Old Bailey Proceedings, 29th May 1811.
Reference Number: 18110529
Reference Number: f18110529-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE OYER AND TERMINER, AND GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND ALSO THE GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, HELD AT Justice-Hall, in the Old Bailey, On WEDNESDAY the 29th of MAY, 1811, and following Days;

BEING THE FIFTH SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF The Right Hon. JOSHUA JONATHAN SMITH , LORD-MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY JOB SIBLY, No. 4, CARTHUSIAN-STREET, ALDERSGATE-STREET.

LONDON:

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED (BY THE AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON.) By R. Butters, No. 22, Fetter-lane, Fleet-street

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON.

Before the Right-honourable JOSHUA JONATHAN SMITH , Lord Mayor of the City of London; Sir Nash Grose , knt. one of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of King's Bench: Sir Robert Graham , knt. one of the Barons of his Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Thomas Smith , esq. Sir Richard Carr Glynn, bart. Sir John Perring , bart. Aldermen of the said City; John Silvester , esq. Recorder of the said City; Sir Charles Flower , bart. William Domville , esq. John Atkins , esq. Aldermen of the said City; and Newman Knowlys , esq. Common-serjeant of the said City; His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of Goal Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

London Jury.

Thomas Wilson ,

Thomas Sanderson ,

Samuel Waldegrave ,

Thomas Sorrell ,

Walter Robinson ,

William Arnold ,

Thomas Lane ,

Samuel Cater ,

James Willmott ,

John Speechley ,

Hugh Beams ,

John Clark .

First Middlesex Jury.

George Adamson ,

William Jameson ,

William Wilson ,

William Newland ,

William Tomlins ,

Thomas Wilson ,

George Lowe ,

Thomas Priddle ,

Thomas Blankley ,

John Brookes ,

Thomas Rian ,

Jacob Wilson .

Second Middlesex Jury.

Charles Randell ,

Thomas Pistal ,

John Jackson ,

John Hill ,

James Addington ,

William Macklin ,

John Hopkins ,

Richard Angel ,

Richard Wake ,

Richard Norton ,

William Roper ,

William Warne ,

Reference Number: t18110529-1

381. ROBERT WITTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of January , two books, value 4 s. eight yards of paper bordering, value 1 s. and two yards of printed paper, value 1 s. the property of James Gibbons .

JAMES GIBBONS . I am an auctioneer . I have a house in town, my family reside in Mary-le-bone Park. I had a house in Norton street , where there was a sale. The paper was taken from the prisoner's lodgings, on the 29th of December, and the books in January. In the month of August the prisoner was placed at a house of mine in Norton-street. The prisoner is a plaisterer .

Q. In Norton-street you had a sale of books - A. I had, in August last.

Q. Did any of them books remain unsold - A. Yes, they did, and they remained in the care of the prisoner. There was a quantity of paper brought in for the purpose of papering the house while he was there; the house at that time was under repair.

Q. After the books were placed under his care did you miss any of them - A. I did. From information I told the prisoner he must either submit to have his lodgings searched, or go to Bow-street; he said search his lodgings; I went with the prisoner to his lodgings, accompanied with a cabinet maker in my employ. I searched his lodgings, we found several quantities of printed paper, and some printed borderings, and there were also some boxes covered with the same kind of paper. On the 5th of January I searched his lodgings again, Humphreys the officer was with me, we found the door fast, the officer looked through the key hole, he saw a man there, and demanded entrance; upon that the door was opened, the prisoner was there, and another man; there were two books found in the room under the bed.

Q. Were the two books that you found under the bed left under the care of the prisoner in your house in Norton-street - A. Yes, they were.

Q. How long had this man been in your employ - A. From the month of August. I gave him two pounds nine shillings a week for the greater part of the time he was there.

CHARLES HUMPHREYS. I am an officer. I accompanied Mr. Gibbons to search the prisoner's room on the floor, under the bed. I found these two books, I shewed them to Mr. Gibbons in the prisoner's presence; Mr. Gibbons said they were his; the prisoner said I had throwed the books there; I had not; then he said Mr. Gibbons did. Mr. Gibbons could not, he was at the other part of the room at the time. These are the books, they have been in my custody ever since.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, called one witness, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110529-2

382. WILLIAM HARPER was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Robins , about the hour of twelve, on the night of the 23d of March , and stealing therein, one hundred and twenty yards of carpetting, value 18 l. his property .

Mr. Gurney, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110529-3

383. WILLIAM THACKER and WILLIAM THOMPSON were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of May , fourteen pounds weight of coffee, value 20 s. the property of our sovereign Lord the King.

SECOND COUNT for like offence, the property of Henry Hanwell .

EDWARD PEARCE. I am one of the constables employed in the West India Docks . On Monday the 6th of this month, I was on duty at the gate, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon I saw the two prisoners, they were coming towards the gate, they were walking together; they turned under a shed opposite No. 1, from that shed they could get to another; I followed them and found them under No. 11, when I came up to them they were about ten yards apart; I first seized Thompson. I felt at his coat pocket, and I felt something like coffee; I told him to stand there, and not to throw any thing away. He wanted me to let him go and to say nothing about it.

Q. Did you know the two prisoners were two Excise officer s - A. I did. I then quitted Thompson and went after Thacker.

Q. When you had stopped Thompson what became of Thacker - A. He quitted the shed and got on board a ship discharging at No. 11, I followed him on board the ship, I left Thompson in the shed, and told him to stay there; he could not get out of the dock at that time. When I got up to Thacker I felt something in his coat pocket, which felt like coffee; I told him to come along with me, which he did. I brought him back to the shed where Thompson was; I took them both into one of the dock offices; I searched them both one after the other; Yardley, another constable was present. I searched Thacker first, I found a quantity of coffee in a handkerchief in his hat. This is the handkerchief and the coffee; I found part of the coffee in his coat pockets; I have put it altogether in the handkerchief; there is here what I found in the handkerchief, and I have added to it what I found in his pockets; I then searched Thompson, I found a quantity of coffee in a handkerchief in his hat, and coffee loose in both his pockets, the quantity was about six pounds. I asked Thompson how he came by it, Thacker was in the same room, he informed me that he got it from a vessel, down below, forward. I then took them to the police office.

Q. Did you find in your way that one of them had a knife - A. Yes, Thacker; this is it, it is a common knife.

Q. The next morning did you go on board a schooner

of the name of Madorosa - A. Yes. I had learned then that was the ship on board which they were stationed, she was lying afloat in the West India Import Dock, she had not commenced the discharge of her cargo.

Q. Did you go down to that part of the schooner which Thompson described below, forward - A. I did; that is in the forescuttle.

Q. Did you feel about and discover whether any coffee had been disturbed there - A. I did. There is no light permitted to be there. I found a board had been wrenched at the upper part of the bulk head. The bulk head is the partition that separates the cargo from the men's birth.

Q. Was this board sufficiently open for you to put your hand in - A. It was, and when I put my hand in it found its way to a in a hole bag of coffee. I took a sample of that coffee, this is it; it appears to correspond with that found on the persons of the prisoners. The fore-scuttle was afterwards locked up until the commencement of the discharge of the cargo, which was on the 14th of May. I had chalked two bags through the hole. I attended the discharge of the cargo until they came to them bags. One bag that I had marked is marked I. S. I. 43; the other bag is marked I. S. I. 22. Both the bags appeared to be cut; the bag that I put my hand into was No. 43, and there appeared to be taken out of the bag, No. 43, from eighteen to twenty pound; and the bag No. 22, appeared to me that it would hold fourteen or fifteen pounds to fill it, it was a damaged bag; I took both the bags away, and have had them in my custody ever since, and what I took from the prisoner I have had in my custody ever since. At the police office the prisoner said it was given him by the mariners. This is the bag 43, there is a cut about eight inches, and this bag 22, there is a cut twelve inches.

JONATHAN YARDLEY . I am a constable at the West India docks. At the time that has been spoken to I was on duty near the the gate, Pearce quitted me to go after these men at the shed; shortly after he called to me to assist him; I went; he had got hold of Thacker; I took hold of Thompson, they were taken into the office, and searched and the coffee was found upon the prisoners as Pearce has described in their hats and their pockets, I saw them both searched Thompson begged and prayed of me to let him go; I said to him, if you are fool enough to lose your own bread I must keep mine. We took them away to the police office.

JOHN PARKER . I am a tide-waiter. I went on board the Madorosa at Gravesend on the 30th of April the vessel came in the dock on the 1st of May, and I believe the crew came into the dock; I believe they left the vessel to go on shore at the time of locking up the dock; as all the people do at the close of the day on that evening.

Q. Do you know the persons of the prisoners on what day did they come on board the vessel - A. On the same day with me at Gravesend.

Q. Did the two prisoners remain on board the vessel untill the 6th - A They were.

Q. Do you recollect between the first of May and the 6th of May whether the fore-scuttle was open or closed - A. It was frequently opened.

Q. Were you on board this schooner on the 6th of May - A. Yes, and the two prisoners were on board that day; on that day I left the vessel about half past one o'clock, the two prisoners and the mate were then on board, and no one else; I did not return to the vessel till the next morning. I then learned that the two prisoners were in custody. The mate came to his work the next morning as usual.

ARTHUR BEDWELL . I am an excise tideman. I was so on the 6th of May.

Q. After these prisoners were taken were you sent on board the next morning - A. I was sent on board the Madorosa the next morning about nine o'clock, in the West India Import Dock; Mitcheson and Pearce went with me and Parker. I continued I these six or seven days until the cargo was all discharged; during that time no person could get at these bags, they remained locked up in the hatch until Mitcheson and Pearce took them out.

RICHARD ONDER . I was the captain of the Madorosa in May last. I brought the vessel to the West India Import Dock; I had the charge of all the contents of the ship, the cargo consisted of coffee and cotton. The coffee was stowed in the hold of the vessel.

Q. Was any part in the forescuttle - A. In the aft part of the forescuttle, the bulk head divided the people from the cargo.

Mr. Alley. I take it for granted your men bring an adventure for themselves - A. It is very often done.

COURT. Had the men any coffee of their own - A. None, to my knowledge. I found some rum in the men's birth.

JOHN PRINCEP , JUN. Q. You are a partner in the house of Princep and Co. - A. I am; the partners names are John Princep , senior, Thomas Parsons , and John Princep , junior. We were the consignees of coffee in the Madorosa I. S. I. 22 and 43, were consigned to us.

Thacker's Defence. This said coffee that we had was taken out of the seamens chest; they left it in the birth place when they went away; they told me and Thompson we might have it.

Thompson's Defence. The same.

Thacker called no witnesses to his character.

Thompson called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

THACKER - GUILTY , aged 25.

THOMPSON - GUILTY , aged 35.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18110529-4

384. WILLIAM SMITH and FRANCISCO PIPI were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of April , two brass sheaves, value 20 s. and two metal block pins, value 4 s the property of the Governor and Company trading to Hudson's Bay .

SECOND COUNT for like offence, the property of Henry Harwell .

HENRY HARWELL . I am the master of the Prince of Wales ship , in the Hudson's Bay company's service.

Q. You can very likely tell me what the corporation of the Hudson's Bay company is - A. They are called the Governor and Company of adventures of

England, trading to Hudson's Bay. On Saturday the 27th of April the ship was put into the London dock , and on Monday morning I was sent for by two dock officers, who said on the Sunday previous they had stopped the two prisoners, and they had taken the two sheaves from them. We tried the sheaves to the blocks and they exactly fitted. I had the charge of the ship and all the property in her.

WILLIAM CLARK . I am a constable of the London dock. On Sunday I perceived the two prisoners walking on the north Quays of the London dock, they were directly opposite No. 1, warehouse; I suspected they had something in their hats by their walk; I followed them up to the gate and stopped Smith; I asked him what he had got in his hat, he told me nothing at all; I took his hat off, and found concealed in the crown of his hat this brass sheave. The gate-keeper stopped Pipi, we searched him, and found one sheave in his hat. I then took them to the police office. After I returned to the Dock I knew the Prince of Wales came into the Dock the day before, and the head of the pins corresponded in colour with the blocks, and the blocks were without sheaves. I looked inside of the blocks, and the verdigrease corresponded exactly with that on the sheaves, they fitted exactly. I then informed the captain of it.

- TILLER. I am a constable of the London Dock. I stopped the prisoner Pipi at the gate, I pulled off his hat, and in the crown of his hat was this brass sheave, and in his jacket pocket was this brass pin.

Smith's Defence. We went into the London dock, we found the two sheaves and the pin laying among some dirt. Pipi said we may as well take them out and get some beer.

Pipi said nothing in his defence.

SMITH - GUILTY , aged 28.

PIPI - GUILTY , aged 35.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18110529-5

385. SAMUEL BAMBER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of May , a cloak, value 25 s. and two pincushion covers, value 6 s. the property of William Lowndes ; a gown, value 10 s. and a cloak, value 4 s. the property of Ann Westrop , spinster , in the dwelling-house of William Lowndes .

SAMUEL PARKER. On the 21st of this month I lived with William Lowndes , esq. No. 9, Lower Seymour-street . On the 21st of May I was in the privy about twelve o'clock, I perceived the prisoner come down the area steps; I afterwards saw his face in the housekeeper's room, her name is Ann Westrop . I went out of the privy, I saw him take a gown out of the window in the housekeepers room; I immediately collared him and I took him into the kitchen; he pulled out a lace muslin cloak, the property of Mrs. Lowndes; he dropped the gown directly I took him in the area. These things have been in my possession ever since.

ANN WESTROP. Q On the 21st of May you were housekeeper to Mr. Lowndes - A. Yes When I went into the room I found the things missing; this gown is mine, it was in my room on the chair when I left the room. This muslin cloak is Mr. Lowndes's; these are the two pin-cushion covers, and this cloak is mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I have nothing at all to say. I leave it to the gentlemen of the jury.

GUILTY , aged 31.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18110529-6

386. WILLIAM ANDREWS , CHARLES SIMMONDS , and WILLIAM NEWTON were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Elizabeth White , widow , about the hour of one, on the night of the 17th of April ; and stealing therein, four shirts, value 10 s. five muslin handkerchiefs, value 2 s. five pocket handkerchiefs, value 1 s. six aprons, value 2 s. twelve pair of cotton stockings, value 6 s. one flannel petticoat, value 1 s. two gowns, value 6 s. a night gown, value 1 s. a waistcoat, value 2 s. two pair of trowsers, value 2 s. a red cloak, value 4 s. eight caps, value 4 s. two habit shirts, value 1 s. two frocks, value 4 s. four dusters, value 6 d. two flat irons, value 6 d. and a yard of check, value 6 d. her property .

ELIZABETH WHITE. Q. Where do you live - A. At Hesson , about a mile from Hounslow.

Q. Did any thing happen to you on the night of the 17th of April, or to your house - A. I heard a noise about twelve or one o'clock in the night before I went to bed, which alarmed me. I was up very late at work, and between the hours of twelve and two I went to bed.

Q. Before you went to bed did you lock up your house - A. Yes, it was all fastened, doors and windows. I then went to bed and went to sleep; I was awaked in the morning by Knowles. I immediately came down, he told me my window was open; this was between four and five; it was light; my doors were all fast; as I left them; there was a piece cut out of the shutter of the window of the foreroom that communicated with the street. The sash was propped up with the piece of wood that was cut out of the sash. I missed all the linen that was in the room, all the linen that is now produced in the bundle. It was quite light when I got up.

JOHN FINAL COOK . I am a constable of Isleworth. I was called up by the prosecutrix, I immediately went to her house, it was between four and five o'clock; I saw that the window had been cut. I returned to Hounslow and wrote a letter to Mr. Smith the police officer, desiring him to come immediately; Smith came about two or three o'clock, and in consequence of suspicion, I went to Newton's house with Smith. Newton lives in the town, on Isleworth side, better than a mile from the prosecutrix, We apprehended Simmonds and Andrews in the street, about five or six hundred yards from Newton's house. I apprehended Andrews, he ran away from Smith; Smith laid hold of him by the collar, he struck Smith, Smith catched the bundle off his shoulder, and he ran away; I catched him, and Smith searched him, and took a pistol out of Andrews pocket; the pistol was loaded with powder and shots; he likewise took a powder flask from his pocket, and a little bag which

contained some slugs, and likewise a knife, and there was a crape found. I did not see Simmonds apprehended, I saw him searched.

Q. Was there any bundle found upon him - A. I saw them both with their bundles before we apprehended either Simmonds or Andrews. On Simmonds was found a large crooked knife, and a crape. After that we went to Newton's house; Smith I believe told him that we were come to search his house; he changed very white and trembled; I stood over him while Smith searched the house, he found several articles in the house that had been stolen from Mrs. White's house. We took Newton in custody, and at Bow-street they were examined and committed. The The first that Smith laid hold of in Newton's house, he asked me if I knew any thing of them. I said, yes, they are my boys stockings.

WILLIAM SMITH . I am an officer of Bow-street office. In consequence of application by the last witness on the 18th of April I went down to Hounslow; I got there about half past three or near four o'clock, I went to Newton's house, I saw Andrews open the door, and Simmonds I saw just behind him; I went over the way and told Cook that I had some suspicion. Cook sent Mortimer over the way to watch the house, in about five minutes Mortimer came back and called Cook; I was standing at the public-house door when he came back about fifty yards off; I looked on the opposite side of the way, I saw two men going down with bundles, I did not see where they came from.

Q. Who were the two men - A. Andrews and Simmonds, the same men which I had seen in the house. Upon my seeing them, I instantly ran of the opposite side of the way, and Mr. Cook along with me, crossed over and met them; I catched hold of Andrews at first by the collar; I conceived I had got him, but the moment I had got hold of him he hit me with his fist on the face; he gave me a second blow, and knocked me up against the wall, and ran away; he was then apprehended by Cook; I never let go the bundle that Andrews had; this is it. Simmonds likewise had a bundle, this was Simmonds's bundle. We then took them into a public-house; upon Andrews I found this pistol, it was loaded then; this is the charge that was in it; there was powder and slugs in it; I took from him a powder horn, a knife, and some crape, and a pair of pincers, in a small bag of square slugs. On Simmonds I found a small gardeners knife, and a gimblet, and this crape was in the lining of his hat.

Q. Had you gone down in the course of the day to the prosecutrix's house - A. I did, I saw the breaking, this knife might have done it; it appeared to have been cut with a knife. Immediately I had secured Simmonds and Andrews I went to Newton's house, Cook went with me. Newton was sitting in the front room when I went in, I told him I was come to search his house, the first things that I took up was a child's pair of trowsers; they were in the front room, and several other things that Mr. Cook knew to be his property. I then went into the back room, Newton's wife was there, she went up against a window; I asked her what she was at, she said, nothing. I took two handkerchiefs from her hand, they belong to Mrs. White; under some straw I found two flat irons belonging to Mrs. White; the things have been in my custody ever since.

JOHN MORTIMER. I am a constable of Hesson. By the orders of Mr. Cook I watched Newton's house, I saw Andrews come out first, and look about him; he went in again, and in about five minutes Andrews and Simmonds both came out with bundles upon their shoulders. Andrews was taken by Mr. Cook. I apprehended Simmonds, I saw them searched afterwards, and the things found.

Prosecutrix. All these things were in my house. I have seen them all. I never made any estimate of their value.

Andrews' Defence. I know myself innocent of stealing the property. I went to Hesson fair; I was coming home, we lit of these things in a ditch.

Simmond's Defence. The same.

Newton's Defence. They were left at my house while I was out with my fish.

ANDREWS - GUILTY , aged 24.

SIMMONDS - GUILTY , aged 24.

NEWTON - GUILTY , aged 35.

Of stealing, but not of breaking and entering the dwelling-house.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18110529-7

387. BAZELLA BEAZELEY and WILLIAM ARCHER were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of George Rogers , about the hour of twelve, on the night of the 12th of May , and stealing therein forty-nine penny pieces. his property .

GEORGE ROGERS . I collect the toll at Kingsland turnpike , the toll-house is in the parish of St. George, Hackney; I was stationed there on the 12th of May. I went on duty about five o'clock on the Sunday morning I went to relieve another man at that time.

COURT. How many men are there at the turnpike gate - A. There are five of us that attend these gates, of Stamford-hill and Kingsland. I went on duty at five o'clock I lived there then, being on duty, and occasionally when we have an opportunity we lye down, there is a couch there for that purpose.

Q. This is not your house no more than it is the other four - A. No, we all occasionally sleep there.

Mr. Arabin. On that evening had you occasion to leave that turnpike house - A. About half past nine in the evening I went to the other gate at Kingsland. When I left it I fastened the door and window; I left the house quite alone, I was obliged to go to the other gate that is about twenty or thirty yards off; I left four shillings and a penny in the window in penny-pieces; they laid about five or six inches from the window; I returned about ten minutes past ten. When I opened and went in I found the window wide open; I left it down, it had been down all the day; I missed all the penny-pieces he had been there.

JOSHUA ARMSTRONG . I am an officer of Worship-street office. On Sunday night I was in Kingsland-road in company with Kennedy, Gleed, Valentine, and Rice, and crossing from Dalton-lane, to come into Kingsland-road, between ten and eleven o'clock at night, I saw Kemlin standing within a few yards of

the turnpike house; I stopped a few moments, Kemlin gave a whistle; which was answered by another immediately; Kemlin then holloaed Bill and walked on to Shoreditch; after he had walked twenty yards he came up with the two prisoners; we let them walk on all three ten or twelve yards further, all conversing together; Kennedy and Valentine was close behind me; I went in front of the two prisoners, I ran after Kemlin, I found Kemlin in custody of Rice. We took all three of them to a public-house, Archer was taken into the side parlour, the other two were taken into the tap-room; Kennedy searched Archer, and when I came into the parlour I saw a quantity of copper in Kennedy's possession; I asked Archer how he came by the copper. Kennedy and Gleed were present at the time; he said he had taken it from his mother; he afterwards said that Beazely had told him to go, and shove the door of the turnpike house in, and on the window he would find the copper; he said he had told Beazeley he was afraid to do that, Beazeley then told him to shove the window back, and take the halfpence out, which he did.

Mr. Knapp. I understand that Kemlin has been admitted an evidence - A. Yes, he was the first person that I observed.

Q. How near was he to the turnpike - A. Between two and three yards.

Q. At that time you made no observation of the prisoners at the bar - A. None; I did not see them at all then; it was about two minutes after I saw them, about twenty yards from the gate.

Q. And Kemlin, when he came up to them, he was conversing with them - A. Yes.

Q. Might not he have given the penny-pieces to them - A. I cannot say.

Q. Was not there time for it - A. Yes.

JAMES KENNEDY . I am a police officer of Worship-street. On this evening I was with Armstrong near the turnpike gate, I did not see Kemlin until Armstrong saw him. I heard a whistle, that whistle was answered by another whistle; I was about twenty or thirty yards from the turnpike gate; I saw them when they were apprehended, they appeared to be conversing together, and Kemlin ran away; as soon as Armstrong came up, he, in the first instance, stopped Archer, and put him up against the wall; I took hold of Archer, Kemlin ran away; Rice, Armstrong, and Gleed pursued him; I took Archer into the Swan public-house; before we got into the Swan Rice came up with Kemlin, we took them all into the Swan public-house, I searched Archer, in his hat I found these two handkerchiefs, in one of the handkerchiefs there were twenty-three penny pieces, in his right hand coat pocket I found twenty-nine pieces, and in his waistcoat pocket I found one penny-piece, and three halfpence. I then asked him where he got these penny pieces, he told me that he had them from his mother to carry to his grandmother at Newington. I told him from the circumstance of his having some in his hat I told him I did not believe him. I desired him to sit down. In about a quarter of an hour the turnpike man Rogers came in; he said the window of the toll-house was shoved open, and four shillings in penny pieces were taken out.

EDWARD RICE . I am an officer. On this evening I was in company with my brother officer I first observed Kemlin about four or five yards from the turnpike and I saw the two prisoners walking together on the road, from the toll-house, and Kemlin was on the path, they walked twenty or thirty yards, and then they joined, and they all conversed together about ten or a dozen yards; Armstrong stopped them, the moment he stopped the prisoner, Kemlin ran away, I ran after him about forty or fifty yards, and overtook him; I asked him what made him run away, he said he had been fighting with somebody in the road, and he was afraid it was the same party that came after him. I searched Kemlin, I found twopence halfpenny upon him in halfpence.

Q. to Rogers. All that you lost was in penny pieces - A. Yes.

Rice. I saw Archer searched, I saw the things found in the manner described by Kennedy. I heard him say that Beazeley had been down in the morning to the toll-house, and asked him if he would be in a good thing, and he went along with them. Beazeley persuaded him to break the toll-house open, but he was afraid to go in at the door; he pushed the window back and got out the penny-pieces; he cried very much, and said he was very sorry, and that he had been over persuaded by Beazeley.

JOSEPH KEMLIN . I am a brick-maker. I have known both the prisoners at the bar for about five or six years. On the 12th of May I was coming along the fields with my brother, about half past six in the evening, I met Beazeley, he asked me if I would take a walk round the Cat and Mutton field. I left my brother and went with him; we met Archer; Beazeley and Archer asked me if I would take a walk to Shoreditch; I went with them. We walked up Shoreditch and came back again towards Kingsland-road turnpike; Beazeley said, would I go to Kingland. This I suppose was a little after eight o'clock. We went as far as the King's Arms public-house, Kingsland, we had a pot of beer there between us three; then Beazeley and Archer came towards the turnpike. I went over the road. I returned to them. Beazely told Archer to get some money out of the turnpike house; Archer went to the turnpike-house, and got some penny-pieces out; I heard the window go back. He afterwards told me he took them out. Then we came on towards London again, and just as I got up to them, them gentlemen came up and took hold of me; I thought it was somebody else, I ran away.

Q.Do you recollect whether you made any noise before them gentlemen came up - A. Yes, I whistled, and called Bill; that whistle was answered, I cannot say by whom.

The prisoners said nothing in their defence; Beazeley called three witnesses, who said they never knew any harm of them.

BEAZELEY - GUILTY , aged 16.

ARCHER - GUILTY , aged 18.

Of stealing only.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction, and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

Reference Number: t18110529-8

388. JOHN BUSH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of May , a chest of drawers, value

10 s. an ebony box, value 2 s. two blankets, value 5 s. a pillow, value 4 s. a book shelf, value 1 s. two prints, value 2 s. five china figures, value 5 s. two basons, value 5 s. six plates, value 3 s. three dishes, value 1 s. two cups and saucers, value 3 s. a cream jug, value 3 d. the property of John Walker . And

TWO OTHER COUNTS for like offence, only varying the manner of charging them.

JOHN WALKER . I am a broker and auctioneer , I live in Shoreditch . I was in partnership with my mother, she is dead; I am her executor, with Robert George Walker , my brother. The goods that are charged to be stolen I was in possession of them, and I had the charge of them. The prisoner lived in my service about fifteen months. From information I went to the prisoner's brother's lodgings, Long-alley, Moorfields. I only saw at that time five china figures, a hanging book shelf, and two prints, all of which I knew to be my property. I went to Dalston and took an officer with me, and took the prisoner into custody; the officer told him that he had taken him in custody for robbing his master, and that his brother was in custody, and that we had found the articles, in the indictment, upon which he made a full confession of taking the whole; he recapitulated all the articles, and mentioned the different times he had taken them. A chest of drawers he had taken about a twelvemonth ago. I found the chest of drawers at his brother's lodgings, they are my property.

DANIEL BISHOP . I am an officer belonging to Worship-street. I apprehended the prisoner at Dalston; he said he had taken the drawers about ten o'clock at night; he said, God bless me, I am very sorry; I took them from my master about a twelve month back, and his brother knew nothing of it.

Prosecutor. These are the drawers; I am sure they are my property.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to his character.

GUILTY , aged 27.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18110529-9

389. WILLIAM HARRIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2nd of April , a truss of hay, value 4 s. the property of Stephen Hope , Thomas Vigne , and Charles Vigne .

STEPHEN HOPE . My partner's names are Thomas Vigne , and Charles Vigne, we are potters , and brick and tile-maker s, at Upper Clapton . The prisoner was in my employ, and the witness Farrow also; the prisoner was an helper in my stables , and Farrow was a chaff-cutter.

Q. On the 2nd of April did you receive any straw - A. Yes.

HENRY MULLER . I am a potter in these gentlemen's employ. On the 2nd of April I was in the pottery. I saw a load of straw brought to my master's stables by a man of the name of Livermore; the straw was received by Harris and Farrow; I saw Farrow put two parcels of hay into the cart. Harris was looking towards the wheel-wrights shop, apparently as if to look out to observe whether any one saw it. Harris put a bit of straw over the hay.

Prisoner. I did not.

Muller. Harris went with the cart and with Livermore up the hill; Farrow went after them in the course of a few minutes, and I saw them go off the premises.

Mr. Bolland. I am told that you are fond of ducks you can tell me whether you are - A. I am not guilty of that.

Q. Have you ever had a partiality for rabbits - A. I suppose you mean both as one; I was accused of rabbits and ducks.

JOSEPH FARROW . I am a chaff cutter in the employ of the prosecutor. On the 3d of April Livermore brought a load of straw to the stables; Harris and I agreed to let him have a truss of clover hay of Mr. Hope's; I went into the loft, and put a truss of hay down in two parts. Harris looked about the yard to see if any body saw us. Harris then put a truss of straw into the cart to take to Mr. Vigne's stable, for his nag to lye upon; he never sprinkled any over the hay; he chucked it in any how. Harris went up the hill with the cart, and Livermore; I followed a few minutes after. When the cart got from Mr. Vigne's I saw him take the straw out of the cart, and the cart went on. I went into the public house, and Harris came to me; he told me that the man had given him a shilling to spend for the straw, and one shilling and three-pence for the hay, that was two shillings and three-pence all together.

Q. You were charged and taken up upon this and was admitted an evidence - A. Yes.

JOHN ARMSTRONG . I took the prisoner in custody; and Farrow at Mr. Hope's house at Clapton; I acquainted Harris with the charge before Mr. Hope, and he confessed it.

Q. to Mr. Hope. What is the value of a truss of hay - A.Between four and five shillings.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not cover the hay with straw; the truss of straw was put into the cart to take to my other master.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 44.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18110529-10

390. WILLIAM JOHNSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of April , two silver tea-spoons, value 5 s. the property of John Robinson .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded GUILTY .

Judgment respited.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110529-11

391. JOHN BIGGS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of April , a cheese, value 6 s. the property of Jane Ronalds , Francis Ronalds , and Michael Mills Coventry .

FRANCIS RONALDS. I am a cheesemonger ; my partner's names are Jane Ronalds , and Michael Mills Coventry . I can only speak to the property.

STEPHEN JORDAN . I am a porter to Mr. Ronalds On the 16th of April, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I saw the prisoner passing by the warehouse in Upper Thames-street several times; a pile of cheese stood about seven or eight yards from the door.

He came into the warehouse, he took one of them and made off with it. I immediately pursued him and took him in the street, with the property on him. He begged of me to let him go and he would never do the like again. This is the cheese, it is my master's cheese.

Prisoner's Defence. Necessity made me do it.

GUILTY , aged 75.

Confined Fourteen Days in Newgate , and Whipped in Jail .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110529-12

392. JAMES HAINSWORTH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of May , nineteen nutmegs, value 2 s. the property of Nathaniel Fenn , and John Knee Hewson

JOHN KNEE HEWSON . I am a wholesale grocer , I live in Botolph-lane , my partner's name is Nathaniel Fenn . The prisoner was our porter . On the 17th of May, in the afternoon, being in the accompting-house, I saw the cellar door open, in which place no porter was permitted to go, and knowing the warehouseman to be at dinner, I went to see who it was; I observed the prisoner come up; I called to him; he did not answer or stop. I followed him, and took him in the shop; I saw him throw away these nineteen nutmegs, they were loose; he acknowledged the offence, and begged for mercy. These are the nutmegs, I have no doubt they are my property.

Prisoner's Defence. I have lived with Mr. Hewson ten years and eleven months. I have only been from my employ three half days since there I have been.

GUILTY , aged 51.

Confined Fourteen Days in Newgate , and Whipped in Jail .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110529-13

393. JUDITH BRADFORD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of May , two tablecloths, value 5 s. a broach, value 6 d. a ten pound bank note, a five pound bank note, and two one pound notes , the property of George Coggins .

GEORGE COGGINS . I am a publican . I keep the Bell in Bush-lane, Cannon-street . The prisoner came to live with me on the 26th of April, she lived with me till the 8th of May, and between five and six o'clock we missed her; on our going up stairs we found a bureau had been broken open, a key was taken out of the bureau that opened a chest; we missed a ten pound note, a five pound note, and two ones, and two tablecloths; the prisoner left me on Wednesday night. On Saturday morning I met her in Ratcliffe Highway. I took her and had her searched. I found nothing upon her, I brought her to the Compter, there the officer searched her. He found a one pound note in the toe of her shoe, and a small broach in her pocket, which I knew to be mine; the officer found the duplicate of a tablecloth, not marked. I believe it to be mine, I have not sworn to it.

FRANCIS BROUGHTON . I am a pawnbroker. This tablecloth was pawned by the prisoner, I believe.

WILLIAM DUNN . I am a journeyman shoemaker. This day three weeks the prisoner came to me; she asked my wife to go out and get some liquor, and while my wife was out she gave me eight one pound notes to take care of for her. On the next morning I returned them to her.

JOHN TURNER . I am an officer. The prisoner was brought to me at the Compter. I found this one pound note in the toe of her shoe, and this broach in her pocket, and the duplicate of a tablecloth. I said, you made haste in spending the eighteen or twenty pounds; no, she said, there was only one single ten pound note in the drawer, and that she fetched her things out of pawn with it, and this one pound note is what she got in change for the ten pound note.

Prisoner's Defence. My husband was serving his Majesty on board a man-of-war. He came home about three months back; I received thirty-one pounds, and my having a child to maintain; I went to service in order to save as much of the money as I could untill my husband came home, and during the time I was in service my mistress employed me to watch the workmen, suspecting that the platsterers robbed the house; and my master I met, he charged me with having robbed him of a ten pound note, and a five pound note; during the time I was in their service I returned a note to my mistress that dropped out of her pocket. I always acted with the strictest honesty and integrity.

Prosecutor. We have never had a plaisterer, carpenter bricklayer, or painter in the house.

Q. Are you sure that is your broach - A. Yes.

GUILTY , aged 38.

Of stealing the broach only.

Confined Six Months in Newgate , and fined 1 s .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110529-14

394. WILLIAM COOLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of April , a wrapper, value 1 s. and seventy-three pound weight of silk, value 143 l. 13 s. 6 d. the property of William Maddick , in the dwelling-house .

WILLIAM MADDICK . I am a silk-weaver , I live at No. 2, Love-lane, Aldermanbury . On the evening of the 6th of April I sent the boy Carol to Wood-street, with the parcel in question, containing seventy-three pounds weight of silk.

Q. What might be the value of it - A. One hundred and forty-nine pounds is the exact sum it cost me; I sent him to the Castle Inn, supposing that the Macclesfield waggon went from thence, which was not the case. The waggon not going from thence he brought it back again to my house, and laid it down in the passage while he went to the back part of the premises to enquire from whence it did go, which I understand is in Basinghall-street, and before he got back again into the passage the parcel was gone. I saw the parcel again before the Lord Mayor, and swore to it.

Mr. Reynolds. Will you favour me with the name of your partner - A. I have no partner.

Q. Whereabouts is this passage - A. There are two entrances into my house, a private one, and the other adjoining the house, both are part of the house, and under the same roof. Before I made the alteration it was the only door by which you could enter.

Q. It is not the common entrance to your dwelling-house - A. No, it is not; it is only the entrance to my warehouse.

Q. Does any body sleep in that part of the warehouse - A. A man sleeps in the warehouse. You go into the open air from the warehouse before you get to the dwelling-house. The passage leads into the yard.

COURT. It is the lower part of the house - A. Yes.

Q. And there you have made a separate door, with out going into your dwelling-house - A. Yes. It is in the parish of St. Albans, Wood-street.

Q. You are the occupier of the whole house - A. Yes.

Mr. Reynolds. Did you deliver the parcel yourself to the boy. It is not likely that I did. The parcel was laying to go to such a place. He knew his business. I suppose he took it.

Q. Did you see him bring it back - A. No.

Q. Then that is what you heard from somebody else - A. Yes.

WILLIAM CAROL. I am fourteen years old next October. On Saturday, April the 6th, at half past six o'clock in the evening, I met the prisoner at the bar with a bag on his shoulder in Aldermanbury postern, Cripplegate; knowing him to be a bad character I stopped him and laid hold of him by the collar; he instantly shoved the bag off his shoulders, as if he would shove it upon me, and rushed out of my hands. I holloaed out stop thief, and pursued him. Two or three people attempted to stop him that broke him from running so fast. I overtook him and brought him to where he had throwed the bag. He was not out of my sight at all. I brought him back to the property, it laid in the road. I left the property and followed him about twenty or thirty yards. I took him and the bag to the sign of the White Horse, Cripplegate-buildings. I marked two letters or the bag, A. H. and left it in the care of Mr. Henshaw, that keeps the White Horse public-house. I took the prisoner to the Compter, and when I came back to take the property away Mr. Henshaw told me somebody had been after it. This is the wrapper, the Alderman desired me to give it up the silk.

Mr. Reynolds. Did you go straight on or turn the corner when you pursued the prisoner - A. It was in Aldermanbury, all the way along.

Q. Of course you had no time to observe where the parcel was - A. No.

Q. Did you ever lose sight of the parcel - A. Yes, I ran after the man, but when I ran after the man I turned round and saw the parcel.

COURT, Q. to Mr. Maddick. Look at that wrapper - A. I know it to be my wrapper, which contained one hundred and forty-nine pounds weight of silk; these directions were to the wrapper; I cut the wrapper open, and saw it was my silk. The alderman gave me my silk back again, and ordered me to produce the wrapper here.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 27.

London Jury before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110529-15

395. THOMAS DAVIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of April , five pound weight of sugar, value 3 s. the property of Guy Champion , John Chapman , and William Nibbs .

The prosecutor was called, and not appearing in court, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110529-16

396. WILLIAM WILLMOTT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of May , three pounds eight ounces weight of solder, value 3 s. the property of Thomas Woods .

ANN WOODS I am the daughter of Thomas Woods, my father is a plumber in Silver-street, Wood-street . On Monday, the 13th of May, I sent the prisoner to clean the accompting-house window; I saw something heavy in his pocket, which was a piece of solder I conceived by the shape of it, and when he went down stairs I said, William, what have you got in your pocket; he said, it is nothing to you what I have got; I said, you had better let me see, or I will call some one in; he said, if I offered to look in his pocket he would knock me down; I seized him by the collar and dragged him into the shop. I took that piece of solder out of his pocket; I sent for an officer to take him in charge, this is the solder, it is my father's property. The prisoner was a labourer at our house.

Prisoner's Defence. I am very sorry for what I have done; I gave it to my mistress when she asked me.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and Whipped in Jail .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110529-17

397. WILLIAM DEBATT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of April , a parasol, value 15 s. the property of John Willatts .

JOHN WILLATS . I live at 21, Gracechurch-street , I am a stick and umbrella manufacturer .

RICHARD TAYLOR. I am a soldier in the 2nd regiment of Tower Hamlet militia. On the 6th of April; between seven and eight o'clock, I was going to Leadenhall for half a pound of cheese, I was going along Gracechurch-street, I saw the prisoner look at a coat hung out at a door for sale; I saw another with him, I thought he wanted to take it; I walked down Gracechurch-street after him; he went to the shop of Mr. Willatts; he walked by several times, and looked in; when he found an opportunity he snatched down a parasol; I followed him; he ran up a court right fronting Fen Church; I lost sight of him a little while; knowing him by a brown coat that he had got on I went up to him; I said, what have you got here; I saw a bulk under his coat; he made no answer. The other ran away; he wrestled with me a bit; something dropped; I cannot say what it was. I held him and Mr. Willatts saw the parasol.

JOHN TURNER . I am an officer. The parasol was delivered to me, I have had it ever since.

Prosecutor. It is my property. Richard Taylor brought the man back with the parasol upon him, and before the Lord Mayor, he said he found it upon him. When the prisoner was brought into the shop the property was upon him.

Prisoner's Defence. He is wrong in saying that I

took it from the shop, I picked it up going along; he is a man of bad character for house breaking.

Taylor. He snatched it from the shop door.

GUILTY . aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110529-18

398. RICHARD ARMITAGE was indicted for feloniously disposing off, and putting away, a forged dividend warrant, with intention to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England .

SECOND COUNT, for demanding of the Governour and Company of the Bank of England 405 l, pon a certain forged dividend warrant.

THIRD COUNT, charging him with demanding the said sum of 405 l. Only varying the manner of charging. And

THREE OTHER COUNTS, charging him with the said offence with like intention.

SEVENTH COUNT, charging him with disposing off, and putting away, a forged receipt, with intention to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England.

EIGHTH COUNT, for having in his possession a forged dividend warrant and receipt, with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England.

The indictment was read by Mr. Bosanquet, and the case was stated by Mr. Garrow.

WILLIAM SMITH . Q. I believe you are deputy secretary to the Bank of England - A. I am.

Q. Did you see this writing executed by the prisoner Armitage - A. I did.

Mr. Garrow. This is a necessary allegation and only to shew that he was in the service of the Bank of England.

ROBERT ROBERTS. Q. how long have you been acquainted with the prisoner at the bar - A. About seven years.

Q. What was his situation when you first became acquainted with him - A. He was living idly not doing any thing with his mother.

Q. You I believe was in the profession of the law - A. I was clerk to an attorney.

Q. Did your employment in that office bring you acquainted with a person of the of name Hudson - A. It did he became a bankrupt as a tradesman.

Q. Did it at any time become a subject of conversation between you and the prisoner and Hudson to endeavour to procure any money by any extraordinary means - A. We had many conversations of that nature between us.

Q. About how long has the prisoner been employed in the Bank of England - A. As far as I can recollect about half a dozen years.

Q. Was any plan finally settled between you dan the persons whom you have named to perform that purpose - A. There was a plan settled between us we met very often to discuss that plan and among other houses we met at the Angel Islington , White Conduit-house and the Barley-Mow, Frog Lane.

Q.Had you respectfully three apartments for you - A. Hudson was a shopkeeper at the time I had lodgings, I believe the prisoner either lodged with his mother or had private lodgings.

Q. Did you occasionally meet at your lodging for the discussion of this plan - A. We were careful not to have any conversation before a fourth person, therefore it was never carried on at any apartments that I had, we used to meet at places were we could have a box to ourselves. It was at last agreed that a forgery should be committed upon the dividend warrant office by filling up four blank dividend printed warrants which was to be brought by the prisoner at the bar and some of the Bank ink on account of its black colour. After the warrants were filled up Hudson was to procure a young man to present them at the proper office in the Bank for payment.

Q. What sum of money was it proposed to be raised by this means - A. Hudson proposed at least ten thousand pounds, the prisoner objected to the largeness of it, saying that an application for so great a sum would cause the person who applied to be sent to the principal in the office, which principal was most likely acquainted with the names of persons holding large stocks in the three per cents.

Q. What did he then propose - A. Not a greater amount than two thousand four hundred and thirty pounds should be presented, which sum was filled up.

Q. That plan was adopted, how did he plan that it should be executed - A. By putting in a fictious name upon a person who had no stock. Then it was proposed to put in a clergymans name because many of them were large stockholders.

Q. How was this to be carried into execution - A. After this was filled up, a young man was to be procured who was to carry it to the proper office which was done. The young man on being procured was to present this and I was to be behind to see that the money was received.

Q. How were you to guard against the person who did present it not being detected - A. It was proposed that all sum of that amount would be paid without any objected.

Q. Was there any question before the business was finished how it was to be settled - A. By Hudson reving 500 l. And the remainder between Armitage and myself.

Q. What were you to do besides being behind the young man to see the money paid - A. To pass the notes and I was to fill up the warrant, Hudson having been in the Bank his hand-writing would be known he thought he should be suspected; I was to fill them up and my principal business was to dispose of the notes afterwards.

Q. Did he in consequence of this agreement bring some dividend warrants and some ink - A. He brought six.

Q. What was the reason of bringing six when there was only four to be made - A. For fear of miscalculation, the two were to guard against an accident.

Q. Did you in consequence or that fill up these four papers - A. I did fill up these four, I did an except the bottom signature, that is Hudson's to them all William Birt attorney.

Q.Before you got to the Bank did the prisoner give you any information respecting that office in which

he was stationed - A. He did, he stated that very day which was the first day of payment.

Q. What date was this - A. I am not certain it was early in July 1809, he stated to me that very day, the day before it was intended to apply for the money, that very day a young man had been appointed to the dividend office to pay the warrants, and that he sat at his left and he had to superintend him, that it would be proper that the application should be made to this young man for the payment of them, because of he having the superintendance to guard against a discovery. He said he had on that day early in the morning received two thousand pounds which he had no occasion for them that day.

Q. This was in the afternoon of the day after the hours of the Bank that you had this conversation with him - A. It was, that he had early in the morning received two thousand pound notes, that he had no occasison for them that day, that he would very likely the next day have the two same or two others of the same amount.

Q. Did Hudson procure a young man - A. He did.

Q. What character did Hudson assume for the purpose of hiring the young man - A. The name of Birt, stockbroker.

Q. Do you know that of your own knowledge - A. I know that he had the clerk, I do not know what name he went by.

Q. Did you after this conversation go to the Bank at the same time the young man went to receive the money with the warrants - A. I did.

Q. Who gave the warrants to the young man - A. Hudson.

COURT. Do you know that - A. Yes I do, I saw him give them.

Mr. Garrow. With what directions did the young man go to the Bank - A. He was taken into the office by Hudson; his master carried him into the office with the papers in the common way of stockbrokers.

Q. Do you mean the warrant office - A. Into the pay office.

Q. The young man knew nothing from you of this transaction did he - A. Nothing at all.

Q. Did you hear the directions that were given him, and see him follow these directions - A. I did, he went to this young man of the left of Armitage the new Bank clerk.

Q. The brokers clerk went to the new clerk in the Bank, you saw him on the left of Armitage - A. Yes and placed myself immediately behind this clerk.

Q. Was it early in the morning - A. About half past eleven.

Q. Had Armitage been apprised that it was to be done that morning - A. It was settled to be done that morning.

Q. Did any thing pass between Armitage and you - A. I moved my hat for Armitage to know me, he knew my business, and that it was settled I should be there the preceeding evening. After waiting some time as the office was thronged the young man put the warrants down before Mr. Mills, the clerk Mills took them up, and asked him how he would have them, meaning in what notes; he had been desired to say the shortest way for I am agoing to take them to our bankers directly. The clerk looked over his money; Armitage was close to his elbow, and the clerk Mills said to Armitage, have you got two one thousand pound notes; He said he had, and produced them, they were given by Armitage to the clerk Mills, and Mr. Mills took the number of the notes, these two one thousand and four one hundred pounds; he then gave to Hudson's young man a twenty and a ten, making together two thousand four hundred and thirty pounds. The young man had been desired by Hudson to come to him at the Bank coffee-house, and if he was not there to wait for him because was there any discovery made I was to have apprized him. He waited for me under the Royal Exchange.

Q. You saw it all done, you went and informed him that it was all right, and then you went with him to the coffee-house - A. Yes, but I staid out side of the coffee-house.

Q. You saw him go in the coffee-house, how soon did he join you - A. In less than five minutes, he gave me the two one thousand pound notes and told me to go to the Bank directly and change them. I by direction wrote Hammersly upon one of the notes; it was mutually agreed by us before to do so.

Q. Look at that note is that the one - A. Yes, the word Hammersley is my own hand-writing.

Q. Then did you get your two thousand pound notes broke into smaller sums - A. Into one hundred and fifty tens, and one hundred fives, and while I was waiting in the cashiers office for change, Armitage came out of his own office into the cashers office and saw that I received the change, that there was no doubt there, he did nothing more than look on; I got my change and went away and met Hudson; Armitage went back to his office.

Q. How soon after that did you meet Armitage - A. About four five or six in the afternoon of the same day he came to my lodgings in Princes Square, Kennington.

Q. How long had you had them lodgings at that time - A. Not much more than a week or nine days.

Q. By whose advice had you changed your lodgings - A. By the advice of Hudson and Armitage.

Q. What reason did Armitage or Hudson assign to you for your changing your lodging - A. Because that was a part of the town I never resided in, and of course was not known.

Q. He came to your lodgings that afternoon, what then - A We rode out together in a chaise me and Armitage we went down the Croydon Road, drank a bottle of wine and returned home to my lodgings. I gave Armitage fifty notes of ten pounds each, and fifty of five pound each and many others of one's two's but the exact amount I could not tell on that night; and the night after made up the amount of a thousand pounds what I gave him, these were the notes that I received at the cashiers office and I had changed some to get smaller notes.

Q. Did you employ any body else to exchange any for you - A. Not the first day, On the Monday early in the morning, Kezia Willis went out with me to break the larger notes; we went to many of the shops at the west-end of the Town, as many as we

could; we got rid of as much as we could in the course of that day.

Q. Then you had your own share - A. Yes, and I paid Hudson his share, excepting thirty-five pounds; I paid him four hundred and sixty-five pounds.

Q. Was any alteration made to the notes - A. Where an ought could be made into a six or a nine, it was done, and a one into a seven or a four, it was done, but no additional figures.

Q.Well, sir, this business being so settled as you made alterations was there any application of the ink - A. We made use of the bank ink.

Q. Is that one of the notes that you so altered - A. It appears like our alterations.

Q. How long was it after this before you were apprehended - A. About thirteen months.

Q. Had you intercourse in the mean time of seeing Armitage and Hudson - A. Yes, constantly in the habit of seeing them. I was taken up about the 4th or 5th of August, 1810.

Q. Was Kezia Willis taken into custody too - A. She was.

Q. Do you know a person of the name of Folkard - A. I do.

Q. How long had you been acquainted with him - A. Not many months.

Q. Was he a common acquaintance between you and the prisoner - A. He was not.

Q. Did you, before you were taken in custody know that the prisoner was acquainted with Folkard - A. We have been in company together upon excursions.

COURT. Do you mean parties of pleasure - A. Yes.

Mr. Garrow. And Folkard knew Willis too - A. Yes, we were often in the habit of riding out together.

Q. Was he soon informed that you were in custody - A. Very soon; he visited me; not he himself, but a friend of his, sent by him, came to see me the first week of my confinement.

Q. Look in that dividend warrant you hold in your hand, there is a hole in the middle of it - A. There is; it was not there when presented; one name I recollect, that is, Hoffman. I see now the letters, Hoff.

Q. Do you know whether there was any clerk in the bank of the name of Hoffman - A. Indirectly I did, that made me recollect the name.

Q. You have no doubt of the name of the person who signed for the bank, his name was Hoffman - A. It was.

Q. Had you any warrants of the bank to fill them up by - A. Yes, two bona fide warrants; he said he had paid for them himself, and therefore had brought them to me for patterns. They were for the purpose of copying the clerks names, whose signature they had, and the manner of filling up.

Q. You, as near as you could, imitated the writing of the clerks - A. Yes, I did.

Q. Hoffman is one of these names - A. It is.

Q. And therefore you made it as much like Hoffman's signature as you could - A. Yes, and G. Taylor, I made that like G. Taylor.

Q. What did you do with the two warrants which he brought you as patterns - A. They were returned to him.

Mr. Serjeant Ruff. Mr. Roberts, Kezia Willis is your companion - A. She is.

Q. Are you a married man - A. I am not.

Q. She were living with you at the time that you were apprehended - A. She was.

Q. And she was also living with you in 1802 - A. She was.

Q. Was she at your lodgings at Lambeth - A. She was.

Q. How lately have you seen her - A. Within the last hour, and I have seen her within the last ten weeks six times.

Q. What prison, Mr. Roberts, do you come from now - A. Horsemonger-lane.

Q. What prison were you in before you came to Horsemonger-lane - A. Newgate.

Q. When you have seen Kezia Willis have you been alone - A. I have seen her between iron bars once, in a room with the keeper of the House of Correction in Cold Bath-fields.

Q. What prison was she in - A. None, but in the governor's house of the House of Correction.

Q. Was he with her when she came to make these visits from the House of Correction - A. Yes. And once his son-in-law came.

Q. What prison were you in before you came to Horsemonger-lane - A. Newgate. Kezia Willis came to see me in Newgate, she passed a whole week with me in Newgate, and slept with me in Newgate.

Q. As she slept with you in Newgate you had an opportunity of talking together without other persons hearing - A. We had.

Q. Where were you first acquainted with her - A. At Epsom. I have known her these four or five years, as lodging at her brother's house during the Epsom races a week.

Q. What situation of life was she in then - A. As living with her brother and sister, assisting them in their houshold work. He is a coal merchant.

Q. You did not first become acquainted with her in any fields about Copenhagen-house - A. I did not.

Q. Kezia Willis went out with you with these notes - A. She did. I do not suppose she knew they were the produce of forged notes.

Q. She knew these notes had been altered - A. I do not suppose she did, I never told her that I had altered them.

Q. How many notes did you exchange that day - A. Possibly twenty or thirty.

Q. What was your reason for taking Kezia Willis for that expedition, what account did you give to her, it was rather an odd thing to do - A. That they had been obtained in that way that it would not do for me to pass them, or as little as I could help.

Q. Do you mean, upon your oath, to say, that if you had not told her they were the produce of forged notes, might not she suspect it - A. Very likely she might.

Q. When did you first take her to live with you - A. She lived with me, or came away with me on the Michaelmas Day, 1808. She was on a visit in town, at her sister's in the Old Jewry.

Q. Had she another sister in town - A. A great many.

Q. Is that sister a married woman - A. No.

Q. Then she went home with you - A. She did, and continued to live with me until our apprehension. The first place I took her to was Penton-street, Pentonville; the next was at Pancras, and we went to Cheltenham for a month; and immediately upon our coming to town I took these lodgings at Lambeth.

Q. At the time that you lived at Lambeth had you any other lodgings - A. I had.

Q. Kezia Willis , as she lived with you at Lambeth, knows of Mr. Armitage coming to you when you went out with the gig - A. I have no doubt but she knew it.

Q. Now, Mr. Roberts, you have spoken of a man of the name of Folkard - A. I have; his first acquaintance was about six months before our apprehension.

Q. You said that Folkard was not a common acquaintance with you and the prisoner - A. He was not.

Q. You spoke also of a party of pleasure that you took with Folkard - A. I went with him to Birmingham.

Q. How long ago is that - A. In the month of September last.

Q. What was the object of Folkard's journey - A. Folkard's object was for the purpose of recovering a sum of money of a man of the name of Holliday, as he told me.

Q. What was your object besides that of a party of pleasure, for going to Birmingham - A. With deference to you, my lord, I am not obliged to answer any question to criminate myself, except relevant to this case.

Q. Does this tend to criminate yourself - A. It does.

Q. You have undergone many adventures not connected with this business, have not you been apprehended upon many other charges than this - A. I have, twice in my life.

Q. How long ago is it since the first apprehension was - A. About thirteen years ago.

Q. May I ask what the occasion of that apprehension was - A. I was apprehended on a suspicion of a robbery.

Q. What age were you then - A. About nineteen.

Q. That was not the time that you were clerk to an attorney, as has been stated by my learned friend - A. I lived with nobody then. After that I lived with Mr. Palmer of Basinghall-street.

Q. How long ago is it that you lived with him - A. I suppose, about ten years ago.

Q. What was the occasion of your leaving his service - A. He failed in business.

Q. You have been in other businesses besides that of an attorney's clerk - A. I have, as an agent to a Birmingham and Sheffield manufactory.

Q. Were not you partner once in a discounting business in Budge-row - A. I never had such connection nor part in it.

Q. Was it in an annuity way that you dealt - A. Never in Budge-row.

Q. But any where else - A. Then I object; I decline answering the question whether I dealt in annuities; because I might criminate myself; it might lead on to other questions.

COURT. Were you concerned in annuities - A. I have been.

Mr. Serjeant Ruff. Have you been concerned in annuities - A. I have, only one transaction of the kind.

Q. Only one single transaction - A. Only one.

Q. Was Hudson concerned with you in this transaction - A. He was.

Q. And the only annuity transaction that you have been concerned in is the one that Hudson was concerned with you - A. The only one.

Q. Have you ever been called by any other name - A. I have gone by the name of Clifford and Bennett, and no other.

Q. Have you gone by a title - A. I object to answering that question.

COURT. Do you apprehend that your going by any title of honour do you think your answering that question it would tend to criminate yourself - A. I think it will.

Mr. Serjeant Ruff. Did you ever call yourself, or go by the name of Lord Percy - A. I shall not answer it without my lord commands me.

Q. Now you have told me when the period of your first apprehension was, when was the second apprehension - A. About the year 1803.

Q. Upon what charge were you apprehended then Mr. Roberts - A. I negotiated a bill which a gentleman had stolen from his purse, or had lost it.

Q. What was the charge made against you to cause that apprehension - A. It was merely the payment of the bill.

Q. Who were you first acquainted with, Hudson or the prisoner Armitage - A. I was acquainted with Hudson first. Hudson was a clerk in the bank.

Q. How long is it since you saw Hudson - A. I suppose it is five months.

Q. Now when was it that you first gave an account similar to what you have now given - A. In the month of last October.

Q. Was that before or after you had escaped from prison - A. After.

Q. What prison were you in - A. In Newgate.

Q. What prison did you escape from - A. The house of Correction in Cold Bath Fields.

Q. What was the charge made against you, which occasioned you to be in the House of Correction, Cold Bath Fields - A. I never saw a copy of my commitment.

Q. And you have no notion - A. I have a notion, I was examined.

Q. Was it a forgery - A. It was.

Q. More than one - A. It was not.

Q. Was not a distinct charge made against you for a forgery, and was not a charge made against

you for stealing - A. There was a charge against me for things that were found upon my person, they were exchequer bills.

Q. And the charge was, that these exchequer bills which were found in your pocket were stolen - A. Yes.

Q. Of course that was a distinct charge from the other charge - A. It was.

Q. Were you charged with having stolen any other things besides these exchequer securities - A. I cannot answer the question. There was another charge made against me, but I believe abandoned; it was entered into, but not continued.

Q. What other things were found upon you besides exchequer bills - A. Two bank post-bills.

Q. They were also made a subject of charge - A. They were entered into. I was not detained upon any of these things.

Q. Then, sir, it was not untill you made your escape from the House of Correction, Cold Bath Fields, that you told the story that you have today - A. It was not.

Q. Who was the first person that you told these things to - A. It was written by myself.

Q. Is that writing extant now - A. I cannot tell, I never kept a copy; it was sent to the Governor of the bank.

Q. You had taken no step to disclose this previous to your being taken - A. None, whatever.

Q. And then for the first time you told the story that you have told to-day - A. It was.

Q. What was your reason for doing that - A. An innate love of justice, and a desire to make as much reparation as possible.

Q. That is what you mean now to state as one great motive for your discovery, upon your oath was it that - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know a person of the name of Clarke a butcher - A. I do.

Q. Upon your oath have not you said to Clarke that Mr. Armitage was as innocent as a child unborn, and that you did it all yourself - A. That is quite impossible.

Q. Did not you state to Clarke that Hudson and you alone did this, and that Armitage was totally innocent - A. That never took place; I will swear it.

Q. Then if you did not say this to Clarke then you did not say any thing about being hanged yourself, did you - A. No.

Q. Do you know such a person as Clarke - A. I do; and I swear that I never uttered such words to Clarke, nor to any person whatever.

Mr. Garrow. Who is this man of the name of Clarke - A. I know a man of the name of Clarke, a butcher at Newington; he was in the habit of coming into Newgate very often.

Q. Do you know whether he was an acquaintance of the prisoner - A. I believe they were acquainted; Clarke kept a public house where Armitage was in the habit of going as well as me, but not lately. It is four years back since he had a public-house.

Q. Where were you at the time that you wrote the narrative that you sent to the Governor of the bank - A. In Newgate.

Q. Did you send it without any stipulation whatever with it - A. I sent it unconditional.

Q. Did you know either of your own knowledge, or from the prisoner Armitage, where Armitage was at the time of that communication - A. I had not the slightest knowledge of it.

ARTHUR HEMMIT MILLS. Q. Are you in the service of the bank of England - A. I am.

Q. How long have you been in that situation - A. About three years and a half.

Q. In what office were you employed - A. In the dividend pay office.

Q. Do you know what day you were first placed in that situation - A. I do.

Q. That is a book of your own memorandums, they refer to the time - A. They are the enteries in that pay-office, I went into that office the 10th of July, 1809, it was the first day that I was allowed to pay to the public.

Q. Was it part of your duty, as pay clerk in that office, to pay such warrants as were presented to be paid - A. It was.

Q. On the 10th day of July, which you say is the first day in which you were placed at that office did you receive any notes to a large amount - A. Yes, I did, two one thousand pound notes I received on the 10th of July.

Q. Upon your receiving these notes you make a memorandum in your book - A. I do, in which I charged myself that I had received them.

Q. Does it then appear in the book that you received these two notes of a thousand pound each on that day - A. It does, on the 10th of July.

Q. After the hours of business are over are you allowed to keep these notes in your possession, or do you return them to another person - A. I return them to some gentleman waiting in the office, we return them to the seller.

Q. Did you make use of the two thousand pound notes on that day - A. No, I did not.

Q. Did you return them in the ordinary course of business - A. I did; it appears in the book that I did so.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar - A. I do.

Q. Was he employed in that office in July, 1809 - A. He was.

Q. Was he in the situation of a pay clerk also - A. Yes, he was.

Q. Was he superior to you - A. Yes, he was, he had a better situation than myself.

Q. Was his situation near yours - A. I cannot exactly say, if he did sit of one side of me it was to the right.

Q. Look at the warrants on the 10th of July, you said you returned the two thousand pounds that you received on the 11th of July; you never had them again - A. No, not to my knowledge.

Q. On the 11th of July had you as clerk in that office, warrants presented to you for payment - A. Yes, I had.

Q. And did you pay them - A. I did, I made an entry of them, there is my hand-writing upon them; I am certain I paid these warrants.

Q. In what manner were they paid and what is the whole amount - A. Two one thousand pound notes, five notes of one hundred, one note of twenty, and the other of ten.

Q. On the 11th of July had you received any notes to the amount of one thousand pounds, or did you obtain these two one thousand pound notes from any where else - A. I received them from Mr. Armitage; I do not charge myself with any thousand pound notes untill I received them from Mr. Armitage. The highest note that I received that day of the teller, is five hundred pounds.

Q. Be so good as to look at these notes, and see whether these are the notes that you paid the dividend warrants - A. Yes.

COURT. Are they all

Mr. Bosanquet. Yes, my Lord, they are all,

Mr. Mills. I believe they are the two one thousand, and the four one hundreds.

COURT. Q. Do you speak positively of the two one thousand pound notes - A. Yes, I do.

Q. And the four one hundred pounds - A. No, not positively, because the figures has been altered.

Mr. Garrow. Tell the numbers of the notes of one hundred pounds, and I will look over the notes - A. No. 2305, to 2308, included.

Q. Give us the date of yours which is 2305 - A. I believe it to be the 8th of July.

Q. Look at this note and see whether it is altered - A. I believe the ought in 2305, is altered into a nine.

Q. It appears to you to have been altered - A. Yes, into a nine.

Q. What is the number of the second one - A.2306, I believe the ought to be altered into a nine, it is now 2396; the next is 2695, a twenty pound.

Q. Look at the one hundred pounds; 2367, that is in its present state, does the third figure appear to have been altered - A. I cannot discover it.

Q. Look at the fourth note - A. I believe the ought in 2368 has been altered into a 6, they appear to have been the notes that I paid away, but the figures are altered, the oughts are altered into a six, and the other into a nine.

Q. What is the number of the note that you issued of twenty pounds value - A.2005, it is altered to 2695, the alteration is visible.

Q. What is the number of the ten pound note - A.3613, it is altered into 3643, that alteration is visible, I have not the least doubt that is the note.

Q. Look at the warrant, you see there is a hole in it, was it in that state when you paid it - A. Certainly not, it has been punched out, I am certain the warrant appeared whole and perfect when paid, they were canceled in this manner at the time, we have altered our mode since.

EDMUND HAMERSHAM . Q. Are you what is called one of the tellers of the Bank - A. I am.

Q. It is a part of your duty upon opening house for business to deliver out to the pay clerks what is called their charge - A. It is.

Q. You deliver to each a certain number of Bank notes of various sums, to furnish them with the means so paying such demands as may be made upon them in the course of their duty - A. Yes.

Q. They enter the description of these notes as they receive them from you - A. Yes.

Q. And upon the conclusion of the business of the day does each clerk deliver back to you such notes as they have not expended - A. He does, he gives the particulars of what notes he has to return, and what he has remaining in his case I take from him, and take an account of what I take from him.

Q. Did you on the tenth of July 1809. issue to Mr. Mills any notes of one thousand pounds, look in your book and see whether you issued to Mr. Mills any notes of one thousand pounds each - A. It appears among a variety of other bills there were two of one thousand pounds each.

Q. Did he expend them in the transactions of that day - A. It appears that he returned two of one thousand pound each.

Q. The fact is he returned them - A. Yes.

Q. Look on the 11th of July, and see whether he is charged with any thousand pound note - A. On that day it did not come under my channel, it came in the name of Mr. Vauting.

Q. Are you acquainted with Mr. Armitage - A. I have known Mr. Armitage only since he has been in the situation at the Bank, some years.

Q. Did you by your intercourse with him become acquainted with his hand-writing - A. I think I could speak to his writing if I saw it.

Q. Cast your eye upon that letter, and tell me whether you believe that writing to be Mr. Armitages - A. I have no doubt in my own mind but it is his writing.

COURT to Mr. Mills. Had you any acquaintance with Roberts - A. No, I never saw him in my life until his examination.

Mr. Garrow. Did you ever talk to Mr, Roberts of what notes you had disposed of on the 10th - A. No, never.

Q. I am speaking of Roberts - have you ever had any conversation with Roberts, or spoke to him, of what notes you retained on that day - A. Never; I never spoke to Roberts in my life.

Q. You first said that you never communicated to Roberts that you had delivered to you on that day, did you ever tell Roberts what sum on that day you took to the teller - A. I positively never spoke to him in my life.

Q. Could any person except the teller who issued out the notes to you, or yourself, or a brother clerk who might look in your collection of notes, could any other person tell what you returned - A. No one out of the Bank.

Q. No stranger of the Bank could know what shape you received in the morning, or what sum you returned in the afternoon - A. No.

Q. That might become known to a brother clerk in the office - A. No one could know but those that belonged to the office.

Q. For instance, was he in such a situation if he was curious enough, could he have known what you had in your posession - A. He could have known, but no other person but in the connection of the Bank.

JAMES VAUTING . Q. In July last were you one of the tellers of the Bank - A. I was.

Q. Did you on the morning of the 11th of that month issue the charge to Armitage and Mills - A. To

both Armitage and Mills.

Q. The delivery in the morning is called the charge, he charges himself in the book, and delivers back to you what is not paid away - A. Yes.

Q If you give fifty thousand pounds, do you in your book break them into the different sums - A. No, not in the morning

Q. What is the amount of Armitage's charge on the 11th - A. Eleven thousand seven hundred and thirty pounds to Armitage that is my book.

Q. Have you got Mr. Armitage's book of the corresponding date - A. Yes; he gives the sums of his return, what he returned that day, appears to be five thousand and thirty nine pounds.

Q. Do you find any account of two notes of one thousand pound each - A. They were not returned the two one thousand pounds, there were two notes of one thousand pound each written to Mr. Mills.

Q. My question is, whether you find any thing in that book concerning and respecting two notes of one thousand pound each - A. There are two one thousand pound notes writen to Mr. Mills; that entry imports that Mr. Mills received them from Mr. Armitage for the purpose of payment.

Q. Is there any other entry in that place in writing of Mr. Armitage's, respecting the lending any other notes to Mr. Mills - A. There are four one pound notes which he discharges himself off, by saying that he gave them to Mr. Mills.

Q. To Mr. Mills. Besides the two notes of one thousand pound each that you borrowed of Mr. Armitage, did you borrow four notes of one pound each - A. Yes, I did.

JOHN HOFFMAN . Q. Were you in the service of the Bank in July, 1809 - A. I was.

Q. Was it a part of your business at that time to sign the dividend warrants in order for them to be paid - A It was.

Q Was there any other person at that time of the same name in the Bank authorised so to do - A. No person.

Q. Was there any person authorised so to do whose name began with Hoff - A. Not that I know off.

Q.Whose writing is that - A. As much as remains of it, I cannot say; it is not mine, there is some little resemblance.

Q. Did you sign warrants in the three per cents. at that period - A. There is no doubt I did, the nine appears to be an imitation of mine; it is not my writing.

GEORGE TAYLOR. Q. Were you in the service of the Bank in the month of July 1809 - A. I was as a lent hand in that office.

Q. Look at the signature at the left hand corner of that warrant; during that period did you sign warrants in your own name - A Yes.

Q. It was part of your business so to do - A. It was.

Q. When the proprietor had got his dividend warrant, is it part of your business to witness it under the printed word witness - A It was.

Q. Now you see the signature there of G. Taylor; is that your hand writing - A. It is not, there is a resemblance, it decidedly appears to be an imitation of it.

NATHANIEL TOWLE . Q. What was your situation in the office of the three per cents, in July 1809 - A. To examine receipts.

Q Have you cerefully examined the books of the Bank in the three per cent. consols at that time, to see whether Matilda Pomfret had any stock - A. There was no such stockholder at that time.

Q. When the time of paying the dividends is coming round, is it usual to shut the transfer before the payment begins - A. It is always usual to shut the stock before the beginning to pay the dividends.

Q. Is that for the purpose to enable the Bank to make out their books, and to make out corresponding dividends to those who are entitled to receive it - A. Yes.

Q. Are the books then prepared in alphabetical order, with all the requisite sums of different proprietors carried out into columns - A. Yes.

Q. These books are then distributed into the letters in legible characters in the different places in the office; a person of the name of Pomfret, resorting there for the dividend, would the clerk there turn to the letter P, before he delivered the warrant - A. Yes.

Q. In the case of such a warrant as this, which is made out by a person whose name is not in the books; if any body presented this to one of the clerks, would not that be immediately detected unless by conspiracy in the Bank - A Yes.

Q. Now Pomfret, for his, or their dividend, the clerk would turn to the book, he would not find the entry, he would ask the sum, he would not find either the name or the sum - A. No, he would not.

Q. A fictitious name would not find its way in your book - A. No.

Q. Therefore the person would be immediately detected - A. Yes, he would.

Q. At the dividend pay office the clerk has nothing to do but to pay upon the warrant - A.Nothing else.

HENRY TEAGUE . Q Were you employed as printer, in July 1809, to print the dividend warrants for the three per cent, consols - A. Yes.

Q. Were you employed by them in the year 1807 - A. Yes.

Q. Take this into your hands; can you tell me whether these warrants were printed upon Bank paper - A. Not on Bank paper, they were printed by me, I have carefully examined them, and I have no doubt they were printed by me.

Q. Was that also printed by you - A. It was.

Q. Does that correspond in date with the dividend warrant which you have in your hand, and in which there is a hole - A. It does.

Q. Having printed them both at the same time and looking at the paper that is perfect, are you able to say that both these warrants were perfect - A. I have not the least doubt.

KEZIA WILLIS . Q. How long have you been acquainted with the person that has been examined here of the name of Roberts - A More than two years.

Q. Did you live with him sometime before his apprehension - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know the person at the bar of the name of Armitage - A. Yes, I do.

Q. Do you know a person of the name of Hudson - A. I do.

Q. Had you, before Roberts's apprehension seen

them three persons in company together - A. Yes, I have, several times.

Q. Did you know what situation Armitage was in - A. I always understood he was in the bank.

Q. Did you understand so from his own conversation as well as Roberts's - A Yes.

Q Where did you live with Roberts in July, 1809 - A. In Princess-square, Kennington.

Q. How long had you lived there before July, 1809 - A. We were there ten or twelve days.

Q. Did you see Mr. Armitage at your apartments there at any time in that month - A. Yes.

Q. Upon what occasion did you see him there - A. He brought some ink once from the Bank.

Q. Did you know from him, or from any thing that was said in his presence for what purpose that ink was brought there - A. He told Roberts that it was blacker ink than they could get elsewhere. I heard them talk about some dividend warrants frequently before some ink was brought.

Q. Who were the parties that talked respecting these dividend warrants - A. I never heard any body talk about it but Armitage and Roberts; Armitage said he could get the dividend warrants of his brother Jack.

Q. What dividend warrants - A. I do not know. I heard him say that.

Q. Did you afterwards see any papers that were called dividend warrants - A. No, I do not recollect that.

Q. Do you remember Roberts coming home any time with a large sum of money - A. Yes.

Q. When was that as near as you can state - A. We had not been at Princess-square long before he brought home a large parcel of bank notes.

Q. Do you know the amount or about the amount of them - A. I heard Roberts say that Armitage was to have one thousand pounds, and Roberts was to have one thousand pounds.

Q. What time of the day was it that Roberts brought home these bank notes - A. I believe it was between twelve and one o'clock in the day.

Q. Did they appear to be rumpled, or were they clean and appeared not to have been in circulation - A. They were quite new.

Q. After Roberts brought them home between twelve and one o'clock in the day he went out did he not - A. He did, and returned about five o'clock, and I saw some notes.

Q. About what time did Armitage come - A. I believe between six and seven o'clock: Roberts gave him some money, I do not know how much; I saw Roberts give him some notes.

Q. Do you know whether they went out that afternoon - A. They went out a little while in the evening together, I believe.

Q. Did you know or did you hear from the conversation where or how they went that evening - A. I did not.

Q. You saw Roberts give Armitage some notes - A. I did.

Q Do you recollect any conversation that accompanied his giving the notes - A. I do not recollect any thing of that.

Q. On the next day did you go out any where - A. I did, I went out with Roberts.

Q. How did Roberts and you employ yourselves when you went out - A. We passed a great many notes. We got change of large note notes for smaller ones by buying things of tradesmen.

Q. From whom did you get the notes that you got changed by trading with trades-people - A. From Roberts. They were quite new notes.

Q. Have you ever seen Armitage in company with Roberts besides at your lodging in Prince's-street - A. When we lodged at Pancras he frequently dined with us there.

Q. When you came home upon the day that you had gone out with Roberts you of course brought home a considerable number of small notes, was any thing done to the notes of your own knowledge - A. I do not know that there was. I saw Roberts alter some of the numbers, one's or two's soon after the notes were brought from the Bank.

Q. Was that before he and you changed them with the trades-people - A. Yes.

Q. What ink did he use to make that alteration - A. Some ink that Armitage brought that he described to be bank black ink.

Q. You continued to live with Roberts until he was taken up - A. I did.

Q. When was he was up - A. I think it was in August last year; I was taken in custody too upon that occasion.

Q. Upon that occasion did you intimate any inclination of communicating what you knew respecting this transaction - A. I did.

Q. How lately before you and Roberts were taken up had you seen Mr. Armitage; had you seen him after July, in which that bank business took place - A. Yes, a good many times.

Q. How short a time before you were taken up had you seen Armitage - A. About three weeks.

Q. Did Armitage and Roberts appear to be on the same intimate footing that they had been before - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know a person of the name of Folkard - A. Yes, I do.

Q. Was he an acquaintance of Roberts and Armitage - A. Yes, he was.

Q. Had he any communication of your intention when you were taken in custody of your disclosing what you knew - A. Yes, I saw him in Tothill Fields prison.

Q. Can you tell us how long you had been in custody when you say Folkard - A. About a week. I informed him I meaned to tell all I knew.

Q You told me just now that the prisoner, when speaking of the dividend warrants, the prisoner said he could get them from his brother Jack - A. Yes; I understood his brother Jack was employed in the bank; I understood that from Armitage and Roberts too.

Q. He said he could easily get the warrants from him - A. He did.

Q. How long before July had you heard talk about doing something at the Bank - A. A great while before; it had been frequently talked of between Armitage and Roberts.

Q. You were known to Armitage as living with

Roberts - A. As the wife of Roberts.

Q. Do you recollect any thing being said about the July business - A. I heard Roberts say it could be better done in July than any other time; I did not hear him say why.

Q. What the particular thing to be done was, you did not know - A. I did not.

Q. You have since Roberts has been in custody, as far as you could, kept up your connexion with him - A. I have.

Mr. Gurney. You have had opportunities of conversing with him about this - A. I have seen him about twice a week.

Q. Then you therefore had opportunities of confering with him on the story which you were to tell here to-day - A. I have; he has not said much to me about it.

Q. While he has been in one prison, and you in another you have been allowed to go and see him - A. Once a week, and sometimes more, since I have been with Mr. Adkins in the House of Correction, which is ten weeks.

Q. You had been in confinement, and was in confinement when Roberts was taken up - A. I was taken to the House of Correction first, and then to Tothill Fields.

Q. How long were you kept in confinement - A. I was in the House of Correction three days, and in Tothill-fields a week, and at Mr. Wilsons, a lock-up house, there I was kept some months.

Q. You said you have seen Roberts after some of the bank notes, and that you and he went out to get change - A. I did.

Q. And when he was taken up he was taken up in a one horse chaise he had things in the chaise that he was charged with their being stolen - what was Roberts - A. I understood ten months after I was with him that he was something in the law.

Q. You never knew of any regular employment that he pursued, did you - A. No.

Q. You know probably that he was a person that went by different names - A. I did.

Q. Did you know him by the name of Bennett - A. I did, and Clifford.

Q. And Lord Percy - A. No.

Q. Do not you know that he played the part of Lord Percy, you know what I allude to - A. I do; I was with him when he played the part of Lord Percy; I knew what you allude to.

Q. And when he was taken up you were taken up in his company, and you had been out with him with these bank notes that you had seen him alter - A. Yes.

Q. I take it for granted you thought you were in a serious situation - A. I did.

Q. And you thought it better that any body else should be hanged than you - A. I did.

Q. And you hope to save yourself from all punishment by giving the evidence that you now give - A. I told the truth, it is so.

Mr. Garrow. How soon after you were in custody did you make your solicitation to the solicitor of the bank - A. In about eight or nine days after I was first apprehended.

Q. Had you during that time been kept separate and apart from Roberts - A. I had been kept separate and apart from him.

Q. For the last ten weeks that you have been situated in the house of Correction, have you been there as a prisoner, or under the care of the governor of the house - A. I was in the governor's house, not as a prisoner for any offence.

Q. Have you used that opportunity which the prison afforded of visiting Roberts in custody - A. Yes.

Q. Upon these interviews have you concerted with him concerning the story that you were to tell this day - A. I have not.

Q. to Mr. Towle. Was there a young man of the name of John Armitage in the bank - A. There was in the Gree per cent consols.

Q. Was it his duty among other clerks to fill up the dividend warrants preparatory to the half year delivery - A. It was.

Q. Is it usual to permit the clerks to carry home the dividend warrants at over hours to their own houses - A. No.

RACHAEL RUTLIDGE . Q. You live at Windsor Terrace, City-road - A. I do.

Q. Do you know a man of the name of Roberts that has been examined to-day - A. Yes.

Q. Did he come to lodge with you in February, 1809 - A. In 1810. I believe. It was a twelve month ago last January or February.

Q. How long did Roberts live there that time - A. About a month.

Q. During the time that Roberts lodged with you do you remember the person of Armitage coming to him - A. I do not remember his name.

Q. Look round and see if that is the person - A. I remember a gentleman like him, I cannot say whether it is the gentleman or not, I never heard his name.

THOMAS HARRISON . Q. I believe you keep the Bedford Arms in Campden Town - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know a man of the name of Roberts - A. Yes.

Q. Did you know him in the year 1808 and 1809 - A. Yes.

Q. Did you know the prisoner at the bar during the same time - A. Yes.

Q. Did you ever see them together during that time, and were they acquaintances - A. I never saw them together.

Q. About the month of July did you know them enquire for each other - A. I declare I cannot recollect whether they did or no.

Q. You knew them both - A. Yes; I remember Armitage asking for Holbrook.

Q. Did you ever hear him ask for Roberts - A. I cannot charge my memory with it.

WILLIAM FOLKARD . Q. Are you acquainted with Armitage - A. I never was intimately acquainted with him; I knew him perfectly well.

Q. How long have you known him - A. About two years.

Q. Do you know a person of the name of Roberts, who has been examined as a witness here, and Kezia Willis - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know whether Armitage and Roberts were acquainted together - A. I believe they were; I have seen them repeatedly together for this year and

a half; I have seen them at the Forest, Woodford Wells, and repeatedly at Lee Bridge; those places are for entertainment, where parties might be without mixing in other company.

Q. Who used to be the companion of Armitage - A. I have seen Mr. Roberts, and I have been in company with him myself.

Q. You four constituting the party - A. Kezia Willis , I believe, was not in the party.

Q. Do you know Hudson - A. I know him very well; I never saw him with Armitage that I remember.

Q. Are you sure of that - A. I am certain of it.

Q. You have seen him after with Roberts and Kezia Willis , have not you - A. I have.

Q. How soon did you hear that Roberts and Kezia Willis were taken in custody - A. I believe the next day after they were taken.

Q. And so like a good-natured friend you went to visit them - A. I did.

Q.Where were they in confinement - A. Roberts and Willis were in the house of Correction.

Q. You think it was the next day you saw Kezia Willis - A. I did.

Q. You knew what they were in custody for - A. I had heard what they were in custody for; I had some conversation with Kezia Willis , she told me that she intended to inform Mr. Kay, the solicitor of the bank, that Mr. Armitage was concerned in the forgery.

Q.Was Mr. Armitage still at that time in his situation in the bank - A. I believe he was.

Q. Where did he reside - A. At his mother's in Kingsland-road, and John resided there too.

Q.Was John still in the bank - A. Yes.

Q.Having heard this information it certainly was alarming enough for a friend - Did you go to Mr. Armitage - A. I went to his mother's immediately the same evening; I believe it was ten o'clock when I got to Kingsland; I did not see either his mother or Armitage that evening; I saw Armitage the following morning at the bank.

Q. Was he in his own office in the bank - A. In the dividend warrant office; I went early, he was at his desk.

Q. What did you communicate to Mr. Armitage - A. I told him that Mrs. Roberts intended to involve him and his brother in the forgery. I always understood she was Roberts's wife. He said I believe it was an unfortunate thing, and that he was always afraid of the woman, Mrs. Roberts. I believe nothing more passed at that time. I left him there.

Q. How soon did you see him again - A. It was on the Saturday he left the bank.

Q. What was the day that you saw him in the bank and made this communication - A. I think that was on the Saturday. I saw Armitage again on the Thursday or Friday; on the week following I met him at Child's Hill, Hampstead Heath; I went with a friend of his, and his friend went for him to some house, and brought him to me on the Heath.

Q. Do you think it was the Thursday or the Friday after you saw Kezia Willis - A. I think it was. When he came to me upon the heath; he walked with me to Finchley.

Q. Did his friend accompany you - A. He did; during the conversation in the way he mentioned respecting furnishing Roberts with the printed blank warrants.

Q. Had you heard that before from the prisoner - A. No.

Q. Then he for the first time mentioned to you that he had furnished printed blank warrants to Roberts - A. Yes, and that he received part of the money that was got by forging the dividend warrants.

Q. What did you say to him respecting that - A. I cannot recollect.

Q. Try - what do you think you said - A. I said it was an unfortunate circumstance, what steps did he mean to take; he talked of surrendering himself, and his friend as well as myself advised him not in the present state of the business.

Q. Do you recollect making any observations to him upon his telling you this - A. I told him it was a strange thing, it was throwing himself upon my mercy, He said he had no friend that he could confide in, and therefore he had sent for me to consult with him what was the best steps to take.

Q.Had you any other friendship with him than in the company of Roberts - A. None, whatever; he said he should come to town that evening. He did not say afterwards exactly what steps he should take.

Q. Who was this friend that took you, and fetched him to you - A. I do not know his name.

Q. Did you know a person of the name of Dudley - A. Yes.

Q. Did Dudley at any time afterwards bring you any paper - A. He did.

Q. How soon was that afterwards - A. I really cannot recollect exactly; within about a week.

Q. Is that the paper Dudley brought you - A. It is.

Q. Are you acqainted with Armitage's hand-writing - A. Not at all.

Q. It begins, Dear R.; he brought you this - A. Yes.

Q. You kept this, you did not deliver this to Roberts - A. I did not.

Q. I believe about this time that this paper was delivered to you he had broke out of prison - A. Yes, and on that day I received this paper from Armitage Roberts was re-apprehended.

Q. Did you ever see the prisoner afterwards until he was apprehended in the country - A. I never saw him until this morning.

Mr. Alley. Because he thought you were an honest man, and a friend, he thought he would trust you upon a common, and he told you all you have related - You had a communication with the girl in prison - A. I had.

Q. I dare say that you, as an honest man, to whom another in distress would look, you went immediately and gave information to the bank - You went to the solicitor of the bank and communicated what you understood - A. No, I did not.

Q. Was it not the duty of an honest man so to have done - A. It might; I did not communicate it to the Solicitor of the Bank, nor to any body else.

Q. You have known Roberts a considerable time, you have been on excursions into the country with him - A. Never but once.

Q.Have you never been junketting together - A. I

have met him in parties of pleasure, although I might have not gone with him.

Q. Then it cannot be right if any body has stated that you and he have been on parties of pleasure - A. We have been.

Q. Where was that - A. I cannot answer you. It is six or seven months ago; that pleasure was blendid with business at the same time.

Q. Then I should have thought, if it was partly for your pleasure, and blendid with business, you could easily tell where it was - A. I do not chuse to answer the question.

Q. Who desired you to say that you did not like to answer the question - A. No one.

Q. Why do not you like to answer the question - A. Because it might tend to criminate myself.

Q. Did any body desire you to give that answer - A. No; I do not chuse to answer, because it might tend to convict myself, or to involve me in some difficulty.

Q. You have told me that it is about seven months ago that you went with this party of pleasure blendid with business, I now ask you again where that was - A. I do not chuse to tell you.

Q. I insist upon an answer, and appeal to his lordship - A. We went to Birmingham.

Q. Did Roberts accompany you to Birmingham - A. He did.

Q. You say you went to Birmingham - A. We did.

Q. Now I ask you whether he and you went on the same business - A. I do not know what business he went on, I know my own.

Q. My question is whether Roberts and you went on the same business - A. No, we did not.

Q. What was the business that Roberts went on - A. That I cannot tell. I went to Birmingham to bail a man that was in custody, that was arrested.

Q. Who was that person - A. I do not chuse to mention his name.

Q. I insist upon an answer - A. William Halliday , now a prisoner in the Fleet.

Q. Do you know whether he might have been arrested for the Wotton Basset bank.

Mr. Garrow. I object to that.

Mr. Alley to Folkard. Then it was not to bail him for a criminal charge - A. No.

Q. What way of life may you be in now - A. A silversmith.

Q. Have you been a pawnbroker - A. I have, and since that I have taken a retail business myself; I have taken a shop about two years next September.

Q. Has it happened that you have been concerned in any other business than that of a pawnbroker and a silversmith - A. No.

Q. Have you ever been concerned with any persons, and take care what you say - look at that paper and tell me whether you know, or have seen any thing of that sort of paper - A. Several.

Q. This purports to be a draft of a note on Messrs. O'Bryan and Co. 10, Budge-row - A. I have had such notes through my hands, and they have been paid there.

Q. Is there such a house there - A. No; there has been one there.

Q. I ask you upon your oath whether you was not concerned in that Bank - A. I never was, direct not indirect.

Q. Then you never deposited such a thing as ten pounds for your share, did you - A. I did not.

Q. Can you tell me when that bank set up - A. I cannot.

Q. Can you tell me when it set down - A. I saw it in the Gazette about a month ago.

Q. You come here to day at large - A. I do.

Q. Have you been in custody yourself under any charge - A. Yes about seven or eight months ago I was charged with assisting Roberts in his escaping from prison; I am now under bail to answer that charge.

Q.Was that prosecution by the solicitor of the Bank - A. I understood so.

Q. And you expect by giving evidence against Armitage to save yourself from that prosecution - A. I should hope that they would drop the prosecution.

Q. I ask you upon your oath, do not you believe it will cease - A. I cannot say; I hope so.

Mr. Garrow. Do you mean to admit, that when a man trusted you as a friend that you went and betrayed your trust by informing the solicitor of the Bank - A. Certainly I did not.

(The letter read)

"Friend R. The money you shall have, and I shall esteem it as a favour if you would commit to paper what has been said respecting me precisely; do not gloss it over in the least, as I wish to have an opinion; therefore the least deviation may lead me into the greatest error.

Yours, - "

JOHN SMITH . Q. You were a clerk in the dividend pay office at the time the prisoner was a clerk - A. Yes, I was.

Q. Do you remember the day that he absconded and went away - A. Yes, I do; it was on a Saturday in August, 1810; I think it was the 11th.

Q. to Mr. Mills. On the day that Armitage absconded did you see him on that day - A. I did; I think the last time I saw him was about eleven o'clock, or half past eleven.

Q. Did you ever see him again until he was apprehended - A. No, I did not.

Mr. Serjeant Ruff. Q. You were a clerk in the same office in the bank with Armitage - A. Yes.

Q. Do you happen to know what money he had in his hands that morning that he went off - A. I dare say from the time of payment it was exceeding one thousand pounds.

Q. You say he had upwards of a thousand pound that was then in his possession - A. I think any one of Mr. Hamersham's clerks had a thousand pound at that time on that day.

Q. That sum he had completely the command of, and he left it behind him, did he not - A. I understood every thing was correct.

Mr. Garrow. Had he then, in the morning of that day been supplied with currency for the transactions of the day - A. He had.

Q. What was the hour for finishing business for that day - A. Three o'clock is the regular hour.

Q. Is it the usual course for the clerk to make up his accompts, and to accompt with some one, and to deliver over to the letter the money not expended - A. Yes.

Q.Did Mr. Armitage wait to settle up his accompts and deliver over the notes not expended to the note waiter, or the teller - A. No. I understood not.

Q. Would any clerk, in the regular course of business leave things at six's or seven's, and go away - A. No.

Q. He departed at an unusual hour, in an unusual manner, and never returned - A. Yes.

Q. These notes were all numbered in the cashier's office - A. Yes.

Mr. Gurney. They might have been changed if he had sent them by any one - A. Yes.

Mr. Garrow. That person would be required to set his name to them - A. Yes.

Mr. Gurney. In fact he did not take the money away - A. No, he did not.

THOMAS GLOVER . Q. You are one of the inspectors of the bank - A. I am.

Q. Did you on the 11th of July, 1809, and on the 1st of August, 1810, make any enquiry after the prisoner at the bar - A. I have made enquiries. I do not recollect the day, it was on the day that he went away, I went to his house in Constable-alley, Hoxton, I did not find him there. I made different enquiries after him in many places. On Tuesday the 19th of March, in the present year, I went with John Foy the officer, and Mr. Lee's of the bank, to the sign of the Bell, Great Blakenham, in Suffolk.

Q. Did you find the prisoner there - A. We did.

Q. By what name did you find him - A. The landlord said he went by the name of John Berkley ; I enquired of the landlord if he had any lodgers.

Q. Did you go into his bed-room - A. I did.

Q. Did you find any thing which he acknowledged to be his own - A. I did; a box that was directed to Mr. John Berkley, and that box he acknowledged to be his own.

Q. Did you hear any body call him by that name - A. I did not.

Q. Do you know of any advertisement for Richard Armitage - A. I have seen them with three hundred guineas reward; I have seen a great many of them in many parts of England.

Q. Have you been in search of him in many-places - A. I have, and these handbills were posted up while he was absent.

ALEXANDER BISS . Q. You are a clerk of the police-office, Marlborough-street - A. Yes.

Q. In the month of August were you employed to print hand-bills, advertising a reward for the apprehension of the prisoner - A. Yes, On the 13th of August I was employed to print hand-bills by the Solicitor of the bank; on that night I sent off bills to Harwich, Dover, Bristol, Holyhead, and Yarmouth, by the Mail, and to other places; and the hand-bills were ordered to be posted in every one of these places. This is the fifty guineas one, after that it was encreased to the sum of one hundred guineas, and then to three hundred guineas. I then sent two hundred to them by every mail-coach in England. This is the three hundred guineas bill.

(The dividend warrant read.)

Prisoner's Defence. My lord, and gentlemen of the jury - I am totally innocent of the charge for which I am accused. The characters of the persons that are brought against me are such that nobody could believe; they are of that description of people that would do an injury to any one by way of saving themselves. My reason of going away I can explain; Mr. Folkard came to me and said that Roberts meaned to hang me and my brother John; he said, if you stay your place will be forfeited; I went away, believing that if I was accused by such a man my situation would be forfeited, therefore I waited for the advice of a friend, who persuaded me, as I was away, to keep away, until I heard the charge. With regard to my accompts I left them correct; I had notes to a large amount, I had frequently larger amounts in my care than all the clerks in the office; I had thirty thousand pounds in my care, as my books will prove. I have been in the bank seven or eight years, and never the smallest imputation against me in the world. I wish to state with regard to my lending Mr. Mills the two thousand pound notes, that is as common an occurence as any in the office, it is done two or three times a day. The person that gives out the notes comes round the office and says, those who have got large notes lend to the other clerks who may want them. And with regard to Roberts's saying I had a thousand pounds of him, had it been so it is very odd that no notes have been traced to me. When my house was searched no notes were found, nor when I was taken and searched was any notes found upon me. Roberts has been connected with Hudson and Cook, both have been clerks in the bank. They both being bad men knew every thing of the bank business; and with respect to the warrants and receipts they might have been got by any clerk in the bank; and with regard to the letter to Roberts I can account for that, I certainly owed him seventeen pounds, which is the money mentioned there; and I mentioned there of what his wife said of me; I wished to know what his wife had accused me off; and with regard to this Folkard and Roberts their words cannot be taken.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 29.

London Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18110529-19

399. CHARLES THOMAS was indicted for feloniously forging, on the 9th of August , a certain receipt for money, with intention to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England .

SECOND COUNT, for feloniously disposing of and putting away, a certain forged receipt for payment of money, with the same intention.

THIRD COUNT, for the prisoner having in his possession a forged dividend warrant. And

SEVERAL OTHER COUNTS of like offence, with like intention, only stating that he had in his possession a forged dividend warrant and receipt.

The case was stated by Mr. Garrow.

RICHARD MARSTON . Q. You are a clerk in the bank - A. I am.

Q. Were you so on the 9th of December, 1802 - A. I was.

Q. Have you got the dividend books - A. Yes.

COURT. Where does that book come from - A. The bank.

Mr. Knapp. What office of the bank do you belong to - A. The Imperial Annuity office. This is the Transfer book.

Q. In that book do you find that Mr. Fraser had some stock transferred in his name, of Apollo-buildings, Walworth, esq. - A. There is.

Q. How much - A. One hundred per annum to Alexander Fraser , of Apollo-buildings, Walworth, esq.

Q. By whom is it transferred - A. By T. Francis, and witnessed by T. Francis.

Q. I believe Mr. Francis is dead - A. He is.

Q. Are you acquainted with his hand-writing - A. I am.

Q. Is that his hand-writing as witness to the transfer of that stock - A. It is.

Q. Was there any other person in possession of a hundred per annum Imperial of the name of Alexander Fraser at that time - A. There was not.

Q. Have you searched the books in the bank down to this day, and is there any other sum of one hundred pound in the name of Alexander Fraser, Apollo-buildings, Walworth, esq. is there any transfer of that sum of one hundred pound - A. No. I examined down to yesterday.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar - A. I do.

Q. Is he a clerk in the bank - A. He is.

Q. Was he so in August last - A. He was; he was in the one and two pound note office.

Q. Was he employed in the dividend office under any department, and under what letter - A. He was called in to assist in our office, that is, the Imperial office, in July, 1810, about the 9th or 10th, the first day of the payment of dividends.

Q. Did he remain there until the month of August - A. Until this was discovered he did; he did remain till August.

Q. What was the letter under which he paid - A. No particular letter; he had the whole of the books of the Imperial Annuity, there being but a small number of dividend warrants in that stock to be paid.

Q. Had he the charge over the books for the purpose of paying - A. He had access to the books, and to the dividend warrants.

Q. Was it the prisoners duty to pay dividend warrants - A. It was, and in the letter F among all the rest.

Q. Had he the care of the drawer containing the warrants - A. Not particularly; he had access to the drawer.

Q. Have you got the dividend book - A. I have.

Q. Turn to the dividend book, and look at the signature of A. Fraser, from 1806, to May 1810 inclusive - A. Here they all are.

Q. Now looking at the different enteries of A. Fraser tell me whose hand-writing you believe it to be - A. I believe it to be the prisoner's.

Q. Do you mean that in all - A. I mean that in all.

Q. I think you said before that you had seen the prisoner write often - A. Yes, often; he came to our office to assist us.

Q. Then you were in the same office with him - A. Yes.

Q. Take these dividend warrants in your hand, and looking at the signature. A. Fraser, tell me whose hand-writing you believe it to be - A. I believe them to be the prisoner's.

Q. You see a signature of G. Thomas to these receipts - A. I do.

Q.Whose hand-writing do you believe them to be - A. The prisoners.

Q. I believe it is the practice of the bank to have the books locked up - A. Yes, very often.

Q. And are the dividend warrants also locked up after the business of the day - A. They are.

Q. So they remain locked up and secured till the next day - A. Yes.

Mr. Gurney. You are permanently stationed in the Imperial office - A. I am.

Q. You are one of the stated clerks of that office - A. I am.

Q. You are one of the established clerks of that office - A. I am,

Q. And the prisoner was, as it were, lent to your office, during the increase of business for a time - A. He was.

Q. How long was he in your office - A. Six or seven weeks.

Q. During these times how many clerks were there in the office during the whole time - A. Six in the whole.

Q. Each of them I take it for granted, had access to the books, and to the drawer for delivering warrants - A. Certainly.

Q. When was your attention first called to these warrants - A. In January last.

Q. You have said, Mr. Marston, the signature of A. Fraser, is the prisoner's hand-writing; I beg leave to ask you whether you made up that belief from the inspection of the writing, or from something that you have heard from other persons, or both together - A. I have made up my opinion from the whole examination of the warrants, and of the books and bank notes, and an odd letter or two that I have seen; from a comparison of all these things I have made up my mind.

Q. Supposing, before you had heard of this business, I had come to you and presented to you that; supposing you had not heard anything on the subject, could you have said that A. Fraser is Mr. Thomas's hand-writing - A. I dare say not.

Q. These warrants were shewn to you in January last - A. I saw some one of them.

Q. Upon their being suspected that there was a forgery committed - A. Yes.

Q. The prisoner was then, in January, a clerk in the bank - A. He was.

Q. And he continued so until April - A. He continued so until he was apprehended.

Q. Was it not in last month that he was apprehended - A. Thereabouts.

Q. Therefore he continued a clerk in the bank for four months after this was shewn to you - A. Yes.

Mr. Garrow. Take this into your hand, attend to what I say to you. I put into your hand the dividend warrant, looking at the signature of this, and refering to nothing but your memory of the prisoner's handwriting, referring to that, and that alone, do you believe it to be his figures, disregarding all the circumstances which combining lead to an opinion, does the characters alone impress a belief that it is Mr. Thomas's hand-writing - A. My belief is that it is his hand-writing, and that belief is founded on these two

things - the general character of his hand-writing, and on the resemblance of one letter to other letters; comparing one letter with another I believe it is his handwriting.

Q. If I was to cut off the signature A. Fraser, and give you this piece of paper, does your memory of his characters enable you to say it is his hand-writing - A. I can speak to one letter in particular, the letter F in Fraser, and the letter T in Thomas, his own name.

Q. Do you mean the capital F in Fraser, and the capital T in Thomas bears such a resemblance that you believe it is his - A. I do.

Q. I take it for granted that the most thing that you saw him write was his own signature - A. I have seen him write his own name more than any thing else.

Q. His duty principally in your office was to witness the proprietor's stock in the dividend warrants with his own name - A. Yes.

Q. Therefore the characters, C. Thomas, were the characters that you were most used to - A.Exactly so.

Q. Therefore looking at C. Thomas, it strikes you so that you believe it to be his writing - A. I do.

Q. Now look in the dividend book, and look in August 1810, now considering nothing but that which is under you eye; A. Fraser, whose writing do you believe that to be - A. I believe it to be the prisoner's.

Q. Do you believe so from your former acquaintance with his characters of writing - A. Yes.

Q. And from the impression that the character's have made upon your mind - A. Exactly.

Q. And you have the same impression upon all the others that you have looked at - A. Exactly.

EDWARD SMITH . Q. Were you formerly acquainted with Mr. Alexander Fraser, of Apollo-buildings, Walworth - A. Yes.

Q. When did he first come to live in Apollo-buildings, Walworth - A. He came to No. 25, Apollo-buildings, Walworth, in September, 1802; he lived there till July, 1804; he then went to Canterbury-row, Newington.

Q. Did you know him when he went to live there - A. Yes; it was the same person that lived in Apollo-buildings; he died in November, 1806.

Q. I believe sir you buried him - A. I did.

JOHN TAYLOR TATAM . Q. Are you a clerk in in the dividend pay-office of the bank - A. I am.

Q. Is it a part of your duty to pay upon warrants of this description which are produced to you - A. It is.

Q. When they appear to be witnessed and signed by the bank clerk you pay them - A.Yes.

Q. Did you pay upon these eight dividend warrants - A. I did.

Q. Is that the book in which you made the entry of the transaction itself - A. Yes, I did.

Q. Before you parted with the bank notes you made the entry - A. I did.

Q. Does it appear to you that you paid all these eight at one and the same time - A. I paid all these eight at one and the same time.

Q. That is not a common occurence is it - A. We more commonly pay every half year.

Q. Did you pay these eight on the 9th of August, 1810 - A. I did.

Q. Now attend to me as I state to you the numbers of the notes and the value you look over the book and tell me whether you paid these notes to the person that presented the warrant.

67118 to 67147 - 30 of 1 l. - July 27, 1810.

6074 to 6098 - 25 of 2 l. - July 23, 1810.

6977 to 7000 - 24 of 5 l. - July 25, 1810.

4497 to 4500 - 4 of 10 l. - July 23, 1810.

5472 to 5479 - 8 of 10 l. - July 23, 1810.

11342 and 11343 - 2 of 20 l. - July 26, 1810.

- A. I paid these notes making in the whole 300 l. They were paid by myself to the person that presented the warrant.

JAMES JOHN ROGERS . Q. Were you in the month of August, 1810, a clerk in the bank of England - A. Yes.

Q. Were you acquainted with the prisoner at the bar - A. Yes, I was.

Q. Did you about that time receive from him three bank notes of the value of two pounds each - A. I did.

Q. Look at these and tell me whether these are the notes that you received from the prisoner - A. Yes, they are.

Q. Is there any mark of your own by which you can state with certainly that you had them of the prisoner - A. I have wrote his name as well as my own in the front of each note.

Q. Are you acquainted with the hand-writing of the prisoner - A. I am.

Q. Is there upon these notes any writing of the prisoner's - A. Yes; there are upon the back of each note G. Signs, that is his hand-writing, and Bishopsgate-street is his hand-writing.

Q. Now look at these eight dividend warrants, look at the signature, A. Fraser, whose hand-writing do you believe that to be - A. The prisoner's.

Q. Whose hand-writing is the signature C. Thomas - A. The prisoner's.

Q. Do you speak of the signature of A. Fraser with any doubt, or with certainly - A. No doubt whatever.

Q. Do you form that opinion from the characters of the hand-writing, unconnected with all other circumstances - A. I do.

Q. I am now going to shew you the dividend warrants; this is one of the eight dividend warrants; lock, there is the signature of A. Fraser, whose hand-writing do you believe that to be - A. The prisoner's. I have looked at the other seven previous to my coming here; they are all in my opinion the prisoner's writing.

Q. Did the prisoner reside in your house any time - A. Yes.

Q. Had you a servant of the name of Ann Wells - A. Yes.

Q. What did your family consist of while she lived with you - A.Lodgers included; myself and my wife, my servant, and three infant children; there was a lodger in the house, a lady.

Q. Your own family consisted of yourself, your wife, infant children, and maid-servant - A. Yes.

Q. When did Ann Wells leave your service - A. Ann Wells left my service on the 17th of October,

1810, somewhere thereabouts.

Q. Did you at any time between the month of July, 1810, and August 1810, send Ann Wells to ger change of a ten pound note - A. Never in all my life.

Mr. Alley. I see you speak very glibly of all the hand-writings of the prisoner - A. I have.

Q. Pray have you always been of the same opinion - A. I have.

Q. Then if you have always been of the same opinion you have always expressed yourself in the same way - do not you understand me - A. Not exactly.

Q. If you have alway been of the same opinion you have never said to the contrary - A. I have not.

Q. Is the prisoner a creditor of yours - A. I am not in his debt.

Q. Why man has not he made a claim of you for two hundred and fifty pounds and above - A. He did, and I paid the balance; his claim was two hundred and fifty-five pound; I settled the account. I do not remain a debtor at all.

Q. Do you know the prisoner's father-in-law - A. He has not one, I believe.

Q. You have yourself a father that is now living in London, or in the neighbourhood of it - A. Yes, at Bow.

Q. Attend to my question - I ask you, upon the oath you have taken, have you never said that you did not think this was the prisoner's hand-writing, and that you was sorry that you said so - A. I never said any such thing.

Q. Have you never said to any body that you admitted too far, but should not now retract, if you did you should lose your situation in the bank - A. I never did.

Mr. Garrow. Have you any reason to apprehend that you should lose your situation in the bank for giving correct evidence - A. Not in the least.

MARY ROGERS . Q. You are the wife of the last witness - A. Yes.

Q. Did Ann Wells live with you as a servant - A. Yes.

Q. Did your family consist of yourself, your husband, and infant children, and Ann Wells - A. Yes.

Q. Did you at any time while she continued in your service, send her out with a ten pound bank note to get change - A. I am positive I never did.

Q. Is there a person of the name of William Davis in your neighbourhood, a cheesemonger with whom you deal - A. Yes.

Q. Was she in the habit of going on errands in your family to Mr. Davis - A. Yes; she was known there as the servant of the family.

ANN WELLS . Q. Did you live in the service of the last witness - A. I was there about ten months, I quitted in the month of October last.

Q. Was Mr. Thomas a lodger in the house during part of that time - A. Yes, not all the time.

Q. Did the prisoner at any time give you any bank note to get changed for him - A Yes, in the month of August, I cannot say what time in August; it was a ten pound note, he desired me to get change for it; I took it to Mr. Davis, a cheese-monger in our neighbourhood, and got the change. I was known there as the servant of Mr. Rogers.

Q. Did you ever change any ten pound note for your master or mistress - A. No, sir, nor for any other person except Mr. Thomas.

WILLIAM DAVIS. Q. Are you a cheesemonger in the neighbourhood of Mr. Rogers - A. Yes, and they have been in the habit of dealing with me ever since I have been there; I knew Ann Wells as their servant, she used to come of errands and receive things.

Q. Did you ever receive that ten pound bank note that I now hand to you of Ann Wells - A. It is my writing, Mr. Rogers, and I signed my own initials; I cannot say I received it of Ann Wells , in order that I may know from whom I receive them I put their name, and sign my own initials.

Q. Looking at that, and it being your course of writing the name of the person of whom you received it, can you say from whom you received it - A. I can say that I received it of some person belonging to Mr. Rogers's family; I put such memorandums on the notes for my own security; I can say no further than that I received that note of some person in Mr. Rogers's family.

Mr. Gurney. Have you any person to assist in your shop - A. Only my wife.

Q. Whether it came to you immediately from any person that brought it you do not remember - A. I cannot say whether it came from the servant, or who it came from.

Q. You cannot say that you received it or your wife - A. Yes, I can; if she received it she puts something on it that she may know whose it is, and I put some more marks on it when I come home.

Mr. Garrow. Now, my lord, I give you the numbers of some of the notes; I will take the first three notes that were paid to Rogers - No. 6092, 6094, 6095, dated 23d of July, 1810; these are bank notes of two pound each, issued by Mr. Tatam, that came to Mr. Rogers. The ten pound note issued by Mr. Tatam, which the prisoner sent Ann Wells to change is one of those that Mr. Tatam paid in satisfaction of the forged receipt, the number of that bank is 5475, that is one of the eight ten pounds, dated 23d of July, 1810; I now produce twenty bank notes of five pound each, dated 25th of July, 1810, which will be found to be part of that sum that Mr. Tatam issued in part of that payment; upon which there is writing to as to prove that they passed through the prisoner's hands, 6994, I will give you this number first, a five pound note, dated 25th of July, 1810.

Q. to Mr. Rogers. Look at that, is there any writing were you believe to be the writing of the prisoner's - A. Yes, there is the name of Mrs. Edwards.

Q. The next 6995, look and see whether there is any writing of the prisoner's upon that - A. There is an initial, I; I believe that to be the prisoner's hand writing.

Q. No 6995 - A. That is the same, and 6994, that is the same; another letter I; they have all the same I in the same place in the note, in the

face of the note towards the right-hand corner, at the top.

COURT. If some of these will not do nothing will turn upon the number.

Mr. Garrow. They are twenty of the twenty-four, between 6977 and 7000. Now I out into the hand of the witness a ten pound bank note, No. 5474, dated 23d of July, 1810; Mr. Rogers look at the back of it, and see whether George Symes, and the address is the hand-writing of any person you know - A. Yes, it is the prisoner's.

Q.Read what it is - A. George Symes , Somerset-house.

Q.5478, 5479, of ten pound each, in whose handwriting is I Solomons upon the front of each of these notes - A. The prisoner's.

Q. Do you know whether the prisoner, before he came to the bank lived with a person of the name of Solomon - A. Yes, I knew that from him.

Q. Now there is another ten pound with the initial I, No. 5500, 23d of July, 1810 - A. That is the same as the former, with the letter I, of the prisoner's hand-writing.

Q. to Mr. Marston. Look at the word, I Solomon, and say whose writing you believe it to be - A. I cannot speak to it.

Q. I will just shew you the three notes that were paid to Rogers, whose do you believe that writing to be - A. I am positive to one of them; the word Bishopsgate, is the prisoner's hand-writing, and I believe the others very much resembles the prisoner's writing; I believe they are the prisoner's writing, they are the three that were issued to Mr. Rogers.

Mr. Gurney. You found your belief principally by comparison, do you not - A. I do.

Mr. Garrow. With respect to the word Bishopsgate-street, is that stated with comparison - A. It is stated with comparison with the transfer book; that and other books I have compared.

Q. Can you speak to it without comparison with the transfer-book - A. I cannot.

(The forged receipt read.)

Prisoner's Defence. My lord, my counsel has my instructions.

JOHN JAMES ROGERS , SEN. I live at Bromley, Bow, Middlesex.

Q. Are you the father of James John Rogers , the clerk in the bank - A. Yes.

Q. Have you had any conversation with your son respecting certain papers that he stated to be the prisoner's hand-writing - A. I know nothing of the transaction whatever.

Q. Has he told you in any conversation respecting the evidence that he was to give against the prisoner, that the papers were not the hand-writing of the prisoner - A. No, sir, I never had no such conversation.

Q. Has he told you that he was sorry for going on with it, and if he did not he must lose his situation in the bank - A. I never had such conversation, I never heard any such thing.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 29.

London jury, before Mr. justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18110529-20

400. ZENOPHON HEARN BASHAM was indicted for that he, on the 1st of April , feloniously had in his custody and possession, a certain forged bank note for the payment of 5 l. he knowing the same to be forged and counterfeit .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded GUILTY .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

London jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18110529-21

401. ZENOPHON HEARN BASHAM was indicted for that he, on the 1st of April , feloniously did forge and counterfeit a certain bank note for the payment of 5 l. with intention to defraud the Governor and Company of the bank of England .

Mr. Knapp, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner, of this charge, was

ACQUITTED .

London Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18110529-22

402. JAMES DAVIS , alias JAMES DEACON , was indicted for that he, on the 2nd of February , feloniously did forge a certain promissory note for the payment of 10 l. with intent to defraud Peter Esdaile , William Esdaile , John Hammet (since deceased), and Thomas Scott .

Mr. Knapp, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

London jury, before Mr. justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18110529-23

403. THOMAS DIXON was indicted that he, on the 15th of April , feloniously had in his custody and possession, a certain forged and counterfeit bank note, for the payment of 5 l. he knowing the same to be forged and counterfeited .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded GUILTY .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

Reference Number: t18110529-24

404. THOMAS DIXON was indicted for that he, on the 15th of April , feloniously did forge and counterfeit a certain bank note for the payment of 5 l. with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the bank of England .

Mr. Knapp, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner, of this charge, was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18110529-25

405. MICHAEL CARNEY was indicted for the wilful murder of Martha Birt .

MARGARET WARD . Q. In the month of August last did you live in the Almonry at Westminster - A. Yes, the prisoner and his wife lodged close by me in a one pair of stairs room, and the deceased lodged in the ground-floor back-room. On Sunday the 26th of August , about twelve o'clock at noon, upon my hearing a noise in the deceased's apartment, I went to her room, I found her sitting in a chair, crying, and said she had been beat, she shewed me a swelling by the right side of her temple; Carney came into the room, he struck her with his fist on the side of her body, and she

fell down; she laid hold of him by the jacket, he then struck her with a hammer upon the lip; he went out and she followed him; he struck her again, and she fell in the passage, against the seat of the privy; the prisoner then went up stairs to his own apartment; the deceased got up to follow him, the prisoner's wife shut the middle door on the stairs to stop her coming after him; they used bad words on both sides, they were both very angry; I think the deceased had had a little liquor; I cannot tell whether the prisoner was sober or in liquor; I was quite frightened. I washed the deceased's face, her upper lip was cut open, her lip was cut clean through. I assisted in taking her to the hospital, and after her wound was dressed she walked home; she lived some time afterward, I cannot say how long.

Mr. Arabin. Mrs. Ward, I understand that the deceased lived in one house and the prisoner in another, you will tell me if I am wrong; the front door of the deceased's house went into the Almonry, and the back door opened into a yard, and the prisoner's back-door opened into this yard, and his front door into Tothill-street - A. Yes.

Q. Do not you know that the deceased was very much in the habit of taking the liberty of going through the prisoner's house - A. Oh, yes, frequently.

Q. Do not you know that the prisoner frequently complained of this - A. No.

CATHERINE BANNISTER . My husband is a lighterman; I live at No. 8 in the Almonry. On Sunday the 26th of August, between twelve and one, I heard murder called out, I went to the passage of the deceased's house, I saw the deceased, she was all in a gore of blood, and she had hold of the prisoner's jacket, the prisoner was trying to get away from her, and she was trying to go after him, she had got still hold of his jacket: there is a dark place in the passage where Carney used to keep pigs; he called her a very bad name, and said, let loose my jacket; I will not, she said, I am murdered; he turned round and gave her a woeful blow over the mouth with the hammer, and twisted himself out of her hands, and he ran to his own back door, got within, and shut it; then his wife came to the door and called out to the deceased, for God's sake go away; she spoke through a hole in the door; the deceased said she would not, she was murdered; he put his arm through the hole in the door and hit her another violent blow with the hammer in the same place, and the blood flowed over the mouth, then she fell back into my arms; Mrs. Douglas took the deceased from me, and I went for a constable. I saw the deceased go to the hospital, and I saw her on the next day, I never saw her after that. I never saw Carney afterwards until I saw him here, I know he was away.

Mr. Arabin. Do not you know that he went to the office the next day and surrendered - A. No, I was not at the office.

ISAAC DOWNING . I was house-surgeon at Westminster Infirmary. On Sunday the 26th of August Martha Birt was brought to the Westminster Hospital as a casualty; I saw her on the Monday morning, she had received a wound on the upper lip, which had divided it, and which had been dressed on the day proceding by a surgeon in attendance. The upper jaw was not injured in the least; I perceived no other injury. I was informed that she was in a state of intoxication when brought to the hospital; there did not appear any injury but the one on her lip. She was admitted an out-patient, and came to the hospital as directed for six or seven days; an inflammation having attacked the place, spreading towards the head, it was judged proper to make her an in-patient.

Q. The inflammation attacked what place - A.About the lip, and it did spread generally over the face, and head, and then from certain symptoms it was considered to extend to the brain; she had a violent pain in her head, with blood-shot eyes, it was considered of having attacked the brain; six or seven days previous to her death she became delirious, in which state she continued attended with a sympathetic fever until the 26th of September, and that day she died. The lips of the wound, when first brought to the hospital were put in amputation, and retained there with a silver pin and ligature; the lip was nearly healed on the fourth day subsequent to the receipt of the injury; it was about this time the inflammation, which was of the erysipelas kind, appeared, though it was too slight to occasion a disunion of the edges of the wound; however, it extended gradually all over the face and head, and finally it appeared to have attacked the membranes of the brain, which, with the accompanying sympathetic sever terminated her existence. Early on the morning, the day after her death, I opened her head, I found the membranes covering the brain, much inflamed evidently with the vessels loaded with blood, a serum and lymph coagulated upon the membranes, and between them. No injury had been received at any part of the body. The liver was much diseased, which I imputed to her intemperance of drinking spirits.

Q. Now, sir, having told us this poor woman's complaints, what in your opinion was the cause of her death - A. I have no doubt her death is to be ascribed to the inflammation of the brain.

Q. And by what, in your judgment was that inflammation caused - A. I think from the wound. I think she inflammation was caused from the local injury, because it first shewed itself in that part. But I should wish to observe that inflammation was very likely to come on in a constitution like hers, without any wound - in a constitution injured by drinking spirits.

Q. Had you any means of knowing whether she was conformable to your rules and directions - A. I believe she had not; when she came she always had the appearance of having drank spirits, and in examining the lip I perceived her breath smell of gin.

Q. Under these circumstances are you able to say whether that inflammation was brought on by the wound or by her intemperance - A. I conceived the wound of such a trivial nature that I should not

hesitate much of having one in my own lip. Where there is a local injury, however slight, the inflammation will seize that part first. I do not say so in a good constitution, but in a bad one, injured by drinking and unwholesome food, and in an unhealthy atmosphere; it was not a wound the least in the world, in my opinion, to occasion death. It has been said that the wound was inflicted by a hammer, I much doubt it.

ANTHONY CARLEY I was surgeon that week. I remember the case perfectly well, I remember seeing her, she appeared to me to be a person addicted to drinking spirituous liquors to excess, of consequence she seemed to have an unfound and bad liver, especially liable to a disease called Erysipelas, that is, St. Anthony's Fire, which is considered as a constitutional disorder, spreading itself without limits, unlike other inflammations which stop at certain periods. When I saw Martha Birt about the second day after the reception into the hospital, I saw symptoms of that disorder all over her head and face, the marks of St. Anthony's Fire distinctly so, there being a continuity of the membranes of the head on the outside of the head with those inside. We always expect Erysipelas of the head, it spread in this manner; - the wound that was received upon the lip was not upon a vital part, even the thin bone of the upper jaw was not shattered, which is thin and cancellated; I considered the wound by no means a mortal wound, but that the subsequent disease was a dangerous disease, to wit, the Erysipelas. I directed the body to be examined but was not present.

Q I will now ask you, sir, whether, from the account you have heard Mr Downing give, you think the injury she received was the cause of her death - A. Any less injury, bleeding, or the pricking of a pin I think simply; the wound on the lip produced the Erysipelas, or it might have arisen spontaneous, but as we traced it from the wound we ascribe that as the cause of it; I consider that was the producing cause.

Mr. Downing. I think there must be a mistake about the hammer producing the injury of the lip, if I had cut it with a knife it could not have been more smooth; I saw it within forty-eight hours after the receipt of the injury. If it had been cut by the edge of a hammer it must have injured the gum or teeth; a slight blow will knock the front teeth out; I saw no injury of the gum. I never heard her complain of ill-treatment from any person whatever. She complained of a fall.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

Reference Number: t18110529-26

406. LOUISA GIBBONS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 18th of April , a watch, value 3 l. the property of Benjamin Hall , from his person .

BENJAMIN HALL. I am a hair-dresser , Garden-court, Baldwyns Gardens, Grays Inn lane . I met the prisoner in Grays Inn lane on the 18th of April near upon ten o'clock at night, I was going to the dram shop to get a glass of gin, I saw three girls standing at the dram shop door, they asked me if I would give them any thing; I said I would, the three girls and myself had a glass each; on our coming out they wanted me to give them a second glass; I said that I had no more than a sixpence, I could not give them a glass each I would divide the gin among them. We had three half-quarterns, and after coming out again the prisoner drawed the watch out of my fob; I immediately took hold of her, and called out, watch, lustily; she immediately gave it to one of the girls; she said, run, and as the girl run she cried, run Jane, run. The watchman came, we secured her. I have not got my watch.

Mr. Challenor. You are a gallant man, you generally take three ladies at one time - A. No.

Q. How many glasses of gin had you drank that night - A. I had drank two before that day.

Q. Do you mean to swear that you were sober - A. I was compos mentis to do my business.

JOHN BLANEY . I am a watchman. At ten o'clock I heard a person call watch, I went to him. As I was going up the court I saw two girls running, the prisoner said, run Jane, run. The prosecutor gave me charge of the prisoner, he said she had picked his pocket of a watch, and gave it to another, who had run away. I took her to the watchhouse.

Mr. Challenor. Did the prosecutor appear to you to be sober - A. He appeared to have been drinking. He appeared to be sensible.

Prisoner's Defence. As I was coming down Holborn with Jane I met the prosecutor, he took Jane and me to a house in Southampton-buildings, after that he took us three times into the wine vaults facing Gray's Inn-lane, and when he came out he was hugging and kissing Jane; she and another ran from him; he said he had lost his watch; he detained me until I told him where they lived, I could not. I was searched, nothing was found on me. He was very much intoxicated in liquor.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Transported for life .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110529-27

407. HANNAH NICHOLAS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of April , twenty-two yards of printed callico, value 1 l. 10 s. the property of John Gunn .

JOHN GUNN . I am a linen-draper , Bishopgate Without .

JOSEPH HARRIS . On the 17th of April I saw the prisoner, she had this printed callico, one part of it was under her cloak, and one part was trailing on the ground; I desired somebody to go to the prosecutor's shop, they came and owned it.

SAMUEL SHEPPARD . I took the prisoner into custody. The property was delivered to me.

Prosecutor. This print was taken from within the shop about a vard and a half from the door. I was in the shop, I did not see it taken. It is my property.

Prisoner's Defence. I have four infant children which are supported through my honest industry. The cotton I am charged with was given me by a man who retired for a certain occasion. If I had stolen it I should not let it remain on the ground, as I had a cloak on.

GUILTY , aged 35.

Confined Three Months in Newgate , and fined 1 s .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110529-28

408. JOHN BATMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of May , a silver watch, value 2 l. a steel chain, value 1 s. a seal, value 6 d. and two keys, value 6 d. the property of William Dodge Fidler .

WILLIAM DODGE FIDLER . I am a clerk to a house in White Hart Court. On Wednesday evening last, about a quarter past ten o'clock, I was going down Bishopsgate street in my way home, I passed a quantity of girls standing together at the corner of Half Moon Street, I went past them, and when I had got opposite of Farriers Rents, the next passage, a girl came up to me on the left hand side, asked me how I did, and would I go and sleep with her; I said no, go along about your business. As soon as I had finished these words, I felt something come round me on my right hand side and I felt my watch go out of my pocket. I put my hand down and found it was gone. I looked round, and saw the prisoner close by my side. I went to catch hold of him, he made a small circle from my reach, ran up Sweet Apple Court, and went through a passage into Dunning's Alley, that is the only time I lost sight of him. He went across that alley as if to go through another passage, he then turned a little to the left and was taken by the watchman. I am sure he is the same man, I was close to him all the while. I never found the watch, he told the officer he throwed it away.

ROBERT WATTS . I am the watchman. I was calling the hour of eleven, I heard the alarm of stop thief, I heard a foot running very quickly. I said, if you do not stop I will knock you down. The man stopped immediately without any resistance. I collared him and took him to the watch house, Mr. Fidler came up directly. I took him, and went with us to the watch-house.

SAMUEL SHEPPARD. I was the officer of the night. The prisoner on Wednesday night last was brought into the watch-house by Mr. Fidler and Watts, I instantly searched him; I found nothing upon him; he called me of one side, told me if the prosecutor would not hurt him he would tell me where the watch was. He said it was on a dunghill in Dunnings Alley. I took him and led him to Dunnings Alley and searched about there a long time, we could find nothing there; he said he was sure it must be there, because he heard the girls throw it away, and then I took him to the Compter.

Prisoners Defence. When I was running through the court I told Mr. Sheppard that there were two girls running in the alley; I saw one of them throw something away, I am very innocent of it.

Prosecutor. There were no girls in the Alley.

Jury. We wish to be informed of the situation of the girls with you at the time you missed the watch. - A. The girl stood at my left arm and had got her arm in my left arm, on the wall side. The prisoner stood by my right hand, and none but him; there was none whatever but this girl.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110529-29

409 JOHN GEORGE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the sixth of April , a box, value 2 s. three frocks, value 3 s. three pair of breeches, value 6 s. five aprons, value 5 s. three shirts, value 3 s. a pair of stockings, value 6 d. and two handkerchiefs, value 1 s. the property of David Millard .

DAVID MILLARD. I am a carrier . I keep an errand cart . On the 6th of April, at half-past six o'clock in the afternoon I stopped my cart in Cheapside , near the corner of Foster lane, facing the Old Change. I got out, and went two or three doors down the street, and as I came to the top of the Old Change, into Cheapside, I saw the prisoner take the box off the foot board of the cart, and put it on his right shoulder. I caught him by the lappet of his coat, and halloaed out stop thief; he made a push forward and threw the box off his shoulder behind, the lappet of his coat came off, and I had it in my hand. I ran after him, and caught him by the corner of Pater-noster Row. I brought him back to my cart, and gave charge of him to Mr. Sheppard.

WILLIAM SHEPPARD . I took the prisoner in custody, and I have the lappet of his coat.

MARY HAYE . I can prove that this property belongs to me; I delivered it to this man for the Chelsea errand cart.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of the charge.

Q. How came the flap of your coat to come off. - A. There were twenty or thirty people about, and this man caught hold of me, I thought it was a press-gang.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110529-30

410. MARY SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of April , a frock, value 2 s. the property of John Lewis Birkett .

MARY BIRKETT . My husband is a book-binder , his name is John Lewis Birkett , we live at No. 40, White Cross Street . On Saturday 6th of April, about half-past twelve we dined, my child went to the door; I did not see him from that time until he was brought to me by some children about four o'clock.

ANN HOLLIWAY . It was near upon one o'clock that I went out of my place to get a pint of beer for dinner. I live in Long-alley; our back door, which lodgers go in at, is in Hand-alley. When I came back with the beer, the door was pushed to, the door is never pushed to, because it is very dark; I pushed it open, and a genteel woman came from behind the door. I did not observe her at the time having any child by her; I passed her, I got up three stairs, I heard her say come Billy, she took this child up in her arms, I turned round, I saw the frock was intirely untied behind, and one of the childs arms intirely bare; she turned round to me with this child in her arms, she said I beg your pardon Ma'am, let me tie this child's frock, the child has piddled itself, seeing her a genteel woman I went up stairs, and said nothing. It was a coloured frock.

Q. Look at the prisoner, is that the woman. - A. As soon as my husband had gone from dinner I went down stairs, the neighbours said do you know this child, it is drove out of your passage. I said I saw this child in a genteel woman's arms, she said she was going to turn the frock; aye, said they, she has turned it quite off. I am positive the prisoner is the woman, and I am positive of the child.

JOHN HUGGINS. I am a constable. On the 6th of

April, about half past one, I was going along Chiswell-street, I saw a mob, I found this women had stripped a child, she was dropping this frock from under her pelisse, I picked it up I searched her, I found a ticket of a pair of ear-rings which she had stripped from another child.

Q.(to prosecutrix) Is that your child. - A. Yes, and this is my frock, here is a piece of it, I am sure it is my frock that the child had on that day.

Prisoner's Defence. I am as innocent as a child unborn, I have four small children of my own, my husband lived with another woman, I had taken a drop too much of drink on that day, I picked up the frock coming a long.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Transported for seven years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110529-31

411. WILLIAM FRAZER was indicted for feloniously stealing from the person of Amos Dixon , a pocket book, value 1 s. three ten pound bank notes, and two five pound bank notes, his property .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded GUILTY .

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110529-32

412. JOSEPH CUTLER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 24th of May , one hundred pound weight of copper, value 5 l. twenty pound weight of lead, value 4 s. a sun dial, value 1 s. an engine pipe, value 1 s. and a key, value 4 d. the property of Thomas Harris .

The case was stated by Mr. Gurney.

CHARLES MURRAY . I am high-constable of Uxbridge division.

Q. In consequence of directions from the magistrate were you and the other constables out on the night of the 23d of this month. - A. Yes, and between twelve and one I heared a pistol fired, I immediately ran to the spot, Mash and Brown were standing by the prisoner at the time he had this copper on his shoulder, I asked him what he had got, he said he did not know, do you know he said to me, I asked him where he was going to take it to, he said he did not know, I said I would tell him he should take it to my house, he carried it part of the way and then throwed it off his shoulder and said he would not carry it any farther, I searched him and found this knife upon him, you will see the copper upon the edge of the knife.

Q. Did you afterwards go to the house of Mr. Harris. - A. I did, it is not quite a quarter of a mile from where the prisoner was taken.

Q. From what building did you find the copper had been taken - A. From a building in Mr. Harris's pleasure ground called the Hermitage , the copper is an hundred pound weight. This key I found upon him, it fits the lock where the engine pipe was taken from.

EDWARD BROWN . I am an headborough.

Q. Between twelve and one at night did you stop the prisoner. - A. I did, there was a person a few paces before him, they had every appearance of being in company, when I asked the prisoner what he had got he said a log of wood, then the other man turned round and said it was all wood, I then said he was the very man we wanted; Mash fired a pistol and the other man went off, I took the prisoner to the cage, Mash pursued the other man he got off.

EDWARD DURHAM. I am in the employ of Mr. Harris, I helped to put this copper down on the building, and I painted it, this copper is what came from the Hermitage, and that key belonged to the landry where the pipe of the engine was kept.

Q. Was this copper stripped off the Hermitage that night. - A. Yes.

Court. What is Mr. Harris's christian name. - A. Thomas.

TAYLOR. I am Mr. Harris's gardener, this copper was safe on the Hermitage at nine o'clock that evening.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been after work up Harrow on the hill, the copper laid on a dung heap on the common.

GUILTY , aged 55.

Confined Two Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110529-33

413. JOHN HULL was indicted for feloniously stealing on the twenty eighth of April a prayer book, value 2 s. 6 d. the property of William Bedford .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded GUILTY .

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110529-34

676. ELIZABETH HORTON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 22d of May , in the dwelling house of Richard Knighton , two silver table spoons, value 1 l. six silver tea spoons, value 1 l. a silver thimble, value 6 d. a guinea, three dollars, five half crowns, a shilling, and a one pound bank note, his property .

SARAH KNIGHTON. I live in Old Cock-lane , in the Parish of Shoreditch, my husbands name is Richard Knighton , and he lives there.

Q. Do you know the prisoner. - A. I do, on Wednesday, the 22d of May, at five o'clock in the afternoon, I saw her coming from my stairs.

Q. Do you let lodgings. - A. Yes. She walked into my shop out of the passage, and I taxed her with going up stairs, she said she had not, she only came to cheapen a bunch of greens, I told her the price, I am a green grocer, she said she would go and ask her mistress if she would like them, I asked her where her mistress lived, she said in the court next to me.

Q. What is the name of the court. - A.Duncan-court, she went out of the house and I watched her going up the court, I immediately went up stairs to see if my property was safe and found it all gone.

Q. Is the property here. - A. It is, it was found upon her, I went out and gave the alarm and she was taken.

Q. How long was it after she left your house before you saw her. - A. Not more than a quarter of an hour.

Q. Were you present when the things were found upon her. - A. I was not.

JAMES DAWSON . I am a weaver, I heared the alarm about Mrs. Knighton been robbed, I came out of my door there was a great quantity of people assembled together, I asked what was the matter and went up three pair of stairs and saw the prisoner, she said do not hurt me but take the property from me, she told me it was all safe in her pocket, I took her back into the shop and she pulled it all out of her pocket, she said I have taken the property which I should not have done.

Q. Did she say from whence. - A. No she did not.

Q.(to prosecutrix) Look at these things. - A. Here are two silver table spoons, six tea spoons, a guinea, a one pound note, a crown piece, three dollars, five half crowns, a shilling, and a box the money was in.

Q. I need hardly ask you whether these things are worth above forty shillings. - A. They are worth more than forty shillings.

Q. Can you swear that they are your husbands property. - A. Yes.

Q. And these were the things that the prisoner took from your house. - A. They are.

Q. Did you speak to the prisoner about it. - A. I taxed her upon the subject of going up stairs, she denied it, she said nothing to me of her having these things.

Q. Where were these things when she first came to your house. - A. In a drawer in my bed-room.

Q. Did you miss them before she was taken. - A. Yes, instantly.

Q. And they were afterwards found upon her. - A. Yes.

Q. She was not a lodger at your house. - A. She was not, I never saw her to my knowledge before.

Q. Then she came in without any acquaintance of your's into your house. - A. Yes.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 14.

The prisoner was recommended to his Majesty's mercy by the jury, on account of her youth.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18110529-35

415. SARAH JOHNSON alias FURLONG , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of April , two watches, value 5 l. three gold seals, value 50 s. a gold chain, value 50 s. three gowns, value 15 s. nine napkins, value 9 s. a cap, value 6 d. a tablecloth, value 1 s. a guinea, and fourteen halfpence, the property of John Goozee , in his dwelling-house .

JOHN GOOZEE . I live at No. 4, Spital Street, Mile End .

Q. Do you know any thing of the prisoner at the bar. - A: She was a weekly servant of mine in April last.

Q. On the 23d of April last how many watches had you in the house. - A. I had three, but she only took two.

Q. What part of the house were these watches in. - A. The silver watch with the gold chain and gold seals were hanging up against the window frame where I work, the other watch I do not know where it hung that afternoon, it commonly hanged against a screw by the fire-place in our bed-room.

Q. What sort of a watch was that. - A. It was a silver watch with a brass cap, it had a scarlet ribbon and a gold seal.

Q. When did you last see these watches. - A. On Tuesday the 23d of April, I last see my watch in the room where I work, I had been to work there about an hour and a half before I missed it. I cannot say particularly when I see the watch in my bed-room.

Q. You rent the whole house. - A. Yes.

MRS. GOOZEE. Q. You are the wife of the last witness. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember seeing these watches on the 23d of April. - A. I hung my watch with the scarlet ribbon and one seal by the fire-place, it was a watch that I generally wore, it hung up there in the morning, I went out about six o'clock in the evening.

Q. How long before that had you seen it. - A. The moment before I went out of the room.

Q. You did not see your husband's watch in his room, did you. - A. No, that was two pair of stairs higher than mine.

Q. When did you first miss the watch. - A. As soon as I returned, near eight o'clock at night. The prisoner slept in the house.

Q. How long had she lived with you. - A. Not above three weeks I believe.

Q. Did you receive any character with her. - A. My father was overseer of the parish, and most of the commissioners knew her, my husband knew her from a baby. I took her by the recommendation of the commissioners, most of them knew her. She applied for relief. I went immediately and searched after my watch to a great many pawnbrokers, at Mr. Matthew's in the Minories I found the watch with the gold chain and seals. I went to Mr. Hill and Sowerby's, Rosemary Lane, and there I found the watch with the scarlet ribbon and seals. He produced two gowns, I knew them immediately. I found these two gowns missing, and also a gown that I had on before I went out. I missed a guinea that was in my drawer in my bed-room, and the gowns were in another drawer. I missed seven pence in halfpence, a cap trimmed with a broad lace, a tablecloth, and nine napkins. The pawnbrokers have them here.

MARY ANN SPECKMAN . I work by the week for Mr. Goozee.

Q. You know the prisoner at the bar do not you - A. Yes.

Q. Tell me what you observed about the prisoner's conduct on the 23d of April. - A. She came up with a pretence of looking at my master's work at half, after six in the afternoon. There were two boys in the workshop besides myself, they were at work at their looms. Sarah Johnson looked at the watch, she told me she would take it down stairs.

Q. Where was it. - A. At the side of the room by the back window, it was a silver watch, gold chain, and two gold seals. I asked what she was going to do with the watch, she said she was going to take it down stairs and put it in the drawer. I saw no more of her afterwards, when my master came home I told him Johnson was then gone.

SPIRE HOLLOWAY. I am a silk weaver, I can only speak to one article. At the Mansson-house on the 24th, the prisoner told me she had pledged a gown for six shillings. Mrs. Goozee is my daughter. In consequence of her information, I went to the pawnbroker in Wentworth Street and found the gown.

Q. How came you to enter into conversation with her about this. - A. I was upbraiding her for her ingratitude, as a pauper I had behaved very attentive to her, she said God had forsaken her. I did not promise her any favour nor threaten her.

CHRISTIAN MATTHEWS . I am a pawnbroker in the Minories. On the 23d of April about seven o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came to our shop and pawned a silver watch, a gold chain, and two gold seals. This is the watch, she pawned it for 3 l.

Q. Was not you surprized that a watch like that should be in the possession of that poor woman. - A. She said it belonged to her brother.

Q. What is the value of the watch. - A. About five pound. On the following morning she came again, she wanted one pound more upon the watch, and I immediately sent for a constable.

ROBERT READ . I am a servant to Mr. Hill and Sowerby on the 23d of April, about eight o'clock in the evening, the prisoner pawned a silver watch and a gold seal, and two gowns, the watch had a scarlet ribbon. I saw the prisoner put them on the counter and deliver them to Mr. Hill.

JEREMIAH ROOTH . I live with Mr. Killingworth pawnbroker, 200, Brick Lane, Spitalfields, I produce two napkins and a tablecloth, pawned on the same day in the name of Sarah Johnson , I do not recollect the person of the prisoner.

ELIJAH GEDGE . I am a pawnbroker, 4, Lower Dorset Street, Whitechapel. On the 23d of April the prisoner pledged this gown, I believe before seven o'clock.

FRANCIS KINNERSLEY . I apprehended the prisoner, I searched her, I found upon her a duplicate of a tablecloth and two napkins.

Q. to Prosecutor. Look at these two watches, do you know them. - A. Yes, I know this watch perfectly well by the steel ring, it is worth three pounds. The other watch has the name of Jackson upon the brass cap. I value it at fifty shillings.

Q. to Prosecutrix. Look at the three gowns. - A. This is the gown I had on just before I went out, it is a short gown and a familiar acquaintance, they are all three my gowns, they are worth eighteen shillings and the table-cloth and napkins are my property.

GUILTY DEATH , aged 48.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18110529-36

416. JOHN TAYLOR , and THOMAS MANGHAM were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Henry Pasley , about the hour of nine at night on the 15th of April , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, seven snuff boxes, value 7 l. 10 s. 9 d. his property .

To this indictment the prisoner Taylor pleaded GUILTY .

MARY PASLEY . I am the wife of Henry Pasley . We live at No. 15, St. Martins-court, Liecester-fields .

Q. Do you know any thing of the prisoner Mangham. - A. No.

Q. You only know that Taylor was at your house. - A. Yes, on the 25th of April.

Q. Do you know that there was any other person with him at the time. - A. I was told that there was, but I do not know.

Q. What time of night was it. - A. About half past eight, or between that and nine, it had been dark an hour.

Q. Do you know what things were found upon Taylor. - A. Seven boxes; six tortoishell and one silver, the constable has got them here.

Q. Did you see Taylor standing near the window. - A. No.

WILLIAM OXFORD . Q.Do you know where Mrs. Pasley lives. - A. Yes, her house is in St. Martins-court. On Thursday night, April the 25th, about half-past eight, or between that and nine, I observed two men standing near about the middle of Mrs. Pasleys window, outside in the court. I observed that Mangham had his right hand, with the flap of his coat up to cover the glass, and his left hand was in the hole in the glass case, the show-glass which comes outside of the window.

Q. Does this show-glass stand in the shop. - A. No, it is outside of the shop.

Q. Can you get at what is within that shew-glass, unless you break the show-glass, without going into the shop. - A. No, the shew-glass draws into the shop.

Q. But you could not get at that without breaking the show-glass or going into the shop. - A. No.

Q. You say there were two men standing there. - A. Yes.

Q. Should you know them again. - A. Yes, both of them. I went by the shop door. Taylor was one of the persons that was standing close to the shop window, nearest to me, and Mangham was the other, he looked very hard at me.

Q. You say there was another person with Taylor, was that Mangham. - A. Yes.

Q. How do you know that the person that was with Taylor was Mangham. - A. When I was looking at Taylor, I was astonished at them, I cried out; Mangham turned round, and looked very hard at me: I am sure one of the persons I saw at the window was Mangham, there was a lamp just above his face that shewed a very great light, it hung over the shew-glass, and, by the help of that light, I saw his face perfectly.

Q. Did you lay hold of either of the persons. - A. I intended as Mangham was the last of them to seize him, he made off, John Taylor stood in the way, I laid hold of him. Mangham made off, and by the description that I gave of him at Bow-street, most of the officers knew him, and he was apprehended. I went to Bow-street to recognize him.

Mr. Ryenolds. Q. Be so kind as to tell me what you are. - A. I am an apprentice to Mr. Bicknell, a printer.

Q.Will you condescend to tell me what brought you through this passage that night. - A. Certainly, Sir; I was going home, I intended to call at my brother's in Marshall street. I was coming past, it was in the middle of the court, the narrow part of the court goes into the square.

Q. How long were you there observing these men. - A. About a minute, before I seized Taylor.

Q. Then the whole observation you made before Taylor went off was about a minute. - A. Taylor did not go off, it was Mangham.

Q. You had not seen him before. - A. Never.

Q. Mangham had his hat on - A. I do not think he had.

Q. Which had he, his hat on or not. - A. To the best of my knowledge he had not, I did not take notice of his hat.

Q. Have you heard there is a reward of any thing for this. - A. I have lately, never before.

Q. When was it you went to Bow-street. - A. When I saw Mangham at Bow-street, after he was taken, it might be a week afterwards.

Q. Then there was a whole week that you saw nothing of him. - A. I did not.

Q. When you went to Bow-street, you went expecting to see this other man. - A. Certainly, and I recognized his features.

Q. A man you never saw before, only a minute. - A. A minute or two. I had a full view of his face.

JOSEPH PIKE . I am a parish constable. I was sent for to Mr. Pasley's house, I found John Taylor in the shop.

Q. Taylor has confessed himself guilty - A. Yes, he has. I found in his right-hand close coat pocket seven snuff-boxes, six tortoiseshell and one silver, a smelling-bottle, and a knife, the knife appears to have been used in starring windows.

Prosecutrix. They are all my husband's snuff-boxes, and they have all a private mark upon them; they were taken at half-past eight, I was at the door just before the alarm was given.

Q. What is the value of these boxes. - A. Above A. I had seen them about a quarter of an hour before, the glass had split, it had been put in too tight by the glazier some little time before.

Q. You did not see the prisoner I believe. - A. No.

JOHN HUMPHRIES . I am an officer. When Oxford gave his evidence at Bow-street, he gave a description of Mangham. I have seen him in company with Taylor at the Carpenter's Arms, at the back of Exeter change; in consequence of his description I apprehended him near Temple bar, near twelve at night. I found this wire in his pocket, they use this wire after they have starred the glass, what their fingers cannot reach out they put this wire in and hook it out.

Prisoner's Defence. I was never seen with Taylor. I never saw him nor he me to my knowledge.

TAYLOR, GUILTY, DEATH , aged 40.

MANGHAN, NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18110529-37

417. HARRIET WHITE was indicted for that she on the 17th of May , being in the dwelling house of Richard Reily , three pair of ear-rings, value 30 s. six rings, value 3 l. five necklaces, value 1 l. five tea spoons, value 5 s. two silk handkerchiefs, value 2 s. a tablecloth, value 12 s. four shirts, value 12 s. three shifts, value 12 s. three gowns, value 6 s. a night gown, value 2 s. three petticoats, value 3 s. seven neck handkerchiefs, value 7 s. eleven pair of stockings, value 22 s. and eleven handkerchiefs, value 11 s. the property of Richard Reily , feloniously did steal, and that she afterwards about the hour of ten at night on the same day, burglariously did break to get out of the same dwelling house .

MARY REILY . My husbands name is Richard Reily , we live at No. 10, Southampton-row, Bloomsbury .

Q. On the 17th of May last was the prisoner in your service. - A. Yes, as s servant of all work .

Q. What day was the 17th of May, - A. A Friday, I had occasion to go out that evening about half past eight my husband went with me, I left the prisoner in the house and five young women some of them are my apprentices, before I went out I went down stairs and gave her directions. The things that I missed were up stairs all but the tea spoons those were below.

Q. Had you seen the silver tea spoons down below. - A. I had not seen them after tea time.

Q. What time did you return that evening. - A. About a quarter before eleven.

Q. Had you supped. - A. No, I rang the bell for the prisoner to bring the supper up.

Q. Had you seen the prisoner before you went out. - A. Yes, I spoke to her the last thing. There is a second door that opens to the passage.

Q. There is first an outer door than there is an inner door that leads into the passage. - A. Yes, I went in at the outer door to the inner door, I am not quite certain whether the outer door was shut or not, the inner door leads to the kitchen stairs and to the other stairs.

Q. The inner door to the passage is parallel to the street door. - A. Yes.

Q. And you say you think one or the other of these doors were shut. - A. Yes, I believe it was the outer door, and the inner door shuts with a latch.

Q. The outer door I suppose has a spring lock, - A. Yes.

Q. You say you rung your bell for the prisoner to bring the supper. - A. Yes, she did not come, I then went and called her, she did not answer, I then asked the young people in the work room if they knew where she was, they told me they knew nothing of her.

Q. Was the work room up stairs. - A. No, on the ground floor within the second door, I sent one of my young people to see if she was up stairs, I found she was gone.

Q. Then your suspicion was raised and you looked about to see what you had lost, what did you lose. - A. I went into the kitchen first, I lost five silver tea spoons, her own clothes were taken out of the box and the box left, I then went up stairs into my own bed room, I missed two clothes bags full of dirty linnen, the bags contained shirts, gowns, petticoats, shifts, stockings, neck and pocket handkerchiefs and night caps, and various other things, the bags were gone as well as the articles, I missed several necklaces, ear rings and finger rings, beads and bracelets and a variety of little articles; these were in a little drawer.

Q. I suppose generally during the hours of the day you keep the outer door open so as to admit your customers, you only keep the inner door shut. - A. Yes, we generally keep the outer door open untill the close of the day and then shut it.

Q. At half past eight when you went out was it dark. - A. It was scarcely dark but very near.

Q. You have spoken to a great number of articles do you think a young woman like her is able to carry off that quantity. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know whether the prisoner had any person to follow her. - A. She had not while with me, she had been only four days in the house. I had a very good character with her.

Q. After discovering this loss when did you first hear of these things again. - A. On the following morning about eleven o'clock an officer from Bow-street came to me, his name is Salmon, he asked me if I had lost a servant and any property, I told him I had, he told me that he had her and the property in custody. An officer afterwards came from Marlborough-street and said she was taken there. I went to Marlborough-street and saw the prisoner and saw the articles and swore to them. I saw all that I lost as far as I know, they were in a bag, except the trinkets which were tied up in an apron or a handkerchief.

Q. Since the time you saw them at Marlborough-street have the remained in they officers custody. - A. Not all of them, the person who first stopt them has part.

ELIZABETH CUMMINGS , I keep a lodging house at St. Giles's, near Great Russell-street.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar. - A. I never saw her before that night, the prisoner now at the bar is the person, when she first came to my house I was two doors off, she had not been in my house above two or three minutes when the maid came to me and asked me if I would take a pair of stockings in for a bed for the prisoner, in consequence of that I went home and saw the prisoner there sitting down just inside of the door, she had three bundles with her, I asked her where she came from, she said she came from Hertfordshire, she had travelled up that day from Uxbridge and that she was very tired, I asked her if she had any friends in London, she said, no. I asked her what brought her to London, she said to look for a service; then my servant said to the prisoner I think I know you young woman, she said no; yes my servant replied about twelve or fourteen months ago you took a pair of stockings away from my master, Mr. Dillon, that I had to pay for, the prisoner denied it, then I said if you have been a thief I must see what you have got in these bundles. I then opened this bundle, she said they were her own. I turned out of a dark cotton clothes bag the contents, a great many dresses, shifts, shirts, and handkerchiefs, a great deal of dirty linen, and some clean white stockings and a little work bag besides; she said that her mother was dead, that they were left her and they were her own, I opened an apron where there were a great many rings and little boxes with trinkets, then I told her she was some servant, and that she had robbed the lady's dressing room. I went out for a watch-man and he took her St. Giles's watch-house, and I went to the watch-house with her. The watchman took the things with him his name is Timothy Lane.

TIMOTHY LANE . Q. On the 17th of May last were you watch-man at St. Giles's. - A. Yes, Mrs. Cummings came to me when I was crying ten o'clock, she took me into her house, I saw the prisoner sitting dawn in a chair and three bundles, Mrs. Cumming opened them, the trinkets were in one of the three bundles, I took the prisoner and the three bundles to St. Giles's watch-house and they were examined by the constable of the night.

Q. After they were examined what was done with them. - A. They were put in that bag and I took them back to Mrs. Cummings's and locked them up in a chest in one of her rooms and I kept the key till the next day. The next morning I went to Mrs. Cummings's, she took me into the same room and unlocked the same chest with the same key she gave me, I took the bundles out of the chest put them in a cart and took them to Marlborough-street.

JOHN SMITH . I am beadle of St. Georges, Bloomsbury. On the Friday night the prisoner and the three bundles were brought to the watch-house, I searched the prisoner and found upon her five tea spoons and two silk handkerchiefs, and a table cloth marked M. B. they were all in one pocket. I kept these articles untill they were carried to the magistrate and then they were sealed up by the magistrate and put in one of these bags.

JOHN BAXTER . I am constable and watch-house keeper of St. Giles's, I attended at the examination at Marlborough-street, this bundle that I have in my hand was sealed up by the magistrate, I was present when the prisoner was brought into the watch-house, an inventory was made out and the things were delivered to Mrs. Cummings, these things have been in my custody ever since the second examination, Mrs. Cummings had them on the Saturday, there was a seal put on every individual thing; and they are so now. Mrs. Cummings insisted upon me having them and I did not want any dispute about them, on the second examination Mr. Reily insisted upon me having them and then these three bundles so sealed were put into a great bundle, and that was sealed. This is the bundle of trinkets.

Prosecutrix. That pocket book I know it is worth half a crown, here are six rings altogether in this box they are worth about 3 l. and I suppose the beads in the box are worth 10 s. in this box there are three pair of ear rings, they are worth 1 l. the rings and necklaces I have no doubt they are mine, I am well acquainted with them and these little things of trinkets are worth 5 s. altogether, all these articles I missed from my drawer in my dressing table, probably I saw them all the day before I missed them. This is one of Mr. Reily's shirts, there were four missed they are worth 12 s. I know the bag is mine I sewed it myself, these five tea spoons are worth 10 s. the tablecloth is mine it is marked M. B. the initials of my name before I was married. These handkerchiefs are mine, they are worth two shillings.

GUILTY , - DEATH , aged 20.

Prisoner was recommended to his Majesty's mercy by the prosecutrix on account of her youth.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18110529-38

418. THOMAS BROWN was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Durick Jones , about the hour of one on the night of the 22d of April , and burglariously stealing therein two gowns, value 10 s. a petticoat, value 1 s. a bonnet, value 2 s. and a habit shirt, value 6 d. his property .

MARY JONES . I am the wife of Durick Jones, I live in the Almonry, Westminster , in the parish of St. Margerets. On the 27th of last month I came home at half past twelve at night, I found my door broken open.

Q. Had you been out of your house. - A Yes.

Q. Where had you been. - A. I went to the Old Bell in Prince's Street, I was drinking some porter, I returned at half past twelve, I went to my cupboard where I keep my things, I found the cupboard broken open. The door was padlocked, I found an iron crow on the bed, it was broken open.

Q. What, the padlock on the door of the room. - A. Yes.

Q. And when you went in did you miss any thing. - A. Yes, my door was standing open when I went up, I went to the cupboard and all the things were gone.

Q. What were the things that were gone. - A. Two gowns, a petticoat, an apron, a bonnet, and a habit shirt, I heard a foot on the stairs, I ran down and

called out, stop thief, and the prisoner was stopped by the watchman.

Q. Did you see him. - A. Yes, after he was taken he was searched, some money was found upon him, he dropped my things, and the watchman picked them up.

Q. Did you see the watchman pick them up. - A. No, a witness here did. The watchman picked them up by Wrights passage in the Almonry.

RICHARD CASTLE . I am a watchman. On the 27th of April between twelve and one o'clock, I was walking up this passage, I heard an alarm of stop thief, I turned back and met a person at the corner of the passage, I ran against him and he against me. I stopped the prisoner, he scrambled away from me and was taken about thirty yards from me, the prisoner dropped these articles, I picked them up, two gowns, a bonnet, and a petticoat, and some other articles, the prisoner was then taken to the watch-house.

JOSEPH COOPER. I walked into the Almonry between the hours of twelve and one, I heard a noise at No. 7 in the Almonry, I went there and found the prisoner in custody, and the property was in the room along with him at the prosecutrix's house, I then took him, in company with the watchman, to the watch-house. I searched him, and found two one-pound notes in his pockets which he dropped on the floor, I afterwards took him to Tothil-fields Bridewell. This key dropped out of his pocket on the floor.

Q. Did you ever find what lock that key belonged to. - A. No, I went back to the house afterwards, and found the staple lying where it had been drawn off, it was laying outside of the door in the passage. On looking further in the room, I found this iron crow on the bed, covered over with a corner of the rug that laid on the bed.

Q. What time of the night was this. - A. Between the hours of twelve and one. The prisoner said after he was in custody a week or so that he should not have done it if he had not been drunk.

Q. How came he to say that. - A. I do not know, I mentioned to him, that it was a bad thing he should do so, he said he should not have done it if he had not been drunk.

SARAH STEVENS . I live in the Almonry Westminster, next door to Mrs. Jones. I was standing at my door about half past twelve o'clock, I heard Mrs. Jones cry out stop thief, and the prisoner ran out of Mrs. Jones's door, the prisoner running by hit me on the arm as I stood at the door, he ran across the road, and dropped the property by Mr. Wright's passage.

Q. Did you see him drop it. - A. Yes, he had it under his great coat, he ran off towards the other part of the Almonry, I was present when he was secured, I caught him by the coat. These are the things that were picked up.

Prosecutrix. These gowns are mine, the bonnet and the habit shirt are mine, they are the property of my husband, his name is Durick Jones.

Q. Now, were these in the house before you went out. - A Yes.

Q. When did you see them. - A. When I was in the room about eleven o'clock.

Q. The house was broken open by drawing a staple was it not. - A. Yes, I went out about eleven o'clock, and returned about half past twelve.

Prisoner's Defence. My Lord and Gentlemen of the Jury, at the time I am charged with committing the robbery, I was in a state of inebriety, and how I came in the house I cannot say, all the recollection that I have of the transaction is being taken to the watch-house, and on the following day when I was at Tothill-fields, the woman who owned the property agreed to make up the matter provided I would make up one pound, I had not the money about me, but an acquaintance of mine offered to pay the sum, with which she was perfectly satisfied, and which was paid her by Mrs. Field. Under these circumstances I trust the court will take it into consideration, I have never been in a court of justice before in my life, and I have always conducted myself to the satisfaction of my employers, and can have a character from them all.

GUILTY , DEATH , aged 18.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18110529-39

419. ZADEAS FONSECA and ANTONIO JOSE were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of April , twelve silk handkerchiefs, value 2 l. the property of Thomas Smyth , in his dwelling-house .

THOMAS SMYTH . I am a haberdasher , I live at 104 Ratcliffe-highway , I rent the whole house myself. On the 8th of April, about eight o'clock in the evening, the two prisoners came into my shop and enquired for some handkerchiefs; I shewed them a quantity of silk handkerchiefs, after looking at them a long time they purchased this one, Fonseca paid for it. Jose then enquired for some black silk handkerchiefs, they purchased one of them; they then enquired for some stockings, and while I was gone to a distant part of the shop to get the stockings, my apprentice, who had been watching them, gave me some information. In consequence of that I sent him for an officer, and when the officer came he took Fonseca's hat off. We found two parcels of black silk handkerchiefs therein, five in one, and seven in the other. Jose was searched, I believe nothing was found upon him, I had taken them handkerchiefs out of the box to shew them to the prisoners.

BENJAMIN WILLIAMS . I am an apprentice to Mr. Smyth. On the 8th of April, in the evening, I saw the two prisoners come into the shop, my master shewed them some handkerchiefs, they purchased a coloured one. I was watching them, and while my master was shewing them some black ones, I observed a piece of black silk handkerchiefs' between Jose's knee and the counter, and another piece on the floor. They then asked my master to shew them some stockings, and while he was gone for them Fonseca stooped down and put both pieces in his hat, and then put his hat on his head; I then informed my master, and master sent me for an officer.

RALPH HOPE . I am an officer. On the 8th of April I took the prisoners into custody about a quarter after eight. Williams told me that Fonseca had two pieces of handkerchiefs in his hat. I took Fonseca's hat off and found these two pieces in his hat, they have been in my custody ever since.

Prosecutor. I can swear positively to both pieces of handkerchiefs, they have both my mark, they cost me two pound, or two pound three shillings.

Fonseca's Defence. After I had done my work I came on shore, we were intoxicated, I saw something lay on the floor, I put it in my hat, with no intention to rob any body.

Jose's Defence. The same.

FONSECA GUILTY , aged 24,

JOSE GUILTY , aged 25,

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18110529-40

420. JOHN EVANS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 16th of May three yards and a half of linnen, value 11 s. a shawl, value 9 s. and a pair of stockings value 2 s. the property of James Gray .

JAMES GRAY . I am a linnen draper residing in Bishopsgate-street . The prisoner was my shopman . In consequence of information I went with Mr. Elsworth to the prisoners lodgings, 66, Paul-street, Finsbury Square, I there saw the prisoners wife, and upon my going into the shop I saw a piece of print hanging in the window I knew it to be mine, it had my mark on it, I asked his wife to shew me some shawls as soon as I received them I perceived one of them to be mine it was marked with pen and ink that I knew to be my writing that mark was defaced, and I saw several pieces of muslin bearing my mark. I went home and saw the prisoner at my house, I told him I was much surprised to find that he had got a shop and I had seen a great deal of my property there and it remained with him to account how it came there. He said he had acted very wrong not letting me know that he had a shop, and the goods he had bought of me for a friend at Deal, instead of sending them to Deal he had kept them himself. He had represented to me before that he bought the goods for a friend at Deal, but instead of sending them to Deal he had taken them to his own lodgings, I told him if that was the case I would take the day book over to his lodgings and call over the goods, and I went there with the day book, we called over the goods and it pretty well tallied with the entry in the book - the book and the goods nearly corresponded but they were entered in another name.

Court. Was the shawl in the day book. - A. It was not.

MR. BARRY. Is the shawl present. - A. No, he has made away with it.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18110529-41

421 JAMES ABEL PERCY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 19th of April , sixty yards of canvas, value 30 s. the property of John Baker , sen. and John Baker , junr.

JOHN BAKER , JUN. I am a sail maker , Shad Thames , and my father John Baker is my partner, the prisoner had been our journeyman between four and five years.

Q. Have you seen some property that was produced to you by Armstrong. - A. Yes, at the office, I have no doubt it is mine.

JOHN ARMSTRONG . I am an officer. On the 19th of April, between eight and nine in the evening, I stopped the prisoner in Worship Street, he was carrying this canvass, it was all in this outside wrapper, it looked like a truss. I asked him what he had got there, he said he had got this bundle to carry to a shop in the Borough, or to some Inn in the Borrough, I asked him whether he had a bill of parcels, he said no, I took him to the public-house next door to the office, and opened the bundle, and found it contained the goods now present, he told me it was to go to one Mr. Essey at Portsmouth, who kept an old iron shop. I took care of the property, and Bishop and my son went in search of the owner. I have had the property ever since.

DANIEL BISHOP . I am an officer, I just came up after Armstrong had taken the prisoner, and in consequence of what the prisoner said about Mr. Newman on the following day, I, in company with the prisoner, went to Mr. Newman's house in Willow-walk; on searching the lower apartment, I found this old sailcloth, it is ochred over with red ochre The prisoner said he had brought it there and was going to carry it into the Borough for Mr. Essey of Portsmouth.

Prosecutor. It is all my property

Prisoner's Defence. It is impossible for any workman to carry out such a quantity from the place by day-light.

GUILTY , aged 72.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction and fined 1 s .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18110529-42

422. THOMAS NORTHEM was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of May , a snuff-box, value 5 l. the property of Abbara Richardson , from his person .

ABBARA RICHARDSON. On Thursday night the 23d of May, I was sitting in the pit at the Opera-house , about half-past ten, one of the officers came and asked me if I had lost any thing, I answered no. He came to me a second time, and asked me the same question, I put my hand to my pocket, I found I had lost my snuff-box; it was a silver gilt one. I followed the crowd, and the officer held up the snuff-box, I knew it to be mine.

Mr. Alley. You had been some time at the Opera. - A. Yes, I had just come out of the boxes.

Q. You were sitting by the railing. - A. Yes, a good way from the officers.

Q. Was not the house very full. - A. It was remarkably thin at that time.

Q. Can you say whether your pressing against the railing might not have turned the snuff-box out of your pocket. - A. I did not perceive the man take it, I cannot say whether it fell out of my pocket by rubbing against the rails or no.

WILLIAM NICHOLS . I am an officer, I was attending in the pit of the Opera-house, I observed the prisoner on the left hand side of the pit.

Q. Had you ever seen him before. - A. No, not to my knowledge, I saw him place himself behind a gentleman who was sitting at the end of one of the seats, I saw the prisoner put his hand into the gentleman's pocket, but he did not succeed there, I was close behind the prisoner at the time, he then removed to the right hand seat of the centre of the pit, there he attacked another gentleman's pocket, he removed again, and as he removed I removed behind him, I immediately touched Humphrey's, my brother officer to follow him. He then went and placed himself behind

the prosecutor, Mr. Richardson. The prisoner then got as close against the rails as he could, he then cast his eyes downward, I saw him put his hand into Mr. Richardson's pocket, and as soon as he got the property he turned round directly.

Q. Did you happen to see the property in his hand. - A. Not exactly at that time, I was perfectly satisfied that he had got something. I told Humphreys to ask Mr. Richardson if he had not had his pocket picked, I followed the prisoner, Humphreys came after me and said no, he had lost nothing, I insisted upon Humphreys going back again to Mr. Richardson, as I was sure he had something, and by that time the prisoner had got into the watercloset, I followed him into the watercloset, there I saw him looking at something, I could not see what it was, he dropped his hand very quick the moment he saw me, I returned out to see if I could see Humphreys, Humphreys came running and said the gentleman had lost his snuff box, then the prisoner was just going into the pit again. When he got into the pit I saw Humphreys had got hold of the prisoner's hands, I assisted Humphreys in bringing him out of the pit, and in his left hand side coat pocket I pulled out the snuff box, I held it up and called out for the owner, the prosecutor came forward and said it was his box. We immediately took the prisoner off to St. Martins watch-house. This is the snuff box.

Prosecutor. It is my box, I missed it out of my pocket upon being informed the second time.

Prisoner. At Bow Street Nicolls did not swear that he saw me put my hand into his pocket.

Court. I have the depositions here, and if you like to have them read you shall. - A. I should wish it.

The Depositions read. The said William Nicolls says he was in the pit of the Opera-house last night for the purpose of finding out and detecting pickpockets - That Humphreys was with the informant, who now says, that he saw Thomas Northam put his hand into a gentleman's pocket but did not take any thing out. He then went to the right hand side of the pit, and was followed by the informant; he then stood up against a gentleman who was standing against the rails, he put his hand into the right hand pocket of the gentleman and then went away, the informant desired Humphreys to go to the gentleman and ask him if he had lost any thing, Humphreys returned and said there was nothing gone, informant being sure he had taken something desired Humphreys to go to the gentleman in the pit again, and he the informant followed him into the water closet, he saw him looking at something and he put his hands down directly, and as soon as the prisoner went into the pit again, Humphreys took hold of his hands and the informant found the snuff-box in the right hand pocket of the prisoner.

CHARLES HUMPHREYS . I was along with Nicolls in the pit, Nicolls informed me what he saw the prisoner do, I followed the prisoner down to the right hand of the pit till he came to the prosecutor, then he stood close behind him close to the railings of the pit, I observed him busy doing something, he put his left hand round the railing, and then his right, I was within a yard behind him, there were no one between us, he remained there about a minute, he looked round towards me, I had a glass at my side, I looked with my right eye on the stage, and looked at him with my left eye, I observed him put his hand into his pocket, I could not see what he had in his hand at the time, then he made off; he never stooped down so as to pick up any thing, any other way than to put his hand between the railings, I kept my eye upon him. After I apprehended the prisoner, on our going to the watch-house, I said a respectable man like you, how came you to be guilty of this; he said it was the first thing he ever did in his life, I replied it is the first time that you were catched doing it.

Prisoner's Defence. I never said such a thing. My Lord, and Gentlemen of the Jury, I stand here accused of a crime, which my situation in life, and the support I ever had from my business, always precluded me from want. I could have no motive whatever in the world for doing it. I came out of the boxes into the pit, and when I saw that box lay down, I took it up, I thought it belonged to Mr. Smith, a surgeon. I went into the water-closet, not with intent to look at the box, but with another motive. When I came out of the water-closet I went into the pit, to look for the gentleman that I thought owned it. Had I stolen it I should have made off with it. This officer says he followed me, how could he follow me, I never was a thief and this gentleman, Mr. Smith, he has been here all to day and yesterday, he has been gone away I believe an hour, he thought my trial would not come on; if he had been here to day, and had shown his box, you would have seen how much they were alike. Still I believe there will be enough witnesses called, whose words will go further than a Bow-street officer's. I believe my Lord you know that Bow-street officers is not very nice in what they say.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 54.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18110529-43

423. JOHN OXLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 17th of April , a box, value 1 s. a gown, value 6 s. three pair of stockings, value 9 s. ten caps, value 15 s. a night cap, value 1 s. two shifts, value 10 s. three aprons, value 3 s. two handkerchiefs, value 1 s. and two shawls, value 5 s. the property of William Page .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded GUILTY .

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110529-44

424. HENRY JAMES VANDENBURGH was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 3d of March , two yards of woollen cloth, value 10 s. the property of Timothy Woodhead .

TIMOTHY WOODHEAD . I am a taylor , I live in Duke-street, Aldgate . I had the prisoner taken up on suspicion, and when he was before the Lord Mayor some duplicates were found on him, I went to the pawnbrokers and saw the cloth, I knew it to be mine.

JOHN HOSKINS. I am a constable, I found this duplicate upon the prisoner's person that led me to the pawn-brokers, there I found the cloth.

JAMES SPURLING . I am a pawn-broker, I took in pawn two remnants of cloth of the prisoner on the 4th of March, he said he found it in his coach.

MARY DAVY. The prisoner came to Mr. Davey on the 3d of March, he asked for George, I said he was not at home, he asked me leave to go into the house to write a note, I gave him a sheet of paper, he was writing a quarter of an hour a least.

Prosecutor. I can swear positively that it was my cloth.

Prisoners Defence. On Sunday the 3d of March I called at the prosecutor's, the person I wanted to see was out, I solicited for pen and ink to write a note during which time a person called whom I left with the servant a month afterwards, a month afterwards a person came to me at the coach yard, I went to the prosecutors, he charged me with stealing two spoons, I was taken in custody and searched and some duplicates found on me and my prosecutor going to the pawn-brokers upon seeing two remnants of cloth the idea came across his mind that they were his, as no such articles were mentioned before; with respect to the cloth I found it on the 5th of January in my coach and pledged it untill it was advertised.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Confined Fourteen Days in Newgate , and whipped in jail .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110529-45

425. ELIZABETH MORTIMER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 19th of May , a handkerchief, value 1 s. and two dollars, the property of Evan Williams , from his person .

EVAN WILLIAMS. I am a labourer . On last Sunday week, a quarter after eleven at night I was coming along Bishopsgate-street, at the top of Skinner-street, two women came one of one side and one at the other and carried me into Skinner-street , they asked me where I was going, I told them I was going home, the prisoner took the handkerchief out of my pocket, I got hold of the handkerchief and when I tried to get the handkerchief back the other women put her hand into my pocket and took two dollars out. I never let the handkerchief go, I called out watch, they dragged me down the middle of the street, and before the watchman came the prisoner told the other woman to run away. The prisoner took my handkerchief and the other my two dollars.

PATRICK MURPHY . I am an officer of the night. The young man and women was brought in by the watchman, we know her well, the man was perfectly sober. This is the handkerchief he held it in his hand all the way he said.

Prisoners Defence. As I was coming home that gentleman followed me, he tore my shawl almost in two, he said I have been robbed by two women, I will swear you are one, when I came to a watchman I gave charge of him, they took me to the Compter instead of taking my charge they took his. I never saw the handkerchief.

GUILTY , aged 36.

Transported for Life .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110529-46

426. JOSEPH CORDLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 25th of May , nine pieces of paper, value 2 l. 5 s. and two pieces of paper borders, value 1 l. 7 s. 6 d. and an hempen wrapper, value 1 s. the property of John Thurgood .

JOHN THURGOOD . I am a carrier from London to Hempstead, in Essex . On last Saturday afternoon I was helping the things out of the ware-house, at the Four Swans, Bishopsgate . I gave our porter a truse to carry to the waggon, he carried it and put it in the hind part of the waggon and returned back to the warehouse, I went out of the ware-house directly, he came back and saw the prisoner going down the gateway with the truss, I followed the prisoner and looked on the top of it and saw no direction on the top, I looked underneath and saw I. Harris and Pexton upon it. I catched hold of him by the collar and asked him where he was going with the truss, he said he was going to carry it to the waggon in the street, I told him no, he should not do that he should carry it back, he pulled to get away, I pulled him up the yard, I led him into the tap room and told our porter to take care of him. I went to the Comptor, got an officer and gave charge of him.

JOHN PEARCE . I am book-keeper, I received the property and delivered it into Mr. Thurgood's care.

JOHN EMMITT . I am a porter in the yard, I was taking a box and other things, I asked the prisoner to lay hold of a box while I put the other things in the waggon, I went afterwards and got the truss.

Prisoners Defence. When he asked me to lay hold of the box I asked him where the truss was to go, he said into the front of the waggon, I went to go round the front of the waggon with it.

Emmitt. He was twenty yards from the waggon and he had a cart in the street that we know nothing of.

Prosecutor. He was gone nearly out of the gate with the truss and more than twenty yards from the waggon.

JOHN BROWN. I was sent for to the four Swans, the prisoner was given in charge, and the truss it is marked I. Harris and Pexton.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110529-47

427. ELIZABETH JEWELL was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 31st of January , a damask table cloth, value 10 s. one other table cloth, value 10 s. two damask napkins, value 9 s. two towels, value 2 s. a sheet, value 5 s. a half silk handkerchief, value 1 s. a pillow case, value 2 s. a flannel waistcoat, value 2 s. the property of Margaret Huson .

MARGARET HUSON . I keep a lodging house in St. Swithers-lane , the prisoner was my servant , she lived with me four months.

Q. When did you lose all these articles. - A. From the first of her coming to me, she came into my service in October, and left me on the 31st of January, her conduct was improper.

Q. You did not accuse her of taking the things then. - A. I did not know it till last March, I found the things in a house where she lodged.

Mr. Arabin. She left you on the 31st of January. - A. Yes.

Q. I am told the young woman married away from your house. - A. She did not marry away from my house she was married afterwards.

Q. I do not know whether after her living with her husband she was compelled to go to service. - A. Yes, she came to me for a character.

Q. Who is this Mills. - A. I never saw her but twice in my life, she gave me the information, she is a relation of the prisoners husband and her husband had lived servant with me.

The Property produced and identified.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110529-48

428. WILLIAM CONNER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 6th of May , nine silver thimbles, value 7 s. 6 d. three bottles, value 4 s. 6 d. four pencil cases, value 8 s. a pair of scissars, value 3 d. a bodkin, value 3 d. two catches, value 1 s. 4 d. three pocket books, value 9 s. 6 d. a needle case, value 1 s. sixteen pencils, value 4 s. two thread cases, value 1 l. four button hooks, value 4 s. four files, value 1 s. five knives, value 9 s. two purses, value 10 s. a book, value 3 d. a glass, value 6 d. a. lock, value 12 s. a razor, value 1 s. four brushes, value 2 s two combs, value 7 d. eight yards of galloon, value 1 s. six skeins of silk, value 1 s. 6 d. seventeen sheets of paper, value 1 s. 3 d. a pair of scissars, value 10 d. a cork screw, value 8 d. a pair of plyers, value 1 s. five balls of cotton, value 6 d. and three pieces of leather, value 1 s. the property of William Smith .

WILLIAM SMITH . I am a pocket book manufacturer , 45, Cow-lane , the prisoner was a porter in my employment, he came to me on the latter end of February. He represented himself as a country lad, he said he had never lived in London; he had a brother who lived in Newington, I sent to the brother and the brother said he knew him to be an honest lad. I took the lad, he conducted himself well till on Saturday evening the 4th of May; my servant maid went to my butchers, he informed her that the lad had taken up two pound of mutton chops in my name. He did not lodge with me he lodged with a brother in law. On Saturday night he received his wages, he might have paid for them on Monday. I questioned him, he acknowledged he had them, I asked him if he had been in the habit of taking any thing, he said not, at last he acknowledged that he had taken one pocket book home to his brother, I asked him why his brother did not bring it home to me. The prisoner was searched and we found a silver pencil case and silver thimbles upon him, which he acknowledged taking out of a drawer in my accompting house. I got an officer, we searched his lodgings, I found a key on him which he said would open his box, with that key I opened his box, in the box I found a variety of articles belonging to me, and in his brothers box I also found things belonging to me; I brought the things home and put him into custody.

Mr. Alley. You said to him if he would lead you in the way to detect the brother you would not be harsh with him. - A. I certainly should have done that.

JOHN BARKER . I am warehouse-man to Mr. Smith, On the 6th of May I searched the prisoner, I found nine silver thimbles and five silver pencil cases, and in his waistcoat pocket a silver top smelling bottle; the prisoner denied having any thing until I turned them out.

WARRALL. I am a constable. On the 6th of May these things I found part in the boy's box and part in his brother in laws box.

Prosecutor. I can swear that it is all my property.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel, and called no witness to his character.

GUILTY , aged 16.

Judgment respited.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110529-49

429 ELIZABETH MARSH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of May four shirts, value one pound; five gowns, value 1 l. 15 s. a pellise, value 18 s. two petticoats, value 5 s. three pair of stockings, value 10 s. five handkerchiefs, value 10 s, a table cloth, value 2 s. 6 d. and three towels, value 2 s. the property of John Blake , in his dwelling-house .

MARY BLAKE . My husband's name is John Blake . He is a taylor and slop-seller . We live in Lombard Street , in the parish of White Friars. The prisoner was a servant with me at the time that she robbed me. On the 18th of May, she went out of the house before I was up in the morning, and took with her a number of articles, such as gowns, shifts stockings, and other things. She had only been my servant one week. After she had left me, I met her in the street; she told me that she was very sorry that she had robbed me, but she would bring the things back again. I took her to Bow Street, the officer searched her, and found the duplicates on her.

GEORGE DENCH . On the 18th of May, in the afternoon, I received of the prisoner three gowns, and a pellise, in pledge. I am sure she pawned them; she had been in the habit of coming to the shop before.

RICHARD BONE . I am an officer, I searched the prisoner, I found sixteen duplicates upon the prisoner, one belonging to Mrs. Blake, for two gowns, and a pellise, pledged for one pound.

The Property produced and identified.

Prisoner's defence. When I went there first, I went as a lodger. I agreed to pay twenty-five shillings a week; there were more lodgers in the house besides me.

Q. You are now only to answer for the two gowns and the pellise. A.- I am guilty of that, I took them through distress.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Of stealing to the value of 28 shillings only.

Confined Fourteen days in Newgate , and fined 1 s .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110529-50

430. WILLIAM BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of April , four pounds weight of lead, value 3 s. the property of James Scatcherd , and affixed to his dwelling-house .

THOMAS BEEMAN . I am a bookseller , I live in Stationers'-court . On the 29th of April last, about nine in the evening, I was in the shop. I heard a noise at the front of the house, as if some person was cutting, I went out of the door in Ave Maria Lane, and went under the arch-way, I saw a person at the corner shutter of the front in Stationers'-court; I passed him, and took no notice, and went a little way on, he went about eight or ten yards from the place, when I had passed him, he returned again, and I saw him in the act of cutting the lead with an instrument. He moved

from the place, I followed him into the Lane, I told him he had been doing what he ought not to do, he said, D - you, what do you want of me, he ran down Ave Maria Lane, I ran after him, he was stopped, I never lost sight of him, he was brought into the shop.

Q. Where is the lead. - A. There was no lead found upon him, it was cut off but not found.

Prisoner's Defence. I wish my family were provided for, I don't care what you do with me, I have a wife and six children, I was running the same as the rest, when the man cried stop thief; I know nothing about it.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110529-51

431. CATHARINE ROOK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of May , twenty cod fish, value 8 s. the property of Thomas Fowls .

ELIZABETH FOWLS . I am an Irish woman, I sell fish . I hired the prisoner at Billingsgate, to take the fish home; instead of her taking them to my house she sold them.

ANN PIKE . I deal in fish. The prisoner brought the fish to my door, and asked me to buy the fish, she asked five shillings, but she would take no half-pence. I bought eighteen fish, I gave her four shillings and sixpence in silver, and six pennyworth of halfpence, the prisoner said she bought them at Billingsgate.

JOHN WHEELER . I apprehended the prisoner. She confessed to me that she had sold the fish.

Prisoner's Defence. I recollect that this gentlewoman gave me the fish to carry, where I do not know, and whether I sold them to that woman, God strike me dead, I do not know.

GUILTY , aged 35.

Confined Fourteen Days in Newgate , and fined 1 s .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110529-52

432. CHARLES THORP was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 24th of May , three pounds weight of bark, value 3 s. the property of London Dock Company .

SECOND COUNT. For like offence, the property of certain persons, to the jurors unknown.

JAMES SLATER . I am a constable of the London Docks. The prisoner is a foreman to a merchant to sort skins at the London Dock . On the 24th of this month he passed me at the West gate, I observed he had something bulky about him, I followed him about forty or fifty yards, and then stopped him. I asked him whether he had got any thing improper about him, he said he had not; I told him I should not be satisfied without he went back with me and let me examine him. He then said he had a little bark; I took him back and searched him, and found in his coat pocket and his hat, three pound of bark, it is worth six shillings, the bark was the property of the London Dock Company. This is the bark.

GEORGE PENFOLD . I am foreman to the London Docks. I saw the prisoner on the west quay where there was bark.

Prisoner's Defence. I never took it to make any property of it. I have seen goods throwed away at the back of the London docks.

GUILTY , aged 41.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110529-53

433. JOHN COLLEY was indicted for the willful murder of Mry Colley , his wife.

ANN THOMPSON . Q. Did you know the deceased, Mary Colley . - A. Yes, I had an apartment of her on Sunday the 12th of May , about half past five in the evening, I was at the deceased's house. At the end of Sun-yard I stood about five minutes, and turning my head round, I saw Mr. Colley, the prisoner, coming, I ran as quick as I could to tell his wife, - he was coming, she answered, is he? Momently Mr. Colley entered the door, and as soon as he entered the door, he said it was his wedding-day, and he had come to do murder, he drew the knife from his trowsers, and plunged it into his wife's bowels.

Q. Do you mean by that, that he thrust it into her bowels. - A. Yes, he turned round, drew the knife from her, and went to stab Thomas Ferguson that sat in the room.

Q. Do you mean that he attempted to stab him?

A. Yes, he made a second stab at Fergusons breast, and Ferguson with his arm struck him into a chair, then I screamed out murder, and Mr. Elias came to my assistance, Mrs. Colley ran from her own house to Mr. Brown's, the public house, I left the house, and went over to the deceased at Mr. Brown's, I said Mrs. Colley, are you much hurt, she said look Nance, I could not see the wound for the blood. Then Mr. Brown, the landlord, told me to run for an officer as fast as I could, upon which I ran for Mr. Lucas, I did not see any more of it until I saw the deceased dead, she died the same evening about half past nine.

Q. Had the deceased said any thing to her husband, or given him any ill language when he came in. - A. No.

Q. Do you happen to know how long it was before that he had seen her. - A. About three weeks or a fortnight I saw him go through the yard.

Q. But he had not seen her that day. - A. No.

Q. What was his situation in life. - A. A sea-faring man .

Q. He had been a sea-faring man, and you had not seen him at home for a fortnight or three weeks before? - A. No.

Q. And you do not know that he had seen his wife between that time. - A. I cannot say.

Q. And when he came in, she did not say any thing to him. - A. No, not a word.

Mr. Alley. Ferguson you mentioned as the man that was found in the room with her. - A. Yes.

Q. The prisoner was a sailor. - A. Yes.

Q. While he was abroad Ferguson cohabited with her. - A. That I do not know.

Q. I ask you whether you do not know that during the absence of the husband Ferguson supplied his place. - A. He ate and drank there, I can answer no more.

Q. You saw him there in the morning. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see him there at night at bed time. - A. Yes.

Q. How many bed rooms had she in the house. - A. Three.

Q. How many were let out, you had one. - A. Yes.

Q. Who had the other. - A. Nobody.

Q. On what floor was the room in which she slept. - A. In the lower room in which she died; I occupied

the one pair of stairs, the garret was the room in which the other bed was.

Q. When you got up early in the morning or when at bed time. I ask you have not you seen him in that room morning, noon, and night. - A. I have.

Q. Do you not know that the prisoner had given her a ticket of three pounds a month to draw his wages. - A. That I cannot say.

Q. Did not he upbraid her of disposing of the money that he allowed her and giving it to Ferguson. - A. I never did hear it, I cannot say.

Q. Did not Ferguson get up when the husband came into the room and endeavour to push him out. - A. No. he said I came here to do murder. It was after he had stabbed her that Ferguson arose.

Q. Then I am to understand from you that Ferguson did not offer any violence to the prisoner until after the blow was given by the prisoner. - A. He did not.

Q. Were you examined before the Coroner. - A. Yes, and I gave the same account then.

THOMAS FERGUSON. Q. You knew Colley and his wife did not you. - A. Yes, I have known them about twelve or fourteen years.

Q. Were you in the room at the time this unfortunate circumstance happened. - A. Yes, it was on the 12th of May, I saw the prisoner come in, I was in the deceased's room, when the prisoner came in I was sitting on a chair, Mrs. Colley was sitting at the table cutting bread and butter at the time, and when the prisoner came into the house the first words that he repeated were, Here I come, it is my wedding day and I am come to make a murdering day of it; immediately as these words came out he plunged the knife into the bowels of the deceased, with that I arose up immediately off the chair and went towards the prisoner, I asked him if he had come to commit murder, and with that he made a pluage at me with the same knife which time the knife penetrated through my waistcoat and shirt and just grazed my skin, with that I waded it off with my hand, it did no further injury than just graze my skin, he made the second plunge at my breast, I struck him across the breast and he staggerd back into a chair.

Q. You struck him into a chair. - A. Yes, when he made the second plunge at me I immediately secured his arms, got hold of the knife and took it from him, and when I wrenched the knife from him, I gave it to Mr. Elias, who came into aid and assist me, and for a few minutes I held him in the same state that I had him when I wrenched the knife out of his hands, after that I let go the prisoner, he arose up from the chair, he said I hope I have finished her and he was very sorry he had not finished me the same, I asked Mr. Elias to take charge of the prisoner and not to let him go out of the house, I went out of the house with the intention of going for an officer, instead of that, finding there was no doctor to assist the deceased I went and found a doctor, he came immediately and then I ran to look for an officer, I met an officer coming about three or four hundred yards from the house, I returned back with the officer to the deceased house, I gave charge of the prisoner, the officer took him away.

Q. You knew the prisoner, did not you. - A. Yes.

Q.Had he been separated from his wife at all. - A. Yes.

Q. How long was it since he saw her last. - A. I cannot really say. The last time I saw him was about a month before the accident happened.

Q. Was he living with his wife then. - A. No.

Q. Could you tell us whether there was any dispute between the deceased and her husband. - A. Not a word passed between them.

Q. You lodged in the same house, did you not. - A. Yes.

Mr. Alley. You lodged in the same house, which bed did you sleep in. - A. Generally in the two pair when I slept in the house.

Q. Do you mean to tell me upon your oath that always when you were in the house at night you slept in the two pair. - A. Yes, I do mean to tell you so, at my first going into the house I slept in the first floor, and after the first floor was occupied I went and slept in the two pair room.

Q. What are you. - A. I am a seaman.

Q. You told my Lord that it was a month before that, that man was in his house. - A. That I saw the man in the yard.

Q. Did you help to turn the man out of his house that day month. - A. No, I did not.

COURT. Had you ever turned him out of the house? - A. Once I did, when he and I had a quarrel in the house, he struck me and gave me occasion to do it.

Q. Then upon that occasion there were blows. - A. There were.

ELIAS JOSEPH. I live next door to the deceased. On Sunday the 12th of May, about half past five, I was standing at Mr. Brown's public-house door, and the landlady was standing there also, I saw Mr. Colley, the prisoner, go into Mary Colley 's house. He had not been in a minute before I heard the cry of murder, I went towards the house, I met the deceased coming out of the house bleeding, saying, I am stabbed, I left her and went into the deceased's house, I saw Ferguson having hold of the prisoner on a chair, the prisoner had a knife in his hand, I saw Ferguson take the knife out of his hand, Ferguson turned round to me and said, Mr. Elias you take the knife, I took the knife and put it into my side pocket. I told Ferguson to let him go and to go for an officer. I staid with the prisoner until the officer came.

Q. Did the prisoner attempt to get away. - A. No, when Mr. Lucas, the officer, came I gave him in charge and the knife also, the deceased died that evening.

MR. RICHARDSON. I am a surgeon, I saw the deceased on the 12th of May, between five and six o'clock in the evening. I found her in a state of insensibility, I found a wound about three-quarters of an inch in length on the lower part of the left side of the abdomen.

Q. With what instrument did it appear to you that the wound was inflicted. - A. It must be some sharp instrument, it was a smooth wound.

Q. What was the consequence of that wound. - A. Whether she died of the wound or not it is impossible for me to say, whether that was the cause of her death, as I did not open her body, it is impossible for me to say.

Q. You can tell me this, whether it appeared such a wound as might be the cause of her death. - A. It did.

Q. When did she die. - A. I was called to her about ten o'clock in the evening and found her dead.

Q. After you found her dead, did you examine the body. - A. Nothing farther.

Q. Then you cannot tell whether she died of that wound or not. - A. I cannot say.

Q. I think you said this, that it was such a wound as might probably occasion her death. - A. It certainly was.

Q. Did you see any thing else about her that was likely to occasion her death. - A. I saw nothing else.

Q. Now be so kind as to tell us how often you saw her after you first saw her? - A. I was called in between five and six in the evening I dressed the wound.

Q. Can you tell me how deep the wound was. - A. I cannot say how deep it was, it was about an half, or three-quarters of an inch in length. I ordered her to be put to bed, she revived a little, I then left her. About nine o'clock I sew her again, and found her quite insensible, I gave her some stimulating medicines, she recovered and was able to speak, she exclaimed, Oh my belly, oh my back. She was very restless, I left her then, it was about nine o'clock; about ten o'clock I was sent for again, when I arrived I found her dead.

Q. Pray Sir, in your judgment, seeing all this and being sent for again and again, what, in your opinion, was the cause of her death. - A. In my opinion that wound was the cause of her death.

Q. I ask you what in your opinion as a medical man was the cause of her death. - A. In my opinion that wound was the cause of her death.

Q. Have you any doubt about it. - A. I have no doubt about it.

Q. That is the question I asked you before. - A. I did not understand your lordship, I could not swear that was the cause of her death, but I have no doubt about it. I wanted to open the body, but the father of the deceased would not admit it.

JOHN LUCAS . I went to the deceased's house, the prisoner was setting in the arm chair, there were several people in the room. I asked which was the man that stabbed the woman, he said, here I am; I asked the prisoner if he had stabbed the woman, he said yes, he had, I asked him if he had got any more weapons about him, he said no he had not, I searched him and found none, he got up, I told him I must confine him, he said I had no occasion to do that, he should go very quietly with me, I insisted upon tying his hands, he gave me a handkerchief himself to do it. Mr. Elias tied his hands while I held him. This is the knife that Elias gave me he said, that it was the knife with which he had stabbed the woman.

Q.(to Elias) Did you give Lucas that knife. - A. Yes, that is the knife that Ferguson took out of the prisoner's hand, he gave it me.

Q.(to Ferguson) Is that the knife with which the prisoner stabbed the deceased. A. Yes.

Prisoner's defence. I am troubled with fits, and being out of my mind at times by this man and this woman treating me as they have done for two or three years past, I might have done it, but one half what they say is false. This man cohabited with my wife, and when I came home, he turned me out of the house. On the Wednesday before I went to the house, and that very woman that has sworn against me, I trod upon her toes almost. She and my wife shut the window down, that women shut the door. I went to the hospital and sent for my wife, she sent me word that she would not come, she wished me better, I have a fracture on my skull, and sometimes I am out of my mind.

GEORGE MASON . I am a sea-faring man.

Q. Did you at any time sail in company with the prisoner. - A. Yes, in an East Indiaman, in the Ceylon; I was ship steward, and the prisoner was boatsman.

Q. During the time that you were in company with him on board that ship, did you observe any thing particular in his conduct. - A. On the evening he left St. Helena, in May, 1806, or the beginning of June, I had been in the carpenter's cabin, in company with the Carpenter and the captain's steward. I left there at ten o'clock, we retired to our separate beds; in a few minutes the carpenter sent to me for a light, which I sent him, and immediately followed myself; I found the carpenter and the captains steward breaking open the prisoners door, and when the door was opened, we found the prisoner laying on his cot, his throat cut in a most dreadful manner. We sent for Mr. Newberg the surgeon, he with a great deal of trouble sewed up the wound, the prisoner was very restless during the time, and attempting to tear it open. Upon examination, we found a razor under the bed, and the whole of the night he attempted to tear the wound open; the carpenter and I sat up with him the whole of the night, and we were obliged to have a man to be with him the next day. The whole of that night he appeared deranged, he fancied he saw a man with a bundle of ratans.

Q.Had you an opportunity of knowing whether he had been at that time allowing his wife any maintenance. - A. His wife received his monthly money, due to him; if ever he took a drop of liquor it turned him into a state of derangement, he was refrained from liquor the whole passage out.

COURT. When he was refrained from liquor he was in his perfect senses was he. - A. When he refrained from liquor he was.

CHARLES BALE. Q. I understand you were a mess-mate with this man. - A. I sailed with him on board another ship, the Isabella, a West-Indiaman, in last July, he always seemed to be a man comical in his senses, and not like another man, he kept walking by himself fore and aft on the deck, and would not be sociable with any one. I was in St. Thomas's hospital with him a week before this happened, he there seemed strange and totally insensible. On Sunday about four o'clock in the day, the mischief was done, he left the hospital, he put up his crokery ware, knife and fork, and some other dirty things in a dirty shirt, and carried it with him, I saw no more of him afterwards until he was in custody.

COURT. If he was out of his senses, how came you to let him go at large. - A. Nobody has any business to stop any person from going out, if I had known his business, I would have gone with him.

ANN WOOD . I was nurse in the ward in St. Thomas' hospital where the prisoner was, I have observed him several times to be in a deranged state, he would get up in the night, and wander about, and talk to himself.

I have advised him to reconcile himself and content himself in bed, or I should be obliged to state it to the serjeant, he would try other means, to which I have had but a slight answer from him, he seemed to be in a melancholy state.

GEORGE CHANBERLAIN. Q. I understand you were an officer on board the ship in which this man sailed, the Ceylon. You have heard that fact of the prisoner cutting his throat, do you know that fact. - A. Certainly, and his conduct was generally so strange, that those officers whom it was usual for him to mess with would not associate with him. And one instance besides, I now consider when the ship was in distress in the River Thames, and I expected from him, as boatswain, great assistance, he refused it, and took a boat and left the ship in that dangerous situation.

COURT. When was it he cut his throat. - A. In some part of May, 1806.

Q. How long did you sail with him afterwards. A. I think it was between two and three months that we arrived in England.

Q. Did you send him to any hospital. - A. We had a surgeon on board the ship, he sewed up the wound.

Q. Did the surgeon treat him afterwards as an insane man. - A. He was not trusted with any command afterwards.

SUSANNAH GILLAM. I live in Worcester Street, St. George's in the East, I am a married woman and let out lodgings. On the 2nd of February the prisoner came to lodge at my house, he lodged there eight or nine days. He frequently at his meals would jump up and throw his knife and fork away, and walk backwards and forwards in the kitchen, and speak very incorrectly about some person, and by his discourse I suspected it to be his wife, he would get out of bed of a night, and walk backwards and forwards in the room, talking to himself. I did not think him in his right senses, he would frequently in his exclamations say, Oh God protect me. I have frequently observed him, when he has been in this way, to go into the yard and wash his head over to make it cool. About the 8th or 10th of February, he left me in the morning, he asked me for a little money, which I gave him; he told me he was going to be paid by the ship. I did not see him for four or five days, then he came and told me that his wife had arrested him, and seemed to be in great agitation of mind. After he paid me he left me, and I saw no more of the prisoner until I saw him in Newgate.

Verdict of the Jury.

NOT GUILTY, believing him to be insane at the time .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose,

Reference Number: t18110529-54

434. HUMPHRY HUGHES , and NICHOLAS RUBY , were indicted for feloniously assaulting Henry Lane , in the King's high-way, on the 16th of April , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, a watch, value 40 s. his property .

HENRY LANE . On the 16th of April last, I was coming along George Street, Westminster , my shop-mate Newman and his wife, and my wife, and my child were with me; we had been to Tothill fair. It was in the morning early, about half-past one, we were going home, three men came across the street and gave insult to the women, they were walking on before us; what they said to the women I do not know, they said something, and the child screamed out, I went up immediately towards them, the prisoner Hughes said d - n your eyes, what do you want, he hit me on the side of my right eye, I fell on my knee, and my hat went off; I raised myself and Ruby came towards me, he got hold of me by the breast, and tore my shirt - I caught hold of him by the breast of his shirt, and it tore off in my hand: at that moment my wife called to me, where is your watch, I put my hand to my fob, and said it is gone.

Q. You did not perceive it taken from you. - A. No, I never felt it go at all, I still kept my hold of Ruby, and my wife called out watch, two gentlemen came up, they assisted my wife in holding of Hughes, the watchman came up and took Ruby from me, they were taken to the watch-house, I saw the watch afterwards in my wife's hands, after they were in the charge of the watchmen, and at the watch-house my wife gave it to the constable.

Q. Did these young men appear in liquor. - A. I cannot say they did.

Q. When these young men insulted your wife, were you under any apprehension of being robbed at all - A. No, I thought of no such thing.

Q. When you was struck did you think they were going to rob you. - A. No, I did not think any thing of the kind.

Jury. Were you perfectly sober at that time. - A. I was in my regular senses, I had been drinking some beer.

Mr. Knapp. When your watch was found it was in your wife's hands. - A. Yes.

Q. You never felt it go. - A. No.

Q. When you were knocked down on your knee in the scuffle on the ground, might it not drop out. - A. I cannot say any thing about it.

ANN LANE . Q. You are wife to the last witness are you. - A. Yes, on the 16th of April last, we were going through Great George Street in our way home, it was about half-past one in the morning, the child was asleep in my arms, I and Mrs. Newman were about five or six yards from our husbands; two young men came from the other side of the way and insulted me and Mrs. Newman, they made a blow at me, and instead of hitting me they hit the child, the child cried out.

Q. How old is the child. - A. Five year old. Mr. Newman and my husband came up, my husband said what do you want, Hughes made use of bad words and said, what do you want, a scuffle ensued between my husband and the two prisoners, another young man came up, he knocked Mr. Newman's hat off, and ran away. Hughes knocked my husband on his knee, they were then on the road, and I was on the pavement, and when I saw Ruby and Hughes were both falling on my husband, I said Lane where is your watch, he put his hand to his fob and said it was gone, and he said my braces is broke. I immediately ran over to him in the road and laid hold of Hughes; and saw the key of the watch in his hand, his hand was clenched I could not see the watch, I called the watchman. Hughes said he would knock my life time out if I did not let him go, two gentlemen came up and assisted me till the watchman came up, and took him. I gave charge of him, I got the watch out of his hands myself. In dragging the watch out of his hands the case came open, I carried the watch to the watch-house, and gave it to the watch-house keeper.

SARAH NEWMAN . I was with Mrs. Lane that night, she had her child in her arms, my husband and Mr. Lane were with us. As we were going through Great George Street, three men came across to us, they all insulted Mrs. Lane and me. Hughes shoved me, and the child screamed out, I saw Hughes knock Mr. Lane down on his knee, and the man that ran off knocked my husband's hat off, I picked it up, and then I saw Mrs. Lane, struggling with Hughes.

Q. Were you walking before your husband or how. - A. We were walking before our husbands, my husband and Mr. Lane, came up and asked what the men wanted, they made use of very bad expressions, and asked Mr. Lane what he wanted, a scuffle ensued, one of the men knocked Mr. Lane on his knee, my husband's hat was knocked off and the man ran away, my husband said to me, pick up my hat, he ran after the man and I picked up his hat, and while I was picking up the hat, I heard Mrs. Lane say where is your watch, Lane replied, it is gone. When I came up to Mrs. Lane I saw Mrs. Lane lay hold of Hughes, then I saw the watch in Mrs. Lane's hand.

Q. You never saw it in Hughes's hand did you. - A. No, but she said that was the man that she took it from. When Mrs. Lane had hold of Hughes, two gentlemen came up, we all cried out watch, the watchmen came up at last, and we gave charge of them. We all went with them to the watch-house.

ROBERT NEWMAN . Q. You were of this party were you - A. Yes, we had been to Tothil fair, and we had been drinking at a house in Tothill fields.

Q. Can you say how many pots of beer you had among you four. - A. I think six, we sat in the public house a good while, I was not in liquor, nor could I perceive Lane was in liquor.

Q. Did you happen to observe whether he had any watch when he was at the public house. - A. Yes, I am clear of that. As we were going down George Street, three men rushed from over the way, they first insulted the women, I heard the child cry. Mr. Lane went forwards, I was just by the side of him; Hughes said d - n your eyes what do you want, Lane said the same, with the same oath, he struck Lane, the blow knocked Lane down on his knee, one of the party struck at me and ran away, my hat came off, I told my wife to pick up my hat, and I ran after the person that struck me, I ran two hundred yards, he ran too fast, I could not catch him. When I returned to my company, I observed the watchman and patrols having hold of both the prisoners, they were taken to the watch-house, I went with them, at the watch-house Mrs. Lane gave the watch to the watch-house keeper, I heard Mrs. Lane say pointing to Hughes, that he was the man that she took the watch from, Hughes pulled his own watch out of his fob, and said here is the watch that will buy you all.

ROBERT GREENLAND. I am a patrol. On the 16th of April last, about half-past one in the morning, I was called, there was a great row in Great George Street, a woman called out murder, and her child was crying, I went up, Mrs. Lane gave me charge of Hughes, I took him to the watch-house, she said her husband had lost his watch, and she took the watch out of Hughes's hand, she said so I did not see it taken, my partner took Ruby to the watch-house.

ROBERT DENHAM. I am a patrol, I heard a woman cry out that one of the prisoners had struck her child; I came up to her, I perceived Lane and Ruby scuffling, they both had their hats off, I asked what was the matter, Lane said that one of them drew his watch from him, I took charge of Ruby, there were three of them together, then the third man ran away, Ruby said he knew nothing about the watch.

The Property produced and identified.

Hughe's defence. When I was at the watch-house, and gave charge of Lane for striking me, he immediately said I was the man that robbed him of his watch.

Ruby's Defence. When the watch was called, two patrols came up, Lane gave charge of me for robbing him of his watch.

Hughes call six witnesses who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

Reference Number: t18110529-55

435. MARY BRIANT was indicted for that she on the 24th of May , about the hour of three at night, being in the dwelling house of John Wilson , two wooden tills, value 2 s. sixty nine penny pieces, and ten half-pence, his property, feloniously did steal, and that she being in the said dwelling-house, and having committed the said felony, feloniously did break to get out of the same .

MARGARET HASWEL. I am taking care of Mr. Wilson's house, he is down in the country, his house is the sign of the Earl of Moira, Great Saffron Hill . I went to bed about three o'clock in the morning, I was called up at four, I was alarmed that the house was robbed, when I came down stairs I missed the two tills, and all the money, one of the tills was found in the necessary, and the other in George alley with a penny in it.

Q. What is the prisoner. - A. She lodged in the house, she had taken her things away for a week, and gone to live in George alley, she slept in it that night.

JOHN BARNSLEY . I am a constable. On Saturday, I went to Mr. Wilson's house, I looked at the place, it is a small room made for people to sat drinking, they call it a cockloft. I saw at the window that a person could come out of the one pair of stairs into that cockloft. I asked them who lived in the one pair of stairs, they told me a man and woman had quarrelled, they had gone to George alley, and they kept the key of that room. I went into George alley and found the prisoner, I asked her where her husband was she said he would be at home to breakfast, he came, and I took him in custody, I searched the room, I found a five shilling paper of half-pence in a table drawer, and nine loose one. I took the prisoner and her husband to the watchouse, I searched them I found nothing on the man, the woman gave me some halfpence out of her pockets, I searched her pockets afterwards, I found two or three more in it, that made ten, what she gave me and what I took out of her pocket. I shewed Mrs. Haswell the halfpence she owned two of them that were found on her person. Hannah Ball the witness dares not come, there were two thieves told her if she came here they would murder her. I have taken one of them.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110529-56

435. JOHN SMITH was indicted for killing and slaying Robert Berry .

MR. COREY. I am an upholsterer; I live in Drury-lane .

Q. Did you see this unfortunate circumstance, and when was it - A. On last Saturday, the 18th, I was in my parlour drinking tea, I saw the deceased dragged from under the cart after it was turned over, he was almost dead.

Q. He died afterwards, did not he - A. Yes. I did not see how the accident happened.

HENRY BELL . I live in Westminster.

Q. Were you in Drury-lane at the time of the accident - A. I was sitting in the cart behind, I could not see plainly how it was; I saw the waggon coming with three or four horses, the prisoner had the whip in his hand. I believe he was driving his own waggon. We saw the waggon coming up Drury-lane, the deceased drew the horse off and the cart to the curb.

Q. Did the waggon and the cart come in contact - A. Not till the cart was drawed to the curb to give the waggon room.

Q.They were going in separate directions, one was passing the other, were not they - A. We were coming down the hill, and the waggon going up, and as we were coming down the lane the coal waggon struck the cart wheel; I believe they were going as quiet as they could go.

Q. The prisoner was driving the waggon, was not he - A. Yes, I believe he was.

Q. Can you tell us whether he was careless, or intended any injury - A. I should not think he intended any injury to the deceased.

Q. Did he appear to intend coming in contact with the cart - A. He did not stay when he was called to. I called to him to mind his horses, and directly as I called to him the cart was overturned.

Q. What I want to know is, was it his fault, or could he get out of the way - A. Yes, there was room for the waggon to get out of the way.

Q. Where was the deceased - A. He was sitting by the side of the cart.

Q. Had he reins - A. Yes. The cart was throwed over. I jumped out of the cart, and the deceased fell under the shafts.

Q. I ask you whether the prisoner intended to do it for the purpose - A. I could not see it plainly whether he did or not; he did not offer to stop the waggon when he was called to.

Q. How do you know that he heard you - A. I dare say he heard, because one answered.

Q. Was it carelessly done - A. He did not appear to draw the waggon of one side when he was called to.

Mr Gurney. This was a coal waggon full of coals - A. Yes, and it was drawn by three or four horses.

Q. You were sitting behind at first, you did not see how it was - A. Yes; I was sitting behind, I did not see it till afterwards where the coalman was. The deceased called out four or five feet before they met.

Q. Do you mean to say the deceased's cart was stopped before the wheels met - A. No, it was not.

Q. Did not the two wheels meet in an instant after the deceased called out - A. No; the small wheel struck first, and then afterwards the large wheel struck and overset the cart.

COURT. Might it not be done by accident - A. I think it was through neglect it was done.

JAMES GILLAM. Q. Were you with the cart - A. Yes, I was sitting by the side of the man that was driving the cart. The cart was on the left hand side of the lane, and the waggon on the right; they were both going a regular pace, we met the waggon, the carman called out to the coal waggoner to give him room, the waggoner did not draw up at all.

Q. How much more room could he have given him - A There was a great deal of room on the other side, our cart was close to the curb, we could not give more room than we did.

Q. to Mr. Corey. What is the width of the road there - A. I have measured the road there, sixteen feet eight inches from curb to curb.

Gillam. The small wheel struck the cart, and the large wheel over turned the cart.

Q. Now how much was there to spare from the side of the waggon to the curb-stone - A. I cannot say.

Q. I want to know what the prisoner could have done to prevent that - A. He might have drawn off.

Q. What room was there to have drawn off - A. I cannot say. The deceased cried out to him, and he made no answer.

MARY COLROY . I was in Drury-lane; I saw the cart coming down the lane, the waggon was going up, I saw the waggon very near the cart, I thought it would turn it over, I stopped and looked, it did turn it over. I did not observe whose fault it was.

Q. Then in fact could the prisoner have avoided it - A. I cannot say.

JAMES HEATH. I am a surgeon. I saw the man after he was brought to the hospital, the man died before he reached me.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18110529-57

436. JOHN PEDLAR was indicted for killing and slaying John Barlett .

JOSEPH COLLINS . I saw the fight take place at the back part of the Red Lion and Still public-house, Drury-lane , about three o'clock on the 24th of April. I was at the public-house, I was in the parlour, I looked through the parlour window into the yard; I saw the prisoner strip, and the deceased in the act of stripping in the yard. They retired into a back room to fight, the deceased finishing stripping in the back room. I followed them into the back room; I followed them into the back room. The deceased was equal in height to the prisoner, but the deceased was thinner after being stripped. I saw a man draw a line across the ground for them to come up to fight, and there they met and shook hands before they began, and after they began they had a short round, the deceased fell; there were two or three blows exchanged, but of no consequence, as I conceived; the deceased was picked up, and they had another round; the prisoner's nose bled, and they fell both together; the deceased fell undermost, that round was nearly the same length as the other; I saw the prisoner strike him one or two blows in the body,

but not very forcibly to do any harm, as I conceived; he was then picked up and put on the bench, and the fight was put a stop to by Moiler the landlord coming in. That is all the fight there was; and all I saw. I went into the parlour where I came from; in about half an hour afterwards I had occasion to go backwards, I saw the deceased standing in the yard in the act of trying to make water, he said he could not, for he was troubled with the gravel.

Q. Did he appear to you to be much hurt - A. No, he did not. I left him then.

JOHN MOILER . I live at the Red Lion and Still. On the 24th of April, about two o'clock I came home, I heard that there had been a dispute between the deceased and the prisoner, I went directly into the taproom, the deceased was standing up with his fist clenched in the prisoner's face, the deceased called him a thief, saying he had collected money on a gathering and made use of it for himself; the prisoner denied the charge; the deceased called him a liar, and said he would fight him then, or any other time for ten pound; a man of the name of Jones pulled out a one pound note to lend to the deceased; I snatched the note out of his hand; I put one in one settle, and the other in another; they promised they would be quiet then; they were both very drunk; I left them quiet and went into the parlour, that is all I saw of it; I did not see the fight in the yard, the yard is detached from the house; I was told there was a fight; I went in and stopped it in the last round; none of the fighting I saw; they ceased fighting when I came in; I would not suffer it.

Q. Did you observe the condition of the deceased at that time - A. I believe there was a sprinkling of blood about his nose. I observed no injury, nor did he complain of any; I only considered him in liquor.

MATTHEW HEWSON . I am a surgeon. I saw John Barrlett, about three o'clock, on the 25th of April, at his lodging, I understood from him and his wife that his principal complaint was want of power to make water; he seemed very languid; and the region of the bladder was very much extended, as if the bladder was very full, from the external appearance, and the whole of the belly in fact. I immediately proceeded to draw of the urine by a catheter. I drew off a pint and half of fluid, which appeared blood and urine mixed together.

Q. Were you told that he had been fighting the day before - A. Neither the deceased or the wife told me that he had been fighting; I enquired what sort of health he had before; I wanted to account for this appearance; he said he had a pain in his back, and had passed some gravel by urine. He was relieved by drawing off the urine, but remained very ill; he was getting very languid every time I saw him. I saw him two or three times the two first days, I found it necessary to use the catheter again, and the second time there was a smaller discharge; he continued growing worse and worse, and died on the Sunday morning following, the 28th. I opened him the same day, about three o'clock in the afternoon, the first thing that presented itself was a rupture of one of the intestines; a laceration of one of the intestines, and in that cavity which the bladder should occupy, there was a large quantity of grumous blood, which upon taking out, I discovered that the bladder was ruptured likewise.

Q. From these circumstances you have no doubt that his death proceeded from the laceration of the intestines and the rupture of the bladder - A. Exactly so.

Q. Are you of opinion as a medical man that the blows he received in the course of that fight could have occasioned the laceration of the bowels, and the rupture of the bladder - A. It is necessary for me to state that his bladder appeared to me to be in a diseased state, and that at one time of life he had great inflammation on the surface of his bowels, I have not a doubt of it, in consequence of which, what we call adhesions, had taken place - parts growing together, His liver adhered so close to his side that it required great force to detach it; the caul, which covered the belly, was almost obliterated, and what there was adhered to the sides. I consider the cause of his death to have been from a violent exertion, tearing away these adhesions; in this diseased state even if he had stumbled and endeavoured to recover himself, he might have done that mischief.

Q. Perhaps I understand you to say that you could not discover any appearance on the body that seemed to be occasioned by any blows - A. No, that might be done by a punch in the belly; I saw no marks, neither external nor internal.

Prisoner's Defence. My Lord and gentlemen of the Jury I drank with the deceased some time on that day, he mentioned that I had gathered money for a sick member and kept it, this was proved to the contrary; then we became comfortable, and drank together again; he then said I was not so good a man to the society as he was, that I was no man; he put his fist three times in my face saying that was my master. If I had been sober I should not have fought with him.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18110529-58

437. THOMAS LUDWICH was indicted for that he, on the 30th of March , was clerk to Thomas Chippendale , esq. and was employed and entrusted to receive monies, and valuable securities for him, and that he being such clerk, so employed and entrusted, did receive and take into his possession a 20 l. bank note, for and on account of his said master, and that he afterwards did embezzle, secrete, and steal the same .

THOMAS CHIPPINDALE , ESQ. I am a barrister and conveyancer in Crown office-row, Inner Temple . The prisoner was my clerk, he entered into my service in June 1809, and continued in my service till March last; he was entrusted by me to receive papers with fees, which were left for me by my clients, not only money but notes also were left with him; the fees were tendered in money, or in securities for money, bank notes; he also received my letters which were brought by the post, and paid the postage, and brought the letters to me; he kept a book in which the bills were entered, received, and in which he ought to have entered the fees. I had done business for Mr. Rooke; Mr. Rooke will prove that he paid the fees in March last, those fees I never received

BENJAMIN ROOKE. I am a solicitor, I live at Hertford.

Q. In the month of March last did you tender Mr. Chippindale any fees - A. Yes, for several conveyances he made out to me on the 27th of March last; I remitted to him twenty pounds - a bank note. I received an acknowledgement of the receipt of that note from some person in the character of clerk to Mr. Chippindale.

Q. Have you got that - A. Yes, this is it.

"Mr. Chippendale begs to acknowledge the receipt of the twenty pound bank note."

Q. Do you know the hand-writing - A. No, I do not.

Q. to Chippendale. Do you know the hand-writing - A. I do not.

Q. to Mr. Rooke. All you know you received an acknowledgement of the receipt of twenty pound by letter - A. Yes, and upon which I made my usual indorsement.

JOHN HOGARTH . I am an attorney, I have got a letter of Mr. Rook's, this letter came to me with some papers for Mr. Chippendale's perusal, on the 29th of March last, or following day, it is dated the 29th of March; and on this part which is cut out, it was; I have mislaid Mr. Chippendale's accompt, but I have sent him twenty pounds. I shall be obliged to you to let me have the accompt of what is due, and it shall be paid; I took the papers to Mr. Chippendale's, and read that part particular to the prisoner at the bar, after reading it over in the clerk's room, the clerk said it was perfectly right, the twenty pound he had received, I then as the letter related to the business to convince Mr. Chippendale, left the letter entire with the clerk, and the next time I got it, it was in this state.

Mr. Knapp to Mr. Rooke. Q. How did you send the parcel - A. by the post.

Q. to Mr. Chippendale The prisoners duty was to receive such fees and papers as were entrusted to him to be accompt to you - A. Yes.

Q. His duty was not to open letters - A. No of course I never permissioned him to open a letter, it was his duty to have brought me this letter to open; I never received this twenty pound note at all, and when I received this letter, it was mutilated in that manner, that part was cut off; if there should be any doubt of his receiving that note, I have a letter from him of his own hand-writing, I received it from Mr. Davies, it is in order to shew me the extent of hig embezzlement; he requested that I would make a debt of it, and among other sums it is Mr. Rookes - twenty pounds.

(The letter read)

Prisoners Defence. I am indicted for stealing on the 30th of March, a bank note, Mr. Rooke says that he sent it on the 27th of March; there is no acknowledgement from me that ever I received it, except from that letter, which, I hope you will not take it as any evidence against me.

The prisoner called two witnesses who gave him a good character.

GUILTY aged 24.

Confined Three Months in Newgate and fined 1 s .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110529-59

438. JAMES LATHAM was indicted for felonioniously stealing on the 28th of March , a mare, value 30 l. a cart, value 10 l. a set of harness, value 2 l. 519 pounds weight of tea, value 190 l. 31l pounds weight of sugar, value 15 l. a basket, value 1 l. 10 s. and a bag, value 10 s. the property of Frederick Sparrow .

GEORGE CHURCH . I am a hatter, I live at 26, Lombard-Street. On the 28th of March, about a quarter past four in the afternoon I saw the prisoner come down Lombard Street , and a young man in company with him, and there was one of the prisoner's companions in conversation with the carman, the cart stopped at the corner of Nicholas Lane, the carman and the man he was in conversation with, went down Nicholas Lane, and left the cart at the corner. The prisoner and the young man in company went away about four doors off from where the cart was, after the carman and the other man had gone down Nicholas Lane: the prisoner came back to the cart and looked down the Lane, then they went away again, four doors further the other way, they then came back to Nicholas Lane, and looked down Nicholas Lane again; the horse made a half turn, and turned up Birchin Lane with the cart, something passed, I could not see what the prisoner did, the prisoner was at the side of the horse, and immediately the horse went up Birchin Lane, the prisoner came from the side of the horse and came behind the cart, and the other young man led the horse up Birchin Lane; the prisoner followed the cart all the way up Birchin Lane, looking backwards as he went on; I followed after the cart up Birchin Lane; when the cart and the prisoner where at the top of Birchin Lane, the prisoner made a stop and looked down Birchin Lane; I thought the prisoner took notice of me, and to avoid the prisoner seeing me, I went through Cooper's Court into Cornhill; I stood behind a gentleman at the corner of the Court till the cart had got some way up Cornhill, I then proceeded on untill I came to a dozen doors of the top of Cornhill where I met with Mr. Nalder, I informed him of the circumstance; Mr. Nalder and myself proceeded on so far as the Black Boy and Camel Leadenhall Street, when the prisoner turned round and saw Mr. Nalder, he left the cart and tried to make his escape; Mr. Nalder took him in custody.

SAMUEL LAWRENCE . Mr. Sparrow sent me to the East India warehouse after three chests of tea.

Q. You drove the cart did you - A Yes, this cart and horse belonged to Mr. Sparrow; I came to Mr. Wells in Philpot Lane and took up some Sugar; there came up to me a young man, and said he had two boxes to take to the Belle Savage Ludgate-hill, he would give me eighteen-pence to take them, he went up Philpot Lane with me while I loaded the cart, from there we went into Lombard Street; he said it is up this Lane, I went with him about half down the Lane, I asked him which house it was; he said it was a mistake he had led me across Cannon Street to Crooked Lane, and then run away, and when I came back the cart was gone.

FRANCIS NALDER . On the 28th of March, about half past four, I was standing at Mr. Nicholl's door the silversmith's in Cornhill, the first witness came up to me, he informed me that three men had taken away that cart; upon which the witness and me pursued the cart, I came up to the prisoner at the Black Boy

and Camel Leadenhall Street; the moment the prisoner endeavoured to make his escape, he was on the curbstone close to the cart, he was in the rear of the cart, he knew me, away he ran, I followed him and secured him; I saw two other men before, whom I knew well.

FREDERICK SPARROW. It is my cart, Lawrence was my servant. I sent him on that day to the India warehouse for some tea.

Prisoners Defence. I am totally innocent of the charge laid against me.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110529-60

439 PHILIP BEREMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 14th of May , twenty-six yards of linnen cloth, value 4 l. 4 s. 6 d. and a scarf, value 12 s. the property of James Newbury , privately in his shop .

EDWARD PLANT. I am shopman to Mr. Newbury. 88, Aldgate . He is a linnen draper ; on the 14th of May, about nine o'clock in the evening the prisoner and another a man came into the shop enquiring for lennen shirts; I immediately said that we had not got shirts ready made but we had linen to make them off, upon which Mears, the other man that is not present asked to look at it, I asked him what price he would wish to go to; he said not more than ten shillings or half a guinea a shirt. We calculated the quantity for the three shirts to be ten yards and a half; I took down a piece of irish to shew him, he then wished me to measure him ten yards and a half off, and on my moving a little to the right, I saw a piece of irish under Bereman's jacket, he stood behind Mears, which gave me suspicion, I immediately gave Mr. Newbury a signal of suspicion, he immediately went out of doors to watch them, Bereman settled very much confused, and told Mears to have the whole piece measured over, that he would take three at the same time, that was ten yards and a half more; In the mean time that I was measuring over the remnant of irish, Bereman put the piece of irish on the chair; I measured the piece over, it was twenty yards, I agreed to let them have it at twenty shillings each, I thought the price might be too high, I went to get another piece, and on my return, saw Bereman put it under his jacket a second time, they then agreed to take the remnant of twenty yards; immediately Bereman went towards the door, saying to Mears that he was going to fetch the money to pay for it; I stopped him, and searched him, I found nothing upon him; Mr. Newbury came in, and asked what was the matter; I told him that I had seen a piece of irish under his jacket, I suspected that he had got something more; Mr. Newbury sent out for two watchmen, they came in and searched them, they found nothing; the prisoner Bereman agreed for our little boy to go with them to their lodgings, and he should bring us the money; I said it was not proper that a boy should go, that one of us should go; we left Bereman in the shop, and me and the porter went with Mears, he went into a public house, had half a pint of beer, our porter came in with two watchmen, we seized him, and brought him to the watch-house, and on his being searched there, a scarf was found upon him.

THOMAS SKINNER . I am a constable, I searched the prisoner at the watch-house, I found a silk scarf upon him.

JAMES NEWBURY . My young man told me that the prisoner had a piece of Irish about him; I sent for the watchmen, they found nothing on him; I gave charge of him, he was taken to the watch-house, the constable searched him, and found this silk scarf in a pocket in side of his jacket it had my private mark on it, I am sure it is mine; I have no partner.

Q. to Plant. Where was this scarf - A. I cannot say whether it was in the window or on the counter.

Prisoners Defence. I am a Prusian, the other man was in the shop before me, I picked it up before I came into the shop.

GUILTY aged 21.

Of stealing to the value of 4 s.and 6 d. only.

Confined three months in Newgate , and fined 1 s .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110529-61

440. THOMAS SOMERSET was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 23rd of March , two hundred and twenty pound weight of bacon, value 8 l. the property of George Ives ; and GEORGE SOMERSET for feloniously receiving the same, knowing it to be stolen .

GEORGE IVES . I live at Twickenham , I am a higler . On the 23rd of March I lost the bacon out of my shed in my yard; I had seen it safe at nine on the night before; on the next morning the neighbours called me up, I found the bacon gone; they cut the lath under the tiling, and got the door open; I picked up a handkerchief that they had left behind them. On the 11th of April I went to the prisoners house, in Twickenham Town, the constable and beadle were with me; the old prisoner was not at home, I went in, we found some bacon in the necessary out of doors, some in the chimney, and two pieces in the cellar; I know the piece of bacon I found in the cellar, that I have swore to. The old gentleman said to me; there George, you are satisfied now you have found the bacon; this was after we had found all the pieces.

ANN IVES . I am the wife of the last witness, I remember loosing the bacon from the out-house; I went to Somerset's house with my husband, I saw the bacon found there, and the piece of bacon that came out of the chimney I know; I am sure that is part of the bacon that I lost out of the out-house. When George Somerset took the bacon out of the chimney, he threw it down, and said, can you swear to that.

Q. Was the the boy by at that time - A. No, he was taken in custody, and when the boy was brought in, he said what is the matter here. The little boy said in the presence of the other prisoner to the constable, his brother told him they were going to search the house, he must go and put the bacon were he could. This his the handkerchief my husband found in the stable.

Mr. Ives. I found the handkerchief just by were the bacon was hung up.

George Somerset . Can you say you ever saw me on your premises - A. No.

Thomas Somerset . Can you say you ever saw me on your premises at any unlawful time - A. No, he was in the place the day before, I asked him to lay hold of a pig, he could not go into the place without seeing the bacon. It was taken on the 23rd, between twelve

and one o'clock.

WILLIAM TURNER . I live at Twickenham.

Q. Do you know the boy and his father and his brother - A. Yes, I met the boy and his brother in a back lane, behind a linen draper's shop, about four o'clock in the morning that the bacon was lost; that Lane leads from the common, to the Town of Twickenham, they were coming as if from Ives's house, his house is on the common; they had something with them; I cannot tell what they came athwart the road towards their home. I did not see them go into their father's house, I saw them within fifty yards of their father's house, I heard a door shut afterwards, I am sure it was this lad and his brother that I saw.

REBECCA - I live at Twickenham, at Mr. Somerset's house.

Q. Whose handkerchief is that - A. I believe it is Thomas Somerset 's handkerchief. I washed it once.

JOHN HADLAND . I am a constable of Twickenham, I apprehended the prisoners, I looked up the chimney and saw something in a sack; I said go and fetch a chimney-sweeper, George Somerset said he would fetch it down; he put his foot on the hob, and took it down, and said, whose is that, and while I was doing that the younger boy took two pieces into the privy. George Somerset then said to Ives, now I hope George you are satisfied you have found your bacon; and coming from the magistrate he kicked up a row, and told the little boy to throw his shoes off, and run away. This is the piece that came out of the chimney.

Prosecutor. I know that piece it was in the house the night before.

Thomas Somerset 's Defence. I never nigh the place.

George Somerset 's Defence. I never knew that there was a bit of bacon in my house until it was searched and found.

THOMAS SOMERSET , GUILTY , aged 16.

Transported for Seven Years .

GEORGE SOMERSET, GUILTY , aged 41.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110529-62

441. WILLIAM PIGEON was indicted for killing and slaying James Chiverton .

JOHN BINDER . Q. Do you know the prisoner Pigeon - A. Yes, about a month.

Q. Do you remember any time his having a battle with James Chiverton - A. Yes, last Thursday fortnight they fought in the Five Fields, Chelsea ; I carried a challenge from Chiverton to the prisoner by word of mouth, and in consequence of that challenge they met they fought an hour and ten minutes. I did not see the last two rounds.

Q. Did the fight fair - A. Yes.

Q. You know that Chiverton was killed - A. Yes.

Q. And this was in consequence of a challenge given from Chiverton to Pigeon - A. Yes. They shook hands together in the field just before they set to.

- . I am a surgeon. In consequence of marks of external violence on the deceased's head I opened the head; I have no doubt his death was produced by that violence.

Prisoner's Defence. The young man sent a challenge to me.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Of Manslaughter.

To pay a fine of 6 s. 8 d. to the King, and to remain in Prison until that fine be paid .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18110529-63

442. THOMAS SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of April , seventy pound weight of lead, value 12 s. the property of Charles Earl of Harrington , and Dame Seymour Dorothy Fleming , then being affixed to a building of theirs .

JAMES WEBSTER . I am clerk to the Steward of the Earl of Harrington.

Q. You know the almhouses situated at Brompton in the county of Middlesex whose property are they - A. The property of Lord Harrington, and Lady Dame Seymour Dorothy Fleming .

JOHN BEST . I am butler to Mr. Canning, his house almost joins the Almshouses. On the 26th of April, about two o'clock in the morning, I was at Mr. Canning's gate, leading to Kensington, I heard a knocking, I went to the house and called to the servant Matthew, and we went together to where the knocking continued; I went close to the man, it was dark. I observed he had something between his knees, and he was chopping. I asked him what he was doing of, he said he was chopping some wood; he got up and ran away, I pursued him and caught hold of him, he got loose again, tumbled into a ditch; he got out and tried to get away the second time; I then caught him, and he struck me over the hand with something which I wrested from him, it proved to be a piece of pipe; I then led him into Mr. Canning's house, and secured him, and in the morning I went for an officer. In our way back we went to the place, there were several bits of lead chopped, we matched the lead, it exactly fitted with the remaining piece, he told me that the piece of lead he had in his hand he was knocking up

WILLIAM BACON . I am an officer of Bow-street. On the 26th of April the last witness came for me, I went to Brompton; in our way we went to see what the man had been chopping; I found the head of the pump in a ditch, where it had been buried; this piece that the first witness took from him matched with the piece of lead remaining to the pump. It is part of the pump of the almshouses.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going to sleep at an outhouse by the road side; I saw three pieces of lead lay close by the road-side, I got a piece in my hand, I was knocking to see if I could break it. I never took it from the pump.

GUILTY , aged 52.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110529-64

443 WILLIAM BOLTON and THOMAS BEVAN were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of May , eleven dollars, six half crown pieces, eighteen shillings, nine sixpences, and a silver three pence, the property of Robert Crookshank , in the dwelling-house .

ROBERT CROOKSHANK. I live at 90, Bunhill-row , I am a baker . On the 27th of March, about ten

o'clock in the morning, a person came into my shop for change of a one pound note; I took a bag of silver out of my desk, and put it on the top of the desk; after I had given change for the one pound note, that person went out, and shut the door after them. I had occasion to go into my parlour which is just out of the shop, and leaving the bag of silver on the top of the desk; I had not been gone two minutes before I heard some person in the shop, and on my coming into the shop I saw the two prisoners at the bar, both going out in a great hurry; I ran after them a little way, but finding that they run so fast I could not overtake them, and having left no person in the shop; I returned back and called my wife into the shop, and then went in pursuit of the prisoners, I found them in Golden-lane in conversation with a woman, whom I supposed they were giving the property to; I saw them give her something, but could not see what.

Q. Did you know them before - A. I never saw them before they went out of my shop; after they parted with the woman I traced them to Barbican; I enquired for a constable, and they were apprehended in Long-lane, we searched them and found nearly an equal part of money upon each.

Q. Where is your house - A. In the parish of St. Luke's; I am the sole occupier of the house; I am very sure these are the two boys I saw go out of my house, because I saw them before they got out of the door; not only that I ran after them a good way.

WILLIAM GREEN . I am a constable. On Monday the 27th of May the prosecutor came to me, I went with him, and in Long-lane we apprehended these two lads; I laid hold of Bolton, the prosecutor laid hold of Bevan; Bolton said to me, Mr. Green, what is this for; I replied, that gentleman will let you know. We searched them both, we found eleven dollars, six half-crowns, eighteen shillings, nine sixpences, nine penny-worth of halfpence, and a penny-piece; I said to Bolton you have made away with a good deal of this money that you took; he said, no, we have not made away with any of it. I found the money nearly equally divided between them.

Q. to prosecutor. Do you know any of it - A. Yes, this three-penny piece I can swear to, and there is a bad six-pence my foreman brought in the night before, and there is a French half-crown there.

The prisoners said nothing in their defence; Bolton called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

BOLTON, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 14.

BEVAN, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 14.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110529-65

444. JOHN HAINES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of April , three hundred and sixty halfpence , the property of Joseph Butler .

JOSEPH BUTLER . I am a cheesemonger , I live in Wellclose-square . On the 11th of April I had a tub of halfpence in the parlour, out of which I missed fifteen shillings worth of halfpence; I made search and found them all in the hay-loft I brought the prisoner into the parlour and charged the officer with him. When I first charged the prisoner with taking the halfpence he denied it; I then told the officer to take him to the watch-house; he then said he had never done such a thing before in his life, and he hoped I would forgive him.

Q. Was he a servant of yours - A. My carman.

Prisoner's Defence. I confess the fault I have committed; I took the halfpence to buy me some shirts; my father being poor and not having it in his power to let me have some. I am now convinced I ought not to have taken any, and in my unfortunate situation I most earnestly implore your lordship's lenity.

GUILTY .

Judgment respited.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110529-66

445. PETER POVEY , alias POVAH , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of May , half a guinea and two shillings , the property of Susannah Mead , widow .

SUSANNAH MEAD . I live in the Broadway, Westminster; I am a widow.

Q. Have you a son serving in the Navy - A. Yes.

Q. On the 13th of May did you go to the Navy pay office, Somerset House - A. Yes, and on that day I there received half a guinea out of my son's pay; after I came out of Somerset House the prisoner followed me, and just as I got a few yards in the Strand he tapped me on the shoulder, and said, good woman, I believe you are deaf; what for, said I; he told me that Mr. Lawson had been calling after me several times.

Q. Was Mr. Lawson the gentleman where you had been - A. Yes, in the pay-office; I asked him what Mr. Lawson called me for; he said that Mr. Lawson had got a check for me to draw more money; I asked him what it was; he said Mr. Lawson had given him authority, and gave him a paper for me to go with him to have that paper signed; I proposed to go to Mr. Lawson, he told me no; Mr. Lawson had given him the authority to do the business for me; he went with me into a street by Hungerford Market ; he bid me wait in the street about five minutes; I said, where are you going to; he said, to the office to get this signed; he came back in about five minutes, I asked him if he had got the paper signed, he said, yes; I asked him how much money I was to have; he said, thirty shillings prize money; he asked me to give him change, I told him I had no money but the half-guinea in my hand, and shewed it him; he said he was to have the half-guinea by Mr. Lawson's order, and to give me the two pound note; he shewed me a paper, giving me to understand that it was a two pound note, he then snatched the half guinea as I was holding it between my finger and thumb, and holding my left hand for the paper; he snatched it and ran away, and never gave me the paper; he was out of my sight immediately; I went back to Somerset House and told this story to a gentleman in the office, he desired me to come the next day; I went, and he was leaning against the rails, near the statue; I said, God bless me you are the man that robbed me of the half-guinea; he attempted to run, a constable was there, and laid hold of him. I am perfectly sure the prisoner is the man.

Prisoner. She says I snatched the half-guinea out of her hand, that is false, she gave it me.

Prosecutrix. He took it out of my hands I am sure.

JAMES LAWSON . I am the clerk appointed for the purpose of paying money to seaman's wives and mothers.

Q. Do you know any thing of the prisoner at the bar - A. I think I know him.

Q. Did you on the 13th of May give him any order to bring the witness back - A. No, I did not.

Q. Did you authorise any person whatever to go after this woman, to tell her that there was a check for her to receive more money than she had received - A. None, whatever.

Q. Were there any more money due to her - A. None.

THOMAS CAVE . I am an officer of Bow-Street.

Q. On the 14th of May did you attend at Somerset House - A. I did, and on that day I saw Susannah Mead ; I was going out to get a half a pint of ale, I saw the old woman pointing with her stick to him, he was leaning against the statue; I went up to the old woman and asked her what was the matter, and from what she told me I took the prisoner in custody. I asked him what his name was, he said Peter Brown ; I took him to the office.

Prisoners Defence. I acknowledge myself guilty, I do not wish to trouble the Court.

GUILTY, aged 57.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

On the following day the prisoner was put to the bar, he kneeled down and said, I pray the benefit of the statute.

Mr. Knapp. Gentlemen of the Jury, you are now assembled to try the shortest question that can be put before you, whether the prisoner at the bar has been before tried for felony, and has had the benefit of his Clergy; by law, when a man has had his Clergy, and if he again offends, he his excluded that, if so, it will be your duty to pronounce it.

THOMAS CLARK . Q. You produce the copy of the conviction of the prisoner at the bar - A. Yes, this is the original record, 13th of September 1802.

Q. What is the sentence of the prison Povey in that record - A. That he should be transported for Seven Years.

Q. What is the offence - A. For stealing a bank note for the payment of two pound, and one other bank note for the payment of one pound, the said notes at the time of his committing the felony being the property of Michael Coleman . It is referred, that if he has any thing to say for himself why the Court should not proceed against him, the said Peter Povey prays the benefit of the Clergy, and the same is allowed.

CHARLES JONES . Q. You were agent to the solicitor of the Admiralty in 1802 - A. I was then in the office.

Q. Were you present at the trial of the prisoner for the offence that is recorded - A. I was, I know his person, and when he came to Bow-Street by the name of Brown, I told him his name was Peter Povey . I conducted the prosecution in 1802, there were seven charges against him.

Mr. Clark to the Jury. Q. Gentlemen is the prisoner the same person that received the benefit.

JURY. He is.

GUILTY - DEATH .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110529-67

446. RICHARD BURKETT was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 9th of April , a sheet, value 2 s. the property of Timothy Dillon , in a lodging room .

The prosecutor was called, and not appearing in Court, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18110529-68

447. WILLIAM WHITE was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Samuel Kidd , about the hour of three in the afternoon on the 29th of May , Sarah, the wife of John Everest , and others in the same dwelling, being therein, and feloniously stealing a pair of shoes, value 5 s. the property of Samuel Kidd ; a pint pot, value 5 s. a coffee pot, value 5 s. three bottles. value 6 d. a quart of wine, value 4 s. a pint of gin, value 1 s. and seven shillings , the property of William Hollingsworth .

SECOND COUNT. For like offence, only stating it to be the dwelling house of William Hollingsworth .

SAMUEL RAYMOND . I am a watchman; last Wednesday, morning, at half past three in the morning he was at a little distance from from Mr. Kidd's house talking to another watchman, I saw the street door was open, and saw the prisoner at the bar come along the passage and out of the door; he made a bit of a stop at the door, and then he proceeded towards Giltspur Street; when he was going from the door I called to him to stop, he then hastened his pace, I took a pistol from my pocket, and told him if he did not stop that I would fire at him, he turned round and told me to fire away as soon as I liked that he could do the same; he took to his heels and ran down Cock Lane, I pursued him and sprang my rattle, I kept in sight of him, he turned round Snow Hill and crossed Skinner-Street down Seacoal Lane, he turned down Bear Alley, and at the bottom of Bear Alley the watchman got hold of him, I called out that is the man that ran out of Bartholomew coffee-house; we took him to Sepulcre's watch-house; I went to the house again, I found a watchman and a patrol at the door, I went up stairs and knocked at the landlord's door, he and his wife got up directly, we came down stairs, the bar door and the till had been broken open, and a small saw laying by the side of the till, then I went away to the watch-house.

Q. You are sure he is the man that came out of the house - A. That is the man and no other that came out of the house, I have seen the prisoner before many times at Mr. Martin's, in Fleet Market.

JOHN CURMAN . I am a watchman. I heard the rattle spring, it was a little better than half past three o'clock, I waited at the end of Bear Alley and took the prisoner; there Raymond came up and charged him, I took him to the watch-house.

SAMUEL KIDD . I live at Bartholomew Coffee-house , on last Wednesday morning, between half after three and four o'clock in the morning, I was awaked by the watchman, I answered him and came downstairs, I saw my door had been forced, but the cellar flap had been lifted up, and the cellar door at the top of the stairs was open, the lock had been pushed back, the sash of the bar which slides on the hatch was broken off and the money till was broken open and emptied of its contents, which was seven or eight shillings in copper; I missed

a plated coffee-pot, a plated pint tankard, two bottles of white wine, and one bottle of gin; I went with the watchman to the watchhouse, there for the first time I saw the prisoner; the constable of the night shewed me a pair of shoes, they were mine; the prisoner was present, he took a pint mug off the shelf at the watchhouse that I missed, and gave it into Mr. Everest's hand, and said, this belongs to you.

Q. Who does these things belong to - A. To the assignee of the bankrupt, William Hollingsworth ; I am there on the commission of bankruptcy; Everest is the husband of the woman that is with me as a servant.

Mr. Alley. The dwelling-house is not yours - A. No.

Q. Do you mean to speak to the mug - A. The mug I had in my possession; I can swear to the shoes, they are my own.

GEORGE WARRALL . I was constable of the night. When I went into the watchhouse I saw the prisoner sitting in the watchhouse, Raymond said he saw the prisoner come out of Bartholomew coffee-house; I searched him, I found a seven-shilling piece, a half-crown, a shilling and six-pence base money, and two or three shillings that were good, and two handkerchiefs in his hat. I looked under his chair, I saw them shoes. The pint pot was given into my hand, I said this was not found on the prisoner since I have been in the house: they said no, he had taken it from the mantle-shelf and given it to a man.

Q. to Mr. Kidd. Look at that pint pot - A. That is my pint-pot which was in the house at the time I was there. The coffee-pot has not been found.

Prisoner's Defence. I had spent the evening with a person of the name of Smith, who said he was a salesman in Smithfield; on my passing the house above mentioned a person came out and seemed to drop the articles that were found on me; I picked them up and had got scarcely twenty yards before I heard the cry of stop thief, I pursued and called stop thief; I lost sight of the man, and I was stopped; I told the watchman I would go any where with him; I was taken to the watchhouse, and after being there a few minutes I thought I might be suspected; I put the mug on the shelf, and the shoes under the chair; when the person came in I took the mug off the mantle piece, and said this is yours, I suppose.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Of stealing only.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110529-69

448. EDWARD CAMPBELL was indicted for that he, on the 19th of April , the dwelling-house of John Rounce , unlawfully did break with intent to enter, and the goods and chattels then and there being, feloniously to steal .

SECOND COUNT for feloniously breaking the said dwelling-house with intent to enter the same.

JOHN ROUNCE . I am a victualler at the Three Tuns, Red Cross-street . On the 20th of April, about four o'clock in the morning, I was alarmed by a violent noise at the door; I have two doors to my house, one in Red Cross-street, and the other in Three Tun-court; I laid in bed, still I heard the noise, I looked out of window, I heard three men in the passage in Three Tun-court, trying to break in, and I heard them talking; I stood with the window up five minutes, with my rattle in my hand; I could see nobody to assist me. The watchman came down Paul's-alley; I said watchman, you secure the court, there are thieves breaking into my house; I knew it was no thoroughfare. The moment he came up two of his comrades that stood at the court, one ran up Cradle-court, into Whitecross-street, the other ran the other way; he secured the court untill I came down. We went up the court, and we took the prisoner, and the moment I opened the door I saw the moulding and the staple of the door were all forced off by an iron crow, we found the iron crow, it fitted the marks in three places. We took the prisoner to the watchhouse; when he was before the Alderman he had the offer to go for a soldier; he said he would sooner swing first.

ROBERT BENBOW . I am a watchman. Mr. Rounce called to me, I saw one man come out of the gateway; I went up the court and secured the prisoner. I saw the door had been forced, here is the moulding that was forced off the door; I found this iron crow, it fitted the marks, and this is the staple that was wrenched out.

Prisoner's Defence. I leave it to the Gentlemen of the Jury, expecting they will have mercy on me.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Confined Three Months in Newgate , and whipped in Jail .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110529-70

449. FRANCIS FERNANDEZ was indicted for that he, on the 21st of April , in and upon John Clare , a subject of our Lord the King, feloniously and wilfully did make an assault, and with a certain sharp instrument did stab and cut the said John Clare in and upon his left arm and right thigh, with intent to kill and murder him .

SECOND COUNT for like offence, with intent to disable him.

THIRD COUNT, to do him some grievous bodily harm.

ABRAHAM GOLE . Q. I believe the East India Company put you in the care of the lascar seamen that come on board their ships - A. The prisoner applied to the East India Company, and they put him under my care.

Q. Did you send him with other seamen to go on board an East India ship - A. I sent him down to the boat with others to go on board an East India ship under John Clare on the 21st of April, between nine and ten in the morning.

Q. Was he acquainted with Clare - A. Oh, yes, he saw him every day, he was one of my door keeper s.

He had been kept at my house by the East India Company a month, and maintained by them to be returned to his own country.

JOHN CLARE . Q. On the 21st of April were you sent by Mr. Gole to take the prisoner and other Iascar seamen, to take them in a boat and put them on board a ship - A. Yes, I took them to New Crane stairs, Wapping, where the Gravesend boats go from, and when Francis Fernandez got to the boat he ran away instead of getting into it.

Q. Did you pursue after him - A. No, I staid to take care of the rest. After I returned to Mr. Gole's premises in about a quarter of an hour the prisoner came in; Mr. Gole's premises is in the Back-road, St. George's in the East , I asked him why he ran from the boat when the boat was just going, he made no answer, he cut me in my left arm.

Q. Had you collared him, or laid hold of his person, to take him as a prisoner - A. No; my hand might have touched his clothes, as my left arm was up; I am not sure whether my hand did touch his clothes or not.

Q.What was he - A. In Mr. Gole's premises, in the yard.

Q. Had you shut any gate upon him - A. No.

Q. How far had he come in when this took place - A. About twenty or thirty yards.

Q. Are you sure that you had not collared him, or gave him the idea that you were going to stop him - A. I had not collared him nor stopped him when he ran the knife into my left arm. - I cannot say how deep the wound was; there was a great deal of blood came from the wound. After he had stabbed me in the arm he attempted to run out of the yard, I ran after him to prevent him from making his escape, as he got to the gate I got hold of him he stabbed me in the thick part of the thigh with a knife. It was a small wound, but I had a great deal of pain with it; it is not perfectly well now. It was a very small pointed knife.

Q.Have you once seen the knife - A. Yes.

COURT. Both cuts were done with a knife - A. Yes

Q. to Mr. Gole. When he was apprehended was the knife taken from him - A. Yes, by me; this is the knife.

Clare. That appears to be the same knife.

Q. Did he after having stabbed you in the thigh this way get away from you - A. Yes.

Q. Had he the knife in his hand when you first saw him - A. I did not see him take it out of his pocket.

Q.When you asked him what he had gone away for what did he say to you - A. He made me no answer.

Q. Did you tell him that you would take him on board - A. No.

Q. Did you advance towards him - A. No, he advanced towards me.

Q. Did you put out your hand with intent to take him - A. No, not then.

Q. What did you put out your hand to him for - A. To stop him to speak to him.

Q. You had spoke to him before - A. He stabbed me at that very instant in the arm, when I asked him what he left the boat for. I did not see the knife until after he had stabbed me in the arm.

Q. He had no time to open it, had he - A. No.

Q. There he must have it in his hand at the time what could be your reason for putting out your hand to stop him - A. To speak to him; he was walking on fast to the barrack-yard when I put out my hand.

Q. What did you mean to do with him when you stopped him - A. Nothing at that time; Mr. Gole was not at home, I wanted to ask him the reason why he ran away from the boat.

Q. How far was he from the house door at this time - A. Four or five yards; he was going towards the house; I did not lay hold of him.

Q. Had you any other Lascars in the house at the time - A. Yes.

Q. Did not you want to stop him to prevent the others from taking part with him - A. No.

Q. Were you under any apprehension that he might induce them to leave the house in a holly, or take part with him - A. No. I am certain I did not lay hold of his person before I received this wound.

Prisoner. That gentleman wanted to send me to the ship, I told him I did not belong to the Company at the time that he laid hold of my clothes.

Q. to Clare. Had you struck him, or had you any quarrel with him going down to the ship - A. No.

Q. Was this man permitted to go out of the house to take exercise - A. Yes, without any body in the care of him, and they are expected to return at a particular hour. This man was under no restraint in Mr. Gole's house. I and another man took nine or ten men from Mr. Gole's house to the boat they walked.

Q. Did you see this man leave the Company when they got to the boat - A. No,

Q. Had he got to Mr. Gole's house before you perceived it - A. No. I got into the house first, I did not see him in my way to Mr. Gole's house.

Q. In your way from Mr. Gole's house to the ship did you or any other man make use of any threats to force him on board - A. No.

Prisoner. There was another man with this man, they took hold of me.

Clare. There was another man with me, an acquaintance of mine who came to see me, he did not attempt to lay hold of him.

Prisoner. The other man pinioned me back by holding me.

Clare. That is not so, nor did the man lay hold of him.

JOSEPH OLIVER . I live with my father, a trimming manufacturer, No. 10, Wilson-street, Moorfields.

Q. Did you happen to be at Mr. Gole's on the 21st of April - A. Yes; I saw the prisoner come down the yard, I did not perceive the knife then, nor when Clare asked him what he ran away for from the boat; the prisoner made no answer, but directly stabbed him in the arm with the knife; I did not see Clare lay hold of him, if he had, I must have seen him; I was looking at him. I saw the

prisoner stab him in the arm, then he went directly towards the gate from whence he came. He was going into the barracks when Clare spoke to him, I and Clare followed him, and laid hold of him at the gate, and then he stabbed him in the thigh; then he came towards me to stab me, I hit him on the side of his head with my stick, then I got outside of the gate to stop him, and he made a strike at me; I struck him and he fell; that blow could not hurt him, and I got no mischief.

COURT. He stabbed at you did he - A. Yes, and after he got up again he held up the knife.

Q. You think he fell in consequence of some false step, and not in consequence of your blow - A. No, it was not my blow.

Q. Had not the other man a stick as well as you - A.No. Clare had not a stick.

Q. to Clare. Is there any mark on your arm now - A. Yes.

Q. to Oliver. Did Clare bleed a great deal - A. Yes, he did, and it was a small knife like that he cut him with. I could not swear to the knife.

Mr. Gurney, Q. to Mr. Gole. The prisoner was taken up the same day was not he - A. Yes, this was done about eleven.

COURT, to Clare. It was some where about eleven in the morning that you were stabbed - A. Yes.

Prisoner's Defence. There were two men got hold of me, one pinioned me, and the other hit me with a stick on the hand, and that is the way he got cut.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 20.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18110529-71

450. FRANCIS FERNANDEZ , alias JOSEPH FERRER was indicted for that he, on the 21st of April , in and upon Thomas Day , a subject of our Lord the King, feloniously did make an asssault, and with a certain sharp instrument did stab and cut the said Thomas Day , in and upon his belly with intent to kill and murder him .

SECOND COUNT, for like offence, with intent in so doing to disable him.

THIRD COUNT, with intent to do him some grievous bodily harm.

MR. GOLE. Q. After the prisoner had escaped as we had evidenced in the former trial, did you go in search of him - A I did; I was accompanied by my servant Thomas Day

Q. I suppose for the purpose of apprehending him for stabbing Clare - A. Yes, I found him in the back room of the Kettle Drum, at the corner of Denmark street , about a quarter of a mile from my house, about three o'clock the same afternoon; upon me and Day entering the room, I said Joseph, and Day stood at my right hand, he jumped round and stabbed Day instantly, he knew Day to be my servant; Day never spoke to him nor lifted his hand, he had scarcely got in.

Q. Where did he stab him - A. In the belly. Day had a stick in his hand, after having stabbed him Day immediately struck him over the head, and Day and me endeavoured to to get the knife from him; I said, Day, for God's sake let him go he has got a knife, he will kill you; Day endeavoured to pinion his hands back; Day grew faint, his hold got loose, and the prisoner rushed out of the house; Day could not hold him any longer, he was bleeding so fast; I ran after the prisoner, I called out stop him; there were fifty people about him; he kept cutting with his knife, so that every one was afraid; he had a bandage round the wrist that held the knife, so that you could not discover the knife hardly, at last, by running about and the people after him; he fell, some man rushed upon him and held him down; I put my foot upon his wrist, that made the point of the knife come out; the point of the knife went against the curb-stone, that made it bent as you now see it is.

Q. Are you quite sure that Day did not speak or do any thing to provoke him - A. I am quite sure he did not.

THOMAS DAY . Q. Did you go with Mr. Gole for the purpose of apprehending the prisoner - A. Yes. Mr. Gole entered the room before me, I followed him, and as he went to speak to the prisoner, the prisoner was behind the table, he was coming round; I was going to take him, he stabbed me through the coat and breeches, in to my belly, I was sixteen days in the hospital, and it was eleven days before they would suffer me to get out of my bed. I am not well now, and I am afraid I never shall; I cannot strain at any thing, or walk fast.

Q. While they were in the house were they under any restraint - A. They went out when they pleased; they were kept in no restraint; the gate is never locked before twelve and one o'clock in the morning.

Prisoner's Defence. This man beat me, and I beat him again.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 20.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18110529-72

451. PATRICK RUSSELL and CHARLES GRUNDEL were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Ann Taylor , about the hour of one, on the night of the 25th of May , with intent the goods and chattels then and there being burglariously to steal .

ANN TAYLOR . I am a widow ; I keep the George public-house, Whitechapel , about one o'clock in the morning last Sunday was a week my house was broken open on the over night, I fastened the cellar up, as I always do with a chain, they broke open the flap of my cellar door, and the door I had chained, they unfastened that, and the pulley of the tap-room door they cut, that leads into the passage, and when they opened the street door they were taken.

Q. Did you see the men - A. No, they were taken.

CHRISTOPHER TAYLOR . I am son to the last witness. On the 25th of last month my mother went to bed about twelve o'clock, and left me up; there were some company in the parlour; she locked the bar, and took the key up with her; about half past twelve, I saw the company out, I barred and chained the street door, and locked the taproom

door; I saw the shutters were safe; I left the house quite safe, all was quite secure, I went to bed. On Sunday morning about half past one, I was awaked by some man coming up to my room.

Q. What man - A. Our lodger, he told me that some men had broke into the house, I got up immediately and went down stairs, then I perceived the cellar door was unlocked, and a dark room we have to put parcels in that are left, that was opened, the tap room door I found wide open, and the string of the pulley was cut, it make a great noise when the strings is on the chain, and the bar of the street door was undone, and the cellar flap was forced open; I went to the watch-house and saw the two prisoners, Grundel I had seen several times before, I do not know what he is, I came home and went down in the cellar, in the front cellar window I saw two different footsteps, there is some bricks there they had slid down, that was plain.

SAMUEL WILKINSON . I am parish beadle. On the 25th of May about half past one o'clock I went down the road with Mr. Higgs the constable, to see him home, I had this lanthorn in my hand, and about two doors this side of Mrs. Taylor's, I saw Grundel the prisoner walking gently, I put my lanthorn in his face, I said to Mr. Higgs, I do not like the look of this man, and when I got to Mrs. Taylor's door it was about four or five inches open, at that instant the door stapped, Russell rushed out, I made a blow at him; I held my lanthorn in his face, he had an iron crow in his hand it appeared to me, I had not time to see what it was; Russell ran away and I after him, he was knocked down by the patrol at the corner of Osborne Street; I said to the patrol take care of him, he has got an iron in his hand.

Q. What become of the other - A. Higgs took charge of Grundel.

Mr. Alley. You said you did not like the man's looks, he might return the compliment; I think you had only a momentary observation of him, you could not see what it was he had with him - A. Yes.

Q. You hit the man on his shoulder, and you assigned it as a reason that you should know him by the mark on the shoulder, and when he was examined there was no mark on his shoulder, and you said the man that ran out of the house had a brown coat on - A. I never said any such thing, I never lost sight of him, I followed him up close to the length of my stick, I had no doubt he was the man when taken.

THOMAS HIGGS . Q. Mr. Wilkinson was with you when you were going home - A. Yes, and when we came within two doors of the prosecutrix's house it was about half past one, I saw Grundel standing within a door or two of that, Mr. Wilkinson had the lanthorn in his hand, he held it up in his face, he said he did not like that man; Mr. Wilkinson poked his stick against two doors and the third gave way, that was Mrs. Taylor's, and out rushed a man, he made a blow at him with the stick, and away the man ran, he ran after him, I ran after Grundel and took him, Grundel ran, I took him to the watch-house; I never lost sight of him.

Q. I understand you say that Grundel was two doors from the house - A. Yes.

Q. And when the other man rushed out of the house, there was a cry of stop thief - A. Yes, and then Grundel ran and I ran after him; I never saw him in the house.

Mr. Alley. Q. you never saw who the man was that out out of the house. - A. I saw a man come out of the house. The light went out, whether it it was by making a blow at him I cannot say.

Q. When the man was coming out of the house, did not your brother officer strike at him without seeing who he was - A. He saw better than I did, he was nearer.

Q. Did not the last witness say that he should know the the man that came out of the house because he had a brown coat on - A. I do not recollect that.

Q. You know there is forty pound reward - A. I do know it, but that has nothing to do with taking a thief.

JOHN CROKER . On the night of the 25th of May or the morning, at half after one there was an alarm of stop thief, I ran to where the sound came from; I met the prisoner Russell at the corner of Osborn Street, without a hat; he was running towards me, I knocked him down at the corner of Osborn Street, and a scuffle ensued between us, the watchman came up to my assistance. The beadle when he came up holloaed out take care there is an iron in his hand, I did not see the iron, I had knocked him down and it was dark. The watchman saw him take something out of his pocket, he wanted me to search him there; I knowing the prisoner before I would not stop, I got him into the watchhouse in an instant.

- SMITH. I am an headborough. On the 25th of May, about half past one in the morning I heard the cry of stop thief; I went out of the watchhouse and went to the corner of Osborn Street, I saw the prisoner Russell on the ground in custody of the patrol; I assisted in taking him to the watchhouse, I searched him, and found one shilling and six-pence, some half-pence and two knives; I ordered the house-man Lewis to go out with me to the spot where I saw him down; we found an iron crow near the spot were I first saw him.

JOHN LEWIS . I went out with Mr. Smith the headborough; I found this crow in the Street.

WILLIAM TAYLOR . I am a watch-man. On the 25th of May, at half past one in the night I heard stop thief, I endeavoured to stop him and the patrol knocked him down.

Q. Which of them - A. Russell, I went to his assistance, I said we had better search him while he was down. He was not searched there; I afterwards found this bit of a box, there containing a bottle of phosphorus and matches; the wax paper was not in the box, it was near the spot.

Russell's Defence. I was taking the straitest way home to the Commercial Road; I saw a parcel of people about the watchhouse, I crossed over, they said here comes one; they ill used me, took the hat

off my head which I never saw again. Some time after I had been in the watchhouse Mr. Wilkinson came in he said, has the man a brown coat on, or a jacket; they said a velveteen jacket; he saw me, he said he believed I was the man; he had struck me on the shoulder if I was the man I had a bruise; I was searched, I had no mark, he said it is all right that is the man.

Grundell. I know myself innocent.

RUSSELL, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 21.

GRUNDELL, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110529-73

452. JOHN HAMERTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of May , twenty-eight pounds weight of plated metal, value 7 s. the property of John Saunders , privately in his shop .

JOHN SAUNDERS . I am an agent to a gentleman to sell metal and wire , I live at No. 2, Brownlow-street, Drury-lane , I keep a warehouse, the whole house is mine; the warehouse or shop is part of my dwelling-house. On the 3d of May the prisoner came to my warehouse, after he was gone I missed some metal.

Q. Did you ever find it again - A. I believe I did; I would not swear to it.

WILLIAM WILLIAMS . About the beginning of May the prisoner called upon me, he said he had got some metal he had brought from Ireland, would I buy it; I informed Mr. Saunders, he sent for an officer; going to Bow-street the prisoner confessed the whole of it, upon which me and the officer went to his lodging and found the metal. We promised him before, that if he would confess there should no harm come to him.

Prosecutor. I cannot swear that metal is my property.

Prisoner's Defence. I am in the habit of using this sort of metal; this kind of metal is sold in the three united kingdoms, as well as at Mr. Saunders's shop, and it is my property.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110529-74

453. ELIZA ROBERTS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of April , a mantle, value 30. a bonnet and feather, value 30 s. a pair of stays, value 10 s. a pair of silk stockings, value 5 s. a pair of shoes, value 2 s. a pair of silver clasps, value 10 s. a silver roaster, value 2 s. a pair of sheets, value 6 s. and a pair of shoe bows, value 1 s. the property of Samuel Solomons , in his dwelling house .

MRS. SOLOMONS. I live in Houndsditch. At the time the robbery was committed I lived in Clements-lane , my husband's name is Samuel Solomons . The prisoner was my servant at the time the robbery was committed, which was Easter Sunday; at that time I had Mary Johnson lodging with me; I had occasion to go out, leaving Mary Johnson and the prisoner in the house by themselves; I left my property in my drawers, and in the bed-room; when I returned the bed-room door, and the drawers were forced open; I had left them locked; I missed all the articles mentioned in the indictment.

Q. Was the prisoner in the house on your return - A. No, nor Mrs. Johnson. I never saw the prisoner again until last Monday.

ELIZABETH MARKWELL . I live at Barnet, I keep a second hand shop. On Easter Monday, in the morning, the prisoner came to my shop, accompanied by another woman; the other woman came first, and then she went and brought this one; she offered some clothes for sale, and by their appearance I had no doubt they came honestly by them; they gave me a sufficient account as I thought that they came honestly by them, after that I purchased them.

Q. What articles you purchased you gave to the officer afterwards - A. I did. I gave for the articles one pound fifteen shillings; they purchased goods afterwards.

JAMES BRAY . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoner on the 27th of May, I afterwards went to Mrs. Markwell's shop; she produced the things; I have had them ever since. The prisoner owned to taking the things, and said she was guilty, and was sorry for it.

Prosecutrix. I have looked at the things before they are all mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I lived as lodger with the prosecutrix, I paid her twenty five shillings a week for lodging; I lodged with her before I lived servant with her; I am very sorry for what I have done, but as for breaking a lock open I never did.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Of stealing to the value of thirty-five shillings only.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110529-75

454. CATHERINE TURNER and CATHERINE SMITH were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 21st of March , in the dwelling house of Robert Green , a 20 l bank note, his property .

ROBERT GREEN. I am a victualler , I live at the Horse and Groom, George Yard, Duke Street . On the 26th of March I missed the note, about twelve o'clock at night from out of the bureau in the bed room. Catherine Turner was my servant . On the 29th Craig the officer came to my house, he had a few words with her, he told me by her appearance she was guilty.

Q. I cannot hear what Graig said - did you trace your note - A. Yes, into the hands of Catherine Smith ; she is a distant relation of Catherine Turner .

JOSEPH FRITH . I am a victualler, I keep the George, Middle Row, Holborn. On the evening of the 25th of April the prisoner Smith came to my house and asked me to change her a twenty pound note; upon my taking the note and looking stedfastly at her, I perceived her countenance become pale; I then asked her if it was her husband's pension. (I believe her husband is a Chelsea pensioner), She said no, though her husband was poor he had good friends; he had it sent him. I took the note and wrote Smith upon it; I then gave Smith change for it.

JOSEPH CRAIG . I am an officer. I apprehended Turner, and Mr. Frith told me he took the note of Smith.

Prosecutor. That is my note.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110529-76

455. THOMAS EVANS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 9th of May , three pair of stockings, value 3 s. the property of John Wooton .

ANNE WOOTON . My husbands name is John Wotton . On the 9th of May last, about half past six in the evening I was in the little room next to the shop making my bed, I heard the shop door open, I saw a man come into the shop, I immediately ran to the shop window where the stockings were and I saw a man run out of the door with a bundle of stockings out of the window, he ran into Princes-court where there was no thoroughfare, I lost sight of him when he went into the court but I saw him again in three minutes, he ran out of the court and went by me, he was brought back to my house by my neighbour Mr. Bowles who pursued him, he had not the stockings with him then. Mrs. Mackgee brought me the stockings in about five minutes, these are them, I am sure they are the stockings that were taken out of my window, I had seen them in the window in the morning, and I am sure the prisoner is the person that was in my shop, I saw him put the stockings under his arm in my shop, and I saw his face in the shop, his face was towards me. The stockings were in paper when taken from my shop and they were in paper when Mrs. Mackgee brought them, there is now my husband's mark on the paper the price of the stockings, and they are worth nine shillings.

WILLIAM BOWLES . On the 9th of May, when Mrs. Wotton called stop thief I immediately came out of my shop and went to Princes-court, the prisoner could not go through he was returning, I took him, I asked him if he had not been in the shop next to me, he said no, I might search him, I took him to Mrs. Wotton's shop and the stockings were produced by Mrs. Mackgee while he was there. There was no other person in the court nor running untill after I had hold of him.

MARY MACKGEE . On the 9th of May I picked up the stockings, they were in paper, I heard them fall all in the yard, they were picked up by a person working with me and given to me, I took them immediately to Mrs. Wotton, the prisoner was there; I asked Mrs. Wotton if that was the parcel she had lost, she said yes.

Prisoner's Defence. There were three or four people running at the time that I was taken, Mr. Bowles collared me, he said I had taken something out of that woman's shop, I said I had not. I knew myself innocent. I was willing to go back.

The prisoner called one witness who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 17.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18110529-77

456. SAMUEL SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 25th of May , a watch, value 23 l. the property of William Yardley , from his dwelling house .

WILLIAM YARDLEY . I keep a silversmiths shop in Charing Cross , Mr. Hill was my partner until last Christmas. I can only swear to the property.

MR. HILL. I was partner with Mr. Yardley till Christmas, our partnership was dissolved then, all the profits since Christmas are on Mr. Yardley's account.

Q. To whom does the stock belong to in this month. - A. To William Yardley . I have no interest in it now, I now attend the business of the shop as a servant, and I am allowed so much per week.

Q. Now look at the prisoner at the bar do you know his person. - A. Very well, he came into the shop on Saturday the 25th of May, a quarter past eight in the evening, it was very light, he came in by himself, he asked me to look at some watches, I shewed him some silver watches, he objected to them, he asked me to shew him some gold ones which I did, he asked me the price, I told him the watch was marked twenty three pound, then he asked me to shew him a chain and a gold seal he said he would bargin with me for them altogether, I told him the price of them altogether was twenty-five pounds, he said he would give me twenty-three pounds for them.

Q. Was any body else in the shop. - A. Not at that time no one besides himself. I said I would put it down on paper and if we did not lose by them he should have them as the stock was selling off under prime cost, he told me to put them together, I put them together the chain on the watch and the seal and key on the watch chain, I was inside of the counter and he outside, I came round the counter I was coming towards the door where he stood, I then gave him the watch into his hand, he put the watch up to his ear and said it did not go, I was then on the same side of the counter that he was, he moved back towards the door as near as he could and immediately bolted out of the door as hard as he could run, I ran after him crying stop thief, he had the watch and chain in his hand, he ran off immediately he got out of the door down in the middle of the street, I ran after him a fast as I could crying stop thief.

Q. I suppose there were a great many people in the street. - A. A great number, the pavement was so full he could not well run down the pavement, he ran as far as Craigs-court, about an hundred yards from our house he ran down there he was over taken and stopped, I saw him taken, he was knocked down by somebody and taken, I was not five yards from him the whole time; when he fell the outside case by this fall flew off, I saw the watch taken out of his hand when he was on the ground, a person laid hold of him by the collar and with the other hand he took the watch from him as he lay on the ground, I had hold of him at the time and the man that took the watch out of his hand gave it into mine, I have had it in my possession ever since.

CHARLES WINTER . On the 25th of this month I saw the prisoner just after he got out of Mr. Yardley's shop, I believe it was about a quarter past eight, I heard the cry of stop thief, I perceived the prisoner at the bar was running, Mr. Hill and a young man was running after him, he was about ten yards from them, I saw the prisoner was gaining ground of Mr. Hill and that young man, I ran after him, he turned up Craigs-court, I and this young man followed him as he was turning about to the right I took him by the collar, I perceived the watch in his right hand, I took hold of the watch chain and seal from him all except the case which had fell, I asked the prosecutor what he had lost, he said a watch, I gave the watch to him, saying, this is it I suppose.

Q. Now Mr. Yardley look at that watch. - A. I

have examined it, I know it by the mark, the cost price, and it has got my name on it, it is my property.

Prisoner's Defence. I do not know whether I am right or wrong, I give myself up to the mercy of the Court.

Q.(to Mr. Hill). Did the prisoner appear to you to be drunk. - A. No, he did not appear to be drunk, he did not run as if he was drunk.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 31.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18110529-78

457. JOHN BLOXHAM was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of May , a sheep, value 40 s. the property of John Bodman .

JOHN BODMAN . I am a butcher , I live in Ratcliffe Highway. On this day week I bought thirty sheep in Smithfield market, I put twelve of them in Mr. Kemp's field, Islington , myself on Tuesday, on the Wednesday I went up and they were all out of the field, I found them all but this one that is here now alive, I was not present when this was found, when I saw it the officer Mathews had it in his possession, I know it to be my sheep by the ochre mark a letter B. I found eight of them in the pound at Islington and two in a carpenter's yard, the other was found at Mr. Laycock's the cowkeeper. They were all alive.

JOHN MATTHEWS . I am an officer of Hatton Garden. On Wednesday, in consequence of information I went to the prisoner's house about a quarter before eight in the evening, the prisoner was not at home, I found the sheep that is in court now in the privy.

Q.Whereabouts does the prisoner live. - A. In Pancras parish, in the new buildings, near Spencer's place .

Q. What is the prisoner do you know. - A. He has formerly been a drover .

Q. Was the door of the privy shut. - A. It was fastened up by a gimblet, it would turn the same as a button would, there was some hay there for the sheep to feed upon. I saw the prisoner near ten o'clock at home in his own pair of stairs room, I had taken the sheep away and returned and waited for his coming home. I knocked at the door, he said he would be d - d if he opened the door, I told him it was of no use, I would come in, after that he opened the window, he said what do you want, I said Mr. Bloxham I want you, he said he would be d - d before he would be handled about by any such d - d rascals as me, he said he would come forward the next morning and he would punish me severely for stealing his sheep, I told him I did not mind that, if he did not come down I would break the door open, I sent a young man to fetch a hatchet to chop the door open, he heard me, he came down and I took him in custody.

Prisoner's Defence. On Wednesday morning last Mr. Smith, a brick maker came into my house, he works just opposite, he said

"Bloxham, there is a sheep run up the brick field," I said I would go after it, I might know the mark, I brought the sheep out, I asked Mr. Clark to open his gate, I said, this sheep belongs to some butcher, it is marked with a B. Mr. Clark immediately opened his door, I put the sheep into his place, and borrowed a bit of string of him, and took the sheep down to my house. I said to Mr. Clark, you know I have got the sheep, if any body makes enquiry send them to my house. I went to four butchers at Somerstown and left the mark there. I came home about a quarter before eight o'clock at night, my wife came and said they had hauled my sheep away.

ROBERT SMITH . I am a brick maker, I work in Pancras Walk, about half a mile from Mr. Kemp's field. A strange sheep came in the ground where I work last Wednesday morning. I knowing Bloxam, that he had been a drover, I told him and shewed him which way it went, I saw him bring the sheep from Mr. Clark's leading it with a string.

EDWARD CLARK . I am a cow-keeper. On Wednesday morning last the prisoner asked me if I would let him drive the sheep into my yard on purpose to catch it, he said he believed it to be a lost sheep and he wished to find an owner for it, he said he thought it belonged to Mr. Bunnel, because it had the mark of B upon it, he caught the sheep and led it away with a string through the public road to his home.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18110529-79

458. SARAH GREGORY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of April , a shirt, value 4 s. an apron, value 1 s. a tablecloth, value 2 s. a shift, value 4 s. a shawl, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of Henry Coates , two gowns, value 10 s. two caps, value 1 s. a shawl, value 1 s. and a bonnet, value 1 s. the property of Anne Barton , spinster .

MARY COATES . I am the wife of Henry Coates , the prisoner was my servant . On the 23d of April, between eight and nine o'clock she laid the cloth for supper, and then absconded, and when she was gone in the back kitchen in an empty box of mine I found six duplicates, I had missed several things before she went, I enquired of her, and she declared herself perfectly innocent. I went to the pawnbroker's with the duplicates, and found the goods.

ANN BARTON . I live with Mrs. Coates. On the 23d of April, when I found the prisoner was gone, I went up stairs and looked among my things, I missed two gowns, two shawls, two caps, a flannel petticoat, and a bonnet, I saw some of them at Hatton Garden office, I know them to be my own.

JAMES RAMSAY. I am a pawnbroker, I live with Mr. Fage, Liquorpond Street. On the 23d of April about five o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner pawned a shift with me, and on the 16th of April, I took in a shawl, I made out a duplicate and gave it to some woman that pawned it, Mrs. Coates produced the ticket. I cannot say whether I took in the shawl of the prisoner or no.

JOSEPH DOWNE . I am a pawnbroker. On the 17th of April we had an apron pledged with us for a shilling, on the 16th a tablecloth for two shillings, and on the 11th of April a shirt for two shillings, they were all pawned by a woman in the name of Scott, I have no recollection of her person.

HENRY CONES . Q. Do you know the prisoner. - A. I have no recollection of her person. On the 24th of April a gown was pledged with me for three shillings in the name of Mary Jones , and on the 25th of April, a shawl for nine pence, in the name of John Walter .

WILLIAM READ . On the 25th of April, the prisoner was brought to the office she had this gown upon

her, and this cap, and on the second hearing she came up with this shawl, belonging to the same person.

Prisoner's Defence. These things the young woman lent me, or else I would not have had them on me.

ANN BURTON. I never lent them her, nor any other things, nor she never asked me.

GUILTY , aged 29.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18110529-80

459. BENJAMIN STUBBS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of May , forty-eight yards of printed cambric, value 3 l. the property of Samuel Weetch , privately in his shop .

SAMUEL GIGGENS . I am porter to Samuel Weetch , he lives at Cock-hill, Ratcliffe , in the parish of Stepney, he is a linen draper .

Q. Did the prisoner come to your shop on the 6th of May. - A. Yes, ten minutes after eight in the evening, it was getting dark at that time, I saw several people collected about the window, I ran by the window as I was coming home, and the prisoner at the bar ran into my arms, he ran out of the shop, and I immediately seized him, he had two pieces of ell wide print on his arm.

Q. Had he any thing else. - A. No.

Q. What was the fabric of it. - A. Printed cambric.

Q. Was there any body else in the shop. - A. Yes, the shop boy William Weetch , he is here, and a customer was in the shop.

Q. When you seized the prisoner what did he say. - A. He begged of me to let him go, and he threw the prints down in the dirt.

Q. Did you secure the prisoner. - A. I took him into the shop and called my mistress out to him, he was kept till the constable came.

Q. What was done with the prints. - A. I picked them up myself, I delivered them to the officer Hope. These are the prints.

Q. What was the latest time that you had seen them in the morning. - A. I cannot exactly say what time I saw them, they were within the shop. One cost my master three shillings a yard, and the other three shillings and two pence. There is forty-eight yards in all.

Q. Are they worth as much as that now. - A. Yes, they cost my master that. The shop marks are on the prints now.

Mr. Knapp. How many persons served in the shop - A. Two at that time, my mistress serves generally in the shop.

COURT. Your mistress was not in the shop at the time you went in it. - A. No.

Q. Where was your mistress. - A. In the parlour, she could see into the shop.

Q. When you went into the shop your mistress was not there, you say she was in the parlour, do you know whether she gave any alarm. - A. No, I do not know.

WILLIAM WEETCH . I am cousin to Samuel Weetch , I was in the shop when the prisoner was stopped by Giggens.

Q. Did you see the prisoner come in. - A. No, I did not see him before he was stopped by Giggens.

Q. Had you seen these two pieces of print in the window. - A. Yes, I had been doubling them up, when a customer came, I shoved these thing behind the door and went to another part of the shop.

Q. You were attending to customers were you. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see the prisoner take these things from behind the door. - A. No, I did not see him, I did not see the prisoner before Giggens brought him into the shop.

Q. Did your mistress give any alarm before Giggens brought him in. - A No, she did not.

Mr. Knapp. Where was your Mistress at that time. - A. In the parlour, it look into the shop.

Q. Whether she saw it or did not, the customer was in the shop at the time you put it behind the door. - A. Yes.

Q. That customer is not here - A. No.

COURT. Did the customer give any alarm. - A. No.

RALPH HOPE. I am an officer. These things were delivered to me by William Weetch on the 6th of May, between eight and nine in the evening, Giggens was there at the time, they have been in my custody ever since.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 17.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18110529-81

460. REBECCA JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 23d of April , in the dwelling house of John Haines , a pocket book, value 6 s. a five pound bank note, four two pound bank notes, and two one pound bank notes , the property of John Ellick .

JOHN ELLICK . I am a sailor . I lost my pocket book on the 23d of April, at Mrs. Haines's, she keeps a lodging house in Well Cross Court, Old Gravel lane , I lodged there.

Q.What is the prisoner. - A. She always came there to read the news paper, she snatched the pocket book off the table, all my notes were in it, Mrs. Haines called to her to bring my papers back, she would not come back, my discharge from the King's service was in my pocket book and I had fourteen pounds in it. I put my pocket book on the table, she snatched it and ran away, Mrs. Haines is a coloured women and she is big with child she cannot come.

JOHN GILLMAN . I apprehended the prisoner, I found her new rigged out in new wearing apparel, on the evening of the same day I found her old clothes in the back yard, I searched her and found only a few halfpence on her, Mrs. Haines got half way here yesterday, and to day she is not able to come.

These things are a new bonnet, a habit shirt, and cap, I took them from her.

Prisoner's Defence. Yesterday six weeks I was coming up the bottom of Wellclose-court, I met the prosecutor and his landlady, he said Jones will you have a glass of gin, and all I saw with him was a sixpence, he asked me to go with him I denied, I was in the court about eight o'clock in the evening. Mrs. Haines and this man were all that day drunk.

Jury. Q. to prosecutor.) Were you sober at the time you lost your pocket book. - A. As sober as I am now.

GUILTY , aged 39.

of stealing but not in the dwelling house.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110529-82

461. JOHN ARMSTRONG was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of May , three hundred pound weight of rope, value 5 l. the property of John Luck , Charles Luck , Alexander Kemp , Robert Williams , and others, in a certain barge on the river Thames .

Second count for like offence stating the goods to belong to Alexander Campbell .

JAMES EVANS . I am a surveyor of the Thames Police office.

Q. On the 17th of May in the afternoon were you on the river. - A. I was about five o'clock, I was in Blackwall Reach on the Kent side opposite of Black-wall. There were two Indiamen one of the name of Severn, nigh Blackwell Dock , as I was going down I observed the prisoner rowing from the ship to Black-wall point. He was on the Middlesex side, I saw him row to the stern of a lighter which laid aground on the point, he stopped there and he was out of my sight for a few minutes, I got down to him and just as I got there he had in his hand a small line apparently having something under water, he instantly dropped that line into the water upon seeing me, I had come round the craft, then I got into his boat, I found in that a piece of coire rope that is manufactured in the East Indies, and another piece weighing forty-two pounds. I then desired one of my men to put the boat hook down which they did immediately and with the boat hook they brought up a piece of buoy rope, weighing an hundred and a half, and another piece of rope, it appeared a topsail halliard, eighty four pounds, they were fast together and a small piece of line to the buoy rope, which appeared to me to be the piece of line that the prisoner dropped, I directed them to fish again, the prisoner said there was no more, we had the whole of them. This is the coir rope it will not sink. Afterwards I went on board the Severn, I found she was an indiaman. This tally was picked up in the boat and given to me in the prisoner's presence.

Mr. Alley. This man was in the river he had got a drag. - A. Yes, he said while he was in the boat he picked up this with the drag but this coire rope will not sink it was in his boat.

LUTEN. I was in the boat with Mr. Evans, I have heard what he has said and the account he has given is correct, after we had fished them up the prisoner took a piece of canvas off one of the ropes we took up threw it down in the boat and put his foot on it, I desired him to lift his foot up and let me see what it was, he did, I picked it up and gave it to Mr. Evans, it is called a tally.

EVANS. This is the forty-two pound rope and this is the buoy rope, this is the top sail halliard, and this is the small line attached to it, that is what he had in his hand.

Q. What is the worth of all these. - A. Five pound.

THOMAS SMITH . I am boatswain yeoman of the Severn, the captain's name is Alexander Campbell .

Q. On the 17th of May was the ship unrigging. - A. Yes, I was writing tallies for the rigging. I wrote on that day that tally, we have little stripes of canvas upon which we write and annex them to what we take down, that is my hand writing, we had a good deal of rigging taken down, some was in the ship and some in the craft alongside, whether that was in the ship or in the craft I cannot say.

JOHN HUGHES . I am a boatswain. I have examined the rope, the coire rope belongs to the ship, I know it by a knot of my own making the top sail halliards I believe belong to the ship.

MR. JAMES. I am a midshipman to this ship. I saw this tally put on the halliard and saw it put in the barge. I actually saw it in the barge.

Prisoner's Defence. I went through Greenwich. I working through the reach, a little rope and that coire I catched down by Blackwall reach, I worked down by this ship, I catched this coire rope and the other I put it in the boat it being of such a weight I hauled it over so that I could row with it, and as to the piece of Canvas I did not know whether it was a tally or not.

Court. How came you to put your foot upon it. - A. My Lord, I have it of one side, not intending to put my foot on it.

THOMAS PITT . On last Thursday fortnight I was at work at this ship, this buoy rope was hove overboard, or one like it, it was cast overboard, I do not know who the man was that did it.

Mr. Gurney. Q. You were rigging the ship. - A. Yes.

Q. And while you were busy somebody whom you do not know cast it off overboard. Did you see him let it loose. - A. Yes.

Q. You did not lay hold of him. - A. No.

MICHAEL DAVIS . I am a dragman, I saw the prisoner pick a rope up, I cannot say it is the same.

Mr. Gurney. Q. A great many times you see ropes picked up. Were not you taken to the Thames police office for it once. - A. Yes.

GUILTY - DEATH aged 30.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110529-83

462. WILLIAM JOSEPH JEFFS was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Nathan Jacobs about the hour of twelve on the night of the 20th of March , and stealing therein, a watch, value 40 s. a chain, value 5 s. and a seal, value 1 s. his property .

MARY JACOBS . I live at 112, opposite the London Docks , my husband's name is Nathan Jacobs, my husband has been insane seven years, I keep a silver and slop shop . On the 21st of last March we were alarmed at six in the morning of the shop being broken open. There had been sixteen holes bored with an auger in the shutter, and the piece forced out, and the glass broken in.

Q. So that the hand might go in. - A. Yes, and they must have had something to put in, there was only one pane of glass broke, there were six panes of glass cleared, I found one of the watches at Mr. Williams's. The watches were all safe on the over night.

THOMAS WILLIAM . I am a pawnbroker, I live in Ayliffe Street. On the 21st of March, a woman came to my shop with this watch, I enquired who it belonged to, she said a young man, I stopped the watch and told her to bring the party the property belonged to, the party came, which I believe to be the prisoner, he said it was his property, I lent him thirty shillings on it. Mrs. Jacobs came in about five minutes afterwards.

Q. Now look at the man and see if he is the same person. - A. I cannot positively say he is the same person.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110529-84

463. PETER FLEGGARD was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Lewis Cohen , about the hour of eight at night, on the 19th of February, and stealing therein, a waistcoat, value 2 s. and a gown, value 5 s. his property .

LEWIS COHEN . I live in New Gravel Lane, Shadwell . On the 19th of February, when I rented the house, me and my wife went out about ten in the morning. I double locked the door, and did not return before nine o'clock; I then found the house broken open. I had been at my father's in Petticoat Lane. I missed other things besides the gown and waistcoat; the waistcoat was on the prisoner when he was taken, and the gown we found at the pawnbroker's.

DEBORAH COHEN , I spent the day out with my husband at my father on the 19th of February; we returned between eight and nine; then we found the house broken open, the shutter was wrenched and the staple was broken off the door.

JOSHUA MICHAEL . I am the father of Mrs Cohen, I came past my son's house that same evening, the house was quite secure then; the prisoner was standing at the door pretending to make water; I asked him if he wanted any body that way; he mentioned something about a crimp living in that house, I told him no. I did not like the man's looks at all; this was about seven o'clock, it was quite dark; then I went home, my son and daughter were at my house; I told them to go home. About two or three months afterwards, the woman that the prisoner lived with laid an information against him. He came past were I lived I secured him; this waistcoat was upon him.

JOHN PARER . I am an officer, I found the prisoner in the custody of the last witness, with this waistcoat on him the woman that gave evidence before the magistrate, said there was a gown in pledge at Mr. Price's, in Wentworth Street. I went to the pawnbroker, he gave it up.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought the waistcoat in Rosemary Lane, for nine-pence, and the woman I live with she has got a gown on her back of the same pattern.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110529-85

464. AARON SOLOMON was indicted for feloniously assaulting Jeremiah Cremer in the king's highway, on the 26th of May , putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, a watch, value 3 l. his property .

JEREMIAH CREMER . I am a stone mason's labourer . On the 26th of May, about eleven o'clock at night, I was coming down Brick Lane , three men came up to me, two of them laid hold of me, and the prisoner at the bar robbed me of the watch while the others had hold of me; the prisoner took hold of the chain of my watch and took it out of my fob directly; I holloaed out, and the three men made off together. The prisoner at the bar he is the man that robbed me of my watch; I never lost sight of him untill he was stopped.

Q. Where is the watch - A. I never saw the watch again.

JOEL BARROW . I am a watchman I live in Osborne-street, Whitechapel, about eleven o'clock, I heard a call out of, stop him; I went directly after him, I saw the prisoner and another alongside of him running as hard as they could run; one ran down Winfield-street, and the other ran down Old Montague-street, and down Green Dragon-yard, and at the bottom of Green Dragon-yard, there is a door that is locked at eleven o'clock at night, the prisoner could not get through there I took him; when I took him I asked him what he had done with the man's watch; he said, I have not a watch.

Prisoner's Defence. I am as innocent as a new-born child; I was coming down the street, I went down that court, there was no thoroughfare; the watchman catched hold of me, and the prosecutor said I was the man some yards before he came nigh to me.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 18.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110529-86

465. DOROTHY JACOBS was indicted for feloniously stealing, in the dwelling-house of Charles Silk , on the 21st of May , six one pound bank notes , the property of Daniel Grace .

DANIEL GRACE. I am a turncock to the New River company , I lodge at No. 7, Middlesex-court, Drury-lane , and the prisoner lodged with my landlady four days, she was a servant out of place ; in the day she took the money out of my box, I went out and left the key in my box.

Q. How do you know that she took it - A. She took six one pound notes, the next day she gave me three pounds of it back again; she had got drunk and bought clothes. I took the clothes away, she said when she got her husband's pension she would pay me the whole of the money.

THOMAS MANTZ . I apprehended the prisoner on the 23rd, he had this bundle, a gown, a petticoat and about forty shilling in money.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going to a place; I sold my husband's watch for four pound five, to buy me some clothes. The prosecutor offered to keep my things and he would say nothing about my money; I said he never should have a half-penny worth of the things, nor did I ever say I would give him three pounds.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110529-87

466. ANN MACDONALD and ANN WILLIAMS were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 21st of April , from the person of George Gingell , a watch, value 2 l. a gold seal, value 1 l. and a one pound bank note, his property .

GEORGE GINGELL . I am a labourer in the East India warehouse. On Saturday evening about twelve and one I was going to my lodgings at Pimlico; I met Ann Williams in Pimlico, I went home with her to her lodging, we went to bed; in the morning I was awoke by a man and woman, they used bad expressions and threatened me, that I was obliged to leave the house.

Q. Where was the woman - A. She went away from me; when they awoke me on searching my pocket, I found my watch, gold seal and a one pound note and some silver gone. On Sunday evening I applied to Green, the constable. I told him the case; I

went with him to the Green Man and Still, and called for a pint of beer and the prisoner Ann Williams brought me the beer. I gave her in charge, I know nothing of the other woman.

Q. Were you sober on that night - A. I was rather in liquor. I am sure she is the woman.

EDWARD GREEN . I am officer. On Sunday evening about seven o'clock, Gingell came to me; he said he was robbed of a watch, some silver and a pound note, and a gold seal. He took me to Pear Street; we went to the Green Man and Still, he shewed me Nance Williams, and said that was the prisoner; I searched her, I found nothing on her but two shillings; she said afterwards she would shew me the girl that had the watch. I found the watch at the One Tun in Perkins's rents, Mrs. Harding produced it.

MARY HARDING . I keep the One Tun in Perkins's rents; Ann Macdonald came in my house about nine o'clock on Sunday morning she was very much in liquor, she asked me to take care of the watch for her till the next morning; Mr. Green came on the Sunday night, and then the watch that I received of Macdonald I gave to Mr. Green.

Macdonald's Defence. I came home before five in morning. I found the watch on the bed, (I sleep along with Williams) I gave it to Mrs. Harding to take care of till the next morning. I found nobody in the room at all.

Williams's Defence. This man had some drink several times in my room, and the last time I went out and returned there were no one in the room; I went out of the room, and pulled the door after me. I saw no more of him until I was taken.

MACDONALD, NOT GUILTY .

WILLIAMS, GUILTY , aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110529-88

467. WILLIAM COLTER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of April , two sheets, value 5 s. the property of John Conigan .

ELEANOR CONIGAN . I am the wife of John Conigan , we live in Essex-street, Whitechapel .

Q. Was the prisoner a lodger of yours - A. He slept three nights in the house in a two pair of stairs room, there were three beds and bedding in the room. On the morning after Good Friday I missed two sheets out of the room. The prisoner was brought to my house on the Saturday by the officer; I knew the sheets when I saw them, they are worth two shillings.

JOHN KINNERSLEY. I am an officer. I was sent for by Mr. Jones, a dealer in old clothes Sparrow corner; I there found the prisoner, he had a pair of sheets in his possession; I took the prisoner to the counter on suspicion; this was on Good Friday. The prisoner at the Mansion-house said who the sheets belonged to. He went with me to Mrs. Conigan, and Mrs. Conigan claimed the sheets. These are the sheets.

Prosecutrix. They are my sheets.

Prisoner's Defence. There was a woman with me, she went off before the constable came, I had been there five days, I went out drinking, and I had run out my money; I took them to the pawnbroker's to sell them.

GUILTY , aged 45.

Fined 1 s. and discharged .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18110529-89

468. MARY BLUE . was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of April , five napkins, value 5 s. two children's bed-gowns, value 7 s. a bed gown, value 2 s. a shift, value 2 s. and a sheet, value 10 s. the property of William Goding .

WILLIAM GODING . I am a farrier , I live in King John's court, Holywell-lane, Shoreditch .

ISABELLA ALLEN. I know the prisoner. she was a next door neighbour to Mrs. Goding. I was nursing Mrs. Goding in her laying in.

Q. When was the last time that you had seen these things safe - A. About two o'clock they were safe in the lower part of the house, hanging on a line, and when I came down stairs I missed five napkins and a sheet off the line, and two children's bed-gowns and other things. There had nobody been in the house I went to the pawnbrokers with Mr. Goding, we found a bed-gown, and two children's bed gowns.

ALEXANDER BURGESS. I received the bed-gowns in pledge of the prisoner for one shilling and sixpence.

Prisoner's Defence. I have been in the habit of going into the prosecutor's house every hour in the day; I do not deny taking them two articles; I did not mean to defraud them, I meant to return them.

Mrs. Allen. When she was asked whether she had pawned any thing at the pawnbrokers, she denied it.

The prisoner called three witnesses who gave her a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18110529-90

469. JOHN BRYAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of May , three pair of breeches, value 5 s. the property of George Bruniges .

GEORGE BRUNIGES . I keep the Rose and Crown, Wentworth-street, Whitechapel . On the 1st of May I lost three pair of breeches out of a chest in the room where the prisoner slept in my house; I had suspicion, I watched outside of my house for the prisoner coming out.

Q. What is the prisoner - A. A sea-faring man ; I saw the prisoner come out of my door, he went into another public-house, I followed him; he had three pair of breeches under his left arm. These are the breeches, I know them to be my own, they are worth five shillings.

Prisoner's Defence. I leave it all to your lordship's mercy, and the gentlemen of the Jury.

GUILTY , aged 38.

Judgment respited.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18110529-91

470. WILLIAM ALCOCK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the of 23d April , eight pound weight of cheese, value 5 s. the property of John Arnold .

JOHN HAMM . I am a sawyer. On the 23d of April, between three and four o'clock, I was about two hundred yards from Mrs. Arnold's shop, I was at a public-house door, I saw the prisoner running with the cheese, he was running as if in the direction from Mrs. Arnold's shop; two boys were calling stop thief.

In about ten minutes he was brought back with the cheese under his arm.

ABRAHAM MILEMORE . I was standing at the Queen's Head, I saw the prisoner pass with the cheese under his arm as he passed us he tried to hide it under his coat; I heard the alarm of stop thief, and two little boys running after him; I saw him brought back by two men; he was let go by them men because they could not find out to whom the cheese belonged; and the cheese was left at the Queen's Head by a carpenter; about half an hour after the prisoner came back, and asked me if I knew the man who had got the cheese; I told him, yes; I did not tell him it was at the Queen's Head; he said he could prove where he bought it; I said I thought if he had bought it he would not have thrown it down and run away; he said he knew he bought it under price, and that was the reason of his throwing it away; he went from me, and he had not gone above twenty yards, and up came Mrs. Arnold; from what she said I pursued the prisoner, and brought him back; I then said, if you bought the cheese here is the person that you bought it off; he made no reply. Mrs. Arnold, in his presence, said the cheese had been stolen from her shop.

MARY ARNOLD. I am the wife of John Arnold , I live at No. 9, Bath-street, City-road ; I keep a chandler's shop ; I was not in the shop at the time; I am sure that cheese was taken from my shop, it was laying on the counter; I had left the shop about five minutes, and as soon as I came in the shop I missed the cheese; John Hamm came and asked me if I had lost a cheese; I said, yes; he took me to the Queen's head, and shewed me the cheese; I knew it to be mine, it is worth five shillings. This is the cheese.

Prisoner's Defence. I belong to the West London Militia . I saw a cheese by a paling, I picked it up.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Whipped in Jail and discharged .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18110529-92

471. JOHN CRONAM was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of May , thirty-two pounds weight of iron, value 4 s. 6 d. the property of John Wells , Sir Robert Wigram , bart. John Wigram , and George Green .

THOMAS OWEN . I am foreman in the iron shop of John Wells , Sir Robert Wigram , John Wigram , and George Green , Blackwall . On Friday the 17th of May I stopped the prisoner in the yard, he had this iron on his arm. I asked him what he was going to do with it, he said he was going to put it at the bottom of his stove; I took him into the accompting-house, there he put the iron down, it weighed thirty-two pounds; he went home and returned to his work the next morning. The prisoner had been in the employment seven years, and has behaved very well.

Q. Was he drunk or sober - A. He was not sober.

Prisoner's Defence. I was drunk and stupid, I did not know what I was doing.

GUILTY , aged 38.

Fined 1 s. and discharged .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18110529-93

472. ANN SCOTT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of May , a pewter quart pot, value 2 s. and two pewter pint pots, value 3 s. the property of Alexander Weir .

ALEXANDER WEIR . I keep the Rising Sun, public house, Charlton-street, Somerstown .

PETER WHITEHAIR . I took the woman and the pots in custody from the next witness. These are the pots.

HOWARD DALE . I live at 51, Charlton-street. I saw the prisoner take the pots off the table outside of Mr. Weir's house, one was a quart and the other two pints; I told Mr. Weir, and then pursued the prisoner and asked her if she had not stolen some pots off Mr. Wier's table; she dropped a quart pot, I picked it up, the beadle was going by, I gave her in charge; he took two pint pots from her.

Prosecutor. They are my pots.

Prisoner's Defence. When I took them I meaned to take them back again.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Fined 1 s. and discharged .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18110529-94

473. THOMAS BROMLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of May , two saws, value 8 s. the property of John Powell .

WILLIAM POWELL . I am the son of John Powell we are carpenter s. The prisoner worked for my father a twelvemonth ago. On the 7th of May, between twelve and one o'clock, I was working at a house in Jubilee-place, Commercial-road ; I saw Bromley go up the road, he had two saws under his coat, as if coming from the house, and I was going to it; I went to the house immediately, I found the door broken open, and two saws were gone; I pursued the prisoner, and came up to him in Albion-street, he had the saws with him then; I said, you have got my saws; he said he had been distressed, and begged for mercy, I took the saws from him, and on my taking him part of the way to Lambeth-street office I met Beeby the officer, I gave him in charge. These are the saws, they are my father's they are worth eight shillings.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked them up in the path as I was coming along, I put them under my arm.

GUILTY , aged 44.

Whipped in Jail and discharged .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18110529-95

474. JOSEPH WALL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of April , a watch, value 3 l. the property of William Wheatley , from his person .

The prosecutor was called, and not appearing in court, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18110529-96

475. SARAH PRICE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of April , a pocket book, value 2 s. the property of Samuel Lack , from his person .

SAMUEL LACK . I am one of the constable s that attend Covent Garden Theatre . On the 24th of April I was at the pit door assisting some ladies into the pit; I felt the prisoners hand at my pocket, I turned myself round and thought to be sure she would no better than to pick my pocket; I laid hold of her fingers

at my pocket, I let her alone for about half a minute, she had got my coat turned up behind cutting my pocket with a knife or scissars; it was not above half a minute before my book went; I turned round and catched her instantly, she dropped the book. I laid hold of her with both hands, she shuffled very much to get away from me. I took her to the Brown Bear public-house, searched her and found nothing of mine, She had cut the bottom of my pocket off. I found no knife or scissars upon her; I went back and saw Crouch find the pocket book on the ground, near the spot where this woman and I were together. This is the book, I am sure it is my book, it cost me three shillings and six-pence without the clasp.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence; called three witnesses who gave her a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18110529-97

476. WILLIAM POMFRET was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 5th of May , a waistcoat, value 5 s. and a pair of trowsers, value 5 s. the property of William Hall .

WILLIAM HALL . I am a cabinet maker , I lodge at Mr. Rippens's the Plough at Hoxton the prisoner lodges in the same room with me. On the 5th of May I found my box open, the staple was out, I lost a waistcoat, a pair of nankeen trowers, a pair of shoes and a half handkerchief. I was absent when it happened.

WILLIAM RIPPEN, JUN. I live with my father William Rippen . My father gave the alarm that he had broken open the box; I ran after him and overtook him, and with assistance I brought him back; my father sent for a constable. I saw the property found on him.

JAMES COVEY . I am an officer, I searched the prisoner, I found the waistcoat stuffed down the arm of his jacket, the shoes he had stuffed in his boots, and the handkerchief was in his waistcoat. The trowsers I found the next morning at the watchhouse.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

GUILTY aged 20.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110529-98

477. MARY LITTLE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 20th of October , three shawls, value 6 s. a gown, value 6 s. two shifts, value 4 s. and a bonnet, value 7 s. the property of Mary Holyhead .

MARY HOLYHEAD. I live in Old Street Square . I go out a washing , the prisoner lodged with me. I lost these things about six months ago; I left the prisoner in the room; she went away and took the key of the room with her. I have never found any of the property.

WILLIAM WELCH . I am a shoe-maker. On the 15th of May I met the prisoner in Holborn, I challenged her with the robbery; she said she had robbed the old woman and was very sorry for it; I took her home to where my mother lives.

MICHAEL WINDER . I took the prisoner into custody on the 15th of May, I asked her what she had done with the old woman's things; she said she had pawned some and throwed the duplicates away; some she had sold, and the rest she had worn out.

Prisoner's Defence. My witness stopped here three days, but being poor they were obliged to go away into the country.

GUILTY , aged 36

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction and fined 1 s .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110529-99

478. JOHN COCKLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 23rd of April , a Yorkshire paving stone, value 2 s. 9 d. the property of John Renshaw .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded GUILTY .

Confined Fourteen Days in Newgate , and fined 1 s .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110529-100

479. RICHARD ROSE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of April , a 1 l. bank note , the property of Thomas Chittenden .

THOMAS CHITTENDEN . I am a merchant , I live at No. 3, New Millman-street, St. Pancres . The prisoner was my footman . On Good Friday he robbed me of a one pound note. Having missed money repeatedly from the drawer of the table in my dining room I took the number and dates of some notes, and put them in my drawer, and locked it. On the morning of the 4th of April, about nine o'clock, I told them it was all right. In the evening I told them again one of them was missing, No. 0012, dated the 4th of March; I applied to the office, and two officers came with me to search all the servants, they found the one pound note in the possession of the prisoner in a box in his table drawer.

WILLIAM REED. I am an officer. I went along with Mr. Chittendon, in company with Wood the officer, and in the prisoner's drawer we found this note. Mr. Chippenden said it was his. I asked him how he came by this note, he said he pawned a seal in Bishopsgate Street, and got the note, there at the office the prisoner was put off for a rehearing for him to bring the pawnbroker. The pawnbroker knew nothing of it, he did not appear.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, called two witnesses who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Fined 1 s. and discharged .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110529-101

480. JOHN MANNING and JOHN BOLTON were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 13th of May eight bushels of coals, value 14 s. the property of Nathaniel Hedley , Sen. Nathaniel Hedley , Jun. and Thomas Mellish Thatcher .

THOMAS MELLISH THATCHER . My partners names are Nathaniel Hedly , Sen. and Nathaniel Hedley, Jun. The wharf is in Milford Lane, in the Strand . The prisoners were in my employ, Bolton is called a pull-back . On the 13th of May, the carman , Manning came to the counting-house and asked what number of sacks he was to load the waggon; I told him twenty one, and the men knew were to go.

Q. Was Bolton one of them men - A. He was. He then went down with the other man towards the craft with the waggon to take the coals out, as soon as the waggon was loaded he drew up to the counting-house

to ask for the tickets; I observed the waggon and told him I believed he had more than twenty-one sacks in his waggon; he told me no he had not; I told him the situation of the sacks were such that induced me to believe that he had more; he told me no he had not, and stated that Bolton had forgot to pitch a seventh sack down on the near side, which accounted for the appearance of the waggon, having four sacks the last row of all. I told him I was not satisfied, and wished him to recollect whether he had more than twenty-one; he told me he certainly had not; I got upon the wheel of the waggon for the purpose of counting the sacks if I could, I was sure I counted twenty three, but they were so irregularly placed I was not certain whether they were twenty-four or no; I said to Manning I was not satisfied with the appearance of the waggon that he should draw up under the hay-loft window, and I would try to count them there; giving him an opportunity of being aware of my observations; and to take them out. The waggon stopped there, I endeavoured to count them, I could not do it precisely; twenty-three I was sure of, but I was doubtful of the fourth. He called to me as I was coming down stairs; are you satisfied, with a sneer; I told him I was satisfied, and he might go on; he went on; he should have gone straight on over Blackfriers bridge, into the Kent-road; I followed him down Fleet-street, I met Creswell the constable; I and Creswell followed the waggon, and instead of the waggon proceeding on the road it turned down by Rowland Hall's chapel, I followed, and we passed Union Hall. There we got another officer, his name is Clark. The waggon went into Snow's fields, it there stopped; upon its stopping Creswell desired me to fall back, so that I did not observe what was done by Manning; Creswell called me soon after, and told me they had detected the man delivering, and then I went into the house of Elizabeth Grays , Manning was still at the waggon. I saw an empty sack, which was my property, and when I came up to the waggon it was untied.

GEORGE RICHARDS . I told Manning to take twenty-one sacks, and no more.

JOHN CLARK . I am an officer. As the prosecutor was going by Union Hall Creswell came to me, and I followed the waggon into Snows-fields, and at the bottom of Snows-fields it stopped, Manning only was with the waggon, I saw Manning go to the tail of the waggon, and untie it, and take a sack of coals on his back, and take them some distance, and turn down into a small court; I saw him slide them off his back to get it under a railing, he got them into a house, I followed him, and saw him shoot them into a cupboard in Elizabeth Gray's house; I asked him what he was at; he said, selling a sack of coals; I told him that I was an officer, and must take him in custody. I then asked Elizabeth Gray what she meaned to give for them; she said three shillings and sixpence; he said he was all right in the waggon. He told me afterwards that he had got two sacks more, that he was to leave them at another place, but the woman was not at home. I then took him to Union Hall. Mrs. Gray offered to pay the prisoner for the sack in my presence.

ELIZABETH GRAY . I live in Farmer's-rents, Snows-fields. I had been out buying some meat for my dinner, the waggon was stopped. The prisoner Manning was asking a woman for the Grange-house, the woman said she did not know the Grange-house; I told him to go on and turn the corner, it would take him to the Grange-road. He asked this woman if she would have a sack of coals; the woman said she had no money, or else she would; I asked him what a sack would be, he said three shillings and sixpence; I said I lived a good step, he must bring them me, I would give him three shillings and sixpence; I went on first, and he came after me; he took them out of his waggon on his back, and followed me in my house, and shot them in my closet, and then the officers, and Mr. Thatcher came in.

Manning said nothing in his defence; called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Bolton was not put on his defence.

MANNING - GUILTY , aged 26.

Judgment respited.

BOLTON - NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110529-102

481. JOHN FREEMAN was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Ann Skinner , about the hour of eight on the night of the 4th of April , and stealing therein, a shift, value 2 s. a pair of stockings, value 1 s. a gown value 5 s. and a petticoat, value 2 s. her property .

The prosecutrix and witnesses were called, and not appearing in court, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110529-103

482. WILLIAM WELLINGS and CHARLES GUERNSEY were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 31st of May , sixteen pounds weight of soap, value 10 s. and five red herrings, value 1 d. the property of Thomas Clack .

THOMAS CLACK . I live at 17, Pitfield-street, Old-street ; I am a tallow-chandler and oilman ; Charles Guernsey was in my service.

Q. Do you know the other prisoner Wellings - A. No. On the 31st of May I was called up a little after five in the morning, I found Mr. Smith at my bedroom door calling me.

THOMAS SMITH . Q. Were you very early in the morning passing Mr. Clack's house - A. At half after five, and I saw the prisoner Wellings coming out of Mr. Clack's house; Guernsey opened the door; Wellings had a bundle of soap under his left arm; I let him go on; I went further on and met him again in Old-street-road with the same bundle; I stopped him at No. 22, James-street, Old-street-road. I never lost sight of him; he had the same bundle with him that he had when he came out of Mr. Clack's house; I informed him that he had stolen property that did not belong to him; he begged for me to let him go, he said he was a soldier, if I took him he would receive five hundred lashes. I took him into custody, Mr. Ashworth assisted me; he said that he had it of his brother; I told him if I let him go I should compound felony. I took him back to Mr. Clack's house, Mr. Clack was not up; I knocked at the door, the prisoner Guernsey let me in; I told Guernsey to call his

master, he went and called his master; I stopped in the shop some short time, his master did not come; I went up stairs and called Mr. Clack; I told him he had been robbed; he said he hoped it was not his servant; Mr. Clack followed me, I looked for the soap, and saw the soap removed where I had left it, it was put into the scale; I looked into the scale, and saw it was fourteen pound weight; Mr. Clack sent for a constable; there were some herrings found with the soap. I cannot say the quantity.

Q. to Mr. Clack. Upon being called by the last witness you there saw the prisoners at the bar - A. Yes, and the prisoner Wellings was pointed out to me as the person that carried the soap away; the witness Ashworth told me to consider that he was a soldier, that he would receive five hundred lashes; I charged Guernsey of being guilty of it; he said he had sold it to the soldier, and he meant to pay me for it.

Q. What time of the morning was this - A. Between five and six o'clock.

Q. Had Guernsey your servant disposed of any soap and made any entery the night before - A. No, I have got my book here.

Q. Was this the usual time for Guernsey to be up - A. He had no occasion to be up so early that morning, as I know of.

Q. You cannot speak to the soap being your property - A. No, because the soap maker sells to other people.

Q. Had you red herrings - A. I had. I would not swear positively to the soap, but Guernsey told me he had sold it to Wellings.

BASIL ASHWORTH . Q. You assisted the other witness in apprehending the prisoner - A. I did; I took him back to Mr. Clack's house.

Q. Before you got there did Wellings say anything how he got possession of the soap - A. He said Mr. Clack's shopman was his brother and seemed agitated in returning to Mr. Clack's house. I know no more than the last witness.

The prisoners said nothing in their defence; Wellings called one witness, who gave him a good character.

WELLINGS - GUILTY , aged 25.

GUERNSEY - GUILTY , aged 22.

Judgment respited.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110529-104

483. THOMAS LAMB was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of May , sixty pounds weight of lead, value 15 s. the property of Francis Dolman , esq. affixed to his building .

FRANCIS DOLMAN . I live in Gower-street ; I can only prove the property.

GEORGE GATE . I am a watchman in Upper Gower-street; as I was going my round at half past ten o'clock at night I saw somebody peeping round the corner of the coach-house at the corner of Gower Mews, I went near, and found it was a woman; I saw a man stoop in the corner, and put something on his shoulder, and then the man and the woman came past me; as he came by me he said, d - n your eyes, why do not you come along; I followed him and stopped him in Francis-street, I asked him what he had got there; he said, if I wanted to know he would soon shew me; the load that he had on his shoulder he clapped on a post, and away he ran; I followed him and took him to the watchhouse.

Q. What had he on his shoulder - A. Twenty-two pounds weight of lead, it came from No. 33, Lower Gower-street, from off the laundry. I saw the lead compared.

Prosecutor. The lead fitted the place where it had been taken off the laundry belong to me.

Prisoner's Defence. I leave, it to the mercy of the court.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Judgment respited.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110529-105

484. EDWARD KING was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of May , a spencer, value 22 s. the property of Silas Cave .

SILAS CAVE . I am a silk mercer , 19, St. Martin's court, Liecester-square.

SILAS WILLIAMSON . I am shop-boy to Mr. Cave. I was going up Tottenham-court-road . On the 25th of May the prisoner met me, he asked me if I was not going to 54, Russel-street; I was going home with a spencer; I told him yes; he took hold of the parcel, and gave me a penny, and said it ought to have been there long ago; I went with a parcel to another place, and delivered it; on my returning I went to 54, Russell-street, to hear whether he had left it; they said no, and just as I came out of the street I met the man that took it away from me; I took hold of him and asked him what he had done with the parcel; he halloaed Benjamin as loud as he could halloa, there was nobody answered; Mr. Gunn asked him why he did not give the boy his parcel; first he said he had not got it, he then said boy, come along with him, I will give you the parcel. He was going up by St. Giles's church, Mr. Gunn said, how far are you going to take us; he said a good way, and at Drury-lane he denied having the parcel. I am quite certain he is the man; I never found the parcel. It was between five and six o'clock that I was robbed.

MR. GUNN. On the 25th of May, about five minutes before six in the evening, that boy and the prisoner were standing on the curb; I told the prisoner to give the boy his parcel; he said he had not got it, if he would go with him he would give him his parcel, and on our coming opposite of Drury-lane he denied all knowledge of the parcel, or that he ever had said he would give him the parcel. I took him to the office in Bow-street, he was searched and nothing found on him.

Prisoner's Defence. The boy came running up to me and said, I have lost my bundle. It is impossible for any body to know where that boy was going.

GUILTY , aged 33.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110529-106

485. RICHARD HATHAWAY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of May , twenty-eight pounds weight of leaden shots, value 5 s. and a bag, value 1 d. the property of Thomas Barnes and William Ilett .

THOMAS BARNES . I live with my father; he is an oilman ; his name is Thomas Barnes , his parner's name

is William Ilett ; they live at Islington . On the 6th of May I was in the accompting-house; a man and the prisoner came into the shop, I went to them, they ran off, I followed them suspecting that they had taken something. I observed the prisoner drop a bag of shot; I followed him and took him; I gave him in charges of the constable. This is the bag of shot, there is our mark on it.

Q. Did you ever find out the man - A. No.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

GUILTY . aged 14.

Judgment respited.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110529-107

486. MARY GUDGEON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of April , eighteen yards of ribbon, value 5 s. the property of James Wilson .

JAMES WILSON . I live at 53, St. John Street , I am a haberdasher . On the 15th of April, between three and four in the afternoon the prisoner and her sister were buying goods in my shop; I knew the sister but not her. The young lady that was serving them came to me, I then charged her with stealing the ribbon and she gave it me. This is the ribbon, it is mine. I believe she is not a person that goes about shop-lifting from what I have heard from her friends.

MATILDA FISHER. I serve in Mr. Wilson's shop, the prisoner and her sister came into the shop and looking at some caps, and while they were doing that I saw the prisoner take the ribbon. I informed Mr. Wilson.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence, nor called any witnesses to her character.

GUILTY , aged 31.

Confined fourteen days in Newgate , and fined 1 s .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110529-108

487. FREDERICK GANBY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 19th of April , forty four pound weight of lead, value seven shillings , the property of Charles wickham .

CHARLES WICKHAM . I do not think the prisoner took the lead with intent to steal it.

Q. You are the prosecutor of that man - A. Yes; it was the magistrate's fault, I did not think they would commit the man for felony.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110529-109

488. SARAH DAVIS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 2d of May , five handkerchiefs, value 6 s. five towels, value 2 s. 6 d. a pillow case, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of William Henshaw .

The prosecutor was called, and not appearing in Court, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110529-110

489. MARY MORING was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 29th of April , a child's frock, value 1 s. a bolster, value 10 s. the property of Edward Larkin .

ELIZABETH LARKIN . My husband's name is Edward Larkin . The prisoner lodged with me; I went out, and when I returned I found the child's frock gone. I went to the Woolpack public-house, I found the prisoner, she was in liquor.

JUDITH RILEY . I bought the bolster of the prisoner.

FRANCIS BEEMAN. I am a constable, I produce a bolster and the child's frock; the prisoner said she had pawned the frock at Mr. Wildman's. I went there, he gave it up.

Prosecutrix. It is my bolster and frock.

Prisoner's Defence. I meaned to return them as soon as my husband had got his money.

GUILTY , aged 35.

Fined 1 s. and discharged .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110529-111

490. JAMES PARKER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 9th of April , three pair of stockings, value 5 s. two cravat, value 7 s. the property of Thomas Merritt .

THOMAS MERRITT . I am a labouring man , I took the prisoner about forty yards from my house, he had on him three pair of stockings that were taken out of my drying ground, Hackney Place .

SARAH MERRITT . I am the wife of Francis Merritt .

Q. You put your things out in your drying ground - A. Yes, I took these three pair of stockings out of the prisoner's hat, they are my property.

Prisoner's Defence. I was walking down these premises, I saw a woman standing at the washer woman's door; there was something dropped, I picked it up, and put it in my hat. In consequence of their seeing me close to the door they came after me.

Q. to Prosecutrix. Were there any body with him - A. I saw another man with him in the drying ground, the other man said, you put this in your hat.

GUILTY , aged 31.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction and fined 1 s .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110529-112

491. MATTHEW MURPHY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 21st of April , a gown, value 3 s. and a silk handkerchief, value 5 s. the property of John Mc'Master .

ANN MC'MASTER. My husband's name is John Mc'Master, I keep a cook's shop . On the 21st of April I missed my gown from a cupboard where the prisoner had been eating his meat; I went after him, took my gown out of his waistcoat; I asked him for my handkerchief, he said he had not got it; I brought him home, and found the handkerchief in his hat. I know them to be my property.

Prisoner's Defence. This woman is swearing my life away as fast as she can; I was hungry, I went into the house, I paid the woman for what I called for, I know no more about it than the dead.

GUILTY , aged 37.

Judgment respited.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110529-113

492. JOHN SANDERS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of April , a flock bed, value 25 s. the property of Archibald Scott .

ARCHIBALD SCOTT . I keep a broker's shop in Cambridge-street, Golden-square .

ELIZABETH COOK . On the 18th of April a quarter before six in the afternoon, I saw the prisoner

take up the bed, and he flung it on his back, and knocked me down with it. When I recovered myself I told Mr. Scott, he pursued him and brought him back with the bed on his back.

Q. to Mr. Scott. You followed him - A. Yes, in New street, I saw him, I collared him and brought him back, and then took him to Marlborough-street office. This is the bed, it is mine.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Whipped in Jail and discharged .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110529-114

493. SMITH BURLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of May , four pounds weight of hogs bristles, value 2 s. and two pounds weight of hair, value 2 s. the property of William Newton .

WILLIAM NEWTON . I am a brush manufacturer , 58, Princes-street, Leicester-square . On the 18th of May one of my servants was looking for an article, he discovered some hair in an improper place, I told him to let it remain.

WILLIAM PENTWORTH . I am shopman to Mr. Newton. On the 18th of May I was looking for a board to make a clothes brush, I put my hand into a dark hole, I found two bundles of hairs, I acquainted my master, he came with me to the place and saw them himself; some little time after that my master went to the same place and found a third bundle; he told me of it, we let the hairs lay there; some time afterwards Burley was going out Mr. Cook kept him in conversation, master went to see if the hairs were gone, he came and accused Burley of taking them.

Mr. Newton. After being informed by my servant that there were some hairs in the hole I went and saw two bundles; I went a second time and found a third bundle, Mr. Cook kept the prisoner in conversation when he was going out, and after I found they were all gone; I turned to the prisoner and ordered him into the back shop, I desired Mr. Cook to search him; Mr. Cook did, and said he had three bundles about him.

RICHARD COOK . I was made acquainted with the circumstance, and was aware that Burley was suspected, when he came in the shop I kept him in conversation, Mr. Newton returned and charged him with the theft: we took him into the back shop, and I took from his side pocket a bundle of hairs, and caused him to take himself one out of each side pocket. This is one bundle.

Prosecutor. They must be my hairs, being on my premises.

Prisoner's Defence. I had not an intention of taking them away.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110529-115

494. THOMAS MARTIN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of May , a copper, value 30 s. the property of William Alexander and Henry Hinton .

WILLIAM ALEXANDER . I am an ironmonger , 15, Drury-lane ; my partner's name is Henry Hinton. On the 1st of May this copper was standing outside of the door, I was in the shop, I saw the prisoner take something, I pursued and took him with the copper on him. This is the copper, it is my property.

Prisoner's Defence. The copper was given to me by some person unknown to take to Rathbone-place.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Judgment respited.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110529-116

495. ELIZABETH HANNELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of April , a two pound bank note , the property of Richard Maxon .

LUCY MAXON . I take in washing; my husband's name is Richard Maxon , I live at No. 6, Spring-street, Portman-square . On the 30th of April I gave the prisoner a two pound note to get changed; she asked me to lend her a sixpence, not having any change gave her the note to get change. I saw no more of her until she was taken to Marlborough-street.

RICHARD FLOWERDEAU . I took the prisoner in custody; she confessed that she took it, and spent it in coach hire, and buying a pair or two of stockings.

Prisoner's Defence. The morning I went to wash for Mrs. Maxon I asked her to lend me sixpence; she gave me a two pound note, to go to the bakers; I went and never returned any more.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110529-117

496. SARAH EVERETT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of April , two pewter pint pots, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of Richard Lunn .

RICHARD LUNN . I went to the prisoner's lodgings; I saw a pot on the fire.

RICHARD FLOWERDEAU . I searched the prisoner's premises, I found underneath the fire place part of a pint which resembled Mr. Lunn's, and this pint pot was in the bed.

Prisoner's Defence. If you will forgive me I will go to the parish.

GUILTY , aged 68.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110529-118

497. GEORGE CRANE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of April , a saddle, value 1 l. and a bridle, value 5 s. the property of Edward Ledger .

JOHN CROSS . I belong to Bow-street office. On the 7th of April I was on duty in Queen's-row, Islington, about eight in the evening, the prisoner passed me with a saddle and bridle, I asked him where he was going with that saddle; he replied to Mr. Thomas's, Saffron Hill; he had brought it from the Nag's Head, Enfield, he was ostler there. I went to Mr. Thomas, he keeps a chandler's shop, he knew nothing of the saddle or

bridle. I detained the prisoner. This is the saddle and bridle.

JOHN LEDGER . I am a dyer , I live at Horsleydown. On Sunday the 7th of April I went on horseback to Mr. Towning of Highbury place in the morning, and there staid till the evening, and when the servant went to saddle the horse the saddle and bridle were gone. I believe the saddle and bridle to be mine, I cannot swear that it is.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked up the saddle and bridle in a lane, by the side of some trees.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110529-119

498. JOHN ANGLIN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of May , a copper, value 40 s. the property of John Francis , being affixed to his buildings

JOHN CLARK . I am an headborough. On the 3d of May, about half past four in the morning, I saw the prisoner coming up Lower Gower-street, with a woman, the prisoner had a knot, and the woman a basket; I suspected the prisoner and watched him, I saw him go into Upper Thornaugh street, they parted, and the woman came and stood at Mr. Francis's door. The woman saw me; I went up China-street, and came back, and as soon as she saw me she went back; I went up Gower-street, and saw the woman lift the copper upon the prisoner's head; I stopped him, and took him to St. Giles's watchhouse, and then I went and acquainted Mr. Francis. I did not see him go in, or come out of the house, only take it up at the door.

JOHN FRANCIS . I am a taylor , I live at No. 10, Queen-street, Golden-square . I matched the copper to the place where it was taken from, it fitted exactly. It is my property.

Prisoner's Defence. I am totally blind. About a quarter after five in the morning mentioned, a man at the corner of Clipstone-street gave me this copper to carry into Holborn.

GUILTY , aged 38.

Confined Two Years in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110529-120

499. MARY SHIPLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of April , a watch, value 21 s. the property of Joseph Norgan , from his person .

JOSEPH NORGAN . I am a cork-cutter , I live at No. 3, St. Thomas's-street in the Borough. On the 17th of April, between the hours of nine and ten at night, I met the prisoner in Whitechapel, I went home with her to No. 6, Black Lion-yard, Whitechapel , she asked me what o'clock it was; I pulled the watch out of my pocket; she took the watch out of my hand by force, blowed the light out, and ran away out of the room, and locked me in; after that I was let out by another woman.

Q. Did you ever find your watch - A. No, I am sure that is the woman.

WILLIAM NEWBOLD . I am an officer. On the 17th of April Norgan told me he had been robbed; I gave the alarm to the patrol, he found her in Essex-street, coming from the receiving-house, I knew her before; she was taken up, brought to the watchhouse, and searched, but no property found upon her.

Prisoner's Defence. On the 17th of April I was coming along Whitechapel, I was met by a young woman and the prosecutor; the young woman asked me to let her have the key of my room for an hour, which I agreed to; I returned in an hour, I saw the prosecutor sitting on the bed, he told me he had lost his watch; I said I was very sorry that they came to my room; he said he was sure that I knew nothing of it, and after he had got his clothes on he wished me good night. In about half an hour afterwards I was taken into custody. I am innocent.

Prosecutor. I am positive the prisoner is the person that took the watch out of my hand.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110529-121

500. ELEANOR WELCH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of May , a silver spoon, value 1 s. fourteen knives, value 7 s. three forks, value 1 s. five glass tumblers, value 5 s. and eight wine glasses, value 4 s. the property of John Long .

JOHN WEEKS . I am a waiter to Mr. Long, he is a hotel-keeper in Bond-street . The prisoner served the house with milk . On the 22d of May I saw her with a glass salt ciller in her hand, I asked her what she was going to do with it; she said she was only going to take a pinch of salt. This was about eight o'clock in the morning, Mr. Long came down stairs, I told him what I had seen; he got a search warrant and went to the prisoner's lodgings.

SAMUEL PLANK . I am a constable. I went with a search warrant to search the prisoner's lodgings in company with Mr. Long, and we found all the articles in the indictment.

Weeks. I can swear to the spoon, the knives and forks and the glass corresponds with what we have got at home.

Prisoner's Defence. The spoon I found on the stairs in the prosecutor's house, and instead of enquiring to whom it belonged I carried it home, the other things I bought of a young man a twelvemonth ago.

GUILTY , aged 36.

Confined Fourteen Days in Newgate , and fined 1 s .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110529-122

501. MARGARET WALTERS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of March , a shilling and a sixpence , the monies of Emanuel Frances .

SECOND COUNT, laying it to be the property of Ann Frances .

HANNAH FRANCES . I am nine years old.

Q. What is your father - A. A seafaring man ; On Easter Monday a gentleman in the house gave me and my sister and brother sixpence a piece; it was for a fairing, it was a shilling and a six-pence;

I had a little box, my mother gave it me to put in my box. I was going to get some things, the prisoner took the box out of my hand, and took the money out and gave me the box again; it was in Brown Bear Alley , I am sure the prisoner is the woman, she lived next door.

ANN FRANCES. Mr. King a gentleman in the house gave me a shilling and my sister six-pence for a fairing, I gave my sister Hannah the money to put in the box, and the prisoner seeing the silver in the box, took the box out of her hand, she called out mother the woman has got the money, and before thy came to the door the prisoner put the money in her pocket, my mother came out and asked her what business she had with the box or the money either; she said she gave her the box back again and denied having the money.

ANN FRANCES . A lodger in our house he gave my children six pence a piece, I took my little boy's six-pence away and gave him a half-penny, my little girl had six-pence, she then had one shilling and sixpence in her box; my children called out, they said this woman had taken the money from my child. I said to her give them back the one shilling and six-pence, she denied having the money and went in door's and shut the door in my face.

JOHN WILKINSON . I took the prisoner into custody, the prisoner denied having the money, and some time after she offered the money back again.

Prisoner's Defence. I am as innocent as a child unborn, she told me if I would give her the one shilling and six-pence she would not think any more of it, I told her I could not think of paying one shilling and six-pence for nothing.

GUILTY , aged 35.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110529-123

502. ELIZABETH SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 16th of April , a looking glass, value 10 s. the property of Richard Davies .

RICHARD DAVIES . I am a broker , 32, Windmill Street, Tottenham court Road . On the 16th of April last, the prisoner walked into the shop and took the glass out and walked off with it about an hundred yards before I pursued her; this is the glass, it is mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been a long while out of work, it is the first offence I ever committed.

GUILTY , aged 38.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110529-124

503. JERRY SHEE was indicted for stealing, on the 18th of May , two pounds weight of pork, value 1 s. 10 d. the property of John Birt .

JOHN BIRT . I am a pork butcher , 115, Drury-Lane . On the 18th of May, between twelve and one the prisoner came to my shop, my wife was behind the counter serving, he asked her for some small article that laid behind her, he took a piece of roast pork and a piece of pickled pork.

JOHN BRANDON . I was going up the Lane, I followed the prisoner, and saw him take first a piece of roast pork, the next he took out of a dish was a piece of pickled pork; I saw him put it under is coat, I went into to the house and catched hold of his collar, I asked him what he had got there, I took him out of the door, he knocked me and kicked me about, there were eight or nine of us to take him. He had come out of prison a week before.

Prisoner's Defence. I was drunk at the time, I did not know what I was about.

Prosecutor. I am certain he was not intoxicated.

Prisoner. I did not want to steal it, I wanted to buy it, but they kicked me out of door's.

GUILTY , aged 31.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110529-125

504. ANN SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of April , a shift, value 9 d. two children's frocks, value 1 s. and an apron, value 3 d. the property of James Hemmings .

MARY ANN HEMMINGS . my husband's name is James Hemmings , I live in Norton Falgate , I am a weaveress, I hired the prisoner in Spitalfields Market to serve me in the Day. I had to go to the warehouse to get some shoot, in the mean time I was gone, the prisoner stripped herself and put on my shift; I believe she had none of her own, she also took an apron and two baby's frocks.

Q. Was she very much distressed - A. Yes. I went to Mr. Bird's and accused her of it, she owned to taking the things.

MARY BIRD . I am a weaveress, I hired the prisoner, she was in a miserable dirty situation, I pulled off her dirty things and gave her clean things, in the afternoon Mrs. Hemmings came up, I shewed her the shift I took off the prisoner, Mrs. Hemmings owned it.

Prosecutrix. This is the shift, it is mine.

RICHARD LAW . On the 29th of April, I took in pawn these two frocks of the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I was very much distressed.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Confined Fourteen Days in Newgate , and fined 1 s .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110529-126

505. PETER RAFFERTY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d. of April , a bed, value 2 l. three shirts, value 15 s. a jacket, value 5 s. a pair of stockings, value 5 s. two razors, value 1 s. a shaving box. value 6 d. and two pair of slippers, value 2 s. the property of John Atkins .

HENRY MYERS . I am a servant to David Solomon , he lives in Ratcliff-Highway, I was a coming from Gravesend in a packet boat with John Atkins , and when we come off the things were gone. About a week afterwards the prisoner came along with the bed on his shoulders; and the sailor was fetched, he said they were his property; John Atkins is now at sea.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110529-127

506. ELIZABETH LUTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of May , four pounds weight of veal, value 3 s. the property

of James Wight .

JAMES WIGHT . I am a baker in Rosemary Lane , on last Mondy sen'night, the prisoner came in about one o'clock, she asked a woman if her dish was there, I came round the counter, her gown was over her shoulder and the veil was under it, she had left the dish behind her, I took the veal from her and put it in the dish, it belonged to, and the person came and claimed it.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined Fourteen Days in Newgate , and fined 1 s .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110529-128

507. MARGARET HOUGHTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of May , a gown, value 5 s. the property of Thomas Stay .

SARAH STAY my husband's name is Thomas Stay, he is a taylor ; I lost my gown on Sunday week, from behind the door, I hung it up there in my room. I told my landlady I had lost my gown, she said a woman asked to come in the house to go to the privy; she let her in and out; on Tuesday I saw the woman in the public-house with the gown on her back; this is the gown, it is mine.

MRS. HOLLOWAY This is the woman that asked leave to go backwards, she went in and went out again.

Prisoner's Defence. I was very much in liquor when it happened.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Confined Fourteen Days in Newgate , and fined 1 s .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110529-129

508. JONH MILLER and THOMAS TAYLOR were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of May , three bats, value 5 s. two balls, value 9 d. a dollar, half a crown and a shilling , the property of Thomas Tinckler .

THOMAS TINCKLER I am a cornchandler and turner at Islington . I lost the bats and balls from out of my shop; I was in my back room at the time it happened.

GEORGE WOODISON . I am eleven Years old, my father is a rag merchant; I saw the two prisoners go into Mr. Tinckler's shop, there were three more boys with them, we have not taken the boys that took the bats; I did not see the prisoner take any thing but the balls.

THOMAS FRANKLIN . I searched the prisoners, I found a ball upon each of them.

Prosecutor. I could not swear that I had not sold them balls.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110529-130

509. JOHN MILLER , NATHANIEL BURLETT and JEREMIAH SLOP were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of April , a mahogany music stool, value 20 s. the property of John Darbyshire .

JOHN DARBYSHIRE . I am cabinet maker , I live in White-cross Street , the three prisoners were in my employ.

JOHN DARBYSHIRE , JUN On Tuesday morning about half past nine, I was in a front room in the City Road, hanging the room; I looked out of window, I saw Miller and Slop carrying these stools; I left my business and followed them towards St. John's Square; I then missed them, I waited and saw Burlett come out of the Albemarle's Head with this single stool. About half past eight we had sent Burlett to Castle Street, Long Acre, with three music stools, and when Burlett came out with this one, Slop come out with these three. When they got to Benjamin Street, Slop took the three stools to Solomon's, in Broker Row; Miller and Burlett had this single stool. I had information that they were gone to Charles Street, Long Acre; and in Long Acre I saw Slop and Miller with this single stool; I saw them offering it to one of the shops; there I lost Slop, Miller had the single stool; he went and offerered it to Mr. Brown, and shortly after Mr. Brown called Miller, and took him to Bow Street. I got an officer and took the two other prisoners at the Rising Sun, in the tap room.

EDWARD BROWN . In consequence of information I received from Mr. Darbyshire, I saw Miller pass our door; I called him in; the price of the stool is twenty shillings. I offered him eightteen shillings, and I then asked him how he came by the stool; he said he made it; I then took him to Bow-Street.

Prosecutor. This is my stool,

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, Miller called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

MILLER. GUILTY , aged 28.

BURLETT. GUILTY , aged 54.

SLOP, GUILTY , aged 39.

Confined Fourteen Days in Newgate , and whipped in Jail .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110529-131

510. WILLIAM CARR was indicted for feloniously, stealing on the 26th of May , a gown, value 7 s. the property of Phoebe Evans .

The prosecutor and witness not appearing in Court, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110529-132

511. SARAH ABBEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of April , a gown, value 10 s. three spoons, value 5 s. two rings, value 10 s. four yards of lace, value 15 s. two frocks, value 2 s. six shifts, 3 s. two handkerchiefs, value 2 s. and two thimbles, value 1 s. the property of Mary Westerman .

MARY WESTERMAN . On Wednesday, I was going through Oxford Road , the prisoner met me, we got into conversation; I had lost my husband in Portugal, and the prisoner had also lost her husband in Portugal; I had my child and a bundle with me. I had laid my bundle down, the prisoner saw me stooping down to take the bundle up, she pretended she should carry it for me, she said she had somewhere to call, she would return back immediately to me, instead of doing that she walked off with my bundle. I did not see her afterwards untill she was taken up, and then I saw the

shawl and the thimble, I know them to be mine; my bundle contained all the articles enumerated in the indictment. I am quite sure the prisoner is the woman, she told me her name was Sarah Alvey .

MRS. BRACRET. I live at 31, James-street, Oxford-street, my husband is a soldier in the guards; I have known the prisoner twelve or thirteen years. On the 26th of April she gave me a shawl, I shewed it to Mrs. Westerman, and she claimed it. The prisoner had a bundle with her; it was in the evening.

JAMES GILLMORE . I searched the prisoner and found this thimble upon her.

Prosecutrix. It is my thimble, and this is my shawl, that is all I have recovered.

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw the prosecutrix until she challenged me in the street; she then offered if I would pay a sum of money she would not take me in custody knowing my own innocence I would not accept the proposal.

GUILTY , aged 36.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18110529-133

512. GEORGE BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of May , a piece of fir timber, value 3 s. 6 d. the property of James Young and Daniel Sharp .

DANIEL SHARP . I am a carpenter ; my partner's name is James Young . I can only prove the property.

THOMAS DUMBRELL . I am a carpenter; I work for Messrs. Young and Sharp. On the 13th of May I was going round the premises in Coventry-street , there is a quantity of timber there for carcasing a house. I saw the prisoner take one of the top pieces off; he raised it with his arms in order to put it on his shoulder, his foot slipped, and he nearly fell; he turned his head round and saw me; he threw the piece of timber down, he ran off, and I pursued him; I called to him, he made no answer. We took him the next morning, I called him up at his own house, and he went with us to Lambeth-street office.

Prisoner's Defence. I was not out of bed that morning at that time; Mr. Young and Sharp hired the use of my yard to put their tools in; when they came the next morning I conjectured they came for their tools; when they accused me I insisted upon satisfaction; I would go to the office

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18110529-134

513. MARIA CHURCH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of April , two sheets, value 10 s. and a pillow case, value 6 d. the property of James Mills , in a lodging-room .

AMELIA MILLS . I am the wife of James Mills ; I live in Swan-alley, St. John-street . The prisoner took a ready-furnished lodging of me in March, and rented the one pair of stairs room a fortnight and three days; she took it weekly, at five shillings and sixpence a week, she only paid one week; she told me she was a doctoress , and a captain's widow, with fifty pound a year coming in. She went away without any warning, I had no thought to suppose that she was going; on the contrary I lent her a shawl, and umbrella, thinking that she would return. I thought she was an honest woman; she locked the room door and took the key away. She left me on the Tuesday, on the Thursday I opened the door, a pair of sheets and a pillow-case were gone. On the Friday she was brought to me by a young woman; she said she had pawned the property, and it was no use to come to me without she could make it good.

THOMAS TISSAKER . I am a constable. I took charge of the prisoner on the 26th of April; the prisoner gave me the duplicates of the things.

WILLIAM SMITH . I am a pawnbroker. On the 9th of April the prisoner pawned with me a sheet and a duplicate.

ROBERT STANTON . I produce a sheet that I got at the pawnbrokers in consequence of a duplicate found upon the prisoner.

Prosecutrix. They are my sheets, and the pillowcase is mine.

SARAH ANDERSON . I met the prisoner in Aldersgate-street; I stopped her; she said she had the pleasure of knowing me; I said I had the pleasure of thinking she should go with me; she told me she had settled Mrs. Mills's account half an hour ago; I said, it was a falsity, she had not been there. I insisted that she should go with me; she said what use was it of her going to Mrs. Mills without she had something to give her. I led her by the arm to Mrs. Mills.

Prisoner's Defence. Being short of money I was obliged to obtain some for medicines for my patients; I made use of a temporary relief. When I was accused of the sheets I immediately owned to the pledging them, and gave the constable the duplicates.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18110529-135

514. MARY CURRAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of May , a pewter quart pot, value 1 s. 6 d. a pewter pint pot, value 1 s. a saucer, value 1 d. and a knife, value 2 d. the property of James Dunn .

MARY DUNN . I am the wife of James Dunn , we keep the King's Arms, Coal-yard, Drury-lane . On the 29th of May the prisoner and a man came into the house and asked for a pint of beer, the man paid for the beer; she staid an hour or better; she left the man's company and went into the parlour; she sent for a pot of beer and paid for it; afterwards she sent for a pint and paid for it; there was a woman in the house knew her, she gave her a bit of meat, and I cut her a slice of bread; she had a saucer and a knife, and when I missed her I missed the saucer and the knife. I pursued her and overtook her, and brought her back; this quart and pint pots were in her apron, and the knife and saucer; they are mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I do not say but I had the pots, and at the watchhouse I did not know where I had been.

GUILTY , aged 42.

Fined 1 s. and discharged .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18110529-136

515. GEORGE BOWMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of April , seventy glass toys, value 9 s. the property of Moses Salter .

MOSES SALTER . On the 5th of April I applied for a search warrant, and shewed the officer the prisoner's lodgings; I saw the things that the officer found there at the office. I cannot swear they are my property.

NOT GUILTY ,

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18110529-137

516. MARY SIMPSON was indicted for that she on the 29th of April , one piece of false and counterfeit money, made and counterfeited to the likeness and similitude of a good sixpence, unlawfully did utter to Mary Hudson , spinster , she at the time of uttering it, well knowing it to be false and counterfeited .

SECOND COUNT, for uttering a false and counterfeit shilling to the same person.

MARY HUDSON . I live with Mr. Swinbourne, a cheesemonger, Cripplegate ; I am his niece. On the 29th of April the prisoner came for two eggs, she gave me a shilling, I gave her ten-pence change in copper; she then asked me for two ounces of the best butter, which came to three-pence; she gave me sixpence, I scrupled taking the sixpence, as I had given her before ten-pence; she said it was for a lodger, and therefore she must have separate change, and before the woman got out of the shop well I took up the shilling and looked at it, and perceived the shilling and the six-pence were both bad; I put them in the corner of the till by themselves. There was only a dollar in the till.

GEORGE SWINBOURNE . I am a cheesemonger. On the 29th of April, just as we were lighting candles the prisoner came in for two ounces of the best Dorset butter that came to two-pence farthing; she gave me a shilling, I looked at it, and put it in the till. I know the shilling that I took of her by a stamp in the middle; she went out, and I had occasion to go to the till; I saw the two shillings and the sixpence, that they were all bad; she came in again, she said she wanted a nice rasher of bacon; she tendered me a shilling, it was a bad one; my neice came in and said that is the woman that passed a bad shilling and sixpence. I sent for an officer. he searched her and found good money upon her. This is the first shilling that I took of her.

JOHN PUGH . On the 29th of April I searched the prisoner, I found on her half-a-crown, and two sixpences and seven-pence farthing good money. There is the two shillings and the sixpence I received of Mr. Swinbourne .

CALEB EDWARD POWELL . Q. You are an assistant to the Solicitor of the Mint, and you are acquainted with coin - A. I am.

Q. First look at that shilling - A. It is counterfeit; the two shillings and the sixpence are counterfeit also.

Prisoner's Defence. I get my living by selling fancy flowers, and it is probable by changing. I might have a bad sixpence ; it is evident that I had good money, and the reason that I kept halfpence frequently when I called at private houses I had to give them change.

Q. to Hudson. Should you know the shilling and the sixpence again - A. Yes, this is the shilling and sixpence I received of her.

GUILTY , aged 48.

Confined Six Months in Newgate , and at the Expiration of that time to find sureties for Six Months more .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder .

Reference Number: t18110529-138

517. MARTHA GOVER was indicted for a misdemeanor .

WILLIAM AMEY . I am an apprentice to Mr. Sparrow, grocer , Ludgate-hill . On the 26th of April last, about six o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came into the shop and asked for half a pound of eight shilling black tea, and half a pound ten shilling green, for Mr. James Smith of Bridge-street, a customer of ours; John Johnson , a shopman, said Mr. Smith had generally eleven shilling green; she told me that I must weigh that instead of the ten shilling green; I weighed them and gave them to her.

JOSEPH HART . On Friday the 26th of April, about half past six o'clock in the evening; the prisoner came into Mr. Sparrow's shop; she said she wanted half a pound of green tea, the same that she had before, for Mr. James Smith of Bridge-street; I saw the tea delivered to her; I had some suspicion, and when she went out of the shop, I followed her; she turned the corner of Bridge-street, and I lost sight of her. This was on the Friday, on the Saturday she came again and said she wanted half a pound of eight shilling black, and half a pound of eleven shilling green, the same as she had the day before, for Mr. James Smith , they were weighed and delivered to her; when she left the shop I followed her, she turned the corner of Bridge-street and joined another woman; I asked her if she did not receive these two half pounds of tea for Mr. Smith, she said yes. I desired her to give them to me. We came through Dolphin-court into Ludgate-hill, then she attempted to run away, two gentlemen were passing, with their assistance I brought her into the shop; I then went to Mr. James Smith , to enquire if he had sent for any tea, and then went for a constable; he came and searched her, and found the three half pounds of tea that she had the day before, two of the first witness, and one of me, and the goods that she had that day; I brought them with me home. These are the five half pounds that she obtained.

JAMES SMITH . I deal with Mr. Sparrow .

Q. Did you send the prisoner in April for any tea - A. I never sent her at all.

FREDERICK SPARROW . It is my house; I have no partner . I was out of town at the time this was done.

Mr. Barry addressed the Jury in behalf of the prisoner.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined Three Months in Newgate , and fined 1 s .

London Jury before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18110529-139

518. HOLLIS WATSON was indicted for perjury .

The plaintiff and witnesses were called, and not appearing in court, the defendant was

ACQUITTED .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.


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