Old Bailey Proceedings, 31st October 1810.
Reference Number: 18101031
Reference Number: f18101031-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE OYER AND TERMINER, AND GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND ALSO THE GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, HELD AT Justice-Hall, in the Old Bailey, On WEDNESDAY the 31st of OCTOBER, 1810, and following Days;

BEING THE EIGHTH SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF The Right Honourable THOMAS SMITH , LORD-MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY JOB SIBLY , FOR R. BUTTERS, No. 4, CARTHUSIAN-STREET, ALDERSGATE-STREET.

LONDON:

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED (BY THE AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON.) By R. BUTTERS, No. 22, Fetter-Lane, Fleet Street.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON.

Before the Right honourable THOMAS SMITH , Lord Mayor of the City of London; The Right Honourable Edward Lord Ellenborough , Chief Justice of His Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir Alexander Thompson , knt. one of the Barons of His Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir Soulden Lawrence , knt. one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir William Curtis , bart. Sir John Eamer , knt. Sir William Leighton , knt. Aldermen of the said City; John Silvester , esq. Recorder of of the said City; Claudius Stephen Hunter , esq. Christopher Smith , esq. Aldermen of the said City; and Newman Knowlys , esq. Common-serjeant of the said City of London; His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of Goal Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

London Jury.

Esquire Sanders ,

Thomas Haggett ,

Stephen King ,

Richard Butler ,

John Hayward ,

Samuel Brooksands ,

Thomas Sabine ,

Thomas Beech ,

George Pritchard ,

Charles Fairbourne ,

Thomas Notsall ,

Joseph Sheersley .

First Middlesex Jury.

Richard Barbarow ,

James Hansard ,

George Sprew ,

James English ,

William Perceval ,

John Vaughn ,

William Wakely ,

Thomas Smith ,

Edward Knapson ,

Robert Belbin ,

James Dobson ,

John Yoens .

Second Middlesex Jury.

John Fields ,

Charles Ponder ,

John Anderson ,

Alexander Moore ,

William Drisdale ,

David Lamb ,

William Ridley ,

Edward Powell ,

William Davis ,

William Simpson ,

Thomas Bowdery ,

John Merrick .

Reference Number: t18101031-1

764. ROBERT BUTT , MARY WALTON , CHARLES WALTON , JOSEPH COPE , and SARAH SLATER , were indicted for that they on the 22nd of August , one piece of false, feigned and counterfeited money, and coin, made to the likeness and and similitude of good silver, current money of the realm, called a sixpence, falsely and deceitfully did counterfeit and coin .

SECOND COUNT for like offence, stating it to be a shilling they did forge, counterfeit, and coin.

WILLIAM STAFFORD . Q. What were you in March last - A. I was a soldier in the East Middlesex militia. In March last I went to the Crispin public-house in Grub-street, I there saw Butt and Mary Walton , and in the evening of the same day, at the same house, I there saw Butt, Cope, Mary Walton , and Sarah Slater , they were altogether there; Mary Walton asked me if I came out of Birmingham, I said, yes, I knew Birmingham; she asked me if I knew her brother, one Boot, I said I believed I did, I recollected Boot being in the Warwickshire militia. Butt came to me and asked me if I was down to the queer, that meaned counterfeit money; Butt then asked me if I knew the process of rolling and cutting; I told him I had heard soldiers in the Warwickshire militia talk of it; Cope sat on the opposite side, he must have heard the conversation, because he came and offered me drink afterwards.

Q. Did you afterwards become acquainted where Butt lived - A. Not directly. Sometime about Easter he lived in Hooper-street, St. George's fields , he asked me to assist him in moving his goods there; I helped to move a lathe, a cutting engine, several boxes, and several implements belonging to chair-making.

Q. Had Butt ever told you for what use he applied this cutting engine - A. Not till I was carrying part of it in my hands, he then said it was part of a cutting engine for cutting bobs and tanners; a shilling they call bob, and a sixpence, tanner; I removed these things into Checquer-alley ; I have been up in his shop at Checquer-alley, and saw him cutting at the engine. I have been in company with Cope and Butt at the City of Chester public-house, in Bunhill-row, Mary Walton and Sarah Slater were there; I have heard Cope complain to Butt that he wanted his blanks to go on with. Blanks that Butt cut out for Cope to finish.

Q. How do you know that Cope was to finish them - A. Because I have heard Cope say he should bring him plates, and then asked him when he should have the goods back again, and sometimes he has given directions where to go and get plates, and then he asked Butts when he should have the goods back again.

Q. When Cope got any of these blanks back again, what was Cope to do with them - A. I never saw him finish them; I heard Cope say he wanted them very bad to finish.

Q. At the times that you have heard this conversation pass you have told us the two women were present - A. Yes, in general. These conversations were at several times.

Q. At any time was Sarah Slater there - A. Yes.

Q. Was Charles Walton present at any of them - A. No, I dot recollect he was; I first saw Charles Walton about the 10th or 11th of August.

Q. Now in the course of time, after Butt had removed from Hooper-street, did you see him cutting out any thing - A. In Checquer-alley, several times; I have seen him cutting out blanks for shillings and sixpences, he cut them out of metal plates.

Q. Have you ever seen Cope give any plates to Butt - A. I do not recollect that ever I did. After Butt had cut out the blanks from the plates, he smoothed the edges at the lathe by a file, and I have seen Mary Walton cutting at the engine when I have been at Butt's house; she lived with Butt's; I have seen her bring in a bundle at Butt's house, which I understood from her were plates. I have seen Butts and Mary Walton count the blanks, clap them in scores, and give them to Cope at the City of Chester.

Q. For what purpose - A. I expect, to finish, because he in general furnished people with counterfeit money. I never heard him say any thing about finishing but once, that was at the City of Chester public-house; Cope shewed me some sixpences, they were very rough, he told me they had been finished by a young man that he had learned; he wanted me to have some of his goods to put off. I recollect that he has told Butts that he wanted his blanks to finish, to execute an order that he had to send in the country.

Q. I believe you were afterwards taken up - A. Yes, on the 25th of June.

Q. Now from that period of March, which you have been speaking of, down to the 25th of June, have you had frequent opportunity of seeing that which you have described - A. Yes.

Q. You afterwards became acquainted with Mr. Powell, assistant to the solicitor of the mint - A. I did. I wrote to the secretary of state, I gave Mr. Powell intelligence, and acted under his directions. I was taken at London, and conveyed under an escort; from the 25th of June I was in the Savoy as a deserter, till the 25th of July. On the 25th of July I went into the country, I gave some information when I was at Guildford.

Q. About the 10th or 12th of August did you see the prisoners - A. I saw Butt at his own house in Checquer-alley.

Q. After you came to town did you as any of those times that you went to Butt's house, see him do any thing - A. Yes, I did, I saw him cutting at the engine, and rounding the edges of the blanks, which he had cut out by the engine, and I have seen him give them to Cope, as I expected, to finish.

Q. Did you see Mary Walton at this time - A. Yes, and generally at all meetings; she was present when Butt was cutting out. I have seen her once or twice cutting at the engine.

Q. When did you first see Charles Walton - A. About the 10th or 11th of August I saw him at Butt's house; that was the first time I saw him.

Q. Who was present - A. Mary Walton, Charles Walton, and Butt.

Q. Did you at any time afterwards, and how soon, the all the prisoners together - A. Yes, I saw them together at the City of Chester public house, in Bunhill-row. (I never saw Cope at the house in Checquer alley) Cope seemed very glad to see me; I asked Cope if he would let me have any white ones to go on, that is, to pass them off in circulation; Cope said he would, but he had not served his customers, he could not give them to me till he had served his customers.

Q. Did you keep any memorandum of what you did from day to day by order of Mr. Powell - A. Yes. On the 17th of August I met Sarah Slater, at the City of Chester in Bunhill-row; I asked her for the goods which I had ordered; she said that she was very sorry that Joe had not been able to do any work, that she herself had been very hard to work. On the 22nd of August I went to Butt's house, and to the City of Chester; I kept up my acquaintance with them till that day.

JOHN ARMSTRONG . I am an officer belonging to Worship-street office. On Wednesday the 22nd of August, I went with Vickrey, Bishop, and my son, Joshua Armstrong, to No. 19, Peter-street, Saffron-hill, that house is kept by Mr. Quin, a chandler's shop.

Q. When you went there did you find either of the prisoners there - A. No; we went up to the garret door, put our feet to the door, and shoved it open, having a search warrant; we had information of Mrs. Quin, that a man and a woman lived in the garret; when we got into that garret there were some drawers, and out of these drawers these counterfeit shillings were taken by Vickrey and given to me; I was standing close by Vickrey, eight sixpences, and I believe, seven shillings. In the same drawer was this sissel, and these bits of silver.

Q. Sissel is the remains of the plate, after the blanks have been cut out - A. Yes. After I had possession of them things I left Mason in the house with Mrs. Quin below, to apprehend any person that might come to that garret; afterwards I went with the other officers to Butt's house.

Q. Was any thing else found in these lodgings - A. I cannot say. I went with Bishop, Vickrey, and my son, to Butt's house, No. 4, Checquer-alley, Bunhill-row; we went in at the door, and Mrs. Walton was just in the passage, Butts and Charles Walton were in a side room on the ground, we secured them instantly. In a moment my son came down stairs, he had run up. We told them our business. I took the two men and Mrs. Walton up in the garret, and the first thing that I saw was this cutting instrument, fixed as it is now, with a cutter in it that fits the size of a counterfeit sixpence, it was matched to it, and another cutter laying by the side. These are all the counterfeit money found by me at Cope's; this is one of the finished sixpences I found at Copes, it corresponds with the engine found at Butt's. At Butts's this piece of metal was laying by the side of the cutter.

JOHN VICKREY . I was in company with Armstrong and the other officers when they went to Cope's lodgings.

COURT. How do you know it was Cope's lodgings. We took Cope in a different part of the town; I told him that we should take him back to his lodgings in Peter-street, he said he did not lodge in Peter-street.

Q. Do you know in fact that he lodged there - A. I only know from what the people told me to his face.

MARY QUIN . I live at No. 19, Peter-street, Saffron-hill. Cope, and the woman by the side of him, lodged in the front garret; they went by the name of Williams, they had taken the room on the 11th of June.

Q. Do you know what they did in that room - A. No, I never went up to it.

Q. Did you ever perceive any smell there - A. Yes, but I took that smell to be from the slaughterhouse.

Q. Have you smelled any thing like it since - A. No, I have not noticed it since.

Q. Were you before the magistrate - A. Yes.

Q. Did you smell aquafortis there - A. Yes.

Q. Was the smell of aquafortis the same that you smelled there - A. It was something like it, Mrs Hunt said it was like it.

Q. to Vickrey. Was it in that house where that woman lived that you went - A. It was; she was below stairs; I went into the front garret of that house in a drawer in a small chest of drawers in that room the money which Armstrong produced was found; I saw the money and desired him to take it out, and them pieces of silver that he produced was in the same drawer, and also the Sissell; there were a number of cloths in the tub wet, they appeared as if they had been just washed; I examined the cloths, they appeared such cloths as have been always found where I have been in the habit of finding counterfeit money, they are stained green in different shades. There was a table in the room, it was not brought away at that time; I have examined that table, there is a green colour upon it, and in the crevise of the table there was some white stuff. which I have no doubt was cream of tartar, and the green stains I have no doubt were produced by aquafortis acting on the metal, and the corner of the table appears to be worn away, as if by being rubbed with sand paper.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18101031-2

765. ROBERT BUTT was indicted for that he not being a person employed by the mint of the tower of London, or elsewhere, nor being a person authorised by the lord commissioner of the treasury of our lord the King, for the time being; on the 22nd of August , one cutting engine for cutting out round blanks by the force of a screw out of flatted bars of gold or silver, or other metal, knowingly and traiterously had in his custody and possession, against the duty of his allegiance and against the form of the statute .

WILLIAM STAFFORD . Q. Are you acquainted with the prisoner Butt, when he lived in Checquer-alley - A. Yes.

Q. Did you ever see any instrument called a cutting engine at his house - A. Yes; I went up in the top garret of his house where he resided; I saw him use

the cutting engine for cutting out metal blanks for shillings and sixpences. I have seen him do that more than once or twice. On the 22d. of August, in the morning, I saw him using it in that way.

Q. In dimension and size these blanks resemble shilings and sixpences - Yes, excepting the colouring they pass for that coin.

JOHN ARMSTRONG . Q. You went to Butt's house - A. I did. On Wednesday the 22d of August, we found him at home and Mrs. Walton; I took them up stairs in the garret, I there found this cutting engine with these pieces of metal laying by the side of it. All these plates of metal were laying on a box in the same room, this is one cutter of the size of a shilling, one part of the cutter goes to the bottom and the other at the top, and the metal plate goes between, and by the force of a screw it cuts out the blanks.

CALEB EDWARD POWELL. Q. How is the operation performed, look at that instrument and say by what force the operation of cutting out the blanks is performed - A. This is the under part of the cutting engine, and this the top; the plate is put between, and by force of this large screw the blank is cut. Witness cut out a blank and it was handed to the Court.

Armstrong. I found this counterfeit money in a drawer, under the cutter a considerable quantity of shillings, here is some more counterfeit shillings, and these are all sixpences.

JOHN VICKERY . I produce a blank sixpence found under the cutter; and a quantity of money finished in another part of the house; it is in this paper there is a great many shillings and a great many sixpences, they were all found in the lower part of the house. I found this blank under the cutter, this one dropped to the floor; there was a box at the bottom to catch them. Butt gave the key of the drawer in which that quantity was found; here is a blank of a sixpence which was cut by me in the presence of the prisoners, by order of the magistrate; it exactly corresponds with the others. There was a quantity of sand paper, sissel, and other things found in the house; there was a lathe that works by the foot that is for the purpose of rounding the edges with a file after they are cut out by the engine.

MR. NICOLL. Q. Would this instrument cut out blanks from gold and silver - A. Yes, and these are flatted bars.

Vickrey. The one blank was found under the cutter, and the other in the room down stairs; the key of a drawer in the room down stairs he produced himself, and admitted that the whole house was in his possession.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 33.

First Middlesex jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18101031-3

766. JOSEPH COPE and SARAH SLATER were indicted for that they on the 22d of August , one piece of base coin, resembling the current silver coin of this kingdom, called a sixpence, falsely, deceitfully, and traiterously did colour with materials producing the colour of silver, and three other counts for like offence only varying the manner of charging them .

WILLIAM STAFFORD . Q. Do you know the two prisoners at the bar - A. Yes, very well. I was in the habit of frequently seeing them between the months of March and August. I have heard Cope complain that he has not had his blanks to finish, I have frequently seen blanks given to him to be finished, they required colouring; colouring gives them the appearance of silver. I saw him on the 22d of August, and I saw him on the Saturday night, his hands were of a green cast. I also know Mrs. Slater, she lived with Cope as his wife, and I have heard her complain of Butts not letting her have blanks to go on with; and that she was obliged to work harder sometimes than others. I saw her on that Saturday afternoon in Banner-street, and at the City of Chester, her hands were in the same state as his

MARY QUIN . I live in Peter-street, Saffron-hill.

Q. Do you know the prisoner Cope and Slater - A. I knew them by the name of Williams, they lodged at my house from the 11th of June, untill the 22d of August, at the time they were taken they occupied the front garret. I thought they were man and wife.

CATHERINE HUNT . I live at No. 19, Peter-street, in the back room on the second floor; that is the house of Mrs. Quin.

Q. Did you know Cope and Slater by the name of Williams, lodging there at that time - A. Yes.

Q. During the time that they have been there were you annoyed by any smell - A. I was annoyed by a smell I could not ascertain from where it came, I have seen them go up stairs, and heard the door locked after they got in the room; that was the usual practice. On the Saturday before they were taken up they were at home fighting in the evening, I called Mrs. Quin, to come to them; Mrs. Quin, went up stairs, she could not get in for a few minutes, at last she was let in.

Q. Did you attend before the magistrate - A. Yes.

Q. You say you smelled a disagreeable smell - A. I did.

Q. Did you smell any thing before the magistrate - A. I did, I thought it was a similar smell, I understood that was aquafortis.

JOHN ARMSTRONG . On the 22d of August, I went to the lodgings of Cope, at Mrs. Quin's house with Mason, Vickrey and my son. I went to the front garret they were not at home, the door was locked, and finding nobody answered, we clapped our feet against it and opened it. I saw Vickrey take some money out of the drawer; he delivered it to me. This is one sixpence that was in paper that was given me by Vickrey, I have kept ever since. I am sure that is one that was found at Cope's, this is the one that I tried with the cutter, I searched him when he was apprehended, I found nothing but good money on him. We took them up at the corner of the Lying-in-hospital, Old-street-road, then I took them home to that room, and took them in there with Mrs. Quin, she called them by the name of Williams.

JOHN VICKREY . Q. You went to Cope's lodgings - A. I did. In a chest of drawers I found the money which I gave to Armstrong in a tub in the same room, was a number of cloths stained green, I have no doubt they had been used to clean the money; I have no doubt it was aquafortis, and on the floor were a number of filings; in the same room was a table, and on it the same sort of green marks as the cloths; in a crevise of the table there was some white stuff; I took my knife and took some out and tasted it, I have no doubt

it was cream of tartar, there is some silver, and them plates were found in the room. The aquafortis and cream of tartar are to bring the silver upon the surface of the metal, the colour is produced by the application of them things; I have apprehended persons of of this description before, and I have found the same sort of things. I was in company with the officers at the time they apprehended Cope; Slater parted from Cope; and went the other side of the way; I brought her back; she put her hands behind her against the wall, I took from her this bag, here are stains of green which I have no doubt were produced by her wet hands; this bag contains two hundred and thirteen counterfeit sixpences, they have all been coloured; there may be an exception of one that is not fit for circulation.

Q. Did you find that sixpence at Cope's - A. It is impossible to say I found it; I can only say what money I found I gave to Armstrong.

Armstrong. They are the same and have been under my care untill produced here.

Mr. Gurney, The sixpences that you found in a drawer, how long they had been there you cannot say - A. No.

Q. There were no marks of aquafortis upon them - A. No.

PETER MASON . Q. You are an officer, you went to Cope's lodgings - A. I did; I found a shirt and several pieces of cloth all stained with aquafortis, and they smelled strong of it at the time.

JOHN NICOLL . Q. You are one of the moniers of his Majesty's mint - A. I am.

Q. I am now giving you the sixpence in question - A. That is a counterfeit. The two hundred and thirteen are all of them counterfeits.

Mr. Gurney. This is only one persons work to do this - A. It may be done by one.

Mr. Knapp. That one sixpence, is it finished so that it would pass - A. Yes, I think it is.

Cope left his defence to his counsel.

Slater's Defence. Mr. Stafford has sworn false against me.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18101031-4

767. JOHN FRUIN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 15th of September , a mare, value 20 l. the property of Thomas Rigden .

THOMAS RIGDEN . I am a malster living at Newington, near Hithe, in Kent . I lost a black mare on the 14th of September, in the morning. I sent her on the over night in the meadow, my man put her in; I did not see her myself then; I had seen her at work in the course of the day; on missing the mare I came to London with John Friend in search of her, we intended to go to the George inn in the Borough, and being strangers we went up to Shoreditch, I met the prisoner in Shoreditch, in the street, he was riding a black horse, and leading my mare; we followed him some distance, and then we saw him turn into Holywell-lane, I rode up to the side of him, and asked him whether that mare was for sale, he said, no.

Q. Are you sure he is the same person - A. Yes. Then I accused him of stealing the mare; I said that mare is my property, he said he was very sorry for it, then he jumped off the horse he was riding and let my mare go, and ran away directly, leaving the horse and mare both loose in the street. I pursued him and cried stop thief, in running he fell down, and a person of the name of Wheeler laid hold of him; Mr. Wheeler asked me what was the matter, I said he had been stealing horses; the prisoner said he was no thief; I said if they brought him back to where the horse was I thought it was in my power to prove him a thief; Mr. Wheeler brought him back to where the horses were in the Curtain-road.

COURT. Do you mean that they were loose in the Curtain-road - A. Yes; then Mr. Wheeler told me if I had any thing to say to the man I must take him myself; I directly collared the prisoner, I took the prisoner to a public-house next to the office, there he was delivered over to Wilson.

Mr. Bolland. When you came up to the prisoner in Shoreditch you say the prisoner was riding a horse and leading your mare - A. Yes.

Q. There was a man with him riding a horse and leading another - A. Yes.

Q. In company with him - A. He was before him.

Q. Now recollect when you asked the prisoner whether the mare was for sale, did not he say he did not know, it belonged to the man that was before - A. I do not recollect him saying that.

COURT. What was done with the horses - A. They were at Mr. Prior's livery-stables; I do not know who put them there, I was with the prisoner.

Q. How long have you had this mare - A. My father bred her; I am very sure of the mare, I have no doubt in the least of her being my mare, she is four years old.

FINNEAS FOX . I am a farmer's servant, I live in Hithe.

Q. You know Mr. Rigden's field, do not you - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know the person of the prisoner - A. Yes, I know him by sight. On the Thursday afternoon before the mare was stolen, I saw him at the Star inn at Newington.

COURT. On the afternoon before the mare was missing - A. Yes; he was with a tall man limping in one leg.

Mr. Knapp. You saw them at the Star - A. Yes.

Q. How long were they together - A. I was there in doors about an hour, and they were there during that time I was there.

Q. Is Fruin a man living about Newington or Hithe - A. No, I never saw him before.

Q. Are you quite sure that he was the person that was with the lame man, drinking - A. Yes, they were drinking together.

Mr. Bolland. You never saw him before - A. No.

Q. What made you take notice of him - A. I went in there to have a pint of beer; I saw him carry some strong beer through the room, I saw him give his dog some toast out of the strong beer pot, that is not common in our country. It was between three and four o'clock.

Q. Had he a cart with him - A. No.

Q. Do not you know that he is a fishmonger at Chatham - A. No.

COURT. How soon after the Thursday afternoon did

you see him again, so as to know him - A. Not till now; I saw him among the prisoners, and I picked him out this morning.

Q. You say he was there about an hour - A. Yes.

Q. And you staid there about an hour - A. Yes.

Q. How near is the Star to Mr. Rigden's - A. It is very near, it is close by Allport farm, it is the next house to Mr. Rigden's.

JOHN WHEELER . I am a painter and glazier.

Q. Upon hearing the cry of stop thief did you stop the prisoner - A. I saw him running by the Crown public-house in the Curtain-road. I ran up to the prisoner and laid hold of him, he got from me then and ran down Holywell-lane, I pursued him when I came up to him he was down, and I took him in custody; he said nothing to me in coming along to Mr. Rigden; I asked Mr. Rigden what he had done, he informed me it was horse stealing; Mr. Rigden and his friend went went on before to look after their horses, which were loose, and I brought the prisoner after them down to the Horse and Groom-yard, in the Curtain-road, there I delivered him up to Mr. Rigden.

RICHARD WILSON . I am an officer. The prisoner was delivered over to me, I searched him, I found this pocket book, this rope in the shape of an halter, and this smock frock; I then secured the prisoner; I then went down to Mr. Prior's stables with Mr. Rigden; Mr. Rigden identified the mare. We took this coat off the horse which the prisoner rode; he owned this coat to be his property, and in this coat pocket I found these things.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel.

PHOEBE SPOONER . I get my bread sometimes by one thing, and sometimes by another, and by making up wood.

Q. Do you know the prisoner Fruin - A. Yes, he is a fisherman by trade, he gets his living by selling fish about the country, he lives at Chatham.

Q. Did Fruin come to your house any time last September - A. On Thursday the 13th of September, about five o'clock in the afternoon, my house is at Deptford, he came there for fish which I had bought as a bargain myself; he staid all night at my house; he went away the next day at nine o'clock, the Friday morning.

Q. Are you sure that it was Thursday the 13th of September - A. Yes; I am as certain of it as I am born.

Mr. Knapp. You are sure it was the 13th of September, are you - You often see this man, do you - A. No, I do not. I know him by his dealing for his family in different occupations; I had not seen him before for a year and a half.

COURT. You know him by what - A. In different trades; any thing that he can deal in to get a living for his family; oysters - fish of any description.

Q. Did you ever know him to deal in horses - A. I knew him to buy old horses for himself; I cannot say that I knew him to be dealing in horses much.

Q. How long is it ago since you have known him buying old horses for himself - A. I cannot say. I have known him to be dealing in some little trifle or other ever since I have known him.

Q. He deals in any thing, not confined to being a fishmonger - A. No.

Q. Have you ever been at Chatham - A. Yes; he keeps a fishmonger's shop there.

Q. But he does not confine himself to the fishmongering - A. No; any thing that he can get by for his family.

Mr. Knapp. How did he come to you on this day, did he walk - A. No, he had his own mare; I sold it for him since he has been in trouble.

Q. Have you seen the prisoner since he has been in custody - A. Yes, I sold the mare and took him the money; I was obliged to see him more than once to get a receipt for the maintenance of the horse, and to take it to the repository in Barbican.

Q. When was the first time that you knew that he was in custody - A. On the 17th of September he wrote a letter to me, informing me that he was in custody.

Q. You know that he was to be tried the last sessions - A. Yes, I was here, I went up to Worship-street when he was committed, only I was too late.

Q. I want you to tell the Jury, why you know this being on the Thursday, can you read - A. No, I cannot; I recollect it being Thursday, because the prisoner sending to me so late as the Monday after; it made me call to mind the day of the month. I cannot read but I can put down the day of the month with chalk, on the back of my door.

Q. Then you can write - A. No, I cannot spell; the letter I received on the 17th from the prisoner on the Monday, so I put down the 17th the day I received the letter on the back of the door, I knew it was on the same week, on the Thursday.

Q. Have you got the letter here - A. No, I have not; I generally burn letters, paper is of no use to me.

Q. Who went to bed last that night - A. He went to bed first; I saw him on the Thursday night about ten o'clock.

Q. Who was in the house at the time - A. Mr. Poole and Mr. Chamber's were in the house, not when he went to bed, they were at half after nine; when I went to bed there was nobody in the house but me and the prisoner, there are only two rooms in the house; he slept up stairs and I below.

Mr. Bolland. In consequence of the prisoner sending to you on Monday the 17th you recollect his being at your house on the Thursday preceding - A. Yes, and I was sure he was there on the Friday morning.

Q. I believe the magistrate gave up to you the horse he was riding on, and you sold it at Dixon's repository - A. Yes.

COURT. You had not seen him for a year and a half before this night - A. No.

Q. How came it to happen that you saw him on this night - A. Why, I sent for him at his own house at Chatham.

Q. What made you send for him at his own house at Chatham - A. My husband, a wood-cutter eloped from home and was at this good man's house at Chatham about two years ago, my husband eloped at this time, and I heard that he was down to Chatham, and I sent down.

Q. The question is about this Thursday - A. I am telling you I heard my husband was down at Chatham, I had no friend at Chatham but this gentleman that I thought knew my husband, I desired if he would enquire about Chatham-line whether my husband was at work there and then, I sent him word that I could help him to

this bargain of fish.

Q. So that you sent partly to enquire after your husband, and partly to sell your fish - A. I sent a letter to him on the Tuesday, he came up on the Thursday, I let him have the fish, he carried it away on the Friday morning.

Q. Did he bring you any tidings of your husband - A. No.

Q. How did this letter go that you sent - A. By the post, he came to my house about five o'clock on the Thursday evening; Chatham is about twenty-eight miles from my house.

Q. Did you see him go away on the Friday morning. A. Yes, he went away on Friday morning with his horse and a little cart with him, he took the fish with him.

Q. Did any body see him go away that morning besides you - A. I cannot say, I did not notice that, I dare say there might be plenty of people; we do not think of such trouble as this.

Q. How came he to stay all night with you - A. It was too late to go all that many miles in the night.

Q. Had he ever stopped with you before at your notice - A. He has been at my house many times, not a twelve-month ago he slept at my house.

Q. You said you had not seen him for a year and a half - A. Well, a year and a half or a twelve month, it will be two years ago next January. I have not known him above two years and a half, I cannot say to a quarter of a year, but I have not known him longer, he then was the same as he is now, dealing in any thing that he could get a livelyhood by.

MARK CHAMBERS . I live at No. 3, Young's Buildings, Old-street; I am a tailor.

Q. Do you know the prisoner Fruin - A. Yes, I knew him that one night I was at Deptford, Thursday the 13th of September last, I saw him at Deptford at Mrs. Spooner's, I think it was near five o'clock in the afternoon; I continued at Mrs. Spooner's till about half past nine, Fruin was there the whole of the time, I am quite sure it is the same man.

Q. What were you doing from five to nine - A. I went with a new coat for her son, I had tea and supper there, there was a man of Deptford there, I do not know his name, I am perfectly clear that it was Thursday the 13th of September.

Mr. Knapp. So you are a taylor living in Old-street, and your customer young Spooner is living at Deptford - A. Yes, and the other person that was in the house, he lives at Deptford I believe.

Q. Do you know his name - A. I have heard it, I should know it if I was to hear it.

Q. It is Poole - A. I believe it is.

Q. Have you made many coats for young Spooner - A. No, only that one.

Q. Did you attend before the magistrate or attend here last sessions - A. No, I was not applied to then.

Q. When was the first time that you was applied to to come here - A. Last week a young man came with a subpoena from this gentleman at the bar I suppose; I do not know who sent the subpoena.

Q. Have you ever seen Mrs. Spooner since the time you were at Deptford and the time that the prisoner was taken into custody - A. No, not till now since the day I met her at her house; I did not know Fruin before that time.

Q. Was there any body with him - A. Not then.

Q. Then who sent the subpoena to you, nor who desired you to come, you know nothing at all about - A. No.

Q. When did you first hear that the prisoner was in custody - A. I did not hear till they let me know by the subpoena.

Q. Did Mrs. Spooner know where you lived - A. I suppose so, the prisoner did not know where I lived, I never saw him before.

Q. Did you go to Newgate to see the prisoner - A. I did, when I got the subpoena, I asked him what I had got the subpoena for; the young man that brought me the subpoena, told me he was in Newgate, I went there; he told me he would be glad if I would come forward respecting of his affair, here he told me to say I was with him at the supper, as I was with him at Deptford.

Q. Did you ever drink tea or sup at Mrs. Spooner's before - A. No, I never was at Mrs. Spooner's before.

Q. Do you know how many rooms there is in the house - A. No, I was only in the bottom room, it is a small house.

Q. Who was there do you know - A. There was the prisoner, Mrs. Spooner, another man and me. We supped on fish, bread and cheese, and beer, and the other man supped there.

Q. You took down in writing I suppose, the day you went to Mrs. Spooner's - A. I did not take it down, I can write.

Q. Did any body else employ you at Deptford - A. No, I have a person employs me at Greenwich, they recommended me to Mrs. Spooner's son, I took two coats home to Greenwich on the Saturday the week before last.

Q. Can you tell us the day of the month - A. I cannot now without I look at my almanack, I recollected this because I looked at my almanack when I got the subpoena, and then upon my being desired to come here, I looked at the almanack to be right in the day.

Q. This was the 14th of September - A. No, the 13th of September.

Q. Then when you took home the two coats to Greenwich, you cannot recollect now - A. No.

Mr. Bolland. You took home two coats to Greenwich, you know it was on Saturday the week before last.

Q. Though you did not know the day of the month, the 13th you know it was Thursday; how do you know it was that Thursday - A. I keep a book of my work and put down every day in the week; I have not my book here.

Q. You had never supped or drank tea there before, are you certain that on that Thursday the 13th of September you supped and drank tea with him - A. Yes, this is the man.

Court. What age was this son of Mrs. Spooner's - A. Twenty, twenty-one, or twenty-two, he is a blacksmith, he works in the Dock-yard at Deptford.

Q. Does he live with his mother - A. I do not know, I saw him at Greenwich, he was at a public house in Bear-lane when I measured him, they fetched him in from somewhere and I was to carry it down to the mother's.

Q. Who paid you for the coat - A. He paid the money to her and she paid me that night, it was a Bath-coat, and the agreement for it was thirty-five shillings.

Q. Then it was not fitted - A. No.

Q. She paid you, and gave you tea and supper also in the bargain - A. Yes, I often sup when I go a long way.

Q. Was Poole gone away before you - A. I think I was the first that went away.

Q. Was there any bed in the room below - A. I never saw any.

WILLIAM POOLE . I live at Deptford, I keep a little bit of a shop for selling slops and clothes.

Q. Do you know Mrs. Spooner - A. Yes.

Q. Look round and tell me whether ever you saw the prisoner Fruin before - A. Yes, he was at my shop and bought a smock frock of me. It was in the last month, I cannot say to any day, it was at the beginning of it I think; he has been several times at my shop.

Q. Did you ever see him at Mrs. Spooner's - A. That was the way he asked me to conduct him to Mrs. Spooner's.

Court. When was that, was it the day he bought the frock of you, that you conducted him to Mrs. Spooner's - A. Yes, and I conducted him to Mrs. Spooner's.

Mr. Bolland. What time in the day was it when he came to your shop about the smock frock - A. I think it must be about three o'clock, I cannot justly say; Mrs. Spooner's house is about four or five doors from my house. When I got to Mrs. Spooner's I saw the prisoner and another gentleman, I conducted him there, I went away, Mrs. Spooner asked me to come back again to have a bit of supper, I went back between seven and eight, Fruin was there and the other gentleman I saw before; I staid there till near nine o'clock, I had salt fish and potatoes for supper.

Q. Who went away first, you or the gentleman - A. I went away first and left them there.

Q. Do you know what that gentleman's name was - A. No, from the conversation I collected, he was a tailor.

Q. You went away about nine o'clock, did you see Fruin again the next day - A. I did not, nor never till now.

Q. Chambers, stand up. Look at that gentleman there, and tell me, whether that is the person that you saw at Mrs. Spooner's - A. This is the very gentleman.

Mr. Knapp. You did not know Fruin before - A. I did, he had been to my place three or four different times.

Q. So he wished you to conduct him to Mrs. Spooner's; he did not know where to find Mrs. Spooner unless you had told him. A. He did not, she had moved once or twice, I have known her sixteen years.

Q. How long has she been at her new lodging - A. Half a year or three quarters.

Q. But however, you were to conduct him there - A. Yes.

Q. When you had conducted him there you went away - A. Yes.

Q. You were asked to partake of the supper and promised to return again, have you ever met that gentleman before to-day - A. No, not from that day to this.

Q. Did he sup there - A. Yes, there were only the prisoner, Mrs. Spooner, him and me.

Q. You went away the first - A. I am sure I did.

Q. Had you ever spent the evening and supped there before - A. A good many times when her husband was with her, he is at sea now I believe.

Q. Have you ever supped with her since he has gone on sea - A. Yes, on the salt fish night, this was the beginning of the last month.

Q. The first week of the month - A. I cannot say.

Q. Were you before the Justice - A. No.

Q. Were you here last Sessions - A. I was not.

Q. Were you living at Deptford, during September - A. I have lived there twenty-two years.

Q. And always to be found there - A. Yes.

Q. You never appeared before the magistrate nor was applied to last Sessions - A. No, I attend here by virtue of a subpoena served upon me a few days back, I was not at home when it was left, I was surpized at that subpoena. I went to Mrs. Spooner, she told me the reason why I was subpoenaed, or else I should have known nothing about it.

Q. Have you seen the prisoner in gaol - A. Yes, I saw him this day in the bail dock.

Q. Did he send for you - A. No, but by being too soon we went down.

Q. Then you learned of him what you were to prove - A. I speak no more than the truth, I did not talk about this business, I had no conversation with the prisoner at all, I went because the rest went; Mrs. Spooner and three or four more; Chambers spoke to him, but what they said I do not know.

Court. You say you lived at Deptford, 22 years - A. I have, or more in the same place.

Q. Mrs. Spooner knew you very well - A. Yes, for several years.

Q. The prisoner bought a smock frock of you - A. Yes.

Q. Then he asked you to conduct him to Mrs. Spooner's - A. Yes.

Q. Was he on foot - A. Yes, and he was in my shop best part of an hour before he went out, then he and I went down to Mrs. Spooner's.

Q. to Fox. You have sworn very positively of having seen this prisoner at the bar on the Thursday afternoon, before the mare was missing - A. Yes. On Thursday, the 13th, I saw him at the Star Inn, with another man who was limping, I was about an hour there while he was there.

Q. Had you any conversation with him - A. No, I was only sitting in the tap room, and in the same room he passed me to give a toast out of the beer to the dog.

Q. Did you take so much notice of him as to be able to say, after hearing what you have, that he is the same man - A. I am sure he is the same man, it was on Thursday, between three and four o'clock.

Q. How far is that place from Deptford - A. I cannot say hardly how far it is.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 35.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18101031-5

768. ROBERT HOWARD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of February , a wrapper, value 1 s, and two hundred yards of calico, value 20 l. the property of Robert Russell , Thomas Russell , Thomas Baker , and Samuel Baker .

EDWARD UNDERHILL . I am a servant to Mr. Russell, at the Bell Inn, Friday-street , he is a carrier . On the 6th or 7th of February, four men came up the Bell yard towards the evening, and asked if the Exeter waggon came there. I told them yes, they told me they had some goods to send to Exeter. I asked them if we should send for them; they said, no, they kept carts of

their own. They went down the yard, and returned in about five minutes; they then said, as we kept carts we might send for them, and asked for a pen and ink. I gave them the pen and ink. They came to the desk, two of them came round the young lad that was writing; one got hold of me, and the other was looking over the goods in the warehouse. I did not like him holding me by the shoulder; I thrust myself out of his hands, and I saw the prisoner at the bar go out with a truss under his arm; I holloed out stop thief, he had got about a dozen yards from the door and then dropped the truss. I picked up the truss and carried it into the warehouse.

Q. Are you sure the prisoner is the person - A. Yes, by the face of him, I am certain he is the man, I had never seen him before.

Q. How soon after did you see him - A. I suppose it was about ten minutes, he was brought back the same night.

JOHN DRAPER . I live at Mr. Muggeridge's, in Fleet-street, I used to live with Mr. Russell, in Friday-street. On the 5th or 6th of February, four men came up the yard, and asked whether the Exeter waggon went from there. I and Underhill were in the yard at the time. We made answer, yes, the Exeter went from there. They went away and returned in five minutes; they said, they had got some things to go. I asked if we should send the cart for them; they said, they kept carts, they would send them. They went down again, and immediately came up, and said, as we kept carts we should send for them, they came in the warehouse, and told Underhill to put it down where to send for them, I was kneeling by the desk at the time. When Underhill was taking the direction down two of them had got their hands tight on my head, because I should not turn my head round; and another had got hold of Underhill by the head. The other man was walking up and down the warehouse. The prisoner took up the truss, and ran out of the door. I saw the prisoner run past the window with the truss. I immediately ran out of the door, and sang out, stop thief; the prisoner ran down Watling-street, the man that is here stopped him.

Q. Did you see him stopped - A. No, I did not, he dropped the truss about ten yards from the door, he was brought back in about five or ten minutes; I am sure he is the man, I could tell him by the face, he came up two or three times.

WILLIAM PRICE . I am a servant to Atkins, Price, and Co. in Friday-street. On the night these men were taken, when I came up to them they went towards Cheapside. When I got to the corner of Watling-street, in Friday-street, I turned my head and saw them go into the yard again. After they had been up the yard about a minute or two, I heard some person cry out stop thief. As I was going from the corner up to the gateway again they came out; this man was one; some went one way and some the other, this man went down Watling-street; I followed him, he turned into Bow-lane; as he got half way up Bow-lane, towards Cheapside, he was stopped. I never lost sight of him any farther than when he turned the corner of Bow-lane, and then I was not above the distance of ten yards from him. I am sure he is the same man.

PETER WOREMAN . I am a porter to Mr. Pickford, the Castle Inn, Wood-street, I was delivering some goods in Bow-lane, that night, and I had been attacked a little before that in Milk-street, by four men; they had pulled a truss out of my cart, I could not catch them, I was looking out sharp at that time, and this prisoner came running up Bow-lane, I heard a cry of stop thief; I jumped behind my cart, and catched hold of him by the collar. He asked me to let him go, I told him I could not, because I had been like to have been done before, I kept hold of him until I delivered him into the hands of the constable, Mr. Willis.

JOHN WILLIS . I am a constable. I heard a bustle in the street, I went out, the last witness and the witness before had the prisoner in custody. I took charge of him.

JOSEPH AUSTIN . I am agent to Russell, and Co. their names are Robert and Thomas Russell , Robert and Samuel Baker .

Prisoner's Defence. I never was in Friday-street, that evening at all; I was in Bow-lane, at the time of the cry of stop thief, where I was with a gentleman. We brought up fifteen horses to Smithfield-market, I was running the same as the others, and the last witness laid hold of me.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18101031-6

769. JOSEPH COPE was indicted, for that he, on the 15th of August , twenty pieces of false counterfeited money, each of them made to the likeness and similitude of the silver coin of this realm, called a sixpence, the same counterfeit pieces of money not being cut in pieces, unlawfully did put off to William Stafford , at a lower rate and value than they by their denomination imported to be or were counterfeited for, that is to say for five shillings .

WILLIAM STAFFORD . Q. Where were you in the month of March last - A. I was in London, I was a soldier in the East Middlesex Militia .

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar - A. Yes, I became acquainted with him about the beginning of March last.

Q. What is the prisoner - A. I do not know what he was particularly, I became acquainted with him at the Crispin public house in Grub-street.

Q. Did you see him often after your first acquaintance with him - A. Yes.

Q. How many times do you think you saw him from the first of March to the end of June - A. A great many times, twenty times or more.

Q. Now these several meetings what did you meet about - A. I used to go after the hours of my work up to the City of Chester, in Bunhill-row. I am a shoemaker. I saw Cope there, he in general was talking about counterfeit money; I was determined to get into his confidence as far as lay in my power. I understood that he was a finisher of counterfeit money. He told me that he finished it and disposed of it, he received the blank in a rough state, and he finished them himself.

Q. In the course of the time that I have been speaking of, did you ever see him with any counterfeit money - A. Yes, I have more than once; I have seen him with half a dozen sixpences and sometimes more.

Q. I believe in the month of June, about the 25th you were taken up as a deserter - A. I was, and I was put in prison; I was afterwards sent under an escort to Portsmouth; I wrote to the Secretary of State at Guildford, and at Portsmouth; I afterwards came up to town, went to Mr. Powell, and acted udder his directions.

Q. How soon after you came to town did you see Cope again - A. I saw him on the 10th of August, at the City of Chester, Bunhill-row. On Saturday the 11th, I saw him at the Key public house, Fleet-market. I went with him from the Key, public house, to a public house in Clement's-lane. I asked him whether he had got any spangles, meaning counterfeit seven shilling pieces; he advised me not to have any, but confine myself to work with bobs and tanners.

Q. What are bobs - A. Bobs are counterfeit shillings, and tanners are counterfeit sixpences. He said, he would let me have some the beginning of the week. I saw him on Tuesday, the 14th of August, at Ben Johnson's head, Westmoreland-buildings, Aldersgate-street . I asked him if he had any thing about him and if he would let me have any thing; he said, yes, he had got a few tanners about him; he produced me six counterfeit sixpences; he said, I should have them for a shilling, I afterwards gave them to Mr. Sewell, a clerk to the Solicitor of the Mint, the next day.

Mr. Alley. Q. I did not hear you say what situation of life you have been in - A. I work at shoemaking, and I had been on the recruiting service, I had my pay from the regiment. When I ran sway from the regiment, I maintained myself by shoe-making, from the beginning of March, till the 25th of June, I lived upon my work. My Colonel knew where I was at work.

Q. Did you receive pay at that time - A. I had not settled with the regiment, I did not receive pay.

Q. We heard something of your being under an escort, were you taken in custody for any offence as a deserter - A. When I was taken in custody I was at Pancras.

Q. Where were you going to when you were under that escort - A. I was going to Portsmouth, my regiment was there.

Q. Did you ever make any charge against that wretched man, or any body else, till after you were taken up and on your journey to Portsmouth - A. No, I did not.

Q. You wrote a letter to the Secretary of State, giving a great deal of patriotic information, did not you give the information in hopes of not being punished as a deserter - A. I knew my Colonel would not hurt me, what I had done I thought it my duty; I wrote to the Secretary of State about the 10th of July.

Q. And from that time you have been an active agent to assist the Solicitor of the Mint - A. I have done all that lay in my power, you may depend upon it.

Q. I will now ask you whether that was done merely to assist the Solicitor of the Mint or to save yourself - A. To assist the Solicitor of the Mint.

Q. Was it not after you wrote that letter to the Secretary of State that you were set at liberty - A. After my writing that letter I was set at liberty, but not through that medium.

Q. You applied to him about some spangles, where did you learn about spangles - A. From the Warwickshire militia; he advised me to deal in bobs and tanners; I bought six tanners of the prisoner for a shilling.

MARY QUIN . I live at No. 19, Peter-street, Saffron-hill.

Q. Do you know the prisoner Cope - A. I know him by the name of Williams, in August last he lodged at my house, he occupied the front garret.

Q. Did any body live with him there - A. His wife lived with him as I thought she was, she turns out to be a person of the name of Slater, they lived with me from the 11th of June till the 22d of August.

Q. On Monday the 22d of August the prisoner was apprehended, was not he - A. Yes.

CATHERINE HUNT . Q. Did you lodge in Mrs. Quin's house - A. Yes.

Q. At the time that you lodged there did the prisoner lodge there - A. Yes, by the name of Williams, in the garret; my room was on the second floor.

Q. Did any body live with him - A. A woman, which I supposed to be his wife, that woman turns out to be Sarah Slater .

Q. During the time that you lived there did you observe any smell - A. Yes, a faint smell.

Q. Did you observe before the magistrate any aquafortis poured out - A. Yes, that had a similar smell.

Q. Did you make any observations of their door - A. It was always locked when they were in it.

Mr. Alley. You have got a slaughter-house in the neighbourhood, have not you - A. Yes.

Q. How do you like the smell of a slaughter-house - A. It is a different smell.

COURT. What business did Cope carry on - A. I never knew what he did.

Mr. Alley. Did you never smell aquafortis before you went before the justice - A. No, I thought it was the smell of vitriol.

Q. to Mrs. Quin. I understand you keep the house; was it not your opinion that that smell did come from the slaughter-house, and that was the smell that you observed in your house - A. Yes.

COURT. What business did Cope and his wife carry on - A. I never knew.

Mr. Knapp. When you came before the magistrate, and the aquafortis was poured out, what did you think then - A. Mrs. Hunt thought it was a similar smell, and I thought the same.

JOHN ARMSTRONG . I am an officer. On Wednesday the 22d of August I went to Mrs. Quin's house. I went up stairs with the officer, Vickrey, Bishop, my son, and Mason; when we came to the front garret the door was shut, it was locked I believe; we, without trying it, put our feet against it, and sent it open, there was nobody in that garret; there was a chest of drawers in the garret, Vickrey took out this counterfeit shilling and sixpence, and gave them into my hands; I have had them ever since, and this sissel.

Q. What is sissel - A. It is the remainder of plates from whence the blanks are cut out for shillings and sixpences. At night I was at the apprehending of Cope in Old-street-road; he was there, and a woman, and two or three men, and the landlord of the City of Chester public house in Bunhill-row; he ran away, we

apprehended him just at the end of St. Luke's lunatic-hospital; I searched Cope, he had nothing on him, but good money; I then told him I should take him to his lodgings, No. 19, Peter-street, Saffron-hill; he said he had none there; I told him I had been there and should take him there; I had left Mason there the whole day to wait. I then took him with the other officers, and Mrs. Quin said, this is Mr. Williams; I then took Mrs. Quin and the officers up stairs that she might shew us before them the room he lived in, and where we found them goods.

Mr. Alley. This is a considerable time after the man was supposed to sell the counterfeit money, was it not ten days after the man was supposed to purchase the money - A. According to the evidence it was.

JOHN VICKREY . I am an officer. I accompanied Armstrong on the 22d of August.

Q. Did you search any part of the room - A. I searched the chest of drawers, I found a number of counterfeit shillings and sixpences, and three pieces of metal, a quantity of sissel, and a quantity of wet rags. I have no doubt the rags had been used with aquafortis, they had green stains upon them, they had been used for the purpose of colouring; I have been an officer eleven years; I have seen the same sort of rags a number of times before, they were at that time quite wet, and at that time they smelled of aquafortis. We saw a table there, one corner of the table had been very much worn away, apparently by a file; in a crevise in the middle there was something white; I took some of it out with my knife, and tasted it, I have no doubt it was cream of tartar. The cream of tartar and aquafortis, and other things, are used to produce the colour of silver.

JOSIAH GILL SEWELL . Q. You are a clerk to the Solicitor of the Mint, you produce six pieces of money - A. I do; I received them from Mr. Stafford, they are the same.

JOHN NICOLLS . Q. You are a monier of his Majesty's Mint - A. I am

Q. Look at these sixpences - A. They are counterfeit.

Q. They are coloured sufficiently to pass to deceive people - A. Yes, I think they are.

Q. Look at the others, these shillings and sixpences - A. They are also counterfeit.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel.

GUILTY , aged 50.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

To this conviction the prisoner prayed the Benefit of Clergy.

The counsel for the Crown put in a counterplea.

JOSIAH GILL SEWELL . I produce a copy of the record of the conviction of Joseph Cope ; I got it from Mr. Shelton's office, the Clerk of the Arraigns of this court; it is a correct copy. (The copy of the record of the conviction of the prisoner read.)

Mr. Bolland. I see at some part there is an interlineation - A. There is; they were made at the time of my examining the copy, and not afterwards.

ROBERT BROWN . I am an officer of Shadwell-office.

Q. Do you know the prisoner, Joseph Cope - A. Yes; I was present at the time of his conviction; I apprehended him upon that charge; in July sessions, 1808, he was tried for putting off forty bad sixpences to Mrs. Briant; I was a witness upon that trial, I was present when he was convicted, and I was present when he received the sentence; I am well satisfied he is the same person.

CALEB EDWARD POWELL . Q. Were you in court at the time of the conviction of the prisoner - A. I was; it was for the offence that I have heard stated in the record.

COURT. You conducted that prosecution - A. Yes.

Mr. Knapp. Are you quite sure that he was the person - A. I am quite sure of it. I was present when he was tried the first time.

Mr. Bolland addressed the Jury in behalf of the prisoner.

Mr. Shelton Q. to the Jury. Is the prisoner at the bar the same person or not?

Verdict of the Jury. The same person.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 50.

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18101031-7

770. HENRY SAVORY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of June , a gold watch case, value 5 l. 10 s. four pendant bows, value 10 s. three balances, value 15 s. two pendant staffs, value 7 s. a watch movement, value 8 s. and five pennyweights of gold, value 7 s. 6 d. the property of Richard Powis .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY .

Fined 1 s. and discharged.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18101031-8

771. WILLIAM BAKER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of September , three sows, value 6 l. and six pigs, value 6 l. the property of Thomas Hayne .

JOSEPH SMITH . I am a servant to Mr. Hayne, at Kentish-town lodge . On the night of the 9th of September the pigs were safe in the sty; on the next morning at six o'clock I went to the hog-sty, the pigs were gone; the staple of the pig-sty was broken, and the door forced open. On the next day I went in search of the pigs, and in Sash-court, Wilson-street, Moorfields, there I found one of the sows alive; we took the prisoner with us there. In consequence of information we went to a stable in a court in the Old Bailey, and in that stable we found the prisoner; then we took the prisoner with us to Sash-court; he told us where he lived, he pointed out the house to us, and when I got there I knew that sow to be my master's; the prisoner said he did not know any thing about it.

JOHN HANLIN . I keep the turnpike-gate at Gray's inn-lane road. A boy that morning was driving three large pigs along, and six small pigs, about six o'clock in the morning.

Q. Was any person with the lad - A. No person that I saw but the lad; the prisoner is very nigh the size of the lad; I cannot swear to the boy. The next day put one I saw the prisoner at Bow-street, he was then dressed in a blue coat, and the boy that paid me the toll was dressed in a blue coat.

JOHN WHITE . I am a servant to a butcher in Kentish town.

Q. On the morning of the 10th of September were you coming to Newgate-market - A. Yes; I was in Gray's-inn-lane about six o'clock. I saw the prisoner there, he was driving three sows and six pigs, in Gray's

inn-lane towards London. Soon afterwards I saw him again, just by the end of the Old Bailey, he had the same sows and pigs with him there; one of the sows ran away down Snow-hill, I got out of my cart and assisted him, there was no man with him then, afterwards a man came down Newgate-street with a small pig on his back. I afterwards saw a sow at Bow-street, I am sure that is the same sow.

MR. MULLEN. I live in Moorfields, I am the owner of the house where the sow was found; the cellar where the sow was, is an open cellar, the prisoner and his father lodged in the house, and all the lodgers had access to that cellar.

WILLIAM MILES . I am a ticket porter.

Q. Did you see the prisoner with some pigs - A. No, I saw the pigs, two of them were catched and taken into a stable in a court, in the Old Bailey; the next day I took Smith the officer to that stable, and the lad was in that stable then,

JOHN SMITH . I am an officer of Bow-street. I was taken by the last witness to a stable in a court in the Old-Bailey, I there saw the prisoner; I afterwards went with him to the house, where he said he lodged, the boy gave me the key, I afterwards went into the cellar and saw the sow there, that sow afterwards was produced at Bow-street.

PETER MASON . I searched this house in Sash-court, I found four pigs in the house; a person came and owned them at Worship-street.

JOSEPH SMITH . I saw them pigs, they are my master's.

THOMAS HAYWARD . I am a servant to Mr. Chandler, a salesman, in Newgate-market. On the morning of the 11th of September, when I came to Newgate-market, I saw the sow hanging on the meat-hooks, the prisoner was walking backwards and forwards, I asked him who that sow belonged to, he said it belonged to him, he asked me to chop it down, I told him it would fetch more to sell it whole, he gave me three-pence for chopping it down.

Prisoner's Defence. On Sunday night Mr. Banks, the Blacksmith, told me he should have a job for me to go as far as the turnpike, Battle-bridge, he would pay me for the trouble; I met him there about six o'clock, he gave me the pigs to drive home, I drove them home, he received them, he asked my father to kill the fat sow, he did, and I took it to Newgate-market, I booked it in my own name, I was to deliver the money to him, and he would pay me he said for my trouble.

GUILTY , aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18101031-9

772. CHARLES WILSON, alias JACK SMITH , was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 9th of October , three sheets of copper, value, 20 s. the property of John Teale , John Willoughby , Robert Dunbar , William Sowden , and John Moyle .

JOHN TEALE . I am a shipowner .

Q. Who are the joint owner's with you of the Lord Nelson - A. John Willoughby, Robert Dunbar , William Sowden , John Moyle , and myself, John Teale . On the 9th of October, this ship was laying in Mr. Fletcher's dock, Shadwell , the prisoner had been working all that day on board that ship.

JOHN HERBERT . I am an officer, I apprehended the prisoner on the 9th of October, about half past seven in the evening, in Cannon-street, St. George's in the East, about a quarter of a mile from Shadwell Dock, he was carrying the copper on his shoulder, I asked him what he had got there, he said copper he had bought it from the Lord Nelson, she lay in Shadwell Dock being repaired, he was going to carry it to his captain, I told him I would go with him, he then said he could not tell me the captain's name nor the house. I apprehended him and the copper.

Prisoner's Defence. On this evening Thomas Fitz gave me the copper to carry until he took it from me; going along, the mate of the ship, and another gentleman, met this Thomas Fitz , they all went into a house to drink, he told me that he had got the copper from the ship, to carry to the captain's house, I went on with the copper thinking to meet him on the road to the captain's house; in Cannon-street I was taken.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Whipped in jail and discharged.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18101031-10

773. ANDREW BENT , and PHILLIP STREET , were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Hannah Bickers , widow , about the hour of twelve at night, on the 20th of October , and burglariously stealing therein a coat, value 2 s. a tippet, value 6 d. two pair of boots, value, 15 s. and two shoes, value 5 s. the property of Samuel Solomon .

SAMUEL SOLOMON . I live in a room in Hannah Bickers 's house, Clare-market, the corner of Houghton-street, in the parish of St. Clements Danes , somebody else will prove that; in this house I have got a shop, I sleep in the one pair of stairs room in the same house. Mrs. Bickers sleeps in the house, she is the mistress of the house. On Friday the 19th of October my shop was shut up at four o'clock in the afternoon. I fastened my shop door with a padlock outside of the door, and another lock inside of the door, and the windows were shut on the ground floor, there were no fastenings to them, only the windows pulled down. On Sunday morning, a quarter before three, the watchman called me, I found the padlock was broken off, and the other lock forced; I missed two pair of boots and a pair of shoes.

Q. Did not you miss other things besides them - A. That I do not know. I went to Bow-street, they shewed me the things on Monday morning, I said they were mine, I had seen the two pair of boots and the pair of shoes in my shop on the Friday afternoon at four o'clock, when I shut up my shop, I am sure of that.

Q. When the watchman called you on the Sunday morning you came down and saw your padlock broken off - A. Yes, and these shoes and boots I missed directly.

Q. Did you miss any thing else - A. Yes, I think I missed more shoes, these were new shoes and the boots were second hand, the shoes I bought at a sale.

Q. You do not know either of the prisoners do you - A. No.

JOHN WHITE . I am a publican, I live in King-street, Drury-lane.

Q. Do you know the persons of the prisoners - A. I know Bent very well, I have often seen him. On last Sunday week, Bent and Street came into my house about eight o'clock in the morning and ordered breakfast at nine, they brought in a bundle but who had it I cannot say, they both had it before them and spread it out on

the table in the tap-room, there were boots and shoes, and a coat or two, but what else I cannot say, they offered them for sale to different people that were in the taproom, to me and all; I bought two pair of boots, and a pair of shoes, the boots were old and the shoes partly new, they are regimental shoes, I believe I gave them six shillings for the lot.

Q. You ought to be scrupulous of buying without asking them how they came by them - A. I had no idea of their coming by them dishonestly.

Q. Why if they had bought them they could not sell them for six shillings - A. No, but I did not know but some gentleman gave them to them, I was busy, I told my wife to give six shillings for them, and she took them up stairs.

Q. Should you know the shoes and boots again - A. Yes, the officers came in about nine, they apprehended the prisoners there, and I delivered up the boots and shoes to the officer.

Q. Did either of the prisoners give you the money back - A. Yes, Street gave me three shillings.

Q. What, they divided the money half and half did they - A. I suppose so, I cannot say.

Q. The prisoners gave no account how they came by them - A. Not any.

Q. Did Solomon come with the officers - A. He came himself, he took them away with him, he said there had been some things taken out of a house, I told him I had them, when he asked me if I had got any thing, and then the officers took away the things.

Bent. Did I offer them to you for sale - A. I cannot say which of you offered them. I believe they had two old coats and some more shoes.

- ADKINS. Q. You are an officer - A. Yes.

Q. You attended Salmon to the house of the last witness - A. I did, the prisoners were apprehended there, Salmon was with me.

WILLIAM SALMON . I apprehended the prisoners on Sunday morning, the 21st of October; I received information that there were some men offering some wearing apparel at a public-house about eight o'clock in the morning, I went there with Adkins between eight and nine, I found the two prisoners there sitting in the tap-room by themselves, I asked the landlord if he had bought any property that morning, he told me he had bought two pair of boots of the prisoners, and one pair of shoes, he produced them.

Q. Did you see one of the two prisoners offer back part of the money - A. Yes, Street gave me three shillings, and he asked Bent for three shillings, he said, Mr. Bent, did you give it him, Bent made no answer, these are the boots and shoes.

Q. to Solomon. Look at these shoes and boots carefully, and say whether these are your shoes and boots you had in your house, when you shut up your shop - A. These were all in my shop, I saw them in my shop on the Friday afternoon.

Q. How late on the Saturday did you see your shop safe - A. On Saturday night at ten o'clock, and the padlock was entire I am sure of that; I had occasion to pass it, I am sure all was safe then.

Bent's Defence. On Sunday morning I bought the boots and shoes of two men and a woman, at the corner of Coal-yard in Drury-lane, I gave them a crown for them, they asked me six shillings, and took a crown; the other prisoner came up to me and asked me what I was buying, I told him, he said he would go my halves, and he gave me half-a-crown.

Street's Defence. I was coming down Drury-lane, I can say no more than what has been said.

JOHN BARFIELD . The prisoners brought the goods for sale into my master's shop about half after seven o'clock.

Q. What is your master's shop - A. A translator of old shoes.

Q. Did the translator buy them - A. No.

Street. It is not a dwelling-house that was broken open, and there is a witness in court can prove it not to be a dwelling-house.

Q. to Solomon. You sleep in the house - A. Yes, in the one pair of stairs room, and Mrs. Bickers sleeps in the house; there are two doors to the house, I enter at the same door they do, to go up stairs to my room; the shop door is in the street.

Salmon. After the house was broken open, I went and examined it; the house is a corner house, the shop door is in Houghton-street, and the house door is in Clare-market, there is no entrance from the shop door into the house, only coming out into the street, and going into the other door to go up stairs, it is all one house.

Street called seven witnesses who gave him a good character.

BENT GUILTY - DEATH , aged 20.

STREET GUILTY - DEATH , aged 16.

Second Middlesex jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18101031-11

774. JAMES MILLER was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Fielder , about the hour of seven on the night of the 15th of October , and stealing therein six pincloths, value 6 s. two dresses, value 10 s. two frocks, value 5 s. seven shirts, value 14 s. six neck-handkerchiefs, value 6 s. seven pair of stockings, value 7 s. three petticoats, value 3 s. five night-caps, value 3 s. four bed-gowns, value 5 s. four handkerchiefs, value 4 s. three towels, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of Thomas Fielder; and three dollars, the property of Mary Howell , spinster .

SECOND COUNT. That he being in the dwelling-house of Thomas Fielder , feloniously did steal the said goods, and afterwards did burglariously break out of the house.

MARY HOWELL . Q. Whose servant were you on the 15th of October last - A. Mr. Fielder's, his house is No. 1, Clipstone-street ; my master and family were at Hampstead at another house, I was left in care of the house in Clipstone-street.

Court. You were a servant in the house before - A. Yes, and left in care of the house.

Mr. Reynolds. Did you go up to Hampstead on the 15th of October - A. Yes, between four and five, I left the house all fastened I am sure of that, I locked the door and took the key with me, I returned between seven and eight to the house in Clipstone-street, there were a many people about the door, I went into a neighbours, the door when I came home was shut as they had left it.

Q. What time did you go into the house - A. I went to a neighbour's, Mr. Flatts, I there received some information; I went into the house between seven and eight and two gentleman that were left in care of the house, opened the door. My trunk was carried from the garret down into the passage.

Q. Had you seen that trunk in the garret before you went - A. Yes, and I had lost fifteen shillings.

COURT. Your trunk had not been opened had it - A. No.

Q. What were these fifteen shillings in - A. Three dollars.

Mr. Reynolds. Do you know where these dollars were left when you went out - A. I had left them on the dresser in the kitchen, I lost two silver tea spoons out of a cupboard in the kitchen and a bundle of clothes, containing Mr. Fielder's childrens clothes; that bundle of clothes was upon the dresser by the fifteen shillings. I carried the bundle from Hampstead the day before.

COURT. Had you seen the things in the bundle what they were - A. Yes.

Mr. Reynolds. Do you know either of the gentlemen that let you in the house - A. One is a hair-dresser, his name is Muffin the other I cannot tell.

Mr. Adolphus. You set out between four and five to go to Hampstead - A. Yes.

Q. It was not dark then - A. No.

Q. Are you sure that you locked the door - A. Yes, I locked the street-door, and the two area-doors, I fastened all the doors and windows, and left nobody in the house.

Q. How long had your master been out of town - A. Not quite two months.

Q. Did he leave any lodgers in the house when he went away - A. No.

ANN GREENWELL . I live facing Mr. Fielder's house. On the evening of the 15th of October last, I was at my window between six and seven o'clock; I saw three men walking to and again by Mr. Fielder's house, it was shut up; the lamps were lighted; I saw the men by the light of the lamps.

Q. Was it light or dark - A. It was not a dark night.

Q. Was there any light of day remaining when you saw these men - A. Very little; it was getting dark; these men went away and came at different times, the party did.

Q. How often may you have seen these men pass the door - A. I cannot exactly say; about half a dozen times. They came past and picked up something out of the kennel, one of them did, and throwed it at the kitchen window shutters; two of them came up and one went close to the door.

COURT. What became of the third - A. I do not know; two of the men came up; one of the men went close to the door and the other, and the other staid behind; they parted again, and the same man who had gone close to the door came up again and went close to the door; he went away again. I went down to Mrs. Dobbings, that lives in my house, I desired her to put out her candle and look out of the window.

Mr. Reynolds. What part of the house was the window that you was looking from - A. The two pair.

Q. How much time from your first observing these men had elapsed to your going down to Mr. Dobbings - A. About half an hour.

Q. How was the light when the half hour had elapsed when you went down to Mrs. Dobbins - A. It got rather darker.

Mr. Adolphus. You began this watch of yours at

Q. You could see every thing distinctly what you have related - A. Yes; I saw him go up close to the door.

Q. It is the custom of your parish to light the lamps before the day-light closes - A. Very often.

SARAH DOBBINGS . I lodge in the same house that that Mrs. Greenwell lodges, opposite of Mr. Fielder's house.

Q. Do you remember on Monday evening, the 15th of October, Mrs. Greenwell coming down to your room - A. Yes; my candle had been alight above a quarter of an hour; Mrs. Greenwell desired me to put out the candle, I did; I got up and tore my curtain away, and locked through the window, I saw three men walking to and fro Mr. Fielder's door. I did not continue two minutes at my window before I went down stairs; I went to Mr. Brodie's the confectioners in Portland-road, next door to Mr. Fielder's.

Q. You made some enquiries when you got there - did any body come in while you were there - A. Yes; one of the men that were standing at the corner of the street, he came into the shop, and bought a halfpenny bun.

Q. How long did you say in Mrs. Brodie's shop - A. About three minutes; then I went to Mr. Flatt's next door to Mr. Fielder's; I made some communication to Mr. Flatt. In consequence of what I told him he and I went to Mr. Fielder's door.

Q. At the time that you were at Mr. Fielder's door was it light or dark - A. It wanted about ten minutes to seven o'clock.

COURT. What makes you say ten minutes to seven o'clock - A. That is the time it was.

Q. Had you observed any watch or clock - A. No, I had not. It was a little before seven when I went to Mr. Fielder's door.

Q. Not speaking by any watch or clock - A. I know it was so by the time of the night.

Q. Is it the opinion you form from the darkness or light - A. From the darkness; the lamps were all lit.

Mr. Reynolds. Now I will ask you whether, supposing the lamps had not been lighted, could you have distinguished the features of any person you met in the street - A. No, I could not.

Q. You and Mr. Flatt went to Mr. Fielder' what did you do then - A. I knocked very loud at the door, three men rushed out.

Q. Did you knock more than once - A. I knocked a loud knock, and Mr. Flatt rung the bell before they rushed out.

Q. Was the door shut or open when you knocked at it - A. Shut; I am quite sure of that; three men rushed out.

Q. Did you observe their opening the door - A. Yes, the same as if I was to take hold of the spring lock, and open it myself; I heard the door open. I hit the door such a knock, almost enough to break it open.

COURT. So that if the door had been open when you knocked you must have perceived it open - A. Yes. There came three men out, the first man had got a bundle, I took it from him, he ran away, and another was behind him, he ran away, and the third, he went to run away, and Mr. Flatt laid hold of him.

Q. You saw that did you - A. Yes. He got away from Mr. Flatt I believe, I did not see that; I afterwards

went to my own house.

Q. What became of the door of the house when these men rushed out - A. Two men went and took care of the house. One of the men was Mr. Muffin, they went in of their own accord to take care of the house untill the maid came home.

Mr. Adolphus. What are you - A. I take in washing; I live in the first floor.

Q. You were busy this night I suppose - A. I was not very busy. It was Monday night, I sat sewing.

Q. That was the reason you lighted the candle - A. Yes, it was too dark to see any thing.

Q. It was too dark to see any thing, and that was the reason you had lighted the candle to enable you to see to sew - A. Yes.

Q. By your age I should suppose your eye-sight is not very good - A. Yes, my eyes are pretty good.

Q. You had seen no clock, you only guess it was near seven o'clock - You say when you were in the street by the light you could not see the features of any persons face, any other person younger with a better eye-sight might.

COURT. You say your eye-sight is pretty good - A. Yes.

Mr. Adolphus. You took hold of the bundle, and he ran away - A. Yes; he was the first that came out.

Q. Are you sure that you saw any other number of men come out - A. Yes, I saw them all three.

Q. You were engaged in taking this man, you also saw the two others - A. Yes.

Mr. Reynolds. What is become of the bundle - A. I have got it here; it has been in my possession ever since.

COURT to Mrs. Greenwell. What became of you after you desired Mrs. Dobbing's to put out her light - A. I went up to my own room.

Q. What was your reason for desiring her to put out her candle - A. I thought they had noticed me; my fire gave a great light, and I damped it. I did not wish to be observed by them; I did not go out to give any information.

MR. FLATT. I am a cheesemonger living in Clipstone-street; I live next door to Mr. Fielder.

Q. Do you remember the last witness, Mrs. Dobbings coming to you on the evening of the 15th of October - A. Yes, very near seven.

Q. Are you able to speak with any accuracy about the time - A. I cannot say I took any particular notice, it was about that time; it was before seven.

Q. Is your shop an open shop to the street - A. The shop and door is open to the street; the candles had been lighted in my shop about half an hour.

Q. In consequence of any information from Mrs. Dobbings did you go out - A. Immediately.

Q. When you went out with her was there any remains of twy-light left - A. I did not perceive any; the lamps were all lighted.

Q. Supposing the lamps had been out do you think you could have discovered the face of any man that passed - A. No.

Q. Now where did you go when you went out with Mrs. Dobbing's - A. To Mr. Fielder's door; his door is up one step a large flag-stone; we went to the door; Mrs. Dobbings and me said to ourselves, is the maid at home? She knocked and rang the bell; she gave a loud knock and I rang sharp.

Q. Are you able to say whether the door was shut or open when Mrs. Dobbings knocked - A. It was shut.

Q. Upon Mrs. Dobbings knocking and you ringing, as you described, what happened - A. Three men came out almost instantly; one followed the other as fast as they could, one after the other; I heard the door open and three men came out; two men went off; I catched the third man as he came out.

Q. Did you make any observation whether any thing was done to the two first men - A. No, I cannot say I did; I saw the bundle in the street.

Q. Did you see any thing taken from the first man - A. I cannot say I did, I was looking at the last man.

Q. Did you see any bundle with the first man - A. Yes, I did; I did not see what became of that bundle. I catched hold of the third man, he got away from me, I pursued him instantly, he took up Portland-street; Clipstone-street, runs into Portland-street, he took to the left of Portland-street, from Mr. Fielder's. I followed him from fifty to a hundred yards more or less, I cannot exactly say.

Q. Was the person that came out of the house that you followed over out of your sight when you followed him - A. No, he ran and I followed him, he fell down a little way up in Portland-street; from the corner he fell, and I fell over him; I was close to his heels, I catched him by the collar and secured him.

Q. Now who is the man that you catched by the collar and secured - A. The prisoner at the bar,

Q. Did any person assist you or go with you - A. There was a man came up at the first instant; I catched hold of him, his name is Robinson.

Q. Did you say any thing as you were pursuing - A. I holloed out, stop thief; Robinson and me took him back to Mr. Fielder's house, not into the house; we took him to the door, Mr. Unwin came up, Robinson, Unwin, and me took him to the watch-house. Howard the constable, searched him, I cannot say what was found upon him, the constable took something from him which he put into his pocket.

Q. Are you quite sure that the man that you collared was the man that you pursued and that you never lost sight of him - A. Yes, I am quite sure of that.

Q. I ask you again was there any remains of day light when this man came out of the house - A. Not as I perceived, the lamps were all lit, I did not see any remains of day.

Mr. Adolphus. You had the lamps lit in your shop some time before this woman came to you - A. Yes.

Q. You deal in retail and want good lights in the shop to see the money that you take - A. Yes, I had only two candles lighted.

Q. You will not take upon you to say that there was no day light left - A. No, I did not perceive any.

Q. When you came to the door you knocked and rang, the door was opened partly soon - A. Yes.

Q. You observed no particular noise - A. No farther than other doors do.

Court. You heard the door open you said - A. Yes.

Mr. Adolphus. You do not know whether it was fastened or no - A. Yes, I tried it before we knocked or rang.

Q. When the man that you pursued came out he

bolted round the corner - A. No, he bolted into the street, the third man went into Portland-street, round the corner, I did not lose sight of him, I was too near him.

COURT. How was that, describe it - A. I did not lose sight of him when he turned the corner he did not go so nigh the corner as that, he went more out into the street.

Mr. Adolphus. In taking him to the watch-house, you had hold of him for one, you observed nothing particular - A. I observed nothing particular.

JOHN ROBINSON . Q. What are you - A. A carpenter and joiner.

Q. Do you remember the night of the 15th of October - A. Very well, I was going up Clipstone-street. When I got opposite of Mr. Fielder's door, I saw Mr. Flatt, and the prisoner at the bar turning from the flag stones into the street. Mr. Flatt, holloed out, stop thief. I instantly run after the prisoner, and Mr. Flatt not being more than three yards distance from him, I saw the prisoner fall, and Mr. Flatt fell on him, I caught the prisoner by the collar before he arose from the ground, and while running before, the prisoner fell, I heard something fall upon the stones, it made a great sound; immediately the prisoner got up he dropped some skeleton keys, I heard him drop it at his heels. When I had got hold of his collar, they were picked up, before we stirred from the place; they were shewed me after they were picked up; I saw them picked up, and saw what they were at the time, they were skeleton keys, we returned to Mr. Fielder's door, and then we went to the watch-house. As we were going across Portland-place, the prisoner made a stop, he got his hand away from the person of the other side; he dropped another key, I saw the key lay on the stones before it was picked up and heard it fall. In Welbeck-street we were joined by the constable Howard, I delivered the prisoner up to him, he was taken to the watch-house and searched in my presence. I saw the constable take some more keys out of his pocket, and a phial of phosphorus, I believe was taken out of his hand, I did not see that.

Mr. Adolphus. Perhaps you knew the prisoner in Portland-road - A. No; when I got to the watch-house I said, I had seen his face somewhere.

Q. In Portland-road could you see one man's face from the other - A. Yes, when I was laying hold of him, I could see his face the lamps were pretty well lit up.

THOMAS UWIN . Q. I believe you are a butcher living in Norton-street - A. I am. I was in Norton-street, the corner of Clipstone-street.

Q. Did you observe any more than these last two witnesses have mentioned - A. No, I observed nothing until I heard the cry of stop thief. I run out of my shop immediately, and when I came up, Mr. Flatt had hold of the prisoner, I saw his hand against his coat pocket when he was standing at Mr. Fielder's door, I said, he was pulling something out of his pocket and the moment I observed it and spoke there was something dropped, I picked it up it was this key; then I desired one of my men to lay hold of his arm to prevent him from putting his hand into his pocket, I walked by the side of him down to the watch-house. In going across Woburn-place, another key dropped, I heard it drop, a person picked it up and gave it me momently. I was going along, I heard Howard speak, I knew him and called Howard, he came I saw him searched by Howard, he took a bottle out of his hand some halfpence and silver, and I saw two bags taken out of his pocket with keys in them.

HENRY HOWARD . I am a constable of the parish of Mary-le-bone.

Q. Do you remember coming up to Flatt and Uwin - A. I joined them in Welbeck-street, I took hold of the prisoner and led him to the watch-house, I gave them strict charge not to let him put his hand into his pockets; I perceived him put his hand into his waistcoat pocket and take out this bottle of phosphorus, and out of the same pocket I took out these matches; I took the bottle out of his hand. In his left hand inside coat pocket, I took these six skeleton keys, they were in this bag they are keys for inside doors, I have unlocked several of Mr. Fielder's doors with them. In his outside coat pocket I found this bag and two more keys they are larger skeleton keys; I searched his breeches pocket, I found four dollars, five shillings in silver, and eight pennyworth of halfpence. I went the next morning and opened Mr. Fielder's door with one of these two keys that I took from his outside pocket, this is the key, it locked and unlocked it. I tried two of the small keys which unlocked the bed room doors. After he was secured in the watch-house, I went back with Vaughan this crow was found.

Q. When you went into the house did you observe any place forced - A. I did. I believe they call it the book case in the parlour that apparently had been forced with a crow and likewise a store place in the kitchen where they keep soap that had been forced the same way, and in the two pair of stairs back room there was a chest of drawers attempted but not broken open.

Q. Did different places in the house exhibit to you that persons had been there endeavouring to break the place open - A. Yes.

MRS. DOBBINGS. This is the bundle, it had been in my care ever since.

Q. to Mrs. Howell. Look at that bundle - A. I have looked over every one of the articles, there is six pincloths, two dresses, they are frocks and trowsers, two pair of trowsers besides, two frocks, seven children's shirts, seven pair of stockings of my mistress and master and children, three children's petticoats, five night caps, four bed gowns, three children's and one mistress's, four pocket handkerchiefs, one silk and the other cambric, and three towels; I cannot tell the value of them, and I lost three dollars, I do not know them.

THOMAS FIELDER . Q. Have you got a house in Clipstone-steet - A. I have. No. 1, in the parish of Mary-le-bone.

Q. Where were you and your family in October last - A. At Hampstead. I took the house for the season only, I left my house in Clipstone-street, in the care of my cook Sarah Howell meaning to return to it in November.

Q. Mr. Fielder can you form any judgment of the value of these articles - A. I cannot form any judgment.

COURT. Mrs. Dobbings have you looked at these things - A. No, I have not.

Q. Just cast your eye over them and tell me whether you can give any opinion about the value of them, what would you give for them - A. I would give thirty-four or thirty-five shillings for them.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel and called no witnesses to his character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 45.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18101031-12

775. ROBERT MORRIS was indicted for that he, on the 8th of October , upon Samuel Williams a subject of our Lord the King, feloniously, wilfully, and maliciously, did make an assault, and with a certain sharp instrument, did stab and cut the said Samuel Williams , in and upon his left side; with intent in so doing to kill and murder him .

SECOND COUNT. With intent to disable him.

THIRD COUNT. To do him some grievous bodily harm. And DAVID HUGHES for that he, at the said time did aid, and abet the said Robert Morris the said felony to do; and commit, and that he knew of, and was privy to the said offence .

Mr. Gurney, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18101031-13

776. WILLIAM SMITH , WILLIAM MANN , and WILLIAM BERRY were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Wakelin , about the hour of three in the afternoon, on the 8th of October , and stealing therein, four seals, value 5 l. his property .

WILLIAM WAKELIN . Q. Where is your shop - A. No. 65, High Holborn .

Q. When did you lose any thing out of your shop - On the 18th of last month I lost five gold seals; I saw them at three o'clock, and missed them at five.

Q. Were you in the house yourself all that time - A. Yes. There was me and my wife. The seals laid in the shop window; one pane of glass was broken, it was cracked before; I never perceived it broken till five o'clock. It was only cracked in one place before; when I saw it broken there were two small pieces out; it was broken in two pieces, they were knocked in the inside of the window.

Q. Did it appear as if it was done by force and violence, or as if it had fell out - A. It appeared as if done by violence.

Q. How were the seals placed - A. Close to the windows; when the two pieces of glass were out any person might put their two fingers in and take the seals, they laid close to the glass, I had observed them there before.

Q. They were set in gold, were they - A. Yes.

Q. What was the value of them five seals - A. I should imagine about seven or eight pounds. I missed them all at one time.

Q. It was by the light of day at five o'clock, on the 8th of October, that you saw your window broken and your seals taken away - A. Yes.

WILLIAM SALMON . On the 8th of October, about a quarter past three, I saw the prisoners in Holborn, they were all three together, I knew them very well; I suffered them to pass me; I immediately turned round, I observed Mann give a gold seal to the prisoner Smith; I immediately catched hold of Smith's arm.

Q. What part of Holborn was this in - A. Nearly opposite of Turnstile. I could see him putting the seal into Smith's hand; they were all three walking abreast; I being behind, saw the seal; Mann put his hand sideways to Smith, Smith took it; I caught hold of Smith's hand, he at the first instant put his hand behind him, and when he found I was getting hold of his hand he threw it into the street; I observed the seal drop; I dragged the prisoner to the seal and picked it up; I looked at it and asked him where he got it, he said he bought it of a boy, and gave two-pence for it; I then took him to the office in Bow-street; I searched him, in his fob I found three other gold seals. He was detained. I made it known to my brother officers, they took Berry and Mann in about two hours in Holborn. This was on the 18th of October, about a quarter past three o'clock; I saw them about three or four doors from the prosecutor's, they were coming down Holborn in a direction, as if from his house, on the same side. I produce the seals. The fifth seal was not found.

Q. to prosecutor. Are these four of the seals that you lost - A. Yes.

- LIMERICK. I am am an officer. I apprehended Mann and Berry in Holborn, a quarter after five; in consequence of information by Salmon I searched Mann, I found six shillings and six pence on him, and this knife; I searched the other prisoner and found four shillings and six-pence. When I had Mann and Berry going along to the office, Mann offered me five shillings if I would let him go. I knew him before.

Q. Did you mention the name of Salmon, and that he had given you some information - A. Yes.

Smith. I told the officer that I found these things; will he swear that I said I bought it of a boy, and gave two pence for it.

Salmon. He said he bought it of the other boy, that was his expression, for two-pence.

Smith's Defence. I was going down Holborn about half after three o'clock in the afternoon, on the 18th of October, I kicked a piece of paper on the edge of the curbstone, a seal fell out of it into the kennel; I immediately picked up the paper, then I went and picked up the seal. There were two papers; there were three seals in the papers, besides the one that fell in the kennel; I put the three into my fob pocket, and I was wiping this one that fell in the mud. As for these two prisoners I know nothing of them, upon my oath, they were never with me, I never saw him before with my eyes. This gentleman laid hold of me, and jolting my hand, he knocked the seal out of my hand that I was wiping of; he asked me where I got them, I told him I found them. He then took me to Bow-street. I am innocent; I never saw the shop in my life, neither were these boys walking abreast with me.

Mann's Defence. I never saw this boy before in my life, until I was at the office.

Berry's Defence. I know William Mann ; that is I have to say.

Q. to Salmon. You have no doubt you saw Mann hand it over to Smith - A. Yes; and taking him to the office Smith offered me five shillings to let him go, and I might keep the seal, and before the magistrate he owned that he received the seals from Mann; and Mann said as soon as he got to the Start he would stick a knife into Smith for owning it.

Q. What did he mean by the Start - A. Newgate.

Q. to prosecutor. Is it the house in which your family lives in - A. Yes; it is in the parish of St. Andrew, Holborn.

SMITH, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 13.

MANN, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 14.

BERRY, NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18101031-14

776. JOHN NEWMAN was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of John Constable , he, and Elizabeth his wife, being therein, about the hour of two in the afternoon, on the 4th of October , and stealing therein, two silk handkerchiefs, value 3 s. and 3 l. in monies numbered, the property of Ann Saunders .

ANN SAUNDERS . I live in Charles-court in the Strand , I lodge in the house of John Constable, I occupy the front parlour; Mr. Constable lives in the house himself; I sell fruit; I have a stall at the Admiralty .

Q. When did you first become acquainted with that boy at the bar - A. I was down at the Admiralty; he was about the place; I asked him who he belonged to; he was close to my stall; I asked him to go of an errand for me; he went; I asked him if he had any parents, he told me he had a grandmother that lived in Holborn; he lived with his grandmother; I asked him what he did.

Q. Was this before you asked him to go of an errand for you - A. Yes. I asked him whether his grandmother would be uneasy if he went of an errand, he told me no; that his grandmother went out a charing, that she paid for his lodging, that she was a week sometimes before she came home, and that he ran of errands for any one for a little victuals; he had nobody to give him any thing.

Q. Did you employ him to go on errands for you - A. Yes, on that day; not to give him any wages; I gave him lodging for two or three nights; I took him to lodge with me on the Monday.

Q. Did he continue to lodge with you till the Thursday - A. Yes, and I employed him some way or other.

Q. On the Thursday morning what time did you leave your lodging to go to your stand - A. About eleven o'clock; the prisoner went with me, he helped me to carry some of the things.

Q. You gave him his victuals - A. Yes.

Q. Before you left this room of yours what had you left in it this morning belonging to you - A. I left three pound in my box; I had counted it the over-night, intending to go to market, but I did not; the box was locked, I took the key with me. The lock of the box was not broken open, it was the hinge that was undone; I had locked my room door and taken the key with me.

Q. Do you know what you did with the key of your room after you got to the stall - A. I left it on my stand; I usually placed it there.

Q. Had the prisoner his victuals with you there that day - A. Yes, at the stand, near about two o'clock; he had not finished his dinner when he went away from my stand; he went away of his own accord. I was not advised of it.

Q. When he went away did he say that he was going - A. No, not a word.

Q. How long was it afterwards before you went to your room - A. It may be about ten minutes after I missed him.

Q. How long had he been absent from your stand when you missed him - A. About ten minutes after he was gone some suspicion struck me; I immediately went through Scotland-yard to my lodgings; it was within five minutes walk to my lodgings from my stand. When I got to my room I went to my door, it was locked the same as I left it; I looked through the window, I saw my box in the middle of the room, on the floor; I had left it underneath the bed.

Q. Had you your key with you to unlock your room door - A. No; I had left it on the stand; the boy had that.

Q. Then when you went to your room to see for the boy, you did not take the key with you - A. No, I went back to my stand to look for my key, I could not find it.

Q. You said you looked in the window, did you get in the window - A. Yes; after I got back from the stall the second time.

Q. You said something about the hinges - A. No, not the hinges; the hasp was loose; two small nails were drawn from the hasp, by which means the box could be opened. I missed out of my box all the money I have mentioned; there were none left behind, and I missed two silk handkerchiefs.

Q. Were they good ones - A. Yes, pretty good ones. There were other things in the box, but he had not meddled with them; only a small window curtain that the money was tied up in, the curtain had money in it. I was coming out of the window again, there was a small pane of glass out, I looked down and saw the key on the floor; there was a basket there, it had dropped in a small-basket; it appeared to me to have been broken through the hole in the window into that basket; I then went into Holborn, to where he told me his grandmother lived.

Q. Had he told you what part of Holborn - A. No, he had not. I found him about the middle of Holborn, it was then between four and five; he was then on the contrary side of the street; I crossed the street and laid hold of him, he did not see me; he had one of the handkerchiefs tied about his neck, and the other handkerchief he had a shirt in. As soon as I took hold of him he got away from me: he had the curtain, and some of the money in it.

Q. When you saw a handkerchief about his neck, and another handkerchief that he had, did you see the curtain at that time with something in it - A. Yes, he had it on his arm; when he got away from the gentleman he fell down, then I got hold of him again; I got him further on and then I saw Hancock the officer.

JAMES HANCOCK . When I saw him he was coming to the office with a number of people with him, and the prosecutrix, I took him in custody and searched him.

Q. to prosecutrix. Did you see the money found upon him, and how much - A. The halfpence were left in the curtain, not the silver, he denied having any silver; Hancock searched his pockets, and found some silver about him.

Q. How much money was taken from him - A. Sixteen shillings in halfpence and some silver.

JOHN CONSTABLE . I live at No. 11, Charles-court, in the Strand; I rent the house; I live in the first floor, and the prosecutrix has the ground floor.

Q. The same outer door you both enter, do not you - A. Yes; I have other lodgers; we all enter by the same-street-door.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. I have seen the boy several times, I knew he was in her employ.

Q. About what time on Thursday did you see him - A. It was after two; I cannot exactly say; I was then coming home and going up stairs to my room.

Q. Was there any of your family at home - A. My wife was at home. As I was coming up stairs I saw him trying to unlock the door with the key, he said he could not undo it; he asked me in a genteel manner whether I would be so good as to undo it for him.

Q. Did you turn the key for him - A. I did; I unlocked the door, I did not see him go in, not knowing but he had the authority of Mrs. Saunders; having unlocked the door I went up stairs to my room, I saw nor heard any thing of him afterwards. I keep a school up stairs, and I remained up stairs till it was dusk; I knew nothing of what had happened till Mrs. Saunders came home, it was dusk then.

Q. Is it a lock that goes hard - A. I suppose he had been trying it, and had strained it somewhere.

JAMES HANCOCK . I am a constable of Hatton Garden office.

Q. When did you see any thing of this boy - A. About four o'clock in the day, in Hatton Garden, I saw Mrs. Saunders and the boy, they were making for the office, he was delivered to me with this little curtain, containing penny pieces; I searched him on the spot; I took this silk handkerchief off his neck, and a quantity of penny pieces and halfpence in his breeches pocket; I took this silk handkerchief and shirt from him; he had bought the shirt somewhere, it seemed as if it had been laying in a shop window, by the flies being upon it. I found to the amount in halfpence of one shilling and seven-pence halfpence, and six shillings in his breeches pocket, a good and a bad sixpence, which the prosecutrix swore to before the magistrate, and a piece of paper, which she said was part of the paper which the silver was wrapped up in, in her box; the curtain was delivered up to me, in it was seven shillings and eleven-pence halfpenny in copper, the major part good, they have been in my custody ever since, and he confessed having done the robbery.

Q. Did he say any thing to you about his grandmother - A. No, nor he would not say where he lived before he went to this woman; he would not answer any question.

Q. to prosecutrix. Look at the two silk handkerchiefs - A. This is the handkerchief that was taken off his neck, there is a mark of paint on it in the middle, I know it to be mine; I have had this handkerchief a good while.

Q. Now look at the handkerchief that contains the shirt - A. This other handkerchief is mine, there is a small hole torn with a pin; there is none of the money I can speak to except that sixpence, this I had by me a good while, it is a very bad one, with two or three little notches in it.

Prisoner's Defence. On Wednesday night Mrs. Saunders had been out all night and got tipsey, she came home at night and had her pockets full of halfpence; she pulled her halfpence out of her pocket, and laid them on the table, and let me count them. She immediately felt in her pocket for the key of her box, she could not find the key of her box; she got a knife and wrenched the hasp of the box open; she pulled the halfpence out of the box and bid me count them: I counted them and there were only fifteen shillings; she said in the box there ought to be three pound; she said I had taken the rest all but fifteen shillings, and she said she would have me taken before the justice the next day; I told her I had no more; she searched me all over, and then we went to bed that night. Then the next day she took her stall out about eleven o'clock, she had been telling me she would get Mr. Hancock to take me up. About two o'clock we had our dinner at the stall, and then she began correcting and beating me, she would let me have no dinner hardly, then I said I would not do any thing without I had my dinner; she said I should have no more dinner, and if I did not do as I should do she would have me taken up, then I told her I had none of the money, I said there were only fifteen shillings in the box. Then she sent me home with a bundle that came from the washerwoman, she gave me key of the door, I unlocked the door and put the bundle in; I brought the key back to the stall, then she sent me home again with one of the fruit baskets; I took the fruit basket down in the cellar in Mr. Constable's house; she told me to bring some apples with me as I came back, and coming back I had the misfortune to let the apples down, then she said she would take me up for letting the apples down, then she went home and got the money that I had counted the over night out of the box.

Q. Were you with her then - A. I was left behind wiping the apples that I had let down. She went home and got the money in her pocket; after I had got all the apples up she said she meaned to take me to Worship-street, or some other place, and have me tried; then she and the woman at the next stall were going to to lock me up in the parlour untill she had got her stall away, and got her fruit in to take me to the office. I ran away from her, and she followed me into Holborn, about Leather-lane, she stopped me there, then she was taking me to Hatton Garden, down Leather-lane she met Mr. Hancock, and she gave Mr. Hancock the fifteen shillings in halfpence.

Q. Do you mean to say that she produced the fifteen shillings in halfpence - A. Yes. Then Mr. Hancock searched me, Mr. Hancock found in my pocket six shillings and six-pence, the six shillings and sixpence was what I took in the course of the day time at the stall in fruit; she told Mr. Hancock that I had broken open the box and took the money; then they went to a public house, and there they sat and drank together for about half an hour, Mr. Hancock and the prosecutrix, and then I was locked up at the office.

Q. Now, Mrs. Saunders, did any thing pass with the prisoner about your money - A. No.

Q. You heard him say that you came home on the Wednesday night tipsey - A. It was no such thing, no: he never saw me count my money, I opened my box; I unlocked it, I had they key in my pocket.

Q. Did you pull any halfpence out of the box to count - A. Yes, but he was never within, I never let

him see the inside of my box.

Q. Did you pull any halfpence out of the box to count - A. Yes, but he was never within; I never let him see the inside of my box.

Q. Did you charge him on the Wednesday night of having taken any money - A. No, nor I never threatened him with taking him to the justice, I never threatened him with sending for Mr. Hancock; I never knew him, I had nothing at all to accuse him, I had missed nothing.

Q. Whether you had missed or not you had not told him so - A. No.

Q. When at dinner did you correct him - A. No.

Q. Did you refuse to let him have any more dinner - A. No, he left part of his dinner on the stall. I said nothing to him about having him taken up.

Q. Did you send him home with any bundle of any washerwoman - A. No, I have no washerwoman, nor did I give him the key of the door.

Q. Did you send him home with a fruit basket - A. No, nor was he to bring any apples; I never sent him home by himself; I never saw him again until I saw him in Holborn.

Q. Where did you give Hancock the halfpence - A. He fell over some stones, and the curtain with the halfpence fell out of his hand, I picked them up and gave them to Mr. Hancock.

Q. Did he take money for you at the stall - A. No, I never left him at the stall, he was only to run of a few errands. I am sure I had this money in my box on the Thursday.

Q. What do you call the value of these two handkerchiefs - A. About three shillings.

Q. Are they worth twelve pence together - A. Yes.

Q. Mr. Constable, what parish is your house in - A. St. Martin's in the fields.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 13.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18101031-15

787. WILLIAM LAWRENCEWOOD was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of John Atkins , esq . about the hour of eight, on the night of the 16th of September , and burglariously stealing therein, a writing desk, value 4 l. a port folio, value 5 s. a ruler, value 6 d. a book, value 5 s. two steel pens mounted in ivory, value 6 d. and a pocket book, value 1 d. his property .

SARAH MUCKGRAY . I am a servant, I live with Mr. Alderman Atkins, No. 4, Austinfriers .

Q. What time of the night was it when this happened - A. On Sunday the 16th of September, between five and six o'clock, I was in my master's private room two story high, I went into the room about two o'clock, I remained there till it was quite dark, I had been reading, I could not see to read any longer. I left the room. I went out and returned home about nine o'clock the same night, I went into the room, I perceived some ink on the papers which were in the window.

Q. The ink was in your master's writing-desk - A. Yes; it was a square desk, the ink was locked up in it; I left it on the table, when I returned the writing desk was gone, and the portfolio; and the ink was spilt on the papers, and on the window, and on the wainscoat.

Q. Had you left the window down when you went away - A. Yes, and found it shut down when I went into the room.

Q. Now which way must this have been gone - A. It must have been taken out of the window, because the ink was running on the window, and on the leads of the counting-house; the ink when I returned was fresh on the table, on the floor, and likewise on the wainscot and on the window.

Q. So that you traced it through the outside of the window - A. Yes, the ink was fresh in every place.

Q. This, you say, was about nine o'clock, was it - A. Yes.

Mr. Alley. You are Mr. Atkins servant, when he is in town does he live in this house - A. Yes.

Q. I thought it was a counting house in which he does not reside - A. Sometimes he does.

Q. You went into this room in which this writing desk had been left, I ask you upon your oath, did not you leave the window a part up before you went down stairs - A. No, I was particular in not leaving the window open, because the wind blew my master's papers off the table; I did not leave the window open.

Q. My lord asked you what time you left the room, you said you could not see to read - A. No, I could not.

Q. I dare say if your sweetheart came to the window you would know his face - if any body came to the window that you knew, you would know your friend's face - A. No, not without he came close to the window.

Q. But if he would come close to the window you would know his face - A. No, not my own sister. I was obliged to light a candle to get my tea by.

COURT. You are sure you shut the window, because your master's papers were on the table - A. Yes, I am sure I shut it down.

WILLIAM BROWN . I am a labourer in the London Docks. On the Friday or Saturday before Tuesday the 16th of October, I met the prisoner Wood's wife in Barbican; about five o'clock in the evening, I met the prisoner Woods wife, she asked me how I did; I went home with her to her premises in Brackley-street, Golden lane, and after a little conversation she shewed me a desk, it was in pieces.

Q. The man was not there was he - A. No.

Q. Then I cannot hear what she said - A. When she said it was a desk; I supposed that it was a desk that was lost from Mr. Alderman Atkins.

Q. Who took the desk - A. Two officers, they went and found the desk in the room.

Q. You had no conversation with the prisoner at all - A. No, none at all; I did not see him.

Mr. Alley. Have you ever heard that they that hide can find - A. Yes.

Q. Where did you get that waistcoat that you have on - A. I bought it of Alderman Curtis's groom.

Q. Is this the first time that you made your appearance in this court - A. I think it is; I am sure of it.

Q. How long have you been in London - A. Always in London, except when I have been travelling with my masters.

Q. Are you the person that had a bundle of waistcoats - A. No.

Q. Were you ever tried here - A. Never was tried here nor any where.

Q. Were you ever in the bulks - A. No, never in

my life; I never was accused of any crime of theft, positively, I have never been tried for stealing any thing.

JOSHUA BRAY . I am an officer. I went along with the last witness Brown; he took me into a house in Brackley-street where the prisoner and a woman was, when I saw the prisoner in bed, and his wife. I then went out and beckoned Mr. Alderman Atkins's son and another man in with me. When I saw the man was at home, there came in another officer. I searched the cupboard, and in the cupboard I found this desk, some part of it, and some part under the bed. I looked the room over and found the other things that Mr. Alderman Atkins's son said belonged to his father. This is the drawer, and this is the top and sides. I found this book; this is the lock of the desk, and two ivory pens; this is a little pocket-book, a ruler, and a wafer-stamp, these I found in different parts of the room. After I got all the things together, I handcuffed the prisoner and took him before the Lord mayor. I asked the prisoner to tell me who he had them of; he said, he wished he could.

- HODGSON. I am an officer. I had information from Brown the last witness. I went to the house and found the things, part in the cupboard, part under the bed, and part under two window shutters; we found a book, two steel pens mounted with ivory; after we found these things, I asked the prisoner, he would not tell me how he came by them, he said, he durst not say where he got them.

JOHN ATKINS esq. Q. I understand you have a house in Austin-friars - A. I have; No. 4.

Q. Now in regard to this window, how high is it from the ground - A. It is only one story from the ground, and two from the kitchen.

Q. In fact, you had left your desk in this room - A. It is my private accompting-house, and my desk was there when I left the house. I lost the desk and a large portfolio of papers; they were both left on the table on Saturday evening, the lock of the portfolio is here, as also the key of it; the key is hung to this ring by a bit of string, It was a leather portfolio, I have had it many years, the plate was worn off it, I I am positive to it being the lock. I am perfectly satisfied that this is my desk; it was made in a particular manner, the front of the desk contained Tapp and Middleton's name, who made the desk, on a card; it was here, which was taken off, so that I am positive it is my desk. This book was in the drawer, it contained some private memorandums and labelled as such, and all the memorandums that were taken down in this book were taken out; it is ruled in the margin in this manner with some precision; I can have no doubt of it. These two pens; having written a great deal with them, and having had them a great number of years, I am very positive to their being mine. This little pocket-book I can identify; I used to carry it in my waistcoat pocket. This wafer-seal I can identify likewise.

Mr. Alley. What is your partners' name - A. I have none at all. All these things were within this desk.

Court. You say it is up one pair of stairs - A. My private accompting-house is up one pair of stairs, the back accompting-house comes close to the window; on the leads of the back accompting-house a person can throw the sash up, and they may enter at the top of the leads.

Q. How high are the leads from the ground - A. Seven feet, and the top of the leads about ten. We traced it to the lamp-lighter's ladder, and we found the ink upon the lamp-lighter's ladders but who took it we could not tell.

Prisoner's Defence. I am an innocent man. Brown has been twice convicted in this court.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 41.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18101031-16

788. SARAH SLATER was indicted, for that she, on the 18th of August , seven pieces of false counterfeit coin, made to the likeness and similitude of the silver coin of this realm, called shillings; and twenty-six pieces of false counterfeit coin, made to the likeness and similitude of this realm, called a sixpence, the same not being cut in pieces, unlawfully did put off to William Stafford at a lower rate and value than they by their denomination imported to be, or were counterfeited for, that is to say for ten shillings . And

THREE OTHER COUNTS for like offence, only stating it in a different manner.

WILLIAM STAFFORD . Q. Are you in the East Middlesex militia - A. Yes.

Q. Were you in town in the month of March last - A. I was.

Q. Look at the prisoner at the bar, do you know her - A. Perfectly well. In the beginning of March was the first time I saw her at the Crispin public-house in Grub-street, I saw her in the company of Cope, Butt, and Mary Walton ; Sarah Slater passed as Cope's wife; I conversed with the prisoner there about counterfeit money, she shewed me some.

Q. How long were you acquainted with her - A. From March till August.

Q. Have you ever heard her say any thing about counterfeit money - A. I have heard her complain to Butt that he did not supply her with blanks enough for her to finish.

Q. Did you at any time purchase any thing of her - A. On Saturday the 18th of August. I saw her on Friday the 17th of August, she requested me to meet her on the 18th, she told me she would bring me some counterfeit money, she was to bring it me at the City of Chester public-house in Bunhill-row; I met her in Banner-street on the 18th, about half after twelve she requested me to go to the City of Chester public-house and wait about ten minutes, I went there and waited, she came and desired me to meet her at the Bull the corner of St. John-street, Smithfield , in the course of an hour I went, she came and told me I must wait half an hour, she came and brought twenty-six counterfeit sixpences, and seven counterfeit shillings; I gave her a dollar, half-crown piece, two shillings and sixpence; ten shillings in the whole for all these bad shillings and sixpences.

Q. What did you do with that money - A. I went and delivered it to Mr. Sewell the clerk of the Solicitor of the Mint.

Q. Had you any previous communication with the Solicitor of the Mint - A. Yes, I acted at this time under the direction of Mr. Powell, the assistant to the Solicitor of the Mint.

Q. You know an officer of the name of Bishop - A. Very well. On the 18th he was watching me most of the day, I believe he saw me meet her in Banner-street.

JOHN VICKREY . I am an officer. On the 22nd of August I apprehended the prisoner in Old-street, I searched her, I discovered something in her hand, she put her back against the wall; I put my hands round her and took this bag from her, it contains two hundred and thirteen counterfeit sixpences; the bag has something green upon it; I have no doubt that is by her taking the bag in her hands after being wet with aquafortis.

JOSIAH GILL SEWELL , Q. We understand you are clerk to the Solicitor of the Mint - A. Yes; I produce twenty-six sixpences and seven shillings, they were delivered me by Stafford.

CALEB EDWARD POWELL . Q. You assist the Solicitor of the Mint - A. Yes.

Q. You are acquainted with this sort of coin, will you tell us whether that is genuine coin, or whether it is counterfeit - A. It is all counterfeit.

Q. Look at the bag that Vickrey produced, cast your eye over them sixpences - A. They are all counterfeit, they appear to be of the same manufactory.

Prisoner's Defence. I deny ever having sold any to that man.

GUILTY , aged 31.

Fined 1 s. and Confined One Year in Newgate .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18101031-17

789. ELIZABETH KINSEY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 25th of October , two shirts, value 8 s. two pair of stockings, value 5 s. two pair of trowsers, value 1 l. 6 s. a pillow case, value 1 s. a pair of shoes, value 1 s. and four handkerchiefs, value 5 s. the property of Henry Williams .

HENRY WILLIAMS . I am a sailor . Last Thursday night I went to a public-house in Skinner-street , I had this property with me, I called for a glass of grog, I fell in with this woman, she was sitting singing there, I asked her to drink a glass of grog, and then I called for a pot of ale; I gave her part of that; I called for at her pot of ale, she and I after that went to the Robin Hood in the same street; I had a pint of ale in the tap-room; I clapped the bundle alongside of me; as soon as ever I had the pint of ale she took the bundle away from me, and in the course of ten minutes I missed her and the bundle.

Q. What were you about that ten minutes - A. I was talking to a man in the same box; as soon as I missed her and the bundle I went to the landlord, I asked him if he saw a woman with a bundle, he said he did, he knew the woman; the landlord sent for Mr. Sheppard, I gave him the description of the bundle, and in the course of an hour the constable returned with the bundle, he took me to the watchhouse, and there was the woman; I knew the woman, I am sure that is the woman.

Prisoner. There were a great many people in the tap-room, and a young woman was with me, and whether I took the bundle or the young woman I cannot say.

Q. to prosecutor. Was she tipsey - A. No. There was another young woman went out, I believe she had nothing to do with the bundle.

RICHARD GREEN . I am the landlord of the Robin Hood in Skinner-street . On this night week, about ten o'clock, I heard a scuffle at the bar. I saw the prisoner with a bundle under her arm, she went out of the house.

Q. Did you know her before - A. Yes, I am sure it it is the same woman.

SAMUEL SHEPPARD . On this night week I received information of the sailor being robbed. I apprehended the prisoner in a lodging-house in Spitalfields. I asked her if that bundle belonged to her, she said it did. I took the prisoner to the watchhouse, I took the sailor, he identified the prisoner, and said the bundle was his.

Q. Was she sober or drunk - A. I do not think she was perfectly sober, she knew what she was about; she went down on her knees and asked the sailor pardon in the watchhouse.

Prisoner's Defence. It is the first time of my being guilty of a crime, if I am brought into it now.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Fined 1 s. and Confined Fourteen Days in Newgate .

London jury, before Mr. Recorders.

Reference Number: t18101031-18

790. PHINEAS ENGLAND was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of October , eight yards of jean, value 10 s. a yard of canvas, value 1 s. two pair of breeches, value 20 s. a coat, value 16 s. and six yards of fustian, value 5 s , the property of William Brounger and Giles Apsey .

GILES APSEY . I am a wholesale slopseller , 127, Houndsditch , William Brounger is my partner. I lost eight yards of Hollands jean and a piece of wrapper, on the evening of the 8th of October, about a quarter before seven o'clock, I received information by some of our men. I went into the warehouse where the porter cleaned shoes, I saw this wrapper and jean.

Q. Was the prisoner any thing to you - A. He was porter to me. It was concealed under a table, I put it there again. The prisoner was then out delivering goods. I came into the accompting house after that, the prisoner came in half past seven, he was in the shop a little while, and after that he went down into this warehouse and stopped there two or three minutes; he then went into the cutting-room, which is another part of the warehouse, four story high. While he was gone there I went down into this warehouse, and saw the jean and wrapper was removed, in consequence of that I was sure he was the thief. I then went for an officer, and had them in the accompting house, waiting till our men went at eight o'clock; the prisoner was going, he had got the door in his hand. I called him into the accompting-house, I told him I thought he had part of our property upon him; he denied it. When the officer was coming to search him he put his hand into his inside jacket pocket, he took the jean and wrapper out, he said he only wanted an apron. I asked him what he did with the jean, he made no answer. He had lived with me eleven days.

EDWARD DAVIS . I am an officer. Mr. Apsey told the prisoner he suspected he had some property about him. He said he had not, and when I was coming round the desk, he put his hand into his pocket and produced the jean and canvas. I found the rest of the articles at his house.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence

witnesses who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 54.

Fined 1 s. and Confined Fourteen Days in Newgate .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18101031-19

791. MARGARET CHITTLEBOROUGH was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 18th of August , a watch, value 30 l. a shawl handkerchief, value 2 s. a silk cloak, value 40 s. two gold broaches, value 2 l. 7 s. two handkerchiefs, value 8 s. a pair of gold bracelets, value 7 l. two shawls, value 15 s. four caps, value 5 s. a pair of stockings, value 3 s. three gowns, value 21 s. eight yards of lace, value 2 l. a pair of bracelet snaps, value 10 s. 6. the property of Samuel Ballin , in his dwelling-house .

HANNAH BALLIN . I am the wife of Samuel Ballin , my husband is a merchant .

Q. Has the prisoner been a servant of yours - A. Yes, eighteen days previous to her absconding.

Q. Had you any articles in your house that you lost when she was your servant - A. Yes, I missed them on the 18th of August. I immediately mentioned it to the prisoner and the other servant; in two days after that the prisoner went away; the prisoner went away before the family was up, leaving her clothes and wages. The other servant is gone home to her friends now. We had hand bills, offering ten guineas reward.

Q. When did you see the prisoner again - A. On the 5th of October she came to my house with my husband in a coach. I asked her how she came to act as she had to take my things. She said she knew nothing of my property. On the same day the officer brought a shawl that was my property.

Q. How lately had you seen that article in the house - A. In the course of the week before she left me.

SAMUEL BALLIN . Q. This is your house in Great Prescot-street - A. Yes. The prisoner has been a servant of mine. On Friday the 5th of October I met the prisoner in Bishopgate-street, I laid hold of her arm, called a coach and put her in it, and brought her to my house. In the coach I asked her if she knew me; she said, no.

Q. Had you been absent from the house while she was there - A. I had, I had only seen her once or twice. After I brought her back to my house a woman knocked at the door, and asked me if I was the gentleman that took a girl in the coach. I said I was. I went in doors and told the officer of it.

Q. Did you see any article that was produced that you knew to be yours - A. Yes, a large blue muslin shawl. I found the shawl in Bishopgate-street, exactly opposite of where I took the coach; it was a silk shawl, I knew it belonged to me. I went with the officer to her lodgings in the City-road, the prisoner accompanied us. I there saw a gown of Mrs. Ballin's, and a pair of bracelets; she produced them herself, and some lace that she had taken the morning she absconded, and she said she had taken four children's caps that morning.

Q. Did you see any thing else found upon her - A. A silk handkerchief of Mr. Ballin's was taken off her person, the fellow half of this handkerchief we found at the pawnbroker's. I had a good character with the prisoner from a respectable house in the City, a twelve month's character.

Q. Do you know what her age is - A. Seventeen.

ROBERT COOMBES . I am an officer. On the 5th of October I was sent for by Mr. Ballin; I found the prisoner at his house, I called her of one side, and asked her a number of questions; she denied knowing any thing of the robbery. She said she had no lodgings since she left her master's place, Mr. Ballin's; she slept any where where she could. After some time a respectable gentlewoman knocked at the door and came into the room and asked Mr. Ballin if the woman that he took in the coach had robbed him. The prisoner was by the side of me, and within hearing. Mr. Ballin said she had; she said she thought so, she saw the prisoner through a handkerchief out of the coach-door, and she saw a coachman pick it up in Bishopgate-street, near the Flower Pot .

Mr. Ballin. That was near the place where I took the coach against the Flower Pot .

Coombes. After the lady had said so, the prisoner then said, if I would go of one side she would tell me all about it. She said that she did rob her mistress, and that she had concealed the property in the cellar until she could get it away. She then told me that she had put her pocket-book into the pocket of the coach-door that her master had brought her in, which contained all the duplicates that she had robbed her master of. Then she told me where she lodged. Mr. Ballin and I immediately went after the coach, where she had left the pocket-book. We found the coach in the Minories. Mr. Ballin had taken the number of the coach.

Mr. Ballin. I took the number of the coach; I am quite sure the coach I found in the Minories was the coach I brought the prisoner in; I found the key in her pocket.

Coombes. Mr. Ballin opened the coach-door, stepped into the coach, and took the pocket-book out of the pocket of the coach.

Q. Did you look into the pocket-book and see the contents of it - A. When we came back to Mr. Ballin's we did; she then picked out the duplicates and told where the property was pawned. I then went to her lodgings, and this gown was hanging in her bed-room; it is one of Mrs. Ballin's gowns. In searching a trunk in her room we found some lace, and different things that she said she had taken from Mrs. Ballin, caps, and a pair of bracelet snaps. Then we went to Mr. Matthews's in Wheeler-street, the prisoner went with us there also.

JOHN MATTHEWS . I am a pawnbroker in Wheeler-street, Spitalfields. On the 20th of August the prisoner pawned a watch with me for three pounds, I am sure she is the the person. On the 11th of September she pawned a broach and two rings with me for eight shillings, and a lace cloak my young man took in.

- LEBLOND. I am a pawnbroker in Shoreditch. I know the prisoner. On the 22d of August she pledged a broach and bracelet, and on the 15th of September she pledged a handkerchief for two shillings and sixpence.

THOMAS COATE . I am a pawnbroker in the City-road; I know the prisoner; on the 24th of September she pledged a shawl, I advanced seven shillings on it.

- SMITH. I am a pawnbroker, 172, Shoreditch.

On the 10th of September the prisoner pledged four children's caps, I lent four shillings on them.

- I am a pawnbroker, 90, Shoreditch. On the 12th of September the prisoner pledged a gown, and on the 25th a pair of stockings, I lent ten shillings on both the articles.

Prosecutrix. I have had this watch seven years, and I have no doubt but all the other articles are mine, they were in my house at the time she was in my service.

Prosecutor. I gave more than ten pounds for the watch considerably.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 17.

[ The prisoner was recommended to His Majesty's mercy, by the Jury and prosecutor .]

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18101031-20

792. WILLIAM SIMPSON was indicted for that he, being a person employed at the General Post office, in sorting letters and packets sent by the post to the General Post office in London, that on the 20th of August , at and in the said General Post office , a certain letter then had been sent by the post from Stamford, directed to James Nowland and Son, and then containing therein five promissory notes each made for the payment of twenty pounds, came to his hand and possession, that he afterwards on the same day, then and there having the said letter in his possession, feloniously did secrete the said letter, containing the said promissory notes, each of them being the property of Octavius Gillchrist ; - and

EIGHT OTHER COUNTS for like offence, only varying the manner of charging them.

OCTAVIUS GILLCHRIST . Q. Had you occasion in the month of August last to make remittance to Mr. James Nowland and son in Keate-street, Whitechapel - A. I had, to the amount of one hundred pounds; it was to meet a bill for that bill I had drawn on him at the request of my brother, his name is Horntio Gillchrist .

Q. In what way did you purpose to yourself to make that remittance what sort of paper - A. By five Liecester bank notes, each of the value of twenty pounds.

Q. Did you deliver five notes of that description to any person in order to be sent up to Messrs. Nowland and son - A. I gave to Thomas Simpson , my brother-in-law, each of the value of five pounds drawn by Mansfield and Miller of Leicester, they were Leicester bank notes; this was on the evening of the 17th of August, I delivered these to Mr. Simpson, directing him to send them to Messrs. Nowland and son on my account.

THOMAS SIMPSON , SENIOR. Q. You are brother-in-law to the last witness - A. Yes.

Q. Did you on the 17th of August receive from him any notes - A. Yes, five Leicester notes of twenty pounds each; I remitted them on the Sunday following.

Q. Did you take any account of any of them - A. Yes.

Q. Which did you take any account of - A. One 758 M, April, 1808; that is my writing made at the time; my two boys copied the rest, one copied three and the other one.

Q. What did you do with these notes afterwards - A. I sent them to London by the post the same day, I enclosed them in a letter directed to Messrs. James Nowland and son, shop-makers, Keate-street, Whitechapel, London, and wrote paid under that; I gave the letter to a servant of ours, John Shaw , to take to the post-office.

Q. Your two sons names are Thomas and James Simpson - A. Yes.

THOMAS SIMPSON JUNIOR . Q. You are the son of the last witness - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember your father enclosing any notes to Messrs. Nowland in August - A. Yes, I took the description of three notes, I wrote the description on paper.

Q. Look at that paper, is that the paper - A. It is 625 C, 17th March, 1810, 693 A, April 18, 1808; 978 C, April 7, 1810. This is the original entry.

Q. Now look at these notes and say whether they correspond - A. Yes, they are the same. When I had taken the description of them I returned them to my father.

JAMES SIMPSON . Q. You are the brother of the last witness - A. Yes.

Q. Did you take any description of any bank note in August A. Yes; one 259 B, 3d of April, 1809, a twenty pound note. When I had taken the description of the note, I returned it to my father. This is the note.

JOHN SHAW . Q. Are you servant to Mr. Simpson - A. Yes, of Stamford.

Q. Do you remember on the 19th of August being directed by him to put any letter in the post - A. Yes, I received a letter from him, directed to be put in the post; I cannot read; I paid the postage of the letter, I paid two shillings, and I put the letter in the post on the 19th of August, I put it in about two o'clock, before the post went out.

Mr. Alley. What time does the post go out - A. About three o'clock; I am sure I put it in before the post went out on that day, Sunday the 19th of August; I only put in one letter.

WILLIAM HAYCOCK . Q. Are you the Post-master of Stamford - A. I am.

Q. Did you make up the bag for London on Sunday the 19th of August last - A. I did.

Q. Did you put into the bag all the letters that were in the office - A. I am certain I did. The mail leaves Stamford between three and four in the regular course.

Q. When would that bag arrive in London - A. I suppose about four o'clock the next morning.

CHARLES WILLIAM HOLDWORTY . Q. Were you upon duty at the General Post office on the 20th of August last - A. Yes.

Q. Did the Stamford bag duly arrive on that morning - A. Yes.

Q. At what time would the letters be delivered out in London that came in the bag on the 20th of August - A. They would be delivered out that morning.

JOHN NOWLAND . Q. You are partner with James Nowland - A. Yes, he is my father; I live in Keate-street, Whitechapel.

Q. Did you on the 20th of August receive any letter from Mr. Gillchrist, enclosing any Leicester bank notes - A. I did not, nor about that time none at all.

Q. In consequence of your not receiving them an enquiry was set on foot - A. It was.

BENJAMIN CRITCHARD . Q. I believe you are inspector of the letter carriers at the post office - A. Yes.

Q. On the 19th or 20th of August was the prisoner employed at the post-office - A. On the 20th he was as a letter carrier to deliver the letters directed to persons on board the ships in the river Thames.

Q. Was he on duty as such letter-carrier, on the morning of the 20th of August - A. He was.

Q. Does he in the Post-office arrange the letters that he is to carry for delivery - A. He does, he does that at a table.

Q. I believe the delivery of letters is divided into twelve divisions - A. It is.

Q. White-chapel is in the eleventh division - A. Yes.

Q. And I believe each division is divided into twelve subdivisions, who is the person that helps to sort the paid letters of the eleventh, among the respective letter-carriers - A. William John , he is the person to divide the paid letters of the eleventh division, among the twelve letter-carriers.

Q. Does he make that assortment in the Post-office at a table there - A. John does.

Q. Was he doing that on the 20th of August at the same table at which the prisoner was arranging his letters - A. Yes.

Q. Can you tell how the prisoner stands at that table with respect to John - A. He stands at his left hand.

Q. Are you able to say whether the prisoner assisted John in sorting the paid letters of the eleventh division - A. I cannot say whether he did or did not.

Q. Had John occasion from time to time to go from the table and deliver the letters which he had sorted to the letter-carriers - A. Yes.

Q. When he did so, I presume, the remaining letters were left on the table - A. They were.

Q. And that was the table on which the prisoner was performing his branch of the business - A. Yes.

Mr. Alley. This letter would not be for the prisoner to deliver in the course of his delivery - A. Yes.

Mr. Attorney General. Those persons who perform the duty of sorting the letters, have they a writen appointment, or whether they are appointed verbally - A. They are directed verbally by the inspector; they are hired by the appointment of the Post master general.

Q. Those people that carry out letters are appointed by the post master general. Do you mean that the prisoner has a written appointment from the post master general. Confine yourself to the question I ask you who is the person that employs him, who gives him the direction to act - A. I was the person who gave him the direction that morning.

Q. Who orders him to come there - A. I order him to come there.

Q. You are the person from whom he receives his immediate direction - A. I do. When I am there he has no written appointment that marks to me the particular duty that he is to perform.

COURT. Upon whose authority does he become employed in the post office - A. Through the direction of the Post master General.

Q. Is there any paper by which he is appointed by the post master - A. No such paper is directed to me, they are frequently appointed by personal application. I have no right to employ them without directions from the secretary.

Q. Does he perform any particular duty, only the delivering letters at the water-side, or is he the general servant of the post office - A. It is his particular duty to deliver letters on board ships in the river Thames.

Q. Suppose you had ordered him to carry letters within London in any of the twelve divisions - A. I should not have directed him to any other part of London.

Q. Whose act is it to appropriate that - A. In consequence of previous instructions from the secretary I appropriate this duty to him.

Q. Do you ever employ persons who are specially appointed upon special service to carry letters within London - A. We do, occasionally.

Q. Then you have your pleasure or have directions from the post master that a man is to be employed upon such particular service, how came he to be employed in delivering letters on board the ships - A. That was in consequence of his father having been a waterman, and he succeeded this business at his father's death.

Q. By whose appointment. What had you to tell you that he was to deliver letters on board of the ships - A. I had verbal instructions from the secretary or a a written order which I do not know. He has been employed about two years. Besides delivering letters on board the ships he has occasionally delivered letters between there and London-bridge.

Q. Has he occasionally sorted letters - A. Yes, he does what we order him.

Mr. Attorney General. And he received pay during this time for carrying letters - A. Yes.

COURT. You did not see him in the act of sorting that day assisting John - A. I do not recollect seeing him that day. On other days I have seen him.

Q. Then sorting is part of his duty under your immediate order - A. Yes.

Q. Then whether he is a sorter or a deliver of letters is under your command - A. Yes, I could not remove him from delivering letters on board the ships because I had no other in his place.

Q. But it rests with you to sort letters or to deliver - A. It does.

Q. That day it was his function to deliver - A. It was.

Q. He would assist any day that he was there from a general order that was given him to assist in sorting or any duty in the eleventh division, according to the general order that you had given him - A. Yes.

Q. Therefore if he did assist this man in sorting letters it would be in obedience to your order for that purpose - A. It would.

WILLIAM JOHN . Q. Were you employed in the General post office on Monday morning the 20th of August - A. Yes.

Q. What was your business then - A. I am a letter carrier, and sort the frank and paid letters in the eleventh division.

Q. Does the prisoner stand at the same table - A. Yes, at my left hand. He is a river letter carrier.

Q. What is his business at the left hand of you at that table - A. Sorting of letters that he is to deliver. He was the next person on my left hand.

Q. Have you, in the course of your employment, occasion to leave the table - A. Yes, to deliver the letters that I have sorted at other parts of the office, leaving the letters on the table.

Q. Do you know whether on that morning the prisoner assisted you in sorting - A. I do not.

COURT. Did you see him take up any letters - A. No.

Q. All that you are conscious of he was arranging his own to deliver on board the ships, did you ask him to arrange yours that you were sorting - A. I do not recollect on that morning.

GEORGE CAIN . Q. How long have you known the prisoner - A. I went to school with him quite young.

Q. Do you remember seeing him on the 20th of August - A. Perfectly well.

Q. I believe that was the day of Camberwell fair, the 20th - A. Yes; he told me he wished to go to the fair, but he had no money; he had got some drafts at home.

Q. Did he desire you to do any thing with them drafts - A. He asked me if I would go to the banking-house of Smith, Payne and Co. and get change for a twenty pound draft. He gave me a draft of twenty pound payable at Smyth, Payne and Co.

Q. Do you remember whether it was a draft or a note - A. I cannot say; it was something for twenty pounds, payable at Smyth, Payne and Co.; I carried the paper there, and left it, and received twenty one pound notes, I gave them to Mr. Simpson.

Q. Then I believe you went to the fair with the party - A. I did so.

Q. Had you any of the notes - A. I had; I told him I had no silver, I was going home to my father to ask for some, he lent me a one pound notes. In the course of a day or two he gave me another twenty pound, payable at the same bankers; he said I was to receive it in small notes; I carried that second twenty pound note to the bankers, I received it in one's and two's, I delivered them to him.

Q. Do you remember on Saturday the 25th of August seeing him again: the first you changed was on Monday the 20th of August, and the other in a day or two afterwards - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember on Saturday the 25th receiving a third note of twenty pounds - A. I cannot say the day I received a third note of forty pounds.

Q. Was it one for forty pound - A. Yes.

Q. Are you sure of that - A. It was either a forty pound or two twenty's, I will not be positive which.

Q. Then whether being a forty or two twenty's, what did he desire you to get for it - A. I was to go to Smith, Payne and company and get change in small notes if I could.

Q. Then either a forty or two twenty's did you carry to Messrs. Smith and Payne - A. I did; I received a forty pound bank note, I asked for small notes, they said they could not let me have them; I had a forty pound bank note; I carried the forty pound bank note to the prisoner, he said he did not knew what to do with it, he asked me to go to the bank of England and change it, I said I had never been to the bank of England, and they might ask me questions; I did not know what to say about it. Simpson said they would only ask me my address, I said I would go, if it was nothing more than that he gave me directions what address to give; he told me not to give his address, nor my own either; I asked him why not, he said, I was to give the persons address from whom he received that draft, for which I had received the forty pound bank note; he mentioned the name of George Bennett , East Lane, Bermondsey.

Q. With these directions did you go to the bank with the forty pound note - A. Yes, and got it changed there for forty one pound notes. I was desired to write my address on the back, I wrote George Bennett, East Lane, Bermondsey.

Q. to John Parker . Hand me the bank note for forty pound, put it into the hands of this witness - A. This is the forty pound note.

Q. Now Cain look at that bank note - A. This is George Bennett , 4, East Lane, Bermondsey, he gave me that direction.

Q. Is that your writing at the back of the note - A. Yes, and it is the note that I got changed for the prisoner for forty one pound notes at the bank. It is the same I received from Smith, Payne and Co. which I afterwards exchanged at the bank for forty one pound notes. I delivered these forty one pound notes to the prisoner.

Q. Do you recollect on the 29th of August, a few days afterwards being desired to receive any other paper to go to the bankers - A. Yes.

Q. Was any one with you - A. Yes.

Q. How much was it - A. A twenty pound; Mr. Mander went with me, he asked me to go; Mr. Mander was coming up, he asked him to accompany me, we went accordingly.

Q. Did Mr. Mander carry in the check first - A. Mander did, and I came in afterwards.

Q. Did you find that it was paid, or that there had been any difficulty made - A. They said it had been taken out of a letter, they refused paying it.

Q. Did you in consequence of any application made by them, write any thing upon the paper - A. I wrote my own address and likewise Mr. Simpson's.

Q. What did you do with this last paper when you came from the bankers - A. I went to Simpson and told him what had passed. He asked if I gave his address, I told him yes, he told me that he had taken it of a smuggler.

Q. Did you give notice to Messrs. Nowland the next morning - A. I did

Q. Did you know what became of the prisoner the next morning. Who had directed you to Messrs Nowlands - A. One of the clerks of the banking-house.

Q. And in consequence of those directions you gave notice to Messrs. Nowland. - A. Yes

Q. Do you know whether the prisoner remained in his lodgings or was he off - A. I do not know; I saw Simpson at night, he called me out of the house, and asked me if I would go with him; I told him no, he said he had a coach waiting.

Q. And from that time you have seen nothing of him. A. No.

Mr. Alley. You do not mean to be accurate whether it was two twenty's, or a forty pound note - A. No.

Q. You were not with him on the 20th of August at the post office - A. No.

Mr. Attorney General. Look at these notes, and say whether they were of that description you see, there are four there - A. Yes.

Q. Now neither of these is the last note you carried, because upon the last you have written your name, there are four there. - A. Yes.

Q. Look over them, I say, whether they are of the description

that you carried, as far as you can recollect - A. I only took three twenty's, there are four there.

Q. You took one on the 20th, you took another two or three days afterwards - A. Yes, I did

Q. Then you took, you said, either a forty or two twenty's - A. Yes; and then I took the other twenty, but I believe it was a single forty that I took

Q. What reason have you to believe it was a forty - A. Because I recollect what I had in my hand, and seeing the clerk take it up as a forty.

Q. You have given an account of this before - A. Yes.

Q. Now recollect yourself, and tell me whether you believe it was a forty pound note or two twenty's - A. I believe it was a forty pound.

Q. You have always believed it was a forty pound - A. Yes.

Q. Now do not let any advantage be taken, answer deliberately, answer correctly; do you believe it was a forty pound note for which you received that forty pound bank note - A. I believe it was one forty pound; I could not swear that it was a forty pound, I think it was.

Q. Have you ever said it was a forty before Mr. Parkins - A. Yes.

Q. You told Mr. Parkins before that it was a forty, now let me have that answer deliberately: do you repeat that you told Mr. Parkins that was a forty pound note, that you carried to Smith, Payne and Company - A. Yes; I told Mr. Parkins so at his house last Monday.

Q. Then I am to understand you to say, that last Monday you told Mr. Parkins at his house, that you carried to Smith, Payne and Company a note for forty pound, and received for that note a forty pound note - A. I am certain I told him that.

Q. Did you never say it was two twenty's - A. I might say it, but I was not certain whether it was a forty pound note or two twenty's. I might have told him it was two twentys, but I am not sure I told him it was two twenty's

Q. Will you say you are sure you did not - A. No.

Q. Did you ever receive any other forty pound note of Smith, Payne and Company - A. No.

Q. Then when you received the forty pound bank note; you either payed two twenty's or a forty pound note - A. Yes.

Mr. Alley. Look at these notes, the twenty's, you cannot swear to either of them - A. No, I cannot.

BENJAMIN COOPER . Q. You are clerk to Smith, Payne, and Smith - A. I am.

Q. They keep a book at your house - A. They do.

Q. Do you know whether 978 C was paid at your house - A. I do. I posted the debit to their account, it was paid on the 20th of August last, I posted it to Mansfield, Miller and Company.

Q. Is that the note marked C 978 that was paid on the 20th of August - A. It is; and a similar note, 625 C, on the 22nd of that month; it was paid on the 22nd of August.

Q. 259 B and 693 A - A. They were paid on the 25th of August.

Q. How were they paid - A. Another gentleman will prove that; I am able to say they were paid on the 25th of August, by posting the notes on the ledger, the notes came to me in the regular course of business in an interior office, as being received that day.

Q. These two notes appear to have been paid together - A. They do, according to the manner they are posted; they follow each other. There is a possibility that they may not have been paid together, but they follow each other; I suppose them to be paid together.

GEORGE BEDNELL . Q. You are a clerk of Smith, Payne, and Smith. - A. I am.

Q. Do you remember on the afternoon of the 25th of August; two twenty pound notes being paid - A. I remember a note or notes of Mansfield, Miller, and Company, being paid on the 25th of August. I remember a 40 l. bank note; it was paid on Mansfield, Miller, and Co. but whether it was a 40 l. or two 20 l. s, I cannot say. I merely put the account in the cash-book.

Q. Now, Sir, be so good as to look upon the back of one of these notes; you see 40 written upon one of them. A. Here is 40 l. written upon the back of the second note; it appears to be my writing; if the two notes came to me in the course of business. I should write the figure 40 l. on the back of the other; if it had, been a single note that I had paid, I should not have wrote any thing, but merely have put it on a file. Suppose twenty times twenty had come to me, I should have wrote 200 l.; that 40 l. wrote indicates that it was one transaction.

Q. What was the bank-note that you paid. - A. 3 m 88, 16th August, 1810.

COURT. You say the marking of 40 l. shews that it was a transaction of 40 l. - A. It shews that I paid for it a 40 l. bank-note, and that it was one transaction. I have got the original entry made by myself. I paid a banknote, 40 l. 16th August, 1810. The bank note tallies in number and date exactly.

JOHN PRIESTMAN : Q - You, I believe, are a clerk in the house of Payne and Smith. - A. I am.

Q. These notes that were paid on the 25th of August, would have passed through your hands. - A. Yes.

Q. In passing through your hands you would make no entry in the cash-book of the notes. - A. Yes. I have an entry in one line of the two 20 l.'s, making 40 l.; that establishes, that on the 25th of August two 20 l. notes were brought in and paid at one time.

WILLIAM GOWER . Q. You are also a clerk of Smith, Payne, and Company - A. I am.

Q. Do you remember on the 20th of August, a 20 l. note being presented to you. - A. I do.

Q. Look at that note; when that note was presented to you, notice at that time had been given to your house to stop payment - A. It had.

Q. To whom did you refer she persons that brought it for payment - A. I referred them to Messrs. Newland.

Q. Did the person that brought it write his name upon it - A. I believe he did. I delivered it back to him; I wrote one name and he the other; he wrote his own name and I wrote the name of the person from whom he told me he received it.

JOHN PARKER . Q. I believe you bring the note from the bank of England - A. Yes, I bring it from thence as a paid note. It is a forty pound note.

JOHN SMITH . Q. You are a clerk in the bank of England. - A. Yes, I am.

Q. Have you any account on the 25th of August of paying a 40 l. note with forty 1 l. notes. - A. Yes, I have, the entry is made by myself. I am the person that paid it. It is my business to see there is the name and place of abode of the person that brings the note, or the person he brings it from. It generally is the person that brings it, or from whom he brings it. If it is his own, he writes his own name, and if it is his master's, he writes his master's name and place of abode.

Q. On the 25th of August was a 40 l. bank-note exchanged by you for forty 1 l. notes - A. Yes, it was; I I have the name of the person written on the back of the note, not the name of the person that brought it, but whom he brought it from; Bennett, 40 l. I never take the address.

Q. Have you any account of the 1 l. notes of which you paid it - A. Yes; I have, opposite the 1 l. note 40 l. the numbers are, 60 m. 131 to 60 m. 170 inclusive; the date according to my book is the 6th of August, 1810, that is the date of the forty 1 l. notes. I paid no other note in the name of Bennett.

Q. Now look at that forty pound note you have in your hand; is that endorsed in that way - A. Yes, it was originally; part of the name is cancelled; it was George Bennett , No. 4, East Lane, Bermondsey. It stood so originally endorsed. I have no doubt it stood so originally endorsed Bennett.

COURT. You see the traces of it that it was so, do you - A. Yes.

Mr. Attorney General. There is G. and B. and then the opening, and then there is two T's.

SMITH. The cancelling is done with a punch to prevent it ever going in circulation again. I have no doubt but that is the note.

- RIEHTER. Q. You are a clerk at the bank - A. I am.

Q. Was it your business to enter the paid notes by the last witness Smith - A. Yes.

Q. Have you any account of a bank note for 40 l. received by him and paid by him - A. I have.

Q. And to the account of the name of Bennett - A. I have; not the account of the name, only 16th August, 3 m. 88, 40 l.

Q. What is the name of the entering clerk - A. Smith.

Q. The meaning of the entry is, that the note was paid by Smith, the last witness - A. It does; I received it with the name upon the parcel that it was in.

ROBERT SPARKE . Q. You are clerk to Mr. Parkins - A. I am.

Q. Did you go down to East Grinstead for the purpose of searching for the prisoner - A. I did, I saw him there on Sunday the 2d of September; he was in a post-chaise along with a woman of the name of Hazlewood, and a man of the name of Hoare, a publican, of Forest-Row.

Q. Was any person of the post-office with you - A. Mr. Jones.

Q. Did you search the prisoner - A. I did; I found in his possession thirteen one pound notes; these are them; they are all of one, dated 6th of August, 1810; all of them 60 m. 152 to 60 m. 164, the rest being intermediate numbers that makes thirteen.

Q. (to John Smith .) I believe you never have notes of the same number, date, and the same sum - A. Never.

Q. You told me you paid the forty pound note by forty one pound notes, dated 6th August, 1810, from 60 m. 131 to 60 m. 170 inclusive. Now look at these notes and say whether these are part of the notes you paid to him - A. I have no doubt these thirteen are a part of the forty.

JOHN HOARE . I am a publican; I keep the sign of the Swan in Forest Row, three miles beyond East Grinstead; on the 2d of September, I went after the prisoner; when I came four miles beyond East Grinstead, I saw a chaise coming along, I had information from the prisoner's wife that he was coming down that day; the prisoner's wife was at my house in the morning; I saw a chaise; I proceeded after it; on the side I expected the person to be the blind was up. I rode round the post-boy and came on the other side, the prisoner was covered all over with a shawl handkerchief; the post boy told me he had two men and one woman going to Forest-row, I got into the chaise and got hold of the prisoner, I told him I was certain he was the man that this bill described; I produced the bill and asked him if his name was Simpson; he told me it was not. When I got to East Grinstead; there was Mr. Sparkes and another they knew him.

SAMUEL EVANS . Q. You are a letter carrier at the post office - A. Yes. I was an assistant as letter carrier in the river duty.

Q. Did the prisoner attend his duty on Thursday the 30th of August - A. No, he did not.

Q. Did you go to his lodgings on the 30th - A. I did, on that day that he was absent, and could not find him.

Q. Have you been to Bermondsey to make any enquiry there - A. Yes, I made enquiry there for a person of the name of Bennet; I enquired both sides of the way; I went also to No. 4, there was no such person there.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 20.

The prisoner was recommended to His Majesty's mercy by the Jury and Prosecutor on account of his youth .

London jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18101031-21

793. JAMES FORSTER was indicted for feloniously forging, on the 9th of October , an order for the payment of 103 l. 12 s. with intention to defraud Westgurth Snaith , William Sikes , John Watson , and Henry Sikes .

SECOND COUNT, for feloniously uttering and publishing as true, a like orders, with the like intention. And

TWO OTHER COUNTS for like offence, only varying the manner of charging them.

WILLIAM COLTON . At the time this happened I was a porter at the White Horse Inn.

Q. Do you remember seeing the prisoner at the bar there and when - A. Yes, on the 8th and 9th of October last, he came there I believe on the 8th; I am not positive to the day.

Q. Do you remember his giving you any directions on the 9th of October - A. On the 9th of October, between three and four in the afternoon, he gave me directions to take the check in question to the bankers for payment, he said to Sikes's and company in Mansion-house-street.

Q. What was the amount of the check - A. One hundred and three pounds twelve shillings, and if I received large notes, I was then to go to the Bank and endorse them in my own name, or the name of Leech, and to get small notes, one's or two's. I accordingly went to the banker s, taking the check with me. On my presenting it at Sike's and company I was asked who I brought it from. I said from a gentleman at the White Horse.

Q. Did you get payment of it - A. No, I did not. I was then desired to wait till one of the gentlemen came out. On the gentleman's return he desired me to tell the person that gave me the check to come for the money himself. I then went home, leaving the check there. Before I had gone home Mr. Nalder the city marshal came up to me and asked are some questions about the prisoner; I went back to the White Horse, Mr. Nalder promised to

meet me there; I happened to be there first; I then went up stairs to the prisoner and informed him of the message I had received from Messrs. Sikes's, which was, that he was to come to receive the money himself, upon which he answered, then I know what to do: I then came down stairs, leaving the prisoner up stairs; I found Mr. Nalder waiting down stairs, I conducted Mr. Nalder to the prisoner, and he immediately apprehended him. Then I accompanied Mr. Nalder and the prisoner to the Compter. In our way to the Compter the prisoner appeared to be quite ignorant of his situation, he seemed to be quite stupefied, he appeared to be insensible of the situation he was in.

Mr. Alley. He said that he knew what to do, did not be add that he received the check with some others of a traveller in the country - A. No, I did not hear him say that.

HENRY SIKES . Q. You are one of the partners in the banking house - A. Yes.

Q. State the firm of your house - A. Westgarth Snaith, William Sikes , John Watson , and Henry Sikes , myself. That is the firm of our house.

Q. Does Messrs. Stokes and Hodgson keep cash at your house - A. They do, they are stock-brokers.

Q. Is there no other firm of that name that you carry on any account there - A. No, none. I have no authority to pay to any body else under that name.

Q. Were you present when the draft was presented by the last witness - A. I was. I immediately perceived the check that was presented was not the handwriting of Stokes and Hodgson, it was presented to me personally; I then shewed it to Mr. Wilkinson, one of the clerks in our house, I handed it over to him.

THOMAS WILKINSON . Q. You are a clerk to Messrs. Snaith and co - A. I am.

Q. You have got a check - A. I have, I received it of Mr. Henry Sike 's.

Q. Were you present at the time it was presented by Colton - A. I was.

Q. Are you sure that is the same check that you received from Mr. Sikes - A. I am, my initials are on it; I put it at the time. This is the same note.

Q. Messrs. Stokes and Hodgson keep cash with you Do you know their hand-writing - A. I do.

Q. Is that the hand-writing of Mr. Stokes or Hodgson - A. Certainly not.

Q. Were there any other check of that amount paid on that day by Messrs. Stokes and Co - A. There were not.

Q. What are the christian names of Messrs. Stokes and Hodgson - A. Charles Stokes and John Hodgson .

Mr. Alley. You knew immediately it was their handwriting - A. Yes, immediately.

(The note read.)

"October 9th, 1810. Messrs. Sikes, Snaith, and Co. pay Messrs. Hargreaves and Aspdon or bearer on demand one hundred and three pounds twelve shillings.

Signed Stokes and Hodgson."

103 12 s.

FRANCIS NALDER . Q. You are the city marshal - A. Yes.

Q. You were applied to go with Colton, the witness just examined, to the White Horse, Fetter-lane - A. I was; I found the prisoner there, I met him coming out of the room he slept in, No. 28, up two pair of stairs; I immediately took hold of him, and told him he must go with me; he asked me who I was, I immediately told him my name and the situation I held in the city; he then asked me what I wanted with him, I told him he must go to Mansion-house street with me; he almost immediately shammed to be extremely drunk.

COURT. Did he appear to be so when you first saw him - A. He did not. I desired Colton to take hold of his arm; we took him down stairs, and from thence put him into a coach, and conveyed him to the banking house. Colton went with me in the coach. Upon getting into the banking-house, I took him into a back room of Mr. Snaith's banking house and searched him; I found upon him three drafts, purporting to be drafts drawn upon Snaith and Co. all of them signed, Stokes and Hodgson, payable to different people, one for the sum of eighty-three pound twelve shillings, another seventy-eight pound twelve shillings and sixpence, another twenty-sixpound twelve shillings, and another draft not quite complete, in as much as the figures are not complete in the body of the draft. It is directed to Sikes and Co. purporting to be signed by Stokes and Hodgson.

Q. Are they checks or plain paper - A. They are plain paper, and on the same paper is part of another draft not finished by the figures neither by Mr. Hodgson's name.

EDWARD MORTIMER . Q. Do you know Mr. Charles Stokes and Mr. John Hodgson - A. I do.

Q. Are you acquainted with their hand-writing - A. Perfectly, I have seen them write.

Q. Look at the note in question - A. I believe this not to be neither of their hand-writing, nor any part of the note.

Q. Look at the other notes - A. They do not appear to be Stokes nor Hodgson's hand-writing, nor any part of them.

WILLIAM RICHARD STOKES . Q. Are you in partnership with the other Mr. Stokes - A. No.

Q. Are you acquainted with the hand-writing of Charles Stokes and John Hodgson - A. I am, I have seen them write.

Q. Take the draft in your hand, and tell me whether it is their writing - A. I think it is not.

Q. Look at the others, do you believe them to be either the hand-writing of Charles Stokes or John Hodgson - A. I do not.

COURT, to Colton. He told you the note that you took to the banking-house to put your own name or the name of Leech, did he assign any reason for it - A. No.

Q. to Mr. Nalder. I suppose you know the bounds of the city - A. I do.

Q. Where is the White Horse - A. It is in the city of London; it is no part of the county of Middlesex; the Liberty of the Rolls is lower down.

Q. to Colton. You left the check behind you when you went to the bankers - A. Yes. It was the same check that I received of the prisoner.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 21.

Of uttering it, knowing it to be forged.

[ The prisoner was recommended to His Majesty's mercy by the jury, on account of his family .]

London jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18101031-22

794. CATHERINE M'CARTY was indicted for that she, on the 19th of September , a piece of false and counterfeit money made to the likeness and similitude of a good sixpence, feloniously did utter to Catherine Marshall , she at the time of uttering it knowing it to be false and

counterfeit, having been twice before tried and convicted of like offences .

JOSIAH GILL SEWELL . Q. I believe you are a clerk to the Solicitor of the Mint - A. I am. I produce a copy of the record of the conviction of one Catherine M'Carty, I got it from the clerk of the peace's office. It is a true copy. (the copy read.)

WILLIAM BEEBY . Q. You are clerk to Mr. Newport the keeper of the New Prison, Clerkenwell - A. I am.

Q. Look at the prisoner, do you know her - A. Perfectly well.

Q. Do you remember whether she was in the New Prison, in the year 1802 - A. I was present when she was tried in February sessions, 1802, for uttering counterfeit money; she was ordered to be imprisoned in New Prison Clerkenwell, for the space of six months, and at the end of that time, to find sureties for six months more. I was also present when she was tried and convicted in November sessions 1802, for uttering counterfeit money; she having been before convicted, she was ordered to be imprisoned in New Prison Clerkenwell two years and to find sureties for two years more, which she did.

Q. Was she in New Prison in execution of these two sentences - A. The whole of the time; six months in the first instance, and two years afterwards.

CATHERINE MARSHALL . I live in Great Earl-street, Seven Dials , the prisoner came to my house on the 19th of September, she asked for two yards of tape a halfpenny a yard, I was sweeping the door, my husband called me, I served her the two yards of tape, she tendered me a sixpence, I did not like it, I gave it to my husband to look at, my husband went out of doors directly; I am sure she is the person.

JOHN MARSHALL . I am the husband of the last witness.

Q. Do you remember the prisoner coming to your house - A. Very well, my wife gave me a sixpence, I looked at it, I saw it was a very bad one; not being satisfied with it, I went to my neighbour and asked his opinion of it, leaving the prisoner there, and on my coming out of my neighbour's door I met her, I asked her where she got the sixpence, she told me the sixpence was given to her, she came for an errand for a pennyworth of tape; she told me I might keep the sixpence, and she would fetch the person that gave her the sixpence; I was not satisfied with that she crossed the dials, went down Great St. Andrew-street, I followed her, and she called in at the wine vaults and asked for a glass of liquor; I stopped till she came out, then she went on; she saw me, she went up New-street and came down Southampton-street into the Strand, then I asked her if she had seen the person that gave her the sixpence she said, she was waiting for her there.

Q. When you came up to her, was she standing still A. No, she was coming back again; then I accosted her I asked her if she meaned to bring the person, or shew me the person that gave her the sixpence, she said, she could not see the person; in the mean time, Thomas Limbrick came up, she was impertinent.

Q. What did she say to you that you call impertinent - A. She said I had no business to interfere with her, nor to accost her as I did, I might let her go about her business. This is the sixpence, I have had it in my possession ever since.

THOMAS LIMBRICK . I am an officer of Bow-street. On the 19th of September last, at the bottom of Southampton-street in the Strand, seeing a mob there I went, Mr. Marshall gave me charge of the prisoner for attempting to give him bad money; I went to search the prisoner, she refused letting me search her; I then told her if she would walk peaceably to the office I would search her there; when we got to the Brown Bear tap room I searched her, in her left hand was a paper containing five sixpences and two shillings, she had an apron tied up in the same hand; I searched her pocket, I found two pence three farthings good money, three skains of thread wrapped up in paper. These are the same shillings and sixpences.

JOHN NICOLL . Q. You are a monier of his majestys' mint - A. I am.

Q. Look at the sixpence uttered and tell me whether that is a counterfeit - A. It is a counterfeit, the five sixpences are counterfeit, they appear of the same manufactory and the two shillings are counterfeit.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 55.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18101031-23

795. HANNAH TAYLOR was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of October , from the person of Thomas Niven , a bank-note, value 100 l. and two bank-notes, value 50 l. each .

THOMAS NIVEN . I live at Deptford, in Loving Edward's lane. I am a general merchant ; I have been much at sea lately. On the 16th of September, I came to London about noon, at two o'clock; I went to the Half-moon tavern, Grace-church-street. I left the tavern, probably, between ten and eleven; I had drank too much wine with my sea acquaintance. I saw the prisoner in Leadenhall-street, she urged me to accompany her, she said, to a respectable home.

Q. Do you know at all that you had any property about you when you left the tavern - A. I do know it, because one of these gentlemen, an East India officer, requested to see what money I had about me, I being far advanced in liquor; I told him two hundred pound. I had two hundred pound and three pound; there was one hundred pound note, two fiftys, they were in my pocket book; and three ones I had loose in my pocket. I went with the prisoner to Mary Hill's house, Still Alley, Houndsditch .

Q. Did you stay there that night - A. I did.

Q. Was there and person in the room with you in which you staid - A. None whatever; until she went away the prisoner any myself were the only people.

Q. Were you in any company with females in the house - A. None, but the old woman of the house. When we asked for a bed-room the old woman was out; she came in; I told her I had two hundred pound about me; as a matter of precaution, I took out my pocket book and counted the notes over before the old woman; she saw me put up the notes again in the interior of my pocket book, and return it into the same pocket. After that the girl sat down on the left hand, I sat down in a chair; I felt myself sick; I was in a dozing state; I requested her to send for some oysters; and as I was dozing, I felt the prisoner feeling about me, she was sitting on my left hand, and my pocket book was in my left hand pocket. I felt myself very sick. The girl expressed a desire to go down stairs, for necessity, as I understood, for a minute, I supposed she would return again, and her remaining so long created suspicion; she did not come back to me at all. felt in my pocket, the two hundred pound

in notes were gone, and the loose notes were remaining. The old woman came in about two minutes afterwards, and asked where the girl was; I told her she was gone and the property also.

Q. Have you ever found the notes again - A. One of them for one hundred pound; I saw it in the hands of the Lord Mayor. It corresponded with the number of the note. I went to Down, Thornton, and Co. and got the number. I had them by a check of Mr. Gill.

Q. How long was it after this you saw the prisoner - A. In two or three days, I saw her at the Mansion-house.

MARY HILL . I live at No. 1, Still-alley, Houndsditch. I have known the young woman at the bar seven years, in the same way of life as described. On the 6th of October, between ten and eleven at night, I was out; when I came home, the last witness and prisoner were at my house, he appeared drunk when he spoke to me; he said, he wished for a bed for the night, but that bed, was not clean enough for him; the woman made answer, Mrs. Hill will put all on clean for you, if you wish to stop for the night. He said the young woman smelled of onions; he desired me to fetch any thing she liked to take the smell of the onions off; she chused brandy; he pulled out his pocket-book, the prisoner said, give me leave to open it, she pulled out silver to the amount of eleven shillings and sixpence; he ordered me to take the money and to get something the lady chused; she said, why was he to give me all the money, and she to have nothing for her trouble; he then said he had plenty of money; he had two hundred pound about him. The woman made an agreement with the gentleman for a pound note, she said so, and he too; she requested the money, he did not give the money, he said he despised the idea of being asked for the money on the over night. She then asked me whether I thought the gentleman would pay her in the morning, if she slept with him; he then pulled his pocket book out, I saw some money, they were all new notes; he turned up the notes; he said, old woman, there is an hundred pound note, one fifty, and I said three ones; I told him I could not read writing. The black part of the note, in which the sum is engraved, appeared to extend a good way in the note. He then ordered the bed to be made; I made it, they seemed to be comfortable together; he ordered her to take any thing she thought proper for supper; she ordered oysters and some porter I brought them in together; I had got the brandy and left them together, and went for the oysters, and I drank some brandy with them. When I returned with the oysters the prisoner was gone, she did not return all night. The prosecutor sat in the chair, he said, the prisoner had used him very well, she had got all; I insisted upon his shewing me the pocket-book, he did, the notes were all gone. The prosecutor staid in my house all night. I did not see the prisoner till she was before the Lord mayor.

JOHN BROWN . I am one of the city officers. From information I apprehended the prisoner in Mile-end-road, I searched her, between her habit-shirt and the bosom of her gown, I found two one pound notes; this was on Wednesday about half past six in the evening. I then desired her to unpin her habit shirt, I brought up an hundred pounds note; I found no fifty pound note at all; the prisoner said she knew nothing of them, nor how they came there.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of taking a sixpence from that gentleman; I never robbed him, indeed.

Q. to Prosecutor. You did not know the number of the note - A. No, only from what they told me at Downs, Thornton, and Co.

GUILTY .

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18101031-24

796. THOMAS KELLY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 8th of October , three pound weight of soap, value 2 s. 6 d. the property of John Jesse Coward ; and WILLIAM KELLY for feloniously receiving the same soap, knowing it to be stolen .

JOHN JESSE COWARD . I am a wholesale soap dealer : I live at Charles-street, Mile-end, New-town . The prisoner, Thomas Kelly , was my carman . In consequence of information we detected the prisoner. On the 8th of October, Thomas Kelly took soap out of my premises in my cart, to deliver to customers.

Q. Do you know the person of William Kelly - A. He has been at my house, he was a labourer at the India house . I and the city officers placed ourselves at a house in Grub-street; I saw the curt draw up at the bottom of Chaple-street, in Grub-street .

DANIEL LEADBETTER . I am one of the marshalmen of the city. On Monday, the 8th of October Cartwright and I went to the house of Mr. Davis, about three o'clock in the afternoon, we went there to see if the prosecutor's cart came there. It came, I saw Thomas Kelly , who came with the cart, get into the cart close by Mr. Davis's house; I saw him stoop into the soap box three or four times; he got out of the cart and went up Chapel-street. I sent Cartwright down stairs to see where he went to. Cartwright and I went into the house to a one pair of stairs-room, I found the two prisoners at the bar. William Kelly lived at the second house in Chapel-street. I found this cake of soap on a desk in the left hand side of the room. We searched the room and found no more soap. I asked them how they came by the soap; Thomas Kelly said, there was no more, it was the first he had taken. William Kelly denied any knowledge of the soap first, and then, afterwards, he said, that was all that was brought in.

DANIEL CARTWRIGHT . Q. Were you upon the watch with the other witness - A. Yes.

Q. Who was the person that drove the cart - Thomas Kelly .

Q. Were there any other person with him - A. There was a person with him in Chiswell-street when he was driving the cart, who that person was I did not take notice, for fear I should be noticed; I watched him along Chiswell-street, he turned into Grub-street, he got up into the cart and took something out; I told Mr. Coward and Leadbetter that he was coming. I followed him into the house he went to; I found him in the room of his brother. Leadbetter told him that he had come there for some soap; the room was dark, they seemed confused, they denied that there was any soap there at all. Then Leadbetter

went to the desk and found the soap. Thomas Kelly said, he was very sorry, it was the first he had taken.

Thomas Kelly 's Defence. I am innocent, and likewise my brother is innocent.

William Kelly 's Defence. I am quite ignorant and innocent of it, I never saw the soap.

Thomas Kelly called two witnesses who gave him a good character.

William Kelly called eight witnesses who gave him a good character.

THOMAS KELLY , GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined six months in Newgate and publicly whipped .

WILLIAM KELLY , NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18101031-25

797. WILLIAM TRUEMAN and JOSEPH HOLBROOK was indicted for feloniously assaulting Mary Jackson in the King's highway, on the 23d of September , putting her in fear and taking from her person and against her will, a watch, value 2 l. a watch key, value 3 d. and part of a watch chain, value 1 d. her property .

MARY JACKSON . I live at No. 7, Harp-court, Fleet-street; I am a mantua maker .

Q. Do you recollect on a Sunday evening in September, being in Bartholomew Hospital - A. Yes. On Sunday, the 23d of September, about half past six o'clock in the evening, I was coming through the square of Bartholomew Hospital , I perceived the prisoner, Trueman, he was walking behind me; I looked round and saw him walking; I intended to go into the hospital. He came up to me and struck me on my face. I got on the step of the hospital intending to go into the hospital.

Court. To see a person you knew - A. No. He put his hand in my face intending to strike me; I put my hand up to prevent him. He struck me on my bosom, and took the watch from my side and ran away.

Q. Was your watch visible - A. It was under my muslin dress, he might see it.

Mr. Walford. He struck you on the breast, then took your watch and ran away; did he do any thing to you after he had taken your watch - A. He struck me again, after he had taken my watch, and I fell against the wall; I recovered myself, and immediately ran after him, and holloaed out, stop thief.

Q. You say you saw Trueman following of you before you came to the steps of the hospital - A. Yes. There was another with him, they spoke together; the other prisoner at the bar was with him.

Q. Are you quite sure that you saw the other prisoner with him before you came to the steps of the hospital - A. I am sure, by the features of his face.

Q. You were telling us that you ran after him, crying, stop thief - A. Yes.

Q. While you were pursuing him did any thing happen to you - A. The prisoner was not out of my sight until he was caught.

Q. Which prisoner - A. Trueman, the tallest man.

Q. Did the other do any thing - A. He tried to stop me, he caught hold of my arm.

Q. During the time that he caught hold of your arm, had you an opportunity of seeing him - A. Yes.

Q. You had observed his person before the watch was snatched from you - A. Yes, I am quite sure he was one of the two.

Q. Who was it apprehended him - A. William Lloyd.

Q. Did Holbrook stop you more than once - A. Only once; as I was running after Trueman, he ran and caught hold of my arm, I caught my arm away.

Q. You are perfectly certain that the lesser man of these two was that man - A. Yes.

Q. And the other man you are certain of - A. Yes, I never lost sight of him until he was taken.

Q. The next day you were before the Sitting Alderman at Guildhall - A. Yes. And when he was brought to the bar, then I knew him again immediately, I saw him.

Mr. Knapp. What line of life are you in - A. A mantua maker.

Q. Living where - A. No. 7, Harp-court, Fleet-street.

Q. Black boy alley it is called - A. No, Harp-court.

Q. How long have you lived in this court - A. I have lived there very near two years.

Q. And you do not know Black boy alley - A. No, it is Black-horse alley, and now it is called Chester-place.

Q. Do you lodge in this Harp-court - A. Yes.

Q. What lodgings have you there - A. One room, the first floor.

Q. How many other lady's lodge there - A. There is no one in the same apartment with me.

Q. How many lady's lodge in the house - A. Nobody but the landlord and the landlady. It is a very small house.

Q. You have one room to yourself and there you mantuamake - A. Yes.

Q. You were in Bartholomew-hospital this night - A. Yes; about half past six o'clock in the evening, it was at dusk.

Q. You had never seen Trueman before - A. No, I never saw either of them before.

Q. It did not take up a great while - A. No.

Q. Somebody was walking behind you, as you say, was the prisoner, where did he come behind you - A. I did not perceive him until I got into the square of the Hospital.

Q. And you looked after him, and the man came up to you, and all of a sudden the violence was committed upon you - A. Yes.

Q. There was no time to look around you, it was done in quite a hurry - A. Yes.

Q. You had never seen him before - A. No.

Q. He struck you - A. Yes, twice.

Q. Do you mean to say you have always said that he struck you before he got the watch - A. He struck me twice.

COURT. The question put to you is, when you were called upon to give the account, whether you said he struck you before he took the watch - A. Yes, he struck me once before he took the watch from me, and he struck me after; I said so before.

Q. You were not hurt much by the violence of the blow - A. Yes, I was ill two or three days.

Q. But you run after him directly, and cried, stop thief, immediately - A. Yes.

Q. At this time of the evening there were several men as well as woman that ran after him, hearing you cry stop thief - A. Yes

Q. Now the person that struck you, came behind you and struck you - A. He came up to me and struck me in the face.

Q. So you mean to say, that a man came behind you and struck you first before he did any thing to you - A. Yes.

Q. At the time that you cried stop thief, there were a great many people - A. Yes.

Q. How far did he go before he was stopped - A. Into Smithfield market.

Q. Then there were a great many people running in the direction you were - A. Yes.

Q. Do you mean to swear, never having seen the prisoner before, and the first blow being given behind you, that he is the person - A. He did not strike me behind, he struck me on the bosom.

Q. Was there any light in the lamps - A. I cannot say whether the lamps was lit at that time, or was not.

Q. It was dusk, and you will not swear whether the lamps were lit - A. No, I cannot.

Q. Now here are two persons charged with the robbery committed upon you - A. Yes.

Q. Are there any officers to give evidence as well as yourself and the constable - A. Yes.

Q. Have you ever learned that there is a forty-pound reward upon each of their convictions, eighty upon the two - A. I do not understand what you mean.

Q. Supposing these men are convicted, you would be entitled to your share of the eighty pound - A. Am I to pay eighty pound.

Q. No, you do not pay for a robbery; I ask you whether you do not know that there is eighty pound to be divided between you and your witnesses - A. No.

Q. Have not you heard that there is forty-pound reward for the conviction of a highwayman - A. No, I do not understand what you mean.

Q. You know you are prosecuting these men for a robbery upon your person, and it chanced to be in the highway, have not you learned that there is a reward of forty-pound upon each of these persons, supposing they should be convicted. Do not you hear - A. Yes. I do not know what you mean.

Q. There is no money for you to pay, have not you heard there is a reward for the conviction of a highwaymen - A. No.

Q. You say you lodge in Harp-court - A. Yes.

Q. And you have lodged there two years, and you never heard that there is a reward upon a person for the conviction of a robbery - A. No, I have not.

Q. Now, upon your oath, between the examination and this time, and during the time that you have been here, have not the constables told you so - A. No, Sir, they never told me any thing about it, nor no one told me any thing about it.

Mr. Walford. Where have you lived since the robbery - A. At Mr. Bray's, in Bartholomew-square.

Q. At whose expence is this prosecution carrying on - A. I do not know; I cannot pay it, I am quite certain I know the men

- LLOYD. I am an engine maker, I work for Mr. Harland, in Fenchurch-street. On the 3rd of September last, I was passing by Bartholomew square, I was going to St. Martin le-grand, I heard a lady, within a few yards of me, scream violently; she said, stop thief. I turned round and saw the prisoner, Trueman, run away from her; at the time that I first saw the prisoner running, I might be the distance from the prisoner to the other side of the court. He was running towards Smithfield: he ran from Bartholomew-square to the corner of Hosier-lane. It was a dark place and no lamps lit; he observed two or three people coming up, I was close to him.

Q. Was he ever out of your sight - A. Never. At the corner of Hosier-lane he saw two or three people coming up, he turned and went towards the George-inn. At the time that he was at the corner of Hosier-lane, he threw the watch down Hosier-lane.

Q. Whereabouts is the George-inn - A. The George Inn is about the middle way in Smithfield. At the corner of Hosier-lane, he seemed to throw something out of his hand, and it seemed to me to be a watch.

COURT. Did you think at the time that it was a watch - A. Yes. I pursued him exactly to the George Inn, he made a stop as if he had been shot. I immediately ran up against him, and collared him, and said, he was the person that committed the robbery; the prisoner, Trueman, said, he was not the person; I made answer, and said, he was. I took him in custody by the collar. When I had him five minutes in my custody, the lady came up, she said, that is the man that robbed me.

COURT. You mean the young woman that gave her evidence - A. Yes. I then told him he must go with me into the public-house, the George Inn. I immediately took him into the George Inn, he went quietly with me.

Q. When she accused him of being the person that robbed her, did he say any thing - A. He made no answer. When I got into the George, I took him by the side of the fire, I had hold of his collar, I had him about five minutes there; when the lady came in, and said, you are the man that robbed me; he denied it.

Q. Then the young woman repeated it that he was the man - A. Yes. I still kept hold of him; in a few minutes, a person came in, and said, is the lady here, has she lost any thing; I said, yes; she said, I am here, I have lost my watch. He immediately made answer, make yourself easy, here is a person here that has got your watch; he produced the watch with half the chain, the chain was broke in two; half of the chain was hanging to the watch the other part was lost. They then said, they would find the rest, probably, if they took a candle and lanthorn.

Q. Was it found - A. Yes, by a little girl, and it was produced; they might be the best part of half an hour gone. I insisted upon going for a constable; there were several people came up to me and said d - n your eyes, let him go, the lady has got her watch, what does she want more. I immediately said, I will not let him go until he was secured; then Finnagin came up and said, I

will not deliver the watch up until I deliver it up to a magistrate, or into the officer's hands. Griffin, the constable, came and said, you will assist me to take him to the Poultry Compter. Griffin and I went to take him to the Poultry Compter. When we came to the corner of Hosier-lane, the prisoner said, what do you hold me by the collar for. I said, to make secure of you; and immediately I said the word he, the prisoner, kick'd my heels up, and slipped upon me, and the officer on the prisoner. There was a party pulled the officer away, and I held the prisoner by his legs. I arose up as soon as I could, and then I found one or two that came to my assistance; the prisoner did not effect his escape. I was no sooner up than I was knocked down on the same spot, and dragged twenty or thirty yards to the pens.

Q. Was that by the prisoner - A. By the prisoner and fifteen or sixteen that there were in the gang. I then got up again, and dragged the prisoner towards Mr. Gent's, a public-house. I desired Mr. Gent to let me in; he said he would let no thieves be brought in there, and shut the door. I was then dragged into the pens. I had still hold of the prisoner. When I was standing at Mr. Gent's door, a party came up and said, d - n your eyes, cut his coat, and let him slip away. At that time I had hold of his coat and waistcoat; they cut his coat round and said, d - n your eyes, cut his bloody arm off and hamstring him. I let go then and fell down, and got hold of him by the thighs; they then immediately dragged me into the pens again.

Q. Was the constable still assisting you - A. Yes; and when I got up again which was in about ten minutes; I found one of the constable wrestling for a stick; I had still hold of him; the prisoner said to the constable, d - n your eyes, let go the stick; the constable said, I will not. When there was a cry of hamstring them, the constable gave a wrench and got the stick out of the prisoner's hands. I then began to drag the prisoner towards the folding gates of the George public-house; there were more collected together; then the number of the gang had increased, with knives drawn and sticks, and they said, throw him over. When I got to the gate, I heard a voice say, throw him backwards, or throw him over. When I turned round, I saw a man stand at a small wicket door; I then took and threw the prisoner's heels up, threw him in there, and fell upon him; somebody cried out, you will break my leg; I said never mind your leg, shut the door. I took him into the public-house, and Griffin the constable came in; I said you must have this man more secure if we take him another time. Griffin got a cord and tied his arms behind him. There was a person came up, and asked the prisoner to have a glass of ale; that person is not taken; I saw him from first to last attempting to rescue him; he said, where does your mother live; he told him; he said he would go and let his mother know; the landlord said, I will let your mother know. We got a coach, and four constables were procured; we got him into the coach, I never let him go, and when we got out of the yard they gave a great shout, and just as we got out of the yard, some one cried out, damn you, stick true, we will have him yet. The coach was brought within the great gate down to the lower part of the public-house; this took place after the coach go through the gates; we proceeded to about the middle of Smithfield; I had hold of the prisoner by the collar in the coach, the coach doors were forced open; I received four or five blows here between my neck and right shoulder by a stick; I then said to some of the constables, give me a stick that I might defend myself; he got it back again in half a minute; I held the coach door by the tassel; the coach stopped all of a sudden; I learned that they cut the reins; the coachman proceeded as far as Newgate-street; I told the coachman if he did not go on, we would blow his brains out; we had no fire-arms. When we got into Newgate-street, the coachman got off his box and went to ride his horses; when he went to ride his horses he found the traces were out; he drove about five yards; when the coach came down altogether; the main braces of the springs had been cut; the constables all then jumped out, excepting me and Griffin, and the prisoner, leaving the prisoner in my care and Griffin; in the course of six or seven minutes, Bray came up; he said, Oh, they have broke my arm; and I am cut.

Q. Was Bray one of the persons who were assisting you in conveying the prisoner - A. Yes; immediately Griffin jumped out of the coach the prisoner and me were left alone; there were a number of coaches passed; they would not stop and take the prisoner in.

Q. Was this gang about you - A. Yes, some of them who had been assisting us had gone off to the Poultry Compter; when they returned Stanton came with a brace of pistols. I still keeping hold of the prisoner, the prisoner began to cry, when Stanton came up to the coach-door. He had not been there above a minute; the man who had given, the prisoner a glass came up; I immediately said to Stanton, that is the man that attempted to rescue him; drive him away; Stanton immediately put a pistol to him and said, if he did not go away, he would blow his brains out. I handed the prisoner out of that coach into another, with two or three more officers with me. We were obliged to turn and take him into Giltspur-street Compter. The gang at that time had encreased to the amount of thirty; one of the knives they threw up against a tradesman's window in Newgate-street. It was about half past nine when we got to Giltspur-street Compter.

Q. What was the time that you left the George - A. About eight o'clock; it was about an hour and an half before we got him to the Compter.

Q. Are you quite sure the prisoner is the man that ran from the prosecutrix to Hosier-lane - A. I am positive of it. When he had got hold of the officer's stick, he struck me, and said, d - n your eyes, let me go; he broke my nose, and gave me two black eyes.

Mr. Knapp. The first you heard was the cry of stop thief - A. The first I heard was a scream, and then stop thief.

Q. Were the lamps lit - A. The day-light was sufficient to see the features of any man.

Mr. Gleed. Are you sure from the first to the last that he was the same person - A. Yes.

THOMAS FINNAGIN . Q. Do you recollect the night that we have been talking of coming along Hosier-lane - A. I do. I was coming up Hosier-lane within a few yards of Smithfield, I felt something strike my leg, I picked it up, it was a watch without the outside case; it had part of the chain; I put it in my breeches pocket, and kept my hand upon it. When I got into Smithfield I asked what was the matter, they said a lady had been robbed. I went into the George.

Q. What did you do with it at last - A. I gave it to the peace-officer, his name is Griffin.

Q. Did you see the woman that gave evidence here - A. I did; she said she was the person that had been robbed. The case was found afterwards.

Q. You saw the outside case afterwards, did you - A. Yes.

CHARLES GRIFFIN . Q. You are the constable of St. Sepulchres - A. Yes, serving in my own right.

Q. Do you recollect this night the robbery happened - A. Yes. I went with the person that came for me to the George, I found a number of people about the door, I asked where the prisoner was, Lloyd had him in custody, he had got hold of his collar; I told him I was an officer; I requested the name of the person that kept hold of the prisoner, and the lady that lost the watch, and the person that found the watch; they gave me their names; I told the prisoner if he would go quietly I would neither tie him nor handcuff him; the prisoner said he was innocent, he would go quietly; I told Lloyd to aid and assist me in taking the prisoner to the Compter. On my looking round the room I saw Bray near the door, I said, Bray, assist me with this prisoner; he gave me his assistance. We came out with the prisoner, and a great number of people after him.

Q. You were with the last witness Lloyd, you have heard the account that Lloyd has given of the attempt to rescue the prisoner, is that the truth - A. It is exactly the truth, but he has not mentioned when I was thrown across some hurdles. Here is the watch, here is the coat of the prisoner's that was cut, and here is one of the knives. This knife was knocked out of some persons hand, that were engaged in this affray I have every reason to believe.

Q. How many knives do you suppose you saw drawn in the attempt to rescue this prisoner - A. Seven or eight drawn knives. This is the watch that I received from Finnagin, this is the side of the coat that Lloyd had hold of; it is Trueman's coat, they cut it, and he slipped out of it. We at last secured him, after undergoing this violence.

JAMES BRAY . I am a box-carrier to Bartholomew Hospital. The prosecutrix has been under my protection because of the gang coming about her house. I was in Bartholomew Hospital about half after six, I heard the cry of stop thief; I run; I saw the prisoner Trueman run; he was running, to go across Smithfield, I pursued him, and was very near to him when one of the gang knocked me down, just by Hosier-lane; when I was within two or three yards I was knocked down; I got up again; while I was down several of the gang tumbled over me, picked my pocket, and turned both of my pockets inside out. I went to the house where they dragged the prisoner, in the George. At the George a coach was sent for, I assisted Griffin in the first attempt to get him into the coach.

Q. Now you have heard the violence that Lloyd has described to endeavour so rescue this man - A. It is true, and it was me that was cut; I stated that my arm was broke; I received a violent blow on my arm by a stick while I was in the coach, and my fingers were cut by a knife.

COURT. How many knives do you think you saw drawn - A. There were a great many, I cannot say how many.

Q. Do you think there were so many as twenty - A. I dare say there was, and a great numbers of sticks, which appeared to be broken from the hurdles in Smithfield. On our coming to the Compter the prisoner Trueman, when he had got Griffin across the hurdles, he said d - n your eyes, hamstring the b - s. They had got Griffin across the hurdles, trying to wrench the stick out of his hand.

Q. Were there persons with knives drawn at the time - A. Yes; I knocked two of them down with the stick that I had in my hand.

Q. Had you the opportunity of seeing any person besides the prisoner Trueman - A. There were two of them had been patients in the hospital, but as soon as they saw me they withdrew.

COURT. If you ever see those persons that drew their knives, do your best endeavours to have them taken in custody.

Mr. Gleed. Did you see Holbrook that evening - A. I cannot swear to him.

Q. The next day you were before the sitting aldermen - A. I was, I was outside of the office.

Q. Do you recollect seeing the other prisoner there - A. I do, he was standing among the concourse of people that came up with the prisoner; there were several in fustian jackets, I believe they were of the gang, and there was a nudge made at the elbow, one among the other, immediately one in a fustian jacket came up and asked if I was not the young man that was cut on the Sunday night; I said no, I was waiting for a letter for the hospital; I turned-round and immediately saw the young man that was assisting me on the Sunday evening, his name is Huggins; he said, that is the young man that struck me; Holbrook walked down Blackwell-hall, I followed him and took him by the collar, one of the officers came up immediately to my assistance, and brought him into the office.

Mr. Gurney. Holbrook made no resistance to you - A. None.

JOHN HUGGINS . I belong to his Majesty's customs; I live at No. 7, Harp-court.

Q. Do you recollect being at the George in Smithfield on the night of the robbery - A. Yes, Jackson sent for me, I directly went, When I came there I found Trueman in custody, I saw Holbrook there, I am quite certain I saw him there; I received a violent blow from Holbrook; I was aiding and assisting the officer to get Trueman into the George Inn gateway, just before the coach was sent for.

Q. Did he give you a blow with a stick or with his fist - A. His fist.

Q. Had you given any sort of offence to Holbrook - A. None at all; I had hold of Trueman at the time.

Q. Then your attention was entirely taken up by holding of Trueman - A. It was.

Q. Now look at Holbrook, are you quite certain that is the man that struck you at the George Inn Smithfield - A. After he struck me I made answer, I should know him another time.

Q. Were you at Guildhall the next day - A. Yes, I was.

Q. Had you ever been Holbrook before this night - A. Never before this night. I saw Holbrook very busy at Hosier-lane in trying to rescue Trueman away

from the officers before he struck me.

Q. Did you see any thing more of Holbrook that night - A. Not that night.

Q. The next morning you were at Guildhall - A. Yes; I saw Holbrook there, he was standing in the crowd along with some more, there were six or seven together.

Q. Do you know whether either of these persons he was standing with were any of the persons that were attempting to rescue Trueman - A. I cannot say, he was conversing with these persons; as soon as Mr. Bray saw him he said he believed that is the young man that attempted to rescue Trueman away; Bray said that to me; I knew him when he was pointed out by Bray directly; I have no doubt but he is the person: I am convinced that he was one of the persons; I had no doubt then.

Mr. Gurney. You belong to his Majesty's custom's - A. Yes, I am a tide-waiter, I lodge at No. 7, Harp-alley, in the same house with the prosecutrix: I have the second-floor; I am married.

WILLIAM STANTON . Q. You are an officer belonging to the city of London - A. Yes.

Q. In consequence of some information this night you went to Smithfield - A. Yes, I did, a little after eight; I took a brace of pistols with me; I run as fast as I could towards Smithfield, when I got down Newgate-street, about half way, I saw a coach surrounded by a mob; when I got to the coach there were some that knew me, they said, stop him; I took no heed of that, I pulled out my pistols, I put them on the half cock; some one tried to stop me, I said, if any one of you try to stop me; I will blow your brains out; I got towards the coach door, they were fighting with sticks; they were striking at the coach with sticks, trying to rescue him out.

Q. Had you an opportunity of knowing them that were around - A. No; when I got to the coach door there was one of them pointed out to me; I told him if he did not go away I would fire at him; I told them that were in the coach not to fear, I would lose my life before they should rescue him; they tried to shove me under the coach, I put my back against the coach and said, the first that comes I will shoot him.

Q. What was the state of the coach when you came up at first - A. It was cut down, the body was hanging on the axle tree. I spoke to the coaches that came past, they would not take him in.

Q. Was the traces of the horses cut - A. Yes, they could not go on any farther.

COURT. And this in the very heart of the city - A. Yes, just by Warwick-lane. When I looked in the coach window I knew him, I said, it is you! When the coach came up that I got to stop, the prisoner said, I will come out with you; I got him into the coach. After we got him into Giltspur-street Compter Griffin said to me, there is a man that you turned away that gave him some ale, I should like to have that man, he is gone to his mother's. We went to this Trueman's mother that lives in Long-lane; I was on one side of the way and Griffin was going to knock at the door; it is very near the corner of the timber-yard; I was along with Huggins, Griffin was on the other side of the way, I saw three of them together, I saw a person exactly of the size of Holbrook; he was beating his his coat as if he had fell down in the dirt; he said d - n his eyes, if it had not been for that b - r at the Compter, we should have had him away.

Q. to Mrs Jackson. Is that the watch that you were robbed of that evening - A. Yes, I can swear to it.

Mr. Gurney. How long have you had it - A. About two months; there is Winfield inside of it, I bought it of Mr. Huggins.

Court. It is Wakefield - A. It is Wakefield or Winfield; I am sure it is my watch, I gave two guineas for it.

DANIEL ELDRIDGE . Q. You are a city officer - A. Yes.

Q. You apprehended the prisoner Holbrook - A. Yes; I brought him in before the sitting Alderman, I found upon him a letter.

Mr. Gurney. He was asked at the moment how he came to Guildhall yard - A. Yes; he said, seeing a mob of people round the Compter, curiosity led him up to Guildhall, he said he was going to the Spread Eagle, to send that letter to his master at Chelmsford.

Q. Was he questioned as to where he had been on the Sunday evening - A. Yes; he said he came up by the Harwich mail. It is a mail that comes up on the Sunday night.

Trueman's Defence. I should wish Griffin to shew where he was cut.

Griffin. I was kept ten days in bed; I was much hurt; I was ill three weeks; I was obliged to have a coach every day I went to Guildhall upon the examinations; I have the doctor's bill to pay; I shall feel the effects of it so long as I live. It was Bray that was cut.

Bray. I was cut across my fingers, here are the marks now.

Holbrook's Defence. I was at work at Mr. William Sheppee 's, at Chelmsford; I came to London on the Sunday. At Rumford, I was overtaken by the Harwich coach; at half past nine I arrived at the Spread Eagle, Gracechurch-street. I went to my wife and family; I wrote a letter to send to my master, that I should not be at home before the Tuesday. On the Monday I was going to take it to the Harwich coachman, and when I was going by the Compter, I saw a mob of people, and out of idle curiosity I followed them, and at Guildhall yard I was taken.

WILLIAM SHEPPEE . I am a currier, and live at Chelmsford.

Q. Has Holbrook been at work for you lately - A. Yes, a few weeks ago.

Q. What was the last day he was working with you at Chelmsford - A. The last day that he was on my premises was on Sunday morning the 23d of September. I was just come out of my garden to go to church, it was about half after ten. He had worked for me about six or seven weeks, and during the time he has been with me he has always behaved very civil, and worked hard.

Q. I believe it was in the course of the same week that you received the news that he was taken up - A. I received a letter from him dated in prison; the first letter that I received from him he said that he hoped to be down in a few days; the second letter I received from him dated in prison.

Q. Are you sure that the last day you saw him was Sunday the 23d of September - A. I am sure, because I received a letter from him on the Tuesday afterwards, saying he would soon be down; this is the letter, dated the 25th of September.

COURT. Can you be positive that you received that letter two days after you had seen him - A. Yes; no other servant has succeeded him.

Q. Have you any reason to know the day of the month that that Sunday was that he left you, excepting from the date of that letter - A. When I received the letter, dated in prison, I looked into my book to see what was the last day I paid him the eight shillings; that was on the 23d; he worked with me till Saturday the 22d; I paid him part of his wages on the Saturday, and because I had no silver, I paid him the rest on the Sunday morning.

Q. I understand that you received more letters than one - A. I received one, dated in prison; I do not know whether I received that letter in that week or the beginning of the next week, this is it; I received it by the post, it is dated Giltspur-street Compter, 10th of October.

THOMAS SHELDRICK . On the 23d of September last I was a post-boy at the Black Boy, Chelmsford, I left the Black Boy on the Wednesday morning following; I live at South End now.

Q. On the Sunday before you quitted did you see the prisoner between Chelmsford and London - A. I did, on the other side of Brentwood, two miles and a half from Brentwood to London; it was very near four o'clock, it was past four when I got to Brentwood; the prisoner was walking towards London, I passed him, I nodded my head to him, and he returned the nod. I knew him before.

Q. Are you perfectly sure that the person that you passed at day-light was the prisoner Holbrook - A. Yes.

JAMES DRING . Q. Are you the coachman of the Harwich coach - A. Yes.

Q. Did you drive that coach up to London on the evening of the 23d of September - A. Yes.

Q. On the other side of Rumford to London did you take up a young man to bring him up to town - A. Yes.

Q. Look at the prisoner Holbrook, and tell me whether you believe he is the man - A. I have no doubt in the world. I arrived at the Spread Eagle Gracechurch-street, a quarter past nine in the evening.

Q. How soon after that were you brought up before the sitting Alderman - A. On Tuesday evening, when I came in, I saw a requisition for me to go before the sitting Alderman; on Wednesday morning I went, I did not see the prisoner before the Alderman. That was the next Wednesday after I drove the prisoner to London.

Q. When you so saw him before the sitting Alderman did you call to your mind any circumstance in the course of your journey, and so on, calling to your mind the conversation that passed on the coach which he related before the Alderman - A. It was dusk when he got on.

Q. He related the conversation, which convinced you that he was the person - A. Yes, he related every word that was mentioned on the coach from the time he got on till he came off.

Q. Was it possible for him to mention that without his being the person you brought up - A. I think it is impossible. I took him up, about half after six o'clock, at the fourteen mile stone. I have no recollection of his person.

Holbrook called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

TRUEMAN, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 23.

HOLBROOK, NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18101031-26

798. ANN HARROWIN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of September , three tablecloths, value 6 s. seven shirts, value 14 s. and three shirts, value 3 s. the property of John Bunt esq .

ANN POLLARD . I am a servant to Mr. Bunt, he lives in Keppel-street , I know that these things are the property of Mr. Bunt.

Q. When did you lose them - A. About three weeks or a month ago. Ann Harrowin had them to wash, she did not return them; I gave them her to wash on the latter end of September or the beginning of October; she was to return them in the course of a week; I applied to her for them, and she appointed a time that they should be ready, she said they were not in the house, but they were perfectly safe, and she sent the duplicates.

Q. She never denied having had the things - A. No.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18101031-27

799. JOHN NORRIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of September , two baskets, value 3 d ten peaches, value 4 s. and ten nectarines, value 4 s. the property of Adam Paul .

ADAM PAUL . I live at Cheshunt. On the 5th of September I came to Spitalfields market with fruit and vegetables for sale, among which were two baskets of peaches and nectarines; I had occasion to go to Bishopsgate-street, I left my goods in the care of William Cracknell . When I returned, the basket of peaches and nectarines were stolen.

WILLIAM CRACKNELL . I keep a stall in Spitalfields market; the peaches and nectarines were left in my care; they were taken away, I do not know by whom.

JOHN OXLADE . I am a fruiterer in the City-road. On the 1st of September, in the morning about seven, I saw two baskets of peaches and nectarines exposed to sale in Spitalfields market, I asked Cracknell who they belonged to, he said, the person they belonged to was gone into the city, he believed the price was five shillings a basket, but he would not venture to sell them untill the owner came; during this time, Norris, the prisoner, came up and stood against the post close by, I knew him by sight perfectly well, I immediately went to purchase some other fruit, and turning round, I saw the prisoner with the two baskets of fruit on his arm; they were the same baskets; he was then nearly behind Cracknell's cart; I went up to him and asked him if they were for sale, he said no, he had just bought them. As I never saw him buy fruit before, it astonished me very much; I instantly went to Cracknell and informed him of it, we both concluded they were stolen, we did not think ourselves authorized to stop him. When the prosecutor came, I informed him.

Q. What became of the prisoner - A, He went behind a row of carts and disappeared.

Prisoner's Defence. I have been thirty five-years in Spitalfields market, and always got my bread in an honest way; I was in the market every morning afterwards, and was not taken untill a month afterwards.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 58.

Fined 1 s. and Confined Six Months in the House of Correction .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18101031-28

800. THOMAS ANTONIO was indicted for feloniously

stealing, on the 20th of September , two silk handkerchiefs, value 5 s. the property of Holditch Baines , privately in his shop .

HOLDITCH BAINES . I am a linen draper , Ratcliffe Highway . On Thursday evening, the 20th of September, the prisoner came into my shop, he asked to look at some silk handkerchiefs; I shewed him a great many, I told him the price of one he was looking at, was five shillings and sixpence; he said, it was higher than he could go to; he spoke English to me, I understood him very well. He fixed upon another, I told him four shillings; he said, he was a poor man; said, he should have it for three shillings and sixpence, what it cost me; after I had cut the handkerchief off, and he had agreed to give three shillings and sixpence, he offered me half a crown. I then told him that I thought he came in to steal not to buy, I bid him go out. I did not miss the handkerchiefs till the next morning; the constable brought it to my house; he asked me if I had lost any thing, and produced two silk handkerchiefs; they had my private mark, and they were the same I had shewn him.

GEORGE LANCASTER . These handkerchiefs were given me at the office; George Hack brought the prisoner with them in his hat.

GEORGE HACK . I am shopman to, Mr. Pike. On Thursday, the 20th of September, I saw the handkerchiefs in the prisoner's hat; I delivered them to the constable. When he took them from his hat he claimed them as his own; the handkerchiefs were inside the lining of his hat, as if concealed, this was about a quarter before nine; our shop is four doors from Mr. Baines's shop.

Prisoner's Defence. I have been here fourteen days; I have always been working hard on board a ship. I went along with another man that spoke English very well; he went to the shop and bought four pounds-worth of goods. I know nothing about it.

Prosecutor. He came alone to my shop.

GUILTY , aged 45.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18101031-29

801. WILLIAM BAXTER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of October , a watch, value 5 l. the property of William Appleby , in the dwelling house of William Butt .

WILLIAM APPLEBY . I lodge at William Butt 's, Mile-end road' he is a publican. The prisoner slept with me three nights. On Sunday night, the 30th of September, I went to bed an hour before the prisoner, I had my watch in my breeches pocket; I put my breeches under the pillow.

Q. Do you recollect his coming to bed - A. No, I knew he was in bed that morning, he got up in the morning, I was not aware of his going away. I got up in the morning about seven o'clock, I missed my watch out of my breeches pocket. The prisoner never returned to his lodging; I saw the prisoner on the Wednesday following, he was in custody then.

Q. When did you see any thing of your watch again - A. On the evening of the Monday that I lost it. I found it at Mr. Watt's, a pawnbroker in East Smith.

JOHN LOWE . On the first of October, about seven o'clock in the morning, my landlady gave me information of the robbery. On my going across East Smithfield, the prisoner accosted me to go to drink with him, I had seen him once before, which I refused; he pressed me, and then I went with him to the Bee-hive, Nightingale-lane, this was about a quarter past eight; he there produced a duplicate of a silver watch, for one pound ten shillings, pledged at Mr. Watt's; he told me that he had been and pledged it. He wanted me to stay away from my duty to eat beef steaks and onions with him, he would pay all expences, I told him I could not do that. I went to the London Docks, and he went with me; I prevailed upon him to leave me, he did. When I had done my duty, I went to my landlady, and told her what had transpired, and in consequence of my landlady's advice, I went into the Three Crowns; I told the prosecutor of this. The prisoner shewed me one pound six and four-pence, as part of the one pound ten. We saw the watch that night.

Prisoner. I do not know that ever I saw this man before in my life.

Lowe. I have no doubt of his person, I had seen him in the Three Crowns once before.

JOHN FARROW . I am servant to James Watts , pawnbroker, 89, East Smithfield. My master took the watch in pledge. On Wednesday morning, the 3d of October, about eleven o'clock, the prisoner came and produced this duplicate, in the name of John Burton , a silver watch, one pound ten, dated 1st of October. He told me if I would give him thirty shillings for the duplicate he would have no more to do with it. In order to detain the prisoner, I said the watch was looking for, and sent for an officer; the officer came, and he was taken into custody. The watch has been in my custody ever since.

JOHN GILLMAN . I apprehended the prisoner. On my taking him down to the office I met the prosecutor. I asked the prisoner if he knew him; he said no. The prosecutor knew the prisoner directly.

Prisoner's Defence. I was walking along the street, I picked up the duplicate; I neither could read or write; I asked a person were this place was, he told me. I went to the place were this watch was in pledge, I asked them to buy the duplicate. I am innocent of taking the watch, of ever knowing that the prosecutor had one.

GUILTY, aged 27.

Of Stealing, but not in the dwelling house .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18101031-30

802. ELIZABETH HIBBERT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of October , four jackets, value 6 l. the property of John Eley , in the dwelling house of John Wigan .

CHARLOTTE ELEY . I lodge in Queen-street, Seven Dials .

Q. What is your landlord's name - A. I cannot tell; my husband's name is John Eley . On the 16th of October, I was working at army jackets, two jackets for marines, and two for privates. The prisoner, on that day, came to my lodgings; I went out between ten and eleven, I left her with my two children; I left the four jackets in my room, two finished and two not I returned to my lodgings about ten minutes after eleven, the prisoner and the jackets were gone. In consequence of what my landlady told me.

I went in pursuit of the prisoner; I found her at her lodgings in George-street, formerly called Dyot-street.

Q. Did you find the jackets - A. No, the constable found the collars, lining, cuffs, and buttons to the jackets, in her bundle in her room.

- GALLEY. I am a constable. I went with the prosecutrix to apprehend the prisoner; I found her at No. 7, George-street, St. Giles's, I found a bundle in the room. I opened the bundle and the prosecutrix claimed it.

Prosecutrix. These pieces of cuffs, linings, collars, are what I had in my room for the two made jackets.

SARAH WIGAN . I live at 16, Queen-street, Seven Dials.

Q. Did the prosecutrix lodge with you on the 16th of last month - A. Yes. On Tuesday, the 16th of September, the prisoner came down with a basket in her hand, the basket appeared to be full, and a soldier's coat was throwed over the top of it.

Q. Had you seen her there that morning - A. Yes; she came in between nine and ten, she had nothing in her hand then, I saw her very plain at the door, scraping her feet; and when she came down she had the basket in her hand; she asked what o'clock it was, I told her half-after ten; she said she was to take them in by eleven.

Prosecutrix. I lost a basket and two soldiers jackets made, and two unmade.

Prisoner's Defence. I had a large bundle in my hand when I came in, and these things belonged to me, except that rag.

GUILTY , aged 56.

Fined 1 s. and confined Six Months in the House of Correction .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18101031-31

803. EDWARD JOLLY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of October , a watch, value 40 s. and a silver tea-spoon, value 2 s. the property of Mary Woodgear , in her dwelling house .

MARY WOODGEAR . On the 10th of October the prisoner came in with two other men; one of the men lodged in my house at the time my husband was living, his name is Edward Stone ; the other was a sailor. They called in and said, how do you do. I am a widow, and have two children; I keep a green-shop . They stopped a quarter of an hour or ten minutes. The watch was hanging at the mantle shelf, and the silver spoon was on the mantle shelf; I missed the watch and the spoon after the prisoner had been gone about five minutes. They all three went out, but the man went out five minutes before the others.

Q. You did not see him do any thing while he was there with the others - A. No. I pursued after them, I could not find them; a little boy was standing at the door, I pursued them the direction he told me.

Q. It is your dwelling house, is it - A. Yes; it is in the parish of St. James's, in the liberty of Westminster.

JOSEPH PENTON . Q. Did you see the three men come out of the house - A. Yes; the prisoner came out first, and the other two about five minutes afterwards. When they came out, they said, it was all right; the prisoner was just by them.

Q. Was he near enough to hear the one say to the other, it is all right - A. Yes. They all three went off together, they ran as fast as they could; as soon as ever the woman came out I told her.

Q. to Prosecutrix. Your watch has not been got back - A. No.

Prisoner's Defence. This woman keeps a disorderly house for girls of the town, in the top part of the house; and there are people passing by her room all hours of the day.

Prosecutrix. I was washing with my back towards them, they took an opportunity and took it, there were nobody in my apartment but them three.

Q. What is the value of your watch - A. Forty shillings.

GUILTY, aged 19.

Of Stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18101031-32

804. WILLIAM JEFFERYS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of October , three bottles, value 1 l. 10 s. four snuff boxes, value 1 l. 7 s. four silver boxes, value 2 l. four purses, value 10 s. five tooth-picks, value 5 s. a tongue scraper, value 2 s. two work boxes, value 1 l. 10 s. three pair of buckles, value 9 s. nine brushes, value 1 l. 8 s. thirteen thimbles, value 13 s. three knives, value 15 s. a pair of salts, value 2 s. 6 d. and two pencil cases, value 5 s. the property of John Lambe , in his dwelling-house .

JOHN LAMBE . I live at 29, Cockspur-street, in the parish of St. Martin's ; I am a pocket book silversmith .

Q. Is your shop part of your house - A. Yes, it is part of my dwelling house. I have no partners; the prisoner was my porter and shopman . On Monday evening, the 8th of October, from suspicion, I went for a constable and returned with him; I told the prisoner to go into my back shop, the constable followed him. I told the constable I suspected he had robbed me; the constable shewed his authority; the prisoner then put his hands into his pocket and pulled out a wicker bottle with a silver cap, a hair brush, two wooden snuff boxes, a small silver box, two pieces of soap, and two silk purses, the other articles were found at his lodgings. The prisoner asked me if I would grant him one favour, to permit him to go to Westminster-bridge and throw himself over, he wished to drown himself; I told him I could not comply with that request; we took him to the watchhouse. The constable has the property found upon his person, and Bly, the officer, the things found at his lodgings.

EDWARD BROOKER . On the evening of the 8th of October, I went with Mr. Lambe into his back shop; the prisoner was called into the room; I pulled my staff out, told the prisoner I was an officer; he then pulled all the articles out of his pocket; he said, he was guilty, and what he produced was his master's; he took out all except this snuff box, which I took out.

COURT. The things that you are now to look at are the things found upon the person - A. These are my property, and there is no one article at forty shillings.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel, and called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY, aged 26,

of stealing, to the value of thirty-nine shillings only .

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18101031-33

805. ANN WALGRAVE was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of James Stone , about the hour of eleven at night, on the 29th of September , and stealing therein a sheet, value 5 s. two blankets, value 5 s. and a quilt, value 1 s. the property of Richard Taylor .

RICHARD TAYLOR . I live at No. 4, Adam and Eve Court, Mary-le-bone ; I am a housekeeper; Richard Taylor and his wife lodges in my second floor. On the 29th of September I was coming home at eleven o'clock at night; and just as I got to my own door, I met the prisoner coming out with a large bundle under her arm; I stopped her; she said they were her own property; she had taken the liberty to go into my house backwards; I took her back to my house; we searched the house, and Mrs. Taylor had lost all the clothes off her bed. I gave her in custody of the watchman; she was taken to the watchhouse, and the bundle also.

JOHN FLYNN . I am a watchman; the prisoner and this bundle were delivered into my custody; I have had the things ever since.

ANN TAYLOR . My husband's name is Richard Taylor ; the two blankets, sheet, and quilt, are my property. When the prisoner was brought back, I was in the three pair room; I had just gone out of my two pair room; I left them things on the bed; the bed was made; my landlady called me down; I went into my room, and the bed was stripped of these things; I went down into the shop; there was the prisoner and these things.

GUILTY, aged 39,

of stealing only .

Fined 1 s. and Confined Six Months in the House of Correction .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18101031-34

806. SAMUEL CLEMENTS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 11th of October , a gelding, value 20 l. the property of Thomas Jarman .

JOHN SCOTT . I am a servant to Thomas Jarman ; he lives at Stoke Newington . On the 10th of last month, in the afternoon, I put the horse into my master's field; I fastened the gate, about half after five I went and found the gate open; I acquainted my master; he sent me to St. Alban's to look after the horse; I could hear no tidings of him.

MATTHEW KEDWOOD . I am a servant to Mr. Jarman; on the 11th of October my master sent me to Bishop Stortford in Hertfordshire, to look after the horse; I met Mr. Dalby, a horse dealer, between Sapworth and Bishop Stortford; the prisoner was in company with him. Mr. Dalby asked me how I came there; I told him we had lost the brown horse, and I was coming to speak to him, to see if I could find him. Mr. Dalby said, it was of no use my going any further; to turn back; the prisoner asked me whose horse it was; I said Mr. Jarman's.

Q. Did you know the prisoner before - A. Yes, he had lived some years near Newington. The prisoner said, you know me; I said yes, I know you. Mr. Dalby and I and the prisoner came a little way along the road as we expected; Mr. Dalby turned his head, the prisoner was gone; he had left his horse that he was riding before on the road; Mr. Dalby and I turned back towards the way the prisoner was gone; we proceeded into a field over a gate, where we supposed he had gone. Mr. Dalby found the prisoner in the field where he expected, a little way from the hedge, in the ditch; it was a bushy place.

Q. Did it appear to you he was endeavouring to conceal himself - A. Yes; Mr. Dalby called me; I went and assisted in bringing him down the field. He said, I have done the crime, and I must suffer for it; then we took him.

Q. Where did you see your master's horse - A. I saw the horse on the Saturday afterwards.

JAMES DALBY . Q. I understand you are a horse-dealer - A. Yes, I live at Stoke Newington.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. I never saw him before the 11th of October; on the 11th of October I saw the prisoner; I am sure it is the man. On the 10th of October I slept at Harlow town; on the 11th I saw the prisoner at Sapworth, about six o'clock in the morning; he was walking and leading a brown horse; about two hundred yards before I overtook him, he turned under a shed where there was a rack and manger, as if he was going to feed the horse. I said, my friend, are you going to the fair with this horse; he said yes; I said, where did you bring this horse from; he said Rumford, it is my brother's; his name is Cook, he keeps a few cows, and draws the milk about with this horse; he has lately gone blind, and is shy when the lamps are lit; he will not stand still, he runs back. I asked him to pull the horse from under the shed; he did; he asked fourteen guineas for the horse; I asked him to run the horse; I could not cough him; I thanked him for the look of the horse; I went on. The horse was sold at Bishop Stortford fair to Wright; before I saw the prisoner there he sold the horse to Wright, a man that I hired to take care of my horses; Wright tied the horse up with mine; a gentleman asked the price of the horse; I sold him to Mr. Gutheridge.

COURT. Wright bought the horse for you, did not he - A. He bought him and paid for it; before I saw him I sold the horse to Mr. Gutheridge.

Q. Do you remember the last witness Redwood, coming to you - A. Yes.

Q. Did the conversation pass that Redwood said - A. Yes; he was riding upon a mare then; after he had sold this horse he purchased a mare, and was riding upon that; I found the prisoner in the ditch among the bushes a Redwood has described; he left the horse in the road; I went into two or three fields before I found him. When Mr. Jarman saw the horse he claimed it; that is the horse that Wright bought, and I afterwards sold to Mr. Gutheridge. Mr. Jarman and I went down on the 11th, and Gutheridge gave it up.

JAMES WRIGHT . I live at Stamford Hill, in Hackney parish.

Q. Do you remember being at Bishop Stortford fair - A. Yes; I bought a brown gelding of the prisoner; I had seen the prisoner before; I am sure he is the person; I paid him eleven pounds for it; that was the horse that I put along with Mr. Dalby's horses; he asked twelve guineas for it; I got it for eleven pounds; it was afterwards sold for sixteen guineas.

THOMAS JARMAM . Q. You are the proprietor of

this horse - A. I am, I lost it on the 11th of October.

Q. In consequence of that, did you go with Dalby on Mr. Gutheridge at Little Munton - A. Yes, I found the horse at Plough; I challenged the horse, and Mr. Gutheridge gave it up. I had it a year and a half; I have no doubt in the world of its being my horse; I lost the horse on the Thursday; I saw it the day before; it is a cart-horse; I gave forty pounds for him a year and a half ago; I value him at twenty pounds.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 36.

Second Middlesex jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18101031-35

807. HENRY DAVIS was indicted for feloniously making an assault in the king's highway, upon Henry Weller , on the 6th of October , putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, one hundred and twenty halfpence, and four one pound bank notes, the property of Carew Henry Reynell .

HENRY WELLER . Q. Who is your master - A. Carew Henry Reynell ; I am apprentice to him; he lives at 21, Piccadilly . On Saturday the 6th of October, about nine o'clock in the evening, I was sent to get change for a five pound note; I got change at Mr. Lawrence's, the baker, in Air-street, Piccadilly.

Q. What change did you get for the five pound note - A. Four one pound notes, fifteen shillings in silver, and a five shilling paper of halfpence I was coming home; I was within five or six doors of my master's house; the prisoner came up to me; he said, they think this is a bad note; he had a paper in his hand; it turned out to be a lottery bill; he said, I must give him the change again, and before I had time to speak, he snatched the four one pound notes and the halfpence out of my hand. I had the notes in my hand with my hand in my pocket. I had the fifteen shillings and the halfpence in the other hand; he took the notes and the paper of halfpence, and ran away directly.

Q. You say he had a paper in his hand - A. Yes; when he took the notes and the paper of halfpence he shoved the paper into my hand; then he run up Air-street. I looked at the paper; it turned out to be a lottery bill; I hollowed out stop thief several times; he was stopped by Mr. Friend. I am sure the prisoner is the man; I never lost sight of him; he was stopped in Air-street.

Q. You had not observed him in the baker's shop, either in the shop or about the shop; had you - A. No.

MR. LAWRENCE. I am a baker in Air-street.

Q. Do you remember that young man coming for change at your shop - A. Yes, on Saturday night the 6th of October; it was a five pound note I changed for him. I gave him four one pound notes, fifteen shillings in silver, and five shillings in copper. I did not see the prisoner in the shop or about the shop; there were four notes shewn to me afterwards, but whether they were the notes I cannot say.

RICHARD FRIEND . I was coming down Air-street, I heard the cry of stop thief; I saw several people come running towards me; the prisoner was the first; I stopped him, and he was taken to the watchhouse; Mr. Lawrence's son found some notes afterwards; he is not here.

- PETHERICK. I am constable of St. James's; I took the prisoner; he desired me to implore mercy of he magistrate for him to go to sea.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel; called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY, aged 22,

Of stealing, but not violently from the person .

Fined 1 s. and Confined Two Years in the House of Correction .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18101031-36

808. LAWRENCE FLANNEGAN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 20th of October , a feather bed, value 10 l.; a bolster, value 2 l.; two pillows, value 10 s.; a bolster-case, value 4 s.; a mattress, value 12 s.; two pieces of wrapper, value 4 s.; five yards and a half of carpet, value 17 s.; four yards and a half of Brussels carpet, value 27 s.; a mahogany card table, value 2 l. 5 s.; a mahogany cloaths horse, value 5 s.; a hearth broom, value 3 s.; two iron brackets, value 5 s.; a pewter jug, value 4 s.; a bedstead, value 2 l. 2 s.; three mahogany boards, value 1 l. 1 s.; four pieces of mahogany, value 7 s.; six deal ends, value 10 s.; a portable desk, value 2 l. 7 s.; a knife tray, value 7 s. 6 d.; a mahogany tea board, value 5 s.; two mahogany pillars and claws, value 1 l. 8 s.; a mahogany table, value 30 s.; five chairs and a arm chair, value 10 l.; a wainscot table, value 6 s.; eighteen locks, value 30 s.; eighteen keys, value 6 s.; and one thousand brass nails, value 4 s. 6 d.; the property of Edward Treslove Cox , in his dwelling-house .

PETER AKER . I am a dealer in household furniture. On the 20th of last month the prisoner came to me; he said he had some goods to dispose of. I went with him to No. 6, Off Alley, in the Strand, to look at them, he took me up to the attic story; he shewed me a number of houshold goods that he had to dispose of; I took an inventory of them: a field bedstead, three mahogany boards, some odd pieces, six deal ends, a portable desk, two mahogany pillars and claws, a mahogany two-leaved table, five mahogany chairs, and one arm ditto, a wainscot table with a drawer, eighteen locks and keys, ten table castors, a table latch, and a thousand brass nails; he asked me eleven pounds for them; I asked him if that was the price he meaned to sell them for; he said yes; I told him they were worth more money; if he would make an inventory of them and bring it over to me at one o'clock, I would buy them of him if I could; he came at half past twelve, and said he had made a grand mistake; he asked twenty pounds for them; I offered him nineteen pounds; he went across the court, came back again, and said I should have them for the nineteen pounds.

Q, Went across what court - A. Old Round Court in the Strand. He left me the key of the room where the goods were deposited, and I was to take them away on the Monday morning, and pay him for them. I suspected they were not come honestly by, I went to Mr. Sheppard, and he found out Mr. Cox; Mr. Cox came to me on the same day.

Q. Did you go with Mr. Cox to the room where these goods were deposited - A. I went with Mr. Cox and Lack, an officer of Bow-street, to the place where he had shewn me the goods. We went to apprehend the prisoner. The goods were left in the care of the officer. I was there when he took part of them away after the prisoner was apprehended.

Q. Was there any feather bed there, mattress and pillows - A. No, there was not, they were at No. 10,

Charles-court.

Q. The prisoner never sold you them - A. No.

Q. What was the value of the held bedstead - A. Two pound six shillings, the mahogany boards and pieces might be worth about four pound, the deal ends, half a crown each, the portable desk, two pound eight shillings, the tea tray, five shillings, the mahogany pillars and claws, a pound each, the two leafed table, a pound, the five mahogany chairs together with the arm shair, five guineas.

Q. What was the arm chair worth by itself - A. Thirty-six shillings, the wainscot table and claw five shillings; eighteen locks and keys, and ten claw castors, a guinea and a half, a thousand brass nails, about four shillings and sixpence.

EDWARD TRESLOVE COX . I am a cabinet-maker , I live at No. 13 in the Haymarket. The prisoner had been my porter about three months.

Q. Did you go with the last witness to Off-alley - A. Yes, and Lack the officer; I went with them on the day he was apprehended to the house in Off-alley; Mr. Aker took me up into a garret, and shewed me some furniture that had been offered him for sale; and the whole of the furniture in that room was mine except one article that belonged to the landlady.

Q. What became of it - A. It was part taken away and part taken to a room in St. Martin's-lane, part of it is here; this desk is part of it; I can swear to it being my property, it cost me forty-eight or forty-nine shillings, this is a reception table, this was in the same room, it cost me I think two guineas, I am sure it did not cost me less than two pounds.

Q. What are the circumstances that enables you with certainty to say that desk is yours - A. From its general appearance it had been cleaned up by the prisoner while in my employ. I also examined my stock book after the prisoner was apprehended; I looked at my stock and saw it was missing, the reception table is particularly marked, it was rubbed by going in a cart to a gentleman, and the tea-board has my own private mark upon it; the knife tray is mine, the bottom part was made out of a slab, a slab is the outside board, and part of the slab remains. The other things were found at his lodgings.

Q. The things that were at Off-alley are the things that we are now enquiring about - When did you go to his lodgings - A. The same afternoon; they were in Charles-court very near Off-alley leading out of the Strand.

Q. How did you know it was his lodgings - A. I went to the master that he had lived with before. This pewter jug, a clothes horse, and a hearth-broom, was found there; the jug is worth four shillings, the clothes horse five shillings, and the hearth brush two shillings and sixpence; that is all we brought here, the magistrate did not think it necessary to bring the whole. We found numerous other articles at his lodging in Charles-court, a feather bed, bolster, and pillow; I have no hesitation of the tick being mine, there was no mark on the feather-bed, I had missed the article, a feather pillow, a bolster case, and a mattrass. The bed and mattras were wrapped round with two pieces of wrapper that I could speak to.

Q. That might be, he might have your wrapper about some other persons bed - A. There were some carpets, there was a mark upon one, a remnant of Kidderminster carpet of five yards, a card table, I can positively speak to, there was my own writing upon it, and a number which I referred to my stock book, it cost me, I believe forty-five shillings.

Q. Did you see the elbow chair - A. I did; that was in Off-alley; that was part of a set that I had not mark upon that; I found the set defective; I suppose that cost me forty-five shillings.

Q. Were all these taken from your shop - A. They were taken from the former house that I inhabited in St. Martin's-lane , the whole of them; it is a possible circumstance that he might take this writing-desk, from the Haymarket; I am not certain as to that.

Q. Your dwelling house is in the Haymarket - A. It is now; I went there soon after midsummer.

Q. That has been your dwelling house during the whole time this man has been in your service - A. It has.

Q. What is this house in St. Martin's-lane - A. It is a house that I formerly inhabited; I have two people that sleep there, and have ever since I left it; I have used it since that time as a warehouse and workshop.

Q. You had no intention of returning there, and your family, I presume - A. No, I had not.

Q. You say there are two servants sleeping there what was the purpose of the servants sleeping there - A. To guard the house; they are two of my work-women.

Q. What parish is that in - A. St. Martin's.

Mr. Andrews. You have left this house as a dwelling house entirely - A. I have, and it is used as a warehouse and workshop.

Q. You have no servants there, but them that work in your trade - A. No.

Q. There were other persons as workmen and warehousemen in the warehouse - A. Yes.

Q. Was he empowered to sell any goods in the warehouse - A. No; my clerk was and my apprentice.

Q. When goods are sold do you make a point to erase the marks - A. Yes.

COURT. Have you any reason to believe that any one article that was found in the garret was sold by any person in authority - A. I am confident not.

ROBERT SUMMERS . I keep the house, No. 10, Charles-court.

Q. How long has the prisoner lodged with you - A. Six months the last time, but he has lodged with me before; I have known him three years next March, he always bore the character of an honest man, ever since I knew him.

Q. to Mr. Cox. The house that you went to in Charles-court was the house that the prisoner lodged - A. Yes. It was in the house of the last witness, Robert Summers . I thought it rather surprizing that Summers did not know of some of these things.

SAMUEL LACK . I am an officer of Bow-street. I went in company with Mr. Cox and Aker to Off-alley.

Q. I want to know whether these things which are produced now as having been brought from Off-alley, were brought from that place - A. Yes. They have been in my custody ever since. The other things were brought from his lodging in Charles-court, they have been in my custody ever since.

Prisoner's Defence. I have never been in such a situation

before, and the prosecutor knows I have been always in the habit of repairing goods which I had at his workshop, and these things are all come by my own industrious hard labour, and if your lordship will be pleased to put him to his oath whether that hearth-brush is not my own, and the pewter pot and bolster; the pot has my own name upon it.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 30.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18101031-37

809. JOHN STALKER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2nd of October , two yards and a half of woolen serge, value 2 s. 6 d. the property of Thomas Courtney and William Courtney .

THOMAS COURTNEY . I live at No. 10, Old Jewry ; I am an army clothier ; my partner's name is William Courtney. The prisoner was a cutter in my employ; I was called up at the time the prisoner was detected by Thomas Woolman and my son; they had him in custody and shewed me the serge whech they said they had found in the prisoner's hat; the prisoner said he was very sorry, and hoped I would forgive him. There were near three yards of serge, it cost me about two shillings and sixpence; I am sure it is my property.

THOMAS WOOLMAN . I am foreman to Messrs. Courtney. On the 2nd of October, about ten minutes before twelve o'clock, Mr. Courtney's son gave me some information. When he came down to go to dinner he was called into a room and told that he was suspected of having stolen property of his masters upon him; Thomas Courtney , junior, pulled off his hat and gave it me; I found in the hat two yards and three quarters of serge. He begged for mercy.

THOMAS COURTNEY , JUNIOR. Q. Were you present when this man came down stairs from the workshop - A. I was; I told him I suspected he had some of my father's goods; he said, you wish to search me, and unbuttoned his waistcoat that I might see; there was nothing there; I said, I suspect it is in your hat, and took off his hat.

JOHN COLLIS . The prisoner was given in my charge, and the goods I have had ever since.

Prisoner's Defence. I cannot deny being guilty; I took that stuff to make a flannel waistcoat of, I had the rheumatism.

GUILTY , aged 57.

Confined Six Months in Newgate , and Publicly Whipped .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18101031-38

810. MICHAEL CASEY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 25th of September , one pound eight ounces weight of tea, value 5 s. the property of John Sanderson , senior , David Barclay , Gurney Barclay , and John Sanderson , junior .

THOMAS STACKHOUSE . I am a servant to John Sanderson , David Barclay , Gurney Barclay , and John Sanderson , junior, they are wholesale teamen , the prisoner was their porter . On the 25th of September, between twelve and one at noon, I discovered a parcel of tea under the filtering-stone in the cellar; I informed my master of it.

Q. About what time was the prisoner accustomed to leave his work - A. Between seven and eight. I watched the prisoner, I saw him come down and take the tea from under the filtering-stone; the prisoner went out about a quarter of an hour afterwards; on his coming out; I desired the constable to lay hold of him, he had a parcel under his arm outside of his jacket, which parcel was the same parcel of tea that I had seen under the filtering-stone.

JOHN PENNER . I am a constable. When the prisoner came out in the evening I laid hold of him, he had the tea under his arm, I weighed the tea in the paper, it weighed a pound ten ounces

Prisoner's Defence. I throw myself on the mercy of the court; I acknowledge of taking the article, and have only to offer the necessity of my family at the time.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Privately whipped and discharged.

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18101031-39

811. JOSEPH HOW was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of October , twenty eight pound weight of shot, value 9s. the property of John Edward Holmes , William Hall , Thomas Chapman , and John William Chapman .

HENRY BACON HALL . I am in the employ of John Edward Holmes , William Hall, Thomas Chapman , and John William Chapman , they are wharfinger s at Bear Quay .

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. I have known him three or four years, always as a lazy fellow about the Quays. On the 6th of October the prisoner was brought back to our Quay by Mr. Hockless, he said, Mr. Hall, this man has got something; I took from his bosom a bag of shot weighing twenty eight pound; he attempted to to make his escape, I prevented him and sent for a constable, he was taken to the Compter. We had a matt package of shot on the Quay. After I had taken the prisoner to the Compter, I examined the matt package, and found it had lost three bags, of which only one was found on the prisoner; the package had been cut.

Q. That package was under the care of these gentlemen - A. Yes, they were answerable for it.

THOMAS HOCKLESS . I am a mariner. On the 6th of October I saw the prisoner running up Bear Quay into Thames-street, I followed him and took him, I told him he must go down the gateway with me, I then clapped my hand on the bag of shot under his shirt, I took him to Mr. Hall, he took the bag of shot from him, he said, he would not go to the Compter, without he had a coach to ride in.

WILLIAM HEPBURN . Q. Are you a servant to these wharfingers - A. Yes, I was in the vessel, I saw the prisoner take the bag from the spot where the package was lying, I gave information to Mr. Hockness; he pursued him.

WILLIAM HOW . I am a constable. I was charged with this man, and this bag was delivered to me at the Mansion house: I have kept it ever since.

Hall. That is the same parcel I took out from under his shirt; it contains shot.

Prisoner's Defence. I am guilty.

GUILTY , aged 36.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18101031-40

812. JOHN DAVIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of September , a watch, value 3 l. two seals, value 1 s. a key, value 6 d. and a quarter of a yard of ribbon, value 1 d. the property of William Kendall , from his person .

WILLIAM KENDALL . I live with Mr. Loche in Billeter-lane.

Q. Did you lose a watch on the 21st of September - A. Yes, between ten and eleven at night. I had been to St. Catherine's-square. I was coming along George-street in the Minories to my house, the prisoner came and snatched the watch out of my pocket and run away; I had a blue ribbon hanging out and two seals, it is a german watch, it cost me three guineas and a half.

Q. Did you perceive him snatch the watch out of your pocket - A. Yes, I ran after him; he was alone; he turned into an alley, and when I bolted in there he turned back again, and so I catched him, I called the watchman, he came, the prisoner handed the watch to a young man of the name of Baker; he gave it to the watchman.

JAMES BAKER . Q. Where was it you first saw these parties - A. In Northumberland-alley, Fenchurch-street, I saw the prosecutor had hold of a man.

Q. Was that man the prisoner - A. I cannot swear that it was, he charged the man with robbing him of his watch. When I was in the middle of the mob, the watch was handed out by some one, I cannot say it was the prisoner; I gave it to the watchman.

Q. The same man that the prosecutor had hold of and charged with having taken his watch, he delivered over to the constable - A. Yes.

SAMUEL FOREMAN . I am a watchman. Between ten and eleven at night, on the 21st of September I saw the prisoner turn himself, put his hand behind him, and give the watch to the last witness, the prosecutor gave me charge of the prisoner for taking his watch from him. I took the prisoner in custody; I gave the watch to the constable.

Prisoner's Defence. I am quite innocent of the crime. I was going home to my uncle in Leadenhall-street, the young man catched hold of me, he charged me with taking his watch away.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18101031-41

813. WILLIAM SHOTTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of September , four petticoats, value 1 l. two pelises, value 1 l. 16 s. seven yards of silk, value 1 l. 1 s. a napkin, value 6 d. a shawl, value 2 s. four yards of fringe, value 1 s. and two yards of woollen cloth, value 4 s. the property of Thomas Pickford , Matthew Pickford , James Pickford , and Matthew Pickford .

JAMES WHEELER . I am a servant to Mr. Traile in Russel-square. On the 28th of September, about seven o'clock in the evening, I took a parcel to the Castle Inn Wood-street , I had it booked to go by Pickford's waggon to Manchester; the parcel was for Mr. Jorderell, I directed it myself.

Q. Have you ever seen that parcel again - A. Yes, on the 2nd of October at Guildhall, the package had been opened, I saw the same direction on it.

JOSEPH WEBSTER . I am clerk to Messrs. Pickford's they are carrier s.

Q. You can tell me the firm of these persons - A. Thomas Pickford , Matthew Pickford , James Pickford, and Matthew Pickford .

Q. Is that the son of Matthew Pickford - A. They are cousins. On Friday the 28th of September the parcel was taken in and booked about half past-seven in the evening. I was at the top of the warehouse, I saw a man at the bottom with a parcel under his arm; I believe it to be the prisoner at the bar; I called out to him, he made no answer, but walked away; I sent the porter after him, I saw the porter pursue him, the prisoner, dropped the parcel in the gateway I did not see him do that, and while the porter was pursuing him at the end of Maiden-lane, I also ran, crying stop thief; he ran as far as Haberdashers's-hall; there came a cart, and then be doubled and ran towards Wood-street, I crossed over and stopped him; the porter came up and assisted me in taking him to the Compter; I there changed him with taking the parcel. The porter's name is James Porter, he is a constable, he has been in possession of the parcel ever since.

JAMES PORTER . I am a porter at the Castle Inn, and likewise a constable. On Friday evening, the 28th of September, I saw the prisoner come out of the warehouse, he had this parcel under his arm, he passed me; Mr. Webster came out and desired me to follow him, the prisoner was then half way down the gateway; I got within two yards of him, and then he dropped the parcel, I pursued him, he ran up Maiden-lane, to Haberdashers-hall; a town cart coming along he turned back towards Wood-street. I never lost sight of him. Webster was in pursuit of him at the same time, he stopped him in Maiden-lane, I brought him back to the accompting house and found the parcel in possession of my fellow servant, Edward Bailey.

EDWARD BAILEY . I am a porter at the Castle Inn, Wood-street; I heard the alarm of stop thief, I picked up the parcel in Mr. Pickford's gateway; I delivered the same parcel to Porter, in the accompting-house.

Porter. This is the parcel, I have kept it ever since, I have examined the contents of it.

Wheeler. The parcel has the same directions; Mr. Jorderell, Manchester. It contains all the articles in the indictment.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going that night to an acquaintance of mine in Bishopsgate-street; I heard the alarm of stop thief, unfortunately I ran as well as the rest; some man accused me of robbing in the Inn-yard. I had nothing at all about me, I went with them where they chused to take me. I am totally innocent of it.

GUILTY , aged 33.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18101031-42

814. JOSEPH COWLING was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 23d of October , one pound eight ounces weight of sugar, value 1 s. the property of William Phene .

WILLIAM PHENE , JUNIOR. My father is a confectioner in Watling-street , I assist in his business, the prisoner was in my father's service.

Q. What do you know of his having stolen the sugar from your father - A. Having some months lost quantities of goods suspicion fell on the prisoners, I watched him. On the 23d of October, a quarter before nine, I took an opportunity of sending the prisoner out; I took part of a lump of sugar and broke it into pieces and put a mark upon it; I then concealed myself in the manufactory; about nine o'clock the prisoner came into the

manufactory, I saw him; he had not been there a few minutes before his fellow servant took the light to light a fire in the stove, which left the prisoner and me in the dark; on perceiving the light taken away he came to the place where the sugar was close by where I was concealed; he began striking the sugar, which occasioned a light being struck together in the dark; he took one piece and concealed it under some part of his dress; I went out; and went over to a public house, I told him my father wanted him; he came back with me, I charged him with having taken the sugar, he denied it. Coming back from the public-house, I observed his hands at his breeches waistband, I felt upon his breeches, he instantly cried for mercy; he then took a piece of sugar out of his breeches and threw it away with violence. I took the other piece out of his hand; the two places, by the size, I suppose, weighed two pounds, on both the pieces I found the mark I had put. This is the sugar, it is the same I marked.

Prisoner's Defence. My lord, and gentlemen of the jury, I plead to you for mercy, hoping you will grant it me, I never committed any crime before this, and what was the cause of my misfortune: I have five children, my wife was confined to a bed of sickness eight months past, in doing my duty to her I sold all the goods I had, and my clothes; at this time she is dead; I was in hopes she was likely to get better; but my misfortune broke her poor heart. I have lost one of the best and tenderest wives, and my children the most endearing mother in the world. I never before was guilty, not never will again, therefore, my lord, and gentlemen of the jury, I hope you will consider my distress, and show me all the favour in your power. I am bereaft of the comforts of this life, and shall forever he miserable on account of my crime. I ask pardon of your lordship, praying for mercy, and also praying for mercy of my prosecutor, hoping you will have mercy on my babes, who are destitute of food, likewise the loss of a tender mother, and the distress of a father, who stands accused before this honourable court, and begging forgiveness, that I may be restored to my distressed babes.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Fined 1 s. and discharged.

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18101031-43

815. SARAH SHARPE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 13th of October , a shilling, and sixty penny-pieces , the property of John Wood .

JOHN WOOD . I am a currier , I live in Church-street, Bethnal-green ; the prisoner was my servant .

Q. What day was it you lost the shilling and sixty penny-pieces - A. On the 13th of October, they were in my front shop; I had seen them in the shop the night before; the penny-pieces were in a five shilling paper on a shelf; I had missed some two days before, that made me mark them. On the preceding night I marked the outside paper with my initials, about ten o'clock at night; about six o'clock the next morning I concealed myself in the shop, in a few minutes there was a ring at the bell, the prisoner came down stairs and let in one of my journeymen; the man came in, crossed the yard, and went into the workshop; I heard the prisoner follow him across the shop at some distance, and presently returned and went to the till. I had left out twenty shillings in my till to give change; the key was in the till, she unlocked it, I heard the silver in the till rattle, and the paper of halfpence moved on the shelf; she went out of the shop, and I immediately followed her, I asked her what she had got there, she said, nothing. I looked in her hand, I saw a shilling and a paper of penny pieces; she said it was the first time, she hoped I would forgive her. The shilling was marked, and also the paper of penny-pieces. I have kept the shilling and the copper money ever since.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence; called three witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18101031-44

816. WILLIAM GARDNER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 25th of October , ten yards of printed cotton, value 12 s. the property of Thomas Stroud , privately in his shop .

THOMAS STROUD . I am a linen-draper , 268, High-Holborn, St. Giles's . On the 25th of October, between five and six o'clock at dusk, I was talking to a man and woman that came to purchase goods, a lady told me that a boy had run away with a print that was hanging on the irons, withinside of my shop; the lady pointed out the direction that he had gone; I pursued him, and took him with the print on his arm. This is the print, I took it from him, I can swear to it, it has my mark on it.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming from my uncle's at Camden Town, coming by the door I picked the print up.

GUILTY, aged 15.

Judgment respited .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18101031-45

817. HENRY CROSSWELL, alias CHAP , and LUKE CULVERWELL , was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 19th of September , a gelding, value 5 l. the property of Peter Giles .

PETER GILES . I live at Hounslow; I am a surgeon .

Q. Had you a gelding in your possession on the 19th of September - A. Yes, he was turned out upon Smallborough Green-common, that is pretty near Hounslow . I had last seen it on the 18th of September; he was turned out about six o'clock that evening; I know it of my own knowledge. On the following morning I missed him I sent my boy for him about seven o'clock, he was not to be found.

Q. Do you usually turn him out upon this Common - A. Yes, on an evening, and fetch him up again in Summer time; he was an iron grey gelding with two broken knees about fourteen hands high.

Q. Do you know either of the prisoners - A. No.

Q. When did you see this gelding again - A. On the 15th of October I saw the gelding at Bath in Somersetshire, it was in the possession of the High Constable

Q. Was the prisoner in custody then - A. No, they had been discharged they were taken up about an hour after I arrived at Bath, I swore to my horse at Bath.

Q. What was the worth of this gelding - A. Five

pound and upwards. The gelding now is at the New Inn in the Old Bailey, that is the gelding that I lost. I have not the smallest doubt of it being my horse.

ELIZA BARRETT . I live at Entry Hill, near Bath, I am in the butchering and farmering line.

Q. Do you know the two prisoners - A. Yes, they came on the 24th of September, they were both in company together, they had two horses with them at the time I saw them.

Q. Was one of them an iron-grey horse - A. I really do not know, I saw them with two horses; Luke Calverwell asked me if I could take them in to keep, he said their backs were bad, he wanted me to take them both in for a week.

Q. Did you understand that they had been galled by the saddle - A. Yes; the other prisoner stood out in the road with the two horses, I told him I would take them in, he asked me what I would charge, I said my husband was not at home, he would not overcharge them; I asked him what name I should put these horses down in, they gave me the name of Cross.

Q. Was Creswell in hearing at this time - A. He was; Creswell then asked me where he was to take them to, I told him to go down the road to a large pair of blue gates, and I would send my servant to him, I called my servant and told him to take out the key and let these horses in.

Q. When did you see the man again - A. On the 19th of October at the Magistrate's at Bath.

Q. Were they under the accusation of having stolen the horses - A. Yes, they were waiting to have my evidence on the occasion. Mr. Giles was there, they were committed upon my evidence; I recollected the persons of both of them, and gave the same account as I have given now; Mr. Scuddimore came up to my house on the Thursday following Mr. Barret delivered up the horse to him.

WILLIAM WEBB . Look at the prisoners, do you know their persons - A. I do; I was servant to Mr. Barret at that time, I am quite sure of their persons.

Q. What passed between you and them on the 24th of September - A. I went down and unlocked the gates by my mistress's order for the prisoner, there was only Creswell at the gate; I only saw Creswell, they went out at the back door, they went down the road; I received two horses from Creswell, and put them into my master's meadow, they were in my master's field from Monday the 24th of September, till the Thursday following, and then they were delivered to Mr. Scuddimore.

Q. To Mrs. Barrett. When was the horse parted with to Mr. Scuddimere - A. On the Thursday following.

Q. to Webb. What did Creswell say when you put these horses into the field - A. He said he was going to put these horses in the field for a week till their backs got better, their backs were very bad when I took them in.

Q. Have you seen the iron-grey horse in the stable in the Old Bailey - A. Yes; that is one of the horses that I took in of Creswell. I saw the horse when Mr. Scuddimore had it in his possession; I then knew that it was one of the horses that Creswell brought to me. I saw it on the Thursday afternoon, the prisoners were then in custody on suspicion of having stolen them. I recollected Creswell's person then; I told the same story before the magistrate as I have now; the prisoners were then discharged, there was nobody could identify the horses.

Q. Is the horse that is now in the stable in the Old Bailey; the same horse that you saw at Bath when they were under suspicion of having stolen the horses - A. Yes, it is an iron-grey horse, with two broken knees near fourteen hands high.

Q. Did you afterwards see the horse when they were taken up the second time - A. I saw the horse, I swore to the horse, and to Creswell's person.

Creswell's Defence. I was going to the pit with my horses on Monday morning of Kingsdown fair. I met a man with these two horses, the man asked me whether I had any place to keep them for three or four day, or whether I could tell him of any place, I said very likely he might have it at Mr. Barret's, at the butchers, or at the Cross Keys; the man said he would satisfy me very well if I would put them in one of the places, and keeping them three or four days, or a week; he went and fetched three or four pots of beer for us, at a public house; about a mile and a half from Bath, he said he wanted to go to Bristol for something particular, he said he would satisfy me for it. I did not want any more than the three pots of beer, the man paid for the beer, and I had these horses to put into the field.

Q. Who was this person - A. I cannot tell, he was a stranger to me; he left me, and said he was going to Bristol; I never saw the man before nor since Calverwell was with me.

Calverwell's Defence the same.

CRESWELL, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 19.

CALVERWELL, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 18.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18101031-46

818. PETER BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 23d of October , in the dwelling-house of Anthony Zitzes , a pocket-book, value 1 s. and seventeen one pound bank notes, the property of John Henry Furman .

JOHN HENRY FURMAN . I am a sailor ; I lodge in the house of Anthony Zitzes , Red Lion-street, Wapping . I lost my pocket-book containing seventeen one pound bank notes, they were taken out of my chest; my chest was locked, the nails were drawn, and the top taken off; I had seen my notes safe at six o'clock in the morning, and before dinner time the chest was broken open, and my property taken away, the prisoner lodged in the same room. This happened on last Tuesday week.

Q. Did you ever see your notes and pocket-book again. A. Yes, about six o'clock.

Q. Do you know that the landlord's name is Anthony Zitzes - A. No, not of my own knowledge.

JOHN BROUGH . I am a sailor, I lodge in this house, in the next room. I only know, that in the morning the prisoner asked me to lend him a knife, I did; I asked him for it in about ten minutes, he returned to me, I put it in my pocket, I did not observe it was broke; I took it out of my pocket sometime afterwards, I perceived the knife was broken, then the prisoner was suspected.

DANIEL WHITE . I am a sailor; having suspicion of the prisoner we went after him, and found him at the Spread Eagle Inn, Gracechurch-street, he was sitting upon the stage coach going to Portsmouth; when he saw me, he jumped off the coach and ran, I ran after him and got hold of him, we brought him back in a coach, and then he took the pocket-book out of his pocket; there were six one pound notes left in it, he said he had bought cloathes with the rest.

JOHN FOX. I am an officer of the Thames police, I searched the prisoner, I found this watch and this great

coat; he said he had given three guineas for the watch, and two guineas for the coat, out of the seventeen pound, he said he had parted with the rest in buying clothes; the box was left in the coach, they have never been recovered.

Prisoner's Defence. I found the pocket-book on the ground.

GUILTY, aged 24,

of stealing only.

Judgment respited .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18101031-47

819. JOHN WHITMORE was indicted for that he on the 22d of October , in and upon Ann Brown did make an assault, and her the said Ann Brown feloniously did ravish and carnally know .

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 48.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18101031-48

820. MICHAEL JOAKESCH was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 15th of October , two coats, value 24 s. a hat, value 4 s.; a pair of pantaloons, value 5 s.; a waistcoat, value 4 s.; a handkerchief, value 1 s.; a night cap, value 3 d.; and a doubloon, value 1 l. 1 s. the property of John Butler , in his dwelling house .

JOHN BUTLER . I am a publican , in the parish of St. Paul, Shadwell ; on Sunday night, the 14th of October, the prisoner came into my house as a seafaring man , and asked for a lodging, I let him have a lodging in the one pair of stairs room.

Q. Had you any clothes in the room - A. Yes, in a chest; the chest was locked, nobody slept in the room but him, he came down on the next morning at six o'clock, I opened my bed room door and spoke to him, he answered very low, and let himself out; there were only three bolts to the door, he paid for his lodging on the overnight, and desired to be called at five o'clock. I told him that was too soon, this was on Monday morning; I did not go into his bed-room till the Tuesday; I observed the lack of the chest had been forced; I missed two coats worth thirty shillings, a pair of pantaloons worth five shillings a neck handkerchief one shilling, two waistcoats four or five shillings, and a new hat that was worth a guinea. The hat was in the room where the prisoner slept, and all the other articles were in the chest; on Tuesday the 16th, in company with the officer, I found the prisoner at the gate of the London docks, I charged him with taking these things, he made a strong resistance, and tried to escape, we prevented him, he said he was very sorry, he would go on board a man of war; I found my new hat on his head, and my pantaloons, and one of my white waistcoats, and the coats he said he had sold to Moses.

BARNET MOSES . Do you know the person of the prisoner - A. Yes; on Monday the 15th, I bought two coats of him, the officer came on the Wednesday afterwards, I delivered him the coats, my shop is in East Smithfield.

ROBERT BROWN . I am an officer; I apprehended the prisoner, I took the hat off his head, we went to Moses, he produced the coats.

GUILTY, aged 44,

Of stealing to the value of thirty-nine shillings only .

Transported for Seven years .

First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18101031-49

821. MARY GREEN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of September , a shirt, value 21 s. a pair of spectacles and case, value 21 s. and a pair of breeches, value 15 s. the property of Richard Field , in his dwelling house .

RICHARD FIELD . I live in Ayline-street Whitechapel .

MRS. FIELD. Q. You are the wife of the last witness - A. Yes; on the 7th of August I met the prisoner in the greatest distress and penury; I knew her when she was the wife of a captain and a housekeeper; I gave her a gown to put on, and let her be at my house. On the 20th of September she went out with my child; I missed out of my chest a pair of spectacles, and my husband's small clothes, and a shirt; they were afterwards found at the pawnbroker's.

JOSEPH CHRISTIR . I am a pawnbroker, a shirt was pledged with me, on the 20th of September, for seven shillings. I cannot speak to the prisoner.

JAMES GODDARD . I am a pawnbroker, I have got a pair of spectacles, I lent seven shillings on them. I cannot speak to the person of the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not pledge the things; if the gentleman would have given me one day's liberty, I would have taken them out of pawn.

GUILTY, aged 37,

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Confined One Year in the House of Correction and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18101031-50

822. JOHN BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of September ; a time piece, value 1 l. four silver tea spoons, value 6 s. a plated sturer, value 1 s. 6 d. a tablecloth, value 7 s. a shawl, value 2 s. a handkerchief, value 1 s. a half handkerchief, value 1 s. two yards of cotton, value 1 s. a pair of stockings, value 2 s. six yards of black stuff, value 10 s. a counterfeit seven shilling piece, value 6 d. two counterfeit sixpence, value 1 d. a Spanish dollar, value 4 s. three shillings, twenty sixpences, and six hundred and twenty-four halfpence, the property of John Dunn , in his dwelling-house .

JOHN DUNN . I live at the White Horse, Turnmill-street . On Sunday the 26th of September I went to bed and fastened the house as usual, the house was shut up at eleven o'clock; I dare say I got into bed as the clock struck twelve; on the 26th in the morning, I was alarmed by hearing some person in the bar; I struck a light and came down stairs with a candle in my hand and saw nobody in the bar; I went to the tap-room door and heard a noise, I supposed there must be somebody in the room, I went up stairs and alarmed my wife, saying, there were thieves in the house; she looked out of the window and alarmed the watchman, I then came down stairs again and went towards the tap-room and heard a bustling, I waited till a lodger came down to open the door to the watchmen; then three watchmen came in, they went into the taprooms and found the prisoner there, he was taken in custody, he begged for mercy, saying the property that he had got on his person all belonged to me, he would surrender it up, he emptied his pockets, pulled out four silver spoons, a plated sturer, a quantity of halfpence, some bad sixpences, and a Spanish dollar, they were all in my possession on the over night; a dial was taken from the bar, and put against the tap-room door, with a bundle containing all the articles in the indictment; we then took him to the watchhouse.

Q. How did he get in, do you know - A. No; the prisoner was at my house in the afternoon; I saw him

I do not recollect seeing him go out, I suppose he concealed himself, as there was no place broken open.

THOMAS CLARK . I am a watchman; I went into the house, Mr. Dunn said there was somebody in the house; I saw the property lay against the tap-room door. When the tap room door was opened, there was the prisoner, he was laying by the settle, under the table: the prisoner emptied his pockets and said, it was through bad women and being in liquor that he did it.

THOMAS MYERS . I am constable of the night. When the prisoner was brought to the watchhouse, there was eight shillings in his pocket.

Prisoner's Defence. I plead guilty of being in the house and being intoxicated, I did not know what I was about.

GUILTY, aged 31.

Of stealing, to the value of 39 s. only .

Transported for Seven Years.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18101031-51

823. MARY JOHNSON and MARY DONOVAN were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of October , a tippet, value 30 s. the property of Samuel Smith , privately in his shop .

ELEANOR SMITH . I live in St. Martin's-le-grand , it is my father's house, he is a furrier . On the 8th of October, the prisoners both came together into the shop, they asked for a sixpenny powder puff. There was five tippets on the counter; Donnavan stooped down; I perceived the tippets falling off the counter; Donnavan ran out of the shop and Johnson attempted to go out; the tippet was lost and has never been found; I am certain it was there when they came in; I detained Johnson and Donnavan returned. Johnson went to the door and called Sally to a woman. I value the tippet at thirty shillings.

JOSEPH MARCH . I am a constable. On the 8th of October, in the afternoon, I was sent for to take these two women in custody; they said they had lost a tippet. I searched Donnavan, I found no tippet in her pocket, I took her to the watchhouse and came back and searched the other, I found four one pound notes. I asked Donnavan why she did not deliver up the tippet; she said, would the gentleman forgive her if she delivered up the tippet; I said, I would see; she said, first she must go down and speak to the woman below; she went to Johnson, Johnson said, you are an old thief, and if you turn nose I will turn upon you for the gold ring; then Donnavan denied any knowledge of the tippet.

Donnavan's Defence. I had two glasses of liquor when I met Mrs. Johnson, and my stomach was uneasy, I went out of doors to discharge my stomach, I never went away from the door.

Johnson's Defence. I treated her with a glass of liquor, and she in return treated me. I went into the shop to buy a powder puff.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18101031-52

824. JOSEPH MILLER was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of William Lampkin , about the hour of one in the morning, of the 19th of October , with intent the goods and chattels therein burglariously to steal .

WILLIAM LAMPKIN . I am a cheesemonger , I live at 98, Old-street; I keep the house, it is in the parish of St. Luke's .

Q. What time did you go to bed - A. A quarter past twelve. On the 19th of October, I made the doors and windows fast. I was alarmed at a quarter before one, by the wrenching a small folding door under my shop window, these folding doors lead into the shop. I got out of bed and went to the shop door, in the mean while they took the second wrench, which made a great noise, they then staid five or ten minutes, in the mean while I unfastened the shop door, they returned again, one said to the other put your crow in here; I went to open the door at the time, I found that I had got a wire fixed to the shop door, which led to two bells, I could not open the door to get out, nor I could not shut the door without making a noise, in the mean while they broke the door open; one said to the other, there is somebody coming this side of the way; they went away for about five minutes, in the mean while I shifted the wire at the door, they came again, they immediately put their hands inside of the door, which they had broken open; they moved something in the inside which rang a bell, one said to the other, d - n it, there is a bell! They immediately went away, they were gone for fifteen or twenty minutes, they came again and walked several times past the door, they found no noise nor light, nor any thing stirring; they came and pushed against the private door of the house, the contrary side to which they had broken open, at last, they gave the door which they had broken open, a pat with the hand; one of them stepped back again, and began at the door again. I immediately went out, and he was bent down to the door with his hands on the door, and his back towards me, I had a watchman's rattle in one hand and an iron bar in the other; I sprang the rattle; I could have knocked him down, I did not like to do it. When I sprang the rattle he run away, I ran after him and kept very near him; he ran over the way to Whitecross-street, and ran round a man who was standing there, several times; he said to this man, whom he dogged round several times, give that man a d - nd good thump of the head, that was me; he dogged round the man once or twice afterwards, and I kept on springing my rattle; presently a watchman came up and catched him.

Q. Had you ever lost sight of him - A. No. I could have hit him several times with the iron that I had in my hand, and I could have catched him several times.

Q. What was done to your shop - A. They broke it open but took nothing away.

Q. When he was stooping in the way that you have described, what was he doing - A. He had got his hand on the top of the doors, the door opens on the outside, he must have removed something to have rung the bell.

Prisoner. Q. I would wish to know whether at the examination, he did not state there were two bolts - A. I stated at the examination, that the bolt must have been broken open, and the other bolt must have been pulled up, there were no holes in the shutters, nor in the doors; the lamp lighter came by at the time, I

could see the door stand open five or six inches.

Prisoner. Q. You stated at the examination, that the bottom bolt was down, the top part of the door was open - A. The bottom bolt was forced up, there were six places in the door where a crow had been put in; and an iron crow had been put in near the bottom bolt; they first of all put a crow in to the top bolt, and broke the top bolt off.

GEORGE LEE . I am a watchman, about half after one in the morning, I heard the rattle spring, I saw the prosecutor running down White-cross-street in his shirt, I followed him, he said, that is the man; I took the prisoner by the collar, and took him to the watch-house.

WILLIAM READ . The next morning I went down, by the order of the magistrate, and examined the premises, there was the mark of a crow at the bottom part of the door, at the bolt where the prosecutor spoke off.

Prisoner's Defence. My Lord, in my way home I made a stumble at this gentleman's shop, and that moment a person came out in his shirt, and before I could recover myself. I saw he had an iron bar in his hand, I immediately ran away; I saw a man in White-cross-street, and when he attempted to hit me, I said, see, he wants to hit me.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 28.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18101031-53

825. JOHN PEARS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of October , a bottle, value 1 d. a pint of blacking, value 1 s. and three sticks of Italian juice, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of William Hodgson , Thomas Hodgson , and Thomas Champion .

JOHN WILLIAM WALTON . Q. Are you in the service of Messrs. Hodgson - A. Yes.

Q. What are the names of the partner's - A. William Hodgson , Thomas Hodgson , and Thomas Champion , they are merchant s. I observed a bottle of blacking between a couple of casks in the warehouse, I marked it. The prisoner was our porter ; his coat was laying by the spot, and as soon as he had gone out, I went and saw the bottle was gone. I immediately communicated it to Mr. Dover; we ran after him brought him back, and asked him where the blacking was; he said, he had taken it to clean his shoes, he took it out and said he thought no harm in it; it was the same bottle that I had marked, I searched him, I found in his breeches pocket, three sticks of Spanish juice, he said, he had taken it for his own use; they are worth one shilling and sixpence, and the blacking a shilling.

BEDFORD DOVER . Q. Is the account that the last witness has given, true and correct - A. It is.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Whipped in jail and discharged.

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18101031-54

826. ANN SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2nd of January , a pellise, value 15 s. the property of James Charles Grant .

JAMES CHARLES GRANT . I live in Church-row, Fenchurch-street; the prisoner had been my servant . I lost the pellise on the 2d of January; at the time the pellise was lost, Inquestioned the prisoner and the other servant, both of them denied having any knowledge of it; a duplicate was found in July, and with the duplicate I went and saw the pellise.

SAMUEL MILLER . I am an officer. I searched the prisoner's box in July at Mrs. Gutheridges, in Bithnal-green, I found a duplicate; I went to Morris, in the Minories, and saw the pellise which Mr. Grant claimed. I searched after the prisoner, on the 9th of October, I saw her coming out of Mrs. Gutheridges door; I then took her up into the room where the box was, I asked her if she lodged in the room; she said; yes, and the box was hers, and she afterwards said, she pawned it.

JOHN KILLINGWORTH . I am servant to Mr. Morris, pawnbroker; I made out that duplicate; this pellise, is pawned in the name of Anderson, on the 2nd of January, that is she name the prisoner mode use of at our shop. I cannot say I took in the pellise of her.

Prisoner's Defence. I have nothing to say.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Confined Fourteen days in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18101031-55

827. MARY JONES and ELIZABETH PAYNE were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of October , twelve pair of stockings, value 4 l. 10 s. the property of Robert Kenyon , privately in his shop .

ROBERT KENYON . I am an hosier , 64, Holborn-hill, in the parish of St. Andrew's, Holborn .

Q. On the evening of Tuesday last, did the prisoners call at your shop - A. I understood as such; I was called down, I found the prisoners in my shop. Just before I went up stairs, I observed a parcel of twelve pair of silk stockings, I tucked the invoice in the parcel; I was going out to a lady with them, but I thought I would take tea first; when I came down stairs I spoke to the prisoners; they said my young man was serving them; I supposed that was true; which was not. I was serving a customer, I heard one of the prisoner's say she would give threepence less than the price asked; I said, we were not in the habit of doing that, I could wait upon them and shew them articles of a lower description. They went to the door, looked at some mitts, saying they would call again and look at the flannel. I looked in the chair and missed the stockings; I jumped over the counter, and found the invoice that I had tucked in the stockings, all over dirt. I went after the prisoners and overtook them within ten or twelve doors from my house; I saw one of them at a mercer's shop, which was well lighted up, tearing something up, apparently they were looking at the writing on the paper and tearing it up. I said to the prisoner Payne, you have got a dozing pair of stockings of mine, you must come back; Payne said, they had not, they would not come back. She had the stockings; I pushed one into Mr. Thelwall's shop, and I had got the other by the arm; a gentleman touched me, he stooped down, and said, this is what dropped from this woman, giving me the stockings in my hand, the gentleman went away immediately. These are the paper of stockings, they are mine; they had tore the paper at one end. With difficulty I got them back to my shop; Payne said, how come you to do such a thing; I suppose you must have taken it up with the child; Oh, says Jones, I do

not care for him; they did not find them upon us.

Mr. Andrews. Who serves in your shop besides yourself - A. My young man and my wife, she is not here.

JAMES KEPLIN . I was in the shop when Mr. Kenyon went up to tea; I saw the two prisoners come in the shop together, Payne said she wanted some flannels; I was engaged serving a customer; I rang the bell, my master came down, he asked them what they wanted; they said I was serving them; I was not. I did not see any thing.

ANN SLAYMAKER . I was in Mr. Kenyon's shop purchasing some flannen at the time the prisoners came in, they came and stood close to me.

Q. How near might that be the chair where these stockings were - A. It might be three or four yards. I did not see the prisoners take the stockings.

Jones's Defence. I know nothing about it no more than the baby in my arms.

Payne's Defence. I know nothing of it, I am as innocent of it as a child unborn. I have a dying husband at home.

Jones called two witnesses who gave her a good character.

Payne called one witness who gave her a good character.

JONES, GUILTY, aged 21.

PAYNE, GUILTY, aged 32.

Of Stealing but not privately in the shop .

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18101031-56

828. ROBERT HOGAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2nd of October last, twelve pound weight of copper, value 12 s. the property of James Shears , Daniel Towers Shears , and James Henry Shears .

MICHAEL NEALE . I am patrol of St. Sepulchre's. On the 2d of October last, a quarter before seven at night, I saw the prisoner in West-street, West Smithfield; I saw one of his hands close to him; I said, what have you got here; he said, copper, I have brought it from my masters, in Long-lane; I told him he did not get it by his master's leave; he then offered me the copper to let him go. I took him to the watch-house, he then said he found it laying outside of the gates of Mr. Shears's manufactory, Fleet-market. This is the piece of copper.

DANIEL TOWERS SHEARS . The names of my partners are James Shears , Daniel Towers Shears , myself, and James Henry Shears ; we are coppersmith s, Fleet-market , the prisoner was in our employment. I know the copper is ours, the value of it is twelve shillings.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of the charge, I submit myself to the honourable court.

The prisoner called five witnesses who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Whipped in Jail and discharged.

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18101031-57

829. JOHN WHITE was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Thomas Newberry , about the hour of seven at night, on the 29th of September , and burglariously stealing therein, seven handkerchiefs; value 3 l, the property of Thomas Newberry .

JOHN NEWBERRY . I am brother to Thomas Newberry, 54, Fleet-street , he is a linen draper .

Q. Were you in his house on the 29th of September, in the evening - A. I was.

Q. Was any part of his house broken that evening - A. Yes, the shop window. On my passing the window in the street, between six and seven o'clock, I perceived the window was cut, but not out; from the appearance of the putty; an instrument had been put into it, about the size of the top of a knife.

Q. At that time it was so open as to pull any thing through - A. No; it induced me to tell my brother of it. And afterwards I went to an officer, who, with me, patroled the street for half an hour to watch.

Q. Did you see any body come to the window after that - A. I saw three boys come to the window, they passed backward and forward three or four times.

Q. Look at the prisoner and say whether he was one of the boy s - A. It was so dark I could not tell whether he was one; at that time I could not distinguish his features by the day-light that was left; one of the boys was the same size as the prisoner, whether he was I cannot say. In passing backwards and forward, I saw one of them, in appearance, as if he had struck the glass, and then walked on a little way, I suppose they thought some one was near them. They walked on a little way and returned to the window; three or four times after they had done that. I know no more until I saw the prisoner in the hands of the officer; I saw the boys run from the prisoner.

Q. Were they running away from the window at the time that you saw the prisoner in the officer's custody - A. Yes.

Q. You came up to the officer that had hold of the prisoner - A. Yes. The piece of handkerchiefs that were tied in the window when I came up to it, had been drawn partly through the window, hanging only by the string; the window had been broken, and the piece of handkerchief had very nearly been got out of the window.

Q. What was the value of that piece of handkerchiefs - A. Three pound; the piece contained seven handkerchiefs, we gave sixty-five shillings for it; we had it three weeks or a month in the shop. The string was cut and afterwards the handkerchiefs, and the lad was taken in our shop.

Q. The prisoner is the lad that the officer took at the window - A. Yes.

WILLIAM MARCH . I am a beadle, I live in Fleet-street, and keep a fishing tackle shop.

Q. Were you applied to by the last witness to watch Thomas Newberry's house - A. Yes; I went to watch a quarter past six; I saw the prisoner near the shop, in company with two others.

Q. When you first saw the prisoner, had the daylight out of doors sufficiently gone for you not to be able to distinguish the features of a man - A. It was dark out of doors.

Q. Did you watch the prisoner and two others - A. Yes; I perceived them walk up to the window, backwards and forwards, two or three times, after that as I was coming down again, I observed two together, one of them had got hold of something. I laid hold of

him, he had got this piece of handkerchief drawn out of the window, about as much as that. When I first came up and saw the window, I observed, that they had broken it, and the next time I came up they had broke it bigger.

Q. Could any other person have broke that window to get these goods through, but those three boys - A. There might be somebody else, but I did not see any body else, I was watching for the purpose.

Q. Who was it that you laid hold of, that had the handkerchief in his hand - A. The prisoner at the bar.

Q. It was partly through the window and partly in the shop - A. Yes. I searched the prisoner, he had no instrument about him, the other two ran away; I examined the window, the putty had been removed and the glass torn out; I took the prisoner into the house; Mr. Newberry brought the handkerchiefs in.

Mr. Newberry. This was one of the pieces of handkerchiefs that we had on sale at my brother's shop.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming along, I saw two young men up at the window, they wanted to breed a riot with me, they took hold of me, and knocked me about.

Q. Is this house of Mr. Thomas Newbury 's in the parish of St. Dunstan's in the West - A. Yes.

THOMAS NEWBURY . Q. Are you the sole renter of this house - A. I am; I have no partner.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 19.

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18101031-58

830. JOSEPH FITZJAMES and PHILLIPINE his Wife , were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 31st of August , in the dwelling-house of John Neale , a gold snuff-box, value 20 l. a pair of gold sleeve buttons, value 20 s. a gold seal, value 10 s. a gold stock buckle. value 5 s. a silver stock buckle, value 1 s. a leather bag, value 1 d. a purse, value 2 d. fourteen doubloons, value 50 l. 8 s. two half doubloons, value 3 l. 12 s. one hundred and forty-nine guineas, and five guineas, a bank note, value 2 l. and three 1 l. notes, the property of Pierre Henry Chevillard , since deceased .

KATHERINE PERCY . Q. Where you well acquainted with the late Pierre Henry Chevillard - A. Yes, I had been acquainted with him sixteen years, he had lived the greatest part of the time in my house, he died on the 31st of August, I am his executrix.

Q. Where had this gentleman lodged last before his decease - A. In Summers Town, Jean Toulonne lived servant with him, I was at his lodgings within three days of his death, Toulonne was there and Phillipine Fitzjames . On the morning of the 31st of August, about eight o'clock in the morning, I went to his lodgings, his priest was with him, I staid below; I saw him half an hour before he died.

Q. Upon his death did any thing take place between you and Fitzjames or you and Toulonne in the hearing of Fitzjames - A. There was a French gentlemen there, he desired to have the keys, I desired he might not, but that Toulonne might keep them, as she was always entrusted with them, this gentleman said he would have them; I said, he should not, he said he would break the door open.

Q. Soon after you sent for Mr. Legou and the will was found - A. Yes; it was in a bureau, in a kind of of secretary; Mr. Legou looked for the value that he had left in the will; I knew that he had property, I did not know how much, I knew also that he was in possession of a gold snuff box.

Q. Was Fitzjames present when Mr. Legou opened the bureau - A. Yes; upon searching the secretary, the snuff box was not in it, nor the gold coin; I asked for it, it was not forthcoming; Fitzjames said my being there was very impertinent, who could send for me, she was sent for to interpret to Madam Toulonne, because she could not talk English; some time after that I requested her to quit the place, she said she had as much right to stay there as any body; she would not go; she sat herself down and dared any body to remove her, and talked of sending for an officer. Mr. Legou read the will and the letter.

Q. I believe afterwards at the police office you saw the coin produced and the snuff box - A. I did, I knew that snuff box.

Q. What was the deceased name - A. Pierre Henry Chevillard ; that is his signature, I have often seen his writing.

MR. LEGOU. I am an artist, residing in Foley-street; I knew Mr. Chevillard. On the morning of his death I was sent for, I went and arrived there by twelve, I found Mrs. Percy there, I found the will and this paper. (The paper read.)

Q. Was there any thing passed in your presence respecting Phillipine Fitzjames - A. Mrs. Fitzjames said she did not understand people coming to take the property by pretending to be executors; the will had been read in her presence, upon which I observed I was sorry to hear such an expression after what she had seen, that she had heard the will read, and ought to be satisfied, and desired her to leave the room in the name of Mrs. Percy; she answered, that she knew what the laws of England were, she would remain in possession of the apartment, and would not suffer any of the property to be taken away; she asked me if I was a lawyer, I said it was nothing to her what I was. She repeated that she would not leave the room, put her fists upon her hips, said, you touch me if you dare; I replied, God forbid that I should come near you; I desired her again in the name of Mrs. Percy to leave the room; she got up, said she would not be turned out of the room, she would go of her own accord.

Q. You saw the secretaire searched - A. I did, there were none of the articles in the indictment found in the secretaire.

JEAN TOULONNE . Q. Did you attend the late Mr. Chevillard at the time of his death - A. Yes; Fitzjames was with me to help the deceased up and down in his bed; she was with me when he died.

Q. In the course of the night before he died did Fitzjames propose to you to do any thing - A. Yes; Fitzjames observed to me that Mr. Chevillard might have made a will, he said he would not forget her; she proposed to me to open the secretaire, in hopes of finding something; I opened the drawer, we both searched the drawer and found a pocket-book; Fitzjames said the will must be here, she wanted to take the pocketbook out of my hand, Fitzjames told me to open the little drawer of the secretaire; I replied I never opened it, I did not know the key; she took the keys and opened the drawer herself, and seeing the paper, observed, that must be the paper; I said do not touch

it. Fitzjames then put it into its place, and took out the money in the box, which was covered round with paper, observing, this was the person that had no money. She took gold Spanish pieces, and I observed there were four silver pieces likewise. When Mrs. Fitzjames took the gold snuff box, containing the gold, she said she must see what was in it; we found a gold stock buckle and a silver buckle, which I took from Fitzjames and put it in my pocket; Fitzjames had the money, she took it from me. I took one of the pieces and said, what is this; Fitzjames said, Spanish pieces; we counted the guineas ten by ten and put them on the table; I observed Fitzjames put in her pocket, I said what are you doing; she said never mind, count away, I know the number I have got, there is about fifty; I would not count any more; I put the remainder in the bag and tied them up myself. This was about twelve or one o'clock at night; I observed that if Mr. Chevillard was to get up, the money ought to be in its place; she said, never mind, you can tell him any thing; in the course of the morning Fitzjames went home and when she returned I asked her to give me the money which she had taken; Fitzjames said, I told you I had but fifty, I counted them, there were sixty-five or seventy-five, as near as I can recollect, she left them at home to please her husband.

Q. Where did you put the snuff box and the rest of the money - A. I hid them in the next room. A few days afterwards I was sent for to Mrs. Fitzjames, I saw the husband and wife; Fitzjames told me that he wanted twenty-five guineas more to finish the building of his house; I said I shall not let you have a farthing more; he said, if you are afraid to keep the money bring it to me, do not you say any thing about it, if you do I will fix the whole blame upon you and ruin you.

Q. After this was Fitzjames taken up - A. Yes, and Mr. Fitzjames was looking for me, he said he had nothing in his possession, and the best thing I could do to save myself, was to let him have the property; I after this took the gold snuff box and the gold that was tied up in the bag to his house. When I went the first time he, Fitzjames, was not at home; I hid them in the grate of the copper, I afterwards saw him and told him where the gold and snuff-box was, and the four silver pieces that I had forgot to put with the gold I gave to Fitzjames, saying, now you have got all the property, and I have washed my hands of it; Fitzjames said he would not keep the property in his house, as they were searching, he would hide it in the garden under a barrel.

Q. Did you afterwards see the money and snuff box at the police-office - A. Yes, and my intention was to restore it.

JAMES BLY . I am an officer of Queen-square. On the 28th of September I went to search Fitzjames's house, No. 3, Hampton-street, Somerstown; I searched that part of the house they occupied, I discovered this purse twenty-five guineas and a doubloon; I took her in custody; she was violent, she would not let me if she could have helped it. I took the man in custody on the 7th of October he took me to the back of the workhouse wall of St. Pancras; we went to the extremity of the wall, and just by the battlement of the wall, I stooped down and picked up a gold snuff box, with the contents, as you have it there, a stock buckle, a pair of sleeve buttons, a seal, four doubloons, twenty guineas, and two half guineas; Lavender at the same time went to a place by his direction and took out a purse with one hundred and four guineas, and three half guineas.

Phillipine Fitzjames ' Defence. The witness has imposed upon me a great deal, and she has perjured herself.

Joseph Fitzjames ' Defence. The old lady brought the snuff box to me, I never desired her to bring it; she hid it under the copper; I was not at home, it is true; afterwards I hid it myself, but I was afraid the officers would have found it at my house; the magistrate recommended to me to discover the robbery.

The prisoners called three witnesses, who gave them a good character.

PHILLINE FITZJAMES, GUILTY, aged 66.

JOSEPH FITZJAMES , GUILTY, aged 60.

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling-house .

Confined Two Years in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18101031-59

831. TIMOTHY KEMPSHALL, alias KEMPSHAW , was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 8th of October , a carpet, value 4 s. a curtain, value 1 s. a sheet value 1 s. 6 d. six chair covers, value 2 s. 6 d. a candlestick, value 9 d. a pair of bellows, value 1 s. 6 d. a bolster, value 4 s. 6 d. a bed, value 4 l. a table, value 10 s. The property of Susannah Maria Erskine , in her dwelling-house .

ANN BURNHAM . I was lady's maid to Mrs. Erskine; I left town with her on the last day of July. The house was left furnished in the care of Jane Kempshaw .

Q. Do you know the man at the bar - A. Yes, he had permission from Mrs. Erskine to sleep there.

SUSANNAH MARIA ERSKINE . Q. You resided in Poland-street, Manchester-square - A. I did, I quitted the house on the 31st of July, I left all the furniture in the house in the care of Jane Kempshaw . I gave permission for her to have her husband to sleep at the house.

Q. When did you return to town - A. Last Friday evening I went to my house, expecting that I had beds to go to; there were bedsteads, but no furniture; the furniture had been all taken away.

MRS. ROBINSON. My husband is an upholsterer; my husband was employed by Mrs. Erskine to take an inventory of the furniture in the house; Mr. Hall the pawnbroker, applied to me to know if I could identify a table, I could not. I went with him to Mrs. Erskine's house to take an inventory with me; I examined the state of the dining parlour, there were only one chair left, and the furniture of all the beds were in the house were gone; Jane Kempshaw was in the house then, and the furniture of the whole house had been stripped; there was only one bed left in the house, that was in the garret, upon which the man and his wife slept, the man said he was not guilty, but that his wife was. This was on the 8th of last month. On the 9th the prisoner was taken in custody.

Q. Were there any duplicates found on searching the house - A. Mr. Hall made her produce the duplicates.

Q. Look at the ticket and see whether there is any mark by which you know it - A. I was at home when

the constable found it, he brought it to me, I marked it.

HENRY HOWARD . I am a constable; I took that ticket out of a waistcoat pocket in the garret of Mrs. Erskin's house on the 9th of last month; the prisoner told me it was his waistcoat, it was a duplicate of a chair cover, said he knew nothing of pledging any thing, nor how it came there; he did not know the waistcoat was under the bed in the garret. The house was stripped of every thing.

WILLIAM JACKSON . I am an officer of Marlborough-street; I was sent for to Mrs. Erskine's house, I apprehended the prisoner, he said he knew nothing of the robbery, nor of the pledging any thing.

Q. What became of the woman - A. I do not know.

JOSEPH BAYLESS . I am a pawnbroker, No. 3, Adams Row, Hampstead Road, I have some chair covers, pledged by a woman.

Q. Who brought the stove, that you lent three pounds upon - A. I do not know.

Q. You have taken articles day after day, tables, chairs, &c. do you mean to say that you do not know that this man pawned any of these articles - A. If I knew I would tell. I could swear to the woman if I saw her; the whole of the articles are at our house.

JAMES HALL . I produce part of a curtain, and some chair covers, pledged by a woman whom I stopped on the 8th of October, she came in the evening to pledge a table, I stopped her, I never saw the prisoner before the Monday night; the bed was brought into the shop, by a woman.

MR. MARRAT. I produce some chair covers pledged by the name of Collins; I enquired of my young man before I came here, none of the articles pledged at my house were pledged by a man.

Prisoner's Defence. I never took any thing out of the house, and always gave a strict charge not to touch any thing whatever.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18101031-60

832. CHARLES OAKLEY was indicted for feloniously assaulting Daniel Barry on the King's highway, on the 6th of October ; putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, three dollars, value 15 s.; and a one pound bank note, his property .

DANIEL BARRY . I am an upholsterer ; on the 16th of October as I was coming from Mile-End, about half past five, I met the prisoner, he asked me if I was at work, I told him I was.

Q. Had you known him before - A. Yes, six or eight weeks; I asked him if he was at work, he told me he was not, nor had not been at work all that week: he asked me if I would give him any thing to drink, I told him yes, and went into the Dundee Arms, I told him to have what he liked and I would pay for it; he made choice of a glass of rum, I told him I drank no spirits except it was mixed, and then he said he would have a glass of rum and water; we came out, I was wishing him a good evening, he said he would turn back with me and go no further that way he was going. We came up Whitechapel, he took me into a back place of a public house, and there we had a pint of beer, as we were coming out he called a man out that was in there.

Q. You were joined by another man, were you - A. Yes; and he said that poor man had not drank a drop of any thing that day, would I give him a pint of beer, accordingly we went into another public house, and I gave him a pint of beer, and then he would come to see me part of my way home. We walked from the side of Whitechapel where the butchers have their stalls, and coming to Somerset-street, I cut across to go down Petticoat-lane to go to Bunhill Row. I had three dollars in my pocket, I stopped to hinder them from making a noise, I stopped in the street, I took the three dollars out of my pocket and the pound note, and was rolling the dollars up in the one pound note, the prisoner came up and struck me on the side, in Whitechapel , and took the note and three dollars out of my hand, he directly ran behind me and left me there, the other called out, Charles, have you brought his thimble? he said,

"whisk, come along;" they both ran away, I could hear what they said but I could not recover my breath to speak for a few minutes; when I recovered my self and got up, two or three people came and asked me whether I was in a fit, I told them I was struck and robbed of a one pound note and three dollars; I walked up Whitechapel, went into a public house, there wiped and cleaned myself and sat there an hour or an hour and a quarter till I was dry; I knew the public house where I had always seen the prisoner, I went to the Seven Stars, and there I said nothing about the robbery, but sat in a box, I heard the people say they wondered where Charles Oakley got the dollars from and the one pound note, he had not the price of a pint of beer in his pocket at dinner time. In about half an hour after Oakley came in, and the moment I saw him I ran at him, and the moment he saw me he held the flaps of his coat and ran out of doors, and I after him crying stop thief, the watchman could not catch him; then I turned into the public house again, not thinking to see him any more; in about ten minutes he came back laughing, and said,

"now any body may take me to the watch-house, or may search me; I then laid hold of him and never quitted my hold until I was assisted by the watchman, we took him to the watch-house; the next day we went to Lambeth-street, two or three people from the Seven Stars attended before the magistrate, the publican, the maid, and one of the lodgers, they came forward to swear they saw the dollars and the note in his hand. The magistrate took her evidence. When sessions were coming on she run from her place, I spent four days in looking for her, I could not find her, her name is Ann Jones . The prisoners father and mother came to my house and offered me money.

Mr. WALFORD. Q. You are an upholsterer - A. Yes; I work for Mr Duncan, and sometimes for Mr. May, and sometimes for myself.

Q. Where had you been that day - A. I had been in Rosemary-lane finishing my job, and received my money, and went to Mile End to see a friend. I was perfectly sober when I met him, I had nothing to drink before I met him, and then I had a glass of rum and water, at the second public house I had a pot of porter, and at the third a pint.

Q. Have you always given the same account of this transaction: you never said to any body that he took the money from you at the Seven Stars - A. They have told me so, but I never said it, if I did I never meaned it, I told them I did not say so, I never meant it, because that is the man that knocked me down in Whitechapel, I never did say it, nor meaned it, I said I got the prisoner at the Seven Stars. I slept in the watch-house all night, they would not let me go because I was no house-keeper. They offered me five pound last Saturday.

Q. Have you never offered to make a flaw in the indictment for three pound ten shillings - A. No, never, but they were learning me to do it. They offered me a five pound note but I would not take it.

Q. Did you ever hear such a thing as a forty pound reward for a robbery - A, No, nor do not want any thing of the kind, I do not expect it, I never conversed with the officer about it.

- SANDERS. I am a watchman; on the 16th of October I was on duty in Whitechapel, between nine and ten o'clock at night there was a call of

"stop thief," one man ran first, he got away, he was followed by two men, they went into the public house again; in about ten minutes, or a quarter of an hour after there was a cry of

"watch," I ran to give assistance; the prosecutor said,

"watchman take charge of this man, he has robbed me of a pound note and three dollars;" I took the prisoner to the watch-house. In the watch-house the prosecutor stated that he was robbed of his money between Somerset-street and Petticoat-lane, and when he was at the Seven Stars he heard the servant maid say, the prisoner came in and had three dollars and a pound note.

PARTRIDGE. I am watch-house keeper; between nine and ten o'clock the prisoner was brought in on charge of robbing a man, on searching him I found ten shillings, and two sixpences, and some copper.

ANN JONES was called, and not appearing in court, her recognizance was ordered to be estreated.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel.

HENRY STANLEY . I am an ironmonger, 105, Newgate-street.

Mr. Walford. Q. Did you happen to be present at the time they were taking the prisoner to the watch-house - A. I was, I heard the prosecutor say the prisoner had robbed him in the Seven Stars public house tap-room, I heard him say that in the watch-house.

COURT. How came you to go to the watch-house - A. Curiosity led me there, I had known the prisoner three years.

Q. Did you attend before the magistrate the next day - A. No.

Q. How came you here - A. Me, sir.

A. Yes, you - A. I was suppoened by Mr. Steward the master of the prisoner.

Q. How came he to hear of it - A. I cannot tell.

Q. How came they to find it was a material question for here, whether the robbery was committed at the Seven Stars, or in Whitechapel. It was a robbery at all events - A. Yes.

Q. Then how came you to be a witness - A. I cannot tell.

SOPHIA WHITE . My husband works at the London docks. Barry, the prosecutor offered to make it up for three pound ten.

COURT. Barry stand up, mind what this woman says.

Q. to Mrs. White. You say he offered to make it up for three pound ten, to whom was the three pound ten to be paid - A. To his mistress: this passed on Saturday the 3d of this month, and then he said he should not know him.

Q. Are you any relation of the prisoners - A. It is a child of my brother's, but not by marriage; I went to the prosecutor's house on yesterday week to know what the affair was.

Q. Did you say any thing about making it up - A. No.

Prosecutor. The mother came with her to the house, and the father staid outside. I never offered to make it up.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 19.

Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18101031-61

833. SARAH PULLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of October , three petticoats, value 8 s. a gown, value 5 s. three shirts, value 12 s. three pieces of silk, value 1 s. five pair of stockings, value 10 s. two shifts, value 2 s a handkerchief, value 1 s. two aprons, value 3 s. three napkins, value 2 s. the property of Henry Tidsall , in his dwelling-house

SUSANNA TIDSALL . My husband's name is Henry Tidsall , we live in Tash-street . The prisoner took a lodging of me, the man she lived with, his name was Chambers, they passed as man and wife; they had two rooms on the second floor; I kept the third room for my own use. I lost some of my things on the 9th of August and some a fortnight ago, and some of my property was found in Mrs. Pulley's room; I kept my things in a box in that room and lived below stairs.

JOHN MATTHEWS . I am an officer. On the 11th of October I searched the prisoner's, I found all these things and a duplicate of a sheet.

JOHN FARMER . I have got a sheet, from whom I took it in pawn of, I cannot say; I gave this duplicate found by Matthews to the person that pawned it.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence nor called any witnesses to character.

GUILTY, aged 25.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18101031-62

834. ANN HEDGES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of November , seven yards and three quarters of printed cotton, value 10 s. the property of Thomas Stroud , privately in his shop .

- CARR. I am shopman to Thomas Stroud , linen draper , 268, High Holborn . On the 1st of November from information I pursued the prisoner and overtook her about twenty yards from the shop; when I got up to her she let the piece of print fall from under her cloak; I took her back to the shop and sent for a constable. The print was rather inside of the door on a chair; this is the print, it is my master's property.

Prisoner's Defence. I was never inside of the shop; I picked it off the pavement.

GUILTY, aged 66,

Of stealing only .

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18101031-63

835. CHARLOTTE BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of October , six bed ticks, value 4 l. 11 s. and a hearth rug, value 10 s. the property of John Harris Eele .

JOHN HARRIS EELE . I keep a carpet and bed warehouse , 33, Rathbone-place . On last Saturday week I missed these bed ticks. The prisoner was one of my workwomen . I got an officer; he searched her; she owned she took them.

THOMAS RUTLAND . I am a pawnbroker. On the 14th of October a woman pledged a bed tick for fourteen shillings; I am not sure it was the prisoner.

JOHN FITZ . I am a pawnbroker, No. 4, Rider's-court,

Leicester Fields. On the 10th of October the prisoner pawned with me a bed tick for tenshillings.

JOHN MARTIN . On the 26th of October I lent a pound on two bed ticks and a bolster, I believe the prisoner to be the woman that pawned them.

RICHARD BURTON . I am an officer. On the 27th of October I apprehended the prisoner; in taking her to the office she acknowledged to pawning the property and destroying the duplicates.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence, called four witnesses who gave her a good character.

GUILTY, aged 20.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18101031-64

836. MARY WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of October , four Bank notes, value 4 l. the property of William Joan .

WILLIAM JOAN . I am a leather pipe and bucket maker , 15, Crown-street, Soho. On the 16th of October, about half past eleven, I met the prisoner in Holborn nearly opposite to Newton-street , I went with her to a public house, we had three half quarterns of gin, I went home with her and gave her part of a pot of beer to drink and half a pint of gin; I went to bed; in a quarter of an hour I said I must go home, she jumped out of bed and put the candle out; I missed my money when I was going to put my breeches on; I called the watch and gave charge of her.

Q. Were you sober - A. Yes, quite sober.

Q. How many notes had you - A. Four one pound notes, I am sure I lost them there, I had the notes when I went to bed with the woman. I took my purse out of my pocket and gave the woman half-a-crown. I conceive she concealed the notes when she went out of the door to light the candle.

CORNELIUS BUCKLEY . I am a watchman; This man called, said he had been robbed of four pounds by this woman. I searched the bed and the room, I could not find the money or the purse.

Prisoner's Defence. When I met this man in Holborn he was very much in liquor. I never saw any more of his money than one half crown, which he gave me.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18101031-65

837. GEORGE SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of October , a garden rake, value 1 s. a hoe, value 1 s. eleven pound weight of Mininet seed, value 25 s. and twenty papers of flower seeds, value 10 s. the property of Frederick Fisher and William Clarkson .

FREDERICK FISHER . I am a nursery and seedsman , Hampstead-road, my partner's name is William Clarkson , the prisoner was our labourer . On the 8th of October the prisoner came to do a little job for us in Hatton-garden he took with him a quantity of seed to Mr. Allport in Holborn and offered them for sale, Mr. Allport came to me in the afternoon and gave me information of it, I went with the officer and took the prisoner, we then went and searched his apartment, we found a quantity of more seeds and a hoe and a rake; I can swear to the tools, they are marked with my own name, and one of the bags of seeds is marked F. F. the initials of my name; he was taken to the office, he said he found the Minenet seeds in his apartments, the other seeds he denied knowing how they came there; I brought the man whom he slept with, he then said, the other man was innocent, and that he had collected the seeds together a little at a time where he went to work, and in cleaning out my warehouse.

JOHN ALLPORT . I am a seedsman in Holborn. On the 8th of October this man came to my house, he said he had some seeds to sell, I agreed so give him five shillings a pound for the Minenet seed; I had some suspicion that he had come improper by it; I desired my young man to weigh it, he came and told me there was eight pound of it; I told him to tell the person to leave his name and address and call the next morning, he left his name, Smith, gardener, Paddington. I called at Messrs. Fisher and Clarkson to make enquiry, they said, there was a man of that name worked for them. I saw the Minenet seed at Mr. Fisher's, I have no doubt that the seed the prisoner brought to me, is of the same bulk.

JAMES HANCOCK . I apprehended the prisoner; I produce a quantity of seed taken at the prisoner's lodgings, a quantity of the seed is not so large as that found at Mr. Allport's, and a quantity of flower seeds in a bag marked F. F.

Prisoner's Defence. The men that are on his premises know that I worked with the hoe and rake every day, on my examination Mr. Fisher said, my sample of seed was better than his own.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction and whipped in gaol .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18101031-66

838. JOHN SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of October , a saw, value 5 s. the property of Robert Warvill .

ROBERT WARVILL . I am a carpenter ; I was at work at a new building; I met the prisoner coming out of the building, he had a saw of mine under his coat. This is the saw, it is mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in distress, I found the saw in the building.

Constable. He had a two-penny loaf in his pocket and part of another, and five penny-worth of halfpence.

GUILTY , aged 74.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18101031-67

839. ROBERT FRANCIS and THOMAS TURVY were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of John Jones ; his wife and family being therein, about the hour of nine in the forenoon of the 15th of August , and stealing therein, fourteen handkerchiefs, value 4 l. 10 s. the property of Robert Middleton , Charles Innes , and John Jones .

JOHN JONES . My partner's are Robert Middleton , and Charles Innes , we are linen drapers and haberdasher at the corner of Chancery-lane, Fleet-street, in the parish of St. Dunstan's in the West ; I am the inhabitant householder, the other partners reside elsewhere. I was the inhabitant householder on the 15th of August, and have been for some years.

Q. On the morning of the 15th of August, about nine o'clock, were you at home - A. I was.

Q. You were inside of the house at the same time information were given you, which is the substance of this charge - A. I was.

Q. Was your wife at home - A. I do not know how

that was.

Q. Had you any handkerchiefs inside of your shop window - A. I am sure I had, it was our constant practice of dressing that window with handkerchiefs exhibited for sale.

Q. Do you know any thing of the fact of your house being broke open between nine and ten that morning - A. I knew my window was cut after some person came in and gave information that the window had been broken. One of my young men came and told me that my window was cut; when I came forward I found the window cut, and a piece of glass laying inside, on the handkerchiefs.

Q. Had you observed the window that morning before you had information that it was broke - A. On Monday the 13th of August the window was cut, and on the Tuesday I had it mended, and the putty being new they found no difficulty in pushing the glass of oneside, and on the Wednesday morning it was cut again between nine and ten o'clock. It was whole in the morning.

Q. When you perceived the window had been cut and the glass removed do you know whether any of your goods had been drawn out or removed by that means - A. I really do not know.

Q. Did you afterwards see any of your goods removed - A. None, whatever. The way the handkerchiefs were put in the window was as them books are, one up against another, till the window was full, I dare say there were a hundred poundsworth of handkerchiefs in the window. In the morning at that time I could not miss ten pound worth of handkerchiefs. I never recollect buying a piece of handkerchiefs that cost me less than two guineas prime cost for seven handkerchiefs.

Q. They are charged for stealing fourteen handkerchiefs - A. That is by the witness Bates, I know no more.

Q. The goods in this indictment were your goods and your partners - A. Yes.

RICHARD BATES . Q. Were you near Mr. Middleton's and Jones's the haberdashers - A. Yes, I work for Mr. Lee, Field-lane, Holborn, he is a shoe-maker. On the 15th of August, a quarter before nine in the morning, I was going to my work, and at the end of Chancery-lane I saw Francis, I had just passed Mr. Jones's shop.

Q. Did you know his person before - A. Yes; he had Turvy in his company; I never saw Turvy before.

Q. Are you sure that Turvy was in his company - A. Yes, he was alongside of him.

Q. Did they appear to be in company together to act together - A. Yes; I saw Francis and the other both go up to the window, I watched them both; I then saw Francis pull something out of his waistcoat pocket, and break the window with it.

Q. Did he do it so as to make much noise - A. No, he did it pretty quiet. Then they walked up to the dial of St. Dunstan's both together; I then saw them come back, Francis put his hand into the same window, he had broke; I then saw him pull out one piece of handkerchiefs and then pull out another, he put them in his bosom, the other was by him at the time; they both walked up Chancery-lane, I saw no more of them; I went home and informed my master of it.

Q. You did not go into the shop and inform the people of it - A. No, I was rather late that morning with my work, my master blowed me up, I told him what I had seen.

Q. You did not attempt to lay hold of these man, did you - A. No.

Q. When did you tell Mr. Middleton or any of them of it - A. I told my master of it first.

Q. Did you appear before the sitting Alderman when they were under examination - A. Yes, they were taken up on that very day, at six o'clock. On Thursday I appeared before the alderman, where they were under examination and repeated this story.

Q. I suppose the handkerchiefs which they took away was never found - A. No.

Francis. Q. I wish to ask him why he did not apprehend me if he saw me - A. Knowing him to be such a desperate character I thought he might do me an injury. I knew where to find him any hour in the day.

Francis. I think there were plenty of gentleman in the street for him to take me without hurting him.

ROBERT GUTHERIDGE . I am a servant of Mr. Biggs, fishmonger, near St. Clements church.

Q. Did you see any thing pass at Mr. Innes and Jones's shop - A. On the 15th of August I was going a little way in the city, when I got to Chancery-lane I saw these two men on the opposite corner, I am quite sure the two men at the bar are the men that were close by Mr. Innes shop; I saw them go up to the window and make a stop, both of them; they stopped a short time with their faces towards their window; when they stepped away from the window I went up and saw a large piece of glass out of the pane, I immediately went in and gave information; I came out of the shop I crossed to the opposite side of the way I saw them turning to come back again.

Q. Where did they turn from - A. Somewhere about the church, they appeared to be making up towards the window again, they then saw a person within taking the goods away, they walked on toward Temple-bar, and I saw no more of them.

HENRY BEVIS . I am a city porter; I ply at the Temple-gate, that is directly opposite of this shop. On the 15th of August I was going down Fleet-street to deliver a message in Crown-court, I saw these two young men here at the corner of Horshoe-court or Fleur-de-luce-court, I cannot say which, at any rate it was in Fleet-street.

Q. Are you quite sure that these are the two persons that were in Fleet-street - A. I am. I returned to the Temple-gate again, a person came over and gave me information, I directed my attention towards the shop; I saw Francis pass the window, Turvy halted behind, he might be ten yards from him, and the moment Turvy passed I saw a lady with her hand taking the handkerchiefs from the window that was broke.

WILLIAM LEE . I apprehended the two prisoners at the bar. After the information I received from Bates I went to Mr. Jones's instantly, I examined the square of glass, I found some instrument had pushed in the pane six inches by four, the piece of glass lay inside; when I went I was the whole day after the prisoners, I found them at the top of Drury-lane, St. Giles's, about a quarter after six in the evening; they were standing together. I caught hold of Francis, and an assistant that I got from Bow-street caught hold of Turvy: Francis turned round and said, halloa, what is this? I told him, for Fleet-street; he said to Turvy, making use of an oath, have we been in Fleet-street to-day? I know nothing about it. I looked up a turning, saw a place of safety; I searched them, upon Turvy I found this small knife, the edges appears to have been rubbed off with a file, it appears to be an instrument for the purpose, I have seen such an instrument found off persons

on a similar charge; I found another of the same sort on Francis, I had the misfortune to break it; I took them to Bow-street. This offence was committed in the city, they were remanded to the City. They were taken before the Alderman the next day.

RICHARD WILLIS . On the 15th of August Mr. Jones sent to our shop, said he had a square of glass broke by thieves; I went down and inspected the square; it had been broken by a sharp instrument, I think, by a knife. I mended the square on the Tuesday, and I mended it on the Wednesday.

Francis's Defence. I know nothing at all about it, no more than a child unborn.

Turvy said nothing in his defence.

Neither of the prisoners called any witnesses to character.

FRANCIS, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 19.

TURVY, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 18.

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18101031-68

840. SARAH FUSSELL and MARY SHEARMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 18th of September , sixteen yards of woolen cloth, value 16 l. the property of Thomas Bowerbank , and Thomas Monkhouse , in their dwelling house .

THOMAS BOWERBANK . I am a Blackwell-hall manufacturer , Thomas Monkhouse is my partner, my dwelling house is No. 50, Lothbury . I reside in the house; when Mr. Monkhouse was in town he resided in the house, at this time he is in America; we keep a warehouse; Mary Shearman , the married woman, was my house-maid . I had a good character with her.

Q. Did you miss any cloths at any time - A. I did not. We have many hundred pieces of the same description, we could not miss it.

WILLIAM STANTOM . I am an officer. On Tuesday morning I received an information I went to Mrs. Matthews, Wine-office-court, Fleet-street, I found the piece of woollen cloth in the parlour, it is about sixteen yards. The prisoner Fussell lived there as a servant; I pulled the paper off the cloth; Fussell was called up to me; I asked her how she came by this cloth; she said she was sitting at her mistress's gate, on the Sunday night, and two men brought it for her to take care of it, they would call again for it; I told her if she took in such an article of two men, she must know something what they were; she said she did not. I went down in the kitchen and searched it, and between the ticking of the bed and the sacking of the bedstead I found this bunch of keys, she told me she found these keys in the court. I told her it was of no use telling me that she did not know these two men, she must go along with me to the Compter; after waiting a little while I told her if she would tell me who the men were I would not lock her up before she went before the Lord Mayor, and if the two men did leave it, it would discharge her. I waited near half an hour, and at last she said, my sister gave it me. I did not ask her any more questions; I took her to the public-house in the Poultry Compter, I did not lock her up, I left her in the parlour while I went to her sister at Mr. Bowerbank's, at the back of the Bank.

Q. You found Shearman at Mr. Bowerbank's - A. Yes.

Q. Did you know from Fussell that she meaned Shearman when she talked of her sister - A. Yes I went into Mr. Bowerbank's accompting-house, I took these keys with me, and enquired after the servant; nothing transpired with these keys; Fussell said afterwards her sister gave her these keys, because Mr. Bowerbank's housekeeper was a suspicious woman. I went up stairs, Shearman was called to me, I told her I found the cloth at her sisters, she denied any knowledge of the cloth.

JAMES GRIFFITHS . I am in the accompting-house of Mr. Bowerbank. On Sunday evening, the 6th of September, I came in and found Sarah Fussell in the kitchen, Mary Shearman and her went down stairs, and in about a quarter of an hour Mary Shearman came up.

Q. Is your kitchen up one pair of stairs - A. Yes.

Q. Did you know them to be sisters - A. Yes.

Q. Where was this cloth deposited on the Sunday - A. Close to the door of the warehouse, that warehouse was locked up, there was no cloth outside of the warehouse to my knowledge.

Q. Did you see these keys that Stanton produced - A. Yes.

Stanton. I applied them with Mr. Bowerbank, there were none of them fitted.

Q. You said the cloth was in some paper - A. Yes.

Q. to Griffiths. Did you know the cloth by the paper - A. Yes, These numbers agree with our books, we missed that number.

Q. Did you miss that number before Stanton gave you that information - A. No. When Stanton gave the information we looked for No. 2, and missed it.

Q. to Mr. Bowerbank. Is that such cloth that you had in your possession - A. This is the cloth that we had in our warehouse from the package, and the manner of making up; there are two letters, G and H, that the manufacturer put on the cloth, and the mark of the package, No. 9630 wove into the cloth, and likewise upon the paper outside, that we may easily refer to it.

Q. Can you say with certainty that you had not sold that cloth - A. Certainly not, and the property in that warehouse was the property of myself and partner.

Q. I need hardly ask you whether you sold any to either of them women - A. No.

Q. What it the worth of that cloth - A. About sixteen or eighteen pound.

COURT. Did you look to your stock to see if any such piece was deficient - A. Immediately, and found it deficient.

Fussell left her defence to her counsel.

Sherman was not put on her defence.

Q. to Mr. Bowerbank. Can you say at what time it was taken - A. No, I cannot say.

Q. Do you know how long you had this piece of cloth - A. Three or four months I dare say.

Q. Do you know that Fussell visited your house to see her sister - A. No; I might have seen her, I should not know her if I saw her.

Q. to Griffiths. Can you say when this piece was lost - A. No.

Q. to Mr. Bowerbank. Is your house in the parish of St. Margaret's, Lothbury - A. It is.

REBECCA MATTHEWS . Sarah Fussell was a servant of mine: I had her sister to be a servant with me before, they both conducted themselves as honest persons.

Q. Did you know that the piece of cloth was in your house - A. Yes; I called the young woman to give me information how it came there. I sent for Stanton.

FUSSELL, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 19.

SHEARMAN, NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18101031-69

841. GEORGE EVERSON and GEORGE SPICE were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of October , three lamp heads, value 3 s. and two glass burners, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of John David Ruffey .

JOHN DAVID RUFFEY . I am a contractor of lighting the lamps in Spitalfields . I missed a great quantity of lamp heads and burners; Everson was taken up for this, in consequence of his information we apprehended Spicer. On the 24th of October, in the evening, I went to Spicer's lodgings, No. 2, Turvill-court, Bethnal-green, there I found a lamp head and two glass burners, the head I knew to be mine. Spicer was not at home, we took Spicer at the back of the Mansion-house after he had done lighting the lamps. He was with us when the lamp head was found; he said, he knew nothing about it. The boy was taken up on the same day; I told him he should not be hurted if he spoke the truth, if we could help it. I cannot speak to the burner; the lamp heads are like my stock, I only speak to this one.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18101031-70

842. GEORGE EVERSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of October , a lamp, value 12 s. the property of John David Ruffey .

Mr. Knapp, counsel for the prosecution declining to offer any evidence the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18101031-71

843. JAMES BATT was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 8th of October , 35 lb. wt. of tallow, value 35 s. the property of Francis Theodore Hay .

FRANCIS THEODORE HAY . I am a lighterman ; on the 8th of October the tallow was taken from a cask on board the lighter, and put into a wherry.

Q. Do you know any thing of the prisoner - A. Yes, he has been a watchman in my employ fourteen or sixteen months.

THOMAS BOOTH . I am an officer in the Thames police; I was off the Isle of Dogs in a Thames police boat, on the 8th of October I saw the prisoner very busy at the head of a cask, I pulled round and went on board the craft, but before I could get on board it was removed from the head of the cask. When I went on board I saw this mat, there was thirty-five pound weight of tallow in it: the mat was spread under the head of the cask, I asked them how it came there, they denied any knowledge of it.

Q. Who was there - A. Two lightermen pulling the punt up with two oars, the other two men were present.

Q. How far had he removed it - A. The mat lay by the side of the cask, and as he pulled the tallow out of it fell on the matt. He had left the cask when he saw me.

Mr. Alley. This is a thing that often happens in a voyage that a cask tumbles down and the head falls off - Very often; but he was in the same barge.

JOSEPH BOWLESS . As we were rowing in Greenwich reach, we observed the prisoner in a punt, he was tearing a piece of hoop off a lining that confines these heads, he hove the piece overboard; we observed that he rowed round and boarded the craft, we observed, that he left the cask and sit down, this matt was spread under the head of the cask with the tallow in it.

Q. That was a barge belonging to Mr. Hay - A. Yes; as soon as he saw us going on board he got up and rowed. On examining the cask, on the tallow there were the marks of the fingers where he pulled the tallow out. I went forward and accused them of it, they all denied it. I told Batt that I saw him at the cask, he said no, look at his hands they are not greasy: I felt his hands, they were perfectly greasy, very much so.

DAVID SHORT . I am a lighterman; I brought the craft from the ship, and my brother came on board of her just at the top of Blackwall reach, my brother and Batt came forward into the craft, Batt went aft in the craft, I missed him five minutes; I asked my brother where he was, he said he was doing his needs; I took no more notice of him until the the police officer came up, and just then he ran along the gunwale. The officers accused him, he said he was not guilty.

WILLIAM SHORT . I was ordered to assist my brother up with the punt, I stepped into the barge, my brother asked me where the prisoner was.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18101031-72

844 WILLIAM GOODMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 17th of October , 44 yards of flannel, value 2 l. 14 s. the property of John Hewitt and Samuel Hewitt , in their dwelling-house .

JOHN HENITT . I live in St. John-street, St. James's, Clerkenwell , I am a linen draper , Samuel Hewitt is my partner, we both live in the house.

HENRY CRASE . On the 17th of October, near four o'clock, I was down St. John-street, I observed three or four pieces of flannel lying in the middle of the pavement, and at the same time a man running with a large roll of flannel under his arm: he ran from the door with the flannel, turned down Great Sutton-street, the prisoner was then on the opposite side of the way, watching, he followed at a distance nearly parallel with myself. In Great Sutton-st. they got the head of me near a hundred yards; at the further corner of Great Sutton-street the prisoner received the flannels of the man who took it, we continued running down Old-street, the man who took it then remained behind. I followed in my gig until we came to the turnpike in Old Road; I left my gig at the gate, and pursued him on foot, he not being aware that I was following of him, he turned down Whitecross-street, and ran through an immense quantity of alleys which that part of the town consists of, until he came to Bunhill row, I then lost sight of him at the corner of a court, he turned down Bunhill Row; I waited there some time to see if I could get any traces of him. I returned to Mr. Hewitt, he went with me to the office in Hatton Garden, and I went in search of the prisoner with Hancock the officer; and after searching for him, we met the prisoner in Whitecross-street, without the flannel, I pointed him out to Hancock, he took him in custody. The prisoner in running through the courts took his apron off, and wound it round the flannel: he did that in the act of running, he did not stop to do it.

Q. Did you ever find the flannel - A. No; when he was taken, the apron was twisted round his body; we have the apron now in court, I can swear to the man. The other man on his taking this piece of flannel away, the other pieces fell down in the street, that it was that attracted my attention.

JAMES HANCOCK . The gentleman applied to me, and after searching several houses, the gentleman said, there he is. I ran after him, catched him, and turned him round, he had this apron on, I found in his pocket a one pound note, a dollar, and some halfpence.

Prisoner's Defence. I never was in St. John-street that day.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18101031-73

845. JAMES JONES , and JOHN WALTERS were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 19th of September , a piece of carpet, value 3 l. the property of Noah Gardley .

MARY GARDLEY . I am the wife of Noah Gardley , we live at No. 12, Church-lane , St. Martin's; we keep a broker's shop , we lost a roll of stair carpet, it was inside of a green fender at the door, I put it there myself.

Q. What time did you lose it - A. Between three and four o'clock.

JOHN ROSE . I am a silversmith; on Wednesday the 19th of September, between three and four in the afternoon, a young man came into Mr. Gordon's shop, he informed me that there were two suspicious people walking about our window, whom he said he knew very well belonged to a gang in Drury-lane; he desired me to come to the door and he shewed me them; they were in the church yard near our house, and they were both talking together; I mentioned it to my master, he desired me to watch them; I had not been out long before they came out of the church yard, and went down St. Martin's-lane, they turned up St. Martin's lane into the Strand. When they came to Church-court, they both went up together; after they had gone half way up the court they separated; Jones came down first and Walter's followed. They went about a dozen doors along the Strand, they went up Hewitt's-court, and turned round at the top of the court. I thinking they were going to my master's house again, I turned up Church Court; between these two courts, at the top, there is Mrs. Gardley's, a broker's shop; I went and informed my master. When I came back to the top of Church-court, I met Walter's with the carpet under his arm; Walter's passed me with the carpet and Jones followed after him into the Strand. I watched then into a court that goes into Hungerford-street, and there Walter's gave the carpet to Jones, and Jones put it on his shoulder. I went to Mrs. Gardleys and asked her whether she had missed any such thing; she said, she had. I came across the church yard; I met Watson, he came with me down St. Martin's-lane to Charing-cross; when we got there I met the two prisoners, Jones had got the carpet on his shoulder; I saw Brooker, he seized Jones, and Watson, Walters; I took the carpet.

RICHARD BROOKER . On the 19th of September I was in pursuit of the prisoner, I saw John Watson and Rose, I saw the prisoner Jones, in Spring-gardens, I apprehended him, he had the carpet on his left shoulder.

JOHN WATSON . Rose pointed out these men that had got the carpet; Brooker laid hold of Jones, and the moment he seized him, he dropped the carpet; I laid hold of Walters, Rose took the carpet.

Jones's Defence. I am not guilty; is it not possible that I might have purchased it; I did purchase it.

Walter's Defence. I know nothing of the carpet; I did not see the gentlemen nor the carpet before I was taken to the watchhouse.

JONES, GUILTY , aged 33.

WALTER'S, GUILTY , aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18101031-74

846. MARY WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of October , eleven yards of carpet, value 20 s. the property of Thomas Williams .

THOMAS SHEPHERD . I am a linen draper , 28, Great Mary-le-bone-street . I lost the carpet on the 10th of October, it was on a nail outside of the door. On the following day it was brought to me by the watchman.

JOHN TRUSSELL . I am a watchman. I was calling the hour of ten o'clock, the prisoner was sitting asleep in a court, I ordered her to get up and go about her business; on her getting up I saw something under her, it was this carpet rolled up; she said, she had it of a woman to make up; she was drunk.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18101031-75

847. JAMES THORNTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of September , eight brass castors, value 5 s. a japan waiter, value 6 d. a lamp, value 6 d. and a box iron stand, value 6 d. the property of Edmund Lloyd .

EDMUND LLOYD . I live in the Strand , I am an ironmonger , the prisoner was a porter of mine. On the 28th of September, I told the prisoner I insisted upon going to his lodgings to see if he had robbed me; he told me he lodged in Butcherhall-lane. On our setting out of the door instead of turning to Butcherhall-lane, he turned to Drury-lane; when he got to Drury-lane I asked him where he was going; he said, to his wife, in Long-acre; I told him to walk on; he had a short jacket on, he was walking on; I saw he was concealing something, I did not know that he had any property of mine about him; I saw something fall down his breeches to his thigh, I was then certain that he had something about him belonging to me; I was then near paved court in Drury-lane, I told him that was the way to Long-acre, I wanted to get him to Bow-street, I got him to the top of Bow-street; I said I must go down Bow-street to call upon a gentleman, he said he would not, and ran, I called, stop thief; he turned up a court at the top of Bow-street, he was stopped. I then told him that he should go before a magistrate with me; he said, he had stole nothing, he would not; with the assistance of some people there, I got him to the office; an officer searched him, and found my property in his breeches; in his pockets were other things. We went to his lodgings lodgings in Butcherhall-lane, we found several other things.

SAMUEL LACK . I am an officer of Bow-street, I searched the prisoner; in the right thigh of his breeches I found this castor, in his jacket pocket I

found this fork and another castor; I asked him who they belonged to; he said, his master; at his lodging I found this box iron stand, a japan waiter and a japanned lamp.

The prisoner called one witness to his character.

GUILTY . aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18101031-76

848. JOHN ANSLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of October , a silver muffineer, value 14 s. a plated wine strainer, value 4 s. the property of William Ranius Deacon .

ELEANOR BEST . I am a servant to William Ranius Deacon , a merchant in Tavistock-square . On Tuesday, the 2d of October, I was sitting in the kitchen it work, I heard a noise in the Butler's pantry, as if something was among the tea things; and going to the pantry door I saw the prisoner; I asked him what he wanted, he made no answer. I ran after him and took hold of the skirt of his coat, he pulled with such violence part of the skirt came off, he ran from me. The paviours that were at work opposite, hearing me cry stop thief, they took him, I saw him taken, I never lost sight of him. I came home and examined the pantry, the muffineer and wine strainer were gone; he was searched, they were found upon him.

ELIZABETH VICKERS . I was at the sink, I heard a noise among the tea things. I saw the prisoner at the area door, I cried out, stop thief; I went up the area, and the people did not come so quick as I wished; I cried, fire, murder, thieves; the prisoner said I have got nothing; the paviours came across the road and took him; the constable came up and secured him, he took from him the muffineer and the wine strainer.

RICHARD BEARD . I am a constable and gardener of Tavistock-square. On the 2d of October, I heard a woman cry out robbers, thieves; I ran out immediately, they gave me charge of the prisoner; I searched him and found in his right hand coat pocket, the muffineer and wine strainer.

Prisoner's Defence. I went there to enquire for a black man; I saw the area door open, I went down there, I saw the tea things, I took them and put them in my pocket.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18101031-77

849. MARY SMITH , SARAH HOWARD , and ELIZABETH THOMPSON were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of October , from the person of James Sinden , a dollar and a five pound Bank note, his property .

JAMES SINDEN . I live at Blackwall causeway; I am a porter . On the 16th of October, I had some business called me up to this end of the town; I had a good deal of walking about all day till between eleven and twelve at night, I was very tired; I was in Holborn, Mary Smith spoke to me, with persuasions I went with her to her room, in Cross-lane, Holborn ; William Howell was with me, I had a five pound note and a dollar; I pulled it out while I was in the room with the prisoner, and wrapped it up in a bit of paper before the witness, William Howell .

Q. Was this man in company when you met this woman - A. Yes, he went with Sarah Howard , the woman with the child, into another room, Sarah Howard was in the house that Smith took me to; we staid not longer there than fifteen minutes, I did not like the place, so I laid down in my clothes and went to sleep.

Q. When did you awake - A. Howell heard them go down stairs; he came and awoke me, and my left hand breeches pocket was turned inside out, that was the pocket in which I had put the dollar and the Bank note.

Q. When did you see the women again - A. In about ten minutes, Edward Smith , the watchman, came into the room, he asked me whether I had not lost money; I told him what I had lost.

Q. When Smith took you to this room was there any other women there - A. There were at the door, the door was open.

Q. Was the door shut before you laid down on the bed - A. No.

Q. Were you quite sober when you went with this woman - A. Yes.

Q. Your business did not keep you out in the streets so late as eleven o'clock - A. I met with a friend, he detained me; I had finished my business by four o'clock.

Q. Was Smith to have staid with you all night in the room - A. Yes. She would not receive any money, she would trust to my generosity in the morning.

Q. Have you ever recovered your money or your note again - A. No.

WILLIAM HOWELL . I am a porter, I live in Giltspur-street.

Q. Were you in company with Sinden - A. I got in company with him about half past three in the afternoon; we went to a friend's house in Newton-street, we left there about half past ten.

Q. Was Sinden sober - A. Yes, and I was sober; the first woman that spoke to us was Smith, she persuaded Sinden to go with her; she said she would get a woman for me; so we went together. I went with Sarah Howard, I left the prisoner Smith with Sinden; I went into another room with Howard; I did not see Thompson until I went out of Howard's room, then she was standing against Smith's door; when I went in Smith's room and found Sinden's pocket turned inside out.

Q. Where was Howard - A. I heard Howard and Smith go down stairs.

Q. Did Howard leave you in the room a-bed - A. No; I was undressed ready to go to bed; she went down to get something to drink; I thought I heard two women go down stairs by their petticoats touching the stairs, I did not hear their voices. Howard did not return until she came with the watchman to shew him who had been robbed. As soon as I went to Sinden to ask him where his money was, Thompson went down stairs. Howard in the watchhouse, said she knew Smith had the money about her, Smith and Thompson was in hearing, Smith made no answer.

JOHN BAXTER . I am a watchhouse keeper. These women were brought to the watchhouse by the watchman,

they were fighting in consequence of not dividing the money they had robbed the man of in Cross-lane, that was the charge he gave; the prisoner, Howard, then addressed the constable of the night and me, she said, Smith had robbed the man, she would not divide the spoil and she would have her share of it, the man was at Smith's apartment, and if I would send the watchman with her she would take him to the man that had been robbed; I ordered the watchman to go with her, he brought Sinden and Howell with him to the watchhouse; Sinden pointed out Smith as the woman that was with him. Smith and Thompson were both searched carefully, no note or dollar was found on them, only a shilling and a few halfpence. Howard insisted Smith had it, or she had fenced it, as she termed it. I searched her again, I only found a few halfpence on her.

Smith's Defence. I am quite innocent. I met this man in Holborn, he had got his friend with him and another woman, he took us in to drink, he had no more than two pence halfpenny about him, he said he would get money in the morning; his friend was to sleep with the woman in the adjoining room. I went down stairs to get a candle. I met Thompson, she said she would shew me where to get one. Howard came down, got me into Eagle-street watchhouse, she said I had robbed the man; I was let out and afterwards taken to St. Giles's watchhouse.

Howard's Defence. When I was taken I was very much in liquor, I did not know what I said.

Thompson's Defence. I had been out to a day's work; coming home I went up stairs, I met with that young woman, she asked me if I would go with her and buy a candle; we had not been out five minutes before this woman came and tore her clothes.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18101031-78

850. MICHAEL WALDER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 22nd of September , 5 lb. wt. of beef, value 3 s. 4 d. the property of James Mucklow .

JAMES MUCKLOW . I am a butcher in Whitecross-street, St. Luke's ; on the 22d of September, between eight and nine in the evening, the prisoner and another man came to the stall; the other man cheapened a piece of meat, the prisoner was behind him, he stood there and pulled the meat about; I told him I had nothing that I thought he would buy, I wished him to go on, he immediately laid down the piece of meat that he had in his hand, the prisoner took up another piece and walked away with it; the prisoner did not speak a word; I followed him, at the end of Playhouse yard I stopped him, he had the beef with him, I brought him back to the stall; he said he had bought it. It cost me three shillings and fourpence, it weighed more than five pounds.

- PRINCE. I took charge of the prisoner, the beef was in his hand, at the time I searched him he had only a farthing in money about him.

Prisoner's Defence. I believe I paid for the meat. Mr. Mucklow swears that I came to cheat him, which is not the case; I really thought I paid him.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 31.

Publicly Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18101031-79

851 MARGARET DRISCOL was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 21st of September , 3 tea spoons, value 6 s.; and a pair of spectacles, value 12 s. ; the property of Isaac Israels .

ISAAC ISRAELS. I live in Old Gravel-lane, St. George's, I keep a hardware shop . On the 21st of September the prisoner was charring at our house, she left the house between one and two o'clock, between two and three o'clock I missed the spoons, and a pair of silver mounted spectacles.

JOHN GEORGE . I am an apprentice to Mr. Cording, Ratcliffe Highway; on the 21st of September, in the afternoon, the prisoner brought three silver spoons, and a pair of silver-mounted spectacles, I advanced ten shillings upon them; on the next day the prisoner came and said she had lost the duplicate, she wished for an affidavit on the Wednesday.

JOHN SMITH . I am an officer; I apprehended the prisoner from the information of the prosecutor, he also gave me a copy of a duplicate he had sent to him, I told the prisoner what I took her up for, she cried very much; I took the prisoner at her lodgings, she lives with an old woman that she called mother: it is not her mother, she has brought her up from an infant; I really believe it is the old woman's persuasions that has brought her into it.

Prisoner's Defence. I have no friends, I was very hungry, I was in distress; Mr. Israels asked me about them, I owned it; Mrs. Israel was with me when I got the affidavit, she said she would not hurt me, on the Monday she took me up.

GUILTY , aged 17.

Fined One Shilling and discharged.

First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18101031-80

852. RICHARD FARMER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 29th of October , a silver spoon, value 10 s. the property of John Ballard .

JOHN BAPTIST ZERO . I live at Mr. Ballard's coffee-house, the corner of Nassau-street . On the 29th of Oct. the prisoner came in and called for a bason of soup, the other waiter brought him the soup; he had a silver spoon to eat the soup with. Before he had done eating the soup, I looked at him, I perceived he had been at our house before, I communicated it to the other witness and desired him to watch him; he supped the soup very slow; the prisoner left the house and the spoon was gone; I ran out of doors, I saw him running, I called out stop thief, he threw the spoon on the pavement; I laid hold of the prisoner and charged him with having stolen the spoon: I went after the spoon, a woman gave me the spoon, this is the spoon, I know it to be my master's.

Mr. Courtney. Q. Were you at this hotel - A. I was.

Q. What is the worth of the spoon - A. Eight or ten shillings.

Prisoner's Defence. I went to the coffee-house. I called for a bason of gravy soup, and paid the waiter for it soon after he brought it, not this waiter. There was another person at the lower end of the table, and when I had done eating the soup, I removed from the table to another table nearer the window to read the paper, leaving the bason and the spoon. When I quitted the room, there was one waiter standing about the center of the coffee-room, the other waiter I met on my descending the stairs; the person was a perfect stranger to me, sitting at the same table. I ate the soup. He left the room as soon as I left the room. I went towards Grafton-street. I heard the noise of stop thief, but could not distinguish from whence the sound proceeded, but supposing it came

from King-street; I walked briskly up Hayes's-court to see what was the occasion of the call, the waiter came up, seized me by the collar, and said I had taken away the spoon; I was taken back to the coffee-house where I saw the master of the house, by hearing what I said he was disposed to let me depart, but was prevented by some gentlemen in the room; shortly after a woman came into the coffee-room and brought in a spoon, but whether that was the spoon that I was eating with I am totally ignorant. I solemnly declare I am innocent of the charge.

GUILTY , aged 52.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18101031-81

853. JOSEPH KIRKLAND was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of October , a shawl, value 4 s. 6 d. the property of William James .

WILLIAM PIERCE . I am a honey merchant, 326, Holborn . On the 17th of October, between five and six in the afternoon, I was standing at my door. I saw the prisoner and another boy go to Mr James's door, which is opposite to my door. The prisoner laid hold of a shawl that was hung at the post of Mr. James's door, he laid hold of a shawl and seemed to inspect it, he snatched it off, put it under his apron and walked off with it down the road, the other boy went a contrary way; I immediately followed the prisoner and I seized him at the next door to Mr. James's, I told him he had stole a shawl or a handkerchief; he answered, I have not stole any thing; he put his hand behind him under the flap of his coat and flung it down on the ground; I picked up the shawl, and took him and the shawl into Mr. James's shop.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of the shawl.

The prisoner called three witnesses who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 17.

Confined Fourteen Days in Newgate and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18101031-82

854. JOSEPH GORDON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of October , two saws, value 4 s. seven chissels, value 1 s a rule, value 6 d. a pair of pincers, four gouges, value 6 d. seven gimblets, value 6 d. a square, value 2 d. a pair of dividers, value 2 d. and a pair of plyers, value 2 d. the property of Turner Comber .

TURNER COMBER . I am a ship carpenter ; I work at Blackwall-yard. On the 23d of October these tools were at home in my chest on that evening: on opening my chest I found they were gone; my chest was in my bed room. There were some bricklayers in the house repairing it. The next morning I went to the pawnbrokers, they told me they had taken a sash saw in of an old gentleman; the prisoner lodged in my house, he sold the duplicate, and the saw was taken out afterwards by Cairns, an old Iron shop man. I went to Cairns and saw my saw hanging up in the window for sale, and another of my saws; I told him I had lost more tools, he brought them out and shewed me them.

JOHN CAIRNS . I live in High-street, Poplar. The prisoner came to my house, said he was a carpenter, he wanted to sell his tools, he was going to Scotland. I gave him four shillings for the small tools; I bought the duplicate of the two saws, had them taken out of pawn; the saws cost me three shillings and a halfpenny. I am sure the prisoner is the man.

GUILTY , aged 60.

Confined Three Months in Newgate .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18101031-83

855. SARAH MILLWOOD was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 27th of October , four shirts, value 6 s. a shift, value 1 s. 6 d. and a gown, value 4 s. the property of John Urwin .

ANN WARREN . The prisoner came into the kitchen and asked for a light, I told her I had none; she went into the washhouse, took the shirts from the line, I informed Mrs. Urwin of it.

MARY URWIN . I live at 37, South Molton-street . From the information of the last witness I followed the prisoner and took these four shirts from her, they are mine. My husband's name is John Urwin .

Prisoner's Defence. I took them, and hope for mercy.

GUILTY , aged 34.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18101031-84

856. ALEXANDER RUSSELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of September , forty-three pounds weight of bacon, value 30 s. the property of Joseph Peacock .

WILLIAM PEACOCK . I am servant to Mr. Peacock. On the 26th of September, between seven and eight in the evening, I was going with my truck down to Ratcliffe Highway . The prisoner came up and said you are heavy loaded, he asked me if he should push behind, I told him I did not mind; then he said he supposed my mistress would not mind giving him a shilling, if she was a good natured woman; I said no, she would not; I dragged it, and he pushed behind; I looked behind and the rope was cut; I had a boy behind, I went on to the Commercial-road, then he sent the boy for a penny-worth of damsons a great way off; I missed the prisoner pushing behind, I found I had lost a side of bacon; I pursued after the prisoner, and found him with the bacon in his arms, he was going to rest himself. I am sure the prisoner is the person.

GUILTY , aged 17.

Confined Fourteen Days in Newgate , and Whipped in Gaol .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18101031-85

857. SARAH PENNY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of October , a watch, value 30 s. the property of John Leek .

REBECCA LEEK . I am John Leek 's wife, I live in Dock-street, Commercial-road . The prisoner lodged with me; I was going to wash my room three weeks ago to-day; the prisoner said, why are you going to do that, it is wrong of you, if you had called me down I would do that, or any thing else for you; I went into my back room while the prisoner washed it, because I should not catch cold, and when I came in I found my watch missing, she was gone out, and I followed her. The officer took it out of her bosom in the pawnbroker's shop.

SAMUEL HIGGINS . I am an officer. I found the watch in the prisoner's bosom, in the pawnbroker's shop.

Prisoner's Defence. I do not know how I came by it, I was in liquor.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Confined Fourteen Days in Newgate , and Whipped in Gaol .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18101031-86

858. MORGAN JOSEPH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of September , one pound thirteen ounces weight of sugar, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of

William Osborne and Thomas Sumners .

WILLIAM OSBORNE . I am a sugar-refiner , my partner's name is Thomas Sumners , I lived in Size-yard, Whitechapel . The prisoner worked for us. On the 25th of September I went to the sugar-house, between nine and ten o'clock in the morning; I found some sugar concealed in the stove, two of my men brought it to me, I saw it put there again.

JACOB FILE . I work for Mr. Osborne; I found the sugar in the stove, I shewed it my master, he marked the sugar, I put it in the same place again; I saw the prisoner go up to the stove, the iron door made a noise, my partner went down and looked, the sugar was gone. I afterwards found the sugar in the prisoner's hat.

Prisoner's Defence. I was allowed sugar for my own drink, I thought it no harm to king a bit out.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Publicly Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18101031-87

859. THOMAS HOWARD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of September , a hat, value 7 s. the property of Thomas Atkins .

THOMAS ATKINS . I am a plaisterer , I live in Mile-End-road , the prisoner slept in the same room that I did; he got up on the 21st of September and went out, there were many things missed, and among the rest, my hat; on the next Saturday week I caught him with this hat on his head; it is mine, he said he had bought it at Rosemary-lane.

Prisoner's Defence. I got up in the morning, and whether I took the hat in a mistake I cannot say.

GUILTY , aged 52.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18101031-88

860. MARY SHEARMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of September , three spoons, value 20 s. the property of Thomas Bowerbank .

THOMAS STANTON . I am one of the city constables. On the 25th of September I went to Mr. Bowerbank's, No. 50, Lothbury . Mary Shearman was called up to me respecting another business. I asked her if she had got any pockets on, she said, no; I then said, I must feel and see; I found she had one pocket, in that pocket was a pocket book, and in the pocket book I found some duplicates, and among them, two relating to these spoons, one ticket two table-spoons, and the other a tea-spoon. I went to the pawnbroker's, he refused shewing them; I told them I was an officer, the woman was in confinement. It caused me to get an order before the Lord Mayor the next day, I went to Mr. Guest's, No. 63, Fleet Market, they were produced at last.

THOMAS BOWERBANK . I live at No. 50, Lothbury. The prisoner lived with me as a domestic servant between three and four months. When the spoons were produced by the pawnbroker before the Lord Mayor, I knew them to be mine, they are silver.

JOHN FLOWER . I am an apprentice to Mr. Guest, pawnbroker, Fleet Market. On the 21st of August I took in two table-spoons of the prisoner, I advanced half a guinea on them; the tea-spoon was taken in by a young man in the shop, he is not here.

GUILTY .

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18101031-89

861. PETER ADAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 31st of October , a watch chain, value 6 d. a seal, value 1 s. 6 d. and two watch keys, value 1 s. the property of Thomas Gordon , from his person .

THOMAS GORDON . On this day week, about a quarter before eight at night, I met the prisoner coming up Moorfields , he pretended to ask me about some place, I could not understand him, it was about the middle of Bedlam Wall; he took hold of my watch chain, which was hanging out, the watch chain broke off in the loop hole; he took the seal, keys, and chain, and ran away. I am sure he is the very man.

Q. Did you ever find your chain, seal, and keys again - A. No. I value them at three shillings. He was pursued and immediately taken by the officer.

THOMAS WONTNER . I am a constable. The prisoner ran past me, when I cried out stop thief some people had turned him; he ran towards me, and a boy with a link said, officer, beware of the knife; he had a knife drawn in his hand; when I came close to him he throwed the knife into the water out of his hand, but whether he threw any thing else away, I cannot say.

Q. Did you ever find the knife again - A. No; I went and searched, I could not find the knife. The moment the prosecutor came up he said he would swear to the man.

Prisoner's Defence. I was standing still when the officer came up, though he raised a mob about me; the prosecutor came and said I was the man. All what the two witnesses says is false.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18101031-90

862. CHARLOTTE CHURCHILL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of October , two blankets, value 8 s. and a sheet, value 1 s. the property of John Mooney , in a lodging-room .

ELIZABETH MOONEY . I live at 27, Field-lane ; my husband's name is John Mooney . The prisoner lodged at my house with a man of the name of John Buzey , they lived together in the two pair front room, they were furnished lodgings; she left us on the 3d of October, left the key in the door, and a light in the room, on the table; finding they did not come home I went into the room and missed the two blankets and a sheet; I found the duplicates on a shelf, and by that means I got my goods.

HENRY KENNEDY . I am a servant to Mr. Lowther, Fox-court, Brook-street, Holborn. On the 29th of September the prisoner pawned a blanket with me, on the 30th another blanket, and the sheet on the 3d of October. I am sure of her person.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Confined One Month in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18101031-91

863. ANTHONY FISHER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 9th of August , thirty-five pound weight of soap, value 1 l. 10 s. 5 1/2 d. the property of Thomas Hall and Elizabeth Hall .

ELIZABETH HALL . I am brother to Thomas Hall , we are tallow chandler s in Goswell-street ; the prisoner was our servant .

Q. You had a customer of the name of Roberts - A. Yes. He took the soap out of our shop in the name of Roberts, and after he quitted our service on sending to Mrs. Roberts I found she never received it; he took it from our shop, I saw him take it, a quarter of a hundred of mottled soap, and seven pound of yellow; a few days after he was gone I made out the bill; then we discovered it. He left our service on the 9th of August. At the magistrates he acknowledged that he appropriated it to his own use, and he intended to m for it in her name.

Q. Whereabouts is the value of the soap - A. One pound seventeen shillings. I saw him take the some out of the shop.

MRS. ROBERTS. I am a customer of Mrs. Hall. On the 9th of August I never received any soap of the prisoner.

JAMES HANCOCK . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner; the prisoner said he was willing to make the matter up; I understood from him that he would settle, and that they owed him money for wages.

Prisoner's Defence. I believe this prosecution is the effect of malice, rather than to promote justice. I leave the case to the justice and mercy of the court.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 39.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18101031-92

864. THOMAS GLYNN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 21st of September , a tress of hay, value 3 s. a bag, value 1 s. and half a bushel of peas and beans mixed, value 2 s. the property of Thomas Austin , and THOMAS MOORE , for feloniously receiving, on the same day, a truss of hay, being part and parcel of the above mentioned goods, he knowing them to be stolen .

DANIEL AUSTIN . I am a sugar refiner , I live in Mile End-road , Glynn was my carman . On the 21st of September, having suspicion of the prisoner Glynn, I arose early in the morning to watch him, I saw him go into the stable, he soon afterwards brought out a bag with something in it, put it upon a cart that was loaded with potatoes ready to come to town; he then went into the stable, brought a truss of hay out and put it on, also he went into the stable again, brought something under his arm, which turned out to be part of a truss of hay, it was covered with his great coat, he put that on also, he then put his horses into the cart; I then came down stairs and saw the prisoner go on with the cart; I followed the cart to the public house called the Coach and Horses, about thirty yards from my house, he stopped there and was joined by the prisoner Moore. They then proceeded up the road to the King Alfred public-house, the prisoner took the truss of hay and put it to Moore to receive it; Moore turned up the gateway of the King Alfred public-house, I pursued him and took Moore with the hay pitched down before him; I followed my cart and apprehended Glynn opposite of the watchhouse, I delivered him in the care of the constable; upon searching the cart I found this bag, the one I saw him put into the cart in my premises, it contains pease and beans; the peas are a foreign production, the beans I do not mean to swear to, the peas being of various sorts would not do for any other purpose than hogs; I bought twenty quarters, upon comparing them with the bulk I can swear to them, there are Prussian blues among them. I did not lose sight of the hay from the time it was taken from my house, untill I saw it delivered to Moore.

Glynn said nothing in his defence.

Moore's Defence. I took the hay up in the road and carried it into the yard; the hay fell off the cart, I did not know who it belonged to.

MOORE, GUILTY , aged 54.

GLYNN, GUILTY , aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18101031-93

865. THOMAS GLYNN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 20th of September , a truss of straw, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of Daniel Austin ; and ISAAC THURSTON , for feloniously receiving, on the same day, the same goods, he knowing it to be stolen .

JAMES GARROD . I am a servant to Mr. Austin. On the 20th of September, between three and four o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner bring a truss of straw out of the stable, I saw him carry it into a field facing of the Plough in Mile-End road ; then I crossed the road, thinking to meet him, the fog was so great I missed him.

WILLIAM REYNOLDS . I am a watchman. On the 20th of September, in the morning, between three and four o'clock, I saw the prisoner Thurston open the Plough door and windows; I then saw him cross the way to the field that leads to Mr. Austin's premises, he stood there for the space of ten minutes; he returned with something on his shoulders, but the fog was so great I could not see what it was; I went to the stable door, I saw a truss of straw lay at the stable door.

Glynn's Defence. I am innocent.

Thurston said nothing in his defence.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18101031-94

866. CHARLOTTE GREEN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 18th of October , three shirts, value 30 s. and a pair of stockings, value 2 s. the property of Samuel Turner .

SAMUEL TURNER . I am a grocer , 64, Turnmill-street ; I lost my shirts on the 18th of October, the prisoner lodged in my house. I charged the prisoner with it, she confessed it.

LAWRENCE STALKER . I am a pawnbroker; I took a shirt in pawn; I lent six shilling and six-pence upon it; I believe the prisoner to be the person.

ROBERT APSWORTH . I took a shirt in pawn on the 5th of October, and on the 3d a pair of stockings.

JAMES BURROWES . I am a pawnbroker: I took a shirt in pledge of Elizabeth Oldacre .

ELIZABETH OLDACRE . The prisoner asked me pledge the shirt at Mr. Burrowes's, she was at the door.

Prisoner's Defence.. Mr. Turner told me if I would own to the things he would not hurt me.

GUILTY , aged 31.

Confined Fourteen Days in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18101031-95

867. WILLIAM POCOCK was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 27th of December , a sieve, value 1 s. a half sieve, value 6 d. ten sieve cloths, value 1 s. two two-pronged forks, value 10 s. a gathering basket, value 6 d. and a pair of shears, value 5 s. the property of Richard Howells .

RICHARD HOWELLS . I am a gardener , I live at

Hammersmith ; the prisoner had been my servant for some years, I discharged him in March last. In consequence of something that passed on the 27th of September I procured a search warrant, I and the constable and Mr. Dawson went to his lodgings, his wife was at home, he was at his work; we opened the door; went up stairs, the door up stairs was padlocked, which the constable broke open. In the room I found the sieve, the cloths and a bag of seed, with my wife's hand-writing; I went down in the cellar, I found the two forks there, they are marked in my own names the shears I lost six years ago.

Prisoner's Defence I did not take the things home to make a property of them; we took them home sometimes when it rained very hard, and sometimes we took a fork home to make sure they should not be lost.

GUILTY , aged 49.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18101031-96

868. ANN ELLIOTT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 31st of October , a tin kettle, value 6 s. 6 d. the property of Joseph Adshead .

JOSEPH ADSHEAD . I am a tin-plate worker , I live in Whitechapel .

JOSEPH ADSHEAD . I am son to the last witness. On the 31st of October, about six o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came in and cheapened a saucepan, she went out of doors and took a kettle away from the door post; she ran down a court, I after her, she laid the sauce-pan down in the court, I went and fetched my father, he took her out of the privy. I am sure the prisoner is the woman; this is the tin kettle, it is my father's.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence called six witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18101031-97

869. THOMAS BOND was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 27th of September , a pewter pint pot, value 1 s. 2 d. the property of James Palmer .

JAMES PALMER . I am a publican , 51, Upper Berkley-street . A neighbour informed me that the prisoner had taken up a pot of mine and put it on his pocket: I pursued the prisoner, he was going along Adam-street, I saw something in his left coat pocket; I took two pots out of his pocket. I sent for a constable, he searched his premises, and found five pots in his box, and an implement for melting them. This is my pot, I took it out of his pockets.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been drinking the over night, before I had these pots on me; I did not know how they came there, I was going to take them home.

GUILTY , aged 46.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18101031-98

870. JOHN JOHNSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of October , a hat, value 5 s. a handkerchief, value 1 s. a tin box, value 3 d. and eighteen shillings the property of Jacob Johnson , from his person .

JACOB JOHNSON. I am a seaman , and the prisoner is a seaman , I am a Swede, he is a Swede too, we are no relation; I was on shore at Shadwell . I lost my hat from off my head, and my handkerchief, and other things out of my waistcoat pocket; I was so much in liquor I did not know I lost it.

JOHN WILLIAMS . I am a watchman. On going my rounds I saw the prosecutor laying at a door, he was asleep; half an hour afterwards found him laying down upon the ground without his hat, and his waistcoat pocket cut open; I heard a footstep, I sprang my rattle, and ran about three hundred yards; I catched the prisoner, he threw the hat away, I picked it up, I took him to the watchhouse.

THOMAS FIELD . I took from the prisoner this handkerchief, a protection box, and eighteen shillings.

Prisoner's Defence. I found the hat, the handkerchief was inside of it; I said, some poor fellow has been fighting, and lost his hat; the watchman came and took me, and knocked my hat off in the street.

GUILTY , aged 37.

Fined 1 s. and Confined Fourteen Days in Newgate . and Whipped in Gaol .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18101031-99

871. JANE BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 15th of October , a watch, value 6 l. the property of George James , from his person .

GEORGE JAMES . I am porter to Mr. Horton, of King-street. I was coming down Broad-street, St. Giles's . The prisoner stopped me, I went with her to a room and remained in the room five or six minutes; the prisoner went away, and I lost my watch.

JOHN HINCKSMAN . I am a pawnbroker. On the 17th of October the prisoner brought this watch, she asked two guineas upon it, she said it was her young man's; I told her to let the young man come in; she went away and came afterwards, she wanted the watch; I detained the watch, and then a woman came in and wanted the watch, she said it was her brother's. The prisoner came on the next morning for the watch, I told her the watch was owned, I told the prisoner to come at seven o'clock, the time the young man was to come: she did, and saw the prosecutor, she said she had not the watch of him. We went down to the magistrate, he committed the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. That man gave it me, and told me to pawn it.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18101031-100

872. PETER SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of November , a watch, value 50 s. the property of George Curtis , from his person .

GEORGE CURTIS. I keep a lodging house , No. 8, St. Catharines. On last Thursday night I was going to the public-house to have a glass of porter, the prisoner staggered and fell down; I went to lift him up, he said he wanted a public-house; I said here is one here, and while I said that he took my watch. The landlord of the house came out with a light to look for the watch, a little girl said do not look on the ground, he has put the watch down his leg.

GEORGE CAIN . I am a constable. I found the watch in the prisoner's breeches.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18101031-101

173. JAMES TUCKER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of August , a gold seal, value 30 s. the property of Sir Edward O'Brien Price , bart.

WILLIAM TURNER . Q. Did you live with Sir Edward Price , at his house at Brompton , on the 2d of August last - A. Yes. I know the prisoner, he came to Sir Edward's house on the 2d of August last; he told me when Sir Edward Price and he were in town together, it was agreed that he should call for the cloth at three o'clock; he went up stairs by himself, he stopped about twenty minutes, I saw him come down and go away with the cloth.

Q. Do you know this room out of which it is supposed the seal was lost - A. Yes; the prisoner might have gone in that room, I do not know, I was down in the garden; the clothes were deposited on the 2d pair of stairs.

Mr. Reynolds. How long have you lived with the baronet - A. Six months.

Q. How long has he had the house at Brompton, I think they call it Sion-hall - A. Yes, it is a cottage; Mr. O'Brien has been in possession of it a month; before he went there, he lived in Manchester-street, No. 21, I believe.

Court. Where is it that you have waited upon the baronet and performed the office of a servant - A. At Sion-hall.

Q. Is that the only place, have you not done all the office of a servant to him in the Fleet prison - A. No, I never attended upon him in the Fleet prison.

Q. Where is his home - A. Sion-hall.

Q. Did he sleep there last night - A. He always sleeps at home.

Q. Upon your oath has he slept at home for the last six months - A. He could not sleep at home when he was in the lock-up-house, and he was in Queen-street, May-fair, in lodgings, and in Manchester-street; he was in a lock-up-house by Temple-bar, and no where else.

Mr. Reynolds. I should like to know how many servants Sir Edward has in this Sion-hall - A. Me and the maid.

Q. Where was the maid at the time this man came about the cloth - A. The maid was not at the house then, we did not want a maid then, it was kept as a warehouse for woollen-cloth.

Court. It was then kept as a warehouse; Sion-hall, without a maid, a black servant in it for the reception of woollen cloth; and this gentlemen was his partner in trade, did not he act as partner - A. He was always backwards and forwards, I do not know whether he was partner or no.

Q. How long is it since Sir Edward and he fell out - A. I do not know.

Mr. Reynolds. Did you tell me any thing about Mrs. Price, is there a Mrs. Price living at Sion-hall - A. Lady Price was not there then, she has got a maid - A. Do you know Bryanster-street - A. Yes.

Q. Upon your oath was not he in Bryanster-street - A. He was in public lodgings there, I was with him there.

Q. How dare you before to say he lived no where else after so many questions being put to you - A. I did not remember then.

Q. How many cart loads of goods are there at this Sion-hall - A. Only nine packages.

GEORGE WOOD . I am an officer of Hatton-garden.

Q. In consequence of a search warrant did you search the house of Mr. Tucker - A. I did.

Q. Did you find the seal there - A. It was found by Howard, a parish constable; Sir Edward brought him with him, I saw him find it, I have got the seal; I searched the drawer in the first instance, I could find no seal, I had shut the drawer and left it. Sir Edward requested the drawer to be searched again.

Q. Did you find the seal there - A. Yes. I searched the drawer as well as I could; I have been a police officer nine years. The drawer was searched again, after I had drawn the drawer open the constable put his hand in; I saw the seal drop from the constable's hand among some old rags in the drawer, the seal was delivered to Read, he is ill in bed.

Q. Did Sir Edward bring the constable with him - A. Yes, he brought him with him to the office.

Q. Did it ever happen that a parish constable was brought to help the police officer - A. I never knew such an instance. I do not mean to throw any imputation on the constable, the first time I searched I could not find it, the second time the constable put his hand in, the seal dropped from his hand among the rags in the drawer.

Jury. You had examined these rags - A. Yes. I could not find the seal.

HENRY HOWARD . I am a constable of Mary-le-bone.

Q. In consequence of an information from Sir Edward, did you go with him to Hatton-garden office - A. I met him there, I went with him to Mr. Tucker's house in Baldwin's-gardens; Read, Wood, and Sir Edward went up stairs, they left me on the stairs, they went to search for bales of cloth, seals, and other, things, which were entered in the warrant.

Court. There is no bales of cloth mentioned in the indictment - A. It was mentioned in the warrant. When I went in the room the two officers were looking over some papers, Sir Edward was nearer the drawer than the officers. I put my hand in the drawer and turning over some rags I found the seal. Sir Edward told me to be careful in searching the drawer.

SIR EDWARD O'BRIEN PRICE . Q. You have a house at Brompton, called Sion-hall - A. Yes, I have had it since May last.

Q. Look at that seal, is it yours - A. Yes. On the 2d of August, I knew it to be in the closet of the room where the cloth was, at Sion-hall, it was deposited in a box with tinkets in it.

Q. You were not at Sion-hall on the 2d of August - A. The house was three months in repair, and at this time there was only a servant man and maid there.

Court. Was there a servant maid there on the 2d of August - A. There was; I wish to be correct, I am not vindicative against the prisoner, by no means, whether she was in the house I do not know.

Q. Do not tell us your motive, nobody has imputed it to you - A. She had the care of the house, but whether she was there about two o'clock I cannot say; the maid servant came there about June and had the care of the house.

Mr. Bolland. You were not there on the 2d of August - A. Not to reside; I had been there about nine o'clock in the morning; I had been in company with

the prisoner in the morning, I parted with him at Ludgate-hill, he was to go about some other business. I directed him to do; instead of executing my commands he returned back to Sion-hall about one or two o'clock, I did not see him there.

Q. We understand from your servant, the blackman, that he went there about two o'clock, whether the seal was there, you do not know, because you were not there. Where was the cloth - A. On the first turning upon the landing, on the lobby of the hall, upon the right, the seal was deposited in that room where the cloths were.

Mr. Reynolds. Sir Edward, you will excuse me for asking you, has your family any creation - A. Since the year 1600; I came to the title about ten years ago, I succeeded Sir Edward Price , he was the last heir of the lineal line, I came in from the collateral line.

Q. Have you been in England the last twelve months - A. Yes, to attend to my estates.

Q. No other business within this twelvemonth - A. About February last, I sat up in the banking concern, in Alfred-place, Bedford-square, was the pay and receiving house, and the bank was in Castle Carey, in Somerset, it did not succeed in business.

Q. You have been in the Fleet - A. I have, more than two months. I commenced the woollen trade about the 16th of July.

Q. When did you first became acquainted with Mr. Tucker, was it at the house of Mr. King - A. Yes; he was servant to John King at the time.

Court. Did you become connected with him in business - A. Yes.

Q. Were you partners - A. I did not conceive that he was a partner, he was employed by me to sell for five per cent, under my approbation.

Q. And he was concerned with you in the woollen cloth trade when you lost this seal - A. Yes.

Q. I suppose before you lost the seal there was a dispute between him and you on money concerns - A. Not a shilling due to him, he was to obtain the goods and sell them under my approbation to the amount of my acceptance.

Q. These acceptances are all paid are they not - A. No. They are not; I have offered to pay for the amount of the cloths that were in my possession.

Q. When did you take out the search warrant for the woollen goods and the other articles on the 4th of August.

Q. The woollen goods is not in your indictment - A. No, it is not.

Q. What was the value of the woollen goods - A. Fifteen hundred pound.

Q. And in the indictment you put in the seal, value thirty shillings, and you do not put in the woollen goods of fifteen hundred pound. The clothiers have not been paid, have they - A. No, they are not; they have claimed the goods.

Q. How came you to take a constable to the police office instead of making your complaint in a regular way - A. Because I understood I could take him in custody for felony, accordingly I went for a search warrant.

Q. Did you think that you could not go to Hatton-garden office and obtain a warrant without taking a constable; why did not you go to Marlborough-street office, that was nearer to you. Upon your oath were not you standing close by Wood, the officer, at the time that he searched the drawer in which the seal was found - A. I know he searched a drawer, I do not know whether that is the drawer or no.

Q. There is no distinction of rank and birth here, those who shuffle in answering will be committed. Were not you standing close by the drawer at the time that Wood searched the drawer - A. I was standing in the middle of the room while the drawer was searched all the time.

Q. Upon your oath were not you standing close by Wood at the time he searched the drawer - A. I am satisfied I was in the room.

Q. I will give you no permission to prevaricate, there is a plain question, I expect a plain answer. At the time Wood was searching the drawer for the seal, and when the seal was afterwards found were not you close by him - A. I know I stood in the room, upon my life, I do not know that I stood by the drawer.

Q. It is a plain question, and if you expect to be believed you must give a plain answer. Upon your oath were not you close by the officer, Wood, at the time he was searching the drawer - A. I believe I was.

Q. Then how dare you to say that you did not know upon your oath, after the officer had searched that drawer and had not found any thing, were you close by the drawers still - A. Yes, I was, but he was between me and the drawers.

Q. If you had the seal in your possession you had the power to put it in, you were near enough to put it in - A. Yes, if I was the base villain to do that.

Q. Where is your son - A. He came with me.

HENRY POWELL PRICE was called, and not appearing in court, his recognizance was ordered to be estreated.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18101031-102

874. THOMAS BRACE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of November , two shirts, value 10 s. the property of John Wilkins .

MARTHA WILKINS . I live in Warwick-place, Hackney , I am a laundress, my husband's name is John Wilkins . On the 1st of November, the shirts were hanging out in the garden to dry; I went into my garden and missed them. About four o'clock Mr. Smith brought the prisoner to my door with the property.

JOHN SMITH . I live in Kingsland-road. From information, I ran after the prisoner and laid hold of him; I asked him if he had got any thing that did not belong to him; he said, no; I said, let me look, I took the shirts out of his pocket; he said, they were his. I took him to Mrs. Wilkins.

HANNAH CHUMLEY . I was in the field adjoining Mrs. Wilkins's house; I saw the prisoner take the shirts out of Mrs. Wilkins's garden.

Prisoner's Defence. I am an old man, I have no friends.

GUILTY ,

Imprisoned two years , and publicly whipped .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18101031-103

875. JASPER JACKSON was indicted for a misdemeanor .

MATTHEW TOPHAM GIBSON . I am a silk warehouseman . On the 2d of October , between eight and nine in the evening, as I was walking up Fetter-lane , I felt my handkerchief attempted to be drawn out of my right hand coat pocket, it was half out; I turned round and saw the prisoner, I said, what are you about now: he immediately set off running. I felt the handkerchief drawing out of my pocket, he had got two thirds of the handkerchief out of my pocket. It is a silk handkerchief. When he found he was discovered by my asking him what he was about; he ran, and I immediately pursued him, and cried stop thief; in the wide part of Fleet-street, before you come to St. Dunstan's church, he turned back again, I caught hold of him; I never lost sight of him, nor was he ever ten yards from me. When I got hold of him I charged him with attempting to pick my pocket.

Prisoner's Defence. I was running up Fleet-street, this gentleman holload out stop thief; they catched hold of me; Mr. Topham said, I had got his handkerchief; he put his hand into his pocket, and took out his handkerchief.

GUILTY , aged 17.

Confined Twelve Months in Newgate .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18101031-104

876. WILLIAM WILLIAMS was indicted for a misdemeanor .

ISAAC ARMSTRONG . I am a sadler's ironmonger ; I live in Cow-lane, Smithfield ; Richard Wilson is my partner.

Q. Do you know John Woodman , of Bishop Walton - A. Yes, he is a customer of mine. On the evening of the 17th of October the prisoner came to my warehouse, he said he came from Mr. Woodman of Bishop Walton, he wanted some goods for him, he held a list of the goods in his hand, he read the list over, and I got him the goods, two pair of plated stirrups, three pair of plated spurs, a plated riding-bit, and two pair of stirrup leathers; I enclosed them in a sheep skin, he said he was going down that night by the waggon to Bishop Walton, he was to take them with him; I believed that account, and furnished him with all the articles; he said he was a journeyman to Mr. Woodman; I gave him the bill of parcels, and a shilling to refresh himself on the road. On Tuesday the 23d of October, the prisoner applied again for some things, leaving a written list of the articles that he wanted; he said he would call the day following for the articles. On the 24th we found out our mistake, and had him apprehended.

JOHN WOODMAN . I am a sadler at Bishop Walton. The prisoner worked for me four days and a half; in the middle of August he ran away from me, and left the work half done; I never sent him for any of the articles of Mr. Armstrong, he never brought them to me.

ROBERT CRIPPS . On the 18th of October the prisoner came into my shop, he produced three duplicates, I bought them and took the articles out of pledge. I delivered all the articles up.

Mr. Armstrong. They are all the articles I delivered to the prisoner except the sheep skin.

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutor told me if I would tell him all about it he would forgive me.

GUILTY, aged 26.

Judgment respited .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18101031-105

877. JOHN GILBERT , JAMES ADAMS , EDWARD LITTLE , and CHARLES BRADBEY , were indicted for a conspiracy .

JOHN ABREY . I am a fly-boy, a taker off in the Newspaper office; I was employed by Messrs . Walter 's, Printing-house-square , they are the printers of the Times .

Q. Do you know John Gildert , James Adams , Edward Little , and Charles Bradbey - A. I know them four persons, they worked for a newspaper office ; I cannot rightly answer who they worked for.

Q. Do you know Stephen Hurley , Robert Howlett , Edward Kidd , Guy Warwick , John Scott , John Gee, William Clifton , Stephen Beckett , and Henry Burn - A. Yes, they were workmen in the printing-business, in the employ of Messrs. Walter's. I saw the four prisoners at Mr. Walters's printing-office, with Stephen Beckett and Henry Burn , they came and asked them if the whole companionship were there, they answered, no. If they had any message to leave they would deliver it to the companionship when they came; this was on Sunday night. May the 13th, they then were preparing for Monday morning paper. The prisoners said to Beckett and Burn, that they had been to their masters for the advance of wages of one halfpenny per hour, and hoped Mr. Walters' then would do the same, if they did they would retrieve their character, if not; they would alway be looked upon as rats, as they always had been; they said there would be a general meeting on the Tuesday evening, and they should hear something more of them, and then they sent out for half a pint of gin: it was brought into the workshop, it was drank; the prisoners paid for it, and then they got talking to Harry Burn about working the newspaper in the Old Bailey at the old price; they asked him if he did not work for Mr. Westall, that works at the Morning Post; he answered, yes, he did, he did not know any thing about working under price; he had his full price for it; accordingly the Times men sent out for another half pint of gin, our people paid for it, and these men went away. On the next morning all Mr. Walter's men gave warning, all the companionship, because Mr. Walter would not grant a halfpenny an hour.

Q. Did they leave him - A. No. Mr. Bradbey, one of the prisoners, came down the same morning to see if they had given warning. They all went into a public-house together, and that evening they gave a fortnight's warning.

Q. They worked through that fortnight, did they - A. Yes.

Q. Did Mr. Walters give the halfpenny per hour advance - A. Not to old hands. They left him on the 27th or 28th, when the fortnight expired, they staid away, and never returned any more.

Q. Do you remember being at Guildhall, in the magistrate's room any time - A. Yes; once before the sitting alderman, it is two years ago; Mr. Wade, a printer in Holliday-yard, my landlord sent me there because I took two pound of iron out of his cellar; I was in distress and out of place; my father lived in the same house.

Q. You were discharged by the alderman directly - A. No, I was sent to Bridewell to be chastized.

Q. I take it for granted you did not tell Mr. Walters of this - A. No. If I had searched the printer's characters, as they have mine, some of them would have been in Botany Bay before this time. Few printers bear a good character.

MR. WALTER, JUNIOR. Q. You are, I believe, engaged in printing a paper - A. Yes, the Times.

Q. What is your father's name - A. John.

Q. Has he any emolument arising from this business - A. Yes, he has.

PHILLIP STREET . Q. Were you in the employment of Mr. Walter's at the time when Stephen Hurley , and the other men, whose names I have mentioned, were working for Mr. Walters - A. Yes. I was in the situation of Publisher of the Times.

Q. Did you see these four men at the bar - A. No, I never saw them before I saw them in court last sessions.

Q. Had you ever any conversation with Hurley, and the other names I have mentioned - A. Some one of them had repeatedly applied to ask Mr. Walter's for an advance of wages for their work, it was two or three weeks prior to their giving notice to quit; I conveyed the notice of these men. When they gave notice finally to quit there was only seven men present; when they all parted the other two I saw coming from the premises, afterwards I asked if they gave notice, they said, yes. Delaney, who is employed as overseer, came to me on the Monday morning, he told me the men had all given notice to quit: I went up to these men, they had done their work, they were together; I asked him who answered for the whole, no single one chosed to answer, they answered individually, they said they would quit Mr. Walters' service without the rise of the price of a halfpenny per hour; that is what they said was the cause of their discontent, the dispute only remained on one part of the work, that was a part of their work they expected a rise of their wages; I told them it was extremely wrong, they placed themselves in an aukward predictment; I observed that they were paid very handsomely for what they did, which was the fact; I used to pay them their weekly wages. I repeatedly warned them. They quitted according to their notice on the fourteenth day.

Q. Now I can ask you what were these mens earnings a week in Mr. Walters's service - A. They were all pressmen; upon the average I should conceive between three and four pound a week, and sometimes upwards of four pound.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18101031-106

878. STEPHEN HURLEY , ROBERT HOWLETT , EDWARD KIDD , GUY WARWICK , RODERICK PASQUIN , JOHN GEE , WILLIAM CLIFTON , STEPHEN BECKETT , HENRY BURN , THOMAS WOOLLEY , WILLIAM WILLIAMS , CORBETT LATHAM , WILLIAM COY , JAMES MACARTHY , JOHN MACINTOSH , NATHANIEL COLLINS , MALCOLM CRAIG , JOHN CHAPMAN , GEORGE WESTRAY , and JOHN SIMPSON , together with WILLIAM WENTWORT , not in custody, were indicted for a conspiracy .

JOHN WALTER , Jun . Q. You, together with your father, are the proprietors of the Times newspaper - A. We are, and have been so for some time, his name is John.

Q. Were any, or all of the defendants of the bar workmen of yours - A. They were, Stephen Hurley , Robert Howlett, Edward Kidd , Guy Warwick , Roderick Pasquin, John Gee , William Clifton , Stephen Beckett , and Henry Burn , were pressmen , the rest were compositor s; they all were in our employ.

Q. What were you paying your pressmen for work - A. Sixpence for two hundred and fifty sheets, if they worked the small size, or, as the pressmen call it, the hour: that what they call the hour is performed in twenty-five minutes.

Q. Did any of the defendants at any time make any application to you for an increase of wages - A. Not to me directly, nor in my presence.

Q. Did they, any one, or all of them leave your work - A. They all left my work on the 28th of May; I believe there had been notice, I believe given to the publisher of the paper, that they would leave on such a day, I understood on that day they left.

Q. Did this occasion you any inconveniency of the paper - A. A very great inconveniency

Q. After they had finished the publication in the morning of the 28th of May about ten or eleven o'clock, at what time should you have wanted them for the paper to go to press in the ordinary course - A. About five or six o'clock. They all left me; the compositors had quitted me two days previous to the pressmen, at least; some of them staid; the pressmen all went on the same day, Westray, Simpson, and Wentworth, they went on the 29th, the day after the pressmen went.

Q. Do you know whether they had given you any notice to quit - A. I received their notice through Westray; nine of the compositors had given warning on the 12th of May, the pressmen had given warning on the 10th. Westray said he was solicited by the companionship to whom he belonged, to enquire whether I intended to raise their wages; this was on the 14th of May.

Q. Who were the parties among those that are indicted that formed the companionship to which Westray belonged - A. Simpson and Wentworth are two, there were six in the companionship, but only three indicted. I told them that; I could give no answer whatever, however, I told him afterwards I had no objection, if eighteen pence a week upon their former wages, these were compositors, and the compositors are paid by the week; he stated that he would communicate it to the rest of the companionship. On the following morning he stated that he had communicated it to the men of his companionship, he said they were not satisfied with that answer, and therefore he was authorized to give warning for them all. I thought he was not disposed to go; however, a few days afterwards, on my addressing himself particularly, he said he must go along with the other men, and he did so go.

Q. You have a boy of the name of Abrey - A. Yes, he is a fly boy, he has not worked for me four months; I sent him into the country to keep him out of the way of my men, by the advice of persons who knew better than myself

Q. I need hardly ask you whether the striking of these men put you to any inconveniency - A. To an extraordinary inconveniency, I could obtain no others a considerable time.

Mr. Gurney; I am Counsel for all the compositors. What are the names of the proprietors of the Times, are they (excepting your father) a brother-in-law, and a sister, Mr. Cartlon and Mrs. Rate, do they appear as partners to the world - A. No; they have in proportion to their share, they are equally interested with my father and myself.

Q. It is carried on for their benefit as well as yours - A. Certainly so; my father and myself print the paper alone, and make a charge to the firm, they certainly pay for a part of the printing, we make a weekly charge for printing the paper, and the profits of the paper are divided between the whole firm.

Q. You have made use of the term companionship, I believe there is nothing illegal in the term - A. No.

Q. Westray was the foreman of his companionship - A. Yes.

Q. And in the regular course of things, he was the medium from whom you should expect to receive warning - A. I should judge so.

Q. And Mr. Crow of another companionship, from whom you thought to receive warning for the other men. - A. It was so.

Q. Westray came to you and told you that he was desired by the men of his companionship to request that you would rise their wages - A. Yes.

Q. You gave no positive answer - A. No; I told him it was undetermined what price we should give to the duplicate men.

Q. That is, what should be given to the principal men were undetermined - A. It was.

Q. There was a meeting of the masters this year upon the occasion - A. There was three or four meetings: we had a committee, it lasted about a fortnight or three weeks. I stated to Westray, that I thought it was a threat on their part.

Q. Did not Westray tell you he had no thought of leaving you that way - A. He did; it certainly was thought he rather wished to stay than otherways, he wished to know how he was to act, he was to call on me the next morning, I then told him I should take their warning, and if they meaned to go they might go. Westray came about ten days after they had left, he said if I discharged the apprentices he would get me men. In the companionship, of which Westry was foreman, the wages were thirty shillings a week for five hours labour: from twelve to five.

PHILIP STREET . I am employed by Mr. Walters as publisher of the Times.

Q. Do you recollect on the 14th of May, or about that time the pressmen making any application to you, and what nature. - A. Prior to the time stated, Hurley, Gee, Howlett, Scott, Clifton, Warwick, Burn, Pasquin, and Kidd, they applied to me to speak to Mr. Walter, for some advance for their work which was one halfpenny per hour, I did, Mr. Walter was willing to accede the halfpenny on one part of the work, but refused to the other; after their first application they continued working about two or three weeks, but on the 14th of May after they were off their work, I received a message sent down stairs to me from the overseer of the press, his name is Delany, in consequence of which I went to the men. I put a question, who answered for the whole, none chose to answer for the whole, they were all perfectly silent, there were only seven up stairs, Hurley, Gee, Howlett, Scott, Clifton, Warwick, and Burn.

COURT. Point out the persons - A. They are all present but Warwick, he is not here.

Warwick was again called and came in Court.

COURT. Warwick must stand by.

Street. There were seven of them there, they said they would answer individually, and they did, Pasquin and Kidd I met as I came out of the door, I requested them to remain, observing they were well paid, and begged of them to consider it, that they had pledged themselves to consider of it, and that they had placed themselves in an aukward situation; I believe it was Hurley observed that he did not conceive there was any thing wrong in their proceedings, or something to that effect. When I met Pasquln and Kidd, as I was coming out of the door, I asked them if they gave warning as well as the others, they said yes.

Q. Have you made any calculation of the wages these men earned - A. About three pound fifteen shillings a week a man, independent of extra work. I have more than once remonstrated with them not to leave their work.

Mr. Knapp When a person means to quit a printer, is fourteen days the usual warning - A. It is, and in my situation I should receive it through the overseer, the overseer has the warnings of the men communicated to him.

Q. And then his duty is to communicate it to you - A. I should consider it so, and then it is communicated to the master.

Q. You have given an account that the pressmen's weekly wages are three pound fifteen shillings, what would the advance of an halfpenny per hour be upon the master, upon an average a week - A. Six shillings. I have known eight men to have had divided between them thirty-four pounds a week. Mr. Baker's would give the advance on the larger paper, on the smaller he would not.

Q. We have heard of these men not working of a Saturday

night, but on the other days there work is a greater part of the night - A. One part of the work is fifteen or sixteen hours, and the other part ten or eleven; the persons that do the heavy work on one night, do light work the other, and so alternatively.

Mr. Gleed. And when there is a pressure of business must not they work eighteen or twenty hours - A. Yes, most part of the night.

WILLIAM CROW . Q. You are an overseer of the Times - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know the different compositors that are standing there - A. Yes, they were all employed by the Times.

Q. Are you acquainted with the wages that the compositors were earning previous to the 14th of May - A. I am, they were earning two guineas; they work from two o'clock in the after noon till two in the morning.

Q. Did any of these compositors make any application to you about the advance of wages - A. I received a paper from Edward Brockett .

Court. We cannot hear that. In consequence of what Brockett came about did you converse with these defendants - A. I did not. The whole of the defendants, Woolley, Mackenzie, Craig, Chapman, Simpson, and the others, with the exception of Westray, all gave warning on the 14th of May, each one for himself, they came altogether, and successively gave warning.

Q. Did they give you a reason for the notice to quit - A. No, none of them; I could not help expressing my regret; I said, I was sorry that they were about to go, I was loth to part with them; I said, the measure was precipitate and rash; I cannot say that they made any answer, I wished them to wait for the masters. They all went away on the 26th and the office was left without a man. Mr. Flint was kind enough to offer assistance through his men and apprentices. None of the defendants returned to Mr. Walter's work before the indictment was preferred.

BENJAMIN BEVERIDGE . I am a pressman, in May last I worked for Mr. Baldwin.

Q. Do you know the defendant Howlett - A. Yes; in May last, Howlett came with Hurley to me, I was working at the press, they said I had applied to Mr. Baldwin for work; I said, I had not; they told me there was a resolution passed, that no man should take a newsman's situation in any of the papers for six months to come.

Q. Did he say where that resolution passed - A. At the house where the society is held, the Coach and Horses, Water-lane.

Q. Did he give you any reason why that resolution was passed - A. Upon the account of the advance being made by the men of one half penny per hour.

Q. Had that advance been granted by the masters - A. By part, it was resisted by Mr. Walters and others. Howlett or Hurley requested me to attend at Mr. Merrits, the Coach and Horses, Water-lane, on Whitmonday. I went to the Coach and Horses, Howlett, Scott, Gee, Clifton, Warwick, and Burn, were there; Howlett wished to have two men impressed, and knowing that I knew a press master, they wished me to introduce them to him; these two men were Fitzgerald and Miller, they were then working for Mr. Walter: Howlett said, he was fully convinced that Fitzgerald and Miller had not the advance that the other man demanded, the other men all agreed to it I accompanied them to the press master, who is a relation of mine; Howlett, Gee, Warwick, and Clifton, Warwick was put on shore at Billingsgate, Howlett, Clifton, Gee, and myself, only went to the press master; I saw my relation, they gave the necessary information, that Fitzgerald and Miller were both deserters from the navy. Mr. Fare, the press master, said, he would come and take them; after some more conversation between the parties, he was given to understand the house was in the city of London; of course, he could not act in the city, that prevented their being impressed; he made no other objection and we came away. Howlett said; provided a warrant could be obtained of the Lord Mayor, and the press gang brought in the night, would answer their purpose; they wanted to stop Mr. Walter's publication of the newspaper.

Q. Do you know from any of the defendants at the bar, whether there were any allowance for the Times men, as a compensation for leaving Mr. Walter's employ - A. They received a pound a week-per man, I saw it paid by the landlord, John Moult, at the Coach and Horses; I saw four or five pound paid to six men.

WILLIAM RIVETT . I believe you are an overseer in the employ of Mr. Walter - A. I am.

Q. Do you remember, subsequent to the time that the men struck, applying to them on the subject of their return - A. I did, more than once; I believe they struck on the Monday, on on the Sunday I saw Howlett, I asked him to return to his master's service; he made a scoff, and said, I could not get any one else to work it, we must keep the old hands, we could get no others to work; the next man I saw was Hurley, I said, well my lad, do you mean to stop, Mr. Walter is fond of some of you, but them that cannot do their work he does not mean to keep; he said, if you do not keep us all you shall not keep one, this was after they gave notice, but before they left. When Mr. Walter's was out of town. Hurley came to my house, said he had been ill treated by the companionship; he asked me to employ him at the risk of my own situation; I did; Mr. Street came and said I did not do right; I gave him some money, and told him I would give him some more at my house, I believed him to have been led away by the rest.

WILLIAM MITCHELL . I am a compositor.

Q. Do you know the different defendants who are compositors - A. Yes, they were working for Mr. Walter's in May last.

Q. Did you attend any of the meetings at which any or all of these defendants were present - A. I attended two of the meetings at a public house, up a court, opposite Somerset-house; I do not recollect any of them were present the first meeting; at the second meeting Coy was there, there was a resolution passed respecting the advance of wages, it was agreed that every one should give a fortnights notice, as is customary in the trade. On the Friday night following it was resolved, at the meeting, that if they could not get the advance demanded, they would quit their situations.

EDWARD BROCKETT . I am a compositor, I recollect these men leaving Mr. Walters's service.

Q. Did you ever attend any any of the meetings of the compositors - A. I did, at Mr. Just's, the sign of the Swan, in Swan-yard, opposite of Somerset-house, and I might have seen several of the defendants there, I do not see any one I recollect now.

Q. For what purpose were these meetings held - A. For the advance of wages, I know of no other purpose; I sooner than lose my situation should have been satisfied with the price given, but I must say, I should have given the preference to an advance; I did not say so to the men, I thought so in my own mind. I left the same time as the rest did for the advance of wages, no one persuaded me to do it. There was no limited time to return to our employ.

Mr. Gurney addressed the jury in behalf of the defendants.

GUILTY.

Judgment respited .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.


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