Old Bailey Proceedings, 15th January 1812.
Reference Number: 18120115
Reference Number: f18120115-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE OYER AND TERMINER, AND GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND ALSO THE GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, HELD AT Justice-Hall, in the Old Bailey, On WEDNESDAY the 15th of JANUARY, 1812, and following Days;

BEING THE SECOND SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF The Right Hon. CLAUDIUS STEPHEN HUNTER , LORD-MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY JOB SIBLY , No. 4, CARTHUSIAN-STREET, ALDERSGATE-STREET.

LONDON:

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED (BY THE AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON.) By R. Butters, No. 22, Fetter-lane, Fleet-street

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON.

Before the Right-honorable CLAUDIUS STEPHEN HUNTER , Lord Mayor of the City of London; Sir Archibald Macdonald , knt. one of the Barons of His Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir Simon Le Blanc , knt. one of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir Alan Chambre , one of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir Watkin Lewes , knt. Harvey Christian Coombe , esq. Sir James Shaw , bart. Aldermen of the said City; John Silvester , esq. Recorder of the said City: Thomas Smith , esq. Matthew Wood , esq. Samuel Goodbehere , esq. Aldermen of the said City; and Newman Knowlys , esq. Common-serjeant of the said City; His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of Goal Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

London Jury.

William Self ,

Robert Snell ,

John Clewlow ,

William Poiner ,

Thomas Owen ,

James Masters ,

William Grove ,

Henry Mackerill ,

John Franklin ,

William Brown ,

Nathan Angell ,

William Duncalf,

First Middlesex Jury.

Rupert Kirk ,

John Perry ,

Adam Edwards ,

William Thomas ,

William Higgens ,

Charles Stanfield ,

James Farmer ,

Benjamin Martin ,

Thomas Cole ,

Jacob Edwards ,

Richard Fairlock ,

John Mann .

Second Middlesex Jury.

Robert Lloyd ,

Robert Friend ,

George Ball ,

Samuel Miller ,

Nicholas Rogers ,

James Clark ,

Jeremiah Gibney ,

John Plowman ,

Peter Purvis ,

William Sharp ,

Samuel Wilson ,

William Kearns .

Reference Number: t18120115-1

83. GEORGE SKENE was indicted for that he, on the 21st of November , feloniously did utter and publish as true a certain forged and counterfeited acquittance and receipt of money for 36 l. 8 s.; and that he feloniously did utter and publish as true one other forged receipt for the sum of 11 l. 10 s.; and a certain other forged receipt for the sum of 5 l. 16 s. 9 d.; and also a certain other forged receipt for the sum of 20 l. with intention to defraud our Lord the King . And

FIVE OTHER COUNTS for like offences, with intent to defraud different other persons.

The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.

JOHN BALDWIN . Q. I believe you are a receiver of the seven offices established by Act of Parliament, of which the office in Queen-square is one - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know the prisoner Mr. Skene - A. Yes, he was chief clerk of Queen-square office .

Q. At what period is it usual for you as receiver of the police offices to settle - A. I settle the accompt with them quarterly.

Q. I believe you receive from the chief clerk of the offices a statement of the salaries of the magistrates, clerks, constables, and others belonging to the office, and a disbursement of the rent and taxes - A. Yes.

COURT. All salaries and expences - A. Yes.

Mr. Gurney. They also send you at the same time an accompt of the fines and fees at that office - A. Yes.

Q. And then you receive from the treasury the balance necessary to enable you to pay the one and the other - A. Yes.

Q. Then I believe the clerk of the office comes to you bringing you the vouchers, and you settle with him - A. Yes; I give him a draft for the balance, with the exception of the three magistrates, who receive it at the bankers themselves.

COURT. What do you call the vouchers - A. The receipts for the money of the different persons.

Q. Did you receive that statement of salary and expences for the quarter ending the 10th of October last - A. Yes; I received that paper as a statement of the salary and expences.

Q. From whom did you receive that - A. I am not quite sure whether I received it of Mr. Skene personally, or whether it was left at my office at the Secretary of State's office.

Q. In whose hand-writing is it - A. I have no doubt it is his hand-writing; I have seen him write often.

Q.

"Police office, Queen-square, Westminster. The magistrates, clerks, constables, and others of the office Queen-square, for salary, expences, and rent and taxes, &c.; Sandy's stationer, 5 l. 16 s. 9 d.; Downes, printer, 11 l. 10 s.; Soulsby and Allison, coals, 36 l. 8 s.; and one quarters rent due at Michaelmas last, 20 l." After you received the accompt just stated, and had been furnished by the treasury to pay did the prisoner wait upon you by appointment to settle the quarterly accompt - A. Yes, he did.

COURT. You received the money at the treasury, at the Exchecquer office - A. Yes.

Mr. Gurney. Where did the prisoner come to you - A. At the Secretary of State's office, Whitehall.

Q. Did he then produce the several vouchers for the charges contained in this accompt - A. Yes.

Q. Among others did he produce to you the four receipts which are annexed to that - A. Yes.

COURT. The four receipts in question - A. Yes.

Mr. Gurney. In whose hand-writing are the bodies of these four receipts - A. There is no doubt they are Mr. Skene's hand-writing.

Q. Did you pay the prisoner the balance of the accompt including these four receipts - A. I did, taking them to be right charges.

Mr. Serjeant Best. This gentleman has been some time clerk in the office - A. He was in the office before I was appointed receiver; he had one hundred and fifty pounds a year; his salary was raised the last half year to two hundred pounds a year.

Q. He brings these receipts to you before he has the money from Government - A. Yes.

Q. He had some monies in his hands of fees and fines - A. Yes.

Mr. Gurney. I was going to ask you - Had he a considerable sum of money of fees and fines - A. Not sufficient to pay that amount.

Q. What sum of money had he in his hands - A. Fees seventy-four pounds three shillings and eight pence, and fines thirty-four pounds, and the balance was two hundred pounds.

WILLIAM HOLMES . Q. Are you clerk to Messrs. Soulsby and Allison, who are coal merchants - A. I am: their names are William Soulsby , Simon Allison , and George Ward .

Q. Are you acquainted with the character and hand-writing of Mr. Soulsby - A. I am.

Mr. Alley. Have you any interest at all in the house - A. None at all.

Mr. Abbot. Look at that charge which has the name

"Soulsby," is that the hand-writing of Mr. Soulsby - A. It is not, nor is it the hand-writing of Mr. Allison or Ward.

Q. Is it the hand writing of any clerk or person belonging to them - A. I believe not.

Q. What other clerks have they to sign - A. Two or three besides myself. John Allison , the nephew, is one.

Q. Does your masters serve the police office in Queen-square with coals - A. We did.

Q. Do you know the amount of their bill for coals, ending at the 10th of October last - A. I can refer to the books.

Q. Here is an account that you yourself made out, I believe, from your books, just look at it - A. Yes, it is my hand-writing, I made that out from the books.

Q. The amount for coals was seventeen pounds nine shillings during that quarter ending at the 10th of October, 1811; was that the whole of their demand for that quarter - A. It was for that quarter.

Q. Do you know whether any bill had been sent into the office for that quarter previous to the 21st of November - A. Yes, I believe so.

Q. Had you yourself made out any bill - A. Yes, I make out the bill for each office; I made that bill. It was generally sent by the post.

Q. Do you know whether it was sent by the post - A. I should believe so.

Q. Were you to be the person that put them in the post-office - A. Probably I might, but I cannot swear to it.

Q. To whom where the bills sent - A. They are addressed to the chief clerk of each office.

COURT. You send them by the post - A. Yes, addressed to Mr. Skene for that office.

Mr. Abbot. Had you made out any bill for such an amount as thirty-six pounds eight shillings - A. Not for that quarter.

Q. The bill was seventeen pounds nine shillings - A. Yes.

Q. Did you make out that bill for that quarter - A. Yes, I believe I did.

JOHN ALLISON . Q. I believe you are a nephew of Simon Allison , who is a partner of Mr. Soulsby the coal-merchant - A. I am.

Q. Are you clerk to them - A. I am.

Q. You are acquainted with their concerns and their hand-writing - A. I am.

Q. Look at that paper which has the name of Soulsby upon it, is that the hand-writing of Mr. Soulsby or his partner - A. No, nor is it my hand-writing, nor any person belonging to them.

WILLIAM SOULSBY . Q. Are you one of the partners with John Allison and Mr. Ward - A. I am.

Q. You are the first partner in the house - A. I am.

Q. Do you supply the office in Queen-square with coals - A. We do.

Q. What was the amount of your demand during the quarter ending the 10th of October last - A. I cannot justly say; I believe it was seventeen pounds nine shillings, as stated. Mr. Holmes is the ledger clerk, he is bettle able to speak to it than I can.

PHILIP CONSTITUTIUS DOWNES . Q. Are you the son of Joseph Downes - A. Yes.

Q. What business is your father - A. He is a printer; I am not in partnership with him; he is printer for the police officer Queen-square.

Q. Do you know the amount of your father's demand for that office for the quarter ending at the 10th of October last - A. I do not. My father is the person who makes the accompt out.

Q. Do you know your father's signature - A. I do.

Q. I put into your hand the receipt signed, J. Downes, is that your father's hand-writing - A. I do not think it is.

Q. That purports to be a receipt for the sum of eleven pounds ten shillings, do you believe that to be your father's hand-writing - A. I do not; the J is so very different. I do not believe it to be his handwriting.

JOSEPH DOWNES . Q. You are the printer - A. Yes; I print for the police office, Queen-square.

Q. What was the amount of your demand for printing for the office in Queen-square, Westminster during the quarter ending at the 10th of October last - A. Four pound fourteen shillings.

Q. Have you any demand now for the quarter ending at October - A. None at all.

JAMES SANDYS . Q. Are you in partnership with your son as stationer - A. I am.

Q. Did you serve the police office in Queen-square with stationery - A. Yes.

Q. What was the accompt of your demand for the quarter ending the 10th of October last - A. I cannot speak to that matter; my son keeps the books, his name is Michael Sandys .

MICHAEL SANDYS . I am in partnership with my father.

Q. What is the amount of your demand for the quarter ending at the 10th of October last - A. By the books I can tell; my account I made out, the amount is five pounds sixteen shillings and nine pence.

JOHN THOMAS . I am an apprentice to Messrs. Sandys and son; I know the hand-writing of the father and son, I have seen them write frequently.

Q. Look at that, and tell me whether you believe the word, Sandys and son, signatures to that receipt to be the hand-writing of either your master's - A. I do not believe it is.

JOHN LEE . Q. What business are you - A. I am a law stationer.

Q. Are you acquainted with Thomas Rider of Lincolns Inn - A. I am; I have known him more than thirty years. I am his law-stationer. I have had the opportunity of seeing him write often.

Q. Look at that receipt - A. I do not believe this to be Mr. Rider's hand-writing. (The receipts read.)

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel; called eight witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 42.

[ The prisoner was recommended to mercy by the jury on account of his former good character .]

First Middlesex Jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

Reference Number: t18120115-2

84. JOHN CLAYTON and WILLIAM JENKINS were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Jane Fearn , about the hour of ten on the night of the 1st of January , with intent the goods and chattels therein being burglariously to steal .

The case was stated by Mr. Gleed.

JANE FEARN . I live at No. 4, Bury-street, St. James's, in St. James's parish. I occupy the house solely.

Q. You have a servant maid of the name of Wakelin - A. Yes.

Q. Was she your servant on the 1st of this month - A. Yes.

Q. On the evening of that day what time did you leave your house - A. I think it was five minutes past nine. Previous to that time I had been extremly ill, and confined to the house. On that evening I went out accompanied by a friend; I went to the play at Covent Garden; I had locked the doors of the upper rooms, the bed room door, the dressing-room door; four doors I had locked, a cupboard and a closet; the closet and the cupboard were in the bed-room. There is one door leading into the bed-room and one door into the dressing-room. I requested the servant not

to leave the house, and to put up the chain when I went out. I returned a little after twelve and found some of the officers at the door; I was very much alarmed. The officers were at the door waiting for me, and some female friends. I did not go up stairs immediately, I was so much terrified. When I went up the officers went with me, I found the dressing-room door broken open.

Q. In what way had it been fastened - A. It was locked, and the key inside. I went out of that room into the bed-room, bolted that door, and went out of the door that leads into the passage.

Q. When you got into your dressing-room did you find every thing in the same state that you left it - A. No, I found the toilet had been very much pulled about, and my bed had been moved from its place, and the bottom valants pulled off, and I believe one of the side ones; the vallants appeared as if they had been forced off. On going into my bed-room the door leading into my bed-room was open, I believe it was forced open.

Q. You have told us all you observed in the dressing-room - A. Yes.

COURT. Your bed was not in the dressing-room - A. No. In my dressing-room I only observed my toilet had been moved.

Mr. Gleed. You told me before there was a door that separated the dressing-room from the bed-room - A. Yes.

Q. Did you observe that any thing had been done to that door - A. I cannot say, I was so much alarmed whether it was broken open, or how I got into it. It must have been broken open, or else I could not have got into it; I had bolted it before I went out: the bold was on the bed-room side. I have told you what was the state of the bed. In the room where I kept my trinket box, which was every thing that I had got in it; it was in a small closet on the right hand side.

Q. When you went out had you left that closet locked - A. Locked, and I had the key myself in my drawer, where I always kept it. I found that door broken open; that lock had been forced open, and the screws out.

Q. When you got into the closet in what state did you find it - A. I found the trunk safe, and the trinket box in the large closet safe.

Q. Did you observe whether any force had been used to open the box - A. It appeared to have been a little forced; I went then to the closet where I formerly kept the trinket box, but I had moved it some time before.

Q. Had you left that closet locked or open when you went out - A. Locked: I took the key out and put in my drawer. I found all the shelves broken to pieces, and the bottom part of the cupboard torn up, and the hinges forced off; the hinges were separated from the wood. At the inside of the cupboard was a canvas and a paper on it, it seemed as if there had been a knife through it, to see if it was hollow. The outer bed-room door was locked in the state as I left it.

Mr. Arabin. Is your name Jane - A. It is.

Q. Does any body live with you that pays part of the rent - A. There is none.

Q. Are you married - A. I am not.

MARY WAKELIN . Q. You are the servant of the last witness - A. Yes, I am.

Q. When did you first become acquainted with either of the prisoners at the bar - A. It was eight or ten days before the 1st of January Clayton came to my mistress's house, I answered the door; he told me his name was Wilson.

Q. Was Clayton by himself, or was any man with him - A. He was by himself. There were two men on the other side of the way, I do not know whether they belonged to him or not. Clayton said he had a letter for Mrs. Martin; that was the name my mistress went by. He went away.

Q. At that time was the other prisoner at the bar with him - A. I cannot say.

Q. How soon afterwards did you see Clayton - A. A night or two afterwards he threw things down in the area.

Q. You heard things in the area - A. Yes. My mistress sent me out with a message, and then I saw Clayton; he asked me to take something to drink; I said no, I would rather not; he insisted upon me having something; we went and had something to drink.

Q. Did he return to your mistress's house - A. No.

Q. Was any thing said about his coming into the house - A. Oh dear no, nothing at all; I saw him a night or two afterwards, when I went for things for my mistress; I saw him in the street.

Q. Did you go to drink any thing - A. No, not that time. He did not return with me to my mistress's house; he was then alone.

Q. Did you see him frequently after that - A. Yes, he spoke to me in the street.

Q. Did he ever come to the door after that - A. Not till the last night.

Q. Between the first time when the letter was delivered to the last time did you ever see the other prisoner Jenkins - A. No; I never saw him until the 1st of January.

Q. On the evening of the 1st of January we understand your mistress went to the play - A. Yes.

Q. How soon after your mistress went to the play on the 1st of January did you go out of your mistress's house - A. It wanted ten minutes to ten. When I went out of the house I double locked the door.

Q. How soon after you double locked the door did you see Clayton - A. Clayton ran after me from the other side of the way.

Q. You saw him immediately you went out - A. Yes; I was going to get some sprats for my supper; I immediately when I saw him returned back to the door to get something that I wanted.

Q. How far from the door had you got when Clayton accosted you - A. As far as the corner of King-street. about four doors. When Clayton came up to me he said, I saw your mistress go out; I said, yes, my mistress was gone out; he immediately returned with me to the door.

COURT. How came you to talk then about your mistress, had you before any conversation about your mistress - A. No. We both returned back to the door, and Clayton said, let me go down stairs for about half an hour; he said he would go against she came home from the play; I told him my mistress suffered no men to come after the maid-servant, and the door was open he immediately rushed in.

Q. The door was open during the time you had that

conversation - A. Yes, I had it a jar, and he desired to go down stairs.

Mr. Gleed. Had you a lamp burning in the passage - A. Yes. I and Clayton went down stairs, he sat down: there was a stone bottle on the dresser, he said give me the bottle, I will go and get a quartern of rum: he went away with the stone bottle, I remained in the house. He returned in about five minutes. While he was gone I went into the parlour to stir the fire up. The street door was shut during his absence.

Q. When he returned back how did he gain admittance - A. He knocked at the door, and Jenkins came in after him.

Q. In what manner did they come in - A. Clayton came in first and when the other man came in he said it is all right. Clayton shut the door. I denied Jenkins coming in, and told him I dare not have two, if I asked one I could not ask two; I said it out loud: Clayton made answer and said, it is all bloody stuff; they said no further; then they went down stairs, I went after them. When they got down stairs they drank a glass each, and left a glass on the table for me to take.

Q. After that what was done - A. Clayton said, I insist upon you to go up stairs; he caught hold of me and insisted upon my shewing him where my mistress's purse of guineas were; I made answer, I never saw my mistress only with one while I was with her, and she said she would sell it.

COURT. One what - A. One guinea, sir. They then dragged me up stairs.

Mr. Gleed. Who dragged you up stairs - A. Clayton, the other man went with the candle. Clayton went up first, I was second, and Jenkins was behind with a candle, they were dragging me up stairs.

Q. In your way up the kitchen stairs was any thing said by either of them to you - A. Jenkins said it was all bloody stuff, for I knew where the guineas were; I said, Lord have mercy upon me, pray, for God's sake do not touch my mistress's property.

Q. Now when you got upon the top of the kitchen stairs what passed then - A. It was then I said Lord have mercy upon me; I spoke it loud, the persons by must have heard; I dare say the gentleman at the door heard me.

Q. You went up the first flight of stairs the same as you did the kitchen stairs - A. Yes, I went up that flight of stairs by force. He immediately broke the dressing-room door open. The candle went out on first stairs, Jenkins went down stairs and lit it, and returned with the light. Clayton told Jenkins to go and get a light. Then we went up the second flight of stairs to my mistress's dressing-room door; Clayton bursted the door open: he put his back against the garret stair-case, and his footagainst the door, and pushed it open.

Q. At the time the door was forced open where was Jenkins - A. He was there.

Q. Did he do anything - A. Not then. I said, pray for God's sake do not; Clayton answered it was all stuff.

Q. At the time that you got to the dressing-room did you see any pistol - A. Yes, Jenkins had it in his right-hand pocket, he produced it, and gave it to Clayton, Clayton put it to my head and told me if I made the least alarm he would blow my brains out. He held the pistol in his hand, and put it to the side of my head, and with the other hand he had hold of me.

Q. Had you been making any noise - A. All the way up stairs I cried out, the kitchen stairs and all.

Q. The door being broken open you all three, I suppose went into the room - A. Yes.

Q. What was then done - A. They opened the bedroom door, they undid the handle, it was not bolted, he took hold of the handle and opened it.

COURT. There was a bolt was not there - A. It was not bolted.

Mr. Gleed. When you got into the bed-room what did they proceed to do - A. Clayton went to the closet, he pulled the paper off the key-hole, the keyhole was pasted over; I never saw the cupboard opened before. Jenkins then pulled out a case of little things, screw drivers, picklock keys, and several things, and put them on my mistress's bed; he took the screw driver, or the picklock key for the purpose of undoing the cupboard door; he did not open it; he sent Jenkins down for the kitchen poker.

COURT. What door - A. The cupboard door on the side of my mistress's bed.

Mr. Gleed. Who was the man that tried to open the door with the instrument - A. Clayton. He was not able to open the door with the instrument, he sent Jenkins down for the kitchen poker; he went down and returned with the kitchen poker, and Clayton opened the door with the kitchen poker; he put the poker underneath the door, and bursted the cupboard door open; he then bursted the bottom part of the cupboard open; Clayton said the guineas were there; the cupboard was empty, there was nothing in it; he put a pen-knife all over the paper. There then was the cupboard on the other side of the fire place, Clayton forced that open; there was a trunk there that had my mistress's property, Clayton forced that open with a screw driver. They tried to open the trunk, I told them it was of no use, my mistress's property was down stairs, they did not open it. At the time that the attempt was made to open the trunk I heard a noise below; I said immediately the property was down stairs. I thought of getting lower down, they had hold of me; we all came down together and there was a knock at the street-door; I went to the door and opened it, and the officers rushed in.

Mr. Arabin. Are the Bow-street officers here - A. They are here.

Q. You say Clayton came at first with a letter - A. Yes. He was a perfect stranger to me, I never saw him with my eyes before.

Q. You had something to drink with him - A. Yes, I had.

Q. You said this night you were going out on some errand of your own - A. Yes.

Q. You did not wish him to come down stairs with you - A. No, I did not.

Q. But yet you neglected your own business - A. I did not neglect my own business; the woman had sold all her sprats, and was gone; she sat at the corner.

Q. You say the bottle was standing at the dresser

dy - A. Not ready for him; it always stood there.

Q. He went for a quartern of rum, you went to stir the parlour fire you opened the door, and in they came - A. Yes.

Q. Did not you go to the public house this night and ask for Clayton - A. No, I did not.

Q. I do not know whether you knew the pistol was not loaded - A. I did not. He put it to my head and said he would blow my brains out.

PETER PERRY . Q. You are one of the patrols of Bow-street - A. I am.

Q. In consequence of some information did you watch the house, No. 4, Bury-street - A. I did. William Read , Thomas Limbrick , John Limbrick , and Townsend were watching the house with me. Under the direction of the office we watched the house.

Q. Do you recollect on what night you went to watch the house first - A. On the 23d of December we watched the house; the first and the second night we got into a house right facing of it, so as to be able to see every thing that came to the door; I saw Clayton one night in the street; I saw him speaking to the servant, the last witness.

Q. Whereabouts was that - A. Not exactly at the door, but a little of one side of the door.

Q. Had you seen him do any thing to the house, or come to the house - A. No. We continued watching the house until the 1st. On the evening of the 1st between ten and eleven o'clock, I was at the public-house and the other four were watching; Read, the two Limbricks, and Townsend were watching opposite; I received an information that the two prisoners were gone in.

COURT. Where is the public-house, how near - A. At the corner of the street, just by. When they informed me I went to them and we all stood about the door; I peeped down, and looked into the area, there is an iron railing goes over; I there heard some loud talk, and I saw a man's hat lay on the dresser, and presently I heard some people coming up the kitchen stairs, I heard the voice of a woman screaming; then they all went up stairs.

Q. Did you hear a noise upon their going up stairs - A. I did, and after they went up stairs I heard a great noise, such as bursting and breaking open of doors, as I supposed it was. I continued at the door a great while untill all was silent, I could hear nothing at all, and then I thought they might be doing the servant some injury; I then got a crow in order to break the door open; in doing that I made such a noise as any person in the house must have heard me, and by that noise they all came down stsirs; me and the other officers rushed in. The door opened, I cannot say who opened it. I and Townsend took Jenkins, and the other officers took the other. We took him to a public-house opposite. I searched him and found this pistol on him, it was not loaded. The other prisoner was taken at the same time all in the passage. After searching the prisoner Jenkins I returned back to the house of the prosecutrix. In the passage these things were picked up, it is a case of small chissels, screw drivers, &c.; it was picked up and given me by somebody there; I did not see it picked up. I went up stairs to see what they had done.

Q. When you went did you find the house in the state that the girl has described it - A. I did.

Q. to Mary Wakelin. You spoke of a case that was put on the bed by Jenkins - A. Yes, this was the same one.

Perry. There is sixteen instruments to the case.

WILLIAM READ . I am an officer of Bow-street.

Q. You were one of the persons that were set to watch the house - A. I was the person that received the information; I first went there on Monday the 23d of December.

Q. Between the 23d of December and the 1st of January had you seen either of the prisoners about there - A. I had seen Clayton standing at Mrs. Martin's door; I saw him there three or four times.

Q. On the evening of the 1st of January tell me what you saw - A. About nine o'clock the servant girl went out, she returned in about ten minutes with a hackney coach.

Q. Had you seen Clayton before that time - A. Not that night.

Q. In fact when the coach came the mistress went away - A. Yes. In about ten minutes the girl came out and shut the door after her.

Q. Had you seen Clayton between the time of the coach going away and the girl going out - A. No.

Q. How soon did you see Clayton - A. In about five minutes after the girl went out Clayton and the girl returned arm in arm together to Mrs. Martin's door.

Q. When they got to the door were you near enough to hear any thing that was said by either of them - A. No. They talked at the door ten minutes or a quarter of an hour before they went in.

Q. Did you know at that time the person of Clayton - A. I did.

Q. How soon afterwards did you see Clayton again - A. In about a quarter of an hour Clayton came out.

Q. How soon did he return - A. In about five minutes with another man with him.

Q. Did you at that time know who the other man was - A. I did not. Clayton knocked at the door, the servant opened it, Clayton went in, and the other forced himself in; Clayton paused at the door.

Q. Describe in what manner the other man forced himself in - A. It appeared that Clayton held the door until the other man came round by the shutters and forced himself in.

Q. So that till the other man came in the servant girl who opened the door could not see him - A. No: he came round by the shutters and forced himself in, and we heard the door bang to. I gave information to Perry, and then we came to the prosecutrix's door we crossed over the way; I looked down the area, I saw a man's hat lay on the table, they all of them seemed to be talking loud.

COURT. Who was talking loud - A. I heard the men's voices taking very loud.

Mr. Gleed. Were you able to hear any thing that was said by either of them - A. No. I heard the girl cry out, Lord have mercy upon me, what shall I do; she continued the cry all up stairs, she appeared to cry very much; then I heard a great noise as if doors were being broken open.

Q. Did you hear anything more than what Perry has

told us - A. Nothing more, until they came down stairs.

Q. When the door was opened which of the men did you take in custody - A. Clayton, and I took him over to the wine vaults and searched him; upon him I found this knife and a dollar; I then took him to the office, and he was committed. This is the knife I found upon Clayton, it appeared bent, as if it had been pushed against places.

Mr. Arabin. It is a very common knife - A. Yes.

THOMAS LIMBRICK . I am one of the patrols of Bow-street office. I was upon watch this night.

Q. When you got to the door what did you observe - A. I kneeled down and peeped through the keyhole to see what was passing through the passage; there was a lamp burning in the passage; the first I saw was Clayton and Jenkins and the servant between them both going up stairs; I heard the girl say, do not, my mistress will be ruined, and I shall be ruined myself; I think them are the words; she said it loud, so that I could hear it, and people that were standing outside as well. They went up stairs, and in about three or four minutes afterwards I saw one of the prisoners, which I cannot take upon me to say, come down and light a candle from the lamp; he returned up stairs with the light. I heard a great knocking up stairs for about the space of five minutes; I then saw Jenkins coming down stairs with the candle in his hand alight; I expected he was coming out of the street door, but he went down the kitchen stairs; I saw him return up stairs with the poker in his hand; he went up stairs, and we heard a knocking up stairs, and in the course of about two minutes I did not hear the servant speak at all; I said I am afraid they are doing something to the servant we had better break in; I saw no more than what the other witnesses have told, except after the prisoners were taken we secured them; at the moment I lit a candle and went up stairs; I found this skeleton key laying in the passage; it is a picklock. This picklock fits the case that has been produced; I found it where the prisoners were apprehended.

JOHN TOWNSEND . Q. I do not know whether you know any more than what the others have deposed to - A. No more than I saw Clayton go in; I saw him several nights before; the other prisoner I had not. The time that Clayton went in was between nine and ten o'clock, he staid in some time, and when he came out and returned and brought Jenkins with him it was gone ten. Here is the staple of the dressing-room door, which they forced out, and here is some of the paper that covered the key-hole of the cupboard, and here are the screws that came out of the cupboard, which were concealed under the paper.

Mr. Arabin. You said you knew Clayton before - A. Yes, by being about there before, no other way.

Q. to prosecutrix. Respecting this cupboard, was any use made of it - A. Not any particular use; it is a cupboard in the wall, even with the paper. It is a part of the house, and covered with the same paper as the roam.

Clayton's Defence. I am very sorry I have employed a counsel, he is not here.

Jenkin's Defence. All I have to say I would wish to ask the servant girl whether Clayton did not say I was his acquaintance. I made no force at all.

Q. to Mary Wakelin. You opened the door when the two prisoners came in - A. Yes.

Q. Describe the manner in which Jenkins came in - A. Clayton came first, and Jenkins rushed in after him.

Q. Did you hear Clayton ask Jenkins to come in - A. No, he rushed in.

Clayton called one witness, who gave him a good character.

Jenkins called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

CLAYTON - GUILTY - DEATH , aged 28.

JENKINS - GUILTY - DEATH , aged 35.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18120115-3

59. THOMAS COLLICOTT was indicted for that he, on the 1st of November , did forge and counterfeit, and caused and procured to be forged and counterfeited, a certain mark upon paper, allowed to be used under authority of the statute, in that case made and provided, with intent to defraud His Majesty .

SECOND and THIRD COUNTS, for feloniously uttering a certain paper with a forged and counterfeit mark, he knowing the said to be forged with like intention.

FOURTH COUNT, that he did utter a certain other paper with a forged mark upon it, with like intention.

AND THREE OTHER COUNTS, for like offence, only stating it to be a stamp instead of a mark.

The case was stated by Mr. Gurney.

MARY LOUISA KING . In the month of October last were you employed as assistant to the prisoner at the bar - A. Yes, I was.

Q. The prisoner I believe was a medicine vender living in Oxford-road - A. Yes.

Q. In the month of October do you recollect the prisoner receiving any order from Wood and Cunningham in Bath - A. I recollect he had an order, I cannot say when it was.

Q. In consequence of receiving that order did the prisoner give you any order respecting packing them up - A. I assisted in packing them up, he told me how I was to do them; I cannot recollect exactly what he said. Upon the bottles that he had filled with medicine I was to put on the stamps.

Q. What directions did he give you for putting the stamp on - A. I was to cut out the center part with Jones, Bristol on them; I was to paste them on, and the sealing wax was to fill up the part where Jones and Bristol had been on it.

COURT. What was the sealing wax to perform - A. To fill up the part where the words had been cut out, and the remaining part of the stamp was to be pasted on each side of the bottle.

Mr. Gurney. Look at that stamp and tell me whether it was stamps of that description that you put on the bottles - A. Yes, it was.

Q. Do you recollect how many in number you were to put on - A. No, I cannot; there were many of different kind of medicines.

Q. Were they all bottle medicines - A. Some of them were lozenges, and Jones Bristol were cut out of the stamp, put on the boxes, and a label was put on the vacancy.

Q. Was this the manner in which it was done - A. Yes.

Q. Were there any other medicines besides the bottle medicines, and the box medicines - A. No, I do not recollect any other.

Q. After you put on the stamp by the prisoners directions what became of the medicines - A. They were packed up in a square deal box.

Q. I do not know whether you saw any invoice that was made out by the prisoner - A. That is the invoice that was made out to accompany the box; I did not see it made out; it was put in the box, and the box was sent by the boy to go to some inn to go to Bath; I cannot say what inn. It was given to Joseph, a boy that lives in the house, for the purpose of being taken to the waggon. The prisoner was in the back parlour at the time, and he lifted it on the boy's shoulders.

Q. Previous to this time when the box of medicines were packed up had he given you any information of the stamps whether they were genuine or not - A. I left Mr. Collicott nn the 17th of September, I returned about the 21st of October, he produced to me some stamps of this description.

COURT. Was that the first time that you had seen stamps of that description - A. The first time I had seen some of that description.

Mr. Gleed. At the time he shewed you the stamps did he make any observation respecting them - A. He said he intended to use them instead of the real stamp.

COURT. Was that the expression - A. It might not be the exact words, it is as near as I can say.

Q. Did he at that time or any subsequent time give you any instructions how you were to use them - A. He did not at that time.

Q. In the month of November last do you recollect the officer coming there accompanied with Mr. France - A. Not in November; about the 6th of December I recollect Mr. France coming to master's house accompanied by some officer.

Q. At that time the prisoner was absent was the house searched - A. Yes.

Q. Were any stamps found - A. Yes.

Q. Who did you see produce them - A. Mr. Vickery.

Q. Were the stamps found in your presence - A. No. I was up stairs at the time.

Q. Are you able to tell me whether the stamps that Vickrey produced were the stamps that were in your apron - A. Yes.

Q. How came they in your apron - A. I put them there. I put the stamps in my apron after the officers came there.

Q. Do you know for what purpose the officers came there - A. Afterwards I did.

Q. After the stamps were produced were these the stamps that were in Mr. Collicot's house - A. Yes.

COURT. Where did you take them from - A. From a back closet.

Q. Did you ever hear any thing said by any other person respecting these stamps - A. Not by any person. I heard Mrs. Collicott request him not to use them; she requested him several times not to use them.

Mr. Alley. These things you call stamps, they never had the coronet of a crown affixed upon them - A. No.

Q. Around the stamp there is a circle, and in the circle of a genuine stamp a crown is placed - A. Yes.

Q. Now these that are called stamps had not the crown, nor the sum payable as the duty - A. No.

COURT. Before you put this label upon the boxes, and upon the bottles, where did you get them - A. I took them out of the back shop closet where Mr. Collicott kept them; he directed me where to get them, and after I saw them they were always kept there.

JOSEPH HARDING . Q. Did you live in the month of October last with Collicott the prisoner - A. I did.

Q. Do you recollect receiving any box from him - A. I do.

Q. Look at that box - A. I took no particular remark of it. I received a box like this, I was to take it to the Castle and Falcon, Aldersgate-street. I think it was directed Cunningham at Bath.

Q. to Miss King. Is that the box that was packed up by the prisoner, and given to the last witness - A. It was a little box like this; I believe it was directed to Cunningham at Bath; there is no direction on the box now.

GEORGE WOOD . Q. I believe you are in partnership with Mr. Cunningham at Bath, as medicine vender - A. I am.

Q. In the course of this last year had the prisoner made any application to you or your partner - A. To me. I believe he made application about July to sell medicine for him as his sole agent; that was his expression to me.

Q. You complied, I believe - A. I did.

Q. Did you after that receive medicine from him - A. Yes.

Q. In the month of October did you send him any order for medicine - A. Yes.

Q. In the execution of that order did you in the beginning of November receive any box of medicines - A. Yes, by Rogers's waggon.

Q. At what inn does that waggon come in London - A. The Castle and Falcon, Aldersgate-street.

Q. Did you receive an invoice, or bill of parcels - A. Yes, inclosed in the box. This is the invoice that I received.

(The invoice read.)

Mr. Gurney. Did you receive these medicines packed up in a box - A. Yes.

Q. Was the box opened, or any part, or the whole taken out - A. Yes, the whole of the medicines were unpacked and taken out of the box.

Q. At the time that you received them were the stamps put upon them - A. I received them with the stamps on them in the usual way on the bottles and boxes.

Q. On the 9th or 10th of December did you receive any letter from the prisoner - A. Previous to my receiving

the box I received a letter.

COURT. You do not know his hand-writing, do you A. I have seen him write; I perfectly believe it to be his hand-writing.

Mr. Gurney, Q. to Miss King. Look at that, whose hand-writing do you believe that to be - A. It is Mr. Collicott's hand-writing I believe.

(The letter read.)

Q. to Mr. Wood. Did you receive another letter in November - A. Yes, the letter bears no date. I remember Mr. France of the stamp-office coming to my house, I believe about the third day from the receipt of that letter.

Q. to Miss King. Look at that also - A. Yes, that is his hand-writing. (The letter read.) Addressed Mr. Wood and Co. Union-street, Bath; December 9th, 1811; signed T. Collicott. Mr. Collicott informs Messrs. Wood and Co. he recently purchased some stamps, which have since turned out to be not correct, and not knowing whether any of them were used sent to Mr. W., should be obliged for him to remove every thing used by a stamp, and to be sent to London, they shall be returned free. If it happens that two or three respectable men call upon you shall be obliged by your telling them you are out of the article, but you expect a supply. Your obliged humble servant.

Mr. Gurney, Q. to Mr. Wood. Did you receive this by post - A. Yes. In consequence of that letter I directed it to be done, and I believe it was done, and in two or three days after Mr. France from the stamp-office came to me, and I delivered up to Mr. France the box of medicines.

Q. Were the stamps that were on these when you delivered them up to Mr. France the same stamps that you received on them - A. Exactly the same.

Q. Had you dealt in medicine before - A. Before Mr. Collicott called upon me I had but recently opened the shop.

Q. Had you any medicine before that package came to you in October - A. Yes; I should suppose in August.

Q. Had you been in the habit of selling medicines of this description - A. Yes; I had been in the habit previous to this of selling medicines with stamps upon them.

Q. Did you look at all upon the label or stamps of those medicines that came from the prisoner - A. Never at all.

Q. So that you cannot form any judgment of the appearance of them - A. I never read them at all.

THOMAS FRANCE . Q. You are the assistant solicitor of the stamp office - A. I am.

Q. In consequence of that information that you received you went to the prisoners house accompanied with Vickrey - A. I did.

Q. Were you present when the stamps were produced in the apron - A. I was; and they were left in the care of Vickrey. In consequence of information I went down to Bath to the house of Wood and Cunningham on the 13th of December I found that box there; it is the same that I found there, it contained medicines with stamps upon them; they are part of the medicine that I found in the box; there is three bottles, and one box that I received of Mr. Wood. The box has been in my custody ever since. In the box there were several bottles that had genuine stamps those I took out, but all these in the box are not genuine stamps.

Q. The three bottles in the box I now produce were part of the contents of the box you now produce - A. They were.

JOHN VICKREY . Q. You I believe are a police officer - A. Yes.

Q. Did you on the 6th of December go with Mr. France to apprehend the prisoner - A. I did. I searched the house, I found a quantity of paper resembling stamps, with some bottles with stamps on them. I found the loose stamps in an apron tied up together, and put into a coal-hole under the front area.

Q. When you first went into the house did you see the young woman that has been examined of the name of King - A. I did.

Q. When you first saw her had she an apron on - A. She had.

Q. While you were up stairs did she quit the place where you and Mr. France was - A. She did, for the purpose of getting us a light, and when she returned she had not any apron on.

Q. Then you searched and found the stamps in the coal-hole - A. I did; they have been locked up by me ever since. These small bottles I found in the apron with the stamps upon them. I after that went to a place called Pell, below Bristol, on the 8th of December, that was two days after I had searched the house, I apprehended him there, and brought him up to London.

Q. At the time of his apprehension did you find any more bottles - A. I did, in a bundle that he produced from his bed-room; there are also stamps upon them two large bottles; there is the impression of a seal of T C upon the top of the bottle, the other is plain; both the bottles have stamps upon them.

Q. On what day did you arrive in town - A. On the 10th I believe.

THOMAS LINLEY . Q. What situation do you hold in the stamp office - A. A supervisor.

Q. Is it part of your duty to have the impression of stamps that are used by direction of the commissioners - A. Yes.

Q. I will thank you to shew me the impression of the stamp for medicines of the value of above a shilling, and not exceeding two shillings and sixpence, used in pursuance of the act of parliament, the 44th of his present majesty - A. These are them.

Q. Have you another of a higher price, value above two shillings and not exceeding four shillings - A. Yes, I have, that is it.

Q. These stamps that I have asked you about, are they used by the commissioners in pursuance of the act, the 44th of his Majesty - A. Yes.

Q. Mr. Marchant I believe is the engraver at the Stamp office - A. He is.

Mr. Alley. Look at that, is that at the sides of it like it or different - A. It is not like it.

Q. This is a counterfeit, value above two shillings and sixpence and not exceeding four shillings, look at that one of the smaller ones - A. The sides of that is different.

COURT. Mention what the difference is - A. They are of no comparison to the stamp office labels.

Q. Do you mean that they have no resemblance - A. Yes, they differ in every respect; there is the same letters and the same writing, but they are in a different shape.

Mr. Gurney. That is a genuine stamp, is it not - A. Yes.

Q. There is some from two shillings and sixpence four shillings - A. These are genuine stamps.

Q. At the ends are not there all the same words and figures - A. Yes.

Q. Is the ornament about these words, though not so well done, is it or is it not done so as to appear in imitation - A. In imitation of the genuine stamp, so that I might buy it myself.

COURT. That is, you might take it for the genuine stamp - A. Yes.

Mr. Gurney. Take that bottle in your hand, do you mean the imitation is such that any purchaser without an accurate observation might take it for the genuine stamp - A. I might buy them myself.

Q. Then in your judgment, sir, these are not genuine stamps - A. No.

Q. to Vickrey. Open the box and take some of the medicine out - A. Yes.

Q. to Mr. Linley. Have you looked over all these in the box - A. No.

Q. Just take some out, are they genuine or not - A. They are not the stamps of the stamp office.

Q. Then they are not genuine stamps - A. No. Dalby's Carminative, that is not the stamp-office stamp.

Mr. Alley. Does not the stamp-office allow venders of medicines to-use stamps of their own form - A. Only of their own name.

Mr. Gurney. You allow persons who take a certain quantity from you to have their name on the stamp - A. They apply to the board to have their own name on; it is made by our own engraver, and it is kept in my custody.

Q. Are any of those which you have examined, the Dalby's carminative, is that a stamp ever authorised by the commissioners of the stamps - A. It is not.

Q. Is it an imitation of the stamp of the stamp office - A. It is a very good imitation.

COURT, Q. to Mr. Wood. What was the nature of your dealing with the prisoner Collicott in the sale of these medicines did you sell them on his account to receive a commission for such as you sold and to return them unsold to him, or were they charged to you and you debitted with them - A. I sold them on my account, and not on any commission; I paid the carriage down.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel, called seven witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 42.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18120115-4

86. BENJAMIN WALSH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of December , twenty-two bank notes, each of them being made for the payment of 1000 l, and one other bank note for the payment of 200 l. the said bank notes, at the time of committing the felony being the property of sir Thomas Plumer , knt.

SECOND COUNT, for feloniously stealing, on the same day, a certain bill of exchange made for the payment of 22,200 l. the said bill of exchange being the property of Sir Thomas Plumer , knt. he said money then being due thereon to the said Sir Thomas Plumer, knt.

THIRD COUNT, for stealing on the same day a certain bill of exchange for the payment of 22,200 l. being the property of Sir Thomas Plumer , knt.

And the FOURTH and FIFTH COUNTS in the same manner as in the Second and Third Counts, only rating it to be a warrant for the payment of money instead of a bill of exchange.

SIXTH COUNT, for stealing a certain other warrant for the payment of 22, 200 l. the said warrant being the property of Sir Thomas Plumer , knt.

SEVENTH COUNT, for feloniously stealing on the same day, a certain other warrant made for the payment of 22,200 l. the property of the said Sir Thomas Plumer , knt. the same being due and unsatisfied to him.

The Indictment was read by Mr. Abbot. and the case was stated by Mr. Garrow.

SIR THOMAS PLUMER , KNT. Q. Have you for many years past employed the prisoner at the bar as your stock-broker - A. I have.

Q. I believe sir, in the course of the last summer you made a purchase or a contract of a large estate - A. I did, in the month of July.

Q. Did you in the month of August apprise Mr. Walsh of your having made that purchase - A. I did, I told him that I had made the contract for the purchase of the estate, which I expected to be completed on the ensuing Michaelmas, and then to be called upon for the payment of it, for which it would be necessary to make provision by the sale of stock.

Q. Did you advise him that the amount of stock would be large - A. I did.

Q. Did you consult with Mr. Walsh of selling the stock then, or deferring the sale until the time that you made the payment - A. I did.

Q. At that time in August what advice did Mr. Walsh give you - A. To postpone the sale of the stock saying that the prospect was that the stocks would considerably rise, that it would recover from the oppression it had suffered gradually, therefore the longer it was postponed the better.

Q. The contract is not yet completed. Did you in the hourse of that morning tell him the execution of the contract was not completed - A. I am not sure whether I communicated that to him, but in the middle of the month of November Mr. Walsh urged me strongly to sell the stock, and at that time I certainly told him that the contract was not completed and that at present I had no occasion for the money, and it was quite uncertain when I should; I believe I said that it was probable it would not be completed before Christmas.

Q. Did Mr. Walsh give you any other reason for selling the stock - A. At an early period, for the want of money he told me it was his opinion that the stock would fall considerably; he urged the advice repeatedly.

Q. By repeatedly do you mean different days - A. Different days, and at one of these times I very

well remember he stated to me to be the opinion of intelligent persons at the stock exchange that the 3 per cent. stocks would be low as 50.

Q. At that time I believe sir they were about 62 or 63 - A. I believe so. He came to my chambers at Lincolns Inn for the purpose of repeating the advice, and he wrote notes (I have looked for them, they are lost, I cannot find them) for the purpose of immediate sale.

Q. Did you, sir, in consequence of this advice, on the 28th of November, give Mr. Walsh any advice to sell the stock - A. I wrote a note for that purpose on the 28th of November; I have not got that note now.

Q. What quantity of stock did you authorise Mr. Walsh to sell - A. I think it was thirteen thousand in the 4 per cents. and eighteen thousand six hundred three per cents. reduced.

Q. I believe that was on the Thursday - A. Yes.

Q. On the Friday morning did you go into the city to Mr. Walsh's office - A. I did. I saw him, he told me that he had made a contract for the sale of that sum, and asked me whether I could come for the transfer of it on the Wednesday or Thursday following, saying it would be necessary to give notice before on what day I should come for the purpose, in order that the purchaser might have notice, and be prepared with his money.

Q. Did he assign any reason why you were not to deliver the stock that day, or any other day - A. Not at all.

Q. Had you gone there for the purpose of selling that stock if he had done it that day - A. That was the only reason for which I went, and to purchase exchecquer bills.

Q. Before that day had any thing passed between you and Mr. Walsh - A. I had consulted with him what was to be done when it was sold, until I paid for the estate what would be the best way of disposing of or placing the money.

Q. What had Mr. Walsh told you would be the best way of disposing of your money - A. In exchecquer bills, the advice which he repeated to me on Friday the 29th. I believe I should mention that before I authorised Mr. Walsh to sell out the stock I had mentioned my intention to a commercial gentleman, who gave the same advice to sell the stock.

COURT. To sell the stock and to place it in any thing of exchecquer bills - A. No. But certainly the idea of selling the stock at all premature was entirely oweing to Mr. Walsh, without which probably I should not have sold it to this hour, as I had no occasion for the money for any other purpose than paying for that estate.

Q. After your return home did you find a letter from Mr. Walsh - A. I did.

Q. Is that the letter - A. It is the letter, I believe it to be the hand-writing of the prisoner.

(The letter read.)

Q. On the Monday or Tuesday did you write a note to Mr. Walsh for your going into the city to transfer the stock - A. I did, either on Monday the 2d, or Tuesday the 3d. I have not got the note. I appointed Wednesday to be the day to tranfer the stock.

Q. On Wednesday did you attend accordingly and transfer the stock with Mr. Walsh your broker - A. I did. I went into the city for the purpose of completeing the whole business, to transfer the stock, and to purchase exchecquer bills.

Q. Did Mr. Walsh furnish you with exchecquer bills on that day - A. He did not, he told me it was too late to get exchecqur bills that day.

Q. What was to be done with the money for the sale of your stock - A. I left him to receive it, and to pay it into my bankers, which he said he should do.

Q. Your bankers are Messrs. Gosling and Sharpe, in Fleet-street - A. Yes. He told me he should call on me at my chambers in Lincolns Inn for the purpose of receiving a check upon my bankers for the money, in order that it might be laid out in exchecquer bills on that day.

Q. The next morning did he wait on you at Lincolns Inn for that purpose - A. He did, soon after eleven o'clock.

Q. Did you give him a check on your bankers - A. I did, I gave him a check on my bankers for twenty-two thousand two hundred pounds.

Q. That exceeded by some hundreds what you sold - A. It did. The produce of the stock sold was twenty-one thousand seven hundred pounds, I made it up twenty-two thousand two hundred pounds.

Q. For what purpose did you give that check on your bankers of twenty-two thousand two hundred pounds - A. For the purpose of being laid out in exchecquer bills, and for no other purpose; and he promised to lay out the money in that manner, and to bring the exchecquer bills to my bankers or myself at four o'clock that day. This was Thursday the 5th of December.

Q. Did he come to you on the afternoon of that day - A. He came to me about half past four or a quarter before five at Lincoln's Inn, he appeared a little out of breath; he came up stairs and complained of an asthma; he said he had the disease of which his father had died. I persuaded him to sit down and not to converse until he had recovered. After a little pause he produced a paper to me; that is the paper he produced to me, giving me the account of what he had done for me that day. This is the accompt of the stock sold, and the exchecquer bills that he had purchased.

(The paper read.)

Q. Did Mr. Walsh furnish you with the accompt of whom you had bought these exchecquer bills for fifteen thousand pounds - A. He did; the fifteen thousand pounds exchecquer bills of Mr. Coutts's broker. I think he mentioned Mr. Trotter, but I am not certain. He stated that they could not be delivered on that day because they were locked up in a drawer, but they were to be delivered at half an hour after three o'clock on Saturday the 7th, the next day but one, and that he should call on me that day at three o'clock to receive a check upon my bankers for the money to pay for the exchecquer bills, he having, as he stated, paid into the bankers that money, the fifteen thousand pounds into the bankers, Messrs. Gosling and Sharpe, he produced a receipt.

Q. They were your bankers for the exchecquer bills - A. Yes. Mr. Walsh left me in a short time;

after enquiring after my family he left my chambers.

Q. After Mr. Walsh was gone did you find there was no receipt at your bankers for the fifteen thousand five hundred pounds - A. I perceived there was no receipt for that.

Q. Upon which I believe you went down to your bankers and made some enquiry - A. Yes.

Q. The next morning I believe you went to Mr. Walsh's office - A. I did.

Q. And I believe you found he was gone - A. I did not see him. I never saw him afterwards untill I saw him at Bow-street.

Q. You have told us that he made an appointment for the money to pay Mr. Coutts's broker that money on that Saturday, did you receive this note - A. I did.

Q. Is this his hand-writing, and by whom was it brought to you - A. It is his hand-writing. Two persons called, one of them is Mr. Anstry, his clerk, the other is a professional gentleman, Mr. Titsell.

Q. By this time it was quite discoverable that you were after Mr. Walsh - A. It was. (The letter read addressed to the Solicitor General.)

Q. Be so good as to look at that letter, in that the hand-writing of Mr. Walsh - A. I believe it is. (The letter read, dated December 6, 1811, addressed B. Walsh, Esq. M. P. London.)

Q. Are these several papers the hand-writing of Mr. Walsh - A. I believe that to be; the second paper, the third paper, the fourth paper, the fifth, the sixth, seventh, and eighth; I believe them all to be the hand-writing of Mr. Walsh.

Mr. Scarlet. I believe Sir Thomas you placed a very implicit confidence in the prisoner - A. I did, and I have done so for a considerable time.

Q. He was a stock-broker by trade - A. He was.

Q. Do you recollect whether the purchase of exchecquer bills came from you originally or whether it came from him - A. I am sure I cannot be positive; very likely it might be my own; I certainly communicated to him that I did not want the money only for the purchase of an estate when it was fixed, and certainly something must be done with the money, and I remember asking him whether it was worth while to invest it in exchequer bills, and he said it certainly was.

Q. Do you know when the money was received whether he paid any money into the bankers, or by a draft - A. I do not know of my own knowledge, but I believe he paid it by a draft; I have understood there were two checks to the amount of one thousand pounds, and another check of his own not quite the whole amount; the whole amount was not paid in, he paid it short two hundred and seven pounds.

Q. I will ask you, sir, whether the whole purchase, the sale of stock and the purchase of exchequer bills are in the trade of a stock broker - A. Certainly.

Q. Your whole object was in laying out twenty-two thousand two hundred pounds in exchequer bills - A. Yes.

Q. I will now ask you, sir, whether it was left to his discretion to pay it in your own bankers - A. I gave him the check in the usual mode.

Q. If he had paid the check itself to the person himself whom he bought, formed no part of the contract, or if he had paid the check into the bankers - A. I certainly expected he was going to pay the check into my bankers.

Q. I ask you whether that formed any part of the contract - A. Certainly not. He had told me that he should pay it into my bankers, and that he should call upon my bankers to receive a check for that purpose.

Q. It was no part of your contract that he should take the check from you and receive bank notes - A. It was no part of the contract; I expected he would. He told me that he paid it into the bankers.

Q. Do you know whether it was his practice to take the check to his bankers, or to pay it into yours antecedent - A. Yes; generally he used to lay out his money first, in former transactions, and then called upon me for a check upon my bankers to reimburse him what he had laid out. Sometimes I delivered him the money. (A letter read, dated December 5, 1811, and others dated December 6, 1811, December 7th, and 8th, 1811.

WILLIAM HEWIN . Q. You are a clerk in the banking-house of Messrs. Goaling and Co. Fleet-street - A. I am.

Q. Sir Thomas Plumer has kept cash at your house some time - A. He has.

Q. Do you recollect on the 5th of December last paying a check drawn by Sir Thomas for twenty-two thousand two hundred pounds - A. I do; I have the check here. (The check read.)

Q. In what manner did you make the payment - A. I gave twenty-two notes of a thousand pound each, and one note of two hundred pounds. I have the numbers of the notes, I entered it in the book at the time; the numbers are, 6531, 6719, 8088, 8376, 8371, 9283, 9282, 8228, 8626, 6214, 5777, 4763, 8711, 9333, 9332, 9331, 9513, 9199, 9141, 8867, 9298, 7394, all for one thousand pounds each, and 7945 a two hundred pound note.

Q. To whom did you pay the check - A. To Mr. Walsh himself, he came personally and brought the check; I delivered the notes into his hands.

Q. Did he return to Mr. Gosling's at any time of the same day - A. He did, about half after four, as near as I recollect.

Q. Did he then deposit with Messrs. Gosling on account of Sir Thomas Plumer - A. He did, some exchequer bills; I did not receive them, I was present.

Q. Did he pay any money at that time - A. No, nor bank notes.

Q. Did he take a receipt for those exchequer bills - A. Yes, he did.

Q. When Sir Thomas Plumer 's check was paid Sir Thomas had balance in that house to that amount - A. Oh, yes.

WILLIAM HARMER . Q. You are a stock-broker by profession - A. I am a stock broker and dealer in exchequer bills.

Q. On the morning of the 5th of December did Mr. Walsh apply to you - A. He did; I sold him to the amount of six thousand five hundred pounds exchequer bills, and fifteen hundred pounds in India bonds. I have a copy of the accompt here.

Q. By whom did you deliver these to the prisoner

- A. By George Hagley; my clerk brought me these eight notes of one thousand pounds each; he brought me a check for the difference upon Mr. Robarts for one hundred and seventy one pounds nine shillings.

Q. In the course of the same day did Mr. Walsh purchase of you any other exchequer bills - A. Not Mr. Walsh himself, but by the means of his clerk.

Q. At the time that he applied to you, and you sold him these exchequer bills of six thousand and odd pounds did he apply to you for any more - A. No, he did not.

Q. If he had applied to you for twenty-two thousand two hundred pounds should you have been able to have accommodated him - A. It strikes me I should, I do not know what my stock was.

COURT. The question is, whether, according to your knowledge of business, twenty thousand pounds of exchequer bills could have been procured - A. There are very few days but what they could, I should think it likely.

Mr. Garrow. What did you do with the notes that your clerk gave you - A. I gave them to Mr. Barber, a bill-broker.

GEORGE HAGLEY . Q. Are you clerk to the last witness, Mr. Harmer - A. Yes. I carried to Mr. Walsh six thousand five hundred pounds exchequer bills, and India bonds to the amount of fifteen hundred pounds.

Q. Did you deliver them to Mr. Walsh personally - A. No, they were first given into the hands of his clerk.

Q. Did you see him at the time - A. No, I received of Mr. Walsh eight notes of one thousand pound each, and a draft for the balance of one hundred and seventy one pounds I believe.

Q. Did you take an account of the bank of England notes that you received - A. Not the numbers; I wrote on them.

MR. PARKER. Q. You attend for the bank of England - A. I do.

Q. You produce the several notes of a thousand pounds each that came in there - A. I do, twenty-two of one thousand pounds each, and one of two hundred.

Q. to Mr. Hagley. Now look out your eight - A. These are my eight, there is on them, 5th and 12th, Walsh; the fifth day of the twelfth month. 8626, 8228, 9282, 9283, 8371, 8376, 8088, 6719. (The number of the notes were again read, of which these eight form a part.)

WILLIAM DEBIRT . Q. I believe you are an agent for the sale and purchase of American stock - A. I am. I am in partnership with Mr. Dearman and Bell, under the firm of Debirt, Dearman and Bell.

Q. Do you know the prisoner Walsh - A. I do.

Q. In the month of November had he any conversation with you respecting the purchase of American stock - A. Yes.

Q. Had he made any enquiry of you respecting American stock - A. He had; whether there was a good many in the market, and whether the sum of ten or eleven thousand pounds sterling money could be purchased. I told him that American stock was scarce, but I believe in a few days it might be accomplished; I would enquire and let him know.

Q. Did any thing pass between you respecting the sort of American stock - A. It did. I suggested it was necessary to know whether the purchaser meant to send it out as a remittance to America, or as a capitalist to keep it here.

Q. Why did you say that was necessary to be known - A. Because there is some sort of stock that is best calculated for America, and others for those who reside here; Mr. Walsh said he thought it would be wanted for America.

Q. Can you recollect how long this was before the 29th of November - A. Two or three interviews had taken place previous to the 29th of November nothing more past than reporting what stock was to be found.

Q. You had reported to him the condition of the market - A. I had.

Q. On the 29th of November had Mr. Walsh called at your office - A. I think he did; I think about twelve o'clock, and I afterwards went to him at his office; I then told him I found the stock could be purchased, and for so large a sum I would request him to give me a written order with the price for my government; he gave me this written order signed B. Walsh, November 29, 1811, Debirt and Co. please to purchase eleven thousand pounds in America 3 per cents or bank shares preference to be given to the latter; the price not to exceed to be paid for an Wednesday.

Q. That Wednesday was the 4th of December on that Wednesday did Mr. Walsh call upon you - A. He did; he said that it was not convenient to pay for it on that day but he would pay for it on the morrow at twelve o'clock, if I would call upon him. On Thursday the 5th I called upon him soon after twelve at his office in Angel-court, he said here are eleven thousand bank notes, count them; I did; he gave me eleven bank notes of one thousand pound each; he said you need not hurry yourself in the delivery of the stock, make it convenient any time this morning. I delivered it that day I believe about a quarter after three with the accompt. I have that accompt with me, this is it. (The accompt read.)

Q. Ten thousand eighteen pound ten shillings and sixpence was the sum that he had paid to you, for which he gave you eleven thousand pounds in bank notes - A. Yes, and the balance I gave to him by a draft on the bankers.

Q. Just look at this, are they American certificates of bank shares of American stock - A. Those I examined in Bow-street were the same; I examined them correctly there, and that is the identical stock.

Q. Did any thing more pass between you and Mr. Walsh - A. Upon Mr. Walsh locking up the stock in his iron safe, as he was locking it up; I said, Mr. Walsh if this stock is to go to America, shall I bring our notary to prepare it is usual. He then said I do- not know that it is going to America, but I am going out of town for two or three days, and you may call, or I will see you in the beginning of the week.

Q. If a person take these things to America will they be of use to him there without a notary - A. If they are lost the record, the entery in the book is like a policy of insurance.

Q. If a person has them in his pocket it does not want to be registered - A. But then if lost it cannot be recovered. I immediately took the notes to the office that I received of Mr. Walsh; I think I delivered them to Mr. Dearman; my clerk, Ellison, was present.

MR. JENKINS. Q. Did you see the last witness, Mr. Debirt, carefully examine these papers at Bow-street - A. I did. They are the same papers, they have been sealed up ever since. I am certain they are the same and in the same state.

JOSEPH ELLISON . Q. Are you clerk to Messrs. Debirt and Dearman - A. Yes.

Q. On the 5th of December last do you recollect receiving any notes from them gentlemen - A. Mr. Debirt handed them to Mr. Dearman, and Mr. Dearman handed them to me, a parcel of bank notes.

Q. Did you take any particular notice of that parcel at that time - A. I counted them, eleven notes of one thousand pound each.

Q. Did you afterwards in the course of that day pay any money on their account at Masterman's - A. I did, the account is kept in the name of John Dearman and Company.

Q. Did you in the course of that day pay these eleven bank notes - A. I did; with other money.

Q. Tell us the fair amount you paid - A. Thirteen thousand four hundred and eighty-two pounds ten shillings, of which the eleven one thousand pound notes were a part; there was no other bank note of a thousand pounds in the sum.

JOHN BRAND . Q. Were you a clerk to Messrs. Masterman's on the 5th of December last - A. Yes.

Q. Do you recollect receiving a parcel of bank notes as coming from John Dearman and Company - A. I do, from Ellison, the last witness, to be placed to their accompt.

Q. What was the amount - A. Thirteen thousand four hundred and eighty-two pounds ten shillings; I entered it to the credit of John Dearman and Company, without the particulars, I handed over the papers to another box to be entered into the waste book.

Q. Before you handed them into that box did you do any thing - A. I made an entry of them.

Q. What did you do with them first - A. I told up the amount, and agreed with John Dearman and Company's clerk. On one of the notes I wrote John Dearman and Company, and the total amount; that was the outside one. I folded them up, wrote it in the book, and put it into the box.

Q. Having written this on the outside of one of them you folded them up so as to make one enclose the whole - A. Yes.

Q. Having so done did you put them into the box - A. I did.

THOMAS OVERY . Q. Were you a clerk to Messrs. Masterman and Company on the 5th of December last - A. I was.

Q. Was it your duty to take out of a box those parcels that are entered - A. It is part of my duty with other clerks to take them out and enter them in a book, and take a particular accompt of them.

Q. Did you take out of a box a bundle having the name of John Dearman and Company upon them - A. I did, and the amount was on the back; I opened the bundle and took out the contents. I have got the entry here. This is the entry.

Q. How many bank of England notes are there - A. Eleven of one thousand pounds each, 8867, 9141, 9199, 9513, 9331, 9332, 9333, 8711, 6214, 5777, 4763.

Q. Were there any other bank of England notes - A. There was not.

JOSEPH WALSH . Q. That gentleman is your brother - A. He is.

Q. In the beginning of December was he indebted to you in any sum of money - A. He was, and had been for some time.

Q. Had he any short time previous to the 5th of December desired you to make out the accompt - A. I had been making repeated applications to him for payment from time to time, and having bought the lease of a house in Lothbury, for which I expected to be called upon for payment; I had been for some time particular urgent upon him. In consequence of which he said, I think about a week previous to the 5th of December that if I would make out the accompt he would compare it and settle; I think to the best of my recollection that I sent him the account on Monday the 2d of December.

Q. Upon the 5th did he make you any payment - A. Upon the Monday he said he was in hopes that he should be able to settle it on the Tuesday. On the Wednesday I saw him he came and dined with me, and brought the accompt and mentioned some omissions which he conceived I had made in the accompt; I convinced him that my accompt was right. We agreed the accompt.

Q. Was was the balance coming to you - A. Eleven hundred and ninety-nine pounds odd, I think.

Q. He did not make you the payment at that time - A. No, he told me he would pay me on the following day: I said, I particulasly wished it, as I had to make the payment for the house on the Friday.

Q. Now on what time on the Thursday did he make you any payment - A. About half past twelve, at his office; he called upon me about twelve o'clock at the Temple, and then afterwards walked with me into the city. I parted with him in Aldermanbury after having settled that he should give me a draft; I went and received the balance.

Q. About what time did you in Angel-court receive the balance - A. Between twelve and one.

Q. In what shape did you receive it - A. I received a note which I believe to be a thousand pound note and a draft for the balance; I received it for a thousand pound; I never looked at it. I sent one of my apprentices immediately on my return home to Messrs. Gosling and Company, his name is William Clark Young .

Q. Do you keep cash at Messrs. Gosling's - A. I do.

Q. Did you deliver to your apprentice William Clark Young that self-same bank note that you received from your brather - A. I did.

Q. Did you see Mr. Walsh again in the course of that day - A. No, I received from him some India bonds on account of my father's estate, I never looked

at them, I received them as of the value of fifteen hundred pound, I sent them up at the same time with my cash, to Messrs. Goslings to be placed to my account, the same indentical papers; at the same time that I paid them into the bankers Messrs. Goslings I knew they were the bankers of Sir Thomas Plumer .

Mr. Garrow. There has never been the least imputation that this gentleman had any knowledge of this transaction.

COURT. The letters proves the direct contrary, that this gentleman had no knowledge whatever.

WILLIAM CLARK YOUNG . I am an apprentice to Mr. Walsh.

Q. Do you remember receiving any thing from him on the 5th of December to carry to his bankers - A. I received a one thousand pound Bank of England note, and a check, I believe from his brother, upon Robarts, I thing it was one hundred and ninety nine pounds eleven shillings; I received some papers which Mr. Walsh told me were India bonds.

Q. To what amount did you understand the India bonds were - A. I do not know.

SAMUEL PRENDERGAST . Q. You are a clerk to Messrs. Goalings - A. Yes.

Q. Does Joseph Walsh keep cash at your house - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember on the 5th of December receiving any thing from his clerk Young - A. Yes, a one thousand pound note, and a check for one hundred and ninety nine pound eleven shillings.

Q. What was the number of the note - A. 7394, the rest was in a check, I think on Robarts, and some India bonds to the amount of fifteen hundred pounds.

THOMAS CLARK . Q. I believe you are the brother-in-law of Mr. Walsh - A. I am.

Q. On Thursday the 5th of December did you receive from him a bank note for one thousand pounds - A. I did.

Q. And I believe you gave him two checks to the amount of six hundred pounds - A. I did.

Q. Leaving four hundred pounds in your hands - A. Yes.

Q. On whose bank were these checks drawn - A. Upon the firm of Scott and Clark, one of five hundred and one one-hundred; they were returned to me by my banker as paid.

Q. Did you hand over to Messrs. Scott that bank note of one thousand pounds - A. I did.

MR. SCOTT. Q. You are in partnership with Mr. Clark, the last witness - A. Yes.

Q. On the 5th of December did he hand over to you a bank note for one thousand pounds - A. Yes, I paid it to our banker, Smith, Payne and Smith, the same day.

THOMAS HORTON JAMES . I am clerk to Smith, Payne and Smith.

Q. On the 5th of December did Messrs. Scott and Clark pay into your banking house a bank note of one thousand pounds - A. Yes, No. 6531.

HENRY ANTRY . Q. Were you clerk to the prisoner Mr. Walsh in December last - A. Yes.

Q. Do you recollect on the 5th of December his giving you a one thousand pound bank note, to be taken to the bank and changed for smaller notes - A. I do, I took it to the bank and got it changed, I do not know the number of it. The notes that I received in exchange for it I gave to Mr. Walsh.

Q. What time of the day was that - A. Between twelve and one. He took the notes and returned some to me, to enter the numbers in this book, in order that they might be sent to a person in the country as a remittance for stock sold.

Q. For payment to some person for whom he had sold stock - A. Yes.

Q. Did he on that day make payment on account of your father - A. He did, he gave me an exchequer bill of three hundred pounds odd.

Q. Was that the same hour of the day or later - A. That was later.

WILLIAM EVERINGHAM . Q. Were you a clerk at the bank on the 5th December last - A. I was.

Q. Do you recollect receiving a bank note of a thousand pound for small change - A. I do.

Q. What name was it brought in - A. In the name of Walsh, No. 9298 is the number of it.

Q. Did you take an account of some of the notes it was paid with - A. I did, one of five hundred, three of one hundred, one thirty, seven tens, twelve fives and the rest in ones.

Antry. I received three one hundred, one thirty.

Q. Did you pay in the one thousand pound note in the name of Walsh - A. Yes, I wrote on the note Mr. Walsh's name, B. Walsh, Angel-court, Throgmorton-street, one thousand pound; I wrote that on it.

Q. That is the note that you received of Mr. Walsh on that day - A. I think it is.

Q. Have you any doubt - A. I have little, if this came on the same day I have no doubt, I changed no other on that day.

MR. CHARLES. Q. I believe sir you employ yourself in the purchase and sale of government securities - A. I do not.

Q. Did you at any time make any contract with Mr. Walsh for the purchase of any stock - A. Certainly with another person.

Q. Did you contract with Mr. Walsh on the subject - A. No, I did not.

Q. Were you present at the transaction - A. I transacted it myself.

Q. I asked you if you transacted with Mr. Walsh, your answer was no; now I ask you again did you transact with Mr. Walsh - A. I did the transaction.

Q. When was it you made any contract with Mr. Walsh - A. On Friday the 29th of November.

Q. What contract did you make with Mr. Walsh on that day - A. There was some stock of thirteen thousand and odd pounds.

Q. What was the contract for - A. The contract was for thirteen thousand four hundred or something of that sort four per cents; and seventeen thousand or seventeen thousand one hundred reduced.

Q. You were to buy and Mr. Walsh was to sell - A. Yes.

Q. Did he name his principal - A. I understood who was to be his principal; I saw a note in his hand.

Q. That was an order of Sir Thomas Plumer - A. Yes.

Q. Was any thing said as to the day upon which Sir Thomas should transfer - A. The day was to be fixed for the transfer, and such day as should suit Sir Thomas Plumer .

Q. Was that day left open to be fixed upon by Sir Thomas Plumer , and communicated to you - A. Yes.

Q. You of course was to be prepared with your money. Upon which day were you to receive the transfer of the stock - A. I left it entirely open for Sir Thomas Plumer to chuse his own.

Q. Did you suggest that Wednesday would do, or Thursday - A. Certainly not; I left it quite open.

Q. In the ordinary course of business when stock is purchased when is it usually completed for transfer - A. If this took place on the Friday it is usual to be done on the next transfer day, but it was not done on that day.

Q. In this case was Tuesday the next transfer - A. It was.

Q. If Sir Thomas Plumer had been there that day on which you made the contract could there have been a transfer - A. It was late in the day, but on Tuesday there could be no impediment.

Q. When was the day, as it was left open for Sir Thomas to chuse a day - A. The transfer stood for the Tuesday, and there was a great disappointment on account of non-delivery to the person who purchased it.

Q. Then after that when had you the first intimation when Sir Thomas would attend - A. On Tuesday from a note which Mr. Walsh shewed me that he received from Sir Thomas Plumer , stating that he would be there on the Wednesday.

Q. You naturally concluded, you had no means of knowing the contrary that was the day he had selected - A. Yes.

Q. Upon Wednesday did Sir Thomas - A. I believe he did. There my transaction ends.

Q. I believe the 4 per cents. was thirteen thousand and the 3 per cents. eighteen thousand six hundred, you have not mentioned it quite correct - A. I believe that is it, I made no memorandum.

Q. I am not finding fault with you, my correcting you is correct - A. It is.

JOSEPH FEARN . Q. I believe you are a goldsmith residing in Cornhill - A. I am.

Q. On Monday the 2d of December did the prisoner, Mr. Walsh, call upon you - A. He did.

Q. Did he make any enquiry of you respecting the Portugal pieces - A. He did; he enquired the price, and whether any quantity could be had.

Q. Did he tell you how much he should want - A. About two or three hundred poundsworth.

Q. Upon Tuesday the 3d did he call upon you again - A. He did, he then said he should want them in the course of a day or two. On Wednesday the 4th he said he should want them on the next day, Thursday.

Q. On Thursday the 5th did some communication pass between you and him respecting these Portugal pieces - A. I sent my clerk over to know what he should want, and received for answer about five hundred poundsworth.

Q. Did you clerk bring back with him a check - A. Not at that time; I made up a parcel of Portugal pieces to the amount of five hundred pounds and a fraction.

Q. Did you receive from the prisoner's office a check for five hundred pounds - A. I did.

Q. Is that the check - A. It is.

Q. Shortly after that did the prisoner call upon you again - A. He did, upon the same day, the Thursday in about half an hour, he said he had mistaken his order, he should not want more than three hundred poundsworth.

Q. I believe at the time that you had received the check you had not delivered the pieces - A. I had not delivered the pieces.

Q. Upon this did you reduce the amount - A. I did, to three hundred and two pounds nine shillings, and gave him my own check for the difference.

Q. What was the pieces that you furnished him with - A. They were doubloons; I gave them to my young man to make up. These are the very same, I believe. My young man's name is William Bell .

WILLIAM BELL . Q. Are you in the employ of Mr. Fearn - A. I am.

Q. Look at these doubloons - A. These are the doubloons and that is the bag that I delivered to Mr. Walsh on Thursday December the 5th.

Q. And that is the species of coin - A. Yes, it is.

JAMES WEBB . Q. You are a hosier - A. I am; I live in Threadneedle-street, behind the Royal Exchange.

Q. Does the Hackney stages stop at your house - Very often.

Q. Do you recollect Mr. Walsh, the prisoner coming to your house on the morning of the 5th of December - A. I do, in the morning, a quarter before eleven.

Q. He had a residence at Hackney - A. He had.

Q. Did he bring any thing with him in the stage - A. A small travelling portmanteau, and a drab great coat; he brought them into my shop himself, he said, good morning Webb; (I had known him some years) and after saying good morning he said, will you allow me to leave my trunk and great coat here, I am going out of town a few days, it will not be in your way. I said, certainly not, sir, make as free with the house as you please.

Q. Were there any stockings on the counter - A. Yes; seeing me busy he said, that is well thought of, I want some warm boot stockings; I cannot stop now, I am particularly engnged, shall you be in the way bye and bye; I answered, yes. He went away, leaving his portmanteau there; he returned again between six and seven o'clock in the evening.

Q. Did he then purchase any stockings - A. I sold him a dozen of woollen strong stockings, some night caps, and a couple of pair of gloves. He asked me if I would send his great coat and portmanteau to his office; I got a porter and sent them to his office in Angel-court.

MR. JENKINS. Q. I believe you were acquainted with the person of Mr. Walsh previous to December - A. I was.

Q. At the time of this circumstance being discovered did you by the direction of the Solicitor General go to Falmouth - A. I did.

Q. When did you arrive there. - A. On the morning of Monday the 9th of December.

Q. About what time had you the first interview with Mr. Walsh - A. About ten o'clock.

Q. At that time was there a packet waiting there bound out to Lisbon - A. I was informed there was.

Q. Upon seeing Mr. Walsh what did you do - A. Mr. Walsh was in a private room in an inn, with three other gentlemen; I requested that Mr. Walsh would come out of the room, he knew me in town.

Q. Did he know that you had the honour of being concerned with Sir Thomas Plumer in some business - A. He did. I desired him to come out of the room, which he did; upon that we went into a private room, we two together; I directed the waiter to come in the room with me: he did come in, and I told Mr. Walsh that he must be aware of the nature of my errand, you have defrauded the Solicitor General to a very considerable amount, and I am now come to desire restitution of such property as you have with you.

He said he had nothing but foreign property with him, which after some time he delivered up. When he said he had nothing but foreign property, I said, I know what property you have. There was a reluctance on his part. He delivered up the American property, together with the bag of doubloons. That was shewn to Mr. Fearns young man.

Q. There were some transactions of business, and you thought if prudent his accompanying you to London - A. Yes.

Q. You had a person of the name of Adkins that accompanied you to Bow-street - A. Yes. He was taken to Bow-street, and there he was committed.

Q. While you were at Falmouth did Mr. Walsh tell you what destination he was going, and what his future plan was - A. While I was in the coffee-house at Falmouth he stated to me that he was first going to Lisbon, and from thence as opportunity should offer to America.

GUILTY, aged 33.

Judgment respited .

Second Middlesex jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

Reference Number: t18120115-5

87. HARRIET DOWDEN were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of August , one yard of lace, value 2 s. the property of David Taylor .

The prosecutor and witnesses, were called, and not appearing in court , the prisoner was

ACQUITTED.

Second Middlesex Jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

Reference Number: t18120115-6

88. WILLIAM PRIESTLEY , JOHN ROBINSON , WILLIAM GOULDING , and THOMAS PRICE , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of January , seven gallons of wine, value 7 l. and fifteen bottles, value 4 s. the property of Charles Ingall and Henry Mann .

HENRY MANN . I am a wine merchant ; my partner's name is Charles Ingall, our wine vaults is in Union-court, Queen-street, Cheapside .

Q. On Saturday the 4th of January at what time on that day were you last in these wine vaults - A. About six o'clock in the evening; I believe I was the last person there. I saw two men examine the locks, the patrol was there; I told him to keep a sharp look out; I examined the place, and the locks of the door were on a patent lock and a padlock. In consequence of information on Sunday morning I went again to the cellar about eight o'clock; Mr. Smith and Lucas came to me when I came to the cellar door the bar was broken off, and the lock was gone; I went into the cellar; in the inner cellar there were eighteen bottles standing empty, they contained port wine before. The corks were then wet with wine. I examined the corks, our names were upon them from the impression of a seal which I have in my pocket, they were close to the bin. I examined the bin, there were six hundred and twenty-seven in the bin, and the mark outside was six hundred and forty-five, exactly eighteen deficient. The first bin was as if something fresh had been taken from it, by the sawdust; that was another bin, there was a deficiency of fifteen in that bin.

COURT. Did you look round your cellar and find anything there - A. We found a bladder by the bin where the eighteen bottles had been taken; this is the bladder. I went to Mr. Betts', Mr. Lucas produced some bottles.

Mr. Gleed. When you returned on the Sunday morning did you find any lock there - A. No, the hasp was broken off, no lock could be affixed to it.

WILLIAM MILLER . I am the cellar man of Messrs. Ingall and Mann. About a quarter before six I locked up the cellar door, the bottles then were in the bins none were standing about; I went again on the Sunday morning about half after eight; I examined the bins and found a deficiency of eighteen in one, I examined the other and found a deficiency of fifteen.

Q. What did you find in the cellar out of the bins - A. Eighteen empty bottles, and the corks lying by them. The corks had been drawn by a cork-screw. I examined the corks, they belonged to Messrs. Ingall and Mann.

Q. Who had the key of the cellar - A. It was locked up in the accompting house.

PHILIP THOMPSON . I keep a cook's shop, 15, Miles's-lane, Cannon-street.

Q. In the beginning of this month did either of the prisoners come to your house - A. Goulding and Robinson came to my house about ten o'clock on the 4th of this month, they asked meif I would buy any wine, they said they were going to work in the evening, they should either get some wine or spirits, if they could get it at the shop they had picked out it would be port wine; if not, they could not tell what it would be. I was to give them ten shillings a gallon for port wine, rum thirteen shillings, brandy one pound. They went away saying that they should be back early in the evening, before the watch came on; they said they were going to meet Price. As soon as they were gone I went to Mr. Lucas, I communicated to him all that had taken place; I made an appointment to meet them at Mr. Betts's house at the bottom of Miles's-lane at five o'clock in the the afternoon.

Q. Now before this appointment did you go any where that afternoon - A. I went to the sign of the Crocked Billet, Rosemary-lane, where I knew these men used to resort: I first met Goulding there, Robinson

and Price came there a little afterwards; they then told me to make haste home, or else they should be gone, and have committed the robbery, and be at my house before I was ready for it. I immediately went to Mr. Betts and acquainted him, and then I went home to my own house.

Q. How soon did either of the prisoners come to yon - A. About seven. Then Goulding, Price, and Robinson came saying that they had been to try the shop, but the patrol and people were so much about they could not get in. They asked me if I would let them leave the tools till the next morning; I consented; two iron crows, a small lanthorn, a padlock and key, and various bladders. They said they should come for their tools in the morning, as soon as the watchmen went off.

Q. Did you take the tools down to Mr. Betts - A. I did, on the over night, and he took them up stairs; I received them back from Mr. Betts, and took them home I was desired to put them in the same place again. This was Saturday the 4th; on the next morning about six o'clock, just as the watchmen went off, Robinson, Goulding, and Price came for their tools; they said, we are very near to our time, are not we; I said, yes, you are exactly. I particularly observed Goulding putting the crow up his coat sleeve with the other part in his hand; when they went away they said they should be back in half an hour or rather better. When they were gone I informed Mr. Betts.

Q. How soon afterwards did you see either of the prisoners - A. About twenty minutes before seven o'clock all four prisoners came in loaded. I had not seen Priestly before. They all came in. I had left the door a-jar, it was shut, but not locked or latched. They gave a knock, and shoved it right in. They said, we have not been long about the business; no, said I, you have been very quick indeed. Robinson had a long bladder full; he put it down in the middle of the floor, and then turned out of my house to go back again; Price, Goulding, and Priestly were in the shop having bottles with them; I said, take them down in the cellar; they were just beginning to take them down stairs when somebody knocked at the door. They took the bottles down in the cellar and began to break them as fast as they could. I opened the door, in came Mr. Smith, and I believe Mr. Drinkall, they had got Robinson with them.

Q. Then Mr. Smith and Drinkall brought Robinson in your house in custody - A. They did, Robinson sat down in a chair; he began to unload himself of bladders, and different things, and he flung a cork in the fire. I saw no more, I was kept as a prisoner in the shop.

Q. How many rooms have you in the house - A. Four rooms and a cellar. I have two men and their wives lodge in the house.

Mr. Alley. What way of life are you in - A. I keep a cook's shop, and I have an income from the army.

Q. Have you not applied to be a police officer - A. No.

Q. Upon you oath have not you applied to be a police officer - A. I might have applied for such a thing, but I did not get it.

Q. I hope you never will. How long have you been acquainted with these men - A. I might have seen them most likely three or four years. I have seen them driving carts.

Q. Upon your oath have not you been intimate and well known by them for the last four years - A. Most likely I have seen them and talked with them; I never drank with them until these two months.

Q. But two months you have known them well - A. They have come and offered me things to sell that I would not accept of.

Q. It is a strange thing these two men strangers to you should come to you and tell you they were going to commit a robbery - A. They were not strangers to me.

Q. You had only known them intimately two months - A. If you will give me leave I can speak as well as you. These men used the Crooked Billet in Johnson's change, Rosemary-lane.

Q. That is the house I was coming to. They asked you where they could sell things that were stolen - A. I suppose so, that is a month ago.

Q. I take it for granted you took them in custody A. No, I did not.

Q. Have you not been accused of having some deals - A. Never in my life, nor for any thing out of the way.

Q. You say that these men told you their story and they left with you them wicked implements - A. Yes. I thought it was my duty to expose them.

Q. Certainly, it is the duty of an honest man. Who proposed to leave the door a-jar - A. The men proposed to me to leave it ready for them, and therefore I left it a-jar.

Q. These goods were found in your premises - A. Yes, and they were meant to be so.

MATTHIAS PRIME LUCAS . Q. You are one of Common Council-men of Tower Ward - A. I am.

Q. Had you associated yourself with other gentlemen to protect the Ward. I had. In consequence of information I had received, all of which I communicated to the magistrate, I associated with the gentlemen of the Ward for the purposes of detecting robberies that were about to be committed.

Q. When did you see Thompson, the last witness - A. Some days previous to the robbery, and I saw Thompson on the morning of the 4th; on Saturday evening we assembled by appointment at Mr. Betts's house, shortly after sun-set; I, Mr. Drinkall, Mr, Skipper, Mr. Smith, William Pope my foreman, and another person; we were there on Saturday the 4th of January, at five o'clock in the evening; we waited there some time, and then Mr. Betts produced a blue and white handkerchief containing two house-breakers crows, a dark lanthorn, a padlock and key, and a number of empty bladders: after myself and the gentlemen that were with me looked at them they were returned to Mr. Betts, and took them away; a part of us staid all night, and the rest that retreated came there at four o'clock on the Sunday morning, I went there between three and four on the Sunday morning. I then agreed with the gentlemen there, to station a person at the top of Miles's-lane, Connon-street; Mr. Smith was stationed at the end of Crooked-lane, that

is connected with Miles's-lane; after I had stationed them there, I stationed myself between Thompson's house and Mr. Betts's house, in Lower Thames-street, a few yards of it; our object was to notice the persons we suspected going to Thompsons' house in the morning. I waited thereabouts till near six o'clock in the morning, I then heard some men talking loud, and on getting nearer to them they were coming from Lower Thames-street into Upper Thames-street. I walked on the opposite side of the of the way, rather behind them untill they turned up Miles's-lane; I observed them go to Thompson's house, as near as possible six o'clock the Bridge-ward watchmen were crying past six o'clock, five or six of them. These men passed through talking loud, I drew back from Miles's-lane a few yards, expecting that when they came out of Miles's-lane they would come out towards Lower Thames-street; I waited a minute or two, and returned to Miles's-lane, and concluded from the appearance of Thompson's house that the men had left it, I instantly went to Mr. Betts, there I saw Thompson, and ascertained that the men had got their tools and had gone to work.

Q. How many men did you observe go to Thompson's - A. Three men went to the door, and I believe they all went in; we called in the two men that were stationed; after they had left Miles's-lane I found that they had gone westward and seperated ourselves into two parties and determined to search all the vaults or cellers west of Miles's Lane, under the apprehension of detecting the parties, I was not successful in the pursuit; I went to Mr. Betts's, and when I went to Miles-lane, I there found the other party at Thompson's house with Robinson the prisoner in custody waiting for our assistance to search the house. I immediately entered the house with the two men I had with me; and proceeded to search it; we had been informed that they had been smashing wine in the celler, we proceeded there, I found a quantity of bottles of wine that appeared to be recently broken, part of them in the blue and white handkerchief that I had seen at Mr. Betts the evening before; the wine running from the bottles in a puddle, I found this crow near the bottles, which I recollected to be one of the crows I had seen the evening before. I found a dark lanthorn with a wax candle in it, which is the one I had seen before, the candle had been burnt down to about an inch and a half; we found one whole bottle of wine and six broken bottles with the corks intire sealed; we only found seven bottles there, we then went up stairs into the one pair of stairs bed room over the shop, it is a single house, only one room on a floor. There was a man there nearly undressed and his wife likewise, he appeared very much alarmed, we found no other person there; then we went into the two pair of stairs, there we saw Mrs. Hill and her husband and some person covered up under the bed clothes that turned out to be Priestly, I knew him again; Priestly was desired to dress himself; the man and his wife were up half dressed and half undressed. Priestly dressed himself, his shoes were wet with fresh mud, his coat did not appear to be wet; Priestly went out and was taken by the person at the door. I heard the cry of stop thief, I ran down stairs and saw him brought back, he was the same man I saw in bed. We then went up into the upper room, and there was Goulding and Price, they were completely undressed in bed, they had got handkerchiefs tied round their heads instead of night-caps; they rubbed their eyes and pretended not to know what was the matter. Mr. Smith who was with me they knew; one of them said Oh, Mr. Smith, what is the matter? and rubbed his eyes as if just awake; from that circumstance I began to doubt whether they were really the men that we were looking after, but on finding there were no other bed in the room, and a woman's apparel on the bed, and understanding that was the bed of Thomson and wife we told them to dress themselves; when they had dressed themselves I searched Price, and found a bladder in his pocket: their clothes were wet and drops of rain on their hats, I thought Price's hands smelt of port wine. They was taken down stairs; we sent the four prisoners off to the Compter with part of our party. I immediately found from the seals on the bottles that the wine stolen must belong to Messrs. Ingall and Mann, I knew that Mr. Mann resided at the Three Cranes wharf: we found out a vault belonging to him under a meeting in Union-court, Queen-street; we having assertainted that that vault was broken open, the lock was broken off. I desired my man to wait there untill I went with Mr. Smith to Mr. Mann's house, and desire him to come or send his cellar man to see if that vault was in the state that they left it in on the Saturday night; these are the bottles that I took with me; I mentioned that Priestly's coat was dry. After Priestly was brought back Mr. Hill gave me this coat, it was very wet and an oil skin was there of his hat, under the chair. Thompson told me Robinson throwed a cock in the fire, we took it out and throwed it in water, it was so hot.

Mr. Mann. The impression on the bottles is the impression of the seal I have in my pocket now.

Mr. Lucas. There were six bottles found up stairs.

MR. SKIPPER. Q. You are one of the common council-men of Tower-ward - A. Yes.

Q. About a quarter before seven were you one of the party who were in Miles's-lane - A. I was. The first of my seeing the parties was in Thames-street, four in number; I heard a talking; I saw four men drawing towards Miles's-lane; I concluded that they must be men that we were in search of; I immediately crossed the street with my friends; I believe I was nearer to him than any of the party that were following them, and I saw four men distinctly go into the house of Thompson. Robinson, the moment he was inside of the door, he came out again immediately; I said to Mr. Drinkall, that is one of them, lay hold of him, he was seized immediately by Drinkall; I immediately went to the door, but the door was shut; we knocked at the door, after a moments pause Thompson opened the door; these men that were in doors, hearing so much noise outside, we heard a great noise inside, they were rushing about to get out of the way; I said, one mind the door and another the cellar, and just as I was watching the cellar Priestly I believe rushed up at the cellar; I said immediately

if you come there again I will run the sword into you. He rushed at the bars of the cellar like a mad cat; he heard what I said, and went back. The other party not coming up so soon as we expected we agreed to remain at the door untill they came. When they came Mr. Lucas and several of the gentlemen went in to search; Mr. Drinkall said, here is a pistol here, (he saw it on the chimney-piece), and said, take that out of the way; he called me to take it away; while I was in that situation I heard a noise in the passage, I turned round and saw Priestly going out of the door; I immediately followed him and told Mr. Betts to cut him down; I ran after him and never lost sight of him, only at the turnings of several streets; I brought him back; I am sure he is the same man.

Q. Did you find any bladder of wine - A. When Mr. Drinkall called to me to take the pistol he said he might as well search Robinson; I saw Robinson remove a bladder under the seat, and I saw a large bladder full of wine in the shop, and seven bottles of wine in the shop; the bottles were full and whole and corked.

Q. Had you seen the lanthorn and the crow the night before at Mr. Betts's - A. I did, and I have no doubt they are the same by the appearance of them; I had them in my hand.

Mr. Mann. Them seven bottles are mine also.

ROBERT SMITH . Q. Where you at the house of Mr. Betts Saturday evening the 4th of January - A. I was.

Q. Did you see any things produced by him to you - A. I saw the implements of housebreaking, a lock and key, and a bladder, with the two crows in a blue and white handkerchief; I took notice of this small crow so as to be able to recollect it at this moment; I saw the same crow found in Thompson's cellar; I knew it to be the same I had seen before.

MR. DRINKALL. Q. You had heard the evidence of the other gentlemen - A. I have, I have nothing to add. These are the two bladders I found under Robinson, and several corks; I took this knife and cork screw out of Robinson's pocket, and one upon Goulding.

MR. BETTS. Q. Did you receive on Saturday the 4th the implements of housebreaking from Thompson return them to him after you had shewed them - A. I did.

- HILL. I am a printer. I lodged at Thompson's. On Sunday the 5th of January I was alarmed by a noise in the room between six and seven o'clock, Priestly knocked at the door, and begged to be admitted said he was a friend of Mr. Thompson's. My wife opened the door, he came in, and set himself down in a chair, two more came in immediately, which I supposed to be two of the gentlemen that came to take him; I catched hold of Priestly, I said, here is one; he begged of me, for God's sake, to let him go to bed, which I refused; he said, if he was taken it would cost him his life. I immediately said, get a light; Priestly undressed himself and got into bed, the other two left the room, and went to Thompson's room; Priestly went into bed, he was the man that was afterwards taken. That great coat I found behind one of the chairs after they were taken away.

Q. Whose great coat was that - A. It was not in my room when I went to bed. It did not belong to me.

Q. Had the prisoner a great coat on when he came into the room - A. It was not light enough for me to observe.

Priestly's Defence. I know nothing about what is alledged against me.

Robinson's Defence. I do not know any thing about it at all.

Goulding's Defence. I am innocent of what I am accused of.

Price's Defence. The same.

PRIESTLY - GUILTY , aged 33.

ROBINSON - GUILTY , aged 37.

GOULDING - GUILTY , aged 34.

PRICE - GUILTY , aged 36.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120115-7

89. THOMAS KITE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of December, in the dwelling-house of Hugh Jones , two bank notes of the value of 2 l. each, and a bank note, value 1 l. his property .

HUGH JONES . I am a linen-draper , I live at 84, Gracechurch-street .

WILLIAM HUGHES . I am shopman to Mr. Jones. On the morning of the 21st of December, a young man with me counted the money in the till, and two hours afterwards he counted the money again; there was not money sufficient for what we had taken in the shop.

Q. Is that young man here - A. No. I asked him to look if there was any one pound note with the mark on it; there was not. The notes we could not find in the time. The prisoner, Thomas Kite , was porter at our house.

Q. Did you see the two pound notes and the one pound notes in the till before - A. I did. When Mr. Jones came home the prisoner was asked whether he had the notes; he said, no; he took some silver out of his pocket.

Q. You do not know who took them out of the till, do you - A. No. Afterwards I saw Thomas Kite take them out of his pocket himself.

Q. Where are they -

- SHEPHERD. I am an officer. Here they are. They were taken out of his pocket before I came up to him.

Hughes. We charged him with the notes; he denied having them. He then took out two two-pound notes, and said that was all that he had got; Mr. Jones took him up stairs and searched his box; he said you may as well give me the notes and go about your business, are all these the notes that you took: he said, no, there are more in the pocket; they are in this paper. These are the two two-pound notes, I put them in the till that morning, not an hour before they were missed. There is the lady's name on them. They are the two two-pound notes that I took of that lady, here is the one pound note that perhaps had been taken the same morning about three hours previous. They were taken out of the till, and the prisoner gave them out of his pocket.

Mr. Alley. For aught you know, the prisoner might have given change for them out of his pocket, and the other man is not here - A. No.

COURT. Q. to Mr. Jones. Where did you get these notes - A. The prisoner gave them out of his pocket to me, when I missed these notes, I took him up stairs and insisted upon searching his box. I took out all his clothes, I found this pocket-book, it contained five pound odd in silver, I said I was certain he had the notes, he had better give them up; he put his hand in his pocket and gave them out before the other witness; they were loose in his coat pocket.

Q. What else did you find upon him - A. Forty-seven pounds. He was my porter, he lived in the house and had twenty guineas a year; he lived with me between thirteen and fourteen months.

Mr. Alley. Was the other man that is not here a shopman - A. Yes, he is not here; he is in my service now.

COURT. What parish is your house in - A. St. Peter's Cornhill.

Q. Have you any partners - A. None, at all.

Q. Is the shop part of your dwelling-house - A. Yes, it is.

Shephard. I know nothing of the robbery, the property was given to me, fifty-two pound in bank notes and five pound in cash.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel, called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 24.

The prisoner was recommended to mercy by the jury, on account of his former good character .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120115-8

90. JOHN GARRAD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of January , five shawls, value 3 l. the property of John Lawrence , Charles Jollands , and Isaac Lawrence , in their dwelling house .

The Case was stated by Mr. Gleed,

THOMAS STUBBS . I am warehouse-man to the prosecutors, their names are John Lawrence , Charles Jollands and Isaac Lawrence . The warehouse is 22, Ludgate-street , they do not live there none of them. The prisoner was foreman to the glazier that we employed. On the 9th of this month he came in the morning about eight o'clock, he repaired the glass and there was one square of glass noticed to be too small which made it necessary to come the next morning. In consequence of suspicion we had the conduct of the prisoner watched the next day. Before the prisoner came I noticed the position of the shawls so as to know if any was taken, they were within half a yard of the window that was to be altered.

Q. In order to do this, was the prisoner inside or outside - A. He was inside when I saw him first, he was there about half an hour. When the prisoner left the shop I gave John Moodey directions to follow him; I examined the shawls before the prisoner got well from the door, I missed the shawls as the prisoner was going out of the door. Moodey went out and returned with the prisoner; I then charged the prisoner with having taken the shawls; he first denied it, he afterwards produced one, I then ordered Moodey to go for an officer, and then he produced four more, there were two or three came out of his hat, and one or two out of his pockets. I looked at the shawls, I knew them to be our property.

Q. Who occupies the warehouse - A. The ware housemen and porter in the employ of the firm, and two maid servants, they are all in the employ of the firm, it is in the parish of St. Gregory's, by St. Paul's.

JOHN MOODEY . I am warehouse-man to Messrs. Lawrence and Jollands In consequence of directions I brought the prisoner back; the prisoner produced one before I went for the officer, and four after I came back, I came back before the officer came.

DOWNING. I am a porter at this warehouse, I received the goods from the last witness.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY, aged 37.

Of stealing to the value of thirty-nine shillings only .

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120115-9

91. JOHN GORDON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of December , five-hundred pounds weight of paper, value 10 l. the property of our Soverieng Lord the King .

JOHN STUART . I am one of the superintendants at the office of military accompts, in Duke-street, Westminster . The prisoner was employed in the office as coal porter , to bring coals to the fires in the different rooms that gave him access to the greater part of the rooms where the books were deposited.

Q. Have you missed a great many official papers - A. Yes, necessary for the conducting the business From information among other places I went, to Mr. Devereaux's shop, in Tothil-street, Westminster. I there found in his possession a good many papers belonging to the office. I afterwards went to Mr. Mills, I found a few there.

Q. Have you got some that you found at Devereaux's - A. Yes, these are a few that I have selected out of Devereaux's, there are for the year 1798, I know them to be official papers belonging to the office.

THOMAS DEVEREAUX . I am a cheesemonger, 9, Tothill Street.

Q. Did you ever buy any paper for waste paper of the prisoner - A. Yes, I had bought some about nine days before he was taken in custody. I think it was twelve or fourteen pounds weight; I gave him four-pence per pound, it being dirty, it was paper with writing and accompts.

Q. You recollect Mr. Stewart coming to your shop - A. Perfectly well, he received some paper of me at my shop, that is the same paper.

Prisoner's Defence. I am not guilty of stealing any, I do not recollect that paper was in my possession.

GUILTY , aged 62.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120115-10

92. PEDRO CASNER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of December , one hundred and twenty-four pieces of foreign gold coin, called doubloons, value 400 l. seventy two dollars, forty four silver spoons, value 20 l. a pair of sugar tongs, 7 s. three silver ladles, value 2 l. 10 s. ten fish knives, value 1 l. 10 s. a silver salt, value 1 l. 10 s. twelve silver dishes, value 11 l. two silver stands, value 1 l. 10.

two coffee pots, value 2 l. a writing desk, value 20 s. nine pieces of silver coin, value 2 l. and fifty-three pounds in monies numbered, the property of Frederic Routh , in his dwelling house .

SAMUEL TAUNTON . In consequence of information I apprehended the prisoner in the City-road, at the apartment of a woman of the town, on the first floor; I found there a box containing a considerable quantity of plate; the prisoner confessed to me that he had stolen that plate from the prosecutor, his uncle, and he attempted to cut his throat.

GUILTY, aged 16,

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling-house.

Judgment respited .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120115-11

93. JOHN DIXON was indicted for that he, on the 10th of September , with a certain pistol loaded with gunpowder and two leaden bullets, feloniously, maliciously, and unlawfully did shoot at Ann the wife of Richard Earle , a subject of our Lord the King, with intent to kill and murder her .

SECOND COUNT, for like offence, with intent to disable her.

THIRD COUNT, to do her some grievous bodily harm.

FOURTH COUNT, for shooting in like manner, not stating the intention.

ANN EARLE . Q. Did any thing happen to you on the 10th of September last - A. I was standing in the kitchen at the window in my own house.

Q. What is the prisoner, do you know him - A. No. I was standing at the kitchen window washing, a pistol was fired at the window, had I been standing forward I must have been shot in the head; I heard a whizzing on the top of my head, I thought it was on fire.

Q. What time of the day was this - A. Half past nine at night.

Q. It was dark of course - A. Yes. I went to my neighbour, Ann Smith .

Q. What led you to suppose it was the prisoner that did this - A. Because he was in the habit of firing over my premises, a great many times for two or three months.

Q. I thought you said you did not know him - A. Only by sight. I live at No. 10, Vineyard-gardens .

Q. Do you know where he lives - A. A little below me in the same lane.

Q. What is he by business - A. I do not know.

Q. What reason have you to suppose that he did this on this particular day - A. He owned himself to me in my kitchen, he said he was very sorry, and he was very glad no further accident happened, he was firing at the cats.

Q. What degree of light was there on this day could any body see to shoot a cat at that time - A. It was very dark.

Mr. Adolphus. What sort of a kitchen was it you were in - A. It was paved with brick. The kitchen door was open at this time.

Q. And the window were the pistol shot came in was shut and the door was open did you ever find any bullet - A. No. I did not search, I was too much frightened; my neighbours came in and searched about, they found no bullet.

Q. You told us you heard a whizzing, was that the case - A. I heard a noise; two squares of glass were broke, one had a round hole in it, and the other a hole, and it was cracked; I am sure the hole was not there before.

Q. You never had any quarrel with this man, had you - A. No, I never spoke to him; I once spoke to his wife concerning the firing.

Q. How far does he live from you - A. Sixteen yards. I have measured it since; the back of his house comes to mine; he is a housekeeper in the neighbourhood.

JUDITH HUGIN . On the 10th of September, at half past nine, I heard a firing, I judged it to be Mr. Dixon. The prisoner was brought to Mrs. Earle by the officer; he said, he was sorry, and was glad there was no injury done.

ANN SMITH . I live opposite of Mrs. Earle. On the 10th of September, after I heard the pistol go off, Mrs. Earle came in, I went over and saw the windows broke.

Q. Did you see the prisoner do anything - A. No. I heard him say afterwards that he was glad he had done no more injury.

- WOOD. I am an officer. It was half past ten when I went to the prisoner's house, I knocked at the door, the prisoner's wife opened the door; I told her I wanted to speak to Mr. Dixon; she said he was in bed. I broke the door open and found Dixon undressing himself, he told me he would blow my brains out; I told him to fire away. I apprehended him; I took him to Mrs. Earle's house; I shewed the prisoner the window and the situation in which Mrs. Earle stood; he said he was sorry, and was very glad no more harm was done, or else his life must have suffered for it. I produce the window. This is a round hole, and there was another round hole in another pane of glass; it must have been done by the shot or the wadding. I found the pistol in his own house, loaded; I drawed the wadding the next day, there was an ounce and three quarters of small shot, and paper wadding, it was rolled up hard at the time; it might have made the hole with the wadding.

Q. Would the wadding have done any injury - A. It might, if it was close to Mrs. Earle, if she was so close as she says she was to the window, if it had struck upon the head or the body not covered it might have done hurt.

Q. I need not ask you whether small shot would make such a hole as that it must be either ball or wadding - A. Yes, it must.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel; called six witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

Reference Number: t18120115-12

94. SARAH WILLS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of November , a coat, value

1 l. and a handkerchief, value 6 d. the property of John Wheaton .

JOHN WHEATON . Q. Did you at any time lose any of your clothes - A. Yes, a coat and a pocket handkerchief; I lost them from No. 4, Charles-street, Drury-lane , on the 2d of November; my coat and handkerchief were in the prisoner's room; I found her in Drury-lane, and went home with her to her lodging.

Q. Is that the woman at the bar - A. Yes, that is the woman. I staid in her room about six or seven minutes: my coat was tied up in my pocket handkerchief, I put it down on the table.

Q. What, you were carrying your coat in your pocket handkerchief - A. Yes.

Q. Was there a candle in the room - A. Yes. The girl went out of the room to get some sugar; she told me she would give me a cup of tea; I thought I saw the bundle in the prisoner's hand; I looked round and missed it. I followed her down stairs. I saw her go out of the street-door, I caught her in the street, about ten yards from the door, she had not the bundle with her; I asked her for the bundle; she said she did not know any thing of it. Two men took the prisoner from me; I called watch, and the patrol came and took her to the watchhouse.

Q. Did you ever see your coat and handkerchief - A. No, never since.

Q. Was there any other person in the room with you - A. Another woman. I met two women in Drury-lane, I went into this room with both of them. The two women went out of the room almost together.

Q. Now when they went out almost together where were you in the room, and what were you doing - A. I was sitting down in a chair, and a candle in the room.

Q. You said you thought you saw the prisoner with the bundle, you are not sure, are you, that that she went out last - A. I am not positive.

Q. Did you go after the other woman - A. Yes, I saw the other woman in the house afterwards. I lodge in Well-street, Somers Town.

HENRY MALBY . I am a patrol. I heard the witness call watch; when I came to his assistance I saw two men rescue the prisoner from him; I said, halloa, what is the matter; the two men went away; I took the girl in custody; he said she had robbed him; I took her to the watchhouse. I never found the coat nor the handkerchief.

Prisoner's Defence. I am an unfortunate girl of the town About half after eleven this man came to me and said, give me my property; I was coming up the yard; he struck me and called the watchman.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18120115-13

95. GEORGE SMITH was indicted for feloniously making an assault in the King's Highway, upon Frances Elizabeth Sharp , on the 21st of December , putting her in fear, and taking from her person and against her will, two hundred and forty halfpence, the property of Joseph Sharp .

ELIZABETH FRANCES SHARP . Q. How old are you - A. Ten.

Q. Where were you on the 21st of December - A. In Clement's Inn , about seven o'clock in the evening; I had been to Mr. Plant's in Chancery-lane. I live in Clement's-lane; I was coming home from Mr. Plant's house, there were two men came behind me, and one put his hand before my mouth and ran away.

Q. What had you with you - A. Two five shilling papers of halfpence, I got them from Mr. Plant's in Chancery-lane, he keeps a broker's shop. One put his hand upon my mouth while the other took the money away from me; he that put his hand over my mouth run away. I was carrying them on my arm.

Q. Did either of them confine you in any way - A. No, only the other put his hand before my mouth while the prisoner took the money away.

Q. How do you know the prisoner was one of them - A Because I ran after him, and kept up with him all the time; I never lost sight of him, and then the patrol took him.

Q. Did you call out - A. Yes, I said stop thief.

Q. Did you take notice of this man after you lost your parcel - A. Yes, I was looking at him all the time. The patrols overtook him, there is one of them here.

MARY SHARP . Q. Are you the mother of Elizabeth Sharp - A. Yes; I sent the child about seven o'clock in the evening to 147, Chancery-lane, for the money of three stools that had been made at our house. When I was informed that my child had been robbed I went to St. Clement's watchhouse, and saw my child and the prisoner there.

ROBERT NEWMAN . I am a patrol. About a quarter after seven o'clock I heard the cry of stop thief, I immediately ran and met the prisoner running towards me, I took hold of him, he tried to get away from me; I secured him, and took him to the watchhouse.

Q. Did you find any thing upon him - A. No.

JAMES TOWERS . At a quarter past seven o'clock I heard a cry of stop thief, I ran out of doors and saw the prisoner running down the lane; when I got up to him Newman the patrol had taken him; in about two yards and a half from him nine shillings and eleven pence was picked up, I have got them here; the two pieces of paper were picked up, I have had them ever since; the paper is an old newspaper I believe.

Q. to Elizabeth Frances Sharp . What paper had the halfpence been put up in - A. A paper like that.

Prisoner's Defence. I am not guilty of what is laid to my charge.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY, aged 20.

of stealing, but not with violence from the person.

Judgment respited .

Second Middlesex Jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

Reference Number: t18120115-14

96. JOSEPH KIMBLING was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of December , a

a box, value 2 s. and fifty pounds weight of candles, value 40 s. the property of Walter Pritchard , in his dwelling-house ; and SARAH MEAD , for feloniously receiving them, knowing them to be stolen .

WALTER PRITCHARD . I live in Kingsland Road, in the parish of St. Leonard, Shoreditch . I am a tallow chandler . I keep the house - the shop is part of the house.

Q. Did you at any time lose a box of candles. - A. Yes, on the 11th of December, in the evening. I saw the box of candles in the shop about seven o'clock in the evening.

Q. Did you see either of the two prisoners, the man or the woman, in your shop that evening. - A. Yes, the man Kimbling, between seven and eight o'clock he came for a pennyworth of pickled cucumbers. I deal in those things. I served him with them.

Q. Was he in that part of the shop where the box of candles was. - A. He was further in the shop than that: the box of candles was nearer the door than he was; he was in about the middle of the shop. When I served him he paid me and went out. I saw him go out - he had nothing with him then. I did not miss the candles till nine o'clock.

Q. You do not recollect seeing it after he had been gone, do you. - A. No, I was in the shop the whole of that evening, and he never came in after that. I left the shop at nine o'clock. I do not know whether the box or candles was there or not.

Q. Were you the person that missed the candles. - A. No, I was not; my boy Jones missed it; he is not here; it was missed when I was out. I returned at ten o'clock, and the box was gone. I saw my candles the next day, about four o'clock in the afternoon.

Q. And the box. - A. No.

ANN HATT . I live at 87, Philip-street, Kingsland Road. I keep a chandler's shop. On the 12th of December, about noon, Sarah Mead came to my shop for a loaf. I served her, and she paid me. She told me that she had something to dispose of - it was a present out of the country, instead of money - I should have them cheap. I told her I would consult my husband.

Q. Did she shew you the candles. - A. No.

JOSHUA ARMSTRONG . I am an officer.

Q. Do you know the place where Mead lives. - A. Yes. It is a turning that goes up by the King's Head. On the 12th of December, about four in the afternoon, I went in company with the prosecutor and his man to this house. I saw the woman prisoner, Mead, sitting by the fire; her father was in the room. I asked her if she had any box or parcel left there. She said no I asked her if she had not been offering any candles for sale. She said no. I then asked her if she had no parcel of candles in the house. She said no. I searched, and on a table in the room where she was, near at the back of where she sat, were these candles in this basket, as they are now wrapped over with this blue apron. They have been in Smith's possession ever since. I then left Smith (the man that works for Mr. Pritchard) in the room - told him not to leave it, and, if any body came, not to let them go. I then went to Kimbling's mother's house with the prosecutor. I did not find him. I returned to the house where the candles was, and found Kimbling in Mead's place.

DANIEL SMITH . Q. You went with the last witness to Mead's place. - A. Yes. I remember his asking Mead about the candles, and her denying it. He found the candles. After Armstrong was gone, in about twenty minutes Kimbling came to the shutters - he attempted to look in, and when I went out to look, he came in, and Sarah Mead asked him if he had seen his brother Bill. She cried. Kimbling told her not to cry - he did not care any thing about it. When Armstrong came in he took hold of Kimbling, and searched him. He asked him how he came by these candles; he said he was coming home about half past nine last night - he picked them up in Red Lion Passage, and put them into his apron.

Q. Were the candles then in the room. - A. Yes, and the basket as they are now. Armstrong then took Sarah Mead and Kimbling to Worship-street Office.

Q. (to Armstrong.) You told us when you returned you found Kimbling there. - A. Yes. I searched him, and found nothing but a pair of stockings, which I believe to be his own. He said he had found the candles last night in Red Lion Passage - he gave them to his sister. It is a very muddy place, but the candles were clean.

- SMITH. I make candles for Mr. Pritchard. - These are the candles found at Mead's. They have been in my possession ever since. I am sure I made them for Mr. Pritchard. They are his property.

Kimbling's Defence. I was going home about half past nine o'clock through Red Lion Passage, I saw them candles lay under the wall. I took them home to Sarah Mead , and told her to do as she liked with them.

Mead's Defence. He brought the candles to my place. He asked me to let him leave them there till the morning.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18120115-15

97. THOMAS WOOD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of July , in the dwelling-house of Joseph Gould , a bank note, value 10 l. his property .

JOSEPH GOULD . I live in Bushy-street, Bethnal-green . I am a weaver .

Q. Had you a pocket-book, with some bank-notes, about three months ago. - A. Yes. I had a ten-pound bank of England note, and three ones, that I am positive of. I believe the precise time was the 23d of July. I have recollected some circumstances since, and I am sure to the time. I had some money to pay away. I put it in my book before I went out. It happened so I did not pay it away.

Q. When you had put these notes in your pocketbook, what did you do with your pocket-book. - A. I put it in my pocket. I did not pay it to the person I intended. I kept it in my pocket. I came home about a little after four. When I came home, I deposited the book in the parlour on the table. I left it there, I did not see it again for two days, to the best of my recollection.

Q. Was your parlour door open these two days. - A. I cannot answer that question. I do not know. I left it laying on the parlour table, and the notes in it.

When I had occasion to look into my pocket-book, I found the ten-pound note was missing, and the ones were left.

Q. The ten-pound note was gone - how many ones remained. - A. Three ones.

Q. What does your family consist of. - A. Myself and wife and three children.

Q. What is the age of the eldest. - A. She is turned of 21 that is at home, the youngest is turned of 17. - When I examined the pocket-book, and missed the ten-pound note, I was very much confused, and did not know what to do; and knowing that the prisoner had robbed me many times before, suspicion fell on him.

Q. You must not talk of what happened before, only this time. Did the prisoner live in your family then. - A. Yes, he is my apprentice.

Q. Have you any other apprentice who lives in your family. - A. No, I have mentioned the whole of my family living at home. I challenged the prisoner with it - he denied it. I have never seen the note since. I searched the prisoner. I found nothing of the note upon him.

Q. Should you know the note if you were to see it again. - A. Yes, I could swear to it, if I saw the note.

FRANCIS CARRON . I am a weaver. I live at No. 6, Swan-street.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar. - A. Yes, I know him.

Q. Have you ever heard the prisoner speak about a ten-pound note. - A. He told me he expected a present from his aunt about the latter end of July. On the 1st of August he brought me a ten-pound note, and said it was come from his aunt; he asked me to take care of it. I received it of him to take care of it; he made me to understand that his aunt sent it to him to buy clothes, a watch, and some other things he was in want of.

Q. What became of the note. - A. I changed the note on the 3d of August by the baker to get change for the boy to buy a watch. I received the change.

Q. What did you pay for the watch. - A. Three pounds three shillings.

Q. What did you do with the rest of the money. - A. The prisoner gave me orders to give two pounds to a journeyman in my house.

Q. What had the prisoner to do with that journeyman. - A. They were acquainted together.

Q. Was that given him the same day, or when. - A. On the 6th of December last, he gave me orders to put it down in a book; he laid out seven shillings and sixpence for a chain and seal - that was the day I bought the watch, the 3d of August.

Q. Did you pay any more money by direction of the prisoner - A. Another pound to another young man, on the 8th of November.

Q. What has become of the rest of the money. - A. The prisoner had three shillings for his pocket; he asked me for it to spend; eighteen pence more he had for the repairing his watch.

Q. To whom did he pay that money to. - A. To one Parker, a watch-maker, that worked at my house.

Q. Does any money remain in your hands. - A. 3 l. five shillings remains in my hands.

Q. Do you know Joseph Gould . - A. No.

Q. The prisoner is Joseph Gould 's apprentice - how came you to know the prisoner. - A. He was acquainted with one of the journeymen in my house; he used to come backwards and forwards at my house to him.

Q. When did you first hear that the bank-note was lost. - A. I never heard any thing about it until the prisoner was arrested for it.

Q. Do you know any of the friends of the prisoner. - A. No.

Q. That book is not signed by the prisoner, is it. - A. No, I put it down as the prisoner ordered me.

Q. Did this pass in the presence of the prisoner and you and any witness. - A. My journeyman that had two pound, and his sister, was present at the time; she had the money in her hands - her name is Wake.

ANN WAKE . I am a weaveress. I worked for the last witness - when I do not know.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar. - A. Yes, I know him by his coming up to Mr. Carron's, in July.

Q. Had the prisoner any conversation with you. - A. No further than he had a ten-pound note; he said he wanted somebody to take care of it. I told the apprentice girl of it; she took it out of his hands - her name is Harriet Thomas .

Q. Did you see the note. - A. Yes, and I had it in my hand. I took it out of her hands. I know it was a note, and that is all I know. The boy said it was a bank-note I can neither read nor write. I looked at the note, and gave it her back again. She gave it to Mr. Carron, in my presence.

Q. Where was your master. - A. He was at work in the same room.

Q. Did you hear the prisoner say any thing at the time that the girl gave this note to her master - A. No.

Q. Did you hear him say how he got it. - A. I heard him say his aunt sent it him out of the country.

Q. Did you hear any directions how it was to be disposed of, or what was to be done with it. - A. No.

Q. Do you recollect the day of the week it was brought. - A. No, I do not. Mr. Carron put it in his chest. I heard him afterwards say that he had paid it away to his baker.

HARRIET THOMAS . Q. You are an apprentice to Mr. Carron, are you. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember any bank-note being put into your hand, and when. - A Yes. I do not know the day of the month, nor what month it was. It is about five months ago the boy came up in the shop, and said what a handsome present he received from his aunt.

Q. You mean the prisoner now at the bar, do not you - A. Yes; he gave it into Ann Wake 's hands, and said he wanted somebody to take care of it, and Ann Wake gave it into my hands.

Q. Do you know a bank-note when you see it. - A. No. I went up to my master. I asked him whether he would take care of it, and he refused it. I gave it into my master's hands - he said he would take care of it. He said his aunt sent it him up, and she desired, whoever he gave it to, to put it down in a book how it was spent, and his aunt desired him to have a watch bought out of it. He had a watch

bought out of it three days afterwards. I saw the watch.

ROBERT CROSSWELL . I am an officer. On the 23d of December last, I took the prisoner in custody; he confessed that he had taken the note from his master.

Q. What was said to him. - A. Nothing more than how could he be such a bad boy. He said that he had taken the note from his master's pocket-book, and that he had given it to Mr. Carron, and that Mr. Carron had given him some trifle of it at different times, but he did not know how much; that a watch had been bought for him, but the watch would not go; he returned it to Mr. Carron, and never saw it since.

THOMAS CABLE . Mr. Gould informed me that he had lost a ten-pound note. I spoke to the boy about it. I promised him no favour, nor threatened him. He said he took the ten pound note out of his master's pocket-book; he gave it to Mr. Carron - that he had some trifle out of it - that he had a watch, it stopped, and he gave it back to Mr. Carron.

Prisoner's Defence. My Lord, I hope you will consider my unfortunate case; I was drawed into it by Mr. Carron, and one of the witnesses against me; that man took the ten-pound note. I had no more than two shillings of it, and he has got 9 l. 18 s. of it, which is the property of my unfortunate master. He bought me a watch, it stopped, I returned it to him. I have never seen it since. The witness Carron keeps a room to harbour boys and girls in, and encouraged me into my offence. I hope your lordship will let me go to sea, and serve his Majesty, that I might get rid of all my bad connections.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 17.

The prisoner was recommended to mercy by the jury on account of his youth .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18120115-16

98. MICHAEL ROWBOTTAM was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 7th of December , a dressing case, value 21 s. and an ink stand, value 6 s. the property of Samuel Britten .

SAMUEL BRITTEN . I live at 94, Cheapside , I am an auctioneer , I lost these things on the 17th of December between nine and ten o'clock in the evening, I was in business selling on that evening, and during the sale I was informed that a person in the room had robbed me; I came out of the desk, and a gentleman had the prisoner in custody, he had a dressing case in one of his pockets, in the other pocket an ink stand.

Mr. Knapp. Have you any partners. - A. I have not.

Q. Did you ask him how he came by them. - A. Yes, he said he had purchased them at the sale.

Q. Had they been sold at the sale. - A. A dressing case of that description had not been put up, we had sold two ink stands, the gentlemen were in the room, and we sold but to them two gentlemen, they were paid for, and the gentlemen put them in their pockets, I am positive that the dressing case nor the inkstand had been put up that day; I have been in the habit of seeing the prisoner about nine month before, he has been in the habit of attending sales at the Mart.

Q. Had the prisoner made any purchase that day. - A. He bought two other articles paid for one, and took possession of it.

WILLIAM MASON . I am a wholesale linen warehouseman, I was between nine and ten o'clock at the auction, I had not been long in the room before the prisoner came in, a gold ring was put up which he purchased and paid for, soon after another was put up which he bought likewise, he said he would leave the second until the sale was over. A rocking horse was then offered for sale, the greater part of the people's attention was taken with the rocking-horse; I saw him endeavouring to put something into his left hand pocket, it must have been something of magnitude by my seeing it. I afterwards saw him take an inkstand and put into his right hand pocket. The prisoner left the room and went down stairs, I followed him to the bottom of the stairs, and said stop, I want to speak to you. Before I had told him what he had got in his pocket, he said what a fool you are, I am employed by the auctioneer to help him off with his goods. I told him he had been robbing him, and must go back into the room. I then, with assistance, led him up stairs, as soon as I had got him up stairs, I told him he had got an inkstand in his pocket, which he took out, I marked it; we sent for an officer, he came and examined his pockets, in his left hand pocket he found a dressing case.

WILLIAM CHAMBERLAIN . I am an officer. I produce the property, I was sent for, the inkstand was handed over to me as having been given up before I came; this dressing case I found in his left hand coat pocket; I searched the prisoner, he seemed very much alarmed indeed, not like a common thief.

Prosecutor. The dressing case and the inkstand is mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I have to inform you, that I have attended Mr. Britten's sales by his request, and have bid for articles, they have been knocked down to me, and often given into my possession; I very often gave a deposit for the articles and at the conclusion of the sale I gave them to the auctioneer, and he returned me the deposit.

Prosecutor. I deny ever having employed him.

GUILTY , aged 37.

Confined Six Months in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120115-17

99. WILLIAM ADAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of December , in the dwelling house of James Hartwell , three pieces of callico, value 2 l. 5 s. the property of James Hartwell and William Beaman .

WILLIAM BEAMAN . I am a warehouseman , my partner's name is James Hartwell , we live at No. 8, Cateaton street, in the parish of St. Lawrence Jury , I do not live in the house my partner does, I live out of town. The prisoner was our porter . On Saturday morning my warehouseman informed me that a piece of goods was bid in the coal cellar, I went down, in the cellar I found a bundle placed in a hole in the coals. I took it up and untied it, it was tied up in the prisoner's apron, and inclosed in it were two pieces of white, and one of grey calico, I tied the bundle up again, and it was replaced again in the coals. I got two officers, it was agreed that they should be in the

passage of the adjoining premises to ours. At a quarter after four they were in waiting, I called the prisoner up to shut up the warehouse, I saw this done, and at half past four I left as usual, as if to go to my dinner, I turned into the passage to the officers, and there waited with them his coming out. About five o'clock he came out, he was directly siezed by Drinkwater with the bundle upon him; I accompanied them with him to the Poultry compter, he was searched, the officers took his keys, we then went to his lodgings, the officers searched his box in my presence, they found in one of his boxes 102 l. in bank notes, and on Monday morning they found two pound more, for his having part of the money, there appears a satisfactory account from a memorandum found in his book, there is an accompt of his having sold some lands for ninety pound, and among these notes there were 65 l. marked as received on the 9th of March. therefore, I suppose that is part of the money; here is an accompt found among his papers, which is a sale of goods, which exactly correspond with our goods in his hand writing.

THOMAS BRADSHAW . I am warehouseman to Messrs. Hartwell and Beaman. On Friday the 13th of December, in counting over some velveteens I found some missing, afterwards I found the callico in the cellar, I told Mr. Beaman of it.

WILLIAM DRINKWATER . I am an officer. On Saturday the 14th of December, I was upon the watch, about five o'clock the prisoner came out with this bundle in his hand, we stopped him, and took him to the compter, this is the bundle.

MR. BEAMAN. There are three pieces of callico, I am certain they are our property.

Prisoner's Defence. The ninety pounds I received at the bankers.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY, aged 22.

of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Confined Six Months in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120115-18

100. GEORGE LESTER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of November , a great coat, value 10 l. the property of James Croft and Thomas Croft , in the dwelling-house of Thomas Croft .

THOMAS CROFT . I live at 22, Fleet-street, in the parish of St. Dunstan .

Q. When did you lose this property. - A. On the 16th of November.

Q. Have you any partner . - A. Yes, James Croft , I occupy the house myself. On the 16th of November we lost the coat.

Q. Do you know how it was taken. - A. I cannot say. I heard no tidings of the coat until the 24th of December. I was passing down Fleet-street, and recognised the coat on a gentleman's back, I accosted the gentleman, and asked him how he came by it, he told me he purchased the coat.

Q. Is that gentleman here - A. No, he is not, he went with me to the shop, he bought the coat in Hare street, Piccadilly. My brother attended there with an officer Mr. Hornbuck, who bought the coat, myself and brother, with the officer, went to Bow-street. The prisoner is a workman that worked with us at the time that the coat was missing, he left our employ on the 16th of November.

Q. Where is the coat. - A. It is here.

Mr Gurney. Had you seen the coat before you had lost it. - A. I had.

Q. When was the last time that you had seen it. - A. I cannot say to a day, the last time I saw it was on the 13th or 14th of November, in our shop in Fleet street, it was a finished coat.

Q. Can you swear positively to that being the coat.

A. I can, by the particular manner in which it is made, we had the fellow coat made in the same manner, I cut the coat out myself.

Q. You found this coat on the back of an officer. - A. Yes.

Q. And that officer is not here himself. - A. No.

Q. This is your dwelling-house Mr. Croft. - A. It is, my brother lives in the house adjoining, there is a communication from one house to another, but not so as to make it one house.

Q. Was this coat in your house, or your brothers. - A In my house.

Q. You could not venture to swear that whoever took the great coat that you lost they took it from your house, and not from your brother's - A. Yes, I could. They are never taken into my brother's house - his house is a private house.

Court. If I am right, you are positive to the coat. - A. Yes, I am.

JOHN SIMPSON . I am a shopman to Mr. Hornbuck, a dealer in second-hand clothes, 13, Hare street, Piccadilly. The prisoner at the bar brought a coat to me, and I brought it for my employer.

Q. Are you sure it was the prisoner. - A. I am, the prisoner is the person I bought the coat of, and the coat is the coat I bought of the prisoner.

Q. When was it you bought it of him - A. I cannot say precisely the day, it was the 19th or 20th of November, some time thereabouts, about three o'clock in the afternoon. I gave two guineas and a half for it, he asked me three guineas for it, I believe it never had been worn at all.

Mr. Gurney. Somebody brought this coat, and asked three guineas, and you beat him down to two guineas and a half. - A. I did.

Q. The coat is worth about 10 l. - is it not. - A. It is. I can swear the coat is the coat I bought of the prisoner, by the mark I put on it.

Q. You mark other coats the same. - A. Yes, but we never had such a coat before.

Q. When the officer went with the coat to Bow-street, they had the cruelty to take you there. - A. They did take us there.

Q. They called you a receiver, that you had bought goods at a quarter of the value - A. They did say that.

Q. To find out the thief, at last you fixed upon this person. - A. I fixed upon the person that I bought it of.

Q. That we have on your word as an honest man, who bought the coat at two guineas and a half, and the coat worth ten pounds. - A. I did not know the value of it.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel, and called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Jury. Q. (to Simpson.) How did you find the man you bought the coat of. - A. Mr. Croft had a suspicion of the prisoner; he sent one of his men with me. I took him at a house in Higlers-lane, Blackfriar's-road. From the description that I gave to Mr. Croft, he said he suspected that man, and it proved to be the man I bought the coat of.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 30.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120115-19

101. THOMAS SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of December , a great coat, value 30 s. and three gloves, value 6 d. the property of Robert Snow .

ROBERT SNOW . I am a stage coachman , the prisoner was horse keeper . I lost my great coat on the 2d of December, about half past seven. I put it on the box, and twenty minutes before eight I missed my coat. My coach was standing in the Swan and Two Necks Inn yard, Lad-lane .

Q. What coach was it. - A. The Liverpool mail. I was going off. I went out with the coach, and the coat was brought to me in the morning.

SAMUEL PRESTON . I am an officer. I went into the inn yard. The report was that Snow had lost his coat. I went into the tap-room, where the prisoner was eating his supper. I told him suspicion fell upon him: such a one had seen him in the yard, having the coat on his arm; he denied it, and laughed. I told him he might be made to laugh on the other side. I took him into the parlour, and searched him. I found these three gloves in the crown of his hat. I said I am sure these are Snow's gloves; he denied it at first; at last he acknowledged that he had taken the coat, and had run and left it at the Bull's Head, in Wood-street. I went there, and saw the coat. I then took the prisoner to the Compter. This is the coat.

Prosecutor. I am sure it is my coat. These are the gloves that were in the pocket.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to his character.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Confined one month in Newgate , and whipped in jail .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120115-20

102. WILLIAM FORD was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 17th of December , twelve pair of boot legs, value 2 l. 12 s. the property of Joseph Curtis .

JOSEPH CURTIS . I am a currier , I live in Red-cross street, Cripplegate ,

Q. When did you loose these boot legs. - A. I cannot say when they were lost, I am certain of their never being sold from the shop; a neighbour, Mr. Duncan, said a shoe-maker had boot legs in his possession that he suspected had been stolen.

JAMES MURPHY . I am a boot and shoe-maker, 7, Wilson street, Finsbury square. On the 17th of December, the prisoner brought the boot legs to sell, he asked six shillings a pair, I informed Mr. Duncan of them in Fore street, he brought Mr. Curtis to my house, and he owned them. I did not pay any money for them; I told him to come the next day for the money, he came the next day in the evening and was taken. The prisoner fixed eight, he did not come untill half past; I then told him if he would go into Fore-street with me, I would get a ten pound bill and pay him. He went along with me as far as the Fountain public-house in Red-cross-street, I took him into the house and called for something to drink, and left him with my friend, I went over and told Mr. Curtis the prisoner was at the Fountain, he got an officer and had him taken into custody. The boot legs were honestly worth about seven shillings, these are them.

Prosecutor. They are my boot legs.

Mr. Alley. You did not know the prisoner I believe until you received information from the last witness. - A. No; a servant of mine lodged with him.

Q. And that servant might have stolen them and carried them to his house; you had him taken up and examined before the Lord Mayor. - A. I never saw the prisoner at my house, he is a stranger to me, my servant might have stolen them, they are in an unfinished state, they are always blacked before they are sold to the shoe-makers.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel, called six witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 50.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120115-21

103. WILLIAM BARLOW was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of December , five pounds weight of brass, value 2 s. 6 d. the property of Thomas Moorman , Josiah Moorman , and Hannah Moorman .

WILLIAM TAYLOR . I am clerk to Thomas, Josiah, and Hannah Moorman , smiths and saw-makers , 61, Old street . On the morning of the 7th of December, I received information that some brass was hid in the cupboard in the warehouse; in the afternoon I observed the prisoner go to the place where the brass was, after the prisoner was gone I went to the place, the brass was not there, I did not see him take it.

JOHN DAY . I am foreman to Messrs. Moorman, On the evening of the 7th of December, about ten minutes before six, I concealed myself to see the prisoner go out, I saw him walk out of the gate, I followed him, and told him that his master wanted him to go of an errand, he said he could not come just then; I told him that he must come, I collared him, and brought him back to the gate, and in strugling to get him in, I found the bundle of brass dust down on the pavement; I brought him and the dust back to the officer, my master gave charge of him for taking the brass dust away. We asked him for what reason he could take the brass dust away, he said the devil must be in him. This is the brass dust, it is my employers property, it is worth six-pence a pound, there is five pounds.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY, aged 40.

The prisoner was recommended to mercy by the Jury .

Fined 1 s and discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120115-22

104. SARAH FRANCIS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 27th of November , three silver table spoons, value 2 l. a pellisse, value 6 s.

a great coat, value 8 s. and a shirt value 5 s. the property of Joseph Hay 's, in his dwelling-house .

The case was stated by Mr. Adolphus.

JOSEPH HAYES . I live in Cleveland street , the prisoner is my servant . On the 27th of November, in the evening, I missed three silver table spoons, they were deposited in a large drawer in a room adjoining my bed-room; from information derived from the prisoner, I traced the spoons to Mr. Dry's shop in St. Martins lane, and a great coat and shirt at Mr. Wadmore's.

WILLIAM JONES . I am shopman to Mr. Dry, pawnbroker, St. Martin's Lane. On the 15th of November the prisoner pawned three table spoons for two guineas.

THOMAS WADMORE . I am a pawnbroker, I live with my brother, 127, Tottenham-court road; I produce a shirt, pawned on the 15th of October, and a coat, on the 2nd of November; I cannot say who pawned them.

CHARLES WILLIAM ANBIRD . I am a pawnbroker, I produce a pellisse, pawned on the 12th of October, I cannot say who pawned it.

Q. (to Prosecutor.) Did you ever give your servant any authority to pawn any thing. - A. Certainly not. The spoons I believe are mine, and the shirt and coat are mine.

FRANCES HAYES . Q. You are the wife of the last witness. - A. Yes, the prisoner was my servant, she came on the 9th of September, and staid with me until the 2nd of December. In consequence of missing the property, I asked the prisoner where they might be, she said they were in St Martins-lane, those were her words. She denied absolutely every thing else to me.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence, nor called any witnesses to her character.

GUILTY, aged 27,

of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18120115-23

105. MARY CLEMENTS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of December , two mantles, value 30 s. the property of Thomas South .

JOSEPH SOUTH . I am shopman to Thomas South , in Covent Garden .

Q. When had you last seen these mantles. - A. About a quarter of an hour before I missed them they were laying on the counter. On the 23d of December the prisoner, in company with another woman, came into the shop and enquired the price of a mantle hanging at the door. The other woman fixed upon having a coat, and paid me a shilling in part; she was to call on Saturday, and pay me the remainder; and while the woman was giving me the shilling, the prisoner went out. On the other woman going away, I returned to the counter, and examined the things. I missed a child's mantle; I immediately went after the prisoner, and overtook her. I charged her with taking the mantle; she put a mantle in my hand, and was going to run away; I followed her into Bedford-court. We had not walked above five minutes before another mantle dropped; it was taken up, and given to me.

Q. Did you see the mantle drop. - A. No. I gave her in charge of Creswell, the constable.

Mr. Alley. Did not the prisoner tell you that the other woman had given her the bundle, and she was gone into the garden to buy things. - A. There was something of that sort. I did not go and look for the other woman. These are the mantles, they are my master's property.

Prisoner's Defence. I was a servant. I went down into the country for three months to see my friends. On this day I met Mrs. Robinson; she gave me a glass of peppermint; she said she wanted to buy something for her children; she took me into this shop with her, I saw her bargaining for something, I took no notice, and went out; she came to me, and gave me the bundle, and told me to go on, she was going into the market to buy potatoes.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave her a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

Reference Number: t18120115-24

106. SARAH DENNETT , ELIZABETH DENNETT , and ELIZABETH COCKLIN , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of December , a shirt value 2 s. two shifts value 2 s. a bed gown value 2 s. two pillow-cases value 1 s. 6 d. two aprons value 4 s. a shawl value 1 s. and a towel value 3 d. the property of Sarah Wynn , privately in her shop .

SARAH WYNN . I live at 27, Monmouth-street . I keep an old clothes shop , and I take in clothes to mangle; my family is one daughter. On the 30th of December, Sarah Dennett and Elizabeth Cocklin came in: they brought two pair of shoes to sell; I had another woman in the parlour; I was buying some clothes of her; my daughter went in the shop when they came in. I told my daughter to stay till I came in; they staid. The woman that I was buying the clothes of went out, and Cocklin and Elizabeth Dennett sold me these shoes. Cocklin stood against the mangle where the bundle was of mangled clothes, and Elizabeth Dennett stood as near her as possible. Elizabeth Dennett said I have got my sister at the door; she opened the door and called her sister. Sarah Dennett came in laughing. and underneath her cloak she had a basket, and in the basket I perceived a bundle done up in a coarse cloth. I not thinking it was mine, it went out of my mind.

Q. Then your bundle that was on the mangle was done up in a coarse cloth too. - A. Yes. I did not see them take the bundle, nor did I suspect that was my bundle. They all went out, and some time after I perceived my bundle was gone. I had seen it on the mangle five minutes before the prisoners came in. I lost all the articles mentioned in the indictment. The prisoners came the next night to sell some more old shoes. Elizabeth Dennett knocked at the door. I was all alone. She said she had got some more old shoes; she ran right into the shop where the bundle laid before. I said, shoes indeed! I missed a bundle last night, and nobody I suspect but you. I insist to know what you have done with the bundle. I sent for the watchman - they were taken to the watch-house.

MARY WYNN . I am the daughter of the last witness.

On the 30th of December, Sarah Dennett and Elizabeth Cocklin came in to sell some shoes, my mother told them to stop; she was in the parlour with a woman; she was buying some clothes. My mother came and bought the shoes, and the girls went out. I did not see the prisoners take the bundle. There were nobody else in the shop but the other woman; she went through.

Q. When had you seen the bundle last. - A. Just as I let the prisoners in.

Sarah Dennett 's defence. I did not see any thing of the bundle.

Elizabeth Dennett 's defence. I was not in the shop at first. I never saw the bundle,

Elizabeth Cocklin 's defence I never saw the bundle.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Chambre.

Reference Number: t18120115-25

107. DAVID JONES was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Augustus Smith , about the hour of six on the night of the 9th of January , with intent the goods and chattels therein being burglariously to steal .

AUGUSTUS SMITH . I live at No. 10, Portman-street . I am the housekeeper, on account of my father having a mill. I am in the house for him. He attends the mill. I am a baker . I and my wife live in the house.

Q. At whose expence is the house kept. - A. By my father at present, and he pays the rent - his name is Hall.

Q. Have you a share in the business. - A. I am to have. I have not had it yet.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18120115-26

108. MARGARET ROACH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of January , 17 yards of printed cotton, value 34 s. the property of Charles Roberts , privately in his shop .

ROBERT SEYMOUR TERRY . I am shopman to Charles Roberts , in Cranbourn-street . On the 8th of January, about four o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner came in to purchase a yard of cotton. I did not miss the print until the constable brought it to know who it belonged to. I looked at the print, and found my private mark upon it. He brought the piece of cotton with it that the prisoner had bought of me - that brought the prisoner to my recollection - she was at the watch-house when I saw her again.

Q. Were there other persons that served in the shop besides yourself. - A Yes.

WILLIAM COTTON On the 8th of January, between four and five o'clock, I saw the prisoner in Newport-market. She was going to take a leg of beef, she saw me, she put the leg of beef down; I took her in custody.

Q. Are you a constable. - A. No, a journeyman butcher in Newport-market. I examined her; she had got mutton and pork, and seventeen yards of printed cotton. I took her to the watch house. The cotton was given to the constable at the watch-house; he traced where the property belonged to.

THOMAS NEWBURY . I am a constable I produce the piece of cotton; it was on the watch-house table when the prisoner was given in my charge. I have had it ever since.

Mr. ROBERTS. This is my cotton. It has my private shop mark.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in liquor; I could not tell how I came by it. They took me to the watch house; I did not know where I came from. I never was guilty of a thing of the kind before.

GUILTY, aged 29,

Of stealing, but not privately .

Transported for Seven Years

First Middlesex jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

Reference Number: t18120115-27

109. JOHN CATHERWOOD was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Butt , about the hour of six on the night of the 10th of December , with intent the goods and chattels of the said dwelling house burglariously to steal .

JOHN BUTT . Q. Where do you live. - A. In Gray's Inn-lane . I am a housekeeper there.

Q. Does your house look towards Gray's Inn-lane. - A. It does.

Q. Have you any lodgers in your house. - A. Yes, Mr. Wandsor. He occupies the front parlour towards the lane.

Q. Whose furniture is it. - A. My furniture.

GEORGE VAUGHAN . I reside in Gray's Inn-lane. I live with my mother.

Q. Had you any opportunity of observing any person near Mr. Butt's house, and when. - A. On Tuesday, December the 6th, about six o'clock in the evening. It was just turned six. I was passing down Gray's Inn-lane. I crossed Liquorpond-street, and just as I got to the Talbot public-house I saw three men stand by Mr. Butt's window.

Q. Do you know Mr. Wandsor. - A. Yes, by sight I seeing these three men, and knowing the house to have been robbed before, created a suspicion. I saw the prisoner stand between two men - one was taller than the prisoner or the other one - the tall man put his hand to the window.

Q. A sash window. - A. Yes, and forced it up, and at the same time shoved open the blinds of the window.

Q. That you could see distinctly, could you. - A. Yes, I stopped by the Talbot light, and just at that instant the other two were in the act of assisting the prisoner at the bar into the window, and before he was in the act of getting in, by the lamp I could see his face.

Q. Just in the act of getting in. - A. Yes, his hands on the lower part of the sill of the window, and the other two men were assisting him in the window, and part of his person in, I seeing him in that situation, I thought by the time that I got up to the window, he would be got in; but I was too quick - and the other two men assisted by pulling him down, and that was the cause of their dispersing.

Q. They fled, did they. - A. Yes, they ran off.

Q. The window was got up, and part of his person in. - A. Yes. I knocked at the door of Mr. Butt's house, and told the servant that the house had been attempted to be robbed.

Q. Did you hear any of the three persons say any thing. - A. No. I told the servant I would go and

look after them. Upon that consideration I went over the way, and stood in a dark place of the new building belonging to Gray's Inn. I heard a whistle, and I saw the three men come together again. I saw them coming, and I walked on. They were coming towards me, and expressed the words, that is, the bugger.

Q. Did you observe any particular reason they had for pulling the prisoner out. - A. The other two men might see me.

Q. That was your opinion - was any thing said or done. - A. No. I thought it proper to cross over the way. I crossed over the way, and they crossed after me, and went before me. I then met a gentleman unknown to me I claimed his assistance in taking the three men, and told him they had been attempting to rob a house above. He said he was in a hurry, but he would assist me as much as he could. We walked on as far as Portpool-lane, and there I told him, as soon as I laid hold of the prisoner at the bar, that he was to assist in taking the others. As soon as I laid hold of the prisoner, I lifted up my umbrella, and told him, if he made any resistance, I would knock him down. He immediately fetched me a blow on the right side of my head. The other two men were standing on the other side of the way, and as soon as the other gentleman saw the prisoner strike me, the other gentleman ran away. I then recovered myself and fetched the prisoner a blow on the head with my umbrella. I pursued him down the lane, and between that and a wheelwright's shop, he turned round, and gave me a blow. I then attempted to take him again, when he slipped under my arm; he hit me two blows, both on my right side and on my left, and escaped from me. I immediately cried out

"stop thief" as loud as I could holloa, and pursued him to a place called Sparrow's-Rents, that leads into Liquorpond-street.

Q. Did you take him at last. - A. I took him at Meux's brewhouse.

Q. Are you sure as to the person of the prisoner. - A. Yes, I had seen him many times before.

Q. Had you seen the other men before. - A. I think I should know them. I know him perfectly. I have seen him on several other different affairs of picking pockets, and such like.

Q. You say it was six o'clock at the time. - A. Yes, there was no light of day at all. The cause of my seeing his face, there is a chandler's shop next door to Mr. Butt's that had a light, and the light of the lamps I saw his face perfectly.

Q. This was an early hour in the evening. - A. Yes.

Q. Were there any other persons passing. - A. Not any one at all; between Liquorpond-street and the Bull, I did not see any person coming. I then took him to Mr. Butt's house, and gave him in charge of an officer, and from thence to Hatton-Garden.

Q. The servant to whom you communicated this is a female servant. - A. Yes, a maid servant.

Prisoner. The gentleman says he know my person well - I wish to know where he knew me.

Mr. Vaughan. I have seen him in Holborn with another person who picked a gentleman's pocket.

MARY NORWOOD . Q. Are you a servant to Mr. Butt. - A. Yes.

Q. Is it part of your employment to attend the gentleman who lodges there, Mr. Wandsor. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you fasten the window shutters of his room on that day. - A. No, I put to the shutters.

Q. Was that the same day that you heard the alarm from the last witness - A. Yes.

Q. Is that the only window of the ground floor that looks into Gray's Inn-lane. - A. No, there are two windows that looks into Gray's Inn-lane.

Q. Did you fasten the shutters any way. - A. No, I did not; I only put them to at four o'clock - the curtain was drawn - the gentleman was going to dine soon.

Q. Did you go into the parlour after you had shut the shutters and let down the curtain - A. No, I did not, I went out in the street, when the young man said, did I know that the house had been attempted to be robbed; I said, no He told me to go in doors and shut the door. I went in, and then I thought there might be somebody in the house. I went out in the street, and saw one of the parlour windows wide open.

Q. The sash was no ways fastened down, was it. - A. No, the blinds were fastened quite.

Q. How did you find the blinds. - A. Wide open flying against the curtains.

THOMAS EKELSOE . The prisoner was delivered into my custody by Mr. Vaughn and several others. I searched him; there were no implements about him, not even a knife.

Prisoner's Defence. I met a brother-in-law of mine. I had been drinking with him the most of the day. I came to see him home, and coming along Gray's Inn-lane; I saw the window open. Two men came up to me, and asked me the way to Holborn. I said, straight along. They ran off; that gentleman came up to me, and struck me. He said I must go with him; I shoved him off. I did not strike him at all.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 22.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18120115-28

110. JAMES FITZGERALD and JOHN FITZGERALD were indicted for feloniously making an assault upon William Henry Aldridge , in the dwelling-house of Ellis Winter , on the 15th of December , putting him in fear, and taking from his person a watch, value 2 l. a gold chain, value 1 l. and a seal, value 1 s. his property .

WILLIAM HENRY ALDRIDGE . On the 15th of December, I was at the Lord Nelson, Little Pulteney-street . There was a great noise in the tap-room. Mrs. Winterr cried out, for God's sake, go and see. There were a great many in the room. James Fitzgerald was fighting with Joe Hall .

Q. Is James Fitzgerald deaf and dumb. - A. Yes. I went to see for Mr. Winter; I could not see him. I felt blows on me at all parts - I cannot say who struck me. I entreated that they would not kill me. I felt as though a small hand had got hold of my watch chain. I got hold of the hand some time, but my watch was gone. I can only prove that the dumb man struck me - he got out of the house in a great hurry.

Q. Did you ever find your watch again. - A. No.

Q. Whose hand was it you found upon the watch. - A. I cannot swear to the man that took the watch; he was in company with them. I cannot swear that either of the two prisoners took the watch; they were round me at the time.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120115-29

108. WILLIAM ARCHER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of December , a basket, value 1 s. and twenty-four fowls, value 3 l. 12 s. the property of Thomas Gower .

THOMAS GOWER . I deal in Poultry ; I live near Chelmsford in Essex. I brought these fowls to market on Monday before Christmas; I brought them to Leadenhall-market ; I missed them about six o'clock in the morning from Leadenhall market, they were pitched underneath the stall.

Q. How many did your basket contain - A. Two dozen.

Q. How soon had you seen them before you missed them - A. About half an hour before I missed them I had seen them under the place.

Q. Why do you accuse the prisoner with taking them - A. I did not see him take them.

- IVESON. I am a porter in Leadenhall market. About six o'clock I saw the prisoner and another man running down Lime-street; the prisoner had the flat on his shoulder; the other ran away; I secured the prisoner and made him bring the flat back. This is the flat, there were fowls in it.

Prosecutor. That is my flat, it contained two dozen fowls.

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutor promised to send me to sea if I would tell him who the other was.

GUILTY, aged 19.

Judgment respited .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120115-30

109. THOMAS WELLS was indicted for feloniously making an assault in the King's Highway upon Thomas Smith , on the 19th of December , putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, a watch, value 3 l. a watch key, value 1 d. and a piece of ribbon, value 1 halfpenny, his property .

THOMAS SMITH . I am a painter and glazier , I live at No. 2, Little Moorfields. On the 8th of December I went out to spend the evening with a friend over Blackfriars-bridge, I was returning home near one o'clock; coming round the corner of Bridge-street to come into Ludgate-hill , I met a party coming down.

Q. How many - A. There were about six men and women, they seemed to be wrangling and disputing one with another under the lamps which belong to the Albion Fire-office, they were near the pastry-cook's which is near the Albion Fire-office, they took the whole width of the pavement. The prisoner was walking half a yard before the others, he was in conversation with them, I went up to give them leave to pass me, and on my drawing up to the shop the prisoner at the bar made a spring at me and knocked me down; with my falling I called the watch; I found that he had got my watch at the same time that I had the blow. As soon as he got the watch he gave it a spring, the outside case fell off from the watch, and the remainder hustled in of a heap to pick up the case of the watch; with his knocking me down I fell to the left of him, he had then an opportunity of running away from me a little to the right; he run over to Fleet-market, down the side of the market of the Fleet prison; he left the curb-stones, and kept at the back of the shambies, I running after him calling stop thief; a watchman was standing at the gate of the prison, he turned upon me, and I laid hold of him; I gave him into the charge of the watchman, saying, that he had robbed me of my watch; I never lost sight of him. I was without my hat. I was determined to make an example of him.

Q. Do not argue. Are you positive that he is the man that struck you and took your watch - A. He is the very man that struck me and took my watch at the same instant. There was a second man, when I cried out he ran over to me and struck me. I was upon my knees and hands when the prisoner knocked me down, I did not think it right to rise; I kept my eye upon him until the watchman was coming, then I got up and ran after him.

JOHN BAXTER . I am a watchman of the parish of St. Bride's. On the 19th of December, between twelve and one o'clock, I heard the cry of watch as I stood at the bottom of Bride's-lane; I ran to the spot, I saw the prisoner running along the front of Fleet-market, the prosecutor was close after him. The lamps shined very bright. He cried out stop thief. I ran over, and about a yard before I got to him the prosecutor had got hold of him.

Q. Did he run down Fleet-market - A. He went down there, but seeing a watchman there he turned and ran towards me; I had my lanthorn behind me. I was standing at Mr. Temple's door, the prosecutor ran after him and catched him by the collar; I asked the prosecutor what he had done, he said he had knocked him down and robbed him of his watch; he desired me to take charge of him, he said he would go back and look for his hat. He had lost his hat. While I was holding him by the collar two men and two women came up to me, they seemed to be cursing and swearing, and I thought they had a mind to take him away from me, I thought it was the safest way to take him to the watchhouse; I did, and told the constable of the night what he had done. On my going along with him to the Compter I said, you had better tell me who they were; he said, d - n your bloody eyes, if it had not been for the last half-quartern of gin you would not have had me.

Q. Do you know any thing of him - A. I see a great many about that quarter; I cannot say I know any thing of him.

ABRAHAM CRESWELL . I was constable of the night. At the watchhouse I asked him how he came to rob the man of his watch; he said he came from Westminster, and then he said he came from Thames-street, and after that he said he came from the Old Bailey.

Prisoner's Defence. These people were about him before; I was passing by: I never touched him at all; I was by myself.

Q. to prosecutor. Did you find your hat afterwards - A. Yes, in the middle of the street.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 26.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120115-31

110. THOMAS HUNT and JAMES MURPHY were indicted for feloniously making an assault in the King's Highway upon Margaret Renny , on the 31st of December , putting her in fear, and taking from her person and against her will, a three shilling

bank token, two shillings and sixpence, a shawl, value 2 s. 6 d. and a bonnet, value 6 d. the property of John Renny .

HENRY ROGERS . I am a labourer in the East India Company's employ. On the 31st of December, at twelve at night, I was proceeding towards Gunpowder-alley, leading into Shoe-lane , I heard the cry of murder, I instantly run to where the voice came from, there I saw the prisoner Murphy strike the prosecutrix a blow upon the head, and as she was falling he struck her again; the prisoner Hunt was in company. When me and another advanced towards them they both took different directions; I instantly ran after Murphy, and just by Harp-alley he fell down, and threw me down to; I was up quicker than he was. I brought him back to Gunpowder-alley.

Q. You do not know of your own knowledge what she lost - A. No.

- GAINSLEY. I am a watchman. I saw the woman in a dirty state, with no handkerchief on; she charged Murphy with robbing her.

ABRAHAM CRESWELL . I am a constable. I took Hunt, and when I took him in the watchhouse the prosecutrix said, that is the man that cut my pockets off, I insist upon your taking charge of him. I find that the prosecutrix, Margaret Renny , has shifted her lodgings; I have used my endeavour to find her, I cannot.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120115-32

111. HENRY MAYBERRY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of January , two pounds weight of indigo, value 7 s. the property of the united merchants, trading to the East Indies .

SAMUEL SAUNDERS . I am a labourer in the East India Company's warehouse; the prisoner was commodore . On the 4th of January I saw the prisoner take from his desk a quantity of indigo, and put it into his hat; he covered it over with a cloth or handkerchief; he put his hat on his head, and proceeded to go down stairs; as he was going out I stopped him, searched him, and found the indigo in his hat.

ROBERT STIRLING . I am an assistant-elder in that warehouse in Cutler-street. When the prisoner had leave to go out he came down to be rubbed down in the accompting-house, one of the labourers followed him down, and said he had property about him; I said, I hope it is not true; the prisoner said, it is too true, he had got it in his hat. I took it out of his hat, there was two pounds, it is worth three shillings and sixpence a pound. There are some thousands of indigo in that warehouse.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence.

GUILTY, aged 49.

Judgment respited .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120115-33

112. MARY ANN WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of December , four bank notes, value 2 l. each and three 1 l. bank notes, from the person of Michael Briant .

MICHAEL BRIANT . I keep a perfumer's shop in Shepherd's Market. On the 6th of December, about twelve at night I was passing along St. Paul's churchyard, going to my home; I had eleven pounds in my right hand breeches pocket. When I came to the corner of Ludgate-hill , near Newbury's, I was accosted by the prisoner, I told her that I had my own wife at home. I proceeded on, she followed me to Messrs. Rundle and Bridge's door, at that moment she swung hold of my coat, turned me round, and a little woman that was in company with her passed close by me; at that instant I felt the prisoner's hand in my pocket; I remonstrated with her, and shoved her from me; I felt in my pocket, my notes were gone; she ran away, I pursued her; she ran down a narrow passage, I missed her in the dark. I had her apprehended the next day at the Swan in Shoe-lane, and on the Monday following was brought before the Alderman; I not having any of the notes she was discharged; I was informed by the Aldermen if I traced the notes I could have her apprehended again. I have traced some of the notes.

Q. Are you sure that that woman is the woman that you met - A. Yes.

GEORGE WORRALL . I produce the note.

Prosecutor. That is one of the notes that I lost.

Mr. Alley. Did not you yesterday, or did not you before the woman was taken up propose that if they would give you twenty pounds you would make it up - A. I appeal to the Bench.

ROBERT IRELAND . I am a hosier; I live on Holborn Bridge. It will appear by one of the subsequent witnesses that one of the two pound notes came through my hands, I do not know that I took it of the prisoner, I merely say that I am in the habit of serving the woman, she bought stockings of me at the time, I do not know whether she paid me in notes or cash; she has been in the habit of dealing with me some years. My name is endorsed on the face of the note; I do not know who I took it of.

GEORGE ARCY . I am foreman to Messrs. Hearn and Co. Cateaton-street. I received that two pound note from Mr. Ireland.

GEORGE WORRALL . I am an officer. On Saturday last, between twelve and one o'clock, the prosecutor with one watchman brought the prisoner into the watchhouse; the prosecutor produced this two pound note, stating that this was one of the notes among others that the prisoner had robbed him of; he gave charge of her for a street robbery. I have kept the note.

Prosecutor. I have traced this two pound note to Mr. Ireland; he said he changed notes frequently for the prisoner, she was a good customer to the shop, he thought her a suspicious character; he could not say whether he changed the note for her or not.

COURT, Q. to Ireland. Did all this conversation pass - A. I do not know from whom I took it; the prisoner was a customer, consequently I could not say otherwise. He described a person to me which turned out not to be the prisoner.

Q. That is not true. Do you deal generally with suspicious characters - A. No. He described her as a handsome woman; I leave it to your lordship to say whether she is a handsome woman.

Prisoner's Defence, I am perfectly innocent; that

man has taken me for another woman.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120115-34

113. WILLIAM FOWLER and CHARLES SCOTT were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of January , one hundred and two pair of silk stockings, value 60 l. and one hundred and eighty pair of gloves, value 15 l. the property of Richard Barlow and John Alvin , in the dwelling-house of Richard Barlow .

RICHARD BARLOW . Q. Have you any partner - A. Yes, John Alvin , we live on Fish-street hill ; we are hosier s; I reside in the house; it is in the parish of St. Clements, Eastcheap. Fowler was a servant of the firm, he had been with us more than a twelvemonth. We had missed both gloves and stockings; we could not exactly ascertain what we had lost; I suppose we lost to the amount nearly of what was taken.

Q. That is about seventy or eighty pounds - A. Yes.

Mr. Alley. You know nothing of the other man - A. No, only Fowler. I never saw the other man in the house.

JOHN UPTON . I am a patrol belonging to Bow-street office. On Wednesday the 8th of January I had been down the Green-lane, I came to the top of Islington by the Angel; I saw the two prisoners go into Goswell-street, Fowler had a bundle under his arm; the other prisoner was with him; Frost and I went up to them and stopped them; I asked Fowler what he had got in the bundle; he told me that he had got linen, that he had brought it from his washerwoman; I asked him again, he repeated that he had got linen the second time; I asked Scott whether he knew what linen it was; Scott said it was sheets and shirts that he had brought from his washerwoman. Not being satisfied with that answer I took the prisoners into a corn chandler's shop and examined the bundle; when I opened the bundle I found it contained silk stockings and gloves; going along I asked the prisoner Fowler where he brought them from; he said his master's, 47, Fish-street-hill.

Q. That is the fact where Mr. Barlow does live - A. Yes. After that Fowler told me he would rather give me fifty pounds than I should have taken him in custody; I told him I did not do business in that way. I then took them both to Covent Garden watchhouse, where they were lodged for that night. I went the next morning to Mr. Barlow, and informed him what had taken place; Mr. Barlow came to Bow-street; they were fully committed for trial. I omitted saying, I asked Fowler as we were going along what he was going to do with this property, he said he was going to take it to one West, a hawker. I could not learn where West lived. I asked him what he was to have for it; he said he had made no particular bargain, but West was in the habit of buying guineas, or any thing that came in his way, and he expected to have met West that night at the Angel but he had disappointed him.

Q. What time of night was it when you took him up - A. It was near upon ten o'clock.

Mr. Alley. The conversation was between you and Fowler, are you sure that he had the bundle his arm or on his shoulder - A. Under his arm I am sure of.

Q. He has sent me word that you are not taken in saying that he had the goods from his master - A. I am not; he said so, I am sure. This is the bundle, I have had it in my custody ever since. Frost was in company with me.

Q. to Prosecutor. What part of the property can you speak to - A. This dozen of silk stockings I have sworn to, and I swear to them now, they are worth about six pounds. There are other things that I could make oath to in the bulk.

- BROWN. I am shopman to Mr. Barlow. By the paper on some of the stockings I know them to be my master's property, and there is a piece of paper on some of the gloves of my hand-writing, by which I know them. There are one hundred and two pair of silk hose, and one hundred and six pair of gloves.

Fowler's Defence. I most humbly beg permission to state that the prisoner Scott knew not the contents of the bundle, nor how I obtained it; I bought them of a sailor, whom I never saw before, nor since.

Scott was not put put on his defence.

FOWLER - GUILTY - DEATH , aged 26.

SCOTT - NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120115-35

114. THOMAS ALLCOCK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of January , two hundred pounds weight of rope, value 30 s. the property of George Harrison .

GEORGE HARRISON . I am a wholesale stationer and rag-merchant ; I live in Old-street . On the 4th of this month, about ten o'clock at night, the watchman knocked at my door, and brought the prisoner, saying that he had caught him with some rope.

JOHN MILLER . I am a watchman. On the 4th of this month I was going down Honduras-street, Old-street, I met the prisoner at Mr. Harrison's warehouse door, I went back and put my light out on purpose to see what they were after; there were two of them; I saw one of the two get over into Mr. Harrison's premises and hand out four bundles; I cannot say whether it was the prisoner or the other that went over the premises. After they had handed four bundles over the gate that one come over again, each of them took up two bundles and came into Baltic-street. I stopped the prisoner and asked him what he had got there; he said some rope, it belonged to his father; I told him if Mr. Harrison would say his father bought it it was all well; I took him to Mr. Harrison's door, and the other man ran away, leaving the property behind him. I knocked at Mr. Harrison's door, and asked him if that was his property; he said it was. I then took the prisoner to the watch-house. This is the rope.

Prosecutor. I have no doubt it is my property.

Prisoner's Defence. I was standing at the corner of Golden-lane waiting for my father he was drinking; I was waiting there, a young man came up and asked me to carry this; he said he would give me a shilling; I took some on my shoulder, and he took the

other; the watchman stopped me; I said, that is the gentleman that employed me, the watchman let the other man run away.

GUILTY, aged 16.

Judgment respited .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120115-36

115. GEORGE DAVEY was indicted for that he on the 18th of December , without lawful excuse had in his custody and possession a forged bank note for the payment of two pounds .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded.

GUILTY .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120115-37

116. GEORGE DAVEY was indicted for feloniously forging, on the 18th of December , a bank note for the payment of 2 l. with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England .

SECOND COUNT, for feloniously disposing of and putting away a like forged note, with the same intention. And

THREE OTHER COUNTS for like offences, only varying the manner of charging them.

Mr. Garrow, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120115-38

117. DENNIS O'CONNER was indicted for that he on the 31st of December , feloniously did make, coin, and counterfeited, and caused to be made, coined and counterfeited, and willingly acted and assisted in making, coining and counterfeiting a certain coin, to wit, ten pieces of coin resembling the silver dollars, coined and stamped by the Governor and Company of the Bank of England .

SECOND COUNT, for coining eighteen pieces of coin resembling the silver coin called dollars, coined and stamped by the Governor and Company of the Bank of England.

ROBERT JOHNSON . Q. I believe you were apprehended about the middle of December last on suspicion of having had dollars - A. Yes; I had in my possession when I was taken eighty-six and two more that the constable did not find at the time, and those two I have now. These are the two.

Q. Where did you get this money - A. From the prisoner. The constable took the eighty-six. I got part of them on the 5th of December, and part on the 16th. On the 5th I got fifty-six from the prisoner's wife, and on the 16th I received fifty-four at the prisoner's house, I went there between ten and eleven in the morning, the prisoner and his wife were in bed. They got up. I told him what I came for, I asked him if he had any dollars ready, he answered he had; he took out a paper and told me it contained forty; I took him at his word, I did not count them: I gave him eighteen pence a piece for them. I breakfasted with him; I said I was going to Sheerness; he said I had better have a few more, it was too little to go a journey with; I told him I had no more money; he said he would trust me until I came back; he went out of the room and fetched fourteen more, they were of the colour of a penny-piece; he coloured them in my presence: he gave me some of the same stuff that he rubbed them with in case people should rub them. He gave me a cork, he told me to rub it on with a cork, and not to touch it with my fingers, it would burn them.

Q. Did he tell you how he made them - A. He told me he cast them in sand and rotten stone, that he made a great quantity; he could supply me in any quantity I wanted; he sold some weeks four or five hundred.

Q. The dollars that you had with you in the country were taken from you - A. Yes, except these two they were too bad, I thought, to offer; I put them bye; one is marked G B; I got these on the 16th, both of the prisoner; they were in the paper of forty.

Q. Where was the house that you received the dollars at - A. No. 6, Somers-street.

Mr. Alley. You are a very honest fellow, you were so fortunate as to get them at eighteen pence a piece - A. Yes.

Q. You were taken up, and you thought you had better convict somebody else than yourself - A. Yes.

Mr. Garrow. Let this be a warning to you, do not carry on this any longer - A. No, the game is stopped, I believe.

- Q. You are a constable - A. Yes; I apprehended the last witness; Mr. Foy the officer has got the dollars.

Q. Are the dollars that Foy has got the dollars that you received from the last witness - A. Yes, there is eighty-six of them.

JOHN FOY . Q. You belong to the office in Marlborough-street - A. I do; I produce the eighty-six counterfeit dollars that were delivered to me by the last witness, he marked them; I have had them ever since.

Q. In consequence of any information that you received did you go to No. 6, Somers-street - A. I did, on the 31st of December, it is in the county of Middlesex; the prisoner was not at home; on my going into the house I enquired if O'Conner was at home; I was told he was not; I saw a woman and two children.

Q. Who was that woman - A. He acknowledged her as his wife, and that room was their habitation. I searched the woman and found nothing on her. In one of the drawers of that room I found twelve pieces of copper with the impression of dollars upon them. and not coloured. On the floor of the same room I found an eighteen-penny token, coloured, and resembling the eighteen-penny token; I found a counterfeit dollar on the mantle-piece ready for circulation. On the floor I found three files; the files had copper metal in their teeth. I searched the back room, on the floor I found a coat there, the prisoner claimed it as his; on searching the pocket of that coat I found six good dollars. These are the six good dollars. In the cupboard of the same room I found a counterfeit dollar ready for circulation. In a hat-box I found a counterfeit seven shilling piece, it was coloured of the gold colour, ready for circulation. On the floor five files and two pair of sheers, one has been used, the other I believe is new. I went up to the top of the house, on the stairs were corks, gloves, rags, drying

sand, and sand wetted in two pans, wetted with strong acid, and seventy old penny pieces; these implements, corks, gloves, and rags, were wet, and had been used shortly before.

Q. Are these things used in the manufactory of counterfeit coin - A. The are; it is necessary they should have such sort of things. I tried the garret door and found it locked; I went down for the key, but did not get it; I broke the door open; I found a furnace fixed in the garret, a quantity of coke and charcoal for the fire of the furnace, five crucibles, all having been used, some having metal in them; a pair of furnace tongs, casting sand; on my examining that sand particularly I found part of the sand impressed with the impression of a dollar; I have some of it here, it still bears the impression; there are several pieces marked with various parts of a dollar, not whole; here is another bit of sand, it has been crushed to pieces, it contains some part of the head and the letters; I have no doubt it was part of the mould that had been used for casting dollars; I found two phials, one I believe contained aquafortis, that is a liquid used to give them the colour. I suppose upward of an hundred blanks for sixpences, a cutting instrument to cut round blanks, a working jacket, it had been used and very much burnt. I found various gloves and rags in the room that appear to have been used in rubbing metal; four iron frames for moulds, that had been frames that the sand is put into with boards to put between them, and a screw to screw them together; the boards were very much burnt, and a pair of nippers to hold the coin in; two pair of shears, two sives holding sand, one finer than the other; four punches with letters on them, such as are used in marking money; a quantity of sand-paper, some of it new, and some of it having been used in rubbing metal; five files that had been used upon copper metal; I found a broken gallipot with a white mixture in it, nearly dry. I tried a little of the composition and rubbed it on a halfpenny, it produced the colour of silver, and I found some on paper, all of which produced the colour of silver on being rubbed on copper. I then came to the lower part of the house, in the passage under the stairs, there I found a paper of cream of tartar, and in the front parlour a dish with some greasy dirty stuff, and a rag that is used to take off the brigtness, to make it look as if it had been in circulation; in the parlour, on the same floor, there was a good quantity of coke and charcoal.

Q. Was there any other family in the house but the prisoner, his wife, and family - A. No other but an old woman, whom they said was the chairwoman.

Q. How long was it afterwards when the prisoner came home - A. I did not see the prisoner come home. I left somebody to wait for him. He was brought to the house I was waiting at. About seven o'clock he came home and was taken in custody; he was brought to the Crown public-house in Clerkenwell by Thomas Foy , whom I had left there, he had been there during part of the search: when he brought him to the Crown Thomas Foy told me in his presence that he had found twelve uncoloured dollars; I then asked him how he came possessed of these that I found on him, and those I found in the drawer; he said a girl had found them and brought them to him in the morning. I understood he meant the girl in the house, his daughter. That is all that he said then. The next morning he said that he had found them himself in the yard at the back of his house, and these six were along with them; he had put these in his coat pocket.

COURT. What six - A. The six genuine dollars that were found in his coat pocket that hung up in the back room.

Mr. Garrow. Now look at these six, and see whether there is any mark or defect - A. Two of them have.

Mr. Alley. You say there was no other person in the house, except an old woman - A. There was not.

Q. Did not he tell you that there was a man left it of the name of O'Hara, in consequence of some misfortune with a child - A. He did not mention the name, he said he said he had not the key of the room, the lodger who had lived there had gone away. I found afterwards that the key of his wife's door unlocked the garret door.

Mr. Garrow. It so opened it that if O'Hara had taken the key away there was another key that opened it - A. Yes.

THOMAS FOY . Q. Did you attend your brother - A. Yes.

Q. At the time of his going away from the house leaving you there, is that account correct - A. It is.

Q. At what time did the other Foy go away - A. About half after five or six, leaving me in the house with this woman, the girl, and the old woman. The prisoner came home at a quarter past seven; the moment he came in I called him by the name of Conner, I said, how do you do Mr. Conner; he answered me, very well. I took him by the arm and proceeded to search him. I found in his coat pocket that he had on twelve counterfeit dollars uncoloured, and one good dollar in his side coat pocket; a good sixpence, and one bad one; I enquired where he got them; he said the girl had found them. The next day he said he found them. I asked him then how long he had kept the house, he said about three months; I then took him over to the Crown public house.

EDMUND HOMERSHAM . Q. You are one of the tellers of the Bank - A. I am.

Q. Be so good as to look at the parcel of sixty dollars - A. I have looked at them before.

COURT. Those are the dollars found upon Johnson -

Mr. Bosanquet. Yes, they are.

Mr. Homersham. They are counterfeit.

Mr. Bosanquet. Look at these two, are they genuine or counterfeit - A. They are likewise counterfeit, they appear to be made in imitation of the dollars of the Bank of England, and all the others are counterfeit.

Q. Now look at them six, and tell me whether there appears to be any of the dollars made from any one of them dollars. These are the dollars found in his coat pocket, the coat that was hanging up - A. From the observance of these dollars there appears a mark upon the head part, there is a kind of a dent

which many of the counterfeits resemble, being taken from the impression of this. There is a mark upon the counterfeit dollars, it perfectly satisfies my mind that they have been made from that.

Q. About what proportion of dollars have that mark - A. There is nine of them.

Q. Those that were found first are all in a state fit to be circulated - A. Yes.

Q. And those found in the house, how many are there in a state fit to be circulated - A. Two of them fit for circulation; these are quite complete, besides those that are in a state of preparation.

Prisoner's Defence. I never was guilty of making, I am not guilty of selling. I have six children, five in Ireland, and one in London.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18120115-39

120. ELIZABETH PEPPER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of November , a silk handkerchief, value 5 s. the property of Daniel Collins .

DANIEL COLLINS . I live at 13, Cursitor-street . The prisoner was my servant , she came into my service on the 17th of October; having missed various articles I caused her to be discharged, and four days after she was discharged I had her taken in custody; she was searched, and among other things a duplicate of a silk handkerchief was found on her; I afterwards saw the silk handkerchief, it was one of my own wear. I am sure it is my property, and in my possession sometime before she was discharged; the handkerchief was worth five shillings.

ELEANOR MARTHA COLLINS . I missed the handkerchief a day after she left us; I saw it after it was produced by the officer, I am quite certain it was my husband's handkerchief.

WILLIAM CHAMBERLAIN . I am an officer. On the 15th of December the prisoner was delivered into my custody; I took the duplicate of the handkerchief found on the prisoner to Mr. Brown's, Fetter-lane, and I saw this handkerchief.

EDWARD BROWN . I am a pawnbroker, I took the handkerchief in pawn, I cannot say whether it was of the prisoner or no.

Prosecutor. It is my handkerchief.

CHARLES COOK. I am an officer of Hatton Garden. I apprehended the prisoner, I found the duplicate of the handkerchief upon her; she said she took it out of distress.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

GUILTY , aged 42.

Confined Six Months in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

London jury, before Mr Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120115-40

121. GEORGE EMANUEL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of January , a box, value 5 s. and three hundred and nine yards and a half of muslin, value 31 l. 10 s. the property of John Willan .

THOMAS GASKIN . I am porter to John Willan , at the Bull and Mouth Inn. On this day week, we were delivering some trusses at No. 40, Coleman-street , I observed our waggon beset by two men, I saw a man take the chain horse away, instead of letting it follow the waggon; it was a quarter before six in the evening; it was quite dark; as soon as we stopped the waggon and went after the horse I saw the prisoner get up into the waggon, he stripped the straw off with his left hand and seized the box with his right hand. When I saw him heaving the box from the bottom of the waggon I attacked him at the time that he had fast hold of it.

Q. Had you loaded the waggon - A. Yes, and he had completely removed it from the bottom where I had packed it; he removed it edgeways; there was a parcel on this side, and that which kept it tight.

Q. Now had he only moved it that any part of the trunk remained on the bottom of the waggon - A. No, it did not, it rested upon the other trusses, it was jammed in between the two. I do not think any part of the trunk touched the bottom of the waggon. I seized the prisoner, and held him untill I called my fellow servant; he got an officer, and then I took him to the Compter.

Q. What part of the country had this come from - A. From Glasgow in Scotland; I was then on the delivery of it.

JAMES DOWTER . I am clerk to the Inn. Mr. Willan receives the cartage for that package exclusive of the carriage. His name is John Willan .

Q. Was that package in the course of delivery on the 11th - A. Yes, it was; the charge of the porterage is sixpence. That is one of the packages that was in that cart.

- . Q. Were you in expectation of that package - A. Yes, it belongs to John Vickers and Company. This is the invoice it contained three hundred and nine yards of muslin, the charge is thirty one pounds fifteen shillings, the value of the box five shillings.

Prisoner. I want to ask Gaskin whether he took me out of the waggon, or was I on the pavement before he took me.

Gaskin. I took you off the wheel.

COURT. Have you any doubt that he is the man that you took off the wheel of the waggon - A. No, I have not.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120115-41

122. WILLIAM JONES, alias PRICE , and JOHN NORTON, alias WARWICK , were indicted for feloniously making an assault upon Robert Cole , in the King's Highway, on the 22d of June , putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, eight one pound bank notes, his property .

ROBERT COLE . I keep the Crooked Billet, public-house, Irongate, near the Tower . On the 22d of June last, about half after six o'clock in the evening, the prisoner Jones came into the house and told me that a person in the street wanted to speak to me; I went out and saw Norton, he told me he wanted to speak to me; I asked them what they wanted, addressing them both; Norton said that Lancaster the beadle, and Norton's father, they were coming down to take charge of me, unless I would give them some money, on a charge of an attempt to commit an unnatural crime; I told them I was willing at

any time to go to any court to answer any such question.

COURT. Was Norton and Jones strangers at that time - A. I had known them about five or six weeks before. Norton said they must have some money for them to go out of the way. I continued walking up Tower Hill , towards the Minories, they following me, they urging me for money; I walked through the Crescent in the Minories, and crossed America-square for fear of being seen by any of my friends with such people; out of America-square I got into New-square, Norton began to swear, and wanted to know where I was trailing him to; I desired him to leave me, and requested to know what they wanted with me, they said, I must give them some money, and insisted upon it, or that they would immediately give charge of me, when I through fear and dread gave Norton three pounds, and Jones two pounds.

Mr. Alley. Through fear and dread of what - A. If they had gone to a public office and have sworn my life away; I considered that my life was in danger if I had not given them the money. They then said that would not do for them; I had given them five pounds; I gave Norton three pounds more, in addition to what I had given them before; they then left me.

Q. This was in New-square that you gave them the money - A. It was.

Q. That is in the City of London - A. It is. I had not proceeded more than eight or ten yards from the square when Jones came running to me again, and said that Norton would give him none of the last three pounds, I gave him a few shillings, five or six. After I got into the Minories I saw them both in company together walking down the Minories. I saw no more of them on that day.

Mr. Andrews. How many persons might you have met in passing from your house to the Minories - A. Perhaps an hundred.

COURT. Did you give them the money because you were afraid they would swear that which would affect your life - A. I did.

RICHARD MITCHELL . I am a waterman, a neighbour of Mr. Cole's. On the 17th of October I apprehended Jones in Mounts gateway, Lower East Smithfield; I put him into a coach and took him to the office.

DANIEL BISHOP . I apprehended Norton on the 14th of December, I had been looking after him five or six weeks; I found him in a one pair of stairs room in a court in Hoxton Town; I got into the room by means of a picklock key, and found him concealed behind the bedstead.

Norton's Defence. One night this lad Jones was standing opposite the London Docks, Mr. Cole asked him which was the Play-house, this lad shewed him; Mr. Cole asked him if he would go a little further with him; Mr. Cole laid hold of him and led him across Wellclose-square, and pushed him down Pell-street; Mr. Cole was indecent and ran away; I halloaed stop thief after him; Mills stopped Mr. Cole, and this lad and me gave charge of him; we took him to the watchhouse, he immediately fell on his knees at the watchhouse, and said he would give us any sum of money if we would discharge him. Mr. Cole gave Lancaster the beadle five pounds; Jones and me had a pound each of it.

Jones's Defence. I was indicted here last sessions, and tried.

COURT. Mr. Cole, you have heard what these persons said - A. I have.

Q. Do you know what day these persons speak of when they talk of your being taken to the watchhouse - A. On the 8th of May. I never saw them till that night. About nine at night I was coming from Shadwell market, the Three Compasses, the lease was to be disposed of; I had four glasses of brandy and water there; I then came out with the intention of going home; I proceeded up Ratcliffe Highway. When I was walking I perceived myself overcome with the liquor I drank; I got into the entrance of Castle-street, on the left hand side of which there is a dead wall belonging to the London Docks; I saw Jones as I was proceeding on; Jones was standing against the wall; when I went close to him he turned round and made water across the pavement; I called him a dirty fellow, and asked him what he did it for: he said if my sister was there he would give her a good swishing; I said, pray how old may you be to talk about such things; he said, sixteen, and he had come from the West Indies, where he had seen plenty of such business. I said, which is my way to Well-street, conceiving that when I got there I should know my way; he said, come, and I will shew you the way; he took me up a street which I have since found to be Neptune-street; he took me round Wellclose-square into North-East passage. When I said, this is not my way home, he said come along, and took me into Pell-street. When we got there he gave a whistle, which alarmed me, and I set off running down the street. I heard two or three following of me, and voices singing stop thief; I had got one third of the way down Pell-street when a man stopped me and asked me what was the matter, these two lads came up and stated to him that I wanted to commit an unnatural crime; I asserted my innocence to the man, Mills, who said he was a watchman. I was taken to the watchhouse; he related to Lancaster the beadle what these lads had informed him, and these lads said to Lancaster that I had wanted to commit an unnatural crime; I asserted my innocence at the watch-house. Upon the oath I have taken I never went down on my knees at the watchhouse, and beg forgiveness of them. Lancaster told me it was a sad thing, that he must take the charge; he put his hand into my waistcoat pocket, and took some silver out of one pocket, and a pencil case out of the other pocket. I begged him not to search me, I would shew him what I had got; I took out of my left hand breeches pocket a five pound note, and three one's, I gave them into Lancaster's hands; he said, I find you are well lined. I told him I was a man of some little property, and my abode, and my wife and family, and declared my innocence, and if he could make it up with the lads I would wish him so to do. Lancaster took the lads out one at a time; he came in the watch-house, he returned to me the three one pound notes, and said he had settled it with the lads.

Q. What became of the five pound note - A. They divided that among themselves as I have been since

informed. Lancaster said I might remain in the watchhouse a few minutes until they were gone out of the way. In a few minutes afterward I left the watchhouse, I had not proceeded more than ten or twelve yards from the watchhouse when I was again accosted by the two lads, who said that they had only one pound each out of the five pounds. They demanded the three pounds that Mr. Lancaster had returned to me, or they would come down to my house and see farther into the business; when I, through fear gave them the three pounds.

Q. Did you tell any of your family what had happened - A. Not at the time. The 18th of October was the first time that I mentioned it to any of my friends.

Mr. Andrews. I will now ask you, sir, whether, at the former trial you did not say that you parted with the money on the 8th of May through fear of exposure in your own neighbourhood, and no other cause - A. I considered my character as dear as my life at the time, that is the reason I assigned for parting with my money at that time.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120115-42

123. MARY SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of January , sixteen yards of ribbon, value 1 l. 16 s. the property of Samuel Forsyth , privately in his shop .

SAMUEL FORSYTH . I am a haberdasher , 52, Shoreditch .

BENJAMIN ASLETT . I am shopman to Mr. Forsyth. On the 14th of January the prisoner came into the shop, she asked to look at some narrow ribbon, I shewed her a drawer of ribbons, she told me to cut her three quarters of a yard of this ribbon, it came to three-pence; I cut it off. She then told me that she wanted some narrow short ribbon; I had to turn my back to get that drawer. I produced the narrow short ribbon, she looked at the second drawer sometime, and told me there was none narrow enough. I put the second drawer away, that occasioned me again to turn my back upon her. Upon my coming back to the counter she then looked over the first drawer again, she then told me she would have a yard and a half off a piece in the second drawer; I turned my back again to get the piece of ribbon out, and while I was measuring it Mary Harris said she had taken a piece of ribbon; Mary Harris took hold of the prisoner's apron, there were six pieces of ribbon in her lap, about sixty yards.

MARY HARRIS . When I came from dinner into the shop the lad was serving the prisoner; there was another customer in the shop which I was serving with black thread; I saw the prisoner take up a piece of grey sarcenet ribbon and put it into her apron; I asked her what she was going to do with it; she said she was only going to look at it. I took hold of her apron and there were five other pieces of ribbon in it, the boy took them out. When I looked at her I am sure she took only the grey ribbon.

Q. to Aslett. You took the ribbons out of her apron - A. Yes, they were plain ribbons that I had shewn her in the first drawer.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence; called five witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY, aged 18,

Of stealing, but not privately .

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120115-43

124. ELIZABETH SKURM was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of January , a bag, value 2 d. seven dollars, eleven three shilling bank tokens, eleven eighteen-penny bank tokens, and six shillings, the property of Thomas Pizzey , in his dwelling-house .

THOMAS PIZZEY . I am a pork-butcher , 99, Drury-lane . On the 6th of January I took a bag from my pocket and put it on the drawer in my room. The prisoner lived with her mother in my house. I saw a woman take the bag of money off the drawer, which woman I belive to be the prisoner. I had lost money before, and I was upon the watch. I obtained an officer after I missed my money, I went to the prisoners room, I accused her of taking money, she denied it, and fainted; I promised her that if she would acknowledge where the money was I would not hurt her: she confessed, and the money was found on the landing of the two pair of stairs; the money was not in the bag. I promised her forgiveness, and I wish to fulfil my promise.

GEORGE RUTHWIN . I am an officer. I found the prisoner in the two pair room; the prosecutor charged her with taking the money, she denied it; she at last admitted that she had it; she went to a cupboard on the landing place, there were in a fish kettle of water four pounds fourteen shillings; seven dollars, eleven three shilling pieces, eleven one shilling and sixpenny pieces, and six shillings.

Prosecutor. It is all my money.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence.

GUILTY, aged 24,

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling-house .

Fined 1 s. and discharged.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120115-44

125. JOHN BARTON was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of George Sizer , about the hour of six on the night of the 4th of January , with intent the goods and chattels in the same dwelling-house, burglariously to steal .

GEORGE SIZER . I am a silkman , 75, Oxford-street .

JOSEPH FRANCE . I am a pewterer; I live in Castle-court, Marybone. On Saturday the 4th of January in the evening I was passing by Mr. Sizer's house, I saw the prisoner and another man; I watched them. They passed to and from Mr. Sizer's shop window near a dozen times before I observed any confusion in the shop; I then went over to the shop, a square of glass was broken in the shop window; I said to Mr. Brown, here are the two men that broke the window, follow me. I followed the men, Mr. Brown went for assistance. Robinson and Brown secured the prisoner, I secured the other man for the little time I could hold him, two men came up, and by their assistance he got away.

WILLIAM BROWN . I am shopman to Mr. Sizer.

About six o'clock on the 4th of January the witness France stepped his foot on the door, he said, here are two men that have cut your window, if you will go with me we will secure them. The window was knocked completely out, nothing was removed that we could see.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120115-45

126. JOHN BUTLER was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Robert Lloyd , about the hour of six on the night of the 9th of December , and stealing therein, a quilt, value 1 s. three blankets, value 6 s. a pair of sheets, value 12 s. two pillows, value 6 s. two pillow cases, value 2 s. the property of Robert Lloyd ; a petticoat, value 1 s. two gowns, value 2 s. a pair of stockings, value 6 d. and a handkerchief, value 6 d. the property of Eliza Woodage .

ROBERT LLOYD . I came home about half past five as near as I can recollect, on the 9th of December, I found the parlour shutter was not put to, I put them to, but I did not fasten them; the window was down, and the blinds were shut to; I knocked at the door and went down into the kitchen; I then went to tea with my family. I live at 14, Leonard-street, in the parish of St. Leonard, Shoreditch .

MRS. LLOYD. I was at tea, I heard a person scrape their shoes across the railing, I thought it was some person wished to come in; I went up to the door, my light went out; I returned and got another light, and got the key and opened the parlour door, and saw the sash thrown up; I saw all the bed clothes off the bed, the two pillows and the bolster were laid at the foot of the bed ready to go out of the window, one half of the bolster on the parlour window and the other half on the bed; the bed stands close to the window. I called my husband up. I saw no person there.

Q. What were taken out that you know of - A. A quilt, three blankets and two sheets, the pillows and pillow cases.

ELIZA WOODAGE . I lodged on the ground floor at this house; I came home about nine, Mrs. Lloyd informed me that the place had been robbed.

WILLIAM CROUCH . I am a patrol of Bow-street office. On the 9th of December last Frost and me were on duty in Old-street, we saw the prisoner with a bundle before seven; we crossed over to him and by that time he got into Sycamore-row; I went up to him and asked him what he had got there; he said, bedding; I asked him if it was his own property; he said, yes; I then said, where are you going to; he said, to No. 6 in St. John-street; he said, you alarm me; I said, you have no occasion to be alarmed if it is your own property. I took him over to the Pitt's Head, the corner of Old-street; I untied the bundle; I found the blankets and sheets, and a bunch of matches tumbled out; I found in his coat pocket a black petticoat; I said, if they are yours I will go with you to No. 6, St. John-street to see whether they are your property or no. We came out with him; I asked him where he had brought them from, he said, the sign of the Hare, Hackney. We walked about one hundred and fifty yards, he then said if you walk with me all night I will not tell you where I am going to take them to; I said as that is the case I will take you in custody immediately. I took him into custody. We walked a few yards, and then he said I will not go any further until I have something to drink; there came a great mob of people; I took him into the next public-house, the sign I do not know; when we got him there he began to be troublesome; I searched him further, I found two bundles of matches in one breeches pocket, and a bottle of phosphorus in the other breeches pocket; I asked him what he called this; he said, a smelling bottle. We tied his hands and took him to Bow-street. The next day I found the prosecutor.

Prosecutrix. They are my husband's property, a quilt, three blankets, a pair of sheets, two pillows, and two pillow cases.

Eliza Woodage . The pair of stockings, two gowns, a petticoat, and handkerchief are my property.

Mr. Challenor, Q. to Mrs. Lloyd. Your window was not fastened - A. No, it was down, and the blinds were shut.

COURT. Q. to prosecutor. You say you did not go into the room at all - A. I did not; I put the shutters to.

Q. Was it dark - A. I am sure it must be dark; it was a good deal past half past five. I keep the whole house.

- FROST. I know no more than Crouch.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming from Hackney, a person gave me this property to carry; the bundle came loose. I put the bottle and matches in my pocket. I am a stranger in town; I came from Birmingham.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 25.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120115-46

127. ROBERT LEACH was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Richard Blogg , no person being therein, about the hour of nine in the forenoon of the 6th of January , and stealing therein a gown, value 5 s. his property .

ELIZABETH BLOGG . My husband's name is Richard, he works on the road . I live in Grenville-street, Camden-town, in the parish of St. Pancras . We have the whole house, it is a small house. On Thursday morning last, at seven o'clock, I went to Covent Garden market; (I sell garden stuff) I returned home at ten o'clock. On my my coming home a man asked me if I had a silk gown; I told him, yes; he said, had you locked your door; I said, yes, and I have the key in my pocket; he said, make haste home there is a man in custody; I went home, there was a mob at the door; I saw the gown, I said it was my property.

Q. How was the door unlocked - A. He had a key that unlocked it.

THOMAS HAWKINS . I am a shopkeeper, No. 1, Camden-place. On Thursday morning the 16th of this month about nine o'clock, a woman came into my shop and said, Mr. Hawkins do you know whether Mrs. Blogg is gone to market; I said, I did not know, she generally left the key with me; she said there was a strange man in her house, she did not like

the looks of him; I ran to Mrs. Blogg's house, I saw the young man in her shop, I asked him if Mrs. Blogg was at home, he answered no, but he had seen her, and she would be at home presently. I asked the prisoner what he had got in his apron, he said he had got something for Mrs. Blogg; I told him I was very sorry of accusing him wrongfully, but I was afraid from his being in the house without any body with him it did not look so well, and as there was so many people coming about the house I said, young man, you and I had better go over to the public-house and stop untill Mrs. Blogg comes home, and if it be your own property that you have got in your lap, it will be more to your credit. After a little while I said there will be no harm in seeing what you have got; he took it out, and a little girl saw it, she said that is Mrs. Blogg's gown. A constable was sent for, he was searched, four keys were found on him and two knives.

- BELLINGER. I am an officer. I produce a gown, I took it out of the prisoner's apron; I searched him and found these four keys on him, and here are two keys that were found in the house by somebody else, they are skeleton keys. This key locked the door, and two knives I found on him.

Prosecutrix. It is my gown.

Q. Did you leave any body in the house when you went out - A. No, the lodger and my husband were out.

Prisoner's Defence. There was only one key found on me.

Bellinger. I found four keys upon you, these are them.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 22.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120115-47

128. THOMAS HUNT was indicted for feloniously making an assault in a certain open place near the king's highway, upon William Green , on the 16th of October , putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, a watch, value 2 l. a steel chain, value 1 s. a steel seal, value 1 s. a steel chain, value 3 d. and a watch key, value 3 d. his property .

WILLIAM GREEN . I live in Love's Grove, Fleet market . I am an hair dresser . I am the bell-man of the parish of St. Bride's. On the 16th of October I went out about a quarter before ten at night to get a pint of beer for my supper at Mr. Wilcox's. I was coming back with the pint of beer in my hand, and as I went home across the market four people followed me; I went into Love's Grove, the West side of Fleet market, and these people followed me to my own door; that is the Shoe lane side. One end of Love's Grove comes to the Market, and the other into Shoe-lane. The four men came to me, one stood before me and one of each side, and when I turned myself round the prisoner knocked me down, and I felt my watch come out of my pocket; I felt the watch come out of my pocket before I was down. When I felt the watch coming out of my pocket I said, what are you doing, and then they knocked me down.

Q. Could you see who the person was that took the watch from your pocket - A. I cannot say; I think it was Thomas Hunt put his hand round; I am pretty clear it must be him, and then he knocked me down. Not a word was said to me until I asked what they were doing.

Q. Were you able to save your watch - A. No. I was not. I had a pint of beer in one hand, and my stick in the other.

Q. They knocking you down I suppose prevented you from saving the watch - A. They ran away while I was down on the ground, the blow brought me to the ground.

Q. Now you tell me the prisoner was the man that knocked you down - A. Yes, I had seen him many times before.

Q Before any thing was done did you observe the person of the prisoner - A. I turned myself round; I had an opportunity of seeing him before I was down on the ground

Q. Was the prisoner in front of you at the time the watch was taken from your person - A. No, rather behind my left shoulder. I saw him as I was turning round, I was quite sure it was him that knocked me down.

Q. How long had you known his person before - A. I believe nigh three quarters of a year, at times I had seen him.

Q. After you had recovered yourself did you tell any body of this - A Many of the neighbours came out and assisted me up.

Q. Were you very much hurt with the blow - A. With the blow and with the fall.

Q Besides knowing the man's person did you know his name he went by - A. Yes, they used to call him Joe the Marine; I mentioned as soon as the people came to my assistance that it was Joe the Marine that had done the act. I never knew him by any other name until now. I have never seen my watch since.

Prisoner. Some time ago he had a woman in custody, he said that woman robbed him.

Prosecutor. There was a woman concerned, she came before me and said, how do you do Mr. Green, how do you find yourself, and then the watch was taken. I never said it was her; I was surrounded by three men and a woman; she was taken up; I could not swear that she took the watch; she was one of the party. She was discharged.

SUSANNAH GREEN . I am Mr. Green's wife.

Q. Were you at home the evening that your husband was robbed - A. I was. I had a candle in my hand; my husband cried out; I ran out with my candle in my hand; I thought he had slipped down; I saw Joe the Marine lift up his hand and knock my husband down.

Q. Did you know the prisoner's person before by the name of Joe the Marine - A. Yes, I had known him a twelvemonth before; I had served him with goods. I sell oysters by the side of Fleet market when I am not out at work. I jumped off the step at the moment and catched hold of him by the jacket; he wrenched himself out of my hands,

and the other men ran off. I saw three men, he was one; I did not see the woman.

Q. How far did you run after Joe the Marine - A. into Shoe-lane. I halloaed stop thief, the people saw him run; by my going up the court they did not hear the voice loud enough. I saw him on the 11th of November and spoke to him about my husband's watch; he said he had not got it; he smacked my face and ran up Eagle and Child-alley into Shoe-lane, and made his escape. He was taken upon another robbery; I was not bye when he was taken.

ABRAHAM CRESWELL . I am constable of St. Bride's. I know nothing of the robbery of Mr. Green. Susannah Green came down and told me of it the same evening it was done. In consequence of that I looked after him, I apprehended him on the 1st of January, about two o'clock in the morning; I took him in Fleet Market, I did not take him upon this charge; I searched him, and found nothing.

Q. You never found the watch - A. No.

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw Mr. Green nor Mrs. Green before with my eyes.

Q. to prosecutor. Had you a chain to your watch - A. Yes, a steel chain, a key, and two seals; the watch was worth twenty-five shillings.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 20.

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120115-48

129. MARY CARROL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of January , three pieces of printed cotton, value 3 l. the property of James Lamming , in his dwelling-house .

THOMAS WALTON . I am a servant to James Lamming , linen-draper , Ludgate Hill, in the parish of St. Martin's, Ludgate . On the 6th of January, between two and three in the afternoon, the prisoner came into Mr. Lamming's shop, she bought a small quantity of flannel and callico, altogether to the amount of seven shillings and a penny; she staid in the shop near ten minutes after she had paid me; at that time I was serving another customer; she came close to the counter and desired me to give her threepence to get a pint of beer; she smelled strong of liquor, but did not appear to be tipsey; I told her it was not our manner of doing business, neither would I give her any thing. I then had occasion to go to a different part of the shop, when leaving that place she had hold of a green print, she was still standing by the counter, and on my return the prisoner had left the shop, and the green piece of print was gone also.

Q. Were there any other persons at the counter besides the prisoner - A. Probably there might be a dozen in the shop, and four or five at that counter. I went out in pursuit of the prisoner, I catched sight of her about forty yards from the door, on the same side of the way as Fleet Market; I stopped her and asked to look in her apron; in her apron I found three pieces of print.

Q. Among the other pieces of print was there the green piece of print - A. There was. I charged her with having stolen them, she said she had got nothing but what she paid me for, and she would not go back with me; I insisted upon her going back, and then she went with me; I kept hold of her arm. When we had got halfway she tumbled one piece of print out of her apron, which I took up and carried in my hand. She then went quietly with me into the shop. I sent for a constable.

Q. Upon examining these three pieces were you able to say they belonged to your master - A. I am; they are his property. There was nobody serving at that counter at the time but me. I had not sold them to her, nor did she ask for any such thing.

Q. What quantity of yards did they contain - A. Near seventy yards; they cost my master, I suppose, between four and five pounds; they all contained the private mark.

ABRAHAM CRESSWELL . The prisoner and the cotton was delivered to my charge. I produce the cotton.

Walton. These three pieces of cotton I took from the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I met with the lady, she gave me a crown piece to get some flannel; she gave me these pieces to carry.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 30.

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120115-49

130. DAVID DAVIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of January , four ounces weight of rhubarb, value 15 d. and a bag, value 3 s. the property of Croer Buckle Herrin , and Thomas Herrin .

CROER BUCKLE HERRIN . My partner's name is Thomas Herrin , we are druggist s in Barbican . The prisoner was my servant , he had lived with me six months. Last Monday he did not return from dinner, and between six and seven in the evening he came to make an apology, stating that his landlord, Jenkin Evans , had been apprehended on suspicion of robbing his master. On the 14th he did not come to work again, for which I went to the office of the sitting magistrate at Guildhall, the first person that I recognised was the prisoner at the bar, he was in custody; he told me the officer had seized his trunk; I then went to an adjoing room, I there saw the trunk; I looked into the trunk, in it was cloves, ginger, nutmegs, bees-wax, Spanish juice, rbubarb, and two bags, one of them I believe had been in my warehouse; that bag had been invoiced under that mark into my house; I was convinced the articles belonged to me, and in examining the bottom of the box I found two pieces of rhubarb, they are split with an axe for the customer to see the quality; I have two pieces that match them in grain and quality. I value the rhubard at one shilling and sixpence and the bag at three shillings.

DANIEL LEADBETTER . I apprehended the prisoner on Tuesday the 14th of this month at the house where he lodged in Charlotte-court in Redcross-street; I asked him whose trunk that was; the prisoner said it was his: he produced the key and opened it; there was no wearing apparel in it; it contained a bag with a quantity of ginger, bees-wax, juice, nutmegs, and two small parcels of mace; he told me that he bought them of a man, he gave three pounds sixteen shillings for them; he said the man was gone for a soldier, and that the man had brought them from Lambeth, and put them in the trunk himself.

Q. Did you see Mr. Herrin compare these two parts of rhubarb - A. I did, and they appeared to me to form one entire piece, both in grain and the parts fitted.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought it altogether, except the bag; I cannot say whether I brought it home for an apron or no.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 27.

Confined Six Months , and Whipped in Jail .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120115-50

131. FREDERIC SEYMOS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of January , nineteen pounds weight of sugar, value 15 s. the property of Jonas Smith Wells , Joseph Hedley , John Wells , Charles Sayer , and William Hinton .

JOSEPH HEDLEY . My partners are Jonas Smith Wells , John Wells , Charles Sayer and William Hinton ; we are wholesale grocer s, 15, Philpot-lane ; the prisoner was our porter . On the 14th of January, in the morning before seven o'clock, I stationed my son in Philpot-lane, and myself at the corner of Rood-lane. At half past seven my son informed me that he had watched the prisoner into the White Horse, Rood-lane. Upon going in I found the prisoner and a woman there; I asked him what he was doing there; he said he came to have some gin; I asked him where the property was that he had robbed me of, and placed my back against the door to prevent him going off; he got up with the intent to lay hold of me to push me from the door; I told him he should not go out of that room untill I got an officer.

Q. Did you find any of your property there - A. A loaf of sugar was found under the woman after the officer came; he and the woman only were in that box. The woman said she bought the sugar of a man. I took the woman in custody, she said she was his wife.

JOSEPH HEDLEY . On the morning of the 16th of January I stationed myself in a court in Philpot-lane, at half past seven the prisoner passed by it; I traced him into the White Horse in Rood-lane, he appeared to have something concealed under his apron. I fetched my father immediately.

Q. What part of the White Horse did you find him in - A. In a small room on the right hand side of the passage. There was no one in the room but the prisoner and a woman. My father asked him where the property was that he had taken; my father was standing in the room with his back to the door to keep persons from going out; the prisoner said he had none, he came to take a glass of gin. A constable was sent for, and immediately the prisoner made a bolt at the door and tried to remove my father. The loaf of sugar was found under the woman, where she was sitting.

GEORGE ROBBINS . I went into the public-house, I obliged the woman to get up, which she did reluctantly. I saw this sugar under her, I have kept it ever since.

IRELAND. I am a servant to Mr. Hedley. I only know of making up the pile of sugar that this sugar was on. I examined the pile, it was one deficient. I believe it to be my masters.

Prisoner's Defence. On Thursday the 16th of January I went to my work as asual about seven o'clock I opened the shop and went to get some refreshment I had a pain in my bowels; my master followed me and asked me what I had got, I said, nothing; the officer searched me and found nothing. My wife, who was acquainted with the landlord, was in there, which was the occasion of a loaf of sugar being discovered On the night before she had been to a house at Downe's warf, and on her return from that house she passed two sailors, one of them gave her a punch on the shoulder; she found he was a person who had been formerly a lodger of her's. He entered into conversation with her, and told her that he had been twice cast away; that he was in possession only of one sixpence; he asked her to lend him some money; she said she had none. She knowing him some time went to her son's master and borrowed him twelve shillings; he waited for her return in Burr-street. He requested that she would go the next morning to his ship; she went and received of him a loaf of sugar. I declare I do not know of any felony respecting the loaf of sugar in question. I am bound to believe my wife's description of the loaf of sugar to be true.

GUILTY , aged 31.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120115-51

132. DAVID HENLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of January , a carpenter's plow, value 10 s. the property of Henry Thomas .

HENRY THOMAS . I am a carpenter . I lost my plow on the 16th of January, between twelve and one o'clock; the plow was taken from my work bench in Mr. Bennet's premises. I saw the plow afterwards at Mr. Purse's, London Wall. The prisoner had been employed at Mr. Bennet's, but he was discharged.

DAVID WATSON . I live with Mr. Purse. Between one and two o'clock the prisoner pawned this plow at our shop; I advanced five shillings on it.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been in the habit of borrowing planes of Mr. Dove who worked there; I went to the bench and took the plow plane, thinking it was the same that I had borrowed before, intending to return it.

GUILTY , aged 31.

Whipped in Jail and discharged.

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120115-52

133. WILLIAM BERRY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of January , fourteen pounds weight of iron, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of Philip Dixey , senior, and Philip Dixey , junior.

PHILIP DIXEY . My son Philip is my partner. I am a smith and iron-founder . After the iron was taken from his lodgings the prisoner confessed that it was my iron; he was my journeyman .

SAMUEL PLESTOW . I am an officer. I went to the prisoner's lodgings, his wife and children were there; I found this iron behind the water-butt, wrapped up in a cloth; this piece was taken from an old iron shop in Whitecross-street. The prisoner said it was distress that made him do it.

Prisoner's Defence. I wanted bread for my family.

GUILTY , aged 33.

Fined 1 s. and discharged.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120115-53

126. MARY RYAN , and ELEANOR HANNON were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 19th of December , fifty yards of printed cotton, the property of John Jeremy , privately in his shop .

JOHN SMITH . I am shopman to John Jeremy linen draper in Holborn . On the 19th of December, about the middle of the day, the two prisoners came to make a purchase the person that served them, his name is Baxter, he suspected that they had robbed us,

Q. He gave notice of his suspicion, did he. - A. Yes, and I shewed the prisoner some other articles that were laying near them, in order to ascertain whether they appeared guilty of having taken any thing before, they appeared very much confounded at my looking very hard at them, and the ticks that I had been shewing them they said they would not do, and requested me to reach one that was rather too high for me to get without getting upon something; I kept my eye upon them, and I saw the prisoner, Hannon, endeavouring to replace a piece of print that she had taken, I immediately returned to the counter, and observed the prisoner Ryan take from under her great loose coat, another piece of print; the other woman had a shawl on. I charged them with having committed the theft.

Q. That is the subject of another charge. - A. Yes.

DANIEL BAXTER . I am a shopman to Mr. Jeremy. On the 19th of December the prisoners came into the shop and desired to look at a gown, I shewed them a great variety; they wished to look at more. I went to get more, and when I returned, observed Ryan with her hands behind her, she appeared confused, she ordered a gown to be cut off, and wanted to leave the shop in a great hurry. What she bought came to twelve shillings and eight-pence, she gave me a two pound note to pay for it; I went into the adjoining parlour to Mrs. Jeremy, to get change for it. I told her I thought the prisoners had taken some print; she said I had better tell Mr. Smith, he was turning his back upon them. I returned from the parlour and gave them the change; I kept a pound back by way of detaining them. I then went into the parlour again, and as I was returning I observed the prisoner Ryan take a piece of twenty yards of print from under her coat, she was going to put it on the counter, Mr. Smith took it out of her hands.

Q. Have you the piece of print here. - A. Yes.

JAMES HANCOCK . I produce the pieces of print.

Q. (To Smith.) Are these the pieces of print that were taken from the women. - A. Yes, there is fifty yards of them, they are worth three pound fifteen shillings.

Ryans Defence. I met this woman, she said come along with me. We were going up Holborn, we looked at the cottons. Mrs. Hannon bought the cotton, and half a yard of linen; the master came in the shop; he said you took a piece of print from under your coat; I did not, it is as true as the Lord is in Heaven.

Hannon's Defence. My husband gave me a two pound note, I went up Holborn, I met Mrs. Ryan, she went with me into this shop, I bought six yards of cotton, and two yards of linen. I gave him a two pound note, he brought me the wrong change; the master said that Mrs. Ryan took a piece of print from under her coat, he said he would transport us, as he had done a good many.

RYAN GUILTY , aged 38.

HANNON GUILTY , aged 32.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before the Lord Chief Baron

Reference Number: t18120115-54

127. HENRY TONATHY , ROBERT CLARK , and WILLIAM LINTON , were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 23d of December , two carpets, value 4 l the property of John Baily .

JOHN BAILY . I am an upholsterer , I live in Marshall street, Golden square . On Monday morning, the 23d of December, I went out of my house about half after eight, I saw three youths lurking about, I knew their persons, I am positive to Tonathy and Clark, and another person with them, which I believe to be Linton, but am not positive. I returned in less than half an hour, the neighbours said I had been robbed, and the thieves had gone towards Great Pulteney street, I saw two men bringing Clark with a carpet, which carpet is my property, this is it, I have had it ever since.

Q. When had you seen that carpet in your house before you lost it. - A. I saw it the same morning, before I went out. I desired the men in custody of Clark, to take care of him; I went in pursuit of Mrs. Bailey, she was knocked down, I accompanied my wife home, and in a few minutes Tonathy was brought to my door; I believe the other carpet is here. They were taken to Marlborough street office. On Wednesday I took Linton at the Newcastle-upon-Tyne public house, the corner of Broad street, I went to a room at the top of the house, the door was fastened; I wished it to be opened. I was answered, that whoever attempted to come into that room, they would blow their brains out, and when the door was opened, a woman struck me; I found the prisoner in the room.

ELIZABETH ASHLEY . I live opposite to Mr. Bailey. On Monday morning, between nine and ten o'clock, I was in my own room, my neice saw them take it; I lifted up the window, and saw the carpet under one of the prisoners arm, I cannot say which, I cried stop thief, I saw three lads, I knew the persons of Tonathy and Clark, I saw the two carpets under one of their arms, they were walking along from Mr. Bailey's shop.

ELIZABETH COWARD . I am Mrs. Ashley's neice.

Q. Where you in her room on this Monday morning. - A. Yes. I saw the three prisoners between nine and ten o'clock from my window near Mr. Bailey's shop. One of them took these two carpets off a deal table at Mr. Bailey's premises; he took them under his arm that was outside of the shop, and then he went down the street, I cannot say which of them took the two carpets.

Q. Where were the other two at the time that he took the carpets. - A. They stood at the next door; when he had taken the carpets, he went to the other two, and the three went off together; they turned towards Great Pulteney street. When they went down Marshall street, I went down stairs and told what I had

seen, they were pursued, I went up stairs, and Tonathy and Clark were brought back.

Q. Had each a carpet with them. - A. I do not know.

Q. Did you take sufficient notice of the persons who were together when the carpet was taken, so as to be sure of these two that were brought back were two of the three. - A. Yes, I have no doubt about that.

Q. Did you take notice sufficient of the person that took the carpet off the table, so as to say one of them were one of the two persons that were brought back. - A. No, Tonathy and Clark were two of the men, Linton I cannot speak to.

Q. But you cannot say whether either of them is the man that took the carpet, or only were standing bye. - A. No, I cannot.

Q. You talk of seeing them take the carpets, you do not know the carpets again, do you. - A. Yes, I had seen the carpets, and noticed the carpets, before they were taken away, these are the same carpets, they had lain there, exposed to sale, some time, not long.

JOSEPH ALLEN . On the 23d of December, I was going up Marshall street, about ten o'clock in the morning, I heard Mr. Bailey had lost two carpets, I pursued after them into Great Pulteney street; at the end of Brewer street, I saw one fling a carpet into a grocers shop.

Q. Do you know who that man was. - A. I could not be certain, his back was towards me. In Archer street I heard one of them was taken, Clark was given into my hands, I cannot say that he was the man that flung the carpet into the grocers shop. I brought the carpet back, and gave it to Mr. Baily.

JOHN KELSEY . Near about ten o'clock, there was an alarm that a thief had ran in. I went down into the cellar, and up the kitchen chimney I found Tonathy. Our shop is a smith's shop in Archer street, I work there. I took Tonathy to Mr. Bailey, I did not see him run in.

Prosecutor. They are my carpets.

Tonathy said nothing in his defence.

Clark's Defence. I was going along, I was stopped, I did not know what for, I was brought to the office.

Linton's Defence. I was not with either of them, I know nothing of it.

Tonathy called seven witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Clark called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Linton called no witnesses to his character.

TONATHY GUILTY, aged 16.

CLARK GUILTY, aged 15.

Judgment respited .

LINTON NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18120115-55

128. SOLOMON MENDES was indicted for feloniously making an assault in the king's highway upon Stephen Henry , on the 20th of January , putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will a watch, value 3 l. two bank dollars, and a three-shilling bank token, his property .

STEPHEN HENRY . I live at Mile-End. I am a labourer. I porter and deal in oysters . On Saturday, the 4th of this month, I was discharged from the Company's employ. Three or four fellow-labourers that were discharged at the same time, we went to drink together. In the evening I left them to go home. In Whitechapel road, going home, three or four men met me. One says to the other, I'll be damn'd if I do not know that man; he lives in Dog-row. I turned round and said, you are damn'd - I do not live there, though I did live there ten years. They made answer, that I dealt in oysters, and that I opened some for them. I then found they knew me, though I did not know them. I got into conversation with them, and they mentioned two or three people's names that did live in Dog-row. With persuasion I went into the Angel and Crown, opposite Whitechapel church, to drink with them. They called for a pot of beer and half a pint of liquor, and paid for it; we drank the liquor, and came out of the house together; there were four of them. I bid them good night, and in my way home, just before I got to Great Garden-street , they overtook me; two of them got my arms behind me, and the other two men rifled me, and afterwards they knocked me down. I got up and halloed out watch; the patrol came up; I told him I had lost my watch and money; I told him two went up Great Garden-street, and the other two went up the road; I went with him to the watch-house, and the constable of the night went with me to the public-house to know whether these lads used the house or no. We could not learn any thing of them; there I was wandering about for a little while. I laid hold of this prisoner somewhere near Whitechapel church, I called the watchmen, and gave him in charge, the officer of the night did not take my charge, they seemed to think that I had not lost a watch, being a poor man. I would not leave the prisoner then, I followed him, thinking somebody might be coming by that would hear my case. By Osborne street, the prisoner knocked me down, a watchman was leaning over his box, when I got up I said, you see how I am served, this is one of the party that robbed me.

Q. Did the watchman take him. - A. No. He knocked me down the second time, and the watchman never came out of his box; I got up, and made the best of my way home. This was on the Saturday night. On the Wednesday morning I saw the prisoner at Worship street, and as soon as I saw him, I said he was one of the four that robbed me.

Q. You said two held your hands back, while the other two rifled you, what did they take from you. - A. A silver watch, two dollars, and a three-shilling token, I have never seen them since. The prisoner was searched at the watch house, nothing was found on him.

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw the prosecutor in my life before he came and gave charge of me.

WILLIAM PARTRIDGE . I am one of the beadles of Whitechapel parish.

Q. Were you on duty on the 4th of January last. - A. I was. A patrol brought the prosecutor to the watchhouse a little after twelve o'clock, he told me that he had been robbed of a watch and two dollars,

he did not then give any account of the persons that robbed him, he could not describe the persons. A little before two he brought this man in, he then said that he had lost his watch, two dollars, and two three shilling pieces, he was very much in liquor and varied his account, that is the reason the officer did not take the charge.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18120115-56

129. ROBERT HUGHES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of December , a tub, value 4 s. and eighty-eight pound weight of butter, value 6 l the property of Richard Aylwin and John Aylwin .

JOHN AYLWIN . I am a wholesale dealer in butter , my partners name is Richard Aylwin , I live in Little Carter Lane, Doctor's Commons .

WILLIAM JACKSON . I am an officer, I took the prisoner in custody.

WILLIAM PRISBERRY . I am porter to Mr. Aylwin. On the 5th of December, a little before six in the evening I was desired to pursue a man that had taken a tub of batter out of Mr. Aylwin's cart. The cart was standing at the warehouse door, I went down Friday Street, I met the prisoner with the tub on his shoulder, I told him he had got my master's property, I took hold of the prisoner with the tub fell off his shoulder, I scuffled with him and throwed him down on his back on the stones, he then begged in God's name I would let him go, I told him no. With assistance I took him to my master's warehouse. This is the tub, I am sure it is my master's property,

JOHN MORRIS . I am carman to Messrs. Aylwin. I loaded sixteen of these tubs at Downes and Holly's wharf, East Smithfield, on Thursday night, December the 5th, and coming down the Old Change a little before six the cart was all safe; and on crossing Watling Street to my master's warehouse, the rope which I tied the cart in with was cut, the tub was missing from the cart When I stopped at the warehouse door I rang the bell, and there I had assistance to seek for the tub of butter. The porter went in pursuit of the prisoner. I am certain that is the tub.

Q. Then between Watling Street and your master's warehouse it was taken away, was it. - A. Yes.

Prosecutor. It is mine, the butter is worth six pounds.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming down the Old Change, I met a man with this tub on a post, he asked me to carry the tub, and he would give me a shilling; when I was taken he ran away.

GUILTY , aged 27.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120115-57

130. JENKIN EVANS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of January , twenty-eight yards of printed cotton, value 2 l. 2 s. a yard and a half of carpet, value 4 s. twenty-one yards of callico, value 14 s. and twenty-one yards of linen cloth, value 1 l. the property of Joseph Clark , Joseph Berry Clark , and George Clark .

LLOYD ALPORT . I am warehouseman to Joseph Clark , Joseph Berry Clark , and George Clark , they are warehousemen in Watling Street , the prisoner was their porter , he had twenty-five shillings a week. In consequence of information his premises were searched, I was there when the things were found, an immense quantity of goods were found, I saw the articles stated in the indictment.

Q. What sort of goods were they. - A. Callico, linen cloths, woollen rags, pieces of carpets, a quantity of boards, I have no doubt they are my masters property. Among other things we found the property stated in the indictment. I saw the things found.

DANIEL LEADBETTER . I am an officer. I went to search the prisoner's house, I found the man's wife at home, she denied having any thing that I asked for. These things were found, which the prosecutor identified by the marks, here is callico, this is part of a piece of printed cotton, eight pieces of linen wrapper, and eight bits of carpet. The prisoner's wife had a gown on her back the pattern of this printed cotton.

Alport. The whole is my master's property.

Mr. Gurney. I believe the prisoner has lived a year and a half in the service of the prosecutors - A. I believe he has; until the preceding day I never had the least suspicion of him, and he came from a place where he had lived seven years, with a particular good character.

Leadbetter. The prisoner took a key that opened a large chest up stairs, he seemed to be anxious to get at a little drawer, I there found three rolls of bank notes, one containing sixteen pound, another thirty-five pound, and another roll containing twenty-nine pound, and some stock receipts, amounting in the whole to seven hundred pounds.

Prisoner's Defence. I request my property that is taken away for my wife and child.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120115-58

131. MARTHA ROBINSON , MARGERET ROBINSON , and HESTER SMITH were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of December , fifty yards of printed callico, value 4 l. the property of James Lamming , privately in his shop .

JOHN TAYLOR . I am porter to Mr. Lynn, an oyster warehouse. On the 10th of December, between four and five in the afternoon, on my coming down Ludgate Hill , I saw Hester Smith and Martha Robinson standing at Mr. Lamming's door.

Q. What is Mr. Lamming. - A. A linen draper . They were looking at a piece of print that was hanging over the line at the door, Hester Smith pulled two pieces of print from the top of the pile standing inside of the shop door put them into her apron and ran away with them, and turned up the Old Bailey; I followed her, she went up a square in the Old Bailey, she could not get through there, I went back and told them in the shop, that they had been robbed, and I saw Martha Robinson standing at the door, she let go the print she was looking at and ran up the Old Bailey, I followed her, she turned up the square where the other prisoner was, I came back to Mr. Lamming's door, and told him that he had been robbed, if he would go with me, or let one of his men, we would go and see if we could take the prisoners, he sent his apprentice with

me up the Old Bailey, there we saw the two prisoners and Margaret Robinson , I had not seen Margaret Robinson before. When I went up Margaret Robinson had the property in her lap, the prentice went up to Margaret Robinson and asked her what she had in her lap, she made no answer, but dropped the two pieces of print on the ground. We took them and the property to Mr. Lamming's shop, Mr. Kimber came and took them to the Compter.

Q. You saw Hester Smith take these two pieces of print. - A. Yes.

Q. When you saw her take it, why did not you stop her. - A. I did not like to stop her by myself.

Q. Margaret Robinson you did not see at the shop. - A. No.

WILLIAM GOODEY . I am an apprentice to Mr. James Lamming , he has no partner. The witness came to the door and said, if either me or Mr. Lamming would go with him he could lead to a discovery of some goods that had been stolen, I went with him and caught them with the printed cotton.

Q. Upon which prisoner did you find it. - A. In Margaret Robinson 's lap.

Hester Smith 's Defence. I am perfectly innocent.

Martha Robinson . The same.

Margeret Robinson. I had the property given into my lap, I do not know who gave it me.

MARTHA ROBINSON NOT GUILTY .

MARGERET ROBINSON NOT GUILTY .

HESTER SMITH GUILTY, aged 18.

of stealing, but not privately .

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120115-59

132. MARY SMOOTH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of December , sixteen silk handkerchiefs, value 5 l. the property of Thomas Flint and John Ray , privately in their shop .

The case was stated by Mr. Adolphus.

JAMES SAMPSON . I am shopman to Thomas Flint and John Ray, at Grafton-house, Soho . On the 7th of December, about three o'clock, the prisoner came to the shop accompanied by another woman, the other woman asked to look at some silk handkerchiefs, I produced forty or fifty silk handkerchiefs. The prisoner staid in the shop until the other woman had bought two, after which she left the shop before the other woman.

Q. Had you up to the time that she left the shop seen her take any thing. - A. No. When the other woman, who had bought two handkerchiefs, left the shop, I followed her into Great Newport Street, at the bottom of Newport Market she was joined by the prisoner, I ran and overtook them both, I asked them to step back with me. They went willingly until we got to the middle of Newport Market, where the other woman said she must return and buy a joint of meat, I turned to see where the other woman went to, the prisoner ran off. I followed the prisoner and overtook her, the other woman made her escape. I took the prisoner into our accompting-house, she produced five pieces of silk handkerchiefs from under her coat. The five pieces contained sixteen handkerchiefs, I have kept them in my possession ever since.

Court. Was the prisoner near the compter. - A. She was while the other woman was dealing. The handkerchiefs are the property of Thomas Flint and John Ray , they are of the value of six pounds.

JOHN HEATH . I am in the service of Messrs. Flint and Ray, I served the other woman with some handkerchiefs. The prisoner and the other woman sat on stools very near the counter, I observed the prisoner go out of the shop before the other woman had received the change.

Q. Had you seen the prisoner take any thing. - A. I had not. I had suspicion of the prisoner that she was stealing goods, not the other woman, her manner did not appear so.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence, called four witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY, aged 30.

of stealing, but not privately .

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction ,

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120115-60

133. CATHERINE DAY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of January , one hundred and eighty yards of galloon, value 26 s. the property of John Elisha Collyer .

JOHN ELISHA COLLYER . I am a haberdasher , 78 Lamb's Conduit Street . The prisoner came to my shop on the 11th of January, between twelve and one o'clock, I was behind the counter going in at the street and while the prisoner was being served at the right hand counter I observed that she had a piece of white cloth or muslin in her hand, and I saw her put it into the drawer. I saw her take it out again as if she had something concealed in the handkerchief, to put it into her pocket, I waited till she had gone out of the shop. She had bought three yards of galloon. I went to the drawer, there were five pieces of galloon missing, I went out and overtook the prisoner in Bedford Row, I brought her back, I told her that I suspected that she had been stealing something out of the drawer, she took these five pieces out of her pocket and begged for mercy.

Prisoner's Defence. I throw myself on the mercy of the court.

GUILTY, aged 44.

of stealing, but not privately .

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120115-61

134. THOMAS HENGHAM was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of December , two baskets, value 3 s. the property of James Dowse .

RACHAEL FRANCIS . I was sitting at my window opposite of Mr. Dowse's about half after four, I saw the prisoner take two baskets away from the door and go away with them, I told Mr. Dowse of it.

JOHN READ . I am foreman to Mr. Dowse, the last witness told me that the prisoner had taken two baskets away, I went after him and found him at Mr. Dowse's yard, Quaker Street, I asked him where the baskets were that he took away from Mr. Dowse's door, he went and got them. These are the baskets, they are my master's property.

Prisoner's Defence. My sister was starving in the street, I took it for my sister to get some sprats in.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120115-62

135. ELEANOR BROOKS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of December , a tippet, value 7 s. the property of Augustin Nicholy .

ELIZABETH NICHOLY . My husband's name is Augustin Nicholy , he is a furrier , 82, Oxford-road . On the 17th of December, between six and seven, the prisoner came into the shop, she asked to look at some tippets, I shewed them her; she took this tippet up and said it was a pretty one; she kept it in her hand, it had white spots in it. She then asked to look at some gloves; I told her we did not deal in gloves. She reached over to the drawer, and then walked towards the door, and I saw the end of a tippet hanging out of her handkerchief as she was going out; I took hold of her and told her that she had got a tippet of mine; she said she had not, and flung it out of the handkerchief, on the side of the shop window; she tore herself from me and ran out of the door as fast as she could; I ran after her, she was stopped and brought back.

Mr. Gurney. Upon your asking for the tippet she shook her handkerchief and out it fell - A. I cannot tell. This is the tippet, it is mine.

The prisoner left her defence to her counsel; called one witness, who gave her a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120115-63

136. DANIEL FREEMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of January , two pair of breeches, value 2 l. and a pair of shoes, value 10 s. the property of William Scott .

WILLIAM SCOTT . I live at Bush Hill with my mother. On the 6th of January I lost two pair of breeches and a pair of shoes; the breeches were hanging up in the yard to dry; the yard is walled round; at the side of the house there is a gate that leads up to the kitchen. The shoes were in the house.

Q. Had you seen them at all on the 6th of January - A. No, I saw them on Sunday morning; they were missed on Monday about half past nine.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. Very well; he lived about two or three miles off. On Wednesday, from information, I found him in the tap-room of the George inn, Enfield.

Q. What did he say - A. He bought them in London; he did not say when; he had a pair of my breeches on.

Q. Did you find the other pair of breeches - A. No. When he was searched at Worship-street the shoes were found in his side pocket.

JOSEPH SCOTT . I am a constable. The prisoner was delivered in my charge. I produce the breeches and the shoes.

Prosecutor. They are mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I found the things between Edmonton and Bush Hill. I was in distress.

GUILTY, aged 21.

Judgment respited .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120115-64

137. JOSEPH SPITTIGUE and RICHARD RICHARDSON were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of December , six fowls, value 9 s. the property of John Biggs .

JOHN BIGGS . I live in Barnes in Surry . I keep poultry in the hen-house.

Q. Do you know the prisoners - A. I know nothing of Spittigue. Richardson, when he worked with me, called his name Lamb; he used to take care of my team. I have lost fowls many times before. On Saturday night, the 28th of December, about eight o'clock, I heard clearly that some person was in the yard; we have a large dog in the yard; we wondered the dog did not open, but he being so conversant with Richardson it is not to be wondered at. I understood on Sunday evening that there were two persons apprehended for stealing of fowls. On Monday I found that I had lost more than six fowls; two of these fowls, a cock, and a black and white pullet I knew. On Monday I went to Bow-street, the two prisoners were in custody; these six fowls were produced, they were all dead. I described two of them, and have no doubt but they all came from one place. Two of them I was able to ascertain when they were produced: one a cropper crown cock, the other was a pullet, black and white; I have no doubt in the world of their being mine. They are worth nine shillings the whole of them.

JOSEPH DURMAN . I am one of the patrols of Bow-street. On the 29th of December, about two o'clock in the morning, I was going the Fulham-road from town, the prisoners were coming towards town; I met them coming towards London, they were both together; Richardson had a bag on his back, I asked him what he had got there; he did not answer me directly; Spittigue said it was tools they had fetched from Richmond; it was brushes and colour; I told them it was an aukward hour of the night to be carrying tools about; I felt at them and was not satisfied; I told them we were Bow-street officers. We examined the bag, in it were six fowls, and no brushes nor colours. They were dead. The fowls were warm at the time, they had not long been dead. We took one to Knightsbridge watchhouse, and the other to St. Martin's watchhouse. On Monday morning we took them to Bow-street, Mr. Biggs saw the fowls there, he believed them all to be his; he pitched particularly upon the cock. Richardson told me on Monday morning that he got the fowls from Mr. Biggs.

WILLIAM BOND . I am an officer. I was in company with the other patrol.

Q. You have heard the account the other witness has given - A. Yes, his account is correct. On the next morning Spittigue stated that he had called upon Richardson, Richardson asked him to take a walk a little way, that he had left his tools at his late master's; I asked him where he brought the fowls from; he said he stood on this side of Putney bridge while the other went and got them from his late master. In the afternoon when I called upon him he said that Richardson took the fowls from Mr. Biggs of Barnes, he had often took some before: he then said that he stood outside of the gate while Richardson was getting them. The clock struck twelve while he was getting them. He said he had spoken erroneous in the morning, he would state the truth.

Mr. Arabin. All this you obtained without any promise - A. Yes.

Richardson's Defence. Spittigue came to me in the afternoon; we were drinking together; we both went out together; he assisted as well as me; I took the things and he received them of me.

Spittigue left his defence to his counsel.

SPITTIGUE - NOT GUILTY .

RICHARDSON - GUILTY , aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120115-65

138. JANE BROWN and MARY BAGGS were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of January , nineteen handkerchiefs, value 9 s. the property of William Jeremy .

JAMES WILSON . I am shopman to William Jeremy , 273, High Holborn . On the 9th of January, between four and five in the evening, a person came in the shop and waved his hand, and said, come to the door immediately. I went to the door; he said these two women have taken some of your property. I immediately missed a piece of handkerchiefs, they were taken from the side of the door; I pursued them; they ran up Leicester fields; I called out stop thief, and at the narrow part of Featherstone buildings several gentlemen met them, they seemed to stop them. I overtook them and laid hold of Jane Brown , and told her that she had taken a piece of handkerchiefs, she moved about two or three yards, and said, how dare you stop me: I said, certainly you must have been doing something not right, or else you would not run so. As I said that I saw a person stoop and pick up the handkerchiefs where they first stopped, he handed them to me. I took hold of one of the prisoner's and said she must come back.

Q. You do not know which of them dropped it - A. No, I do not. I took them back to the shop, sent for an officer, and gave them into custody.

Q. These handkerchiefs were hanging at your door - A. Yes, part in and part out.

ELIJAH DENHAM . I am a taylor. On my going up Holborn on the 9th of this month, I met Mr. Wilson and another man running, I followed them into Featherstone-buildings, and there Mr. Wilson was searching Brown; she said she had not the property, and wondered at his stopping of her; the other said she was innocent; and in about two or three yards from them a gentleman picked up the handkerchief and gave it to Mr. Wilson.

JAMES HANCOCK . I am an officer. I took the prisoner into custody; I produce the property, with a label attached to the handkerchiefs.

Wilson. It is Mr. Jeremy's property.

Brown's Defence. I am innocent of having them.

Bagg's Defence. I am perfectly innocent of it. As to this woman I know nothing of her.

BROWN - GUILTY , aged 50.

BAGGS - GUILTY , aged 27.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120115-66

139. SAMUEL RADFORD was indicted for that he, on the 13th of October , upon Elizabeth Nicholson , spinster , feloniously did make an assault, and her the said Elizabeth Nicholson , feloniously did ravish and carnally know; and ELIZABETH RADFORD for assisting him, the said Samuel Radford , the said rape to do and commit .

Mr. Knapp, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoners were

ACQUITTED .

A second indictment for the same offence on the 23d of October .

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120115-67

140. ELIZA DESMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of December , one hundred and nineteen halfpence, and one piece of copper coin called a Coventry halfpenny , the property of Samuel John Freame .

SARAH FREAME . My husband's name is Samuel John Freame , we keep the Carpenters Arms public-house, Bury-street, Allen-street . I lost these halfpence on the 13th of December; I was sitting in the tap-room, I heard the rattle of halfpence; I got up and went to see what it was; I saw the prisoner with a five shilling paper in her hands; I asked her what business she had in the bar, she said that my daughter was drawing her a pint of beer, and I have the money in my hand; I said that is my five shilling paper of halfpence; the prisoner said she had the halfpence of Mrs. Fitzpatrick. The prisoner and I went there, Mrs. Fitzpatrick said she had no halfpence of her. Mr. Hancock came and took her to the watch-house. I believe this would not have happened if she had not been in liquor.

Prisoners Defence. I was at the corner of Noble-street, the woman gave me a five shilling paper of halfpence; I came home and went to get a pint of beer, the paper of halfpence fell out of my hand, she called me a thief.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120115-68

141. MURIEL STONE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of January , twenty-seven yards of linen cloth, value 2 l. 14 s. the property of Charles Parry , privately in his shop .

CHARLES PARRY . I am a linen-draper , 292, Holborn . On the 16th of January the prisoner and another woman came into my shop, they asked to look at some muslin; I shewed them some muslin and then they asked for some gingham; they bought a small quantity of that, and while I was serving that the prisoner had a child in her arms, she went towards the door and went out; the person that was with her paid for what she had bought, and went out. I missed a piece of Irish linen. I told John Edmonds to go after the two women; he did, and returned with the prisoner and the linen; I sent for an officer and gave her into custody.

Q. How many persons were in the shop - A. A gentleman, me, and my shopman, and a woman customer. I had seen the piece of linen five minutes before I missed it; it was on the counter, near the window,

as you go out of the door.

JOHN EDMONDS . I am shopman to Mr. Parry. My master told me to go after the two women; I stopped the prisoner at the bottom of Holborn Hill; she said she could not come back, she was going to the doctor's; I told her go where she would I must follow her. In Hatton Garden she said if I would let her go and forgive her she would confess what she had got; I asked her what it was; she held it on her arm; I took it from her and looked at it, and saw it was my master's property. I brought her back; I said, here is the woman and the cloth. This is it, I am sure it is my master's property.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence; called three witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY, aged 22,

Of stealing, but not privately .

Confined Fourteen Days in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120115-69

142. EBENEZER SAMBROOK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of December , sixteen pennyweights of gold dust, value 20 s. the property of Josiah Allen .

JOSIAH ALLEN . I am a seal-maker , I live at No. 16, Charterhouse-street . The prisoner has been in my employ about a twelvemonth. On the 12th of last December the prisoner came to work about half past eight in the morning: the box containing the gold filings were in the shop under the charge of my apprentice, placed on one of the work boards; the apprentice was then called out of the shop, and the prisoner was left alone. Shortly after that another man came to work, and was followed close up stairs by the apprentice; the box then containing the filings was taken away by the apprentice. I shortly after weighed them, and found it to be deficient sixteen pennweights. There was some missing on the morning before. It was weighed on the 11th at night, the last thing, in the presence of my apprentice. About twelve o'clock I sent to Bow-street for an officer; he came and asked the prisoner if he had any gold about him; the prisoner answered, no; he searched him and found in his breeches pocket a small grain; he searched his fob and found a paper, he asked the prisoner what it contained; he said, gold. The officer found another paper, he asked what it contained; he said, gold. It was weighed in the presence of the prisoner and the officer, I found the weight that we missed out of the box.

- ROBINSON. I am an apprentice to Mr. Allen. I saw the gold weighed on the 11th of December at night.

Q. Was it on the work board when the prisoner came to work in the morning - A. Yes. I saw the gold found in his fob.

SAMUEL LACK . I asked the prisoner if he had any gold about him; he said he had not. This gold I found, one parcel in his fob pocket, and the other in his breeches pocket.

Prosecutor. This is the gold filings that I lost by the chips that come off; they are chips and filings together.

Prisoner's Defence. I had a brother that was sick for six years, he worked at home, and after he was dead I looked over his box I found these filings, there is a very little gold in it I believe.

GUILTY , aged 41.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120115-70

143. CHARLES KING and THOMAS CULLIVER were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of December , two hundred and eighty deals, value 100 l. the property of Joseph Tucker, senior , in a certain barge in the navigable river Thames . And GEORGE HOUGHTON for feloniously receiving the said goods, knowing them to have been stolen .

SECOND COUNT for like offence, stating the goods to be the property of Henry Bolton , David Briscoe Baker , and Charles Bolton .

JAMES CLEMENTS . I am a lighterman in the employ of Mr. Tucker.

Q. Has he a barge called the Union - A. Yes. On Friday the 20th of December I took her from the moor chains and moored her in Rosser and Fisher's wharf, Rotherhithe ; I moored her both head and stern. She was laden with deals.

Q. At the time that you left her was there a pair of oars in her - A. Yes. I left the barge between three and four in the afternoon.

JOSEPH TUCKER, JUN. Q. Your father is a lighterman - A. Yes.

Q. On Saturday the 21st of December did you go to Rosser's and Fisher's wharf to look for the Union - A. Yes; I went there about half after two in the day. I did not find the barge, she was gone from there; I went in search of her up and down the river in a skiff.

Q. In the course of your search did you meet with the prisoner King - A. I did. He is a lighterman . I enquired of him whether he had seen my barge; he told me he had not; he told me he thought she must be on the South shore, as the wind blew from the North.

Q. I believe you did not find her that day - A. No, nor the Sunday; on the Monday evening I found her at a place called East-lane on the South shore; she was empty.

Q. Were the oars gone - A. Yes, they were. She was a barge without either fore or stern hatch, or any sealing.

JOSEPH TUCKER , SEN. Q. You are the owner of the barge Union - A. Yes.

Q. For whom had you lightered this cargo of deals - A. For Messrs. Bolton and Baker.

Q. What was the value of the cargo - A. Ninety-nine pounds was the parchase if they came out right by the barge note.

Q. Having known by your son that the barge was missed did you go about to the deal yards - A. I did and on Thursday after I went to Mr. Houghton's premises in the Borough road; he sells old building materials; I saw no new there but my own.

Q. Did you see any deals there that you thought were your own - A. I did, thirty-five in number; thirty-two eight-feet, and three twelve-feet. I marked

them before they came to the office. I recognised them by the ship's mark.

Q. Having examined them did you proceed to Union Hall to obtain a warrant - A. I did. I went back with an officer, and took possession of the deals.

Q. While you and the officer were there did Houghton come in - A. He did; I asked him how he came by them deals; he said he had bought them of a man of the name of Chapman, who lived in Dover-street; that is a cross street near the Magdalen; he said he bought two hundred and a half, he gave thirty-five pounds a hundred for them; I asked him what become of the rest of the deals; he told me that his wife and he had retailed them out at two or three at a time, and to whom he did not know. I told him it was a serious loss to me, if he could tell me it would help me; he said it was using him ill to ask him. I went to him again in the evening. There was an hundred deals at the Royal Mortar in the London-road, Mr. Inman, he lived next door but one, he claimed them.

Q. After you had found them did you tell Houghton that you had found them - A. On the next day I told the magistrate before him. In counting over the two hundred I found nine that did not belong to me. In the thirty-five that I found at Houghton's they all belonged to me.

Q. How near did you find these deals at Inman's premises to his - A. About two or three hundred yards.

Mr. Alley. I believe Houghton, who is now indicted pointed out to you where to apprehend Chapman - A. He did, I believe.

Mr. Gurney. The deals were a small part of the ship's cargo - A. Yes.

DAVID BRISCOE BAKER . Q. Are you in the house of Messrs. Bolton and Baker - A. Yes. The names of the firm are Henry Bolton , Charles Bolton, and David Briscoe Baker. These deals were consigned to us for sale, and they were all that were in the ship. Mr. Tucker had all the deals to the best of my knowledge.

- CHAPMAN. I live at 23, Dover-street, Blackfriars-road, near the Magdalen.

Q. Do you know the three prisoners at the bar - A. Yes. I knew King before this transaction.

Q. Did King and Culliver come to you on the evening of Thursday the 19th of December - A. Yes, they came to my own house; they said they wanted to speak to me. We went over to the Dover Castle public-house, they asked me if I wanted to buy any deals, they said they had got about an hundred; I said I did not want any, I am out of business, I have got nothing to do; I said, I knew a person that did; I would let them know the next evening.

Q. Was any price mentioned - A. Not then. We had two or three pots of beer together. We met again the next evening. On Friday I went to Mr. Houghton's, I asked him if he wanted to buy any deals; he said yes, he would buy them.

Q. Was any price agreed upon - A. Not then.

Q. You knew King was a lighterman - A. Yes. I never saw Culliver before Thursday evening.

Q. Did Houghton ask who was to supply the deals - A. I told him they were lightermen.

Q. Did any thing pass between Houghton and you how the deals were to be brought - A. He told me to provide carts to bring them to his house the next morning, and he would go down with me in the morning, and I went to see Culliver and King that evening.

Q. That evening did King and Culliver come to you again - A. Yes; I informed them what had passed between Houghton and me; King told me he would call me up in the morning about half after five. The deals were to be at the Anchor wharf, Wapping Old-stairs, Mr. Johnson's wharf; he told me that they would be there at high water in the morning.

Q. Upon that, that evening, did you go to bespeak waggons - A. I did, that evening, to Mr. Briant's, East Smithfield.

Q. On Saturday morning did King call you up - A. He did, about half after five; I went with him over Blackfriars-bridge, and from there to the Anchor wharf; the barge was there; the name of the barge was the Union, she was laden with deals.

Q. Did you see any oars in her - A. Yes, one pair, they were in the barge, and King, in about half an hour fetched the oars from the barge and put them on the wharf, and afterwards he took them away.

Q. What time in the morning was this - A. About half after six, or nearly seven.

Q. While you were there did Culliver come - A. Culliver came in about twenty minutes with an empty barge, he moored that barge outside of the Union; the Union laid close to the wall.

Q. What was the use of mooring that empty barge close to the Union - A. To cover her; she was empty, and laid higher in the water. Culliver came to us at the public-house, there we had something to drink. We stopped there some time; I went out and met one of the waggons coming to the wharf; I directed the waggons to be loaded at the Anchorwharf. Culliver, King, and me went as far as Tower Hill together; then I went over the water to Mr. Houghton, I told him the deals were come to the Anchor wharf, one waggon was loading, and the other waggon was coming; I got a man to unload the barge. I breakfasted at Houghton's, and then Houghton and I came to the Anchor wharf.

Q. When you got there did you find the waggons loaded - A. One waggon was loaded and gone out of the yard; Mr. Houghton gave them a card where to go to; they asked for money to pay turnpikes, Houghton gave each of the men a shilling; he paid the wharfinger and the man I employed.

Q. Then the waggons were sent off - A. Yes.

Q. Did you go with Houghton to his own yard - A. Yes. In going over we overtook one of the waggons.

Q. At last did the waggons arrive at his yard with the deals - A. They did; he and I assisted to unload them. All the deals came. On Monday we counted them over; I cannot exactly say the number, I think two hundred and seventy-three, short hundreds; I asked him thirty-two pounds a hundred; I said the men would not be satisfied without thirty, that was to be the lowest; Houghton said he could not afford to give so much money for them; he said, you know I

run a hazard, he agreed to give twenty-five pound, he gave me a pound note, earnest of the money.

Q. Did Culliver call upon you. - A. He had called upon me on the Saturday night, to know if I was paid. On Monday night Culliver and King came together, and Houghton came to my house; we all went over to the Dover Castle, I went home to Houghton's house with him, he gave me twenty-nine pounds, making up with the one pound, thirty pounds; I went to the Dover Castle, and gave it King, Culliver was in the tap-room, I went into the parlour, and gave King twenty poundout of the thirty.

Q. Who was present at the time. - A. Mr. Jones's boy was reading prayers at the time, the oldest son turned round and looked at me, while I was paying him the money; we agreed to meet the Tuesday evening to have the remainder of the money. On Tuesday evening they came to me, we went to the Dover Castle, I had not got the money, we appointed to meet on the day after Christmas day. On Thursday morning I saw Houghton, he gave me fifteen pounds, he told me that he had sold the deals.

Q. How much did that leave to pay. - A. Thirteen pounds, with the expences, there were three pounds paid for waggons, wharfage, and landing, he promised to pay me that on the Friday or the Saturday after.

Q. I believe on that evening, Thursday, an officer came to your house to take you in custody. - A. I was in the country, I heard of it, I sent a young man of the name of Murphy to King and Culliver, I saw Culliver, and told him that the officer had been after me; he said he had heard something of thirty pounds, he thought it must be Houghton that had told.

Q. Had you heard of the reward. - A. I was apprehended that same day, through Houghton; after I was apprehended I told Glannon all I knew.

Mr. Alley. Q. In what way of life is Houghton. - A. He buys new and old building materials.

Q. What are you. - A. I am a carpenter.

Q. Are you in earnest. - A. Yes. I am a tradesman.

Q. What house is it you keep in Dover-street. - A. A private house.

Q. In which you let out lodgings. - A. That is not material, my wife does.

Q. I think, according to your own observations, you applied to Houghton to purchase these deals of the lightermen. - A. I did.

Q. Had you a bill of invoice at the time. - A. None at all.

Q. Then I take it for granted, though you said you had these deals of a foreign captain to Mr. Houghton, that you did not produce a bill of invoice pretending that you had them upon that account. - A. I did not.

Q. You remember the man Houghton, when he was a witness before you and the other parties, do you not recollect his stating that fact, and did not you admit it. - A. No, I did not; I perhaps might, I do not recollect it.

Q. I ask you again, did not the prisoner Houghton say in your presence, and in your hearing, that you told him that you had the deals of a foreign captain, and that was what induced him to purchase them of you. - A. He might, I made no answer, I heard him say something, about a foreign captain.

Q. Were not you standing as a party accused of the robbery. - A. Yes, I must.

Q. Now attend to the question. When you were first examined, did not you at each of the examinations, desire to have it postponed, that you might produce the foreign captain of whom you had the timber. - A. I never said a word about the captain, Houghton did; I said if they would give me another day, I would bring the person that I had the deals of. I never saw the other men untill they were under examination.

Q. Were not you asked at that very time whether you knew them two men, King and Culliver. - A. I was asked that, I said I believed I had seen them before, that was before I was put on oath.

Q. So then you only tell lies when not upon oath. - A. When upon oath, I speak the truth.

Q. Do you know the first witness that has been examined, Clements, the lighterman. - A. I saw him at Hick's Hall.

Q. Did not you in the presence of Clements, and two other persons say, you would be d - d if you did not stick so close to Houghton as the shirt upon his back, because of your own expressions, he had pulled you up. - A. I do not know that I did.

Q. Houghton you say got the timber into his possession before you talked about the price of them. - A. I do.

Q. This yard of Houghton's in which the timber is put, is it not a yard directly open to the highway. - A. One part of it is open.

Mr Gurney. Glannon took you up, and whether you were charged with stealing or receiving, you did not know - A. I did not.

Q. On the Friday you were taken to Union Hall. - A. Yes.

Q. At first when you went there you had the discretion to hold your tongue; you told Glannon you would tell all you knew if they would receive you as a witness. - A. Yes.

Q. Is that the receipt of Houghton's - A. Yes, Received of Houghton thirty pounds in part of the amount of the deals.

EDWARD LAWSON . Q. Do you keep the Swan public house, Wapping Stairs. - A. I do, that is close to the Anchor Wharf.

Q. Early in the morning of Saturday, the 21st of December, do you remember a barge load of deals being there. - A. Yes, that barge was not there the night before, I saw it at seven o'clock, before daylight; the deals of that barge were landed, and carried away by Mr. Bryant's waggon; that was done by the direction of Chapman, he came there the afternoon before. After one waggon was loaded, Chapman came there in the course of the morning, I saw Mr. Houghton with him. Houghton assisted Chapman in putting the deals on the landing.

Q. Did you see Culliver or King there. - A. No, I did not.

Q. Is there a public house opposite to yours called the Bells. - A. Directly opposite.

DAVID MITCHEY . Q. Are you clerk to Mr. Briant

of East Smithfield, who lets out waggons. - A. Yes.

Q. On the evening of Friday the 20th did Chapman come to you to hire some waggons to go to Ahehor wharf to bring away some deals. - A. Yes, I asked to what place, he said to Oxford Road, the next morning I sent one waggon down by seven o'clock. When I went down there were about eighty deals in one waggon, they waited near an hour before any person came to give orders, then Chapman and Houghton came, I asked them where the deals were to go, Houghton gave me a card, I looked at the card and said, there was a deal of difference between Oxford Road and the Borough Road, Houghton said he should have them at his own yard. Houghton promised to pay me the cartage, I saw Houghton pay the wharfage.

Q. Did you see the barge. - A. I did, she had got no cieling in her, there was an empty barge outside of her.

Q. That empty barge was higher out of the water than her. - A. She was.

Mr. Alley. Chapman was the man that called upon you. - A. Yes, and he said they were to go to Oxford Road. Houghton gave me the card, he said they should go to his own yard. The cartage is not paid yet, he promised to pay.

MARY ARCHIBALD . Q. Do you keep the Bell public-house, near the Anchor. - A. Yes, Mr. Spencer keeps the house, I am his niece.

Q. Do you remember about the time of that unhappy murder in your neighbourhood, seeing some man in your house that morning; look at that man - Chapman, stand forward. - A. No, I do not.

Q. Look at the bar, and tell me whether you recollect any of them men. - A. I do not recollect either of them.

MARY PHILLIPS . Q. Are you servant at that public-house, the Bell. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember the prisoners being at your public-house. - A. I have knowledge of them two young men, I have seen them within these three or four months, I cannot say I saw them in my master's house. They might have been in the house, I cannot say.

WILLIAM CLEMENTS . Q. I believe you are waiter at the Dover Castle public-house, Dover Street, St. George's Fields. - A. Yes.

Q. Does Chapman use your house sometimes. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember his being at your house drinking with any person a few days before Christmas. - A. Two days before Christmas day, I have some recollection of King, but I cannot positively say I saw him twice there with Chapman.

Q. Do you remember Chapman going out of the room with either of them. - A. Yes, with King, he went into the parlour, he did not stay in the parlour more than five minutes I think; that was on the Monday, they came out of the parlour and had some gin and water, there were three of them together then. On Tuesday two of them came again, they were a good while together then before the other one came.

WILLIAM JONES . I am the son of the landlord of the public-house.

Q. Do you remember on the Monday night before Christmas being in the parlour with your brother. - A. I think it was Tuesday, Mr. Chapman came into the room where I was, I saw Chapman pay King a quantity of notes, and when they had done that they went out again.

THOMAS JONES . Q. I believe you are the landlord of the Dover Castle. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember shortly before Christmas day Chapman coming to your house. - A. On the Saturday before I am certain of seeing him with King, and I believe Culliver. On the Monday they all, I believe, came, King was one, I am not positive to Culliver, I remember they being there two days, I am not certain to the Monday.

JOHN BURROWS. I live at the corner of Dover Street.

Q. Were you at the Dover Castle on Saturday evening, or an evening shortly before Christmas day. - A. I have seen King and Culliver there, I have seen them in company with Chapman within a week, or two or three days before Christmas day, I remember they were there at the time of the talk of Williamson's murder, they were in company together.

JOHN MURPHY . Q. Do you know Chapman. - A. Yes, I am a slight relation to him

Q. Did you see the prisoners at his house nigh Christmas day. - A. On Monday before Christmas day I saw King, Culliver, and Houghton, on the same evening I saw them in company with him again at the Dover Castle, and there was a fourth man, I only saw his back, I took it to be Houghton.

Q. On the night that Houghton was apprehended, did Chapman send you to King's house. - A. He did, his house is close to the Old Barge house, I did not see King then. On the next morning, at seven o'clock, I saw Culliver, I told him that an officer and Mr. Tucker had been at Mr. Chapman's house in search of him, concerning some deals, Culliver said he would meet Chapman in a quarter of an hour at the Oakley Arms, I met Culliver after that going to the Oakley Arms, they both met there together.

WILLIAM GILBERT was called, and not appearing in court, his recognisance was ordered to be estreated.

WILLIAM INMAN . I live at 24 in the London Road.

Q. Did you on Monday, the 23d of December, purchase any deals of Houghton the prisoner. - A. I did, I bought-two hundred, at thirty-six pound per hundred, Mr. Tucker afterwards claimed them.

Prosecutor. I have examined all the deals, they are mine.

JOHN GLANNON . I am an officer, these deals have been in my care ever since, I took thirty-five deals from Houghton's yard.

Q. Did you enquire of Houghton what had become of the remainder. - A. I did, he said they were all sold, one at a time, he did not give me the name of any one person that he had sold to, I went to him on the evening again, and then he was offended with my asking, he said he knew nothing what became of the deals.

Mr. Alley. He never denied to you that he had bought the deals. - A. No, he said he had.

Q. At the first examination the three prisoners were there, and Chapman. - A. I believe they were.

Q. At that time the prisoner Houghton said that he had bought the deals of Chapman, Chapman saying he bought them of a foreign captain. - A. There was something of that.

Q. And you got it postponed. - A. Yes.

Q. At that time King, Culliver, Houghton, and Chapman were all together. - A. Yes, Chapman said I was perfectly right, these two men were of the party.

Mr. Gurney. Q. Then Chapman did not send you after the foreign captain. - A. No, certainly not, I knew to the contrary.

King's Defence. My Lord, I have no defence to make, only that I am innocent, and throw myself on the mercy of your Lordship and the court.

Culliver's Defence. I know nothing of the business.

Houghton's Defence. I am an innocent man, I was innocently led into it by Chapman, which I hope I shall prove to you.

WILLIAM HOLLIS . I am a carpenter, I live in the Borough Road. On the 20th of December Chapman applied to me to purchase the deals, at forty pound a hundred. I had not the money, or else I should have purchased them, he told me they were a captain's purquisites.

RICHARD NESBIT . I am an accomptant. On the morning of the 23d of December, I saw Chapman at Houghton's deal yard, and in conversation Houghton said, I have been buying of deals, here is the man that I have been buying the deals of, at forty pounds a hundred. Mr. Samuel and I were together, we were passing by accident.

ABRAHAM SAMUEL . I am a confectioner, I live in the Borough Road, I was at Houghton's yard, I saw Houghton and Chapman together, I said, you have a great many deals, yes, he said, I have bought a lot at forty pound a hundred, Chapman heard it, and never denied it.

Houghton called six witnesses, who gave him a good character.

King called five witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Culliver called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

KING GUILTY - DEATH , aged 32,

CULLIVER GUILTY - DEATH , aged 34.

HOUGHTON NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120115-71

144. THOMAS BEARD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of January , a bank note, value 10 l. and a bank note, value 5 l. the property of John Fletcher Wilkinson , in the dwelling-house of Richard Seaman .

The case was stated by Mr. Alley.

JOHN FLETCHER WILKINSON . Q. I believe you reside in the neighbourhood of Cavendish Square . - A. I do, the prisoner had lived with me about six weeks or two months.

Q. In the month of December did you leave you pocket book about on the table. - A. I did, there were two hundred and seventy-five pound in it.

Q. Did you afterwards miss a five-pound note. - A. I did, and the boy was very much affected, he said, when he found it was a five-pound note, if the drawer had been open he would have returned it.

SARAH BARNARD . Q. On the 7th of January do you remember the boy coming to you to change a five pound note. - A. I changed a five-pound note for him, he afterwards admitted that he had taken it from his master.

MRS. BENNET. Q. I believe you were with the last witness at her house when the boy was there. - A. I was, he said that he put the produce of the five-pound note upon the clock, I found it there.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120115-72

145. JOHN RADLEY was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Cooper , about the hour of six on the night of the 23d of December , and stealing therein twenty-four yards of carpet, value 7 l. his property .

WILLIAM COOPER . I live at 231, Tottenham Court Road , I am a carpet manufacturer . On the evening of the 23d of December, about six o'clock, I was in the accompting-house with a gentleman, I heard the front door of the warehouse open, conceiving that it was my boy that I expected in, I waited for some little time, expecting that he would come to speak to me, not finding him coming forward, I looked forward and saw the prisoner with a piece of carpet in his hand, going towards the door, I immediately followed him, and came up to him about three doors off, he was running away, and when I came up to him he threw it down; when he threw it down I called out stop thief and ran after him, and by assistance I secured him. I never lost sight of him.

Q. Was the door upon the latch. - A. I cannot say, it might be put to and not upon the latch. This is the carpet, it is mine.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to his character.

GUILTY, aged 21,

of stealing only .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120115-73

146. ANN RAYMOND and ELIZABETH WARNER were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of January , a shawl, value 7 s. the property of John White and John M'Pherson , privately in their shop .

ROBERT HILL . I am shopman to John M'Pherson and John White , linen draper s, No. 7, Middle-row, Holborn . On Monday last, between the hours of twelve and one, the two prisoners came into the shop, they bought some check, paid for it, and went out of the shop, I missed a shawl that was laying on the counter, I immediately called them back and told them that I had lost a shawl, they came back and said they should like to be searched, I sent for a constable, and

while the young man was gone for the constable, we looked on the floor where the prisoners were standing, and saw the shawl.

Q. Was it near the counter. - A. It was two yards from the counter, when I took up the shawl it was quite warm. This is the shawl, it is worth seven shillings.

Raymond's Defence. We were accused of taking the shawl, we said we would strip, and the shawl was found where they packed up the blankets.

Warner's Defence. I turned my pockets out, I had not the shawl.

The prisoners called seven witnesses, who gave them a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120115-74

147. ELEANOR KING was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of January , a gown, value 7 s. the property of John Winfield .

JOHN WINFIELD . I am a pawnbroker, 65, High Street, Bloomsberry . On the 3d of January, about four in the afternoon, I found the prisoner abusing my man violently, she said that he had charged her with stealing a gown, upon enquiry I found that the gown was missing from the door, the prisoner was searched and the gown found under her clothes. This is the gown, it has my private mark upon it.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going to pledge my shawl, going into the shop I picked up this gown.

GUILTY , aged 29,

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120115-75

148. PHILIP BARNARD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of December , a pair of shoes, value 7 s. the property of John Fraser and Richard Price , privately in their shop .

JOHN FRASER My partner's name is Richard Price , we are shoemaker s, 17, Ratcliffe Highway . On the 7th of December, the prisoner came into our shop, pretending to purchase some shoes, accordingly I shewed him some shoes, which he objected to as not fitting, I shewed him others, and the last I shewed him he said fitted him very well, he offered me two shillings less than I asked him, he then went to the door and offered sixpence more, I told him I did not do business in that way, and then he went out. About ten minutes previous to his coming in, I saw the shoes, and in about ten minutes after he went out I missed the shoes. My partner was in the shop with some customers. I then suspected the prisoner, I went to several pawnbrokers near to tell the men to stop the shoes if they came there. After I had returned home, a young man came into the shop with the shoes in his hand, asking me if I knew those shoes, I told him they were my shoes which I had lost, he said the prisoner came to pawn them, they had sent him to the watch house, and kept the shoes. This was between seven and nine at night.

Q. How long was this from the time that you lost the shoes. - A. About an hour and a half.

JOHN MURRY . - I am a pawnbroker, 90 East Smithfield. On the 7th of December, about eight o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came in the shop and offered these shoes to pledge, I looked at the shoes and saw that the shoes did not correspond with his dress, I suspected that he had not honestly come by them, he then told me that they belonged to a shipmate of his, I told him I should detain the shoes untill he proved that he came honestly by them, I sent for an officer and sent him to the watch-house, seeing the name in the shoes, that they were made for a person in Ratcliffe Highway. That is how we found it out. These are the shoes.

Prosecutor. They are mine, there is my writing on them. There was nobody but me serving on that side of the shop at that time.

Q. What is the value of the shoes. - A. Seven shillings.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming along the highway, I went into this man's shop, he asked me nine shillings, I offered seven shillings and sixpence and went out about my business, I went to the public-house, a man came to me and asked me to pawn the shoes, he would give me something to drink, I went to the shop, he asked me if they belonged to me, I said, no, they belong to another man. I declare to God I never stole them.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 20.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120115-76

149. THOMAS JEFFRIES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of December , in the dwelling-house of Peter Flannagan , two one-pound bank notes, the property of John Wade .

JOHN WADE . I am a labourer , I lodge at No. 9, Church Passage, Islington , I left the house between seven and eight in the evening, and when I returned home in the morning I found my box broken open, I lost two one-pound notes.

ANN JONES . I went up to make the bed on Sunday morning, the prisoner was sitting on the bed, I told the prisoner to get off, he would not.

Q. Did he lodge there. - A. He had lodged there, but not at that time, I told him three times to get off, the third time he got off the bed; I then found a knife and a steel between the bed and the bolster, he asked me for a hammer, I told him I had no hammer to give him.

WILLIAM BUTLEY . I am a stone-mason, I was in the room when Ann Jones told the prisoner to get off the bed: I saw her find the knife and file between the bed and the bolster.

JAMES FLANNAGAN . I was up in the room, the prisoner was sitting upon the bed; he had John Wade 's box, with his arm upon it, and a knife in his hand.

MARY FLANNAGAN . I saw him come in the house, and go up stairs between ten and eleven in the day.

JOHN READ . I took him in custody, this knife and file was delivered to me. I fitted this file to the place where the hinge was broken off, and it fitted exactly, I searched the prisoner, and found nothing on him.

Prisoner's Defence. The Sunday before that I went away from the house, I came back on the next Sunday,

and asked for my shirt, I asked if my shirt was washed, or not, I took John Wade 's box, and put my box on it, I set on the bed, I found my shirt dirty, I went down stairs and washed it myself. I am quite innocent.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120115-77

150. RICHARD WOODHATCH was indicted for, that he on the 15th of January , feloniously was at large in this kingdom, before the expiration of the term of seven years, for which he was ordered to be transported .

JOHN PRESCOT . I am one of patrols belonging to Bow-street. I was along with some sawyers about a fortnight ago, at the Adam and Eve, in Tottenham Court Road. I heard the discourse about the prisoner running away with a saw of another person, and likewise that he had run away from the hulks.

Q. When did he escape from the hulks. - A. I do not know. In the sawyer's discourse I heard that he was one of the nineteen that run away from the hulks I went home and looked at the Hue and Cry, I found that his name answered to one of them. On the 15th, I found him at the White Horse, Kensington , he was at dinner along with some more sawyers. I apprehended him, and put him upon a coach, and coming through Kensington he jumped off the coach with his hands tied, I jumped off and caught him going down the lane into Fulham Field, he made use of a desparate oath, and said,

"if it was your case you would do the same, and try to get off, if I am taken my case is desperate, I have served four years." I brought him back, and put him on the coach again, and took him to the office. I produce the copy of the conviction of the prisoner, I got it of Mr. Shelton, I saw him sign it.

(The copy of the conviction of the prisoner read.)

WILLIAM ERASMUS HARDY . Q. Were you present when he was tried. - A. I was. On the 2d of July, 1807, he is the same person. He was afterwards delivered on board the hulks on the 27th of July 1808.

Prisoner's Defence. I beg for mercy, I hope you will take my case intto consideration; an opportunity offered, I took the advantage of it, I have been at work ever since. Mr. Harris is my master.

WILLIAM HARRIS . My father is a timber merchant, he lives at Pedlars Acre, Lambeth, the prisoner worked in my father's employ in the capacity of a sawyer, he worked for us about a month or five weeks, it is a month or five weeks since he left our employ.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 31.

The prisoner was recommended to mercy by the Jury .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120115-78

151. GEORGE LOVEDAY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of January , a shirt, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of Edward Watson , a pair of shoes, value 3 d. a pair of stockings, value 2 d. and a piece of callico, value 2 d. the property of James Watson , from the person of Eliza Watson .

EDWARD WATSON . I am a bricklayer . On New-Years day I sent my little girl to my mother's house, Green Lane, Stamford Hill , my mother's name is Elizabeth Watson . The shirt is only mine, I sent for the shirt.

Q. How old is that child. - A. Turned of seven years.

ELIZABETH WATSON . Q. You are the mother. - A. Yes, I live in Green Lane. I sent by this child a shirt, a pair of stockings, and a pair of shoes, tied up in a piece of callico, she was to carry the things to Kingsland to my son.

ELIZA WATSON I am seven years old.

Q. Where did you meet the prisoner. - A. At a gate, the gate was against my grandmother's, almost down a little alley. I was coming from my grandmother's, a going home to Kingsland, he asked me if my hands were cold, I said yes; then he said, shall I carry your bundle for you, I said no thankye, and then he took it out of my hand, he carried it a little way, and then he said he must go into the field to make water, then he went off.

Q. Are you sure that is the man. - A. Yes, sir. I waited to see if he would come, he did not come, I got upon the bank to see if he was there, he was not there.

WILLIAM PULSFORD . I am a merchant. On new-years day, at five o'clock, I was riding up Stamford hill, I found a child crying, I asked her the reason, she said a man had ran away with her bundle, and that he looked like a painter. I rode down Lower Clapton, and apprehended the prisoner at the bar, he appeared like a painter, with a bundle under his arm, I delivered him and the bundle to Thomas Hill, the constable. The prisoner made no resistance, but said, the bundle belonged to a child that he had lost.

Q. How far was it distant from where the child lost it. - A. About a mile and a half.

THOMAS HILL . I am the officer. I produce the bundle.

ELIZABETH WATSON . These are the things that I sent by my grand-daughter.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not take these things from the child, she gave me them to carry; I went over into the field to do my oocasion, I lost the child, I enquired after the child of a great many people.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120115-79

153. ABRAHAM FEARON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2nd of January , 4 yards of velveteen, value 12 s. two yards of corderoy, value 6 s. four yards of twilled cotton, value 2 s. and two yards of brown holland, value 2 s. the property of Michael Goadley .

MICHAEL GOADLEY . I am a taylor , I live at No. 2, Gibralter Gardens, Bethnal Green. On the 2nd of January, I called in at the Adam and Eve, the corner of Brick lane , for a pint of beer, I had a bundle with me, I laid it by the side of the pot. A man put his hand over, and took my bundle from my side, I turned round immediately, and saw it in the prisoners hand, and as soon as I could get out of the box, my bundle was gone out of his hand, and I saw no more

of it. I then enquired for the landlord, he came in, I told the landlord I had lost my bundle, he said did I know the man, I said yes; he went and got an officer, the officer came, and took the prisoner in the public house, I never saw the bundle since. I am certain that the prisoner is the man that took my bundle. I saw his face before he had got the bundle over the settle.

JOHN CROSWELL . On the 2nd of the month I went to this public house, the prosecutor pointed out the prisoner, and told me that he had robbed him. I took the prisoner in custody, I found no bundle.

Prisoner's Defence. I came in the public house ten minutes after the alarm was given, I have subpoened three people up to prove it.

Prosecutor. He was in the house at the time that I went in.

Q. (to Croswell) When you took him what did he say. - A. He said he was not in the house at the time that the bundle was lost.

JAMES GABRIEL , JUN. I am a weaver, I live in Bethnal green, I was at the Adam and Eve, a woman came in along with the prosecutor, they were both intoxicated in liquor, he had a bundle with him, there was an old coat in it, one bid six-pence for it, others a pot of beer, in the mean time he said he had been robbed, I will take my oath the prisoner was not in the tap-room at the time.

Q. What became of the bundle. - A. I do not know, the room was full of people, and I was sitting on the opposite side.

Q. How do you know he was not there. - A. To the best of my belief he was not there.

JOHN GARNINGHAM , I am a weaver, I went to indulge myself with a pint of beer, I had not been long there, before I saw this gentleman come in, he came in in a very funny character waving his hand; a woman came in with him; I then thought it was his wife, but I do not think it was his wife now, and after talking, he danced up and down the tap-room, to the best of my recollection the young man was not in the room.

JAMES GABRIEL , SEN. Q. You went to the Adam and Eve for a pint of beer. - A. I saw the prosecutor come in with a woman in liquor, he jumped about, and made a bit of a noise; then the man sat himself down in a box, he got a parcel of men about him, he pulled out a coat, one of them tried it on.

Q. We had not got that before. - A. One said he would give sixpence for it, another a pot of beer, I saw no parcel,

Q. (to Prosecutor.) Were you drunk or sober. - A. Perfectly sober.

Q. Were you dancing about there. - A. No, I had no woman with me, nor anybody I knew besides myself.

Q. (to Croswell) Was this man drunk or sober. - A. He had been drinking, he gave correct answers, he answered the same before the magistrate the next morning. The young man, Gabriel, that spoke to you first, he is not very good.

GUILTY, aged 24.

Judgment respited .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120115-80

154. EDWARD JAMES, alias EGGERTON , was indicted, for that he, on the 8th of January , feloniously was at large in this kingdom before the expiration of the term for which he was ordered to be transported .

SAMUEL TAUNTON . I am an officer belonging to Bow-street office, I apprehended the prisoner on the 8th of January last, in Cripplegate buildings, in the city of London .

Q. You did not take him from prison. - A. No, I did not, he was quite at liberty, he was walking alone in the street.

Q. Did you tell him what you took him for. - A. No, I did not. When I took him to the office in Bow-street, I then told him what I took him for, on suspicion of returning from transportation; he acknowledged it, and he was well known when he came to the office. I produce the certificate of his conviction, I got it from Mr. Hilditch, the clerk of the assizes for the midland circuit.

The certificate of the conviction of the prisoner read.

WILLIAM HOMAN . I am one of the goalers of the office of Bow-street.

Q. Do you know the person of the prisoner at the bar. - A. Yes, I have known him between four and five years.

Q. Do you know of your own knowledge that he was tried at Westminster sessions any time. - A. Yes, I was present at the time he was tried there for stealing a silk handkerchief; I was present when he was taken from Tothill-fields to be tried; and I was present in the Session's house at the time. I used to attend the Sessions, at that time he was transported for seven years.

Q. What jail was he returned to from the Sessions. - A. To Tothill Fields first, and from there to Newgate.

Q. When did you see him after he was sent to Newgate. - A. I never recollect seeing him until I was sent for to go to Birmingham, near three years ago, I found him in the jail at Birmingham.

Q. Did you know him to be the same person whom you had seen tried at Westminster. - A. Yes, and under the sentence of seven years transportation.

A. Did you see him tried at the Warwick assizes. - A. Yes, I was bound over to give evidence against him, and I did give evidence against him.

Q. Did you hear the trial at Warwick. - A. Yes, and heard the verdict, the jury returned him guilty.

Q. Is it possible that you can be mistaken as to the man. - A. No.

Q. When was the next time you saw him after he was tried at Warwick. - A. Never, until he was brought to Bow-street.

Prisoner's Defence. My lord, it is not with the intent of denying my charge, that I pleaded not guilty, but humbly hoping there are some circumstances in my case, that deserves your lordship's commiseration. At Westminster quarter sessions I was tried for the attempt of stealing a pocket handkerchief, by only moving the pocket handkerchief from one pocket to another; since my return, which is about fourteen months, I have had the satisfaction to say, that no police officer, or any other, can lay the slightest charge to me; I was, for

the first ten months in the country, residing on my friends' bounty, since then I lodged at Mrs. Hoare's, Blackfriers, never quitting her house till seven in the evening to enjoy the fresh air, and invariably returning at nine o'clock. I am by trade a glass-cutter, and should have ever been a useful member to society; I therefore humbly implore implore your Lordship to recommend me. With respect to my doing any hurt to the community, I declare to God I have not.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 31.

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120115-81

155. JOSEPH FARREN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of January , twenty pound weight of rope, value 2 s. the property of John Wells , Sir Robert Wigram , Bart and George Green .

THOMAS GARRET. I am foreman to John Wells , Sir Robert Wigram , and George Green , the prisoner is a carman sent by Hanson and Wilson of Hackney, of Hackney Road, we sell wood to them. On the morning of the 2d of January, about nine o'clock, the prisoner came with his cart for a load of wood, he was told he could not be loaded untill the people came from breakfast, I saw the prisoner about twenty minutes after nine o'clock take a board from the side of a ship building, and carry it to the cart, I immediately went up to him and expostulated with him for taking the board, and at the back part of the cart, I saw a bag, I pulled out the bag, and found it contained a rope of the firm. This is the rope, it is the property of the firm.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and whipped in jail .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120115-82

156. THOMAS CARR was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of November , a pair of sheets, value 12 s. and a towel, value 1 s. the property of John Trueman , in a lodging room .

JOHN TRUEMAN . I keep a public house , 191 Oxford Street , the prisoner lodged with me three nights. On the 12th of November he slept there, I furnished him with a towel and a pair of sheets, he was to pay one shilling per night, he went out in the morning about seven o'clock, my servant maid said he had stolen the sheets, I saw no more of him until that day three weeks, my boy came in and said,

"the man that stole the sheets has gone down the street," I followed him and overtook him, and said,

"my friend, I want you to settle with me for your last night's lodging," he said, I paid for your lodging, I said, no, you did not pay for the lodging, nor for the sheets that you took away. I delivered him to the constable, I am sure he is the same man. The officer on searching him found the duplicate.

JOSEPH CRAIG . I am an officer, I searched the prisoner, on him I found a duplicate of a pair of sheets and a towel.

- DARBY. I am a pawnbroker.

Q. Is that your duplicate. - A. It is, of a pair of sheets and a towel, the prisoner pawned them on the 14th of November for seven shillings.

Prosecutor. The towel and sheets are mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I have no friend please your Lordship, I throw myself on your mercy.

GUILTY , aged 37.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120115-83

157. WILLIAM MARTIN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of January , a great coat, value 20 s. a pair of breeches, value 15 s. five pair sheets, value 5 s. three waistcoats, value 2 s. a pair of gaiters, value 6 d. and a wooden chest, value 6 d. the property of Thomas Archer .

RICHARD GREGORY . I am a salesman in Spittalfields Markets. On the 7th of January, about five o'clock in the evening, I saw the Norfolk waggon going through Paternoster Row, leading to Union Street , I observed three men following the waggon, they were in velveteen jackets, like porters to an inn, I did not see their faces, two of the men got into the hind part of the waggon, and one walked by the side just behind, the driver was with the horses, the two men that got into the waggon pulled a box out and gave it to the third, I followed the men, they turned down Red Lion Street, leading into Rose Lane. When the trunk was out they all three went away, I followed them, the waggon went up Church Street, and they went down Red Lion Street, quite a different direction, I seized the prisoner, one of the other men was carrying the box on his shoulder, and the moment that I seized the prisoner the man that had the box threw it down and ran away.

Q. When you saw two men get into the waggon, and the box handed out to the third, I suppose you could not say the third man was the prisoner. - A. No, I took the prisoner and the box to a place of safety, the prisoner made no resistance, he was close to the man that was carrying the box. I have hardly a doubt that he was one of the three persons.

MARY ATTO . Do you know that box. - A. Yes, it is my husband's, his name is Thomas Atto , the things that were packed in it is my husband's, they are worth three or four pounds, they were sent by the Norfolk waggon.

- SCOTT. I am book keeper to the Norfolk waggon, I received the trunk on the 7th of January, I saw it put in the waggon.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of it.

The prisoner called five witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120115-84

158. WILLIAM TURNER was indicted for feloniously marrying Ann Bignell , spinster , his former wife being then alive .

WILLIAM PEPALL . Q. Look at that extract, did you examine it with the original book at Burford, in Oxfordshire - A. I did, Mr. Knowles, the vicar's son, gave it me, his father being out of town.

Q. Where was the book. - A. At the vicar's house, I examined it myself, by Mr. Knowles's son reading it

to me; I held the certificate in my hand, and I read it, we read it both ways.

Mr. Alley. How do you know it was the register book. - A. No more than seeing it in the vicar's house, there was a number of more registers in it.

"Burford, in the county of Oxford. - William Turner, of this parish, batchelor, and Elizabeth Picket , spinster, were married by banns, by me, Richard Wells , clerk, on the 23d of October, 1797."

WILLIAM PALMER . Q. Do you know Burford, in Oxfordshire. - A. Yes.

Q. Look at the man at the bar, do you know him. - A. I know him very well.

Q. Do you remember his being married at Burford. A. Yes, I was present at the marriage, the young woman's name was Elizabeth Pickett , she was a single woman. They lived at Burford some time. I have met them together in the street, and asked them how they did.

Q. What was she. - A. Her father used to drive the mail.

Q. When did you see her last. - A. I saw her a few minutes ago, here.

Q. What way of life was the prisoner in when he married this young woman. - A. He was a plasterer .

GEORGE HOLLAND . Q. You produce a register of the prisoner's marriage at Addington in Buckinghamshire . - A. Yes, I examined it myself with the minister, I examined it both ways.

"Addington, Buckinghamshire; William Turner , plasterer, of this parish, batchelor, and Ann Bignell , spinster, of the parish of Winslow, were married in this church, by license, this 13th of September 1811 , by me, W. Aryre, Curate."

LUCY BIGNELL . Q. Are you a relation to the young woman that man married. - A. Yes, first cousin to Ann Bignell .

Q. You were present at the marriage of that man with the young woman. - A. Yes, I saw them married, and signed my name.

Mr. Alley. Q. Has he not behaved to her in the kindest and best way. - A. I cannot tell.

Q. Do not you know that this is not a prosecution instituted at her suit. - A. I do not know.

Court. In what situation of life was the young woman. - A. She was a publican's daughter, her father lived at Winslow.

Prisoner's Defence. I was unfortunately married to this woman when I was an apprentice, I lived very sociably with her upwards of a twelvemonth, when her temper became so violent and disgraceful to all human society, that I could not bear to live with her any longer, I parted with her, and lived from her six years. It so happened that I had to go down into Oxfordshire, she wrote letters repeatedly, saying that she would be happy to live with me, and be a different woman to what she was before; I consented so to do, we lived in peace and comfort nine or ten months in the country, when I had finished my job I came to London; it is only two years ago that she robbed the house where I lodged, where I was taken up, the people knowing me innocent, never offered to prosecute; she frequently told me that I might go out on the highway, and get more money in two or three hours than I could earn in a month. I parted with her on the 2d of last September twelvemonth, I agreed to allow her a crown a week, and to pay ten pound a year for her house rent, I paid the last half years rent for her on the 10th of September last, when she found out I was married, she would not take my money any longer. When I became acquainted with Ann Bignell , I told her I was a married man.

Court. Q. (to Lucy Bignell .) How long ago is it since you saw your first cousin who was married to the prisoner. - A. It is better than a month ago.

Q. Was she pregnant then. - A. Yes.

GUILTY , aged 35.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120115-85

159. GEOVANNI ASTARDO was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of January , two pair of pearl ear rings, value 10 l. a pearl ring, value 1 l. and a diamond ring, value 5 l. the property of Christopher Love and Richard Butler , privately in their shop .

GEORGE PIZEY . I am clerk to Robert Garrow , jeweller, I was accessary to the prisoner's apprehension.

RICHARD BUTLER , JUN. Q. Have you any share of the business of Messrs. Love and Butler. - A. No, the partners are Richard Butler , and Christopher Love , they keep a jeweller's shop , No. 6, Bond-street . On Wednesday the 15th of January, the prisoner came in the shop alone, about twelve o'clock at noon.

Q. Had you any other person serving in the shop - A. Yes, Mr. Davis, he is not here.

Q. Have you more than one counter. - A. Yes, two counters. The prisoner addressed himself to me, he was in the same dress as he is now, I was not at the same counter as Mr. Davis. He asked to look at some ear-rings, in English, I understood him perfectly well, I shewed him some small gold ear rings, such as foreigners usually wear, he objected to them, and wished to see larger, I shewed him some large ones, he made an offer for them, but did not buy any.

Q. In the same box in which these ear rings were, were there any diamond rings. - A. No.

Q. Were there any diamond rings in the reach of were he stood. - A. Yes, they were open on the counter, they were pearl rings, and a diamond hoop ring that was on the counter.

Q. How long do you think he staid in the shop. - A. I suppose nearly ten minutes, he remained all the time at my counter.

Q. When he went away did you miss any thing. - A. About five minutes afterwards, when the workman called for them, they were left out for the workman, upon the workmen calling, they were missing.

Q. From the time that the prisoner quitted the shop, had any other customer come to the shop. - A. Only one customer came there, and that person we knew, that customer is not here, it was a Mr. Croker, a gentleman well known to me, he was the only person except the Italian.

Q. What did you miss upon the workman coming.

- A. I missed five pearl ear rings, and a diamond hoop ring, value altogether about sixteen guineas.

Q. Did you ever see any of these things again. - A. Yes, in the evening, in the possession of Mr. Perks the officer, the prisoner was then in custody.

Q. When you saw the prisoner in custody were you quite sure that he was the person that came in your shop and asked for ear rings. - A. Yes. The house is in the parish of St. George's, Hanover-square.

JAMES WOOD . I am a servant at Mr. Hamlet's shop in Sidney's Alley. The prisoner came to his shop about one o'clock, he asked for ear-rings, I desired some to be shewn him.

Q. Was he stopped while in your shop. - A. I received some information from Mr. Pizey, in consequence of that I stopped him, I went for Perks the officer, I saw Perks search him, there was a tin case found behind him, that he put out.

Q. Did you see his hand move. - A. I did not.

Q. Did you observe any tin case on the counter, before he was stopped. - A. No, I did not, it did not belong to our shop; and after he was stopped, there was a tin case close behind him on the counter.

Q. What did the tin case contain. - A. It contained five ear rings and the diamond hoop ring; then he was taken to Bow street.

- PERKS. Q. You were sent for to Mr. Hamlet's shop. - A. Yes, I searched the prisoner's person, I found a passport on him.

Q. Where was the tin case when you went in. - A. I searched about him, and after that I found the tin case behind his back, containing the articles named in the indictment, together with a pair of cornelian ear rings.

Q. Did the prisoner say any thing. - A. No. He pretended not to understand me, I told him to go about his business, he understood that and was going.

Q. (to Pizey.) Were you in the shop at the time that this man was laid hold of by Perks. - A. Yes, I was in the shop, I informed Mr. Hamlet of such a person being about, we had missed a watch and a pair of ear rings while he was in the shop. When he was taken he was removed into another room where there was a counter, Mr. Hamlet removed every thing out of his reach.

Q. After he was searched was there any thing on the counter. - A. Yes, he had put his hand behind him, Perks brought his hand forward and said, you rascal, what have you behind you, and then I saw the tin case on the counter.

Q. (to Mr. Butler.) Look at these articles, and tell me whether these are the articles that you missed from the counter. - A. They are, I have no doubt whatever about them.

Prisoner's Defence. It is not the truth.

The prisoner being a foreigner, was allowed an interpreter.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 15.

Tried by a Middlesex jury of half English and half foreigners, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120115-86

160. ANTONIO FRANCISCO was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of January , a blanket, value 8 s. the property of William Looseley .

WILLIAM LOOSELEY . I keep a broker's shop . No. 17, in Wapping ; the blanket was in the back part of the shop, I missed the blanket at twelve o'clock. I was taking some money in the parlour, I turned round and saw the prisoner going out of the shop, I pursued him, and took him within two yards of the door, he had the blanket in his hands, I took it from him, he said no thief. He ran from me, Mr. Lawrence stopped him, when he came to the corner. I never lost sight of him.

MR. LAWRENCE. I saw the prisoner running, and the prosecutor running after him, I stopped the prisoner about an hundred yards from his door, I saw the prisoner come out of the shop, the prosecutor called stop thief; he threw the blanket down, and said, no thief.

Q. (to Looseley.) What was the value of that blanket. - A. Three shillings.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not steal it, I bought it of the prosecutor.

Prosecutor. He never asked the price. I was in the act of a transaction with a person of the name of Swan; he never asked the price, nor bought it of me.

GUILTY, aged 27.

Judgment respited .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120115-87

161. WILLIAM HOWELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of January , two loaves of bread, value 2 s. 10 d. the property of James Douglass .

JAMES DOUGLAS . I am a baker . On January the 4th, between three or four, I left my basket at the corner of Hoxton Square , I went about an hundred yards off to serve a customer, and when I returned I missed two loaves, in consequence of information, I laid hold of the prisoner near Shoreditch church, he had got the loaves under his arm; I asked him where he had got the loaves, he said, he was serving his customer, he is a baker, I stopped him, and took him to my master's shop, an officer was sent for, he was taken to the watchhouse, he told me he got one of the loaves of a young man, and the other he had bought.

Q. What was the worth of these two loaves. - A. Two shillings and ten pence.

JOHN MAYNER . I live at 55, Hoxton Square, I was in the kitchen, I saw the prisoner move the basket, and lay it down again, the basket was standing at the area gate, I told the baker what I had seen.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of what is laid to my charge.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120115-88

162. JOHN FROGLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of January , twenty pound weight of tallow, value 15 s. the property of Henry William Hobbs , and William Henry Hobbs .

WILLIAM HENRY HOBBS . I am a lighterman , I am in partnership with my father, Henry William Hobbs . The prisoner was in our service as a lighterman

upwards of ten years; he was employed by me, on the night of Tuesday the 14th, to fetch a lighter of tallow in casks, from Lime-house to Iron-gate , he did so, and on the Wednesday he was taken in custody, and twenty pound weight of tallow was found in his possession, I examined the casks in the lighter, and one of the casks appeared to have been plundered.

Q. Was he the sole person to conduct the lighter. - A. He had another with him, he is in court. I saw the tallow that was taken, and it appeared to be the quantity that was taken out of the cask, and it corresponded with the cask that had been plundered.

JOHN MAUD . Q. Where you with the prisoner when he took the tallow out of the ship. - A. No, I came up with him in the lighter, it was loaded with tallow.

Q. How were the casks. - A. I cannot say indeed, it was a dark night. After I had made the lighter fast, at Iron-gate, I left the prisoner in the lighter, there was not any tallow taken from the casks while I was there.

JAMES CONNER . I am a patrol of the parish of St. John's, Wapping. On the morning of the 15th, a quarter before one, I saw the prisoner at the top of King Edward Street; he was going in the middle of the street made me suspect him. I called him, he made no answer; the third time I called him, he answered, I asked him what he had got, he said, a little tallow, I took the tallow from him, and sent him to the watch-house by another patrol; the tallow was at the police office the next day, it weighed twenty pound, I asked him where he got the tallow, he told me out of the lighter. This is the tallow.

Prosecutor. This is a sample of the tallow, I took out of the cask that was plundered.

Prisoner's Defence. I went to Iron-gate with the lighter, I was going to row the skif down to Union-stairs. In an empty lighter I found the tallow, I put John Maud on shore at Iron-gate, out of the skift, though he says, he left me in the lighter.

The prisoner called five witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY ,

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and publicly whipped one hundred yards, near Iron-gate .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120115-89

163. WILLIAM BARTHOLOMEW DIMOND was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of December , twenty-five penny-pieces, and forty halfpence , the property of Richard Wright .

RICHARD WRIGHT . I am a master baker , I live in Brick-lane, Old-street , the prisoner was my journeyman .

Q. Did you, on the night of the 27th of December, mark your copper money. - A. I did, and after that I placed it in the till, had locked it; I placed a constable in a room concealed, opposite of the till, and then I, and my wife and family went to bed.

Q. At what time did the prisoner come to work that night. - A. At eleven o'clock; I went to bed at half after, leaving him in the bakehouse.

Q. Is there a communication from the bake-house to your shop, where your till was - A. There is. About half past twelve I was alarmed by the constable, and on coming down, I found the prisoner in custody of the constable, he was searched by the constable in my presence, there were forty half-pence found on him, and twenty-five penny pieces, they were a part of the coin I had marked the preceding evening; the prisoner said he was exceeding sorry, he would never do so again.

JOHN GOLDSMITH . I am a constable. I was placed in the room, as the last witness has described, I saw the prisoner undo the till, and take something out three times, he put it into his right hand pocket, on his coming out I laid hold of him, I asked him what he had taken out of the till, he said nothing, I called Mr. Wright down; I searched him, and found upon him three shillings and nine-pence in half-pence and penny pieces. These are the penny pieces and halfpence.

Prosecutor. I marked them with a punch, this is the punch. I am quite sure they are mine.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, called one witness who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 29.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120115-90

164. ANN HUDSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of January , a chair cover, value 1 s. two plates, value 3 d, a saucer, value 2 d. an egg cup, value 2 d. and a towel, value 2 d. the property of Edward Wilson .

EDWARD WILSON . I live at 115, Mount-street , the prisoner worked and chaired for me .

GEORGE WILSON . I am son to Edward Wilson . When my father was out, the prisoner said she wanted some bread to feed the fowls with, she went up stairs, and came down, she said she had been looking after the chickens; we kept chickens in the three pair of stairs; I saw a chair cover hanging under her shawl.

WILLIAM DEANE . I am a constable I searched the prisoner's lodgings; I found there two plates, an egg cup, a towel, and this duplicate.

JOHN THOMAS KING . I am a pawnbroker, No. 9, Bird Street, Manchester Square; I produce a chair cover, I took it in pawn on the 8th of January, of the prisoner.

Prosecutor. I believe these are my property.

Prisoner's Defence. I became acquainted with my prosecutor, he has three children, he repeatedly sent me with things to pawn, to support them, he told me to take any thing to support the children; the week before, he sent me with a tea-pot and a milk pot, he looked upon me as his wife, and he took that liberty with me; and what I have done, I did for the support of the children; I have been in the habit of working for them, for which I never received a farthing.

Q. (to Prosecutor.) Did you ever employ her to pawn any of these things. - A. The tea pot and milk pot I did, otherwise I did not.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120115-91

165. ELIZABETH JOHNSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of December , three sheets, value 10 s. the property of Patrick Carrol .

PATRICK CARROL . I live at No. 3, Phoenix-street, Bloomsbury , the prisoner lodged in my house. On the 4th of December the servant missed a sheet; on the 7th the girl missed a pair, and no other person was up stairs but the prisoner. We took the prisoner to Bow-street. We found a pair of sheets pawned, one on the 4th, and one on the 6th, and I found a sheet wrapped up under the bed.

JOHN WILKINSON . I am a pawnbroker in Charles-street. I produce two shirts, one pawned on the 4th, and the other on the 6th, by the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I throw myself on your Lordship's mercy, and the gentlemen of the jury.

GUILTY , aged 49.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120115-92

166. ARTHUR ORGAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of December , four geese, value 12 s. the property of Job Green , and a sack, value 3 s. the property of John Cox .

JOB GREEN . I live at Goldhill , I am a labourer , I lost the geese out of my geese-house. On the 21st, or early on the 22d, before I was up, the door of the geese-house was not locked, it was unpinned, and three geese and a gander were taken out of it, I had seen them just at dark the night before. On Sunday morning I got up about seven o'clock, they were gone, I received information that a man was taken in the wood picking of geese, I went to Harefield and saw the geese, I knew them.

JOHN COX . I keep two or three horses, and do hire work , I know the sack, I lost it out of my barn in the parish of Denham .

- BROTHERTON. On Sunday morning I was going through the wood between eight and nine o'clock, I saw the prisoner picking geese in the wood, I asked him what he was doing, he said he was picking some geese that he lit of, I told him I thought he had not come honestly by them. I took him and the geese to Harefield, I delivered him to the constable, he there said he found them on the common.

- IVE. I am a constable, I took charge of the prisoner, I looked in the sack, I found in it three geese and a gander. The next day I took him before the magistrate, Green swore to the geese, and Cox to the sack.

MR. COX. That is my sack.

MR. GREEN. I really believe the geese were my property, one of them I can positively swear to.

Prisoner's Defence. I found the geese in a sack near a pond upon Harefield common.

GUILTY, aged 22.

Judgment respited .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120115-93

167. JOHN RAY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of January , two straw bonnets, value 5 s. the property of John Hagley .

FRANCES HAGLEY . My husband's name is John Hagley , I keep a straw bonnet shop, No. 2, Old Compton Street , I lost the straw bonnets on the 2d of January, about six in the evening, I knew nothing of it untill the prisoner was brought back.

MARK CLARK . I am a porter, I was coming out of a public-house that I use, I saw the prisoner and another person lurking about Mrs. Hagley's door, I saw one stoop down, as if he was unlocking the door, I saw the prisoner come out with two bonnets, I told them he had stolen them, he chucked them away.

- LACEY. I ran out of doors as soon as the last witness cried out stop thief, I saw the prisoner with the two bonnets, he threw one into the middle of the street, and the other into Mr. Cunningham's shop.

THOMAS NEWBURY . I am a constable, the prisoner and these bonnets were delivered to me.

Prosecutrix. They are my bonnets.

Prisoner's Defence. It is the first offence that ever I committed, I hope you will extend mercy to me.

GUILTY, aged 19.

Judgment respited .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120115-94

168. WILLIAM WHITEBREAD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of December, two loaves of bread, value 2 s. 6 d. the property of Charles Andrews .

CHARLES ANDREWS . I am a baker , 57 Charlton Street, Somers-town . On the 10th of December, between six and seven in the evening, I was informed that there was a suspicious person about the house, in about half an hour after the prisoner came in and took two loaves of bread off the counter.

Q. Did you know him before. - A. I knew him about three years back, he was a decent lad then, when I apprehended him he was very poor. I pursued him, he was stopped, I saw him drop the loaves.

Prisoner's Defence. I am a carver and gilder , I had been out of employ, I was starving.

GUILTY, aged 23.

Judgment respited .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120115-95

169. RICHARD HAWKINS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of December , a hat, value 10 s. a pair of shoes, value 1 s. a jacket, value 1 s. and a shirt, value 1 s. the property of William Powell .

WILLIAM POWELL . I am a carpenter .

Q. What regiment does the prisoner belong to. - A. The tower hamlets, he lodged in the same room with me.

Q. When was it you lost these things, - A. A month before Christmas day, I found him on the Christmas day where they parade, he had got my shoes on, he said he would fetch me the things back, he never did.

Prisoner's Defence. He said he only wanted the things back, I told him I would bring them back, I wanted him to stop till the next day, he would not, he knew they were in pledge.

GUILTY, aged 30.

Judgment respited .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120115-96

170. ANN MIDDLETON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 7th of December , three gowns, value 13 s. the property of William Cohen .

ELIZABETH COHEN . I live in Union Street, Shadwell , I am a dealer in clothes, the prisoner came to me as a lodger. On Saturday night the 7th of December, I came down stairs, I found my parlour door open, I missed several gowns, and the prisoner was gone. On Monday I found her in Shoreditch with one of my gowns on her back. I lost seven gowns, I have only found three.

WILLIAM BEEBY . I am an officer, I took the prisoner in Petticoat Lane, she had this gown on her back, on the next day I went to the pawnbroker and found these two gowns.

CHRISTOPHER JAMES . I am a pawnbroker, 23 Hollywell Lane, I produce two gowns pawned on the 9th of December by the prisoner.

Prosecutrix. They are my gowns.

Prisoner's Defence. This woman keeps a house of ill fame, she induced me to live with her. One night she ill used me and beat me, I came away, and these things I was to wear. She keeps several bad girls in the house, I was one.

Q. (to Beeby.) What kind of a house is it. - A. It is a lodging-house for sailors, and for girls of the same description as the prisoner.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120115-97

171. SARAH PHILLIPS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of January , two shirts, value 6 s. a petticoat, value 1 s. and one pair of stockings, value 9 d. the property of Joseph Powell .

The prosecutor and witnesses were called, and not appearing in court , the prisoner was

ACQUITTED.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120115-98

172. MARY MURPHY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of December , two pair of breeches, value 9 d. two axes, value 2 s. an apron, value 1 s. a shift, value 9 s. and a cap, value 6 d. the property of John Morris .

ANN MORRIS . My husband's name is John Morris, he is a carman ; we live in Drury-lane , I engaged the prisoner to take care of my child, while I went out to work.

Q. What work. - A. I go out washing, or any thing that I can do to help maintain my family. The first articles that I missed were two shirts, of two young men that I washed for, which I got out of pawn and forgave her, the next was two pair of breeches, and the next an apron; I found them at the pawnbrokers.

JAMES JOSEPH JONES . I live with a pawnbroker, I produce an apron, an handkerchief, and a half handkerchief, and a shift, the duplicates are all different dates, from September to November, to the best of my recollection, the prisoner pawned them.

BENJAMIN FLETCHER . I am a pawnbroker, 135, High Holborn; I produce two pair of breeches, pawned by the prisoner; one pair on the 29th of October, and the other on the 31st.

GEORGE ODDY . I am an officer; I searched the prisoner, and found the duplicates.

Prosecutrix. It is all my property; it was left under my care.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120115-99

173. JANE THOMAS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 15th of January , six books, value 3 s. a cloak, value 18 d. a tippet, value 6 d. and a handkerchief, value 2 s. the property of George Steele .

GEORGE STEELE . I live in Warwick Place, Bedford Row , I am a stable-keeper . The prisoner lived servant with me; and on Wednesday last she was going away, we had a wash that day, and upon her going, Mrs. Steele went into her bed room, she found a man under her bed, she was very much alarmed at it, a sheriff's officer was in the way, he took him in custody, I was sent for, I gave charge of them both, they were taken to the watch-house, this was at ten o'clock.

Q. What was the man. - A. I never saw him before in my life. They were examined at Hatton Garden office, the officer searched her box, and found in it six books and the other things.

ELIZABETH STEELE . I saw the mantle last when I came from school.

SAMUEL BROWN . I am an officer, I searched the prisoner's box, and found the articles in the indictment, the prisoner gave me the key of her box.

MISS STEELE. That is my mantle, and these four small books are mine, the tippet and the handkerchief are my mother's.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not mean to take them, the handkerchief I put in my box in a mistake.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Confined Nine Months in the House of Correction .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120115-100

174. CHARLES NELSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of January , a shirt, value 7 s. the property of James Gibson .

JAMES GIBSON . I am a victualler , I keep the Nag's Head, Tower Hill , I lost the shirt in my own room on Tuesday last. A man came to me and asked me if I had not a coloured man in my house, I said yes, he opened a bundle and said, do you know that shirt, I said yes, he said the black man brought him the shirt.

MR. MOSELEY. I am a slop seller in East Smithfield. Last Tuesday the prisoner came to the shop, he said, can you get me a birth, I said yes, I would send the captain to him. In about an hour after he came and said, will you buy a shirt, I said, let me look at it, I looked at it and saw I. G. marked on it, I told him he must go with me to Mr. Gibson, he then said he did not steal it, a man stole it and gave it him to sell.

Prisoner's Defence. I have been twenty-six years in the British service, and if I had not been in liquor I should not have done it.

GUILTY , aged 50.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120115-101

175. JOHN, alias FRANCIS, BRANDON was indicted for that he, on the 2d of January , was clerk to Samuel Sandon and Thomas Cobham , and was employed and entrusted to receive money for them, that he being such servant and so employed and entrusted, did receive and take into his possession the sum of five shillings, on their account, and that he afterwards feloniously did secrete and steal the same .

GEORGE BARNARD . I am clerk to Samuel Sandon and Thomas Cobham , they are brewer s; the prisoner was one of their servants; he was foreman to a dray . On the 2d of January he had forty-one casks delivered to him, and he had receipts for those customers that pay ready money; he was to take the money of those customers, or to bring back the receipts. Mrs. Baker is one customer. This is his delivery-book, Mrs. Baker's name is not in it; he returned the receipt, and gave us to understand that she had no beer.

MRS. BAKER. I live in South-street, Grosvenor-square . The prisoner gave me this receipt for a cask of beer on the 2d of January.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence; called five witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 32.

Publicly Whipped and discharged.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120115-102

176. SAMUEL STEELE and JOHN LAMB were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of December , twenty-three mother of pearl shells, value 30 s. the property of the United Company of Merchants trading to the East Indies .

JOHN BLUNDLE . I am the second assistant elder at the warehouse in Blackwall ; the two prisoners were labourer s at that warehouse. On the 5th of December, at three o'clock, they were going home as usual; I rubbed Steele down, I found six mother of pearl shells concealed under his waistcoat, and two hanks of twine in the crown of his hat; I took him into the accompting-house and took the shells from him. I sent for an officer and searched Samuel Steele 's house; from there we went to Lazarus Jacob, and there we found twenty-two shells. These are the shells, they are the property of the East India Company.

LAZARUS JACOBS . I am a broker; I live in Raven-row, Spitalfields. I know both the prisoners. On the 3d of January Steele came in doors, Lamb waited outside; it was about four o'clock in the afternoon; Steele had some shells under both his arms, he asked me if I would buy them; I told him, no, I was no judge of them; he said if I would sell them at the door he would satisfy me; I said, what is the price of them; he said, eighteen-pence the large ones, and nine-pence the small one's. I put them at the door; I did not buy them. Steele said he would take them back again if I did not sell them.

Q. How many were there of them - A. Twenty-one. Afterwards Mr. Combe the officer came, and Mr. Blundle; two of the shells on that day were at the door, and the others on a shelf. Steele was then in custody. I told the magistrate that Lamb was with him.

- COOMBES. I am an officer. I went to Jacob's, I found two shells at the door, and twenty-one on a shelf just as you went in at the door. Jacobs described the other man, and Freeman went and apprehended Lamb. Steele said in Lamb's presence that they were together, and that they used to sell them at Burnet's in Mile End road. This was the first time that they went to Jacob's. Lamb said nothing.

Blundle. These are the shells we lost in December.

Steele's Defence. I picked them up in the dock; they had been throwed out of the ship with the ballast.

Lamb was not put on his defence.

STEELE - GUILTY , aged 58.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction . and fined 1 s.

LAMB - NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120115-103

177. JOHN LAMB was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of December , a mother of pearl shell, value 2 s. the property of the United Company of Merchants trading to the East Indies .

JOHN COTTELL . I am a labourer in the East India company's warehouse, Blackwall . The prisoner also was a labourer . On the 5th of last December, about three o'clock, as I was turning down an alley in the warehouse I saw the prisoner take a shell out of his breeches, there was one or two more laying by the side of him; he then seemed in a great agitation, and said I cannot find the stick. I then went down, and the next morning I went to the place, I saw six shells lay where I saw the prisoner the day before, and a board put before them. I went and told the elder.

COURT. You found these shells in the warehouse - A. Yes, and I saw him taking them out of his breeches.

- SINKWELL. On the day the prisoner was taken in custody he said, Sinkwell, this is a d - d bad job; I said, what? Concerning these mother of peal shells, said he; I said, have you any thing to do with it; yes, says he, Cottell saw me take them out of my breeches; I said, what in doors or out; In doors, he replied, that is, in the warehouse; he said he brought them from the bottom of the warehouse to the top, close to the door where you go out; he brought them concealed in his breeches because the rest of the men should not see him; he brought them for Steele to take away.

Prisoner's Defence. It is all false.

GUILTY , aged 39.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120115-104

178. THOMAS JOHNSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of October , two sheets, value 12 s. and three blankets, value 18 s. the property of John Stow , in a lodging-room .

JOHN STOW . I keep a chandler's shop in Bull Inn-court in the Strand . I let to the prisoner a furnished room on the 18th of September, he occupied the room untill the 19th of October; he paid me but one weeks rent, and when he went the sheets and blankets were gone; from information I and Mr. Heath went to the Scotch Arms, we saw the prisoner, I asked

him what he had done with the key of the room; he said he left it with a woman in the room that he cohabited with; I asked him to go with me to authorise me to open the door; he said he would; he came about twenty yards, and then refused to go any further. We got two watchmen, they took the prisoner, and went up to the door with him; when I opened the door the sheets and the blankets were gone.

Q. When did the woman leave the lodgings - A. She was never seen after the 19th, in the morning they went out together. The watchmen took the prisoner to the watchhouse.

Q. Did you ever find your things - A. No. I lost two sheets and three blankets.

Prisoner's Defence. I left the blankets and sheets in the room when I went out to work.

GUILTY , aged 37.

Confined One Month , and whipped in Jail .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120115-105

179. SAMUEL WILLIAM AMOS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of November , a waistcoat, value 16 s. the property of Abraham Simmons .

ABRAHAM SIMMONS . I am a taylor and draper in the Strand : the prisoner was my errand lad , he had lived with me about a month. On the 3d of November he took away from me a kerseymere waistcoat; this is it; I found it at the pawnbroker's.

JAMES WAUGH . I am an apprentice to Mr. Simmons. On the 3d of November I saw the prisoner take a black kerseymere waistcoat, I asked him what he was going to do with it; he said he wanted money, he was going to pawn it; I told him not to take it; he buttoned it up between his coat and waistcoat.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not take it without the apprentice's leave. My mother was ill, I wanted three shillings to buy her victuals.

GUILTY, aged 19.

Judgment respited .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120115-106

180. JOSEPH ROBERTS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of December , ten quarts of oil, value 5 s. the property of Edward Porter .

EDWARD PORTER . I am a lamp-lighter , I work for Mr. Spencer and Hudson. There were frequently complaints of losing oil; I requested liberty to put mine in a yard, it was granted me. I went on for six or eight days, the oil was safe untill the 16th of last month; I put my oil in the yard as usual and went to work, and when I came back I found that almost all the oil was taken away; I asked the servant maid if any body had been there; she said, yes, a man had been there, he said he came from me, he was going to help me to work. I never saw the prisoner before I saw him at Marlborough-street office.

JANE GRIFFITHS . I am servant to Mr. Ratcliffe, at the White Horse, the corner of New Burlington-street .

Q. Do you remember Porter leaving his oil there - A. Yes. The prisoner came in with a stone bottle on the 16th of last month between ten and eleven; I was washing my pots out.

Q. You knew him before, did not you - A. Yes; I knew his father and mother; he took the oil out of the man's tin cann, put it into his stone bottle, and went away with it.

Prisoner's Defence. I have nothing to say in my defence.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120115-107

181. CHARLOTTE LATTIMORE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of December , from the person of Jonathan Drewitt , five ten-pound bank notes, four five-pound bank notes, and nine one-pound bank notes, his property .

JONATHAN DREWITT . I am a carman . Mr. Bird gave me a draft upon Messrs. Coutts, the bankers, for near eighty pounds, it was for emptying the shore of mud at the West end of the town; I received the money at Messrs. Coutts's, the biggest part was in ten's and five's, and the remainder in small notes; I thought of making my way to Berner's mews, Oxford-road, it was between five and six o'clock in the evening, I mistook my way and fell into Dyot-street ; at the corner of Dyot-street I asked my way into Oxford-road, a girl at the corner said, yes, master, I will soon shew you the road; up came another and said, we will be sure and put you in the road; I found these two girls were making away from me; a man came up, he said, never mind the girls, I will shew you the road immediately; then I put my hand into my pocket and missed the notes.

Q. They got pretty close to you - A. Yes, they hugged me and said they would shew me the road. If the man had not come and said he would shew me the road I should not have thought I was robbed. I cannot swear to either of the girls, but here is evidence here that will.

Q. You had not been with the girl to any house - A. No.

Q. Were you sober - A. I had drank as much as six-pennyworth of rum and water. I never found the notes.

JOHN BAXTER . I took the prisoner into custody. I had heard that she had a vast deal of money about her; I searched her and found nothing on her but a bad shilling, and two pence halfpenny. We traced a ten pound note to Mr. Pike's, his lad said he knew the mark, and he knew the person that paid it to his master. When we went again the master was in the way, he was angry, and would not allow him to go to the place; Mr. Conant ordered this person to be here to give an account why he would not suffer his servant to go to the place. His name is Edward Pike , and his boy Edward Cole .

EDWARD PIKE . I know nothing of the note at all, I do not know who I took it of. I sent my lad with the officer to the bank. When he saw the note he saw it was endorsed by his own hand-writing, 25, Union-street; he said, I know the parties, and I took the goods home.

COURT. It is very improper conduct of you, you should have suffered your lad to have attended.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120115-108

182. ELIZABETH THOMPSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of December , a pincloth, value 15 d. from the person of John Neale , the property of Sarah Kelly .

SARAH KELLY . The pinafore was taken from my child in Whitechapel ; the pinafore was upon the child.

MRS. YOUNG. About four o'clock on the afternoon of the 30th of December the prisoner came into our house to have a pint of porter; she stood by our fire; she had the child with her; and there was a girl looked in our window about ten years of age. I went out to the door, the girl told me that there was a woman in the tap-room by the fire that took the little boy's pinafore from him and had put it her pocket; I came in and asked her what business she had with the child's pinafore; she said she had taken it to fill it full of apples; it was her brother's child. I told her apples were too dear to fill a pinafore with apples; I detained her; a person in our parlour took her to Lambeth-street office.

Q. Where did you find the pinafore - A. In her pocket; I told her to take it out, and she took it out; I took it out of her hand.

Prosecutrix. This is my property.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not take the pinafore off.

GUILTY, aged 33,

Of stealing, but not from the person .

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120115-109

183. RICHARD WILSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of January , a silver salt siller, value 1 l. and a silver spoon, value 2 s. the property of Christian Henry Warman .

JAMES BARNES . I am a servant to Mr. Christian Henry Warman, 16, Bedford-place . On Thursday the 9th of January I placed a silver salt and spoon in the cupboard in the pantry; at one o'clock my mistress sent me out, I was out until a quarter past two; on my return my fellow servant said there had been a person down stairs and had taken away the salt and spoon. It was safe at one o'clock, and when I returned it was gone.

JOHN THOMAS . I am a servant to Thomas Meux , Bedford-place. On the 9th of this month I was cleaning the drawing-room window, I saw this prisoner come to our area gate, he tried it, and found it was locked; he went to several other area gates, and tried them, untill he came to No. 16, he found the area gate open; he went down the area steps, I watched until he came out; he stood below in the area some time; when he came up the area-steps he made away with something in his side pocket, and buttoned up his coat, and crossed to the other side of the way, and coming up to our house again seemingly; he seemed to be very pleased, and as soon as he got opposite of our door; I halloaed to him, he looked up at me; I said, I want to speak to you; he came into the middle of the street, I came down and opened the street-door, he was running; I ran after him; he ran up Russel-street and turned into Bury-street; I pursued him and took him; I asked him what he had got; he said, nothing belonging to me; I told him I knew he had something in his pocket, and I should see what it was; I opened the front of his coat, and found a silver salt, and a silver spoon; I took them out. Soon after I stopped him I saw a man, he said, deliver him up to me and the goods; I thought he was a constable by his demand, and instead of the man taking the prisoner into Bedford-place he took him up Montague-place; I halloed to the man to bring the prisoner back; I ran after him and stopped him again; a constable came up then, and we took him back to Bedford-place, No. 16.

THOMAS TAYLOR . I am a constable. There was a mob at the top of the street, I went and took the prisoner to 16, Bedford-place, and there the property was owned.

Barnes. It is my master's property.

Prisoner's Defence. I am a chimney sweeper; I was out of empley; I had been down to several houses in the street to ask them if they wanted the dust taken out; I was never nigh that house in my life.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120115-110

184. ANN SHEARS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of December , a gown, value 4 s. the property of Charlotte Hatton .

CHARLOTTE HATTON . I am a servant ; I live with Mr. Simmons at the Coach and Horses, High-street, Kensington . On the 28th of December, about nine o'clock, the prisoner came in, and a young man, she called for something to drink; they stopped about an hour, and about five minutes after they were gone I missed my gown.

Q. Where was your gown - A. In the parlour upon the top of my box. My master went after the prisoner, overtook her, and demanded the gown.

JOSEPH SIMMONS . Q. You keep the Coach and Horses - A. Yes, after the girl missed the gown I went out after the prisoner, I traced her from Kensington to Knightsbridge; I brought her back and took the gown out of her handkerchief. This is the gown.

Prosecutrix. It is my gown.

Prisoner's Defence. I was very much in liquor; I did not know that I had the gown in my handkerchief.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120115-111

185. SUSAN LAMB was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of December , an earthen dish, value 2 s. the property of Jesse Phillips .

The prosecutor was called, and not appearing in court , the prisoner was

ACQUITTED.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120115-112

186. DAVID DAVIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of December , a coat, value 12 s. the property of George Jones .

GEORGE JONES . I was employed as a porter to a broker's shop . In the evening I laid my great coat just within the door; I was taking the goods in; Mrs. Chesterman came to me and asked me where my great coat was; I looked at the place where I put it, and it was gone.

ANN CHESTERMAN . I saw the prisoner stoop and take something out of the shop; I followed him up to Chamber-street, I heard him say such a one shall not have a penny of this coat; he said so to two other boys that were with him; directly I said, that coat belongs to me. I am certain it is the same boy. When I took the coat away he ran, the officer stopped him.

WILLIAM CHETLEY . I am an officer. I heard the cry of stop thief; I stopped the prisoner; he said, what have I done. When I brought him back to the woman she said, that is the boy. This is the coat.

Chesterman. That is the coat I took from him.

Prosecutor. It is my coat.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going home, two young fellows stopped me and asked me if I would buy the coat; I took the coat in my hand and looked at it; that woman came up and took it out of my hand, and immediately the two young fellows ran. The woman cried out stop thief, and when I was stopped I asked what I had done.

GUILTY, aged 12.

Judgment respited .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120115-113

187. HANNAH BRITTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of December , a silver spur, value 9 s. the property of Stratford Robinson .

THOMAS WATERHOUSE . I am a servant to Stratford Robinson , No. 4, Eagle-street, Red Lion-square. I brought these spurs from my master's house to my room to clean them, I hung them both on a nail in the room; I went home to dinner, I saw Hannah Britton in the room, she went out of the room, and I had my dinner; after a few minutes I went out of my room and went to my work. In the evening my wife came to me and asked me if I had removed one of the spurs; I said, no; I went home and found the spur missing.

ELIZABETH WATERHOUSE . The prisoner came in my room and asked to sit down; I told her she might, and when my husband came home to dinner she went into the adjoining room, and returned again after dinner, and sat there till six o'clock, and then went out; at nine o'clock I missed the spur off the nail; nobody else had been in the room.

JOHN HARRIS . I am shopman to Mr. Beachem, silversmith, Holborn. On the 7th of December, about half past eight, the prisoner came into the shop and asked me if I purchased old silver; I told her we did; she produced a silver spur, she told me she found it at the corner of Belton-street, and it being all mud I did not hesitate but it was so; I weighed it, it weighed an ounce and a half; I gave her nine shillings for it.

JAMES COOK . I am an officer. I produce the spur. I apprehended the prisoner on the 9th, I asked her if she did take it, she said she did.

Waterhouse. It is my master's spur.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence; called three witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Confined Fourteen days in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120115-114

188. WILLIAM BUDD was indicted for that he, on the 12th of December , was servant to Mary Allanson , and was employed and entrusted to receive money on her account, and being such servant, and so employed, did receive and take into his possession the sum of 1 l. and that he afterwards did embezzle, secrete, and steal the same .

MARY ALLANSON . I am a widow ; I carry on the business of a rope and twine manufacturer .

Q. How long has your husband been dead - A. Nine years, and the prisoner has been my servant five years; I entrusted him to take out goods and receive the money.

Q. Did the prisoner give you any account of money received on the 12th of December - A. He did not. When I found out that he had been embezzling money of Boyer and Company; I went round to my customers and found that he had received the money of Stock and Company and gave a receipt in my name; he has received forty-three pounds at different times.

FORD WILSON . I am a servant to Stock, Cooper, and Company. On the 12th of December the prisoner brought a dozen skeins of cord, it came to one pound, I paid him, he gave me this receipt.

"Bought of Mrs. Allanson a dozen skeins of cord, one pound. Received, William Budd ."

Prosecutrix. I am sure he never brought it to accompt.

Prisoner's Defence. The property was never my mistress's, although I made use of her name in the bill.

GUILTY , aged 32.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120115-115

189. MARTHA ASHFIELD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of January , two pewter pint pots, value 3 s. the property of George Groom .

GEORGE GROOM . I keep the Angel and Trumpet, Stepney Green . The pots I lost on the 11th of January. A servant who lived in the square came and told me there was some pot-stealers in the square. I went out and found a man and a woman; we searched the woman, she had three pots, one in each pocket, and one in her apron. These are the pots, they are mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked them up going along.

GUILTY , aged 46.

Confined Two Years in the House of Correction .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120115-116

190. HANNAH HASKETT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of December , a pelisse, value 6 s. the property of Alexander Lamb .

The prosecutor was called, and not appearing in court , the prisoner was

ACQUITTED.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120115-117

191. GEORGE MOULD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of December , twenty-two pieces of marble stone, value 5 l. the property of George Goring .

GEORGE GORING . I am a statuary and mason , I live in the Kent-road . The prisoner quitted my employ in the month of November last. On Saturday the 7th of December my premises were locked up safe by Williams my servant: my premises are a workshop and warehouse, and the marble chimney pieces were then safe on the premises.

Q. Did you in fact miss the marble - A. I missed part of three marble chimney pieces, more than twenty pieces, of the value of twenty pounds.

Q. Did you see the prisoner afterwards - A. I met him on the Tuesday morning in the Kent-road, he told me he worked for Mr. Marshall at Westminster. I afterwards found these marbles in the possion of Mr. Markey, and then I took the prisoner in custody.

Q. How many pieces did you find at Mr. Markey's - A. All the pieces but one, they are the same that I lost; I can speak to the marble. I put some of it together with my own hands.

MATTHEW WILLIAMS . I am a servant to the last witness. On the night of the 7th of December I shut up my master's premises, and the chimney pieces were all safe. When I went on the Monday I found the lock hanging on the staple, and the door broken open, I missed the marble chimney pieces.

PHILIP MARKEY . I live in Gloucester-place.

Q. Did Barnes and the prisoner call upon you - A. Yes.

Q. When did you see the prisoner - A. I saw him go to Henry Barnes .

HENRY BARNES . Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. Yes, he called on me in December, I do not recollect the day of the month; I was engaged as foreman; I knew Moulds the prisoner when he was an apprentice. When Moulds called upon me I and Mr. Markey was at a public-house, we all had some porter together. In the course of conversation Moulds asked me where it was likely for him to get sale for marble chimney pieces; I said I did not know any likelier place than about that quarter that I was employed in, there were so many builders to purchase; the prisoner went away. I saw the prisoner again on the week following, we went over to Lisson Grove where the prisoner was at work; Mr. Markey expressed a wish to see the chimney-pieces, he agreed to go with the prisoner and to see the chimney-pieces. We went into Locks fields, I saw the chimney-pieces, Mr. Markey and the prisoner agreed for the price; this was on Thursday, on Saturday Mr. Mackey was to send a cart, and on the Friday before that Saturday they were brought and delivered into the shop; I was not present; when I came home I found them in Mr. Markey's shop.

Q. Do you mean those things that are now produced and claimed by Goring - A. Yes.

WILLIAM MARKEY . Q. Did you see the prisoner at your brother's house last December - A. Yes, he brought some marble chimney pieces in a cart into my brother's yard.

Q. Who unloaded the cart - A. Mould; I was in the shop at the time, I saw the prisoner unload the cart; there were two other men assisting the prisoner. This is part of the marble that he brought; I am sure that the prisoner is one of the men that came with the cart.

Q. Did you see the prisoner before the justice - A. I did, and I spoke with certainly to him.

PHILIP MARKEY . I saw the prisoner when he called on my man Barnes, I did not then attend to what he said. On the Thursday following we went over to see the chimney pieces; this was Thursday, he was taken up on the Monday. Barnes, him, and me went to inspect these chimney-pieces, it was a long way from the other side of Westminster bridge; he shewed me the chimney-pieces, he asked Barnes in my hearing what they were worth, if he thought they were worth twelve pounds; I said I thought they were; Barnes said, there is Ellison's cart; I said, that will bring them over on the Saturday.

Q. Was it proposed that you should send the cart and bring them away - A. Saturday was mentioned. On the Friday they were brought over in my absence; on Saturday morning I found they were on my premises.

Q. Are they the same chimney pieces that you saw on Mould's premises - A. I believe them to be the same.

Prisoners Defence. I was at Mr. Markey's yard on the Friday, I borrowed a shovel and returned it again at night. That is all I have to say.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120115-118

192. CHARLES RICHARDS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of January , a piece of morocco leather, value 7 s. the property of John Maberley .

JOHN MABERLEY . I am a coach-maker in Welbeck-street ; the prisoner was my servant, he was harness-maker and budget-man .

EDMUND FESEY . I am foreman to Mr. Maberley. In consequence of suspicion on the 13th of January John James watched the prisoner, from his information I stopped the men when they were leaving work, I searched the prisoner and found near a whole skin of morrocco leather in a handkerchief in his coat pocket, it is worth seven shillings. The prisoner said he took it to make some braces. This is the morrocco skin, it is Mr. Maberley's property.

Prisoner's Defence. I leave it to the mercy of the court.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 29.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and Whipped in Jail .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120115-119

193. FREDERIC WHITEHEAD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of January , a watch, value 2 l. four books, value 1 l. the property of William Colderoy ; three books, value 3 s. a box, value 1 d. and twenty pieces of copper, value 20 d. the property of Thomas Sims Colderoy ; and sixty-four

penny-pieces, and fifty halfpence, the property of William Colderoy and Thomas Sims Colderoy .

THOMAS SIMS COLDEROY . My father, William Colderoy , is my partner . The prisoner was my clerk .

Q. Had you a house in Bunhill-row - A. Yes. The prisoner was entrusted with the key of the accompting-house; the accompting house is in the Green-yard, Whitecross-street ; we had missed a watch; we received two anonymous letters, and then we had the prisoner taken up. I went with the officer to take him up at his apartments in Lambs-buildings; his box was searched, in it was one book belonging to me and one belonging to my father; he said he had the books to read.

JAMES KENNEDY . I am an officer. I searched the prisoner's box, I found two books in it, he said they belonged to his master, he had taken them to read; at the bottom of the box I found sixty-four penny-pieces and about fifty halfpence. I searched his person, in his coat pocket I found a brace of loaded pistols, and this phosphorus box and matches; he said he carried the pistols about him for his own defence, and the phosphorus to get a light, as he was in the habit of getting up early in the morning. We then proceeded to Mr. Colderoy's, 13, Bunhill-row; he had another box there; we searched it; we found four or five books there, he said they belonged to his master, he had taken them to read.

Prisoner's Defence. I have lived four years with the prosecutor; I mostly read of a Sunday, and when I had done with the books I put them away: and the copper pieces of money were all my own.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120115-120

194. ELIZABETH WHITE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of December , a tea kettle, value 3 s. a bolster, value 1 s. a sheet, value 2 s. and a pail, value 2 s. the property of Thomas Fitzgerald , in a lodging-room .

ELIZABETH FITZGERALD. My husband's name is Thomas Fitzgerald . On the 16th of December the prisoner went out of the room, I found missing a pair of sheets, a bolster, tea-kettle, and a pail, they were all gone.

Q. Had she left the lodging - A. No.

Q. How does she get her bread - A. I do not think she is much good. One sheet we found about her while she was in custody.

Prisoner's Defence. The sheets were very old; I had got one about me as an apron; the tea-kettle I took out to get water, I lost that; the pail I lent to a Jack-ass man, the ass knocked it to pieces in the stable; the bolster I was willing to pay for, and the tea-kettle and the pail; the other sheet had one good piece in it, I tore it up for a towel.

GUILTY , aged 36.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120115-121

195. MARY GROVES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of January , from the person of Silvester Horsam , a one pound bank note, his property .

SILVESTER HORSAM . I am a seaman ; I called into the Red Lion public-house, Nightingale-lane ; I was enjoying myself; the prisoner asked me if I had not got some halfpence; she put her hand into my jacket pocket, and took out my protection box and two one pound notes, and run away with one of the pound notes.

JOHN CONNER . I saw the girl have two one-pound notes and the protection box; she gave me a pound note to get changed; I called the man to take the change; the girl had a pound note, she said she would keep it till the morning.

Prisoner's Defence. That is a house of unfortunate girls. He gave me the notes and told me to pay for the last half pint of rum.

MICHAEL PERCY . I saw the man take two notes out of his protection box and give them to Mary Griffith , he told her to keep them.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120115-122

196. SARAH DRUCE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of January , a feather bed, value 7 l. a bolster, value 5 s. two pillows, value 5 s. a blanket, value 1 s. and a counterpane, value 3 s. the property of John Bullen , in a lodging-room .

MARY BULLEN . I live in Union-place, Tottenham-court-road . The prisoner took the lodging on the 28th of December. On the 4th of January I went up and looked through the key-hole and saw the bed and bedding was gone; I got a constable and went into the room, we found the things missing out of the room; a feather bed, bolster, two pillows, a blanket, and a counterpane were gone.

Q. Did you ever find any thing of them afterwards - A. No. When the prisoner took the room she said her husband was foreman of a dustyard.

GEORGE SQUIB . I was with Mrs. Bullen. I forced the door open: there was not one single thing left; there were feathers about the room; the window was open and feathers in the street, as if the bed had been throwed out of the window, and somebody appointed to take it up. I took up the man that was with her, his name is Hall, he lived in the room with her. We took him to Hatton Garden. On Monday morning we took her with her real husband at Hammersmith; I searched her; I found nothing of those things that were lost.

JOHN CLARK . I know no more than what Hall said, that the things were in the lodging when he went out.

Prisoner's Defence. I left every thing in the room when I left it.

GUILTY , aged 35.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120115-123

197. JOHN DREW and WILLIAM HOLLAND were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of December , fourteen pounds weight of beef, value 5 s. the property of William Woodhatch .

- JENNETT. I am a painter and glazier, 15, Compton-place, Brunswick-square. I was coming up Marchmont-street , nearly at the top; I saw the two

prisoners lurking backwards and forwards Mr. Woodhatch's shop.

Q. Is he a butcher - A. Yes, in Marchmont-street. I thought they were suspicious character; I passed them, and when I got to the top of the street I crossed over nearly opposite, I saw the two prisoners near Mr. Woodhatch's door; Drew reached over the partition which parts the shop from the private door, and drew over a piece of beef, and rolled it in his apron, and walked away; Holland looked into his apron as he was rolling it in. I went and told Mr. Woodhatch that a man had taken his beef away; I pointed out to him the man that had got the beef. Mr. Woodhatch took him back to the shop. I took Holland and brought him back.

Drew's Defence. I throw myself on the mercy of the court.

Holland's Defence. I am innocent.

Constable. I went to Mr. Woodhatch this morning, I said the prisoners were going to be tried to day, he said he did not care for the Old Bailey, we might all be d - d, he would not come.

The prosecutor was called, and not appearing in court, his recognisance was ordered to be estreated.

DREW - GUILTY, aged 18.

HOLLAND - GUILTY, aged 21.

Judgment respited .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120115-124

198. SARAH SLATER was indicted for that she on the 13th of January , twenty pieces of false and counterfeited milled money and coin, made and counterfeited to the likeness of a good shilling, feloniously did put off to Mary the wife of John Harcup at a lower rate and value than they by their denomination did import, and were counterfeited for, that is to say ten shillings .

SECOND COUNT for like offence, only varying the manner of charging.

MARY HARCUP . I have been in service some years; I have been out of service four months. On the 12th of January I was introduced to the prisoner by a woman of the name of Nowland, in company with a woman of the name of Byat for the purpose of buying some bad money.

Q. You knew Mrs. Nowland before - A. Yes. Mrs. Byat told me she would sell half a piece of goods, that is, twenty bad shillings, she would sell me a half piece for ten shillings. I appointed to meet her the next day at twelve o'clock, the 13th of January; if she did not come the next day herself Mrs. Slater would come, it was equal the same.

Q. Mrs. Slater was present at this time - A. She was. I then went to Mr. Powell and acquainted him with this circumstance; Mr. Powell told me to come to his chambers the next morning and to buy them.

Q. Did you go there the next morning - A. I did, about half past nine; I waited there untill Mr. Armstrong came, and the officers came. When the officers came then they gave me the money.

Q. Before they gave you the money had you any money about you - A. No, I had not a halfpenny In the world.

Q. Who gave you the money - A. Mr. Armstrong, I saw him mark the money; two three-shilling pieces, a half-crown, one shilling and sixpence, and they gave me four pennyworth of halfpence to treat the woman with gin. After that I went to the wine-vaults the corner of Hollis-street, Clare-market , that was the place appointed to meet the woman the day before. The officers were behind me, they had sight of me all the way I went. I then met the prisoner at the door of the wine-vaults, she told me that she had been sometime waiting for me; she then said, she had brought me what was promised me last night. We walked about an hundred yards from the door; she said they were very much in want of money, and Byat's people were at work; she said they were very bad, they were all scratchy, but if I could do away with them, that is, pass them off, she would get me some that would be much better to-morrow. We went into the wine-vaults, Mr. Armstrong was just behind us, and then I treated her with a quartern of gin, and gave her the four-pennyworth of halfpence; she then gave me the twenty bad shillings out of her hand, they were in brown paper; I gave her the ten shillings that I had received of the officer, the same money; she stood at the bar, and then she gave me in her turn a quartern of gin; she paid for that with the sixpence I had just given her, she had it in her hand; then I stood at the bar a few minutes longer, and then a little boy came in; I was to put my hand to my bonnet when he came in if I had bought the money; I did, and the officers came in.

Q. Was that sixpence that was given by her for the last gin given to the landlord - A. Yes. Mr. Armstrong took hold of my hand and asked me what I had got there; I told him what I had bought and paid for; he took it out of my hand and looked at it, and asked me who I bought it of; I told him, the prisoner.

Prisoner. Were not you tried here last sessions - A. Yes, and I was acquitted. The woman was drunk and pawned the watch herself.

JOHN ARMSTRONG . I am an officer. On Monday the 13th I searched Mary Harcup and found she had no money; I delivered her two three shilling bank tokens, a half crown, a shilling and a sixpence, I marked them all in the presence of Harcup and my son, Bishop came in afterwards; I then delivered the money to her, and let her go on first; I and my son followed her; we then came into Clare-market, I saw Mrs. Slater join the last witness, they talked about the space of a moment, and then walked a hundred yards both together; they then returned, and went into the wine-vaults at the corner of Hollis-street. When I and my son and Bishop went into the wine-vaults Mrs. Harcup's face presented herself to me, Mrs. Slater's back was rather towards us: I catched hold of Harcup's hand and said, what have you got here; I took out of her hand a paper containing twenty counterfeit shillings; I produced them before the grand jury, and by some mistake there is only nineteen, there were twenty then, which I counted. I then asked Mrs. Harcup of whom she got them; she said she had bought them and paid for them of the prisoner, the prisoner then being present. We took them into a little room and there I saw Bishop produce some marked money, which I knew I had given

to Mrs. Harcup. The money produced wanted a sixpence. I went to the landlord and told him the sixpence that we wanted had a dot in it under the letters, which the man found. The prisoner was secured and taken to the office. I did not search Slater, she never made use of a bad word, but behaved exceeding well.

DANIEL BISHOP . Q. Were you with Armstrong - A. I was; I followed into the wine-vaults after Armstrong, I there took Slater in custody and searched her, I found in her pocket two three-shilling tokens, a half crown, and one shilling, all of which were marked and I had seen before, they were given to Harcup, I have kept them in my custody ever since.

Q. to John Armstrong . Just look at that and tell the jury whether these are the marked money - A. Yes; these are all marked money.

JOSHUA ARMSTRONG . I was in company with my father and Bishop. I produce three counterfeit shillings, these were under the prisoner where she stood when Bishop searched her pockets.

CALEB EDWARD POWELL . Q. You are an assistant to the solicitor of the Mint - A. Yes.

Q. I believe you employed these officers upon the information you received from Harcup to detect these people - A. I did.

Q. Look at these nineteen shillings - A. They are all counterfeits, exactly of the same manufactory, and these three are of the same description and make.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent.

GUILTY.

Mr. Shelton. Sarah Slater , you stand convicted of felony, what have you to say why the court should not give you judgment to die according to law.

Prisoner. I beg the benefit of the statute.

Mr. Shelton. Prisoner at the bar, the prosecutor has put in a plea that you have been tried and convicted of felony, and did receive the benefit of clergy before, and that you are the same person who was tried and convicted, and had judgment in October sessions 1810.

Mr. Knapp. Gentlemen of the jury, the nature of the enquiry for you is, whether the prisoner is the same person that was convicted of felony, and if she is, by law no prisoner can be entitled to the benefit of clergy but once, and therefore she will be liable to a capital conviction. That she is the same person I undertake to prove; it appears that she was tried in October sessions 1810.

MR. SEWELL. I am clerk to the solicitor of the Mint. I produce a copy of the record of the conviction of the prisoner, Sarah Slater ; I examined it with the original record, it is a true copy.

(Read.)

WILLIAM ERASMUS HARDY. Q. You are clerk to Mr. Newman, the keeper of Newgate - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar - A. Yes, I was present at the time of her conviction, and when she received sentence, her sentence was to be imprisoned one year in Newgate, and to be fined one shilling. She remained in Newgate, and was discharged the 31st of October last. I have no doubt at all of her being the person.

COURT. Gentlemen of the jury, the question for you to determine is, whether she is the same person that was tried in October 1810.

Verdict of the jury - We find that she is the same person.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 35.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120115-125

199. RICHARD JACKMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of March , five ducks, value 10 s. the property of John Dobson .

JOHN DOBSON . I live in Wardour-street , I am a paper stainer . I lost my ducks on the 16th of March from a stable of mine in Edgware-road. The watchman took the prisoner on the night of the 16th of March, he had the ducks in a bag. On the 13th of this month I was sent for to appear against him, he had been taken up for something else. I never knew the prisoner till the 13th of this month. I only knew the ducks, they were killed that morning.

THOMAS HINWOOD . I am a watchman. I saw the prisoner on the 16th of March last, he came by me at one o'clock in the morning towards town the Kilburn way, and then at three o'clock he came back again towards Kilburn; he passed by me, and I followed him to the top of Edgware Hill; there was a watchman there, he followed him. It was a moonlight morning. I went on along with him into the ground of one Tims, a gardener, he had a brother watching a mushroon bed. We watched about till four; I turned up to two horses that I had the care of, and coming back I met the prisoner with this bag with a horse cloth in it, five ducks, a hedging hook, and this sawyers dog-iron. I attacked him and said, what have you got there; he said, what is that to you; I made a snatch at him; he said, what do you want, you bloody fool, and turned from me; he threw the bag down, and after he ran about ten yards; I said, he might go and be d - d, if he would, I knew him. I have seen him since in the day-time.

Q. If you saw him afterwards why did not you take him up - A. It was left for the Marlborough-street officers to take him. I knew him to be a thief well. Mr. Dobson had the ducks, they were dead and all warm.

WILLIAM WINFIELD . I was calling my hour in the Edgware-road, I saw the prisoner come with the bag, it contained ducks, a horse cloth, and the other things.

Q. You are sure that is the man, are you - A. Yes; I knew him before.

Q. to prosecutor. You saw these ducks - A. Yes; I am sure they were my ducks. The dog-iron wrenched the door open, there are the marks on the place.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

GUILTY , aged 42.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120115-126

200. JOHN BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of January , a pewter quart pot, value 1 s. 2 d. the property of William Brown .

- NEWMAN. I saw the prisoner take the pot from a house in New-street , he put it into his

apron, and went down Park-lane, I went to Mr. Brown, and told him the pot was found in his apron, by Mr. Brown and me.

WILLIAM CHESTER . This is the pot.

Prosecutor. That is my pot.

GUILTY , aged 59.

Confined Two Years in the House of Correction .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120115-127

201. WILLIAM JONES and JOHN NORTON were indicted for feloniously assaulting Robert Cole , in the king's highway, on the 23d of September , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, two bank notes, value 1 l. each .

Mr. Gurney, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoners were

ACQUITTED .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120115-128

202. WILLIAM JONES and JOHN NORTON were indicted for another robbery upon William Cole , and taking from him eight one pound notes, his property .

Mr. Gurney, counsel, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoners were

ACQUITTED .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120115-129

203. DENNIS REAORDEN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of January , a deal plank, value 4 s. the property of William Hitchcock .

WILLIAM HITCHCOCK . I am a coal porter , I lost a deal plank on last Sunday night was a week, I lost it off Mr. Johnson's wharf, Wapping-dock , it belongs to me, and two of my partners that worked together.

Q. You have a joint property in the stock. - A. Yes.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18120115-130

204. SAMUEL BENNETT and JAMES TAYLOR were indicted for that they, on the 7th of January , unlawfully did utter to John Pitt Fladdy , a counterfeit three shilling token, resembling the legal three shilling bank tokens, made and issued by the Governor and Company of the Bank of England, they well knowing it to be false and counterfeited .

JOHN PITT FLADDY . I live at 20, Ludgate Hill , I am a confectioner . On the 7th of January, both the prisoners came into my master's shop about seven in the evening, Bennett asked for a couple of cakes, I served him, he gave me a three shilling token, I looked at it, and thought it was a bad one, he offered me ano- I looked at them both, and returned him one, I told the prisoners I should go backwards and get change, I went into the cellar and shewed the three shilling token to Mr. Collins, he thought it was a bad one; not being satisfied, I went to the next door neighbour, to ask his opinion, and when I returned the prisoners were gone, I then went to Mr. Collins, and both the prisoners came into the shop, Bennett asked for his change, I told George Fisher to shut the door, he went to shut the door, and Taylor attempted to get out, one of our men went to his assistance; while Taylor was struggling with Fisher, I told the man to keep the door shut, while I went for a constable; I returned with a constable, there were several good shillings found upon Bennett, Taylor was sitting upon a chair when I came in, I gave the same bank token to Kimber, that I received from Bennett.

Q. Did the two prisoners appear to know each other. - A. Yes, I think so, they came in one immediately after the other, Bennett said, this is the house I left a three shillings piece at.

JOHN COLLINS . I am foreman to Mr. Hodges, where the bank token was tendered, Mr. Fladdy is the shopman, Mr. Fladdy came down in the manufactory, in haste, and asked me to look at a three shilling token, I looked at it, and told him it was a bad one, I went up after him and saw no one in the shop, I concluded that Mr. Fladdy had gone out; Fladdy returned, he and I were in conversation in the shop, when Bennett came in, and demanded change for this token, accompanied by Taylor; Fisher fastened the door, and Fladdy went for an officer, and Taylor seated himself in a chair, I observed him put his hand behind him, I had my eye particularly upon Taylor, I observed him put his left hand down by the side of the chair, where stood a small basket, with a few tin frames in it, I kept my eye steady upon him, I observed him drop two pieces into this basket, I immediately stepped forward and said, here is something, take up the basket, I heard it jingle against the tin frames, as well as saw it, I took the two pieces out, resembling three shilling tokens, they were similar to what Fladdy had shewed me, I soon after heard something more fall behind the chair, that was a bad shilling. The prisoner Bennett said to Taylor, d - n your eyes Jem, you ought to have been hanged twenty years ago. They seemed very familiar, Taylor made no reply, I gave the two three shilling tokens, and the bad shilling to Kimber.

GEORGE FISHER . Mr. Fladdy came down to shew the token to Mr. Collins, I went up into the shop, and saw both the prisoners walk out of the shop into the street, I went to the door, and lost sight of them, I returned into the shop, and both the prisoners came into the shop, I went to shut the door, Taylor made an attempt to escape out, Richard Cyder came to my assistance, and we shut the door, Fladdy went for Kimber, and they were searched.

RICHARD CYDER . The first that I saw was Taylor struggling with Fisher, to get out of the shop, I took hold of his body and prevented him, and Fisher shut the door. Then Taylor sat down in a chair, he had an apron on, I saw him put something out of his left hand into his right, I heard it rattle as it passed from his left to his right, I saw it pass again from his right to his left, and he dropped them into the basket.

WILLIAM CROXFORD . I am a servant in Mr. Hedge's shop. When Taylor was in the chair, I saw him put his hand behind him, I saw and heard something drop like a shilling, Mr. Collins picked it up, it was a bad shilling.

WILLIAM KIMBER . I am a constable. Upon Bennett I found nineteen shillings and six-pence in good silver, and sixteen pence in copper; upon Taylor I found in his pocket some black pudding, and in Bennett's hat about three pound of raw meat, a small loaf in his pocket, and a stick of horse radish; this is the bank token that was delivered to me by Fladdy, and this is the money that was given me in the shop by Mr. Collins, two three shilling tokens, and a bad shilling.

EDMUND HOMERSHAM . I am one of the tellers at the bank.

Q. Look at that token, and tell me whether that is one issued by the bank. - A. It is made in the similitude of those issued by the bank, it is base metal, and these two dollars are exactly of the same stamp, they are equally base and counterfeit, and that shilling is a bad one.

Bennett's Defence. I am innocent of knowing it was a bad three shilling token, I went out of the shop to my brother-in-law, he gave me what money he had in his bag, I went into the shop and said I could pay for what I had.

Taylor's Defence. There was a good many people about the shop door when I went in, I did not speak to Bennett, I did not see the man.

BENNETT GUILTY , aged 39.

TAYLOR GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined Six Months in Newgate , and at the expiration of that time, to find sureties for Six Months to come .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120115-131

205. MARY CAVENAUGH was indicted for that she, on the 9th of November , unlawfully did utter to Joseph Pirch , a counterfeit and false token, resembling the three shilling bank tokens issued by the Bank of England, she knowing it to be false and counterfeited .

JOSEPH PIRCH . I am a book-keeper at the Bell and Crown Inn, Holborn . The prisoner is a barrow-woman , she stood opposite of the Bell and Crown, selling fruit, I have known her a month, I have changed tokens for her every day.

Q. Do you remember on Saturday the 9th of November, changing her any tokens. - A. Yes, I changed her some in the morning, and some in the afternoon. About two or three o'clock in the afternoon I received these two of her, I marked them, and put them in my pocket by themselves. About a quarter of an hour after, she came with the third, her coming so often I had suspicion that it was not good, I cut it with a knife, and found that it was copper; that is the one, it has my mark. I then gave it to George Fewson , the porter, to take it to her, and tell her it was bad; the porter soon returned, he left the three shilling piece with the woman; the other two three shilling piece that I had taken of her before were also bad.

GEORGE FEWSON . I am a porter. I saw Mr. Pirch cut the three shilling piece, he said it was a bad one, he told me to take it to the barrow-woman. I took it to the prisoner, I asked her whether that was her three shilling piece, she said it is, is it not a good one, I said no it is not, she said she had taken it of a man just gone, she took it out of my hand and said she would run after the man and get him to change it.

Q. Did you see any man near her. - A. No. I went into the office and told Mr. Pirch, Mr. Fagg came in just after, he sent me for a constable, the constable took her into the coach-house and searched her.

Q. You had not told her that any more had been discovered to be bad. - A. No.

PETER BARRET . I am a constable. I took the prisoner in custody, and while I was searching her she endeavoured to turn two or three shillings of one side that I might not see them, they were in a little purse in her bosom. In her throwing the purse down on the ground, she had a method of throwing them two dollars of one side; there were twelve shillings and sixpence in the bag, independant of the dollars, and two of the shillings were bad. The prisoner was rather intoxicated, but she was able to run away while I was talking to the ward beadle, she was stopped almost immediately. I picked up three tokens, two were bad and one was good. I produce the counterfeit money.

EDMUND HOMERSHAM . Q. Look at these tokens, they are the two that were uttered in the afternoon. - A. They are both counterfeits.

Q. Here are two other tokens, do they appear to be of the same manufactory. - A. They are counterfeits, and the two shillings are bad, and the dollars are counterfeits.

Prisoner's Defence. I took this money on Lord Mayor's day, it was a dark day, and I am no judge of money. I was a little tipsey, they are spiteful against me and wrong me very much; there was a woman her last night that saw me take the three shilling pieces.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Confined Six Months in Newgate , and at that expiration of that time to find sureties for Six Months to come .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120115-132

206. JOHN ROLLS was indicted for a misdemeanour .

JAMES LAWRENCE . I am shopman to Mr. Barnes in Cannon-street , he is a pen and quill manufacturer . On the 26th of December the defendant came to the shop, he said he came from Mr. Portman, Bell-alley, Lombard-street, for five hundred pens at four shillings per hundred; he then said he would take six dozen of black lead pencils, at half a crown a dozen, I delivered them to him with a bill of parcels, and entered them in the delivery book which he signed. This is the delivery book; I saw him sign it G. Smith. He brought these four hundred quills, he said we were to

clarify them and send them home. I sent them home and discovered that this was not true. I afterwards saw him before the sitting Alderman in custody. I am sure he was the same person, he was taken up on another charge.

WILLIAM PORTMAN . I am a stationer, 11, Bell-alley, Lombard-street. The defendant left my service about five months.

Q. Had he any authority from you to make application to Mr. Barnes. - A. No. I never gave him any authority, I was not at all accquainted with his having done that act until these quills were brought to me.

The defendant said nothing in his defence.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120115-133

207. FRANCIS DIMMOCK was indicted for wilful and corrupt perjury .

The plaintiff were called, and not appearing in court, the defendant was

ACQUITTED .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120115-134

208. ABRAHAM LEVI was indicted for that he on the 4th of December , one piece of false and counterfeited money, made and counterfeited to the likeness and similitude of a good shilling, unlawfully did utter to Hearsey Heard , he at the time well knowing it to be false and counterfeited .

HEARSEY HEARD . I am brother to Joseph Heard , he is an orange merchant, 37, Pudding-lane . On the 4th of December, in the afternoon, the prisoner came into my brother's house, I was in the shop, my brother was in the accompting house. The defendant came for a hundred lemons, which I sold him for three shillings, he gave me three shillings which I took to my brother, my brother came and told the prisoner they were all bad, and told him he must send him to the compter, the prisoner then ran away, my brother followed him and brought him back. I went for the beadle. I am quite sure that the three shillings that I had of him, I took to my brother, and they were not given back to him.

JOSEPH HEARD . I live at 37, Pudding-lane. I keep an orange shop.

Q. Did you see the prisoner at your shop. - A. On the 4th of December I did, my brother brought me the three shillings, I perceived they were bad and told my brother so. I went into the shop to the prisoner and threatened to send him to the compter, he ran away, I pursued him and brought him back. I delivered him and the three shillings to the beadle. The beadle asked him whether he had any more, he replied he had not, I perceived there was something in his breeches pocket, the beadle told him to pull them out, he did, they were three more bad shillings, the shillings were all of the same appearance exactly, the beadle got a constable and he was taken before the Lord Mayor.

MR. ROW. I am ward beadle. I took the prisoner into the back room. Mr. Heard observed something in his breeches fob, I told him to take it out, the prisoner pulled out three shillings, I gave them the constable, and the other three shillings also.

JOSEPH WORRALL . I am a constable. Mr. Row gave me six shillings. I have had them ever since. I produce them.

CALEB EDWARD POWELL . I am assistant solicitor of the mint.

Q. Look at them six shillings. - A. They are all counterfeits, they are of the same manufactory. At the examination they looked much better than now, they appeared never to have been in circulation. They are washed, it is done by a solution of silver in aqua fortis.

Prisoner's Defence. I sold four dozen of lemons to a countryman, he gave me them six shillings, there was nobody by at the time.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Confined Six Months in Newgate , and at the expiration of that time, to find surities for Six Months to come .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120115-135

209. CHARLES JOHNSON was indicted for that he, about the hour of five on the night of the 13th of December , a certain warehouse belonging to John Hankes and Benjamin Lee did break and enter, with intent the goods and chattels therein burglariously to steal .

JOHN HANKES . My partner's name is Benjamin Lee , our warehouses are 47 and 48 Watling Street , 47 was the warehouse broke into. We are warehousemen , I only know that the warehouse belonged to me and my partner.

WILLIAM GROVE . I am a boot maker, I live about five houses from this warehouse. On Friday the 13th of December, about five in the afternoon, it was dark at that time, I was standing at my own door, I observed four men, the prisoner was on the opposite side, shortly after they passed my house the prisoner joined them in company. Suspecting that they were on something bad I watched them, and just as I got to a house adjoining Mr. Hankes I passed on and the four men and the prisoner separated, three men took their station against the church nearly opposite the prisoner, and another turned round the corner of the hord, and at that instant I lost sight of them. It had not been a moment scarcely before I discovered the prisoner open the warehouse of Mr. Hankes and Lee, it was by the glimmer of the light at the extremity of the warehouse that I discovered the prisoner, at that time he had got his head and the forepart of his body in the warehouse, at that instant I jumped up and got hold of him by the neck, I then called out Mr. Hankes, the warehouseman came running down to me, I told him my opinion of the prisoner. There was a great deal lumber box and other things that he might have concealed himself in to have robbed the warehouse, which I suspected was the case.

Q. What became of the four companions. - A. They all decamped, then the prisoner was secured. The other four were grown men, one of them was convicted here last night, he went by the name of Joe the marine, he was tried for knocking down the bell-man of St. Bride's. I sent for a constable, he was

searched, nothing was found.

EDWARD FEATHER . I am warehouseman to Messrs. Hankes and Lee, I heard Mr. Groves make the alarm, I had not been to the door for near half an hour, in consequence of the alarm I immediately ran forward and found the lad in the possession of Mr. Groves. Our door is a very heavy door and a pulley, if any person opens it it will shut itself, I sent for an officer, he knew him, and at the Mansion-house he was known by the officers.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going up Watling Street to go to Billingsgate to see if any fish had come up, this door was a-jar, I thought I saw somebody go in that I knew, I put my head in, and Mr. Groves seized me.

GUILTY, aged 16.

Judgment respited .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120115-136

210. ROBERT YIELDER was indicted for a misdemeanour .

The plaintiff was called, and not appearing in court , the defendant was

ACQUITTED.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120115-137

211. FRANCES YIELDER was indicted for wilful and corrupt perjury .

The plaintiff was called, and not appearing in court , the defendant was

ACQUITTED.

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120115-138

212. CHRISTOPHER HODSON was indicted for a misdemeanor .

GEORGE RUTHWIN . I am a patrol of Bow Street, I met Mr. Powell, the assistant solicitor to the mint, at Salisbury, he delivered me these ten guineas, Mr. Powell marked them in my presence.

Q. After you got these guineas of Mr. Powell, and received directions of him, what did you do. - A. I went to the Devisees.

Q. You went in the mail coach as far as Newbury. - A. I did. At Marlborough I paid for two glasses of brandy, one for the coachman who drove me, and one for me, I pulled out a pound note, and there the other saw the guineas, my hands were cold when I pulled out my bag, I could do no other, and there the coachman saw the guineas.

Q. At Newbery, there you changed the coachman that drove the mail. - A. We did so.

Q. You had not seen him before you got to Newbury - A. No, he drove to London.

Q. Was he and the former coachman in conversation. - A. Not as I knew.

Q. Had you pulled the guineas out after you came in company with the defendant at Newbury. - A. I pulled the bag out to pay for something for the coachman, there the defendant saw the guineas.

Q. Did you shew him them afterwards. - A. I believe not until I came near Maidenhead. At Maidenhead he told me I had better give my money to the guard, that was a great place for thieving, the Gloucester Mail had been fired at, and one ball had entered the side; soon after this conversation, passed about four miles, we talked again about the guineas. He told me that they used to be sold at twenty-seven and twenty-eight shillings, they did not go for so much now. I expressed a surprise that guineas should rise and fall, I had never heard any thing about it, he told me it was according to the risk they run in leaving the kingdom, that there had been a number seized. I before this, told him that I was going to Gerrad's Hall Inn, Baising-lane, that I had never been in London before, but my brother had come to London to meet me in a one horse cart. The subject was mentioned two or three times after that, but not so particularly; when I got to Piccadilly at the Gloucester coffee-house, I got down to have something to drink, he told me I had better go with him as I was going to Gerrad's Hall Inn, he was going great part of the way; I went on the coach again afterwards to the city, he then said as I did not know London we had better go together. As we was going along we went down St. James's Street and along Pall Mall, we came by a goldsmith's shop, I asked him if it was at this shop they bought guineas, he told me no, did I want to part with them, I told him if they gave as much as had been stated by the other coachman, I had no objection three and twenty shillings and sixpence he said, no, he would give me twenty-two shillings and sixpence, and as I was going to Gerrard's Hall Inn it would be nothing out of my way to go with him to the Swan and Two Necks, upon which I went with him to the Swan and Two Necks, I got off the box first, he told me to go into the parlour while he unhitched his horses, and he would come in directly, upon that I contrived to go out of the yard and brought an officer, the officer waited in a proper place. When I came back the prisoner was looking after me, he told me if I would go into the room he would be with me immediately, he asked me where I had been, I told him to have a run, I was so cold, I went into the room, called for a pint of porter, drank part of it, he went out in the yard and returned with the nine one-pound notes, the officer has the notes, I gave them to Chamberlain the officer, I gave the defendant eight guineas for the nine one-pound notes after he gave me the notes.

Q. Were these part of the guineas that were mark'd by Mr. Powell. - A. The same guineas, then Chamberlain took him in custody.

Q. Did you go in the coach with the prisoner. - A. I did, to the Compter, he said he thought me a friend, he did not think I would have served him so, I told him it was my duty, I was sent upon it.

Mr. Gurney. You went and left him in the yard, you gave him no change. - A. There was no change agreed upon.

Q. So you tell us you did not mean to give any, you took your guineas and shook them for him to see them. - A. My hands was cold, I could not help it.

Court. Did you untend that he should see your guineas. - A. I did.

Mr. Gurney. Then you need not put upon me that your hands was cold. So you set out as a country farmer, with a silk handkerchief round your neck. - A.

The same as I have on now.

WILLIAM CHAMBERLAIN . I am an officer of the city of London. On the 19th of September, about nine in the morning, Ruthwin desired me to go along with him; I went in a coach and waited at the corner of Lad-lane, he beckoned me and then I went to wait at the corner of the Swan and Two Necks gateway; I waited there a few minutes, Ruthwin came out of the office and said, here he is in the back office. He told me then it was for buying guineas; he desired me to take him in custody, he was my prisoner. I took him into custody and took him in a coach to the compter; Ruthwin went with me. Previous to the defendant's going in the coach Ruthwin said, I give you charge of this man for buying guineas, the defendant turned as pale as ashes and said, I thought you were my friend, you have taken me in, it is the first time I ever did such a thing in my life, and expressed a wish that it might be settled. I did not actually search him; he put his hand into his pocket at the Poultry Compter, and delivered to me eight guineas, I have had them ever since, and Ruthwin, in the presence of the prisoner gave me these nine pound notes; the prisoner acknowledged having paid the notes to Ruthwin. The defendant said he thought it very hard that he should be imposed upon in that way; Ruthwin said it was his duty, he was sent by the magistrate, and the solicitor of the Mint; he could not help it, he must do his duty.

CALEB EDWARD POWELL . Q. You are assistant Solicitor of the Mint - A. Yes.

Q. Look at the eight guineas now produced by Chamberlain, are these the eight guineas that you had delivered to Ruthwin - A. Yes; I marked ten guineas and delivered them to Ruthwin, on Monday the 16th of September last, at Salisbury; I marked them in his presence; these are eight of the ten that I delivered to him.

Mr. Gurney addressed the jury in behalf of the defendant.

GUILTY .

Fined 40 s.

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18120115-139

213. ANN EDWARDS and MARY ANN STANWELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 31st of October , six frocks, value 11 s. six petticoats, value 9 s. two shirts, value 20 s. a gown, value 7 s. 6 d. a cornelian locket set in pearl, value 30 s . three pair of silk stockings, value 7 s. a sword, value 30 s. a sword case, value 2 s. seven printed books, value 10 s. 6 d. a pair of ear-rings set in gold, value 10 s. 6 d. the property of Ann Earle ; and two gowns, value 16 s . 6 d. the property of Mary Smith .

MARY SMITH . I am a servant to Mr. Earle, Bedford-row .

Q. Do you know either of the prisoners at the bar - A. Yes; the first time that ever I saw them was on the 1st of November; I went out of town with the family on the 1st of September, we returned the 1st of November .

Q. Who was in care of your master's house - A. Mrs. Edwards; they were both there on my return.

COURT . They were both in the house when you came back - A. Yes.

Q. When you came back did you miss any thing - A. I went up stairs to my own room, I found my drawer open and my things gone in my box, and my box had also been broken open; I acquainted Mrs. Earle of it. On the next day I went to the wardrobe and found many things gone.

Q. What sort of things were they - A. Different kind of wearing apparel; my mistress sent me down to Mrs. Edwards about it; I told her that my box was broken open, and a great many things broken open; she said she knew nothing of it: I told her she must have duplicates of the things; she denied at first having any, afterwards she delivered them up to me; I had four duplicates from the daughter, and the others of Mrs. Edwards.

COURT. It is her daughter-in-law, is it not - A. It is her own daughter.

Q. You say the girl delivered up four duplicates to you - A. Yes; I put them all together; I cannot distinguish one from the other; they were all delivered to Humphreys , a Bow-street officer.

Q. What was taken of yours - A. Two gowns, one made and one unmade; I missed three, two from the drawers and one from the box, and I missed some rows of garnet necklace, and one shilling and sixpence in silver has been found; the gowns and garnet necklace has been found.

Q. Now tell us what of your mistress's were lost at that time, and since have been found - A. There are gowns, stockings, shirts, frocks, pinafores, and muslin.

Q. You and your mistress were just returned from the country - A. Yes. I knew where they were always kept, and they were under my care; I put them in the drawers and gave my mistress the key, and when I returned I found the drawers broken open, and the things gone.

BENJAMIN ARMSTRONG . I am a servant to Mr. Armstrong, pawnbroker, Baldwyn's gardens .

Q. Do you know either of the prisoner's - A. Yes, the younger one; she came to our shop several times. On the 23d of October she pledged a dimity pelisse, pledged by the younger prisoner in the name of Mary Edwards ; all I took in I took in of the younger prisoner in the name of Edwards.

COURT, to Mary Smith . Look at these different articles , two frocks and a pair of stockings - A. They are Mrs. Earle's; I saw them before I left town, they were in the wardrobe .

JOHN RAMSAY . I am shopman to Mr. Page, pawnbroker, in Liquorpond-street; I produced a ring pledged for three shillings on the 19th of October in the name of Edwards, and two shifts by the same prisoner in the same name.

Mary Smith . This ring is the property of Ann Earle ; the three shifts are all Mrs. Earle's.

Ann Edward 's Defence. I am innocent.

Mary Ann Stanwell 's Defence. I have this to say, the other prisoner is innocent.

Ann Edwards called five witnesses, who gave her a good character.

EDWARDS - GUILTY , aged 50.

STANWELL - GUILTY , aged 19 .

Confined One Year in the House of Correction .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre .


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