Old Bailey Proceedings, 10th July 1811.
Reference Number: 18110710
Reference Number: f18110710-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE OYER AND TERMINER, AND GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND ALSO THE GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, HELD AT Justice-Hall, in the Old Bailey, On WEDNESDAY the 10th of JULY, 1811, and following Days;

BEING THE SIXTH SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF The Right Hon. JOSHUA JONATHAN SMITH , LORD-MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY JOB SIBLY, No. 4, CARTHUSIAN-STREET, ALDERSGATE-STREET.

LONDON:

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED (BY THE AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON.) By R. Butters, No. 22, Fetter-lane, Fleet-street

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON.

Before the Right-honourable JOSHUA JONATHAN SMITH , Lord Mayor of the City of London; Sir Simon Le Blanc , knt. one of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of King's Bench: Sir Alan Chambre , knt. one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir Watkin Lewis , knt. Harvey Christian Combe , esq. Sir James Shaw , bart. Aldermen of the said City; John Silvester , esq. Recorder of the said City; Sir Matthew Bloxam , knt. Samuel Birch , esq. Christopher Magnay , esq. Aldermen of the said City; and Newman Knowlys , esq. Common-serjeant of the said City; His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of Goal Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

London Jury.

Thomas Burn Hopwood ,

George Kempster ,

Thomas Hacking ,

Richard Tomkais ,

William Phillips Norris ,

William Hopes ,

Nicholas Feeling ,

William Greaves ,

William Crew Ireland ,

John Briant ,

William King ,

John Wood .

First Middlesex Jury.

Thomas White ,

George Fray ,

John Waller ,

John Wilkinson ,

Nicholas Boys ,

John Studall ,

William James ,

John Franklin ,

Moses Ford ,

Charles Hendervick ,

Daniel Corney ,

Benjamin Brown .

Second Middlesex Jury.

Thomas Dickenson ,

John Bull ,

Thomas Chapman ,

Matthew Jenkinson ,

William Woundell ,

James Perry ,

George Fox ,

William Dawes ,

Thomas Walklin ,

Thomas Bowdel ,

Charles Whitrow ,

Edward Billingham .

Reference Number: t18110710-1

519. JOSEPH HILL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of May ; one thousand bricks, value 50 s. the property of William Hobson .

THOMAS TAYLOR. I am a foreman to Mr. William Hobson , he is the proprietor of a brick field in Kingsland Road. The Prisoner was a carter to Mr. Smith, of Battle-bridge. On the 4th of May, the prisoner, with four other men were to deliver bricks at Drapers Place, Burton Cressent , for Mr. Hart, who was building there. The prisoner took a thousand there in the morning, there were five thousand to be taken in the morning and five thousand in the afternoon.

WILLIAM BROWN . I am a servant to the prosecutor.

Q. On the 4th of May, did you see the prisoner load a thousand bricks for Mr. Hart - A. Yes, he loaded a cart where I was at work in the morning, to be taken to Mr. Hart.

WILLIAM WATERMAN . I am a servant to the prosecutor; in the afternoon I delivered a thousand bricks to the prisoner, to be taken to Mr. Hart.

THOMAS OWEN . I am a servant to Mr Hart, the builder at Burton Cressent . On Saturday, the 4th of May, I received one thousand bricks of the prisoner, at half past eleven in the morning; he brought none in the afternoon; I only received nine thousand, I was to have received ten thousand.

CHARLES BELLINGER On the 4th of May, in the afternoon. I saw Mr. Smith's cart leave the bricks in St. John's Street Road, at the back of the Coach and Horses. I cannot speak to the prisoner at the bar being the man.

Prisoner. The man that worked at the kiln did not load the cart, I loaded it in the afternoon.

Waterman. I did not load them all, I finished it. I saw them loaded in the afternoon between four and five.

Prisoner's Defence. That man did not put a brick in the cart my fellow servant and I loaded it all.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY, aged 40.

Judgement respited .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110710-2

520. THOMAS ROONEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of June , two pocket books, value 2 s. fifteen thread cases, value 12 s and fifteen pieces of sponge, value 10 s. the property of Michael Openheim .

MICHAEL OPENHEIM . I am a merchant , I live in Manse Street, Goodman's Fields . The prisoner was my porter .

Q. Did you at any time miss any articles or your property - A. Several times. On the 12th of June I returned home about six o'clock in the afternoon, and in consequence of information I received. I waited till the prisoner returned home; I then him I had been informed that he had got two pocket books and desired him to produce them. He told me that he had returned them from whence he took them. I knew that to be the case, I had taken them from the drawer into the accompting-house prior to my speaking to him. I said, these are the two pocket books that you took, he said, well master I returned them from where I took them from, and I hope you will think no more about it. As I had frequently missed things, I thought it right to have the business investigated; I sent for an officer, he came, and the prisoner was taken into custody. I sent another officer to his lodgings.

- SHERRARD. I am warehouse man to Mr. Openheim. On the 12th of June, I sent some goods out of my master's warehouse. As the prisoner was loading the truck, he stooped forward to speak to me, two pocket books sell out of his bosom; I asked him how he came by them, he answered that they were given him by Mr. Foudriner, our stationer. He took them up and replaced them in his bosom; I informed my master I knew they were Mr. Openheims property as they lay upon the ground, they are a particular make.

Q. Did you see them pocket books afterwards - A. Yes, I saw them in the drawer afterwards, and I saw Mr. Openheim take them out of the drawer.

- WOODROW I am extra officer for the City. I am a warehouseman to Mr. Openheim. On the 12th of June, in the evening, I was sent to the prisoner's lodging, in Hun Alley East Smithfied.

Q. Did you know where the prisoner lodged - A. Not before Mr. Openheim told me.

Q. Who did you find at his lodgings - A. No one at all, his wife came a minute or two afterwards. I told her what I had come about, and went in and searched; and in a box on the table I found fifteen pieces of sponge, tied up in a handkerchief, and fifteen thread cases, they were in the box I gave these things to Kennersley, the officer. I had no conversation with the prisoner,

FRANCIS KENNERSLEY. I am an officer of Portsoken Ward.

Q. Do you know Mr. Openheim's warehouse - A. Yes, it is in the County. When Mr. Openheim told me that he had been robbed by the prisoner, I apprehended him. The prisoner acknowledged that he had taken these two bill cases for a friend, he was sorry for it, he did not mean to make a property of them I then whispered to Mr. Openheim to dispatch some body to his lodgings before the wife went to his lodgings. I had these two pocket books at the time, I had received them of Mr. Openheim; when I had lodged the prisoner in the Whitechapel watchouse; I returned to Mr. Openheim's house; he said he had dispatched some body to the prisoner's lodgings, and as we were going to East Smithfield, we met Woodrow, with these thread cases and the sponge He delivered then, to me; they have been in my custody ever since.

Prisoner's Defence Those two pocket books which they occured I had in my possession, I did not n make any property of them; I returned them and left them in the same place.

GUILTY, aged 35.

Of stealing two pocket books, value 2 s.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18110710-3

521. JOSEPH IBBOTSON , THOMAS MITCHELL , and JOHN SYMONS were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Sarah Cooper , widow , about the hour of eight in the afternoon, on the 28th of June ; the said Sarah Cooper and others, in her dwelling house then being, and stealing therein, two clocks, value 9 l. three gowns, value 6 l. two petticoats, value 8 s. a neck lace, value 8 s. a pair of ear-rings, value 7 s. two tablecloths, value 6 s. a counterpane value 5 s. two night gowns, value 5 s. a shawl, value 3 s. two handkerchiefs, value 1 s. and one binder, value 6 d. her property.

SARAH COOPER . I live at the Horse and Groom. in Maiden Lane, Covent Garden ; I keep the public house .

Q. Were you at home on the 28th of June - A. Yes.

Q. Did you miss any property from your dwelling house that day - A. Yes, about half after eight in the evening, from out of my bed room where I sleep, in the one pair.

Q. Do you know whether the door of that bed room was fastened or locked - A. There were two doors to the bed room, one door was in constant use, the other door was always kept locked, both the doors were locked.

Q. Look at the prisoners, had you seen them before - A. I saw Ibbotson and Symons, about three o'clock that day, and I saw Michell with them, about seven o'clock in the evening, they were all three together then when I saw them, they were in the ground belonging to the house, playing at bumblepuppy.

Q. What is that - A. A game that they play with balls.

Q. Had they been playing that game before Mitchell came - A. No, they began that game after they were three.

Q. What were the two others doing from three o'clock - A. I do not know, they had a pot and a pint of beer, and a pint of gin; I saw Mitchell in the tap room once, I did not see him after the robbery was committed.

Q. What did Mitchell do in the tap room - A. He was smoaking a pipe and had a pint of beer.

Q. Where were the others at that time - A. I do not know. After they had been there, a lodger came down for her supper; she told me my bed room door was open, my servant went up stairs, upon her coming down she told me that my bed room door was open. I shall know the things when they are produced. Ibbotson and Symons were at my house the day before; they came there together.

ELIZABETH HALL. I am a servant to Mrs. Cooper. On the afternoon on 28th of June, about five o'clock, I saw the prisoners, they were playing at bumblepuppy.

Q. About what time did they go away - A. About nine o'clock, it was just duck.

Q Did you hear any conversation among them - A Yes, about four o'clock, in the yard, they were all together; Ibbotson said he would lay any thing that the old woman was worth money, it was said when I was cleaning the yard.

Q. Do you remember one of the lodgers coming down that evening - A. Yes, about a quarter after nine, I went up immediately, and saw my mistress's door was open, and the drawers; I went down and told her directly.

Q. Did you go up to your mistress's bed room - A. Yes.

Q. There were two doors to that bed chamber - A. Yes, and the one that was never used was the door that was forced open, that door was always kept locked, and the other door was always locked except when we wanted to use it; when I went up stairs the door was open and all the drawers were open.

Q. How lately before you went up had you seen the door - A. About three hours before I had been up. The door that was always used was locked, I had locked it before, and I gave the key to my mistress; I had not had the key after that, and before I locked the door, the drawers were all shut.

Q. When you went up afterwards and found the door open, could you distinguish in what manner it had been opened - A. It had been forced open, and the door was open, and the bolt of the lock was shot out.

Q. Do you know what had been in these drawers in that room - A. Yes, I know what I put in the drawers in the morning.

Q. Did you examine the drawers when you went up - A. I ran and got a candle, I examined the drawers, and there were several things gone.

Q. And you are sure you saw all the three prisoners playing together at this game at the back part of the premises - A. Yes, I saw them altogether in the yard, about five o'clock.

Mr. Reynolds. Your mistress said Mitchell did not come till seven - A. My mistress did not go out of the bar.

SAMUEL LACK , I am one of the Bow-Street, patrols. On the morning of the 29th of June. I saw Ibbotson, about twenty yards before me, in Drury Lane, with this bundle under his arm; I ran after him, and till I got within three or four yards of him, then I slackened my pace and watched him; I followed him to the Cock and Magpie, in Drury Lane, I followed him into that public house, he went in alone, the other two men, and a woman were at a table and seemed to be casting up something with chalk figures, the figures were chiefly 6 and 8, it did not in all exceed a pound. Ibbotson shoved the bundle up in the corner of the bench.

Q. Were the others sitting upon the same bench - A. Yes, they got up and endeavoured to conceal it. Mitchell and Symons got up; they put their back towards it and their faces towards me. I then told Ibbotson, I must see what that bundle contained. One thing I omitted, Ibbotson had a leather apron on, he took it off, and gave it to Mitchell as soon as he came into the room, and Mitchell tied it round him. When I asked Ibbotson for the bundle, he said it does not belong to me it belongs to that man, pointing to Mitchell; Mitchell then jumped up and began to shuffle about the room and wanted to go out; I then told him he must not go out, I will shoot the first man that went out of the room; he then said he wanted to go to the privy, he said I might go with him; I replied you shall not go

cut at all. I am going to take you to Bow-street; he then said, d - n my eyes if I will go to Bow-street, and jumped out of the window. Stanley, was with me; I said to Stanley, fetch him back again. Stanley fetched him back again. Before he got out of the window I took this stick off the seat where he sat; I stood it up against the edge of the door, and when he came in again he moved it to another bench on the right-hand side of the room. I searched Mitchell, and found on him, two keys, and a room door key a knife, three one pound notes and a watch. I returned him the notes and the watch. I searched Ibbotson, and found a pawnbroker's ticket on him, and a knife On Symons, I found a knife that is used in house breaking, a hunting watch, a dollar and a pair of earrings; I kept nothing of his but the knife. I looked round the bench were the stick was put, these three keys were laying on the stick as though they were all layed down together. They are two skeleton keys and one parlour door key. I examined the bundle, and then sent to Mrs. Cooper; she came and owned the things. I had received information the night be fore that her house had been robbed.

Q. Was any thing produced by the landlord of the house - A. Yes, another picklock made on purpose for opening room doors was produced by the landlord, his name is Day.

Q. Have you any doubt about the persons of the prisoners - A. None at all, I knew them before. The bundle has been in my possession ever since.

Mr. Knapp. You know there are three forty pounds reward in this case - A. I think if there is any reward, I am entitled to it.

AUGUSTIN STANLEY . Q. Do you know any thing more of this matter excepting being sent out to fetch Mitchell - A. No, just as he got to the bar door and was pulling it open, there I laid hold of him.

JAMES DAY . Q. You are landlord of this public house in Drury Lane - A. Yes.

Q. There has been a picklock produced, which the officer said he received from you - A. Yes, this is it, I found it in a box of bran, exactly behind where the officer searched Mitchell

Q. Had you seen it there - A. I had not, I know nothing of it. The bran had only been there ten minutes, I had but just sent out to the shop for it.

Ibbotson's Defence. I am totally innocent of what is alledged against me.

Mitchell's Defence. Mr. Lack has said false towards me, I never went out of the room at all.

Symon's Defence. On the morning the property was found in the public house, I was going to a gentleman who is in Court, to receive an order; his name is Stanton. I called into the public house, and a woman that was along with Mitchell asked me to have a glass of ale; I sat down, and Ibbotson came in with this bundle, and with respect to the other house; I saw the two other two men go in there, and a coachman; I went in and had a game with them.

Ibbotson called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Symons called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

IBBOTSON, GUILTY, aged 20.

MITCHELL, GUILTY, aged 32.

Of stealing to the value of thirty nine shillings only and not breaking and entering the dwelling house .

Transported for Seven Years .

SYMONS, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18110710-4

522. JOHN MILLS was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Daniel Spragg , about the hour of ten, on the night of the 22d of June , and stealing therein, two silk handkerchiefs, value 18 s. the property of David Kerr .

DAVID KERR . I live at 43, Bedford Street, Covent Garden . I lodge in Daniel Spragg 's house, in the Parish of St. Martin's in the Fields . I hold a shop, parlour and kitchen; Mr. Spragg lives in the first floor. On the 22d of June I lost the handkerchiefs out of the shop, they are things that I deal in. I had seen them within the shop about half an hour before I lost them, they were hanging in the shop window.

Q. When did you miss them - A. About twenty minutes before ten, in the evening, my wife and servant were in the shop, I was in the kitchen; I heard the breaking of a window, I ran up stairs directly; I observed both my wife and servant out side of the door, and as I passed the window I observed it broken, and my servant said the window was broken and some handkerchiefs were stolen out of the window; I saw the broken glass in the street. I pursed, but I did not see the prisoner untill he was stopped; he was taken to the watchhouse, I returned home to see what I had lost. I found I had lost two silk handkerchiefs. I took my servant Adamson to the watchhouse; she identified the prisoner. The handkerchiefs have never been found.

HARRIOT ADAMSON. I live servant with Mr. Kerr. I was in the shop talking to my mistress when the window was broken, the candles were lighted, it was not quite dark when I heard the glass break; I ran out of door and saw the prisoner draw the handkerchiefs out of the broken square; I cannot say how many, nor what he did with them; I called out to my mistress, the man ran away, and I ran after him; he had the handkerchief in his right hand, behind him; I could not see what he did with the handkerchiefs; I called stop thief; he ran down Chandois Street, and I went home; in about half an hour afterwards I saw the prisoner in the watchhouse, he is the same man that I saw drawing the handkerchiefs out of the window, they were silk handkerchiefs.

THOMAS CHILDS . I was driving the Chelsea coach up Bedford Street, about twenty minutes before ten, on the 22d of June. The prisoner met me.

Q. Are you sure it was the prisoner - A. It was a man; I cannot swear to the prisoner. The man was coming from Chandois Street; he went back to Mr. Kerr's shop, he dashed his fist through the glass and pulled the handkerchiefs out.

Q. Did you see that - A. Yes, and heard the glass break.

Q. But you did not know the man - A. No, he had the handkerchiefs in his right hand, and he bound them round his left hand as he went up the street. He ran down Chandois Street into the Strand. I did not see him taken.

JOHN TOWNSHEND . On the night of the 22d of

June, about ten o'clock, I was coming out of the Strand, I heard the cry of stop-thief; I ran towards it, I saw the prisoner up against a house in the Strand, and several people round him; I immediately laid hold of him. The prosecutor came and said he had his window broken. I took him to the watchhouse and searched him; I found nothing on him.

Prisoner's Defence. I know myself innocent; I heard the cry of stop thief, I ran as well as other people; they said I was the person, and laid hold of me.

NOT GUILTY ,

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18110710-5

523. BENJAMIN RICHARDSON was indicted for that he, on the 5th of June , in and upon Ann Nicholls , spinster , violently and feloniously did make an assault, and her, the said Ann Nicholls , against her will feloniously did ravish and carnally know .

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18110710-6

524. WILLIAM HALL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of June , in the dwelling house of Joseph Fennell , a bank note, value 5 l. the property of John Newby .

JOHN NEWBY . I am a seaman , I belong to the Warrior; I came from Chatham; and arrived at the Four Swans, between three and four in the morning, on the 20th of June; the prisoner and another man were in the Four Swan yard; I wanted something to drink; there were nobody up at the Four Swans. I asked the prisoner and the other man if they knew where there were any public houses open; they said they did; they took me to two public house, I drank at both of them; I am a stranger here, I cannot say what streets I was in, and from the last public house I went into a shoemaker's shop to buy a pair of shoes; the prisoner and his companion went with me; I bought the shoes, and pulled out the notes that I had in my pocket. I got them from the Commissioners yacht the day before that, I had two five pound Bank notes, and the rest in one and two pound notes; they were all wrapped up together. I offered a five pound note to pay for the shoes, and while I was paying the shoe-maker; the prisoner drawed a five pound note.

Q. Did you see it - A. I will be upon my oath I had it when I went into the shop; I counted my money in Leaden-hall Market, to see what money I had.

Q. Did you charge him in the shop with taking the note - A. I made a great noise about it. I thought the shoe-maker had taken it; I was a little groggy; I did not know who had it; the shoe-maker found himself clear of it; he searched the prisoner, and found it upon him.

CHARLES TROTTER . I am foreman to Mr. Fennell, 38, Shoreditch; he is a shoe-maker; in the Parish of St. Leonards, Shoreditch; he keeps a shop there, the shop is part of the house; he is the house keeper. On Thursday, the 20th of June, about a quarter to nine o'clock the prosecutor and two persons with him came into the shop, the prisoner was one of them; the prosecutor asked for a pair of shoes, I served him, they came to eight shillings and six-pence; he sat upon the edge of the counter; he pulled out a piece of rag from his fob pocket, and in his rag was a liberty ticket, two five pound Bank of England notes; I saw them at the time. He said give me change of a five pound note; the prisoner said, what do you want change for a five pound note when you have got a two. The prosecutor said what his that to you, what do you follow me about for, I think you are a thief, I do not want any of your company, and go about your business. And the prisoner made himself so intimate that I thought the was his shipmate. I took the five pound note as he insisted he would have change. I went to my employer and asked him for change; I gave the prosecutor a two pound notes two ones, and eleven shillings and sixpence in silver. The other notes laid on the counter under his guard, as if he was protecting them to fold them up again. When I brought him the change there was one of our curriers in the shop; I gave him a look, to mind what I did; I said, here is your change; he said how much have I got now; I said there was eight pound eleven and sixpence; A five pound note was gone; he said I told him there were fourteen pounds, I said I did; he said he was robbed; I said to the prisoner, where is your partner; he had ran away, he said he knew nothing about him; I said to the prisoner, you d - nd rascal you have robbed this man; he said, me; do you think that I would do such a thing. He put his hand over the counter; I catched hold of his wrist, and turned it up; there was the five pound note clinched in his hand; I opened his hand and took it from him; it was folded up then very small; I opened it; it was the five pound note; I said before I opened it; it was a five pound note, my suspection it was as he had it in his hand that it was that note, and it was a five pound note. Two City officers were coming past; I gave the five pound note to one of them and the prisoner to the other. The prosecutor was intoxicated; the prisoner was quite sober.

WILLIAM ELDRIDGE. I am a City officer. On the 20th of June, about a quarter before nine; I passed the shoe-maker's shop; William Smith was with me. I observed the sailor and the prisoner standing at the shoe shop door, and another man; I said to Smith, stop a minute; the sailor is much in liquor, they mean to rob him. I looked in the window and saw the last witness give the sailor change for a five pound note. The prisoner came out and stood along side of me at the window; the sailor was in the shop; the prisoner went in again, and the other man that was with him came out and went away. I heard the sailor make a noise about the notes. I saw the prisoner coming out of the shop with Smith, the officer. Mr. Trotter gave me this five pound note, I have had it in custody ever since. The prisoner said he picked it off the ground.

WILLIAM SMITH . I am a City officer. On that morning, I and Eldridge were passing Mr. Fennell's shop, I went into the shop to see what past, I saw the shop-man catch hold of the prisoner's collar; he said, you d - d rascal you have robbed that sailor of that five pound note. I catched hold of him by the collar; I saw the shop-man's hand coming from the prisoner's hand, with the five pound note. I took the prisoner into custody; the five pound note was given the other officer.

Q. to Prosecutor. Do you know your notes at all - A. Not the numbers of them, I know that by a

piece being torn out of the corner and writing upon it; I observed that before.

Prisoner's Defence. On Thursday, the 20th of June, about four o'clock in the morning, I was in company with a young man, we were going to Billingsgate, to seek employ; in Bishopsgate Street we met the prosecutor; he alighted from a post chaise, and enquireed of me to take him to a house, to get some drink. We all went to a public house in Leadenhall Market, and continued drinking there upwards of an hour and a half; the Prosecutor being the worse for liquor, prevailed upon us to stay with him, and when he found himself refreshed; he went with us to the Four Swans, to book his place, leaving at the office his new clothes; we afterwards went to another public house, drank four pots of ale, and four pots of porter; he gave me a shilling to buy some chops, he want into a hoster shop, to purchase stocking, from there to a shoe warehouse in Shoreditch, and bought a pair of shoes, for eight shillings and sixpence; he took from his pocket the Bank notes, holding the notes in his hand; he exclaimed he had been done; the other young man went out, and upon looking about the counter, he found the note in question among some papers; some altercation taking place, two officers came in, whereupon I was taken in custody, and fully committed to trial. I most solemnly declare myself innocent.

GUILTY, aged 22.

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling house .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18110710-7

525. SUSANNAH Mc'PHERSON alias RNETT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of June , in the dwelling house of John Munroe, nine bank notes, value 1 l. each, and a bank note, value 5 l. the property of Alexander Gregg .

HANNAH GREGG . I am the wife of Alexander Gregg . I lodge in John Munroe 's house, No. 12, Hermitage Street .

Q. Had you any valuable notes on the 6th of June - A. Yes, I had a five pound note, and nine ones; I kept these bank notes in a chest; I put them into the chest two days before the prisoner came into my house, that was on Thursday; on the Friday night I looked in the chest and they were all there; it was on the Sunday following the Friday that the prisoner came into my apartment and staid all night. On that Sunday morning at nine o'clock, I was going to lend Martha Christopher , a pound note; I found the chest broken open.

Q. Had it been locked before - A. Yes, I am sure it was locked on the Thursday and on the Friday, and on Sunday I looked for the notes; finding the chest broken open and they were all gone; the nine one pound notes, and the five pound note.

Q. Did you take notice of any mark on the notes - A. No, I did not pay any attention to the marks.

Q. You are sure you did not pay them away - A. No, I did not, I had no person in my custody but the prisoner.

Q. Did you know the prisoner - A. Yes, I on knew her once when she came into my house, and pretended to be very sick and very ill.

Q. Did you see her at your lodgings any where about the time that you lost the notes - A. That night that she slept in my bed, my money was in my chest, on Friday night, the seventh of June, she slept in my bed, then the money was safe.

Q. As you knew so little of her, how came she to partake of your bed - A. I had seen her once before. and being so sick and ill I had no person with me; I would not turn her out of doors.

Q. Were there other lodgers in the house - A. Yes, one more underneath me.

MARTHA CHRISTOPHER. Q. Are you the person that lodged in the house that Mrs. Gregg lodged - A. Yes, No. 12. Hermitage Street.

Q. Do you remember the prisoner at the bar coming to the lodging - A. Yes, on Friday, about three o'clock, she pretended to be very sick; she said, was there any tender hearted creature in the house that would let her lay in the bed; Mrs. Gregg said she had a bed, and if she chuse she might lay on her bed; she laid down from that that time till Saturday morning about five o'clock; then she got up.

Q. Did Mrs. Gregg sleep in the same bed - A. In the same bed. About five o'clock in the morning the prisoner went out; she was out about two hours, and then she returned home again, and laid down again; she did not lay long; she came down to my apartment to breakfast, about nine.

Q. Was Mrs. Gregg with you at breakfast - A. Yes, and she continued in my apartment till about twelve, and then she went away.

Q. Your apartment is under Mrs. Gregg's - A. Yes, at the lower part of the house.

Q. Do you know whether she went up to Mrs. Gregg's again - A. She did, and went up to her chamber again; Mr. Gregg went up with her.

Q. Did Mrs. Gregg see her when she went away - A. No, she told me when she went away, she was in a great hurry to get to the pawnbrokers, to stop some tickets, she had lost her pockets, and she had in them one shilling and two-pence.

MARY ANN CANOPY . Q. You were servant to Mrs. Gregg, were you - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember receiving from her, a key of a chest - A. Yes, on Friday night, the 7th of June, she gave me the key of her chest to take a candle out; I opened the chest; I could not find the candle; I lifted up the till of the chest, I saw a roll which I took to be bank notes; I did not examine the roll. Mrs. Gregg come and took the candle out, and locked the chest and put the keys in her pocket.

Q. That is all that you saw of these bank notes that you supposed them to be - A. Yes.

Q. And you said your mistress locked the chest - A. Yes, she did.

Q. Who made the bed on Sunday - A. I did.

Q. Did you find any thing particular in the bed - A. A part of pockets, there was fourteen-pence in them.

Q. Did you find out to whom the pockets belonged - A. To the prisoner.

Q. How do you know they belonged to her - A. She said she had lost a pair of pockets.

Prisoner. I called upon Mrs. Johnson, this young woman came in to be hired, when I came in she was there about twenty-five minutes, and all that past was, what she was to have a week.

COURT. to Canopy. How long had you been in the service - A. I was only in the place that night. I left them both together, and came on the Sunday morning.

ANN DEACON . I live in Pell-street, Ratcliffe Highway. The prisoner came with a man that passed as man and wife to take a lodging at my house about six weeks ago.

Q. Do you remember her sleeping from her lodging any night - A. Yes, on Friday night, the 7th, the night that they mentioned; she came home on the Saturday, the next day, and had something for dinner, and went out again, she said she had business to do. About nine or ten in the evening she came home again, the first time that she came she brought change of a one pound note, she said she had no pockets on, she asked leave to lay it on my table.

Q. Could you see whether she had any more at that time - A. No, not at that time; when she came home in the evening, between nine and ten o'clock at night, she brought in change for another pound note, she brought a person in with her, she called her Betcy; they sat down in my room, and talked about some notes that the prisoner had in her pocket, and Betcy asked the prisoner if she had not got a five pound note; she said, what is that to you; afterwards I saw her bring out three or four notes, but I did not see a five pound note; she took them out of her bosom to look at them, and put them into her bosom again.

Q. Where did she sleep that night - A. Her husband would not let her in the room to sleep with him, and I let her stay in my room all the night.

Q. Do you know any thing of her having been taken ill on the Friday - A. No.

Q. While she was in your house was there no complaint of illness - A. A little too much in liquor.

Q. Where was the husband the first night that she slept out - A. He slept at home in his own lodging.

Q. What is the husband - A. He is a day-watchman in the New London docks.

Q. Had you ever seen any money or notes in the possession of the prisoner before that - A. No, never. On the Friday morning before she went out she asked me to lend her sixpence; I lent her sixpenny-worth of halfpence. On Sunday she told me that she had paid all her debts in the neighbourhood.

RALPH HOPE I am a police officer. I apprehended the prisoner on Monday the 10th of June, on searching her I found this box in her pocket, a one pound note was in it, and eighteen shillings in silver. Under the bed, in this pocket, I found two one pound notes, and a two pound note, and laying upon the table in the room I found to the amount of one pound, and two shillings in halfpence, all in papers. There were a pair of old pockets which Mrs. Gregg's servant found, the prisoner claimed them; in the pockets there were fourteen-pence.

Q. to prosecutrix. Should you know the notes if you looked at them - A. No.

Prisoner's Defence. The first thing I have to say if it meets with your lordships approbation, I ask for the money that was taken from me, and the next thing is, I am indicted by Mrs. Johnson, which I presume to be her name, her husband is a Dutchman I believe, he is master of the Alexander. She requested me to go down to the Docks to see her, and at the time I called upon Mrs. Rusk, where I had before seen Mrs. Johnson. I found she had removed; I went to her lodgings, I was not very well, Mrs. Johnson behaved in a very discreet manner, and I staid there for the evening, and this young woman came in, and agreed to be her servant for her board, and so much a week till Mr. Johnson came home. In the morning I got out of bed, Mrs. Johnson gave me a shilling, and asked me to get something to drink. I went down to Cannon-street, the wine-vaults was not open. I went to three different places before I found a wine vaults open; I went home; she said, you take a little, and I will, and we will lay down again. That was done. In the morning Mrs. Johnson asked me to come down and take a cup of coffee; I did. I then said, as I have been out all night, which I ought not, I will go home. I went home in the course of the afternoon, Arnott would not let me come in, this lady said I was welcome to sit in her room all night. I am in the habit of receiving every year thirteen pounds four shillings and eight pence; I was asked from where I got it; I said I would rather stand by the consequence than send for the person that allows it me

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 56.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18110710-8

526. CHRISTIAN FREDERICK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of June , a pocket handkerchief, value 6 d. the property of John Claxon , from his person .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY .

Confined One Year in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110710-9

527. MARY HAYS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of June , three shawls, value 14 s. four caps, value 4 l. three pair of gloves, value 6 s. a veil, value 2 s. 6 d. three pieces of lace, value 10 s. 6 d. a strainer, value 12 s. a caddie ladle, value 3 s. a locket, value 2 l. a broach, value 12 s. and a hat, value 14 s. the property of Robert Lankester , in his dwelling-house .

ROBERT LANKESTER . I live at No 15, Bread-street, Cheapside . I am a cotton and linen factor ; I lived there at the time the robbery was committed, but I have removed since. It is in the parish of Allhallows , Bread-street; I keep the whole house.

Q. When did this happen - A. On Monday the 10th of June. I was not at home; there was only a servant in the house.

ELIZABETH LANKESTER . I am the wife of the last witness. I know of the property being in the drawer on the Sunday.

Q. What was the prisoner - A. I never saw her

until I saw her at Hatton Garden office. The property I left in the drawer on Sunday evening. I went out on Monday morning, and missed it on Tuesday morning.

JAMES BURNE . I live at Mr. Baxter's, pawnbroker, 79, Snow-hill. I took in of the prisoner on the 11th of June, a scarf, and on the 10th I was present when she pawned this hat; I did not take it in myself; a child's cap, and a large silk shawl were pawned by two different Irish women. I am sure the white scarf was pawned by the prisoner to me, and the hat I saw taken from the prisoner.

MR. DAVIDSON. I am a pawnbroker, No. 14. Skinner-street. I produce a silk scarf pledged for five shillings, a silver shield, a silver caddie ladle, a pearl locket, and a pearl broach, pawned for seventeen shillings, three caps, three pair of gloves, a white handkerchief, a lace veil, and three remnants of lace for seventeen shillings; all these things were pawned by the prisoner on the 11th of June I am sure she is the person; two of them in the name of Briant, and one in the name of Harrison.

JOHN MATTHEWS . I am an officer From the description I received from the pawnbroker in Snow hill I apprehended the prisoner.

Prosecutrix. The things are all mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I am not guilty of the charge. I never did pawn the things; I know no more about the things than the child that was born last night, or any more about them than you do. You may do just as you like with me.

GUILTY, aged 26.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s only .

Transported for Seven Years

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110710-10

528. JOHN BLEWETT and ANN BLEWETT were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 28th of June , twelve pair of breeches, value 14 s. and a pair of pantaloons, value 2 s. the property of Robert Carter .

ROBERT CARTER, JUN I carry on the business for my father Robert Carter , he keeps a whole sale clothes warehouse , No. 16, in the Minories . I never knew the property was lost until it was found at Mr. Stevenson's, Bethnal Green

JOSEPH STEVENSON . I am a wholesale dealer in clothes, No. 2, Dog-row, Bethnal Green. On the 28th of June Mr. Carter came and asked me to let him look at some goods that I had bought of one Phillips I shewed him the goods, he said they were his property.

Q. The goods that you shewed him you bought of Phillips - A. Yes.

ISAAC PHILLIPS . I am an old clothes man. The goods that I told to Stevenson I bought of the woman prisoner at No. 21, Captain Cook's place Commercial-road, when I bought them nobody was present but the woman prisoner, I gave five pound for nine pair of breeches, and one pair of pantaloons we called them all breeches.

Q. You sold them to Mr Stevenson - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see any man at all - A. No, I never saw him.

EDWARD DAVIS . On the 28th of June I was sent for to Mr. Carter's house, and there the prisoner was in the parlour. He was porter and warehouseman to Mr. Carter Mr. Carter asked the prisoner how much he had robbed him off; Mr. Carter said he supposed he had stolen a hundred pounds worth of property; the prisoner said he had not robbed him to that amount. He asked him to what amount he had robbed him; the prisoner replied, he supposed about fifty pounds. Why, said Mr. Carter, what have you done with the money. He said that part of it was in the drawer at home, in his house; Mr. Carter asked him what he took out yesterday, he replied two pair of breeches, and he carried them out in the crown of his hat, and that they were then at his house. He then begged for mercy, and said his house was in Merman-street, Commercial-road, and if Mr. Carter would forgive him he would sell all his property, and make restoration. I went to Merman-street, and there I found the other prisoner, his wife I asked her for the breeches that her husband brought home, she denied any knowledge of it. I asked her where the money was that she sold the last lot of things for to the jew Phillips, she denied any knowledge of that. I told her I must search the premises, and began to do so; she then said to Mr. Carter, she hoped he would be merciful, the things were in the other room; she went with us into the other room, and opened a box, and said the breeches were in the box, in that box I found the two pair of breeches, and in the third drawer of a chest of drawers she said I should find the money that the goods were sold for, and in a small box in that drawer I found fifteen pound in notes, and in the bottom drawer I found another pair of breeches.

The prisoners said nothing in their defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

JOHN BLEWETT - GUILTY, aged 37.

Judgment respited .

ANN BLEWETT - NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110710-11

529. JAMES WATTS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of June , a handkerchief, value 3 s. the property of Perrot Fenton , jun. from his person .

PERROT FENTON, JUN. On Sunday night, or on Monday morning, about half past twelve, I was returning home along Fleet-street , I was going from the Temple home, I felt my handkerchief going from my right hand coat pocket, I turned round immediately and saw it in the act of dropping from the prisoner; I called he watch, and took him to the watchhouse, there he admitted the fact.

Mr. Alley. He stated that he had laid a wager with two friends, they said that he could not pick your pocket - A. He said that he had said a wager that he could do it without my knowing it.

Prisoner's Defence. I have no other defence than what has been before said. When I found the mistake and the error I had done, he gave me in custody, and as for the property I had not got it.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY, aged 21.

Judgment respited .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110710-12

530. ANN MASON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 31st of May , a pint pot, value 1 s. the property of Thomas Shuffrey .

THOMAS SHUFFREY . I am a publican , at the Crown and Magpie, Skinner-street, Bishopsgate . On the 31st of May the prisoner came in the house I saw her go out about nine o'clock in the morning, I suspected that she had some of my property in her pocket; I pursued her and brought her back, and took the pot out of her left hand pocket This is the pot, it is mine.

Prisoner's Defence. It was in my right hand pocket.

GUILTY , aged 36.

Confined Six Months in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110710-13

531. GEORGE MADDEN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of July , from the person of Lack Kearns , a pocket book, value 2 s. two bank notes, value 10 l. each, a bank note, value 5 l. seven 2 l. bank notes, and ten 1 l. notes his property.

LACK KEARNS. I am a general dealer , No. 10, Duke-street, Old Artillery ground. On the 1st of July, a little before twelve at night, at the corner of Union-street, Bishopgate , the prisoner laid hold of my arm, and asked me how I did; I looked in his face, and said you are a stranger, I do not know you. I hardly had time to speak when he had got my pocket book out of my inside breast coat pocket. I held him for a time, he scuffled and got away from me. I cried stop thief, he ran across the street, a man catched him by the collar; I was close to him all the time, and never lost sight of him. I saw the pocket book in his hand just as he got from me.

Q. What did he do with your pocket book - A. That I do not know, I have never recovered it. I thought the first man that catched him got the pocket book, he did not like to come forward to prosecute; he came with us to the watchhouse but refused to come forward to prosecute.

EDWARD TRUSTY . I am houseman to Castle Baynard ward. I was coming from my benefit Society last Monday week, and just as I got to the corner of Union-street a man had got hold of the prisoner; I said I am an officer, you assist me, and I will assist you. The prosecutor came up, he said he had been robbed of his pocket book, and forty-nine pounds in bank notes, and small bills and other things mounted to sixty or seventy pounds.

JOHN WILLIAMS . I am constable of Bishopsgate Ward. I searched the prisoner, and found no pocket book.

Q. Was the prosecutor sober - A. He was not; but he described how the prisoner came up to him, and took the pocket book out of his pocket, the same as he has to-day. He seemed to know what he was about.

Prisoner's Defence. I was a great way from the corner of Union-street when I was taken.

GUILTY, aged 16.

Judgment respited .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110710-14

532. JOHN ROBINSON was indicted for feloniously assaulting Robert Bolton , in the King's highway, putting him in fear, and feloniously taking from his person, three gold seals, value 4 l. his property.

ROBERT BOLTON . I am warehouseman to Richard and Benjamin Tucker , wholesale stationers , Upper Thames-street, I was robbed in Bishopsgate-street on the 9th of June , about one o'clock on the Sunday morning, as I was going down Bishopsgate-street; I was turning to go through Bishopsgate church-yard. I considered that the gates at Broad street were locked; I returned, and was going down Bishopsgate-street to my lodging; the prisoner came up to me, and said, what did I strike him for.

Q. What were his words - A. Damn you, what did you strike me for.

Q. Had you struck any body - A. No, I was going peaceably along. He put himself in an attitude to strike me; I turned my hands in a sort of defence, and told him to go along; he went, and I expected I had got rid of him. In a minute afterwards he came up again, turned me round, and made a snatch at my seals; the chain broke, and the seals came off.

Q. Were you sober - A. I had two small glasses of whiskey with a friend, I knew what I was about. When he snatched at my seals I prevented the watch from going by putting my hand upon it. He took the seals, I pursued him immediately, and of course he was taken in about a minute afterwards. I did not lose sight of him, he turned down Old Bethlem; he was taken before he got to Sun-street.

Q. Did you find your seals - A. No; I fancy he throwed them away in the pursuit. I looked for the seals afterward, I did not find them. I can swear positively to his person that he is the man that snatched the seals.

Mr. Andrews. Saturday evening was Bow-fair - A. It was. I had been spending the evening with a friend at Walbrook.

Q. Of course he snatched so suddenly he got them before you made any resistance - A. He did it so instantly that I had not time to resist. He put himself in an attitude of offence, laid hold of my collar, and snatched them away. The chain broke.

COURT. He tried at your watch, you prevented it by putting your hand - A. Yes, the watch was almost out, but I seized it. The chain was a base metal chain.

CHARLES HORNBY . I am a labourer in the East India warehouses. On Sunday morning, the 9th of June, between twelve and one, I was coming into Bishopgate street, the prisoner was standing with his back towards the road, and his face towards Bishopsgate church-yard; the moon shone very bright, I could discover him two or three yards off. The prisoner ran up against the prosecutor, and said, d - n you, how dare you strike

me, I am one of his Majesty's subjects.

Q. Did he strike him - A. No, there were a great many words: I crossed over and said to the prisoner, how could you think of taking advantage of this-man, he is rather in liquor. The prisoner put himself in a fighting attitude, he did not strike him; the prosecutor said, my good fellow, I have nothing at all to do with you, he pushed him away, and went on. The prisoner came along with me, I tried to make up the matter, I did not know either of them, and just as I got from Bishopsgate church-yard there were two women standing, then the prisoner left me. He ran up to me a few minutes afterwards; he said he thought to take one of them bloody bitches home with him, but there was a man with them. Then I was afraid of him; he viewed me all over, he darted away from me, and ran towards Mr. Bolton; when he came up to him he gave him a turn round, he snatched the bunch of seals, I do not know how many there were, only there was a bunch, which he got from him, and ran away; Mr. Bolton called out immediately. I was in the road. The prisoner was stopped before he got to Sun-street, I am sure the prisoner is the man, he walked with me several steps before he came up to the woman; he was taken to the watch-house; Mr. Bolton catched hold of me by the arm, and insisted upon my going into the watchhouse. I left the prisoner then, and Mr. Bolton, and I never saw him or the prisoner until last night, Mr. Bolton called on me.

Mr. Walford. You said it was not right the prisoner should take advantage of a man that was in liquor - A. I certainly did.

Q. Do not you think the seals were gone before he put his hand there - A. I cannot say.

Q. The snatch was made before he put his hand there - A. Of course it must.

CHARLES HENLEY . I was officer of the night. Between twelve and one o'clock in the night the prisoner was brought into the watchhouse, Mr. Bolton charged him with robbing him of three gold seals.

- MURPHY. I was in the watchhouse. The prisoner was searched, the seals were not found. The prisoner broke out, I followed him, and never lost sight of him. He was taken again in Houndsditch.

Mr. Walford. How far was it from where the seals were taken, to where the prisoner was taken - A. From Old Bethlem to Dunning's-alley, between three and four hundred yards.

Prisoner. I wish to ask any of the witnesses if there are any here that took me.

Hornby. He was stopped by the watchman.

Prisoner's Defence. I will prove to the contrary, and that this man said he would hang me if he could. I have served his Majesty in the dragoon service nine years; I have been willing to serve my king; I likewise have been an honest, industrious man. I can bring forward the most respectable noblemen and gentlemen to prove that I am an honest man.

COURT. Are they here now - A. No, they are not.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 30.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110710-15

533. ELIZABETH KING , PHILADELPHIA WALTON , and FRANCES BLOTT , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of June , thirty six guineas, the property of William Coombe , in his dwelling-house .

WILLIAM COOMBE . Q. Do you remember the prisoner at the bar coming to your house on Saturday the 8th of June - A. Perfectly well, about seven o'clock in the evening; the prisoner Blott came in first, the old lady followed her, and then King followed the next: they came in company together. Blott called for a pint of ale, they drank the best part of the ale down. Blott asked leave to sit down in the bar till such times that Mrs. Lloyd came in.

Q. Did you know Mr. Lloyd - A. Yes. I knew him some time; I permitted them all three to sit down in the bar, they sat two or three minutes, then Blott, and her mother Walton said they would go and see where Mr. Lloyd was, as he stopped longer than they expected; they went out, leaving King behind; they returned in about three or four minutes; in the course of that time I was called into the parlour to receive some reckoning; I let the bar, and left King in the bar only. They returned with Mr. Lloyd, and then the prisoner King immediately left the bar and went out into the tap-room, into the street. The prisoner, Mrs. Blott, and her mother, Mrs. Walton, informed Mr. Lloyd that they had a pint of ale; he said he would pay for it; they said they could not wait, they were both in a hurry; they both immediately quitted the bar. Mr. Lloyd paid for the ale; he followed them. I did not see any thing more of them till the next morning I sent for Mr. Lloyd.

Q. When did you miss your money - A. The same night, between eleven and twelve o'clock.

Q. How much property did you miss - A. Thirty-six guineas in gold.

Q. Where was it - A. In my coat pocket hanging over a chair in the bar, it was in two bags, the inside bag was a silk bag, and the outside a brown canvas. On the Sunday morning I sent for Mr. Lloyd, I told him I had been robbed.

Q. What is Mr. Lloyd - A. He is clerk to a coal merchant.

Q. Did you ever find your money again - A. No, I have not found it again.

Q. While Blott and Walton were there you were in the room - A. No, not the whole time; they were in the room, because I served some customers in this parlour.

Q. They went out leaving King alone - A. They did.

- DICKENS. I am an officer. I apprehended King in Red Lion street on Sunday the 9th of June, I took her to Covent Garden watchhouse. She had nothing about her but a few halfpence. She told me she threw the two purses away.

Q. Did you make her any promises - A. No. I asked her where the guineas were, she said thirty guineas were at the Blue Last public house, Ludgate

Hill, she had got notes for them, and the notes were given to one Mr. Slyfield, that keeps a wine vaults in Brook's Market there I went I found two tens, eight one's, three guineas, and three half crowns.

Q. Did she say what she had done with the other six - A. She said she had bought a bonnet out of the other and spent it; I went to Mr. Barker the publican, he told me he had changed, the guineas, Mr. Slyfield has got the notes.

Mr. Walford. Did not Blott desire you to come - A. No. Mr. Harding sent for me.

Q. That was at the instigation of Blott - A. I believe it was, because Blott went down with me to Mr. Coombes.

WILLIAM SLYFIELD . I produce the money and notes thirty-one pounds ten shillings and sixpence. The two ten pound notes are marked by Barker and eight one pound notes, three guineas, and three half crowns that were delivered by King.

MR. BARKER. Q. You live at the Blue Last - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember the prisoner King coming to your house - A. I do not; she was a total stranger to me, I never saw her before.

Q. Look at them bank notes - A. Here is my name upon two of them.

Q. Did you give them notes to the person that brought you some money change - A. I can swear to them notes in particular, I always put my name on the notes I receive.

King's Defence. On Saturday as I was taken on the Sunday I met this lady, I had not seen her some time before; she invited me to dine with her, she said she was going to meet her husband on the Saturday evening we went into Mr. Coombe's house, which I never saw before, we went into the tap-room, Mrs. Blott objected to sitting in the tap-room, and we went into the bar, and when Mrs. Blott and Walton went out of the bar I was left in; I never took it out of the bar, it was laying on the floor, by the bar door; when they returned Mrs. Blott said, as I did not wish to see Mr. Lloyd I had better go, I picked it up on the threshold, when I went away I went to look at them, thinking they were halfpence, but they proved to be guineas. I at first thought they were counterfeits. As for stealing them I never did in my life. The old lady has no concern in it, she is perfectly innocent, and so is the other.

Q. to Mr. Coombe. What parish is your house in - A. St. Andrews in the Wardrobe.

Walton and Blott were not put their defence.

KING, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 26.

WALTON, NOT GUILTY .

BLOTT, NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110710-16

534. JOHN RICHARDS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of July , seven yards of cloth, value 5 s. the property of London Dock company .

ALEXANDER LOW. Q. You are an assistant foreman at the London Docks - A. Yes.

Q. You know the prisoner at the bar, do you not - A. Yes, he is a carpenter , he was employed in June last, and in the early part of last month, by the London Dock Company, in No. 4, warehouse. On the 5th of this month he was repairing a door of No. 4 warehouse. I saw him putting away a piece of linen between some mats which contained barilla; I asked him what he was doing there, he answered he was doing of nothing; I put my hand to the cloth that I saw him stuffing away; I said, do you call that nothing. He then asked me to forgive him, it was the first time I brought him forward to the front warehouse, and left him in charge of Pickering. There were chests of linen in the same warehouse about three yards from him, and there was one of them opened when he was there; they were all safe about half an hour after two. About three o'clock one of them seemed to have been wrenched open.

Q. When that cask was warehoused what quantity did it contain - A. One hundred and twenty-four pieces on the 6th of this month, and on the 6th of this month I counted it, it was one piece deficient; the piece that the prisoner was stowing away answered in size mark and length to the piece taken out of the cask.

Q. This cask was in the London Dock - A. Yes.

WILLIAM CLARK . I am a constable in the London docks. I was sent for to No. 4, warehouse on the 5th of July the prisoner was standing where the linen was stowed away; I saw the linen stowed between two packages of barilla; I went to the chest and saw that the chest had been broken open, there were six nails drawn out of a clamp; I asked him whether it was done with a hammer; he said, no. I took the linen in custody and took charge of the man, On the next day I counted the linens in that chest, I found there were one deficient, that piece corres- with the number in the chest. This is the linen, it is six yards.

BENJAMIN PICKERING . I am a labourer. I was at this warehouse No. 4, I heard the prisoner ask Mr. Low to forgive him; he asked me to speak to Mr. Low to forgive him, Mr. Low said it was out of his power to forgive him.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence; called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY, aged 33.

Judgment respited .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110710-17

535. HENRY PEARCE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of June , two silver spoons, value 28 s. the property of the Right Honourable Henry Earl of Uxbridge .

ROBERT ROUSE . I am a fishmonger, I live about twenty yards from Lord Uxbridge. On the 7th of June, between twelve and one o'clock, I was standing at my own door, I saw the prisoner, I observed him picking up a spoon, and I heard it fall, Mr. Goodman, who was with me, seized him. We went to Lord Uxbridge's, and asked the porter whose spoon it was; I cannot say whether the prisoner heard me or not; I looked round and saw the prisoner was gone; I cannot say how he got away. This is the spoon that I heard drop from him and which I saw him pick up.

FRANCIS JACKSON . I am the steward's room boy.

Q. You have eight spoons intrusted to you for that particular room - A. Yes; I laid the cloth on the 7th

of June and left seven spoons on the table.

Q. Is the stewards room near the area - A. Yes, it looks into the area, it is not far from the door of the house below.

Q. What time did you leave the room with the cloth so spread - A. I was called away by the porter about half past twelve, and returned to the room again in about ten minutes and I missed five spoons.

Q. Look at that spoon, do you believe that to be one of the spoons - A. Yes, I do, it is the property of Henry, Earl of Uxbridge.

Q. How soon after the spoons were missing did you see at the house the first witness - A. I did not see him all; in about five minutes I heard that one of the spoons were found.

MICHAEL STRINGER . I am under butler to the Earl of Uxbridge.

Q. Did you at any time on the seventh of June, see the prisoner - A. Yes, I believe I did; I saw him come down the area it was a person of the description of him; when I saw him at Whitechapel afterwards; he came down the area steps, the area gate was open.

Q. Do you know whether the stewards room door was open - A. I cannot say, it is left open all day.

Q. Look at that spoon - A. That spoon is one of the Earl of Uxbridge's.

JOSEPH DUNN . I am shopman to Mr. Church pawnbroker, Whitechapel. On the 8th of June, about half past eight in the evening, I saw the prisoner lurking about the shop a long time before he came in and exactly at hall past eight he came in, and took this spoon out of his pocket, and wanted five shillings on it; seeing the crest upon it, I asked him how he came by it; he informed me that he found it upon a dust heap. I detained him, and sent for an officer.

Q. to Stringer. Look at that spoon - A. That spoon is one of the Earl of Uxbrigde's.

Prisoner's Defence. I was very much in liquor; I do not know that I was near the house at all.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Confined Six Months in the house of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18110710-18

536. JOHN COX was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 29th of June , thirty knives and forks, value 5 s seventeen plates, value 9 s. four dishes, value 6 s a flower pot, value 6 d. a sugar bason, value 1 s. thirty cups, value 8 s. twenty-seven saucers, value 7 s. two basons, value 1 s. a mug, value 1 s. an ice pail, value 1 s. sixteen earthen plates, value 1 s. a tea pot, value 1 s. four pickle dishes, value 1 s. three goblets, value 1 s. three tumblers, value 1 s. seven glasses, value 1 s. 6 l. a Derbyshire spar goblet, value 1 s. one butter color and stand, value 6 d. fifteen books, value 15 s. an pera glass, value 10 s. a pocket book, value 6 s. two India boxes value 1 s. five brushes, value 2 s. nine tablecloths, value 50 s. thirty-three napkin, value 12 s. seven pillow cases, value 7 s. a half pound weight of scarlet silk, value 1 s. a silk scarf, value 10 s. a yard of chinez, value 5 s. a petticoat value 2 s five yards of point lace, value 2 s. five yards of black lace value 2 s. two lace veils, value 1 l. a silk handkerchief, value 3 s. two pair of silk stockings, value 5 s. a silver tea spoon, value 2 s. the property of Mary Ann Sturt , in her dwelling house .

SECOND COUNT For stealing the like things, stating them to be the property of Charles Stuart Esq. in his dwelling house, six yards of silk, value 18 s. nineteen handkerchiefs, value 19 s. three aprons, value 6 d. a scarf value 2 s. one sleeve; value 2 s. a necklace, value 1 l. a pair of boots, value 2 s. thirteen pair of gloves, value 2 s. eleven pair of stockings, value 2 s. a cloak, value 2 s. the property of Catherine Mitchener , spinster, in the dwelling house of Mary Ann Stuart , and Charles Stuart, Esq.

SAMUEL HAMILTON . I am an officer of Marlborough Street. On the 2d, of the present Month, about ten in the morning, I searched the prisoner's lodgings, No. 7 Little Chesterfield street, Mary-le-bone. The prisoner was in bed; when I went into the room, I told him, that the lady Sturt had reasons to suspect that he had wronged her; he said, he had, and he hoped he should die for it. I searched the room the drawer of his trunk, and in two large bundle under the bed, I found all the articles named in the indictment; Catherine Mitchener was with me; she said, they were her mistress's property. All the articles are here, except the china.

CATHERINE MITCHENER . I live with Mary Ann Sturt, I have lived with her six years, in Upper Seymour Street.

Q. What is the name of her husband - A. Charles Sturt.

Q Do you know the prisoner, did he ever live in her family - A. Yes, a year and ten months, as footman; he left her service on the 20th of June. I was with the officer when these things were found; I looked at them all; the whole of the lace is hers; I had it under my care; I am not at ail a judge of the value of the lace. The tablecloths are the lady's property, and the cabinet; the tablecloth may be worth two or three shillings each, and the napkins a shilling each; I am a judge of the value of the cabinet, some of the things were missed before the prisoner left the service, and many of them afterwards.

Q You cannot speak of any particular thing to any particular time - A. No, these silk handkerchiefs and muslin handkerchiefs, muslin aprons, a muslin gown and many other things, are mine; they have been all worn, they may be worth a shilling each.

Q. Were they missed at any particular time - A. No, I cannot speak to any particular time when these acre taken away.

Q. There is no single article of the value of one guinea perhaps - A. No.

Mr. Arabin. He lived in the family near two years, and if he had been evil minded enough, he might have taken them away one one day, and another another - A. Yes.

The prisoner left his defence so his counsel, and called no witnesses to character.

GUILTY, aged 26.

Of stealing to the value 39 shillings .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18110710-19

537. WILLIAM BLER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of June , a watch; value 4 l. the property of William Hallgarth in his dwelling house .

WILLIAM HALLGARTH . I live at the sign of the Westminster Arms, Westmister , I keep a public house .

Q. Did you miss any of your property any time - A. I did, on the 17th of last month, I missed a silver watch, from out of a small drawer in the bar; I saw it about four o'clock in the afternoon; I missed it about half past six.

DEBORAH CLARK . On the 17th of last month. I was at work at Mr. Hallgarth's public house, from ten in the morning, till nine in the evening; on that day the prisoner was sitting drinking with two more men in the tap room; they were there from ten in the morning, till five in the evening; I saw the prisoner with two women, drinking in the passage of the bar, he was standing between the two women; I saw his hand over in the bar, it was closed, but what was in it I could not see; this was about half past five; he afterwards went away with these two women, and returned about half past eight.

JOHN HILLMAN . I am shopman to Mr. Lucas, in Rider's Court. I believe the prisoner to be the person that brought the watch; I cannot be certain. On the 17th of June, about six or seven o'clock in the evening, I advanced thirty shillings upon it.

JAMES GILLMORE . I am an officer. On the 17th of June, I was sent for to take the prisoner into custody, about half past eight in the morning I apprehended him. I found him in the custody of Mrs. Clark, she accused him of taking the watch; he struck her on the breast, and jumped out of the window; I brought him back to the prosecutor's house, and while I was searching him, the wife came in, and said, here is the duplicate and the money, let my husband go. In taking him to Tothill Fields, I told him, I thought he had made a foolish job of it; he said he was drunk, or else he should not have done it.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, called two witnesses who have him a good character.

GUILTY, aged 34.

Of stealing to the value of 39 shillings only .

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre,

Reference Number: t18110710-20

538. HENRY HARRIS was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of John Brown , he and others of his family being therein, about the hour six in the afternoon, on the 7th of June , and stealing therein, a coat, value 2 l. two pair of breeches, value 2 l. two shirts, value 10 s. three pair of stockings, value 4 s. four handkerchiefs, value 2 s. and five towels, value 2 s. 6 d. the property of William Smith .

WILLIAM SMITH I live in John Brown's house, No. 6, West Street, in the Parish of St. Ann's, Westminster . On the 7th of June I went out to work, about half after four in the morning; I had left my things safe in my box, and the box locked; I locked my room door, and put my key of the room door under the landlord's door where he slept. They sent for me home between eight and nine in the morning, I found my room door unlocked, and my box broken open; I missed out of my box, a blue coat, two pair of breeches, two shirts, three pair of stockings, five towels, and six handkerchiefs. I found one shirt on the prisoners back the same morning he was at Bow-street.

Q. Did you know the prisoner before - A. Yes, he used to lodge in the same house with me, he had been gone away a fortnight.

WILLIAM HOMER . I am an officer. On the 7th of June, about eleven o'clock in the day the prisoner was brought to me by William Low ; I took him to Bow-street. The prosecutor said he thought he had his shirt on, if it was his, it was marked W. S. with blue thread or silk; I made him pull the shirt off, it was marked as he described; this is the shirt.

Prosecutor. it is my shirt, it is worth six shillings.

Prisoner's Defence. This being the first time that ever I was charged with any thing of the kind, I did not like to let my master know it.

GUILTY, aged 19.

Of stealing the shirt only .

Confined Six Months in the house of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18110710-21

539. JAMES PERRY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of June , a mare, value 3 l. the property of William Mason .

WILLIAM MASON . I am a carter . I live in Warren Street, Camden Town. On the 6th of June, in the morning, I met the prisoner with my mare, on the Kentish Town Road; he was leading the mare towards Town. I had the mare before that at a field at grass, facing St. Giles's burying ground. I met him upon the road, leading the mare away. The prisoner let go the mare before I came to him I looked at the mare to be sure it was mine. He left the mare in the road; he said it was a moon light morning; he was leading the mare with an alter; as soon as he saw me he ran away across the road; we took him to the watchhouse. I am sure it was my mare. After we had taken him to the watchhouse, we put the mare into a field.

Q. Did you observe the field whether the gate was open - A. There was a gap in the fence that a horse might escape through. The prisoner denied taking the mare out of the field but it was a man with a brown coat on.

RICHARD PETLOW . On the Wednesday night before twelve o'clock, I fetched my horses out of the field, I saw the mare in the field then.

JOHN SMITH . I am an officer on Wednesday, the 5th of June, about eight o'clock, in the evening, I saw the prisoner go out with two others, in Tottenham Court Road, near the turnpike, about half a mile from the field were the mare was at grass; I saw him the next morning when he was brought to the office I knew him to be the same.

WILLIAM READ . I am an officer, I took charge of the prisoner in Somerstown; he told me that he had come from Barnet.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been to Barnet with my sister with black lead; coming home I saw a man coming across the road, he had a brown coat on with a horse. The prosecutor halloaed out stop thief, I turned round to see what was the matter, he came and catched hold of me. I am innocent.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18110710-22

540. MARY MACKDONALD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of June , a towel, value 1 d. and 11 l. in monies numbered, the property of Edward Edwards , in the dwelling house of John Cameron .

EDWARD EDWARDS . I am a butcher .

Q. Do you recollect having any quantity of silver any time, and leaving it in any body's care - A. Yes.

Q. When was it - A. I cannot rightly say, it may be a month ago.

Q. What quantity of silver had you - A. Eleven pounds worth there were sixteen dollars, the rest were half crown, shillings, and sixpences. I took this silver and tied it up in a coarse cloth, and delivered this silver tied up in the cloth to Mr. Cameron the publican. I gave it to him in order to deliver it to my brother whenever he should call for it; I gave it him about half past nine.

Q. What is your brother - A. He is a butcher.

Q. Cameron knew your brother, did he - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see what Cameron did with it when you gave him the towell and the money in it - A. Yes; I saw him put it in a small drawer in his own bar in his own house, and than I went home.

JOHN CAMERON . I keep the Weavers Arms public-house in Hay's-court, St. Ann's parish.

Q. Do you remember receiving a quantity of silver at any time of Edwards - A. Yes, on Friday the 6th of June, about half after nine o'clock in the evening; the silver was tied up in a cloth; he counted out the silver on the table before he tied it up; there were eleven pounds worth of silver; there were a good many dollars, I do not know how many. I was to keep it, and his brother was to call for it the next morning; I put it in the till in my bar; at twelve o'clock I told my wife to take it out of the till to take it up stairs; I saw my wife take it out of the till ten minutes after twelve, I looked at the clock at the time.

Q. What did she do with it when she took it out of the till - A. She put it on a small box by the side of the fire place, then she went to get some warm water, and forgot the money; I went up before her, and she came up stairs after me; the last time I saw it was in my wife's hands before she put it on the box. Then she and me went to bed about a quarter after twelve.

Q. Do you know any thing of the prisoner Macdonald - A. Yes, the prisoner was my servant in the house at that time.

Q. Do you know whether she was gone to bed before you went to bed - A. Yes, she was.

Q. What time did you get up in the morning - A. About five minutes before seven.

Q. Do you know whether or no she was up before you - A. Yes, she was, and had the tap-room and parlour cleaned out, and the door wide open; my wife did not get up till eight o'clock.

Q. When you went up to bed at a quarter after twelve was the house shut up - A. Yes.

Q. Who was in the house besides yourselves and the servant maid - A. There were two or three butchers that lodged in the house, they were in bed some time before that, there were nobody else in the house.

Q. Did you miss the money when you got up - A. No, I did not until Edwards's brother called for it nigh ten o'clock, and then I found it was gone.

Q. Did you make any enquiry about it - A. Yes, my wife said she had left it there; I spoke to the prisoner about it at ten o'clock, I asked her whether she had seen it when she was cleaning out the tap-room, she denied it. She had seen the silver counted out the night before, and given to me.

Q. Did you afterwards find out where the money was - A. Yes, the day after I found it out part of it at least; there was a washerwoman that the prisoner recommended; that washerwoman left the house about eight o'clock in the evening, before the money was brought into the house.

Q. Did you know where the washerwoman lived - A. No, I did not. On the next day I took the prisoner and all the butchers that lodged in the house to Bow-street to be examined; I asked the prisoner where the washerwoman lived, she said she did not know; then she said she lived at Chelsea; two officers went up to Chelsea, they could not find any such person. After they came back she would not tell where she lived. On Saturday morning I found out the washerwoman at 34, Rupert-street; she lived there, I went to Bow street office, got a search warrant, and took two officers with me; we found in a box in the washerwoman's room, a cloth, and six pounds one shilling tied upin the cloth, all silver, and we found twelve shillings and six pence in the washerwoman's pocket. Limbrick the officer has the cloth and the money.

MARGERET CAMERON. Q. You are the wife of the last witness - A. Yes.

Q. You have heard the account that he gave, do you recollect taking this cloth with the silver out of the till for the purpose of carrying it up stairs - A I did, and I put it on the box by the fire place intending to take it up stairs; I went to get some hot water out of the boiler, and forgot it and went up stairs without it.

Q. The next morning you did not get up till after your husband - A. No, I did not get up till after eight o'clock, it was not discovered till near ten o'clock.

Q. Do you remember the washerwoman being at your house that day - A. Yes, she went away about eight o'clock in the evening, before the man brought the money. She was not there afterwards.

JOHN LIMBRICK . I am an officer. On the Friday the prosecutor brought the prisoner down to the office; I searched her and found nothing on her. She denied having any knowledge of the money. On Saturday I went up to 34, Rupert-street, I asked the woman of the house whether she had any box belonging to the prisoner.

Q. What woman - A. Mrs. Molaney. She told me she had no box there of hers; I found a box belonging to Mrs. Molaney; I shook the box and found a rattling of silver; the box was locked; I went for a smith and had the lock picked; Mrs. Molaney was present at the time; she was bad in bed; in her box I found six pounds one shilling in silver, tied up in this cloth. After I had found the money I went to the prisoner I asked her where this washerwoman lived; before I told her I had got the money; she said she did not know where she lived; I took the towell out of my

pocket, then she began to cry, and begged for mercy; I told her where I had found it, she then said she would tell me all about it; she said the washerman came there very soon that morning, and she told her that she had found some money; she was going to take it up stairs, but the washerwoman called her back, and said it was better for her to keep it, and with that she did; they both went out together, and she gave it to the washerwoman tied up as it was; then when she got to 34. Rupert-street she took the money from the washerwoman, and carried it up stairs, and put it in the box, and locked it, and left the key on the mantle shelf. There was no key to be found.

MARY MOLANEY. Q. Are you the washerwoman that was at work at Mr. Cameron's - A. No.

Q. What do you know about this business - A. I know nothing at all about it. I live in Rupert-street.

Q. What number - A. I cannot tell the number indeed. I lived in Rupert-street in that room four months.

Q. Were you ever at Mr. Cameron's, the Weavers Arms - A. Never in my life.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar - A. I do.

Q. You were not at Mr. Cameron's in the morning - A. I was sick in bed. I do not know anything about the money.

Q. Did any other woman live in your lodgings - A. Yes, Ann Molaney ; she is no relation to me at all.

Q. And she used to come backwards and forwards to your lodging - A. Yes, sometimes.

Q. Did you ever see the prisoner, Mary Mackdonald at your lodging - A. Yes; I gave her some shelter in the winter.

Q. Did you ever let her put any thing in a box of yours - A. No, never.

Q. Was there any box in your room - A. Yes, it belonged to the prisoner.

Q. Did you ever see her put any thing in that box - A. Indeed I did not.

Q. Do you remember Limbrick coming to your lodgings and opening that box - A. Yes, and he took this money out.

Q. Did you see that money put in - A. No, I did not never in my life.

Q. Had you seen the prisoner in your room a day or two before the officers came - A. No, I did not. I had been ill a month; I was laying in bed with this boy; Ann Molaney was attending me.

Q. to Edwards. The cloth and money is there, look at it - A. I think it is the cloth, it has the appearance of it, and among the money there is a shilling I took in the shop, it was of the appearance of this, but I cannot swear to it; it is a queen Ann's shilling; there was a queen Ann's shilling among mine, and here is a sixpence marked S S, I had such a one.

Prisoner's Defence. I had no box in the place.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 18.

[ The prisoner was recommended to his Majesty's mercy on account of her youth .]

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18110710-23

541. THOMAS DENNIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of June , a coat, value 30 s. a pair of breeches, value 10 s. a waistcoat, value 1 s. and four shillings, the property of William Golding , in the dwelling-house of Benjamin Stokes .

WILLIAM GOLDING . I am a grocer ; I live at No. 6, Cross-street, Finsbury-square , and I have the care of Mr. Benjamin Stokes 's house. No. 9, South street, Finsbury square. On Sunday the 16th of June Roberts brought the prisoner into Mr. Stokes's kitchen, and called me; I was in the water closet; I came down stairs, I saw the prisoner with the things belonging to me under his arm, I had left on the table in the kitchen two minutes before; I looked on the table and saw the money gone as well as the clothes; four shillings was wanting. I examined the bundle that he had under his arm, he had a coat, waistcoat, and breeches, and four shillings in his hand. I took care of the clothes, and gave them to the officer. I asked the prisoner what he did it for; he said he did it for want. We marked the shillings when we found them.

Q. Were these things laying on the table so that people passing along in the street could see them - A. No; the table was at the further end of the kitchen.

TIMOTHY ROBERTS . I live in service with Mr. Gappards, No. 8, South-street, Finsbury-square, next door to Mr. Stokes. On the 16th of June, between twelve and one, I saw the prisoner coming down the area-steps of Mr. Gappard's house, he came towards the kitchen door and begged charity; he said he was a very poor man, he wanted a few halfpence to bear his expences that night; I gave him sixpence, with which he was seemingly thankful. One of my masters sons were in the kitchen, he said, Robert, I think he is an imposter, you had better look after him. I went up our area steps, and looked after him; I saw him going down Mr. Stokes's are a steps, he advanced towards the kitchen door, he went into the kitchen; in a minute and a half after I saw him coming out with a bundle under his left arm. I met him on the area steps and stopped him; I took him into Mr. Stokes's kitchen; I called Golding who was in the care of the house; I asked him it that was his property; he said, yes, it was his property; the prisoner had his coat, waistcoat, and breeches; Golding looked on the table where he had left the things; he said, I suppose my money is gone also. The prisoner said here is your money, he had four shillings in his left hand. I then went for an officer.

WILLIAM ALLEN . I am an officer. I searched the prisoner, I only found a knife upon him. I have had the things in my possession ever since.

Prisoner's Defence. William Golding kept me in custody during the time that man was found to take me in custody.

GUILTY, aged 38.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18110710-24

542. ELIZABETH MARSHALL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of July , five yards of printed cotton, value 15 s. the property of Benjamin Marshall , privately in his shop .

GEORGE GRISBROOK . I am shopman to Mr. Marshall, 360, Holborn , he is a linen-draper . On Thursday last, about half past seven, the prisoner

came into our shop to match a print, I could not match it; we had none of it left; the prisoner seemed dissatisfied and asked us to look again. Mrs. Payne informed our porter something the prisoner said, she had better mind her own business, she thought she was no good herself; the prisoner then said, cut me off a yard of this print; it was laying on the counter; I began to cut her off a yard, and directly she flew in a passion, and said I was tearing her print; one of our young men came up, and said it was our print; the porter came up and told me he saw her take it out of her handkerchief; she then flew in a passion and cried. I told the porter to go for a constable, and before the constable came she confessed that she had taken it. I had noticed the print on the counter just before the prisoner came in. The print was five yards, it was worth fifteen shillings.

CALEB MUNN. I am a porter to Mr. Marshall, I saw the prisoner come into the shop, I saw the print on the counter before the prisoner came in; I did not see the prisoner take any print off the counter. Mrs. Payne told me she saw the prisoner take the piece of print and put it in her handkerchief; I went up to the prisoner, I said, what is your pleasure; she said, I want a yard of print like this; part was in her handkerchief and part on the counter. I told Mr. Grisbrook he went to her; she said, cut me off a yard off this, and immediately he was going to tear it, she said you are tearing my print; he said it was not; I was sent for a constable.

Prisoner's Defence. I have been in the habit of dealing at the prosecutor's shop. Having purchased a gown at the same shop; I went a few evenings afterwards with the print to get some of the same pattern to make my childrens frocks; they then said that some woman had taken it clandestinely.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18110710-25

543. THOMAS MENDES was indicted for feloniously stealing on, the 25th of June , a picture framed, value 1 l. 10 s. the property of William Pacey .

WILLIAM PACEY . I am a picture dealer , and deal in old curiosities . I live at 10, Lisle-street, Leicester Square . On the 20th of June, the prisoner offered me a piece of spar for sale; I told him it did not suit me; he went out of door, he laid hold of a picture that stood at the door, looked at it, and put it on his shoulder and walked off with it. I was standing in the shop and saw him do it; I ran to the door holloaed after him where he was going with it; he said he was going to shew it; I pursued him and brought him back and made him put the picture down, and then took him to the watchhouse. I gave a guinea and half for the picture. The prisoner appeared to be tipsy.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged, 28.

Confined One Month in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18110710-26

544. SARAH DOBREE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of July , five shawls, value 6 l. the property of George Seaman , in his dwelling house .

GEORGE SEAMAN . I am a linen draper , Bishopsgate Street, the Parish of St. Botelph . On the 5th of July; about four o'clock, in the afternoon, the prisoner came into bar shop, accompanied by a female friend of her's; the friend purchased some articles, and as the prisoner was going out of the shop, I found information, asked the prisoner if she had any property that did not belong to her; she denied having any thing but what was her own; I told her the constable was present, I should give charge of her; She immediately ran to the bottom or the warehouse; I saw one shawl drop from her; the constable took hold of her round the bottom of her waist, and found four more shawls upon her.

JOSEPH WOOD . I am shopman to Mr. Seaman. On Friday, last, in the afternoon, the prisoner, and another customer came in during the time; I was serving another lady; I saw the prisoner take some crimson shawls that lay by her right hand, and sweep them into her lap; I informed Mr. Seaman, and sent for an officer.

SAMUEL SHEPHARD . I am an officer as the prisoner was coming out of Mr. Seaman's shop I laid hold of her, she retreated into the back part of the shop; she dropped one; I then put my arm round her to prevent her dropping any more; she turned the child and turned the shawls over her arm; I searched her, and found only three or four bad shillings and some halfpence.

Prisoner's Defence. I went into the shop with a woman to buy a suit of muslin; I sat my child on the counter; my child was wet, if any thing got hold of the child I know nothing about it, I never saw the shawls untill I got before the Lord Mayor.

GUILTY, aged 42

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Confined Six months in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110710-27

545. ANN KENNEDY, alias KENNETT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of June , a gown, value 14 s. the property of Mary Stacey , spinster .

MARY STACEY . I live at No. 4, Hare Court, Aldersgate Street , I am a servant out of place .

Q. What was the prisoner - A. She was a servant out of place , she lived in the same house with me.

Q. Did you miss a gown at any time - A. Yes, It missed it on Wednesday it was taken out of the room where I lodge. I found it afterwards at Mr. Essex's, the pawnbrokers'.

JOSEPH BLANCH. I am a constable. On the 27th of June, I took the prisoner into custody; I searched; her, in her stocking in her left leg, I found this pocket; it contained thirty-two duplicates, two keys and a penny-piece. The prosecutrix went with me to the pawnbroker's and found the gown, she swore to it; this is the duplicate.

ROBERT ESSEX. I am a pawnbroker, 25, Aldersgate Street; that duplicate is mine, I took in the gown; advanced four shilling upon it, on the 1st of June; I have no recollection of the prisoner.

Prosecutrix. It is my gown.

I am prisoner said nothing in her defence, nor called any witness to her character.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110710-28

546. SARAH WISE , HANNAH LEVI , ELIZABETH WALTERS , SARAH ATKINS , and SARAH STONE were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of July , a watch, value 5 l. a metal chain, value 6 d. a gold seal, value 16 s. and a gold key, value 1 s. the property of George Hardy , from his person .

GEORGE HARDY . I am a labourer in the East India company's warehouse . On July the 2d, between one and two in the morning, I met Sarah Stone and Sarah Atkins , in Bishopsgate Street, the corner of Sun-street; they asked me to give them something to drink; I went into a court, and gave them a glass each, of peppermint; I got change for a pound note ten shillings in silver, and the rest in half-pence; I put the halfpence in my handkerchief; I went with these two prisoners, to a room in a Court in Angel Alley , directly. I got there, they pulled the handkerchief out of my hand, spilt the half-pence about the room; in a few minutes, Wise came up, she abused the other two girls for bringing me there and while she was taking to them she came up close to me; I perceived my watch go from me; I said, give me that watch again; then Levi and Walter came in the room; they came between me and Wise, I requested the watch; a man came in and knocked me down; I tried to rescue myself from the man, and got him down, when the whole of the prisoners pulled me off, beating me at the same time; they got me down, and I expected they were going to take my life away, I cried out and begged for mercy; he got up in the mean time these girls got out of the room. I being fatigued got up, and instantly he shoved me down stairs; I waited in the Alley near three quarters of an hour by the door; finding nobody come, I thought it was dangerous waiting there any longer. I went towards Bishopsgate; there I saw the five prisoners coming up the court; I fancy the prisoners saw me, they returned back again, and went into a gin shop, near Sun-street. I saw the watchman, and requested that he would take the whole of them; he informed me he was off his duty; I told him I had been robbed and ill used. He then took them all up to the watchhouse; they were searched, and about seven shillings and odd were found upon them in copper.

Q. Were you sober - A. I had been drinking porter. I knew what I was about; I am sure that Sarah Atkins and Sarah Stone picked me up, I am sure the other women came to assist them.

BENJAMIN CHAPMAN . I am a watchman. On Tuesday, at four o'clock in the morning, the prosecutor gave me charge of the five prisoners; I took them from the wine vaults to the watchhouse.

JOHN WILLIAMS . I am a constable. On searching the prisoners, I found on Ann Levi one shilling and nine-pence farthing, half a crown in silver, and the rest in copper.

Q. to Prosecutor. I suppose you cannot swear to the half-pence - A. No.

Atkins's Defence. I never saw the man before with my eyes.

Stone's Defence. the same.

Wise's Defence. I am innocent.

Levi's Defence. I went to Spitalfields market, I could not buy any thing; I was returning, I met the other prisoners, and we had a quartern and a half of liquor together.

Walter's Defence. I never saw the man with my eyes

WISE, GUILTY , aged 18.

LEVI, GUILTY , aged 22.

WALTER, GUILTY , aged 21.

ATKINS, GUILTY , aged 19.

STONE, GUILTY , aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110710-29

547. JOSEPH LONG was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of June a silver tea-pot, value 10 s. the property of John Edmonds , in the dwelling house of John Jones , and Thomas Jones .

JOHN EDMONDS . I am a tea-pot handle maker , I live at No. 4, Monkwell Street, Falcon Square . On Saturday, the 1st of June, about half after three, the tea-pot was sent to me, by Mr. Stroud in Burleigh-Street, Exeter Change, The boy left it, and desired it might be done on Monday, I promissed it should; the boy went away. About five o'clock the same day the prisoner came to me in a violent prespiration, and said he came from Mr. Stroud; I asked him what he came for, he said a silver tea-pot; I asked him who brought the pot, he said a boy; I asked him what kind of a boy, he said a boy that was commonly called cribbage faced; I asked him why he called him cribbage face, he said because he was pitted with the small-pox.

Q. Was the boy pitted with the small-pox - A. Yes, he is. I asked him then, what dress the boy had on, he said a brown jacket; I asked him to describe the nature of the tea-pot; he said certainly he could, for a shopmate of his which stood by gave it the boy. He described it as hear upon the interogations for me to suppose that he had a knowledge of the pot and that he was sent. I asked the prisoner why he came in so short a time after it was left, when it was promised on Monday, he observed that the pot came from Mr. Ellis, in Oxford-street, and Mr. Ellis finding that it would not be done till Monday, he had sent for the pot. Then I delivered him the pot. My wife looked out of the two pair of stairs window, she asked me whether the prisoner had the tea-pot; I said yes, she said that man spoke to the boy at the door before the pot was delivered. I immediately went to Mr. Stroud, he said he had not sent for the tea-pot.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110710-30

548. WILLIAM WETHER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of June , a pair of shoes; value 2 s. the property of Isaac Samuda .

FRANCES NALDER. Q. You are a marshall - A. I am. On the 18th of June, a very serious fire took place in Bury-street, St. Mary Axe; I was called to it in the situation I hold; I observed the prisoner very active in and out of several houses. I observed him coming from the house which I understood was occupied by Mr. Samuda, he had then on a similar jacket to what he has on now, perhaps the very same jacket. I observed his pockets to be very bulky; I went up to him and asked him what he had in his pockets; his answer was what was that to me, he had nothing belonging to me; I shewed him my staff of office, and

told him who I was, and insisted on searching him, he resisted me immediately; with great difficulty and with the assistance of four or five people I searched him, I found several articles, three pair of stockings, braces, a hat brush, and a pair of shoes. Upon looking into the shoes I observed the makers name in Shoemaker row, I went to the shoemaker, he told me they were Mr. Samuda's shoes; I found where Mr. Samuda was, at a house, No. 5, Coopers row, Tower Hill; I went to him, and asked him if he had lost any thing; he said he did not know that he had; I produced the shoes to Mr. Samuda, he laid they were his; I searched the prisoner, I found a watch and eleven guineas in gold; however I could not get an owner to anything but the shoes; I understand the prisoner up to this time has borne an exceeding good character.

MR. SAMUDA. Q Are these your shoes - A. Yes. When I last saw then they we in the back room of our house in Bury-street next door to the fire.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence.

GUILTY, aged 34.

Judgment respited .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110710-31

549. GEORGE SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of June , a carcase of a pig, value 1 l. 16 s. and fifty pound weight of pork, value 1 l. 16 s. the property of William Banford Chandler .

JOHN WALMSTER CHANDLER. I am the son of William Banford Chandler, he is a salesman in Newgate Market .

Q. In the course of last month was the prisoner in your father's employ - A. He was. On Saturday the 22nd of June we lost the carcase of a pig, we missed it between eight and nine in the morning, and within half an hour after the pig was missed the prisoner came and said to me, sir, I understand there is a pig lost again, I can throw some light upon it; I said I should be glad if he could; he said he was going in with some meat, and he heard some words. He took me up to Middlesex hospital, and from there to the Haymarket, we found no tidings of the pig, about half past four that afternoon I received some information which led me to Paskin.

Q. Did you ever see your pig again - A No. We took the prisoner up the same afternoon about six o'clock, I told him what we took him for; he said he knew nothing about the pig.

JOHN PASKINS . I am a butcher. On Saturday morning, the 22d of June, I was coming past Mr. Chandler's shop, I saw the prisoner take a carcase of a pig off Mr. Chandler's hooks; he walked with it to where the carts stand in the Green Market, it was about eight o'clock.

GEORGE LOWERS . I am a butcher. On the morning of the 22d of June I saw the prisoner with the carcase of a pig on his shoulder; he put it into Whitford's cart, it stood in the Green Market.

EDWARD TOWNSHEND WHITFORD I keep a cart. On the morning of the 22d of June the prisoner put a carcase of a pig into my cart, he directed me to take it to Mr. Upwell, a butcher in Blackfriers-road.

MR. UPWELL. I keep a butcher's shop in Blackfriers-road. On the morning of the 22d of June the carcase of a pig was left at my shop while I was at market by Whitford, and about twelve o'clock the prisoner came to my house, and took the pork on his back. I asked him if it was his, he said it was, and took it away.

Q. to Mr. Chandler. What is the worth of the pig - A. One pound sixteen shillings.

Prisoner's Defence. My place was searched, and no pig was found.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Confined Three Months in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110710-32

550. WILLIAM DANIELS and WILLIAM SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of May , a seal, value 1 l. 10 s. a seal and key, value 1 l. 10 s. and part of a watch chain, value 10 s. the property of Robert Potter , from his person .

ROBERT POTTER . I am a Manchester warehouseman , I live in Little St. Thomas Apostle. On the 30th of May I was coming home, I was met at the corner of Fleet Market, Holborn bridge about a quarter past twelve, I had my wife on one arm, and my sister on the other, and all in a moment five men came round me, one of them made a snatch at my watch, and the chain broke, they got half the chain, seal, and key. I got liberated as soon as I could from the ladies, and followed the person that took the chain, I called for the watchman, I could not get any watchman to my assistance, and on my pursuit the prisoner Smith accosted me, and asked me what was the matter; I collared him and told him he was one of the scoundrels that assisted in robbing me of my property; as soon as he saw the watchman coming down the hill, he rescued himself from me, gave me a blow upon the eye, and cut my lip; he then ran down towards Snow-hill, I pursued him, and there he was taken into custody, and taken to the watchhouse. The patrol, after we had been in the watchhouse some time asked me if I should know the man that took my chain and seals if I were to see him. I told him I thought I should; I went out with the patrol, there were a great many of them about the place; I pointed our the man to the patrol, I then went into the watchhouse for safety; there was some error between the patrol and the watchman, they brought in some other man that was not there. The patrol said, here is a great number of them about here, I had better look out, I did, I saw the prisoner Daniels, whom I identified; he was taken into custody.

Q. Did you ever find the chain - A. No.

Q. In regard of Smith are you sure he is the man - A. I am certain of it. I was in an aukward situation, they knocked down my wife and her sister; five of them came half round us in a circle, Daniels came between Mrs. Potter and myself, and broke the chain, and run back again. I pursued

Daniels, and Smith pursed me, and accosted me, saying, what was the matter, I collared him, and told him he was one of the scoundrels.

EDWARD SMITH . I am a tea-dealer, I was coming down the bottom part of Holborn, when I heard the cry of stop thief, I immediately ran down to Holborn Bridge, where I saw five or six people collected, and two ladies, the ladies seemed to be very much agitated; I asked what was the matter, and Smith ran past, he was pursued towards Skinner-street, one of the gentlemen I believe pursuing him was Mr. Potter; I stopped with the ladies, and told them not to be alarmed, a little time after that Mr. Potter came to see that the man was secured: I conducted the ladies and Mr. Potter to the watchhouse, where I saw the prisoner Smith; I saw Daniels brought into the watchhouse after I was there.

ROBERT FREEMAN . I am a constable. On the 31st of May, the prisoner Smith was brought into the watchhouse Mr. Potter gave charge of him; the inspector went out, Mr. Potter pointed to a man that pulled the chain and seals from him; he brought in a man, Mr. Potter said he was not the man; after going out again this Daniels was pretending to be very drunk; Mr. Potter immediately pointed to this man that pulled his chain and seals off, and gave charge of him. Mr. Potter was perfectly sober.

Smith's Defence. I was coming from Covent Garden Theatre about a quarter past twelve; I went to this gentleman to assist him, he told me he had been assaulted with some ruffians; I was with him ten minutes. When he called the watch I own I struck him. In the watchhouse there was a young lad brought in with a fustian jacket, he said he was positive he was the man, and then they brought in this prisoner, and then he said he was positive that was the man.

Daniels' Defence. The same.

Smith called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

DANIELS - GUILTY , aged 21.

SMITH - GUILTY , aged 19.

Transported for Life .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110710-33

551. EDWARD SAWYER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of June , half-a-crown , the property of Daniel Talbot .

DANIEL TALBOT . I am horsekeeper to Mr. Boddy, farmer at Cowby . The prisoner was a haymaker , and slept in the same room with me.

Q. Did you at any time lose a half crown piece - A. Yes, on the 24th of June, between two and three in the afternoon, it was taken from my bundle in my bed-room; I saw it at ten o'clock in the morning, it had W S upon the head of it. I saw the half crown taken from the prisoner, I claimed it as mine.

WILLIAM BODDY . I am a farmer at Cowby. The prisoner worked for me in the hay season. On the 24th of June, between two and three o'clock the prisoner went up stairs into his bed-room, he staid about ten or twelve minutes. In about twenty minutes afterwards Talbot came down and said he had lost all. He had lost some before. On the Sunday I found the prisoner at the Red Lion, Uxbridge, I charged him with stealing the half crown, he abused me, and denied having the money; I charged the constable with him. I saw the half crown taken from him and delivered to me; this is the half crown.

Prosecutor. This is the half crown I had in my bundle on the Monday morning.

Prisoner's Defence. I got that half crown in change at Uxbridge.

GUILTY , aged 27.

Whipped in Jail and discharged.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18110710-34

552. MARY CUMMINS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of May , two shirts, value 4 s. three shirts, value 9 s. two waistcoats, value 5 s. a handkerchief, value 3 s. two curtains, value 4 s. a tablecloth, value 5 s. a salt spoon, value 2 s. the property of John Butts .

JOHN BUTT . I live at No. 6, New Bond-street , I am a silversmith The prisoner was my servant . On the evening of the 11th of May, when I went to bed, I missed he sheets off my bed, I went to the shopman's bed and found that in the same state; at nine o'clock the prisoner went out for a lettice for my supper and did not return. On Sunday morning I went to get a shirt and waistcoat to put on, I missed two waistcoats, and more than two shirts. On Monday, the next day, one of my people found a paper parcel containing nineteen duplicates, I went to the different pawnbrokers and saw the things. On the 27th of June I saw the prisoner in No. 33, Golden square, at Mrs. Clutterbuck's; I got an officer and took her in custody.

EDWARD JENKINS . I am an apprentice to Mr. Harrison, pawnbroker, Beak-street. On the 8th of May the prisoner pawned a sheet and apron, on the 19th of April a shirt.

JOHN JENKINS I am a pawnbroker; the curtain and sheet were pawned at our house by the prisoner.

Prosecutor. They are all my property.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence, called one witness, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY .

Fined 1 s. and discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18110710-35

553. JAMES GRIFFITHS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of February , a watch, value 3 l. the property of William Hodsoll , in the dwelling-house of William Shrubsall .

WILLIAM HODSOLL . I am a watchmaker , I live at No 8, Norton Falgate , I occupy part of a shop in the dwelling house of William Shrubsall , the prisoner was my journeyman . On the 14th of February I missed a watch out of my window.

Q. Had the prisoner the means of getting at that watch - A. He sat close before it. I told him there was a cap watch missing, the fellow to this; he said he did not know that I had such a watch in the house. I discharged the prisoner that very evening.

I have seen my watch since at Mr. Windsor's, pawnbroker, Whitechapel.

Mr. Knapp. How long had the prisoner lived with you - A. From the November prior to that.

Q. On the 14th of February 1810 you discharged him you have never seen him since have you - A. Oh, yes, I have seen him several times since at his father's house.

Q. Upon your oath did not you take him into your service again - A. I certainly did. I discharged him on the 14th of February, and took him again on the next day, and then he continued with me until the June following.

Q. I believe you never took up this man until you got some representation of him by Lill, and when you did take him up had there been any dispute about wages - A No, not at all.

JOHN KERL . I am shopman to Mr. Windsor, Whitechapel. On the 30th of May Lill pawned this watch with me for two guineas.

WILLIAM NEAVE . I am shopman to Mr. Christie, Lower East Smithfield.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. Yes, I have taken in watches of him.

Q. Had you seen that watch - A. A watch answering that description was pawned on the 14th of February, 1810; it was pawned in the name that the prisoner pawned by, but I cannot recollect the transaction.

JOHN LILL I am a waterman and lighterman by business; I have known the prisoner six or seven years. Last September I was standing on Tower Hill, he asked me if I wanted a watch for my own wear; I told him I did not; he said he had a very good one that he had made for a gentleman in the country, it was in pledge for two guineas, he wanted money, and he had pawned it; he said if I did not want it myself there was room for me to get a guinea by it; it was a capped watch; he produced a duplicate in the name of Smith, a silver watch, two guineas; he said he always pawned his things in that name: I had the duplicate, and got the watch out at Mr. Christie's, Butcher-row, East Smithfield; he charged me five shillings; he said he would see me the next day; he did, he took the watch and opened it; he said that was the watch, he asked me if I would buy it out, I said, yes: he asked me what I was going to give him for it. It stood me in two pounds seven shillings. I think I gave him fourteen shillings. I wore it a month. Last February the main spring broke, the prisoner put another in; he lodged at my house then. I wanted money, I pledged the watch the sessions before last, at Mr. Windsor's, the corner of Essex-street, Whitechapel, for two guineas.

COURT. How came you to know any thing about the prosecutor - A. Some conversation came out at the time a cause was tried at the Sheriff's Court, six or seven weeks ago; I was in company with the prosecutor at the Elephant and Castle, Moorgate. I his is the same watch there is Camarthen upon it.

Mr. Knapp. Mr. Lill have you had any quarrel with the prisoner - A. No, he lodged in my house. I never had any dispute with him.

Q. Nor is there any account between you that is not settled - A. Yes, there is. When that cause was tried he went away with ten weeks rent, at seven shillings a week, which was not paid.

Q. There were no words, was there - A. Yes, there were some words.

Q. What are you - A. I am an officer in the impress service.

Q. This excepting your appearance at Clerkenwell Sessions, was the first time that you were in a court of Justice - A. No, my lord knows better than that; I was here last winter as a witness.

Q. Were you in custody - A. No, I was not.

Q. You never was in custody - A. Yes, I was. I was in custody in Union hall.

Q. Did you find your way to Horsemonger-lane the College or the Jail there - A. I was there upon a charge of felony.

Q. Is that the only time that you have been in custody - A. It is not. I was in custody at the Thames Police office.

Q. Upon what charge - A Upon my life I do not know. I was taken in custody, and sent to the house of Correction, and in my younger years I have been in custody several times.

COURT. Were you ever tried - A. At the Guildford aflizes I was; I was at the galley, a man asked me to give him a lift up with some cotton some officer was there, I was taken up. I have been accused but never tried.

RICHARD WILSON . I am an officer of Worship-street office. On the 26th of June I apprehended the prisoner as we were coming up the Commercial road, the prisoner asked me if the matter might not be made up for a sum of money. I made no reply but proceeded to the office.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel, called eight witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18110710-36

554. JOHN FRANCIS was indicted for that he, on the 9th of September , feloniously did falsely make, and caused to be procured, forged and counterfeited, and willingly acted, and assisted in making and counterfeiting, a certain order for the payment of 15 l. with intent to defraud Jemima Ware , widow .

SECOND COUNT, for uttering and publishing as true a certain order for payment of money, with the like intention. And

TWO OTHER COUNTS for like offences, stating the intention to be to defraud William Praed , William Tyringham Praed , Kennath Digby , Philip Box , Scrow Bornard , and William Newcombe .

ANN WARE Q . You are the daughter in law to Jemima Ware - A. Yes, my husband's name is William Ware

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar - A. Yes, he came to lodge with my mother in law on the 15th of August, 1808, the lives at 28, Sidney-street, Goswell-street road, he came with the name of Mr. Cook when he took the lodgings, he was to pay twelve shillings a week.

Q. Do you remember, on the 9th of September, 1808 the prisoner making any application to you - A. On the 9th of September, 1808, he called me up into his apartment, and asked me if I thought I could get a draft changed for twelve pounds; I told him I did not know, I would try. I went and tried. He wrote the draft in my presence. This is not the first draft.

Q. He wrote a draft in your presence for twelve pounds, you saw that - A. Yes, that was upon the banker, Mr. Praed, he gave it me, I went to try to get change at a publican in the same street, I could not get change, I returned and my mother gave me some information that she had got a fifteen pound bank note; I went up to the prisoner's apartment, I told him my mother had a note of fifteen pound, if he would give me the difference: he said, yes; he then asked me if it would make any difference if he gave me a draft of fifteen pounds instead of that; I gave him the first note, he tore it, and then he wrote another, he gave me the other, I took it to my mother, and gave it to her.

Q. Did you look at that draft - A. Yes, that was also a draft of Praed's.

Q. You took it to your mother - A. Yes, she had occasion to put it away that afternoon.

Q. Did you take notice of that draft so as to be able to say it is the same - A. Yes, I did. This is the same draft that he wrote, and it is the same that I gave to my mother, and she paid it away in my presence to Mr. Haynes, he brought it back again.

COURT. When the prisoner gave you the other draft that he drew did he receive from your mother the fifteen pound bank note - A. He received from me the fifteen pound bank note which my mother had given me to give to him; she paid the draft in my presence to Mr. Haynes, he had it about an hour and an half; he brought back the draft, saying that he had no money there. I took the draft up to the prisoner, I told him that we had occasion to pay it away to a tradesman, the tradesman had been, and the answer was, that there was no money there; he took it out of my hand and read it over; after he read it he said he saw his mistake; for his father formerly had money at that house, but had not now; he had forgot to put the word junior; he took it out of my hand, and wrote the word junior to the name of Cook; he told me then that I should find that it would be right. I carried it down stairs and gave it to Mr. Haynes again; he went back the next morning with it.

Q. You did not go with him - A. No.

Q. Did Mr. Haynes after he had been there come to you the next morning - A. Yes.

Q. Between that night that you had so given it Mr. Haynes, and when Mr. Haynes came to you the next morning what became of the prisoner - A. While Mr. Haynes remained in the house Cook left the house saying that he should return again to tea.

Q. Did the prisoner know that Mr. Haynes was in the house - A. I do not know.

Q. But during the time that he was in the house giving the draft to you so altered the prisoner went out of the house saying that he should return to tea - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see him afterwards - A. No.

COURT. After the prisoner had altered the bill you gave the bill to Mr. Haynes after it had been so altered, and you had so given it to Mr. Haynes the prisoner went out of the house, while the prisoner was there did he ever return - A. No.

Q. Then you say that Mr. Haynes returned the next morning, and returned you the draft - A. Yes.

Q. Did he give it to you - A. I do not remember whether he gave it to me or to my mother; we were both present.

Q. Was the draft that was brought back the second time by Mr. Haynes the same draft you had given Mr. Haynes with the name of Cook, without the alteration - A. Yes, it was.

Q. Your mother had the draft - A. Yes.

Q. How soon did you hear of the prisoner again - A When he was taken I saw him at Hatton Garden. I do not know the day of the month.

Q. When you did see him at Hatton Garden had you any doubt that he was the same person that had been your mothers lodger, and who wrote the draft of which you have been speaking of - A. I had no doubt he was the same person. It was in June, the last month, that he was apprehended, I believe.

Q. That draft that you have now produced is the same draft - A. It is my draft, having my own name, which I put at the back of it before it ever went out of the house, and before I delivered it to Mr. Haynes by his desire; he is a very particular man. I have no doubt of the draft.

Prisoner. The witness says that the money was paid on receiving the second draft I understand.

COURT, to witness. Was the fifteen pound paid at the time when you received the first draft without the word, junior - A. He had the money then.

Prisoner. I mean to say that the money was paid for the draft that was destroyed.

Witness. He gave me that for the fifteen pounds.

Mr. Knapp. You did not give the fifteen pounds for the twelve pounds draft - A. I gave him the note, saying if he would give me the difference. I thought he would give me the change of the difference.

JEMIMA WARE . Q. We understand that you mother-in-law of the last witness - A. Yes.

Q. You remember the prisoner coming to lodge with you upon the terms you have described - A. Yes, exactly so.

Q. On the 9th of September, 1808, had you an application from your daughter, at the instance of the prisoner for change of a draft for twelve pounds - A. Yes, sir, I had, upon that I gave her a fifteen pound bank note to take to him, then she brought down a check for fifteen pounds.

Q. What became of the check for twelve pound - A. I heard it was broke to pieces, I never saw it again.

Q. You had brought back a draft upon Praed and Co for fifteen pound - A. Yes.

Q. Did you look at that draft - A. No, not particularly.

Q. Did you receive any other draft than that of fifteen pounds as coming from the prisoner or any body else on that day - A. No.

Q. When your daughter brought back this draft of fifteen pound what did you do with the draft - A. I gave it Mr. Haynes.

Q. How soon did you see the draft again - A. In about half an hour after it was produced by Mr. Haynes he said it was not a good one, and it had not been paid; I gave it to my daughter again, then when she brought it back to me again it had the word junior wrote upon it.

Q. Are you sure that the draft that was brought back to you was the same as the first, except the alteration of that word, junior - A. Yes, Mr. Haynes was waiting I paid it to him again.

Q. When did you see the draft again - A. The next morning, in the forepart of the morning.

Q. Was that the same draft that you had given him in the two instances - A. The very same.

Q. What became of that draft that was so returned - A. My daughter took it in her care. We are all as one.

Q. You never had any draft of the same value from any other person, had you - A. No.

Q. What became of the prisoner - A. He left the house while Mr. Haynes was in the house the second time.

Q. Do you know whether he saw Mr. Haynes - A. I do not know that he did; he left word that he would come home to tea, he never returned any more.

Q. Look at that draft and tell me whether that is the draft that you saw in the first state without the word junior to it - A. I never observed it at first, I afterwards did; I have no doubt it is the same draft. I saw my daughter write her name on it in the presence of Mr. Haynes and myself.

RICHARD HAYNES. Q. I believe you live in Union-street, Whitechapel - A. I do.

Q. On the 9th of September, 1808, did you receive a check of Mrs. Ware - A. I did.

Q. Should you know the check if you were to see it again - A. I should. This is the same I have no doubt.

Q. Look at the back of it, and see whether there is a name written - do you remember the daughter putting her name - A. The daughter, by my desire, put A. W. upon the check.

Q. Did the daughter put on any other draft in your presence drawn upon Messrs. Praed and Co. for fifteen pound the mark A W - A. Never.

Q. Did you ever receive from the daughter or mother any draft drawn upon Messrs. Praed and Co. that one you have shewn - A. None.

Q. Therefore have you the least doubt upon earth that that is the draft - A. None in the least.

Q. When it was produced to you first did you look upon the draft - A. I did, it was given to me in part of payment of a bill; it was first James Cook , only.

Q. Did you go according to the order which the bill gave you with James Cook upon it to Mr. Praed's - A. Immediately.

Q. That draft was refused to be paid - A. It was. Upon which I went back with the same draft to Mrs. Ware.

Q. Was that draft taken up stairs to the prisoner, the same draft - A. The same draft of fifteen pounds.

Q. How soon was it returned - A. I suppose in about three or four minutes, and the word junior was added in the body of the instrument; I did not present it that night it was too late; I presented it the next day at Messrs. Praed and Co. about a quarter after nine in the morning.

Q. Upon presenting it a second time with this alteration did you get any money then - A. No, they wrote upon it

"the drawer is not known." I went back and delivered it to Mrs. Ware the elder. I am quite sure that is the same draft that I delivered back.

Q. I do not know whether you saw the prisoner that night - A. Yes, I saw him going out of the door after the first presentation, and after it had been altered to junior. I saw him go out of the house, whether he saw me I cannot say.

Q. Did you know the prisoner before - A. No, I should not have known him if I met him.

JACOB THOMAS . Q. I believe you are cashier in the house of Praed and Co. - A. I am.

Q Tell us the names of the partners in the house; the partners at the time the draft was presented - A. William Praed , William Tyringham Praed , Kennam Digby, Philip Box , Scrow Bernard, and William Newcombe .

Q. Do you know the last witness Mr Haynes - A. No, I do not; I recollect a person presented a draft on the night of the 10th of December, a check was presented to me for payment; I cannot say that this is the draft presented in the first instance, but in the second I am positive I wrote across it; the drawer is not known; I am sure this is the draft.

Q. Have you any person of the name of James Cook that keeps cash with you James Cook , senior or junior - A. No, we have not.

Q. Had you any person of the name of Robert Cook that kept cash with you at that time - A. We had then, and have now.

Q. Are you acquainted with the hand-writing of Robert Cook that who is your customer - A. Perfectly.

Q. Look at that which is signed James Cook whether that is the hand-writing of Robert Cook - A. There is not the least resemblance.

Q. And with Robert Cook you are perfectly acquainted with his handwriting - A. Perfectly; he has been a customer to my recollection five years.

Q. to Mr. Haynes. Is that the gentleman to whom you presented the check the second time - A. I believe it was; I have not the least doubt of it.

WILLIAM READ . I am an officer of Hatton Garden office. I took the prisoner into custody for this offence on the 3rd of last month; he said his real name was John Francis , the magistrate asked him it that was his parents name; he said, it is; I asked him if he did not go by the name of Francis Murray, he said no, my name is John Francis .

Q. Did he ever attempt to say that his name was Cook in your presence - A. Never.

(The draft read.)

JAMES MOSS . Q. You are a surgeon and apothecary,

living in Somers Place - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. Very well, he has windled me out of twenty-five pounds.

Q. Do not tell me that. What name did you know him by - A. He came to me by the name Fredrick Mordant, as an assistant. This is his hand-writing. I desired him to write his name, he wrote it; he lived with me nearly a week and went by that name during that time and no other.

Prisoner's Defence. The defence that I have to make is, that I never received any money for the paper now produced in Court, that money was for the former paper which was destroyed.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 28.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18110710-37

555. ELEANOR THOMPSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of July , a watch, value 4 l. and two seals, value 10 s. the property of Richard Homer , from his person .

RICHARD HOMER . On last Sunday evening, about eleven o'clock, I first saw the prisoner in Long Acre, I was coming home to Bear-Yard, Clare Market; the prisoner asked me for something to drink, there was another woman with her; I told them that I had no money; they both began feeling my pockets and pulling me about. They said that I had money; I gave them sixpence, and kept walking along the street, and at the time I gave them the sixpence the prisoner drawed my watch out of my sob; I called for assistance, the prisoner gave my watch to the other woman, she ran away with it; the prisoner held me by the coat till the other woman was out of my sight, so that I could not run after her, after some time the watchman came, I gave charge of her. The watch I never saw again; it was a silver watch, a metal chain to it, a gold seal and a metal one.

JOHN MACKDONALD . I am a watchman. On last Sunday night in Long Acre, I took charge of the prisoner for robbing him of his watch, and giving it to another woman, and she running away with it.

Prisoner's Defence I was going through a court; that lad had a pair of trowsers on, they were down, and he was standing with a woman, the woman said here is some body coming, and left him, his trowsers were down so low he could not get them up in time for me to come by. He asked me if I knew the woman, I said no.

JURY. Q. to Prosecutor. What had you been doing that day - A. I lodge with my mother; I went from home at three o'clock, in the afternoon; went to a public house at Mill-Bank, and staid there till ten o'clock at night; I had only a pint of ale with another lad.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18110710-38

556. HENRY WALTER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of June , a gold broach, value 20 s. the property of Jesse Coles .

JOHN ADAMS . I am shopman to Jesse Coles , jeweller , 3, Hanway-street, Oxford-street . On the 8th of June, between seven and eight o'clock, in the evening, the prisoner came into Mr. Coles's shop, and asked to look at a pearl ring; I shewed him a tray full of rings and broaches together; he asked me if I had a pearl hoop ring, I said yes, I turned round to the window to get one, I saw a broach in the prisoner's hand; I saw him put it into his pocket, and afterwards he pulled out his pocket handkerchief with presence to to blow his nose; he then pulled out his watch out of his pocket and asked me if I had got a seal like the one he wore, I said no, he then asked me what it would be to repair that seal; I aid I did not know, and immediately rung the bell for Mr. Coles, Mr. Coles came down; I told Mr. Coles that the prisoner had robbed me of a broach, and in which pocket he had put it into; the prisoner said Mr. Coles was wellcome to search him. Mr. Coles put his had into his pocket and took out the broach. It was a pearl broach set in gold, with a mock topaz in the center.

JESSE COLES . When I was called into the shop, the young man acquainted me that the prisoner had robbed him of a gold broach; I collared him, put my hand into his pocket, and took the broach out. I sent for a constable.

Prisoner's Defence. I am perfectly innocent of the charge against me, had I been feloniously inclined to take any thing out of the shop, I could have taken things of ten times the value, and ten times lesser size.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18110710-39

557. ANDREAS PETERSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of June , sixteen pound weight of hemp, value 9 s. the property of Robert Newark .

SECOND COUNT for like offence, the property of Joseph Watson .

JOHN BEDWIN . On the 1st of June, I was watchman, at Mr. Joseph Watson's wharf, St. Catherines ; I saw the prisoner take some hemp out of a truck, in Mr. Watson's wharf, he put it under his arm, and walked off with it; I pursued him, and brought him back; he made resistance, and said if I did not let him go, he had something in his pocket that would make me fall that I should never rise any more. Mr. Watson's clerk came up at the same time.

WILLIAM BOWNESS . I am clerk to Mr. Joseph Watson .

Q. Did you go up when the last witness had hold of the prisoner - A. I did, the hemp was laying at his feet.

Q. Whose was it - A. Joseph Watson 's; I had the hemp and the prisoner taken back to the wharf. This is the hemp, it is worth nine or ten shillings.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in liquor when I did it.

GUILTY , aged 55.

Whipped in Jail , and discharged.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18110710-40

558. ZILPHA DRAKE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of June , a tablecloth, value 8 s. and a sheet, value 5 s. the property of Robert Iveson .

ISABELLA IVESON. I live in Leadenhall-street , my husband keeps an inn there, the prisoner lodged in my house.

Q. Was there any linen lost in your family - A. Yes. about the 3d of May, I missed a large tablecloth; I have seen the tablecloth since at the pawnbroker's. I did not know but the sheet was in our possession, untill I saw it.

ELISHA GEDOE . I am a pawnbroker, I live in Gulstone-street,

Whitechapel. On the 4th of May, the prisoner pawned a tablecloth with me for five shillings, in the name of Elizabeth Weller. She said she was a lodger at the King's Arms, Leadenhall-street, that the tablecloth was her own. On the Monday following, a man came with the ticket of the tablecloth to my shop, which I had given to her the Saturday before; he said he had purchased it of a woman, in Shoreditch, for a shilling; I told the man my suspicion, he did not take the tablecloth out in June the 5th, following, the prisoner came to pledge a sheet; I examined the sheet, and found it corresponded with the mark of the cloth; I sent for an officer and she was taken in custody.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence, nor called any witness to her character.

GUILTY , aged 55.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18110710-41

559. CATHERINE CURTAIN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of June , two bank notes, value 5 l. each , the property of James Griffiths .

JAMES GRIFFITHS . I lodge in Patrick Curtain 's house, in Bromley ; I lost the money on the 2d of June. The prisoner was Patrick Curtain 's wife. I had seen my money safe in my box, ten days before I missed it. In my box were two five pound notes, and fourteen pounds in small notes. On Sunday morning I went to my box to take a one pound note out, I missed the two five pound notes, all the small notes were in the box, I always kept my box locked and the key in my pocket; I found my box locked when I went to it. There was the name of Holmeson one five pound note, and Hanns and Co. upon the other, I have never seen my notes since.

CATHERINE GARDNER . I live upon Bow-common.

Q. Do you know the house of Patrick Curtain - A. Yes, the prisoner was my neighbour.

D. Do you remember her coming at any time to you to borrow a key - A. Yes, on the Thursday before the 2d of June, and I heard of this having happened on the Saturday. When the prisoner came for the keys, she said she had lost the keys of her own box, she had got a pound note in the box; she wanted to get it out to buy bread for her children. I lent her the three rusty keys, she said she believed one would do. She took them all, and brought them back almost immediately.

THOMAS HASSELDON . I am a broker, in the Commercial Road, facing Limehouse Church. On Saturday, the 1st of June, the prisoner came to my shop; she bought hall a dozen knives and forks, a tea caddie, a tea-pot and a cannister; they all came to about twelve or thirteen shillings. She paid me with a five pound note, I sent for change, and gave it her, I took no notice of the note no further than to see that it had the water mark.

Mr. Barry. How long have you known her - A. About two or three years; I never saw any dishonesty of her.

ABRAHAM HAMILTON . I am a grocer, in the Commercial Road. On the last Thursday, in May, the prisoner bought eggs and bacon, she laid out about six shillings, and paid for it with a five pound note. I gave her the change; on the following Saturday she came again, and bought bacon and tea, and laid out six or seven shillings, and paid by a five pound note; I did not notice the notes, and gave her the change.

RALPH HOPE . I am an officer of Shadwell office. On the 4th of June, I apprehended the prisoner, I searched her and found nothing upon her. In a chest up stairs I found new knives and forks, a teapot, tea caddie and canister; she said she bought them in Whitechapel. Coming along the Commercial-road I went into Mr. Hasseldon's shop, I found she had bought them there. There was a woman in the house of the name of Mary Wolf ; on searching her I found this key, which opened another lodgers box

Q. Did you try whether it would open Griffith's box - A. Yes, and it would not.

MICHAEL GLEEZEY . Q. You lodged in this woman's house, in the same room with Griffiths - A. Yes, I know that Griffiths had two five pound notes, I saw him take one about four or five months ago, with the name of Holmes upon it.

Prisoner's Defence. They took me upon suspicion only.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave her a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18110710-42

560. JOHN BOWERS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of June , one hundred and eighteen half-pence , the property of William Biddlecombe .

WILLIAM BIDDLECOMBE . On Saturday, the 1st of June, I sent my son George Biddlecombe for some bread; I gave him a pound note.

GEORGE BIDDLECOMBE . I am the son of William Biddlecombe . My father sent me to Mr. Gosford's; he gave me a pound note to pay for the bread; I had two quartern loaves; I gave them the pound note, and they gave me the change all but seven shillings, the change that I received, and the bread I took home.

Q. Why did you leave the seven shillings - A The seven shillings was in copper, I could not take it home all at once. I returned to the shop and received seven shillings in half-pence of Mr. Gosford, and I was coming home with it when the prisoner asked me where that street would lead to; I said if he went straight on it would take him into Union-street. Then snatched five shillings out of my hand, and ran down Spital-square. A young man stopped him by Mr. Goldsmith's, he then threw the half-pence down.

THOMAS STARKE . Q. You were in Spital-square on the evening of the 1st of June - A. Yes, as I came along I heard young Biddlecombe holloa out stop thief, I saw the prisoner run, I pursued him, and stopped him at Mr. Goldsmith's door, he dropped the halfpence just as I laid hold of him. Mr. Wilson came up and took the prisoner into custody.

RICHARD WILSON . I am an officer of Worship-street office. On the 1st of June, about a quarter before ten, at night, I heard the cry of stop thief, I ran out of my house immediately, and pursued the voice, and just as I came round Mr. Goldsmith's door, I heard something falling on the ground that sounded like copper, the prisoner was in the custody of the

last witness; I assisted in picking up the copper, there were one hundred and eighteen new half-pence; I asked the prisoner how he came to rob a child like that; he said that his mother send him out, and if he did not take something home his mother would beat him.

GUILTY, aged 13.

Judgement respited

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18110710-43

561. HANNAH ARNETT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of June , three hundred and fifty yards of bed sacking cloth, value 5 l. the property of Thomas Gabriel and Christopher Gabriel ; and THOMAS JUDGE for feloniously receiving on the same day, the said goods, he knowing it to have been stolen .

CHRISTOPHER GABRIEL . My partner's name is Thomas Gabriel , we are bed sacking manufacturers , Banner-street, St. Luke's . In the course of the last year, we sustained a loss of near upon an hundred pounds, upon bed sacking. On the 13th of June, about two o'clock, I and Armstrong and two other officers, went to the house of the prisoner, the prisoner Judge was then behind his desk; Armstrong read to him the search warrant, at our feet laid two of the sacking in a little nook in the back warehouse; I examined them, I know they belonged to my partner and myself; we then went up stairs, and found six more in a warehouse up stairs.

Q. What trade does the prisoner Judge carry on - A. A grocer, and selling snuff and tobacco . I asked Judge whether he had any more sacking, he said no, I asked him whether he had sold any that week, he said yes, he had sold six to a bedstead maker in the same street; I asked him if he had sold any more, he said no. He said there had two been brought in that morning, by a girl; he said he did not know whose girl she was. Hannah Arnet was in our employ in the sacking manufactory for about five or six years, and about three or four years as a servant , in my brother's house; we reposed in her, an almost unbounded confidence. These sackings we keep in our warehouse.

Q. Had she an opportunity of going to that warehouse - A. I did not know that she had untill afterwards it was found out.

Mr. Alley. Q I suppose from the evidence you have given, that this woman lived in your house - A. She carried work from our house to her lodgings.

Q. It is the custom of your trade for the servant to deliver out work to her, and she is to carry it back to them - A. Yes.

Q. Now when you talked about a great loss you sustained, that must be from your reference to your books - A. It is.

Q. I believe you have a great many women that make up these bed sackings for you - A. We have eight or nine.

Q. And they are entrusted out to her the same as to other women to make up - A. Yes, they are cut in proper length for bed.

DAVID MORGAN . Q. You are clerk to the prosecutor - A. Yes.

Q. It is your business to deliver out the sackings to the manufacturer - A. It is, they are delivered out in bundles, a bundle contains from three to six, but generally six in a bundle. When they are delivered out I make an entry of them, and when they are returned we put the money to it.

Q. I suppose you know the woman prisoner - A. Yes.

Q. In what part of the warehouse are they sackings placed - A. In the one pair of stairs room.

Q. I want to know from you, whether she had an opportunity to go to this warehouse when she came for sacking - A. Sometimes I gave the key to the porter.

Q. Have you ever given her the key to go into the warehouse - A. Yes, I have without the porter going with her, she always brought sacking to me.

Mr. Alley. I understood you to say, that when ever the woman had the key delivered to her she always brought the sacking she took under your observation - A. Yes, I always entered the quantity she took and the quantity she returned, the quantity taken and the quantity returned always corresponded. But I did not go up stairs with her.

HUGH LOCKEY . I am in the employ of the prosecutor. In the absence of the clerk I have the delivering out of the sacking, I always went up with her. I never gave her the opportunity of going up into the warehouse by herself.

SARAH BOURME . I am Mrs. Arnetts' niece.

Q. Do you know the other prisoner Judge - A. Yes, I have taken bed sackings to him; I do not know how many, I took two sackings to him at a time, when I went to Mr. Judges, I said to him, if you please Sir I have brought you two more sackings; Mr. Judge said, take them backwards, I did so and the errand boy took them from me; he gave me five shillings for them in half-pence.

Q. Who gave you these sackings that you took to Judge - A. Hannah Arnett . Mr. Judge lived in Featherstone-street, the next street to my Aunt's, and the money I received of Judge I gave to her.

Q. When you went first to Judge's house who directed you to go there - A. My Aunt sent me to know whether he wanted a bed sacking, he said yes, how much does your Aunt want for it, I said half a crown as my Aunt told me; he asked me it my Aunt had any more, I said I did not know but would ask my Aunt. My Aunt sent me to Mr. Judge to say that she had some more; I asked Mr. Judge how many he wanted, he said I might take as many as my Aunt had got; I then took him two at a time in a basket, this is the basket; sometimes I went once a day, and sometimes twice a day; I went most days in a week; sometimes I had money for them and sometimes tea; sugar and soap, and other articles.

Q. Do you know George the boy - A. Yes, he lived at Mr. Judge's; when I went back wards and forwards sometimes he took the sackings from me. When I was first found out I said I had the sacking from a strange woman, my Aunt told me to say that. The magistrate spoke to me about telling the truth, after that I told the truth, and have told the truth to day.

GEORGE CATHERINE . Q. Did you ever live with the prisoner Judge - A. I went to live with him about nine or ten months ago.

Q. When did you leave him - A. About three

months ago.

Q. During the time you were in his service do you recollect seeing the last witness there - A. Yes, she used to bring bed-sackings there she used to come about once a day, and sometimes more. When she brought them in I used to take them backwards.

Q. Did you ever sell any of them for Mr. Judge - A. No, I used to take them out; a man of the name of Reading went with me.

THOMAS WHITNEY. I am a bedstead-maker, I live in Featherstone-street.

Q. How far is that from the prisoners - A. The prisoner lives in Featherstone-street, he on one side of the way, and I on the other.

Q. Do you know a person of the name of Reading - A. Yes, he came and asked me if I wanted any bed sackings about seven months ago; he said Mr. Judge over the way, had some bed-sackings; he had taken them out of the country for some debt or in exchange; I took to the amount of a dozen and a half altogether at two at a time. I paid him four shillings a piece for them.

Q. Did you at any time see Reading coming from Mr. Judges with the articles - A. Yes, and I knew that Mr. Gabriel dealt in these articles, I communicated it to him, and after that I purchased some more under Mr. Gabriel's direction.

Q. Did you or your wife have any conversation with Mr. Judge - A. That was my wife.

MRS. WHITNEY. Q. Did you by the directions of your husband go to Mr. Judge - A. Yes; I told Mr. Judge I came from my husband, who was a bedstead maker, to ask if Reading was came on his account to my husband; he said, yes, he did.

DANIEL CATHERINE . Q. You are the father of George, the boy that has been examined - A. Yes.

Q. Do you recollect the time that Judge was taken in custody - A. I was before the magistrate when he was in custody, I asked him if I should go to Mr. Barrets in Silver-street, and tell Mr. Barret to put the things on one side; he said, if I did he would satisfy me for my trouble.

Q. You asked him if you should go and put the goods of one side, what goods - A. I understood some bed sackings.

JOHN READING . I am a porter.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. Yes.

Q. Were you employed by him at any time to sell any bed sacking - A. Yes. Mr. Whitney was the first person that I offered any bed sacking to; I sold him two the first time, and several after, Mr. Judge said, he had got sacking if I could get any orders for them, I was in the habit of getting orders for other things in his business, I told him I would try.

Q. Did he say how he came possessed of them - A Not a word; I told Mr. Judge that I had a nephew in the business most likely it would suit him; my nephew lives in Silver-street, Golden-square; I took William Barret my nephew two or three sacks as a sample to shew him he gave four shillings and sixpence for them at that time, I told Mr. Barret that they came from Mr. Judge, that he had got more if they suited him.

Q. In the month of June do you recollect selling Mr. Barret any quantity - A. The last that went was seven dozen; I took them in a truck, the boy went with me, they were to be paid for after midsummer at four shillings each; I took them about a week before Judge was taken up.

WILLIAM BARRET . I am the nephew of the last witness; I live in Silver-street, Golden-square.

Q. Do you remember him coming to you any time offering any bed sacking for sale - A. Yes, I bought upwards of two hundred of him, the largest quantity that I receive at one time was three days before he was apprehended; seven dozen all but one came in last, my uncle came with them, and a little boy with a truck.

Q. Did you pay for the last quantity that you received - A. No.

Q. Had you any conversation with Mr. Judge on the sacking that you received - A. I saw him once about four months ago, I went to settle with him for what I had bought; I gave him a bill, and he agreed to give me the balance; I gave him a bill of twenty-nine pound, I had the balance of seventeen pound.

Q. Do you recollect Armstrong the police officer coming to your house - A. Yes, at that time Catherine came and told me they were stolen goods; I put some out of the house, Mr. Gabriel and Armstrong came, I shewed them what I had in the house, and then I shewed them what I put away. The officer took them away.

JOHN ARMSTRONG . I am an officer of Worship-street-office. On the 13th of June, about two o'clock I, in company with Mr. Gabriel, went to the prisoner's Judge's house, my son and Wilson were with me, Mr. Judge was behind the counter, I asked him if his name was Judge; he said yes; I told him I had a search warrant; I read it, I asked him if he had any sackings; he said yes; I went with him into the warehouse; he said there is two; these are the two, they were laying on the ground. I then asked him if he had any more; he said, yes. We went up stairs over that place, and found five sackings, and a pair of bennets; he said he had no more; Mr. Gabriel asked Mr. Judge if he had sold any in the course of that week; he said six to a bedstead maker in that neighbourhood; I asked Mr. Judge of whom he had bought them; he said he had once bought them of a fresh-coloured woman, but these were brought by a little girl, he gave three shillings and sixpence for them, and he supposed the parties would come again. We secured the goods, and Mr. Judge was taken to the office. All the women that worked for Mr. Gabriel were ordered down to the office that night, but no one was held in custody. On Friday the 14th I went to Mr. Gabriels house, there was this girl with the prisoner Arnott, they, with several of the women that worked there, were ordered to go to the magistrate; from the prisoner Arnott's house I fetched this basket; after that examination had taken place I had a search warrant to search Mr. Barrett's house, Silver-street, Golden-square, when I came there I found Catherine in the shop, I read my warrant to Mr. Barrett, Mr. Gabriel saw some sackings on bedsteads that he knew. Directly afterwards we were led by Catherine and Mr. Barret to a shed next door, I found there one hundred and fifty sackings, they are all here in a cart.

They have been in my possession ever since.

Q. to prosecutor. Look at the two first - A. They are my property, we are the only persons supplied in town with cloth of this description from a manufactory in Plymouth; I never saw any like them in my life before. The holes are worked with thrums of sailcloth. I can swear to the property. They sell for six shillings and sixpence wholesale

Arnott's Defence. I lived servant with the prosecutor's brother four years, and since that I have been employed five years by the prosecutor constantly, and had the care of their house when out of town, and gave the greatest satisfaction, as such I solemnly declare I am innocent.

Judge's Defence. I had no knowledge whatever of the articles being stolen, nor any thing of the kind.

Arnott called one witness, who gave her a good character.

Judge called eight witnesses, who gave him a good character.

ARNOTT - GUILTY , aged 26.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

JUDGE - GUILTY , aged 37.

Transported for Fourteen Years

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18110710-44

562. JOHN FREEMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of June , four shirts, value 14 s. five handkerchiefs, value 6 s. and a shift body, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of Ann Jones , widow .

ANN JONES . I am a widow woman; I live at No. 5, Tower Royal court ; I take in washing . The articles were lost on last Sunday, I was not at home.

JOHANNA GOODWIN . I had the care of Mrs Jones' place. On last Sunday, in the afternoon, I went to the door for a little air for five minutes.

Q. You went a little way from the door, and left the door - A. Yes, upon my return in the house I found the prisoner on the stairs, I called him down and asked him what he wanted; he said that he had mistaken the house, and when he passed me I perceived he had a bundle under his arm; I then called for assistance; he walked leisurely down the court; I begged a gentleman standing at a door to stop him, or send somebody; he sent somebody. The prisoner was out of my sight before he was stopped.

Q. Are you sure that the man that was stopped and brought back was the same man that you saw come down the stairs - A. Yes, and the bundle was brought back with him; after the man was brought back; I went up into the room, I perceived four shirts, five handkerchiefs, and a shift body had been removed, and the bundle that the man was brought back with, contained them articles. The prisoner then asked for forgiveness.

JOHN RICHARD EASON I saw the prisoner, I pursued him to the corner of Dowgate-hill; after he turned the corner of Tower Royal court he ran; I stopped him, he had a bundle with him; he said he had been robbed, and he robbed to make it up. I took him back, and Mrs. Goodwin claimed the things.

Prisoner's Defence. I leave it to your mercy.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined Three Months in Newgate , and whipped in Jail .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18110710-45

563. MARGARET SHEPPARD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of July , a gown, value 10 s. the property of Thomas Christie .

CHARLOTTE CHRISTIE My husband's name is Thomas Christie , I live in Bethnal Green , near the Dundee Arms. The prisoner was at my house on the 1st of July, I had been out and on my return I met my little boy, he was coming to tell me that the gown was gone; I pursued after the prisoner, I could not find her. On the Tuesday week I saw her, I told her if she would give up the duplicate of the gown I would not hurt her. The gown was worth ten shillings.

ROBERT PEARSON . I live with my father, he keeps a pawnbrokers shop in Shoreditch. On the 1st of July, in the morning, I took this gown in, I advanced four shillings and sixpence on it, it was pawned in the name of Ann Shepherd ; I believe the prisoner to be the person.

Prosecutrix. It is my gown.

Prisoner's Defence. I asked Mrs. Christie to lend me one shilling and sixpence, she said she could not, but there was something that I might pawn; she desired me to bring some butter and sugar in; I did. I went to Mr. Pearson's and pawned the gown in my own name; I came back to Mrs. Christie, and gave her six-pence. I told her I should get the gown out on Tuesday morning; I told her to mind the things that I had left with her.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18110710-46

564. ANN BEARD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of April , two waistcoats, value 5 s. a shawl, value 3 s. three handkerchiefs, value 3 s. and four gowns, value 1 l. the property of Samuel Gray .

ELIZABETH GRAY . My husband's name is Samuel Gray . On the 24th of June I had occasion to go into the prisoner's bed room, she was my servant , I saw her pocket laying on the ground, a silk handkerchief was half out of it, I knew it to be mine, and in her pocket I found the key of my drawer, which I had lost three weeks, and a number of duplicates. An officer was sent for in the morning, and she was taken in custody.

JOHN WOODYEAR . I am a pawnbroker. I produce a waistcoat, shawl, gown, and petticoat, pawned by the prisoner.

Prosecutrix. They are all mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I acknowledge myself in fault; it is my first offence.

GUILTY , aged 32.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110710-47

565. WILLIAM WRIGHT and JOSEPH LEVERETT were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of June , ninety pound weight of lead, value 20 s. the property of John Leech and Thomas Dallimore .

THOMAS BUTLER . I am clerk to John Leech and Thomas Dallimore , they keep the London Coffee-house , Ludgate Hill . On the 4th of June about twelve o'clock, the two prisoners came from Mr. Bowyer, plumber, Shoe Lane, to take away some old lead, the whole parcel of lead was between four and five hundred weight, they put it in parcels to take it away, I shewed them the lead. They had a truck at the door.

Q. For what purpose were they to take it away, were Messrs. Leech and Dallimore to be allowed for it. - A. Yes, I gave it to them for that purpose only. When the first piece, which was about ninety pound was missed, we stopped the other lead from going. The prisoners were only permitted to take the lead to be conveyed to Mr. Bowyer's in Shoe Lane, Mr. Bowyer was to account to Messrs. Leech and Dallimore for it.

WILLIAM KIMBER . I am a constable. On the 4th of June I was standing in Ludgate Street about four yards from Messrs. Leech's and Dallimore's, I saw the prisoners bring the truck to the door, the truck was outside of the coffee-house, they both assisted in putting the lead upon the truck, they went the second time to fetch some more. When they put the second parcel on Leverett went round to the front of the truck and Wright behind, Leverett leaned his right shoulder towards the truck and Wright put the lead upon him, then Wright went into the coffee-house and Leverett went away with the lead on his shoulder and left the truck there. Leverett went on to the top of the Old Bailey and turned the right hand of Newgate Street, I followed him all the way, after he had got into Warwick Lane about an hundred yards I stopped him, I told him that he had taken the lead from Mr. Leech's out of the truck, that he should take it back, he said very well, I asked him where he meaned to take it, he said he was going to take it to his master's in Shoe Lane, I told him that was the wrong way to Shoe Lane, he must take it back again. The lead weighs exactly ninety four pounds. I brought him back and took him before Mr. Dallimore, he ordered me to take him before the Alderman.

Q. Did you take Wright into custody. - A. I did, Wright said he knew nothing about it.

Mr. Walford. Do you happen to know where Wright's wife lodged. - A. In Warwick Lane.

Q. Did not Leverett tell you that Wright desired him to call on his wife in his way home. - A. No.

Court. What is the lead worth. - A. I should suppose twenty shillings. This is the lead.

Prisoner's Defence. My Lord and Gentlemen of the Jury. - We, William Wright and Joseph Leverett , prisoner's at the bar, being directed by Mr. Bowyer of Shoe Lane to fetch a large quantity of lead, about five or six hundred weight, from Mr. Leech and Dallimore's Ludgate Hill, and finding if a larger quantity than we could draw, in order to expedite our master's business felt it necessary that one should take a porter's load, I, Wright, lifted the load on Leverett's shoulder and said,

"call upon my wife and let her know that I shall not

"come home to dinner," I have frequently done so before, and did not think it likely that I should be called upon to answer for it.

The prisoners called two witnesses, who gave them a good character.

WRIGHT GUILTY, aged 22,

LEVERETT GUILTY, aged 21,

Judgment respited .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18110710-48

566. ANN BALL and ELIYABETH FOGG were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of June , a watch, value 20 s. a metal chain, value 2 s. a metal seal, value 2 s. a key, value 6 d. a pocket book, value 2 s. and a 2 l. bank note , the property of John Harris .

JOHN HARRIS . I am a seafaring man , I met the two prisoners on the 24th of June, between five and six o'clock in the evening, at the London Dock. We came together from the London Dock in a coach, the coachman drove us to Bishopgate Street, I paid the fare and discharged the coachman. The women went into a house and called me up to have tea. We all three were in one room, I staid there a quarter of an hour, my watch was on a chair, I had a reason for it, I was very warm, I pulled off my coat and put it on the chair, over the watch. There was a bed in the room.

Q. Then I need not ask you what reason there was for it. - A. When I took up the coat my watch was not there, and both the women went out of the room, my pocket book was in my coat pocket, that also was gone.

Q. While you were on the bed which of the women were with you. - A. Ann Ball . They both went out of the room together.

Q. Did you examine the chair for your watch and pocket book before they went out of the room. - A. Yes, I said to the prisoners

"my property is gone and I would mark the house if they did not let me have the property. I saw no more of them afterwards.

Q. Had you given them any thing before they left the room. - A. I gave a crown piece to Fogg to get tea.

Q. After they quitted the room how long was it before you saw them again. - A. I believe it was the third day that I saw them in custody. I am quite certain to their persons, and that they were the two women that were with me.

Q. Did you ever find your pocket book again, or your watch. - A. I have seen the watch, it is pawned. The watch was produced before the Lord Mayor.

SAMUEL SHEPPARD . I am an officer. On the 24th of June I saw the prosecutor in Bishopgate Street, he said he had been robbed down that street, which is Skinner Street, it leads to Angel Alley, he had lost his watch and pocket book containing a two pound bank note. He was sober, and from his description of the persons I apprehended Ball on the same evening, a little before ten o'clock, I told her what I apprehended her for, she said she knew nothing about it. On the Wednesday the prosecutor saw her coming out of the Poultry Compter, at that time the other woman was in custody, he declared they were the two women that robbed him, I searched Ball, I found a duplicate of a

watch pawned on the 24th of June, for thirteen shillings, in the name of Cox, pawned at No. 30, Barbican; I took the prosecutor to the pawnbrokers, he saw the watch, and claimed it.

Q. Had it the seal and key to it. - A. Neither, they were gone.

Q. Did you know her person before. - A. Yes, and what way of life she was in.

THOMAS MILLER . I am a constable. I apprehended Fogg on the same evening, about a quarter past ten; I found nothing on her respecting this charge, I told her what I apprehended her for, she said she was innocent.

Q. Were you present when they were being conveyed to the Mansion House. - A. I was; the prosecutor declared they were the two women.

ROBERT UPSELL . I am a pawnbroker's journeyman, at Mr. Williams's, 30, Barbican. On the 24th of June I took in a silver watch of a woman in the name of Sarah Cox , I advanced thirteen shillings upon it, between seven and eight in the evening, it was not pawned by either of the two prisoners, I know the woman that pawned it, I have not seen her since.

The Watch produced and identified.

Ball's Defence. On Monday morning I went to Fleet Market to purchase a flat of cherries; I returned home early in the afternoon, and took two shillings with me, and coming across Finsbury Square about five o'clock in the afternoon, I met a middle aged woman, she asked me to buy a duplicate of a watch, she asked a shilling for it, she said she was in distress, I gave her a shilling and took the duplicate, she said it was her husband's, after that I was turning the corner of Skinner Street, the officer told me he wanted me, he took me to the watchhouse, and searched me, and found the duplicate; I am unacquainted with the charge that is alledged against me.

Fogg's Defence. I get my living by selling fruit in the street. I went to Newgate Market for a round of strawberries, I employed a porter to take them to Bartholomew Lane, I continued there till the evening, on my going home I was taken in Bishopgate Street; I am innocent of the charge alledged against me, not having been near the prosecutor.

BALL, GUILTY , aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

FOGG, NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18110710-49

567. JOSEPH TOLSON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 18th of June , a watch, value 1 l. the property of George Sims .

GEORGE SIMS . I am a servant . I live at the Red Cross, Newgate Market .

Q. Were you possessed of a watch on the 12th of June. - A. Yes, about a twelvemonth I had the watch. The watch was taken from the kitchen of the public-house, I had left it on the shelf about two o'clock in the morning. It is a market-house, we generally open about two o'clock in the morning. I opened the house at that time. The prisoner came into my house, as I opened it, he asked if he could have any coffee.

Q. Was he in the kitchen - A. Yes, he said he would take a quartern of brandy, we drawed him the brandy. I asked him for the money, he said he had nothing less than a ten pound note, we immediately ordered him out of the house.

Q. Did he produce a ten-pound note. - A. No, he left the house upon being ordered out, about three minutes after he left the house, I missed the watch, I gave an alarm, and went out of doors to look for him, and while I was out, the prisoner was brought back, when I returned he was in the house, he was taken to the watchhouse, I saw the watch found upon him by Kimber; I knew it to be mine.

WILLIAM KIMBER . I am a constable. The prisoner was brought to the watchhouse, I took the watch from him, I have kept it ever since.

Prosecutor. This is my watch.

Prisoner's Defence. The matter is this: I am a person that was upwards of twenty years well-doing in this metropolis; I have had upwards of five years sickness in the north, my friends were kind to me. On this morning, through great distress I stood in need of something, they were early open in the market, I thought perhaps I might get a cup of coffee, the young man brought me brandy, what I called for; as I could not produce the money, I said nothing less than a ten pound note, I had not the note; I was ordered out, I went to the upper part of the market, told my distress, they gave me coffee, I was not apprehensive there was any alarm given, I took a walk round the market. They over-hauled me, and found the watch upon me.

GUILTY, aged 52.

Judgment respited .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18110710-50

568. PETER TEAPOT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of July , twelve ounce weight of tobacco, value 2 s. the property of Robert Lloyd .

ROBERT LLOYD . I am a tobacconist on Holborn Hill . The prisoner was my servant , on the 4th of July, about one o'clock, the prisoner went out to dinner; in consequence of suspicion, I called him back, and said, I wished to search him if he had no objection, he said no, my brother was standing by, I ordered him to search him; he, in my presence put his hand into his pocket, and pulled out five ounces of loose tobacco. The constable was standing over the way, I called him in, he took out of his breeches knee seven ounces more quite loose, spread all round the knee. It is worth two shillings and nine pence a pound to myself, before it is manufactured. I have a witness here, that saw him take it.

ANN EDWARDS . I live with Mr. Lloyd. I saw the prisoner take the tobacco, and put it in the knee of his breeches, about five minutes before he was detected.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, called two witnesses who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Whipped in jail , and discharged.

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18110710-51

569. THOMAS TURNER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of June , a handkerchief, value 1 s. the property of Charles Collier , from his person .

CHARLES COLLIER . I am an officer of his Majesty's ship Sulpher . On the 7th of June, between eleven and twelve, at the corner of Queen Street , I felt the handkerchief go, I immediately turned round and

catched hold of the prisoner's hand, the handkerchief was in his hand at that time. He said my handkerchief was hanging out of my pocket, and he was going to give it me. I sent for a constable, and had him secured.

Prisoner. Q. I wish to ask you whether I did not say, Sir, here is your handkerchief hanging out of your pocket, before you turned round. - A. I turned round and caught hold of his arm, then he made that excuse.

Jury. Are you aware that your handkerchief is hanging out now. - A. It might be hanging out a little way then.

WILLIAM PARRY . I am a constable. I was sent for to take charge of the prisoner.

Q. Did you know the person of the prisoner before. A. I never saw him to my knowledge. The prisoner said that his handkerchief was hanging out of his pocket, that he meaned to tell him that he thought he would lose it. I have kept the handkerchief ever since.

Prosecutor. This is the handkerchief I found in the prisoner's hand, it cost me eight shillings, it is worth a shilling.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not intend to rob him. I was going down to Tower Hill, being out of work. I saw this gentleman's handkerchiefs part out of his pocket, I said, you will lose your handkerchief, and when he saw the handkerchief, part in my hand, and the other part in his pocket, he said, you rascal, you intended to take it.

Prosecutor. He had the handkerchief completely in his hand when I turned round to him.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18110710-52

570. RICHARD HUMPHREYS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of July , sixteen loaves of bread, value 6 s. and a basket value 1 s. 6 d. the property of Robert Carrick .

CHARLES WRIGHT . I am servant to Robert Carrick , he is a baker . On the 10th of July I pitched my baskets within a few yards of Alderman Smith's door, in the Crescent, New Bridge Street . I had occasion to leave both my baskets in the street, to go home for some flour. On my return, both my baskets were there, and while I went down the area with the flour, one of the baskets were gone. I, from information run down Tudor Street, into Water Street, I could not see or hear anything of him; on my return I met the prisoner with my basket on his back in Crown Court, leading into Tudor Street. I knew my basket. it contained fifteen half quartern loaves, and a three-penny one, and there was that quantity when I found the prisoner with it. The prisoner said he was sorry for it, and he hoped I would forgive him. This is the basket I took from the prisoner's back, the bread was my master's property.

ROBERT CARRICK . Q. Have you any partners. - A. No.

Q. What was the worth of the sixteen loaves. - A. Rather better than eight shillings, and the basket one shilling.

Prisoner's Defence. I am nineteen years old. On Wednesday morning I was coming down Bridge Street, I saw a basket there, I knew the young man that had lived with Mr. Carrick, his name is Charles Gregory , and out of mere fun I put the basket on my back, not with any intention of stealing it.

GUILTY, aged 19.

Judgment respited .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18110710-53

571. JOHN LEACH was indicted for that he, on the 13th of June , feloniously, and without lawful cause, had in his custody and possession, divers forged bank notes, for the payment of 5 l. and 1 l. he well-knowing the said notes to be forged .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110710-54

572. THOMAS LEACH was indicted for that he on the 24th of April feloniously did forge and counterfeit a certain bank note for the payment of 5 l. with intention to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England .

SECOND COUNT - for disposing of, and putting away a like forged bank note, with like intention, he knowing it to be forged and counterfeited.

AND OTHER COUNTS - for like offences, only varying the manner of charging them.

Mr. Knapp, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence of this charge, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110710-55

573. HENRY ASHTON was indicted for that he, on the 20th of May , was clerk to Francis Molynew Ommaney , and John Druce , and was employed and entrusted by them to receive monies and valuable securities for them; and that he being such clerk, so employed and entrusted, did receive a banker's draft of 102 l. 16 s. for, and on account of his said masters , and that he afterwards did embezzle, secrete, and steal the same .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY .

HENRY ASHTON again indicted for receiving 84 l. and embezzling, secreting, and stealing the same.

To this charge the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY .

AGAIN indicted for receiving 208 l. 3 s. 10 d. on the 7th of June, and afterwards secreting and stealing the same.

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110710-56

574. THOMAS MANN , was indicted for feloniously forging and counterfeiting, on the 9th of June , a certain order for the payment of 78 l. 17 s. 9 d. with intent to defraud Henry Oppenheim .

SECOND COUNT. - for uttering and publishing as true, a like forged order, with like intention.

TWO OTHER COUNTS. - for like offences, stating the intention to be to defraud Isaac Spooner , Matthias Atwood , Sen. Matthias Atwood , Jun. and Edward Spooner .

The case was stated by Mr. Gurney.

JAMES BRIGGS . Q. How old are you. - A. Fourteen last April, I am the son of Matthew Briggs . He is a porter in the Bank.

Q. Do you know the prisoner Mann. - A. Yes, he lodged at my fathers nine months, down to the 24th of last month, he left him.

Q. Do you remember his desiring you last Tuesday to go of any errand for him. - A. Yes, I was then at our house in Little St. Thomas Apostle, he asked me to ask my mother for me to go into Newgate Market, to help him over with some butter and cheese to Walworth, where he had gone to lodge, I went out with him, and instead of going to Walworth he said he wanted to go into Bishopsgate Street.

Court. He did not go into Newgate Market then. - A. No.

Mr. Knapp. Well. - A. Then I went on to Fish Street Hill with a note.

Q. Did you go into Bishopsgate Street. - A. No, Thomas Mann gave me a note by the side of the Mansion House and told me to take it to No. 40, Fish Street Hill, and they would give me some money for it. He and I went to No. 40, on Fish Street Hill, Spooner and Company, a Banking House, it was the corner of Monument Yard, I gave them a piece of paper the prisoner had given me, they gave me some money and asked me for charge, I told them I had none. They gave me the money and then they took it away from me, I had the money in my hand about a minute. Then they sent two gentlemen with me to shew the person that gave it me.

Q. You had told them that some person had given it you, had you. - A. Yes, two gentlemen went with me, keeping the note, to see the person that gave me the note, that person had agreed to meet me at the corner of Lombard Street, I went there, we waited there about ten minutes, the prisoner did not appear. Then the two gentlemen and me went to Mr. Oppenheim's in the Commercial Road, and the prisoner was taken up the same day he gave me the paper. I was in the Mansion House then, my father went out in search of him, and he was brought into the Mansion House.

Q. You say you knew him for nine months, have you any doubt he is the same person. - A. Yes, he is the same person.

Q. And the note he gave you you offered at the Banking House. - A. Yes.

WILLIAM MEDLEY. Q. Are you clerk to Spooner and Company. - A. I am.

Q. Who are the partners in that firm. - A. Isaac Spooner , Matthias Atwood , Sen. Matthias Atwood , Jun. and Edward Spooner , the are bankers, Fish Street Hill, the corner of Monument Yard.

Q. Do you remember the boy that has been just examined, coming on the 9th of June last. - A. I remember a boy coming, I cannot be positive that is the boy.

Q. Did that boy offer a draft for payment. - A. He did, he offered it to me.

Q. Is that the draft that he offered. - A. Yes it is, this draft was offered me by a boy.

Q. I see it is for 78 l. 17 s. 9 d. - A. I offered payment of it, I gave him a 50 l. note and a 25 l. note, I asked him if he could give me 2 s. 3 d. the boy said he had no change about him.

Court. You gave him a 50 l. note and a 25 l. note, you did not give him the full amount. - A. No, and just as I was going to cancel the draft I immediately perceived it was not Mr. Oppenhiem's writing.

Mr. Gurney. Did Mr. Oppenheim keep cash at your house. - A. He did, I then shewed it to another clerk whose name is Sells, in consequence of what he said I took the notes back from the boy

Court. Had the boy taken up the notes or were they lying on the counter. - A. He took them up and I took them from him. I told the boy to wait a moment.

Mr. Gurney. You sent cut two clerks to accompany the boy. - A. Yes, I kept the check.

Q. Is that the check. - A. It is.

Q. Did you receive any other check of Mr. Oppenheim's of that sum that day. - A. None

Mr. Alley. Is there any other persons connected with the names you have mentioned in the profit or loss. - A. No.

Mr. Gurney. Upon examining it minutely did you believe it not to be the hand writing of Mr. Oppenheim. - A. I am certain it is not, I have known his hand writing some few years. He has kept cash at our house.

WILLIAM DRINKWATER. I am an officer of the city of London. I apprehended the prisoner about ten minutes before two on last Tuesday, in Bucklersbury in the street. I searched him and found upon him this book.

Q. Did you tell him upon what charge you took him. - A. He asked me what was the matter, I told him he would know when I took him into the Manson House. I took him into the Mansion House before the Lord Mayor, the Lord Mayor asked him if he had heard the charge what the boy stated against him, he said he had not distinctly heard, the boy was asked some questions again, I do not recollect the words, and the Lord Mayor asked him if he had any thing to say in his defence.

Q. Was he asked by the Lord Mayor how he came by the note. - A. The prisoner said he found them, that is all he said in his defence, he said he had found them papers.

Court. How many papers were they. - A. I think there were two. I did not see the draft at all.

JOHN SCOLEFIELD . I am a warehouseman to Mr. Crank, who is a hide and skin broker, Nicholas Lane.

Q. Do you know Mr. Oppenhiem of the Commercial Road. - A. I know him.

Q. Has he occasionally transacted business with Mr. Crank. - A. Some time ago there was a transaction between them.

Q. At that time was the prisoner at the bar in Mr. Cranks employ. - A. He was.

Q. You have seen the prisoner write I believe, have not you. - A. Yes.

Q. Look at that draft and tell me whether you believe it to be his hand writing. - A. From the similarity of his hand writing, I believe it to be the prisoners hand writing, I cannot swear it.

Q. I know you cannot swear it, you have seen him write frequently, have not you. - A. Yes.

The draft read.

JOHN SOUTHEY DAVIS. I am clerk to Messrs. Spooner and Company.

Q. Were you in the shop when the lad uttered the

draft last Tuesday. - A. I was not.

Q. Did you go with the lad afterwards to the end of Lombard Street, to look for the person that uttered it. - A. I did.

Q. And not finding any person there, did you go with the lad to Mr. Oppenheim in the Commercial Road. - A. I did.

Q. Were you present when the prisoner was apprehended. - A. He was brought into the Mansion House, I was not at the apprehension of him, I was present at the Mansion House when he was examined.

Q. Is that the boy that you went with to the end of Lombard Street. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember the prisoner being asked by the Lord Mayor how he came by this draft. - A. Yes, he said he had found it.

Prisoner's Defence. Respecting the draft that is on Mr. Spooner, I never received any draft of Mr. Oppenheim, I had been at Mr. Oppenhein's several times. I did not know that Mr. Oppenheim kept cash at the house. And with respect to the finding of it, there was a person that passed at the time that I picked it up at the foot of Blackfriers Bridge.

GUILTY. - DEATH , aged 25.

Of uttering not of forging .

London jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18110710-57

575. ELIZABETH LEACH was indicted for that she on the 13th of June , feloniously did forge and counterfeit a certain Bank note for the payment of one pound, with intention to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England .

SECOND COUNT. - for feloniously disposing off and putting away a like forged and counterfeit Bank Note, with the said intention.

AND TWO OTHER COUNTS. - for like offence, with intent to defraud James Hulme .

The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.

JAMES HULME . I keep a pawnbrokers shop in Bow Street Bloomsbury. On the 13th of June, between one and two o'clock the prisoner came to my shop, she looked at some stays that were hanging up in the shop, she asked me if I thought they would fit her, I told her that I had half a dozen more pair in doors, I had no doubt I could fit her, I shewed her some more, she tried one two or three pair and then selected one, for which she was to pay me five shillings, she took from her pocket a one pound note, she delivered it to me, before I saw the note I asked if she would take five shillings worth of halfpence, I saw that she was pulling out a note, she said oh, yes, if they are tied up in a paper, she produced the note, I took it in my hand, I observed it to be a bad one. I asked her immediately her name and where she lived, she said her was Elizabeth Leach , she lived at No. 4, Drury Lane. I put that address immediately upon the note.

Q. Look at that address and hand writing, and see whether that is the note that you received of her. - A. That is the note and that is my hand writing, I know from that that is the note that I received from her, I asked her from whom she received it, she said it was Mr. John Thomas in Holborn that she received it off, he was a taylor. I asked her whereabouts Mr. John Thomas lived in Holborn, she said somewhere in Holborn, I said do not you know whereabouts, she then said it was usual to put their name upon the back and where the person lived, but to make no more observations. I looked at the back of the note and saw John Thomas , I asked her if that was the person, she said it was. I said I suppose you know where Mr. John Thomas lives if I go with you there, she did not then say any thing. I put on my hat and went with her to the door, she said it is of no use to go there, then I said we will go to No. 4, Drury Lane, we got a few yards from my house, she said it was no service to go there for she had removed. I asked her then where she had removed to, she said into Theobald's Road, she had been gone about a fortnight from Drury Lane.

Q. Did she mention any number. - A. No, I believe she said the corner of Old North Street, and that she kept a cloaths shop, and that if I would go with her to Theobald's Road she would give me another for it, she did not know it was a bad one. Her husband would make a fine piece of work with her if he knew it to be a bad one, that she had taken it for two shirts that had been sold in the shop, I told her that I would take her to No. 4, to see if she had lived there, she then complained that she was not able to walk, that she was unwell, I still persisted in going down to Drury Lane, and took her by the arm and crossed over and took her to Bow Street, there she was examined.

STEPHEN LAVENDAR . Q. You are one of the officers of Bow Street. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember the prisoner at the bar being brought to the office in Bow Street. - A. Yes, on the 13th of June.

Q. Did you go for the purpose of searching the lodgings of the prisoner. - A. I did.

Q. How did you learn them to be the lodging of the prisoner. - A. From her own account, she delivered the key of her room to me herself, she said that her lodgings was situated in Theobalds Road, I took her with me, Lack and Vickrey were with me, two other officers. In going there she was asked what property she had in the house and what description, she said she believed there was nine pound in bank notes in a pocket book, which were in a drawer, she was asked if she had any more, she said there were not that she knew off.

Q. Where was that room situated that you went with her to, of which you had the key to open the door. - A. On the ground floor of the house, at the corner of North Street. We then proceeded to search, we found the nine pounds that she described, and on making a further search we found this bag.

Q. You found the nine notes in the pocket-book in the drawer. - A. Yes.

Q. You found them in the pocket-book were good. - A. They were so, we proceeded to search further, in this bag we found a five a two, and a one, that work bag hung up at the side of the fire place.

Q. How were they in a bag. - A. They were to to the best of my recollection in some paper, but I delivered the bag to Lack, and he will tell you.

Q. These notes you so found, you would know them again if you were to see them. - A. Yes, this is the one pound note I found, I endorsed it at the time; this is the five pound note, I marked it in the same manner; and this is the two, I endorsed it likewise, I have no

doubt of them. In returning from the room to the office she then said they were notes that she had taken in the shop, and she had put them there as a private purse of her own, and that she had put them there unknown to her husband.

Q. Did she appear desirous of preventing you from suspecting her husband. - A. I should imagine that she did.

Court. Did you imagine that only from the expression that she made. - A. Yes.

Mr. Knapp. She is indicted as a single woman. The husband, as he is called, was apprehended for a different offence than that which the woman at the bar now is indicted for. - A. Truely so.

SAMUEL LACK . Q. You are an officer I believe. - A. Yes.

Q. Were you in company with Lavender when the prisoner's lodgings were searched. - A. I was.

Q. Did he deliver over to you that bag. - A. This bag hung upon a nail on the right side of the fire-place. Lavender handed this bag to me, I said to the prisoner

"what is this," she said

"it is a work-bag," I then proceeded to search to see what was in it, I found three notes wrapped up in a piece of paper, I delivered them directly to Vickrey the other officer.

JOHN VICKREY . Q. Were you at the prisoner's lodgings with the other two officers. - A. I was, I received three notes from the last witness, I saw him take them out of the bag, they were wrapped up in a piece of paper, I kept possession of them till they were marked by Lavendar, and I marked them myself. I, Vickrey, 13 June, and the date of the year. These are the same, that is my hand writing on the back of each note.

JOHN HENRY PRINCE. Q. You live at the corner of Old North Street, Red Lion Square. - A. Yes.

Q. You are the landlord of the house there. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar. - A. Yes, she came to my house on the 16th of May, with Thomas Leach her husband, she said he was.

Q. Whom did you let the lodgings to. - A. To this woman and a man she brought with her, which she said was her husband, I let them both the front and back parlour on the ground floor in Theobalds Road.

Q. Was that the parlour in which the notes were found. - A. So I understood.

Mr. Gurney. Put Thomas Leach to the bar.

Mr. Knapp. Q. to Prince. What did the rooms consist of. - A. A front and back parlour, the front parlour looked into Theobalds Road.

Q. Whom did you deliver the key to. - A. I cannot say, I took Thomas Leach 's direction, he said his name was Thomas Leach , I took his name, I delivered the key to them both. They came to me on the 16th of May, they were taken up on the 13th of June.

Mr. Gurney. That is the man that you are speaking of. - A. Yes, that is the man.

Q. They came together as man and wife and lived in your lodgings. - A. Yes, four weeks.

THOMAS FOURMEY . Q. You keep the Hand-in-hand public-house, High Holborn. - A. Yes.

Q. Look at that note, did you ever receive that note in payment of any body. - A. Yes, I received this note, and I believe it to be of the prisoner at the bar on the 17th of March last.

Q. What was it paid for. - A. A bottle of wine, four shillings and six pence, I gave the change.

Q. Was that the person from whom you received it. - A. I believe it was.

Court. Have you any doubt. - A. I believe it to be the same.

Q. You are not sure. - A. No, I marked it 17. 3. 1. stranger.

Mr. Gurney. I suppose your habit is, when you receive a note of a stranger you write stranger upon it. - A. Yes.

Q. I suppose in your business you are in the habit of receiving a good many notes. - A. A good many.

Q. At the time you received the note you did not suspect it to be forged. - A. No, I put it in a desk.

Q. To which desk your wife has access as well as you. - A. No, my sister, Sir.

Q. Were there other notes in that desk in which you put this. - A. No other. It remained in that desk that day from two o'clock till eleven at night.

Q. Do you mean to say from between two o'clock to eleven no other bank note was there. - A. No, my sister was not at home, she could not put any in. At eleven at night I put it in my box along with other notes.

Q. How many notes do you think. - A. I suppose fifty.

Q. Now, carrying back your recollection to the 17th of March, do you mean to swear that you received no other one pound note on that day. - A. No, I marked it with my own hand writing. It was returned to me three days afterwards.

Q. Do you make enterys in any book of notes that you receive. - A. Not small notes. This was on the Sunday, on the Friday I had the note returned.

Q. On the Sunday night you put it in a box with fifty other notes. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you go to that box on the Monday. - A. Yes, and put some more in. On the Tuesday I took them all and paid them away to a stock broker, on the Friday this note was brought back.

Q. As the note that you had given to the stock broker. - A. Yes.

Q. You found written upon it 17. 3. 1. stranger. - A. Yes, which means 17th day of the third month, the one means 1811.

Q. The person from whom you received it you did not see for a long time. - A. No.

Q. You were taken to Bow Street to see a person who was charged with uttering forged notes. - A. Yes.

Q. And then you thought she was the person from whom you received it, but you do not mean to say that positively. - A. No, I do not.

Mr. Bosanquet. Did you put this mark upon it, stranger, 17. 3. 1. at the time that you received it. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you mark any other note with stranger, 17. 3. 1. - A. I took no other note that day, I am quite sure.

JOHN LEES . Q. You are an inspector of Bank notes. - A. I am.

Q. It is your duty with others to examine bank notes. - A. Yes.

Q. You are perfectly acquainted with all the private marks, and knew whether it is genuine or not. - A. Certainly, it is my duty.

Q. I put that in your hand, that note is the note for which the prisoner is indicted. - A. I have seen this note before.

Q. Upon your inspection of that, is it forged or not. - A. It is a forged note.

Q. Is it from a bank plate. - A. It is not, it is altogether forged, the signature is a forgery.

Q. The plate, the signature, and in every respect it is forged. - A. It is, Sir.

Q. Now look at the back of the note, and see whether John Thomas, Holborn, is there - A. Yes, it is.

Q. Have you made enquiries for John Thomas , of Holborn, with all your diligence to find such a person. - A. I have done every thing in my power to find out such a person, I could not find him.

Q. Look at these three notes, the five, the two, and the one found in the work bag, look at the one first. - A. The one is a forgery.

Q. And alike for the same reason with the one that I shewed you before. - A. It is, and from the same plate. The two is also a forgery, and the five is also a forgery.

Q. Look at the one and see what is the name, there is an indorsement, Mrs. Wilson, New Street, Covent Garden, on the back of the one pound note that was found in the work bag, have you made enquiry after that lady. - A. I have in every house in the street, no such person lives there. On the back of the five, in the same hand writing, Thomas Charlton , Somers-town. I have made enquiry after him, and could find no such person. On the back of the two there is Mrs. Smith, Broad Street, Bloomsbury. There is a Mr. and Mrs. Smith, Cheesemongers, they are now in court.

Q. Now I put into your hand that which was produced by Fourmey - A. It is a forgery, and from the same plate with the other one. The signature is the same hand writing in them all.

Q. Look at the endorsement. - A. There is an endorsement on this, of John Smith .

Q. Does the appearance of the endorsement satisfy you that they are or are not the same. - A. All the indorsements are the same hand-writing upon each of the notes.

Mr. Gurney. My friend asked you whether you knew the private marks. - A. Yes.

Q. No person can know a forged note correct but an inspector, can they. - A. I should think not.

CHARLES CHRISTMAS . Q. You are an inspector of bank notes, were you at the prisoner's lodgings when they were searched by the officers. - A. I was.

Q. Did you hear the prisoner say any thing when the notes were found in the work bag. - A. She denied any knowledge of them. When they were first produced, I asked her how these notes came in the work bag, she said she did not know.

Court. Was the husband there. - A. No; in taking her back to Bow Street, I asked her if the forged notes found in the work bag were given to her by her husband, for the purpose of uttering, she said no, I then asked her how she came by them, she said she had received them in her shop in Little Drury Lane, and the parties she had received them off, she had put the name and address on the back of them.

Mr. Gurney. There were three police officers, and you, the inspector, all of you about this poor woman, asking her many questions, I suppose you were telling her to take care what she said, that you should give evidence of it, and hang her. - A. There was no such thing said to her.

Q. You were very tender gentlemen to say nothing of that kind. - A. I told her when she got back she would be interrogated not to prevaricate, but to tell the truth.

ELIZABETH SMITH . My husband's name is John Smith. We keep a cheesemonger's shop in Broad Street, Bloomsbury.

Q. Do you know any thing of the prisoner at the bar. - A. Not at all, I never saw her before, to the best of my knowledge.

Q. Did you ever pay a two pound note to the prisoner, at No. 4, Drury Lane. - A. Never in my life, nor to any other person in that shop, I was never in the shop in my life.

Mr. Gurney. Whether any person gave your name you cannot say. - A. No.

JOHN SMITH . I am the husband of the last witness.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar. - A. No.

Q. Did you ever pay any note at a shop, No. 4, Drury Lane. - A. I was never in the shop in my life.

The note read.

Prisoner's Defence. I mean to speak the truth. Them notes that were in my work bag, my husband gave me the day before, to purchase some articles that I wanted in the house; he said, if I did not go that day, I might keep them by me, and he would go with me, I considered that I should like my husband to go with me, I put the notes in the work-bag, until he could go. Respecting the other note, that I uttered for the stays, I am positive that I took that note in the shop at Drury lane, and I put the name on at the name. The reason that I denied these notes being in the work bag. I did not know what to say, being in the hands of officers, I imagined my husband might know something of them, I knew I was in the hands of officers, I said, I knew nothing about it; my husband was at the door when I went in for the stays, and when I came out he was gone.

SAMUEL LEACH . I live at 20, George Street, Hope-town, Bethnal Green. I am a weaver.

Q. Do you know the two prisoners at the bar. - A. Yes.

Q. Are they man and wife. - A. They are, I was present at their marriage at Shoreditch church, I think on the 26th day of February twelvemonth, I am related to the man, his real name is Tattersall, and by that name he was married.

Q. He has taken your name of Leach - A. His mother was my father's sister.

Court. When did he take your name of Leach. - A. I do not know indeed, when he lived with my father, he went by the name of Tom Leach .

GEORGE LIMMING . I am parish clerk of Shoreditch. I have the registers of the last year; Thomas Tattersall and Elizabeth Warwick were married in this church on the 26th of February 1810. The last man was a witness to the marriage.

SAMUEL LEACH . That is my hand-writing.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 34.

of disposing of, and putting away a forged one pound note, knowing it to be forged .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18110710-58

576. PETER BOURDEAUX was indicted for the wilful murder of Law Wilson .

The case was stated by Mr. Gurney.

ROBERT JONES . I am a sailor. On Wednesday last I was in the Export Dock, Blackwall , I saw the prisoner there, he spoke to Law Wilson, he enquired of him whether it was a running ship, I understood him a London ship, Wilson said, yes to be sure boy, a London ship. The prisoner asked why she had not her rails up, the deceased said, what does she want with her rails up to come into the dock, boy, the prisoner said, if you call me boy any more, I'll give you a punch of the head.

Q. Did the deceased call him boy again. - A. Yes, and then the prisoner struck him, the deceased struck again; they had four or five rounds.

Q. Now while the fight was going on, did the prisoner do any thing besides striking with his fist. - A. Yes, he took hold of his collar with his left hand, and kicked him with his right foot, in his private parts.

Q. Did the deceased fight any after that. - A. Yes, he fought two rounds after, then he said he must leave off, then he walked about twenty minutes, and then he leaned with his head against the wall, unbuttoned his trowsers, and looked at his private parts, he sat down on the grass, then fell upon his back, I halloed out for assistance, he died in a few minutes afterwards.

Q. Are you sure the prisoner is the man. - A. Yes, I am sure he is the man.

Q. Which was the strongest man. - A. The man that is dead, if he had not kicked him, would have beat the prisoner.

THOMAS SAUNDERS . I am a seaman, I was in the Britannia at the time of this fight, I saw the deceased and the prisoner fighting together.

Q. While they were fighting did you see the prisoner kick the deceased. - A. Yes, I did, he kicked him in his privates, I jumped out of the ship for assistance, I got to them while the fight was, a little while after the kick, the deceased went to the wall, and unbuttoned his trowsers, his privates were swelled, and blood came out of his mouth, the prisoner ran away, I pursued him, and brought him back.

- I am a surgeon, I examined the body of the deceased.

Q. Did you find an injury done by such an act as described. - A. I did, I found a rupture near the part on opening the abdomen, there was about a quart of blood, the artery had been ruptured by violence, and such a kick as I have heard described might occasion it, I firmly believe he died of that injury.

Prisoner's Defence. As I was going down the dock with intention to look for a ship, I spoke to myself that cannot be a running ship, the deceased was behind me, he said she is a running ship, I said how is that she is without rails, he said what does she want with rails boy, I tapped him on the shoulder and said go away, he struck me and I struck him, we did not make any agreement to fight, this young man came to help him, he told him he had no occasion, he said he would not fight any more, after fighting we spoke together ten minutes. I did not know the man was dead. I ran away thinking they wanted to stop me, when I was stopped they said I had killed the man, I said my God he was not dead when I left him, he was very pale. I do not know whether it was the kick or the blows. I am very sorry for it.

GUILTY, aged 24, of MANSLAUGHTER .

Confined One Year in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18110710-59

577. DIANA CROW was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of July , a gown, value 3 s. the property of John Potts .

JANE POTTS . My husbands name is John Potts , I live in Union Row, Kent Row , I hired the prisoner as a servant , she lived with me only a week, I lent her a great many clothes that she took away, and the gown she stole out of my daughter's room.

MR. FIRTH. I am an headborough, on the 2d of July, I apprehended the prisoner in White Lion Street, Norton Falgate, I searched her, in her pocket I found this duplicate.

JAMES DEMER . I am a pawnbroker. On the 2d of July, the prisoner pawned this gown with me.

Prosecutrix. This is my daughter's gown.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

GUILTY , aged 29.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110710-60

578. ELIZABETH RANDELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of June , two shirts, value 1 l. a waistcoat, value 6 s. and a neckcloth, value 4 s. the property of Abraham Brier .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY .

Confined One Year in the House of Correction and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110710-61

579. MARTHA ANCELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of June , six pewter quart pots, value 9 s. and six pewter pint pots, value 3 s. the property of Joseph Hammond , and a pewter pint pot , the property of James Taylor .

The prosecutor and witnesses were called, and not appearing in court the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110710-62

580. SAMUEL HOOTEN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of June , a pewter pint pot, value 1 s. 3 d. the property of Thomas Tudor Owen .

THOMAS TUDOR OWEN . I keep the Bank Public House , King Street, Drury Lane . On the 16th of June, the prisoner came into the house and had half a pint of ale, after he was gone, I pursued him and asked him what he had got in his pocket, he said nothing at all. I put my hand into his pocket and took this pint pot out. It is mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked the pot up at the door.

GUILTY , aged 48.

Confined six months in the House of Correction .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110710-63

581. JAMES HODGETTS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of June , fifteen carats weight of diamonds, value 100 l. a diamond ring, value 12 l. three pearl rings, value 4 l. the property of John Romer , in the dwelling-house of John Cooper . And HENRY LAWRENCE for receiving fifteen carats weight of diamonds, value 100 l. and a diamond ring, value 12 l. being part and parcel of the said goods, he knowing them to have been stolen .

JOHN ROMER . Q. You are a working jeweller , we understand - A. Yes.

Q. Where is your shop situated - A. No. 11, Gough-square , in the dwelling house of John Cooper , I occupy the front garret only. It is in the parish of St. Dunstan's in the West .

Q. In what situation was the prisoner Hodgetts to you at the time that this transaction happened - A. A journeyman at two pound a week.

Q. How long had he been your journeyman - A. He came in my employ in November last, and worked with me until this affair happened.

Q. When you retired from your room from work, you lived in Water-lane - A. Yes, at No. 2.

Q. Was it your habit and your directions to him always to lock the door of the room - A. It was the general order.

Q. Had you considerable property there, diamonds and other things to a great value - A. Yes.

Q. What was the day on which you missed this property - A. On Saturday the 1st of June.

Q. About what time did you retire from your room to go to dinner - A. A little after one; I left Hodgetts and the apprentice in the shop.

Q. Were you pretty busy at that time - A. I was very busy, and chiefly in diamond work I was absent from my shop about fifteen minutes, when I returned I found my apprentice in the shop, I said, where is Hodgetts.

Q. What was Hodgetts usual time to go to dinner - A. No particular time; Hodgetts was gone at that time, I sat down to work, I wanted a small file out of my bottom drawer, and I missed my diamond box out of that drawer. It was a small round box.

Q. What diamonds were they of any value - A. The box was nearly of the size of a box for the impression of a seal, it contained about two carats.

COURT. Small diamonds chiefly - A. Yes.

Mr Knapp. You do not know how many stones there were do you - A. No, I cannot say. I looked on the board for it, thinking it might lay on the work-board, it was not on the work-board, and I opened a larger box, in which there had been diamonds on the wax arranged for the setting of it; that was my work, the diamonds had been picked off.

Q. How many carats do you think the diamonds removed from the wax might be - A. About one carat. These drawers were left open to me and my journeyman. The carat in the wax box cost eight pounds.

Q. What was the value of the other - A. About fifteen pounds. I am quite sure that both were in the house when I left it. There were two other wax boxes from whence the diamonds were picked off; I had seen the diamonds in the morning.

Q. Of what value were they - A. In one there were seven guineas worth, in the other about twelve pounds. There were a pair of transparent diamond drops set for the ears, in the two centers were two large stones, they were set ready for the wear; they were worth fifty pounds, they weighed five carats and a half, all fine brilliants; they were all safe in the morning, I saw them. There were two separate papers of diamond stones, unset for work, one paper contained two carats, they were on my board when I left the shop, one paper value eighteen pound, another paper worth eight pounds. On looking farther I missed three pearl rings, these I had seen in the morning, and a brilliant ring square; the pear rings are worth about four pounds, the brilliant ring worth about ten pound, the making and all. I believe that is the whole.

COURT. All these had been safe before you went to dinner - A. Yes. Upon missing this I went to Hatton Garden, and left my apprentice in charge of the shop; I got a warrant to search the prisoner Hodgetts place; this was near two o'clock, he had told me that he lived over the water; I found out he lived in Fetter-lane, I went to Fetter-lane and did not find him, he had not been home all day. A Mr. Cooper and Wilkinson waited for him until he did come home, and they took him and brought him to the Royal Oak, Hatton Garden the same evening, between ten and eleven at night. I saw the prisoner the same night about eleven o'clock, at the Royal Oak, the officer sent for me. The officer searched him, but not in my presence, a gold chain was produced before me, two gold seals, thirty-seven pounds, and a sixteenth share of a lottery ticket.

Q. Had you any conversation with him at that time - A None at all. On the Monday afternoon following I had conversation with him, I was sent for by the prisoner, I went to the lock-up-place, Hatton Garden office; when I went in he cried bitterly; there was a long pause for about five minutes; I asked him what I had done that he should injure me in this manner; he said I had injured him; I said, in what manner? he replied I was too good to him; he then said, would I forgive him; I told him he was in the hands of justice, and not in my hands. He begged of me to go the magistrate to ask forgiveness, and he would let me know where my diamonds were, or who he had sold them to. The magistrate was sitting, I went to him and related what had past. The magistrate ordered him to be brought up, and told him he must make a voluntary confession without any expectation of advantage or disadvantage from it. He then said nothing, but was sent back. He sent for me again, I went back to him, he then said he would let me know where the diamonds were if I would not see him totally destitute in a prison.

Q. I suppose these notes and gold seal and chain had been taken from him - A. Yes. I told him he must trust to providence, I would do what I could.

Hutt was on one side, and brought in pen and ink. The prisoner Hodgetts wrote it down himself what he had sold, and told me that he had sold them to the prisoner Lawrence. I asked the prisoner Hodgetts what he had sold them for, he said fifty-four pounds; fifty pounds he had received, and four pounds he was to receive on the Monday following.

Q. Did he say on what day he had sold them - A. On the Saturday, between three and four o'clock, on the same day they were taken away.

Q. Did he give you any note to shew you that they had been sold there - A. No, I took all this from his verbal declaration, he had written only the number of diamonds, and the direction of Lawrence, I think No. 16, Duke-street, Aldgate. When he said he was to have the four pounds, on the Monday following, the Saturday he said he was to have called on Monday, the 3d of June, to look at some watches, at Lawrence's. It was on the Monday evening he gave me this account. On the Monday morning I went with the officer to see where he bought these two gold seals, it was wrapped up with the name of the person that he bought it of. At Mr. Aughtie's in Cheapside, I went there; with respect to the pearl rings; we found out where Mrs. Stracey lived, I went with Hancock and found her at home; she took us to the pawnbrokers shops; Mr. Nicholls in the City-road, I found two pearl rings there, and at Mr. Crouch's in Fore-street, I found the third by her direction; I am quite sure they are my property.

Q. Had you ever seen Mrs. Stracey at your shop - A. She had called once at the street door, to go the play with the prisoner. On Tuesday morning the 4th, we went to Mr. Lawrence's, Hutt, the officer went in first. I went in and saw Mr. Lawrence in his shirt, it was about seven o'clock in the morning, in Duke-street, Aldgate.

Q. What business was Mr. Lawrence carrying on - A. I could not see any business, there was a shop; I saw no business carried on in it, he was just out of bed, speaking to Hutt, Hutt told me to go about my business, he did not want me yet. Hancock came in and shut the street door, and locked it. Lawrence dressed himself and went up stairs with Hutt; I remained down stairs; I went up in a quarter of an hour afterwards. Hutt said to Lawrence, this is the person that lost the diamonds; Lawrence said he knew nothing about the young man; I told Mr. Lawrence where they young man had lived, where he became acquainted with him; Lawrence said he did not know him; he seemed very much agitated, and said he did not know what we where talking about, we communicated to Lawrence that I had lost diamonds; I went in the passage again, and left Lawrence with Hancock and Hutt; we took Lawrence to the office in the City.

COURT. At this time had any property been produced or found in Lawrence's house - A. No, Lawrence was taken to the Poultry Compter.

Q. Then down to this time he persisted in not knowing any thing of Hodgetts, or any thing of the transaction of the diamonds - A. Yes.

Mr. Challener. Q. I believe you have a partner - A. I have none.

Q. Does Mr. Cooper always reside in Gough-square - A. Yes.

Q. You did not say to Hodgetts it would be better for him to confess did you - A. No, I said I would leave it to the justice.

Mr. Alley. Q. Your shop is in the front garret - A. Yes.

Q. That is what is called the sky parlour; with respect to the prisoner Lawrence at the time that you and the officers went to his habitation, it was seven o'clock in the morning, you expressed a surprise at seeing no customers.

Q. Have you customers calling upon you at seven o'clock in the morning - A. No.

COURT. When you said there was no appearance of business, did you mean that were no appearance of customers, or that there were no appearance of goods - A. I saw no appearance of shop goods.

Mr. Alley A great quantity of jewellery goods might go into a snuff box - A. Yes

Q. Am I to understand you that you told Lawrence Hodgett 's had robbed you - A. I told him that the person that robbed me had sold him the diamonds; he went by the name of Nicolls.

Q. What name did he go by with you - A. Hodgetts.

Q. Why did not you tell him his name - A. He went by the name of Nicolls to him.

Q. You neither mentioned Hodgetts name nor was Hodgetts with you - A. No.

Q. Why did you tell him that Hodgetts had robbed you - A. Because Hodgetts told us that he went by the name of Nicolls to Lawrence

Q. Did you mention to him the name of Nicolls - A. No.

Q. So you would give a blind story to the man still you sought for an answer of the question, whether he had received goods from the person that robbed you - A. I described his person, and said he had a bow in the front of his hat.

Q Why did not you mention the name of Hodgetts or Nicolls - A. Because Hutt had mentioned the name.

Q Did you search the place - A. They opened the drawers very freely, we did not search the place.

Q. You knew Lawrence a long time - A. I heard of him repeatedly.

Q. Did you take Lawrence at that time - A. He was taken in custody about an hour after; we staid in the house all this time he was with us. The same day he was taken before the Lord Mayor.

Q. Was he discharged by the Lord Mayor - A. He was on bail.

Q. Now attend to my question, I ask you on the oath you have taken do you know that he was admitted on bail, to appear if called upon to give evidence against the person who sold the diamonds to him - A. I do not know, I understood he was on bail. I did not stay there to see the process come forward.

Q. He was at large nowever - A. He was.

Q. You attended at the second examination - A. Yes, and Lawrence attended to his bail.

THOMAS LAWRENCE . Q. You were the apprentice at this time to the prosecutor - A. Yes.

Q. You remember his going away to dinner - A. Yes, and I went to dinner about three minutes after Mr. Romer. I left Hodgetts and no body else in the shop. I staid about ten minutes, and when I came back I found no body in the shop and the door open.

My master returned into the shop in about five minutes after I got in. Hodgetts never returned again.

Q. Did you make any discovery of the loss of any property - A. No, I was in the shop when my master made the discovery.

JOHN HUTT . I am an officer belonging to Hatton Garden officer. On the 4th of June, I went to Mr. Lawrence's, the prosecutor and Hancock were with me, about seven o'clock I got to Mr. Lawrence's house, in Duke-treet, Aldgate. I found Lawrence at home and in bed; I told him I had a letter directed to him, which letter I had agreed upon before I went there with Hancock, he wrote that letter, I gave him the letter, he broke the seal and asked me to read it. This is the letter.

Q. Read it - A. Yes, directed to Mr. Lawrence, 16, Duke-street, Aldgate.

"Sir, please to pay the bearer my brother, the balance of four pounds, due to me, as I am going to Margate and have not the opportunity of waiting on you myself, but if you have got a good watch you can recommend, you may send it by him, as I have not provided myself with one and I shall do myself the pleasure of waiting on you on my arriving in town.

P. S. If there is any difference he will pay you.

I am your humble servant

JOHN NICOLLS ."

June, 3d, three o'clock.

HUTT. He said he did not know whether I was his brother or not, he should not pay me any money, I said why not Mr. Lawrence, you have only given him fifty pounds why not pay him the four; he said no, he should not, he wanted to see my brother particularly. I said sir you may as well pay me, I will give you a receipt for the money. When I found he would not pay me the money, I said my brother was to have a watch of you I believe. He said directly, is there any thing the matter; he was standing in his shirt, he told me to come in the room; just at that moment Mr. Romer came into the passage from the door. Mr. Lawrence said to me, who is that; I said it is another of my brothers. The moment I said that he dropped all conversation, he denied any knowledge of buying any diamonds.

Q. Had you said any thing about diamonds - A. I said you had a good bargain of the diamonds, you only gave him fifty pounds, why not pay the four pounds; he said he would not pay it; I told him my brother wanted the money, he was gone to Margate. When Mr. Romer made his appearance, he said he knew nothing of man or the diamonds. I told him then he was my prisoner. Then he asked me if I had got a search warrant; I told him I had traced a fifty pound note to a very near neighbour of his, that was passed for the diamonds. We took him then to the Mansion-house.

Mr. Alley. Q. At the first examination he was permitted to go at large - A. I believe he was, some body passed their word for him. On the second examination he appeared pursuant and was afterward committed to take his trial.

Q. Where there any expressions of threats used by you or your brother officer - A. I made use of none; I was a used by his friends they threatened to knock my head about, and said I would swear any man's life away for sixpence, here is one gentleman sitting here that said it.

Q. When was the first day that he threatened to bring an action against you for coming into his house without a warrant - A Mr. Lawrence said he was an officer himself, that I had no business in his house at all.

Q. Did not you understand that he threatened to bring an action - A. It might be something of that sort.

Q. Did not you make use of this expression, that you would serve him out - A. I never did to him, the man that they call the infant, he threatened me, I meaned an action.

COURT. At the time you saw Lawrence, you told him he had purchased diamonds, he had made a good purchase, you only gave my brother fifty pounds, why do not you give me the other four pounds - A. I did.

Q. Did you say that to him from any communication you had from the prisoner Hodgetts - A. Yes, this is what Hodgetts gave me; this paper is, and that is what I wrote down from Hodgetts description; forty-four double cut stones, one hundred and seventy-five various, some cut and some not, fifty-four pounds. Here is a discription of Lawrence's person. Long faced pock-marked, on the first floor; and the part that is written by Hodgetts, is Lawrence, 16, Duke's Place, Aldgate; all the rest is my writing from Hodgetts dictation.

JAMES HANCOCK . I am one of the officers of Hatton Garden office. Hodgetts was brought to me at the Royal Oak I searched, him I found thirty-seven pound in bank notes, one ten, one five, two two's, eighteen one's, two pound one shilling in silver, copper three shillings and five-pence, two gold seals, a gold chain and a sixteenth share of a lottery ticket bought at Mr. Bish's, Cornhill. He denied having robbed his master, he said that the money I found upon him was his own. I was with Hutt, on the apprehension of Lawrence. After that I went in search of a woman of the name of Stracey; I found her in Myrtle-street, Kingsland-road. I afterwards found three pearl rings, two in the City-road, and one at Mr. Crouch's, in Ford-street.

MRS. STRACY. I live in Myrtle-street, Hoxton.

Q. Do you know the prisoner Hodgetts - A. I do, Mr. Hancock and Romer came to my house, I told them where to find the three pearl rings that Hodgetts gave me for a debt of two pounds that he owed me, Hodgetts desired me not to sell them, but to pawn them for two pounds. He came to me on the Saturday preceding that they came to me on the Monday. At Mr. Nicholson's, near Finsbury-square. I pledged two of them for one pound one shilling; I pledged the other at Mr. Crouch's for eight shillings. Hodgetts said that they were rings that he had done on his own account.

NICHOLAS DAVIS . I am a pawnbroker, 25. City-road. The last witness pawned two rings with me, for one pound two shillings on the Saturday, the 1st of June. These are the rings.

DANIEL BUTTON . I am servant to Mr Crouch, pawnbroker, in Fore-strret. On the 1st of June, Mrs. Saracey pawned this ring with me.

Q. to Prosecutor. Look at these rings - A. They are all mine, they are worth about four pounds; the materials and workmanship cost me near three pounds; I made them myself, I began and finished them.

ALEXANDER LEVY was called, and not appearing in court, his recognizance was ordered to be estreated.

Hodgett's Defence. Mr. Romer said that I was in his employ at the time that the property was missed, that I deny; since last Christmas I have worked for him two or three times a week, and a week previous to the transaction he told me that I was very inconstant to my business, that I must look out for another situation; I told him my situation, that I was frequently with Mrs. Stracey, that she and I were upon taking a shop and I could not determine to say whether I could keep in his employ or not. I called on the Thursday, he told me his work was in an hurry. I set myself down, I did a trifle of work; I was not above one hour in the shop, he said, Hodgetts, I have removed my apartments to No. 2. Water-lane, Fleet-street, if you go out to dinner lock the door, and bring me the key; I left the shop and took the key. On the Saturday I went and had no intention to work; he asked me as a favour to sit down and mount a pair of small top ear-rings, he said he should have no money except they were done. I sat down and nearly completed them for him to take them in his hand, he left the shop, and a little while after he was absent from the shop I went down and never said a word to any person. The door of the house is continually open, and the stairs of the house are continually subject to persons going up and down. With respect to Mrs. Stracey's evidence, she said I, in consequence of owing her two pounds, I had given her these pearl rings to pledge for the money; that part of it I deny of owing her two pounds; I gave her a four pound note to buy me linen for shirts, she returned me one pound, she said she had bought the linen, and gave it to a person to make at Stepney Green; I went frequently for the shirts, she put me off, and with respect to Mr. Romer he has frequently given me orders to go out with diamond articles: I do not say that he gave me orders to take these diamonds out on commission, and I deny that ever I told him that I had taken these diamonds or that I ever said I had sold them to Mr. Lawrence.

Prosecutor. He said he had disposed of them to Mr. Lawrence.

Lawrence left his defence to his counsel.

Hodgetts called one witness, who gave him a good character.

Lawrence called eleven witnesses, who gave him a good character

HODGFTTS, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 25.

LAWRENCE, GUILTY aged 47.

Judgment respited.

[ The prisoner Hodgetts was recommended to his Majesty's mercy by the prosecutor and jury, on account of his former good character, and believing it to be his first offence ]

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18110710-64

582. JONES MICHAEL was indicted for feloniously assaulting, John Ellis , on the 9th of June , in the King's highway, putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, a watch, value 7 l. his property.

JOHN ELLIS . I am cellerman to Solomon Beal, wine merchant , in Idol-lane, Tower-street: I live in Jane-street, Commercial-road. On Sunday morning, the 9th of June, between twelve and one, I was in company with Mr. and Mrs. Pegg, and their servant, her name is Cummings, we were returning home from Bow fair, I was coming through the posts at Mile End Turnpike , a man came up, he pushed me in the breast, and snatched my watch away; I felt the watch go; Mrs. Cummings had hold of my arm; or else I might have catched hold of him.

Q. Did you think at the time that it was a push to take your attention off - A. Yes, that he might take my watch, not with intent to do me any personal injury.

Q. Can you say who it was that did it - A. I have not a doubt of the prisoner. When I felt the watch go out of my pocket I said I had lost my watch; up came three or four jew men, and said what is the matter; I said, why do you ask, you know well enough; Mr. Pegg that was with me followed a little way, but did not get hold of him. On the Tuesday evening afterwards I saw the prisoner in custody at Lambeth street office, he was with other persons; directly I saw him, I said I would fetch the witnesses, they said it was too late. I saw him again on the Wednesday I was quite sure then that he was the person that struck me and took my watch away. On Tuesday, when I saw him there, it was dark, and on Wednesday it was day light, I was quite sure he was the man. I saw him by himself.

Q. What sort of a night was this, the 9th of June - A. It was quite moon light. I was quite sober. I have never seen my watch again. It was worth seven pounds.

SARAH CUMMINGS . I live in Jane-street, Commercial-road; my husband is a sailor, he is in French prison.

Q. Were you returning from Bow with Mr. Ellis - A. Yes, I had hold of his arm at the time, at the Turnpike, I saw the man strike him, and instantly Mr. Ellis turned round and said, I have lost my watch.

Q. Where did the man strike him - A. Just in the pit of his stomach. I saw the same man again on the Wednesday when he was under examination before the justice.

Q. Who was that man - A. The prisoner. It was a moon light night. I took notice of his face.

JOHN GRIFFITHS . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner; Mr. Ellis described him to me; I knew his person before; I told the prisoner what I took him for, for a watch in Mile End Road; he told me he knew nothing of it; he could bring people to prove that he was in a different place at the time.

Q. to Mrs. Cummings. Did you see him on the Tuesday evening before you saw him at the justices - A Yes, in the yard at the office.

Q. Were you sure of him the first time as well as the second - A Yes.

Mr. Alley. What coloured breeches had he on -

A. Corderoy at the time he was in the yard. I do not know what he had on when the fact was committed, but I am sure he had breeches on.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel.

ESTHER LEVY. I am a married woman, I live in Fireball-court, Houndsditch. I and my daughter Louisa Levy was at Bow fair on the Saturday. I met the prisoner at the fair at nine o'clock, he lives in my house, I and my daughter accompanied him home; we arrived in Houndsdith at eleven o'clock, my daughter gave the prisoner a light; after we came into the house.

Q. Had the prisoner breeches on or pantaloons - A. He had nankeen pantaloons on, and boots.

Q. Did he go into his room after he got a light - A. Yes, I fastened the street door after him when he came in.

Q. How long might you be up before you went to bed - A. About half past twelve; my room is up two pair; his room is right facing of mine.

Q. Did you hear any person go out - A. Not a soul.

COURT. Did you attend before the examination - A. No.

Q. When were you sent for - A. Almost immediately that he went to prison; I heard from the prisoner's father on the Monday night, that he was taken up. The prisoner's own father came to me on the Monday night after the Saturday.

Q. That you are as sure of as every thing you have told - A. Yes, he told me he had been up about a watch. Excuse me, it was on the Tuesday, he told me he was taken on the Monday.

Q. Did you ever go to visit the prisoner - A. Twice at Newgate. I am quite sure the father told me he was taken on the Monday.

LOUISA LEVY . Q. How old are you - A. I am going of twelve.

Q. Were you at Bow fair with your mother on the Saturday - A. Yes; we met the prisoner in the fair, he came home with us; he lives in the same house with me and my mother.

Q. Was the street door fastened when you came home - A. My mother went in first, I went after, and my mother shut the door, it goes with a bolt: my mother bolted the door as soon as we went in; the prisoner and I went up stairs before her; our room is two pair of stairs, his door faces ours.

COURT. You went to bed directly - A. We had some coffee first.

Q. How long do you think it was before you got into bed - A. About half an hour.

Q. When did you hear the prisoner was taken up - A. We did not hear of it till the next week his father brought word that he was taken up on the Monday.

GUILTY, aged 25.

Of stealing from the person but not by violence .

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18110710-65

583. JOSEPH ANTONIO and JOSEPH KING were indicted for feloniously assaulting John Line , on the 6th of July , in the King's highway, putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, a watch, value 3 l. a metal chain, value 6 d. a seal, value 1 s. and a watch key, value 2 d. his property.

[The prisoners being foreigners were asked by the clerk of the court whether they would be tried by a jury of all English, or half English and half Foreigners, to which they replied half English and half foreigners.]

NAMES OF THE JURY.

George Fray ,

John Waller ,

John Wilkinson ,

Nicholas Boys ,

John Studall ,

John Franklin ,

George Coleby ,

Gasper Valentius ,

Peter Benezetch ,

John Allans ,

Gasper Vital ,

Ralph Mills .

JOHN LINE. Q. When did this happen - A. On Saturday the 6th of July I was in company with Armstrong and Edward Rice , we had been round the Commercial-road, we went into the Ship at Stepney, the persons name is Frost that keeps it, we called for a pot of porter, and had it in the yard, and said that a gentleman had been robbed of his watch in the fields near the White Raven public-house, Stepney, I in company with Rice and Armstrong went across the fields in pursuit of them, I went first about an hundred yards, and coming towards the Cow lair, I saw something, I could not tell what it might be coming towards the houses, I saw they were two sailors . It was about a quarter to eleven; they passed me on my left side about two paces, they turned round each of them, and seized me by the collar, King presented a knife at my throat, and said, he, he, he! neither of them spoke; I, in answer to that said, oh, oh, for my partners to hear me, seizing Antonio at the same time with my left hand, while King with his right hand drawed my watch from my fob; by that time Rice and Armstrong appeared in sight. I delivered Antonio in Rice's and Armstrong's custody; King ran away when they appeared; I pursued King caught him and brought him back, and delivered him to Joshua Armstrong , who searched him.

JOSHUA ARMSTRONG . I was with Lines and Rice.

Q. You had information and you went across the fields - A. Yes; I sent Lines a head as he has described, me and Rice were behind walking, one on one side of the grass plat, and one on the other, that they should not hear that any body was coming; as soon as I heard Line halloa out, ho, ho, I immediately ran and came close behind them, I saw Antonio holding Line, and Line holding Antonio, King was then close by, as close as possibly could be; I catched hold of Antonio, King immediately ran away, I then said to Line go along after him, which he did; he brought him back; by that time Rice came up, I left him with Rice and went after King, who was then in the custody of Line; I searched King, in his left hand jacket pocket, I found this knife open as it is now. Line said to me, he has ding'd my thimble; I asked King what he had done with the watch; he said, I know no watch; I searched behind his hankerchief,

and then took his hat off, and in his hat I found this watch in this handkerchief.

Q. Whose watch is that - A. Line's. In his right hand jacket pocket I found this tobacco box. Rice searched the other man.

Line It is my watch, there is the initials of my name on the seal.

JURY to Line. Are you an officer - A. Yes.

Q. Did you let them men rob you - A. I could not help it.

Antonio's Defence. The men cut my head.

King's Defence. I had that little knife in my hand going to eat bread and meat, one man came, I do not know which it is. This man was going past, he said, ho, ho, and then the other men came after him; one cut my head with a cutlass, I began to run away; one came after me and catched me; in about two or three minutes after that they tied my hand to his, he asked me where my watch is, I saw no watch at all, he took my hat off, he said he took the watch out of my hat. I never saw the watch.

ANTONIO - GUILTY - DEATH .

KING - GUILTY - DEATH .

Tried by a jury of half English, and half foreigners, Before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110710-66

584. JOSEPH ANTONIO and JOSEPH KING was indicted for feloniously assaulting William Watt , in the King's highway, on the 14th of June , putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, a watch, value 30 s. a watch key, value 6 d. two dollars, half a crown, and three shillings , his property.

WILLIAM WATT . I am a ship owner .

Q. Were you going across Stepney fields any time - A On the 14th of June last about eleven o'clock at night, I met two men dressed in sailors dresses, one a tall man and the other much shorter. The tall one stopped me, and collared me, I made what resistance I could, until the other assisted him, the tall one drew his knife out of his pocket, and stabbed me in the shoulder; all the resistance I then could make I found was of no effect. They pushed me into the ditch, where the tall one cut me in the cheek, and the neck here very much. I got out of the ditch by some means or other, and the tall one took hold of me again. The little man then put his hand into my right hand breeches pocket, and took from me the silver I had there, and also tore from the breeches the watch out of my fob, fob and all. The tall one put his hand into my side pocket, and took from thence a small memorandum book; he then took hold of the left skirt of my coat, where there was a silk handkerchief and penknife, and cut that pocket off; I then made my escape from them, and after running, being a good deal agitated, and from the loss of blood, I fell down; I got up again as fast as I could, and found they were still pursuing me; I exerted myself and ran on till I got to the houses at Mile End road, nearly, I found a watchman in the watch-box, he took me down to the watchhouse, from whence the constable of the night conducted me home; a surgeon was sent for, and my wounds were dressed.

Q. Look at these two persons, do you know either of their persons - A. I have no doubt of the tall man, being the person that cut me from his stature, and appearance of his visage, and what I could recollect at that time. The other I do not know nothing about, nor have I seen the little one since.

Antonio said nothing in his defence.

King's Defence. I do not know any thing of that man at the Justice's, he said he did not know any thing of me, I never saw the man.

Prosecutor It is Antonio that was the man that cut me. As to King I do not know any thing of him.

Q. Was the property ever found - A. I do not know, I never heard any thing of it

ANTONIO - GUILTY - DEATH .

KING - NOT GUILTY .

Tried by a Jury of half English and half foreigners, Before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110710-67

585. JOSEPH ANTONIO and JOSEPH KING were again indicted for feloniously assaulting Henry Rose , in the King's highway, on the 30th of June , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, a watch, value 5 l. a gold chain, value 30 s. a gold seal, value l. and a hat, value 15 s. his property.

HENRY ROSE . On the 30th of June I was going along Stepney Fields , near ten o'clock, I was passing along with Jemima Ware . On the right side the prisoner Antonio seized me with a violent blow fast by the collar, and at the same time I observed knife opened. The knife came towards my neck, I threw out my left arm, and kept it off my body as well as I could; the knife entered my neck, went through my coat, waistcoat, shirt, and through my neckcloth, into my, flesh. I struggled with the prisoner, I held his arm away from my body as well as I could; the prisoner Antonio got me down into a ditch. King, I believe he was behind the other, the young woman that was with me can declare to him. I struggled with him in the ditch I got the knife from his hand, and when the knife was in my possession, during that time King let go of the young woman, during the time I was struggling with Antonio King came across my thighs, tore from my pocket my watch, chain, and seal, and pocket and all; as soon as he took the watch the prisoner King made off. I having the knife in my left hand, he could not get it out of my hand shut the knife down on my hand, which wounded my hand, and which wound is not well yet. I let go the knife, the prisoner Antonio took the knife with him I believe, to the best of my recollection, he ran to the young woman, took from her my hat, leaving his hat behind in the ditch. I took the hat that was left behind, I did not discover but what it was my own until I got to the Rose and Crown public-house, I followed them with the cries of murder, nobody came to my assistance. The man that robbed me took away my hat.

Q. You are sure of Antonio are not you - A. I

am more sure of the hat than I am of the man.

JEMIMA WARE . Q. You were walking with Mr. Rose - A. Yes.

Q. You were stopped by two fellows - A. Yes, I know King, he held me by my arm, and by the top of my stays; I am sure he is the man.

Q. Do you know any thing of the other - A. No, I only took notice of this that one was darker than the other. I cannot say that I know him.

ARMSTRONG. I produce the hat. While they were examined at the office in Worship-street Mr. Rose said to me, I observe Antonio pulling off a band from the hat, that hat is mine. I took the hat away from him, I could not find the band.

Mr. Rose. According to the general recollection I have of the hat I believe it to be mine. I saw him in the act of pulling off the band; my hat had a ribbon on.

Antonio said nothing in his defence.

King's Defence I know nothing about it, I never was along with this man in my life. Every one of them men will take my life away for money. You are a pick pocket to put the watch in my hat, you pickpocket you called for a pot of beer, and you took the half pence out of my pocket to pay for it.

Armstrong. He called for a pint of beer, he had it himself, he would not pay the man.

ANTONIO - GUILTY - DEATH , aged 28.

KING - GUILTY - DEATH , aged 24.

Tried by a jury of half English and half foreigners,

Before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110710-68

586. CHARLES NORTON and JOHN WALMSLEY was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Philip Castang , about the hour of twelve at night, with intent to steal, and feloniously stealing therein, ten pigeons, value 15 s. and three ducks, value 15 s. the property of Philip Castang .

PHILIP CASTANG I keep a bird-shop in the Hampstead-road, opposite the New River Reservoir .

Q Is your shop part of your house - A. It is my dwelling-house, I have a part of my family sleep in that house; I sleep in the other where the rooms run one out into the other. On the 29th of June, about between two and three o'clock in the morning, the watchman knocked at my door, I opened the window, he said he supposed the house had been robbed, I went down stairs, I found two or three shutters taken down, the pin was taken out, which fastens the bar; I afterwards found the pin in the mud in the middle of the road. Upon searching my shop I found some of the baskets were taken away, and on looking about I found four of the baskets were out under the stall board in the street. On my going into the shop I discovered another basket empty, and a basket that contained three ducks was cut, and the ducks taken out, and a clasp knife lay on the stall-board, which knife was claimed by one of the prisoners; between four and five there were two men being taken to the watch-house; I went to the watchhouse, and the prisoners were then being searched, they had then taken out of their pockets five pigeons alive, and a handkerchief I saw there containing three of my ducks, they were dead.

Q. What became of the other pigeons - A. There was another concerned in the robbery, he made his escape.

ABRAHAM KING . I am a watchman on the Hampstead-road. A little after two in the morning on the 29th of June, I alarmed Mr. Castang, I saw his shutters out of place. I had not seen any body about.

JOHN CLARK . I am a constable. On Saturday morning, about three o'clock, I was going round at the Upper Gower street, I saw three men in the fields some distance from me, I called a watchman and told him there were three men I suspected in the Fields; I told him to go a little way from me, and I went after them; after I saw the tall one put a bundle into the hole of the field I went up to where they put the bundle down, and asked what they had got there. They had got a pigeon in their hand at that time, looking at it. I catched hold of the two prisoners, and the little one got away; the watchman catched him, and the ran off, We took the prisoners up to St. Pancras's watchhouse searched them and found the pigeons upon them.

GEORGE MAUX . I am watchhouse-keeper. Clark brought the ducks in a handkerchief. On searching Norton I found four live pigeons in his pockets, and a white lan tail in the pocket of Walmsley. Mr. Castang came to the watchhouse, and claimed them. Mr. Castang brought in a knife at the watchhouse Norton owned the knife.

Norton's Defence. I am quite innocent of the crime.

Walmsley's Defence. I met Norton between three and four in the morning in Tottenham-court-road, he said he would stop there till it got a little later, and then he would take the pigeons home.

Norton called five witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NORTON - GUILTY , aged 18.

WALMSLEY - GUILTY , aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110710-69

587. RICHARD FREDERICK was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Wilson , about the hour of twelve, on the night of the 8th of July , and burglariously stealing therein, twenty yards of canvas, value 2 l. his property.

THOMAS BEAL . I carry on the business for William Wilson, I live in Limehouse. On last Monday evening, about seven o'clock, I left the house, there was a sail cloth left on the floor, on Tuesday morning. When I came to work again, there was part of it cut and taken away out of the sail room.

MR. RICHARDSON. I am foreman to Messrs. Tilt and Dent, colour manufacturers. On last Monday a little after twelve at night, I saw the prisoner come out of Mr. Wilson's warehouse with the canvas under his arm; I went to meet him, he jumped down into the yard off the wall with the canvas I and the watchman followed him, and took him. This is the canvas.

Beal This is our canvas.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not take it. I was in the yard when I was taken.

GUILTY, aged 16.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only, not of breaking and entering the dwelling house .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110710-70

588. JAMES BOYD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of May , a watch, value 3 l. acoat, value 10 s. a shirt, value 3 s. a pair of stockings, value 2 s. and a handkerchief, value 1 s. the property of James Gordon , in the dwelling house of Francis Smith .

JAMES GORDON . I live in Hanover-street, Oxford-street. I lost these things on the 28th of May, from Hatt and Tun Yard, Hatton Garden . I left these things in my bed room, at half past four in the morning, when I returned at half past nine at night, they were gone.

FRANCIS SMITH . I live at No. 16, Hat and Tun Yard. The prisoner lodged in the attic story. On the 28th of May, about five o'clock, I forced the door open, I found Gordon's box broken open and the property taken out.

MRS. SMITH. On the 28th of May, between eleven and twelve the prisoner asked me to let him go up stairs and lay down on the bed; I did, I never saw him after he went up stairs.

Prisoner's Defence. I am perfectly innocent.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110710-71

589. WILLIAM BEAL and JOSEPH BROWN were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of June , a pair of boots, value 40 s. the property of Edward Harvey Lord Hawke .

ROBERT FLOWERDEAU . I am beadle of the Parish of Mary-le-bone. On the 29th of June, I saw the two prisoners in company together. Beale had a colliflower under his arm; I saw Beale go down several area's in Portland-place; Brown stood out side. Beale came up again, and then joined company with Brown. I followed them to Gloucester-place, he joined company with Brown; Beale had this apron before him, he untied it, and handed it with its con tents to Brown; I saw two life guardsmen, with their assistance I took the two prisoners in custody. On the person of Brown, I found this apron, containing a pair of boots; I was three hours and a half following them.

DAVID DAVIS was called, and not appearing in Court, his recognisance was ordered to be estreated.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110710-72

591. AMELIA MAJOR was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of May , a shawl, value 8 s. the property of Harriot Hobbs , spinster .

HARRIOT HOBBS. I am a servant . I live at Hamptoncourt, I lent my shawl to a Abice Foot.

ABICE FOOT. On Sunday, the 26th of May, I was at Mr. Smith's, Hamptoncourt, I generally stop and help them in the kitchen, the cook lent me her shawl to walk home with; when I got home I took the shawl off and laid it on a table in the room, and laid a silk handkerchief upon it, I had no person in the room but the maid; I missed the shawl and the silk handkerchief. On the Saturday following, I asked her what she had done with the shawl and handkerchief, she answered that she never saw them; I went away to my Parish, she went away in a little time after.

Q. Did you ever find the shawl - A. Yes, in her mother's house, at Essen, it was in the prisoner's box, and new things that she had bought with my money. The silk handkerchief I never found.

MR. COLLEY, I am a constable, I produce the prisoner's box, in the box I found this shawl, and the other things were quite new.

HARRIOT HOBBS. That is my shawl.

Prisoner's Defence. I took the shawl, I meant to return it again.

GUILTY , aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110710-73

592. MARGARET BAKER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of July , in the dwelling house of David Lane , two keys, value 6 d. and two one pound bank notes , his property.

DAVID LANE . I am a baker , I live in Great Coram-street . The prisoner lived with me as an assistant in the shop . On the 4th of July, about eight o'clock in the evening, I told her to draw me some ale and table beer mixed together. I thought her long. I went on see what was come of her; I found her in the act of shutting down my bureau, she came from the desk and presented me the ale.

Q. Did not you accuse her - A No, I was afraid of accusing wrongfully. I called a neighbour in; I then went in the parlour. I asked her what she was doing to my desk; she burst out a crying, and said she was not at my desk; she told me she had no money about her. I went out and got the watchman to take her in custody; my wife gave me two notes, which I gave into the possession of the watchman.

MRS. LANE. When my husband charged the prisoner, she said she had no money about her. I saw her slipping her hand under the baby's coat. I said Margaret, what have you put there, she said nothing. I took the candle and saw two notes, she said they were her notes.

WILLIAM READ was called on his recognizance.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110710-74

593. ELICIA COX and MARY HEGAN were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 17th of June , eight yards of muslin, value 18 s. the property of John Thwaites , privately in his shop .

JOHN MEADOWS . I am shopman to Mr. Thwaites. The two prisoners came into the shop to look at some caps. They asked for others, and while I was gone, I saw Cox take this muslin off the counter and put it in her pocket. Cox and Hegan came in together, I did not see Hegan take any thing, she pulled the things about and tried to put me into confusion.

JOHN THWAITES . I am a linen-draper , I live in Holborn . On the 17th of June, in the after part of the afternoon, the prisoners came into my shop, and from information I searched both their pockets. On Cox, I found some worked muslin for caps.

Cox said nothing in her defence, called two witnesses, who gave her a good character.

Hegan was not put on her defence.

COX, GUILTY, aged 29.

Of stealing, but not privately .

Transported for Seven Years .

HEGAN, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110710-75

594. JOHN EVANS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of July , a gown, value 3 s. a handkerchief, value 3 d. the property of Jeremiah Hurry .

ANN HURRY . I live at Lower Clapton, my husband's name is Jeremiah Hurry , he is a gardener . I sent the gown by my son Thomas Hurry , from Lower Clapton to Upper Clapton.

THOMAS HURRY . My mother sent me to Mrs. Paterson's with a gown for my sister. A man with a cart asked me where I was going. I said I was going to take home my sister's gown, and as I was going along the prisoner ran after me and snatched it out of my hand.

MR. - I am a carpenter, I heard an alarm, and saw the prisoner pursued. I saw the prisoner throw this bundle away in the road, I picked it up.

Prisoner's Defence. I never took the bundle from the child, I am quite innocent of it.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110710-76

595. JOSEPH BAYLIS and JAMES WINKS were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of June , six chairs, value 1 l. 16 s. the property of John Ingram .

WILLIAM HARRIS . I am an apprentice to Mr. Ingram. On the 13th of June, I went down the yard to let our cart in, and when I went to open the gatest here was a ladder placed up against it, and a chair at the bottom of that. Baylis came up and said he wanted half a dozen chairs; I told him he was doing what was very wrong.

Q. What is Bayles - A. He and Winks are fellow-apprentices . I informed Mr. Ingram of it.

Q. Have you lost any chairs - A. There are three gone.

JOHN INGRAM. I am a chair manufacturer , in the City-road . From the information of my apprentice I went in my back gate, I saw Winks come up and knock at the gate, the dog barked, and he left the gates. I saw him afterwards at his own home. On searching the premises I found three chairs in the lower workshop next Tabernable Walk, they had been removed from were they had been left in the morning, about fifty yards.

WILLIAM WILSON . I am a police officer. On the 14th of June, Baylis was brought to our office, I searched him, and found these keys upon him, he told me there were the keys of his boxes at Mr. Ingrams. I went to his master's house, I searched his box, and found this tea caddie and eleven chair spindles.

Prosecutor. I am positive the tea caddie is mine, and the spindle to the best of belief are.

The prisoners said nothing in their defence, Winks called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

BAYLES, GUILTY , aged 18.

WINKS, GUILTY , aged 23.

Judgement respited .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110710-77

596. ELIZABETH SMART was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of May , two shirts, value 10 s. a tablecloth, value 4 s. and a pair of stockings, value 2 s. the property of James Calverly .

ELIZABETH CALVERLY . My husband's name is James, he is a dealer in potatoes , No. 17, Brook-street, Holborn .

Q. When did you loose these things - A. On the 21st of May, the prisoner washed for me, I recommended her to Mrs. Savage, of Hatton Garden, to char for her; she came and told me that she had lost some things, and after searching I found I had lost several things more than I have found. I found a sheet of mine pledged in Baldwin's Gardens. On Monday she was washing for me. I got an officer, and accused her of the theft; I told her I had found the sheet, she begged I would not take her to Hatton Garden office, and she would get her husband to take the rest of the things out. The officer searched her, and found several duplicates that led to other things of mine.

WILLIAM READ . I found the duplicates in the room, not on her person. I produce a sheet that was given me at the office by the pawnbroker.

WILLIAM GIBSON . I am a pawnbroker. The prisoner pawned with me a sheet, a tablecloth, and a pair of stockings, at separate times, in the name of Ann Simmons , I know her person well.

Prisoner's Defence. It is my misfortune to have a drunken husband; and unfortunately through his promising to give me money to get the things out again, I took them and pledged them, and since I have been in prison he has left me.

GUILTY , aged 42.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110710-78

597. SARAH HARDY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of July , five silver teaspoons, value 7 s. 6 d. and a petticoat, value 5 s. the property of William Barrow .

WILLIAM BARROW . Q. When did you loose these things - A. On the 5th of July, I lost them out of a

box which was not locked, out of my own bed room. The prisoner lodged in my house.

Q. Did you ever find your property - A. Yes, I charged the constable with her, she owned where she had pawned the goods; she gave one duplicate and that her mother with the other two.

JEREMIAH LEWIS . I am a pawnbroker, I live with Mr. Killingworth, 200, Brick-lane. I took in pawn a petticoat of the prisoner.

THOMAS MANNING . I am a pawnbroker. On the 1st of July the prisoner pawned two silver tea-spoons with me, and three on the 5th of July.

Prisoner's Defence. It is my first offence, I took it in mere distress.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110710-79

598. MARY BAILEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of June , a counterpane, value, 3 s. the property of Ann Lawrence , and a gown, value 6 s. the property Mary Colton .

ANN LAWRENCE . I am a servant out of place , I lodge at 17, Twisters Alley, Bunhill Row . On the 20th of June I lost a patch-work counterpane, I found it the same day, at the pawnbroker's.

MARY COLTON . I live in the same house with the last witness. On the 20th of June I lost a gown from my lodging.

THOMAS UPSELL . I am a pawnbroker, 30, Barbican. On the 20th of June the prisoner pawned a gown and a counterpane, for nine shillings, in the name of Bailey.

Prisoner's Defence. I by accident saw a man and woman, in Whitecross-street, selling articles; I bought the gown and counterpane of them for twelve shillings, upon my going home, I found money wanting, I went and pledged them.

GUILTY , aged 47.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110710-80

599. ROBERT MILLER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of June , two saws, value 6 s. and a square, value 6 d. the property of John Weston .

JOHN WESTON . I am a carpenter , I work in Grafton-street, Tottenham Court-road . On the 6th of June I left my tools, we went to breakfast in the kitchen in the house were we were at work. I heard somebody come into the house, the next witness saw the prisoner go out with the saws under his arm; he ran after him, and took about fifty yards from the building.

JOHN WILLIAMS . I am a carpenter, I was at work at this building, and was at breakfast in the kitchen; I heard somebody go up stairs, I looked out of the window and saw the prisoner go out of the door with two saws under his arm; I pursued him and brought him back; he had these two saws and this square.

Weston. They are my property.

Prisoner's Defence. I was very tipsy, I did not know what I was about.

GUILTY , aged 51.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and whipped in Jail .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110710-81

600. ROBERT MANSFIELD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of June , forty-five pound weight of lead, value 7 s. 6 d. the property of certain persons, to the jurors unknown, affixed to a building .

JOHN BROWN. On Thursday, the 6th of June, my brother was with me, he said there was a man stealing some lead opposite, I saw the prisoner come out of the house, he had nothing with him; he had a leather shoe and a list shoe on him, this was about six o'clock, about eight o'clock, a little boy said a man had gone out of the house with some lead; I pursued the prisoner and took him in custody; he then had one leather shoe and a list shoe. I am sure he is the same man.

EDWARD HENRY . I am eight years old, I saw the prisoner with the lead on his shoulder, he is the same man that I saw tie it up in the front parlour. The prisoner was in the house the day before that.

JOHN HUTT . The lead came from Queen's Row, Pentonville; it was cut from the garret; I fitted it, it belonged to the same house that two men were convicted two sessions ago. This man belonged to the same gang, there are ten of them.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw the lead laying in the kitchen area, I never was in the house before in my live, I would wish to ask Mr. Brown if it was himself that saw me in the morning.

MR. BROWN. I did, you came from a back wall, eight foot high.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110710-82

601. JOHN VINCENT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of May , fifty-six yards of printed cotton furniture, value fifty-six shillings, and forty-seven yards of muslin, value forty-seven shillings , the property of Henry Francis .

ROBERT GILES . I am a shopman to Mr. Francis, linen draper , Holborn Hill .

Q. When was it you lost this cotton furniture - A. On the 21st of May, about eight in the morning. The prisoner was shopman to Mr. Francis . He made up some goods in a wrapper, saying that he was going to wait on a customer, at the bottom of the hill. He had got three lengths of printed cottons, and two pieces of muslin. I requested him to wait the arrival of Mr. Simmons, who superintended the concern, as Mr. Francis was gone to Margate. The prisoner refused waiting. In the course of half an hour he returned, saying he had sold two squares of muslin, for five shillings and sixpence. On our examining the prints, we found six yards and a half deficient. Previous to the prisoner going out he borrowed six-pence of me; in the day he repaid it, having plenty of silver. In the evening he went to bed in the warehouse, in the morning I found he had left the house, twenty minutes after three. Mrs. Francis mentioned it to him in the morning, he flew in a passion and left the employ, on examining with the stock book, we missed two pieces of furniture.

Q. There is only one charge here - A. On the 13th

of June, a woman came to our shop and ordered some goods for an artificial flower maker, saying it was for a gentleman that was poorly and could not attend.

Q. I cannot go through all the things that this man has done in his life, you must confine yourself to the printed cotton and the muslin - A. On the 13th of June this woman came, I went with her to No. 50. Dover-street, Blackfriers-road, when there the gentleman she said was so ill, she could not get out of bed; I entrusted her with the muslins to go up; Mr. Vincent came down and said he should detain the muslins for his salary; I came home without them. The next day, obtaining a search warrant the officer, and I searched his apartment in Guildford-street, we found twenty yards of furniture there, and part of another; we found nothing at the house I had left them at.

Mr. Knapp. Did not he claim wages that was due to him - A. Yes, he did.

COURT. He is indicted for stealing furniture - A. Yes, on the 22d of May, we never found that.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110710-83

602. THOMAS TANT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of June , seven pounds weight of lead, value 21 d. the property of Joseph Day , and John Roberts .

JOSEPH DAY . I am a lead merchant ; my partners names is John Roberts , I live in Norton Falgate, the prisoner was my labourer . On the 21st of last month I received information that the prisoner was robbing us, that I should find three pieces of lead, I did so, and saw them, about three o'clock, two of them pieces of lead were taken away. About a quarter before nine o'clock the prisoner came to shut up the premises, I watched him, I desired the servant to inform him, when he had shut up the shop to ring the bell. After he had shut up the premises, I saw him go to the lower part of the premises, he returned and rang the bell, the servant came down, he said to her Hannah every thing is done up as tight as a bug in a rug, good night; I then pursued him across the road, brought him back and told him that he had got property that did not belong to him. I shook him by the collar, he let this lead fall from him on the ground, he begged for mercy.

HANNAH TOMKINS. I saw the prisoner brought back; when master shook him this piece of lead fell from him, and the two lesser pieces I saw him put on the window out of his pocket.

Prisoner's Defence. As I was shutting up the door shutter this piece of lead fell on my foot; I picked it up and put it under my apron, and when he shook me it fell down.

GUILTY , aged 31.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110710-84

603. DIANA FIDLER , alias SCHULLS , and MARY DIX were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of June , from the person of Mumbaccus , six 2 l. bank notes his property.

MUMBACCUS. I am a foreigner .

Q. What do you know about these two women - A. I only know about Mary Dix ; I do not know what day it was; I was sitting at the Angel public-house, Mr. Mitchells; the prisoners were sitting in the public-house when I went in they came and sat on each side of me, and at the time they went away Poll put her hand into my pocket and took my money away.

MARY CLARK . I was sitting in the Angel public house, in the opposite box to the prosecutor, Mary Dix sat on one side and Diana Fidler on the other; I heard this man call for something to drink; I saw several notes in his pocket, besides odd money, Diana Fidler said to Mary Dix , he has got plenty of money, why do not you draw him; Dix said, I never did such a thing, I do not wish to do it; Fidler said Poll, you are a fool if you do not do it. I went out and came in a little time afterwards, the prosecutor called for something to drink; the prisoners were gone then; he put his hand into his pocket, he had no money to pay for the beer; I went away home, in about an hour and a half I came up to this place to get a pint of beer for my supper I saw the prosecutor standing by the public-house door, he was crying, saying he lost his money.

GEORGE PATRIDGE. On the 21st of June I was informed that Dix, in company with Fidler and another had robbed the Lascar, I took Dix and another young woman to the office; the other girl the magistrate discharged. I found upon Dix a shilling and a few halfpence; I went after Mrs. Fidler, I took her, and found nothing upon her.

Q. Were you present when these women were examined - A. Yes. I saw Dix and the magistrate sign the examination.

(Read.)

" Mary Dix , I live in Bluegate fields, I took the money from the prosecutor at the Angel in Back-lane, they were six two pound bank of England notes. I had been drinking with Hannah Gray , she knew nothing of taking the money. Fidler advised me to rob the prosecutor, I went out into the yard, and hid the money behind the water-butt. The next morning Mrs. Fidler took the money and gave me six pounds. I do not know what I did with some of the money, as I was very much in liquor."

Signed by the mark of Dix X

Dix's Defence. I was very much in liquor, Fidler persuaded me to take the money; I said no, she said, if I did not take it I never should enter the door of her house; after I took it she put it behind the water butt, and in the morning she took it from behind the water butt; I asked her what she had got, she said, what she had got she would keep, and she gave me six pounds.

Fidler's Defence. It is all false what she says; she unfortunately slept in the house that night, in the morning, she asked me to go with her to the Angel, she said she left some money there; I went with her; she said go into the yard with me; I went with her; she then said, I have put a little money here, if we get it safe we will have something that is good; she took the broom and took it from behind the water-butt; I picked them up, I told her I could not read; she said, as I was going to Gravesend, and wanted a little money she would give me two pounds, I said no, lend it me, and I will pay you.

FIDLER - GUILTY , aged 27.

Transported for Seven Years .

DIX - GUILTY , aged 17.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110710-85

604. MARY RILEY NOLAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of July , a gown value 4 s. the property of Robert Gibson .

ROBERT GIBSON . I live at 212, Whitecross-street . On the 30th of July, between nine and ten in the morning, the prisoner came to my door, she kept looking in my shop about a minute, she then stepped in and took a gown that was hanging at the door, she then thrust it into her bosom. I was in the back room, I saw her do it, and I saw my wife take the gown from her.

ELIZABETH GIBSON . From my husband's information I went to the prisoner, I said, where is the gown; she said she had got none; I opened her shawl, and she had it stuffed down her breasts.

Prisoner's Defence. I was examining the gown, and by accident it fell off the nail. I had no intention of defrauding them.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110710-86

605. MARIA SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of June , a shawl, value 1 l. the property of Edward Pike .

EDWARD PIKE . I am a linen-draper , 121, Ratcliffe Highway . On the 20th of June the prisoner came into my shop with another woman, she asked to look at some silk shawls, she appeared to be in liquor, or wished to appear so; she was altogether a suspicious character. I served her myself and kept a good eye upon her. I went to the other end of the shop to get some more shawls, and while I was turning myself round I heard something as though it was going from the counter; I turned myself immediately round, and saw the shawl go up the prisoner's arm; I let her and the other person go out of the shop; I said to my lad, go after the hind woman, and bring her back. This is the shawl, it was under her arm when in the street.

WILLIAM COE . I went after the prisoner, and saw the shawl under her arm in the street.

Prisoner's Defence. I was intoxicated at the time. The woman with me forced the shawl on me, and innocently I took it.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110710-87

606. MICHAEL SMITH and MARY NOBBS were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of July , two sheets, value 3 s. the property of John Wallis .

MARY WALLIS . My husband's name is John Wallis , we live at 18, Wapping Wall ; Smith lodged in my garret. On the 8th of this month, about nine o'clock, I went into my bed-room, my sheets were there then, and about a quarter before ten I went into my bed-room again, and missed them. I suspected this Smith, I went after him, and met him in New Gravel-lane; I asked him for my sheets; he said Mary Nobbs had got them.

Q. Did Mary Nobbs live with him - A. No, I never saw her before that evening. The prisoner when I asked him for the sheets, struck me over the breast, and ran away. The watchman pursued the prisoner, and took him to the watchhouse, he there said he would bring me the sheets if I would not hurt him, and a one pound note.

MARIA CARR . I live servant at the Wheatsheaf. Smith came into the Wheatsheaf, he told Mary Nobbs to go and pawn these two sheets, she said it was past nine o'clock, it was too late. She took the bundle, and Smith followed her.

SHEDRICK NUALL. I am a watchman. I pursued Smith when he ran away, I catched him in Ratcliffe Highway; I took him to the watchhouse, he then said he would give me up the sheets.

GEORGE PATRIDGE . I assisted in taking the prisoner Smith, he told us, if we would let him go he would find the sheets the next morning. The sheets were during the night taken to Mrs. Wallis by Nobbs' father.

Smith's Defence. I did not take them.

Nobbs was not put on her defence.

SMITH - GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

NOBBS - NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110710-88

607. WILLIAM CHOWN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of June , sixty pound weight of lead, value 12 s. the property of William Hewitt , affixed to a building of his .

WILLIAM HEWITT . I am a carman . I only know that I lost the lead from off my stable in Robin Hood-yard, Leather-lane on the 12th of June.

EDWARD NADIN . I was going along Saffron-hill that evening, about a quarter past ten o'clock, I saw the prisoner standing in the passage 109. This is the sack, and the lead that he had with him, I asked him what he had got there; he said he knew nothing about it, he had one piece in his hand, and the other was standing by him. I afterwards compared the lead to the roof it fitted exactly. The prisoner when I took him had mistaken the receivers house, it was next door.

Prisoner's Defence. I know no more about the lead than a child unborn.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110710-89

608. RICHARD PARNELL and ANN CARROL were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of June , from the person of James Nelson , eleven 1 l. bank notes , his property.

JAMES NELSON . I am a sailor . On the 9th of June I came from Liverpool, I met Ann Carrol , she asked me where I was going; I said, to find my landlord; she said will you go home with me, and have a bed; I said I wanted a bed to myself; she said very well; I went with the woman. When

I came to the house I said to the man (Parnell), is it agreeable that I should have a bed here; he said, yes. I did not want to pull off my waistcoat. she said, you had better pull off your waistcoat, I did, and put my clothes under my head, and went into bed; Ann Carrol then said, why your head is not right, let me put your pillow comfortable; she said, will not you treat me and my husband; I said I wanted no drink, I wanted sleep; I gave her a shilling. I went to sleep. About twelve o'clock the man came and roused me, and said, what do you do here; I said, you were agreeable last night; he said put your clothes on, and when I was going to put my waistcoat on I found I had lost my watch and notes; he said, look under your pillow you will find your watch, I did; I asked for my money; he said he did not care about my money; I put on my clothes and called the watchman, the watchman called the officer and there was nobody in the house. About five o'clock I went back with the officer to the house, and remained in the house. The man came in between eight and nine o'clock with a bundle of new things that he had bought.

Q. You never got your money - A. No, no more than a one pound note, I knew it, I had it of Mr. Sanders.

JOHN SANDERS . I sold four pair of stockings to a man and a woman, they were found on the prisoner. I cannot say any thing about the woman, because it is a month ago. This is pound note I received of the prisoner, or the person that I sold the stockings to.

GEORGE PATRIDGE . On the 10th of June the watchman, in company with this sailor, called me, the watchman informed me that the sailor had been robbed, they shewed me the house, I knocked at the door, nobody answered; I got into the house and found nobody there. This was one o'clock in the morning, it was quite day light; we returned again to the house. The prosecutor was fatigued, I told him to lay down on the parlour bed. I sat in the parlour till a quarter before nine in the morning, about that time Parnall came and opened the door with a key: he brought this bundle in his hand; he was in the act of unlocking a chest; I then went to him, I said to him, you have been playing a pretty game; he said, what is it; I said, you remember a sailor coming in last night; he said, there was a sailor with a girl of the town that he turned out; I awaked the prosecutor, he said, that is the man that gave me liberty to sleep here. I searched Parnell, on his person I found one pound eleven shillings and sixpence, and this bundle. There is two pair of new stockings, a pair of women's shoes new, and the stockings the woman then had been wearing, they could not have been off the legs many minutes. I found the stockings were purchased at Mr. Sanders's shop; there was some tea and sugar bought at Whitechapel, there was a pound note changed there. This tippett I can swear to be the woman's, here is also a duplicate of hers I found amongst the halfpence in his pocket, of a bed-winch pledged for four-pence on the 6th of June. I found the woman in Smithfield. After the woman prisoner was indicted she never has been near the house since.

Q. to prosecutor. Look at that note - A. This is one of mine. I lost eleven one pound notes, and a two pound note.

Parnell's Defence. He came into my house about ten o'clock at night, he was there with a woman two hours, he sent for liquor at twelve o'clock; I said why do you stop so long here, I want to go to bed; they stopped till a quarter after twelve, he then said he must go and see after the girl that had been there, he had been robbed; I said, why did not you tell me, she should not have gone away. In the morning, when I came into the house, Patridge said, there is a man that was robbed at your house last night, do you know the woman; I said I knew the woman personally, but I did not know her name.

Carrol's Defence. I never saw that man in my life until I saw him at the office.

PARNELL - GUILTY , aged 48.

CARROL - GUILTY , aged 39.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110710-90

600. ELIZABETH CREMER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of June , four shillings, sixty penny-pieces, one hundred and twenty halfpence, and a one pound bank note , the property of William Spencer .

ELIZABETH SPENCER. My husband's name is William Spencer, he is a butcher in Old-street-road . On the 15th of June the prisoner came into my shop and asked for a leg of lamb, and beef steaks for the kitchen. I weighed the leg of lamb and the beef steaks together, she told me I must make a note of it and send it to her mistress, No. 10, Banner street, and to send every day for orders, that her mistress would be a customer, and she told me to send change for a two pound note, which was to come back. I sent my own boy with the meat, a one pound note, four shillings in silver, and ten shillings in copper. She was dressed decent like a servant, with a street door key on her finger. The meat came back again, but not the change

WILLIAM SPENCER , JUN. Q. You were sent with this meat, were not you - A. The prisoner and me went out together; she took me round Charles's-square, I told her that was not the way to Banner-street; she took me into Winkworth-buildings, City-road, then she asked for the change, she took the change, a pound note and four shillings out of my hand, and then took all the copper out of my basket; she then told me to go to Banner-street, and not to knock till she came, and then the mistress was to give me the two pound note. When I went there there was no person had ordered any such thing.

Q. Did the prisoner come to you at No. 10 - A. No; I went back to the City road, I could not find the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I entreat for mercy.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110710-91

610. JOHN PLATT , was indicted for that he, on the 4th of May , was servant to George Tillage and John Norris , and was employed and entrusted by them to receive money for them, and being such servant so employed and entrusted, did receive and take into his possession, the sum of 26 l. and that he afterwards did embezzele, secrete, and steal 1 l. 6 s. part of the said sum .

JOHN NORRIS . I live at No. 1, Worship-street, Fin-bury-square, my partner's name is John Tillage . On the 4th of May I sent the prisoner to Croydon, with some pigs to sell; when he came home he gave an account of thirteen pigs that he had sold at thirty-eight shillings a piece. I told him it was too little, he knew that I gave that for them in Essex. He said he did not know who he sold them to.

MARTHA TILLAGE . I am the wife of George Tillage. On the 18th of May I went to Croydon; I there received information that Mr. Harman had bought the thirteen pigs of the prisoner.

ANTHONY HARMAN . I am a brewer, at Croydon. On the 4th of May, I bought thirteen pigs, for twenty six pounds, I cannot say who I bought them off.

- THOMPSON. I am clerk to Mr. Harman. This is Mr. Harman's check. On the 4th of May I delivered it to the prisoner for thirteen pigs.

Prisoner's Defence. I sold twenty-six pigs in all, and some I sold lower than I ought to have done, and put the money on them.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110710-92

611. SARAH MILLINGTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of July , from the person of William Hancock , a promissory note, value 5 l. a five pound bank note, four two pound bank notes, and a one pound bank note .

WILLIAM HANCOCK . I am a publican at Tottenham, I keep the Black Boy . I cannot say where I lost the notes, I know the last place that I had the notes was in Fleet-market, a friend of mine was with me; I met the prisoner in Fleet-market, I was tipsy.

Q. Did you go into a house with the prisoner - A. Yes, in Fleet-market. I missed my notes in Clerkenwell Green; my friend picked up a guinea and a seven shilling piece as we were coming along.

Q. Did you ever find your notes - A. Yes, I believe the officer found them.

JOHN FELL . Q. You were one of this drunken party - A. Yes, Hancock and me had a bottle of wine. The girl accosted him, and in Clerkenwell I heard something drop out of his pocket; a little boy picked up a guinea, and gave it me; I said, Hancock have you got the money; he said no, he had lost all the money.

JOHN HUTT. About half past ten, on Friday night the prisoner was given in my custody for robbing this man; I searched the girl, I found nothing upon her. Going along she said. I will look round and see whether I can find any thing; she stooped down and picked up something, I laid hold of her hand; she picked the notes up from the ground; I asked the prosecutor whether he did not pull these notes out of his pocket himself; he said he did not know.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110710-93

612 JAMES LANGAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of July , a pair of pantaloons, value 2 s. the property of Susannah Guest .

SUSANNAH GUEST . I live at No. 4, Wood-street, St. Pancras . On last Friday I was a washing, I left these pantaloons at my window on a chair.

JAMES JOHN SMITH . I am a patrol of Bow-street. On Friday last, between twelve and one in the day, I saw a person go by Pancras-walk, I saw him give something to the prisoner; I secured the prisoner. I inquired of Mrs. Guest if she had lost any pantaloons; she said yes, these are the pantaloons.

Prosecutrix. They are mine.

Prisoner's Defence. A man asked me to take a walk with him, I did, he told me to wait for him; and when he came back he gave me this property.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110710-94

613. ANN MILBURN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of July , a coat, value 10 s. and a handkerchief, value 6 d. the property of James Waugh .

JOHN HUMPHREYS . I am shopman to James Waugh , haberdasher , 78, Lambsconduit-street. On the 11th of July, from information I followed the prisoner. I asked her what she had in her apron; she let down the apron, and told me to take out the coat and say no more about it; I told her I should prosecute her for it.

THOMAS FREDGELEY . I saw the woman go into Mr. Waugh's passage, and come out with something in her apron; I told Humphreys of it.

Prisoner's Defence. It is the first crime I ever did.

GUILTY , aged 43.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110710-95

614. MARY SALE and ANN MILLER were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of July , from the person of Edward Hughes , a pocket book, value 1 s. 6 d. a silver pencil case, value 2 s. a bank note value 15 l. two ten pound bank notes, three five pound bank notes, eleven bank notes, value 2 l. each, and seven one pound bank notes, and a bill of exchange, value 17 l. 7 s. 9 d. his property; and WILLIAM SALE , JANE SALE , and JAMES SALE for feloniously receiving on the same day, a pocket book value 1 s. 6 d. being part of the goods so feloniously stolen .

EDWARD HUGHES . I am haberdasher , 120, Great Saffron Hill. On the 4th of July, near twelve o'clock at night, I was coming down Fleet-street, Ann Miller and Mary Sale accosted me, one of them took hold of one arm, the other another; we walked into Lilly-street, Saffron-hill, just inside of a passage, and one of them went as they said, to get a light; I left the other and came home, and when I got in I told my sister that I had like to have been run-away with, by two girls; then she said you have lost your pocket book. I clapped my hand in my pocket and found I had. I took the watchman with me, and found the two girls

and charged the watchman with them. They both were taken to the watchhouse, and in the watchhouse Mary Sale threw this pencil case away from her bosom, I have had it in my pocket book twenty years. We traced thirty pounds of the notes.

Q. These two girls picked you up, was William Sale in the passage, James or Jane Sale there - A. No.

Mr. Knapp. Were you sober - A. No, I had been drinking brandy and water.

Q. You might have dropped the pocket book and the notes - A. No, it was not likely.

JOHN BARNLEY . In consequence of the girls being taken up on the over night, I apprehended the old woman, at the office, Read took a five pound note from under her arm.

READ. The old woman told me where the notes were, he said had put the pocket book down the necessary, in Turnmill Street.

Mary Sale 's Defence. I met this gentleman, he went with me into a passage in Lilly-street; he behaved very rude. After he left me, I kicked this pocket book before me.

Ann Miller's Defence. The same.

William Sale , Jane Sale , and James Sale were not put on their defence.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110710-96

615. THOMAS BRIGHT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of June , a pocket handkerchief, value 1 s. the property of Christopher Henry Martin .

CHRISTOPHER HENRY MARTIN . I am a merchant . I live in Crutchet Friars. On the 30th of May I lost my pocket handkerchief. The commitment took place on the 1st of June. On the 30th of May, between three and four o'clock I was going into the Exchange; at the East gate I felt somebody's hand in my pocket, I turned round and saw the prisoner with my handkerchief in his hand; he threw it down at the moment I turned round, he was close to me at the time, I picked up the handkerchief and laid hold of him.

JAMES BENNET . I am a constable, Mr. Martin delivered the prisoner to me.

Prisoner's Defence. I have followed the sea all my life.

GUILTY , aged, 54.

Confined One Year in Newgate , and whipped in Jail .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110710-97

616. EDWARD PAYNE was indicted for that he, on the 19th of June , not being authorised by the bank of England, unlawfully did utter a certain note, purporting to be a promissory note, for the payment of twenty-pence .

JOHN SAWYER . I keep the Pea-hen public house, in Bishopsgate-street. On the 19th of June, in the morning, the prisoner holding a note in his hand, asked me if I could give him change for that note; I said it is a twenty pound note, he said yes; I asked him if it was his master's, Mr. White, he said yes. I gave him two five pound notes and the remainder in one's and two's, to the amount of twenty pounds. I wrote Mr. White's name on it, and Swan-yard. This is the note that I received of the prisoner.

THOMAS SAPWELL. I am an officer, I apprehended the prisoner on the 22d of June. I asked the prisoner if he he had changed a twenty pound note with Mr. Sawyer; he said he had, he said his master Mr. Humphryes had sent him; I asked him if he was sure his master sent him, he said no, he found it on the dunghill. I searched him, on his person I found six one pound bank notes, in his box I found two five pound notes, and a one pound note. He said it all belonged to Mr. Saywer.

(The note read.)

Bank in England.

No. 5689. I promise to pay to James Junior or bearer, the sum of twenty-pence. 1811, London, 1st of May, for the Governor and Company of the Fleet Bank in England.

R. D. Dents.

20.

ROBERT BEST. Q. You are secretary to the bank of England - A. I am.

Q. Had the prisoner any appointment from you or the Governor and Company of the bank of England to utter that note - A. No, it was never printed by the authority of the bank.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked up the note among the dung.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined in Newgate Six Months .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18110710-98

617. ELEANOR BINNING and MARY TOMLINSON were indicted for that they, on the 6th of June , unlawfully and deceitfully did utter to Samuel Towsland , a counterfeit dollar, resembling silver dollars coined, stamped and circulated by the governor and company of the bank of England, they well knowing it to be false and counterfeited .

SAMUEL TOWSLAND. I keep the sign of the Paul Pinder's Head public house , Bishopsgate street . On Tuesday, the 6th of June the two prisoners came to my house. Binning called for a glass of gin and rasberry, the other said she would have a glass of peppermint. Binning put down a dollar, I went to try it; Tomlinson said, you need not try it, I will give you another or other money, I am not positive which; I tried it and found it bad I sent for Mr. Sapwell.

Q. Is that the dollar. - A. This is the dollar that I tried and marked. I saw Sapwell find another bad dollar upon Binning.

THOMAS SAPWELL . I am an officer, I searched Binning, I found a dollar in her pocket and a pound note. Binning said her husband gave her the dollar; I searched Tomlinson; on her I found all good money.

EDWARD HAMERSHAM . I am a teller in the bank of England.

Q. Is that a genuine dollar - A. No, it is a counterfeit; and the other dollar found in Binning's pocket, is a counterfeit.

Binning's Defence. My husband came home intoxicated from Greenwich fair, he gave me a pound note and two dollars; I met the other prisoner, we went in and had something to drink. I offered a dollar, which he said was bad; the officer searched me, and found another dollar, which the officer said was bad. On the other woman was found all good money.

Tomlinson's Defence. I offered to pay for it; after the dollar was offered the gentleman would not let me. I leave myself in merciful hands.

BINNING - GUILTY , aged 25.

Confined Six Months in Newgate , and at the Expiration of that time to find sureties for Six Months more .

TOMLINSON - NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18110710-99

618 MARY LUSCOMBE , alias MATILDA MILLER , and MARY RUSSELL , were indicted for that they, on the 4th of June , one piece of false and counterfeited money made to the likeness of a shilling, as and for a good shilling unlawfully did utter to George Lancaster , she, at the time of uttering it, well knowing it to be false and counterfeited, and that she, at the same time, had in her custody and possession one other piece of counterfeit money, made to the likeness of a good shilling, she well knowing it to be false and counterfeited .

SAMUEL SHEPPARD . Q. You are the beadle of Bishopsgate - A. I am. On the 4th of June, I observed the two prisoners in Threadneedle-street, I saw Russel take something out of her apron, I was not near enough to tell what it was, it rattled like halfpence. I then walked past them, I saw Luscombe with a black purse in her hand, I saw her give something to Russell, I saw Russel wiping and wetting it, she went up Finch-lane with it, she returned again in the course of a minute or two, Luscombe was then walking further on in Threadneedle-street, she stopped near against Merchant Taylors hall untill Russel came up to her, they had some conversation, and walked to the end of Threadneedle-street, Russel then sat down on the church-steps, Luscombe went into Mr. Wilsons, a stationers shop opposite of Threadneedle-street; Luscombe came out with this quire of whitybrown paper, and joined Russell, I immediately went into Mr. Wilson's shop, I made enquiry, a shilling was produced to me; I took the shilling, I have it now. I looked at the shilling, and judged it to be a counterfeit; I went into Threadneedle-street and caught hold of both the prisoners, Luscombe said what did I want, if she had done any thing wrong she was very sorry. Russel instantly clapped her hand to her mouth, I endeavoured to get my fingers in her mouth, I saw her swallow something. I then observed Luscombe have something in her hand; I seized hold of that hand immediately; I then called one of the waterman in the street to assist me getting them into Mr. Wilson's shop.

Q. What was there in that hand - A. Five shillings, four bad, and one good I believe; I took them into the shop and searched Luscombe first; in her pocket I found this black purse, this appears to be the purse I saw before, and in it were twenty shillings all had; I found this little box in her pocket containing three good sixpences, and one bad, and a piece of black ball; I found loose in her pocket six shillings and two pence farthing, all good halfpence; I searched Russel, I found nothing on her.

GEORGE LANCASTER . I am a servant to Mr. Wilson, stationer, in Bishopsgate-street. On the 4th of June, about eleven o'clock, Luscombe came into our house for a quire of whity-brown paper, that is sixpence; she paid by a shilling, I afterwards gave the same shilling to Mr. Sheppard, I am sure that is the shilling that was uttered by Luscombe. I told Mr. Sheppard what had past, he brought back the two prisoners: I saw the money that was found on Luscombe.

CALEB EDWARD POWELL . Q. You are an assistant to the Solicitor of the Mint - A. I am.

Q. Look at that shilling that is the shilling uttered by Luscombe to Lancaster - A. That is a counterfeit.

Q. I now give you the purse which contains the twenty - A. They are all counterfeits, and the five found in the hand four are counterfeits, the other is an Irish one, but still counterfeit; the four sixpences, one of them is a counterfeit, and the other three are good, and this piece of blacking is usual to be found on persons of this description, its use is in taking off the brightness. There is part of the blacking on them now.

Luscombe's Defence. I am innocent of any intention to defraud. On my purchasing the quire of paper I gave a shilling, which the shopman put into the till; and with regard to Mary Russell I had only met her a few minutes before.

Russell's Defence. The same.

LUSCOMBE - GUILTY , aged 40.

RUSSELL - GUILTY , aged 42.

Confined One Year in Newgate , and to find Sureties for Two Years to come each of them in forty pounds, and two Sureties for twenty pounds each .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18110710-100

619. CHARLOTTE BATES was indicted for that she on the 8th of June , one piece of false and counterfeit money, made to the likeness of a shilling, unlawfully did utter to Thomas Waldie , she well knowing it to be false and counterfeited And that she afterwards, on the 12th of June , did unlawfully utter a counterfeit sixpence to the said Thomas Waldie, she well knowing it to be false and counterfeited .

THOMAS WALDIE . I am a baker , I live in Sun-street . On the 8th of June, about dusk, the prisoner came to my house, she gave me a shilling for a half quartern loaf, or half a quartern of flour, I do not know which, as I had suspicion of her I wrapped it up in paper, and put it in my pocket by itself until the Sunday morning, I kept it in my pocket until she came again. On Wednesday the 12th of June, about twelve o'clock, she came again,

and offered my wife sixpence, and a penny for half a quartern loaf; I looked at the sixpence, I observed it to be a counterfeit; I then shewed her the shilling that I had taken the Saturday before. I sent for Mr. Sapwell, and gave him the counterfeit shilling and sixpence. The other officer found a sixpence in the bosom of the child.

THOMAS SAPWELL . I took charge of this woman on the 12th of June, she had an apron on full of peas and potatoes; I said to Miller, take the child and look out; he put his hand into the bosom of the child, I saw him take out a paper. These are the two sixpences that were taken out of the child's bosom. I received of Mr. Waldie a shilling, and a sixpence. They have been in my custody ever since.

THOMAS MILLER . I assisted Mr. Sapwell, I found this piece of paper in the child's bosom, I delivered it to Mr. Sapwell.

Mr. Waldie. This is the same shilling I gave to Mr. Sapwell, and it is the one that the prisoner gave to me. This is the sixpence that was uttered to my wife the second time, when I was in the shop.

CALEB EDWARD POWELL. The shilling and the sixpence are both counterfeits, and the money that was found in the bosom of the child, they are exactly like the other sixpence.

Prisoner's Defence. My husband gave me the money. I am innocent of the charge they have alledged to me.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Of uttering to Mary Waldie .

Confined Six Months in Newgate , and to find sureties for Six Months more .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18110710-101

620. WILLIAM FORD was indicted for that he, on the 19th of June , a certain passage belonging to James Parker , and leading to his dwelling-house, unlawfully did enter, and go into, and unlawfully did cut open two packs, containing fifty pieces of linen cloth, value 100 l with intention, part of it, to steal and carry away.

JAMES PARKER . I am an Irish and Scotch linen-factor ; my house is in Queen-street, Cheapside .

JAMES TRIMMER . I am shopman to Mr. Parker. On the 19th of June, between five and six in the evening, I was at dinner at a public house Our carman, James Deer told me, I was wanted, I went home, and in my masters passage, I saw the prisoner pulling open one of the bales, I saw a knife in his hand, I collared him, and said you have been cutting my master's property; he said, he had not; I then said, what did you do with the knife in your hand; he said he had no knife; the knife was in his hand at that time; he sliped the knife into his left hand coat pocket. Upon my examining the bale the outside wrapper had been cut, and one of the pieces of goods in that wrapper was cut. I took him to the Compter.

JAMES DEER . When I returned with Trimmer I saw the prisoner standing against the bale, Trimmer seized him, Trimmer asked me to take the knife out of his left hand pocket. The prisoner said he had not a knife at first, afterwards he took it out of his left hand pocket, and shewed it me. I saw two bales were cut, that bale contained linen.

Q. to prosecutor. What might be the value of the linen contained in this bale - A. From one hundred to an hundred and fifty pounds.

Prisoner's Defence. Wanting to make water I turned up this passage, afterwards I saw a knife I was picking it up, when this man came and said I was cutting a bale.

GUILTY , aged 29.

Confined Six Months in Newgate , and whipped in jail .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18110710-102

621. JOSEPH LONG was indicted for that he, on the 1st of June , did falsely pretend to John Edmonds , that he came from William Stroud , for the tea-pot which the boy had brought there, by which means he obtained from John Edmonds, the said tea-pot, value 10 l. whereas, in truth and fact the said William Stroud had not sent him for the said tea-pot .

JOHN EDMONDS . I am a tea-pot-handle maker , I live at No. 4, Monkwell-street, near Falcon-square .

Q. Had you a silver tea-pot from a man of the name of Stroud to put a handle - A. I had, on the 1st of June, about half past three o'clock, a boy brought it in the service of Mr. William Stroud , he is a silversmith.

Q. He brought a silver tea-pot to have a new handle put to it - A. Yes; I received it of the boy. About five o'clock the prisoner, Joseph Long came to my house, he said he came for a tea-pot, I asked him what tea-pot; he said a silver, tea-pot; I asked him who brought the pot, he said a boy left it, commonly called cribbage face; I asked him the reason why he called him cribbage face; he said, because he was pitted with the small pox, which the boy is certainly pitted with the small pox; I asked him the dress the boy was in, he said a brown jacket, which he certainly had on; I asked him if he could describe the nature of the pot; he said, certainly, he could a shopmate of his a polisher, gave the boy the pot, he described the pot very exact.

Q. Did he say whose boy had left it - A. Yes, he said Mr. Stroud's, he said he came from Mr. Stroud as Mr. Stroud's servant, and as he was able to describe the pot so accurately I believed he did come from Mr. Stroud; I asked the reason he came so early for the pot, as it was promised on Monday; he said, that the people came from Mr. Ellis in Oxford-street, and Mr. Ellis's customer would not wait untill Monday for it, and therefore he came from Mr. Stroud for the tea-pot.

Q. This appeared to you to be a very probable story - A. Yes, and upon which I delivered him the tea-pot in consequence of his story, believing what he said to be true.

Q. What is the worth of the tea-pot - A. Ten or twelve pounds. The prisoner took the tea-pot away with him. After I delivered their tea-pot, before the prisoner could turn the corner of Monkwell-street, my wife looked out of the window and saw the prisoner, and in consequence of what my wife said, I went up to Mr. Stroud, he lives in Burleigh-street, Exeter Change. I told him what I had done with the tea-pot.

Q. In consequence of what Mr. Stroud told you did you look after the man - A. Yes, I did not see the prisoner untill the 6th. I saw him in Featherstone Street, Bunhill Row. I had an officer with me, and took him at a chandler's shop, in Featherstone-street.

Q. Did you ever find the pot again - A. No, when the officer called me up stairs I gave charge of him. I told the prisoner that Mr. Stroud had not given him authority to come for the tea-pot; he said he was very sorry, he had known me some years. He did not deny the charge.

WILLIAM STROUD . I am a silversmith.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. I never knew him before this transaction, he never was in my employ.

Q. Had you sent the tea-pot by a boy to have a handle put in it - A. Yes, I did, I value the tea-pot at ten pounds, it cost fourteen pounds. I sent it to Mr. Edmonds to have a handle put in, by a lad of mine.

Q. Did you ever send the prisoner to Mr. Edmonds for this tea-pot - A. I did not; I did not know him I could not.

Q. Have you ever recovered the pot since - A. No.

WILLIAM KEITH . I am fourteen next September

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. No.

Q. Did you take a silver tea-pot to Mr. Edmonds to have a handle put in it - A. Yes. I was to fetch it again on the Monday following.

Q. Do you know whether the prisoner saw you taking it - A. Yes, he joined company with me. I told him I was going to leave this tea pot for a handle, and was to call for it on the Monday.

Q. Did you ever tell him to get it from Mr. Edmonds and to pretend that he came from your master - A. No, he said he meant to apply to Mr. Stroud for a job.

JURY. Did the prisoner see the shape and appearance of the tea-pot - A. No, he felt the tea-pot in the bag; he asked me if it was silver, I told him yes; he said is it one of these squab things; I told him it was; he asked me if it was a silver button, I said no.

ANTHONY HARRISON . On the 2d of June, I recieved a description of the prisoner; I went in search of him; Edmonds was with me. On Thursday morning I went up stairs first, the prisoner was in bed when I entered the room. I told him I was coming to take him in charge; I called Edmonds, he came up, and the prisoner said he was sorry for it. Going to the Compter he confessed that he had sold it; I said what have you done with the tea-pot; he said I do not want the people of the house to know. He told me coming along, that a young man had sold the pot to Mrs. Lack, in Long Lane, for five pounds; the man made him drunk and robbed him of the money. He had about two-pence half-penny when I took him.

Prisoner's Defence. I was very much intoxicated at the time, I do not remember seeing the boy or going to Mr. Edmonds.

Mr. Edmonds. He was perfectly sober as I am now, and I am a man that never drinks a pint of beer from one week's end to another.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Judgement respited .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.


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