Old Bailey Proceedings, 6th June 1810.
Reference Number: 18100606
Reference Number: f18100606-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE OYER AND TERMINER, AND GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND ALSO THE GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, HELD AT Justice-Hall, in the Old Bailey, On WEDNESDAY the 6th of JUNE, 1810, and following Days;

BEING THE FIFTH SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF The Right Honourable THOMAS SMITH , LORD-MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY JOB SIBLY, FOR R. BUTTERS, No. 117, ALDERSGATE-STREET.

LONDON:

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED (BY THE AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON By R. BUTTERS, No. 22, Fetter Lane, Fleet Street.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON.

Before the Right-honourable THOMAS SMITH, Lord Mayor of the City of London; Sir Nash Grose, knt. one of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir Robert Graham , knt. one of the Barons of his Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir Charles Flower ; bart. Sir John William Anderson , bart. Sir Charles Price, bart. Aldermen of the said City; John Silvester , esq. Recorder of the said City; John Ansley , esq. George Scholey , esq. Sir William Plomer , knt.; Aldermen of the said City; and Newman Knowlys, esq. Common-serjeant of the said City; His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of Goal Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

London Jury.

Stephen Ward ,

Benjamin Parry ,

James Buckland ,

John Vincent ,

John Skipper ,

Alexander Christie ,

Robert Blachford ,

Charles Cordey ,

John Robson ,

George Young ,

John Wontner ,

Alexander Waugh .

First Middlesex Jury.

William Roberts ,

Edward Roberts ,

Robert West ,

William Lapworth ,

John Spear,

James Gornm ,

John Mills ,

Thomas Maycock ,

George Bird ,

James Moodey

Thomas Hurst ,

David Allen.

Second Middlesex Jury.

John Watkins ,

Thomas White ,

William Davis ,

William Payter ,

Richard Howell ,

Richard Spear ,

William Faulkener ,

John Wright ,

Nathaniel Coster ,

John Sanders ,

John Brown ,

Timothy Carter .

Reference Number: t18100606-1

403. JOHN EGAN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 30th of May , one hundred pounds weight of lead, value 20 s. the property of Joseph Day and John Roberts .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY .

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100606-2

404. GEORGE BARBER, alias, GEORGE WILLIAMS , was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 16th of February , in the dwelling house of James Tidball , a ran of twine, value 2 s. and a ten pound bank note , the property of James Tidball .

JAMES TIDBALL . I live at 29, Gun-street, Old Artiliery ground . I was not present at the time; my wife was.

MRS. TIDBALL. I am the wife of the last witness On the 16th of February, about two o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner came to out house and enquired for Mr. Tidball; I told him he was not at home; he said he wanted to see him to purchase some twine of him.

Q. Does your husband sell twine - A. He does; I shewed the prisoner some twine, I asked him eighteen shillings a dozen for them; he desired me to make out a bill of parcels in the name of Williams; I did: he purchased three dozen. He dropped his pocket book in our shop, my girl was gone out to get change of a pound note, when she returned she picked up the pocket book in the shop; she brought it to me; I said it belonged to that gentleman in the shop, I had seen it in his hand just before; the prisoner exclaimed, what a lucky thing it was that she picked it up, he had bills in it to a great amount, some hundreds, belonging to his captain and himself; he said he would reward the girl for picking it up; I told him there was no necessity for that: he asked me to change him a five pound note; I told him I was not certain whether I could; I took out my pocket book to see, I had not enough small notes to give him change for the five pound note; I had a ten pound note, it was the first note I took out of my pocket book; he asked me if I could give him change of a twenty pound note; I had the ten pound in my hand; he catched the ten pound note out of my hand very quick; he then went to the door in a very great hurry, and said, send your girl with me, my captain is waiting just above; he went away with the twine, saying, he would be back in a moment; my girl went with him; she did not return for several hours.

SARAH FOSTER . Q. Did you live servant with Mrs. Tidball - A. Yes.

Q. Look at the prisoner at the bar and tell me whether you remember his coming to your mistress's house any time, and when - A. Yes; I cannot tell what day it was; it was about February; I never saw him before. When he was at my mistress's house I went out to get change for a pound note for my mistress, and when I returned I saw a pocket book lay upon the floor.

Q Was the prisoner in the the room - A. Yes. The prisoner took a ten pound note out of my mistress's hand.

Q. How do you know it was a ten pound note - A. I did not know what note it was, only my mistress told me; I saw something like a note in my mistress's hand; I am sure it was a note; I did not see it opened; he snatched it out of my mistress's hand and told her to send her servant with him, his captain was waiting just above; when he came out the door he told me he would give me a handsome present for picking the pocket book up.

Q. Did he go out of the door gently, or how - A. He went out very fast from the door.

Q. He ran out did he - A. Yes, with the ten pound note in his hand; he took me to a corner of a street and told me to wait there till he came to me, if he did not come himself he would send his lad; I waited for him there from two o'clock till between six and seven at night; he did not return. I never saw him again until the time he was taken.

Q. You are sure that in the house you saw him take the note out of your mistress's hand, are you not - A. Yes.

THOMAS SAPWELL . I am an officer. I know nothing but taking the prisoner on the 13th of March. I found upon him this pocket book.

Q. You found no ten pound note - A. No; only a few papers.

Q. to Mrs. Tidball. Is that the pocket book that you saw in the prisoner's hand - A. Yes; I know it by that tree on it.

Sarah Foster . This is the pocket book that I picked up from the ground; I saw the inside of it; I know it by the mark on it.

Prosecutrix. When he came to our house he came in a respectable dress, with a great coat on his arm.

Prisoner's Defence. I beg of the court to call in a woman of the name of Atkinson, that appeared at Worship-street against me. On the 5th of February, 1760, I went into the Royal Navy, on board captain Lockhart Ross's ship, and was turned over to his Majesty's ship Namur, and was at the taking of the Havannah in August, 1762; and when I returned to England was turned over, and remained on board the Royal George; after that I went on board the Princess Amelia; and when the war began with America I was sent out with Lord Howe; I received a wound and was sent on shore at Dublin's Island. After that I was sent on board the ship commanded by captain Keith, and remained on board untill I was sent home, and then I was sent on board the ship commanded by sir Hyde Parker, and when I came to Spithead I was drafted on board the Agammemnon, and when that ship arrived at Plymouth I was paid off; but as long as I could stand under British colours I was willing to serve his Majesty; I went on board again when lord Hood took the command; I was on board the Barfleur, and the Victory, and after Touton was taken in 1793, I was sent home with a French man-of-war, and was then drafted into sir Edward Pellew 's ship, and was sent to Deal to sick quarters;

when able to serve I was drafted on board captain Trollop's ship; there I was severely wounded and discharged. I am old and worn out, being between sixty and seventy years of age; as a seaman, I have done my duty: which England expects of every seaman.

ANN ATKINSON .

Prisoner. What is your lawful name - A. My lawful name is Ann Atkinson .

COURT. This woman is a prosecutrix against you upon another indictment.

Ann Atkinson - Yes.

Prisoner. This is the woman that appeared at the public office, when the magistrate asked her what she had against me; she said nothing, but I threatened to beat her; the magistrate said, what, such an old man as that. She is the person that brought all the parties against me.

Atkinson. I did not; I know nothing of the parties.

Prisoner. Please to ask her if she has got a husband at home - A. I have not; I do not know whether I have one living; I have not lived with him for ten years; I am now living in servitude.

Prisoner. When I was taken up for this note and brought before the magistrate at Worship-street the woman first said that I snatched the note out of her hand afterwards she said she gave it me; there is an attorney of the name of Davies that knows I was admitted to bail. I had the note from her, but not violently.

COURT to Mrs. Tidball. This was sometime ago that this happened at your house, how did you apprehend him upon this occasion - A. I went into a porkshop one night in Bishopgate-street; I found him there and gave the alarm, and had him taken; I knew him again.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 61.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18100606-3

405. ELIZABETH TIPPETT was indicted for that she on the 30th of June, 1806, at the general quarter sessions of the peace for the county of Middlesex, was convicted of being a common utterer of false and counterfeited money, and was sentenced to be in New prison, Clerkenwell, for one year, and to find sureties for two years more; that she afterwards on the 16th of April last, a piece of false and counterfeit money, made and counterfeited to the likeness and similitude of a good sixpence, feloniously did utter to Ann, the wife of William Warwick , she knowing the same to be counterfeit .

JOSIAH GILL SEWELL . Q. You are clerk to the solicitor of the mint - A. I am. I produce a copy of the record of the conviction of Elizabeth Tippet ; I examined it with the original; it is a correct copy.

(Read in court.)

WILLIAM BEEBY. Q. You are clerk to Mr. Newport, the keeper of the New-prison, Clerkenwell - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know the prisoner, Elizabeth Tippett - A. Yes; I was present at the sessions-house, Clerkenwell, at the time she was convicted in June, 1806, she was convicted of being a common utterer of counterfeit money, and was sentenced to be imprisoned one year, and at the end of that time to find sureties for two years more, she remained in custody to that time and found sureties by the order of the court.

COURT. Is the prisoner the same woman - A. She is; I have known her for the last seven years.

Mr. Knapp. You have no doubt about it - A. No doubt at all. I have had her in custody since.

Q. Do you remember seeing her on the 16th of April last, and where was it - A. On Monday the 16th of April, between four and five o'clock in the afternoon, I was in St. John-street, the prisoner passed me, I spoke to her, she immediately crossed the way and went out of St. John's-street into St. John's lane, I followed her; she went down St. John's-lane, until she came into St. John's-street again; she went into Mr. Warwick's, the Hat and Mitre, in St. John-street; she had not been in the house above two or three minutes before I went in; I found the prisoner in the act of taking up some halfpence off the counter; I then asked Mrs. Warwick what the prisoner had to drink; the prisoner was standing by all the while, she told me that she had a glass of gin; I asked her how she paid for it; she told me with a sixpence; I asked Mrs. Warwick where that sixpence was; she told me that she had put it in the till, she should know it again, because she had no other there; on my looking at it I discovered it to be a bad one; I desired Mrs. Warwick, in the presence of the prisoner to mark it, so that at any time hereafter she might be able to speak to it; she marked it and gave it to me; I have had it ever since; this is the sixpence. I proceeded to search the prisoner; in her right hand pocket I found one counterfeit shilling, and two other counterfeit sixpences; I have had them ever since. In her left hand pocket I found two thimbles, some thread and tape in small quantities, and under her left arm pit, between her shift and gown, I found this paper containing six other counterfeit sixpences, and seven new halfpence; I have kept them by themselves ever since; these are them. I then took her in custody before the justice in Hatton Garden; she was committed.

ANN WARWICK . Q. What is your husband's name - A. Charles Warwick ; we keep the Hat and Mitre public house, St. John-street. On the 16th of April, between four and five in the afternoon, the prisoner came into our house, she asked for a glass of gin, I drawed it her; she offered me a bad shilling, which I refused, and returned to her; she put it in her right hand pocket; she then offered me a sixpence, which I took, I thought it was a good one, I put it in the till; I had no other sixpence there; I am quite sure of that.

COURT. What other money had you there - A. I had three shillings. Mr. Beeby came in while I was giving her change for the sixpence.

Mr. Reynolds. How much did the glass of gin come to - A. Two-pence; she had four-pence change.

Q. What did you do with that sixpence - A. Mr. Beeby desired me to mark it; I did, and gave it to Mr. Beeby.

Mr. Knapp. Look at that sixpence, and see whether it bears the mark that you put - A. Yes, it is the same; I marked it with a knife.

JOHN NICOLL . - Mr. Knapp. You are one of the moniers of his Majesty's Mint - A. I am.

Q. I am putting into your hand the sixpence uttered to Mrs. Warwick, tell me whether that is counterfeit - A. It is counterfeit.

Q. Now look at the two sixpences found in her right hand pocket and the shilling - A. They are all counterfeit, and the six sixpences are all counterfeit.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence, nor called any witnesses to her character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 70.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18100606-4

406. MATILDA MILLER was indicted for that she on the 17th of April , two pieces of false counterfeited milled money, and coin, each of them made to the likeness and similitude of good legal current coin of this realm, called a shilling, unlawfully did put off to James Callow , at a lower rate and denomination than they imported to be, that is to say, for one shilling .

JAMES CALLOW . I live in Warwick-street, Golden square.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. Yes; I have known her for three years. On the 17th of April, about one o'clock, I saw the prisoner in Drury-lane, I asked her how she did, and where she lived; she told me if I would go home with her she would shew me; I went home with her; she lived in Charles-street, Drury-lane ; a woman was waiting there; I saw the prisoner sell to this woman, that was waiting, some of these base shillings; I went to Bow-street and gave information; I then went back to the prisoner's house again, there were three women there, she was selling to them crooked bad shillings; I asked her if she would be so good as to spare me a few, I said two would be enough; she let me have two crooked shillings, she said they were sixpence a piece; I gave her a good shilling; immediately I went to Bow-street again, I saw Croker and Lavender; I gave Lavender the two shillings; Lavender, Croker, and me went back to the prisoner's house, we found the prisoner there, and another woman; Lavender asked Mrs. Miller whether she knew me or not; she did not say any thing the first time; he asked her again whether she knew me; she said, oh, yes, it is my husband.

Q. Are you her husband - A. No.

Mr. Gleed. You have not been in this court of late - A. Never before.

Q. What court was it - have you not been in this court for uttering base silver coin - A. No; I never was a witness in this court before.

Q. You never stood charged any time perhaps - A. Yes, I stood charged; I was not guilty, else I should have been punished.

Q. Whose employ are you in now - A. In a master carpenter's employ in Silver-street, Golden-square.

EDWARD LAVENDER . Q. You are an officer of Bow-street - A. I was; I am not now. In consequence of information from the last witness I went with him and Croker to a house in Charles-street, Drury-lane, in a back room on a ground floor; there were two women; the prisoner was one of them, she was sitting on a chair by the fire; I asked Callow which was the woman; he pointed to the prisoner; the other woman went out. I think Croker then asked her if she sold that man any silver, pointing to Callow; she made no reply; I asked her if she knew him; she said, oh, yes, he is my husband; Callow denied it; she had the appearance of a blue handkerchief in her hand, I asked her what she had got there, she gave me no answer; I attempted to take it from her, she resisted, and in the struggle a quantity of silver fell into her lap, and on the floor, which I took up, and Croker took the handkerchief from her; I picked up twelve counterfeit shillings, these are them; I searched the room, and in a cupboard I found this counterfeit dollar, and in a drawer in the room I found another counterfeit shilling, and a small piece of metal; she was taken into custody.

Q. Have you any shillings that Callow the last witness gave to you - A. Yes; two that he gave to me at the Brown Bear public house; I have had them in my custody ever since.

Q. to Callow. Did you give Lavender any more than two shillings at any time - A. No.

Q. Look at them two shillings and tell me whether you believe them to be the two shillings that you gave him - A. Yes; I believe they are; they were crookest shillings; I did not mark them. I am quite sure I gave Lavender no other than the two shillings I purchased of Mrs. Miller.

HENRY CROKER . I am a constable.

Q. Did you go with Lavender to the prisoner's house - A. I did; I found this handkerchief in her hand, and these two bad shillings in the handkerchief and this sixpence on the floor.

Q. I suppose the account that Lavender has given us is correct, you cannot tell us any more - A.No; his account is correct.

JOHN NICOLL . Q. You are one of the moniers of his Majesty's mint - A. I am.

Q. Look at these two shillings that were put off to Callow, are they counterfeit or not - A. They are both counterfeits; the dollar is a counterfeit, that shilling is also a counterfeit that was found with a file, and the twelve shillings are all counterfeits, and the sixpence is a counterfeit.

Q. to Croker. Did you search the prisoner's pockets - A. I just handled her about her pockets.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18100606-5

407. WILLIAM ROBERTS was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of John Davis , no person being therein, about the hour of eight in the afternoon, on the 13th of May ; and feloniously stealing six napkins, value 5 s. a shawl, value 3 s. a tea caddie, value 5 s. a silver caddie shell, value 3 s. the property of John Davis ; - a pocket book, value 2 s. and eleven one pound bank notes , the property of Samuel Dobbs .

JOHN DAVIS . I live at 18, Paradise-place, St. Luke's, Old-street .

Q. How many have you living in family - A. Two, my wife and child. I have two lodgers, Samuel Dobbs and Robert Lee . On Sunday afternoon, the 13th of May, about half past three o'clock, I left my house; my wife and me and the child went out together to spend the evening, and left Mr. Dobbs and Mr. Lee in the house up stairs, in their own room; these young men had one key and we the other. I returned at half past eight in the evening, I found the door locked as usual; I took the key out of my pocket and opened the door with it.

Q. You found nothing amiss with the lock - A. Nothing at all; it is a spring lock, there is no latch; the door was single locked. As soon as I opened the door I saw two men, they stood before me, close by the door.

Q. It was not dark then - A. Not quite dark; it

was so dark within doors that I could not tell who they were by their faces; they both of them instantly rushed out by me; I was alone; as they passed me they dropped a small dark lanthorn. This lanthorn gave me full reason to believe they were thieves.

Q. What business do you carry on in your house - A. None at all. I am a porter to Miller, Berry and Co. King-street, Cheapside. I instantly cried out, stop thief; I kept them in sight, and ran after them as far as the top of Tabernacle-row, very near; they ran together; when they got near the top of Tabernacle-row the prisoner turned round and rushed back by me again; I turned round after him.

Q. Are you quite positive that you kept them both in your sight till they both got to the top of Tabernacle-row - A. I kept them both in my sight. The prisoner rushed back by me again, the other got out of my sight, up the road; I turned round after the prisoner, I still cried out stop thief, and kept my eyes upon him all the while; after he passed me about twenty yards he was stopped by a gentleman, his name is Pearce, I got up to him, and, with assistance, took him to Worship-street; Armstrong searched him in my presence, and took out of his pocket a small bag containing thirteen picklock keys, a steel crow he took out of his pocket, also a small box, and a red leather pocket book; the prisoner said the pocket book was his own; he took from him a watch and some silver, I believe he returned him the silver. When the prisoner was secured I went home with Mr. Armstrong and others about nine o'clock. When I first ran after the prisoner the door was left open, on my way other office I returned to my house then with the prisoner and told the people that was the house where I lived, and where I had found the prisoner. I locked the door and took the prisoner to Worship-street.

Q. After having secured the prisoner, when you came from the office you found the door locked as you had left it, did not you - A. Yes; I opened the door with my own key; Armstrong, my wife, and two or three more went in with me; we first went into the parlour, we saw on the floor, close by the door, a black canvas bag, Armstrong asked if the bag was ours.

Q. Was that bag yours - A It was not. I never saw the bag before to my knowledge. Armstrong took out of the bag a tea caddie with some tea, and a silver shell in it, he also took out of it a shawl, six napkins, an ironing blanket, and a piece of wrapper about the same size.

Q. Were any of these yours - A. Yes, all my property, they were in my house when I left it, about three in the afternoon; the tea caddie was on the dining table in the parlour, and the tea and the shell, the napkins were wrapped up in the ironing blanket, and the piece of wrapper was with it, they were in the closet in the parlour when we went out of the house We then went up stairs into my lodgers room, the lodgers were out, they lodged in the one pair of stairs; when we got into the room we found Mr. Dobbs's box, the ead of it was thrown open; we examined the lock, we found it had been broken open with a crow; Armstrong asked the lodgers names, I told him; he said very likely the pocket book had been taken out of that box. Lee and Dobbs both lodged in one room; we examined all over the house, we lost a silver tea spoon, and two plated spoons, but never recovered them.

MARY DAVIS . Q. The last witness is your husband - is he - A. Yes. I and my husband went out about half past three o'clock.

Q. You did not return with your husband - A. No, but I went to my husband when he returned from delivering the prisoner into custody. I saw him open the door with Armstrong; I saw a black bag in the parlour; I am sure it was not mine nor my husband's property.

Q. Your husband has told us what Armstrong took out of the bag; first of all he took out a tea caddie with a silver shell - A. Yes.

Q. What do you think might be the value of that - A. About eighteen shillings, and the shell about three shillings, six napkins, they are worth about six shillings, and the ironing blanket and wrapper about three shillings.

SAMUEL DOBBS . Q Young man, what business do you follow - A. A mill-wright.

Q. On the 13th of May you lodged at Mr Davis's - A. Robert Lee and me rented a room of Mr. Davis.

Q.Do you remember Davis and his wife going out of the house on the 13th of May last - A. Yes; it was on a Sunday; they went out about three o'clock in the afternoon.

Q.He left you and Lee in the room, did not he - A. He left us both in the room.

Q. What time did Lee and you go out - A. About four o'clock in the afternoon; I locked my box, it was in my bed-room; I had a red pocket book in my box I am certain of, it contained nine one pound notes, but I believe it contained more; they were all one pound bank of England notes.

Q. You say about four o'clock you locked your box - A. Yes; we left the house then about four o'clock; we returned about a quarter past ten o'clock both together.

Q.This was of course after the house had been robbed - A. Yes, the disturbance was just over. When I went out of the house I single locked the door, that I am certain of.

Q. You had both a key of the house to yourselves - A. Yes.

Q. You observed the parlour windows when you went out to be secure, did you - A. It was all secure when we went out. In my pocket book there was a card with my name on it of the society of millwright, and the time I entered the society; it is a card that is delivered to a person when he enters the society, to shew that he has a right to the trade; and in the pocket book there was a bill and receipt that I had paid, a quantity of papers, and one letter directed to me. I found among the picklock keys that were taken from the prisoner, a piece of India rubber that had been in my box, and I missed a double bladed pen knife out of my box, and a key belonging to a tool box.

ROBERT LEE. Q You are a mill-wright, are you - A. Yes.

Q. You lodged in the same room with Dobbs -

A. Yes. On Sunday the 13th of May we went out about four o'clock, and returned together about ten o'clock; we went up stairs; I missed nothing at all.

Q. Do you remember seeing this box of your companion Dobbs - A. I saw him lock it; I did not know the contents.

JOHN ARMSTRONG . I am an officer of Worship-street office. On Sunday the 13th of May, about nine o'clock, I received charge of the prisoner from Mr. Davis, at the public house next door to the office; I said I would search him; he said Mr. Armstrong, I will give up all to you; I searched him, in his coat pocket was this bag, with the major part of these keys in it, one or two might be loose in his pocket, the India-rubber was loose in one of his pockets, and this crow in his waistcoat or coat pocket; this phosphorus, in his putting his hand, this came out, I picked it up, with one piece of match in it. One of these parts of the lanthorn was given me by some gentleman accompanying Mr. Davis.

Q. to prosecutor. Look at these two pieces of the dark lanthorn and tell me whether that was the lanthorn that fell at your door - A. The lanthorn dropped down in two pieces; I had not time to examine it. I believe this to be the same lanthorn, it fell in two pieces.

Armstrong All that I found about the prisoner were the matches, keys, and phosphorus; I then searched his breast pocket of his coat, I found this red pocket hook, he at that time said it was his; I saw some papers in it, but no bank notes; there was in it a ticket of she mill wrights company, and a bill and receipt in Dobb's name; after I had found these things I locked the prisoner up, I went with the prosecutor, and a number of gentlemen accompanied me to his house, the door was unlocked, and in the parlour, just as I turned in, this bag laid on the floor, I opened it and turned these things out, which Mr. Davis said was his; here is the tea-caddie and the shall I went up stairs, and in a minute Bishop came to me; he was placed at the back of the house; I found a box wrenched open.

Q. Would such an instrument as that crow wrench it open - A. Yes; the hasp appeared to have been forced out; Mr. Dobbs was not there. I took care of this pocket book, hearing his name was Dobbs, I have had it in my custody ever since. The next morning Mr. Dobbs appeared, he said he had lost pocket book; I then took Mr. Davis, Bishop, the prisoner, and one or two gentlemen that were there into the parlour at the side of the office; I had the prisoner stripped; I searched his clothes and could not find any thing; I got hold of his coat, I rubbed the collar, sleeves, and breast part, and at the lower part of the breast I heard some paper rattle; I pulled them out and it was eleven one pound bank notes, I have had them ever since.

Q. to Mrs. Davis. Look at these things - A. The caddie and silver shell is my husband's property, the shawl is my sisters, she left it at my house; I washed it; the napkins are my property; they were all in my house when I left it.

Q. to Dobbs. Look at that pocket book, is it yours - A. It is my pocket book, I know it by my own hand-writing; the mill-wrights ticket and the letter addressed to me is there.

Q. You say at least there were nine one pound notes in it, you believe more - A. Yes.

Prisoner's Defence. I leave it entirely to the mercy of the court.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 22.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18100606-6

408. JAMES SISSON was indicted for feloniously assaulting Roger Parker , esq. in the king's highway, on the 18th of April , putting him in fear, and feloniously taking from his person, and against his will, five dollars, value 25 s. a half crown piece, two shillings, and eight sixpences , the property of Roger Parker .

ROGER PARKER , ESQ. Q. On the 18th of April last were you returning from London to your country house - A. I was riding on horseback, returning from London to Munden, in the parish of Hendon, between the four and five mile stone, between London and Edgware . It was perfectly light, the fun was shining perfectly bright.

Q. Do you know the person of the prisoner at the bar - A. I do; I had a view of his person distinctly; he took hold of the rein of the bridle with his left hand, holding the pistol in his right.

Q. Was the prisoner on foot - A. Yes, and alone; he said give me your money, or I'll shoot you; I did not give him the money that time, in a little time he repeated, if you do not give me your money I'll shoot you; in a little time after I gave him my purse, with my money in it; there were thirty-three shillings in it, in sixpences, shillings, and five shilling pieces, a half crown piece, as stated in the indictment. I believe that was the exact sum, but as I had been in London I cannot say to a shilling or two; there was a remarkable sixpence among the money in the reign of king William, 1698, was the date; it being a sixpence that had not been worn, I carried it in my pocket three or four years. He then asked me for my pocket book, I did not deliver him my pocket book; he said, if you do not give me your pocket book I will shoot you, my pistol is well primed; I told him I thought there was enough in my purse to content him; then he said to me, is there much in it, to which I answered, I cannot tell, you can tell by the weight of it as well as I can; then he took his hand off my bridle, and we parted.

Q. Did you observe which way the prisoner went A. I did; I went over just the rise of the hill that he might think I was gone home quietly; I met with a young man, I told him I had been robbed, I asked him if he would go back and help to take the footpad; we soon after saw Mr. Dixie, to whom I mentioned the circumstance, he very regularly joined me, and in a few minutes we had possession of the prisoner; he was searched, Mr. Dixie pulled the pistol out of his pocket, without any flint or any charge, and he also pulled my purse out of his pocket; I looked at my purse and saw my sixpence there; the purse and money was given to the patrol of Edgware.

Q. There are other sixpences of the same date - A. No doubt about it.

Q. When you overtook the prisoner was he walking - A. I saw him turn down a lane. I must in justice say of him, for a crime of this kind, I do not

know how he could commit it with less offence.

WILLIAM DIXIE. Q. In consequence of Mr. Parker communicating the circumstance to you, you returned with him and apprehended the prisoner - A. I did; Mr. Parker met me at the bottom of the hill, as far as what he speaks in my presence is perfectly correct.

JOSEPH WRIGHT . I am a patrol.

Q. Were you on duty on the 18th of April last did you receive any thing of Mr. Parker - A. I received the purse and the pistol from Mr. Croome, the magistrate at Edgeware, and the pocket book also.

Q. to Mr. Parker. You were before the same magistrate - A. Yes.

Q. Is that your purse - A. It is my purse; the sixpence corresponds with what I had; I have no doubt about it.

Q. When he said he would shoot you, at that time did you suppose the pistol to be loaded - A. Yes.

Q. Then from the terror of that threat you delivered your money - A. Yes, I did. If he had told me his pistol had not been loaded I should not have delivered it to him.

Prisoner's Defence. I have nothing to say.

WILLIAM BILBY . I am the prisoner's uncle; I have known him ever since he was a child; I never heard any thing against him in my life. He was a merchant at Hull, and failed about ten years ago; since that he has been to India; about four months ago he was at my house; I took a lodging for him; we considered him as delirious, as such his friends contributed to his support.

Q. Did you consider him to be out of his mind, so as to get him confined - A. No.

The prisoner called one other witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 35.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18100606-7

409. SAMUEL BRYAN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 1st of May , forty pounds weight of lead, value 7 s. the property of Sarah Bartley , affixed to her house .

SARAH BARTLEY . I live at Kingsland Green . I did not miss the lead from my premises untill the officer came to my house; it had been taken from the top of the kitchen. I saw the lead compared, it appeared to fit.

JOSEPH JOHNSON . I am headborough. I apprehended the prisoner at the top of Hoxton, about three quarters of a mile from Mrs. Bartley's, about five o'clock in the morning, he had a sack under his arm; I asked him what he had got there, and felt outside; he said it was lead, he had found it as he come from the Whitmore's Head. I took him into custody. The lead appeared to be fresh cut, it was quite bright.

JOHN RAY . I am an officer. On the 1st of May I was ordered by the magistrate to find out who had lost any lead; I made enquiry at Kingsland, I found this lady's house had been stripped of lead; I matched it; here is a nail-hole in the lead, and the nail was left on the premises; it fitted exactly.

Prisoner's Defence. About five o'clock in the morning as I was going through Hoxton town, I picked this lead up in the street; I turned back to take it home, I met the watchman, he put me into the watchhouse.

GUILTY , aged 31.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18100606-8

410. JOHN SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 24th of April , fifty five yards of carpet, value 6 l. the property of William Boothby , Moses Maddox , and John Musgrove , in the dwelling house of John Musgrove .

WILLIAM MILLS . I am clerk to Messrs. Boothby and Co. in Cannon-street . From information I followed the prisoner and stopped him with the carpet on his shoulder; he said, let me alone, I am drunk. I took him back to my masters.

Q. Was he drunk - A. No.

Q. Where is the carpet - A. It is in my master's warehouse sealed up; I have not brought it here.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100606-9

411. WILLIAM SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 2nd of March , a sheep, value 3 l. the property of Adam Morton .

SECOND COUNT, that he on the same day, a sheep, value 3 l. feloniously did kill, with intent to steal the carcase of it.

ADAM MORTON . Q. In what situation of life are you - A. I am a farmer on Ham Common .

Q. You had some sheep on the 1st of March - A. Yes; two hundred and seventy wether sheep. My shepherd counted them on the 1st of March, they were all right; I did not count them. I was there on the 2d of March, and then there was one missing.

ROBERT HEDGES . Q. On the 2nd of March last you were shepherd to Mr. Morton, were you - A. Yes.

Q. Whereabouts did he keep his sheep on the 1st of March - A. At Charlton field .

Q. Is Charlton field a field belonging to Mr. Morton - A. No, he bought some turnips there, and the sheep were there all hurdled round. On the evening of the 1st of March I counted them, there were two hundred and seventy; I went away from them about six o'clock when it was dark, they were all right when I left them. On the 2nd of March I let them out in the course of the day, counted them, and missed one; when I missed the sheep I looked round the hurdles, I saw one hurdle had been opened, and hard by that there was a gap in the edge, and the sheep had been drawed through there.

Q. Could you see any marks in the edge by the wool that the sheep had been drawed through there - A. Yes. I went to the other side of the edge, there was an appearance upon the ground, that I could see; it had been drawn plain about fifteen rods; it was loaded on a poney then and carried away; I tracked the feet of the poney up the field and down.

Q. Were you alone when you tracked the feet of the poney - A. Yes, I was.

Q. Where did you track the feet of the poney to - A. I tracked it about eighty rod that night, it was in the evening, I could not track it any more that night; I went home to my landlord, I told him that I had lost a sheep, and that it was carried away with a poney; I got some information from my landlord.

Q.The second day how far did you track the poney - A. I had to go across the road and up a little meadow's; we tracked the poney close to the prisoner's garden.

Q. You traced the poney quite back to the prisoner's house - A. Yes, where the prisoner lodged; the house belonged to Mr. Saunders.

Q. Did you know this poney - A. No, I was a stranger there, my master sent me there to look after the sheep.

Q. You say you traced this poney close up to the hedge as far as it could go - A. And the sheep was drawed over there.

Q. Where you suppose the poney to be unloaded did you see any marks there - A. I saw marks on the paling by Saunders's house.

Q. I only want to know how far it is from where you saw the marks on the hedge to Saunders's house - A. About twenty rods, he could not go any further with the poney.

Q. How far where the pales from the hedge - A. Close by.

Q. You saw no marks on the other side of the hedge A. No, the poles were close by.

Q. When you observed this what did you do - A. I went down and got a search warrant; and the constable went with me to Saunders's house; we searched the house.

Q. This was the second day after you missed it, was it - A. Yes, Mr. Saunders was not at home, I saw the prisoner and his wife, they were at home when we searched; the prisoner is a taylor; upon searching the house we found all but the liver and the head; we have got the skin and wool here. The sheep was cut up into joints as well as he could cut it, and all hung up over the bed.

WILLIAM SAUNDERS . Q. How old are you - A. Thirteen, my father's name is John Saunders .

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar, Smith - A. Yes, he and his wife lodged at my father's house on the 1st and 2nd of March last.

Q. Was your father at home then - A. No, my father went from home on the Saturday before.

Q. Where does your father live - A. At Upper Alliford Sunbury.

Q. On what day was the sheep brought to your father's house - A. On Friday the 2nd of March; my father returned on the Tuesday following.

Q. Have you a mother alive - A. No, I have a sister, she is nine years old, there were only us two left in the house.

Q. Do you know any thing of his bringing this sheep in your father's house - A. No, only I saw it in the back-kitchen on the Friday morning about five o'clock, the prisoner was just coming in at the back-door.

Q. Was the sheep dead - A. Yes, but the skin was not off; the prisoner asked me to help him up stairs with it; I did, and his wife helped it up too. When he got it up stairs he began skinning it; he asked me to help him, I helped him.

Q. Did he tell you where he got it from - A. No, did not ask him. I thought it queer to see it in the house. He skinned it, and about three o'clock on the Friday afternoon he cut it into joints. At night I saw him pulling the wool off the skin.

Q. Did you see him hang up the joints - A. Yes near about his bed.

Prisoner. Q. Recollect, you are going to take my life away. Was not part of the wool off the skin when you saw it in the house - A. It was not.

Prisoner. Q. The wool been seen in that place, there were some sheep in the field adjoining to the house, they come backwards and forwards into a garden this lad turned them out - A. Some of Mr. Collin's did the week before, none of Mr. Morton's.

Prisoner. This poney has been in these people's field; it was apt to break into gentlemen's fields which is well known to the neighbours all round.

Court. Q.(to Saunders.) What poney was this - A. My father's poney, he would sometimes run into the fields.

Q. Where was this poney on the 2nd of May - A. In my father's stable. It was in the stable that morning when I got up at five o'clock.

MR. ESSOM. I am a constable of Sunbury, I searched the prisoner's house on the Saturday.

Q. Do you recollect what day of the month it was - A. Yes, the 3rd of March, I searched one room, and when I went to search another the prisoner ran away. I and another man went after him and brought him back. Then I searched the upper part of the house and in his bed-chamber I found very near the whole of the sheep cut up in joints in a very bad manner. We brought some of it down stairs, then we perceived there was something buried in the garden close to the back door and there we dug up the entrails, we found the skin at the top of the stairs in a bag, I took the bag with the wool and the skin in it home to my house; I have had it in my custody ever since.

Q. Was there any trace of the owners name on the skin - A. The wool was all plucked off the skin and the skin was underneath the wool in the bag, the wool being plucked off we could not trace the owners mark. This is the skin it was wet then, it is dry now, and this is the wool.

Q.(to Prosecutor) Look over the skin - A. I have done it before there was a mark on the wool provided that it had not been plucked off it was mark'd WL on the near side.

Q. In the situation that you found the skin and the wool you could not discover any trace of that mark - A. No I could not.

Q. Were there several people in that neighbourhood that had sheep as well as you - A. Yes; not fat sheep, it was a very large sheep, I suppose it weighed thirteen stone, the neighbours flock of sheep were chiefly lambs.

Q. You did not weigh the different joints of this sheep did you - A. No, it was a wether sheep and by the skin I could perceive it was a wether sheep.

Prisoner's Defence. I hope you will have a feeling for my wife and children. I am innocent of what I am brought here for as a child unborn. On the 29th of February as my wife was going home from Kingston to Alliford she saw a man standing close by the river with the carcase of a sheep, the head was missing, my wife having a horse and cart the gentleman told her she might take it home for her family, he told her it would be a pity for the sheep to lay there the tide would wash it away, the gentleman looked for the mark and finding no mark he told my wife he would help it into my cart which he did, my wife thanked him kindly, the gentleman told me I might take it without fear, I thought him to be my friend, the boy knows that I did not bring the sheep in, I was in bed.

Witness. He brought it in his own self.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 33

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18100606-10

412. JOHN COLEMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of February , a wrapper value 2 s. and an hundred pound weight of cotton-twist, value 20 l. the property of James Holt .

JAMES HOLT . My uncle's name is James Holt , he is a carrier at the Axe Inn, Aldermanbury, these things were stolen out of a cart.

JOHN WATSON. I am a carman to James Holt . On the 5th of February about seven o'clock I had a cart load of ds, I had delivered some, and what I had in the cart I was to bring home to the Axe Inn. I received the goods at Paddington they came up by the Canal. I had four packs of cotton in one bail, they were all safe when I left Mr. White's facing the bottom of Falcon-square, they were at the bottom of the cart covered over with a sheet.

Q. Where was it you missed this - A. In Silver-street . I missed one of these packs through some one calling out stop carman, you have lost a truss; I stopped the horse; I ran and took it from the prisoner myself and put it in the cart again; the patrol secured the prisoner, and some of the by standers, the prisoner was not above ten yards from the cart. He said it tumbled down from the cart and he had holloaed for the carman to stop.

Q. Was it possible that it could have dropped from the cart - A. It was impossible for it to have dropped, from the cart, it is a close bodied cart; there is a tail-board to it, it shuts up close, it lay at the bottom. The patrol secured the prisoner and brought him back to the Axe Inn, there was a constable sent for and he was charged.

Q. Are you quite sure that was one of the four packs that you had in the cart - A. Yes, I can swear to the wrapper, Sir John Eamer granted the cotton to be taken out of the wrapper to be brought here, the contents of the wrapper was one hundred pound weight of cotton-twist I have delivered the cotton and kept the wrapper. The cotton-twise was to be left at the Axe Inn till called for; it belonged to Mr. Beardmore he has a warehouse in Milk-street, it was lodged there.

JOHN WAUGH . I am a patrol. On the 5th of February about seven o'clock or half-past seven in Silver-street I saw two men on the opposite side of the way, drawing something out of a cart driven by Watson. I went round the tail of the cart and seized hold of the prisoner, he had got the wrapper out of the cart, the other person ran off, I held him till somebody ran after the carman, Watson secured the wrapper and the goods and put it in his cart, as soon as I seized hold of the prisoner he holoaed Carman.

Q. He did not holloa out Carman before you took hold of him - A. No, and when the Carman came up, he asked me whether I thought he looked like a person that would take such a thing out of a cart; the prisoner wanted me to let him go, he said he would not run away, I said he might depend upon it I would not let him go, I took him to the Axe, I ran and Mr. Holt sent for an officer and from there we took him to the Compter; the wrapper was delivered to Prestow the officer.

SAMUEL PRESTOW . I am a constable. This man was given in charge to me, this is the wrapper. I saw the goods unpacked, they were cotton-twist. I have kept the wrapper ever since. The owner told me the cotton-twist was worth 21 l.

Q.(to Watson) Tell me whether that is the wrapper that contained the cotton-twist that was taken from your cart - A. It is.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel, and called no witnesses to his character.

GUILTY aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100606-11

413. FREDERICK MILLER was indicted, for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of April , two fowls value 4 s. the property of William East .

WILLIAM EASE . I have a house and garden No. 5 Manner-place Kings-row Chelsea ; I keep my poultry in an enclosed place in my back premises.

Q. How many poultry had you - A. I believe six or seven, they were entirely enclosed from the sides and the top so as to separate them from the garden; I only know when the poultry were produced at Queen-square, they were mine; my business is in town, I am not often there; they were of the French poland kind, and worth four shillings.

ALEXANDER GOODYEAR. I am a paper-stainer. On the 19th of April I lived in Mr. East's house. On that morning about a quarter past three, it was moon-light, I was alarmed at the barking of a dog, and shortly after the alarm I heard a fowl squall out. I jumped out of bed, opened my window, and looked out. I saw the prisoner standing in Mr. East's garden. I asked him what he was about there; he made no answer. I called the watchman, the watchman came, and took the prisoner with the two fowls they appeared to have been recently killed. I knew the fowls, they were alive the evening before.

Prisoner's Defence. I served his Majesty twenty-six years and a half.

GUILTY , aged 52

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100606-12

414. ABRAHAM HART BRAHAM was indicted for feloniously making an assault, in the King's highway, upon Christopher Lewis Trumff , putting him in fear, and feloniously taking from his person and against his will, a watch, value 20 l. a chain, value 4 l. a seal, value 1 l. and a key, value 5 s. his property.

CHRISTOPHER LEWIS TRUMFF . I live at No. 10, George-street, Westminster. On the 30th of March I was in Fleet-street , about ten o'clock at night, it was near to Mr. Adam's shop, a mathematical instrument maker. A man ran against me; I was walking at the time, and at the same moment I felt my watch was gone. No violence was offered me at all, his running against me did not hurt me at all, it only drew off my attention; there were two or three others with him.

Q. Do you know that you had your watch about you at the time that the man ran against you - A. Most certainly.

Q. Could you distinguish the person of the man who ran against you - A. I cannot identify him, it was dark, he was a man of that size and appearance, he was dressed in black.

Q. Upon perceiving that your watch was gone what did you do - A. I ran after these men, all the three men ran, the other two put on the appearance as if pursuing him. I tried to lay hold of him, but he very soon disappeared. I called out watch, and stop thief. When he got to Temple-bar he took to the left hand side of the way.

Q. How long was it after that you saw any person in

custody - A. A little more than a fortnight; this was on the 13th of March, and on the 18th of April I saw the prisoner.

Q. Was your watch ever found again - A. It was found the following day at the pawnbroker's, the chain was wanting. I have seen the watch key and seal again.

Q.Now when you saw this man in custody, did you recollect this man to be one of the persons - A. It struck me very much; I cannot but believe that he is, but I do not speak positively to him.

Q. What was the worth of your watch - A. It was a gold watch, I value it very little under twenty guineas; the chain was bought for four guineas, and the seal is worth a pound; it was marked with my initials, and the watch had my initials on it.

Q. Do I understand you right that you felt the watch moving from your person, or did you only perceive that you had lost it after the man ran against you - A. I felt the motion of the watch as it was going from me, and in a violent manner.

Q. Were you quite sober - A. Quite sober.

CHARLES FREDERICK PRIDDLE . I live at Mr. Barker, 115, Houndsditch. On the 31st of March about, twelve o'clock in the day, the prisoner pawned a gold watch with me; it had a gold seal and gold key to it. I advanced 8 l. on it. On Tuesday the 17th of April he came to our house with another man to look at the watch, he did not say for what purpose, he produced the duplicate of this gold watch that he had pawned. I recollect him to be the very man to whom I had advanced money upon the watch.

Q. Had you at that time heard of the watch been a stolen watch - A. Yes; on the same day that I took it in, about four o'clock in the afternoon, a bill came from Bow-street describing the watch.

Q. Did you stop him or cause him to be stopped then - A. I pretended to be looking for the watch while I sent for an officer; when the officer came the prisoner ran off.

Q. Before the prisoner ran off had you told him that you suspected him to be the person that stole the watch A. No. I told him nothing at all about it; he got off and the next evening I saw him in custody at Bow-street, I knew him directly. When he first came in with the watch he brought a gold chain, he wanted to know the weight of it; the chain at that time was not attached to the watch. I weighed the chain for him, it weighed an ounce and five pennyweight, it was worth about 3 l. 10 s.

The property produced and identified.

JOHN ADKINS . I am an officer of Bow-street. I apprehended the prisoner in a public-house at the bottom of Bow-street, he had been taken upon another charge and got away. I asked him what he had done with the chain that he had stolen with the watch, he said he never saw any chain. I said, where did you get the watch that you pawned in Houndsditch. He said, he had it of a man of the name of Smith, who lived at No 14, Charles-street Black-friars-road. I told him I would be obliged to him to let me know where the chain was because it would be proved that he produced the chain at the time that he pawned the watch. He said he could not tell me where it was. When I first apprehended the prisoner, I said, oh, master Braham, is it you? I have been looking for you a good while for a watch that you stole in Fleet-street. He said, I know nothing of a watch. I went to No. 14 Charles-street, no such person as Smith lived there as I could find.

Prisoner. I am entirely innocent of the charge that I am accused of; I have dealt in watches, and I have pledged watches; the gentleman must be mistaken in the man. Mr. Morris can come forward to say that I have pledgded watches at his shop.

GEORGE MORRIS. I am a pawnbroker, I live in the Minories.

Prisoner. I have pledged to the amount of an hundred pounds of watches at his shop and, Mr. Morris never knew any harm in my character - A. In all probability he has been at my shop I have some knowledge of his face; I have seen him before, upon particularly what I cannot say, it may be watches; I have taken things in pawn of him, but what I cannot say.

GUILTY, aged 22.

Of Simple Larceny .

Transported for Life .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100606-13

415. JEREMIAH LONG was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of May , two bottles value 6 d. and nine pounds weight of quicksilver, value 2 l. 2 s. the property of John Kirk , Richard Hearn , Henry Hearn , and Brailsford Bright , in the dwelling-house of John Kirk .

SECOND COUNT for like offence, only varying the manner of charging it.

BRAILSFORD BRIGHT. I live at 95, Bishopsgate-street Within; my partners names are John Kirk , Richard Hearn , Henry Hearn , and myself Brailsford Bright. We are wholesale druggists . Mr. Kirk resides in the house, and no other partner but him. The prisoner was our porter . In consequence of suspicion, we directed the officers to be upon the watch. On the 30th of May I saw the prisoner go out of the warehouse at eight o'clock, he had been at work in the laboratory. The warehouse is the bottom floor of the house.

Q. How do you go from the laboratory to the warehouse - A.Through a yard there is a wall that encloses the whole from the laboratory; he came to the warehouse and out of the door of the house. I did not see the officers apprehend him. After he went out the officers came in a quarter of an hour afterwards. I went with them to the Vine inn, Bishopsgate-street; they shewed me the two bottles of quicksilver, I knew them to be mine; there was a label on one of the bottles by which I knew it; the bottles of quicksilver were worth a guinea each, and the bottles 6 d.

WILLIAM SHEPPARD . I am an officer. I saw the prisoner come out of the prosecutor's house. I followed him, and came up with him in Bury-street, St. Mary Axe. I never lost sight of him. I caught hold of him. I saw Sapwell find upon him two bottles, one in each breeches pocket.

THOMAS SAPWELL . I asked the prisoner how he came by these, first, he told me he got it from Clerkenwell, and he was going to carry it to Petticoat-lane; he said it was oil; then he said he had it from a man at the corner of Camomile-street. I took him to the watch-house, and informed the prosecutor.

Q.(to Prosecutor) Was there any quicksilver in the laboratory - A. Not at that time, it was in a room above the laboratory, the prisoner had access to that room.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I told them where I had the bottles from.

GUILTY, aged 25,

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100606-14

416. JOHN DAVIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of April , eight yards and three quarters of a yard of satin jean, value 30 s. the property of Thomas Sorel , privately in his shop .

THOMAS SOREL . I am a leather seller in Bishopgate Within . I was not at home at the time the robbery took place.

Mr. Alley. These things had been sold to a customer. - A. Yes, they had.

THOMAS HUGHES . On the 17th of April, about eight in the evening, I was standing at my own door; it was just dusk. I had information that the officer was waiting for a person that had robbed the shop. I saw the prisoner cross the way with the jean under his arm; the prisoner was coming from Mr. Sorel's shop nearly across to ours; the officer met him in the middle of the street and stopped him.

Q. You did not see him at any time in Mr. Sorel's shop, did you - A.I did not; the officer attempted to take him; the prisoner struck at him twice or three times; after he struck at him he dropped the property and ran off; the officer picked up the jean. I pursued the prisoner, the prisoner was never out of my sight till he was secured, there was a board in the jean when he struck at the officer.

JEREMIAH SHRUBSALL . I am a constable. I was coming through Bishopgate-street on the 17th of April, a little after eight o'clock. I saw three or four suspicious characters. I saw the prisoner Davis, and another, go to Mr. Sorel's shop, the lower part of the window is board instead of glass; they stood a tiptoe and looked over the blank window into the shop. I watched the prisoner, and crossed over the way, being by myself, and spoke to Mr. Hughes's porter, and while I was speaking I saw the prisoner coming towards me with this jean in his arms; I stopped him and said, what have you got here? he said, you b - r, I'll let you know, and then hit at me. made a hit at him with my truncheon; he hit me again and I dropped on my knee; I made a catch at his waistcoat, the buttons broke, he got away; on his seeing Mr. Hughes coming he dropped the goods and set off; Mr. Hughes got hold of him, and then I got up to him and secured him.

Q. Was there any body in Mr. Sorel's shop at that time. - A. I was not positive what shop it was taken out, after I had secured the prisoner I went to a linen draper's shop. I asked them if it was their property, they said, No; Mr. Sorel's shop was shut up. I went there the next morning, they said they had lost the property.

Q. to Prosecutor. This was about eight o'clock the man stopped him, how lately before had you seen it. - A. I had not seen it since the morning; the person to whom it was sold lived in Henrietta-street, Cavendish-square.

Q. Was there any body at home in your shop at this time. - A. There were two men, they are neither of them here; the jean is worth thirty shillings.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel.

GUILTY, aged 22,

Of stealing, but not privately .

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100606-15

417. WILLIAM COOMBS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of May , a box, value 2 s. and eight bonnets, value 11 l. the property of Thomas Boyce .

JUDE WEBSTER. I am clerk to Thomas Boyce , he is the proprietor of the Cross keys, Gracechurch-street . On the 17th of May last a deal box was brought into the warehouse directed to Mrs. Giles, of Kingston, Surry, I received the box; I booked it myself. Mr. Boyce has no partner. The box was delivered about ten minutes before four o'clock; the coach starts at four or ten minutes after; the parcel was put on the counter ready for delivery; the porter had put part of the parcels into the coach, and while he was loading the coach I was alone in the warehouse looking in the book. I never heard any one come in. I lifted up my head, I saw a man go out of the door with a deal box in his hand; I immediately pursued him; he got into the narrow passage of George-yard before I saw him again. I called out stop thief, he looked and saw me pursuing; he threw down the box I never lost sight of him untill he was stopped.

JOHN KEMPSON . I am a porter. On the 17th of May I stopped the prisoner and collared him; he was secured.

WILLIAM ELDRIDGE . I am an officer. I opened the box, it had straw bonnets in it.

The property produced and identified.

GUILTY , aged 34.

Confined One Month in Newgate and whipped in jail .

London jury before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100606-16

418. MARGERET ROBERTSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of May , twenty-four yards of printed cotton, value 1 l. the property of James Laming privately in his shop .

JOHN EVANS . I am an assistant to James Laming , linen draper , Ludgate-hill . On Monday the 28th Mr. Lee brought the prisoner into our shop, and the print, and about a quarter of an hour before I had laid the print on the counter within three yards of the door. I did not miss it till Mr. Lee brought it in, and then I knew it perfectly well, Mr. Laming had no partner at that time.

Q. Had you seen the prisoner in your shop - A. The quantity of people we had in the shop it is impossible to say. There are twenty-four yards of linen it cost sixteen pence a yard.

WILLIAM LEE . I am a constable. On the 28th of May a little after seven o'clock, I was passing down Ludgate-hill, in company with Hardy, I observed the prisoner whom I knew to be a suspicious character go into Mr. Laming's shop. I set Hardy upon the watch, I sent for assistance, I did not see the assistance I expected on Ludgate Hill. I returned and saw the prisoner within three or four doors of Mr. Laming's, towards Fleet-market; she was alone walking very brisk, she went down Fleet-market, and then I stopped her; I asked her what she had got in her apron; she made no answer but instantly gave it me out of her apron, this is the piece, I told her I knew where it came from, I took her back to Mr. Laming's.

Q Was the linen claimed by Laming's people - A. Yes, instantly as I took her in the shop; I have had the linen ever since in my possession.

- HARDY. I was on the opposite side of the way and saw the prisoner go into Mr. Laming's shop, I saw her go in twice she came to the door and went in

again; when she came out I followed her with Lee, she turned up a court, two other persons were with her, they all three went up the pawnbroker's court, a woman that was with her gave the property to her at the pawnbroker's door in the passage.

Q. How many persons had been in the shop besides this woman - A. Two others, the prisoner came out first, the two others came out in about two minutes afterwards.

Q. Did they all go up the pawnbroker's passage - A. Yes.

Q. Did Lee join you at the time - A. He joined me coming up the hill; I accompanied Lee till he stopped the woman.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked it up in the pawnbroker's court, I was never in the shop so help me God, in Fleet-market the gentleman came up to me, I said, if it is your's take it, nobody gave it me; I picked it up and saw no owner to it.

Jury. Q.to Hardy. Did you see the woman come out of the shop - A. I saw the other woman take it out of her apron and deliver it to the prisoner.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100606-17

419. WILLIAM COLLINS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of May , forty pounds weight of lead, value 10 s. and sixty pounds weight of solder, value 3 l the property of John Roberts and Joseph Day , in their dwelling house .

JOSEPH DAY . Q. What is your partner's name - A. John Roberts , we are wholesale plumbers and glass cutters , No. 10, Norton Falgate . The prisoner was the foreman of the carpenters in our employ he had lived with us about nine months, he worked in our premises in making boxes. In consequence of information on the 10th of May I marked some lead; it was concealed in a cupboard, when I marked it I replaced it.

Q. Did you mark any solder - A. No, I had some solder in the house I had recently cast it and of that casting I had sold none. On the next morning I was on the watch about six o'clock, I saw the prisoner on my premises, in consequence of that lead being missed that I had marked the night before, I took one of the men into custody, and in consequence of what he said I took this man into custody; I sent for an officer between six and seven o'clock and charged him with the theft. The officer enquired of him whether he had any property of mine or my partner's; he said he had not, we then went to his apartments, No. 11, King's-head-court, Shoreditch, there we found six bars of solder laying in a chair in the parlour and six bars more in a cupboard concealed in the same room; we then returned and brought the prisoner to his room, Armstrong then produced the solder. We had cast the solder a few days before and not sold any, I knew the solder to be mine, this is the mould that made the impression in the sand to cast it in. This is the lead that we found under his own chest in our own workshop.

JOHN ARMSTRONG . I went with Mr. Day to the watch house, I had the prisoner brought out; Mr. Day in my presence asked the prisoner where he lived and the man gave his place of residence; I then told him I am now going to search your house, is there any thing there that belongs to your master; he said no. I then went with Mr. Day and in the parlour I found these six in a chair, and these six in a basket in a cupboard, Mr. Day said, they are mine; I then had the prisoner brought from the watch house, Mr. Day and Mr. Roberts were present, I said to the prisoner is this your apartment; he said, it is, I have taken out these goods; I said your master owns these how came they here; he said, they were brought by a labourer; I secured the goods, the prisoner was taken to the magistrate.

Prisoner's Defence. I am not guilty of any misdemeanour of stealing or of taking any thing out of Mr. Day's premises, if ever I saw any thing that was amiss I always told him of it.

The prisoner called three witnesses who gave him a good character.

GUILTY, aged 31.

Of stealing but not in the dwelling house .

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100606-18

420. HENRY MOLLOY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 19th of May , in the dwelling house of Jane Eliza Martin , thirty-two guineas, a bank note, value 10 l. five bank notes, value 5 l. each, two bank notes, value 2 l. each, and one 1 l. bank note , the property of Jane Eliza Martin .

JANE ELIZA MARTIN . I live at No. 4, Berry-street, St. James's .

Q. Look at the prisoner do you know him - A. Yes, I have known him for this five years, he is a groom to a gentleman, he was in the habit of coming backwards and forwards to my house, but not so much lately as some years before.

Q. On the 19th of May you were going out were not you - A. Yes, to a ball; I went to the ball about half past eleven or a quarter to twelve.

Q. What is your situation and way of life - A. I am a single woman and keep a house for myself.

Q. What servants have you in your family - A. I had no female servant in the house, the prisoner called upon me between five and six, I asked him to stay in the house.

Q. What is your general establishment - A. Only one female servant and a porter, his name is Henry Kelley , he does not sleep in the house but on that night I left him in the house.

Q. What did you do with the money - A. I put it in the box where I took it from, about half past eleven I went into the parlour, I opened the upper drawer of a chest of drawers to take some trinkets out that I wanted to wear, I saw the money in the box, thirty-two guineas, a ten pound bank note, five five pound bank notes, two two's and a one, the box was not locked the drawer was locked and the key I had with me. About half past eleven I desired the prisoner to stay to watch the house, he first said, he must go and tell his fellow servant that he was not coming home or his master I am not certain which.

Q. Do you know who his master was - A. I do not know his name No. 40, Albermarle-street, it was there that he was taken, I was going that way in a hackney coach, I told him to make haste back, I took him in the coach and set him down at the top of St. James's-street. Rachael Lyons went to the ball with me at No. 52, Great Marlborough-street, I do not know whose house it was.

Q. What sort of persons were there - A. I knew very few of them it is a ball where people pay for going.

Q. Did you dance - A. Yes, with a stranger.

Q. More than one - A. No. I got home about half past five.

Q. Did that stranger come home with you - A. No, only Mrs. Lyons came home with me; the prisoner was at home, I think I found him in the back parlour on the sofa; I believe Kelley was in the kitchen.

Q. How soon after you came home did you go to bed. - A. In about three quarters of an hour.

Q. Was there nobody else in the house - A. Yes, Mrs. Lyons slept in the house, I believe she went to bed at the same time; she is a widow, and often visited me.

Q. Did any body come in the house at that time when you and Mrs. Lyons came home - A. No, only Mrs. Lyons came home with me in the coach; and nobody was in the parlour but him.

Q. But there was somebody in the house besides him. - A.Just for a few moments, but I never left him, a person that came home in the coach with me.

Q. You said nobody came home in the coach with you - A. Yes, I did not think proper to mention it.

Q. I took it down from your mouth, that only Mrs. Lyons came home in the coach with you - A. Nobody but her and a gentleman, he came home with me and went in the front parlour; he did not stay above ten minutes, he never went into the back parlour; I beg your pardon, Mrs. Lyons can tell better than me.

Q. Was that man an acquaintance of yours - A, No, he came home with me from dancing at the ball; when he was gone I went to bed. I got up in the morning about eleven o'clock, I went into the back parlour, the prisoner was not in the house; then I went to the drawer to put my trinkets away; I took hold of the box, when I used to take hold of the box the guineas used to rattle, and then it did not; I said to Mrs. Lyons, Oh my goodness, the guineas are not in the box; I searched and found the bank notes and money was gone. I mentioned my loss to Kelley and sent him to the prisoner; he sent word he would come in a quarter of an hour; he did not return. I went to his master's house; I told him he had taken my money, and asked him to give it me; he said, he knew nothing at all about it. I went to Bow-street, got a warrant, and took him up.

Prisoner. There were two men came home with her, one stopped and slept with her.

Prosecutrix. There were two men came home with me in the coach, one never came in the house.

Court. When you come here to swear upon that oath you have taken, whatever is the consequence to your private character, do not swear that which is false; the prisoner desires me to put this question to you, whether one of these men did come home and sleep with you - A. He remained with me a little time in my bed room; he did not sleep with me.

Prisoner. I have a witness here to prove that he did sleep with you. You asked me to come and sleep with you; I am telling the truth; did not you say in the coach, by God, Harry, if you do not come back and sleep with me, I never will speak to you any more - A. Upon my oath I said to take care of the house; I never asked him to sleep with me in my life.

RACHAIL LYONS. I am a widow woman, I live with my relations; I have a small pittance of my own; I was in the habit of calling on Mrs. Martin. On the 19th of May, the prisoner was at Mrs. Martin's when I came in.

Q. Were you present when Mrs. Martin desired him to stay in the house that night - A. Yes, she pressed him very much to come and stay in the house with Kelley. I went home to fetch some clean things to dress myself; I went down in the kitchen to put my clean things on; he was in the back parlour with her all the time Mrs. Martin was dressing; and by the time I was ready he went and fetched a coach, then we all three went to the top of St. James's-street; I and Mrs. Martin went to the ball. We returned about half past five in the morning; two gentlemen came with us in the coach, one was an Irish gentleman that lodged at the hummums, I do not know who the other was.

Q. When you got home did these two gentleman go into the house - A. Yes, both went into the house, one went into the front parlour, and the other went into the back parlour. Mrs. Martin went into the parlour with the Irish gentleman, the other went away; the Irish gentleman staid almost till twelve at noon; he wrote a note for the man to go to the hummums to fetch his clothes.

Q. With respect to this back parlour door, did you lock it when you went out. - A. No, I locked it in the morning when I went up stairs.

Q. When you returned you found Molloy there - A. Yes, he was in the habit of being there a great deal; when I saw him in the morning, he was coming out of the back parlour, going home.

Q. You say that this gentleman went into the back parlour, and was for some time with Mrs. Martin, and by his staying till twelve o'clock at noon, I suppose that he went to her bed room and slept with her - A. Certainly.

Q. And he did not get up from her bed till about twelve o'clock - A. No.

HENRY KELLEY . I am a porter.

Q. Who is Ann Kelley - A. My wife. I have done business for Mrs. Martin for five years. On the 19th of May, the prisoner returned soon after Mrs. Martin had set him off; about twelve o'clock he went into the back parlour, and there he staid till Mrs. Martin came home. I went several times into the back parlour to attend the fire; the prisoner was all the time laying on the sofa, sometimes asleep and sometimes awake. I only went into the room to make up the fire, and came back again directly.

Q. Did your wife go into the back parlour - A. No, my wife came to me between ten and eleven o'clock, and asked me when I was coming home: she staid half an hour and went away. When Mrs. Martin and Lyons came home two gentlemen came with them, they both went into the front parlour when I saw them, and then I went down stair. One of them went up stairs with Mrs. Martin, and went away about twelve o'clock at noon.

Prisoner's Defence. On the evening of the 19th of May I called on Mrs. Martin, she asked me to give her some brandy; I told her I had no money; she gave me half a crown to get some, and then she gave me a shilling. I fetched the brandy; she asked me to stop, I told her I was afraid of losing my situation. I got a coach for her; she said, by God, Harry you shall sleep with me to night; I told her I would come let my situation be what it would. I had been five years about her house, and almost every day there. I laid on the sofa till five o'clock; when she and Mrs. Lyons came home I went down in the kitchen, and when Mrs. Lyons came down she asked me to come to dinner; I said, no, I would call in the evening,

I went home my master was getting up he told me to go to Mr. Obee's, the boot maker; when I returned Mrs. Martin came she said, you have robbed me, give me the seventy-five pounds; I told her I did not know what she meaned, and after that the officer came and took me to prison.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18100606-19

421. SOPHIA SMITH and ELIZABETH BUTLER were indicted for feloniously assaulting John Wain on the 9th of May , putting him in fear and taking from his person and against his will two handkerchiefs, value 2 s. a promissory note for the payment of one pound, four one pound bank notes, and a two pound bank note , his property.

JOHN WAIN. I am a farmer , I live at Hillingdon. On Wednesday the 9th of May, I went into the Turk's Head, George-street, St. Giles's, to get a pint of beer. The prisoners came in and asked me for some liquor and after that they decoyed me to another house.

Q. What do you mean by decoying you. - A. One took hold of one arm and the other the other.

Q. Were you sober - A. I had some liquor; I knew what I was about, I was at the Turk's Head an hour and a half and about an hour with them, they asked me for gin I gave it them, I had a glass or two I believe.

Q. Now sir if they took you one by one arm and one by the other where did they take you to - A. They took me into Church-street , into a room there, they kept me there till between ten and eleven o'clock.

Q. What o'clock was it when you went - A. Between eight and nine. When they got me up they rifled my pockets, they put the candle out and as soon as they had robbed me they turned me down stairs; they broke my knuckles the blood was running down my fingers.

Q. I want to know which of them took the money out of one pocket and which out of the other, and which of them it was - A. I had my money only in one pocket it was loose; a two pound bank note, four one pound bank notes, and a one pound Uxbridge note, they took the handkerchief off my neck, they were both concerned in robbing me they turned me into the street; I called the watch, he came directly and took Sophia Smith , the other was gone she was taken afterwards; when I saw her at Marlborough-street, I knew her directly.

JOSHUA PEEL . I am a patrol. On the 9th of May, a little after eight o'clock, I saw Sophia Smith , and Elizabeth Butler bring the prosecutor out of the house, Smith had hold of his right arm and the other the left, I said to my partner, do not you see carrotty Sophy and the other has got that farmer, we shall hear of a robbery to-night; they went up Church-street, the prosecutor did not appear to be sober. At eleven o'clock when I was going my beat, the prosecutor says, watchman, I have been robbed; that was about three hours after I first saw him, he told me there were three women that did it, one was a carrotty haired woman, I then put him into a house and went to the watchman in George-street, he has been on that beat many years, I asked him where carrotty Sophy lived, he said he believed he did; I went with him he went up stairs, I staid by the door, he told me that he had got her, I fetched the prosecutor he went with me into the room, I then desired him to look at Sophia Smith as she was in bed, he said, it was her he could tell better when she was dressed; and when she was dressed he said, that is one of the women; we took her to the watch house he charged her.

Q. Did you search her - A. No, I told the watchman to search her, nothing was found upon her as I know of. I took Elizabeth Butler nine or ten days afterwards, she was very drunk sitting at a door; when I got her to the watchhouse I told her what I took her for, she denied it. the other that went by the name of Uxbridge Bet, I could not find her.

Smith's Defence. I am innocent.

Butler's Defence. I was in the Turk's head when this man came in, I saw him with two more girls; when the prosecutor was there me and two more girls went to the Robin Hood to have some more drink. Uxbridge Bet bade me good night; she had a room and took him up stairs.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18100606-20

422. JAMES BUTLER was indicted for feloniously assaulting Thomas Dukes in the King's highway, on the 25th of December , putting him in fear and taking from his person, and against his will, a handkerchief, value 5 s. a gold ring, value 5 s. and a one pound bank note , his property.

THOMAS DUKES . I am a master taylor . On the 25th of December last, between eleven and twelve, I was in the Haymarket talking to Frances Adams .

Q. What was she a girl of the town - A. Yes, I had known her for fourteen years. I am not a married man. I was speaking to her; the prisoner was unknown to me at that time. A person unknown to me came and knocked me down; the night was dark and rainy. The person that knocked me down came rather behind me; I did not see him; I was stunned immediately; I was cut on the nose; it disfigured me; I should think it was done with some instrument; I was stunned and fell. I did not recollect any thing afterwards till the next morning, I then saw my pockets were turned out. It was Christmas day, I was rather in liquor.

Q. When you was knocked down what became of you. - A. I was led to a house in Titchfield-street by persons more than one, as I was told the next morning, I do not recollect it.

Q. How do you know that you were robbed - A. I know from the loss of what I missed; before I spoke to this woman I had a one pound note and a gold ring in my pocket, and a silk handkerchief.

Q. When you recovered yourself had you your clothes on or off - A. Off, and my clothes were in the room; it was not where I did lodge, but where I used to lodge. When I came to dress myself one of my breeches pockets was turned out, where I had these things they were all missing.

Q. Was your nose badly cut - A. Very bad indeed, and both my eyes were very bad.

FRANCES ADAMS . Q. You are an unfortunate girl of the town - A. Yes.

Q. You know Mr. Dukes do you - A. Yes, I have known him fourteen years. On the 25th of December Mr. Dukes met me in the Haymarket, about half after eleven at night; I was in Tichbone-street with another young man. I met Mr. Dukes by a wine vaults; I do not recollect whether I asked him, or he me, to go in to have something to drink; the young man, me, and Mr.

Dukes, went into the wine vaults; Mr. Dukes could not pay for the liquor, he had not got any thing less than a one pound note, he pulled the one pound note out; the young man paid for the liquor, it came to sixpence; we came out and stood talking a little while, then Mr. Dukes and me took a walk down to Coventry court together, and as we went down the Haymarket, at the corner of Coventry-court, I saw no person near but the prisoner; I have known the prisoner three or four years, he is a butcher by trade, and at the corner of Coventry-court the prisoner knocked Mr. Dukes down without saying a word; Mr. Dukes fell, I cannot tell what part he struck him his back was towards the prisoner; when he knocked him down I did not observe any thing in his hand.

Q. When Mr. Dukes was struck down did he continue on the ground - A. He fell on his face; immediately as he fell I went to assist him, and screamed out; I stooped to pick him up, there was some instrument came and cut me across my right eye, I fell with the cut; the watchman or patrole took me into No. 12, Coventry-court. I do not know nothing further from the loss of blood.

Q. Where you so stunned by receiving this cut, that you did not know what passed afterwards - A. Yes, this shawl that I have on was covered with blood; I cannot swear that the prisoner cut me, but I can swear that the prisoner knocked down Mr. Dukes, but I could not swear that he robbed him.

Q. Have you brought any of the people at whose house you were carried in Coventry-court - A. No, I did not know there was any occasion, I thought if it was necessary, Mr. Bly would do it.

JAMES BLY . I am an officer of Queen-square: from information, I apprehended the prisoner at Banbury, in Oxfordshire; I brought the prisoner to town, and Frances Adams appeared at the office; the magistrate asked her whether that was the man; she said, yes.

Prisoner's Defence. On Christmas day I was at work in Smithfield till late at night, and after that I went home to my lodgings; I never was in the Haymarket that night.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18100606-21

423. WILLIAM BEGGES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of April , a silver milk pot, value 2 l. 10 s. four silver tea spoons, value 12 s. a pair of sugar tongs, value 6 s. the property of Charles Nevinson ; and a watch, value 5 l. the property of William Hazard , in the dwelling house of the said Charles Nevinson .

THOMAS HUTSON . I am a servant to Charles Nevinson , No. 4, Saville-Row . On the 24th of April I cleaned the plate and put it into the pantry, after that I went into the privy in the area; I saw the prisoner come down the area step and go into the house. I thought perhaps he might be coming after some business: he came out so soon that I had suspicion of him. I ran into the pantry and missed the cream jug, four tea-spoons, the sugartongs, and a silver watch that was hanging against the door, belonging to William Hazard , the porter there. I immediately pursued the prisoner, he was walking along with his hands in his pocket. As soon as he saw me he ran down Swallow-street as hard as he could run; I holloed out stop thief several times; he ran down George-court, next Piccadilly, down Church-passage, into Jermyn-street; he was stopped at the corner of Well-street, in Jermyn-street; I did not see him stopped.

WILLIAM HART . Q. Tell me whether ever you saw the prisoner and when - A. Yes, on the 24th of April, between eleven and twelve, I saw the prisoner running in Swallow-street, I followed him he went through Church-passage, and in Jermyn-street, a little way down he was overtaken, I saw him chuck some silver down an area in Jermyn-street.

Q. Did you see the silver picked up afterwards - A. Yes, a pair of sugar tongs, and one spoon hit against the rails and flew out on the road I picked the tongs up and the spoon and then he was stopped.

Q. Was any thing found on him - A. No, I gave the tongs and spoon to Gregory the constable. The watch has never been found.

JOSEPH GREGORY . I am a constable, I live close by. On the 24th of April, I heard the cry of stop thief, the prisoner was stopped at the corner of Well-street.

Q. Did you take any thing from him - A. Nothing at all, the property was stowed away; I produce a spoon and a pair of sugar tongs.

ANN CARBUT . I am a servant to Mr. Cooper, 109, Jermyn-street. I heard something jingle in the area, it seemed like glass, I thought it was the window broke, upon my going into the area I saw a cream jug and three silver tea-spoons, I took them up stairs, and gave them to my mistress Mrs. Cooper. This is the cream jug and the three spoons.

Q. to Hutson. Did the prisoner pass that way - A. Yes, he passed by 109, Jermyn-street.

SAMUEL VENHAM . I stopped the prisoner at the corner of Well-street, nothing was found upon him, he said, he was not the person.

Q. to Hutson. What do you say as to these articles - A. They are my master's property, I cleaned them up that morning.

Q. Your master is Mr. Nevingson is he - A. Yes.

Q. What is the value of the cream jug - A.2 l. 10 s. the spoons 12 s. and the sugar tongs 6 s.

WILLIAM HAZARD . Q. What are you in the house of Mr. Nevingson - A. I am his porter, I know no more than my watch was lost at the time, it has not been found again.

Prisoner's Defence. I was passing Saville-row, I heard a cry of stop thief, and a great quantity of people running, I immediately ran, and cried out stop thief, a man stopped me I am innocent.

- GREGORY. When I had him in custody he told me he had been down in Mr. Nevingson's-house, he went down into the area to find a privy to ease himself, and he said so before the magistrate.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 19.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18100606-22

424. THOMAS HARDWICK was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Gustard , about the hour of three, on the night of the 5th of January , and burglariously stealing therein one thousand two hundred and thirty-six yards of woollen cloth, value 1433 l.

Mr. Gurney, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100606-23

425. JOHN GREEN was indicted for that he on the 7th of May , with a certain loaded pistol, and divers leaden shots, feloniously, maliciously, and wilfully, did shoot at Jane Woodford , spinster, a subject of our lord the king, with intent in so doing, to kill and murder her .

SECOND COUNT for like offence, stating the intent to be to disable her; - and a

THIRD COUNT, to do her some grievous bodily harm.

The case was stated by Mr. Curwood.

JANE WOODFORD . I am a servant to Mr. Manton, he lives in Queenstown-house, on Harrow-hill common .

Q. What was the prisoner - A. A gardener at Mr. Manton's.

Q. Was he in your company in Mr. Manton's house - A. Yes, on the 7th of May, between nine and ten o'clock in the evening.

Q. Were you two left in possession of the house - A. Yes.

Q. What past at that time - A. He asked me if I was going to bed, I told him I was not going to bed till the washerwomen came.

Q. What, the washerwomen were coming were they - A. Yes; the prisoner said if I did sit up for them I should sit without fire; then he began to put the fire out with the poker, and it became too hot for him; he says, d - n you, if I cannot put you out I'll quench you out.

COURT. Did he say so the fire - A. Yes. I then went towards the kitchen door, he pulled me back again; the gate bell rang for the washerwomen, he went to the gate using all the bad language he could, and he returned using bad language, the same as before, and did not let the women in; I them went towards the door to let them in myself, he gave me a blow on my right breast, and sent me back again, and insisted upon me not letting them in; I then went and unbarred one of the kitchen windows, I said to the women, for God's sake do not go, if you do I shall be killed. The women I had not let in, they were in the front court; the prisoner then barred the window again, and then I went and let the women in. When I went out there was a fire, and when I came in there was no candle; I bid the women stand still; I went up stairs into my own sleeping room and truck a light; I came down again; he put that candle out; I went up the second time and struck another light, and left one burning in my own room, and brought the tinder box and one light in my hand.

Q.Did you lock the door of your room - A. I did, and brought the key of my door down; he put the second light out I had brought down; I struck a light the third time, he attempted to put that light out; with great difficulty we kept the third in; he then gave me several blows, and insisted upon my going up stairs; he pulled me up one stair, and I resisted him; he kept using very bad language, and insisted upon the women going home, and my going up stairs.

Mr. Walford. Where were the women all this time - A. In the kitchen. He then found that he could not get the better of none of us, he fetched three large doors out of the yard, he came into the kitchen with them, and one of the women went out for assistance; there was one of the woman left with me in the kitchen; he then threw me down, gave me several blows upon my arms and different parts of my body, he said, if that d - d old bitch is gone out she shall keep out; he then went out to bolt the woman out that was gone for assistance, and while the prisoner was bolting her out I concealed myself in an out house.

Q.Could you see the house from the out-house - A. No; I saw the house as I was going through the court, and while I was in the fore-court I saw the prisoner in the closet, in my sleeping room; when I saw him come out of the closet I went to let in the woman that went for assistance; I let in the woman and Anthony Darvill .

COURT. When you saw him in the closet in your room I suppose he had a candle - A. Yes, he had two candles, one he had with him in the closet, and one I left in my room; I could see all over the room, there were no curtains; I stood in the front court until I saw him come out.

Q. What was there usually kept in that closet - A. Powder and arms.

Q. How long was he in that closet - A. For the space of three minutes; and when I saw him come out of the closet I let the woman and Darvill in; I said, for God's sake make haste, we shall have the house burned, or else we shall all be shot, the gardener has gone into my master's powder closet.

Mr. Walford. Did you return with Darvill and the woman towards the kitchen - A. Yes, and on our entering the kitchen he said, d - n my eyes if I do not shoot the first man that enters: Darvill went up to him and laid his right hand on his left shoulder; Darvill lowered the pistol with his left hand, the prisoner instantly pulled both the triggers, (it was a double barrelled pistol) and lodged three slugs in my foot; I have never been able to do my work since. This is the pistol.

Q. When Darvill went towards the prisoner in what direction was the prisoner pointing the pistol - A. The prisoner was sitting in a chair when Darvill went up to him, he was holding the pistol in this position; the pistol was pointed exactly to my middle at the time that I went into the room.

COURT. Then the pistol was pointed towards you was it - A. Yes, it was pointed towards me; Darvill lowered it; the prisoner instantly pulled both the triggers, it went off and lodged three slugs in my foot; one ball grazed my ankle bone and the other my toes the prisoner refused to give the pistol up after he had fired it off.

Mr. Walford. Did you afterwards see the door of your bed room - A. Yes; it had been broken open.

Q. Was the key of the closet where the arms were kept in your bed room - A. Yes; it by over the door.

Q. Then for the purpose at coming at the pistols, he must have broken open your door - A. Yes.

Mr. Gurney. The moment the pistol went off, was as Darvill had hold of the barrel, lowering it - A. Yes, his hand laid to, lowering it, and the prisoner's fingers were in the triggers.

Q.When you speak of his pulling both the triggers you cannot tell whether it was lowering it that moved the triggers - A.He only put his hand so on the barrel.

COURT. Did you see the prisoner's fingers move - A. Yes. I am sure Darvill's fingers were not on the triggers.

Q.But did you see his fingers move - A. No.

Q. Then you suppose his fingers moved when the

pistol went off - A. Yes. Darvill did no more than lay his hand on the barrel and lowered it, or else I must have been shot dead.

Q. That is, supposing the trigger had been pulled, if he had not laid his hand on the barrel you must have been killed - A. Yes.

Mr. Gurney. He was angry about the washerwomen coming so late that night - do not suppose that I say he was right - A. Yes; he said because they came so late he would not let them in, and they should not come in.

Q. And then when one of them went out afterwards he said no man should come in the house - A. He said he would shoot the first man that came in and Darvill was the only man that did come in then; I let him in.

Q. After the pistol went off did he say it was done by accident, or what did he say - A. I said, see what you have done; yes, he said, I have done it now, those were the words; I said, look, you have made me a fine foot, he said, d - n your foot; when the surgeon came he said, I am the boy that done it.

COURT. What was your situation in the family - A. Cook.

Q. How long had you been acquainted with the prisoner - A. Ever since the 19th of December, that is the time I came into Mr. Manton's service.

Q. And what was this day of the month - A. The 7th of May when it was done.

Q. You had lived together in the same house had not you, you the cook, and he the gardener - A. Yes.

Q. Had you had any disputes together - A. No further than other servants do, trifling affairs, and not before this night any particular dispute; we had been good fellow servants together till this night.

Q. And you had no reason to suppose that he owed you any gradge or malice - A. No.

Q. You owed him no ill will, nor he owed you no ill will - A. No.

Q. Had he at any time taken any liberty with you - A. No.

Q. And he did not, as I understand from you wish to take any liberty with you - A. Yes, he wished to pull me up stairs and send the women home again.

JAMES CHAPMAN . I am a bricklayer's labourer.

Q. Do you live on Harrow-hill - A. No; I was at work there. On the night of the 7th of May I was fetched to Mr. Manton's house on the night the accident happened. On the next morning he said, that he had shot the cook; I told him it was a very bad affair; he made me answer that he could not get her to his terms; he said no more.

ANTHONY DARVILL. I am a day-labouring man, I live at Harrow-hill common; Mary Boddomey , the washerwoman; came and called me up out of bed; I went to Mr. Manton's house, and when I came to the door the prisoner swore he would shoot the first man that, entered the door; I got about half across the kitchen, I said, John, if you shoot the first man that enters the kitchen, you must shoot me, for I am the first man that enters the kitchen; he swore he would be d - d if he would not; I seized him by the collar with my right hand.

Q. How did you stand with respect to him - A. By the side of him; I clapped my left hand on the pistol and lowered it down.

Q. Now at that time that you put your hand on the pistol and lowered it down, did it appear to you that he was pointing it at any person - A. Yes, it was directed to the cook, much about her middle. After I lowered the pistol it went off immediately; he shot the young woman in the foot, and the young woman said, for God's sake hold that fellow fast, do not let him go, while some assistance comes; he said, there I have let it off.

Mr. Gurney. Upon your lowering the pistol it was pointed quite downwards - A. Much about so.

Q. The young woman was coming on in the room - A. Yes, by the side of me.

Q. Was the prisoner standing or sitting - A. Sitting.

Q. Did he point the pistol at all to you when he said he would shoot the first man that came in - A. No, it was merely as I tell you; he did not alter the pistol at all until I pointed it down.

COURT. Before you had bore it down as I understood from you it was levelled at the cook - A. Yes.

Mr. Gurney. And you say, until you bore it down, he had not altered the direction at all - A. No.

Q. Who entered the kitchen first, you or the cook - A. I did.

Q. And she followed you - A. Yes.

Q.And you tell me he did not at all alter the direction of the pistol from what it was at first - A. No.

Q. Then he did not alter the pistol to point it at her, but she came by the side of you - A. By the side of me.

COURT. I understood you to say when you and she went into the room the pistol was directed to her - was it directed to you or to her - A. Directed to her.

Q. You say she was on the side of you - A. Yes.

Mr. Gurney. When you entered the kitchen you entered before her, then she was behind you - A. Yes.

COURT. Then do you mean that when you entered the kitchen that he must have shot you first if he meaned to shoot her - A. I entered the kitchen first, and when I got up she stood at the side of me.

Mr. Gurney. And you have told me from the time that you entered the kitchen he did not alter the position of the pistol - A. No.

Q. Therefore by her not remaining behind you but coming of oneside of you, she came in the front of the pistol - A. Yes.

Q. And at that time you clapped your hand on the pistol to lower it, and then it went off instantly - A. Yes.

Mr. Walford. To whom was the pistol pointed at when you first went in the kitchen - A. It was pointed rather across the kitchen, in a direction towards the persons that entered the door.

Q. And if you had not lowered the pistol would it not have shot the woman in the body - A. Yes.

Mr. Gurney. If it had gone off - A. Yes.

Q. Whether it would have gone off if you had not lowered it is more than you can swear - A. Yes; I cannot swear that.

JOSEPH MANTON , ESQ. Q. Look at that pistol that is produced, have you seen that before - A. Yes; this is my own pistol, what I meaned to travel with; I had it all last winter.

Q. Have you fired with it - A. No.

Q. Is it a pistol hard upon the finger or very light - A. One of the triggers is much stronger than the other; the left is the strongest.

Q. Is it a pistol that you call very easy to go off - A. No, middling.

COURT. Neither of them goes off with a light touch - A. No; but one is harder than the other.

Prisoner's Defence. It was not done intentionally to hurt any body, nor to hurt her neither. I liked her too well to hurt her.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 40.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18100606-24

426. THOMAS DENNIS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 16th of May , a silver watch, value 2 l. a chain, value 6 d. a seal, value 6 d. and two keys, value 6 d. the property of Charles Crawley , from his person .

CHARLES CRAWLEY . On the 16th of May, between the hours of eleven and twelve at night, I was returning home with my basket of tools, as I was crossing Long-lane , I was accosted by two men and a woman; I was hustled by them; I felt something go from me, I put my hand down, I felt it was my watch; I put my basket down and ran after the prisoner, he was the man that stood before me; I was in sight of him till he turned the corner of Long-lane, he was then pursued by the watchman and brought back; I knew him to be the same person that stood before me.

Q. Was the property found - A. No.

JAMES CARTER . I am a constable. On the 16th of May the prisoner was brought to the watchhouse, he cried and said he had not the property about him; I searched him and found nothing upon him; the patrol came in and said, he knew him very well, he was an old thief. I took him to the compter.

JOSIAH RUSHWORTH . I am a watchman. On the 16th of May I was watchman at the corner of Long-lane, and at the White Bear, at half after eleven o'clock, I saw a man run from Long-lane, he ran as far as Carthusian-street; I cried out stop thief, he was stopped; I came up and took hold of him, he said, for God's sake let me go, I am not the man; directly the prosecutor came up, and said, that is the man that robbed me of my watch. I took him to the watchhouse. I saw the prisoner come from Long-lane.

Prisoner's Defence. I never was in Long-lane at all. The gentlemen told me to stop; I said, there goes the man; they said, never mind, you stop; the watchman came up, and the prosecutor; I told them to hold my hands; they immediately took me to the watchhouse.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100606-25

427. JONATHAN FURLONGER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 10th of April , two shirts, value 10 s. three neckcloths, value 3 s. a waistcoat, value 5 s. a pair of stockings, value 2 s. two handkerchiefs, value 2 s. and a pocket book, value 10 s. the property of Edward Pilcher .

SECOND COUNT for like offence, only stating it to be the property of John Leach and William Dallimore .

EDWARD PILCHER. I am a miller .

Q. On the 9th of April, 1809, were you at the London coffee-house - A. I was; I arrived there on the morning of the 9th of April; I brought with me a portmanteau.

Q. Do you remember the number of the room to which you were shewn - A. I do not exactly remember the number; it was at the top of the house; my portmanteau was put into that room that I engaged; I had in that portmanteau a pocket book, and some articles of linen. I did not sleep in the coffee-house that night. On the 10th, the next day, I called at the London coffee-house, about two o'clock, I found my portmanteau was cut, and missed two shirts, three neckcloths, a waistcoat, two pocket handkerchiefs, a pair of stockings, and my pocket book; I mentioned it to the people of the house that I had lost these things out of my portmanteau; a strap that went round the portmanteau was cut at one end, so that it was completely open. This was on Monday the 10th. On Tuesday week the 18th of April, I received that letter by the post.

HANS BUST . Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. Yes; I have seen him write; he was a clerk in a brewery that I had.

Q. Look at that paper - do you believe it to be his hand-writing - A. I do; I believe the whole of the letters to be his hand-writing.

Mr. Pilchar. I received two other letters from him, one at Margate, and the other at the London coffee-house.

Mr. Bust. I believe them all to be his hand-writing; I have had many opportunities of seeing him write.

Mr. Alley to prosecutor. I have letters from No. 1, up to No. 10 - A. I received all from him.

(The letter, No. 1. read.) Signed G. B. directed to Edward Pilcher , Margate.

"London, 19th of April, 1809.

SIR, Your pocket book has fell into the hands of a young man whose ungovernable passion, and cursed insatuation for the gaming table has led him into an act the most disgraceful; and the property I took from your trunk at the London coffee-house furnished me with a guinea at a moment I was destitute; again I took to the gaming table and have been fortunate; this morning an opportunity offered for my going abroad with the prospect of doing good. Your linen is gone, and it is out of the question. Is your pocket book of any value to you? I offer it to you on the following terms; I require twenty-five pounds. Twenty-five pounds is a large sum to give away, possibly you will have to return at no distant period. Insert to me in the Morning Chronicle Newspaper the following, should you be disposed to give this sum; - E. P. R. agrees to the propoposition contained in G. B's communication. This I shall look for, and do not delay."

Mr. Gleed to prosecutor. This is a long time since this happened - A. It is above a year.

Q. I do not know whether you in point of fact packed up your own clothes yourself, or left it for your servant - A. I am pretty sure I packed them up myself. I am certain I lost my things out of my portmanteau; I saw the pocket book in the portmanteau, and the linen also when I was in London. I arrived by the mail coach at the London coffee-house; I shifted myself at the London coffee-house, and saw them there; I do not know the number of the room I had there, it was between No. 60 and 70. I received that letter at Margate; I marked it.

MARY WALTON Q. Were you, in the month of April, last year, upper chamber-maid at the London coffee-house - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember Mr. Pilcher coming there in the mail coach on Sunday morning - A. Yes; he engaged a chamber, No. 65.

Q. Look at the prisoner and tell me whether at that

time he lodged at the London coffee-house - A. Yes, he was sleeping at No. 66. Mr. Pilcher told me to take care of his portmanteau; he should not sleep there that night. He left his portmanteau in his chamber, and went away till the next day. He spoke loud enough that any one in No. 66 might hear him. On the next day Mr. Pilcher returned to the house, he complained to me that his portmanteau had been cut.

FRANCES MILLER . In April, the last year, I was chambermaid at the London coffee-house.

Q. Do you remember the time the portmanteau was cut - A. Yes. I shewed the prisoner to bed on the night of the 9th of April, or the 10th, I cannot recollect which; I lit him up to bed on the night the portmanteau was cut; the prisoner lodged two nights in our house; nobody lighted him up the next night.

FRANCIS NALDER . Q. I believe, in consequence of the correspondence that was carrying on, you were stationed at Garraway's coffee-house - A. I was; on the 3d of May, 1809.

Q. You were stationed there and a letter was put in there with twenty-five pound in notes - A. I was stationed there; this pocket book was brought there by a porter, and given to Mr. Pilcher in my presence.

Q. At that time you did not succeed in apprehending the prisoner - A. I did not.

Q. On the 4th of April last did you by accident meet him - A. I did, in St. Paul's church-yard; Bishop, the officer, was with me; he went up and and asked him if his name was not Furlonger, he said it was; upon that I accosted him; I told him that I had a question to put to him relative to some business at the London coffee-house, and whether he would have any objection to go there to have some questions put to him; his answer was, certainly not; he was desirous to know what we wanted of him. When he came to that part of St. Paul's church yard where there is a turning into Pater-noster-row, he sprang from us and ran as fast as possible for a man to run; I cried out stop thief; he was stopped. I put him into a house and went to Mr. Leech.

DANIEL BISHOP. I am an officer. While the prisoner was in my custody in St. Paul's churchyard I told him he was charged with a felony at the London coffee house, and for writing a number of letters; he acknowledged writing the letters; he said, distress, and misfortunes of his family drove him to it; I then shewed him a letter, which I have in my hand; he said he wrote a number of letters; I said, did you write this; he said, yes.

Prisoner's Defence. I bow with submission to your lordship and the court, and throw myself on the mercy of the court.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100606-26

428. ANN NACAN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 19th of April , a cloak, value 2 l. 10 s. the property of Joseph skins .

JOSEPH SKINS I live at 1, Minories . On Thursday the 19th of April, a person came in my shop and told me that a woman had taken a cloak from the doer; I went out and the prisoner was pointed out to me; I took hold of her; she at that instant dropped the cloak; I took her to my shop, and send for a constable.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of it; they have done it out of spite.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined One Month in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100606-27

429. JAMES CARNEY and JOHN EMANUEL were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 21st of May , from the person of Carl Bern Schutt , a pocket book, value 4 d. and ten bank notes, value 1 l. each , his property.

JAMES HUTTON . I am an insurance broker. On the 21st of May, a quarter before five in the afternoon, I was at the window of my lodging, 46, Leadenhall-street , with Mr. White, I observed the prisoners on the opposite side of the street, and from their behaviour I was fully convinced they were there for the purpose of picking pockets; I desired Mr. White to remark them; in a few minutes they crossed towards Billater-lane , and followed captain Schutt; when they came under my window I observed Emanuel take from the captain's pocket a pocket-book, and put it into his breast; I immediately called out, captain, your pocket has been picked; upon which they crossed the street and run down a little alley; Mr. White and I ran down stairs directly, and pursued them; they crossed some narrow streets into St. Mary Axe, through Great St. Helens into Bishopgate-street; I then observed them walk pretty moderately towards Wormwood-street, they conceived they had given us the slip, as they were a good way off. Mr. Steadman and I came up to them at Bishopgate church-yard, Emanuel again ran off; other friends came and Carney was secured. I ran after Emanuel and secured him in Houndsditch. I am sure they are the same men; I have frequently, when I came from the Exchange, remarked them; I knew their persons.

GEORGE STEADMAN . I am clerk to a ship broker. On the 21st of May, between four and five in the afternoon, I was in Leadenhall-street; Mr. Hutton informed me that he had seen the captain's pocket picked, he pointed out the two men; they turned down a small court, I lost sight of them. I procured information of the route they had taken, and in Bishopgate-street I observed the two prisoners walking along quietly as though nothing had occurred.

Q. Were you sure they were same men when you came up to them - A. I am positive they turned round and saw Mr. Hutton and others pursuing them; they took to running; Emanuel ran down Houndsditch; I pursued Carney calling out stop thief; he was knocked down by a constable; he got up and escaped from the constable; I got up to him and collared him; an officer came up and searched him and found a pocket book on him. I assisted the officer in conveying him to the compter, and on examining his contents of the pocketbook it was found to contain ten one pound notes, a cr party on the ship Ockham, commanded by captain Schutt. I saw captain Schutt that day in Bishopgate-street; he claimed his pocket book in the presence of Carney; Carney said he picked the pocket book up.

JAMES WHITE . I am a clerk. I was in company with Mr. Hutton, looking over the window; he pointed out the prisoners to me; I kept my eyes upon them for some time. I am positive those are the men.

Q. Which of them took the pocket book - A. Emanuel; I saw him run off; they went through Chimney Sweepers alley; I pursued them, with others.

Q. Did you see captain Schutt - A. Yes, and I was present on the examination on the next day; that pocket book was produced.

WILLIAM LEE . I am a constable. I have got the pocket book and the dates and number of the ten one-pound notes, as were made by the Lord Mayor's order, by Mr. Hobler, and sworn to in my presence. Carl Bern Schutt was the name of the captain; I was present when the captain gave in that name. I saw Carney, he gave me the pocket book out of his pocket.

JOHN HARDY. I am an officer. As I was walking up Bishopgate-street, on the 21st of May, about half past four in the afternoon, I saw a number of people run, I joined in the pursuit; Carney was stopped just by Bishopgate church; Emanuel made down Houndsditch; I pursued Emanuel, I collared him a few doors lower than the Quakers meeting, in Houndsditch. Emanuel said he knew nothing of the other man; sometime after the pocket book was found, the captain came and owned it. I searched Emanuel and found nothing at all on him.

Q. to Mr. Hutton. Is that the pocket book that you saw taken from the captain - A. Yes. When we got to the compter the captain told what was in the book, I examined it and found it was so.

Carney's Defence. I was passing down Bishopgate-street, I picked up a pocket book; whether any body saw me I do not know. As for stealing it from the pocket of a gentleman I did not, and what was in it I cannot tell.

Emanuel's Defence. I know nothing at all of it, I am innocent of the affair. I know nothing of Carney, he cannot say any thing of me. I was walking up Houndsditch, I heard somebody call out stop thief; I ran as well as others; that gentleman came and took hold of me, and let me go, then he came after me and took me.

CARNEY - GUILTY , aged 18.

EMANUEL - GUILTY , aged 21.

Transported for Life .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100606-28

430. JAMES TAYLOR was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 30th of April , a silk handkerchief, value 3 s. five yards of printed linen, value 8 s. and a key, value 3 d. the property of Samuel Crooks .

MARIA CROOKS. I am the wife of Samuel Crooks , he collects the city toll ; I am in the silk branch, I lost the things from the corner of Brick-lane ; I believe it was on a Monday, I cannot tell the day of the month. Me and Mary Newman had been to take a walk in Brick-lane, the prisoner asked us if we would take a glass of ale. I set a little while in his company; I went out to buy the child a cake, when I came back the prisoner was in the public house, he had my handkerchief in his hand; I asked him for my bundle, he said he would not give it me; he went out, I saw no more of him till the next morning.

Q. What was in the handkerchief - A. A gown piece, a child's frock, and the key of my room door.

Q. How came you to go into a public house with a man you never saw before - A. I was in fault.

Mr. Walford. Is Mrs. Newman here - A. She is not Mrs. Newman took two pound of one Johnson, who was along with the prisoner; they were both strangers to us. I have had twenty shillings of the money, I said I would have nothing to do with it; I took it to my husband.

JOHN ARMSTRONG . The prisoner was brought to the office; I searched his room where he lived with a young woman, I found this handkerchief, the prosecutrix owns it. They are two married women, they had been drinking a good deal with these men.

COURT to prosecutrix. How much did you drink - A. We had two pots of ale.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100606-29

431. JAMES TAYLOR was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 30th of April , two yards of printed cotton, value 3 s. the property of Robert Newman .

MARY NEWMAN was called upon her recognizance, and not appearing in court, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100606-30

432. SARAH PURYER was indicted for that she on the 30th of March , in and upon John Puryer , a subject of our lord the king, then and there being, feloniously, and with malice aforethought, did make an assault with a certain wooden mallet, value 6 d. which she then and there held in her right hand, in and upon his head, did strike and beat, thereby giving him, by the said striking and beating, one mortal blow and bruise, of which said mortal blow and bruise he languished, and languishing did live until the 10th of April, and on the said 10th of April he died, and so the jurors say that you, the said John Puryer did kill and murder .

JAMES CROCKFORD . I am an headborough of Shoreditch; I took the prisoner in custody. On the 10th of April, the sister in law of the deceased came to me, desiring that I would get the deceased into the hospital; I gave her some temporary relief, and desired her to let me know how he was; the next morning she came to me and announced that he was dead; I went with her and saw the deceased lay on the floor, with a cut on his head; I went to Mr. Weston the surgeon that attended him, he told me he had not a doubt but that blow on his head was the cause of his death. The wound on his head appeared to me to have been done with a blunt instrument; I searched the room, I found this mallet, on examining the mallet I found several marks of blood. I found the mallet under some matting, the prisoner was in the room, I asked her what the use of that mallet was; she said, they used it in platting their work. They were door matt makers.

Q. Was the prisoner any relation to the deceased - A. I believe the prisoner was wife to the brother of the deceased, but cohabited with the deceased.

Q. Had you any conversation with the prisoner about the death of the deceased - A. She said she knew nothing of the death of the deceased, nor how the blood came on the mallet; she told me he came home on Friday night, the 30th of March, very much intoxicated, he quarrelled with her and threw her down stairs; she went up a second and third time; after that there was a candle lit by his desire; they had a scuffle again; he pulled the lighted candle out of the candlestick, and thrust it into his eye, which very much burned his left eye.

ANN EVANS . I am a malt-maker; I live in Wheeler-street.

Q. How far is that from Puryers - A. A good distance. They live in French gardens.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. Yes, and the deceased; they lived together as man and wife for many years. The deceased rent for me on the Monday as he died on the Tuesday, I found him very bad, he told me he thought he should die before night; he complained of his head and asked me to stop with him. I saw a plaister on his head, I did not look at the wound, I asked him how it came.

Q. At that time, when you asked him, he supposed he was dying - A. Yes; he said that Sarah Puryer throwed the wooden mallet that they worked with at his head; he told me they had some words some days back and then she throwed the wooden mallet at him.

Q. Did he tell you what happened in consequence of those words - A. No; he was almost past speaking when I went.

Q. Did you understand from him that in consequence of these words that she threw the mallet at him - A. I should think so.

Q. Then if I understand you right, you understood they had a quarrel together; they had many words, she threw the mallet at him in consequence of that - A. Yes.

Q. How many children had they - A. Two; they have had five. I have known them twenty years.

Q.Had they lived well together and orderly - A. They lived very unhappy, they frequently quarrelled and fell out.

Q. In consequence of that blows passed from one to the other - A.Sometimes they often parted for a day or two.

Q. There was nothing at all that passed from him for which he charged her with the cause of his death - A. He only wished her to take care of the children; he said he should not die happy if she did not come and take the children away.

MR. WESTON. Q. You are a surgeon - A. Yes. On the the 9th of April the deceased came to my house, he stated that he could not open his mouth; I examined and found him with a lock jaw. I found a confused wound on the back of his head by some blunt instrument; considering him in great danger. I wrote a letter to Mr. Ashley Cooper, a surgeon of Guy's hospital. I requested the deceased to go with that letter that he might be admitted into Guy's hospital.

Q. Was he got into Guy's hospital - A. No. He went to Mr. Cooper, he did not see him; the servant saw him, he told him he had a lock jaw. Mr. Cooper told him he might come on the Friday, he would take him; he came again to me, I saw him at the door; I told him to go again, he would die if he did not get into the hospital immediately. He then stated that he hoped I would bring his wife to justice, that he considered himself as dying; I told him he would die. When I came home I was surprised to see him at my house, he told me that Mr. Cooper said he must come on Friday, I told him he would be dead before then; he died on the next day. He had some medicines from my house.

Q. After you had told him he must die did he tell you how he received the wound - A. Yes; he stated by his wife throwing a mallet at him; I said, I suppose you were both drunk; he said that she was drunk, and that she thrust a lighted candle in his eye. He died on the 10th of April. I saw him on the Thursday following; upon examining the head there was a confused wound, with extraversated blood between the scull and the scalp, which covered the scull; the scull was not fractured; there was a slight extraversation under the scull, on the membrane of the brain, and injuries of the head frequently produce death. I conceive that the blow was the cause of his death. I consider the blow on the head produced a lock jaw and after that death.

MARY REEVES . Q. Do you know the deceased - A. Yes. I met him the next morning after he had been fighting, and having words by Whitechapel-market; he asked me if I had heard of his row; I told him no. I live in the middle of the court, he lived at the top; he said, how do think my Sall served me; I said I did not know, I was a bed; he replied, we had a few words last night.

Q. Did he appear to be in a dying situation - A. No; his face seemed scarrified and scratched.

Prisoner's Defence. I went at this precise time to buy some stuff, the gentleman was not at home; he said, Sall, you go in here and have a pint of beer; I went in along with him, we had another pint, after that he sent me out to see if the gentlemen was come in, where I buy my stuff; he said, Sall, we'll have another pint of beer; I said, my dear, do not have any more, we will go home. After we came out he said, Sall, we will have a glass of gin; I said no; then he said he would have some beer; I said I would have a glass of peppermint. When we came home he had all the money in his pocket; the children asked me for bread; I said I have none until your father gives me the money; he immediately throwed me down stairs three times; I begged of him to let me in, he did. I know nothing about the mallet. After we had the words he laid down and went to sleep, he awaked again and said, strike a light; I said my dear, lay still and have rest; he would not; he began again immediately; I struck a light, he dragged the candle one way and I another; that is all I know about it.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY, aged 45.

Of Manslaughter, not of the Murder .

Confined Two Months in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18100606-31

433. JAMES BUTLER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 21st of December , eighty pound weight of mutton, value 2 l. the property of Joseph Woodhead and Charles Whitmore .

JOSEPH WOODHEAD . I am a butcher ; I live in Tothill-street, Westminster ; my partner's name is Charles Whitmore .

Q. On the 21st of December last had you any sheep hanging up in your shop - A. Three dressed sheep hanged up outside of my shop. About a quarter before seven o'clock in the evening, a man came in the shop that wanted some beef steaks, and while I was cutting them he informed me that an officer was gone to Queen-square with a carcase of a sheep that he had taken from a man. In consequence of that I turned round my head and missed one of my sheep; I went up to the Hoop and Grapes public house, and there I saw my carcase of mutton; I knew it to be my sheep by the score that

we make through the spine in the fore quarter, I waited till the magistrate sat; Mr. Bly marked it and I was ordered to take the sheep home; my young man took it to the office the next day.

CHARLES COUSINS . I am a butcher; I work for the prosecutor. On the 21st of December three dressed sheep were hanging at my master's door; when I returned my master informed me one of the sheep had been taken away. The next morning I took the sheep up to Queen-square office, and that sheep I killed and dressed for my masters; I know it to be my masters property; I took the same sheep that was brought from the office; Mr. Bly put a mark on it; he shewed me the sheep.

JAMES BLY . I am an officer of Queen-square. On Wednesday before Christmas day, in the evening between six and seven o'clock. I was coming up Tothill-street, I saw a carcase of mutton on a man's back, and the person who had it turned up a street near the prosecutor's house; I followed the person that had the sheep. After walking about twenty yards I observed the prisoner to mend his pace; I kept the person in view for about four or five turnings, at last he ran with it, and I ran after him; then the person got into Duck-lane; at that time I did not know who it was. In Duck lane the person went into an entry with the sheep on his shoulder. At that time I might be the distance of twelve or fifteen yards; I ran up to the door and found the prisoner standing at the door as bold as could be; I am sure the prisoner is the man; I asked him what he had done with the mutton; he said, what mutton. I Immediately perceived the carcase of mutton close to his heels; I collared him with both my hands; I said, you rascal, you know I know you. I hold him and pulled him out of the house; there was a in the window nearly opposite, I pulled him towards that window as nigh as I could, in order that I might not be deceived in his person; I found he was too strong for me; he is a strong young man. I kept him in that state half a minute, in hopes of getting some person to assist me; it is a bad neighbourhood; I did not holl out, as it was likely I should get somebody to act to the contrary. I received a severe blow over the bridge on my nose the blow stunned me so that I was obliged to let the prisoner go; he ran away as fast as he could, I ran after him a little way and returned and secured the mutton. I took it to the public house; the Hoop and Grapes, Queen-square; Mr. Woodward came and claimed it; he swore to it before the magistrate, then I marked it. Cousins brought down the sheep the next morning.

Q. When did you see the prisoner again - A. I never saw him until he was apprehended at Banbury, and when I saw him I knew him to be the same man; I immediately charged him with this offence, among others; as soon as he saw me he called me by my name; he was put into my custody; I brought him to town. I saw him at Banbury on last Wednesday fortnight; I brought him to town on the Friday following.

MARY ANN LUSHINGTON. Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember his coming to your house in December a few days before Christmas - A. Yes; I believe on Wednesday, about seven o'clock in the evening. I was at a young woman's in Simon's Buildings, near Duck-lane, there came a great noise on the stairs; I opened the door; I saw the prisoner with his hands covered with blood; I said for God's sake, Jem Butler, what brought you in here; I asked him how he knew Sarah Taylor lived there; I was in Sarah Taylor 's room; he said he did not know whose room it was, it was the first place he flew to for shelter; he said he had boned a sheep, and he had knocked down the bloody trap that was after him; I asked him what he did with the sheep; he said he threw it into a passage.

Prisoner's Defence. On Wednesday the 21st of December, I never saw Mr. Bly that day, nor was I in Tothill-street; I was at the Half Moon, Stratton-Ground, with some friends spending the evening; I never saw the witness Lushington in Simons's-buildings in my life; I never was there that night.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18100606-32

434. FREEMAN MARTIN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 29th of May , a gown, value 10 s. a silk pelisse, value 7 s. a shawl, value 2 s. and two sheets, value 8 s. the property of Elizabeth Matthews, widow; three gowns, value 1 l. five yards of printed cotton, value 7 s. 6 d. a petticoat, value 6 s. a shawl, value 6 d. a silk handkerchief, value 1 s. a pocket handkerchief, value 6 d. five half handkerchiefs, value 2 s. 6 d. and six caps, value 6 s. the property of Sarah Goulding , spinster , in the dwelling house of Elizabeth Matthews .

ELIZABETH MATTHEWS . I live at No. 4, King's Row, Pimlico . On the 28th of May the prisoner came to lodge at my house.

SARAH GOULDING . Q. You lived with Mrs. Matthews on the 29th of May last - A. Yes.

Q. You remember the prisoner coming to your house - A. Yes. On the next morning I got up at six o'clock, the prisoner was gone away then.

Q. When did you find that any thing was missing in the house - A. About a quarter before eight o'clock I missed all the articles mentioned in the indictment; I had seen them all safe on the night the prisoner came to lodge there, and my mistress's things were all safe then. On last Monday I saw them again at Queen-square office.

JAMES GILLMORE . I am an officer of Queen-square police. On Friday last I apprehended the prisoner at a public house in Tothill-street; I searched him and in his pockets I found a number of duplicates; I went to the several pawnbrokers and ordered them to attend and produce the property before the magistrate; they did attend and produced the property, and it was identified. On the Monday; as I was bringing the prisoner from Tothill-fields, the prisoner told me if I would let him go, he would raise money enough to get the thing out; he was very sorry he had done it, he had never done so before; he knew they were in pawn for about thirty shillings.

JAMES BLY . I know no more than on Friday evening I found this handkerchief in the crown of the prisoner's hat.

JOHN JONES. On the 29th of May a pair of sheets was pledged with me by the prisoner.

JOHN BARLEY. On the 29th of May a pair of sheets were pawned with me. I do not know the prisoner.

THOMAS BARNES . I am a pawnbroker.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. I do not. A silk

pelisse and a shawl were pawned with me.

SAMUEL LABOR. I am a pawnbroker. A gown was pawned with me, and a petticoat, and a shawl. I do not know the prisoner.

JOHN MANNING. On the 29th of May three gowns was pawned with me; I produced them in consequence of Gillmore's duplicates.

Prisoner's Defence. I have nothing to say; I must entirely leave it to the prosecutrix and the jury. It is my first offence.

GUILTY, aged 20.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18100606-33

435. MICHAEL GORMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 27th of May , a shirt, value 5 s. a pair of stockings, value 3 s. four neck handkerchiefs, value 6 s. a pocket handkerchief, value 1 s. a pair of breeches, value 12 s. and a waistcoat, value 14 s. the property of James Driver , in the dwelling house of Edward Wallis .

JAMES DRIVER . On the 27th of May, between eleven and twelve at night, I went into my bed room to go to bed; I lodged at Edward Wallis's the Queen's Head, Piccadilly ; I went to my box, I had some difficulty in getting the key in the lock; at last I unlocked it and missed a pair of breeches; I went down and told my landlord; the landlord and I went up stairs and examined the box; I then missed, besides the breeches, a shirt, four neckcloths, a pocket handkerchief, a pair of stockings and a waistcoat. We got a constable, the prisoner was in the bed in the same room, the constable charged him, he denied it at first, and afterwards confessed that he had taken them out of my box.

ALEXANDER BALL . I am a constable. I went to the Queen's Head and awoke the prisoner, and told him that a box had been broken open; I searched his coat pockets, I found a waistcoat, four neck handkerchiefs, and a silk handkerchief, and under his pillow I found a pair of breeches and a shirt; I found some keys, two skeleton keys, the others are common keys; one of the skeleton keys fitted the lock of the box. The prisoner said that key, did not open the box, he pointed out the key that opened the box very easy; he said he meaned to put them all back except the shirt.

Prisoner's Defence. I come over from Ireland from sir Alan Johnson ; he sent me on a visit to the regiment; his servant brought these keys with him, they are the keys of captain Johnson's trunks; his servant packed his master's things up in an hurry, and forgot the keys, he wrote to me in London to bring the keys with me; I happened to go into this house, having these keys occasioned me to go to this box. I had some nice characters in my pocket, they took them all away from me in the jail. It is the first offence that ever I committed in my life.

GUILTY, aged 28.

Of stealing to the value of 30 s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18100606-34

436. JOHN CRUSE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 24th of April , a coat, value 8 s. a pair of breeches, value 12 s. two waistcoats, value 6 s. a shirt, value 3 s. two towels, value 1 s. a hat, value 9 s. 6 d. and three handkerchiefs, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of Robert Jones , in the dwelling house of Joseph Pleempton .

ROBERT JONES . I am a soldier in the East London militia. On the 29th of April last I lodged at Joseph Plesmpton 's, in the parish of St. John Westminster . On the 29th of April I went to my room between seven and eight o'clock.

Q. Was the door of your landlords house generally open - A. Yes. I had the key of my room door in my pocket. (I lodged up in the two pair) when I went into the room I saw the prisoner sitting on the bed, I asked him what he did there, he said he was sent up to sleep by Mrs. Plumpton; I told him it could not be in that room, it must be in the other; my box I found broken open and all the things were taken out; in the mean time the prisoner ran out of the room with the things under his arm; I followed him, he dropped some of the things on the stairs, and some on the landing place, and when he got to the bottom of the stairs I laid hold of him; I held him till Bly the officer came.

JAMES BLY . Q. Do you remember being sent for on the 24th of April - A. Yes; I went to Mrs. Plumpton's house; I saw the prisoner below stairs, I took him into Jones's room; I saw the things laying on the stairs; I collected them together.

Prisoner's Defence. Mrs. Plumpton said if she had a spare bed I should have it; I went up stairs and went into the room and pulled off my shoes; my prosecutor came in and asked me what I did there, I told him I was going to bed. I went down stairs upon his saying the room belonged to him, he went to the chest and throwed the things down stairs, he held me; and reported it to Mrs. Plumpton; they sent for an officer; I was taken to Tothill-fields.

Prosecutor. I had nothing in my hand; I saw him drop them as he went down stairs.

GUILTY , aged 36.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18100606-35

437. JOHN JACOBS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 14th of May , a cloak, value 2 l. the property of James Roberts .

JAMES ROBERTS . I am a silk mercer , 160, in the Minories . On the 14th of last month, about eight o'clock in the evening, I was in my shop, I heard a noise at the door, I went to the door. I missed a cloak that had been hanging these about three minutes before.

Q.It was outside of the shop I suppose - A. Partly in and partly out. I saw the prisoner crossing the road, I pursued him and gave the alarm of stop thief; he immediately dropped the cloak, I picked the cloak up, pursued him, and brought him back; I never lost sight of him; I am sure he is the man that dropped the cloak.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going up the Minories, my prosecutor run and holloaed out, stop thief; I run down Goodman's yard to see what was the matter; they stopped me; I said you have stopped the wrong man. Two men that were running got away, and the prosecutor took me in custody.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100606-36

438. JAMES NEWLAND was indicted, for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of John Smith , about the hour of ten in the forenoon of the 24th of January , the said John Smith and others being therein, and feloniously stealing a dress, value 10 s. a neck handkerchief, value 2 s. two pair of stockings, value 10 s. a pair of clasps, value 5 s. a slip, value 14 s. and an handkerchief, value 6 d. the property of John Smith .

JOHN SMITH . I live at No. 9, Jermyn-street, St. James's; I keep an eating house .

Q. What family have you in the house - A. My wife, myself, my maid servant, and my neice. On the 24th of January last about ten o'clock in the forenoon, the prisoner, in company with another man, came to my house. I knew them both by sight. They called for a breakfast of tea, they were shewed into the dining room; after they had taken their breakfast; in about half an hour a young woman came in that had been with them, they ordered tea for her; they stopped till about half after eleven o'clock. After the young woman had taken breakfast the prisoner went out, he returned in about a quarter of an hour; they paid their breakfast and all went away. In about ten minutes afterwards I went into the said parlour, to a cupboard in the partition, to fetch a bill; I went to unlock the cupboard door, the bolt of the lock had been forced back. I pulled the door open and missed a bundle that I had deposited in that closet; the bundle was left in my care, it was not my own property; the bundle was in the cupboard ten minutes before the men came in, and there were no other persons but them during that morning in that room while they were. Immediately I found the bundle was gone I went to Marlborough-street and took out a warrant for the prisoner, and the other man of the name of Edwards. The prisoner was apprehended in the borough, about a month or five weeks back for a robbery; I went to the office and saw him, and knew him well; he acknowledged that he had been at my house, at the office.

Q. Then you charged him with this offence - A. I did.

Q. Have you ever seen the things since - A. I have not; I have paid two pounds one shilling for them, I believe it was more than the value of them.

MARY OAKFORD . Q. You live with the prosecutor. - A. Yes. On the 24th of January last, the prisoner and another man came with him; we shewed them into the dining-room below stairs: they called for a breakfast of tea, I served them with it. In about half an hour a young woman came to them, the prisoner ordered tea for her. They all staid about an hour and a half; the prisoner went out about a quarter of an hour: he returned, and they all three went out together.

Q. Do you remember the cupboard where these things were kept - A. Yes, I saw the bundle in the cupboard the day before: my master kept one key and my mistress the other. About five or six minutes after they went out my master went to the cupboard, and missed the things.

Q. Now during the time these people were there, did any other person go in there - A. No one at all, except me, to serve them, after I had served them, I was out in the shop the whole time; if any body had gone into the dining room I must have seen them.

Q. Are you positive that none of your master's family, and none of the lodgers went into the room while you were there - A. I am.

Prisoner's Defence. They must have seen me with a bundle if I had it. This lady and master always attended the shop; I left the man and woman there for a quarter of an hour, why should they charge me.

GUILTY, aged 27,

Of Stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18100606-37

439. SARAH KEITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of April , in the dwelling house of Henry Raptey , two dollars, value 10 s. two shillings, and two one pound bank notes , his property.

ELIZABETH RAPTEY . Henry Raptey is my husband. I live at No. 9, Cold-bath-square, St. James's, Clerkenwell . On the 22nd of April the prisoner was charing for me, I set her to clean the kitchen, and told her when she had done to bring me a pail of water into the parlour; she brought me the pail of water, and took out the carpet from the back parlour into the yard, and went out of the back door and never returned; after she was gone I missed, immediately, two one pound notes, two dollars, and 2 s. The prisoner went to sell a pot that she had stole from somewhere else, the person sent to me. I went to the prisoner and asked her where was the money she had robbed me of; she told me that the had got tipsey and lost it.

Q. Then you never found the money since, have you. - A. No; I know she had the money, there was no other person in the place but she and me. I missed the money out of a closet in the kitchen, I had not locked the closet door.

CHARLES HUMPHRIES . On the 27th of April, I was sent for to apprehend the prisoner on another charge. I asked her how she came to rob the lady; she said, she did not know, but she had done it, she said she had spent part of the money, she got so intoxicated, she did not know whether she was robbed of it or lost it.

Prisoner's Defence. My prosecutrix said that she would take the money, would make it up, and would not prosecute me; I did not take it all at one time.

GUILTY, aged 18.

Of Stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18100606-38

440. JAMES PENNY , MICHAEL WALSH , and THOMAS SAWELL , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of May , twenty gallons of foreign geneva, value 5 l. the property of our Lord the King . And

FOUR OTHER COUNTS for like offence, only stating it to belong to different persons.

THOMAS MUNDEN . I am an Excise watchman: on Saturday the 5th of May, I was stationed on board the Emma, a craft belonging to Mr. Lucas, laying at Sam's Quay, near Billing gate , I believe in the city of London. I staid there from twelve at noon till six in the evening, and then Thomas Sawell came to relieve me; I came away and left the cargo in his care, he is an Excise watchman .

Q. What did the cargo consist of - A. Hollands gin, in nine gallon casks. And at twelve at night I came to relieve Sawell; when I got on board the Emma I did not find Sawell upon deck, he was in the cabin, in company with James Penny , Michael Walsh , and a stranger.

Q. Who was Penny - A. The lighterman's watchman , in the employ of Mr. Lucas, Walsh was another

Excise watchman. I stood upon deck; I asked Walsh if he was going on shore: they told me I was to relieve Walsh, he was forward in liquor. When he got upon deck he could not stand, I helped him down in the cabin again for fear he should fall overboard; when I went down in the cabin I saw some gin and water in a saucepan; James Penny said, father, will you have some grog; I said, with all my heart; it was poured out into a tin pot; I drank some of it, at that time I did not know where it come from. In about a quarter of an hour after after, Penny said, will you have a little more grog; I said, I should like a little more, where am I to get it; he hauled a nine gallon keg out of the bed place; I said, Penny, who brought it here, he said, he did, I told him he was the properest person to take it back again; some time after he took it to the hold. After some time, Penny and the stranger went on shore, they were all forward in liquor.

Mr. Alley. You know what sucking the monkey is. - A. Yes, drinking and carrying nothing away but what is in the belly; I do not believe they did any more.

GEORGE SEARS. I am a lighterman to Messrs Lucas and Co.

Q. On the morning of the 6th of May were you on board the Emma - A. I was, between the hours of three and four, I perceived the hatch was off and down in the hold; this vessel was laden with anchors of Hollands gin by the Excise. I immediately went down in the cabin, I found Walsh and Penny was quite drank, and the other was cherry merry. I saw Penny take a keg from the cabin and put it down in the hold. I told Penny he had better come up and put the hatch on; he did, and he assisted in mooring the craft. We unlocked the barge, I then missed two kegs.

Q. How long before had you seen the kegs safe - A. On Saturday evening, between five and six, I stowed them in tiers. I told Penny that I would not go down with the craft with the kegs deficient, because if I had, I must have been accountable for them, as I took them in; he replied, that he would buy some kegs and fill them with water; I told him I would not. I took a boat and went down to the London docks, and after that I communicated it to Mr. Lucas's foreman. On the 9th of May I went on board again, I handed the keg on shore that Penny took down into the hold from the cabin.

Mr. Alley. Now I ask you upon your oath, did you taste of the gin on board that lighter - A. I did not, before it was poured out to me in a bason.

Q. Upon the oath you have taken, did not you drink of the liquor that came out of the keg - A. I did.

Court. You went down in the cabin and drank some with the rest - A. Yes, I never saw any liquor taken from the cask.

Prisoner Penny. Q. Did not you broach a keg on Saturday afternoon - A. I never broached a keg in my life.

MR. PEARSON. I am an Excise officer.

Q. Did you guage these several casks before they were put on board the Emma - A. I did, that is one of the casks that I guaged, it contained eight gallons and three quarters; I guaged it after it was on shore, it contained seven and a quarter. I looked over the casks I found three deficient; the casks all contained foreign geneva.

Mr. Alley. Q. You say you guaged the different casks on board the Emma on shore - A. Yes.

Mr. Alley. Whatever quantity there was put on board; you cannot tell no more than the man in the moon.

The prisoners left their defence to their counsel.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100606-39

441. EDMUND WAIN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of June , seven yards of carpet value 1 l. 8 s. the property of William Wilkinson .

WILLIAM WILKINSON . I am an upholsterer , No. 14, Ludgate-hill , the prisoner was my carman , he was sent with the cart to fetch a roll of carpet from Cannonbury , he came home with it, the carpet was measured the next morning and found to be seven yards deficient. I charged an officer with the prisoner, he told us it was of no use to go to his lodgings his wife was not at home. We went to his lodgings and found the carpetting there, I compared it to the piece it was cut off it tallied exactly.

JOHN BOLLARD . I took the man in custody; I went to the prisoner's lodgings and found the piece of carpeting.

Prisoner's Defence. When I was going home with my master's cart I got drinking more than did me any service; I was quite intoxicated, how the carpet came cut the Lord knows, the landlord of the house has told me since that I threw it down there and then took it up stairs.

The prisoner called five witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 33.

Confined One Month in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100606-40

442. JOHN GILL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of May , one hundred and two pounds weight of rags, value 1 l. the property of Benjamin Watson and Samuel Jackson .

JOHN COOPER . I am warehouseman to Benjamin Watson and Samuel Jackson , Lower Thames-street . On the 3d of May, about half past one at noon, on opening the bottom door of our warehouse I saw the prisoner, with part of a bag of rags on his back; I asked him what he was going to do with it; he bursted out crying, and said, it was some evil disposed person that prompted him on to do it; an officer was procured the prisoner was taken to the Compter.

Q. Did you know him before - A. Yes, I had employed him about six months before, I never knew any thing against him till this time.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going by accidentally a man at the door asked me if I would help him with a bag to another warehouse; I told him I would, the bag stood on the stairs about four or five yards from the door, he put the bag on my back and went out first. Mr. Cooper came and detected me with the bag I had no intimation that the bag was stolen, I was intoxicated.

GUILTY , aged 36.

Confined One Month in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100606-41

443. SARAH JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of April , a frock, value 2 s. the property of Benjamin Morgan .

BENJAMIN MORGAN . I know nothing further than the child went down stairs between five and six o'clock, and about seven she was brought home; I did not miss the child she is five years old, I live at the Horse-shoe, Little Britain.

GEORGE SMITH . On the 15th of April, between six and seven o'clock, I heard a child say, my mother will beat me if you take my frock off, the woman said, no, she would not, she would bring her a pretty one and a penny cake, she saw me and then she said, my child I will take your frock your mother has got company, you must not go home in a coloured frock; I went down and pursued the prisoner and stopped her, we asked the child where she lived, she told us, we took the prisoner to prison, there was found upon the prisoner a velveteen jacket and trowsers. When I stopped the prisoner she said, what do you tremble for I do not, I have done nothing but what is just and right.

WILLIAM SIDEY . I am an officer. I happened promiscuously to come past there while the woman and twenty or thirty people were up the court; I asked what was the matter, George Smith said, here is a woman that stripped a child, I took charge of the prisoner and the frock.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. Great distress drove me to what I have done, if your lordship will be merciful to me. I will leave London, and never leave my native parish any more.

GUILTY , aged 45.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100606-42

444. SARAH JONES was again indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of April , a jacket, value 5 s. and a pair of trowsers, value 6 s. the property of Thomas Cutler .

WILLIAM SIDEY . Q. You searched the woman what did you find upon her - A. I searched the prisoner, I found in her apron before her this jacket and trowsers, they were claimed by Mr. Cutler. I also found in her apron an old bed gown and a pelliese.

MRS. CUTLER. On the 15th of April, about six o'clock in the evening, I missed my little boy, he was stripped. I live upon Saffron-hill, I am sure the jacket and trowsers are my property.

GUILTY aged 45.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100606-43

445. THOMAS HUNT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of April , a quarter of veal, value 15 s. the property of William Haines .

WILLIAM HAINES . I am a butcher , I live in Leather-lane, Holborn. I lost the veal on the 28th of April, between six and seven in the morning, I bought it in Newgate-market , of Mr. Chandler, I put it on a barrow and when I went to the barrow again it was gone; I immediately went up the alley, I saw the prisoner with the veal on his shoulder, he turned round saw me coming and ran, when he found I came nearer to him he threw the veal down; I called out, stop thief, he was taken; Mr. Starkey picked up the veal, it was the same veal that belonged to me.

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw the veal till he brought it to me.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Confined One Month in Newgate , and whipped in jail .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100606-44

446. THOMAS BROWN and WILLIAM SPENCER were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of May , a handkerchief, value 4 s. the property of David Jones , from his person .

DAVID JONES . I am an attorney . On the 17th of May, about half past seven in the evening, I was in Fleet Street with Mr. Forbes; as I was walking, I observed Spencer drawing my pocket handkerchief out of my pocket, he had got hold of a corner taking it out: it was not quite out when I saw him. I turned round immediately to seize him, he had got it quite out then, as soon as he saw me turn round he put the handkerchief and his hand behind him to the other, who was behind him; I quitted Spencer and seized Brown, he dropped the handkerchief and I picked it up; a mob gathered round, and while I laid hold of Brown, Spencer walked away: Mr. Forbes went after him and brought him back, they were delivered to the constable.

MR. FORBES. I am one of the landing waiters of his Majesty's customs. I was coming up Fleet-street along with Mr. Jones, on the evening of the 17th of May, between six and seven o'clock, I saw him seize Spencer and say, you rascal you have picked my pocket of a handkerchief, he was so close to him at the time, that he touched his clothes; Mr. Jones let him go and seized the other prisoner, who immediately dropped the handkerchief, Mr. Jones picked it up. I followed Spencer and took him in custody, the prisoner then told me that he had not been in Fleet-street that day.

THOMAS SMITH . I am an officer, I was sent for on that evening to Mr. Lords, the brandy merchant; where the prisoners were detained, the prisoners were given into my custody, and the handkerchief I have had ever since.

The property produced and identified.

Brown's Defence. As I was walking in Fleet-street there was a man walking before me, it was not the other prisoner, he threw a handkerchief at me.

Spencer's: Defence. I am innocent of it; I never was nigh the gentleman, within four hundred yards; there was a man went by me with a white jacket, I was going up to Somerset-house. I was stopped and put into a house; I said, what for; he said, picking my pocket; I said I never picked your pocket. Ask him if ever he put his hand upon me, before I was brought back by the gentleman.

Prosecutor. I was in the act of seizing him, but seeing the handkerchief pass, I thought it was best to take him with the handkerchief, I then seized Brown.

BROWN, GUILTY , aged 17.

SPENCER, GUILTY , aged 55.

Transported for Life .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100606-45

447. EDWARD SHEPPARD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of May , twelve pound weight of Cork, value 12 s. the property of John Blenkarn .

JOHN BLENKARN. I am an agent : on the 7th of May, between two and three in the afternoon, I was at my accompting house, Lower Thames-street, when and where the prisoner was brought to me.

JAMES WILLIAMS . I am clerk to Robert Smith , wharfinger, Bull Quay. On the 7th of May, about two o'clock, I saw the prisoner in Bull Quay , pulling out the cork from a pile and putting it into a bag: he went away with it. I informed one of Mr. Blenkarn's men.

Q. Who was the proprietor of this cork - A. Mr. Blenkarn. The prisoner was going up Bier-lane with the cork in his hand, I stopped him and brought him back to Mr. Blenkarn.

- KING. I am constable, the prisoner and the cork was delivered to me.

Prosecutor. I can only say, that the cork in that wharf belonged to me.

Prisoner's Defence. I came along Galley Quay, a soldier said, old man, take this, go and light your fire with it, I did not think any harm of it.

GUILTY , aged 60.

Confined Two Months in Newgate , and whipped one hundred yards near Galley Quay .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100606-46

448. JOHN TOWERS and GEORGE FLOOKS were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of May , four gallons of brandy, value 4 l. the property of our Lord the King .

JAMES CLARKE . I am a Thames police officer: on the 26th of May, I was on duty in the morning at the London docks a little after seven o'clock. I saw Flooks go on board the ship Frederick William , she was laden with brandy; I afterwards saw him come on shore towards the gate, Towers was then with him, I stopped Flooks; the gate-keeper pursued Towers and brought him back. I searched Flooks and found a bladder in his hat, it held two quarts and half a pint of foreign brandy. I saw a bladder taken out of Towers's hat. Clements produced four more bladders, they all contained foreign brandy; the six bladders contained three gallons, three quarts, a pint, half a pint, and a gill, I took them to the police office.

DANIEL CLEMENTS. I am a gate-keeper of the London docks. On the 26th of May I commenced my duty a little before eight in the morning. I saw my brother officer lay hold of Flooks, and Towers ran away. I followed him; he fell; then I collared him and took him to the guard-room; there I found Clarke with the other prisoner. I took a bladder from Towers's hat. Mr. Clarke went away, and I had the two prisoners under my custody. I heard them whisper, what shall we do with these. I said, men, you have got more about you, give it me. From Smith I received a bladder out of his breeches, and one from Towers out of his breeches. Towers then gave me two more from a machine that went round his body. The prisoners were taken to the Office.

JOHN LEE . I am a tide surveyor of the Excise. The prisoner Towers was in the same situation.

Q. Were you on the 24th of May on board this ship, the William Frederick - A. I was, she was laden with brandy from Oporto. Towers was a tidesman attending the said ship. On the 26th, after the prisoner were apprehended, I compared the brandy found in these bladders, and it corresponded with the brandy in the casks in colour and in strength.

Towers's Defence. I did not conceive that I was doing wrong in bringing this brandy away on account of my wife's illness. I sleeped on shore in the place I usually did. I found them bladders of brandy. I conceived it would be of essential service to my family. I went to take them home.

Flook's Defence. The brandy that I had with me was given me by the mate of a ship. I went to settle with him a small bill, and he gave me three quarts of brandy. I know nothing of the other man.

Flook called one witness, who gave him a good character.

TOWERS GUILTY , aged 32.

FLOOKS GUILTY , aged 24.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100606-47

449. JOHN MYERS was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Thomas Botly , about the hour of twelve at night on the 30th of April , and stealing therein a feather-bed, value 5 l. and a looking-glass, value 14 s. the property of Susannah Hopkins , widow .

SUSANNAH HOPKINS . I am a widow; I live at Mr. Botly's, No. 10, Bayswater-court, St. James's parish . On the 1st of May I came home in the morning about two o'clock; I found my door wide open.

Q. What time did you leave the house - A. On the 30th of April at noon. When I went into my room the bed was taken away, and the looking-glass.

Q. Can you tell me whether you traced how it was done - A. I found the door had been forced with two large pieces of iron.

Q. When it happened you cannot tell, because you were not there. - A. No.

Prisoner. Was not I in company with you all the evening - A. Yes, you was in and out of the public-house where I was. You came in between eleven and twelve; I did not see you after twelve. I staid till near two o'clock in the morning. I had no discourse with you during that evening.

COURT. Were you acquainted with him - A. Yes, he lived in Husband-street.

FRANCIS HOPKINS Q. Do you know Mrs. Hopkins's house - A. Yes. On the last day of April I was at the Lord Nelson public house, the prisoner was in and out of the public house till between eleven and twelve, that was the last I saw of him there. I went home with Mrs. Hopkins.

Q. Then you do not no whether the house was broken open in the day or the contrary - A. No.

Q. In what state did you find the door - A. I went up stairs and found the door wide open. Mrs. Hopkins had only part of the house; it was let to different persons.

Q. Did you examine to see whether the door had been forced - A. I struck a light. I saw the bed and the looking glass were gone. When I left the house with her about twelve o'clock in the day, I saw her look the door, the looking glass and the bed were there then.

Q. And it was gone when you went home - A. Yes, and in pulling the clothes on the bedstead I found two iron bars, and on my looking at the door I saw it had been forced open by these irons, then I had a strong suspicion of the prisoner.

THOMAS NEWBERRY. I am a constable, I apprehended the prisoner about eleven o'clock at night, on the first of May, at the Lord Nelson public house; he said Hopkins was concerned with him, I then put him in the watchhouse. In the morning he said, he was not the man that took the bed away, it was Williams and Harding, they took the bed to Wildings, in Green-court, they had thirty shillings upon it. When he came to the office the magistrate sent two officer's to fetch Wilding, he was not to be found. On Wednesday I searched Wilding's premises, the bed was never found.

JOHN CRAIG . I am an officer. In the way to the watchhouse the prisoner was left at my house, his father and his friend were with him, he did not scruple of telling me, that the bed and the looking glass were sold at Mr. Wilding's for thirty shillings.

Q. to Prosecutrix. What is the value of your bed - A. Five pound, and the looking glass fourteen shillings.

Prisoner's Defence. I had no conversation of the kind at Mr. Craig's house. I was in company all that night with the woman, till between the hours of one and two. When she asked me to go with her to the Pantheon. I told her I was going home to bed. I worked all the next day. Mr. Newbury came in the public house at night, and said. I was his prisoner, he took me to the watchhouse. In the morning he brought me a pint of purl and a quartern of liquor mixed with it; he said he would be my friend. I have been in the habit of cohabiting with the woman for a twelvemonth. It is a piece of spite, Newberry had a warrant against me for cutting his head.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY, aged 18.

Of Stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18100606-48

450. FRANCES PATTERSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of March in the dwelling house of Joseph Smith , a knife value 6 d. a five pound bank note, and nine one pound bank notes his property.

JOSEPH SMITH . I am a shipwright , I live in Mill-yard in the parish of St. Paul's Shadwell . On the 26th of March, the prisoner was in my family.

Q. Was she a servant there - A. Yes, I took her in from the London Hospital, out of charity, she had only been a week in the house.

Q. Had you known her before - A. My wife had some knowledge of her about ten years before. On the 26th of March last, my wife left her in a charge of the child, she had to come to this part of the town. I went out to work early in the morning.

Q. And you left behind you your wife and child and this woman - A. Yes, I had three children at home.

Q. This woman was the only servant in the house was she - A.Yes, the only servant, my eldest children were at school.

Q. Then you only left your wife and one child - A. My wife and one child.

Q. You do not know what past in the day - A. No, I do not.

Q. After this happened did you see the prisoner - A. I did; two months after on the 22d of May, I met her in Wapping, close by the Thames Police, I asked her what her name was; she told me Frances Richardson , I asked her if her name was not Frances Patterson, she said, yes; I asked her where she had been; she told me down to the northward, and had travelled back by land, I asked her the reason of her taking my money out of my box.

Q. How much did you miss on the 26th of March. - A. A five pound bank note, and nine one's, they were wrapped up inside of a letter and put into a box in the kitchen.

Q. Was the box locked - A. No, the key was left in it. About half past nine, I went out from my breakfast and left my wife in the house, then I saw the notes safe, before I went out, I put the notes in the letter myself that morning, and eleven pound more, but my wife took the eleven pound to pay away.

Q. The question that you asked her on the 22d of May was, the reason of her taking your money out of the box - A.She said, on Mr. Smith, I took your money, but it is out of my power to give it you at present, she begged that I would not take her before a magistrate, I told her I must walk back along with her, I took her into the potatoe warehouse near where I live, and the man that keeps the house he went up along with me to Shadwell office, with her; there she was searched, we found nothing about her but an old penknife belonging to me wrapped in a bundle.

Q. Did you know the penknife - A. Yes, I gave it over to Mr. Drummond.

Q. On the 26th of March, where was that knife - A. I cannot say, it generally used to lay in the table drawer along with the other knives in the kitchen.

Q. You cannot say how long before the 26th you had seen it - A. No, I am quite clear it was my own knife, when this knife was taken out of her pocket she said, it was mine, the children were playing with it, she took it away from the children.

Prisoner. Mr. Smith, did I say I took your money, I never saw it; he has sworn falsely.

Prosecutor. I am sure she said so, I have a witness that heard it; she said so first to me, and then afterwards before Mr. Drummond.

Prisoner. That is all false. And the wife had one child with her, and the others were with me, the child did not go out to school at all.

Prosecutor. I cannot say that, I am sure they went to school that day, I expected and believe they were, because they went regular every day.

ESTHER SMITH . Q. You are the wife of the last witness are not you - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember on the morning of the 26th of March, when your husband left you after his breakfast - A. Yes.

Q. Do you recollect whether the elder children went to school when your husband left you - A. My eldest child went with me, he is five years old; the two youngest were left with the prisoner.

Q. When your husband went away, he used to keep his money in a box in the kitchen - A. Yes, it was kept in a box.

Q. Do you remember having occasion to go to the box while your husband was absent - A. I went and took eleven pound out of the box. I left in the box a five pound bank note, and nine ones; I counted the money over before the prisoner. I told her I was going to buy a gown.

Q. Did you lock the box - A.No, I left the key in the box when I put the notes in, it is a box that we keep other things in, it stood on the kitchen floor, in the room that we generally live in. When I counted the money over, I told her that there would be but three pound left our own, when I had paid every body, I said I could not afford to buy a gown. I gave my infant the breast, and gave it to her, and the reason of my leaving the box open, I thought I should have reason to come back again to it, I went to a relation in Newgate-street to pay the eleven pound.

Q. What time was it in the morning that you went out - A. About twelve o'clock, I returned about four.

Q. When you came back was the prisoner in your house - A. No, and my two children were at a neighbours house; I never saw the prisoner from the time till the 22nd of May.

Q. Did you ever enquire after her - A. We printed hand bills and we advertised. When I came home and found the prisoner was gone I went to my box, I opened it, all the money was gone.

Q. Do you remember missing any thing else - A. I missed nothing else than a shawl, I never missed the penknife, I remember he had a penknife an use, I cannot recollect when I last saw it.

Q. I understood from your husband that it was from your recommendation that you took the prisoner in your house - A. Yes, I knew her in Sunderland.

Prisoner. Mrs. Smith, did not you know that I was going away - A. No, Fanny, do not say that.

Q. Did not I ask you when you were to come back, you said three o'clock - A. No, I said four o'clock, I was to go home.

Court. Did she say any thing of her intention to go at four o'clock - A. Yes, she said she wanted to go to the matron, to get work at four o'clock; I was willing for her to get work to help her.

Q. Did she tell you that she wanted to go and return no more - A. No; I went to the hospital, and she had not been there that day.

WILLIAM DRUMMOND . On the 22d of May, Mr. Smith brought the prisoner into my house, he asked me what was best to be done with her; I desired him by all means to take her before a magistrate, she immediately exclaimed, for God's sake do not take me before a magistrate, and I will pay Mr. Smith all the money back again; we took her to a magistrate, and this knife was found upon her. Mr. Smith swore to the knife at Shadwell office, he said it was his, and she acknowledged it to be his.

Q. Did she say how she come by it - A. By the children playing with it.

Q. Did she say any thing about bringing the money back to him - A. She said that she would go to service and endeavour to bring the money back to him.

Q. to Prosecutor. That knife was found upon the prisoner - A. Yes, it is my own knife.

Q. You rent the whole of this house do you - A. Yes.

RALPH HOPE. I am a constable, I know no more than taking the prisoner into custody.

Q. to Mrs. Smith. When you went to Newgate-street, upon this occasion did you leave your outer door open or shut - A. I only fastened it with the hasp and left her in it.

Prisoner's Defence. I am a poor widow woman, I was under the necessity of going to the hospital, when I came out I went to the house of the prosecutor's who knows I intended to go from there for a few hours, I left him for six weeks; when I met the prosecutor he said. I had robbed him of fourteen pounds, I went to his house and was searched, nothing was found, the fact is, I am not guilty, one Drummond, who is an evidence, knows that I said if I was young I would work the money out; I did say so, I did not wish to go before a magistrate. Ask the prosecutrix and his wife, if another woman and Mrs. Trumbell was not left in the house as well as myself, I throw myself on the mercy of the court.

Prosecutrix. Nobody was left in the house but the prisoner and my children.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 51.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

Reference Number: t18100606-49

451. FRANCES PHILPOT was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 24th of April , six ostrich feathers, value 6 l. the property of Louisa Morris , spinster , in her dwelling house .

LOUISSA MORRIS. I live at Mile End New Town .

Mr. Reynolds. You are a married woman. - Yes.

Q.Is your husband living - A. Yes, but my husband does not live with me.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18100606-50

452. ANN RILEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of April , nine yards of printed cotton, value 10 s. the property of Thomas Blowers privately in his shop .

HENRY GUDGEON. I am shopman to Mr. Blowers linen draper , Tottenham-court-road, in the parish of St. Pancras . On the 26th of April, I cannot say the hour it was between twelve and five some where about the middle of the day, she came to our shop for half a yard of Irish linen, I sold her the half yard of Irish linen she paid eleven pence for it. I was engaged with other customers while she was looking at different things on the counter, we had a great many pieces of printed cotton laying on the counter.

Q. How many other shopmen were there in the shop serving beside, you - A. Only myself, Mr. Blower's, and his wife went in the parlour at the back of the shop.

Q. Was the door of the parlour open or shut - A. Shut.

Q. Was it a glass door - A. Yes, a looking glass door, not to look through, persons within could not see the shop excepting through a small side window.

Q. Could they see through the side window as they sat in the parlour - A. No; they must come up to the window for the purpose of looking through.

Q. How long do you think the prisoner staid in your shop, altogether - A. About five minutes.

Q. How was she dressed - A. As she is now with a shawl and no cloak, she went out of the shop, and in five minutes after she was gone I missed nine yards of printed cotton, the moment Mr. Blowers came into the shop I missed the cotton, I told him I missed the print.

Q. At the time that the woman went out of the shop were there any other customers in the shop besides her - A. Yes, several others, I ran out of the shop and pursued the prisoner, I saw her going into Howland-street, I ran into Howland-street, and overtook her, and as she was walking the way to the watch house, I said very little to her, she wished to know what I wanted with her, I laid hold of her shoulder, I told her that she had stolen something, she said, she had not, I told her I was certain that she had; then she said, she had; and gave the cotton to me.

Q. When did she take it from - A. It was concealed under her clothes, she put her hand under her apron or gown, I am not certain which, and she produced it, I took it and her likewise to the watch house, I gave the cotton to Mr. Baker, the watch house keeper. The next day she was taken before the magistrate, and committed.

- BAKER. I am the watch-house keeper. The prisoner and this piece of cotton was delivered into my charge, I have had the cotton ever since.

Q. to Gudgeon. Look at that printed cotton does that belong to Mr. Blowers - A. Yes, I know it by my own mark.

Q. Can you take upon yourself to swear that that piece of cotton was laying on the counter when the prisoner came into the shop - A. Yes, and it is the piece of cotton the prisoner gave me when I overtook her.

Q. What is the value of that piece of cotton - A. Ten shillings it cost more, it would sell for twelve shillings.

Prisoner's Defence. I went into that man's house, to buy a bit of linen, I asked him if he had any linen at one and eleven pence per yard, he said, he had, he asked me to wait, I was not well I sat down on a stool, I asked this boy would he please to cut off a bit of linen for me, he did, going out of the door I being very ill I caught hold of the rail of the door. A woman came and gave me this bit of cotton in my hand, and immediately this boy came and put his hand on my shoulder, he asked me what I had got; I said, I did not know that woman gave it me, she was gone to get a coach I was so ill, I was not able to go home. When I was taken to the watch house, the bit of cotton was given to the watch house keeper's wife, when the watch house keeper came in he was very tipsey, there was a milkman there he said, he knew me, and that I was a hard working woman.

GUILTY , DEATH , aged 38.

The prisoner was recommended to his Majesty's mercy by the Jury, on account of her being pregnant.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

Reference Number: t18100606-51

453. HANNAH PARSONS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of April , six shawls, value 20 s. the property of George Brown .

GEORGE BROWN . I am a linen draper , No. 7, Shoreditch , I can only prove the shawls were hanging inside of the shop.

CATHERINE KEITH . I live at Mile End New Town. On the 26th of April, I was at Mr. Brown's shop door, I saw the prisoner go inside of the shop, I saw her take the shawls that hung on the inside of the shop down, and put them under her apron, she turned out of the shop and went off with the shawls, I went into the shop and gave information.

MR. BROWN. I am Mr. Brown's brother. On the 26th of April, from the information of the last witness, I pursued the prisoner and saw her with the shawls in her apron, I charged an officer with her and these are the six shawls that I see the officer take from her.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoners Defence. It is the first time I ever was in trouble, I beg for mercy.

GUILTY , aged 35.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18100606-52

454. ELEANOR WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of May , four yards of muslin, value 9 s. the property of Emanuel Thorley , privately in his shop .

EMANUEL THORLEY . I live in Red-lion-street, Holborn : I am a linen draper . On the 3d of May last, the prisoner came into the shop, she asked to see some prints for a child's frock. From her appearance I suspected her, I told her I should not serve her any thing, she only came to plunder. Mr. Cook came in, from his information the prisoner was detained and taken in custody.

WILLIAM COOK . On the 3rd of May the prisoner came into my shop in company with another woman: when the prisoner went out, from suspicion I followed her, she went to Mr. Thorley's shop. As I was entering Mr. Thorley's door I saw her stealing a piece of muslin; she sideled towards the counter, put her hands behind her, and pulled the muslin off the counter. I spoke to Mr. Thorley, and told him the prisoner had stole a piece of muslin; Mr. Thorley's daughter came and took it from under the prisoner's coat.

MARY THORLEY. I am the daughter of the prosecutor.

Q. Do you recollect the prisoner on the 3rd of May being at your father's shop - A. I do, very well; I took a piece of muslin from behind her, under her coat; she said she did not touch it, she was certain it came there of itself. When I took it from her she had hold of it with one hand behind her. It is my father's property, I had seen it about half an hour before in the shop.

Q. What is the value of it - A. Nine shillings.

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw the muslin. When the lady turned round, I told her I was very willing to strip, to see whether I had any thing. I pulled off my old coat that I had on, and by pulling the coat off it throwed the muslin down.

GUILTY, aged 38.

Of stealing, but not privately .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18100606-53

455. JOSEPH LONG was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of March , a drake, value 5 s. the property of George Potts .

GEORGE POTTS. I am a baker , I live at Stratford . Between the 23d and 24th of March, this Muscovy drake, three ducks, and six fowls, were stolen out of the fowl house.

Q. About what time did you see them last - A. I believe they were not gone at eleven o'clock at night. In the morning I went to Leadenhall market, I saw Dennis Hanagan with this drake, I knew it to be mine.

DENNIS HANAGAN . I bought this drake of the prisoner at Newgate market, on Saturday the 24th of March, I gave him five shillings for it.

Prisoner's Defence. I work at the water side; an Irishman gave me these ducks to sell; I know the man, but I do not know where to find him, he gave me two shillings for disposing of them.

Q.to Prosecutor. Did you see the prisoner near your premises - A. No, I never saw him before.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100606-54

456. JOHN SIMKINS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of April , a watch, value 3 l. a chain, value 1 s. a seal, value 10 s. 6 d. and two keys, value 2 d. the property of Thomas Biddle , from his person .

THOMAS BIDDLE . I am a porter at Goldsmith's hall. On the 18th of April I was going from the hall down St. Ann's lane, I met the prisoner at the corner of St. Ann's lane , there is a post at the corner about two foot from the house, there is not room enough for two persons to pass at the same time. The prisoner obstructed me from going down St. Ann's lane, and would not let me pass, but rushed on before me, squeezing me up against the corner. I had a good opportunity of looking him full in the face. I said to him, my friend, you are in a violent hurry; while the words were in my mouth, I felt my watch go out of my fob pocket, he was obliged to pull it very hard

my breeches being very tight. I immediately cried, stop thief, he has got my watch, he crossed over into Maiden-lane, and ran very fast until he got out of my sight. A witness in court saw him do the fact, and followed him.

Q. Have you any doubt as to his person - A. I know his person very well, I had an opportunity of staring him in the face, I am sure he is the man.

WILLIAM SHEPPARD. I am a cabinet marker. On the 18th of April, I was passing up St. Ann's-lane close behind the prisoner, I saw the prisoner take the watch out from Mr. Biddle's pocket. I immediately ran after him, when he turned up Gutter lane I was close behind him. Mr. Webster, a gentleman volunteer, with his musquet in front stopped the prisoner; then I laid hold of his collar, and said, he was the man that stole the watch.

Q. Had you lost sight of him - A. No, only as he was turning the corner; I was close behind him; I never lost sight of him for a minute, I am certain he is the man.

WILLIAM GRIFFITHS . How hold are you - A. I am thirteen, I was going on an errand into Mincing-lane, I saw a bustling at the corner of St. Ann's-lane, I heard a cry of stop him, he has got my watch; I saw a man run and throw a watch away, it came close across my shoulder, I tried to catch it, it fell at my feet, I picked it up; Mr. Biddle said, it is my watch; I said, I did not know whose it is, stop till somebody comes; two men came and said they had got the man; I gave the watch to Mr. Biddle.

GEORGE HEDGCUP . I was standing at the corner of Maiden-lane looking at a puppet-show, I heard Mr. Biddle cry out, stop thief, he has got my watch, I immediately saw the prisoner run up Maiden-lane, I saw him throw the watch over his head. I took up the watch case and gave it to a gentleman, he gave it to Mr. Biddle.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of what I am accused of, I was not in that street at all that night.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Transported for Life .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100606-55

457. GEORGE BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of April , a handkerchief, value 7 s. the property of John Horn Clark , from his person .

JOHN HORN CLARK. I am a thread lace manufacturer . On the 10th of April, about three o'clock in the afternoon, I was crossing the end of Fleet market , towards Fleet-street, I felt a pressure on my back, I suspected it was for the purpose of picking my pocket, I put my hand to my pocket and found my handkerchief gone, I immediately turned round and suspected the prisoner, I took him by the right shoulder with my left hand, I discovered the handkerchief in his hand before him; I intended to lay hold of him, he ran, I pursued him, he was making towards the market, he had crossed the street, and went across again, he fell into Davis's hands.

Q. You are sure he is the person - A. Yes, I never lost sight of him, he dropped the handkerchief, and I picked it up.

- DAVIS. I am a porter at the stand at Fleet market. On the 18th of April, about three o'clock, I observed the prisoner advancing towards me, I saw him drop a red handkerchief, I stopped him, and held him him till he was delivered to the officer.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been over the bridge, and coming home there was a coach stopped, a cry of stop thief was holloaed out, that gentleman catched hold of me directly, I never had the handkerchief in my hand, nor never saw it.

GUILTY , aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100606-56

458. CATHERINE COLLINS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 22nd of May , a ring, value 7 s. the property of Joseph York Hatton .

ELIZABETH ALICE HATTON . I am the wife of John Hatton , he lives at St. Magnes, London Bridge , he is a watchmaker and jeweller . On the 22nd of May, about six o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner and another woman came into the shop to look at some wedding rings; the prisoner, after taking up several and putting them down, took up two, and one of them she put in her mouth; and the other, after having it on, she laid it down. I told her she had another; she said, she had not; I said, I was sure she had, I saw her put it in her mouth. The woman that was with her then run out of the shop. She took the ring out of her mouth, gave it to me, and then ran away; Mr. Hatton went after her, fetched her back; she attempted to run away the second time, but I stopped her; we then sent for an officer.

JOSEPH YORK HATTON . At the time that the prisoner was looking at the rings, a man came in and asked to look at some gold broaches, I handed the gold broaches to the man. When I heard Mrs. Hatton say to the prisoner, you have got two rings, she said, she had but one; Mrs. Hatton said, you have put one in your mouth; she denied having it in her mouth, but made an attempt of slipping it out of her mouth, which Mrs. Hatton saw, and told her of it; she then gave it out of her hand to Mrs. Hatton; there was a parchment ticket attached to the ring, which was in a moistened state, from having been in the mouth. The moment that Mrs. Hatton charged the prisoner with the ring, the man that asked to look at the gold broaches, walked out of the shop.

GUILTY , aged 36.

Confined Two Months in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100606-57

459. MARY SULLIVAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of April , a bag, value 2 d. three dollars, half a crown, and a sixpence , the property of John Johnson .

JOSEPH ROOME. I am ward beadle of Billingsgate. On the 27th of April, about nine o'clock at night, I was near the watch house there was a man and the prisoner together, he accused her of robbing him, I took the prisoner to the watch house, she was searched, I could find nothing, at last by some means I discovered it.

Q. Who was that man - A.He gave his name Captain Johnson, before the Lord Mayor. I made enquiry at the Coal Exchange, for the captain of the ship that he gave the name of; there was no such man as captain Johnson, of that ship, he must have given the wrong name.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100606-58

460. JAMES ROBSON was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of John Cross , about the hour of five in the afternoon, on the 16th of May , Elizabeth Cross and others, being therein, and feloniously stealing sixteen neck handkerchiefs, value 12 s. eleven silver tea spoons, value 1 l. two silver sugar tongs, value 12 s. two pair of stockings, value 2 s. a pair of gloves, value 1 s. four handkerchiefs, value 12 s. and a prayer book, value 5 s. the property of John Cross .

JOHN CROSS . I live at 42, Rosemary-lane, in the parish of St. Mary, Whitechapel ; I keep the Alderman Parson's Head . On Wednesday the 16th of May the prisoner came with another man into my house, he called for a pint of ale, he asked me if I could furnish him with a lodging, saying that he was a jeweller and worked hard by; he had another pint of ale, and after a little while I answered him that I could accomodate him with a lodging; this was about one o'clock in the day; he said he had been up the night before, and he wished to retire to rest. I shewed him a room up two pair of stairs, he seemed pleased with the room, he said he should take it for a constancy; he offered me money for a deposit, I declined it. I left the room and went to Hox on that same afternoon. I returned about eight o'clock in the evening.

Q. What time was it you left your house - A.About three o'clock in the afternoon; when I returned I understood the prisoner was gone. On the following day my wife missed all the articles mentioned in the indictment. These things were taken out of my own bed room in the one pair of stairs, the door of which was locked when I went to Hoxton

Q. However, he did not break and enter into the house - you say you shewed him into the room - A. Yes, I did. The officer found some of the property upon him.

SAMUEL MILLER. I am an officer. On Friday the 18th of last month, I went to the Alderman Parson's Head in Rosemary-lane; I took the prisoner in custody, I asked him where the things were that he had taken from Mr. Cross; at first he denied it; I told him I should certainly find him out if he did not tell, and was going to search him, he then pulled off his hat, and said, here is some of your property; there were three neck handkerchiefs, and another handkerchief he pulled out of his pocket; he said he had sold three silver spoons to a jew in Rosemary-lane, and the remainder of the handkerchiefs he sold to this jew for fourteen or fifteen shillings, and that he did not take any more than three spoons and a number of handkerchiefs; the rest were never found. He said he burst the landlord's bedroom door open after he had been an hour and a half in bed, and took the property.

Prisoner's Defence. I came up from Scotland that present time; I came into this house, I asked for a bed, he took me up to bed; I was sick, I came down, I saw the door open, I saw the thing sticking out of the drawer, there were three tea spoons, and about nine or ten handkerchiefs; it is the first thing I ever did in my life.

GUILTY, aged 17

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. not guilty of breaking and entering the dwelling house.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18100606-59

461. JAMES BARKER , alias, JAMES TINDALL , and MARY MARTIN , were indicted for feloniously stealing from the person of Robert Parker , on the 24th of May , 2 l. 12 s. two promissory notes for the payment of 1 l. each, and six one pound bank notes , his property.

ROBERT PARKER . I am in the green grocery line . On the 24th of May I was watering my horse in Turnmill-street.

Q.Was your horse in a cart - A. Yes. James Barker was coming by, he asked me if I was going to Billingsgate; I said, yes; he chucked his basket in the cart and asked me if I would give him any thing to drink; this was about half past six in the morning; in Turnmill-street he had a glass of rum and I had a glass of gin; we went down to Billingsgate, we had several glasses of gin together there.

Q. When you drank this gin I suppose it made you pretty drunk - A. I was not sober. Barker was more sober than I was, he was drunkish.

Q. When you went down to Billingsgate what money had you in your pocket - A. I had ten pound sixteen shillings in my bag in my breeches pocket; I had spent four shillings; I had six one pound bank notes, two country one pound notes, and two pound twelve shillings in silver; Barker and I returned home from Billingsgate in the cart together.

Q. Do you know any thing of the other prisoner, Martin - A. She lives with Barker.

Q. She was not of your party to Billingsgate, was she - A. No, nor returning home. As we were coming back, at Cow-cross I felt him take the bag of money out of my pocket as he sat by the side of me; I asked him what he was doing, he said I am only taking the money out of your pocket; I heard the silver drop down in the cart; the prisoner called Anthony Manley when the money dropped, and Manley took me home in the cart; Barker went home, and when I got home I found my bag and money was gone. This was about eleven o'clock.

Q. Did you ever get your money again - A. Part of the money was produced before the magistrate.

Q. How much did you get back - A. Six pound and a shilling.

ANTHONY MANLEY. I am a butcher. On the 24th of May I was in Cow-cross, and just by the Compasses I saw Parker very much in liquor in the cart. Barker was driving the horse very fast, he stopped the horse all at once and they both fell back in the cart together, Parker's hat and handkerchief fell out of the cart, I picked them up and chucked them in the cart. Barker went on again till he came to the sign of the Hop Pole in Cow-cross, he stopped again; he said, butcher, step up here, here is son nver lying in the front of the cart; I it stepped in the cart and picked up some shillings, and Barker picked up some, I put them into his left hand, and got out of the cart. In about two or three minutes Barker called me again to see what notes he had got I got into the cart again, Barker had five one pound notes in his hand, I put them into the bag he had in his hand.

Q. At this time what condition was Parker in - A. Very drunk; he said not a word to me. Barker got out of the cart, walked with me; I led the cart and horse home, Parker was in the cart. I asked the prisoner to sit down in Barker's place, he said he would go home.

MATTHEW PRIESTMAN. I am a warehouseman to a hop-merchant. I saw Parker and the prisoner together in a cart in Cow-Cross; I saw Manley called by the prisoner to pick up the silver, after that I saw him tell the notes into Barker's hand, there were seven altogether.

THOMAS LEWIS . I keep a clothes shop in Vine street. On the 24th of May, towards the forenoon, the woman prisoner came into my shop and chucked something on the counter, she said take care of this for me and I will satisfy you. I saw nothing more of her then; after she was gone I looked at it, there was a country note, and four bank notes of one pound each, sixteen sixpences, and thirteen shillings, one of them was a very bad one. I kept it an hour and a half, and then I delivered it to Mr. Hutt at the office.

JOHN HUTT . I am an officer. I received from the last witness at the office, four one pound bank notes, a country one pound note, sixteen sixpences, and thirteen shillings, and one bad shilling, which Parker described he had lost in the money. I apprehended the two prisoners, I searched them both, on Martin I found two pound ten shillings and three farthings, she said that was her money, it was in this bag.

Prosecutor. That is not my bag; I had two pound sixteen shillings and sixpence in silver when I first went out; I remember having a bad shilling. The notes I took of a publican, he had silver of me.

Barker's Defence. On the 24th of May, on our going to Billingsgate, we stopped and had something to drink in St. Martin's-le-grand, and at the next place he stopped he spent a shilling, after than, in Thames-street, he spent two shillings more in Bishopgate-street he had something more to drink, he spent a shilling more at Lucky Bob's; he paid for more liquor in Chiswell-street and Bunhill-row. In Golden-lane he drank two or three glasses of liquor along with Barney Porter . He then went with me to the Catherine Wheel , there he throw his money about, he gave a shilling to the landlord for a pot of ale, his head went through the window, he paid three shillings for that. The landlord told him he had better leave his money with him, he said, no, I will give it into Barker's hands. I had the money, how much he lost, or I had, I cannot say. I called the butcher to see what notes I had.

Q.How came you not to give the money up when you came to Parker's house - A. I was stupid, I did not know what I did.

Martin was not put on her defence.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham.

Reference Number: t18100606-60

462. LOUISA DURAND was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Peacock , about the hour of one on the night of the 17th of April , and stealing therein, a bonnet, value 2 s. two caps, value 2 s. two shawls, value 8 s. two neck handkerchiefs, value 3 s. a gown, value 10 s. a petticoat, value 2 s. a shift, value 4 s. a pair of gloves, value 2 s. a handkerchief, value 1 s. and an apron, value 6 d. the property of John Suanker .

ANN SUANKER . My husband's name is John Suanker, I live in Cannon-street, Commercial-road, we live in Mr. Peacock's house.

Q. Does the prisoner live in the house - A. She is there of a day, but not in the night. On the 18th of April, in the morning, I missed my bonnet and found the prisoner's.

MR. FRIEND. I am an officer, I apprehended the prisoner on the 12th of May, at night, I asked the prisoner what she had done with the property that she had robbed this woman of, she at first denied any knowledge of it, but afterwards told me that she could produce some of the property, the greatest part she had disposed of. She said that she was shut out of her lodgings, that she went to Mrs. Peacock's house and shoved back the bolt of the door and took these articles, stated in the indictment; she said it was between twelve and one in the morning. On the next day, when the prosecutrix came to the office, she identified a gown, cap, petticoat, and shift; they were all upon the prisoner's back.

Prisoner's Defence. I was a lodger in the house, that woman there was a lodger there likewise. The door was left open at all hours of the night, and the things that she has said of me is wrong. She sent to me that she would make it up for six pounds. I am not guilty of every thing than I am accused of.

GUILTY, aged 25.

Of simple larceny only,

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18100606-61

463. ANN PITTARD , ELIZABETH HOUNSWELL , and MARGARET DORRINGTON , were indicted for feloniously assaulting William Milner , on the 15th of April , putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, a watch, value 2 l. and an apron, value 1 s. 6 d. his property.

WILLIAM MILNER . I am a porter in the week day, and an hair dresser on a Sunday. On the 15th of April I went into the Magpie and Stump, Mutton-lane, Ann Pittard came in while I was there, I went home with her to her lodgings in Love court, Mutton-lane , I was there with her about half an hour. These other women were in and out, there was a blanket thrown over my head, Pittard and Dorrington were only in the room then; when the blanket was thrown over my head I felt the watch go out of my pocket.

Q. Did you endeavour to keep it back - A. No, it was gone in a moment. Dorrington struck me, tore the frill of my shirt, and pushed me out of the place. I went to Hatton Garden office, Mr. Hutt came with me to Pittard's lodgings, he searched the three prisoners, and on Hounswell he found my apron.

JOHN HUTT . I am an officer. On the 15th of April I went with the prosecutor to Dorrington's lodgings, No. 6, Love-court, Mutton-lane, I met Dorrington just coming out of the door, I took her

into her room; Pittard was sitting on the bed; knowing of Hounswell, I said to her, I suppose you have got the man's watch; I searched her, in her pocket was this apron, the prosecutor claimed it; I searched them all three, and the room, I found nothing. The prosecutor was in liquor.

Ann Pittard's Defence. On the day this happened I went into the Magpie and Stump, the prosecutor was there, I drank with him, he followed me home, and immediately Dorrington came in, he struck her; she asked him what business he had in her place, he said she had robbed him, but she did not know of what: Hounswell was coming along the court, he said take this apron, I am going for an officer; she came in and asked us if we would take this apron, we said, no.

Hounswell's Defence. This man was in liquor, he met me in the court, he said, take this, I am going to to fetch an officer. I took it into the prisoners room, they would not have it.

Dorrington's Defence. This woman and man were in my room when I went home, I asked him what occasion he had in my room, he struck me, and I tore his shirt.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18100606-62

464. THOMAS NORTH was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 19th of May a piece of timber, value 7 l. the property of Thomas Brockerbank .

SECOND COUNT, the property of Matthew Flower and Thomas Stirling Benson .

THOMAS BROCKERBANK . I am a timber rafter , living at Bermondsy.

Q. How near do you live to the prisoner - A.About four or five miles.

Q.In the month of May last had you any rafts of timber belonging to Flower and Co. - A. I had, at Hanks's mud, Blackwall; forty-nine pieces in rafts, that came from the ship Britannia, belonging to Matthew Flower and Thomas Stirling Benson.

Q.What is Hanks - A. A timber merchant; he has a parcel of muds for the convenience of laying up timber.

Q. Did you find any of these pieces of timber missing - A. On the 18th of May I directed George Hutchins, a man in my employ, to go and look at the timber; about eleven o'clock at night he informed me that seven pieces of the timber had been taken away. On the 19th of May I went down to Blackwall, I went on shore at the Folley-house; on my going up that way I saw a piece of timber covered with some boards; I asked a labourer there whose premises they they were, he said, Thomas North 's; I saw the prisoner's brother, I asked him if the premises belonged to him, he said no, to his brother. The timber was placed upon two rollers, about ten feet from the saw pit.

Q.At the time the timber came into your possession belonging in to Flowers and Benson had it any particular mark - A. It was marked F 987, and at one end it was marked with B, and at the other end B, K , my private mark, and No. 54, was cut on it.

Q. When you came into the prisoner's yard were these marks upon the timber - A. Yes, and I observed a mark on the timber, which it had not when in my possession, it was marked T N, and 46 had been burnt over to make the mark look old. The timber I so found on North's premises, I consider it so far my own, if it had not been found I must have paid for it It was the property of Messrs. Flower and Benson that I had in my custody.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18100606-63

465. THOMAS BRACE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 23d of May , a pick axe, value 5 s. the property of the Company of the East London water-works .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY .

Publicly Whipped .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100606-64

466. THOMAS CLARKE alias SMART , JAMES GOFF , and CHARLES HILL , were indicted for making an assault upon Thomas Fitzhughes , on the 14th of March , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, a bank note, value 1 l.

Mr. Alley, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence the prisoners were.

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100606-65

467. WILLIAM FOLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 2nd of June , thirty pounds weight of lead, value 8 s. the property of our Lord the King .

SECOND COUNT for like offence, only stating it to be the property of Thomas Pope .

THOMAS POPE . I am a clerk of the works at the mint , and have the care of the premises. On the 2nd of June, I saw the prisoner going out of the mint gate; it was near nine o'clock in the evening. The prisoner was a labourer there, and a watchman every other night.

Q. Had he any business to be there at that time - A. None at all. Upon my seeing him coming out I saw his smock frock stick out, I felt it and found it very hard; I took thirty pound weight of lead from under his smock frock.

Q. Had there been any lead brought to the new mint that morning - A. There had been a great quantity brought from the old mint; I believe, from the appearance of it, it was part of that brought from the old mint. It being Saturday night the prisoner was taken to the watchhouse till Monday morning, then I accompanied him to the magistrate.

Q. When you attended before the magistrate do you know whether that which the prisoner said was taken in writing or not - A. I believe it was.

The confession of the prisoner read.

"The prisoner faith, I know I did wrong, I am sorry I should do any such thing."

Q. to prosecutor. What is the value of the lead - A.Eight shillings; it is rather under what the value is.

Prisoner's Defence. I was drinking at my master's pay-table; I got in liquor, and how I came by this lead I cannot tell.

GUILTY , aged 34.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and Publicly Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100606-66

468. JOHN BATES was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 15th of May , a book, value 4 s. the property of William Simmons .

WILLIAM SIMMONS . I am a bookseller ; I live in Paternoster-row . On the 15th of May, about half past ten in the morning I perceived my son to go out of my shop very quick; I went to the door and saw him have hold of the prisoner, and was in the act of taking a book away from him; a constable came up, I gave charge of him.

EDWARD SIMMONS . I am son of the last witness. On the 15th of May, between ten and eleven o'clock, I saw the prisoner at the window, I suspected him; he had been there very often; I watched him; he staid some time and walked away; I concealed myself; he came again and took a book from the shop and put it into his pocket.

Q.What book was it - A. A volume of the Gentleman's Magazine. He crossed the road with the book, I followed him, I told him he must walk back with me. I took the book out of his pocket.

Prisoner's Defence. I have a wife and three children. I was out of work above a month; I pledged my coat the day before to buy my children a bit of bread; I shewed the officer the ticket.

GUILTY , aged 35.

Confined Fourteen Days in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100606-67

469. BARNET LEVI was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 5th of May , a pocket book, value 2 s. the property of George Remkin from his person .

WILLIAM MOORE . I am an assistant to Mr. Angel, the cook. On the 5th of May, near twelve o'clock, I was standing at the corner of Creed Church-lane, I heard a cry of stop thief, I met a person running; I laid hold of him, and in the scuffle I saw a pocket book on the ground, I took the pocket book up, the prisoner said he picked it up as he was running along; two foreign captains came up and said it was their property. Neither of the captains are here.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100606-68

470. HENRY COHEN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 5th of April , twenty-nine silver spoons, value 14 l. the property of Sarah Markham , widow , in her dwelling-house .

Mr. Gurney, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18100606-69

471. ANN CROWDY was indicted for that she on the 23d of March , about the hour of one at night, being in the dwelling house of Thomas Dyson , feloniously did steal a watch, value 5 l. a gold seal, value 1 l. a gold key, value 2 s. a pocket book, value 6 d. two half crowns, ten shillings, a bank note, value 5 l. and a bank note, value 1 l. the property of William Shaw ; and that she afterwards, about the same hour of the night, on the same day, burglariously did break to get out of the said dwelling house .

WILLIAM SHAW . On the 23d of March, about eleven o'clock at night, I was going down Drury-lane, I met with the prisoner, I went home with her to her lodgings, No. 4, Charles-street, Drury-lane ; I asked her the expence, she said, half a crown; she then said she wanted to go in the yard and she wanted some gin; she went down; I thought her gone a long while; Mr. Dyson came up. I told him that I had given her half a crown; he went and brought her up again to me, and asked her why she did not stop with me, or else give me the half crown: she said she would stop with me all night, and after some time I went to sleep; I locked the door and left the key inside. In the morning, about a quarter past five, I awoke and found the prisoner was absent. I felt in my pocket, my watch was gone, and a five pound note, a one pound note, and fifteen shillings in silver; I went down to the landlord and told him; he said she was his lodger, she had broke the lock of the street door and got out; the constable took her up about a fortnight ago; I went to the watchhouse to see her; I knew she was the person.

THOMAS DYSON. Q. Did the prisoner lodge at your house - A. Yes.

Q. She was an unfortunate woman, was not she - A. Not before this time. She lived with a plaisterer, he was gone in the country. On the 23d of March I heard a noise in the prisoner's room, I went and asked what that noise was; Shaw told me that the prisoner brought him in, that he gave her half a crown, and that she went away with it. I went and looked and found the prisoner in another room; I said to her, Nancy, you must come up stairs and give the young man the half crown, or else give him satisfaction; I took her up stairs, and the matter was settled; I then went to bed and took the key of the street door between three and four o'clock in the morning I heard a noize, I got up and found the street door open. I went to bed again, and about a quarter past five Shaw came down stairs and told me that he had been robbed of eight pound, I believe, and a watch. In four days afterwards I saw her and spoke to her; I asked her if she was not ashamed to rob the man in my place and run away; she said she was sorry for it, she had got drunk on the business and lost all.

Q. Did you send to the prosecutor and let him know where she was - A. No; I told the constable to send for the prosecutor.

Prisoner's Defence I never saw the prosecutor before I saw him at the watchhouse.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18100606-70

472. ELIZABETH DURANT , alias, SULLIVAN , MARY KITE , and ELIZABETH ELLIS , were indicted for feloniously making an assault upon William Gardener , on the 25th of April , putting him in fear, and feloniously taking from his person and against his will, a watch, value 2 l. a silver breast buckle, value 5 s. a shirt, value 2 s. a pair of stockings, value 1 s. three handkerchiefs, value 3 s. and nine shillings , his property.

WILLIAM GARDENER . I am a waterman ; I live at Lechrade, Gloucestershire; I have a wife and a family of children. On the 15th of April last I was in St. Giles's, I met with Elizabeth Durant, she asked me to give her a glass of gin; we went to the Turk's

Head, I gave her what she desired; I called for a pint of beer, she sat herself alongside of me. I called for another pint of beer, and repeated it to the third; she then asked me if I was going to reside in that part of the town that evening, if I was she had an excellent bed and a room, if I would put my body under her care: I asked her the expence, she told me half a crown; I granted the request. She piloted me home to a room in Church-lane, St. Giles's ; when I came there she asked me for eighteen pence to pay for her lodging; I gave her the eighteen pence, and in a minute and a half after she asked me if I meaned to send for any liquor for supper.

Q. What time of night was this - A. Ten o'clock. She said she should like a drop of gin; I told her I was not partial to gin, if she would send for a drop of beer, well and good; I gave her a shilling more; she called Kite and Ellis into the room where I was in the second story; she sent them for the liquor, they were gone rather longer than ordinary, I being very tired and wearisome asked Durant's consent to lay down upon her bed till they came back.

Q. Had you been to work that day - A. I had moored the craft that morning that I had come in with.

Q. Besides the liquor that you had with Durant had you drank more liquor than that - A. Yes; I had drank my mooring beer, which is a pint allowed. When I met Durant I was sober.

Q. When you asked her to lie down upon the bed were you sober - A. I was as sober as I am now.

Q. Have you been drinking any thing this morning - A. I had a little saloop, and one pint of half and half.

Q. When you asked her to lie down did you lie down upon the bed - A. Yes; I fell asleep.

Q. Before you went to lie down upon the bed what money had you in your pocket - A. I handed my watch up to see what o'clock it was; I had nine shillings in my pocket; I had a loose great coal, tied with two pieces of rope yarn, and a bundle in that coat pocket containing a shirt, a pair of stockings, and three handkerchiefs. After I fell asleep Durant shook me by the shoulder and asked me whether I meaned to have any of the liquor that I sent for; I told her that I wanted rest more than I did any thing to drink; before I went to bed I laid my great coat on the feet of the bed; I arose from off the bed and told them that I would drink; they were all three in the room then; I got up and found the waistband of my breeches slack, on my examining it it was cut in two with some instrument; I felt in my pocket, my money was gone, and my watch was cut out of my fob, I examined the pocket of the great coat, the bundle was gone. I put my shoes on; I told the girls that they had been serving me in a clandestine manner, and if they did not surrender my property I should look for further assistance; they began to threaten me with terrible fury and oaths; Kite said, blast his eyes, if he pretends to say any thing about his property, murder him. I told them to have a little mercy, as I was a stranger, and give me permission to abide in the room that night; they all three laid down upon the bed with their clothes on, I placed myself across the room door to hinder them from escaping; I placed myself in that situation all night, I had enough to do, sometimes they were asleep, sometimes they were domineering over me, and at break of day light Sullivan got out of bed and laid on my big coat upon the floor. When it was broad day light Ellis got out of bed and demanded the door to be opened; I told her I did not object it, if she would deliver my property up to me; Kite rolled herself off the bed, and said, do not stand hesitating about him, let us do the b - r; I said, what do you mean by doing of me; she said, murder the b - r. Kite took up a large pair of bellows, Durant took up an iron bar which burned in the fire, Ellis took up a quart pewter pot, they came to me with great fury; I got Kite in the center, Durant to the right, and Ellis to the left; they struck me, and repeated their blows as long as their strength would hold out. I found myself weak, I thought I must take some other means.

Q. Did you cry out for assistance - A. I did not, the engagement was too sharp; I made at Durant, but catched Kite, I threw her athwart the room with as much vengeance as I could, she received her fall upon the bed; the other two drew back, which gave me time to open the door; I went down stairs as fast as I could, I left my great coat behind me; luckily I heard the watchman sing out the hour or five, at my second call he came to my assistance; I told him that I had been robbed in the night and nearly liked to be murdered about a minute ago; I told him that was the entrance of the nest, and the birds were up stairs. On our going up stairs Kite and Ellis escaped from the room where we were all night into a different apartment; as they were crossing the top of the stairs I heard one of them say, if we had murdered the b - r, as we proposed, it would have been all snug enough. I went up stairs with the watchman into the apartment where they resided all night, there was Durant by herself, the mother of all the mischief, I contracted with her for the bed; I gave the watchman charge of her, he took her to the watchhouse.

Q. Was the searched when taken to the watchhouse - A. Not till the others were taken. We went back directly and found Kite and Ellis just come down stairs at the door, they were taken to the watchhouse; they were searched, a watch was found on Kite, between her breast and under her arm, in a kind of a pocket in her shift. These are the breeches that I have on now, the waistband is cut in two.

Durant. Did you not give me the watch to keep for the night till the pawnbrokers were open - A. I never gave you the watch, so help me God.

Durant. I gave Kite the watch in his presence - A. I never saw the watch from the time I handed it up to see what o'clock it was, till I saw it in the watchman's hands.

WILLIAM EDMONDS . I am a watchman of St. Giles's. On the 25th of April, past five o'clock, I was opposite Church-lane, the prosecutor called me, I went to him, he took me to the house where the robbery was done, and conducted me up stairs, he went first, and just as I put my foot on the third stair I heard a woman say, the b - r is charging the watchman with us, had we murdered him according to our proposal it would all have been snug enough. I did not see any body go out of the room because I was behind him. He opened the room door and said here is the mother of the mischief, pointing to Durant; I took her to the watch-house, and delivered her to the constable. I went back with Gardener, I saw Kite and Ellis somewhere near about the door, I took Kite and the patrol took Ellis,

we delivered them to the constable.

CHARLES STRAY . I was constable of the night. On the morning of the 26th of April the watchman and Gardener brought in Durant to me, and in about three quarter of an hour Ellis and Kite were brought in; I searched Durant and Ellis, I found nothing; I saw Kite shifting her hands about her bosom, I put my hand nearly under her armpit, I found a silver watch, she said she found it on the stairs. I found nothing else.

JOSHUA PEENE . I am a patrol. On my going down George-street I met the watchman and Gardener, he told me he had been robbed in Church-lane; I told him there were two or three suspicious characters in Church-lane; I went with him there, he pointed out Kite and Ellis; they were standing talking to another woman about four doors from the house where he had been robbed; I told him to be quiet for fear they should make a run; I went beyond them and crossed over, Ellis ran down the lane, the prosecutor took her. I took Kite and conveyed her to the watchhouse.

Durant's Defence. I knew this man for some years by coming to the Black Dog and the Turk's Head, and he mostly, when he came out of the country, sent for me. I was at work all that day; he sent for me, I told him I could not come until I came from work and when I had done work I went to him; he said I am short of money, I have not got above two shillings, take me home, my girl; I said, you must make it more than two shillings; he said, I will pawn the watch and give you five shillings, and give you something to drink; I said it was too late. He gave me the watch, and in the morning he wanted to take it away from me. As he was kicking up the row I reached the watch to Kite. Ellis was never in nor near the place.

Kite's Defence. I live in the same house. I heard this man and woman a quarreling. I went into the room, this man went to hit her several times; I said, do not hit her, what she has got she will give it you. She gave me the watch and told me to keep it.

Ellis's Defence. I was down stairs, and when the watchman was coming by I was talking to a young woman that came from Covent Garden with flowers; he pointed to me; I said I knew nothing of it. I attempted to go away, he stopped me.

DURANT - GUILTY, aged 28.

KITE - GUILTY, aged 24.

ELLIS - GUILTY, aged 26.

Of stealing from the person, but not violently .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18100606-71

473. ELIZABETH DANCER, alias, WILLIAMS , was indicted for feloniously making an assault upon Morgan Morgans , on the 20th of April , putting him in fear, and feloniously taking from his person, and against his will, a watch, value 3 l. a gold seal, value 15 s. three gold keys, value 3 s. a silver watch chain, value 3 s. a dollar, two shillings, and a sixpence , his property.

MORGAN MORGANS. On good Friday, about a quarter after twelve in the day time, I was in a public house in Charles-street, Drury-lane , having my dinner with my shop mate, we had a pot of beer, the prisoner came in with a child in her arms, she asked me for a drop of porter to drink; I gave her the pot, and she drank twice and went out. After we had drank the beer we went out; the prisoner stood opposite of the house, she said, you have plenty of time, will you take a walk to see my room; we went, both of us, and sat down for nine or ten minutes, then I told my shopmate it was time to go to work; he got up and went out, I was following of him, she took bold of my wrist and begged me to lend her sixpence till the next day, she would call the next morning at the public house and would pay me; I put my hand in my pocket, took out a dollar, and two shillings and sixpence I had in my hand; she slipped the money immediately out of my hand, I took hold of her arm and asked her whether she meaned to rob me; she then slipped my watch out of my pocket; I took her towards the door, I thought to give charge of her to somebody; there were then three men at the door, I told them she had robbed me of my watch and property; one of the men knocked me down, she escaped immediately. She was taken on the Sunday following at an iron shop over the way.

Q. Are you sure she is the same woman - A. Yes.

CHARLES STRAY . I am an officer. On the Sunday, about ten o'clock, I went to the prisoner's lodgings, I found a padlock on the door. I apprehended her at a house opposite, I found nothing upon her.

Prisoner's Defence. This gentleman came to my window, seeing a child with me he asked me if it was mine, I said it was; he gave the child a penny for a bun; he went over to the public house, he asked me to come over; I went and had some of the gin, and another young woman. It about two hours he came to my room with a recruiting serjeant and went away; he broke open two peoples doors, said they were the people that robbed him, and being fearful of his making a disturbance, went out and locked my door; my landlady hearing of it, and I owing her a little money, she padlocked me out; that is the reason I was found at another lodging.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Grose.

Reference Number: t18100606-72

474. ALEXANDER MIGNOT was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 16th of April , four pounds and half a pound weight of verdigrease, value 15 s. 9 d. two pounds and half a pound of mineral green, value 7 s. 6 d. a pound weight of Prussian blue, value 10 s. a pail, value 2 s. and four pound weight of white lead, value 1 s. the property of Francis Albert Leonard Strick Van Linschoten .

The prosecutor was called, and not appearing in court, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100606-73

475. WILLIAM PARIS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 4th of June , a silk handkerchief, value 6 s. the property of Philip Stopford , from his person .

PHILIP STOPFORD . I was formerly a captain; I live upon my means, at 47, Upper Baker-street, Mary-le-bone. On the 6th of June I was in the crowd in St James's-street , looking at the company going to the palace; I was off the pavement; the Lord Mayor's carriage was coming down; I was endeavouring to regain the foot pavement, I saw a police officer collar the prisoner and come up to me, he said, sir, you have lost your handkerchief, I saw him take it out of your pocket. I owned the handkerchief immediately, I had it in my hand about a minute before.

Q. What was the worth of the handkerchief - A. Six

shillings.

Q. Did you perceive the handkerchief go from you - A. I did not miss it at all. It was owing to the Lord Mayor's carriage coming, I was retiring precipitately previous to the carriage coming; I observed the prisoner, he was stuttering pretty much, talking in an audible voice to two or three men.

CHARLES HUMPHRIES . I am an officer of Bow-street. On the 4th of June, between three and four in the afternoon, I saw the prisoner, he was in company with one more, he was standing behind captain Stopford; I suspected the prisoner, I had seen him in company before; I saw him put his hand into the pocket of Mr. Stopford, and take out this handkerchief; not three minutes before I had seen captain Stopford wipe his face with the handkerchief. Directly as I saw the prisoner make off through the crowd I went after him and brought him back immediately; he had not gone above five or six yards; when I laid hold of him he had the handkerchief in his hand; I took it out of his hand. His companion made off. I told Mr. Stopford he had been robbed, and I saw the man take the handkerchief out of his pocket. I took the prisoner to the watchhouse; he had got two other handkerchiefs, one in his hat and another in his pocket; he had got a wire, and an instrument that is used for star glazing, as they call it.

Prisoner's Defence. I was standing by the gentleman when he had his pocket picked; I did not do it; I picked up the handkerchief; and as for saying I had any other person with me, it is false.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Transported for Life .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100606-74

476. HENRY PHILLIPS was indicted for feloniously assaulting Henry George Acoulen , in the King's highway, putting him in fear and taking from his person and against his will, a watch, value 5 l. a chain, value 2 s. a seal, value 3 d. and a key, value 3 d. his property.

HENRY GEORGE ACOULEN. I am a copper plate printer ; I live in Ely-court, Fetter-lane. On the 29th of April, about eleven o'clock at night, me and Richard Walker , who is not here, were coming up Barbican, the prisoner and another man came before us, they let us pass by, and then walked behind us, and when we got to the White Bear, Barbican , they stopped me, the prisoner made a snatch at my watch; I put my hand upon the watch, he struck me on the nose and stomach, ran off with the watch, and gave it to his companion; me and Richard Walker pursued him; we stopped him, the watchman took him to the watchhouse. I am sure he is the same man; I never lost sight of him. I was in liquor, but not so much but that I knew what I was about.

JAMES SUTHERLAND . I am a constable. On the 29th of April the prisoner was brought into the watch-house by the watchman and patrol, the prosecutor and Richard Walker , I took the charge of Richard Walker , who is not here. Richard Walker said, in the presence of the prisoner, that the prisoner took the watch from the prosecutor and gave it to an accomplice, that made off; the prisoner said he was innocent.

Q. Was the prosecutor very drunk - A. He was so much in liquor that I could not take the charge of him. I thought he could not be able to swear to the man, and understanding that the property was given to another, I did not search the prisoner.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel; called five witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100606-75

477. ESTHER SILVER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 7th of June , a shawl, value 6 s. the property of David Thomas .

- WILSON. I am shopman to David Thomas, linen-draper , Bishopgate Without . On the 7th of June, the prisoner came to our shop and bought a shawl, she opened it on the counter, and in taking it off to try it, on she pulled one of the other shawls off the counter; she paid me for the shawl that she bought, and while I was putting it up in paper, she stopped down and put the shawl under her gown or petticoat. I suffered her to go out of the shop about fifteen yards, and then I brought her back; on entering the shop I observed the shawl drop from under her clothes; I charged her with stealing it; she said she was sorry. An officer was sent for, she was taken in custody.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Confined Fourteen Days in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100606-76

478. ANN BRANKER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 18th of May , a pair of boots, value 1 l. the property of John Pycroft .

MARY PERCEVAL . I am a servant at the commercial chambers in the Minories . On the 18th of May I was going up stairs I met the prisoner on the first floor, she had a pair of boots with her, I insisted upon looking at the boots, In the inside of them was Mr. Pycrofts name, belonging to the second floor. I took the prisoner to my mistress, and the boots to Mr. Pycroft; he said they were his boots.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in a state of intoxication. I leave myself to the mercy of the court.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined Two Months in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100606-77

479. JOHN BEDDING was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Joseph Smith , about the hour of twelve at night, on the 28th of May , and stealing therein, forty pounds weight of lead, value 10 s. and a copper, value 30 s. then being affixed to his dwelling-house; a board, value 10 s. three handkerchiefs, value 1 s. a pair of stockings, value 1 s. a coffee pot, value 1 s. a curtain, value 6 d. a flat iron, value 6 d. and a lanthorn, value 6 d. the property of Joseph Smith.

JOSEPH SMITH . I am a horse-hair manufacturer , I live at Kensil-green, in the parish of Kensington ; I keep the house, me and my family live there. On the 28th of May my house was broken open, between the hours of eleven and twelve.

Q.Had you made the house fast - A. Yes, I had fastened all the windows, and the doors were all shut, and when I got up in the morning, I found the outside door that leads into the garden, broken open, It seemed wrenched open by a crow; I went out and made an alarm, and Mary Dimmott said, it must be old Bedding;

he was met last night coming by the house.

Q. What time did you go to bed - A.About ten o'clock, as near as I can guess, and I got up about six o'clock in the morning. I lost from the house a copper and the lead work round it, and a plank that the lead was nailed to, three handkerchiefs, a pair of my stockings, a window-curtain, a coffee pot, a lanthorn, and a flat iron; I saw them all there the night before in the house, and locked them up myself.

Q. The circumstance, who did it you do not know of your own knowledge - A. When the information was given me I sought for Bedding, and found him in Bell-street, Paddington, the same morning, between seven and eight o'clock, I went up to him and asked him whether his name was not Bedding, he said, yes, I told him he was my prisoner, he said, for what? I said, for taking my copper away; which at that time was the principal thing that I missed; he denied being at Kensil-green for a long while before; I said your back proves that you have had the copper, for the soot was on the back of his coat. I took him to Marlborough-street and had him searched by Mr. Foy and myself, we found these handkerchiefs in his pocket, and my stockings. He declared he had not been in Kensil-green, he could not tell when.

Prisoner. You never saw me nigh your ground, did you - A. I found the property in your possession.

Q. What reason have you to think of me in particular - A. Because you always bore a bad character. I enquired into your character by two men that came, from your country; they said you deserved to be hanged twenty years ago.

MARY POPE . I live at Kensil-green, I keep the sign of the Plough. I went down the reach from our house, in company with Mary Dimmott, between eleven and twelve at night on Monday was a week, to meet my husband; we met two men, I did not know either of them; I wished them good night; one stopped behind and the other came forward and said, are you married, my dear; I told him, yes, I was going to meet my husband, and the man that spoke Mary Dimmott said that is old Bedding; she said so at the time.

Q.Had they any thing about them - A. The man in a lightish coat had a sack at his back, it appeared to be empty. I went on till I met my husband; they were going on to Mr. Smith's, we were going to Paddington, they were going to Kensil-green, it was better than a mile from Mr. Smith's. When I came back I saw a light at Mr. Smith's, it appeared to be out of doors. We came back about twelve.

Q. I suppose you had no suspicion at that time - A. No, none in the least. When we got nigher the house the light was out.

Prisoner. When do you say you met me - A. I say I met two men; your voice is like the voice of the man that bid me good night.

MARY DIMMOTT . Q. You were going along with Mrs. Pope. to meet her husband - A. Yes. We met two men and Mrs. Pope said, good night, and the man said, good night, and one went on and the other staid behind.

Q. Who was it staid behind - A. By his voice I took it to be Old Bedding; I have known him for this three years.

Q. Then did you judge from his person or only from his voice - A. From his voice I thought it was old Bedding; he had a sack on his back. I did not take any notice that there was any thing in it. He asked Mrs. Pope if she was married, she said, yes; then he went on and we went on. When we came back we saw a light very bright; I took it to be in Mr. Smith's room, and when we came up with Mr. Pope the light was put out.

Q. You were not near enough to judge whether the light was in the house or out of the house - A. No.

Prisoner. I am sure she never met me there.

JOHN FOY . I took this man in custody at the public house near the office in Marlborough-street, about nine o'clock in the morning of the 29th of May, I searched him and found three handkerchiefs and a pair of stockings in his pocket, which the prosecutor said were his; the prosecutor charged him with having stolen a copper as well as these things; the prisoner said he had not; I said, it seems as if you had, you have got the marks on your back. His back was sooty, he appeared as if he had been carrying a copper; he said he had not done so, nor had not been near Kensil-green for some time before; I asked him how he became possessed of these, to which he gave no answer till he was before the magistrate, and then he said he had found them.

Prisoner. Did not I give you an answer when you asked me how I came by them - A. No.

Prisoner. I did; I picked them up against Paddington church-yard; there was another man by at the time I picked them up, he said halves; I said, call again tomorrow. Do you think that I should have kept them things in my pocket if I had stolen them; they were tied up in a blue handkerchief.

Prosecutor. There have been a great number of people robbed about there, and Wilsdon and they all suspected him.

COURT. Look at these things - did you ever find your copper - A. No, I was not quite quite enough for that, I wish I had. These stockings I can swear to, and the handkerchiefs too, they are all mine; they were tied up in this blue handkerchief.

Q. Had you any light in the house after you went to bed - A. No.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked them up about five o'clock in the morning; I was all that day emptying gravel at Mr. Bowns's, I and two more; I went home that night and went up to the Brazen Head and had two pints of beer; then I went home to the Green Man and went to bed, and paid three pence for the bed before ever I went to bed.

Prosecutor. I asked him when I took him where he lodged, he answered, what was that to me.

Prisoner. I was not obliged to tell you where I lodged.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 50.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100606-78

480. WILLIAM MORRIS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 19th of May , eleven pounds weight of flour, value 3 s. 6 d. the property of James Hayes .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY .

Whipped in Jail and discharged.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100606-79

481. JOHN HARDING HORPHARD and CHARLES DIAMOND were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 2d of June , a tub of butter, value 5 l. a stick, value 1 s. a writing box, value 2 s. and a book, value 6 d. the property of George Nicholson , in his dwelling house .

GEORGE NICHOLSON . Q. In the month of June last you lived in Newman-street, Oxford-street, you carried on the business of a cheesemonger - A. I did, as I had lived there about nine-weeks, and during the time I lived there I became acquainted with the prisoner Horphard, and supplied him with articles in my trade; he lived in Eden-street; Tottenham Court-road.

Q. Before the 1st of June had you communicated to Horphard about quitting your premises - A. Yes, he said, he was acquainted with a gentleman who had been a butler fourteen years; and he wanted a shop in the same line, it would suit him to have the goods. I told him I was not willing to part with all my goods, I would keep part and let him have part on reasonable terms. Diamond came on the 1st of June, Harphord was with him about one o'clock, they had both been with me on the day before, I told them, that I had all ready, I had only the cheese to weigh, I weighed the cheese, and Diamond set them down as I weighed them.

Q. Was any thing said by him or you on the subject of butter - A. Nothing at all, I had some butter in tubs and some was out, I did not sell the butter, the articles that I sold were weighed and put together in the shop, on the right hand side, the counter parted the butter and cheese.

Q. Had you any writing box - A. I had, in the parlour on a table, nothing was said about the writing-box, or the book, it was Gay's tables, I told them the carman would have taken them all away that night but could not, he was overleaden.

Q. What goods are you speaking of - A. cask of butter and another cask with some cheese plates and glass, they were in the parlour; Mr. Diamond said, it would not be convenient, to take them away till about twelve o'clock the next day as he had the key of the premises; it was agreed that Diamond should take possession and carry on business there and I was not to send my cart to fetch my goods away that I had not sold to him till twelve o'clock; after that we all three went to a public house opposite of Newman-street. The sum for which I had sold to him was one hundred and seven pounds ten shillings, for which I received bill, Harphord said, he would go out and get the money, he went out leaving me and Diamond together. When he returned he said, his banker was shut up; he said, he hoped I would have no objection of taking a bill upon him; I told him I would rather have my money and likewise the money that he Harphord owed me he said, certainly, I had do that we shall settle to; he said, you will take this bill consented at last; they promised to pay me the next day at four o'clock, Horphard went out to get the stamp, and upon that, Diamond drew the bill for one hundred and seven pounds ten shillings.

Q. Did that include the butter. - A. It did not; we had a glass of wine or two, I gave Diamond the key after I had got the bill. On the 2d of June in consequence of information from Mr. Ward, I got a search-warrant, I attended the officer with it we went to a house in Charles-street, Bridgewater Gardens. We found the property that had been in my house the day before, every thing was removed there, the tub and all the other articles that I had in my parlour, every things, except a few coals; as well those things that had been sold, as those things that had not been sold. Horphard was there, he said, it was his house; Diamond came in at the time that we were looking over the goods, he began abusing me, and said all them goods were his; afterwards he said he would go down stairs and get some dried mutton, he opened the door and ran away; he was brought back again. They were both taken in custody.

Q. Did you, after this, go to your house in Newman-street - A. I did, I found all my goods were gone except a few coals.

Q. What may be the value of this tub of butter - A. Five pounds, at least.

Court. Have you ever been paid your bill - A. I have not, my attorney has called upon them for it.

Mr. Knapp. You looked the bill, and if you had got the money for the bill we should not have seen you - A. I expect you would, if I had got the money.

Q. After he gave you a bill you parted; with the key of your house, you gave up possession of the house - A. Yes.

Court. If you had been paid the hundred and seven pounds ten shillings for the goods sold, should you have prosecuted for taking the goods that you had not sold - A. I certainly should not although I had given up the key of the house to Diamond, I had not given all that was in the house.

Q. You are positive and certain that you sold butter whatever to the prisoner - A. I am positive of that, I told him, no butter.

ANN NELSON . Q. Were you at the house of Mr. Nicholson on the 1st of June - A. Yes, I was there, and helped to pack the things, to be removed to Mr. Nicholson's other house.

Q. Were you present in the shop at the time that the two prisoners were there - A. I was.

Q. Were all the goods intended to be taken to Bethnal-green, to Mr. Nicholson's other house, taken away at that time, or did any remain - A. There were some remaining, intended to be taken the next morning, there was a tub of butter and other things, the Mr. Nicholson said, in the presence of Diamond and Horphard, that had had other goods to the following at the cart could not take all; I myself pointed them out to Diamond, in the presence of Horphard, there was a tub of butter, and a tub with china in it, and some other things. I asked Mr. Diamond what time in the morning it would suit him for me to call and take these things away; he told me not to come till twelve o'clock, because it was not convenient for him before, he had got to come a little way out of the country.

THOMAS WARD . I live at 92, Newman-street, near the house that was occupied by Mr. Nicholson.

Q. On the evening of the 1st of June, did you see the two prisoners in Mr. Nicholson's house - A. I did, I heard a conversation between Mr. Nicholson and Mr. Diamond about the cheeses. I said to Mr. Diamond are you to be our neighbour; he said, he believed he was he had agreed, except the price, as he paid ready money he hoped Mr. Nicholson would use him well. On the next morning, the 2nd of June, I got up about twenty minutes after five, the first thing I saw was a before the door, and the two prisoners with it they brought out the dining room stove, and a table that belonged to

me, which I had lent to Mr. Nicholson, I went and demanded the table, and got it. The cart was loaded with hams and bacon, two or three stoves, and a bedstead, not unscrewed, and some butter; I saw in the cart the large piece that stood on the end of the counter, and three butter tubs. I said to him, you are moving early; one of them said, we are moving a few things, he said either to Bethnal-green, or Bateman's-green, or Bateman's-buildings, it was something like that; I thought it was Bethnal-green, I knew the prosecutor was going there.

Q. To a place that you did not hear distinctly, but you thought Bethnal-green. If they had said No. 2, Charles-street, could you have mistook it for that - A. No, not by any means, I am certain they did not say Charles-street. I looked at the cart and saw no directions on it. I gave directions to my boy to follow it.

JOHN BAYLEY . I am nephew to Mr. Ward, I followed the cart from the door, in Newman-street, to No. 2, Charles-street, Bridgewater-gardens; they did not go the strait road; the prisoners left the cart, and then came back to the cart; I did not follow them I followed the cart, and when the cart came to No. 2, Charles-street, Bridgewater-gardens, the prisoners were there. I came back and told my uncle.

WILLIAM BRAND . Q. You are one of the marshal-man of the city of London - A. I am. I had a warrant to search the house in Charles-street, Bridgewater-gardens; I went there about five o'clock in the afternoon, Mr. Nicholson and Mr. Ward both went with me. We found Horphard there; he said, the house was his; the first that we found was a book, that Mr. Nicholson claimed, it laid on the table; in the room were Horphard was we found a walking stick; we found a tub of butter in the lower room, they have been in my possession ever since. While we were looking over the goods, Diamond let himself in with the key of the street-door, we were then in the passage, he was in a kind of surprise, and asked what was the matter; Horphard said, there was a pretty to do, the officer had come to take the goods out, that they had bought of Mr. Nicholson. Diamond defyed us taking any thing out of the house; I told him I would take him and the goods too; he made a jeer; but when he understood he must go to prison, he said, he would not go without getting something to eat; he went into the cellar for a mutton ham, when he came out of the cellar, we were watching him, he opened the door and ran away as hard as he could, I pursued him, in going round the corner I lost sight of him, I got sight of him again; it appeared to me that he came out of a house that he ran into; I brought him back.

Horphard's Defence. Before the business was settled, the bill was nothing like a hundred pound, which Mr. Nicholson demanded of Mr. Diamond. He says I have three balls there of lard, a tub of butter, a stick, a writing box. He said, the bill of the whole cask of butter, and the stock, included together to the fixtures, make one hundred and seven pounds ten shillings, I said I have not the money; I went out to a friend to get the money, I was too late. I should have honoured this bill if I had had my liberty. I went out and got a stamp, Diamond drew the bill, and Mr. Nicholson took the bill. Mr. Nicholson said, here is the key Mr. Diamond, go and take possession, to-morrow I will come and see how you get on.

Diamond's Defence. After every arrangement as I thought, I agreed to give him one hundred and seven pounds ten shillings, for the whole amount of every thing, there were stove, grates, counters, and every other thing, the counter is left behind now; the copper and other things, and a kitchen stove, which belongs to me at this moment, if I am obliged to pay the bill. The bill would have been honoured if I had been able to have gone about my business. When he delivered the key to me, he said, Mr. Diamond, here is the key, all that is in the house is yours, so it ended.

Q. Prosecutor. When you had agreed, and the several articles were put down, did it amount to one hundred and seven pounds ten shillings, without them goods, when you say were stolen - A. Yes.

Q. Did you tell Horphard that he might take the writing box, the butter, and all the things in the house, in order to make up one hundred and seven pounds ten shillings - A. No such thing.

HORPHARD, GUILTY , aged 43.

DIAMOND, GUILTY , aged 33.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Graham .

Reference Number: t18100606-80

482. WILLIAM WARNER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 23d of April , one hundred and twenty deals, value 50 l. the property of John Chatfield , Thomas Arnott , Robert Mercer , and Thomas Arnott , jun. in a certain boat upon the navigable river Thames . And

TWO OTHER COUNTS for like offence, only varying the manner of charging him.

CHARLES POTLIDOE . Q. Do you live with Messrs. Chatfield and Co. - A. Yes.

Q. Were you employed in April last, to mark any deals - A. Yes; on Saturday, the 21st of April, I marked one hundred and twenty deals, sixty with W. O. and sixty with I. W; I marked them at Mr. Lett's yard, and I stowed them into Mr. Chatfield's boat, I left them at Mr. Lett's wharf.

Q.Where was she moored - A. Three barges outside of the wharf.

ROBERT MERCER . Q. Are you the firm of Chatfield and Co. - A. Yes, the names of the firm are John Chatfield , Thomas Arnott , Robert Mercer myself, and Thomas Arnott , jun.; the deals in question, they were marked sixty for William Ortery , and sixty for John Worthy ; they were put on board the lug boat, to be sent by the Winstable hoy, one to be left at Ridge, and the other at Canterbury.

Q. What are the worth of the hundred and twenty deals - A. Fifty pound.

WILLIAM LINHAM . Q. Do you live with Messrs. Chatfield and Co. - A. Yes. On the 21st of April, I brought the lug boat, containing one hundred and twenty deals, from Mr. Lett's yard, to Mr. Chatfield's timber yard, close by Blackfriars-bridge, Surry side; I made the lug boat fast to my master's yard, and left them there.

- DOBNEY. I am a lighterman to Messrs. Chatfield and Co.

Q. Did you take any deals from Messrs. Chatfield's - A. Yes, they were in a lug boat; on the 21st of April, about half after six o'clock in the evening, I took them down to the Old Swan wharf, I delivered them to Mr. Cock, the owner of the Winstable hoy, I saw Mr. Cock, he took charge of them.

Q. Do you know how many deals you took down there. - A. No, I had no note, I suppose there was about one hundred and twenty in number.

JOHN COCK . Q. I believe you are one of the owner's of the Winstable hoy - A. Yes; my partner's names are Thomas Wakefield, Edward Hayward , and Benjamin Reynolds .

Q. What time did Dobney arrive at your wharf - A.About seven o'clock, I took charge of the lug boat.

Q. How many deals were there on board there - A. I suppose there were one hundred and twenty, the boat had as much as she could almost carry; I moored her facing Fishmonger's hall, alongside of Mr. Thompson's, the coal merchant's, craft; that was on Saturday evening, I saw her lying there as late as nine o'clock, and I saw her at two o'clock on the Sunday, the deals were all just the same as they were when brought on Saturday evening.

Q. Was there any other lug boat with deals there - A. No craft with deals, whatever.

PETER BELL . Q. You are a watchman at London-bridge water works, I believe - A. I am.

Q. On Sunday, the 22d of April, did you see a boat at Thompson's wharf with any deals - A. I went on duty at twelve o'clock on Sunday night; on monday morning, the 23d, at one o'clock, I saw a boat with deals in her, she was laying near the water works at London-bridge, and facing Fishmonger's hall.

Q. In what state was the tide at that time - A. The tide was near low water, the mills were standing still.

HENRY RUST . I am a watchman at Yallowby's wharf, by East-street, Blackfriars.

Q. Early on Monday morning, April 23d, did you see any boat with deals come there - A. Yes, about half past three, it was before day light, in the dawn of the morning.

Q.What kind of a boat was it - A. I only took notice that it was a boat with deals, there were two men in the boat, it was not light enough to distinguish their persons. It was about half tide, it just floated her in, they brought her in and moored her there; and after they had made her fast to one of the barges, they got into a skiff and rowed over the water.

Mr. Alley. What time in the morning was this - A.Half past three o'clock.

Q. You say you could not tell who the men where - A. No.

Q. Did not you say before the magistrate, that you knew that the prisoner was not one of the men - A. I said had known the prisoner for some years.

Q. And therefore if he had been in the boat you must have known him directly - A. No, I could not, I was forty or fifty yards from him, I could not swear to any man, I could not if it was my own brother.

JOHN FIGG . I was a porter at Herrington and Yallowby's wharf. On Easter Monday morning, the 23d of April, between ten minutes and five minutes before five o'clock in the morning, I was called up by two men; one man of the name of Warner was present at the time, and another man stood by the side of him.

Q. Had you known Warner before - A. Yes, I am sure the prisoner is one of the two men. When they called me up, Warner, the prisoner, told me that there was a craft of deals at Yallowby's wharf, that wanted landing. The other man said he brought them from Limehouse.

Q. Did he say we or I - A. He said, I have brought them from Limehouse. He said, get them landed a soon as we could, to get his craft afloat, as he wanted to take his craft down to Limehouse again; when he sent for the deals away he would pay for the wharfage and for the landing. They went away, I saw no more of them until the prisoner was taken into custody.

Q. Did you go down to unload the deals - A. Yes; I got Giles to help me, we found the lug boat loaded with deals, the name on the lug boat was Chatfield and Co. We unloaded the lug boat, there was a large hundred of deals, about one hundred and twenty, we did not count them.

Q. On the same morning did Mr. Arnott, one of the firm of Chatfield and Co. apply to you - A.Yes; and I guided Mr. Prior and Towsy to the prisoner's house, he had told me, on a former occasion, where he lived.

Mr. Alley. In point of fact, you had known the prisoner in consequence of a former contract he had with you - A. Yes.

Q. There was no disguise on his part you knew he has been a lighterman for many years - A. Yes.

Q. It is the business of a lighterman to call upon you when the tide requires - A. Yes.

Q. Therefore his coming to you at five o'clock on that morning was on the occasion of the tide - A. Yes.

Q.This man that was with him was quite a stranger, you have never discovered him since - A. No.

Q. You found the prisoner directly you went to his house, he did not run away - A. Yes, the prisoner was found the same morning.

Q. You did not find any deals or the boat on his premises - A. No.

Mr. Gurney. The deals were at Yallowby's wharf at the same time - A. Yes.

Q. What time was it you went after the prisoner - A. It might be half past eight the same morning.

THOMAS ARNOTT , sen. Q. You are one of the prosecutors - A. Yes.

Q. Did you on Easter Monday morning find your boat at Yallowby's wharf - A. Yes, I went there between seven and eight in the morning, I saw the lug boat in the water, and the deals pitched up on the wharf.

JOHN TOWSY . I went to apprehend, the prisoner. About half after eight o'clock in the morning, Mr. Prior was with me, we went to Burbridge-street, near Marsh-gate, in the New-cut, leading from Rowland's Hill's chapel; Figg shewed me where he lived, I saw his wife standing about two yards from the door, the prisoner was about thirty yards off, Figg pointed him out to us, I took him in custody to Union-hall. When I took him I told him it was on suspicion of stealing some deals he said, oh, those deals I brought up this morning, I can get through that easy enough, I was hired; I asked him for whom he brought them; he said, an entire stranger that he knew nothing of; and at Mr. Chatfield, he pretended not to recollect the man that hired him, I was present at Union-hall, and there before the magistrate he said, he was employed by a man of the name of Steinback, the magistrate said, you have said to the officer that you was employed by a man you did not know; he replied, I recollect now his name is Steinback. Gough, the officer said, we are able to find Steinback.

Mr. Alley. They could not find him - A. No, the other had taken care of that, this was at half past one in the afternoon.

Q. He was in custody from eight o'clock till half past one, he had no opportunity of seeing Steinback - A. He spoke to his wife going from Mr. Chatfield's accompting-house to the magistrate, she said, Warner what is the

matter, oh he said, it is about them deals that I brought this morning, oh, she said; it is a pity you got up so soon this morning to earn two shillings.

JOHN HENRY PRIOR . I am a clerk to Messrs. Chatfield and Co.

Q. On the morning of Easter Monday did you go with Towers and Figg for the purpose of apprehending the prisoner - A. I did, the prisoner asked Towsy what he wanted with him; he said, he wanted him on account of some deals that had been taken away, the prisoner then said, he could get over that very well as he was hired by an unknown person to take the deals up to Yallowby's wharf.

Mr. Alley. You were examined at Guildhall - A. I was, the prisoner there said, that he was employed at so early an hour in the morning to bring them to the wharf, I understood it to be before day light.

CHARLES POTRIDGE . These are the deals that I marked, they were in a lug boat.

MR. ARNOTT. These are the deals that I found on Yallowby's wharf.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of the charge. I never saw one of the deals before in my life as I hope to see my Saviour. It is not likely I should have brought them deals if I had stolen them in a neighbourhood that I was brought in.

WEEDY CLOSE. I am a servant to Mrs. Adams, she keeps a coal shed in Petticoat-lane. On Easter Sunday I was along with Mr. Warner at the Red house about nine o'clock, I left him in King-street, Lambeth, he was near home then. I went out with him at one o'clock and was in company with him till nine, George Potter was with me.

GEORGE POTTER. I was in company with Mr. Warner at Battersea; I left him a quarter before ten o'clock on Easter Sunday, at his own door.

MR. STEWARD. I am a printer. I lodged in the prisoner's house, at that time, and do now, and have for some years past.

Q. How is his bed-room situated as to your's - A.Mine is and was in the front parlour, they sleep in the back; the top of the house is in an unfinished state.

Q. Is there any communication to their bed-room but through your room - A. No.

Q.Then, after they had gone to bed, if they came out of their room to go abroad, must not you know it - A. Yes. On Easter Sunday, I came home between ten and eleven o'clock; I went to bed. I saw the prisoner, he came out to me in an undressed state, we had some conversation about rising in the morning; this was between ten and eleven at night.

Q. Do you recollect in the course of the night or morning, any body calling to him - A. Yes, I was disturbed about half past four.

Q. Did you know the person that called him up - A. No, not by his voice; I know him now, I have seen the man.

Court. Q. You did not see the man that called him up - A. No.

Q. What time did he go out - A. A little after that he dressed himself and went out.

Q.Was it light when he was called up - A. I know not indeed; I am very close shut up. The day had broke when I looked at my watch, and it wanted twenty minutes to five, that was a few minutes after.

Q.What occasioned you to look at the watch - A. Because I was roused, and I was afflicted with the rheumatic tooth-ach; rather anxiety to get up to business.

Q. When did you get up - A. I got up about half an hour afterwards.

Q. What business had you for calling, you up so early - A. Oh! six o'clock is the usual time in the morning to go to my work.

Q. Does your door open into the street - A. Yes, directly.

Q. Did he leave the door open - A. No, he shut the door after him.

Q. How do you know it was light at that time - A. By being roused; I never went to sleep till I looked at my watch.

Q.After he had gone out and shut the door, you looked at the watch - A. Yes.

Q. Why did not you look at your watch when the prisoner went out - A. I had not an opportunity, there was no light.

Q. You did not look at the watch before the prisoner went out, because there was no light - A. I was more effectually awaked by his shutting the door; the prisoner said something to me, I cannot say what.

Q. Did that rouse you, or did the shutting of the door rouse you - A.Both; I was in a state of anxiety; I was perfectly awake when the door was shut, not before that.

Q. If you were perfectly awake, perhaps you can tell me what the prisoner said to you - A. I cannot.

Q. When the prisoner shut the door that roused you, effectually - A. Yes.

Q. Then you immediately looked at your watch - A. Yes; I got up directly, though I went to bed again; I got up in bed, and got out of bed, though I did not put my clothes on; I looked at my watch; I did nothing else; I laid down again.

Q. Then what light was there to look at your watch - A. Of course I opened the street door to look at my watch.

Q. Do you mean to swear that - A. I opened the street door, I cannot say whether I opened it to look at my watch, but I opened the street door and looked at my watch; curiosity led me to open the door to look about me, and to look at the watch at the same time. I did open the door, I cannot say for what purpose.

Q. When you opened the door did you look out - A. Yes, but I did not look about me. I cannot tell whether I shut the door immediately.

Q. When you opened the door did it appear a fine morning, was the sun up - A. Yes, it appeared so; my eyes were heavy; as I had mentioned before, I had very little sleep in the early part of the evening.

Q.As your eyes were very heavy, and you were very sleepy, and had no sleep in the course of the night hardly, what could induce you to get out of bed and open the door - A. I do not know, it was done; it was the anxiety, as I have said before, that induced me to know what time of the day it was.

Q. You heard him speaking to you, and was very anxious to know the time of the day, how came you not to ask your friend - A. Because I was not so effectually roused; after the knocking at the door I must have dozed again, and awaked by his speaking to me; I hardly remember his speaking to me; in fact, I remember something or other passing.

Q.Will you swear to his speaking to you, or no - A.

I will swear that there was something passed between us; he certainly spoke to me.

Q. Why, man, if you come here to tell the truth, there is a strait-forward way to tell it: now then I want to know, are you certain that the prisoner did speak to you, or did he not - A. Yes, he spoke to me, it roused me a trifling, it did.

Q. What time was it when you dressed yourself - A. Between seven and eight.

Q. I thought you said it was your custom to get up at six o'clock - A. It was so, but through my heavyness I laid afterwards.

Q. What was your reason for your looking at the watch - A. To know the time of the morning; it wanted twenty minutes to five.

Q. You were not so heavy then but what you marked that - A. Yes, I took notice of it.

Mr. Gurney. Your usual time of rising was at six o'clock in the morning - A. Yes.

Q. Your anxiety not to oversleep yourself made you get out of bed to open the door to look at your watch A. I do not know what induced me; I got out of bed, opened the door, and looked at my watch.

Q. You do not know whether it was by chance or design that you took your watch to the door - A. I know I looked at my watch, I cannot say whether it was by chance or design.

Court. Did you take your watch from your bed to the door - . That I cannot swear.

Q.When you were at the door, where was your watch - A. In my hand, and it wanted twenty minutes to five.

Mr. Gurney. Q. Did it ever happen to you before, to get out of bed and look at your watch - A. Oh! frequently these fine mornings. I generally look out in my shirt, and sometimes I put on my small clothes. I generally throw the door open to find my things, and sometimes pop my head out.

Q.And you generally to look at your watch take it to the door - A. Yes, generally.

Q. You were extremely anxious to get up at six o'clock, where do you work - A. At the Philanthropic Society.

Q.You told my Lord, that you looked at your watch, it wanted twenty minutes to five, you had an anxiety to get up, you got up about half an hour afterwards - A. I beg your pardon, it certainly is a misunderstanding; I said, in about ten minutes after the prisoner went out I got up and looked at the watch.

Q. You told me directly the prisoner went out you looked at the watch - A. In ten minutes after the door slammed that I got up; I conceive so.

Q. You dozed, and was in a state of stupefaction - A. Yes.

Court. It might be half an hour that you dozed after the door slammed - A. No, it appeared immediately almost.

Q. Did you doze, or did you not, after the door slammed - A. I beg your pardon, as I heard the door slam I got up instantly without dozing.

Q.What does the half hour apply to? In half an hour after the prisoner went out, did you get up or doze - A. Between seven and eight, I said, I got up.

Q. Did you breakfast in the house, or not - A. I am not quite certain; I am almost positive that I did; I cannot take upon me to swear.

Q. Did you stay without breakfast - A. I do not know how that was; I have done that before now.

Q. Do you come here to say merely it wanted twenty minutes to five - A. Yes.

Q. If you can recollect it was twenty minutes before five, why cannot you recollect the other - A. When I came home I heard Warner was taken up, it impressed my mind. It was in a conversation between me and Mrs. Warner, I think at dinner time, It was at his own house, or going home.

Q. Do you know, whether on the Monday you got any dinner, or not - A. Oh! yes, I got a dinner, I cannot tell where.

Q. Did you go to the prisoner's house at dinner time - A. I go almost every day there at dinner time; I am pretty certain I did.

Q. You staid to dinner with her - A. I do not know, I know I dined, I cannot tell where; I cannot say whether I had any breakfast or not.

Mr. Gurney. The prisoner was at home before you went out - A. Yes.

Q. You left him at home when you went out - A. Yes.

Q. Will you swear that - A. I will not; he was at home two or three minutes before I went out; he came home much about the time that I got up, or a little after; I saw him, and spoke to him.

Court. Q.to Figg. You say you worked as a porter at Herrington's and Yallowby's Wharf, where was it you were called up - A. In Green Dragon-court, St. Andrew's-hill. I heard St. Paul's strike five when I had got my clothes on, before I got down stairs.

Prisoner. I was called up by this man only to recommend him to that wharf to land the deals. I called Figg myself, the man was with me. I never went out of my house before the time that my witness has stated.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 38.

The prisoner was recommended to his Majesty's mercy by the Jury and the Prosecutor, on account of his former good character.

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100606-81

483. THOMAS CROTHALL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of April , a tin fish-kettle, value 4 s. the property of John Dowding .

JOHN DOWDING . I live at 58, Featherstone-street . I am a tin-plate-worker . On the 21st of April I lost the kettle from the outside of the door.

JOHN WAITE . I was sent for on the 23d of April, to take the prisoner into custody for stealing a fish-kettle; he had offered it for sale to Briggs at the shop in Shoreditch.

- BRIGGS. I am a journeyman tin-plate-worker. On the 21st of April I was in my master's shop, in Shoreditch, the prisoner came in and asked me to buy a kettle; I said, no, we made them. A man came and said, stop this man, he has stolen the kettle; as soon as the man said so, the prisoner went away and left the kettle in the shop. At seven o'clock the prisoner came for it; my master said, John, here is the man come for the kettle. He went away, and on Monday morning the prisoner came again and asked for the kettle; the officer was there and took him in custody.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought the kettle, and I offered it for two shillings to these people.

GUILTY , aged 48.

Whipped in jail , and sent to his parish.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100606-82

484. WILLIAM SEXTON and WILLIAM HARRICK were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of April , two mould frames, value 2 l. 2 s. the property of William Smith .

JOHN EVERETT. I am shopman to Mr. Smith, soap and tallow manufacturer , Oxford-road . On the 17th of April the moulds were standing by the door, there were candles in them. About half past six in the evening we were informed that two of them were taken, and which way they were gone. I pursued, and overtook William Sexton with a mould frame on his back; I brought him back to Mr. Smith.

THOMAS SAINSBURY. I am porter to Mr. Smith. I pursued and overtook Harrick in Great Marlborough-street; I saw him drop the mould frame out of his hand as I crossed over to him, I took him in custody. I am sure both the frames are my master's property.

Sexton's Defence. As I was returning home I met with one of these frames, and that young man accused me of taking the frame. As for the other prisoner I never saw him.

Harrick said nothing in his defence; called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

SEXTON, GUILTY , aged 22.

HARRICK, GUILTY , aged 22.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100606-83

485. GEORGE WRIGHT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of May , three saws, value 5 s. the property of Thomas Russell .

THOMAS RUSSELL . I am a journeyman carpenter. On the 17th of May I went to my dinner, and left three saws in the parlour of the house where I was at work, and on my returning to work I saw the prisoner in custody of my shopmate.

GEORGE SEDGEMORE. I saw the prisoner come from the building, he had a basket containing three saws, I took him in custody; Russell came up and claimed the saws and the basket.

Prisoner's Defence. As I was coming along, a man asked me to carry the basket while he tied up his apron; he had just come out of the house when I was taken.

SEDGEMORE. The prisoner was alone.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100606-84

486. MARGARET AUSTIN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of April , from the person of John Long , a purse, value 3 d. six half guineas, and a one pound bank note , his property.

JOHN LONG . I live in Henrietta-street, Hackney-road. On the 26th of April, between ten and eleven o'clock in the evening, I met with the prisoner at the corner of Golden-lane; she asked me to give her something to drink, I did; she then asked me to give her something to eat; we went into an eating-house in Golden-lane, we staid there about twenty minutes, we then proceeded along towards Old-street ; I stopped with her in an alley, the prisoner made a start from me, I could not find her. After she had passed the watchman, I told him what she had done; she was taken and searched, and nothing was found; the prisoner was discharged.

Q. Did you see your note and your purse again - A. Yes, in about an hour and a half after.

Q. Do you mean to say, while you were in this court with her that your dress was in the same state as it is now - A. No, not in the exact state.

DAVID MOORE . I am inspector of the watch. The prisoner was brought in the watch-house, searched, nothing was found, she was discharged. I was going my round I saw the prisoner in Basket-alley, I heard her say, it was along here I dropped it.

Q. Might not she say, that it was here that it was dropped - A. No, that I dropped it; I took her to the watch-house; I returned back and found the purse.

THOMAS GRESHAM. I am night beadle. I picked the purse up in Golden-lane, about twenty yards from Basket-alley, where the prisoner and the prosecutor were together.

The purse produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I was taken to the watch-house and discharged. I was going through the court, they took me to the watch-house again.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100606-85

487. SARAH ELIZABETH WARRENER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of April , a gown, value 7 s. three handkerchiefs, value 1 s. 6 d. a petticoat, value 5 s. and a pair of sleeves, value 6 d. the property of John Holland .

ANN HOLLAND. I am the wife of John Holland . I live in York-street, Gardener's-lane . I lodged in the garret. On the 12th of April I went with my husband's dinner to Knightsbridge Barracks, I left the prisoner in bed in my room; I went into my room again between ten and eleven o'clock, I missed my things, and the prisoner was gone. On the 14th of April I saw the prisoner at the Bull, in Gardener's-lane; she had one of my handkerchiefs on her neck, and the other on her head, and my sleeves on her arm; my gown, petticoat, and third handkerchief has not been found. I charged a constable with her.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been to Mrs. Aige, at Tottenham, she gave me several articles of wearing apparel, and when I went out I must have taken these things up. I did not know that I took any thing but my own.

GUILTY , aged 32.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100606-86

488. WILLIAM STAPLETON and WILLIAM SHERRARD were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of May , two yards and a half yard of Nankeen, value 3 s. 6 d. the property of Jemima Croton and Ann Croton , spinsters .

JEMIMA CROTON . Ann Croton is my partner; we are linen-drapers , in Camden-town ; we are both single women.

Q. Did you loose any Nankeen any time - A. Yes. On the 28th of May the Nankeen was taken from the

window, a square of glass had been cut the day before, we lost something then, the Nankeen was standing at the next pane, and that square of glass had not been mended; and in consequence of information from a stranger I ran out of the shop, and saw the two prisoners running; I pursued them calling out, stop thief; they were both stopped by a person on horseback; he is not here.

Q. What was the worth of the Nankeen - A. Three shillings and sixpence.

WILLIAM BRADOCK . I am a journeyman carpenter. I saw a man on horseback coming full gallop, he stopped the two prisoners; Sherrard's hat fell off, and the Nankeen came out of it. I took the two prisoners to Mrs. Scroton's.

Stapleton's Defence. There was a man running along, he dropped this piece of Nankeen, he told us to pick it up and run.

Sherrard. This man was coming down the road, he dropped the Nankeen, we picked it up, and we ran together.

STAPLETON, GUILTY, aged 14.

SHERRARD, GUILTY, aged 18.

Judgment respited .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100606-87

489. JOHN NORTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of May , a coat, value 20 s. a handkerchief, value 1 s, a pair of gloves, value 1 s. and a prayer book, value 3 s. the property of William Parsons .

WILLIAM PARSONS . I lodge at the Rising Sun, Bedford-bury . I am a taylor , the prisoner lodged in the same house, he is a taylor . On Sunday evening, I put my coat in the drawer; the other things were in the coat pockets, on Wednesday evening, I examined the drawer, and missed my coat, handkerchief, gloves, and prayer book.

JAMES BROOKES. I am a pawnbroker, I live at No. 7, London-road. On the 22d of May, the prisoner pawned a coat for sixteen shillings, the prayer book, gloves, and handkerchief, are in the pockets.

Prisoner's Defence. There was no one saw me take the coat, I am quite clear of the fact.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 17.

Fined 1 s. and discharged.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100606-88

490. MARY MAHONY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of April , two blankets, value 15 s. two pillows, value 2 s. a bed quilt, value 2 s. and a spoon, value 2 d. the property of John Moore , in a lodging room let to her .

CATHERINE MOORE . I am the wife of John Moore , I live in Rose and Crown-court, Moorfields , I let out lodgings.

Q. Did the prisoner take a lodging at your house - A. The prisoner's husband did.

Mr. Gurney. I object to it, the indictment is laid to her.

NOT GUILTY

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100606-89

491. JOEL JOSEPH and ISAAC SOLOMON were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of April , from the person of Thomas Dodd , a pocket book, value 4 s. a thirty pound bank note, a five pound bank note, a two pound bank note, three one pound bank notes, and a warrant for the payment of fifty-six pound his property.

THOMAS DODD . I live at Eltham, I am agent for Crowley Millington, and Co. Ironmongers, at Greenwich.

Q. On the 17th of April, did you lose any pocket book and bank notes - A. I did, I had in my pocket book a thirty pound note, a five pound note, a two pound and three or four one's, bank of England notes.

Q. What was the last part of the day that you were conscious that you had your pocket book and notes about you - A. About one o'clock I was at Greenwich, I then came up to town, and coming up Palace-yard , there was a crowd, it was the meeting of the inhabitants of Westminster, I had the curiosity to see what was going forward. I got to Palace-yard, a little after two o'clock, I stood outside, I did not go in the crowd.

Q. Can you say whether you saw either of the prisoner's near you - A. No.

Q. Did you perceive that your pocket book went from you while you where in Palace-yard - A. No, I missed it while I was in Palace-yard. In about twenty minutes, I had a friend Mr. Good, with me, I told my friend that I had much property in it, and among the property there was a check of fifty-six pound. In two or three days after, I saw my pocket book and all the contents at Bow-street.

JOHN VICKERY . I am an officer. On Tuesday, the 17th of April, I was at this meeting.

Q. Did you see Mr. Dodd that day - A. I did not. As I was standing there, between two and three o'clock, I saw the two prisoners come out from among the people, and go into Westminster hall, I knew them both; I called to Preston, and desired him to walk to the hall door to watch them. When I came up, I saw the two prisoners very near together, and in the hands of Joel Joseph I saw some paper, it appeared to me to be like bank notes, they were in Joel Joseph 's left hand, and it seemed as if he was counting them; there was no other person near them within a dozen or twenty yards, they had taken a circular walk round the hall, and where they were there was no company. I directed Preston at the door to take hold of Joseph, whom I pointed to, and that I would take hold of Solomon; I put myself inside of the door, and that moment I was seen by Joseph, he turned round and ran away towards the Court of King's Bench; Preston pursued Joseph and secured him, just as he had got up the second or third step leading into the Court of King's Bench; Solomon stood still, I took hold of him; I said, I had no doubt that something wrong had been done, I must search him. Preston had got hold of Joseph, at that moment I saw Joseph attempting to put something in his mouth, which I suspected was the notes, I called out do not let him eat the notes; Preston said, he has nothing in his mouth, and brought him up to me. Joseph refused being searched by Preston, and said, Vickrey shall search me, he has known me a good while, and whatever he finds he will return me. As I was searching Solomon, I perceived something strike me on the toe.

Q.At the time that this struck you on the toe, were there any person near you and Solomon, excepting Preston and Joseph - A. Neither of them were near enough at that time, but there were a number of people collected round. I picked up the book, it opened by falling, and the papers fell on the ground, it was this pocket book with the papers it now contains; I searched Solomon further, in his fob pocket I found four one pound bank notes; in his right hand coat pocket I found a one pound

bank note, with a number of loose papers, and a lottery bill; in his left hand breeches pocket I think there were eight dollars, which were returned to him all except two. I searched Joseph, I found nothing in his pockets; I attempted to take off his neckhandkerchief, he refused, said no man should take that off, I took it off; in his neckcloth was a thirty pound bank note; between his shirt and his neck, a five pound bank note, and in the same place a two pound note. I then took them up to the office in Bow-street. In the pocket book there is a banker's check, payable at sight; Mr. Dodd has sworn to it; and a bill for goods sold and delivered to Mr. Dodd, outside it is endorsed, Mr. Dodd, Eltham, that led me to find Mr. Dodd out; I sent word down by the stage coachman that night.

Q. Was Solomon near enough to you for the book to fall from him - A. We were close together face to face, there was only room for my hand to be in his pocket between him and me.

JOHN PRESTON . I am one of the patrol of Bow-street. On this day, when the electors of Westminster met in Palace yard, between two and three o'clock, Vickrey came to me, I was standing near the hall door, he said, there were two men, noted characters, gone into the hall, he desired me to see in what part of the hall they were, I looked, and saw the two prisoners in company together. I was told by Vickery to walk towards them, they were looking at something, which appeared to me to be bank notes; Joseph had the notes, and when I got within two or three yards of the two prisoners, Joseph looked towards the door and ran, he ran towards the Court of King's Bench steps, I catched him; and Vickery cried out, mind, he is eating the notes; I clapped my hand to his jaw bone, he opened his mouth; he had nothing in his mouth; I said to Vickery, if it is any where it is in his neck. I brought him to Vickery; Joseph delivered to me eight shillings, I asked him if he had no notes, he gave me a one pound note out of his hand. I was ordered by the magistrate to give him the one pound note and the eight shillings. I was going to untie his neck-handkerchief, he resisted, said he would not be searched by me, Vickery should search him, as he had known him: I told him I would indulge him; I kept hold of him while Vickery searched Solomon. On Vickery's searching Solomon, to the best of my recollection he was unbuttoning his waistcoat, I saw a pocket book shop from some part of Solomon's person, and the papers flew about, they were picked up by Vickery. I held Solomon while Vickery searched Joseph; Vickery untied Joseph's neck handkerchief, and there took out some notes between his shirt collar and his neck. I accompanied Vickery to the office with the prisoner's, and Mr. Dodd appeared on the Thursday.

Q. to Mr. Dodd. Look at the pocket-book, is that the pocket book of which you were possessed that day - A. Yes, and here are some memorandums I can swear to, here is an order for payment in my favour, it was in my pocket book when I lost it.

Q.Look at the notes which Vickrey took from Joseph - A. The thirty pound note, I had not taken the number of that note, I traced the number, Mr. Lloyd is her from whom I had it.

MR. LLOYD. Q. Look at that note and say whether you know it - A.On the 11th of April I received thirty pound bank note for a check.

Q. Do you know that thirty pound note was in your possession - A. No, further than the banker's book will tell.

JOSEPH ROBBINS . I am a clerk to Fuller and Co.

Q. Do you know that thirty pound note - A. I paid a check, on the 11th of April, of Eltham and Co.; by the indorsement on the back of the note, I have no doubt I paid it to Mr. Lloyd, I wrote St Bishop, I received it of S Bishop not half an hour before.

Mr. Gurney. You would not have known that you paid it to that gentleman, except from reference to the book - A. No.

Court. Q. to Mr. Lloyd. Did you cash any check at Fuller's house with Robins - A. Yes, I received the amount of a check of Eltham and Co., and among the rest I received a thirty pound note, which I carried to Mr. Dodd the same day. I did not observe whether the note had any writing on it.

Q. to Mr. Dodd. Did you observe at the time that you received the thirty pound note of Mr. Lloyd, whether there was any writing on it - A. No, I know that I had a thirty pound note of Mr. Lloyd; and I know that I had a new five pound note in my pocket book, which I received of Mr. Morris, at the India house, on the 11th of April.

MR. MORRIS. Q. Look at that five pound note, do you recollect paying Mr. Dodd the five pound note - A. On the 11th of April, I paid him this five pound note, I paid him six months interest of two bonds; of one hundred pound each, two pound ten shillings upon each bond, that is five pound; I have the bond in my pocket of the East India company, upon which I wrote the number of the note, the number is 14m808., the date is 3d of April, 1810; I received it at the bank on the 11th of April, it was a new note.

WILLIAM ROSS . Q. Were you present when these men were in custody of Vickrey and Preston - A. I was present at the time Vickrey told Preston to go towards Joseph, he advanced towards Joseph; Solomon was perfectly composed when Vickrey took him in custody. Preston took Joseph and brought him to Vickrey, he was searched, and I saw something taken from his collar, which I supposed to be Bank notes. During the investigation I saw a pocket book fall at the foot of Solomon.

Joseph's Defence. I was coming along the bridge to Westminster I picked this book up, and looking at it I put the notes in my neck for safety, and the next morning I intended to look in the newspapers to see if they were advertised. I meaned to restore them to the owner if they were advertised.

Solomon's Defence. On the 17th of April curiosity led me to go the Westminster Meeting. I had not been in the crowd two minutes, the crowd was so great I ran out for fear of being hurt. I proceeded to Westminster-hall, and I had not been there one minute before somebody catched hold of me Vickrey searched me, and found five pound notes, which was my own property, seven dollars and half a crown, and a cork-screw, and papers that I took coming along. I had no conversation with any one, nor had I any intention of committing a felony whatever. I am quite innocent of this business. I never had the pocket book in my possession; I was before Vickrey, and Preston behind me, I do not know how he could see me drop a pocket book, Mr. Vickrey and I being face to face, if I had dropped it, surely he must have seen the drop it.

JOSEPH, GUILTY , aged 26.

SOLOMON, GUILTY , aged 21.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100606-90

492. MARIA DIGBY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 19th of April , a counterpane, value 10 s. and 2 l. 10 s the property of Joseph Northern , in his dwelling house .

JOSEPH NORTHERN . I live at the Horseshoe and Magpie, in Burleigh-street . On the 19th of April, between the hours of one and two in the morning the prisoner came with three or four more, they had a glass of gin each; they all went out; the prisoner turned back and asked me to serve her a slice of bread and cheese, I did so; I fell asleep, and awoke in about fifteen or twenty minutes, I found the prisoner gone. I looked in the till, I found all the silver gone, there was between two and three pound; there was one sixpence in particular that I knew, it had been in the till several days. On the next morning I went to the Wheatsheaf in Drury lane, I found the prisoner sitting in the tap-room, I had her taken in custody; she was searched, and a sixpence was found on her marked with the letter S.

ROBERT BOOTH. I am an officer of Bow-street, On the 19th of April, about ten o'clock, in the morning, I apprehended the prisoner at the Wheatsheaf in Drury lane. On searching her I found a bad sixpence, with a letter S upon it, which was all that she had about her.

Prisoner's Defence. I went in there between two and three o'clock for a slice of bread and cheese, and a pint of beer; I had no gin at all; I came out; he was sitting by the fire, he told me to shut the door after me, and so I did. The house was full of people when I came into the house.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100606-91

493. DANIEL GEORGE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 13th of April , a pewter pint pot, value 14 d. the property of William Riley .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18100606-92

494. DANIEL GEORGE was indicted for stealing on the 13th of April , a pewter pint pot, value 14 d. the property of William Moore .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18100606-93

495. DANIEL GEORGE was indicted for stealing on the 13th of April , a pewter quart pot, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of Henry Layton .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY .

Confined Two Years in the House of Correction , and Publicly Whipped One Hundred Yards in High-street, Mary-le-bone .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100606-94

496. SAMUEL GOODMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 28th of May , a pair of tongs, value 3 s. a shovel, value 4 s. and a poker value 2 s. the property of Mary Lea , widow .

JOHN WHITEHEAD . I live with my aunt, Mrs. Lea, she is a widow; she is a stove grate manufacturer , No. 7, Crown-street, Finsbury-square . On the 28th of May, between twelve and one, I saw the prisoner lurking about my aunt's shop, I watched him, he went away and came back again in the course of half an hour, and then he stood about the window, and while I was in the back warehouse (I kept my eye upon him) the prisoner came in and took a set of fire irons out of the window and put them under his coat; I ran after him and cried out stop thief; I lost sight of him for a minute while he turned down the alley; he threw the fire irons down and I picked them up; the prisoner was stopped by a gentleman, and Magnalley brought him back to our house.

MR. MAGNALLEY. I saw the prisoner drop the irons, the lad was pursuing him; I assisted in taking him.

The property produced and identified.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

GUILTY , aged 17.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and Whipped in Jail .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100606-95

497. THOMAS WOODWARD and THOMAS COLLIER were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 4th of May , forty-nine skins, value 10 s. the property of the London Dock company .

SECOND COUNT, for stealing the same goods, the property of persons to the jurors unknown.

JAMES EVANS . I am an officer of the Thames police. On the 4th of May, in consequence of information, I went to the West Key of the London Docks , where I saw the prisoners packing skins; I searched Collier, I found in his pocket twenty-one skins, and six in his hat; I saw the other searched by James Lue, he found eleven in his hat, and eleven he had throwed out of his pockets. Woodward said he had taken a skin or two just for the use of his family.

JAMES LUE . I am a Thames police waterman. On the 4th of May, between two and three o'clock in the afternoon, I was on the West Key of the London docks, I saw the prisoners, they are custom-house officer they were repacking skins, they were putting some in their Pockets, and some in the their hats; I gave information, and then I searched Woodward, I found eleven in his hat, and eleven in his pockets; he said it was only a few that he had taken for his family.

THOMAS JOHNSON. I am a gangsman of the London docks.

Q. What were the prisoners - A. Custom-house offcers. On the 4th of May they were employed in the London docks, one to take the amount of the skins, and the other the quality.

Woodward's Defence. I took the skins and did not know the value of them.

Collier said nothing in his defence; called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Woodward called five witnesses, who gave him a good character.

WOODWARD - GUILTY , aged 32.

COLLIER - GUILTY , aged 31.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and Whipped in Jail .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100606-96

498. WILLIAM JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 25th of April , three quarters of a pound weights of opium, value 3 s. the property of the London dock company .

SECOND COUNT for like offence, the property of persons to the jurors unknown.

FRANCIS MASE . I am a watchman at the London

docks. On the 25th of April the prisoner was packing opium at the North Key ; there was a chest of opium there. In consequence of my seeing him take his hand from behind him I felt outside of his pocket, I told him to hand it out; he said he had nothing; I told him again, to hand it out; he gave me one piece; I told him he had more; he gave me another piece; I told him the third time, he said he had no more; I searched him and found one piece more in his pocket; I took it up to the office and delivered it to James Slater .

Mr. Alley. Did not he say that these were two or three pieces that he had picked up walking over the premises - A. Yes.

JAMES SLATER . I am a constable of the London docks. On the afternoon of the 25th of April I took the prisoner in custody; I received the opium of Mase, it is three quarters of a pound, it is worth fourteen shillings a pound. The prisoner was a labourer at the London Docks.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel; called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 55.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and Whipped in Jail.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100606-97

499. EDWARD HAWKE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 1st of June , four piece of timber, value 3 l. 9 s. the property of John Kemshin .

JOHN CLARK . I am a constable. On the 1st of June, at four o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner coming from Mr. Kemshin's yard, at the back of Upper Gower Mews , he had a piece of timber on his shoulder; he crossed a field with it, and throwed it in a ditch under the Bedford-nursery; the watchman was coming, he and I watched the prisoners back, to Mr. Kemshin's yard; we looked through the fence, and saw him measure other pieces of timber; I ordered the watchman to watch him. I met the watchman, he gave me some information; I went and marked four pieces of timber.

GEORGE GATES . I am a watchman. On my last calling the hour at Upper Gower mews; I saw Mr. Clark; I saw the prisoner go into Mr. Kemshin's yard and shut the gate after him; I looked through the cracks of the fence, I saw him measuring other pieces of timber with a hook in his hand; he came out of the yard, saw me standing, he went down Francis-street, looked up at a public house; I was desired to pull my coat off. I watched him into Mr. Kemshin's yard again. I went to Bedford nursery-place, there I saw three pieces of timber lay; I saw the prisoner coming; I secreted myself; I saw him carry the three pieces of timber by turns to another house, he left the timber there and went to Mr. Kemshin's yard; I watched him in and out of the yard; he brought another piece of timber to the three-pieces. I then met with Mr. Clark; he took the prisoner that morning. The timber is in the Yard.

Prisoner's Defence. A man of the name of Garrod was building a house in Southampton-place, he asked me to lend him some boards for scaffolding; I said I would see what I could do. This was on the Thursday. On the Friday I took the four-pieces and laid them near the house he was building; I took a memorandum in my book that the same pieces should be returned. I was no ways interested; I did it to serve the man as a friend.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 42.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100606-98

500. THOMAS TAYLOR was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 14th of May , fifteen pieces of iron value 6 s. the property of George Ireland .

GEORGE IRELAND . I am a carman , I live on, Friers-hill. I only know that the iron was missing, and I was present when the officer took it away from the prisoner's premises.

TIMOTHY MOSS . I am a wheelwright. On the 11th of May, I missed these iron out of Mr. Ireland yard; I went to the different iron shops in search of them, at last I went into the prisoners shop in Well-street, I asked him if he had any irons half a yard long that crewed at each end; he said he believed he had one or two; I looked at them, he then brought me out fifteen, all that I had lost. These are the irons; he told me that they had been made for a cart, and that the man had gone in the country. I agreed to give him sixpence a piece for them.

Q. Where did he produce them from - A. From under a bench; they were not expose to sale. I do not think this took them.

Prisoner's Defence. I am a blacksmith ; I do not get my living by keeping an old iron shop. I have kept that house ten years.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100606-99

501. ROBERT DAVIS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 29th of May , a watch, value 4 l. a gold seal, value 15 s. and a gold key, value 2 s. the property of Robert Ashby .

HENRY RABAN ASHBY . I am an apprentice to my father, Robert Ashby , he is an engraver in Lombard-street.

Q. When did you lose this - A. On Tuesday the 29th of May, by the New river at Islington ; my brother and me were washing. When I got out of the river, and was standing by my clothes three men came by the side of the river towards me; one of the men said, we will cut across to the Sluice House, and came directly by the side of my clothes and one of them took up a little dog that I had with me and run up the field with it; my brother ran after him and the two others were going up the field, and I grumbled about their touching the dog; they said let us go back and hit him; they came up to my clothes, I went past my clothes. The prisoner came as if to hit me; my brother said to me, have you lost any thing I put my watch to my hat; I looked in my hat and my watch was gone.

Q. You did not see any body take it did you - A. No.

Q. Did you ever see your watch again - A. No. The prisoner said, which of them took it, shall I run after them. I did not see either of them take it.

Q. Are you sure this is one of them - A. I am sure that he is the one that came to hit me.

Q. How was he taken afterwards - A. My brother ran after him and a man stopped him.

WILLIAM ASHBY. Q. You went to bathe with your brother - A. Yes. When my brother was going across the field I told him to put his watch seal in; he would not. I put my seal in, and when we got to the river I went in first; they did not offer to come to my clothes. When my brother went in he put his watch in his hat; when he came out of the river there were three of them came across; there was no foot path where our clothes were; one of them said, let us go to the Sluice House, and another took up the dog; I went after him to get the dog; after I had got the dog the prisoner came up to my brother and offered to strike him, the third one took the watch out of his hat, while the prisoner was with my brother; I saw him take it out of the hat. The prisoner stood a little while, and said, which is the one that took the watch; he ran up to Highbury-barn, and the others ran to Cannonbury-house, I pursued the prisoner, he was stopped by the ostler at Highbury-barn; a gentleman took him down to the Cock at Islington; he winked to one of the other men that was in Islington, and they run away.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going to bathe, there were two young men going forward, they said they were going to bathe; I went with them; they said they were going towards the Sluice House; this young lad said he had lost his watch, I asked him who had got it, and I pursued him.

GUILTY , aged 31.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100606-100

502. GEORGE FRENCH was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 10th of April , four silver tea spoons, value 12 s. and a silver table spoon value 1 s. the property of Richard Wareham .

RICHARD WAREHAM . I am a leather cutter , 23, Cleveland-street, Fitzroy-square I lost the spoons on the 10th of April. My first floor was to let, the prisoner came in to see it a little before one at noon, my wife shewed him up stairs. I was in the shop when the prisoner came through.

Q. The apartment was shewn him - A. Yes, and then he saw the sleeping room; in the closet laid five silver spoons; he went into the sitting room, he asked the price of the apartment, she told him fifty-five pounds per year; he asked if fifty-two pounds would do and desired her to go and ask her husband, in the mean time he went into the sleeping room again.

Q. How do you know that - A. Upon my wife going up stairs she found him coming out.

Q. Is your wife here - A. No. I know of my own knowledge that no one went up stairs from half past twelve till between six and seven that afternoon. On the following day I saw the prisoner at Marlborough-street office, and on the Wednesday the pawnbroker with the spoons appeared.

JAMES HOW . I am shopman to Mr. Dobree, pawnbroker. On the 10th of April, about the middle of the day, the prisoner pledged these spoons with me for twenty shillings.

Prisoner's Defence. I never had the spoons.

GUILTY , aged 38.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100606-101

503. WILLIAM EVANS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 14th of June , a watch valu 4 l. two gold seals, value 1 s. a gold chain value 30 d and two metal watch keys, value 2 d. the property of Richard Twist , from his person.

RICHARD TWIST I am a taylor , I live in Coventry court in the Haymarket. On the 4th upon between three and four in the afternoon, I was in St. James's-street , endeavouring to make my way the crowd; on a sudden I found my watch from my pocket, I turned round and saw it dropping on the ground, a blue coat boy picked it up and gave it to me I do not know who took it.

JOHN APPLEBY . I am a On the 4th of June I was stationed at the corner of St. James's-street on duty, between three and four o'clock, I observed a crowd coming forward, and all of a sudden I saw the prisoner put his arm between Mr. Twist and another gentleman, and drew a watch from his fob, and instantly he drew it the watch fell on the ground, a blue coat boy picked it up and gave it to the prosecutor. The prisoner pressed forward, I seized him, and called for the assistance of Jones and Blackmore to take him to the office.

RICHARD BLACKMORE . I am an officer. On the 4th of June I assisted in taking the prisoner to the office. nothing him along he attempted to throw a handkerchief away, I seized his hand that endeavoured to do it. He took the handkerchief out of the nap of his breeches. On searching him at the office I found another handkerchief in his breeches pocket.

Prisoner's Defence. One of them handkerchiefs is my own, the other I did not see untill I came to the office.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100606-102

504. JOHN DUDDY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 12th of May , two ounces weight of tea value 2 s. a pound weight of sugar value 1 s. 6 d. two pounds of bacon, value 2 s. 4 d. a pound weight of salt, value 41 d. two ounces weight of mustard, value 5 d. and a pound weight of candles, value 1 s. the property of Edward Davis .

SARAH DAVIS . I live at 31, Kingsgate-street, Holborn ; my husband's name is Edward Davis ; I keep a chandler's shop . On the 4th of May, near nine o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came in and asked for the several articles in the indictment he had a paper in his hand and read over the articles; he spread a large handkerchief, I put the things into the handkerchief; he told me to count them; he tied the things up in a handkerchief and put me down half a guinea the moment he put it down I saw it was good for nothing; he insisted that it was a good one; I gave it to a lad in the shop to take it to the next door for them to look at it, the prisoner then snatched the bundle and run off; I ran after him and called on, stop thief; he was stopped in Holborn, and brought back with the things.

WILLIAM REYNOLDS . I was at Mrs. Davis's shop when the prisoner was served; he laid down half a guinea, Mrs. Davis did not like it; I went to the next door to get it changed, it was a bad one, and when I came back the man was gone.

EDWARD SMITH . I am a watchman. On this night

I heard a cry of stop thief, I saw the prisoner running with a bundle under his arm; I stopped him in Holborn, brought him back to the prosecutrix's house; she gave me charge of him and the half guinea.

Prisoner's Defence. My lord, and gentlemen of the Jury, in the unfortunate situation I am involved, I beg leave to state that a person came to me and bespoke a pair of shoes, which were twelve shillings, leaving a deposit of one shilling and sixpence; on the following evening he gave me half a guinea, which I offered at the chandler's shop, and it proved to be a bad one. I hope, as I have maintained an unblemished character, that you will temper your judgment with mercy.

GUILTY , aged 49.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100606-103

505. GEORGE CROFT was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 28th of April , fifty-seven penny pieces, and one hundred and twenty-six halfpence , the property of Michael Ashley , and John Hill .

WILLIAM JONES . I a shopman to Michael Ashley and John Hill, they are grocers in the Strand . On the 28th of April, about a quarter before seven in the morning, the prisoner came in the shop and asked the person that was standing at the counter for an ounce of coffee, the person had sufficient coffee ground on the counter to serve him, without turning his back; the prisoner observing this immediately asked for another ounce of a different price; this was obliged to be ground, and for the purpose of grinding it the person was obliged to turn his back; the prisoner took this opportunity when his back was turned towards him, to take two five shilling papers of halfpence and penny pieces that were on the counter, in the window. I was on the stairs and observed all this from the counter. The prisoner was in our shop the morning before and seemed to act in a strange way, which gave me suspicion. Upon his taking the coppers I came from the place where I was, I did not lose sight of him nor the coppers; he turned his back to the counter and held them to his breast, and before I got up to him he put the coppers on the counter, by the side of him. When I went up to him he seemed violently agitated, said he had never been guilty of such a thing before, and fell upon his knees, and begged we would not hurt him. An officer was sent for, he was taken in custody.

WILLIAM CLEMENTS. I was sent for. I took the prisoner in custody, I searched him, I only found on him ten or eleven new halfpence.

Jones. These are the halfpence; there is my initials on them.

Prisoner's Defence. I went into the shop for an ounce of coffee and a quartern of sugar. I never touched that property I am challenged with. I am innocent.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100606-104

506 JAMES CAMFIELD was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 31st of May , two saws, value 18 s. the property of John Williams .

JOHN WILLIAMS . I am a carpenter ; I was at work at a building near Chelsea . On the 31st of May I left the saws hanging up in the building while I went to my breakfast; when I returned they were gone.

WILLIAM JENNINGS. As I was going to breakfast the prisoner passed me, I saw him enter the house; I suspected him; I went to the door, he was coming out; I took hold of him and took one saw from his right arm, and after he had gone about twenty yards from the house a gentleman said, perhaps he has got something else; I looked under his other arm, there was another saw.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100606-105

507. LYDIA BRANNAAN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 23d of May , two silk handkerchief, value 2 s. 6 d. the property of Humphry Jones .

HUMPHRY JONES. I live with my uncle, Edward Jones , he is a grocer , No. 3, Raven-row, Spital-fields . I missed my handkerchief from out of my box on the 23d of May; I had seen it in my box on the day before.

EDWARD JONES . I am the lad's uncle. He informed me he had lost his handkerchief. I found the handkerchief at Mr. Parkins.

Q. You have a number of lodgers in your house - A. Yes; the prisoner has lodged in my house five or six years.

THOMAS BARCLAY . I am an apprentice to Mr. Parkin, a pawnbroker. On the 23rd of May, about five o'clock, I took the handkerchief in of the prisoner, I lent her one shilling and sixpence on it.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked this handkerchief up at the foot of the stairs; I kept it a good while, and finding no enquiry about it, I thought it was my own; I wanted a few halfpence, I pledged it.

The prisoner called five witnesses, who gave her a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100606-106

508. HENRY ROGERS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 22nd of May , a silk handkerchief, value 2 s. the property of a certain person to the jurors unknown.

SAMUEL LACK. I am one of the Bow-street patrols On the 22nd of May, about twelve o'clock at night, as the people were coming from Covent Garden theatre, I saw Rogers following a gentleman at the corner of Bow-street ; I saw him take a handkerchief out of the gentleman's pocket and put it into his breeches; I followed him across the street and took him in custody. I took him to the public house and searched him, and found in his breeches these two handkerchiefs, and this in his pocket; I cannot swear which handkerchief it was he took out of the gentleman's pocket. He went upon his knees and prayed very hard that I would let him go, and said it was his first offence.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence; called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100606-107

509. JOHN HARVEY , was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 28th of April , two dollars, half a crown, six shillings, and sixpence , the property of Peter Oliver .

PETER OLIVER . I am a drum-major in the Denhigh militia.

Q. What is the prisoner - A. He vends medicines . On the night of the 28th of April, this man and I slept together, when I went to bed, I had nineteen shillings in my pocket; John Harvey rose about six o'clock in the morning, he left the room and returned several times between six and eight, and every time he came into the room he made it his business to speak to me, I answered him every time but the last time and then I heard him at the foot of the bed where my clothes and the money lay, I believe that was the time that he took my money, I still thought that he was at the foot of the bed, but when I looked he was gone; I did not see him again till about ten o'clock, he came and placed himself by the side of me and asked me how I did; I called him to the door, I said, now you know what I want to speak to you about, and if you have taken it in a joke you should not have kept it so long from me, he said, he did not know what I meaned, and if I had lost any money or property it was nothing to him, he said, there were other people in the house, he had seen a soldier in the passage brushing his gaiters, he denied having the money, I charged the watchman with him.

Q. Might not any body else come into the room - A. Not from the time that he got up till I got up. A soldier came to the door and bid me good bye, he did not come in.

Prisoner's Defence. I came unfortunately to this house to sleep, he challenged me with taking the money; I told him I knew nothing of the money, I got up at six o'clock, went out and got shaved and came in again, I asked the landlord who was in the room with him; the landlord told me his comrade that drank with him last night, I heard the soldier in the room with him. They came to me in prison, and asked me if I would give up the money I had upon me and they would not appear against me; I told them I would not, I would be tried by God and my country.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100606-108

510. JOHN YATES , alias GATES , and SAMUEL MAN were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of May, a portmanteau, value 21 s. the property of James Wyer .

JAMES WYER . I am a trunk-maker , I live in Oxford-street. I can only speak to the property.

JOHN JAMES SMITH . I am a patrol of Bow-street. On the 5th of May, about seven o'clock in the evening, I was passing through Oxford-street I observed the two prisoners at the bar. I observed the two prisoners and another in company with them, standing at the corner of Chapple-street, leading into Orchard-street, and having seen these prisoners before caused me to stop; they observed me and went away; they all three went down Great Chapple-street. I crossed Oxford-street, and looked down Chapple-street to see which way they turned; not seeing them I walked a little way up Oxford-street, in less than five minutes I saw them all three coming on the opposite side of the way, on the same side of the way they were on before; I hid myself by the side of a hackney coach; I saw each of them, as though they took it by turns, walk as far as Mr. Wyer's door; they did not go altogether. Gates took this portmanteau from off others that were placed at the door where it was standing for sale; immediately that he took it, Man and the other that is not apprehended ran off; they followed Gates, who had the portmanteau. Gates, on turning his head off, saw me coming after him; he ran with it as far as the corner of Titchfield-street, there he dropped it opposite of Mr. Leaf's door; he ran down Titchfield-street, I passed the portmanteau, into Dean-street, he took up Dean-street into Oxford-street again. I called out, stop thief; he crossed Oxford-street and ran to the corner of Rathbone-place, where he was stopped. I took him in custody. The prisoner asked me, what I wanted with him, he had done nothing; and as I was conveying him to the place where I saw the portmanteau drop, I found he had his hand in his waistcoat pocket, and he seemed very uneasy; I clapped my hand upon his hand as he had it in his pocket, and he brought out this clasped knife half open. I conveyed him back to the place where I saw the portmanteau drop. Mr. Leaf came out of the shop and said, you are looking for this, and gave the portmanteau to me; then conveyed him to the office. Man was not taken till the Wednesday night following. I know no more than seeing him in company with Gates.

Q. You are sure as to their persons, are you - A. Yes, I know them both well.

JAMES LEAF . I live at the corner of Titchfield-street. The prisoner dropped this trunk at my door, the party called out, stop thief, and run after the prisoner. I took the trunk in, and delivered it to the officer when he returned.

Gates's Defence. As I was coming down Oxford-street I ran to see what was the matter, I was stopped at the corner of Rathbone-place, and this gentleman took me to Mr. Wyer's shop.

Man's Defence. I am innocent of what I am brought here for. I know this young man by being in his company two or three times. The officer never knew me in my life.

SMITH. I saw him brought to the office with Gates; he was committed and tried last sessions for a burglary.

GATES, GUILTY , aged 16.

MAN, GUILTY , aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100606-109

511. ELIZABETH HUNT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 31st of May , two blankets, value 5 s. two rugs, value 7 s. and two quilts, value 8 s. the property of Samuel Elias Barnet .

MRS. BARNET. I live in Denmark-street, Ratcliffe . My husband's name is Samuel Elias Barnet ; he is a dealer in glass and China . On the 31st of May, between eleven and twelve o'clock at night, I went out and ordered a pint of beer for my supper, as I returned I found a bundle at the bottom of my stairs; I went up stairs and saw the bare bedstead; I looked under the bedstead, and there lay the prisoner with her shoes in her hand; I was frightened; I ran down stairs and sent for the watchman.

Q. Did you know the prisoner at all - A. No.

HENRY SEAMAN . I am a watchman. I saw the prisoner in the room, both the beds were stripped, and a bundle of clothes lying in the room. I took charge of the prisoner and the property.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in liquor. I went into the house in a mistake.

GEORGE HANKS . I am the watch-house keeper. The prisoner was quite sober.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100606-110

512. ROBERT SKEEN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22nd of April , thirty-five ball cartridges, value 5 s. the property of our Lord the King .

RICHARD SATTERTHWAITE . I am quarter-master serjeant of the Westmoreland Militia. I was quartered at Mr. Baker's, the Nag's Head, Hackney . The prisoner used that house.

Q. Did you at any time in April miss any cartridges - A. On Sunday, the 22nd of April, about one o'clock, I met the prisoner at the back door of the Nag's Head with about thirty-five ball cartridges in his hand; I desired him to return and to put them in the pouches he took them from. He returned, and put them into pouches, but not the right, they were improperly put; and the men being short of cartridges reported it to their officers. The men's pouches were placed in this public-house while they attended Divine Service. These ball cartridges are furnished by government. The commanding officer ordered him to be taken in custody.

Q. How much do you think these ball cartridges could have been sold for - A. I do not know the value of them; the men are, I understand, charged three-pence a piece.

JOSEPH BARTLEY . I am a private in this regiment. On that Sunday I missed fourteen cartridges from my pouch.

THOMAS COOPER . I am a private in the same regiment. I missed thirty-two cartridges from my pouch.

FRANCES GODDARD . I am a cook at the Nag's Head. On the Sunday the men went to church, the pouches were left in the back kitchen; I did not see him take them; I saw him replace them by the serjeant's desire.

Prisoner's Defence. It was only a frolic, by my being acquainted with the men.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Fined One Shilling and discharged.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100606-111

513. ELIZABETH SULLIVAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of April , a quart pewter pot, value 1 s. 4 d. and two pint pewter pots, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of Richard Sibley .

RICHARD SIBLEY . I keep the White Swan, Little Ormond-street . On the 25th of April, at five o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came to my house with some butter in a basket; she placed her basket on a table where there were seven pots, and pressed me to buy butter of her; she had half a pint of beer, and went out. When she was gone, out of the seven pots that were on the table there were three gone.

THOMAS STIRLING . I am a constable. On the 25th of April I saw the prisoner in Dorrington-street; she had three pots in her basket and some butter. I took her to the office.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I was very much in liquor.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100606-112

514. MARIA WODDISON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of February , twenty-two yards of sarcenet; value 8 l. the property of William Lyons . And

TWO OTHER COUNTS for like offence, only varying the manner of charging them.

ANN LYONS . Q. Are you the wife of William Lyons - A. I was, he is since dead; I live at No. 2, York-place, Lambeth . On the 10th of April, in the morning, the prisoner called upon me; she said, that she had come to town to purchase two sarcenet dresses, Captain Munns was going to make her a present of them, one for her, and one for her sister. I sent for some patterns to Messrs. Roberts and Plowmen, and one of their men brought some patterns; she said, she could not judge of the patterns, she wished to see the pieces. The young man went and brought a number of pieces; she fixed on two remnants, and requested the young man to bring some plain sarcenet, and to leave the two pieces and she would fix on one of the two while he was gone. As soon as he was gone she said, Captain Munn was waiting at a coffee-house near hand, begged of me to let my girl go with her to carry the pieces for his approbation; the little girl went with her. I never saw the prisoner again till the Sunday before Easter. The little girl returned without either of the pieces. I have been made to answer for the sarcenet.

Q. When you saw her again, what passed - A. I was going through St. Paul's Church-yard with the little girl's father I saw her, and he took hold of her. I charged her with taking the two pieces of sarcenet from my girl; she made no answer whatever, and never spoke during the time of taking her to the watch-house.

Q. What has been charged to you for the sarcenet - A. Eight pounds.

Q. Did you understand that the captain was to pay for it - A. I understood that she was to pay for it, and that she had the money in her pocket; she said, he had given her eight pounds to pay for it.

ANN POWBY . I lived with Mrs. Lyons at the time this happened.

Q. Do you recollect the prisoner coming to her house about some sarcenet - A. Yes. On a Saturday I was to go with the prisoner with the sarcenet. She took me into Russell-street and took the sarcenet from me, told me to go into the biscuit shop and wait there till she returned; I said, I will stay at the door till you return. I staid there quarters of an hour, she never returned.

Prisoner's Defence I did not give any wrong address in Charlton-street. Captain Munn is at Malden, in Essex.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100606-113

515. STEPHEN SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of May , one hundred and forty staves, value 14 l. the property of Lewis Berlesque . And

FOUR OTHER COUNTS the property of different persons.

The case was stated by Mr. Gurney.

THOMAS HAWKINS . I am a foreman to John Boulcott , and Joseph Boulcott , timber merchants, Narrow-street, Ratcliffe .

Q. I believe you have a wharf on one side of the street,

and the other side a yard, what you call an interior timber yard - A. Yes.

Q. In the last month had you any quantity of staves in your wharf - A. We had.

Q Prior to the 12th of May, in consequence of any thing that occurred, did you remove these staves from the wharf into the interior yard - A. Yes; they were marked S. and N. they were marked Dantzic staves.

Q. At the time that you removed these staves, did you put any additional mark - A. I marked them with a circle, by which I should know them again.

Q. On the night of Saturday the 12th, were the staves safe in the interior yard - A. I believe they were, the bulk did not appear diminished. The staves were the property of Lewis Berlesque , they were on our wharf on his account.

Q. How late on the Saturday had you seen them - A. I generally lock up on Saturday about six o'clock. On Sunday morning I went up about seven o'clock, I looked at another pile, I had marked them also, I saw that the top tier had been disturbed.

Q.Then besides this parcel that you had moved into the interior yard, there was another parcel - A. Yes, there was no mark on them but my mark, a circle.

Q. On the Sunday morning you found this parcel, which had no other mark but what you had put, some of them were gone - A. Yes; I looked at the other parcel, I did not see that any of them were disturbed.

Q. On the Monday did you make enquiry about the neighbourhood, and make it known - A. Yes; and on Tuesday morning I was called up.

EDMUND WARREN . I live in London-street, Ratcliffe, opposite of the prisoner's house, and about an hundred yards from Mr. Boulcotts, in a parellel street.

Q. On the morning of Tuesday, the 15th of May, did you see any thing opposite your house - A. I was standing at the corner of London-street, I saw a horse and cart coming down London-street, the cart was drawn by a grey or white horse, that cart came to a house opposite my house; I never saw the prisoner there, the back of the cart turned towards the street door, the man knocked at the door and took the staves out, I saw the carman take the staves from the door of that house. On the evening before I had heard that Mr. Boulcott had lost staves; I went to Mr. Boulcott's foreman.

Q. What time in the morning was this - A. About a quarter after six. The cart, when it was filled with staves, went down London-street; I followed the cart and saw it in the Commercial-road; I saw Mr. Hawkins, and sent him after it.

RICHARD KERR . I am a carman to Robert Hutchinson , Plantation-place, Commercial-road, he is a cooper.

Q. How long have you known the prisoner - A. About four months; he is a cooper, he lives in London-street.

Court. Has he the appearance of a cooper in his house - A. Yes, at the windows there are tubs and pails.

Q. On the evening of the 12th of May, did you see him at Hutchinson's - A. I did; he told me to look in on him, may be he might have a few staves for master. On Monday evening I called on him, I saw him, he told me to come the next morning with the horse and cart. I told him I would come in good time as master had ordered the horse to be ready for him to go out at eight o'clock; he said, he had a few staves for my master. I went the next morning, betwixt six and seven o'clock, to his house, I knocked at the door, Mr. Smith came to the door himself.

Q.(to Mr. Warren.) Describe whereabouts in London-street your house is - A. About four doors up.

Q.(to Kerr.) Is that opposite where the prisoner lives - A. Yes.

Q.(to Mr. Warren.) Have you been in the habit of seeing pails and tubs in the window - A. Yes.

Kerr. I knocked at the door, Smith handed me out the staves, I put them in the cart, I took them to Mr. Hutchinson's yard.

Q. What was the colour of the horse - A. A white horse. As soon as I got in the yard I got the horse ready for the chaise. I left the staves standing in the cart in the yard without the horse.

Q. How soon after you had taken the horse out of the cart did Mr. Boulcott's foreman come - A. About half an hour after Mr. Hawkins came. The staves were all in the cart then; I told him I brought them from Smith.

Q.(to Mr. Hawkins.) In consequence of information that you received, where did you go - A. I went immediately to Mr. Warren, and by his directions I went on the Commercial-road to Hutchinson's yard, there I found the cart in the yard with thirty-six staves in it. I looked round the yard, I saw an hundred staves fixed on a pile, which I recognised having lost from the wharf; and the thirty-six in the cart I knew directly when I saw them. I saw Mr. Hutckinson, and he sent for Kerr. Kerr went to the prisoner's house, he was not at home. About three quarters of an hour afterwards we took the prisoner at the King's Head, by Limehouse-corner. I asked him where he got the staves I found at Mr. Hutchinson's; he said, he had bought them of a master lighterman, he did not know his name. I then went with him to his own house; he said, he had four more staves of the same sort, which he had bought of the same man; he desired me to go and look at them; he found them and brought them to us, they had every appearance to be the same kind of staves, but no marks on them. I found thirty-six staves in the cart at Hutchinson's, sixteen of them were marked; they were Dantzic staves.

ROBERT HUTCHINSON . I am a master cooper.

Q. It was in your yard, we understand, these staves were found - A. Yes.

Q. What were you to give for the staves - A. I know nothing of them; I had given nothing for them. As soon as the staves were claimed I sent for my carman.

Mr. Alley. When Mr. Hawkins was at your premises, did he not say that he could not undertake to speak to them - A. Close to the side of the cart he saw the hundred that I bought the week before, he overhauled them and said, he could not find the brand marks. I examined them and found half a dozen that had the mark, there was no chalk mark at all, that was the hundred: with respect to the thirty-six in the cart, part of the thirty-six bore his mark that he could swear to, that is what he calls the ring.

JOSEPH BOULCOTT . Q. What is the value of these staves - A. Half a crown each is the least value.

Prisoner's Defence. I have no further to say, the chalk mark is my private mark in trade.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 33.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100606-114

516. ANN BARRY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of April , a gown, value 14 s. the property of William Gordon .

SARAH GORDON . I am the wife of William Gordon . I live at the corner of Gun-street, Mile-end New Town. On the 21st of April I lost my gown from Mrs. Cope's, the mantua-maker left it there for me.

CHARLOTTE COFE . I deal in rags. The mantuamaker brought a gown to me for Mrs. Gordon; it was left in the room adjoining the shop. The prisoner was a customer of mine, she came in my shop and staid half an hour. After she was gone, Mrs. Gordon called for her gown; I looked about, and it was gone. On Easter Monday I saw the prisoner with the gown on her back. I sent for an officer, and she was charged. I sent for Mrs. Gordon, she came and claimed her gown.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Fined One Shilling , and discharged.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100606-115

517. JOHN KING , alias PRICE , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of April , four pewter pint pots, value 4 s. the property of Stephen Woodward .

STEPHEN WOODWARD . I am a publican , I live at the Devonshire Arms, Duke-street, Portland-place .

Q. Did you lose any of your pots any time - A. Yes, four, I believe they were taken from my house, being all clean when they were found upon the prisoner.

JAMES COLLINS . I live in Denmark-street, St. Giles's, I am a sign painter. On the 21st of April, about half past seven o'clock in the evening, I was at work at the corner of Denmark-street, the prisoner passed by and dropped a pot, one of my men called after him, and said, master, you have dropped a pot, the prisoner went on, I am certain he heard, I pursued him and looked him in the face, I recollected that I had seen him before, I took him to the public house opposite, he had got one pot in his apron, and two pots tied with a string in his breeches, I picked up the pot that he dropped, the four pots had Mr. Woodward's direction on them.

Prisoner's Defence. I must leave it to your judgement and the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY , aged 53.

Confined Two Years in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100606-116

518. HANNAH BOOTH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of May , four iron shovels, value 2 s. the property of John Smith .

JOHN SMITH . I keep a broker's shop , No. 5, Osborne-street, Whitechapel . On the 4th of May, about two o'clock in the afternoon, I was at Mr. Allison's opposite of my house, I saw the prisoner and another woman standing at my door, the prisoner went away, and then I missed four shovels, I pursued her, and overtook her in Whitechapel; I took the shovels from under her cloak. The prisoner said, that a woman gave them to her.

Q.What became of the other woman - A. I do not know.

Q. What is the worth of your shovels - A. Four shillings. These are the shovels, they are mine.

Prisoner's Defence. As I was coming along the other woman said, hold these, go on, I will overtake you; I must go back for a candlestick.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined in Newgate One Week , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100606-117

519. EDWARD BIRT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of May , two saws, value 2 l. the property of Thomas Awbrey .

THOMAS AWBREY . I am a sawyer . On the 11th of May, after the hours of work, I left these saws in Mr. Mansfield's premises, Herbert-street . On the 30th of May, I saw my saw.

JOHN FOX. I am a sawyer. On Saturday the 12th of May, the prisoner came to me, he told me he was a carpenter, he asked me whether I wanted to buy a saw; I was at work at Mr. Parson's, New Inn-yard, Shoreditch, and whether he should bring it down to the pit; I told him no, if we did not agree about it he would have the trouble to carry them back; he said, he lived in Featherstone-street. I told him I would call up at breakfast time, and look at it, my son and I went at eight o'clock, it was a frame saw, I bought it of him for fifteen shillings, the next day he shewed me the other saw, it was a long saw, I gave him fifteen shillings for that, he told me the saws belonged to Thomas Hill he was gone to sea, his wife wanted him to sell them. On the 30th of May, an acquaintance of Awbrey's came by; and saw the saws, my son, and I were taken and committed to prison, and on the second hearing before the magistrate, we were discharged.

JOHN FOX, Jun. I am a sawyer, my father and I bought the two saws of the prisoner at his house in Featherstone-street, we gave him fifteen shillings a piece.

JAMES BARNARD . I am a sawyer, I worked with Awbrey. On the 11th of May I was at work with the saws, the saws were put into the shed, I know the saws well.

RICHARD REYNOLDS . I am a sawyer. On the 30th of May I saw the saws in the Foundling-field, where the two Fox's were at work, I told Awbrey of it.

JOHN HUTT . The Foxe's were given into my custody. They said, they bought the saws of a man in Featherstone-street, young Fox went with me and shewed me the place; after he was committed, to No. 14, Featherstone-street. In a back room these men were kept in custody pretty nigh a week, I went twice with Fox to the prisoner's lodgings, I saw the wife, and she gave me evasive answers; I left word with the wife that these two men were going into the country to cut some deals for me, and that if he would meet me at the Jacob's Well, and bring the saw box that belonged to the long saw, I would advance the money for them, as they were short of money that bait took; I waited there till about half past ten, the prisoner came to the Jacob's Well, I laid hold of him; I asked him if he did not sell two saws to Fox; he said, no, it was a friend of his that sold them that would be there presently; he denied his name being Birt.

Q. Did that friend ever arrive - A. No, I took him into the kitchen, and told him he had led two innocent men into an error though his bad conduct; he said, that he had them of a woman to sell, her husband was gone to sea; I asked him where that woman lived; he said, he should not tell me, then I immediately handcuffed him and brought him away.

Prisoner's Defence. This woman brought these tools to me on the Saturday morning.

Q. Is that woman here - A. No, they were brought to me where I live.

GUILTY , aged 34.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100606-118

520. JOHN CROSBY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 6th of June , a petticoat, value 7 s. a shift, value 2 s. and a towel, value 6 d. the property of William Claxton .

MRS. CLAXTON. My husband's name is William Claxton ; I live at the corner of White Hart-lane, Tottenham . On the 6th of June I had been out, when I returned Mr. Holmes came to my house with the prisoner; I went to my bundle of linen and perceived there was a shift, a petticoat, and a towel, gone; the constable shewed me the things, I knew them to be mine.

JOHN HOLMES . I am a constable of Tottenham. On the 6th of June I saw the prisoner coming along the street with a bundle under his jacket.

Q. Did you know the man at Tottenham - A. Yes, he gets his bread by thieving. I stopped him on suspicion; I took the bundle from under his arm; I asked him where he got them, he said what is that to you; I took him to the magistrate, he then said he had been to this woman's house, and by the magistrate's desire the prisoner shewed me the house and the room that he took them from.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

GUILTY , aged 50.

Whipped and discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100606-119

521. JAMES CALLAGHAN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 21st of May , a dollar , the property of Mary Crossland , spinster .

MARY CROSSLAND . At the time the dollar was lost I lived with Mrs. Reading, she keeps a wine vaults . On the 21st of May I paid this dollar to Mrs. Reading for rent; I laid it on the counter, she was there and thanked me, but did not take it up.

MARY READING . On the 21st of May, Mary Cropland paid me a dollar for rent; she laid it on the counter before me; I thanked her; the prisoner came in to shew me some fish, and at that time there were no other person besides the prisoner in the shop; he reached his arm over the place where the dollar was, and shewed me the fish on a platter.

Q. Was that platter held over where the dollar was - A. It was. There is a ridge all round the counter, it could not have fallen off. When the prisoner was gone I missed the dollar.

Q. How long did the prisoner continue with you - A. About three minutes. I could not go after him and leave the shop, my husband was out; about two minutes after my husband came in; I went after him, and came up to him; I accused him of taking the dollar; he said he had not seen a dollar to day; I told him he had better come back. He came back to my shop, and while he was standing in the shop, Mr. Man, who keeps the next wine vaults, came in, he went into the back parlour, beckoned us to come and speak with him; my husband went. Mr. Man said he took a dollar of the prisoner; we were persuaded to let him go and sell his fish, and in about three hours he was taken and committed.

WILLIAM MAN. Q. You keep a liquor shop in Gray's-inn lane - A. Yes.

Q. Did you come into Mr. Reading's shop while they were accusing this man of stealing a dollar - A. Yes; I told them the prisoner had left a dollar with me about a quarter of an hour before I went in; he had a glass of gin and left the dollar untill he had been round with his fish, and then he would return; he frequently left money; he is in the habit of taking a good deal of copper; he brings the copper and takes the silver away.

Q. How came you to go into Mr. Reading's shop - A. Mr. Reading came into my shop to see if he had been there.

JOHN MATTHEWS . I am an officer. I took charge of the prisoner; Mr. Man's wife gave me the dollar in the presence of Mr. Man. When I got the prisoner down to the office his brother in law came to him, he said, you had better pay the dollar back; he began to make an oath in the Irish language.

Q. to Mrs. Crossland. Was it such a dollar as that - A. I cannot speak to the dollar, it has the same appearance; it was not a very bright one.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent; I know nothing about it. I went to Mr. Low's house after I left Mrs. Reading, she came there to me and asked me for the dollar; I turned my pockets out in Mr. Low's house; Mr. Low said you had better go back and have yourself examined at Mr. Reading's house; I did, and was examined, and then they sent me about my business.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 46.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100606-120

522. ELEANOR CAIN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 17th of April , twenty-one yards of printed cotton, value 35 s. the property of Judah Wilkinson .

GEORGE WELLS . I am a shopman to Judah Wilkinson , Dartmouth-street, Westminster ; he is a linen-draper . On Tuesday morning, the 17th of April, from information, I went to the window and saw the prisoner take the print; I pursued her and brought her back to the shop with this print in her apron. It was hanging outside of the shop; I am sure it is my master's property.

Prisoner's Defence. I took this print up in my hand; I was going into the other door with it; he told me that was the wrong door; I went into the shop and put it on the counter, and he sent for a constable.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Fined 1 s. and discharged.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100606-121

523. GEORGE ALDRID was indicted for feloniously staling on the 25th of January , nineteen skins, value 6 l. 13 s. the property of Andrew Kaye .

Mr. Gleed, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100606-122

524. SARAH DAY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 22d of May , a pewter quart pot, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of John Wells .

JOHN WELLS . I am a publican in Clipstone-street, Mary-le-bone .

SARAH STEVENS. On the 22nd of May I was

coming in at the street-door, and behind the street-door I saw the prisoner, I asked her what she did there; she said she was tyeing her stocking; she then wanted to pass me with her gown under her arm; I saw the pot handle stick out; I asked her what she had got there; she replied, I am going to take it to Mr. Wells; I will give it to you.

Prisoner's Defence. I humbly implore your mercy in this my unfortunate situation.

GUILTY , aged 41.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100606-123

525. MARY ELGAR was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 30th of June , three blankets, value 20 s. a bolster, value 10 s. two sheets, value 10 s. a looking glass, value 4 s. two flat irons, value 2 s. a rug, value 2 s. a shovel, value 2 s. and a pain of tongs, value 2 s. the property of Anthony Potts , in a lodging room .

ANTHONY POTTS . I am a chandler ; I let lodgings; the prisoner had a ready furnished lodging of me, with all the articles mentioned in the indictment; she had a front garret at four shillings and sixpence a week; she lodged with me better than a twelvemonth. On the 17th of April I told her I should like to examine the bedding; I went to take the bedstead down, she then told me it was deficient of every thing; I said, you have not taken away my bed, have you; she said, yes. When I found all my things were gone I took her in custody; at the watchhouse she said I should find the duplicates in the room; I found all the duplicates, except of the bed, which was pawned for one pound five shillings, and when I went to the pawnbroker's it was taken out. I found all the property except the bed.

Q. How did she get her livelihood - A. She took in sewing.

JOHN BURTON . I produce the duplicates.

THOMAS NELSON . I am a pawnbroker. A bolster and two blankets were pawned with me in June, by whom I do not know.

JOHN BENNET. I am a pawnbroker. A looking glass, two flat irons, a rug, a blanket, tongs and a shovel, were pawned with me by the prisoner's daughter.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not mean to leave my lodgings untill I replaced them.

GUILTY , aged 48.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100606-124

526. JAMES CHRISTOPHER HARPER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 31st of March , ten yards of carpet, value 12 s. the property of William Mitchell .

LYDIA MITCHELL . I am the wife William Mitchell ; I live at No. 1, Union-street, St. Andrew's; I keep a broker's shop. I lost a stair case carpet on the 31st of March, and on she 31st of May I saw it at Mr. Cohen's.

BARNET COHEN. I am a broker, 40, Cow-cross. The carpet was in pawn for twelve shillings. I went with the prisoner to the pawnbroker's; the carpet was taken out, and then I bought it of him; I then put it out for sale openly.

Prisoner's Defence. I sold Cohen the ticket before I went to take it out; he told me he would buy any thing of me. I bought the carpet of a man in the street, I gave him ten shillings and two pints of porter; I did not know it was stolen. I kept counseller Stafford's house with my wife for fourteen years.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100606-125

527. DIANA SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 14th of May , a copper kettle, value 10 s. the property of Mary Hales .

MARY HALES . I am a laundress ; I live in Fig-lane, Highgate-road . On Monday, the 14th of May, I lost my kettle from a washhouse adjoining my room.

JOHN HUTT . I am an officer. I saw the prisoner in Edmond-street, by the Small pox hospital; she had a kettle; I knew her, and took it from her; I told her I would find the owner; I took her to the office.

Prisoner's Defence. In Kentish town I saw this kettle standing, no person was coming or going; I took and put it in my apron.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100606-126

528. THOMAS WALTERS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 24th of May , a pair of boots, value 1 l. 5 s. the property of John Wilson .

JOHN WILSON . I am a bricklayer ; I live at No. 4, Tennis-court, Middle-row, Holborn .

ANN BRIANT . I keep the house, No. 4, Tennis-court. On the 24th of May the prisoner came and asked for a lodging, and asked to look at it; I let him go up and look at it by himself; he went up in the two-pair, where two young men slept, he took these boots out of the two pair of stairs room, and nine-pence halfpenny out of a young man's pocket. A lodger of mine came in, I desired her to go up, she found him slipping down stairs with the boots under his coat; she catched hold of him; in the struggle he dropped one of the boots in the court; I cried out stop thief, and they stopped him; I took the other boot from under his coat.

JANE CLARK . When I came in Mrs. Briant said. I wish you would go up to see where that man is; I got one foot on the stairs, he was coming down stairs very softly indeed; I saw the boots under his coat; he told the landlady he would call again in half an hour; I let him go; he dropped one of the boots in the court. He ran into Middle-row, we cried out stop thief, a young man stopped him, and Mrs. Briant took the other boot from under his coat.

Prisoner's Defence. I am guilty of it. I was very poor at the time; I am very sorry that I committed any such thing.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100606-127

529. HANNAH ABBOTT was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 6th of June , four one pound bank notes, two two pound bank notes, and a five pound bank note , the property of William Barber .

WILLIAM BARBER . I am a gentleman's servant. On the 6th of June I met with the prisoner in the Haymarket, she persuaded me to go with her to

Parker's-rents, Westminster ; I went up stairs and stopped half an hour with her; I agreed to stop with her all night, and gave her half a crown; we both went to bed. After some time I found she was got up; I said, what is the reason that you get up, why do not you come to bed; she came into bed again. I was going to sleep, I found she had got up again; I followed her out naked; I found she had got my clothes and her own in the bottom room; she got out of the window. I lost a five pound note, two two-pound notes, and four ones.

Q. Are you sure that is the woman - A. Yes. She was taken that evening. I was with her about eight o'clock in the evening.

JAMES BLY . In consequence of information I apprehended the prisoner, she had her apron in her hand; in her apron were two-two pound notes, and four ones.

Prosecutor. I can swear to the endorsement on the notes.

Prisoner's Defence. Mr. Bly has known me a long while; he has never known any thing against me before.

Bly. The woman has been a long while in Westminster; she never was in my custody before.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined Fourteen Days in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100606-128

530. ANN GIBSON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 4th of June , a pewter pint liquor measure, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of Joseph Wells .

JOSEPH WELLS . I am a publican ; I keep the Grapes, in Fleet-market . I lost the measure on the 4th of June.

WILLIAM VINCENT . I keep an iron shop, No. 1, Great Saffron-hill. Last Monday week the prisoner brought me that measure to sell; I asked her how she came by it, she said that was not a fair question. I detained her and went to the office, Mr. Read came and took her.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I told him if he would go with me I would go to the person that gave it me.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100606-129

531. ELIZABETH KING was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 1st of May , fourteen yards of printed cotton, value 1 l. 8 s. the property of Charles Price .

HENRY POOL . I saw the prisoner take a piece of cotton that was hanging outside of the shop, and walk off with it, I called the boy that was in the shop, told him, and pointed out the woman to him. I am sure it is the same woman; she was taken immediately. She dropped the cotton when she was pursued about two or three doors from the house.

SAMUEL NEWMAN . I am an apprentice to Charles Price , linen-draper, 86, Oxford-street. Mr. Pool told me there was a woman stole the print; I pursued her; she threw the print down; I brought her back.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of what I am charged.

GUILTY .

Confined Fourteen Days in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100606-130

532. CATHERINE RICHARDS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 25th of April , a watch, value 2 l. the property of Thomas Fell , from his person .

THOMAS FELL . I am a day-labouring man . On the 25th of April I went into a gin shop, which I took to be a public house, to get some refreshment; the prisoner came and asked me to give her some of my meat and radishes, and she gave me a glass of rum; we came out, and she took me to another house and gave me another glass, and then she took me to another house, and there I had the third glass: she then took me to Newtoner's-lane , on a stair case and robbed me. When I came down stairs I was stopped, and she too; she was taken in custody by Mr. Warren; he asked me if I had lost any thing; I then found I had lost my watch, and seven shilling piece; she was taken to the watch-house and the watch was found under her arm.

JAMES WARREN . I am beadle of St. Giles's. On the 25th of April last I was sent for to take the prisoner and the prosecutor into custody for going into Mr. Willy's house and not giving any account of themselves The man was very tipsey, the woman was not. On the woman I found seven shillings and two-pence. The watch was found under the woman's arm by the prison keeper.

Prisoner's Defence. He told me to take care of his watch. I had a friend lived at No. 6, Newtoner's-lane; I made a mistake, and went to the wrong house.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100606-131

533. BRIDGET FEAROCK was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 5th of May , two silver table spoons, value 20 s. the property of Joseph Naldi .

MARY SHEEN . I am house-maid in Mr. Joseph Naldi 's family, he is a music teacher , No. 8, Piccadilly . On the 5th of May an acquaintance of mine, a cook, in Leicester-square, sent the prisoner to me and out of compliment to the cook, it being our dinner time. I desired the prisoner to go into the kitchen; I was busy, I left her in the kitchen. I had the plate under my care. She drank tea with me, and as soon as she was gone I missed the spoons. I went to my acquaintance, and at last found out the prisoner, and the duplicate was found on her.

JAMES BLAND . I am a pawnbroker, 185, Holborn. On the 5th of May the prisoner pledged a table spoon for ten shillings.

RICHARD LIMBRICK . On the 7th of April I apprehended the prisoner. On searching her I found a duplicate of a spoon; I asked her where she pawned the other spoon; she took me to a shop in Drury-lane, they produced the spoon.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence; called two witnesses, who gave her a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100606-132

534. SIMEON STAR was indicted for a misdemeanor .

JOHN BAKER . I am a clerk to Mr. Waterhouse, in the coach office, at the Swan and Two Necks, Lad-lane.

Q. In the month of February was the prisoner a porter employed at that inn for the delivery of parcels that came in at the coach office - A. He was.

Q. Have you any entry of a parcel directed to the commissioners of the customs - A. I have. This is the original book; it is called the porters book; the parcels that are delivered to the porters are entered in that book.

Mr. Alley. Is that your own entery - A. No; it is an assistant that is not there now.

COURT. That book is not your hand-writing - A. No, nor I never witnessed his writing, only a small mark as a delivery check; the defendant puts a small R, as received to the three shillings and two pence carriage, and sixpence porterage. I did not see him make the mark; it acknowledges the receipt of the parcel.

MARGARET HENDERSON . I am house-keeper to the customs.

Q. Do remember the prisoner bringing a parcel to the custom-house in February - A. I do not know that he brought it; I paid to some person what was on the ticket.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100606-133

535. SIMEON STAR was indicted for three misdemeanours, of similar offences .

The counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the defendant was

ACQUITTED .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100606-134

536. JAMES SCOTT was indicted for that he on the 8th of May , unlawfully, and against the will of Thomas Hankey , did put his hand into the coat pocket of the said Thomas Hankey , with intent the goods therein feloniously to steal .

THOMAS HANKEY . On the 8th of May last I was walking down Cheapside , I felt something touch my pocket, I suspected the prisoner; the prisoner followed me till I came to the end of Newgate-street, then I felt him put his hand into my pocket; I laid hold of him, and gave him in charge of the constable.

JOSEPH DOVE . I saw the prisoner in Newgate-street, he had another with him; he made an attempt to pick Mr. Hankey's pocket, he made the second attempt and then Mr. Hankey took hold of him; and instantly the man with him came sideways and drove Mr. Hankey, I suppose with intent to dislodge his companion; that man ran off.

Prisoner's Defence. As I was passing by this gentleman I might touch his pocket, but not with intention to pick his pocket; it was a very slippery day; I had no intention of the kind.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Confined One Month in Newgate , and Whipped in Jail .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100606-135

537. ANN SMITH was indicted for a misdemeanour .

SIMON IBBETT , I am foreman to Mr. Jefferies, No. 10, Barbican. On the 31st of May, about eleven o'clock, the prisoner came and asked for a pair of shoe strings, they came to two pence, she tendered to me a bad shilling; I then produced a counterfeit shilling that she had brought the over night, and went for a constable. I delivered the prisoner and the two shillings to the constable.

JAMES JEFFERIES . On the 30th of May the prisoner came into my shop for a pair of shoe strings, I served her, they came to two-pence; she gave me a shilling and I gave her change. I noticed a C upon it, and put it into my pocket; I had one other shilling in my pocket, that shiling had no mark upon it at all; she went away, and about six or seven o'clock the same evening she came in again for a pair of shoe strings; she was served with them, they came to two pence; she gave me a shilling, I gave her change; immediately upon her going I had a suspicion; I sent my man after her, he could not see her. The last shilling I kept in my hand, I compared it with the other shilling with the C, I discovered they were both counterfeits; I then put them in my pocket separate. I know this shilling with the C upon it to be the first shilling that the prisoner tendered to me. These are the shillings; the first shilling has a C upon it, and the third shilling a P. Sometime after the prisoner was gone a customer came into my shop, she wanted a sixpence in change of the article she purchased; I gave the first shilling with a C upon it to my man to get two sixpences; I saw the same shilling on the next morning, Mrs. Watts said it was a bad one, she brought it back to me. I knew it to be the first shilling tendered to me by the prisoner.

Q. to Ibbett. Your master has told us that he gave you the first shilling uttered with a C upon it, and you got two sixpences of Mrs. Watts - A. Yes; she refused it at the time. The same shilling that I received from my master I gave to Mrs. Watts.

MRS. WATTS. I live at the Still in Barbican; I received a shilling of Ibbett, I gave him two sixpences; I laid it by itself; afterwards I discovered it to be a bad one, it was marked with a letter C. I returned the shilling to Mr. Jefferies.

- SUNDERLAND. I am a constable. Ibbett gave me two shillings, and when the second examination was I had another shilling gave me by Ibbett.

Q. to Ibbett. Did you give the last shilling uttered to you to the constable - A. Yes; it has a letter P upon it.

CALEB EDWARD POWELL . Q. You are clerk to the solicitor of the mint - A. I am.

Q. You are acquainted with counterfeit coin - look at these three shillings - A. They are all three counterfeit.

Prisoner's Defence. I lived servant at Highgate. I was going for some things that I had left there, and going up Islington I picked up one of them shillings in paper; I went to that gentleman for a pair of shoe-strings, I did not know it was a bad one, he stopped me.

GUILTY , aged 16.

Confined Six Months in Newgate , and at the end of that time to find Sureties for Six Months to come .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100606-136

537. JOHN DALTON , alias WILLIAMS , was indicted for a misdemeanour .

ELENOR DENNIS. I am the wife of Robert Dennis , I live at the sign of the French Horn, Beech-street. On the evening of the 4th of February the prisoner and another person came to my house together, I served them with six glasses of port wine, it came to three shillings; the prisoner put down a seven shilling piece and told me to take the reckoning; I rung the seven shilling piece and weighed it, it was a good one, I put it back in my till and was going to give change, the other person put down a five shilling piece and said he would pay for it; Dalton said, give me back my seven shilling piece again; I returned him the same seven shilling piece, I had no other in the house. The crown piece laid on the counter, he took it off and said he would not pay for it; then Dalton gave me a seven shilling piece back again; I thought it was the same, I throwed it back in the till, I did not ring or weigh it. I had no other seven shilling piece in the house. I gave them their change and they went away. In less than two minutes after they went out I suspected them; I weighted the seven shilling piece. I found it was not the same, it was a bad one; I called my servant Rachel, I told her I took a bad seven shilling piece of the men that were drinking at the bar; I put the seven shilling piece in a bit of paper, delivered it to her, and directed her to go out of the house; she came back in two or three minutes; in the course of two or three days Dalton came to my house again, he had a glass of part wine: I took this seven shilling piece out of the till. I asked him if he knew it, he gave it me on the Sunday night, it was a bad one; he said he did not knew where he took it, and if I would let have it he would give me another for it; he had not one about him then; I would not let him have it. In a few weeks after Mr. Pugh came to me, and I found the prisoner in custody.

Q. To whom did you give the seven shilling piece that you received of the prisoner - A. To no one; it had not been out of my possession, only to my servant two or three minutes, except when the prisoner was in custody, I gave it to Mr. Pugh.

RACHEL SMITH . Q. On the 14th of February last do you recollect receiving a seven shilling piece of your mistress - A. Yes, and I returned the same seven shilling piece to her.

JOHN SANKEY PUGH. I am a constable. I received a seven shilling piece of Mrs. Dennis on the Sunday after the prisoner was apprehended; Mrs. Dennis marked it; I have had it ever since.

JANE THOMASON . I am the daughter of Ann Thomason , she keeps a porkshop in Grub-street. On the 12th of February, between seven and eight in the evening the prisoner came in and asked for a German sausage, it came to seventeen pence; he gave me a seven shilling piece: I weighted it, it was a good one; I had not silver enough, I called to my mother to give me some; she came into the shop; he then said, you need not trouble yourself, I can pay you without; he gave me a shilling and three pennyworth of halfpence, he said that would not pay seventeen pence, he must still have change; I returned him the shilling; he threw another seven shilling piece on the counter, towards my mother; I had been served so before; I pushed the weights towards my mother; she took the seven shilling piece and the weight into the kitchen to weigh it; she said this is not a good one; he then said, Ma'am, I'll give you another; mother said, no, he should not give her another; he said she had no right to detain his money; she said she would detain the money and him too; he went into the kitchen and endeavoured to wrest it out of her hand; he did not succeed. My mother delivered the seven shilling piece to Mr. Hedger.

ANN THOMASON . Q. You are the mother of the last witness - A. Yes. I took the seven shilling piece off the counter and took it into the kitchen to weigh it; I weighed it and found it not worth a farthing; I holloaed out, now you have given me a had one; he said. I will change it; I said you shall not change it; he ran into the kitchen and used great violence to get the seven shilling piece from me; I told him it was of no use, he should not have it. I gave the seven shilling piece to Mr. Hedger. I believe he tried to pass one with me before.

MR HEDGER. I am a constable. I was sent for upon this occasion; Mrs. Thomason gave me this seven shilling piece after she had marked it.

CALEB EDWARD POWELL . Q. I believe you are an assistant to the solicitor of the mint - Look at the first seven shilling piece uttered to Mrs. Dennis - A. It is a counterfeit, and the other is a counterfeit, they are of the same die.

GUILTY .

Confined One Year in Newgate , and to find sureties for Two Years to come .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100606-137

538. JOHN DALTON and HENRY WILLIAMS were indicted for a misdemeanour .

ELIZABETH COHEN . I am a widow, I keep a chandler's shop in Chapel-street, Grub-street. On the 24th of February, between ten and eleven in the evening, the prisoners came to my shop, Dalton turned himself round and said, I think we shall have some bacon; I said, I do not sell bacon, he said, never mind, we will have some cheese; they had half a pound, it came to five-pence halfpenny; Dalton put a seven shilling piece on the counter, I weighed it and found it to be a good one; he said, you seem to scruple it, you had better weigh it again; he kept it in his fingers and put down the same again, as I thought, but it was not the same; I said, there is no necessity of weighing it again. I gave him the change. Williams took the cheese. When they were gone I discovered the seven shilling piece to be a bad one. I have had the seven shilling piece in my possession ever since.

ANN LEWIS . I live at Mrs. Taboran's, Fore-street, she is a pastry-cook. On the 24th of February, the prisoners came to our house, Dalton said he would buy a cake; I served him with a cake, he gave me a seven shilling piece; I gave the same seven shilling piece to Mrs. Taborah, she said it was a very good one; then Williams said, I will have a cake too; then there was a dispute who should pay for it; I gave Dalton the seven shilling piece again, as there was a dispute; Dalton took the seven shilling piece and gave me another; I put it into the till. At that time three or four people came in and said, it these persons have had any thing they have been passing bad money. I then rung the seven shilling piece, I found it was a very bad one. I

am sure it was a different one from the first, it rung like a bit of lead. Mr. Pritchard the constable came and took him in custody.

JOHN PRITCHARD . I am a constable. I went to this house and took Dalton and Williams in custody; I searched them, I found on Dalton three crown-pieces, six shillings, half a crown, and three dollars. While I was searching him Williams was at the counter, William Young said he heard something drop, I looked and discovered four bad seven shilling pieces.

CALEB EDWARD POWELL . Q. Look at the first seven shilling piece uttered to Mrs. Cohen - A. That is a counterfeit; and the five are of the same die.

DALTON - GUILTY .

Confined One Year in Newgate , and at the Expiration of that time to find Sureties for two years to come .

WILLIAMS - GUILTY .

Confined Six Months in Newgate , and at the Expiration of that time to find Sureties for six months to come .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: o18100606-1

JOSEPH PEARCE and HENRY CLARK were put to the bar; Mr. justice Grose delivered the opinion of the Judges as follows; -

Joseph Pearce , you were convicted in April Sessions of stealing a pocket book, a handkerchief, and gloves; from the evidence it appears that the things were taken from the person of Charles Thompson by the prisoner, under such circumstances, and without such force as is sufficient to constitute the crime of robbery. In the statute the 49th of George the Third, it is enacted that every person who shall feloniously steal goods from the person of any other without their knowledge or not, and without any such force as is sufficient to constitute the crime of robbery, shall be transported beyond the seas for life, or for a term of seven Years, or to imprisonment only. That there was a felonious taking from the person in this case, without such force as is sufficient to constitute the crime of robbery, and it could only be punished as a common larceny, as the learned judges are of opinion; but as the learned judge who tried the man thought proper to defer the objection made by the counsel, to the opinion of the judges, whether it appeared in evidence that the things taken from the prosecutor were taken by the prisoner or accomplice, and whether the prisoner, under the statute of the 49th of George the Third could be convicted. The judges unanimously are of opinion that the prisoner, under these circumstances that appear in this case, might well be convicted. Looking in this case as it is laid in the indictment, and looking into the statute, it is clear that the Legislature did not mean to alter the law respecting robbery, they only meant to alter it from a capital offence to transportation for life, or to a term of seven years, or to imprisonment only, to be kept to hard labour. This statute not being meant to alter the law respecting robbery, describes it as taking from the person of another money or goods, whether privily, without his knowledge, or not without such force or fear as is sufficient to constitute the crime of robbery, leaving the event of taking with force punishable, as heretofore, by a capital conviction. This indictment, therefore, not containing a capital charge, it is not an indictment for robbery, it is an indictment for taking from the person, though there might be such force as might warrant a conviction for robbery, yet the prisoner could not be convicted of a capital offence. The judges are therefore unanimously of opinion, that the offence is well charged and may be punished by transportation .

Reference Number: o18100606-2

Henry Clark , in February Sessions you were charged with stealing a quantity of promissory notes, drawn upon stamped paper, stating them to be, in one count , the property of Messrs. Large and co. and in another, the property of Messrs. Brown and co. and in another, the property of Messrs. Waterhouse and co; and other counts charging the prisoner with stealing one hundred and thirty-five pieces of stamped paper. Upon looking at the facts stated in the case, it appears that Messrs. Large and co. corresponded with the house of Messrs. Brown and co.; that Messrs Large and co. lost all the notes that were paid at the house of Messrs. Brown and co.; and previous to the 2nd of January these notes were put into a parcel directed to Messrs. Large and co. Wotten Bassett, to be forwarded by the mail coach. On the 2nd of January they were received by the bookkeeper at the Swan and Two Necks inn, Lad-lane, directed to Messrs . Large and co. and were entered in the book; they were regularly forwarded by that bookkeeper. They did not arrive at Messrs. Large and co. this parcel was never received by them. By an act of parliament, they, as bankers, are permitted to reissue their notes for three years; and these notes having never been received by them, they have been under the necessity of issuing other notes, with other stamps; they would have reissued these notes, had they received them. The notes received by Messrs. Brown and co. in London must go back to Messrs. Large and co. at Wotton Basset, to be reissued; so that if they were stole in London, and never got back to Wotton Basset, they could not be reissued by them. By the evidence it appears several of the notes were traced to the prisoner. There was an objection made by the prisoner's counsel on each of the three last counts , of stealing the stamps, that these counts could not be maintained, because they were used; they were not saleable, nor where they convertable to any other purpose whatever, though the bankers reissued them; but that the paper and stamp upon which they were, were worth nothing. The question is , whether the paper and stamps are the subjects of larceny - whether they are the property of the persons mentioned in the indictment . The paper and stamps had belonged to, and did belong to Messrs. Large and co. which notes had been issued notes, and do not appear to have been issued more than once, and they were then of value to Messrs. Large and co. so long as they had not been issued three times . They were the goods of Messrs. Large and co. and which as such may be the subject of larceny, as well as other papers and stamps. It is enough if they are chattels valuable to the possessor, it is not necessary that they should be valuable to other persons. They are of value to Messrs. Large and co. to the price of the stamp, so they are the subject of larceny, and therefore the conviction is good.


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