Old Bailey Proceedings, 19th September 1810.
Reference Number: 18100919
Reference Number: f18100919-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE OYER AND TERMINER, AND GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND ALSO THE GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, HELD AT Justice-Hall, in the Old Bailey, On WEDNESDAY the 19th of SEPTEMBER, 1810, and following Days;

BEING THE SEVENTH SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF The Right Honourable THOMAS SMITH , LORD-MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY JOB SIBLY, FOR R. BUTTERS, No. 4, CARTHUSIAN-STREET, ALDERSGATE-STREET.

LONDON:

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED (BY THE AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON.) By R. BUTTERS, No. 22, Fetter Lane, Fleet Street.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON.

Before the Right-honourable THOMAS SMITH , Lord Mayor of the City of London; John Heath , esq. one of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir George Wood , knt. one of the Barons of his Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir John Bailey , knt. one of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Harvey Christian Coombe , esq. Sir James Shaw , bart. Aldermen of the said City; John Silvester , esq. Recorder of the said City; Sir Matthew Bloxham , knt. Samuel Birch , esq. Aldermen of the said City; and Newman Knowlys , esq. Common-serjeant of the said City of London; His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of Goal Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City of County of Middlesex.

London Jury.

John Bissett ,

Caleb Moore ,

John Stevenson ,

Charles Northcote ,

George Scott ,

John Clark ,

William Parr ,

Abraham Marshall ,

Joseph Collins ,

Richard Futerill ,

John Spencer ,

Joseph Aldwinkle .

First Middlesex Jury.

Charles Cox ,

Abraham Dee ,

Jonathan Fenton ,

Richard Hare ,

Samuel Hannam ,

Richard Flower ,

John Scott ,

James Rickey ,

William Busby ,

James Granger ,

Thomas Willan ,

James Mackquiness .

Second Middlesex Jury.

John Hoggins ,

Walter Hodgkinson ,

William Francis ,

John Sheppard ,

Thomas Vincent ,

David Cameron ,

Robert Lowe ,

John Mark Coward ,

Alexander Donaldson ,

John Lewis ,

Thomas Prior ,

Samuel Blacklow .

Reference Number: t18100919-1

629. JOHN THOMPSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of July , a warrant for the payment of 19 l. 18 s. 9 d. the property of Henry Stone .

HENRY STONE . On the 5th of July about six o'clock in the afternoon, on my passing Westminster-bridge , I saw a number of people collected together, I found there was a boat race, I stopped at a place by myself for some time, when a number of persons that I had no suspicion of at the moment came round me; one in particular got his hand on my shoulder, pushed me down, and took my pocket-book as I supposed afterwards; I found him disappear in a strange way; I put my hand in my pocket for my pocket-book; I found it was stolen away.

Q. How soon had you seen or felt the pocket-book before - A. About ten minutes; I had Bank notes in my pocket-book to the amount of one hundred and twenty pound, and among the rest, that check was in my pocket-book; I had it of Lady Burton. In consequence of my loss I sent to my bankers', and I communicated it to Humphreys an officer of Bow-street office.

Q. Look at that check, is that the check that was stolen at the identical time that you lost the pocket-book - A. It is.

CHARLES HUMPHREYS . I am a Police officer of Bow-street.

Q. In consequence of any communication made to you on this subject, did you go to Messrs. Coutts and Co. and when - A. On the morning of the sixth of July a little before nine I went to the bankers', and after I had been in the shop about two minutes, the prisoner came in and presented the check.

Q. Is that the check he presented - A. That is the check. I asked him how he came by it, he said that a gentleman in the street told him he would give him a shilling if he would go and get it cashed, the gentleman was in black, he knew nothing of him, he was at a distance from the house. I left him in the care of the clerk, I went out to try whether I could see the person that he described; I went a little way in the Strand, I saw a person at a shop window that I suspected; I took him in custody, and took him back to the prisoner and asked him if that was the man that gave him the the check; he said, no. I took him out; I saw another person, I asked him if that was the man; he said, no; I asked him where it was that he received this check from, and the person that he said gave it him, he said at the bottom of Catherine-street in the Strand. I asked him to look round if he could see the person; he said he could not. I took him to the office; he there said, that the very man I first brought into the banking-house was the man that he received the check of. I have not been able to see that man since.

ROBERT CARR . I am clerk in the house of Messrs. Courts and Co. this check was drawn by Lady Burton in Soho-square.

Q. Of course it was worth money, or you would have paid money for it - A. Yes

Prisoner's Defence. I wish to call in some people, to convince your lordship and the gentlemen of the Jury that I was not on Westminster-bridge that day; it was on the 9th of July, I believe, and not on the 6th.

JAMES CATMAN . I am a Victualler. I keep the Fountain in Great Shire-lane. I have known the prisoner about a twelve-month. On the 6th of July I saw the prisoner twice in my house. I cannot justly say the time; I think towards dark, he was drinking at my house, the last time he staid in my house about half an hour.

Court. What makes you swear to the day - A. I did not recollect until it was mentioned to me; I only recollect the last day he was in our house, he came in twice; I cannot speak to the day.

Prisoner. On July the 6th, the day of the rowing match, I was there from five to six o'clock.

GUILTY , aged 54.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18100919-2

630. HENRY CRAWLEY was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Samuel Wigan about the hour of twelve at night on the 27th of June , and stealing therein a silk handkerchief, value 2 s. a knife, value 6 d. six pieces of foreign copper coin, value 3 d. two hundred and four halfpence, and seventy-two farthings, his property .

SAMUEL WIGAN . I live in Church-lane Whitechapel .

Q. Did you ever see the prisoner at your house - A. On the evening before he broke in he was in the privy in the yard backwards, about nine o'clock at night, I saw no more of him, I had never seen him before.

Q. Was your house broken open that night - A. It was not broken open, he got over the wall and got into the house.

Q. You did not see him - A. No.

Q. What time did you go to bed - A. About half past eleven, I was the last person up in the house, I locked my door and made every thing secure.

Q. Did you get up first in the morning - A. Yes. I got up about half past five, I saw my till laying down in the house, it had been taken from the bar, I had not locked it the over night.

Q. What was in the till - A. There were some halfpence, some foreign pieces of coin, some farthings and bad silver; it was all gone.

Q. What might be the amount of it - A. That I do not know.

Q. Did you see how the person got in - A. The back window was left open all night.

Q. Did you find any of your money any time - A. I found in the other yard one penny.

SAMUEL WILKINSON . I am a beadle of Whitechapel parish. I was sent for by Mr. Windsor, Pawnbroker, in Whitechapel; the prisoner broke a window there, he offered to pay for the window. I knowing there had been a house broken open, I took him on suspicion. I found this coin on him, this black silk handkerchief, and this knife, which Mr. Wigan swore to.

Q. What money is it - A. Halfpence and farthings, and this bad silver, twelve and three pence altogether, and some foreign copper.

Q. to Prosecutor. Can you swear to any of that

money - A. There is one farthing and a sixpence that was in the window, and one farthing laid on the bar; that knife is mine, it was in the drawer, and that is my handkerchief.

Prisoner's Defence. I came home from the West Indies with Captain Poppell, I had Portuguese money like this. I am in a strange country, give me fair play; the knife I brought from Martinique, and the handkerchief I brought from Philadelphia in America.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

Reference Number: t18100919-3

631. BENJAMIN BOOTH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of August , a watch, value 30 s. the property of Robert Bask .

ROBERT BASK . I am a boatman , I live in Coventry. I lost my watch on the 20th of August, between five and six o'clock in the afternoon, out of a cupboard in my boat at Uxbridge . I had wound it up the night before, and I had seen it about nine o'clock that morning.

Q. Have you seen the watch since - A. I saw it at Mr. Handy's, a watchmaker at Uxbridge.

GEORGE HANDY . Q. Have you got a watch here belonging to Mr. Bask - A. No; I believe it is here.

Q. Did you ever see the prisoner - A. If ever I saw him, he is in a different dress now, I cannot swear to him.

Q.(To Prosecutor.) Did you ever see the prisoner - A. Yes; he came into my boat and went sixty miles with me, up to Uxbridge, and there he left me. When he first came he engaged to go to Paddington, he left me at Uxbridge between five and six o'clock. When he was gone, I missed the watch.

Q. Have you ever had any conversation with the prisoner about the watch - A. Yes; I saw him sitting at a door. I told him if he would give me the watch or the money it would be better. He took us to the watchmaker where he had sold it.

Q.(To Handy.) You say you do not know the prisoner; was a watch brought to you any time, and when - A. On the 20th or 21st of last month, about one o'clock, it was brought by a person about the prisoner's height, I gave him ten shillings for it, that watch was in my possession till the Friday following, and then three or four men came into my shop with a constable.

Q. Was the prisoner there then - A. I do not know that he was; some man asked me if I had not bought a watch lately. I said I had. I brought the watch out of the case; I said is that your watch; the prosecutor said, yes, he believed it was, but I had put new cases to it. I had repaired it and beat out the dents in it, they were not new cases. I asked him the watchmaker's name, he said, Cook, Oxford-street, I then said, this is not your watch, and put it in the case again, and they went away. After they had been to the magistrate in the evening, the constable came, and I delivered the watch to him.

CHARLES MURRAY . I am the high constable of Uxbridge, I received a watch of Mr. Handy, I have had it in my possession ever since.

Q. Did you go with Bask to Mr. Handy's - A. Yes; Bask came to me, I asked the prisoner what he had done with the watch, he said he sold it nearly opposite. I went to Mr. Handy's, the prosecutor mentioned a name that is not in the watch, he said it was cracked in the face, and the watch Handy produced is cracked in the face.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Fined 1 s. confined One Year in the house of correction, and there kept to hard labour .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18100919-4

632. WILLIAM SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of August , four sacks, value 8 s. the property of William Ball ; and WILLIAM HOWSE for receiving the said sacks, well knowing them to have been stolen .

CHARLES SHARP . I am ostler at the Ram Inn, Uxbridge. On the 10th or 11th of August Smith brought a sack full of rags for William Howse , and told me to keep it till Howse called for it. On the 11th Howse came he asked if there was any thing left for him, I said there was, and gave him the sack of rags, he gave me twelve shillings for it. This is the sack.

Mr. Gurney. You were the ostler at the Ram Inn. Upon this being brought into question, you took the liberty of running away. - A. I did not, I walked away.

Q. Where they could not find you - A. Yes they could.

Q. Why, they did not. How long was it before you came back again - A. Four days.

Q. And when you came back you said you that had the bag of Smith - A. Yes.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18100919-5

633. WILLIAM SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of August , a sack, value 2 s. the property of Peter Parker : and WILLIAM HOWSE , for receiving the same, knowing it to be stolen .

Mr. Arabin, Counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoners were

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18100919-6

634. THOMAS HALE was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Ord , Esq. about the hour of one on the night of the 23rd of August , and stealing therein a silver teapot, value 4 l. four silver table-spoons, value 3 l. sixteen silver desert-spoons, value 3 l. 10 s. fourteen silver forks, value 2 l. two silver salts, value 20 s. eight silver salt-spoons, value 20 s. a silver mustard-spoon, value 2 s. two silver skewers, value 20 s. a silver marrow-spoon, value 2 s. two silver wine-ladles, value 20 s. and a silver lemon-strainer, value 2 s. the property of John Ord , Esq .

JOSEPH LUPTON . I am butler to Mr. Ord; his house is in the parish of Fulham, and the prisoner had been his footman for fourteen months.

Q.Was he in his service on the 23d of August. - A. Yes.

Q. On that day had your master any company at dinner - A. Yes, several friends, and the whole of the plate was in use.

Q. On the evening of that day did the prisoner go from Fulham - A. Yes, before eight o'clock, to see his friends. He went to sleep in town to go the next morning by the coach.

Q. Did you secure any part of the house before you went to bed - A. The greater part.

Q. Did you secure that part of the house that was broken open - A. No; the shutter was very old; it was secured by iron bars.

Q. What window is that - A. It is the window in the servants' hall, that looks upon the lawn in the garden; the shutters were shut to; I cannot say whether the window was down or not. I left the house near twelve o'clock. I do not sleep in the house. I had seen the plate all safe in the house two or three hours before.

JOHN PATRICK . I am under butler at Mr. Ord's.

Q. What time did you go to bed on the 23d of August - A. About twelve.

Q. Had you seen whether the window of the servants' hall had been shut that night - A. I cannot say; the shutters had been put to; there were no fastenings to them. About six o'clock in the morning I was called by the coachman; I came down stairs and went into the pantry; I missed a silver tea-pot, fourteen table-spoons, and all the articles mentioned in the indictment. I then went into the servants' hall, I found the window open; there were six iron bars inside, that secured the window, one of them was forced of one side, and one of the outside wooden bars was broken, it had been forced away, I found it upon the lawn.

Q. Did you find any matches on the lawn - A. I saw them matches and about two inches of candle, it appeared to have been lit.

WILLIAM CABLE . Q. You are coachman to Mr. Ord - A. Yes.

Q. On the morning of the 24th of August at what hour did you come - A. At six o'clock. I found the back area door open, I then went into the servants' hall, found the shutter open, and one of the iron bars unscrewed at the bottom, and the window open.

Q. When that bar was put of one side, was there room enough for a man to enter - A. Yes; and two wooden rails outside had been sawed across and then forced away.

Q. I believe you then went up stairs, and called the last witness - A. I did. I saw the candle and matches in the front court within ten yards of the house, it was not on the lawn, the other witness has made a mistake.

MARY RAMSAY . Q. You are a servant to Mr. Ord - A. Yes.

Q. Have you not the care of the town house in Lincoln's-inn-fields - A. No, there is a housekeeper there.

Q. On the night of the 23d of August did not the prisoner come to the town house - A. Yes, a little after eleven o'clock. He asked me to make up a bed for him, he was going off early, at five o'clock in the morning, by the coach, into the country. I made up I bed for him, I heard him go up stairs to his bedroom a little after twelve o'clock. I was in my bedroom by a little after eleven. He had been below alone three quarters of an hour before he came to bed. I heard him go down stairs and go out of the street door about three minutes after he had been in his room. The street door fastens with a spring lock, he pulled the door three times before he left it, it shuts very hard.

Q. In the morning when you came down did you observe the appearance of there having been any fire in the servants' hall - A. Yes.

Q. Was there any fire there when you went up to bed a little after eleven - A. No, there was not.

Q. Was there any appearance of any thing having been done at that fire - A. Yes, I found some pieces of lead, and some gunpowder on a candlestick.

Q. Did you examine the condition of the bed that you made up for him to sleep in - A. Yes, it was very much tumbled, as if a person had slept all night in it.

Q. Did you ever hear him come in that house after he had left it - A. No, I did not.

Q. Did you find him in the morning - A. I did not.

JOHN PERKS. I am a police officer. On the morning of the 24th of August I went to Mr. Ord's house and examined the manner in which it had been broke open; the entry appeared to have been made by the two wooden bars being sawed away, and then an iron bar, out of five or six, was turned of one side, the two screws were drawn out and left on the sill of the window inside, and the window was open. At two in the afternoon of the same day, I went to the White-horse cellar, Piccadilly, I there observed the prisoner sitting on this deal box, I asked him if it was his box, he replied yes. I tied his hands together and put him in a coach. On his way to the office he began to cry, and endeavoured to beat himself; he said, I have robbed the best of masters; I begged him to desist saying any thing further to me. I took him to the office, and opened the box, it contained the whole of the articles mentioned in the indictment. He said every article of plate was there, he had made away with none.

Q. Was the whole of the articles in the indictment in that box - A. They were. On searching him, I found this black crape, this screw-driver, some lead melted in various forms, and some loose gunpowder. In his jacket pocket I found the duplicate of a pair of pistols, which appeared to have been pledged at Rochford's the same morning. In the morning I went to the lawn I discovered these matches and a candle under a clump of trees.

Q.(To Cable.) Are these matches and the piece of candle the same that you saw there - A. Yes; I left them there.

Q.(To Perks.) Has that candle been used - A.Yes, it has. I previously saw this candle and matches when I first went to the house, and under the apprehension of apprehending the prisoner, I desired them to let them remain.

Q.(To Lupton.) Look at that plate - A. I have examined them all, I have not the smallest doubt of their being my master's, and that they are worth more than 20 l.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel, and called no witnesses to his character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 42.

Of stealing in the dwelling-house, but not of breaking and entering the dwelling-house.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

Reference Number: t18100919-7

635. MARY HURLEY was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Charles Zachary , about the hour of five in the forenoon of the 11th of August , Eleanor, the wife of Charles Zachary , and others; being therein, and feloniously stealing six yards of cotton, value 10 s. the property of Margaret Prenival , a bed, value 2 l. two blankets, value 10 s. and a sheet, value 5 s. the property of Charles Zachary .

CHARLES ZACHARY . I live in George-street, Saint Margaret's Westminster ; I rent the house.

Q. Did the prisoner ever live with you - A. Yes, five or six months; she left me on Saturday, the 6th of August last.

Q. Do you know of your own knowledge of your house being broken open - A. Yes, it was on the Saturday after she had left me, I believe on the 11th of August; I got up in the morning about half past four, I and Margaret Prenival, the maid servant . I looked at the fastenings of the house before I went to bed, my wife was up after me, she is not here. When I got up I found every thing fastened as it was the night before; I and the girl went out and locked the door, and put the key under the door to let ourselves into the milk-house; I and the maid went away; I returned about half past five, I then found the door was open, and one bed, two blankets, and a sheet of mine were gone, and a gown-piece of Margaret Prenival ; they were taken from the room where Margaret Prenival laid.

Q. What was the value of the bed - A. Four pounds ten shillings, it would sell for that.

Q. Could you tell how the person got in - A. No more than finding the door broken open.

Q. When you got back did you find your wife up or not - A. My wife was up.

Q. When had you seen these things - A. When we went away in the morning they were in the same room where the girl slept.

Q. Was that the room in which the prisoner used to sleep when she was with you - A. Yes.

Q. Have you seen the things since - A. Yes; I took the prisoner on the Wednesday following, she denied having been on the premises; I told her she had better confess; she said the property was at Mr. Tolner's, in Drury-lane; I went there with her, and she pointed out the property.

JAMES GILMORE . I am an officer of Queen-square. I have got a bed, two blankets, and a sheet, I took it from the house of Mr. Tolner on Wednesday, the day the prisoner was apprehended, I have had them in my possession ever since; I discovered the gown-piece at a pawnbroker's.

Prosecutor. I know the bed to be mine, it is stained in the middle; there is no mark on the blankets and the sheet that I can speak to them.

MARGARET PRINEVAL . Q. Do you live with Mr. Zachary - A. Yes.

Q.What time did you go out on Saturday morning, the 11th of August - A. I went out at the same time as Mr. Zachary did, it wanted about twenty minutes to five, I came back about half after five, I then found the bed, a pair of blankets, and a sheet, and the gown-piece were gone.

THOMAS STEPHENS . I live at Mr. Dobree's. I produce a gown-piece pledged on the 13th of August, in the name of Mary Dean , I took it in of the prisoner for seven shillings and sixpence, I am sure it is the prisoner; I asked her the quantity, she said, six yards and a half and better.

MARGARET PRINEVAL . I think it is mine, it is a new piece, the piece I lost was of that pattern, there was six yards of it, I think it is the same quantity.

HENRY TOLNER . I live at the corner of Broker-row, Drury-lane. On the 11th of August, between twelve and one o'clock, the prisoner came to my house, I went with her to a room in St. Giles's, she shewed me a bed and two blankets, she asked four pounds, I bid her three pounds, she said she would not sell them under four pounds; I then bid her three guineas.

Q. Did you buy them - A. Yes, I gave three guineas, and she gave sixpence for carrying it.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence, nor called any witness to character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 21.

Of stealing in the dwelling-house to the value of upwards of forty shillings.

The prosecutor recommended the prisoner to his Majesty's mercy, on account of her behaving well in his service.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18100919-8

636. JOHN WALKER and CHRISTIAN WALKER were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Boxer , about the hour of one on the night of the 29th of August , and stealing therein thirty-six watches, value 30 l. three time-pieces, value 6 l. ten silver spoons, value 30 s. a shirt, value 10 s. a shift, value 10 s. a tablecloth, value 2 s. four nightcaps, value 4 s. four children's frocks, value 20 s. a bed-gown, value 1 s. part of a metal locket, value 3 d. three shawls, value 12 s. two gowns, value 17 s. four curtains, value 10 s. and a handkerchief, value 6 d. the property of William Boxer .

SECOND COUNT. For feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house in the day time, and stealing the said goods.

WILLIAM BOXER . I am a watch manufacturer , I live at Bethnal-green , I am a housekeeper there.

Q. In last August did you lose any property out of your house - A. On the 29th of August, about a quarter after twelve o'clock, I went to bed; I awoke in the morning, as the Shoreditch bell went; it was perfectly day-light then; I went into the parlour, I discovered that the sash was up, I was the last that went to bed, I saw the house was fastened as usual, I fastened the door with my own hands; I am sure that when I went to bed the sash was down, and the shutters were fastened then with this bolt; in the morning I found the sash up, and one square of glass broken, which was scattered about on a pembroke-table; this

bolt had been wrenched off, apparently with a crow of large chissel.

Q. Did you miss any property - A. On a table at the end of the room laid thirty-six watches, and three time pieces, they were stolen; the watches I value at forty pound, and three pound the time pieces, the watches I put on the table an hour before I went to bed, and the time pieces I saw there. I discovered the side board drawers had been opened, I lost out of it two gowns. Part of the watches are here, I can swear to them.

Q. Did you know the prisoner before your house had been broken open - A. I might have seen him, but I cannot say.

THOMAS SAPWELL . I produce the property, I found it in the prisoner's lodgings on the 30th of August, between three and four in the afternoon. The prisoner was not there, he came in about a minute afterwards. As soon as he came into the room I searched him; I found a silver watch in each pocket; I have got them here. In the top drawer in his room I found six more watches, two watches in the bottom drawer, and three time pieces in the middle drawer. He told me that some man brought them there to him. I found some shirts and some napkins, they are all here. I found on the woman three pawnbrokers' tickets.

Q. to Prosecutor. Is that your property - A. I can swear positively to the watches and time pieces, two shawls, and this gown.

Q. How many watches are there - A. Eight, they are worth eighteen pounds; the time pieces have my own name on them; I finished them myself, and the watches I finished, they have not my name on them.

John Walker 's Defence. My lord and gentlemen of the jury; I am charged at the bar of this most honourable court on suspicion of committing a felony, to which I declare I am innocent. I lived in Angel-alley, Bishopsgate. I am a private in the first regiment of Royal Tower hamlet militia. I arose at five o'clock in the morning, and on my way to Hackney I was met by two men at Norton Falgate. They offered me the articles in question to pawn. I asked them why they could not take them themselves; they replied, they had particular business to attend to, they would call on me at night, and pay me for my trouble. I asked them whose property it was, they said, one of their brothers, who had left off business. I took them home in order for my wife to pawn them. I have been seven years in the navy, and in three general actions. I was at the battle of St. Domingo, under the command of Admiral Duncan, in which I exerted my best endeavours for my King and country. I volunteered myself to go down. I was struck with a splinter across my loins, and by the skilful exertion of the Surgeon I was enabled to do my duty at last. When I came over, I exerted my greatest endeavours in cutting out three privateers. I attended on Captain Cockman , and likewise General Abercrombic. I assisted in taking him on board the ship appointed that honourable Commander, who expressed his desire that those brave men who attended him at his death should be acknowledged.

Christian Walker was not put on her defence.

John Walker called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

JOHN WALKER, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 29.

Of stealing in the dwelling-house, but not of breaking and entering the dwelling-house.

CHRISTIAN WALKER , NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18100919-9

637. JOHN CATHERWOOD was indicted for feloniously assaulting William Bagnall in the King's highway, on the 16th of August , putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will a gold chain, value 3 l. a gold key, value 7 s. and three gold seals, value 5 l. his property .

WILLIAM BAGNALL . I live in Silver-street, Clerkenwell. I am a steel die engraver and tallow-chandler . On the 16th of August, about half after eleven o'clock at night, I was going down Jerusalem-court , a man rushed upon me; he instantly seized my seals and chain. I put my hands and pressed upon my watch with all my force to save it; he with a sudden jerk drew the gold seals, gold chain, and a gold key, from off the watch. I value them about 9 l.

Q. Did he run off with them - A. Yes, he ran away round the left hand corner. I took notice of the man the moment he rushed upon me, and I knew him the moment I saw him in custody, by his size and by his dress: he was dressed in a dark coat, light waistcoat and breeches. It was moon-light. I swear to his size and dress. I can swear to his being the man. I know his features very well, but not to positively swear. The watch I have got in my pocket, I never saw the chain again.

WILLIAM COB . I am a hackney coachman. On the 16th of August about half after eleven at night. I heard the cry of stop thief, about ten yards from the corner of Jerusalem-court. I saw a man running. I called to the watchman. I struck the man that was running with my umbrella over the breast to stop him; I pushed him against the watchman, they both fell together. I made an attempt to lay hold of him. He ran away. I followed him, he was never out of my sight. He was stopped by a person in Hooper-street; I then got hold of him. I am sure it was the prisoner, the mark was on his breast. I took him to the watchhouse.

Q. Did you see Bagnall, the last witness - A. Yes, immediately he was stopped Mr. Bagnall came up.

Q. to Bagnall. You immediately went up it seems, when this man was taken - A. I did.

Q. Is the man that was taken the same man that took your chain and seals - A. I believe him upon my oath to be the man, there was no other person in the court when I was robbed.

Q. What interval of time was there between the time this chain and seals were taken from you, and the time you saw him in custody of the hackney coachman - A. I should suppose not above a minute, I ran after him.

JOHN CERLOS . On the 16th of August, about half past eleven at night, I was taking my supper in the house, I heard the watchman spring a rattle; I went to my door; in a minute the prisoner came running down the court, and the coachman after him. He holloed out to me, that is him, stop him. I immediately ran across the way, and seized him by the collar.

Q. Is that the man you seized by the collar - A. It is, I think he had the same clothes on he has now, I did not notice his small clothes.

Prisoner's Defence. The gentleman was very much intoxicated in liquor, and when I was taken as a prisoner he did not know who to say it was.

Q. to Prosecutor. Were you in liquor - A. Not much; I had been spending the evening along with a friend, I was in my senses, I knew what transpired.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

Reference Number: t18100919-10

638. ELIZABETH WILLIAMS , alias SYMMONS , and MARY SMITH , alias TYRRELL , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of September, a gold chain, value 3 l. and seven gold seals, value 4 l. the property of Charlotte Carr , in her dwelling-house .

CHARLOTTE CARR . I live in Bridge-street, Westminster ; I am a widow , and I am a jeweller and silversmith ; I rent the house. On Friday the 7th of September, near four o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoners came to my shop; they asked for a trifling gold pin, then they wanted two alike. Elizabeth Williams wanted a ring, I shewed her some, and while she kept me engaged in conversation, the window that opens with a door and a sliding sash, the door of the window lay open. I was shewing them the goods that I took out. Elizabeth Williams slid the sash, and took out seven gold seals and a watch chain.

Q. In what manner did she take them out - A. I caught her hand in the window.

Q. Did she take them out privately, or how - A. Part was privately.

Q. You say you caught her hand - A. Yes, in the act, but not with all the goods in it. I caught one gold seal in her hand; upon my catching her hand, she dropped the others I believe, I cannot say.

Q. Did you see any thing at the time you catched her hand - A. I believe I did; she said she did not know what I meaned by taking hold of her hand and polling her about.

Q. Was there any body else besides you and the two prisoners in the shop - Not at the moment when I detected her, I called my daughter from the parlour.

Q. How far was she from that part of the shop where you was standing - A. I was standing up by the window, and she on the other side, we were close together, my face was that way at times where she was, they both kept me in conversation.

Q. Does the sliding of the sash make any noise - A. It generally does, but I did not hear any noise.

Q. Was it slided back any material distance - It might be about six inches.

Q. You saw one gold ring in her hand, are you sure she took up all the rest - A. I am positive that no one else did; she came some distance from the place, and then dropped them on the floor just by the counter; the chain she threw on the opposite side of the counter, not the side that I stood on.

Q. They both came in together - A. Yes.

Q. When you had seized her hand, you called your daughter you say - A. Yes, I sent her in for our next dear neighbour, he came; an officer was sent for, and they were taken into custody; the prisoners were searched; I believe about three or four shillings were found in halfpence, they had some money each of them, but no other coin but halfpence.

Q. You said they looked at a pin, what was the price of the pin that they looked at - A. Half-a-guinea. Then they said they wanted one each; at three shillings, or three and sixpence. That one was half-a-guinea.

Q. What was the value of the ring they looked at. - A. About seven shillings. I do not think they enquired the price of the ring.

ELIZABETH WILLIAM . Q. Were you in the room when the two prisoners came into the shop to your mother - A. Yes.

Q. Your mother called you out - A. Yes.

Q. Had you seen any thing done by either of the two prisoners, before your mother called you - A. No. I saw my mother take hold of Williams, and I heard the seals fall; I was behind the counter when she threw the chain.

Q. Which way did she throw the chain - A. Behind the counter where I was, the same counter that my mother was behind.

Q. Was that the same side of the shop where the seals and chains used to be kept, or the opposite side - A. The opposite side.

Prisoner Williams. Q. Did you see me throw the chain - A. Yes, I did, I am sure of that

RICHARD WESTBROOK . I am an officer, I apprehended the prisoner's on the 7th of September, in the shop; I found three shillings and sixpence in halfpence, on Elizabeth Williams , and one shilling and eleven pence on Smith. Here is the property of Mrs Carr, it was deliverd to me in the shop, it has been in my possession ever since.

Q. to Prosecutrix. Look at the chain and seals - A. They are all fastened together now, they were separate then.

Q. What is the value of the chain - A. Three pound, that is under the cost price; and the seals, four pound.

Q. Were these in the window, of the same side of the shop where you were, or on the opposite side - A. On the opposite side.

William's Defence. I know nothing at all about what the lady has said to me.

Smith's Defence. I know nothing at all about it, only that the lady accused the other about it.

WILLIAMS, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 20.

SMITH, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18100919-11

639. JAMES TURNER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of July , thirty yards of woollen cloths, value 20 s. the property of Jacob Clark in his dwelling house .

JACOB CLARK . I am a woollen draper , 24, Stanhope-street, Clare-market : I can only swear to the property.

JOHN LAURENCE HARRIS . I am an apprentice to the prosecutor. On the 21st of July, about half past eight in the morning, I was sweeping the shop, I saw the prisoner putting his arms over the goods.

Q. Where were the goods laying - A. The cloth was laying in the window.

Q. Did he take it away - A. Yes; I made an outcry and pursued the prisoner, he was taken.

Q. Did you see him drop the cloth - A. No, I did not; I picked up the cloth in an alley in Wild-street, near the spot where the prisoner ran with it.

Prosecutor. The goods are here.

Q.Who gave them to you - A. I was called into the shop on the 21st of July, between eight and nine o'clock, my apprentice brought the goods into the shop, he picked them up after the prisoner dropped them. It is my property, there is my hand writing upon them. I value them at about twenty pound.

MR. BRANDON. I keep a coalshed opposite of Mr. Clarke; I heard the word, stop thief, the prisoner was stopped, when I came up to him, by Goddard.

MR. GODDARD. Q. You stopped the prisoner, did not you - A. Yes, he was running.

Q. Had he any thing with him - A. Not when I stopped him; he wished me to let him go, I collared him and took him back to the shop.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of the crime that is laid to my charge.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 21.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18100919-12

640. ELIZABETH SMITH , alias GRAVES , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of August , twenty-four yards of ribbon, value 13 s. the property of James Meycock , privately in his shop .

JAMES MEYCOCK. I am a haberdasher , residing at the corner of Broad St. Giles's . On the day charged in the indictment I was in the shop, I saw the prisoner come in, she was served by Mr. Young; he jumped over the counter, I saw him lay hold of the prisoner; he said, you may as well leave what you have got; she hesitated, he brought her in; she pulled out eighteen yards of green and yellow ribbon, that was my property, it had my private mark. Young desired her to pull out what she had got besides, she pulled out a piece of lavender and pink, that was my property. I then desired Young to go for a constable; he said, she has your property on her now. She went down to the privy, a young person in my shop went with her; she was not searched till she was taken to the watchhouse, I was not there.

Q. When was this - A. About eight in the evening.

THOMAS YOUNG . I live at Mr. Meycock's. The prisoner came into the shop and purchased some odd bits of ribbon; I took out three drawers full of ribbon; I saw her put a piece of black ribbon in her pocket; I jumped over the counter, and told her to leave what she had got; she hesitated, and then pulled out two pieces that I did not see her take, one was green and yellow, and the other lavender and pink; they are my master's property, they have his mark on them: they were in the drawers that I exposed to the prisoner, and they are worth thirteen shillings.

JOHN BAXTER . When the prisoner was given into my custody, these pieces of ribbons were given to me; I searched her in the watchhouse, these remnants were found upon her.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence, nor called any witnesses to her character.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Of Stealing, but not privately.

Fined 1 s. and Confined One Year in the House of Correction, and there kept to hard labour .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

Reference Number: t18100919-13

641. THOMAS HAMMETT was indicted for an unnatural crime .

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18100919-14

642. EDMUND BURKITT was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of John Smith , about the hour of eleven at night, on the 1st of October , in the 49th year of his Majesty's reign, and stealing therein, twenty-eight thousand one hundred and twenty yards of ribbon, value 727 l. and sixty-five pound weight of silk, value 172 l. his property .

BENJAMIN HANSTEAD . Q. In the month of October last, were you in the service of Mr. Smith - A. Yes, he is a ribbon manufacturer in Gutter-lane .

MR. SMITH. My house is in St. Dennis, Foster-lane. It is my warehouse where these goods were taken from, this man slept in it at that time.

Hanstead. I slept there, I was the warehouseman. On Sunday, the first of October last, I left the warehouse at about one o'clock in the day, I locked the street door; the warehouse is up one pair of stairs. I came home in the evening about half past ten, I pushed against the door and found it fast; I then went over to a house opposite to meet a young man that slept in the house with me; I returned again in about twenty minutes, I unlocked the door with the key I had with me; I went up stairs with the young man; I struck a light in the kitchen; I went into the warehouse, I found several drawers open, and two bags in the middle of the warehouse with silk in them; I had not seen them bags in the morning, they were tied up ready to take away.

Q. Did you find any quantity of ribbons gone - A. Yes, I found drawers, that had been full in the morning, empty. We lost about seven hundred poundsworth of ribbon, and about two hundred poundsworth of silk.

Court. All you know the property was in the house and it had been taken out of it - A. Yes, it was.

JOHN ARMSTRONG . I am an officer. On the 13th of October last, I went with a search warrant, in company with Vickery Bishop and my son, to the house, No. 4, Sandy's-row, Spitalfields, I there saw a woman who gave her name Burkitt. In searching the lower apartment of the house, I found this box, it was locked, with a string across it, and a seal upon the string, upon the seal was E. B.; I opened this box, it contained a number of pieces of ribbon; they were afterwards shewn to Mr. Smith, he claimed them.

JOHN VICKERY . I was with Mr. Armstrong upon this search at Sandy's-row, while he was in the lower part of the house, I was up stairs, I saw a gold watch hanging on the bed's head; I have the watch here, there is a gold seal with the initials E. B.; I compared the impression of the seal with the impression upon the box Armstrong found, they tallied, I have both the impression and the seal.

Q. Did you, or any person in your presence, find any thing else - A. There was a quantity of plate taken, marked with the letter B.; chiefly that plate was returned to the prisoner's brother; this is a memorandum of the delivery.

Q. Has that plate been produced to you by a person of the name of Nadin - A. Yes.

Q. Were any other things found in the house - A. There was an implement of house-breaking, it is a large center-bit, it was found in different parts of the house, not together as it is now; the wood part, or handle, was found in the garret, or a small part of the garret, it was partitioned off; there were a number of files, and a vice

fixed, the crosspiece of iron and counterpiece were found in the drawer in the bed room; the four knives and screws were found in the washhouse, even with the ground floor, and this gimblet and wrench were with them.

Mr. Knapp. Did you go to the house to see how this burglary was committed - A.I did.

Q. Do you apprehend that the burglary was committed by this center bit, or by any other means - A. By other means.

DANIEL BISHOP . I was present at this search, I found one piece of black ribbon in the drawer, in the one pair of stairs room. In a small leather case, in a cupboard of the same room, I found some patterns of ribbon.

GEORGE DAVIS. I live in Steward-street.

Q. Did you at any time live in Sandy's-row - A. Yes, No. 4, I quitted it in lady-day, 1809.

Q. Who took the house of you when you quitted it - A. Mr. Burkitt, I sold him the lease of the house and the fixtures.

JOSEPH NADIN. Q. I believe you are the conductor of the Police of Manchester - A. Yes. On the 17th of May, I searched the prisoner's house at Eaton-lane, near Stockwell, Lancashire; he was apprehended by Birch on the 18th.

Q. Did you learn from him that he house you searched was his house - A. Yes, he had paid the rent the day before; he claimed the articles that I found in that house. I found a quantity of silver plate, four silver table spoons, a gravy spoon, marked B., a cream jug, marked B., a punch ladle, not marked, two butter ladles, marked B. In the cellar, a portmanteau; at the bottom of the cellar window was affixed a smith's vice, and two or three files; in a box were these two iron crows, a brace of loaded pistols, a dark lanthorn, two phosphorus bottles, matches, and wax candle, quantity of picklock keys, this parcel is marked large street-door keys; another bag of keys, marked small street; another bag of picklock keys, the bag is marked parlour; another bag of iron chest keys; and another lot here containing blank keys not filed out, some part of them is begun and not finished. Under the stairs, in the cellar, I found these two large iron crows, and the cellar window was darkened with something white.

Q. Did you hear the prisoner say where he had been, when you searched his house - A. He said, that he heard me say something to Mrs. Brown, about an information; he went out of the window into the next house. He went by the name of Henry Wilson .

Q. What business did he profess to carry on - A. He told the magistrate that he was in the commission line.

Mr. Gurney. Q. to Vickery. Did you see that key tried at Mr. Smith's door - A. Yes, it opened it inside and outside.

Q to Armstrong. Mr. Nadin brought this man to town and delivered him on this charge - A. Yes; and the prisoner said, some of you, turning to me and Vickery, have got a gold watch of mine.

Vickery. I was present; I said, I have got it. I have seen that plate, I have no doubt but that is the plate that I returned to the attorney, and the brother of the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. My lord, and gentlemen of the jury, to say that I am totally innocent, in every respect, is not consistent with truth; but the crime of burglary, for which I am charged before you, I solemnly protest I am not guilty off. I will state to you the circumstances as they occurred, and the occasion of my retiring from London. On the 11th of October last, I received samples of these ribbons from a person of the name of Robbins, with whom I had some dealings; on my receiving the samples, it was agreed to meet him the next day at twelve at noon, at the public house of James Hodges , Creed Church-lane; we met accordingly, he bringing with him a box containing the goods, and I not having the sample with me, could not conclude the purchase; he requested me to take care of them; I said, I was not going home; he said, he would take them; he took them to my house and left them. But to say I was about to purchase these goods in a fair and honourable way, would be to deceive the court, and make me appear more culpable; I had every reason to suppose that I was about purchasing goods dishonestly come by; and on my hearing that the officers found the goods in my house I retired from London, by advice of my friends; my absenting myself was not from a consciousness that I was the robber. The goods themselves lay in the most conspicuous part of my house, just as if some person had just brought them; had I stolen them, should not I have concealed them, and left the samples in any careless situation, instead of which, the principle was to be seen; was it not necessary for me to have the samples while the goods were in my possession, samples which shewed the quality of the goods; for this purpose I kept the samples till I purchased the goods, which is usual. And, as I have stated to you before, that the person with whom I was about to purchase the goods, had, in my opinion, come by them dishonestly; he brought the goods to Mr. Hodges, they were taken to my house, and I sealed the box, that I might be sure the box should not be opened: it was sealed in the presence of Mr. Hodges, who is since dead, which the officers can testify; had it been stolen by me, that seal would not have been left in the place. In it such an act, which a man guilty of the crime of burglary would have committed. It is always a presumption, that persons committing robberies are always anxious of getting rid of the goods; this bulk of property was disposed in different quarters, one James Hale , was proved to have in his possession, ribbons, and silk, part of the property, he was tried here and acquitted. Mrs. Jackson, whom I shall entreat your Lordship to call, had part of the property. Is it natural to suppose that I should be the person who committed the robbery, whose interest it was to dispose of them; instead of which there is not the smallest degree of intimation, that I offered them for sale. The officers knew the things in the box, were what they searched for, and unexpectedly these goods were found in my possession twelve days after the robbery, is that a proof that I must have stolen them. Nor was such a key found in my house, at Sandy's-row. And, however blameable I may be for the intent to purchase this property, for which, I had every reason to believe, to be dishonestly stolen; my conscience acquits me of the theft. I trust you will see this transaction in a true light, and that you will not convict me of the capital offence because I am guilty of a crime of less magnitude; and if any doubts are entertained by you, I entreat you that I may have the benefit of that doubt.

HANNAH JACKSON . Q. What are you - A. I keep a stand in Fleet-market, I sell ribbons and hardware.

Q. Were you examined here upon the trial of Hale - A. No; I was examined four times before the Lord

Mayor; my house was searched by virtue of a warrant, and my selling ribbon, there was a great deal of ribbon found in my house. I bought nine pieces of ribbon of a man who said he lived in Coventry; I gave them to Mr. Hale to get them dressed for me; he was tried here and acquitted.

Court. Do you know any thing of the ribbon that was found in this man's house - A. No, by no means

NOT GUILTY .

Q. to jury. Gentlemen you see he quitted his house in town, and went to Lancashire; you are to say whether he fled for this felony.

Jury. He did not fly for this felony.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100919-15

643. EDMUND BURKITT was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Folkard , about the hour of twelve on the night of the 8th of October , in the 49th year of his Majesty's reign, and stealing therein forty-four watches, value 150 l. fourteen chains, value 30 l. thirty seals, value 20 l. thirty keys, value 5 l. four corkscrews, value 18 s. a tobacco-stopper, value 2 s, a necklace, value 40 s. a pair of bracelets, value 10 s. a coral, value 20 s. and six pair of bracelet-snaps, value 5 s. his property .

WILLIAM FOLKARD . I live in sun-street, in the parish of St. Botolph, Bishopsgate , I am a silversmith . On the evening of the 8th of October last, or the morning of the 9th, I had my shop shutter cut.

Q. What time did you see it safe - A. I saw it safe about eleven o'clock. The servant got up about six o'clock, observing the window cut, she informed me; I got up, it was light, I found the shutter had been cut with an instrument; that centre-bit fits the hole exactly.

Q. Were you present when this instrument was found - A. Yes; it was found at No. 4, Sandy's-row, at the house of Burkitt.

Q. What did you lose - A. I lost the articles stated in the indictment. I was robbed to the amount of three hundred pounds, in watches and jewellery. None of the property has ever been found.

JOHN VICKERY . In consequence of a warrant, I went, in company with Armstrong and Bishop, to No. 4, Sandy's-row. On searching a little small back-house, in a writing-desk on a table, I found this pocket-book, in this pocket-book is a list of articles of jewellery; I shewed it to Mr. Folkard, he said it exactly corresponded with the articles that were lost; I found that centre-bit divided in different parts of the house, as I have before described; I put it together.

Q. Is that a centre-bit used by carpenters - A. No; it is such a tool that I have seen found, with the only difference, the one I before saw found was a little smaller; that tool was applied to the aperture made in the shutter, it exactly fitted. There were several holes bored in Mr. Folkard's door, and this gimlet fitted them exactly.

Q. to Mr. Folkard. Look at that pocket-book which was found in the desk - A. Here are a number of memorandums, and among them here is the statement of the articles I lost, and the sum affixed to some of them.

Mr. Knapp. Supposing a man to have bought these articles, and to have entered them in a book, might it not be the entry of a man that purchased them - A. No doubt about that.

Prisoner's Defence. I had some lodgers in my house; I know nothing of that centre-bit whatever.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100919-16

644. MARGARET HAWKINS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of August , a silver spoon, value 20 s. the property of Peter Levesque .

ELEANOR BARNES . I reside in St. Bride's workhouse ; the prisoner was a pauper in the house. On the 20th of August, about two o'clock in the day, I desired a little girl to put the spoon in the drawer; that spoon was missed the next morning; I went to the prisoner and asked her if she had made away with the spoon, it was the property of Mr. Levesque, if she would give me the ticket, I would take it out; she said she had; she took the ticket out of a stone jar, and gave it me; I gave the ticket to Mr. Levesque.

JOHN FLOWERS . I am an apprentice to Mr. Guest, pawnbroker, 63, Fleet-market. On the 20th of August the prisoner pledged this spoon.

Prisoner's Defence. I was very much intoxicated.

Confined one month in Newgate , and whipped in jail .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100919-17

645. ROBERT PRICE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of September , three books, value 3 s. the property of Joshua Fuller .

JOSHUA FULLER . I am a bookseller , No. 66, church Street, Bethnal Gree n. On the 8th of this month I was looking through my shop window, I saw the prisoner stop at my door, and take some books out of a box, which were exposed to sale; he concealed them under his coat, and walked away; I pursued him, and took these three books from him; they are my property, I had marked them three shillings for sale.

Prisoner. It is the first offence that ever I committed, and I promise it will be the last; I was overseen at the moment.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 17.

Fined 1 s. and discharged .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100919-18

646. BRIDGET PENDERGAST , alias BETTY SMITH , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of August , two gowns, value 20 s. a cloak, value 20 s. a shawl, value 15 s. a cap, value 1 d. a bonnet, value 15 s. a laced cloak, value 30 s. a spencer, value 1 s. and five yards of muslin, value 50 s. the property of Charles Cutts , in his dwelling-house .

NANCY CUTTS . I am the wife of the prosecutor, he is a housekeeper, he keeps the Cooper's Arms public house . The prisoner left my service on the 8th of August, between eight and nine in the evening; I missed the things that same nigh; I saw her the next evening at the Flying-horse, Lambeth-street, Whitechapel; she had my gown and spencer on her back; she took the property out of the one pair of stairs room.

Q. When was the last time you had seen them before they were stolen - A. On the 7th of August.

ELIZABETH ALLINGHAM . I keep a milliner's and cloaths-shop in Seething-lane, Tower-street.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar - A. Yes, I can positively swear to her; I bought of her a piece of muslin and a black lace cloak, I gave her two pound for them altogether.

JOHN GRIFFITHS . I am an officer. On Thursday the 9th of August, I took one gown and spencer of the prisoner's back; I found a gown and a bonnet in a box where the prisoner told me, in Thames-street, and a shawl, a bit of muslin, and an old nightcap that was in the trunk.

Prisoner's Defence. The lady gave me thirty shillings for them, and the box belongs to me.

GUILTY , aged 15.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18100919-19

647. ANN FRANKLIN was indicted for feloniously assaulting James Escombe in the King's highway, on the 22nd of July , putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, a watch, value 4 l. his property .

JAMES ESCOMBE . I live at No. 8, Colonade, near the Foundling. On the 22d of July, between twelve and one at night, I was coming home, in Holborn , just by the Coach and Horses watering-house, the prisoner came up to me; she put her arm round my waist, and immediately I found my watch go from my fob; I catched hold of her handkerchief, she cried out, murder, I cried out I am robbed; two hackney-coachmen came up and held me while she ran away; I could have held her if it had not been for those fellows

Q. How lately before she came up to you had you felt your watch in your pocket - A. Not two minutes before.

Q. This was in the street, was it - A. Yes; I was walking on the pavement, in middle-row, Holborn, going home, when she took the watch from me; I am sure the prisoner is the woman; I saw her three or four different time before, walking the street; she was taken up on the 31st of July, I described her person, John Smith took her up.

JOHN SMITH . Escombe lodges with me. On Monday morning he came home near one o'clock; he told me he had been robbed, and described the person.

Q. Did you go in search of the person that robbed him of his watch - A. I did; we found the prisoner on the 31st of July, between nine and ten at night, she and another was walking before us; he said, here she is; she went into a public house, and we followed the moment she turned round from the fire-place and saw him, she was very much confuse, and whispered to the other girl.

Q. How was she confused - A. She looked very pale, and was quite struck, and whispered to the other girl. I asked her whether she knew that young man; when I came into the passage with her, the landlord came out and touched her on the arm, and while I was talking to her about this young man, she ran away and spanked the doors after her; I pursued her into Short's gardens, I there saw her go into a house; the watchman sprang his rattle; we went and searched the house, and on the first landing-place on the stairs I apprehended her. I then said to her, why, if you are innocent, did you run away. She said, she would not come down; I pulled her away, and took her to the watch-house, and searched her the next morning; I found nothing but two letters.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence, nor called any witnesses to her character.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Of stealing, but not violently from the person.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

Reference Number: t18100919-20

648. WILLIAM LAWRENCE and CHARLES LAWRENCE were indicted for feloniously making an assault in the King's highway, on the 12th of July , upon Thomas Rutlidge , putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will a watch, value 3 l. a gold seal, value 15 s. and a gold ring, value 5 s. his property .

THOMAS RUTLIDGE . I am a hatter . I live in Great Castle-street, Cavendish-square. On the 12th of July, past one o'clock in the morning, I was going home. I was not much in liquor.

Q. Where were you when you lost your watch - A. In King-street, Covent-Garden . I had seen it a few minutes before under the Piazzas.

Q. Did you see either of the prisoners when you lost it - A. No, I do not knew who took it. Some man ran against me coming out of Rose-street. The sudden jerk knocked my hat off, and while I was in the act of picking my hat up, I felt my watch go from me, and the man immediately ran away. a gave an alarm; the man was not taken; I have seen my watch since,

CHARLES HUMPHREYS . I am an officer. On the the 10th of August I apprehended the prisoner. I found the watch on William, and the seal on Charles; the gold ring is not found.

William Lawrence 's Defence. I bought that watch of a man in Deptford. I gave him three pounds for it. I put it in my pocket and wore it afterwards; the seal I gave to my brother. I asked the man if it was his watch, he told me it was. In buying the watch he called for a pint of rum; I drank one glass of it. I left the man in the house. I went home, and never saw the man afterwards. The man said he was in distress for money, he was along with a woman of the town.

Charles Lawrence said nothing in his defence.

The prisoners called two witnesses, who gave them a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18100919-21

649. RICHARD OGLE , WILLIAM HAMILTON , and MICHAEL DOYLE , were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Adlington , Sarah his wife and others being therein, about the hour of two in the afternoon of the 14th of August , and stealing eight shawls, value 22 s. three pair of stockings, value 10 s. eleven yards of printed cotton, value 30 s. one yard of cotton, value 2 s. and a handkerchief, value 1 s. the property of John Adlington .

SARAH ADLINGTON . My husband is a carpenter , he is a housekeeper at Tottenham . I only know that I missed the property, I can swear to it.

WILLIAM READ. On the 14th of August last, I saw Ogle and five more in Hatton-Wall. I took this property from Ogle. Two were not taken. I was

lame, Hutt stopped them; Ogle said the things that he had got belonged to him.

Q. You found nothing on the other prisoners - A. No.

JOHN HUTT . I am an officer; I was with Read; I apprehended Ogle, Hamilton, and M'Namara.

MICHAEL M'NAMARA. Q. Do not you attempt to save yourself by accusing innocent persons, what do you know of taking away the things from Adlington - A.There were me, Hamilton, Ogle, Doyle, a bricklayer, and Fairburn; we all met, by appointment, on Tuesday, at the White Swan, in Salisbury-street, Fleet-street, to go a robbing in the country. We went to Tottenham, Ogle, Doyle, and Fairburn, went into Mr. Adlington's shop, me and Hamilton was on the opposite side of the way; in a minute or two I saw Doyle run out with a gown piece under his coat; Ogle came out with a parcel of shawls in his hat, and Fairburn with some stockings; we went up the road, and M'Carran went back into the house; he afterwards came out with some stockings and more things; we went into a field on the other side of the house; and there M'Carran and Doyle divided them.

Q. Had you any part - A. I had not of that property.

Mr. Burry. When you were taken there was some property found upon you - A. Yes, that was stolen property, but none of Mr. Adlington's property was found upon me.

Ogle's Defence. M'Namara brought me into this.

Hamilton's Defence. M'Namara brought me into it, I never thought of doing any thing of the kind before.

Doyle's Defence. M'Namara was the first that induced me to leave my master, and to go into the country.

OGLE GUILTY , aged 17.

HAMILTON, GUILTY , aged 16.

DOYLE, GUILTY , aged 15.

Of Stealing only.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18100919-22

650. RICHARD OGLE , WILLIAM HAMILTON , and MICHAEL DOYLE , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of August , three handkerchiefs, value 5 s. and 3 d. the property of James Wright , privately in his shop .

JAMES WRIGHT . I keep a linen draper's shop at Newington .

Q. You lost some handkerchiefs, did you - A. Yes, I do not know when I lost them from my shop, they are here.

Q. When was the last time you saw them before they were taken - A. About three days.

Q. You did not see any of the prisoners about your shop, did you - A. No.

WILLIAM READ . I found the handkerchiefs on the lads at the same time, they were all in one bundle.

Ogle's Defence. I have nothing further to say than what I have said.

Hamilton's Defence. The same.

Doyle's Defence. The same.

OGLE, GUILTY , aged 17.

HAMILTON, GUILTY , aged 16.

DOYLE GUILTY , aged 15.

Of Stealing only.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18100919-23

651. JOHN WHEELER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of August , a horse, value 5 l. a cart, value 5 l. twenty stone weight of beef, value 5 l. 10 s. and 16 stone weight of lamb, value 5 l. the property of Thomas Powell .

MILBORO POWELL. I am the wife of Thomas Powell , I live at Ratcliffe.

Q. Did you go to market on the 11th of August last. - A. Yes; I purchased of Mr. Boots, one quarter of beef, one piece of beef besides, and four lambs; his house is in Whitechapel , he is a carcase butcher; I took my horse and cart to fetch it away.

Q. Was it a gelding or a mare - A. We call it a horse.

Q. What time did you go for it - A. When I took it from Mr. Boots, I think it was between ten and eleven o'clock in the forenoon.

Q. Was the horse your's - A. No, I borrowed the horse and cart of my neighbour. I put this meat in the cart, and I got up and drove it homewards.

Q. How far had you got before you saw the prisoner - A. I think it was near five hundred yards; the prisoner stopped me; he said, Mrs. Powell, you must go back, Mr. Boots wants you.

Q. Had you known him before - A. I had seen him, but I did not know his name. I told him I could not go back; he said, I must go back, I had made a mistake in my bill; I said, I could rectify that another day; he said, he was one of Mr. Boots servant's, he could mind the horse and cart the while, I must go back; I got out of the cart and went back.

Q. That was all the conversation that past - A. Yes; I left the prisoner with the horse and cart, as he told me he was to mind it. I went back, and said to Mr. Boots, Sir, what do you want with me, what is the matter, he answered, nothing at all, he did not want me; upon that I went back. He had run away with my horse and cart, and the meat.

Q. The prisoner and the horse and cart were gone - A. Yes.

Q. Did you go in search of him - A. Yes. I cried out, Oh! my God! I am ruined One Gorden, went and found the cart and horse in Brick-lane.

Q. You gave an alarm - A. Yes.

Q. And people went in search of him - A. Yes, in all parts they could go.

Mr. Reynolds. Q. You said you did not know the man's name, but you knew his person - A. I did not know his name, but I have seen him many a time.

Q. I am told that it was you that bid him get into the cart - A. No, that I deny.

Q. Who does the horse and cart belong to - A. Thomas Gregory .

Q. It is said to be yours - A. I am answerable for it.

JAMES BOOTS . Q. You are a butcher, are you not - A. I am.

Q. Did Mrs. Powell buy any meat of you on the 11th of August - A. She did, a quarter of beef, a piece of beef besides, and four lambs.

Q. She brought a cart and horse to fetch it away - A. Yes; and she drove it away. She returned afterwards, and asked me if there was any mistake; I told her no, not that I knew of.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar - A. I do not.

Q. Then of course you had not sent him to tell her to come back, that there was a mistake - A. Certainly not, I did not desire any body to call her back upon any occasion.

ROBERT YORK . Q. You are a butcher, I believe - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see the prisoner on the 11th of August - A. I did, near eleven o'clock, I saw him coming up the street, opposite of my own door, riding in a cart, drawn by one horse.

Q. What was there in the cart - A. The carcase of four lambs, a quarter of beef, and a piece of beef; I saw Gordon running after the cart, and opposite of my door I saw the prisoner jump off, he seemed very much frightened; in a moment, he turned round and made away from Gordon; Gorden called out, shop thief; then I and Gordon ran after him, Gordon catched him; I was close behind him, I never lost sight of him.

Q. Did you hear Gordon speak to him - A. Gordon was talking to him, it was not above a minute, what he said I could not hear. We delivered him over to Mr. Lloyd.

Mr. Reynolds. You know Mr. Boots's shop - A. Very well.

Q. How far was the cart, when you saw it, from Mr. Boots - A. About a quarter of a mile. I live in Brick-lane, Whitechapel. He was going the Shoreditch way, or Hackney.

ROBERT LLOYD . I am an headborough. Gordon delivered the prisoner to me, I took him to Lambeth-street office. I asked him how he came to run away with the cart and horse; Oh; said he, I will make it appear that I am right enough; I said, if so, then the magistrate will acquit you.

JOHN GORDON . I saw the prisoner stop Mrs. Powell just beyond Red Lion-street, and then Mrs. Powell went away, leaving him with the horse and cart, then he drove off. He drove up Brick-lane: I followed him, and overtook him; I said to the prisoner, where are you going with that cart and horse; he made no answer, jumped off the cart, and ran away. I holloaed out, stop thief, ran after him, and took him, and Mr. York came and assisted me.

THOMAS GREGORY . Q. Are you the owner of the horse - A. Yes; he is a stallion, I cannot turn him out any were.

Prosecutrix. I borrowed that horse and cart of Mr. Gregory.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel, and called no witnesses to his character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 25.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

Reference Number: t18100919-24

652. MARY BULL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of August , a watch, value 3 l. the property of David Evans , in his dwelling house .

ELIZABETH EVANS . I am the wife of David Evans , we live at No. 7, Green-street, St. Mathew, Bethnal-green , my husband rents the house. The prisoner lodged in our house.

Q. Did you loose a watch at any time - A. Yes, on the 10th of August, between the hours of nine and ten, my husband's watch was taken from the mantle piece of the ground floor; it cost near four pound.

Q. What time might you see it - A. I saw it twenty minutes before eight o'clock. I left the house in care of my mother, and when I came back, my mother informed me the watch was gone, and Mrs. Bull and no one else had been in the room. Mrs. Bull never came home that night; I enquired at the pawnbroker's, and could hear nothing of it. On the next day, I saw Mrs. Bull near the rising Sun, Spitalfields market; I took hold of her, and said, Mrs. Bull, deliver up my husband's watch; she said, she could not tell what I was talking of. I took her home, and then I desired her to give up the duplicate, she told me she had none; I then said, must I accuse you or my mother, as there was no one else in the place; she said, not your mother, your mother is innocent, I have stole it, and I have sold it, it is what I expected, it serves me right.

Q. Did you ever find your watch again - A. No, I was never able to find it.

ELIZABETH WEBBER. Q. Are you the mother to Elizabeth Evans - A. Yes.

Q. Were you at home on the 10th of August - A. Yes; the prisoner came in about nine o'clock in the morning, she only staid a few minutes; I looked at the watch to see what it was a clock, the watch was there; I saw it at nine o'clock; a few minutes before ten I went to look what it was o'clock, I missed that watch; Mrs. Bull was gone then. On the 11th my daughter brought her home, and asked her for the duplicate; she said, she had no duplicate, she had stole it and sold it; I asked her where she had sold it; she would not tell it.

ELEANOR EDWARDS . Q. Did you see the prisoner after she was brought back - A. Yes. Mrs. Evans asked her to give her up the duplicate of the watch, if she had made away with it; she said, she had sold it, it served her right, it was what she expected.

ELIZABETH GAD . I am a lodger to Mrs. Evans. When Mrs. Evans brought the prisoner home, she asked her to deliver up her husband's watch; she said, she could not, she had sold it.

Prisoner's Defence. She lives in the next room to me, and the boy that she lives with is a dust boy; he came down stairs as I did. On Thursday I went to Somerset House, to take my husband's half-pay; I came home on the Saturday, and about one hundred yards from my own door, I met Mrs. Evans, she said, give me my husband's watch; I told her, I did not know what she was talking about. I went up into my own room, and went to the cupboard for my husband's half-pay ticket, it was gone; she said, you have taken my husband's watch, I will keep your husband's half-pay ticket. Mrs. Evans said, make your husband's ticket over to me, and I will not hurt a hair of your head; I told her I would not make it over to any one, I had not pawned the watch nor sold it.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18100919-25

653. ANN IZON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of July , in the dwelling house of Frederic Bryant , a broach, value 2 s. two pair of gloves, value 4 s. two half handkerchiefs, value 2 s. half a yard of lace, value 1 s. a pair of stays, value 5 s. a purse, value 6 d. and two one pound bank notes, his property .

MARGARET BRYANT . I am the wife of the prosecutor, the prisoner was my servant . I lost the property out of the dining room closet; I never missed it until I saw it in the prisoner's possession; I searched her box, and then I searched her person, in the presence of the officer.

Q. What did you find about her - A. The purse that

contained the money and the broaches, two one pound bank notes, four dollars, two halfcrowns, eighteen shillings, and five sixpences. In her box I found two pair of gloves, two handkerchiefs, a pair of stays, and half a yard of lace.

Q. What did your purse contain the last time you saw it - A. I know there were two bank notes, but I cannot say they are the same. The cupboard was locked, I had lost the key for a fortnight. On the morning that she was going away, I told her she must know where the key was; this key was with the other keys; she brought them to me from the book case.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence, called one witness, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Of stealing, to the value of 30 s. only.

Fined 1 s. confined One Year in the house of correction, and there kept to hard labour .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18100919-26

654. ALEXANDER LOVELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of August , three straw hats, value 40 s. the property of Catharine Wallis , widow , in her dwelling-house .

CATHARINE WALLIS. I am a widow, I live at 235, Holborn , in the parish of St. Martin's-in-the-fields; I have a shop there, it is part of my dwelling-house, I keep a straw hat warehouse . On Saturday, the 4th of August, between eight and nine at night, I saw a man come in my shop, he took something off the counter, I could not see what it was; he was pursued. I did not know what I was robbed of until the hats were brought back.

GEORGE SHONE. On the 4th of August I was in Mrs. Wallis's parlour in conversation with her; I saw some person go out of the shop with some straw bonnets; he was at the door when I saw him; I pursued him and overtook him, he was walking, with two bonnets in one hand and one in the other; I tapped him on the shoulder, and begged that he would walk back with me with those bonnets. When I took hold of him he gave me a violent blow on the cheek, and threw the bonnets, at me; about a minute I was insensible from the blow. I ordered my apprentice to take the bonnets up; I pursued him into Princes-street, he was entangled there by the posts; he said, b - r you, I will stick a knife in your b - y guts. I stopped, and called out, stop thief; he then ran, and I moved on behind him at a distance; a watchman coming by and a woman was knocked down; he ran into Queen-street, I collared him, I never lost sight of him, I am sure the prisoner is the person.

WILLIAM MAY . I picked up these bonnets while Mr. Shone was pursuing him. The prisoner was taken to the watchhouse, and I delivered the bonnets to Mr. Baxter.

JOHN BAXTER . The prisoner and the bonnets were brought to the watch-house; I have had them ever since.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Of stealing, to the value of 39 s. only.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18100919-27

655. SAMUEL COCKLIN was indicted for feloniously assaulting Edward Green in the King's highway, putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, three-dollars and three shillings, his property .

EDWARD GREEN . I live at No. 11, Worship-street, I am a tea-pot manufacturer . On the 12th of August , between two and three in the morning, I was going home, in Beech-street, just by Whitecross-street , the prisoner met me and knocked me down; my hat flew off, I got up to get my hat, two men had hold of it, I asked them to give me my hat; they did. I went to the prisoner and asked him what he did that for; he then had five or six more with him; I was struck down two or three times.

Q. Do you know whether he was the person that knocked you down the second time - A. I cannot say; there were other persons standing with him.

Q. Did you see any other person strike at you besides him - A. I believe I did. He was by when I was knocked down the second time. When I was down and upon my back, I felt a hand in my pocket, I called out immediately, they are robbing me, what is your hand doing in my pocket. The watchman came to my assistance; I shewed him the prisoner, he was about twenty yards off; he was taken into custody immediately, and was taken to the watch-house and searched; nothing was found upon him. I am sure the prisoner is the person.

Prisoner. When the prosecutor came to the watch-house he was very much intoxicated, as well as me.

Prosecutor. I was not; by reason of my being knocked down, my tongue was cut, and my mouth was full of blood, I could hardly speak.

Prisoner. He told the constable that he had been robbed by girls of the town of eighteen shillings.

Prosecutor. It is impossible I could say any thing of the kind, I had been with no girls of the town.

THOMAS SHEARMAN . I am a watchman. On this morning I was on duty in Beech-street, I heard some person call out, what is your hand doing in my pocket. I ran to the place, I saw the prisoner go away from the person that was down; I assisted Mr. Green up: the prisoner had his coat off, and an old red waistcoat on his arm, that is how I knew him; the prisoner did not go out of my sight, he did not go above twenty or thirty yards off, he got behind a spout in Whitecross-street, as there were two or three watchmen coming down Whitecross-street, that he was runing up. Mr. Green came up and said, this is the man that robbed me of eighteen shillings, I never lost sight of him. I took him into custody and took him to the watch-house.

Q. Did you see more than one person running away from Mr. Green - A. Yes; I saw another, but he ran away.

Q. Did Mr. Green say that he had been robbed by girls of the town - A. No.

WILLIAM PALMER . I am a constable. The man was brought in charge to me at three o'clock in the morning; I searched him, and found no money upon him at all.

Q. Did the prosecutor say that he had been robbed by girls of the town - A. No.

Q. Did the prisoner seem much in liquor - A.He did.

Prisoner's Defence. When I was taken to the watch-house I was so much intoxicated in liquor, it was nine hours before I knew where I was. I lost my jacket and waistcoat.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18100919-28

655. JOHN LLOYD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of September , fourteen oxen, value 140 l. and three heifers, value 24 l. the property of William Williams .

Mr. Knapp, Counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner was.

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18100919-29

656. JAMES COOK was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering and entering the dwelling-house of James Thompson , about the hour of two at night, on the 3d of September , with intent the goods and chattels then and there being, to steal and carry away .

JAMES THOMPSON . Q. Are you a housekeeper - A. Yes. No. 15, Tottenham-court-road ; I am a butcher .

Q. Did the prisoner break into your house lately - A. Yes; I was at home, it was a little after two o'clock on Tuesday morning; I was alarmed by a noise at the shutter of my shop door; I sleep in the parlour behind the shop; I heard it, and immediately got up; the noise ceased, I stopped a few minutes, and then laid down. I heard the noise again; I heard the shop door open, I ran out naked, and looked to the left, I saw two men, they did not see me, I ran after them, and caught hold of the prisoner, the other ran away, I held the prisoner tight by the collar.

Q. You do not know that he was in the house - A. I heard the footsteps go out of the house, I was not a moment after them.

Q. You lost nothing - A. No. They forced the shutter open, and broke the bolt. He was taken to the watch-house, we found a broken chisel in his pocket, and a knife; his companion had an iron crow, which he threw away in Howland-street, which was brought to my shutter; it exactly fitted the marks.

Prisoner. Q. Did I offer to run when you called out stop thief - A. You had not time, your back was towards me, I was immediately after you, when I saw you, you were talking together; the other man saw me, and ran away.

Court. Are you positive that they were in your shop - A. I am quite positive.

Q. Did you try the chissel to the shop - A. No, only the crow.

MR. WARD. I am a broker. I picked up this crow at my door about half after five o'clock.

Prisoner's Defence. I left my work about five o'clock, with intent to take a chissel to make a seat-iron. I am a shoemaker, the knife is a shoemaker's knife, I had used it that afternoon, I took it to be ground, and on my returning from the fair late, I was locked out, I had no place of refuge, I was obliged to walk the streets. I saw two young men talking together, I said, are you locked cut, they said, yes; this gentleman came out, they ran away, he came and took me in custody.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18100919-30

657. CHARLES LINTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of July , two sheets, value 18 s. and a towel, value 2 s. the property of Frederick Barnes .

FREDERICK BARNES. I live at twenty-five, Northumberland-street . I can only speak to the property.

JOHN HUTCHINSON. On the 23d of July, between two and three in the afternoon, I saw the prisoner in Northumberland-street, he was close to to Mr. Barnes's house, he was in company with two or three other boys, they hesitated a little while, then the prisoner went down the area steps; the area door was open. In two or three minutes he came up again, and brought some things up in his apron. I then asked him what he had got there, he hesitated, and either said what is that to you, or somebody has given it to me. I told him I should not let him go. He then said it was his first offence, he hoped I would let him go, and that the other two had desired him to go down stairs. I told him, if the person to whom the property belonged to would let him go, I had no objection, but I should not let him go. Mr. Barnes was not at home, he was sent for, and the property was identified,

Q. Did you see what the property was - A. I did; I took it from him; it was two sheets and a towel, Mr. Barnes had the property, and the prisoner was taken to Marlborough-street.

Prisoner's Defence. I went down the area, a man there gave me this property, he told me to go to the corner of the street, and he would give me something for my trouble.

GUILTY , aged 17.

Confined six Months in the House of Correction, there kept to hard labour , and whipped in gaol .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

Reference Number: t18100919-31

658. ROBERT FRENCH was indicted for feloniously stealing, from the person of Thomas Mackgowen , a pocket-book, value 1 s. eight shillings, two bank notes, value 5 l. each, five 2 l. bank notes, and a one pound note, his property .

THOMAS MACGOWEN . I am a sailor , I belonged to the Armoury brig. I came into the river on the 17th of June, I came on shore on the 18th, and on the 19th of June , about twenty minutes before twelve o'clock at night, I was coming by Aldgate pump , the prisoner was talking to a woman, I asked him the way to Snowhill: he came athwart me and took hold of my right arm, and put his left hand into my right hand jacket pocket, and took the pocket-book out, with twenty-one pounds eight shillings in it; I had my hand upon it when he took my hand out of it.

Q. What did these notes consist of - A. There were two five pound notes, the rest so many twos and a one.

Q. How many twos - A. I know I had only one one pound note, besides the twos and the fives, twenty-two pounds I had first. I changed a one, and had eight shillings left; I changed that one at a house at Wapping, just after I came out of the West India Dock.

Q. When he put his hand into your pocket and took out these notes, what did you do - A. He kept me off with one hand; and put his other hand behind him, he gave the pocket-book, notes and all, to the woman. He took hold of my jacket and tore it, here is the tear now. I held him until the watchman came up, and gave him in charge of the watchman. I never parted with him.

Q. Did not he say any thing to you - A. Not a word. I am sure the prisoner is the man.

Mr. Gurney. Where did you come from - A. I came from Ireland.

Q. So you had twenty-one pounds of the produce of a former voyage - A. Yes, it was money that I left in England when I went abroad. I left twenty-four pounds, and I got twenty-two pounds of it when I came back, I got it from my sister, she lives in Wright's-buildings, Chick-lane.

Q. Have you always told the same story of it being twenty-four pounds that you left behind you - A. It was twenty-two younds that I got from my sister, I left twenty-four.

Q. Have you not at other times said it was twenty-eight - A. No.

Q. Did not you, to this gentleman, when he served you with notice of trial within these two days, say it was twenty-eight - A. I did not; he came to me in the street, I said twenty-four, unless he took it in a mistake.

Q. When you came on shore on the 19th, from two o'clock till near twelve o'clock at night, when you arrived at Aldgate, had not you spent your time in the alehouses - Yes.

Q. And then you charged this man with having picked your pocket, How many alehouses had you been at - A. Three, as much as I can guess.

Q. You will not swear it was not five - A. No; I had spent twelve shillings; I was not drunk, you may depend upon it.

Q. I cannot depend upon any such thing, you having spent twelve shillings in drink, and then you charged this man with having picked your pocket - A. I did.

Q. You went the next day before the Lord Mayor, and the Lord Mayor, after hearing your tale, let the man go upon bail - A. Yes.

Q. After he was admitted to bail, did not you go to the prisoner's house, and the watchman with you, and desire him to give you money to make it up - A. I went to a public house.

Q. Where was that - A. God in heaven knows; I cannot tell.

Q. Before you went to that public house did not you go to the prisoner's house, see the wife, and inquire for the prisoner - A. I went with another man, not the watchman, the watchman met us.

Q. Did not you go to the prisoner's house - A.I did not, I come past it, the watchman said, that is the house where the man that robbed you lodges; he went up to the door, and knocked at the door, he asked if the man was at home. She said, no. He took me into a public house and called for a pot of beer.

Q. When he asked if the man was at home and she said, he was not, did not he ask where he was to be found - A. I did not hear it.

Q. Did not she, in answer to his inquiry, tell him that he would be likely to be found at a neighbouring public house - A. I cannot tell; we went to a public house at the bottom of the street, had a pot of beer, I paid for it.

Court. You are asked the question, whether, after having knocked at the door and asked if the man was at home, did not you hear the person of the house tell him where he was to be found - A. No, not a word.

Mr. Gurney. Before you quitted his house did not the watchman lift up the stick over the woman's head and tell her it would be worse for her husband if it was not settled - A. I will swear that was never in my eyesight.

Q. After that, did not this man come to the public house and ask the watchman how he dared behave to his wife so, and that he would never settle any such thing - A. I will tell the truth; he never spoke a word to the watchman or me either.

WILLIAM ING . I am a watchman. On the 19th of June, Mackgowen called me, a little before twelve at night; he said, watchman, I have been robbed, this is the man that robbed me. He had hold of him; I took him by the collar and led him to the watch-house, and from there to the Compter. The prisoner said he was not guilty; the other said he never loosed him after he took the money from his pocket.

Q. Did you see any other person about there; any woman - A. No, not that I saw. The prosecutor said there were two women behind the prisoner that took it from his hands.

Mr. Gurney. He told you where he lived - A. Yes; he told the constable of the night, and desired to send home to his friends.

Q. You went before the Lord Mayor, and the Lord Mayor bailed this man - A. Yes.

Q. A day or two afterwards did you go to the prisoner's house - A. I might be happening to go through Mark-lane; I do not recollect.

Q. Did you ever happen to walk with the prosecutor in Mark-lane - A. I did not walk with him.

Q. Therefore it is quite impossible that you could have called at the prisoner's house - A. I am sure I am not certain; I do not recollect that I saw the prisoner afterwards.

Q. No, no, one thing at a time; we will come to that afterwards. Now do not recollect calling at the prisoner's house at all - A. I do not; it has quite slipped my memory, if I did, I never knocked at the prisoner's door.

Q. Will you swear that you never knocked at the prisoner's door and saw his wife - A. I will not swear it; I do not recollect it.

Q. Do you remember seeing the prisoner in a public house in Mark-lane - A. I do; Mackgowen was in my company then.

Q. Now only half an hour before you went to that public house, had not you called at his house and spoken to his wife - A. I might do it, I really have forgot it.

Q. When you saw him there, upon your oath did not he reprobate you for going to his house and ill-treating his wife - A. He spoke to me but one or two words, and that was an unbecoming word; I do not recollect it.

Prisoner's Defence. On the evening of the 19th of June, I went out to meet a friend who owes me some money; I spent the evening at a friend's house; being disappointed of getting the money of my friend, who is here present, I staid with him till about a quarter past eleven o'clock; then I left his house and walked fast home, because I was later than usual. On my coming by Aldgate, seeing this man placed against a post, he asked me the way to Snowhill; I immediately told him. He said, d - n my eyes, what is the use for me to go to Snowhill? I have got no money. I went on about eighty yards, then this villain came and took hold of me, and swore I had robbed him. I believe it is a combination of the watchman and him to make money of me.

THOMAS LEWIS. Q. Are you a porter - A. Yes, a fellowship porter.

Q. Do you remember, in the month of June last, being at a public house called the White Hart - A. Yes, it was after Mr. French was taken up; I saw Ing, the watchman, there, and Mackgowen; the prisoner came into the house. Mr. Russell was in conversation with the watchman when I went into the room; I heard Russell say, you mean to make a property of that man; the watchman said, we will, or it shall cost him his life.

THOMAS CARTER . Q. Were you at the White Hart a day or two after French was taken up - A. Yes, I saw the watchman there, and Mackgowen, I heard Mr. Russell say, you want to make a property of this man; he said, yes, I will, or it shall cost him his life.

Q. to Ing. You hear what these men have said - A. I do not recollect that I said any such words

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100919-32

659. EMANUEL JOSEPH was indicted for the wilful murder of John Jones , and also charged upon the coroner's inquisition, for the like murder.

PETER JACOBS . I am a sailor; I knew Jones, the deceased, he was a sailor, he was born in Wales. I am a Swede.

Q. On the evening of the 26th of August were you in company with him - A. Yes; the deceased lodged in the same house with me, in Red Lion-street, Wapping. We went out of our lodging between five and six, we went to the Dundee Arms public house, the landlady would not let us in, and we walked about the street. We got into Great Armitage-street , I might be five or six yards before the deceased; we met four or five Portuguese sailors. As soon as they had passed me, I heard a row behind me; they were heaving stones at us, and a stone hit me upon my mouth.

Q. What was Jones doing - A. I saw nothing that he did. One of the Portuguese ran after him. When I returned, I found Jones stabbed in the lower part of the belly, he was lying down on his right side. He was taken to the hospital.

Q. When they were heaving stones at you and him, did you see Jones do any thing to them - A. No; we had given no offence to them, as I saw.

Q. Are you able to say that the prisoner is one of those Portuguese sailor s that you met - A. I cannot say.

Q. Were you in company with the deceased in Plough-alley, where the prisoner lodged - A. Yes; we were walking there, he and me; I was not in Plough-alley till the accident happened. We went straitway from Red Lion-street to Plough-alley; there was no other one in company with us; there were sailors and women in the alley.

Q. Were not there a great many persons who made an attack upon the Portuguese - A. Not that I know of.

Q. Did not you see the house where they lodged surrounded by a mob of people. - A. No, I did not see the house; I know the house now.

Q. The Dundee Arms is one end of Plough-alley, and Hermitage-street on the other - A. Yes. Jones and I were walking by ourselves; we did not go to any house where the Portuguese lodged. I had not given them any offence, nor he, as I saw. He was with me from the time he left Red Lion-street, till the accident happened.

SUSANNAH PORTER. I live at No 6, Plough-alley.

Q. On the evening of Sunday, the 26th of August, did you see any Portuguese sailors - A. Yes, at the end of the alley, the prisoner was among them, he was the first that struck Jones. I did not see Jacobs. I did not see the deceased insult any body before Jones came up. The prisoner said, if he could see the deceased, making use of a bad expression, he would have his life.

Court. He did not mention his name - A. No.

Q. How soon after did the deceased come near the prisoner - A. It might be five minutes. Jones was coming quietly along, the prisoner struck Jones with, I think, a stick, Jones had no stick, as I saw. There were about five Portuguese altogether, as nigh as I can recollect. They got Jones down at the corner of Plough-alley, and Jones called out, a knife! a knife! I saw the prisoner, he had a knife at the lower part of Jones's belly, and then I saw the prisoner throw it into the street. Then the prisoner ran about twenty yards towards Hermitage Bridge, before he was stopped, two gentlemen, who are here, laid hold hold of him, he was taken to the Thames Police. Two gentlemen led Jones to the opposite side of the way; he had his bowels in his hand; he asked me if I saw his bowels; I said, I did; he said I am no more for this world. I did not see any stones thrown: I did not see the whole transaction.

JOHN REYLICK . I am a Swedish sailor. At this time I was coming out of my lodging, and going up Hermitage-street. I saw five or six sailors, Portuguese. I saw the Portuguese take stones from under their jackets, and heave them at the deceased. The deceased said, do not heave the stones at me, give me English play. The prisoner took a knife from under his waistcoat, and came five or six yards and stabbed him under his belly. I collared him immediately, and five or six Portuguese hit me on the head with sticks and stones, by that means he got away from me, and ran across the street. I ran after him, and catched him again; I never lost sight of him. His knife fell down in the street, I do not know who picked it up. I took the prisoner to the office.

JOHN MARKS . On the evening of this transaction, I was going to the Sugar Loaf, Hermitage-street; I

heard the cry of murder, I saw the prisoner making his escape from the last witness; I said, if nobody will lay hold of him, I will; and then I went with the people that took the prisoner to the hospital.

Mr. PRATT. I am one of the pupils belonging to the London Hospital. I saw the deceased the next morning, he lived till eleven o'clock the next morning, and then died.

Q. Where was he wounded - A. On the left side, on the lower part of the belly, with a sharp instrument; in my opinion, that wound was the cause of his death.

REV. EDWARD ROBSON. Q. You are a magistrate of the county of Middlesex - A. I am. On Sunday, the 27th of August, about eight o'clock in the evening, I attended the diseased at the London hospital; he was sensible, perfectly so.

Q. Was he sensible of his approaching death - A. I did not ask him that question; I administered the path to him, and took the examination from his own lips, and writ it down at the instant, and he signed it, that is the deceased's signature; he was perfectly sensible, though in great pain. The prisoner was present and heard it.

Q. Did it appear to you that the prisoner understood it - A. Certainly it did; though I was surprized on the second examination, to find that he wanted an interpreter upon what the deceased said. I asked the prisoner two or three questions, he gave me answers. The man was brought before me in custody. I went to the London hospital to take the deposition of John Jones .

The examination of John Jones , taken before me, the Rev. Edward Robson Clerk , one of his Majesty's justices for the county of Middlesex, and sworn at the London hospital in the presence of Emanuel Joseph - Who says, that yesterday afternoon, between five and six o'clock, or it might be a little sooner, I was near the bottom of Hermitage-street, and passing through Plow-alley, I met the prisoner and two other men, who, because I did not make way for them, grossly abused me, and shoved and struck me. I went up to the house where several of the Portugueze lodge, my shipmates then came to me. Several of the Portugueze then came up, I was then fighting another Portugueze with a stick, the prisoner seeing me likely to get the better of him, struck me with a knife and stabbed me in the belly. I am certain the prisoner is the man who shoved me in the alley, and I am certain that he is the man that stabbed me with the knife.

JOHN JONES .

MR. ROBSON. The prisoner, after the examination was taken, he declined saying any thing at all before, that he said his name was Emanuel Joseph .

Prisoner's Defence. The first witness took off my hat and struck me, and after I was struck I struck him again.

JOHN GILL . I live in Russell buildings; my father-in-law lives in Plough-alley, No. 10, opposite to where the Portugueze lodged; I was there in the evening, before this accident happened.

Q. Did you, in the course of that day, see the deceased, in company with others, go to the house in which the Portugueze lodged - A. I saw them in the alley, but not to go to the house.

Q. How long was that before you herd the poor man lost his life - A. About three quarters of an hour.

Q. Was the deceased in company with any one - A. One, two, or three; more or less, they addressed themselves to me, and said, they had been ill used by the Portugueze, which they had been fighting with sticks. The Portugueze had fastened their door and window shutters; I advised them to go home, they walked down the alley, and I went to my friends.

Mr. Gurney. About what time had you any occasion to be in conversation with any persons - A. Between six and seven.

Q. After having that conversation, you advised them to go away. and you also went away, when did you return - A. It might be half an hour afterwards. That quarrel was over, and another had ensued in Hermitage-street, and that was over.

A. How do you know that the person that you conversed with in Plough-alley was the deceased - A. I do not know that it was, I saw the deceased in the dark, I could not get near enough to see whether it was the man.

WILLIAM FOREST . I am a tallow-chandler in Hermitage-street. On the day the man was killed, I was at my door, a tall thin man went down the street about half an hour before the murder was committed, in a blue jacket and trowsers, he appeared to be full of vengeance, and used bad language against the Portugueze, they were two more with him, but they did not appear to like to come with him; I never saw the man before to my knowledge. I did not see the deceased after the accident happened.

Mr. Gurney. Then who that man was you do not know - A. No.

ELIZABETH SAUL . Q. I believe you are a servant to Rodriquez, the landlord of the house, where this man lodged - A. Yes.

Q. On the day that the man was killed, had you seen him at your house - A. Yes, he came there between five and six in the afternoon; a Portugueze and a lodger came into the house, and the deceased followed, and four of the deceased comrades followed him; his comrades persuaded him to quit the house; he said, he would not, without fighting. I told him my master was not at home, and whatever words he had with the man, to decide it elsewhere; he wanted to fight with the man that came into the house. With a deal of persuasion he left the house; in about seven or eight minutes the deceased returned again, and there were six with him outside of the door; he used violent language and struck one of our men, his name is Lopez. I shut the door and the windows, the deceased went away, our lodger came in; he returned, in about seven or eight minutes, with the end of a rope, he had seven or eight comrades with him, he thrust violently against the door and the window, saying, he would break the door, if the b - y b - r did not come out. Mr. Gill persuaded him not, as the men were quiet, saying it would be against the law to break the door; the men were quiet at that time, and the house was shut up. He said, he would not leave the alley that night, and every b - y b - r that he met, that he thought was a Portugueze, he would split his head open; revenge he was determined to have. I know no further, than I heard the cry of murder in about ten or twenty minutes afterwards. The prisoner was not in the house during any of these times, but Lopez was, he was the person that was first struck.

Mr. Gurney. Q. You are the servant of the lodging house keeper where the Portugueze lodge - A. Yes.

Q. The American sailors and the Portugueze sailors are always fighting - A. Yes, I generally hear of them fighting. I did not see the murder done, nor did I go to the hospital.

Q. The man that you called the deceased, was not he an American sailor - A. Yes; he is a Welchman, as I am informed, he is called an American.

Q. How do you know that the person you have been talking of was the deceased - A. No, I do not; the man I have been speaking of, was a tall man pitted with the small pox, and a speck in one eye, and long tied hair.

FRANCIS LOPEZ . Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. Yes, he and I lodged together in Rodriquez's house.

Q. Do you recollect the man being killed - A. Yes.

Q. On the day he was killed, did you see him at the house where you lodge, and at what time - A. From four to five in the evening, I do not know for what they came; I was at home, I saw the deceased come into the room, at the lower part of the house, where I was; he called to all the Portugueze to come out to fight, they refused; the deceased went out, and we all remained in the room. He came in again the second time, they pushed him out of doors, then the deceased struck me; there were seven or eight with the deceased. As soon as we pushed him out of the door, we locked the door and fastened the windows, and remained inside of the house.

Q. When the door and the windows were fast, did you remain within, or did you go out to walk - A. The prisoner and I went out to take a walk as far as the London Dock, on our return home, the deceased, with some other men, followed us home to the house. They would not let us into the house. They fell upon the prisoner and struck him, I ran away and never returned back.

Q. Did you ever see the diseased after he was wounded - A. I never did.

Q. How do you know that the man that was wounded, was the man that you are talking about - A. I do not know that he is the man that died; I recollect a man in their company who had a stick in his hand.

Q. How long was it after the man ran away, before you heard of a man being killed - A. About two hours afterwards.

Q. to Mr. Pratt. Did you observe any thing particular upon the eye of the deceased, that they have mentioned - A. I think I do, indistinctly, there was a mark on the man's eye, he was marked with the small pox, a middle sized man.

GUILTY of Manslaughter only .

Confined one year in Newgate , and fined 1 s .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18100919-33

660. EPARAIM SHORTER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of August , a mare, value 50 l. the property of Henry Hutchins .

HENRY HUTCHINS . Q. In the month of August last, were you in possession of a mare - A. Yes. On the 22d of August, I saw the prisoner at Mr. Hammond's house, in Worship-street , where I lodged. The landlord introduced Mr. Shorter to me, and then Shorter said, I will buy your mare; I asked for the mare, cart, chaise, and harness, sixty five pound; he said, that he had not got the money, but I was going into the baking business again in the city, and coals would be as useful to me as the money. It was perfectly understood, that I was to have the goods before he had the horse.

Q. Tell me what was said - A. He said, I was to have the coals the next day, that he had bought them of Horn and Devey. I was not to deliver the mare until I had the value.

Q. At this time where was your mare - A. In Mr. Cowell's stables, the mare was that night, that was the 22d of August. Early the next morning Mr. Cowell came to me, he gave me some information, and before I got to the stable the mare was gone.

Q. Had he gave you any intimation of his coming to take away the mare - A. No, nor had I given him any permission to do it. I met the prisoner, after having been seeking for him in Worship-street, between two and three of the same day. I said, Shorter, you have taken away my mare; he said, d - n your eyes I do not know what you mean, I have sold her, he said it was his mare. I sent for an officer, and he was taken to the office.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

Reference Number: t18100919-34

661. GEORGE RICHARDSON was indicted for feloniously assaulting William Roberts , in the King's highway, on the 15th of August , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, a watch, value 40 s. his property .

WILLIAM ROBERTS . I am a taylor , I live at No. 1, Great Russel-street, Covent-garden.

Q. Did you lose your watch on the 15th of August last - A. I did, between two and three in the morning, I was coming home from Crown-court, Princess-street, Soho.

Q. Had you been drinking - A. I was forward in liquor. I was under the piazza's when I lost my watch; I did not see it taken; it rained very fast, I stopped there for shelter; a girl came up to me, followed by the prisoner and another man, and accused me of striking the girl as I passed; I told the girl that I never saw her, and told her to go about her business; upon which, the prisoner and the other man came up to me, and made use of very abusive language; I was then surrounded by nine or ten. When I saw that I made off to the other end of the piazza's, just by the theatre door, I was not there many minutes, before I heard a great noise at the place which I came from, upon which I returned back; there was a gentleman there, accused the prisoner of attempting to pick his pocket. I told him, these are the fellows that insulted me. The prisoner came up and pushed me, asked me who I called fellows; he knocked me down; I got up again; he gave me two or three blows then ran away; I followed him into Wild-street; the watchman caught him. I lost my watch in the scuffle; I did not perceive it go. When I left the house I looked what time it was, I had not felt it since. The watch has never been found.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18100919-35

662. WILLIAM HITCHEN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of April, in the 46th year of his Majesty's reign , an Exchequer bill, value 100 l. the property of William Kent .

SECOND COUNT for like offence, only stating it to be the property of different persons.

WILLIAM KENT . Q. I believe you are an upholsterer at London Wall - A. I am; my partners names were, at the time of the transaction, Abbott Kent , Joseph Luck , and Samuel Luck Kent .

Q. In the month of April, 1806, were your premises broken open - A. They were; on the night of the 16th we presume so, on the morning of the 17th we discovered it. The shutter at the warehouse door was forced away from its fastening, a pane of glass was taken out, by which means they entered, there was room for the admission

of a boy at least, I should think for a man. The counting house is in the warehouse, so that if a person gets in the warehouse, there is an admission into the counting house, where there was fifty pound, besides an Exchequer bill for one hundred pound. I think the number was 1401, I have got the memorandum in my pocket, it is a brokers memorandum, it was a collateral evidence, not what I received with the Exchequer bill. This Exchequer bill was enclosed in an iron drawer, within the iron safe, which drawer having been locked, was forced open; I never discovered any thing of the Exchequer bill, until the prisoner was taken up. The Exchequer bill was my private property; I had that Exchequer bill in my possession three or four months; I have the number and date in my pocket book. If I saw the bill I could swear to it.

Q. Now, looking at that bill, have you the least doubt that is the bill that belongs to you - A. No, this is the bill that I lost.

Mr. Alley. This has been cut across has it been paid - A. I have received from government the amount of it.

Q. Then you have lost nothing - A. Yes, I have lost fifteen pound. After the robbery, I applied to government for that bill; and upon my given bond that I never would call for payment, they paid me the money.

JEREMIAH GOODALL . I live at Coventry; I am a peace officer. I apprehended the prisoner at Daventry, in August, 1808; I searched the prisoner on the 17th of August, I found this Exchequer bill in his breeches pocket.

Q.Has it been in your keeping ever since - A. Not exactly. It was given up to Mr. Carlton, an attorney at Warwick; I marked it at the time.

The number and date of the Exchequer bill read. 1401. 45. 21 Oct. 1805. This entitles the bearer to one hundred pounds.

Prisoner's Defence. My Lord, and gentlemen of the jury, I come to this tribunal, equally impressed with the confidence of my own innocence, and in the justice of the court, conscious as a British subject, I shall have justice from a British jury; I claim your indulgence for a few moments, while I relate the circumstances of the prosecution. It is a well known fact that I was educated for a merchant, that I have imported and exported corn and cheese, and by the loss of two vessels and the failure of a house at Boston, in America, I was a considerable sufferer; I became insolvent; since which time, I have resided at Liverpool and London as a dealer in corn and cheese. In the year 1808, I was a resident in Somers-town. Gentlemen, in the beginning of August, 1808, I had several mercantile transactions with Mr. Benjamin Shaw, who then lived in Walbrook, and having to receive some money of him on account of cheese delivered to him; I received of him, at the Virginia coffee house, that Exchequer bill with other monies, making in the whole, one hundred and nine pound, thirteen shillings, and one penny; this transaction very fortunately took place in the presence of gentlemen, who will prove, in a very honourable manner, the way I became possessed with this bill. I was subpoened at Warwick, I left London on Saturday, the 13th of August, and arrived at Warwick the next day. The trial was over on the 16th, and I set of for London. In consequence of which I was pursued, and took back on a charge of forgery; and so high ran the tide of malice and revenge, that although the magistrate knew no forgery was committed, still he committed me upon a charge of forgery. Gentlemen, it shews you the malice of the parties who were my prosecutors. After laying eight months under the dreadful charge of forgery, in a jail, the worst England can produce; under a jailor the most tyrannical, in the center of my enemies, who were determined upon my life; my dear family ruined; obliged to associate with ruffians of the worst denominations; deprived of all communication, even of the nearest relative, unless with the third person. At March assizes a bill was found upon me for forgery, and one for a fraud, all arising out of the same charge. I tried the charge of forgery, the prosecutors were not able to make out their case, I was most honourably acquitted, without being called upon for my defence. I was then permitted to find bail in six thousand pounds; not being able to comply with it, I was detained. Gentlemen, the managing persons, and the principal witnesses in the prosecution, their malice have never ceased, it has continued with double perseverance. All this was grounded upon whim and supposition. Is a man to be stamped with ignominy, and his family to be ruined, because an insatiable thirst for popularity, actuated them to bear an individual down great part of his time. I was suffering the most dreadful affliction, and upwards of two years imprisonment in the bloom of my life; I trust these things will be duly deliberated. Gentlemen, since my arrival in town, and Shaw's name being in the papers, in spite of my endeavours he has been able to keep back. I will prove to you that he is in town, or in its vicinity, and not in America; that his wife has called upon me several times, is well known - Why could he not call if he was an innocent holder of the bill - Why did he not come forward, and prove to you, that he and me are innocent men. It appears to me, and I think it must in his own mind, that he ought to come forward and prove the honourable way he possessed it, or I think every honest heart would avail himself of that. My conduct in this was when I was committed for trial; I did not deny the bill, when the attorney and committing magistrate lodged a warrant against me. I instantly gave up the name of Shaw, as the person from whom I received this bill; I used every effort in my power, by which means I became possessed of this bill. I was buried to the world, or at that time I had it in my power to produce Mr. Shaw: two years have elapsed, and from my long confinement, and my finances being ruined, I have not been able to bring him forward. I suppose, at the request of the prosecutor, in order to lead me off my guard; the first time the warrant was served upon me, the jailor assured me, that the warrant was withdrawn against me; but to my inexpressible surprize, the day on which my confinement expired, at twelve o'clock at night, I was taken out and brought up to London. I have certainly been hunted down by the hand of power. Therefore, being confident of my innocence and integrity, I shall call such witnesses, as I trust you will not convict me upon this charge. Any of you, gentlemen, might have been placed in my unpleasant situation; even his lordship on the bench might have been a holder of this bill, it being a government security. It is not impossible, that the day on which the burglary was committed, that it might have been circulated through several persons hands, and that with impunity. It is a known fact, that persons who are in the act of making these depredations, they, if they cannot part with the bill they so obtain, destroy it. But this bill is found in my possession two years after the burglary was committed.

Gentlemen, whatever prejudices may rest upon the public relative to any mercantile transaction of mine, nothing criminal whatever has attached to any part of my conduct. Even after I had given an hundred pound for it, had I known a felony was connected with it, I would have destroyed it, and my having possession of the bill, no man would think I committed the burglary. And if I had been aware that any felony had been connected with it, I would not have gone to the office of Mr. Bish, to know if it was a good bill; Mr. Bish is known to be a government broker, and in all human probability, Mr. Bish might have had information that this burglary was committed. My going into the county of Warwick was not any premeditated design, but by order of the court; would I have then in my possession a bill to which a burglary was connected. I most solemnly declare, that if any nefarious transaction is concerned with this bill, a fraud must be imposed upon me by Shaw Gentlemen , our English constitution breathes nothing but liberty, no man can be punished without guilt, and of this guilt there must not only be proof, but the guilt must be proved by legal clear evidence, so that nothing dark shall operate to the subject. I bid defiance to my most inveterate enemy to prove, that any knowledge of guilt of mine is connected with it. Gentlemen, my ruin must have been sought after, but if Providence, through your medium, should restore me to my family, it shall be my prayer to God, to fulfill those great and important duties of a christian, a husband and father, to the end of my life. Give your minds to the facts, examine into the truth, and I am certain your verdict must be an acquittal; thus you, gentlemen, and self approving conscience, will release me from woe, and I am restored to my family to alleviate their wants.

WILLIAM ANSLIP . Q. What way of life are you in - A. A tanner, I reside at Greenwich.

Q. Were you in the habit, some years ago, to frequent the Virginia coffee house - A. I was in the habit of going there frequently, about the latter end of July, or the beginning of August, 1808; I have seen the prisoner there two or three times.

Q. Do you know a person of the name of Shaw - A. I cannot say I know the person to swear to him; I knew a person of that name that was produced to me by the prisoner, if he was in this court I could swear to him, I saw a bill which the prisoner produced to me, and asked me if I knew what it was; I saw him receive it of a person, that he told me was Mr. Shaw; he told me it was an Exchequer bill, I never saw such a one before, it was signed Grenville, and there were some figures on the back of it, it was cut in two, and sealed or wafered on the back.

Q. Look at that, and tell me whether you think that is the same bill that you saw of the prisoner's - A. I could not swear positively, I believe it is the same, it has the same appearance, it is cut in the same way, wafered in the same way, the same signature, and for the same sum of one hundred pound.

Mr. Gurney. You and the prisoner are acquainted together - A. I knew him when he was in Ipswich, he had a bank there; he sent circular letters about for connection; I applied to him for the loan of thirteen hundred pound on my estate, it was not complied with; during that interim, they were taken up and tried for forgery, in the very place where we are now.

Q. You afterwards became acquainted at the Virginia coffee house - A. Yes, about two years back.

Q. How long was that after you became acquainted with him as Ipswich - A. Rather more than four years.

Q. However, he and you met two years ago; you saw the ceremony pass; the person that he called Shaw offered to him a piece of paper, which he shewed to you, which he told you was an exchequer bill; that is all you know about it - A. Yes.

Q. Where it came from, and whether ever it was in Mr. Shaw's pocket, you do not know. When were you first told that you were wanted as a witness - A. About a week or ten days back.

Q. Then till a week or ten days back, you had no knowledge that you should be wanted as a witness here - A. No.

Q. Do not you know that your friend was taken up at Warwick two years ago - A. I saw it in the papers. He is no friend of mine.

Q. He knew where you lived - A. Yes.

Q.Why, upon his being taken up did not he write to you? Did you receive a letter from him - A. There was one letter wrote, I took no notice of it, there were several letters, as I understood.

Q. Do not tell me what you understood, tell me what you know. Is the first account correct, that you never heard that you should be called upon as a witness till a week or ten days ago - A. It is impossible that account can be correct, if I received a letter; I had a letter from the prisoner at Warwick after he was taken up. I cannot recollect any circumstance of the letter at all.

Court. Are you a master tanner - A.I am supported by my brother, he lives at Kimbolton, I live at Greenwich. I have not worked in the trade for three years; I never worked with any body, only as a journeyman to myself.

JAMES GASKIN . I am a shoemaker. I have known the prisoner about three years.

Q. In the summer, 1808, did you meet him at the Virginia coffee house, by appointment from him - A. I have met him there to receive money of him for work that I had done, for boots and shoes.

Q. Do you remember seeing any instrument of security of money paid to him - A.There was a gentleman in company at that time, I think, in August, 1808, gave him a note. In fact the note was put into my hands. There was a gentleman in company gave Hitchin the note, I believe he called himself Shaw.

Q. Do you think you should know it if you was to see it - A. I have no doubt about that; I think it was wrote upon the corner on the face of it.

Court. What was written upon the face of it - A. A name upon the corner.

Q. What was it, a parish indenture - A. No, it was not.

Q. Was it written or printed - A. I think written. There was a person's name in writing; I think it was part written and part printed. I think it was a one hundred pound note, or bill, Mr. Hitchen informed me that Mr. Hitchen shewed it to me, because he could not pay me for the work I had done, without I got it changed.

Q. Did you get it changed - A. I went to the gentleman's in Walbrook, Mr. Shaw could not change it.

Q. Then the prisoner did not pay you - A. No, because he had not small notes enough.

Mr. Alley. Look at this bill, are you able to say whether that was the bill that was shewn you - A. Yes, I think it was.

Q. You say you saw that given him by Shaw - A. Yes.

Mr. Gurney. Q. What was the amount of your bill - A. Two pounds fourteen shillings.

Q. You came for the two pounds fourteen shillings just in the nick of time - A. No, I was not in the nick of time.

Q. Mr. Shaw was there, he handed over the bill to him, and he handed over that bill to you; he said, Mr. Gaskin, I cannot pay you without I get that bill changed - A. Yes.

Q. Did not he say, I will go over to Palace-yard and get that bill changed - A. No.

Q. Where do you live - A. I live at No. 26, in Marshall-street; St. George's Fields.

Q. That is in the rules - A. I believe it is.

JOHN BROOKS . Q. You were clerk to Mr. Bish, Cornhill, in 1808. Do you recollect the prisoner calling there in the month of August - A. I recollect a person calling there, I have not the least recollection of the prisoner's person.

MR. STROUD. Q. I believe you are the keeper of the Virginia coffee house. Do you know the prisoner Hitchin - A. I recollect his being in the house some time ago.

Q. Do you recollect the person of Shaw - A. I do not.

GUILTY , aged 31.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100919-36

663. ROBERT SAMPSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of September , five barrel heads, value 15 d. and two brooms, value 2 s. the property of William Leader , John Faulkener , and James Langdon .

SECOND COUNT. For like offence, only varying the manner of charging it.

WILLIAM HAMBLEN . Q. I believe you have the care of a mill at Isleworth . What are the names of the proprietors of the mill - A. William Leader , John Faulkner , and James Langdon . It is a mill for grinding corn. The prisoner was in our employ at this mill. On the 2d of September I was alarmed by the watchman's rattle, I looked out of the window, the watchman told me he thought there was somebody stealing the poultry, and while I was dressing myself, he came and asked me if I knew any person that lived in such a house, I desired the watchman to wait at the mill to see if any body came there. I live about twenty yards from the mill. I went to the watchman and told him to go his round as usual, and I placed myself here to keep the watch. After I had been watching some time, I saw the prisoner go into the mill. When he came out of the mill, he had nothing with him, he came as far as the little bridge, to see if any body was watching him. He immediately after went into the mill and took something under his arm; he came out of the mill about fifteen yards, upon which I seized him by the collar; he had got barrel heads and hair brooms. I asked him whether he was not satisfied with going once. He said, he had not been home. I interrogated him, and then he said, he had been home, he had taken flour.

Q. Are these things the property of Mr. Leader and Co. - A. The hair brooms and barrel heads were in our possession, they are worth one and sixpence, or two shillings.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100919-37

664. ELIZABETH HINCHCLIFF was indicted, for that she, on the 16th of August , feloniously, wilfully did administer, to Ann Parker , Chistopher John Stanley , and Samuel Smith , certain deadly poison, that is to say, arsenic, with intent to murder them . And three other counts for like offence, only varying the manner of charging.

ANN PARKER. Q. Are you a married woman - A. I am not. I live at 14, Tavistock-row, Covent-garden , I am the householder, I have a shop and a school , I deal in perfumery and medicines . Stanley and Smith were my boarders. The prisoner was my servant for a long time back. Full two months she told me that the lower part of the house was over run with rats, and for a fortnight back; she repeatedly requested me to send for poison for them. I sent for it at last.

Q. What poison was it - A. I wrote for poison, not knowing what I was to have.

Q. To whom did you write - A. to Mr. Midgley, in the strand, chemist and druggist. I received the poison; the prisoner took a note and brought back the poison.

Q. What did you do with the poison - A. I ordered her to put it into the desk, which she did; a few minutes afterwards I put it into the back locker, the division of a large writing-desk. I did not lock it. Soon after that; I told her to settle the parlour and bring up tea. She brought up tea in two teapots. I then gave her some halfpence to fetch some mortar to put over the rat-holes after the poison was put into the holes. I then cut bread and butter for the children, and poured out the tea; my own cup of tea stood till it was quite cold. I then poured out some for the children. It appeared as usual at the time it was at my mouth. I took the cup of tea at one draught, it being cold. As soon as I took the cup away, I found a great heat in my throat, and said, oh! there is pepper in this tea. I sat still for some time, then I poured out a cup of tea; I was going to take it to allay the heat of the throat, I recollected myself, that it was wrong to take that tea, as it might be all alike. The children were taking their tea. I sat still. It run all down me, searching me to the lower part of my stomach. It soon searched round me, and met me at my back bone. I then wished the girl would come in; she was gone for the mortar, she had not returned. I thought I never felt any pepper search me as that did. It then shot into my thighs. I then began to think that the girl sure had not played tricks with the packet of poison. I did not think she had. I looked at the packet; I satisfied myself that it had never been opened. I then sat down: I had not sat many minutes, before one of the children, the last

tea that went down his throat, it flew all over the table.

Q. How old was that child - A. Five years old. I was angry with the child, and hit him two pats over the head, I thought he had eaten more than his stomach could bear, and I turned him away from the table. I walked across the parlour to get a cloth to wipe up the tea that the child had cast up. I then was seized with a trembling. At the time I was wiping it up, the child brought up more. I was then frightened, and thought it was not an overfilled stomach, and wished the girl would return. The other child was then taken sick in the same way. The girl returned in a few minutes after the second child was taken ill. I then said, Eliza, what have you put into the teapot, my tea tasted as if there was pepper in it, but I never tasted any pepper that searched me like that. She said, nothing, madam, I have not put any thing in. I said, Eliza, tell me the truth, if you have been playing any tricks with the pocket, tell me, I can go to the chemist's in Southampton-street, he will give me something it shall be of no consequence whatever. She said, no, indeed, madam. She still denied it, and said, if you will please to look at the parcel, you will see it is as the gentleman gave me, tied up, I dare say in half a dozen knots. I then said, there is no time to be lost, give me my hat and pelleise, I must go to the gentleman and ask him how the packet was tied where it was bought. I ran as fast as my trembling limbs would let me go. In the middle of Southampton-street I was taken sick, and at the bottom, by the straw shop, I was taken sick again; between that corner, and forty-nine, in the Strand I was taken sick again. I thought I should never be able to get to the shop, I should die, and the children would die.

Q. You never did examine the pot, did you - A. No, not at any time. I went to Mr. Midgley, Mr. Midgley mixed up medicine for the two children, and went to my house and gave it to one of the children. I went to Mr. Moore, of Great Russel-street; I went to his shop.

Q. How soon did you recover - A. A fortnight, all but a day, I recovered myself.

Q. How old is the girl - A. She calls herself fourteen last February; she has lived in my service a twelve month last May.

Q. Had you any occasion to correct her for misbehaviour - A. She had behaved exceeding well; I never corrected her but for dirt and filth only, I repeatedly corrected her for that.

Q. How soon before that had you corrected her for dirt and filth - A. I was making her a new gown the day she gave me this. About three days before, I had been angry with her for wearing dirty linen.

Q. Did you ever perceive any rats in the house yourself - A. Yes.

Jury. Who put the tea into the teapots - A. I put the tea into the two teapots myself. I gave them to her, she took the two teapots down stairs and put the waser in, and brought it up stairs.

Q. Had not you had poison in the house before that - A. Yes, in January before, there were none of it left, not the least in the world; and there was no person in the family that could have gone to the desk but the girl and me.

MR. MIDGLEY. I am a chemist and druggist in the Strand. On the 16th of August, I received a note from Mrs. Parker, the prisoner brought it; she says, I will be obliged to you to favour me with some more poison to kill the rats, as I am overrun. Upon which I put up a parcel of two ounces of arsenic. The prisoner requested to have more than the usual quantity, as they were dreadfully overrun. I put up two ounces in one parcel, that was all that she had; it was marked on the outside, poison, on the outer paper, and the inside paper, arsenic, poison.

Q. You know the effect of arsenic as to the human body - A. Certainly.

Q. You have heard what the prosecutrix said, was that the operation of arsenic - A. It operates different, according to the quantity. As it operated as an emetic, which is not the effect of poison, it could not poison; her symptons, that she has described, are the effect of metallic poison; it will have that effect.

Q. Arsenic generally makes the tea black - A. I believe it was not Chinese tea; it was a tea of English herbs.

Prosecutrix. It was British herb tea, I always buy the herbs ready prepared.

Q. to Mr. Midgley. Did you look at the parcel afterwards - A. I did; it had been opened, it was lesser in quantity, about a quarter of an ounce, I weighed it.

Q. to Mrs. Parker. When this girl told you to look at the parcel, you did not look at the parcel, did you - A. I had looked at it before; I was convinced, in my judgment, that it had not been opened, there was not an extra rumple on the paper.

Q. to Mr. Midgley. You made up the parcel yourself - A. I did.

Q. How was it altered - A. The knot was twisted when it was returned by Mrs. Parker; it was tied in my usual way, a double knot, not twisted. When I arrived at Mrs. Parker's, the child Stanley was very sick. I tasted the tea, it had a strong metallic taste, I boiled some arsenic in the same herbs, which I bought of Mr. Butler, the appearance of the tea is not altered by the infusion of arsenic.

Q. to Prosecutrix. Have you any lodgers - A. Yes; they have a place to themselves, they never go into the kitchen, or into my apartments.

Prisoner's Defence. My mistress ill used me.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 14.

The prisoner was recommended to mercy on account of her age, and her parents being honest people; and the jury recommended her on account of her age.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18100919-38

665. JAMES DALEY was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Michael Carney , about the hour of nine, on the night of the 12th of August , and stealing therein one regimental jacket, value 21 s. a great coat, value 21 s. three waistcoats, value 7 s. 6 d. a jacket, value 1 s. two pair of breeches, value 6 s. a pair of gaiters, value 1 s. 6 d. a pair of pantaloons, value 2 s. 6 d. and a shirt, value 7 s. 6 d. his property .

ELIZA CARNEY . Q. Why is not Michael Carney here - A. He has met with an accident, and is not able to attend. I live in Tothill-street, Westminster , Saint Margaret's parish; my husband keeps a house there.

Q. Did you lose any coats from your house any time - A. Yes.

Q. When had you seen them - A. On Sunday, the 12th of August, about five o'clock; I went out at about that time, and my husband followed me. I returned between ten and eleven; I found the door broken open of my room; the staple had been drawn off the door. The house is mine, I let it out in lodgings. I missed from my room all the articles in the indictment.

SARAH MARK . Q. Do you know the Prisoner - A. Yes; he brought me these things, and asked me to go and pawn them for him. I did; he brought me two pantaloons, a waistcoat, and a shirt; I pawned them all at one time, at a pawnbroker's shop in High-street, Marybone, for thirteen shillings; I gave him the money.

RICHARD WESTBROOK. On the 14th of August the prisoner was brought to Saint Margaret's watch-house, Carney gave charge of him. The prisoner told me if I would let him go, he would go to this woman's lodgings, where the property was lodged, and produce them. These things were left in my care by Mr. Fry, a regimental great coat, and other things.

GEORGE FRY . On Sunday night, the 12th of August, a man came into our passage, and asked to leave the things there till the next morning. I saw the man, I do not know whether it was the prisoner or not. On Monday morning I took the things down to Queen-street office.

JOHN HOLDSWORTH . I am shopman to Mr. Morat, pawnbroker. A woman pawned two pair of pantaloons and a shirt for thirteen shillings. I cannot say I know the woman.

Prisoner's Defence. This woman's husband and father, on Saturday had been to my pay-table, knowing me to be a boot and shoe maker; he asked me to drink out of the pot with him; he asked me whether I was out of work; I said, I was; he said, if you come up to me on the morrow, I will get you work. I went up to his house to enquire for him, they denied him at first; then, after that, they said, stop, he will be in in a few minutes. I went out and met him in the passage; he asked me to go up to this woman's room, he told me to take the teapot down, he took three shillings out of the tea-pot; he took me out, and made me drunk, he said, he would get me ten guineas of a recruiting serjeant; he would get me to sleep with himself, then I might go where I liked. Then him and I laid down in the bed together, and on my returning down stairs, I found these things which are now there.

GUILTY , aged 30

Of stealing, to the value of 39 s. only, not of breaking and entering the dwelling-house.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

Reference Number: t18100919-39

666. GEORGE ROWELL was indicted for an unnatual crime .

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18100919-40

667. MARY BRYANT was indicted, for that she on the 2d of May , was servant to James Farquhar and Joseph Riley , and was employed and entrusted by them to receive money for and on their account, and that she, being such servant, and so employed, did receive and take into her possession, the sum of four pounds fourteen shillings for her said masters, and that she feloniously did secrete and steal the same .

JAMES FARQUHAR . My partner's name is Joseph Riley , we are straw plat manufacturers , we serve the trade. On the second of May I sent her out to sell straw plat, she was to receive the money for it. She told me that she sold straw plat to John Wiltshire to the amount of four pounds fourteen shillings, and that Mr. Wiltshire stood indebted to us for the four pounds fourteen shillings. She afterwards gave me this note:

"To Messrs. Riley and Farquhar. I am sorry as I cannot pay you, as the trade is slack, therefore I shall not be able to settle with Mary Bryant till the 24th of this month. I am your humble servant,

" John Wiltshire ."

JOHN WILTSHIRE . I live at number 4, Hay's-court, Soho-square.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. Yes; I frequently bought plat of her; I always paid her for the straw plat, I do not owe her a farthing. On the second of May I bought straw of her to the amount of four pounds fourteen shillings; I paid her for it. I never wrote that note.

Prisoner's Defence. They accused me wrongfully. My prosecutor's wife went out with me frequently, and my master frequently also. On that day I lost the money that I received. I would have made the money good, if they had given me my liberty.

GUILTY , aged 37.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18100919-41

686. MARY BRYANT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of June , one thousand five hundred and sixty yards of straw plat, value 12 l. 2 s. the property of Joseph Riley and James Farquhar , in in the dwelling-house of Joseph Riley .

Mr. Barry, counsel for the prosecution, declining to call any evidence, the prisoner of this charge was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18100919-42

668. RICHARD CROUCH and CATHARINE DRISCOLL were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of August , in the dwelling-house of John Turner , a jacket, value 6 d. two pawnbroker's tickets, value 1 d. four pounds twelve shillings in monies numbered, and nineteen one pound bank notes, the property of Edward Kinan .

EDWARD KINAN . Q. Do you know the two prisoners - A. Yes.

Q. Were you with them at the Weaver's Arms - A. Yes; they had a room at the Weaver's Arms. On the fourteenth of August they were there; on that evening I got my money.

Q. You met with them at the Weaver's Arms - A. Yes; I asked them for tea, Catharine Driscoll made me some tea, and I treated her far getting me the tea at the Weaver's Arms. I stopped there three quarters of an hour, until Richard Crouch came in, I am informed that is his name. He spoke to me as I am in the seafaring way ; I treated him with a pot of beer; for that I wished to go to bed.

Q.Where were your lodgings - A. In the Weaver's Arms public house. I went up to my bed he came up

with a pot of beer; that was between seven and eight o'clock, the day light had not gone out of the sky; that was the first time I lodged there, he lodged there before. He came up with a pot of beer; he said, sailor, will not you drink; I took a hearty drink, and said, here is money to get a pot of beer for yourself; he brought spirits next, I drank a little spirits with him and bid him good night. The woman was with him all the time, they went out of my room then.

Q. Did they shut the door after them - A. I do not know, there were two or three beds in the same room.

Q. Were there any people in them - A. None.

Q. Did you pay them for the liquor - A. I gave them half a crown, I think I gave it to her, they were both together, and they brought me the change; my getting out the half crown was the way they knew I had money; I had nineteen one pound bank notes in my right hand pocket, and in my left pocket I had the silver.

Had you any thing in your pocket besides - A. I had two duplicates in the same pocket with the notes, the silver was four pound twelve shillings in dollars and half crowns all, only a sixpence and some halfpence in my left hand pocket.

Q. After they left you did you go to sleep - A. I doubled my jacket and put it under my pillow, under my head, and went to sleep; I awoke two or three times in the night. When it was quite early, almost day light, I found my jacket was gone and all my money; I had a duplicate of a watch, that was gone; the other duplicate was for a coat and pantaloons, I pawned them together I pawned these things because my ship was not paid before I got my money.

Q. Did you find any of your property again - A. My witness has the duplicates.

Q. When had you got your money - A. I got it that very evening.

Q. Where you much intoxicated when you went to bed - A. No more than I am this moment.

Q. Had you been acquainted with these people before - A. I never saw them before that time.

Q. How came you to get acquainted so soon - A. By her boiling the water for tea, that made the acquaintance. She introduced this man into my company.

Q. What is the mans name that keeps the Weavers Arms - A. I cannot recollect.

RICHARD LIMBRICK . I am an officer of Bow-street. On the 14th of August, I saw the two prisoners at the wine vaults, at the top of Gray's-inn lane, they were in a hackney coach, stopping to have something to drink. Blackman got into the coach and searched it; I was there, he found nothing; the coach went on with them in it. We went after the coach, from some information, Blackman and Mantz got into the coach, and I got on the box, and we drove to the watchhouse. I searched Crouch, I found on him, eight dollars, six half crowns, five shillings in silver, and some halfpence, and these two duplicates; one duplicate is a coat and pantaloons, the other is a watch.

THOMAS MANTZ . We came up to the coach at the wine vaults, the corner of Middle-row, Holborn, they called for something to drink, Blackman knew them, he examined the coach and found nothing; the coach then went away. We went and stopped the coach, I opened the coach door, and took eight one pound notes out of Crouch's hand, he was trying to put them under the seat of the coach; I found a one pound note underneath where the woman had been setting in the coach. I was ordered by the magistrate to give the notes up to the prosecutor.

WILLIAM BLACKMAN . On the 14th, I saw the prisoners come up to the wine vaults at the bottom of Gray's-inn-lane, in a coach, I knew him; I got into the coach to secure the prisoner, hearing that he had been throwing the notes about the street. He knowing me, he chucked the notes out of the coach; I held him by the hand that he should not destroy the notes, Mantz took the notes from Crouch; and at the watchhouse the coach was searched, and Mantz found a one pound note. The next morning there came an information, that this wooden legged man had robbed this sailor. Mantz left a jacket in the coach, we took the number of the coach, and two days afterwards I found that jacket in the same coach. It proved to be the sailor's jacket that lost his money.

Mantz. I did see a jacket in the coach that belonged to the sailor, we went and got it.

Prosecutor. These are the very duplicates, and that is my jacket that the notes were in.

Q. You do not know any of the notes - A. No. They were bank of England notes, I know the man I got them off.

The prisoners said nothing in their defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

CROUCH, GUILTY , aged 22.

DRISCOLL, GUILTY , aged 21.

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling house.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

Reference Number: t18100919-43

670. JOHN WARREN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of August , a coat, value 4 s. the property of Medicus Ramsdale .

MEDICUS RAMSDALE. I am a butcher , I live at Kingsland. On the 4th of August I left my cart in Leadenhall market , with my great coat in it. I had bought a lamb, and was putting it in my cart; I saw the prisoner watching the cart very narrowly, I moved the cart facing of the passage of Mr. Carr's alehouse; I watched him about five minutes, and then I thought he had left the cart; I went into the market about my business. In about ten minutes or a quarter of an hour afterwards, I had information, that a man was taken for robbing a cart of a coat. I came out of the market, and saw Mr. Whittle with the great coat in his hand, he said the man was in the watchhouse. I went to the watchhouse and saw the prisoner, he was the man that I saw watching the cart; this was at five o'clock in the morning.

SOLOMON WHITTLE . I am a victualler, I live at the Bull, in Leadenhall-street. On the morning of the 4th of August, I was going into Leadenhall market, I saw the prisoner go to the tail of a cart, I went into Mr. Carr's shop and watched him; I saw him lay hold of the horse, he led him about twenty yards, along side of another cart, then he came and looked round the market to see if any body was coming, he returned back, got up into the cart, pulled the coat from behind the cart, and laid it across the forepart of the cart, then he got down, and looked down the passage again; after that, he went back and took the coat from the forepart of the cart, held it up and looked at it, folded the coat up and put it under his arm, and went away with it; I followed him, and took him before he got into Leadenhall-street. I took him back to the cart, and took him to the watchhouse, they searched him and found twenty duplicates on him.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

GUILTY , aged 52.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100919-44

671. JOHN THOMPSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of September , two ounces weight of silver, value 5 s. the property of Robert Metham .

ROBERT METHAM. I am a working silversmith , I live at 57, Bartholomew-close ; the prisoner worked with me as my journeyman , he worked with me from five to six or seven months. Having suspected him for some time robbing me, for the last few days, I marked some silver, and on Wednesday, the 12th of this month, when the prisoner went out to dinner, I weighed his work; and from information, I went with the constable into Long-lane, met him, and brought him back to my house, and there he acknowledged that he had been robbing me; he took part of my property out of his breeches pocket himself; the constable searched him and took out some more silver to the amount in the indictment. I weighed the silver out myself to him, and when I met him in Long-lane, I told him he had robbed me, and what piece he had about him, he took it out of his pocket, and said it was mine.

GEORGE WORRALL . I am a constable. Mr. Metham called upon me two or three days before, and wished me to remain in his house while the prisoner went out to his dinner, for him to weigh his work. On the 12th I was there about one o'clock, the prisoner came down from his work with another of his shopmates, I watched him into Long-lane, he there went into a cook's shop. Mr. Metham came after the prisoner, and saw him, he appeared as if he was going back to his work. Mr. Metham took hold of him, told him that he had robbed him. We took him back, and searched him in the parlour; I took some silver out of the prisoner's breeches pocket.

Prisoner's Defence. I have done several jobs for myself, and the silver I had upon me for a long while. I had a private job, that was the silver that I was a going to make it with.

The prisoner called three witnesses who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 31.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100919-45

672. JOHN WELLS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of August , a watch, value 5 l. a chain, value 1 l. a seal, value 10 s. and two keys, value 10 s. the property of John Gavins , from his person .

JOHN GAVINS . I am a waiter at the Lock and Key, 62 Smithfield. On the 17th of August, I was going across Smithfield to call a coach for a gentleman that lodged in the house, about ten minutes past seven; on my return back, at the corner of Long-lane, a stick was thrown from some person at the corner, I picked it up; I had the stick in my hand, the prisoner came to the right side of me, caught hold of the chain of my watch, and pulled it out of my fob; I immediately caught hold of him by the right shoulder, and asked him what he was about; he made no reply; he attempted to escape, when he found he could not, he throwed the watch away. I loosened the prisoner directly to secure my property; two waggons were coming along; a waggoner picked up the case, and I the watch. The prisoner ran away towards Bartholomew's hospital.

Q. When did you get hold of the prisoner - A.In about twenty minutes afterwards, Branscomb brought in a man, which I thought was the man, who robbed me, but when I saw the prisoner brought into the house, I said, that is the man, the other is a mistake. The prisoner was brought in five minutes after the first man, and he appeared to be very much intoxicated at the time that he was brought in.

Q. Upon the oath you have taken, is the prisoner the man that robbed you of the watch - A. Yes, I am certain he is the man.

Q. Had you time enough to observe that he was the man - A. Yes, I had him in my possession time enough to ascertain that he is the man.

Mr. Alley. How came you to say the other person was the man - A. Because I had not seen his face.

JAMES MERRY . I am an oilman, I live at the corner of Long-lane, West Smithfield. On the evening of the 17th of August, about ten minutes after seven o'clock, I saw the prisoner and John Gavins in a scuffle, in the scuffle I saw the watch go from one of them, the case went one way and the body another; the prosecutor immediately let go the prisoner and picked up his watch, the prisoner went towards the hospital gate. He returned back, in the course of ten minutes, opposite of the house again, where he was followed by two of his companions. In a few minutes after, I saw him taken into the Lock and Key, in Smithfield, by Eldridge and Branscomb.

Q. Are you sure the prisoner is the man you saw - A. I am, and he was scuffling with Gavins.

Mr. Alley. The prisoner was a stranger to you - A. No, I had seen him in Smithfield two or three times a week, he is a pig drover .

WILLIAM ELDRIDGE . I am an officer. On the 17th of August, between seven and eight, I, in company with Branscomb, apprehended the prisoner, I took him into the room, the waiter had this stick in his hand, the prisoner said, that is my stick, I will swear to it; the waiter said, that is him, I made a mistake in the other man.

Prisoner's Defence. I am quite innocent of it, I know nothing at all about it.

The prisoner called three witnesses who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100919-46

673. THOMAS GOUGH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th August , fifty six pound weight of cochineal, value 100 l . the property of Joseph Connop .

JOSEPH CONNOP . I am a dealer in drugs , I live at No. 14, Chapel-fields, South Lambeth.

Q. Were you in possession of a quantity of cochineal, and where was it deposited - A. At Mr. Thompson's in Clement's-lane; I had bought it of Mr. Thompson, it remained there upon my credit.

Q. About the 16th of August had you sold it to any body - A. To Mr. Bennet, of Plumber's-row, Commercial-road. On the 15th I sold it, and on the 16th I was to deliver it to him. On the 16th about a quarter past nine in the morning, I went down to St. Magnus's church to hire a porter , when I was going to hire the porter, the

prisoner was talking to a man of the name of Bailey. I am certain the prisoner is the man; he went with me to St. Clement's-lane, Mr. Thompson delivered to me fifty-six pounds of cochineal, the value of it is on hundred pounds sixteen shillings. I then went out of Mr. Thompson's with the prisoner, intending to accompany him; I told him to go to Mr. Bennet's, number 12, Plumber's-row, Commercial-road. I wrote a direction on paper with a pencil, as I should not walk close with him, but keep him in sight. I saw him in Fenchurch-street, by Aldgate pump; there I was stopped by some friends; I was talking with them on some business; when I looked round for the porter, I missed him.

Q. How long did you continue with them - A. Not more than a quarter of an hour. I went directly to Plumber's-row, the goods had not been delivered; I went as fast as I could to Saint Magnus's church, to find the man that he was talking to, and what regiment he belonged to; he was in a soldier's dress. In consequence of information I received there, I obtained a warrant, and went to his house, he resided in a back street near Bunhill-row: we found him there, I knew him immediately, although he had changed his dress and was clean shaved and had his hair cut. I asked him whether he did not recollect me, and whether he did not carry a load for me; he denied it. I have never been able to find the cochineal since.

JOSEPH THOMPSON . Q. On the 16th of August de you remember the last witness coming to your house and desiring you to deliver the cochineal to a porter - A. Yes.

Q. Look at the prisoner, and say if he is the man - A. I believe he is the man; I cannot swear that he is; I did not take that particular notice,

CHARLES BENNET . I live at number twelve, Plumber's-row, Commercial-road.

Q. On the 15th of August had you purchased any cochineal of Mr. Connop - A. Yes, it was to be delivered on the 16th; it never came at all.

JOHN SANKEY PUGH. I am a constable. On the night of the 16th of August I went with the prosecutor to the prisoner's house, in New-court. Moor-lane, I found the prisoner at home, Mr. Connop charged him with taking the cochineal, he said he knew nothing of it; Mr. Connop said, he was certain he was the man. Bailey was present, he said, he could swear he was the man which the prosecutor hired. I searched the prisoner's pocket, I found a two pound note, I asked him how he came by it, he said, he had it of his serjeant, he belonged to the London Militia. I searched the woman, on her I found six or seven dollars, three or four half-crowns, and some shillings. I asked her how she came by that silver, she hesitated, he said, you bitch, you took it for your work.

Q. Did you find any duplicates on them - A. No; there were some things that lay as if they were just taken out of pledge; he said, he had taken them out with his own money.

PHILLIP BAILEY . I am a broker. On the 16th of August I was at the foot of London Bridge about a quarter past nine; I was talking to the prisoner when Mr. Connop hired him.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, called one witness who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100919-47

674. PHILLIP MANTLE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of August , three pounds twelve ounces weight of tobacco, value 10 s. 6 d. the property of Robert Hains , George Hains , and John Daniel Hains .

RICHARD RUSSELL . I am a clerk to Robert, George, and John Daniel Hains . On the 3rd of August, at seven in the evening, I followed the prisoner when he left the house; I stopped him a little way from the doer, he was brought back to the house, he was searched, there was found upon him about three pounds and three quarters of tobacco; it was found between his shirt and his body; it is worth about ten shillings and sixpence. I asked him how he came by it; he acknowledged he took it out of the warehouse; he said it was for his wife and children; after that he said, that he had taken it for his brother in Germany. This is the property that was found on him; it is tobacco.

Prisoner's Defence. I found it as I came from dinner. I have a wife and three small children; I hope you will be merciful.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 35.

Confined six months in Newgate , and fined 1 s .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100919-48

675. WILLIAM CARTER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of August , a silver spoon, value 15 s. the property of William Pidgeon .

WILLIAM PIDGEON . I am a waiter at Peel's coffee house . On the 21st of August, between one and two o'clock, William Carter came into the coffee room and called for a bason of broth, which I gave him, he paid for it the instant he had it. I went to the further end of the coffee room, he got up out of the box, he ate none of the broth: I looked at the bason and saw the spoon gone. I followed him close to the end of Flower-de-luce-court; I put my hand on his shoulder; he asked me what I wanted; I told him the spoon was gone which I gave him with the soup; he said he knew nothing of it; I told him it was an unpleasant circumstance, he had better come back into the box, there was nobody there but him. He took the spoon out of his pocket, I grasped his hand with the spoon in it, and brought him back to the coffee-room. He declared it was his first offence; I was convinced it was not, he had stolen one a fortnight before, from the same box.

Prisoner's Defence. On the 5th of June, 1771, I obtained a commission in the forty-seventh regiment by purchase; in 1774 I was in two actions with that regiment. On Bunker's-hill I was in the fortieth regiment, as a lieutenant. I have been wounded at four different times in my body. I have two sons serving my king and country. In consequence of a melancholy family loss which I sustained, my affairs became deranged; I was obliged to have refuge at Saint Martin's workhouse; from thence I was discharged much about the time that man mentions of the capture of the spoon. I was pennyless and friendless; unfortunately for me I did take this spoon; I was starving in every sense of the word. I now submit myself to the mercy

of the court, not doubting but that mercy will be blended wish justice. It is the first time I ever was before a court of justice.

GUILTY , aged 66.

Confined three months in Newgate , and fined 1 s .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100919-49

676. THOMAS STANTON and WILLIAM GOODEAR were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of August , a watch, value 30 s. a seal, value 10 s. and a key, value 1 s. the property of George Thorne , from his person .

GEORGE THORNE . I am clerk to Joshua Green, merchant, Camomile-street. On the 14th of August, between eleven and twelve o'clock at night, I was going home; in passing along Bishopsgate-street , I was overtaken by a young woman, she laid hold of my arm, she wished me to go along with her, and pulled me along; at the time I pulled my watch out of my fob, and put it into my coat pocket. At that time the prisoners came up to me, one on each side; the woman was very troublesome, and I thought to send for an officer; they said they would shew me an officer, if I wanted one. After her being with me a short time, I missed my watch, I accused them of robbing me of my watch, they both ran away; I ran after them, crying stop thief. Stanton was stopped and taken to the watchhouse, and after being questioned by the officer, he confessed that he had robbed me of my watch, and told where his companion lived. I saw Goodear the next morning at the Mansion House.

SAMUEL SHEPPARD . I am an officer. On the 14th of August the prisoner Stanton was brought into the watchhouse, charged by the prosecutor of having robbed him of his watch; he denied any knowledge of the watch for some time. When I told him I must take him to the Compter, he said, he took the watch out of the gentleman's pocket, that he had given it to Goodear, who had run away with it. He told me Goodear lived with his father in Union-court, Fashion-street, Spitalfields. I went there, and found Goodear; I charged him with the watch; he denied any knowledge of it; I told him I should search the house; then he told me not to make a noise, he would shew me where the watch was. He took me into the privy, there were some boards nailed up to form a cieling, there I found the watch.

The prisoners said nothing in their defence, called two witnesses, who gave them a good character.

STANTON, GUILTY , aged 18.

GOODEAR, GUILTY , aged 19.

Fined 1 s. and discharged .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100919-50

677. TIMOTHY TOOMEY and WILLIAM BARRY were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Brookes , on the 29th of August , and stealing a gold ring, value 20 s. his property .

JOHN BROOKES . Q. Are you a housekeeper - A. Yes; I live at twenty-four, Charing-cross . On the 29th of August, about nine o'clock in the morning, as I was sitting in the parlour, behind the shop, I heard a square of glass break; I went to the shop window, I perceived one of the squares of glass had been broken, I examined the window, I saw nothing had been taken away.

Q. When had you seen the window before - A. The same morning. It had been cracked about three or four days before, by an instrument being put against it; it was cracked only in one part of it, no part of the glass was out. At first I missed nothing, I retired a little way behind the partition that separates the shop from the parlour. and in a minute or two the prisoner Toomey put his hand into the hole of the window, that he had made, and took out a ring.

Q. Have you got the ring here - A. No, it was a gold ring, the fellow one to this.

Q. What did he do with it - A. I cannot say, he went off; I went to the window and looked into the tray, I found that one was taken away.

Q. Were you near enough to see the boy - A. My sister saw the boy as well as myself. I went after him to Scotland-yard, and took him, I am sure it is the same boy; I found the knife upon him, which had upon the point the same putty; it is a bright red putty; I cannot be mistaken. He said, nobody could hurt him; I could not find the ring upon him. I saw him in company with the other boy, Barry, after he had done the act, but not at the time.

JANE BROOKES . Q. Did you see any part of the transaction - A. I saw Toomey put his hand in the window.

Q. Did you see him take any thing - A. No, I did not; I saw him move the piece of glass that he pushed in the window.

WILLIAM CLEMENTS . I am an officer. On the 28th of August I took the two prisoners into custody; I found nothing on either of them, excepting a knife on Barry; it is not fit to star the glass.

Q. to Prosecutor. What is the value of this ring - Q. Twenty shillings.

Toomey's defence. I never was at the window at all.

Barry was not put on his defence.

TOOMEY, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 13.

BARRY, NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18100919-51

668 ELEANOR FLYNN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22nd of July , four yards of lace, value 20 s. a paper of pins value 3 d. and a bank note for the payment of 2 l. the property of Elizabeth Mountcastle , in the dwelling-house of John Cave ; and CATHARINE KING for feloniously receiving the same goods, knowing them to be stolen .

ELIZABETH MOUNTCASTLE. I am sister to John Cave , 140, Whitecross-street ; he is a cheesemonger; Eleanor Flynn lived with him as servant .

Q. Did you lose any pins, lace, and notes - A. Yes; on tee 22d of July I lost four yards of lace, a five-shilling-piece, and a paper of pins, from a small box, the key of the box was left loose on the table in that room.

Q. When had you seen them there - A. In the morning, about ten or eleven o'clock; I missed them between ten and eleven at night The box was in an empty room, and one of the doors of of the room was locked, there were two doors to the room, and the door that was not locked was opened. I sent for a constable, and accused the prisoner of it; she denied it;

the things were found at the mother's house about eleven o'clock that night.

Eleanor Flynn. My mother is innocent.

EDWARD TRING. I am an headborough. I searched Eleanor Flynn and found nothing. She said she had been out to her mother to fetch some cloaths; I went to the mother, I asked the mother where her pockets were; she shewed me the pockets, I found the two pound note, a crown-piece, and the pins, in the mother's pocket; she said she knew nothing at all about it: she was in bed.

Q. Did you find any lace - A. Not there. I searched Eleanor's box, I found this four yards and a half of lace; she said, she found the lace in Mr. Cave's room, and she found the two pound note, but the crown-piece was given to her by the woman down stairs.

JOHN CAVE. I am a cheesemonge, I live 140, Whitecross-street.

Q. Do you know whether your sister had a box in one of the rooms - A. Yes.

Q. Did Eleanor Flynn live with you - A. She came to me on the Saturday-night, and on the Sunday I was out in the afternoon about two hours and a half; nobody was in the house at that time but Eleanor Flynn .

Q. Could she get at that box of your sister's - A. She could get in at one of the doors that was not fastened.

Q. Did you see the mother that day or not - A. I did not see her at our house. The constable accused Eleanor of it; she persisted in denying that she had been in the room. We afterwards went to her mother, the officer told her mother for what purpose we came. I was present when the bank note was found in her pocket; we found the lace in a box; Eleanor Flynn said she found the lace in a room.

Eleanor Flynn 's defence. My mother is innocent. When my mistress sent me home for my clean things, I took off my dirty pockets, and put them on the bed; my mother did not know any thing was there.

Catharine Flynn said nothing in her defence.

ELEANOR FLYNN , GUILTY , aged 12.

Of stealing the lace to the value of 20 s. only.

Transported for Seven Years .

CATHARINE FLYNN , NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18100919-52

679. EMMA CHARINGTON and SARAH ANNESLEY were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of August , six handkerchiefs, value 12 s. and a shawl, value 2 s. 6 d. the property of William James , privately in his shop .

JOHN MOTT . I am shopman to William James , linen-draper in Holborn . On the 23d of August, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, the two prisoners came into my shop; Charington asked to look at some common shawls; I shewed her a great quantity she bought none; Annesley sat on a stool by the side of her. After some time, I observed her shuffling her hand underneath her gown, as if she was shuffling something under her gown. When Charington went out the second time, Annesley went after her, we perceived that she had something under her gown; Mr. James went after her, and brought her into the shop; I went out too, and saw six handkerchiefs lying at the door in the shop; I saw that Annesley had something in her hand, I took it out and opened it, it was a piece of an apron, and a shawl wrapped in it; the shawl was Mr. James's property, it cost above two shillings and sixpence.

Q. You did not see where the six handkerchiefs were dropped from - A. No, they cost two shilling each.

Charington's defence. I am innocent; I never saw the handkerchief.

Annesley's defence. Charington is innocent.

Charington called one witness, who gave her a good character.

Annesley called five witnesses, who gave her a good character.

CHARINGTON, NOT GUILTY .

ANNESLEY, GUILTY , aged 28.

Of stealing, to the value of 2 s. 6 d. only.

Fined 1 s. confined six months in the House of Correction, and there kept to hard labour .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

Reference Number: t18100919-53

680. JEREMIAH SULLIVAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of August , a watch, value 3 l. the property of John Horogan , in the dwelling-house of Thomas Manyon .

JOHN HOROGAN . I live in Baxter's-buildings, Oxford-road ; I am a labourer ; I lodge in Thomas Manyon 's house.

Q. Did you lose a watch on the 3th of August last - A. Yes, it was taken from my bed-room; I went to bed about ten o'clock, I laid it by my side, I missed it before five o'clock in the morning; it has never been found. Sullivan slept in the same room that I did, not in the same bed; he and his comrade got up in the morning before four o'clock. He once told me that he would allow me half-a-crown a week if I would let him go.

Q. Had you told him it would be better for him to confess - A. Yes; he never told me what he had done with the watch.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18100919-54

681. THOMAS BARNET was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of July , from the person of John Firth , a pocket-book, value 1 s. six one pound bank notes, a five pound bank note, and a ten pound bank note, his property .

THOMAS PURVIS . I am a boot and shoemaker. On the 17th of July, I went down to Mill Wall , to see the Queen Charlotte launched. I was on the opposite side. In a few minutes after the ship was in the water, I heard a cry of stop thief; at that instant, a person brushed by my side, and not being able to get away by the pressure of the crowd, I got hold of his coat, and held him till Mr. Sapwell, an officer, came and took him; he was taken into a house; I examined the contents of the pocket-book, there was a ten pound note, a five pound note, and six one pound notes; the prisoner said he found it.

Q. Is there any body here that see him take it - A. No.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

Reference Number: t18100919-55

682. WILLIAM FIDGEON and SWEETHEART WILLIAMS were indicted for feloniously assaulting William Jones in the King's highway, on the 24th of July , putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, a watch, value

40 s. a gold chain, value 10 s. and a gold seal, value 10 s. his property .

WILLIAM JONES . Q. Were you robbed on the 24th of last July. A. I was, at the corner of Tower-hill , between twelve and one in the day time. I saw a bullock confined with a rope, and a mob of people following him. In consequence of that I went and took a look at him. As soon I got to Tower-hill, some men attacked me, who confined my hands and my legs.

Q. How many - A. that I cannot say.

Q. Did you see either of the prisoners - A. I do not know either of the prisoners. I was confined by a set of ruffians, they held up my head at the same time, in consequence of that, I found I was robbed of my watch, a gold chain, and seal.

Q. Was the chain hanging out - A. Yes.

Q. When had you felt your watch before this - A. Before I went to see this bullock, I had felt it within a quarter of an hour of the time I was robbed.

Q. Have you seen it since - A. I have not. I followed the persons across Tower-hill, some lads came up, and observed to me, that I had lost my watch, they knew the parties well. They shewed me the parties at the corner of St. Catharine's. I was knocked down, and they repeated the blows at the back of my head; I was senseless. They took me into a house, they desired me to go home, they were a desperate party, they said.

JOHN PANTON . I am a shoemaker, I live in Moor-lane. O the 4th of July I was out, I saw a bullock and people following him; I saw the prosecutor on Tower-hill, by some railings; there were some people about him; I did not exactly see what they were about; I saw a man come from the crowd with a watch in his hand; his name is Williams.

Q. How long did he continue in your sight - A. Not long; he gave the watch to another person; I perceived it was a silver watch and a yellow chain; I went to Mr. Jones to show him the man that had the watch last. I saw no more of Williams till he was taken into custody, Mr. Jones followed me, I shewed him the man that had the watch; I watched to see where they went, Fidgeon came out of the house and said d - n your eyes, what do you tell lies of me for, and hit me over the head. Williams had a butcher's mixture jacket on, and a white hat, at the the time I saw him, and when I saw him in custody, between six and seven o'clock, he had his jacket and white hat on.

MOSES ISAACS. I live with Mrs. Parsons, Shoemaker-row. I was out on the 24th of July, I saw the prosecutor at the corner of a street in Tower-hill. I did not notice what he was doing; I saw a mob of people about Mr. Jones, about thirty; I saw one of them coming away with a chain hanging down his waistcoat pocket.

Q. Can you judge whether the watch was in his pocket or in his hand - A. In his pocket, with the chain hanging out, so that any body might see it; he ran when he had the chain hanging out.

Q. When he had the chain hanging out of his pocket were there any seals to the chain or not - A. There were; I did not take notice how many; I am sure there was one, I cannot say whether there was more than one or no.

Q. Do you know who was the man that was running - A. No, I only saw his back; he had a brown great coat on, it was not either of the prisoners, he ran towards the warehouses on Tower-hill.

Q. Did you see either of the prisoners - A. No, not till I came into St. Catharine's-lane, and there I saw the two prisoners with a bull, Mr. Jones went to lay hold of another man; Williams struck him over the head with a stick, he was knocked down; Williams was dressed in a white hat. After the bullock was in the slaughter-house, I met Mr. Jones; we went into a public house.

ISAIAH HART . I live at No. 4, New-court, Aldgate; I am no trade, I do any thing for a living. On the 4th of July I was on Tower-hill, I saw Mr. Jones standing against the iron railing of King-street, he was standing still, the people with the bull were about six or seven yards off.

Q. How many people were there following of the bull - A. Perhaps twenty-four or twenty-five, they were going towards Mr. Jones and passed him, they were fourteen or sixteen that stopped and surrounded him, Williams was one of them, he was dressed in a butcher's mixture jacket and a white hat. I saw some man put his hand to Jones's small cloaths, but to swear that it was the prisoner, I will not. I saw Williams come from the crowd with a gold or metal chain, and one or two seals, but a watch I did not see. Williams ran on following the bullock.

Q. Did you see what he did with the chain, and what he had in his hand - A. I saw him deliver it over to a tall man, dressed in a dark brown great coat. Then the bullock went on towards St. Catharine's-lane, Mr. Jones followed the mob, to try to get one of the prisoners whom he thought had robbed him, and when they came near the Black Boy, St. Catharine's, Fidgeon said, here comes the gentleman that you robbed, or drawed the thimble, or some such words like it. Then three or four turned back with sticks in their hands, Jones stood at the door of the Black Boy, which was open, they struck him, he fell backwards into the house.

Q. Did you see Fidgeon among the crowd on Tower-hill - A. Ye, I did; he was in the mob with them that surrounded Jones. They left the bullock at Mr. Smalls. I went into the public house with Mr. Jones, he desired us to give him our direction. After they had left the bullock, Fidgeon came to John Panton , he said, what did you tell lies of me for, and struck him across the head with a stick, he seemed to be rather frightened, and ran away; when I saw that, I went away with Morris Isaacs . We went to Jones's house. Going along Whitechapel, I met the two officers, I went with the officers to see if we could find them, and when we came into a public house in Whitechapel, I pointed out Williams, he was taken into custody.

SAMUELL MILLER. I am an officer; I apprehended both the prisoners in company with Griffiths and Beeby. I asked Williams where the watch was, he said, he did not know any thing about it; I told him I was confident he did; he began to cry, and said, if you will let me go or not hurt me, I will tell you who has it; he then named two men, Sam Bailey, and Richard Eveling Mr. Jones was present. I have never found the watch.

JOHN GRIFFITHS . I am an officer.

Q. Were you present when the two prisoners were in custody - A. I was; Miller asked Williams if he knew

any thing about the watch; he said, yes, and told the name, I do not recollect the name; we never could take that man.

Q. Then he never said that he did not know any thing about the watch - A. Not as I recollect. This conversation was in the parlour of the Flying Horse.

Q. to John Panton . How was the man dressed to whom you saw Williams give the watch - A. He had a dark brown great coat with a red handkerchief on.

Mr. Alley. Q. to Prosecutor. Will you favour me who you are - A. I live in Sharp-buildings, near Tower-hill; I am a salesman, a dealer in clothes.

Q. What sort of a watch was it - A. A silver watch, I bought it in my own house; I cannot tell the name or the number.

Q. I think you can have no difficulty in telling me who you bought it of - A. It is impossible for me to say, nor can I say what I paid for it.

Court. Did you by the watch, chain, and seal, altogether - A. By no means. I bought the chain of some man at my own house, a stranger; and I think I bought the seal of a jew that sells me clothes.

William's Defence. The day I was taken I was very much intoxicated in liquor, I was hardly capable of speaking, I know nothing about it.

Fidgeon's Defence. I had hold of the rope of the bullock, I was to take it to Mr. Small, East Smithfield. I heard that there was a watch lost. I hit that gentleman because he would not keep away from the bullock; I know nothing about the watch.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18100919-56

683. RICHARD GRIFEIN was indicted for the wilful murder of Ann, his wife .

THOMAS GRIFFIN and PRUDENCE GRIFFIN were called, and not appearing in court, their recognizance was ordered to be estreated.

EDWARD WATKINS. I am an hair dresser, I live at No. 20, Union-street.

On Tuesday, the 5th of September , did you hear the cry of murder - A. Yes, at half past twelve at night, upon hearing the cry of murder, I ran down stairs, I turned the corner of Onslow-street, I met a watchman, I said to the watchman, here is the cry of murder, make haste; I went with the watchman to where the murder was committed, I went to No. 5, Onslow-street ; I went with the watchman into a one pair of stairs room, I saw a woman lay upon the bed; the bed at the foot was all over blood; I saw the prisoner's brother, Thomas Griffin , in the same room. The watchman said, go for a doctor; Thomas Griffin said, he would go with me for a doctor; I went for Mr. Skinner, he came with me and Thomas Griffin .

Q. How did you find this woman - A. The woman was laying upon the bed, he took the woman up and looked at the wound, and said it was a terrible cut; I saw that her throat was cut. The two watchmen had quitted the room; I said, where are the watchmen. I went to find the watchmen; they were gone in search of the prisoner, I went after them, I met the watchmen going down Mutton-hill, with the prisoner, they were taking him to New Prison, Clerkenwell, I went with them. I heard the prisoner say, when he got to the prison door, he hoped she might be dead in the morning.

RICHARD WINTERBURN . I am a watchman.

Q. Were you on duty on this Tuesday evening, did you hear any cry of murder - A. Yes; I followed my brother watchman to the place where we heard the cry of murder, No. 5, Onslow-street; I went up into the room, I found Thomas Griffin and his wife, there was no light in the room untill I took one. I went to the bedside, I saw the woman lay upon the bed with her throat cut.

Q. What woman was it - A. The wife of the prisoner, her name was Ann.

Q. Was she able to speak at that time - A. No. There was a great deal of blood upon the bed. I sent Watkins for the docter. I looked all over the room to see if I could find any instrument that it was done with, I could not find it: I came down stairs, and looked if I could find it upon the stairs, I could not; I went up stairs again, I could not find it; I came down stairs and held my light up, I looked the other way to see if I could see it in the passage that leads into Saffron-hill; I saw something moving up and down upon the steps in Saffron-court.

Q. Was that near No. 5 - A. Yes, within five yards of the door that comes out into his passage, I directly held my lanthorn up, it moved from me, I pursued it, I saw it was a man; I sprang my rattle and holloaed out stop him. A man coming up Saffron-hill stopped him, his name is Cootes, he knocked him down; my brother watchman catched him by the collar, as he was on the ground; I said to the prisoner, how could you do such a rash act as you have done; he said, what I have done I shall be happy if she is a dead woman, and I shall die a happy men. I took him to the watchhouse, he said the same there.

Mr. Alley. I suppose you were a stranger to the parties before you were called there - A. I was no acquaintance of theirs.

Q. You have said that the deceased's name was Ann, Ann I see she is charged in the indictment; in the commitment she is called Mary - A. I know no further, than other people called her Ann since.

Court. Do you know whether she was his wife - A. I do not know that she was his lawful wife, she was reputedly his wife, I only know since.

WILLIAM HERITAGE . I am a watchman.

Q. Did you, on this Tuesday evening, hear the cry of murder - A. Just as I was going the hour of half after twelve, I heard the cry of murder; I went directly down Union-street, and just as I was turning, Watkin's said, it is murder in Onslow-street. I went to No. 5, Onslow-street, with Watkins and Winterburn, I went up stairs.

Q. Who did you find in the room - A. The brother of the prisoner, and the brother's wife; there was no light there, I begged my partner to give me a light; I lit my lanthorn, I saw, then, blood all over the bed, and the woman lying with her throat cut.

Q. Do you know who that woman was - A. They called her the prisoner's wife, the brother and sister both said it was his wife. The prisoner was not there then.

Q. Had you known this woman before - A. I saw her two or three nights before, they had two or three words before.

Q. Did you hear their names - A. I heard their names were Griffin. When I was there three nights before they had words; he said it was his wife, and the landlady below said it was his wife.

Q. Upon seeing her upon the bed what did you do - A. I went down stairs and went in search of the prisoner, I went into Castle-street and just as I turned into Onslow-street

again, my partner's rattle sprang, I saw the prisoner running, and Cootes after him; he hit him on the side of the head and the prisoner fell down; I catched him by the collar and took him to the watchhouse; on our coming up Saffron-hill, he said, he hoped she would be dead; he said the same at the watchhouse; from there we took him to prison, then he said, he hoped she was dead, or would be dead when we got back.

- FAULKENER. I am a carpenter.

Q. Did you go to the prisoner's lodgings, No. 5, Onslow-street - A. I did, in company with Mr. Skinner, the doctor. When we got there, I saw the woman lying on the bed with her throat cut; she was setting up on the bed when I went in, she was held up by two men, whom I did not know; the doctor ordered that she should be laid down; he examined the wound and said he could do nothing for her, that she must be taken to the hospital as soon as possible; she was then held up by me and another; I asked her who it was that had done it.

Q. She was then in a dying state was she - A. Yes; the doctor said he was certain that she could not make me any answer, she could not speak. I then asked her if her husband had done it, she nodded her head twice; I asked her if she was sure that her husband had done it, she nodded her head twice again; I asked her what it was done with, she pointed with her left hand towards the foot of the bed; and turning over the bed, between the cording of the bed I observed the razor lying on the floor; in the manner that I hold it was open; there is some blood on it now, and there was some blood on it then, and there is the name of Griffin on the handle of the razor. I requested a man that was standing at the foot of the bed to pick it up, he did, and gave it to me. I held the razor up to the woman's face; I said, mistress, was it done with this, she nodded her head twice; I asked her again if she was sure that her husband had done it, when I had the razor in my hand, she nodded her head; I asked her if she was sure that she did not do it herself, and she shook her head; I asked if he was her husband, she nodded her head; I asked her no further questions. She appeared to be sensible for ten minutes or a quarter of an hour afterwards; before we moved her she endeavoured to speak to the brothers wife, but could not.

Q. Was the brother's wife there all the time - A. All the time I was there, and the brother was in the room with me, and the doctor.

Q. Did you assist to carry her to the hospital - A. I did; she died between there and Holborn-bridge, in the city of London, in the parish of St. Andrew's.

Had you known the prisoner before - A. I am not positive whether I had seen either of them or not.

Q. Did you hear her name mentioned - A. I did not, while I was there. The brother's wife accompanied us to the hospital.

Mr. Alley. The prisoner was not present at the time that you put these interogatories to the deceased - A. No, I did not see him untill the Sunday morning.

WILLIAM SKINNER, Q. You are an apothecary - A. Yes; I was sent for to the poor woman; when I came there I examined the wound, I found there was a compleat separation of the wind pipe, and the wound being so extensive in depth and breadth, I could render no assistance whatever; it was evidently mortal, and she was then sinking very fast for want of blood.

Q. Was that the cause of her death - A. Yes. I desired her to be taken to the hospital; I thought it was better for her to die any where else, than in the filthy room where she was then lying. She smelled very strong of liquor.

Q. Did you know her before - A. Yes; I attended her five or six months before, of a uterine hemourage; I knew her name was Griffin, that was all, that she was the wife of Griffin. When I was called at that time, she was very much in liquor, and the room smelled so much, that my mouth was full of water; and she smelled very much of liquor this time.

WILLIAM GODDARD . Q. You are the surgeon of St. Bartholomew's hospital - A. The house surgeon.

Q. Did you examine the wound of this woman - A. I did.

Q. Was that the cause of her death - A. I have no doubt about it.

- COOK. I am an officer. On this Tuesday night, a man of the name of Coleman fetched me, I went to the room, there was Thomas Griffin 's wife sitting in the room, with a child in her arms; I then went up to the bed where the deceased laid.

Q. Was Thomas Griffin there - A. He was not, I saw a great deal of blood upon the bed, I desired them to lift her up; I then asked if any doctor was sent for, they told me there was; the surgeon came while I was there; I then took the candle and searched for the instrument, and just at that time there was a cry, that the man had gone up Hatton-garden, then I quitted the room, and went in pursuit of the man, I found him in the watch-house in Hatton-garden. I asked him if he had not done a pretty thing; he said, he had, but do no talk to me here, I shall be talked to in another place; he did not say what the job was. I searched him and found nothing upon him; I looked at his hands to see whether they were bloody or not, they were not, I then took him to the New Prison, going along, he told me that she had been out all the night before, and him, his brother and his wife, had been in search of her, he met her in the gin shop, at the corner of Charter-house-lane, they went in and had some gin together; and they went to another house and had four or five pots of beer, it grew late and they came home, then we had got near on to Clerkenwell-green. As I was going to take him to the New Prison, he said d - n it, Cook, you know me very well, let us go and have something to drink; I told him we could not have any thing at that time of night; he said, Yes; I declined having any thing. I then, going along, told him it was a bad job for him; he said, he hoped she was dead, he would not mind being hanged, as to-morrow, for he should die a happy man, he said, how should I like another man to go along with my wife; I said, not at all; he said, that is the reason I done it; he said, she had been out all night, he had been looking for her all night, and part of the next day.

Q. Then he did not tell you that she had been with a man all night, and that she told him he would give him a good wapping - A. I think I recollect his saying, that she told him, that one Jem would give him a good wapping, she had been out all night, I do not recollect any further.

Mr. Alley. Q. What is become of the sister - A. I do not know.

Q. Did you know the deceased, the prisoner's wife - A. Yes; the prisoner called her Nance; I had some business to do for them about five months before, I had a warrant to serve for the man and woman, and he called her Nance four or five times.

Q. Did not he tell you that she had been profligating with Jem - A. No.

Q. Did not you hear him say, just before they returned home, they went into a public house, and two young men had taken indecent liberties with her - A. No, that is the evidence of the brother and his wife.

THOMAS GRABNELL . I am the watchhouse keeper.

Q. Did you say any thing to the prisoner in the watchhouse - A. Yes, I asked him his name; I then said to him, how came you to be guilty of such a rash act as this; he answered, how would you like to see another man brought under your nose, he then said, that she was dead, or that he should soon hear of her being dead, he did not mind being punished, he should die a happy man.

THOMAS SOUTHGATE . I was officer of the night; the man was given into my custody; I heard him make a reply, when he was questioned how he could do such a rash act, I only understood that he feared she was not dead, if he heard she was, he should die with pleasure, or similar to that, I will not say that he used these words precisely.

HENRY COOTES . Q. I believe you are constable - A. Yes, I apprehended the prisoner; the first word he said when I got hold of him was, let me go; directly after, he said, he did not mean to go away. When we got into Saffron-hill, he said, he was very happy. At the watchhouse he said, he was very happy, he was, upon his soul; he said, how would any of you like it, if your wife was to bring a man home before your face.

Q. to Cook. Look at the deposition that you made before the magistrate, and see whether you recollet every thing you see what you said there is that true - A. It is, I omitted saying he would give him a good wapping, and she had been out all night. That account is perfectly true; I recollect it now.

Prisoner's Defence. I was seeking after her; I cannot say whether what they say against me is so or not; I hope I was not unfortunately guilty of that.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY ,

Of manslaughter, only.

Fined 1 s. confined one year in Newgate .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood .

Reference Number: t18100919-57

684. ELIZABETH THOMPSON , alias MITCHELL , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of August , fifty-nine yards of muslin, value 4 l. the property of John Hewitt and Samuel Hewitt .

The prosecutor was called, and not appearing in court, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100919-58

685. CAROLINE COOK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of August , a one pound bank note, and two twenty pound bank notes, the property of Jeremiah Brown , from his person .

JEREMIAH BROWN . I am a Fishmonger , I live at Guildford, in Surry. On the 8th of August I was at the corner of St. Paul's-church-yard , the north side; I was going home to my brother-in-law's, Charing-cross.

Q. How long before you reached the corner of St. Paul's-church-yard had you reason to be certain that you had these notes - A. I had them in my pantaloons pocket when I came into St. Paul's-church-yard, I had a one pound note and two twenty pound notes. At the corner of St. Paul's-church-yard the prisoner came to me and hugged me round the waist, and pressed me to go with her, she was alone, I told her to go about her business, I had not a wish to go with her, after which, I said, where do you live, I insist upon your going about your business. She then said, I am unwell, she would not go with me, and then left me; she left me before I perceived I had lost the notes. When I got upon Ludgate-hill, I put my hand to my pocket, to see whether I had the notes, and my pocket was inside out.

Q. After this woman left you had you been accosted by any other woman - A. No.

Q. What kind of an evening was this, light or dark - A. It was dark; but there were lamps where she stood. I looked her in the face, I am sure it is the woman; afterwards I went to Charing-cross and made my loss known. I saw her again on the 17th in custody; I was sure that she was the woman that accosted me in this way. The bank sent to me, informing me that they had stopped the twenty pound notes. I only know that I had two twenty pound notes in my pocket that I had of Mr. Read. I have one twenty pound note, the other is at the bank, I could not trace it.

Q. When did you receive that of Mr. Read - A. On the 8th of August, about four or five hours before I lost it.

ABRAHAM READ . I am a lighterman and mariner. I paid to the last witness, Jeremiah Brown , forty-four pound; I paid it that day I received it at Mr. Dorringtons. I paid Mr. Brown two twenty pound notes, and four ones, I do not know the numbers nor the dates. I gave him the two twenty pound notes that I received for the check of Mr. Peter Barnes .

MR. INNES. I am clerk in the house of Dorrington and Co.

Q. Did you give cash for the check of Mr. Barnes - A. I have got a copy of the entry, I have no recollection but from the book; the book is not here.

Q. to Mr. Brown. Did you know the number of the notes before you lost them - A. No, I do not.

JOHN PHILLIPS . I am a publican in Drury-lane, at the sign of the Constitution.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. Yes, she was a customer of mine for two years past. On the 8th of August, between ten and eleven at night, she came for two bottles of red port; I gave her change for the twenty pound note, and took ten shillings for the two bottles; I put on the note the name of Cook, that she went by.

Q. Look at the note that Brown produces - A. I know this note perfectly well, I wrote the name of Cook on it.

CHARLES HUMPHREYS . I am an officer of Bow-street. I apprehended the prisoner on the 17th of August; I searched her, I found a bunch of keys, one of them opened her trunk; she took me to a house in Feather's-court, to a front room, I found eight one pound notes in her trunk, she said it was her own.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100919-59

686. GEORGE CURRAN was indicted, for that he was a person employed in the General Post-office,

taking and carrying from a certain table, to another table in the said office, and delivering to the last mentioned table, drivers letters and packets. And that on the 18th of July , at and in the said General Post office, a certain letter, then lately brought by post from Worcester, for and to be delivered to Joseph Ipwell , containing ten promissory notes, from the payment of 10 l. each, came into his possession, he feloniously did secrete the said letter, containing the said promissory notes, being the property of William Lyne .

And SEVEN OTHER COUNTS for like offence, only varying the manner of charging them.

WILLIAM LYNE . I live at Shipston in Worcestershire.

Q. Had you occasion, on the 17th of July last, to send any bank notes to London - A. Yes. The letter was to be sent to Joseph Ipwell , I made up a letter and directed it to him and enclosed ten ten pound Stratford notes in it; I sealed it and took it to Mr. Bray, at the Post-office; I delivered it to Mr. Bray, myself, and paid him two shillings for the postage.

Q. Have you got an account of the particular notes that you enclosed in the letter - A. Yes; I wrote them down at the time, this is the paper; there are ten of them here, but I am not sure the uppermost number is right. The numbers read. This is the letter that I enclosed the notes in, it is my hand writing.

VINCENT BRAY . Q. I believe you are assistant at the Post-office at Shipston - A. Yes.

Q. Look at that letter, do you ever recollect seeing that letter before - A. Yes, on the 17th of July, this is my mark, I received it of Mr. Lyne, I took two shillings for the postage of that letter; I marked on the letter the postage and put it in the letter box; at the time that I packed up the letters, I took a memorandum of the letter, which is here.

Q. What time, according to the regular course, ought that letter to arrive in London - A. On the 18th; I forwarded it that evening for London.

CHARLES READ . I am a clerk in the post-office.

Q. Were you on duty at the post-office on the 18th of July last - A. I was, the Shipston bag arrived on the morning of the 18th in its due course.

DANIEL STENE . Q. I believe you are the principal officer in the inward department - A. I am.

Q. Was the prisoner employed in the post-office on the 17th of July last - A. On the 18th he was.

Q. How long before that time - A. About three weeks previous.

Q. How are the letters that are brought into the post-office, and post paid, are they carried from one table to another in the posting business - A. They are letters post paid coming from Shipston would pass from the D table to the inspectors table, at that time it was the prisoner's duty to convey the letters of that description from the D table to the other table.

Mr. Alley. Was he employed immediately by Mr. Freeling or somebody else - A. He was employed by the post master, his appointment was in writing.

BENJAMIN FRANKLIN . On the 18th of July I was president of the inland department, it is my duty to take notice of the officers who are on duty; the prisoner on that day was on the employ according to the entry of the book, the entry was made by myself the book is here, I was there, I can only speak from the entry.

HENRY JOYCE . Do you know the prisoner's hand writing - A. I have no hesitation in saying that is the prisoner's hand writing; I have seen his hand writing of his name nothing else. All the persons come and enter their names, it was my duty to be there, I am sure I saw him there, it was my duty to see the book filled up; I have no doubt but that is his hand writing.

Mr. Adolphus. You have no distinct memory that you saw him there that day at all - A. I cannot charge my memory with that, seeing his name there I have no doubt but that he was there. D table the stampers name is written Messenger, George Curran . I remain in the room the whole of the time they are in the room; my station is at the fore-door, so that if a person goes away before they are discharged, I should know it in five minutes and find a substitute for them.

Mr. Abbot. Wednesday morning 18th of July, is according to the book in printed columns, D Messenger, George Curran .

JOSEPH IPWELL . Q. Did you receive a letter from William Lyne of Shipston, on the 18th of July - A. No, I did not, nor the next day. I was in expectation of receiving a letter from him that day, I never did receive that letter.

Q. to Joyce. Did Curran ever attend his duty after the morning of the 18th - A. Not to my recollection, I have looked through the book and do not find his name.

Mr. Alley. Q. to Ipwell. Did you expect to receive money from Mr. Lane - A. I did.

JOHN HAZARD . Q. You are clerk to Sir James Esdaile and Co. - A. Yes. On the 18th of July I paid ten Stratford notes, I have nine of them the other is mislaid, these are the nine notes. The number and dates of the notes read.

Q. In what notes did you pay these Stratford notes - A. Sixteen five-pound bank-notes, and twenty-one pound notes.

Mr. Alley. You only recollect from the book - A. The book is here, I did not make the entry myself, the person that made the entry is not here. I paid the notes to the person.

Q. Did you receive from the prisoner any Stratford bank-notes - A. I have no recollection of the prisoner, I gave to the person that gave me the notes, sixteen five-pound notes. All that I know I paid him eighty pounds in five-pound notes, and twenty one's, I can only swear that I paid an hundred-pound.

Q. You have no recollection these notes you produce to-day are the notes that you paid on the 18th of July - A. No.

ROBERT SPARKES. Q. I believe you are clerk to Mr. Parkins - A. I am. I went to the lodgings of the prisoner, No. 17, Sutton-street, Clerkenwell; the house is kept by Elizabeth Bonner as I understood.

Q. Did you at Mr. Parkins's office search the pockets of the prisoner - A. I did.

Q. Did you find this letter in his pocket - A. Yes.

Q. Had Mr. Lyne seen the letter - A. No, he had not been in town. I asked the prisoner how he came by the letter, he acknowledged that he had stolen it, I made no promise to him nor held out any threat.

Q. Had any such hope or threat been held out to him by any other person - A. Certainly not. He told me that he stole the letter out of the post-office.

Q. Did you afterwards go to the prisoner's lodgings - A. I did, with him and Joyce to his room at his lodgings.

Q.Was there any trunk or box in his room - A. That trunk I have every reason to believe is the same, it has the letters I. T. upon it; the trunk I found there had those initials. I found in the trunk this small box, he opened the trunk himself with this key which he produced.

Q. That box that you hold in your hand was found in the trunk - A. Yes; in this drawer I found nine five-pound bank-notes, them are the notes that I found accompanied with four one's, these are the four one's.

Q. Did you ask the prisoner what he had done with the Stratford-notes - A. He acknowledged that he had taken the letter, that he went to Sir James Esdaile 's the morning that letter arrived or the morning following. I believe it was the day the letter arrived, and these banknotes I found in the trunk were part of the produce. He stated that he had bought clothes for which he had paid near ten pound, that he had changed some of the other notes, but he did not go into particulars as to whom he had paid them.

Court. Where was this letter - A. In his coat pocket that he was wearing.

Q. The letter was not concealed then - A. No certainly not.

Q. Did he say from what part of the office he stole it A. No not as I know of.

- JOYCE. Q. Did you go with Mr. Sparkes, to the prisoner's lodgings on the morning of the 27th of July - A. Yes I did; not finding him at home, I went again at eight o'clock in the evening he was not at home; I went again about ten minutes to nine, he was then come in; I asked him how he did, he said he was much better he had been ill some time; I told him I was glad of it, I sat down, I told him he was wanted at Mr. Parkins's that evening he wished to know what was the matter; I told him I did not know, he wanted to know if it would do in the morning, I told him no, I must go myself if he did not go with me, he directly said, if I would stop a bit he would go with me, he walked directly out of the room into the passage, and I got up from my seat to the door in the passage, he had slippers or shoes on at that time, he put on his boots and returned to me in the room, I suppose it was not two minutes at least; I asked him if he was ready, he told me he was, he came out and immediately laid hold of my arm, and walked with me to Mr. Parkins's house.

Q. Did you in the course of your way acquaint him with the business - A. That would have been impossible, I did not know it myself; I asked him questions deviating from what I thought it was. When he was brought to Mr. Parkins, he was not at home; Mr. Sparkes came in. In a few minutes I saw a letter taken out of his coat pocket, my initials are to it, I have no doubt that is the letter. Mr. Sparkes asked the prisoner where he got that letter, to the best of my recollection he said, he did not know how he came by it. After Mr. Parkins came home, I heard him acknowledge that he had stolen it; I remember hearing him say he was there; I do not remember any more he said, he acknowledged that he had been guilty of stealing it; he acknowledged his guilt, what words he made use of I cannot say.

Mr. Alley. I take it for granted as you walked together to Mr. Parkins, you told him he had better tell you all he knew, and you would endeavour to serve him - A. I did not.

Q. Then when he came to Mr. Parkins's office, the clerk was to take in writing what he said, the same as if he was a Justice of Peace; was there any Justice of the Peace present - A. Not as I know of.

Q. So then there was no friend of the prisoner there; an examination of the prisoner takes place and it is taken down in writing, both the interrogatories and answers, did you attend to take in writing what the prisoner said - A. No, I did not.

Q. Mr. Sparkes did - A. I believe so, I expected so.

Q. What became of that writing - A. I know not.

Q. All that you have been stating against the prisoner was taken down by Mr. Parkins or by Mr. Sparkes - A. I suppose so.

Q. Did not he at first deny all knowledge of the letter when Mr. Sparkes was interrogating him - A. He certainly did.

Q. Did you or any body else say any thing to get him to alter the declaration that he first made - A. Nothing was said to him whatever to induce him to make a different declaration.

ELIZABETH BONNER. Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. Yes, he lodged with me.

Q. Did you ever accompany him to buy any linen - A. Yes; on the day after he left the office to the best of my recollection he laid out five-pound, and some odd money, he paid it in a note and some odd shillings, he brought a trunk home in a coach, I think that is the trunk.

GEORGE COSTON . I am a trunk maker, I am foreman to my employer.

Q. Do you remember a trunk of this description being sold to any person - A. I do. On the 19th of July, the person gave the name of J. Thompson or James Thompson , I marked J. T. on the trunk by the desire of the person that bought it; I understood he took it away in a hackney coach.

Prisoner's Defence. I was not guilty of secreting the letter in the office, or while I was in the office, or while I was on duty in the office.

Q. to Mrs. Bonner. I understand he was apprehended in your house what parish is that - A. Clerkenwell.

Q. to Mr. Stone. Is the post-office in the parish of St. Mary Woolnoth - A. It is.

Court. It was part of the prisoner's duty to convey the letters from the D table to another table - A. Yes, to the inspectors table those letters are carried open.

Q. Would his employment give him an opportunity of secreting them - A. Yes, if he had been so disposed.

Q. After he had delivered them to that table would his employment give him an opportunity of taking a letter - A. It would after having delivered them to the inspectors table, there is a possibility of his taking a letter.

Q. That would not be so easy as while he was carrying them - A. It would not.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18100919-60

687 GEORGE CURRAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of July , ten promissory notes, value 10 l. each, the property of William Lyne .

SECOND COUNT for like offence the property of Joseph Ipwell .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded GUILTY .

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18100919-61

688. JOHN NOWLAND was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of September , six pound fifteen ounces weight of quicksilver, value 1 l. 10 s. and a bottle,

value 2 d. the property of Thomas Davey , and Josiah Roberts .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded GUILTY .

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100919-62

689. JANE HOWE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of August , three frocks, value 1 s. 6 d. four petticoats, value 1 s. two pincloths, value 6 d. two tippets, value 6 d. two pair of stockings, value 6 d. two shirts, value 6 d. two bed-gowns, value 6 d. two night caps, value 3 d. five towels, value 8 d. and a napkin, value 6 d. the property of James Green , a gown, value 3 s. two caps, value 6 d. an apron, value 6 d. and a shift, value 6 d. the property of Grace Gardener .

GRACE GARDENER . I live with Mr. James Green, he keeps the family hotel, Portugal-street, Lincoln's-Inn-Fields . On the 27th of August, I delivered the articles in the indictment to Mrs. Gillmore, the washerwoman, I gave them to her in the nursery, she carried them down stairs, I saw them after they were down stairs in the parlour; when she first came at eleven o'clock, she could not take them away. I saw the prisoner at Bow-street, that same evening.

JOHN COX . I am a porter to Mr. Green. On the 27th of August, a little after three, as I was coming from one coffee room to the other, I saw the prisoner at the stairs with a bundle under her arm, she went from the stairs to the private door and walked away. From information I followed her, and stopped her about twenty yards from the house, she said, she had been sent by a woman to fetch the things to wash. I brought her back and the bundle with her.

Prisoner's Defence. A woman asked me to go into that gentleman's house, and fetch a bundle in the passage and she would give me a days work. I never saw the woman before.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Fined 1 s. Confined Six Months in the House of Correction, and there kept to hard labour .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100919-63

690. HENRY GRIFFITHS was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Henry Haleworth Merryweather , about the hour of eight at night on the 10th of September , with intent the goods and chattels then and there being, feloniously to steal, and carry away .

MARGARET PAYNE . I am a servant to Mr. Merryweather, he lives in Charles-street, Bedford-square . On the 10th of this month, Mr. Merryweather was out of town, I had the care of the house.

Q. At what time of the evening did you quit the house - A. About six o'clock, it was not dark then, I went to Astley's; when I quitted the house there was nobody in the house then, I came home at half past eleven.

RICHARD MORRIS . I am a clerk to Mr. Merryweather. On the night of the 10th of September, about a quarter past nine, I went to Mr. Merryweather's house, as usual I rung the bell, the prisoner and another man came to the door, they asked me what I wanted; I asked them whether the servant was within, they said, no, she was gone to the Wells; they told me they were left in care of the house. I asked them what business they had in the house; they told me I had no occasion to alarm myself there was a stout man left in care of the house. They proposed that I should go to the public house to have something to drink then I should know them.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18100919-64

691. ANN SINGER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of September , in the dwelling house of Hannah Hobbs widow, seven one-pound bank-notes, and a two-pound bank-note , the property of William Elliott .

WILLIAM ELLIOTT . I am a servant out of situation. On the 16th of this month, about ten o'clock at night, I met the prisoner near Buckingham-gate, I agreed to go home with her.

Q. Were you the worse for liquor - A. I was, I went to her apartment in Duck-lane , I agreed to stay the night, I undressed and went to bed.

Q. Where was your property at the time that you went to bed - A. In my pocket book; it was all safe when I went to bed in my right hand breeches pocket, I put my breeches under my pillow, under my head. I staid there about an hour, and then I altered my mind and would not stay all night; she said, I could not go out without permission of the people of the house. She went out and came in again, and said, I might go; when I had put part of my clothes on, I found two one pound notes on the bed. I examined my pocket book, and missed seven one pound notes, and a two pound note; I called the watchman, he came and searched, he found nothing on the prisoner or in the room.

JAMES BLY . I was directed to search the room, I found nothing. The room is over an iron shop; I discovered a hole that goes down into the iron shop.

Prisoner's Defence. The man was very much in liquor, I do not know that he had a note about him.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18100919-65

692. JOSEPH FILCE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of August , a bag, value 6 d. and twenty eight pound weight of tea, value 9 l. the property of George Wood .

GEORGE COLLINS . I live with Mr. Wood, a grocer in Hackney-road. On the 21st of August, I went to fetch twenty eight pound of tea from Mr. Jeroms, in the Poultry, for my master; I took it on my shoulder and carried it as far as Bishopgate-street, there a young man accosted me; he asked me what I had got in the bag, and where I was going; he left me at Sun-street. I carried the tea further on, he came up to me again, then he asked me whether I would have any beer, there was a cart coming on, he desired me to put it in the cart, it would be a rest for me; he took it off my shoulder and put it in, that was in Norton Falgate; we walked on as far as the Black Dog, in Shoreditch; he stopped at the public house and gave me some beer, he wanted me to go in the Black Dog, I would not go in, the cart went on. While I was standing at the Black Dog, I saw the cart stop at Mr. Wests, the grocer, in Shoreditch , I saw the prisoner take it out and put it on his shoulder.

Q. Had you ever seen him before - A. No. I was about twenty yards off, I ran after him, crying out, stop thief, directly I saw him take it out. He went down Swan-yard, I ran after him; a gentlemen stopped him with the bag on his shoulder in Webb-square. He was out of my sight, it was five minutes before I came up to him, he had the bag on his shoulder, Mr. Stamford

took him in custody; I asked him what he was going to do with it; he said, he was going to take it home for me. The road that he was going was quite the contrary road. Mr. Wood's name was upon the paper bag.

Q. Are you sure the person that was stopped in Webb-square, was the same person that you saw take it out of the cart - A. Yes.

PETER CREMER . I live in Bailey's-court, Webb-square. On the 21st of August I saw the prisoner coming down Webb-square, coming out of Shoreditch, he was walking very fast, he had a bag under his arm; Collins came up to me, and asked me whether I had seen a man go past; I told Collins which way he was gone. Mr. Gilbert took him in custody, and they sent for an officer.

WILLIAM GILBERT . I am a taylor. I saw the prisoner, on the 21st of August, in Anchor street, he had a large parcel on his shoulder, walking very fast; I heard the cry of stop thief, he was out of sight, I run, he went up Club-row, there I stopped him; the boy came up and said it was his parcel, he had robbed him of it. He told me that he was going to take it home for the boy; I asked him where the boy lived; he said, in Shoreditch. He was going from Shoreditch.

EDWARD STAMFORD . I was coming by just at the moment it happened, I took the prisoner into custody, I took the bag, I have had it ever since.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, called three witnesses who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18100919-66

693. JAMES DRIVER was indicted for feloniously assaulting William Russel , on the 13th of August , in the King's highway, putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, a pocket book, value 3 d. a twenty five pound bank note, four twenty pound bank notes, a fifteen pound bank note, a ten pound bank note, and a five pound bank note, the property of William Russell .

WILLIAM RUSSELL . I am employed to raise men for the army . On the 13th of August, about ten o'clock in the evening, I was in the King's Arms, public house, Wood-street; I stopped there till within a few minutes to twelve. While I was there I had occasion to take out my pocket book to pay for a watch, I had in it property in bank notes, to near the amount of one hundred and forty pound. The prisoner was sitting before me, he had an opportunity of seeing the notes.

Q. Had you seen the prisoner before - A. I had seen him a number of times. I had a pint of porter to drink, and a sixpenny worth to drink while I was there, exclusive of some wine and water the prisoner pressed me to drink. When I left the public house, I went up New Compton-street, in the direct way to my home; when I got into Great Poulteny-street , I was s suddenly knocked down by a violent blow upon my nose. In the course of a minute I found somebody over me, endeavouring to take my book away, I holloaed out, murder, two or three times; the book was taken away, and they snatched at my watch chain; in snatching the chain they dragged the button off, but fortunately, I caught hold of my chain; there were two or three over me. I heard the prisoner over me, he said Nash.

Q.Are you sure it was the prisoner's voice - A. I am certain of it, I have heard his voice a score of times; they separated and got away. Immediately I got up I saw the prisoner before me; I endeavoured to lay hold of him, I could not; he escaped for that night. He was taken the next day at the same public house, and directly I saw him, I said, there is one of the d - nd thieves that robbed me; the prisoner seemed to be alarmed, endeavoured to make his escape by throwing the table over, and applied to the poker; he was taken into custody.

Mr. Knapp. Q. I understand you never recovered any of your property - A. None.

Q. You had known the prisoner before, you had no difficulty in knowing his person, as well as his voice - A. No.

Q. You said so at all the examinations, before all the magistrates; there is one of the magistrates here - A. Yes.

Q. You said you knew him before Mr. Birnie - A. Yes.

R. BIRNIE, ESQ. Q. I believe you were one of the magistrates acting on this occasion - A. The only one; this is the examination taking by me, I had the prisoner up three times.

Q. to Prosecutor. How many examinations did you attend before the magistrate - A. Three, I believe.

Q. In all the examinations before the magistrate, you had just so much certainty of the prisoner as you have now - A. Certainly, I had, I never before the magistrate entertained a doubt.

Q. Have you got the servant maid of the house to give evidence to day - A. I believe she is here.

Q. Did you make any application to her on the subject of this robbery - A. Certainly not, never.

Q. Nor did she tell you that she would tell no untruth about it - A. No such conversation.

ROBERT KENT . I am a cooper.

Q. Were you in the public house on the 13th of August - A. I was there from nine o'clock in the evening, till near a quarter to one; I was there when the prosecutor was there, I recollect his buying a watch and giving twenty pound for it; I recollect seeing his pocket book and notes, the prisoner was in the room at the time. The prosecutor left the house about a quarter after twelve, the prisoner and the prosecutor went out of the parlour nearly together; the prosecutor came back and made some enquiries; he said, he had been robbed in Carnaby-street.

Mr. Knapp. When he came back did he attempt to charge the prisoner, or mention his name that night - A. No.

Court. Did he say that he knew the man - A. I did not hear him say so.

SARAH HURSEY . Q. I understand you are a servant at this public house - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember the prosecutor leaving the house at the time he has told us - A. Yes, a little after twelve, when I lit Mr. Russell out of the door, I returned back, I saw the prisoner five or ten minutes afterwards in the house. When the prosecutor sent for me at Bow-street, he desired me to say I saw the prisoner

and several others follow him out, I told him I was come there to speak the truth. When the prosecutor came back he told Mr. Huff, that he had been knocked down in Broad-street, Carnaby market.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18100919-67

694. JOHN GIBBS , alias JUDD , was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 12th of July , two sheets, value 7 s. the property of William Hall , in a lodging-room .

CATHERINE HALL, I am the wife of William Hall No. 9, Union-Court, Holborn . I let the back room on the first floor furnished, to the prisoner on the 12th of July; there were two sheets on the bed, he slept there that night, he went out the next morning and locked the door, he never returned at all, about 10 o'clock the same evening, I opened the door and found the sheets gone from the bed, I have never seen the sheets since.

PETER MASON, I am an officer, I apprehended the prisoner on Thursday, the 26th of July, in Hoxton town the woman had hold of him, she said she had followed him from Smithfield, and nobody would assist her; she charged him with stealing two sheets, he denied it, he said he had never seen her nor her house, she said it was him and three men were obliged to lay in one bed, to make room for him, he then said he never saw three men in the bed, he only saw one man in the bed, he had several duplicates, but none for sheets.

Q. To Prosecutrix. You did not tell us any thing about this - A. I saw him that day fortnight in Smithfield, I took hold of him, and tore his coat because I could not hold him; I followed him to Hoxton, because I could not get any body to assist me.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of the charge.

GUILTY , aged 49.

Fined 1 s. Confined One Year in the House of Correction, and there kept to hard labour .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18100919-68

695. JOHN MILLER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 10th of September , sixteen yards of callico, value 8 s. the property of Thomas Walker .

MR. SMITH. I am a neighbour to the Prosecutor, I saw the prisoner take a piece of callico, put it under his coat, he then turned his back and went away.

WILLIAM WALKER . I pursued the prisoner, he dropped the property, I picked it up, I never lost sight of him.

THOMAS WALKER . I am a linen draper , 18 Blandford Street . On Monday the 10th of September, between twelve and one at noon, while I was engaged with customers, Mr. Smith gave me some information; the prisoner was pursued, and brought back to my shop, he said it was poverty that induced him to take the callico.

Prisoner's Defence. At Marlborough-street, he said he saw me take it from the door, and when the magistrate asked him how it was placed, he could not tell until the man of the shop said where it was.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Fined 1 s. Confined Six Months in the House of Correction, and there kept to hard labour .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18100919-69

696. SARAH BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 11th of August , two frocks, value 2 s. two petticoats, value 1 s. and one ear-ring, value 2 s. the property of James Armstrong .

MRS. ARMSTRONG. I am the wife of James Armstrong , I have two children, Mary and Elizabeth, the youngest is three, and the other seven years old. On the 11th of August I was alarmed by a little girl, that my two children were decoyed away. We live in Angel-court . My children had been out in the court that day by themselves, I overtook the prisoner, she had got one child on her left arm, and was leading the other she was going towards Westminster-bridge when I overtook her I catched hold of my child, I said, oh you bad wicked woman, you are going to strip my children, she said no, she was not, she had lost two children the week before, and every child she met she noticed, and took them to go and buy them cherries.

Q. She had not taken the cloaths from either of them - A. No.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18100919-70

697. JOHN WHITE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 7th of August , a load of gravel, value 3 s. 6 d. the property of Thomas Rhodes , Samuel Rhodes , and William Rhodes ; and THOMAS BROWN , for counseling the said John White do and commit the said felony .

MR. ADOLPHUS counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner were acquitted .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18100919-71

698. WILLIAM BOWERS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 29th of August , two pieces of brass, value 25 s. the property of Richard Parkes , jun. Richard Parkes , sen. and Nicholas Sinnisson Parkes .

THOMAS PELWIG . Q. Do you know who are the partners in the house of Parkes and Co. - A. Richard Parkes , jun. Richard Parkes , sen. and Nicholas Simpson Clerk .

Q. How is it in the indictment - A.(Mr. Clerk) It is Sinnisson in the indictment.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18100919-72

699. JAMES FLOOD and HARRIET SMITH were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 26th of August , a watch, value 40 s. the property of George Burdekin , from his person .

GEORGE BURDEKIN . I am a shoemaker , 74, King-street, Golden-square. On the 26th of August, I lost the watch, in the forenoon the last time I saw it in my possession I was in James Flood 's house, in Bear-street, Duck-lane, Westminster .

Q. Had you known him before - A. No not before the night before.

Q. Did you sleep in the house - A. No. I was locked out of my lodgings the night before, and picked up with him, I thought he was the fittest person.

Q. When you were in James Flood 's house you perceived your watch did you - A. Yes, and I believe I missed it about one o'clock in the day, I cannot tell who took it, I was very much in liquor, I went to the watchhouse after I found I was locked out, they would not let me in, he invited me to his watch box.

Q. Were you in liquor when you went into his watch box - A. No we got tipsey going from the watch box to his house, and we had more liquor when we got to his house. I found the watch the next day as a pawnbroker's in Chelsea.

Q. Were both the prisoner in the house - A. Yes, she lives with him, I thought she was his wife, but I

understand she is not, I got to his house a little before six, and staid till one.

MOSES GAMMON . I am an apprentice to Maverley and Thompson, No. 3, Grovesnor-row, Chelsea. On the 27th of August, in the morning, the two prisoners brought a watch to pawn, he had 30 s. upon it in his own name. The property produced and identified.

JAMES GILLMORE . I am officer. When I found Flood, the prosecutor was with me. I asked him for the young man's watch, he said he knew nothing of the young man or the watch, he had never seen him before, I told him I knew better than that, he had not long pawned it at Maverley's, he said he had not pawned any watch of anybodies, I searched him, Renny searched the girl, he found the duplicate on the girl.

Flood's Defence. The watch was given me to pledge by the prosecutrix.

FLOOD, GUILTY , aged 35.

Of stealing but not from the person.

Fined 1 s. Confined Two Years in the House of Correction, and there kept to hard labour .

SMITH, NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey

Reference Number: t18100919-73

700. THOMAS WATERFALL was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 28th of August , one hundred and eighty-six halfpence , the property of Thomas Wood .

THOMAS WOOD . I am a publican at the Black Dog, Kingsland Road . The prisoner was a lodger of mine, he was in the habit of opening and shutting the shop. On the 28th of August, between six and seven in the morning, he came down and knocked at the chamber door, he told me the time of the morning, I dressed myself, came down and unlocked the bar, I observed the fastening of the bar had been taken out, I had fastened it myself before I went to bed; I went to the till where I had the over night put two pounds worth of copper, I missed seven shillings and nine-pence, they were marked, the prisoner opened the house for me, he called for a pint of porter, his friend William Baker paid for it, three half-pence out of the five were marked, the prisoner had another pint of porter, and paid me, two out of the five half-pence were marked, I went to Armstrong, he came and searched the prisoner, he found only two half-pence marked in his pocket, he searched his apartment, the prisoner then said I am the thief, I will show you where it is, and between the bed and the sacking produced a bag of copper, the whole of which were marked except one halfpenny.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 33.

Fined 1 s. confined One Year in the House of Correction, and there kept to hard labour .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18100919-74

701. JOHN HUSHER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 2d of August , two pillows, value 5 s. a sheet, value 2 s. one rug, value 2 s. thirty-two penny pieces, and twenty-nine halfpence , the property of Mary Gosling .

MARY GOSLING . I am a widow , I live in Golden-lane . On the 2d of August I went out to market a little before seven, I came home about eight, I only know that I had put the penny pieces and half-pence in the drawer the over night, the drawer was not locked, I had left my daughter at home. The sheet, quilt, and pillows were in a box.

MARY HOLDER . I am the daughter of the last witness, I was at home on the second of last August.

Q. Had you any pillows, sheets, and rugs in a box - A. Yes. We had, I knew they were in the box, I had seen them within two or three days before. On the second of August a little after seven in the morning I heard a noise in the shop, I went into the shop, I saw the prisoner in the shop taking the halfpence out of the drawer, I asked him what he did there, they were my mother's halfpence that were in the drawer, he said they were his own.

Q. What shop does your mother keep - A. A greengrocers shop , he said they were his own and jumped over the counter, he ran away, I called out stop thief, a gentleman stopped him as soon as he went out of doors.

Q. Did you ever loose sight of him - A. I did, he was stopped a few doors from our house.

Q. Had your shop been opened that morning - A. No, I was not up when I heard the noise.

Q. In what state did you find the box in which the things were taken out - A. He had taken them out and doubled them up in this quilt, they were laying on the floor under his feet.

Q. How much are the things worth altogether, are they worth more than a shilling - A. Yes.

Q. How many halfpence were there in the drawer - A. There were three shillings and ten-pence after he had got them in his pocket, I did not know before.

GEORGE FRY . Did you stop the prisoner - A. Yes, not more than forty yards from the door. I was going by the door at the time I heard the cry of stop thief, I saw the prisoner come out of Mr. Goslings shop, he was searched in my presence, he pulled the halfpence out of his pocket before the officer came and said they were all he had taken, they were counted three shillings and ten-pence halfpenny, he begged forgiveness.

JOSEPH PRINCE . I am an officer, I took the prisoner into custody, I found nothing upon him but two knives and two keys, he acknowledged to me that he got over the counter and got this money, but the pillows and other things he denied having taken.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming from work, I went in there to get some bread and cheese for my breakfast, the shop was open, and presently the woman sung out stop thief, that man said you are my prisoner, I immediately went back with him.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18100919-75

702. ROBERT MITCHELL was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 7th of August , twelve teapots, value 2 l. 19 s. 8 d. a tea caddie, value 5 s. 6 d. five milk pots, value 10 s. 6 d. a wine pot and cover, value 1 s. two jugs, value 2 s. 4 d. eight saucepans, value 5 s. seven half pint pots, value 2 s. a saucepan and cover, value 2 s. 3 d. a shaving pot, value 1 s. 2 d. a tinder box, value 16 d. two pannakins, value 6 d. eight extinguishers, value 1 s. a japan tumbler, value 9 d. a tea canaster, value 1 s. a snuffer stand, value 1 s. fourteen metal spoons, value 5 s. 3 d. two coffee pots, value

4 s. a cheese toaster, value 2 s. 8 d. the property of William Robert Wale King , William Matthews , Daniel Masterman , and Samuel Fossick .

WILLIAM ROBERT WALE KING. My partners names are William Matthews, Daniel Masterman , and William Fossick . We are manufacturers of iron and japanned ware . The prisoner manufactured horn lanthorns for us, he lived in Leather-lane, the corner of Baldwn's-gardens, he kept a tin shop in a small way, he very frequently came to my shop to bring home horn lanthorns.

Q. On what day was he apprehended - A. On the 7th of August, after his apprehension I went with the officers to his house. We searched his shop and house and found the several things stated in the indictment.

JAMES HANCOCK . Q. Did you go to search the prisoners house - A. I did with Cave and Lee. We found twelve tea pots, and all the articles stated in the indictment we found the greatest part of them in a cupboard in one corner of the shop, they were not exposed to view in the window in the shop.

WILLIAM LEE . I am an officer, I apprehended the prisoner at Mr. King's warehouse, in Union-court, we took him from thence to the Compter, in our way to the Compter, he repeatedly requested to see his wife in consequence of that we went and searched his house.

Prisoner's Defence. I worked about ten months for Mr. King, I was in the habit of having a running account for eight weeks together, I generally paid for the things when I had them, and when I wanted things the clerk used to tell me to look them out; I never saw him set down any.

Prosecutor. My warehousemen are Stubbing, Sanderson, and Lush, we call them warehousemen, they act as clerks. I look goods out, but do not enter them. My partners do nothing in the business, I only conduct it.

WILLIAM LUSH . Q. You are one of the prosecutor's warehousemen - A. Yes.

Q. If the prisoner wanted any articles in your warehouse he applied to you and you furnish him and make the entry in the book - A. Yes, I did not furnish him with one of these articles now before us.

JOSHUA SANDERSON . Q. You are another warehouseman, have you sold to the prisoner any of these articles - A. I believe none of these articles, I have known him dealing with the prosecutor a twelve month or upwards, I have looked over the book, I do not find one of these articles in the book to the best of my knowledge, I have always put down every article that I sold to him.

WILLIAM STUBBINGS . Q. You are another warehouseman, have you ever sold to the prisoner any of these articles - A. I cannot say that ever I did, I always made the entry of what I sold to him.

Jury. Q.(To Hancock) We would wish to know whether the whole of the property produced in court, was concealed in the house - A. The major part was concealed in the cupboard in the shop, there was a tea-pot and caddie up stairs, and a little tea-pot in the window, that Mr. King said he had not sold.

GUILTY , aged 39.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18100919-76

703. ROBERT EDWARDS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 31st of August , two trusses of hay, value 9 s. the property of William Bellavin .

WILLIAM CHING . I am foreman to William Bellavin , he is a farmer and grazer , and likewise a salesman in Smithfield .

Q. Did he lose two trusses of hay on the 31st of August last - A. I missed more than two, I only found two of them again, the hay was taken from the stack to a garden one hundred and fifty yards distance. The stack stands behind St. George's Hospital , in the county of Middlesex.

Q. Had any quantity of trusses been cut and bound up in bundles - A. Yes, eighteen, I saw them in the evening after the man left his work, his name is Wigan. In the morning, soon after sun rising, I went to the stack, I missed three, there remained fifteen. I had information at one o'clock that there were two in Porter's garden, I went there it was removed, there were the marks of hay having been there; I went to the prisoner's premises, where I saw two trusses of hay on the barrow, he lives in Michael-row, Brompton about a mile from our premises, he is a milkman, and keeps four or five cows. The officer asked the prisoner how he came by this hay, he said he bought it and paid for it.

JOHN GIBBS . I am an officer; on the 31st of last month, Ching came to me, I went and apprehended the prisoner, I asked him how he came by that hay, he said he would not tell me where he got it.

Q. Then Ching must have made a mistake, when he said the man said he had bought the hay, I was with Ching all the while, he never told me he bought it.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought that hay, I gave five guineas for the half load, they took me when I was milking my cows, I had not an opportunity of sending for any body.

The prisoner alled four witnesses who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18100919-77

704. WILLIAM NORTH and JOHN DAY were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of William Anness , the said William Anness and Sarah Greenway , being therein about the hour of six on the afternoon of the 30th of September , and stealing therein a watch, value 1 l. and a pair of watch cases, value 10 s. the property of William Anness .

WILLIAM ANNESS . Q. Where is your house - A.102, Cheapside , in the parish of St. Mary-le-bow.

Q. You rent the whole house do you - A. I do, I am a watch-maker .

Q.Is there a young woman of the name of Sarah Greenway , that lives in your house - A. There is she, is a single woman, she was in the house on the 13th of September, about six in the evening. At the time we have just mentioned, I was sitting in a room having my tea, the door and the whole front of that room is glass, I saw the door that goes into Freeman's-court,

open; I have a front door that opens into Cheapside, and another door that goes into Freeman's-court.

Q. Can you say, with certainty, that that door was closed - A. I am not clear that it was not closed, I am not certain, no one made their appearance; I have not the smallest doubt that the door was closed.

Q. You did not see any body come in - A. No one: I went forward into the shop expecting some one coming in; I went on the threshold of the door, looked up the court, to the right and to the left, and saw nobody that was likely to be coming in, I then shut too the door and returned into the room again.

Q. Are you quite sure that you closed the door again - A. That I am sure of, and then I returned to the room where I had been drinking my tea, and just as I sat down, I saw a man.

Q. Could you at all tell whether he came in at the front door, or the side door - A. I am certain that he came in at the side door, in Freeman's-court.

Q. Was that side door locked - A. No. The counter is exceeding long, from the position I saw him in, I am quite certain that he must have come in at the side door, between the time of my going into the room and drinking a cup of tea. When I saw him, he was in the act of taking something off my board, where I have a number of watches laying on the spot towards which part I saw him.

Q. Did you perceive that your side door was open from the manner in which he stood - A. I have no doubt it was; I called my servant down stairs and advanced to the shop.

Q. As you were advancing what became of the man in your shop - A. He turned out of the shop and shut the door after him.

Q. Did you hear the door close - A. Yes.

Q. Had you opportunity enough to observe him to know whether either of the men at the bar was the man that was in your shop - A. I have no doubt but John Day was the man. I immediately went into the street, I looked into the court and saw the man just turn the corner of the court into Cheapside, the door is close to Cheapside, and Cheapside was very thin of people, there were no more than three people near; I immediately ran up to him, caught hold of his left arm, told him he must go back with me immediately.

Q. Before you had left your shop could you perceive whether any of your watches or watch cases had been taken - A. No, I had not time, I did not know whether I had lost any thing or not. He turned round with me to go back, according to my desire; I thought I discovered a wish for him to get his right hand round to his pocket; I was very watchful of that and kept him forward with my right hand, I had hold of his left hand, I thought he wanted to get rid of something; at that instant, another man joined him, which is William North , and Day handed to him a watch, and something in paper, which I conceived to be in paper; I did not see where North came from; I saw Day hand something to him, thought it was a watch at the time, or a paper with case in it. It passed quickly on to the other, but it appeared to me to be a watch; I then laid hold of the old man, and kept hold of both, I seized him by the collar, I had hold of the other by the arm. They struggled violently, I was afraid that I might loose one or both. I called out stop thief, some people closed in against me in the front, I then dragged them into the first door that was open, Messrs. Townshend and Simpson's shop, two doors from my own, and through a small passage, I took them into the warehouse, there they were secured. They dropped the watch and a pair of cases in the passage; I saw some, thing in the set of falling while they were in custody.

Q. Did either of them say any thing at the time they were secured - A. No; I told the persons round me under what charge, and for what reason, I had taking them, they neither of them said any thing.

Q. After the watch and cases were picked up, did you know them to be yours - A. I knew them to be mine in the place where they were dropped, I had no doubt of it, both the watch and the cases.

Q. After they were secured, on going back to your shop, did you perceive there was a watch and a pair of cases missing, which you had when you were at tea - A.Immediately.

Q. What watch was it - A. A metal watch; one left with me for a glass to be put in, it belonged to a customer.

Q. What was the worth of that - A. Twenty shillings. The watch cases, they were also a customer's, they had been gilded, and had not been taken out of the paper; the cases were worth ten shillings.

Q. Were either of these prisoners known to you before - A. No, I never saw them, to my knowledge, before.

Mr. Alley. You say it was between five and six o'clock when this robbery was committed upon you, perhaps you observed them through the mirror - A. I have no mirror in my shop; I saw the person in my shop, and when, I went into the street, from the figure of the man, and the colour of his coat, altogether, I knew him to be the man.

Q. How do you hang the watches up that do not belong to yourself - A. They were laying on the counter the cases were wrapped up in paper, the watch was laying without glass.

Q. If the cases were wrapped up in paper, I want to know how you could see the cases - A. It is tishy paper, I could see the yellow cases through the paper.

Q. When you took hold of Day the other prisoner was not present - A. No.

Q. Then the people came about, it excited their curiosity - A. No; I had only hold of his arm.

Q. You did not see the old gentleman at your shop - A. I did not. After I took hold of Day, I thought there seemed to be a wish to get at his pocket, I kept him forward; the old man presented himself all in a moment.

Q. When the prisoners were taken into your neighbour's shop, there was nothing found upon them - A. The property was dropped in the passage.

Q. Are you quite sure that you put too the door - A. I am quite sure; I supposed the wind might open it the first time, seeing nobody.

Q. If you supposed the wind opened it one time, the wind might open it another time - A. I am quite sure the door was shut the second time, because I shut it close too the second time, and tried it.

Q. When you were at tea, you are not sure that you saw either of the prisoners there - A. I am sure I saw a man, I am perfectly sure that the mans features that

I saw in the shop, was the man in the street.

WILLIAM STAMFORD . I am a constable; I was sent for to take charge of the two prisoners. I have a watch and a pair of cases.

Q. Who delivered you that watch and cases - A. As soon as I went into the house I saw the two prisoners, I knew them before; I said, I know these men before; the gentleman said, they have been into my shop and robbed me of my watch and cases; they had opened his door and took them out. I took them down to the counter; Mr. Anness gave me the watch and cases, I have kept there ever since.

Prosecutor. That is the watch that was on my counter, I have no doubt of it, and these are the cases, I have the watch belonging to the cases.

Q. Then you can have no doubt, but that watch and cases were those that lay on your counter just before - A. No.

North's Defence. I had been carrying a box to the Castle, in Wood-street; I went up inadvertently, and said, what is the matter; as to me, I know nothing about it all; he laid hold of me and took me into the warehouse; he was there a great while before the constable came to search us, and then the watch and case were handed over to Mr. Anness.

Day's Defence. When this property was picked up it was about a quarter of an hour afterwards.

Prosecutor. Immediately I took them in the passage, I stamped upon the watch; a gentleman's servant gave me the watch.

NORTH, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 74.

DAY, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 38.

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100919-78

705. JOHN RODRIQUEZ was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of September , a pair of breeches, value 12 s. and a handkerchief, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of Matthew Swift .

MATTHEW SWIFT . I live at No. 15, Sparrow-corner, Minories , I am a slop-seller and salesman . On the 13th of September, between seven and eight o'clock in the morning, the prisoner, with another man, came into my shop, the prisoner brought in a new pair of trowsers and tried them on, they were not mine. I asked him the reason of his coming into my shop to try on trowsers, why did not they try them where they purchased them, and not to take up our time; seeing me offended, he seemed to make an offer to sell his other trowsers; I told him, I did not want to buy any thing, to make haste out of the shop. I then ordered the lad to go on with his work, in getting the goods out of the door, I was assisting; I then got outside of the shop, when I perceived the goods, which hanged on the top rail of the window, pulled over off the rail, altogether. I ran into the shop, and said, was it not sufficient for you to come in and take up our time, without robbing us, come make haste, get out of the house, not knowing at that time, that he had got any of my property with them, we shoved them out. When they had got out into the pavement, my youth observed he had a pair of velveteen breeches under his coat; I looked, and saw a deficiency of a pair of velveteen breeches; I followed him, and found him in Mr. Baron's shop, he put the breeches on in their shop, under the trowsers, I pulled the trowsers up and saw they were my breeches, he has torn the mark off, I knew them to be mine. He was taken to Lambeth-street office and searched, the handkerchief was found upon him, I saw it taken out of his side pocket, I am positive it is my handkerchief. When I charged him with stealing the breeches, the prisoner said I pushed him out of the shop with the breeches; when I pushed him out, I did not know he had these breeches.

THOMAS FOCARTY. I live with Mr. Swift.

Q. Did you see this man and his companion come into the shop - A. I did, they bought nothing.

Q. Did they go out of the shop of their own accord - A. No, they were shoved out.

Q. Did you see them while they were in the shop take and thing - A. No; as they were going out of the shop, I saw a pair of velveteen breeches on the prisoner's arm, part inside of his jacket, and part out; I informed my master, he examined his stock and missed a pair. We pursued the prisoner. I know the breeches to be my master's property, and the handkerchief likewise.

Prisoner's Defence. When I was shoved out of doors I had no small clothes on, and when they brought my clothes out of doors, they brought them breeches with them. I was in liquor the night before, I did not know where I was.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Publicly whipped and discharged .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100919-79

706. JOHN NORTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of September , a seal, value 1 l. 11 s. 6 d. the property of Edward Taylor .

EDWARD TAYLOR . I am a jeweller , I live in Leadenhall-street . On the 8th of September, about five in the afternoon, I was alarmed by a violent ring of the bell, and my young man calling me to come down immediately; I came down immediately, I found my young man had got the prisoner by the collar, and said he had robbed the tray of a gold seal.

JOHN LINDSEY . I was serving in my master's shop, on the 8th of September, the prisoner came in, asked me what I could have a gold seal for; I told him about a guinea and a half; he asked me if it would make any difference, if he paid part of the money then, and paid the rest when he called for the seal; I told him no. I shewed him some, he took up two seals, the one which he had in his finger and thumb, he laid down, and the other he held in his hand, concealed under his little finger, he directly shifted his hand from the tray, along the glass case. I had a seal in my hand which I told him the price was twenty eight shillings, I put it along the counter, to his hand in which he had got the seal, to see whether he would take it in that hand in which he had the seal concealed; I pressed him very strongly to take hold of it, saying it was a very strong seal, and wished him to examine it; he directly shifted his hand off the glass case into his right hand breeches pocket, with the seal in his hand. I directly laid down the seal which I had in my hand, and took hold of him across the counter, by his collar; I asked him to deliver up the seal which he had in his hand, in his pocket; he immediately drew it out of his pocket, and gave it into my hand

I still held his collar; he begged my pardon, and said, he did not intend to steal the seal; I told him I should call my master. I rung the bell and called my master.

Q. What was the worth of that seal that he had put into his pocket - A. Thirty shillings.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, called five witnesses who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 16.

Privately whipped and discharged .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100919-80

707. GEORGE BRIGG was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of August , five shilling , the property of Robert Kenyon .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded GUILTY .

Fined 1 s. and discharged .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100919-81

708. WILLIAM BUXTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of August , a tippet, value six shillings, and a half a guinea , the property of Daniel Edridge .

SECOND COUNT for like offence, only stating it to be the property of different persons.

DANIEL EDRIDGE . I am a guard to the Nottingham and Sheffield coach .

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. I do, he is a taylor . On the 16th of August, I loaded the coach at the Angel-inn, Angel-street . The prisoner was in the coach yard; I went to put some more parcels in, on my return, I missed a parcel that I had put in the front seat of the coach; the parcel was directed to Miss Smith, Nottingham; this parcel was in my care. I am answerable for the parcels when in my care. In consequence of what the porter told me I went to the prisoner, I asked him if he had been in the coach, he said, he had not. I was not present when the constable found it.

JAMES WOODMAN . I am an officer; I laid hold of the prisoner in Mr. Robinson's yard; he watched his opportunity and ran away, he was pursued, and brought back; in his breeches, the right thigh, I felt the parcel, I unbuttoned them and took it out, the parcel contained a tippet and half a guinea.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, called three witnesses who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 27.

Confined one month in Newgate , and whipped in jail .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100919-82

709. TIMOTHY LANGTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of June , a bridle, value 4 s. the property of James Tillyer .

HENRY BOLTON. Q. Do you live with James Tillyer - A. Yes, I am his servant, he is a farmer .

Q. Do you recollect in June last, seeing a bridle in your master's stable - A. Yes, somewhere about midsummer day I missed the bridle, the next morning, I went to the stable; the door was open, and the bridle and saddle was gone.

JAMES HALEY . I am an ostler at the Castle Inn, Brentford.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. Yes. Somewhere about midsummer, he came into my master's yard with a bridle and saddle; he asked me would I buy them; I told him I did not want to buy them for my own use; if I bought it, I should want to turn a few shillings by it. I asked him where he got it; he told me he drove farmer White's team at Shipston; his master had sold the poney, and told him to sell the bridle and saddle. I bought it of him, and and gave him eight shillings for them.

JAMES TILLYER . The bridle and saddle were gone out of my chase house on the 23d of June. The bridle only is mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I was carried into this place intoxicated. I cried out. They tied a handkerchief over my mouth. I could not get out by any means.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100919-83

710. CASPER FREDERICK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of September , two saws, value 5 s. the property of Robert Petre .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded GUILTY .

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and whipped in jail .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100919-84

711. THOMAS GOLDING was indicted, for that he on the 8th of June was Clerk to James Humphreys , Esq. and was entrusted to receive money for him, and being such servant and so employed, did receive and take into his possession for and on account of his said master, the sum of 6 l. 6 s. and having received the said sum, feloniously did embezzle, secrete, and steal the same .

Second Count for like offence, only stating that he received the said money from James Rowe .

JAMES HYMPHREYS . The prisoner was my Clerk. It was part of his duty to receive money for me.

JAMES ROWE . I am a Clerk to Mr. Clement, the Solicitor. On the 8th of June I took the prisoner these papers. I paid him six pounds six shillings.

Q. to Prosecutor. Did the prisoner ever account to you for the six guineas - A. He did not; he received the fee on the Friday, and left me on the Saturday, I did not see him until he was apprehended about five weeks afterwards. At the time he left my service there was about a guinea and a few shillings due to him.

Q. Was not the prisoner in the habit of receiving fees, and to balance the fees against his salary. - A. When there was a balance of salary due to him, I let the fee remain in his hand.

Prisoner's Defence. When I received Mr. Clement's money there was Clerk's fees and salary due to me. I left Mr. Humphreys for fear of being arrested.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100919-85

712. THOMAS GOLDING was indicted, for that he being Clerk to James Humphreys , Esq. was entrusted to receive money for him, and being such servant and so employed, did receive and take into his possession the sum of 5 l. for and on account of his said master; that he afterwards fraudulently did secrete and steal the same .

Second Count for like offence, only stating that he received the money from James Cogery .

JAMES COGERY . I am Clerk to Mr. Harvey, a Solicitor.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. Yes, merely at

being clerk to Mr. Humphreys. I paid him five pounds for Mr. Humphreys in the latter end of May or the beginning of June.

THOMAS HUMPHREYS . Q. The prisoner was your clerk, did he ever account to you for any fee from Mr. Cogeny - A. I have the book here; this book was kept by himself; the fee is entered April 24th in the prisoners hand writing five guineas, there is no entry of the payment, he never accounted for any part of the fee.

Q. At the time that he left your service, how much money was due to him - A. A guinea and eight or nine shillings, he never told me that he was in embarrassed circumstances, he had no claim upon me for fees.

Prisoner's Defence. At the time that I left Mr. Humphrey's service, I was very conscious that there were clerks fees due to me, I knew the balance would be in my favour, and the occasion of my leaving his service was my embarrassed circumstances.

Fined 1 s. Confined six Months in the House of Correction, and there kept to hard labour .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100919-86

713. WILLIAM MOORE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 16th of August , ten gallons of wine, value 10 l. forty-two bottles, value 7 s. and a handkerchief, value 2 s. the property of Peter Dennis in his dwelling house .

PETER DENNIS . I live in Hans-place, St. Luke, Chelsea . The prisoner was my butler .

Q. In the month of August last, had you purchased any wine of your wine merchant - A. I had given orders for ten pipes of port wine to be delivered on the 16th of August, the ninth pipe was delivered, the cellarman bottled it and lackered it.

Q. Who stacked it - A. Hughes, the cellarman of Messrs. Gray and Burcham, wine merchants. In consequence of information that the prisoner had been tipsey, I went into the prisoners room, I found a number of lacquered corks laying about, all of which seemed to be drawn with cork screws; I found a bottle of port wine in his room in the grate with a lacquered cork. I challenged him with having secreted it, he denied it; I searched further and found in a drawer that he used in his room another bottle of port wine, under the bed I found eighteen bottles of port wine, and nine more under the side of the bed. He then confessed that he had taken them, and hoped I would be merciful; I then desired to have his box searched, his box was locked, he refused opening it, upon which I told him if he did not, I should send him to the watch-house, lock up the room, and obtain a warrant, in consequence of that he opened the box, I found four bottles of Madeira wine, similar in flavour to that which I have, which I believe to be my own, I found a pocket-handkerchief belonging to me, and one to Lady Charlotte, one I can swear to.

Q. In consequence of this you ordered two of your servants to set up with him that night - A. I did, and from information of others I saw more bottles.

JAMES PEGG . I am a carpenter under Mr. Dennis. Q. On the 16th of August in the evening did you attend your master and see this wine found - A. Yes, the greater part of them, I sat up with the prisoner, he got up at half past three in the morning, he said there was some wine in the plate chest in the beer cellar the next morning we went to the cellar and found six or seven bottles of wine.

JOHN GILL . I am steward to Mr. Dennis - Q. Were you present when Mr. Dennis found this wine - A. I was present when the first bottle was found, and six or seven bottles of port wine, I took out of the plate chest the next morning.

ROBERT HUGHES . I am a cellarman, I corked all the ten pipes that were sent to Mr. Dennis, they were all lacquered in the same way.

Prosecutor. I have tasted the wine, it is the same flavour and quality, I believe it to be mine and this handkerchief is mine.

Prisoner's Defence. Mr. Dennis gave me an old coat, after I had it a week or a fortnight, I was going to give the coat to some poor boy, I found that handkerchief in it, I put it into my box, I had not an opportunity of giving it to Mr. Dennis; I experience some consolation when I reflect it is not insinuated that I purloined this wine with intention to sell it.

GUILTY , aged 54.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100919-87

714. ELIZABETH BYRON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 1st of September , a gown, value 20 s. the property of Margaret Raven .

MARGARET RAVEN . I live in Charlton-street , I missed the gown on Saturday afternoon, I pinned it on three lines, the prisoner lodged in the same house, on the same floor.

Mr. Knapp. The prisoner had a daughter living with her - A. Yes.

JOSEPH AVORY . I took the gown in pawn of the prisoner's daughter, on the first of September, I lent her three shillings on it, she is here.

Q. How came you to take it in of a child like that - A. From knowing the mother so many years.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100919-88

715. CHARLES GROVES was indicted for that he on the 26th of June , was servant to John Davies , and was employed and entrusted to receive money for him, and being such servant, and so employed, did receive and take into his possession the sum of 7 l. on account of his said master, and that he afterwards did embezzle, secrete, and steal 1 l. part of the said sum .

JOHN DAVIS . I am a farmer , I live at Norwood. The prisoner was my servant. He took out hay and received the money at different times. On the 26th of June, the prisoner took out the hay, he told me he had not got so well as he expected, he brought me home six pound, he said that was the money that he sold it for, he sold the hay to Mrs. Woolley of Walham-green, I learned from Mrs. Woolley that it was sold for seven pound, I then went to Bow-street, when the prisoner knew I found it out, he declared openly, that he kept a pound back.

ANN WOOLLEY . I live at Walham-green. On the 26th of June, I purchased a load of hay of the prisoner, I gave him seven pound for it.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called my witnesses to character.

GUILTY , aged 29.

Confined six Months in the House of Correction , and whipped in gaol .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100919-89

716. JAMES HOLMES was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 21st of July , two watchmakers turn-benches, value 5 s. the property of Thomas Charters .

THOMAS CHARTERS . I am a watch motion maker , I live at No. 2, Bell-yard, Golden-lane ; about the 21st of July I paid the prisoner what money was due to him the prisoner worked for me, I had occasion to go out, I left him in the shop, and that is the time I suppose he took the tools. He never came back afterwards, I missed the tools on the Tuesday afterwards.

JOSEPH PRINCE. I am a constable, on the 28th of July I took the prisoner up, I searched him and found a duplicate on him of the tools.

JONN ANDREWS. I am a pawnbroker, that is my ticket, a woman pawned the turnbenches on the 21st of July.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, called two witnesses who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 32.

Fined 1 s. confined six months in the House of Correction, and there kept to hard labour .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100919-90

717. MARY MASON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 4th of September , two sheets, value 10 s. the property of James Askew Leach , a bonnet, value 1 s. two caps, value 1 s. a half handkerchief, value 3 d. the property of Mary Thomas , a shirt, value 2 s. a handkerchief, value 1 s. the property of John Peterson ; a gown, value 5 s. a pocket, value 2 s. and a habit-shirt, value 1 s. the property of Caroline Cooper .

JAMES ASKEW LEACH. I keep the crown in Chiswell-street . On the 4th of September, about nine in the morning, my servant came in and asked me if I had seen any person coming down stairs, I followed her and saw her stop the prisoner, the prisoner had a bundle with her, containing a pair of sheets of mine, the other property belonged to my servant and a lodger, I saw the prisoner in possession of this bundle.

MARY THOMAS . I am a servant to Mr. Leach, I saw the prisoner coming down stairs with a bundle, I followed her, she had this bundle.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence, nor called any witness to character.

GUILTY , aged 20

Fined 1 s. Confined six Months in the House of Correction, and there kept to hard labour .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100919-91

718. JOHN TINSON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 23d of August , a coat, value 16 s. the property of Michael Myers .

MICHAEL MYERS . I live in Houndsditch, I am a cloathsman . About four months ago I was going along Guildford-street, by the Foundling, the prisoner asked me if I had a coat that would suit him, I had four coats across my arm, I told him I believed I had, I delivered a coat to him, he asked me the price, I told him eighteen shillings, he tried it on, said it fitted him he would give me sixteen shillings, I told him he should have it, he then said, come along with me, I live down Doughty-mews ; I had a great many clothes on my arm, I followed him, going down the Mews I lost him. On the 20th of August I was coming along Oxford-road, I saw the prisoner in the rank with a Hackney-coach, I said, you served me a pretty trick, he drove out of the rank and went out of sight, I saw the number of the coach, I had him apprehended, I am sure he is the man. This is the coat, I found it on his back, it is my coat.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought the coat of him, I was to pay him when I saw him again, I had never seen him from that time.

The prisoner called three witnesses who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100919-92

719. JAMES WOOD was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 23d of August , a watch, value 30 s. the property of John Dodman .

JOHN DODMAN . I am a brewers servant , I work for Mr. Whitbread. I lost my watch on the 23d of August it was in my jacket pocket, it hung up in the stokehole, I was busy at work and left it there, at night it was gone.

Q. What was the prisoner - A. He worked for a cow farmer , he came there for grains, I saw him there that day, I had suspicion that he took it, I had him taken up, and taken to Hatton-garden office, he owned it.

JOHN HULT . I apprehended the prisoner on the 24th of August, the prisoner said he would satisfy the man, any thing rather than go to prison, I said where is the watch, he said at Islington, and the ticket was with his landlady, I applied to the landlady, she gave me the ticket.

JOHN EVERING . I am shopman to Mr. Wildman, pawnbroker at Islington. On the 23d of August, I took in this watch of the prisoner, I lent him twelve shillings on it.

Prisoner's Defence. There were two or three more with me, the duplicate was put into my pocket, I went home and found it in my waistcoat pocket, I told my landlady to take care of it, I did not know the consequence of it.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Fined 1 s. Confined Six Months in the House of Correction, and there kept to hard labour .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100919-93

720. JOHN GROVES was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 28th of July , a trunk, value 5 s. three silver tea spoons, value 3 s. and a shirt, value 3 s. the property of William Kibblewhite .

WILLIAM KIBBLEWHITE. I lost these things on the 28th of July, I was coming down Broad-street, St. Giles's , in a one horse chaise, an alarm was given me that my straps were cut, and were hanging behind my chaise, it was near nine o'clock in the evening. Limbrick an officer took the prisoner, I recovered my trunk again.

RICHARD LIMBRICK . I am an officer of Bow-street. On the 28th of July I was on duty, the lady and gentleman were going along in a one horse chaise. A person hollowed out they would lose one of the straps, it was hanging behind the chaise, the lady looked over the back part of the chaise, she said the trunk was lost, I immediately ran across to Bowl-yard, and under the gateway I apprehended the prisoner with the trunk, he was carrying it.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw the trunk in the middle of the road; I went off the pavement and took the trunk on my shoulder and went to Bowl-yard, and the first house I should have put it into for safety.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Fined 1 s. confined One Year in the House of Correction, and there kept to hard labour .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100919-94

720. WILLIAM EDWARDS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of September , ten doubloons, value 36 l. and thirty-five dollars, value 7 l. 17 s. 6 d. the property of Robert Wollaston .

ROBERT WOLLASTON . I am a steward on board the William Dent . I lost the money on the evening of the 2nd of September.

Q. Where was it - A. In my chest in the pantry, and under my bed-place on board the ship; the ship was lying in Blackwall Bason . About four o'clock in the afternoon, the waterman that attends the ship brought the prisoner on board, he introduced him into the pantry, and asked me whether I would give him a glass of grog; I told him, by all means; I told him to help the prisoner, as I was busy. He helped the man; the man drank a glass of grog, and he had some beef and bread; he sat himself down upon a chest adjoining my chest; I was going to and fro; I had occasion to go to my chest, this money was laying at the top, ready for me to give it to one Mr. Moel, to bring it up to London for me. Two boys came down and wanted to have a pair of trowsers, I took out the money and laid it on the chest to get out a pair of stockings and the trowsers; the prisoner said, aye, there is cash there. It did not strike me. I then put the money back and shut the chest, I did not lock it; it was tied up in a cotton nightcap. Soon after I was called up into the cabin to get some water; I went upon deck to the drip-stone, there was no water, and I was absent about half an hour, during that time I cannot say whether he was left alone in the pantry or not; Mr. Johnson, Mr. Moel, and the waterman were in the pantry. Every one quitted the ship about dark, and when I went to my chest, intending to pack the money up, the money was gone. I had no suspicion of any but the prisoner.

Q. Are you sure he is the man - A. Yes.

Q. You never found your money - A. No; he sold the coin in Leadenhall-street. He confessed that he had done the depredation; he hoped I would shew him lenity.

SAMUEL BOND. I am a waterman, I was employed by this ship. I am sure that the prisoner is the person I took on board, and introduced to the steward of the ship; I know nothing about the taking of the money, I was not in the pantry at the time.

WILLIAM BEEBY . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner on Tower-hill; I then went to his lodgings; in searching him, I found in his breeches pocket this leather purse, in it were found four dollars, three half crowns, and two shillings; in his side pocket I found a book containing twenty-nine one pound notes. I asked him who it belonged to; he said, to his wife, she was deranged in her mind. After I had counted part of them over, I said, how many notes should there be; he told me twenty nine. You say they belong to your wife; he said, no, I said no such thing, they belong to my mistress, I am foreman to Mrs. Hunter, stonemason in London-wall, she gave it me to pay the journeymen their wages. I then took him to the office. On the Monday the prisoner said he had robbed him, he hoped he would shew him as much mercy as he could. The silversmith and his young man came to the office on the Monday, and could not identify him.

ELIZABETH HUNTER . I am a stonemason, 21, London-wall; the prisoner was a servant of mine.

Q. Did you give him any money to pay your men - A. No, never; I always pay the men myself; he was my foreman.

Mr. Alley. Do not you know that he had some prize-money, about an hundred pound, some time ago - A. Yes.

Prosecutor. He lent Mrs. Hunter ten pounds on the Monday.

Court. Q. to Mrs. Hunter. What day did he lend you ten pounds - A. Monday, the third of September.

Q. When was he at sea - A. Some time back; he has worked for me about seven years.

Q. When did you hear of this prizemoney - A. twelve months ago.

Q. Did he, before the the third of September, lend you any money - A. No.

Prisoner's Defence. These gentlemen have spoken false, I never said any such words, I said, shew me lenity towards the heavy iron I had on my leg at that time, it was one of the heaviest in the New Prison. I never said I had sold the coin.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 36.

Fined 1 s. and confined Fourteen Days in Newgate

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100919-95

721. BENJAMIN LEE and JOSEPH CHINNERY were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of August , a pocket book, value 2 s. the property of Robert Jackson , from his person .

ROBERT JACKSON. I am a taylor , I live in Bond-street. I lost the pocket-book at Charing-cross , between twelve and one, on the 1st of August, I went to see the men in the pillory that day, I had been in the mob about five minutes, I was holding my hands upon my pockets, I had a silk handkerchief in one pocket, and a pocketbook in the other. I had my hat over my eyes, I put my hands up to raise my hat, it was rather tight; I lost both my pocketbook and handkerchief; the moment I felt in my pockets and found I had got nothing, I turned round and saw Humphreys had got hold of Lee; he was picking up my pocketbook. I assisted in taking Chinnery to the office.

CHARLES HUMPHREYS . I am an officer. On the first of August I went to Charing-cross for the purpose of apprehending pickpockets; I saw the two prisoners in company with another, I followed them into the crowd, they were following Mr. Jackson; after he had been in the crowd five minutes, the three persons surrounded him, they were all standing as close at they could behind him; I saw Lee make several attempts to take his pocketbook out; I saw Mr. Jackson put his hand to his pocket; after some time he took his hand away to move his hat, at the same time a coach came alongside of the pillory, to take the men out, Lee took hold of the pocketbook, I laid hold of him by the collar, and with the other hand I took hold of the book; the next witness was in company with me at the time, I desired him to lay hold of Chinnery;

the other made off, before Lee drawed the pocketbook out of his pocket, Chinnery looked round at me, then I looked off; he then gave the other a touch of the arm, as much as to say, take it now. I knew their persons all three.

JOSEPH BECKITT . I was in company with Humphreys, I saw Chinnery and Lee in company, close to Mr. Jackson; Chinnery spoke to Lee, and Lee pointed down to Mr. Jackson's pocket; what he said, I cannot say; he had got his hand in his left pocket; just after that, a coach came up, Mr. Jackson moved rather to the right, Lee took the pocketbook at the time, Humphreys took hold of Lee, I took hold of Chinnery immediately; there was a third person in company with them. Humphreys picked up the pocketbook.

Lee's defence. I know nothing at all about it. I never see this young man before in my life.

Chinnery's defence. On the first of August I went to see the pillory the same as another person might go. I am innocent of any thing of the kind.

LEE, GUILTY , aged 15.

CHINNERY, GUILTY , aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100919-96

722. WILLIAM HARRISON CRAIG , alias KENYON , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of July , a sheet, value 10 s. a knife and fork, value 2 s. a pair of sugar-tongs, value 5 s. and two tea spoons, value 5 s. the property of Hannah Ball , in a lodging room .

HANNAH BALL . I live at No. 2, Church-court, Kensington , I let ready-furnished lodgings. On the 22d of July, the prisoner came to my house between twelve and one; I let him one room on the second floor, he was to give me half a guinea a week; he said it was the price he always gave; he was a tea-merchant in the city. He came in the same evening, before I could send for his character. He referred to a gentleman in Moorfields; my daughter went to the gentleman, he said, he did not know him. He went up with a parcel on the Sunday and took the key with him; he was not to come to sleep till the Monday evening; he then came and slept there. On Tuesday I missed the things, my sheet, towel, spoons, and tea-tongs were gone.

Q. Where did you find these things - A. He sent me a letter.

Q. Do you know his hand writing - A. I never saw him write.

JAMES ALEXANDER . I am an officer. I produce two sheets.

Prosecutrix. They are my property.

Prisoner's Defence. Gentlemen of the jury, It is my humble hope and trust, knowing that I am come before a jury of my countrymen, to offer these few observations; although they may appear foreign to the charge, yet they are inseperably connected with the groundwork of my conduct. Gentlemen, I am unfortunately deserted and persecuted, and the persons I mean to ailude to are the appointed guardians to my wife and family. In their views they are fulfilling the voice of a dying parent, in persecuting the children. My brother was sent on board a ship at the Nore. I am the husband of the eldest child. I have been insulted by them in the grossest manner, and by them treated with indignation; our quarterly salary was diminished; not having it in my power to have redress from the law, I threatened them with manual punishment. I was plunged into a prison fourteen weeks by their power. I began to think I was to be sent after my unfortunate brother, and the only thing left for me to do, they told me, was by signing a certain deed to our disadvantage. I refused to do it, and at the same time I got bail; I absconded, and was a prey to the greatest distress. This was my fatal epoch; I was unable to appear in public, I was friendless and deserted; my infant son and dying wife made me do acts of the greatest dishonour; nothing but the most imperious necessity prompted me to act as I have done. I have a letter from the honourable Mr. Wilbeiforce, Member of Parliament, I beg leave to forward it to your Lordship, that you may be satisfied.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100919-97

723. THOMAS BASSET was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of September , a ham, value 15 s. the property of Benjamin Richardson .

SARAH YATES . On the tenth of September, about nine in the morning, I was going past Mr. Richardson's, a cheesemonger 's shop, at the corner of West-street, Grafton-street , I saw the prisoner put his hand into the window and take a ham; I informed Mr. Richardson of it, he sent a man after him, he took the prisoner and the ham.

JAMES BRIMSKILL. I am a servant to Mr. Richardson. From information of the last witness, I pursued the prisoner, he fell down and dropped the ham, I picked up the ham and took him. This is the ham, it is my master's,

Prisoner's defence. I leave myself to the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY , aged 32.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and Whipped in Jail .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100919-98

724. CATHARINE KENNEDY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of September , two pounds weight of sewing-cotton, value 14 s. the property of James Pratt ; and MARGARET KENNEDY for receiving the same, knowing it to be stolen .

JAMES PRATT . I keep a cotton warehouse , 132, Bunhill-row . Catharine Kennedy was my servant , she had lived with me two months; she had warning to quit my service, and having suspicion, I sent for an officer to search her box; she acknowledged to have some cotton of mine in her pocket, which we found; we searched the mother's apartment in Type-street; we found property to the amount which is now produced in court.

Q. Used the mother to come to see her - A. No.

EDWARD TRING . I found this cotton in Margaret Kennedy 's room, and this cotton in Catharine's pocket.

Catharine Kennedy's defence. I slept in a room where a great deal of cotton was kept; I took it, not thinking to injure my master; I took it to my mother, she was not at home. I hope you will shew mercy, it is the first crime that ever I was guilty of.

Margaret Kennedy was not put on her defence.

CATHARINE KENNEDY , GUILTY , aged 18.

Fined 1 s. and discharged .

MARGARET KENNEDY , NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100919-99

725. SARAH ROBERTS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of July , a boy's coat, value 20 s. and a boy's waistcoat, value 10 s the property of William Butters .

WILLIAM BUTTERS. I am a taylor , I live at 71, Tottenham-court-road .

Q. When did you lose this coat - A. On the 28th of July, about seven o'clock in the morning, from information, I ran out of the shop and found this coat and waistcoat upon this woman; it is my property. When I overtook the prisoner, she said, she had nothing upon her; I told her I must get a constable and get her searched; I took the coat from her, and she dropped the waistcoat.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked up the coat and waistcoat. I never was in the shop, nor do I know where the shop is.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Fined 1 s. Confined Six Months in the House of Correction, and there kept to hard labour .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100919-100

726. SEBASTIN PULLEN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of September , twelve pair of boots, value 12 l. and five pair of lasts, value 3 s. the property of William Limebeer ; and THOMAS BATES for feloniously receiving, on the 18th of September , the said boots, he knowing them to have been stolen .

WILLIAM LIMEBEER . I am a shoemaker , I live in Fleet-street , Pullen was a journeyman of mine, he had been in my employ better than two years.

Q. Did you receive a letter from the prisoner Pullen - A. I did, on the 17th of September.

(The letter read, directed to Mr. Limebeer, no date or post-mark.)

"Honoured Master - I hope you will not advertise me, or mention the circumstance to my relations; I have been one of the greatest villains to you; I was young and inexperienced to Mr. Bates, he is an old man, and should not have betrayed a boy to commit such a crime; he said, he would tell me how I might steal the boots from you, and to mark the name of any person in the shop that took the work in, and he would give me sixteen shillings a pair for them; he said he would send them off for Bombay, he told me that he sent them off to a captain. I am now assured you can hang me for forging the name of the men in the shop. I hope you will forgive me for the sake of my poor aunt. May God protect you, is the prayer of the wretched

"Sebastin Pullen."

Prosecutor. I received this letter after I had desired Owen, one of my men to go to Pullen.

Q. Did you, after you had received this letter, go to the house of Bates with Daniel Leadbetter - A. I did, to number ninety-five, Bartholomew Close; he is a shoemaker, and keeps an open shop there. Leadbetter searched his shop in my presence: the prisoner was not within; Leadbetter opened a cupboard in the shop and found thirteen pair of boots, twelve pair of them were in an unfinished state. I swear, to the best of my judgment, the twelve pair of unfinished boots were my property. Bates then came in the shop; Leadbetter addressed him, he said, that he had got a warrant to search the house, he had found them boots, he wanted to know how he could account for them. Bates replied, that he bought them of Mr. King, that he could produce the bill and receipt. He took the file where he usually filed his bills, and sorted them over for about ten minutes; the officer seemed impatient, seeing he could not find it, said, he must come along with him. He was taken away. In four or five of these boots are my marks, and the others have the appearance of the marks having been rubbed out; I place the number in the back of the boot.

Mr. Gurney. Q. Your usual method of doing business is this, that you or your, clickers deliver out the materials to Pullen, and he is to bring back these materials to you made up into boots - A. Yes.

Q. How many clickers - A. I have three that are in the habit of doing that.

Q. You have three clickers, and the duty of the clickers is this, he delivers out the materials to the maker, the maker brings the work home and receives from your clickers a shop-bill, which is an acknowledgment of his bringing home the work that he had taken out - A. Yes.

Q. Upon the production of that shop-bill to you, you or a clicker pay him for his work - A. Yes.

Q. Therefore what is here conveyed in the letter, by marking the initials of your shopmen, is imputing this sort of fraud, instead of bringing home the work that he should have obtained from your shopman, a shop-bill, purporting that the work was brought home; that you understand by that - A. I do.

Q. So that the fraud is a double fraud to you, you pay for the work, and do not get back the boots - A. That is the case.

Q. So that you have given out the leather for the making, and the boots are not brought back to you, and yet you have paid for the making - A. Yes.

Q. These marks that you speak of are made upon the leather before it goes out to be made - A. Yes.

Q. Therefore the crime which you impute to Pullen, instead of bringing the boots home to you, he obtained from you the money for making - A. Yes.

Q. They were never in your possession in the shape of boots. You have charged him with having taken these boots from you; they were only boots in the shape of legs and soles - A. No other way.

Q. The finishing is only the blacking and polishing; afterwards did you find any last at Bates's - A. I took five, but I thought one of them did not belong to me; I found them in the shop with the numbers rasped out from the usual place where I number them.

DANIEL LEADBETTER . I am an officer. In consequence of a search-warrant, on the the 18th of September, I went to Bates's house; I searched the house; in a cupboard I took out these twelve pair of boots, which Mr. Limebeer said belonged to him. After I had found these boots, in about ten minutes, Bates came in; I then asked him how he accounted for them boots being in his possession; he said, he bought them of a man of the name of King; he could shew me the bill and receipt for them; he took down two files of receipts, he looked them over two or three times; I told him I could not wait, as he could not find them; I advised him to put his papers up and examine them at leisure. Mr. Limebeer took out six lasts from the rails, five of them he thought were his, and one was not.

EDWARD OWEN . Q. Are you in the employment of Mr. Limebeer - A. I am.

Q. Did you, on the 17th of September, go to Pullen - A. I did; it was before he wrote any letter to Mr. Limebeer; I told him, that he had been robbing Mr.

Limebeer, and that he had better confess; he then said, he would write to Mr. Limebeer,

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100919-101

727. SEBASTIN PULLIN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of September , two pair of upper-leathers for shoes, value 4 s. the property of William Limebeer , and JOHN LEADBETTER , for feloniously receiving the said goods, knowing them to be stolen .

Mr. Pooley, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoners were

ACQUITTED .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100919-102

728. SEBASTIN PULLEN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of December , a pair of boots, value 1 l. and ALEXANDER WILSON , for feloniously receiving them, knowing them to be stolen .

Mr. Pooley, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoners were

ACQUITTED .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100919-103

729. RACHAEL CAMPBELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of September , four shawls, value 4 l. 4 s. the property of George Vipond and George Rimington .

GEORGE RIMINGTON . My partner's name is George Vipond ; we are linen-draper s and silk-mercer s, 29, Ludgate-hill . On the 11th of September, in consequence of information from Sarah Davis , I went out of my shop, I saw the prisoner about twenty yards from my shop, near St. Paul's; she was standing; when I came up to her, I told her I thought there was an error, and I would be obliged to her to walk back to the shop, She returned willingly. When she came back into the shop, I told her I was informed she had secreted a shawl, or shawls. When she was in the shop she denied it, and threw off her cloak, and appeared in great distress, and ran behind the counter. I followed her, and after pleading for mercy, saying she had two children, I saw the shawls fall to the ground from underneath her clothes.

SARAH DAVIS . I live in Castle-street, Clerkenwell. On the 11th of September I was in Mr. Rimington's shop, I saw the prisoner come in, she asked to look at some shawls; she did not like the price of them; she threw a parcel of shawls down with her cloak; in her confusion she dropped a dollar, she picked up the dollar, put the shawls between her knees, put her hand into her pocket-hole, and drew the shawl or shawls up. I told Mr. Rimington what I had seen. I saw her after she was brought back, she forced herself behind the counter; I saw the shawls drop at her feet.

WILLIAM KIMBER . I am a constable. I was sent for to take charge of this woman. When I came into the shop, she was behind the counter, struggling with Mr. Rimington; she then had the shawls partly over her cloak. The shawls were delivered to me, I have kept them ever since.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence, called five witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY , aged 40,

Confined one year in Newgate .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant

Reference Number: t18100919-104

730. WILLIAM PLUMMER was indicted for feloniously assaulting Edward Kinan in the King's highway, putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, a dollar, two half-crowns, eight shillings, and two sixpences, his property .

EDWARD KINAN . Q. You had been a seaman on board an East Indiaman - A. Yes.

Q. Did you live in Somers-town on the 13th of August last - A. Yes; I went to Barnet with my wife and friend that day; I returned at night between twelve and one, in a returned post-chaise.

Q. Where did that returned post-chaise take you to - A. It took me to the Bull's Head, I went there to get lodgings, I could not get them; my wife was with me at the time. We went from the Bull's Head to the Barley Mow, Long-lane, for the same purpose. The postboy left me there.

Q. Did you apply there for a bed - A. Yes.

Q. Did you get one - A. No.

Q. Look at the prisoner, do you know him - A. I know him perfectly well; I took the right cuff off his coat.

Q. Did you see him there - A. Yes; I treated him with some drink; he said he would get me a bed; we were in company there a quarter of an hour.

Q. Did you change any piece of money there - A. A seven-shilling-piece.

Q. Did he see that - A. He did; I paid for the liquor.

Q. When you had been there a quarter of an hour did you go out together - A. Yes; my wife and he went with me, we went down the lane a good piece, he said, there is a house I can get lodgings; he said to my wife, stand there, of that side, if I do not get lodgings in that house, I will get lodgings in another. I went with him, and he walked close by my side; my wife staid behind.

Q. What house was that - A. I could not tell then. When he got me outside he got hold of me by the throat; he put his hand into my trowsers pocket, and took all my money out of my pocket, some of it fell on the ground. Upon this I catched hold of the right hand cuff of his coat; it tore off, I threw it away, I never saw it any more. I tried to lay hold of him the second time, and had like to have fell on him; if I could have held him I would not have let him go until I had beat him all over blue. I had nineteen shillings odd, a five-shilling piece, two halfcrowns, and two sixpences, all the rest in shillings. I attempted to pursue after the man, I sung out; there were two others with him; I called the watchman, he run after him, but he knew the way well.

Q. Was the pocket from which he took the money the pocket in which you had put the change of the seven-shilling piece into at the public-house - A. Yes, and it being a wet morning, the patrol challenged my wife what she had lost.

Q. You communicated your loss - A. Yes.

Q. Did the patrol go with you any where - A. The patrol went with me to the Barley Mow, when I returned there I saw the prisoner drinking at the bar with a woman.

Did you know him - A. Directly I knew him.

Q. Did you observe his coat - A. Immediately, in one moment.

Q.Was his coat deprived of its cuff - A. It was quite fresh torn off.

Q. Did you charge him with the robbery - A. Yes.

Q. What did he say - A. Nothing; how could he say any thing for himself, he remained silent; the patrol took him to the watchhouse, I saw him searched, and one of the shillings I knew in particular.

Q. How much was found upon him - A. There was half-a-crown, and two or three shillings, there was one that I got from my wife, I had it in my hand playing with it like a child, it had an A upon it.

Q. Did you go back to the place where you had been robbed - A. Yes, with a lanthorn, I found nothing; I was creditably informed, that there had been a lanthorn there before.

Q. How long was it before you returned back to the spot where you had been robbed - A. About a quarter of an hour; it could not be more.

Q. When he seized you by the throat were you disabled - A. Yes, I could scarce speak at the time.

CATHERINE KINAN . A. Are you wife to that last honest man - A. Yes.

Q. You have heard what he has said - A. Yes.

Q.Now upon the oath you have taken, is it true what he has been speaking - A. Yes.

Q. Do you recollect the man - A. Yes, the prisoner is the man.

Q. After you had gone out of the Barley-mow what happened when you came to Chick-lane - A. He came up Chicklane, he said, there is the house; he told me to stop there on the other side; I saw him lay hold of my husband by the throat, he tore the shirt and the pocket too; I called out a robbery, I thought I should be killed as well as he.

Q. After he got away from your husband did you see him with any thing in his hand - A. No, I was on one side, and he on the other; he told me he chucked the cuff away; the patrol came up, I told him what had happened, then he went with me; I knew the man directly I saw him.

WILLIAM CHALLIEES . Q. I believe on this night of the 30th of August, you were one of the patrols of St. Sepulchre's - A. I was; on the 30th of August, about half past one o'clock, I was going by the Bull's head, Smithfield, I saw this man and woman telling the watchman that they had been robbed; I directly took them to the Barley-mow. I asked him if he should know the man if he saw him; he said, yes, from all the world, he said he was dressed in a light coloured coat, like a coachman, and part of his right cuff sleeve was gone away, by his seizing him by the cuff, he had pulled it off himself. I said, come along with me, we will try if we can find him. We went to the Barley-mow, and there was the prisoner and a woman standing at the bar, directly they saw him, they said that is the man, I will give you charge of him.

Q. What did the prisoner say - A. Not a single word.

Q. Did you observe the sleeve of his coat - A. Yes, it was gone off, it appeared quite fresh, I found it was the right arm; I asked him particular; he said, the right arm, so I found it. I searched him at the watchhouse, I found on him a half crown, two shillings, and three or four halfpence; before I shewed the prosecutor the money, I asked him if he should know any of the money; he said, there is but one shilling I can swear to, it was marked with the letter A. I shewed him the half-crown, he said he could not swear to it; I shewed him a shilling, a remarkable one, he said he could not swear to it; I shewed him the other, he said he could swear to that, it was marked with a letter A upon it.

Prosecutor. This is the shilling.

- HALE. I am a watchman; I can only tell you the same story.

JOHN CHAPMAN . Q. You are the landlord of the Barley-mow - A. Yes. These people first came in my house, between twelve and one, they all three came in together, the prisoner, the prosecutor, and his wife; the prisoner asked me whether he could get a lodging for this man and woman; I said, no, we are all full. They all three went out together; he said, he could get a lodging in Chick-lane . I have seen the prisoner frequently before.

Prisoner. The money is my own.

Q. to Prosecutor. Did he take all the money you had in your pocket - A. Every halfpenny.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 18.

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100919-105

731. THOMAS HUMPHREYS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of August , seven iron pins, value 7 s. twenty-four bolts and nuts, value 4 s. one hundred screws, value 2 s. two spring sword case catches, value 2 s. the property of Phillip Godsal , Charles Baxter , and Edward Mackglew .

CHARLES EDWARD BAXTER . I am the son of Mr. Baxter. The firm of the house is Phillip Godsal , Charles Baxter , and Edward Mackglew , they are coachmaker s in Long Acre . On the 16th of August, the prisoner was clearing some things away in the cellar, at the back premises. I went to the top of the stairs, I saw the prisoner putting the property in his pocket and under his waistcoat; I was about three minutes watching him, I then called him up, and asked him what he had been about in the cellar; he said, he had been putting the things away; I asked him what he had put the things in his pocket for; he denied having any thing about him that did not belong to him. I then told him that I saw him take them, and desired him to return them to where he took them from. He took these seven pins out of his pocket, they are worth about a shilling. I sent the officer to search his lodgings, there he found one hundred screws, twenty-four bolts and nuts, and two spring sword case catches.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100919-106

732. JOZE SURVANA was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of August , from the person of John Wood , a silver watch, value 5 l. a gold chain, value 5 l. a gold seal, value 1 l. a silk purse, value 2 s. a guinea, two dollars, two bank-notes, value 20 l. a two-pound bank-note, and a one-pound bank-note, his property .

JOHN WOOD . I am master of the ship, Hilton , she was laying at Bell wharf tier, near Wapping , on the

Middlesex side. I went to bed about ten o'clock, I undressed myself, and hung my watch inside of my bed place, a silver watch, gold chain, and gold seal; I had a purse with a guinea in it, the notes and dollars were loose in my breeches pocket, two dollars, two ten pound notes, a two pound note, and a one pound note, I lost them in the night, whoever came into the ship took them away; I knew nothing of it till six o'clock in the morning, I then found my clothes removed from the place where I left them, the watch and all the property gone, I saw the prisoner in custody, about nine the same morning, and all the property I had lost.

JOHN HERBERT . I am a Thames Police officer. On the 16th of August, about half past two o'clock, before day-light, near Pellican-stairs, I saw a ship's boat rowing to shore; I boarded the boat, the prisoner only was in it; I examined the boat, found it belonged to the ship, Hilton, a collier of South Shields. I took the prisoner in custody; when I landed him he made a start to run, I laid hold of him; I searched him, in his waistcoat pocket I found a watch, and chain and seal to it, two dollars, two shillings, and two sixpences; in his trowsers pocket I found two ten pound notes, a two pound note, a one pound note, and a guinea, in a brown silk purse; he made me to understand, that he had worked for the money, and the watch he had bought of some sailor, I locked him up; in the morning I found out the Hilton, and gave information, Captain Wood came to the office.

Prisoner's Defence. The two sailors who saw me play at cards, and win the watch, they are gone to sea.

GUILTY , aged 27.

Judgment respited.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100919-107

733. JOSEPH TOTHERICK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of July , half a coil of rope, value 14 s. the property of Daniel Stephens , and William Watt .

JAMES EVERETT . I am a servant to Daniel Stephens and William Watt , they have a rope-house in the Commercial-road . On the 30th of July, I saw the prisoner going out of our rope-house with something in a bag, I ran after him and pulled him in again; I asked him what he had got; he said, nothing; I sent for a constable. There was half a coil of rope in the bag.

Prisoner's Defence. The cord I took to look at.

GUILTY , aged 62.

Fined 1 s. and confined One Year in the House of Correction .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100919-108

734. JOHN RILEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of July , seven yards of linen cloth, value 17 s. 6 d. the property of Joseph Partridge .

JOSEPH Partridge . I live at the Sir Han Sloanes head public house, Knightsbridge . The prisoner was quartered at our house, my box was in the room where he slept. On the 28th of June, between nine and ten o'clock at night, I missed seven yards of linen cloth out of my box; in about half an hour after I missed it, I saw it at Mr. Chalmers, a pawnbrokers.

JOHN GOODEAR . I am a servant to Mr. Chalmers, pawnbroker, at Knightsbridge. On the 28th of July, about ten o'clock in the evening, the prisoner pledged seven yards of linen, I lent him eight shillings on it; in about half an hour afterwards the prosecutor came and claimed it.

Prisoner's Defence. The cloth was given to me by another man to pawn, an old man who has been drinking, and said he was a watchman. I have been serving my King and country thirty-five years; I never defrauded a man yet of a shilling.

GUILTY , aged 50.

Judgement respited.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100919-109

735. WILLIAM HARRISON and WILLIAM COGNEY , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of September , in the dwelling house of Thomas M'Carthy , a watch, value 4 l. and a bank note, value 2 l. the property of William Crowder .

WILLIAM CROWDER . I was a coachman to the late Sir Francis Ramsay ; I was not in place at the time I lost my property, I lodged at the three Compasses, Bedford-square. On the 15th of September, I was coming up Oxford-street, just by the Pantheon, I saw Harrison, who appeared at that time intoxicated; a woman came up to him and took a watch out of his pocket, it was soon returned to him; I offered my assistance to convey him home; he then said, that he would go into a public house in Oxford-street, which he did, I went with him, he still appeared to be intoxicated, and called for a pint of beer; Cogney there made his appearance, and sat close by the side of us. I asked Harrison if he would go; he said, that he had been drinking, he had fourteen shillings to pay, if I would go with him there he would go home; I agreed to go with him; we went then together to Thomas M'Carthy', public-house, in St. Giles's ; Cogney followed after, and entered the room pretty nigh as soon as we did; and at M'Carthy's in came another man, who appeared like a groom. They had not been in above half a minute, before Harrison produced a pack of cards, seemingly from the window, and offered to play a game of put with the person appearing like a groom, the did play; the groom got up and asked me to hold his hand while he went out to make water; Cogney was sitting by all the time; I immediately replied, I did not understand playing at cards, I did not wish to have any thing to do with them; he said, d - n it it can be no harm, you can take hold of the cards and just look at them while he returned back.

Q. Did you understand the game of put - A. No; I had no intention of playing at cards at that time; I then laid hold of the cards, I looked at the hand, there were two three's and an ace; Harrison then offered me to play for a pound note, I refused, the groom had returned then, he persuaded me to do it; I pulled out a two pound note, the Groom took the two pound note, before I began playing Harrison had recovered from his drukenness; I pulled out my watch to see the time, and laid it on the table, the watch and notes were taken away in less than a minute, and they all three went away at once, they did not stop to play; when they went away I stood very much confused; the landlord came in, told me they had robbed me, which way they had gone, why did not I follow them; I followed in the direction the landlord told me, I saw Cogny and Harrison going into a public house; I immediately offered five shillings for any body to go for a constable. They let Harrison out of the back door; I saw Harrison again in King-street.

Q.Harrison was not able to walk strait when you saw him first in the morning - A. No. I went round King-street, Seven Dials, I saw Harrison and catched him by the collar, he immediately produced the watch in the middle of the street; he said here is your watch let me go. He was secured

Q. When did you see Cogney again - A. I did not see Cogney for some time; I said to Harrison, d - n you give me the two pound note; he said, he had not got that; then I said you shall not go away from me. This was about one o'clock, it was half past four when we took Cogney; on the same day the officer searched Harrison, Harrison produced a bad five pound note, and a gambling thing, which Harrison called a puzzle, the note was made to look like a five pound note. Cogney was found in a court near St. Giles's, the officer brought him out to me, I knew him directly.

Q. Was any of your property found upon him - A. No, there was not, they could not find the two pound note. The other man, that appeared like a groom, has not been taken.

Q. Should you know him again if you were to see him. - A. Yes

Q. Whenever you see him lay hold of him and convey him to the first public office - A. The day after, the publican and some other man, a strange man, came to me, brought me two one pound notes, instead of my two pound note.

Mr. Knapp. You have been a gentleman's servant, how long have you been out of place - A. Six weeks.

Q. You do not know how to play at cards - A. I have played among servants, I do not know the real game of put.

Q. Upon your oath, do not you know which is the best card to the game of put - A. I cannot tell.

Court. Which is the best card they reckon at put - A. They call three.

Q. What was in your hand - A. Two three's and an ace.

Q. Then you had a very good hand - A. I do not know what the hand was.

Mr. Knapp. Then two three's and an ace would be a good hand at a gentleman's house - A. I do not know much about card playing.

Q. You understand which is the best card - A. I am not a gambler.

Q. You put down a two pound notes, did not the prisoner put down a two pound note - A. I do not know whether he put down any thing or no; I put down a note which the stockholder took up. If I had won, I did not expect to have a one pound note of a man that was drunk.

Q. Did not you put down your watch, and Harrison staked his watch against it - A. No, I put down my watch, they took the watch immediately and went away, they did not give me time to play.

Q. When you put these down did not you mean to play for the watch and the note - A. I did not intend it at all.

Court. For what purpose did you put down your two pound note on the table, explain it to the jury - A. Not with any design to play; being persuaded, I took the two pound note out, and it was taken away immediately.

- READ. I am an officer of Bow-street; I was coming down King-street, Crowder had hold of Harrison, Harrison had returned him his watch; he charged him with a two pound note, Harrison said he had not got it.

Q. Did he tell you at what place this happened - A.He did not know at that time; he said, it was at a public house; the prisoner, Cogney, took us to it; some time after I took charge of Harrison, I knew Harrison before, not Cogney.

Q.When you had taken Cogney, did the prosecutor know him - A. Yes, he pointed him out, and charged him with being in company with him, and taking his watch and two pound note; Cogney said, he had never seen Harrison before, he owned being in company at that time. Harrison appeared to me to be sober, I searched him, I found this puzzle, and this fivepenny note, the five is marked in the same way as a five pound note; Cogney had no notes or money about him. When I apprehended Cogney, he was at the Hare and Hounds, Puckeridge-street, kept by Thomas M'Carthy.

Q. Did not you learn from the prosecutor himself, that he had been playing at put - A.He said, that when this man went out, he persuaded him to take up his hand, he said he did not play it out; I understood him that he took the note out to play.

THOMAS HAWKINS . I was coming down King-street, I saw Crowder collar Harrison; he charged Harrison with his watch and a two pound note; Harrison took out two watches, he gave Crowder one, he said, here is the watch, let me go; Crowder said, I want my two pound note; Harrison told him he had not got it; Crowder said, he would not loose him. I understood the same as Read, that he had pulled out the note for the purpose of playing, and that they had run away with the watch and note before the game was out.

Prosecutor. This is the watch, it is a silver watch.

Harrison's defence. I was very much in liquor; we played four or five chalks; at the commencement of the play we did not play for watches or money. He put his two pound note, and clapped his watch against my watch, as for the note I never had possession of it. When he came to me in the street, I said, here is your watch, take it; as to the puzzle, the prosecutor was present when I bought it; I bought the puzzle for my children, and the note I gave twopence for it in Holborn. The prosecutor, I am convinced, has taken a false oath, merely to take my liberty away. I have lived seventeen years in one house, Captain Newman lives in the house with me; if I was that notorious character, I should think that respectable man would not live in my house; my wife keeps a boarding school in Surry. When the prosecutor found he had got such a good hand, he put down his watch against my watch. I never saw the prisoner before in my life, had not he been indicted he would have been a witness for me. If any officer can say I was a thief, I should willingly go out of the country. I was so tipsey, that when I was taken to Bridewell, I laid upon the stool; I had my gold ring taken off my finger. I am innocent of the charge I declare to Almighty God.

Cogney's defence. I came into the house for a pint of porter, and sat there; I know no person that was there; I drank out of their pot; I never saw them before.

HARRISON, GUILTY , aged 42.

COGNEY, GUILTY , aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100919-110

736. MARY PORTER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of August , a watch, value 40 s. the property of John Godwin , from his person .

JOHN GOODWIN . I am a lighterman , I live in Pell-place, New-road, St. George's. On the 5th of August, about half past seven in the evening, I met the prisoner in Rosemary-lane, she took me home to her place, and in about five minutes the woman went out of the room; I fell asleep till half after eleven; I missed my watch when I awoke.

Q. Where was the woman - A. She was not in the room; I found the watch at a pawnbroker's in Whitechapel.

Q. Are you sure that is the woman - A. Yes.

JOSEPH DUNN . I am a pawnbroker, I live at 83, Whitechapel. I produce a watch pawned on the 6th of August, in the name of Mary Porter . I cannot swear to the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I do not recollect ever seeing the man at all.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100919-111

737. GEORGE WELCH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of December , thirty yards of Gingham, value 15 s. and twenty yards of cotton, value 20 s. the property of James Parker .

JAMES PARKER . I am a linen-draper , 104, Shoreditch . On Tuesday, the eighteenth of this month I lost the property; about seven o'clock in the evening I crossed the street to speak to an opposite neighbour, and on my turning my back to his house, I saw the prisoner walking backwards and forwards at the front of my house; after seeing him make two or three attempts to go into the shop, I went over to my shop and informed my wife, who was in the parlour; she disturbed him two or three times; I came to the door and looked at him; he would not go away; I went across the way and waited a considerable time; he after two or three times attempting, went into the shop, took the goods mentioned in the indictment from off a pile. I then crossed the street, and when he came out, with the assistance of a neighbour, took him by the collar; he attempted to drop the goods; I caught them as he was dropping them. I took him to Worship-street office.

Q. What are the goods - A. Thirty yards of Gingham, and twenty yards of printed cotton.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

GUILTY , aged 62.

Fined 1 s. confined One Year in the house of Correction, and there kept to hard labour .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100919-112

738. MARY MURPHY , alias CONNOLLY , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of September , a quart pewter pot, value 1 s. 4 d. the property of Joseph Collis .

JOSEPH COLLIS . I am a publican , I keep the George, Great St. Andrews-street, Seven-dials . On the first of this month, about four in the afternoon, the prisoner came into my house, she enquired for somebody, she went up to the top of the house, came down stairs, and went into the yard, and took a quart pot. I ran after her, catched hold of her arm; the officer was coming by at the time; she was stopped, and the pot was found upon her. This is the pot; it is mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I do not recollect any thing about it.

GUILTY , aged 39.

Fined 1 s. confined Six Months in the House of Correction, and there kept to hard labour .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100919-113

739. MARY SANDERS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of July , a shift, value 3 s. and a frock, value 1 s. the property of Peter Gibeaud .

MARY GIBEAUD . I live at No. 3, Bury-street , my husband's name is Peter Gibeaud ; I am a laundress. On the 10th of July I lost the shift and the frock from the staircase of the two pair; I hung it there about four in the afternoon; I never recollect seeing it after. I saw the duplicate of it by an officer that took her in custody.

JOHN SMITH . I am an officer. On the 1st of August, about half past four in the afternoon, I was sent for to No. 6, Little Russell street, Bloomsbury, I there apprehended the prisoner, I took her to the watchhouse, searched her, and found upon her thirty-one duplicates, one of these duplicates related to this property.

JAMES SHERWIN . I am a pawnbroker in Little Pulteney-street. On the 10th of July I took in a shift and a frock about half past four in the afternoon, I cannot swear to the prisoner. The duplicate that Smith produced I gave to the person that pawned it.

Prisoner's Defence. A young woman that lived with me gave me these duplicates. I told the officer where she lived and worked; she was not sought after.

GUILTY , aged 29.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100919-114

740. ANN WOODMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of September , a sheet, value 5 s. the property of William Elliot .

JANE ELLIOTT . My husband's name is William, we live in Essex-street, Hoxton . On Tuesday, last week, about one o'clock, I went down into my yard, and when I returned to my room, I missed a sheet from off the horse by the fire. The prisoner dropped this bag in the road, which led to the discovery where I might find her. I asked my neighbour if she saw any body come in; she said, yes, an old clothes-woman.

ANN SHARP . I live next door to the prosecutrix. I saw the prisoner go into her house; when Mrs. Elliot enquired I told her.

THOMAS PEARSON . I am a pawnbroker, 161, Shoreditch. I took that sheet in pawn on the 18th of September, between one and two o'clock, of the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I asked him to lend me two shillings, he lent it me; as soon as they found it out, I told them I had lost the ticket.

GUILTY , aged 80.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction, and there kept to hard labour .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100919-115

741. CAROLINE COOK was indicted for feloniously stealing, from the person of William Dwyer , a ten pound bank note, his property .

WILLIAM DWYER. I am a bookseller in Holborn.

Q. When was it that you lost this bank note - A. On the 7th of August last, between nine and ten in

the evening, I was going up Great Queen-street, Lincoln's-inn-fields , a woman threw her arms round me, and said, here is a tall man; I threw her arms off; I did not perceive that I had lost any thing. The next morning, when I discovered that I had lost a ten pound note, I went to the bank and stopped the note.

Q. Where was the note - A. In my breeches pocket.

Q. Are you sure the prisoner took it - A. No, I traced the note to her.

Q. Are you sure that she is the woman - A. No, I am not; I did not pay any attention at the time.

MR. FOULKES. I am a linen-draper, No. 4, Little Russell-street, Covent-garden. The prisoner bought some goods of me to the amount of one pound fourteen shillings. I changed a ten pound note for her, on the 19th or 20th of August. That note was traced back to me the next day.

Q.to Prosecutor. You do not know that woman attacked you - A. I do not; she said, that she had received this note four months ago. It had not come out of the bank at that time.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100919-116

742. JOHN WELCH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2nd of August , a loaf of bread, value 1 s. 5 d. the property of John Morgan .

JOHN MORGAN . I am a journeyman baker . I lost the loaf on the 2nd of August, at noon, from the basket at the corner of Bolton-row, Piccadilly ; I left in the basket eleven quartern loaves, and when I came back there were only ten; from information I pursued the prisoner and overtook him with the loaf, before he had got twenty yards from the basket. A few days before that, he robbed me and I forgave him.

CHARLES BUCKINCHAM. I saw the prisoner at the corner of Bolton-row, go to the basket, take a loaf out, and put it in his leather apron; the baker came up, I told him, he followed and stopped him.

ALEXANDER BALL . I took the prisoner in custody, he went down upon his knees and begged pardon, the baker said, I forgave you the last loaf, I will not this.

GUILTY , aged 53.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and whipped in jail .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100919-117

743. JAMES HATT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of August , two yards of velveteen, value 3 s. two pair of breeches, value 12 s. and two pair of trowsers, value 8 s. the property of John Johnson .

JOHN JOHNSON . I am a slopseller , 50, Broad-street, Ratcliffe-cross . On the 24th of August, between seven and eight in the morning, I was in the back-room, I saw the prisoner on his knees on the counter; he took all these things from off a shelf; I called out to him, directly he threw them down, and jumped off the counter. I secured him.

Prisoner's Defence. I went into the shop intending to buy a pair of braces, I had a crown-piece in my hand, the gentleman came out of the back-room, and said you d - d thief. I never touched the things at all.

GUILTY . aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder,

Reference Number: t18100919-118

744. JANE BRICE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of September , a pelleise, value 10 s. a gown, value 5 s. and ten yards of silk, value 10 s. the property of Jane Hamilton .

SECOND COUNT. For stealing the said good, stating them to be the property of Archibald Hamilton .

JANE HAMILTON. My husband's name is Archibald Hamilton , I live at 17, Duke-street, St. James's . I went down to Margate; on the 10th of August I received a letter from my mother, informing me some duplicates were found. I returned to town on the 11th or 12th, my mother gave me the duplicates, and I found these things at the pawnbroker's. The prisoner was my servant , she had been living with me three or four months.

WILLIAM ROGERS . I am a pawnbroker. I took in the pelleise and gown of the prisoner, on the 5th of September; the ten yards of silk were pledged on the third of September; I did not take that in myself.

Prisoner's Defence. I have nothing to say; I only want my wages and the duplicates that belong to me.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100919-119

745. SARAH LEFEVRE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of August , a dollar, three shillings, and twenty-two halfpence , the property of Jeremiah Hudson .

The prosecutor not appearing in court, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100919-120

746. JAMES QUARMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of August , a coat, value 5 s. a waistcoat, value 3 s. two pair of drawers, value 5 s. a pair of breeches, value 7 s. and a handkerchief, value 3 s. the property of Hugh M'Kay .

HUGH M'KAY. I am a serjeant in the 36th regiment; I lost these things at the Goat public house, Pimlico , on the 11th of August, they were tied up in a handkerchief, I had placed them upon the table, they were mine. The prisoner took them away from there about seven o'clock in the evening; a corporal of mine catched the prisoner with them in the Borough.

Q. Was the prisoner in the public house with you - A. Yes; he was sitting in the box with us; I knew him before.

Mr. Gurney. Q. You had been that day cloathing a recruit - A. Yes, to send him down to Tilbury-Fort.

Q. And the clothes were the recruit's clothes - A.They were before, but they all belonged to me at the time he took them away.

Q. The recruit gave the clothes to you, and you have been tried by a court martial - A. Yes, and honourably acquitted.

Q. You never swore that you entrusted this man to take them to your lodgings - A. No.

Q. Is that your hand-writing - A. It is.

(Read.)

"The information of Hugh M'Kay, taken before me, William Fielding , one of his Majesty's justices of Peace, this 22nd day of August, 1810, who being present, saith upon oath, I was in company with James Quarman, I entrusted him with one coat, a waistcoat, two pair of drawers, a pair of breeches, and a handkerchief, to take home to the house where he lodged, and early the next morning I found that he had absconded, and when I found him he had my coat and waistcoat on.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100919-121

747 RICHARD TURNER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 31st of August , a gold watch, value 30 l. a gold chain, value 4 l. two gold seals, value 5 l. and a gold key, value 10 s. the property of John Sparke Prowse .

JOHN SPARKE PROWSE. I am a ship and insurance broker . I lost my watch on the 31st of August, between seven and eight in the evening, while bathing in the New river, near Newington . After being in the water about two minutes, I heard the people on the bank ask, whose clothes are these. I got out of the water, examined my clothes, and found the fob cut out of my breeches, and the watch, chain, seals, and key gone, and the prisoner was in the custody of two witnesses who are here. I have never found my watch again.

GEORGE CHARING . I am a jeweller. After I had done bathing, me and William Horn were sitting on the bank, and saw the prisoner go towards the cloaths, then he went towards the river and put his hands into the water to wash his hands; then he went and sat by the side of the clothes, with his back towards me; I watched him, he took the breeches on his knee, I saw him put his hand up towards his waistcoat pocket, whether he put any thing in I could not see; he got up and ran away from the river, me and William Horn called out, stop thief! he fell down, we overtook him, and brought him to the clothes again, and called the gentleman out of the river; he came out, and said, he had lost his watch, chain, seals, and key.

Q. What did the man do with the watch - A. I cannot say.

Q. to Prosecutor. You never found your watch - A.Never; I did not search him immediately, in consequence of some person saying I had no right without an officer.

Q. Did you search the place - A. Yes, we did that evening, with a lanthorn, me and William Horn ; he found the pocket in the place where he stumbled and was taken.

WILLIAM HORN . On the 31st of August my man and I went up to bathe. I saw this gentleman jump into the water; the prisoner then put his hands into the water and went towards the clothes; he took something out of his pocket, what it was I cannot say, I have every reason to suppose it was a knife; he ran away, I pursued him, it was not twenty yards before I took him; immediately a mob gathered round him, I suppose he delivered the watch to a gang that was round him. I found the fob where he fell, not half a minute afterwards.

Prisoner's Defence. On that evening I went up to the river, after the constables had done duty, with an intention to bathe myself, I put my hands into the water to see if is was fit for me to go in, as I was hot walking; I began to unbutton my coat and waistcoat, I was taken short, I immediately made the best of my way to the hedge, there was a hue and cry of stop thief, I fell down; I was taken into a greenstall and searched, they never let my hands go, nothing was found on me.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100919-122

748. JAMES BRADLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of September , a hat, value 9 s. and a handkerchief, value 6 d. the property of Joseph Braham .

JOSEPH BRAHAM. I lost my hat on the 18th of December, about half past one, it was taken from my chest on the half-deck. The prisoner came on board, the mate of the ship thought he had been one of the men, called him John, he answered, yes; the mate called for some beer, he did not bring the beer, the mate was alarmed; we went and catched him on the half-deck; the hat and handkerchief he had on, they were taken from him at the Thames police; he left his old hat on board the ship.

Prisoner's Defence. A man belonging to the ship told me to go on board; he would give me a jacket, handkerchief and hat; he owed me some money; his name is Isaac Hamilton .

GUILTY , aged 22.

Judgment respited.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100919-123

749. MARY ANN PICK was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 18th of August , two dollars and a one pound note , the property of John Bick .

JOHN BICK . On the 18th of August, between ten and eleven at night, I was going along Whitechapel, the prisoner asked me to give her some gin, I gave her some, and went home with her; in the morning when I got up I found my property was gone. I found my one pound note at the gin shop that she used, the Whittington and Cat, Whitechapel.

SAMUEL WILKINSON . On Saturday morning I took charge of the prisoner, I searched her and found one pound nine shillings and eleven pence, and three dollars; the note was produced to the prosecutor at the liquor shop.

- I produce two notes, I took one of the prisoner, I could not say which.

Prosecutor. This is the note.

Prisoner's Defence. I met that gentleman in Whitechapel; we went and had something to drink; he went home with me, he was very much intoxicated; he said provided he could lay down till morning he would give me something; he gave me the note to change.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100919-124

745. ELIZABETH LINTON was indicted for feloniously marrying William Bonner , on the 25th of December, in the 43d year of his Majesty's reign , Thomas Linton , her former husband being then alive .

The prosecutor not appearing in court, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100919-125

746. HENRY SCHENIOR was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 17th of July , four coats, value 4 l. and a waistcoat, value 5 s. the property of Moses Levy .

MOSES LEVY . I am a taylor , I live at 13, Bennett-street, Westminster . On the 17th of July I lost from my workshop thirteen coats, a waistcoat, and a pair of breeches; the prisoner worked for me eight days before that. I have only found four coats and a waistcoat. On the 17th of August I saw the prisoner in Leadenhall-street, I asked him where my property was, he told me he would take me to his lodging and shew me; he took me to Rosemary-lane, there he ran from me; I caught him again and gave him into the hands of the constable. He had a coat and a waistcoat on of mine. We found the other three coats where he confessed he had sold them.

Q. Are you sure the one you found on him is your property - A. Yes.

Prisoner's Defence. I leave myself to the mercy of the court.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Judgment respited.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100919-141

747. JOHN EADES and JOHN MORTIMER were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 20th of September , a mahogany table, value 15 s. the property of John Pittard .

JOHN PITTARD . I live in Church-street, Spitalfields. The table was taken from a summer-house I have in a garden in Hackney road .

Q. Was it broken open - A. No, I had left the door upon a latch; it had been broken open before, I had placed a spring gun on a bench, and fastened a string to the door, they cut the string and went in. I saw the property in their possession on Thursday evening last, about eight o'clock, I asked the prisoner Eades how long he had the table, he said fourteen years; Mortimer said he knew it to be his table. I then gave them in charge of an officer.

JOHN PICKERING . On Thursday night last I was returning from the garden where the table was stolen in company with Mr. Cole, I saw Mortimer, he had the table on his bead, Eades and another man were with Mortimer; we followed them to a public house, the sign of the Loggerheads; I left Mr. Cole to take care of them, I went for Mr. Pittard.

ROBERT COLE. I was coming along Hackney-road with Mr. Pickering, Mortimer had the table on his head, Eades was with him; Cadman the officer was in the public house they stopped at, Cadman told me Eades had offered to sell the table to him for a pound, he offered him fourteen shillings.

JOHN CADMAN. I am an officer. Eades offered me the table for a pound, I offered him fourteen shillings for it, Mortimer said he would give him fifteen shilling for it, it should not be sold for that. I came out of the house; I received information that the owner of the table was sent for, he came and owned the table, he saw them fetch it out of the house.

Eades' Defence. Going to my labour I found this table against a brick wall in Hackney-road, I took it home; on my going up Shoredith I met John Mortimer , I asked him if he wanted a job, he said he did; I took him to my house and agreed to give him a shilling to carry it; he took the table, and we called at the Loggerheads. A man asked me if it was my property, I said, it was.

Mortimer's Defence. The same.

EADES - GUILTY , aged 45.

MORTIMER - GUILTY , aged 29.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and Whipped in jail .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100919-126

748. LEONARD WEST and WILLIAM VINCENT were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 2nd of May , in a certain barge in the navigable river Thames, a coat, value 1 l. the property of John Keene ; two coats, value 3 l. a pocket book, value 2 d. two handkerchiefs, value 2 s. a 2 l. note, and two 1 l. notes , the property of James Keene .

JAMES KEENE. I am a bargeman , I live at Wey-bridge. On the 2nd of May my barge was in the Thames, laying at Allhollow-stairs , facing of the Steel-yard, on the London side of the river, between one and two o'clock I went on shore, I left in the chest a great coat of John Keene , a great coat and a close-bodied coat of mine; the chest was locked, I had the key in my pocket, my pocket-book was in my close-bodied coat pocket, and in my pocket-book was a two pound bank note and two one pound bank notes, and a couple of handkerchiefs in the coat pocket. The chest was in the barge, under the stern sheets, under the tilt, that we call a cabin; I returned to the barge in about a quarter of an hour, I found the chest had been broken open and all these things were gone.

Q. Do you know any thing to affect the prisoners of their being the persons that committed it of your own knowledge - A. I cannot say any thing about that; I know them, I have seen them rowing in a waterman's boat.

Q. Did you afterwards see any of these cloths - A. Yes, about a month ago I saw the two great coats only at the Mansion-house, I knew them to be mine and my brother's coat.

JAMES WHITNEY . I am an apprentice to Mr. Merwin, pawnbroker. 17, St. Thomas's-street, in the Borough. I produce two coats pawned on the 2nd of May, between the hours of three and six in the afternoon, I took them in of Charity Duvall , I advanced ten shillings on them, they were pledged in the name of Dark.

CHARITY DUVALL. I live in Prinney's gardens in the Maze in the Borough.

Q. Do you know the prisoners - A. I know them both, I washed for Leonard West . West came into my house alone and brought these coats, he asked me to pledge them; he left the coats with me. It was about half past two, I was hanging out my clothes when he came, I did not pledge them then, I was busy; he came the second time, Vincent was with him, and the third time Vincent and West were together; the first time West was alone, Vincent did not interfere with it, only came with him. I pawned the coats for ten shillings at Mr. Merwin's, I gave the money and the duplicate to West, he put down a shilling, he sent for a pot of porter and took the change. I had only a share of the pot of porter. That is all I know of the business.

Q. Did West ever call upon you after this - A. Yes, but never said any thing about the coats nor Vincent either.

Mr. Reynolds. I should like to know what you are - A. I am a poor hard-working woman.

Q. How long after they had been with you and desired you to pawn these coats, were they taken up - A. I cannot say I know when Vincent and West were in Newgate the first time.

Q. You never went and gave any information when they were taken up - A. No, it was not worth while. If I had known they were not their coats, I should not have pawned them.

Q. You never communicated any thing about it till you were taken up, and then you charged them - A. I had my house searched, I was taken to Horsemonger-lane, I was had up three times to Union-hall, and the last time I came before Sir John Pinner he cleared me; before that I was taken before the Lord Mayor about these coats, I told the same story there as I do now, that Leonard West gave me them to pawn.

JOHN BRANT . I am a waterman and lighterman, I know both the prisoners. On the 2nd of May, as I was coming through bridge, I saw them both in a boat by themselves, they were rowing from Horseshoe-alley to the Steel-yard; they rowed alongside of Keene's barge; this was about a quarter or twenty minutes before two; Leonard West got on board, and Vincent held the boat alongside; West staid a-board five or ten minutes, I did not see West come out, I saw them row up through Blackfriars-bridge, as I was making my barge fast they went through the middle arch, they rowed towards the Surry side.

JOHN GOFF . I am a police officer of Union-hall. I apprehended the two prisoners on the 3d of May, in company with another officer; I found a knife with a picker to it upon West, and one upon Vincent, this picker opens this padlock, I have tried it. When I apprehended Vincent, I told him the nature of the charge, he said, if he might be admitted an evidence, he would tell what he knew. He spoke to the Lord Mayor, the Lord Mayor would not admit him.

WEST GUILTY , aged 25.

VINCENT GUILTY , aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100919-127

749. SOPHIA RAUTENHAUTEN , alias HOLTON , and ANN WIER were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of August , a tablecloth, value 15 s. 6 d. and six shirts, value 2 l. 5 s. the property of John Christian Spledtgerber , in his dwelling-house .

JOHN CHRISTIAN SPLEDTGERBER . I live at No. 8, Newcastle-court, College-hill . The prisoner Holton was my cook and housekeeper , I gave her warning on the 26th of last month, and on my return from the Change she was gone. I had one other maid-servant besides her.

Q. Had you received any intimation of her intending to go that day - A. I had not; I owed her about two months wages; she lived with me near four years. After she was gone, I missed a tablecloth and six shirts; I then applied for a warrant.

CATHARINE COATE . I am housemaid to Mr. Spledtgerber.

Q. Before the prisoner Holton left your master's house, had the prisoner Wier been there - A. I believe she was there within a month before the cook went, she staid about a quarter of an hour.

JOHN VICKERY . In the month of August I apprehended the prisoner at the house of Colonel Daker , I found upon her a duplicate of shirts and a tablecloth.

JAMES LAWSON . I am a servant to Mr. Cotterell, pawnbroker, in Shoe-lane. That is my duplicate; the two prisoners were both together when the tablecloth and six shirts were pawned, on the 7th of August, for three pounds. Weir gave me the property; I asked her if they were to go in her name or the other, she said, in her name, she gave me the direction, No. 30, Fleet-lane.

Holton said nothing in her defence.

Wier's Defence. I had nothing to do with the pledging these things, this lady pledged it herself, and received the money.

Wier called two witnesses, who gave her a good character.

HOLTON, GUILTY , aged 39.

Of stealing, to the value of 39 s. only.

Fined 1 s. confined Three Months in Newgate .

WIER, NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100919-128

750. SOPHIA RAUTENHAUTEN , alias HOLTON and ANN WIER were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of April , two silver spoons, value 1 l. 2 s. two other silver spoons, value 2 l. 2 s. six silver spoons, value 3 l. 3 s. a pair of window-curtains, value 1 l. 15 s. four curtains and headcloths, value 2 l. a sheet, value 9 s. a napkin, value 1 s. 6 d. a handkerchief, value 3 s. a coffee mill, value 1 s. 6 d. a counterpane, value 15 s. three tablecloths, value 1 l. 5 s. a sheet, value 12 s. 6 d. a pair of boots, value 10 s. a tent bed furniture, value 15 s. three tablecloths, value 2 l. 6 s. two silver spoons, value 18 s. a shirt, value 2 s. 4 d. a curtain, value 2 s. a handkerchief, value 4 s. a tent bed furniture, value 5 s. a bolster, value 5 s. a bolster, value 7 s. a tumbler value 6 d. two wine-glasses, value 6 d. and a pillow, value 3 s. the property of John Christian Spledtgerber .

CATHARINE COATE . I am a servant to Mr. Spledtgerber.

Q. In the beginning of this year, January, March, and April, did the prisoner Wier frequently come to this house - A. She did, for the purpose of doing needlework.

A. After the departure of Holton from his house, did you discover that these articles were missing - A. Yes, after my master missed them.

Q. She had occasion to mend the things, so as to know your master's mark - A. Yes.

JOHN VICKERY . Q. You apprehended the prisoner Holton on the 7th of August - A. Yes; I found upon her no duplicates of this property. I apprehended Wier at her lodgings in Seacoal-lane; I told her I came to look after property that had been stolen from Mr. Spledtgerber. She produced to me a tea-caddle, containing these thirteen duplicates, and after that thirteen in a pocketbook. On the next day I went with Coate to the pawnbroker's, she saw the property and identified it before the magistrate.

JAMES GARROD . I am a servant to Mr. Edwards, pawnbroker Clare-market. I have two pair of spoons

pledged on the 25th of April, by Wier, six spoons, on the 30th of January, in the name of Ann Wier , for three guineas, a pair of window-curtains, for one pound each, on the 26th of April, pawned by Wier, four napkins and a counterpane, on the 18th of May, and four curtains and a headcloth, on the 3d of April I did not take them in, they are in the name of Sophia Holton ; a silk handkerchief, in the name of Ann Wier , a sheet, nine shillings in the name of Holton, a napkin and a coffee-mill, in the name of Wier.

WILLIAM FORRESTER. I am servant to Mr. Lane, Drury-lane. I have two tablecloths pawned on the 8th of January, for a guinea-and-a-half, in the name of Jane Holton, a tent-bed furniture, pawned on the same day by Wier, in the name of Holton, and a pair of boots, ten shillings, in the name of Wier.

Holton said nothing in her defence.

Wier's Defence. Mrs. Holton sent me with the different articles to pledge, she acted more as a mistress than a servent, I did as Holton ordered me, I always gave her the money.

HOLTON, NOT GUILTY .

WIER, GUILTY , aged 39.

Of stealing, to the value of 39 s. only.

Fined 1 s. confined One Year in Newgate .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100919-129

751. JOHN JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of September , twelve yards of Cassimere, value 6 l. the property of George Gordon and James Phillips , in the dwelling-house of George Gordon .

GEORGE GORDON . I am a woollen-draper , I live in Fenchurch-street , in the parish of St. Dionis Back church. James Phillips is my partner.

JOHN WATSON . I am shopman with Mr. Gordon. On the 6th of September, at a quarter past nine o'clock in the morning, I was in the accompting-house at break fast, the prisoner came in, went round the counter, and reached this piece of cassimere out of the window; he walked out of the door into the street; I ran after him, and caught him with the goods under his arm. I brought him back and gave him in charge of the constable.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

GUILTY , aged 14.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100919-130

752. MARY ROMAINE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of August , two candlesticks, value 2 s. 6 d. three irons, value 2 s. a counterpane, value 5 s. a coat, value 1 l. a hammer, value 1 s. twenty pounds weight of feathers, value 2 l. 10 s. a tea-cannister, value 6 d. a handkerchief, value 6 d. and three aprons, value 2 s. the property of Isabella Davidson .

ISABELLA DAVIDSON. I lived in Rose and Crown-court, Foster-lane , I had a room of goods there, I took a situation in Islington, and the prisoner took my room, I leaving my furniture in it, and she was to pay the rent. She did not; she took the feathers out of the bed, and took all the articles stated in the indictment.

Q. When was it you left her in possession of your room - A. On the 2nd of August; I returned on the 6th, and on my return I found the door locked, I got the door broken open, I found all these things taken away. On the 17th of August I found the prisoner in Currier's-row, I got the key from her, I found some of my property at the pawnbrokers. I have not recovered all, only part.

JESSE ALLEN . I live at Mr. Fleming's pawnbroker in Newgate-street. On the 4th of August I took in, of the prisoner, an iron and two aprons, on the 6th two irons, on the 8th a pair of candlesticks and a coat; she pawned them in the name of Harris, the whole of them.

Prisoner's Defence. That property was mine, a young woman that lodged with her sold me the aprons; I pledged the other, as I had been out of work; I meant to get them out on the Saturday-night.

GUILTY , aged 43.

Confined One Year in Newgate , and fined 1 s .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100919-131

753. GEORGE BIRTWHISTLE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of July ; four pounds weight of pewter, value 3 s. the property of John Hudson .

SAMUEL BACON . I am in Mr. Hudson's employ, he is a pewterer in Fetter-lane . On the 28th of July I marked three pieces of pewter, in the morning; the prisoner, after seven o'clock, was paid his wages; he went away; one piece of marked pewter was missing, the prisoner was brought back to the premises, I was present when he pulled it out of his pocket himself. This is the pewter, I marked it with the initials of my own name; it is Mr. Hudson's property.

Prisoner's Defence. At times I am not so well in my recollection as I ought to be; four years ago I was taken with the brain fever, I was in St. Martin's workhouse, out of my mind. I did not know I had any thing about me until I came into the accompting house, and when he said he would search me, I put my hand into my breeches pocket and took it out.

GUILTY , aged 48.

Whipped in Jail and discharged .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100919-132

754. JAMES MOSES ROBINSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of July , two pounds weight of bees-wax, value 6 s. seven pounds weight of soap, value 5 s. eight sticks of Spanish juice, value 4 s. an ounce weight of cloves, value 9 d. an ounce of ginger, value 1 d. two ounces weighs of sugar-candy, value 4 d. six paper bags, value 1 d. a tap-borer, value 6 d. and a pound weight of pepper, value 7 s. the property of John Larkin and Joseph Pearson .

USEBIUS COLES . I am shopman to Messrs. Larkin and Pearson, they are oilmen in Aldersgate-street : the prisoner was a porter in their employ. On the 27th of July I met the prisoner at the top of the cellar stairs, I immediately sent him out; I went down into the cellar and found some bees-wax concealed between the cellar and the flooring of the shop; I left it in the same place I found it. The prisoner came in a quarter of an hour; after he had been in the cellar and was gone to breakfast, the bees-wax was gone; no person had been in the cellar but him. Before this I had seen empty bags in the cellar that gave me suspicion.

JOHN VICKERY. I am an officer. I went to the prisoner's lodging and searched his bed-room; under the bed, in a box, I found this soap, there is eight or

nine pounds, eight sticks of Spanish juice, ginger, and this tap-borer. I found all the articles in his lodgings mentioned in the indictment. As soon as ever I found them, I took them to the prosecutor's house, the prisoner was sent for into the accompting-house; I said, we had been to No. 28, Long's-buildings, Whitecross-street, we have found these things in a box under your bed, to whom do they belong. He said, I am very sorry, they belong to my master; I took the soap for my wife's washing, the Spanish juice for my cold.

Coles. They are all articles that my master deals in.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined in Newgate Six Months , and whipped in Prison .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100919-133

755. WILLIAM RONGHEAD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of August , a pint of oil, value 1 s. the property of George Allen Aylwin .

GEORGE ALLEN AYLWIN . I live in Lower Thames-street, I am an agent and oil-broker .

RICHARD LENT. I am one of his Majesty's chief watchmen at the Custom House. The prisoner is an excise watchman.

Q. Where was this oil that he is charged with stealing - A. On the Custom House quay . George Allen Aylwin had oil on the quay in our charge, until the duties were paid. On the 18th of August, between eleven and twelve at night, I was walking down the Custom House quay, I saw three men standing very near together to the oil-cask; I said, what are you doing here, the prisoner was one of the three; as I stepped up to them, two of them ran away, and at the same time the prisoner had got a bladder in his hand, and appeared to be doing something at the bottom of the cask. I laid hold of the prisoner's coat, asked him what he was doing there; he begged for God's sake I would forgive him, and consider his wife and family. I told him I could not forgive him, my place was in danger. There was a pint of sweet Florence oil in the bladder, there were two spills in the cask. I secured the prisoner.

Prosecutor. I was shewn the oil in the bladder. I had oils at the Custom House Quay, and this oil was the same as I had there. I believe it to be mine. We had the cask re-guaged, there was a deficiency of some gallons.

Prisoner's Defence. It is my first offence.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY . aged 27.

Confined Six Months in Newgate , and publickly whipped 100 yards, near the Custom House quay .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100919-134

756. ANN CALLAGHAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of September , a coat, value 20 s. the property of Abraham Smith .

ABRAHAM SMITH. I live at 38, Beech-street . On the 5th of September, between eight and nine in the morning, as I was sitting at breakfast, I saw the prisoner coming out of the accompting-house. I followed her and took her four doors from the house, he had my great coat in her apron, she had taken it from a chair in the accompting-house.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in liquor and went in there; I know no more of any coat than my dying day.

GUILTY .

Confined one month in Newgate , and fined 1 s .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100919-135

757. MARY CARTHY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of August , twenty-four yards of cambric muslin, value 1 l. 18 s. the property of George Vipond and George Rimington .

WILLIAM KIRBY . I am shopman to George Vipond and George Rimington , they are linen-draper s on Ludgate-hill . On the 9th of August, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner came into the shop followed by two other woman, she asked to look at some prints, I shewed her some, she was backward in purchasing, I suspected her honesty. There were four whole pieces of printed muslins on the counter; the top one was folded up; she, by the assistance of one of these other women, contrived to get it under her cloak. I saw her draw it off the counter and then put it under her cloak. I let her take it out of the shop; I followed her and took her about twenty yards from the shop door, I brought her back into the shop, she dropped the piece of print from under her clothes about a yard from the shop door; I saw it after it had dropped, there was nothing of that description before she came in; I took it up, it was the same piece of muslin I had seen her put under her cloak.

Q. What became of the two other women - A. They went both out of the shop when I returned with prisoner, the prisoner denied having taken it.

THOMAS PARKER . I am shopman to Mr. Rimington. I saw William Kirby bring this woman into the shop, I saw the piece of muslin as it was falling from her person on the ground.

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw any thing of the cotton.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100919-136

758. WILLIAM DALTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of September , six pounds weight of mutton, value 3 s. the property of Theodore William Hill .

THEODORE WILLIAM HILL . I am a butcher in Fleet-market . On the 17th of this month I lost the mutton; I was standing at the front of my shop, my wife hear a rustling noise in the passage, she called me in, I immediately missed the neck of mutton, it hung inside of the shop, I had seen it two hours before, I hung it there myself, I walked out of the door, I perceived nobody but the prisoner driving a cart with two horses in it; I suspected him and followed him two hundred yards, I perceived that he had got something wrapped up in his apron, I stopped him, and asked him what he had got there; he said nothing. I took the mutton out of his apron; he then said, as to the mutton, I I bought just now, I gave a shilling for it; I told him he could buy mutton cheaper than I could, there was six pound of it; he said, take the name and number of the cart, you will find me there. He whipped his horses on, I could not stop him until he got into Fleet-street. I am positive of the mutton being mine. After I gave him in charge of the constable, I was ill

used by a number of people for giving this man in charge.

WILLIAM KIMBER. I took charge of this man at the corner of Bridge-street, it was with difficulty I conveyed him to prison; I was very ill used, not by the prisoner, but by the people that were about me; they kicked me and threw me down.

Prisoner's Defence. I work for Elizabeth Moels . I was returning from the Saracen's Head inn, a lad said, master will you buy a bit of meat, it is not very good, you shall have it for a shilling; I bought it. I told the butcher to take the number of the cart and the name. The mob kept driving the horses on, I could not help it.

The prisoner called six witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100919-137

759. SARAH BAILEY and ELIZABETH ADAMS were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 24th of July , a one pound bank note, and a promissory note for one pound , the property of James Wright .

WILLIAM ABEL . I am a lamplighter. On the 24th of July I was at the Fortune of War public house, Giltspur street , I saw Mr. Wright and the two women in the tap-room together, Wright was very much intoxicated; I saw Sarah Bailey put her hand into his pantaloons pocket, Mr. Wright was asleep, she took some papers out, what they were I could not tell at that time; I saw her take some halfpence out of his waistcoat pocket; I went and told Baldwin, he met them coming out of the tap-room into the passage.

RICHARD THOMAS BALDWIN . I am a servant to Mr. Teague, keeper of the Compter. In consequence of what Abel told me I met the prisoner in the passage, going out into the street, I told them they must go back with me to Mr. Wright, who was then asleep; I saw him laying on the bench with his right hand breeches pocket completely turned out; I perceived Bailey wish to get rid of something out of her hand, I seized her hand and took out of her hand a one pound bank note, and a one pound Braintree note. I then awoke Mr. Wright and asked him if he had lost any thing, he put his hand in his pocket which had been turned out and said he had been robbed; he described the notes which I had taken from Bailey's hand, Bailey acknowledged that she had taken one note out of his pocket, but the other he gave her; Mr. Wright said, no; I sent for an officer.

Q. Was Mr. Wright bound over to prosecute - A. Yes; he told sir William Plomer he should not be able to come here, he was going abroad.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100919-138

760. ELIZABETH MORRELL was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 14th of September , a shift, value 5 s. a night gown, value 1 s. 4 d. a shirt, value 1 s. a pillow case, value 1 s. and a napkin, value 1 s. the property of William Moon .

SUSANNAH MOON . I am the wife of William Moon , he is a silversmith in Holborn, we reside at 33, Cursitor-street ; these things were lost in Cursitor-street, the prisoner was a servant in the house where we lodged. On the 14th of September the shift, night gown, shirt, pillow-case, and napkin, were taken from the kitchen, I had seen them in the course of the day, at twelve o'clock they were brought home from the mangler's, I missed them about seven o'clock in the evening; I have seen them since, the night gown was found in her box, and the other things at the pawnbrokers.

JANE GOODEAR. I lived servant with the prosecutrix; I missed all the articles at seven o'clock at night, I informed my mistress that they were missing.

JOHN LOCKHART SIMMONS . I am a pawnbroker, Holborn-hill. The prisoner pledged a shift, a shirt, a pillow case, and a napkin with me about seven o'clock in the evening on the 14th of September.

Prisoner's Defence. I throw myself on the mercy of the court.

GUILTY , aged 43.

Confined One Month in Newgate .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100919-139

761. WILLIAM CASSAN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 16th of August , three quarts of oil, value 5 s. the property of James Coppinger .

JAMES COPPINGER . I am a merchant , I live at 50, Devonshire-square , I employed the prisoner to bottle some French oil, I watched the prisoner and detected him, after he had gone ten yards from the house, I called him back, told him I fancied he had some of my oil in his pocket, he either hesitated or denied it, at last he acknowledged and brought out three quart bottles out of his pocket; I desired to search him further, he then took two more bottles from his breeches, or under his apron.

Prisoner's Defence. I leave myself to your lordship's mercy, and the gentlemen of the jury.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 33.

Whipped in Jail and discharged .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100919-140

762. JAMES LAWRENCE and MARY RAXTER were indicted for a conspiracy .

JOHN READ . Q. Is your mother's name Barbara - A. Yes, she is a pawnbroker in Redcross-street .

Q. Do you know the defendant Lawrence - A Yes, I understand he is a working watchmaker. On the 21st of April, last year, he came to my mother's shop, he brought two chains and wanted four pounds ten on them.

Q. Had they the appearance of gold chains - A. Exactly; it was impossible at the time for me to discover the fraud. I asked him what they weighed, his answer was, two ounces, or exactly the weight which they did weigh; I put it in the scales and found it correspond exactly. If I had considered them to be base metal I should not have thought them worth two shillings. There is one I cleaned up, it does not look half so well as when brought in; they are made precisely the same as a gold chain, I lent him four pounds on them; Lawrence was alone at that time. On the 6th of May he came again alone, he brought me two more chains nearly the same passed as before, I lent him four guineas on them, they had the appearance and fashion of gold chains so as to deceive me. On the 3d of June he came again and brought two more, he got four pound

on them, they were exactly like the others: on the 10th of June he came alone and brought two more, he had three pound ten on them; on the 20th of October he came again and brought three chains, I lent him six pound on them. On the latter end of that month I had occasion to go to the drawer, I had a great quantity, upon that I opened them, I found the deception, they had changed colour, I found they were base metal. These chains could not have been made for any other purpose than to deceive, they are not fit to wear for in two or three days they would turn black. The prisoner never redeemed any of them.

Q. In consequence of the discovery you made you caused Raxter to be apprehended two or three days afterwards - A. Yes. These chains were so made that they deceived me with aquafortis. At the time I took some of them in I tried them with aquafortis, and they deceived me. There is not a grain of gold in the metal; I had an essay made, I should suppose there is some pewter mixed with it.

THOMAS NICOLLS . Q. Do you remember the prisoner Raxter coming to Mr. Read's to pledge chains - A. Yes, she came first to me on the 11th of April, last year, she brought one chain, two pound I lent on it, she said she brought it from her brother. At the time I received it it appeared to me to be a gold chain, I weighed it, the weight corresponded with the weight of a gold chain, it is not a gold chain. On the same day the prisoner Lawrence came and brought two others, I lent him four pound on them; the chain that she and he brought were of the same appearance and make, and every thing exactly the same. On the 18th of April Lawrence came and brought two other chains, I lent him three guineas and a half, I weighed them at the time they appeared to be gold.

Q. Are they gold - A. They are not.

Q. On the 11th of April was it pawned by Lawrence or Raxter - A. By Lawrence, I did not see Raxter that day. On the 25th of May Lawrence came and brought one chain, upon which I lent him one pound fifteen shillings, I weighed that. On the 13th of October he came again; brought two gold chains, for which I lent him four pounds. On the 22nd of September, last year, the woman Raxter came, brought one chain, upon which I lent her a guinea and a half, I weighed that, she gave the name of Sarah Tomkins , and said she brought it from her brother. On the 30th of the same month she brought another chain, I lent her two pound, and the 3d of October two chains, four pound, on the 7th of October she brought three chains, I lent her six pound eight shillings; on the 27th of October two chains, I lent her three guineas and a half.

Q. I believe after that Mr. Read made a discovery of these things not being gold - A. Yes.

Q. Did you take in all these chains upon the footing of their being gold - A. I did, I weighed them all as gold in the presence of Raxter and Lawrence.

Q. Were ever any of them redeemed by Raxter or or Lawrence - A. No. On the 2nd of November Raxter came again, we stopped her, I went out and shut the door and brought a constable in, I found the prisoner Lawrence at the door, he ran away, she was examined before the alderman on the 6th of November, and while she was being examined Lawrence was apprehended in Guildhall-yard upon this charge of fraud; Lawrence then said the chains were his, and he had sent Raxter with them. All the chains were precisely the same sort of metal; I was deceived.

MR. READ. Q. Your young man has told us that he went out to fetch a constable the last time Rexter came - A. Yes. I told her I stopped her in consequence of her bringing a great number of chains, she said they did not belong to her; I told her if she could produce the person to whom they did belong, that was all I wanted; previous to that she said they belonged to her brother, she then said they belonged to a friend, she did not know where he lived for the last three years. While she was under examination at Guildhall the officer proposed to go out into the yard, as it was most likely the man was waiting about there; in consequence of that my young man went out and he was brought in; he said the chains belong to him, she did not contradict him; he did not tell where he lived that time, said he was a journeyman watch-maker.

HENRY CHAMBAUD. I am a working goldsmith. I have examined a few of the chains, when you see a few of the chains you see the whole, they are all alike, they are made in imitation of gold, I have no doubt for the express purpose of deception; they are polished, the expence of polishing them is a needless expence, unless to make them pass for gold; gold chains are not polished. I have essayed one of them, there is not a grain of gold in them at all.

Mr. Alley addressed the jury on behalf of the defendants.

LAWRENCE - GUILTY .

Confined in Newgate Six Months , and during that time to stand in and upon the Pillory for One Hour .

RAXTER - GUILTY .

Fined Twenty Shillings .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100919-142

763. ROBERT FRANCIS and THOMAS TURVY were indicted for a misdemeanour .

MR. JONES . I am in partnership with Robert Middleton . On Monday the 13th of August a pane of glass was broken in the shop window in Fleet-street , and on Tuesday, the next day, I had a fresh pane of glass put in, on the 15th the pane of glass was broken again; I am sure it was whole in the morning.

ROBERT GUTHERIDGE. I am a servant to Richard Birch, a fishmonger in the Strand. On the 15th of August, between the hours of nine and ten in the morning, I saw these two men standing at the corner of Chancery-lane, near Middleton's and Jones's shop, knowing them to be suspicious characters I stood and watched them, I saw them go to the shop window and stop, then they went on again; when they got a few yards from the place I went up and saw a piece of glass out of the pane, I immediately went in and gave information; I came out and crossed the opposite side of the way, I saw these two men make a turn to come back again, when they saw a person inside taking away the goods from where the window was broken they walked on as fast as they could as far as Temple-bar, and I went about my business. In the evening I saw them in custody, I am quite sure they are the men.

- BATES. On the 15th of August I was coming from my work I saw the prisoner in the brown jacket (Francis) go up to the window, I saw him pull something from his waistcoat pocket, it appeared to me to be some sharp instrument, he shoved his hand to the

window, afterwards he walked away; he came back again and then I saw the window was broke; I watched the men; after that they went up to the window again; I saw the prisoner in the brown jacket take some handkerchiefs out and tuck them inside of his waistcoat. I am quite sure of it; the other prisoner was by the side of him.

Prosecutor. I could not state whether they took five shillings or fifty poundworth of silk handkerchiefs; I have so many, or whether they took any; I cannot recollect missing any particular pattern.

RICHARD WILLIS . I am a glazier. I mended this window on Monday the 13th, on the Tuesday it was safe, and on the Wednesday I mended it again.

- REEVES. I apprehended the prisoners at the corner of Drury-lane, upon each of the prisoners I found a small knife, the points appear to have been rubbed down. Bates gave me information.

NOT GUILTY .

Detained till next sessions, for house-breaking in the day-time.

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.


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