Old Bailey Proceedings, 19th February 1812.
Reference Number: 18120219
Reference Number: f18120219-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE OYER AND TERMINER, AND GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND ALSO THE GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, HELD AT Justice-Hall, in the Old Bailey, On WEDNESDAY the 19th of FEBRUARY, 1812, and following Days;

BEING THE THIRD SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF The Right Hon. CLAUDIUS STEPHEN HUNTER , LORD-MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY JOB SIBLY , No. 4, CARTHUSIAN-STREET, ALDERSGATE-STREET.

LONDON:

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED (BY THE AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON.) By R. Butters, No. 22, Fetter-lane, Fleet-street.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON.

Before the Right-honorable CLAUDIUS STEPHEN HUNTER , Lord Mayor of the City of London; John Heath , esq. one of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir George Wood , knt. one of the Barons of His Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir John Bailey knt, one of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of King's Bench, Sir William Curtis , bart. Sir John Eamer , knt. Sir William Leighton , knt. Aldermen of the said City; John Silvester , esq. Recorder of the said City: Sir Mathew Bloxham , knt. Christopher Smith , esq. Christopher Magney , esq. Aldermen of the said City; and Newman Knowlys , esq. Common-serjeant of the said City; His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of Goal Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

London Jury.

James Gray ,

Lewis Williams ,

William Finch ,

Nathan Merry ,

David West ,

William Chudworth ,

John Hearne ,

William Cooke Cooper,

William Baker ,

Richard Valentine ,

Solomon Sheldon ,

Richard Woollaston .

First Middlesex Jury.

John Knight ,

James Power ,

David Edwards ,

James Wilson ,

Thomas Tharp ,

Robert Read ,

Thomas Turner ,

Thomas Readawy

Joseph Evans ,

George Todd ,

John Price ,

Theophilus Davis .

Second Middlesex Jury.

Joseph Christian ,

James Simpson ,

Samuel Leigh ,

George Barclay ,

William Parr ,

James Ashman ,

Thomas Bowling ,

James Dudgeon ,

John Pickford ,

Thomas Bull ,

Sandy Staunton ,

Francis Barrows .

Reference Number: t18120219-1

214. ROBERT GREEN and JOHN PARTON were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of James Rogers , about the hour of seven on the night of the 31st of January , with intent the goods and chattels in the same dwelling-house therein being, burglariously to steal .

JAMES ROGERS . I am a linen-draper , 205, Piccadilly in the parish of St. James, Westminster .

Q. Was your house broken open open - A. Yes, on the 31st of January at seven o'clock in the evening.

Q. Was it quite dark then - A. Yes, it was quite dark; we had lit the lamps about an hour. A square of glass was broken in the shop window. The Bow-street officers brought the two men into my shop. The window was broken so that I could get my three fingers in; the handkerchiefs that laid near the place were moved a little of oneside; I had seen them there about an hour before that.

- NICHOLS. I am a conductor of the patrol of Bow-street. I saw Parton go to the middle of Mr. Rogers's window; he put his hand against the glass; he went to the other side of the window, and then Green, he came; I passed the window and perceived the glass was starred. I saw the two prisoners go back again to the window, it appeared to me that Green had got hold of some of the goods; I found two knives upon him. Partons fingers were cut.

- JONES. I am a patrol of Bow-street. I have no further to say than what Nichols has said, I was with him at the time.

Parton's Defence. I have subpoened the glazier that mended the prosecutor's windows the next day.

ROBERT HALL . I am the glazier that mended the prosecutor's windows.

Parton. How large was the hole - A. I could not introduce three of my fingers without danger, but I did not try.

PARTON - GUILTY - DEATH , aged 24.

GREEN - GUILTY - DEATH , aged 19.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18120219-2

215. JAMES HIGGINSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of January , three bushels of coals, value 3 s. the property of Samuel Sawyer and Peter Davey .

SECOND COUNT for like offence, the property of William Roberts .

MR. ROBERTS. I gave Higginson the order on the over night; I saw the coals in the barge, but I did not see him take the barge away.

Q. Did you see the coals took away - A. Yes, I saw the coals, twenty one chaldrons in the barge, he was to take them to Mr. Roberts of Hammersmith.

Q. Did you deliver to him the ship's certificate of the quantity - A. No, I did not.

Q. He was to deliver the coals to Mr. Roberts - A. Yes, the prisoner was. They were my master's coals.

WILLIAM ROBERTS . Q. You purchased a score of coals of Messrs. Davey and Sawyer - A. I did; I saw the coals in the barge the Gilbert; I was determined to watch this barge in its way to Hammersmith; I went to Milbank on the 16th of January, they were to be sent me there were two men to proceed towards Fulham with this barge; I took a boat and went up the river towards Fulham I came up to the barge that I supposed to be the Gilbert at Wandsworth , the prisoner Higginson was navigating the barge.

Q. Did you know the prisoner so as to be quite sure of him - A. I did not know him before; I was quite near enough to know his person; I am sure it was him. There were two men besides Higginson on board the barge and there was a boat lashed to the stern part; I observed the two men, one held up a sack and the other put coals in it.

Q. Who was in the boat - A. Nobody then; I saw one man holding up a sack, and the other man putting coals into it; that was on board the Gilbert; Higginson was one of these men, he was steering the barge.

Q. What became of the coals - A. The men went and moved the boat from the stern of the barge to the side, and put the sack with the coals into the boat. They got into the boat, and rowed off, and I after them. They put their boat ashore at Wansworth; we put our boat ashore likewise and attempted to go to the boat. My son and the waterman went to the boat, we attempted to go near the boat when on shore. They pushed off, and would not let us come near them.

Q. Was it evident that that was done for the purpose of avoiding you - A. It was, apparently. We pursued them all the way up to Chiswick; there I lost them; they were two hearty strong young men, they rowed away in a light wherry; I lost them on the other side of Chiswick.

Q. At the time that you saw the coals handed over the barge into the boat was the barge on the Middlesex side or the Surry - A. The barge was on the Middlesex side when the coals were taken out.

Mr. Alley. Was not that day the dark and foggy day - A. No, it was not; I could perfectly see the men.

Q. There were other barges on the river at the same time - A. Yes, there were.

WILLIAM ROBERTS , JUN. What my father has stated is perfectly correct.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18120219-3

216. JOHN PHENIX, alias ABRAHAM PHENIX , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of February , a table, value 1 l. the property of Richard Owen .

RICHARD OWEN . I live in the Curtain-road , I am a broker . On the 3d of this month, between

eleven and twelve o'clock I missed the table; I had seen it about half an hour before I missed it. When I missed it I pursued the prisoner, from information I went directly up the street, and into another street, through a court in Chapel-street, I found the prisoner and the table upon him; the prisoner was carrying it, he did not go any further; I halloaed out to him, and he stopped. I apprehended him, and here he is come upon that apprehension. The table is here at the door, my name is upon it.

Q. Had you written your name upon it before it was stolen - A. No, but I know the make of the table; it is not my own making, but I had observed the make before it was stolen. I know the table well.

Q. What did you say to the prisoner when he stopped - A. I asked him how he came to do it; he said that somebody had told him to take it; he made some frivolous excuse. I hardly know what he said.

Q. Was the table standing at the door - A. No, rather round a corner.

Q. Your house is in Middlesex - A. Yes, in Shoreditch parish.

Q. Did you know the prisoner at all before - A. I believe I have seen him somewhere about. I have lost many things, but that is neither here or there.

Prisoner's Defence. I humbly acknowledge the crime laid to my charge, but it was distress that drove me to it. I have a wife and six poor children, and I humbly beg for mercy. My wife and children have been removed to the workhouse since my confinement.

GUILTY , aged 36.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18120219-4

217. WILLIAM WHITE was indicted for feloniously being at large in this kingdom before the expiration of the term for which he was ordered to be transported .

JAMES TAUNTON . I am an officer belonging to the public office, Bow-street. I apprehended the prisoner on the 24th of December last in Little Bridge-street, Blackfriars, at the Ship public-house . I took him in custody on suspicion of returning from transportation. I produce the certificate of his conviction on the 29th of May for grand larceny; I saw Mr. Shelton sign this certificate.

(The certificate read.)

Q. Did you know any thing of him before you took him up - A. No, I did not.

Q. You merely found him at large - A. That is all.

SAMUEL DAVIS . I am a turnkey of Newgate; I know the prisoner, I have known him from the 29th of last May when he was brought in prison.

Q. Were you present when he was tried - A. Yes, I was; I took him to Portsmouth to be transported; I delivered him on board the hulk; I cannot say exactly the time. That is all I know. I am sure he is the same man.

Prisoner's Defence. I have nothing to justify myself. I was unwell while at Portsmouth; every thing was very disagreeable; an opportunity offering I made my escape, not with an intention of robbing, but on getting my living by an honest livelihood.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 26.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120219-5

218. HENRY OVERTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of February , in the dwelling-house of Joseph Wassell , four bottles of wine, value 1 l. and a twenty pound bank note, his property .

JOSEPH WASSELL . I am a pawnbroker , I live in Fleet-street , my house is exactly opposite the Temple, I have had the house in my occupation since November, 1807, it was formerly occupied by Mr. Salkeld, who carried on the same trade; I have occupied it about four years and a half.

Q. Was the prisoner a journeyman of yours - A. Yes, he had lived with me as my journeyman from the time I first came there, between four and five years.

Q. Had he been an apprentice to Salkeld - A. I understood so by Mr. Salkeld. When he first came to me he was to have at the rate of forty pounds a year, I then raised him to fifty pounds, then sixty pounds, and the two last years to seventy pounds a year and his board and lodging. I find there were some wages due to him.

Q. How came these wages to be due to him - A. I had offered the wages to him, but he declared he was not in want of money, and when he was he said he would ask me for it.

Q. Who did you employ in the shop besides him - A. William Hill as an under shopman, and Samuel Morris , a lad more particularly for the warehouse, a shop-boy.

Q. Where was the note placed that you missed - A. The twenty pound note, I never missed it; it was placed in the till for the general purposes of business.

Q. Was your money that was taken in the shop put in the till - A. It was.

Q. When did you put it in the till - A. About the beggining of November, about the 5th, I think.

Q. Who did you receive the twenty pound note of - A. Of Mr. John Hall.

Q. Who in the house had resort to that till - A. Nobody but me and Hill and the prisoner.

Q. You went up stairs into the prisoner's room, when was that - A. Upon the 2nd of February, when the wine was missed.

Q. When you went up to the room of the prisoner did you find in the prisoner's room the same day the wine and the note - A. Yes; in the box I found the wine and in the drawer in same room I found the note.

Q. How much wine did you find - A. Four bottles of red wine.

Q. Was the note in one of the drawers in the prisoner's room - A. Yes; he had a small drawer and a large one in a secretary.

Q. Were those drawers in the prisoner's room used by the prisoner - A. Yes.

COURT. Whose drawers were they - A. His own.

Q. When you found them there was the prisoner with you - A. He was present.

Q. Did he furnish you with the key with which you found them - A. Yes, he did, at my request. He

gave me up all the keys, he had every place in the room locked; he gave me the keys of the drawers and the box.

Mr. Knapp. Before you had proceeded to open the box had the prisoner said any thing at all about the contents of the box; he said he had opened the drawers and the box to me before. When I was searching for the wine I was only searching for the bottles, but finding no bottles in the drawer, he said here is only one more box which contains the clothes of my brother, who was called to sea; they were left off clothes; as he let the things in the box down I heard something scratch. I put my hand down and pulled out a bottle, I said, if this is the wine I have missed there are some marks by which I can describe the bottle, it is marked in the bottom in the hollow of the bottle with whiting, and if they are figured and numbered you will find I have not miscounted.

Q. Had you been charged before that time by the prisoner with having miscounted - A. Yes, I had, and then I proceeded to search the figures, and I found the four bottles, marked as I had described them.

Q. In what manner were these four bottles in the box - A. About half way in the box between the clothes. Upon that he said he was ashamed of having taken the wine, and hoped I would look over it. I told him if every thing else was right I might overlook it, and merely discharge him. At that time I had not missed my note, I was determined to make a minute search, and then I examined the drawers, and in a little drawer of the secretary I found two twenty-pound notes and sixty one-pound notes.

Q. Did you observe upon one of the twenty pound notes the name of Hall upon it - A. I knew it to be his hand-writing; he is a trustee and in the habit of receiving dividends for my sister.

Q. You remember Mr. Hall paying you that twenty pound note do you - A. I do, and the reason I know it, there is a calcution at the back, I thought I should always know the note again, I found other property in cash and goods.

Mr. Alley. With respect to the bottles of wine they were marked at the bottom - A. Yes.

Q. There was a peculiar mark done in chalk after you found that your observations were alive and you found the twenty pound bank note - A. I did.

Q. You have not resided in the house since the month of November - A. No.

Q. Upon the oath you have taken did you ever return to it to sleep there; have not you an intention to go elsewhere - A. I had. I did not intend to go back there since in the month of November.

Mr. Knapp. You have taken a lease of it since - A. I have.

Q. Three of your servants slept in it at that time - A. Yes, three when the prisoner lived there.

Mr. Alley. Had not you and yours left that house without ever intending to return to it - A. Yes, we had.

Q. You had left this man in complete possession himself of your domestic concerns in that house - A. I had.

Q. Can you tell me what quantity of smaller money you might have in the till when you put that twenty pound note there. Do not you know upon your oath, that he was in the habit of occasionally getting change for you at Child's the banker's - A. Yes he had.

Mr. Knapp. What power had he to draw any sum of money and to what extent of the till - A. To the amount of ten or twenty pound, he was not restricted to any sum.

Q. You say the accounts of the state of the house was necessarily kept by him - A. They were.

Q. And on his producing accompts and vouchers to correspond with them you thought all was fair till you found otherwise - A. I did.

Q. When the wine was found what became of it - A. It was sent to the Bow-street officer to the other house in Pickett-street, and he left it upon the dresser.

Q. When you saw it again in Picket-street where the marks altered - A. They were taken off entirely of three, except in the holes of the bottles.

Q. And the notes had a mark upon it by which you know it to have been received from Mr. Hall - A. Yes.

COURT. Here is from the beginning of November to the 1st of February you never saw this note at all - A. I did not; I was not in the habit of keeping the accompts myself.

Q. Might not he have changed a large note for smaller notes since the 14th of November - A. In case of the delapidated state of our house our trade is very much reduced therefore since that time there has been a great quanty of small notes in order for change in the till.

Q. Were you in the habits of lending twenty pounds - A. Very seldom; such a circumstance might occur.

Q. It seems very odd that you should leave twenty pounds in the till - A. Because persons might pawn for larger sums, and so it might be useful for change.

- BUTTERWORTH. I am an officer. I produce the note.

JOHN HALL . Q. Is that the twenty pound note that you paid to Mr. Wassell - A. Yes; I know the hand-writing of my father upon it; the figures upon it, they are my father's hand-writing.

Q. Did you pay a twenty pound note to Mr. Wassell - A. I did; I cannot say when; I had it several days in my possession. The same note that I received of my father I paid to Mr. Wassell. I have never paid a note of that value to the prosecutor but that one.

WILLIAM BUTTERWORTH . Q. You are an officer belonging to Bow-street - A. Yes.

Q. Were you sent for on the 2nd of February last - A. I was; I went to No. 9, Picket-street, Temple Bar, there I had four bottles of wine delivered to me, I have had it ever since. I went to Mr. Wassell's house and searched the prisoner's lodgings, the prosecutor informed me that the prisoner lodged in the house; he delivered the keys in Picket-street, he did not go to the house; I went there to his room and found a quantity of notes to the amount of forty-six pounds; I found the twenty pound note in question.

Q. Were you present at any conversation that took place about the wine - A. The prisoner confessed to

taking of it, he said he was extremely sorry for taking the wine. This is my wine.

Prosecutor. Two of the bottles have my marks on them.

Prisoner's Defence. I have nothing particular to say.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY, aged 26.

Of stealing the wine only .

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120219-6

219. DAVID DIXON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of December , a watch, value 17 l. the property of John Wortner , in his dwelling house .

JOHN WORTNER . I am a watch-maker , in the Minories, in the parish of St. Botolph, Aldgate , I keep the house. On Monday the 3d of February, I lost the watch between ten and eleven o'clock in the forenoon, the prisoner at the bar came to my shop to look at some gold watches for his brother in Scotland he said; I shewed him several, and he fixed upon one for twenty-five guineas, a gold seal at two guineas, and a gold chain at four guineas and a half, and desired me to have them ready, and he would call the next day and take them with him; he left the shop, and within five minutes after we missed a gold watch, value seventeen pounds, suspicion immediately attached to the prisoner, and no man had been the shop from the time he left it to the time the watch was missed; I sent two of my young men after him to endeavour to bring him back, but without success. On Tuesday, between two and three o'clock, the prisoner came again to my shop, saying, he could not receive his pay till the latter end of the month, when he would come and take the watch, I expressed some disappointment, and kept him in talk till one of my young men came in; I then took him in the passage behind the shop, and told him what my suspicions were, he denied having it, I told him I must be further satisfied that he had not taken it, he said he was going further, and he would call in ten minutes or a quarter of an hour. I told him that I could not suffer him to go without first being satisfied that the watch was not stolen, he went to the door of the shop, wishing to leave, I told him I could not let him go, and he walked a part of the way to the Minories, saying he had an appointment in East Smithfield, at five minutes after three. I took him into my uncle's house, and into their back room I left him while I went for a constable. The constable and myself, and one of my young men, went with him to his lodgings at St. Mary's Hill, Tower-street, where the constable said he must then search him; proceeding to do so, he let his handkerchief and his gloves fall out of his pocket, and laid them upon the table. The constable went immediately to take hold of the hankerchief and gloves, but he took hold of them himself, and put his hands behind him. While the constable proceeded to search his person, I told the constable he did not search the glove in the gentlemen's other hand, the constable went to take it, whereupon the prisoner tendered a watch to me, and said, there is your watch Mr. Wortner. It was the watch which I had missed, and which I can swear to.

FRANCIS KINNERSLY . I am an officer. On Tuesday the 4th of March I was sent for by Mr. Wortner, it was Mr. Wortner's wish for me to go to his lodgings immediately.

Q. Why did not you examine first. - A. Because it was Mr. Wortner's wish for me to go to his lodgings. As I was searching him, Mr. Wortner noticed his hand, and said he had got something in his hand, and he presented the watch to Mr. Wortner and said, Mr. Wortner, here is your watch, he produced the gold watch, and begged pardon, and hoped that he would forgive him, at the same time I pulled out a gold seal that Mr. Wortner never missed. This is the watch.

Prosecutor. It is my watch that I missed. He bought a watch of me some years ago, and he has been in the habit of coming to the shop for nineteen years. He is a lieutenant in the navy. He has left it about six month ago, as I understand, it is not the first thing that we have lost.

Prisoner's Defence. I have a statement of my service in the navy in my pocket.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 41.

[ The prisoner was recommended to mercy by the prosecutor and the jury for his having served his country so long ]

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120219-7

220. HENRY FEAST , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of February , from the person of Daniel M'Donald , 3 l. in monies numbered, a 20 l. Chelmsford bank note. a 5 l. bank note, a 2 l. bank note, and nine bank notes, value 1 l. each, his property .

DANIEL M'DONALD . I am a hackney coachman . I lost this property on the 4th of February. I sold my coach and horses to Mr. Wooten, who keeps the watering house in Smithfield, he bought all the utensils in the bunch, Mr. Wootten paid me the money, thirty five guineas, the prisoner was present when Mr. Wootten paid me, he was servant to Mr. Wootten. After he had paid me, the prisoner asked me several times, if I would go up with him to his master's yard to help him out with the things inside of the coach, and he asked me if I would go in the Black Horse public house to have something to drink. The Black Horse, is in Aldersgate-street. As soon as ever we went in the house, I put my hand in my pocket, and pulled out the notes; I said Harry, I will not be worse than my word, I promised you two one pound notes, and as such I will give them to you, he then called for something to drink, and I laid my head upon the table, we had something to drink; after that we came out in the street, and we were a good while in the street together, till we got just by the end of Long-lane, there I stopped, by the end of Long-lane , and dropped asleep upon a bench at the corner of Long-lane. I was not very drunk.

Q. What became of your companion, Feast - A. He was with me most of the time.

Q. Did he take a nap too - A. Not that I know

of. Thinking that I would have a coach home, I put my hand in my pocket, and I found it turned inside out, I had no money at all, when I awaked he was gone.

Q. When you was taking your nap at the corner of Long-lane he left you - A. Yes, my lord.

Q. Did you ever find your notes again - A. I found the twenty pound note.

Q. You had known him a long while - A. I have known him driving a hackney coach about London a good while.

ABEL M'DONALD . I am an hackney coachman. Upon the 5th of this month I heard that my father had sold his coach and horses, I walked up to my father to see if it was true, and I found it was, and he had lost the money. I went to Mr. Esdaile's, where the twenty pound note was payable, I caught the prisoner at the bar coming out with the change for the twenty pound note, and I took him in custody, he had thirty five pound in notes, four one's and a poundsworth of silver.

JOHN HAZARD . I am cashier at Mr. Esdaile's. Upon the 6th of February, the prosecutor came to our house, he told me he had been robbed. The prisoner presented the note, and I gave it to the constable.

Q. Who presented this note - A. The prisoner at the bar, I gave him the change.

JOHN BROWN . I am an officer. I produce a twenty pound note, deposed to by Mr. Hazard. I went there to take the prisoner Feast in custody, at the house of Mr. Hazard, he gave me a twenty pound note in the room, I searched the prisoner in the office. I then went to search the prisoner's lodgings, here is a bill I found in the prisoner's lodgings, upon the very day of the robbery, I found nothing else but a few duplicates.

THOMAS WOOTTON . Q. Look at that note - A. That is the same note I paid to M'Donald.

Mr. Alley. Q. And you knew that Feast was to have some present given him - A. No, I knew nothing of it.

HENRY HOPKINS . I perceived Mr. M'Donald laying upon the corner of Long-lane, and I awaked him. The prisoner came up, and said, is this you M'Donald, he said yes; the prisoner said I will never leave you until I see you safe home, stop while I go and fetch a coach to take him home; he was gone about two minutes, and returned back again, and laid hold of his two thighs to lift him up, he put his left hand into his right-hand pocket, and pulled out some papers.

Q. Who did this - A. The prisoner, and turned about and went up the street, and left me there with the man.

Q. What became of M'Donald - A. I got him down upon the White Bear Bench, in Aldersgate street, and there he went asleep, I saw him about two hours afterwards.

Mr. Alley. I take it for granted that you saw M'Donald home when you saw him so drunk - A. No.

Q. What inducement had you to wake him - A. I saw him lay there, and as I came up, the prisoner came up immediately, and said, M'Donald I will never leave you until I take you home.

Q. Were not you there ten minutes or more; as you found Mr. M'Donald so you left him - A. I did not think that Feast came there to rob him; I thought he was coming as a friend to assist him; I thought that as Mr. Feast had taken the money he would return it the next day.

Q. When for the first time was it that you transferred this friendly act of Mr. Feast into a robbery - A. I saw him put his hand into his coat pocket and take it out.

Q. M'Donald was very drunk - A. He was sensible, he could speak if anybody spoke to him.

Q. What time was it - A. Between four and five o'clock; I am positive it was before five; I do not think it was soon enough for a man to travel to Esdaile's and back again.

Q. You found M'Donald as drunk as a man could be - A. He was in liquor. I never saw a man much worse.

Mr. Alley. How long were you at the corner of Long-lane - A. I cannot tell exactly.

Q. Can you tell any thing that happened to you while you were there - A. I cannot particularly, I could walk.

Q. Can you tell what became of your notes - A. No, I could not. I did not find it out till I went to put my hand in my pocket.

Prisoner's Defence. Mr. M'Donald gave me two notes, and the next morning I found the twenty pound note instead of a one pound; I went to Esdaile's to get change for the note, thinking to give M'Donald nineteen pounds out of it; and I should have given it to the son had not he bore a very loose character, and I thought he would not return it to his father.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 36.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120219-8

221. WILLIAM WHITE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of January , a pewter pint pot, value 2 s. the property of John Boon .

JOHN BOON . I keep the Rose public-house in the Old Bailey . The pot is my property.

JAMES BARLOW . I was in the Rose public-house in the Old Bailey. I saw the prisoner come in, he set down at the opposite corner to me, and called for a pint of porter, and change for a shilling, and paid for it. I saw him take the pint pot from the table and put it in his pocket. I went and informed the landlord of it; I saw the pot taken from him.

JOHN BROWN . I produce the pot, I received it from Mr. Boon's hands.

Prosecutor. It is my pot.

Q. to prosecutor. What did the prisoner say when you took the pot from him - A. He said he believed the devil was in him. I searched him and found in his other pocket a knife which the people in the house dined with in the day time.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in liquor; I have a wife and six children.

Mr. Boon. He did not appear to me to be in liquor.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Whipped in Jail , and Confined Fourteen Days in Newgate .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120219-9

222. JOHN WILSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of January , two silver pepper castors, value 30 s. the property of John Robinson .

PETER REYNOLDS . I live with Mr. Alderman Goodbehere and company, in Cheapside.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. I think I have seen him before. I saw him on the 23d of January, between two and three o'clock, he came in the shop; he brought two silver pepper castors to sell as old silver; I suspected him by his calling at our house before. I took the pepper castors in question to my employers in the accompting-house, and mentioned the circumstance to them, and they ordered me to go to Mr. Robinson's; I went there; he is an inn-keeper at the Angel inn, Angel-street .

Q. Did the prisoner leave the shop - A. No; our gentlemen kept him in conversation till I came back; I went to the Angel and brought Mrs. Robinson.

JOHN FRENCH . I am a waiter at the Angel, Angel-street.

Q. Who is the proprietor of the Angel inn - A. John Robinson .

Q. Upon the 23d of January did Mr. Reynolds come to your house and give you any information - A. Yes.

Q. In consequence of that did you miss anything - A. Yes, two pepper castors, I missed them the moment I went in the room.

Q. Now before you went with Reynolds I would ask you did you know the person of the prisoner, did you know whether the prisoner at the bar had been at your house - A. Yes, about twenty minutes before two on that day I saw him myself at the house.

Q. What room did he come in - A. In the coffee-room.

Q. Were those silver castors in use in the coffee-room - A. There is an ordinary at two o'clock, and I put four silver castors on the table, one on each corner.

Q. So that if any person was inclined to behave dishonest towards them they were easy to come at - A. Yes.

Q. You did not return with Reynolds to Mr. Alderman Goodbehere's - A. No, the other waiter, John Metcalfe .

Q. Did you ever see the prisoner before - A. No.

Q. Are you sure that he was at the house that day - A. Yes.

JOHN METCALFE . Q. Were you a waiter at the Angel upon the 23d of January - A. Yes.

Q. Look at the prisoner and tell me whether you saw him upon that day - A. I did not. I know nothing further than what the other waiter told me.

Q. In consequence of any thing that you heard did you go with Reynolds to Mr. Alderman Goodbehere's - A. I did.

Q. Had you seen the pepper castors in use that day - A. I put them upon the table myself that day, about twenty minutes before two o'clock in the coffee-room.

Q. After Reynolds had brought that information to the Angel did you find these pepper castors were missing - A. Yes.

Q. How long before Reynolds gave you this information had you seen them in the coffee-room - A. I never saw them again until Mr. Reynolds came, he came about a quarter after two; I had seen them about half an hour before. The two pepper castors were brought back by Mr. Reynolds to the coffee-room and then they were taken from the coffee-room to the shop where the prisoner was.

Q. Were they the same pepper castors that you had put upon the table, and they were your master's were not they - A. Yes, they had my master's initials upon them. I can positively say I know them well. I had been there about eight or nine months, and had them in my hand every day.

Q. to Reynolds Did you shew Metcalfe the same pepper castors that the prisoner brought to your house for sale - A. Yes, I shewed him the very same that the prisoner produced at our house for sale.

Q. to French. Did you see the prisoner at Mr. Alderman Goodbehere's - A. Yes.

Q. Did the prisoner say any thing - A. No, he did not say a word.

Q. Was he charged with offering those pepper castor's for sale - A. He was asked several questions, but he would not answer one word.

BENJAMIN ROBINSON . These are my father's property, I only prove the property to be my father's. They are the pepper castors delivered to John Tanner the officer.

JOHN TANNER . I am a constable. I was sent for to Mr. Alderman Goodbehere's to take charge of the prisoner.

Q. What charge was given against the prisoner in the prisoner's hearing - A. Coming there to sell these two pepper castors as stolen property; he did not say any thing. I search him, he had no further property upon him.

Q. Did he deny offering them for sale - A. No, he said he was very sorry for it. These are the castors.

Q. to Benjamin Robinson . Have you any share in the business - A. No. I am son to Mr. John Robinson .

Q. Has your father any person that has a share with him in the business - A. No, none.

Q. How long have you known these castors, what letters or marks upon them - A. I and P R, John and Phoebe Robinson .

Q. Did you claim them in the presence of the prisoner to be your father's - A. No, I did not.

Q. What is the worth of them - A. About thirty shillings.

Q. Had you seen them on the 23d of January - A. No, I had not.

Q. Had you ever seen the prisoner at your house - A. No, I do not know I had, but I am not much at home.

Q. to Metcalfe. Tell me whether these are the castor's that were set out that day - A. I am perfectly sure they are the same.

Q. Did you ever see the prisoner at your house before - A. No, to the best of my knowledge.

Prisoner's Defence. I am an unfortunate distressed man, I have lately come from Manchester, I have no witnesses.

GUILTY , aged 44.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120219-10

223. THOMAS HAPPY and JOHN NIAS were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of February , a great coat, value 12 s. the property of Richard Philip Hyam .

RICHARD PHILLIP HYAM . I live at No. 105, Bishopsgate without , I am a pawnbroker , the great coat will not be produced, it is not found. About five o'clock in the afternoon, Thomas Cooper , who is a porter to an opposite neighbour, came and asked me if I had lost any thing, I had a young man in the shop, he looked round, and missed the coat.

Q. How long before had you seen the coat. - A. About one hour.

Q. What part of the shop was this great coat in. - A. It was next the door, outside, hanging up.

Q. Is the door of your shop generally left open. - A. Always during the day; we have always somebody attending in the shop. We went with Cooper in search of the prisoners, whom he said he should know; we went into the Blakeney's head, in Norton Falgate, from there we were proceeding to another public-house in Skinner-street; in our way, Cooper saw the prisoner, Happy, he declared he was the man that received the coat, he seized him immediately, and said, here is the man that received your coat from the man who took it, three were together at the time the coat was stolen.

Q. What said Happy to that charge of Cooper's. - A. I do not recollect, Cooper will explain better than I can.

Q. Was Happy alone then. - A. He was with some girls of the town.

Q. What was the worth of that coat. - A. Twelve shillings.

THOMAS COOPER . I am a porter to Mr. Henry Worms , in Norton Falgate, he keeps a carpet warehouse, our house is opposite Mr. Hyams.

Q. Do you know the persons of either of those two men at the bar. - A. Yes, both of them, I have known Happy six weeks or two months.

Q. Did you see either of them the day you gave any information to Mr. Hyam. - A. Yes, I saw him a little after five in the afternoon, about forty yards distance from Mr. Hyam's door, in company with another.

Q. Any women with him. - A. No. There were three in all.

Q. Which way did they go when you got sight of them. - A. They went towards Mr. Hyams's, when they got towards Mr. Hyams's I saw Nias, and the other man, who is not here, move from the window towards Mr. Hyam's door, I saw him put out his left arm, take down a coat, or at least pulled it down, I am not certain which, he delivered the coat into Happy's hands, Happy put it under his apron, and ran off with it, the other two went down another direction, Nias and the man who is not here.

Q. Did you pursue them. - A. No, I went over and informed Mr. Hyams; in two or three minutes afterwards, we went in pursuit of them, Mr. Hyams and me, I saw Nias standing in the street smoking his pipe about seven o'clock or a little after, I said to Mr. Hyams, here is one of the men, Mr. Hyams said, is it the person that stole the coat, I said No, the person that received it, Happy said he knew nothing of it, he had just come out of the Magpye in Skinner-street, I am quite sure he is the man, I could not be mistaken in his person, knowing his features so long.

Q. Were you present when Nias was apprehended. A. No, I was not, Nias I believe was apprehended on Monday morning, I saw him upon examination at the Mansion-house, I am sure he is one of the three person. The coat has not been found.

JOHN GROVES . I am a constable, I took charge of Happy, he was delivered over to me, I know nothing of the transaction myself, he was in custody before I had him, I carried him before the magistrate.

- WHITE. I am an extra constable of the city of London, I apprehended Nias. On Saturday evening last, about half past six, I met my brother officer, Groves, and he said there were two or three lurking fellows hanging about Bishopgate Street, and immediately we went to the Magpye, Nias and Happy came in there, they were in company together, Nias had a piece of bacon in his left hand when he came in, and he throw'd it in the off box and sat in the seat alongside of the bacon, I said to Groves, there is something that is not right, he said, we will watch them. After that Happy came and spoke to me in Skinner Street, he came to me again the second time and spoke to me, a little girl went out and Nias went after her just in Skinner-street, and just in Skinner-street, Nias gave a woman a piece of bacon, I ran after him and stopped him, I asked him what he was doing there, he got away from me, I lost him, and I apprehended him again on the Monday morning between the hours of ten and eleven in Swan-street, Shoreditch; I told him I took him upon suspicion of stealing some bacon, when I brought him to the Mansion-house, I told Mr. Sapwell that I had got a person that was along with Happy, and Mr. Cooper came out and said, he was one of the men that was concerned in this transaction.

Q. Did you search him. - A. No, I did not, Thomas Sapwell did. I took Happy myself from Mr. Hyams, I searched him and found nothing at all.

Happy's Defence. My Lord, I am really innocent of the charge that is laid against me, why did not the gentleman take me with the property, as he says I had it; I am a master for myself, I am a shoemaker, I make goods, and serve shops about London with them.

Nias's Defence. I am really innocent of the charge, and knew nothing at all about it.

Happy called one witness who gave him a good character.

Nias called one witness who gave him a good character.

HAPPY GUILTY , aged 40.

NIAS GUILTY , aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120219-11

224. HENRY JAMES WESTBROOKE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of January , a carcase of a sheep, value 2 l. the property of Thomas Covel Smith .

GEORGE BENJAMIN CLITHEROW . I am a butcher in Newgate-market.

Q. Do you know the prisoner Westbrooke. - A. No further than seeing him with the sheep upon his back upon the 28th of January, he was running up Rose-street, with the carcase of mutton upon his shoulder, about twenty minutes past nine, I followed him through the market and Ivy-lane, he crossed Newgate-street, he went down Butcher-hall-lane, I stopped him at the corner of St. Ann's-Lane, I asked him what he was going to do with it, he said, a lad had given it him to carry, and he was going to follow him.

Q. Did you see any lad. - A. No, he said, take the carcase do not take me; I told him he should take it back from where he took it: I met an officer in Butcher-hall-lane, I then gave charge of him; it was claimed by a young man in the employ of Mr. Smith.

Q. How far was he from Mr. Smith's shop when you first saw him with this carcase. - A. Mr. Smith's shop is in Cloth-fair, but he had taken it out of a truck in Newgate-street , I took the sheep and hung it up in my master's shop.

Mr. Knapp. This was twenty minutes past nine. - A. It was.

Q. So this man was publicly travelling with this sheep all through Newgate market. - A. Yes, he was, to Ivy-lane.

Q. But he went through a great part of the market. - A. He turned round by Mr. Fisher's.

Q. The sheep we know, eight stone is a considerable weight for a man. - A. We think it nothing in our business.

Q. Where is Mr. Smith's house. - A. In cloth fair, but his cart was in Newgate-street.

Q. When you asked him how he came by the sheep, he said a lad had given it him to carry: was he employed as a porter to carry sheep. - A No, I have seen him lurking about the carts and waggons when I watched him before.

EDWARD BURTON . I am a servant to Mr. Thomas Covell Smith , my master purchased four carcases, they were in Newgate market, I was left with my fellow servant to get them in the truck, we got two of them in, and went to fetch the other two and missed one.

Q. Now how long do you think you were gone. - A. I might be gone five minutes, and I sent my fellow servant in search of my master, to know if he had taken it.

Q. How long was it after you saw the prisoner in custody. - A. It might be ten minutes, or a quarter of an hour, I knew nothing of him before.

Q. You gave him no authority to take it, did you. - A. No.

Q. Was the carcase you saw, the same carcase as was in your master's truck. - A. Exactly, I have every reason to think so.

Q. What is the worth of it. - A. Two pound.

Prisoner's Defence. I had it of a young man to carry, he said he would satisfy me for my trouble.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Confined One Month in Newgate , and publicly whipped .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120219-12

225. EDWARD EVANS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of January , twenty-six yards of linen cloth, value 38 s. the property of John James Peele , Thomas Turner , and Thomas Scott .

THOMAS TURNER . I am a wholesale linen draper , I am one of the firm of John James Peele , and Thomas Scott , there are no other partners.

Q. Where is your business carried on. - A. In Cheapside . Upon the 18th of January, between eight and nine o'clock, I had reason to suspect the prisoner, he had been with us about three weeks as porter , I was informed by a youth in my house, that he suspected the prisoner had taken from the warehouse a piece of linen that morning, he had not left the house, I came down stairs almost immediately, and went out to our back premises, to send our porter for a constable, when I came back, the prisoner had just got outside of the door, and shut the door, I took him by the collar and said, Edward you must go with me this morning; at that instant the warehouseman came up, and we took him immediately to the compter, in the passage leading to the compter he took from under his apron a piece of linen which is now in the possession of the constable.

Q. Upon examining that piece did you find it a part of your stock. - A. I did, he said the property is yours; he took it from under his waistcoat and breeches, it is about twenty-six yards, worth about eight or nine and thirty shillings.

Q. What house did you take him from. - A. We took him from Mr. Martin's in King-street, with a good character with him, and a very fair one.

THOMAS WILLOUGHBY . I am a constable, the piece was delivered to me, the prisoner only begged Mr. Turner to forgive him.

Mr. Turner. That is the cloth which the prisoner took from under his apron, it is mine and my partners.

Prisoner's Defence. I have nothing to say; I beg for mercy.

GUILTY , aged 35.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120219-13

226. FRANCES NISSEN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of January , a ruff, value 2 s. 6 d. two tippets, value 30 s. and a cap, value 2 l. the property of Samuel Arundel .

SAMUEL ARUNDELL . Q. Where do you live. - A. No. 7, Leonard-square, City-road.

Q. Where did you live upon the 25th of January last. - A. No. 3, City-road, I had lived there about a year and a half, my wife carries on the business of embroidering muslins.

Q. Do you sell anything else than embroidery muslins yourself. - A. It is muslins worked into caps and

aprons, it is called satin stitch, we sell children's caps and aprons, children's frock-bodies, ruffs and tippets .

Q. Do you sell all these in an open shop. - A. Only wholesale.

Q. Was there any card left at your house on the 24th of January last. - A. Yes.

Q. Have you got it. - A. This is one of our own cards, wrote on the back of it, Nissen. Ashby-street, Northampton-square, Goswell-street ; call before ten, or after three.

Q. Did you go in consequence of the direction that is upon the back of that card. - A. I waited upon the prisoner at ten o'clock the next morning, I took a general assortment of what my wife was in the habit of working and selling. I selected the articles on the morning I went, I put them into a paper box.

Q. Do you know how many articles you took. - A. I suppose from the quantity in the box, there must be about an hundred.

Q. When you arrived at the house were you shewn into it. - A. Yes, into a parlour on the right hand side, without a fire.

Q. Who came to the door. - A. Mrs. Nissen. I began to open the box, she said she was very glad I had come in time, I shewed the articles, and she began admiring them.

Q. Did she say who had recommended you to her. - A. Not at that time; she selected what she thought was beautiful, she wished to take them to her mother, she informed me, and her sister; I opened more articles to her in the box, and she wished to shew them to her mother, she took a second quantity to shew her mother, she staid about the same time as she did the first, and returned; on her returning the second time, instead of coming to shew me the articles, to check, as she did the first, she came hasitly into the room, not coming to me to check the articles as she did the first time, but gathered all the articles with both her hands, that were laying on the table, or nearly the whole of the articles with both her hands, saying, Sir, we'll go into a room where there is a fire.

Q. Did you go immediately with her. - A. I remained to pack up what was on the table that I wished to put into the box again, she did not gather all. On my going into the room where she was, she seemed very much confused, and was shutting the drawers, she was throwing the articles about and shutting the drawers.

Q. How do you mean throwing the articles about - A. The articles were laying about in a rough state on the table, and she was shutting the drawers; when I went into the room I felt considerably from such conduct, I said, Mrs. Nissen the articles ought not to be throwed about that way, they ought not to be pressed or soiled, they are not so saleable; she said, oh, they are not injured, and she began to select more of the stock than she had selected, she went through the whole that I had in the box, she examined the whole that I had in the box, and selected what she thought would suit her, to the amount of three guineas, and she paid me for it, saying that she should be a very good customer, and begged I would put the lowest price. I did. In noticing what she had taken, I noticed that I had another ruff similar to what I had sold her, in looking for it I could not find it.

Q. Is that the ruff that you have charged in this indictment - A. Yes.

Q. Was that ruff that you could not find, took by you in the box, when you came from home. - A. It was

Q. Had you seen it after you arrived at Mrs. Nissen's house. - A. Yes, I had, I am positive of that. At this time I had nearly put the whole of the things in the box again, of the quantity of the things in the box, I thought it was not as full as it ought to be. I know I missed some children's bodies of frocks, and I afterwards missed a cap and two tippets.

Q. Did you say any thing about it. - A. Nothing further than the ruff, I told her the fellow ruff to the one I had sold her, in looking for it, I could not find it, she called her sister to go into the other room to look for it, she came back, and said it was not there, I looked again through the quantity of goods I had, and could not find it, I thought it very extraordinary, I said to Mr. Nissen I was surprised, she had my card, she said she could not recollect the person's name that had given her the card. The prisoner told me that she was in the same line of business I was, and that she employed thirty hands.

Q. You went home, and then, by your attorney's advice, you applied to Hatton Garden office. - A. I did, between two and three o'clock the same day, the 25th of January, I went with the officer and the warrant to the house, when I had got there Mrs. Nissen had left home.

Q. Did you find any of the articles that you supposed you had lost. - A. Not one, I searched the major part of the house.

Q. Did you search for them as long as you pleased. - A. The officers searched as much as they thought proper.

Q. Did you find any of the articles that she had paid for. - A. Not one.

Q. What was the whole worth of the things that you lost. - A. Three pound twelve shillings and sixpence.

Mr. Alley. What is your name. - A. Samuel Arundel .

Q. You have always called yourself Samuel. - A. Never any thing else.

Q. The officers attended the search of this lady's house, did you take them before the grand jury when you went to find the bill. - A. No, I did not.

Q. You had nobody with you before the grand jury. - A. No.

Q. Were not the officers examined before the magistrate. - A. Certainly they were.

Q. Notwithstanding that you went before the grand jury without them. - A. Yes.

Q. I ask you again how you get your livelyhood, tell me whom you have been an accomptant to this last month. - A. For the Earl of Warwick.

Q. Look on the bench, and you will see my Lord Warwick. - A. I have not the pleasure of knowing him.

Q. When you were at the magistrate's did not you say that you worked for him. - A. No.

Q. Now, upon the oath you have taken, did not you tell me, in answer to a question I put to you at the magistrate's, that you were employed by my Lord Warwick six months ago, and that is the way you have got your livelyhood six months since. - A. I never did, you asked me how long I had been employed by Lord Warwick. I told you about three weeks ago.

Q. I asked you this question, whether you could give me the name of any person, your answer was this, I have done business for my Lord Warwick for that time. - A. I had my Lord Warwick's accompts put into my possession, I was to rectify them, they are not compleat now.

Q. I asked you, Sir, whether within this last month you could venture to name any person, your answer was this, I have done business for my Lord Warwick for that time. - A. On account of the Earl of Warwick, Mr. Bethbridge employed me.

Q. For whom did you do any thing in this accompting way before. - A. Messrs. Coombes and Bailey a considerable time.

Q. You told my learned friend, that in the morning before you went out you very carefully packed up them things, and you were astonished how she came by your card. Who was it introduced you to the prisoner by way of serving you. - A. Not any one but my own card.

Q. You have not brought your wife here as a witness. - A. No, it is not necessary.

Q. Pray did you take her before the grand jury. - A. I did not.

Q. She knows how many caps and things she has, she is not here to prove, you say it is not necessary. Upon the oath you have taken, did not you say before the magistrate, that your wife packed up the box the night before, and that you packed it in that state. - A. I did not.

Q. Now, in charity to you, I will get you to recall your answer, I have two witnesses here that heard you say your wife the night before packed up the box, and you now say you did not say so.

Q. You say when you went into this lady's house you went into a cold room where there was no fire, did not she afterwards tell you that she had gone through an operation, aad that was the reason of her removing you. - A. She never said a word about it.

Q. There was a fire in the room in which you went into the second time. - A. There was a fire in that room.

Q. You saw a young lady there that let you out. - A. She came in frequently.

Q. You lost your glove, and found it in your own hat. - A. I did.

Q. You did not find any of the other things in your hat. - A. I never did.

Q. Was your wife at home on the Friday afternoon, - A. No, she was gone to Chelsea.

Q. When did your wife leave your house on the Friday. - A. I cannot exactly say, I was not at home.

Q. What time did you get home on the Friday. - A. Between five and six o'clock, she was not at home when I came home.

Q. Did she return that night. - A. She did not.

Q. Was the box packed before five or six o'clock. - A. I did not know of the order until the Saturday morning. I never saw the card until Saturday morning. I packed the box.

JOSEPH KING . Q. What are you sir. - A. I am an attorney. I live in Bedford Row.

Q. I believe you attended the examination at Hatton Garden. - A. I did.

Q. Pray did not that man just gone down, say that his wife packed up the box.

Mr. Bolland. Was what Arundel said taken down by the magistrate, any thing. - A. I believe it was.

Mr. Alley. Mr. King, I ask you whether the prosecutor did not say to the magistrate when he was upon his oath, that his wife packed up the box the night before he took it. - A. So he positively swore, and repeated it again and again.

Mr. Bolland. Did you yourself make any memorandum of it. - A. I have a perfect recollection of it. I made a memorandum of it in my instructions, it formed a part of my instructions.

Mr. Alley. Was this said in the course of the examination; you attended, did not you. - A. I did, on the examination; when he was giving evidence before the magistrate, he stated that his wife packed it up, assisted, and was present.

Mr. Bolland. You have given first, the account that his wife packed it up, assisted, and was present. Now which of these statements did he make. - A. I am not certain, he either said that his wife assisted him or was present.

Mr. Alley. Now I will call another witness.

MR. LUKIN. Q. What did you hear the prosecutor say on the packing up the night before. - A. His words were, that his wife assisted him on the night before in packing up the box. I have no doubt of it at all.

Q. Did he say it more than once. - A. I rather think he did. I have no doubt that he said his wife assisted him.

Mr. Bolland. You do not remember the precise words. - A. I remember the words, he said his wife assisted him. I believe it was in answer to a question asked by Mr. Alley, he said that his wife assisted him. I recollected it in drawing out the brief a few days ago.

Court. Gentlemen of the jury, It is for you to say whether you will believe a witness like the prosecutor, who has been so materially contradicted by two respectable persons; if you think it necessary to call any other witness, I will go into it.

Jury. The jury do not think it necessary to go into any other evidence.

Mr. Alley. Q. (to Prosecutor) Did you ever prosecute before this. - A. Not for any thing stolen.

Q. Did you ever prosecute before this for any thing that was not stolen, how odd things come out. Did not you apply to the magistrate to have your wife and mother taken up. - A. No.

Mr. Bolland. Did you charge your wife and mother with having robbed you. - A. I mentioned it to the officers, my wife had been from home and had taken out a few memorandums.

Q. I believe you and your wife were not upon very good terms. - A. At that time we were not.

Q. You have been asked who employed you as an accomptant, when you originally came to town you lived with Messrs. Hankey, he failed. - A. He did.

Q. And then you had to seek for another situation as an accomptant. - A. Yes.

Q. Mr. Bothbridge employed you to settle that accompt. - A. He did. Lord Warwick was the ostensible person.

Q. You learned on Wednesday at Hatton Garden that Miss Goodwin had recommended you to Mrs. Nissen, had you delivered any cards to Mrs. Nissen. - A. Perhaps Mrs. Arundel had.

The prisoner left her defence to her counsel.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18120219-14

227. THOMAS TIMOTHY, alias EKINS BRITTEN , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of February , a silver pint mug, value 3 l. a silver mustard spoon, value 2 s. two silver tea spoons, value 3 s. and three silver scollop shells, value 30 s. the property of William Strong , in his dwelling-house .

ROBERT STRONG . My father's name is William Strong, he lives at No. 7, Montague Place, Russell Square, in the parish of St. George's, Bloomsbury .

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar. - A. I do, he lived with my father as under-footman , my father is afflicted with a paralytic stroke, and cannot move. The prisoner came into my father's service on the evening of the 18th of November last.

Q. On the same day had your father occasion to hire a person of the name of Greenaway. - A. Yes, he was upper footman, they both came the same evening into my father's service, I delivered to Greenaway my father's plate myself.

Q. Was there a list provided Greenaway for the charge of that plate. - A. There was a list which I gave Greenaway, and he signed one part of it, it was to be under his charge.

Q. Was the property in the indictment so entrusted to him. - A. Yes, the whole of it.

Q. How long did the prisoner remain in your service before he gave warning to quit your service. - A. He gave warning I think the 27th of January. I understood from my father that it was on account of ill health.

Q. How soon did Greenaway give warning. - A. Greenaway did not give warning, he was dicharged on account of being absent the 29th in the morning, he was absent a day and night. I was present when he was dismissed his service.

Q. Upon his dismissal did you compare the list with the articles of the plate - A. I did, and there were missing all the articles in the indictment after calling er the list.

Q. What with Greenaway. - A. It was.

Q. Now what he said will not be evidence against the prisoner.

Q. When was it that the prisoner left your service. - A. On the 4th of February, in the evening. We were provided with another.

Q. After Greenaway was gone was there any butler to whom the plate was in charge. - A. Not particularly.

Q. Had the prisoner access to the plate after Greenaway went away. - A. He had.

Q. Had he before Greenaway went away - A. Only by permission of that butler

Q. Was the plate that is charged in the indictment of being lost, was it the plate that you were in the habit of using at your father's table. - A. Part of it.

Q. During the time and previous to Greenaway's going away, was the prisoner in the habit of bringing up that plate to furnish your father's table. - A. Part of it. I should persume he had.

Q. After he was gone, and you had paid the wages, no suspicion fell upon the prisoner. - A. None in the least, he went away on the 4th of February in the evening.

Q. How soon was it you received any information from Hatton Garden office. - A. On the 6th of February, two days after he went away, in consequence of information, I went to the office. I afterwards saw some plate produced at the office, which I knew to be that plate; I had no doubt about that plate when I saw it, none at all.

Q. Where you shewn among other things the mug. - A. I was.

Q. Whereabouts was the value of the mug. - A. About two pounds.

WILLIAM PAGE . I am a pawnbroker. I live in Liquorpond Street.

Q. Look at the prisoner at the bar and tell me whether you know his person. - A. I do On the 6th of February between two and three o'clock he came to my house, he offered to pledge these articles, a salt spoon, a tea spoon, and a mustard spoon, they were brought to me at one time.

Q. What were the value of these that were brought to you at one time.

Mr. Gurney. What is the value of one scollop shell. - A. About twenty shillings each, they were all brought to me together, the mustard spoon about four shillings, and the tea spoons about half a crown each. I asked the prisoner whose they were, he said they were his own, the scollop shells were both together at that time. I asked him how they came doubled together in that way, he said they were his father's, his father had given them to him, and he had brought them to me. I asked him who his father was, he said his name was Thomas Tomkins , that he lived with his father, No. 8, Blackfriers Road. I then asked him respecting the cornet upon them, he was not able to give me any satisfactory account; I said have you come honestly by them; he could give no account, therefore I gave him in charge of the officer.

WILLIAM MATTHEWS . I am an officer. I was sent for to the last witness's on the 6th of this month, I went to Mr. Page's shop, I found the prisoner there. I searched the prisoner, going across the road I found

him putting his hand into his side pocket. I found something against my own, and in searching him I found this silver mug.

Q. (to Mr. Page.) What is the worth of the silver mug. - A. I should not hesitate to give three pounds for this mug to melt, it is very heavy indeed.

MR. STRONG. I know the mug belongs to my father, I have no doubt of it. I can swear to the mustard spoon, and as to the rest, I am sure they are my father's property, I have seen them often, my father's crest is upon them. I know the mug by the initials upon it.

Prisoner's Defence. I found these things laid out of the place. I found them in the wash-house against a tub. I found the things in the wash-house after the other servant was gone in the morning, and after I found them, the other servant came back into the house. I put them into another place of the wash-house, and the next day I was going away, and when I came at night I brought them away.

Court. Q. (to Mr. Strong.) Do you know the wash-house in which the prisoner states he took them away. - A. I do, it is part of the dwelling house. The prisoner always behaved with the greatest deportment, we had a good character with him.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 21.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey,

Reference Number: t18120219-15

228. BENJAMIN HITCHCOCK was indicted, and the indictment states, that at the time of committing the several felonies herein mentioned, he was a person employed in a certain business at the general post office, that is to say, in sorting letters and packets brought to the general post office; that a certain letter brought to the said office, and containing therein one bank post bill, and three promissory notes, each of them made for the payment of one pound each, came into your hands, you being a person employed as aforesaid, and that you afterward, having the said letter containing the said bank post bill and promissory notes, feloniously did secrete the said letter, containing the said bank post bill and promissory notes, the property of Edward Child .

And also stood charged with feloniously stealing and taking out of the said letter, the said bank post bill and the promissory notes, instead of secreting the letter, stating the bank post bill and the promissory notes to be the property of John Francis Spenlove .

Again indicted, for that he, being employed as aforesaid, a certain letter brought to the post office, in the parish of St. Mary, Woolnoth, a certain letter was brought to the post office to be delivered to Sarah Barrington , that he, being such person so employed as aforesaid, the said letter did secrete, containing the two one-pound bank notes.

SECOND COUNT - for feloniously taking out of the said letter the said bank notes.

THIRD AND FOURTH COUNT - charged in like manner, stating the bank notes to be the property of Thomas Barrington .

PETER FISSINGLEY . Q. Were you at Canterbury on the 27th of January. - A. I was.

Q. Did you ever see that letter before. - A. I did, the body is written by me, the signature is my aunt's, it was written by me for my aunt, and signed by my aunt, Magdalen Lonbert. After I had written the letter I carried it to the post office; I put in it two bank notes of one pound each given me by my aunt, I wafered it, I then afterwards put it in the post office myself at Canterbury on the same day, the 27th.

MAGDALEN LONBERT . Q. Where do you reside. - A. In Canterbury, I am aunt of the last witness, Mr. Fissingley.

Q. Did he by your direction write any leter. - A. He did, to Mrs. Barrington.

Q. Who signed that letter. - A. I signed it, that is my signature and my name, I gave him two one-pound Bank of England notes, I saw them enclosed in the letter in my presence; the letter was sealed in my presence.

Q. And how directed. - A It is directed to Mrs. Barrington, 67, Old Bailey, London, dated January 27th, 1812.

Mr. Alley. And when directed, are you sure that it was two one-pound notes that were enclosed, and not a two. - A. Quite sure.

Jury. Did you take down the number of the notes. - A. I did not.

BENJAMIN CRITCHETT . Q. You are an inspector of the letter carriers in the general post office. - A. Yes.

Q. Was the prisoner on the 28th of January, and some time before, a letter carrier belonging to the post office. - A. Yes.

Q. Is the Old Bailey, 67, within his district or walk of delivery. - A. It is.

Q. Look at that letter, and see whether the marks made upon it are the marks made at the general post office. - A. They are.

Q. I believe one of them is 28, to shew that it came to the post office on the 28th. - A. Yes, it has, it is charged a treble letter, the red stamp of the crown denotes that an alteration, there is a crown upon the letter, which denotes that the original charge on the letter was incorrect.

Q. Is that crown put on at the general post office. - A. It is.

Q. When the letters first arrive at the post office, I believe they are sorted into twelve large divisions. - A. They are.

Q. Each division comprizing the district or walk of the several letter carriers. - A. Yes.

Q. Are these divisions distinct by number. - A. Both by number and names.

Q. To what division would that leter, directed to the Old Bailey as that is, be carried. - A To the West Smithfield division. The letter of the Old Bailey would be sorted at No. 6, West Smithfield division. The prisoner's district was the West Smithfield.

Q. How many walks or divisions would that be carried to. - A. They would be carried to No. 6, West Smithfield divisions, the prisoner's district was called the West Smithfield.

Q. In what way would that letter, at this sixth division, get subdivided into that walk. - A. By the sorter, one person would sort the whole of them out into

all the smaller divisions, one person attending the sixth division would sort the letters into all the smaller ones.

Q. Would the prisoner have any thing to do with that. - A. One person would sort the whole of the letters into No. 6, West Smithfield, and into the smaller ones.

Q. What would the prisoner have to do after they were sorted into the smaller divisions. - A. The amount of postage is done by a clerk in that division, then they would be delivered to the respective letter carriers belonging to that division.

Q. How do they get them. - A. They are put into the box, each is named according to the walk.

Q. Has the prisoner any thing to do with the letters untill they are put into that box for him. - A. He does not assist in the sorting.

Q. Does he sort out of his own district. - A. He arranges them for the delivery.

Q. He has nothing to do with them untill they are in the box.

Q. When in the box is it his business to overlook them. - A. It is his business to overlook them, it is his business first to see the amount of the postage that is charged, then to arrange them for the order of delivery.

Court. What, he is charged with the postage, is he. - A. He is.

Mr. Abbott. Was the prisoner upon duty upon the 28th of January. - A. He was.

Q. Then would that letter which you have in your hand, go into his hand for delivery. - A. According to the course of business it would.

Q. Did you go to the prisoner's house on the 30th of January. - A. I did, in company with Collingbourne in Edward Street, Blackfriars Road.

Q. Did Collingbourne search the prisoner's person in your presence - A. He did, Sir.

Q. Did you see Collingbourne take any thing from him - A. Yes, letters and papers, and notes, and a pocket-book.

Q. Did you see Collingbourne take the pocket-book from him - A. I did.

Q. Was any thing in the pocket-book - A. Yes, two letters.

Q. Was that one of them - A. I cannot say; there were two in the pocket-book, and some not in the pocket-book.

Q. Was that letter found upon the prisoner - A. That I cannot speak to. This letter is marked by me, I carried it to the post office, I got the letters from his person, and carried them there.

Q. Is that one of the letters you so carried - A. That I cannot speak to.

Q. What was done with the letters and papers that were taken from him - A. I carried them there. When we arrived at the post office we searched the prisoner's drawer, the whole of them was laid on the table; whether this letter was found on his drawer or on his person, I cannot say.

Q. Had he a private drawer there - A. Yes he had, and he had the key in his possession, he was with me; he was in custody of the officer at the time, then the letters all being put upon the table were marked that were of any consequence, this I have a particular recollection of.

Q. When the drawer was opened, was the prisoner present - A. He was.

Q. Then although you are not able to say whether it was found on his person, must it not have been found on his person or in the drawer. - A. Yes, I am sure of that.

Q. Was the letter open when it was found, as it is now. - A. Yes, the letter was open, I did not break the wafer, the wafer was broken.

Q. Did you examine it - A. I did.

Q. It ought to have been delivered on the 28th. - A. Yes.

Mr. Alley. I understood you to say that he was not employed as a sorter, but merely as a letter carrier. - A. As a carrier.

WILLIAM COLLINGBOURNE . I am an officer of Union Hall. I apprehended the prisoner in Edward-street, Blackfriars Road, on the 30th of January.

Q. Did you ever see that letter before. - A. I saw it on the 2d of February.

Q. Did you find any letter upon him. - A. I did, I gave them instantly to Mr. Critchett, the last witness.

Q. Did you give any letters to Mr. Critchett, except those you found upon the prisoner. - A. No.

Q. Is that letter one of them. - A. I suspect not.

SARAH BARRINGTON . Q. Where do you reside. - A. 67, Old Bailey.

Q. What is your husband's name - A. Thomas.

Q. Did you, on the 28th of January, receive any letter from Mrs. Lonbert of Canterbury. - A. I did not; the letter was brought to me on the 1st of February, by a postman.

Q. Then that letter was brought to you open. - A. Yes, on the 1st of February the postman asked me whether I had ever received that letter before I said no.

Court. Who brought it you. - A. A general postman, he asked me if I had had that letter before, I told him no.

Q. Did you receive any one pound notes from Mrs. Lonbert on the 28th of January or any time since. - A. No.

Mr. Abbott. Q. (to Mrs. Lonbert.) Mrs. Barrington is your daughter - A. No, my husband's niece.

Q. These notes were intended for a present to her. - A. Yes.

Q. Tell me whether you had any reason for not mentioning the notes in the letter - A My nephew wrote the letter, it was not mentioned in by accident; I had told him that I meaned to send the notes, it was by accident he did not mention it.

Mr. Critchett. That mark is mine with pen and ink, I put it on it on the 30th, I thought it over charged, it was charged first as a double letter, and then as a treble letter, the double charge was put on by the postman at Canterbury, upon that being examined at the post office, I put that mark on.

Prisoner's Defence. I have been in town I suppose about a twelvemonth, I obtained my situation at the

Post-office about ten or eleven months ago, during that time I have had very severe fits of illness, which the inspectors know to be true; I certainly have been very much distressed, and to add to my misery, I was threatened with an arrest on the part of my physician, and the consequences I knew if I was arrested I must lose my situation; I am willing now to make restitution to the best in my power, for property that has been purloined in that way; upon these considerations I hope you will take my case into consideration, and spare my life if it is possible. I throw myself on the mercy of the court.

GUILTY DEATH , aged 33.

London jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18120219-16

229. ANN CHRISTOPHER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of January , a shawl, value 1 s. two handkerchiefs, value 1 s. four shirts, value 16 s. three half shirts, value 3 s. and two collars, value 1 s. the property of Jacob Halson .

SOPHIA HALSON . I am the wife of Jacob Halson . I lost these things on the 20th of January, it was half past ten o'clock when I missed them. The prisoner took these clothes when I was talking to a captain, the prisoner was my washer-woman. I went to the watch-house; and they had just taken the prisoner in with the bundle; when I came in the watchhouse I knowed the prisoner and the bundle.

RICHARD BEARD . I am a constable. The prisoner, near twelve o'clock at night on the 20th of January, came to the watchhouse, she asked me to let her in, I did, she had a bundle, I saw there were three new calico shirts, and some half shirts in the bundle, she wanted to go out of the watchhouse again, I detained her; about half an hour after, the prosecutrix came to the watchhouse door, I told her we had a suspicious person there, she came in and claimed the shawl.

Prosecutrix. These are all my things.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

GUILTY , aged 33.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120219-17

230. SARAH BEGGS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of February , sixty penny pieces, and one hundred and twenty half-pence , the property of Joseph Robinson .

JOSEPH ROBINSON . I am a flour factor .

Q. When did you lose these half-pence and penny-pieces - A. I cannot say; I missed copper out of my house, and also guineas.

Q. You know nothing yourself who took these - A. No, I do not.

GEORGE HIGGEN . I am a servant to Mr. Robinson. On Tuesday I went out on an errand, I came home between two and three o'clock, I knocked at the door, nobody answered, I looked through the key-hole, I saw the prisoner in the accompting-house; she is a servant to Mr. Robinson; I went down into the kitchen, I looked in the dresser drawer, and saw about four or five shillings paper of half-pence and penny-pieces.

Q. Had you looked in the drawer before you went out to see whether there were any papers there - A. Yes, I found two papers of halfpence, she went out and took these two papers of halfpence with her, in her apron.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120219-18

231. SARAH POWELL and SARAH HASTINGS were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of February , a counterpane, value 3 s. and a bolster-case, value 1 s. the property of Edward Pennyfather .

MARY PENNYFATHER . I am the wife of Edmund Pennyfather. I live at the Queen's Head, Hoxton town , Sarah Powell was my servant . On the 4th of February, as soon as she was gone, I missed my counterpane and bolster case, I went to Mr. Pope's, the pawnbroker, and found them there, and knew them to be my own.

Q. What is Sarah Hastings - A. The girl that pledged them.

Q. Was she in your house. - A No, Sarah Powell lived with me, Sarah Hastings was in the habit of coming to the house and enquiring after her father, he was a bricklayer that used the house.

WILLIAM POPE . I am a pawnbroker in Hoxton. I produce a patchwork'd quilt and a bolster case, I took them in pawn of Sarah Hastings, on the 23d of January, I took in the quilt, and the bolster-case on the 29th, both pledged by Sarah Hastings

JAMES POOLEY . I am a constable, I took the prisoners in custody, Sarah Powell denied all knowledge of it to me, she confessed to the watch house keeper that she stole it and the other pawned it.

Prosecutrix. It is my property.

Powell said nothing in her defence.

Hasting's Defence. I did not know they were stolen; she gave them to me.

POWELL GUILTY , aged 18.

Fined 1 s. and discharged.

HASTINGS NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120219-19

232. MARY COOK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of January , a table, value 9 s. the property of William Kennedy .

WILLIAM KENNEDY . I am a broker , I live at No. 2, Great Earl Street, Seven Dials . On the 27th of January, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, I saw the prisoner pass my shop three or four times, that caused me to suspect that she had an intention to buy or steal, on the last time of her passing I went out to see whether my goods were safe, I missed a round table, I saw the prisoner carrying this table, it is my table.

Prisoner's Defence. My husband sold the furniture to his wife.

GUILTY , aged 27.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120219-20

233. JAMES KEAFE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of January , a skiff, value 16 l. the property of James Whitehead the elder.

JAMES WHITEHEAD . I am a blockmaker at Limehouse .

Q. Did you lose a skiff in January last - A. I did, it was a skiff eighteen feet long, painted green, it was about three years old, but in good preservation.

Q. Where did you see her last in your own possession - A. I saw her on the 14th of January at the back of my premises; she was fastened in the river to some timber. I found her missing on the morning of the 15th, at nine o'clock.

Q. What was the boat worth - A. Twenty pounds.

JAMES WHITEHEAD , JUN. Q. When did you see this boat last before she was lost - A. On the night of the 14th of January, it was getting dark, early on the morning of the 15th I missed her, as soon as it was light. As soon as it was day-light I went down with my father to Sheerness and found the boat.

Q. You agree with your father that the boat was in a state of high preservation - A. Yes.

EDWARD FRIDAY . Q. I believe you are a carpenter residing at Sheerness - A. I am.

Q. About the 20th of January last were you employed by the prisoner to repair a skiff - A. I was employed to put a strike round her to raise her higher; she was laying by Forts Creek, the prisoner took me to her and shewed me the boat.

COURT. Where did this man live - A. Near the Fountain Inn. I had but little knowledge of him.

WILLIAM JOHNSON . I am a boat builder at Sheerness.

Q. Did you go with Mr. Whitehead in search of this boat - A. I did.

Q. Had you seen the boat before she was painted lead colour - A. On Wednesday the 22d before that I had seen her.

Q. What colour was she then - A. Then she was green. On Wednesday evening Mr. Keafe brought a paint pot and brush with priming in it to my shop and wished to leave it in my shed till the next morning; the next morning, Thursday, I went and saw the boat again; the name was painted out with the lead colour; I saw afterwards three people working upon her.

COURT. Was this boat in good preservation - A. Yes, every thing perfect; I saw nothing wanting.

Q. Did you know this man - A. Yes, some little, not much.

Q. What was the boat worth - A. Twenty pounds.

Q. What would she cost building - A. Twenty-four pounds.

Prisoner's Defence. Mr. Friday and I were going to be partners, I went up to London and bought a boat, he was to have half of it.

Q. to Friday. Had you proposed to this man to buy a boat, and going partners with him - A. That was after I saw this boat.

Q. Had you any conversation with him before respecting any partnership with him in a boat - A. I am not certain whether I had not said I should like to go in partnership with slop-selling.

Q. to prosecutor. In consequence of information that you received did you, on the 26th of January go down to Sheerness - A. Yes; I found my boat, and after I found my boat I saw the prisoner.

Q. Did he claim the boat as his - A. He did; I asked him how he came by it, he said he bought it at Deptford, he produced a receipt.

Mr. Gurney. This receipt is signed by John May - A. Yes.

Q. He brought forward a person whom he identified to be the person that he had bought the boat off - A. Yes, that person came to the police office, his name turned out to be Edges, the man denied that he had sold it him; the prisoner still persisted in it, the magistrate desired him to attend on Monday; the man attended a second time before the magistrate and denied having sold the boat.

Q. When you found the boat was it in the same state as when you lost it - A. No. When the boat was in my possession it was painted green, when I found it at Sheerness it was painted lead colour, and my name painted out; the lead colour paint was hardly dry.

Q. Was it a boat in good or bad repair - A. In good preservation.

Q. Had your son any share in this boat - A. No.

(The receipt read.)

"January 16th, 1812, received the sum of twelve pounds of James Keafe for a skiff-built boat. Settled, John May ."

GUILTY , aged 28.

Judgement respited till Next Sessions .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120219-21

234. ROBERT OAKINS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 31st of January , eight bushels of coals, value 14 s. the property of Nathaniel Hadley and Thomas Mellish Thatcher .

THOMAS MELLISH THATCHER . I am a coal merchant ; Nathaniel Hadley is my partner.

Q. Was the prisoner your servant - A. No, he was not. The prisoner worked in the stables that parted our coal yard by a partition only; he was in Mr. Winkle's employment; his yard adjoins ours.

Q. Where are your premises - A. At the bottom of Milford-lane . On the morning of the 31st of January I had occasion to go into this repository of coals between eight and nine o'clock, accompanied by my carter, and at the father end of the warehouse, against where the prisoner was employed, I discovered two boards were removed.

Q. Would the removal of these two boards enable a man to creep through - A. Yes, and there were a large bulk of the coals gone, many chaldrons of coals had gone I determined to lay wait at night to see whether any person was employed in taking them, and between six and seven o'clock; on the same evening after dark I saw the prisoner go into his stable with a light; I then lay as close concealed as I could in the warehouse, and heard a shovel employed in throwing coals out of the warehouse; I then went to Mr. Winkle's, and a man that is not in custody opened the door to me, and he immediately let the stable-man run away; he has not been seen since; I then went to the further end of the stable, I cried out to the prisoner, I knew he was inside of our warehouse, that he must come out, or if he did not I would certainly shoot

him, he then told me to take the pistol away and he would come out; I had a pistol with me; he did come out, and I took him in custody. The boards were down, he came out through the opening of these boards; we measured the coals afterwards, there were three sacks thrown out.

GUILTY , aged 10.

Publicly whipped near the place where the offence was committed , and Confined One Year in the House of Correction .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120219-22

235. CHARLOTTE JANE THORP was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of January , a shawl, value 4 s. a mantle, value 10 s. a tippet, value 6 d. and a petticoat, value 2 s. the property of Patrick Harlow .

PATRICK HARLOW . I live at Coney, in Hertfordshire . The prisoner was my house-maid , I discharged her in January 1811.

Q. Was your house robbed - A. It was.

Q. Among other things was there a shawl lost - A. Yes, from Mrs. Harlows dressing-room.

Q. By what means did it appear that the robbery had been affected - A. From various circumstances, it appeared that the thief found his way into the house the preceeding evening, and secreted themselves in one of the bed chambers, and when the family were asleep they stole the property.

Q. What, the house had not been broken open - A. No.

Q. But you found that some person must have been within - A. Yes.

Q. In the course of last month did any thing occur to you - A. On the evening of the 21st of January in consequence of what my butler told me, between seven and eight o'clock I searched the house, I found one of my rooms in the house fastened on the inside, a key which had been on the outside before was within, I addressed myself to the prisoner, supposing her to be on the inside, I had the door broken open, and found her in the room.

Q. Did you then charge her with being the person who had robbed your house before, in the first place, did you promise her any favour, or threaten her if she did not confess - A. I did not, I was very anxious to know because, I did not know whom to suspect. I asked her whether that was the first time she came there with that intent, she said no, it was not the first time that she came there with that intent. I asked her whether it was her that robbed the house in November, she said it was, she told me that some of the things were at Chelsea. I accompanied Vickrey the officer to her lodgings, she took us to her lodgings, the woman of the house in which she lodged was there, and by her desire took us into a room, and there she produced articles.

JOHN VICKREY . I am an officer of Bow-street. The prisoner handed these things out of the box herself.

Prosecutor. I have no doubt they are my property.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence, nor called any witnesses to her character.

GUILTY , aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120219-23

236. JANE BRIDGER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 31st of January , in the dwelling-house of Mary Thompson , widow , a habit shirt, value 4 s. two shirts, value 4 s. a cap, value 6 d. a petticoat, value 5 s. the property of Mary Miller ; spinster , a shawl, value 1 s. a silk handkerchief, value 6 d. two bank dollars, value 11 s. a ten pound bank note, four one pound bank notes, and a promissory note, value 1 l. the property of Mary Thompson, widow; and a pellisse, value 25 s. the property of Catherine Grant .

MARY THOMPSON . I live at No. 42, Piccadilly . I rent the whole of the house, it is in the parish of St. James, Westminster; I let the shop to Mr. Cooper, a carver and gilder, I keep the rest of the house myself; the prisoner was my servant , she lived with me about nine months.

Q. Who is Mary Miller - A. My daughter.

Q. What reason have you to charge the prisoner with having taken any of your property, or of Catherine Grant 's, or Mary Miller 's - A. Last Friday three weeks I called the prisoner to breakfast, between the hours of nine and ten, she was not to be found in the house.

Q. Had you sent her out for any thing - A. No, I went down into the kitchen to some things to put by, I missed a petticoat that was in the kitchen, then I went to my drawer to see if any thing was missing, from thence to my daughters work-drawer, where nobody had any business but herself; I put the money in the drawer the day before, I had in it one ten pound bank note, and four one pound bank notes, and a Canterbury note of one pound, the two dollars were folded up in the notes, I had put them in the drawer the day before.

Q. Upon your looking in the drawer were they gone - A. Yes; my daughter and myself were constantly in that room.

Q. Finding these things were gone, did you look to see whether any thing more was gone - A. Yes, I did not miss any thing else at that time but my silk handkerchief. I was in search of her from that day till the Friday week.

Q. Had she given you any intimation of her leaving you - A. No.

Q. She never returned to her service, did she - A. No.

Q. How long after this was it that you apprehended her - A. On the Thursday following I had some information, I apprehended her on the Saturday.

Q. Were you present when she was taken up - A. Yes, we found her a little of this side of Westminster Marsh gate, in a small house by Marsh-gate, Westminster, I saw my daughter's cap upon her head, and another cap on the woman of the houses head.

Q. What was the name of the woman that kept the house - A. I cannot say, we found upon her a two pound note and some silver.

Q. You saw her searched - A. Yes.

Q. Did you ever find your ten pound note, or your one pound notes - A. No, she acknowledged to

to changing the ten pound note, I used no threats or promises, she told me she would tell me all, she acknowledged to the officer, in my hearing, to changing the note, and said that she had bought a gown and some things with it at a linen-drapers shop, and had changed the ten pound note for that purpose.

Q. Did she appear to be possessed of a good many things - A. She had got things to the value of about six pounds.

Q. Did you lose a habit shirt - A. That was my daughter's, they were in her drawer, in the same apartment, the officer found them on her in my presence.

Q. The pellisse, did you find that - A. Yes, that belonged to Catherine Grant , and the silk handkerchief belonged to me.

Prisoner's Defence. My mistress has a few clothes of mine, I should be obliged to her to let me have them; I must leave it to the mercy of the court.

CHARLES HUMPHREYS . I belong to Bow-street office. I apprehended the prisoner in a house near Marsh Gate.

Q. Who keeps the house - A. I do not know the persons name, it was No. 7, down a lane by the Gate, a small house.

Q. Did you find these things in that house - A. Yes, I asked the prisoner what she had done with the woman's notes; she said that she had lent the landlady of the house one pound.

Q. Did you get that one pound of the landlady - A. I got part of it; there was a gown and shift put out to be made by the person of the house; I have a two pound note.

MR. THOMPSON. The silk handkerchief is mine, and the shawl.

MARY MILLER . Q. You live in the house with your mother - A. Yes; these caps and habit shirts are mine.

CATHERINE GRANT . Q. Do you live in Mrs. Thompson's house - A. Yes.

Q. Do you find there any property of yours - A. The pellisse is mine, it is worth twenty five shillings.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 21.

[ The prisoner was recommended to mercy by the jury on account of her youth, and believing it to be her first offence .]

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120219-24

237. ROBERT RANSON was indicted for that he, on the 19th of February , feloniously did break and enter the dwelling-house of William Tudor , no person being therein, and feloniously stealing three sheets, value 15 s. three blankets, value 12 s. and a bed quilt, value 10 s. the property of Daniel M'Lawrence .

WILLIAM TUDOR . I live in Buckeridge-street ; the house is let out in lodgings, the landlord does not live in the house, my room in the house is the two pair room.

Q. All the owners of the separate tenements enter in at one street door - what is the name of the landlord - A. Daniel M'Lawrence . I was the only person that lived in that room at the time that I lost the goods, I am a mattrass maker , I work for Mr. Harris, 406, Oxford-road. On the 19th of February, I left my room at seven o'clock in the morning, I fastened it with a padlock quite safe, I left the room quite secure, and every thing in it.

Q. When you left the room did you leave three sheets and three blankets, and a bed quilt in it - A. I did. I returned to my room about half past six o'clock, as nigh as I can guess; I went to the landlord and asked him for the key, as I generally do, I had left these things in the room, and when I returned they were gone.

Q. Was it day-light when you returned - A. The day-light was closed.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. I had known him for a twelvemonth or more, he called on me about five o'clock, I had just done work; I went and drank with him at a public house; the things have never been found. The next day, about eleven o'clock, the prisoner called upon me at St. Martins lane, I told him he was the man I wanted to see, he must go with me to Mr. M'Lawrence; I told him he was accused of having taken the things, he refused going with me, he said he was going into the Strand he would call as he came back, and would go up to Mr. M'Lawrence; I would not trust him. I secured him in the warehouse until I sent for somebody to lay hold of him, he always denied that he had done the fact; I resigned him up to Mr. M'Lawrence. He always denied that he had been concerned in it.

DANIEL M'LAWRENCE. Q. Are you the owner of the house in which Tudor lives - A. I am. I do not live in any part of it myself; Tudor has a room on the second floor.

Q. On the day this man lost his property did he leave the key with you of his room - A. He left the key with me about seven o'clock in the morning, it was his regular custom.

Q. Do you know the man at the bar - A. No; I never saw him until I saw him at Bow-street. On Wednesday was the day that Tudor lost the goods. I went up stairs about ten o'clock, I brought down these blankets to mark them; I marked them with black paint, I took them up into the room again between three and four in the afternoon, I spread the blankets on the chairs, I put the padlock on the hasp, and I am sure I locked the door. About six o'clock a boy gave me some information; the boys are here.

THOMAS FLETCHER . I am going of fourteen.

Q. Do you know this house in which Tudor lives - A. Yes. On Wednesday, the 19th of February, about six o'clock, I was standing at the door of this house with a boy that lives in the house, I heard some footsteps go up stairs; I waited at the door until I heard some person come down, I could not tell what part of the house he came from; when he came he had two bundles.

Q. As he came down could you distinguish his features - A. Yes, I and the other boy stood in the door-way, he pushed the other boy away, that made me take notice of him.

Q. Was there day-light enough for you to distinguish his features - A. Yes.

Q. Where they large bundles - A. Yes. I saw at one of the bundles, part of the sheets were hanging out, I could not distinguish what was in the other

bundle.

Q. As he shoved your companion away you took notice of the man - A. Yes. I am quite sure it was the prisoner at the bar.

Prisoner's Defence. At the time that it was stated the robbery was committed I was a public-house in Church-lane with William Tudor .

Q. to Tudor. Did this man drink with you that afternoon - A. Yes, in Church-lane; the house I was drinking at is about twenty yards from the house where I live.

Q. Do you know what time it was you went into that house - A. A little after five. We had a couple of pints of beer together. We were about twenty minutes together; we both came out together, I went towards Oxford-road; he told me he was going down the Strand. I left him in Church-lane, and turned up Oxford-road. It was before six.

Q. Can you venture to say it was not more than half past five - A. That was about the time as nigh as I can guess.

Prisoner. He knows it was half past five when we came out of the public-house, it was quite dark.

Tudor. It was not. It was about half past five as nigh as I can guess.

Prisoner. It is false. I have a witness to prove where I was after I left this man.

ANN ASHTON . I live at No. 6, Hungerford-street, in the Strand. I have known the prisoner five years, I never heard any thing against him in my life; he is a mattrass-maker and upholsterer; he brought his linen to my place to wash between five and six o'clock. It was between light and dark.

Q. Was it a large bundle - A. No, it was nothing but a shirt, waistcoat, and a pair of stockings.

Q. Where did he live at that time - A. In King-street, Drury-lane.

Prisoner. I was at that woman's house all the rest of the evening.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120219-25

238. ELIZABETH BUCKLEY was indicted for feoniously stealing, on the 1st of November , a watch, value 5 l. a tea-chest, value 10 s. and ten guineas, the property of William Jones , in the dwelling-house of David Anderson .

MRS. JONES. I am the wife of William Jones , he is a cabinet-maker .

Q. Do you know whether Mr. Anderson's name is David - A. Yes.

Q. On the 1st of November were you at home - A. I was.

Q. Was your husband possessed of a watch that day - A. I was myself. It was a silver watch, it hanged up in the room on the 1st of November, I had seen it in the room that very morning.

Q. What part of the room was it on the 1st of November - A. In a tea-chest in my room.

Q. On what part of the day on the 1st of November had you seen the tea-chest - A. I had it in my hand at five in the afternoon, and at that time it contained, a watch.

Q. Did you leave your room - A. The prisoner came into my room, she altered her voice.

Q. Did the prisoner live in the house - A. She had been a few nights in the house. I lodged in the back parlour; the prisoner was an acquaintance of the person that had the back parlour, and I lodged in that room likewise.

Q. What time did she come in the back parlour - A. About five in the afternoon I had the tea-chest in my hand, I was going to unlock it, she brought an apron in her hand, and pressed me very much to pawn some property for her to pay her lodging that night.

Q. Did you pawn her apron - A. She pressed me very much and I wished her to be gone out of the room.

Q. Did you consent to take her apron to pawn for her - A. Yes, I did, I left the room and left her in it; she said she would not go out of the room for two hours; I said I should not be gone above five minutes.

Q. Where do you live - A. The house is in Coventry-court, in the parish of St. Pancras.

Q. What pawnbroker did you go to - A. Mr. Hill in Rathbone-place, I pawned for her two aprons for nine-pence; I was not ten minutes gone. When I returned the prisoner was gone, and my tea-chest was gone; when I looked for it my tea-chest and the watch in it was gone; I never saw the prisoner again until the 14th of January; this was on the 1st of Nover; I was in search of her all the time. When I saw her she had been taken up for something else. I saw her in custody in Bow-street, then I made a charge before the justice. I gave half a guinea for the tea-chest.

Q. What did you give for your watch - A. Seven pounds.

Q. Was the watch worth five pounds - A. Yes, I had it above two or three years, and there were ten guineas in gold in the tea-chest and the other articles. I have never seen the tea-chest, the guineas, or the watch since; I lost all.

Q. Are you quite sure of the woman - A. I am quite sure; I had known her a fortnight.

MARGARET ANDERSON . My husband's name is David Anderson .

Q. Does your husband rent the whole house - A. Yes.

Q. Did this prisoner lodge in your house - A. Susan Pratt lodged in my back parlour. I believe the prisoner slept in my house two or three nights.

Q. Did you know that she was in Mrs. Jones's room when Mrs. Jones went any thing for her - A. I saw the prisoner go into the parlour to Mrs. Jones, I think that was about four o'clock; I saw her go towards the street-door and return; she said Susan give me the apron, I want the apron.

Q. Did you ever see the prisoner again after Mrs. Jones complained of having lost the property - A. No. I am quite sure she was the person that was in the house.

Q. Had you seen Mrs. Jones's watch any time before this - A. Yes, Mrs. Jones shewed me the watch.

SUSAN PRATT . I rent this back room and Mrs. Jones lodged with me. Mrs. Buckley came to me on the Saturday; I gave her a few nights lodging. When I went out a quarter before five, the prisoner and the

tea chest was safe in my room; I never saw Mrs. Buckley again till she was taken in custody.

Prisoner's Defence. Susannah Pratt and I went out that day. When I came home at five o'clock in the evening, she and I had a few words; she said I should not stop. She told me that my prosecutrix had a tea-chest with gold or ten guineas in it, that she had opened it with a false key.

Mrs. Pratt. It is not true.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 46.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120219-26

239. ANN CAMFIELD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of February , four pair of list shoes, value 12 s. the property of Robert Colcock .

JOHN FORDHAM . I am a carpenter, I live at Tottenham .

Q. When did you lose shoes - A. They were not my shoes. The shoes were hanging out of Mr. Colcock's shop, a shoemaker's shop. On Friday the 7th of February, at half past four o'clock, I saw them at the door, I said to the young man that was along with me, I think that woman is after no good, and I watched her; I saw the woman take the shoes, the moment she took the shoes, she put them under her coat.

Q. What, they were hanging on the outside, were they - A. Yes. I went after her and took her into the shop of Mr. Colcock, I took the shoes from her, and gave them to Mr. Colcock; I left the woman and the shoes there, and came away. I am sure the prisoner is the woman.

JOHN CASKINS . I am a carpenter. I was coming by with Fordham, I observed the prisoner standing at Mr. Colcock's door, we watched her and saw her take four pair of shoes from off the door, she put them under her coat; the prisoner was intoxicated.

WILLIAM GOODMAN . I am an officer. I took the prisoner in custody.

Q. Do you know whether they are Mr. Colcock's shoes - A. No.

ROBERT COLCOCK . Q. Have you been sworn - A. No. I cannot be sworn.

COURT. Then we cannot convict the prisoner.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120219-27

240. MARTHA COX and JUDITH EAKIN were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of February , two loaves of bread, value 2 s. 8 d. the property of James Clack .

- BULLOCK. I am a baker. I live at No. 6, Mark-street, City-road; I am a servant to Mr. Clack; I lost the loaves from St. Martin-street, Westmoreland-place, City-road ; I left my bread in a basket. When I returned from serving my customers from information I pursued the prisoners and took the bread from them in Wilderness-row.

JAMES GEARY . I am an officer. I produce two loaves.

Bullock. These are my loaves. I had a split loaf in my basket when I left it. I am certain the split loaf is mine.

Geary. They acknowledgedged to me that they took one a piece.

COX - GUILTY , aged 15.

EAKIN - GUILTY , aged 16.

Confined Fourteen Days in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder,

Reference Number: t18120219-28

241. WILLIAM CRISP and JAMES STEVENS were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of January , two pair of list shoes, value 4 s. the property of Thomas Brimson .

THOMAS BRIMSON . I am an umbrella-maker , I live in Plumber's-row, City-road . I only know the property is mine.

JOHN SKIDMORE . I live next door to Mr. Brimson. I saw each of the prisoners look at the shoes, and then they turned round and walked back again, they came back again and each of them took a pair of shoes out of the basket.

FREDERICK HURST . I was in the City-road. I heard a cry of stop thief, the prisoners were both running, and the witness Skidmore after them; Stevens throwed out a pair of shoes, and some of the people cried out, there is another pair of shoes dropping; I could not see who dropped them, they fell by Stevens.

WILLIAM JANUS . I am a constable. These are the shoes that were gave to me when I took the prisoners.

Prosecutor. They are my property.

CRISP - GUILTY , aged 26.

STEVENS - GUILTY , aged 39.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and Whipped in Jail .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120219-29

242. THOMAS JEFFERY was indicted for that he, on the 5th of September, 1796, did marry Elizabeth Jackson , and that he afterwards on the 5th of November, 1810 , did take to wife and did marry Lydia Smith , and said Elizabeth his former wife being then alive .

ANDREW WOOD . Q. You produce the register book of the parish of St. Giles's, Cripplegate - A. I do, I am clerk.

Q. Turn to the 5th of September, 1796 - A.

" Thomas Jeffery of this parish, batchelor, and Elizabeth Jackson , spinster, were married in this church by banns, this day the 5th of September, 1796, by me, William Manning , curate.

Q. Who are the subscribing witnesses - A. Richard Kirby and Mary Jeffery .

Q. I suppose you have no recollection of the persons - A. No, it was before I was clerk.

GEORGE LEMMING . I produce the register book of marriages of the parish of St. Leonard's, Shoreditch , 25th of November.

" Thomas Jeffery of this parish, widower, and Lydia Smith , of this parish, spinster , were married in this church by license, this 25th of November, 1810, by me, Thomas White , curate.

Q. Have you any recollection of the person of the prisoner - A. No. Joseph Ellwick and Rebecca Brown were witnesses.

RICHARD KIRBY . Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. Yes, I was present at the first marriage at Cripplegate

church in the year 1796; he was married to Elizabeth Jackson .

Q. Is she alive - A. Yes, she is here; she lodges in the same house with me; I knew the woman very well, the husband always appeared to be on good terms with his wife. I think they separated, I cannot say the date. They afterwards lived together. I heard his relations say that he went to sea in the year 1803.

LYDIA SMITH . Q. Were you married to this prisoner at Shoreditch Church - A. Yes, in November, a twelvemonth ago.

Q. How old were you when you were married - A. Not quite twenty-two.

GUILTY , aged 36.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120219-30

243. WILLIAM HEPWORTH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of January , three books, value 4 s. the property of George Hughes .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY .

Fined 1 s. and discharged.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120219-31

244. WILLIAM MATTHEWS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of February , a cheese, value 10 s. the property of Thomas Wells , privately in his shop .

THOMAS WELLS . I am a cheesemonger ; I live at No. 4, New Inn-yard, Shoreditch . On the 3d of February I was sitting in the back parlour at tea; I heard a noise, I turned round, I saw some person going out of the door: I instantly pursued the prisoner, about an hundred yards from the door I overtook him with the cheese in his possession; I had him taken into custody.

Q. Where was the cheese - A. Standing in the shop, about five or six yards from the door, and some more cheeses upon it, on an empty firkin.

Prisoner's Defence. I was about fifty yards from the place; a man came to me, and said, if you will take this cheese to the London Apprentice I will give you a shilling; this gentleman came and took it from me.

GUILTY, aged 16.

Of stealing, but not privately in the shop .

Confined Six Calender Months in the House of Correction , and Whipped in Jail .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120219-32

245. SARAH BOWYER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of January , a watch, value 6 l. the property of John Davidson , from his person .

JOHN DAVIDSON . I am a carpenter , I live in Somerstown. On Friday the 24th of January I lost my watch in Charles-street, Drury-lane , at eleven o'clock at night.

Q. You picked the prisoner up in the street - A. Yes. We went into a room together in Charles-street. The moment the prisoner went out of the room I missed the watch.

Q. How long had you been together before she went out - A. About three or four minutes.

Q. Were you sober - A. Yes. Another girl was passing, I took her to the watchhouse.

Q. Did you ever find your watch again - A. No.

Q. You had never seen the prisoner before that night, had you - A. No.

Q. Had you a light in the room - A. Yes, there was a candle in the room.

Q. And she was there but two or three minutes. Can you take upon yourself to swear that she is the woman - A. Yes.

Q. How soon afterwards did you see her again - A. Not till the next morning. I got an officer to take her up.

GEORGE RUTHWIN . On Saturday, the 25th of January the prosecutor came to the office, I was sent to apprehend the prisoner; I apprehended her in Charles-street, Drury-lane. The watch has never been found.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18120219-33

246. GEORGE BRADING was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of January , a bag, value 1 s. and twenty pounds weight of soap, value 20 s. the property of James Raccine , senior, John Jaques , and James Raccine , junior.

JAMES RACCINE , SENIOR. I am a silk-dyer , our manufactory is in Hare-street, Bethnal Green . My partner's names are John Jacques and James Raccine , junior. I had given particular orders that the soap should be watched.

Q. Is the man here that watched it - A. Yes. The prisoner lived servant with me seven years, with a number of others.

JAMES WILLIAM BROOKS . I am a journeyman to Mr. Raccine. On the 17th of last month master gave me orders to watch the prisoner to see if he took any parcel out. When he went out in the night I followed him, he had this bag upon his shoulder; he had gone about fifty yards from the dwelling-house before I overtook him; I told him to come back. In searching the bag I found these eight cakes of soap.

Prosecutor. I have no doubt but it is the soap that was made for our house.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence.

GUILTY , aged 42.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18120219-34

247. ROBERT BLACKMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of January , a box, value 1 s. and fifty pieces of ribbon, value 20 l. the property of John Cunvin , in the dwelling-house of Alexander Hayes .

MARY CUNVIN . My husband's name is John Cunvin . On the 18th of January I lived in Chandois-street in St. Martin's parish.

Q. Whose house is it - A. The landlord is a shoemaker. I took the lodging for five shillings and sixpence a-week. When we took the room it was between twelve and one o'clock, but when we moved into the room it was between five and six. We took a

box with us there, it contained ribbons.

Q. How many ribbons were there - A. About fifty, value fifty pound, and about fifty yards of lace.

Q. What were they worth - A. About fifty pound. I put the box down in my lodging room, and I left it there and went out; Mrs. Thompson helped me to move, and my children were in the room when I put the box down, and the prisoner Blackman was there, and Tom Lake was there, they are strangers to me.

Q. How came these men to be there - A. I asked them to come up. Lake I believe is a carpenter

Q. Did you get any of your things again - A. I saw three silk handkerchiefs at Queen-square, that is all the property I have seen again.

Q. Where they in the box - A. Yes.

JOHN CUNVIN . Q. How old are you - A. I am going of twelve.

Q. Were you in the house at the time that these goods were removed - A. Yes, I went with the cart and the goods, the box was taken into the room.

Q. Do you know what was in the box - A. Ribbons, I think, and lace.

Q. Did you see the prisoner, George Blackman , there - A. Yes, he came with the cart; the prisoner went to fetch Tom Lake to put up the bedstead; Lake came with him, they put up the bedstead; Lake asked me what was in the box, I said ribbons and laces, Lake took it away, he said he would take care of it.

JAMES GILLMORE . I am an officer. On the 27th of January, I had information of the persons taking the box away; I found the prisoner in a public house, and Charles Hassel , I took them into custody. I went to Blackman's lodgings in Clement's lane, I told him I was going to search for silk handkerchiefs, and other things that he was in possession of. I asked him if he knew Tom Lake, Blackman said he did. I then said that I wanted the box that he and Tom Lake had taken away, he said he knew nothing about it; I found these handkerchiefs in Blackman's room.

Prosecutrix. They are my handkerchiefs, they are worth five shillings each.

ISAAC PIKE . I am a constable, the landlord's name is Alexander Hayes , he is a shoemaker.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18120219-35

248. WILLIAM BAILEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of January , a silver teaspoon, value 3 s. and a pair of sugar tongs, value 10 s. the property of Richard John Millington .

GEORGE COSTAR . I am a servant to Richard John Millington , he is a tavern keeper , the Queen's Head, Holborn , I am a waiter in his employ. On the 23d of January the prisoner came into the coffee-room, and ordered tea; he paid for his tea, he ran away with the spoon and the sugar-tongs; I had seen the tea-spoon about two minutes before he left the room. I pursued him, and took him with the spoon and tongs upon him, these are the things, they are my master's property.

Prisoner's Defence. I am truly sorry.

GUILTY , aged 27.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18120219-36

249. MARY BANKS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of January , five brushes, value 4 s. a pair of breeches, value 10 s. a table-cloth, value 1 s. and a napkin, value 1 s. the property of Adrian Le Roi .

ADRIAN LE ROI. I live at 66, Swallow-street .

Q. Did you lose brushes and other articles on the 16th of January last - A. Yes, and a pair of sheets.

COURT. The sheets are not in the indictment - A. And a pillow-case; she took these articles out of a bed room in my house, she slept for a week in my house; the table-cloth was darned, she took that from the kitchen.

Q. Did you lose any breeches - A. No, they put down breeches for sheets in the indictment; the table cloth we had upon the table at dinner that day.

Q. When had you seen these brushes - A. I saw them in the shop some time before.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18120219-37

250. ELIZABETH HORTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of June , a looking glass, value 8 s. a shawl, value 10 s. two caps, value 2 s. and three shirts, value 3 s. the property of John Bailey .

SARAH BAILEY . I am the wife of John Bailey .

Q. Did you lose any articles from your house - A. Yes, about ten months ago, I think it was in March, I lost a looking-glass, three caps, and two littleshirts.

Q. What part of your house did you lose them from - A. It was upon the two pair; I saw the glass about two months ago, at Mr. Attenborough's, in Crown-street.

Q. Where is your house - A. In Reddick's Buildings, Shoreditch; this is the glass, it is mine.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. No; when I went out I locked the door and took the key with me, and when I came back, I found the room door open.

ALEXANDER BURGESS . I live at Mr. Attenborough's, a pawnbroker in Crown-street. On the 6th of June last, I took in a looking-glass of the prisoner.

Q. Did you know her before - A. Yes, she has been in the habit of dealing at our shop; she pledged it for four shillings and six-pence, in her own name, on the 16th of January, Mr. Attenborough delivered it to Sarah Bailey , as she saw it hanging up in the shop, and he went up to the office with the prosecutrix, she claimed it.

Q. Did you ever see her between the 6th of June and the 16th of January - A. I never saw her in the shop until the day I went up to the office to get an officer to apprehend her. I saw her pass the house one day in the street.

Q. Do you know about what time that was - A. No, I do not indeed.

Q. Had she been in the habit of coming often, before the 6th of June - A. Sometimes two or times a week.

Prisoner's Defence. My husband purchased the glass for ten shillings, it was brought to our house, and after we moved into Nelson-street, we wanted money, by my husband's order I took the glass to Mr. Attenborough's they lent me four shillings and six-pence upon it.

The prisoner called five witnesses, who gave her a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18120219-38

250. JOSEPH DAY and CHARLES WOODSTOCK were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of February , a basket, value 1 s. and three hundred of asparagus, value 3 l. 3 s. the property of John May .

JOHN MAY . I live at Bermondsey; I am a master gardener .

Q. Did you lose a basket of asparagus - A. Yes, on the 4th of this month in Covent Garden ; I was in a house close by where my garden stuff stood.

JOHN BIER . I am a potatoe seller in Covent Garden.

Q. Were you there on the morning of the 4th of February - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see any body take any thing away that morning - A. Yes, Woodstock.

Q. Was Mr. May absent at that time - A. Yes. Woodstock took it on his head and I stopped him; he got as far as Tavistock-street. When I stopped him I asked him what he was going to do with it; he told me that some man had put it on his head, he did not know where he was going with it. I told him I thought it was not his property. I took him back.

Q. Did you see him take it up himself - A. No; I saw a man on the shafts of the cart, he put it on his head. I do not know whether that man was Day or no. The man that put it on his head walked away before Woodstock; they were both taken in Tavistock-street.

WILLIAM HEWITT . I am in the habit of attending the market. I saw Day upon the shafts of the cart.

Q. What is Day - A. A costermonger. Day brought a basket from the front of the cart to the hind part, he jumped off. I did not see any more for a few minutes until I saw him walking along with Woodstock toward Tavistock-street. I did not see him take it from the cart, nor yet put it upon the other's head. I saw Woodstock brought back; Day follows the same business. I know them both. I did not stay, I saw obliged to go away.

Prosecutor. I have known Day some years, he was in the habit of coming to the market.

Q. What was there in the basket - A. Three hundred of asparagus, worth three guineas.

DAY - GUILTY , aged 25.

WOODSTOCK - GUILTY , aged 26.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18120219-39

251. MICHAEL DUFFY and CATHERINE DUFFY were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of January , a blanket, value 3 s. a sheet, value 3 s. a coverlid, value 2 s. and a flat iron, value 1 s. the property of Edward Wild , in a lodging room .

EDWARD WILD . I live at 19 in Featherstone-street, City-road .

Q. Did you let lodgings to the prisoner - A. Yes, to Michael Duffy and his wife on the 4th of January; they were both present, it was a small room furnished, they were to give three shillings and sixpence a week.

Q. Did you miss any of your furniture - A. Soon afterwards they went away, on the 27th of January; they gave me no warning. The next day I went in the room and missed the blanket and sheet, I took Michael Duffy in the guard-room in the Artillery-ground. He is a soldier in the West London Militia.

GEORGE STEELE . I am a pawnbroker. I produce a blanket pawned by Mary Duffy on the 15th of January.

Catherine Duffy 's Defence. I took a room of the prosecutor's wife, I told her I wanted no sheets, nor did I get any sheets. My husband told me to pawn that blanket for a shilling, I did, and I expected to get it out again. He accuses me of a flat iron and a sheet, his wife knows I never had them.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18120219-40

252. MARY WEEDON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of January , eight caps, value 2 l. 10 s. three frocks, value 3 s. two pinafores, value 2 s. a shift, value 3 s. and a towel, value 6 d. the property of Charles Robinson , in his dwelling-house .

MARY ANN ROBINSON . I am the wife of Charles Robinson , he is a stationer , 48, Red Lion-street, Holborn .

Q. Was the prisoner in your service - A. She was, four weeks.

Q. Is the property you lost in court - A. It is. I missed it on the 26th of January, it was taken from a drawer in the bed-room; the drawer was locked; I kept the key myself. The first thing I missed was my little girl's knife and fork; I asked her for it, she told me it was on the side board in the drawing-room; I looked, and told her it was not there. I insisted upon it being found. She then said, ma'am, I have taken it out and put it among some dirty clothes, if you had looked there you would have seen it. I saw the duster, but never thought of looking there for the knife and fork. She brought the knife and forward to me. I missed the caps on the Sunday; she said the had never seen them.

Q. Pray whereabouts did you find the things - A. At the pawnbrokers, they are here.

- HONSEY. I am a pawnbroker. I produce some children's things, two frocks, a petticoat, three caps, four napkins, a pinafore, a shift, and a towel. I advanced twelve shillings upon them I believe the prisoner to be the person that pawned them; I am not sure.

Q. to Mrs. Robinson. Did you find any duplicates upon the prisoner - A. No.

JAMES BLAND . I am a pawnbroker. I produce two caps pawned with me by the prisoner at the bar, I advanced her eight shillings upon them.

Mrs. Robinson. These caps are my property, I lost them while the prisoner was in my service.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence.

GUILTY, aged 15,

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18120219-41

253. MARY WEST was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 18th of January , twelve pound weight of beaf, value 3 s. the property of Samuel Brook .

SAMUEL BROOK . I am a butcher , I live in Lumber-court, St. Giles's , No. 9. On the 18th of January, I was serving my customers inside of the shop, I missed a leg of beef, it laid outside, on the block, after I had served my customers I looked round to see if all my meat was right, I missed the leg of beef from off the block, I looked and saw two women together, one had got a leg of beef wrapped up in a cloth, with the knuckle just out of the cloth, I directly charged her with it. I took the cloth off the leg of beef, and saw my mark upon it, I brought her back to the shop, and she did not deny but what she took it off the block. I am positive it is my beef.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming by the court, a woman asked me if I would accept of it.

GUILTY , aged 29.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120219-42

254. WILLIAM DAVIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of February , three ounces weight of silver, value 15 s. the property of Charles Hayward .

CHARLES HAYWARD . I am an upholsterer ; the prisoner was my errand boy ; the silver was taken off a knife case, the handle and the lock.

Q. What age is the boy - A. He says himself he is more than fourteen.

MR. SMART. I am a goldsmith. The prisoner offered me some silver for sale. It is the handles of a knife case, or of some furniture, he said his father was a broker; it was quite black; when he came the second time he brought a note, which he wrote himself, and signed his father's name. This is the silver.

Prosecutor. It is my silver, it fits the different parts of a knife case.

GUILTY , aged 11.

Judgment respited .

The Jury recommended the prisoner to the Philanthropic Society.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120219-43

255. ISABELLA RICHARDS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of January , a set of tent bed-furniture, value 2 l. three pillows, value 16 s. six blankets, value 26 s and three yards of cotton, value 3 s. the property of John Long .

JOHN LONG . I am a wine merchant , I keep an hotel called Long's Hotel . I missed these things on the 23d of January.

Q. Was the prisoner a servant of yours. - A. No. It is a house I have in Duke street, St. James's, a furnished house, the prisoner had the care of it, and on the 23d of January, the house being cleaned, I went to put up the furniture, and after doing up the drawing-room and the two back bed rooms, we found the prisoner gone, we looked over the things, we found a great many of them gone.

Q. Did you find them afterwards. - A. Yes, after she left the house on the 23d; on the Saturday her husband brought me the duplicates.

THOMAS NELSON . I am a pawnbroker. On the 5th of December the prisoner pawned a blanket, for three shillings; on the 7th a pillow for half a crown; on the 12th a curtain for twelve shillings; and a blanket for three shillings; on the 24th a curtain for twelve shillings; on the 29th a blanket for seven shillings; they were all pledged by the prisoner in the name of Isabella Richards.

Prisoner's Defence. I entirely leave it to the mercy of the court; I had them all under my care, I did not pledge them to defraud Mr. Long of his property, but to return them.

GUILTY , aged 48.

Confined Two Years in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120219-44

256. WILLIAM TAITE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of February , a watch, value 4 l. the property of Phillip Crogger .

PHILLIP CROGGER . I am a coachman .

Q. When did you lose your watch - A. On Thursday last, the 20th of February, William Taite came to see me as a friend.

Q. Where was your watch - A. Hanging by the right hand side of the fire place. The watch was in a little bag; I did not see the prisoner take it, I was not at home when the prisoner came, I traced the prisoner until the watch was found.

JAMES HULME . I am a pawnbroker. I have a watch that the prisoner pledged with me on Thursday last.

Prosecutor. It is my watch, my wife was at home.

MRS. CROGGER. All I know, the watch was in the room three minutes before the prisoner came in my back room. I was washing in the other room.

Prisoner's Defence. Distress drove me to it.

The prisoner called one witness who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Judgment respited till next sessions .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120219-45

257. THOMAS KEYS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of January , a shirt, value 4 s. the property of Francis Clark .

FRANCIS CLARK . I am a carpenter , I live at Hackney . I lost my shirt on Friday last, it was taken off the line.

MARY RILEY . I am a washer-woman. On Friday last, about one o'clock, I saw the prisoner standing near Mr. Clark's house at Hackney, I saw him attempt twice, to get over into his garden, he was prevented by the children; afterwards he jumped over, and took the shirt off the line, I called out and pursued him, and a butcher took him, he threw the shirt down.

JAMES HERRIN . On Friday afternoon, about one

o'clock, I heard somebody cry out stop thief, I saw the prisoner jump off Mr. Clark's paling, he ran away, I pursued him; he left the shirt in the garden, when he found Mrs. Riley saw him.

Prisoner's Defence. I never touched the shirt.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Confined Six Calendar Months in the House of Correction , and whipped in jail .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120219-46

258. WILLIAM HENRY BLANEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of January , four yards of oil cloth, value 30 s. the property of William Hall .

WILLIAM HALL . I keep a broker's shop in Titchbourne-street .

Q. Where did you lose your oil cloth - A. From the door. I lost it on Thursday last, I was down stairs in the kitchen, my wife came to the area, and told me a man had stolen a roll of oil cloth, and he had taken up Piccadilly; I immediately pursued the prisoner; I looked up Titchbourne-street, I saw him crossing from the right to the left, with the roll of oil-cloth on his shoulder; I immediately ran up the street, I saw the prisoner turn into Gibson's court, as soon as he heard my footsteps behind him, he threw the oil-cloth off his shoulder, and ran into Castle-street; I followed him, and just as I had got up to him an officer was coming up the court, and at the same time he run into the Constable's Arms. This is the oil cloth, it is my property, I am positive of it.

BENJAMIN JOHNSON . The prisoner is the man I stopped.

Prisoner's Defence. In Titchbourne-street a man said if I would carry the oil-cloth to the White Bear in Piccadilly, he would give me a shilling.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120219-47

259. MARY JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of February , eighteen yards of ribbon, value 4 s. the property of Samuel Oliver .

SAMUEL OLIVER. I am a linen draper , 33, Aylesbury-street, Clerkenwell . On the 10th of February, between three and four o'clock, the prisoner came into the shop and asked for some black ribbon, I shewed it her, and as I was turning my head to look for the scissars to cut it off, I observed the prisoner take this piece of ribbon in her hand, and convey it under her clothes, I took no notice; I put the drawer of one side, she said, put up my ribbon, and take my money, and let me be off; I went up to her and said, you have taken a piece of ribbon, I charge you with it: I said, John, fetch a constable; she seemed confused, and the piece of ribbon dropped from under her clothes. I believe the prisoner was intoxicated at the time.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120219-48

260. SARAH BONE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of February , a pewter quart pot, value 1 s. and two pewter pint pots, value 1 s. the property of James Farr .

JAMES FARR . I keep a public-house , the Mason's Arms, in Upper Berkeley-street .

Q. When did you lose these pots. - A. On this day week. Thomas Large brought the prisoner to me, I took the pots from her myself.

THOMAS LARGE . I saw the prisoner go into 48, Upper Berkeley-street, and bring these pots out of the passage, she put them into her apron, she ran to the corner of Adams's Mews, there I stopped her.

Prosecutor. They are my pots. I took them out of her apron. This is an aggravated case. She had her husband following her that morning with a basket, I suppose to take them from her.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence.

GUILTY , aged 32.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120219-49

261. JAMES LAND was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of January , a copper, value 1 l. the property of William Ayton . And JOHN LLOYD , and ELEANOR LLOYD for feloniously receiving, on the same day, the same copper, they knowing it to be stolen .

WILLIAM AYTON . I keep an ironmongers and braziers shop , in the Harrow Road .

Q. On the 9th of January did you put out any copper in the front area - A. I did, a copper and a boiler, between three and four o'clock; I looked there before four o'clock, it was gone, it was there after three, I afterwards saw the copper at six o'clock in the evening, at the prisoner Lloyd's.

ANN BOLTON . Q. Where did you live on the 9th of January - A. I lived at No. 3, facing of Lloyd's house, on the 9th of January. I was there that day to assist to wash.

Q. At any time in the day did the prisoner, Land, bring any thing into the house - A. Yes, about four o'clock he brought in a copper.

Q. Was there any body in the shop - A. No. John Lloyd was not at home; Eleanor Lloyd was in the parlour, Land called her from the back parlour, and whispered to her; he had a copper on his head; he went to the back premises, and put it down; he then went away, and she came in; I said to her, I am sure them things are stolen, by the manner they are brought in, she said, mind your business, that is nothing to you. Lloyd, the man, returned home at six o'clock, Land called at Lloyd's house two or three times.

Q. At six o'clock did Lloyd go out - A. He came home at six o'clock, and he went out a little time, he returned with the prisoner, Land.

Q. What part of the house were they in when they returned - A. In the shop. Land stopped about ten minutes, they all went backwards together. I saw no money pass.

Mr. Knapp. Have you been acquainted with the Lloyd's any time - A. About two or three years.

Q. So Lloyd was not at home when the copper was brought - A. No, not till six o'clock.

Q. Had you ever any quarrel with the Lloyd's - A. No.

Q. Were not Lloyd's girls witnesses against you - A. Not as I know off.

Q. And you were never at Marlborough-street - A. Yes, I was there.

Q. There was a charge made against you there, was there not. - A. Yes, about three one pound notes.

Q. What became of that charge - A. I paid the money, and it was all done away. I found them in the street.

JOHN BOWLES . I am a constable of Paddington. I and my brother constable searched Lloyd's house, I found this copper in an inclosed place in the yard, there was nothing else there but a crow bar, and some fowls at roost.

Prosecutor. That is my copper.

SAMUEL WILLIAM TIAL . I apprehended the prisoner Land, under the bedstead in his uncle's house at Brentford.

Land's Defence. I am innocent of what I am brought here for, that girl will swear anything.

Eleanor Lloyd 's Defence. My mother and father were not at home when the man brought the copper in; I was in the shop weighing some old lead; Ann Bolton was in the parlour.

John Lloyd 's Defence. I am innocent of the charge, I was not at home, nor my wife; I knew nothing of it until my child took me in the washhouse, nor I know nothing of the man that brought it in.

Land called two witnesses who gave him a good character.

LAND GUILTY , aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

JOHN LLOYD GUILTY , aged 44.

Transported for Seven Years .

ELEANOR LLOYD GUILTY , aged 13.

Confined Six Calendar Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120219-50

262. JOHN NORTON was indicted for feloniously making an assault, in the King's highway, upon Robert Cole , and taking from his person, and against his will, two bank notes, value 1 l. each .

JOHN NORTON was indicted for another highway robbery, on the 3d of August , and taking from Robert Cole , two bank notes, and a bank note, value 10 l.

And a robbery in a dwelling house, and taking from Robert Cole two ten pound bank notes .

Mr. Alley. counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120219-51

263. GEORGE HENRY FRANCIS , THOMAS ROCHESTER , and JOHN CRANE SALT , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of January , two hundred pound weight of beef, value 6 l. 6 s. the property of John Peasegood .

JOHN PEASEGOOD . I am a butcher in Wapping-street .

Q. Do you know these three persons at the bar - A. I was not present when two of the prisoners came to my man, to serve the ship with beef, it was on the 10th of January.

GEORGE WOOD . I am a servant to Mr. Peasegood. On the 10th of January, about one o'clock, Francis and Rochester came into my master's shop, and inquired the price of beef, and said it was for the ship, the ship was laying at Deptford, Captain Scolly, they agreed for the price, and said, they would come bye and bye, when the boat was up, which they did. They returned about five o'clock.

Q. Did Salt come with them - A. No, Francis came alone, between four and five o'clock, he ordered me to weigh a quarter of beef, and take it down to the boat, the price was agreed for three guineas a hundred, I weighed it, and took it down to the boat at Execution Dock, it was two hundred weight, I delivered it to a black man in the boat, I never saw the beef again, nor the boat.

Q. You never saw Salt I suppose - A. No.

Q. Now whether Salt was concerned in this you do not know. - A. No.

Q. When was this beef to be paid for - A. It was not agreed, they gave their address, Scott and Palmer, 51, Great Hermitage-street. I parted with the beef, expecting to be paid for it.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120219-52

264. WILLIAM STEWARD was indicted for that he, on the 2d of November , had in his custody and possession, divers forged and counterfeited bank notes, for the payment of two pound, he knowing them to be forged and counterfeited .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120219-53

265. JOHN COOPER was indicted for that he, on the 10th of January , had in his custody and possession divers forged and counterfeited bank notes, for the payment of two pound, he knowing them to be forged and counterfeited .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded.

GUILTY .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120219-54

266. THOMAS COLLICOTT was indicted for that he, on the 24th of October , feloniously did forge and counterfeit a certain mark provided and used in pursuance of a certain act of parliament made and passed in the reign of King George the Third, with intent to defraud his Majesty .

SECOND COUNT - with uttering and vending a certain paper with a forged and, counterfeit mark thereon.

AND ANOTHER COUNT - calling it a stamp instead of a mark, which said certain mark or stamp was used in sequence of a certain act of parliament, and allowed to be used under the authority of the statute in that case made and provided, with intent to defraud his Majesty.

And charged in another indictment, for that he, on the 30th of October , feloniously did forge and counterfeit a certain mark provided and used in pursuance of a certain act of parliament, thereby to cheat and defraud his Majesty.

SECOND COUNT - selling and vending a certain other paper with a counterfeit mark thereupon, provided to be used in pursuance of a certain act of parliament, with intent to defraud his Majesty, he knowing the same to be forged.

ELIZABETH CARVER . Q. I believe you have the management of a medicine shop under the Royal Exchange - A. Yes.

Q. Is that in the city of London - A. Yes, it is.

Q. Do you know the prisoner. - A. Yes.

Q. I believe you know he keeps a medicine shop in Oxford Road.

Q. In the month of October last did he apply to you to purchase any of Dr. Jebb's pills. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you give him any order. - A. I gave him an order for half a dozen boxes of Dr. Jebb's anti-billions pills.

Q. Do you know who sent them, or who brought them to you - A. I do not, I think it was a boy.

Q. Did you make any entery in the book, is that your hand writing it is on the 24th of October, cash paid Collicott, twelve shillings and nine pence - A. I made the payment upon the delivery of the pills.

Q. At this time had you any other of Dr. Jebb's pills - A. Not to my knowledge.

Q. Do you recollect Mr. France of the stamp office coming to you - A. Yes, I delivered to Mr. France three boxes of the pills.

Q. Previous to your delivering them did you make any mark upon them - A. Yes, I did.

Q. Look at these three boxes, and say whether they are the boxes - A. Yes, they are just in the same state as when I received them, they are past of the six that I received.

Q. When Mr. France came to you had you any other of Dr. Jebb's pills - A. No other.

Q. Do you know who is the proprietor of Dr. Jebb's anti-billions pills - A. Mr. Collicott, I had them from him.

Mr. Alley. I want to know how you can undertake to say that these three boxes that were found in your possession were three that you had of the prisoner - A. Yes, I can.

Q. Have you searched your shop from the top to the bottom to see whether there is any more of Jebb's anti-billions pills - A. I can say to the best of my knowledge there are no more.

Q. Have you searched the shop from the top to the bottom - A. I did, when Mr. France was there, and I could not find any more.

Q. When was it you gave the prisoner the order - A. I gave him the order, he has served the shop a long time.

Q. Had he served your shop before - A. Yes.

Court. With these pills. - A. Yes.

Mr. Alley. Q. You had no suspicion at this time that he was doing wrong, or else you would not have dealt with him - A. Certainly not.

Q. Therefore, dealing with him in the ordinary course of your trade, you took no particular remarks of the boxes, he lives in Oxford Road I understand - A. Yes.

Q. This your house is in the city of London.

Q. Who were the things delivered by, perhaps you cannot tell that these things were ever in his house at all - A. No.

Q. You cannot tell who brought them to your house. - A. I cannot, I had an order for one of the boxes, and I gave Mr. Collicott an order for half a dozen boxes.

Mr. Arabin. Q. Why Madam, you having an order for one or more boxes, you gave an order for half a dozen - A. I do not order more at a time.

Q. Had you the means of supplying one or two boxes without applying to Mr. Collicott - A. I had not.

Q. Had you ever purchased Dr. Jebb's anti-billious pills of any other person but the prisoner at the bar - A. Never to my knowledge.

Q. When Mr. France came to your house, did you in his presence make a strict search for these pills - A. I did.

Q. I understood you to say that the pills were in the same state when brought to your house as they are now - A. Yes.

Court. How long have you dealt with Mr. Collicott for these pills - A. Two or three years.

Q. Did you ever deal with any body else for these pills than him - A. No, never.

Q. You had an order for one or two boxes, how long was that before you gave the order - A. I cannot tell. I believe it was a day or two before.

JOSEPH HARDING . Q. Were you in the service of the prisoner at the bar in October last. - A. Yes.

Q. Did he keep in October last a shop in Oxford Street for the sale of quack medicines - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember in the month of October taking a small parcel to a shop in the Exchange - A. Yes, a shop kept by the last witness, I delivered the parcel into her hand, she paid me twelve shillings and nine pence for it.

Q. From whom did you receive that parcel - A. From Mr. Collicott at his house in Oxford Street.

Q. What directions did he give you when he gave you the parcell - A. To take it to Mrs. Randall's.

Mr. Gurney. Q. (to Mrs. Curver.) Your shop goes by the name of Randall's - A. Yes.

Q. (to Harding.) Did you know what that parcel contained - A. No, it was a small parcel, I took the money to Mr. Collicott, and gave it to him.

Q. How long have you been in his service - A. About seven weeks, and I had taken one other parcel besides this.

Mr. Curwood. It was your daily practice to carry

out medicines, was it not - A. Yes.

Q. Will you undertake to swear that you have not been to Mrs. Carver's more than twice - A. Yes.

Q. At this time that you went you did not know what the parcel contained - A. No.

Q. You did not know the other time what the parcel contained - A. No, I did not.

Court. When you took the other parcel, did you receive more than twelve shillings or less - A. I think it was more.

Q. Which of the parcels did you carry first - A. The one that I recived twelve shillings for I took last.

THOMAS FRANCE . Q. I believe you are assistant solicitor to the stamp office - A. I am.

Q. Do you recollect going to Mrs. Carver's house - A. Yes, on the 5th of December I went to Randall's shop at the Royal Exchange, I enquired if she sold Dr. Jebb's anti-billious pills, she said she did; I asked for a box, seeing where she took it from, I put my hand into the shop, and took two others, I asked her whether she had any more of the same sort, and assisted her in searching, she assured me she had none.

Q. Did you and Mrs. Carver search for more - A. We did, both of us, but I did not find any more; I told her it was of consequence, and in my presence she marked the box as that we found. These are the three boxes that I received; I desired her to mark them.

Q. I believe you thought proper to search the prisoner's house - A. Yes, that was on the 6th of December. I took an officer and went to the house, the prisoner was not at home; I saw Mrs. Collicott, and Miss King, I asked her if the prisoner was not at home, and I asked her if she sold these boxes of pills, she said she did; I assisted the officer in searching the house; I asked for a light, Miss King went down for a light, at the time that she left the room for a light, she had an apron on her, she staid about five minutes, and returned without a light, and without her apron.

Q. Did you afterwards see any thing produced in an apron - A. I accompanied Vickrey in the search, he left me about a second, he produced an apron, containing some stamps; I searched again on the 10th of December, I accompanied Vickrey and went into the back warehouse; I knew the circumstance of Jones of Bristol; I searched, and in the shop I found a quantity of pieces of paper with Jones, Bristol, upon it, I picked up a great many, and Vickrey picked up a great many.

JOHN VICKREY . I am an officer of Bow Street office. On the 6th of December, I went to the prisoner's house with Mr. France, I searched the house; when Miss King went to get a light she had an apron on, she returned without a light or her apron; I discovered this apron in the coal hole in the front area, it contained these stamps that are now in it, I have no doubt it is the same apron, I apprehended the prisoner on the 8th of December, at Pell, in Somersetshire.

THOMAS LINLEY . Q. I believe you are a supervisor in the stamp office - A. Yes.

Q. I believe you have examined all this vast quantity of stamps - A. No.

Court. Upon looking at these boxes, you see the parts cut out - A. Yes.

Q. Can you tell from seeing these boxes, that that which now remains was never a genuine stamp - A. They never were.

MISS KING. Q. Are these the kind of stamps that were in the house when Mr. Collicott was at home - A. Yes.

Q. Had you assisted in putting them on - A. Yes, by Mr. Collicott's directions, he directed me to cut out the words Jones, Bristol, and to paste them on the bottle, and the vacant part to be filled up either by sealing wax or wafer.

Q. Is that one found in your apron the same as Mr. Collicott directed you to do them - A. Yes, the vacant part is filled up with a seal, if it was a box instead of a bottle, it was filled up by pasting a label over it.

Q. How soon after you came back to the prisoner's house on the 21st of October did you see these kind of stamps - A. It might be a day or two, but it did not exceed that.

Q. By whom was your attention called to them - A. By Mr. Collicott, he told me that he intended to make use of them in future, to the best of my recollection those are the words he used then.

Q. Did you cut them out of these small sheets for use - A. Yes.

Q. After you came back to the prisoner's house do you remember any parcel being made up for Randall's at the Royal Exchange - A. Yes, I do.

Q. A parcel of Dr. Jebb's pills I mean - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember how many boxes there were. - A. I think half a dozen.

Q. Did you assist in pasting the stamps upon them. - A. I did, by Mr. Collicott's directions.

Q. Did you in that instance, as in others, cut out the centre, Jones, Bristol - A. I did.

Mr. Alley. The genuine ones have a crown and a ring round it, with the duty - A. Yes.

Q. (to Mr. Linley.) Have you the book of stamps here - A. I have the specimens taken from the books; these are part of the book of specimens.

Q. Is that a sheet of genuine stamps - A. It is. These are the stamps approved by the commissioners; and these are the first impressions made, which are reserved in our office as documents.

Q. In the first place, look at these sheets, except in the centre part, Jones, Bristol, is that an imitation of the genuine stamp - A. It is a good resemblance.

Q. If you were to see the whole of the words, Jones, Bristol, in the centre, instead of a crown, you would not take it for a genuine stamp - A. No.

Q. If the centre is cut out, or a seal upon it - A. Then I should take it myself, when I compare them together, there is so little difference.

Q. Look at these three, where there are labels, in the state in which they are do they appear to you to be imitations of the genuine stamp - A. A very good resemblance, it is such a resemblance as would impose upon any common purchaser, it might impose upon me, but on my examining these boxes, they have not the genuine stamps upon them.

Court. If you had not have been called upon to

have examined them, if you had gone to have bought a box, you would have bought them - A. Yes, I should have bought them without a scruple.

Q. Those parts that are exposed to the eye, would impose upon any ordinary observer - A. Yes, it would pass any where.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 42.

Of uttering, knowing it to be forged.

London jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18120219-55

267. LYON LEVY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of January , two hundred and twelve yards of flannel, value 12 l. the property of Thomas Archer .

SECOND COUNT - stating it to be the property of Robert Ranyard and William Geary .

WILLIAM GEARY . Q. Did you pack up any goods to send into Yorkshire - A. My porter did. I saw the truss packed up, there was flannel in that truss, with other goods, it was delivered to the porter for the purpose of being taken to the Norfolk waggon, on the 5th of December.

WILLIAM BROWN . I am a porter to Messrs. Geary and Ranyard, I assisted in packing up the truss, there was flannell in it, four or five pieces; I took the truss to the waggon office in Sun-street ; I delivered it to a person in the yard.

MRS. SCOTT. I am the book-keeper to Thomas Archer 's waggon. I received the goods from the last witness, I wrote to the gentleman to whom the goods were consigned to, I have the entry I made at the time I received the goods.

(The entry read.)

7th of January, 1812, I received a bale of goods marked S. S, a truss weighing a hundred and a half, I saw the truss put on the top of the waggon, S. and S. Davey, Norfolk. That was the direction on it.

Q. What time did the waggon leave your yard - A. About a quarter before five in the afternoon, on the 7th of January; on the next morning I went to the office, and received information of the waggon being robbed of that bale of goods.

JAMES COTEO . I am the driver of this waggon, Archer's Norfolk waggon. On the 7th of January, I recollect binding this truss down safe; I set off between four and five.

Q. How far did you go before you missed it - A. About Woodford. When I arrived there I found the rope cut on the off side, and the skewers pulled out, I missed this truss, it was a very dark night. I saw the truss in Whitechapel.

JOHN MILLER . I am an officer. In consequence of information, I went, in company with Griffiths and Dalton, to search the prisoner's house, about six o'clock in the evening.

Q. Was the prisoner by at the time - A. No, he was not. I found a piece of flannel in a hole in the wall behind some laths, I called to my fellow officers below to bring the prisoner up, I asked him whose flannel that was, the prisoner said it was his. I searched a room on the two pair of stairs, I found two pieces and a half of flannel more.

Q. Whereabouts was the prisoner's house - A. In Goodman's yard. The prisoner said, some man or men brought the flannel there.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18120219-56

268. GEORGE CLARIDGE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of January , two saws value 5 s. the property of Roger Lane .

ROGER LANE . I live in Haberdasher's place, Hoxton .

Q. Did you lose two saws - A. Yes, on the 27th of last January; I missed them on the 28th, the following morning, I had seen them on the 27th, when I left work; on the next morning, I saw them at Mr. Essex's, a pawnbrokers in Aldersgate-street.

JOHN LONG . I live with Mr. Essex.

Q. Did you take in a saw at any time - A. Yes, on Tuesday the 28th, between eight and nine in the morning.

Q. Who brought it - A. I believe the prisoner to be the man; I have some little doubt.

Q. (to Lane.) Do you know the prisoner - A. Yes, he was a sawyer to Mr. Edges.

Prisoner's Defence. May it please your Lordship, I am not guilty of the charge in the indictment, I was at Greenwich, or on the road, when the pawnbroker said I pledged that saw; I left London at seven o'clock, and arrived at ten minutes before nine, I have subpoened witnesses who were with me that morning.

GEORGE BAGGERLEY . Did you see the prisoner on the morning of the 28th of last January - A. Yes, on Tuesday at eight o'clock in the morning, he was going towards Greenwich.

SAMUEL ROLF . I am a soldier. I saw the prisoner at eight o'clock on Rotherhithe wall, going towards Greenwich.

GEORGE BAILEY . I was with the two other witnesses, I saw the prisoner going towards Greenwich, at eight o'clock, he was two miles from Aldersgate-street.

Q. Did he turn and go towards London - A. No.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18120219-57

269. THOMAS GIBBONS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of February , seven pounds weight of brass, value 3 s. the property of Jukes Colson , John Henry Pelly , and Paul Malin .

JOHN EADE . Q. You are a person employed by the prosecutors to guard their yard at Poplar - A. Yes. On the 8th of February in the evening some of the men had left their work, the prisoner rang the bell, he said, John; I went and opened the house; he said he wanted his jacket, when he had got this jacket, he took this piece of brass out of his jacket pocket, and put it between his legs; I said, what have you got there, and took the brass from between his legs I was going to make a snap at him, he run away. I apprehended him on Sunday morning. I kept the brass in my possession.

JUKES COLSON. Q. Who are your partner s - A. John Henry Pelly , and Paul Malin. This is the same sort of brass that was on our premises.

GUILTY , aged 14.

Whipped in jail and discharged.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18120219-58

270. JOHN COOK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of February , eleven fowls, value 12 s. and six ducks, value 3 s. the property of Charles Elliott .

CHARLES ELLIOTT . I live at Tottenham . On the 7th of February, between three and four o'clock, I was awoke by my dog, in a yard that adjoins my premises, I got up and dressed myself, I saw a light going the road from Stamford-hill, I came to the front of the house, and called out watch; the person said it was not the watch, he said his name was Soul; I told him to stop at the back gate until I came down, I wanted his light; I let him in, and searched the premise, I brought a musquet with me; my fowls were placed at the back part of the coach house. When I got to the coach-house door, I found the padlock off, and the door pulled too by the string; I opened the door, and found the prisoner standing towards the front of the coach-house, and by the side of him was a bag, it was filled with fowls and ducks; we took him in custody; he made no resistance; I told him to stand still, I searched him. I brought him to the front of the house, the watchmen were there; I delivered him into the custody of the watchmen. We then examined the bag, there was, I believe, eight fowls and three ducks in the bag, and he had four fowls in his blue apron; the officer took them out; all their necks were broke.

Q. Whose fowls were these - A. Mine, I examined them all; I sould swear to them all.

Prisoner. Q. Was your place locked up - A. I am not certain whether it was or not.

GUILTY , aged 50.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18120219-59

271. JAMES FORD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of February , a tin can, value 2 s. and two gallons of oil, value 10 s. the property of James Smethurst .

HORATIO TAYLOR . I am shopman to Mr. James Smethurst in Bond-street , he keeps a lamp and oil-shop .

Q. Did you lose a can of oil on the 3d of this month - A. Yes, I missed it on the 4th.

Q. From what part of the shop did you miss it. - A. It was put against the private door, I had seen it there about half past eight on the Monday evening.

Q. What time on the 4th did you miss it - A. About half past nine.

Q. Did you see it afterwards - A. I saw a can at the watchhouse; it might be at eleven that morning.

Q. Do you know whether that can you saw at the watchhouse was the can you saw in the shop - A. It corresponded, and the oil corresponded.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. Yes, he is one of our porters, and we are in the constant habit of selling cans of the same make, and oil of the same quality continually; it was sold, and set aside for delivery on the 4th; it was going to Queen Elms, it was too far to go that evening.

JOHN GILL . I am a watchman. On the night of the 3d of February, before nine o'clock, I saw the prisoner bring this cann down and hide it in the dunghill in Grosvenor Mews; after he had planted it there, my fellow servant asked him where he had been too, and directly after he was gone, I went to the dunghill, and found a can of oil; I covered it up again, the same as he left it.

Q. How far is the mews from Mr. Smethurst - A. About fifty yards. He came again and took the can from the dung-heap, and then I seized him, when it was in his possession; I took him to the watchhouse with the can of oil.

THOMAS SUNKINS . I am a patrol. I saw the prisoner take the oil can from the dung-heap. He was seized by Gill and me immediately.

- CLARK. I am a constable. I have had the can in my possession ever since.

Q. (to Mr. Taylor.) Is that can like what you lost or not - A. Yes it is.

GUILTY , aged 27.

Confined Two Years in the House of Correction and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18120219-60

272. THOMAS THACKER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of January , a great coat, value 12 s. the property of Thomas Grimstone .

THOMAS GRIMSTONE . I am a constable and waterman of the Thames Police .

Q. Did you lose a great cost any time - A. Yes. On the 11th of January I hung it up on a rope in the office; our watchman being ill, I was sent down to look after the boats, between the hours of three and five, I left my great coat hung up, and when I came back, I missed my coat.

Q. Had you seen any thing of the prisoner that day. - A. Not to my knowledge.

Q. Who did the great coat belong to. - A. To the police office, it was entrusted to me to wear it as long as I am in the office.

GEORGE WEBSTER . I am a waterman and constable of the Thames police; I was in the office from three to five, on the 11th of January, I saw Grimstone hang the coat on the rope; the prisoner was laying upon a locker under the rope.

Q. Did you see the prisoner go away - A. I did not. When Grimstone came in, the prisoner and the coat was gone.

ROBERT WALKER . I am a pawnbroker, a servant to Mr. Mount, in Old Gravel-lane. On the 11th of January the prisoner pawned this coat with me for twelve shillings; he pledged it in the name of Richard Davis .

Grimstone. It is the great coat I lost at the office, I

know it is my coat.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18120219-61

273. JOHN MEREAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 31st of December , two sheets, value 8 s. and a pillow case, value 2 s. the property of Peter Marshall , in a lodging room in his dwelling-house .

MARGARET MARSHALL . My husband's name is Peter Marshall , I let a back garrett to the prisoner, at three shillings a week; he entered the lodgings about the 28th of December, he remained in it five months, and then went away; he paid me no rent.

Q. How soon after did you see him - A. I did not see him afterwards until he was taken.

Q. What property did you miss - A. Two sheets They were on the bed in his room.

THOMAS PALMER. I am a pawnbroker. I produce two sheets, pledged by the prisoner on the 31st of December, for seven shillings.

Prosecutrix. They are mine. They are marked P. M. M.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18120219-62

274. EDWARD PROCTER was indicted for that he being declared a bankrupt, and having surrendered to be examined before the commissioners, did not fully and truly disclose all his effects and personal estate, but did conceal part of his personal estate, to wit, more than the value of 20 l. a gelding, value 25 l. and a mare, value 25 l.

GEORGE BOCKEY . Q. You are foreman to Messrs. Dowlings - A. Yes, to Thomas Dowling and James Dowling ; they are corn factors, Bank-side.

Q. Do you know whether they had any dealings with the prisoner - A. I am certain of their furnishing him with corn.

Q. In what situation was the prisoner - A. He belonged to the Belle Savage coach office, as far as I understand.

Q. Can you tell me, from your own recollection, whether, in the month of January, he was furnished with any quantity of corn - A. There were ten quarters of corn. There is the returned notes. I went many times to the prisoner, the prisoner signed the tickets, admitting that he had received the corn. I was present when James Hyam delivered the corn.

MR. HOBBS. I am book-keeper to the Belle Savage, Ludgate Hill. I was Mr. Procter's bookkeeper in the year 1810. Mr. Procter was coachmaster, to run the stages, and take in horses.

Q. That is, to find horses for the stages. - A. Yes.

Q. Who was it furnished sustenance for the horses - A. Mr. Procter.

Q. The corn that Mr. Procter had for the sustenance of the horses, from where did he get that from - A. From Mr. Dowling, Willow Street, Bankside, Southwark.

Q. Do you know, during the time the corn was provided by Messrs. Dowlings at the desire of the prisoner, what quantity it was - A. The corn was brought in from Mr. Dowling in different quantities, ten quarters at a time, what price I cannot say, the corn was put up in the granary for the horses in the coach concern.

Q. Do you know of a horse and a mare that the prisoner had previous to the bankruptcy - A. The mare I know, a bay mare, it was an aged mare and fired, I knew nothing at all about the horse.

WILLIAM ANDERSON . Q. You are a guard to the Salisbury coach. - A. Yes, in the year 1810.

Q. Do you recollect a horse and a mare that you drove in that coach - A. Perfectly well, a large brown horse with two white legs, the horse was aged, and the mare the same.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18120219-63

275. JOHN SUTTON was indicted for feloniously forging, on the 20th of December , an order for the payment of 160 l.

AND OTHER COUNTS - for uttering and publishing as true a like forged order to defraud Thomas Jackson .

AND ANOTHER COUNT - to defraud Alexander Davison and William Middleton Newel .

CHARLES HOLLOWAY . I am a clerk to Messrs. Davison and Company, they are banker s.

Q. The names of the partners are Alexander Davison , William Middleton Newell , and George Sinclair . - A. I was introduced to the prisoner at the Robin-hood public house, on a check having been presented by another person, I was then introduced to the prisoner at the Robin-hood public-house, Charles Street, St. James's Square; I asked him from whom he received that check, which was forged; at that time having reference to the first check, he denied the forgery. I told him he must accompany me to the banking-house, he made some hesitation, and said, he must go up stairs and put on his things; he then accompanied me to the banking house, I introduced him to the chief cashier as the person from whom I had the check, he was then told it was a forgery by Mr. Allen, he declared it was a good check, that he received it from his brother-in-law Mr. Jackson.

THOMAS JACKSON . Q. Have you the draft upon which this charge is framed. - A. I had it some time ago, what is become of it upon my oath I do not know, I have looked every where for it, and cannot find it.

Court. Unless the draft is produced, how can we tell whether it corresponds with the tenor of the draft in the indictment.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18120219-64

276. JONATHAN THOMPSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of January , two boots, value 1 l. the property of Thomas Lee .

THOMAS LEE was called and not appearing in court, his recognisance was ordered to be estreated .

NOT GUILTY.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18120219-65

277. ANN HILL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of January , two gowns, value 1 l. two petticoats, value 4 s. and two shifts, value 3 s. five handkerchiefs, value 2 s. 6 d. one shirt, value 2 s. and a pillow case, value 1 s. the property of Joseph Yeasford , in the dwelling-house of James Patrick .

ANN YEASFORD . My husband's name is Joseph Yeasford ; we live at No. 14, Park-street, Westminster .

Q. Did you lose any goods out of your house on the 16th of January - A. Yes. Ann Hill came to me one morning, and said my box was broken open, and all my things were gone.

Q. Where was your box - A. In my room where I lodge; I have lodged there eleven years; she lodged with me; I went with her to my box, I found my box had been broken open.

Q. What was gone out of it - A. Two shifts, a shirt of my husband's, four caps, five handkerchiefs, two waistcoats, five towels, and a pair of shoes; I always kept my box locked.

Q. How long before you missed these things had you seen them in your box - A. On the Sunday when I cleaned myself; she came to me on the Friday morning, I was out washing.

Q. How long had the prisoner lodged with you - A. Eleven weeks; she made straw platt for bonnets.

Q. What is your husband - A. A soldier in the 1st regiment of foot guards; I go out a washing from Monday morning to Saturday night.

Q. Did you ever get any of these things again - A. Mr. Gillmore has got them all in his possession; she owned to me that she had taken them out of my box; she asked me not to hurt her; I said, no, if the gentlemen would forgive her I would; she told me that my property was at the horse guards sutling-house the whole of them; she had not made away with one thing belonging to me; I and Mr. Gillmore went to the Horse Guards sutling-house; Mr. Coffin keeps the Horse Guards sutling-house, he had my things in his custody. Mr. Gillmore took them into his custody.

JAMES GILLMORE . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner on the 23d of January, I got the property from Mr. Coffin's. I have had them ever since.

THOMAS COFFIN . Q. Where did you get these things - A. On Thursday the 16th of January the prisoner brought these things to the bar window of the Horse Guards sutling-house I keep it; begging me not to let any one have them, unless she called for them herself, and on the 23d I gave them to Mr. Gillmore the officer.

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutrix has got some of my clothes at her house now.

GUILTY , aged 35.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction, and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18120219-66

278. WILLIAM WELLS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of December , two shirts, value 10 s. six cravats, value 12 s. four handkerchiefs, value 4 s. the property of John Green ; a coat, value 10 s. and eight papers of halfpence, value 2 l. the property of William Green , in the dwelling-house of John Green .

JOHN GREEN . I live at No. 11, Chapple-path, Somerstown, in the parish of St. Pancras . I keep a dwelling-house there. We lost a black coat; the linen belonged to a gentleman, it was in my place to be washed. The black coat was my brothers, William Green , and two pound in copper. I saw the copper on my brother's work board, he is a taylor . I am a cabinet maker; the prisoner is a taylor; the prisoner went away on Sunday the 29th; I never saw him after until I saw him in New Prison, Clerkenwell; I believe he was taken up for thieving brass candlesticks. That is the account he gave me; he in prison writ where he had pledged the things; I got the shirts, the shirts are worth five shillings each, the coat worth ten shillings; the prisoner gave me two handkerchiefs out of his pocket belonging to the same gentleman, he said he had sold one of the cravats for sixpence, in Mary-le-bone-lane.

Prisoner's Defence. I have nothing at all to say. I leave it to the mercy of the court.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18120219-67

279. WILLIAM WELLS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of January , a coat, value 34 s. three waistcoats, value 15 s. a shirt, value 4 s. a pair of trowsers, value 7 s. the property of William Hoare , in the dwelling-house of William Patterson .

WILLIAM HOARE . Q. Do you know of Mr. Patterson's house being robbed on the 19th of January - A. Yes; I lived there; it is in Mary-le-bone parish.

Q. Does he rent the house there - A. Yes, his name is William Patterson .

Q. Were you at home at the time - A. No, I was not. I was the person that missed the property on Sunday 19th of January, about four in the afternoon.

Q. When had you seen it before - A. In the morning.

Q. What part of the house was it gone from - A. The three pair.

Q. Do you lodge up three pair of stairs - A. Yes, it was in the room in which I lodged; it was locked up in a box. I locked the box before I went out.

Q. Was your door locked or not - A. No.

Q. When you returned did you find your box broken open or not - A. My box was locked when I returned I saw some of my things again on the next Sunday following; I saw the coat at Mr. Benjamin's, Marybone-lane. I saw the prisoner at Shadwell office, I asked him what he had done with

my coat, he said he had sold it to Benjamin in Marybone-lane for eight shillings; he told me the rest of the property was pledged in Church-street, Grosvenor-square.

Q. Did you know the prisoner before - A. Yes, he worked with me three days.

Q. Had he been up in your room before - A. Not to my knowledge.

JOSEPH BENJAMIN . I am a salesman.

Q. Did you receive from the prisoner a coat - A. Yes; the prisoner came to me for employment, I had none to give him; he is a taylor : he brought the coat on the 19th of January, about half after twelve; I gave him a pound for the coat that is as much at is worth; he said he sold it for distress; if he had not pleaded poverty I would not have bought it on a Sunday.

JAMES FOLKARD . I am a taylor; I bought the coat of Mr. Benjamin, I agreed with a good deal to do to have the coat for one pound eighteen shillings; the coat is worth two pounds to a wearer.

Prosecutor. I know the coat by the make of the collar, I have worn it; I bought the cloth myself; I gave seventeen shillings a yard; there is two yards of it; the prisoner had the trowsers on, I did not take them from him.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18120219-68

280. JOHN BAKER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of January , two shirts, value 10 s. two tablecloths, value 2 l. 1 s. the property of John Harris , in his dwelling-house .

JOHN HARRIS . I am an optician , I live in Hyde-street, St. George's, Bloomsbury .

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. I do not. The washerwoman delivered in my linen on the Saturday night.

Q. This property that is in the indictment you delivered to the washerwoman - A. I did.

Q. When did you miss any of it - A. I heard of it on the Saturday evening, and then the whole property was taken from off the stairs, it had been left on the stairs, I saw it on the stairs; Ann Perrin , my servant left it on the stairs.

GEORGE ADAMS . I am a brass-turner; I am an apprentice to Mr. Harris. The prisoner came to our house on the 18th of January and enquired for a person of the name of Nash; this was at three o'clock; I requested him to come in; I called Nash down, he came and spoke to them; they went out together; Nash returned in about three quarters of an hour; the prisoner came again about a quarter to seven, and enquired for Nash; I asked him to come in and shut the door; I called Nash and lit my lamp to give light to the parcel. I returned with Nash; the street-door was open and the lamp blown out; the parcel was gone when I came down.

Prisoner. Was not there a young woman at the door with you at the time - A. I did not see any woman.

ANN PAINE . I keep a chandler's shop about a quarter of a mile from Chelsea. The prisoner came to my house on the 18th of January, at half past seven o'clock in the evening, he asked me if my husband was within; I told him he was not; he went out, and returned again in about five minutes; he asked me if he should leave the bundle; I looked at him, and said, yes, if he liked.

Q. Did you know the prisoner at the time - A. I never saw him to my knowledge in my life; he left me the bundle; he asked me if I would lend him a pound on it, I innocently let him ten shillings in halfpence, and ten shillings in silver, and he went away, and then on the Monday following he sent for four shillings more, I refused him. The officer came afterwards and claimed the bundle; Townshend and Perry came and claimed the bundle.

Q. Are you sure the prisoner is the man that came to you - A. I have no doubt about it.

- PERRY. I am an officer. I produce the things.

Prosecutor. This tablecloth I had lent by my mother, there is the initials T C H, which is the initials of my mother's and father's names.

Prisoner's Defence. My lord and gentlemen of the Jury, when I had served my apprenticeship I became acquainted with Mary Little , she is a married woman, and a common prostitute; she asked me to go to the prosecutor's house and ask for a person of the name of Nash; the servant put the candle on the stairs where there was a bundle; she said, Jack, there is something worth having; she blowed out the candle, and held up her apron; she told me to put the bundle into her lap; she took me to Mrs. Paine's; she asked her to lend a pound on these things, which she said she would; I came to my lodgings on the Monday when I was informed by her Mr. Harris was in pursuit of me.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18120219-69

281. WILLIAM HERBERT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of January , a handkerchief, value 6 s. the property of William George Motely , from his person .

WILLIAM GEORGE MOTELY . On the 22d of January I was coming through Lincoln's Inn-fields , between one and two o'clock; the handkerchief was taken from my pocket. I saw the prisoner and another boy run from me; the prisoner was stopped in Holborn; when I came up to him he had the handkerchief on his shoulder; the prisoner said, when I claimed the handkerchief, he did not take it. He was stopped by a person.

Q. Who stopped him - A. I cannot say.

Q. When did you miss your handkerchief - A. Not till a boy told me the person was running away that took my handkerchief, they saw him take it; the boy is not here; I could not find the boy.

Q. Do you know whether you had the handkerchief with you at Lincoln's Inn-fields - A. No, I do not. About half an hour before I felt, I had a handkerchief in my pocket.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence; called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18120219-70

282. MARY BENNET was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of February , a great coat, value 50 s. a shawl, value 1 s. and an apron, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of Thomas Butcher , in the dwelling house of William Johnson .

SARAH BUTCHER . I am the wife of Thomas Butcher ; we live in Yeoman's-row, Brompton, Kensington parish.

Q. Whose house is it - A. William Johnson 's, he lives in it, I lodge there, I live in the back parlour.

Q. Did you lose any thing on the 15th of this month - A. Yes, a great coat, a shawl, and an apron; they belong to me and my husband, they were taken from the back parlour from off my bed.

Q. What time did you miss them - A. About a quarter before twelve in the morning, from information I went after the prisoner, I asked her what that was she had before her; she said nothing, and I saw the coat hanging down, I brought her back, she did not seem to say any thing concerning the theft. I was at home and saw the things safe on the bed at eleven o'clock.

WILLIAM JOHNSON . Q. You keep this house - A. Yes. In consequence of an alarm I went out and assisted to bring the prisoner back.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence, nor called any witnesses to her character.

GUILTY, aged 54.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Confined one year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18120219-71

283. JAMES SETTREE , CHARLES WHEELER, alias WALKER , and EDWARD DROUET , were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 2nd of May , a heifer, value 30 l. the property of William Hailey .

SECOND COUNT. for like offence, only stating the property to belong to another person.

WILLIAM HAILEY . I am a carcass-salesman , in Newgate Market.

Q. Among other cattle had you three heifers, the property of Mr. Penlease - A. Yes.

Q. Describe these heifers - A. They were marked and numbered, No. 8, 9, 10, and the letter P upon each of them, on the right side on the rib.

Q. Did you see them on the afternoon of Wednesday the 1st of May - A. I did, at a field in Islington , the field is secured by pales and gates, and the gate locked.

Q. On the morning of the 2nd of May did you send up for any cattle that was in that field - A. I sent up for four cows by my boy, he goes by the name of Jack Straw , he fetched four of the cows first, and then I sent him up for one cow and one heifer, they were brought home and slaughtered; in the afternoon I went up to see them that remained in the field, that was about four o'clock, when I went up I found one of the heifers missing, marked P.

Q. What colour was that - A. It was a brindled colour heifer, the horns turned rather up; I came home then.

Q. How soon did you find the skin of the heifer - A. On the Tuesday following it was produced to me at the watchhouse Threadneedle-street.

WILLIAM TOLLOWAY . Q. You I believe are a slaughtering butcher - A. Yes, and Settree is a butcher .

Q. On the morning of Thursday, the 2nd of May, were you called up by any person - A. Yes, Settree called me up between five and six on Thursday the 2nd of May, he told me that he had got some sheep and lambs to kill for Mr. Mathews, St. John-street, and likewise for John Silvester , in Goswell-street, and a bullock to be killed at Mr. Newton's slaughterhouse in Goswell-street.

Q. Did he tell you who was to bring the bullock down to Mr. Newton's - A. He told me he expected the bullock there then, before that time, I got up and went with him; in going along King-street we went down to a public-house at Cow-cross, and enquired for three drovers, they were not there, they said they were just gone, he said he wanted Bill Kitchener , Drouet, and another.

Q. Did he give you the name of the third person - A. No, he did not.

Q. When you found they were gone where did you go to - A. We went to Smithfield, and found Bill Kitchener , Drouet, and Hookey; and Wheeler, alias Walker. Settre went up to them, and mentioned something that they were not up to their time; Kitchener and Drouet said the reason they had not done it, Jack Straw had been up with some beasts, they could not bring it down.

Q. That is, they could not get the bullock - A. Yes.

COURT. Which of them said that - A. Kitchener.

Q. Was Drouet and Hookey close to them when Kitchener said that - Yes, he desired Settree and me not to be out of the way, he would be sure to come.

Q. Why were not you and Settree to be out of the way - A. Because they wanted the bullock killed, I and Settree were butchers, the others were all drover s.

Q. Did you and Settree go to Mathews, St. John-street, to kill sheep and lambs - A. Yes; Settree went over to Mr. Mathews for a tray, when he came back, he said Bill and his mob are just gone up; by mob, I understood him and the other two men; we finished killing there, and went to go down to Mr. Silvester's, in Goswell-street, and in going down I turned home again to get my light, in my way I met Kitchener; he asked me where Settree was, I told him he was killing at Mr. Silvester's; he said it is odd he is now out of the way now I have brought it, he said he had got it close at hand, but he could not get it in the slaughtering-house himself unless the gates are opened, he said to me do go and get the gates opened; I went down, and Mr. Newton and his man were at the door, they opened the gates, and Bill Kitchener drove the heifer in.

Q. What kind of a heifer was it - A. A light brindled heifer with Herefordshire sort of horns, she was marked X O P on the near side. Afterwards Settree and me went down to Newton's, and we killed the heifer.

Q. Had it been at all agreed who should come and fetch the heifer away after it was killed - A. Drouet came as servant of the owner; he was there when it

was taken away.

Q. Who were by at the time it was taken away - A. Newton's men were by, there were none of the prisoners there but Drouet and Settree, Settree cut it up.

Q. Afterwards, did you reap of the produce - A. Yes. In the first place there was Bill Kitchener , me, Dronet, and Settree, we four met together, Drouet, me, and Kitchener, met at a public house near the spot on Saturday evening.

Q. How much money did it sell for - A. Twenty-eight pound eleven shillings and six-pence; Kitchener and Drouet said, as Hookey had not so much trouble as we had, there should be a pound a piece, four pound, taken out of the whole, that was to be given to a butcher coming to own the beast.

Q. What was to be done with the rest of the money - A. We went up to the Bull's head in the Layer; we all five met there, the money was divided; I had between five and six pounds for my share, Kitchener had the same, Drouet had more because he demanded a crown a piece off each man, he having come to own the beast; he took it of us three.

Q. How much had Wheeler - A. Four pounds. Wheeler was one of the party, he took the beef to Leadenhall. All five of us went to Leadenhall, Mr. Terry was the salesman; the fat of the heifer Settree and me took it to Mr. French's, Barbican. When I was taken up I told the story equally the same as I have now.

Mr. Alley. They have suffered you to be at large until this time. - A. I was in prison twenty-one weeks.

Q. How much had you for your share - A. Between five and six pounds.

Q. And you would like a smack of the reward, that would wind it up.

JOHN PARKER . Q. Do you go by the name of Jack Straw - A. Yes; I am a drover.

Q. On Thursday, the 2nd of May, were you sent down by your master to fetch some cows - A. Yes, I was twice.

Q. Do you know Kitchener - A. Yes, he sometimes helped me to fetch beasts out of the field, he is a drover.

Q. Do you know Drouet - A. He used to work in the market, and Wheeler worked in the market.

Q. On the morning that the heifer was lost, did either of these men help you out of the field with any beasts - A. Kitchener helped me down with four beast, I locked the gate myself.

Q. Then how was it managed that the heifer got away - A. I did not take the heifer out. When I went I found the gate unlocked; the cows were in a shed, and the heifer was in the shed with the cows, Kitchener went into the shed with me.

MRS. GOODS. I live at the Prison Bars, Goswell-street.

Q. In the month of May last did Tolloway lodge with you - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember his being called up on Thursday morning - A. Yes; a little before he was taken up, Settre called him up, I heard no more, he called Tolloway between four and six, I was washing.

WILLIAM NEWTON . Q. Have you got a slaughtering house in Goswell-street - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember a heifer being brought to your slaughterhouse on the morning of the 2nd of May last - A. Perfectly well, I remember it; Settre came twice to enquire if it had come, and afterwards Tolloway came and enquired if it had come, Settree and Tolloway killed it.

Q. Who came as the owner - A. On Friday, Drouet came and took away the offal, he said he was the servant to Mr. Barnes of Somers Town; I asked him why Mr. Barnes did not come, he said he was confined with the gout. On Saturday morning Settree, Tolloway, and Drouet took it away, they cut it in pieces.

WILLIAM NEWTON . Q. Do you remember this heifer coming to your father's slaughtering house - A. I saw it brought, Kitchener and Tolloway brought it in; Settree and Tolloway killed it.

WILLIAM TERY . I am a salesman in Leadenhall market.

Q. On Saturday, the 4th of May last, were you employed to sell the four quarters of an heifer - A. Two quarters came in whole quarters, except a clod, sticking and shin; and the other two quarters were cut in joints. Settree brought it to me; he used to be in the habit of bringing meat to me in the name of Sylvester, it was entered in our books in the name of Barnes. When Settree came for the money there was some person with him, I think it was Tolloway, there were three or four of them in company together; Settree gave me the name of Barnes, he said he lived in Somers Town; I sent for him back, I said to Settree, who is this Barnes, he said master it is all right, I know the man, he lives in Somers Town.

JOHN CHARLESWORTH . I am a servant to Mr. French, in Barbican.

Q. On Friday, the 30th of May last, did you receive at your house any fat of a heifer - A. On Thursday, I believe it was, I paid Settree and Tolloway for it.

JOHN HUTT . I am a police officer.

Q. After Tolloway was taken did you endeavour to apprehend Kitchener. - A. I did. In the month of May I apprehended Drouet, in the name of Shephard, his right name is Wakingshaw; Charles Wheeler absconded, I apprehended him in Bethnal Green, on the Sunday. I am afraid Settree has been led into this error, I have known him many years, I believe he is an honest man.

SETTREE, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 31.

WHEELER, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 22.

DROUET, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 23.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120219-72

284. ANN CAMPBELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of January , in the dwelling-house of Samuel Phillips , a trunk, value 1 s. four gowns, value 3 s. fourteen handkerchiefs, value 14 s. a petticoat, value 4 s. a pair of gloves, value 6 d. a box, value 1 s. a half guinea, and four 1 l. bank notes, the property of Martha Gooday .

MARTHA GOODAY . I am a servant . I was housemaid to Mrs. Thompson, 45, Manchester Street, I left there on the 18th of January, and went to Ann

Oakes , my friend, where I live when I am out of place, and on Tuesday I went out about twelve o'clock and did not return untill Thursday about three o'clock; as soon as I came home I found my box was taken away, and about half an hour after I came home I was informed that she was taken, and the things lodged in Marlborough-street office. I found my property in the custody of John Baxter , at the watchhouse.

Q. Where had you kept these things - A. In Ann Oakes 's room; the prisoner was a lodger to Ann Oakes .

Q. What sort of a house is it - A. A house full of lodgers.

ANN OAKES . I live at No. 12, Barwick's-court , my husband's name is William, he is a soldier.

Q. Is the whole house let out in lodgings - A. The landlady has the parlours. I know nothing further than the property was in my room when I went out to a day's work. Martha Goodey was an acquaintance of mine, she came for a few days while she was out of place; Ann Campbell lodged with me about a fortnight I think. I know no more than the box was in my room, who took it out of the room I do not know; I was out washing. When I went out in the morning I left Martha Goodey and the prisoner together in the room. When I came home Martha Goodey was gone to see a friend of her's, and the prisoner was gone, we heard she was taken.

ELIZABETH CUMMINGS . On Tuesday night the prisoner came to my house in a coach between seven and eight o'clock as I was going into the country; I live in Camden Town; she came to my house in Dyot-street; I saw the coach at my door; I said to my housekeeper; that woman seems to be in liquor, do not let her in, and she seemed to be very dirty indeed, the coachman said, no, ma'am, she is not in liquor: she stood up in the coach and handed out a large bag like a bolster case, it seemed to be full of clothes; I told her to come in; she sat down in the parlour; I asked her whether these things were her's; she said, yes; I untied the bag and opened it, and seeing her so miserable; I said, young woman, I am afraid these things are not yours; she asked me what I took that liberty for; I told her where I had suspicion I always did it, and there was a little trunk there with the hasp broken off; I sent for Timothy Lane the watchman, then in a few minutes after she said if I would give her a gown and two shifts, and let her go, she would give me a pound note; the watchman came, he took the things to the watchhouse.

TIMOTHY LANE . I am a watchman. Mrs. Cummings sent for me between seven and eight o'clock I searched the prisoners pockets, I found two three shillings pieces, six shillings, and three halfpence; the prisoner was in the house and this box; I took her to the watchhouse, she offered me a pound note going along, the boy picked it up.

Prosecutrix. The whole is my property.

GUILTY, aged 26.

Of stealing to the value 39 s. only .

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120219-73

285. JOHN KEATING was indicted for feloniously assaulting James Mark Aldridge , in the King's Highway, upon the 30th of January , putting him in fear and taking from his person, a watch, value 40 s. his property .

JAMES' MARK ALDRIDGE . Q. What age are you - A. Sixteen. I live in Tottenham-court-road; I am an apprentice to a brush-maker . On the 30th of January last, about a quarter after eight in the evening, I was coming up Broad-street , a man came to me and laid hold of me by the collar, and he made a hit at my face, and pulled my watch out of my pocket.

Q. Was there any seal to it - A. No, a key. I called out watchman; last Saturday they took the prisoner. I do not rightly know him.

Q. You do not know that is the man - A. No. I cannot tell whether the prisoner is the man or not.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18120219-74

286. JEREMIAH BRICKLEY, alias BERKLEY , was indicted for feloniously making an assault, in the King's Highway, upon William Hall , on the 3d of February , putting him in fear, and feloniously taking from his person, a silk handkerchief, value 5 s. his property .

WILLIAM HALL . I am a servant , I live in Cursitor-street.

Q. On the 3d of February did any thing happen to you - A. Yes, about twenty minutes after eight o'clock; I was in Holborn near Great Turnstile ; I had taken out my silk handkerchief to wipe my face. When the prisoner came by with a girl, he snatched the handkerchief out of my hand, he was passing the same way as myself; I immediately rushed after him, and at the distance of three or four yards; I catched hold of his hand, I said he had stolen my handkerchief; he hit me a dreadful blow on my head, and brushed off with a running walk; I recovered and ran after him; I came up to him again, I perceived a soldier with him, they took the direction down Gray's Inn-lane. In Fox-court I perceived two patroles I mentioned the circumstance to them, and they were apprehended, he told his comrade to tell his wife that he was taken to the watchhouse.

Q. Was he discharged that night - A. Yes.

Q. Now are you sure that the prisoner is the man who snatched your handkerchief - A. I am positive.

Q. He got it away from you by a snatch from force - A. He pulled me round and the second tug he pulled it out of my hand, the first time he pulled without success.

Q. And then he pulled a second time and got it - A. Yes.

Q. Then there was some degree of resistance on your part - A. I held it by natural impulse.

ROBERT HILL . I am a patrol. I know nothing of the robbery. On the 3d of February I was on duty in Holborn; the prosecutor gave me charge of the prisoner.

WILLIAM READ . I apprehended the prisoner in Spread Eagle-court. The property was not found.

Prisoner. When I was at the watchhouse the prosecutor told me to beg his pardon; I said I would not, I was not guilty of it.

Prosecutor. I did not.

Q. to Hill. Were you at the watchhouse - did you hear any thing of this - A. I did not, it was proposed by some person, but not by the prosecutor, the prosecutor did not consent to it.

Prisoner's Defence. On the 2d of this month I was in company with some friends at a public-house in Gray's Inn-lane coming down Holborn with my daughter; this gentleman tapped me on the shoulder, he said, good friend you have robbed me; I said, you scoundrel, I never robbed you nor any body else; with the aggravation and passion I struck him; going through Fox-court I saw a soldier of the name of Day, I said, Day go and tell my wife, I am going to the watchhouse; he said, will you ask my pardon; I said, no, I will not.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Bailey

Reference Number: t18120219-75

287. MICHAEL M'CARTY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of January , a saddle, value 3 s. the property of the Reverend James Burgess .

- TUCKEY. I am gardener to Mr. Burgess, he is a clergyman, the Reverend James Burgess , he lives at Hadley .

Q. When did you lose the saddle - A. On the 28th of January I hung the saddle upon the stall in the stable, I missed it before ten o'clock.

Q. Had the stable been broken open - A. No, there was no lock nor bolt to it. Upon the 28th I went to the Swan Inn, I was there some time before Michael M'Carty came in, he had been after some horses or colts for some other man; he wanted some refreshment upon the man's account that he went after the horses for, and the lady would not let him have any; I told them to let him have some refreshment, and I would pay them for it: I mentioned the loss of a saddle, and he never told them that he had got a saddle by him; he said it was a shame to rob such a man as he was; upon the 29th the saddle was found under M'Carty's mattrass that he slept on, under the roof belonging to Mr. Stinton.

WILLIAM STINTON . I am a blacksmith. Upon the 29th of January I heard the prisoner had got a saddle to sell; I had heard that Mr. Burgess had lost a saddle; I wondered how he could come by a saddle. He slept in a hay-loft of mine; I went up into the hay-loft, there was a mattrass there, he laid upon it, and it was under this mattrass. I sent for a constable and went to Mr. Burgess, and fetched one of his servants to look at the saddle, and he said he could swear to it. The prisoner said he found the saddle near Mr. Burgess's house.

Prisoner's Defence. Ask the gentlemen whether I did not tell two gentlemen in the public-house that I had found a saddle, and that if any body owned it, there it was; I did not know who owned the saddle; I found it fairly upon one side of the road.

THOMAS FIELD . I am a footman to Mr. Burgess. I know the saddle, I saw it pulled out from under the head of the mattrass upon which the prisoner slept.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 55.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and Whipped in Jail .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120219-76

288. JOHN BROWNELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of February , a gown, value 8 s. and an apron, value 1 s. the property of Mary Hughes .

MARY HUGHES . I am a servant to John Nicholson , Watling-street . Upon the 10th of February I lost my gown from the washhouse, I got up at three o'clock in the morning; the prisoner's wife washed for us; I left the washhouse and locked the door, and me and the washerwoman were in the washhouse, we had a dog that used to bark at strangers, he knew this man, so he made no noise; the man got in the wash-house by opening two doors; the officer found the duplicate upon the prisoner.

JOHN WILLIS . Mr. Nicholson sent for me to his house; I took him in custody; I found these pawnbroker's tickets upon him.

Q. What is the prisoner - A. A jobbing gardener.

JOHN LONG . I am a pawnbroker's man. These are our duplicates. The prisoner pledged a gown and apron at our shop on the 13th of February for five shillings.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going out in the morning as I was going down the road, I saw some things laying on the road; I picked them up; there was no person saw me pick them up, I was by myself.

GUILTY , aged 34.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120219-77

289. MARY WANE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of February , a great coat, value 2 l. 8 s. another great coat, value 1 l. 3 s. another great coat, value 19 s. a pelisse, value 1 l. one pair of pantaloons, value 13 s. one pair of cloth trowsers, value 17 s. one pair of breeches, value 12 s. the property of Matthew Swift .

MATTHEW SWIFT . I live at No. 3, Sparrow Corner, Minories ; I am a salesman and slop-seller . On the 6th of February, between two and three o'clock in the afternoon, I had occasion to go up stairs to give some instructions to my cutter. When I came down then I discovered the prisoner coming out of my warehouse upon the first floor, she was making towards the second floor up stairs; I followed her, accusing her that she had robbed me. When she had got half way up she dropped a pair of blue cloth pantaloons; I picked them up and accused her with robbing me; she said she had only taken them to put some buttons upon them. On my looking at the pantaloons I discovered that there were no buttons off,

and I stated that as such she could not have taken for that purpose, but for no other purpose than taking them away. I immediately searched her, and caused her to go to the apartment that she occupied; the rooms that I appropriated for the work people to have rent free, for the sake of protecting my property, a kitchen, and a little room adjoining. I then ordered one of my servants to go up and tell her husband to come down, who was in my employ at that time; he came down, I told him of the circumstance, we went together into her apartment; I stated, before her, I had missed a number of other things, and as she had taken them pantaloons, I conceived that she had taken many others; and told her if she would give up the property, and tell me where it was, I would not prosecute her, or send for an officer, on account of her family. She stated, that she had never robbed me of anything else, and as such she could not give up any thing else. I went up in the shop and consulted with my brother; Wane came up in the shop, and told me that he could not get her to acknowledge to any thing, I then sent for an officer; he came, and I went with the officer into her apartment; he searched her, and while he was searching, she dropped a duplicate on the ground; I picked it up, and discovered it was a coat, pledged for one pound, at Mr. Fleming's in Whitechapel; she was then taken to the counter, and returning to search the apartment that she occupied, they discovered a new cloth great coat, a cloth pellisse, a pair of cloth pantaloon-trowsers, and a pair of cloth breeches; all these things were found there. In the evening I went to Mr. Fleming's, the pawnbroker, he sent up the coat, and looking over his books he discovered another coat. I found another coat there my property.

FRANCIS KINNERSLEY . I am an officer. Mr. Swift desired me to take the prisoner into custody, and told me she had in her bosotn a pair of pantaloons; I immediately searched her. As I searched one pocket, she put a hand in the other pocket, and dropped a duplicate down; and afterwards I found the other things amongst a great parcel, as much as I could carry.

MARY WADE . I am a sister of the husband of the prisoner.

Q. Did you ever converse with Mr. Swift upon a pellisse which he had lost - A. Yes; he said that he thought he had given her the pellisse to be repaired, this was on the Friday after the prisoner had been apprehended on the Thursday.

MR. SWIFT. I never said any such words as Mary Wade has said.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined One Year in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120219-78

290. JOHN NORTON, alias WARWICK , was indicted for a highway robbery .

There being no evidence against the prisoner, he was.

ACQUITTED .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120219-79

291. THOMAS DUTTON and ISAAC CRANE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of January , sixteen bushels of oats, value 3 l. the property of John Willan .

JOHN TAPLIN . I am a servant to Mr. Willan.

Q. Were you employed on the 15th of January by Mr. Willan, to deliver any oats to be conveyed to Whetstone End, Barnet - A. The prisoners were employed to take the oats down to Mr. Willan's horses. I delivered to them men four sacks of corn, they were oats, black and white; I filled the sacks. They loaded the corn themselves out of Mr. Willan's granary in Bartholomew Close, eight sacks of white oats, and the rest black and white; there were twenty four sacks in the whole.

ROBERT SHAPP COLWIN . On Saturday the 25th of January, I remember seeing the prisoner Dutton with a cart. I was looking out of my partner's window in King-street, directly opposite Smith-street, Clerkenwell ; the prisoner, Dutton turned out of Percival-street with his cart in Smith-street, and there stopped; immediately a young man in a jockey cart drove up close to the prisoner's wheel, the prisoner Dutton put out four sacks of corn into the jockey cart. Crane, in the jockey cart, covered them over with an empty sack; then the young man in the jockey cart went up Goswell-street Road, I went to Camden Town, there I saw the cart that took the corn away, there where black and white oats at the bottom of the cart. I am quite sure the prisoners are the men.

WILLIAM HEATH . I am a toll collector in Goswell-street. I know the prisoners; I have seen them on the road. I remember Mr. Willan's cart coming through, between twelve and one on the 25th; Dutton was not with the cart, there was a little jockey cart behind, with the name of Crane, Hampstead, upon it.

MR. HAWKINS. I saw the oats, they are the same that I bought at Mark-lane for Mr. John Willan .

DUTTON - GUILTY , aged 31.

Confined Two Years in the House of Correction . and fined 1 s.

CRANE - NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18120219-80

292. WILLIAM WHITE was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Richard Payne , about the hour of three at night on the 15th of February , and stealing therein a watch, value 48 s. a three-shilling bank token, and an eighteen-penny bank token .

RICHAKD PAYNE . Q. Where do you live - A. In Shepherd's Mews, Ray-street , I am a hackneyman , in the parish of St. Pancras, I live over a stable, the prisoner was my horse-keeper , he had been in my employ one week.

Q. What time did you go to bed - A. About twelve.

Q. Did you leave the prisoner up - A. He had no business there at all, I had paid him his wages that night. I was disturbed about half-past three in the morning, I felt him get the breeches from under my head. I heard him unbolt the window on the justice, I pursued him and in the manger with my watch, ten shillings and six-pence, a three shilling piece, and

an eighteen-penny piece; he was searched, a bunch of keys and two razors were found upon him.

Q. Was there any light in your room - A. No. I put them under my pillow; before I put my breeches under my pillow; there was a carpet tacked up at the window instead of a sash, and that is the way he got in the room.

- TURNER. I am a coachman; I was called up by Mr. Payne on the 15th of February, he called out watch, I went to the door, he said some person was in the stable. I went into the stable, I saw the prisoner by the manger, I picked up the watch, the money, and the handkerchief. This is the watch.

Prosecutor. It is mine.

Prisoner's Defence. Between seven an eight o'clock my master paid me my wages; I owed a person three shillings, I went that night and paid him; I stopped till I got tipsey. I thought it my best way to go back to the stables, I laid in the hay-loft and went to sleep. I thought I felt somebody feeling about me, I got up and went down into the stable, and then somebody went through the door, and I not being sober I laid myself down in the stable until the alarm was. My master came down in his shirt, and a sword in his hand; he asked me what brought me there; I told him I would do him no injury, nor any one else; they searched me and found nothing; in the stable that I was sleeping in they found the watch, the money, and the two handkerchiefs.

GUILTY, aged 31.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only, not of the burglary .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18120219-81

293. THOMAS BLAKE and THOMAS HARRIS were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of February , five pounds weight of beef, value 4 s. two loaves of bread, value 2 s. two dishes, value 6 d. and a quarter of a pound weight of cheese, value 3 d. the property of George Williams .

HANNAH WILLIAMS . Q. Are you the wife of George Williams - A. Yes; We live at 21, Castle street, near Oxford-road .

Q. Did you lose any thing from your safe - A. Yes, the safe is in the front area. I had seen these articles safe in my safe about seven or eight in the evening on the 1st of February, on the 2d of February we missed them.

Q. Did you ever see these articles again - A. On the 6th of February I saw the dishes.

CHARLES THOMAS BIRCH . I live at 62, Castle street, with my parents, my father is a chair maker, nearly opposite to Mr. Williams. I saw the two prisoners a little after seven o'clock in the morning. I saw them both. I saw Blake letting a basket over the rails, Harris was close to him, Blake lifted it over and put it on his shoulder, and they both went away together, down Well-street.

JAMES BLY . I am an officer of Queen-square. I apprehended the two prisoners in a court in Pie-street, Westminster. I saw a bone with meat on it, and two baking dishes. Blake we found concealed under the stairs. I charged them with committing the offence, they did not deny it. These are the dishes.

MRS. WILLIAMS. To the best of my knowledge the two dishes are mine.

BLAKE - GUILTY , aged 18.

HARRIS - GUILTY , aged 14.

Judgment respited .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18120219-82

294. JACOB RYLE, alias ROSE , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of January , two silver table spoons, value 20 s. the property of William Holland .

WILLIAM HOLLAND . Q. Did you lose any table spoons on the 29th of January - A. I can only say that I was informed by Mrs. Holland that they were lost; the prisoner lodged in my house.

ANN HOLLAND . Did you lose any table spoons on the 29th of January last - A. I did; I lost them out of my cupboard, I missed one on the 27th, and one on the 28th; I missed them both on Wednesday the 29th at twelve o'clock.

Q. How long had the prisoner lodged at your house - A. I cannot rightly tell.

JOHN HODDINOTT . I am an headborough of St. Luke's parish. On Wednesday the 29th of January, about half-past one in the day, I went to Mr. Holland's; I asked the prisoner where Mr. Holland's spoons were; he said he had pawned them at Lucock's, the corner of Banner-street, White Cross-street, he had destroyed the duplicate.

MR. LUCOCK. I am a pawnbroker in Whitecross-street. The prisoner pawned two table-spoons with me on the 29th of January, for sixteen shillings, in the name of John Rose , No. 7, Banner-street; I have had the spoons in my custody ever since.

Q. to Mr. Holland. Look at these spoons - A. They have my cypher, I should take them for mine, merely by the cypher.

MRS. HOLLAND. I only know them by the cypher, I believe they are mine.

GUILTY, aged 16.

[ The prisoner was recommended to mercy by the prosecutor.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18120219-83

295. JAMES NEWMAN was indicted for manslaughter .

RICHARD CHACE , and WILLIAM MACKNEAL were called, and not appearing in court, their recognisances were ordered to be estreated, and the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18120219-84

296. CATHERINE COLLINS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of December , a blanket, value 3 s. a shawl, value 1 s. a pillow, value 2 s. the property of Joseph Murray .

JOSEPH MURRAY . I am a publican ; I keep the Duke of Bedford, in Old Gravel-lane .

Q. Was the prisoner in you employ - A. No; she had been.

SARAH DONNAHOUGH . I am in the service of the prosecutor.

Q. Do you know of the prisoner taking your master's property - A. Yes, she took them; I did not see her take them; I had the charge of them; I kept them up stairs; I saw them about an hour before they were stolen; the prisoner was in the house at the time.

OBADIAH COOPER . I am a pawnbroker. I produce a blanket and a pillow, they were pawned with me by the prisoner on the 31st of December in the name of Collings for five shillings.

Sarah Donnahough . They are all my mistress's property.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18120219-85

297. WILLIAM BERRY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of December , a brass cannon, value 1 l. 5 s. the property of Richard Lawson .

RICHARD LAWSON . I live at Kensington .

Q. Did you lose a brass cannon on the 26th of December - A. I did. I saw it in the stable a few days before it was missing, it is a model of a larger one. I am in His Majesty's service, a captain in the Royal Marines . I saw the cannon in Mr. Wilson's shop in Vigo-lane a long while after; I lost it the Christmas 1810, I saw it in Mr. Wilson's shop about nine months afterwards; Mr. Wilson traced it to the prisoner who was a carpenter working in my house.

WILLIAM HENRY WILSON . I purchased this cannon of a man of the name of Longrove, I have kept it ever since. I exposed it publicly in my shop for some months.

- LONGROVE. Q. Where did you get this cannon - A. I was at the sign of the White Hart, Old Brompton, the prisoner was in there, he said I bought a cannon last night, it was to have been raffled for; it was put up for twelve shillings, and the person that put it up offered to sell it for nine shillings, not getting members enough he sold it to the prisoner for six shillings and a pint of beer, he said it was of no use to him, and that if any person in the tap-room would give him a shilling profit he would sell it for seven shillings and a pot of beer, they should have it. There were nine or ten people in the tap-room; it was handed about to me; I bought it, I gave seven shillings, and a pot of beer for it; I took it home that night and cleaned it.

Q. When was this - A. About a twelvemonth ago. I sold it to Mr. Wilson; my son let it off in my absence, I sold it because he should do no hurt with it.

Q. Did the prisoner say when he bought it - A. He said he bought it at the Bell and Crown in Holborn a day or two before I bought it; I never heard any thing about it till the 7th of October last; I went into Mr. Wilson's shop to buy powder and shot. I told him exactly what I have told you, I told Mr. Wilson I would produce the prisoner; I went to the prisoner, he said he was very willing to come forward, and he and I went the next morning to Mr. Wilson, he advised the prisoner to go down to Captain Lawson; the prisoner did; Captain Lawson was at Woolwich; I went to the Bell and Crown the people that occupied the house at the time it was to be raffled for, they were gone and left the house. I went into the country, Mr. Wilson wrote to me that I must return the one pound fifteen shillings. I have known the prisoner sixteen years, he is a very hard working man.

Prosecutor. The cannon is mine, it is the cannon that I lost.

Prisoner's Defence. This cannon was put up at the Bell and Crown Holborn to be raffled for, he offered it for nine shillings, I bought it for six shillings and a pot of beer. I brought it down to Old Brompton, I kept it in my possession four days; I offered it at the White Hart Tavern for sale; I told them there if any person would give a shilling advance they should have it, it was of no use to me; Longrove purchased it of me. He took it home that night. I heard nothing more of the cannon until it was owned by captain Lawson. I went to Mr. Wilson and asked him for captain Lawson's address; he gave it me. I went to captain Lawson. I have taken a great deal of pains to find out the man I bought it off. Captain Lawson came three times to me at Old Brompton, he said if I did not come forward and pay five pounds he would seek a recompence; he said the last time if I would come forward and pay the five pounds he would do away with the business.

Prosecutor. This assertion is as false as God is true.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 36.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18120219-86

298. SAMUEL WEBB was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of October , fifteen shillings in monies numbered , the property of Nehemiah Pricknell .

NEHEMIAH PRICKNELL . I am a hackney coachman . I live at the Red Lion in Gray's Inn-lane.

Q. When did you lose this money of yours - A. Upon the 1st of October I was plying with my coach at the stand in Aldgate High-street, he came and spoke to the waterman and said that he wanted a coach and a pair of horses to go to Camberwell and back to take a midwife; the waterman came to me and said that he wanted me, and said, go speak to that man, he wants a coach to go to Camberwell to take a midwife; I went to him, and he knew me and I knew him; he said, aye, is that you; he said he wanted a coach to go to Camberwell to take a midwife, they were good people they would pay any thing to make haste, I might take my time in coming back again. I went with him; he got upon the box with me; he said I was to take up in Fenchurch-street; he said he had got a better situation than he had; he took me to the corner of Church-row, Fenchurch-street , that goes into Crutched-friers, he said pull up here, they will be out in five minutes; he was not gone one minute before he came back again, and said, can you give my mistress change for a pound

note; I told him I had not got silver enough, I had but fifteen shillings; he said, that will do; he said I should have money to take for my fare, and then I might settle it with my mistress; I waited there about twenty minutes and thought it very odd I could not see any thing of him. I went to the lady and there was no man had gone for a coach; I never saw him after till he was in custody at Bond-street watchhouse a month afterwards. I am sure he is the man.

Prisoner's Defence. I have nothing to say, I hope you'll be merciful to me.

GUILTY , aged 48.

Confined One Month in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120219-87

299. WILLIAM BLADES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of January , one pound weight of tea, value 5 s. the property of the United Company of Merchants trading to the East Indies .

JOHN MILES . I am a commodore in the service of the East India Company. The prisoner has been a labourer in the company's employ about ten years. On the 23d of January last I said to him, Bill, I have reason to think that you have some tea about you; he said, oh Lord, Jack, I am undone; he put his hand into his small clothes and took out a small parcel of tea and threw it upon the ground. I took the handkerchief off his neck, I found a pad full of tea there is about eight ounces of tea in the pad.

GUILTY , aged 35.

Confined One Month in Newgate , and whipped in Jail .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120219-88

300. JOHN SULLIVAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of January , a pair of worsted stockings, value 2 s. the property of Evan Roberts Ferguson .

EVAN ROBERTS FERGUSON SMITH . I am a linen draper , I live in Sun-street, Bishopsgate Without .

JAMES COBLEY . I am shopman to Mr. Smith. On the 29th of January a gentleman brought a pair of stockings in, he enquired if they were Mr. Smith's property; I said, they were; on examining them I found they had been taken from the door. That gentleman is here, his name is Howard.

EDWARD HOWARD . I was passing along Sun-street on the 27th of January about three o'clock I observed the prisoner with another suspicious character near Mr. Smith's door, the person that was with the prisoner snatched something when he came to the prisoner he gave it him, which the prisoner put under his jacket. I proceeded for about sixty yards, when I saw an opportunity I turned round and looked at the prisoner and the other man, they separated; I immediately crossed the street and seized the prisoner with the property in his possession, and with assistance I took the prisoner to Mr. Smith's house, where the stockings were stolen from. When I seized the prisoner he threw the stockings down, the person that assisted me picked them up.

Q. Where they outside of the door - A. Close to the outside of the door.

THOMAS SAPWELL . I produce the stockings.

Mr. Smith. They are mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I am a labouring man .

GUILTY , aged 47.

Confined One Month in Newgate , and whipped in Jail .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120219-89

301. ANN KIRBY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of January , twenty-five pounds weight of mutton, value 20 s. the property of Abraham Jacobs .

ABRAHAM JACOBS . I live at 49, Petticoat-lane , I am a butcher . On the 23d of January about half after nine at night, I was setting in the backroom eating my supper, I heard something give a great alarm in the shop, I saw the back of a woman, I followed her; I thought she had something by her walking, as if she was heavy loaded; I followed her about ten yards from my shop; I asked her what she had; she had taken the whole fore-quarter of a sheep in her lap. I laid hold of her arm, she dropped it down, and laid herself down as if she was drunk. I took her to the watchhouse and gave her in charge of the officer of the night.

Q. What part of the shop did she take it from - A. A good way in the shop near to the door of the back room.

GUILTY , aged 45.

Confined One Year in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120219-90

302. THOMAS CLARKE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of February , a wrapper, value 1 s. five pieces of callico, value 5 l. five pieces of muslin, value 3 l. two pieces of cambric, value 2 l. five shawls, value 2 l. a pair of boots, value 10 s. a brush, value 2 s. the property of Charles Read and others.

ALEXANDER MITCHELL . I am a wharfinger at Downes wharf.

Q. What is your partners names - A. Charles Read , Andrew Gillam , George Atkins , and William Bell , those are all my partners; the parcel belonging to us was stolen out of the waggon.

EDWARD MASTERS . I am a carman. On the 13th of this month I was unloading my waggon in Pancras-lane about half past nine in the morning; I observed the prisoner pass the waggon with the truss upon his back, and I observed the truss was marked O K; I recollected as I stood by the side of my fellow servant's waggon at the time he was loading the waggon, he had a truss with the same mark on; I jumped out of the waggon and followed him in Queen-street, Cheapside, a little way; upon my stopping him with it he tried to throw it upon me. He ran down Queen-street a little way, and he was stopped; I went and collared him, and took him back to my fellow-servant's waggon; I was never above ten or fifteen

yards from him before he was taken.

ISAAC SUTTON . I drive a cart, my cart on that day was in Budge-row.

Q. Do you know any thing of the prisoner - A. I never saw him till I saw my fellow-servant bring him back, and this package.

Prisoner's Defence. The package was not stolen out of a cart, a person employed me to carry it.

Q. Is that person here - A. No, he went away.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120219-91

303. SUSAN FOWLER , and ANN MORRIS , were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 3d of February , thirteen yards of printed cotton, value 18 s. the property of George Vipond and George Rimington .

WILLIAM KIRBY . I live with George Vipond and George Rimington . On Monday, the 3d of February, between five and six in the evening, the two prisoners came into the shop and asked me to shew them some printed cotton; I shewed them some, and they bought some, Fowler paid for it; and shortly after I observed her draw a piece of print out with one hand, and the prisoner Morris received it under her apron. Soon after that they were leaving the shop, I immediately got over the counter and laid hold of her apron, and asked her how she came by that print. She told me she could not tell, she knew nothing at all about it. I sent for a constable and gave her in charge.

Ann Morris 's Defence. I was very much intoxicated the time, I do not recollect any thing that was done.

JOHN BROWN . I am an officer; I produce the print

KIRBY. It is the property of Messrs. Vipond and Rimington. I searched them in the shop, and found two or three other articles upon them which do not belong to this prosecution.

Susan Fowler 's Defence. I went to buy a piece for an apron, which I bought and paid for; I was coming out of the shop, and that gentleman accused me.

The prisoners called two witnesses, who gave them a good character.

FOWLER - GUILTY , aged 23.

MORRIS - GUILTY , aged 32.

Confined Two Months in Newgate and fined 1 s.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120219-92

304. GEORGE HAMMON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of January , two bank notes of 50 l. each, the property of Thomas Birch , and Abraham Henry Chambers , in their dwelling house .

SECOND COUNT, Stating the dwelling-house to belong to the said Thomas Birch .

THIRD COUNT, Stating the dwelling-house to belong to Abraham Henry Chambers .

JOHN VALE . Q. Do you live in Shephard-street, May Fair - A. I do; I am a builder.

Q. Do you keep an accompt with Messrs. Birch and Chambers - A. Yes, for several years. I became acquainted with the prisoner at the bar in the month of December.

Q. In the month of December do you recollect his calling upon you - A. Yes, I do; he called upon me with my banker's book, I believe on the 19th of December; he brought my book, and said he had entered two hundred pounds to my accompt. I told him he should not have done that; he said my account was rather low, there is the entry there; he said he had entered two hundred pounds, I told him I wished he had not done that. I told him he must not enter monies to my account; he brought a stamp with him, and asked me to draw a bill of two months for the two hundred pound, which I did,

Q. Did any thing further take place then - A. Nothing further; I do not think I saw him again until the 9th or 10th of January, he called upon me to give me the two hundred pound bill, he brought a stamp, and desired me to write a bill for one hundred more; he gave up the two hundred pound; bill, and I destroyed it - tore it to peices. These are the bills.

Q. That check and that bill that you have in your hand now, was the check and bill that you drew - A. Yes.

Q. Did you give them to him - A. I gave them to him.

Q. What was the reason of its being made payable to Mr. Plomer - A. At his request.

Q. On the 10th of January, did you say he called upon you - A. Yes; the 9th or 10th.

Q. I see, Sir, that check is dated the 9th of January, was there any reason for that - A. Yes, he desired me to date the check the day before.

Q. Had you paid that sum of two hundred pounds to your banker - A. No.

Q. Did you authorize the prisoner at the bar to pay it - A. No, Sir.

Mr. Laws. You had cash at this house - A. Yes. I remember the prisoner a great many years at this house before I went to the house.

Q. Did you settle your accompt - A. Never, until my accompt came regular from the bankers.

Q. The impression of your mind was, at that time, your accompt was good with them - A. Yes.

Q. Did you look at it, to see how it stood - A. Not exactly; I conceived that I had over-drawed.

Q. And you would not have over-drawed upon them, not with the idea of over-drawing upon them - A. Not to my knowledge, I would not.

(The bills read)

MR. GATTY. You are a clerk in the house of Birch and Chambers, and have been so some time - A. Yes; and the prisoner has also been for many years past a clerk in that house; he attained the situation of fourth clerk in the house.

Q. When cash is paid into your house it will first come into the waste book; the waste book is the foundation of all other enteries. - A. Yes.

Q. From the waste book, into what book will it next find its way - A. Into the cash book, and from the cash book into the ledger.

Q. Then, in the regular course of the business, no entry can find its way into the ledger that has not been in the cash book - A. Certainly not.

Q. Do you keep the ledger - A. I do.

Q. How many ledgers are there - A. There are four at this time, at that time there were three.

Q. You say you kept the ledger - A. That was my department.

Q. Did the prisoner sometimes assist you by posting into the ledger - A. He did.

Q. Did he do that asked or unasked - A. Occasionally unasked when I was absent, when I came from my dinner I found him at the ledger; he then chused the last ledger, containing Mr. Vale's accompt. I remarked to him that it was rather singular that he should assist me in that one ledger particularly.

Q. The clerk who holds the cash book calls, and the clerk with the ledger ticks it off - A. Yes.

Q. Is that entry in the ledger ticked off - A. It is.

Q. When an entry is ticked off, what does that tick denote - A. It denotes that it has been called from the cash book.

Q. Therefore after turning over the ledger in the morning, and it is ticked, you do not tick it again - A. No, we conclude it to be done.

Q. Therefore if a person had put it in the ledger the day before, and had ticked, it would not be ticked the next day - A. Certainly not.

Q. Your comparison of all your ledgers only takes place anually - A. Only annually.

Q. Inasmuch as the clerk who holds the cash calls if there is no entry in the cash book, he could not call it - A. Surely not.

Q. You say your comparison of all your ledgers takes place at Christmas - A. At Christmas.

Q. If false entries takes place in the ledger it can only be found out at the ending of the ballance - A. Only at the end of the balance.

Q. Upon your balance last Christmass did you find there was something wrong - A, A considerable deficiency, it exceeded two hundred pounds.

Q. Upon that did your house take a new set of ledgers - A. A new set of ledgers were taken, not in consequence of that.

Q. You proceeded then to see how this could arise - A. Yes.

Q. Now, sir, look in the waste book of the 10th of January, and shew how Mr. Vale's draft was paid; the 11th of January, it is my mistake - A. The 11th of January John Vale 's draft was paid in two fifty-pound notes, to man.

Q. What does man imply - A. It is generally understood, the man, the drawer of the draft. No. 15,451, fifty pound; No. 10,790, fifty pound; - one hundred pound, And posted from that one hundred pound.

" John Vale ." That is the prisoner's handwriting.

Q. Saturday is a busy day with you - A. Generally.

Q. Do you find more enteries of his writing besides that - A. One preceeding, and two more.

Q. Had you received either of these fifty pound bank-notes yourself - A. No.

Q. This was the 11th of January, Saturday; on the Monday or Tuesday after that, you slept at the prisoner's house - A. I did, that was on the 13th and 14th.

Q. On the 13th and 14th did he attend at the banking house - A. No.

Q. I believe you slept at his house, your mother was ill. On the evening of the 14th, when you went did the prisoner make any enquiries of you what was going on in the banking house - A. He knew we were searching for the difference, he enquired if any thing had been discovered. I told him a few of our differences had been discovered in a very unpleasant way; that credit had been made in John Vale 's accompt, for which there was no existing credit in the cash book.

Q. You mentioned Mr. Bolton's name, I believe from his hand-writing, I am speaking of the entry that was first discovered, I believe he said he was sorry it was discovered, and enquired where Bolton was; I believe you parted, and you retired to rest - A. I did, and the next morning I saw the prisoner. I did not see him after that until I saw him in custody.

Q. I believe this was Wednesday morning, did you hear of him the next day - A. No; I heard of him two or three days afterwards, a letter arrived at my residence, and in that letter I learned that he had quitted London shortly after I arrived.

RICHARD FERRES . Q. I believe you are clerk and chief cashier. What are the names of the gentlemen that keeps the firm of that house - A. Thomas Birch and Abraham Henry Chambers .

Q. Where is the business carried on - A. In New Bond-street, it is a shop and a dwelling-house, the shop is part of the dwelling house, and under the same roof.

Q. Is there any thing by which there is a communication - A. Yes, there is. It is in the parish of St. George, Hanover-square.

Q. By whom is the dwelling-house occupied - A. By Thomas Birch , when he is out of town Mr. Chamber's has a room in which he sleeps, there is a bed for Mr. Chambers.

Q. Is Mr. Birch's family there - A. Yes, they are.

Q. Whose servants are they, the cook, the house maid, and the menial servants - A. Thomas Birch 's.

Q. Turn to the receiving book, the 11th of January last, and see whether any money was paid in from Mr. Stevens, of Bond-street.

COURT. What, the waste book, that is the general receipt book - A. Mr. John Stevens of Bond-street, paid in a fifty pound note, on the 11th of January; he is a customer of the house.

Q. Read the entry - A. John Stevens , Bond-street; fifty pound received, 15,451; dated 4th of December, 1811.

Q. Is Dr. John Clark a customer of the house - A. He is.

Q. Is there any entry to his credit on that day - A. Dr. John Clark , fifty pound received, a note; 10,709, fifty pound, dated 16th November, 1811.

Q. In whose hand-writing is that entry - A. My own, both entries are mine.

Q. Did you receive these notes - A. I did, and I put them into the banknote drawer.

Q. Have you heard the account that Mr. Gatty gave - A. Yes.

Q. Is that the course of your business - A. It is the course.

Q. have you any share in the business - A. No.

COURT. How do you make up your books - A.

We compare the actual cash in the house with the balance, that is the way we make up our books.

WILLIAM LINCH . Q. You have a brother a banker at Hithe, were you there assisting him in his business - A. I was.

Q. Do you recollect the day on which the prisoner arrived at Hithe - A. He arrived on Friday morning, the 17th of January, I did not see him arrive.

Q. On the Monday following did any conversation take place respecting any notes - A. Yes, he gave me some notes; I made an entry of them in the waste-book; here is the entry of my own handwriting.

Q. How many notes did he give you - A. The amount was two hundred pound in bank notes, and one pound in silver; there is two bank notes of fifty pounds among these, one note fifty pound, 10,790, dated November 16th, 1811, one fifty pound, 15,451, dated December 4th, 1811; I afterwards returned him them notes on the Tuesday morning, the 21st, he said, you have given me the notes I gave you. He desired me not to mention his name in the correspondence I made in London. I shortly after that left Hithe; he desired me not to mention his being there to any one.

JOSEPH HILL . Q. I believe you are solicitor to Messrs. Birch and Chambers - A. Yes. In consequence of information I went down to Hithe in pursuit of the prisoner, I arrived about nine o'clock in the evening of Wednesday the 22d, he was gone from there; I went after him to Sandys, twelve miles from Hithe; I found him there at a house of Mr. Barratt's.

Q. What is Barratt - A. I do not know; I had two Bow-street officers with me. The prisoner was searched in my presence at Sandy's, by John Marsden the constable.

JOHN MARSDEN . I searched the prisoner, I found three ten-pound notes upon him, this fifty pound note No. 10,790, November 16, 1811, and another fifty pound; I have had the notes ever since.

Q. Did you afterwards learn from the prisoner whether he had put any other money into any one's hands - A. Certainly into Barratt's hands, one of one hundred pounds. I brought the prisoner up to London in a post chaise. Before I went from Barrett's house I gave him a caution not to say any thing. We used no promises or threats. After we had left Hithe we had some conversation respecting Mr. Gatty; he observed that had Gatty looked at him he might have discovered who it was that had done the deed. The prisoner in justice declared that Mr. Bolton had nothing to do with the transaction.

ROBERT WILLIS . I am the head of the bank note office.

Q. What is the practice of issuing bank notes at the bank - A. We never issue two genuine bank notes of the same number and date.

Mr. Gurney, Q. to Mr. Gatty. Did you take an accompt of the balance of Mr. Vale on the 19th of December - A. I did. I handed the paper of which I took the accompt; fifty-three pounds four shillings and seven-pence; 20th of December, one hundred and thirty-five pound and a fraction; on the 21st two hundred and seven pounds; on the 9th of January one hundred and twenty-one pounds; at one time the real balance was against Mr. Vale, upon the 2nd of January the balance was against him fourteen pounds fourteen shillings.

Q. You have investigated Mr. Vale's accompt - A. I have.

Q. What was the real state of Mr. Vale's accompt on the 11th of January last. Do you find any other entries to his credit, for which there is no voucher whatever, particularly to the extent of eighteen hundred pounds, sixteen hundred pounds, besides the three hundred, whose entries are these - A. Upon the 11th of November an entry of cash two hundred and thirty pounds made by the prisoner for which there is no entery made by Vale, it is in the hand-writing of the prisoner, this is ticked, as if there was an entry to compare with it in the waste-book. There is no such entry in the waste-book. Upon the 2d of October there is two hundred pounds, entered by the prisoner, a man, to Vale's credit, marked likewise; there is no credit for that in the waste-book or cash-book. June 28th a similar sum to Vale's credit, two hundred pounds, for which there is no credit in the cash-book.

Q. Was it part of the prisoner's business to pay checks when brought in by customers - A. It was not a part of his business, but he might do it for other clerks that were absent or employed.

Q. What was his regular business - A. The cash-book, which is copied from the waste-book.

Q. to Mr. Vale. You have heard the clerk state several sums of money to your credit, had you or not any other person that paid this money in for you - A. Not in these instances, I think not.

Q. Upon the 11th of November there is a credit given to you of two hundred and thirty pounds, look at your banker's book do you remember the prisoner coming to you in November - A. I cannot recollect the day.

Q. Look at the entry on the 11th of November two hundred and thirty pounds, was that paid in by you - A. It was not.

Q. Do you remember seeing the prisoner about that time - A. He called about that two hundred and thirty pounds, and said I have placed cash, mentioning this sum, to my accompt and asked me for a draft for the money back, which I gave him.

Q. Did that occur in several instances - A. Much in the same way.

GUILTY, aged 23.

Judgement respited for the opinion of the Judges .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18120219-93

305. WILLIAM MARTIN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of January , a tub, value 6 d. and thirty pounds weight of butter, value 20 s. the property of William Liddiard and John Aylwin .

The prosecutors were called, and not appearing in court , the prisoner was

ACQUITTED.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120219-94

306. JONAS SOLOMON , JAMES DEARING ,

JOSEPH GREAVES , and ABRAHAM NATHAN , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of February , three reams of paper, value 5 l. the property of George Bangley and William Nott .

GEORGE BANGLEY . I am a stationer in Budge-row. On the 3d of February I lost the paper out of the cart coming from the Half Moon in the Borough . I know nothing of the loss myself, only from information. My partner's name is William Nott .

WILLIAM FLINTOFF . I am a carman to Messrs. Bangley and Nott. We were loaded with thirty two bundles of paper; I lost one out of the cart somewhere between the Half Moon and Budge-row, one bundle, consisting of three reams; I knew it was impossible for it to fall out of the cart, and when I came home I was a bundle short.

EDWARD DAVIS . I am ward-beadle of Portsoken Ward. In consequence of information on Monday the 3d of February about six in the evening; I went after Jonas Solomon to his father, Barnard Solomon 's house; when I came to the door I saw the prisoner Nathan standing with his back to the door just upon the threshold, close to the step of the stairs leading to the one pair; I made a push at him, he stood stiff. I told him to get out of the way, and with another shove drove him into the room; the passage is about six feet square; there were two women sitting in the parlour at a table, and I then endeavoured to shut the street door on purpose to secure the party that I suspected were in there, there being something under the door; I could not do it; Nathan turned round and halloaed out some expression in Dutch, which I did not know the English of; I immediately heard a violent bustle over my head. I took a light from the table and made towards the foot of the stairs; I saw a light in the one pair room, I observed a man coming out of the room; I halloaed out fall back immediately; before he could turn round I was upon his back, and he went into the room from whence he came. When I got in the room the door being very narrow, I stood in the centre of the door way, and put the candle down, and called Joseph Hitchens , a man who was below to aid and assist me; he came up, and we shut the room door. I then asked the prisoner Solomon if he knew any thing of the other two men; there were three persons in the room; Dearing was sitting on a chair: I asked Solomon if he knew how they came there; he said, he did not. I then asked Dearing how he came there; he said he had come to Mrs. Solomon, and she bid him go up stairs; I then asked Greaves how he came there; he told me that he was an acquaintance of Dearing's, and met with him by the way, and accompanied him there; I then addressed myself to Solomon. I thought it very extraordinary that these men should come in his mother's bed-room, and he did not know any of them; I then asked him if his mother was at home; he said she was not: she had been out on a visit some hours, he had but just come home from his master's; he was an apprentice; I told him it was extraordinary if he was an apprentice that he was always there.

Q. Did you know him before - A. Yes; since the 1st of January; he is always there. The owner of the house has abscouded ever since the 2d of January for a barrel of mustard that was stolen; I then secured the prisoners, got assistance, and took them to the compter. I saw Levy there, I ordered him to aid and assist me; the prisoner Dearing was endeavouring to get out of the door; I pushed him back again, and tied Dearing and Greaves together; I then went and fetched the three reams of paper which were laying at the foot of the bed; I asked Solomon if he knew how that paper came there: he said he knew nothing at all about it; I produce the paper; I went to this house in consequence of information that two men had just gone in the house with a large swag.

Prosecutor. This is the same paper that I missed; I have got the following number, and the number preceding; I have a note from Mr. Cripps at the paper-mill. This is the same make and the same date and exact quantity that I missed.

Deering's Defence. This is a very hard case that I should be charged with what other people have in their possession.

Greaves' Defence. I met this young man, and he asked me to take a walk with him.

Nathan's Defence. I live within five doors of Mrs. Solomon's house; I stopped there about half a minute.

SOLOMON - GUILTY , aged 17.

DEARING - GUILTY , aged 25.

GREAVES - GUILTY , aged 21.

NATHAN - GUILTY , aged 50.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120219-95

307. MICHAEL SULLIVAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of January , a saw, value 5 s. a plow, value 2 s. a stock, value 1 s. two adzes, value 1 s. and an orgar, value 6 d. the property of Jonathan Brown .

JONATHAN BROWN . I am doing business for the prisoner's master in a shop in a yard in King-street, Edgware-road .

Q. When did you lose these things - A. On the 29th of January they were in the shop that I let to the prisoner's master.

Q. The prisoner's master was a tenant of yours your tools was in the shop, and you lost them - A. Yes.

Q. Why do you accuse the prisoner of taking them - A. Because we found them in his possession in his apartment, No. 11, Marybone-court. These are the tools, they are mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I found them in the rubbish.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Publicly Whipped One Hundred Yards in and near the spot in Edgware-road , and Confined Fourteen Days in Newgate .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18120219-96

308. ELIZABETH SIMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of February , a sheet, value 5 s. the property of Dennis Williams .

DENNIS WILLIAMS . I am a shopkeeper , 76, Red Lion-street, Holborn . On Friday the 14th of February, between twelve and one, the prisoner knocked at my door; I admitted her in myself; I thought she was a visitor to one of my lodgers; I

found afterwards that she lodged with one of my lodgers. The servant girl, Elizabeth Monk , was sent up to wash her bed room, at two o'clock she was called to her dinner; between three and four o'clock, my house-keeper went into the room, she saw the bed was tumbled, she examined the bed, and found the sheet gone; I went up and saw a sheet gone, I went to the person in the next room, I asked her if she had any stranger there; she said no person but the prisoner, and she had gone out. I went in pursuit of the prisoner to the pawnbroker's, and on last Saturday I went to Mr. Page's shop, and identified the sheet.

- TAYLOR. I am shopman to Mr. Page, pawnbroker, Liquorpond-street. On the 14th of February, the prisoner pawned a sheet with me, I lent her three shillings upon it. I produce the sheet.

Prosecutor. It is my sheet, it is marked D. W. in two places.

ELIZABETH MONK . Q. Did you find your things - A. Yes.

Prisoner's Defence. I have no earthly friend to intercede for me, I beg for mercy.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18120219-97

309. JOHN RAY was indicted for obtaining goods by false pretences .

EDWARD TICKNER . I am an assistant to William West , leather dealer, Fleet-street , in the city of London. The prisoner came in the accompting-house, and introduced himself as Mr. Ray's son; he said he was come to look out some leather for his father, Mr. Ray. Mr. Ray has been a customer to our shop many years, the reason that he asigned for his father not coming himself, was, that he was dangerously ill; he said he wanted two hides of Russia, and two skins of Morrocco leather, and he took them away.

Q. Whereabouts is the value - A. About four pound, he said he had not got the book, upon which Mr. Ray's accompt was kept, but Mr. Ray never sends the book except when he comes himself.

Q. You acceeded, believing that he was the agent of the father - A. I did.

Q. You, nor Mr. West, gave credit upon his own accompt - A. We did not.

Q. Did he afterwards come to your house - A. Yes, on the 11th of February; I let him have four hides of Russia then.

Q. Did you afterwards see the father - A. On the 11th of February Mr. Ray made his appearance; I told him I was glad to see him look so well, as I had been informed he had been extremely ill. We apprehended the defendant about a week after the 11th, and took him to the compter.

Q. Have you ever got your skins again - A. No, we have not.

ROBERT RAY . I am the father of the unfortunate man at the bar, I am a bookbinder.

Q. Did you, upon the 6th of February, authorize your son to go to Mr. West for any skins in your name - A. I did not, nor knew any thing of it.

Q. How long before the 6th of February had you seen him - A. I saw him in the street, but I did not speak to him; I have not spoke to him since Christmas upon any business. Upon the 6th of February I was as well as I am now, I did not receive any skins from my son at that time.

Prisoner's Defence. I hope for mercy of the Jury.

GUILTY , aged 31.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120219-98

310. EDWARD LAWLEY was indicted for a misdemeanour .

JOHN JENKINS. I am a porter to Mr. Willan, the Bull and Mouth, Bull and Mouth-street. I got acquainted with the prisoner at the Crown, in Lad-lane, I have known him about four years. Upon the 24th of January, about a quarter past two in the afternoon, I saw him at the Crown, in Lad-lane, he said he wanted to speak to me, and we went round into the back room; he said he had got some bad tokens to dispose of, with that he took two out of his pocket, and we talked a bit together; I asked him whether that was all he had, he said he had got one more, he gave me them in my hand, the three; I asked him what he asked for them, he told me I should have the three for seven shillings; I kept them some time in my hand, and I staid at the table; he put his hand in my pocket, I had some silver in my pocket, he took the silver out and spread it upon the table, thinking his tokens were there, I do not believe he meant to take the silver, the tokens were not there. I took the money up myself, and I told him he should not have the tokens at all. I came out of the Crown public house, and walked on towards Guildhall, and he with me; I was going to the Hall, and he came on to me; and nearly opposite to Guildhall coffee-house I saw two officers standing at the Justice-room door at Guildhall, and then he turned round and went back, and I after him; I catched hold of him and pulled him down, and the officers came to see what was the matter; we were both down together, and I found the tokens in one of the officers hands. I gave charge of him, and told the officer that this man wanted to pass bad money; they took him in custody, but I believe they found nothing more upon him. I gave the tokens to Porter, the officer, the three that the prisoner gave to me.

Prisoner. He was totally drunk at the time.

Tickner. I was rather, but not so far but what I knew what I was about.

COURT. What hour of the day was this - A. It was about a quarter after two o'clock.

SAMUEL PORTER . I am a marshalman of the city of London; me and my partner were standing at the Justice-room door, I saw a struggle at St. Lawrence's church; we went to it, and Tickner said this man was offering bad money, and he gave me three three shilling tokens. We took them up to the Justice-room and searched, and found nothing more upon him. We asked how he came by them; he said he had them of

one Macdonald, he said he would be at Newgate at three o'clock. We took him to Newgate, he came to see one White. We searched Macdonald, and found four tokens in his pocket, and White was called down, and I believe two bad tokens were found upon him.

EDMUND HOMERSHAM . I am one of the tellers of the bank.

Q. Look at these tokens, and tell us whether they are tokens issued by the Governor and Company of the Bank of England, or counterfeit - A. The whole of them are counterfeits, they appear of the same manufactory.

GUILTY , aged 45.

Confined Six Months in Newgate , and to fined Sureties for Six Months from that time .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120219-99

311. ELEANOR WESTON and ANN WESTON were indicted for a conspiracy .

ROBERT ALLMAN . I am parish clerk of St. Mary Nottingham.

Q. Have you the register book of marriages in February, 1787 - A. I have.

" John Thompson , of the parish of St. Nicholas, of this town, was married to Margaret Jeffs . of this parish; married in this church by license, 22d of February 1787.

JOHN THOMPSON . Q. Did you formerly reside at Notingham - A. Yes.

Q. Were you married there in the month of February, 1787 - A. Yes, to Margaret Jeffs .

Q. Your wife, I believe, is dead - A. Yes, she died on the 3d of June last.

Q. And you have, for some time past I believe, resided at Birmingham - A. Yes, with my wife, we lived together as man and wife at the time of her death.

Q. Did your business occasion you to be frequently in London for a length of time - A. Yes.

Q. In the spring of the year 1810, did you meet the young woman at the bar, Eleanor Weston - A. Yes, I did.

Q. And in a few days after you met her were you introduced by her to her sister, Ann Weston - A. Yes, I was, they lodged together at No. 12, Fetter-lane.

Q. Were did you then lodge - A. At No. 10, Mitre Court, Fleet-street.

Q. In a few days after you met her, did you and she form a more intimate acquaintance - A. Yes, we did.

Q. At that time when you came to town did you and she principally live together - A. No, we did not at first.

Q. Did you cohabit when you came to town - A. We first cohabited upon the 26th of May, I went down into Birmingham one week after I became acquainted with her, and stopped a week or ten days, and came back again.

Q. Were you in London near the beginning of the month of August in that year - A. I was.

Q. Were was your sleeping-room then - A. No. 10, Mitre Court; I slept with her then at her lodgings; I then moved to St. John-street, Smithfield.

Q. Did the sister lodge in the same house with you then - A. In the same house.

Q. You say you left London for Birmingham on the 7th of August - A. It was.

Q. Was your place taken in town, or taken in Birmingham - A. Taken in town, in the Prince coach the George and Blue Boar.

Q. What time of the day did it set off - A. Three o'clock in the afternoon.

Q. And you set off on the 7th or the next day - A. On the 7th at three o'clock in the afternoon.

Q. Did you know then Mr. or Mrs. Houghton - A. Yes, they were in the same coach upon that day.

Q. Did you know them before - A. Yes.

Q. How far did they go with you - A. Within ten miles of Birmingham, to Hockley-house, there the carriage waited for them.

Q. What time did you arrive upon the 8th at Birmingham - A. About eleven, or a quarter past, upon the 8th, morning.

Q. What state of health was Mrs. Thompson in at that time - A. She was extremely ill, she was attended by a physician.

Q. Had you heard of her being worse from her illness before you left town - A. Yes, I had received a letter acquainting me that she was worse.

Q. Have you every reason to believe that letter is destroyed - A. After my wife's death I destroyed every letter.

Q. By whom was that letter written - A. About two or three lines by my wife, and the remainder by the servant.

Q. How long did you remain at Birmingham at that time - A. About ten days, I then went to Liverpool, and came to town again about the 27th, upon the close of that month.

Q. After you returned to town did you again cohabit with the prisoner Eleanor - A. Yes, I did.

Q. When did you cease wholly to cohabit with her A. Upon the 20th of March.

Q. She had a child by you - A. So I understood since, she has a child, of which she was pregnant when I left her in March.

Q. And you took her with you to the Isle of Wight - A. I did take her with me to Portsmouth in October, 1810. her friends lived in that neighbourhood.

Q. Did you give her liberty to pass in your name - A. I did.

Q. In visiting any of her friends in town, or their visiting you, did you let her pass by your name - A. I permitted her to pass by my name.

Q. Did she know that you were a married man - A. She did; I let her know, the first week of our acquaintance in the month of April, before any intercourse had taken place.

Q. I must ask you, for form sake, were you ever married to her - A. Never.

Q. I must further ask you, for form sake, were you ever married to her on the 9th of August, 1810, at St. Bride's church in London - A. In the autumn of the year 1810, that the ceremony had been gone through between her and the other person, she told me herself, on the 27th or on the 28th of August, when I returned to town, that she had got married to a man in my name, and it was for the sole purpose of satisfying her friends, and she said that her sister

had persuaded her to it.

Q. Was her sister by at this time - A. It was only what she said herself; she said that the man came to her apartment, and her sister's apartment, and she agreed with the man for two pounds.

Q. Did she say any thing with respect to the ceremony - A. She said that they had dressed themselves in such a figure and manner that nobody should know them, they dressed like washerwoman.

Q. What did you say to her upon this - A. I was very angry with her, and asked her how she could think of doing such a diabolical act, as to go to the altar in that manner; she said that she had wrote to her friends, saying that she was married, and they said they would not receive her without a certificate, therefore she was compelled to do it. I asked her if she knew the man's name, and she declared she did not.

Q. Upon this, I believe, you took a lodging for her and her sister - A. Very near that time.

Q. You say you continued living with her occasionally to the month of March last, after you ceased to live with her did she upon any occasion apply to you - A. She did, several times, for money.

Q. Do you remember her applying to you at the house of Mr. Young of Bartholomew-close in October - A. Yes; I supplied her with money for the use of the child.

Q. Did she come to you at the house of Mr. Young in October last - A. She did.

Q. Did she there say anything to you respecting being married to her - A. Yes, she knocked at the door; I opened it; she came to my room door, brought the child, and a bundle, and said she was come to live with me, for she was my lawful wife; my answer was if she made any disturbance there I should be obliged to send for a constable and take her away.

Q. Had she made any application to you prior to this A. No further than drinking tea with me and inviting me to renew the intercourse.

Q. Was Mr. Young by when any thing of this passed - A. No. She would not go out at this time, and I was obliged to go out and leave her in one of my rooms, and I locked up the warehouse, and went out; she would not come out; I staid out till eleven o'clock at night.

JOHN WHITEMAN . I am parish clerk of St. Bride's.

Q. Turn to the 9th of August, 1810, read the entery.

" John Thompson , of this parish, widower, and Eleanor Weston , spinster, of the same parish, were married at this church by banus, the 9th of August, 1810, by me, J. M. Jones, curate. Signed as having been married; John Thompson , Eleanor Weston."

Q. Who attested as witness - A. Ann Weston .

Q. to Mr. Thompson. Is that signature yours - A. It is not; I believe the signature, Eleanor Weston , is her's; I have seen her write.

Q. Have you seen Ann Weston write - A. I am not certain I have seen her write at all.

Q. to Whiteman. Can you recollect who were the persons that were married that day. How many are married in that church in the year - A. A good many.

Mr. Alley. You say you know the man very well, has he or has he not been with you; I ask you whether you could or could not remember whether he was married at your church - A. He is a parishioner of the town of Birmingham, he has been several times in our vestry-room.

Q. Has he not, again and again, spoke to you upon the subject of this marriage, and asked whether you could or could not recollect whether he was the person that was married at your church with this woman - A. He did ask me once, and but once, and I told him directly: I know you very well, but I do not know whether it was here, or it might be in Birmingham.

Q. How often can you recollect that he has been at your parish vestry-room - A. Very often.

Q. Do you allow it, or is it the custom for persons who are not your parishioners to come to your vestry-room - A. No; it is not; he never came at any period but it was about the business that this book concerns.

Q. How often was it in all - A. I cannot say, it might be four or five times; he brought other gentlemen to look at the book.

Q. How long ago had he been before Christmas - A. I do not recollect, he was there before Christmas; he has been at my house two or three times.

Q. Was he a private acquaintance of yours - A. No.

Q. What did he come to your house for - A. He came to ask my daughter if I was at home.

Q. Have you seen him yourself - A. I have.

Q. For what purpose did you see him at your house - A. He came to ask for the book to see the names in it; he never saw it at my house, but at the vestry.

Q. How long before Christmas - A. Never before Christmas; the first time he came about the books; he applied to the Rev. Mr. Jones.

Q. Did you ever live at Birmingham - A. No, but I have been there repeatedly, several months together.

Q. Do you know any thing of his character at Birmingham at all - A. It is improper to say things of a man's character, which we do not know is true.

Q. Then you had not the honour of his private acquaintance at Birmingham - A. No; I had not.

Mr. Gurney. You say he has come to your house for the purpose of making enquiries respecting the book, and that book not being at your house he has gone to the vestry to see it - A. This he has done four or five times.

Mr. Gurney, shewing a paper to Mr. Thompson. Tell me whose hand-writing it is - A. Eleanor Weston 's.

Mr. Alley. You know of course the nature of your oath - A. Yes.

Q. You were married in 1787, at what time of life have you arrived to - A. Forty-eight.

Q. Quite to years of discretion, you have learned your catechism, you read the bible and go to church - A. I do.

Q. Do you believe in God, and you believe in a

future state of rewards and punishment, and have read the Scriptures, I take it for granted - A. I have.

Q. So then your poor wife at Birmingham was upon her death-bed, and you travelled up to London, and met with the woman at the bar, and took a lodging, your poor wife requiring the solace of your duty, and you spending your time with a prostitute - A. Yes.

Q. You got home to Birmingham, and when was it your poor wife died - A. The 3d of June, 1810.

Q. And you continued on this intercourse with the woman up to the time of her decease - A. Up to the 20th of March.

Q. Now I put one plump question to you in Christian charity, I caution you before you give me your answer, in the presence of God I ask you, and in the presence of your country, is it or is it not your handwriting to the register of St. Bride's - A. It is not my hand-writing; the name of John Thompson in the register of St. Bride's is not my handwriting.

Q. Now I caution you that I will prove this - A. It is not my hand-writing.

Q. You say you met this woman in the street first - A. No, I did not; I met her in St. Paul's Church.

Q. What, talk to her in St. Paul's church - A. I did not.

Q. Did your attachment to her take place in St. Paul's, where you first found her - A. I followed her home from St. Paul's church to No. 12, Fetter-lane. I had not been to that church to prayers, I had just come from a place of worship.

Q. So coming from a place of worship you followed her home to Fetter-lane - A. I did.

Q. Did you speak to her in the street - A. I did not.

Q. What day was this - A. On Sunday.

Q. What religion are you, for God's sake - A. I do not know any name I can give to my religion.

Q. Thanks to God, I hope no other man is of the same religion - you followed her in the house without having spoken to her before was the door of the house open - A. It was.

Q. Did you see her or her sister first - A. Her.

Q. How long was it before your intimacy took place with her - A. I do not understand you.

Q. How soon did the intercourse take place with her - A. On the 25th of May.

Q. In Fetter-lane, at her sister's house - A. I am not sure it was in Fetter-lane, I think they were removed to St. John's-street while I was in Birmingham. I lived with her there one month, and then went down to Birmingham.

Q. Then I think you said you were very angry with her for having married in your name - A. I was.

Q. You said you were shocked at her profligacy - A. I did.

Q. What are you - A. I am a jeweller, I make imitable diamonds.

Q. What, mock diamonds to cheat the world with - A. My warehouse is 53, Great Bartholomew-close, my manufactory is in Birmingham; I employ seven or eight working under my direction.

Q. So then after this woman told you she had married in a fictitious name you took her down to Portsmouth with you - A. I did.

Q. And you at Portsmouth took her to her own brother, and I tell you here he is, a respectable tradesman at Portsmouth as your wife, and requested that he would receive you as his brother-in-law - A. I suffered her to introduce me to her brother, and I kept up the delusion.

Q. Now, sir, did not you yourself say that you hoped he would have no objection to you as a brother-in-law - A. I did not.

Q. How long did you live in that habitation as the husband of his sister - A. About ten days.

Q. Received as a brother-in-law - A. Yes, I was.

Q. Received the same at her mothers - A. We were not at all with the mother.

Q. So that after you left Portsmouth you returned with this woman to London - A. I came to London, and went down to Birmingham, and left her at Portsmouth.

Q. Then you came to London and took a room in Mitre-court - A. Yes, Mrs. Currie's, a fruiterers and oyster shop.

Q. She fitted up a room - A. No, it was not fitted up at all, it was only took to deceive Mrs. Currie; I put a bed in it in order to deceive her.

Q. How long did you live with her as man and wife - A. I think till the 20th of March last.

Q. She had a child afterwards and you thought it time to be off - A. I was two months at home on account of my wife's illness.

Q. Where did his mother live - A. In Old-street, opposite of St. Luke's church.

Q. You say you were always ready and willing to pay for the maintainance of this poor orphan - A. Yes.

Q. No action has been brought against you to compel you to pay - A. That was brought for the premises, the rent; for the old woman told me she would never take any rent of me, therefore she never made any demand; she made a demand of rent before the action was brought.

Q. Did you object to paying that demand - A. Yes, my lord, but my attorney paid part of that demand in court.

Q. Who is your attorney - A. Mr. Draper.

(Mr. Draper was desired by Mr. Alley to go out of court.)

Mr. Alley. Mr. Harmer is here, I cannot ask him to go out of court. When were you first introduced to Mr. Draper - A. I cannot recollect.

Q. Do you recollect Mr. Draper being desired by you to call upon the mother to propose that if she would forego the claim for the rent you would not prosecute her two daughters for a conspiracy - A. I did not; I did know of the conspiracy at the time.

Q. Then if ever Mr. Draper has said so he did it without your direction - A. Certainly, if he did it at all he did it without my direction.

Q. Did you or did you not hear that he went to the mother of these people with a warrant upon the indictment to take them in custody if they did not accede to the proposal, and forego the action - A. I

never did hear so.

Q. Do you remember the night they were taken in custody - A. Not the day of the month.

Q. Have you ever corresponded with the prisoner - A. Once.

Q. Has she often been with you - A. About four times.

Q. You have been once to her and she four times to you - A. Yes.

Q. Did you ever copy a letter for her to write - A. Never, nor any other document.

Q. Did you ever dictate to her the form of any letter that he was to write - A. Never.

Q. Have you never said to any body that you took care that she should not have your letters, but that you took care to manage well to have letters of her's - A. Never.

Q. Have you or have you not said that you took care that she should have no letters of yours to shew, or any thing to that effect - A. Never.

Q. Nor have not you said that you took care that you would have letters of hers - A. Never.

Q. You again deny it. Now I again caution you and tell you that I will call a witness to contradict you if you again deny it; have not you said that you took care to have her letters, but you took care she should have no writing of yours to produce - A. I did not.

Q. Did you ever propose to her that she should write a letter to you declaring to you that she was not married to you, as your reason that it might save you from a prosecution for bigamy, because the thing was wispered about among your wife's friends - A. Never.

Q. Do you understand the question - A. I do.

Q. Do you know that you have been subject to a prosecution if the fact had been so discovered - A. Assuredly.

Q. I think you told me that you left London upon the 7th of August in the year 1810, and did not return for two weeks - A. I did not return till the 28th, I was not in town on the 9th or 10th.

Q. Can you tell where you dined on the 9th - A. At home, at Birmingham.

Q. With your poor wife that is gone - A. Yes, with her.

Q. Have you got any body here that dined with you that day - A. No.

Q. Did you meet with two persons that went with you within ten miles of Birmingham. Are they here to-night - A. They are.

Q. When did you first apply to them to come here to day - A. About a month back.

Q. As a Birmingham man doing business, you went backwards and forwards continually - A. I came about four times a year.

Q. Do you usually go yourself to enter your name or send any other for you, for the clerk to put it down, so that it will not appear in your own handwriting that you went down at that time - A. It will not.

Q. If you had a friend that you wished to accommodate in the coach I suppose you would not object to enter his name as Thompson that he might be well accommodated - A. I do not understand you.

Q. Have you never entered a name of Thompson for any of your friends for whom you took a place to go in the country - A. I have for my wife, not for any male friends. Yes, from Birmingham not from London; I had a servant that lived with me about six years, and her name was put down with mine when we came to London together.

Q. Who has she lived with since your wife's death - A. With Mr. Griffiths, a surgeon, No. 2, Tooth-place, Finsbury-square.

Q. Where has she lived, and with whom, since your wife's death - A. After I gave up house-keeping she went to live with her father; she lived with me after I gave up housekeeping till the month of August, and from that time till she came to live in London I had seen her two or three times: she went to see her father about seven or eight miles from Birmingham.

Q. How long did she continue to live with her father - A. About a week, and then she went down to Sheers Hill in Staffordshire, about twenty-three miles from Birmingham; I understood she was there about a fortnight or three weeks or a month, then she came to Birmingham and waited my return, and then she came to London with me in September in the coach in a very ill state of health; she went the very same day to Mr. Griffiths.

Q. Where does she live now - A. In the very same place.

Q. Now let me again caution you, do you know a person of the name of Susannah Currie , who cooked your wedding dinner - A. No one in London.

Q. Did not Mrs. Susannah Currie upon the 9th of August, 1810, in London, cook your wedding dinner for you - A. No.

Q. Do not you know Mr. Thomas Evans , he is a respectable wholesale dealer in town - A. I do not know it.

Q. Do you remember a visit from him on the 9th - A. I do not.

Q. I ask you, upon the oath you have taken, did you either on the 9th or the 10th receive from him both you and your wife a congratulatory visit just before he was going into the country - A. I did not; I was in Birmingham at the time.

Q. You know the man - A. I do.

Q. Do you recollect the chit-chat of the afternoon Mrs. Currie saying it was a very odd thing to say that she had the pleasure of dressing a wedding dinner for her master and mistress, and it was the following day that she was married herself some years ago - A. I never heard any such thing said in my presence.

Q. That you persist in - A. I do.

Mr. Alley. There then I leave you.

MARY HOUGHTON . Q. Where do you reside - A. At Wild Green, Sutton Colfield, near Birmingham.

Q. What is Mr. Houghton - A. In the ordnance.

Q. Do you know Mr. Thompson of Birminham - A. I do; that is the gentleman.

(Pointing to him.)

Q. How long have you known him - A. Since the 7th of August, 1810.

Q. Did you go down in the Birmingham coach on the 7th of August - A. I did; I got in it at the end

of Sloane-street, in the afternoon.

Q. Did you travel in that coach all night. Was Mr. Thompson a passenger in the coach all the way you went - A. Yes.

Q. Where did you and Mr. Houghton leave the coach - A. At Hockley, about ten miles from Birmingham.

Q. Did you leave Mr. Thompson pursuing his journey to Birmingham - A. Yes.

Q. Are you quite sure this was the 7th of August - A. Yes, I am.

Mr. Alley. You never knew him before - A. No.

Q. You never spoke to him on the 7th of August, did you - A. Not till I came to London.

Q. At the time you passed him in the street did you know it was Mr. Thompson you travelled with. When was you first applied to to become a witness - A. Wednesday evening last, at Wild Green.

Q. And you have come up from Wild Green on purpose to be a witness - A. I have.

Q. What particular reason have you for knowing it to be the 7th of August - A. I recollect it upon account of my birth-day the Tuesday before, when I kept my birth-day with my friends at Chelsea.

Q. What time did you quit the coach - A. About ten o'clock.

Q. When did you first see him - A. Last Friday.

Q. You never spoke to him in your life before, till last Friday -

Mr. Gurney. You had travelled with him by daylight, can you have the least doubt about his person - A. Not the least.

WILLIAM PORTER . Q. What are you - A. I am an assistant at the George and Blue Boar. I have the entries of the coach of the 7th of August, 1810; this is my fellow-servant's hand-writing, he is dead; he was the book-keeper at that time, I know his handwriting.

"Tuesday, August 7th, 1810, Mr. Houghton two to Birmingham; 4 l. 10 s. Sloane-street. Mr. English one, Stratford. Mr. Thompson one, Birmingham; 2 l. 5 s. full.

COURT. Q. You know the hand-writing of the man that kept the book at that time - A. I do; this is his hand-writing.

JOHN HOUGHTON . I live in Wild Green, Sutton Colfield.

Q. Were you in town in the beginning of August, 1810 - A. I was.

Q. Upon what day did you leave town to go home - A. On the 7th, in the afternoon, it was on a Tuesday.

Q. Was your wife with you - A. She was.

Q. Do you know Mr. Thompson, of Birmingham - A. I know him from going to Hockley with him that day.

COURT. Do you know your wife's birth day - A. On the 2d was her birth-day, it was kept at a friend's house at Chelsea.

Q. Do you know Mr. Thompson - A. I know him very well.

Q. Was he one of your fellow-travellers - A. He was. I am perfectly sure of it.

Q. Had you any acquaintance with him before this - A. No.

Q. Have you since - A. I have met with him two or three times in the street, and he called upon me some months ago.

Mr. Alley. You often travel backward and forward to London, will you tell me that you can recollect the faces of the different passengers that you meet with in the coach - A. I cannot of every one, but I do that of Mr. Thompson very well.

Q. Did you travel by night - A. Surely.

Q. What time did you leave the coach - A. I cannot tell to an hour or so, about ten o'clock the following morning I should suppose.

Q. What time did you go off at night - A. I believe the coach leaves London at three in the afternoon.

Q. You went in your own coach from the stage, and left him - A. No, not my own coach, in an hackney chaise.

Q. You took a post chaise and left it before you got to Birmingham - A. Yes, at Hockley.

Q. Where do you live now - A. In Wild Green, but then I lived in Birmingham.

Q. When did this man call upon you after your first interview together - A. I do not know.

Q. Will you swear that you never saw the man's face for a full year and a half - A. I cannot, I have seen him in the street once or twice.

Q. What did he call upon you for - A. There was a circumstance which would occasion a trial in Hereford, he should be obliged to subpoene me.

Q. Did he call upon you six, or three months ago - A. He called upon me at one of my manufactories.

Q. Had you given him your address before you left him - A. I am so perfectly well known in Birmingham that I might easily be found; he asked me if I recollected him, I said I did, and then the circumstance of our travelling together, whether he mentioned it first or me, I cannot recollect; it was five days after my wife's birth-day at Chelsea that I travelled with him, there was a particular circumstance that makes me remember.

Q. What time did you leave him in the morning, at Hockley - A. I believe we breakfasted at Stafford.

Q. Did you leave him at Stafford, or go the next stage - A. The next stage I think.

Q. He called upon you you say; when were you first applied to to be a witness here - A. I believe about nine or ten days ago.

Q. Were you before the Grand Jury - A. No.

Q. Was your wife - A. No, we came up to London together.

Q. Have you and he visited often lately - A. No, sir.

Q. Not at your house at all - A. No.

Mr. Gurney. Has he called at your house lately - A. He called upon me at the Imperial hotel, where I am now; I saw him on Friday when he came to town.

Q. Are you well known in Birmingham - A. Perfectly well known.

Q. In the course of travelling, do you think very likely you and your wife might call each other by your names - A. I frequently called her Mrs. O.

Q. You say you are a person extremely well known - A. I am.

Q. Then if any one went to the coach-office to know who was his fellow traveller, he would very

soon find you - A. He certainly would.

Mr. Gurney, Q. to Porter. What time did the coach set off - A. At three o'clock.

Mr. Houghton. I got in the coach at the end of Sloane-street.

Q. At whose house were you at Chelsea - A. At Mr. Nobles.

EDWARD NOBLE . I reside at Chelsea.

Q. In the month of August were your friends Mr. and Mrs. Houghton on a visit to your house - A. They were.

Q. Was Mrs. Houghton's birth-day kept there - A. In particular it was mentioned at the time, I remember that her birth-day did occur at the time she was at my house; we complained that we had no plumb-pudding on that day.

Q. Do you remember on what day they quitted your house - A. On the Tuesday after, that was the 7th of August; I accompanied them to the coach, and saw them in it at the end of Sloane-street. I have made a memorandum of the day, I have it in my pocket. Mr. Houghton left on Tuesday and returned on Friday.

LETITIA MOSELEY . Q. Did you live with Mr. and Mrs. Thompson at Birmingham - A. Yes, near seven years.

Q. You remained in their service till Mrs Thompson's death - A. Yes, I did.

Q. Was your master in town in the beginning of August, 1810 - A. He was.

Q. Do you know your master's birth-day - A. Yes, the 4th of August.

Q. Was it usually kept in the family - A. Yes.

Q. Was it kept at that time when he was in town - A. It was not kept at that time; Mrs. Thompson was very ill indeed.

Q. Do you remember her attempting to write a letter at that time - A. Yes, she began to write to my master in London on Friday morning, the 5th.

Q. Did she finish it - A. No, she was too ill. I finished it for her.

Q. Did you ever write or finish any letter for her but that one - A. No. I took it to the post.

Q. When did your master came down - A. On Wednesday after the Friday, and my master remained at home about nine or ten days at Birmingham.

Q. Are you quite sure he staid above a week - A. Yes, I am sure of that.

Mr. Alley. You are in service now, are not you - A. Yes.

Q. You lived at that time, two years ago, at Birmingham - A. Yes.

Q. As soon as your poor mistress died you did not think it right to stay at Birmingham, you came to London, you did not remain any time at Birmingham - A. I remained there till my master sold off, my mistress was buried in June, and he sold off in Birmingham.

Q. Was there any other servant in the house but you - A. No, but I had a person in the house with me, but she was not a servant; I was in the country altogether three or four months after her death.

Q. How long did you stay in the same house with your master - A. About two months; the rest I passed with my friends; my master called on me once while I was at my father's.

Q. You know Eleanor Weston , the woman that says she is his wife, and he denies; has Eleanor Weston ever happened to pop in on you, and your master any where - A. Yes, at the warehouse, twice she did.

Q. She wanted to know what business you had there - A. She did not ask me.

Q. Did she ask Mr. Thompson - A. Not in my hearing.

Q. In what room did Eleanor find you in - A. In the bed-room, I was looking up Mr. Thompson's clothes I had got to be washed, and I was there when Mr. Thompson went to the door.

Mr. Gurney You had lived in his family for near seven years - A. Yes.

Q. His wife had ill health - A. Very ill health.

Q. At the time that this Eleanor saw you in the bed-room were there any words between you and her - A. I never spoke to her at all; he said if Mr. Thompson choosed to keep me as a servant she had no objection; Mr. Thompson was in the room at the time, he did not speak at all. She said she was his lawful wife; he told her if the did not go about her business immediately he would send for a constable and have her taken up; she said he was her lawful husband, it was a shameful thing, he had promised to marry her a fortnight after Mrs. Thompson's death; Mr. Thompson told me to go directly home, and I did, leaving him and her both in the same house; she said he was her seducer, and she would make it cost him a great sum of money. This was in Bartholomew-close.

JOHN TWELLS . I am clerk to Messrs. Spooner's the bankers.

Q. Does Mr. Thompson keep cash at your house - A. He draws checks upon us for the credit of the house at Birmingham.

Q. Look at the signature, John Thompson , in the parish book of St. Bride's do you believe this to be his hand-writing - A. No, I should not pay a check in that hand-writing. This differs from his usual manner of writing, I should not take it to be his writing. I do not conceive any similarity between it, it is not like his hand-writing; I have seen him write six or seven times.

COURT, to Porter. What time did that coach that set out from your coach office return to town - A. About two o'clock.

Q. Are there coaches that set off earlier from Birmingham - A. Some get to town about eight in the morning, they leave there about seven in the evening.

Q. Do you know of any coach that come up at an earlier hour - A. No.

JURY. How early does the mail get up to town from Birmingham - A. That I do not know.

COURT, to Thompson. Do you know when the mail gets up to town - A. The Shrewsbury mail sets off about three o'clock in the afternoon, and would get to town about seven or eight in the

afternoon, and would get to town about seven or eight in the morning, they arrive about seven in the morning.

Q. Do you know any coaches that come up to London at an earlier hour - A. No.

Q. From what place did you subpoene Mr. and Mrs. Houghton - A. I first called upon him in January, I called on him at his warehouse, the last time I wrote to him at his warehouse in Birmingham.

Q. What was the name of your physician and apothecary that attended your wife - A. I applied to them both, and they would not prove any thing concerning the day.

Q. Had your wife a nurse - A. No, she had not.

Q. What hour did you get to Birmingham on the 8th - A. About eleven o'clock in the morning.

JOSEPH BLANDFORD . Q. You are a practicing attorney in London - A. I am.

Q. Were you solicitor to a commission where Mr. Thompson was a creditor - A. I think John Thompson, I know him well.

Q. What commission was it - A. A man of the name of Brothers, two commissions; this Thompson was a creditor and assignee under both commissions.

Q. The hand-writing in the church-book of St. Bride's, look at it - A. It is not his usual hand-writing, but I have not the smallest doubt in the world but it is his hand-writing. There is one thing remarkable, which no man will mistake, the letter S is pretty similar in all the instance which I have ever seen him write, I never saw him write otherwise than John Thompson in full length, and I have seen him write a dozen times under those commissions. (A paper shewn the witness, which Twells thought was not his hand-writing.) This is his hand-writing, I called upon him for the composition myself, for the money to be paid under this agreement, and he paid it himself. (Another paper shewn the witness, which Twells did not think was his hand-writing.) I will swear that this is his hand-writing, I saw him sign it, these are the proceedings under the commission, and I saw him sign them.

Q. Is that signature to be found more than once in these proceedings - A. Yes, a dozen times, and I saw him sign them all but one.

Mr. Gurney. You are attorney for the prosecution A. I have never interfered at all, my part is concerned for the defendants certainly.

WILLIAM MURRAY . I am partner with Mr. Blandford.

Q. Do you know the hand-writing of Thompson - A. I know his hand-writing perfectly well.

Q. Look at the register book of St. Bride's, and tell me whether you think it is his hand-writing - A. From the knowledge I have of his hand-writing, I think there is no doubt but it is hand-writing, I have no doubt, not the least in the world.

(The commission under the bankruptcy shewn the witness.)

MR. MURRAY. I drew up these depositions and memorandums, I positively saw him write his name to them.

Mr. Gurney. You have a very strong opinion that the writing in this register-book is his hand-writing - A. I do, but I think he meant to disguise it.

Q. Is not the letter T perfectly unlike his handwriting - A. He has made the T to differ in all the times he has wrote his name.

Q. But as to the letter s, which is a blotted letter, is there any other letter which is like his - A. Then I do not think much like it; I think it is really his hand-writing.

Q. I ask you whether there is any other letters like his besides the s and n, is the i like - A. The i is not like exactly it is not so much like his general writing as I have seen.

Q. Is the o like - A. I think it is like his general hand-writing.

Q. Do you mean to say the h is like - A. I cannot speak to every letter

Q. Is the n in John - A. The n, I do not think it is, neither are they alike here.

Q. Is the h in Thompson like - A. No, I think it is, not as he usually writes.

Mr. Alley. He signs almost different in every character - A. He certainly does

Q. Look at the general character of the handwriting, do you believe it to be his hand-writing - A. I do believe it to be his hand-writing.

SUSANNAH CURRIE . Q. Do you know Eleanor Weston - A. I know Mrs. Thompson.

Q. Do you know the woman that was Eleanor Weston - A. Yes.

Q. Did you know where she lived - A. Yes, in the month of August 1810.

Q. Do you remember cooking a dinner for her - A. I did, on the 9th of August I cooked the dinner for her and Mr. Thompson.

Q. Why did Mr. Thompson dine with her on that day - A. On account of the wedding; there was nothing extraordinary for dinner, but it was for the wedding.

Q. When was the wedding dinner - A. On the morning that Mr. Thompson and Eleanor Weston were married.

Q. Did you learn that from Mr. Thompson yourself - A. I did not see Mr. Thompson till about three in the afternoon.

Q. Do you know Mr. Thompson when you see him - A. I do.

Q. Have you seen him here to day - A. Yes, that is the man, pointing to him.

Q. Did you learn from him, or Mrs. Thompson in his presence, that they had been married - A. As soon as Mr. Thompson came in I quitted the room.

Q. Did you hear from Mr. Thompson that any thing had particularly passed that day - A. No.

Q. Did you on any other day speak to him about his being married - A. To be sure.

Q. Did you at any time speak to him about the subject of his being married - A. He called her his wife.

Q. Did he pass her as his wife - A. She was called so.

COURT. Are you quite sure it was upon the 9th that you, dressed this dinner. Are you quite sure that you saw that man in the afternoon, in London particularly - A. I am quite sure.

Q. Did you live in the same house with Mr. Thompson and these two ladies - A. No.

Q. When did you see Mr. Thompson next after that day - A. I cannot positively say.

Q. Did you see him the day before you dressed the dinner - A. Yes, I did; that was the 8th; it must be some time in the afternoon, because I did not dine there.

Q. Can you charge your memory upon the 8th, at all - A. I think between the hours of one and three to the best of my recollection.

Q. Upon the 9th the ladies talked to you about a marriage, are you quite sure that you saw him the very day before that, on the 7th - A. To the best of my recollection the day before, but I cannot charge my memory further; I am quite sure that I saw him on the 9th that the marriage took place.

Q. Are you as perfectly sure that you saw him the day before - A. Not so perfectly sure of that.

Q. Have you dressed dinners for them often - A. I was in the habit of cooking there.

Q. Can you take upon yourself to say for a certainly that you saw him a week after they were married - A. I cannot.

Q. You only saw him from going to dress a dinner there - A. That is all; I am sure he was there upon the 9th after the ladies had told me that a marriage had taken place; he came in the room, and I left it immediately. I knew my place.

Q. Who lived in the house with the two Miss Weston's, did they keep any regular servant - A. No.

Q. Was it a lodging-house - A. It was let out in tenements.

FRANCIS EVANS. Q. I believe you are a wholesale tea-dealer - A. Yes, in St. Mary Axe.

Q. Are you acquainted with the prosecutor, Thompson - A. Never until he paid his addresses to Miss Eleanor Weston as a widower, that is about two years ago; she lived then at No. 12, Fetter-lane, Fleet-street.

Q. Did you ever hear him express himself to be a widower - A. I never heard him say what he was.

Q. Do you recollect being at Miss Weston's lodgings on the 9th of August - A. I called at Miss Weston's lodgings on the 9th of August by appointment, because I was to prosecute a journey; I called there between seven and eight in the evening, 150, St. John-street, they were Ann Weston 's lodgings; I staid there till ten o'clock; I found Ann Weston at home, and after I had been there some little time Thompson and Eleanor came in together; I left them there.

Q. How long might they stay while you were there - A. About an hour, or an hour and a half. I went away about ten.

Q. What was your reason for recollecting this was on the 9th of August - A. Because I took leave of the ladies previous to my going the journey on the 10th.

Q. Have you any memorandum of that journey - A. I have.

Q. Read it - A. (A pocket book produced and read.)

"Journey began 18th of August, ended September 1st."

Q. I do not know whether any thing was said about the marriage - A. There was not.

Q. Had you ever any conversation with Thompson about her - A. Never.

Q. Did he ever call her his wife in your presence - A. I do not know that ever he did.

JURY. When was it you made these memorandums - A. At the time the transaction took place.

Mr. Gurney. Which of these sisters did you visit - A. I visited Ann; I have been acquainted with her four or five years.

Q. Did you write this on the 10th of August - A. I did, when I commenced my journey that day.

Q. Did you know by a spirit of divination when it would end - A. No; that was not written till the journey was ended; the list is made out before I left home, and the date made when I received the money.

Q. Do you always leave a blank to write that alone - A. Always; it is only 1st of September, which was not written before I settled; it was written previous, and room left for the date; it is all written with the same ink. There is other entries in the book made in the same manner.

COURT. You say with a perfect certainty on the 9th of August you saw Eleanor and Mr. Thompson on the evening of that day - A. I can.

Q. Can you say with certainty how long you had seen them before - A. I do not think that I had seen them for two or three days before; I did not return from my journey untill the 31st of August or 1st of September.

ELIZABETH STOCKMAN . I live at Portsea; my husband's name is Edward, he is a grocer.

Q. What relation are you to these two young women - A. A sister.

Q. Do you remember Thompson the prosecutor coming to your house in September 1810, who did Mr. Thompson bring with him - A. My sister Eleanor, he brought her as his wife.

Q. Did you introduce him as your brother-in-law to all your acquaintances - A. I did, and he was received as such, and he slept with her.

COURT. Had you any reason to entertain the least suspicion that they were not man and wife - A. Not the least.

Q. Do you know whether she shewed the certificate in the presence of Thompson - A. I do not know that she did; I took him to a friend of of mine, a merchant, to send some jewellery to America.

Q. Did they ever talk about the church they were married in; did he - A. At St. Bride's, it was said in his hearing by my sister, and he said it himself.

Q. So then you had no earthly reason to doubt but that he had married her at St. Bride's - A. Not the least on earth.

Mr. Gurney. How many times was the place of marriage conversed upon in your hearing - A. I cannot say, frequently.

Q. Did it not strike you as extraordinary - A. It did not.

ELEANOR WESTON . I am the mother of Eleanor and Ann Weston , the defendants.

Q. Do you know the prosecutor, John Tompson - A. Yes.

Q. Do you recollect his coming to Portsea, in September 1810. - A. Yes; he introduced himself to me as my son-in-law. I lived in Portsea at that time, and supported myself in letting out my house in lodgings.

Q. Did he say any thing about when or where he was married - A. He said he had married my daughter at St. Bride's.

Q. Was he present when the certificate was produced - A. Yes, I saw the certificate, and heard it read, and was fully satisfied; it was read in his presence.

Q. You did not live in the same house with Mrs. Stockman - A. No, he was going to Mrs. Stockman's, and continued there about a fortnight or three weeks.

Q. Where did he go to then from Portsmouth - A. He told me he was going to Birmingham.

Q. Was he absent from Portsmonth - A. Yes, a few days, about a week, and returned again.

Q. When he returned where did he go to - A. He then went to London with me and my daughter Eleanor; upon our arrival in London he brought me to his lodgings in Mitre-court.

COURT. You say there was a certificate, and every semblance of marriage, at that time had you the least reason to believe there was the least semblance on their part, or did you really believe they were man and wife - A. I really believed they were man and wife, I gave them my blessing.

Mr. Alley addressed the Jury in behalf of the defendants, and Mr. Gurney replied.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.


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