Old Bailey Proceedings, 18th September 1811.
Reference Number: 18110918
Reference Number: f18110918-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE OYER AND TERMINER, AND GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND ALSO THE GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, HELD AT Justice-Hall, in the Old Bailey, On WEDNESDAY the 18th of SEPTEMBER, 1811, and following Days;

BEING THE SEVENTH SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF The Right Hon. JOSHUA JONATHAN SMITH , LORD-MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY JOB SIBLY, No. 4, CARTHUSIAN-STREET, ALDERSGATE-STREET.

LONDON:

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED (BY THE AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON.) BY R. Butters, No. 22, Fetter-lane, Fleet-street

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON.

Before the Right-honourable JOSHUA JONATHAN SMITH , Lord Mayor of the City of London; John Heath , esq. one of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir John Bailey , knt. one of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir William Curtis , bart. Sir John Eamer , knt. Sir William Leighton , knt. Alderman of the said City; John Silvester , esq. Recorder of the said City: Claudius Stephen Hunter , esq. Matthew Wood , esq. William Jacob , esq. Alderman of the said City; and Newman Knowlys, esq. Common-serjeant of the said City; His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of Goal Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

London Jury.

Thomas Maymont ,

William Hunter ,

John Davis ,

Robert Gibson ,

Thomas Saltwell ,

James Wisdom ,

James Johnson ,

William Rolfe ,

William Williams ,

John Buckler ,

Edward Ricketts ,

William Pidcock .

First Middlesex Jury.

James Gates ,

Joseph Hitch ,

Thomas Prosser ,

Abraham Purdy ,

Wiliam Saunders ,

Richard Gibbs,

William Burgess ,

John Gagan ,

John Carter ,

William Shreeve ,

Thomas Durant ,

James Hoare .

Second Middlesex Jury.

Joseph Adshed ,

Thomas Tew ,

Joseph Whiting ,

Alexander Crow ,

Edward Trymbery ,

Robert Goodbird ,

John Hinde ,

Richard Jackson ,

Thomas Havell ,

Christopher Winshuttle ,

George Clark ,

Peter Rayner .

Reference Number: t18110918-1

622. THOMAS TUCKER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of July , forty-two pounds weight of lead, value 5 s. the property of the London Dock company .

SECOND COUNT for like offence, the property of certain persons to the Jurors unknown.

JAMES GRIFFITHS . I am an officer. On the 17th of July, about a quarter after one in the afternoon, I observed the prisoner coming out of the London Docks ; I thought he had something sticking out of his waistcoat, I searched him and found this lead about his person, under his waistcoat, and beneath his breeches, about forty two pound of lead; I believe it is worth twelve shillings. The prisoner said he worked for Mr. Spence; that is all he said.

Q. Were these repairs going on at the London Docks, to which such lead were used - A Yes. I believe it to be the property of the London Dock Company.

COURT. What was the prisoner - A. A labourer to Mr. Spence the plumber. I let him go outside of the gate; I followed him and took him close to the outside of the gate.

WILLIAM CLARK . I am a constable belonging to the London Dock Company.

Q. Were they repairing the London Dock - A. Yes, on the 17th of July, and Mr. Spence is the chief plumber employed for the London Dock. The prisoner was employed by Mr. Spence, I saw him at work at half past twelve on that day, he was doing plumber's work, I took the prisoner in custody, and the other officer took the lead; the lead is the property of the London Dock Company.

Prisoner's Defence. I was called out of the dock to my master's shop to load a cart, and sent back. On my returning into the dock I went into a corner, there I saw that lead among some old stuff. I put it into my jacket, and took it out of the Dock with me.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and Whipped in Jail .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110918-2

623. WILLIAM NEWMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of February , eleven pair of gold ear-rings, value 18 l. 2 s five gold rings, value 41 s. thirteen gold broaches, value 17 l. 16 s. and divers other articles , the property of John Sampson .

JOHN SAMPSON . I am a working goldsmith, and jeweller , I live in Denmark-street, Soho.

Q. When did you first see the defendant - A. About five years ago I cannot be accurate to the day, I have got my book here, it was in February the 7th 1807. He was introduced to me by a man calling himself Newcastle, he told me the prisoner was a merchant, and did a deal of business. I was not at home when the prisoner first came to my house. An order had been given in my absence, they called to see if the order had been executed; they said they should want three or four hundred poundsworth of goods to send to Russia, he told me he could not pay me ready money, he would give me a good bill; I said I should have no objection if the bill was good; I got the goods ready and left them in the hands of my clerk. I went out and returned about two o'clock, and the goods were gone.

Q. How soon after the goods were gone did you see them again - A. About four or five days after I saw them at Mr. Farron's, a jeweller in the Strand, they were exposed in the window for sale.

Q. What was the value of those goods - A. Three hundred and seventy odd pounds.

Q. When you came home did your clerk shew you any bill which he got - A. Yes, the body of the bill is my clerks hand writing. I put the signature to it after I came home. It is made payable at Smith's and Company, 42, Lombard-street. I went there that afternoon but found no banker there. There was a man of the name of Smith that kept a little room there, but not no banker. I never got payment of the bill.

HENRY BURNE . I am clerk to Mr. Sampson. When the prisoner came for the goods he was introduced by Newcastle, and Newcastle and he looked out the goods as they said for the express purpose of going to Russia.

Q. What was the amount of the goods they looked out - A. The first was three hundred and twenty-nine pounds. I drew that bill. I told the prisoner my master wanted a bill accepted by a merchant of respectability or made payable to a banker.

Q. Did he accept this and represent that Smith and co. were his bankers - A. Yes. I delivered it upon the ground of Smith and Company being his bankers.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18110918-3

624. ROBERT ROBERTS was indicted for unlawfully escaping from and out of the House of Correction, at Cold Bath Fields, he being a prisoner therein upon a charge of suspicion of felony .

NATHANIEL CONNANT , ESQ. Q. Are you a magistrate - A. I am.

Q. Is that your hand-writing - A. It is. The prisoner is the person to whom that commitment applies.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18110918-4

625. JOHN SMITH was indicted for that he, on the 23d of August , feloniously and unlawfully did present, point, and level a certain gun loaded with gunpowder and a leaden bullet at Benjamin Gower , a subject of our Lord the King, and attempting, by drawing the trigger of the said gun him the said Benjamin Gower , to kill and murder And

OTHER COUNTS for like offence, only varying the manner of charging them.

BENJAMIN GOWER . I belong to the exporting gang in the West India dock ; I was employed in making the ship fast. It is better than three weeks ago.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. Yes, he was captain of the ship. After we had made the ship fast the captain demanded one of the boats; we took the boats away from the ship, he then ordered a musket up, and said he would blow our brains out if we took them away; the gun was handed up by one of the boys, with a ball cartridge, he loaded it with it; he presented the piece to me, and pulled the trigger. I could hear it snap.

Q. Who was there then - A. There were four of us.

Q. How near were the three others to you - A. As close as they could stand; one of them had his hand on my shoulder, his name is William Stoker .

Q. What was the name of the other two - A William Randall , and William Watts . He fired at me as nigh as possible. I was about ten yards from him.

Mr. Knapp. So you are sure it was pointed at you though there were three other persons to whom it might be pointed - A. I am sure it was pointed at me.

Q. The quarrel had been with Randall - A. Yes, first of all.

WILLIAM RANDALL . Q. Were you on board this vessel at the West India Dock - A. Yes. When I made the ship fast the captain asked me if I would put him on shore. The prisoner is the captain; I told him I would put him on shore; he asked me if I would put his trunk on shore; I told him yes; he asked me what demand I made; I told him a glass of grog, if he pleased; he said is that all you demand; I said yes; he looked over the ships side, and said there were two boats belonging to the dock, they were for the purpose of putting him on shore; I said they were not; he ordered a man into the dock boat to take charge of the boat, and said the first man that went into the boat he would blow his brains out; I said you must not do that; I went into the boat and ordered the man out, and the man came out of the boat; I went down into the boat, and called the remainder of the dock people, he shoved the boat off; about half the length of the boat from the ships side he ordered the musket up, and loaded it, and levelled it at me and the other three that were in the boat.

Q. In the mean time did any thing pass between the prisoner and Gower - A. Not at all. Gower was in the boat, he aimed the piece at Gower and me, we were close together Gower was standing first; it flashed in the pan the first time.

Q. What distance were you from him - A. About seven or eight yards.

Mr. Gurney. Were Gower and you both in one boat - A. No. He aimed at me and Gower both the first time; I stood opposite of him; the second time he pointed at me only.

Q. Do you remember turning round and putting your hand to your posteriors, and saying fire at that - A. I clapped my hand to my thigh, the second time.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18110918-5

626. THOMAS BURNHAM was indicted for feloniously assaulting Daniel Green , in the King's highway, on the 2nd of September , putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, a watch, value 2 l. a watch chain, value 1 s. a seal, value 4 d. and a watch key, value 2 d. his property.

DANIEL GREEN . I live in Saville-alley, Princes-square, St. George's in the East, I am a cooper in the London docks. On the 2nd of September last I went to a benefit society at the Rose and Crown, Parsons-street, Wellclose-square.

Q. Did you lose your watch - A. Yes, between eleven and twelve at night.

Q. Were you in liquor - A. No. I drank a little drop of beer, nothing to hurt me else I could not have catched the prisoner.

Q. How long were you at the public house - A. About three hours I had business to be there; I had the care of the box and to see the books put away.

Q. Was the prisoner at the public-house - A. No, I never saw him before that night to my knowledge.

Q. Was there any body in company with the prisoner or not - A. Yes, another man.

Q. Did either of them speak to you - A. No. One of them held me fast by my right arm, and the other kept his arm round my neck.

Q. Where was it it happened - A. By the watch-house, Wellclose-square . One caught me by my right arm, and the prisoner whipped my watch out.

Q. How do you know the prisoner did that - A. I never lost sight of him; the prisoner is the man that caught me by the neck; he took my watch out, and the case flew off.

Q. Did either of them lay hold of you by violence - A. Yes; I was afraid to speak, they pushed me against the wall, and held me against the wall. I could not move till they took the watch out.

Q. You say the case flew off - A. Yes, I picked it up and ran after them, and called out watch, stop thief.

Q. Did you ever lose sight of the prisoner - A. Not till he went into a new building, an unfinished warehouse in Pennington-street.

Q. When he turned in there you lost sight of him - A. Yes, I saw him again in ten minutes, I stopped at one of the holes, and the watchmen went in at the other after him and brought him out.

Q. What kind of a hole was it - A. A hole that they carry in rubbish with the wheelbarrow it was level with the floor of the building.

Q. What was the name of the watchman - A. John Martin .

Q. In about ten minutes you say Martin found him out - A. Yes.

Q. Was there any passage through the building - A. No more than them two places.

Q. When Martin brought him out had he got your watch or not - A. He had not got the watch. We brought him up to the watchhouse, and he was searched. I saw the watch on the day following at the examination, it was in Mrs. Lane's custody; she said she picked it up; I knew it again.

ROBERT BROWN . I produce the watch.

Prosecutor. It is my watch; I know it by the number and maker's name, Thomas Pearce made it, he lives in Whitechapel. Sarah Lane produced the watch before the magistrate, and said she found it; I picked up the case directly the watch came out; I kept the case till the day following, and then I delivered it to the magistrate, and the magistrate gave it to Brown the officer.

Mr. Adolphus. You had been at this Benefit Society till between eleven and twelve o'clock, what time did you go there - A. I went there at eight.

Q. Was not there beer the whole time you were there - A. There was not beer there the whole time. I was minding my business.

Q. You had never seen this man before - A. No.

Q. You were so frightened you could not speak when these two persons laid hold of you - A. I was.

Q. Though your watch was snatched from you your case fell to the ground, you picked it up, and the two men run away - A. Yes.

Q. How far did the case fall from you - A. About half a yard. I stooped and picked it up that instant that they run away.

Q. Could you stoop down with your eye intent upon your watch-case, and at the same time keep your eye upon the men running away from you - A. Yes, because it was not a yard from me.

Q. How far were these men a head of you at any time - A. About seven or eight yards.

Q. Were there no crossings from where you picked up the watch case, and where you ran after him - A. No other turning at all.

Q. It was in the passage by the watchhouse where they took your watch - A. Yes.

Q. That is a dark passage is it not - A. No, it is a light passage.

Q. What distance did you run after them from the passage by the watchhouse into Pennington-street - A. About three hundred yards. It was not more than three minutes. I never lost sight of him until he went into the building.

COURT. You having never seen him before can you pretend to swear to him - A. Yes, I would swear to him out of a thousand.

SARAH LANE . I live in Bishopsgate-street. On the 2nd of September I picked up a watch in Ratcliffe Highway, having no case; it was after twelve o'clock, I pointed out to Mr. Brown where I picked it up, it was near to Shadwell office.

Q. Do you know Pennington-street - A. I do not; it was on the left hand side coming from Wellclose-square.

Q. Do you know the passage by Wellclose-square - A. I did not go near the watchhouse. It was by a passage at the sign of the Coach and Horses in Ratcliffe Highway; I picked it up and put it in my bosom, and gave it to my husband, and persuaded him to sell it; he said if I pretended to sell it I should be stopped; I received it of my husband again; my husband delivered it the next day to the magistrate, and he delivered it to Mr. Brown.

JOHN MARTIN . I am a watchman of Wellclose square. I was on duty on the 2nd of September I heard the cry of stop thief, I saw two men come down Brazier's hill, they were running, I saw one man go into a building, I went into the building after him, I found him there, and took him to the watchhouse.

Q. Was that the prisoner - A. Yes. I never lost sight of him from Braziers-hill till I saw him go into that building in Pennington-street.

Q. How far is that building from the watch-house in the alley - A. I suppose it may be twice the length of this hall.

Q. Did you see what became of the other man - A. There was one man turned to the right, I lost sight of him. When I saw these two men the prosecutor was running down the hill after them.

Q. How near might he be to them - A. He might be a dozen yards of them.

Q. Did he stop while you searched this building - A. He stopped at the opening where they wheeled in the rubbish, there were two openings, he stopped at one by my desire.

Q. Did you search the prisoner - A. Yes, when we got him to the watchhouse.

Q. What did the prosecutor say that he had lost in the prisoner's presence - A. A watch.

Q. You did not find the watch - A. No.

Q. What kind of a building was this - A. An unfinished warehouse.

Mr. Adolphus. You had never seen the prisoner before - A. Yes, I had him in charge once before.

ROBERT BROWN . I am an officer of Shadwell office.

Q. Was that watch and case delivered to you - A. It was; on the 3d of September, I have had it ever since. It was delivered to me at the magistrate's

Q. How far is it from the watchhouse to that building - A. About two hundred yards.

Q. Did Sarah Lane point out to you the place where she picked up the watch - A. She did.

Q. How far was that from the watchhouse - A. It was about a quarter of a mile from where the prosecutor had been robbed, and about a quarter of a mile from the watchhouse. They are both just the same distance.

Q. It was about a quarter of a mile from the watchhouse and from this building, and not in the way to the watchhouse - A. No.

WILLIAM DUNBAR . I am a watchman; I heard the rattle spring, I went to his assistance, Martin was at the building before I came up; the prosecutor stood at one entrance of the building and Martin at the other; Martin went in and brought the prisoner out; I went with them to

the watchhouse.

Prisoner's Defence. There was another man taken away with me in the building.

Martin. There was no other man in the building, except a man that went in with me to take the prisoner. Green said he thought that the man was concerned with him.

Q. You say the other man went in the building at your request - A. Yes.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 21.

[The prisoner was recommended to his Royal Highness the Prince Regent's mercy, on account of his youth.]

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18110918-6

627. ELIZABETH FIELD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of August , twenty yards of printed cotton, value 20 s. the property of Griffiths Fawkes , privately in his shop .

GEORGE BANKS. I am an apprentice to Griffiths Fawkes, he is a linen-draper in Little Russel-street, Covent Garden . On Friday the 16th of August, between four and five in the evening, the prisoner came into our shop, she asked to look at some patterns for a gown, she looked at them, and bought none, she went away, I suspected her, I went out and followed her, and brought her in, and when she came in again. I saw the prints drop from her, four lengths.

Q. How many yards - A. I do not know exactly; it was worth twenty shillings, we could sell one piece for that and there were three lengths besides that.

Q. Was that printed cotton - A. Yes, it was my master's property, it had his shop mark upon it.

Q. When had you seen it the last time before it was taken - A. I pulled it off the shelf about half an hour before; I am confident it is the same.

Q. Did you see her in the shop before - A. No,

EDWARD JONES . I am shopman to the prosecutor, I saw the prisoner brought back, and I saw the printed cotton fall at her feet, it fell from under her clothes I fancy; I know it is my master's property; there were four lengths containing about twenty yards. One length cost twenty shillings.

Q. How much is one length - A. One length is twenty yards it cost twenty pence a yard.

Prisoner's Defence. I went to the shop to purchase some callico, when I went away the young man called after me. I immediately turned round. I never saw the cotton, untill I saw it on the floor of the shop.

JURY to Banks. Where did this lay - A. On the counter; I did not see her take it; I missed them before I suspected the prisoner and followed her out; I can swear positively I saw it drop from her.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 24.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18110918-7

628. WILLIAM JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of August , two coppers, value 40. the property of Thomas Meek .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY .

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110918-8

629. ANN KENLOW was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of September , a silver soup ladle, value 30 s. a counterpane, value 12 s. four shirts, value 22 s. the property of David Pollock , in his dwelling-house; and a watch, value 30 s. the property of James Gruby .

DAVID POLLOCK . I live in Charing Cross, in the parish of St. Martin's in the Fields .

Q. Is it your house, or do you rent it - A. It is the King's house, I occupy the shop, and several apartments up stairs, I do not pay any rent.

MRS. POLLOCK. I am the wife of David Pollock . The prisoner had lived in my service six months. On the 4th of September I missed the property, a silver soup ladle, a counterpane, four shirts, and a watch belonging to the apprentice, I suppose they were taken at different times. The things are here.

THOMAS COLE . I live with Philip Lawton , a pawnbroker, 21, Green-street.

Q. Did you take in any articles of the prisoner - A. I did.

Q. How long have you known the prisoner - A. Since May last. On Wednesday evening, the 3d of September the prisoner pledged with me, the soup ladle, I lent her thirty shillings upon it; I delivered it up on the 6th of September to Mr. Pollock on the 10th of June, I took in one shirt of the prisoner, and another on the 25th of May. I delivered them to Mr. Pollock.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

GUILTY, aged 20.

Of stealing only to the value of 3 s.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18110918-9

630. SARAH GREEN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 17th of June , a watch, value 20 l. three neckcloths, value 12 s. a shawl, value 5 s. and seven yards of lace, value 10 s. the property of James Cranbourn Strode , in the dwelling house of William Liddiard .

JAMES CRANBOURN STRODE . I am a lodger in the dwelling house of William Liddiard , the prisoner was a servant there, she had access to my lodging.

Q. Did you lose any property - A. I lost a gold repeating watch, a seal, three neck handkerchiefs, and about seven or eight yards of lace.

Q. Did the prisoner leave the house - A. Not upon taking of my things.

WILLIAM JACKSON . I am an officer of Marlborough-street, I apprehended the prisoner at her mother's, Kew Green; this shawl and the coral necklace belonging to Mr. Lidiard, she had in her pocket.

Q. That is not in this indictment - A. I went with the prisoner to her lodgings, 32, Mary-le-bone-lane, there I searched her box in her presence, I found a duplicate of a gold repeater, eight yards of lace, and three muslin handkerchiefs in her box; the prisoner said she knew nothing about it, and was very willing to be searched.

MR. EWER I am a pawnbroker. I produce a gold watch, I believe it to be pledged by the prisoner. I have very little doubt, but I cannot be positive.

Prosecutor. This is my watch, I know it by the striking of it. This shawl is mine, there is a great deal of work upon it; I know it by the work, and the neckcloths are marked.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 23.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18110918-10

631. WILLIAM BRADFORD was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Sarah Shepherd , about the hour of twelve on the night of the 19th of July , and stealing therein, two dollars, six shillings, a ten pound bank note, a five pound bank note, and a one pound bank note , her property.

SECOND COUNT for like offence, the property of Eliza Shepherd .

SARAH SHEPHERD . I keep the Gun Dock public house, Wapping, in the parish of St. John's, Wapping ; I rent the house. On the 19th of July, between eleven and twelve at night, I was robbed.

Q. Was it after you were gone to bed - A. No, I was up.

Q. From what part of the house was the property taken - A. From a one pair of stairs back room; he got up the water butt, and by a ladder fixed on the butt he got in the window; it was a sash window, it was up, I had left it open. I lost property to the amount of between thirty and forty pounds, the exact amount I cannot tell, in notes and cash. The money was in a drawer, locked up, I had the key in my pocket. The prisoner lodged in my house, he told me he was a lighterman, he had lodged in my house between five and six weeks.

Q. Was he at home that night - A. Yes, I saw him that evening at half past eleven o'clock, he was in the parlour; he went out after that, and staid out about a quarter of an hour. I saw him when he came in, I asked him where he had been.

Q. You say you had lost between thirty and forty pound - A. To the best of my knowledge.

Q. Have you ever since seen part of your property - A. Yes, on his first examination. The prisoner was apprehended on the 20th, he was taken at a public-house close by.

Q. And upon being searched was any of your property found upon him - A. Yes, a ten pound note, and a five pound note; I was not present when they were found.

JOHN GILLMAN . I searched the prisoner; I took these notes from the prisoner, I have had them in my custody ever since.

Q. to prosecutrix. Before you open it do you know the number of your notes - A. I know the five pound note by a tare. I cannot say I know the numbers, there is no mark to enable me to speak to the ten pound note; I have every reason to believe this is my five pound note; I tore it myself; the money was all safe in my drawer at four o'clock, the five pound note likely I might have it a week or a fortnight. I cannot exactly say.

Q. Does that tare enable you to speak to that note - A It does.

Prisoner Q. to prosecutor. Was not I in your house all the evening, playing with you at dominos - A. No.

JOHN GILLMAM . I am an officer belonging to the Thames police office. I apprehended the prisoner on the 20th of July, between nine and ten in the evening, I took him out of the tap-room into the parlour, I told him he was charged with a robbery; he said nothing, he was about half groggy; I found in a pocket inside of his jacket, that he has on now, a ten pound note, a five pound note, and a one pound note, and in his outside pocket, two dollars and six shillings, that was all; I kept him in custody. I asked him if he had received any money; he said upon the Saturday before that he received a one pound note of his master, that was all he received. On the Sunday morning I went to him; he was locked up in the office; I asked him if he knew what money I had taken from him; he said yes; I asked him where he got it; he said he took it from Mrs. Shepherd, he got into the room at the back window; I asked him how he had forced the half chest of drawers; he said, by pulling it the lock flew off; I told him there was more money lost than found; I asked him whether his wife had any part of it; he said no; she was apprehended, and she said she knew nothing about it.

Prisoner's Defence. That gentleman swore false against me; I said no such thing. The money I brought from sea with me.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 29.

Of stealing the 5 l. bank note, not of breaking and entering the house .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18110918-11

632. SAMUEL FRAZIER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 31st of August , a time piece, value 40 s. the property of Stafford Norcote .

ELIZABETH JOHNSON . Q. Are you a servant at the prosecutor's house - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember when the prosecutor lost the time piece - A. Yes. On Saturday the 31st of August I left the house door open for the purpose of fetching a jug to get some milk, before I could return I heard a footstep over my head. I missed afterwards a time piece out of the front parlour. I had seen the time piece a few minutes before seven. The prisoner was brought to me, and the time-piece.

JOSEPH ANGEL . On the 31st of August I was at Mr. Mills's door, about three or four yards from Mr. Northcote's house; I saw the prisoner go into the house, and immediately he came out again with something in a handkerchief; I went to the girl and asked her whether she had seen any body go into the house; I then pursued the prisoner, and took him, he had the time piece wrapped up in his handkerchief He said he deserved every thing that he should meet with; I gave the time piece to Mr. Northcote.

RICHARD COX . I received the time piece from Mr. Northcote.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

GUILTY, aged 25.

Of stealing to the value of 20 s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18110918-12

633. WILLIAM JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of August , a time piece, value

3 l. and a handkerchief, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of James Peak , in his dwelling-house .

JAMES PEAK . I live at 23, Blackmoor-street, Clare Market, in the parish of St. Clements Danes . I rent the whole house.

CHARLOTTE LINTON . I keep Mr. Peak's house. On the 8th of August, about ten minutes before eight in the morning, I was going up with a tea-kettle of water, I saw somebody going up the two pair of stairs, I called to him, I said, oh, Billy, why do you go up in such a way; at my speaking he went up stairs so softly, it was impossible for any body to hear him; I heard him come down; I said, oh dear, how you frighten me; I did not know him. I heard something rattle in his apron; I was frightened, I thought he had been in that room to take something; I shoved open the room door, I called after him, oh, you have got the time piece.

Q. From what room was the time-piece taken - A. From the one pair front. The prisoner ran down stairs, I ran to the street-door, and called for assistance; Mr. Swinton came and took the prisoner in the coal cellar; he brought him up stairs; he had not the time-piece, when brought up stairs; I had seen the time-piece not a quarter of an hour before.

THOMAS SWINTON . Q. On the morning of the 8th of August did you hear any alarm - A. Yes, this good lady came in and said there was a thief in the house, I went down stairs, and there the prisoner was shut up in a bit of a coal cellar; I said what do you do here; he said do forgive me, I have not got any money. I then said what have you done with the timepiece. He went with me into the other cellar, and pointed out where it was. I took it up, and gave it to Charlotte Linton .

Q. Are you sure the prisoner is the person that you took in the cellar - A. Yes, and the prisoner is the person that shewed the time piece to me. I live over the way. I left the prisoner in the house, and went about my business.

Q. to Charlotte Linton . Mr. Swinton said he gave you the time-piece - A. Yes, he gave it me, and Mr. Peak took it to Bow-street. The constable found the handkerchief in the shed; Mr. Swinton left the prisoner in the house, and about a quarter of an hour afterwards he was delivered to the constable; there were so many people in the house he could not get out of the house.

Prisoner's Defence. I am a bricklayer, and Mr. Peak is. I went in the shed to ask for work, I heard them cry out stop thief, I did not know what to do. I never asked forgiveness. Is is reasonable or likely that I should have staid there a quarter of an hour if I had been guilty.

Charlotte Linton . He could not get away. He asked me forgiveness twenty times. I told him it was of no use, he would not get forgiveness there.

GUILTY, aged 20.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18110918-13

634. JOHN JOHNSON and PHILIP BARRYMER were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of September , a jacket, value 10 s. the property of William Spotswood , privately in his shop .

ANN SPOTSWOOD . I am the wife of William Spotswood , he is a shipwright, we keep a slopshop . On the 5th of September the two prisoners came into the shop, Barrymer asked for a jacket, and while Barrymer was trying it on I turned my back to take one off the shelf, and when I turned round I perceived Johnson had stolen a jacket; I saw the sleeves hanging down under his jacket; I said he had a jacket from off the counter; he ran away and threw the jacket away. Barrymer was in the shop while I pursued Johnson.

Q. That is all you have to say against Barrymer - A. Yes. Barrymer was in the shop when I came back, he had put on his jacket then, and was going away; I told him to stop, that he was a confederate with the other man; he said he did not know the man.

MR. SYKES. I am a shoe-maker. I was coming along the street at the time, I heard the cry of stop thief. I saw him throw the jacket away, I pursued him and stopped him.

- NOTTAGE. I produce the jacket, I received it in the shop.

Mrs. Spotswood. That is the jacket that Johnson took, I had seen it not five minutes before it was stolen. It was stolen from off the counter; it cost seven shillings and six-pence.

Johnson said nothing in his defence.

Barrymer was not put on his defence.

JOHNSON - GUILTY - DEATH , aged 41.

BARRYMER - NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18110918-14

635. SUSANNAH MORRIS , alias NORRIS , and MARY ANN DAVIS , alias SALE , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of July , eighteen yards of ribbon, value 10 s. the property of James Maycock , privately in his shop .

JAMES MAYCOCK . I live at 64, Broad-street, St. Giles's, in the parish of St. Giles's in the Fields . On the 26th of July, the two prisoners came to my shop about seven in the morning, my apprentice was sweeping out the shop, they wanted to look at some ribbons, and they both looked at some plain ribbons a considerable while I took out a drawer of figured ribbons, they looked at various patterns; Davis took up a piece of pink ribbon, she said buy this, it is a pretty one; Norris declined it; I took out the plain drawer again, she at last chose a piece and had a yard, and paid five pence for it, they then left my shop.

Q. At the time that they left your shop had you any knowledge that you had missed any thing - A. No, not in the least; I put the plain drawer in its place, and in putting the figured ribbon drawer to rights; I missed the piece that Davis picked out: I desired my apprentice to go after them, he did, and brought them back; I desired them to leave the ribbon that they had stolen; Davis, after hesitating a great while, took out of her pocket a piece of buff, that was not the piece that I had missed nor did I know that they had got that. I said to my apprentice go for a constable. He immediately went out, I went and bolted the door. They offered to pay me for the ribbon, Davis said she would pay for it; I told them that was not the way I would settle it. They then said they would go out;

I begged they would remain quiet till the constable came, upon which Davis came to the door where I was standing, and beat me over my head. I at length got hold of both her hands, and held her fast. Then Norris came and beat me, their blows were pretty heavy on me; this lasted until Jane Harris , my servant, came up to me, she rescued me. I looked at the door, there were a number of people about my shop, I saw a person among them whom I knew, I called him in, my boy brought a constable, and he took them to the watch-house, I followed them there.

JAME HARRIS. I am servant to Mr. Maycock, I came into the shop, Mr. Maycock was standing against the door to prevent the prisoners from going out; they asked the demand for the ribbon, he said they must wait until the constable came. I waited untill the constable came.

SAMUEL ROBERTS . I am a constable, I took the two prisoners in custody at Mr. Maycock's shop, this piece of ribbon Mr. Maycock produced to me, and when I was taking them out of the shop, this piece of pink ribbon was picked up and given to me. The person that picked it up informed me in the prisoner Davis' hearing, that she dropped it. At the watch-house I searched them, in the apron of Norris I found this piece of drab.

Norris's Defence. I cannot say how the ribbon came in my lap.

Davis's Defence. I did not take any thing.

NORRIS, GUILTY, aged 19.

Of stealing to the value of two shillings only .

DAVIS, GUILTY, aged 18.

Of stealing to the value of 3 s. 6 d. only .

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18110918-15

636. MARY JONES and SARAH PARKER were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of July , a pair of shoes, value 3 s. a hat, value 5 s. a knife, value 3 d. a handkerchief, value 6 d. twenty-four penny pieces, and twenty-four halfpence, the property of Joan Anderson from his person .

JOAN ANDERSON. I am a Swedish sailor . On the 17th of July, about twelve o'clock at night, I was drunk and asleep against a wall, in the street below, Ratcliffe Highway , and when I awoke, I missed my hat, shoes, stockings, my protection, a knife, a pocket handkerchief, and three shillings in penny pieces and halfpence. I saw them afterwards at the watch-house.

ANN JARRARD . My husband is a sawyer. On the 17th of July, between twelve and one o'clock in the morning, I heard somebody talking under my window, I knew by the voice that it was Mary Jones , she lived in the same place, she said to Sarah Parker , take off his shoes and stockings. I looked out of the window, then I saw Sarah Parker take them off, it was a star light night, I saw them take them in doors. In about five minutes after, my husband called the watchman, and they were taken in custody, I was present when they were taken, the things were found in the privy.

JOHN TAYLOR. I apprehended the prisoners, I found the property in the necessary,

ELIZABETH CLAREY . I was coming home to my own house, I live next door, I saw Mrs. Jones holding the prosecutor up, while Parker took the money out of his pocket.

The prisoners said nothing in their defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

JONES, GUILTY , aged 54.

PARKER, GUILTY , aged 27.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18110918-16

637 WILLIAM BRAMLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of August , a pair of shoes value 2 s. a jacket value 5 s. and two waistcoats, value 3 s. the property of John Bull .

JOHN BULL . I am a sailor . On the 3d of August I lost a jacket, a waistcoat, and a pair of shoes from out of the vessel I belonged to, called the Mars, they were taken out about a quarter before five, I had seen them about one o'clock. They were found on the prisoner in my presence.

MR. FALCONER. Upon the 3rd of August, the ship was laying in Shadwell Dock. I am the captain, I saw the prisoner on the deck by the gangway, I stopped him and pulled up his frock, and these things now produced dropped from him.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined one Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18110918-17

638 MARY BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of August , two silver spoons, value 1 l. 10 s. the property of William Smith .

ESTHER WEEK . I am William Smith 's servant. - On the 13th of August, between twelve and one, I was in the bedroom in my master's house, I heard a knock at the street door, I immediately ran down and was surprised to find the door open, I went directly to the back parlour, and missed two silver table spoons from the sideboard, I ran immediately after the prisoner and caught her, she took the two silver spoons from her cloak, and threw them in the area.

PETER WALTER . I saw the prisoner take the spoons from behind her back, and threw them down the area. I took the spoons up, and gave the woman in charge.

Prisoner's Defence. I am a soldier's wife , I never saw these spoons until I saw them in the man's hand that took me prisoner.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Whipped in Jail , and then discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18110918-18

639. JOHN BRANDON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of August , three hats, value 1 l. 10 s. the property of William Cobble .

MARY COBBLE . My husband, William Cobble, is a hatter , 25, Oxford Street. On the 6th of August, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I was in the back room, I heard somebody in the shop, I looked, I saw the prisoner take one hat out of the window, he then ran out of the shop with the hats under his arm; I ran after him, and called stop thief, I saw him stopped, he had the hats in his possession when he was stopped, I never lost sight of him, he was delivered to the constable and the hats also.

GEORGE HORNE . I heard the cry of stop thief, the

prisoner was running, I pursued him and overtook him, he had two men's hats and a lady's. I took him back to Mr. Cobble's shop.

The property produced and identified.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to his character.

GUILTY , aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18110918-19

640 WILLIAM GOODWIN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of September , a pair of stockings, value 2 s. 9 d. the property of Thomas Forsaith .

THOMAS FORSAITH . I am a hosier , 29, Union St. Bishopsgate street .

MR. SMITH. On last Thursday afternoon, I observed the prisoner looking at some stockings out side of the door. On turning my head, and observing his hand under his coat, I informed Mr. Forsaith, we pursued the prisoner, and took him.

MR. FORSAITH. I took the prisoner with Mr. Smith, he had a pair of my stockings under his coat, I had seen them hanging at the door about ten minutes before.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence.

ROBERT COZEN . I am a Broker, I have known the prisoner about eleven years. About seven years ago he was taken with an appoplectic fit, he was put into Spitalfields poor-house, he was let out to carry parcels when this happened.

Q.(to Mr. Smith.) You saw him looking at the stockings, did he seem to be looking about. - A. No, he said I ask your pardon, he did not run away.

NOT GUILTY,

On account of his being insane at the time he commited the fact .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18110918-20

641 PHEBE HUTCHINSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of August , a shawl, value 8 s. the property of Charles Thomas Brookes .

WILLIAM WILLIAMS . I live with Mr. Thomas Brookes , he is a linen draper , 47, Duke street, Manchester square . On the 28th of August I was in the shop, I saw the prisoner snatch the shawl from a piece of print that hung at the door, she ran off with it, I pursued her instantly, I secured her, I saw her throw the shawl from her, I knew the shawl again, this is the shawl, it is my own mark.

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw the shawl until I saw it in Marlborough Street.

GUILTY , aged 36.

Confined six months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18110918-21

642 CHARLES HENRY and JOHN MILLER were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of July , two hats value 33 s. the property of William Adcock .

WILLIAM ADCOCK . I am a hatter , I live in Princes Street, Cavendish Square . On the 11th of July, about half past four, as I was returning home, I saw the two prisoners come out of the shop, with each of them a hat in their hands, they passed me, I did not know they were stolen at the time, I went in the shop and missed the two hats out of the window, and not finding the man in the shop, I suspected they were stolen, I pursued the prisoners, and took Henry with the hat on his head.

Q. Was that your hat. - A. Yes, Miller ran away, he was stopped by a gentleman, I swear to them both, when I cried out stop thief Miller dropped the hat.

ROBERT COOPER . I had occasion to leave my master's shop on the 11th of July about half after four for three minutes to fetch an iron. I came into the shop and went to work, I heard a riot in the street, and then I missed two hats out of the window. I had seen them about half an hour before they were stolen.

Henry's Defence. I never came out of the house with the hat.

Miller's Defence. I was coming that way. I was detained, I never saw this young man before in my life.

HENRY GUILTY , aged 23,

MILLER GUILTY , aged 25,

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18110918-22

643. ANN ROBINSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of May , four quart glass bottles filled with red port wine, value 16 s. and two quart glass bottles filled with sherry wine, value 8 s. the property of Sarah Baron , widow .

SARAH BARON . I keep the New Inn tap, Bridges Street .

Q. Did you lose any wine on the 20th of May last. - A. Mr. White had six bottles of wine of the prisoner, and he gave her linen for it, he thought it was for me.

Q. Did the prisoner live with you. - A. She did. On the 20th of July I charged her with taking six bottles of wine, she said it was not my wine, and she had disposed of it at the linen draper's.

Q. Was it part of the prisoner's business while living with you to sell wines. - A. No, she has carried out a bottle, but no more.

Q. Did you ever look at your wines to see if there were any missing. - A. No, I did not count my wines to see if there were any missing.

Q. Had the prisoner access to your wines. - A. Not to my knowledge, I kept the key.

MR. WHITE. I am a linen draper. On the 20th of June the prisoner came and asked me if I would have any wine of her mistress, she would take it out in linen drapery. She had no wine with her when she came. I told her to tell her mistress I would. She afterwards brought four bottles of port and two of sherry, and took the linen drapery in return. The wine I drank, she said it was her mistress's wine.

HANNAH WALKER . Q. How old are you. - A. Thirteen. I know nothing at all about this.

Prisoner's Defence. That young woman came and said she had lost five shillings of her aunt's money, I went and asked the aunt to lend it me. That and several odd shillings I have given to her, and in return the first thing she made a present to me was a bottle of wine, and then others, till it amounted to half a dozen. I was not in the habit of drinking wine. I went to the linen draper's, I asked him if he wanted any wine, I never mentioned any name, I took three

that day and three the day after, and I had this petticoat for the money. On the day I was taken up I saw two gentlemen in the parlour, Mrs. Baron took no notice who they were. Hannah Walker came to me and said the linen draper has come about the wine, I said you knew about it as well as me, you have been the instigation of it. She told me her aunt was going to fetch an officer, she wanted me to be locked up in the cellar, I would not. I went out in the street, and stood at the end of the New Inn steps until she came out to me, and then I went to the Seven Dials. I told Mrs. Green of it; and when I returned home she told me Mr White and Mr. Lamb the constable were searching my box, and begged me to say nothing about who I had got it off.

Q (to Hannah Walker). Did the prisoner supply you with money. - A. Yes, five shillings for my teaching her to read.

Q. Did you give her any of this wine. - A. I never did.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18110918-23

644 ELEANOR NEALE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of September , a shawl, value 30 s. the property of John Heath and Samuel Taylor .

JOHN HEATH. I am a linen draper , 34 Minories , my partner's name is Samuel Taylor . On the 13th of September the prisoner with another woman came into the shop, they asked to look at some shawls, and after looking at several shawls, the young man that was in the desk wrote upon a card and delivered it me. In consequence of that I charged the prisoner with having the shawl, she denied it, I told her that I should send for an officer. I did. An officer came, and I gave her in charge.

JOHN APPLEGARTH. I am shopman to Mr. Heath. When the prisoner came into the shop I went into the desk to watch her, in about five minutes afterwards I observed her take a shawl and put it under her apron, I immediately wrote upon a card, that the woman had stolen a shawl, and gave it to Mr. Heath.

JOHN WATSON . I am a watchmaker. I went into Mr. Heath's shop, he begged I would watch her closely, I did, I observed the shawl drop from her.

Prisoner's Defence. I never did it, I am a poor woman with a large family.

GUILTY , aged 32,

Confined Six Months in Newgate and fined 1 s.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110918-24

645 JOHN DAVIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of August , a handkerchief, value 2 s. the property of Moritz Bochardt , from his person .

MORITZ BOCHARDT . I am a merchant , I live at 18 Wilson Street, Finsbury Square. On the 17th of August, about seven in the evening, I was in Gracechurch Street , and when I came to the corner of Leadenhall Street I was told that I was robbed, I turned round and saw the prisoner in custody of another man. The man desired me to follow him. We went to a house in Gracechurch Street, there he searched the prisoner, and my handkerchief was found upon him.

SAMUEL SHEPPARD. On the 17th of August I was in Gracechurch Street, I saw the prosecutor passing, and the prisoner in company with another was walking closely behind the prosecutor. I followed them about twenty or thirty yards. At the corner of Leadenhall Street I saw the prisoner draw this handkerchief out of the prosecutor's pocket, I saw him tuck it into his bosom I ran and caught hold of him, I called to the prosecutor, and I took the handkerchief out of the prisoner's bosom. I asked the prosecutor if he had lost his handkerchief, he put his hand into his pocket, and said he had, I shewed him the handkerchief, he said it was his. This is the handkerchief.

Prosecutor. I believe it is mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I was walking along Bishopgate Street, there were several people walking. This man accused me of taking the gentleman's handkerchief, I only pulled it out of my pocket to wipe my face with it.

GUILTY , aged 19,

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110918-25

646. MARY THORPE and JUDITH BROWN were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of August , from the person of James Brewer , a bag, value 1 d. three five pound Bank notes, eight two pound Bank notes, and six one pound Bank notes .

JAMES BREWER . I am a farmer , at Everton in Bedfordshire. On Sunday the 4th of August I came to town for the purpose of settling my accompts with Mr. Clarke in Fleet Market, and after eleven at night I was walking on the curb in Cow Lane, West Smithfield , I saw the two prisoners come along arm in arm, and when they got within four or five yards of me they parted their arms. Then Thorpe laid hold of my wrist Brown walked round her and clapped her left hand on my back, and her right hand into my breeches pocket, she took a canvass bag. This was without any conversation at all, it was momently done. She took out a canvass bag that contained thirty-seven pound in notes, three fives, eight twos, and six ones. I had received them notes of Charles Clark in Fleet Market that morning about eleven o'clock, I kept them by themselves in that bag in my pocket until this girl took them out. When she took them out of my pocket I cried, stop thief, I am robbed of thirty-seven pound, Brown made her escape, I secured Thorpe and resigned her up to the watchman.

Q. Are you sure these are the two persons. - A. I am positive to them both.

Q. Are you positive to Brown. - A. I am, although she is not dressed now as she was then, but her features are the same.

JOHN GRACE . I am a constable. Thorpe was brought to me by a watchman.

WILLIAM LEE . I am a constable, I apprehended Brown in Old Street, I found upon her a one pound note and a dollar, in her apartment I found a quantity of new wearing apparel. I produce a two pound note that I received of Mr. Frogard.

SAMUEL FROGARD. I am shopman to Mr. Plummer, Newgate Street, he is a taylor and draper, I know both the prisoners perfectly well. On Tuesday the 6th of August, Thorpe and Brown came together to our house, Thorpe purchased a coat of me for nineteen shillings.

Q. Look at that two pound note, and tell me whether that is the two pound note that she paid you. - A.

It is, I know it by my own endorsement I delivered the same note to Mr Lee.

LEE. It was on Sunday night the robbery was committed, I apprehended Thorpe on Tuesday night near St. Sepulchre's watch-house. The prosecutor being in the country she had been discharged, I apprehended her on the same evening I apprehended Brown.

CHARLES CLARKE . I am a fruit salesman in Fleet Market, I know the prosecutor. On the 4th of August I paid him thirty-seven pound in notes, three fives, eight twos, and six ones.

Q. Look at that note, do you recollect whether that is one of the twos that you paid him. - A. It is, and it is endorsed, and two of the fives were marked with the same endorsement.

Thorpe's Defence. I picked up that note upon Snow Hill.

Brown's Defence. I was never in that gentleman's shop, the prosecutor had a woman before I came up.

Prosecutor. I had not.

THORPE GUILTY , aged 14.

BROWN GUILTY , aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110918-26

647. JOHN PATTY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of August , fifty-nine pound weight of lead, value 5 s. the property of Robert Humphry Martin , John Craven , Thomas Fellows , and others.

SECOND COUNT - for like offence, the property of certain persons to the jurors unknown.

JOHN FORRESTER . I am a constable. On the 15th of August, between four and five in the afternoon I observed the prisoner in Aldgate High Street. When he came to me he had a bushel basket on his shoulder covered over with an apron, and on the top of the apron was straw. In consequence of suspicion I followed him into Petticoat Lane, there I stopped him and asked him what he had got, he said lead, and he was going to dispose of it at the first rag-shop he could find, I asked him where he brought it from, he said from the Commercial Sale Rooms in Mincing Lane, I asked him if he had the priviledge to sell the lead from there, he said there were three or four in it besides him and the foreman knew of it, but he had it of the foreman's brother. I told him I must take him to the Compter, he begged and prayed I would not, and said I might have the lead, that I might call upon the foreman, he would satisfy me for my trouble. I took him to the Compter, the lead has been in my custody ever since. This is the lead, it is fifty-nine pound weight.

JAMES HURLEY . I am superintendant clerk of the works at the Commercial Sale Rooms . The prisoner was employed there as a labourer , in the course of that day they were removing lead from the arches. The lead that the constable has produced tallies with the lead of the arches, the lead was upon oak joists, it gives the lead a particular colour. I can swear it is that lead.

RICHARD HIGLEY . I was foreman of the bricklayers on the 15th of August, the prisoner was a labourer.

Q. Did you authorise him to take away any lead. - A. I did not.

THOMAS HIGLEY . I was employed upon these premises.

Q. Did you authorise him to take away any lead. - A. I did not.

ANTHONY BROWN . I am solicitor to these gentlemen, the property is invested in the gentlemen whose names are in the indictment.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined six Months in Newgate and publicly whipped .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110918-27

648 WILLIAM WOOD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of August , two pair of stockings, value 4 s. the property of Thomas Brown .

THOMAS BROWN. I am an hosier , 121, Bishopsgate Street . On the 24th of August, in consequence of information, I pursued the prisoner, he was taken and brought into my shop, and on the prisoner was found two pair of odd stocking, I had the fellows to them in my shop, they were taken from the outside of my door.

JOHN EDWARDS . On my going past Mr. Brown's door, I saw the prisoner taking the stockings, I informed Mr. Brown, and I pursued the prisoner, when he was stopped, he was surrounded by a quantity of loose people. I said I would never lose sight of him, and when I got hold of him, I would never loose him, the women that surrounded him took from his pocket three pair of stockings, they said why do you not knock the son of a bitch down, I told them it was impossible for him to do it. As soon as I got hold of his neck-handkerchief, by some means or other he got my fingers in his mouth, the women that surrounded him persuaded him to bite my fingers off, I brought him to Mr. Brown's shop, then there were two pair of stockings found upon him, but they were odd ones, the women took several pair out of his pockets, the prisoner said they should not be found upon him, therefore girls pick away as fast as you can. I never lost sight of him.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming from Whitechapel that gentlemen caught hold of me, he said I was the man that took the stockings, he threw me down in the kennel, the officer searched me, and did not find any thing about me.

GUILTY , aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110918-28

649 HANNAH BOLTSAGE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of August , twenty yards of printed callico, value 30 s. the property of James Lamming .

WILLIAM KAYE. I am a shopkeeper to Mr. Lamming, a linen-draper , 30, Ludgate Hill . On Monday the 5th of August, about four in the afternoon, I was returning from the door, I observed the prisoner watching the young man, who had been attending to her who had occasion to go into the back shop, and before he could return, she drew a piece of print off the counter, and secreted it under her clothes, I believe that she was not at all aware of my being at the door, and before the young man returned from the back shop, I placed myself at the back of her, so as she could not meet the young man without seeing me, she was desirous of getting to the counter, she could not because of me, I saw

her let the callico go. I took it into my hand, she said she took it to look at it.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I had no intent to steal it, I took it to see whether I liked it or no.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Confined one Month in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110918-29

650 HENRY DIXON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of July , a trunk, value 7 s. the property of William Bryant .

WILLIAM BRYANT . I lost the trunk on Monday the 15th of July, at half past three. Mr. Baker of the Old Bailey came to me, and asked me if I had sold a trunk. I said no, he told me that the man had run up the Old Bailey, I pursued and overtook him at the felon's door of Newgate.

BENJAMIN BAKER . On the 15th of July I saw this man take the trunk from Mr. Bryant's door, I went over to ask him if he had sold one, he said he had not, he went after him, and took this trunk from him.

BENJAMIN DRINKWATER . I am an officer, I pursued the prisoner, I overtook him, and took this trunk from him.

Prosecutor. It is my trunk.

GUILTY , aged 48.

Confined in Newgate one Month , and publickly whipped .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110918-30

651. JANE ELVIN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of July , a tea-tray, value 1 s. the property of Thomas Carrington .

THOMAS CARRINGTON . I am a bricklayer , I live in Seething Lane, Tower Street .

ANN WRIGHT . I am a servant to Mr. Carrington. On the 24th of July, between three and four in the afternoon, I heard a person come down stairs, I ran into the passage, and saw the prisoner go out, I asked her what she had got there she said nothing; I asked her where she had been, she said no where, and when she found I would call somebody in, she said if I would not call any body in she would give me the tea-tray, she then pulled it from under her gown and petticoat. This is the tea-tray, it is my master's property, it was in the corner of the one pair of stairs, she said she found it on the stairs

Prisoner's Defence. I was not up stairs.

GUILTY , aged 35.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110918-31

652. JOHN BUTTS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of August , a cloth, value 6 d. - thirty-nine lb weight of pork, value 1 l. 10 s. twenty-seven lb. weight of beef, value 15 s. 11 d. and nine lb. weight of mutton, value 6 s. 8 d. the property of Richard Hodds .

JAMES LEWIS . As I was going to school on the 28th of August, I saw that man take the meat out of the barrow and walk down Jewin Street . I went into Mr. Jackson's wine vaults, and asked if there was any body that belonged to the meat, Mr. Hodds said yes, he went out and collared him.

RICHARD HODDS . I keep a cook shop in Goswell Street. On the 28th of August, I came from Newgate market, and left my meat at Mr. Jackson's door. A little boy came in and said a person had taken some meat out of my barrow. He directed me up Jewin Street. I followed him and overtook him within fifteen yards, he dropped down the meat, he fell, and I laid hold of him, as soon as he got up he drew out something, Mr. Jackson said, if he did not put his knife in his pocket, he would knock him down. I held him, I could not see the knife.

GEORGE JACKSON . On the 28th of August, the prosecutor came in my house about half after eight, the little boy came in and said whose meat is at the door, the prosecutor and I went out, and the boy followed and said that is the man, the prosecutor overtook him, they both fell down together, the prisoner had certainly the knife in his hand, I told him if he did not put it in his pocket I would knock him down.

Q.(to Prosecutor) What meat had he taken out of your barrow. - A. There were two legs of pork, and a spring of pork, a shoulder of mutton, and a brisket of beef.

JAMES BRAY . I was constable, I asked him for the knife, he gave it me.

Prisoner's Defence. I was walking down Jewin street, I went into a street and evacuated there, and when I came to the top of the street, that gentleman accused me of taking the meat, I told him it was not me.

GUILTY , aged 29.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110918-32

653 THOMAS LEE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of August , a great coat, value 14 s. and a hat, value 4 s. the property of John Beacher , Esq.

JOHN LEE . I am butler to Mr. John Beacher .

Q. Is the prisoner any relation of yours. - A. No. On the 29th of August, about one o'clock, I was in my pantry, I heard some one open the area door, my fellow-servant went to see who it was, he missed a great coat and hat out of the hall, I ran up stairs, and saw the prisoner coming back with the things under his arm, he came back when my fellow-servant called him.

THOMAS BASSETT . I am a servant to Mr. John Beacher , my great coat and hat were hanging in the servant's hall, I heard the area door open, I ran to see what it was, I saw the prisoner go up the steps with my great coat and hat under his arm, I asked him where he was going with the things, he said he was a poor man, we took him in custody.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I leave myself to the mercy of the court.

GUILTY , aged 45.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and publickly whipped .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110918-33

654. THOMAS WHITFORD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of July , a pocket book, value 1 s. and five keys, value 5 d. the property of Henry Longland , from his person .

HENRY LONGLAND . On the 30th of July I went to the theatre in the Haymarket , and took my seat in the front box the last row but one, After I had been in the box about a quarter of an hour the prisoner came in and took his seat immediately behind me, he had remained there about a quarter of an hour or twenty

minutes, when all of a sudden I heard the sound of some keys falling upon the ground. It immediately occurred to me that they were my keys, I turned round and saw the prisoner quilting the box, I immediately started up and followed him into the lobby. I seized him by the collar and accused him of having picked my pocket, he denied it, I took him into the box and called for a constable, the constable came up, whom I desired to search him, they found nothing upon him, but obtained a light and found my keys upon the floor. I then took him, assisted by the constable, to St. Martin's watch-house, having been previously informed that searching was useless, he having been seen to throw something away, the keys were found under the floor immediately under the seat upon which I was sitting, my pocket was cut, my pocket book was taken away and my keys fell out.

RICHARD CLARK . On the 30th of July that gentleman came in to the box, I saw the prisoner throw something away, I could not tell exactly at that time what it was, when the prisoner was taken to the watch house, I looked for it, and found it was a pocket book.

Mr. Alley. It was half an hour afterwards when you found that pocket book. - A. Yes.

Court. Where was he when he threw it away. - A. In the lobby, I found it in the same direction where he threw it away.

JOSEPH THOMPSON . I am a constable. On Tuesday the 30th of July I was on duty at the Haymarket Theatre. About nine o'clock in the evening I saw a bustle in the lobby, I went there, and I saw Mr. Longland holding the prisoner by the collar, I took the prisoner in custody, we returned in the box, I searched him, I found this pocket book on him, Mr. Longland said that is not mine, I found the small keys on the floor behind where Mr. Longland was sitting, Mr. Longland said they were his property, I found this knife on him.

Prosecutor. This pocket book and keys are mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I am intirely innocent of the charge alleged against me.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110918-34

655. THOMAS SHEFFINGTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of July , a mare, value 20 l. the property of Joseph Brill .

JOSEPH BRILL . I am the prosecutor, it is my mare.

Q. You lost your mare did not you. - A. Yes, on the 19th of July, about eleven o'clock at night, out of my stable. I racked her about nine o'clock at night.

Q. Where do you live. - A. I live at Weston, near Aylesbury .

Q. When did you miss the mare. - A. About eleven o'clock at night.

Q. How long had you this mare. - A. About two years.

Q. Where there any marks about her. - A. She had the pole evil.

Q. In whose possession did you see the mare afterwards. - A. In Charles Brown 's possession on the 25th of July.

Q. Is that the mare that you lost. - A. Yes, I am sure it is.

Q. You do not know any thing of your own knowledge that the prisoner took it do you. - A. No

CHARLES BROWN . How came you by that mare. - A. I bought the mare of Groves at Paddington, on the 23rd of July.

WILLIAM GROVES . Q. You sold the mare to that witness did you. - A. I did.

Q. How came you by that mare. - A. The prisoner stood at the back door of the Green Man, the prisoner asked me to sell the mare for him, he said he bought her in the country; here is a note that he gave the man that bought it, this is a note that he gave the buyer in my presence. Brown has had the mare ever since.

BROWN. That is the note, (read), June 30th. 1811, Thomas Sheffington bought a mare of the name of Kit, of William Hepkins of Henly, Staffordshire, sold it to William Hickingbottom for 10 l. 5 s. It is signed Thomas Sheffington paid William Groves . My master's name is Hickingbottom, I bought it for him.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 27.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18110918-35

656. WILLIAM BEVAN was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Mary Stratford , about the hour of one on the night of the 23rd of August , and stealing therein two silver table spoons, value 1 l. six silver tea spoons, value 15 s. a pair of sugar tongs, value 5 s. a watch, value 1 l. nine gowns value 2 l. a pellise, value 1 l. two shawls, value 5 s. - two towels, value 6 d. two sheets, value 10 s. a table cloth, value 5 s. a cloak, value 5 s. a pack of cards, value 6 d. six yards of callico, value 6 s. six shifts, value 6 s. two pillow cases, value 1 s. and one petticoat, value 1 s. her property.

The case was stated by Mr. Reynolds.

JOHN STRATFORD . My mother lives in Wright's lane, Kensington, in the parish of St. Mary Abbots, Kensington , her name is Mary Stratford , she is a widow .

Q. On the morning of the 24th of August did she go out. - A. Yes, about half after twelve, and I went out with her, leaving a nephew of mine in the house, his name is George Stratford , it is a small house, only two rooms, when we went out we left the doors and windows secured and fastened, I returned about a quarter after five.

Mr. Arabin. The prisoner is a neighbour of yours. - A. He is, he was born in the neighbourhood.

Q. Had there not been a quarrel between you and the prisoner some years ago. - A. Yes, I took the part of a widow whom he wanted to defraud.

Q. You were not very well pleased with him, - A. No.

Q. You never fought him. - A. No never.

Q. You went out at half past twelve. - A. Yes.

Q. You say the doors were fast. - A. Yes, they were perfectly secured, without force had been used, the door was locked, my mother had the key, when I returned the door was open, some of the family had been in, I returned about a quarter before five, it was daylight.

Court. Did you examine the door to see whether it

was forced open. - A. No, it was a small window that they got in at of four panes of glass, two of the panes slided by the other two, that was fastened when I went out, I saw it fast that was shoved in.

Q. What time was it you saw it fast. - A. About seven or eight o'clock in the evening, when I came home I found it had been forced in by some instrument, apparently an iron crow, they had lifted it out of the frame, and left it outside of the house.

Q. Was this your mother's house. - A. She rents it, I am not the house-keeper, I only take care of the business for her.

CHARLES STRATFORD . You are a nephew of George Stratford . - A. Yes.

Q. Where you at your grandmother's sleeping there on the 24th of August. - A. Yes, I slept in the back room.

Q. Do you know how the doors and windows were that night. - A. Yes, they were all fastened, I was awoke in the night just before as I heard the clock strike one.

Q. Have you got a clock in the house - A. Yes, and after I heard the clock strike one I went to sleep again, and then I was awoke, I heard a noise and saw a light in the front room, I spoke and said grandmother shall I go to market with you, nobody answered, I was going out of the room to get my shoes, they laid under the table in the other room, the prisoner struck me on the head and told me to go to bed again; he struck me with his hand on my head in the outside room, then the other man came up.

Q. How many other persons did you see. - A. Two in all, the other man came up and asked me where my mother put the money. Upon being desired to go to bed I went to bed, and after I went into bed, the other man asked me where my mother put the money, I told him I did not know, he said you tell me before I use any rashness, I told him I did not know, and then the prisoner came up to me, and told me if I did not tell him he would shoot me.

Q. Had he any thing in his hand. - A. Yes, a pistol in one hand, and a knife and iron crow in the other, and then the prisoner covered my face over with a gown and a large sheet of brown paper, while he was standing over the bed I heard the other man break open some drawers, then I laid in the bed until the clock struck three, they went out of the house then, they were in the house about three-quarters of an hour, they were sitting in that room drinking beer and eating green gage plumbs.

Q. You say they went away about three, which way did they go away. - A. They went out of the window that they came in at in the front room.

Q. Did you know that that window had been fastened before. - A. Yes.

Q. How does that window open. - A. It slides back, I saw my grandmother fasten it before she went to bed, they forced the frame of the window in, and they both went out.

Q. You say there was a light in the front room. - A. Yes, and when they came in the back room, they brought a light in with them, they staid in the back room about an hour.

Q. They had a light in the room. - A. Yes, I took notice of that man's hand, he has his fingers off, two of his fingers are quite off, I observed it that night.

Q. Which hand, the right hand or the left. - A. I do not know which hand it was, two fingers quite off. and a short thumb, and got nails on them all.

Q. Is there any thing particular in the other two fingers. - A. No.

Q. Have you any doubt about that man. - A. I am quite sure that is the man.

Q. Do you knew whether your grandmother had any silver spoons. - A. Yes, she had two silver table spoons, marked W. M. S. and six silver tea spoons not marked, and a pair of sugar tongs marked W. M. S.

Q. Do you know any thing about any watch. - A. Yes, a metal watch, the maker's name is Wendin, the watch was in the room where I slept in.

Q. Was it there after the men had been there. - A. No, I saw it before I went to bed.

Q.Where did your grandmother keep her gowns. - A. In a chest of drawers.

Mr. Arabin. Were you not much alarmed. - A. Yes, I was.

Q. I am told that two or three days after this affair happened you were not so positive. - A.Yes, I was.

Q. Do not you know the son of the prisoner. - A. Yes.

Q. Did not you ask the son the description of the father's hand. - A. No, I did not.

Q. You had not seen these parties before. - A. No.

Q. And you were very much alarmed. - A. Yes.

Court. You had never seen the prisoner before. - A. Yes, I had before the 24th of August.

Q. Had you seen him often. - A. No, not very often.

Q. How many times had you seen him in your life before the 24th of August. - A. I cannot say how many, about three or four times, he lived I believe at the bottom of Gower Lane, that is not far from my grandmothers.

Q. You say they brought a light into your room. - A. Yes.

Q. Had they any thing over their faces. - A. Yes, the prisoner had a red mask, the other man had a black ribbon tied over his mouth.

Q. You did not see the prisoner's face at all did you. - A. No.

Q. Had he gloves on or not. - A. No, the prisoner hit me on my head, and told me to go into bed, and followed me into the bed room, the other man came in afterwards.

Q. You got into bed directly. - A. Yes.

Q. And then the other man came up. - A. Yes.

Q. Had he any thing in that hand which the fingers were off. - A. No, not then, he had the pistol, the iron crow, and the light in his other hand.

Q. He had not a knife then at all. - A. No.

Q. He covered your face over with a gown and brown paper. - A. Yes, and my face continued in this way till they left the room.

Q. How long did your face continue covered. - A. About an hour and an half.

Q. How long was he in the room before your face was covered over. - A. About a quarter of an hour.

Q. And was he in your sight during all that time. - A. He was in the room, but I could not see him.

Q.Then when was it you discovered the state of his hand. - A. Before my face was covered, when he hit me on my head.

Q.Was that the hand with which he hit you. - A.Yes.

Q. Did you observe that hand afterwards. - A. No.

Q. Not after the moment he hit you. - A. No, Sir.

Q. How was the person dressed. - A. He had got a dark coat on.

Q. Was there any thing besides his hand by which you knew him again. - A. Yes, his voice, he talks very rough.

Q. How soon did you see him again after the 24th, - A. At the time he was brought to Bow Street, Thursday afternoon.

Q. And then you heard him speak. What day of the week was this 24th of August. - A. Saturday.

Q. Did he speak much while you were at Bow Street. - A. No.

Q. Did he and his companion talk much while they were in the room at your grandmothers. - A. Yes, they whispered very much.

Q. When did you observe his voice to be rough. - A. When he told me to go into bed.

Q. Did he tell you to go to bed as soon as you got into the outer room. - A. Yes.

Q. Had you turned round to go back again before he hit you or not. - A. I had turned round, and he hit me on the right side of my head, he was behind me at that time.

Q. Was it his right hand he hit you with or his left. - A. His right hand.

Q. Was it while he was in the act of hitting you that you observed his fingers. - A. Yes.

Q. You did not see that hand afterwards did you. - A. Yes, when he came to the side of my bed and covered over my face.

Q. When he covered over your face, was your face from him or towards him. - A. Towards him.

Q. Then you saw his hand twice did you. - A. Yes, I observed the state of his hand twice.

Q. Did you see his hand so as to make that remark upon it, except at the time he struck you, and the time he covered over your face. - A. No.

WILLIAM BACON . I am an officer, I apprehended the prisoner at the bottom of Gower Lane at his own house, on Thursday the 29th, between five and six o'clock in the morning.

Q. Did the little boy give you any description of any person. - A. He did, and in consequence of that I searched the prisoner's premises, I found nothing. I told him I thought it was a bad job. I asked him where he was on the Saturday night the robbery was committed, he told me he had been at Somerstown, I asked him where, he hesitated some time, I said you had better recollect, I am afraid it will be a serious consequence, he then said he had been at the Somerset Arms, who was with you? he said some young woman, he did not know who she was, and afterwards he went and slept under a hay stack.

Q. What is there remarkable in his hand. - A. The fingers of his right hand are short stumps, he told me he was born so, they have nails upon them all. I searched for the prisoner at his house on the Saturday morning from information. I had seen Stratford's son and the old lady. I did not find him there.

WILLIAM PASSINGER was called, and not appearing in court, his recognizance was ordered to be estreated.

Prisoner's Defence. I have friends to my character. The boy says I held the pistol with this hand, I could not hold a pistol or a stick in this hand.

The prisoner called two witnesses who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , DEATH , aged 30.

The prisoner was recommended to his Royal Highness the Prince Regent's mercy by the jury on account of his good character.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18110918-36

657. WILLIAM HOWARD was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Joseph Cable , about the hour of twelve at night, on the 24th of July , and stealing therein a coat, value 30 s. a waistcoat, value 3 s. a hat, value 6 s. a shirt, value 2 s. and a pair of stockings, value 9 d. the property of George Brown ; a pair of breeches, value 11 s. a waistcoat, value 3 s. a pair of stockings, value 2 s. a frock, value 1 s. three pinafores, value 2 s. a tablecloth, value 3 s. two handkerchiefs, value 1 s. a bed-gown, value 6 d. and a bottle of rum, value 2 s. the property of Joseph Cable .

JOSEPH CABLE . I keep the George public-house in Little Saffron Hill, in the parish of St. Andrew, Holborn .

Q. Was your house broken open. - A. Yes, on the 24th of July after we went to bed. I was the last of the family that went to bed, I went to bed about twelve o'clock, I fastened the doors and windows myself. I was called up at six o'clock by my brother that was going to work, he found all the doors open. I knew nothing of it until I was called up.

MRS. CABLE. Q. What property was lost. - A. Three pinafores, a frock, a bed-gown, a tablecloth, two handkerchiefs, a napkin, and two bottles of spirits. The clothes were all in the kitchen; I had seen them on the over night.

Q. What is the value of all these things. - A. About ten shillings.

GEORGE BROWN . I am a lodger in this house, I lost a coat, waistcoat, shirt, hat, and a pair of stockings. I had worn them about seven months, they were all in the kitchen. I put them away on the Sunday night before the robbery.

JAMES HANCOCK . I am an officer. On receiving the information of the robbery from Mrs. Cable, I went to the prisoner's apartment in Portpool Lane, the morning after the robbery. The prisoner was in bed, I found the whole of the property now produced on a box at the foot of his bed, he said his brother gave it to him.

The property produced and identified.

Prosecutor. The prisoner and his brother came into the house the night before the robbery was committed; and when the robbery was done these two hats were left in the house, they belong to Howard and Hunt, I knew one of them, I enquired where he lived. I took Hancock, and went to his apartment, that is how we found the robbery out. Hancock forced the door open

and found nobody in the room but the prisoner and his wife.

GUILTY, aged 21,

Of stealing to the value of thirty-nine shillings only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18110918-37

658. AGNES COOMBS was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Joseph Bagnell , about the hour of twelve at night, on the 5th of September , and stealing therein, a pair of scales and weights, value 6 s. thirty yards of callico, value 30 s. forty yards of ribbon, value 1 l. a tea-caddie, value 6 s. twenty remnants of cloth, value 2 l. two gowns, value 12 s. and two caps, value 1 l. his property.

JOSEPH BAGNELL . I live at 16 Bear Street, in the parish of St. Martins in the fields , I am a taylor .

Q. Do you rent the whole house. - A. No, only the shop and parlour, my landlord's name is Spencer, he lives in the first floor. On the 5th of September I and my wife went out at between eight and nine o'clock, and returned at one. We found our premises had been broken open.

Q.What property was gone. - A. A great quantity of remnants of cloth, callico, and ribbons. We found the major part of them on the Saturday following, some at the prisoner's lodgings, 22 Queen Street, Seven Dials. We found four bundles at four different places, and a tea-caddie at the pawnbroker's.

Q. What other places. - A. One at a chandler's shop in Queen Street, one at a cheesemonger's in the same street, one at a milk cellar in Nottingham Court, and another at a baker's in Wild Street.

Q. What did you find at the prisoner's. - A. We found two pieces of cloth in a box, I was with the officer and saw them found.

Q. Had the prisoner the key of that room or box. - A. She had the key of both, she was present at the time the things were found. These are the pieces of cloth that were found in the box; we likewise found this apron in a drawer, the drawer was locked and the prisoner had the key. That was all the things that were found at that time, we found more things at her apartment the same evening when we went again: we found this shawl under a green baize, the covering of a table, and this piece of callico that my wife cut out for the little boy, that was under the green baize, the covering of another table, and we found a pair of pockets in the dirty clothes; I know them all to be my property, I had seen them the same day in my shop. The prisoner told us where the other things were.

HENRY CRESWILL . Q. Did you go to search with Mr. Bagnell. - A. Yes, and I went to the other places for the different bundles. I have had them ever since.

JOHN ROBERTS . I live with Mr. Winfield, a pawnbroker, I produce a tea-caddie, I took it in pawn of the prisoner on the 7th of September between nine and ten in the morning, I lent her six shillings on it.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence, nor called any witnesses to her character.

GUILTY, aged 26,

of stealing only .

Transported for Seven Years.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18110918-38

659. AGNES COOMBS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of May , in the dwelling-house of John Herrin , a tea-caddie, value 13 s. five tea-spoons, value 15 s. a pair of sugar-tongs, value 6 s. a five pound bank note, a two pound bank note, and five one pound bank notes , his property.

JOHN HERRIN . Q. Are you a house-keeper. - A. No, I rent a shop and parlour of Mr. Webster, he lives in the house.

Q. Did you lose any property. - A. Yes, out of the parlour.

Q. Do you know the prisoner. - A. I have seen her once before. The property is all here except the bank notes and the sugar-tongs.

HENRY CRESWELL . I am an officer, I found this tea-caddie on a chest of drawers in the prisoner's apartment, and the spoons.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence, nor called any witnesses to her character.

GUILTY, aged 26,

of stealing only .

Transported for Seven Years.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18110918-39

660. JAMES THOMAS was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Michael Favell , about the hour of eight at night, on the 20th of January , and stealing therein, thirty pair of stays, value 30 l. forty-eight yards of nankeen, value 2 l. three yards of jean, value 7 s. fourteen yards of cotton, value 7 s. and one yard and a half of linen, value 2 s. his property.

MICHAEL FAVELL . I am a staymaker .

Q. You have a house in High Street, Borough, have you also a house in Cranbourn Passage, Leceister Square . - A. I have.

Q. Do you sleep there. - A. No, Elizabeth Donnovan sleeps there continually as a servant.

Q. On Sunday the 20th of January last were you at the house in Cranbourne Passage. - A. I was about eleven o'clock, in the forenoon, I left the house after twelve o'clock, the shop woman went out with me, I left it fast.

Mr. Alley. Your dwelling-house is in Southwark. - A. Yes.

ELIZABETH DONNOVAN . I am shop woman to Mr. Favell.

Q. Do you remember going out on this Sunday. - A. Yes, between twelve and one on the 20th of January, I returned a quarter before nine at night, I saw a woman paying great attention to me, looking at me, I went home immediately, I left the door double locked, I found it single locked; on going in and getting a light I discovered some persons had been in, I missed some twills that laid behind the counter, and about thirty or forty pair of stays, I had seen them in the morning before I left the house; and in about two months or six weeks I saw part of this property again.

JAMES GILLMORE . I am an officer. On the 24th of January I went to the prisoners lodgings, he kept a pastry cook's shop in Princes Street, Leicester fields, I found thirty pair of stays tied up in this tablecloth in the prisoner's window, the prisoner was at home; I also found in the same bundle some twilled jean to the amount of forty-eight yards, and other remnants of

cotton packed up in this paper, I asked him how he came by these stays, he told me that a poor distressed friend of his that was in an insolvent state, and had become a bankrupt, had left them there for protection, I told him I was not satisfied with that, I should take them to the office. At this time we had no information of Mr. Favell's robbery, Lavendar who was with me agreed to take the stays, and to keep them till the Saturday for him to bring the insolvent friend before the magistrate, which he agreed to. On the next morning the Friday, Mr. Favell gave information, we went to Thomas's house, but we could not find him until the 21st of August, I apprehended him at a public-house in Westminster, I had been frequently at his house, but could not find him before.

Q. On the Saturday, in January, were you at the office. - A. Yes, and the prisoner and his friend did not come, I took thirty pair of stays, and, by the order of the magistrate, delivered to the prosecutor twenty-four pair of stays and kept six.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, and called eight witnesses who gave him a good character.

GUILTY, aged 38.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18110918-40

661. MARY LOCK was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Thomas Hanley , Ann his wife and others, in the dwelling house then being, about the hour of eight, on the 25th of August , and stealing therein a blanket, value 2 s. 6 d. a sheet, value 2 s. and a coverlid, value 1 s. his property.

ANN HANLEY . I am the wife of Thomas Hanley .

Q. Is your husband a housekeeper. - A. No, a lodger. Mrs. Davenport lets the house out to different persons, she does not live in the house. On the 25th of August, at eight o'clock in the morning, I was in bed, a person came up stairs and said I had been robbed, I had locked the door and secured the window when I went to bed, it is a sash window, they entered at the window, when I was alarmed the window was thrown up, I lost a sheet, blanket, and counterpane.

ANN FISHER . I am a single woman, I saw the prisoner go into the passage of the house about eight o'clock in the morning, I saw her come out with the property in her apron.

Q. Does the window look backward or forward. - A. Backward, I alarmed the woman that belonged to the property, and in the course of an hour she was taken, I had no suspicion at the time that the property was stolen.

SAMUEL TAYLOR . I am an officer, the woman and the things were brought to me at the watch-house, I have had them ever since.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been out all the Saturday evening, and I was rather in liquor, a woman told me to wait for her at the corner of Nag's Head court, and said she would give me something, I did not know they were stolen.

Q.(to Ann Fisher.) Did you see a woman in company with her. - A. Yes, the woman went into the passage with her.

GUILTY, aged 32.

Of stealing only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18110918-41

662. JOHN HARRIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of August , a sheet, value 10 s. - two children's shirts, value 3 s. three caps, value 1 s. two half handkerchiefs, value 2 s. five caps, value 2 s. 6 d. two petticoats, value 3 s. three frocks, value 6 s. a spencer, value 2 s. a habit shirt, value 6 d. a tablecloth, value 4 s. and one gown, value 6 s. the property of John Wood in his dwelling house .

ANN WOOD . I am the wife of John Wood , my husband rents the house. On the 1st of August, about seven o'clock in the evening, I put some clothes in the wash-house into a basket ready for boiling, I went into the front kitchen to mangle a bed gown, in the mean time my husband came in and caught the prisoner.

JOHN WOOD . On the 1st of August I came home about seven o'clock in the evening, not knowing my wife was in the kitchen I went to the wash-house window and called her in the yard, the prisoner burst open the door of the wash-house, and threw a bundle out of his arms, I took the prisoner directly he came into the passage, I ordered my wife to bring the bundle up stairs, she brought it up stairs, the bundle is here, it was delivered to the constable that night.

Q. You stopped the prisoner before he got away from the premises. - A. Yes.

Prisoner's Defence. I never touched any thing there at all, I went down below to enquire for one Williams, a shoemaker, I was never near the place.

GUILTY , aged 52.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Confined two years in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18110918-42

663. MARY JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of August , seven yards of cambric, value 30 s. the property of John Thomas , privately in his shop .

JOHN THOMAS . I am a shopkeeper at Westminster Bridge .

Q. Were you at home when the property was taken from you. - A. I was in the shop. On Friday the prisoner came into my shop, my young man William Green served her.

WILLIAM GREEN . Q. You served the prisoner. - A. Yes, she looked out a number of shawls, she ordered them to be laid of one side, they were to be sent to a neighbour for inspection, and afterwards she looked at some prints, upon which she made great confusion on the counter and took one piece which I missed, I shewed it to her, and that print I found upon her, it was a piece of printed cambric, about seven yards, when I missed the print, I asked Mr. Thomas if he had removed it.

Q. Did you stop her. - A. Mr. Thomas said he suspected that she had got what was not her own, she unfolded the napkin, and produced the print that I had missed.

Q. She bought nothing of you then. - A. No.

Q. Was that print your master's. - A, Yes it was, I had shewn it her with the rest.

Q. Did she make any difficulty in shewing it. - A

No, after a little hesitation she opened the napkin and produced the print.

JAMES BLY . I produce the print.

GREEN. That is my master's.

Prisoner's Defence. May it please your Lordship and gentlemen of the Jury, situated as I now stand at this criminal bar, my tongue is unable of utterance, I humbly submit these few lines to your humane consideration that I was formerly a servant, through illness and an unfortunate companion I lost my character, since then I have been in a state of mental derangement, and till this unfortunate affair I never had a stain in my character. I trust for a just and merciful verdict.

Q.(to Prosecutor). What is the prime cost of this. - A. Three shillings and four pence a yard, there are seven yards.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 23.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18110918-43

664. WILLIAM BRADLEY , alias HAMILTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of September , a watch, value 2 l. a gold chain, value 20 s a gold seal, value 20 s. and a gold watch key, value 5 s. the property of Peter Armour .

PETER ARMOUR . I am a master of a ship .

Q. Was the watch taken from you. - A Yes, it was taken from off my bed, I saw the prisoner take it I was in bed, I went and took it from him.

Q. Where was the ship - A. Off the Tower I was on board the Robert on the Middlesex side of the river, I saw the prisoner take it I jumped and seized him by the collar, I took it from him, I have it in my hand, I have had it ever since, I asked him what he was doing there, he said he ran from the Eagle Frigate, my name is inside the watch.

Q. What time was this. - A. About half after four in the morning on the 10th of September just dawn of the day, I was asleep, but he made a little scuffle coming in at the door, it awoke me

GUILTY , aged 24.

Confined Two Years in the House of Correction and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18110918-44

665 ELEANOR LAREY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of July , a gown, value 2 s. a habit shirt, value 2 s. a pair of women's half boots, value 2 s. a cap, value 5 s. two aprons, value 2 s. and a yard of ribbon, value 6 d. the property of John Hudson .

ANN HUDSON . I am the wife of John Hudson , we keep a public house in Poplar , the prisoner was servant in the house. She took the property and quitted her service in the middle of the night, I found the prisoner at Limehouse dressed in my clothes.

Q. How far is that from your house - A. About a mile.

Q. When she left your service, did she give any notice. - A. No.

Q. Where was the property. - A. In the first floor.

JAMES PEWSALL . I am a constable, part of this property was on the girl, a gown, a habit shirt, and a pair of half boots.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I hope the next servant that you and Mr. Hudson get, he will not take them in the cellar, and give them drink, he gave me liquor and that made me drunk, that was the occasion of my doing what I did.

Prosecutrix. My husband was not up for three hours after that.

GUILTY , aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18110918-45

666. MARY RILEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of July , a saw, value 9 s. the property of James Osborne .

JAMES OSBORNE . I am a carpenter , I lost a saw on the 30th of July from No. 3 Cadogan Place . I left the place about twelve o'clock, and on my returning I saw the prisoner with two people, they took her to the watch-house, and there I saw my saw taking from her petticoats; as soon as I saw it I said it was mine.

EDWARD WOOLDRIDGE I was walking down Sloane Terrace, I cast my eye down a new building, I saw the prisoner putting a saw under her petticoats, I and a young man took her to the watch-house, and there the saw dropped from under her petticoats.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming by, I saw some shavings, I took them up and put them in my apron, I did not know that I had the saw until I went on to the street, and then I was going to put it down. The man came and asked me what I had got, I said nothing, and at the same time he found the owner of the saw.

Prosecutor. Nobody could get the saw without going into the building, it was on the bench covered over with shavings.

GUILTY , aged 56.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18110918-46

667. ELIZABETH BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of August , two pillow case, value 4 s. and a handkerchief, value 1 s. the property of Henry Hughes .

ELIZABETH HUGHES . I am the wife of Henry Hughes , the prisoner had been my servant .

JOHN CRESWELL . I am a constable, I took the prisoner in custody upon another charge on the 12th of August, the pillow cases and a handkerchief were laying upon a table with other things which the prisoner owned, I asked the prisoner where she got this property, she said the pillow-cases and the handkerchief she had brought from Mr. Hughes by mistake.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I had a great many words with Mrs. Hughes after she gave me warning, she insisted upon my going, I took the things in a mistake, I did not like to go back with them.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18110918-47

668. BENJAMIN GOODMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of August , four bushels of oats, value 17 s. the property of Sarah Rainsdon , widow .

- FOWLER. I am a patrol of Aldersgate Street. On the 24th of August, at half after three in the morning, I stopped at the end of Carthusian Street. I thought I saw a man with something on his back, I watched him

until he came to the top of the street, and as he came up I crossed over to him, I asked him what he had got there, he said nothing, I told him I thought he had got something, I said he must stop and go down to the watch-house along with me. He went to go down Carthusian Street again with the sack, I told him that was not the way, he must go to the watch-house; then he pitched the sack down at the green-grocer's door at the corner of Carthusian Street, and said he must ease himself, I catched hold of him by the collar and told him I should stand by him while he eased himself, and sung out for the watchman. He told me he hoped I would not hurt him, it was a bit of corn that was given him for his horses, he had a wife and family, I told him I would not hurt him no more than the law, if the law did it so be it, he must go down to the watch-house to tell the constable how he came by the corn, I took him down to the watch-house, and the watchman brought the corn down after him. On the same morning about nine o'clock I went to Mrs. Rainsdon, she claimed the corn.

THOMAS FOON . I am foreman to Mrs. Rainsdon Red Lion Yard, Aldersgate Street, she is a carwoman , we have every reason to suppose the corn is her property, the sample agrees with her corn, the corn now produced, I have examined it, it belongs to Mrs. Rainsdon, the samples correspond with each other.

Q. Have you lost any corn. - A. We have at different times, but could not tell how it went.

Q. You know nothing of the prisoner himself, do you - A. I have known him for years, I have seen him frequently about the premises at night.

Q. Had he any business there. - A. None at all, he worked in Smithfield market.

Q. Had you seen him there that night. - A. No.

THOMAS ROBINSON . I am a watchman, the patrol called out,

"Robinson make haste," he had hold of the prisoner by the collar, I went up to him at the corner of Carthusian Street, he told me to bring the corn, and he took the prisoner.

JAMES CARTER. I am a constable, at the watch-house I asked the prisoner where he got this sack of corn, he said he saw it lay in the footway, he kicked his foot against it, and he thought he had as much right to it as any body. These are the two samples, one of the sack, and the other of the corn loft of Mrs. Rainsdon.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel, and called four witnesses who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY ,

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110918-48

669. WILLIAM JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of August , two pewter pint pots, value 2 s. the property of William Stanley .

WILLIAM STANLEY . I am a publican , I keep the Bull Tap, Holborn .

SAMUEL WEBSTER. I saw the prisoner going to take the pots from off the table, and when he came out I went after him, and stopped him, Mr. Lee took two pint pots out of his pockets.

WILLIAM LEE. On Saturday evening the 3d of August, as I was passing up Holborn, I observed the last witness stop the prisoner, I took the prisoner into the Bull tap, in each of his coat pockets I found one of these two pots, he begged for mercy, and said he did it through distress.

Prosecutor. They are my pots.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of any knowledge of taking them, they must have been put into my pocket by some one seeing me in liquor.

GUILTY , aged 46.

Confined three months in Newgate , and whipped in jail .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110918-49

670 JOHN DIXON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of August , nineteen pounds weight of Indigo, value 3 l. the property of the United Company of Merchants trading to the East Indies .

Second Count. For like offence, the property of certain persons to the jurors unknown.

The case was stated by Mrs Knapp.

JAMES HIGGS. Q. In the month of August last you were an elder in the East India company's warehouse. - A. Yes, in Seething Lane in the city of London, the prisoner was a labourer in the same warehouse, it is an Indigo warehouse entirely.

Q. About what time do the labourers leave the warehouse. - A. A little before three, I stopped the prisoner, and put my hand down his clothes, I felt something hard in his pocket, I told him I thought he had some indigo about him, he said he had not. I called in the king's officer Robert Griffin , I said Dixon you are certainly guilty, he pulled some indigo out of his pocket, he said he was sorry for what he had done, the officer took some more out of the lining of his jacket. It was the same kind of indigo that we had in the warehouse.

ROBERT GRIFFIN . I am a looker at the warehouse, Seething lane, I made the prisoner pull off his jacket, I looked in the lining and there was one lump more besides what he had put on the table, he was very sorry he said, and he hoped we would pardon him. He gave us information where we should find more, - we went to Walworth and there we found about eighteen pounds more.

- ELDRIDGE. I am an officer, I had a pound of indigo delivered to me by the last witness, I have had it ever since.

- CHAMBERLAIN. I am an officer, I searched some premises at Walworth in consequence of what the prisoner said, I found this indigo there, I have had it ever since.

Q.(to Higgs,) Whereabouts is the value of the indigo. - A. From three to ten shillings a pound.

Prisoner's Defence. I have been thirty years in the Company's employ, I have a wife and four small children, I never had a dispute about my character before, I have been serving the company abroad fighting the enemy.

GUILTY , aged 41.

Confined Three Months in Newgate , and whipped in Jail .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110918-50

671 CHARLES LAXTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of August , one hundred and twenty halfpence, the property of George Mead , from his person .

GEORGE MEAD . I am a gun-borer . On Saturday night, the 17th of August, about eight o'clock in the evening, I went to market to get something for dinner. The prisoner put his hand into my pocket, and took a five shilling paper of halfpence out of my pocket. I took hold of him, he overpowered me, and ran away.

Q. What became of your halfpence - A. I look upon it he throwed them away; I cried out, stop thief; the officer happened to be in the street, and catched him.

WILLIAM LEE . On the Saturday evening I was standing at the top of Fleet Market, I heard a cry of stop thief; I saw the prisoner pursued; I joined in the pursuit, and overtook him on Holborn Hill. The prosecutor came up, and charged him with taking a five shilling paper of halfpence out of his pocket; I searched him, I did not find any halfpence about him.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in Fleet market . Some men ran by me, and directly I heard the cry of stop thief, because he could not find the same young man; he took me because I had the same coloured coat. He came to the Compter and threatened to transport me, and offered to take four shillings; I at first told him I would not; he knows he took the four shillings.

GUILTY, aged 16.

Judgment respited .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110918-51

672. JOHN GREEN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of July , a silver tablespoon, value 12 s. the property of Richard Harrison .

MARY KIGHTLY . I live servant with Mr. Richard Harrison , No. 1, Park-place, Baker-street . On the 25th of July, in the evening, I left a silver table-spoon in a currant pie, and between five and six in the morning I missed it; I was called up at the time, and the prisoner was in custody. The spoon has never been found.

FRANCIS HALLETT . On the 26th of July I was in Baker-street North. I saw the prisoner and another man, they come over the area rales of No. 1, Park-place, as the prisoner was coming over; I saw a silver spoon drop from his left hand pocket, and I saw him pick it up again; I called to him, I said, what have you been at there, that is not your property, he made some answer, and away he ran; I cried out stop thief; I missed him, and catched sight of him in Park-street again; I followed him until he was taken, and brought back to No. 1, Park-place; I put my hand into his left hand pocket; I said, you have not got the spoon, what have you done with it; he said he knew nothing about it. He was stopped, and taken in Lord's Cricket ground; I am sure he is the same man that came over the area rails of No. 1, Park-place, and the the spoon dropped out of his pocket; I called the servant girl up and the pie had been removed into the coal-place, and he had ate almost all the pie, and taken the spoon away.

Q. to Mary Knightly . When you were called up did you go down into the kitchen to look for this pie - A. I went to the cupboard, the pie was gone. I found it in the coal-place.

Q. Are you sure it was a silver spoon that was left with the pie - A. Yes. I have the fellow to it here.

GILBERT JONES . I heard the cry of stop thief, I run towards the Cricket ground, I saw the prisoner; I told him to stop, he said no; Mr. Hallett came up, he said this is the man I saw with the spoon; we took him to No. 1, Park-place.

HENRY HOWARD . The prisoner was given into my charge; I examined his waistcoat, some currant juice was upon his waistcoat, and part of a currant.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going past Park-place early on Friday morning, in order to seek employ. A man said he saw something drop from my pocket; I was pursued, with the cry of stop thief, and taken hold of. I was searched, and no property found on me.

GUILTY , aged 56.

Confined Two Years in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18110918-52

673. JOSEPH DAVIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of August , a pocket book value 2 s. a pair of scissars, value 2 d. a penknife, value 1 s. a pencil case and pencil, value 1 s. a tootl pick and case, value 1 s. the property of William Mainwaring , from his person .

WILLIAM MAINWARING . On the 1st of August, between four and five o'clock in the afternoon going out of Castle-street into Crutched friers; I felt somebody give me a violent push; turning round to see who it was; I saw the prisoner and asked him what he meaned by it; I told him there was room enough for every body; he gave me a great deal of abusive language, and went into the ale-house at the corner of Seething lane, thinking he was in liquor, I proceeded on my way. When I came to the bottom of Crutched friars, crossing of Cooper's-row, I stopped a few moments because the boys were breaking up school. I then went on into John-street , and felt another violent push; turning round to see the cause of it, to my great surprise I again saw the prisoner; I asked him what he meaned by such behaviour; he again abused me, and turned down Cooper's-row. I then began to suspect that he had some motive for it, and put my hand into my pocket, and found my pocket-book was gone; I exclaimed out, I have lost my pocket book, and I suspected the person who had pushed me so had picked my pocket. One of the boys said a person had just gone round the corner who had picked my pocket, and if you please I'll shew him you; I followed the boy, and he shewed me the prisoner; I immediately went up to him, and told him my suspicion. He again abused me, and said he was no more a pickpocket than myself, and asked me whether there was any money in my pocket book; I told him no, nothing of much value in it. The crowd desired me to charge a constable with him; I said why so, I can prove nothing against him, and he may have given

the book to an accomplice. Somebody in the crowd said, sir, I believe I know where your pocket book is, he said seeing a crowd I came to see the occasion of it, and hearing you had been robbed I fixed my eyes upon the prisoner, and if I would go, and open a hatch, and go into a stone mason's shop, the corner of Cooper's Row, I might find my pocket-book, I went there; I rang the bell; I asked the maid who came to the bell whether any body had been there, she said no; I then asked her to look in the passage to see if there was any pocketbook there; she opened the hatch, and she and I found the pocket-book in there.

Mr. Alley. I fancy there was nothing in your pocket-book of any value - A Nothing.

Q. In point of fact you lost nothing, and your property was returned to you - A. It was.

HENRY SELLARS . I live in Jewry-street, and and attend upon gentlemen. I was going with a letter into Gould-square, Cooper's-row, the boys coming out of school occasioned me to stop; I saw a man standing at Mr. Smith's door, reaching over to open it, or something of that kind.

Q. Where - A. At the corner of Cooper's-row, a stone mason's. I went into Gould-square and returned; I saw the same man standing among the boys. Soon after I heard great bustle in the street, the people said that a gentleman had his pocket picked; I then saw it was the same man that I had seen at Mr. Smith's door I heard the man repeatedly say what have I done, search me if you have lost any thing; I saw Mr. Manwaring, I asked him if he had lost any thing, he said, yes. I saw the same man come from the other side of the street, I said that is the man that I saw at Mr. Smith's door; it struck me that he might have thrown the book in that passage, or thereabouts. Mr. Smith's house has two doors, one in John-street, the other in Cooper's-row; I saw Mr. Smith's servant, I asked her to go round to the other door; she saw the book and I picked it up. I gave the book to Mr. Manwaring, he said it was his.

- SHERRARD. Q. Do you belong to the school - A. Yes. As I was coming out of the school I saw the prisoner take something out of Mr. Manwaring's pocket, I ran and told him; Mr. Manwaring said, run and stop him; I said, I will shew you the man.

Q. Is the prisoner the man - A. Yes; I came out of school first with another boy. I was buying apples, I heard the prisoner insult Mr. Manwaring I am sure it was the prisoner. I never took my eyes off the prisoner untill he was taken. I saw him lean over the hatch, and afterwards he was taken.

FRANCES MILLS . Mr. Sellars knocked at Mr. Smith's door; he asked me if any body had been there upon business; I said no; he told me to go to the other door in Cooper's-row, and look to see if any thing was there; I went to see, and there was nothing there; he opened the hatch immediately, and came and looked behind the door, and saw the pocket book. I saw him pick it up.

Mr. Alley. It was Mr. Sellars the witness that was at the hatch - A. Yes.

Q Not the prisoner. - Was it possible for any man to place the pocket book in the situation it was found, without coming inside of the door - A. They must have come in to do it.

Q. Mr. Sellars is the worthy gentleman who told you where it was, and insisted it was there - A. Yes.

Prisoner's Defence. I am entirely innocent. I am a taylor by trade, I was going to a gentleman in the Minories to measure him for clothes. When Mr. Manwaring accused me, I said I hope you do not suspect me; he said if you are an honest man tell me where you have been; I did, and shewed him the house.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110918-53

674. JOHN JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of August , from the person of Henry Price , a pocket book, value 6 d. a two pound bank note, and ten one pound bank notes, his property .

HENRY PRICE . I am clerk to Mr. Charles Richards , and Charles Price , Holborn bridge. On the 16th of August, about one o'clock in the day, I was passing along Lombard-street , I felt some one behind me; I looked round and saw the prisoner. I went on a pace or two and put my hand in my pocket, and missed my pocket book, and the same time I turned round, and saw the prisoner cross over the road, I pursued him, he went through Pope's head-alley, across Cornhill, to the Exchange. I came up with him, and looked him in the face; he let the pocket book fall. I saw the pocket-book fall; I picked the pocket book up, and secured the prisoner.

Q. You never lost sight of him at all - A. No.

JAMES PENNINGTON . I am a constable I took the prisoner in custody. I received this pocket-book of Mr. Price.

Mr. Price. That is my pocket-book, it contained a two pound note, and ten one's, and other papers.

Prisoner's Defence. My Lord and gentlemen of the Jury. On Friday, the 17th of August, between twelve and one o'clock, I was passing the Royal Exchange, and having occasion to cross to go to the piazza's over the way; the prosecutor came up to me; he said he must seize me; I said I would retire to a coffee-house; he sent for an officer; I was examined before the Lord Mayor, and being searched, no property was found on me, but my watch, which is my own. I am perfectly innocent of the felony. I am a young man, twenty-five years of age, eight years I have been in the sea-service. I am convinced that should conviction follow I shall bow with due submission. - Should I meet with an acquittal I am determined to go to sea again. - But it convicted, I trust you may in your wisdom think fit to grant that I may serve his Majesty at sea.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110918-54

675. SUSANNAH SULLIVAN was indicted

for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of July , a watch, value 2 l. 5 s. a ribbon, value 1 d. and a key, value 6 d. the property of Thomas Martin , from his person .

THOMAS MARTIN . I am coachman to Mr, Maud, Aldersgate-street. On the 24th of July near eleven o'clock at night; I was going to the stable; the prisoner stood by a new building in Long-lane ; she asked me where I was going; I said to the stable to do my horses up; she followed me up the gateway and clapped her arms round me; I pushed her away; she came up the second time and then took my watch; she run from me, and told me to go about my business. I clapped my hand to my fob and missed my watch; I followed her and catched her; I asked her for the watch; she denied taking it; she was searched, and no watch found upon her. I lost sight of her, but I am sure she is the woman that took my watch. There was another woman that the prisoner ran to.

WILLIAM DENT . I am a constable. The prisoner and another girl were brought in the watch-house; I searched them both, and found no watch. The prosecutor said the prisoner was the person that took the watch with one hand in his breeches, and the other out.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence, nor called any witnesses to her character.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110918-55

676. ELEANOR KING was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of August , a set of half tester bed furniture, value 12 s. the property of Richard Howard .

RICHARD HOWARD . I am a broker ; I live in Shoe-lane . On the evening of the 8th of August, I was in my parlour, I saw the prisoner and another woman walk very quick into the shop; I went immediately forward; I suspected the prisoner had some intention; I watched her; she was in the shop three or four minutes, and these suspicions wore off; she asked the price of several tin saucepans; she changed them about a good deal from one place to another, and then went to the corner of the front of the house, and after cheapening another, she was going away; immediately upon it the next door neighbour, Mrs. Williams, came out, and said give the man the property that you have got under your clothes; her reply was, woman, what do you mean by it; I have none of his property. Immediately upon that the woman that came with the prisoner ran out of the shop, which convinced me that my neighbour was right in her suspicion; a tuftle then ensued between my neighbour, and the prisoner; I took care that the prisoner should not go away, and in two or three minutes; my neighbour took from under the prisoner's clothes the furniture. That furniture had lain in the middle of the shop upon a table before the prisoner came in; I then endeavoured to secure her. After three or four minutes I could not succeed; the street-keeper came and secured her; she then begged my pardon and hoped I would not prosecute her, but let her go home, and that the woman that came with her had made her drunk, and told her to put the furniture in her apron.

ELIZABETH WILLIAMS . I live next door to Mr. Howard. I received information that the woman that cheapened the saucepan had a bundle under her apron; I went up to her and turned the apron of oneside; I saw rings of curtains, I took it from her, and gave it to Mr. Howard.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence; called four witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110918-56

677. SARAH DAVIS was indicted for that she on the 15th of May , feloniously, knowingly, wittingly, and without lawful excuse, had in her custody and possession, a certain forged bank note, for the payment of 5 l. she well knowing it to be forged and counterfeited .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110918-57

678. JOHN BOND, alias, JOHN SMITH , was indicted for burglariously of burglariously and entering the dwelling-house of John Mackinder , about the hour of twelve, on the night of the 12th of July , and stealing therein, five shirts, value 10 s. a gown, value 7 s. seven caps, value 3 s. five frocks, value 5 s. three shifts, value 7 s. a pillow-case, value 1 s. 6 d. two shawls, value 3 s. two pincloths, value 1 s. 6 d. four pair stockings, value 4 s. a petticoat, value 2 s. and a blanket, value 2 s. his property.

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY - DEATH .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110918-58

679. SARAH DAVIS and ELIZABETH EDWARDS were indicted for that they, on the 15th of May , feloniously did forge and counterfeit a certain bank note for the payment of 1 l. with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England .

SECOND COUNT for feloniously disposing off, and putting away a like forged bank note, with like intent, they well knowing it to be forged and counterfeited. And

OTHER COUNTS for like offence, only varying the manner of charging them.

Mr. Knapp, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoners were

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18110918-59

680. ELIZABETH EDWARDS was indicted for that she, on the 15th of May , feloniously, knowingly, and without lawful excuse, had in her custody, and possession, a certain forged and counterfeited bank note for the payment of 5 l. she well knowing it to be forged and counterfeited .

Mr. Knapp, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18110918-60

681. JOHN PAWSEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the of 2d August , two silver spoons, value 5 s. the property of Thomas Record .

ELIZABETH RECORD . I am the wife of Thomas Record , he is a servant to the Earl of Sussex. On the 2d of August, at half after eight in the morning I was in the kitchen at breakfast; I heard somebody in the parlour; my servant went up stairs and saw the prisoner coming out of the parlour door; he delivered a letter to her.

SARAH HAYES . I live with Mrs. Record. On the 2nd of August, I was at breakfast in the kitchen; my mistress said she heard some one in the parlour; I went up the kitchen stairs, the prisoner was coming from the parlour; he offered me a letter, and asked me if there was such a person lodging there; I said I thought he had been in the parlour, he said no; I went into the parlour, and missed two salt-spoons. I told him I was sure he had been in and taken the two salt-spoons; he said he had not. I held fast of his coat, and told him if he would give me the spoons I would let him go; my mistress came up stairs; she made a great screaming. He gave her the spoons; he said he did not know how he came by them.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing at all about the spoons.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110918-61

682. DANIEL DAVIS was indicted for that he being a person employed in a certain business at the General Post office , on the 31st of May , at and in the said General Post office, a certain letter then sent by he post from Liverpool, to be delivered to John Scolefield , then containing a 10 l. bank note, came to his hands, and possession, and that he afterwards feloniously did secrete the said letter, containing the said bank note, the property of William Scolefield . And

EIGHT OTHER COUNTS for like offence, only vary the manner of charging them.

The case was stated by Mr. Attorney General.

WILLIAM SCOLEFIELD . Q. Where do you live - A. At Liverpool.

Q. Did you on the 29th of May last make up any letter for your father - A. I did; my father was in London at that time, his Christian name is John. I addressed the letter to my father, to the care of T. Raine, 25, King-street, Covent Garden, London.

Q. Did you put any thing into the letter - A. I did; I put a ten pound bank of England note in that letter; I took an account of the date and number the note previous to my putting it in the letter. I made the memorandum in pencil at home; No 8161: the date 1st of April, 1811, for ten pounds; I sealed the letter with the note in it; and after addressing I gave it to my father's apprentice to to carry to the Post office. His name is James Bevan .

Mr. Reynolds. Had you any occasion to put up any other bank note - A. I have a perfect recollection of it.

Q. Did you deliver the letter immediately or was there any interval between your sealing it up and delivering it - A. No. It was not out of my sight all the time; no one had access to it whatever.

JAMES BEVAN . Q. Did you on the 29th of May receive a letter of the last witness, William Scolefield , to be put in the post office at Liverpool - A. I did; I carried it into the post office, and put it into the box in the usual place.

Q. At what time of the day - A. From twenty minutes to half past five.

Mr. Reynolds. Had you any other letter to carry at that time - A. No other but that one.

WILLIAM BANNING . Q. You are employed in the post office at Liverpool - A. I am.

Q. Were you so on the 29th of May last - A. I was.

Q. Do you know whether the bag of letters were made up for London on that day - A. I made it up myself and delivered it to the guard of the mail coach; it was duly forwarded.

COURT. What day - A. On the 29th of May. The bag was made up from half past nine to ten at night.

Mr. Mears. At what time ought a letter put in the post office on the 29th of May, before ten o'clock, arrive in London - A. On the 31st in the morning before nine o'clock.

Mr. Reynolds. What situation are you in the post office at Liverpool - A. A clerk.

Q. Are you certain that all the letters were put in the bag on that day - A. Before the bag is delivered the boxes are examined to see no error is committed. I never knew one in eleven years.

DAVID IRON . Q. You are employed, I believe in the General post office, London - A. Yes.

Q. Were you so employed on the 31st of May last - A. I was.

Q. Did the Liverpool bag come on that day as usual - A. Yes.

JOHN HODGKINSON . Q. You are a letter carrier, I believe - A. I am. And I was so on the 31st of May last.

Q. If a letter had been given to you directed to a person, King-street, Covent Garden, what should you have done with it - A. I should have delivered it immediately.

Q. On what time of day would that be - A. Between eleven and twelve in the morning.

JOHN SCOLEFIELD. Q. Are you the father of the first witness that was examined - A. Yes.

Q. Were you in London on the 31st of May - A. I was.

Q. Were you in expectation of any remittance from your son on that day - A. I was.

Q. Did you go to Mr. Raines's, Covent Garden, that morning - A. I was there from half past eleven till two that day expecting a letter; the postman did not come at all; I was waiting there that day that time, and I was there the next day watching for him.

Q. Did you ever receive a letter enclosing a note No. 8161 - A. I did not.

WILLIAM ROSE. I live at the public-house

he sign of the Crown and Two Chairmen, Dean-street, Soho.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar - A. I have seen him many times.

Q. Was he indebted in any sum of money about the end of May last - A. Yes, he was, about three or four pounds. He paid me on the 31st of May, or thereabouts, by a ten pound note; he bid me take it out of it. I was to take what was due to me, and to give him the change. That is my writing on the note, 31st of May, Postman. That is the note that I received of the prisoner to the best of my knowledge. He paid me a note. I wrote on the note he gave me 31st of May, Postman. I believe it to be my writing. I have not the least doubt of it.

Mr. Reynolds. Did you make the memorandum at the time - A. I did; I took it in the bar and made it immediately.

Q. Had you received any other ten pound note at that time - A. Not to my knowledge. I had others up stairs, but I wrote it on it immediately.

Q. You had some other notes in the bar at that time - A. I cannot recollect whether I had or not.

Q. Perhaps you had other ten pound notes in the bar at that time - A. I took it in immediately, and wrote that on it immediately.

Q. What were you doing at the time - A. I cannot recollect.

Q. What time of the day was it - A. In the afternoon, after dinner, I believe. I cannot recollect the exact time.

Q. Was it day light or not - A. Day light, I believe; I cannot recollect particularly about the time.

Q. Was any body by at the time - A. I cannot recollect whether there was or not. He sat down by the window.

Q. Did not he make you a little merry that day - A. I do not recollect whether I was tipsy or not.

Q. If you do not remember whether you were or not, you may have been so - A. I may have been.

Q. You can remember this one thing perfectly well - A. I remember perfectly well taking this note.

Q. You do not recollect whether you were drunk or sober, or whether any body was there - A. Because I had no reason to take any notice of it.

Q. What makes you take notice of this - A. Because I see the name wrote on it.

Q. All that I recollect perfectly well on this evening is about this note - A. I remember perfectly well of the note; as I told the gentleman before it might be a day before or after.

Mr. Attorney General. Have you any doubt that you took that note of the man at the bar - A. I have no doubt.

Q. When you wrote the 31st of May you believe you took it on that day - A. I do.

Q. You might have wrote one day for another, but no farther, and that is what you have no knowledge about - A. No.

SARAH AKER. Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar - A. I have seen him before.

Q. Do you remember seeing him about the latter end of May - A. Yes.

Q. Where did you see him - A. In St. Ann's-court, Dean-street, at Mr. Rimmers', public-house.

Q. Did he know of your having pawned any ring - A. Yes.

Q. Did he give you any direction about taking out of pawn - A. Yes. It was pawned for five shillings. He gave me a ten pound note to get it changed, and to redeem my ring.

Q. That is, you were to carry it to the pawnbrokers, take your ring out of pawn, receive the change and bring the change to him - A. Yes.

Q. Who was the pawnbroker - A. Mr. Alder, Berwick-street, Soho.

Q. Did you carry the ten pound note to Mr. Alders for the purpose of redeeming your ring - A. I did, and offered it in payment of the five shillings, and desired change. The man went to get change, I believe; I delivered the note to a young man; he came back and said they could not change it; he did not exchange it, and I had it away again.

Q. After that did the prisoner give you any other note by which you did get the ring redeemed - A. Not that day.

Q. Was it the next day - A. I am not certain. I cannot tell exactly what day he gave me the ten pound note. It was soon after I got a one pound note of him, and I got my ring out of pawn.

Q. What did you do with the ten pound note after you received it back from the pawnbrokers - A I carried it back to the prisoner.

Q. Did you ever go by the name of Beazely - A. The ring was pledged in the name of Beazley.

Mr. Reynolds. Perhaps you go by many names - A. I do not.

Q. You cannot recollect what day this was - A. No I cannot.

WILLIAM SMITH . I am an apprentice to Mr. Alder, of Berwick-street.

Q. Do you know the person of the young woman that has been examined - Do you recollect her coming to redeem a ring that was in pledge - A. Yes.

Q. What did she bring to you - A. A ten pound note. I put her name on that ten pound note, and afterwards took it to my master.

Q. Look at that note, there is written on it, Mrs. Beazeley, Charles-street, Middlesex hospital - A. That is the name the ring was in pledge. I did not give her charge; I gave her the note back again.

Q. Did she come afterwards with any other note to redeem the ring - A. I cannot say. The ring was redeemed on the 31st of May, or the 1st of June.

Mr. Reynolds. Do you know this woman - A. No.

Q. Where is your shop - A. In Berwick-street.

Q. In that neighbourhood a great number of women are coming to pawn things - A. Yes.

Q. You do not know this woman particularly - A. No.

Q. Are you quite sure this is the woman - A. Yes.

Q. How long have you known her - A. I did not know her until the time the ring was pledged.

Q. Not before - Then you had not seen her above once before - A. Not above once or twice.

Q. It is not an uncommon thing to have a thing pledged by one person, and redeemed by another - A. No.

Q. What time was the ring pledged - A. On the 29th of May, I cannot tell what time; I did not take it

in myself.

Q. Then what opportunity had you of observing the person that came for it - A. No more than the person that brought the note.

COURT. Did you see her - A. Yes, when she came to redeem it and brough the ten pound note.

Mr. Reynolds. It was a woman that came to you to redeem it - A. Yes.

Q. You cannot be mistaken in that point - A. No.

Q. How long was she with you - A. Five or ten minutes I cannot exactly say.

Q. What time did she come - A. In the morning.

Q. Was any body else there - A. Not in the shop.

Q. How was she dressed - A. I cannot say.

Q. A bonnet or a hat - A. I cannot say.

Q. Was her face hid - A. No, it was not.

Q. And you having seen such a variety of people are you capable of knowing a person you have seen once or twice - A. I know her perfectly well.

Q. You are perfectly sure it was not a young man that came - A. No, it was not.

Mr. Abbott. Have you seen the young woman since - A. Yes.

Q. Have any doubt that she is the person - A. No.

Mr. Parkins. Q. You are the solicitor of the Post-office - A. Yes. On the 7th of August last the prisoner came to my house; I told him that the Bank note in question had been traced to Mr. Rose, who had said that he received it of him; at the first moment he did not seem to recollect that he had paid Mr. Rose a ten pound till I repeated the circumstance again; then he said he had, and that he had received the Bank note of Messrs. Foutheroy and Steward, for a draft of twelve pound which he had of Mr. Oswell, of Dean-street, Soho, an army taylor.

Mr. Reynolds. Where was this conversation - A. At my house in Leadenhall-street. He was the next day taken before the Magistrate.

DAVID READ . Q. You I believe are clerk to Mr. Oswell - A. I am, and was so in May last.

Q. Did the prisoner receive any check of Mr. Oswell in May, for twelve pound - A. He did, on the 4th of May he received it. This is the check on Marsh, Sibil, Foutheroy and Steward.

Q.Was there any other check on the 4th of May given by Mr. Oswell to the prisoner - A. There was not.

WILLIAM TYSON . Q. You are clerk to Messrs. Marsh, Sibil, Foutheroy and Steward - A. I am.

Q. Look at that check drawn by Mr. Oswell on your house - A. Yes it was paid by a ten pound note, with two one's or a two pound note, the number of the ten pound note was, 17734, I made the entery myself, dated 4th of April, I cannot say as to the year.

Mr. Attorney General. The number of the note in question is 8161, dated 1st of April 1811.

Q. Was there any other check of Mr. Oswell's paid in May or April - A. Not of twelve pounds.

Mr. Reynolds. Did you pay the note - A. Yes, I did.

JOHN MOLE . Q. You belong to the general Post-office - A. I do.

Q. Look at this note, this is not the note in question but it is the note the last witness mentioned, 17734, dated 4th of April, from whom did you receive that note - A. From Daniel Davis the prisoner.

Q. I see there is endorsed upon it, 6th of May 1811 and the prisoner's name; is that his hand writing - I received it of the prisoner and I believe it to be his hand writing.

Q. Did you receive it on the 6th of May - A. On the 6th of May I paid it in at the receiver general's office.

BENJAMIN CRITCHARD . Q. What office do you fill in the Post-office - A. I am inspector of the letter carriers.

Q. Was the prisoner at bar employed in the Post-office at the latter end of May - A. He was as a letter carrier, on the 30th and 31st of May.

Q. Is there a room in the Post-office in which all the letter carriers are collected together and receive there letters - A.There is.

Q. How many are there of them - A. About one hundred and forty.

Q. How many divisions are they arranged in - A. In twelve.

Q. Within what division does King-street, Covent Garden apply - The fourth division.

Q. That I believe was not the prisoner's division - A. No; his division was the 2d division.

Q. Does it happen that letters which belong to one division get into another division, being missorted - A. That happens daily.

Q. Does the person that receives missorted letters account to the person to whom it should be sorted to - A. Not directly, it passes to the chargetaker, whose business it is to account for the postage of the division and the allowance is made through him, no money passes.

Q. Are there chargetakers belonging to each respective division - A. Yes, there are twelve primary divisions and one hundred and sixteen subdivisions.

Q. The letter carriers are all collected, are they not in the same room - A. They are when the letters are delivered out to them.

Q. All of them consequently have access to the letters - A. Yes.

Q. And the prisoner attended on the 31st of May - A. He did.

Q. And he was in the employ of the Post-office, as a letter carrier, and employed in sorting the letters that is delivered in the second division into districts - A. The prisoner was.

Q. This letter if it had been regularly sorted would not have come to the second division, but would belong to the fourth division - A. Yes.

Q. But letters are frequently missorted - A. Yes, frequently.

Mr. Reynolds. It would not have fallen to this man's scope to deliver letters to King-street, Covent Garden - A. No.

Q. Did you see him employed that morning - A. My recollection does not serve me, he writes his name in a book every morning.

JOHN WILLATT . Q. Are you what they call a chargetaker in the Post-office - A. I was on the 31st of May chargetaker to the second division.

Q. Was the prisoner employed at that division - A. He was, and attended there with eight others and myself.

Q. What was the business of each of you - A. To sort out the respective letters for the delivery.

Q. Were there any letters missorted that day - A. From the face of the book there was.

Q. Supposing any to have been missorted that day what reason should you have to know it - A. From the face of the book, the book was kept on that day by me.

Q. On the 31st of May, tell me whether the prisoner accounted to you for any letter that was missorted - A. Yes, he did, I gave him credit three times that morning for missorted letters that appears by my own entry, I am positive of it.

Q. Does that entry enable you to say positively that the prisoner was in the Post-office - A. Undoubtedly, eles I should not have credited him three times.

Mr. Relynolds. When did you make that entery - A. That very morning.

COURT. Q. to Critchard. Did he sort the letters generally - A. No, the second division.

Q. to Mr. Scolefield. Is that the note that you put in the letter - A. It is, I know it by a private mark.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel, and called no witness to his character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 36.

London jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18110918-62

683. JOHN HOPWOOD was indicted for that he, on the 28th of June , feloniously did forge and counterfeit, a certain bank note for the payment of one pound, with intent to defraud the Governour and Company of the Bank of England .

SECOND COUNT, for disposing of, and putting away, a like forged bank note with the same intention.

Mr. Knapp, counsel for the prosecution declining to offer any evidence the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18110918-63

684. JOHN HOPWOOD was indicted for that he, on the 13th of June , feloniously, knowingly, willingly and without lawful excuse, had in his possession and custody, a certain bank note for the payment of one pound .

Mr. Knapp, counsel for the prosecution declining to offer any evidence the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18110918-64

685. MARGERET NOWLAND was indicted for that she, on the 20th of August , feloniously did forge and counterfeit a certain bank note for the payment of one pound, with intention to defraud the Governour and Company of the Bank of England .

SECOND COUNT, for feloniously disposing of, and putting away, alike forged note with the same intention and THIRD and FOURTH COUNTS for like offence calling it a promissary note.

The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.

JAMES HULME . I am a pawnbroker, in Bow-street, Bloomsbury. On the 20th of August last, the prisoner came to my shop to redeem a gown that had been pledged for half-a-crown; she said that she wanted change a note that she hand in her had, I told her I could not give her change; she said give me change I'll take five or six shillings in half-pence. I took the one pound note and looked at it, I then asked her name and were she lived; she said Nowland, No. 2, George-street. I wrote on the note No. 2, George-street; I then asked her where she had it from; she said she had it from her father, a bricklayer's labourer. I told her then that it was a bad one, that she must go along with me, and she walked down to Bow-street with me. In our way to the office I asked her particulary who she had it of, and likewise; where she lived; she then told me that she lived at No. 2, New Street. There is a New-street Saint Giles in that neighbourhood. She said that she had it of a bricklayer's labourer, whom she would not tell, he was a relation of her's.

Q. Look at that note and see whether your writing is on that note - A. Yes, that is my writiting, I am sure this is the note she offered me.

Mr. Alley. She gave her true name - A. Yes, and the further account that she gave of her residence is right.

NOT GUILTY,

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18110918-65

686. MARGERET NOWLAND was indicted for that she, on the 20th of August , feloniously, knowingly, willingly and without lawful excuse, had in her possession, a certain forged and counterfeited bank note for the payment of one pound, she well knowing it to be forged and counterfeited .

Mr. Knapp, counsel for the prosecution declining to offer any evidence the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18110918-66

687. JEREMIAH NOWLAND was indicted for that he, on the 20th of August , feloniously, knowingly and willingly, and without lawful cause, had in his custody and possession, a certain forged and counterfeited bank note for the payment of one pound, he well knowing it to he a forged and counterfeited .

The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.

JOHN TOWNSEND . I am an officer of Bow-street. I apprehended the prisoner on Thursday, the 20th of August, I went in company with Mr. Lees and Lack to No, 2, New-street, Saint Giles; the prisoner was not there, they left me there in case he come, and a little while after they were gone, the prisoner Nowland came in; he desired to know what the people wanted with him, I told him I could not tell him; he agreed to go with me any where; we came into George Street. He and I walked together. I did not lay hold of him, he ran away into Charlotte-street, I ran and secured him, and took him into the Brown Bear , Bow-street; there I searched him, and found three dollars upon his person, one is a bad one, three good shillings and two bad ones, and in his coat pocket, a one pound note where his gloves were. I sent for Mr. Lees and Lack, they came over to me; I put the money and the one pound in a leather bag, and delivered it to Samuel Lack .

Mr. Alley. You have been some time an officer of Bow-street, you are pretty well known - A. Yes.

Q. I believe about this time there had been a riot in St. Giles - A. There had been before, and the officers had apprehended some.

Q. You had not told him for what purpose you were about to apprehend him, and then he run away - A. That is the fact.

Q. When you found the note upon him did you ask him where he got that note - A. No.

SAMUEL LACK. I am an officer of Bow-street; Townsend delivered to me, a one pound note, three dollars and some silver, one of the dollars are bad and two shillings bad; I marked the note before I parted with it; this is the note.

JOHN LEES. I am one of the inspectors of the Bank.

Q. Is that a forged note or is it a good one - A. It is a forgery the whole of it.

COURT. Is that note so as to impose on an ordinary man - A. I think it might.

FRANCIS THOMAS . Q. Are you one of the clerks at Bow-street - A. Yes, I was present, and took down the examination of the prisoner what he said.

" Jeremiah Nowland , says, that he is a bricklayer's labourer, works at Ryslop, that he got two one pound notes on Saturday night last for his wages. Mr. Hibbs, the bricklayer of the works, paid him the two notes, one of which he gave to his daughter, Margeret Nowland, now present, to get her gown out of pawn, in order that be might have the change."

Mr. Alley. That daughter is the girl that was tried the last - A. Yes.

Q. So far that is all true - A. Yes.

HENRY HOBBS. Q. You are a bricklayer, at Ryslop works - A. Yes. On Saturday, the 17th of August I paid the prisoner a one pound note out of a parcel of eight that I received of Mr. Spratling, the foreman.

Mr. Alley. When you got the notes of Mr. Spratling did you put any mark upon them - A. No, I cannot speak to the note.

JOHN SPRATLING . Q. I understand you are foreman of Ryslop works - A. I am. On the 10th of August I received fifty one pound bank notes of my wife, to pay the mens wages working at Paddington. On the 15th I delivered eight of these notes to Mr. Hibbs.

Q. Do you remember the prisoner being apprehend - A. I do. On that morning I met him on the Edgware-road, that was Tuesday, the 20th of August, about half-past ten, I asked him what brought him from Ryslop works, he said he was unwell. I did not see the prisoner again untill I saw him at Bow-street; I asked him then what he had sent to me for; he said to speak for him, I told him what I had to say would be un injury to him, I must speak the truth. He said he received the notes from Hibbs, I replied that the notes that Hibbs paid him were good, and that what I had to say would be of no good to him, he then said you had better not come.

ANN SPRATLING . I am the wife of the last witness. On the 10th of August, I received fifty one pound notes, of Phillip Wright, I delivered them to my husband.

PHILLIP WRIGHT. I am clerk of the works at Ryslop and at Paddington. On the 10th of August, I received two hundred and ten one pound notes of Charles Birt , I delivered fifty of them to Ann Spratling.

CHARLES BIRT . On the 10th of August last, I received two hundred and ten pounds of Mr. Horn, four bundles of fifty, and ten loose one pound notes, I delivered them to Mr. Wright.

JOHN HORN . I am clerk to Mr. Mackintosh. On the 10th of August last, I went to the Bank and changed a five hundred, and a fifty pound bank note; I delivered two hundred and ten to Charles Birt .

The prisoner was not put on his defence.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18110918-67

688. EDWARD SIMKINS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of August , a gold seal, value 25 s. the property of Joseph Fisher .

ROBERT WARNES . I am shopman to Joseph Fisher , No. 2, Leicester Square .

Q. Were you at home on the 21st of August last - A. Yes, the prisoner came to the shop and desired to look at some gold seals. I shewed him a tray, containing five or six dozen. After looking at them some time, I observed that he put a seal in his pocket, and when he was about leaving the shop, I said you, have got a seal in your pocket, he immediately put his hand into his pocket and gave it me, and ran off; I pursued him, called stop thief, and took him in Lisle Street; I never lost sight of him; I took him to Bow Street.

Q. What were you doing at the time that you saw him put the seal in his pocket - A. Nothing, my attention was fixed entirely to him; I saw him put his hand in his pocket and the seal fell in.

Q. Had you observed whether that hand had been shortly before that time in the tray - A. He had had his hand in the tray, and took up a dozen of different seals to look at, he put the seal into his right hand breeches pocket.

Q. Was he searched at Bow-street - A. Yes, I was not present.

WILLIAM HOMAN . I am an officer. The prisoner was brought to the office at Bow-street. I took him in custody he had a half-penny and a farthing that was all the money that he had about him; he had a silver hunting watch, that was traced to the shop where it was bought, but not by him, the gentleman came for it. Two gold seals, a gold ring, and a gold key, and a little tortotshell snuff-box.

Q. Had they the appearance of being new - A. The watch was but last year's, and the seals and key quite new.

Prisoner's Defence. I am sorry I am brought here, I have been a servant fifteen years, I declare myself innocent of the charge. I do not disown I had the seal in my hand, the moment I took up the seal he challenged me with it, I put it down, and he, directly called me a thief and rascal, and the moment I went out, he called after me stop thief.

COURT. Q. to Warnes. Are you sure he remained in the shop any time after he put the seal in his pocket - A. I am quite sure he remained two minutes, if I said four I do not think I should be wrong. After I accused him of it he turned round and went out of the shop.

GUILTY , aged 27.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18110918-68

689. GEORGE BASSETT and THOMAS FORD were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of July , twenty pounds weight of silver, value 50 l. the property of Henry Moor .

HENRY MOOR . I am master and part owner of the Archduke Charles , she came from Lima in Peru. She came into London Dock on the 9th of July, I had on board that ship two bags of raw silver in lumps. On the 26th of July I discovered that both the bags were removed from the place where I put them in under some indigo on the starboard side of the hold.

Q. Had you authorized any person to take them away. - A. No, this silver was my own property.

JOHN SPENCE . I am one of the warehouse keepers of the London Dock, I superintend the whole of the business.

Q. In the latter end of July was the Archduke Charles in the dock. - A. She was.

Q. Were the two prisoners and Jarvis employed in unloading her. - A. They were.

Q. What days were Ford there. - A. On the 19th of July, 20th, 21st, 22d, 23d, 24th, 25th, 26th, 27th, 30th, 31st, and 1st of August, Ford was there assisting unloading, partly on board and partly on shore.

Q. Was Bassett there every day. Ford was except the 26th and 27th - A. Yes, and Jarvis was there every day.

RICHARD PAGE . Q. Were you employed on the Archduke Charles as a gangsman. - A. Yes, in July we began on the 12th to unload, she was unloaded on the 31st of July, I know the prisoners and Jarvis were working on board the ship several days.

GEORGE JARVIS. Q In the month of July, were you a labourer in the employ of the London Dock company. - A. Yes.

Q. Were you employed in unloading the Archduke Charles. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember while you were unloading the Archduke Charles shifting some seal skins in the coal-hole. - A. Yes, Bassett and Ford were with me, I then saw something in a bag, it was some kind of metal, it looked very black, there was a hole in the bag, Ford and Baskett were in the ship with me and two lumpers besides, the bag was left there that night till the next morning. I told Bassett and Ford that I had found it almost as soon as I found it, Bassett told me to bring up a piece the next morning, he would take it out and see what it was. The next morning I took it up out of the hold, and gave it Bassett about five minutes before eight, he was at a place behind the warehouse, Ford was in the ship's hold at the time I took it up, we had agreed the night before what to do.

Q. In the morning what time did you go to work. - A. About eight o'clock, Ford was there as soon as I, he saw me take it I have no doubt, this was on Thursday morning, I gave it into Bassett's hands, he put it into the crown of his hat, he went out with it.

Q. How soon did you see Chip come. - A. I did not see Chip until the Thursday following, Chip was ordered in on the Wednesday night to fetch some.

Q. Was that which was afterwards conveyed away by Chip part of that bag. - A. Yes, it was part of that which was taken out of that bag out of which Baskett took away that morning one piece, and then a week afterwards Chip came and took away some more of it.

Q. The week following did you see Chip come into the dock. - A. Yes. Ford had told me in Chip's cellar that he was to come. Chip has a cellar in Well Street, he sells beer. In the morning Chip came in about ten minutes before eight, Ford ordered me to be there a little before him to give Chip a piece every morning, it was hid under some flax in a shed in the London Dock, that was where Ford told me to hide it, I took a piece from under the flax and gave it to Chip and he went out with it, Chip came in again about twelve o'clock, Basset gave him another piece, he went away with it.

Q. I believe there was a great deal of noise made about this, and at last you were taken up. - A. Yes.

Q. And after you were in custody you made this confession. - A. Yes, what I have said is true.

THOMAS CHIP. I keep an ale and porter cellar in Well Street.

Q. On the 30th of June last, do you remember the prisoner Ford coming to your cellar. - A. Yes, On Tuesday morning, a little before eight o'clock, he asked me whether I wanted a job, I said frequently, he said it was something valuable to sell, it was a kind of silver, he asked me if I could get sale for it, I told him if it was any thing valuable there was no doubt but I could sell it, he made an appointment to come on the Wednesday night, he did come and Jarvis with him, he then asked me to come to a box in the Docks, on Thursday morning, I went there on the Thursday at eight o'clock, and Jarvis gave me a piece of silver, I wrapped it up in this handkerchief, I took it out of the Dock gates, I went again at twelve o'clock, I saw Ford, Bassett, and Jarvis, Ford pointed to me to go to Jarvis, I heard Jarvis say to Bassett I have been once it is not my turn, I then saw Bassett go to the place where Jarvis had gone in the morning, Bassett gave me another lump, he said there I can trust you, I took and hid it under a watch box in the Dock, the other piece I took home in the morning. When they left work at four Ford came and asked me if I had got any money, I said no, you did not tell me what to do with it, I asked him what he called it, he said it was the best virgin silver. I went to Lloyd's Coffee house to find the captain of the vessel to give information, I took the piece of silver I had at home to Mr. Clarke, coming home I saw a paper, I went to Mr. Barry's office, I left the card with my address at the broker's.

Q. That led to the ultimate enquiry, so it was a voluntary act on your part. - A. Yes.

MR. CLARK. I live in Husher Court, Water lane. Q. Do you know the witness. - A. I know him by bringing porter and ale to our house, he brought a piece of metal that looked like lead on what day I cannot say, he brought two officers and came for it about a week after.

Q. Was that which was delivered back in the presence of the officers the same that he left. - A. Yes.

JOHN GILLMAN . I am an officer.

Q. Do you recollect going along with Chip to the last witness's house for some silver. - A. I did, she delivered it me, this is it.

JOHN WATKINS . I am a constable. On the 3d of August Chip desired me to follow him, Chip went to a watch box in the London Dock, and under that box he took up this piece of silver.

- MACKDONALD. I am an officer. On the 3d of August, in consequence of Chip's information, I searched the coals in the Archduke Charles, I found this bag containing four pieces of silver.

The property produced and identified.

Bassett said nothing in his defence.

Ford's Defence. I never was tried before, I never touched a bit in the ship.

Bassett called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

BASSETT, GUILTY , aged 28.

FORD, GUILTY , aged 55.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18110918-69

690 MORGAN DAVIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of September , a gelding, value 2 l. the property of John Hanmore .

JOHN HANMORE . I am a chimney sweeper , I live at Staines.

Q. Was the prisoner in your employ. - A. No, he was not. I turned the horse out on Staines Common field on the evening of the 4th, it was a gelding, on the 5th about five o'clock in the morning I went to look for it, I missed it.

Q. When did you see it again. - A. On the 7th in Tothill Fields in the possession of John Smith .

Q. What was the value. - A. About 2 l.

Q. Did the prisoner five about Staines. - A. He had been about there, he asked me for a job or two, I gave him a little but I did not employ him regular, I saw him on the 4th at Staines.

Q. When you saw your horse on the 7th, was the prisoner there or not - A. No, he was not there.

JOHN SMITH . I am an officer. On the 5th of September I went to No. 1 Short's Gardens, I apprehended the prisoner, and took the horse from him.

Q. You found the prisoner there, where was the horse. - A. In the street facing the door.

Q. Was the prisoner in the house. - A. He was in the house, I asked him where he got the horse, he answered he brought it from Kingston.

Q.Kingston is the other side of the water to Staines. - A. It is.

Q. Was that the same horse that Mr. Hanmore claimed. - A. Yes.

JOHN DAVIS . I am a chimney sweeper, I saw the boy in Holborn on a Thursday, I do not know the day of the month, it was in the evening, he was standing by the horse, he was offering the horse for sale, he said he was hungry, I took him home and detained him as a run-a-way apprentice, he said any body might have the horse for a pound or fifteen shillings, I filled his belly and informed his master Mr. Berry, in Swallow Street, his master took him out of my house.

GUILTY , DEATH , aged 12.

The prisoner was recommended to his Royal Highness the Prince Regent's mercy on account of his youth.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18110918-70

691. JOHN KENT was indicted for returning from transportation before the expiration of Seven Years, for which he was ordered to be transported .

JAMES HARRIS. I am in the impress service, I took John Kent on the first of this month, in Tottenham Court Road at a private house in Francis Street, kept by one Champion.

SAMUEL LACK . I went on board the Enterprize, and took Kent in custody from information that he was there. I have got a copy of the record of his conviction, which I received at Mr. Shelton's office, I compared it with the original record, it is a true copy, I saw Mr. Shelton sign it. (read.)

JAMES KENNEDAY . Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar. - A. I was present when he was tried and convicted, I apprehended him for the robbery that he was tried for.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, called one witness who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , DEATH , aged 34.

The prisoner was recommended to his Royal Highness the Prince Regent's mercy on account of his good character.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18110918-71

692. JOSEPH DALTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of July , five pound weight of silk, value 10 l. five pound weight of worsted, value 1 l. two pound weight of cotton, value 6 s. one pound weight and a half of thread, value 4 s and two bobbins of silk, value 2 s. 6 d. the property of William Winter , in his dwelling-house .

WILLIAM WINTER . I am a laceman in Long Acre .

Q. Did you lose any property from your house on the 18th of July last. - A. A quantity of silk was found on the 18th of July in a house of mine that had been taken from my house in Long Acre.

JAMES BANNER . I was then apprentice to Mr. Winter, the prisoner was Mr. Winter's porter . The shop is in Long Acre, the work-shop is in Broad Court, I saw a door open and one of the workmen in there looking for some wood, in searching the wood over I found a bundle, I opened the bag, it was full of silk, this was in Broad Court in a lumber-place; I shewed the silk to Mr. Winter, and by his directions I put it in the same place again. About half past six in the evening the prisoner came into this place, I called John Brooks to watch, I went to Bow Street and got an officer.

JOHN BROOKS . On the 18th of July I watched, and observed the prisoner come out of the shop into the court, I followed him into Wild Street, and there I stopped him, he had a bundle which I saw him come from the shop with.

Q. You took him with the bundle. - A. Yes, I took him back to Broad Court, there I met the officer with the apprentice, I delivered the bundle to Mantz, the officer.

THOMAS MANTZ . I am an officer. On the 18th of July I found the prisoner in Broad Court with this bundle in his hand as it is now, I searched him, in his coat pocket I found four knots of silk, in his breeches pocket I found two, I asked him where he lived, he said, 15 Drury Lane, the second floor back room, I went there in company with the apprentice, there I found this property.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. Necessity drove me to do this I hope my worthy master will mitigate the matter for me.

GUILTY, aged 47.

of stealing to the value of 39 s. only ,

Confined Two Years in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18110918-72

693. HANNAH CARTHY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of August , in the dwelling-house of John Flannagan , five one pound bank notes , the property of William Stokes .

MARY STOKES . I am the wife of William Stokes , I lodge in the house of John Flannagan . On the 28th of August I took the prisoner into my house out of charity, she staid with me four nights.

Q. When the prisoner left the house did you miss any thing. - A. About ten o'clock at night she came in and borrowed an apron and a bonnet, she said she wanted to go after a milk place.

Q. Did she tell you that she was going away. - A. Yes, to come back again, I missed my money, it was concealed in the waist of my petticoats in a small pocket-book, the five one pound notes, I had seen them the night before.

Q. Did the prisoner ever return to your house. - A. She did and had her breakfast with me. I never saw my bank notes again, my pocket book fell out of my petticoat, I was surprized to find it empty.

Q. Were you present at Bow Street when the prisoner confessed. - A. I was.

Q. Did you say it would be better for her to confess. - A. Yes,

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18110918-73

694. SARAH COLLIER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of July , four hundred and eighty penny pieces, value 2 l. and four hundred and eighty half pence, value 1 l. the property of Samuel Nicklin , in his dwelling-house .

SAMUEL NICKLIN . I keep the Golden Key, Church Street, Bethnal Green . On the 27th of July I missed three pound in half-pence and penny pieces out of some bags that were tied up, I accused the prisoner, she denied it, and afterwards acknowledged it, she was my servant , she said she took it by shillings and pence. She had access to it by going up to the room to make the bed daily.

JOHN SPOONER . I am an headborough, I took the prisoner in custody, Mr. Nicklin charged the prisoner with taking the copper, she denied it, and afterwards confessed that she had bought articles to the amount of two pound, seventeen shillings.

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw the money at all.

The prisoner called five witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY, aged 18,

of stealing to the value of five shillings only.

Judgment respited .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18110918-74

695. FRANCIS LUNDY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of July , a saw, value 5 s. and a jacket, value 2 s. the property of William Cook .

WILLIAM COOK . I am a carpenter , I live in Skinner's Place, near Somerstown. I was at work in a house by the New Road side, I went to dinner, and when I returned I missed my saw and jacket, I saw the prisoner coming across the fields with the saw and jacket, John Searle took him. The prisoner said he had a large family, and he hoped I would forgive him.

JOHN SEARLE . When I took the prisoner he said he had a large family, and poverty made him do it.

Prisoner's Defence. I found the saw by the back of the building.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18110918-75

696. ANN LEWIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of July , two shirts, value 1 s. a robe, value 1 s. a petticoat, value 6 d. two towels, value 6 d. and two pillow-cases, value 6 d. the property of George Robinson .

GEORGE ROBINSON . I live at Edmonton, the prisoner lived servant with me. I missed the property on the 16th of July, I fetched them from the Two Brewers, Ponders End; and when I brought them in I sent for the prisoner, I opened the bundle and said,

"Nanny, how came you to do this," she cried and said she did not know how she did it. This is the shirt, it is mine, it is marked G. R.

Prisoner's Defence. My Lord and Gentlemen, I was in a hurry when I packed up the things to send home to wash, I did not know that I rolled them up, I did not mean to do it.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY, aged 19.

Judgment respited .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey

Reference Number: t18110918-76

697. SARAH MAY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of August , a gown, value 7 s. and a shift, value 6 d. the property of Henry Jenner .

SARAH JENNER . I am the wife of Henry Jenner . On the 23d of August, about four o'clock, I hung my gown and shift on the top of the landing place. On the 24th, about eight o'clock in the morning, I missed it. On the 25th I saw the gown in the possession of Mary Fisher , the shift was found on the prisoner's back.

SARAH FISHER . Q. Had you in your possession a gown claimed by Sarah Jenner . - A. Yes, I bought the duplicate of the prisoner, I took it out of pawn.

Prisoner's Defence. On Saturday I went to Long Acre to get a petticoat out of pledge, I was asked by a woman to buy a shift, I bought it for a shilling, she then asked me to buy a duplicate of a gown, I gave her six pence for the ticket, and finding that I had not money enough for the petticoat, I sold it for the same.

Prosecutrix. The gown was in pledge in the name of Sarah May .

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18110918-77

698. WILLIAM BETLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of November , three silver waiters, value 30 l. the property of William Rowlatt , in the dwelling-house of Henry Topham .

SECOND COUNT - for like offence, only varying the manner of charging it.

WILLIAM ROWLATT . Q. Does Mr. Henry Topham , Enoch Durant , and you keep house together. - A. As to expences, the house is at No. 2, King's Arms Yard, Coleman Street .

Q. Who has the lease of that house. - A. I believe Mr. Topham, I never saw the lease, Mr. Topham is in the house constantly. I believe it is in the parish of St. Stephen, Coleman Street.

Q. Had the prisoner at the bar been in your service some time. - A. The prisoner was in the service when I went to Mr. Topham's house, which is between four and five years, Mr. Durant keeps an office there. We are not partners in business, only joint occupiers of this house, the wages of the servants are paid by us all three, and the house keeping. Suspecting this man's dishonest practises, I examined the chest in which I kept this plate. It was my own.

Q. What plate did you miss from that chest. - A. Three waiters, some table spoons, some desert spoons, and some forks. When Lavender came the prisoner was in my room, Mr. Durant and myself charged the prisoner with having defrauded us, that is the term I used, Mr. Durant said,

"no, he has robbed us." He denied having done so, expressed great surprize, and could not tell what we meaned; I told the prisoner I was confident that he had robbed us, and the best course that he could take was to tell us of it.

STEPHEN LAVENDER . Q. You belong to Bow Street. - A. Yes.

Q. You went to the house of Mr. Rowlatt on the evening that we are speaking of. - A. Yes, I went with the prisoner into the pantry, he produced these duplicates from the recess in the pantry, from thence we proceeded into the cellar, he there took some mortar out of a hole in the wall, and produced a quantity of duplicates of different plate belonging to different gentlemen in the house, he was then taken into custody. I have two duplicates which were taken out of the recess in the pantry, of the 5th of November, 1810. One of these duplicates relates to one waiter pawned for twelve pound, and the other to two small ones for five pound, I took these two duplicates to the house of Mrs. Reeve and son. The waiters were delivered to me at Guildhall. These are them.

THOMAS NICOLLS . I am a servant to Mrs. Reeve and son, pawnbrokers, Red Cross Street. The three waiters that are produced were pledged at our house, I have the counterpart of the duplicates, they were pledged by the prisoner at the bar on the 5th of November, I advanced him ten pound on the large one, and five pound on the two small ones. I had seen the prisoner repeatedly, I have no doubt whatever that he is the person that pledged them, the duplicates correspond exactly.

Prosecutor. The large waiter is mine, and the two small ones are my property, they weigh about ninety-two ounces, at six shillings and two pence an ounce, unwrought.

HENRY TOPHAM . Q. In what parish is your house situated. - A. In St. Stephens, Coleman Street, I have the lease of the house, I reside entirely in the house, it is my dwelling-house.

Prisoner's Defence. I find myself guilty.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 45.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110918-78

699. JOANNA BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of September , a watch, value 3 l. a chain, value 6 d. and a key, value 2 d. the property of Edward Gregory , from his person .

EDWARD GREGORY . I am a milk-man , I live at No. 5, Mumford's Court, Milk Street, Cheapside. On the 4th of this month, about one in the morning, I went to Bartholomew fair , the prisoner got close to me, I asked him what he wanted, he talked like a foreigner, I think he said he was a Swede, we went on a little way, a fight took place, I told the prisoner to be careful and not to go into the crowd, if he had got any thing about him he would certainly loose it. A man came up with a stone bottle, he asked us if we wanted any gin, I took a glass and gave the prisoner a glass, for which I paid six pence, we took a walk between the booths and by St. Bartholomews hospital, the prisoner and I sat down on a board, I was taken with a little sleep. There came a party and said,

"halloa, who is here, it is time to go home," I said,

"by all means it is," one of them said, had I lost any thing, I said I had not, I recollected in a moment, I said I had, my watch was gone.

Q, You were not quite sober. - A. I was not, some man of the party went behind the booth, and said he found the watch.

- HODSON. I was at the fair, I am an officer, I spoke to Gregory and the prisoner, and desired them to go home, the prisoner said, that is my father, my partner woke Gregory, he told him to mind that he was not robbed, he said he believed not, the prisoner got off the platform, said

"I'll go to water," he went away; then the prosecutor said he lost his watch, I immediately pursued him, I saw him throw something away from his hand which glistened much, I directly made a spring and took hold of him, I said to my partner,

"get a candle and look under the show for the watch," he got a candle and the watch was picked up, I took him to the Poultry Compter. This is the watch, Groves found it in the place where I saw him throw it, I searched the prisoner, I found a pocket book with eighteen duplicates, one of which led to a watch claimed by another person.

JOHN GROVES . I am an officer, I was at Bartholomew fair, I saw Mr. Gregory laying on the boards, and going by one of the women said she thought that he had been robbed by the prisoner, I awoke him, Hudson, I, and my brother followed the prisoner.

GEORGE GROVES . I was with my brother and Hodson, I saw a soldier getting up with the chain in his hand, I took it from him and gave it to my brother, my brother gave it to Hodson.

Prisoner's Defence. That gentlemen was with me at the fair, he treated me with a glass of gin, we were both drunk, and both fell asleep. I have been nine years in his Majesty's service, and never was a thief.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110918-79

700. CASPART THOMAS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of August , a hearth rug, value 1 l. the property of John Woodard and James Morton .

JAMES MORTON . My partner's name is John Woodard , we are wholesale carpet dealers , No. 2, Holborn Bridge, the prisoner was our servant .

MR. MARTIN. I carry on business for Mr. Baxter, pawnbroker, Snow-hill, I know the prisoner, I have seen him several times. On the 28th of August he

pledged with me a hearth rug in the name of John Bond for one pound. I asked the prisoner where he came from, after hesitating, he at last told me from No. 2, Holborn Bridge, I then gave them information.

- DRINKWATER. I am a constable, I gave Mr. Morton that ticket of which there is a part on the carpet that corresponds, I received it of Branscomb, he found it in the prisoner's pocket book.

Q.(to Mr. Morton) Do you know the prisoner's hand writing. - A. Yes, perfectly, that is his handwriting, I received it of him. It is directed to Messrs. Woodard and Morton. (Read.) The humble petition of Caspart Thomas. - Honoured Gentlemen! your petitioner is desirous of expressing his heart-felt sorrow, and I acknowledge myself deserving of the worst punishment for the crime I have committed against so good a master. I still hope for mercy, but my thoughts distract me. Your petitioner humbly begs that you would look down on him with mercy. Consider a broken-hearted wife, I am sorry for what I have done. Oh let mercy prevail while you have it in your power, and let my wife share those blessings with me as the wife of an honest man. I have confessed all I know, and you promised me mercy which is in your power. You have done right in what you have done, to mercy's voice your petitioner trusts, while it is in your power let the cries of a mother, with a broken-hearted wife, prevail, and let the cries of brother and sister intercede for me, and I shall be in duty bound to pray for your wellfare.

CASPART THOMAS.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, called one witness who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110918-80

701 CHARLES PARSONS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of September , five scarfs, value 9 l. two manteliers, value 8 l. four hundred and thirty yards of ribbon, value 8 l. a bank note, value 2 l. and seven one-pound bank notes , the property of Thomas Hughes .

THOMAS HUGHES . I am a British lace manufacturer , at No. 23, Wood Street.

JOHN WIGGINS . I am a servant in the warehouse where this robbery was committed; about half past eleven I was alarmed by a noise of somebody breaking open of locks, I got out of bed and put some of my clothes on, I went to the window, I saw a glimmering light, and afterwards I saw two persons descending the stairs, I followed them, when I got to the bottom of the passage by the door, the men stopped, one of them said somebody was coming, they both made out of the door, one of them stopped at the corner of Maiden Lane and very near knocked me down, one of the men was close to me that came out of the house, he began to run, I followed him calling stop thief, to Falcon Square, and there two watchmen stopped him.

Q. Who was that man. - A. The prisoner.

Q. Are you sure that he is one that came out of the house. - A. I am sure that he is one that came out of the house, I never lost sight of him.

Q. Was any of the property found. - A. Yes, I was coming back to the house to put on my shoes and stockings, we found a bag containing the articles mentioned in the indictment, it was found in Maiden Lane where the man nearly knocked me down, I gave the bag to the constable of the night.

- I am a constable in Falcon Square. Near twelve o'clock the lad called stop thief, I catched the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing about it, they found no property about me, nor did any one see me throw any thing away, I was not near the house, no higher than Maiden Lane.

GUILTY , aged 45.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110918-81

702 WILLIAM WILSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of September , a deal board, value 4 s. the property of Thomas Hacker .

THOMAS HACKER . I am a timber merchant, my wharf is in St. Brides.

ABRAHAM CHESWELL. I am a constable. On Sunday morning, the 1st of September, about a quarter after two in the morning, I saw the prisoner come down the north side of Fleet Street, three doors below Shoe Lane, I said to him, my brave fellow, where are you bound to with this, he had a deal on his shoulder, ten feet three-inch deal, he replied to Bartholemew fair to Saunders, he said a strange man gave him the deal and a shilling to take it to Saunders, I took him and the deal to the watch-house.

MOSES OXLEY . On Monday morning when I came to the yard there were half a dozen deals missing off the pile, I went to the watch-house, I saw one of them that I missed.

Prisoner's Defence. I was intoxicated, I met a man, he offered me a shilling to carry the deal to Saunders, in Smithfield, I had not carried it far when I was stopped, I thought the man was behind me.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined Three Months in Newgate , and whipped in jail .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110918-82

703 ROBERT TAITE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of September , two lamps, value 4 s. the property of William Colderoy and Thomas Sims Colderoy .

JOHN MARKWELL . I was constable of the night. About half past two o'clock we were going along Bethlem Wall , and when we came up we saw the prisoner up the lamp post, he brought the lamp down, and laid it down by the side of the lamp post, he proceeded to the next, took that, hearing us he fell down, and the lamp broke to pieces, he ran away, we called stop thief, the watchman stopped him.

EDWAKD SAPSWORTH. I am a watchman, I heard the rattle spring, I saw the prisoner coming towards me, when he came up I collared him.

THOMAS SIMS COLDEROY . I am a lamp contractor, all the lamps on that spot are our property.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in liquor, and when I am in I am out of my reason, I can say nothing for myself that night.

The prisoner called four witnesses who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110918-83

704. JOHN PHENIX was indicted for feloniously

stealing, on the 12th of July , a mahogany table, value 1 l. the property of Thomas Dew .

THOMAS DEW . I am a cabinet maker , I live in the Curtain Road , On the 12th of July I met the prisoner with the table on his head.

Q. Where was the table before he took it. - A. Standing outside of the door, I asked the prisoner if he had bought the table, he said a gentleman in black gave it him, and ordered him to take it to No. 13. I am sure it is my table, I went to No. 13, they did not expect any thing of the kind.

ANN DEW . I am the wife of the last witness. On the 12th of July I was at home, I did not sell the table, and there was nobody there but me. It is a found table; it stood outside of the door, I did not see the prisoner take it.

Prisoner's Defence. On the 12th of July I was returning from Hoxton, a gentleman stood at that shop in black, he told me to take it to No. 13, I took it, and Mr. Dew stopped me.

GUILTY , aged 38.

Whipped in jail and discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110918-84

705 WILLIAM BOWLER and ELIZABETH TATTLEBY were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Hamblin , about the hour of twelve on the night of the 21st of July , and stealing therein a coat, value 10 s. a gown, value 10 s. two frocks, value 4 s. and a waistcoat, value 3 s. his property .

ROBERT HAMBLIN. I am a house keeper , I live in the parish of St. Dunstan's, Stepney .

Q. Was your house broken open in July last. - A. Yes, I lived in another house, and my property was locked up in that house, I had lived in it a twelvemonth, and meant to return there again. I lost a coat, gown, children's frocks, and a waistcoat piece.

WILLIAM HEWITT . I found these things at Mrs. Billing's, she keeps a clothes shop at Limehouse.

SARAH BILLING . Q. Where did you get that property that Hewitt took from you. - A. I bought it of the prisoners, they both came together as man and wife, I asked them if it was their own, they said yes. Bowler had the property, I paid him for the goods, the woman said she wanted a shirt for her husband.

Q. Did she say the other prisoner was her husband. - A. Yes, she bought a shirt for him, both talked about the bargain, they had a shirt, waistcoat, petticoat, and stockings, in exchange.

Q. They sold you these things. - A. Yes, and both joined in the sale.

Bowler's Defence. I am perfectly innocent.

Tattleby's Defence. I got up between four and five o'clock to go work, I saw the things by the side of the mill. On the Saturday morning I sold them to this woman, the man knew nothing of them until I shewed him them when he came home.

Tattleby called five witnesses, who gave her a good character.

BOWLER, GUILTY , aged 21.

TATTLEBY, GUILTY , aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18110918-85

706 MARY KING was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of September , a silver milk pot, value 2 l. a silver table spoon, value 9 s. two shawls value 6 s. and a dollar, the property of Edward Turner in his dwelling house .

ANN TURNER . I am the wife of Edward Turner, I live at 33, Hart Street, in the parish of St. Paul's, Covent Garden . My husband rents the whole house and lives in it.

Q. On the 12th of September, did you lose any property out of the house. - A. I did between twelve and one in the day, I lost a silver table spoon, a silver teaspoon, a silver milk pot, and two shawls. The prisoner lived with me as my servant, I hired her the day before, the dollar I gave her to go of an errand. I had seen the things in the morning.

Q. You sent her on an errand, did she return. - A. She returned with the pot of beer I sent her for, she absconded with the change of the dollar, and the articles I have mentioned between twelve and one, I did not see her until Monday when she was in custody.

MR. JONES. I am a pawnbroker, I produce the property, they were brought to my shop by a witness that is here, I stopped them, I have had them ever since.

ARTHUR HAYDON . I carried them things to the last witness. I received them of Mr. Perryman, in Compton Street, on Monday, they were never out of my custody, from the time I received them of Mr. Perryman untill I carried them to Mr. Jones.

DAVID PERRYMAN. On Thursday the 12th of September, I received them things of the prisoner at the bar, I have known the prisoner a long while, she has lately lost her husband.

Q. What time in the day did you receive them. - A. About the middle of the day, approaching to the afternoon, I took them in pledge, she said she pledged them for Anne Turner , 3, Hart Street, Covent Garden, I lent two guineas on it, I also took in two shawls, I advanced five shillings on them.

Q.(to Haydon). Did she ask you to redeem them for her. - A. Yes, she said she was distressed, that she had a duplicate, she would be obliged to me to take them out, she would redeem them in two or three days, I took the things out, there was a gentleman in company that partly advanced the money. Coming home I wanted money, I went to Mr. Perryman.

Q. She did not desire you to sell them, did she. - A. No.

Prisoner. I wanted him to keep them, and would redeem them in a day or two, he lent me a shilling.

Haydon. I have known her some time, I served her and her husband with porter.

Prosecutrix. That is my own milk pot, the spoons are mine, the table spoons are marked with my own initials, there is no mark on the milk pot, I used it the day before, I have had it a great while, the shawl is mine, there is a place torn in it with a nail.

Prisoner. Q.(to Prosecutrix.) Did not I return with the change of the pot of beer, and you sent me back because there was a halfpenny short. - A. You did, and you wished to go back because there was a halfpenny short.

Prisoner's Defence. I asked Mr. Haydon to redeem them, I meant to send them back in a few days.

GUILTY , DEATH , aged 42.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18110918-86

707 THOMAS LONG was indicted for feloniously

assaulting Walter Sly in the King's highway, on the first of September , putting him in fear, and taking from his person a watch, value 40 s. his property .

WALTER SLY. I live in St. John's Street, Clerkenwell . On the 1st of September I heard an alarm, I went out, I saw my lodger Thomas Fallen sadly beat, I went to raise him up, the prisoner struck me four or five blows on the head, he laid hold of me by the neck handkerchief, got me down, and pulled my watch out of my fob, and put it into his waistcoat pocket, I never saw my watch afterwards.

Prisoner. Had you not been challenging me to fight. - A. You asked me to fight, I told you I was not able.

Court. What countryman are you. - A. I am a Dublin man, and he came from Munster. There is an enmity fixed. I do not know how it is.

THOMAS WOOD . Q. What man are you. - A. I am an Irishman, I am a Westmead man, I saw Thomas Long lay hold of Walter Sly by the neck handkerchief, he got him down, and at the same time took the watch out of his pocket, I took the handkerchief off Sly's neck and rescued him. I do not know what he did with the watch, after Sly got in doors they played with brickbats after him.

NOT GUILTY ,

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18110918-87

708 JOHN CONNOR was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of July , in the dwelling-house of Maria Wood , widow, a pocket book, value 6 d. twelve one-pound bank notes, two five-pound promissary notes, a two-pound promissary note, a promissory note for one guinea, and four one-pound promissory notes , the property of Joseph Sweepstone .

JOSEPH SWEEPSTONE . I lost twenty-nine pounds. On the 27th of July I was at the Brown Bear, East Smithfield .

Q. Who keeps the house. - A. Maria Wood . I am a bricklayer , it was in the morning when I lost it, I missed it when I returned from breakfast about nine o'clock.

Q. What was it in. - A. In my pocket book, and my pocket book was in my coat pocket, I left my coat in the house in the back room on the ground floor.

Q. Did you sleep in that house. - A. No, I did not, I had seen my pocket book the night before, and the money in it.

Q. Have you ever seen your pocket book or money since. - A. Yes, on the same day he took it, about ten o'clock.

Q. Did you search him. - A. He was searched in my presence, part of a one-pound note was found upon him.

Q. Where was the pocket found. - A. I do not know.

Q. Had you any conversation with him about it when he was taken. - A. I asked him how he came to do it.

Q. Was there any promise made to him before you asked him that question. - A. Yes, before it was found there was.

Q. Had you known the prisoner. - A. About a week, or eight or nine days.

Q. Had you seen him at the Brown Bear on the morning of the 27th. - A. Yes, he went to work along with me about six o'clock in the morning.

Q. Did you see him at Mrs. Wood's. - A. Yes, at six o'clock, or soon after.

Q. Did you see him in that back room. - A. Yes, he was working with me there.

Q.You were then at work in that back room. - A. Yes.

Q. Did he go away with you, or did you leave him behind you there. - A. He went away with me.

Q. Were you ever out of the room. - A. Yes, I went to breakfast.

Q. Before you went to breakfast were you ever out of the room. - A. He went out with me but did not go with me to breakfast.

Q. Did he know of your having any of that money. - A. Not as I know of.

EDWARD SHAW . I kept an eating house, Butcher Row, East Smithfield.

Q. Do you know this house kept by Mrs. Wood. - A. I knew the house. The prisoner asked him for change of a one-pound note, I gave him change for it, I gave him three dollars and a half-crown, I had the note in my pocket before the magistrate, and kept it ever since.

SAMUEL MILLER . Maria Wood keeps the Brown Bear , she is a widow, in the parish of St. John, Wapping.

Q. She lives in the house does she. - A. She does. On the 27th of July Mr. Baston, a master bricklayer, came to we, I went with him to a shed, I was ordered to search that shed, the prisoner was not there then, and in a heap of lime that was slacked for mortar, I took a lath and turned it up, and found this pocket book, in it were these ten one-pound Bank of England notes, a Canterbury note of one guinea, two five-pound notes and all the rest are one-pound notes, amounting in all to 27 l. I then had a suspicion that the labourer had taken it, I went and took him in custody, I asked him how he came to take this man's money, he said he had a scold of a wife, the devil came over him, and that he had never done such a thing before.

Q. What time was it that you made this search. - A. About ten o'clock in the morning.

Q.(to prosecutor.) You say part of a note was found upon him. - A. No, a part of the property was found upon him.

Q. Who found any thing upon him. - A. Miller.

MILLER. I was going to search him, he pulled three dollars out of his pocket, two shillings and a penny farthing, he said he got them in change for one of the notes at the cook's shop, he said he had only changed one, there is one missing now, there is only twenty-eight instead of of twenty-nine.

Q.(to prosecutor.) Look at that pocket book do you know it, - A. Yes, it is my own.

Q. Can you read. - A. No, there are no marks on the notes by which I knew them, I can swear to the pocket book.

Q. Do you remember whether there were among your notes any of 5 l. - A. Yes, two, they were country notes.

Q. What were the rest. - A. I do not know.

Q. Were there any Bank of England notes among yours. - A. Yes. I do not know how many.

Q. You were at work at the shed where there was some lime. - A. I was at work at the Brown Bear ,

East Smithfield, I was plaistering, and the prisoner fetched a hod of mortar in the morning from the shed, he fetched no more, after breakfast I went to the shed to see whether the prisoner was there, he was not, coming back I saw him, he and I went into the back room of the Brown Bear , I asked him whether he saw me strip, he said no, I said I have lost 29 l. he said he knew nothing of it.

Prisoner's Defence. When I went from the shed with a hod of mortar I took the broom to clean up the taproom, and sweeping along I picked up this pocketbook, this man went to breakfast, I breakfasted in the public house, I kept the pocket book to find an owner for it, I took a one-pound note and changed it, I took to the value of one shilling and six-pence out of it, and meeting with a ship mate of mine he made me almost tipsy. When the gentleman came back I was rather groggy, he d - d the Irish b - rs, I told him I took one shilling and six-pence out of it.

Q.(to prosecutor.) Are you sure that when you told him your pocket book was lost, that he said he did not know any thing at all about it. - A. Yes.

GUILTY , DEATH , aged 36.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110918-88

709. WILLIAM WHITE was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Wilson , about the hour of twelve on the night of the 21st of July , and stealing therein, a warming pan, value 10 s. a fender, value 10 s. a candlestick, value 2 s. two tablecloths, value 4 s. a tea-cannister, value 4 s. three knives, value 1 s. and a pocket book, value 5 s. his property.

ELIZABETH WILSON . I am the wife of the prosecutor, my husband is abroad, I am the housekeeper, it is in the parish of St. Mary le Strand .

Q. You lost some property. - A. Yes, the house was broken open in the night, after I went to bed.

Q. When had you last seen this property the last time before it was stolen. - A. On the night, before I went to bed, and I saw it afterwards in the possession of the constable.

JOHN BRANDON . I was coming home from the watch-house about half past three o'clock in the morning, I saw two men coming by with a looking-glass, in a little time after I saw the prisoner coming with these things, the fender and the warming pan, I stopped him and took him to the watch-house. He said he met two men in the Strand, they asked him to carry them to the pump in Queen Street, they would give him three shillings for it, he meaned the two men that passed before.

Q. Did you know the two men that went before. - A. No, nor did I know the prisoner before.

Q. How soon after you stopped him did he say he was hired. - A. About ten minutes.

Q. Then the first ten minutes he gave no account. - A. No, after I searched him he told me, if I went as far as the pump in Queen Street I should find them, I went directly, and could not find them. I took these picklock keys out of his waistcoat pocket, and this phosphorus box I found upon him.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been drinking with some bakers, one of them said,

"White, I am rather in arrears with my rent," I said, worse luck, he said

"I am going to move my things, would I help them move the things," I said I would, not knowing that these were stolen goods in the least. They gave me them things, and the bundle came untied. I picked them up, and some I put in my pocket, and the others in the bundle.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18110918-89

710. JOHN PASS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of June , a hat, value 10 s. a key, value 1 s. and a pair of spectacles, value 5 s. the property of John Spybey .

JOHN SPYBEY . I live at No. 9, Broad Street, Bloomsbury , the prisoner is my apprentice . On the 7th of June last I went out of town, I left a bunch of keys for the use of Mrs. Spybey, in an open drawer in the back parlour, I was two or three weeks in the country, when I returned the prisoner was at home. In consequence of information that he was seen opening my money drawer at night when he was gone to bed. I called in the patrol and told the prisoner that I had suspicion that he had my keys, the patrol searched him in his pocket he found a key, that was one that I left on the bunch of keys in the drawer, this was on the 19th of July, I sent the prisoner to the watch-house, the spectacles were found upon the prisoner's mother at the office, I had lost them out of my desk. The mother's house was searched at Hoxton, we found a variety of things in her house, among which was this hat, it is a new hat, there is my private mark in it, that hat was kept in the shop in the glass case, I had seen it about a week before the 19th of July, the prisoner slept twice a week at his mother's.

JOHN ORAM . I searched the prisoner, I found this key in his pocket.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to his character.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18110918-90

711 ROBERT LINLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of August , a pair of breeches value 34 s. the property of John Dawson , and twelve skeins of twine, value 6 d. the property of Thomas Bates .

JAMES RICHARDS . I am a carman, on the 26th of August I was coming down Newton Street , a man asked me if I knew where the vessel started for Staffordshire, I told him yes, I went to a door with him, I turned round, and saw the prisoner with these two parcels, they are property that I had to carry to the wharf at Paddington, when the prisoner saw me coming up to him, he said he thought they belonged to the tall man that was going in doors with me.

Prisoner's Defence. I observed the nose bag laying down. I picked it up and threw it in the cart, he examined the cart, and found all right. I did not know any property was in the nose bag.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18110918-91

712 JANE JOHNSON and ANN ANGLE were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of August , four half crowns, a shilling, and sixpence, the property of John Read from his per son.

JOHN READ . I live in Fore-street, Gravel-lane. On Sunday, the 25th of August, about four o'clock, I lost four half crowns, a shilling and sixpence; I was at the Three Compasses.

Q. How long had you been there - A. I cannot say. I was with two or three acquaintances, they had a glass; I was taken ill; I went backwards and fell asleep. I cannot tell how long I had been there.

Q. Do you know who took the money away - A. I cannot say; I found Johnson's hand in my pocket; when I was in the privy, that awoke me.

Q. You do not know how long you had been there do you - A. I cannot say to half an hour; I was asleep when the two prisoners came into the privy.

Q. When had you perceived your money in your fob - A. A little before I went into the privy.

Q. Was the prisoners taken up - A. Not the same evening; I was not in a right trim to follow them at that time; I saw Johnson the same night; I charged her with robbing me of my money; she said she had not got any of it.

ELIZABETH ANN THOMPSON . I saw Angle's hand in the prosecutor's pocket, he was asleep then, and continued asleep until I went out of the yard. Johnson was at the bar.

Johnson's Defence. I was in the public-house when there was an alarm of a man sitting indecent in the privy; he was called out; he passed me at the bar, and said nothing; in the evening I was in the tap-room, he accused me of being one of them.

Angle's Defence. I am innocent. I was charing at this house; they were without a servant; he was asleep in the privy in an indecent manner.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18110918-92

713. FRANCES EMERSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of September , five yards and a quarter of printed cotton, value 8 s. and five yards and three quarters of callico, value 12 s. the property of Thomas Nells .

JOSEPH CHARLES . I live with Thomas Nells , 253, High Holborn . The prisoner was his servant maid . On the 10th of September, about seven in the morning, I came down stairs, I observed the prisoner going out of the shop with a bundle in her apron; I followed her into the kitchen, where I waited a quarter of an hour first, she put the bundle on the chair, and then into the table drawer, and then she went to take it up stairs; I insisted upon seeing what it was; she resisted; I took it from her by force, and saw five yards and a half of printed cotton, and five yards and three quarters of callico.

Prisoner's Defence. On the Monday evening Mr. Charles came into the kitchen, and behaved very rude, he said if I would let him have connexion with me he had put a piece of print in the shop for me on a shelf by itself. In the morning I resisted against him, I had got it in my apron, he tore it from me and swore I stole it. There was no person present but ourselves.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave her a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18110918-93

714. SARAH TAYLOR was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of August , a gown, value 5 s. the property of Christiana Davis ; and a handkerchief, value 1 s. the property of Cornelius Keefe .

CHRISTIANA DAVIS . I live in Aliffe-street ; I keep a house there.

Q. How long have you lived there - A. Not quite two months; I lived at Deptford before.

Q. Do you carry on any business now - A. No.

Q. Did you on the 3d of August lose any gown - A. Yes, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, I lost it from a trunk in the kitchen. The prisoner lived with me as a servant; she came on the Monday as she took the things on the Saturday. On the Saturday, between three and four o'clock, she went without my knowledge.

Q. Were you present at the time it was found - A. Yes. The handkerchief was round her neck; it is Cornelius Keefe's, he is my lodger.

Q. Has the prisoner been in the habit of being out of nights while in your service - A. No.

Prisoner. How can you say you never let me out of nights when you send your own daughter out with me - A. I never sent you out in the streets.

CORNELIUS KEEFE. I am a painter and glazier, I lodge with Mrs. Davis. On the 3d of August last I lost a handkerchief, it was taken out of my trunk. My trunk was in the room where I slept.

Prisoner. You know very well that it is a house of ill-fame; you live along with that woman, and bed with her.

JOHN FORRESTER . The prisoner was delivered in to my custody; I took the gown from her.

Q. Did she say any thing how she came by the things - A. The same account that she gave you that her mistress consented to her wearing them.

Q. Do you know this house of Mrs. Davis's - A. Yes; it was a bad house before she took it; the house was indicted; they were obliged to leave it about a week before Mrs. Davis took it.

Prisoner's Defence. I am an unfortunate girl. I called there on the Monday between six and seven o'clock; Mr. Keefe is the man that wished me to stop till the return of Mrs. Davis; when she came in I enquired for the persons that were gone away; she said I have taken the house for the same description; she had paid thirty-five pounds for the good will; she said, as they have taken all the girls away, if I would stop with her I should have food, and plenty of raiment. On Tuesday I received company; on the following evening I was dressed and attired, and her daughter with me. On the Saturday I put on the daughter's gown in the evening I went out, it was not my esual hours to return home; Mrs. Davis followed me to the Turk's Head with her nephew; she asked for money; I said I cannot rob gentlemen for money; she said money she would have. She told the constable of the night that I had her things on, and she would bring the man forward; he would swear to the handkerchief. This man is no lodger, he is in the house to insult gentlemen if they lose their money or pocket books, that is his character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18110918-94

715. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of August , three silver spoons, value 5 s. the property of Philip Monoux Lucas .

MARY BUCKLAND . I am in the service of the prosecutor. He is a merchant , 23, Compton-street . On the 24th of August, about half after eight in the morning, I saw the prisoner come out of the parlour; I asked him what business he had there; he asked me if the captain was at home; I told him he did not want the captain; he then ran away; he was pursued; he threw the spoons away before he was taken. These are the spoons, they are my masters.

Prisoner's Defence. I was passing Mr. Lucas's house, and seeing the servant in the passage, I enquired if she knew captain Simmons; I found she did not, and when I was passing the street I heard the cry of stop thief, I was stopped and secured.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18110918-95

716. MARY SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of August , a shawl, value 2 s. 6 d. the property of Samuel Richards , John Richards , and John Needs .

WILLIAM HARRISON . I am shopman to Samuel Richards , John Richards , and John Needs , they are pawnbrokers in Brick-lane, Spitalfields . On the 17th of August I looked out a shawl, intending to hang it out for sale; about nine o'clock I was going to hang it up, I missed it. About eleven o'clock I saw it again in the possession of Robert Drake .

ROBERT DRAKE . I am a pawnbroker, 83, Whitechapel. On the 17th of August, about eleven o'clock the prisoner offered this shawl to pledge; I asked her who she had it of; she said a young woman in Winfield-street. I opened it, and there was the mark of Richards and Needs upon it.

Harrison. The shawl is my own marking, it laid on the counter. I did not see the prisoner come in.

Prisoner's Defence. I went into Mr. Richards's to pledge a pair of shoes. I picked it up by the counter.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18110918-96

717. PHILIP CRANE was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Philip Castang , about the hour of two, on the night of the 28th of June , and stealing therein, ten pigeons, value 15 s. and three ducks, value 6 s. his property.

PHILIP CASTANG . I live in the Hampstead-road, St. Pancras . I rent the house and keep an aviary there.

Q. On the 28th of June did you lose any pigeons and ducks - A. On the 29th in the morning, a little after two, I was called by the watchman; when I came down I found the shop shutters were down, and the sash window was thrown up. On searching about there were five baskets taken out, they were in a little enclosed place next to the front of the street, they had a pair of pigeons each, all the five were gone. On coming into the shop again I discovered a basket too large to go out of the window, that basket was cut and the three ducks that were alive in the basket taken away. I came in at eleven at night, and found the shop shut up in the usual way. I did not examine the windows.

Q. Do you know whether the sash was down or not - A. I should rather suppose that it was not, on account of the heat of the weather. I did not see that any force had been used. The pin was found the same morning in the middle of the street.

Q. Can you take upon you to say that the window shutters were up - A. Yes, I am certain of that.

Q. If they were not pinned it is possible that the shutters might be pulled out - A. They were rather loose; I might myself, by moving the shutters, take one out; I know I could. I saw the pigeons afterwards; the ducks were killed, part of the pigeons were alive.

Q. How many were recovered - A. I think five, they were alive; they were here last sessions. I have sold them. I knew them and the ducks to be my own; I saw them on the 29th, between five and six. I valued the ducks at two shillings each, and the pigeons fifteen pence each.

Mr. Gurney. The two persons that you took with the things you prosecuted last sessions - A. I did.

JOHN CLARK . I am a constable of St. Pancras.

Q. Did you find the ducks and pigeons - A. I did; the other two prisoners had put them into a hole in the field, there were three together, the prisoner was one of them. I had watched them above half an hour, sometimes one was carrying the bundle, and sometime the other. I saw them carry the bundle between the three, before they went to the hole.

Q. Did the prisoner ever carry it - A. Yes, it was in his possession when I first saw the bundle, and one of the pigeons was in his hand. When I came up close to him at the time, the pigeon was in his hand, the bundle was in the hole. I went up to him at the hole, and passed him, I asked him what he was going to do with it, he said he was going to toss it; Norton catched it out of the prisoner's hand, and put it into his pocket, and said, we will not toss it now; the prisoner said, what use is it bringing the pigeon here without tossing it. I looked at the bundle in the hole, and the moment I saw it, I catched hold of Norton and Walmsley, the prisoner ran off immediately. One of the prisoners that I had got hold of twisted himself from my left hand, and got away. Gates the watchman secured him.

Q. How soon did you see the prisoner after that - A. I did not see him until he was in custody at Bow-street. I think about a fortnight ago from this time.

Q. Had you ever known the prisoner before - A. No.

Q. What time in the morning was this - A. About four o'clock, on the 29th of June.

Q. Had you sufficient opportunity of viewing the prisoner's person, so as to be able to speak with certainty at the distance of two months - A. I had. He was the first man that I looked at. I took some

pigeons from the other prisoners, and the watchman searched Norton's pocket, and found others.

Q. Did you find the ducks in the hole - A. Yes, and pigeons, they were shewn to Mr. Castang; he described the ducks before the handkerchief was opened. The pigeons were all alive, there were only five.

ROBERT GATES . I am a watchman.

Q. Did you see the prisoner on the morning of the 29th - A. I did, I saw him about a quarter after after four, there were two more with him, Norton and Walmsley, I saw them in the fields at the back of Gower-street, I perceived one of them with a bundle, I was about one hundred and fifty, or two hundred yards from them. They were coming from the New-road along to St. Giles's.

Q. Were they coming in a direction as if coming from Mr. Castang's house - A. Yes, by coming round the fields to prevent them coming along the streets, as little as they could help, they continued in my sight about a quarter of an hour, they stopped by themselves just before they got to Keppel-street; I was then one hundred and fifty or two hundred yards from them; they stopped there; I pulled off my coat, and put it into the watch-box; I went one way, and the constable the other before. Before I came up the constable had collared one; Crane made a catch at the bundle; Walmsley twisted out of the Constable's hand, and came past me; he was nearest me; I was pursuing him. Crane said, here you b - r, come and catch me if you can. I pursued Walmsley and took him.

Q. Did you know Crane before - A. I had seen him about Somerstown and Pancras a great many times. His father keeps a green grocer's shop just below the Britannia in Campden Town, he lived with his father.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of it.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY, aged 19.

Of stealing only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18110918-97

718. THOMAS WHEATLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of July , a watch, value 5 l. a watch ribbon, value 2 d. and a watch key, value 3 d. the property of William Simpole , from his person .

- . I am a patrol of St. Giles's, Cripplegate Without. On the 14th of July, about half past twelve at night, Mr. William Simpole came up to me at the corner of Beech-street , and said, I have lost my watch, he pointed across the way to some persons, among which the prisoner was one; I crossed the way; I tapped the prisoner on the shoulder, I said you have robbed this man of his watch, directly the prisoner dropped a watch from his right hand, with the fall the case flew off. I laid hold of the prisoner, and with stooping to pick the watch up, the prisoner run away. I picked up the case, pursued the prisoner a few yards, and took him. I am sure he is the man that dropped the watch, he was never out of my sight. I took the prisoner to the watchhouse, Mr. Simpole accompanied me. Mr Simpole claimed the watch, and gave charge of the prisoner. Mr. Simpole is not present in court, I have not seen him since last Tuesday morning. I have been to his house twice a-day, except to day.

WILLIAM SIMPOLE was called upon his recognizance.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18110918-98

719. JOHN DANIELS was indicted for that he, on the 7th of August , was servant to Charles Richard Constantine Gould , and was employed and entrusted by him to receive monies and valuable securities, for and on his account, and being such servant so employed and entrusted, did receive and take into his possession, one shilling, two three shilling bank tokens, and a one pound bank note, and that he afterwards feloniously did embezzle, secrete and steal the same .

CHARLES RICHARD CONSTANTINE GOULD . I am a hatter on Ludgate-hill. I have no partner's. The prisoner has been in my employ in my shop.

Q. Has he been entrusted in your shop to receive money; goods, and valuable securities - A. Yes. I employed John Ditcham to come and buy a hat on the 7th of August, I saw a note marked, and the coin was marked B, a shilling, a one pound note, and two bank tokens.

Mr. Knapp. You have told my friend that you have no partner - A. No, my father is dead, there are executors, but they are not acting; there are persons interested in the trade, by the will, the profits of the trade is left to be divided among all the children.

Q. Then the profits at that time the property was stolen was part yours, and part of the family - A. Eight altogether share in the profits of this business. I am the only acting person in the business.

COURT. Are there any of your brothers or sisters that are of age, and are acting in the business - A. Two sisters, they are of age, and they serve in the shop. My mother has not administered to the will, she has no interest.

JOHN DITCHAM . On the 7th of August did you go to Mr. Gould's to buy a hat in consequence of Mr. Gould's request - A. I did. I saw the prisoner in the shop, I purchased a hat of him for twenty-seven shillings; I paid him a one pound bank note, two three shilling bank tokens, and a shilling; I had previously marked them. I paid these to the prisoner in the afternoon.

Mr. Alley. You are not at all connected in the business - A. No. Mr. Gould asked me to go and purchase a hat to detect the prisoner, whom he suspected. I went at his request.

Q. It was his money that you went with - A. No. I expected the money to be returned to me.

Mr. Gurney, Q. to Mr. Gould. It appears in the afternoon of the 7th Mr. Ditcham came and purchased this hat - A. Yes.

Q. Did the prisoner account to you for the money

that he received fore that hat - A He did not. I caused him to be apprehended on the 8th of August; on that day I saw him in the shop; he never did account for that hat.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18110918-99

720. THOMAS ENGLISH was indicted for that he, in and upon John Edward Bennett , a subject of our Lord the King, feloniously, maliciously and unlawfully did make an assault, and with a certain razor, did cut the said John Edward Bennett in and upon his nose and left eyelid, with intent in so doing to kill and murder him .

SECOND COUNT, for like offence, with intention to disable him.

THIRD COUNT, to do him some grieveous bodily harm.

JOHN EDWARD BENNETT . I am a baker , I live at 73, Minories . The prisoner came into my shop and stole a small loaf.

Q. Did you see him take any part of your property - A. No, I heard my wife say, master you shall not have that loaf, and seeing her run out of the door's I followed her, and laid hold of the prisoner and threw him down on the pavement; the prisoner struggled and turned upon his back; the loaf fell from him. I took the prisoner by the collar, he then struck me with some sharp instrument as he laid upon his back; he cut me through my left eyelid, and across my nose; it did not touch the ball of my eye at all. I still continued my hold, untill a person came up and took him. This was on the 17th of September, near nine at night.

ELIZABETH BENNETT . I am the wife of the former witness; I saw the prisoner come into the shop and take a loaf from the window, he immediately ran out. I said he should not have it. I followed him, and my husband followed in consequence of what I said; I returned in again. I am quite sure he is the man, I have seen him before.

WILLIAM BENGOFF . I am a hackney coachman.

Q. Were you in the street when Mr. Bennett went after the man - A. I was in the rank, and saw two men scuffling in the street, I thought they were two hackney coachmen skylarking together; Mr. Bennett was uppermost. I heard Mr. Bennett call out murder Mr. Shuttleworth, I saw his face bleeding, I picked up the razor it laid close against the prisoner, and the loaf of bread by the side of him. I delivered the razor to Mr. Shuttleworth, the landlord of the watering house.

JOSHUA GRAY . I am a constable, I was on the opposite side of the Minories, I ran over; Mr. Bennet was gone to the doctor's. I took the prisoner in custody, and when I got to the Compter the razor was delivered to me by Mr. Alder; there was blood on it then, and there is now. I know the prisoner, he was in the habit of coming to the Mansion-house, he appeared to be a man not in his right mind he came with papers to the Mansion-house to have them copied. I took them to an interpreter in Birchin-lane; they were all nonsense; that was six months before this transaction took place, he appeared decent then; I have seen him several times at the Mansion-house.

JAMES ALDER . I keep a porkshop in the Minories, I helped to convey the prisoner to the Compter. Mr. Shuttleworth delivered the razor to my young man to bring it to me; this is the same razor that I delivered to the constable.

MR. SHUTTLEWORTH. Mr. Bennett called to me, I went, and saw him wounded. Bengoff delivered the razor to me.

FRANCIS HOBLER . Q. You are the clerk at the Mansion-house - A. I am.

Q. Bray has mentioned that this man came frequently to the Mansion-house - A. I have seen him frequently there. The man came creditably dressed, with a parcel of papers, they were in the shape of bills of exchange, being a foreigner I thought he was imposed upon; they had Sir Francis Burdett and liberty upon them. I have got them interpreted, and they were perfectly nonsense. I thought him an inoffensive man; he came several times after that, and then became more and more poor.

NOT GUILTY,

Believing him to be insane at the time of committing the offence .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18110918-100

721. JOHN BEADLE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 10th of August , a bushel and a half of oats, value 5 s. the property of John Isaac ; and JOHN KELLY for feloniously receiving on the same day, the said goods, he knowing them to have been stolen .

JOHN ISAAC . I live at Tottenham, I am a coach master . Beadle was my horse-keeper , Kelly deals in rags and iron , he lives in the Kingsland-road. In consequence of information I employed the officer Spencer to watch my premises.

JOHN SPENCER . On the 10th of August I watched Mr. Isaac's premises at the Roebuck, Tottenham . I watched the loft where the corn was kept; about four in the afternoon I saw Kelly's boy come into the yard with the cart; I knew the boy and the cart, it was Kelly's cart. He drew the cart under Mr. Isaac's shed, in the yard of the Roebuck; presently afterwards I saw Kelly come; Kelly made a place in the front of the cart, he cleared the front of the cart which was then covered with rags and iron. In the course of five minutes I saw Beadle come with these oats that I have in the sack here; he come out of Mr. Isaac's stable adjoining the shed, with a sack which I afterwards found containing oats. He put it into the cart; Kelly was by at the time, he stood at the hind part of the cart with his back towards me; I was concealed.

Q. Did you see whether any payment was made - A. No, I did not. After the oats were delivered in the cart, the cart was immediately drawn out of the yard; the sack was left in the front of the cart as it was put. I saw Kelly cover the sack with the rags and iron, and Beadle stood by the cart.

Q. Did the cart go out of the yard - A. Yes, a few yards from the Roebuck. I stopped Kelly and the cart; I told Kelly he was my prisoner, he asked me what for, I told him for receiving the corn belonging to John Isaac as I supposed it to be; he said he did not know that there was any corn in the cart

belonging to any body; I secured him, I examined the cart, there was no more than a bushel of oats. I apprehended Beadle as he was on the premises doing his work two or three hours afterwards; Beadle was by when I took the oats out of the cart; he heard what I charged Kelly with; Mr. Isaacs ordered me to take Beadle into custody; I charged him with giving this man the corn; he said there was nothing amiss, there was nothing broke.

Q. to prosecutor. Does any person keep oats in the stable besides yourself - A. No.

Q. What was the worth of this bushel and a half of oats - A. Five shillings.

Beadle said nothing in his defence.

BEADLE - GUILTY , aged 54.

Fined 1 s. and Whipped One Hundred Yards near to the Roebuck public-house, Tottenham .

KELLY - NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18110918-101

722. MAGNUS BRUSH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of August in the dwelling-house of Francis Freeman, six one pound promissory notes, and two one pound bank notes , the property of Philip Collins .

PHILIP COLLINS . I am a slop-merchant at Portsmouth; I lodged at Francis Freeman 's public-house one night; I was going off with the coach the next morning.

Q. Did you lose any money there - A. Yes, eight pounds; six one pound Portsmouth notes, and two one pound bank of England notes.

Q. When was the last time that you saw them - A. When I was sitting on my bedside, going to bed, about half past eleven; I put my pantaloons under my pillow; the notes were in the pantaloons pocket; I missed them in the morning when the coachman came to tell me the coach was ready. That might be a quarter after five.

ISAAC SPURRIER . On the 18th of August last, about half past six in the morning, I was sent for into St. Martin's lane, at the Northumberland's Head; in consequence of information I went and searched the prisoner, he was a lodger there, he had been there about fortnight; I went in the room with the landlord, I told the prisoner a gentleman had lost some notes in the course of the night; I asked him if he knew any thing of the notes; he said no; I told him suspicion fell upon him; I searched his nankeen pantaloons, and as he came off the bed he kept his shirt sideway; I saw him keep his shirt in his hand, up against his groin; I pulled his drawers off, I said, now you shall stand up; he stood up, and there was a bundle of papers fell from his privates, the landlord picked them up. The notes are here, they have been in my possession ever since.

Prosecutor. That note was mine, it was marked 308 on the back, it is a one pound Portsmouth note. The six one pound Portsmouth notes, and the two one pound bank notes, are all here, they are the exact quantity that I lost.

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutor was sitting in the room drinking with me, he had his papers out, and I had my money out at the time he was sitting in the room, and as to his money, I know nothing about it.

Prosecutor. I came into the room where he was, and spoke to a gentleman, and left him there; I was not in his company.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 34.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18110918-102

723. JAMES CAVENAUGH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of August , a pair of shoes, value 6 s. the property of John Sutton , and John Barker .

JOHN BARKER . I keep a shoe-warehouse opposite St. Giles's church, I am in partnership with John Sutton ; the prisoner was our journeyman . On the 5th of August, between eight and nine in the morning, when I had given him a sufficient quantity, I desired him to turn his bag out, and in the bag there was a pair of country made shoes, he said he had bought them on the Saturday evening at his own home.

Q. And he came to your shop with the shoes in his bag - A. Yes. There is a possibility he might have bought them, as we serve other shops.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18110918-103

724. HENRY JAMES VANDERBERG was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of August , an iron poker, value 6 d. a pair of iron tongs, value 1 s. a looking glass, value 10 s. and a green curtain, value 6 d. the property of Joseph Boltwood . And

TWO OTHER COUNTS for stealing like goods, laying them to be the property of other persons.

ANN BOLTWOOD . I have the care of the Gravel-pit chapel, in the parish of Hackney , I and my husband live in a room above the Vestry. On the night of the 7th of August, between eleven and twelve, when I went to bed, the chapel was secured. A little before five in the morning I was disturbed by a door slamming, I got up and found the prisoner in custody of Mr. Shubirt and two of his apprentices.

Q. In the chapel did you find any of the things removed from where they ought to be - A. Yes, I saw them the night before in their places, the looking glass standing over the chimney, the fire irons in the fire place in the Vestry. I found them in a pew in the meeting.

Q. Does your husband live there with you - A. Yes.

Q. Did you find any of the windows were broken open - A. A shutter was broken open, and a square of glass was broken. I had fastened the window on the Sunday night myself, and it remained shut till the Thursday morning.

JEREMIAH SHUBIRT . I live about one hundred and thirty yards from the chapel. On the morning of the 8th of August, a little after four I called up my apprentices, I went with them to to this chapel, I found one of the shutters open, I entered the meeting door, we saw the prisoner coming up the aisle; we found the door open, and went inside, the prisoner was coming up the aisle

as we went down I apprehended him.

Q. Did you find any marks of violence - A. I did, there was marks of a crow on the door of the vestry, and at the window, we found the crow about twenty yards from the place, and the crow fitted the marks exactly; I saw the prisoner jump in the window like a bird. This is the glass that was in the vestry, and these are the fire irons.

Prisoner's Defence. I got up early that morning, and was going towards Bow, and going across the fields it rained very hard; I went up to this meeting-house-door for shelter, seeing the window open I looked in my hat fell off; I instantly jumped in. Mr. Shubirt met me, and asked me what business I had there; I said I had no business, if you think me a thief, send for a constable and search me; I was searched, and no property found; I have nails in my shoes, and jumping in the window to get my hat, my foot slipped, and by that means my elbow broke one of the windows.

Q. to Mr. Shubirt. Did it rain hard - A. It rained a little.

GUILTY , aged 36.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18110918-104

725. MARY EWEN and ELIZABETH JANE STREET were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of August , a gold chain, value 1 l. a gold broach, value 10 s. a diamond ring, value 1 l. a plated ink-stand, value 10 s. a silver teaspoon, value 2 s. a silver salt-spoon, value 18 d. a dress, value 2 l. a tippet, value 3 s. and a pair of shoes, value 5 s. the property of Elizabeth Bonnywell , in her dwelling-house .

The prosecutrix and witnesses were called, and not appearing in court, the prisoners were

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18110918-105

726. ELIZABETH MARSHALL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of September , a shawl, value 56 s. the property of Robert Robson , privately in his shop .

The prosecutor was called, and not appearing in court, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18110918-106

727. SARAH ROBERTS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of July , two watches, value 35 s. and six silver tea-spoons, value 24 s. the property of John Edwards , in his dwelling-house

The prosecutor and witnesses were called, and not appearing in court, their recognizances were ordered to be estreated, and the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18110918-107

728. HARRIET SAMPSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of September , in the dwelling-house of John Lewis , a silk purse, value 1 s. a dollar, a seven shilling piece, five shillings, and two one pound notes , the property of Ann Nash , spinster .

The prosecutrix and witnesses were called, and not appearing in court, their recognizances were ordered to be estreated, and the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18110918-108

729. ELEANOR HARRIS and ELIZABETH DANCER were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of September , from the person of Samuel Marlow , a pocket book, value 2 s. a silver pencil case, value 2 s. and five one pound bank notes , his property.

SAMUEL MARLOW . I am a painter and glazier ; I live at No. 75, Mount-street, Grosvenor-square.

Q. You lost a pocket-book with bank notes in it - A. Yes, on last week; I cannot say what time it was, I was asleep at the Ship public-house in James-street, Covent Garden .

Q. Had you been in company with the prisoner - A. I had not; I saw them in the same room before I went to sleep; during the time I was in the room I gave the landlord a pound note to take the reckoning; I saw the pocket book and the notes safe. Nothing has been found but my indentures, they were found in the street. They had been in my pocket book.

ANN SIMPSON was called, and not appearing in court, her recognizance was ordered to be estreated.

CHARLES HUMPHREYS . I apprehended the prisoner, I searched him, and found nothing upon him.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18110918-109

730. THOMAS ALEXANDER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of September , a pair of breeches, value 9 s. the property of Jacob Levy .

MATILDA LEVY . I am the wife of Jacob Levy ; we live in Bell-court, Grays-Inn-lane , I keep a clothes shop. On the 10th of September, about ten in the morning, I hung the clothes up; I saw the prisoner come out of the Blackmore public-house, in Beacham-street, I challenged him with having taken the breeches; he said he had not got them, he would pay for them; I said I would not take any money, I wanted my breeches; I went for the constable myself; the breeches were never found again, they were a light kerseymere.

SARAH FOTHERGILL . I live in Bell-court, No. 15.

Q. Did you see the prisoner that day - A. Yes, I saw the prisoner come from Mrs. Levy's window with the breeches in his hand; he clapped the breeches in his apron, and went into Brooks's market; I did not see him take them; I saw him bring them from Mrs. Levy's window. I am sure the prisoner is the person. I saw him again at Hatton Garden the same day.

ROBERT STANTON . I am an officer of Hatton Garden. I apprehended the prisoner on the 10th of this month, in the middle of the day; I searched him, I found no property about him; he said he would give the value of the breeches if they would let him go; Mrs. Levy refused, she said she might be robbed again.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him

a good character.

GUILTY , aged 45.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and find 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18110918-110

729. CHARLES PETER WHITTAKER was indicted for that he, and Edward Gibson , on the 13st of January , in fifty-first Year of his Majesty's Reign, and six months had before been merchants, and traded under the firm of Gibson, Whittaker and Company, and that they became indebted to Samuel Joseph , Simeon Joseph , Joseph Joseph , and Aaron Joseph ; in the sum of two hundred pounds and upwards, and that they on the said 31st of January, became bankrupts, within the true meaning of the Statue; that afterwards they were summoned to appear on the 11th of May, and on the 18th of May; and that notice was published in the London Gazette, that the commissioners did meet on the 11th of May, and on the 18th of May; and on the 13th of June. That on the 15th of June, John Charles Peter Whittaker appeared, and stated that he was not prepared; whereupon the commissioners adjurned the meeting to the 17th of June; and that on the 17th of June, that he, the said Charles Peter Whittaker did not then surrender himself to be examined upon oath .

The case was stated by Mr. Gurney.

JOSEPH SCOTT . Q. You formerly were clerk to the prisoner - A. Yes, his partner's name was Edward Gibson their accompting house was in Great St. Helens chambers, in the City of London. They carried on the mercantile business of linens, stockings, dimities and muslins, by buying and selling.

Q. Do you recollect at any time receiving any directions from Mr. Gibson your master - Do you recollect Mr. Gibson absenting himself - A. I do. In the month of January last, previous to his going away he said, if any of my creditors should come, to say he was gone into the country a few days, but he should soon return. He told me he was going to the Cecil Coffee-house , in the Strand.

Q. During the absence of Mr. Gibson did any person call - A. Yes, Mr. Berry and Mr. Mellow.

Q. Do you know in point of fact, whether these gentlemen were creditors to this firm - A. I did, they asked for Mr. Gibson; I informed them that he was gone into the country, but would soon return. On the same day I was going to the Cecil Coffee-house I met Mr. Gibson in the street, I gave him one or two letters and informed him of these gentlemen calling; he told me that he should dine at the coffee-house that day, and sleep at some other place.

Q. Do you know whether Mr. Gibson and the prisoner were indebted to Joseph and Company - A. I do, I believe that is the right amount; one bill five hundred and thirty eight pounds three shillings and eight-pence, and the other five hundred and thirty eight pounds three shillings and four-pence. These bills are for dimities and muslins.

CHRISTOPHER MORRIS . Q. I believe you are one of the turnkeys of the King's Bench Prison - A. Yes, I recollect the prisoner being in the prison, the clerk is here with the books.

MORELAND BRUSHAW. Q. You are the clerk to the Marshall of the King's Bench - A. Yes, I have the commitment, it appears that he came in on the 5th of February 1811; he continued in custody up to the 15th of June, and then he was discharged; I recollect his person, he was upon four or five different actions.

- MORRIS. Q. You are one of the turnkeys of this prison - A. Yes, I recollect the person of prisoner, he was in custody for the length of time stated by the last witness.

MR. CHURCH. Q. Have you the affidavit of the petitioning creditors - A. Yes, wherein Messrs. Josephs maketh oath, that Mr. Gibson and Charles Peter Whittaker , of Great St. Helens, carrying on trade there, are justly indebted to Samuel Joseph , Simeon Joseph , Joseph Joseph , and Aaron Joseph ; in the sum of two hundred pounds and upwards, and that they are become bankrupts, within the true meaning of the statute; sworn in the Office of Chancery, 1st of May 1811, before me, Charles Thompson .

MR. HEWETT. Q. Are you the clerk to Messrs. Josephs - A. Yes, there names are Samuel Joseph , Simeon Joseph , Joseph Joseph , and Aaron Joseph .

JAMES TOMKINS . Q. What is the date of the commission - A. Second of May, fifty-first Year of his Majesty's Reign; the Commissions are John Nares , Edward Christian , Robert Capper , Francis Veesey .

Q.You conducted this business - A. I did, they are my minutes and my hand writing.

Q. On the 2d of May did Mr. Nare and Mr. Veesey meet - A. They did, I have the memorial that they signed.

Q. That is there declaration of the prisoner being a bankrupt - A. Yes.

Q. Have you any adjucation of their being bankrupts - A. I have the gazette from April the 30th, to May the 4th; and from the 3d, to the 15th of June.

"Whereas a commission of bankruptcy is awarded, date, the 11th of May instant; the 15th of June next, they are required to meet then and finish the examination."

Q. On the 11th of May was the first meeting, did the commissioners meet - A. Yes, Mr. Nares, Mr. Christian and Mr. Veesey.

Q. On the 18th of May, did the commissioners then meet again - A. They did, and on the 15th of June the commissioners met again, on that day Mr. Gibson surrendered and passed his commission. Mr. Whittaker was brought from the King's-bench on purpose to be examined; he was not brought till a late hour, there was no blame to him, it was the mistake of the officer, he did come and declare that he was not prepared, he requested untill the Wednesday following: From information of his absenting, the commissioners did not think proper to give him till Wednesday, they gave him till Monday, and then if they found it necessary, they would give him further time. Mr. Christian stated to the prisoner, that if he did not appear that day and surrender to his commission, he would commit an act of felony, and suffer death without the benefit of Clergy, although he did not receive a shillings of his property. On Monday the 17th of June, they met in consequence of that adjournment. The prisoner did not then appear; the commissioners waited in attendence; I remained part of the time, and the messengers the other time; a little before twelve he was proclaimed. I was present, he was summonsed in the

usual way, on the steps at Guildhall, as the clock was striking twelve.

Q. Now you tell us on the Saturday he requested an adjournment did you make any appointment with him to assist him in prison in adjusting his occompts - A. I did, he appointed Sunday at six o'clock at the King's Bench prison, I was to carry all the books and papers that he had previously selected; I took the books and papers at the time appointed, and when I came to the gate they informed me the prisoner was gone.

JOHN BINNING . Q. You are a messenger to bankruptcy's - A. I am. I was messenger to this commission.

Q. Did you give notice to the prisoner of the issuing of this commission - A. I did, on the 15th of June, I gave him a copy of that notice, it is signed by the commissioners; I had given him no earlier notice.

Q. Had you seen him before that time so as to give him any notice at all - A. I think I had, but I am not positive.

Q. Had your assistant served any notice to the prisoner - A. I think not.

JAMES FARMER . Q. Had you served any notice to the prisoner - A. I had not.

Mr. Gurney. Then certainly that is not the forty-second day.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18110918-111

732. JOHN BENNETT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 31st of August , two pair of sheets, value 2 s. the property of John Carroll .

The prosecutor was called and not appearing in court, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18110918-112

733. JOHN BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of September , a handkerchief, value 3 s. the property of John Taite , from his person .

JOHN TAITE . On Wednesday the 11th of September, about half past eight in the evening, I was going along the Strand , I had my pocket picked of a silk handkerchief; I perceived it at the time; I took the prisoner, I saw him in the act of conveying it away to another; I saw his hand come from my pocket, and he held his hand out to another person; I did not see the handkerchief, I am confident he had it; I had seen the handkerchief two minutes before; he gave a something to the other man; I could not see what it was.

Mr. Alley. This was at half after eight in the evening - A. Yes.

Q. It must be dark, and at the time that a great many girls were running about the street - A. Yes.

Q. You swear to his giving it away to another, you did not see it - A. I was convinced that he had taken my property.

Q. Did you never feel a man's hand but against your pocket - A. Many times.

Q. You would not like to be prosecuted for that - A. No, I should not,

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel, called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18110918-113

734. ABRAHAM LEVY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of August , a pocketbook, value 2 s. the property of a person to the jurors unknown.

CHARLES HUMPHREYS . I am an officer. On the 29th of August I was at Hackney , there were thousands of people there, Mr. Sadler went up in the balloon, I saw the prisoner there in company with a dozen more; I knew some of them; I saw them in the act of hustling a gentleman; I was close behind them watching them, I saw the prisoner take something from the gentleman's coat pocket and directly as he did that he gave them a signal to follow him, and put what he took out of the gentleman's pocket, under his coat; I laid hold of him, and directly I laid hold of him he dropped it; a gentleman close by me stooped down, picked it up, and gave it into my hand; I have had it in my possession ever since. I secured the prisoner with the assistance of a gentleman that came up who had been robbed of his watch, and asked me if I had got it.

Q.Does that pocket-book contain any thing - A. Yes, a passport from America. Thomas Bradshaw is wrote on the pocket book; I advertised it, and I went to the alien office. and enquired if he had been there; I could not find him out. At the time that I had got hold of the prisoner by the collar; I was attacked by those about him; I received a violent blow in my mouth; he endeavoured to get away from me. I had enough to do to secure the prisoner, I could not get at the prosecutor.

Prisoner's Defence. It is all stories every word what he has said at Bow-street, he gave in two different statements.

COURT. I have looked at the depositions, they would not help the prisoner.

The prisoner called five witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18110918-114

735. ANN HELY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of August , a watch, value 1 l. and a seal, value 1 l. the property of Abraham Bains , from his person .

ABRAHAM BAINS . I live at No. 1, St. Paul's church-yard.

Q. Where did you lose your watch - A. In Lincoln's Inn fields, on the 6th of August, about half past ten at night, I had been dining at the Freemason's Tavern; I was coming home, and I was a little in liquor; as I was turning the corner of Newcastle House , a woman accosted me; I cannot speak to the prisoner; the woman took me to the front of Newcastle house, and when I parted with her I missed my watch and seal; I recollected then that I felt her hand about my small clothes.

Q. How long before had you seen your watch - A. About ten o'clock.

THOMAS MANTZ . I am an officer of Bow-street.

On the 7th of August, about ten in the evening, from information, I went to a gin shop in Drury-lane; the prisoner was there; I found this watch upon her.

Prisoner's Defence. I found the watch in Lincoln's Inn Fields, under the arch-way belonging to Queen-street. I am innocent of taking the property from him. At the time he said he lost his watch I was in my lodging.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave her a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18110918-115

736. MARY EALING was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 31st of August , a dollar , the property of Joel Hill .

JOEL HILL . Q. Did you lose any thing on the 31st of August last - A. Yes, in George Street Bloomsbury , I was going through Holborn, between nine and ten at night; the prisoner caught hold of me, and said the had something to say to me, she took me up George-street.

Q. Had you any money with you - A. Yes, I cannot say exactly how much.

Q. Did you lose any thing - A. Yes, a dollar. I felt her hand in my pocket, I caught hold of her, she pulled her hand out and ran off, before I secured her I felt in my pocket, the dollar was gone; I pursued her, I could not overtake her.

Q. How long were you with her up that street - A. Not five minutes; I saw her again in eight days afterwards, I recollected her again; I am sure she is the person.

JOSEPH HORN . On the 31st of August I saw the prosecutor, he said he had been robbed.

Prisoner's Defence. On last Monday night was a week, this gentleman came into the public house where I was, I went up to him. I said do you want me, he said yes, you robbed me of a dollar, I said you are welcome to take me in charge; in the morning I went to the office in Marlborough-street; he said it I gave him a dollar he would get me discharged, I said it is very hard for me to replace a dollar I never had; he then said he would go as far as the laws of his country would go, to send me out of the country.

Q. to Prosecutor. Were you in liquor or no - A. I was not, I never spoke to her since I was in the watchhouse.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18110918-116

737. WILLIAM FOWKES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of August , eight pounds weight of lead, value 2 s. and a brass cock, value 2 s. the property of Edward Ball , then being affixed to his dwelling house .

JANE BALL . I am the wife of Edward Ball . On the 29th of August, about eight o'clock I put my little boy to bed, and coming down stairs I heard the water running away in the kitchen.

Q. When had you seen these things the last time before the pipe and the cock were taken away - A. About half an hour before, they were safe then. I went to the street-door, and from information. I pursued the prisoner and took him, he had the leaden pipe about him and a brass cock; they were behind his great coat.

Q. Who helped you to secure him - A. Mr. Humphreys the constable. I let him go and called my husband, he pursued him and then he was taken; it was not quite dark, I am confident the prisoner is the man.

Prisoner. What clothes had I on - A. A brown coat.

JOHN TRIGGER. I saw the prisoner come across Drury-lane; I saw him go into Vinegar Yard; there he dropped the pipe. The prosecutor lives in Bennett's-court, it is nearly opposite Vinegar-yard. I saw him through the pipe down, I piched it up, he was half way down Vinegar-yard. He took the pipe from underneath his coat, and threw it down; I am sure it is the same man, I saw him in the court before this happened, I have no doubt at all of his person.

JANE BALL . Q. You received the pipe from the last witness - A. Yes, it is my husband's pipe.

JOHN WINSTANLEY . I saw the prisoner go down Vinegar-yard; I saw him drop the pipe down.

Prisoner's Defence. This is the first time I ever was in confinement or had my character called in question. The leaden pipe and brass cock the prosecutor has recovered, nor is there any evidence to prove they had been in my possession. In Bennett's-court there was a hue and cry that the prosecutor had lost his pipe and cock; in Vinegar-yard the property was picked up. I was taken in Russell-court when the prosecutor charged me; I offered to be searched, and went voluntary to Bow-street, where the prosecutor said he could not swear to the person of the prisoner as he had changed his clothes, which is not true, as I had the same clothes on. I live in the same court where my prosecutor lives; I left work at eight o'clock, I went through the the court, I saw the man cross over Drury-lane into Vinegar-yard, where the property was picked up.

ELIZABETH MORGAN . I was at Bow-street with the prisoner's wife, and the prisoner's sister asked John Winstanley if he could swear to the man; the prosecutor and Winstanley said he had changed his coat they could not swear to him. Omer the officer said he was not permitted to change his shirt, much more his coat, while he was in Tothill-fields prison.

Winstanley. I did not say I could not swear to him, I said I thought he had changed his coat, I did swear to him.

GUILTY , aged 32.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18110918-117

738. WILLIAM CABLE and WILLIAM DALEY were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of July , one hundred bricks, value 5 s. the property of Alexander Stewert .

ALEXANDER STEWERT . I am a builder , I live at 69, Shadwell High-street.

Q. What is the prisoner Cable - A. He is a plumber and glazier , at Poplar. Daley is a labourer . In consequence of suspicion I watched the two prisoners in the houses that I was building at Stepney ;

Mr. Smith was with me; the gentleman whom I am building for; I had about twenty-five thousands of bricks there. About one o'clock in the morning, I saw Cable the prisoner go seven or eight times to my piles of bricks.

Q. Where was the other prisoner then - A. He was digging the well; after he had taken seven or eight turns with the bricks to the well he said to the labourer if he would came up, he would go down and stem the well; the labourer got up and put the bricks down that his master had taken from my piles; when he had handed all that was along side of the well; he went and brought bricks six or seven times to the well from off my piles, and the master made use of them; the last turn I ran out of the house where I was watching, seized hold of the labourer, and detected him with the bricks upon him. He was in a very great confusion; I said he must go along with us; the master was getting out of the well, I then took him. He was in a considerable agitation; he begged that I would not take him to justice, no doubt it could be settled without. I told him I had been robbed repeatedly at different buildings, I was determined the first I catched should go to justice; Cable wished to settle it, that I would not do, and he was brought to justice. I said I considered it worse in him than in a labouring man. I had told him before it was a strange time of night for a tradesman to come digging a well; he said he was very busy in the day, and he could not come and do it; I said you have no bricks here; he said they were loaded at six o'clock in the morning, he could have them at half an hours notice; I then said recollect them bricks belong to me. There were several stacks, if you take any bricks do not take mine; his answer was, do you think I want my neck in an halter; I said I hope not. After this I went to my house, I had suspicion that he was going to use my bricks; I went to watch. And I had told him if the water came in he would have to pump it out in the morning. It is a very swampy place.

Mr. Gurney. When you apprehended him he was willing to pay for the bricks - A. No doubt of that.

COURT. When you seized him you say he was in a great agitation - A. He was.

Q. Did he say that he meaned to come to you the next morning to pay you for them - A. No, he did not.

Q. If it was a very swampy place must it not be likely that he should have known that he must have land springs come in upon him - A. I should imagine so.

Q. Whereabouts is the value of the bricks that you lost - A.About five shillings.

ROBERT SMITH. I was with the last witness.

Q. You have heard the last witness give his evidence - A. Yes, it is correct.

Cable's Defence. When I began to sink this well it was about five o'clock in the evening, after I had done my business at home; I sunk about three foot, I found the water began to come in; the man said as we had begun it we might as well finish it; I said it will be ten o'clock before we are done; he said, never mind. I went to get my supper while my man was digging, and when I returned the water came fast in. I then concluded I would finish it. On the further end of the ground there were some of my bricks, they were so small it was impossible to do it with them. The well was within eighteen yards of the houses. About six o'clock in the evening Mr. Stewart came up; he told me, if I wanted any bricks not to take them, but to take them; accordingly I took them, and then he accused me of feloniously taking, which is not the truth. Mr. Stewart gave me free commission to take bricks, but he did not say where.

Mr. Stewart. I said them bricks belong to me, if you take any bricks do not take mine.

COURT. Did you give him leave to meddle with any of your bricks - A. I did not; on the contrary I cautioned him against it.

Daley said nothing in his defence.

Cable called five witnesses, who gave him a good character.

CABLE - GUILTY , aged 23

Transported for Seven Years .

DALEY - GUILTY , aged 27.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18110918-118

739. MARY THOMAS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of July , a quilt, value 6 s. a sheet, value 2 s. a blanket, value 1 s. a pair of trowsers, value 2 s. two pair of stockings, value 3 s. two waistcoats, value 3 s. and a napkin, value 6 d. the property of William Wager .

WILLIAM WAGER . I am an optician ; I live at No. 4, Rose-lane, Spitalfields .

ELIZABETH WAGER . I am the sister of the prosecutor he lodged with his mother; as I was going on the three pair of stairs; I saw the prisoner with the things in her hand; I called my mother, my mother and my sister stopped her.

MARGARET WAGER . I am the wife of the prosecutor. The prisoner ran down stairs, and left the property on the three pair; I stopped her, and sent for an officer.

Prisoner's Defence. I do not know any thing about the things; I only came into London that day, and was directed in that street for a lodging.

GUILTY , aged 49.

Confined Two Years in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18110918-119

740. BENJAMIN SCRIVEN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of September , half a bushel of oats and beans mixed, value 3 s. the property of John Harper .

JOHN NICOLLS . I live with John Harper , a farmer , Edgware-road .

Q. Do you know any thing of the prisoner taking a small quantity of oats and beans on the 7th of September last - A. I believe it was the 7th, a little after five in the morning, I observed the prisoner coming out of the stable with something in his smock frock; I let him walk about forty or fifty yards; I then tapped him on the shoulder, and asked him what he had got there; he said a little horse corn, it was the first time, and he hoped for mercy; I brought him back to the stable door; I told him to stay there until I brought something to put the corn in, and while I went he

strewed the corn about the yard as thin as he could. It was beans and oats mixed for the cart horses.

Prisoner's Defence. I had a little horse, I let Mr. Nicolls have it to ride over the farm; he was to feed it. I took this little corn to give to the horse, I did not at the moment think I was acting wrong; I am now convinced of my error and am sorry for it, I should not have thought of taking the oats if the foreman had not have had the horse.

Nicolls. With regard to the poney, when the young man Mr. Harper had it, it was in the lane, it was literally starving; the young man asked me to give him some corn, provided he would let him ride it for a week, and then it was in our stable. The poney had been returned about ten days before this transaction.

The prisoner two witnesses who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 50.

Whipped in Jail , and discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18110918-120

741. JAMES ROGERS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of July , two duck, value 2 s. 6 d. the property of George Davis .

GEORGE DAVIS . I am a cow-keeper and carman . On the 25th of July, between six and seven in the evening I missed two ducks out of my yard, I had seen them about eight o'clock in the morning; I met the prisoner with the ducks, in Hackney-road, he was offering them for sale. He told me he took them from my place and he intended to bring them back again.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought you a load of hay, you ran away and had no money to pay the man. I met some lads as I was going from your yard, they had your ducks, they said you have been along with Mr. Davis, will you take these ducks; I took them.

GUILTY , aged 41.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18110918-121

742. JOHN BARBER and TIMOTHY MURPHY were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of August , six rabbits, value 6 s. the property of John Holland .

JOHN HOLLAND . I am a greengrocer , I live at Spitalfields Market .

Q. Did you loose any rabbits on the 27th of August last - A. I did, they were in a hutch, the hutch was not taken away only the rabbits. I saw the rabbits again the same day; they are here.

THOMAS BAILEY. I live at 171, Shoreditch, I keep a birdshop. On the 27th of August, Murphy and Barber brought two rabbits, I gave him three shillings and sixpence for them; one of them is dead, the other is here.

Prosecutor. I will not be sure that is one of them.

JOHN CAPER . I am a dealer in rabits. On the 27th I bought two rabbits of Barber.

Prosecutor. I cannot swear to them.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18110918-122

743. MARY BEATON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of August , a coat, value 1 l. a handkerchief, value 6 d. a rule, value 2 s. and forty-eight half-pence , the property of Thomas Marsh .

THOMAS MARSH . I am a plumber and glazier , I live in Little Russell-street, Bloomsbury. On Saturday night, the 24th of August I went out to spend the evening along with some friends, we kept it up until one o'clock in the morning; going along Drury-lane I met the prisoner.

Q. You were the worse for liquor - A. No, I was as sober as I am now. The prisoner asked me to go with her; it being late I agreed to go with her. I went home with her, she persuaded me stop with her all night, I told her I had no objection to stop with her till daylight; I undressed myself and went to bed; I did not find things pleasant; I told her I should stop about half an hour. I got up, she still persuaded me to stop till day light; I told her I could not, I did not like the apartment. I had given her what I had agreed for. I sat down on the chair, and when I was tying my stocking on, she said if you do not give me more money I will charge the watch with you; she took my coat and ran off; I did not miss my coat till a few minutes afterwards.

THOMAS MANTZ . I am an officer. On Sunday night I received information of the prosecutor. I went with him and took the girl in custody.

Q. Did you find any coat there - A. I did not.

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw the man with my eyes. When I got home on Sunday morning it was nigh four o'clock, that man come on the Sunday night and took me.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18110918-123

744. MARY ROWCROFT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of July , a shawl, value 9 s. the property of Robert Peart .

ROBERT DRAKE. I live with Mr. Peart, linen draper , 83, Whitechapel .

JOHN BERRY . I live in Golden-lane. On the 17th of July I saw the prisoner look at a shawl at Mr. Peart's shop, it was hanging inside the shop, near the door. I saw her pull the shawl down and put it in her apron; I went into the shop and informed the young man. We then pursued her and brought her into shop. She drooped the shawl on the ground.

Q. Did you see her drop it - A. I cannot say that, I saw it on the ground; Drake picked it up.

Q. to Drake. Do you remember Berry coming into the shop - A. I do, I pursued the prisoner, when she returned back she had that shawl in her apron. I saw it fall from her. I had seen that shawl hanging up about half an hour before.

Prisoner's Defence. I had the misfortune to pick it up, when the shawl catched my shoulder I thought whether I should keep it or not.

GUILTY , aged 41.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18110918-124

745. JOHN FREEMAN DUBBERLAIN was indicted for that he, on the 14th of June , was clerk to Samuel Scott , Richard Garnet , and Nathaniel Palmer , and was employed and intrusted by them to received money and valuable securities, and that he being such servant so employed did receive and take into his possession,

a banker's draft, value 218 l. 1 s. 6 d. on account of his masters, and that he afterwards feloniously did secrete and steal the same .

SECOND and THIRD COUNTS for embezzling, secreting and stealing 60 l. being part of the 218 l. 1 s. 6 d.

WILLIAM TYLER STOKER . I am clerk to Mr. Dyson, leather factor.

Q. On the 14th of June did you pay into the house of Messrs. Scott and co. a bankers draft of two hundred and eighteen pounds one shilling and six-pence - A. I did, the check I have in my hand. (The draft read.)

Q. That was on account of leather sold by Mr. Dyson to that house - A. It was.

Q. After Mr. Dyson had drawn the check and given it you did you take it to the house of Scott, Garnet and Palmer - A. I did; I gave it into the hands of the prisoner, and I requested him to write their bankers name across the check, which he did in my presence; I then withdrew. This is the check, there is Hankey and Co. across it.

WILLIAM JOSHUA TERRY . Q. I believe you are clerk to Messrs. Hankey and Co. - A. I was at that time.

Q. Did Messrs. Scott, Garnet and Palmer, bank there - A. They did.

Q. Look at that check that has been produced was that check paid by you - A. I paid sixty pounds I believe to the prisoner, (I do not speak with certainty) and placed one hundred and fifty pounds one shillings and sixpence to Messrs. Scott and Co's. accompt. I acted by the directions of the person that gave me the draft, and in consequence of the mark at the back of it; Messrs. Hankey and Co. is written across, and knowing the prisoner, and the confidence I had in him I should have paid him the whole demand if he had asked for it.

Q. Then this check remained in your hands, you would have given him the whole credit for the whole amount, two hundred and eighteen pounds one shilling and sixpence - A. Yes.

Q. Was it after received by them in the regular course of business - A. I believe it was. I heard no complaint.

Q. On the 3d of July was any payment made by the prisoner of the sum of two hundred and eighteen pounds one shilling and sixpence on their house - A. No such sum.

NATHANIEL PALMER. Q. What are the names of your partners - A. Robert Garnet , and Nathaniel Palmer , we are cornfactors in Aldermanbury. The prisoner, I should think, has been our clerk twelve years.

Q. Did you employ Mr. Dyson to sell some leather that you had from the country - A. We did, but as the transaction had passed some time we were not aware that Mr. Dyson had the selling of them. We employed more brokers than one.

Q. Did the prisoner on the 14th of June account to you for two hundred and eighteen pounds one shilling and sixpence, having received it of Mr. Dyson - A. Not in the account of June. On the 2d of July, in looking over the ledger I observed that there was a quantity of leather that appeared not to be accounted for; I asked the prisoner who had sold it; he stated at the time that he was ignorant who had sold it, it was either Scott and Clark, or Mr. Dyson, or Mr. Alexander Ross , but he would go and enquire; I desired him not to go out, there were notes in the house that would ascertain it, and desired him to ascertain it. In about the course of an hour from this time he said he had been out, he had ascertained that Mr. Dyson had sold it, and he had received the money. On the 6th of July I asked him what he had done with Mr. Dyson's draft; he stated that he had paid it to Messrs. Hankey and Co. I remarked that he had not debitted it to them; he said it was his omission; I desired him to do it; he took the cash book and debited it to them. In the cash book you will see cash, two hundred and eighteen pounds one shilling and sixpence; upon the third, and under the second, as if it was an omission this entry was made, on the 6th of July.

Q. Do you find any prior entry that he had made in your cash book, that he had accounted to you of one hundred and fifty-eight pounds one shilling and sixpence - A. That you will find in the other book, it does not exactly correspond with this book, that is subsequent in the other book under the 14th before the 15th.

DANIEL OCKMAIR. was called, and not appearing in court, his recognisance was ordered to be estreated.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to his character.

GUILTY.

Of embezzling sixty pounds .

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110918-125

746. JONAS GOVER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of March , forty-seven deal boards, value 3 l. 10 s. 6 d. and ten pieces of wood, value 5 s. the property of John Eades .

JOHN EADES . I am a builder , I live opposite Sadlers Wells. The prisoner is a carpenter , I employed him to do work for me in Islington-road ; I found the materials except nails and labour. The last parcel of deals I sent in was some time in March, in the course of a week forty of them disappeared; I challenged the prisoner with what had become of the deals, he said they were used for a frame that was done before; I discharged him, and caused him to be taken to a police office; the magistrate took bail of him, and he has discharged his bail by appearing here this morning.

Q. When was he apprehended - A. On the 10th of June. He was indicted last sessions, it was put off till this.

Q. Whatever property was there at your house was it your's - A. It was.

Mr. Knapp. You say he was employed by you as a carpenter, and the only thing that he was to find was nails - A. It was.

Q. Am I to understand from you that there was no accompt between him and you for deals and timber - A.Never.

Q. Of course if there never was an account it never was referred to any person what should be done with

the accompt delivered - A. There never was any accompt for timber or deals, he asked me for two loads of bats, which I sent him in.

Q. Nor was there any reference of any account in which there were timbers and deals - A. Never.

Q. You know such a man as Skiring, do not you - A. Yes, he measured the prisoners work on his part. The prisoner acknowledged to my surveyor that he took seven deals away by my order. I protest against it.

WILLIAM FISH . I am a carpenter, I worked under Mr. Gover, in the building of this house for Mr. Eades.

Q. In the month of March how many deals were taken away - A. Forty-seven boards after they were prepared for flooring, and several trimmers, joists, and riders for steps, and two newells, they were taken to a house that Mr. Gover was building in Green Man's-lane, Islington. They were taken by me, my partner. Mr. Gover, and his son. He shewed me a paper that Mr. Eades was debtor to him, and I fully believed that he might take them. We used these boards in Mr. Gover's house of an evening or morning. There are four floors that I laid there, I told Mr. Eades of it.

COURT. Are you able to say of your own knowledge how many boards could be produced from the largest deal you have seen in the market - how many of these boards that you conveyed from Eades's house to Gover's could have been made out of one piece of deal - A. Five boards; thirty-five of such as I conveyed away could have been manufactured from seven deals.

EDWARD EMERY . I worked at this house of Mr. Eades. In the month of March I carried seven boards from Mr. Eades house to Mr. Gover's.

COURT, Q. to prosecutor. Did you see these forty-seven boards at Gover's house - A. Yes, Fish pointed them out to me.

Q. Could they have been manufactured from seven deals - A. No.

Q. These seven deals you allowed him in accompt - A. My surveyor did.

Prisoner's Defence. I wish the court to see the accompt. Mr. Eades was very poor, he got fresh credit over the water on Bank side; I said, Mr. Eades, let me have seven of them deals, I want them. I had the deals on the 2nd of February they were acccompted for; I supplied Mr. Eades with hinges, glue, and every thing that was wanting in the building line; he now swears nothing but nails. Fish is a bad character. When the work was measured I had one surveyor, and Mr. Eades another. I then said there is a few odds and ends of stuff that I have to accompt; I had asked him for them; he said take what you want.

ZACHARIAH SKIRING . I am a Surveyor. I was appointed by Mr. Gover and Lovell by Mr. Eades to measure off the new work done by Eades; we measured the whole of the work, we agreed as to the measure, but not as to the price. After that Mr. Eades said I should like you to take account of the money Gover has had because he had no receipt; Mr. Eades called Gover and asked him what money he had; he said he gave him three pounds, that made one hundred and twenty pounds; I put it down; Eades said, now recollect you had two loads of bats, two guineas, and October 23d Gover had a small piece of timber of Mr. Eades, they agreed that the piece of timber should be eleven shillings; then said he there were seven twelve-feet three-inch deals, cut into half-inch stuff; Gover said, what do you charge for them. Mr. Eades said the deals cost me sixty pound a hundred; they agreed the deals should be with the cutting four pound.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18110918-126

747. ALEXANDER CHARLES LEVIGNE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of July , fourteen fowls, value 30 s. the property of Edward Coleman .

EDWARD COLEMAN . I keep a public-house at Halsden Green , near Wilsdon Green, I lost fourteen fowls, they were at roost in a coal-house in my yard, I had seen them in the 15th going to roost; they were found on the 16th. The prisoner was a haymaker, he used my house.

SAMUEL WILLIAM PYALL . I am one of the patrols of Bow-street. On Tuesday morning, the 16th of July, about half past four in the morning, I met the prisoner with a quantity of fowls in a basket, he appearing to me to be a suspicious character I stopped him, I asked him where he brought the fowls from; he told me from Wemley, after further questioning him I asked him again; he said he brought them from Fleet Market; I then asked him if he was not a foreigner. He called me a b - y English b - r, and if I followed him he would give me this, taking this pair of scissars out of his pocket; I then drew back a little, but kept hold of the basket. When I got to the watchhouse I examined it, and found it contained fourteen fowls; I took two pair of scissars from him, he had them both in his pocket. I took him to the magistrate and found out the prosecutor, I shewed him the fowls, he swore to them at Bow-street. The fourteen fowls were all dead; I suppose they were cut in the throat by these small pair of scissars.

Q. to prosecutor. How were these fowls taken out of your place - A. On the over night the door was open till nine o'clock, and then the door is locked up. I know the fowls, I bred some of them, and some I bought.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought them in Fleet Market, I gave a guinea for them; I am a foreigner, I was taken prisoner on board a ship.

GUILTY , aged 36.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Tried by a jury of half English and half Foreigners,

Before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110918-127

748. JOHN FREDERICK JULIZ was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of September , eight handkerchiefs, value 6 s. a waistcoat, value 6 d. two shirts, value 10 s. two pair of stockings, value 1 s. a gold buckle, value 5 s. a gold broach value 5 s. and a fork, value 1 d. the property of Joseph Pavey .

MARY PAVEY . My husband's name is Joseph Pavey , he is a sea-faring man . I lost these things at different times. The prisoner is a foreign sailor , he lodged at my house. I accused him of taking the things; he said no, and afterwards he said he would never do it again.

SARAH STANTON . I took this handkerchief out of the prisoner's pocket. I went and fetched a constable.

THOMAS MILLS . I am a headborough of St. George's. I took charge of the prisoner, he made off; I pursued him and took him in Denmark-street. We took him down to the watchhouse; I searched him and found some duplicates upon him.

WILLIAM GREGSON . I am a pawnbroker; I took in pawn this handkerchief of the prisoner.

Prosecutrix. It is my handkerchief.

Prisoner's Defence. I lived with the prosecutrix two months, and bedded with her that time; she told me at first that she was not married, and when she fell out with me she said she was married.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Confined Two Years in the House of Correction , and Whipped in Jail .

Tried by a Jury of half English, and half Foreigners,

Before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110918-128

749. JAMES SMITH was indicted for feloniously assaulting Sarah the wife of Thomas Kay , in a certain field, near the Kings highway, on the 18th of August, putting her in fear, and taking from her person, and against her will, a shawl, value 2 s. the property of Thomas Kay .

SARAH KAY . I am the wife of Thomas Kay. I do not know whether he living or dead. I am an unfortunate woman, I get my bread as I can. On the 18th of August I was at Kentish Town , this soldier and several more were quartered in the town; he and one or two more gave me gin, ale, and porter; we drank together, I was nearly tipsey, so was he. It was getting late, I told him I did not want to go with him, I wished to go home; he took my shawl and run away. I knew my shawl when the officer shewed it me.

- WRIGHT. On the 18th of August, about a quarter before ten o'clock, I heard the cry of murder; Preston and I went into a field near the Black Horse, we there saw the prosecutrix, she said she had been robbed of a shawl by a soldier, and much ill-used; I went to the King's Arms in Kentish town, I found the prisoner there; I saw the shawl in his cap, he said he had taken it from a woman in a field. I took him to the Black Horse, where the prosecutrix was, she said it was her shawl, and that the prisoner took it from her.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110918-129

750. SAMUEL DAVIS was indicted for feloniously assaulting William Evans , on the King's Highway, putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, a watch, value 50 s. a watch chain, value 6 d. and a seal, value 6 d. his property.

RICHARD WILLETTS. I am a warehouseman, I live with Messrs. Darby and Hilton in Lime-street. On the 17th of July I was standing in Red Lion-street, I heard the cry of watch, I saw two men running towards me, the prisoner was one; I followed him across Whitechapel into Essex-street, he got under a gateway, stooped down, and when I came up to him he jumped up, made a blow at me, and then ran on and came to another gate, there he stooped down again; I saw him gather some mud; he put something under the gate, he came up again and made a blow at me; I brought him back and delivered him to the patrol.

Q. Where is the prosecutor - A. He is dead.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110918-130

751. JOHN KNIGHT , THOMAS MOORE and JOHN HARWOOD , were indicted burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Edward Cooper , about the hour of two in the night of the 19th of September , and stealing therein, a great coat, value 20 s. the property of Nehemiah Bricknell .

EDWARD COOPER . I am a coachmaster , I live in St. John-street, in the parish of St. Sepulchre . Knight had been a servant of mine; he went away with one of my keys about a fortnight ago.

JOHN CARLISLE . I am a watchman in St. John street. I was crying half past two up St. John-street, these three men came opposite of me on the same side that Mr. Cooper lives; one said, you go of the other side, you will see. I suspected them; I pulled off my shoes, and watched them down the street; two of them got to Mr. Cooper's yard, they opened the door and went in, they gave a whistle, and the other crossed over to them. I went over to the gate with my shoes in my hand, and listened at the gate, I heard one of the coach doors open, one of them said, let that alone, come on I then put on my shoes and sprang my rattle, directly the gate opened, and out ran one of them. I shut the gate to, and shut the others in; I halloaed out stop thief, he is gone towards St. Johns-lane. One of the patrols stopped him, I kept at the gate and sprang my rattle again for my other partners to come up to my assistance; a man that lived facing of the gate asked what was the matter, and said he had got the key of the gate. I told him to make haste down with it, there were two others inside. When he came down with the key we went in with a light; we searched about, we found one in a coach, and the other in the harness room.

Q. Who was the man that ran away - A. Harwood.

EDWARD EDWARDS . I am a patrol. I was in St. John-street; I heard the rattle spring about a quarter before three; I ran to Carliste's assistance, he said there were some persons in the gate; I entered the yard, the first thing I saw was a large blue coat laying on a splinter bar of a carriage, I went further down the yard, I found Moore pretending

to be asleep in one of the coaches; I hit him and he made as if he was awaking; I took hold of him and pulled him out; I took him to the watchhouse, I returned, and then my partner had got Knight. We took him to the watchhouse,

Mr. Knapp. You found Moore in the coach, you struck him with your cutlass - A. Yes.

Q. Will you venture to say he was not asleep - A. His eyes were shut, as far as his being asleep I cannot say.

Q. Perhaps you are not asleep when you know there is forty pounds reward upon each of their convictions - A. I do not know that.

NEHEMIAH BRICKNELL. I am a coachman, I drive for Mr. Cooper. I came home about half-past twelve, and left the yard about one, on the night of the robbery; I am sure I left my coat in the stable; I saw it the next morning at the magistrate's.

JOHN DRAKE . I am a constable, I was along with the watchman, I saw Knight taken out of the harness room; I took this latch key from him, which opens Mr. Cooper's gate; Knight acknowledged it to be Mr. Cooper's.

ROBERT SEAGRAVE. I am a patrol, I heard the rattle springing; Carlisle said, that is him running towards St. John's-lane; I saw Harwood, and stopped him in Peter's-lane. I took him to the watchhouse.

Knight's Defence. When I was taken to the watch-house, I stated that the key was my own which I bought when I went into Mr. Cooper's service.

Q. to Prosecutor. How is this connected with your house - A. We have no other way to go to the house, but into the house, the dwelling house is in the yard. All the men have a key to let themselves in.

Q. How did Knight behave when he was with you - A. Very well, I never know any dishonesty of him except taking away the key.

Mr. Knapp. Do not you know it is a common thing for them to sleep in coaches - A. Not my men, I never had one of my men to sleep in the coaches in my life.

Q. to Bricknell. You are a hackney coachman, are you not - A. Yes.

Q. It is not an unusual thing for hackney coachmen when they are drunk, to go into coaches to sleep - A. It is an usual thing.

Knight called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Moore called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Harwood called one witness who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110918-131

752. THOMAS NEALE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of July , in the dwelling house of Morris Roach , a pair of shoes, value 2 s. and seven one pound bank notes , the property of James Railey .

MARY HAVES . I was nursing at No. 3, Cammomile-building, Portman-square .

Q. Whose house is it - A. I do not know, I was nursing a little boy eighteen months. I was sitting at the window, a man came up and knocked at the next room door, it was in the morning between nine and ten o'clock, I told the man there was nobody at home; he went down stairs and asked the girl for the key of the two pair of stairs room.

Q. Where did this man live - A In the one pair front. He unlocked the two pair back room door and went in; he came down stairs in about ten minutes and came into the room where I was nursing, and took up a book that laid in the window, he held it in his hand a little bit and put it down again. The child took up the book and pulled out this key with a string to it; I told him he had left his key, he said so I have. I gave him the key and he gave it back to the girl. I am sure it was the prisoner, he absented for two days.

Q. What is he - A. He is a breeches maker , a lodger in the front room one pair.

JAMES KAILEY . I am a labourer, I live in the front room two pair, No. 3, Cammomile-buildings. I lost seven one pound notes and a pair of shoes

Q. Why do you charge the prisoner with it - A. Because of that witness; I know nothing of it my self.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110918-132

753. JANE MILLS alias CHARLOTTE GROVES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of September , in the dwelling house of Mary Corbut , widdow; a silver milk pot, value 1 l. two silver tablespoons, value 30 s. three silver teaspoons, value 10 s. three remnants of dimity, value 1 l. two petticoats, value 5 s. six yards of printed cotton, value 1 l. a gown piece, value 10 s. a silk cloak, value 30 s. a bonnet, value 10 s. a pair of shoes, value 4 s a gown, value 6 s. a pair of corsets, value 4 s. a pair of stockings, value 2 s. three yards of callico, value 1 s. two handkerchiefs, value 1 s. 6 d. and two one pound bank notes , the property of Mary Ann Brown , widow .

MARY ANN BROWN . I am a working woman, as a widow, I live at 5, Maynard-street, Lawrence-lane , I lodge at Mary Corbuts , widow woman, she lives in the same house.

Q. What is the prisoner - A. A working woman, as far as I know, she lodged in the same house. On Monday the 16th instant, about twenty minutes past four o'clock I went out leaving the prisoner in my room; I returned at six, and finding my door locked, and as she said she had been unwell, I thinking that she had gone to get something for herself I waited with impatience betwixt hope and dispair; the prisoner not returning I sent for a smith, he drew the staple of the lock, I went in my room, looked about the room and saw nothing missing of the furniture; perceiving a piece of printed cotton hanging out of my trunk, which I was sure was not on the Sunday when I locked the trunk. Upon that getting my lock picked by the smith.

Q. What had gone with your key - A. The keys of my door and my trunk were found upon the prisoner. On my opening the trunk, I found my property was gone.

Q. Was any property found upon her. - A. All my property was found upon her except my cloak and my shoes.

CHARLES HUMPHRIES . I am an officer of Bow-street

office. On the 16th, about one o'clock at night, I was standing near the Broad-way, Westminster; the prisoner came by with a bundle under her arm, I asked her what she had got there, she said it was nothing to me; I told her I was an officer and I insisted upon seeing. I took her to the watchhouse, I searched her pocket, found these spoons, and a cream jug; two silver table-spoons, and three silver tea-spoons, a nutmeg-grater, two keys and a thread-case; a one pound note, two dollars, four shillings and some halfpence. I opened the bundle and found all these things, she said it was her own; she had taken them out of pawn, in Compton-street, Soho. I asked her what she did down at that part at that late hour of the night; she said she had been to see a cousen, at Pimlico. I told her I was not satisfied, I should lock her up for the night. I took her before the Magistrate, he desired that I would give the pound note and the dollars to the prisoner; I told the Magistrate one of the dollars was marked, some person might claim it. I gave her the note back, four shillings and the halfpence. I kept the two dollars. She stated to the Magistrate that she bought the dimity at a shop at the corner of Bow-street. I advertised it in the paper, and the prosecutrix came forward and owned all the property. I found this hat and gown on her person when the prosecutrix came forward.

Prosecutrix. The spoons are mine, and the milk-pot. This is the key of my trunk, and this is the key of my padlock, every thing here is mine.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence, nor called any witness to her character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 40.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110918-133

754. THOMAS PRIOR was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of August , a board, value 2 s. 6 d. the property of Thomas Alcock .

THOMAS ALCOCK . I am a builder , No. 6, Harrow-road, Paddington. The prisoner was my labourer .

JOHN MAGGRAFT . I am a watchman, in Mary-le-bone Parish. On the 10th of August at night, I was going my round between ten and eleven at night, and seeing the prisoner coming along with a board on his shoulder, I questioned him how he came by it; he told me he was taking it home, he bought it from his master's building. He told me his master's name and were he lived, I took him to the watchhouse and went for his master, he came and swore to his property. It is marked with his master's initials.

Prisoner's Defence. I found this board as I came home from paytable. The watchman met me and asked me where I got it; I told him in the Edgware-road.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110918-134

755. JOANNA BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of August , a watch, value 6 l. and a seal, 3 l. the property of John Bradshaw , from his person .

JOHN BRADSHAW. I am an invalid at Chelsea College . On the 29th of August last, as I was coming home from the second regiment of life guards stables, at ten o'clock; I came through Portman Square. Corporal Duslap observed the prisoner following of us, I did not; we came into South Audley-street, to the sign of the Nag's Head; there we had one pot of porter, me and the corporal, and the prisoner was with us, he would have us go in and have a pot of porter; we went in and had a pot of porter, and no more. There were some people playing at drafts, the prisoner interfered with them; he said they were playing wrong; he shewed them which way to play. Then we came out, the corporal, me and the prisoner, all three together, we walked into Freeman-street; the corporal bid me good night, he returned to his own home. The prisoner would lay hold of my left arm. I have got a paralytic stroke in my right leg and my right arm. I can always walk better without assistance than I can with it. He walked near an hundred yards with me, when he come opposite of Mount-street watchhouse door, he gave me a violent blow on my left arm, and a violent kick on my left ankle; down I came upon my knees upon the first step, with that I was double, and then in my rising I had hold of the railing of the pallisades, he then drawed my watch from me, I felt him draw it and saw him, he turned back as soon as he tore my watch out of my pocket, away he went, and never spoke a single word.

Q. You are sure as to the man, are you not - A. I am confident sure of it. He pawned the watch the day afterwards, on the 30th of August.

WILLIAM DUSLAP . I am a corporal of the second regiment of Life Guards. The prisoner is the man that accompanied John Bradshaw and me to the Nag's Head, and partook of a pot of porter.

Prisoner. That man gave me the watch to pawn.

COURT. Q. Did you give him the watch - A. No.

- HUDSON. I am a City officer. I apprehended the prisoner at Bartholomew fair, between three and four o'clock in the morning; I found a pocket book upon him with a duplicate of a watch that Bradshaw claimed.

JOHN RAYMENT . I am an apprentice to Robert Barker , 115, Houndsditch, pawnbroker. On the 30th of August I took that watch in pawn of the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. That soldier gave me the watch in St. James's Park; I never saw the prosecutor at all. I have been serving King George nine years.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Transported for life .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110918-135

756. JANE COCKING was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of September , from the person of Thomas Tucker , two shillings, eight halfpence, four two pound bank notes, and nine one pound bank notes , his property.

THOMAS TUCKER . I am a journeyman painter ; I lost this property on Monday, September the 9th; I had been to Bagnigge Wells in the evening with a friend, and my friend accompanied me as far as the Blue Lion, Gray's Inn-lane; he then returned back from me; I proceeded on for home, and the prisoner followed me; I had been drinking more than customary. I fell down near Henry-street, Gray's Inn-lane ; as I lay on the ground I felt somebody rifling my pocket, I called out to the watchman who was going by, that I was robbed, the prisoner made off.

The next day I went to Hatton Garden and gave information. In the evening the officer and I went to St. Giles's and took the prisoner at the corner of Dyot-street; the officer searched her and found on her a one pound note, three dollars, and two or three shillings; the note I can swear to. I am sure of her person. I lost seventeen pounds in one and two pound notes.

SARAH WELL 'S. I live in the same house with the prisoner, 32, George-street, formerly called Dyot-street. On the evening of the 9th of September, between twelve and one, I saw the prisoner with several notes which she said a friend gave her.

Q. How many were there - A. I do not know. I heard her say three two's and six one's.

MARY BARNES . The prisoner lodged in the same house that I did; I saw her the same evening with a number of notes; I changed one of the notes, she made me and another person a present of it.

- ROBINSON. I had a two pound note in my possession; I received it of Mary Barnes .

JAMES HANCOCK . I am an officer. I searched the prisoner, I found a one pound note pinned at the bottom of her petticoat. In her right hand pocket I took three dollars, two three shilling pieces, and three shillings.

Prosecutor. I know the note by the endorsement at the back. I am sure it is my note.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been out that evening, I met a person that knew me many years, he made me a present of the notes, and when I bought the things that note was given me in change.

GUILTY , aged 51.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110918-136

757. ANN DELANEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, from the person of John Conner , three five pound bank notes, two two-pound bank notes, and four one-pound bank notes , his property.

JOHN CONNER . I am a seamen . This girl picked me up in Whitechapel, and took me to some house in Spital Fields ; I stopped there all night; I had half a gallon of beer and half a pint of gin; I drank nothing of it. I gave her a pound note and a new pair of stockings. I had been in bed about an hour, an old woman was sitting in the room smoking a pipe, and drinking my beer and gin; I went to sleep, and awoke about four o'clock in the morning; I said it is my turn to drink now. The half gallon pot was empty, and the gin was gone; I looked for my trowsers, there was only a sixpence and a shilling both bad in my pocket; I said, where is my money; she said the other girl persuaded me to take it. I took her to the watchhouse.

Q. Who is this other woman - A. Ann Mannakin .

Prisoner's Defence. In the morning he accused me of taking his money, which I never saw. The woman has absconded, and I have never heard of her since.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110918-137

758. ELIZABETH DEACON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of July , a pewter quart pot, value 3 s. and a pewter pint pot, value 1 s, the property of John Watts .

JOHN WATTS . I keep the Rose and Crown, public-house, Broad-street, St. Giles's . On Saturday night, the 13th of July the prisoner came to drink some gin with two men, we missed a quart pot that stood on the counter; I followed the prisoner home, she put the light out; I came home got a light, and went and searched the prisoners room. I found the quart pot concealed in a pail of filth, the filth is to be seen on the outside of the pot now. I gave charge of the prisoner. After she was taken to the watchhouse I came back, I asked for the pint of ale that I had drawn; my wife said she missed it. When she missed the other I went back and found the pint pot in her room with part of the ale in it. These are the pots, they are mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I went into Mr. Watts's, and the man, I called my husband and a woman were with me; I called for a quartern of gin; I said, Watts, take the first glass, which he did; we went into the taproom, and called for a pint of beer; I went to the bar, and said, Watts give me a pint of beer; he did; I gave it to the woman, and she took it up to her apartment, and on my going by the bar Mr. Watts said have you seen a quart pot; I said no; he followed me up stairs. There was no candle, but there was a fire of wood; he went down stairs, returned with a light, and before he came into the room, he said here is my quart pot.

GUILTY , aged 45.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110918-138

759. WILLIAM HAWKINS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of August , twenty paving stones, value 30 s. the property of George Stainsworth , esq. and others.

SECOND COUNT for like offence, only varying the manner of charging.

JOHN LEE. I am Vestry clerk of Hanover square and clerk of the committee of paving likewise; all the names of the committee are in the indictment.

THOMAS PARISH . I am a journeyman employed by the contractor, Mr. Johnson. I had missed stones in Albemarle-street , and also at the end of Piccadilly , there are two stones that I marked, one in Albemarle-street, and one in Piccadilly. On Wednesday the 21st of August I missed twenty stones; I went to Mr. Collett's near Sloane-street; I there found a load of stones, and among them I found the two marked stones.

THOMAS COLLETT . I am a builder, I live in Sloane-street. On the 17th of August the prisoner applied to me to know if I wanted any old paving; I told him I should want some at a future time. He brought me a load of stone on the Wednesday following; I measured them, they made eighty-one feet; I told him I would give him sixpence a foot for bringing it and laying it down, which he agreed.

Q. Had you these stones in your possession until Mr. Parish came - A. Yes. Mr. Parish lay claim to two of them in particular.

Mr. Parish. This is one that I marked.

MR. JOHNSON. Q.What is the value of these

stones - A. Sixpence a foot.

Prisoner's Defence. I deny the charge.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110918-139

760. ELIZABETH PRIOR was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of August , two pewter pint pots, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of Barnard Healey .

BARNARD HEALEY . I keep the Marquis of Granby . On the 9th of August, between six and seven o'clock, the prisoner came into my house and stopped two or three hours in the tap-room.

NICHOLAS BEAL . I keep the Stag's Head, Duke-street, Portland-place. The prisoner came to my house about nine o'clock, she had half a pint of beer, I was called, I went and said, where is my pint pot; she said, I have not got your pint pot; I put my hand upon her bundle, I found there were pots in it; she said your pot is under the seat. Mr. Healy came, we opened the bundle, there were these two pint pots.

Prosecutor. They are my pots.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence, nor called any witnesses to her character.

GUILTY , aged 47.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110918-140

761. CATHERINE HOLLAND was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of July , twenty-two yards of printed cotton, value 20 s. the property of William Brown .

JOSEPH POBJOY . I am an apprentice to William Brown , linen-draper , Ratcliffe Highway . On the 24th of July, about five minutes after eight in the evening happening accidentally to go to the door; I observed the prisoner with a piece of print in her hand. It had been hung up outside.

Q. How far was it removed from the part where it was hanged to - A. About three or four yards. This is the print, it is twenty-two yards, I took it from her, it is Mr. Brown's property.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence; called two witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Confined Fourteen Days in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110918-141

762. ELIZABETH YATES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of December , a gold locket, value 5 s. the property of Selina Rawlins , spinster .

SELINA RAWLINS . I live at 38, Alfred-place . I missed a gold locket while the prisoner lived servant with me, and mentioned it to her.

LOUISA LANE . The prisoner lived with me after she left Miss Rawlins; I live in Guildford-street, Bedford-square. During my confinement in June last I missed a variety of articles, and Mr. Lane likewise missed articles. The next morning I had all the servants in the room at the same time; I said it is a painful thing to accuse you, but I am sure it is among you and when I find it out I certainly will prosecute. The prisoner gave me six duplicates, one of which proved to be the duplicate of the gold locket. That was between July and August. The prisoner lived with me rather better than three months; she had lived with me before a year and a half.

- . I am a pawnbroker. This locket was pledged in December last, I cannot remember who I took it off. I gave a duplicate to the person that pawned it.

JOHN WOOD . I am an officer. This is the duplicate.

Pawnbroker. They correspond.

Prisoner's Defence. The locket was given me by a fellow servant who lived with me as cook.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110918-142

763. ELIZABETH YATES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of July , a gold seal, value 5 s. a thimble, value 1 s. and a ring, value 10 s. the property of Richard Lane .

LOUISA LANE . I am the wife of Richard Lane, he is a surgeon . The prisoner came to live with me in last May; during the month of June I lost several blankets, table-linen, and a variety of other articles; I lost also a gold seal, a gold ring, and a thimble. The prisoner gave me the tickets where she had pledged them. She had lived with me more than a twelvemonth a prior time, she had behaved well during that time.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110918-143

764. ROBERT THAKES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of September , seventy three pounds weight of lead, value 20 s. the property of the Grand Junction Water-works Company . And

TWO OTHER COUNTS the same as the former, only varying the manner of charging them.

THOMAS ROGERS . I am a wharfinger, I live at the Stone pipe company's wharf, Paddington .

Q. When did you lose this lead - A. On Saturday the 7th of September. This man was at work with seven or eight more men. The prisoner was a labourer . About seven o'clock, or a little after, I paid the men and I was sitting in the house by myself; afterwards in about an hour a friend of mine came, I went out with him; I saw the prisoner come out from behind the watch-box where he had no business to be; he said master, I have lost my money; I said, have you, Robert, that is a bad job; the prisoner followed us to the wharf gate; I went on. In about five minutes I went back again, I had suspicion. When I had got in the wharf gate I saw this man coming on with this lead; I called John Riley , and we followed the prisoner

into the Edgware-road. He put the lead down about ten yards from Loyd's house, we passed him and stopped; he picked up the lead and took it into Loyd's house; I went and asked him what he had got there; he said nothing, and ran out of the house. Riley catched him, he then said that the man told him he would give him three half-pence a pound if he would bring any lead to him.

MR. PEAKE. Q. What are you - A. I am, called wharfinger or foreman, I am appointed by Mr. Hill. The water work company are chartered, I have the Act of Parliament in my pocket.

Q. Did you see any thing about him or upon him while he was in the wharf - A No, but about twenty yards off; it turned out to be lead, and I saw him go into the house and put it down, and I missed a fig of lead, I know the shape and size of it; here is a man that will swear to it.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel, called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110918-144

765. ANN WEBB was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 10th of September , a table cloth, value 10 s. the property of John Hanson .

JOHN HANSON . I keep the Phoenix public-house, Ratcliff-cross ; the prisoner was a servant of mine About a fortnight. I missed the table-cloth about a week before the 10th of September, Mr. Banister produced to me a tablecloth; I knew it to be mine.

JOHN BANNISTER . I am a pawnbroker, Broad-street, Ratcliff-cross. On the 10th of September, about eight o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came in and offered this tablecloth to pawn; on looking at it I saw Mr. Hanson's name; I asked her how she came by it; she said she washed for Mr. Hanson, she hoped I would let her have the tablecloth she meaned to return it. I took the tablecloth to Mr. Hanson, she followed me, begging me to give her the tablecloth back again. I went into Mr. Hanson's and asked him if it was his tablecloth, he said it was, and that he lost it about a week; he begged me to call again in about five minutes, she was out; I called again, the prisoner was called into the bar; I immediately knew that she was the same woman that offered me the tablecloth. The prisoner said she never saw me before, nor had she been out of the house. The beadle was sent for, he has had the tablecloth ever since.

JAMES PERRY . I am a beadle. The prisoner was given into my charge, she denied stealing the tablecloth; I searched every thing where she had things, I could not find any thing except these keys, one of them will open a good many drawers. This is the tablecloth.

Prosecutor. it is mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I lived servant with the prosecutor, and in consequence of his losing a tablecloth some day before I left, he said the house maid must be accountable she having them in her charge; unfortunately me and the house maid having words, she swore she would have revenge, and on my coming into the bar to take instruction for the supper, a person came into the house and called for a pint beer and asked me if I had not been into his shop to pawn a tablecloth; I said I had not; he insisted I had, and wished my master to take me in custody; my master said he would consider of it. After he was gone I became passionate, and the next morning the father of the house maid come and abused me very much, he told me he would not mind giving ten pound to make me suffer for the injury I had done to his daughter. Had I been disposed to rob my master there was always plenty of plate about.

Q. to Prosecutor. At the time that this tablecloth was brought to your house did you inquire whether the prisoner was at home - A. I did, she was out of the house, I saw her come in and then I sent for the pawnbroker.

GUILTY , aged 47.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18110918-145

766. JOHN THOMAS YOUNGER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of July , a key, value 1 s. 6 s. a brass cock, value 3 s. and seven pound weight of lead, value 14 d. the property of William George Bell , affixed to his building .

WILLIAM GEORGE BELL . Q. have you any building belonging to you - A. Yes, I have the lease of three houses, 11, 12, and 13, in Little Arthur-street, Goswell-street . I had employed a master sweep to sweep the chimneys. On the 25th of July; the lead work and the cock was safe when the sweep was there. From information I found the prisoner on Monday morning; I asked him to return the key, he denied having it.

WILLIAM BELL , Jun. On Saturday I was at my father's houses, in Arthur-street; I saw the prisoner playing about the house, I left the key in the door, I saw him take it out.

Q. to Prosecutor. When was it you went into the house to ascertain what you had lost - A. On Monday the officer and me went over the wall, the lead was hammered off, and the brass cock taken away from No. 13.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent, I never troubled my head with the key nor any thing else.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Whipped in jail , and discharged.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18110918-146

767. LUCY FOLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of September , a gown value 10 s. a petticoat, value 5 s. an apron, value 2 s. a pair of stockings, value 1 s. a pair of shoes, value 3 s. a cap, value 10 s. and a handkerchief, value 1 s. the property of Samuel West .

ELIZABETH WEST . My husband's name is Samuel West , he is a bricklayer , 14, Newtoners-street, Holborn . I hired the prisoner to work for me, she slept in my place on Friday night, the 13th. At five o'clock on the Saturday morning I missed her and all the articles mentioned in the indictment. I met her on the Monday; she had the petticoat, shoes, apron and cap upon her.

Prisoner's Defence. She lent me the gown, and as for the cap I know nothing of.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18110918-147

768. CATHERINE GODDARD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of August , eleven pounds weight of beef, value 7 s. the property of John Luckit .

JOHN LUCKIT . I am a butcher , 265, Whitechapel . On the 17th August, from information, I watched the prisoner, she had a large cloak on; I saw her take the beef, and put it under her cloak; I pursued her and took her, she dropped the beef, she begged for mercy.

Prisoner's Defence. I have got a small family of four children, none of them earn any thing.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY , aged 45.

Fined 1 s. and discharged.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18110918-148

769. WILLIAM JOHNSTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of September , a towel, value 6 d. and a tablecloth, value 3 s. the property of John Elliott .

JOHN ELLIOTT . I am a publican , I keep the sign of the Feathers, Brown-street, Edgware-road . On Sunday the 15th of this month the prisoner came to my house; he called for a glass of ale and left it at the bar; he went through the house as we supposed to go into the yard; I was not in the house then; my wife went into the kitchen and saw the prisoner coming out; I came in and met the prisoner and my wife together; she said she thought the prisoner had something not his own. He made no answer; I took the towel from under his coat; the tablecloth he pulled out of his coat pocket, I knew them to be mine, they are worth three shillings. He had not the least appearance of being intoxicated.

Prisoner's Defence. I was drunk when I went into the house; I called for a drink of porter; I had occasion to go backwards. If I was to die this moment I have no knowledge about the towel and the tablecloth.

GUILTY , aged 36.

Whipped in Jail and discharged.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18110918-149

770. HANNAH KEPPEL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of August , a shirt, value 1 s. and a pair of stockings, value 6 d. the property of John Hancock .

ANN PARSONS . I take in washing and mangling; I live at No. 17, Stanhope-street , I had a shirt, and a pair of stockings to wash for Mr. Hancock. On the 25th of August the prisoner came in with John Hancock , he is a journey man brass founder; she staid in the kitchen about ten minutes he had occasion to go out, and then she took the shirt and stockings and put them in her apron; I followed her and cried stop thief; she struck me on the face and kicked me several times; she was secured. This is the shirt and stockings.

JOHN HANCOCK . Q, Did Mrs. Parsons wash for you - A. Yes; she had my shirt and stockings on the 25th of August.

Q. Had you known the prisoner before - A. No further than her coming into the Kings Arms, public-house, and asked for a messenger; the landlady recommended me being a lodger in the house; she wanted me to go to the Peacock in the same street with a message, and on my coming back I called at Mrs. Parsons for my shirt and stockings, the prisoner followed me in. The prisoner is quite a total stranger to me. I was not present when the prisoner took the shirt and stockings. The shirt and stockings are mine.

Prisoner's Defence. He desired me to take the shirt and stockings to the Kings Arms his lodgings.

Prosecutor. It is a great falsity.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18110918-150

771. ROBERT CLEAVER and WILLIAM WIDDISON were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 1st of August , a flat of butter, value 1 l. 3 s. the property of Benjamin Hazel .

BENJAMIN HAZEL . I am a cheesemonger in Great Russell-street, Covent Garden. I received a flat of butter of the waggon at the Golden Lion Inn, St. John-street; I put it in a barrow, and wheeled it to Smithfield; I then left it in the care of Edward How , a boy to wheel home; the flat of butter was forty-two pounds, and three pounds ten shillings was the wholesale price.

EDWARD HOW . I was to wheel it home in the barrow; at Fleet Market somebody came up to me and said should he wheel it home for me, that was a boy, he is not here; I had wheeled it from Smithfield to Fleet Market; I let him wheel it, I kept by him.

Q. Now look at these two men, do you know whether you ever see them before - A. No. The boy wheeled it into Fleet-street, he asked me if I would have any beer; I said thank you, and we went into a public-house about the middle of Fleet-street , he told me to leave the wheelbarrow about four doors of the public-house; we did not stop in the public-house ten minutes, then he told me go and look if the barrow was safe; I did; the butter was gone and the wheelbarrow was left.

Q. What became of the person that gave you the beer - A. I do not know, he left me. I went home and told my master the butter was gone.

HENRY TAYLOR . I am a porter, I work at the Golden Lion, St. John-street. On the 1st of August, about nine in the morning, I met Cleaver with a flat of butter on his back in Charterhouse-square, Widdison was with him, I knew them both before by sight; they were about ten yards apart, but both in one direction. I knew the flat, I asked Cleaver where he was going with the flat, Cleaver told me he was carrying it for a gentleman, which was Widdison; there was no other person by him. Widdison told him to come along with it.

He went on into Fan-street, I followed Cleaver, and Widdison went first. When they got into the middle of Fann-street I asked Cleaver to set it down; he set it down. I cut the flat open and shewed the note that was in it to a gentleman, the gentlemen said it did not appear to have been sold by any butter merchant or cheesemonger that morning. Cleaver said he was carrying it for Widdison; Widdison was at the bottom of the street, he went away and left the butter and Cleaver and me. A young man that was with me took the butter, and I took Cleaver to the Golden Lion, and when we came to the Golden Lion the carrier knew that it was delivered to Mr. Hazel. We sent for a constable and gave charge of Cleaver; Cleaver said he was to have sixpence for carrying this flat, of Widdison that was along with him. On the next morning I saw Widdison at Cow Cross, I catched hold of him and asked the carrier to assist me. I told Widdison he must go along with me. I took him to the officer that took the the other in custody, he tried to get away; I gave him in charge of the constable. I know both the prisoners well, I had seen them several times before in Newgate-street, and about Newgate-market. I am sure Widdison was one of the two.

WILLIAM TISSAKER . I am a constable. I took charge of Cleaver, he went quiet with me to the watchhouse. Widdison was brought to me the next morning by the porter and bookkeeper, I took hold of him; as I was going along he made his escape from me. I called out stop thief, and he was stopped.

JOHN BRANSCOMB . I am an officer of the City.

Q. Taylor has said he saw the prisoners go from Charter-house-square from thence into Fan-street, is any part of that in the county - A. Carthusian-street is a narrow street. The whole of the footway is in the county, and on the right hand in the City.

Taylor. The man carried the butter on the left-hand on the flag-stones.

Cleaver's Defence. I had been to market about six o'clock in the morning to buy some potatoes to go out with in the day; I was coming along St. Johns-street, by the Bull's head, I met a man he asked me to carry the flat of butter, and he would give me six pence; I said very well; he put it on my shoulder, and I went on with it.

Widdison's Defence. I am innocent of the charge that is alledged against me; the other prisoner is quite a stranger to me.

CLEAVER - GUILTY , aged 22.

WIDDISDON - GUILTY , aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18110918-151

772. THOMAS FOGERTY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of August , a watch, value 3 l. the property of Charles Powell Milbourn , from his person .

CHARLES POWELL MILBOURN . I am a seaman .

Q. Did you lose a watch on the 29th of August - A. Yes, I was at High-street, Whitechapel, between one and two in the morning, I had been at Mrs. Casheer's in Goodman's yard, in the Minories, I was not intoxicated. I looked at my watch just previous to my leaving the house; I was going to No. 12, Brewer's Wharf, Whitechapel, and coming along Whitechapel High-street I saw the Yorkshire Grey public-house open, I had an inclination to take a glass of gin, I went in, and at the bar I asked for a glass of gin. Immediately three other persons followed me in, the prisoner was one of them, I speak to him with certainty. While I was at the bar the two other men went out after drinking their glasses of gin, leaving the prisoner behind. As soon as I went out of the house, he followed me immediately; he came abreast of me and snatched the watch from my fob.

Q. Did you perceive it done - A. Yes, I immediately cried out stop thief; I did not see any other person but the prisoner, he ran; I pursued him a short way, he was apprehended; he had not gone above thirty yards when the constable of the night took him; he was taken to the watchhouse; he was searched, I was present, the watch was found in his coat pocket; I claimed it immediately. The prisoner said he knew nothing of the watch until it was put in his coat pocket by somebody else. There was no other person near us at the time to have done it; I value the watch at three pounds, it cost me four guineas.

RICHARD HANBRIDGE . I am an headborough of Whitechapel. On the night of the 29th of August I was on duty, I was standing at the corner of Church-lane, between fifty and sixty yards from the Yorkshire Grey, I heard a cry of stop thief, I saw the prisoner running, I caught him by the collar, and stopped him, he said he had got no watch, without my asking a question, I had not charged him with any thing; I dragged him into the watchhouse, the prosecutor was in the watchhouse about two or three minutes afterwards; I searched the prisoner, I pulled his right hand out of his coat pocket, and he had got the watch in his hand. The prosecutor charged the prisoner with having taken his watch; he gave the same account then as he did now; he told me that there was a lady worked in silk inside of his watch; I found that to be correct. The prisoner said he was a man of respectability, and dared me to lock him up in the watchhouse.

Q. Did he tell where he lived - A. No, nor would he tell his name. I have kept the watch ever since.

JOHN SANDERS . Q. I am a watchman opposite of the Yorkshire Grey. I heard the cry of stop thief, the prisoner run from him immediately; I came up to him when he was stopped by Hanbridge; the prosecutor in the watchhouse charged the prisoner with having snatched his watch out of his fob; he described the watch accurately before it was produced.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in the Yorkshire Grey, this gentleman came in intoxicated; I could not finish the glass I had in my hand, he finished it, he called for half a pint of gin and bitters; he drank out of that; he pulled out his watch, and offered it

for sale.

Prosecutor. I did not do any such thing, nor did I drink any bitters, nor ever out of the glass with him.

The prisoner called eight witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18110918-152

773. FRANCES BIAS was indicted for feloniously assaulting George Mackenzie , in the King's highway, on the 5th of September , putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, a watch, value 4 l. his property .

The prosecutor being called, and not appearing in Court, his recognisance was ordered to be estreated, and the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18110918-153

774. SARAH LINE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of August , a shirt, value 7 s. and a shift, value 3 s. the property of James Thompson .

ELIZABETH THOMPSON . I am the wife of James Thompson , I live at No. 12, Freeman's-lane, Islington ; I take in washing. I employed the prisoner. I missed the shirt and the shift when I went to put the linen up to take to my customer; the prisoner had been at my house half a day that day; she left the house before I missed them. I took her up on suspicion. I afterwards found the shirt at Mr. Wildman's.

JOHN HUTT . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner at the prosecutrix's apartment. When I took the prisoner in custody she wanted me to promise her forgiveness; I told her I could not do any such thing. Coming along, the prosecutor and another woman told her they would transport her if she did not tell where the things were; she then told. I went to Mr. Wildman's, the pawnbroker, and found the property; she took a gown and a pair of breeches to redeem the things, I would not suffer her to do it. The prisoner said she had lost the duplicate.

WILLIAM WILDMAN . I am a pawnbroker, at Islington. On the 10th of August the prisoner pledged a shirt and a shift for five shillings.

Prisoner's Defence. Mrs. Thompson said if I would own to it, and give her thirty shillings she would make it up, and no officer should have the hands of me. I hope you will pardon me this time, it is the first time, I will never do the like again.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Fined 1 s. and discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18110918-154

775. NATHANIEL RUSSELL SPENCER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of July , two saddle flaps, value 5 s. two stirrup irons, value 2 s. two trace buckles, value 2 s. the property of William Parry .

WILLIAM PARRY . I am a collar and harness maker , 7l, Islington-road.

Q. On the 26th of July did you lose any saddle-flaps stirrup-irons and trace-buckles - A. Yes, they were on a pentice, as high as a one pair of stair; they were safe on the night of the 25th. I set up till four o'clock in order to detect the prisoner. Finding that he did not not come, I went to bed, and nigh upon half past five Mr. Bellfour called me, and told me some person had been stealing my leather, I got up and pursued the prisoner, and catched him just by the skin market; about half a mile from my house. The saddle flaps had been cut of a whole saddle, he spoiled the saddle. I took them from the prisoner, they were in his hand. The constable found two stirup-irons on him, and two trace-buckles. I asked him how he got them, he said they were mine; I said yes, you rascal, what have you done with the property you took before; he said he took none before.

JOHN BELLFOUR. My father is a schoolmaster. As I was opening the window I saw the prisoner with a knife in his hand, he picked up two saddle-flaps from of the ground. I told my father, and he called Mr. Parry up.

WILLIAM LACK . I am a headborough of Islington, I searched the prisoner. I found two stirrup-irons, two buckles, and knife in his pocket.

Prisoner's Defence. I was passing through the yard, it is an open thoroughfare, I saw the things laying on the ground, I took them up; I did not think I was doing any one an injury.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 37.

Confined Six Months in the House of Corrections , and whipped in Jail .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18110918-155

776. JOSIAH WHARTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of September , a turkey stone, value 5 s. and a saw, value 2 s. the property of John Tanner .

JOHN TANNER . I am a wheelwright , I live near the Stones-end Southwark.

Q. Did you lose a saw at any time, and a turkey stone - A. Yes, I lost them out of my shop, on the 3d of September. I left them on the 2d at night, and missed them the next morning, betwixt six and seven. I saw the turkey stone at the office the next day, and the prisoner in custody; I also missed an axe, it was never found.

JOHN HUTT . I am an office. I apprehended the prisoner in Red-lion-yard, Red-lion-street, Clerkenwell, about two o'clock in the middle of day; he was in bed with his clothes on; when I went into the room I saw a quantity of tools; knowing that Mr. Tanner had lost a turkey stone out of the frame I looked in the drawer, and found that turkey stone was afterwards claimed by Mr. Tanner. I asked the prisoner how he came by it; he said the whole of the tools was his own property. I told him to get up he was my prisoner, he did, I went to hand-cuff him, he made some resistance; I took a pistol out and said I would shoot him; he after that surrendered, I searched about the room and found some duplicates; one a saw, pawned for a shilling, in the name of John Wharton , the pawnbroker produced it before the magistrate, and Mr. Tanner claimed it. I found a quantity of tools in the prisoner's apartment; he said they were his own, he bought them of a man.

THOMAS PAISY . I am shopman to Mr. Chapman,

pawnbroker, 50, St. John Street. I produce a saw, pawned on the 4th of September, this is the duplicate, it corresponds with that produced by Hutt.

Prisoner's Defence. The property was picked up in the street by Newington-causeway, in a nail bag, and more property that is to be owned.

GUILTY , aged 29.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18110918-156

777. JOSIAH WHARTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of September an iron vice, value 12 s. a rule, value 6 d. and a plain, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of John Langridge .

JOHN LANGRIDGE . I am a chair maker , I live at Newington-causeway . All the things were safe in my shop, on the 2d of September when I went to bed, and my shop was locked; a little after six, on the morning of the 3d my lad informed me that some body had been in; I went into the shop, I found the vice was gone, and on the 4th I saw the rule and the plane at the office.

JOHN GOODWIN . I work for Mr. Langridge. On the 2d of September I used the vice and the plane the thing myself, between eight and nine in the evening. I came the next morning at six o'clock, the vice and the plane were gone, and the bag taken from the shop window on the inside. On the next day I saw the vice at Mr. Rhodes's, Vine-street, Clerkenwell; I said I could swear to it. I afterwards took my master there, and Mr. Rhodes had hid it, or taken it away.

RICHARD RHODES . I live at 25, Vine-street, Mutton-lane, I am a tool dealer and smith.

Q. There was a vice found on your premises by a search warrant - A. No, I found it afterwards, it was not upon my premises when the search warrant was executed I was alarmed about the prisoner, in case he had given me a wrong direction where he lived. I took the vice to the office, it was claimed by Mr. Langridge. I bought the vice on the same day of the prisoner, I gave twelve shillings for it; I bought a hatchet the same morning of the prisoner, that was sold to a stranger. This is the vice.

JOHN HUTT . I apprehended the prisoner as I have described on the other indictment. I found the plane on the drawer, and in his pocket I found this three foot rule.

Prisoner's Defence. This property was all concealed in a nail bag. On the morning of the 3d, at half past five I picked it up; after I picked the property up, I thought it was my own. My wife was brought to bed, I sold the vice to make money, and the rest I kept for my own use.

GUILTY , aged 29.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18110918-157

778. LOUISA WOOD was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 14th of September , a handkerchief, value 2 s. the property of Charles Goodwin , from his person .

CHARLES GOODWIN . I am a warehouse keeper , I live at No. 2, Finsbury Terrace. On Saturday, the 15th of September, between ten and eleven in the morning I was going through Broad-street , I stopped at a bookseller's door, to look at a book. I had been there probably a minute, not more. I perceived some persons hand at my right pocket, I turned myself round, and I saw that three women had just passed me; I put my hand into my pocket, my handkerchief was gone, it was a silk handkerchief, I think three minutes before I had used it, I am sure that I had it a short time before. There was no other person near me expect a person reading a book besides these three women, who were apparently in company together. I said to the person that was standing by, that I had my pocket picked; I crossed the street, and I perceived them all three go into a gin shop; I saw the bookseller standing the door, I held up my finger for him to come over to me, he came over; I asked him to procure a constable, I said I had had my pocket picked; he said he would go with me to the gin shop; we went in together, we charged them with one of them picking my pocket, they all denied it, a constable was sent for; before the constable came the prisoner said what a bother you make about your handkerchief, or something to that effect, and took it out of her pocket. Mr. Wright took it from her and gave it to me, I gave the constable charge of her, the others went away; she was afterwards taken before the magistrate, and committed. This is the hand kerchief, it is worth two shillings, its mine.

PETER WRIGHT . I am a bookseller. On Saturday morning I was standing behind the counter, I heard a gentleman say to my boy that he had his pocket picked by these women that went by; I went immediately to the door; I saw a gentleman crossing the street, he held up his finger to come to him, I went; he asked me to get a constable, I said while I am going for a constable they may escape, I said if you chose I will go into the gin shop with you. On going into the gin shop I charged the three women to produce the handkerchief that they had taken out of the gentleman's pocket. I knew the women by passing my door every day; they all denied it at first; I told them it was of no use denying it, the gentleman had kept his eye upon them since they did it. I clapped my back to the door, and said you shall not go out untill you are searched. The landlord sent his son out for a constable, and being so long before he came, the prisoner produced the handkerchief out of her pocket, and said it was of no use to make such a piece of work, is this it; I took it out of her hand, and immediately Mr. Goodwin claimed it. This woman was detained, and the other women were suffered to go about their business.

Prisoner's Defence. On the morning as I was going along Broad Street I met these two women, they asked me if I would have some refreshment; we were walking along to go to the wine-vault's I kicked something before me, I stooped down and picked up a handkerchief, I turned round and saw no one enquiring for it; we went into the wine vault's; a little time after this gentleman came in, he said one of you women have got a handkerchief, presently the other said one of you picked this gentleman's pocket, I made answer I picked up a handkerchief, I do not know who it belongs to; is this the handkerchief, and immediately I handed it to one of the gentlemen.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18110918-158

779. CATHERINE MULLIGAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of September , a gold ring, value 5 s. the property of Joseph Christie and William Christie .

JAMES GODDARD. I am an apprentice to Joseph and William Christie , pawnbrokers , 59, Lower East Smithfield . On the 3d of September, in the evening, about half past seven, the prisoner came in to redeem a bed-gown pledged for a shilling; while the bed gown was gone for she asked me to shew her a card of plain gold rings; I did, and counted ten on the card before I gave her the card, she returned the card with nine on it; she said there were not any that would suit her; I saw instantly there was one missing. I told the prisoner as soon as I had counted them again, that she had got one of my rings; she said it was her own ring, she had it on her finger; I told her I would send for an officer if she did not give me the ring; she said I might, it was her own ring; I sent for an officer, she staid in the shop untill he came, and persisted in her innocence; she was searched, and no other ring was found but that one on her finger.

Q. Had you observed when she came in whether she had a ring on her finger - A. No. I saw a bit of thread on the ring on her finger, I told her of it.

MARIA MILLER . I came in the shop after the prisoner had the ring on her finger; there was a bit of thread hanging down; she turned her back to the counter, and bit the thread off.

JOHN FREEMAN . When the prisoner was brought to the office she had the ring on her finger, she said it had been on ten years, I could not get it off. I got it off easy, it was perfectly new. After that she said she had it on fourteen years. There was no other ring found on her.

Q. to Goddard. Is that a new ring - A. I do not know; it is a plain gold ring.

Prisoner's Defence. My husband bought the ring, I had it fourteen years.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY , aged 32.

Confined Fourteen Days in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18110918-159

780. EDWARD PHILLIPS was indicted for that he, on the 31st of July , feloniously did set fire to a house belonging to Thomas Lane , with intent to injure him . And

OTHER COUNTS for like offence, only varying the manner of charging them.

The case was stated by Mr. Gurney.

HENRY COHEN . I live at 69, High-street, Shadwell, in the parish of St. Paul, Shadwell . I am a taylor and slop-seller .

Q. Did the prisoner live next door to you, No. 70 - A. He did, he is a dealer in potatoes .

Q. Beyond him does a person live of the name of Andrews - A. Yes.

Q. On the 31st of July were you the last person in your house that went to bed - A. Yes, and it was always my custom to rake the fire out myself, and see that every thing was safe. I went to bed about half past ten or later, it was not eleven.

Q. What does your family consist of - A.Myself, my wife, and one child, my maid servant and shopman; the shopman sleeped in the shop.

Q. Your wife was far advanced in pregnancy - A. Yes, she has since been brought to bed. The prisoner's family consisted of himself, his wife, and two children, the oldest about six or seven years old.

Q. On the 31st of July, between twelve and one o'clock, were you awoke - A. I was, by a smoke or smother of fire. I sleep in the back room, up one pair of stairs.

Q. Mr. Cohen, look at that plan, and tell me whether that plan correctly describes Mr. Phillips's house, and yours - A. Yes, that is as near as possible.

Q. You told me that you awoke with a great smell of fire - A. Yes, I came out of bed, I found the room all of a smoke; I went down stairs, I found the flames coming through a crevise from between the lath and plaster that came into my passage from a partition between my house and Mr. Phillips's, there is no brick wall to these houses, there is nothing but lath and plaster on my side, and waistcoat on Mr. Phillips's side.

Q. And the flames were coming through the lath and plaster in your house - A. Yes, between the skirting board and the floor. When I found the flames coming at the foot of the stairs I called the servant first, because she had a child in the two pair, and my wife I called all to come down stairs; I had nothing on but my shirt. I went to the street door, I called the boy, he was sleeping under the counter. I opened the street door, there was a watchman there, I gave the alarm there was a fire; the watchman sprang his rattle, then there were some more watchmen came up. The watchman that I called first, he went in doors with me, his name is Street; he then asked me if I could get any water; I told him I would give him what I had; I believe it was three or four pails; I gave him all I had.

Q. After he had throwed some water and damped the fire did he break in the plaster - A. Yes, with his cutlass, and with his foot he kicked it away; he threw more water in, and I went out, and made further alarm.

Q. After you had used what water you had what further did you do - A. I went into the yard. We have only one yard to the two houses, the back of his house is in my yard.

Q. So that you could get at the back door of Phillips's house - A. Yes. I knocked as loud as I could, I could not get any answer; I then went to the prisoner's street door, there were several people knocking there before I came out, and then as I was not answered; I tried to save what property I had; I was still in my shirt; I kept moving my things, and therefore did not attend to what was

going on in the street; the watchman still continued knocking with their sticks at Phillip's door full five minutes.

Q. Where you in the street when Phillips came to the window - A. Yes, I was crossing the road, he opened the sash and stood at the window; I saw him with a silk handkerchief round his neck, and something like a dark or black waistcoat, and lower I could not see.

COURT. Had he his coat - A. No.

Mr. Gurney. Was that the room that he and his wife slept in - A. Yes.

Q. His chamber is over the shop door where they were making this noise - A. Yes. When he appeared at the window he asked what was the matter, some of the people cried out, come down stairs, your house is a fire. He said, I cannot come down for the smoke, get me a ladder. There was a great many people about the door, they said break the door open. I heard many people say if he could not get down for the smoke he must know that the house was on fire without asking that question The people upon that cried out, break open the door; some of them broke open the pannel of the door before the engine came, then with a crow the door was broken open. I then got to the house, I looked in and saw Mr. Phillips in the shop; in a minute after the door was broken open. I saw him first, and his wife about a minute afterwards.

Q. How was he with respect to his dress - A. He was completely dressed and all his clothes on exactly as I saw him the day before, and his wife was completely dressed.

Q. The door that was broken open by the mob was the shop door in the street - A. Yes, the private door was not broken open.

Q. The fire was I believe put put out in a short time - A. Yes, I suppose it was not above ten minutes.

Q. After the fire was put out do you remember any person asking the prisoner whether he was insured - A. Yes, he said he was insured some years at the Phoenix; he did not say to what amount Some gentlemen there asked him how his skirting-board, came to be off, he said the rats had knawed it off, and it had been so some time. I remember his being asked how the fire began. He said it must be in the next house, meaning mine. He made use of abusive language to me, and said that I had lighted coals and shavings in my coal-hole.

Q. In point of fact that was not true - A. No, I had no lighted shavings in my coal-hole

Q. In a short time afterwards did your servant shew you some turpentine chips - A. Yes. I gave them to Mr. Harmer.

JAMES HARMER . Q. Did you receive these chips of the witness - A. I did, I have kept them ever since.

Mr. Cohen. I received them of my servant girl, I was standing at the door, I asked Mr. Phillips how the turpentine chips came there meaning where the fire was; he said, you must have put it there; I had not; I never had a bit of that sort of stuff in my house.

Q. Before the watchman cut that plastering away to extinguish the fire had you any place to put them in there - A. There was not a hole to put my finger in.

Q. Were you present when the firemen shewed the prisoner some rags - A. I was. They called me in and asked me if they were mine; they asked Phillips, he said they were not his; the fireman came and asked me, I told them I had no such thing in the house. Mr. Phillips then said if they are not yours I suppose they must be mine.

Q. Are you the sole occupier of the house you live in - A. I am. I hold the lease under Mr. Thomas Lane, I pay my rent to him.

Mr. Alley. You are a salesman - you deal in shoes and old clothes - A. I seldom deal in old clothes, but if I buy them I sell them again.

Q. You deal in new and old clothes - you need not be ashamed of it - A. I am not ashamed of it.

Q. You have lived two or three years next door to the defendant - A. About two years.

Q. There is a passage between your house and the defendant's - A. I do not understand you.

Mr. Gurney. There is a private entery into your house - A. Yes.

Mr. Alley. Your man slept in the shop - A. He did, he is here.

Q. When you discovered the smoke you said you ran down stairs and alarmed your own family - A. Yes.

Q. It is very natural you should, and after that you went and alarmed your neighbour - A. Yes, I did.

Q. And it was after that about four or five minutes that you saw him at the window - A. Yes.

Q. You of course were a great deal agitated, you cannot say correctly to the time - A. No. It was long enough to wake him if he was asleep.

Q. That depends upon how a man might sleep - When the watchman came you and he forced your way into the passage and endeavoured to force down the lath and plaster in order to extinguish the fire - A. I did not touch it; the watchman did it. I was there at the time.

Q. You have said there was lath and plaster on your side, and wainscot of his side, was not the inside of his place covered over with paper - A. The bottom part of his parlour is wainscot, it comes up as high as the paper.

Q. Above that was there any thing but paper, and under that canvas - A. I did not see any canvas.

Q. The next morning you went to the police office - A. I never went to any police office before Mr. Harmer took me, that was a week after.

Q. Was there any examination until the week after - A. No. there was not.

Q. The prisoner attended, did not he - A. He was fetched by an officer.

Q. You said he was fetched by an officer, you would have us infer from that that he was brought against his consent - A. I know an officer fetched him. I do not know whether he came against his consent.

Q. He remained in his own house a week, so that he might have run away if he had been so disposed - A. Yes.

Q. Then he was a week at home before he went to the office - A. It was some days; I cannot say it was

a week.

Mr. Gurney. Was any part of your house burned - A. There was the joists began to be burned in my one pair of stairs back room; the boards were beginning to burn, and that was just under the head of my bed.

ELIZABETH COHEN . I am the wife of Henry Cohen . I was awoke as well as my husband by the smell of this fire; we both awoke together; the room was in a great smoke.

Q. Did your husband get out of bed and go down stairs - A. He did; I went out of the room door and perceived the flames. I could see them from my staircase.

Q. Did these flames proceed from the partition of your house and Mr. Phillips's - A. It proceeded through the skirting board, it was breaking through at that place. I ran up stairs and called the servant to bring the child down, she came down directly. Afterwards I ran down stairs and stood at the street door. I did not stop to dress myself. I desired the servant to carry the child to a place of safety, and to come back to help us to save our property.

Q. Did you endeavour to save what property you could. I did not move any property, I stood at the street door to see that no person should take any thing away.

Q. After you came down stairs was there any knocking at Mr. Phillips's door - A. Yes, there was a great knocking.

Q. How long did that knocking last before Mr. Phillips opened the window - A. I should imagine near five minutes.

Q. Was the noise considerable - A. The noise was very great, there were people from two dozen houses off they had carelessly put on their clothes and come there.

Q. Was the noise in your judgement loud enough to wake the soundest sleeper before Mr. Phillips came - A. I think it was.

Q. Had you yourself any knowledge whatever by what means the fire took place - A. I could partly guess.

Q. Could it have taken place at your house - A. No, it could have not.

SAMUEL NATHAN. Q. You are in the service of Mr. Cohen - A. I was then, I slept underneath the counter in the shop.

Q. Did your master awake you - A. Yes; I opened the door, and went into the street. Mr. Cohen and me went out together; Mr. Cohen gave the alarm to the watchmen; the watchman came in and endeavoured to put the fire out; I saw Mr. Cohen go first to Mr. Phillips's back door and call Mr. Phillips, he had no answer, he went to the front door.

Q. Did other people join in making a noise at the front door - A. Yes. The rattle sprang first.

Q. At last did Phillips speak at the window - A. Yes, he opened the window and put his head out, he had no coat on, he had something dark about his body like a waistcoat, and a handkerchief round his neck, he asked what was the matter; some of the men made answer, come down, your house is a fire; he directly replied he could not come down for the smoke without going back to look, I went in doors.

Q. After that the people broke the door open and got in - A. Yes.

Q. When the people got in did you see Mr. Phillips in his shop - A. I did not. I was taking some things out of my master's house, I afterwards saw Mrs. Phillips bring a large bundle over to Mrs. Hamert's, I looked inside of it, it did not look like things gathered together in a hurry; they were wrapped up quite smooth as far as I could see.

Q. Did the fire take place in your master's house - A. No, I am sure of that.

Mr. Alley. What time did you go to to bed - A. Between ten and eleven; I am sure it was before eleven.

Q. You had a candle to go to bed - A. Yes, but Mr. Cohen always fetched it down himself. There was nothing of Mr. Cohen's moved until we were alarmed.

Mr. Gurney. The fire was in the back part of the house - A. Yes.

Q. Therefore the fire was several feet from the shop - A. Yes.

JOHN STREET . I am a watchman.

Q. On the night of the 31st of July did Mr. Cohen come out of his house and give you an alarm - A. Yes, of fire; I went up directly. Another watchman sprang the rattle. I ran in and found the fire in Mr. Cohen's passage, coming out of Mr. Phillips's place, underneath the skirting board; I told him to fetch me some water, I throwed it along the skirting board to damp the fire; I made a hole with my cutlass, told him to fetch me another; I kicked it with my foot, and got more water, I threw three or four pales into the hole.

Q. Before you made that hole was there any hole - A. None that I saw.

Q. Did Mr. Cohen go out and alarm Mr. Phillips's house - A. He went out to get more water; I did not take notice, I kept in Mr. Cohen's house entirely.

Q. Did you hear the noise made in calling to the prisoner - A. I did not. I minded my business,

HENRY BLAND . I am a watchman, my beat is a short distance from the prisoner's house, I heard a rattle spring, and the alarm of fire. I ran to the engine house and got the engine. The engine house in one hundred yards or better from the prisoner's house. I assisted in bringing the engine.

Q. When you came with the engine was the prisoners house open - A. It was not. There was about five or six people assembled; the first person that I saw was the officer of the night, he and I rapped at the door, he with his staff, and I with my large stick that I carry every night, we got no answer. I called to Thomas to give me the crow out of the engine.

Q. Was the knocking loud enough to wake any person - A. Yes, except by reason of the smoke a person might sleep sounder.

Q. If any person was dressing they must have heard you - A. Yes.

Q. Before you used a crow did any body break a pannel in - A. Yes, some person, but who it was I cannot tell. With the crow that I had in my hand I broke open the door.

Q. When you had got in the shop did you see the

prisoner - A. I did not: It was two or three minutes after I was in the house, I went to the fire; the first thing when I got into the shop I could see it; the fire was in the back parlour, it seemed to me as if it was burning from the skirting board all the way up to the ceiling; with the crow I strove to knock part of it down, and after I found two butts of water in Mr. Phillips's cellar. I went up stairs to get assistance to get the water up. I went then to get the other engine up. I was not in the house again after the fire was extinguished.

Q. After you had been in the house two or three minutes you saw the prisoner - A. I did, I saw him dressed; I asked him if his family were in the house; he said they were; I said for God's sake, Mr. Phillips get them out as soon as possible. Thomas Elliott asked him why he did not come sooner; he said he could not get down sooner, there was so much smoke.

JOHN BATTERSBY. I am an oil and colourman, my house is directly opposite of the prisoners. The moment I heard the alarm of fire I came down in my shirt, and the first person that I saw in the street was Mr. Cohen in his shirt. I took some things of his to save.

Q. At this time were there any people in the street - A. I do not think there were, except the watchmen, they were knocking at the prisoner's door, and the rattles were springing in the street,

Q. You I believe returned to your wife to make her hear - A. I did; the knocking continued till I returned.

Q. How long did the knocking continue - A. From five to ten minutes. I could not say exactly.

Q. I ask you from the noise that was made, and the calling and the springing of the rattles was it possible that they must be awake - A. I think they must; I was awake before that by the noise, at last he opened the one pair of stairs window; his first words were, what was the matter; the people said, come down, your house is a fire; he said I cannot for the smoke, he gave that answer directly.

COURT. Did the smoke issue out of the window - A. There was smoke in the room, it was not so much smoke as that. The watchmen were endeavouring to get the door open, a crow was obtained, and the door was broken open.

Q. How soon after the door had been opened and the watchmen entered did you see the prisoner - A. A short time, I stood near; it could not exceed three minutes the outside; he was dressed completely; I saw nothing wanting. I was present when Mr. Cohen asked him who put the turpentine chips where the fire had been; he replied, you must have put them there, you know you have lighted coals and shavings in your coal-hole. I directly got a candle and went and searched the coal-hole. I found nothing of the kind.

HANNAH ATKINSON . I am a servant to Mr. Cohen.

Q After the fire was extinguished did you search between the partition of the house, the lathe and plaster - A. I went to clean the rubbish away; I found some turpentine chips, I immediately gave them to my master.

Q. Had they been on fire - A. I cannot say. I found them between Mr. Phillips's skirting and my master's. They were in the state I found them.

Q. Was that the spot from whence the fire proceeded - A. It was.

Q. Of your knowledge had that fire proceeded from your master's house at all - A. No.

Mr. Alley. That is as far as you know, you did not set it on fire yourself - A. No.

Mr. Gurney. Was there any hole in that place before the opening was made to put the fire out - A. No, there was not.

BENJAMIN BERRY . Q. Were you in Mr. Cohen's house when the maid-servant was clearing away the rubbish - A. Yes, I saw the maid find the turpentine chips, they were tucked down between the two skirting boards of Mr. Cohen's house, and Mr. Phillips's house.

THOMAS WHITE . I am a fireman of the Phoenix fire-office.

Q. At what time did you come to this fire - A. About half an hour after it. About two hours afterwards I searched, and found a piece of a towel among the rubbish between the skirting boards, it appeared to have been a towel, because it had a piece of tape to it; I asked Mr. Phillips if it belonged to him; he told me no. I then said, Mr. Cohen does this towel belong to you; he said, let me look; I gave it into his hand, he said it is canvas, I do not keep any canvas towels in my house. I found it within the skirting board that was loose when I came there, and the hole open. It burnt all the way up on Phillips's side. I did not go into the other house. It was all open when I went in; the edges of the rafters had been on fire right up.

Q. Can you tell me whether the fire had come out of the floor of that room - A. Yes, I dare say a foot or ten inches. This is the skirting board. This is the inside of it.

Q. I observed the inside is all burnt and charred - A. It is so.

Q. If the skirting board had remained in its place could the floor have been burnt without that being burnt through - A. I do not think it could, it must have been pulled out at this end.

Q. It must have been out at least a foot at the time of the fire, or else it must have burnt the board through - A. I should think so.

Q. to Mr. Harmer. I believe you attended the examination of the prisoner - A. I saw him before the examination at his house; he admitted that the towel that had been found was his, that it had been hanging on a chair, or a table in the parlour.

GEORGE HORN . Q. After the fire did you rip up the boards of Mr. Cohen's chamber - A. I did.

Q. In what state did you find the rafters and timber under the boards - A. They were not burnt at all. A beam in the passage was burnt which ran under the ceiling. I helped to put the fire out. I live the fourth house from the fire. The noise brought me to the fire.

Q. In what state were the boards in - A. They were hot, and a deal of steam came from them when I took them up.

RICHARD BOLTON . I live nearly opposite to the prisoner. A little after twelve o'clock I was awoke by hearing a great noise in the neighbourhood, I immediately

leaped out of bed and ran to the window; I saw a few people collected at Mr. Phillips's house nearly opposite of me, I called out to know what was the matter, the watchman answered me the house was on fire; I told the watchman to go down the street to spring his rattle and alarm the neighbourhood. I went over as soon as I had dressed myself in a hurry, I went over, the door had been broken open, the engine had arrived; the first person I saw was Mr. Fletcher in the shop, and within half a minute I saw the prisoner, he and his wife appeared to be dressed, the fire was burning rather smartly.

Q. How soon was it extinguished - A. Perhaps in ten minutes, and after the fire was extinguished by the exertions of Mr. Fletcher, myself and others that assisted, it certainly struck me that it was not an accident I thought so then, I think so now, I expressed myself so then. The prisoner was a dealer in potatoes.

Q. You saw the stock he had and the household furniture - A. I did.

Q. In your judgement what was the utmost value of all the property in the house - A. Not more than thirty pounds; I saw but one bed, there were three or four chairs in the bed room, and two or three in the back parlour, the other rooms were empty.

THOMAS ANDREWS . I live at 71, next door to the prisoner on the other side to Mr. Cohen.

Q. On the night of the 31st were you alarmed by the smell of fire - A. My wife awoke first, she awoke me, I opened the back window on the ground floor, I smelled fire, it was then near one o'clock; my bed being backwards is against the private passage in the prisoner's house, I heard Mr. Phillips's voice, he was walking on the same floor, that is the ground floor.

Q. Did you hear any other person walking besides himself - A. I did not pay any attention, I heard him, I am quite sure of that, he appeared to me to be in the parlour behind the shop; I heard him about three minutes after I was alarmed.

Mr. Alley. You sleep on the ground floor in the back parlour - A. Yes.

Q. The fire that happened was not on the side of the house that you sleep, but on Cohen's side - A. Yes.

Q. His door to go into the parlour is out of the shop is it not - A. I do not know the premises.

Q. How came you to swear as you have done, you have been swearing as if you had an accurate knowledge of this man's place - A. I know my own.

Q. You said your wife awoke you, and in two or three minutes you heard the man walk about the room - A. Yes, and likewise talk.

Q. Was he talking loud - A. He talked as I heard him, I cannot say who he was talking to.

Q. You said it was his foot that was walking across the floor, so that you swear to a man's foot, and swear to the description of premises you have never seen. Is your wife here - A. She is not, she knows more, she is indisposed.

Q. You have sworn, and mean to be believed, that you know it was the prisoner's foot that was walking across the floor - A. I have sworn it.

Q.You shall swear why. had you a light in your room - A. Yes.

Q. You could not see through the wall - A. No.

Q. How do you expect to be believed that this man was walking across the floor - A. I swear to his voice.

Q. You cannot tell who he was talking to - A. No.

Mr. Gurney. You have been asked who he was talking to. Does the prisoner's wife live with him - A. Always, I cannot say whether she was there that night, I heard a talking at the same time I heard the walking.

COURT. Was it a man's or a child's foot - A. I cannot say that.

DANIEL DAVIS . Q. I believe you are surveyor to the Phoenix fire-office - A. I am.

Q. Did you go the prisoner's house after this fire had taken place - A. I did, I examined the spot where the fire was, at the moment I saw it I told Mr. Phillips it was not accidental; upon my oath I have no doubt of it.

Mr. Alley. You are surveyor to the Phoenix office - A. Yes, one of them.

Q. And you say it was the effect of design - A. Yes.

Q. You communicated it to the gentlemen of the fire-office - A. Yes.

Q. The office does not prosecute - A. So it seems.

JOSHUA GARRETT . I am clerk in the Phoenix fire office.

Q. In the month of January last, did the prisoner apply at your office to make an insurance - A. Either him or somebody applied for him. There was a policy of insurance effected.

ISAAC DE YOUNG. Q. Did you serve copies of these two notices on the prisoner - A. Yes, on Saturday, and on the day before. (Notices read.)

JOHN LOCKEY. I am in the employ of the Phoenix fire company. I remember delivering a policy at the prisoner's house, in February, 1808. I delivered it to a female.

MR. GARRETT. I produce the minutes from which the policy was made. On the 29th of January, 1811; the amount is four hundred pounds, one hundred pounds stock in trade, hundred and fifty pounds in furniture, and hundred and fifty pounds the lease. The policy is a transcript of that minute.

Mr. Alley. You do not know that the prisoner ever received that policy - A. I cannot tell.

JOHN PAWLIN . I am an assessor of damaged furniture to the Phoenix fire office. I saw the fire after it happened.

Q. Did the prisoner present any thing to you for the loss by fire - A. He did, to the amount of fourteen pound one shilling.

JAMES PAWLIN . Q. Did you go on the morning of the fire to the prisoner's house - A. I did, I asked him if he could give any account how the fire happened; he told me no; I asked him what he did upon the alarm of fire, he said upon being alarmed he went down stairs in his shirt, that he ran into the parlour where the fire was, and from the smoke where the fire was he could not get out, he then said he returned up stairs, and dressed himself, and his wife and children.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel.

SAMUEL LLOYD , I am a watchman. I went to

ist with the engine; the fire was burning when I came. Bland broke the door open. I went in; I saw the prisoner up one pair of stairs, he was undressed and his wife was undressed; I took the boy down stairs, I went up again and took the girl down.

Q. What was Mr. Phillips, doing - A. I do not know; I did not see him any more.

PETER ANDREWSON . I am headborough of the Parish. At the alarm of fire I went and broke open the pannel of the prisoner's door.

Q. When you went into the house did you see the prisoner - A. I saw him before I went in the house, I saw Mr. Cohen's people carrying goods over at that time, both parties were strangers to me; I ran to the first man on the opposite side of the way; I asked him what he was about, he said the next house was on fire. I said it was a surprizing thing to me, that his house should be on fire and your goods almost out. As I went over the prisoner opened the window, and said, for God's sake save my life and my wife and children, I am almost choaked with smoke; he was in his shirt. I could not see any more than his arms, head and shoulders.

Q. Were there many people there at that time - A. No more than Cohen's people, and a sailor that I could observe.

COURT. Why the watchman was there, was not he - A. No. I said my friend, there is no ladder to be got now, if there is any thing that you have in the house that is not on fire. I mentioned beds, blankets; I said there were two of us, and by the help of God I would save their children, I waited for a minute or two, but seeing nothing throwed out of the window I broke the pannel of the door, in about ten or eleven minutes the engine came; Bland called for the crow, forced the door in. Bland, Clew, the beadle and the sailor went in, and after I had taken the door away I ran for the water, I saw the prisoner after the fire was over, he had his clothes on then.

Mr. Gurney. Then the prisoner threw up the window, and called for you to assist, ten minutes before the engine came up - A. Yes, or more.

Q. Might it not be a quarter of an hour before the engine came - A. I cannot be sure, it might be minute over or under.

Q. How long was the engine there before you broke open the door - A. The engine was not there two minutes before the door was thrown in the street.

Q. Then as long as a quarter of an hour before the engine came, the prisoner knew the house was on fire A. Most undoubtedly.

JOSEPH BROWN. I am a labourer in the rope ground, I arrived between twelve and one at the fire, I saw the door broken open, Mr. Phillips looked out of the window, with a white shirt on.

Mr. Gurney. Did not the engine come directly after he spoke to you - A. Yes.

SARAH BROWN . Q. You and your husband work in the rope ground - A. Yes, I was alarmed, I went to the fire, I stood by the shop door before it was broken open, I saw the prisoner look out of the window, with a white shirt on, that was just before the door was broken open.

The prisoner called nine witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH ; aged 52.

The prisoner was recommended to His Royal Highness the Prince Regent's mercy, on account of his good character.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110918-160

781. ANN HOUSE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of September , a watch, value 3 l. the property of Edward Davis , from his person .

EDWARD DAVIS . I am a labourer . On the 1st of September I met the prisoner in Fleet-market, I spoke to her, we went into a house in Chick-lane ; I was in the house with her about five or six minutes, I am sure I had the watch in my fob when I was the house with her, and when I came down stairs I found I had lost my watch, I charged her with taking the watch; there was nobody near me in the house but the prisoner. It was a silver watch, I gave four pounds for it about a year ago.

JAMES THOMAS . I am a constable, on Saffron-hill. On Saturday the 1st of September, between five and six o'clock, Davis and the prisoner came to my house together, he charged her with stealing his watch; I searched her, and found nothing.

JOHN BARNLEY . I am a constable. Thomas and I were together. We did not go to search the house I was sure they knew how told things in that house.

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutor took me to the house in Chick-lane, and when he came down stairs he said he had lost his watch, I never parted from his company untill the constable had me.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18110918-161

782. THOMAS M'GOWEN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of August , a watch, value 2 l. the property of Joseph Kenworthy , from his person .

JOSEPH KENWORTHY . I am a carpenter , I live at Poplar.

Q. Did you lose a watch on the 13th of August - A. Yes, in the King's-head, and I fell asleep.

THOMAS PRITCHARD . I was in the King's-head on the 13th of August, the prosecutor sat along side of me, he was very much in liquor, the prisoner was in the same box facing of him; the prisoner leaned over the table and drew the watch from his person; I immediately informed the landlord. I wanted the prisoner to give it up to the landlord, he refused; the headborough was sent for, the headborough kept the watch and took the prisoner into custody.

GEORGE HIND . I am an officer. Kenworthy and the landlord gave me charge of the prisoner, I went to the box, Pritchard had got hold of the prisoner by the collar; he said this man has got Kenworthy's watch, it is in his right waistcoat pocket; he made as if he would strike me. I said you villian if you strike me I will knock you down. I took the watch out of his pocket, I have it here.

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutor laid down and took his watch out; I said, you give it me, you are not able to take care of it: Pritchard asked me to give it him; I said I would not. Then they asked me to give it the landlord. The headborough shoved me, he said you rascal, where is the man's watch, so he took it out of my pocket.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and Publicly Whipped .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18110918-162

783. STEPHEN CLIFTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of July , a pair of sheets, value 10 s. two tablecloths, value 4 s. the property of William Mitchell ; a gown, value 5 s. three caps, value 3 s. a habit shirt; value 1 s. a handkerchief, value 1 s. a duster, value 1 d. and a piece of cotton, value 6 d. the property of Esther Sculthorp .

ESTHER SCULTHORP . I am a servant to William Mitchell , in the New-road. On the 28th of July, about six o'clock, a little girl gave me information, I saw the prisoner go up the area steps, I called out stop him; I pursued him, he was stopped about six yards from my master's house, he had the things with him at the time, and brought them all back to the door; upon examining it, it was all the articles mentioned in the indictment. I went into the kitchen and saw they all had been taken out of the drawer. I had seen them all in the drawer at four o'clock. The prisoner said I had got all the things again, I might as well let him go.

- WHITEHAIR. I am a constable. I took charge of the prisoner; he said two gentlemen coming by, they said, if he would go down into the gentleman's house and bring the things up they would give him half a crown.

Prisoner's Defence. I am not guilty.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18110918-163

784. JOSEPH SWABEY HOLLINGSHEAD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of September , a silver ladle, value 50 s. the property of Sebastian Lopez

The prosecutor was called, and not appearing in court, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18110918-164

785. JOHN HALLIFAX was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of August , thirty pounds weight of lead, value 7 s. 6 d. and three pounds weight of solder, value 3 s. the property of Robert Fell .

ROBERT FELL . I live at Holloway, I am a plumber , the prisoner was journeyman to me about seven or eight days. On the 17th of August, the prisoner was working at a new house of Mr Pocock's; I had sent the cart there the day before with lead. The officer brought the prisoner to me with the lead and solder; he said he had stopped the prisoner with this lead; the prisoner said he hoped I would be merciful to him, it was his first offence, and it was my property.

JOHN LIMBRICK . I am a Bow-street patrol On Saturday, about nine o'clock in the evening, I stopped the prisoner in Penton-street, Pentonville; he had this lead tied up in a handkerchief on his shoulder; I asked him what he was going to do with it; he said he was going to meet his master at Aldgate to do a job there; I took him back, and sent for his master; his master denied it; I asked him if he had got any more; he said no; I searched his waistcoat pocket, and found this folder.

Prosecutor. The lead is worth about seven shillings and sixpence.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence; called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Whipped in Jail and discharged.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18110918-165

786. JOHN KING was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of August , three pewter pint pots, value 6 s. the property of Joseph Kendall .

JOSEPH KENDALL . I keep the Mitre public-house, Chancery lane . On the 1st of August, a little after four o'clock, the prisoner came in he had half a pint of beer, he stopped while he drank his beer, and then went away. The prisoner was brought back in about an hour and a half by the constable; the constable had the pots, I knew them to be mine.

WILLIAM STEVENS . I am a constable. I stopped the prisoner on Saffron Hill, he was in a house when I took him.

Q.What house was it - A. A green grocers and coal shed, he went in and had some little conversation with the parties there at the bottom of the stairs, I took him; I saw a pot sticking out of his small clothes. I took a quar pot from him then that belonged to Mr. Norman. On my taking him to the watchhouse a pint pot dropped out of his coat pocket, and the party behind saw it drop, he gave it me. He was searched and three pint pots were found on him; there were two ale glasses, found on him, one in each breeches pocket.

- BARNESLEY. I am an officer. I was with Stevens, his account is true. The prisoner had four pounds and sixpence in his pocket.

GUILTY , aged 55.

Confined Two Years in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18110918-166

787. PETER RILEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of June , a pair of overalls, value 5 s. the property of Thomas Dimmock .

THOMAS DIMMOCK . I am a cow-keeper to Mr. Wetherall, I wore the overalls in days and left them at nights in the cow-house.

Q. When had you last seen them before you found them upon the prisoner - A.About seven weeks.

Q. Was the prisoner employed upon the same premises - A. He had been, but not at that time. On the 30th of July I saw the prisoner, I said the overalls were mine; he said he bought them on the latter end of May; I had him taken in custody. These are the overalls, they are mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought them in Monmouth-street, of a jew that was passing by

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18110918-167

788. JAMES BRADFORD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of July , a mahogany board, value 1 l. the property of William

Turner.

WILLIAM TURNER . I am a cabinet-maker , No. 10, Mount-street, Bethnal Green .

ROBERT CLARK . I am a watchman. I took the prisoner in Swan-street, a few yards from the prosecutor's house about three o'clock in the morning, I asked him who the board belonged to, he was returning with it, I thought he had stolen it; he said it belonged to his brother. I asked him again afterwards, he said two men had given it him, he was to carry it to a certain place, they would pay him for his trouble.

Prosecutor. I saw the board safe in my yard on the Saturday night. On Monday morning, at three o'clock, I was called up by the watchman, he had she prisoner in custody, and the board. This is the mahogany board, it is mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I work along with my father.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Fined 1 s. and discharged.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18110918-168

789. JOHN KELLY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of August a bushel and a half of oats, value 5 s. the property of John Isaacs .

JOHN ISAACS. I am master of a coach at Tottenham, at the Roebuck-yard , I have stables, and a loft to keep corn in over the stables; John Beadle was my horse-keeper, he had the care of my corn. The prisoner was a stranger to me. In consequence of suspicion I directed Spencer the constable to watch my place. The prisoner lived in Kingsland road, he was a rag and iron dealer .

- SPENCER. I am a constable in Tottenham. I was directed by Mr. Isaacs to watch his stable. I put myself in a place to observe without being seen, the first hat I observed was Kelly's boy bringing the horse and cart into the Roebuck yard, the horse and cart was put under the shed; a little white afterwards the prisoner Kelly came.

Q. What was in the cart - A. Rags and baskets of iron. When the prisoner came he took the baskets out, and cleared the corner of the cart.

Q. How far was the cart and horse from Mr. Isaacs stable. - A. About three or four yards. After he had cleared the cart I saw Beadle the horse-keeper bring corn in a sack, and he put it in the cart, Kelly was then standing in the hind part of the cart; after the sack was put in the cart Kelly then got in the cart and covered it up with some things over the sack containing the corn.

Q. You did not know at that time that the sack contained corn - A.No, he covered it over with rags so as to conceal it, he then backed the cart out and got into the street; I went after him and came up to the cart about ten yards from the Roebuck yard, I told him he was my prisoner, I took him for receiving corn belonging to Mr. Isaacs; he said he did not know that there was any corn in his cart. I took out the corn and the sack before his face.

Q.Did you find it covered with rags - A Yes, it was. I took out the sack, it contained oats, more than a bushel. I saw the direction on the cart, John Kelly , in some court, Kingsland-road, he was a ragman. I have seen him often go up and down.

Q. Did Mr. Isaacs see the oats afterwards - A. Yes. The sack did not belong to Mr. Isaacs.

Q. You saw the sack of oats come out of Mr. Isaacs' stable - A. Yes.

Q. Did you know Beadle - A. Yes, he was tried and convicted here. I have know him this twenty years, he is a labourer.

Q. He is not a man able to buy corn, is he - A. No.

Q. What did Beadle say for himself in the presence of Kelly - A. His master wished me to let him alone till he had done his work. I let him alone till he had done his work. The corn is here in the sack.

Prisoner's Defence. I am as innocent as a child unborn, I know nothing at all about it.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18110918-169

790. SAMUEL SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of August , a watch, value 4 l the property of Joseph Williams .

JOSEPH WILLIAMS. I live at No. 8, High-street, Islington, I am a carpenter .

Q.Did you lose a watch at any time - A. On the 2d of August, after I had gone to dinner, I took my watch out of my waistcoat pocket to see if it was time to go to work, it was time to go to work; there was nobody was there but Smith, he worked in the same yard that I worked. I put the watch into my pocket again and went to work I pulled my jacket off and hung it up in the shop, the watch was then in my jacket pocket. It was a silver watch.

Q. Where was this shop - A. About six doors from the Bluecoat Boy.

Q.Did the prisoner see that you had a watch - A. Yes; there was no other person with me but him and his mate; his mate's name is Waitford, he is not here. The prisoner saw me pull it out in the public-house; it was safe in my jacket pocket when I hung it up in the shop. In about half an hour afterwards they came to work in the adjoining yard. After they came back Smith came to the partition that parts the two yards and asked me to go and take take some gin; I went. I was not absent more than five minutes; the prisoner and his mate staid with me all the time I was in the public-house; I went to my work, and they went to their work; immediately I returned I went for my watch, and it was gone.

Q. They were with you, what possibility had he of taking it, he did not come into the shop, he asked you outside of the partition, and from the time that you left the shop he was with you, he could not be the stealer - A. No, he could not. I suspected no man but Smith and his mate, and the watch was found upon Smith.

- COOK. This is the watch.

Prosecutor. It is mine.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18110918-170

791. REBECCA REYNOLDS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of July , a straw bonnet, value 5 s. the property of Thomas Day .

THOMAS DAY . I live at 42, Whitechapel-road , I keep a straw bonnet shop . On the 12th of July, about three o'clock in the afternoon, I was informed that my child was taken away by a woman; my child had been playing about the door, she was missing an hour and a half.

Q. What is the age of your child - A. About six years of age, my child had a straw bonnet on; I ran in the direction of the person that had described the circumstance; I came up to the prisoner about two hundred yards in Greenfield-street, I then perceived the prisoner in the custody of William Johnson . The child was brought home before.

Q. What was the worth of the bonnets - A. Five shillings.

WILLIAM JOHNSON . On the 12th of July between two and three o'clock, I heard this child cry in Cannon-street-road, she said the woman had taken her bonnet; she pointed to the prisoner, the prisoner then began to run; the child was without a bonnet at the time; I left the child in care of a neighbour, and ran after the woman; I never lost sight of her, only just as she turned the corner; she ran half a mile as fast as she could before I catched her. When I came up to her I said, you strumpet how dare you to strip a child in the road. I took the bonnet immediately out of her hand. The prisoner said nothing but came back along with me. I delivered up the woman and the bonnet to the father of the child in Greenfield-street.

GEORGE NEWBOLD . This bonnet was delivered to me by Mr. Day, about three o'clock on the 12th of June, I took charge of the prisoner; he charged the prisoner with stealing this bonnet, in the hearing of the child, and enticing her away by her offering her cherries, and then taking away her bonnet; I took the prisoner in custody, and took her before the magistrate. I have kept the bonnet in my possession ever since.

Prosecutor. That is the bonnet my child was dressed in on that day.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence, nor called any witnesses to her character.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18110918-171

792. JOHN RADLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of September , two tea-chests, value 20 s. the property of John White .

JOHN WHITE . I am a cabinet maker , No. 12, Poland-street .

JOHN WHITE , JUN. I opened the shop about a quarter before eight; I went away from the door about ten minutes; upon my returning I saw the prisoner come out of the shop, he had two chests with him, one under each arm; I pursued him and cried out stop thief; he laid down the chests and ran on, Abraham Tuffnell stopped him, and I picked up the tea chests. The prisoner begged to mercy.

Prisoner's Defence. I work at the bricklayer's business.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Publicly Whipped and discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18110918-172

793. THOMAS SMITH and MICHAEL MARTIN were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of September , two geese, value 7 s. and four ducks, value 6 s. the property of James Ford .

JAMES FORD . I am a tin plate worker , I live at Battle-bridge , I keep geese and ducks. On Sunday morning, the 15th instant, I went into my yard and missed two geese and four ducks. I had seen them safe in the evening. I saw them again at four o'clock, Clark and Gates came to my house. They were worth thirteen shillings. I knew them to be mine.

JOHN CLARK . I am a constable. On Sunday morning, about five o'clock, I saw the two prisoners, they were both together, they were coming across a field from the New-road. They had each a bundle, I stopped them; I asked them what they had got, they did not answer me; I took them in custody. The bundles each contained a goose and two ducks. I found out Mr. Ford had lost them; he described them before he saw them, and the marks corresponded exactly.

Smith's Defence. I have nobody here to give me a character.

Martin's Defence. I was not guilty of the robbery at all; this man said he would satisfy me for carrying the bundle. I told the constable I did not know what was in the bundle.

SMITH - GUILTY , aged 40.

MARTIN - GUILTY , aged 35.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and Publicly Whipped .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18110918-173

794. ANN TULONNE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of September , two baskets, value 2 s. 6 d. the property of Richard George .

RICHARD GEORGE . I live in Castle-street, Cavendish-square; I am a basket-maker .

GEORGE EDWARDS . I am a servant to Mr. George. On the 20th of September the prisoner asked me the price of a basket; I told her two shillings, she offered me eight pence, I refused that; she put it down as I thought, and I went to my work; in a minute afterwards I saw her crossing Oxford-street with two baskets; I followed her, and she just turned the corner of Holly street, she turned round and saw me coming, she put them down and stood by them. I told her that she should go to the watchhouse; she said, you have got your baskets, are not you satisfied. These are the baskets, they are my master's property.

Prisoner's Defence. I had no baskets with me; it is a piy he should false swear himself.

The prisoner called three witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Fined 1 s. and discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18110918-174

795. ROBERT LUCKIMORE, alias LATTIMORE , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of August , eight clothes lines, value 20 s. the property of Edward Buckingham and Francis Buckingham .

EDWARD BUCKINGHAM. My partner's name is Francis Buckingham , we are flax-dressers and rope makers at Pancras .

JOHN CLARK . I am a constable of St Pancras parish. On Wednesday the 28th of August, between four and five in the morning, I saw the prisoner, he was in the fields in the path leading from Mr. Buckingham's premises; I left him at that time, and went after some other person that I was in pursuit of. I saw him again in the New-road, he came out of a field, he was tyeing the line up. I went up to him, I told him he was my prisoner; he said he was going to take it to his master in the Borough I took him to the watchhouse and searched him, I found this piece of line in his waistcoat pocket. The servant of Mr. Buckingham came and owned the line. I knew the person of the prisoner before.

WALTER WILSTOW . I am a servant to Mr. Buckingham I manufactured these eight clothes lines, I left them to dry; when I came on the Tuesday morning I missed them. They are worth twenty shillings.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in the habit of going out soon in the morning to work, I met a man, he asked me if I wanted a job; I said, yes; he said he would give me half a crown to carry them lines to the Green Man, Tooley-street, and to call for half a pint of beer, and to wait till he came.

GUILTY , aged 33.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18110918-175

796. FRANCISCO DE SYLVIA , alias EMANUEL DE SYLVIA , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of August, a jacket, value 2 s. a pair of stockings value 2 s. and a pair of shoes, value 1 s. the property of Joze Maria .

JOZE MARIA. The prisoner slept with me at Portsmouth ; he took my jacket, shoes. and stockings away; I am a sailor , I live in Church-lane; I came up to London to get a birth; I thought I should see him; I did, he had my clothes on him then.

THOMAS DARLEY . Maria gave me charge of the prisoner, I took him at a public-house in Staple-alley on the 24th of August.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Whipped in Jail and discharged.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant

Reference Number: t18110918-176

797. HANNAH COLLAGHAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of July , four silver teaspoons, value 8 s. the property of Judah Pariente .

SARAH MARTHA LAWRENCE . I am servant to Judah Pariente , he is a merchant , 60, Lemon-street, Goodman's-fields . I never saw the prisoner until I saw her at the office; I know the four spoons were missing from Mr. Pariente's on the 26th of July, about half past eight in the morning. The spoons were kept in the parlour, I had put them upon the breakfast table a few minutes before they were missed Immediately I saw the spoons at the office I knew them to be my master's; I went the same day to the office, about ten in the morning.

JOHN GRIFFITHS . I am an officer of Lambeth-street. I apprehended the prisoner. About nine o'clock on Friday morning, the 26th of July, I received information that a person was shewing tea that had spoons about her; I went to the public-house and saw her there. I saw a large paper parcel of tea upon the tap room table, I went to search her, and she pulled the spoons out of her pocket; she said they were her own, she had had them fourteen years. I took her in custody, and Lawrence came and claimed the spoons.

Prisoner's Defence. I lent a woman my scarlet cloak, it cost me twenty three shillings, and she left me the spoons until she came back.

GUILTY , aged 44.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18110918-177

798. THOMAS WINK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of September , a shawl, value 7 s. the property of George Terry , from the person of Sarah his wife.

SARAH TERRY . I am the wife of George Terry , my husband is a soldier in the 3d regiment of Guards.

Q. When was it you lost your shawl - A Last Sunday night I was coming along the Strand by Exeter-street , the shawl was snatched off my shoulder by the prisoner; I never saw him before to my knowledge, he says he knows me; he ran away with the shawl, I halloaed out stop thief directly; I saw him run up Exeter-street, he was stopped by some man, and the watchman took the shawl out of his hat. I am sure it is my shawl.

EDWARD SHEANE . I am a watchman. I heard the cry of stop thief, the prisoner was stopped before I came up to him; the man had thrown him down, and the shawl upon the ground when I came up; Sarah Terry claimed the shawl; he said nothing.

Q. Did you see where the shawl came from - A. I did not.

Prisoner's Defence. I have had connexion with the prosecutrix, she has known me all my life time.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and Whipped in Jail .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18110918-178

799. ROWLAND MATTHEWS was indicted for that he on the 9th of September , unlawfully, knowingly, and designedly did falsely pretend to Carolina Heaton , spinster, that he came from

Thomas Roberts , for a dozen of plated spoons, and a dozen of plated tea-spoons to match the table-spoons, and by means of which said false pretence he did obtain from Carolina Heaton, one dozen of table-spoons, value 12 s. and one dozen of tea-spoons, value 6 s. with intention to defraud William Heaton .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY .

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110918-179

800. CATHERINE HANNAGAN was indicted for that she, on the 22d of August , one piece of false and counterfeit money made to the likeness and similitude of a good sixpence, as and for a good sixpence unlawfully did utter to William Osborne , she well knowing it to be false and counterfeit, and that she at the same time of uttering it, had in her custody and possession, one other piece of false and counterfeit money made to the likeness and similitude of a goods sixpence, she well knowing the same last piece of false and counterfeit money to be false and counterfeited .

WILLIAM OSBORNE . I live at the Turk's-head, Aldgate High-street .

Q. Do you remember a woman of the name of Williams and a woman of the name of Stevens coming to your house on the 22d of August last - A. I do, between eleven and twelve o'clock at night, Sarah Stevens came for a quartern of gin, it came to fourpence, she offered me a sixpence; I told her it was a bad one, I kept the sixpence and gave it Kennersley, the officer. Williams came up at the same time and offered another sixpence o pay for the same gin. I told her that was a bad one also, I would have them taken up for smashers. They told me they took it of a woman that sat in the passage of my public-house; I sent for an officer. Tremer the officer came, and the woman slipped off the bench, I saw her hand go from her bosom, as if she was parting with something, I held the candle under the bench, there I saw a little bag, with four sixpences of the same shake, with some shot. I sent her over to the watchhouse. I afterwards looked in the same place were I found the bag; I found a shilling. The canvas bag was warm, as if it had been in some person's bosom.

SARAH STEVENS . Q. On that day did you go with Hannah Williams and the prisoner to Mr. Osbornes - A. I know nothing of the prisoner, she was sitting in the house about half past eleven o'clock, I went into that public house with Williams. I had a pot of porter, was paid penny-peices for that; the prisoner was sitting in the passage, I never saw her before I went with the porter to Hannah williams. The prisoner asked me to give her a drink of beer. I did so, she then said for my good nature she would give the some money to fetch a quartern of gin, she put her hand in her bosom and gave me a sixpence out of the bag, I went to the bar for a quartern of gin, I gave him that same sixpence that I received of the prisoner for a quarter of gin; I had no other, nothing but a few penny-pieces. Mr. Osborne objected to it, and kept it. Hannah Williams followed me up to the bar directly, and told me to make half a pint of it. Mr. Osborne stopped her with it. The prisoner sent for a pint of beer before that with a bad sixpence, he stopped that sixpence. I told Mr. Osborne that I and Hannah Williams received them sixpences of the woman in the passage; I am positive that the sixpence I paid came from the prisoner.

Q.What is Williams - A. an engine winster, she lives in Rose-lane, Spital-fields, I have known her three years, she was in the house before I came.

Q. Was she talking with the prisoner when you came in - A. Not as I know of, no further than she fetched the prisoner a pint of beer before.

HANNAH WILLIAMS . I am a single woman, I live in Rose-lane, I am an engine winster.

Q. You remember going to Mr. Osborne's public-house on the 22d of August - A. Yes, I went there about a quarter after eleven; the prisoner came in soon after, she sat down on a bench in the passage, I had never seen her before, she asked me fetch her half a pint of beer; I said I would; she gave me a sixpence out of a little bag that was in her bosom, and when I was going she said, make it a pint, I went and got a pint of beer, and gave Mr. Osborne the sixpence; I had no other, only five farthings, for which I had half a pint of beer; she then sent Sarah Stevens with a sixpence for a quartern of gin, and sent me after her to make it half a pint, with another sixpence; Mr. Osborne said he would have us both taken up for Smashers. I said, when he stopped Stevens's sixpence, look at mine; and I waited at the bar until the officer came.

THOMAS TREMER . I am a constable. When I went into Mr. Osborne's he said he had taken two bad sixpence; he pointed out the prisoner to me, she was sitting on the ground, I lifted her up by the arm, and Mr. Osborne picked up a canvas bag. I took the prisoner to the watchhouse.

CALEB EDWARD POWELL . Q. You assist the Solicitor of the Mint - A. Yes.

Q. Look at these two sixpences - A. They are both counterfeit, they are not worth a farthing; they are merely washed; this shilling and sixpence they are counterfeits, and the four sixpences in the bag they are counterfeits.

Prisoner's Defence. I have been but two months out of my own country, and have been out of bed five weeks with this baby; I was put to bed on the road, I was coming to my husband. I sold my shift the last thing for a shilling; I changed that shilling I got two pennyworth of shop, and a pennyworth of bread; I had only then a sixpence and three penny-pieces in my pocket; I was going to Gravesend to my husband. Coming along the road I met with this woman, she said if I was to go to St. Giles's I might find some of my country people who would give me a lodging; she said come along with me; I was fatigued and weak, I could not walk. It was twelve o'clock, she took me to this public-house, she said, we can rest here and have part of a pint of beer; I sat down, this woman went for the pint of beer, I gave her sixpence; the other woman said, had we nor better have a drop of gin; I said, I do not mind. I was taken in custody, and by the Lord God I am in custody for holding.

GUILTY , aged 36.

Confined One Year in Newgate , and at the Expiration of that time to find Sureties for Two Years to come .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18110918-180

801. WILLIAM COPPERTHWAITE was indicted for that he, on the 9th of August , without being authorised and appointed for that purpose by the Governor and Company of the Bank of England, unlawfully did utter and publish a certain promissory note, purporting to be a promissory note for the payment of Five Pence, expressing the word Five in white letters on a black ground .

JOSEPH CARPENTER . Q. I live at Shepherds-Bush. On the 9th of August, I saw the prisoner in Smithfield ; I had brought a horse to Smithfield to sell. He came up to me and asked me the price of the horse, I told him five pounds; he said, what is the lowest that you mean to take for it; I said, I did not know; he said, if you give me three shillings out of the five pounds I will buy it; I said, agreed; he asked me if I had any silver in my pocket; I said, yes; he said, what shall I do for an halter, the bridle was an old one; I said, take the bridle; he then said, bring him up to the post; I immediately went to the post; I said, we will go over to the book office, which is the proper place to get change. I had but one shilling; he said never mind, give me that; he said I shall not go into that house so long as I live; he wanted me to go to Snow Hill; I said I shall not go there; he tried to snatch the note out of my hand; I said no, my friend, you shall not have the note any more you may depend upon it; Mr. Williams stood at the door; I asked him to look at the note; Mr. Williams said it was a bad one; the moment I asked Mr. Williams to look at it the prisoner started away; I pursued him and caught him by the corner of the Bluecoat school; charged the prisoner with a constable, and he was taken to Guildhall; he first said, he did not know where he got the note, and afterwards he said Long Jack gave him the note to go, and buy that horse as cheap as he could. This is the note that I received of the prisoner, it has my hand-writing upon it. (The Note read.)

COURT. What was the horse really worth - A. I sold the horse afterwards for four pound ten shillings.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going up Smithfield-market, the man said Bill, go and buy this horse as cheap as you can, here is a five pound note. I went and cheapened the horse, he asked five pound, I said that is too much, if you will give me three shillings out of it I will have it; I gave him the note; I told him to tie the horse to the post, and we went down to the cooking house, I said I will not go in here, we had a few words the other day when I bought a horse and cart; I said I will go in here, he would not, and we returned in the market; he shewed the note, and the gentleman said it was a bad one, I knew who I took it of, I ran after the man that gave it me, and my prosecutor ran after me, and took me.

GUILTY ,

Confined Six Months in Newgate.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110918-181

802. THOMAS CARIER was indicted for a misdemeanour .

RICHARD SEAL . I keep a clothes shop in Aldgate . The 18th of June the prisoner came into the shop, he made a kind of a pause, and said this is not the shop were I always used to deal, however as I am some in I will look at a coat. I shewed him several, he pitched upon a blue one, and then looked a waistcoat and small clothes, he agreed to give four pound for them. He pulled a handkerchief out of his pocket, I was in the act of lying them up, he said I do not know whether you can change it or not, I said I hoped it was not a large one, no, he said it was a fifty; he pulled it out; I looked at the note I did not perceive it to be a bad one at the time I said if you wait a little while I will bring you change; I said to my brother, will you go to the bank and get some small notes for it; he said you had better look at it, first I did, and it appeared to be a bad one; I then challenged the defendant with it, he said he was sure it was a good one he took it of a farmer, at Ware, his name was Jones; then he said he lived at Bromley, that he was a waiter at the London Tavern. This is the note. (the Note read.)

FRANCIS KENNERSLEY. I apprehended the prisoner. I asked him where he lived, he said Bromley, then Bow, then Stratford; and then he said he belonged to the London coffee-house.

MR. HOBLER. Q. You are clerk to the Lord Mayor - A. I am, this is the first examination of the prisoner (read) I called at the City of London Tavern on Tuesday, coming from there I lit of the young man that I had the note o; the young man lives in a street leading out of Golden-lane. After some time he produced me a fifty pound note, he said he looked in all the papers not advertised, he did not see any impropriety in parting with it; he agreed to give me five pound; I never opened the note; the young man waited outside; I did not say his name was James Jones .

The defendant called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined Six Months in Newgate ,

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110918-182

803. GEORGE ENGLEBERT was indicted for a misdemeanor .

Mr. Knapp, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the defendant was

ACQUITTED .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110918-183

804. THOMAS BROWN was indicted for a misdemeanor .

EDWARD MILLS . On the 17th of August the prisoner came and asked for a leg of mutton for Messrs. Simper and Parry, they keep the Woolpack, St. Peter's alley, I said, you are sure you are right; he said he was; I asked him who sent him for it; he said the man with one eye. I then desired my man to give him the largest one I had. I immediately said to my lad, it is something singular his asking for a leg of mutton for Mr. Simper, he refused having one in the morning; I desired the lad to run after him and to see if he carried it safe. I was sent for in a few minutes afterwards to Messrs. Simper and Parry's On my appearing the prisoner fell on his knees, acknowledged his offence, and begged for mercy.

Q. What is he - A. A carman.

HENRY PARRY. I am partner to Robert Simper .

Q.Did you send this man for a leg of mutton - A. No; I never sent him for a leg of mutton.

Prisoner's Defence. I do not wish to deny the charge. I was going to work next week, I intended to pay him.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Confined Fourteen Days in Newgate .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: o18110918-1

Joseph Long - Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: o18110918-2

John Blewen - Whipped in Jail and discharged.

Reference Number: o18110918-3

William Wright , Joseph Leverett , and Henry Lawrence , severally fined 1 s. and discharged.

Reference Number: o18110918-4

James Winks , Confined Six Months in the House of Correction, and fined 1 s.

Joseph Hill and John Richards , Confined One Year in the House of Correction, and fined 1 s.

Reference Number: s18110918-1

Prisoners convicted in July Sessions.

Reference Number: s18110918-1

Joseph Long - Transported for Seven Years.

Reference Number: s18110918-1

John Blewen - Whipped in Jail and discharged.

Reference Number: s18110918-1

William Wright , Joseph Leverett , and Henry Lawrence , severally fined 1 s. and discharged.

Reference Number: s18110918-1

James Winks , Confined Six Months in the House of Correction, and fined 1 s.

Joseph Hill and John Richards , Confined One Year in the House of Correction, and fined 1 s.


View as XML