Old Bailey Proceedings, 30th October 1811.
Reference Number: 18111030
Reference Number: f18111030-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE OYER AND TERMINER, AND GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND ALSO THE GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, HELD AT Justice-Hall, in the Old Bailey, On WEDNESDAY the 30th of OCTOBER, 1811, and following Days;

BEING THE EIGHTH SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF The Right Hon. JOSHUA JONATHAN SMITH , LORD-MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY JOB SIBLY, No. 4, CARTHUSIAN-STREET, ALDERSGATE-STREET.

LONDON:

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED (BY THE AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON.) By R. Butters, No. 22, Fetter-lane, Fleet-street

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON.

Before the Right-honourable JOSHUA JONATHAN SMITH , Lord Mayor of the City of London; Sir Alexander Thompson , knt. one of the Barons of His Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir Simon Le Blanc, knt. one of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir John William Anderson, bart. Sir Charles Price , bart. John Ansley , esq. Alderman of the said City; John Silvester , esq. Recorder of the said City: George Scholey , esq. Christopher Smith , esq. Alderman of the said City; and Newman Knowlys, esq. Common-serjeant of the said City; His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of Goal Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

London Jury.

John Johnson,

William Jellis ,

John Stewart ,

Edward Ryder ,

Richard Baker ,

George White ,

Benjamin Davis ,

Thomas Feather ,

Arthur Allen ,

Anthony Woodroffe ,

John Hudson ,

Samuel Barber .

First Middlesex Jury.

William Bond Copeland ,

William Andrews ,

Owen Williams ,

David Gillchrist ,

John Bindon ,

Thomas Eaton ,

James Bateman ,

Edmund Chaunt ,

Enoch Anstess ,

Joseph Bagshaw ,

Thomas Maples ,

Thomas Gray .

Second Middlesex Jury.

Thomas Moon ,

Booth Hancock ,

John Uwins ,

William Prosser ,

Richard Lester ,

John Lacey ,

Richard Rickwood ,

John Riley ,

John Rabbet ,

William Darcy ,

James Turner ,

John Bardon .

Reference Number: t18111030-1

805. JAMES HUGHES was indicted for that he, on the 17th of September , upon Susasannah Pratchett , spinster , did make an assault, and her, the said Susannah Pratchett , feloniously did ravish and carnally know .

SUSANNAH PRATCHETT. Q. Is your name Susan or Susannah - A. Susan is my Christian name.

SARAH BURTON . I am sister to the last witness, she is in her three-and-twentieth year, her name is Susan Pratchett , she was always called Susan.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson .

Reference Number: t18111030-2

806. JOHN SIDNEY was indicted for that he, on the 10th of September , upon Mary Ann Hunt , spinster , did make an assault, and her, the said, Mary Ann Hunt , feloniously did ravish and carnally know .

The prosecutrix and witness being called, and not appearing in court, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18111030-3

807. RICHARD BEDFORD , alias, BUTLER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of October, a sheep, value 2 l. the property of Joseph Fountain .

SECOND COUNT, for feloniously killing and slaying a sheep, value 2 l. with intent to steal the carcase of the said sheep, the property of Joseph Fountain .

HENRY CROUCH . Q. Are you the servant of Mr. Fountain - A. Yes.

Q. Did you by your master's direction take seventy sheep to a meadow near Duvoll's lane - A. Yes, I took them on Saturday week, the 22d.

Q. Were any of them marked with red ochre across the loins - A. Yes, some of them were marked with a line of red ochre across the loins.

Q. Had these sheep any other mark - A. A pitch bran mark, the letter S on the rump, and an ochre dot on the hip.

Q. What kind of sheep were these that were so marked - A. Between a Lincoln and a Leicester, they were large sheep.

Q. Then this afternoon you left these sheep safe in the field - A. Yes, seventy in number. I left them safe in the afternoon about four o'clock.

Q. Did you go again to the field on the next day - A. No. On the Thursday I found sixty-nine, one was missing.

Q. Have you seen the skin of the sheep that is to be produced - A. Yes, I believe that to be the skin of one of the sheep which I left in the field. The skin was shewn me by my master, he is a butcher .

JOHN PROUGHTON . Q. I believe you keep the King's Head, Crouch End - A. Yes.

Q. Last Wednesday evening, in consequence of in- of something else, did you and other inha- - A. Yes, a little after seven we went that joins Duvoll's-lane, I met a man his back, the sack appeared full.

was the prisoner - A. Yes, and the sack appearing full made me make up to him. When I went up to him I asked him what he had got there. I asked him if he had got a pig; he said, no, mutton. Then I asked him where he came from, he answered Holloway; I asked him where he was going to, he said Holloway; I said, it was very strange that he should come from Holloway, and going there again; I then rubbed him down of both sides to feel if he had any fire arms about him; I did not say any more to him until we got him over the gate. I had four more with me. I ordered two of the men to go over the the gate, which they did. I told the man to put the sheep over to them, which he did; he then said, I think one of you had better take a turn now; no, I said, you had better take it up, we are going your road. He asked the men to help him up with it; they did. We went on the road until we came to Mr. Crosses, and there we opened the bag; we found the carcase of a sheep in the sack, no head to it; the skin was taken off, the entrails were all gone, but the heart and lights, and part of the liver were left. It was quite warm, it was killed and fleyed in the regular way, and was dressed very nicely. We took the prisoner to the watchhouse, and returned to the field where we first found him. We there found the skin of a sheep with the head on it; we found the entrails, and all the remainder of the sheep.

Q. How near did you find that in the field from where you first found the prisoner - A. Near about an hundred yards in the same field.

Q. Were these things warm when you first found them - A. Quite warm. It being dark we did not observe the sheep in the field that night, the next morning I saw that there were sheep there. I afterwards delivered the skin to Mr. Thompson the owner of the field, and he delivered it to Mr. Crouch afterwards.

COURT. You have said a man, who was that man - A. The prisoner at the bar. I have seen him many times before, he is a butcher.

JAMES THOMPSON . Q. We understand you are the owner of this field where the prisoner was found - A. Yes. I let the after grass to Mr. Fountain, and he stocked it with sheep. We brought the carcase and the skin of the sheep, and the prisoner to Bow-street in a cart.

JOSEPH FOUNTAIN . Q. We learn that you rent the after grass of Mr. Thompson - A. I do.

Q. You were at Bow-street when the carcase of the sheep and the head was produced - A. I was. I compared one with the other, and I have no doubt that they belonged to each other. It was my sheep. It was delivered to me at Bow-street, after I came out of the office. I have kept it ever since.

Q. to Crouch. Did you see any blood as well as entrails in the field - A. There was a great deal of blood laid by the entrails nearly a yard square; it was killed there I have no doubt of it. This is the skin.

Prosecutor. This is the mark across the loins, and

here is the pitch mark the S, and this is the dot upon the hip. I had the sheep about a fortnight; I have no doubt about it whatever.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 43.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson .

Reference Number: t18111030-4

808. EDWARD HALL , alias CAMPBELL , was indicted for that he, on the 21st of October , about the hour of three at night, the dwelling house of Samuel Finch , burglariously did break and enter, with intent the goods and chattels in the same dwelling-house burglariously to steal .

SAMUEL FINCH . I keep the Bell public-house, Red Lion Market, in the parish of St. Luke's .

Q. Were you called up in the night on the 21st of this month - A. Yes, between two and three o'clock.

Q. Of course it was dark, no day light at that time - A. No. I got a light and came down.

Q. Who called you up - A. John Osborne , a watchman. I went into my dining room, opened the window, and asked what was the matter; he told me to came down I looked round, I saw nobody; I went to my bar door, it was locked. I found my cellar door smashed.

Q. Was the door open - A. Yes. I went forward to the street door, I held up the light to the private door of the bar, a pannel of wood was forced in. I turned my head on the right, I saw the prisoner laying in the bar on the floor, with his head on a chair.

Q. Was that the private door of the bar of which the pane of wood was taken out, was that door open - A. It was open. It was fastened when I went to bed with a drop bolt, if you put your arm in that pane you could shove the bolt up. I unlocked the street-door, and let the watchman and a man of the name of Leach in; they took hold of the prisoner by the collar and pulled him up. The prisoner said nothing, he appeared to be dead drunk. He was taken to the watchhouse.

Q. Was the prisoner completely dressed - A. I did not observe that any part of his dress was off.

Q. Had he his shoes on - A. That I cannot say. I unlocked my bar front door, I found on the counter a dark lanthorn, an iron crow, and a little bottle in a tumbler; they were not there when I went to bed. Then I went into my cellar, I found my cellar flap, one dog was quite off, and the other hung by one nail.

Q. Are these dogs part of the fastenings of the cellar flap - A. Yes, they are the front part of the flap that goes into the solid oak frame. The bolts are on the opposite side, and the bolts were shot, they could get under the shutter by pulling the dogs out. I found in the cellar a small bunch of matches.

Q. Was either that little bottle in the tumbler in the bar, or the bunch of matches in the cellar there in the night when you went to bed - A. No. The bottle would light a match in a minute, I have tried it.

Q. Had you observed the flap of your cellar the night before - A. Yes, I fastened it myself I bolted it with two bolts a little after eight o'clock.

Q. I suppose by forcing the dogs on the opposite side of the bolts the flap could be got up - A. Yes, and they could get under it.

Q. You had not lost any thing - A. No.

Q. Your bar was safe the night before, and the cellar - A. Yes.

Q. Had you known the prisoner before - A. No, I never saw him before to my knowledge in my life.

Q. What time had you gone to bed that night - A. A little before twelve, and then my house was quite safe. I always take my keys up stairs, and put them on my drawers.

Prisoner. The publican went to bed before ever he shut up the house; two of his lodgers shut up the house; he went to bed quite tipsey.

Prosecutor. I was the last up in the house, and took the key up stairs with me. My lodger fastened my shutters, I went down and saw them all safe. I myself fastened the cellar flap.

- OSBORNE. I am a watchman in the parish of St. Luke's.

Q. In going your round on the night of the 21st had early in the evening tried any of the fastenings of that house - A. Yes; the shutters of the window were safe at eleven o'clock at night. I went round every hour. I was going my round at two o'clock, a gentleman knocked at a door at the opposite corner to the Bell; the landlord let him in, and from what he told me we tried the flap of the cellar and found it open. On that we called Mr. Finch, the landlord of the Bell, up; he got up and let me in, and a gentleman that is here, he is not the landlord of the next house. I saw the pannel of the bar out, I lifted up my lanthorn, I found the prisoner in the bar, he was laying across two chairs lengthways, as if he was asleep. I went and took him.

Q. Did Mr. Finch, the landlord of the house, point him out to you first - A. No, he was at the door at the time, I did not perceive any body find him out but myself, I took hold of his collar and said, my friend rise up; the prisoner said, oh, that is all he said then. I took him to the watchhouse; he walked to the watchhouse with his shoes off. He had no shoes on when I found him. At the watchhouse the prisoner asked for his shoes, and a little girl brought them, he did not put them on till the morning.

JOHN LEACH . I am an excise officer. I was on my duty that morning, I was coming from Barbican up the court into Red Lion Market, I found a gate loose in the court.

Q. Does this public-house lay in a court - A. No, at the extremity of two courts. My curiosity was arisen at seeing the gate loose; a man rushed violently by me as if from Mr. Finch's down towards Barbican, he was going at a quick pace.

Q. That man you did not know - A. No. I scarcely bad turned round before another man came in the same direction as if from Mr. Finch's house, it rather alarmed me. I proceeded up the court and heard distinctly a bolt drawed back at Mr. Finch's, I did not know it was a public-house then, I know it now; I heard a bolt or something making a noise, which attracted my attention, and seeing a light on the right hand side of the house on the opposite side of the alley, I knocked at the door, the master came in his shirt and shoes with a lanthorn, him and me applied to the watchman; the watchman was deficient in candle;

the man said, there is plenty in my house; I went to his house and got a candle; they were stationed one of each side of the cellar flap; I saw the shoes found on the outside of Mr. Finch's house, a pair of thick shoes with large nails in the heels. The neighbour took the shoes into his own house. This was previous to Mr. Finch's door being opened. We tried all that we could to wake Mr. Finch with our voices, we could not; we knocked the shutters with such violence that soured him, he came to the door and let us in. I observed this square of wood was out of the casement, and when the light came nearer I observed the prisoner plainly, his body couching down a if to conceal himself, and not as has been observed living along the chairs. I caught hold of him by the right hand, the watchman pushed the door open, and we brought him out. I having seen the shoes so and the first thing I did was to look if he had any shoes, I found he had none. We took him to the watchhouse, and there he asked for his shoes; I asked him what kind of shoes they were; he said, I shall know them again, they have got nails in the heels. There was a little girl and another standing at the watchhouse, I told them where they were to be found, and they were brought. The next day I saw him put there on, they appeared to sit him. I staid in the watchhouse untill they brought in the implements they had found, and they were shewn to the prisoner.

JOHN ARMSTRONG . I attended at the office, Worship-street the next day when the prisoner was brought, on Tuesday the 22d, I was desired by the magistrate to go with Mr. Finch. This iron laid on the table. When the prisoner was examined it was brought by Mr. Finch, or some of the witnesses. There was one place in the flap of the cellar that corresponded with this iron.

Q. What do you call the iron - A. It is called a Sawyer's Dog. it is not what they call a crow. It may be used as a crow, and it appeared to have been used to one part of the cellar flap. When I went to Mr. Finch's, I saw this pannel laying in the bar, it appears to bear the impression of the broad part of this iron. This dark lanthorn and a bit of candle was produced to me at the office at the same time, and a few matches and a phosphorus bottle, which I have had ever since.

Prosecutor. I found this iron in my bar. This is the little bottle that I found in my tumbler glass, and these are the matches that I found in the cellar, they were afterwards taken to the office.

Q. Did you attend with Armstrong when the iron was tried to your bar and to your cellar flap - A. Yes.

Prisoner's Defence. I was very much in liquor, I had been drinking in the house in the night. I cannot say how I came there.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 20.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18111030-5

809. WILLIAM HIGGENS , alias FOWLER , was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Gillbank , about the hour of three at night, on the 24th of October , with intent the goods therein burglariously to steal .

JOHN GILLBANK . I keep the Pitt's Head the corner of Old-street and Goswell-street ; I rent the house, it is in the parish of St. Luke's.

Q. When was this - A. On last Friday morning, about half after three.

Q. What time had you and your family gone to bed A little before twelve; the house was quite clear then of company.

Q. Who was the last up - A.Myself.

Q. Were your doors and windows secured at that time - A. Yes.

Q. What sort of a door is there to your cellar - A. The outer door there is a flap that lifts up.

Q. Before this night when had you examined that flap - A. On the Monday previous. This was on the Friday. On the Monday before I had beer in; it was opened for that purpose.

Q. Did this flap used to be opened excepting for taking beer in - A. No otherwise taking beer in, and letting butts out.

Q. How was this cellar door secured within - A. Within it is secured by a perpendicular door that it rests upon; we were forced to have a square hole made in the bar, otherwise the hole would not be large enough to let a butt up, and the back of the cellar flap is secured by this perpendicular flap, and the perpendicular flap is secured by the window within the bar.

Q. Can you say whether on the Monday that the beer had been taken in that this flap was secured - A. I fastened it myself in the usual way, and had no occasion to use it afterwards. The other end of the flap next to the street is fastened by means of iron dogs that goes into the oak frame round the cellar.

Q. You had no occasion to examine your cellar from the Monday till the time this happened - A. No.

Q. Is this an old flap or a new one - A. The flap and framing are both new, they had not been made above a fortnight; it was very substantial and firm.

Q. Who were the persons that gave you the alarm on the Friday morning - A. Horn, the inspector of the watch, and Lockwood the watchman.

Q. Of course you came down upon receiving the alarm - A. The watchman having no rattle I sprang mine out of the window before I came down. Then I came down and let Horn and Lockwood into my house.

Q. Did you go with them into your cellar - A. Yes. There is a door in the house that goes down into the cellar, I looked at it, it was as I left it. When I went into the cellar with Horn and Lockwood; I saw a man standing between the cellar stairs and the cellar flap.

Q. Who was that man - A. The prisoner at the bar.

Q. Did you at that time perceive any thing else - A. I perceived a tinder box and candle, the watchman shewed it me.

Q. Did you see them pick it up - A. No, he shewed it me.

Q. Did you make any observation upon the cellar flap - A. Not until after the prisoner was taken to the watchhouse, that was three quarters of an hour afterwards. The watchman shewed me a file, the end of it was broken off; I looked to see if I could

see the end of the file sticking in the flap; the flap was wrenched up and one of the dogs off, and the other nearly so; I likewise found the end of the file, I have it in my hand now, it was sticking between the oak frame and the flap. The iron dog the watchman had previously found; Horn and myself tried the dog on where one was missing, it fitted the place exactly.

Q. Now when one dog was totally removed, and the other nearly so, was there large space enough for a person to get through there - A. When the dog was removed, and the flap only rested upon the curb, it might easily be removed.

Q. How far inside from the ground is your cellar door - A. Near nine feet.

Q. Did you see found any thing more in your cellar - A. When we returned I found a remainder part of the tinder box. We found part of a tinder box before.

Q. Where was it - A. Behind one of the butts.

Q. When you speak of a tinder box was there any tinder in it - A. Some small portion, flint, steel, and matches. At the watchhouse I saw two keys found on the prisoner, one a street door key, and the other a smaller one.

Q. Did you know the prisoner before - A. I think I have seen his face in my house.

Q. You mean in drinking in your house - A. Yes. or coming to the bar more properly.

Q. Then when the dog was wrenched off the flap would rest upon the curb it would not stand wide open - A. No, it would rest upon the curb; I asked the prisoner how he came there, he told me he fell through he was going to sleep there.

Q. But the flap was down when you found him - A. Yes, it laid even over.

Q. Then upon the alarm you did not examine the outside of the cellar flap - A. I did not examine it particularly, I saw it had been wrenched up.

Prisoner. When he asked me how I came there I told him I came by about half after three, finding the cellar flap open I went through to sleep there.

Prosecutor. He said he fell through, and that he was going to sleep there.

THOMAS HORN . I am inspector of the watch there. Early on the morning of the 25th I was standing in the watchhouse, about twenty yards from Mr. Gillbank's house.

Q. Was the watchhouse door open or shut - A. The top part of the hatch was a jarr. The watch-house is in Goswell-street, It was about half past three, I heard a noise as if somebody had slipped down, as if they had fallen down in the street, and the sound of wood of something, it appeared at Mr. Gillbank's house; upon nearing this I got up and pulled the hatch of the watchhouse open. I perceived two men standing at Mr. Gillbank's door; I thought by their standing there they were after some lead over the bar window; I opened the lower hatch and walked out; as soon as they perceived me the two men ran down Old street, both of them; I then walked towards Mr. Gillbank's door, and perceived a light under the cellar flap.

Q. The flap was down - A.Not quite close.

Q. From what aperture did you perceive the light - A.Through a small space in the front of the flap towards the street, I lifted up the flap a little higher and observed the hand of a person, and a lighted candle.

Q. You did not observe any thing more than the hand of the person - A. No.

Q.Whereabouts was the hand - A. Just under that past going into the bar. I could see nothing of him but the hand, and a piece of candle in the hand without a candlestick; upon perceiving this I immediately shut down the flap and found this file laying close at the front of the flap on the outside one, and appeared to have been broken. I immediately stood upon the flap to keep it down. I then alarmed Mr. Gillbank by hitting the handle of my cutlass against the boards at the window. I called watch; he was stationed about forty yards from there, that was Lockwood. He came, and the landlord came down, he opened the window first and asked what was the matter; I told; he came down, me and Lockwood went down into the cellar through the house passage.

Q. That cellar door was fastened was it not - A. Yes.

Q. When you went into the cellar was there any light there but what you brought with you - A.None. I had a candle, the watchman had nothing. I observed a man standing in the cellar, facing the cellar flap.

Q. Who was that man - A. The prisoner at the bar. We took him in custody; I told Lockwood to keep him secure while. I searched about the cellar to see if there was any more persons there; I looked round the cellar, there was nobody else there in the cellar. I found the top of this tinder box underneath the flap in the cellar, and this piece of candle; the candle was out, but the wick was warm; I found this iron dog on the ground, under the cellar flap. I found nothing else at that time, the prisoner was taken to the watchhouse, and in about three quarters of an hour we returned to the house; Mr. Gillbank and I went into the cellar together, we there found this tinder box, flint, steel, and matches. The top that I found before exactly corresponded with it. They were found in a corner under the cellar window, between a butt and the wall. Mr. Gillbank and I tried this dog to the place where it was wrenched off, it fitted the marks exactly. The other dog was nearly wrenched off.

Q. Did you hear any account the prisoner gave how he came there - A. When he was at the watchhouse he said he had fallen into the cellar, and was going to sleep there. I saw the officer take these two keys out of his pocket, one a large key, and the other a smaller one.

Q.Where did you pick up the tinder box - A. Mr. Gillbank and I were both together when we found them.

Q. Then from the observation that you made how did it appear to you that the cellar window had been opened - A. It appeared to me that it had been wrenched open.

Prisoner. There was no light in the cellar.

Witness. I perfectly saw the light from the outside, but when I went down there was no light; this piece of candle I picked up, she wick was warm.

JOSEPH LOCKWOOD . Q. Had you heard any

thing that night near Mr. Gillbank's house before you were called to it - A. No, I was about an hundred yards from that house when I heard the alarm, I was walking up and down the street; I heard the rattle, I went to the assistance, I found Thomas Horn , and the cellar window was a little open, I did not observe any light in the cellar, I had my lanthorn with me. I heard a voice say, open the flap that he might come out to us. I told him I would not let him come out. I would go down as soon as the door was opened, Mr. Gillbank came down and opened the street door.

Q. And then you went with Mr. Gillbank and Mr. Horn into the cellar - A. Yes. There was no light in the cellar but what I brought. I saw the prisoner at the bar standing there with his back to the wall, nearly opposite to the flap. I asked him how he came there, he told me he was going by there about half past two o'clock, and he tumbled into it, and having no lodging to go home to he pulled down the flap of the cellar, and meant to go to sleep there. I immediately took him in charge.

Q. Before you took him into the watchhouse did you see any thing picked up - A. Yes, the top of the tinder box, and I saw the dog picked up; when I came back I saw the candle picked up and the tinder box. Mr. Horn shewed me a file; I did not see it picked up.

Q. to Mr. Gillbank. You produced what you supposed to be the end of a file - A.Yes, here it is.

Q. Try it with that file - A. It fits exactly. I found the end of the file sticking between the flap and the curb. (The file and the end of the file handed to the jury.)

Prisoner's Defence. I was passing by about half past two in the morning, I thought it rather an unreasonable hour to go home; I saw the cellar flap of one side. I went down into the cellar and drew the flap over me; I fell asleep then; I kept there till about half past three I was alarmed by the watchman.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 20.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson .

Reference Number: t18111030-6

810. EDWARD FULLER , alias OSBORNE , was indicted for that he, on the 10th of September , about the hour of four at night, being in the dwelling-house of Margaret Dinness , a watch, value 2 l. a jacket, value 5 s. a pair of trowsers, value 5 s. two waistcoats, value 10 s. a pair of stockings, value 2 s. three handkerchiefs, value 3 s. a seven shilling piece, two shillings, and two one pound bank notes, the property of Godfrey Cook ; a watch, value 2 l. and a hat, value 5 s. the property of Johan Helet , burglariously did steal, and that he afterwards, about the same hour of the same night, burgariously did break to get out of the said dwelling house .

MARGARET DINNESS . I live at No. 1, Chigwell-hill, in the parish of St. George , I am a widow . The prisoner lodged in my house, and Godfrey Cook, and Johan Helet boarded and lodged in my house. They all three slept in one room.

Q. Do you recollect the time when Cook and Helet complained of having lost some of their property - A. That was the 11th of September, in the morning.

Q. On the 10th of September had these three men all lodged in your house - A. Yes, they all went to bed about ten o'clock in the same room.

Q. The next morning did you hear any body go out - A. Yes, about five o'clock I was awoke by the moving of the chairs.

Q. What reason have you to say it was about five o'clock - A. I heard St. George's bell ring a little time after, it rings a quarter before six. I suppose it was about five.

Q. Were your window shutters open or shut - A. They were all shut, I cannot say whether it was light or dark at that time; I heard a person coming down stairs, I called, whose there; the prisoner answered that he was going on board the vessel; he asked me if he should open the door and go out, or would I get up and let him out; I told him he might let himself out, upon that he opened the door and went out. I heard him unlock and unbolt the door; I bolted it myself after the lodgers had gone up to bed.

Q. Did his way to go out of the house lay through your room - A. Yes, the stairs come into my room. He went out, and I went to sleep again. He did not return. He had lodged with me about a month.

Prisoner. There was only a thin linen screen between the bed and the door, it was impossible for me to pass with a bundle at that time of the morning without being seen.

GODFRY COOK . Q. Did you lodge in the house of Mrs. Dinness - A. Yes. I lodged there seven weeks, the prisoner and Johan Helet lodged in the same room with me.

Q. Did you lose any thing any night when you lodged there - A. Yes, I lost a jacket and trowsers, two waistcoats, a pair of stockings, a black silk handkerchief, two pocket handkerchiefs, and two one pound bank notes, a dollar, and a three shilling piece, my notes and money were in my waistcoat pocket, the waistcoat hung on the bed side; my stockings and handkerchiefs were in the room, my watch hung on a pin that was gone; I gave two pound ten shillings for the watch, I only had it ten days. I had seen all these things when I went to bed at night. I got up the next morning at half after six, I missed my property, the prisoner was gone.

Prisoner. The waistcoat I bought of a hawker.

JOHAN HELET . Q. Did you lodge in the same room at Mrs. Dinness's with Godfrey Cook and the prisoner - A. Yes.

Q. Did you all three go to bed at the same time - A. All. I awoke the next morning about half after six when I awoke, I missed my watch and my hat, they were both on the table; I never saw any of my property again.

OBADIAH COOPER . I am shopman to Mr. Cordy, pawnbroker. On the 13th of September the prisoner pledged at our shop, a coat, waistcoat, and a shirt for eight shillings; only the waistcoat

has been sworn to. This is the waistcoat.

Cook. It is my waistcoat, I bought at Plymouth, I had it on three times.

CHARLOTTE BEST . Q. Are you acquainted with the prisoner - A. I knew him seven or eight years ago by a young woman that he used to cohabit with. About five weeks ago I pledged for him a black silk handkerchief for one shilling and sixpence, at Mr. Williamson's, Cable-street.

THOMAS WILLIAMSON . I am a pawnbroker in Cable-street. On the 12th of last September I took in pledge of the last witness a handkerchief, this is it.

Cook. This is my handkerchief.

ROBERT WILLAN. I am a police constable. I apprehended the prisoner on the 21st of January, I searched him and found several duplicates, and among which were the duplicates of that waistcoat and handkerchief.

Prisoner's Defence. I went from my lodgings some little time before six, at that time it was light. I asked the landlady could I let myself out. It was not possible for me to pass through the house with any bundle without her seeing of it. On the Thursday the captain came and mustered the ships company and there were four more than the ships crew, then we that entered last wore discharged; I was three days and a half on board, I had but little money to take. I did not go back to my landlady as she would look cool on me, having no money, and that was the reason of my not returning.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18111030-7

811. EDWARD FULLER , alias OSBORNE , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of September , a handkerchief, value 2 s. and a pair of stockings, value 3 s. the property of Margaret Dinness .

MARGARET DINNESS . I lost a chocolate coloured handkerchief with yellow spots, and a pair of cotton stockings, I missed them the day before he went away; I do not know the day that I had last seen them; the handkerchief used to be in my drawers, and the stockings laid on the drawers; I saw them afterwards at the pawnbrokers.

ROBERT WILLAN . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner, searched him, and found some duplicates upon him. These are the duplicates of the handkerchief and stockings.

OBADIAH COOPER . I am shopman to Mr. Cordey, pawnbroker, Ratcliffe Highway; I know the prisoner. On the 21st of August he pledged a pair of stockings for one shilling; 30th of August a handkerchief for two shillings; the duplicates the officer has produced are the duplicates that I gave the prisoner.

Prosecutor. The handkerchief I know to be mine, I hemmed It with a darker colour than the handkerchief, and I know the stockings by the mark.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought the handkerchiefs of one of the hawkers that travelled about the West India Docks.

GUILTY , aged 48.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18111030-8

812. JAMES HEWETT was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Warner Cobham , he and others of his family being therein, about the hour of eight in the forenoon of the 17th of September , and stealing therein, a pair of boots, value 10 s. and two hats, value 20 s. his property .

WARNER COBHAM . I live at 28, Duke street, Portland-place, in the parish of Mary-le-bone , I keep a hatters shop , the shop is part of my house. On the 17th of this month I went down stairs to breakfast about eight o'clock in the morning, I heard a noise in the shop about three or four minutes, upon hearing this noise I went up stairs, I missed the boots from off the work bench, and the hats from off the counter; I opened the door, it was only latched, I looked towards Foley-place, which is about four or five doors from the shop, I saw the prisoner, he was walking with the boots in his right hand, and the hats in his left hand. I ran after him and called stop thief; he immediately threw down the hat and boots, and ran. I took the hats and boots up and went home, another person pursued him, he was soon brought back.

Q. You had done nothing to your shop door to secure it, had you - A. I merely put it to; there is a patent latch underneath, sometimes it does not catch, that might be the case that morning. These are the boots I have on, this is the hat I wear myself, and this is the child's hat I fitted up the night before.

GEORGE SHUTLEY . About eight o'clock in the morning I was crossing over from Portland-place to Foley-place, I heard the cry of stop thief, I turned round and saw the prisoner, he was then running and Mr. Cobham after him, he had a pair of boots and two hats with him when he was running. I saw that. I saw him drop them, Mr. Cobham picked them up; I pursued him in Riding-house lane, he gained ground of me. I called out stop thief, Mr. Clowes stopped him.

RICHARD CLOWES . I was standing at the corner of Riding-house-lane, I heard the cry of stop thief, I saw the prisoner running up the lane; I waited for his coming, he had no other way except turning

Q. Had he any thing with him at that time - A. No. I stopped him when he came up, he said, I am no thief; I said, if you are no thief you have no occasion to be in a hurry. I afterwards conducted him to Mr. Cobham's.

Prisoner's Defence. As I was going along the street there rushed a young man by me, he dropped two hats and a pair of boots, I asked him if he knew he had dropped any thing, he made no answer, but kept running. I never picked the hats up, they did not belong to me; I was going along, I only looked at them; somebody cried out stop thief, the man stopped me at the corner of the street, I said, what do you stop me for; he said, what did you run for.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY, aged 16.

of stealing, but not breaking and entering the dwelling house .

Confined six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18111030-9

812. MARY BRIAN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 26th of October , ten yards of Printed Cotton, value 10 s. the property of John White and John M'Pherson .

ROBERT HILL . I live with John White and John M'Pherson, they are linen drapers No. 7, Middle Row Holborn . On last Monday morning the prisoner came to look at some goods.

Q. Who was serving in the shop. - A. Myself and a young man of the name of Crease, we were in the shop. He is not here. The prisoner looked some prints, muslins, and other articles out, she did not pay for them, said she would call again for the parcel, we thought it better to send the parcel with her, I took the parcel home with her.

Q. Did she tell you where she lived. - A. No, I followed her as far as Newgate Street, I asked her how much farther she was going, she told me if I would wait there ten minutes she would return, I told her I would not leave her, I wished her to go back again, she consented, returned back a little way, she went in a court and sat on the ground and said she would go no further, I hired a Hackney Coach and as I was taking her up she dropped a piece of print.

Q. Did you see the print drop. - A. Yes, as she arose it dropped from under her, I took it up, I then secured her. This is the print that dropped from her, it is a different sort to what she had bought, I had the goods that she bought.

JOHN WHITE . I am a linen draper in Middle Row, John M'Pherson is my partner. I can swear it is my property, it has my private mark upon it.

Prisoner's Defence. I come from Ireland to find my Uncle, I could not make him out. My husband belongs to the 17th segiment of foot, I was going to him.

of stealing but not privately

GUILTY, aged 18,

Confined six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blance.

Reference Number: t18111030-10

813. GEORGE LLOYD was indicted for that he on the 22d of November , was a clerk to John Edington since deceased, James Yerraway , and Edington Fulcher , and was employed and entrusted to receive money for them, and being such servant and so employed, did receive and take into his possession the sum of 17 l. 7 s. 3 d. and that he afterwards did embezzle, secrete, and steal the same .

WILLIAM BURFORD . I am a boot and shoe maker, I live in Blackman Street in the Borough.

Q.Do you know the prisoner. - A. I know him as the servant of Messrs. Edington and Company. On the 22d of November he came to me for Seventeen Pounds, Seven Shillings, and Threepence, for a room of coals I had of Edington and Company, I paid him the money and he gave me this receipt.

JAMES YERRAWAY . Q. Who was your partners in November last. - A. John Edington , and Edington Fulcher. John Edington died last March.

Q. Was Mr. Burford a customer of yours. - A. He was.

Q. Did you receive any sum of money of the prisoner as paid by Mr. Burford for coals that you had furnished Mr. Burford with. - A. I did not.

Q. He was employed and entrusted to receive money for you. - A. He was, he was clerk and book-keeper, he came in April 1806.

Q. Did he keep any book in which it was his duty to enter the sums that he received of his customers and in which he was to account to you. - A. There was a book in which he was to enter the sums that he received; I have the book here, I have looked through the whole of the book, there is no such sum entered. On the 19th of July I charged him with having received sixty-one pounds, ten shillings, and sixpence, which he had not accompted for, he said he would accompt to me the next day following.

Court. What became of him afterwards. - A. I believe he went away the day afterwards, on the Saturday he came about eleven o'clock and went away, I never saw him afterwards until the day I apprehended him.

Mr. Gurney. Independant of your book I want to know whether you have any recollection of it. - A. I can say from my own recollection he has never paid me any money on that accompt, my other partner is here.

EDINGTON FULCHER. I am partner with Mr. Yerraway.

Q. Did the prisoner ever accompt to you for this seventeen pounds, seven shillings, and threepence. - A. Never, I have looked the book over carefully, there is no entery.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel, and called ten witnesses who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged, 40.

Transported for seven years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18111030-11

814. HARRIET STEEDMAN and MARY BARNES were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 25th of September , from the person of Noah Perfett , a purse value 1 s. five guineas, a five pound bank note, and four one pound bank notes his property .

NOAH PERFETT . On the 26th of September, between three and four o'clock in the morning, I was in Fleet Street on my return home to the Spread Eagle in Gracechurch Street, I was accosted by the two prisoners, mostly by Steadman, they asked me if I would give them something to drink, I told them I had no change, Steadman said look Sir, I dare say you have and attempted to attack my pocket, they walked on. the followed me shortly after, Barnes left the other, I walked on to St. Paul's Church Yard , I there made a stop and told Steadman that she was only losing her time, I should not have any thing to do with her. While talking I considered I felt her hand in my pocket, I put my hand down, she took her hand away, at this time Mary Barnes passed again, I then said to Steadman you have picked my pocket, she handled me in some way so as to pick my pocket, I caught her by the arm and put my hand in my pocket and found my purse was

called the watchman, he came, I requested he would light about where she stood, to see if she had dropped it, he did so, but nothing was found. He took hold of one of her, hands and I the other, we led her to the watch-house, he searched her but found nothing on her. I was asked if another woman had not passed or been with her, I said there was, the watchman desired me to wait a bit, he would go in search, he expected she would be waiting about the door. The watchman went out, he shortly after returned with the prisoner Barnes, who immediately recognised to be the same person that was in company with the prisoner Steadman, the watchman searched her, found two guineas and a one pound note which she had dropped, I told the watchman I had lost nine pounds in bank notes and five guineas, the watchman went and searched the place where he had taken this woman and brought back a purse with eight pound and three guineas in it which I knew to be my property.

Q. Are you sure that Barnes is the woman who was in company with Steadman. - A. I am positive. It must be Steadman that took it out of my pocket.

CHARLES DONNOVAN . I am a watchman of St. Paul's, in the morning of the 26th of September about five minutes before four o'clock I observed the prosecutor passing and a young woman with him, they walked quietly together, I took particular notice of him he had a whip in his hand, I thought him to be a country gentleman, after he passed me I saw a woman passing by, I asked her whether the gentleman and woman belonged to her, she said no.

Q. Is that the woman. - A. I cannot directly swear to her face, I went into the watch-house and turned out the relief and proceeded on my walk At the chapter house I met the prosecutor and Steadman together, he had hold of her left wrist, he said this woman has robbed me, watchman shew me a light, I looked round for his property, there was none to be found there. I asked him if he had seen another woman in company with her, he said yes, I took the prisoner Steadman to the watch-house, I did not see her searched, I described the other woman by her dress as near as I could, the patrol went out and brought Barnes in.

JOHN FITZGERALD . Donnovan and Mr. Perfett brought Steadman in the watch-house, I searched her, nothing was found on her, he said another woman was in company with her, I asked the description of the woman and sent one of the watchmen and the patrol to find the woman. Trusty brought Barnes in, when he brought her to a little passage by the watch-house she made a stand, he holloaed out to me, I went and laid hold of her by the wrist and he by the other hand, I then said you must either deliver up the property or be searched, in taking her coat off out dropped two guineas and a one pound note, that is all she had about her.

EDWARD TRUSTY . I am a patrol, I was at the watch-house and had a description of the other woman, I went out and took hold of Barnes, she answered the description, I brought her to the watch-house.

Q. Where did you find her - A. At the corner of St. Paul's Church Yard, of the Tobits side, I took hold of her she said I had no business with her, I got her to the watch-house passage, there she made a stop, I called out to my partner, he came, and then she came easy. We searched her, there were two guineas and a one pound note dropped from her person, I took a candle and lanthorn and went over the ground where I had taken her, when I came to the corner of the passage where the struggle was, I there found this purse containing eight pounds in notes and three guineas. The gentleman wanted the purse and the money, I said no, you must not think of that before we go before the Alderman, the money that I found in it the Alderman gave to the gentleman, and gave me the purse. This is the purse.

Prosecutor. I am positive it is my purse, I lost nine bank notes and five guineas, the whole that was found made it the complete sum.

Steadman's defence. I am innocent of the charge the gentleman accuses me with. I never knew any thing of it.

Barnes said nothing in her defence.

STEADMAN, GUILTY , aged 31.

BARNES, GUILTY , aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before, Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18111030-12

815. JOSEPH PITT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of October , a gold watch-chain, value 1 l. 10 s. three seals set in gold, value 3 l. and a gold watch-key, value 6 s. the property of John William Prior , from his person .

JOHN WILLIAM PRIOR . I am a silversmith , I live at Newington Causeway. On the night of the 7th of October, about the hour of eleven, I had just entered Gracechurch Street on my return home from London Wall, I met the prisoner, he snatched at my watch-chain and seals, I was coming from Bishopgate Street, he was coming as from the bridge, we met together, the chain of the watch broke, the prisoner ran away with it, I followed and took him, just before I laid hold of him he threw the seals down into the road about half a yard from him. I held him until the watchman came.

Q. Did you see him throw them away. - A. I heard them go down, there was no one by at the time. I never lost sight of him. I told the watchman that he had robbed me, and that he had thrown the seals down just as I laid hold of him, and if he would look with his light he would find them within a couple of yards, where he was standing.

Mr. Gurney. You stated at the Mansion-house what you have omitted to-night, you there said you were met by three persons that were running. - A. They were walking. I met three persons, the prisoner came first, the two others were close behind him.

Q. I take it for granted that you had no opportunity of observing the face of any person when your watch-chain was snatched away. - A. No.

Q. At the time that the person snatched your seals away what became of the other men. - A. I left them behind. They came up when I had hold of the prisoner, they kept walking behind me.

Q. Had not you other persons taken up on suspicion. - A. I had one person taking up on suspicion.

Q. Had not you two men taking to the watch-house. - A. Yes, the other two.

Q. Did not you charge three men with robbing you. - A. I told the watchman this man robbed me, I told

him there were three men in company.

Court. You have told the story here now as if there was only one man. How came you not to mention to us about three men - A.At they were acquitted, I did not think it necessary. The prisoner was a short man, the other was tall with large whiskers. There was no pushing at all.

JOSEPH GREEN . I am a watchman of Cornhill ward. About eleven o'clock I was calling the hour, the prosecutor called to me to take charge of the prisoner, I took hold of him, he said he had been robbed by this person, he said

"give me a light, my seals are thrown down just here." he said he heard them fall. I found them in the road, I gave them into the young man's hand, and he gave them to the constable. At the watch house he said there were two more concerned, he thought they wanted to rescue the prisoner from him, I asked him if he should know the two men that wanted to rescue him, he said he should know them, they came up to the watch-house door, I fetched them in, he swore to one, we had him before the Lord Mayor, he could not swear to the other, he accused him of attempting to rescue the prisoner from him, he said he shoved against him.

Mr. Alley. This is a curious story altogether, watchman, have not you heard him a while ago swear that neither of the men offered any violence to him. - A. That is what he told me at the time.

Q. He told you different at the watch-house. - A. He did so.

Q. When the prisoner was searched, did not you find some of the work that belonged to Messrs Rundle and bridge. - A. There was some work found upon him.

WILLIAM WOOD . I am the officer that took the charge. The prisoner was charged by the prosecutor of robbing him of the chain and seals, the other man was charged with being an imaginary accomplice, he was detained, and discharged the next day by the Lord Mayor. This is the watch-chain.

Prosecutor. That is my property.

Prisoner's Defence. My Lord and gentlemen of the jury, with all deference to you, I unfortunately had been into the Borough on business, I was returning home through Gracechurch Street, some man run against me and shoved me against the prosecutor, having property about me, and fearful of danger, I walked faster than otherwise I should. this man accused me of taking his chain and seals, which I knew nothing of till the constable asked me my name and put it down in the book. Mr. Prior swore positively to me, the watchman went out and took two others. I know nothing of the parties, nor they of me, one of them was detained, and discharged by the Lord Mayor; Mr. Prior, through malice, or I cannot say for what swore to me. I was a peaceable subject of his Majesty passing at the time.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18111030-13

816. JOHN BRACE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of August , a shirt, value 5 s. the property of John Starling .

MARY STARLING . I am the wife of John Starling, I live at Enfield Highway .

Q.Among other persons do you wash for Mr. John Reynolds. - A. Yes. On the 28th of August I put out my linen that I had washed to dry in my garden. After some time I went to look after the property, I found four shirts were gone, one of which was Mr. Reynold's. On the next day I went to Mr. King's the pawnbroker, I there found the shirt.

JAMES KING . I am a pawnbroker, Fore Street, Edmonton. On the 28th of August, between three and four in the afternoon the prisoner offered me a shirt, he asked me to lend him five shillings on it, I took the shirt in my hand and asked him the marks, he said I. B. I looked at it and found it was I. R. I then said, " you villain, you have stolen this shirt off some line," it was damp. I went to the door to call Mr. Steele to charge a constable with him, during which time he was gone, I was not half a minute, I am certain he is the man. The next day Mrs. Starling came and claimed the shirt.

Q. How far is that from Enfield Highway. - A. About four miles to my house. I gave a description of the prisoner.

JOHN FITKIN . I am a constable, I apprehended the prisoner on the 3d of September, at Enfield Highway, I had a search warrant, I took him to Enfield watch-house, about two mile from his own house he broke away from me, I apprehended him again on the 16th of October.

Q. Had you made search after him. - A. I had been twice to his house, and I went to Waltham Abbey after him.

MR. REYNOLDS. It is my shirt, it is marked I. R.

Prisoner's Defence. This shirt I pick'd up in a field, I offered it to that gentleman to pledge.

GUILTY , aged 37,

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18111030-14

817. JOHN STEPTOE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of September , two yards and a half of cotton, value 4 s. four handkerchiefs, value 8 s. four yards of flannel, value 12 s. a shawl, value 3 s. a dress, value 6 s. two yards of muslin, value 7 s. 6 d. the property of Joseph Craig , in his dwelling house .

EDMUND PIKE . I am shopman to Joseph Craig , linen draper in Holborn .

Q. On the 25th and 26th of September was the prisoner employed at that house as a carpenter . - A. He was.

Q. After he had left the work was there any property missed. - A. Yes, we applied to Read the constable, and I accompanied Read when he went to search the prisoner's house. I saw all the property found.

WILLIAM READ . I am a police officer. I, in company with the last witness, went to the prisoner's house and found these things, he keeps an oyster shop facing Gray's Inn Lane. Some of the property was found in a cock-loft, and some down below. They were all found in his house.

PIKE. This is a piece of Irish, about four yards and a half, we missed a piece bearing the same number, number eleven, this shawl was missed, and this is a

piece of printed cotton. I believe they are all my master's.

JOHN CRESWOOD. I bought this piece of print of Mr. Craig, I returned it because there was some damage upon it.

Prisoner's Defence. These things were bought at different times, and at different places in this metropolis.

GUILTY , aged 37.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18111030-15

818. MARY BUCKLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of October , in the dwelling house of David Fitzgerald , ten dollars, thirteen shillings, and a one-pound bank note , his property.

HANNAH FITZGERALD. My husband's name is David Fitzgerald, we live at No. 9, Buckridge street, St. Giles , I occupy a back room on the ground floor, the landlord does not live in the house, the whole house is let out to different lodgers, my husband when he is at home he lives in the same room with me, he was not in town when this happened.

Q. Did any other person live in the same room with you. - A. None at all except a young child. I took the prisoner in for her victuals and drink, and a shilling a week to take care of my young child, I go out with a barrow, she came to me at ten o'clock in the morning, on Saturday the 12th of this month, and staid till four in the afternoon, she then returned the child and key to me.

Q. What time did you leave your lodgings that day. - A. At one o'clock I took the prisoner with me where I pitched my barrow, because she should know where to bring the child to me in the afternoon to give her the breast, when I had pitched my barrow she went away and took my child with her and the key of the room, she returned to me in the afternoon with the child, and delivered me the key, when I looked about she was gone, I returned home at half after eight in the evening, keeping my child all that time, when I returned I found my room door locked, I unlocked it with the key and went in.

Q. Had you left any money in your room at the time you went out. - A. Yes, I left ten dollars, a one pound note, a half crown piece, and thirteen shillings.

Q. Where was this money of yours put. - A. In a locker in my box, I had seen it safe in my box a little before eight o'clock, I left the box under the bed, when I returned the box was near the fire, not where I had left it, the lock of the box was broken, and all my money and note was gone. Between nine and ten the same night I saw the prisoner in a cellar in Bembridge Street, I gave her in charge of the watchman, she was taken to the watchhouse, in the watchhouse she owned to the money.

Q. Was it first said to her that it would be better for her to tell. - A. Yes, it was.

Q. Then you must not say what she said, there was none of the money found upon her. - A. No.

Prisoner's Defence. There was another person lived in the same room with Mrs. Fitzgerald.

PROSECUTRIX. There was not.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18111030-16

819 THOMAS LONG was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of October , thirty-three yards of flannel, value 50 s. the property of Elizabeth Webb , spinster , in her dwelling-house .

THOMAS PAINE. I live next door to Elizabeth Webb, her house is in Cleveland Street, Fitzroy square, I am a butcher, on the 10th of October I was standing at my door, minding my business, I observed the prisoner go into Mrs. Webb's shop.

Q. Are you sure it is the prisoner. - A. Yes, it was between eleven and twelve, I saw him go in and from the appearance of him, and coming out again with two rolls of flannel in half a minute, I suspected him, he carried them in his arms before him, I immediately went into the shop, there was nobody in the shop, the door between the shop and parlour was shut, and a thin silk blind up at the door window, I went into the parlour, there was a young woman there, the young woman came out of the shop, and said somebody has stolen two rolls of flannel, I ran directly after the man, he had got about five or six doors, I laid hold of his collar, and brought him back with the flannel in his arms into the shop, when I took the prisoner I said, young man you must bring this back, he said nothing, and when I brought him in the shop, I said lay the flannel down, he laid it down, Mrs. Webb said you villain I suppose you are the same fellow that stole the callico off the same shelf about a fortnight ago, he said he did not.

Q. Was the young woman in the shop when you brought him back. - A. There were two women sculking about, I brought them in, I asked the prisoner if he was married, he said no, he knew nothing of the women, I let them go, I took the prisoner and the flannel to Marybone watchhouse.

ELIZABETH WEBB. I am a single woman, I keep a haberdasher's shop in Cleveland Street.

Q. You knew nothing of this business until the last witness into the shop. - A. No, I was called down by a young person that I left below to mind the shop, I had not left the shop five minutes, I saw Mr. Paine bring the prisoner in at the door, I came into the shop.

Q. You did not know the prisoner at all I suppose. - A. No.

Q. Had the prisoner any thing with him in his hands. - A. Two rolls of flannel, the flannels were laid on the counter. I was so flurried I could say nothing, I left it all to Mr. Paine.

Q. Did you see the flannel in your shop a short time before. - A. Yes, I was the last person in the shop, it laid on a shelf where I always kept it.

WILLIAM ROWE Mr . Paine delivered the flannel to me at the time, he brought the prisoner to the watch-house, I have had it ever since,

Prosecutrix. This flannel is my property, it has my private mark on it, there is fifteen yards one and eighteen yards of the other, the cheapest cost me one shilling and nine pence a yard, and the other two shillings, I am sure it is mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I was rather in liquor, I know nothing at all of it.

GUILTY , DEATH , aged 40.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18111030-17

820. JAMES MEAD was indicted for feloniously

stealing, on the 9th of October , seventeen yards of carpet, value 5 l. the property of Richard Middlemore Weight , in his dwelling-house .

RICHARD MIDDLEMORE WEIGHT . I live at 53, Little Charlotte Street, Fitzroy Square, in the parish of St. Pancras . I have no partner.

Q. Is your shop where your goods are sold part of your dwelling-house. - A. Yes.

Q. Where you in the shop when this happened. - A. No, I was in the attic story of the house, I heard a cry of stop thief, it was nigh eight o'clock in the morning, on the 9th of October, I looked out of the window and saw several people running across the street about a stones throw from my door. I heard the words he has dropped the carpet.

Q. You did not see him drop the carpet yourself. - A. No, I did not, suspecting it might be from my shop I immediately went down stairs, and found the prisoner there surrounded by several people, he was brought into the shop, the prisoner said he hoped I would be merciful, he had done it through distress, that was before I spoke to him, the carpet was brought back and was in the shop then, I took the prisoner to the watch-house.

Prisoner. I never begged pardon and hoped the gentleman would forgive me. I said I was innocent.

Prosecutor. I am certain of the words.

MARY WASCOUGH . I work for Mr. Weight. On the morning the carpet was stolen I was sitting upon the sofa in the middle of the shop at work, it was about a quarter after eight in the morning, I did not see the prisoner walk in and take the carpet, but I saw him going out, he had a carpet with him, I had seen that carpet before in the window that morning; upon seeing this I got up and went after him, there was nobody else in the shop besides myself, I saw the carpet upon his left shoulder, he had just then got off the steps, I cried out stop thief, and the third door from the shop he threw the carpet down, when he threw the carpet down he attempted to run away, and in two or three minutes he was brought back again.

Q. You did not see the prison stop him then. - A. No.

Q. Then you had lost sight of him before he was brought back. - A. Yes, because I stooped down and picked the carpet up, he was brought back in about two minutes I think.

Q. Upon having lost sight of him a short time, can you undertake to swear that the person brought back was the same man that you had seen drop the carpet, and that you had seen take the carpet out of the shop. - A. Yes I can, and that man was the prisoner.

Q. You picked up the carpet, what did you do with it. - A. I carried it back in the shop.

Q. Was Mr. Weight in the shop then, - A. No, not that moment, he came immediately almost. I heard the prisoner say he did it through sickness and distress.

Prisoner. When I was at Marlborough Street Office the gentlewoman could not swear to my person at all, she said she only knew my back.

Witness. I told the magistrate I was sure of his person.

JOHN BAKER . I am watch-house keeper of St. Pancras, the prisoner was brought to me about a quarter after eight o'clock, on the 9th of October, Mr. Weight gave charge of him for stealing a carpet. I have had the carpet ever since.

Prosecutor. The carpet is mine, it is Brussels carpet, it has the manufacturers mark on it, it is the same quantity and quality.

Q. How long had it been yours. - A. Three months, it stood in the window, it is seventeen yards three quarters, it cost me more than five pounds.

Q. You have none of the persons here that stopped him. - A. No. He was stopped by several of the neighbours that surrounded him.

Prisoner's Defence. That morning I was looking for work. I heard the cry of stop thief, I ran round the corner, as I was running a man stopped me, he said I must go back with him, I had stolen some carpet, I said I was innocent. I went back without making any resistance. I know no more of it than you do.

The prisoner called three witnesses who gave him a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 23.

The prisoner was recommended to his Majesty's mercy by the jury, on account of his good character.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson .

Reference Number: t18111030-18

821. RICHARD PAYNE and JOHN MALONEY were indicted for feloniously making an assault in the King's highway, on the 7th of October , upon William Ducketts , putting him in fear and taking from person and against his will, a pocket book value 6 d. a ten pound bank note, a five pound bank note, and three one pound bank notes his property.

WILLIAM DUCKETTS . I am a spring-blind maker , I live at 67, Well Street, Oxford Street.

Q. On the night of the 7th of October, were you going through St. Giles's . - A. Yes, about twelve o'clock at night, I was in my way home, I went into a public house on the right hand side, I had a pipe of tobacco and six pennyworth of rum-and-water, there were several people in the public house. When I asked for something to drink an old man said they did not draw any beer, I then ordered some rum-and-water. The old man asked me if I could help him to any work, I said no, when I was coming out I gave him a glass of gin. Payne came in and began to quarrel with the old man, I said take this glass of gin, and not have any words with the old man.

Q. Did you see any thing of the other prisoner at that time. - A. No.

Q. How long did you stay in this public house. - A. About a quarter of an hour, I only drank six pennyworth of rum-and-water there.

Q. When you left that public house, where did you go to. - A. I went into the public house opposite, I went out and did not like to go into that house again, I went into the house opposite, I found the two prisoners there, they were there before I went in, and there we had in the whole two glasses for each person, I had two as well as the rest.

Q. How long might you be in company with the two prisoners there. - A. I might be half an hour.

Q. After you left the second public house where did you go then. - A. I went over to the cooks shop, and the prisoners went in with me. I had not been in the cooks shop many minutes before the officers of Bow Street came, there might be six or seven of them, I sat

opposite them in the shop, the master of them said to me who are you, I said I am a tradesman, I live in Well Street, he said come out, I went into the middle of the shop, he said I shall search you, the prisoners were there at the time, I said you may search me and welcome, I have nothing but what is my own property, he began searching me, the two prisoners were there and a few other persons, they saw the officer take my property out, he took out my pocket-book and my handkerchief, he opened the pocket-book, in a little book that was in my pocket-book there were the notes, a ten pound note, a five pound note, and three ones. Then he looked into the remaining part of the pocket-book, he found what I told him was true, he told me to fold the pocketbook up in his presence, and advised me to go home, I put my book in my inside pocket, the prisoners saw the whole of this.

Q. Did either of them do any thing while you were being searched. - A. Payne pulled a pocket knife out while I was searched, as I was in the cook-shop, Salmon said d - n you if you let me have any nonsense I will take you to the watch-house, he put the knife in his pocket. I went out for the purpose of going home, I had not gone many yards from the house that I came out of, the prisoners came along with me out of the house, I crossed over, it might be twenty, thirty, or forty yards, I cannot justly say, they came and laid hold of me.

COURT. Did you see them. - A. I saw them right and left over me, they were not in the front, they laid hold of me and tried to get into my pocket by force, they laid hold of my shoulders and arms, then Payne forced his hand into my pocket, and cried out a book, a book, he got his hand into my side pocket.

Q. Where were your hands and arms all this time. - A. Confined.

Q. Who held you in that manner. - A. Both of them for the moment it was.

Mr. Walford. How long were they about this. - A. Not above two or three minutes.

Q. Did they get the book out. - A. Yes, his hand went along in my pocket, the book was rather large, he could not get it out. I eased it, he pulled and said, book, book, and out it came. They ran one way, and I the other, I ran to the first watchman I came to.

Q.What did you run away from them for. - A. Because they should not injure me. The prisoners were not apprehended till the next day.

Q. You told me that among the notes there was a ten pound note, who gave it you. - A. My wife brought it me, she brought it in change of a check at a bankers.

Q. When did you see that note again. - A. I saw a ten pound note again at the office, I could not swear to it again.

MR. ARABIN. It seems you are a married man. - A. I am.

Q. This was twelve o'clock at night in St. Giles's. - A. Yes

Q. Where had you been before twelve. - A. I had been down into Fleet Street, an upholster failed he owed me nine pounds, he called his creditors together. I went there about eight in the evening, and was detained there about two hours, I left about ten, I had

Q. Did not you drink while you were at the meeting of the creditors. - A. I drank two glasses of wine, nothing else.

Q. Did not you turn into any gin shop. - A. I did not. I was not disposed for any thing of the kind.

Q. But when you got to St. Giles's you were. - A. No, I drank no more than would do me good. I went into the second public house up the street.

Q. There you met the old man. - A. I did, I gave the old man some rum-and-water and some gin, I never saw him before.

Q. Then you say Payne came in and some conversation passed between Payne and the old man. - A. Yes.

Q. Then you went over the way, you saw the prisoners there. - A. I did.

Q. Did you know them before. - A. No, never before. I paid for two half pints of gin, and drank a glass of each.

Q. Are you always sensible when you are so generous. - A. If a person wanted a glass of liquor if I saw them at any time I would give it.

Q. Did you then go home. - A. I went to the cook-shop.

Q. And there the officers came in. - A. Yes, they searched me and this money was produced.

Q. He advised you to go home, and these men came and used you in this way. - A. Yes, I am positive of it, so help me God.

Q. You were perfectly sober. - A. Perfectly sober.

Q. Perhaps you knew of a reward. - A. No, God forgive me.

Q. Do you swear that you do not know there is a forty pound reward. - A. I have heard of such things formerly, I never knew it for certainty.

Q. I ask you upon your solemn oath, whether you did not believe before you gave your evidence here. If these two men are convicted, that there is a 40 l. reward for each of them. - A. So help me God I never knew such a thing in the world. God forbid that ever I should expect such a thing in my life, I have heard before that there was a 40 l. reward for a highwayman, but not of this kind.

WILLIAM SALMON . I am a police officer. On the night of the 7th of October, about half past twelve, I in company of four others went into a cooks-shop, in St. Giles, I saw the two prisoners there and the prosecutor, soon after I went in the prisoner Paine got up, he asked me if I knew the man that was standing up, that was meaning the prosecutor, I said no I did not know him; he said he is a returned lad, lately bolted from the bulks, meaning a returned transport, the prisoner Paine said he had got a pocket book and some notes in it, I recollected there were about thirty-seven that broke away from the hulks about four days before, in consequence of what Paine said to me I went to the prosecutor; I asked him who he was, he said he was a tradesman and lived in Well Street, Oxford Street, I asked him what he had got about him, he said nothing but his own, I told him I wished to be satisfied, he said I was welcome, he offered to shew me, I searched him in the presence of the prisoners.

Q. Were they both looking on. - A. They had every opportunity of so doing if they pleased, I found a ten-

took. While I was searching Paine made some observation, I did not take much notice, the prosecutor has stated right, I said if he was not quite I would take him to the watchhouse, I looked at some papers and read them over, and put a few questions to the prosecutor, and from the answers that he made I concluded that Paine's statement was not correct. I knew Paine, after this desired the prosecutor to put the notes in his pocket book again, and put the book in his pocket, I advised him to go home, or else he would be sure of being robbed, he then wished me good night and went out, there were two patrols of my party in the cook's-shop and two at the door, when the prosecutor went out the prisoners were certainly in the room, there was vacancy in the room, they might have gone out while was speaking to the landlord of the house for keeping his house open so late, and harbouring such company. cannot say whether the two prisoners were there then I went out, they might have passed me.

THOMAS ROACH . I keep a public house in George street, I know the two prisoners at the bar, they came a Tuesday morning about half past eight, and changed a ten pound note he same day they were taken by that was the morning they came to my house, - Paine asked me to change a ten pound note, they had four or five shillings worth of rum and milk, I said to Paine, Dick, have you been selling out? because his mother had left him some property lately, yes, he said, he had, I sent the note out to the pork butcher to be anged, I put Paine's name upon the back of the note before I sent it out, when I got the change I gave it to Paine. I got the note the same day from the pork butcher.

Court. Q.(to Salmon) At the time that you found the Prosecutor and the prisoners at this cook's-shop did the prosecutor appear to be intoxicated. - A. No, he did not.

JOHN VYSE . I am the landlord of the prosecutor's house.

Q. Do you remember receiving any money from Duckett. - A. Yes I received a 20 l. check drawn by Mr. Barnett, payable at Messrs. Marsh, Sibil, and company, in Barlow Street, I gave it to Mrs. Duckett, she went out with the check in my presence, and ought in two ten-pound notes, she gave it to her husband in my presence, this was on the 3rd of September.

ANN DUCKETT . Q. You are the wife of the prosecutor. - A. I am, I received a check of Mr. Vyse, took the check to No. 6, Barlow Street, and received two ten-pound notes, I came home and gave them my husband, he put them into his pocket book, and at his pocket book into his side pocket.

WILLIAM TYSON . I am clerk to Messrs. Marsh Sabil and Company.

Q. Look at the 3d of September in your book, do you find any entery there of a twenty pound check. - A. Yes, James Barnet , twenty pound, that check was id in two ten pound notes, one 8639, 22d July, the her 7367 5th, August.

MR. SHELTON. The note in question produced by coach is 7367, dated the 5th of August.

Court. Q.(to Tyson). Look at that note and see whether you can say any thing respecting of it. - A.It came into our house on the 31st of August I have doubt that note has been in the possession of our banking house.

Q.Whatever the date of the year is it is not in your book. - A. It is not.

THOMAS BELLAMY . I am beadle of St. Giles's in the fields. I apprehended Payne on the 6th of October in the afternoon, on his person I found three one pound notes, three dollars, and two shillings. After I had taken Payne I went and took Maloney.

Payne's Defence. The prisoner Maloney is as innocent as a child unborn, he was not with me when the robbery was committed, he was with me in the cook-shop, but he was not with me when I went out of the house and the robbery was done.

Maloney's Defence. I am innocent of the crime.

PAYNE GUILTY - DEATH , aged 28,

MALONEY GUILTY - DEATH , aged 22.

The prosecutor recommended the prisoners to his Majesty's mercy, on account of Payne's relation being respectable honest people.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18111030-19

822. MARY SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of October , nineteen handkerchiefs, value 6 l. the property of John Harris , privately in his shop .

JAMES AMIES I am shopman to John Harris, No 1 Pickett Street, Temple Bar, St. Clements . On the 7th of October the prisoner Mary Smith came in the shop about eleven o'clock in the morning she asked to look at some silk handkerchiefs, I shewed her some, she bought one at eight shillings and paid for it.

Q. Did any body come in with her. - A A child that she brought with her At the time that she was in the shop, from her manner, I suspected her than she had stolen something. In shewing her various patterns I missed a piece of handkerchiefs, the next witness David Harris stopped her as she was going out of the shop, I then saw the piece of handkerchiefs drop from her petticoats, containing nineteen handkerchiefs, I then sent for a constable.

DAVID HARRIS. I am the brother of John Harris, I serve in the shop.

Q. Has your brother any partner. - A. No. On the morning that the last witness has mentioned, I observed the prisoner shuffling something on the counter, I could not tell what it was. When she was going to pay for what she had bought she dropped a dollar or some silver, she was going to pick the silver up, she stooped down and put something under her petticoats. In her way to the door I laid hold of her, she stood some time, and from under her petticoats the silk handkerchiefs dropped, I picked them up and kept them till the constable came.

WILLIAM WESTWOOD . I am the constable sent for, I took the prisoner into custody and had the handkerchiefs delivered to me by the last witness.

AMIES. They are nineteen handkerchiefs, they are Mr. Harris's property, they have our private marks upon them, they cost Mr. Harris five pound ten shillings and six pence.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence, nor called any witnesses to her character.

GUILTY, aged 45,

of stealing, but not privately .

Transported for Seven Years .

Reference Number: t18111030-20

823 JOHN WOODHOUSE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of October , fifty pounds weight of beef, value 20 s. the property of James William Jeffery .

WILLIAM JEFFERY. I am a butcher , I live in Spitalfields. On the 9th of October, a quarter past five in the morning, I was going along with my cart up Camomile Street , and in turning round the corner I had some lots of beef in the tray at the top of my cart, when I was four doors round the corner, I missed a buttock and an aitch bone of beef, I stopped my horse and cart, I saw the prisoner with the aitch bone and buttock on his shoulder, when I stepped up close to him he threw it down, I pursued him and brought him back to the beef, and with assistance it was picked up, I took him to the watchhouse.

THOMAS SAPWELL . I am an officer, I produce an apron in which the meat was tied up, I saw the meat weighed, it weighed fifty-two pounds and an half, I asked the prisoner before the Lord Mayor if he knew any thing of this apron, he said no, I found this apron with the meat.

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw the meat nor the cart.

GUILTY , aged 45.

Confined One Month in Newgate , and publicly whipped .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18111030-21

824. JOHN BATEMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of September , a basket, value 7 s. two-quarters of pork, value 5 l. five calf's heads, value 5 s. three calve's plucks, value 7 s. the property of George Watson jun. and John Brown .

GEORGE HAWKINS . I am a watchman, my box is in Lime Street. On the 21st of September, about half past four I was sitting in my box, I heard a terrible bustling, one said to the other,

"come along, the road is all clear," I came out of my box and went down St. Mary Axe, and as they saw me three run away and one stopped with the basket, the prisoner, he had his knee against the basket, I asked him whether the basket belonged to him, he said no, he was coming by that way, and had just left work.

Q. Did you observe who they were in Lime Street, or what they had with them. - A. They had a basket, so I took the prisoner up on suspicion.

Q. Are you sure he is one of these men. - A. There were four of them, I followed them, three run away, and this man stopped, I never lost sight of them. At the watch-house the prisoner said he was a lamplighter. This is the basket the four men had hold of it, one at each handle and one before and one behind it.

WILLIAM STRICKWOOD . I am the officer of the night, Hawkins brought this man in with a basket, we searched it and found two quarters of pork, five calve's heads, and three plucks in it, he brought the prisoner in with it, the prisoner said he was a lamplighter, he had locked his ladder up in some court by the Mansion-house, we asked him how he came that way, he did not give a satisfactory account, we took him to the Compter, we went to Leadenhall Market and found the owner of the meat.

JESSE ROLFE . I am the driver of the waggon, the partners names are George Watson jun. and John against Leaden hall market, and while I was unloading the front, I went to take the flats off behind, I missed this flat.

Q. What o'clock was it. - A. It was about a quarter past four when I missed it, I saw nobody about me, it was quite dusk.

Q. Look at that flat do you know it. - A. This is the flat that I had with me, it contained two quarters of pork, five calves' heads, and two plucks.

Prisoner's Defence. When he came into the watch-house, these gentlemen asked him if he had lost a hamper, he said yes, there were quarters of pork and pigs' heads in it he believed, he said now they were calves' heads and pork.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18111030-22

825. JOHN LUTWORTH and THOMAS RUE were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of October , fourteen pounds weight of sugar, value 9 s. the property of William Heale , Richard Hill , and John Rowden .

JOHN ROWDEN. I am a wholesale grocer , I live in Mincing Lane, my partners' names are William Heale and Richard Hill. On the 21st of October, I was informed by one of my servants that he suspected the two prisoners.

Q. What are they. - A. They are soldiers , we employed these two soldiers with some others that day as labourers, I accused them, they denied having taken any thing, and I might search them if I pleased. I requested Rees to take up his apron, he is called Rue, in the indictment, on his so doing I discovered that he had secreted in his small cloaths some sugar, which he immediately took out, the other threw out what he had down his breeches without being pressed, there were fourteen pounds of sugar taken from out of their breeches.

WILLIAM LISTER . I am porter to Messrs. Heale and Rowden, after we had craned the hogsheads up I went into the warehouse, I saw the least of the two with his breeches partly up and partly down, he began buttoning them, I perceived a bulk, and suspected that he had got some sugar, I informed Mr. Rowden, I saw the sugar taken out of Rue's small cloaths, the other put his down behind him, there was fourteen pounds of sugar.

Lutworth's Defence. Mr. Rowden searched me first, he found no property on me.

Rue said nothing in his defence:

Lutworth called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Rue called one witness, who gave him a good character.

LUTWORTH, GUILTY , aged 38

RUE, GUILTY , aged 32.

Confined Three Months in Newgate , and fined 1 s ,

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18111030-23

826. SARAH FLOWERS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of September , twenty pound weight of feathers, value 2 l. the property of Richard Greenwood .

MARY FRANCIS . I am chambermaid at the Bull and Mouth, in Bull and Mouth Street . On Sunday past eight, I

saw the prisoner coming down stairs, she had three parcels containing feathers, I had suspicion that she had taken them from one of the beds, I asked her where she slept, she said up three pair of stairs, she asked me then for a glass of brandy, I shewed her to the Coffee-room, I left her there, and told a young woman to mind her until I could go up and see what property was missing, when I was going up stairs the young woman called me back, and told me the waiter had turned her out of the coffee-room, I returned and met her three parts of the way up the yard, I asked her what she had got in the baskets, she said two baskets and a bandbox, I said I was confident she had got feathers, she said no indeed I have not a feather about me, I turned her round and shewed her the way into the kitchen, I went up into No. 5 room where she had slept on the 21st at night, I found she had made the bed she slept in, I pulled the clothes off the bed and missed the feathers, the bed had been ripped and sewed up again, - and a pin put in the end of it, because the thread was not long enough, I came down and took her to the room and told her she had not left it as she found it, she made no answer.

Q. What quantity of feathers had she taken away. - A. Twenty pound weight. I am in the habit of going into the rooms every day and making the beds; the property is under my care; the bed was not ripped before.

- WOODMAN. Here is the two baskets of feathers and a hat box. I took the woman in custody; I weighed the feathers, they weighed twenty pounds.

Prisoner's Defence. I was distressed in circumstances and distressed in my mind, and if I had not done that I should have done something worse, my husband had volunteered to go to Ireland, I wanted to go to him, and that made me do this.

GUILTY , aged 52.

Confined six Months in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18111030-24

827. THOMAS CARTER was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Rice Price , about the hour of five on the night of the 26th of October , and stealing therein four tea-spoons, value 1 l. 4 s. a pair of sugar tongs, value 12 s. a knife, value 1 s. a pair of scissars, value 1 s. an apron, value 2 s. and 8 l. 18 s. 6 d. in monies numbered his property.

- CRESWELL. I am a servant to Mr. Price, Snow-Hill , he is a pork butcher . Last Sunday morning the 26th of October, I got up and came down stairs, I opened the staircase door and there I saw Carter lying close to the door by the side of the counter.

Q. Did you know him before. - A. No. I saw a bundle tied up laying over him on the counter, I reached over my hand and felt that they were halfpence in the bundle. Then I examined the doors, I found the door was unbolted and upon the single lock.

Q. Was he asleep all the time. - A. Apparently so to me; he did not move any. I then opened the door he got up and ran out, he frightened me at first, but I saw a paper of halfpence drop out of his pocket, which knew to be my master's, I had tied them up in a paper the over night and knew the paper, I went and stopped him, he struggled and tried to beat me, I brought him back to my masters door, I rang masters bell, he came down stairs, I gave him in charge to my master. Afterwards I saw four silver spoons taken out of his pocket, and four five shilling papers of halfpence, I then saw nineteen shillings and sixpence in copper taken out of a hat and eight and sixpence in silver, two knives and a pair of scissars.

RICE PRICE. I am a pork butcher, 78, Snow hill, in the parish of St. Sepulchre. On the night of the 26th of October, or rather half past six in the morning, I lay awake in my bed, all of a sudden I heard the cry of stop thief, I thought I knew the voice, I instantly got out of bed, I opened my back window to ascertain whether I knew it or not, I dressed myself and ran down stairs, and found the prisoner in the custody of my young man, I took him by the collar and looked at him, then I requested my young man to lay hold of him, I then went for an officer, the officer came with me an I searched him There was sound in his waistcoat pocket eight shillings and sixpence in silver, and loose copper two shillings and eightpence. In his coat pocket was found one pound in halfpence, four silver tea spoons, a pair of sugar tongs, a small knife and a pair of scissars.

Q. Where had all these things been the over night. - A. The tea spoons and sugar tongs were in the parlour, he took an apron into the shop, broke open a small desk, the contents of the desk were eight pound ten shillings in copper done up in papers, and eight shillings and sixpence in silver.

Q. Do you know any thing of the man. - A. I have seen him before up and down Snowhill. My house is situated at the corner of Cock court, on examining the premises we went up the court, and found the wall was marked with chalk, the wall is about twelve feet high, on the top of the wall glass bottles were placed in mortar, it appeared as if he had got up that wall, and by the marks on the parapet wall, he had walked backwards and forwards once each way, inside there is a shed, he got down the wall on to the shed, he could get down by the tiling into a small yard that adjoins my house, In the yard there are two sash windows that goes into the parlour, he pushed up the sash, got into the house, and opened the bolt of the door.

Q. Are you sure that window was down when you went to bed. - A. Yes.

Q. Did he say any thing how he came there. - A. He never uttered a word. There were a knife and a nail found upon him, the marks we found on the two tea caddies and the desk, he could not well break the lock of the till, he cut a hole in the counter and pushed the bolt of the lock back.

GEORGE WORRALL . I am an officer. I went down to Mr. Prices's. I searched the prisoner, I found upon his person four tea spoons, a pair of sugar tongs, a small knife, and a pair of scissars, which Mr. Price said were his property, and there was a large knife and a nail, which I took out of his pocket, there was a mark inside of the tea chest the knife fitted that mark, here are four five shilling papers I took out of his pocket, and eight and sixpence in silver, and these are the loose halfpence.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witness to his character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 21.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18111030-25

828. JOHN DUTTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of October , eight ounces weight of tea, value 2 s. the property of the United Company of Merchants trading to the East Indies .

ROBERT CARWOOD . I am an assistant elder to the wharf in Thames Street , in the city of London, the prisoner was employed as a labourer there. On Saturday the 19th instant, from information I went on board at the time of shutting up the vessel. The prisoner was on board and the surveyor was just in the act of searching him, and on seeing me he unloosed his breeches; I told him it was useless doing that if he had any property about him he must bring it on shore. He was taken to the office and searched, and about half a pound of tea was taken out of his breeches, the officer was sent for to take him in custody, he begged pardon and hoped me and Mr. Bird would forgive him.

Prisoner's Defence. The chests were some tier high, they were broken, and this tea tumbled down by my side and some-how fell into my pocket. It is the first time I have been detected in any thing of the kind.

GUILTY , aged 53.

Confined one Month in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

London jury, before, Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18111030-26

829. PETER SUMNER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of October , a tablecloth, value 18 s. the property of William Church .

WILLIAM CHURCH . I live at Hayes near Uxbridge , I am a publican . On Sunday the 13th of October I missed this tablecloth, on Saturday the 12th the prisoner was at my house for four or five hours, we had a club feast and were very busy.

JAMES CURTIS . I am an Inn-holder at Uxbridge, the prisoner was quartered at my house, he is a soldier and belongs to the West Middlesex Militia. He came into my house on the 12th of October, about ten in the evening, I perceived he had linen under his great coat, I asked him what he had got there, he said his wife's or sisters gown, I laid hold of the table cloth, I saw it was not mine, the cloth was full of gravy and liquor as if it had been shortly used, and by his saying it was his wife's or sisters gown I thought he had stolen it. I lodged him and the cloth in the constable's hands.

Q. How did you find the owner of it. - A. By the company that were in the house, there had been a club-feast there, we suspected that it belonged to that house.

Q. Was he drunk or sober. - A. I rather think he was elevated. The prosecutor's house is about three miles and a half from mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I was very much in liquor, I found the cloth in the road, whereabouts I cannot tell.

GUILTY, aged 30.

Judgment respited .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18111030-27

830. THOMAS WATERS was indicted for feloniously killing and slaying Henry Griffen .

THOMAS PRANCE . Q. Were you in Wilson Street Somerstown on the 10th of September. - A. I was in company with Robert Pag . I saw the prisoner approaching with a waggon loaded with coals, and a woman sitting on the coals, the prisoner was standing on the shafts of the waggon talking to the woman with his back to the horses, there were three horses to the waggon one behind another, the horses were going steady on a walk.

Q. Did you see a child Henry Griffen passing over the road. - A. Mr. Pag informed me, I saw the child fall but I did not see it cross the road, when I first saw the child it was just by the first horse's head. When we saw the child down we halloaed to the waggoner to stop.

Q. Could he have heard you if he had been in a proper situation. - A. No doubt of it, and where he was he might have heard if he had been attentive, we ran towards the waggon to save the child, but we were too late, the fore-wheel of the waggon had gone over the child's ankle just as we came up. The prisoner jumped down immediately, and stopped the horses after it had gone over the child's ankle, the child was taken up and taken to a surgeon immediately. The prisoner behaved with a great deal of contrition, I never saw a man shew more contrition in my life, he said he would make every satisfaction in his power.

ROBERT PAG . I saw the child Henry Griffen fall, he was about half a horses length from the first horses head; as soon as the child fell I cried out immediately and ran after the waggon. If the waggoner had been attentive he might have heard me, and if he had been in his right situation he might have taken the child out of the way, I saw the wheel go over the child's foot, this was between five and six o'clock in the evening. When I first saw the child it was crossing the road before it fell, if it had not fallen it would have got out of the way.

THOMAS GRIFFEN . Q. You are the father of the child Henry Griffen . - A. Yes, his name was Henry.

Q. When did the child die. - A. The accident happened on the 10th of September, and the child died on the 24th.

Mr. Knapp. How soon did you see the defendant after the accident happened. - A. The next morning he came to my house, he was going before the magistrate, and he came to go along with me, he said if the child lived he would do all in his power for it, he seemed hurt very much.

Q. Was your child in the habit of running across the road. - A. It would always run out if it could.

JOHN WANT . I am a surgeon; I was sent for. When I saw the child the bones of the foot were crushed, a mortification had already taken place on the morning after the accident.

Q. When was you sent for. - A. On the morning after the accident, I continued to attend the child until it died, I attended the child from the 11th to the 24th. The mortification suppurated, which is common in these cases, the child did not die of mortification, but from the suppuration that followed it.

COURT. Did you not think of performing amputation. - A. I should have performed it, but a large abcess took place in the thigh, it was so high up it was impossible to perform it.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel, and called two witnesses, who gave him a humane character.

GUILTY OF MANSLAUGHTER .

The Jury recommended the prisoner to the mercy of the court.

Confined one Month in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson .

Reference Number: t18111030-28

831. JAMES HUGHES was indicted for that he, on the 17th of September , upon Susan Pratchett , Spinster , did make an assault, and her, the said Susan Pratchett , feloniously did ravish and carnally know .

The prisoner called six witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 26.

The prisoner was recommended to his Majesty's mercy, on account of his former good character.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18111030-29

832. WILLIAM MILLS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of September , a cart, value 5 l. and a gelding, value 7 l. the property of Stephen Kibbel .

STEPHEN KIBBEL was called, and not appearing in Court, his recognisance was ordered to be estreated.

- COLTSEN. I am a watchman. On the 27th of September, about ten o'clock at night, I espyed a horse and cart at the Queen's Head, Clerkenwell Close, there was no one with the cart, and just before the clock struck eleven it turned round and came up Clerkenwell Close, there were two men with it, one in the cart and the other running after it, I was in my box, I saw the cart come by my box up towards the field, the cart afterwards turned round and went back to the Three Queen's, then it was half past eleven, when I came back to my box at a quarter to twelve, it was standing there then, when I went back at twelve, the cart was gone. I saw no more of the cart till a quarter before one, I heard the rattle spring and a voice halloa out stop thief, the same cart and horse came down the close and went to the Three Queens again. I went to the watch-house to get somebody to come along with me, the officer of the night and I went up to the Three Queens, the cart was not there then. In about a quarter of an hour the cart came again to the Three Queens, there were two men with it, the prisoner was in the cart driving it, they got out of the cart at the Three Queens, and went into the house, there was nothing in the cart. Me and the night officer looked all over the cart, there was neither name nor number to the cart, a short man came out of the Three Queens, I asked him if the horse and cart belonged to him. The prisoner made to the cart as if he was going to get in, I asked him if the horse and cart belonged to him, he said the horse belonged to him, I asked him if it was his property, he said, what was that to me, I told him I would take his horse and cart to the green-yard, and him to the watch-house if he did not give me his address, he said it was a neighbour's, he did know his name, I then took him to the watch-house, I left the man that was in the cart along with a watchman. The man took to his heels, the watchman took the cart and horse to the green-yard.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson .

Reference Number: t18111030-30

833. JOHN FRAZER was indicted for burlariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Glover , about the hour of three on the night of the 12th of October , and stealing therein three five-pound bank notes, two two-pound bank notes, and six one-pound bank notes , the property of John Piper .

JOHN PIPER . I am a traveller .

Q. Where were you when this happened. - A. At the Green Dragon Inn Bishopgate Street, in the parish of St. Ethelburg , Mr. Thomas Glover is the keeper of that Inn . On the 12th of October I went into my bed room about five minutes to twelve o'clock, the windows were down, the curtains of the window not being drawn I drew them, it is a sash window in the gallery, I found there were no fastenings to it, afterwards I put the candle upon the table immediately under the window, placed my coat and waistcoat upon a chair close to the table, at the corner of the window, and went to bed. Somewhere about three o'clock in the morning I thought I heard something move like pushing up the window, I heard it rain very hard, and therefore conceived it might be the wind and rain that deceived me, I went to sleep again: I heard it the second time, but had the same impression, I thought, as I supposed, for some short time I heard my coat move, I also heard something fall, at that time it appeared to be like the sound of a small tea-spoon, but it turned out to be my pencil-case, I also heard my money rattle, I had two dollars and a shilling in my waistcoat pocket. I listened for some time, but I could not hear the foot of any person, I heard the mewing of a cat, I thought there might be a cat in the room, or a rat, or something of that sort, that might move my coat, I got out of bed, I looked round the room as well as I could, it was dark, I could see nothing, I had no idea of the window being opened, the door I knew to be locked, I considered myself in a very respectable house, therefore I had no fear, and got into bed again, it was still raining and very dark. When I awoke in the morning about five or ten minutes past eight I observed the curtains of the window moving gently, as though blown by the wind, I got out of bed and saw that the window was open, I looked at my coat and waistcoat, and did not find them in the situation that I had left them at night, I immediately searched my coat pocket, I had put my coat and waistcoat on the back of the chair. When I got up in the morning the coat was on the chair, not upon the back, the coat was upon the seat of the chair, and the waistcoat upon that, but not as I had left them. I searched for my money, but it was gone.

Q. What was it you lost. - A. Twenty-five pound, three five pound notes, two twos, and six ones, Bank of England notes, I for some time considered whether I should mention it to Mr. Glover, he being a particular friend of mine, I was afterwards so determined. I knew the notes when I saw them.

Mr. Gurney. You did not try the window. - A. No, I am certain it was down.

Q. You had been dining at the house. - A. Yes, I was perfectly sober I assure you.

JOSHUA HERD . I am a waiter at Mr. Glover's, the Green Dragon Inn. On Saturday, the 12th, the prisoner came into our house, between the hours of two and three in the day, and asked whether he could have some dinner in the coffee room, it was served to him according to his orders. About an hour after dinner he called for the bill, when he discharged the bill, he asked whether he could sleep at our house after he came from the theatre, having at that time the appearance of a gentleman I told him yes, he came between the hours of ten or eleven, he had his supper and went to bed.

The next morning about seven o'clock he got up, he

paid me his bill in the coffee-room and went away, I am sure as to his person.

FRANCIS NALDER . Q. You are a city marshal. - A. I am. On the Sunday morning I was going down Bishopsgate Street, about the hour of ten or a little after, Mr. Piper was on one side of the street and I on the other, he beckoned me to come to him, he had something to communicate, he then told me that he had been robbed at a house, which of all the houses in London he respected for punctuality and good conduct, he wished me to come before Mr. Glover to investigate this robbery, after some few minutes I requested the waiter might be sent for from thence, I had every clue that caused me to do what I did, that is to apprehend the prisoner. I went round to the different coffee houses and inns in London to give information that if a man, answering the description, that they would be good enough to give information, so that we might be able to see if it was the man that slept at that inn that night. I received information on the Monday morning that induced me to take him into custody, I instantly took him into the coffee-room at the Four-Swans, Bishopsgate Street, where I apprehended him. He made a strong resistance before he would suffer me to search him, upon searching him, in his breeches pocket I found three five-pound Bank of England notes, with other things that he had about him, which I now produce. I went on Monday evening to the prison, and took four one-pound notes from the person of the prisoner.

Q.(to prosecutor.) Look at these five-pound notes. - A. They are mine all three of them, there is on them the person's name I had taken them of the day of the month, the date of the year. The four pound notes are mine, I knew them again.

Jury. Can Mr. Piper say that he had the property about him when he went to bed. - A. Yes, when I was in Mr. Glover's bar I put my hand in my pocket, and felt the notes two minutes before I went to bed.

Prisoner's Defence. I changed a thirty-pound note in a gambling house in Oxford Street, I lost five pound there, that was on the Saturday night. On the Monday night I was taken up, I was as liable to take them in change as any body else, on Thursday night I slept at the Green Dragon.

GUILTY , - DEATH , aged 34,

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18111030-31

834. JOHN ROW and JOHN JONES were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of October , in the dwelling-house of William Hazel , a ten pound bank note , his property.

WILLIAM HAZEL. I keep the Bull and Axe, in John Street, Oxford Road . On the 21st of October, between four and five in the afternoon, the prisoners Row and Jones came into my house together.

Q. Did you know them before. - A. Row had used my house about four or five days, he worked for a livery stable over the way, they called for a pot of porter and sat down in one of the boxes to drink it, Row came to me in the passage, he said here is a man owes me ten pounds, he has got a twenty pound note, and if I cannot give him change now perhaps I may never get it. If you will give me change, or let me have ten pounds till I get the note, you shall have the note and give me the difference when you can, I immediately replied if it was a good note I thought I could give him change, he then returned to the prisoner Jones, and in about a minute or two he came again, he said here is a comical joke, he will not part with the twenty-pound note until he has got the ten, in the mean time Jones came to the bar to my wife with the false note so as to shew the word twenty, it was doubled up in four parts, here, said he, you need not be afraid, you see it is a twenty pound Bank note, I saw the note, and heard him say it, I said this is a comical piece of business, but I shall be sorry for the man to loose the money for the want of ten pound, I went up stairs and brought a ten-pound note down, I held my hand on the table with the note, I said here is my ten-pound note, where is your twenty, the note was snatched out of my hand by Row, Jones immediately took it from him, Jones doubled up the note, put it in his pocket; he threw down the false note; here, said he, is the note, it is not worth two pence, that fellow has swindled me of ten pound, and I have got it again, I do not care a d - n.

Q. Did you ever recover the note. - A. One of the Marlborough Street officers searched Jones and took it from him. I never parted with the note, it was snatch-out of my hand.

CROKER. I am an officer. I searched Jones, I found that ten pound note upon him.

Prosecutor. That is my note.

Row said nothing in his defence

Jones's Defence. John Row asked me to give him ten pound on a note, I gave him nine pound and one pound the next day, but I should not have done it if I had not thought it a twenty pound note. On Row I demanded ten pound, the prosecutor lent him ten pound, upon getting that I returned him the twenty pound note again. Had not the prosecutor been warm I should have given him the note again, although I should be a loser.

ROW GUILTY , aged 40.

JONES GUILTY , aged 68.

Confined Two Years in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18111030-32

835 WILLIAM SIMPSON HENNINGHAM was indicted for that he, on the 19th of September , feloniously had in his custody and possession three forged Bank notes, for the payment of ten pounds each, he knowing them to be forged .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded GUILTY .

Transported for Fourteen years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18111030-33

836 WILLIAM SIMPSON HENNINGHAM was indicted for feloniously forging, on the 19th of September , a certain note for the payment of ten pound , with intention to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England .

SECOND COUNT - for feloniously disposing of, and putting a like forged note with the same intention, and SEVERAL OTHER COUNTS for like offences, only stat- intention to be to defraud different other persons.

Mr. Knapp. Counsel for the prosecution declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner of this charge was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18111030-34

837. CARL JOHN STRAS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of September , in the dwelling-house of Peter Linguest , two watches, value 4 l. and two one pound bank notes , the property of Charles Lenrose .

CHARLES LENROSE . I lodged in Farmer-street, Shadwell parish , when I lost my watch, in Peter Linguest 's house.

Q. Does Peter Linguest live in the house himself - A. Yes, he is the housekeeper.

Q. Did the prisoner Stras lodge in the house at the same time - A. Yes, he was there about six weeks; he slept in the same room that I did. There were four besides us two that slept in the room, lodgers in the house. I missed the watch on a Sunday afternoon. I do not know the day of the month, it is about a month ago.

Q. Did the other persons who lodged in the room go to bed at that time - A. Yes, the prisoner was out at that time, he did not come home that night.

Q. Had he been home on the Saturday night, the night before - A. Yes, he had slept there on the Saturday.

Q. Had you seen him there on the Sunday - A. Yes, in the afternoon about six o'clock.

Q. You did not see him after six o'clock - A. No, not before the Monday.

Q. When you went to bed on the Sunday night had you the watch - A. No. The watch was in my chest, on the Sunday at dinner time I had seen it in my chest, it lay loose in the till.

Q. Did you lose any thing else that was in the chest besides - A. Yes, two one pound notes, they were in the chest too; I had seen the notes at dinner time, the chest was locked.

Q. Had you any other watch in the che chest besides that one - A. Yes, one that I wore in my pocket, I laid it on my chest when I went to bed. They were both silver watches.

Q. Do you mean to say that you had your watch in your pocket on the Sunday night, nine o'clock, when you went to bed - A. No. I lost that watch first out of my pocket, he took that one first.

Q. How long before the Sunday had you lost that - A. That was the week before, from the top of my chest, where I had laid it. One watch cost me four pounds ten shillings, and the other four pounds. I have seen one of the watches again in the pawnbroker's shop.

Q. Did you tell me that the prisoner Stras had slept at his lodgings on the Saturday night - A. Yes, but not on the Sunday; he came home on the Sunday at dinner time, and then went out and came home again on the Monday.

Q. How long did he continue to lodge there after the Monday he came home - A. He lodged there a week afterwards. I took him up on board a ship.

Q. How long after the Sunday that you missed your watch and notes was it that you took the prisoner up - A. About a fortnight afterwards. He came back on the Monday and staid about ten days, and then went away.

Prisoner. I did not take the watch on his chest.

JOSEPH HARRIS . I live with David Windsor , pawnbroker. On the 16th of September I took this watch in pawn, I do not know the man.

ROBERT WILLAN . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner on the 16th of October, on board a ship in the West India Dock, I searched him, I found nothing upon him at that time. I told him that I had a warrant to apprehend him for robbing a man of two watches, and some money; the prosecutor was with me, he pointed him out. The next day I was going to search him again, he gave me a duplicate out of his pocket; he said he would leave him a monthly note to make good the watches and the notes he had lost, if he would let him go on board a ship.

Q. to Harris. Look at that duplicate produced by Willan, is that the duplicate of that watch - A. It is.

Willan. After that he was taken before the magistrate there the prisoner promised that he would pay the money if he would let him go. The magistrate asked him him if he had any means of paying him he said his captain would give him a monthly note for the payment of the money.

Q. Did you see any thing taken down in writing that was signed by the prisoner - A. Yes, this is the prisoner's signing, it was read over by the clerk to him, and I saw the magistrate sign it.

Q. to prosecutor. Look at that watch - A. It is my watch, I know it, I bought it eight months ago; the case has an old spring, it will not keep fast. This is the watch that was in my chest, it was taken at the same time with my two notes.

Prisoner. The prosecutor was with me in my confinement, he said he would make it up if I had any money, last Monday.

Prosecutor. I went and asked him if he had any money, if he would give me my property I would be satisfied.

(Read.)

" Carl John Stras being asked what he had to say in his defence, acknowledged that he stole the two watches, and two one pound notes, that he pawned one of the watches at Mr. Windsor's in the Minories, and sold the other watch and spent the money."

Prisoner's Defence. I recommend myself into the merciful hands of you good gentlemen.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 26.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18111030-35

838. JOHN THOMPSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of October , a pair of shoes, value 10 s. the property of Robert Dickson , privately in his shop .

JAMES GRIFFITHS . I am a shoemaker, I work for Mr. Dickson. On the 5th of October I was at work up stairs in Mr. Dickson's house about three o'clock in the afternoon, I heard a screaming in the street, I looked out of the window, I saw Mrs. Dickson and the prisoner scuffling together, they were about twenty yards from the door, I could not distinguish what was said. I saw the prisoner lay his hand upon Mrs. Dickson's breast to shove her away from him; she had hold of the flap of his coat.

Q. How high is this window that you were looking out - A. I was looking out of the two pair front, I could see distinctly all this. She would not let him go; the prisoner fell down, and the flap of his coat

came off with a pair of shoes in the pocket. I could see the heels sticking out of the pocket distinctly, in the pocket of that flap that came off. I saw Mrs. Dickson come back to the shop with the shoes in the pocket of the flap that came off. I did not come down until I saw the man go down the Commercial-road.

Q. How came you not to come down sooner when you saw the man scuffle with Mrs. Dickson - A. I had not time, it was done so quick. When I came down stairs I went out of the house and turned the corner of the Commercial-road, two captains had hold of the prisoner; he was brought back to the shop by them, and then the prisoner had only one flap to his coat, he asked for the flap. The shoes were taken to the office in the pocket of the flap of his coat. I did not examine the shoes until I came to Shadwell office, then I knew them to be Mr. Dickson's property.

EDWARD DICKSON . I am a shoemaker , I live at 79, White Horse-street .

Q. How lately before this had you been in your shop - A. About a quarter of an hour. Griffiths looked out of the window, he said it was my wife scuffling with a man in the street; I ran down stairs, my wife had come back when I came down; the shoes were in the pocket of the flap, on the counter. I went out of doors, turned the corner of the Commercial-road, I saw two captains had got him; he was brought back to the shop. I sent for an officer; he begged me to let him go; he begged hard for the flap of his coat, to sew it on, the officer would not let him have it.

Q. Is your wife here - A. No, she is not in a fit state to come. The prisoner came to me on the day before and made application for work; I told him I would give him a winters seat of work if he suited me, if he could get himself a lodging; he asked me if I could recommend him; I told him no, I would not recommend any one; he said he would come to-morrow morning; he came about twelve o'clock, I was then in the shop, he told me he could not get a lodging, could I recommend him one; I told him no, I would not; the prisoner said, as you are going to dinner I will go and seek for one; I said, when you get one I will employ you. The shoes were in the window, he took the shoes up two or three times to look at; he said, they are very good shoes; I said, yes, they are, and if you make as good you will suit me. Then afterwards he went out of the shop, I never saw any more of him until the time that I have spoken of before.

Q. When you examined the shoes at the office that were in the pocket of the coat, do you mean to swear that these shoes were the same which the prisoner had been looking at in your shop, and upon which he made the observation that they were good - A. Yes; I am sure they are the same, because they were cut particularly high for a customer, and they are higher than the other shoes. These are the shoes, I know they are mine.

ROBERT WILLAN . I am a police constable. On Saturday the 5th of October the prisoner was brought to the office by the headborough; Griffiths and Dickson were with them. The headborough shewed the flap of the coat and the shoes, Mr. Dickson saw them, and the prisoner had the flap of his coat torn off.

Prisoner's Defence. I am accused of a thing that I am totally innocent of.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY, aged 28,

Of stealing, but not privately .

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18111030-36

830. ELIZABETH BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of October , six yards of printed cotton shawls, value 10 s. 6 d. the property of William Gillman and Thomas Clay , privately in their shop .

MORGAN JENKINS. I am shopman to Mr. Gillman. On the 12th of October, between ten and eleven at night, the prisoner came into the shop and asked for some dimity; I stood at the door, I asked her to walk down the shop; she went down about the middle where the shawls were laying upon the counter. I turned my back and fetched the dimity, and when I turned back I missed six printed cotton shawls.

Q. What was the value of them - A. Ten shillings and sixpence. I cut her off half a yard of dimity, it came to seven pence, she paid me in copper for it.

Mr. Challenor. There are many persons employed in your shop - A. Yes, there were two or three persons in the shop at the time, and there was a young woman came in with the prisoner.

Q. Who left the shop first - A. The one that is gone, and this one was left behind.

WILLIAM PITT . I am shopman to William Gillman and Thomas Clay , they are linen-drapers , 23, Barbican, St. Giles's, Cripplegate . I came in just as the prisoner was going out; a signal was given me; I immediately followed her into the street; I laid hold of her arm and brought her back, at that moment I discovered the shawls between her feet and mine in the street; I immediately took her and the shawls into the shop, I then sent for a constable.

Q. Where had she put the shawl - A. I do not know; I did not see them fall, I saw them between her feet and mine; my foot touched them as I laid hold of her.

Mr Challenor. Whether the shawl dropped from this young woman or the other you cannot tell - A. The other young woman was gone at the time, the shawls were on the ground. The prisoner went out the first time, and returned to know if she had paid for the dimity; she had, and then when she went out the second time a signal was given me. I went after her and laid hold of her arm, and the shawls were on the ground. These are the shawls, I know they are ours, there is my private mark upon them.

The prisoner left her defence to her counsel, and called no witness to her character.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18111030-37

840. ANN PAYNE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of September , from the person of John Burn , a metal watch, value 2 l. a gold seal, value 14 s. a metal key, value 6 d. and a metal chain, value 1 s. his property.

JOHN BURN . I am a lamp-contractor , I live at No. 2, Ratcliffe-place, Upper Thames-street. On the 29th of September, about a quarter before two in the morning, I was going down Fleet Market , and going by a gateway the prisoner catched hold of me, she was standing there, she held me with one hand and with the other she drawed the watch out of my fob, and then she ran across the way. I caught her before she had gone five yards; she tumbled down on her back. In lifting her up two men came to heave mud and stones at me. I told them it was of no use they should not take her away from me, I would take her to the watch-house. There was no watchmen to be found; I took her under Fleet Market.

Q. Did you find your watch - A. No. I suppose the watch was given to these two men. I took her to the watchhouse. I never lost sight of the prisoner from the time that she snatched the watch; she was not five yards from me when I laid hold of her.

Q. You had not been with her, had you - A. No. I never saw her till I came to the gateway, I was going by.

JOSEPH BROWN . I am a constable of St. Bride's. On the 29th of September, about two o'clock, the prisoner was brought to the watchhouse by the prosecutor, I searched her particularly, but found no watch. There was no watchman on that beat, we were short of watchmen.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming past, there were four of them altogether, they wanted to take the advantage of me. When the watchman came up he swore I robbed him, and three of the men ran away.

Prosecutor. There was nobody by at the time that she snatched the watch, as I could see, and afterwards there was nobody but the two men that threw mud and stones at me. The little man was nighest to me, he was nigh enough to take the watch from her. I had a stone come on my arm, I thought it had broke my arm. I would have taken the two men if I could.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18111030-38

841. WILLIAM JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of October , seven pounds weight of pewter, value 5 s. the property of Richard Joseph .

JAMES STANIFORD . I am a journeyman pewterer, work for Mr. Richard Joseph , Little New-street . On the 25th of October I was below in the casting shop, I was told that the prisoner had been there; he had no business there; I observed this piece of pewter had been moved out of its place, it was stood up and covered with straw and ends of rushes. As I had suspicion of the prisoner I watched, and saw the prisoner come at five o'clock in the evening, he took that same piece of metal, placed it under his apron, and went out of the shop. I followed him across the yard, through the front shop, to the street door, he got into the street; I then called him back, I accused him of having the property about him; he denied it two or three times, and said, that I might search him. I told him I would not search him, I was confident that he had got it, and told him to pull it out; he said he had got a small bit, and pulled it out from under his apron, I took it from him, and gave it to one of my shopmates. I sent for my master, I told him what I had done, and what he had done.

THOMAS ASHLEY . I am a journeyman pewterer. Staniford called me down on the 25th of October, about five o'clock in the evening, Staniford told the prisoner he had taken some metal; the prisoner denied it. He took his apron of oneside, and in his waistcoat and waistband of his breeches, this piece of metal was lodged; he pulled the metal out, and gave it to Staniford; I received it of Staniford. He begged for mercy, and said it was the first time.

Staniford. This is the piece of metal I saw him take out of the shop, it is my master's property.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witness to his character.

GUILTY , aged 45.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18111030-39

842. JOHN HARRIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of October , a silver spoon, value 10 s. the property of Alexander Colvill Johnson .

ALEXANDER COLVILL JOHNSON. I am a linen-draper in Norton Falgate. The property was stolen at Hounslow , but found in the City of London. On the 23d of October the prisoner was employed with some carmen to remove some furniture from my house at Norton Falgate to my house at Hounslow; when they arrived at Hounslow he assisted in taking out the goods; they came to a chest of drawers that was remarkably heavy, and in order to lighten the chest of drawers I ordered the servant to take out two of the drawers to lessen the weight; they were taken out; the prisoner took hold of one of them, my servant took another and followed him up stairs.

JAMES BOOTH . I am a silversmith in Leadenhall-street. On Thursday morning the prisoner came to my house and enquired if I bought old silver; I told him I did; he then produced the table spoon in question, it appeared in so mutilated a state I had suspicion the property was stolen; I sent for an officer, he was taken before the Lord Mayor; the spoon was advertised, the prosecutor came forward and claimed the spoon.

WILLIAM CHAPMAN . I am the officer that Mr. Booth sent for; the prisoner said he found the spoon.

Prosecutor. It is my spoon, it belongs to a set; we have examined the drawers since, all is safe except that spoon.

Prisoner's Defence. I have nothing to say for myself.

GUILTY , aged 52.

Confined One Month in Newgate , and Publicly Whipped .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18111030-40

843. JOSEPH SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of October , two pair of women's shoes, value 10 s. the property of James M'Laren .

JAMES M'LAREN. I am a boot and shoemaker , 55, Cornhill . I lost the shoes on the 21st of October, on the morning of the 22d I was informed that the prisoner had been at Mr. Barker's, Houndsditch, pawning two pair of shoes. I went to Mr. Barker's

and saw the two pair of women's shoes, one was a pair of velvet, and the other of leather; I found they were mine. The prisoner was in my employ, he was my boot cleaner .

- HODSDEN. On the 21st of October, about seven o'clock in the evening, I was at Mr. Barker's in Houndsditch, I saw the prisoner pawning two pair of shoes, knowing he was employed at Mr. M'Laren's it gave me suspicion. When the prisoner walked out I stepped forward and looked at the shoes; I told the pawnbroker I thought they belonged to Mr. M'Laren, Cornhill; the young man said he would be aware for the future. I went up the next morning to Mr. M'Laren's and told him; he desired me to go with him to the pawnbrokers, and there he saw the shoes, and knew they were his property. I am sure the prisoner is the man, I am in the habit of seeing him every day. I work for Mr. M'Laren.

THOMAS TERRY . I am an officer. I took the prisoner in custody. I had these shoes of the pawnbroker.

Prosecutor. These are my shoes.

JOHN WAREHAM . I am shopman to Mr. Barker, 115, Houndsditch. The prisoner pawned with me two pair of shoes in the name of Smith, I lent him five shillings on them.

Prisoner's Defence. I have this to say, I am as innocent as you are. I believe it is nothing else but a piece of malice. I went out about thirty-five minutes past six o'clock, I went into the Black Lion, Bishopgate-street, to get a pint of porter; I stopped there till near seven o'clock, I got into the shop a few minutes after seven. I was never in the pawnbroker's.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 54.

Confined Three Months in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18111030-41

844. JOHN PLASTON and PETER HOBLAN were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of October , fifty brass breast plates for army belts and accoutrements , the goods and chattels, and ordnance stores of our Lord the King .

SECOND COUNT, for stealing the same goods, the property of different persons.

THOMAS BELLIS . I am the master forbisher in the ordnance department. The prisoners were labourers in the Tower.

JOHN HODSON . I am a constable in the City of London. On Friday the 25th of October I saw the prisoners in America-square. they went up Vine-street, into John-street, into the Minories; I called my brother officer, I said John, here is something not right. In the Minories I shewed my authority, and said to Hoblan, what have you got here. I touched him upon the stomach. I found something hard; my brother officer came up, I said, Jack, take care of this man, I gave him charge of Plaston: I had hold of Hoblan, we took the two prisoners up the Minories into Whitechapel, to a wine-vaults, I untied Hoblan's apron, out dropped five pieces of wood. On searching farther I found nineteen brass breast plates belonging to different regiments of volunteers.

Q. Did you see Plaston searched - A. I did, on him was found thirty-one breast-plates.

Q. What did they say - A. For God's sake do not hurt us, you may do away with it, Plaston said he had a wife that had been bed-ridden for nine months; Hoblan said, for God's sake do not hurt us, we can settle it. I kept the property in my custody ever since.

JOHN BROWN. I am a city officer. On this night week, about half past five in the evening, I saw the prisoners in America-square, I was with Hodson, by their shifting their hand I immediately suspected they had got something; the moment I laid hold of Plaston, he said, I will tell you the truth if you will let me go; I said, I do not know what you mean, I have not accused you of any thing. I put my hand to his pocket, I felt something that appeared to be brass. We brought them to the wine-vaults in Whitechapel. In his two waistcoat and breeches pocket, I took out thirty-one brass breast-plates. Hudson searched the other going along. Plaston begged for mercy, he had never done such a thing in his life.

Q. to Mr. Bellis. Are they what you call breastplates - A. Yes, they are brass breast-plates, they appear to be part of the ordnance stores of his Majesty; we had a good many in the tower; they are worth about four shillings.

Plaston's Defence. My lord, and gentlemen of the Jury, I have a poor wife that has been laying bed-ridden a long time.

Hoblan said nothing in his defence.

Plaston called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Hoblan called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

PLASTON - GUILTY , aged 35.

HOBLAN - GUILTY , aged 28.

Confined Three Months in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18111030-42

845. JOHN BAYLIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of October , a tea-caddie, value 2 s. a japan waiter, value 6 d. five pair of scissars, value 5 s. a razor case, value 1 s. two razors, value 3 s. 6 d. two curtain pins, value 3 s. eleven dozen of screws, value 2 s. and one pair of nut-crackers, value 2 s. the property of James Biggs and Samuel Anstie .

JAMES BIGGS . I am an ironmonger , St. Andrew's Hill: my partner's name is Samuel Anstie . The prisoner was our porter . On Wednesday last we were informed by another porter that he was seen with his pocket full of goods. I went to the Mansion House and procured an officer to go with me to his lodging, and in his lodging we found all the articles mentioned in the indictment. The tea-caddie and waiter have our mark upon them; I believe all the rest to be our property, they are articles that we deal in.

Q. When you searched his lodging what did he say - A. He said that he bought them at our warehouse of a young man that died, except a parcel of screws that he had taken, and he meaned to return them.

JOHN LACEY HAWKINS . I went with the prosecutor to his warehouse. I searched the prisoner and found nothing; I searched the prisoner's apartment,

I found these things, he said he had bought these of a young man, he was dead, he took the screws to do a job, and he meant to take them back again.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought the things of the apprentice, John Gale , I never defrauded my master of any thing.

Q.(to Prosecutor.) What age was this apprentice of yours. - A. Nineteen; he died about two months ago, I am pretty confident I have seen the razor case within two months.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 34.

Confined Three Months in Newgate , and fined 1 s ,

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18111030-43

846. WILLIAM HABBERFIELD was indicted for feloniously forging and counterfeiting a certain bank note for the payment of two pound, with intention to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England .

SECOND COUNT - for feloniously disposing of and putting away a like forged note, he knowing it to be forged, with the same intention.

And TWO OTHER COUNTS for like offences, stating it to be a promissory note, with the like intention.

JOHN BARRY . Q. I believe you are a prisoner in the House of Correction, Cold Bath Fields. - A. I was a prisoner there. I come now in custody.

Q. Do you know Mr. Westwood, the clerk to Mr. Kay. - A. I do.

Q. Do you know Joseph Beckitt . - A. I do, he is a turnkey in the House of Correction.

Q. Did you receive any notes of Mr. Westwood in September last. - A. Yes, on Monday, the 23d of September, between twelve and one o'clock, I received eight one pound bank notes in the presence of Joseph Beckitt and James M'Quire, they were given to me for the purpose of purchasing Bank notes of the prisoner

Q. How long had you been acquainted with the prisoner. - A. As near as I can recollect, the commencement of my dealing with him was the 20th or 21st of August, that is to have dealing with him, I have known the man before six or seven months, I had seen him, but not in the habit of intimacy with him till then.

Q. He was at that time a prisoner in Newgate. - A. He was.

Q. When you received the eight one pound notes of Mr. Westwood, had you any other notes about you. - A. I was particularly searched by Beckitt and M' Quire, I had no others.

Q. Having received these eight notes what did you do. - A. I went from the House of Correction in company with Mr. Westwood, Beckitt, and M'Quire in a coach to Newgate, when we came to Newgate I and Beckitt got out of the coach.

Q.Did Beckitt accompany you to the door of Newgate. - A. Not immediately to the door, he was on the opposite side of the way, he saw me go to the door, and go into the prison, I then went to Habberfield, the prisoner at the bar, I could not be admitted, immediately, I saw some other person with him, when that person was gone I got admittance. Mr. Westwood requested that I would keep part of the eight pounds, and put them into my pocket. I then delivered six one-pound notes into the prisoner Habberfield's hand, he knew what I want by giving him the money, and he gave me the quantum according to what money I gave him, I gave him the six one pound notes without saying any thing then. He delivered me six. three of which were what I gave to him, and the other three were three two pound notes forged on the Bank of England.

Q. Did he give you any reason for returning you three of the notes that you had given to him. - A. I always purchased them at ten shillings the pound and on returning me the three he told me that he had no more left, and that in the course of a few days he should have a fresh supply, I think on the Wednesday or Thursday week, in the course of eight or ten days he should have a fresh supply. I then returned to Beckitt, and put into his hand these three two pound notes, he was in the same place, as near as I could recollect, as I had left him, M'Quire was with him, I put into his hand the three two pound notes, the same that I had received from Habberfield, the prisoner at the bar.

Q. What did you do with the five one pound notes that were left. - A. I was brought to Mr. Westwood, I found him nearly opposite to Newgate, I gave him the five one pound notes on my return in the coach with Beckitt and M'Quire.

Mr. Gurney. What countryman are you. - A. I was part of my time reared in Ireland, and part in Scotland. Ireland is the place of my nativity.

Q When you were in Cold Bath Fields prison the Bank expected you dealing in forged notes. - A. It appears so

Q. And you wished to disappoint the gallows this time, you thought you would bring it on somebody else. - A. I always wish to disappoint it

Q. So they searched you before they let you out of prison. - A. Yes.

Q. How long were you in Newgate. - A. About fifteen or twenty minutes. I did not watch the time.

Q. Nobody went with you into the prison. - A. No.

Q. What part of the prison was Habberfield in. - A. I believe they call it the state side.

Q. How many doors did you go through. - A. Four doors, and a subterraneous passage.

Q. The turnkeys went through these doors, they did not know the errand on which you came. - A. No.

Q. Therefore there was nobody there to watch you inside of the prison, with whom you spoke to, nor whom you dealt with. - A. No.

Q. You saw many other prisoners though you did not converse with them, walking backwards and forwards. - A. Oh dear yes.

Q. Did you ask for Habberfield, or any body else ask you who you wanted - A. They seldom ask who you want, except past six o'clock in the evening.

Court. Did you at that time enquire for Habberfield. - A. Not just then I did not.

Mr. Gurney. Did you enquire for any other person. - A. No, not just then I did not.

Q.

dealing with any other person besides Habberfield, - that we are to take upon your veracity. - A. I had not.

Q. That you would say of course, Mr. Beckitt was not there to watch you. Are you acquainted with a man of the name of Kelly. - A. Yes, two or three of that name.

THOMAS BEVERLEY WESTWOOD . Q. You are a clerk to the solicitor of the Bank of England. - A. I am.

Q. In consequence of information that you had received, did you go to the person that has been examined of the name of Barry, in the house of Correction. - A. I did, on the 23d of September last.

Q. From what you learned of him, did you then make up your mind to try the experiment for him to go and buy any forged notes. - A. I did.

Q. You had permission of the directors of the Bank to go for that purpose. - A. I had, I gave Barry eight one pound notes. I was present when Barry was searched by Beckitt and M'Quire in the house of Correction, before I gave him the notes, he had neither Bank notes or money about him, his pockets were turned inside out, and he was stripped.

Q. Now before you gave him the eight one pound notes did you make any marks upon these notes individually, and describe what marks they were. - A. I put upon the back of these note a small W, but previous to my doing that I took an accompt of the number of the eight notes and by whom they were signed, this paper contains an accompt of the numbers and dates of them. Brickett marked all the eight one pound notes with another mark in my presence.

Q. For what purpose did you deliver these eight one pound notes to Barry. - A. For the purpose of detecting the prisoner, and to enable him to purchase forged bank notes by them. After delivering the notes to Barry, I then went with Barry, Beckett, and M'Quire in a coach from the House of Correction to the Old Bailey, very near Mr. Newman's house Barry and Beckett then got out of the coach, and I got out also, and I saw Barry go into Newgate.

Q. How long was it before you saw Barry again. - A. About a quarter of an hour or twenty minutes, and Beckett delivered me these notes, three two pound notes which Beckett marked in my presence, and I marked them also. These are the three two pound notes, they have been in my possession ever since, after I had received the three two pound notes, Barry returned to me five one pound notes, these are them, they are part of the eight one pound notes that I delivered to him, I know them by the mark I had put upon them. In about a quarter of an hour afterwards I received from Beckett and Brown a city officer, after they came out of Newgate, on the same day I received two one pound notes and part of a one pound note, the two one pound notes contains both mine and Beckett's mark, the part of the one pound note only contains Beckett's mark, that part of the note where my mark was appears to have been burnt, it contains the same number that I marked, they form a part of the eight that I had given to Barry. I attended the examination of the prisoner in Mr. Newman's house, about a fortnight after he was in custody, Barry was then produced as a asked what he had to say in answer to the charge that had been brought against him.

Q. Was this examination taken down in writing. - A. The examination was taken before Mr. Alderman Christopher Smith , what the prisoner said was not taken down, it was suggested that he had better leave what he had to say until the time of his trial. The prisoner denied all knowledge of Barry, and said he had never seen him before.

JOSEPH BECKITT . I am a turnkey in the House of Correction, Cold Bath Fields.

Q. Were you present on the 23d of September when some bank notes were delivered by Mr. Westwood to Barry. - A. I was; I marked them and searched Barry dilligently, previous to the notes being put in his possession, there was nothing in his possession but a shilling and a few halfpence. I accompanied Barry to Newgate, with Mr. Westwood in a coach to the end of Newgate Street, and when he came out again he delivered into my hand three two pound notes. I marked them. These are the notes. I delivered them to Mr. Westwood.

Q. Now look at these five that Mr. Westwood produced, that were returned to him by Barry. Are those five that you hold in your hand now, part of the eight that you marked in company with Mr. Westwood, in the House of Correction, Cold Bath Fields. - A. They are.

Q. Now when you had received the three two pound notes of Barry, did you afterwards go into Newgate. - A. I delivered them first to Mr. Westwood, the three two pound notes. After that I went into Newgate, accompanied by John Brown, the city officer. I went with Brown to the prisoner's room, there were seven or eight people in the prisoner's room.

Q. Was there any of the turnkeys there. - A. Yes, two, Vinge and Smart went in with us. The prisoner was sitting on the bed, I asked him if he had any property about him, he answered yes, he put his hand into his pocket and pulled out a handful of gold, after that he pulled out a pocket-book containing notes, I opened the book and looked over a great many of the notes, he then produced a stocking full of notes. It was requested by some one in the room to have the number of the notes taken down as I looked over them, after I looked over twenty or thirty, or more, some in the stocking and some in the pocket-book. I asked him for the remainder of the property he had got about him, he said he had no more property, then he put his right hand in his waistcoat pocket, he pulled some notes out of his right hand waistcoat pocket and laid them on the bed, about twenty or thirty pound. I looked over them and found they were not what I wanted, that had my mark upon them, he then put his hand in his left hand waistcoat pocket and pulled out three notes, he laid them down on the bed. These were three one pound notes that had my mark upon them.

Q. Were these three that the prisoner took from his left hand pocket, part of the eight that was given to Barry in Cold Bath Fields prison. - A. Yes.

Q. Now these three notes you say he produced and laid them down on the bed. - A. Yes, I took them up and looked at them, and by request I handed them over to Brown the same as the rest to have the numbers After the numbers were taken down

Brown handed them back to me, just after I had got them in my hand from Brown, the prisoner Habberfield ran and snatched them out of my hand, he snatched part of the three notes out of my hand, he left three pieces in my hand.

Q. What was done with the part that remained in he prisoners hand. - A. He went to the fire immediately, I ran and caught hold of the prisoner to prevent him burning them, there was a scuffle took place between Vinge, Brown, and the prisoner, to prevent him burning them. the prisoner attempted to put them under the trivet on the fire. I believe there was a kettle on the trivet, he tried to shove them under the trivet, but was prevented. I took some off the fire, it was in the flames, I throwed it on the ground and put my foot upon it.

Q. Did he attempt to snatch any other bank notes out these three. - A. None, he afterwards snatched at some paper that the person had been taking down the numbers.

Q. What numbers did the paper relate to. - A.I tore off from the paper the numbers of these three notes, was in my hand, and he snatched at it. This is the paper, I delivered the paper to Mr. Westwood.

Q. You had tore it off before he snatched at it. - A. Yes.

Q. Take that in your hand, you see there are two one pound notes, each tore in half, and two bits of a one pound note - A. They have my mark on them. They are what the prisoner produced out of his left hand pocket, they are also the notes that he snatched at and tempted to burn.

Q. Are they also part of the eight notes that you and Mr. Westwood marked together in Cold Bath Fields prison, and delivered to Barry. - A. They are, there is y mark on them.

COURT. During all this enquiry of yours about the property, did the prisoner put any question to you, what business you had with his property. - A. As we were going out he asked us what business we had with his property, and said he would serve us out. We did not tell him for what purpose we came, there were so many in the room.

JOHN M'QUIRE. Q. I understand you are employed in the House of Correction, Cold Bath Fields. - A.am, I was present when Beckitt searched Barry, he was searched dilligently, he had no notes about him. I am not certain whether there were not a few halfpence, there was no money to a great amount about n.

Q. Then you saw some notes that were marked by Mr. Westwood and Beckitt, given to Barry. - A.Yes. I think eight one pound notes. I went with Mr. Westwood, Beckitt, and Barry in a coach to Newgate.

Mr. Alley. Is the time of Barry's conviction out. - A. No.

EDWARD VINGE . I am one of the turnkeys of Newgate.

Q. Were you present on the 23d of September, in Newgate, when the prisoner produced any property to the witness Beckitt. - A. I was.

Q. I believe you were sent there for the purpose of ing present. - A. I was by the order of Mr. Newman that was produced was from his left hand waistcoat pocket, after the prisoner produced these, notes I saw him snatch them out of the officers hands.

Q. Who was the officer. - A. Beckitt.

COURT. In whose hands were they. - A. I cannot say rightly whether Beckitt or Brown. I saw him snatch them, he immediately put them on the fire underneath the tea kettle, they were taken out of the fire by the officer, he trampled upon them and extinguished the flame.

JOHN BROWN. Q. You are one of the city officers. - A. I am.

Q. Did you go with Beckitt to Newgate on Monday, the 23d of September. - A. Yes, I saw the prisoner at the bar produce a great many notes, some in a book, some loose that he took out of his breeches pocket, and some in a stocking, after producing these, Beckitt told him he had more, he then pulled three more out of his left hand waistcoat pocket, he gave them to Beckitt to look at, the moment that Beckitt had looked at them, he gave them into my hands for a man that was sitting by to take the numbers down, after the man had taken the numbers, I returned the three notes to Beckitt again. At the moment that Beckitt had got them in his hands, the prisoner Habberfield made a snatch at them, Beckitt immediately scuffled, and Habberfield made towards the fire place, seeing him in the act of putting them under the kettle, I immediately laid hold of him with my left hand, and stretched my right hand out to lay hold of the notes, his waistcoat gave way so that I was obliged immediately to throw him down, the moment he fell, the notes fell from his hand into the fire, as soon as he was down I put my hand into the fire to rescue the notes, there were two partly whole not burnt, and one partly burnt. I picked up the piece that was burnt and gave it into Beckitt's hands, the other I put into my pocket, that I took off the fire and kept it in my pocket until I came out of the prison I then delivered them into the hands of Mr. Westwood, in the lobby of the prison. The man, then of the name of Gilbert, was then asked for the paper that he had taken the numbers down. Gilbert gave the paper into Beckett's hands, who immediately tore off the number of the three notes now in question.

Q. You mean by that the number of the three notes that came out of the left hand pocket. - A. I do. When they were torn off Habberfield made a snatch at that paper, but could not accomplish it.

Q.(to Mr. Westwood.) Do you know that paper. - A. I received this paper from Beckett, it contains the number of the three notes that were torn.

Q. Look at the mark of the five notes. - A. The mark that I made is a small W, under the one at the back of each of the notes, all the eight notes were marked the same way.

Q.(to Beckett.) Point out the mark on the five ones, and tell me what is your mark, and whether that mark appears upon them. - A. My mark is a blind E, the letter E filled up, it is on all of them, even upon that which appears burnt.

THOMAS GLOVER . Q. You are one of the inspectors of the Bank of England. - A. I am.

Q. It is your business as such to examine notes. - A. It is.

Q.

notes given to Barry, are these genuine or forged notes. A. These are forged notes, the signatures are forged as well a the rest of the notes. They are not the impression of bank plates, nor bank paper or ink. They appear to be impressions from the same plate all three and they appear to be filled up by the same hand writing.

Mr. Alley. These notes are such that any man in honest course of trade might take them. - A. They might.

(The notes read.)

Mr. Alley. Q.(to Mr. Ray.) Would the Bank of England pay one of their own notes, struck from their own copper plates, having the same appearance of these. - A. I have known an instance where it has been entirely a blank. These are exactly as bank notes are.

The prisoner upon being asked what he had to say in his defence, handed a paper to Mr. Alley.

Mr. Alley. He merely says it is a wicked accusation of these people.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 50.

London jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson .

Reference Number: t18111030-44

847. PAUL WHITEHEAD was indicted for feloniously forging and counterfeiting an acceptance on a certain bill of exchange for 87 l. 10 s. with intention to defraud William Moreland , Scrope Bernard Moreland , the Honourable Douglas Kinneer , William Bernard Moreland , and John Hosier .

SECOND COUNT - for like offence, with intention to defraud Abraham Roberts , Sir William Curtis , Bart. Abraham Wildey Robarts , and William Curtis jun.

THIRD COUNT - with intention to defraud Thomas Gullan .

AND THREE OTHER COUNTS - for uttering and publishing as true a like forged acceptance, with the same intention.

The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.

ABRAHAM WILDEY ROBARTS Q. What is the firm of your house - A. Abraham Robarts , Sir William Curtis , Bart. Abraham Wildey Robarts, and William Curtis jun.

Q. On the 3d of May last were you at the Royal Exchange. - A. I was, I am not positive to the day, it was in the early part of May, I saw the prisoner there.

Q. Did you know him before. - A. No, I did not. He accosted me by name, he said he had a favour to ask of me. I expressed some surprize that he should address me as he was a perfect stranger to me, he then stated that I must have seen him in the cashier's office in the bank, I then looked at him, and recollected him in that situation as having been a clerk in the bank, I asked him what favour he had to ask of me, he replied he wished me to discount a bill, I expressed a considerable reluctance in doing it, stating that I never wished to discount bills out of the regular course of business.

Q. Had any bill been produced by him. - A. No. He then stated to me that he was very well known by Mr. Lee, one of our principal clerks, who would also confirm his statement to me, he would go over to our house, and Mr. Lee would confirm it. I still continued to express my dislike to discount the bill, he pressed me very hard, that he had a sum of money to make up in was not made up, would be affected by it, to the best of my recollection them are the words he said I went back with him to my house, I then called Mr. Lee, Mr. Lee said he knew him very well as a clerk in the cashier's office in the bank, that he had always been very civil and very attentive to him when he had occasion to transact any business in that office. The bill was then produced, I think, for the first time by the prisoner, I then shewed the bill to Mr. Lee in his presence, Mr. Lee stated that he thought from the situation that the prisoner was in the bank, there would not be any risque in discounting a bill of that amount. I however was not perfectly satisfied with that, I requested the bill might be left with me, in order that I might make enquiry of Ransom's clerk, with respect of the respectability of the acceptor. I said that in the presence of the prisoner, The prisoner expressed no objection of leaving the bill with me at all, and accordingly, the next day, when Ransom's clerk came to our house, I asked him if it was a bill that I might safely discount.

Q. In consequence of these enquiries, did you give any directions to discount the bill. - A. When I was satisfied, I then gave directions for the bill to be discounted, and the money given to the prisoner, charging him for the regular discount.

Q. Did you see it paid. - A. No, I did not.

Mr. Arabin. Look at that bill, and see whether that is the bill. - A. This is certainly the bill.

Mr. Alley. You have no other partner at all intrested. - A. None whatever than has been stated.

Q. The man left it with you in order that you might make enquiry. - A. I made the enquiry myself.

Q. You could not remember the name of Gullan, you shewed him the bill, and the clerk on looking at the bill, he said it was a bill that you might take. - A. Yes.

WILLIAM LEE . Q. You are a clerk in Robarts's house. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar. - A. I do, I have known him probably four or five years, I knew him first in the chief cashier's office in the bank.

Q. Was he in the cashier's office at the time he came to you. - A. I thought he was, it turned out he was not.

Q. Do you remember his coming to your house. - A. I remember enquiry being made of me by Mr. Robarts, whether I knew him or not, the prisoner was present, I knew him very well, I once knew him to be a respectable man.

Q. Did you pay the prisoner the day after the amount of that bill. - A. I did.

Q. Look at that bill and see whether you know it. - A. I do not know that I saw it. The bill goes into another office, a ticket is brought me; Whitehead brought the ticket himself, and I paid him the money. This is the entry in the book, 86 l. 18 s. 2 d. G b. that is the book, I paid him eighty seven pounds in Bank notes, he paid one shilling and ten pence to make it even bank notes, that is the amount, deducting the discount. The bill was eighty-seven pounds ten shillings, that left eleven shillings and ten pence discount.

Mr. Alley. I see the name of Whitehead is here, now you copied that from some other person in the A. Yes, I

Q. Pay P Whitehead eighty-six pounds eighteen shillings and two pence. Looking at that, can you say that you paid that for the ticket that is now produced - A. Yes, I knew Mr. Whitehead very well.

Q. That I know. Looking at this you could not say whether the bill was one month, two, or three; you know that would make a difference, if the bill was a two month bill, then this might be it deducting the interest, I want to know whether the bill produced in question was the bill that Whitehead discounted to you. - A. It certainly was.

Q. When was it you first saw the bill before. - A. The night before I paid the money Mr. Robarts enquired if I knew Whitehead, I had seen the bill the night before.

Q. You might have seen a bill in Whitehead's hands, which being a two month bill, and deducting the discount, would amount to this ticket. - A. It could not be two months quite, the interest would be more.

Q. I want to know, you not having the bill presented to you at the time, how you can swear to that being the bill. - A. I do not know that ever Mr. Whitehead discounted a bill before.

Court I understood you to have been present the day before, when the prisoner came into your shop, Mr. Robarts called to you to tell him what you knew about the prisoner. - A. Yes, then I believe I saw the bill, but not when I paid the money, Mr. Robarts asked me wether I knew Whitehead, Whitehead was present.

JEREMIAH BOWEN . Q. You are clerk in the house of Robarts and Co. - A. I am.

Q. Did you at any time present that bill. - A. I presented it at Ransom's in Pall Mall, on the 21st of June, it was not paid.

JOHN DOMAN . Q. You are one of the principal cashiers in the house of Ransom, Moreland, and Co. - A. I am.

Q. Tell us the partners of that house. - A. William Moreland , Scrope Bernard Moreland , the Honourable Douglass Kinneer , William Bernard Moreland , and John Hosier .

Q. Do you know a person of the name of Thomas Gullan . - A. Yes; his house is in Manchester Buildings, his livery stables are in King Street, Westminster.

Q. Had he an account in your house. - A. He had.

Q. Had you received general directions not to pay any acceptances from him. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you refuse payment of it. - A. It was refused by me, it was presented by Mr. Bowen, Mr. Robarts's clerk.

Q. Do you know Mr. Gullan's hand writing. - A. I do exceeding well.

Q. Look at that, and tell me wether you know that acceptance is Mr. Gullan's hand writing. - A. In my judgment it is not, I have seen him write repeatedly.

Mr. Alley. In your judgment it is not is your answer, I want to know whether that judgment is formed in consequence of any conversation with Mr. Gullan, or whether it is solely the result from the view of the bill itself. - A. From the bill itself, strengthened from that.

Q. Suppose you had seen that, and you had no conversation with Mr. Gullan, would you not believe that to be his hand writing. - A. I certainly would not.

Mr. Knapp. Supposing you had received no directions from Mr. Gullan himself, should you have paid that bill. - A. Not if I had looked at it as I do now, - it might have been paid in the hurry of business.

Mr. Alley. Making allowance for the distinction of a man's writing now and then, can you undertake to say that is not Mr. Gullan's hand writing. - A. I have seen him sign drafts for fifteen years, according to the best of my opinion it is not his hand writing.

RICHARD GULLAN . Q. You are the brother of Thomas Gullan . - A. I am, his stables are in King Street, Westminster.

Q. You know your brother's hand writing. - A. Very well, I have seen him write very often.

Q. Look at that acceptance, and say whether that is his hand writing. - A. No ways like it, it is not his writing.

Mr. Alley. You are come here to tell us that it is no ways like it, are you his partner. - A. No, we are not concerned in trade.

Q You both carry on the same business. - A. Yes, we are no ways connected in business.

Court. Do you know any other person of the name of Thomas Gullan living in King street. - A. No one. I did know one, that was his father, he has been dead ten years.

Q.(to Doman.) Have you any other customer that keeps cash at your shop of the name of Thomas Gullan , who keeps stables in King Street. - A. Not any.

TIMOTHY HILL I live at Westminster Bridge foot, I am an ironmonger.

Q. Do you know Thomas Gullan , the livery stable keeper, Westminster. - A. I have known him fourteen or fifteen years, I never heard of any other of that name, I have lived there twenty-four years, I have seen Thomas Gullan write frequently.

Q. Look at that and tell me according to your belief whether that is his hand writing or not. - A. No, it is not.

Mr. Alley. Do you form your opinion solely upon the hand writing, supposing you had seen it elsewhere. - A. I should be able to have said it was not his handwriting.

WILLIAM HADNUTT . I live in Oakley Street, Lambeth.

Q. Do you know Thomas Gullan , the livery stable keeper there. - A. Yes, I have known him six years, I know of no other person of the name of Thomas Gullan living near there.

Q. Have you seen Mr. Gullan write. - A. Yes, frequently.

Q. Tell me whether you believe that to be his hand writing or not. - A. I do not believe it is.

HENRY DOVER . Q. In what situation are you in the Bank of England. - A. In the chief cashier's office.

Q. Do you know the prisoner Whitehead. - A. I do.

Q. On the 3rd of May last, was he in your office. - A. No, he was not, he had been in the office before, he left it the 2nd of August, 1810.

Mr. Alley. Sometimes persons are suspended in the

Bank of England, and taken in again. - A. I believe they are, he gave in his resignation.

Q. That you do not know of your own knowledge. - A. No.

Mr. Arabin. Has he ever been in any office in the Bank since he resigned. - A. No.

(The Bill read.)

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel, and called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 36.

London Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18111030-45

848 EDWARD POULTER was indicted for feloniously forging, on the 23d of August , a certain order for the payment of ten pounds, being an order in the name of R. Roberts, directed to Messrs. Grote and Prescott , with intention to defraud them .

SECOND COUNT - for desposing of and putting away a like forged order, for the payment of money, with the same intention.

AND TWO OTHER COUNTS - for like offence, only stating the intention to be to defraud Robert Roberts .

ROBERT ROBERTS was called upon his subpoena, but did not appear in court.

THOMAS MAKIN . Q. Do you know Robert Roberts . - A I do.

Q Have you seen him write. - A. I have, but it is now some time since. I have seen him write several times.

Q. Take the draft in your hand and look at the signiture R Roberts, and tell me whether you believe that to be his hand writing. - A. I cannot say whether it is or not. I think it may be his hand writing, there is some resemblance, if it was handed to me for payment I should think it was his hand writing.

The prisoner was not put on his defence.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron Thompson .

Reference Number: t18111030-46

849. EMANUEL LEVY and TIMOTHY MURPHY were indicted for feloniously making an assault in the King's Highway, on the 26th of September , upon Robert Worth , putting him in fear and taking from his person and and against his will, a watch, value 2 l. and a watch chain, value 2 s. the property of Michael Worth .

SECOND COUNT - for like robbery stating it to be the property of Robert Worth .

ROBERT WORTH I was nine years old on the 30th of June last. My father is a stationer in Cambridge Street, Hackney Road

Q Had you ever a watch gave you. - A. Yes, my father gave me a silver watch.

Q. How long had you this watch before this happened, that you are to speak about. - A. About half a year, this happened on Thursday the 26th of September. I was going home from school, it was about a quarter past twelve I go to school at Mr. Parry's, by Hackney turnpike, I had my watch with me then in my waistcoat pocket, I put the chain through my waistcoat button hole.

Q. So that part of the chain was out - A. Yes, I was going alone.

Q. Whereabouts was it that any thing happened to you. - A. Almost facing of the Nag's Head, about a quarter of a mile from the school, and about half a mile from my father's house. I was in the road walking towards my father's. Three men came all of a row, they met me.

Q Did you know any of these men - A. Yes, the two prisoners at the bar are two of the three, I was going of one side of them, they stopped me, then I wanted to go on the other side of them, they stopped me again, they would not let me pass, they slipped before me, they kept of a row when they slipped before me. Then I wanted to go of the other side of them and they slipped before me, there they made an opening in the middle, I wanted to go through and two of them closed me.

Q. Explain what you mean by closing you, what did they do. - A. They crowded me up, they pushed me, they both got me in between one another, and I was standing between them, they pushed against me, and squeezed me, they crowded me up and said stop young fellow, then they snatched at the watch and broke the chain.

Q. Can you say which man snatched the watch. - A. Yes, Murphy. I am not sure it was him, it was one of these two men.

Q. Was it between these two men that you were pushed and squeezed - A. Yes, it was one of these two that snatched the watch and broke the chain.

Q. What became of your watch. - A. They took it, when the chain was broke they snatched it out of my pocket and then gave it to the other.

Q. They put a hand into your pocket and took your watch, did they - A. Yes, and part of the chain remained in my button hole. They ran down Nag's Head Yard directly after they took it out. I holloaed out, a soldier ran after them and they were taken into a house. I saw them in the house.

Q. How happened it that only two were taken, there were three men. - A. The other ran down the London Field, and the two men that ran down Nag's Head Yard was taken.

Q. And one of them that were taken was the man that took your watch. - A. Yes.

Q Did you ever see your watch again. - A. No.

Q. Were the two prisoners that were taken searched in the house. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see any part of your chain again. - A. Yes, here it is they left in my button hole.

Q. I suppose you were a good deal frighted while this was doing. - A. Yes.

Q. Notwithstanding this did you take notice enough of the men to know them again. - A. Yes I followed them quite close down Nag's Head Yard. I never lost sight of them before they were taken. They were taken to Worship Street and I went there the same day, soon after this happened.

JOB GREGGS. I am a soldier. On this day between twelve and one o'clock. I was about twenty yards from the Nag's Head, as I came along I saw the child run across he road

Q. Had you seen any men with him before that time. - A. No. I heard the boy cry out stop thief, he has got my watch, these two prisoners were turning down Nag's Head Yard at the time, and as they found there was no thoroughfare they were returning back again. I stopped them both, I asked Murphy to give the boy his watch, he said he had not got it.

Q. Did you see any thing of a third man. - A. No. I took them into a persons house in the yard, there I had them searched, they had not got the watch about them.

JAMES SANDERS I am a watchman. I had been to the London Fields selling cakes in the day time, I was coming home. I was near the Nag's Head. I saw the three men altogether, and saw the boy. I was about four or five hundred yards off them, or not quite so far. I saw them shuffling and hustling the boy, and stopping him from going along, they shoved him from one to the other.

Q. Can you undertake to say that they did any more than stop him. - A. They shoved him from one to another.

Q. Then were you so far off as four or five hundred yards. - A. No. I made a mistake in that, I was near the Nag's Head.

Q. Were you near enough to hear them say any thing. - A. No.

Q. Did you actually see them lay hold of him and see them shove him from one to another. - A. Yes, I did. All at once I saw them all three run, and immediately the boy cried stop them, they have got my watch. I holloaed out stop them, they have got the lads watch, they all three ran past me, the lad and I ran after them, they got up Nag's Head Yard, the soldier had got them before I got there.

Q. Did you see the other man run. - A. No. I did not see that, the boy and I followed these two.

MICHAEL WORTH. Q. You are the father of that little boy. - A. Yes.

Q. You made your son a present of a watch I understand. - A. Yes, rather better than six or seven months, and a steel chain. I wore this chain myself twenty years, the watch was not quite so old as the chain.

Q Had you given it him or lent it him. - A. Which you please, he called it his watch, and I allowed him to call it so.

JOSHUA REYNOLDS. I am a constable. On the 26th of September, between twelve and one o'clock, I was coming out of the Nag's Head public-house, I heard the cry of stop thief, the people said they had just run down Nag's Head Yard. When I got to the yard I met this soldier coming up with the two men, I heard the boy, these are the men that stole my watch, we took them into a neighbour's house in the yard, we searched them and found nothing, and after that took them to Worship Street. The magistrate knew them directly

Levy's Defence I was going of an errand for my father down Hackney Road, I was going along by the side of this little boy, I was off him a good way. When I heard him holloa out, stop him, he has got my watch, I saw the little boy run after the prisoner.

Q. What you mean the other man there. - A. Yes, I was running the same as some more people, one of these men took me in custody and charged me with having the boy's watch,

Murphy's Defence. I was looking after work, I heard stop thief cried, and as I was passing this turning that soldier stopped me and gave charge of me.

LEVY GUILTY , aged 16.

MURPHY GUILTY, aged 18,

Of stealing from the person, but not with violence ,

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson .

Reference Number: t18111030-47

850 JOHN BAGNELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of October , three pound eight ounces weight of hair, value 4 s. the property of Caleb Welsh Collom and Richard Wells .

JOSEPH LUCKETT . I am in the employ of Messrs. Collom and Wells, they are hair manufacturers , their house is in Fleet Street, and their manufactory is in Water Lane, the prisoner was in their employ. On Wednesday last I found some hair under the horse's manger in the stable, I went immediately to the accompting house and informed Mr. Wells of it, and then Mr. Goodwin went with me and found it as I had described, he took it away with him, and afterwards returned it me, I put it in the same place again. After the prisoner was gone the hair was gone.

Q. What time was it you found it. - A. Between six and seven.

JOSEPH GOODWIN I am an apprentice to the prosecutors. On the afternoon of Wednesday last the last witness shewed me where a bundle of hair was, I found it under the manger under the stable, I took it to the accompting-house and shewed it to Mr Wells. It was in separate lots, I put a dark piece of twine round each bundle, I gave it to Luckett and desired him to place it where he took it from, this was between seven and eight o'clock. Mr. Wells brought the prisoner to the accompting-house about a quarter before eight o'clock, he desired a porter to search him, the prisoner pulled off his coat and waistcoat, and afterwards pulled the hair out of his breeches. It had the dark thread on it, I knew it to be my master's property

WILLIAM WELLS . My partner's name is Caleb Welsh Collom After I had been informed of this hair being found and replaced I went to the stable, Luckett gave me a signal, the prisoner came out of the table, I took him over to the accompting-house and called the porter to search him, he took off his coat and waistcoat, I told him he had it about his person, he then took it out of his small clothes. This is the parcel, it is the kind of hair that we use in our manufactory, I believe it is our property, it is worth upwards of four shillings. The prisoner earned thirty-four shillings a week, and his wife ten shillings and six pence, he had been with us two years

Prisoner's Defence. I had a little drop of beer. I did not know what I had done. I never did such a thing in my life before.

GUILTY , aged 35.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18111030-48

851. HANNAH NELSTROP was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of October , five skins of leather, value 7 s. the property of William West .

JOHN SMITH . I am shopman to Mr West, leather seller , in Bride Lane . The prisoner has been in the habit of coming to Mr. West's shop once or twice a week for ten months, and during that time when she bought articles at our shop, it was her custom to leave them, saying she was

day she asked to look at some sheep-skins, Mr. Tickner shewed them her, he went backwards, and I went into the accompting-house to direct a parcel, I heard a bustling, I looked through the glass, and saw the prisoner distinctly put something under her cloak, I went into the shop, she had selected some skins, and offered money to pay for those, saying, she wanted to go to the Oxford warehouse to buy sheets, she put five shillings down on the counter, I said,

"Mr. Tickner will be here presently, he will prize them," I stepped backward, told Mr. Tickner my suspicions. As soon as she saw Mr. Tickner coming she threw down the five shillings and went out, without taking the goods that she had selected. I immediately pursued her and brought her back, Mr. Tickner asked her whether the skins under her cloak had been prized, she said, no, it was the first time she had taken any, she hoped he would pardon her, he lifted up her cloak and took from her five skins, value seven shillings the prime cost, they are the property of William West . These are the skins.

MR. TICKNER. The other witness has stated the transaction, I know no more.

Prisoner's Defence. I beg for mercy.

GUILTY , aged 49.

Confined Six Months in Newgate , and whipped in jail .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18111030-49

852 CORNELIUS REYNOLDS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of October , a pound weight of cantharides, value 1 l. 19 s. the property of Edward Harvey , Thomas Beckworth , Robert Baron , Robert Hernon , and William Lanckton .

THOMAS BECKWORTH. I am a druggist in Giltspur Street , my partner's names are Edward Harvey, Robert Baron , Robert Hernon , and William Lanckton . The prisoner lived porter with us about eighteen months, he had access to all our warehouses. From information on the 30th of October we sent for Branscomb and Drinkwater, two officers, and during the time that we were relating to them the information that we had received, the prisoner was leaving our premises at the bottom of the gateway, he was going to dinner.

Q. Can you take upon yourself to say that he had been that day in the warehouse where the cantharides were. - A. I only know from report. When Branscomb was in possession of the information, he immediately stopped the prisoner, he took him to the warehouse and searched him, I saw Branscomb take a paper bag from him containing a pound of cantharides, they were worth thirty-nine shillings.

Q. Was it a species of drug that you had in your warehouse. - A. Yes.

THOMAS BRANSCOMB. I am a constable, I was sent for to Mr. Beckworth's warehouse, the prisoner and two more were going out of the gate, I desired that they might go back into the warehouse, they all went back. I followed the prisoner into one warehouse, and Drinkwater followed another into another warehouse, I told the prisoner I must search him, I took out of the front of his small-clothes this paper bag, I asked him what it was, he said he did not know any thing about it, he did not take it, I took him to the Compter, and after that went and searched his house, we found se-

Q. When you produced this paper bag did Mr. Beckworth claim the property. - A. He did, they were his.

- DRINKWATER. I am a constable, I went to the prisoner's house with Branscomb I found a great many articles, cayene, pepper, cloves, black lead as much as half a bushel.

Prosecutor. These cantharides are a similar article to what we have, I have compared them to the chest, they are similar.

Prisoner's Defence. The cantharides I got from another person, I did not know that they were my master's.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 54.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18111030-50

153 JAMES MANSFIELD was indicted for that he on the 15th of September , a certain boat coming from certain foreign parts, found by Henry Smith , a servant in the customs of our Lord the King, containing one hundred gallons of foreign brandy, and Geneva in four gallon casks, the said Henry Smith , being the said officer, did lawfully seize the said boat, containing the said foreign brandy and Geneva, and after seizing the said boat, containing the said foreign brandy and Geneva, he the said James Mansfield , by force and violence, feloniously did assault, oppose, molest, and hinder the said Henry Smith in retaining and securing the foreign brandy and Geneva .

The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.

HENRY SMITH . Q. You are the deputed mariner on board the Rattle Snake. - A. Yes.

Q. Were you so on the 15th of September last. - Yes, she is a lugger belonging to the customs.

Q. On the 15th of September you were on board of one of the boats of the Rattle Snake. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see any boat that attracted your attention. - A. Yes, in the Walmer road, a little before eleven at night; we chased the boat and came up with her, when she found that we came up with her, she ran on shore.

Q. How near was she to the shore when you first saw her. - A. She was about thirty rods off.

Q. What did it turn out that she contained. - A. Spirits in half anchors. She was full when I seized her first.

Q. You seized her. - A. Yes.

Court. After she got on shore you actually seized her. - A. Yes, the boat's crew were with me at the time, I saw the mob assemble on the beach, I cannot tell what number they were. I sent after the soldiers directly, I went up on the beach, and told the mob to keep off, if they did not I would fire into them, they gave three huzzas and ran down to the boat, and began to take out the tubs.

Q. Do you know what number they took out. - A. No, I cannot say, I judge that there might have been about sixty taken away, because the boat was full when I seized her, and afterwards there were left but thirty-two. When I saw them take out the half anchors, I fired a couple of pistols over them, that was for a signal for the other Custom house boats to come to assist; d not desist, I ordered the boats

crew to fire in upon them, the fire was not returned just at that present time; finding that I could not keep them off, I ran up to the barracks, the soldiers were just coming out, they came down with me, the serjeant is here of the 21st Regiment, he came down with a party and assisted, then when I came I fired my piece, and ran round the boat, and the mob left it, they ran up behind the boats that laid on the top of the beach, the mob did, and then they fired two or three pieces, the mob did, we could see the flashes but not see the people, we tried to get the boat off, at the time they fired I ran up on the top of the beach, there I saw Leonard, he told me he took a man.

Q. Did you see the man. - A. Yes, I told him to take care of him.

Q. Did you know the man. - A. I did not know the man then, I knew him since, I saw him on board our lugger the next day morning.

JOHN LEONARD . I am a private in the 23d Light Dragoons.

Q. On the 15th of September, were you stationed at Walmer barracks, near Deal. - A. Yes

Q. Did the Custom-house officer come to your barracks for the assistance of the military. - A. Yes, about a quarter before eleven o'clock, at that time there was firing going on at the beach, I and others went to the beach.

Q. Did you go between the public houses called the Good Intent, and the King's Head. - A Yes, the firing was going on then, I think it proceeded from different parts, right and left; the fire was mostly on the left, but some on the right, Smith was with us, he told me to fire to the left, I fired twice accordingly to the left, I had no more ammunition I drew my sword, I then observed firing at my left, about twenty yards off or better; I instantly ran to the spot where I had seen the flashes of that firing. I found three men standing there behind a boat, I struck one of these three men with my sword, somewhere about the shoulder.

Q Was that man the prisoner at the bar. - A. I cannot say, it was dark.

Q Upon your so striking that man somewhere near the shoulder, did that man speak to you - A. Yes, I do not think I touched the skin. I left a mark upon the jacket, the man said soldier, do not strike me, I am a man of Deal, and have a small family, I seize him directly, and made him my prisoner, I delivered him over to Serjeant Lamshire.

Q.Had you any doubt whatever that the last firing, by the flash of which you ran to that boat, proceeded from that boat where these three men were. - A. I should think it was, I have no doubt of it, it must be some or one of them, the last firing I think was only one piece discharged at the spot to which I ran.

Q. How near were the three men to the boat when you came up to them. - A. They were all three in the rear of the boat.

Mr. Alley. You fired all your ammunition, and then drew your sword. A. Yes, I was about twenty yards from the boat from which I saw the flash come, and so far from the Custom house boat.

Q. The persons that were in the boat could not tell but that it came from the other boat. - A. Yes.

Q. So there were distinct parties firing on the ground

Q. You struck some man on the shoulder, and you did not touch his skin, but you think you cut his coat. - A. Yes.

Q. That man had not any stick. - A. No.

Q. Did you find any ammunition, or guns, or any thing of that sort. - A. No, not about the place.

Q.Nor in the boat. - A. No.

SERJEANT LAMSHIRE I am a Serjeant, I was on barrack guard at Walmer barracks, I belong to the 23d Dragoons.

Q. Did you go with the last witness Leonard - A. I did; when I went out first there was a great deal of firing from the left of our party, there were firing from different places.

Q. Did you see the smuggling vessel - A. I did.

Q. Did you see any firing from them - A. No, I did not.

Q. Do you remember being between the public houses, the Good Intent, and the King's Head - A. Yes.

Q. At that time did you hear any firing - A. I did, at that present time I gave orders to my men to fire.

Q. Did you see any person that Leonard had in charge - A. He gave me up the man he took, which I supposed to be one of the smugglers, it was very dark but I think it is the prisoner, it is the same man I delivered to Riley, I heard him say to Leonard when he struck him, Soldier, have mercy. I am a man of Deal, and have a small family.

Mr. Alley. When you were between these two public houses, the Good Intent and the King's Head you heard a firing, you could not say from whence it came. - A. No, I could not.

Court. Do you mean to say that you did not hear any firing until you came there - A Oh yes, I heard different firing as soon as I came out of the barrack gate before I got to the two public houses, but more when we got between the two public than there were before.

EDWARD RILEY . I am a private in the 23d Dragoons.

Q. Did you go on the evening of the 15th of September to assist the Custom house officers. - A. I did, I heard the firing before I went out.

Q In what direction. - A. Upon the beach; when I got down, I received a man from Serjeant Lamshire, he went to help to shove the boat into the water that the sailors were on board of, and he jumped into it, that was the seized boat, Tutt was in that boat, I saw nothing further of him, I told the Serjeant directly that he was got into the boat.

ISAAC TUTT . Where you there at that time. - A. Yes, I am one of the crew of the Rattlesnake, I was in the boat when he came in we were then launching the boat off, it might be a little after eleven, we took her along side of the boat belonging to the Scourge, and put him into that boat.

Q. Who did you put into the Scourge boat. - A. A strange man, as soon as he got into the boat he began to say how the soldiers had used him, he said he was glad to get out of the soldier's way, they had almost cut him in pieces, I afterwards, the next morning, when he was on board the Rattle Snake. saw his jacket; this is the jacket, here is the cut on the left shoulder.

Q. Then is had not - A. There is

Q.Is that the man now at the bar. - A. It is, I was in the boat that was seized, it contained spirits in half anchors, and there is no doubt but she is an English boat.

Mr. Alley. The man that was brought to your boat was a stranger. - A. Yes.

Q. You did not know by whom he was brought, or from whence he came you cannot say. - A. No, we took him to the lugger, there he remained five days.

Q. That is but a short way from the shore. - A. No.

Q. If he had had a mind to get away he might. - A. I don't know whether he could swim.

Mr. Gurney. He was on board the Rattle snake. - Yes.

Court. When you put off from shore with the seized boot, how many men had you on board that boat. - A. There were five of us in all, and the strange man one of the five, belonged to the Scourge, and the rest to the Rattle Snake, the prisoner was the only man that I did not know.

Jury. He assisted you in launching the boat off. - A. Yes, and he jumped in directly and sat down.

HENRY TUTT. I belong to the Scourge, I was lying off Deal, I received him from the smuggling boat, I took him to the Rattle Snake.

Q. Is the prisoner that man. - A. I cannot tell, it was dark when I received him.

THOMAS ROGERS . I am commander of the Rattle Snake. I received the prisoner on board the Rattle Snake between twelve and one, he was brought by Tutt, I had him on board the lugger five days, I am sure he is the man, his jacket was cut on his left shoulder.

GUILTY, aged 34.

Judgment respited .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18111030-51

854. HENRY CRAWLEY was indicted for returning before the expiration of the term for which he was ordered to be transported .

JOHN MILLER . I am a police officer. I produce the copy of the record of the conviction of the prisoner. I received it of Mr. Shelton. I saw him sign it.

(The copy of the conviction read.)

EDWARD VINGE . I am one of the turnkeys of Newgate.

Q. Where you here at the sessions last September twelve month. - A. I was not.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar. - A. Perfectly well, he was transported for seven years, I knew him there as a prisoner under that sentence in the jail of Newgate last September twelvemonth.

Q. What was his name. - A. Henry Crawley . I was not present when he was tried. After that Sessions he was detained, under that sentence, under the conviction of transportation for seven years.

Q. Do you know of his being removed from Newgate. - A. He was removed, I believe, on the 21st of February, 1811.

Q. What makes you think so. - A. That is the account in our books of the delivery on board the hulks. On the 21st of February I had the key of the main gate; when he was called down to be ironed with the

Q. Then he remained in Newgate from the Sessions till that time. - A. He did.

MR. BEASLY. I belong to the hulk at Woolwich. I received the prisoner on the 21st of February at the hulk at Woolwich.

Q. Was he ever discharged from the hulks. - A. No.

JOHN GRIFFITHS . I am a constable; from information I went in company with Miller, on the 30th of September, at nine in the evening, to the George public house, George yard. Whitechapel, we found the prisoner sitting in the tap room with another man in a box I told him he was wanted, he must go along with us, we took him down to the flying house by the office, I searched him, but found nothing but an old knife about him, I then took him into the parlour, we asked him how he got away, he said there was a hole made in the ship by some of the prisoners, and he got away. He asked me if I would not get out of the hole if I was there, I said yes, he said he got into the fields, and there he was four or five days, and there with a file he filed the irons off. When he was before Sir Daniel Williams , he said the reason of his going away was he was on board the hulk starved, and that was the reason of his going away.

Prisoner's Defence. I leave it to Jesus Christ, and his twelve apostles, I received these two wounds in my head in Lord Duncan's fleet, on board the Triumph, a ninety-four gun ship.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 30.

The prisoner was recommended to his Majesty's mercy, on account of the wounds that he had received.

London jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson .

Reference Number: t18111030-52

855. GEORGE FLOAT was indicted for feloniously assaulting Serjeant Gifford in the King's Highway, on the 8th of October , putting him in fear and taking from his person and against his will, a watch, value 2 l. a watch chain value 2 s. and a gold seal, value 10 s. his property.

SERJEANT GIFFORD. I am an under clerk to Cox, Stevens, and Company. I lost my watch on the 8th of October, about eight o'clock in the evening, I was going home to my lodgings, I live in Mount Street, at the back of Whitechapel. I was walking gently down Mount Street , a man came quick round the corner and ran against me with his right arm and whipped my watch out of my pocket with his left hand, it was done in a moment, he did not say a word, he took to his heels and ran away. I clapped my hand to my fob and missed my watch.

Q. You did not know the person of the man I suppose. - A. No. I followed him down the street, and called out stop thief, he ran to the end of the street, crossed Whitechapel and went into Baker's Row, there were several people followed him.

Q. Did you see him stopped. - A. No, he ran across through all the people, as they heard me say stop thief they followed him. The watch was advertised, I have not seen it since.

Q. You do not know the person that ran against you. - A. No.

SAMUEL MILLER . I received information on the 9th of October. I took the prisoner on that day between eight and nine in the evening. I took him at the

him, in one of his waistcoat pockets, I found this watch. I asked him whose it was, he said it was his own, and that he had had it two years, in the other waistcoat pocket I found this gold seal, he said he had had it eighteen months, and that it was his property.

Prosecutor. That watch is mine, I have had it forty years, it is a metal watch and a metal chain to it, the seal has a motto on it,

"Forward without fear." It is the same watch that was in my pocket the 8th of October last.

Prisoner's Defence. On the morning following I found the watch as I was going to work at the India Warehouse.

GUILTY, aged 23,

of stealing, but not with violence .

Transported for life .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blance.

Reference Number: t18111030-53

856. ELIZABETH THETFORD and MARGARET THOMPSON were indicted for feloniously making an assault in the King's Highway, upon William Hicks , on the 12th of October , putting him in fear and taking from his person and against his will, two one pound bank notes , his property.

WILLIAM HICKS. I am a silversmith . I work in Giltspur Street. On Saturday night the 12th of October, about ten o'clock, I was going home to my father, three girls came up to me, one laid hold of my coat.

Q. It was not done by any force I suppose. - A. No. I was going to push on when I saw a paper in Thetford's hand wrapped up with something in it.

Q. What sort of light had you. - A. It was not very light.

Q. Any lamps near. - A. No. I do not think there were any, I put my hand to my waistcoat pocket, I missed my money.

Q. You had not perceived any body take it had you. - A. No.

Q. What did you miss. - A. Two one pound notes and a halfpenny or a penny, I do not know which.

Q. Before you put your hand to your waistcoat pocket did you see any thing done with that paper in Thetford's hands. - A. Yes, she passed it into one of the other women's hands. I had received them notes in the accompting-house in Giltspur Street, and put them in my waistcoat pocket. Upon my missing them two bank notes, I said you have robbed me, give me my money or I am ruined. I then laid hold of all three, hey all began beating me, and two of them broke from me, I kept Thetford, she tried to get away, an officer came up and she was taken to the watch-house.

Q. Are you able to speak to the person of the other. - A. No. I can only speak to Thetford. I know nothing of Thompson. I have never seen my notes since.

EDWARD TRING . I am an headborough. I came up and took Thetford to the watch-house, I found no notes upon her.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson .

Reference Number: t18111030-54

857. MARY HICKEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, in the dwelling-house of Mary Menzies bank notes , the property of Richard Redding .

MARY REDDING. My husband's name is Richard Redding. I lodge in Mary Menzies house, Colvill Court, Charles Street . The prisoner lived with me and minded my child.

Q. Do you recollect losing any money at any time. - A. Yes. I saw my money safe in my box on the Friday or Saturday week before she was taken. I always kept my box locked.

Q. What did your money consist of. - A. Three one pound notes, and two guineas in gold.

Q. Had the prisoner ever seen your money in this box. - A. I do not know, I had never shewn it her. On Tuesday I agreed with her to stop, she lived with me weekly, I then settled with her. On the Wednesday morning she went away with her bundle telling me that she was going to a place where she should have two shillings a week. About an hour after that I went to the box, it was locked, I opened it, my money was gone.

Q. Do you happen to know while she was living in your room, whether she had any money or not. - A. I am certain she had no money, she always begged of me to give her a bit of tobacco until her week was up, she had lived with me about eight or nine weeks. I never saw my money or notes again.

WILLIAM WESTCOAT . On Wednesday the 16th of October I was coming through Coventry Court, I saw Mrs. Redding, she had hold of the prisoner, she said the prisoner had robbed her of three one pound notes and two guineas. The prisoner put her hand into her bosom as if she wanted to take something out, I took the prisoner into a house in Rupert Street, I put my hand into her bosom, I took out a little bag containing seventeen shillings, two half crowns, and the rest three shilling pieces. In her pocket I found this key, and eighteen penny pieces, she told me it was money she had brought away from Ireland. I took her to Bow Street, the key I found in her pocket I tried to Mrs. Redding's box, it locked and unlocked it.

GEORGE JAMES . I am the book-keeper of the Black Bear, Piccadilly. On Wednesday morning the 16th of October the prisoner came to me and took an outside fare for Bristol, about ten o'clock she paid eighteen shillings, she pulled out a bag, she had but fourteen shillings in silver, that not being enough she opened a dirty piece of paper, in that was a guinea, I gave her two shillings and eighteen penny pieces change.

MICHAEL HAYE . I found a bundle of the prisoner's at Mrs. Corbett's house.

MARY CORBETT . The prisoner came into my place on the Wednesday, between the hours of eight and nine in the morning, she asked me to let her leave the bundle while she went and took a place in the coach, this is the same bundle which Haye took in, the bundle is a shawl, three new handkerchiefs, and a new gown and petticoat.

Prisoner's Defence. They are my own gowns, myself bought them, I brought the money from Ireland in my petticoat, I told my mistress if she would not give me two shillings a week, I would part with her, I gave her a week's warning, and then left her, I never saw the inside of the box since I was born.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18111030-55

858. WILLIAM SAVAGE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of October , in the dwelling house of William Guy , a two-pound bank note, and six one pound bank notes , the property of Edward Pasquin .

The prosecutor was called, and not appearing in court, his recognisance was ordered to be estreated.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18111030-56

859. WILLIAM WHITE was indicted for feloniously being at large in this kingdom before the expiration of the term for which he was ordered to be transported .

JOHN LIMERICK. I produce the certificate of the conviction of the prisoner, I had it at Mr. Shelton's office, I examined it with Mr. Shelton, I saw Mr. Shelton sign it. I had information that William White was returned from Woolwich, I met the prisoner in Tottenham Court Road, and took him in custody on the 7th of October, I told him that I had suspicion that he had returned from transportation, which he denied at first, and going down Tottenham Court Road he confessed it.

(The copy of the record of the conviction of the prisoner read.)

Q.(to Limerick.) Did you see him tried. - A. No, I could not find any person that saw him tried, he signed his own information at the office.

The confession of the prisoner read.

10th of October, 1811. - The prisoner William White says, that he was sent to the hulks at Woolwich, and got from there on shore on Tuesday week, X the mark of William White .

Prisoner's Defence. My Lord and gentlemen of the Jury the circumstance that I feel it my duty to declare to his honourable court that caused me to do the act: During the last two years of my confinement I felt as happy and comfortable as it was possible for a man in my situation, looking forward to the time that should restore me to my family I have a wife and children. Not hearing from my wife for the last two years, on my enquiring I heard that she had cohabited with another man, and had a child by him, she has since married another man, and is with child by him. A boy of mine was permitted to see me, who told me this about three months ago. Jealousy and rage got the better of me, and finding no rest day or night, I resolved I would make my escape. I did not desire to make the above escape until the above circumstances came to my mind The night the ship was cut I could then come away if I liked. If ever there was a poor fellow deserved pity, I do.

LIMERICK. He hears a good character with the officer of the hulks, and here is an officer knows of the other man living with his wife.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 40.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18111030-57

860 WILLIAM FEARON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of October , four cravats value 8 s. two shirts, value 20 s. two coats, value 20 s. a pair of benches, value 5 s and a waistcoat value 2 s. the property of John Worship Sandys , in the dwelling house of John Worship Sandys and John Ratcliffe Cousins .

JOHN WORSHIP SANDYS . I occupy a set of chambers jointly with John Ratcliffe Cousins , in St. Clements Danes .

ELIZABETH HARVEY. I am a laundress at Clements Inn, to Mr. Sandys and Mr. Cousins. The pri- prisoner came on the 28th of October, at half past ten in the morning, he enquired for Mr. Cousins and Mr. Sandys, he told me that he had appointed to meet them there, I told him they were not within, he went away and came about one o'clock on the same day, he enquired if Mr. Cousins had returned, I told him no, he said that he had seen Mr. Cousins, and that he would be there at a quarter past one, he gave me some papers and told me to give them to Mr. Cousins, and he would return directly; I immediately put the papers into the chambers, about a quarter after one the prisoner returned, he enquired if Mr. Cousins had been, I told him no, he said would I return him the papers he gave me, I immediately opened the chamber door and gave the prisoner the papers, the prisoner then said he would wait a little while, I said very well; he walked in and sat down, I came out and left him in the room setting in the chair. I shut the parlour door and the passage door after me, I ran up stairs to my own room, which is over the chambers, and staid there about ten minutes. Mr. Cousins not coming home, I wanted to go of an errand, and being uneasy leaving a stranger in the chambers, I sat on the garret stairs, and on hearing the chamber door go gently, I looked over the bannisters, and saw the prisoner come out of the door with a great bundle under his arm, I immediately ran down stairs after him, and called out stop thief as quick as possible, he dropped the clothes he had under his arms on the last stair case, I immediately stepped over the clothes and followed him through the Inn, and called out stop thief, he was stopped by some gentlemen, who brought him back, he was searched, and these things were found upon him, two shirts, four cravats, they were taken out of his pocket, he was immediately taken to Bow Street. When I pursued the prisoner, I never lost sight of him until he was taken.

ELIZABETH PHILLIPS. I am a laundress at Clements Inn. I heard the cry of stop thief, I ran out of my room, and on the second pair of stairs I picked up these clothes.

Prosecutor. They are all mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I came from Plymouth two months ago, in order to get promotion in the navy, I had got an engagement with Captain Mackey , I had not the means of joining the ship, I had taken myself to this rash act.

GUILTY, aged 27,

Of stealing to the value of 39 shillings

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18111030-58

860. JOHN EVANS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of November , from the person of Richard Haughton , a silk handkerchief, value 5 s. his property.

RICHARD HAUGHTON . I am a silk mercer. No. 8, Henrietta-street, Covent Garden. Yesterday I was walking in Watling-street , I heard a voice exclaim, sir, your pocket is picked.

Q. Did you perceive any person at your pocket - A. No. I turned round and saw my handkerchief lay in the area of the house; I was passing, a cry of stop thief was raised; I saw a man pass me into Friday-street, I followed him, the man ran very fast, he was stopped before I came up to him. The prisoner is the man.

Q. Was your handkerchief a silk handkerchief - A. It was, and the value about five shillings. At first the prisoner denied that he had taken it, on the way to the Poultry Compter he seemed agitated, and said he would not do so again.

SAMUEL WILLIAMS. I am a warehouseman in Watling-street. I saw the prisoner and Mr. Haughton in Watling-street, I knew Mr. Haughton; I was on the opposite side of the way; the prisoner and another person was behind Mr. Haughton; I saw the prisoner take the handkerchief out of Mr. Haughton's pocket; the instant he took it he found he was detected, he threw it over his head, it went into an area; I do not know whether he saw me; there was a gentleman standing at a door directly opposite where the handkerchief fell. The prisoner run away, and I followed him, his companion was standing near by him at the same time, he did not attempt to run away; he did not run. It was not a minute before the prisoner was stopped.

Q.Have you any doubt that he was the man that did this act - A. No doubt; he was not out of my sight, only just when he turned round the corner. I came up when he was stopped. I told Mr. Haughton that he was the man that picked his pocket, I would go back and shew him where the handkerchief was. Going to the Compter the prisoner told me that I must mind what I swore to. We had the man that was with him up also, he being a bad character; the grand jury threw the bill out.

JOSEPH BENGOFF . I am a warehouseman, 48, Friday-street. I heard the cry of stop thief, and immediately recognised the other man as having been before Mr. Alderman Hunter; I saw the prisoner taken at the corner of Friday-street.

DANIEL CARTWRIGHT. I am a marshalman, I took the prisoner in custody, and received the handkerchief. I have had it ever since.

Q. Do you know the prisoner before - A. Yes.

Prosecutor. It is my handkerchief.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going to my work in Whitechapel; the gentleman passed me, his handkerchief was hanging out of his pocket, I took it out meaning to give it him; a gentleman passed me, I threw it of one side; I did not run, I walked. It is a very unlikely thing that I should put my hand in a gentleman's pocket in the day time. I wish to know where Cartwright knew me.

Cartwright. I knew you to be in the company of thieves about Fleet Market.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Transported for Life .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18111030-59

861. THOMAS RAWBONE and JOSEPH GRAINGE were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of October , a pair of shoes, value 10 s. the property of Robert Prior , privately in his shop .

ROBERT PRIOR. I live in Hillingdon-lane, I am a Windsor chair maker, and shopkeeper . On Tuesday, October the 8th, about half past seven in the evening, the two prisoners came into the shop, Rawbone said he wanted a pair of light shoes to ran a race that evening for a guinea by moon-light; he tried three or four pair on; Grainge sat on the counter, and directly they went out I suspected them. In about half an hour after Edward Brown produced to me a pair of high shoes, I believe they are mine. I missed a pair of high shoes from off a shelf by the door. Mrs. Prior was in the shop, she is not here.

EDWARD BROWN . I am a constable of Uxbridge. I took the prisoners about three hundred yards from Mr. Prior's shop. I met Mr. Prior in the street, he told me that he had been robbed of a pair of high shoes; he described the men, I took them by that description. I searched them, I found a pair of high shoes in Rawbone's pocket; Rawbone said he bought them; Mr. Prior claimed them in the prisoner's presence.

Rawbone said nothing in his defence.

Grainge's Defence. I am a soldier, I was recruiting in the town. I met the prisoner in the afternoon, he is a stranger to me. In the course of the evening he told me he was going to buy a pair of shoes; he went to Mr. Prior's shop; he tried a great many pair on; I did not know that he had a pair of shoes about him.

RAWBONE - GUILTY, aged 29,

Of stealing, but not privately .

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and Whipped in Jail .

GRAINGE - NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18111030-60

862. MANUEL JOSA DE SILVIA was indicted for the wilful murder of John Douglas .

JOHN WILLIAM TANDY . I am a seaman.

Q. When was it this happened - A. On Sunday evening, the 22d of September .

Q. Where had you been that evening - A. At Mr. Paris's the Bee Hive public-house in Nightingale-lane; I came out of the house about a quarter after ten o'clock, I was waiting for some person to go to bed with me at my lodging; I waited outside of the door, an English sailor came down Nightingale-lane, he asked me the way to Plough-court, I directed him; I saw him go as far as Redcross-street, and just as he got to the corner there came the prisoner and three other Portugueze, and Rosella Plunkett, I had seen her before. They came up as far as the Bee Hive door, some words occurred between them and the English sailor; the prisoner wanted to go back to the English sailor; Rosella Plunket appeared to be endeavouring to hold him; the other men had passed me; the prisoner said, d - n your eyes, you English b - r, I ll kick you to hell.

Q. Who was that said to by the prisoner - A. To this man that asked me the direction; he was standing

still at Redcross-street , about three yards from me. When the sailor heard them words he walked up to the prisoner; the prisoner then went out in the middle of the road, as to what words passed between them I cannot say. The deceased came towards the English sailor and the prisoner.

Q. Had you seen the deceased before - A. No. The deceased got in between them, and Rosella Plunket sung out, oh, Manuel, do not now; she repeated it, and before she could say it the third time the deceased came to me, and put his hand on my left shoulder, and said, I am stabbed. I put my hand to his left side, my hand was all over blood. I unbottoned his trowsers, and he walked with me as well as he could to Mr. Paris's bar at the Bee Hive.

Q. When you unbuttoned the waistband of his trowsers did you perceive any thing - A. Yes, it was just at the hip bone. When we came into the Bee Hive the deceased called for a glass of spirits; Mr. Paris said, you have got plenty of spirits running away from you, you do not want any. The deceased remained in the house, we went for a doctor, but could not get one. Some more of us joined together and took him up to a doctor's in East Smithfield.

Q. Did you go with him - A. Yes, and then I took a watchman with me and went to Mr. Bolingbroke's public-house, the prisoner was there and Rosella, I gave charge of him.

Q. You yourself saw no blow whatever made, did you - A. No, I never did.

Q. Did you afterwards hear the deceased's name - A. I did. On the Wednesday I went in the hospital, I saw him, he was then dead.

Mr. Gurney. How long was it after that you went to Bolingbroke's and caused the prisoner to be taken up - A. About twenty minutes or half an hour. I had been to the doctor's first.

Q. You found him in the public-house smoking his pipe - A. No, he was standing at the bar, and Rosella was in the house.

Q. What sort of a night was this - A. Rather dark.

Q. How far were you from the deceased at the time that you supposed he received the mischief - A. I have paced it since with eighteen long steps.

Q. And then you say there was the prisoner, the deceased, the English sailor, Rosella, and the other men close to him - A. Yes, about as far from him as I am to you.

Q. These three men, were they close together or parted - A. A little distance from each other, and Rosella close to the deceased.

Q. You went for a doctor, you could not find one, and when you came back you found in the house the English sailor that you have been speaking of - A. Yes, he went with me and the deceased to the doctor's shop.

Q. When you got him to the doctor's shop you found he was very bad indeed - A. Yes, and then we thought it was best to take him to the hospital.

Q. Upon which the English sailor went away, saying, he would fetch a coach to take him to the hospital, and he never brought any coach, or ever come back again - A. No, he did not.

Q. Have you ever seen either of these three Portuguese since - A. I have seen one, but at that time these three men went away.

THOMAS JONES. I am a seaman. I was coming up Nightingale-lane about a quarter past ten, I heard a woman say, oh, Manuel, do not do that; Walker was with me; we made the best of our way up to where the noise was; I saw a man running towards the Bee Hive door, he came out of the road, he said, I am stabbed; we took him into the Bee Hive, Tandy was there at the time. We assisted him when he said he was stabbed; he put his hand upon the bar and asked for a glass of spirits.

Q. When he came running out of the road you saw some other people there at the time - A. Yes, four or five where he run from, who they were I cannot say.

- WALKER. I am a seaman, I was with Jones in Nightingale-lane, I heard a woman's voice say, Manuel, do not do that. Afterwards I heard a man sing out, I am stabbed; he came from out of the road, and where the man came from there were four or five in company, who they were I cannot say. The man told me his name was John Douglas .

THOMAS PARIS . I keep the Bee Hive, public-house, in Nightingale-lane.

Q. This Sunday night that has been spoken of do you remember the deceased coming into your house - A. I do, one of my servants and three or four sailors helped him in, I asked him what was the matter, he said he was stabbed; he asked me for some spirits, I told him he had better not take any till the doctor came.

Q. Did you know him before this happened - A. I did by sight, his name was John Douglas . He was afterwards taken to the doctor's; I saw him afterwards in the hospital when he was dead, that was the same man.

PATRICK MANN. I am a watchman. John William Tandy came to me at a quarter past ten, and told me that there was a man stabbed; I went with him and took charge of the prisoner, and brought him to the watchhouse. The next morning at half past three I picked up this knife by Nightingale-lane, about twenty yards from the Bee Hive.

MR. NICHOLSON. I am a surgeon in East Smithfield.

Q. When you came home on the night of this Sunday did you find the deceased laying in your shop - A. Yes, about eleven o'clock. Upon examining him I found a wound upon the left hip, which I dressed; there was a considerable quantity of blood on the floor, his clothes was likewise wet with blood; I found him to be very low and very fast declining; I ordered him to be sent to the hospital, he said his name was Douglas, he was a Scotchman; I asked him if he should know the person that had stabbed him if he saw him. He gave me no account of the person.

JAMES CHAMBAUD. I am a pupil at the London Hospital.

Q. About what time of the night was it when the deceased was brought to the hospital - A. Near twelve o'clock. I observed a wound upon the left hip, there was no hemorrhage at that time, though there appeared to have been some, from the appearance of his shirt. I dressed the wound and ordered him to be

put to bed; the next day his body was examined; he died between one and two on Monday morning; there was a wound on the hip, it passed from the hip into the cavity of the belly; the wound divided two large arteries, it wounded one intestine, and part of another, the wound was three or four inches or more in depth, it appeared to be a penetrating wound, it appeared to have been done with a stab, it did not appear to have been done with a triangular instrument. There is no doubt the man died with the stab.

ROSELLA PLUNKETT. I was so intoxicated at the time I do not know any thing about it.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent, I know nothing about it.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson .

Reference Number: t18111030-61

863. JOHN PANKARD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of September , five plates, value 1 s. and nine dishes, value 2 s. the property of James Smith .

ANN SMITH. My husband, James Smith , keeps the Ship public-house, Lower Shadwell . On the 25th of December the prisoner and five or six more were drinking in the house, a man came in between three and four o'clock and asked me if I had lost any thing, I looked, and missed some plates and dishes out of the kitchen: I went out and found the prisoner standing at the window of the White Lion public-house, he had something in a coal sack, I told him I thought they were my dishes; I asked him to go back, he immediately returned with me. Mr. Willans (the constable) examined the sack, they were plates and dishes, I had some of the same kind. The prisoner said he did not know how he came by them, he believed he got them at our house.

ROBERT WILLANS . I am a constable. These are the dishes and plates I took out of the sack; the prisoner said some person had put them in the bag, it was not his bag. He was quite drunk.

Prosecutrix I belive they are mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been drinking. I was so insensible I did not know but it was my own bag. Mrs. Smith has since found out whose bag it is.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18111030-62

864. WILLIAM FITCHETT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of October , two heifers, value 33 l. the property of Richard Sadler .

RICHARD SADLER . I am a wholesale butcher . On the 9th of October I bought two heifers, I gave thirty-three pounds for them; I ordered the drover to put them in a field behind the Angel at Islington . On the next day I saw them at the Skin market.

RICHARD INGLESTORFF . I am a drover. On the 9th of October, about one o'clock in the afternoon, I put Mr. Sadler's heifers in the field behind the Angel, I left them there until Mr. Sadler took them away to kill. On the Friday following I saw them at Mr. Austin's, the skin-market.

JAMES BUTTERWORTH . I am watchman of St. James's, Clerkenwell. On the 10th of October, about one o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner when I was upon my beat, it was very dark; I heard some beasts coming down Corporation-row, it was the prisoner with two heifers, he told me he was going to take them to the Green-yard, it being an unseasonable hour I stopped him. I put the beasts in Mr. Austin's yard, the skin-market, and took the prisoner to the watchhouse; he said he picked the beasts up in a court in Corporation-row.

JOHN AMOS. I am foreman to Mr. Kent at the Angel, he takes in cattle for drovers and butchers; the drover said he had put two heifers in the field; the field has a gate to it, and if that was secured the beasts could not get out.

Inglestorff. I put these beasts in the field at half past four on Wednesday afternoon, I shut the gate after me, and told Mr. Amos of it.

Q. to Amos. Is this gate locked - A. No; the outer gate is locked of a Sunday night and Thursday night, it is upon the latch of other nights. I saw the prisoner twice in my hay barn about six weeks before; I turned him away.

CHARLES COOK . I am an officer of Hatton Garden. I examined the field where the beasts were in, it was impossible for the beasts to have gone out if the gate was catched.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw these two beasts at the top of Corporation-row, I was going to take them to the Green-yard.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18111030-63

865. CATHERINE CONNER, alias BURKE , was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Michael Buckley , no person being therein, about the hour of eight on the forenoon of the 15th of September , and stealing therein, two gowns, value 10 s. a pair of breeches, value 10 s. and one hundred and twenty halfpence , his property.

MICHAEL BUCKLEY . I am a watchman . When I returned home in the morning my door was broken open; my wife went out last.

MARGARET BUCKLEY . I live in Hodges-court, Drury-lane, in the parish of St. Giles' . On the 15th of September, about half past seven in the morning, I locked my door and went out; I live in the lower room, my landlady does not live in the same house; I am sure I locked my door, and I took the key in my pocket; I fastened my door with a padlock. I came home between eight and nine o'clock the door was wide open, and my chest wide open. I lost two gowns and a pair of breeches, and five shillings in copper. I was informed the prisoner was in a public-house; I went in there; she offered as soon as she saw me to go into a room to strip.

Q. You knew her before, did not you - A. Yes, she lodged with me about two weeks. Instead of her going into a room, she went out at the back door; she had one of my gowns on. Between two and three o'clock the very day she robbed me I took hold of her, she knocked me down, beat me, and made her escape while I was down.

Q. Did you recover any of your property - A. No. She promised to return them; she said she had pawned them.

HARRIET DUNN . My husband is a white-smith.

The day the robbery was committed I saw the prisoner at Buckley's door about a quarter after eight; she asked if I knew where Buckley was; I told her, no. She sat herself down on the stairs, and stopped for him. I went away and came back again in a few minutes, I found her in the room; I asked her what business she had to take Buckley's lock off the door in his absence; she told me to go along, she wanted to go to bed. I went away, and when I came back again I found she was gone, I stopped in the room until Mrs. Buckley came in.

JOHN GOFF . I am an officer of Union Hall. Me and Clark received information of the robbery. On the 25th of last month the prisoner was brought to us at Union Hall, I charged the prisoner, Catherine Burke, with the robbery; she told me that she knew nothing of the robbery, that her name was Conner. I told her I had seen her tried so often by that name I was sure of it. I kept her in custody.

JOHN CLARKE. I know what Goff has said to be true.

Prisoner's Defence. I lodged at this woman's house about five weeks; I follow the market, selling meat and butter. The prosecutor has got a key to the chest and this prosecutrix another; she took the things out to pawn, and I gave her a shilling a week to fetch them out of pawn. There were some words passed between us, she swore she would send me over the water. This woman that she has brought against me knows nothing about it; she is a common prostitute in the streets, and she would go twenty miles for a glass of gin; she knows it is false what she has sworn against me.

Q. to Mrs. Dunn. Are you sure this is the woman - A. Yes, I am.

GUILTY, aged 28,

Of stealing to the value of 4 s. 9 d. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18111030-64

866. SARAH IRWIN was indicted for that she, about the hour of twelve on the night of the 10th of August , being in the dwelling-house of James Dwyer , burglariously did steal, two sheets, value 14 s. and two shirts, value 14 s. that she afterwards did break to get out of the same .

JUDITH DWYER . My husband is a working man, his name is James Dwyer , we live at No. 10, Lilly-street, Saffron Hill, in the parish of St. Andrews . On the 10th of August I took the prisoner in my place out of kindness.

Q. Are you a lodger - A. Yes, I have the two lower rooms. She came about ten o'clock in the morning. I intended to keep her that night if she would stop; my husband went to bed about ten o'clock, my son went to bed soon afterwards. A woman that washed for me delivered my clothes about nine o'clock, they lay upon two chairs in the kitchen; the prisoner and me sat talking till near eleven o'clock, I told her she might sleep with me, and she wanted to stop to smoke some tobacco; I went to bed and went to sleep, I left her smoking; she was to have laid with me. My son got up about four o'clock to go a milking; I said where is Sally; he said she is gone, and the clothes were gone. I found her about half after ten at night on Michaelmas day. I sent for a constable, and she made off.

Q. Did you ever find your things again - A. No.

TIMOTHY DWYER. I am the son of the last witness. I went to bed about ten o'clock at night, I got up about four in the morning to go for my milk, I found the door open, and the things gone. We made every enquiry, we could not find the prisoner until Michaelmas day, I found her at Mr. Morris's public-house, Great Saffron hill, I told the girl to go for an officer, and while I was speaking to the girl she ran out of the front door; I pursued her and stopped her by Hatton Wall.

JOHN BARNLEY. I am an officer. The prisoner was brought to me, I searched her, and found nothing relating to this property.

Prisoner's Defence. I was at Mrs. Dwyer's house, she was in liquor, we had seven shillings worth of drink, beer and gin; we continued drinking; a woman brought in some washing and laid it on the table. After Mr. Dwyer and his son had gone to bed a tall woman in a black gown was there. Mrs. Dwyer sent me for two pots of beer before the public-house shut up. I left her and this woman about half after eleven at night.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 24,

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18111030-65

867. WILLIAM HAXLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of September , two boards, value 2 s. the property of David Hood .

DAVID HOOD . I am a painter , I live in John-street, Whitechapel, I have some premises in Well-street, Mile End New Town , which I have been pulling down.

Q. Do you know of your own knowledge that you had two boards taken from them premises - A. No. I left Robert Hood in the care of the premises. I cannot speak to the boards.

Mr. Gurney. I believe the prisoner had lent you some money, had he not - A. Conditionally.

Q. You had let him make a saw-pit frame on your premises; after he had lent you the money you could not conveniently pay him - A. It was not to be paid untill he had done the work.

Q. The saw pit was constructed of your materials - A. I have been so informed.

ROBERT HOOD . I was to superintend these premises for David Hood . I missed the two boards on the 16th of September; on the 24th I saw them in the saw pit; I asked the prisoner where he got them boards, he said, about the building; I said they were my favourite boards, he replied, I might take them if I liked; he said he had put them at the bottom of the saw-pit to keep his boys feet dry.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18111030-66

868. JAMES LOWE was indicted for that at the General Quarter Sessions of the peace for the county of Surry, holden on the 8th of October, in the 51st Year of his Majesty's reign, Stephen Read was tried and convicted of feloniously stealing, eight unfinished hats, value 5 l. and six unfinished hats, value 3 l. the property of George Vaughn and James Plank ; and

that he, the said James Lowe, feloniously did receive the said goods, he knowing them to have been stolen .

JOHN PLANK . I am a hat manufacturer , my partner's name is George Vaughn.

Q.Was Stephen Read in your employment lately - A. He was a hat stiffener in our employ. We searched Read's premises and found a hat finished fit for wear; in consequence of that we had Read taken up and tried at Union-hall, and Mr. Hanks went with a constable to Lowe's house.

ROBERT HANKS. I am a hatter, I reside at No. 6, Broad Wall, Blackfriars-road.

Q. You had an apprentice of the name of George - A. Yes. On the 17th of August I went with George and Cooper to Mr. Lowe's house in Ratcliffe Highway, he is a retailer of hats; I went into the shop, I said, Mr. Lowe, you have been buying hats in an unsaleable state of my apprentice, I am given to understand; he said he did not know that he had; I said you have bought of my apprentice yesterday, and I demand a sight of the hats, as the goods were stolen; we asked where the goods were; he said, they were backwards; the constable and he went into the workshop behind, and brought the goods into the shop; his wife then came into the shop; she said, for God's sake, what is the matter; the prisoner was so struck he could not answer; I told her that the goods that Mr. Lowe bought yesterday were stolen goods; she said, the Lord forbid, and then said to my apprentice, you wicked wretch, you knew the goods were stolen, how could you bring these things to my husband, and distress me in the manner you are a doing. The constable took the goods and told Lowe he must go with us to Union-hall I believe; he was taken to Union-hall. While I was in the coach I said, Mr. Lowe, these are good goods for the money; he said he thought he had given sufficient, he thought the hats were covered with hares wool. At Union-hall George was asked how many hats he had sold to Mr. Low, he said eight; Mr. Lowe was asked, he said he had purchased eight. We took four first and nine more in the afternoon. They were unfinished unstiffened hats, eight of them, and four were trimmed up ready for wear.

Q.Is it part of the retailers business to stiffen hats - A. It is not common.

Q. What would be the selling price of these hats in this state - A. I should expect sixteen shillings, because we are liable to a discount of five per cent.

Q. What did these hats cost the manufacturer - A. Without they know the materials that they are made of they cannot tell within a shilling or two: it is the worst state that a hat can be sold. I do not suppose I could manufacture them under thirteen shillings.

Q. Did you look in these hats to see if there were any marks - A. The marks were D O.

Mr. Gurney. In the same state in which these hats were a person might be deceived two or three shillings - A. They might be two shillings in that state.

Q. Does it not occur to you that a little maker may sell at times under the price - A. Very often; they never sell to a maker.

Q. They would sell to a person that kept a shop - A. Certainly.

Q. At Mr. Lowe's you found a workshop behind his selling shop.

Q. He is himself a hat-maker and hat-seller, and therefore is himself competent to do any work to the making a hat - A. So I am informed.

Q. When he told you that he had been buying hats of your apprentice did not he say he did not know he was your apprentice, or any apprentice - A. I believe them are his words. I do not believe that Mr. Lowe or Mrs. Lowe from what they said, knew any thing of their being stolen hats.

JAMES LAMMOND . I am an officer at Union-hall. I went with Mr. Plank to search Mr. Lowe's premises. In the back premises I found four hats dyed and unstiffened.

Q. You know something of the business of a hatter, I believe - A. I am a hatter by trade. I found these hats under the stall-board.

Q. Were there in that part of the premises the necessaries for stiffening - A. Yes, to make shift to do it in a very small way indeed. It is not usual for hat-makers to sell them dyed and unstiffened, they are so likely to become damaged in the dye, they generally sell them in the grey. We found at Mr. Lowe's nine hats in all, four dyed and unfinished, and five finished, besides the four that were produced at Union-hall.

Q. to Mr. Plank. You went with Lammond and George to the house of the prisoner - A. I did, I was present when these nine hats were found. The hats are our property.

THOMAS COOPER . I apprehended Read on the 16th. The next day I searched Mr. Lowe's house and found four unfinished hats, and there were four more produced to me at Union-hall; he said he had them of George.

ROBERT GEORGE. I am an apprentice to Mr. Hanks.

Q. Did you, in the month of August, receive any hats of Stephen Read - A. Yes, Stephen Read I knew to be in Mr. Vaughn and Plank's service; I received of him four hats first; I cannot say on what day.

Q. Was Stephen Read the man who was tried at Horsemonger Jail - A. Yes, he told me to take them to Mr. Lowe's house to sell them, and to ask ten shillings, to take what I could get for them, and to bring the money to him, he was to satisfy me for going with them. I went with the hats to Mr. Lowe's, he was not at home; I left the hats there till the next day, and on the next day I went into the shop, I saw Mr. Lowe; I told Mr. Lowe that I had left four hats that a young man had sent me with; he asked me his name, I told him Read; he looked at the hats and said nine shillings were as much as they were worth, he thought they were covered with hares wool; he gave me thirty-six shillings for the four. This was two months before I was taken up. I gave the money to Read, he gave me five shillings for my trouble. About two or three days before I was taken up Read left four more hats at my lodgings for me to take to Mr. Lowe's. I went to Mr. Lowe's, I told him I had brought four more hats for sale; he looked at them and said, nine shillings was what he gave me before. He

gave me the money.

Q. Did he upon this occasion ask you where the hats came from - A. No.

Q. You had not gives over the last money at the time you was taken up - A. No.

COURT. How old are you - A. Twenty one. I did not know that he had stolen them.

Mr. Gurney. When you were before before the magistrate at Union-hall did you say that you mentioned the name of Read to him - A. No; at Union-hall I did not say that I told him that Read sent me. (The copy of the Conviction of Stephen Read read.)

Prisoner's Defence. I actually did not know that they were stolen when I bought them.

The prisoner called nine witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18111030-67

869. TIMOTHY RAGAN and FRANCIS WILKS were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of October , one hundred and seventy-four yards of bed ticking, value 11 l. six pieces of cotton lace, value 3 l. 3 s. and a wrapper, value 2 s. the property of Robert Norris , and Thomas Norris And

TWO OTHER COUNTS for like offence, only varying the manner of charging them.

SAMUEL DANIEL. I live in Princes-street, Soho. The goods were consigned to me by Messrs. Norris; the date of the invoice is the 8th of October; they are bed ticking, one hundred and twenty-two yards of one quality, and fifty-two of another, making altogether one hundred and seventy-four yards, and six pieces of cotton-lace, and there was a wrapper; Thomas Norris and Robert Norris sent them to me.

Q. Did you ever get them - A. No; I had an invoice, by which I expected such goods to come by Pickford the waggoner.

JOHN WRIGHT. I am clerk to Messrs. Pickfords, their names are Thomas Pickford , Matthew Pickford , James Pickford , and Mathew Pickford .

Q. Do you remember the arrival of these goods at Paddington - A. I do, they arrived on the 18th of last month by the canal, they were put into the warehouse. I am the clerk of the warehouse at Paddington. In about two hours afterwards they were delivered to Cowdall our carman; the truss was directed to Mr. Daniel, the truss was numbered, and the weight mark upon it, half a hundred and twelve pounds; I say it put in the cart and delivered to Cowdall; I afterwards saw it at the magistrates office on the same day; that was the same truss.

JOHN COWDALL . Q. You are carman to Messrs. Pickford's - A. I am. On the 18th of October I received a truss out of their warehouse directed to Mr. Daniel, No. 572; it was put in my cart on the top of of the goods, on the off-side of the cart. When I was in Berner-street delivering goods I was obliged to leave the cart. Downe met me as I was coming out of a door, from his information I looked in the cart and saw Mr. Daniel's package was gone; I and Downe pursued Wilks and Ragan, we came up to them in Hollis-street, Wilks had the truss on his shoulder, I laid hold of him, asked him what he did with the truss and told him it was taken out of my cart; he said a man gave him a shilling to carry it for him; I told Downe to take Ragan.

Q. Was Ragan a man at that time - A. I did not perceive it. Ragan said he did not know Wilks, he had never seen him before. I put the truss in a public-house, I knew it to be the same truss that I had in my cart. The prisoners were taken to Marlborough-street-office.

JOSEPH DOWNE . I am a porter. On the 18th of October, in the afternoon, I was in Wardour-street, I saw the prisoner Ragan, he had a truss in his arms; I gave information to Cowdall; we pursued him into Holly-street, we there saw both the prisoners, Ragan was about five or six yards from Wilks, Wilks then had the truss on his shoulder; Cowdall took Wilks and the truss, Ragan ran away, he did not appear lame at that time, he ran near as fast as I did. They were both apprehended and taken to Marlborough-street office.

BENJAMIN BLACKGROVE. I am carman of the Ealing-cart. On the 18th of October I was going along Oxford-street, I saw the cart from whence this truss was taken, it was standing at the corner of Berner-street; I saw the prisoner go across the street with the truss in his arms as fast as he could go; he was about six yards from the cart when I saw him first, in the direction towards Wardour-street; I saw him put the truss down on the pavement; he then spoke to Wilks, and when he spoke to Wilks he took it up again, and went as fast as he could down Wardour-street. I gave the alarm to Cowdall when he came out of the house.

JAMES ALEXANDER . I am a constable. I received the package at the office; I have had it ever since.

Wright. 572 is on it, and two quarters twelve pounds, it is the same package; there is lace and ticking in it.

Ragan's Defence. It is no use going on any further. I am the man that took it out of the cart. That man is as innocent of the fact as a baby; I put it down twice, I was not able to carry it.

Wilks' Defence. Being out of work I was walking up Oxford-street, the bale was then at the corner of a street, the man said, will you give me a lift up with this on my shoulder; I did; he said I wish I could get a man to carry it to Fleet-Market; I said; I am out of work, I will carry it, I had it on my shoulder and that man took it off. I never saw the other prisoner before.

REGAN - GUILTY , aged 25.

WILKS - GUILTY , aged 33.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18111030-68

870. EDWARD HEATH was indicted for burglariously breaking an entering the dwelling-house of the inhabitants of the parish of St. James's, Clerkenwell at night, on the 26th of October , and stealing therein, two hundred and forty penny-pieces , the property of Thomas Bowen And

TWO OTHER COUNTS for like offence, only varying the manner of charging them.

THOMAS BOWEN . I am master of Clerkenwell workhouse , that is my dwelling-house.

Q. Do you pay rent and taxes for it - A. No, unless in consideration of the salary I receive; I have an accompting-house in the workhouse, it has two windows looking into the yard, they are fastened by a spring-latch. I had about twenty shillings in penny-pieces and fifteen shillings in paper by the side of them, in the accompting-house, I missed twenty shillings of penny pieces, Malpas, one of the boys acknowledged the theft, and Heath finding that Malpas had acknowedged it, he came to me and said he would show me where the penny pieces were; he took me to a hole under the stone stair case, he said it was hid there, he could not exactly tell where, a boy of the name of Evans had hid them; Evans came and pulled a great many penny pieces out of a hole, apparently like a rat-hole, to the amount of sixteen or seventeen shillings. The prisoner said that he got up himself about one o'clock on the Sunday morning, and broke the accompting-house window, Malpas was with him, they got in and and took the penny-pieces away from a cupboard of mine in the accompting-house; he told me he had done so repeatedly. He is a pauper in the house.

Q. What could induce the boy to tell you this - A. Finding that Malpas had confessed it. I told Malpas if he would tell who it was he should not be hurt if he told me the truth.

Q. Did not Malpas go and tell him - A. No; a gentleman took him of oneside while I examined Heath. These are the penny-pieces that Evans took out of the hole by the direction of Heath.

MR. HAMBLIN. I am one of the overseers. I found thirty-penny pieces in the ward in which the prisoner slept.

Prisoner's Defence. I should not have taken them if I had victuals enough; I was obliged to buy victuals every day.

Bowen. They have three quarters of a pound of broad every days and meat days five ounces of meat, and an ounce of cheese every day, and rice mills, and a full pound of rice pudding on Wednesdays.

GUILTY, aged 15.

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling-house.

Judgment respited .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18111030-69

871. MARY ASHBY and ELIZABETH CHURCHILL , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2nd of September , a coat, value 2 l. a waistcoat, value 6 s. a handkerchief, value 1 s. and a pair of gloves, value 1 s. the property of Thomas Johnson .

THOMAS JOHNSON. I am a plaisterer , I live in Little College-street; Westminster. On the 2d of September a shopmate of mine and two of his friends came to see me; we spent the evening together; a little before nine he said he must go home; he asked me to go with him a little way; I said I did not mind. He lived at Paddington, and as we were going up the Hay market we met the prisoner Ashby; she asked us to give her some gin; we had half a pint between five of us, we came out of the public-house, a man struck me with a stick; I turned round and asked him what was his reason for doing that; I could not understand him, he was a foreigner, I thought he was a Portuguese, he seemed to push against me as though he was going to persevere in it I took off my coat, it hanged on one arm, and kept him off with my right hand that he should not strike me; the crowd came round. Ashby drawed the coat off my arm, and by drawing it off the lining came outside. The watchman came up and asked what was the matter, and wished us to disperse; we did; I looked round and Ashby was gone; we got intelligence which way she was gone; I went home. In the morning I went to Queen-square, and gave a description of Ashby, we took her in Pie-street, Westminster, we found my coat and waistcoat at the pawnbrokers.

Q. Were you quite sober - A. I was fresh.

Q. Are you sure as to the woman - A. Yes.

Q. What do you say about the other woman - A. The other woman pawned the coat; I never saw her till the morning we went to take her.

- M'GUIRR. Q. Were you of this party - A. Yes. In the Haymarket we met the prisoner, she asked us to give her some gin; we did. This young man ran against a man by accident, the man struck him with a stick in his face; he pulled his coat off one arm to defend himself, the prisoner pulled it off the other arm; the watchman interfered and wanted us to disperse, we did. I had seen Ashby with his coat, we looked for her and could not find her.

JOHN GILLMORE. I apprehended Ashby and Churchill together; Ashby denied knowing the young man; I found she had pawned the waistcoat by Congee, and the coat by Churchill.

ELIZABETH CONGEE . I received the waistcoat of Mary Ashby , I pawned it for three shillings in Strutton ground.

JOHN HUGHES. I am a pawnbroker in Strutton-ground. I took a waistcoat in pawn of Mrs. Congee, I lent her three shillings upon it.

CHARLES JOHNSON . I am a pawnbroker. I took in this coat of Elizabeth Churchill , I lent her eight shillings on it on the 3d of September.

Prosecutor. It is my coat and waistcoat.

Ashby's Defence. The prosecutor gave me the coat and waistcoat to hold; the watchman took me away; I walked up and down the street, nobody came to me for it. In the morning; I being distressed, pawned the coat, thinking if ever I met him I would give him the duplicates.

Churchill was not put on her defence.

ASHBY - GUILTY ; aged 21.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction, and fined 1 s.

CHURCHILL - NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18111030-70

872. MARY LENNIN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of October , twenty-yards of printed cotton, value 30 s. the property of John White and John Macpherson .

JOHN WHITE . I am a linen-draper ; 268, High Holborn , my partner's name is John Macpherson . On Monday, the 7th of October, a man came into the shop and said he saw a woman come out of the shop with a large piece of print. I went out immediately I saw the prisoner, I put back her cloak, and saw the print. This is the print, I know it it to be our property.

Prisoner's Defence. As I went past the door that piece of cotton lay near the door, I took it up, and carried it in my in hand.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18111030-71

873. GEORGE MARTIN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of October , a copper saucepan, value 15 s. an iron pot, value 2 s. and a shovel, value 2 s. the property of Thomas Warburton .

JOSEPH TOVEY . I am brewer to Mr. Thomas Warburton , he keeps a house at Hoxton . On the 9th of October, about one o'clock in the morning, I was awoke by the noise or footsteps of some man; I immediately got out of bed and went to the window, and I saw the prisoner trying to look in the window where I lay; I immediately opened the door and went and caught him by the collar; I asked him what he wanted, and how he came there, and how he could think of getting over a wall of that heigth; he said he wanted a place to lay down. I asked him how long he had been on the premises, he said, about twenty minutes or half an hour, My fellow-servant got up, and we took him into the lodge. We looked about the premises, there are a great many things deposited in the area of the kitchen; we found a copper saucepan, and an iron pot taken from there and put into the gravel walk; a shovel was brought from the piggery and set against the front gates; he had opened the straw-house, and left the doors wide open, and the hogs got in; and the windows of the lower part of the house had been throwed up, but being so strongly barred no person could make any entrance. We then took him to the watchhouse. The pots not being taken off the premises we did not think it would be wanted.

Prisoner's Defence. I was looking over the place to lay down.

GUILTY , aged 64.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and Publicly Whipped .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18111030-72

574. CHARLES SHROPSHIRE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of September , three ten pound bank notes , the property of George Dobree .

JAMES EWERS . I live with Mr. Dobree, pawnbroker . On the 10th of September I enclosed three ten-pound bank notes, I put them in a parcel with a direction on them for Mrs. Dobree, Mr. Market's cottage, Great Stains; I gave the parcel to John Magnay to take to Charing Cross. The notes have been traced.

Mr. Gurney. Whose property were they - A. His property; he has no partner. The notes were for Mr. Dobree's sister-in-law.

JOHN MAGNAY . I live with Mr. Dobree. I received the parcel from Mr. Ewers, I took it to the Golden Cross, Charing Cross. I delivered it to the porter, John Hind , in the coach office on the 10th.

JAMES DARWELL. I am a hackney coachman.

Q. What is your number - A. Twenty-six.

Q. Do you know anything about this parcel - A. I know no more about it than you do; Charles Shropshire brought to me a note to get changed.

Q. Is the prisoner the man - A. I believe he is the man, he is a porter at the Golden Cross. The Worthing coach goes from that place one morning, and another morning from Gracechurch-street.

Q. What did you receive of that man - A. I received a ten pound note, I think the 12th of last month.

Q. Was it October or September - A. October, I believe.

Q.You knew it was September, not October - A. No, I did not. It is five weeks ago.

Q. Then it could not be in October - A. It was before the last sessions was done, I believe two days. I changed that note with Askeville Brodie. I got small notes for it.

Q. Did you change any other note any other time - A. No, it was all in one day. I received three ten pound notes of him, I got them all into small notes, and gave them unto him directly, they were out of one hand into the other.

Mr. Gurney. Where was it he applied to you to get the notes changed - A. He came home to my house, I was ill at the time.

ASKEVILLE BRODIE. I keep a public-house in Whitechapel. On the 12th of September I changed a ten pound note for Darwell. I marked it on the back.

JOHN BARKER . I have the note; I belong to the bankers.

GEORGE VAUGHN . I keep a public-house in Whitechapel. I changed a ten pound note for Darwell on the same day; I marked it.

JOHN LEONARDS. I keep a public-house in Gracechurch-street. I changed a ten pound note for Darwell on the same day.

Mr. Ewers. These are three notes that I enclosed in the parcel, I marked them all.

Q. When was the coach to go to Worthing - A. On the 11th, at seven o'clock in the morning.

Q. Do you know what time the coach arrives at Worthing - A. No.

JOHN FREDERICK THOMPSON and WILLIAM HIND were called, and not appearing, their recognizances were ordered to be estreated.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18111030-73

875. MARY VIGO was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of October , four rabbits, value 6 s. the property of James Moore .

JAMES MOORE . I live at No. 11, North-street, Bethnal Green . On the 8th of October I lost four tame rabbits.

ROBERT BAILEY. On the 9th of October, I bought three rabbits of the prisoner, I gave her three shillings and sixpence for them; she said she had the mother of them; she went home and fetched her; I gave two shillings and sixpence for her. In about five minutes after Mr. Moore came and claimed them.

Prisoner's Defence. I thought the rabbits belonged to the boy that I bought them of. If I had had any idea of their being stolen I would not have gone to Mr. Bailey to have sold them.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18111030-74

876. WILLIAM TIBBETT and WILLIAM BURNE were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Caleb Blant , about the hour of nine on the night of the 27th of October , and burglariously stealing therein, a time-piece, value 7 l. a tooth-pick, value 6 d. three silver tea-spoons, value 4 s. a horn box, value 3 d. three five-pound bank notes, and four one-pound bank notes , his property.

MRS. BLANT. I live at 21 Oxford Market , my husband keeps a school with me, his name is Caleb Blant , we have the whole house. On Sunday the 27th of October, at eight o'clock we went out, and returned home at twelve o'clock, and when we came home we could not open the door, the lock was stiff, we were obliged to get the watchman to open it, it is an old lock, it does not open very easy. We got the watchman to light us, the first thing I saw when I went in was the parlour door open, I looked up at the mantle piece for the time piece, it was gone, I had left the time piece on the mantle piece in the front parlour when I went out. I went into the back room, I found the money and the notes box gone from out of a drawer in the bedstead, three five-pound notes and four one pound Bank notes, and two pair of gold ear rings, and a plain gold ring, and a breast pin, were taken away, I went into the front parlour, there were three silver tea spoons taken out of the cupboard, I have seen all the things since.

Q. How did the persons get in. - A. By the cellar door, it is a bad bolt. I saw all these things before I went out, and when I returned they were all gone.

WILLIAM READ . I am an officer. On Monday, the 28th, I received information of the house, No. 21, Oxford Market, being broken open, I went and searched the premises, and found where they got in, the prisoner Burne was active in shewing us the place, he is a relation of the prosecutrix, we concluded that it could not be any one but what well knew the premises and knew where the property was, Burne seemed very much flurried. Limerick told me to go and ask the prosecutrix who he was, I went and asked the prosecutrix, we then accused Burne of it, saying that we had great suspicion that he either knew who it was, or had had concern in it himself, he denied it, we told him that we were sure he was concerned in the robbery, and that we should take him in custody, he then said it was not him, but he knew who it was that did it, it was two soldiers that belonged to the West London militia, and a young man of the name of Tibbett, he said he partly knew where they were, he would go and shew us where they were in the city. We then came into Bunhill Row, Burne went into several houses they were not there, he went into one house, they said they had not been gone above half an hour; he then said he supposed they were gone to the Bricklayer's Arms, in South-Molton Street, where Tibbett was to meet him in the afternoon to divide the property; we then went into Oxford Market to the prosecutor's house, there he wished to see the prosecutor, they went up stairs, Limerick followed the prosecutor and Burne, - when they came down again the prosecutor, Burne and Limerick, and I, went into Grovesnor market, we went into a house, Burne and Limerick went down into the kitchen, and Burne brought up some notes in his hand, we counted them over, there were two fives and two ones, he then said if you come along with me to the Bricklayer's Arms in South Molton Street, we shall have the remainder part of the property; we went there, and was there near half an hour, when Tibbett came in, Burne asked him to drink, they drank together, and went out, and Limerick followed them, they got some distance, Burne turned back and said, come along, you shall have the other part of the property; we then went into New Court, Fleet Lane, Fleet market, we went into a garret where there were presses, they were book binders, and under some paper shavings Tibbett produced this time piece, three silver spoons, a breast pin, two pair of ear rings, a gold ring, a silver tooth pick, and a horn box, and a small article or two that are not mentioned in the indictment. We brought them to the office, and took them before the magistrate.

Q. How had they got in. - A. The way they got in was at the cobler's stall, the kitchen was being repaired, they took the wainscot away and got into the cellar, they got into the back window, up one pair of stairs, the prosecutor found the back window open,

Q.(to Prosecutrix.) This window is up one pair of stairs, was that up or down when you went away. - A. It was down, not fastened, we found it up a little way, it was quite shut down when I left it, when they got into the yard, there is a shed that goes up to this window, we saw the foot marks where they got in at the window.

JOHN LIMERICK . I went in company with Read to 21, Oxford Market, to look at the house that had been broken open, we went in, Burne was there present, he shewed us all about the place, we went into the cellar, it was dark, I said to Burne go up and get us a light, he did, he seemed a great deal alarmed at the time, I told Read to go and ask who he was, he brought back word that he was a relation, and had been out of work six months, I then had a strong suspicion of him, we went up stairs, I told him I should take him in custody concerning the robbery, he said he had not done it himself, it was three others; he said there were three men that had done the robbery he could give us information where the things were; he said it was two soldiers and one Tibbett, we went in company with him to Bunhill Row, we could not find the three men, he said most likely they would meet him at the Bricklayer's Arms, he pressed very hard to see the prosecutor, we took him to the prosecutor, he wanted to see him privately in a room, I told him I had him in custody, I could not grant any such thing, without being present at the time. He went up stairs, he asked the prosecutrix if he was to bring back all the things would she hurt him, she said she could not say any thing to it, it was gone too far; we went up to Grovenor market, where his mother and he lodged, he went down into the kitchen and produced these two five pound notes, he said these were a part of the notes that he had taken, he owned to changing one of the ones, he said he had three, and that is all that he had received, two fives and three ones, there were three fives lost. We went with him to the Bricklayer's Arms, in South Moulton Street, we waited there about half an hour, and Tibbett came in, they drank together, and he beckoned him out, Tibbett made answer to

him, you are in a hurry. They went out, they had got about half way down the street, they called to us, we were very near to them, and Tibbett said to us, if you have all the things it shall be all right, I said that rested with the magistrate; we went straight on to New Court, Tibbett went up and brought the remainder of the property, when we came to the office before the magistrate, they confessed the whole.

Q. Did you see them sign this. - A. I did, and I saw the magistrate sign it. That is my hand writing. I saw both the prisoners sign it, it was read over to both of them.

Read.

Middlesex. The examination of the witness Tibbett, brought before me William Read , on of his Majesty's Justices of the Peace, acting for the said county, 28th of October, 1811, who says that he knew nothing of the robbery until it was done, that Burne came to him and brought a time piece at the Adam and Eve, that he asked him to take it home, and he took it home.

Middlesex. The examination of William Burne , - brought before me, William Read , one of his Majesty's Justice of the peace, acting for the said county, 28th of October, 1811, who says that the account given to the officers by the witness is all true, except about the two soldiers, nobody knew any thing of the robbery but themselves, that they got in at the back room window, they had no light, he knew the premises, that they gave the officer all the notes.

Q.(to Prosecutrix.) Look at these notes. - A. I do not know the number of them, here are two fives and two ones, they are mine, the time piece is mine, and all the things are mine.

Burne's Defence. I gave Limerick three five pound notes, and three ones.

LIMERICK. He did not, he gave me only two fives and two ones, I told him at the time these were not all before Read.

Tibbett said nothing in his defence.

Burne called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Tibbett called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

TIBBETT, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 19.

BURNE, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 20,

The prisoners were recommended to his Majesty's mercy on account of their youth and good character.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18111030-75

877. JOSEPH ALDERS was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of John and James Bayles , about the hour of two in the afternoon, on the 18th of October , and feloniously stealing therein five yards of kerseymere cloth, value 10 l. their property.

JAMES BAYLES . I am a man's mercer , 215, Strand , my partner's name is John Bayles .

THOMAS CAVE . I am an officer of Bow Street, I was coming out of Somerset House, on Friday the 18th in the afternoon, I saw the prisoner in company with two other men, I crossed over the way, and followed them down to St. Clements Church, they stopped at Mr. Bayles's shop, and I got behind the pump, I saw Alders the prisoner go into the shop, and he came out with this piece of kerseymere under his arm, he saw me run over, he dropped the piece of kerseymere, he ran down Essex Street, I caught him and brought him back to Mr. Bayles's shop, the shopman took the kerseymere up, and took it in, I then took him to Bow Street.

ROBERT PORTER. I am shopman to Messrs. Bayles, this is the kerseymere, it is their property.

Q. Were you in the shop - A. Yes, at the back part of it, I saw the man going out of the door, with it under his arms, the prisoner turned round before he went out, and I saw his face.

Q. What may it be worth - A. About 121 the wholesale price.

Q.(to Mr Bayles) Whose house is it - A. It is mine and my brothers, we both live in the house, we have no other partner, the house is in the parish of St. Clements Danes.

Prisoner's Defence. Please your Lordship, he took me in custody in Essex Street, I should wish to know whether he saw me go into the shop, and whether he did not lose sight of me.

CAVE. No, I did not lose sight of him, I was close behind him, I knew him before

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 27.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18111030-76

878. SARAH IRVIN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of August , in the dwelling-house of Hannah Ganley , a gown, value 10 s. a handkerchief, value 1 s. two dollars, two shillings, and two one-pound notes , her property.

HANNAH GANLEY . I am a widow , I live in Jacob's Court, Cow Cross , I lodge in the two pair of stairs room.

Q. Does your landlord live in the house. - A. No, the house is let out in lodgings.

Q. What day did you lose these things - A. On the 6th of August the prisoner was to bring me a nurse child, she told me I should have eight shillings a week, I gave her a cup of tea, I went to my box and brought some half-pence out to buy some fresh butter, and this money I had in my hand, when I went out I left my money in a black silk glove in my box, two notes, two shillings, and a gown and a silk handkerchief were also in my box, I left her in the room when I went out and no one else. I returned in about ten minutes, I found her there, she had two cups of tea poured out when I came in, then she asked me for her to go the yard, she did not drink any tea. She went out and never came back.

Q. What did she take with her. - A. Two one-pound notes, two dollars, two shillings, two gowns, and a silk handkerchief.

Q. Have you ever recovered any of these. - A. No, I am sure they were in the box when I took the money out, I had the money in my hand before I went out for the butter, and my gowns and handkerchief I saw in the box, and there was no one in the room but herself. I missed them in four minutes after she was gone.

Prisoner's Defence. I was there, I know nothing of the money or the gown.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 24.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18111030-77

879. MARY MAHNEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of October , two pieces of handkerchiefs, value 3 l. the property of David Stephens .

- BLISS. I am shopman to Mr. Stephens, 108, High Street, Shadwell , he is a slop seller and draper . On the 16th of October I was in the back part of the shop When I was informed by Mrs. Parker, a person living directly opposite of our house, that woman had entered the shop and had taken some goods, but what she could not say. I immediately went in pursuit of the woman, she was gone up a street little distance from our shop. I overtook the woman and asked her what she had got, she said that she had got something that a woman gave her in the street I turned her coat of one side and discovered the two pieces of handkerchiefs. I brought her and the property back, and she was taken to Shadwell office

DIANA PARKER . Q. You live opposite do you. - A. Yes, in High Street, Shadwell. On the 16th of October, between eleven and twelve, I saw the prisoner go into the shop, she took something off the chair that stood opposite of the door, and by her concealing it I supposed that she stole it, she was by herself. I went over and gave information of it.

JOHN PARTRIDGE. These are the articles, they have been in my custody ever since.

- BLISS. Thy are Mr. Stephens' property, of the value of between three and four pound. Mr. Stephens has no partner, he has the whole house.

Prisoner's Defence. A woman met me at the shop door, she said she would give me a shilling to carry the bundle, I was glad to earn a shilling. I did not know that they were stolen, or else I would not have had any thing to do with it.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 64,

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18111030-78

880. WILLIAM HAMAN was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Hopwood , about the hour of nine on the night of the 6th of October , and stealing therein, six silk handkerchiefs, value 30 s. and twelve doilys, value 12 s. his property.

WILLIAM HOPWOOD JUN. I am a linen draper , 44, Duke Street, Manchester Square . On Saturday evening about nine o'clock, I heard a window break, accordingly I went out, and observed the prisoner crossed the other side of the way, I went across and laid hold of him and took him back to my father's shop. One of the witnesses is here that gave me a dozen of doilys, and I had six silk handkerchiefs gave me, I do not know who gave me the silk handkerchiefs, Joseph Atkinson gave me the doilys.

JOSEPH ATKINSON . On the 26th of October, about nine in the evening, I saw Mr. Hopwood in pursuit of the prisoner passing our door, in about ten yards he stopped the prisoner, on returning opposite of our door the prisoner dropped a piece of doilys, I saw him, I picked them up and gave it to Mr. Hopwood, who had the prisoner in custody.

JOHN LANGLEY . I am an officer, I produce the handkerchief and the doilys.

MR. HOPWOOD. They are my father's property, I put them in the window myself in the morning.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, called four witnesses who gave him a good character.

GUILTY, aged 20,

Of stealing, but not of the burglary .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18111030-79

881. JOHN JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of October , a goose, value 7 s. the property of Thomas Goodwin , privately in his shop .

THOMAS GOODWIN . I am a poulterer , 23 Great Russell Street . On the 17th of October the prisoner came up to my shop and took hold of the goose, there is a board outside of the shop, part of the goose laid in the shop and part on the board, the prisoner turned up the goose, as I thought, to buy it. A lady came into the shop to settle a bill, in the mean while the prisoner walked away with the goose. I received information that he had taken it, and in about ten minutes the prisoner walked by my shop without the goose, I immediately collared him and took him into New Street and enquired where his lodgings were, we found his room and the goose in his room, he is a near neighbour of mine As we were going to the watch-house he begged for mercy, and said he did it for distress. I am sure he is the man, and I am sure it was my goose, it was a grey goose, I bought it particularly large for a publican to have for dinner.

Q. How do you know it was the prisoner's room. - A. The landlady of the house said it was the prisoner's room, that he had lodged there a fortnight.

JOHN CUMMINS. I came by Mr. Goodwin's shop at the time of the robbery. Mrs. Goodwin gave me the description of the prisoner. I looked down New Street and saw him. I told the prisoner Mr. Goodwin wanted to speak to him. I walked him by the shop to see if they knew him, they all came out and said that was the man. We went into his room, and there was the goose on the table, the landlady of the house said it was his room.

Prisoner's Defence. I never confessed to taking the goose, if it was in my room I did not know it I said.

GUILTY, aged 56.

of stealing, but not privately .

Confined Two Years in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18111030-80

882. ANN WELLS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of October , twelve yards of flannel, value 10 s. the property of Benjamin Preece , privately in his shop .

BENJAMIN PREECE. I am a haberdasher and hosier , 5, Grafton Street, St. Anns, Soho. On Friday, the 25th of October, about a quarter past five in the afternoon, when the prisoner came in I was engaged serving a lady, there was a piece of flannel lay near the door, I saw her lay her hand upon it, as if to see the quality of it, she has been in the habit of coming into my shop two years, perhaps three or four times a week, she stood a long while in the shop as if waiting to be served. I could not go to serve her immediately, she walked towards the door, I lost her all in a minute, and the same time I missed a piece of flannel.

Q. Did you ever find it again. - A. Part of it. I ran to the door, she was gone out of sight, we found out where she lived. I applied to Bow Street Office. I had a warrant, she lived in Great Earl Street, the officer

mark to it, the other part she had made away with. I lost it about a quarter past five, and she was taken about half past eight the same day.

JOHN LIMERICK . I am an officer. I went with the prosecutor to No. 30, Great Earl Street. I went up stairs and enquired for the prisoner, she came out. I saw her tucking up something under the bed, I asked her what she was doing there, she said what is that to you. I got a light from the next room, I took these two pieces of flannel from between the bed and the sacking, she had a number of halfpence, and she was rather in liquor, she denied taking it, or knowing any thing about it. This is the flannel.

Prosecutor. That is my flannel, we found about a couple of yards. I can swear to it by my mark.

Prisoner's Defence. I went into the gentleman's shop for silk and thread, that I used for shoe binding, I met a man that came out of the shop, that used it for haberdashery to sell again, he said hold this bit of flannel until I came back, he did not come back. I took it home. When the officer came he said where is the flannel, I said here it is. I thought it was the man that gave it me.

GUILTY, aged 48,

of stealing, but not privately .

Confined six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18111030-81

883. CATHERINE DUNN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of October , ten yards of muslin, value 18 s. the property of George Dorvell , privately in his shop .

GEORGE DORVELL . I am a linen draper Shadwell High Street . On the 29th of October, between four and five in the afternoon, the prisoner came to my shop, she asked to look at some muslin, I shewed her some, she purchased half a quarter of a yard, it came to threepence three farthings, after I had served her I doubled the wrapper over, and put the wrapper behind her in its place. I then went to the till to get change for sixpence, and on my coming to her again, I saw her stoop down as if apparently forcing something up her petticoats. I could see nothing whatever, my suspicions were aroused, I took the wrapper again, and on my turning again, she was stooping down the same as before. I looked over the wrapper, but being confused I could not miss any particular article that time, she was then going out of the shop, not liking to tax her with a theft until I had looked over the wrapper. I called to her and said I had a bargain in the wrapper that I would sell her cheap, and while I was looking over the wrapper, she stooped the third time, and slowly took up two pieces of muslin, and placed them on the counter, the muslins were as smooth as if in the wapper, not tumbled in the least. I then jumped over the counter, took her by the arm and sent for an officer. From the appearance of the muslin, they had never been on the ground.

Q. And because they had not been on the ground, you suppose she had taken them. - A. Yes. I had my eye upon her the whole of the time, her countenance changed. I observed her take and put them on the counter.

Prisoner's Defence. I only wanted a bit of muslin to go over my caps. I saw it lay on the ground, when I stooped down to pick my pattens up.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18111030-82

884. JOHN MILLER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of October , a handkerchief, value 5 s. and a snuff box, value 1 s. the property of Francis Brown , from his person.

FRANCIS BROWN . I live in Crown Street Westminster. On the 23d of October, I was in St. James's Park about twelve o'clock at noon, there where some engines there, they were trying of, a number of people were collected to see it. I stopped some time, I had not been there above half an hour before the officer asked me if I had lost my handkerchief. I saw the box lay on the ground at the same time, the officer picked it up, it is a paper painted snuff box, worth sixpence. I told the officer I missed my handkerchief, it is worth two shillings, the officer shewed me the handkerchief, I knew it to be mine. Two officers had hold of the prisoner at the time.

RICHARD WESTBROOK. I am a constable. Mr. Essleby and I were in the Park together, on the 23d of October, there were a great many people looking at the engines, we saw Mr. Brown in the crowd, we were watching the prisoner for half an hour. we knew the man that was with him, I saw the prisoner at Mr. Brown's pocket trying to get the handkerchief out of Brown's pocket, the handkerchief was half way out of his pocket.

Q. Was it so when you first saw Mr. Brown. - A. No, when first I saw Mr. Brown, I could not see that he had a handkerchief in his pocket. The handkerchief had been drawn out of his pocket by the man who was with the prisoner, the prisoner went up and took the handkerchief out, I directly collared him, and took the handkerchief out of his hand immediately, some person picked up the snuff box. I believe it was my brother officer. I held the handkerchief up and said who had lost a handkerchief, Mr. Brown claimed it. I am quite sure that Mr. Brown's pocket, was the pocket from whence I saw it taken. Mr. Brown claimed the snuff box too. The prisoner said he was very sorry for it, he did it out of distress, we took him to Bow Street. The mob gathered round so very soon the other man absconded.

JOHN ESSLEBY. I belong to Bow Street. I was in the park, and knowing of Westbrook I joined him, I saw Mr. Brown in the crowd, he was near the Dukes of York, Kent, and Cambridge. I saw the prisoner with another attempting several gentleman's pockets, that induced us to watch. I saw the prisoner draw the handkerchief out of Mr. Brown's pocket, in drawing the handkerchief this snuff box fell to the ground from the pocket, we both seized the prisoner at the same time. Westbrook took the handkerchief out of his hand.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to his character.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant;

Reference Number: t18111030-83

884. ELIZABETH HART and WILLIAM TAYLOR were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of September , 9 s. 6 d. the property of Daniel Fox , from his person .

DANIEL FOX. I live at the corner of John Street, by Edgeware Road.

Q. When did you lose your money. - A. About this day month, between four and five o'clock in the morning, in Oxford Road .

Q. Had you been to bed. - A. No. I was perfectly sober. I had been to see a person home, that was not capable of seeing himself home. I had been spending my evening at Paddington, till twelve o'clock, from there I went to see my friend home, in Crown Street, it was then about two o'clock

Q. How came you to be two hours coming from Crown Street into Oxford Street, how many minutes would that take a man that was not drunk. - A. If I must speak I was coming up Oxford Steeet when I met this woman. I had been at a watering house in Oxford Street, by St. Giles's, from there I went up to my home, I found I could not get in, then I went into a market.

Q. Did you see either of the women in your way. - A. I saw the woman in Oxford Street. I had then a crown, a half crown, a three shilling piece, and two shillings in my pocket. This woman asked me to give her something to drink, I went to the Watering House, Oxford Road. I went afterwards towards my home as far as a market, I forgot the name of the market. I there lost my money out of my breeches pocket. I fell asleep in a cart while the woman was with me. Taylor is a watchman, he came and awoke me in the market.

Q. You fell asleep in the cart in an open market, any body else might have stolen it. - A. The money was taken out of the watchman's pocket.

JOSEPH WAKEMAN I am a watchman, in South Molton Street. Hart and Fox passed me about four o'clock in the morning, he was intoxicated, they went up towards Grosvenor Market. I saw them in a passage about ten minutes, they were talking together. I saw the woman afterwards, she said she had left Fox sleeping in a cart. I went and awoke him, he said he had been robbed, I told him he should keep better company. We went to Taylor's box, we found Hart in Taylor's box. We took her to the watch-house, Taylor followed, they were both searched, on Hart was found nine-pence halfpenny, and upon Taylor a crown piece, half a crown, and two shillings.

FRANCIS RAMSDEN . I searched Taylor, and this is the money I took from him.

Prosecutor. The money is mine.

Hart's defence. I am not guilty.

Taylor was not put on his defence.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18111030-84

885 JOHN LATHAM and MICHAEL CARROL were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of October , a handkerchief, value 5 s. the property of William Calvert , from his person .

WILLIAM CALVERT . I was passing from my house in Shire Lane to St. Clements Inn , and in passing a man and woman hallowed out, these two men have picked your pocket, this was about half past four in the afternoon, a witness saw it fall from Latham's hand, and I picked it up at Latham's heels.

Q. Did you see it drop - A. No, I did not, I picked it up off the ground behind him, I am certain they were in company from a previous observation, I observed Carrol in Shire Lane with Latham before.

Q. Where is your handkerchief. - A. I cannot say whether it is in the drawer or in my pocket, I have fourteen of them.

The prisoners said nothing in their defence,

Latham called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18111030-85

886 GEORGE FISHER and JAMES LEITH were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of October , a coat, value 5 s. three waistcoat, value 12 s. and a jacket, value 6 s. the property of Richard Clark .

ELIZABETH WELLS . I am Mr. Clark's niece, he lives in Charles Street, Westminster , he is a green grocer , the waistcoats were lost on Tuesday, the 8th of October, between seven and eight in the morning, I saw them safe, I missed them about a quarter before eight, they were kept in the back room on the ground floor, and this room opens into a passage, we go into the passage to go into the shop, I was in the kitchen; I heard a footstep, I saw one only, I could not swear to the man, I saw a person, in consequence of that I came up stairs, a neighbour came in and met me in the passage, he said he saw a young man go out with something in his apron.

JOHN STONALL . I live at No. 7, Charles Street, I was standing two doors off, I saw the two prisoners coming down the Street, a neighbour told me that they were thieves, I watched them into Mr. Clark's house, I saw Fisher go in with nothing about him, I saw him come out with a large bundle, and part of it was drab coloured clothes, I went into the house and told Elizabeth Wells what I had seen. They were taken at the Old Bell, in Pie Street, I went there with the officer to identify them, we found one waistcoat in the crown of Fisher's hat.

Q. Has the other things been found since. - A. No. Fisher went into the house only, Leith stood ten yards below.

JOSEPH COOPER . I am a constable. I went in company with Stonall to the Old Bell, in Pie Street; I apprehended both the prisoners and searched them, when I got to the office, I found this waistcoat rolled up in the crown of Fisher's hat.

Q.(to Stonall.) How long was it from the time that you saw Fisher come out of the house that you discovered him in Pie Street. - A. About two hours and a quarter.

WILLIAM HERRING . I live at 51, in Charles Street, on the 8th of October, I saw the two prisoners come down the street together, I have seen them several times before, it was a quarter before eight, I saw Fisher go in Clark's house, Leith waited at the corner, No. 1, till Fisher came out, I saw Fisher come out and then Leith followed

corner of Charles Street, on the 8th of October, I saw Leith by the post at the corner of the street.

JOHN CROW . I am a broker, I live in Dean Street, Westminster.

Q. Did you see the prisoners on this day. - A. Yes, about eight o'clock, I did not see their faces, they had passed me, I saw two answering the description of the prisoners, the lame man had the bundle, Fisher is lame, they went towards Orchard Street.

ANN HABRIS . I saw both the prisoners pass, I live at 6, Charles street, Westminster, Fisher I am certain of, and I believe Leith, but I am not positive, I saw Fisher go into No. 3, Mr. Stonall said if he staid longer than he could buy any thing he would go in, because Mr. Clark might be at market.

ELIZABETH WELLS. This is the waistcoat that was lost from the back room with the other things, I am quite certain of it, I have washed it several times.

Fisher's Defence. On the morning the robbery was committed Leith was not in my company at all, I only saw him when I came to the public house.

Leith's Defence. I was on my road to Chelsea, I happened to go into the public house in Pie Street, I had not been there three minutes.

FISHER, GUILTY , aged 19.

LEITH, GUILTY , aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18111030-86

887 JOHN MARLIN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of October . a feather bed, value 1 l. the property of Richard Adkins .

RICHARD ADKINS . I am an auctioneer , I live at Whetstone, I had a sale at North End, Finchley , on the 14th of September, and lot the second was the feather bed, I saw the bed safe then, it was sold to Mr. Thomas, a broker, at Bushey, and at six o'clock at night it was safe, when I left the premises; on the next morning I missed it out of the barn. On the evening of the 15th it was brought to me by the constable and my two sons, I knew it to be the same bed that was in the barn under my care.

GEORGE ADKINS. At what time did you go to the barn. - A. At ten o'clock at night, the bed was safe then; the next morning I went to the barn, it was broken open, and the bed had been taken away.

Q. Was the prisoner at all employed about the business of that sale. - A. No, we traced feathers up to the very place, an out house, near half a mile from this barn, we found the bed in the out house, under some soot.

HENRY ADKINS . In consequence of information, I found the bed under the soot in the out house, that the prisoner has rented for two or three years,

Q. Did you find any body on the premises. - A. No, it is a stable where the prisoner keeps his soot, and he sleeps there.

WILLIAM JARVIS . I am a labourer.

Q. Do you know Marlin. - A. Yes, he is a sweep .

WILLIAM CURVIN. I am a constable. I have known Marlin two years, he kept his soot in this outhouse, and slept there, I found the bed under the soot there.

for me to or three yards off the prosecutor's door, we went with the prisoner to his place, we asked him for the key, he said he had not got it, I had the door broken open, this was between seven and eight at night, on the 15th of October, we went in and found the bed under the soot, wrapped up in the cloths that he puts before the chimnies, I took the prisoner, and the bed was taken away: before we found the bed he said he knew nothing of it, and after we found it, he said he did not steal it. This is the bed.

Prosecutor. This bed was under my care for sale, it is worth twenty shillings.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been drinking at the Swan public house, and on my returning to my lodging, I observed the bed in the road, I took it up there being no one near, in the morning I went out for the purpose of enquiring whose it was, and also to my labour; - when I was informed by my neighbours that there was a search warrant, and in going to my lodgings it was found there. I am perfectly innocent of the charge, and ignorant how it came in the road, I took it in my place for safety.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex

Reference Number: t18111030-87

888. MARY ANN TAYLOR was indicted for feloniously stealing, from the person of Thomas Dalwin , a pocket-book, value 6 d. three 2 l. notes, and two 1 l. notes , his property.

THOMAS DALWIN. Q. Did you lose a pocket-book any time containing two two pound notes, and two one pound notes. - A. On the 9th of October , I went into the King's Arms, the corner of Golden Lane, I had not been in there a few minutes before David Crossely came in, he asked for gin, we came out of there, I said I am going to Leather Lane; David Crossely and Mary Ann Taylor went with me to Saint John Street, I and Crossely went into the King's Arms, St. John's Lane, Mary Ann Taylor and her sister followed us, we stopped there about half an hour, and just as we were coming out the girls tapped at the window, they said they were going to Sadler's Wells, we came out, I wanted to get David Crossely home.

Q. Did you go with these girls towards the New River. - A. They were going to Sadlers Wells, and I did not want to go home without him. Crossley is my brother in law, I wanted to get him home to his wife, he said he should do as he liked. When we came to Sadlers Wells there was no admittance, we came down to Aylesbury Street , the girls said we are going to have some alamode beef, David Crossley and Priscella Taylor went in, Mary Ann Taylor came behind me and look out the pocket-book, she ran off with it. I am sure she is the person that put her hand into my pocket and took out the book, I felt her hand in my pocket, I called after her when she ran away.

Q. What had you in the book. - A. Three two pound notes and two one pound notes. The pocket was brought back, not the notes.

HENRY DALWIN . Mr. Robinson brought me the book at ten o'clock the next morning. Mary Ann Taylor me she had spent three pound of the money.

me the pocket-book, she is not here. I examined it, there were only memorandums in it. I delivered the book to Dalwin.

JOHN LONDON . I am a silversmith. Mr. Dalwin called on me the next morning, he told me he had lost his pocket-book and his notes, and requested me to search the lodgings of Mary Ann Taylor , she cohabited with his brother-in law, he said and he conceived it a joke. I found her in Green-hill Rents, she was coming out of a house. The prisoner said he gave her the pocket-book, I said it was a likely matter, she said what is that to you, are you an officer, she did not care a shifting for him, he might do his worst.

CHARLES COOK. I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner up stairs at a gin shop, in St. John Street. Dalwin said she was the woman that had taken his pocket-book, she was very much intoxicated at the time, she said she bought these things with part of the money. I searched her and found only a shilling and a few halfpence.

Prisoner's Defence. My lord and gentlemen of the jury, the awful predicament I now stand in, has so agitated my mind and worked upon my feelings, that I have scarce power to appear before your lordships and this honourable court. On the night of the 9th of October, I in company with my sister were met by the prosecutor between two and three in the afternoon, he said we should have something to drink, we went into the house at the corner of Golden Lane, during the time we were drinking in the house, the brother of the prosecutor came in, we left this house and went to the Britannia, we all were drinking freely. I and my sister went home to fetch my bonnet, to go to Sadlers Wells, it being full we could not get in, we went to the John of Jerusalem, the prosecutor took his watch and his book out of his pocket. I put it in my bosom, I kept it safe, the prosecutor requested me to go home with him, finding myself unwell I returned him his book and his watch and went home.

Q.(to Prosecutor.) Did you lose your watch. - A. I never had it out of my pocket.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Confined six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18111030-88

890. JAMES ATTLEBURY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of September , twenty-four penny pieces, and seventy-two halfpence , the property of James Coleman .

JAMES COLEMAN . I am a shoemaker , 210, White Cross . On the 24th of September, the prisoner came into the shop to buy a pair of boot bottoms, they came to eightpence, he paid for them, he asked me to give him a string to tie them, and while I was reaching the string he took a five shilling paper of copper from off the shelf, and ran out of the shop with them, the next morning he came past the shop, and then he took to his heels.

JOHN NEWLAND . I work for Mr. James Coleman . I brought home work on the 25th, he told me he had been robbed.

Q. When did you take the prisoner. - A. At half after eleven o'clock, I saw the prisoner standing at the with me, and as soon as the prisoner saw Mr. Coleman he ran, Mr. Coleman said that is him, stop him, I pursued the prisoner and took him in Checquer Alley.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of it.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Confined six Months in the House of Correction, and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18111030-89

891. THOMAS HUGHES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 34th of September , a bridle, value 8 s. the property of John Boswell .

JOHN BOSWELL. I am a boatman . I live at Birmingham. I lost my bridle out of Mr. Crab's stable, at Paddington , from information I went to the Red Lion, at Kilburn. I found the bridle on the horses head, of the man that brought it, his name is John Thorn.

JOHN THORN. I am a highler. The prisoner said to me, countryman, I will sell you a saddle and bridle, we went up to the Star and Garter, he called out there is my brother gone out of the house they said yes, he then said the saddle is gone. I will sell you the bridle for three shillings. I said I will give you half a crown if you will take it to a sadler's, so he took it to a sadler's, there I bought it. I would not buy it without a witness. I am sure he is the man. This is the bridle.

- BOSWELL. That is my bridle, it is marked I. B. inside the winkers.

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw any thing of it.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined one Year in the House of Correction , and whipped in jail .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18111030-90

892 JOHN MILLS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of October , eight pound weight of pewter, value 7 s. the property of William Walker .

WILLIAM WALKER . I am a pewterer , No. 15, Brown's Buildings, the prisoner was my journeyman .

SARAH PEARCE . I am the matron of the workhouse of the liberty of the Old Artillery Ground. On the 5th of October I sent a person in the workhouse to put a wheel in the cupboard; her name is Ann Williams , she came back and said she found something in the cupboard, I went with her, she took out two pewter bottoms for pint pots, I took a candle and found twenty-one bottoms for quarts and pints tied up in a handkerchief; the prisoner came to me on the 6th, and asked me if I had not taken something out of the cupboard, and for Christ's sake to pardon him, I told him it was out of my power, it laid to his master to pardon him. The prisoner was a pauper in the workhouse, and worked for Mr. Walker.

ANN WILLIAMS . I am in the workhouse. I was sent to the cupboard with a wheel, I found the pewter bottoms, I looked at them and put them in again, I went and informed my mistress.

Prosecutor. I am sure they are mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I hope master will recommend me to mercy.

GUILTY , aged 49,

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and whipped in Jail .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18111030-91

893 HUGH MACKFARLANE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of October , a box, value 2 s. and fifty-six pound weight of soap, value 2 l. 3 s. the property of Hugh Cleaver , Samuel Cleaver , Charles Cleaver , and Edward Cleaver .

HUGH CLEAVER . I am a soap manufacturer at Battersea, my partners names are Samuel, Charles, and Edward Cleaver .

HENRY HARRIS . I am a servant to Edward Frisby Harris . On the 9th of October, I was coming out of the City, I saw the prisoner standing upon the hind part of Mr. Cleaver's cart, about half past ten in the forenoon, the cart was stopping opposite Ship Yard in Pickett Street , he lifted up a little white box, and then came down and took the box on his shoulder, and made away from the cart to Pickett Place, I followed him into Pickett Place, he went to the end of that, and there is a court at the corner by the left, he set the box down upon some steps, which goes down into Newcastle court, another man joined him, they walked a few steps on in that court, I there made towards them, and asked them if they could tell me my way to Covent Garden, they directed me, the prisoner helped the other man with the box of soap on his shoulder, they then went up the steps, walked up the court and I behind them; when they got to the top they put down the soap when I got into Boswell Court I met a baker. I asked him to help me to take them, he would not, I told him I saw the man take it out of the cart; I then asked the baker to watch these men while I got assistance to take them, which he did, I ran back to the cart and saw the carman. I asked him if he had lo t a box he said he had, I told him to come to me, I knew were the man was, we went back to where I had left the men, and they were gone, the baker stood in Boswell Court, told me which way they were gone, I ran after them through the court, which leads into Clements Inn, the soap was on the curb of the railings there, and the prisoner a little on the left, I ran and took hold of him, and the carman took the soap, the other man got out of the way.

Q. Are you positive that the prisoner is the man that you saw in the cart. - A. Yes, he is the man. The prisoner told me the little man that I saw with him in a white apron, hired him, when I laid hold of him.

JOSEPH HIND . I am a carman, I stopped my cart at the bottom of Ship Yard, Pickett Street, and when I came back I missed one of my boxes.

Q. How long had you been absent. - A. A quarter of an hour.

Q. Did you at last find the soap. - A. Yes, in Clement's Inn, I was going to the West India Docks with them, I had twenty-five in the cart. All the boxes in the cart belonged to my master.

Prisoner's Defence. I am quite innocent of taking the soap.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY, aged 21,

Judgment respited .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18111030-92

894. ISABELLA RICHARDSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of September , a pewter measure, value 8 d. and a wine-glass, value 6 d. the property of Nicholas Burgen .

SUSANNAH BURGEN . My husband is a victualler . we keep the Cock in Dyot Street .

HARRIET DAVIS . I live with my aunt. On the 25th of September I served the prisoner and another with a quartern of gin, when the prisoner went out I thought I heard the measure and the glass jingle in her pocket. I went to see if it was in the tap room, it was gone. I went out and told the prisoner that she had the glass and measure, she said she had not got it. I went to pull her in doors, she offered me the glass, I refused it, then she took out the measure and threw it down and the glass after that.

Q. Was she drunk or sober. - A. She did not appear to be drunk. This is the measure, and this is part of the glass, it is my aunt's property.

Prisoner's Defence. I told her I did not know how the measure and glass came in my pocket.

GUILTY , aged 38,

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18111030-93

895 RICHARD RIPPEN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of October , a gold ring with an antique head, value 5 l. a heart stone, value 10 s a blood stone, value 10 s. four pair of ear rings, value 4 l. two broaches, value 1 l. seven bracelets, value 10 l. two gold chains, value 8 l. eight rings, value 40 l. a gold locket and key, value 3 l. an amethyst stone, value 10 s. a topazring, value 1 l. a painting and frame, value 5 s. and a box, value 5 s. the property of Elizabeth Campbell . And JOHN POLLARD for receiving the said goods, he knowing them to have been stolen .

HANNAH HARRIN . Is your mistress's name Elizabeth Campbell . - A. Yes. she is a single lady.

Q.On the 2nd of August last, did your lady move to Sloane Street. - A. Yes, from Brick Street to Sloane Street . A hackney coach was sent for for the purpose of removing her property. The prisoner Rippen was the driver of that coach.

Q. Among the different things that you gave the footman to put in was there a box of jewels. - A. Yes, and that box of jewels contained the several things in the indictment, I myself put these jewels in that box, and kept the key, and went with the coach to Sloane Street, and there the things were taken out of the coach, and put into the house.

Q. Have you any recollection of the jewel box being taken out of the coach, and put into the house, - A. No.

Q. I believe at that time you did not observe or miss any thing. - A. No.

Q. How soon afterwards did you miss that jewel box. - A. That day week, I have since seen some of the things at Bow Street.

JOHN CHESTER . I am a coachman. I fetched the hackney coach for the purpose of removing the property, the prisoner Rippen is the driver of that coach.

Q. Did you put the

things into the coach. - A. I do not remember the particular things, I remember the ladies maid bringing all the things into the hall, I put them all into the coach, I do not remember one from the other, I am quite certain the prisoner is the man that drove the coach.

Q. Did you take them out of the coach. - A. Some I took out, and some the prisoner Rippen took out.

Q.(to Hannah Harrin). You put all the things in the hall. - A. Yes, and the jewel box among the rest, and begged it to be particularly taken care of, I mentioned it particularly to the coachman.

WILLIAM DE ROACH . I am a working jeweller.

Q. In the month of August last did you work for the prisoner Pollard. - A. Yes, he is a working jeweller.

Q. Where was his shop. - A. In the two pair of stairs in John's Court, Handy Street, Oxford Street. The prisoner Rippen lodged in the same house in the one pair of stairs, Pollard keeps the house. In the middle of August I was in Pollard's Parlour, Pollard was reading the newspaper, he saw these things advertised, and said,

"they have got a good booty," I made answer,

"I think they have." Then the week following Mrs. Rippen came down several times and asked what such stones and such ear-rings were worth. Then after she came down and made these enquiries, then Pollard sent for the same newspaper, and on his reading the same paper she said,

"I think these things are up stairs." Then on the Saturday night following Mrs. Rippen brought down an amethyst stone and a heart-blood stone, and an amethyst broach, there were nobody else in the parlour but me and Mrs. Pollard, Mr. Pollard came in at the time, he said they were the finest stones that ever he had seen in his life, and then I saw the amethyst broach was crack'd at one end of it, Mrs. Rippen asked Pollard what these things were worth, Pollard said the blood stone was worth a pound, and the others were very good, he could not say what they were worth. Then on the Sunday morning I was up in the shop, I saw several of the sittings of diamond rings broken up, and I saw some stones I had seen the night before.

Q. Did you see an antique head in a ring. - A. Yes, and I saw a gold lockit with a snake round it with diamond eyes, when it opened the inside opened in the shape of an heart.

Q. What was done with the amethyst stone. - A. Pollard was taking the ring out of the heart, and in taking the ring out of the heart, it broke the stone.

Q. Did you see what Pollard did with the antique ring. - A. I saw the stone, he had it reset.

Q. What was done with the blood stone. - A.Rippen waited in the shop while I did it, he had it to wear it as a broach in his shirt.

Q. Did you see any sitting of a miniature picture. - A. Yes, I had it, that was among the other things.

Mr. Alley. Q. You were journeyman to the prisoner at the time. - A. Yes.

Q. What reward are you to have for giving evidence to-day. - A. Nothing, I have been offered something by Pollard's brother not to give my evidence.

Q. Did you go to a magistrate. - A. No, I never went to a magistrate till they took me with Pollard and Rippen, I was taken in Pollard's house.

Q. Then you gave no account of this transaction until you were taken upon the charge as a prisoner. - A. No. I did not know they were stolen. I did not know whose they were, Mr. Isaacs bought the pearl head piece and the gold locket with the snake round it, some loose diamonds and the beads to match the head piece, and beads for a necklace, for which Isaac's gave eight pound five shillings, as Pollard told me.

NATHAN ISAACS . Q. In the month of September last, did you purchase any jewels of the prisoner Pollard. - A. I did, I have got them with me. This is what they call part of a head ornament, it is gold.

Q. And the broach, did you purchase any thing in the shape of a snake. - A. I did not. I gave between three and four pound for them.

Q. You did not give between three and four pound for that. - A. No, there was a pearl ornament with them, they lain in my shop window, and part of them were sold. When the officer came and made the enquiry, I had no more than these. I got the pearl ornament back. I went for the lady and shewed it her, she said it was not hers.

Q. Did you buy other things. - A. I bought some loose diamonds.

JAMES STONE. I am an officer. I went with Foy to search Pollard's house, upon searching the work shop I found this amethyst heart broke in three.

THOMAS FOY . I found on a person of the name of William Jones this antique head. Jones produced it before the magistrate, and afterward by the order of the magistrate. I went home with him and he gave me this copy.

WILLIAM JONES . I keep a shop in Castle Street, Leicester Fields. I am a dealer in antiquities.

Q. In the month of September last did you puschase any antiques head of the prisoner Pollard. - A. I did, I gave him two guineas and a half for it, it was set in a rimg, I saw it previous unset, I delivered it to Foy. I had an order for the copy of it previous to the officer coming, I had the copy of the stone made by Mr. Tassy. Mr. Smith gave me the order.

Q. Looking at it as a man of science what do you call it. - A. Cleopatra.

Q. Is not that generally with a snake around the head. - A. It is. When I saw it in an unfinished state it had no snake round it.

JOHN JONES . I am an apprentice to Mr. Hill, in Rathbone Place, in September last the prisoner Pollard brought a quantity of stones and other things. These are the stones.

Q.(to Harrin.) Look at the locket, the miniature picture. - A. I know it perfectly. It is the antique that was lost I think, and part of the ornaments that Isaac produced are part of her ornaments, and the amethyst stone is broke in three. I am quite positive of it, and the stones produced by Jones I can speak to positively. And the antique head is the head of the empress Julian not Cleopatra.

Rippen's defence. The lady's coachman knows he searched my coach with a candle, and then asked me my fare, I told him four shillings, he took my No. 210, at Marlborough Street. I told him the number was 218, after that I went to Vauxhall and it was three o'clock in the morning when I got home.

Pollard's defence. I never had any dealings with the man in my life, except making a blood stone, I cut it with my own hands and mounted it, he saw it in the rough state, and the man that worked for me saw me make it; he told me he had lost the broach, well then, I said you have lost it before you have paid for it.

Rippen called six witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Pollard called one witnesses, who gave him a good character.

RIPPEN, GUILTY , aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

POLLARD, GUILTY , aged 32.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18111030-94

896, JOHN SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of September , fourteen sheets of royal paper, value 1 s. 6 d. five sheets of demy paper, value 6 d. and seven sheets and a half of printed paper, value 6 d. the property of Andrew Strahan and William Preston .

JOHN MACARTY . I am superintendant in the printing office, their names are Andrew Strahan and William Preston .

JOHN CROSS . I am superintendant to the press part, the prisoner was a pressman , in the employ of Messrs. Strahan and Preston. On the evening of the 27th I looked in the prisoner's drawer, I found five or six sheets of proof paper, I shewed it to Mr. Scott and then replaced it in the drawer the same as I found it, on the next morning, Saturday, the prisoner came to work sooner than usual. I then stated to him that I believed we should have something to do on the Sunday, so that if I had occasion to call upon him I might know where to find him, he gave me No. 3, Bull's Head Court, Peter Street, Saffron Hill. After the prisoner was gone to breakfast I looked in the drawer again, and found the paper gone from the drawer. The work that he was upon I counted out and missed fifty or sixty sheets out of about three thousand five hundred. I obtained a search warrant and went to his lodgings that he had described. I searched the lodgings on the Saturday afternoon, and found the six sheets that I had found on the over evening, it was hanging upon a line to dry, it had been wetted fit for work. I found also a quire of royal paper, which was part of the paper that he was at work, and part of that I had missed. I found some sheets of printed paper, some sheets of what I was printing of Blairs Sermons, and some sheets of the Monthly Review. This is the property that we found. I am certain that the paper is the property of Mr. Strahan and Mr. Preston.

ROBERT STANTON . I apprehended the prisoner, he told me he was very sorry I had apprehended Charllotte, she was intirely innocent of it, he had taken it that morning at breakfast.

Q.(to Cross.) What is the value of the paper. - A. Somewhere about three shillings.

Prisoner's Defence. I own to the paper in the drawer, but to any thing else it is false.

GUILTY, aged 35.

Judgment respited .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18111030-95

897. WILLIAM POPE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 31st of October , fifty pound weight of lead , the property of the Royal College of Surgeons of London .

The case was stated by Mr. Gurney.

Mr. Gurney produced the charter of the Royal College of Surgeons, it says they shall be called the Royal College of Surgeons of London.

MARY LOMACK . Q. Your husband I believe was in the service of the College of Surgeons. - A. Yes assistant, superintendant of the museum. On Thursday the 31st of October, I was at one of the windows of the house in Lincoln's Inn Fields , a quarter before eight in the morning, I saw the prisoner and another man coming into the yard at the front of the house, and walked backwards and forwards there about three minutes, the other man looked hard at me through the window. I kept the prisoner in my eye, then in about five minutes after the prisoner walked past the window with something in his apron, which he endeavoured to conceal. I was some distance, I saw before he got out of the yard that what he was carrying appeared to be a great weight. I suspected one of the pieces of lead was gone, there were eight pieces of lead in the hall. I had seen them about ten minutes before in the hall, they had been sent in the night before. I sent my child for my husband, and watched the way the prisoner went, the other man went off first.

Q. Did your husband go in pursuit of him. - A. Yes. I saw him in about seven or eight minutes, he was brought back.

JOHN LOMACK . Q. You are the husband of the last witness. - A. Yes. I pursued the prisoner and overtook him, he had the lead in a leather apron carrying it on his shoulder, I collared him, he resisted three or four minutes, the lead dropped in the scuffle, and then he begged of me to let him go, that I did not do. I left the lead in Mr. Wilds shop, opposite of whose house I took him, I took the prisoner to the watch-house. I am certain there were eight pieces of lead in the hall. I went to look in the hall before I pursued him, and one was gone. I have the lead in my care. This is the apron it was tied up in, and this is the lead.

MR. WELLS. The lead was desposited in my shop and the same lead I delivered back again.

WILLIAM GOOD . I am a plumber, employed by the Royal College of Surgeons. On the night before this was done I sent in eight pieces of lead, it was their property. I have examined this piece of lead, it corresponds with one of the pieces to make up the eight, it is about half an hundred weight, it is worth fifteen shillings.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of stealing the lead. I was hired to carry it.

GUILTY , aged 45.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18111030-96

898. MARTHA WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of October , two pewter pots, value 2 s. the property of John Woodrow .

JOHN BURTON . I am a lamp lighter. On the 12th of October I was in upper Wimpole Street . I saw the prisoner put her hand through No. 3, area rails, and take two pint pots, I pursued her and took her, we found

four pints and a quart upon her.

JOHN WOODROW . I keep the Weymouth Arms, upon the information of the last witness, I pursued the prisoner and took her, and found the pint pots upon her. These are the pots, they are mine.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence, nor called any witnesses to her character.

GUILTY , aged 37.

Confined one Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18111030-97

899. ANN BUCKLAND was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of October , two pewter quart pots, value 3 s. the property of Stephen Woodward .

SAMUEL GALLOWLEY . On the 22d of October I was crossing Portland Place, I heard a little boy call out to Mr. Woodward's pot lad, a woman as got your pots. I told the prisoner I should take her to his master's, she then put the pots down, the lad took the pots, we took the prisoner to Mr. Woodward's.

STEPHEN WOODWARD . I keep the Devonshire Arms, Duke Street, Portland Place , the prisoner was brought to my house by the last witness and the pot boy. I sent for an officer, and while my back was turned she tried to get out of the window. These are the pots, they are mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I took up the pots merely to frighten the lad, and not with any felonious intention.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined one Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18111030-98

900. FRANCES STEVENS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of October , a pewter quart pot, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of Richard Clark .

RICHARD CLARK . I keep the Fortune of War, East Street, Manchester Square On the evening of the 10th of October, a little girl came for a pint and a half of beer, it was drawn, and given to her in a quart pot. In consequence of information I followed the girl, she went to 22, East Street , she remained in the house about half a minute, came out and went the opposite way to my house, I asked her what she had done with the pot, she halloed out, mother bring the man the pot. The mother was the prisoner at the bar.

Q. Did you find the pot upon the prisoner. - A. I did, wrapped up in the corner of her shawl.

Q. Which way was the mother going. - A. She was going away from 22, and had got a hundred yards from it.

Mr. Walford. Was there beer in the pot. - A. Yes.

Q. She might be going to her own home. - A. Yes she said so, I thought it was not true.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18111030-99

901. JOSEPH HACK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of October , nine pound weight of citron, value 38 s. the property of Thomas Hamilton Durnford .

CHRISTIAN LAW . I am a servant to Mr. Durnford. I found this man on the premises, 13, Tower Wharf , he was below, he ran up stairs, I called him, he would not stop, he dropped the basket, it contained preserved citron.

Q. Are you sure it is the said man that had the basket. - A. I am not quite sure.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18111030-100

902. JOSEPH STUART was indicted for that he, on the 7th of October was servant to John Allen , and employed and entrusted by him to receive money, and being such servant, so employed and entrusted, did take into his possession 11 s. 8 d. on account of his said master, and that he afterwards did embezzle, secrete, and steal the same .

JOHN ALLEN . I am a baker in Long Alley, Moorfields, the prisoner was my journeyman , he left me on the 12th of October.

Q. When he lived with you did you entrust him to receive money for you. - A. Yes, and on the Monday that he left my service the young man left the weekly bill, and there was one bill wrote upon the back of it paid.

ELEANOR DAVIS . I live in Featherstone Street, I deal with Mr. Allen, I paid the prisoner eleven shillings and eight pence. This is the receipt.

MR. ALLEN. I never received that money.

Mr. Gurney. That week did the prisoner settle his accompts with you or your wife. - A. With me. I have not my book here, whatever accompts he settled, they were put down in my book. I am sure he did not render me this payment.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel, called three witnesses who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18111030-101

903. JOSEPH STUART was indicted for that he on the 7th of October , was servant to John Allen , employed and entrusted by him to receive money, and being such servant, so employed and entrusted, did receive and take into his possession, the sum of 7 s. 9 d. and that he afterwards did embezzle, secrete, and steal the same .

JOHN ALLEN . I am a baker in Long Alley, Moorfields; the prisoner was my servant, he left me on the 12th of October.

MARIA EVERINGHAM. I live in Crown Street, Finsbury Square, I deal with Mr. Allen. On the 7th of October I paid the prisoner seven shillings and nine pence that is the bill, he gave me a receipt, that is his own hand-writing.

MR. ALLEN. I never received the money, I am sure he never brought it me.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and whipped in jail .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18111030-102

904. THOMAS MOORE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of October , forty-two yards of flannel, value 1 l. 17 s. the property of Henry Mason .

JOHN WATSON . I am shopman to Henry Mason,

161, Oxford Street . On the 30th of October about seven o'clock in the evening, in consequence of information, I ran out and caught the prisoner between thirty and forty yards from our shop, he had got forty-two yards of flannel in his arms, the value is one pound seventeen shillings.

Q. Where about was that flannel laying. - A. About a yard from the door on a bench. I brought the prisoner into the shop.

THOMAS WALKER . I live at 164 Oxford Street. On the 30th of October I saw the prisoner steal the piece of flannel from off the bench in Mr. Mason's shop. I gave information, and assisted in the pursuit.

JOHN LAMLEY . I am a constable. The prisoner was delivered to my charge, and this is the flannel.

WATSON. This is my master's flannel.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to his character.

GUILTY , aged 29.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18111030-103

905. ANN LANE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of September , a gown, value 16 s. the property of Mary Elliot .

MARY ELLIOT . I am a single woman , I live at No. 1, Union Street, Middlesex Hospital; I lost a five pound note, and various other articles, seven gowns, there is only one gown indicted for. The prisoner lived servant at No. 8 Suffolk Street; I lived servant with a gentleman and lady, she moved into that house, the prisoner helped me up with my box; this was the 2d of September, she observed that it was very heavy.

Q. Was your box locked. - A. No only corded. I put the box in an empty second floor, locked the door, and kept the key myself. On the next day I asked my mistress leave to go out, I obtained leave, I went to the box and got some clean things out, and to get two one pound notes, and left the five pound note in my box. This was between nine and ten on the Sunday morning. I found the things safe in my box, I locked the box and took the key up to the landlord; I returned on the Monday morning; I slept at my mothers; I went up stairs for the key, the landlord was out, I found the key on the table, I took it, and went into the room; when I came back the prisoner was gone. I found the room door locked; when I entered the room I found the rope not tied as I left it, there was nothing left in the box, all the clothes, and the five pound note were gone, I value my clothes at ten pound, I had seven gowns, they cost me twenty-five shillings each, on the 27th of October, I received information that the prisoner was in Oxford Road; I went and saw her, she had one of my gowns on her back, she said she had pledged the things, and left the duplicates at Mrs. Barlow's in Gravell Lane, and if I would forgive her, she would tell me all she could, and pay me half a guinea a week.

JOHN LANGLEY . I am a constable, I took charge of the prisoner, and took the gown from her person, I went to Mrs. Barlow's, Gravel Lane, I could not find any duplicates.

Prosecutrix. This is my gown.

Prisoner's Defence. I am an unfortunate girl in the street. Mr. Simpson asked me to scower a room, and on the Sunday I took my gown off to wash it, and I took that gown, and that is all.

GUILTY , aged 29.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18111030-104

906. ELIZABETH KIRBY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of October , a pewter quart pot, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of William Gower .

WILLIAM GOWER . I keep the Red Lion at Lambeth , the prisoner has been served at my house with half a pint of porter.

DAVID LAMB. I am a publican. I keep the Crown Seven Dials, by information we were in the old iron shop, at twelve o'clock at night, on the 19th of October, a constable was with us, the prisoner tapped at the window, and then at the door, I opened it, and as soon as the door was opened she saw the beadle, she ran away and I ran after her.

Q. Had any body said any thing to her before she ran away. - A. Not a word. I took her and brought her back, and in the passage of the old iron shop she dropped a quart pot from under her petticoats, it had Mr. Gower's name upon it.

MR. STEPHENS. I was there present in this old iron shop at the time.

Q. What is the name of the person that keeps the old iron shop. - A. Sarah Fisher . I saw the prisoner brought in. I saw the quart pot tumble from her clothes, it fell upon my foot, the prisoner denied any knowledge of the pot, the landlady said she had left a pint pot there before. This is the pot.

Prosecutor. It is my pot.

Prisoner's Defence. I was returning from my work and having seen a bill in Mrs. Fisher's window, I went to enquire for a lodging.

GUILTY , aged 50.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18111030-105

907. JOHN GALLOW was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of October , three horse-cloths, value 5 s. and a roller, value 1 s. the property of William Collins .

FRANCIS DIXON . I am foreman to Mr. Collins, livery stable keeper , George Street, Sloane Square . On the 30th of October, about six in the evening, I saw the prisoner come out of the stable, and from there he went out of the yard, I followed him, supposing that he had got an arm full of straw. When I got up to him I asked him what he had got, I secured him with a scuffle, and when I had got him down on the ground I saw he had got three horse-cloths, a roller, and a pair of small-clothes, I knew the roller and horse-cloths to belong to my master. This is one of them.

Prisoner's Defence. I have been seventeen years in the army , and thirteen years abroad; I belonged to the 112th regiment. I never had the things in my possession, I was in liquor, and these people took the advantage of me.

GUILTY , aged 48.

Fined 1 s. and discharged.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18111030-106

908. CHARLES REEVES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of September , a ham, value 30 s. the property of John Gowland .

MRS. GOWLAND. I live at 19, Kempton-street, Brunswick-square , I keep a cheesemonger's shop and sell ready-dressed ham. On the 25th of December, the prisoner and another man came in and asked for pudding; I told them I did not sell it; they went out and came in again, and asked for two ounces of ham, they said they must toss up for it; they tossed the money under the scale, and went out; they came in again and said they must have two ounces more, they must toss up for it; the prisoner throwed a halfpenny the other side of the counter, and asked me to pick it up; I said no, that may go for the ham; the prisoner said no, pick it up. I stooped to pick it up, in the mean while the ham was taken away; I said, a thief has stolen my ham; the other man said, I will soon have him, and ran out; I locked the door and kept the prisoner in.

Prisoner's Defence. I went into that shop for what I wanted, and paid for it; I never touched the ham, nor knew any thing about it.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18111030-107

909. MARY PRICE and CATHERINE HARLEY were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of October , six pounds weight of bacon, value 4 s. 6 d. the property of William Hodges .

MRS. PERRY. I am servant to William Hodges , he is a cheesemonger in Great Queen-street . On the 1st of October the two prisoners came into the shop, they looked at the bacon, and asked the price of the cheese; the short one took the bacon and put it into the tall one's lap, they were going out of the shop, I had them stopped. This is the bacon, it is Mr. Hodges' property.

Price's Defence. It was real poverty and distress that excited me to do it, the parish would not relieve me.

Harley said nothing in her defence.

PRICE - GUILTY , aged 57.

HARLEY - GUILTY , aged 59.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18111030-108

910. BENJAMIN HART was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of September , two brass cocks, value 4 s. the property of John Sherwood .

JOHN SHERWOOD . I am a publican in Princes-street, Drury-lane . I was not in the house when this was transacted, Thomas Moore was.

THOMAS MOORE was called, and not appearing in court, his recognisance was ordered to be estreated.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18111030-109

911. JOHN BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of October , a shirt, value 2 s. the property of John Ford .

MARY FORD . I live in Monmouth-street . On the 12th of October, about half after eleven at night, the prisoner with another man came in and asked for a shirt; I shewed him some, he tumbled the shirts about, and said, shew me others; I said, I have not a shirt for you, go away; they went away, and I missed a shirt.

BENJAMIN WELSH. I am a patrole. I produce a shirt, I took it out of the prisoner's left hand pocket. The prisoners threw away six counterfeit dollars, and another shirt.

Prosecutrix. That is my shirt.

Prisoner's Defence. I found that shirt on the bannister outside of the door. I never was inside of her shop.

GUILTY , aged 36.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and Whipped in Jail .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18111030-110

912. JAMES BONNER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of September , four pigeons, value 18 s. the property of Henry Hemmings .

HENRY HEMMINGS. I live at 29, Castle-street, Bethnal Green . I lost four almond tumblers out of my shed on the 28th or 29th of September, I found one at Mr. Watts's in Susannah-road, he shewed it me; a man went past, he said that is the man that I bought it of; I went out and took him to Worship-street. I found two of the pigeons at Mr. Preston's, the corner of Featherstone-street, City-road, and one pigeon I have never found.

WILLIAM WATTS . On Saturday, the 30th of September, I bought an almond tumbler of the prisoner for two shillings and sixpence, it is a hen pigeon. On Monday the prisoner happened to go by, I said to the prosecutor, there is the man, and the prosecutor and I took him to Worship-street office.

MR. PRESTON. I am a bird-dealer at the corner of Featherstone-street, City-road. This is the pigeon I bought of the prisoner, it is a cock. I gave eight shillings for it.

Prosecutor. These are my pigeons; the third I got from Mr. Preston, he did not buy it of the prisoner. There were more concerned in it.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought the pidgeon of a man going along the street.

GUILTY, aged 20.

Judgment respited .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18111030-111

913. JAMES SCOTT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of October , a blunderbuss, value 8 s. the property of William Alexander .

WILLIAM ALEXANDER . The blunderbuss I carried to a public-house to be sold on the 3d of October.

EDWARD MOORE . I was in the auction-room that night, there were two blunderbusses in a drawer; I looked at this blunderbuss, and as I was going to lay it down the prisoner said, it seems to be a good one; I said, it is; he took it and kept it in his hand. I went across the room, and looked to see what he did with it; in a minute or two after he walked off with it; I made an alarm, some of the people went after him.

WILLIAM HOLLEY . I was at Mr. Brooke's sale in Castle-street . The former witness gave the alarm that the man had ran out with the blunderbuss. I

him where he was going with the blunderbuss; he then dropped it. I am sure this the blunderbuss that I saw the prisoner drop about twenty yards from the place.

Prosecutor. It is my blunderbuss.

Prisoner's Defence. I have a wound in my head, and when I take liquor I do not know what I do.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18111030-112

914. ELIZABETH MOULD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of September , a gown, value 10 s. a tablecloth, value 2 s. and a shirt, value 10 s. the property of William Edmonstone .

SARAH EDMONSTONE . My husband's name is William Edmonstone , I live at the White Horse, Battle Bridge . I hired the prisoner to nurse me. On the 21st of September the first thing I missed was a silk handkerchief; I told her, if she had done any thing with it to get it before my husband came home; she went out an hour and brought it back; we discharged her. After she was gone we missed a gown, a shirt, and a tablecloth, she had pawned them; I also missed blankets and stockings that are not put in the indictment.

JOHN HUTT . I am an officer. I took the prisoner in custody, and the prosecutrix gave me these two duplicates.

WILLIAM ANDERSON . I am a pawnbroker. These duplicates correspond with the articles.

Q. to prosecutrix. Where did you get these duplicates - A. The prisoner came in the afternoon after she left me, and put down the two duplicates, and said you will not do any thing to me. I said, that is as my husband shall think proper.

Anderson. I produce a gown, a tablecloth, and a shirt, I took them in of the prisoner.

Prosecutrix. They are my property.

Prisoner's Defence. I brought the duplicates to the prosecutrix, and the prosecutrix told my aunt if she would undertake to see the money paid he would not hurt me; she went to him the next day but could not find him out.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18111030-113

915. MARY CASTELLOW was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of September , a cloak, value 1 s. a shirt, value 4 s. and a pillow case, value 1 s. the property of John Stephens .

MARGARET STEPHENS . I am the wife of John Stephens , I live in Rosemary-lane . The prisoner was an old acquaintance, she came to see me on the 27th of September, she took a cloak, shirt, and pillow-case. I missed them after she was gone, I found them at the pawnbrokers.

JOHN HALL . I am a pawnbroker, 69, Barbican. On the 28th of September I took the cloak in pawn for one shilling and sixpence of the prisoner.

RICHARD FERRIS . I produce a military shirt, I cannot swear the prisoner pawned it.

Prosecutrix. It is my shirt and cloak.

day; I thought of returning it.

GUILTY , aged 29.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18111030-114

916. JAMES BARTHOLOMEW was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of October , a cask, value 21 s. the property of John Buckley and Jervas Raynes .

JERVAS RAYNES. My partner's name is John Buckley , we are brewers in Belvidere-place. I only know the cask to be mine, it is in court with my name on it.

JEREMIAH HUGHES . Q. You live with these gentlemen - A. Yes. On the 21st of October I was laying down some beer at the King's Head in Bear-street, Liecester-square , I saw the prisoner and his partner; he said, you are laying it down here, and when we came for a third cask off the dray, he was turning our cask over; my partner asked him what he wanted with the cask, they did not belong to him, nor yet his master. When we had taken a fourth I came up again and missed the barrel cask; I asked Mrs. Farrol if she knew the men; she said she knew one of the men, they had a quartern of gin, and left me to pay for it. I know no more of the men than what I have told you. She told me they were gone into Castle-street, and it was Mr. Atkinson's dray in Cannon-street. I went there and asked the prisoner what business he had with the cask; he said he had no cask belonging to me; I told him it was my cask, it had Mr. Buckley's name on it; I told him I should get an officer; I did, and when I came with the officer the cask was put on my dray.

JOHN LIMERICK . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner, he was alongside of the dray, he said he should not go with me, and sat himself down, I took him in custody.

Prisoner's Defence. The man that was with me told me to take the cask, and when the man was gone to Bow-street, he put it on the dray, and I saw no more of the man. I was taken to Bow-street.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18111030-115

917. EDWARD ADDISON and CHARLES ADDISON were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of October , a two wheeled cart, value 2 l. the property of George Edward Gerrard .

GEORGE EDWARD GERRARD. I am a fishmonger . I lost my cart on the 27th of October, it was in a recess belonging to Mr. Collins of Old-street , it was a new cart. On the Sunday I saw these two prisoners looking at my cart, and on the Wednesday I searched for it; I went into Whitecross-street to Mr. Berry the coach-broker, of whom I purchased the axletree and wheels; during the time I was in the yard talking to Mr. Berry Edward Addison came into the yard and said to Mr. Berry, I have a nice axle-tree if you will buy it; Mr. Berry looked at the axle-tree. This was on the 30th; he said he had purchased it a fortnight back of a man in Smithfield, and had given fifteen shillings for it; I told him it was my property, and could he bring forward the man that he he said no; I shut the gates and

went for an officer for the prisoners.

MR. BERRY. I am a coach broker. About the 8th of October I sold a pair of wheels, and an axletree to the prosecutor. On the 30th he told me that his cart was finished, and that he had had it stolen; he told me to stop it if I should see it offered for sale. While he was talking the elder prisoner brought the axle-tree; I believe it to be the same axle-tree, it has been in the fire since.

ABRAHAM BARRETT . This is the axletree, I was present when the prosecutor purchased it; it was put into my possession to make a body for it. I can swear to it being Mr. Gerrards property.

Edward Addison 's Defence. My brother has nothing to do with it in any shape. They are swearing false.

Charles Addison said nothing in his defence.

EDWARD ADDISON - GUILTY , aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

CHARLES ADDISON - NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18111030-116

918. CATHERINE PRICE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of October , a watch, value 2 l. and a 3 s. bank token, the property of George Armstrong , from his person .

GEORGE ARMSTRONG. I am a painter . On the 3d of October, between two and three in the morning, I was in Long Acre , the prisoner accosted me, I had some conversation with her, and the moment she was gone I discovered that my watch was gone, and some silver; I was not perfectly sober.

Q. Did you ever find your watch - A. Yes; the officer found it.

JOHN LIMERICK . On the 3d of October, about three o'clock, I was going down Long Acre, I heard this person cry out, watchman; I went over, the prosecutor had got hold of the prisoner's arm; I searched her, and she put her hand up her petticoats, and took this watch out. The prisoner was in liquor.

Prosecutor. That is my watch.

Prisoner's Defence. He said he would get a room for me, and that he would render me all the service he could.

Prosecutor. I would rather do her a service than an injury.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18111030-117

919. ELIZABETH CANEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of August , a watch, value 3 l. the property of Thomas Cullom , from his person .

THOMAS CULLOM . I am a gentleman's coachman . On the 23d of August last I met the prisoner, she asked me to with her; I went with her to No. 3, Charles-street, Drury-lane , and after sitting in the room I gave her a shilling and two-pence halfpenny for porter; when she was gone for the porter I looked at my watch, it was a little after eleven; I wound it up and put it in my pocket. The prisoner returned, said she could get no porter, and said, I had better stop with her to-night; I said I was short of silver; she said, never mind that, you can see me another time. I locked the door, and put the key in my pocket; she said, what property you have about you is safe with me. We went to bed. About three o'clock I awoke and found the prisoner gone, and the property likewise. I came down stairs, and met the patrol, the landlord of the house, he opened the door to come in, he said, who are you; I said I had lost my watch, and gave him my address. In a few days I got information, and took the prisoner.

THOMAS ADAMS . I am a patrol. On the morning the young man was going out I came in; he said he had lost his watch; I went up stairs and searched the house, and found no one missing but the prisoner.

- PILGRIM. I apprehended the prisoner on the 28th of October at night, I searched her, I could not find any thing about her.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing about it, I never saw such a thing. I left the place because I could not afford to pay for it.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18111030-118

920. ISAAC JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of October , an ink-case, value 18 d. the property of a person to the jurors unknown, from his person .

THOMAS CAVE . I am an officer. On the 21st of October, about half past four, I was coming along the Strand , I saw the prisoner, and knowing him before, I watched him. There was a gentleman just going to get into a coach, he put his hand through the coat and took this case out of his pocket; I saw him do it. I apprehended him, and saw him drop it; I took it to the gentleman in the coach, I asked the gentleman if he had lost any thing, he said he had not; I told him to feel; he felt his pocket and said he had lost his ink-case; I shewed it to the gentleman, he said it was his; he said he was going in the country, he could not attend. I took the prisoner to Bow-street, on searching him I found this skin, he said he found it.

Prisoner's Defence. The officer found the ink-stand on the ground; I know nothing about it.

GUILTY , aged 55.

Confined Two Years in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18111030-119

921. SARAH DUMMETT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of October , a knife, value 6 d. a handkerchief, value 1 s. and a dollar, value 5 s. 6 d. the property of John Moss from his person .

JAMES STONE . I am the officer. The prosecutor is not here.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18111030-120

922. SARAH SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of September , a sheet, value 1 s. a tablecloth, value 1 s. 6 d. two frocks, value 15 d. a shift, value 1 s. 9 d. four pinafores, value 15 d. and an apron, value 1 d. the property of Mary Page ; and two gowns, value 1 s. the property of Mary Moore .

MARY PAGE . I keep a linen drapers shop , Church-street, Bethnal Green .

MARY MOORE . I am servant to Mrs. Page. I saw the prisoner going out of the door about eight o'clock in the morning on the 27th of September, I ran after her and caught her; I asked her if she would go

back with me, she said, yes; she went back with me; she had all the property in her apron.

Prosecutrix. These are the things, they are all mine and my servants.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence, nor called any witnesses to her character.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18111030-121

922. ANN SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of October , a tin can, value 4 s. the property of John Gardner .

JOHN GARDNER . On the beginning of October there was a quantity of tin cans lost.

JOHN TRIGG . Ann Smith came to me and stated that she had got some oil, and her husband belonged to the Lyceum Theatre, it was a perquisite of his, she asked me to buy it; I told her, yes; she came again, I purchased it; she left it in a can, and in consequence of information I found the can belonged to Mr. Gardner. The man has absconded.

WILLIAM CRESWELL . I apprehended the woman in Chandois-street; after I had apprehended her the man she called her husband absconded.

Prosecutor. That is my tin can; the husband of the woman worked for me, he had the custody of the can to convey oil to the different theatres.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18111030-122

923. MARY SMITH and MARY BROWN were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of October , six pieces of ribbon, value 1 l. the property of Thomas Swift .

The prosecutor and witness were called, and not appearing in court, their recognizances were ordered to be estreated.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18111030-123

924. JOHN SCHULTZ was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of August , a jacket, value 6 s. a pair of trowsers, value 5 s. and a waistcoat, value 4 s. the property of Lawrence Gunderson ; a pair of stockings, value 5 s. and a handkerchief, value 1 s. the property of Andrew Anckstoffe .

ANDREW ANCKSTOFFE . I am a Swede. The prisoner took the things from No. 5, Shakspeare's Walk . The prisoner is a Swede, and Gunderson is a Swede. The prisoner slept in the same house, but not in the same room. On the 11th of August, at twelve o'clock I let him in, he came from a club called the Odd Fellows. He went away about three o'clock in the morning, he took a jacket, a pair of trowsers, and a waistcoat of Gundersons; and of mine, a pair of stockings, and a handkerchief.

GEORGE PARTRIDGE . I am an officer. I took the prisoner in custody on the 3d of October, he told me where he lodged; I found there a jacket, trowsers, and a waistcoat, and a pair of stockings and a handkerchief belonging to these two men.

Anckstoffe. These are my stockings and handkerchiefs.

GUNDERSON. That is my waistcoat, trowsers and jacket.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to his character.

GUILTY , aged 29.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18111030-124

925. SARAH PANNETT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of October , two neck cloths, value 1 s. and two pieces of carpet, value 1 s. a petticoat, value 2 s. a cap, value 3 d. and and a night gown, value 1 s. the property of John Fletcher .

SARAH FLETCHER . My husband's name is John Fletcher , he is a cabinet maker ; we live at No. 70, James-street, St. George's in the East . On the 22d of October I left a blue coat, three waistcoats, two neck handkerchiefs, a night gown, two pieces of carpet, a petticoat and a handkerchief, and other things, I left them in my bed-room; I went out about nine o'clock, and returned about twelve. I suspected the prisoner, she used to come to a lodger in our house. The officer searched her room, and found the petticoat, night gown, two pieces of carpet, and a handkerchief.

EDWARD KING . I searched the prisoner's room, No. 11, St. George's-court, the prisoner was in the room; I found a petticoat, two pieces of carpet, and a night-gown in the room, and a night cap on her head; that was on the 22d, the day that they were lost. In her pocket I found a duplicate of two neck handkerchiefs. The key of the prisoner's room door unlocked the room door that these things were stolen from.

CHARLES WILLIAMS . I produce two white handkerchiefs; I think the prisoner is the person that pawned them.

Prosecutrix. They are mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I was out all day from half past eight until eight in the evening, I left my room door open; I found the lodger in her house had been to my room and left these things, and I had no cap on at all.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18111030-125

926. JANE PROCTER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of October , a pewter quart pot, value 15 d. the property of John Dallimore .

ROBERT FLOWERDEAU . On the 18th of October I was in Upper Titchfield-street ; I saw the prisoner take a quart pot that was hanging on the rails; from there she went into Cleveland-street; I saw her take three pint pots from the doors there and put them in her apron; I took her in custody, and found upon her three pint pots of Mr. Cook, and a quart pot of Mr. Dallimore. These are the pots.

JOHN DALLIMORE . I am a publican. I keep the Green Man in Union-street, Mary-le-bone. This quart pot is mine, it is worth fifteen pence.

Prisoner's Defence. Necessity drove me to do it.

GUILTY , aged 42.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18111030-126

925. SARAH FISHER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of October , a pewter pint pot, value 1 s. 4 d. the property of William Patterson .

WILLIAM PATTERSON . I am a publican , I keep the Rose and Crown in Colville Court, St. Pancras .

THOMAS BELLAMY . On the 19th of this month I went to the prisoner's house, No 6, Castle Street, Long Acre, she keeps an old iron shop. It was between eleven and twelve at night, I felt around her, I told her I took her on suspicion of pot stealing, I took that pot out of her pocket, the pot has the direction of the publican. Mr. Patterson came and claimed it.

DAVID LAMB . I saw Bellamy take the pot out of her pocket.

Prosecutor. It is my pot.

Prisoner's Defence. I never would buy any pewter article, and particularly desired the woman that was in my shop not to purchase any pewter whatever. I had been out, and when I came home the person that brought that pot she said would leave it until I came home. I grew angry and put it in my pocket.

GUILTY , aged 35.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18111030-127

926. SARAH FISHER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of October , a pewter pint pot, value 1 s. 2 d. the property of Thomas Emerson .

THOMAS EMERSON . I keep the Black Horse, Rathbone Place . I only know the pot is mine.

THOMAS BELLAMY . Q. Was this on the 19th of October. - A. Yes, Mr. Lamb found this pint pot in a small travelling trunk. The prisoner was by at the time.

DAVID LAMB . I took this pint pot out of a small trunk in the prisoner's shop, she said she had bought it of the woman that was tried before, and gave her nine pence for it.

Prisoner's Defence. I declare to God I knew nothing of it, I was out at the time.

GUILTY , aged 35.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18111030-128

927. MARY WRIGHT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of October , a shawl, value 1 s. a habit shirt, value 1 s. a half handkerchief, value 1 d. and a tippet, value 2 s. 6 d. the property of Mary Cawthorn .

MARY CAWTHORN . I am a widow , the prisoner was my servant , she lived with me a week. I lost the articles on the 29th of October. On the Tuesday morning her sister called to know how I liked her, I answered, she would not suit me, she was so dirty, she had better take her with her, she said she would call in the afternoon and take her. In the afternoon she came about six o'clock, I asked the prisoner if she was ready to go with her sister, she said she was, I saw her pockets extended, I asked her what she had got in her pockets, she said nothing, she kept nudgeing her sister, I said,

"what do you nudge your sister." I begged her sister to see what was in her pockets, she pulled her own handkerchief out, and then afterwards pulled out my half handkerchief and other things, her sister told her to strip, the officer came in, and then came my shawl, it was three times round her waist, the officer told me to search her stockings, we did, and there were several trimmings of lady's gowns, and in her box was my tippet.

THOMAS PRIOR . I am an officer, this is the property.

Prosecutrix. They are mine.

Prisoner's Defence. It is the first offence, I hope you will have mercy on me.

GUILTY , aged 15.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18111030-129

928. MARIA WHITE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of October , a yard and a half of callico, value 2 s. six yards and a half of fustian, value 12 s. and twenty buttons, value 1 s. 8 d. the property of John Wicks .

MARY WICKS . John Wicks is my husband, he is a hatter . I delivered to the prisoner a yard and a half of callico, six yards and a half of fustian, and twenty buttons, about the latter end of September, she was to make my husband a jacket, and to bring it as soon as she could get it done.

Q. What reason have you to charge her with stealing them. - A. She had pawned them.

Q. You expected to receive them in a jacket. - A. Yes.

NOT GUILTY.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18111030-130

929. MARIA WHITE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of October , a blanket, value 5 s. two pillows, value 5 s. and two bed curtains, value 5 s. the property of Jonathan Bacon .

SARAH BACON . I live at 13, Bluecrop Street, Leicester Fields , my husband's name is Jonathan Bacon . The prisoner lodged in my house, she had a back garret, a furnished room.

Q. Had she a blanket, two pillows, and curtains, as part of the furniture that she hired of you. - A. Yes, she was to pay four shillings and sixpence a week for it. She first came with another woman's husband, about the latter end of March, I let the lodgings to them both at first, the man left the lodging, and then she had it, and agreed to pay me four shillings and sixpence a week for it, she paid me regular for a time, there were five weeks due when she left me, she went away without giving me any notice whatever, but sent me a letter. I knew of the blanket being gone at that time. She came again, and left me without notice. There were two genteel women that she brought into my house about August, and when I accused her of taking my things, she said she had taken them through distress, I said that could not be, because she had been tipsey. She left my lodging on the 1st October, I found her the next day in Market Lane, and the duplicates was found upon her.

THOMAS COLE . I am shopman to Mr. Lawton, pawnbroker, 21 Green Street, Leicester square. On the 6th of August the prisoner pledged a pillow with me.

THOMAS BEALE. I am shopman to Mr. Brown, Panton Street Haymarket, the prisoner pawned with me two curtains.

Prosecutrix. These are my goods.

Prisoner's Defence. I paid Mrs. Bacon as far as my ability would let me, and when I was distressed, I had resource to taking these articles. I did not intend to do any thing that was dishonest.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18111030-131

930. DANIEL COTTER and WILLIAM WAGSTAFFE were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of September , two check braces, value 2 s. and one holder, value 1 s. the property of Thomas Darvell .

THOMAS DARVELL . I am an hackney coachman , I drive No. 26. On the night of the 26th of September, my check braces were all cut off, and one holder, they were taken away in Drury Lane , between eleven and twelve o'clock at night; I do not know who did it. I saw the buckle, and some part of the leather belonging to them, I knew them to be mine.

THOMAS MANTZ . I am an officer. On the night of the 26th, a little after one in the morning, I saw the two prisoners in Drury Lane, I searched them, and found a great many different sort of buckles belonging to harnesses, and leather, they said they had cut them off different coaches, they hoped I would forgive them. Darvell came up to our office about some ten pound notes, I told him that I had some buckles, these are them.

DARVELL. Here is four bucklers that belong to me.

Cotter's defence. I work at a tobacconists.

Wagstaffe's defence. I did not cut them off.

COTTER, GUILTY, aged 14.

WAGSTAFFE, GUILTY, aged 14.

Judgment respited .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18111030-132

931. THOMAS HENRY MARSH was indicted for that he on the 3d of September was servant to Francis Albert Leonard van Strick Linscoten , and was employed and entrusted by him to receive money, and being such servant, and so employed, did receive and take into his possession the sum of 3 l. 18 s. 6 d. for, and on account of his said master, and that he afterwards feloniously did embezzle, secrete, and steal the same .

FRANCIS ALBERT LEONARD VAN STRICK LINSCOTEN . I am a colour manufacturer , the prisoner was in my employ, and entrusted to receive money on my account.

Q. Have you a customer of the name of Charles Mann. - A. Yes, trading under the firm of Thomas White and Co.

Q.Was there any sum due to you from Charles Mann . - A.Yes, three pound, eighteen shillings, and six-pence.

Q. Did you give any orders for the prisoner to collect that money. - A. Not particularly for that money, he collected as much as he could obtain.

Q.Has he accompted to you the three pound, eighteen shillings and six pence, as received from Charles Mann - A. No.

Q. Have you any book in which he enters the money that he received. - A. Yes, he enters it on a slip of paper, and then he enters it in a book.

Q. Can you say from your recollection that he never gave you the sum of three pound, eighteen shillings, and six pence, as from Mr. Mann. - A. Yes.

CHARLES MANN . Q. Have you purchased colours of Mr. Linscoten. - A. I have.

Q. Were there any sum due from you to him in September last. - A. There was three pound, eighteen shillings and nine-pence for colours. On the 3d of December the prisoner called for it. I paid him myself three pound, eighteen shillings and six-pence, he gave me this receipt for it. Mr. Linscoten called for the money again about a fortnight back, I told him I paid his servant.

Q.(to Prosecutor.) Whatever money this man received he gave you an accompt of it in writing, and then he used to enter it in his books. - A. Of course, it was his duty to enter it in his books, I have not the book here.

Court. Then I cannot take your memory for it.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18111030-133

932. ELIZA COOK was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 31st of October , a handkerchief, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of Samuel Harmer , from his person .

GEORGE HIGGENS . On the 31st of October, the prisoner, accompanied by Samnel Harmer and another man, came into John of Gaunt's house, in Duke Street, Leicester Fields , they staid in the house a quarter of an hour, and had three half pints of gin, I saw the prisoner take the handkerchief out of Harmer's pocket, I told him of it, he charged the watch with her. He was very much intoxicated in liquor.

THOMAS CROOK. I am a constable, the prisoner denied having the handkerchief, I searched her, and found the handkerchief on her, she said the prosecutor gave it her, he was so intoxicated he did not know the handkerchief.

Prisoner's Defence. These men drank best part of the gin, the man gave me the handkerchief, and because he had no more money, and I would not give the handkerchief up, I was taken to the watchhouse.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18111030-134

933. SARAH BLANDY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 31st of October , from the person of William Crawley , four ten pound bank notes and a five pound bank note, his property .

WILLIAM CRAWLEY . I am a seaman lately discharged from the navy.

Q. On the 31st of October did you lose four ten pound notes and a five pound note. - A. I did, in the night about three o'clock. I was as sober as I am now this present moment. I felt her going out of bed, I asked her where she was going to, she said to make water, I was in bed in a house in Long Acre , this woman is one of the turnkeys of the house, it is a house of pleasure. This prisoner came through the lane that I live in, I went home with her to this house.

Q. A little after three you found her go out of bed. - A. Yes, and I found my property gone.

Q. Did you find that she had got your notes. - A. Not at that time, I took hold of her, I said if you do not give me the money that I have earned honestly, I will make you suffer for it, and there was this lady by the door; then these ladies said if I would go out for five minutes, they would give me the money, I went out, and staid till the five minutes was out, as I thought, I had no watch, and then I went in, and then she told me that she had swallowed them, when I went in this house I had four ten pound notes, and one five, I changed a ten pound note with my landlady, she took the heaviest notes and left the lightest, she capsized me, I found four tens and a five gone.

Q. Have you ever recovered the notes again. - A. Never a farthing. She told me if I would take her to an apothecary's shop, and get her a dose, she would capsize them, I got her a dose of oil to bring them up, then she said if I would let her alone for twenty-four hours, she would bring them down, I never could bring them up or down.

Prisoner. I knew this man three times before.

Prosecutor. No only once, and then I gave you a dollar.

MRS. GRIFFITHS. I live in Bird in hand court, Long Acre. I am a servant in that house, Ann Winwood keeps the house, between eleven and twelve o'clock I let the man and woman into the house, they were shewed into a room, and they went to bed. I heard a great noise in the room, I went up stairs, he said he had lost seven and forty pound, I took a light in the room, and took the bed off, no money could I find, we searched the woman, no money was found.

Q. Did you hear her say that she had swallowed the notes. - A. I heard him say it.

RICHARD BOULTER . I keep the sign of the George in Drury Lane. I am the landlord of this man, before ever he went out of the house this book contained fifty-four pounds, that was between seven and eight o'clock, he was about half seas over, this woman was an entire stranger in the house, she came in and called for half a pint of ale, I saw him leave the house in company with the woman. The next day the master of the house came down to me. I saw the prosecutor about nine o'clock the next morning. Donaldson gave me this book, it contains seven ones and a two, the four tens and the five were taken from this book, he charged this woman with robbing him, and this woman declared just now that she heard nothing from the prisoner about her swallowing them, they were taking water up stairs to make this woman's emetic operate. I know that he had fifty-four pound when he left my house, and on the next day he had only nine left. The prisoner in jail sent to the prosecutor telling him that she had voided the notes, and they was as sound and good as ever they were; and when they went she said he had come too late, a prisoner that is under transportation had robbed her of them.

Prisoner's Defence. I met this man in Drury Lane, he asked me to go and have two pots of porter with him, and then I went to his landlords and had some ale, and after that we went into a public house Covent Garden. I left him and saw him again. I went to bed in this house with him, in the morning he said you have picked my pocket, and he said if you do not give it me I will rip you open. I alarmed the house, this good woman came up stairs, a constable was sent for, they took off all my clothes and searched me. I am not guilty at all, and as to swallow a note I never said so, nor did I do it.

GUILTY , aged 27.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18111030-135

934. ANN KENNY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of October , two gowns, value 10 s. a shift, value 2 s. and a pair of stockings, value 2 s. the property of Mary Ann Hudson .

MARY ANN HUDSON . I live at No. 3, Tavistock Court , the prisoner slept in the same bed with me. I missed my things and had her apprehended, and my property was found at the pawnbrokers.

WILLIAM PENNY . I am shopman to Mr. Ashman in the Strand. On the 30th of October, I took in two gowns, a shift, and two pair of stockings, for six shillings of the prisoner.

Prosecutrix. They are mine,

Prisoner's Defence. She took two dollars out of my trunk. I told the pawnbroker these things did not belong to me.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Confined six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18111030-136

935. ABRAHAM WOOLLER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of October , a pewter pot, value 1 s. 3 d. the property of David Saggett .

JAMES LAMB . I am a publican. In consequence of information I went to the prisoner's house, 23, Tower Street, Seven Dials. I was informed there were four dozen pots there the day before. We told him we come to look for stolen pots. I went to the place where he kept the pots, I found one pewter pint pot, and 107 lb weight of pewter, all in cakes, there is the rim of a pot on one of the cakes, he denied at first that were any pots, and when we found the pot and the pewter he said he was a collecter, and a woman brought the pot in with some beer.

THOMAS BELLAMY . I am a beadle, we went to this man's house, he keeps an old iron shop, we told him we were come to search for pots, he said we were welcome to search, he had none. Mr. Lamb found this pint pot under some rags. The door was open when we went in, this was between eleven and twelve o'clock at night.

DAVID SAGGETT . It is my pot. I keep the Britannia, Berwick Street.

Prisoner's Defence. I told them how I came by the pot, that I found it in a lodgers room.

GUILTY , aged 60.

Confined Two Years in the House of Correction , and publicly whipped .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18111030-137

936. JOHN WESLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of June , from the person of John Eades , two five pound Bank notes, and eleven one pound

bank notes , his property.

JOHN EADES. I live in Islington Road. I am a builder . On the 8th of June I was in the Marlborough's Head, Islington , between ten and eleven o'clock at night, the prisoner was with me, I was inebriated, I said I would pay the reckoning. I pulled out my notes, the prisoner and I had been drinking together.

Q. Do you know how much at that time you had about you. - A. I had eleven ones and two fives, I took them out on a bench, they were tied with a piece of pack thread across, he pushed me, or I pushed him. In the event I fell down, I did not suppose him a robber, in my getting up he got hold of my hand clasped, endeavouring to unclench it, and seeing me with this parcel of notes, he said, you could lend me some notes, I said I could if I liked, I am quite certain I did not lend him any, though it may be asserted hereafter that I did, I gave no consent whatever. Finally he took the notes away from me, I called upon him the next morning, supposing it was a joke, he disappeared from his lodgings.

MR. CHURCHILL. I recollect the circumstance of the two gentlemen coming into my house, they had been out spending the evening. Mr. Eades was very much intoxicated. Wesley was not. I recollect Mr. Eades lending the other four pounds, but he took the whole.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18111030-138

937. THOMAS HENRY MARSH was indicted for that he on the 14th of August , being servant to Francis Albert Leonard Van Strick Linscoten, and was employed and entrusted by him to receive money for and on his account, that he being such servant and so employed, did receive and take into his possession the sum of 4 l. 14 s. and that he afterwards did embezzle, secrete, and steal the same .

THOMAS JAMES . I am an oil and colourman.

Q. Do you buy your colours of Mr. Linscoten. - A. Yes.

A. Do you know the prisoner. - A. Yes, he called on me on the 13th of August for the money due to his master. I observed that his master was in a great hurry, he said his master had a bill to make up, the last bill was one pound five shillings. I said if you will take discount of I will pay you. I paid him four pound fourteen shillings, he gave me this receipt.

Q. How long since that did Mr. Linscoten make application. - A. I believe about a fortnight.

Mr. Knapp. The receipt is in the name of Moore. - A. The business is carried on in the name of Moore and Sons, it is my father in the City Road.

FRANCIS ALBERT LEONARD VAN STRICK LINSCOTEN . The prisoner had been in my service about fifteen months, and occasionally collected money that was due to me, he made the entry of the sums he received in my book.

A. Turn to the entery of the 13th or 14th of August, do you find any entery made of any sum received of Moore or James. - A. I have examined the book before. I find no such entery about the 13th of 14th of August.

Q. At this time were you much pressed to make up a bill. - A. Not the least in the world, he said that without my authority. I believe he applied to me to take off the discount of five per cent. of the one pound five.

Q. Did he bring that money to accompt the four pound fourteen shillings. - A. He never did. I called upon Mr. James for the money on account of receiving the letter upon which he acknowledges receiving the money and not accompting to me for it.

(The letter read.)

Prisoner's Defence. I acknowledge receiving the money, I never received it with intention of defrauding him.

The prisoner called two witnesses who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 36.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18111030-139

938. MARY RYNES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of April , a bonnet, value 2 s. a shawl, value 5 s. an apron, value 1 s. and three caps, value 1 s. the property of Garret Coodey .

HANNAH COODEY . I am the wife of Garret Coodey , we live at No. 2, Charles Street, Drury Lane . On the 11th of April the prisoner came to our house, we entertained her all night, and in the morning she went away before me and my husband were up, she took my bonnet, shawl, apron, and caps with her. I had seen these things safe in the house on the night the prisoner slept there. We could not find the prisoner until the 5th of October, and when I asked her for my things she beat me, and gave me a black eye. I have never been able to find my things since.

Prisoner's Defence. She gave me the bonnet, the apron, and the shawl.

Prosecutrix. I did not give her the things, I never saw her before.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18111030-140

939. ELIZABETH ATKINSON was indicted for a misdemeanor .

JAMES M'LAREN. I am a shoemaker in Cornhill. I have known the prisoner between two or three years. Thomas Atkinson , her husband, was employed by me as a journeyman lady's shoe maker. I settled with him every Friday night, between seven and eight o'clock.

Q. How much could she earn a week. - A. Twelve shillings upon an average. On the 4th of October, I paid the prisoner one pound sixteen shillings and threepence, upon her coming in the usual way, and presenting the book I paid her. She takes the book up stairs to my foreman, his name is Young, he signs the book, and I pay upon that signature. She brings the husband's book, and always came and took the money for the husband.

Q. Have you any means of knowing that this is not

the husband's making out, and his writing - A. No, I have not. This is the book that she presented to me, I supposing it all to be right paid the money; the bills have been made out in the same hand-writing for three years. This largest book is the book she brought me. I never saw the book my foreman signed and made out until she was apprehended; this book has my foreman's signature, it is fourteen shillings and twopence; that is the book she should have presented to me; but upon presenting to me this book, twenty pair making and binding, one pound sixteen shillings and threepence; I paid her that sum.

JAMES YOUNG . I am foreman to Mr. M'Laren. The prisoner came to me on the 4th of October to make out a list of her husband's work; I made it and signed to no more than fourteen shillings and two-pence, that is the wages of the week for ten pair. The other book is a forgery.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence; called six witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY , aged 32.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18111030-141

940. SARAH REMMINGTON was indicted for a misdemeanor .

MARIA READ . I am the daughter of Thomas Bassett Read, shoemaker, Beach-street. The prisoner came into my fathers shop about eleven o'clock on Saturday night to purchase a pair of shoes at four shillings and sixpence; she tendered me a dollar, I gave it to my father.

THOMAS BASSETT READ. I am the father of the last witness. My daughter shewed me the dollar, and the prisoner said, if you dislike it I have another; she gave it me; I marked them both before I gave them to the constable. I considered them as bad.

JAMES FOWLER . I am a constable. I received the two dollars of Mr. Read. These are the two dollars, I marked them.

EDMUND HOMERSHAM . I am a teller at the bank. These two dollars are counterfeit, they are not silver.

Prisoner's Defence. I received the two dollars for good; I did not know they were bad until Mr. Read told me.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18111030-142

941. RICHARD DENTON was indicted for a misdemeanor .

THOMAS BRANSCOMB . I am one of the city constables. On the 27th of June last I went, in company with Mr. Nalder and Drinkwater, to the Fleet prison; we went into the prisoner's apartment, and searched the room, and Drinkwater found a ten pound plate, which he immediately gave into my custody; the prisoner came in, I shewed him the plate, he acknowledged it to be his. We found a great number of notes, one's, two's, ten's, twenty's, and fifty's. I delivered them to Mr. Nalder, and the plate.

WILLIAM DRINKWATER . I went with Branscomb to the prisoner's apartment; when he came in we told him we had found the plate; he looked at the plate and said he had got no more there; we asked him if he had any one's or two's; he told us that if we went to Greenhill Rents we should find them. He acknowledged this to be his plate.

FRANCIS NALDER . Q. You are one of the City Marshals - A. I am.

Q. Did you receive this plate from Branscomb - A. I did; I am certain it is the same, and I received a large quantity of notes also, I delivered them to Mr. Westwood.

MR. WESTWOOD. These are the two parcels of notes I received from Mr. Nalder.

JOSEPH HENRY HARPER . I am one of the engravers of the bank of England.

Q. You see a promissory note engraven upon that plate - A. I do. The sum is white letters on a black ground. I took an impression from the plate; this is a an impression of that plate.

Mr. Alley. The bank notes are engraven with white letters on a black ground - A. Yes.

Q. Look at that, and tell me whether that is a white letter upon a black ground - A. Most assuredly it is.

WILLIAM GLORIO . I am an engraver, and have been upwards of twenty five years.

Q. Look at that and tell me whether the sum 10, is what you understand a white letter on a black ground - A. It is a white letter, but the ground is not black, I call it grey; the white is to be seen between the lines, in a black ground it would not. I can see white copper plain with the microscope. If they were printed in red green or blue it would produce the same effect.

COURT. Look at that, do not open it, do you call that a black - A. I do not call it a pure black.

Q. Upon your oath do you call it a grey - A. No, nor a black.

THOMAS PRATTEN . I am an engraver.

Q. Is that a white letter upon a black ground - A. No, it is a grey. I should consider it a black surface where there are no white to be seen, and where there is white to be seen I call it grey.

Mr. Bosanquet. Is a grey ground a term known in your profession - A. Not peculiar known.

Q. Is it an usual term - A. No.

COURT. What do you call that - A. A dark colour, not a perfect black.

Mr. Alley addressed the jury in behalf of the defendant, and Mr. Knapp replied.

GUILTY .

Confined Six Months in Newgate .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18111030-143

942. MICHAEL CONDER was indicted for a misdemeanor .

RICHARD COLLIER. I am the superintendant of the Philanthropic Institution; this is the act which incorporates our institution.

Q. Had you two boys of the name of Weightman and Smith in your institution in August last - A. We had; they absconded on Monday evening, the 19th of August.

JOSEPH MOORE . I am the master of the taylor's shop in the Philanthropic Society.

Weightman was under my care; previous to the 18th of August I was furnished with cloth for eight coats, it was sent to my shop by Hollroyd and Jackson, to be made up into coats; the Philanthropic Society got three shillings and sixpence a coat for making them, and we received cloth for trowsers; the cloth was charged ten shillings to us, and a shilling making made it eleven shillings for the trowsers. Weightman was my apprentice and Smith was a boy in the Society, and Benjamin Bent belonged to the shoemaker. On the Tuesday morning we missed two coats and three pair of trowsers. On Saturday the 31st we went with a warrant to Mr. Swift's, a slop shop in Rosemary-lane, attended by the officers, Turner and Drinkwater; I saw the defendant at the door, Drinkwater asked him if his name was Swift; he said, it was; he desired him to walk into the shop, and told him he had a search warrant to search the house. I asked the prisoner if he recollected three boys coming and selling him two coats for an old coat and two jackets; he said he knew nothing about the matter. I then asked him if he did not recollect buying a pair of trowsers for half a crown, and out of that the boy stood sixpence to be spent. He said he had no knowledge of it. We then proceeded to search; I found this pair of trowsers that I had lost; Mrs. Swift came in, and said she was very sorry any thing of the sort should have happened, he was but a servant, and she knew nothing of it, we were welcome to search; we searched and found nothing more than the trowsers. We took the prisoner before the Lord Mayor, and the boys were produced, Weightman and Smith. Weightman said that he took one pair of trowsers and two coats to Swift's shop; he sold the two coats for an old coat, and two old jackets, and the trowsers for half a crown. I have never recovered the coats, only the pair of trowsers. The prisoner then said that he had a slight recollection of seeing the boys in the shop. The trowsers are of the value of eleven shillings, and the coats, one at twenty-four shillings, and the other twenty-five shillings, and the coat and jackets the boys had of the prisoner might be worth seven shillings.

WILLIAM DRINKWATER . I am an officer. I went with the last witness to Mr. Swift's, Sparrow Corner; I saw the prisoner, I asked him if his name was Swift, he said, yes; I desired him to walk in, I told him I had a warrant to search the house for some things that had been sold by the Philanthropic Society boys; he said I was welcome to search, he knew nothing about it. We searched and found one pair of trowsers, nothing else was found At the Mansion house the boys said they had sold him a pair of trowsers for half a crown, and sixpence was given back to drink.

JOHN TURNER . I am an officer. Mr. Moore found the trowsers on the shelf. These are the trowsers, they have been in my custody ever since

Mr. Alley. Have you looked at the trowsers - A. I have, there are some splashes on them, they have been worn by somebody.

WEIGHTMAN. Q. Were you one of in August last - A. Yes. I am seventeen.

Q. Is that the dress that you have on of the Philanthropic Society - A. Yes.

Q. Was Bent and Smith with you in the Society - A. Yes. We all left the society and went away on Monday evening, about half past eight, on the 19th of August. I was employed by Mr. Moore, the taylor; I took away two coats and two pair of cloth trowsers, and one pair of nankeen; we took them to Mr. Swift's, the same place where the officer found the trowsers. We all went there together on Tuesday morning.

Q. Did you go dressed in the same way that you are now, with your badge on - A. No; Bent, one of the boys, had his clothes and his badge on; I had not, and Smith had not. We all went past there; the defendant asked us if we wanted to buy any thing; we told him no, we had some clothes. We would make an exchange with him; he told us to come in; we all went in together; we asked him to give us two sailors jackets for a coat, he gave us two sailors jackets for one coat. We told him we had another coat, if he would exchange for another kind of coat; he gave us another coat in exchange. We told him we had a pair of trowsers we would sell him; he said he would not give more than half a crown for them. These are the trowsers he gave us half a crown for, and he asked us for sixpence to drink, we gave him sixpence. I had worn the trowsers on the Monday night.

Q. What became of Bent - A. I do not know where he went to. I returned on the Wednesday, and Smith on the Friday.

Q. What became of the coat you exchanged - A. Smith brought it back, and I brought a jacket with me; these are them, they are both old. I gave the same account to the Philanthropic Society as I have now. I have told the truth.

Mr. Alley. The clothes that you carried to the defendant were the clothes that you stole - A. I stole them all.

Q. How long have you been in that good institution - A. Seven years.

Q. And after having seven years good protection you turned thief and robbed your benefactors - A. Yes.

Q. Where is your comrade Bent, upon your oath - A. He is in Newgate.

Q. How dared you to tell me this moment you did not know where he was - What is he in Newgate for - A. For thieving.

Q.You said that one of the boys that went with you to this man's shop had his badge on - A. No, he had not his badge on, he had the buttons.

Q. Did you ever call a button a badge - A. No.

Q. Then what did you mean by swearing that Bent had his badge on when you went into this wretched man's shop to change the things, was it not false - A. Yes, it was.

WILLIAM SMITH . Q. Were you in the Philanthropic Society on the 19th of August - A. Yes. I, Weightman, and Bent ran away together on Monday evening, the 19th of August, we took two and three pair of

trowsers. On Tuesday morning, between seven and eight we went to Mr. Swift's, this gentleman was at the door, he asked us if we wanted to buy any clothes; we said we wanted to exchange for some; he told us to come in. We asked two sailors jackets for one coat, and a coat for the other coat. Weightman sold him a pair of blue trowsers for two shillings and sixpence; we gave him six pence back; he asked for something to drink.

Mr. Alley addressed the jury in behalf of the defendant.

NOT GUILTY.

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.


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