I then resorted to my pockets, and gave her a key, I meant to give her the key of the shop, it turned out to be the key of the coal-hole; she said do not you get up, I will make the kettle boil and call you, soon after that I heard a violent noise at my brother's door, I called my husband to let him out, and when they went down stairs they said Betcy, the prisoner was not down stairs. I missed some things that I had on on Sunday, and some I had on on Christmas day. I missed two gowns and a petticoat, and a black velvet spencer, that is all at that time that I missed out of my room. I went immediately and opened my box, and found that was rifled, and every thing was taken away.

Q. Did you lose a bottle green great coat - A. Yes, that she went away with.

ELIZABETH SAUNDERS. Q. Do you remember seeing the prisoner on the morning of the 27th of December - A. Yes, about a quarter before seven I saw her come from Mrs. Baker's house, she had Mrs. Baker's dark green pellisse on, and two large bundles,

she went down to Princes-street, Lambeth, it leads to Westminster bridge.

ANTHONY WINSLAN . I met the prisoner the same day about seven o'clock in the morning, in High street, Lambeth; she had something on like the coat mentioned, and one or two bundles in her hand, it was not light enough to distinguish the exact colour of the coat. I saw her in the way from Mr. Baker's to Westminster or Blackfriars bridge.

SAMUEL TODD . Q. You are clerk to Mr. Turner, Brewer Street, Golden Square - A. Yes, a pawnbroker.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. No, I do not. I produce some duplicates, they correspond with the things the officer has to produce, I delivered up the property to the officer.

EDWARD JENKINS . I am clerk to Mr. Harrison, pawnbroker, of Baker-street, Golden Square.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. No, I do not. I produce a duplicate I took off the file, I delivered up the articles.

JOHN WILDING . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner in Haydon-street, Willow-street, on Saturday the 14th of March, as she was going into the house where she said she lodged, at No. 13; when I stopped her I asked her if she would go back for me to see whether she had got any things of these people that said she had robbed them; she was upon the step of the door when I took her, she said she never would return there any more. I told her if she would not go there she must go to the watchhouse with me, and there I must search her. I took her to St. James's watchhouse; I searched her, upon her head was that cap.

Prosecutrix. I know this cap, it was taken out of my box, I made it myself, I had it on the day after Christmas day.

Wilding. I asked the prisoner to come back with me to the room to let me search it, she said she would not, she gave me this key, and said, I might search it myself. The prosecutrix and I went with the key, we searched the room; I opened the room door with the key the prisoner gave me, the first thing we found was this apron, laying on a chair. In a drawer, a sleeve of a gown, and a number of pieces that belonged to the same gown; this habit shirt was in a box that was unlocked, and this cap, the prosecutrix said the lace was hers but not the cap. I then went and asked the prisoner for the keys of the trunk that was locked to prevent breaking in, she told me I should find them between the sacking and the bed, I found them there. On the Sunday morning I went again, and opened the box in the presence of the landlord, I opened the box, and found eleven duplicates, six duplicates of Mr. Turner's, and some of Mr. Harrison's. These are the things that I got from the pawnbrokers, in consequence of these duplicates they delivered them up to me.

Todd. I have the duplicates. This is a duplicate for a gown, pledged for four shillings, I delivered up the gown to Wilding, it was pledged by a woman in the name of Smith.

Prosecutrix. This is my gown, I lost it out of my box on the 27th of December, I never lent it to her, I had seen it the day before in my box.

Q. to Jenkins. In consequence of them duplicates that were produced to you by Wilding, and which you have now in your hand, did you deliver up any thing - A. Yes, one of the duplicates is written by myself, of a gown for three shillings, pledged by John Graves. This is the gown.

Prosecutrix. It is mine, she took it off the nail, it was there the day before, all the property produced by the officer is mine.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence, called two witnesses who gave her a good character.

GUILTY, aged 23.

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling house .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18120408-6

317. RICHARD MARSH was indicted for feloniously making an assault upon Joseph Eaden , in the King's highway, on the 31st of March , putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, a watch, value 2 l. his property.

JOSEPH EADEN . Q. What are you - A. I have been a butler but have left my service on account of my master's death. On Tuesday morning the 31st of March, about a quarter before three, I was going home to No. 8, Little Russell-street, Bloomsbury, I had been out on Easter Monday with my brother and a friend, I had stopped later than I expected.

Q. Where were you when any thing happened to you - A. I was in Bow-street, Bloomsbury , in my way to Little Russell-street. I was walking in Bow-street, I saw no person, and all at once I was knocked down by a blow on my eye; I saw no person at the time the blow was given.

Q. All at once you received a violent blow you say - A. Yes, upon my right eye, that knocked me down.

Q. You suppose that was given you by some person behind - A. Yes, because I did not see any person, I could not say whether it was done with the fist or not. When I was down upon the ground, it was raining, and I had my umbrella up, it rolled out of my hand, and my hat rolled off; and when my hat was off, and my umbrella out of my hand, I was pressed down by a man, he pressed me down by his left hand and was trying to take my watch.

Q. Where was your watch - A. In my fob when I felt my watch going, I struggled for the space of two minutes, as near as I could guess, then I exerted myself as much as I possibly could to take care of myself and my watch, then while I was trying to protect myself after a little struggling he ran away.

Q. He got up and ran away - A. Yes, and on his running away I got up and ran after him, calling out stop thief, as much as I possibly could; I never lost sight of him, when I got up until he was taken by the watchman.

Q. How far had he ran before he was taken by the watchman - A. About a furlong he went down a dark street, and turned on the right hand into Thornaugh-street, there he was taken

Q. In the dark street I suppose you lost sight of him - A. No, I did not.

Q.Now who was this man that made this assault upon you - A. That was the man.

(Pointing to the

prisoner.)

Q. What sort of a light was it - A. It was dusk.

Q. Was it dark - A. About dusk.

Q. At two o'clock in the morning - A. Yes; the lamps gave a light, they were burning.

Q. So that he did not get your watch from you - A. No.

Q. You were able to protect that - A. Yes.

Q. How long might it be after the time that you beat him off that he was taken - A. It might be two minutes as near as I could guess; I cannot say exactly.

Q. Should you have known him again if he had not been then taken - A. Yes, positively I should. When I got up I never lost sight of him until he was taken.

DANIEL MURPHY . I am a watchman. I was on duty in Thornaugh-street, it was about a quarter before three, I heard the cry of stop thief, when I heard that I put the light under my coat; I ran up Thornaugh-street the prisoner was coming from Duke-street, Bloomsbury, on the foot pavement.

Q. Does that communicate with Duke-street, Bloomsbury - A. No, it is very near it. He was running very fast, and the prosecutor was very close after him. He did not see me until I was close to him I told him to stop; he fell down, and I fell down on the top of him he got away from me, he ran and I ran after him.

Q. Where was Eden all this time - A. He was after us all the time; I came behind him, and struck him with the stick; he fell again, and I took fast hold of him; Eaden when he came up he was bleeding from his nose; I sprang my rattle for assistance, and then when he was going down to the watchhouse he wanted to get away.

Q. to Eaden. I understood you to say that you never lost your watch - A. No, it was not taken from my fob.

NOT GUILTY .

To be detained for the assault.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18120408-7

318. WILLIAM WEBSTER and SUSANNAH WEBSTER were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of March , two pieces of Irish linen, value 5 l. the property of Edward Breeze , Elizabeth Breeze , and Susan Breeze , privately in their shop .

EDWARD BREEZE . I am a linen-draper , No. 10, Church-street, Kensington . On the 4th of March I was at home, I saw both the prisoner's come into the shop, I attended to them; the man said he wanted to look at some prints for a gown; I shewed him a great many.

Q. Did he look at them, or the woman - A. He looked at most himself; they bought a gown, and left two shillings, saying they would call the next morning for it.

Q. Who bought it - A. Both; it was for the woman; the woman desired the man to pay the two shillings; I think it was the woman that desired me to cut it off.

Q. Who paid the two shillings - A. The man, by the woman's desire.

Q. What did the gown come to - A. Ten shillings.

Q. Did they leave the shop then or not - A. They did.

Q. Did you miss any thing while they were there - A. No.

Q. How many people was there in the shop at the time you were serving them - A. There was one woman, she lived in Kensington; she was in the shop at the same time as the prisoners; the other woman was waiting to be served; none of my people was in the shop besides myself.

Q. Did you afterwards miss any thing - A. Yes, about three minutes after they were gone. As soon as they left the shop I went to put one of the prints in the window that the woman took out and throwed on the counter, and when I went to the window to put the print in its place, I missed two pieces of Irish linen from the window. The woman had been to the window while she was there, and throwed it for the man to look at on the counter. That piece of print lay on the smallest piece of Irish, I put them in the window that morning. When I missed the pieces of Irish I called my sister, and pursued the prisoners; I went towards Hammersmith; my brother-in-law met them.

Q. Was the property afterwards found - A. Yes, by my brother, James Ball .

JAMES BALL. I am brother-in-law to Mr. Breeze. I pursued the prisoners and overtook them by Knight-bridge, they were both together; I procured a constable; I took them and told them they must go back with me to Kensington: I gave the man into the constable's hands and walked with the woman to the watchhouse. They wanted me to go to have something to drink at the public-house, and gave me the bundle, the woman did, they were taken to the watch-house; they were searched, and two pieces of Irish linen were found upon the man. When I caught hold of the man he had got the two pieces of Irish tied up in a shawl under his arm.

Q. Did you take them from him - A. No, I did not. He carried them himself to the watchhouse, and then the constable searched him.

Q. And were they delivered up to the constable at that time - A. They were; his name is Winter.

MR. WINTER. I am a constable of St. Margaret's parish. The prisoners were delivered into my charge the two pieces of Irish linen were under the man's arm tied up in a shawl; I took them from him, I kept them till the evening, and then I delivered them to Gillmore.

Q. Were they ever out of your possession - A. Never.

JAMES GILLMORE. I am an officer. I have had these pieces of linen in my possession from the time that Winter delivered them to me; they were delivered to me in the prisoner's presence at the office, Winter marked them before he gave them to me, and Mr. Breeze wrote his initials.

Q. to prosecutor. Look at these two pieces and tell me whether you know either of them - A. Yes, they both of them have my shop mark.

Q. When had you seen them both before you missed them - A. That very morning I put them myself on the window; I can speak positively to both pieces.

Q. What is the value of them - A. I suppose between four and five pounds.

Q. Is the cost price above forty shillings - A. Yes.

Q. Was the man ever near that part of the window where these things were - A. Not close; the woman was there all the time.

Q. The man was never near enough to the window to take them himself, was he, to take them himself - A. No. The woman was near the window while her husband was looking at the print at the counter.

Q. Were you present when they were searched - A. No.

Q. to Winter. Had they any money - A. No, except two or three halfpence I found on one of them.

Q. to prosecutor. There was no alarm at the time in your shop that any thing was taken was there - A. No.

William Webster's Defence. My wife, and I were walking together down the road, a man came up to me, he said my friend, will you hold this for me while I go and get a glass of liquor: I said, I will. I put it under my arm. When the person laid hold of me, and said you must go with me, you have stolen that property: Me! said I, there is the man coming out of the house that gave me the property. No, he said, you are sufficient, you have got the property, and with that they hurried me to the watchhouse. That is true, so help me God, and my wife is as innocent as me concerning the robbery; I did not know it was stolen, had I known it was stolen or any thing of the kind I would not have had any thing to do with it.

Susanna Webster's Defence. My lord, my husband and me had some words, and I had a very bad arm; my husband asked me if I would have a gown; I said, yes; he had money to pay for the gown; as we came from the shop we were going to the hospital to have my arm dressed, and coming along the man said would my husband have something to drink, my husband would not. This man went in to get three half quarterns of gin, he gave my husband the bundle to hold. He shewed the officer the man. They would not take him, therefore we are as innocent my lord as you are.

Q. to Mr. Ball. When you took them what did they say - A. They pointed to another man that was at the public-house door, and said, that was the man that gave them the bundle, but I saw him with the bundle from where I first overtook him.

Q. You had seen him with the bundle before they got up to that public-house - A. Yes, walking quite unconcerned.

Q. How far were they from the other side of the public-house when you first saw them - A. About a dozen yards; I had seen them on the Kensington side of that public-house nearly an hundred yards.

Q. When you saw them first was that man in their company or not - A. I do not recollect seeing more than the two.

Q. When you took them were they walking on, or were they stopping - A. Walking on, and there was no man with them then.

Q. to prosecutor. Did you see these pieces of Irish while they were in the shop - A. Yes; I saw one while they were in the shop.

Q. How long before then had you seen the other piece - A. I had not finished dressing the window untill twelve o'clock.

Q. Do you know whether they had a shawl with them - A. I think the woman had a shawl on.

WILLIAM WEBSTER , GUILTY - DEATH , aged 53.

SUSANNAH WEBSTER , GUILTY - DEATH , aged 44.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18120408-8

319. EDWARD DIKES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of February , six pieces of gold wire, value 2 l. the property of John Nevill , senior, John Nevill junior, and Samuel Hall .

JOSEPH BENNETT . I am clerk in the house of Cox, Merle, and Co. gold and silver refiners, Little Britain. On Friday the 28th of February last, the prisoner brought these pieces of gold to me, and offered them for sale; seeing it was unmanufactured gold I asked him if they were his own; he said he found it in Red Lion-street, Clerkenwell; I told him I was sure it was the property of some workmen, I should make enquiries, and by that means I should find the owner; I said I should go to Goldsmith's Hall, and make enquiries if he would come the next day they would be glad to reward him, he said he would come the next day; he did not come, he was brought there; I have no doubt in the world about the prisoner's person, nor never had; he told me that he lived at No. 33, Goswell-street, he gave me the name of Watson.

SAMUEL HALL . I am a watch-case maker , I can only swear to the property it belongs to the firm of Nevill, son, and Hall; I am one of the firm. I am sure it is our property; I cannot say how it was lost; the prisoner was errand lad , he had been with us five months.

Q. Where was it kept - A. In a drawer, but he had the drawing it down, about five ounces were delivered to him at a time.

Q. How much is there of it - A. About two ounces.

JOHN NEVILL , JUN. I know the gold to be our property.

SAMUEL BROOKES . I am only come to prove that the address that he gave to Cox and Merle was a false one; he left his address to a butchers in Goswell-street, No. 33, he gave the name of Watson, I found no person there of the name of Watson.

JOHN NEVILL , SEN. He came to me in the name of Edward Dikes .

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing about stealing the metal, nor of the selling of it.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Fined 1 s. and discharged.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120408-9

320. HENRY SKIPPEY was indicted for feloniously assaulting, William Ebsworth , in the King's highway, on the 5th of March , putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, a watch, value 3 l. two watch keys, value 1 s. a seal, value

1 s. and a hat, value 3 s. his property.

WILLIAM EBSWORTH. I am an umbrella-maker , I live in Silver-street, Wood-street.

Q. When did this happen to you - A. On the 5th of March, about a quarter after twelve in the night. I was returning from my benefit society coming up Snow Hill I was accosted by Henry Skippey, and another; my watch was taken from me, the maker's name is Morgan, No. 352. I was attacked by three men, two of them took hold of my collar, Skippey on the right hand side; I cannot say which of the three took the watch from me, they were all present at the time the watch was taken away, one of them stood before me.

Q. How did they take your watch - A. They pulled it out of my pocket; I laid hold of the middle one by my right hand, I received a severe cut in my right hand, and one of my fingers bled very much for sometime, and then I had a violent blow on the knee, which brought me to the ground; I cannot say which of them struck me with the bludgeon on my knee, I have been lame about three weeks. They made their escape as soon as I called out stop thief, one towards Fleet-market, and two towards Holborn. A gentleman coming along at the end of Field-lane gave Skippey a blow and turned him into the hands of the patrols, and he was taken to the watchhouse by the patrols. The watch was picked up by the watchman and brought to the watchhouse. I am sure that Skippey is the same man that had hold of me by the collar; I was very lame, I called out stop thief very loud, one of the watchmen threw his stick at him, he was running without his hat.

Q. When you got to the watchhouse you was sure he was the same man - A. Yes.

Mr. Alley. Were you quite sober at the time - A. Upon my oath I was sober.

Q. Had you ever seen the prisoner at the bar before that night - A. No, I had not.

Q. How long had you been at your club - A. About nine o'clock. We had a shillingsworth of rum and water, and a pot of half and half between three of us.

Q. Was there any body in company with you - A.Nobody at all.

Q. You say there was only three men that stopped you - A. No, there were two women just by, whether they belonged to them I do not know.

Q.Have you or have you not said there was a fight in the street at the time that you lost the watch - A. No.

Q. You fell in consequence of the injury offered you - A. Yes, by the blow on the knee. I lost sight of the person that brought me to the ground.

Q. How long was it that you saw him at the watch-house - A. About three or four minutes; the blow was given me just after they got the watch.

Q. Before that you was collared - A. Yes, and after that I received a blow on the knee. The watch was brought in the watchhouse by one of the watchmen.

THOMAS BROWN. I am one of the patrols of St. Andrew's, Holborn. On the night of the 4th of last month just going upon duty at twelve o'clock, I heard the cry of stop thief at the time of hearing the cry I was going along Shoe-lane, in consequence of hearing the cry of stop thief I returned into Holborn, I saw people running down Field-lane, I made the best of my way down the lane, the prisoner was coming towards Holborn, there was a gentleman behind him, called out stop thief; when the prisoner came towards me I took him, I put my hand upon his shoulder, and the point of my foot against his and tripped him up and brought him to the ground; I took him by the collar and took him to the watch-house. At the watchhouse he said, gentlemen, I have not got any property belonging to any person excepting my own; he took his watch out, he said, gentlemen, this is the only watch I have got, it is my own. The prosecutor was asked by the constable of the night whether he could identify the prisoner, at that moment he could not identify the prisoner. One of the watchmen understanding that a hat had been lost, returned to the spot where the prisoner fell, or was knocked down; the watchman returned and asked the prosecutor if he should know or give the description of his watch, he gave the description of the watch, and further stated that he had the maker's name and number in his pocket book; the description answered to the watch, and then immediately he recognised the prisoner. The prisoner was given in charge and conveyed to the poultry compter.

WILLIAM CHAPMAN. I am a watchman; I was just finishing my round, about a quarter past twelve on the 5th, and coming Holborn Hill, I heard a cry of stop thief, I ran down the hill in order to meet the person, and just as I came to the corner of Field-lane I saw a man running as fast as he could without a hat, I went four doors down Field-lane, I saw the young man down on the ground.

Q. Who was that young man - A. Henry Skippey. The patrol was just rising him up off the ground, I helped to assist to raise him up, we conveyed him to the watchhouse.

Q. Was that the man that you saw running without his hat - A. I believe he is the very same; after being taken to the watchhouse he was searched, he pulled out a watch, he said it was his own property, his father gave it him. They searched him, no property could be found, both the prosecutor and the prisoner lost their hats; I returned to the spot where the prisoner fell, to see whether I could see either of the hats, being late at night, and in looking for the hat I found the watch out of the case. I took the watch to the watchhouse, I asked if the gentleman had lost his watch, the prosecutor answered, I have lost my watch; he said it was a plain silver watch, a small steel chain, and a metal seal; the constable of the night looked at the watch, and saw the maker's name exactly as the prosecutor had stated.

Mr. Alley. Did not the prosecutor seem as though he had had a good share of liquor - A. I do not think he was the worse for liquor.

- HOLT. I was patrol. On the 5th of March between twelve and one, Brown the patrol and I came out of the watchhouse; we were both talking at the end of Shoe-lane, Brown left me and went up Shoe-lane; we heard the cry of stop thief; I called him, he came back; we both ran across the way; we saw some man running on Snow Hill, he turned down Field-lane. We turned down Field-lane about three or

four doors down I saw the prisoner returning without his hat, he was returning back again from Field-lane into Holborn; Brown met him, whether he struck or pushed him I do not know; the prisoner fell, and immediately he fell Brown took him by the collar; I assisted to lift him up; he said he had done nothing. We asked him what he ran away for, he said he thought a press gang was after him. On going into the watchhouse with him he said he had lost his hat. When we got into the watchhouse the watchman went to look for the hat, and while he was gone two of the patrols brought the hat, which was found at the end of Fleet-market. The watchman on his return came into the watchhouse and asked what gentleman had lost his watch; he said he had lost his, it was a plain silver watch, a steel chain, and the maker's name so and so, which he had got in his pocket book. The watch was produced, and it answered the description that he gave.

Chapman. This is the watch.

Prosecutor. It is my watch.

Prisoner's Defence. I am totally innocent of the charge that is alledged against me.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 21.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120408-10

321. JOHN PURRIER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of March , forty-nine yards of printed cotton, value 3 l. the property of Richard Galley , privately in his shop .

RICHARD GALLEY . I am a linen-draper in Aldersgate-street . All I can prove the property is mine.

CALEB JONES . I am shopman to Mr. Willis, grocer in Aldersgate-street, opposite of Mr. Galley's, within five doors; I was going by the shop at the time that the prisoner was coming out with the goods under his arm, and by the manner of his coming out, I thought he did not come by them honestly; I watched his transactions, and he immediate set off running as hard as he could run; I followed him and halloaed out stop thief, he ran some distance before I could catch him; he went under the chains of some waggon horses that were going along; I went through after him, and then he dropped the cloth, and directly he dropped it I picked it up and followed him; I soon after caught him and brought him back to Mr. Galley's, I asked Mr. Galley if he could swear to the property; he said, yes. I told him I saw him come out of the shop with it, I thought he did not come by it honestly. Mr. Galley immediately sent for a constable to take him to the compter. I never lost sight of him after I first saw him come out of the shop until I caught him.

JAMES STEVENS . Q. You are a constable - A. Yes. I had the goods delivered to me, I produce them.

Prosecutor. It is my property; there are my private marks upon it; there were twenty or thirty pieces of them together in the window; I was not in the shop at the time.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to his character.

GUILTY, aged 22,

Of stealing, but not privately in the shop .

Confined One Month in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120408-11

322. HENRY LAZARUS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of March , two reams of paper, value 12 s. the property of John Davis .

WILLIAM NICHOLS. I am a carman to John Davis , a master carman . I had twenty bundles of paper in my cart, that I loaded at the Custom-house Quay, I had to take them to Wood-street. On the 20th of March, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, I lost a bundle out of the cart, while I was standing at the door in Wood-street , I had information of it; a bundle is two reams. I had information that an officer had got him in charge from the man who saw him take it out of the cart. The officer is here with the paper.

JOHN WAUGH . I am an officer. On the 20th of March, about half past seven o'clock, on going up Wood-street I saw the prisoner on the opposite side of the way to where the cart was, on the same side that I was on, and then he crossed over the way to the cart that was standing at the door; he looked up at the number or the name of the cart; I saw him take something out from behind the horse in the front of the cart I presume it must be. He came away seemingly talking to himself, he came away from the cart. The cart was about two doors from Bull's Head passage; he turned up Bull's Head passage; I was close to his heels; I said to my partner, Jem, here; I catched hold of the prisoner's jacket at the hind part, he immediately dropped the bundle; I said, Jem, you pick it up; I jumped over the bundle; the prisoner got away; I pursued him into Oat-lane, he was not a yard before me the whole time, I called out stop thief, and he called out stop thief as lustily as I did, and just as he got to the top of Bull's Head passage; I struck him over the legs with a stick, he fell down and rolled over two or three times, and called out stop thief the whole time, I got hold of him; he got up again and said he would not be taken, he said he was an honest man.

JAMES TOMPKINS. I was in company with Waugh at the time. This is the bundle the prisoner dropped in the passage, I took up the bundle, and followed him. We secured the prisoner.

Q. to Waugh. Did you see any other man in the passage besides him - A.No.

Nichols. That is the bundle that was in my cart; I delivered nineteen instead of twenty, this made the twentieth.

Prisoner's Defence. I am quite innocent.

GUILTY , aged 57.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120408-12

323. MICHAEL CARROL was indicted for feloniously assaulting William Norris in the King's highway, on the 25th of March , putting him in fear and taking from his person and against his will, a gold watch, value 30 l. a gold chain, value 3 l. a gold seal, value 1 l. and a gold watch key, value 5 s. his property.

WILLIAM NORRIS. I live in the Old Jewry.

Q. You are a Surgeon - A.Yes, sir. On the 25th

of March, at half past eleven at night, I was in Holborn, about the end of Furnival's Inn , next to Leather-lane ; I was walking along with an infirm old friend who was laying hold of my arm; and coming down Holborn, we observed two men coming in the opposite direction meeting us, making way for them to pass; instead of taking the advantage of that they ran violently against us, one of them, whom I perceived to be the prisoner at the bar, snatched a watch from my pocket and ran off; I pursued him, crying stop thief, I was gaining fast upon the man myself, but he was very soon taken. The watchmen were perfectly upon their duty. Before he was taken I saw him throw away the watch and almost immediately he was in the custody of the watchmen.

Q. Are you sure he was the man - A. I am perfectly certain that he is the man.

Q. What kind of a shove was it - A. I am very glad that question is asked, I was desirous of making it known to the Court that their was no stick, no bludgeon or knife, merely running violently against me and at the same time snatching out the watch; there was no blow, a mere shove, I conceive it was to put me of my guard, it was by no means to do me any personal injury.

Q. It produced no terror in your mind then - A. None at all.

Q. You have not got the watch now I suppose - A.I have, this is it.

(producing it.)

THOMAS PRENDEROAST . I am a watchman. I and the patrol secured the prisoner together, there was another in company with the prisoner, I went after him down Leather-lane.

ROGER PATTERSON. I am a patrol of Holborn. On the 25th of March, about half past eleven at night, near Furnival's Inn, I heard the cry of stop thief, I laid hold of the prisoner, we both fell down, and Dr. Norris came up and identified the prisoner as the person that took his watch away.

Prisoner's Defence. I was returning home to my lodgings, there was a short man in a drab coat run across the road very sharp indeed, and finding that he was close pursued he run very fast, Dr. Norris came up and said he thought I was the person.

Q. to prosecutor. Were you in liquor - A. I accidentally drank two glasses of wine at my dinner, after that I was at the College of Surgeons and had not an opportunity.

GUILTY, aged 17.

Of stealing, but not with violence .

Transported for Life .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120408-13

324. ANN JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of March , in the dwelling-house of Benjamin Towle, three pound four ounces weight of cotton thread, value 2 l. 15 s. the property of Thomas Towle , Benjamin Towle , and John Towle .

BENJAMIN TOWLE . I am a cotton thread manufacturer . I live at 15, St. Anns Lane ; I cannot recollect in what parish it is in at this moment, my partner's names are Thomas Fowle and John Fowle , they live in the country. I know nothing of the prisoner. On Friday, the 27th of March, about one o'clock, my boy had gone out and locked the warehouse door which is up one pair of stairs, and left the key outside of the door; I was up one pair of stars higher, in a sitting room. A very short time after the boy had gone out I thought I heard a noise in the warehouse, I went to the top of the stairs, I observed the warehouse door open, the prisoner came out of the warehouse and went down stairs, I called out, who is there, what do you want, she made no reply; I then followed her down stairs as quick as I could, and caught her just at the bottom of the stairs, I put my hand on her shoulder and turned her about; I examined her apron and found three pound and a quarter of cotton that she had taken out of our warehouse, my warehouse is up one pair of stairs, and the upper part of the house I occupy myself, the lower part of the house is let to another gentleman, it is shut up.

Q. What did she say for herself - A. She begged me to let her get away, saying that she had several young children that depended upon her.

SAMUEL GLOVER . I am an officer. I produce the thread.

Prosecutor. It is my thread and my partner's, I value it at two pound fifteen.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence, nor called any witnesses to her character.

GUILTY, aged 48.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Confined Six Month in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120408-14

325. LYDIA BUTLER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 17th of March , a pewter pint pot, value 10 d. the property of Gardiner More Cutmore .

GARDINER MORE CUTMORE. I live at the Bird Cage, Wood-street , I lost my pot on the 17th of March, between eleven and twelve o'clock, the prisoner usually came into my house two or three times a day for half a pint of beer, my wife drawed her half a pint of beer and noticed there was a pot behind her, she looked soon afterwards, and the pot was gone; she called to me and said that woman has got a pot. I followed her out of doors and told her she had got my pot, she shook and cried, and begged for mercy, and produced the pot from under her apron or out of her pocket, I took the pot from her; This is the pot, it is my pot.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not go from the door, I was going in for a pint of beer. I am a poor woman, I have got a family.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined One Month in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120408-15

326. WILLIAM BLAKE and JOSEPH DARKE were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of March , a bushel of coals, value 1 s. 10 d. the property of Joseph Holl and Paul Bevan .

JOSEPH HOLL . I am a coal-merchant , I live at Eagle Wharf, Milford-lane; my partner's name is Paul Bevan . The prisoner, I believe, are fishermen .

THOMAS HARDY . I am a lighterman, I am a servant to Mr. Holl, and Paul Bevan . On the 1st of

March a little after ten at night I was coming out of my own door on the wharf, I saw somebody outside of the barges and heard the rattle of coals; I got a gun and went on the craft where the prisoners were. The prisoners were in the barges, on the river Thames, I went on the barges, it was near low-water, when I came where the prisoners were I saw a person taking coals out of the barge, he had got a basket of coals, and seeing of me he jumped into a boat with the basket of coals; I told him to stop or else I would certainly fire; both of them endeavoured to conceal themselves under the deck of the boat It was a decked boat they were in called a Peter boat, with a good many coals. I jumped into the boat to them, immediately I got into the boat they put out the sculls and rowed away with me in the boat; as soon as I get my feet to stand at the bottom of the boat where there were a good many coals, I demanded them to stop, and if they would not leave off rowing I would shoot them; telling them that my piece was loaded that I had in my hand; with that the prisoner Blake began to throw the coals over board which were in the boat, I told them it was of no use to throw the coals overboard, I was determined I would take them; the prisoner Darke left off rowing at that time, and begged the other to leave off, saying it was of no use to resist any more. I ordered them to row me on shore, towards Blackfriars-bridge, a young man whom I had left on shore came in a boat along side of us; I then told them I would not trouble them to row me to Blackfriars-bridge, to row me to where I came from, they rowed me back again.

Q. What quantity of coals were there on board - A. Twelve bushels and odd in that boat and the lighter where I saw the prisoners at work; both lighter and coals belonged to Mr. Holl and Bevan.

Blake's Defence. I was rowing a west country barge out of Pool.

Darke's Defence. We rowed up to the Pool, there was a west country barge wanted to be rowed up to Putney, they gave us some coals to do it.

BLAKE - GUILTY , aged 45.

Transported for Seven Years .

DARKE - GUILTY , aged 23.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120408-16

327. MARY JULIAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of February , three coats, value 1 l. a watch, value 30 s. a waistcoat. value 2 s. and a pair of breeches, value 2 s. the property of Thomas Heardson , in his dwelling-house .

THOMAS HEARDSON . I keep the White Swan public-house, in White-cross-street, St. Lukes , I have employed the prisoner for three years as a chairwoman .

Q. On the 23d of February last did you miss any thing out of your house - A. On the 20th I missed a watch, I had missed things for two years.

Q. Now where was that watch - A. In the dressing case draw in my bed-room, I had not seen it ten days prior to that, I saw it there ten days before I missed it, prior to that I lost a coat, waistcoat, and a pair of breeches, and many other things I always suspected her. I got a warrant, I went with the officer to search her apartment, I went up stairs with the officer, she was not at home the first time the officer came; the officer came the second time on the 23d of February, she was then at home; he searched her apartment and her person, he pulled out of her pocket a pocketbook, full of duplicates.

Q. Did you afterwards see any articles belonging to you. - A. Yes, I went with the constable to the pawnbrokers, and identified all the property I could find.

JONATHAN ARMSTRONG . In consequence of a search warrant, I went on Sunday the 23d of February to the prosecutor's house, he said the prisoner was at home; he went up stairs first and I followed him. I searched the prisoner, in her pocket I found a quantity of duplicates, she said they belonged to herself, and the property that was pledged belonged to herself. I took her to Worship-street, there she was examined by the magistrate, I went round with the prosecutor to the pawnbrokers there he saw the property.

Q. Did you go to the pawnbroker with the duplicate of the watch - A. I did, at Mr. Crouch's, in Paul-street. We had no duplicate of the coat and waistcoat, they were at Mr. Crouch's. We found at Mr. Nicolas's a spoon, two pellisse coats at Mr. Sadler's, Aldersgate street, and a pair of breeches at Fothergill's.

ROBERT HEARN . I am an apprentice to Mr. Crouch, pawnbroker.

Q. Do you know the person of the prisoner - A. Yes. I produce a coat and waistcoat, and a watch, pawned on the 2d of February.

FREDRICK EDWARDS. I am a pawnbroker. I live at Fothergill's, Aldersgate-street. I produce a pair of breeches, pawned by somebody on the 24th of last October.

Prosecutor. The watch and the other things are mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I did it through distress.

GUILTY, aged 31.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Confined Two Years in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18120408-17

328. JANE WILSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of March , three gowns, value 10 s. ten shirts, value 13 s. six napkins, value 6 s. and four handkerchiefs, value 15 s. the property of Richard Woodward , in his dwelling-house .

MARGARET WOODWARD. My husband's name is Richard Woodward ; we lived at the time that this happened in Queen-street, Bloomsbury . The prisoner lived with me in the capacity of house-maid , she came into my service on the 12th of last January, she quitted my service on the last day of February.

Q.When did you miss any part of your property - A. She was gone, it was the 5th or 6th of March, that I missed my property.

Where were they kept - A. In a trunk on the landing place of the garret.

Q. Can you say when you see any part of this property

before the prisoner went away - A. About three or four weeks before she went away in the trunk, I saw them, and on the 5th or 6th of March I went to the box to get something out, and to my surprise I found the box empty; I kept the box locked and had the key; I cannot say how it had been opened, I missed the things; I then took out a search warrant; the warrant was executed and the things found in the prisoner's room, and the articles were brought to my house. Nicholls the officer produced me the things that had been taken from my trunk on the 9th of March.

WILLIAM NICOLLS . I am an officer of Bow-street office. On the 9th of March I had a search warrant delivered to me; I went with the warrant to No. 8, Upper Marybone-street; I went up to the two pair of stairs back-room, I there saw the prisoner and the woman that belonged to the room; the prisoner lodged there with the woman that rented the room; I asked the woman whether she rented the room; she said she did; the prisoner was present and heard it. The woman said her name was Robinson; she told me the prisoner lodged with her; I asked the prisoner how many boxes she had in the room; she pointed to two boxes and a hat box; I searched her boxes, the keys laid upon the boxes, I asked her whether them were the keys, she said, yes; I opened the boxes, I found several napkins, the gowns were in a bundle behind the bed; six handkerchiefs were in the box.

Q. Did you find any petticoats - A. Not in the boxes. Mrs. Woodward has part of the property, they have been delivered up to her by order of the magistrate. I have the three gowns here, the prisoner produced them herself, they were behind the bed, and six petticoats with the sattin one.

Q. to prosecutrix. We understand that part of the property was delivered up to you by order of the magistrate - A. Yes.

Q. Now look at the articles, how many gowns are there - A. Three, and a petticoat; the napkins and handkerchiefs were delivered up; I can swear positively to these articles, they had been in that box two or three years, I had not made any use of them for that time, and every thing that I lost was from that box.

Prisoner's Defence. My mistress came for me at the House of Correction, and offered to take the sum of four pounds to pay the expences of the Bow-street officer; I told her that I had not got the money, but would consider of it; she asked if I had not got a friend that I could send to to give her the money; a friend of mine went to speak to her.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY, aged 22,

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson .

Reference Number: t18120408-18

329. JOHN DALY was indicted for feloniously making an assault in and upon Henry Barnett , in the King's highway, on the 20th of March , putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, a watch, value 2 l. his property .

HENRY BARNETT . I am a dealer in toys ; I live in Bell-lane, Spitalfields. On the 20th of March last two sailors were brought to my house for me to go and give security for two months advance of pay of the East India Company. The prisoner was one of the two men.

Q. Had you ever known him before - A. No. A man brought them to me, he told me he would put something into my pocket if I would do it; I was to have the crimpage of them; I gave security for nine pounds, that was the advance of their wages, for which I was to receive six pounds of Mr. Solomons, I was to put them on board the ship.

Q. Were both the men willing to go on board - A. Yes, very willing seemingly, they were in sailor's dresses. They were brought to me on Friday the 20th of March, I took them to the office to receive the two months advance, and I gave security for them, and then I took them to my house, I told them to go and buy clothes and other necessaries to go down to the ship that night, they then gave me two pounds to buy them two beds; I told them to buy them themselves. This was about about four o'clock. I then went with them as far as Fleet-market, the prisoner then told me to go into a public-house and wait there until he came back with his things; I went in and waited about an hour, he came in and said, am not I an honest man? he called for something to drink; he said he had got no clothes, he had got to go to Temple Bar: I and the other man accompanied him; this was about half past five o'clock in the evening. When he got me there he said it was only a little further; he took me to a place called the Coal-yard, St. Giles's, and then went into a public-house, and said he had got a duplicate of a watch there, and when he was in there a great many people knew him, some called him Daly and others John.

Q. They seemed to be his intimate acquaintances, did they - A. Yes, he then sat down, and had a game of cards with the other people, I was in the room and the other man with me; I said, do not sit down at cards, this is a Friday, and my sabbath is a short day, make haste and go home. This was about half after six o'clock, it was then dusk. One of the men pretended to know me, and asked me to have something to drink; I told him I would rather not; he said what makes you so down hearted; I told him I had enough to be down hearted, to be security for nine pounds for these two men, that was a handful of money these times; he then said never fear, I will go and speak to them, and hear what they say; I know they mean to go. He went and spoke to them, and came back to me again.

Q. The stranger did - A. Yes, he said, I have spoke to them, I know they mean to go. The other man said, I want to go backward; I told him he might go backward if he wanted; the stranger said, do not you know there is a back door, go along after him; I was going after him, I saw the prisoner pass me, go out of the front door; I then went after the prisoner, and caught him in the Coal-yard, at the corner of a stable yard, I got hold of him by the collar, and he laid hold of me, and pulled me down, and pulled my watch out of my pocket.

Q. Was there nobody in the coal-yard at that time

- A. No; there was a jew cleaning a horse in the stable; the prisoner got away, then the jew told me to get out of the yard, they were all Irish that lived there.

Q. I understood you to say that the prisoner got from you, and run into the stable - A. Yes, in the corner of the yard that he knocked me down, he ran into the stable.

Q. How did he get off again - A. That I do not know; about five minutes after this I saw the prisoner come down the yard in long clothes hugging a girl round the neck. I would not leave the yard; I gave a girl sixpence to fetch an officer, the officer came; the prisoner saw me, and run off to the Rose and Crown public-house in Broad-street, I ran after him, there was a serjeant of Marines there, I wanted him to keep him while I went for a constable; the publican of the house said, Daly, go away; he knew him, and the serjeant knew him, he said, Daly go away. The landlord called Daly of oneside, and put him into the street; he ran up a little court by the side of the public-house, I ran after him, he got a matter of forty of his countrymen and women, they knocked me down, kicked me, and rolled me in the mud; they used me very ill. I came out and enquired for the officer of the parish; a gentleman told me to run up the street, there was Bow-street. I went to Bow-street, and brought three officers. We went to several houses, the prisoner was found and secured.

Q. When you went into this coal-yard you had no idea of his robbing you - A. No, I thought he was an honest man.

Q. In the coal-yard upon your catching hold of him he threw you down - A. Yes, and pulled my watch out.

Q. Did you call out then - A. No, there were no houses, only a parcel of stables there.

Q. Did you ever get your watch again - A. No.

Mr. Challenor. You told my lord that you were a dealer in toys - A. Yes.

Q. You were not a crimp then - A. No.

Q. You are in the habit of giving security for seamen - A. I have done it before. It is very seldom I go to the India House, I do sometimes.

COURT. What is the name of the public-house that the landlord told him to go away - A. The Rose and Crown.

SAMUEL LACK. I am an officer of Bow-street. On the 20th of March, about seven o'clock in the evening, the prosecutor came to the office, he had been terribly rolled in the mud, he said he had been knocked down by two men, and robbed of his watch; I took him into the office to the clerk, and under the direction of the clerk I and Mantz went with him to St. Giles's. We found both the men, he pointed them out, and in their presence he exclaimed of their having robbed him. I told the prisoner what I wanted him for, he resisted my searching him, I was obliged to strike him; he was quiet after that. I searched him, and upon him I found fourteen or fifteen shillings; he denied knowing the prosecutor until he was before the magistrate.

Mr. Challenor. You have heard the prosecutor say that there was only one man that knocked him down - A. To me he said he had been robbed of his watch by two men, and that he had been advancing money for them. We took both the men into custody, the other man was discharged. The publican of the Rose and Crown has left that house, he keeps the Cock in ottenham-court-road.

THOMAS MANTZ. I am a constable of Bow-street. I know no further than what Lack has stated.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of it.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18120408-19

330. GEORGE LITTLE was indicted for feloniously making an assault upon Michael Carney , in the King's highway, on the 2d of March , putting him in fear and taking from his person and against his will, a seal, value 20 s. his property.

MICHAEL CARNEY . Q. Where do you live - A. In Old Tothill-street, Westminster. On the 2d of March I was going home from Tottenham-court-road I was coming up King-street, Westminster, about five minutes past twelve at night as nigh as I could guess, I met the prisoner and another man in the street. The prisoner said what a nice morning; I knew nothing of him before; I was alone; I answered a very nice morning. We walked till we came to the corner of Great George-street, they turned back with me nothing more was said, they walked with me to Great George-street, just at the corner of King-street which leads into Great George-street, then the prisoner said can we get nothing to drink; I said I would not have any. We walked along past the ruins to the sessions house. When we went into the ruins where the houses were pulled down; the prisoner laid hold hard of me by the breast; he clapped his hand to my coat, then he took hold of the seal of my watch chain; he pulled the watch out, and broke the swivel of the watch; I took hold of him by the neck handkerchief, and by his throat; I sung out murder.

Q. What became of the string or chain and seal - A. He took the ribbon and seal in his hand.

Q. You saw that - A. Yes; I saw the seal and ribbon in his hand. When I cried out murder the man that was along with him turned back.

Q. What he had gone on a little before - A. Yes, he gave me two blows, my hat was cut with the blows.

Q. That was the other man - A. And the prisoner struck me in the side, and in the face with his fist. Mr. Hilliard came up at the time I was crying out. After Mr. Hilliard came up he struck me twice.

Q. Who did - A. The prisoner. Mr. Hilliard called for the watch. I kept hold of the prisoner till the watch came up.

Q. What became of the prisoner's companion - A. He went away when he saw Mr. Hilliard came up.

Q. Was the prisoner secured when the watch came - A. Yes.

Q. What became of the chain of your watch or ribbon - A. I took it out of his hand when the watchman came up, I have got it here, he had it in his hand

then. I had seen it in in his hand before that.

Q. You said something when he laid of you - A. Yes, he tore my coat.

Q. And that was the time that he snatched your watch - A. Yes.

Q. Did he lay hold of your breast as you described at the time that he snatched your watch - A. Yes.

Q. You say your coat was torn by him - A. Yes, it was.

Q. So that you have no doubt that he had hold of you in that way when he snatched your watch - A. Yes.

Q. And when the swivel was broke - A. Yes, he had.

Q. Then you did not take the ribbon and seal from him until the watchman came up - A. Not till after the watchman came up.

Q. Now produce it then - A. This is the ribbon and seal, there is no impression upon it, I bought it for gold, I gave a pound for it.

Q. Then he was secured I suppose and taken to the watchhouse - A. Yes.

Mr. Barry. This you say was about twelve o'clock at night - A. Yes.

Q. When you first saw the man at the bar I think you described it to be in King-street, near to the ruins - A. Yes, in the middle of King-street.

Q. And he and you walked on a considerable way - A. I met him.

Q. Have you always said you met him - A. Yes, I am sure of that.

Q.You all three walked together towards the sessions house, you had no fear on your mind - A. No, I had no notion of it whatever; it was not very dark.

Q. Was it not the same moment that he stopped you that he snatched at your watch - A. Yes.

Q. And till that moment that he made a snatch at your watch you were under no apprehension - A. No.

Q. You received no blows untill the man had snatched the watch - A. No, he laid hold of me first.

Q. Where had you been since you left your own home - A. I had been at a friend's house, I had some supper, and some beer; I was neither drunk nor sober.

Q. Have you ever been in this court before in any shape - A. Yes, I have been.

Q. Did you ever stand at that bar - A. Yes.

Q.What was that for - A. Not for felony.

Q.Was not there a scuffle between that man and you, and a quarrel, and some blows struck by you first - A. No, I never struck him at all.

JAMES HILLIARD . I was at that time a clerk in the Registery office, I lived at that time in Johnson's-row, Westminster. I was returning to my mother in Howland-street.

Q. Did your way lead you through King-street - A. Yes, it had just gone twelve; I observed three men just entering on the ruins at the sessions house, I avoided the ruins because I saw three men go on there; at the same time I heard the cry of murder, it proceeded from the place in the ruins where I had seen the three men; I hastened to the spot, as I approached one of the three ran away. When I got up the prisoner was struggling with the prosecutor.

Q. What, the prisoner and Carney were two of the men - A. Yes. When I got up the prisoner was striking him, I saw him strike him two blows; I caught hold of the prisoner's skirt of his coat, and desired him to desist, he told me that Carney had accused him of robbing him; Carney answered that he had attempted to take his watch, and that he had got the seal, I saw the seal in the prisoner's hands, it had a ribbon to it. Seeing no other help at hand I left the prisoner and called the watchman.

Q. At that time had Carney hold of him or not - A. He had, by the neck; I called the watchman, he came, and the prisoner was secured. After the watchman came up I saw Carney take the ribbon and seal from the prisoner's hand.

Q. You say the prisoner struck him after you came up - A. Yes, he struck him two blows with his fist after I came up.

Q.What state was Carney in after you came up - A. He had been drinking, but he was not thoroughly intoxicated.

- NEALE. I am a watchman.

Q. Where were you at the time you heard the alarm - A. In King-street, close to my box I heard murder called, I hastened to the place where I heard the voice, I saw the prosecutor holding the prisoner with his right hand on the neck.

Q. Did you see Mr. Hilliard there - A. Yes, I laid hold of the prisoner by the collar, I took him to the watchhouse.

COURT, Q. to prosecutor. You are sure of the prisoner laying hold of you by the breast of your coat - A. Yes.

Q. At the same instance you have admitted that you had been drinking - A. I had been drinking.

Q. Had you senses enough to take notice of every thing that happened in the the order of time in which it happened. You are very positive of your being laid hold of by your breast, and positive that your coat was torn - A. Yes.

Mr. Barry. Do not you know that there is a forty pounds reward if this man is convicted - A. No.

Prisoner's Defence. My lord, I claim a few minutes of attention for the charge that that is laid against me. On the night in question I was returning home. I live in Westminster; I was returning home through King-street, Westminster, on my passing by the prosecutor he jostled against me, I thought it was an insult offered me, and I did push him again, he was near falling at the time, he recovered, and said, you villain you want to rob me; I said I am quite sure you will find me a person of quite a different description; he seized me that moment by the handkerchief, and by the throat, and held me in that situation by the handkerchief and throat, I called out and struck him three or four blows, a person passing by at the time told the prosecutor to let go my collar and I would go quietly to the watchhouse, and answer any charge preferred against me, and I immediately surrendered myself into the custody of the watchman without attempting to make any resistance. Now, my lord, and gentlemen

of the Jury, if I had been a person of that description there was only one watchman I never would have been taken in that way. I appeal to you whether I would have surrendered myself in the way I did; I shall rest myself satisfied with the judgment of the Court, and I am sure I shall get justice in this way. This prosecutor has acted with the greatest duplicity to me, and said he would not hurt me, he has persuaded my friends not to come forward, saying that he would not hurt me, that I was in no danger at all, he went to my father's house, told him I need not have my friends come forward, he would not hurt me.

Q. to Prosecutor. Have you used any means to keep away this man's friends - A. I have not, his father is in Court.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 26.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson .

Reference Number: t18120408-20

331. SUSANNAH EATON was indicted for that she on the 22d of February , about the hour of one in the night, being in the dwelling-house of Dorothy Graham feloniously did steal, six silver table spoons, value 3 l. four silver desert spoons, value 30 s. a pair of silver sugar tongs, value 5 s. and a great coat, value 3 l. the property of Dorothy Graham , and that she afterwards burglariously broke the said dwelling-house to get out of the same .

WILLIAM ISAAC. Q. In the month of February last did you live with Mrs. Dorothy Graham in Gower-street - A. Yes, I lived with her as footman.

Q. Now look at the prisoner at the bar, do you know her - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see the prisoner on the night of the 22d of February - A. No, on the morning of the 23d about half past one in the morning, I was out the night before, the 22d of February, and then after the family went to bed I went out afterwards.

Q.Mrs. Graham is a widow lady is not she - A. Yes.

Q. What does the family consist of - A. Me and a valet, and four maid servants.

Q. You went out with the family and returned - A. Yes, they went to bed about half past one.

Q. And then you went out - A. Yes. I met with the prisoner at the corner of Plumb-tree Street, St. Giles's, I took her home to my mistress's house, about two o'clock I took her to bed with me, and in the morning when I awoke I missed the prisoner.

Q. What time did you awake - A. About seven, it was not broad day-light, then I missed six tablespoons, and four desert spoons.

Q. You found the girl was gone - A. Yes. I went out afterwards for a constable.

Q. Before you went for a constable or in search of her, did you examine to see what you lost in your mistress's house - A. Yes, I missed six table spoons, four desert spoons, all silver, and three silver forks and a pair of silver sugar tongs, and a footman's drab great coat.

Q. You let her in with a key did you - A. Yes. When I let her in I locked the door, and left the key by the side of the Pantry door.

Q. Now you say you got up in the morning about seven o'clock - A. Yes.

Q. Were you the first of the servants that got up in the house - A. Yes, I went into the pantry after I awoke, I found the pantry door open at the bottom of the stairs, in the room where I sleep.

Q. You sleep below - A. Yes, in the pantry; then I opened the area door and looked about, and then I found some wearing apparel, belonging to the woman at the bar in my pantry, then I made it known to my fellow servant the cook; I then went to the street door. I found the street door unlocked and unbolted within.

Q. Had you seen the street door the over night - A. Yes, I locked it myself, and bolted it and put up the chain.

Q. You found the chain undone, the bolt and the lock, and the street door only upon the first lock - A. Yes. The under nurse was up, I saw her at the bottom of the kitchen stairs before I went up myself.

Q. Did you see any other part of the servants up - A. No, only the cook.

Q. When was the prisoner apprehended - A. On the Thursday following; this was on the Sunday, and I was taken upon the Sunday.

STEPHEN LAVENDAR . I am an officer of Bow-street. On the 25th of February last in consequence of some information I received. I went to a public house in White Hart-yard, Drury lane; I there saw the prisoner in company with some other women drinking, this was about three o'clock in the afternoon, I took her and the other women into an adjoining room.

Q.Had you heard of Mrs. Graham's robbery at the time - A. I had, but I did not know what I was enquiring into led to this. I asked each of them separately, if one of them had not some articles of plate about them; I then asked the prisoner if she had not got some plate about her person, she denied having any such articles, and I proceeded to search her; she then became alarmed, and on searching her I found four silver table spoons in one of her pockets, wrapped up in a towel and a handkerchief; upon my asking her from whence she got them, she said she had them from a person who was with her in a hackney coach, she did not know any thing of him.

Q. She did not say of a gentleman's servant - A. No. They all seemed so much intoxicated at the time the prisoner was taken care of till the next day when she was identified, that is all that past then. From the initial G upon the plate, it struck me then that it was the property that had been stolen from the house of Mrs. Graham, upon enquiry it so turned out. She was then committed till the next day, she was examined the next day or the day after. I produce the spoons, they have remained with me ever since, in my custody. When I first saw her at the public house she was in a bed-gown, she said she had cut her gowns up to make aprons.

Q. to Isaac. You said that you found some part of the prisoner's wearing apparel - A. Yes, I did, I rolled them up and put them into my own drawer, I gave them to Mr. Adkins the officer, Adkins gave it to Mantz, and on the Sunday morning it was given to Lavendar.

Lavendar. On the Tuesday morning the wearing apparel was given to me by Adkins.

Q. Open that bundle - A. Here is a gown, apron, and two handkerchiefs.

Isaac. These are the same that I found on the Sunday morning, I know them by the pattern, they are the same that I found in the pantry.

Q.Look at the table spoons - A. There is four table spoons, I know them by the G upon them, they are such spoons as Mrs. Graham had, I believe them to be hers; the four desert spoons, I believe them to be Mrs Graham's; three forks, they are marked in the same manner.

Prisoner's Defence. When I met this man it was nigh two o'clock in the morning, I was at a watering-house in St. Giles's, he asked me to go with him to Gower-street, Bedford-square. The watchman passed us he said all is well, I said what have you to do with the watchman, you told me you had no family; he took me down into the pantry, he gave me a shilling, it was a bad one, he poured out a glass of brandy, he said it was his mistress's; I said if he did not give me the five shillings I begged to go; he told me he had no more money, if I made any alarm he would charge the watchman with me, he gave me another glass of brandy which intoxicated me; he put something into my hand rolled up in a bundle, and told me to keep that, and in a night or two he would see me again; he told me to go up stairs, he had left the door open, to unlatch the door and go out at the street door before the watchman saw me.

COURT. Q to Isaac. Did you give her a glass of brandy - A. Yes, shrub and brandy.

Q. Did you give her any thing rolled up in a bundle - A. To the best of my knowledge, no.

Q. What is the value of these four spoons - A. The table spoons, I think the value of them near six pounds, the desert spoons about thirty shillings altogether, and the forks about fifteen shillings a-piece.

JURY. Q. After you had been drinking with this woman, were you able of understanding what you were about - A. I had been drinking, but I never should give my mistress's property, I had two watches of my own, I should have given them away.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 31.

Of stealing in the dwelling-house, not of breaking out .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18120408-21

332. CATHERINE MURRY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of March , four silk handkerchiefs, value 1 l. the property of Simeon Brown , privately in his shop .

THOMAS YOUNG . I live with Simeon Brown , in Broad-street, St. Giles's , I am shopman, he is a linen-draper . On Saturday the 28th of March, the prisoner came into the shop and asked to look at some silk handkerchiefs.

Q.Who was in the shop at the time - A. Only a boy belonging to the shop, he is not here. I took out the box of handkerchiefs and shewed her some; she told me to cut her off two, she put her basket on the counter. I saw her basket go off the counter to the ground; a few minutes after I saw her putting a piece of handkerchiefs into her apron, upon which I ordered the boy to search her basket, he opened the cloth in the basket, the boy pulled out four silk handkerchiefs.

Q. Was that before you observed her putting a piece of silk handkerchiefs into her apron - A. After.

Q. You are sure of that - A. Yes.

Q. Did not you observe her put something into the cloth - A. No, into her apron, I did not suspect that she had got any thing until I saw the handkerchiefs go into her apron.

Q. Did she buy any thing - A. No, she had not money enough without calling again. These are the four handkerchiefs she had in the basket, they are worth a pound, five shillings a piece is the cost price, they are my master's property.

SAMUEL THOMAS. I am a constable. The prisoner was brought to me at the watchouse, I searched her, and found nothing on her but a penny.

Prisoner's Defence. I throw myself upon my two knees, I never was guilt of the like before.

The prisoner called five witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY, aged 30.

Of stealing the goods, but not privately .

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson .

Reference Number: t18120408-22

333. JOHN KING was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of April , three bottles of castor oil, value 20 s. the property of John Kirk , Richard Herrin , Henry Herrin , and Brailsford Bright .

THOMAS DENSON . I am warehouseman to John Kirk , Richard Herrin , Henry Herrin , and Brailsford Bright, they are chemists and druggist , Bishop'sgate within . The prisoner was a porter employed by them, I believe he received eighteen shillings a week. On Saturday April the 4th, I mentioned my suspicion to the partners, I had an opportunity on Saturday night of detecting the prisoner. Before I went into the cellar the prisoner was in the cellar, I called the prisoner up, and sent him with a bag which was standing about the cellar into another part of the warehouse, with a view of going down into the cellar myself. I went into the cellar and concealed myself behind a cask, and presently the prisoner came into the cellar and took two or three bottles off a shelf in the cellar, I supposed them to be castor oil, it was from a place where there ought to be nothing but castor oil. When he had taken them from a shelf he wrapped them up in paper and then put them into his breeches, he left a lamp standing upon a cask, and came up stairs in the dark, and I remained on the premises until eight o'clock. When the prisoner had gone about twenty yards from the door an officer secured him, which we had procured for the purpose, he was taken to the watchhouse.

SAMUEL SHEPPARD . I am a constable I was stationed opposite to Mr. Kirk's house, a wholesale druggist, in Bishopgate-street; from the information I received I watched the prisoner, I saw him about ten yards from Mr. Kirk's house.

Q. Did you know him before - A. No. I did not. I observed that he walked very wide and stradling; I walked close behind him for about ten yards further, then I laid hold of him and asked him what he had got about him, he said nothing, what did I want with him; I told him I was an officer, and insisted

upon searching him; I put my hand between his legs, then he began to make some resistance; I told him I would knock him down if he took any thing out of his pocket; he was putting his hand into his breeches; I then took from his breeches three bottles, I asked him what it was; he said, oil; I asked him if he was not a porter in some house; he said, no, he was a jobbing porter in the street. I secured him and took him into the watchhouse; I further searched him, and only found his wages which he had received. I took him to the Compter, I there asked him where he lived, he said in Old-street-road; I then went to his lodgings in Draper's-buildings, No. 21, Old-street-road; I there saw his wife, I asked her leave to search the place; I found this quantity of soap of different descriptions, and a piece of rhubarb, and this roll of oil-skin. These are the three bottles that I took from his person, I have had them ever since.

Q. What soap is it - A. Castile soap.

RICHARD HERRIN . Q. Have you looked at these bottles - A. I have. They are castor oil.

Q. Do you keep your castor oil in the cellar which we have been speaking of - A. Yes, of that description, we keep in that cellar, I have no doubt it is our property. The soap I can say is Castile soap of a similar description to ours we use it. The rhubard we sell and the oil skin we sell.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to his character.

GUILTY , aged 34.

Transported for Seven Years

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120408-23

334. DANIEL TAYLOR was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9d of March , fourteen pounds weight of ham, value 12 s. the property of Edward Gedge .

EDWARD GEDGE . I am a provision-factor , I live at 17, Lower Thames-street . I lost this ham on the 2d of March.

Q. What is the prisoner - A. A soldier in the 3d regiment of guards, in my employ at my house as an occasional porter . In consequence of suspicion of the prisoner, I had all my property marked, and the next day I put the prisoner to work, and two men to watch the premises, which on the prisoner leaving the premises discovered this ham in his possession.

ROBERT WESLEY . I am a constable. On the 2d of March I was walking past Mr. Gedge's door, I perceived the prisoner come out of his door, he had something under his apron, I walked after him about forty yards; I asked him what he had got under his apron, he said nothing; I insisted upon seeing whether he had or not, he lifted his apron up; I perceived that he had got this ham concealed in his breeches; I took the ham from his breeches, and took him back to Mr. Gedge's warehouse, I asked Mr. Gedge if he knew any thing of this man, he said, yes, he worked for him some time. This is the ham.

Prosecutor. That is my ham.

Prisoner's Defence. The man is not here that took the ham from me, it was taken by one Thompson, it was not taken from me by Wesley; a man gave it me at the corner of Pudding-lane. It was through the instigation of Thompson that that ham was given to me.

Wesley. I saw him come out of the house, Thompson had nothing to do with him first nor last.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY .

Fined 1 s. and discharged.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120408-24

335. JOHN BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of April, a pewter pint pot, value 10 d. the property of Joseph Hoare .

JOSEPH HOARE . I am a publican ; I keep the Jack of Newbury, the corner of Bunhill-row, Chiswell-street.

JOHN FENNER . I am a constable. I stopped the prisoner upon another indictment. This pint pot was in this bag, I found this bag upon him.

ROBERT SMITH . I saw the prisoner coming out of the public-house, the Three Butts at the corner of the Old Jewry with a pot under his coat; I followed him to Basinghall-street and stopped him; the constable coming by asked me if I was a constable: I said, no, he said he would take charge of him; he did. Afterwards we found this other pot in the bag.

Prosecutor. This is my pot. The prisoner has been in the habit of coming to the house for some time. When I saw him at the Compter I said to him, I am sorry to see you here; I thought he was a carpenter. He said he stole the pot from my house.

Prisoner's Defence I met an old shipmate that day he gave me some liquor; I did not know rightly what I was doing off.

GUILTY , aged 43.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120408-25

336. JOHN BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of April , a pewter pint pot, value 10 d. the property of George Waugh .

ROBERT SMITH . I was standing at the door of the Three Butts, at the corner of the Old Jewry; I saw the prisoner come out of the house, and the handle of the pint pot I saw under his jacket; I followed him and took him into custody. This is the pint pot.

GEORGE WAUGH . I am the landlord of the Three Butts. This is my pot.

Q. Have you ever seen the prisoner in your house - A. Not till that day to my knowledge. I saw him that afternoon. I am sure this is my pot.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

GUILTY , aged 43.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120408-26

337. MARIA WITHERS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of March , a pair of silk stockings, value 2 s. a silver tea-spoon, value 1 s. 6 d. and a necklace, value 6 d. the property of William Smith .

WILLIAM SMITH . I am a leather-seller and shoe manufacturer , I live in West Smithfield .

ALICE SMITH . I am the wife of the last witness.

Q. When did you lose these things - A. On the 7th of March I lost them from up stairs in my house. The prisoner was a servant of mine, she lived with me four days, I only missed the tea-spoon. These things were brought to me by Mrs. Gardner.

MARY GARDNER. I work for Mr. Courtney in the Old Jewry. On Saturday evening the 7th of March the prisoner came to my place, and said between Mrs. Smith's house and mine, she said some person threw these things out of a window, she heard them fall on the stones; there was an S upon the spoon, it gave me uneasiness for fear it should belong to Mrs. Smith. On the Tuesday I found out it was her mistress's property.

MR. KING. I am a constable. I was sent for on Tuesday to go to Mr. Smith's house, these things laid on a table a silver spoon, a pair of stockings, and a necklace; Mrs. Gardner produced them; I was desired to take the prisoner into custody.

Q. to Mrs. Gardner. What did the prisoner bring to you besides the spoon - A. She brought a few things which she said her mistress threw out of a drawer; the stockings were there, and the necklace she gave to my little girl; I took them all to Mrs. Smith; she said some person threw the tea-spoon out of the window, she heard it jink on the stones.

Mrs. Smith. They are all mine.

Prisoner's Defence. Mrs. Smith did not behave to me like a mistress, she behaved very dirty to me indeed. I was nursing the child, the child dropped the spoon out of the door, I picked it up and put it in my pocket. I did not know that the child dropped it.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120408-27

338. JOHN HOLCOMB and JOHN PITKEATHLY were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of January , a gallon of rum, value 15 s. the property of William Chatfield and Samuel Chatfield .

JOSHUA BRAY . I am a city constable.

Q. On the 18th of January were you placed by Mr. Chatfield's cellar in Cooper's-row - A. Yes, on the 18th; I followed the man and saw him go down the cellar; I saw Holcomb go down Mr. Chatfield's cellar, between five and six in the afternoon, it was light.

Q. How long did he remain down - A. Three quarters of an hour. When he came up again he passed me, and I looked at him. I then lost my partner, I waited till he came.

Q. Did you observe his appearance - A. I observed that he was loaded, I was sure of that. I followed him, as soon as I found my partner, to a public-house, the Ship, near Mark-lane; he got into the house a little before me, I found him at the front of the bar, he was going to pull something out of his pocket, but he had not pulled it out; I could not see what it was; I came in so quick upon him that he covered it over with his coat; the landlady, I suppose her to be, was in the bar, she was standing as if to receive it; as soon as he saw me he walked across the tap-room, I said, I will see what you have got there; he hustled with me a little; I told him it was of no use; I took him into the kitchen and searched him, and found these two tin bottles upon him, they were in the inside coat pockets, the glass bottle I found upon him when I took him to the Compter. There is a gallon of rum and a quart, he said I came very honestly by it, I had it gave me. I did not steal it; well, said I, I did not say you did. When I took him to the Compter I went into Cooper's-row, and I found Pitkeathly locking up the cellar; I asked him if Mr. Chatfield was at home; I found he was not.

Q. Did you go the next day to Mr. Chatfield's - A. I did, and I examined all Mr. Chatfield's servants; I told him I was informed by the man that he had given the man a pocket full of rum; yes, he said, I did; he said it is usual to give it him once a quarter.

Mr. Alley. He left it to you to examine all the servants, and the man at the bar, he said he got it honestly - A. Yes, he did.

Q. That was the excise officer, the question here is not whether it was smuggling, but whether it is stealing. When you examined the servant he said it is customary to give it once a quarter - A. Yes.

CHARLES PHILLIPS. I am a city constable.

Q. Did you see the officer go into the cellar and come out - A. Yes, I followed the last witness to the public-house.

Q. Do you know the name of the person that keeps the public-house - A. A man of the name of Cramphorn keeps the house the Ship in Hart-street, Crutched-friars.

Q. Did you see the officer standing at the bar - A. I did, I was the first that entered the public-house after him, as soon as I got in I touched him over one of the pockets; I asked him what he had got there; I told him I must see what he had got in his pockets. We took him into the kitchen and searched him. We took these things out of his pocket.

SAMUEL CHATFIELD . I am a wine-merchant, my partner's name is William; the prisoner, William Pitkeathly , was my cellarman. In consequence of information I had placed these officers to watch the cellar. On the morning after the officers apprehended Holcomb Pitkeathly came to me and said an unpleasant affair has happened; I said, what is it; he said Holcomb is in; in the Poultry Compter I concluded; I said, he had not got there for any good perhaps; he said he did not know, he had given him a little rum; I asked him how much; he said perhaps about a bottle; I then asked him if there was any thing else; he said there might be a tin besides; I then asked him whether the tins might not hold a gallon, or somewhere thereabouts; he said, probably they might, he could not say; he then said he belived it was a customary thing; I made answer, I rather doubted it; he called it a quarterage.

Q. How long had the officer surveyed you that time - A. The last time, only three surveys.

Q. Do you know of, or sanction any such custom, as to give quarterage - A. Certainly not. It is impossible to swear to rum. I looked at the rum at the Mansion House.

Q. Did you afterwards taste that rum - A. I tried it, I did not taste it; I believe it corresponded with the other rum in the cellar; I believe it to be part of my rum. The officer surveyed the quantity of

stock in the cellar; there was a deficiency of about fifty gallons.

Q. What is the value of a gallon of rum - A. About sixteen shillings.

Mr. Alley. How long has Pitkeathly lived you - A. About fifteen years, and more likely he acted from mistake than principle; I think he might be led into it; I think he acted without thinking of the error he committed.

The prisoners left their defence to their counsel.

Holcomb called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Pitkeathly called seven witnesses, who gave him a good character.

HOLCOMB - GUILTY , aged 49.

PITKEATHLY - GUILTY , aged 47.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120408-28

338. WILLIAM LOVEGROVE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of March , a glass bottle, value 3 d. and one quart of port wine, value 4 s. the property of Thomas Almond .

THOMAS ALMOND . I am a wine merchant , I live in Suffolk-lane, Cannon-street .

Q. When did you lose this bottle of wine - A. On the 23d of March; I was moving wine from one cellar to another, the prisoner was employed in my service; after he had got to the cellar in Suffolk-lane, the cellerman went out to open the door, and left him with the wine standing at the cellar door, which were in open baskets; there were ten dozen in the baskets. While he was gone on to the cellar-door, I promiscuously came down the street, I saw the prisoner take a bottle of wine out of one of the baskets, he secreted it in his bosom, and was going to the door where he lodged, which was close by the cellar; I immediately ran down the street, took him by the collar with the bottle of wine in his bosom, and snatched it from him. My cellar man at the same time was opening the door, he saw me have the man with the bottle of wine; I put him in the warehouse and called my clerk while I went for a constable; the cellar man is here, and so is the constable. I only employed the prisoner occasionally as an assistant. This is the bottle of wine, it contains port wine, being part of that ten dozen.

Prisoner's Defence. I took the bottle of wine up with intention of drinking it only; I could not get the cork out. I did not intend to make the least property of it.

GUILTY, aged 27,

Of stealing a glass bottle .

Whipped in Jail and discharged.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120408-29

339. DANIEL BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of February , ten sacks, value 1 l. 10 s. and twenty-five hundred weight of flour, value 41 l. 10 s. the property of Joseph Agnes .

JOSEPH AGNES . I am a miller , I live at Mount, in Essex. Some time in February, 1811, I sold to Mr. Skirven in Grub-street ten sacks of flour, I sent them from my mill on the 24th of February, I considered they would be delivered on the 25th of February last year; I delivered a sealed note to my carter for him to deliver to Mr. Skirven.

RICHARD PINDER . I am carter to Mr. Agnes.

Q. On the 24th of February you had a load of flour to Mr. Skirven - A. Yes, of Grub-street; I fell into Grub-street; I saw a baker's shop, I enquired; I saw a man at the door of the baker's shop, that was the prisoner, he read the note and said it was right, he took the flour in.

Q. Now look at the prisoner, are you sure that is the man - A. Yes, that is the man. I asked him for a note to take back; he said, there is no occasion for one. I went back to my master; I carried back the empty sacks, I had no doubt it was all right. The prisoner took the the note out of my hand, and said it was right, and took the flour in.

Q. You are sure the prisoner told you it was right are you - A. Yes; I am sure he read the note and said it was all right.

Q. to Mr. Agnes. What was the note that you sent - A. I wrote not to send the money by the carter, to stop till I came to town, I would come for it; it was directed to Mr. Skirven, 95, Grub-street; it was a sealed note.

Q.Was there your place of abode on the note - A. Yes, on the inside. My name was not on the cart, it was on the sacks.

Prisoner's Defence. There are several people that I dealt with had sacks of the same mark.

Prosecutor. I never employ a factor to sell my flour, and my place of abode was on the sack.

COURT. Have you ever been paid for it - A. No. I came up about a month after the flour was delivered, and went to Mr. Skirven, and when I came there I was very much surprised that the flour was not delivered; Mr. Skirven said I should not wondor if it has gone to that swindler Brown's; I went down there, I saw the house was shut up, I rattled at the door, which caused a person to look out of the window; I went in the premises after that, and saw the sacks there.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120408-30

340. WILLIAM WARREN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of February , an urn, value 10 s. a whip, value 3 s. a book, value 5 s. three pair stockings, value 6 s. two cups and saucers, value 4 s. and a plate, value 2 s. the property of Henry Usborne .

HENRY USBORNE . I live in Baker-street, the prisoner was my servant .

Q. In consequence of his being taken up was his premises searched - A. Yes, his lodgings were, at No. 36, in Paddington-street, where his wife and family lived.

Q. Were the things found in his lodgings - A. Yes, and they turned out to be my property.

Q. How long had he lived with you - A. Nearly a year.

WILLIAM CRAIG . I am an officer of Marlborough-street office. I accompanied the prosecutor with a search warrant to the prisoner's lodgings on the 14th of February last; I found the things in a chest in a back room, the tea-urn, a book, a plate, stockings,

and cups and saucers.

Prosecutor. The whip, and all the things are mine.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence; called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY, aged 30.

Judgment respited .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120408-31

341. THOMAS FLANNAGAN was indicted for feloniously forging, on the 24th of January , a bank note for the payment of 5 l. with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England .

SECOND COUNT, for feloniously disposing and putting away a like forged bank note, with the same intention. And

TWO OTHER COUNTS for putting away and disposing of a like bank note, to defraud John Shoel .

JOSEPH MASON . I am a shopman to John Shoel , he keeps a wholesale clothes warehouse in Houndsditch.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember his coming to your master's house in January - A. Yes, he came to buy great coats on the 13th of January last; he purchased fourteen; they were various prices, amounting to twenty-four pounds two shillings with the canvas they were packed in.

Q. Where were they to be delivered - A. They were to be delivered on the Tuesday as he bought them on the Monday.

Q. They were to be delivered then the next morning - A. Yes, at the White Horse, Fetter-lane, at ten o'clock; he was going into the country.

Q. How did he offer to pay you - A. He paid me in notes.

Q. Before that did you ask him his name and address - A. Yes, on account of making the bill of parcels out.

Q. What was the name he gave you - A. Jones.

Q. Did you go to Fetter-lane the next morning - A. Yes. I met the prisoner in Fetter-lane, he told me that he had been waiting for me an hour or more; I was rather five minutes before my time; he told me he had been waiting for me an hour, he did not think the coach went so soon, it was gone he said; he took me into the White Hart public-house nearly opposite the White Horse. When I got into the public-house he pulled out his pocket book; I asked for a pen and ink to write a receipt.

Q. Did you deliver him at that time the bill of parcels - A. Yes.

Q. Did he look at it - A. Yes. The prisoner got the pen and ink, and asked me if I would have something to drink; I had something to drink; I was writing the receipt, and he was counting the notes from his pocket book.

Q. Did any thing pass then about the notes - A. The discount was agreed upon the day before; five per cent, discount was to be taken off for ready money; he asked what discount was allowed for ready money at the time that he looked the goods out; he gave the notes to me for twenty-three pounds, they appeared to be bank notes.

Q. Do you know what they consisted of - A. Two five's, five two's, and three one's, making together twenty-three pounds. I gave him the receipt, I had not two shillings to give him to make the twenty-three pound up.

COURT. What was the discount - A. One pound two shillings, therefore he wanted of me two shillings change, there was two shillings coming from me to him; he said he would give me the two shillings.

Q. Then you took the notes - A. Yes.

Q. What did you do with the notes - A. I took them to the Bank in about an hour.

Q. Were they out of your possession before you took them to the Bank - A. One note, but not out of my sight. I think it was a two; I took them to the Bank and delivered them to one of the clerks.

Q. Were these notes that you received of the prisoner the notes that you afterwards gave to the bank-clerk - A. The exact notes.

Q. Why did you take them to the Bank - A. Because I thought they were not good ones.

Q. Should you know the person to whom you delivered them to at the Bank if you were to see him - A. Yes, I delivered them to Mr. Jackson, he was the person I delivered them to, and then they were detained.

COURT. Had the prisoner left you before it occured to you that they were bad notes - A. I left him in the house, it was the circumstance of his giving me the two shillings, that made me suspect.

Mr. Garrow. At what place did you first examine them - A. In Monmouth-street, at one Thorpe's, he is in the clothes line, I had business to do there before I went home. When I went in I immediately pulled out the notes and looked at them.

Q. Are you sure that you did not give them to him or that you only looked at them yourself - A. Yes, I laid them down on the counter with my hand upon the remainder.

Q. What do you mean by the remainder - A. I looked at one of the notes, I cannot say whether it was a two pound exactly I clapped my hand upon the remainder.

Q. Upon looking over them what occurred to you - A. They looked very faint and the water marks more distinct than I thought they did in general, the water marks stronger, then I took them to the Bank immediately.

Q. Are you sure they did not pass from your hands into the hands of any body else for the purpose of inspection before you took them to the Bank. -

Q. Did you ask this man, Thorpe - A. I asked him if he could tell, only the two pound note I put into his hands, the note I shewed him he particularly suspected, he said he should have taken it.

Q. And upon inspection you suspected and carried the whole mess of them to the Bank - A. Yes.

JOHN SHOEL . You are a salesman in Houndsditch - A. Yes.

Q. The last witness is your shopman - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember any person coming to your shop on the 13th of January last to buy any great coats - A. Yes, that person was the prisoner at the

bar, I am sure of his person.

Q. Were those the great coats that were sent out by Mason - They were; I agreed with him to allow a discount.

MR. BROOKES. I am a shopman to Mr. Shoel.

Q. You have heard the account given by Mason - A. Yes, his account is correct, and the coats were afterwards sent out by him.

Q. Who was the person that Mr. Shoel, and you agreed with - A. The prisoner, I am quite certain.

MR. JACKSON. Q. You are one of the inspectors of bank notes of the Bank of England - A. I am.

Q. Did you, on the 14th of January, receive from the witness Mason, certain papers purporting to be bank-notes - A. I did. I immediately marked them all before I parted with them out of my own possession, I think it was about eleven o'clock.

Q. Look at these, and tell me whether these are the papers - A. They are the same notes; two of five pounds each, five of two pound each, and three of one pound each.

Q. You have examined all these carefully have not you - A. I have.

Q. Are any one of them genuine bank-notes - A. Not one.

Q. Are they printed from bank plates - A. No, nor on bank paper.

Q. Are any of the signatures genuine signatures - A. Not one of them, in all respects they are all forged.

COURT. Do they appear to you, all the two's, do they appear to be from one plate - A. They do, and the five's and the one's the same.

Q. There is no one circumstance which appears genuine - A. No. They do not resemble our notes at all.

Mr. Garrow. Q. You do not mean to say that they have not the general resemblance of a bank note - A.Not one of them are genuine bank notes.

Q. Do the Bank use paper expressly made for their own use - A. Yes.

Q. And use plates for their own use, neither is this on bank paper, nor the signature, nor the manuscript part by any body in their office, nor from their plates - A. No.

(The notes read.)

SAMUEL CLARK . Q. You keep a wine vaults, in Dean-street, Soho - A. I do.

Q. Do you remember on Christmas Eve, the 24th of December, seeing the prisoner at the bar - A. I do, about eight o'clock in the evening, he came for two quarts of the best rum, he paid me in a ten pound note, it had the appearance of a very good bank note, I asked him where he came from, he told me from Mr. Phillips's, in Chapel-street, No. 5; I wrote Phillips, No. 5, Chaple-street, upon the note; I know Mr. Phillips very well.

Q. Shall you know the note if I show it to you - A. Yes, I shall.

Q. Take the note that I produce to you, and tell me whether that is the note - A. That is the note, I know it by my hand writing being writ upon it at the time; 5, Chapel-street, 24th of the twelfth month.

COURT. Did you know the prisoner before - A. Not to my knowledge, I never saw him before.

Q. Have you any reason of knowing whether he did or did not come from Mr. Phillips - A. No further than this; he said he was an acquaintance of Mr. Phillips, and Mr. Phillips would be obliged to me to change a ten pound note.

Q. How came you afterwards to know it was not a good note - A. I paid it to Mr. Whitbread's clerk, for porter, and it was returned to me by the banker's clerk; that is all the knowledge I have of it's being a forged note.

FRANCES GRIFFITHS . Q. Are you bar maid to Mr. Boys - A. Yes, he keeps a public house, in Broad-street, Bloomsbury, in the neighbourhood of St. Giles's.

Q. Do you remember in the middle of January any person coming to your house and changing a two pound note - A. Yes, the prisoner at the bar, I cannot fix the day.

Q. Did he deliver the two pound note to you into your hand - A. Yes. I asked him for his address, he said his name was Smith, No. 4, Lascelles-court. I handed over the note to Mrs. Boys my mistress directly, and stated the address of the prisoner to her, I saw her write that address upon the note, she wrote it directly, before the prisoner quitted the house.

MR. BOYS. Q. Is the last young woman your bar maid - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember, in the month of January last, any person coming and buying gin and paying a two pound note - A. Yes, I cannot recollect the day of the month, it was in January.

Q. Did the young woman hand over the note to you in the presence of the customer - A. Yes, immediately, and mentioned the address that she gave me.

Q. Is that your hand writing - A. Yes, Mr. Smith, No. 4, Lascelles-court.

Q. Look at the prisoner and tell me whether you recollect his person - A. I could not recollect his person, I was attending other customers.

MR. GLOVER. Q. I believe you are an inspector of bank notes in the Bank of England - A. I am.

Q. You have been long employed and have had much experience - A. I have.

Q. Look at these bank notes, the two pound, is there any one circumstance respecting this that is genuine - A. There is not, it is a forgery in all respects, and the ten pound note is a forgery in all respects.

Q. Now, sir, I shew you another two pound note, look at that, and see whether in your judgment that is the same in every respect as the other two pound note - A. They appear to be struck from the same plate, and these six appear to me that they are all signed by the same person in different names, it appears to be the same hand writing, three are signed Wade, and three I. Booth; both Wade and Booth I believe to be signed by the same person.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 29.

London jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18120408-32

342. NEIL DALEY was indicted for that he, on the 2d of October in the 51st year of his Majesty's

reign , feloniously did utter and publish as true, a certain forged will and testament, purporting to be the last will and testament of one Charles Rhodes , with intention to defraud Willam Mellish , esq. he knowing the same to be forged and counterfeited .

SECOND COUNT, for like offence, stating his intention to be to defraud Eleanor Isaacs , widow , and Maria Isaacs , spinster .

THIRD COUNT, in like manner to defraud the next of kin of Charles Isaacs , otherwise Charles Rhodes.

JOHN MATHEWS . Q. What are you - A. I am a clerk to Mr. Fox, Proctor in Doctor's-Commons, and deputy register in the registry court Doctors-Commons.

Q. Have you the custody of wills by virtue of your situation to take care of, have you got any will - A. Yes, I have, I bring it from the registry of that office.

Q. Does it appear upon that will that a probat has been obtained - A. It does.

Q. Does it appear who the executor of that will was - A. Neil Daley .

Q. Does it appear by that instrument that Neil Daley was sworn in as executor - A. It does, on the 2d of October last he was sworn before Dr. Parsons, in a surrogate of that court.

Q. The act of swearing appears by the surrogate's hand-writing, is that Dr. Parsons's hand-writing - A. It is.

Q. Have you seen Dr. Parsons write frequently - A. I have, I am well acquainted with Dr. Parsons's hand-writing.

Q. And is Dr. Parsons the person before whom such an oath would be taken, he having authority - A. Certainly, sir, no doubt of it.

Mr. Alley. I take it for granted you do not know the person by whom it was proved - A. No.

JOHN WILLIAMS . Q. You are an admitted witness by the justice, are not you - A. I am.

Q. I caution you, before I ask you any qestions, mind, give us the whole truth and nothing but the truth - A. No.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar - A. Yes.

Q. What is his name - A. Neil Daley .

Q. What is he - A. A Publican.

Q. What house did he keep - A. The Old Queen Elizabeth, Lower Water Gate, Deptford.

Q. Do you know a person of the name of Dempsey - A. Yes, Christopher Dempsey , but I did not know his name was Christopher before I heard it at the magistrate's.

COURT. You knew him by the name of Dempsey before, did not you - A. Yes.

Mr. Knapp. Do you remember meeting Dempsey any time before, and when was that - A. I met him at Daley's house, it was near about two months before I was apprehended, in or about that time.

Q. What did you do there - A. Daley called me to the bar, and asked me if I would be a witness to a will.

COURT. Was that the beginning of it - A. Yes, as far as I can recollect it was.

Mr. Knapp. He asked you whether you would be a witness to a will - A. Yes, he said it was only a matter of form; Dempsey was present, and he said no harm would come of me, he said she was not his mother.

Q. Who was not his mother - A. They said she was not his mother, both Daley and Dempsey said some woman or other, one Mrs. Rhodes; I did not know the woman; they said she would never come forward.

COURT. Daley and Dempsey said some woman whom they were talking of was not the mother and would not come forward, was that it - A. Yes. They took me into a back room, Dempsey and Daley both went into the room, Daley came out and left Dempsey and me there together; Dempsey pulled a paper out of his pocket, and asked me to fill it up; I said I never filled up one in my life, and I did not know how to go about it, he said he would dictate it for me, then I began according to what he expressed to me, and I put down what he said word for word what he told me.

Q. Now what sort of a paper was this that you were to fill up according to his dictation - A. It appeared to me to be a printed form of a will.

Q. Did you write as he dictated - A. Yes.

Mr. Knapp. Just take that will into your hand, look at that will, and tell me whether that is the will that you filled up there - A. Yes, I am sure of it, I wrote according to his dictation; I filled up the different blanks what he dictated to me.

Q. Did you write the signatures to it - A. I put my name as a witness; Dempsey put the mark Charles Rhodes ; I wrote by Dempsey's direction.

Q. You say that is your own name as a witness you put - A. Yes.

Q. There is another name as a witness, who wrote that - A. Dempsey asked me to put another name, any name, so I asked him what name to put down, he mentioned the name Cranfield, so I put down Samuel Cranfield.

Q. Then you wrote it for Cranfield - A. Yes, I did.

Q. That is your writing likewise - A. It is.

Q. What did you do with the will then after you had wrote it and completely fitted it up - A. Dempsey gave it into the hands of Neil Daley ; Daley had gone out of the room a bit, he had been in the room backwards and forwards while I was writing.

Q. You saw Dempsy take the will and give it into Neil Daley 's hands, did not you - A. Yes.

COURT. Where was that - A. In the same back-room.

Q. Did you know any person of the name of Charles Rhodes - A. No, I never did, nor saw him to my knowledge.

Q. Where you ever paid any thing for what you had done - A. Not a single farthing.

Q. I suppose you expected to be paid something - A. They did propose to pay me something, but I never got it, nor asked for it, they both proposed it. Daley said three guineas, and Dempsey said he would make it five guineas.

Q. You have known Daley since I suppose, did you use Daley's house after that time - A. Yes. It was in his house I was taken.

Q. Did you hear Dempsey say, in the presence of the prisoner at the bar, what became of Charles

Rhodes - A. No, I cannot recollect.

Mr. Knapp. Do you remember some time after that being sent by Daley to Mr. Clarkson's of Doctor's Commons - A. Yes.

Q. How long was that after this - A. I cannot say.

Q. Was it a week or two - A. It might be; I cannot say; it might be a fortnight or less.

Q. Did you go there - A. Yes.

Q. Did you take any thing with you there - A. I took a paper at that time it was folded up; I did not open it all the time.

Q. Who gave you that paper you took - A. Daley.

Q. Did you learn from Daley what it was you were taking - A. I understood that it was the will.

Q. Did he tell you what you were to do with it - A. He told me to give it to Mr. Nicolls.

Q. He said Mr. Nicolls - A. Yes.

Q. Who did you understand Nicolls was - A. He did not tell me who he was.

Q. Had you been sent by Daley previous to this to any public-house at Doctor's Commons - A. I was sent and ordered to meet Dempsey before I went with the will; it might be four or five days, or it might be a week or less.

Q. It was after you had written the will - A. Yes, I was sent to a public-house near Doctor's Commons to meet Dempsey.

Q. Did you see Dempsey - A. Yes.

Q. Was that public-house the public-house where Dempsey afterwards was apprehended - A. I do not know where he was apprehended; that public-house was up by St. Paul's near to Doctor's Commons.

Mr. Alley. Is this your first appearance as a witness in court - A. Yes.

Q. Or upon any case of any kind, or any charge, or any thing else, no matter how often you might have deserved it, but this is the first time you have been here - A. Yes, or any other court.

Q. What way of life are you in - A. I used to work on board a ship when I can get it.

Q. You have been speaking of a transaction transacted not in the country of Middlesex, but in the county of Kent - A. Yes.

Q. This forgery, if it is a forgery, was a forging at Deptford - A. Yes.

Q. You have said Daley, the man at the bar, called you out of the public-room into the private-room - A. Yes, he called me to the bar.

Q. Do you mean to persist in that account now - A. I do.

Q. Your memory has been hurt by being in prison, do you mean to say that it was the prisoner called you out - A. He called me from the tap-room to the bar; Daley was the first man that called me.

Q. How often were you examined at the Thames police upon the subject of forgery - A. I was down five or six times.

Q. Often enough to correct yourself if you at first said what was wrong - A. I do not recollect I heard a word wrong.

Q. Do not you imagine that I think you would tell a story. I ask you where not you examined five or six times - A. I was not examined there at no examinations.

Q. Nor did you from first to last before the magistrate say that Dempsey was the person that addressed you and asked you to do the job for him - A. No. Daley was the first that applied and called me to the bar; they both spoke to me at the bar.

Q. Now you come to both - A. I spoke of it before.

Q. Then I am to take it from you now that they both called you to the bar - A. Daley spoke to me first, and then they both asked me about this will.

Q. Did not you say at the magistrate's that Dempsey was the man that called you - A. I recollect that I said it was Daley that called me to the bar at the first examination, the second examination it was mentioned Dempsey called me to the bar, but Daley was the man that called me to the bar.

Q. Then I am to understand you, am I, the magistrate first took down Dempsey called you and you afterwards said it was not right - A. I told him in the office.

Q. Then whether you were accurate or the clerk depends upon you - A. I was correct in what I said, Neil Daley was the man I said first.

Q. How many men were in the tap-room or in the private room where you executed the will - A. There was nobody in the room but Dempsey and me, Daley came backwards and forwards, except any children came in I cannot say.

Q. You say you had three guineas or five guineas promised you but you never had any thing - A. One proposed three guineas, and the other five, but I never got a farthing.

Q. I see the will was dated in May 1809 - A. Yes, three years ago.

Q. You say you did not know any thing of the supposed testator Rhodes - A. No, I did not at the same time; I was drawn into it.

Q. Have you known any thing of him since - A. I have heard of him.

Q. I take it for granted you were not much pleased that these men did not keep their promise of giving you the three guineas or the five guineas - A. I never asked for it, nor never required it; I never looked for it at all.

Q. Then you were quite satisfied in your mind about it - A. I was very uneasy in my mind when I heard about it.

Q. Are you a catholic or a protestant - A. A protestant.

Q. Though you do not confess to the priest you went and confessed to the magistrate what you had done to take the burthen off your mind - A. After I was taken I did.

Q. Then as soon as you were taken it was then your mind began to be uneasy and not before - A. I was uneasy before.

Q. So I should have thought then as you were uneasy before I take it for granted the first day you were in custody you told the magistrate - A. I was not examined that night; I was locked up that night, it was the next day.

Q. But the officer took you, and you had an opportunity of telling him, but you did not - A. No, not till I was before the magistrate.

Q. Now I ask you, so far from telling it did not

you deny the fact untill it was after you were promised to be a witness, and for to screen yourself you told it - A. I said it was a fair will to be sure at first, I did untill I was admitted an evidence.

Q. Why as your mind was uneasy did not you think you should go out of your senses you first said it was a fair will, after that, when they promised to admit you a King's evidence then you said it was a false will - A. Then I told the truth.

Q. What is become of poor Dempsey, your friend - A. He was never no friend of mine; I cannot tell what is become of him now.

Q. When you made this declaration it was in November last was it not - A. In November.

Q. And you suffered all that uneasiness of mind for going on of three years. -

JAMES NICOLLS . Q. I believe you are clerk to Mr. Clarkson, the proctor, Doctors Commons - A. Yes.

Q. I believe you principally conduct his business - A. In part.

Q. Do you know the prisoner, Neil Daley - A. I do.

Q. How long have you known him - A. Some years.

Q. Did he make any application to you in the autumn of last year respecting a seaman of the name of Rhodes - A. He first applied to me at the latter end of August last to enter a caveat respecting the goods of Charles Rhodes , lately belonging to the ship Perseverance.

Q. What was the object of that caveat - A. I do not recollect he mentioned it then, at a further time I understood the man was indebted to him.

Q. In what character then did he claim to enter the caveat - A. I do not know; he entered the caveat.

Q. Did he tell you upon what ground - A. It was his wish to enter a caveat; at a future time it was mentioned by him that Rhodes was indebted to him.

Q. Did he tell you for what - A. I do not recollect nor the amount. The object was I suppose to prevent any other person having letters of administration, to prevent any other person proving a will, or taking out letters of administration.

Q. Do you recollect how many interviews you had with him before any relations of Rhodes made any application to you - A. Only one, I believe, or two, I cannot be sure, I think it was but one.

Q. On what day did you enter the caveat - A. I entered the caveat on the 17th or 20th day of August.

Q. Now down to the time of your entering a caveat or to the time of the deceased's relations coming to you had he mentioned to you that he had any will of Rhodes's - A. No, not previous to the applications of Rhodes's friends.

Q. How long after you had entered the caveat was it that the first application was made to you by some of the relations to Rhodes - A. Some few days.

Q. In consequence of their application did you send to Daley - A. Yes.

Q. Did he come to you - A. Yes, he did; I told him that the person who said she was Rhodes's mother had applied respecting the caveat that he had entered; to which he answered and said it was very wrong, there was no lawful mother living.

Q. Did you ask him the particulars of the debt which was due from Rhodes - A. No, he said there was no lawful mother living, that he doubted; he had a will, that he would have his papers searched when he went home, and if he had one he would send it.

Q. Now had he ever till that moment mentioned that he had any will, or talked of any will - A. Never till that time.

Q. How soon afterwards was the will brought to you - A. In the course of two or three days to the best of my recollection.

Mr. Gurney to Williams. Stand forward.

Q. to Nicolls. Was that the man by whom the will was brought - A. I cannot positively say, I believe it might be the man, but I am not positive.

Q. I ask you do you believe it was or was not - A. I believe it might be, but I am not sure; it might be another man somewhat like him, I cannot say.

Q. I ask you again, do you believe or not believe that he is the man, you know what you believe - A. I believe it might be, and I believe it might not.

Q. I shall not be put off in that way, you have seen him before now. Do you believe, or do you not believe that he was the man - A. He might be the man.

Q. Do not talk of might - A. It might be the man. I cannot speak positively.

Q. I did not ask you to speak positively, I ask you what you believe - A. I cannot say to further than what I have said.

Q. Do you believe or not believe that he is the man - A. I am not certain.

Q. I did not ask you whether you was certain, I ask you what you believe, look again - A. I believe it was the man, but I cannot speak positively to it.

Q. After the will was brought to you how long did it remain in your office before you proved it - A. It might be a month; I think it was the 7th of October the will was proved.

Q. Have you got your pocket-book here - A. No.

Q. You were told to bring it with you, I told you at the office. You think it remained about a month with you - A. Yes.

Q. After you had it in your possession did Rhodes' relations apply to you again - A. Yes, they called and looked at the will.

Q. While that will was laying in your office how many times did Daley call upon you - A. Two or three times.

Q. I take it for granted you told him what the relations of Rhodes said about the will - A. I told him they had inspected the will, and said they would call again.

Q. Did you tell him what they said respecting the genuineness of the will - A. I told him they had looked at it and said they had some doubt it, that they would call again in a few days.

Q. How many times did you tell Daley that they had called about it - A. I do not know that I told him more than once.

Q. You told me that it was proved on or about the 7th of October - A. Yes.

Q. How many offices are there in Doctors Commons in which wills can be proved describe them - A. There are three.

Q. What is the principal office - A. The Prerogative office, that is the principal; two other offices belonging to the Bishop of London, one called the Consistory; and the Commissary.

Q. Which is the principal - A. I believe there is done at the Consistory.

Q. Did you prove this in the Prerogative office - A. I did not.

Q. Why not - A. We usually prove wills at the Bishop of London's office, or at the Commissary or the Consistory.

Q. Before you proved this in the Commissary did you know that you could not prove it at the Prerogative office - A. I did not.

Q. Did you search the Consistory and find a caveat there - A. There was a caveat there I was told by the officer, entered by Townly.

Q. In that office there was a caveat entered by your neighbour - A. Entered by him.

Q. And then without going to Townly you went and proved it at the Commissary office - A. Yes.

Q. Did the prisoner at the bar come with you and go to that office to prove it - A. No, he did not. I accompanied him before the surrogate.

Q. Where was he sworn before the surrogate - A. At his chambers in Doctors Commons.

Q. Look at that, sir, did you see him sworn to that will - A. I did, before Dr. Parsons.

Q. Did you mention to Daley before he was sworn to that, that the relations had entered a caveat at one of the offices - A. I did not.

COURT. Nor of course to Dr. Parsons - A. No.

Mr. Gurney. What became of the prisoner after he was sworn - A. He went away.

Q. What, home, and you went to the office - A. Yes.

Q. How soon did you obtain the probat - A. Four days after he was sworn.

Q. Did the prisoner get it on that day or soon after you had obtained the probat - A. On the day that the money was obtained, on the 8th.

Q. On the 2d of October he was sworn - A. Yes, on the 7th the probat was obtained, and on the 8th the prisoner came to town, he met me by appointment in Gracechurch-street.

Q. By his appointment you having the probat in your pocket - A. I had; I accompanied him with it to Mr. Moses's accompting-house for the purpose of receiving the money due upon the will. Moses is the ship agent for the ship Perseverance.

COURT. You mean the money due to Rhodes - A. Yes, the wages to Rhodes.

Q. When you got there did you produce the probat - A. At Mr. Moses's in his presence, I did; Mr. Moses paid me one hundred and sixteen pounds and a fraction, he paid me in a check, I believe upon his banker.

Q. Did you and the prisoner leave Mr. Moses - A. We did.

Q. Where did you leave the prisoner - A. At the King's Arms in Leadenhall-street. I went to Robarts and Curtis's banking-house, Lombard-street, with the check; the prisoner requested me to go and get cash for him; I received the money for him at Robarts's, and went back to the prisoner.

Q. Did you give him the money - A. I did.

Q. What was your regular charge for the business that you had done - A.Five pounds for that.

Q. Did you make out a bill - A. I did not. I put the figures down on a bit of paper.

Q. You made your charge about five pounds - A. Five pounds; one pound three shillings he owed me before.

Q. Then the debt was six pounds three shillings - A. And ten shillings and sixpence I charged for my trouble going to Mr. Moses, that makes six pounds thirteen shillings and sixpence.

Q. How much did he pay you - A. Ten pounds. The probat was left with Mr. Moses.

Mr. Barry. You are the clerk of Mr. Clarkson - A. Yes.

Q. You are now - A. Yes.

Q. How long have you know the prisoner - A. Some years.

Q. When he first spoke to you respecting the deceased I think it was in last August, and at the time the probat was taken up I think it was in last August. Did not he tell you at the time the deceased was indebted to him - A. I cannot say whether it was at the time, or the time following.

Q. He desired you to enter a caveat against any will that might be attempted to be proved - A. He did.

Q. Did you enter a caveat - A. I did, in the three courts; the Prerogative, and in the Bishop of London's two courts, the Consistory and the Commissary.

Q. Now I ask you upon your oath, it is not very usual in Proctors in your situation in the Commons to enter caveats without desiring to know the reason why - A. It is a case sometimes, not always, it happens now and then.

Q. You have stated to his lordship that when he first made an application to you to enter a caveat for him he did not mention any thing to you of a will - A. I have so stated.

Q. Is it a necessary consequence that a man must have a will in his possession when he enters a caveat - A. No.

Q. Then he might have had a will or might not have had a will for ought you could tell - A. I did not know.

Q. You have stated to his lordship also notwithstanding you were acquainted with the prisoner Daley the objection made by the relatives of the deceased to the will did you at the time make him acquainted with their objection. Did the prisoner understand from you, or others, the consequence of persisting in it if it was forged - A. I cannot state for that whether I had or no told him the consequence.

Q. Now, sir, you have stated that the will was a month in the office before a probat was taken out - A. Somewhere thereabouts that was in Mr. Clarkson's office.

Q. While it was there might not any one who controverted the will have an opportunity of perusing it - A. Yes, if they knew where the will was and applied.

Q. And pending that time some of the relatives did call - A. They did.

Q. Now, sir, I think you said when it was mentioned in Mr. Clarkson's office, something of a doubt was expressed by the relatives of the deceased; Now, sir, is it not a common thing to doubt the genuiness of some of the best of wills that pass through your office.

COURT. That only goes to the general doubting.

Mr. Barry. Q. Now, sir, you have stated that you took out a probat - A. Yes.

Q. Was the prisoner Daley ever in possession of that probat - A. Never.

Q. And you got the money at the banker's - A. I did.

COURT. Q. to Williams. Can you fix the time when what you have related passed at Daley's house, all that we got from you before that it was about a fortnight before you were apprehended; can you fix near about when that time was - A. About two months before I was apprehended; I was apprehended on the 7th of November, on or about two months before that.

Q. What reason have you for fixing the transaction to be about two months before your apprehension - A. I cannot be positive to the time; I am partly sure it must be before the 1st of October, I was employed to go down to a ship at Gravesend, and on that day to bring her up, and I was nineteen days on board of her. On the 1st of October I went down, it was before I went down to that ship, it was before the 1st of October.

Q. Can you say how long before the first of October - A. I cannot say, when I was examined I could not tell the time, I said on or about two months before I was apprehended, I cannot say how long it was.

(the Will read.)

"I Charles Rhodes , mariner, in the county of Kent, in the parish of St. Vickerey's, being in bodily health of sound memory, and considering the perils and dangers of the seas, and other uncertainties of this transitory life, do provide and declare this to be my last Will and Testament. First, I recommend my soul to God that gave it, and my body I give to the earth, or sea, as shall please God to order it: And my worldly estate I dispose thereof as follows. All that remains, the sums of monies, lands, goods, estates, whatever as shall be in any wise owing to me at the time of my decease, I devise the same to my worthy friend, Neil Daley , house-keeper, Lower Watergate, Deptford, in the county of Kent. And I acknowledge this to be my last Will and Testament, revoking all others; and this to stand as my last Will and testament; where unto I have set my hand and seal, the 30th of May, 1809, in the forty ninth year of the reign of his Majesty King George.

Charles Rhodes , his mark, (X).

"Signed, sealed, and declared, in the presence of John Williams ."

Mr. Gurney. Q. Nicolls. He was sworn before Dr. Parsons, on the 2d of October - A. Yes.

Q. Was he sworn a second time - A.No.

Q. Is that your hand-writing - A. No, not this bottom, the upper part.

COURT. Who wrote the name of Clarkson there - A. It is only the surname.

Q. Is that your writing - A.It is.

Q. The description of the deceased who died, when did you write that - A. From the instructions Daley gave me.

(read.)

"October, 1811. Neil Daley sole executor. - This Will was duly sworn, and that the goods and chattels of the deceased do not amount to the value of two hundred pounds; - before me, A. Parsons. The deceased, Charles Rhodes , was lately belonging to the merchant's ship Perseverance, in the South Sea fishery, and died this year."

COURT. Q. to Nicolls. That is in the year 1811. - A. Yes.

Mr. Gurney. The probat is dated the 7th, is it - A. Yes.

MOSES MOSES . Q. Are you clerk to Mr. Abraham Lyon Moses. - A. Yes.

Q. Where does he reside - A. No. 10, John-street, Minories.

Q. Was he agent to the owners of the Perseverance, a South Sea Whaler - A. Yes.

Q. Who was the owner of the Perseverance - A. Mr. William Mellish.

Q. Look and tell me whether you know the person of the prisoner Daley - A. I saw him once at Mr. Moses's.

Q. Was that once the 8th of October - A. I cannot say, it was the day the check was paid, I was present.

Q. Take the check out of your pocket-book - A. It was the 8th of October.

Q. The prisoner came to your master's accompting house that day - A. Yes, and Nicolls with him. I saw Mr. Moses give a check to Daley or Nicolls, they were both present, there was nobody else there that he could give it to but Daley or Nicolls.

Q. Was the probat left with it - A. Yes, I have the probat here.

Q. Did the prisoner give any receipt for it - A. Yes, this is the receipt, it is witnessed by Nicolls, I saw the prisoner make his mark.

Q. to Nicolls. First look at that receipt, I observe you are a witness to it - A. Yes, I saw Daley make his mark.

Q. Now look at that probat, is that the probat that you took there, upon which afterwards the check was given and the receipt - A. The very same.

(the receipt read, and the probat read.)

Mr. Alley. Q. Moses Moses , whose agent are you - A. The agent of the owner.

Q. Have you got the ship's register here - A. I have not, we made up our accompts to Mr. Mellish.

Q. You acted as his agents, you receive a remuneration for taking care of his concerns - A. I cannot say what my master does.

Mr. Gurney. Q. Do you know any thing about whether Mr. Mellish paid money into Mr. Moses's hands - A. I know nothing about it, Mr. Moses draws upon his own bankers.

PHILIP CAREY . Q. I believe you are a clerk in the Custom-house - A. I am.

Q. Have you the log book of the Perseverance deposited in the office - A. I have, this is it, it is

deposited in the office principally from which I bring it, in the office of clerks of the ship entries, inward.

Q. to Moses Moses . Have you the ship's register here - A. I have.

Q. Tell me, from the ship's articles, on what day Rhodes entered on board the ship - A. On May 20, 1809, in London.

Mr. Alley. You did not see the articles executed - A. I did not.

Mr. Gurney. Q. to Moses Moses . The money paid upon the probat was one hundred and sixteen pounds and a fraction - A. It was.

Q. For what time was the service of Rhodes directed for that sum for to be paid - A. There was a share of the whole.

COURT. He is entitled to such portion of the voyage whether he lives or dies - A. Yes.

ADAM KINSLEY . Q. I believe you were the cooper of the Perseverance - A. I was.

Q. Do you remember a man on board who went by the name of Rhodes - A. Perfectly well.

Q. When did you sail from England - A. The 30th of May, we sailed from Gravesend 1809.

Q. Who had entered on board first, you or he - A. I had.

Q. Do you remember how long before you sailed from Gravesend that he came - A. I cannot say, he came on board at Deptford.

Q. Where did you go to - A. The South Seas.

Q. Rhodes was unfortunately drowned in the course of the voyage - A. Yes, on the 15th of February, 1811. We came back to England in August last, and he died in February, before we came to England, at Tombast, on the coast of Peru.

Q. Is it a common thing for sailors to be on board by another name than their own - A. A very frequent thing.

Q. Did you know from him what his real name was - A. I knew his real name from his acquaintances, his name was Charles Isaacs .

Q. Did you learn from him where his mother lived - A. No, his mother lived in London, I do not know where.

Q. Do you remember, shortly before he died, hearing him speak of his mother - A. Yes, I heard him speak what he would do when he came home with his money; that he would have a cruize, or a frolic, that his mother should have the rest; he spoke of her in terms of great affection.

Q. Did you learn from him whether he had or had not made a will - A. I never heard him mention it.

COURT. Was there any other man of the name of Rhodes on board - A. No, he that was drowned was the only one.

Q. How did you learn that his name was Isaacs - A. By people that knew him, that had been with him.

JAMES WALL . Q. I believe you are a lighterman at Deptford - A. I am.

Q. Did you know the man that entered on board the Perseverance by the name of Rhodes - A. I did. I saw him on board the Perseverance, his real name was Charles Isaacs ; I knew his mother, I have heard his mother call him Charles Isaacs , I knew him as her son, I knew both him and her.

Q. I believe you had gone a voyage with him - A. I had been in a ship with him, in one vessel.

Q. Were you much in his company shortly before he sailed on board the Perseverance - A. No, I saw him on board the Royal Escape, about a month before he went on board the Perseverance.

Q. Do you remember going a-shore with him - A. Yes, from His Majesty's yard, Deptford, there we went on shore.

Q. When he went on shore what house did he use - A. He used generally to walk to the Queen's-head at Greenwich.

Q. Upon going with him daily as you did, did you ever know him go to a public house kept by a man of the name of Neil Daley . - A. Never.

Q. From the intimacy that you had with him, do you think it was possible that he could contract a debt with a man of the name of Neil Daley without your being acquainted with it - A. Daley did not keep a public house at that time.

Q. Did you know Daley at that time - A. Yes, he did not at that time keep a public-house.

Q. Now you say you visited him and his mother - A. I did.

Q. Upon what terms did he and his mother appear to be - A. Very agreeable, and very loving indeed.

Q. Did he appear to regard her as a son should do - A. Very much so indeed.

Mr. Alley. Did you know his father in his lifetime - A. No.

Q. You say that Daley when this man and you came on shore did not keep a public-house - A. No.

Q. He kept a house for the entertainment of sailors did not he - A. Something of that sort.

Q. You have been asked a question, whether he could be indebted to him or not, which you cannot answer. Do you know whether he lodged with him at any time - A. I cannot say whether he did or not

Q. Do you know how long his ship laid off Deptford - A. I cannot say to a week or a fortnight, I never saw him in Daley's company or at his house.

COURT. You said something about an uncle of this Rhodes that served his time with your father - A. Yes, his name was Rhodes.

Q. How do you know that this person of the name of Rhodes that did serve his time to your father, was an uncle of that man - A. By his nephew being a shipmate of mine, I have seen him come to my father's house, and his uncle, he called him his uncle.

GEORGE PENSILE . Q. Did you search the register, and did you extract the register from the registry - A. Yes, it is a true copy, I examined it backwards and forwards, the parish clerk gave it me.

(The copy of the register read, of the marriage of Charles Isaacs and Eleanor Rhodes , and the register of the baptism of Charles Isaacs read.)

GEORGE RHODES . Q. I believe you are the brother of Mrs. Isaacs - A. Yes.

Q. You remember your nephew went on board the Perseverance by the name of Rhodes - A. I did not know rightly by what name he went, I heard when the ship came home.

Q. When did your sister die - A. She died about a week or a fortnight before these persons were taken,

she had the misfortune to be burnt to death.

Q. Her husband had been dead several years before her - A. Between thirteen and fourteen years.

Q. Had he any sister - A. Yes; her name is Maria, a single woman; she is here; and her mother's name was Eleanor.

Q. You know your nephew's will, I take it for, granted - A. Oh, yes.

Q. When he was at home from sea did he use to visit his mother - A. Yes, very often.

Q. Upon what terms was he with her - A. Very good terms; a very nice young man as any in England, he was a solid young man.

Q. Where did the mother live - A. In Wentworth-street. I live in Wentworth-street, Whitechapel; she lived in the same street, on the other side of the way.

Q. Do you know that he went in the ship Perseverance - A. Yes.

Q. Did these habits of affection to his mother continue down to his latest stay in England - A. Yes.

Mr. Alley. You say the son and mother were upon good terms - A. Yes; I never heard of their having any words; he would have given her gold to eat if he could have afforded it, and she the same.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel; called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 52.

London jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18120408-33

343. SARAH WHEELER was indicted for that she, on the 22d of February , feloniously, knowingly, wittingly, and without lawful excuse had in her possession and custody divers forged and counterfeited bank notes, that is to say three counterfeits notes for the payment of 2 l. each, she knowing the same to be forged and counterfeit .

SECOND COUNT, for she feloniously having in her custody and possession a certain other counterfeit note for the payment of 2 l. she knowing it to be forged.

Mr. Garrow, counsel for the prosecutor declining to offer any evidence the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18120408-34

344. EVAN EVANS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of March , thirty pounds weight of candles, value 15 s. and fifteen pounds weight of pieces of candles, value 7 s. the property of Robert Albion Cox , William Merle , and Robert Patterson .

DANIEL LEADBETTER . Q. You are a marshalman of the City of London - A. I am.

Q. Did you search any house in Princes-court, Trinity-court, Aldersgate-street - A. I did; No. 4, Mr. Cox went with me; I learned from the prisoner that that was his residence.

Q. You had a search warrant - A. I had; I executed it on the 5th of March. Under the bed in the one pair of stairs room I found these two boxes, one box contains whole candles, and the other pieces.

Q. What quantity are there now of whole candles - A. There is thirty-one pounds and a half, and pieces fifteen pounds. I found some pieces in a pan under the bed also, and some in paper, some hanging up in the two pair of stairs room. I found a wonderful quantity of wearing apparel. I found seven India bonds for one hundred pounds each under the mattrass of the bed, and several other bills; Mr. Cox has them in his possession now.

Mr. Barry Are these the identical candles you found - A. Yes.

Q. Where is the pieces - A. They have been under lock and key, of which I have the key.

ROBERT ALBION COX . William Merle and Robert Patterson, they are my partners; we are refiners in Little Britain.

Q. The prisoner has been in your employ as porter - A. Yes, he came in July 1802.

Q. What were his wages - A. Latterly a guinea a week.

Q. Did you accompany the officer that made the search - A. I did, and found the quantity of candles, I saw the officer take them both away from under the bed. There were seven India bonds of one hundred pounds each, and several bills; altogether twelve or fourteen hundred pounds.

Q. Have you any means of knowing these candles - A. I understand they are made on purpose for us. The prisoner always had the care of the candles as far as I knew. We did not go to his apartment to look for candles. We looked for silver, and afterwards we found the candles.

EDWARD CASE. I am a tallow-chandler; I make candles for Cox, Merle, and Co; they are of a peculiar description; we call them Cox's candles, the weight they are nine to two pound; we never retail them; I have examined them before the Lord Mayor, they are the candles that were manufactured for Mr. Cox, Merle, and Co. The candles are worth a shilling and a halfpenny a pound.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel; called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 37.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120408-35

345. SOPHIA RUTH ROBINSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of March , two shillings, and six penny-pieces , the property of Thomas Pierson .

WILLIAM BRAND . Q. You are a marshalman of the City - A. I am. On the 8th of March last I went to Mr. Pierson's house; I searched the prisoner's box in her presence.

Q. On your searching the box did you observe her do any thing - A. Before I searched the box she put her hand into the box and catched out a brown paper parcel before I began to search; she endeavoured to secrete it under her clothes; I caught it from her. Upon opening the paper parcel they appeared to be two bank dollars; upon further examination one turned out to be a bad one; there was a three shilling token, an eighteen penny token, and ten shillings; I then proceeded to search her box, and after I took all the clothes out of the box I saw a quantity of silver laying at the bottom of the box, it contained just the quantity that Mr. Pierson said he had lost. It was loose at the bottom of the box; two three shilling tokens, three eighteen penny tokens, five shillings,

and two sixpences; I then asked the prisoner how she came by it; she said that she had not taken it all from Mr. Pierson but some of it was what she had from her friends upon her giving that answer; Mr. Pierson, who was close behind, said, if it is the money that Mr. Pierson has lost, it is all marked. We looked it over minutely, and we found every piece marked as Mrs. Pierson had described. I had six penny-pieces produced to me; I cannot say where they were found they were brought to me at the table by one of the maid servants.

THOMAS PIERSON. Q. What are you - A. I am an Irish factor ; I live in Star-court, Bread-street .

Q. The prisoner, I believe, had been apprenticed to you from the Asylum - A. She had so, she had been with me near two years.

Q. Had you lately missed your money - A. I had.

Q. And in consequence of that you had marked your money - A. I had.

Q. Were you present when the officer searched the prisoners box - A. I was not present; I saw the money produced.

Q. to Brand. Shew first the three shilling pieces.

Mr. Pierson. This was marked with a cross under the word token.

Q. Now the eighteen-penny pieces.

Mr. Pierson. The marks were not put by me, but this is that I had in my purse marked, they were marked by a young gentleman in my house, under my inspection.

Q. to prosecutor. In consequence of suspicion that you entertained to discover who the thief was when did you begin to mark any of the money - A. On Saturday the 7th of March.

Q. Did you mark any before Saturday - A. No, I did not. The eighteen-penny pieces were marked on Saturday night, they were put into a yellow bag or purse, and put into my breeches pocket; my breeches were up in my chamber on a chair back near my bedside.

Q. Was the prisoner in the habit of coming into your chamber in the morning before you were up for the purpose of lighting your fire - A. She was. It was in the same purse in my pocket that I had before missed my money.

Q. In the morning of the 8th did the prisoner come into your chamber - A. She did, as usual to light the fire.

Q. Did you observe that while she was in the room she was near where your breeches were - A. She was, it was near the fire place, she could not help being near the fire place, after she left the room; I suspected that something had been done, and the officer came within ten minutes or a quarter of an hour.

Q. When you came to examine the bag in your breeches what did you find was missing - A. Sixteen and sixpence in all; consisting of five one-shilling pieces, two sixpenny pieces, two three-shilling pieces, and three eighteen-penny tokens, and they were all marked, and they were all found by Brand in her box.

Mr. Alley. How old is this poor girl - A. She is sixteen.

Q. You took her from the Asylum - A. I did, in the year 1810; she has been with me two years.

Q. Were the females in the house always upon good terms with her with respect to jealousy - A. I do not know with respect to jealousy.

Q. How many servants have you in the house - A. Two servant maids, who live in the same room with the prisoner.

Mr. Gurney. To your knowledge had any other servant been in your chamber that morning - A. Not any.

The prisoner left her defence to her counsel; called four witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY, aged 15.

Judgment respited .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120408-36

346. JOSEPH PITTMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of March , a waistcoat, value 9 s. 6 d. the property of William Smith Gilpin .

WILLIAM SMITH GILPIN. I am a gentleman . I belonged to the Custom House four years back. On the 7th of March, going down Fleet-street about ten o'clock at night, I missed an under waistcoat which I had bought that night.

Q. Where was that waistcoat - A. In my outside coat pocket.

Mr. Alley. You had been buying a bargain that day - A. Yes.

Q. And like an honest fellow you had not put any mark upon it, you would not know it again - A. No, I should not.

GEORGE VAUGHN. I was clerk to Edward Christion , the counsel; I have got my living since as an hackney-writer, and collecting debts. On the 7th of March, about ten o'clock at night, as I was passing up Fleet-street I saw the prosecutor going down Fleet-street, four men were following him, two of which were near to his person, one of them touched his person which caused me to follow them: I was going the contrary way, but on the same side of the way. The prisoner was one; there was two tall men and two short men; the prisoner was one of the four; I cannot positively swear whether he was the person that touched the pocket or no; he was in company with the other man that was near to the prosecutor. The two tall men stood talking to a girl of the town while the two short men were pursuing the prosecutor, they stood for the space of five minutes, and then went on; I then followed them, I was behind the two tallest, I saw one of the short ones touch the prosecutor's pocket; I followed the two tall ones that went in the direction to where the two short ones were, and the prosecutor, I followed them all; they came together again, and when I came up to them I saw the prisoner at the bar, he was next to the prosecutor; I saw him take something from the prosecutor's pocket, but what it was I could not tell, and at the same instant he put his hand towards a pocket in his great coat, a side pocket at the top of his coat; they then turned round; the two short ones turned round, and came behind the two tall ones, they were then trying of his other pocket. I went up to the prosecutor and asked him if he had lost any thing out of his pocket; he stopped, and the four men surrounded him; he put his hand into his pocket and said, yes, I have lost an

under waistcoat; I said one of these men have robbed you; I laid hold of the prisoner and the other short man, I gave the other man to the prosecutor, and said this is the man that has got your property, at the same instant I put my hand into his great coat pocket, and said, this is your property in his pocket; the prisoner said it was not, he had picked it up on the step of a door. I had hold of his great coat, it was unbuttoned; he turned his arms out of his great coat, left the great coat on my arm, and ran away; I pursued him and cried stop thief, and took him in Salisbury-court; I conveyed him to the watchhouse; the constable of the night knew him; the constable of the night has got the property.

ABRAHAM CRESWELL . All I know the constable desired me to bring the property here, and a certificate from his doctor.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120408-37

347. MARY POWELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of January , a bank note, value 50 l. the property of William Rich , deceased.

SECOND COUNT for like offence, stating the bank note to belong to Stiles Rich , John Rich , John Leech , and William Twinch , executors of the last will and testament of William Rich .

GEORGE RICH . Q. What are you - A. A pastry cook on Ludgate Hill. On the 17th of January I went to a banking-house in the city to change a check and the bankers gave me a fifty pound note, which I marked with the banker's name upon the back; after that I took it home, my father being then ill I was to give all the money I got to my second eldest sister; I gave her this fifty pound note on that day. On the 25th of January the same year, the day after my father died, my sister and myself went to look up the money to give to our executors.

Q. To give to your father's executors - A. Yes.

Q. Who are they - A. Mr. John Leech of the London coffee-house, Mr. William Twinch of Fetter-lane, Mr. Stiles Rich of Gloucestershire, and Mr. John Rich of Bristol. They are the executors of my father's will. On that day, while we were looking it up, we missed the fifty pound note, and then we told my uncle of it, Mr. Stiles Rich, and then payment was stopped at the Bank. We heard nothing more of it till the 2d of March, 1812, then I went to the Bank. The Bank-clerk has the note.

Q. Had your father any partner - A. No, none at all.

AUGUSTA BROOKS . Q. Are you the sister of Rich the witness - A. Yes.

Q. Did you receive the note from him - A. I did, and put it into a drawer; we missed it the next day after our father's death.

Q. Do you know the number of it - A. No.

Q. What was the prisoner - A. She was a servant at that time.

Q. How long had she lived with you - A. Between three and four years.

Q. Were was this drawer - A. In the two pair room, in my brother's room.

CHARLES CHRISTMAS . I am one of the inspectors of the Bank. I produce the fifty pound note, it was stopped at the Bank on the 2d of March, the present year, it was brought in by George Wexham of Beckworth-place, Walworth, and stopped by Mr. Rich. That is all I know of it.

GEORGE WEXHAM. About the middle of February last I had occasion to borrow a few pounds of my friends; I called upon Mary Powell , I asked her if she could lend me three or four pounds; she said she could not just then; she said if I could call again in a day or two she would see what she could do. In a day or two after that she called upon me, she said, take and change this note, and take what few pounds you want. I looked at the note, and said, what do you call this; she said, it is a fifty pound; I said, have you nothing else but this to let me have, it is not worth while to change this for so small a sum; she said, take that note, and call and give me the change when you have changed the note. I took the note to my master, Mr. Branston in Cheapside, I asked him to change me a fifty pound note; he said, he could not, but if I went to the Bank I could get done; I went to the Bank, I set my name to the note, and the place where I lived. When I presented the note for change they told me the note was stopped.

Mr. Arabin. I believe they were unkind enough to take you up - A. They were unkind enough; I considered it great injustice to put me in prison.

Q.After this injustice you told this story - A. It is the truth.

Q. You did not accuse this woman untill you were accused yourself - A. When I was taken I said where I had it.

COURT. When you were asked where you got it, you said where you lived and where you had it from - A. Yes, I did.

Mr. Rich. The prisoner, before the Alderman, said she gave Mr. Wexham the note.

The prisoner left her defence to her counsel, called five witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined One Month in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120408-38

348. BENJAMIN COOMBS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of February , a great coat, value 30 s. the property of Joseph Lee .

JOSEPH LEE . I am carter to Mr. Green, in the parish of Eston. I lost my coat on the 18th of February in Great Windmill-street , it was taken out of my cart; I had been with some potatoes in Oxford-road. Mr. Lloyd saw the prisoner take it.

WILLIAM LLOYD . I am one of the collectors of the assessed taxes for the parish of St. James's. On the 18th of February, between ten and eleven o'clock, I was standing at my parlour window, I saw a cart pass, and the prisoner Coombs, whom I have known for many years I saw opposite of my window, at the tail of my cart. I did not see the carter; the prisoner was off the foot-path, he reached his arm over, and pulled the coat towards the tail of the cart; I immediately went and stood at the street-door; the cart had not got more than sixteen yards before the prisoner made the second go off the foot path; he laid hold of the coat and put it into a smaller compass; he took the coat of the cart and put it under

his arm and turned off with it towards Titchbourn-street, I was not certain at the time whether he was not taking his own coat out of the cart, and I followed after the prosecutor with his team; I overtook him in the Haymarket, I asked him if that coat did not belong to him. Yes, sir, he said, it is there; I said a man whom I know very well has taken it out of the cart, but at the time I did not know but it was his own coat. On the Saturday three weeks afterwards, the 14th of March, was the first time that I saw the prisoner afterwards, he was standing at the corner of Coventry-street, within a few yards of where he had taken this coat from the countryman's cart; I got Knight and Wilding, two constables, to apprehend him, and took him to Marlborough-street office.

Q. Was the coat ever found - A. No.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to his character.

GUILTY, aged 30.

Judgment respited .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120408-39

349. DANIEL ARCHER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of March , 17 s. 6 d. in monies numbered , the property of Robert Pizey .

ROBERT PIZEY . I am a pewterer , I live at No. 11, Church-street, Bethnal-green, the prisoner was my servant . On the 9th of March I sent him with a bill of seventeen shillings and six-pence, to Mr. Arnott, of Willmot-street, Bethnal-green, he returned shortly afterwards and told me Mr. Arnott would not pay him; the next day I sent to know the truth of it, I never had the money.

ELIZABETH ARNOTT . On the 5th of March Mr. Pizey sent in some pots, I paid the prisoner on the 9th seventeen shillings and six-pence.

JOHN WILSON . I am an officer. The prisoner acknowledged to the magistrate that he had taken this watch out of pawn.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120408-40

350. THOMAS CARTER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of June , two hundred deals, value 50 l. the property of Richard Bradshaw , in a barge in the navigable river Thames .

SECOND COUNT, for like offence, stating the deals to be in a lighter in the said river Thames.

THIRD COUNT, for like offence, only stating the deals to be the property of Henry Stevenson , James Stevenson , and James Gunning Stevenson ; and two other Counts, the property of different persons.

JAMES STEVENSON . I am a timber merchant at Mill Bank, my partner's names are Henry Stevenson and James Gunning Stevenson.

Q. On the 5th of June last, did a lighter called Susan come to your wharf - A. Yes, about the 5th of June, I am not positive to the day, my wharf is at Mill Bank.

Q. To whom did that lighter belong - A. To Mr. Bradshaw.

Q. To whom did the deals belong - A. To Messrs. Wood and Dorvill.

Q. From that time till about the 11th of June, did that lighter continue unloading - A. It did. On the morning of the 12th I missed her myself, and to the best of my recollection she was tied to the wharf.

Q. About how many deals had she had in her - A. About two or three hundred when she was lost, all the deals belonged to Wood and Dorvill.

Q. I believe afterwards you sent a clerk of yours of the name of Berney - A. Yes, and from information I went to Scott's wharf at Chelsea, I there found the lighter, she had been sunk, the tide was leaving her, there was water in her; and I went to Mr. Sibley's premises at Chelsea, I there saw about two hundred of the deals.

Q. How do you know them to be a part of the deals you lost - A. By the general appearance they were of the same cargo, they had upon them the same marks as were upon the other deals, the rest of the cargo. I had no doubt they were the deals I had lost.

Q. When you found the lighter it was empty - A. Empty.

Q. How came Wood and Dorvill to place these in your wharf - A. Wood and Dorvill treated with me for the purchase, they were offered to me, and being a cargo of various qualities it was thought advisable that we should see how they turned out before we purchased them.

Q. Then they were in a course of delivery to you and afterwards you agreed upon the purchase - A. Yes.

Q. At any rate, were you responsible for them - A. So far as being under my care. We have two or three deals, here, they are marked by my servant that sorted.

Mr. Alley. That servant has absconded - A. He has absconded.

COURT. How long had this barge been lying at your wharf - A. She came up about the 5th of June and we began unloading her until the 11th or 12th, and then she was missing.

JOHN BERNEY . Q. I believe you are clerk to Messrs. Stevenson - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see this lighter while she was lying by your wharf for the purpose of unloading - A. I did.

Q. Was she lying on the river - A. On the bank, floating at high-water, and on the mud at low-water.

Q. Was the part where she was lying in the river - A. Yes. On the morning of the 12th I missed her, I afterwards went in search of her, I found her at Scott's wharf at Chelsea on the morning of the 13th, I found the deals taken out of the barge, the plugs pulled out and the lighter nearly full of water.

Q. What is the use of the plugs - A. When the barge is overloaded and the water comes in they have no other way of letting it out.

Q. From thence did you proceed in search of the deals - A. I did, I found them on the premises of Mr. Sibley, I should think it three quarters of a mile from Scott's wharf.

Q. How many deals did you find there - A. Two hundred and forty nine single deals.

Q. Did you know them again - A. Yes, I knew them by their general appearance, by the mark of

the cargo, and by the mark of our man, who had sorted them; this one has the mark of our sorter, a W.

Q. How is it that they have not all the ship-mark - A. I do not know, it is sometimes the case. This one appears to have been cut, the ship-mark is generally upon the edge.

Mr. Alley. Do you know whether any of the deals were on the wharf - A. They were.

Q. Then it is impossible for you to tell whether these deals were taken from the wharf or the barge, they are the deals I admit that were originally in the barge - A. All those that were loaded had the sorter's mark upon them, except some few which laid in the barge when the men left off work; I missed no deals that were piled on the wharf, only those that were left in the barge.

JAMES GILLMORE . I am a police officer. I was with the last witness when he went into Sibley's yard and afterwards with Sibly in searching further. I have had the care of these deals, the rest have been at Mr. Stevenson's wharf.

NATHANIEL HARDING . Q. In the month of June last were you in Mr. Stevenson's employ - A. To the best of my knowledge I was; I was landing a cargo of deals.

Q. Do you remember a barge being taken away from their wharf - A. Yes.

Q. Whose barge was it - A. I believe the lighter-man was Mr. Bradshaw.

Q. What had the barge in her - A. I cannot say; I am not in a barge for two days together sometimes.

Q. Was the barge empty - A. I cannot say.

Q. Attend to what has taken place before, recollect what passed before - A. I do.

Q. What time was that barge taken away - A. I cannot say.

Q. Can you say by whom that barge was taken away - A. I do not know, sir, without I was to see the man; I will swear to the best of my knowledge.

Q. Who was the man, turn round and see whether you see him here - A. Why, sir, I think that is the man at the bar, I cannot safely say.

Q. Was it day-light - A. Yes.

Q. How long had you known the prisoner before - A. I know the prisoner by being in my club, how long I cannot say; it might be six months or a twelvemonth.

Q. In the course of that time had you seen him frequent - A. No, not seen him frequent, but I have often times seen him.

Q. Had you helped to work in that barge the night before - A. I never worked in any craft of Mr. Stevenson's.

Q. Had you helped to pile any of those deals from that barge the night before - A. I cannot say; I piled all the cargo, whether it was from that barge I cannot say.

Q. Had you piled any deals that came out of that lighter - A. I cannot say whether I did or did not.

Q. Have you any doubt of it - A. I cannot say; I cannot swear for other men.

Q. You had seen that lighter unload - A. No, I never saw her unload at all.

Q. Did you see the deals taken out of that lighter - A. I believe, sir, that must be the craft.

COURT. What makes you so shy of speaking - A. The craft lay under Mr. Stevenson's window, not on the wharf.

Mr. Gurney. How long is the wharf - A. Thirty yards.

Q. Does Mr. Stevenson's window join the wharf - A. His window fronts the wharf where these deals lay.

Q. What is the prisoner - A. I don't know.

Q. Why he belongs to your club - A. That I cannot help; I do not enquire what trades they are; I do not know what he is.

CRADOCK HARDING. Q. Last summer you were in Mr. Stevenson's employ - A. Yes, a backer; that means carrying the deals.

Q. Do you remember a lighter being lost from their wharf that was found at Chelsea - A. I remember hearing talk of it.

Q. Were you and you brother on the wharf early on the 12th of June - A. I was walking up Millbank-street between four and five o'clock it was day light.

Q. Did you see any man take the craft away - A. I saw a man on board the barge.

Q. What did that man do - A. I do not know any more he did than being on board the barge.

Q. What became of the barge after that - A. I do not know. I went to have half a pint of beer as usual in the morning.

Q. How soon afterwards did you find the barge was gone - A. We came back in half an hour, and went to work, the barge was gone, and the man too.

Q. Who was that man - A. I do not know, I am sure.

Q. How near were you to him - A. Between twenty and thirty yards.

Q. Look round and tell me whether you see any man here that you believe to be the man - A. I cannot say; I cannot believe any thing.

Q. Now I ask you whether you do not believe that that is the man at the bar - A. I cannot say.

Q. Did you know the man at the time - A. I did not nor never saw him before, I did not know but it was Mr. Bradshaw's man.

JOHN SIBLEY . Q. What are you - A. I am a builder; I live in Jubilee-place, King's-road, Chelsea.

Q. There were some deals found in your house by the officer, and Mr. Stevenson's clerk - A. Yes.

Q. From what place did you have these deals - A. From Scott's wharf, from on board a board a barge.

Q. When did you first see that barge - A. The day before the deals were found at my house.

Q. The deals were found at your house on the 12th - A. I saw them the day before at five o'clock in the morning at Scott's wharf.

Q. Who was there first, you or the barge - A. The barge.

Q. Did you see it coming up the river - A. No, I did not. I went there by appointment, a person came to me that brought up the deals.

Q. Did you know of the barge coming there the

day before - A. I expected deals by a barge.

Q. Look at the prisoner, and tell me whether he had been with you a day or two before - A. I cannot say it was him; it was a person very much like him.

Q. Look again, you have seen him before - A. I have, at Queen-square; I have some doubts of his being the man.

Q. You have some doubts, have you - A. Yes, sir.

Q. How many times have you seen the person that came about the deals - A. I saw him once before he brought the deals; he came and said he sold deals by commission; he offered me some for sale; he said the deals were at Dock-head; I asked him if I could see them; he said he was going down that day, and he would bring them the next morning, and if I did not approve of them I had no occasion to buy them.

Q. Did you ask him the price - A. I did, he said as they were an inferior sort, thirty-five.

COURT. This was before you had seen them - A. Yes.

Mr. Gurney. Do you mean thirty-five or any other sum, recollect what you have sworn to - A. He asked thirty-five; I agreed for thirty-five if I approved of them after they came up.

COURT. You said he asked thirty-five - A. He asked more, I believe it was forty; I said I would give thirty-five if I approved of them.

Q. On the morning of the 12th did he bring them to Scott's wharf - A. Yes, on the day before they were found at my house.

Q. Were you fetched down to Scott's wharf - A. I was.

Q. How far is Scott's wharf to where you live - A. Near a mile.

Q. At what time did he come in the morning to your house - A. Near five o'clock.

Q. Did you go down to Scott's wharf with him - A. I did. I found the deals in the barge.

Q. Did you go on board with him - A. I did, and examined the deals, I agreed upon the price; to the best of my recollection it was thirty-five; I began to land them in about an hour and a half; it took us the whole day to get them into my premises; on the next morning Mr. Berney and the officer came and claimed them.

Q. How many were they - A. Upwards of two hundred.

Q. Now look at the prisoner, do you or do you not believe him to be the man - A. I cannot say; I believe he is very much like him; I cannot say. To the best of my knowledge he is the man; I cannot say he is the man.

JAMES WOODFORD . I am a barge-man, I live at Chelsea.

Q. Do you know Mr. Sibley - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. I know him now; I never knew him before; he was brought to Queen-square office.

Q. Do you remember seeing Mr. Sibley on board a barge one morning in June last at Mr. Scott's wharf - A. Yes, about five or ten minutes before five; there was another man in the barge with him, they were mooring the barge.

Q. Look at the prisoner, and tell me whether you believe that to be the man that was with Sibley - A. It has the appearance; I cannot say whether it is the man or not; I do not know the man.

Q. to Gillmore. Did you go in search of the prisoner - A. Yes, me and Sibley. I found his wife by the Old Barge House, opposite of the Temple, on the Surry side of the river; I have from that time frequently endeavoured to apprehend him; at last I gave the warrant into the hands of Evans of the Thames police office; I believe it was the 9th or 10th of February; Mr. Evans brought him in custody to me.

Q.Now from the search that you made after him, if he had been at home, and in the regular course of his business must you have found him - A. Not the smallest doubt of it.

JAMES EVANS. I am an officer of the Thames police office. I apprehended the prisoner on the 10th of February at Deptford in Kent; he is a boat builder; he told me he had been down into Hampshire to work. I endeavoured to find him all I could, he was out of the way.

Q. to Mr. Stevenson. Have you been out and examined the deals that are in the yard - A. I have, they have two strokes on the edge, that is the ship's mark in this instance in the deal that is here the mark is gone.

Q. What is the value of them - A. They are of various sort, upwards of ninety pounds, and a considerable part of them worth sixty pounds a hundred.

RICHARD BRADSHAW . Q. Are you the owner of the lighter Susan - A. Yes.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson .

Reference Number: t18120408-41

351. THOMAS CARTER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of June , a barge, value 20 l. the property of Richard Bradshaw .

SECOND COUNT, stating it to be a lighter, the property of Henry Stevenson , James Stevenson , and James Gunning Stevenson .

Mr. Gurney, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18120408-42

352. JOSEPH THOMPSON , alias JOSEPH WOOLMAN THOMPSON , was indicted for feloniously forging a certain acceptance of a certain bill of exchange for the payment of 118 l. 18 s. 4 d. in the name of A. M'Dougall and Co. with intention to defraud William Carter , and Samuel Sprats Strong .

SECOND COUNT for feloniously uttering and publishing as true a like forged acceptance, he knowing it to be forged, with like intention.

SAMUEL SPRATS STRONG. Q. I believe you are a ropemaker at Poole in Dorsetshire - A. At Hanworthy, near Poole, in Dorsetshire; William Carter is my partner.

Q. Have you any other partner - A. No.

Q. In September last did you receive this letter from town - A. Yes; it is dated the 27th of September.

Q. Did you make any reply to that letter - A.

Yes.

Q. In consequence of that reply did you receive another - A. Yes; that is dated October the 1st.

Q. In consequence of that letter on the 1st of October did you furnish any goods - A. Yes.

Q. To the house of M'Dougall and Co. - A. Yes.

Q. What were the goods - A. Cordage to the amount of one hundred and eighteen pounds eighteen shillings and fourpence.

Q. Did you draw for any bill of the amount - A. Yes.

COURT. You drew a bill to the amount - A. Yes.

Q. What is the date of that bill - A.23d of October, 1811.

Q. What did you do with that bill - A. I paid it into our bankers at Poole.

Q. After this you received another letter from town - A. Yes, the date of that letter is the 8th of November.

ROWLAND TOBY . I live in Cavendish-street, Brunswick-square; I am an house agent. I know the prisoner at the bar.

Q. Look over these letters, and see whether these are his hand-writing - A. All these three are his hand-writing to my belief. I believe that acceptance to be his hand-writing.

Mr. Gurney. Do you mean the signature to the acceptance is his hand-writing - A. To the best of my belief.

(Read.)

"Messrs. Carter and Strong, We consign our application to you, provided you seem disposed as to our general character, to open correspondence with us; if this be the case you will advise us with the particulars of your various articles of manufacture, upon which we will be guided respecting our future correspondence. Signed, M'Dougall and Company, 51, Great Hermitage-street, London Docks."

JAMES ROBINSON . I am clerk to Mr. Strong, the prosecutor. I served a copy of notice on the prisoner on the 8th of April, and on Mr. Harmer, his attorney.

Mr. Strong. This letter is copied from my book.

Mr. Gurney. It is a copy of a copy.

Mr. Alley. We will read the last letter that acknowledges the receipt of that.

Q. to Mr. Strong. After the receipt of the goods the prisoner wrote a letter acknowledging a receipt of the goods - A. Yes.

(The letter dated the 8th of November read.)

"Messrs. Carter and Strong, The cordage for the vessel has duly arrived, we have availed ourselves of the opportunity of sending you another order; we have also accepted your draft when presented a few days back. You will very much oblige our house with an early execution of the above order, as it is for a friend. You telling us when it will be completed will very much oblige us. Five hundred two inch ditto. and two tons of twist cordage the same as the last.

A. M'Dougall and Company."

Mr. Alley, Q. to Mr. Strong. Your first order was one hundred and eighteen pounds and a fraction - A. Yes.

Q. You had sent goods up to the amount of that one hundred and eighteen pounds and a fraction - A. Yes.

Q. Which the acceptance mentions - A. Yes.

Q. Did you ever receive any payment for it - A. Never.

JOHN BROOKS. I am a clerk in Esdaile's house.

Q. Did you at any time present that for payment - A. I did, at 51, Great Hermitage-street, Wapping; I called for it again the following day; I received it accepted as it is now.

Q. Did you at any time call for payment - A. I did, on the 26th of December.

Q. Where you paid for it - A. No.

Q. Did you receive any answer about it - A. I left word where the bill laid.

Mr. Gurney. This has happened to you frequently the last two years to call at places where the bills have been unpaid - A. Yes, frequently.

(Read.)

Poole, 23d of October, 1811.

" 118 l. 18 s. 4 d.

Two months after date pay Mr. Salmarder, or order, one hundred and eighteen pounds eighteen shillings and four pence, as advised per your obedient servants,

Carter and Strong.

To Messrs. M'Dougall and Co. 51, Great Hermitage-street, London Docks.

(Accepted)

M'Dougall and Co."

ELIZABETH BADDEN . Q. You keep a house, No. 51, Great Hermitage-street - A. I keep the house.

Q. Did the prisoner take some apartment of you - A. He did; he came in the name of Thompson; he took the accompting-house and parlour; two brothers came together.

Q. They said they were brothers - A. Yes.

Q. How long did the prisoner continue - A. He took it last Lady Day twelvemonth, 1811, he staid untill January 1812.

Q. His name was Thompson, did he pay the rent - A. The first quarter.

Q. Was there any name put on the door - A. No, there was not.

Q. Was there a person of the name of Sibbott who officiated as clerk to him - A. When they first came he was with him about six weeks.

Mr. Gurney. You say at the time that the prisoner came a brother of his came with him - A. Yes.

Q. The brother did not live there with him afterwards - A. No, he did not; the brother went into into the rules of the King's Bench.

Q. Where is your husband - A. He is not here in court, he is waiting out of court.

Mr. Alley. Is your husband well - A. He is not he has been sick for six months.

Mr. Gurney. The prisoner you know him by the name of Thompson - A. Yes.

Q. How many persons were there in the firm of M'Dougall and Company - A. I saw no partners whatever; the latter end of May or the beginning of June I saw a person brought there whom the prisoner said was M'Dougall.

Q. Do you remember yourself having people enquire for M'Dougall - A. Various times they answered themselves.

Q. I asked you whether the enquiries were made to you for M'Dougall - A. Not at that time. There has been.

Q. In your answers to these enquiries I ask you

whether you did not represent Mr. M'Dougall to be a partner in that house - A. No.

Q. Then that is not true - A. It is not.

Mr. Alley. You say your husband's state of health is bad is his memory perfect - A. No.

Mr. Gurney. Upon your oath at the police office did not you represent the contrary to what you are now talking of - A. No, never in my life.

Q. Was not your husband a partner - A. My husband had never no concern in it at all.

ALEXANDER BADDEN. Q. You are the husband of the poor woman that has just been examined - A. Exactly so.

Q. Do you know the man at the bar, he lodged at your house - A. Yes, I do.

Q. Had you any concern with him in business - A. Never in my life.

Mr. Gurney. You are not one of the firm of M'Dougall - A. Never in my life. I never saw him.

Q. Pray what are you - A. I keep a house, and have an annuity paid me from Chelsea. I never saw any person of the name of M'Dougall at my house in my life. I have my annuity in the name of Alexander Badden . I served his Majesty twenty-four years at home and abroad.

Prisoner's Defence. I have only to observe that when I first took that place I was acquainted with Mr. M'Dougall and with Mr. Badden, which I believe I shall substantiate by my witnesses, that a gentleman of that name did exist; I carried on the firm in that name, and I presume he giving me authority, and from that reason, and that alone, I ever took upon me to sign the name of M'Dougall and Company.

THOMAS JENNINGS . I live at Bow, but my warehouse is at Red Lion Wharf, Wapping.

Q. Do you remember being employed by Badden and some others to sell some things last year - A. Yes.

Q. Did Badden ever tell you he was of any firm - A. He told me that he was of the firm of Thompson, Badden, and Company; I was employed by Thompson and Badden, they were both present.

Q. Did you afterwards see Thompson and Badden together, and hear them converse about any other firm than that - A. No.

ALEXANDER BROUGHTON . I am a warehouseman; I had a house, No. 54, Wood-street; I live at No. 50, Rose and Crown-court, Moorfields.

Q. Do you know the house of M'Dougall and Co. Wapping - A. Yes.

Q. Have you been at the house, 51, Great Hermitage-street - A. Yes.

Q. Who have you seen there represent that firm - A. I have seen M'Dougall, Joseph Thompson , and Alexander Badden , I have seen them altogether five or six times; I was there in July, August, and September last year.

Q. Do you know what became of M'Dougall - A. I do not.

Q. You are perfectly sure that you have seen the prisoner M'Dougall and Badden together as part of the firm - A. I have.

Mr. Alley. Your warehouse is in Wood-street, Cheapside - A. I have lived in Wood-street, Cheapside, till within some months ago No. 54, Wood-street; I rented the house as warehouseman; I sold woollen goods, and various goods, woollen goods in particular, any goods; I was employed to sell by commission.

Q. You cannot give me any name of any respectable house in town that employed you - A. I have sold goods for people in Wood-street.

Q. That is not the answer, give me the name of any respectable house that employed you as a warehouseman for them while you lived in Wood-street - A. Clay and Company; they lived in Trump-street, King-street.

Q. Where did you live in July last - A.81, in Holborn.

Q. Were you at large in July last - A. Yes.

Q. Have you been in custody lately - A. I was in custody the latter end of January twelvemonth.

Q. What was that for - A. For accepting a bill, for accommodating a bill. I was accused of a thing, if that is being in custody.

Q. When was that Mr. Warehouse-keeper - A. On the 23d of October last I picked up a pot in the street, and carried it home, and they accused me of stealing it; they could not find a bill against me; I was then living with a relation at Walworth, I sold goods while I was there.

Q. What brought you to the prisoner's house in Hermitage-street - A. To sell goods for him.

Q. You sold rope - A. No, I never did.

Q. Who do you mean to say you met at his house - A.M'Dougall.

Q. Did you happen to meet him there in the month of November - A. No, July and August.

Q. What business did you transact with him - A. I bought two pieces of Irish of him, and some blue cloth; I paid him for these in Bank notes, it was the only transaction I had with him.

Q. Then you never had any bills of exchange of him - A. No.

Q. And M'Dougall, whoever he is, or where he is, you do not know, and whether he is living or dead you do not know. Who told you his name was M'Dougall - A. The prisoner; I saw him at the Excise coffee-house, and when I asked for him I asked for M'Dougall.

Q. Do you know Hart-street, Mark-lane, did you ever hear of Beckwell and Company - A. I have heard of the firm.

Q. You have had dealings with them - A. No, I have not.

Q. You have had a great many dealings with the prisoner - A. No, I have sold for him.

Q. You told me that the prisoner introduced this man to you as M'Dougall - A. Yes.

Q. When was you sent for to come here - A. About a week ago.

Q. Where have you been for the last three months - A. I have been at my house Rose and Crown-court, Moorfields.

Q. Why did you attend the police office when your friend was taken up, he has been in custody upwards of two months - A. I did not make it my business to go to him.

Q. You heard that he was examined at the police

office - A. No, I did not until he was in Newgate.

Q. Who sent for you pray - A. His brother.

Q. What is his name - A. Andrew.

Q. Where is his brother now - A. He is locked up in Clerkenwell.

Q. Where was it the prisoner's brother called upon you - A. He sent to me.

Q. He wrote a note - A. No, he sent Mr. Jennings.

Q. That worthy gentlemen that has been up this moment - A. Yes, Mr. Jennings; he lived at Bow when I knew him.

Q. Do you know the firm of Bailey and Co - A. No. I think I have heard of it.

Q. Have you been in the firm of Bailey and Co - A. I never went by any name but Broughton.

Q. Did not the last witness pass by the name of Bailey and Co - A. I never knew it.

Q. So he called upon you to tell you to be a witness to Mr. Thompson - A. He went to the prisoner's brother at Clerkenwell.

Q. And his brother desired you to come here - A. I received a subpoene from an attorney's clerk.

Q. Did you ever visit your friend in prison - A. I have seen him down in the Dock.

Q. You never took a bill of M'Dougall and Co - A. No. When people sells goods by commission they sell them for ready money.

JAMES SIBBOTT , SEN. Q. Where do you live - A. No. 13, North-street, Manchester-square.

Q. Do you know any thing of the house of M'Dougall and Co - A. All I know of it is this, that my son last summer was engaged as a clerk to M'Dougall and Company.

Q. Did you ever see the partners of that firm - A. Not until I saw the prisoner in custody.

Q. Did you ever see Badden or Mrs. Badden - A. When I went to the house I enquired if Mr. Thompson lived there; a woman answered me in an abrupt manner and told me there was no such name.

Q. Did you ever ask for M'Dougall and Company - A. Never to my knowledge.

Q.And you never saw him - A. Not to my knowledge.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 31.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18120408-43

353. THOMAS WATKINSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of September , fifty-eight gallons of wine called Port wine, value 46 l. and fifty-eight gallons of other wine, value 46 l. nine gallons of other wine called Madeisa wine, value 10 l. and three gallons of other wine, called sherry wine, value 2 l. 10 s. the property of Divie Robertson .

JOHN IRESON . Q. Where do you live - A. In Durham-street, in the Strand; I keep a chop-house.

Q. You retail wines - A. I retail wines, and wholesale wines. Two of my cellars are in William-street, in the Adelphi.

Q. How far is that from Mr. Robertson's cellar - A. Mr. Robertson has cellars in the same street.

Q. Has Mr. Robertson any cellars elsewhere - A. I believe he has in Villier-street, that is about a street or two off.

Q. Did the prisoner, in the month of September last, offer to sell you any wine - A. He did.

Q. What quantity did he propose to sell you - A. A hogshead of Port wine.

Q. Did you agree with him for it - A. He said himself that he had got a hogshead of Port wine to sell by commission; I told him if he would leave a sample, and if I liked it I would buy it of him.

Q. Which was done - A. Which was done; I approved of it, he asked me forty-eight, finally I agreed for forty-six pounds. The hogshead of wine was brought to my cellar door.

Q. And received by you yourself - A. I know I was not there. The cellar is detached from my house, Into my cellar door it was received.

Q. Received by some person - A. I rather think I had a man watching for it at the time, I came and found it in my cellar.

Q. In what sort of a cask was it - A. It was in a claret cask.

Q. What number of gallons were marked on the cask - A. Fifty-eight gallons were marked on the cask by the guagers mark; I had a bill of parcels and a permit. This is the bill of parcels, it was paid by two bills of exchange that he drew upon me; these are the bills.

Q. Do you know his writing - A. I know they are his writing.

Q. From whom did you receive the permit - A. I rather think I received it myself from the prisoner.

Q. Did you see him after the cask came - A. I saw him the same day.

Q. Then he brought you that bill of parcels and that permit - A. Yes.

Q. Did he at that time say any thing to you about returning that cask - A. Not at that time.

Q. At what time was it that he spoke to you about sending it back - A. About a month or three weeks afterwards. He said he wanted a fresh headed hogshead, and if I would let him have that he would give me another in return.

Q. Who took that hogshead away - A. I rather think my boy rolled it to Mr. Robertson's cellar door.

Q. Did Watkinson desire that it might be brought to Mr. Robertson's cellar - A. He did.

Q. Have you been lately at Mr. Robertson's cellar - A. I have this day week, I saw a claret cask there it had the guagers mark. Claret hogsheads are very much alike.

Q. I do not ask you to say positively. Do you believe it to be the same - A. It has every appearance of being the same cask that was in my cellar.

Q. You mentioned just now that the prisoner delivered to you a permit - A. Yes, it was given to the exciseman by myself; I think the man's name was Cross, it was either Cross or Ray; I rather think it was Cross.

Q. The wine was port wine, was it not - A. The wine was port wine.

Q. Had you ever dealings with the wine merchants Platt and Clark - A. Never.

Q. You had the sample of this wine - A. I had.

Q. What quality was the wine - A. Very fair.

Q. You bought it at forty-six pounds a hogshead

that is a large hogshead - A. No, I do not call it a large hogshead.

Mr. Arabin. Q. You do not know yourself who brought the wine - A. No, I do not.

Q. All you know, you saw it in your cellar and you paid for it - A. I saw it in the cellar and I paid for it.

Q. I understood you to swear that you cannot swear to a cask they are so much alike - A. No, I cannot swear to a cask.

Q. This cask was not applied for until some time after - A. Not until three weeks or a month after.

Q. Mr. Robertson is in a great way as a wine-merchant - A. Yes.

Q. I do not know whether you know that it is frequent in the trade for cellar-men to sell wine by commission - A. I do not know it is customary in the trade, I never bought of a celler-man before. He shewed me a catalogue, and said he bought wines at sales.

Q. I believe you knew that his brother-in-law was a wine-merchant - A. I knew that he was in the wine way, I did not know where he lived, nor where his cellar was.

Q. Do you know whether you received the permit from the prisoner, or somebody else - A. I rather think I received it from the prisoner himself.

Mr. Abbot. Q. You say, sometimes persons in the trade lend wine to another in the trade, is Watkinson in the trade - A. No, he is not.

Q. I understand you to say, that the day the wine came, Watkinson came to you and told you the wine was in the cellar - A. No I did not say that, I said he came to me.

COURT. When he told you that he wanted the cask back again did he tell you where it was to go to - A. He told me that it was to go to Mr. Robertson's cellar.

(The bill of parcel's read in Court)

" John Ireson , Bought of Thomas Watkinson ,

Fifty-eight gallons of Port wine - 46 0 0

Three dozen of East-India Madeira - 10 10 0

One dozen of Sherry - 2 10 0

Total 59 0 0

(The bills of exchange read in Court.)

London, September, 16, 1811.

"Two months after date pay to my order fifty-six pounds, value received; directed to Mr. John Ireson .

(Accepted) John Ireson ."

Directed to Mr. Ireson.

"Two months after date pay fifty-six pounds.

(Accepted) John Ireson ."

RALPH TONGE . Q. In the month of September last were you in the employ of Mr. Robertson - A. Yes.

Q. Were you employed in the cellar under the prisoner - A. I was, as porter.

Q. Do you remember assisting in taking a hogshead of wine to Mr. Ireson's - A. Very well.

Q. How was it taken - A. It was taken out of Mr. Robertson's cellar in Villier's-street, by the crane.

Q. By whose directions - A. By Watkinson's directions.

Q. What was then done with it - A. Watkinson and I rolled it to Mr. Ireson's.

Q. Was it delivered into Mr. Ireson's cellar - A. I assisted in rolling it to the door, and there I left it.

Q. What kind of a cask was it - A. A claret hogshead.

Q. Was that hogshead afterwards brought back to your cellar - A. I afterwards saw it at the cellar-door in William-street. It was put into the cellar afterwards, I did not see it brought there.

Q. What part of the money had you - A. Mr. Watkinson gave me ten pounds of it.

Q. When did Watkinson leave your master's service - A. I cannot say exactly the day, about January I believe.

Q. You were questioned about some other things and you mentioned this - A. No, I did not.

Q. Then you never made any disclosure to your master until after you were apprehended - A. Not before.

Q. Do you know when that was - A. On a Monday evening, I do not know the day of the month, then I disclosed this transaction.

Q. How long have you lived with Mr. Robertson - A. Eighteen years all but four days.

Q. When you were first spoken to about this business you did not tell this story - A. The story about the hogshead, sir? Afterwards, sir.

Q. How long might you be in prison before you told this story - A. I was not in prison at all.

Q. When were you first spoken to about it - A. On Monday night.

Q. When did you tell this story first - A. With respect to this hogshead, sir? On Tuesday night to the best of my knowledge, I believe so, I will not be sure.

Q. Where was it - A. It was in Bow-street.

Q. You had not been in prison you say - A. I went into prison on Wednesday night, I was sent to Tothill-fields.

Q. Where were you the night before - A. At home.

Q. Were you not locked up on the Tuesday nigh - A. No, nor on the Monday night.

Q. Was it on the Tuesday or the Wednesday - A. On the Wednesday evening, I was taken to Bow-street.

Q. And you told it on the Wednesday evening - A. I believe I did.

Q. Were you imprisoned on the Wednesday night - A. I was, had up to Bow-street, and was sent to Tothill-fields.

Q. When were you taken again to Bow-street - A. On the Friday.

Q. Was that the first time you told the magistrate - A. I believe it was.

COURT. Then you did not tell it on the Wednesday - A. I believe not.

Mr. Arabin. So you believe you did not tell till the Friday - A. I will not be positive, I believe I did.

Q. You were locked up for stealing this yourself - A. No I was not.

Q. Why did not they take you up - A. Mr. Robertson had me in the accompting-house and desired

me to make a disclosure, which I did.

Q. You disclosed it a great many days afterwards A. On the Friday, sir.

Mr. Gurney. And I believe after the prisoner was committed you were enlarged and have been at liberty ever since - A. Yes, at liberty ever since.

Q. And have come here now - A. Yes.

MR. DIVIE ROBERTSON. Q. You are a wine-merchant - A. Yes.

Q. How long was the prisoner at the bar your cellarman - A. About nine years.

Q. In the month of September last I believe you were in Wales - A. Yes, I was.

Q. Have you discovered that you have lost a considerable quantity of wine - A. Yes, I have.

Q. You did not discover it till lately - A. No, not untill February, I parted with the prisoner in January.

Q. It was after you had parted that you found out your loss - A. It was.

Q. How did you make the discovery - A. In consequence of information. From the nature of my business, and the immense quantity of stock I had, it was impossible to ascertain it.

Q. You say your stock was so large you could not ascertain sufficiently, after you had your stock taken could you ascertain any deficiency - A. I could not exactly ascertain much.

COURT. Was it by taking of stock, or by the information of your cellarman - A. By the information of my cellarman, who succeeded this man as cellarman, a person of the name of Davis.

Mr. Gurney. Do you remember on what day you first questioned the last witness respecting this - A. Monday, the 1st of March, and he was taken to Bow-street on the Wednesday.

Q. Did he as early as Wednesday communicate the fact of the robbery - A. He did, and I think he did on the Tuesday morning.

Q. And you are sure he did on the Wednesday - A. I am sure he did on the Wednesday.

Q. Until he communicated this circumstance did you know any thing of Mr. Ireson - A. I never heard of him.

Q. Was it then upon his information that you resorted to Mr. Ireson and obtained the information that he has given us - A. It was.

Q. Has the claret hogshead been pointed out to you by Tonge - A. I saw the claret hogshead in my cellar in William street, where it was unusual.

Q. Where should it have been - A. In Villiers-street.

Q. When did it come into your cellar originally - A. In the month of April last; this time twelvemonth.

Q. What did it then contain - A. Claret.

Q. When was that bottled off - A. By the prisoner's cellar-book in the month of July, that book is kept in the prisoner's own hand-writing.

Q. Had you ever authorised the prisoner to sell any wine to Mr. Ireson - A. Never.

Q. In short, did you know at all of this cask of wine going out of your cellar to Mr. Ireson - A. I never knew of it at all.

Q. I need not ask you if your cellarman is a place of a considerable trust - A. It is.

Q. I need not ask you his character, if he had not been honest you would not have kept him in your service - A. I would not.

Q. Can you speak to the cask - A. I know the mark and number and cut guage, and the time it came into my possession; the shipper puts that mark, I can speak to the marks and the cut guage.

COURT. Had you observed them before July last - A. I bought them upon the Quays myself, I bought ninety-nine hogsheads of Claret at one time.

Mr. Andrews. Upon each of which, I take it were the guagers mark - A. Yes.

Q. Then it is not singular to find the guager's mark - A. Some guagers do not mark, the cellar-book will show the mark of this cask most likely.

Q. When was this hogshead purchased - A. I think in the month of April in last year.

Q. Probably at the time of their coming into your cellar, was in July. Pray, sir, is fifty-eight gallons a small or a large hogshead - A. They are from fifty-five to sixty, very few of them sixty; sixty, we call them a large size.

Q. Did the prisoner leave your service of his own account, or did you send him about his own business - A. It was then each mutually agreed.

Q. Did you soon afterwards take any account of your stock, with a view to discover any loss - A. Not with a view to discover any loss, because I had a good opinion of him.

Q. Did you find you stock upon that taking correct - A. That I could not tell, the management of my stock was necessarily under the care of my cellar-man.

Q. I am asking you now if you took it for any purpose, did you examine your stock before he left you - A. He rendered me an account of the wine.

Q. Did you cause any examination to see whether the stock of wine that he rendered was accurate or not - A. No, I took it as such.

Q. Who succeeded the prisoner as your cellar-man - A. Barnaby Davis.

Q. I understood you to say that your stock is so large that it is impossible you could have missed any part of your stock - A. I trusted to my cellar-man.

Q. The other man, Tonge, was eighteen years in your service, and it was not till he was pressed very hard that he told any thing - A. He was not pressed very hard, I was led to suppose that my porters had wine in their possession, I applied at Bow-street office, Mr. Stafford sent Taunton to me, we searched our porters, I found some wine in Tonge's possession upon searching his apartment.

Q. Had master Tonge fled at that time - A. He was at home.

Q. I take it for granted you took him in into custody - A. I did not, I took him into my accompting-house, and told him his salvation depended upon his telling me what he had taken, and the prisoner.

Q. There are many considerable wine-merchants in this town, is it not the custom of some of them to permit their cellar-men to trade themselves - A. I have been twenty-five years in the trade and I never knew of it.

Q. Perhaps if great ones do not, little ones may - A. I do not know, I should be very sorry to allow it in my house.

Mr. Gurney. When Tonge made this charge, how long were you before you took the prisoner into custody - A. From the Monday to the Friday.

Q. I believe you took up his brother-in-law - A. I did.

Q. And then on the Friday the prisoner came and surrendered - A. He did.

COURT. Tonge communicated to you on the Tuesday - A. He mentioned it on the Monday night when detected, and mentioned it on Tuesday morning: he mentioned it on the Monday night that I found the wine in his room.

Q. And mentioned Mr. Ireson's name, did he - A. Ireson's, and many others.

WILLIAM CROSS . Q. I believe you are an excise officer - A. Yes.

Q. In the month of September last was the prisoner Watkinson a licenced dealer in wine - A. Not in our division he was not.

COURT. Was Villier-street in your division? You surveyed the cellar did not you - A. Yes.

Q. Is it usual to have port wine in a claret cask - A. I have seen it before.

Q. Is it usual to buy a hogshead of port wine in a claret cask - A. I do not know that it is usual, I have seen it, it is not a common thing.

GEORGE CLARK . Q. I believe you are a wine-merchant - A. Yes, in partnership with William Platt .

Q. Is William Platt related to the prisoner - A. His brother.

Q. Here is a permit out of your stock, did you sell Mr. Ireson any wine - A. I never sold him any wine, I did not know of the permit, however the permit was got, I never sold Mr. Ireson any wine, I did not know him.

COURT. And to your knowledge there was none sold from your house. - A. I am certain of it.

Mr. Arabin. Q. Is it not the custom and habit of wine-merchants to accommodate one another with permits - A. I have heard it is.

Q. Do you know of the prisoner at the bar purchasing of wine on his own account and selling it - A. I do not know.

Q. You cannot say whether he purchased any at sales - A. I saw him once at a sale, whether he bought any I do not know of my own knowledge.

COURT. Q. You say it is common for one house to accommodate another house with a permit - A. I do not know it, I have heard it is.

Mr. Gurney. Q. What is the value of this hogshead of wine - A. Forty six pounds would be a low price, one hundred and thirty eight pounds the pipe.

Prisoner. I would wish to ask the prosecutor a question. Had not the prosecutor bought wine at a lower rate previous to my selling that - A.(Prosecutor) Forty six pounds was a low price for this wine I had before this time bought wine at a lower price, but at this time the price of wine was raised.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel.

COURT. Q. to Tonge Do you know of your own knowledge how that hogshead was filled - A. I do not, I did not see it filled.

Prisoner. Q. to Tonge. Was not every empty cask sent out of Mr. Robertson's cellar before I left his service - A. I believe they were in Villier-street.

JOHN WILDE . - Mr. Arabin. Q. Where do you live - A. In Martins-lane, Cannon-street, I am a wine-broker.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar - A. By sight.

Q. Have you ever purchased wine for him - A. Never.

Q. Have you sold wine to him - A. I was once present at a sale, where he purchased wine, in June 1809, he bought six dozen of wine there, port wine, he gave Webb as his own name.

Mr. Gurney. These were in bottles - A. Yes.

The prisoner called eight witnesses who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 29.

Transported for Seven years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18120408-44

354. WILLIAM HARPER and MATTHEW SMITH were indicted, for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Peter Watson , about the hour of seven at night on the 29th of February , and burglariously stealing therein, seven gold seals, value 15 l. the property of Osbertus John Hamley .

OSBERTUS JOHN HAMLEY . I live in Newcastle-street, in the parish of St. Clement's Danes , it is the house of Peter Watson ; he and his family reside there.

Q. How is your shop situated - A. There is a private door and a shop door.

Q. Do you use the same door that Mr. Watson does to go in - A. Not till the shop door is shut, then I go in by the common door.

Q. I want to know of a Sunday do you go in at the same door that Mr. Watson does - A. Yes, I do.

Q. Is there a communication from the shop to the stairs - A. Yes, there is.

Q. You sometimes use that door upon occasions - A. Frequently for convenience.

Q. When you are out at night and your shop shut up, do you go through the public street door where Mr. Watson does - A.Always, by the same street door that Mr. Watson and his family enters.

Q. By that door you get to the parlour - A. Yes. I have the shop and parlour, and the upper part of the house.

Q. By getting in the house that way you get to the upper part of the house by the street door, is them stairs common to Mr. Watson also - A. Yes.

Q. How do you go to the parlour then - A. There is a communication to the passage, from the passage I can get to the parlour, there is a door from the shop to the passage.

Q. Then how do you get to the parlour - A. There is a parlour in the shop, the back room is in the shop.

Q. What you call the parlour is a back room - A. Yes, in the shop.

Q. Then there is a way out of the shop into that parlour - A. I cannot go in the parlour but out of the shop.

Q. You can get from the shop into the passage, can you - A. Yes, I can, that is my private door; Mr. Watson and his family has nothing to do with it; I pay so much for the whole together.

Q.In what part of the house do you sleep - A. In the attic.

Q. Have you more up stairs than the attic - A. No, not on my own account; all I rent is the shop, parlour, and the sleeping rooms, which are the attics. I pay so much for the whole together.

Q. The attics is what you mean by the upper part of the house that you rent - A. Yes.

Mr. Arabin. You were stating to my lord that you were robbed on February the 29th - A. Yes, at a quarter after seven o'clock at night; I was in the shop within two feet of the window.

Q. Was that before day light was gone - A. It was after day light.

COURT. What time - A. A quarter after seven. I recollect sending my errand boy out about seven; I invariably set down the time when I send him out and I think it was about a quarter of an hour after I sent him out.

Q. What attracted your notice - A. The alarm of glass being broken; at the moment I cast my eyes to the window I observed a man's hand inside of the window.

Q. You mean the shop window - A. The shop window, especially at a tray; the tray contained gold chains to the amount of forty pounds, and upwards.

Q. Did that hand take the tray, or leave it there - A. He had some difficulty in taking it away, and it fell out of his hands, and at the same instant I saw that tray fall from one hand there was a second report of glass breaking at the shop window, at the next pane; I saw a man's hand taking out of one of the trays some gold seals; I then turned round to it, and took away those gold seals; there were seven taken away; I missed seven that night; I saw the seals taken out by that hand; I went round to the shop door, and gave the alarm immediately.

Q. Did you find your shop door fastened - A. Yes, it was fastened by a rope to the brass handle of the door, and to the scraper, and also to the rails underneath the shop window; I got out in two seconds, in consequence of the brass handle the rope was fastened to breaking by my force, at the instant I got out the prisoner Smith was brought in by a neighbour, Mr. Burne; I went in pursuit of the other robber; I left Smith in the custody of Mr. Burne, and went in pursuit of Harper.

Q. You went in pursuit you did not know of whom - A. No, I did not. I went in pursuit of another from a description Mr. Burne had given me; I pursued him into George-yard, Drury-lane.

Q. Did you see any man run - A. No, I did not see any man run myself; I came back to my house without having seen the man.

Q. How long afterwards did you go a second time - A. In about twenty minutes I went back to George-yard, Drury-lane, with Davis.

Q. What distance is George-yard from your house - A. About an hundred yards. On our entrance the second time into George-yard Davis identified the prisoner Harper, he was walking out of George-yard very slowly; I seized Harper.

Q. You say you seized him - A. Yes; I called the officers to come and assist me, and they came up; on the approach of the officers Harper got one of his hands from me; I had hold of him; he put his hand into his coat pocket on purpose to throw the seals from him.

COURT. Did you see they were seals - A. I felt them fall against me, and before they came to the ground one fell into the officers hands, and one into another person's hands; one or two of the seals came to the ground, which were afterwards taken up; I saw one fall into the officer's hands, and one into another person's hands.

Q. Is that gentleman here - A. Yes. I did not see the seals fall to the ground, nor I did not see them picked up.

Mr. Arabin. Who has the seals now - A. The officer.

STEPHEN BURNE . I am an auctioneer.

Q. Were you in Newcastle-street on the 29th of February last - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know Mr. Hamley's shop - A. Perfectly well.

Q. I am speaking of the 29th of February - A. Yes.

Q. Were you near Mr. Hamley's shop that night - I went by several times, but not at the time this robbery was committed.

Q. Where were you - A. In Wych-street, I was only a few yards from the shop.

Q. What time of the evening was that - A.Before the hour of seven and eight.

Q. Was it night time - A. Yes, the shops were all lit up, and the lamps were lit. I took him in Little Drury-lane. I could not have seen his countenance except from the lamps; I followed him very close.

Q. Tell me first what attracted your notice - A. I heard glass break; I was about seven yards from Mr. Hamley's shop; I heard the breaking of glass, in less than two seconds I heard another; I turned round short to go to the spot where I heard it; I saw a man come running, Smith came first; he appeared to come from Mr. Hamley's shop.

Q. He came in a direction as if from Mr. Hamley's shop - A. Yes, and Harper about a yard from Smith running after him, running the same way; I thought men would not run off from an accident, and I sat up a hue and cry stop thief. I ran after him, and almost catched Smith at Astley's pit door.

Q. Did you afterwards catch him, and where - A. They each crossed the road, and Harper got before Smith; I cried out stop thief; the street was very quiet at the time; they run with great violence untill they came to Little Drury-lane, they ran across the road, a woman interrupted them; Harper immediately run up George-yard; I cried out, here is a thief gone up George-yard, stop the gateway; Smith got under the bar of Little Drury-lane, and I pursued him, and when I got near the bottom of Little Drury-lane towards the Strand; I catched Smith and brought him back, and on bringing him back I met with Jones the Bow-street officer; I requested Mr. Jones to go up George-yard, for one of them was

gone up there.

Q. Now with respect to Smith had you ever lost sight of him until you caught him - A. I had both of them in my sight until Harper ran up George-yard; I never lost sight of Smith until I took him.

Q. Now with respect to Harper did you make such observations so as to say whether he is the man, or not the man - A. Harper is the man, I have not the least doubt of it.

Q. When he was taken had he the same dress as when pursued. Where you there when Harper was taken - A. No, I was not. I saw him after he was taken.

Q. Had Harper the same description of dress that the man had you pursued that you think was Harper - A. Yes, he had.

Q. How soon did you see him after he ran up the George-yard - A. About twenty minutes; when he was taken to Bow-street.

Q. Had you any doubt at that time about his person - A. Not the least doubt. They found nothing upon Smith.

DANIEL DAVIS . Q. Do you know Mr. Hamley's shop - A. Yes. On this night I was close to the window with a cart; I was sitting in a cart driving I was passing the shop, I saw Harper and Smith in conversation together; I am quite sure the prisoners are the men.

Q. What time was this - A. Between seven and eight, they were in conversation together at the window, close as ever they could be.

Q. Did you keep your eye upon them - A. Yes, I got a little way from the window, I did not see the first window broke I heard it; I saw Harper come a little way from the window, and go to the window again and push his elbow into the window, he took something with his left hand.

Q. Did you see him put his left hand into the window - A. Yes, and take something out; they ran away, and then I did not see them again until they were taken, they ran round the corner where Smith was apprehended.

Q. How soon did you see them afterwards - A. In about twenty minutes, I saw Smith in about five minutes; I knew him to be one of the same men; Mr. Burn was bringing him back; I stopped with the cart to tell the gentleman who they were.

Q. And in about five minutes you saw Mr. Burn bringing him back - A. Yes.

Q. Did you know him again - A. Yes.

Q. Have you any doubt of him - A. No, none at all.

Q. Did you see Harper afterwards - A. Yes, I went along with the officer to point him him out; that was about twenty minutes after the window was broke.

COURT. Was that he that broke the window with his elbow - A. Yes.

Q. What sort of a light was there - A. A large light in Mr. Hamley's shop window.

GEORGE ODDY . I am a Bow-street officer; I was on duty at Astley's, along with Jones, at the Pavillion.

Q. How far is that from Hamley's shop - A. About fifty yards. At the time of the hue and cry, and stop thief, I was in the next public-house to Astley's on purpose to get refreshment.

Q. What is the name of the street - A.Wych-street. I heard the call of stop thief, I flew out that moment, I saw a number of people running to the George-yard, the corner of Little Drury-lane; I enquired what was the matter; I found there had been a robbery; I got a light and went up George-yard, and searched, I could not find either property or person; I returned back to Mr. Hamley's shop, Jones was tyeing Smith; I hurried back to George-yard again, Jones, me, and Hamley, and several more.

Q. What time elapsed to your return from George-yard, and going back again - A. Not more than five minutes. When I got back I just got under the gateway, I heard Jones say, Oddy, here is one of them; I ran to him directly, and found that he had hold of Harper's right arm; I immediately laid hold of the left, Jones gave his brother the other that he had hold of. We were taking him across a passage to take him into a public-house; I then observed him throwing something out of his hand; he threw away two or three seals, as I thought, one hit my thigh, it fell to the ground; I put my right foot upon it, and picked it up; this is it. Two others were picked up in my presence; there were four picked up altogether, two I picked up myself, and two the people picked up. I took them from the people, they have been in my possession ever since.

THOMAS JONES . I am an officer. I was in George-yard that evening, I took the prisoner Harper, he was coming out of the gateway. When I took him I saw his hand in his pocket, I secured his arms; I saw two seals picked up near the spot where he was; a little boy picked up this seal and gave it into my hand.

Q. Harper was not taken back to Mr. Hamley's - A. No, he was not.

COURT. What sort of a night was this - A. The light was gone, it was moon light.

CHARLES HUMPHREYS . Q. Were you in George-yard - A. I was; I assisted in taking Harper into the public-house; I searched him, I found four small saws upon him.

JOHN BEAL . I am a patrol; I was on duty near Mr. Hamley's house.

Q. Do you know the prisoners at the bar - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see them together on that night - A. Yes.

COURT. Did you take so much notice as to know them again - A. Yes, I am sure they are the same men; I saw them after they were taken; I knew Harper before that night, Smith I did not.

Q. to prosecutor. Look at these seals - A. I have examined them before, they are my seals; there is five here, they are gold seals, value from five to eight guineas.

Q. Was the day gone - A. It was rather moon light.

The prisoners said nothing in their defence.

Smith called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Harper called one witness, who gave him a good character.

HARPER, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 20.

SMITH, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 21.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson .

Reference Number: t18120408-45

355. RICHARD CRESWELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of February , in the dwelling-house of Edward Stevenson , John Stevenson , William Remington , John Smith Stevenson , and David Robert Remington , fifty bank notes, value 1 l. each , their property.

And OTHER COUNTS for like offence, only varying the manner of charging.

WILLIAM TAYLOR . I am a clerk of the Bank; I delivered out the notes; my partner posts the numbers, which must correspond with the notes I give out; I delivered out four hundred one-pound notes on the 26th of February, from No 61,201. to 600. inclusive; they were all done up in parcels. I delivered these notes to Mr. John Tate .

JOHN WILLIAMS . I am a clerk in the Bank of England, in the same office with Mr. Taylor.

Q. Is it his duty to deliver out notes to the public - A. Yes, and it is my duty to enter the notes, and what they are delivered out for.

Q. Turn to your book and see whether there is any entry there to Mr. Tate, of any notes delivered out to him - A. Yes, four hundred one's from 61,201, to 600, inclusive, dated the 3d of January.

JOHN TATE . I am a clerk to Messrs. Stevenson.

Q. Did you receive any notes from Mr. Taylor on the 26th of January - A. I did; I received a parcel of notes in exchange for two notes of one thousand pound each.

Q. Were there any one's among those that you received - A. I do not know, they were delivered to me in a parcel tied up; I delivered them to Mr. Edward Hall, clerk in the house of Stevenson and Company in the same state that I received it.

EDWARD HALL . Q. You are a clerk in Stevenson's house - A. I am.

Q. Did you receive from Mr. Tate on the 26th of February any parcel of notes - A. I did, they were tied up four hundred one's, and a hundred two's; I gave them to Mr. Toulmen, they were tied up; I delivered them to Mr. Toulmen in the same state that I received them Mr. Tate.

JOSEPH PITTY TOULMEN. Q. I believe you are chief cashier in the house of Stevenson - A. Yes.

Q. On the 26th of February did you receive four hundred notes of one pound each - A. I did.

Q. Were they in parcels of fifty, sir - A. They were.

Q. What were the number of the notes - A. We do not enter the numbers of the one's, I received that number, that parcel, of the last witness, Mr. Hall.

Q.Upon making up your cash accounts did you discover that you missed any - A. On the evening of the 27th I discovered that I was fifty pounds short in my account, in the cash I ought to have had.

Q. I believe in your accompts the small notes you denominate cash - A. Yes, my deficiency was in that denomination; we call it as cash in our books, it is given to me as cash.

Q. How soon did you discover any of those that you had missed - A. On Sunday morning, the 30th.

COURT. We are speaking of February - A. The 1st of March I mean. On Thursday evening the 27th I discovered the loss, and on Sunday the 1st of March some notes were shewn me by Mr. Costan, who is a clerk in our house; he shewed me a bundle of forty one's; they were forty of the parcel of four hundred that I had received on the 26th; they are following numbers 61,411 to 52.

Q. These parcels were all made up in fifty's - A. Yes, in even fifty's: this was one of the parcels wanting ten, all dated the 3d of January of the present year.

Mr. Gurney. How soon afterwards did Mr. Costan deliver to you any other note about three quarters of an hour on the same day; Sunday he gave me one more note, 61,408, the same date.

Q. In consequence of the communications that Mr. Costan made to you when he gave you that note did you speak to the prisoner - A. I did. The prisoner was a clerk in our house; I accused him of the theft; he denied it. I insisted on knowing what other notes he had about him; he produced two others, one of them turned out to be one of the notes I had lost this 61,409, the same date; I then asked him how he came by these two; he said he got them of Thomas Hall in change of a dirty two pound note. The first note I received of Costan; he borrowed it for me, I have had it ever since.

COURT. Is it known to all the clerks that it is not the practice of the house to take the number of the small notes - A. It is.

MARY DIXON. Q. You live servant in the house of Messrs. Stevenson's - A. Yes; I am house maid there.

Q. Do you know a room called the library - A. Yes. On the last Friday I observed in a box a roll of bank notes, I looked at them, and just saw they were one pound bank notes, I put them where I found them, and in consequence of what I said to Mr. Costan, Mr. Costan and I went up on Sunday morning to the same place, I found the roll of bank notes, which I left on the Friday morning in the same place; on the Friday I left them on the top of two sheets of paper, and on Sunday morning they were under these two sheets of waste paper; I told William; he went up with me, and saw them; we both looked at the notes, and we both counted them together, we counted forty-eight. That was on the Friday before Mr. Costan saw them. I left them in the box.

WILLIAM MABBOTT. Q. You are a servant to Mr. Stevenson - A. Yes. From the information of Mary Dixon I went up with her into the library; I there found a roll of bank notes; I looked at them, they were all one pound notes. We counted them on the Friday, there were forty-eight. I left them in the box as I found them.

SAMUEL COSTAN . I am a clerk in Mr. Stevenson's house.

Q. On Sunday the 1st of March did Mary Dixon mention any thing to you respecting a box in the library - A. Yes; I went up stairs to that room, I was in the library when she mentioned the circumstance of the notes to me; that is the place where I saw the

box; there are three rooms up there that contain books, they are called the library; I got up and looked in the box; I could not find them. She got up herself and took them from the bottom; I saw her take them out.

Q. What was the parcel that she took out of this box - A. Forty notes one pound each.

Q. Were those the notes that you afterwards gave to Mr. Toulmen - A. Yes, they were.

COURT. Only forty - A. Yes, I counted them afterwards, I and Mr. Toulmen counted them together, we made them only forty.

Q. Until the moment Mary Dixon acquainted you of the circumstance had you any knowledge of these notes being in the box - A. Not any. I gave these notes to Toulmen.

Mr. Gurney. After you had given them to Mr. Toulmen did you ask the prisoner to lend you a one pound note - A. I did; he lent me one, No. 61,408; I delivered that to Mr. Toulmen.

Q. Were you present afterwards when Mr. Toulmen received from the hand of the prisoner the other one - A. Yes.

Mr. Alley. You knew there had been missing in the house fifty one pound notes - A. Yes.

Q. All the clerks had access to the drawer were the notes were - A. Yes.

COURT, Q. to Mr. Toulmen. Did you ever authorise the putting that forty pounds into this box - A. Certainly not.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel; called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120408-46

356. RICHARD CRESWELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, in the dwelling house of Edward Stevenson , John Stevenson , William Remington , John Smith Stevenson , and David Robert Remington , two bank notes, value 1 l. each , their property.

SECOND COUNT, for stealing fifty bank notes, value 1 l. each, in the dwelling house, and the property of the aforesaid persons.

Mr. Gurney, counsel for the prosecution declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120408-47

357. JAMES DAWSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of February , a wrapper, value 1 s. 6 d. and forty-five yards of woollen cloth, value 35 l. the property of Daniel Deacon .

SECOND COUNT, for like offence, stating it to be the property of Daniel Deacon , John Harrison , John Jackson , and others.

DANIEL DEACON . I am a carrier from sundry places in the north, in the York and Wakefield waggon.

Q. Are you the only proprietor of that waggon - A. No; there are John Harrison , John Jackson , William Howard , John Dixon , William Beal , and John Beal . John Butler was the waggoner, he had the care of the waggon.

JOHN BUTLER . Q.Had you the charge of the Wakefield waggon - A. Yes; the waggon unloads at the White Horse Cripplegate; I unloaded it that morning, on the 26th of February, at seven o'clock; there was no parcel missing by the way bill from the waggon. About half past twelve o'clock I sent a parcel in our cart; the parcel was woollen cloth in a canvas wrapper; that was part of the contents of the said waggon.

Q. Who was the person that had the care of it - A. John Cox . John Cox left the yard with the cart, with another person to guard it; I saw the wrapper again at the Mansion House the next day; the prisoner was then in custody.

JOHN COX. Q. Did you take care of the cart which was to convey parcels that came by the Wakefield waggon - A. Yes, I did.

Q. Did you take every thing that you received safe out of the yard - A. I did. I was going down London Wall, and the wind blew very hard; I found it blew the covering off. I covered them over safe, and this said truss was safe in the cart at the time.

Q. What time of the day was this - A. As near a quarter before one as I can possibly guess.

Q. How much further did you go before you had reason to think you had lost any thing - A. I went as far as Broad-street, and as soon as I stopped the cart I missed it in a moment; I had occasion to stop the cart there; we had some goods to deliver in Broad-street, I missed the truss in a moment.

Q. In that distance could it have dropped out of your cart by accident - A. I am sure it was impossible it should shake out. I was driving the horse along, walking by the side of the horse.

Q. How could any person have got that truss out of your cart - A. There were a number of coal waggons passing at the time, and I was obliged to keep at the horse's head, going by the narrow part of London Wall by the church wall.

Q. Could any person have took it from behind - A. That must have been the way, it could not have fell out; it could not have gone out any other way than some person taking it out.

Q. Did you observe any person following of the cart - A. My attention was to the horse at that moment.

Q. Therefore you did not see any person about the cart - A. Not at the moment I did not; I did not miss it until I came to Broad-street. On the next day I saw the truss at the Mansion House.

GEORGE ROBERTS . I am a woollen cloth manufacturer.

Q. Was this package that was sent up by the Wakefield waggon your property - A. Yes; I delivered it to Deacon's waggon at Huddersfield; the parcel was directed to Mr. John Blackburn, Duke-street, Aldgate; the canvas wrapper contained two pieces of woollen cloth, a green and a blue forty-five yards and a half; the two pieces value thirty-three pounds eighteen shillings and seven pence, that is the charge to Mr. Blackburn.

SAMUEL SHEPPARD . I am an officer. On Wednesday the 26th of February I went into Broad-street about one o'clock; I saw the prisoner with this truss upon his shoulder; he was going towards Throgmorton-street. In Throgmorton-street I laid hold of him

I asked him what he had got there; I received no answer; I saw the truss was falling from him to me, and I threw it off his shoulder backwards; I kept hold of the prisoner and secured him, after I had secured the prisoner he said he wished I had secured the man that passed me; he was the man that asked him to carry it. I had observed that man walking on the other side of the way before he passed me.

Q. Did he say that before the man was clean off - A. No, he did not. I took the prisoner to the Compter, on opening this bale at the Mansion House I found this invoice; I found it was consigned to Mr. Blackburn; I went to Mr. Blackburn, and he directed me to Mr. Deacon; I have kept it ever since, it contains a piece of blue cloth, and a piece of green.

Q. to Mr. Roberts. Look at that bill of parcels you sent with the wrapper and its contents - A. Yes, and the wrapper, and its contents belong to me; the contents are the same I sent up.

Q. to Mr. Deacon. Do you live in town - A. I do; I saw it was taken out of the waggon into the cart; I am the only person that has the carting business.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence.

CHARLES DEANE . Q. On the day this man was taken in custody did you see any thing of him - A. I saw him at the corner of Winchester-street, opposite the posts; he was standing in the street; a gentleman asked him if he was a porter; he said, yes.

Q. Had he a knot - A. No, he had not; the gentleman asked him if he would carry that parcel a little way in the city for him; he said he would, and I parted with him; I saw no more of him.

Q. Was the parcel that the gentleman wanted him carry like that - A. I cannot say exactly it was like that, but I took no particular notice, nor which way he went.

COURT. Where was the parcel laying - A. Upon the posts facing of Winchester-street; I went towards Fore-street, I left them together; I went on my business; I am a taylor, I live at No. 72, Golden-lane; I live in the one pair, I do not rent the whole house.

Q. Who does rent the whole house - A. The landlord does not live in the house, he lives in Smithfield: he is a cutler, his name is Dennis; he has a workshop in Golden-lane, and his shop is in Smithfield.

Q. It is an odd thing for a gentleman to have such a large parcel, did it not strike you. How long have you known the prisoner - A. I have worked for him a twelve month back, and more than that latterly; he lived at No. 80, Grub-street, just above the chapel.

Q. What sort of a gentleman was this - A. It was a gentleman, he had a brownish coloured great coat on, or an olive colour.

Q. Are you quite sure that you were not in Throgmorton-street that day - A. I was not to my knowledge.

Q. Why you can best know whether you were or not - A. I certainly was not that day, nor week.

Q. When did you learn that this man was taken up - A. Why I heard from his friends that he had met with an accident.

Q. What do you mean by an accident - A. That he had got into trouble; they said, did you see James so-and-so, I said yes.

Q. What day was it you saw him - A. The 26th of February; I believe it was Wednesday.

Q. When were you told of it - A. I heard of it on the Sunday morning. It was Wednesday that I met with him to the best of my knowledge.

Q. What time of the day was it. A. It was past eleven o'clock; it might be half an hour, but I am quite sure it was not twelve.

Q. Look at the truss was it as large as that - A. I cannot say; I did not take particular notice.

Q. to Butler. What time of day was it the cart left your premises - A. Within ten minutes; I cannot speak truly about half an hour after twelve.

Q. to Cox. What time did you leave the inn-yard - A. I am quite sure I was in the inn-yard at twelve o'clock.

Q. How long do you think you had left before you missed this truss - A. I do not think it was more than about twenty minutes.

Mr. Adolphus. Will you undertake to say that very truss was the truss that was in the cart - A. Yes: I know it by the direction, there was only this one truss to Mr. Blackburn.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120408-48

358. JOHN SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of March , a pair of breeches, value 10 s. the property of George Gerson .

GEORGE GERSON . I am a licensed hawker ; I lost the property on the 2d of March, at the sign of the Crown, Hornsey-lane, Highgate-hill ; I went into that house where there were twenty-five Irishmen, navigators. The prisoner took the breeches from my arm, they were handed from one to another; I asked the prisoner for the breeches, he said he had not got them. I afterwards went into the room with Lewis Page the constable; we were both in danger of our lives. When the prisoner was apprehended he knew where my breeches were; he said he saw a man offer my breeches for two pots of beer; his wife had got the breeches. I could not get hold of the wife.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120408-49

359. GEORGE SMITH was indicted for feloniously forging, on the 26th of November , a bank note for the payment of 10 l. with intention to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England .

SECOND COUNT, for feloniously disposing off, and putting away a like forged note with the same intention. And

FOUR OTHER COUNTS for like offence, stating his intention to be to defraud Abraham Easley .

ABRAHAM EASLEY . Q. I believe you reside in Crown-street, Finsbury-square - A. I do; I am a linen-draper .

Q. Do you remember the prisoner at the bar coming to your house - A. I do; he came with a lad in his hand on the 26th of November, about four o'clock in the afternoon, he bought twenty-eight yards and a half of gingham at eight pence per yard, it amounted to nineteen shillings; he proffered in payment a ten

Pound note; I rather scrupled giving change, but in the event I gave him a pen and ink and desired him to write his name and address on the back of the note; after he had done that I put the day of the month, and my own initials A E at the bottom.

Q. Take that note in your hand - A. It is William Martin , Barnet; William Martin is the name he gave and Barnet the name of the place; I wrote A E 26th of November; that is my own initials. That is the note; I am sure it is the note; I wrote it at the time; I am sure it was uttered by the prisoner.

Mr. Gurney. It is your custom I take it for granted to desire persons to write their names - A. Not always; I do sometimes.

Q. How long afterwards was it that you saw the prisoner in custody - A. I think it was in February.

Q. And then I believe you saw him in custody - A. I did; I was taken to the public-house adjoining the office.

Q. You take a great number of notes in the course of a year - A. Not of that amount; my trade is such that I take mostly one's and two's; the circumstance of taking a ten pound note is rather unusual; after I had given him the nine one pound notes it struck me that it was foolish to give nine one pound notes in change for so small an article.

Mr. Knapp. As that time has elapsed have you the least particle of a doubt that he was the man - A. Not the least.

THOMAS GLOVER . I am one of the inspectors of the Bank of England.

Q. Look at that note, is it a genuine note - A. No; this is a forged note, it is not the impression of a bank plate; it is not bank paper, nor struck from a bank plate; the signature is not the signature of any bank clerk.

(The note read.)

WILLIAM HUDSON . I am a linen-draper in Sun-street, Bishopsgate-street.

Q. Look at the prisoner at the bar, did you ever see him before - A. Yes; he passed to me a ten pound note on the 26th of November, he came to my house between three and four in the afternoon; he purchased two counterpanes at two pounds eight shillings for the two.

Q. What did he give you in payment - A. A ten pound note.

Q. Did you put any mark upon the note that you received of the prisoner - A. I did not at the time on the 26th I received it; on the 28th I carried it to the bank for inspection.

Q. Was it out of your sight or possession until you put a mark upon it at the bank of England - A. It had not.

COURT. It was never out of your possession untill you presented it at the bank of England - A. It was not.

Q. Look at it and see whether the mark you put upon it at the bank is upon the note - A. It is; I am perfectly sure it is the note I received of the prisoner, I did not see him again until he was in custody some months after.

Q. Did you know before you went to the bank that other persons had similar notes - A. I did.

Q. You doubted the note before you went to the Bank - A. I did, in consequence of something I heard. The prisoner said he came from Barnet; I was busy at the time when he first came in; he was in the shop about half an hour; I sold him two counterpanes; in the course of conversation, he said he came from Barnet, his wife had been there the week before, and she had purchased some articles that she liked; he said he was going in a chaise, he could take take them to Barnet, he had a boy with him.

Mr. Alley. I suppose you have shopmen that serve in the shop as well yourself - A. No; my wife serves in the shop; I always put the money in the drawer myself.

Q. You carry the notes up stairs of night I suppose - A. Yes; I had no other ten pound bank note.

Mr. Garrow. Do you frequently change ten pound notes for a small article - A. Very seldom.

RICE JENKINS. I am a shopman to Mr. Mackwell, a haberdasher in Crown-street, Finsbury-square.

Q. Look upon the prisoner, do you know him - A. Yes, perfectly well.

Q. Upon what occasion did you first see him - A. He came into Mr. Mackwell's shop on the 26th of November, I believe between three and four in the afternoon, he was in company of a little boy; he asked to look at some silk handkerchiefs, which I shewed him; he fixed upon two at a low price, he bought them.

Q. What was the price - A. About seven shillings a-piece. He bought something else, some little trifling haberdashery, the whole amount was eighteen shillings; I was not able to give change; I went across the way with it to Alexander Illman, a linen draper in the same street.

Q. Did you deliver to Mr. Illman the same paper that you had received of the prisoner - A. I did.

Q. Do you know a person of the name of Amelia Alcep - A. I do, she is Mr. Illman's daughter-in-law.

Q. Did she in your presence write any thing upon it - A. No, I got the change of Mr. Illman; I went back and delivered it to the prisoner. I did not see the prisoner afterwards untill he was in custody.

Q. Had you any doubt then of his person - A. I had not then in the remotest degree, nor have I now.

Mr. Adolphus. Did you take any particular notice of the man, more than any other man - A. I did, and the impression that it made on my mind, that I recollected the person more forcibly than before.

Q. You have no more memory of this particular bank note than of other notes - A. Yes, I have; there is a mark on the note, I can recollect; I took most particular notice of the prisoner, and the note itself.

ALEXANDER ILLMAN . I am a linen-draper in Crown-street, Finsbury-square.

Q. Do you remember your neighbour's shopman Jenkins, coming to your shop with a ten pound note for change - A. I do, I took no notice of the day then particular, it was in the latter end of November

I know.

Q. Did you deliver that note which he put into your hand to your daughter-in-law, Miss Alcep - A. I said to him, do you know the person you took this note of, the water-mark appears too visible; he said he had it of a respectable man. I said to my daughter-in-law, put Mr. Mackwell's name upon it and give change; I went to the bottom of the shop, I did not look particularly at the note or else I should not have given change at night. I said at night to my daughter, look for the bright note I took of Mackwell; she looked and did not find it, I looked for it and found it.

Mr. Gurney. You say he said he had it of a respectable man - A. Yes, if he had said he had it of a respectable looking man, a stranger, I should not have taken it.

AMELIA ALCEP. Q. Do you remember Jenkins coming to your father-in-law for change of a ten pound note - A. Yes.

Q. Can you fix the day - A. No, I think it was in the latter end of November; my father-in-law told me to write Mackwell's name upon it and to give change to Jenkins, I did so.

WILLIAM HOOD . I am an apprentice to Pothonoir and Co. distillers in Old-street.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar, look round - A. Yes. On the 28th of November last he came to our house, he had either a little girl or a boy with him, having a great coat on, I cannot say which, he asked me the price of gin, I told him the price, he said he wanted two gallons, they came to one pound eight shillings, he paid me in a ten pound, to appearance a Bank note; upon his giving me the note I asked him his name and address, he gave me the name of Smith. I understood him to say, that he lived at Whetstone, he gave me the ten pound note, I told him I did not think I had change enough in my desk, upon examining I had; I gave him the change and took the ten pound note, I asked him whether he would take the gin with him, he said no, he was going further, he would call for it as he came back.

Q. What did you do with the ten pound note - A. I put the name of Smith upon the back of that note.

Q. Look at this note and tell me whether that is the note you received of the prisoner - A. I am positive that is the note I received of the prisoner.

RICHARD BOTHEROYD . Q. You keep a wine-vault, Golden-lane, Barbican. Did you ever see the prisoner there - A. Yes, about one o'clock on the 30th of November last. He came into my wine-vaults, he asked for two bottles of Sherry, and half a gallon of the best rum, he gave me a five pound note; I asked his name, he said it was Smith; I asked him where he lived, he said in Smith-street, Islington. I wrote Smith, and under I put Smith-street, Islington, 30th day of November, that is my writing on the back of the note; I never saw him after untill I saw him in custody, but I described him to the Bank-clerk.

JOHN FOY . Q.You are an officer of the police - A. I am. The prisoner was brought to the office, he said he lived at No. 9, Peerless-place, Peerless-pool. I found he lived there.

Q.Peerless Pool is in the neighbourhood of Finsbury - A. Yes. I searched his house, I found a stone bottle and two counterpanes, they have been in my possession ever since, I produce them.

Q. to William Hood . Is that a bottle that has been in your service - A. Yes, the firm of the house is stamped on the bottle in full length, Pothonoire and Hill, 68, Old-street, these bottles are manufactured on purpose for us.

Q. to Mr. Hudson. Look at the two counterpanes - A. I can swear to one positively by the marks, I believe they are the counterpanes I sold to the prisoner.

Mr. Garrow. We have already shewn Mr. Glover the note in the indictment, we now shew him the note uttered to Mr. Hudson. Mr. Glover is that the paper of the Bank.

Mr. Glover. Q. It is altogether a forgery, it appears to me to be of the same manufactory as the first.

Q. I now shew you the one uttered to Mackwell - A. This is a forgery throughout.

Q. I now shew you the forged ten pound note, uttered to Pothonoire - A. That is a forgery throughout of the same manufactory.

Q. I now give you the five pound note, uttered to Botheroyd - A. That in all respects, it appears to be from a plate of the similar manufactory, they are much worn, the water marks are still too clear and too transparent.

Q. I believe Mr. Glover you have a sum of money - A. I have, it was delivered to me by the prisoner at the bar; upon the prisoner's apprehension the prisoner delivered to me one hundred and sixty four pound, which he had in his pocket-book, good notes of the bank of England, the balance I have now, is one hundred and nine pounds; part of it has been delivered to him for his purposes.

BERNARD BAILEY. Q. Are you the proprietor of the house No. 9, Peerless-place, Peerless-pool - A. The house belongs to my daughter.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar - A. I know it is the same man, I saw the man in prison, I went after him to get the key, he came two or three times to my house; I left word with my wife to give him the key.

Q. When did you first see him at the house, No. 9, Peerless-place, Peerless-pool - A. He was there residing as the tenant occupying the house; after that I saw him in the jail, I asked him to give me the key, he sent me the key.

COURT. How long had he resided there - A. A quarter and a half, I was paid for the half quarter.

Prisoner's Defence. I had these notes of Mr. Thomas Bray , a well-known character here, who told me they were all good notes. I had ten ten's from him at one time; one ten at another; four fives, three ten's, six two's, and eight one's at another time; he then told me these were all good Bank of England notes, and I knew no other till about a week prior to my apprehension; he asked me if I had paid them all away; I told him I had, except two small ones; he then told me that I was a very bad judge not to know a good note from a bad one; he told me they were certainly forged notes. We had a serious altercation about it, and that at my own house; I told him

I had two small ones left which I burnt in the fire before his face, and a woman that was present; I told him I did not think he was capable of deceiving me in that kind of way, from the length of time I had known him, and the often dealings we had together; he told me he hoped it would be all right, and that nothing further would come of it; he returned me a twenty pound Dartford bank note by way of appeasing my trouble; he said he would take care to support me through it, as I never knew they were bad bank notes. A few days after I was apprehended he hearing of this it took a great effect upon him, he was taken ill in fact to his bed, and he died in about a week afterwards; at the time I was in prison he frequently declared to those that were in the habit of seeing him, that he gave me the notes for good notes.

Mr. Gurney. Q. to Foy. I believe you apprehended Bray, either at the prisoner's house, or close to it - A. He came there, I kept him in custody while I was searching the prisoner's house.

Q. Do you know that he is dead - A. I have heard so.

Mr. Gurney. The evidence that I have to offer is of the death of Bray, and his declaration when he was in the view of death.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 38.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120408-50

360. JOHN MARTIN was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Edward Berry , the said Edward Berry and others of his family being therein, about the hour of four in the afternoon, on the 6th of April , and stealing therein a coat, value 12 s. and a plow, value 6 s. his property.

EDWARD BERRY . Q. Are you a house-keeper - A. No, I have only part of the house, No. 8, Vine-street, St. Martin's in the Fields ; the house is let out in tenements, the landlord does not live in the house. I occupy the first floor, I am a carpenter ; one of my rooms on the first floor I use as a work-shop; I left my work-shop to go to the other room on the same floor, to get my tea; I locked the padlock on the door and left the key in it, it was from half-past four o'clock to a quarter to five.

Q. Any person coming up stairs might get admission by turning the key - A. Yes, and by taking the padlock off. I left the work-shop about five minutes, I heard the door shut too, I looked out of the window, I saw the prisoner going out of the house; I immediately left the room and ran down stairs after him, when I got to the bottom of the stairs, my brother, George Berry , was bringing him back.

Q. Had he any thing about him belonging to you when he was brought in - A. Not any thing, I found my coat in the passage of the ground floor, which I had left in the work-shop, and on going up into the work-shop I missed a plow; I am sure I left the plow in my work-shop; I put it out of my hand when I came out of the room; the plow has never been found. This is the coat, it is worth twelve shillings, the plow was worth six shillings.

GEORGE BERRY . Q. Had you been at work in the place you call the work-shop with your brother - A. I had. From what I heard on the stairs, I went out from my tea to see if any thing was wrong, I found the padlock off, and the door a little way open, I just looked in and saw no one was there, I immediately turned my head on the stairs, and saw the prisoner stepping off the last stair; I followed him as fast as I could, I saw him drop my brother's coat, I overtook him about twelve or fourteen yards from the house.

Q. Could you distinguish whether he was in company with any other person - A. I observed that he ran against another man when he got out of doors, as if he did it designedly; the other man ran up Vine-street, and was off. I seized the prisoner, I said I have you. The plow has never been found.

THOMAS CAVE . I am an officer. The prisoner told me if I would let him go he would get the plow; I could not unless he went before the magistrate.

Prisoner's Defence. I cannot controvert one single syllable they have said, I was in a state of insensibility from liquor.

GUILTY, aged 56,

Of stealing only ,

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120408-51

361. WILLIAM PENTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of September , a gelding, value 2 l. the property of William Lane .

WILLIAM LANE . I live in Cornwall-street, in the parish of St. George's in the east. I am a butcher .

Q. Did you at any time lose a gelding - A. Yes, on the 1st of September last I lost the gelding from out of a field near the half-way-house, Commercial-road ; I had the gelding near a twelve-month.

Q. What was the worth of the gelding - A. I gave four pound and a crown for him.

Q. What sort of a horse was he as to his marks - A. He had white spots in the back, in the saddle place, and white spotted down his side, and his belly.

Q. What fence was there to this field - A.A wodden railing.

Q. Could the horse have strayed out of this field - A. No, he could not, he was blind, he could not get out without being led out.

Q. When was the last time you saw him before you missed him - A. I missed him the day after I put him in; I put him in the field on the morning of the 1st of September, on the 2nd I went to fetch him, he was gone.

Q. Did you make enquiry after him - A. I did, and could not find him until I saw him last Sunday three weeks, he was then with Mr. Calf, of Walworth-common.

Q. Were you quite sure that when you saw the horse, that it was the horse that had been taken out of this field - A. Yes, I have not the least doubt in the world, it is the same horse answering in every description as my horse did.

Mr. Alley. My good fellow you swear very stout to the horse - A. Yes.

Q. By proving it to be the horse here, you think you will get the horse and ride home again. You lost a horse in September - A. About the 1st of September.

Q.How old was the horse when you bought him - A. I cannot tell his age; I am no judge of a horse's age.

Q. Is he of the same colour as your horse was - A.No, his coat is rougher and longer.

Q. Come, come, Mr. Butcher, you are not to cut me up in that way, is the horse you now swear to the colour that your horse was - A. Yes.

Q. Did not you say now this moment that it had white spots about it, do you mean to swear it is quite the same colour as when you lost it - A. Yes, he is a black horse, but his coat is rougher.

Q. How many hands high was that horse that you lost - A. I am no judge of the hands.

Q. What sort of a tail, had he a swish tail - A. A kind of a nag-tail; it is a black horse with a nag tail.

Q.How are his ears - A. Short ears.

Q. Are they cropped or not - A. No.

Q. Short ears - A. Yes; I bought him of John Dennis , and sold him to another man, and that man sold him to John Dennis , and I bought him a second time again.

JAMES CALF . I live at Walworth; I am a dustman.

Q. Had you a horse in your possession that was claimed by William Lane - A. Yes; I bought that horse at a door in Smithfield of a man, I cannot say his name.

Q. Look at the prisoner, do you know him at all - A. Yes, I know that old gentleman; I did not buy it of him.

Mr. Alley. When was it you bought him - A. Last Friday three weeks.

Q. You never saw him in the prosecutor's possession before that did you - A. No.

JAMES YATES . I live at No. 3, Stonard's-court, Great Peter-street, Westminster.

Q. Did you dispose of a horse to Joseph Calf - A. Yes.

Q. From what person did you get that horse - A. I bought it of the prisoner in the month of October last; I know the prisoner well; I paid him for it in my own dwelling house; I gave him two pounds twelve shillings for it; he is my neighbour; I had known the horse twelve or thirteen months before I bought it; I saw the horse every morning; the stable was next door to my house. I have known the prisoner twelve or thirteen years, and always knew him to be an inoffensive man.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120408-52

362. JAMES POWELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of March , two pair of sheets, value 1 l. and two counterpanes, value 1 l. the property of Francis Brennen , in his dwelling-house .

FRANCIS BRENNEN . I am a victualler , I live at the Northumberland's Head in the parish of St. Martin's in the Fields .

Q. Did you lose two pair of sheets and two counterpanes at any time - A. Yes, on Thursday the 12th of March; the prisoner had slept at our house. I have seen my property since.

THOMAS DELL . I am a patrol in High-street, Kensington. I saw the prisoner on the 12th of last March, in the evening, between ten and eleven o'clock, he had a large bundle with him; I asked him what he had got, he said nothing but what belonged to him and his wife; he asked me for a lodging; I said I had a friend, if he would walk with me I would get him a lodging; I took him to the watchhouse and left him in the possession of George Hull .

GEORGE HULL. I am a constable. The prisoner was delivered to me; I have kept the bundle ever since. The prisoner at the watchhouse said he redeemed the property in the bundle out of a pawnshop; he could not tell the name of the pawnbroker, nor the street where he lived.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to his character.

GUILTY, aged 35,

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and Publicly Whipped .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120408-53

363. WILLIAM HIGGINBOTTOM and ANTHONY MUSSON were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of March , eleven waistcoats, value 2 l. 17 s. 6 d. nine handkerchiefs, value 16 s. 6 d. and two pair of braces, value 2 s. the property of John Ryan , in the dwelling-house of William Hollings .

JOHN RYAN. I am a licensed hawker . I lost these things on the the 4th of March at the Star and Garter public-house, Paddington .

Q.What is the landlord's name - A. William Hollings . On the 4th of March I went into the house between eleven and twelve o'clock in the day -

Mr. Challenor. That is not the time you lost the bundle - A. No; I lost the bundle between seven and eight at night; Anthony Musson took the bundle from between my legs, and handed it to Higginbottom, Higginbottom gave it to a boy, he ran away with it; I demanded my bundle, Higginbottom said if I said three words more he would have my life; I procured two constables; we had a coach, and then we took the prisoner to Marlborough-street office.

Q. What was in your bundle - A. Eleven waistcoats, two pair of braces, and nine handkerchiefs; I never saw my goods again.

Q. This took place in a public tap-room - A. Yes.

Q. Were you quite sober - A. Yes, I was, because I had no money.

Q. Did not you tell the landlord you would make him pay for it - A. Yes, and right, if any man takes away another man's living.

WILLIAM HOLLINGS . I am the landlord of the Star and Garter, public-house. I know nothing of the bundle only from hear say; I saw nothing of the prosecutor in the tap-room in the morning; I advised him to go home, because he was in liquor, I refused drawing him any thing, because he was in liquor. The prisoners bear a good character.

GEORGE SHERRARD . I was at the Star and Garter at the time that the prosecutor was; the prosecutor was in liquor. I saw the bundle go out of the house; I did not see who took it; a boy in a white hat took the bundle out; a man in the tap-room said

to the prosecutor, is that your bundle, do you see it going out; he replied, it might be d - d, and you too, I will make the landlord pay for it.

Mr. Challenor. The boy that took the bundle was not in Higginbottom's company, was he - A. No, he was sitting in a distant part of the room, and Musson was sitting on the other side of the table, eating pickled sprats.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120408-54

364. DANIEL BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of April , a gelding, value 16 l. the property of Joseph Robson .

WILLIAM FARRER. I was an helper in Mr. Robson's stables in St. George's in the East . On the 5th of April 1811 the prisoner at the bar hired a horse of me to go to Stoke Newington.

Q. What time of the day was it - A. Between one and two o'clock I lett him the horse, he was to return it in the evening by seven o'clock at the latest, he was to pay nine shillings for the afternoon, but never returned, but immediately went, as I understand into Whitechapel and sold the horse.

Q. Now are you sure he is the same man - A. I am sure he is the man.

Prisoner. Did not you say at Queen-square office that it was a tall stout man - A. I did think he was a taller man than what he was, but when I saw him a second time, I saw it was the man. The prisoner is the person I lett the horse to I am sure of it.

Prisoner. He stated before he was sure I was not the man, now he says he is sure I was the man.

COURT, Q. to witness. Did you say at Queen-square office that you were sure he was not the man - A. I did not; I did say at that moment that I could not positively swear to him, but when I had a sight of the man afterwards; I could swear to him, and that I did.

EDWARD ROPER . I am a publican, I live at the Star in Wentworth-street. Daniel Davis came to me about three o'clock in the afternoon on Friday the 5th of April, 1811; he said there was a horse to sell in Petticoat-lane; I went to the prisoner in Petticoat-lane, he said he wanted to sell the horse; I said if he would let me ride him, I would try and buy it of him. I rode the horse to the turnpike, and came back again, I asked him what he wanted for him; he said twenty pounds; I told him I would give him sixteen pounds for the horse, and the saddle and bridle; he said no, the saddle and bridle is not my own. I bought the horse, and got the receipt of him for the horse and bridle; I gave him sixteen pounds for the horse and bridle. Here is the receipt the prisoner gave me, and then in thirteen days time the horse and bridle was owned by Mr. Robson; Mr. Robson had the horse and bridle, and the saddle he got of some Jews in Petticoat-lane.

Q. Look at the prisoner - A. Yes, that is the man I bought him of, I will swear to him.

Prisoner. Have not you taken up one or two upon this charge, you have before stated that I was not the man - A. I can swear that you are the man; I took up the man that came and told me the horse was to sell, then when I took up him they fetched you; I knew you as soon as I saw you.

Prisoner. I do not know any thing of Mr. Roper, I never gave him a receipt in my life.

JOSEPH ROBSON . I am the owner of the horse; at that time I had two stables in St. George's in the East, and another in Little Britain; I had some horses to lett at St. George's in the East, as well as in Little Britain; my man let the horse on Friday in Easter week, 1811; I got the advertisement out in the Easter week; I circulated the bills, and found the horse at the Talbot Inn, Whitechapel, it was in the custody of Peters, then Roper had sold him.

Q. When you claimed the horse did Roper see the horse - A. He has seen the horse several times since.

Mr. Roper. It is the same horse I bought of the prisoner.

Mr. Robson. I am sure it is my horse; I had the horse four years.

Roper. Daniel Davis is the man that recommended me to go and buy the horse.

DANIEL DAVIS . I ship men for the East India Company. I was in Petticoat-lane between four and five o'clock on a Friday.

Q. What day of the month - A. I cannot tell the day of the month, it is about thirteen or fourteen months ago, two men came up to me and asked me if I wanted to buy a horse; I said, I can fetch a friend, perhaps he might buy it of you; I fetched Mr. Roper, he came and looked at the horse; he exercised the horse down Whitechapel-road, I went along with him, and when he came back the man asked him twenty guineas for the horse, he bid him sixteen; he fetched a drop of gin, and the man bought the horse for sixteen guineas or pounds, which I cannot be certain, I think it was pounds.

Q. Who was the man that sold the horse - A. I never seen the man since nor before. In about two days afterwards the horse was owned, Mr. Roper took me up.

COURT. You fetched a man to buy a horse, who was the man that employed you, who is the man that sold the horse - A. It is fourteen months ago. I do not think that is the man.

Roper. I gave you a pound.

Davis. Will you be upon your oath you gave me a pound? You gave me ten shillings. I went with Roper to look at the man in Tothill-fields, I said, I do not think it is the man. Mr. Roper asked for the sixteen pounds back of the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I was not in London at the time; I have a witness here to prove I was in Northamptonshire.

JANE SATCHELL. Q. Where do you live - A. In Northamptonshire. I live now at No. 102, High Holborn, with my sister.

Q. What part of Northamptonshire - A.Pratton. My husband is a butcher and a farmer.

Q. When did you live there - A. Almost a twelvemonth ago. I have been down there since I left it; I was down there in August last.

Q. When did you leave - A. I do not know exactly the month.

Q. You have got a husband there - A. I have, and two children.

Q. Do not you know when you left your husband - A. No, I do not know. I cannot call to mind when I left the country.

Q. Where have you been since August - A. With my sister in High Holborn.

Q. What is your sister - A. Her husband is a British wine merchant, his name is Jones.

Q. Have you lived with them ever since August - A. No, I have been in a situation, a nursery maid at Clapham-row-place, at Mr. Demitt's, a Jews family.

Q. What is he - A. I believe a merchant.

Q. Are you a sister to the prisoner - A. I am the prisoner's own sister.

Q. Do you live at Mr. Demitt's now - A. No; I quitted the family about three weeks ago; I was there nine weeks. All I know Daniel Brown went into the country on the 26th of February last year, he did not return till the August following.

Q. What is he - A. A baker.

Q. When did you hear of his being apprehended - A. He sent me word when he was taken up.

Prisoner. On the 22d of February.

COURT. Q. to Satchell. Is there any body here to prove that fact that he was in the country from February till August - A. No.

Q. Did your brother keep a house in town - A. He kept a house in Grub-street.

Q. How long did he live in Grub-street - A. I do not know.

- COOPER. I am an officer of Queen-square office; I apprehended the prisoner in company with his brother on Saturday the 22d of February upon another charge.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 22.

[The prisoner was recommended to mercy by the jury on account of his youth.]

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120408-55

365. WILLIAM ROGERS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of April , fourteen pounds weight of ginger, value 18 s. the property of Robert Lawrence , privately in his shop .

ROBERT LAWRENCE . I am a grocer ; I live in Great Portland-street, Marybone . On the evening of the 10th of April I was at home, my apprentice informed me that a man ran out of the shop. It was between the hours of eight and nine.

THOMAS ROBERTS . I am an apprentice to Mr. Lawrence. I saw the prisoner going out of the door, I immediately told my master; my master pursued him. I did not see him come in, I was busy.

Mr. Lawrence. I immediately followed the prisoner, I found him standing at a private house door with fourteen pounds of ginger at his feet; I went up to him, and he turned round; he was in the act of undoing his apron; I took up the parcel and saw it was my property; the prisoner ran away, I cried stop thief, the prisoner cried stop thief likewise; I followed him down Cavendish-street, he went into Charlotte-street. I saw no more of him untill he was in custody of the watchman. I am positive he is the same man; I could swear to his waistcoat, he had on the same waistcoat he has now.

EDWARD WAUGH . I am a watchman. I was crying the hour half after eight, and hearing the words stop thief; I turned towards where I heard the noise and saw the prisoner, he was the first I met, he was crying stop thief as hard as he could; he was the first, and there were about an hundred after him, seeing he had an apron on I thought he was a shopman, and not a thief; I bethought myself that he must be the thief; I followed him, and sprang my rattle; he ran into a mews where there was no thoroughfare; he tore his apron off, and threw it upon a dunghill; he returned out of the mews against me; I said where is the man that ran in here; oh, said he, he is gone down the mews; I said, stop my friend, I think you are the man, what have you done with your apron; he replied, I had none; I took him on suspicion as a thief; I secured him; not knowing what he had done I brought him along to Duke-street; Mr. Lawrence called have you got him watchman; I said, I have somebody like him; he said, has he a striped waistcoat on; I said, he had; he told me to take care of him. The apron was found at the same place where I had seen him throw it.

HENRY HOWARD . I am an officer; I produce the ginger. This is the apron that was picked up in the mews.

Prosecutor. It is my ginger; it is peculiar fine ginger; I know it by the bag; there were two bags of ginger in the shop, this was taken and the other left.

Prisoner's Defence. On my hearing the gentleman had been robbed I ran hard to catch the thief as well as the other people.

GUILTY, aged 23,

Of stealing, but not privately .

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120408-56

366. ELIZABETH COOPER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of March , a silver mug, value 3 l. the property of Mary Herrin , widow , in her dwelling-house .

MARY HERRIN. I am a widow, I live at No. 1, Suffolk-street, Middlesex Hospital ; I rent the whole house. On the 15th of February I missed my silver mug about nine o'clock in the morning, I took it up into my bed room on the over night before I missed it. The prisoner was my servant .

Q. Had you any lodgers - A. Yes, three women lodgers; I found my mug at Mr. Hill's, pawnbroker, Rathbone-place; my maiden-name, Griffiths, was at the bottom of the pot in full length.

JOHN JAMES . I am a servant to Mr. Hill, pawnbroker, Rathbone-place. On the 25th of February, about ten o'clock in the morning, she brought a silver mug, I advanced three pound upon it; the shop was full of people; she gave the name of Mary Greave, No. 5, Clipstone-street. She seemed to be a servant. I did not ask her any more questions.

Q. Are you sure she is the woman - A. I am sure.

Prosecutrix. I am sure it is my pot.

Prisoner's Defence. It is a night-house, I used to set up of a night, and Cook used to get up of a morning, she is run away, she took this mug. It is a house for ladies.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120408-57

367. JOEL WARE was indicted, and the indictment stated that at the general sessions of the King's gaol of Newgate, holden for the city of London and county of Middlesex, he was tried and convicted of a burglary, and was sentenced to be hanged by the neck until he was dead; but that afterwards his majesty was graciously pleased to extend his royal mercy to him, on condition of his being transported to New South Wales, and he was thereupon transported accordingly; and that he on the 15th of March last was at large in this kingdom before the expiration of the term for which he was ordered .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded guilty .

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 22.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120408-58

368. JOHN HOWE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 13th of March a kit of cod sounds, value 8 s. the property of James Hilton and John Everth.

JOHN EVERTH. I am a merchant in Thames-street, my partner's name is James Hilton , I can only speak to the property.

GEORGE TYLER. I am a constable, on the 13th of last month about a quarter after five, I was sent for to Mr. Everth's, he gave me charge of the prisoner on suspicion of stealing this kit of cod sounds, the property not being found he was discharged.

Q. Did you afterwards see the property found - A Yes, I went to the Sir John Falstaff public house and there I found the property, secreted in a corner by the side of the bar, I left the property in the landlord's hands, and was going to tell Mr. Everth I had found the property, I met the prisoner at the corner of Pudding-lane, I watched the prisoner, and he turned into the Sir John Falstaff , he peeped out at the door, he asked me if I was going to take any thing to drink, I said it is you I want you scoundrel, I told him I had found the sounds, he must go with me. He offered me half a guinea to let him go. I secured him.

SAMUEL COOPER. I am servant to Mr. Gedge in Thames-street, opposite to the prosecutors. On the 13th of March I was standing at Mr. Gedge's door, I saw the prisoner come from the prosecutors with a kit of cods sounds under his coat, I went over to the prosecutors and asked them if they had sold a kit of cods sounds, and in a few minutes the prisoner returned; I asked him what he had done with the kit of cods sounds, he at first denied having any, he afterwards said he had returned it, and then a constable was sent for.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I am an innocent of it, I never saw it before I saw it at the Mansion-house.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Whipped in gaol and discharged.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant

Reference Number: t18120408-59

369. MARY BECK was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 5th of July nine shirts, value 4 l. 8 s. and a shawl, value 12 s. the property of Nicholas Marchant .

SARAH MARCHANT , My husband's name is Nicholas Marchant , I am a laundress, I live at Peter's-hill, Doctor's-commons , the prisoner had washed for me two years.

Q. Did you at any time lose nine shirts and a shawl that you were employed to wash - A. The shawl was my own, these things were taken from me on the 5th of July last, the prisoner was working for me, the shirts were washed and ironed ready to be taken home, the prisoner took them while I was out upon my business.

Q. What part of the day on the 5th of July did you leave your house - A. About eight o'clock in the evening; I left the prisoner in my house, I returned between ten and eleven, I found her at home, I had seen the shirts safe in my house in the fore part of the day, this was Friday, and between four and five o'clock on Saturday morning there was an alarm of fire in my house, in the room where she slept, the girl called me to come to her as soon as I could, and when I opened the door the flames came out of the drawer against me, my husband throwed a pail of water against the place where the fire was coming out, and put out the fire.

Q. Was the prisoner dressed when this alarm of fire was given - A. Yes.

Q. Was the girl completely dressed - A. No, the prisoner awoke the girl out of her sleep, we asked the prisoner about the shirts, she said they were all burnt to ashes and the shawl with them.

Q. Did you afterwards find the shirts and shawl - A. Yes, at the pawnbroker's.

Q. Were they all injured by fire - A. No, not at all.

Q. Was there any of your linen burnt by that fire - A. Two shirts and a sheet, the drawer was not burnt.

ELIZABETH DUBBER . I am a servant girl to Mrs. Marchant, I slept with the prisoner on the Friday my mistress went out, she said she was going to her daughters, it is not far off; the prisoner went out about half an hour after my mistress went out, she returned before my mistress did; I and the prisoner went to bed together.

Q. When did you awake in the morning - A. When the fire was, the prisoner came and awaked me, I saw the fire, it was in the drawer. I was naked in bed and the prisoner was dressed, I alarmed my mistress.

Q. How long after this was it any shirts were missing - A. My mistress missed them about eight o'clock in the morning, I told my mistress I knew nothing about it, no more I did not, I heard the prisoner say they were burnt.

HARRIOT STYLE. I live at 25, Little Trinity-lane, near Mrs. Marchant, on Friday evening between eight and nine o'clock at night the prisoner brought a parcel to me, she asked me to let her leave it, she had been gossiping she said, and it was too late to take it home.

Q. Did you afterwards see what it contained - A. No, I delivered her the same parcel on Sunday morning.

JOHN BROWN. I am an officer, on the 19th of July I received a warrant against the prisoner, and on the

23d of February I apprehended her at Stratford, I searched her and found no duplicates upon her.

SAMUEL CHAPMAN . I am shopman to Mr. Crouch, pawnbroker, Paul-street, Providence-row, Finsbury-square; on the 8th of July the prisoner pledged two shirts for 18 s. in the name of Mary Hanson , on the 13th of July she came and took a copy of the affidavit.

ROBERT IVY . I am shopman to Mr. Dexter, pawnbroker, 125, Whitechapel-road, I produce a shirt pawned on the 8th of July in the name of Ann East , I do not recollect the prisoner.

JOHN RICHARDS . I live at 49, Brick-lane, I am a pawnbroker, I produce two shirts pawned in the name of Mary Williams , on the 8th of July.

WILLIAM CROSSLEY . I am a pawnbroker, 36, Wheeler-street, I took two shirts in pledge on the 8th of July, in the name of Mary Hanson , I advanced sixteen shillings upon them I have no recollection of the person who pawned them.

ALEXANDER BURGESS . I produce two shirts pawned on the 8th of July, on the 13th of July an application was made for an affidavit, I granted the affidavit myself, I think to the prisoner, I cannot be certain.

Prosecutrix. These shirts were all in my care to wash.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence, called two witnesses who gave her a good character.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120408-60

370. ESTER HOGGINS was indicted for feloniously receiving on the 30th of March , a watch, value 5 l. 5 s. the property of Alexander Bosanquet , being part of the goods feloniously stolen by Ann Smith, whereof she had been convicted .

ALEXANDER BOSANQUET. Q. Had you a watch stolen from you at any time - A. Yes.

Q. Did you prosecute Mary Smith for stealing it - A. Yes, she was tried and convicted at Kingston, in the county of Surry, that watch was my property.

THOMAS WREN . I am a constable, I have the copy of the conviction of the prisoner, I received it from Mr. Knapp's clerk, it is a correct copy.

(read.)

Q.(to Wren.) What do you know of the prisoner at the bar receiving this watch from Mary Smith - A. Radford the patrole apprehended her, he produced to me this duplicate. The pawnbroker was applied to by Radford, the pawnbroker delivered the watch into his possession at Kingston, his name is William Alexander .

WILLIAM ALEXANDER . I am shopman to Mr. Salmon, pawnbroker, 51, Bishopsgate-street, on the 3d of March the prisoner pawned this watch with me, in the name of Ann Jones , on the next day I saw her in custody at Union-hall.

RICHARD RADFORD. I am a patrol, I apprehended the prisoner on the 3y of March, she voluntary gave me the duplicate, and said she was sorry for what she had done, she said she pledged it for Mary Smith, and gave her the money.

Q.(to Wren) Did you apprehend Mary Smith - A. She was given into my custody, the prisoner and Mary Smith , both lived in the same house, upon searching Mary Smith I found fifteen shillings, which she said was part of the money she received for the watch.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent entirely of the offence.

Prosecutor. I think the prisoner innocently pawned the watch for Mary Smith not knowing how she came by it.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120408-61

371. WILLIAM CARTER and JOHN HOLLIS were indicted for feloniously forging and counterfeiting and uttering as true a forged last will and testament with intention to defraud the next of kin to William Perkins , deceased .

Mr. Alley, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoners were.

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120408-62

372. JOHN HUGHES was indicted for stealing on the 20th of February five pigs, value 13 l. the property of William Bolt . And RICHARD STONE and EDWARD CONNOLLY for feloniously receiving two pigs, value 6 l. part of the before mentioned goods, they knowing them to have been stolen .

The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.

ANDREW KEEF. I am a servant to William Bolt, he is a quaker , he lives at Hertford-heath, in the parish of Hamwell; I had the care and feeding of young Mr. Bolt's pigs, he kept them in his father's yard, I missed five pigs on the 20th of February, I had seen them safe about six o'clock at night, I missed them about six in the morning.

Q. When did you see them pigs again, and where - A. I saw three dead ones at Battle-bridge, I saw two alive near the Foundling-hospital, the officers were with me.

WILLIAM CLIFF . I am ostler at the College-arms, Hertford-heath, that is about a mile from where the pigs were stolen. On Wednesday the 19th of February, the prisoner Hughes came into our house between six and seven o'clock in the evening, he called for a pint of beer, he left the yard about eight.

RICHARD THURROGOOD . Q. Do you know Hughes, the prisoner - A. Yes, I saw him on Thursday morning, the 20th of February, at Enfield highway, about eight o'clock in the morning, he came to hire a cart of my master.

Q. What is your master - A. A farmer; he wanted a cart to draw five pigs, my master let him a horse and cart, and the five pigs were put into the cart, I drove the cart, and went to the back of Islington; Hughes left three pigs at the back of Islington, he took three out and left me in the street until he returned, he went somewhere but I do not know where he went on and told me to follow him, we went round by Gray's Inn-lane, near Little Guildford-street, he

took the pigs out of the cart, I delivered the pigs to Hughes and Stone.

Q. You did not see Connolly at that time - A. No.

Q. Where did Stone join in company - A. In Gray's Inn-lane; Hughes gave me half a guinea for the cart and sixpence for myself, then I returned.

Q. In Islington did you meet with any body - A. Yes, my master and another gentleman, I communicated to them what I had been about, and we all went to Hatton-garden Police office, and there I gave information.

Q. Did you go in company with John Hutt an officer - A. Yes, we went to where I set the pigs down, we found two alive in Stone's stable.

Q. You are sure these five pigs are the same that you delivered - A. Yes.

JOHN HUTT . I am an officer, on the 20th of February I went with the last witness to Berner's mews by the Foundling-hospital, we traced the pigs to Woburn-mews, Little Guildford-street, after making two hours enquiry I went to the stable window and forced a pane, we undid the door and got in, the two pigs laid under the manger, I suppose the weight was thirty stone a-piece, they were very much fatigued, I could not get them to stir at all; I fastened the door up again and took my station at the top of the mews to see who came to the stable, presently Stone and Connolly came to the stable, Connolly with a sack under his arm, I let them go towards the stable door, Stone put the key into the door, as soon as I saw the key put in the door I came up and seized them both, Stone asked me what was the matter? I said you keep this stable for other purposes besides horses, you keep pigs in it, he said the two pigs were brought there by a man, he gave him leave to put them in the stable; I observed that they were stolen pigs, and that there were three more wanting, he said that he knew nothing about them; I saw his waistcoat was bloody, I asked Stone where he lived? he said he should have no objection telling me if I would not touch any thing at his house, I told him I knew partly what it was by what I had found in the stable, molasses and sugar, and draining of a distillery, a great quantity was in the stable, a great quantity we took to the Excise office with a still that we found at his house; I got my brother officer to mind the pigs, I found out where Stone lived, it was then about eight o'clock in the evening, I sent my brother officer to Stone's house to enquire if he was at home, I desired him to put his foot in the door to keep the door open until I came up, the door was opened by Mrs. Stone, I knew Stone, his real name is Peppitt, I told her I come about some pigs, we found a still and about five hundred gallons of wash fermentation, we did not find any pigs there, we stopped these all night, a little before six in the morning a person throwed some dirt at the window and smacked a whip at the door, presently a man knocked at the door, I opened the door directly, and Limbrick rushed out and seized Hughes, this was Friday morning, we told him what we apprehended him for, he said he drove the pigs for a German butcher from the ry, he had left him down by Bagnigge-wells, I told him that we had two of the big ones, and that they were stolen pigs; I asked him where he lived, he would not tell; I told him I understood he used the Bell down at Battle-bridge, I should take him down there and make some enquiry, we were going along, and by the Pindar of Wakefield he took me of one side and said he did not want to be exposed, he said he would tell me where he lived, and that the pigs were dead at his house, I went to his house in Smith's-place, Battle bridge, there I found the three pigs hanging up dead there, they would weigh about eleven or twelve stone a piece, they were quite warm all the offal laid upon a table in a large pan, the copper was hot, and hair all lying about, they could not have been killed above four or five hours; I shewed the pigs to Keefe.

Keefe. The pigs Hutt shewed me are my master's property.

- LIMBRICR. I am a constable, I accompanied Hutt to Stone's house, I helped to seize Hughes, I took him and the whip, I asked Hughes how he came by the pigs, he told me that he was a pig drover, he drove them for a German butcher; I asked him where he lived, he said he did not know, he drove for him ten or eleven years.

Hughes' Defence. My lord, on Wednesday the 19th of February, I was employed to go down to Cheshunt to see if I could engage a house for a friend of mine, either in Cheshunt or a mile or two of this side or the other; I met with a friend I had known seven or eight years, he asked me where I was going, I told him not much farther; he told me he was going to Hertford, and if I was going further we would walk together; I told him I was weary of travelling; he asked me how I got my living; I told him by hawking of meat and slaughtering, he told me he was going to Hertford to meet some pigs, and if it was agreeable I might drive them home and kill them, I told him I had a very good convenience for slaughtering pigs or sheep, we went on, we come to Hoddesdon, it was about five o'clock when he left me, he told me I had better remain there and get some refreshment and rest myself; I sat there till half after five, or a little better, I asked the people of the house how far it was to the next public house on the Hertford road, I did not like to be idling there so many hours, I went to the public house called the College-arms, I called for something to eat and a pint of beer, and returned to Hoddesdon to the same house that I had left, I called for a pint of beer, I sat there till ten o'clock, I saw the company going home, I walked out, and in about a quarter of a mile of the other side of Hoddesdon I met a man with the pigs and another man walking along with him as a traveller with a bundle, we walked about an hundred yards, and the traveller wished us good night, and the person who employed me to drive the pigs, he left me at the further end of Hoddesdon, he said he must seek a bed there, when I told him it was doubtful the hogs would not travel to town, he told me then I might engage a horse and cart, I came to Enfield highway, I saw Mr. Steel standing in his yard, I asked him if he had got a horse and cart to let, the hogs were drove into the yard, Mr. Steel and his man assisted me with them into the cart, we came on to town to Pentonville chapel, we took three pigs out, we went on to Gray's

Inn-lane, I called Mr. Stone and asked him to help me with them into Berner Street. I drove the hogs to a stable that is between him and me.

Court. Now where is this man that hired you at Hoddesdon - A. He is not here.

Stone said nothing in his defence.

Connolly was not put on his defence.

HUGHES, GUILTY , aged 36.

Transported for Seven Years .

STONE, NOT GUILTY .

CONNOLLY, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120408-63

273. THOMAS BROTHERTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of March , a clock, value 10 l. the property of Robert Shearsley .

SECOND COUNT for like offence, the property of John Rickman .

THIRD COUNT, the property of John Bellamy .

EDWARD PHILSIPS. I am one of the clerks of the committee room, No. 9. The clock was in the room, No. 9.

Q. When did you see it - A. A little before leaving the office. I left the room about four o'clock.

Q. Is Mr. John Bellamy the keeper of the House of Commons - A. He is.

BENJAMIN SPILLER . I locked up the committee room, No. 9, about five o'clock. I saw the clock in the course of the day.

Q. Look at the prisoner and tell me whether you saw him about the committee room - A. I saw him about three or four days before that.

JAMES BROOKS . I am shopman to Mr. Folkard, pawnbroker, No. 7, London Road. I produce a clock pawned about a quarter before eight on the 6th of March, I believe the prisoner to be the person that pawned the clock. I lent him six pounds on it.

Q. On the next morning, the 7th, did any person call to look at the clock - A. Yes, Mr. Myers, he had the duplicate that I had given to the person that pawned it, he asked to look at the clock, and I shewed it.

Mr. Gurney. You say you believe the prisoner to be the man that pawned the clock - A. Yes.

Q. You do not mean to say you are positive - A. I think I have hardly a doubt in my mind.

HANNAH MYERS . Q. Are you a married woman - A. I am.

Q. On Saturday the 7th of March, do you recollect the prisoner bringing to you a duplicate of a clock - A. Yes, about ten o'clock, he wanted to dispose of it, my husband did not approve of it, he did not buy it.

CHARLES COLVILLE . I am an upholsterrer.

Q. Do you know any thing about the duplicate of this clock - A. On the 11th of March last, I met the prisoner in the Strand, he said he was going to my house, he said he had the duplicate of a clock to sell. This is the duplicate the prisoner gave to me.

Q.(to Spiller.) When you locked up the room did you look to see whether the clock was there - A. No. When I missed it, it was about a quarter after seven.

Q. Had the door been broken open - A. No, It must have been taken out before I locked up the room.

JOHN RICKMAN . Q. That clock you had put up in the committee room - A. Yes, that is the clock I hired for the use of the committee room in the House of Commons. It is a eight day clock.

Prisoner's Defence. When I was had up to Bow Street the second time, I there stated every thing that occured to me relative to this unpleasant business. I there stated nothing but the truth, which I most solemnly avow to now, the rest I leave to my counsel.

BENJAMIN CHURCHILL . I am a butcher. I live at No. 1, Saville Place, Lambeth Walk.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. By sight. I have seen him about half a dozen times. I know his person very well. On Friday afternoon, the 6th of March, I was at the sign of the Rose, Saville Place. I saw the prisoner there from a quarter before four, till ten minutes to six. I am quite sure he was there as early as a quarter before four.

Q. Who keeps the house - A. I believe Charles Winter .

Q. I believe within a fortnight afterwards the prisoner was apprehended - A. He was, and I was applied to upon this subject.

Q. Have you any reason to know that day, the 6th of March - A. I am positive, because upon that day I went to Smithfied and could not buy any thing, therefore, in the afternoon, I had nothing to do, if I had bought any thing, I should have been killing in the afternoon.

Q. On the Friday before had you bought - A. No, I had not, the Friday after I did. On the 13th I did buy, and when the prisoner was taken up, I remembered this was the last Friday that I did not buy, when I quitted the house, I left him and his child there about ten minutes before six.

Mr. Alley. Q. Are you a master butcher - A. I am in business with my father, it is equally the same.

Q. It is not the same, are you a master or a journeyman - A. I have lived with my father all my lifetime.

Q. Do you receive wages from him - A. Yes, I do, it is similar the same.

Q. Where is your father's shop - A.Saville Place.

Q. Has he any other journeyman than you - A. No, only a boy.

Q. I take it for granted, though you did not buy on Friday, you sell of a Friday - A. Yes. I had nothing to do in the afternoon, my shop continued open till nine or ten o'clock at night.

Q. Do not you usually attend the sale in the shop - A. In the morning I do, my mother attends in the afternoon.

Q. You say you have seen the prisoner five or six times before - A. I have.

Q. Are you an acquaintance of his - A. No. I have seen him before at the Rose public house.

Q. You say it was a fortnight afterwards you heard of this transaction, I take it for granted you attended at Bow Street office - A. I did not.

Q. You say you never spoke to the prisoner in your life - A. No, I have not;

Q. I should like to know how he came to apply to you - A. He saw me in the house, he has heard my name from the people in the house, several people called me by name that afternoon.

Q. I think you said before, that you went in about a quarter before four - A. Yes. And the prisoner came in about a quarter before four.

Q.Was Mr. Luxter in your company - A. He was, the best part of the time. There are two boxes in the room.

Q. You sat in the same box with the prisoner - A. Yes, facing of him.

Q. Who was in company of the prisoner - A. Nobody but a child.

Q. Are we to suppose the prisoner sat from a quarter before four, till ten minutes before six, keeping a child in the public-house, and no companion with him all that while. What did he drink - A. He had two pints of porter: I know he had no more. I had rum and water to drink.

THOMAS LUKTER. I live at No. 5, East-street, Lambeth. I am a bricklayer, a journeyman to my father; I was at the Rose public-house, Saville-place, on the 6th of March, in company with Churchill, Lavenew, and Winter, and several other bricklayers that I went in with.

Q. Who is Winter - A. The landlord of the Rose.

Q. What time did you go in - A. At four o'clock, my watering time. Churchill came in two or three minutes after me.

Q. Did you see the prisoner there - A. He was there when I came in, and a child with him. I and Churchill sat in another box.

Q. How long did you stop there - A. I did not stop there half an hour; I returned again at six o'clock, the prisoner was there then; he went away about ten minutes after six.

MR. WINTER. Q. Do you keep the public-house in Saville-place, Lambeth - A. Yes, the sign of the Rose.

Q. Do you remember the prisoner being at your house on Friday the 6th of March - A. It was on a Friday; the day of the month I cannot swear to. I heard of his being taken up, a week or nine days after he came into my house a little before four, he left the house somewhere before six.

Q. Do you remember what he drank - A. He had two pints of porter. He had a little girl with him.

GUILTY , aged 62.

Confined Two Years in the House of Correction and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120408-64

375. ANTONIO DASYLVA was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of February , fifty yards of printed cotton, value 20 s. the property of Thomas Pagon .

AND OTHER COUNTS - for like offence, only varying the manner of charging it.

DANIEL CURTIS . On the 11th of February last, I was stationed at the Export West India-dock. I passed the prisoner on the bridge, he was coming from the Export dock, he had a jacket under his left arm, I asked him what he had got in his jacket, he said nothing; I asked him a second time, he said, a bit of meat; I asked him to let me see, he refused; Pearce, my brother officer said, why refuse the officer seeing what it is, and taking the jacket from him, I found this piece of cotton in his jacket, under his arm: we took him to the guard-house, and searched him, and found three pieces more secreted under his shirt, and two dozen of buttons I found in his pocket, after I had done searching him, I saw this knife open in his hand.

MR. PEARCE. I took four pieces from the prisoner's jacket.

Q. Did you see him on board the Ealing Grove - A. No, I was informed he was employed on board, the prisoner was a seaman employed on board, hired for the voyage.

BENJAMIN RICHARDSON . I am an excise officer. On the 11th of February I was on board the Ealing Grove, I certify for a trunk that was shipped by James Hunter , Dobson, and Co. marked L. and A. Diamond, No. 6, this is the trunk, it contained thirty-one pieces of British printed callico, eight hundred and sixty four yards; I examined the trunk again, after the prisoner was examined, it had been broken open, and the deficiency was two hundred and thirteen yards.

THOMAS SHUTTENDON . Q. On the 10th of February did you take a trunk from Galley Quay, and put it on board the Ealing Grove - A. I did, the trunk was marked L. and A. Diamond, No. 6.

Q. Is that the trunk - A. It is.

MR. BARLOW. Q. I believe you are one of the house of Hunter and Co. - A. Yes.

Q. In the month of February last, did you sell to Mr. Pagan, any quantity of British cotton - A. I did, to be exported, his name is Thomas Pagan , I have no doubt that is the trunk. The patterns all correspond.

MR. CLAYTON. I am clerk in the house of Hunter and Co. I packed up the trunk for Mr. Pagan. These are the goods I packed.

Q. Are those eight pieces found on the prisoner, part of that property - A. It is part of the property. The eight pieces are worth fifty shillings.

Prisoner's Defence. I was employed about the vessel to work. The mate and boatswain employed me under them, they had the care of the goods. The mate gave it me to bring it on shore; that is all I know of it.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120408-65

376. JAMES STAMP SUTTON COOKE was indicted for that he, on the 10th of October, in the 48th year of his majesty's reign , by the name of James Cooke , did take to wife, one Sopha Saunders , his former wife Jane being then living .

The case was stated by Mr. Gurney.

REV. JOHN MANNING . In the year 1799, I was rector of the parish of St. James's, Westminster; he was married by license.

(The register read.)

James Stamp Sutton Cook, and Jane Browning , were married on the 13th of September, 1799, with the consent of the father, John Browning , by me, John Manning, in the presence of John Browning , and Julia How.

JULIA HOW . Q. Were you present at the marriage of that man with Jane Browning - A. Yes, at St. James Church he married Jane Browning .

Q. Have you seen Miss Browning, now Mrs. Cook lately - A. I saw her in June, and I have seen her within two months, her brother is here.

JOHN BROWNING . Q. Are you the brother of the lady to whom the prisoner was married in 99 - A, I am.

Q. Your father I believe is dead - A. He is.

Q. Look at that register, and say whether you believe the signature of that marriage to be your father's hand writing - A. It is his to the best of my knowledge.

Q. Is your sister now living - A. She now is.

Q. Where did your father live - A. At Eston, ten miles from Canterbury, near Ashbourne, it lies between Ashbourne and Canterbury.

Q. How long did your sister live with him after her marriage - A. He was with her two years nearly, at times with my father.

Q. Therefore he knew your father's residence well - A. He made my father's house his home.

Q. Do you know how long after the marriage it was that he left your sister - A. That I cannot rightly say; he left her several times, I think it was about three years that he left her, I believe at Margate or Ramsgate he left her.

Court. How long had he lived with her, before he finally deserted her - A. About three years, to the best of my knowledge: from the time of his deserting her, she lived with my father during his life, and with my mother since his death. They have removed since to Ashbourne.

Q. If any body was to enquire for your sister, there would be no difficulty in finding her - A. No. She had one child by him, dead born.

Prisoner. Q. I wish to ask him one question. As he says that I have deserted this lady, his sister, is he aware of the cause of my leaving her at Ramsgate, in the year 1801 - A. I am not certain of it, he left her in great distress.

Q. I wish to ask you in what kind of distress I left this lady - A. He went away and left her without any money in her pocket, and also took her clothes from her, and pawned her clothes.

Q. I do not wish to take the witness by surprise; will he swear that I pawned his sister's cloathes - A. From what I heard my sister say.

Q. Had I any marriage portion with your sister - A. That I cannot say; my father frequently supplied you with money, to my certain knowledge.

Q. Speaking within the mark, do you know what was the amount - A. I cannot speak to that exactly; he advanced money several different times; to what extent I do not know.

Q. Upon your oath to what extent he may suppose, does he imagine to the amount of one hundred pounds, or any such sum - A. Considerably more.

Q. More than five hundred pounds do you imagine - A. I cannot say that it was more than an hundred.

Court. What way of life was your father in - A. A farmer.

Prisoner. I wish to ask the witness whether he means to maintain, upon his oath, that I lived with his sister three years: as I was an officer in the South Loyal Gloucester militia, whether I did not leave this lady in my military character - A. I never saw him until after they were married. I never saw him in uniform; he was a military man at that time.

Q. As seduction seems to be laid to my charge more than bigamy, is he aware that I met his sister about six o'clock; and went away with her the same night - A. He did, but not the same afternoon.

Q. Does he mean to swear that she did not come away at twelve o'clock at night, from her father's house; does he mean to contend that it was not the same afternoon

Mr. Alley. I object to that question.

Court. Have you any reason to know that your sister came away with him the first day that she was acquainted with him - A. To the best of my knowledge she was acquainted first with him at Canterbury, and at this time the regiment laid at Ashbourne.

Mr. Gurney. How long were they acquainted before they were married - A. About a month before they went away together.

Q. Your sister eloped from your father's house with the prisoner, upon which your father came to London, and sanctioned the marriage with his presence - A. He did.

Q. After leaving your sister two or three times, distressed, he finally left her - A. Them were not the only times he left her.

GEORGE MOSS. I am a clerk in the Bishop of London's office, Doctors' commons. I produce the affidavit upon which the license was granted.

(The affidavit read.)

James Stamp Sutton Cooke maketh oath, that he is a batchelor, that he is twenty-one years of age, and engages to marry Jane Browning , with the approbation of John Browning her father, to be married at St. James's, Westminster. Sworn before Dr. Parsons.

Prisoner. I wish to ask the witness whether he is aware who took out that license, and whether it is my hand-writing.

Court. It could only be sworn by the person who was married under that license; if you were the person that was married under that license, you must have sworn that affidavit.

MISS SOPHIA SAUNDERS . Q. Where did your father live before he returned from the West Indies - A. At Islington.

Q. When did you first become acquainted with that man - A. In September 1808, I first became acquainted with the prisoner.

Q. Were you, after some acquaintance married to him - A. I was at St. Lukes, Old-street, on the 10th

of October, 1808.

Q. Did you afterwards live together as man and wife - A. We did; we lived together nearly two years, I have had two children by him, one is dead, the one living is two years and a quarter old.

Q. In what situation of life did the prisoner represent himself to you - A. Having a share in the coal mines; he said he derived about three hundred a year from it.

Q. Was your father in this country at that time - A. He was gone back to the West Indies.

Q. I believe you are his only child, and your father is a man of property in the West Indies - A. Yes.

Prisoner. I wish to ask the lady whether she witnessed this paper before we were married - A. I did; it has been done over with ink since; I signed it with a pencil.

(The paper read.)

London, September 24, 1808. I, Sophia Saunders , give my free will and consent to James Cooke , Esq. to get published the banns of matrimony between him and myself, and to hold myself in readiness to marry him, within the rights of the church of England: witness my hand, Sophia Saunders .

Mr. Gurney. Whose hand writing is the body of it - A. Mr. Cooke's.

Q. How old were you when you were married - A. Eighteen years and nine months.

Prisoner. I wish to ask this lady whether this letter is her hand writing, and some poetry that is here - A. That is my writing.

(Read.)

Oh, valiant Cooke, why do not you run to fight the French, Then shall my days in one sweet torrent run, And end in bliss as they have not begun; Then pluck up courage, and run or trot, That I may die with laughter on the spot.

Court (to Witness.) Was this written after you were married - A. A few months ago.

(The letter read.)

Saturday night. Dear James, permit me to condole with you upon your late sufferings of body, I should have written a few days ago; I dare not unburthen my mind now, I shall meet with your reproaches, and besides, which adds fresh pain to those you have already experienced.

Mr. Gurney. Q.(to Miss Saunders.) Is that your writing - A. I do not believe it to be my writing.

Court. Then do not read it.

Mr. Alley. There is a few lines of poetry addressed to this man, what induced you to write it - A. I was angry at the time.

Q. You have been living upon your mother, and supported by her - A. Yes, me and my child.

Q. Did this man contribute to your support - A. Never.

Prisoner. I wish to ask the lady whether these lines were not written to me when I was in Clerkenwell prison, upon a charge of an assault brought against me by this lady's mother.

Mr. Alley. If you will have it, you shall. Miss Saunders, was he at that time confined for an assault committed upon your aged mother - A. He was.

HENRY WILLIAM PASEY . I am parish clerk of St. Luke's, I produce the register of marriages.

(Read)

James Cooke of this parish, batchelor, and Sophia Saunders of this parish, spinster, were married in this church, by banns, 10th of October, 1808, by me, James Busby .

Prisoner's Defence. My Lord, and gentlemen of the jury, being a batchelor, and an officer in the South Glocester regiment, I was married in 1779 under twenty years of age, without the knowledge of my father, and Jane Browning , under age, a spinster. I entertained some doubt of her fidelity, with my companion, one Thompson, I was going to London, to obtain legal redress, and I applied to Mr. John Ingram Lockhart, a barrister, and stated to him the facts, he gave me perfect assurance that I could not sustain any damages, that all marriages under age, by the act of George the Second were invalid by law, which opinion of Mr. Lockhart I found confirmed by Burn's Justice, and Blackstone's reports; and after 99, having no interview with Jane Browning , I paid my addresses to Miss Sophia Saunders ; I applied again to Mr. Lockhart, who did not swerve from this opinion. Upon this, the marriage took place in October, 1808. I beg leave to state, that had I fallen in with the views of this party, I should not have had to stand at this bar. I shall humbly proceed to call my witnesses.

CHARLES THOMPSON . I live at No. 12, Judd-place east, New Road; I am a house-keeper; I keep a preparatory school for young gentlemen.

Prisoner. Q. Pray sir, have not you known me for a number of years - A. Yes, I have known you eleven years.

Q. Do you remember being at Ramsgate in the year 1801 - A. I do.

Q. Did I not shew you this letter, in the presence of Mrs. Cooke, and accuse her of writing it, and did she not reply, she did not write it.

Court. That evidence cannot apply.

SARAH COOKE . I live at Anderson's wharf, Vaux-hall, I am a single woman, I live with my mother. I am a cousin to the prisoner.

Prisoner. Have you not known me for a number of years - A. I have known you since my birth, I knew your father likewise.

Q. Did not he depart this life in the year 1801 - A. As near as I can recollect.

Q. What have you heard him declare.

Court. That cannot be evidence.

Q. Do not you know that my father did not give consent to my marriage. - A. I do not know but what I have been told.

Mr. Gurney. Can you tell me of any visible way he had of living.

Court. Had he any share in a coal mine.

LUCY PROBEN . I live at Plastow in Essex, I am a widow, I live independent.

Prisoner. Q. Was not I born on the 13th of April, - A. I was not present at his birth. He is my sister's son, I know he was born in the year 1780, in the rioting time.

Court. Q. Did he ask you his age before he married his first wife - A. I heard he was married, I know nothing about his wedding.

Q. He has sworn that he was twenty-one years of age when he was married - A. I know he was born in the year 80.

Q. Then he has sworn falsely. - A. He must.

Mr. Gurney. Q.(to Miss Saunders. Look at that affidavit, James Stamp Sutton Cooke, is that his handwriting. - A. I believe it to be his hand-writing.

Prisoner. I will call the clerk of Clerkenwell.

JOSEPH PENEY. I am the parish clerk of Clerkenwell. I produce the register of baptisms.

Read.

James Stamp Sutton Cooke, born April 13, 1780, christened 10th of November, 1780.

Mr. Gurney. The day of the month of the baptism the minister certifies, the age is not known to him, but is given by some other person, certainly it is, as it was given you. - A. Yes.

JOHN JACKSON. Prisoner. Q. Were not you authorised by a deed, together with three other trustees, that when I arrived at a certain age, to give me some money.

Mr. Gurney. That is no evidence, we cannot go into the contents of a deed.

Prisoner. Sir, you then state in respect of what may be my present age. - A. I certainly do not know when he was born, all I know, when I was appointed trustee in the year 1780, he was an infant in arms, he could not be a twelve-month old.

GUILTY , aged 32.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120408-66

377. JOSEPH AINSWORTH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of March , a shirt, value 4 s. the property of John Williams .

JOHN WILLIAMS. I am a slop seller , 267 Shadwell High Street .

SAMUEL FULLER . I was passing along Shadwell High Street on Saturday evening, the 7th of March, about eight o'clock, I saw the prisoner in company with two other boys, I saw the prisoner pull a shirt within the prosecutor's door, he pulled and did not get the shirt, I watched him, he returned back, made another pull at the shirt, and got it down, he went to a corner of a court and put it in his breeches.

Williams. Mr. Fuller brought the prisoner into my shop, I took the shirt out of his breeches. This is the shirt, it is mine.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to his character.

GUILTY, aged 16.

Judgment respited .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120408-67

378. NICOLAS BIRD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of February , an epaulett, value 1 l. 4 s. the property of Samuel Solomon .

SIMEON SOLOMON. I live in New Street, Covent Garden, my father's name is Samuel Solomon , the prisoner was our servant . On the 29th of February, about seven o'clock, the prisoner was sent out on business, and previous to his doing the business he was sent on for his master, he was brought back by a man to whom he had offered a silver epaulet for sale.

Q. What is your father's name. - A.Samuel.

SOLOMON MEDSWORTH . I keep a sale shop in Swallow Street. On the 29th of February, in the evening, the prisoner came into the shop and offered an epaulet for sale, I asked him what he asked for it, he said fifteen shillings. He ran away, I ran after him and took him down to his master; he there went down on his knees, and said, pray master do not hurt me. This is the epaulett.

Mr. Solomon. It is my father's property. The prisoner behaved very well in our service

GUILTY, aged 19.

Judgment respited .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120408-68

379. CHARLES GOWLING was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of March , a silk handkerchief, value 7 s. the property of William Finnikin , from his person .

WILLIAM FINNIKIN . I am a gentleman's servant .

Q. When did you lose this handkerchief. - A. On the 12th of March, going from Bloomsbury Square to the Strand. Going through Wych Street I met three men, they stared me very hard in the face, I passed them, a gentleman tapped me on the shoulder, he asked me if I had not lost my handkerchief, I felt in my pocket and missed my handkerchief, I told him yes, I went up Craven's buildings, I saw three men, I laid hold of Charles Gowling and took him to the office. The prisoner gave me the handkerchief. It is mine.

THOMAS DENHAM . I belong to Bow-street office. I saw the prosecutor in company with the prisoner, whom I knew to be a thief. Finnikin informed me that he had been robbed by the prisoner, and that the prisoner had given him the handkerchief.

Prisoner's Defence. I was passing along, when three women past me, one of them threw down the handkerchief, this gentleman came up and asked me for the handkerchief, I gave it him.

GUILTY, aged 19.

Judgment respited .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120408-69

380. PRICILLA TAYLOR was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of February , two pieces of woollen cloth, value 16 d. the property of Benjamin Mumford .

MARY MUMFORD . My husband's name is Benjamin, I live at 21 Pitfield Street, Old Street, the prisoner worked for me at army work. On searching her apartment, 77 Grub Street, I found some woollen cloth for jackets that I had missed the week before, she never made up cloth into jackets, only trowsers.

JAMES GEARING. I am an officer.

Q. Were you present when this cloth for jackets were found. - A. I was, they were claimed by the prosecutrix.

Prisoner's Defence. Them two pieces of cloth I had given me in two pair of trowsers for facings.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120408-70

381. DANIEL BROWN and HENRY BROWN were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of January , a marble slab, value 5 l. and a mahogany stand, value 2 l. the property of John Spray .

JOHN SPRAY . I live at 15, Edward-street, Portman-square.

Q. When did you lose your marble slab and mahogany stand - A. On the 1st of January, from No. 19, James's-street, Manchester-square ; it was in the back parlour when Daniel Brown took the house. Daniel Brown came to me about the middle of November, and the last day of November, he and his brother came. Daniel took it the last day of November, and on the 2nd of December we had an agreement drawn up; he was to have the house for three years.

Q. Was his brother with him - A. He came with him the first and second time, but not when he took the house, his brother was in the house all the time.

Q. When did they go into it - A. I do not know what day it was, it was two or three days before Christmas, they both lived in the house together.

Q. What did Daniel Brown pretend to be - A. A baker; he had twenty sacks of flour brought into the house between eight and nine at night; and on the 1st of January he moved it all off, and his goods that were worth any thing at all. I watched the flour where it went to, there was a sofa and a chest of drawers, and a bureau-bedstead.

Prisoner. What have you to do with them, I did not buy them of you - A. They went down into Clare-street, Clare-market, and there they sold the flour. They began to unload the flour, and put the sofa down in the street.

Q. Who were they - A. Daniel Brown , and a man of the name of Hemmington. I then watched the goods where they went to, I saw the goods come up by St. Giles's church, they went into a mews; I returned back to Clare-street, and stopped the payment of the flour, I told the man I thought it was not honestly come by. I met Daniel Brown in Oxford-street, I got my keys of him. I got one or two to go with me to the house to see that every thing was safe in the house. When I came in the house, I found the marble slab and the mahogany stand were missing. On the 17th of January I took a warrant out for Mr. Brown, I found my slab at No. 32, Bow-street, Covent-garden.

FRANCES PRIEST . I lived servant with Mr. Brown. I cannot tell rightly when I went to the place I was not there above a fortnight.

Q. Who lived in the house - A. Daniel Brown and Henry Brown , and a woman, named Miss Farmer.

Q. Do you mean those two prisoners there - A. Yes. On Saturday a marble slab was there with a mahogany stand, in the back parlour; it was moved out of the back parlour, and put into the shop; the marble slab was turned up on one side of the counter and the stand at another, and two men fetched it away, Henry and Daniel Brown helped it over the counter to put it into the cart, it was taken away.

Q. What day was that - A. I cannot rightly tell, I think it was a week before I left the house, I am not sure.

Q. Did you go in before they went in - A. I went in to clean the place first.

Q. You know New Years Day, do not you - A. Yes, they went away on New Years morning.

Q. It was about a week before that was it - A. Yes, I think it was.

ROBERT PRIEST . I am a broker, No. 5, Castle-street, Long-acre. Daniel Brown and two other gentlemen called on me one afternoon, and asked me whether I would buy a marble slab, I cannot say what day it was; I asked him where it was, he said in James-street, Oxford-road. I said I knew the slab, my neighbour sold it about six months before. I agreed to give three pounds for it and to fetch it away, and I fetched it away; Daniel Brown delivered it me.

Q. Did you see the other prisoner there - A. I cannot say whether he was there or no. In the course of two or three days I sold it to Mr. Wood for four pounds ten shillings; the slab is in Queen-square office, it is the same slab.

Q. You are sure it was Brown that came to you - A. Yes, Daniel Brown .

DANIEL COOPER . I am an officer. I executed the warrant on Saturday, the 9th of February, at Mr. Wood's a currier in Bow-street, Covent-garden, I found the marble slab and the mahogany stand; Mr. Spray identified it.

WILLIAM WOOD . I am a currier, in Bow-street, Covent-garden. I bought this slab in the latter end of December, at Mr. Priest's shop.

Q. to prosecutor. Did you see this marble slab at Mr. Wood's house - A. Yes, I am sure it is mine.

Daniel Brown 's Defence. The prosecutor says it is his slab after he had sold it to me, he has an agreement in his pocket that I was to give forty pound for the fixtures.

Prosecutor. I have an agreement, and the gentlemen shall read it; he was to give me forty pounds for the lease of the house and the fixtures for three years; I never got a farthing.

(The Agreement read).

"Memorandum of Agreement, 2d December, 1811. Between Daniel Brown of John-street, Edgware-road, on one part, and Mr. John Spray , of Edward-street, Portman-square, on the other part: - The said Daniel Brown agrees to pay to Mr. John Spray , or order, the sum of forty-four pounds to wit - for the good-will and fixtures of a house to wit, No. 9 James-street, Manchester-square, for the term of three years, and to take possession on the 2nd of December, 1811, and to pay quarterly; and the said Daniel Brown agrees to leave the same as he found it.

(Witness)

John Spray. Daniel Brown."

DANIEL BROWN - GUILTY .

HENRY BROWN - NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120408-71

382. JOHN SMITH and RICHARD HAYWARD were indicted for feloniously making an assault in the King's Highway, on the 11th of March , upon Thomas Saunders , taking from his person and against his will, a Bank note, value 50 l. and a Bank note, value 25 l. his property.

THOMAS SAUNDERS . I am employed by the India Company . On the 11th of March I left the City

of London tavern soon after eleven at night.

Q. Had you a pocket-book with you at that time - A. I had. I had a fifty-pound Bank note, and a twenty-five-pound note, and some small notes in the pocket-book.

Q. Was any body in company with you at the time you left the tavern - A. No. It was in the Little Minories I was knocked down, my great coat was torn open, and my next coat thrown open, and my pocketbook taken out of my left hand pocket.

Q. What were you knocked down with - A. I do not know, I suspect it was a fist, I had very black eyes the next day, and a black mark on my chin.

Q. Were them from the effects of violence that you had received at that time - A. I think they were.

Q. Did the person who knocked you down, come before you or behind you - A. I do not know, I believe there were three of them; I was so stunned with the blow that I could not observe what passed afterwards. Mr. Vickers, and a neighbour of his assisted me up and assisted me home; one took me of one side, and one the other. I immediately put my hand in my pocket, and said I missed my pocketbook.

Q. Did you at any time afterwards see the fifty-pound note, and the twenty-five-pound note? When did you go to the police office - A. About three or four days afterwards; I there saw the fifty and the twenty-five-pound note that I had been robbed of, at Lambeth-street office.

MR. VICKER Q. On the night of the 11th of March were you in the Little Minories - A. Yes; I was passing through in my way home, I saw Mr. Saunders there, he was laying across the pavement, in the act of endeavouring to get up; I and another gentleman helped him home, he said he had missed his pocket-book.

Q. Had he the appearance of being perfectly sober - A. No. He had the appearance of being in liquor.

WILLIAM SMITH . Q. I am an officer of the City. I apprehended Nathan Aswell , a servant of Mr. Aylett, a publican and a carpenter. After I had talked to Aswell he took me to his master's work-shop, he took a bit of wood off a work-bench, and between that piece of wood and the work-bench was this fifty pound note, wrapped up in this bit of paper; No. 12,504, a fifty pound note, dated the 25th of January.

Mr. Saunders. That is one of the notes I lost, I had written upon them the name of the person of whom I took them, and my own initials; I can swear to the notes, I took them of Mr. Price, a clerk in the public office. I took them about two days before I lost them.

Mr. Knapp. I believe you caused an advertisement to be made concerning the robbery, did you give the description of the note which was to compose your advertisement - A. I did not, Kinnersley gave it.

Q. You gave Kinnersley the number - A. I did, he gave a wrong copy.

Q. Now this is the advertisement, it is described No. 120,54 - A. The 0 is in the wrong place, I corrected the mistake as soon as I saw it, before my note was found.

KINNERSLEY. I believe it was the printer's mistake, we issued an hundred more before the notes were found.

NATHAN ASWELL. I am an apprentice to Mr. Aylett, he keeps the Blakeney's-head, Norton Falgate; he is a carpenter besides a publican. Miller and Smith came to me on Friday the 20th, and said they were sent by my master; I gave them the fifty-pound note which I had concealed, I had received that note of my mistress on the Tuesday before; she told me to take care of it; we had so many men in the shop, I did not know who they were, that was my reason for nailing it up in the way I did.

MARY ANN AYLETT . My husband keeps the Blakeney's-head public-house.

Q. On the morning of the 12th of March do you recollect the prisoners coming to the public-house - A. Yes, both of them; they came between twelve and one; they had rum and some refreshment. Smith produced a fifty-pound note into my husband's hand, my husband gave it me to change, I gave them change, the prisoners came in together and went out together.

Q. Your husband was taken in custody, you got alarmed, you gave your apprentice this note to keep for you - A. I did, and here is a twenty-five pound note, my husband gave change for it.

Q. Have you any doubt about the prisoners - A. No, they had used the house about three or four months.

Q. When the officers came to your house, do you mean to say you gave the same account then that you have now - A. I was taken at a disadvantage that morning for the safety of my husband, I said I know nothing of it.

JAMES AYLETT. Q. You keep the Blakeney's Head - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know the two prisoner's at the bar - A. Yes, they had frequented my house about three or four months. They both came on the 12th of March between ten and eleven o'clock, they staid about an hour and a half; Smith offered a twenty-five pound none to change, my wife was out, she keeps the cash. I went to Mr. Perkins the pawnbroker and obtained change of him; I gave Smith the change, Hayward was by at the time. After my wife came in they asked for change of a fifty-pound note, I gave the note to my wife, and she gave change for it.

Mr. Knapp. Q. You never said any thing about this until you were taken up yourself - A. No.

ROBERT SUMMERS. I live with Mr. Perkins, pawnbroker, 52, Bishopgate-street. On the 12th of March I changed a twenty-five pound bank note for Mr. Aylett; this is the note. I wrote upon it the 12th of March, 1812.

Smith's Defence. When Mr. Aylett came to Clerkenwell, I asked him if he meaned to swear our lives away, he said no, we were not the persons he took them off. I am innocent of the notes, Mr. Aylett he knows I did not give him the notes, nor his wife.

Hayward said nothing in his defence.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120408-72

383. THOMAS KIPPING was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 31st of March , twelve gun barrels, value 7 l. and six gun locks, value 4 l. the property of Thomas Ashton . And AMOS ASTON for feloniously receiving, six gun barrels, value 3 l. and six gun locks, value 4 l. part of the before mentioned goods, he knowing them to have been stolen .

STEPHEN WHITEMAN . Q. Are you in the employ of Thomas Ashton - A. Yes; he is a gun-smith ; and Kipping was also in his employ. On the 26th of March my mistress sent me out to buy some gun locks; I purchased five at first, I purchased three afterwards; I purchased eight on that day. I brought them home and took them to my mistress; I examined them all, they had the king's mark upon them; I paid six shillings each for them, my mistress gave me four pounds four shillings; I laid out three pounds ten shillings and sixpence; the rest of the money I laid out in walking about.

THOMAS ASHTON . I am a gun-maker; I work for the Tower; I receive out barrels and locks from the Tower, I put them on stocks, and make them into guns, and return them into the Tower.

Q. When these locks were brought by the last witness did you examine them - A. Yes, and they were all such locks as I had from the Tower, one of them I knew in particular; I have the gun for it, and the stock, it had been fitted to that gun.

(Witness producing the stock and gun barrel.)

Q.Upon your knowing this you took up the witness Bull - A. I did.

Q. Was it in consequence of what Bull said that you went and searched Kipping's premises - A. I did, Kipping and Bull both worked for me. I found these six barrels at Kipping's, I found them between the sacking and the bed in Kipping's house, they are all new, they have the King's mark upon them. When I went to Kipping's house he was at home, I told him I was come upon a disagreeable circumstance, I told him Bull had told me that he had six barrels and six locks; he denied that he had any such thing; he told me I might search his house if I would get a search warrant; I told him I should do it without, and he had better give them to me than for me to disturb his goods; he directly said, he would shew them me; he turned down the bed and pulled out these six barrels; the officer took them in custody; I asked him what had become of the locks; he told me that he had sold them to Amos Aston . He was taken away, and these are the gun barrels, and there is not a doubt they are mine. I can swear to the barrels.

Mr. Knapp. Then do I understand you that you do not mean to swear to the locks - A. I will not. I told Kipping I would be as favourable to him as I could. He had been with me four months, and Bull two years.

JOSEPH BULL . I work for Mr. Ashton, a gunsmith, and the prisoner Kipping worked with me.

Q. Do you remember any thing being done by Kipping and you respecting gun-barrels - A. I was taking on Tuesday the last day of March, about eight weeks before that we had more barrels and locks that than was for use directly; he spoke to me about doing something; I agreed that he should have twelve barrels, and twelve locks; he had twelve barrels on one evening, and twelve locks on another evening; he had twelve barrels in a sack of shavings, and the locks he took away in his apron.

Q. Did Kipping afterwards tell you what he had done with the barrels and locks - A. Yes, on the Friday following he told me that he had sold six barrels and six locks to Amos Aston ; he told me he would give me part of the money; I went from the shop to the Crooked Billet; he gave me sixteen shillings and sixpence; he told me he was to have sold Aston the other in the morning, but he sent him a note to keep them eight or nine days longer; he gave me five shillings and sixpence for a barrel and lock.

Q. to Mr. Ashton. What is a barrel worth - A. Eight shillings, and a lock seven shillings and sixpence.

Mr. Knapp. So it must rest upon what you say, and not in the presence of the other prisoner - A. Yes.

Q.He, according to his own account, agreed with a thief, and not in the hearing of another man - A. No.

- COOMBES. I am a police officer. I went first to Mr. Ashton's house and apprehended Bull; Kipping was at work. When I took Bull in custody I went to Kipping's house, I told him I apprehended him for stealing locks and barrels; he said he had sold the locks, but the barrels he had got; he had sold the locks to Amos Aston . I apprehended Aston, I told him he had been buying locks and barrels of Kipping belonging to Mr. Aston; he denied buying barrels, but he did not deny buying locks.

Kipping's Defence. Bull, the evidence, asked my permission if he might bring the barrels and locks to my place, saying he had got some barrels and locks; I gave him permission. I did not know who they belonged to, nor how he came by them.

Ashton's Defence. I deny what Mr. Coombes said; I denied to him buying the locks or the barrels, and there is no proof of it.

Kipping called five witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Aston called eight witnesses, who gave him a good character.

KIPPING - GUILTY , aged 28.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

ASTON - GUILTY , aged 41.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

[The prisoners were recommended to mercy by the jury on account of their good characters.]

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120408-73

384. MARY SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of February , a silver soup ladle, value 50 s. a silver cream jug, value 30 s. a silver cup, value 10 s. and two silver table spoons, value 1 l. the property of Ann Dalrymple , in her dwelling-house .

ANN DALRYMPLE. I live at No. 16, in the Commercial-road . On Saturday the 29th of February, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, I saw the prisoner going out of the door of my house; my street door is kept open; my shop door is in the

passage; on seeing the prisoner go out at the street door I went after her, and took hold of her arm, and insisted upon her coming back with me to the house, and as she turned round I saw the handle of a soup ladle at her pocket; I told her she had robbed me; she said she had, and she was very sorry for it; she took them out of her pocket and laid them on the stairs; the soup ladle, the cream jug, silver cup and spoons; I told her to go about her business; some man at the door said, if I did not prosecute her he would prosecute me; a constable was sent for. I believe it was through distress she did it; her looks appeared distressed, and she appeared very sorry for what she had done.

- DOLPHIN. I am a constable; I took charge of the prisoner; I have kept the plate ever since.

Prosecutrix. They are my property.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

GUILTY, aged 28.

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling-house .

Confined One Week in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120408-74

385. ANN STEVENS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of March , twenty-two yards of printed cotton, value 2 l. the property of John Thwaites , privately in his shop .

THOMAS BENNETT . I am shopman to John Thwaites , linen-draper , 306, High Holborn . On the 2d of March, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner and another woman came into the shop, they seemed to be companions; her companion asked to look at some printed cottons; I shewed her a great many printed cottons; the other woman agreed for a yard and a half of print; I was cutting it off at fourteen pence a yard, and the prisoner went out of the shop. I went after her, and brought her into the shop, and she dropped from under her clothes twenty-two yards of printed cotton; I saw it drop from under her clothes, and while I was securing the prisoner the other woman made off, and left the yard and a half of print that I was cutting off in my hands.

Q. You had other shopmen in the shop - A. Yes, four or five.

WILLIAM READ . I am a constable; I took charge of the prisoner; I produce the property.

Bennett. It is Mr. Thwaites's property.

GUILTY, aged 23,

Of stealing, but not privately .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120408-75

386. MARY LEWIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of March , six yards of cambric, value 5 l. the property of John Thwaites , privately in his shop .

JAMES WILKS . I am shopman to John Thwaites . On Thursday the 19th of March, about eight o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came in by herself, she asked for some brown holland; I shewed her some; she stood in the shop about a quarter of an hour; she bargained for a yard and a half; I cut it off, it came to three shillings; she wished to look at some French cambrics; I shewed her some; she bought three sixteenths of a yard, it came to sixteen shillings; she paid for that, and the brown holland; I shewed her two or three pieces; I missed one of the pieces while she was at the counter, and when I gave her the articles she went out of the shop, and I followed her.

Q. What might be the length of yards in one of these pieces - A. Six yards and a quarter; it will fold up in a very narrow compass.

Q. How far had she got from the shop before you overtook her - A. About an hundred yards from the shop; I did not know positively whether she had the cambric or no; I saw her looking at the cambric by the light of the lamps in Chancery-lane; she crossed over the way, and dropped the cambric; Bennett was with me, he picked up the cambric; I saw it, it was one of the pieces I had shewed her.

WILLIAM READ . I am an officer of Hatton Garden office. The prisoner and the pieces of cambric were delivered to me, and these are the things she bought; she said, Mr. Read, I am sorry to see you here; she said she was taking up what she had bought, and with them she took up the cambric, and going down Chancery-lane she looked and saw something more than she had bought, and seeing somebody behind her, coming up, she was surprised, and threw it down, she did not know what to do. I have known her some time, she was a respectable woman.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave her a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120408-76

387. JOHN PILCHER was indicted for that he, on the 23d of May, 1798, at the parish of St. Olave, Silver-street, did marry and take to wife one Sarah Elizabeth Langham , spinster ; and that he afterwards on the 13th day of January, 1805 , did marry and take to wife one Elizabeth Talmarsh Parke , his former wife, Sarah Elizabeth , being then living .

JOSEPH LEE. Q. Do you know the person of Sarah Elizabeth Langham - A. I was present when she was married to the prisoner.

MR. LANCHAM. They were married at St. Alban's, Wood-street, that parish is united with St. Olave, Silver-street. (The register read.)

" John Pilcher , batchelor, of this parish, and Sarah Elizabeth Langham, of St. Mary, Lambeth, spinster, were married in this church by license, 23d of May, 1798." I know the man and the woman, I dined with them on the wedding day. The prisoner is the man.

JOSEPH PARKE . I live in Saffron Walden, in Essex. Elizabeth Talmarsh Parke is my daughter, she was married to the prisoner on the 13th of January, 1805. The prisoner is the man. I gave her away, and after my daughter had been married to him about five years I discovered he was a married man.

Q. to Mr. Lee. You know the first wife - A. I do.

WILLIAM SMITH . I apprehended the prisoner at the sign of the Hope, Banner-street.

RICHARD GROVES . I live at Kennington; I knew the prisoner's first wife for some years. The prisoner lived in a public-house, which I afterwards kept;

I knew the first wife, after she left him it was reported that she was dead.

Q. Do you believe that she was alive or no in January, 1805 - A. I believe she was.

GUILTY , aged 38.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120408-77

388. WILLIAM PRICE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of March , a feather bed, value 3 l. 3 s. the property of Robert Heap , in his dwelling-house .

ROBERT HEAP . I am a housekeeper, I rent the house No. 7, and 8, Woburn-court, in the parish of St. George's, Blomsbury ; I live in the house, No. 8; I lost the feather bed on the 19th of March; I had seen it in my shop three hours before it was stolen.

SARAH LANGSTON . I live at No. 3, Woburn-street. I was very near the prisoner when he took the bed out of the shop; it is an open shop; I saw him actually take it; I was in Woburn-court at the time he took it; I did not raise the alarm; I was not able to speak.

JAMES EDWARD WYNNE . I am a coachman; I saw this man running with a bed at his back, I heard stop thief cried, the man with the bed I followed to the corner of Diot-street, he dropped the bed; I let the bed lay in the street and followed him, I overtook him in about fifty yards; he was never out of my sight.

- I am an officer. This bed was delivered to me by the last witness.

Prosecutor. It is my bed, it is worth three guineas.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 20.

[The prisoner was recommended to mercy by the Jury on account of his good character.]

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120408-78

389. SAMUEL BAILEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of March , a bag, value 1 d. two penny pieces, one hundred and eighteen halfpence, and two farthings , the property of Lyon Lyons .

LYON LYONS. I am a clothes-man ; the halfpence were taken from my boy.

EMANUEL LYONS . On the 9th of March, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, I went into a public-house in Hackney-road ; I put the bag containing the money on the tap-room table; there were two particular farthings in the bag, and two penny pieces; the rest were halfpence, altogether to the amount of five shillings. The prisoner sat at the same table upon which the bag was put. I went out and left the bag behind me, I am so forgetful of every thing; I returned again to the public-house in five minutes, and the prisoner and the bag was gone.

Q. Where was this public-house - A. The Duke of Clarence, Hackney-road. I went over to the Union public-house, I there saw the prisoner, I got an officer, he took the prisoner, and the bag and money was found in his house.

JONATHAN ARMSTRONG . On the 9th of March I apprehended the prisoner at the Union public-house, he told me where he lived, I went to his room in Leg of Mutton and Trimmings Yard, Kingsland-road; I found there a bag containing a quantity of halfpence; he said he found it under the tap-room table. I know the prisoner to be a hard-working man.

GUILTY , aged 56.

Fined 1 s. and discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120408-79

390. ANN DODD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of February , two three-shilling bank tokens, and seventeen shillings and sixpence in monies numbered, the property of John Vincent , from his person .

JOHN VINCENT . I am a master shoe-maker , No. 29, Bowling-street, near the Abbey. On the 19th of February I left my own house about nine in the evening, I went to a friend in the Broadway, Westminster, at the White Horse, I stopped there till eleven o'clock, I had a pint of half and half; I was perfectly sober; I was returning through New Tothill-street , the prisoner met me, she demanded two-pence of me, she said she wanted two-pence, and two-pence she must have; I told her I had no two-pences to give away, I had a family at home; she laid hold of my coat and said, she must have two-pence; she tore my coat all down the side, and on my looking on the ground I saw two shillings lay on the ground; I put my hand into my pocket, I found my money was all gone, one pound three shillings and sixpence, it was all gone; I said to her, you have robbed me; she said I was a thief, I had robbed her. I said you shall go with me to Tothill-street, I will charge the watch with you; I took her to Great Tothill-street; she throwed eight shillings out of her hand in the mud; I picked up eight shillings, and two shillings when I first saw her; I lost thirteen shillings; the watchman came and saw me pick this money up, among the rest I lost two three shilling tokens.

EDWARD BOOTH . I am a watchman. When I came up to the prosecutor he had hold of the prisoner with one hand, and picking up money with the other; I asked him what was the matter; he said she had throwed some money down that she had robbed him of. I took her to the watchhouse.

JOHN DAVIS . I am constable of the night; I searched the prisoner, upon her, I found twelve shillings and three halfpence, there are two three-shilling bank tokens among it.

Prisoner's Defence. I asked him for something to drink, he said he would give me two pence if he had it; he felt in his pocket and dropped something; I was very much in liquor, I did not know exactly my conduct, or else I should not have conducted myself so. I am totally friendless.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120408-80

391. ELIZABETH TODD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of March , a blanket, value 5 s. the property of George Gates , in a lodging-room .

ELIZABETH GATES . My husbands name is George Gates, we live in Thornton-place, Quebec-street, New-road . The prisoner lodged in my house, her husband is in the room now; they both of them took the room.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120408-81

392. DANIEL MEAD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of March , a jacket, value 4 s. and two pair of breeches, value 6 s. the property of Joseph Lamb .

REBECCA LAMB . My husband's name is Joseph Lamb , we live at the York Hospital, Chelsea. I did not miss the jacket and breeches, until they were brought me by Benson; they were taken out of the store that we keep locked up. They were brought to me on the 13th of March, when they were taken I cannot say, they are my husband's regimentals.

Q. Had you known the prisoner before - A. Yes, in the hospital, he never came to our house, he had been in the hospital for five or six months.

AMBROSE BENSON. I am a patrol. On the 13th of March, about three o'clock, I met the prisoner with these things under his arm. I asked him what he had under his arm, he said some clothes to sell. I took him to the watchhouse, the cloathes were claimed the next morning by serjeant Lamb's wife.

Prosecutrix. I know it is my husband's jacket, I made it.

Prisoner. I bought the things of a man in the street, he said he was going on garrison duty at Guernsey.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120408-82

393. CATHERINE CORMACK and ALICE CATON were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of March , four yards of printed cotton, value 3 s. the property of Simeon Brown .

THOMAS YOUNG . I am shopman to Simeon Brown , linen-draper . On the 30th of March the prisoners came into the shop between three and four o'clock, they purchased three quarters of a yard of cotton, it came to nine pence, Caton paid for it; and while I was turning round to take down some pieces, I saw Cormack as if in the act of putting something under her clothes. After they had paid the nine pence they left the shop, I went after them, I told them they must come back; Cormack dropped two remnants of cotton before she came in the shop; one of the remnants I remembered, the other I do not.

Q. What is the worth of the remnant you remembered - A. One shilling.

Caton. Q. Did not I buy a yard and a half of blue cotton - A. I thought it was three quarters.

SAMUEL ROBERTS . I am watchhouse-keeper. I searched the two prisoners; in Cormack's pocket I found two shawls, and eight shillings and eight-pence. in Caton's pocket.

Cormack's Defence. I am a widow, with four children.

Caton's Defence. I know no more than what I tell you, that I bought a yard and a half of cotton, and paid for it.

CORMACK - GUILTY , aged 35.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

CATON - NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120408-83

394. SAMUEL RICHARDSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of March , from the person of George Dell , a warrant for the payment of 15 l. 10 s. and two Bank notes, value 5 l. each, and six one-pound notes , his property.

GEORGE DELL . I keep the Barley Mow, public-house, in the Strand . On the 30th of March I had my pocket picked of my pocket-book; I suppose it to be at nine o'clock in the evening, I did not find it out until half after twelve. I had been to Deptford.

Q. Were you in liquor - A. I had been drinking, I was a little fresh; me, and two or three friends, and the prisoner, went out together. The last time I saw my pocket-book, was at the Nelson's Head, at Deptford. I had in my pocket-book a check of fifteen pounds ten shillings, two five-pound Bank notes, and the rest one's, in all, sixteen pounds in Banknotes. The prisoner left me at Deptford , I did not see him until two days afterwards; he came into my house, and said he had heard I suspected him of having stolen his pocket-book. I got out of bed and heard what he said; he said he had paid a one-pound note to Mr. Lightfoot, he took a score out of it. On the next morning I went to Mr. Lightfoot, I saw the note; I had endorsed that note with the man's name that I took it of; I am sure I had that note in my pocket-book when I was at Deptford that evening. I had the prisoner taken.

SAMUEL LACK . I am an officer of Bow-street. I I apprehended the prisoner; he said he knew nothing at all about it. I received the note of Mr. Lightfoot, I have kept it ever since.

MR. LIGHTFOOT. I keep the Red Lettice public-house, Frogwell-court, Charter-house-lane. On the 31st of March I received a one-pound of the prisoner, I gave the same one pound note that I received of the prisoner to Lack.

Prosecutor. Q. Look upon that note, and see whether there is any indorsement - A. Yes; Cox and Co's carman; I am sure that is the note I took that day.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120408-84

395. THOMAS JOSEPH ELLIOTT was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 30th of March , a watch, value 3 l. the property of William Goodwin Brufart .

WILLIAM GOODWIN BRUFART . I am a journeyman carpenter ; I live at No. 1, Cross-key-court, London-wall.

Q. When did this happen - A. On Easter Monday, the 30th of March, between eleven and twelve o'clock; I was coming out of the public-house when the prisoner snatched the watch out of my pocket; I saw him with my watch in his hand. I catched hold of his collar and called out watchman, and for Morgan

whom I had been in the house with, and the prisoner was taken to the watchhouse. I saw the case of my watch fly from the watch as he had it in his hand.

WILLIAM MORGAN . On the 30th of March I was at this public-house, drinking with the prosecutor; the prosecutor and the prisoner went out before me, in a short time I heard the prosecutor cry out Morgan, and that he had been robbed of his watch. I came out, and saw the prosecutor had hold of the prisoner; a stranger asked me if I was the person that was acquainted with the person that lost his watch, I said yes, he gave me the watch in my hand to take care of; I said there is neither outside case nor glass; the prosecutor said, never mind, I have got the man. The constable of the night came up.

Q. Did you ever find the outside case afterwards - A. No. I delivered up the watch to the constable of the night.

JOSEPH BARNS . I am a constable. About ten o'clock in the evening, on the 30th of March I went into this public-house, I saw the prisoner, the prosecutor, and his friend, drinking with a parcel of women of the town; I returned to the watch on my duty, I saw no more of this till twelve o'clock. The prosecutor brought the man in by the arm, and told me that he had been robbed of his watch; I asked him where the watch was, he said Mr. Morgan had got it. Morgan gave me the watch, and told me the case was lost, he gave me the watch in the state it is now in, without the case or glass. I asked Morgan where he got it, he said, some unknown man gave it him in the street. I searched the prisoner, and found nothing; he said he was not guilty of it. The prosecutor said his watch was pulled out of his fob by the prisoner, in the street; the prisoner denied it, and said he never did such a thing in his life.

Q. Was the prosecutor sober - A. No; he knew what he said and did.

Prosecutor. It is my watch.

Prisoner's Defence. I am not guilty of what I am charged with; as I came out of the public-house he catched hold of me fast, there were two or three women with him, he said you have robbed me of my watch; I said I was innocent, I was willing to go to the watchhouse, I knew nothing of the watch.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120408-85

396. RICHARD COLLARD , HENRY COLLARD , and ROBERT ADAMSON were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of April , sixteen pounds weight of leaden pipe, value 16 s. and a copper ball cock, value 1 s. the property of John Dowling , affixed to a certain building of his .

JOHN DOWLING . I am a carpenter, and keep a public-house in White-cross-street, St. Luke's . On Saturday evening, the 4th of April, from information I went to see if my leaden pipe and ball cock were taken away. I went to the water-butt, and found the pipe and cock taken away; I went out backwards, and saw Mr. Jackson, he had three boys in custody, he said he saw them cut the pipe away.

JOHN JACKSON . I am a stone mason, I live next door to Mr. Dowling. I saw the three prisoners lurking about the prosecutor's house about three o'clock in the afternoon. I took notice of them, they went away. About eight o'clock I saw Richard and Henry Collard , I saw them going into the place where the pipe was, I took notice of their actions. I heard a tapping, as if with a hammer on a knife; I saw Henry Collard convey something away. I saw Adamson at the time that they were cutting the pipe away; I saw Henry go away again, and immediatly Richard followed him, and I heard the water bursting out of the pipe; I went up the court, and caught Henry, he dropped the ball-cock down; I got hold of Henry with the lead in a bag; Adamson was waiting at the public-house; I laid hold of him, this knife was found in Richard Collard 's pocket.

Prosecutor. It is my property.

RICHARD COLLARD - GUILTY, aged 15.

HENRY COLLARD - GUILTY, aged 13.

ROBERT ADAMSON - GUILTY, aged 15.

Judgment respited .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120408-86

397. JOHN DONNOLLY , alias M'NULLY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of March , sixty-five pounds weight of lead, value 5 s. the property of Joseph Dowding , affixed to a certain building of his .

JOSEPH DOWDING. I am a victualler , I live in Oxford-street . On the 7th of March the prisoner came into my house with another man, they had two pots of porter, in the afternoon they went away; he came again in the evening, after dark, in company with a soldier, and was drinking with him in the room; he went out of the house at eight o'clock, and wished me good night; I followed him out, my girl had told me that he was a thief; I thought he was gone away. A little while after my wife was taking the children to bed, she came down and said I had been robbed: somebody went up stairs and brought down this lead, it was on the stair-case in this apron.

MARY MALONEY . I am a servant to Mr. Dowding. I went out in the back yard, I saw the prisoner cutting the lead.

Q. to prosecutor. Where was the lead affixed - A. Upon the back parlour.

Mary Maloney. I saw him cut it off. I said Jack have you come here to thieve the lead. I knew him before.

JOHN COBHAM . I am a constable. The lead was given into my possession. I searched the prisoner, I found nothing upon him but a bad shilling.

JOSEPH DOWDING , JUN. My mother was going to take me and my brother up to bed, I heard a noise on the stairs; I wanted to know what it was, I did not like to go into the room, and this prisoner came down the stairs by me, I am sure he passed me.

The prisoner called four witnessess who gave him a good character.

GUILTY, aged 17.

Judgment respited .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120408-87

398. ANN ADAMSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of March , three chissels, value 9 d. a goudge, value 3 d. a spike, value 6 d. and a saw, value 2 s. the property of Daniel Hewitt .

JAMES SHAW . I was a work at Bath-street, St. Luke's , on Saturday the 22d of March. I shut up

the building and left the tools there on the Saturday evening, and on the Monday morning when I went to work, I found some of the tools gone. I found my tools on the Saturday following at Joseph Ward 's, in Old-street.

JOSEPH WARD . I am a broker, 121, Old-street. On the 26th of March I bought these tools of my next door neighbour, Mr. Asler.

WILLIAM ASLER . I bought these tools of Ann Adamson .

Prosecutor. They are my tools.

Prisoner's Defence. I sold these tools for Mrs. Collard, I gave her the money.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120408-88

399. LUCY PARSONS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of July , two gowns, value 10 s. a breakfast cloth, value 2 s. and a shawl, value 2 s. the property of James Green .

ELIZABETH GREEN . My husband's name is James Green.

Q. When did you lose these gowns, shawl, and breakfast cloth - A. I cannot say exactly; I employed the prisoner to work for me a fortnight before; I was ordered by the surgeon to go into the country; she absconded for four months; I had a cancer in my eye; the surgeon that took my eye out ordered me to go in the country; I found my things at the pawnbroker's.

MR. KINGTON. I am a pawnbroker. I produce two gowns, a shawl, and a breakfast cloth; I took them in pawn of the prisoner.

Prosecutrix. They are mine.

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutrix gave me the things to pawn for her.

Prosecutrix. That is not true, I never gave her any thing to pawn in my life.

GUILTY , aged 37.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120408-89

400. CATHERINE WILSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of March , a ham, value 7 s. the property of Alexander Shirafs .

The prosecutor not appearing in court, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120408-90

401. JAMES TAYLOR was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 31st of March , nine fowls, value 9 s. the property of Stephen Long .

JANE PEARCE . I am a servant to Stephen Long , he lives in Earl's-court, Old Brompton. The fowls were lost on the 31st, about eight o'clock in the morning; I had them the night before, as late as five o'clock.

THOMAS CHAPMAN . I am a watchman of Old Brompton. On the 31st of March, about five o'clock in the morning, the prisoner passed me; I saw a bag over his shoulder, I asked him what he had got in the bag; he said working tools; I said, let us see what sort of tools you work with; I felt the outside of the bag, I said, you have got fowls; he said, I have got one; I said, let me see how many one's you have got; I turned them out of the bag, and there was nine fowls. I took him to Kensington watchhouse.

Mrs. Pearce. I saw the fowls at Bow-street office I know the fowls very well.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going to Windsor to see my son; I saw this bag laying in the main road. I took it up, and was returning to my own home; the watchman stopped me.

GUILTY , aged 65.

Confined Two Years in the House of Correction , and Publicly Whipped at the carts tail One Hundred Yards at Kensington .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120408-91

402. MARGARET LUNN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of February , a gown, value 5 s. a shift, value 3 s. a petticoat, value 2 s. the property of Sarah Bainbridge ; and a waistcoat, value 2 s. the property of Thomas Bainbridge .

SARAH BAINBRIDGE and THOMAS BAINBRIDGE were called, and not appearing in Court, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120408-92

403. WILLIAM NEIL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of March , three fowls, value 4 s. the property of James Ball .

JAMES BALL . I live at Paddington , I am an egg-dealer . I lost the fowls on the 5th of March, they were in an enclosed shed.

Q. When did you see them before they were lost - A. I did not see them in the shed that evening; the man brought them to me between seven and eight o'clock in the evening; the man brought the prisoner with the fowls; I took the little boy, he was taken by a constable.

SAMUEL EATON . I am a labourer. I saw two boys come from Mr. Ball's premises, they dropped the fowls in the yard. It was on the 5th of March, about half past seven in the evening. One of the boys made his escape; I secured the prisoner, and took the fowls up.

Prosecutor. I am sure they are my fowls.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 14.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120408-93

404. PRISCILLA KIRK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of February , a tea-kettle, value 5 s. the property of James Farrol .

MARY FARROL. My husband's name is James Farrol ; we live at No. 5, Great St. Andrew-street, Seven Dials . On the 23d of February I went to the cupboard to get the tea-kettle to put it on the fire, I saw the prisoner come out of the cupboard with the tea-kettle in her hand and her apron over it; I followed her down stairs, I asked what she had got, she said, nothing; I looked under her apron, she had got the tea-kettle in her right hand.

Q. Did she lodge in your house - A. No.

Prisoner's Defence. I beg for mercy; I am not guilty of it.

GUILTY , aged 41.

Confined Fourteen Days in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120408-94

405. RICHARD HOW was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of April , nineteen pounds weight of lead, value 5 s. the property of Samuel Sewell .

SAMUEL SEWELL . I am a plumber and glazier at Limehouse-hole . On Thursday the 2d of April I was informed that some lead was secreted in a part of the shop, I took it up and marked it, and secreted myself in a part of the premises to see what became of it. The prisoner worked for me, he came in and brought a bag of tools in with him, he immediately went to the spot where this piece of lead was deposited, took it and put it into a narrower compass than it was, and drove a nail through it and put it under his waistcoat, and secured it from tumbling down by putting the nail into a button-hole, he immediately went off the premises with it, I followed him and brought him back and gave him into custody. This is the lead, it was in my charge.

Prisoner's Defence. The lead did not belong to Mr. Sewell, I am an old man with a family, I am very sorry I should be brought into all this trouble, it is the first time and I hope it will be the last.

GUILTY , aged 64.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120408-95

406. EDWARD O'BRIEN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of April , sixty pound weight brass, value 3 l. the property of Richard Evered .

RICHARD EVERED . I live at No. 11, Charles Street, Long Acre. On the 3d of April, the prisoner went to the privy, and as soon as he came out another of my men went to the privy, he came out directly and told me there was some brass in the privy upon the seat, I know O'Brien had been the last. In about ten minutes the man came to me again, and said he saw O'Brien put something in his breast, I sent for a constable, the prisoner was searched, and a quantity of brass found upon him. The constable searched his lodgings and there was found a quantity of brass.

WILLIAM RICHARDS . I am an officer. I searched the prisoner and found five pound weight of brass betwixt his shirt and his skin, and I searched the prisoner's lodgings. I there found fifty pound weight of brass.

Prosecutor. I can swear to all that brass being my property, it is worth nigh a shilling a pound.

Prisoner's Defence. I leave myself to the mercy of the court.

GUILTY, aged 23.

Judgment respited .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120408-96

407. JOHN HANSDALE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of March , two shirts, value 6 s. two pair of stockings, value 3 s. one pair of stockings, value 1 s. and a cap, value 3 d. the property of James Shuttleworth ; and ELIZABETH CLARK for feloniously receiving the said goods, she knowing them to have been stolen .

JAMES SHUTTLEWORTH . I am an apprentice to Mr. Brown and Hayes, watchmakers, 27, Upper North Place, Grays Inn Lane.

Q. What is the prisoner - A. He is housekeeper to my father, my father lives in Red Lion Yard, Warne Street , my father is a coach master. I lost this shirt and handkerchief on Tuesday morning the 3d of March. I took my things home to my mother to wash, and put them behind the door that parted the house from all the people that lived in the yard, and when my sister went to look for them they were gone. John Hensdale did not come to work the next morning, suspicion fell on him.

MARIA SHUTTLEWORTH . I saw the prisoner go by the door and stoop down.

WILLIAM READ . I am an officer. I took the prisoner in custody on the 4th of March, he denied having any knowledge of these things. I searched his lodgings, he cohabited with Clark. I found part of the things at Mr. Armstrong's pawnbroker. Clark sent me a handkerchief and a pair of stockings the next day by her little girl, Clark said Hensdale brought them to her, she had made a present of them to her brother, she would get them again.

MR. ARMSTRONG. I produce two shirts pawned in the name of Clark, for two shillings, on the 3d of March.

HENSDALE, GUILTY , aged 43.

Fined 1 s. and discharged.

CLARK, NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120408-97

408. MARY MILLER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 15th of March a gown, value 8 s. and a straw bonnet, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of Samuel Lucas .

MARY LUCAS. I live at 14, Monmouth-street , I keep a clothes shop.

Q. On the 14th of March did you lose a gown and a straw bonnet - A. Yes, I had seen them in my shop ten minutes before they were taken, a young man brought the prisoner into the shop and said this woman has stolen your gown, the prisoner had the gown hanging on her arm, and the straw bonnet with her; I knew them to be mine; I asked the prisoner how she came to take them away? she said I might do as I pleased with her.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw the gown hanging up, I took hold of it to look at it, it fell down, I took it up to take it into the shop, a young man took me into the shop and said I was going to take it away.

GUILTY , aged 37.

Confined Fourteen Days in Newgate .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120408-98

409. WILLIAM RADDICK was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 25th of February two pewter pint pots, value 2 s. the property of Richard Priest .

RICHARD PRIEST. I am a publican , I keep the Wheatsheaf, Church-row, St. Pancrass, on the 24th of February, I delivered the pots out to Mrs. Roberts.

MRS. ROBERTS. I live at 31, Church-row, St. Pancras , I take my beer of Mr. Priest. On the 25th of February I saw the prisoner pass my house, I had

put the pots outside of the door, I heard the pots rattle, I ran out and called after him, I asked him what he was going to do with the pots? he said he was going to take them to the Duke of Clarence, I told him they did not belong to the Duke of Clarence, he gave me the pots. These are the pots.

Prosecutor. They are my pots.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of stealing the pots.

GUILTY , aged 51.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and Publicly Whipped .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120408-99

410. JOHN WHITEHAIR was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 3d of April a silk handkerchief, value 5 s. the property of Thomas French , from his person .

THOMAS FRENCH . On Friday evening, the 3d of April, about five minutes past nine o'clock, as I was going home to Southampton-row , I was beyond Gray's Inn-lane, Holborn , I felt some person drawing at my pocket, I put my hand down and found my handkerchief gone, I turned round and saw the prisoner with it, he threw it from him, I immediately took hold of him, and took the handkerchief off the spikes of the gate where he had throwed it, he said it was not him who did it; there was no person near at the time. I took him to the watch-house.

EDWARD BRITTEN. I am a patrol in Holborn, I came up at the call of watch, and took the prisoner to the watch-house. I knew the prisoner's person well.

ROBERT DAWSON. The prisoner was left, in the watch-house in my charge. This is the handkerchief.

Prosecutor. It is my handkerchief, it is worth five shillings.

Prisoner's Defence. At the time the gentleman laid hold of me I perceived a person turn round and make his escape.

Court. Q.(to Prosecutor.) Could any person run away and make his escape upon the spot without your seeing him - A. I think it impossible.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120408-100

411. ROBERT WEIR was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 9th of March a box, value 1 s. two window curtains, value 4 s. and a valence, value 1 s. the property of William Mellersh .

WILLIAM MELLERSH . I live at the King's Head, in the Borough. A box directed to Miss Davis, Tower Terrace, came by the Arundel waggon, it was sent out on the 9th of March in the care of my porter, Thomas Bishop , I never saw the box till the next morning at the office, Whitechapel.

THOMAS BISHOP . I am porter to William Mellersh . On the 9th of March I took the box in Mr. Mellersh's cart.

Q. Do you remember having this box directed to Miss Davis, Tower Terrace - A. Yes, I missed it in Whitechapel . A man told me he saw a man take it out, when he told me I immediately pursued, I saw the box on the pavement in Whitechapel-road, I saw the prisoner twenty minutes after the box was taken. On the next day I saw the box opened, it contained some window curtains and a valence.

THOMAS HIGGS . I am a cabinet-maker in Whitechapel-road. On the 9th of March I saw the prisoner with this box in his hand and an apron over it, he chucked it out of his hands, I ran after him and took him. This is the box that he threw down, when I stopped him the people asked what he had done, I said he had stolen this box, the prisoner said he was a poor fellow, he had not got any work to do; I said this is the way to make people poor, you do not go away from me, I took him to the magistrate. This is the box that he threw down, and the prisoner is the man that had the box.

RICHARD DANIEL . I was standing at the corner of Great Garden-street, Whitechapel, the prisoner passed me with this box in his hands, carrying it before him, there was a cry of stop thief, I immediately run, a tall man behind him told him to run. I am quite sure the prisoner is the man. The carman picked up the box, it is directed to Miss Davis, Tower Terrace, London.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of all the charges laid against me.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120408-101

412. JOHN STAFFORD was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 17th of March six copper pans, value 10 s. and four iron scale beams, value 8 s. the property of John Schooling , James Lawrence , and James Schooling .

JAMES SCHOOLING . I am a wholesale ironmonger , my manufactory is in Great Garden-street, Whitechapel , John Schooling and James Lawence are my partners. The prisoner was a workman , he had worked for us on and off seven or eight years, he was a good servant.

SAMUEL MILLER . I am an officer. From information I apprehended the prisoner as he was coming out of a turning that leads from Petticoat-lane to Whitechapel on the 17th of March, I took his hat off, I found these copper pans in his hat; I asked him whose property they were? he said they belonged to Messrs. Schooling, they were good masters, and he was a ruined man, he said I might as well take the scale beams also, he took them out of his pocket and began to cry.

Prisoner's Defence. I was rather in liquor when I did it, I was sorry for it then, and have been sorry for it ever since.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Fined 1 s. and Discharged.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120408-102

413. JOHN GIBBS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 2d of March a sheet, value 5 s. the property of Stephen Furlong .

MARY FURLONG . My husband's name is Stephen Furlong , I live at No. 1, Dean-street, Shadwell . There being a bill at the window, the prisoner asked if he could have a lodging, it was the 2d of March, about half past eleven in the morning. I told him Mr. Furlong was a very particular man, could he refer me to any body for a character, he said he had come from some distance, and was going to work in the highway, he could not refer to any body. He came in the evening about half after five with a large bundle, saying if I would permit him he would go up stairs and put them things in the room; I went up stairs with him, and shewed him into the room, he asked me to let him put on a clean shirt, I left him there, he was in the room about ten minutes, I was in the next room, I heard him shut the door, I went down immediately afterwards. I went up to him at the street door saying I hope if you bring the remainder of your things to night you will not be late, he did not turn round to look at me, I looked to see if he had a clean shirt on, he had not. I went up stairs and found a sheet was gone, I pursued him and overtook him in the highway, I told him he had got my property I believed, my husband was a working man, that it was an object to me; I begged a gentleman to see me righted, he was secured, one gentleman said he has nothing in his hands, I said no, he certainly has it round his body; he unbuttoned his waistcoat, it was bound round his body under his waistcoat.

MR. SOLOMON. I saw the sheet taken from his body, and assisted in taking him.

Prisoner's Defence. I had no other intention than to return it; if I had a mind I could have taken more.

GUILTY , aged 52.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and Publicly Whipped .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120408-103

414. CHARLES FULLER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 14th of March three saws value 6 s. three planes, value 4 s. and two sashes, value 10 s. the property of William Powell and Joseph Morgan Powell .

WILLIAM POWELL . My partner's name is Joseph Morgan Powell , we are dealers in all sorts of household furniture .

Q. On the 14th of March did you lose any saws and planes - A Yes, on the beginning of March we did, I know the prisoner pledged them, he was a carpenter employed by us.

HUGH MACDONALDS . I am a dealer in building materials, I bought these two sashes of the prisoner, he asked two shillings for the last he brought, they are worth five shillings each.

JOHN BAXTER . I am a constable. The prisoner was brought to the watchhouse. The tickets were produced; Mr. Powell found the articles.

Q.(to Prosecutor.) Did you find any duplicates upon the prisoner - A. No, he delivered them up. I took the duplicates to the pawnbrokers and paid for the articles. I know they are all mine, and the sashes are mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of the sashes. The tools Mr. Powell said, I was welcome to them, I was to pay for them by instalments.

Prosecutor. Nothing of that sort passed.

GUILTY , aged 56.

Publicly whipped and discharged.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120408-104

415. HENRY ROBINSON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 14th of March , three pair of reins, value 18 s. the property of James Bushnell , and Thomas Rawson .

JAMES BUSHNELL . I am a coach-maker , 29, Oxford street . Thomas Rawson is my partner. The prisoner worked for us from the 9th to the 14th. My foreman, on looking over the harness, missed three pair of reins, I found them at Ringers, in Dean-street.

SAMUEL RINGER . I am a harness maker in Dean-street, about two days before the prisoner was taken up, I bought two pair of reins of him, I delivered them to Mr. Bushnell.

AMEY LEE. I am a coach-broker. I bought a pair of coach reins of the prisoner; I delivered them up to Mr. Bushnell.

GUILTY , aged 32.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and publicly whipped .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120408-105

416. JAMES GODFREY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of March , two sacks, value 10 s. and three bushels of wheat, value 36 s the property of John Whitbread .

JOHN WHITBREAD . I occupy two large farms at Edmonton . The prisoner has been in my employ nine or ten months.

Q. In the last month, and some time preceding, had he been thrashing in Warehall barn - A. Yes. The only person. I had entrusted him with great confidence; it was his business, when he had done work, to lock up the barn, and to bring the keys to my house, and to come for them in the morning.

Q. What sort of gates are there to your barn - A. A large pair of gates, and the yard is inclosed by a high wall, and large gates to the wall of the yard; the gates of the yard and of the barn are on the same construction, and the same sort of fastenings, and a wicket to each of the gates; the wicket is locked by a key, and she gates are fastened by a bar and a pin.

Q. On the 19th of March you, I believe, had been out late - A. Yes, I had been in town, I came home about twelve o'clock, I sent my boy with the horse, he returned, and said he found the gates open. In consequence of that I went to the barn, I found the gates open, I went into the barn, there was a large heap of corn, it was visible that there had been a quantity taken from the bulk.

Q. You had not given him any directions for carting

any of that heap, had you. - A. No, he had not been working there the day preceding, nor any other person whatever. On the next morning the prisoner was taken in custody, I went to his house, his wife came out, I told her that I had come to search for property that I had lost; in a shed attached to his house I found a quantity of wheat in two sacks, about two bushels in another sack. I found about two bushels of peas and beans, and one sack marked with my own name, I also found a fat hog feeding upon clean wheat, which I had no doubt is my property.

Q. What was the price of wheat at that time - A. Fourteen or fifteen shilling a bushel. It is a thing that is never done, to feed hogs upon wheat, the wheat the hog was feeding on, it was the same kind of wheat as that in the sack, I compared it with the sample of the bulk remaining in the barn; I have no doubt it is my wheat.

MR. WOOD. Q. I believe you went with Mr. Whitbread to search the prisoner's house. - A. Yes, his account is correct.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to his character.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and publicly whipped .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120408-106

417. ROBERT BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 31st of January , eight bushels of coals, value 12 s. the property of Nathaniel Hadley and Thomas Mellish Thatcher .

THOMAS MELLISH THATCHER . I am a coal merchant , my partner's name is Nathaniel Hadley . The prisoner was a spare man employed on the coal wharf .

Q. Were your store robbed of any coals on the 31st of January. - A. It was between six and seven o'clock in the evening, the prisoner that I convicted last sessions was a man employed in a stable that we have separted by a boarded partition, and the prisoner was in the stable, and in the act of throwing out the coals. This man was in the stable, and was the man that opened the door to me, and afterwards absconded. It was the stable adjoining the warehouse belonging to me and my partner.

Q. Was there any communication between the stable and the coal-warehouse. - A. None whatever, the boards were removed so as to enable a person to have access to my coals in my warehouse.

Q. Before you found out the parties, did you discover that your coals were diminished close to that stable - A. We searched in the morning, and found that a large quantity of coals were gone, and these boards, leaving a passage to the stable where the late prisoner was employed, they could not have been removed from my premises at that spot. In consequence of the coals being removed, I lay in wait. Soon after six o'clock I heard a shovel going in the warehouse, and in the act of throwing out coals, I went to the stable door where the late prisoner was employed, whom I had seen go in with a light, I knocked at the stable door, and in a faint voice, asked the prisoner to open the door and let me in, he opened the door, and as soon as he saw me, he set off and ran away, and we were not able to see or hear any thing of him for a great length of time, I then went to the far end of the warehouse, and detected the other man throwing the coals out, to the amount of eight or nine bushels thrown out; the other man I secured, this man absconded till last Friday week he was taken.

Q. What is the worth of these coals - A. Twelve shillings.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of the thing.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and publicly whipped .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120408-107

418. ELIAS ABRAHAM was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of March , a tea caddy, value 5 s. and a silver spoon value 2 s. the property of Avice Kelham .

TAYLOR JOHN GREEN . I was a servant to the late John Kelham , he occupied the attic chambers, No. 12, Staples Inn , I reside in the chambers to take care of the property, and Avice Kelham occupied one of these rooms during her brother's life.

Q. What time did you leave the chambers - A. On Saturday, about three o'clock in the day. When I went out I locked the chamber door, I had locked the outer door on the evening before, both doors were perfectly secure when I went out: I returned to my chambers about ten minutes before four, and when I got upon the third landing I met the prisoner coming down, I went two or three steps further, and saw that the small room door had been violently used, that room door was broken open, Mrs. Kelham occupied that room, I pursued the prisoner, and got hold of him by the collar, on the last flight of stairs; I asked him what business he had on the top flight of stairs, he said, he had been to see if they wanted any pens or quills; he had none with him: I told the prisoner he had not been in the habit of selling pens or quills there, he had no right there, I detained him, and sent for a constable. The prisoner was searched in Mr. Townshend's presence, we found upon him two and three large spike nails, one of them bent, a gimblet in the bosom of his shirt, a small pair of pincers, and a file. In searching the prisoner's breeches pocket, something fell out, the prisoner snatched it up, it turned out to be a caddy spoon. After having secured the prisoner, the constable and I went to the small chamber, we went in, there had been a piece of wood split off the door, about an inch wide, by the lock, and about two feet long, and two or three holes bored slanting, by a gimblet; it appeared that there had been something pushed in the lock, and the bolt of the lock had been pushed back. In the room, two boxes had been forced open, one of the boxes had been corded, and the cords were cut; the other box had been nailed, the nails had been drawn, and two caddys were on the floor, they had been both opened, and the tea spilt about.

Q. The caddies were left behind - A. Yes, the spoon was in one of the caddies, I have no doubt. On our missing the spoon we asked the prisoner for the spoon, he said he had not got it; we asked for something he let fall, the constable searched him, and found the spoon in his shoe. This is the spoon, it is bent, it was in the shoe, under his right foot. I have no doubt that the spoon is the property of Miss Kelham; I had seen it frequently in use.

Bolderow. I am constable and porter. I was sent for, I found the prisoner at No. 11, at Mr. Townshend's. This is the spoon, I took from his right shoe; these other things were delivered to me; I looked at the door, it had the appearance as if it had been broken open with these implements.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, called six witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120408-108

419. MARY COLEMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of March , two pounds weight of bees wax, value 5 s. the property of Mary Calliot .

WILLIAM STEVENS. I live at No. 27, Earl-street. On the 26th of March I was standing in my mother-in-law's shop, (Mrs. Calliot's shop), about five o'clock in the afternoon, a girl called out a woman has stolen a cake of bees-wax; I saw a woman go out, and pass the shop-window; I pursued her, and she finding somebody after her, ran into the passage of a house; I brought her from thence, and took the cake of bees wax from her, I looked in the shop and missed a cake of bees-wax.

Prisoner's Defence. A woman gave me this, I thought it was soap; I followed her into the passage, I thought she went in there.

GUILTY , aged 34.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120408-109

420. WILLIAM PEARSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of March , two glass salts, value 10 s. and a mustard pot, value 2 s. a pep- castor, value 2 s. and a napkin, value 6 d. the property of John Long .

JOHN LONG . I keep a hotel , the corner of Clifford-street, Bond-street .

Q. Did you lose any salts and a mustard pot - A. Yes, and a napkin. About the beginning of March, in consequence of information, we went to the prisoner's lodging and waited till he came home; I informee him that he had got a pair of salts, a mustard pot, and a napkin of mine; he said, whatever property I have got of yours I will give you; he produced a napkin from a drawer, he gave it me, he said he got it from one of my waiters; I said I must have the salts and the mustard pot; he said he had them locked up in a back room in the second floor, they were altogether there; he said he bought them of Phillemore the waiter. The prisoner had been at my house papering the rooms; he had papered the parlour where these salts and mustard pot were in.

WILLIAM PHILLEMORE . I am one of Mr. Long's waiters. I have seen him at work at Mr. Long's house as a paper hanger; I never sold or gave articles to him.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence; called five witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 63.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120408-110

421. WILLIAM STORMONT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of February , two teapots, value 1 s. two milk-pots, value 6 d. a sugar bason, value 6 d. seven cups, value 10 d. seven saucers, value 10 d. a snuff-box, value 1 s. three shaving boxes, value 1 s. a shaving case, value 1 s. a rule, value 1 s. and twenty-four books, value 9 s. the property of John Shield .

JOHN SHIELD . I am a broker . The prisoner lodged at my house about the 16th of February, he left my house and went to lodge with Mrs. Waters in Compton-street; I live in Moor-street, Soho . On the 26th of February Mrs. Waters sent to me, saying, that the prisoner had property in his room that did not belong to him; I went and looked at it, in one corner of the room; I saw a sack with property of mine in it, china and other things.

Q. Did not you miss any of them - A. I did not.

Q. Now select some of the property that you know to be yours - A. I swear to the milk pot, and the shaving case, I can swear to the mark upon it; it is marked two shillings and sixpence, it is my own writing.

MRS. WATERS. The prisoner took a lodging at my house; he asked me to lend him a key, in the evening he came in with Mr. Shield's servant and this bag; I did not know what was in it; he continued to lodge with me untill the Tuesday week following; I heard a knocking at my door, I charged the watchman to take charge of the prisoner, and he charged the watchman with me; we were taken to Marlborough-street; Mr. Shield's came and deposed to the property.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of the indictment that is alledged to me totally.

GUILTY, aged 23,

Of stealing the shaving case only.

Judgment respited .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120408-111

422. RICHARD PIKE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of April , a watch, value 21 s. the property of Harriet Pitt .

HARRIET PITT . I live at No. 12, Vincent's-row, Newport-market. I am a servant out of place .

Q. When did you lose your watch - A. On the 4th of April. The prisoner's father and mother lodged in my sister's house.

GEORGE DONALDSON . I am a constable of St. Martin's. I took the prisoner in custody, on searching him; I found this duplicate in his pocket. He said he took it for want.

MR. PERRYMAN. I am a pawnbroker. This is the duplicate given with the watch when it was pawned.

Prosecutrix. It is my watch.

Prisoner's Defence. The duplicate was given to me, the person is gone out of town.

GUILTY, aged 22.

Judgment respited .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder

Reference Number: t18120408-112

323. JOHN GOOK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of February , an iron stove, value 1 l. the property of John Partridge and John Cowdan .

JOHN PARTRIDGE . I am an ironmonger , my partner's name is John Cowdan . I live in Tottenham Court-road . The stone was stolen out of the passage leading into the warehouse; a workman saw the prisoner take it, his name is Owen Swinney .

OWEN SWINNEY . I am a porter to Mr. Partridge. I shut the street-door before the prisoner came to the door, and I went into the warehouse; I heard the latch of the street-door go. I went into the passage, I saw the prisoner put the stove on his shoulder, I pursued him, and took the stove from him.

Prisoner's Defence. A man asked me, as I was passing the shop, to assist in putting this stove into a cart; he went and put it on my shoulder. I was taking it to the cart, the witness seized me, he said I had been thieving a stove, he forcibly dragged me back to the shop, he would not take the man with the cart.

GUILTY , aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120408-113

424. WILLIAM JACKSON and JOHN SPENCER were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of March , a handkerchief, value 14 d. the property of John Snook Harvey , from his person .

JOHN SNOOK HARVEY. I am a servant to linnen draper in Holborn.

Q. When did you lose your handkerchief - A. On the night of the 28th of March, I was just returning from a short walk at half-past ten at night, I was standing at the door waiting for the door to be opened; as soon as I had rung the bell, my face was towards the door, I felt my pocket-handkerchief moved from my pocket. On looking round, I saw my handkerchief in a young man's hand, whom I supposed to be Spencer, I saw him give it to another man, whom I am confident is Jackson. They walked on a little way together, I followed them, and accused them of taking my handkerchief, which they denied, and I cried out stop thief, they run off, and in a few paces they separated, one went straight on, and the other crossed the road. I followed Jackson, thinking I should find my handkerchief. Mr. Vaughan brought up Spencer, having heard the cry of stop thief. They were both taken to St. Andrew's watchhouse. As they passed to the watchhouse they went through a crowd of girls of the town, they said, if they had any thing drop it; nothing was found on them. Spencer at Marlborough-street office, told the magistrate it was Jackson that took the handkerchief, I supposed it was Spencer that took my handkerchief, when he was brought back, he answered to the description of the man that gave it to Jackson.

GEORGE VAUGHAN. I am an attorney's clerk. On the 28th of March, about half-past ten at night, I was on my way to Eagle-street, Holborn, I met the two prisoners, I saw them in company together, just by Red Lion-street. I heard the cry of stop thief, I saw Spencer cross the Road, I laid hold of him and told him I stopped him on suspicion of having robbed some person. I know him to be one that I had seen in company with Jackson. I am sure I saw Spencer in company with Jackson. On our road to the watchhouse, I heard the girls of the town say, if you have got any thing drop it.

Jackson said nothing in his defence.

Spencer's Defence. I never was in a court of justice before in my life. I am as innocent as a child unborn.

Jackson called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Spencer called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

JACKSON - GUILTY, aged 20.

SPENCER - GUILTY, aged 21.

Judgment respited .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120408-114

425. ANN IRONS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of April , a matrass, value 1 l. four bags, value 2 s. and fourteen yards of bed-lace, value 1 s. the property of Jonathan Hammond .

JONATHAN HAMMOND . I am a mattrass-maker , 95, Whitecross-street. From information of my sister, I went to the prisoner's house, I saw her go into a neighbour's house, and carry the things there, worsted and bed-lace, and a mattrass.

MARY HAMMOND. The prisoner worked for my father. I happened to go to the prisoner's house, I saw a mattrass there, I told my brother. This is the mattrass.

Mr. Hammond. I cannot swear to it.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120408-115

426. CHARITY REGAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of March , a waistcoat, value 3 s. the property of Robert Peart .

ROBERT DRAKE . I am shopman to Robert Peart, salesman , Whitechapel. From information, I pursued the prisoner, and took this waistcoat from under her arm. She had taken it from the inside of the shop where it hung up.

GUILTY , aged 37.

Fined 1 s. and discharged.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120408-116

427. ROBERT BLACKMAN was indicted, and the indictment stated, that Thomas Lake, on the 11th of January, in the dwelling-house of Alexander Haye , feloniously did steal a box, value 1 s. fifty pieces of ribbon, value 50 l. fifty yards of lace, value 20 l. and fifty silk handkerchiefs, value 50 l. And that Robert Blackman did receive the said fifty silk handkerchiefs, he knowing them have been stolen , the property of Mary Cunningham .

JAMES GILLMORE . The prisoner was last session acquitted of the stealing, and ordered to be indicted for receiving the property. The prosecutrix is not to be found now. And Thomas Lake has not been apprehended.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120408-117

428. JAMES LIGHTFOOT and SARAH LIGHTFOOT were indicted for a misdemeanor .

Mr. Knapp, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the defendants were

ACQUITTED .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120408-118

429. HYAM JOSEPH was indicted for that he, on the 23d of February , one piece of false counterfeit money, counterfeited and made to the likeness of a good shilling, unlawfully did utter to William Page , he knowing at the time it to be false and counterfeited .

WILLIAM PAGE . I live at 62, Watling-street. On the the 23d of February last, I saw the prisoner in Budge-row, Watling-street , he had oranges, offering them for sale, I purchased six-pennyworth of them, I tendered him a five and six-penny dollar, he gave me five shillings as I supposed, I refused one, saying it was a bad one, he gave me another; I objected to that, saying it was a bad one, of the same make. He then said, sir, I will give you another, a good one, which I took and put along with the other four shillings, I had no other shillings about me. In about three quarters of an hour I examined these shillings, I discovered two of them to be bad. In about two hours afterwards, I saw the prisoner near the Royal Exchange, I went to the Mansion-house and procured an officer, and had him taken in custody. I delivered the two shillings to the officer, the other three shillings were good.

JOHN LACY HAWKINS . Mr. Page pointed out the prisoner to me. I took him to the compter. I found two dollars in his right hand waistcoat pocket, or the right hand breeches pocket; and nine three-shilling pieces, and seven six-pences. Mr. Page delivered to me these two bad shillings, and I found on him nine eighteen-penny pieces, and nine three-shilling tokens, all good; I found also on him two counterfeit shillings and five good one's.

THOMAS WHEELER . Q. Look at these two shillings - A. They are bad, and the two uttered to Mr. Page are bad as well as the two found on the prisoner, they are all just alike, and of the same manufactory.

Mr. Arabin addressed the jury in behalf of the prisoner.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.


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