Old Bailey Proceedings, 11th April 1810.
Reference Number: 18100411
Reference Number: f18100411-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE OYER AND TERMINER, AND GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND ALSO THE GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, HELD AT Justice-Hall, in the Old Bailey, On WEDNESDAY the 11th of APRIL, 1810, and following Days;

BEING THE FOURTH SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF The Right Honourable THOMAS SMITH , LORD-MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY JOB SIBLY, FOR R. BUTTERS, No. 117, ALDERSGATE-STREET.

LONDON:

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED (BY THE AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON By R. BUTTERS, No. 22, Fetter Lane, Fleet Street.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON.

Before the Right-honourable THOMAS SMITH , Lord Mayor of the City of London; The Right-Hon. Edward Lord Ellenborough , Chief Justice of His Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir Alexander Thompson , knt. one of the Barons of his Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir Soulden Lawrence , knt. one of the Justices of his Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir William Curtis , Bart. Sir John Eamer , knt. Sir William Leighton , knt. Aldermen of the said City; John Silvester , esq. Recorder of the said City; Claudius Stephen Hunter , esq. Christopher Smith , esq. Aldermen of the said City; and Newman Knowlys , esq. Common-serjeant of the said City; His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of Goal Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

London Jury.

James Panrucker ,

William Brace ,

Peter Lake ,

James Furness ,

Jonathan Millard ,

William Cuff ,

Henry Madgin ,

Edward Kidder ,

James Stock ,

William Davis ,

Edward Bgg ,

Henry Batley .

First Middlesex Jury.

Ambrose Evered ,

John Searl ,

Henry Molloy ,

William Robertson ,

James Martin ,

George Duckitt ,

James Brown ,

William Taylor ,

Robert Robertson ,

James Butterworth ,

John Franks ,

William Leighs .

Second Middlesex Jury.

Samuel Slyde ,

Thomas Beane ,

Thomas Mills ,

John Dwerryhouse ,

Peter Macknocken ,

George Warring ,

Alexander Anderson ,

Harry Criddel ,

Richard Davies ,

Edward Orme ,

William Tarner ,

Richard Otley .

Reference Number: t18100411-1

262. HENRY LAZURUS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 11th of January , two umbrellas, value 18 s. the property of Thomas Godwin .

THOMAS GODWIN . I live at No. 10, Tottenham-court-road ; I am an umbrella maker . On the 11th of January I was at work in my shop, about four o'clock in the afternoon; my wife observed two men make a halt before the door, she said there were some customers coming into the shop; I saw the prisoner at the same time take hold of the two umbrellas, he unhooked them off the hooks and walked away with them deliberately; I pursued him and brought him back to the shop door; he then threw the umbrellas down. He said he was going to look at them; he went away from my shop about thirty yards with them. My apprentice girl took the umbrellas up; these are them; they are mine.

Prisoner's Defence. The crime I now stand indicted for I was led to believe I was totally clear of, as I was in custody for it in January sessions, and was discharged from the sessions house, Clerkenwell.

Q. to Godwin. How came you not to prosecute last January - A. That was owing to the mistake of the officer; he got the bill of indictment the day before the sessions ended; he said if he was not tried that sessions, he would put a note in to detain him; I believe that was not attended to.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100411-2

263. JOHN ADAMS was indicted for that he on the 8th of January , upon Mary Dellar , spinster , violently and feloniously did make an assault, and her, the said Mary Dellar , against her will and consent, did ravish and carnally know .

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18100411-3

264. MELINDA MAPSON was indicted for that she on the 10th of February , about the hour of twelve, in the night of the same day, being in the dwelling house of William Dignam , two shifts, value 5 s. the property of Margaret Garey ; - a tablecloth, value 5 s. a silk handkerchief, value 3 s. a gown, value 10 s. a silver punch ladle, value 12 s. a shift, value 3 s. a counterpane, value 5 s. a silver table-spoon, value 10 s. and a pelisse, value 20 s. the property of the said William Dignam, feloniously did steal, and that she did afterwards burglariously break to get out of the same .

WILLIAM DIGNAM . I live at No. 5, New-street, Covent Garden, in the parish of St. Martin's in the Fields .

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. I do. On the 10th of February, 1809, about a quarter past nine at night, she came into my service.

Q. Who was the last up in the house that night - A The prisoner was. I came home about a quarter on twenty minutes past eleven; the prisoner let me in. I secured the house, and at the same time I said young woman, I suppose your mistress has told you where to sleep, go down stairs and put the fire out, and then go to bed. We had no lodgers in the house, nobody but my wife, me, and her. I did not see her after; I went to bed directly.

COURT. Was your wife in bed before you - A. Yes. On the next morning I got up about a quarter before seven, my wife was up first; when I came down the prisoner was gone; I missed a time piece and a basket of clothes.

Mr. Knapp. In consequence of the prisoner being gone, and you missing the property you set about making an enquiring - A. Certainly.

Q. How could the prisoner have got out of the house - A. She must have unfastened the door.

Q. Did you fasten the door - A. Certainly; with a chain and a bolt at the top and bottom; the locked tried, I found it had been hampered.

Q. Then the security of the door arose from the chain and two bolts - A Yes. There was no outer door to the house; the windows were all secured.

MRS. DIGNAM. I am the wife of the last witness. The prisoner came into my house on Friday night, about the 10th of February, 1809; my husband was gone out; he returned about a quarter past eleven; I went to bed about ten o'clock, leaving the prisoner up; there was no other person in the house but she and me; I gave her directions what she was to do in the morning, shewed her her sleeping place, and told her to stay up till her master came in, and I told her to come to me about a quarter before seven in the morning.

Q. At the time that you went to bed did you observe the state of the windows - A. They were all fastened before she came.

Q. How was the door fastened before you went to bed - A. Only with a spring lock; there was a key in the door.

Q. Did you try at that time, or before, whether it would lock - A. In the course of the day, when the servant maid went in and out, the door locked very well; I never found any difficulty in locking the door before that time. On the next morning I awoke about six o'clock; she was to call me about a quarter before seven; I waited till the time; I found she did not come and then I rang the bell; I got out of bed and called her several times, she did not answer me; I went up into her bed room, she was not there; I missed the sheets from her bed, and on my going down stairs to the kitchen I found the street door open; I went down into the kitchen, there was a candlestick on the table, the candle had burned down in the socket, and the grease had run about on the table; the fire was nearly out; it appeared as if there had been a fire all night; I missed a basket of small linen that had been standing on the table in the kitchen; I had been in the kitchen with the servant until I went to bed, and then I left that basket there; I missed same linen out of a pan, and a large counterpane from the kitchen, and two pair of boots, and a drawer was broken open in the kitchen; I missed out of that drawer, tea, sugar, soap and candles; I went up stairs and told my husband that the servant was gone, and the street door was open. He came down stairs and opened the shutters of the first floor; we missed a basket of linen from out of the dining room, it contained sheets and table linen; we

missed a silver punch ladle, three silver table spoons, four silver tea spoons, a silver caddie shell, and a pair of silver sugar tongs; I went from there up into the garret, and missed the curtains from off the bed.

Q. Where were these things put in the dining room - A. In the knife case; I had used them that very day.

Q. Who is Margaret Garey - A. The servant that left me the same day; her box was broken open; she left her box till she had and opportunity of taking it away. I missed several tablecloths, four silk handkerchiefs, and ten gowns.

MARGARET GAREY . Q. You were a servant to this lady - A. Yes.

Q. Upon your going away we understand the prisoner succeeded to the service - A. Yes. I went away on Friday the 10th.

Q. Did you stay till the prisoner came in the service - A. No; I went away about ten minutes before nine; I left my box in my bed room where I slept, I was to call again for it on the Saturday. I returned on Saturday, and my box was broken open; I missed my clothes to the amount of fifteen guineas; there were six gowns, five petticoats, six pair of stockings, and five shifts.

Q. How lately had you seen them - A. I locked my box at eight o'clock; I tried it, and it was locked.

Q. Have you ever seen any of your property since - A. Yes.

JOSEPH SNOW . I am a constable and patrol of Newington parish. In consequence of information I apprehended the prisoner on the 21st of December last at the Waggon and Horses, Newington. I had been searching for her before several times at different places, I could not find her. When I apprehended her I searched her and found a red pocket book in her pocket, in the pocket book I found some duplicates; I delivered the woman and the pocket book to my father, Thomas Snow . I asked the prisoner when I took her if she knew Mr. Dignam, No. 22, New-street, Covent Garden; she said she knew nothing of him, nor any thing of the kind; I told her that I wanted her for a robbery that she had committed there. The next morning I went to Mr. Dignam and ordered him to attend at the office.

THOMAS SNOW . I am a constable belonging to Newington. My son delivered the prisoner to me, and the pocket book, on the 21st of December last. I have a number of duplicates, three of them lead to the property that is found in the indictment. I gave these three duplicates to my son, he went to the pawnbrokers with them, and afterwards delivered them to me.

Q. to Joseph Snow. We understand that your father gave you were three duplicates - A. Yes. I went to Mrs. Dignam, and with her I went to Mr. Dexter's, in Whitechapel-road, Mr. Matthew's in the Minories, and Mr. Obee's High Holborn.

THOMAS DEXTER. I am a pawnbroker; I live in Whitechapel-road.

Q. Look at that duplicate - A. This is a duplicate of a handkerchief pledged on the 18th of March, 1809, pledged in the name of Mary Green, and a tablecloth pledged on the 8th of April, 1809, in the name of Ann Green. I have no recollection of the person that pledged them.

CHRISTIAN SMITH MATTHEWS. I live in the Minories; I am a pawnbroker. This is a duplicate of mine for a gown, pledged on the 6th of December, 1809, in the name of Mary Mapson ; I think it was the prisoner.

JOHN WILLIAMS . I am a pawnbroker; I live at Mr. Obee's, High Holborn. I have a punch ladle and a counterpane, pledged in the name of Mary Fuller , on the 13th of February, 1809, and three shifts on the 11th of February, 1809. It was a woman that brought them; I have no recollection of her. They were claimed by Mrs. Dignam.

Snow, jun. I have a spoon delivered to me by Mr. Rossiter, a pawnbroker, in Blackfriers-road. He was not bound over to appear.

Mrs. Dignam. The handkerchief found at Mr. Dexter's is mine; I lost four; this is one of them; the tablecloth and gown produced by Mr. Matthews is mine, this petticoat is mine, and one of the shifts found at Mr. Obee's is mine; the other two belongs to the servant; the punch-ladle and counterpane is mine. I lost ten gowns, only one is found.

Margaret Garey . The two shifts are both mine, they are marked P. G. I am sure this red silk handkerchief is my mistress; it is my working.

Q. to Mrs. Dignam. All these things that are found what value do you put upon them - A. I think they are worth more than forty shillings.

Q. Whereabouts was the value of all the property that you lost - A. I value them at thirty pounds.

Q. You described the candle to have been burned out - A. Yes; the candlestick stuck to the table with grease, apparently as if it had been burned out for three hours; it was quite cemented to the table with grease; it had ran over in that way.

Q. What time did you get up in the morning - A. About a quarter before seven. I did not miss the curtains from the bed when I first went into the servant's room; it was not light enough to see without a candle.

Q. Was it light enough to see any person out of doors - A. Yes, out of doors I could, but in doors I could not see any thing without a candle. We did not miss any thing out of the house until we opened the shutters.

Q. When you first went down was it light enough, supposing the shutters to have been down, to see what was missing without a candle - A. No; not when I first went down.

Q. You described the door to be open - A. Yes, it was; it was put to but not shut.

Q. Supposing the door to have been wide open would it have been light enough to distinguish the person of a man - A. Yes, certainly.

Q. This property being taken by whom it would, must take a great deal of time - A. Yes; I suppose it must have taken the whole night; there were different drops of tallow grease at different parts of the house, where the property was taken away.

Q. You described the drawers which appeared to have been broken open - A. Yes; the wood work had been cut away at the top and bottom. On the dresser there was tallow grease dropped, and particularly where she broke the maid's box there was tallow grease dropped.

Q. to Margaret Garey . When you were in the service was it your duty to fasten the door of a night - A. Yes, I always found it locked perfectly easy.

If there had been any injury done to the lock it must have been occasioned after eight o'clock; I came in and unlocked the door at my return, and found no difficulty whatever.

COURT, to Mrs. Dignam. What makes you say it was a quarter before seven when you came down - A. I had a clock in the room; it was a quarter before seven, or rather earlier. I was awake at six, and heard the clock strike.

Prisoner's Defence. I went to Mr. Dignam's house as a servant ; I had been in the house about an hour when Mr. Dignam came home; Mrs. Dignam was gone to bed; Mr. Dignam told me to go down stairs and put the kitchen fire out, but the door was never fastened; Mr. Dignam went to bed and left me in the kitchen; there was some one knocked at the door; I opened the door; it was my husband; he swore if I resisted in letting him come in he would take my life, accordingly he came in, and my fright was so great that I went out of the house, and went to my lodgings near Temple Bar. He brought the property in question home, and made away with it as he thought proper. After that I left London; and after that I came back to London I went to the Waggon and Horses, Newington, where I saw Mr. Snow; he told me he would search me; I voluntary gave him the pocket book that he has got in his possession, there was the ticket of the gown and the tablecloth, but the handkerchief in question is not theirs; he told me if I confessed where any of the property was Mr. Dignam would forgive me, and let me go; I did as far as I know, as my husband had told me where it was.

Q. to Mrs. Dignam. When you took this woman into your service did you understand her to be a married woman - A. Yes; she told me her husband was at sea, and he allowed her four shillings a week.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 30.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson .

Reference Number: t18100411-4

365 JANE MOORE was indicted for that she on the 10th of October , feloniously did receive a coat, value 5 s. two tablecloths, value 12 s. two pair of stockings, value 3 s. three shirts, value 15 s. and two yards of flannel, value 12 s. the property of James Jackson ; - whereof Margaret Craig was, at the General Quarter Sessions of the peace for the County of Surrey, on the 3d of January last, convicted of feloniously stealing, she well knowing them to have been stolen .

THOMAS DEXTER. I produce a copy of the record of the conviction of Margaret Craig , from Horsemonger sessions-house; I examined it with the record; it is correct. (The copy of the record read.)

JOSEPH JACKSON. Q. What do you know of this woman receiving any of these things whereof Margaret Craig was found guilty of stealing - A. On the 14th of October last we got a search warrant and went to the prisoner's husband's house in Stepney Green; the prisoner lived in it; the house is in Stepney Green, we found her there. On searching her house we found a coat and some flannel, and a duplicate of the shirts; the coat and the flannel were in a box in the bed-room, and the duplicate was in a small tin box, in a larger one, in the cupboard, in the bed room. She denied that the things were my father's, (his name is James Jackson) she said her husband bought them at Liverpool, and from there brought them to London. We took her with us to Mr. Dexters in Whitechapel-road, the pawnbrokers, we found the shirts marked James Jackson.

Q. Who had the care of the things on the trial of Mary Craig - A. I had; these are the things. I produced them on the trial of Mary Craig ; they were the subject of the trial of Mary Craig , for the stealing of which she was convicted. When the prisoner was at the pawnbrokers the prisoner said, her daughter, Mary Craig , gave them her. Her daughter lived servant with my father.

Q. She first said her husband bought them at Liverpool, and brought them from there, and then at the pawnbrokers she said that her daughter gave them to her as a present - A. Yes.

Q. to Mr. Dexter. Were you present at any time when she stated how she came by these things - A. Yes; I was present when she said in my shop, that her daughter gave them her.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

GUILTY , aged 37.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18100411-5

366. REBECCA GOODYEAR was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 24th of October , a shirt, value 7 s. two pair of stockings, value 4 s. four yards of cotton, value 10 s. a tin box, value 2 d. and fifty pawnbrokers duplicates, value 1 s. the property of William Thompson .

MARY ANN THOMPSON . The prisoner used to work for me last summer, at my house in David-street, Grosvenor-street; I sent her home with a gown to one of Mrs. Johnson's shop-women, in Union-row, Chelsea. The prisoner was in the hospital when I found her; when she came out she came to my house, I was then removed into Berwick-street, Soho; she was in a distressed state; I gave her a shilling and a pair of shoes. I had occasion to go to some of my duplicates in a tin box, she was very assiduous in looking over them; she said, I am very sorry for you now, I knew you when you had all these things about you. She went out with me.

Q. Did you go to any of the shops where these things were pawned - A. Yes, to one of them. and she wished me good night at the top of Davey-street, and told me she was going home. When I came home I asked my landlady for my key, she said, it was in my door; she said my husband's sister had come back and got the key of her, as she said she had left her key on my table. When I went into my room the first thing I missed was a piece of cotton, about four yards and a half, it was what had been left for me to make up, and a new pair of stockings that I had been shewing to her; the next thing I missed was a shirt and a shift; my duplicates I missed the next day; I went to the pawnbrokers and found all my things were redeemed; I never found any of these articles. When she was taken nothing was found upon her but two of my gowns, that had been in pledge. She stole the duplicates and the tin box.

Q. You lost them, on what day - A. On the day after the Jubilee day. She came for the key the same night, Mrs. Bailey, my landlady, gave it her. I am sure I left the things in the apartment before I went out.

Mrs. BAILEY. Q. Do you remember the prisoner coming and getting a key at your house. - A. Yes; it was a very short time after Mrs. Thomson went out; she said she had left her key in the room.

Q. Did she say she was the husband's sister. - A. Yes, I understood her so; I gave her the key; I did not see what she brought out; nobody went up but her; she staid there but a short time.

JAMES GILLMORE. I belong to the Public Office, Queen-square. I searched the house where the prisoner was taken, and in the water-butt I found two gowns.

Q. That is not in this charge. - A. She owned to the tin-box; and the duplicates, she said, she had put in her bosom; but she was so drunk she did not know what had become of them.

Prisoner's Defence. - When I first went to live with this person, she hired me, to work for her. She was a person on the town, and I went with her; she wore my gowns, and I wore her's; and part of these duplicates the clothes belonged to me. I asked her to give me the duplicates; she refused giving them me; she asked me to go out with her; she had another woman with her at the time I went out with her. I had left my key in her room on the table: I said, Mrs. Thompson, I forgot my key; she said, go and get it. I asked the landlady for the key; she saw me go out; I was very ill; I had lost the use of my limbs; I heard that she had a charge against me; I went and delivered myself; she has been the ruin of me entirely.

GUILTY,

Of stealing the tin box only, value Two Pence .

Fined 1 s. Confined Six Months in the House of Correction .

First Middlesex Jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18100411-6

367. MARGARET FITZGERALD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of March , two teapots, value 9 s. and a tea-pot-stand, value 1 s. the property of William Davenport , privately in his shop .

WILLIAM DAVENPORT . I keep a cutlers and japan shop , 25, Queen-street. Westminster . On the first of March, about two o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner came into my shop; I was in my back-room; I came out immediately; she had her hands upon some japan tea pots; the tea pots were standing on a shelf; she asked me the price of one that she had in her hand. I told her the price was six shillings; she said it was a great deal of money; I told her it was very cheap for those who wanted to purchase. I immediately missed two out of the five that were placed there. I told her I could sell her one in her handkerchief for much less.

Q. Where was her handkerchief at the time. - A. She had it before her; it was a bundle handkerchief. She said what do you mean; I told her she had got my property in her handkerchief. I put my hand upon the handkerchief, and felt the tea-pots; I then attempted to take the handkerchief; she resisted; I took it from her, and sent for a constable; she was taken into custody; the tea pots were taken before a magistrate, and deposited in the constable's possession.

Q. Then you did not see her put these into her handkerchief. - A. No, I did not see her at all.

Q. How many tea pots were there on the shelf - A. There were three left; two were missing; I had placed five there in the morning. I gave the handkerchief, containing the two pots to my daughter; she placed them on the counter; the handkerchief was not opened till the constable came, and the tea pots were delivered to him.

RICHARD WESTBROOK . I am a constable; I apprehended the prisoner in Mr. Davenport's shop. I opened the handkerchief, and found these two tea pots in it.

Prisoner's Defence. I leave myself to the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY, aged 27.

Of stealing to the value of Four Shillings and Ten-pence only .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson .

Reference Number: t18100411-7

368. JAMES CAREY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of February , one hundred glass bottles, value 10 s. twenty-three silver forks, value 20 l. thirty-three table spoons, value 10 l. and two silver salts, value 1 l. the property of Arthur Noble , esq. in the dwelling-house of Edward Gill .

ARTHUR NOBLE , esq. The prisoner, James Carey , lived servant with me two years and five months, as a servant out of livery . He had the charge of my plate; he eloped from my service on Friday the 23d of February last; I then missed plate that had been in his possession, to the value of 31 l.

Q. Has any of it been afterwards seen. - It has not; and I have likewise lost wine out of my cellar that has not been found since. He has stolen empty bottles, and sold eight dozen and a half of empty bottles; I did not know what had become of these empty bottles till after he had eloped from my service.

WILLIAM MATTHEWS . I was a servant to Mr. Rye, but I have left him. At the time I received the bottles, I was a servant to him.

Q. What quantity did you receive from the prisoner. - A. Eight dozen and a half. The prisoner took the bottles from a room below in the pantry, in the house where Mr. Noble lodged.

Q. What time of the day did you take them. - A. About twelve o'clock, I believe; Mr. Rye paid eleven shillings and sixpence for them; the prisoner told me that was the price, and asked me whether I had brought the 11 s. 6 d. with me; I told him no. He said he was to have it; however, he let me have the bottles without my giving him the money.

Q. to Mr. Noble. Whose house was it. - A. David Gill 's; in the parish of St. James's, I believe.

EDWARD RYE . I am a victualler.

Q. You bought some bottles of the prisoner, did not you. - A. I could not possibly recollect the prisoner. A young man called at my house, and asked me if I was a buyer of bottles; I told him I was; he told me they were at the corner of Clement's-street and Cox-street; it was the corner-house; I cannot recollect the day of the month; he wanted me to send somebody with him. I did not send my servant on that day; he called in a few days afterwards. I do not say it is this man.

Q. to Matthews. Was it the prisoner that delivered the bottles to you. - A. It was another man came for me. The prisoner took the bottles out of the pantry, and gave them to me.

Mr. Rye. He called a few days afterwards, or some person called; I sent that boy with the person that

called. I think I paid the eleven shillings and sixpence to the prisoner; here is a witness that saw me pay it.

GEORGE MARTIN . I saw James Carey , he prisoner, receive a five shilling piece, two or three shillings, and some odd halfpence, of Mr. Rye; he had a quartern of shrub and a glass of peppermint, and left sixpence for Matthews. The prisoner asked me if I would go to the top of the street with him. I was going out for oil for Mr. Gill's lamps; I went with him; I heard Mr. Rye say, this is the money for the bottles; I saw Matthews fetch the bottles away in a basket.

Mrs. BARTLETT. I lived in the family for six months; I live with Mr. Noble now; the prisoner had all the plate in his care; he went away on Thursday night the 20th of February; we missed these articles after he was gone; one dozen and eleven forks, two dozen table spoons, two large gravy spoons, two salts, and one sauce spoon; and none of them had been seen since.

Q. Had you any conversation with the prisoner. - A. Yes; some time before he went, he said there was a method of disposing of plate that had a crest upon it; he said there was a shop in the city; whoever made off with plate, there was a hole you put it down, and it was melted off; and when the plate was weighed you go in and receive the money. We missed the plate about three hours after he was gone; he went out on Thursday night, and came on Friday morning, and stopped till between seven and eight o'clock.

Mr. Reynolds. You never told any body of this conversation between the prisoner and you till after he was taken up. - A. No, I never mentioned it till Mrs. Noble asked me if I had heard him mention any thing of disposing of things at the pawnbroker's.

Q. He came again on the Friday morning. - A. Yes, on the morning he asked me to go into the pantry with him, to see that he took nothing but his own.

Q. You did not know then but that he was going away. - A. I did not know but what he was coming back again, as he had not received his wages. He took a pair of gloves out of the pantry, and his razors; he locked the cupboard-door and the door of the pantry, and left both the keys on the dressers of the kitchen; then he went out.

MARTHA GREAVES. I brought the keys down from Mrs. Noble's dressing-room, to give them to Carey. I carried them up to my mistress the night before.

Q. Have you usually done so. - A. No, I have never done so before; I locked up the cupboard-door that night; I did not see whether there was any plate there. I saw a few dirty forks there the next morning.

Q. to Prosecutor. Had he been paid his wages at the time that he eloped from your service. - No; he ran off to Bath, where he was apprehended about ten days after he eloped.

Q. Do you know whether there was any plate in the cupboard in which the dirty plate was not kept. - A. He had a separate cupboard and a trunk with lock and key to keep the clean plate in, not in the pantry. It was in a cupboard in my dressing-room; he had always the key of that in his possession; he left that key behind him. In the morning when I got up, I made a search after the plate; I had an inventory of the plate that I gave to him when I hired him.

Q. How lately had you seen any of that plate which you found upon examination missing - A. About two months before they were in the house; I had a good deal of company; I found no defalcation then; about two months before I think the plate was all in the house; there was missing one dozen and eleven silver forks, worth twenty pounds at least, two dozen silver table spoons, two large gravy spoons, two sauce spoons, and two salts; I value them at thirty-one pounds; all was gone from that cupboard.

Q. You do not know of the removal of any part of this place from the house of Mr. Gill - A. No; I thought it was in his possession.

Q. Do you know till the next morning that he had been out that night - A. The maid told me that night that he was then out; I believe it was about eleven o'clock; I intended to discharge him; he had been so beastly drunk that night. I expected him to return the next morning to receive his wages.

Q. to Martha Greaves. Did your mistress discharge him - A. No.

Q. Did she threaten to discharge him - A. Yes. On the Thursday night Mrs Noble bid him go to bed: he said he would not.

Mr. Reynolds, to prosecutor. I think you say about two months ago you had this party, you saw all this plate - A. Yes.

Q. Whether it was all there you do not know - A. I saw salts and spoons sufficient for fourteen people.

Q. Is there any one separate article of these silver things that is worth more than forty shillings - A. No, I do not think it is.

Q. And if he had been so of a mind he might take these things one at a time - A. He might; I cannot say he did not.

Q. What part of Mr. Gill's house had you - A. The first floor, a drawing room, and a dressing room, and in the dressing room there was a closet, in which closet there was a chest that kept this place; this man had always the key.

Q. Mr. Gill and his wife keeps a fancy dress maker's shop - A. Yes.

Q. When you and Mrs. Noble went out you did not lock the door did you - A. I did not.

Q. There was an opportunity if persons went to Mrs. Gill they might go up stairs - A. It was not impossible.

Q. Did not the rest of the servants know that the plate was kept there - A. They might; both the women witnesses say they did not.

COURT. When you looked at the lock did it appear to have been forced - A. No, not at all forced; it was locked and opened as usual. All the plate was not gone; a silver tea-pot was left, and a silver coffee-pot, and a plated tea-urn, and there were some spoons left; he had three dozen forks, he took one dozen and eleven.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing at all of the plate that I am accused of. At half past eleven o'clock, when I took up Mr. Noble's supper I found Mrs. Noble in the pantry, she said, you wretch, I shall take the key away, you have broke all my china. The bottles that I am accused of, they did not belong to Mr. Noble, the bottles belonged to me and Mr. Gill's lodgers. I have lived there two years and a half, there were several bottles sent me while I was there, and a few of the bottles, some families that were there, they left them, and my friends sent me a bottle of rum and a bottle of

blacking.

Q. to prosecutor. Did you miss any bottles - A. I did; bottles and wine, and they were particular bottles; I had some port wine from Ireland; they are smaller than English bottles.

Q. How many guineas were due to the prisoner - A. I suppose between five and six guineas.

GUILTY, aged 34.

Of stealing to the value of thirty-nine shillings only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18100411-8

369. JAMES BUTCHER and ANN BUTCHER were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 8th of March , two beds, value 10 l. three looking glasses, value 3 l. three sets of bed furniture, value 5 l. a blanket, value 1 s. and a gown, value 2 s. the property of Louisa Atkins , spinster , in her dwelling-house .

LOUISA ATKINS . I am a single woman; I have a house in Downing-street, St. Margaret's, Westminster .

Q. Did you reside there at the time that you lost the things out of the house - A. No; the last time that I slept in the house was on the Jubilee night; since that night I have not slept there. The prisoner lived servant with me two months before her husband came home, and when he came home I gave him leave to be there. The prisoner left my service in January, and they left my house on the 1st of March; I went to my house on the Monday following; I know every thing was safe at five o'clock in the afternoon; I locked up the house; then I went to Cork-street to my mother, and on Thursday I learned from my mother that the house had been robbed.

Q. In consequence of that information did you go there - A. Yes, on Friday; I went there with Gillmore the officer; I discovered two feather beds gone, three looking glasses, two of them swing looking glasses, a counterpane, a blanket, a gown, and three sets of bed furniture.

Q. Those things you missed, how lately had you seen them before - A. Not since the Monday I was there. I have not recovered any of the property since.

Q. Had you ever lived in this house yourself - A. Yes. I had rented it two years last November; the last time I slept in it was the night of the illumination; I had not slept in the house before that time for a twelvemonth Mr. Templer lived in it a twelvemonth; it had been shut up for a twelvemonth prior to the illumination night, except a fortnight, it was let as a lodging house. Butcher and his wife went to live in it about the 21st of January. I considered Cork-street my home; I slept in Cork-street a twelvemonth, except on the Jubilee night. It is my house in Cork-street.

ANN HICKMAN. I live in Downing-street, two doors from Mrs. Atkins house.

Q. Do you know the two prisoners - A. I know them both by sight. On the 6th of March I was looking out of the two pair of stair window, about twelve o'clock in the day; I saw a hackney coach stand in the gateway of the stable-yard that goes, into the Treasury; I saw the prisoners come from under the gateway and put some things into a hackney coach; a bird cage, a swing glass, and a cat. Mrs. Atkin's back door comes out into that stable-yard.

JOHANNA HICKMAN . I am daughter of the last witness; I saw the two prisoners first, and called my mother. I saw a coach standing in the gateway; it was Wednesday or Thursday the 5th, 6th, or 7th of March; I saw a bed given to the coach man to put into the coach, and that man gave the coachman a glass of gin.

Q. What man was that. - A. I did not see the man: I saw the coachman draw the bed, and put it into the coach, and after that I saw a man bring a bird cage.

Q. Look round and see whether you know him. - A. Yes, I saw this man, these two prisoners go into the coach; I saw the man prisoner put a swing glass and bird cage into the coach.

Q. Did you see where the coachman got the bed from. - No; the coachman came from under the archway, and put the bed into the coach, and then came the man and woman, and they both went into the coach, and away they drove.

JAMES GILLMORE . I am an officer of Queen-square office; I apprehended both the prisoners; I searched their apartments; I found nothing there; I told the man I took him into custody for taking away the things out of the house in Downing-street; I asked how he brought away his own things out of Downing-street. He told me, in a coach; he had a few rags of his own, he said; a small trunk and a bird-cage.

James Butcher 's Defence. When I went home, my wife was crying; she said her mistress had been there making a noise. When I came away from Flushing, I had some money to take. I said, you had better take a hackney-coach, and carry your things to your father's; go to your mistress, and let her see that every thing is safe. I wish I had taken the number of the hackney-coach when I took my wife's things away; it would have been a good thing for me.

Ann Butcher was not put on her defence.

JAMES BUTCHER , GUILTY, aged 30,

Of stealing to the value of Thirty Shillings only .

Transported for Seven Years .

ANN BUTCHER , NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18100411-9

370. JOSEPH MARSHALL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of January , two shirts, value 10 s. two coats, value 30 s. a hat, value 5 s. and a pair of breeches, value 5 s. the property of Thomas Potter , in the dwelling-house of Henry Potter .

THOMAS POTTER . I live in my brother Henry Potter 's house, No. 3, Porter-street, Newport-market . The prisoner and I slept together. On the 10th of January I got up about seven o'clock; the prisoner was in bed then; I kept my clothes in a box by the side of the bed; I went to work, and left my box unlocked; I returned about nine o'clock; the prisoner was out then; I went up into my room; I saw some of my things throwed about the room; my box was shut down as I had left. I examined my box and missed two coats, and a pair of small clothes; and two shirts were laying upon the box; I missed them; I saw them there when I went out.

Q. Did the prisoner return again to his lodging. - A. No; on the 22d of March my brother met him accidentally, and brought him to me; and on that day I found my things at the pawnbroker's, except one shirt, and that he said he had got on.

HENRY POTTER. Q. You are the brother to Thomas Potter . - A. Yes; my brother lodged with me, and so did the prisoner. On the 10th of January, my brother and me went to work at seven o'clock, and left the prisoner in bed. I saw nothing of him till the 22d of March, and then I met him in the parish of St. Giles I charged him with robbing my brother; he told me if I would go with him, he would shew me where the things were pawned, which he did.

WILLIAM FOSTER. I am servant to Mrs. Payne, pawnbroker, Bow-street, Bloomsbury. On the 10th of January, the prisoner brought a coat and a pair of small clothes. I lent him five shillings upon them in the name of Thomas Smith, and a shirt was pledged at our shop in the same name. I did not take that in.

- JONES. I am servant to Mr. Hill, pawnbroker, Rathbone-place. On the 10th of January, a coat was pledged with me for four shillings, I think by the prisoner; a hat was pledged at our shop for two shillings, and both in the name of John Walker ; I know nothing about the hat.

Prisoner. I have nothing particular to say in my defence.

GUILTY, aged 42,

Of stealing to the value of Thirty-nine Shillings only .

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18100411-10

271. MARY GAMBLE was indicted for feloniously making an assault in the King's highway, upon Sarah Attwood , on the 17th of November, putting her in fear, and taking from her person, and against her will, a gown, value 18 s. and an umbrella, value 4 s. the property of Thomas Attwood .

SARAH ATTWOOD . I am the wife of Thomas Attwood ; we live at 28, Henrietta-street. On the 17th of November, between seven and eight, I was coming from Bishopgate-street, I had a gown and umbrella with me; I was tyeing up my shoe at a corner of a street in Bishopsgate-street , there were three women came up to me, one seized me round my neck, another gave me a knock of the head and knocked me down, and the other took my bundle and ran away. I was so alarmed I should not know either of their persons again.

RICHARD ATTENBOROUGH . I am a pawnbroker, No. 1, Crown-street, Finsbury-square. On the morning of the 18th of November the prisoner pledged a gown with me for eight shillings.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going down Angel-alley, Bishopsgate-street; after I had done my work I picked something up by the Sun alehouse, it was a gown; I pledged it the next day for eight shillings.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100411-11

272. THOMAS CANNON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 3d of April , four pounds weight of copper, value 4 s. the property of James Shears , Daniel Towers Shears , and James Daniel Shears .

DANIEL TOWERS SHEARS . I am a coppersmith ; I am in partnership with my father, James Shears , and James Daniel Shears; we live in Fleet-market .

JOSEPH MARSHALL . I live with Messrs. Shears. I went into the kitchen to fetch my master's boots to clean, I saw the prisoner take this copper from off the bench in the shop, he took it down in the cellar and hid it under the stove; after he came up I went into the cellar to look at what he had hid, I saw the copper, I told my master of it. At eight o'clock it was time for their breakfast; he went down in the cellar with a basket, he took the copper pipe away and hid it in his breeches, he said he should go to breakfast; he went out, my master went after him and brought him back, and the copper was found on him in his breeches.

Mr. Shears. I found the piece of copper partly under his trowsers, and partly under his waistcoat; he said it was the first time that he had done such a thing. This is the copper; it is the property of myself and partners.

Prisoner's Defence. I do not know any thing about it.

GUILTY , aged 50.

Whipped in jail , and discharged.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100411-12

273. THOMAS BRADFORD was indicted for breaking and entering the dwelling house of William North , about the hour of eight, on the 21st of March , and stealing therein, two decanters, value 5 s. his property.

WILLIAM NORTH . I am a potter and glass-seller in Bishopsgate-street . On Wednesday the 21st of March, about the hour of eight in the evening, I was reached home from my neighbour's house with an alarm that my house was robbed; I came home immediately and found the prisoner in the back part of my shop in custody of the officer, with the decanters, I think, in his possession at the time.

JOHN GOODWIN . I am an officer of Langbourne ward. On the 21st of March, about half past eight in the evening, I was going down Bishopsgate-street, I perceived three men who appeared to me to be suspicious characters; I passed them, and they went against a public house window. The prisoner went to Mr. North's shop, took a survey of the window; he then came back and had some conversation with the other two, then they all three went over to Mr. North's; the prisoner laid hold of the handle of the door while the other two stood round the door; he opened the door and went in, I, seeing that, instantly crossed the way, at the time I got up up to the door he was delivering this pair of decanters to one of them standing at the door; his companion was going to receive them; I I struck the man who was going to receive them over the arm with my stick, he ran away, and I seized the prisoner at the door with the decanters in his hand; I collared him and backed him into Mr. North's parlour; I then asked him what he was going to do with them; he begged that I would forgive him, he only came for a half quartern glass. By that time the master of the house was sent for, and with assistance we took him to the compter. I am sure when he went to the door it was shut, there is a latch you lay hold of the handle to lift it up.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been out all day; I broke a glass; I wanted to buy a dram glass. I went into the shop and knocked with my foot, nobody answered; that gentleman ran in, he said, you rascal, you want to rob the shop. There was nobody along with me; the door was standing a jar, it was not upon the latch.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY, aged 28.

Of stealing, but not of breaking and entering the dwelling-house .

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100411-13

274. WILLIAM HORN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 11th of April , a coat, value 10 s. the property of James Cook .

ANN COOK. My husband's name is James Cook ; he is a gardener .

Q. When did you lose this coat. - A. Yesterday morning I lost it out of a cart; the cart was standing at Mr. Kemp's door, No. 7, Aldgate . I had been to Newgate market, and returning home, I called at this house, and left the coat in the cart; I got into the shop, and delivered a few flowers and a few radishes; I was talking to the shopman; I saw the prisoner take the coat out of the cart, and run away with it. I told the young man in the shop; he run after him, and took him; the coat was brought back, and the man was secured in Mr. Kemp's shop till an officer came.

GEORGE GOODFELLOW . About eight o'clock I was in my master's shop; this good woman came in; I saw the prisoner come by; he took the coat out of the cart. I went after him, and overtook him, about ten or twelve yards off; he said, is it your coat? I said, no, nor is it yours. With the assistance of another man, we took him back to my master's shop; we kept him till the constable came.

FRANCIS KINNERSLEY. I am an officer; I took charge of the prisoner, and this coat was in his possession.

Prisoner's Defence. I must leave every thing to the gentlemen of the court.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100411-14

275. EDWARD CHINNERY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of March , a coat, value 15 s. the property of Thomas Allom .

THOMAS ALLOM . I am a coachman ; I drive Captain Welley . On the 8th of March I drawed up at the coach-house door, in Boar's head yard, King's-street, Westminster , to back the carriage in, and I got off the box to open the doors. At the time I was opening of the doors, my coat was taken off; and on my going back, I saw my coat in the possession of the prisoner; I took hold of him by the collar, and took him to the constable.

Prisoner's Defence. Another man took the coat, and gave it to me; I was very much in liquor; I did not know what I was doing.

JAMES GILLMORE . I am an officer. The prisoner was quite sober when he was brought to our office, which was a few minutes afterwards he was delivered into my custody together with the coat.

GUILTY , aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100411-15

276. MARY CONNOLLY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of March , two pewter value 2 s. 6 d. the property of William Clarke .

WILLIAM CLARKE . I am a publican , No. 1, King's-street, Golden-square . On the 28th of March the pots were brought to me by the constable.

WILLIAM LOOSE. On the 28th of March I was going along Golden-square; I met the prisoner with something wrapped up under her gown-tail; she seemed very much confused; I was close to her; I saw they were pots; I suspected she had stolen them. I spoke to Gregory, the officer; he apprehended her.

JOSEPH GREGORY. I received information from Loose. I took two pots from the prisoner; they were wrapped up in her gown-tail.

Prisoner's Defence. A woman asked me to hold the pots; I did not know she was a thief; she said she was going to a servant maid for some victuals; she did not like to take the pots. I held the pots for a quarter of an hour; at last the old woman came; Gregory would not take her. I never stole any thing in my life.

GREGORY. She never said any thing about the old woman till after she had been at Marlborough-street Office.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100411-16

277. JOHN STOKER and JAMES BROWN were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Edward Acres , about the hour of four in the afternoon, on the 15th of March (the said John Edward Acres being therein), and feloniously stealing two gold seals, value 20 s. a pair of ear-rings, value 10 s. and two gold rings, value 20 s. the property of John Edward Acres .

JOHN EDWARD ACRES . I live at No. 6, High-street, Kensington ; I am a silversmith ; my shop is part of my dwelling-house. On the 15th of March, a little after four o'clock in the afternoon, I was sitting in my parlour at the back of my shop; some persons came into my shop, and gave me information that my shop window was cut. I went to the window; I perceived one of my panes of glass had been cut or starred. There was a hole sufficient to get them articles out, not sufficient to put any hand in; I perceived the tray where we put the things inside of the window had been pulled about; I missed a number of articles, but what at the moment I could not say. I was in the shop about half an hour before; then I saw the tray; it stood close to the glass; it contained gold seals and gold ear-rings, and gold things of different kinds; the articles all were safe in the tray at that time. In a very short time the prisoners were brought in by Mr. Swan, the constable, and a man of the name of Winter. The prisoners were searched, a silver watch was found upon Stoker; that was not any thing that I had lost.

Q. Was any part of your property found upon either of the prisoners. - A. No; and not finding the property upon them, I supposed they must have dropped them somewhere; I directed Sheldrick to go under the gateway, where these boys were found standing; he brought me a gold seal, a gold finger ring, and a gold finger ring with a Cornelian drop; shortly after, another gold ring was brought in by Pickett, another seal, and a finger ring; they were all my property.

THOMAS WINTER I am a labouring man. On the 15th of March, about ten minutes after four, I was at the sign of the King and Queen, Kensington, it is nearly opposite of Mr. Acres's shop, I saw the prisoners they were standing against Mr. Acres's shop window; I saw Brown run his hand down the window, I could not see whether he had any thing in his hand; I then saw him give Stoker something twice, which appeared to me to come out of the window; upon seeing this I ran over too Mr. Swann, he came out of his house; we went up the gateway at the corner of Mr. Swann's house; both the prisoners were under the gateway, they were both stooping; I collared them both and took them into Mr. Acres's shop, and a watch was found upon Stoker. I went under the gateway to where the prisoners had been stooping, by the step of the back door, there I picked up two bits of tickets, they were in a puddle near the step.

MR. SWANN. Q. We understand you are a constable of Kensington - A. Yes. Winter came over to me, we went under the gateway adjoining my house, we saw the two boys, they were by a back door under the gateway; they were searched in Mr. Acres's shop, nothing of his property was found upon them. I have the gold articles that were afterwards found, they were delivered to me by Mr. Acres; I put them altogether.

- SHELDRICK. I am a waterman at Kensington. I was standing at the Marquis of Granby, directly opposite of Mr. Acres's. After the prisoners were taken I went into the shop, some person said the boys had been under the gateway, I and Pickett went under the gateway, and just by Mr. Billet's door, Pickett saw a piece of wire lay, and with that wire he pulled up a finger ring, a seal, and an earring, he took them into Mr. Acres's shop; after he was gone I searched in the same spot, and found a finger ring, a seal, and an ear-ring; I laid them on Mr. Acres's counter.

Stoker said nothing in his defence.

Brown's Defence. I am innocent of the crime.

Thomas Pickett was called, and not appearing in court, his recognizance was ordered to be estreated.

Stoker called no witnesses to his character.

Brown called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

STOKER - GUILTY, aged. 14.

BROWN - GUILTY, aged 13.

Of stealing to the value of thirty-nine shillings, but not of breaking and entering the dwelling-house .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson .

Reference Number: t18100411-17

278. JOHN STOKER was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Ann Moon and William Moon , about the hour of five, on the 13th of March , the said Ann Moon and others being therein, and stealing therein a watch, value 5 l. their property.

WILLIAM MOON . I am in partnership with my mother , Ann Moon , No. 4, Holborn bars ; our shop is there, and my mother lives there; I reside at Cursitor-street, Chancery-lane. I know no circumstance relating to the breaking of the shop window whatever. On Tuesday the 13th of March, I had been out, I returned about five in the afternoon, I found a pane of glass had been broken or cut. I went out about four o'clock, the watches were all safe in the window then, I had put them there in the morning. On my return I went to take the watches away, and found a bit of glass, and a great number of watches gone.

Q. Did you see any of them again - A. I never saw any of them till the one now in question was brought to me by Mr. Swan, the constable, on the 15th, the Thursday following. It is a new silver hunting watch; I knew it to be mine, it had only been finished that day.

MR. SWAN. Q. You searched the prisoner at Mr. Acres - A. Yes, I did, I found a silver hunting watch in Stoker's waistcoat pocket.

Prisoner's Defence. On my going down Holborn I saw three men at Mr. Moon's window, they gave me three watches to hold; they went towards the window again; they came to me and took the three watches from me; they gave me this watch; John Brown asked them if they would give him any, they hit him and ran away.

GUILTY, aged 14.

Of stealing only .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson .

Reference Number: t18100411-18

279. THOMAS STREET was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 1st of March , fourteen yards of kerseymere, value 7 l. the property of Thomas Jenkins , in his dwelling house .

THOMAS JENKINS . I am a mercer ; I live at 27, Fleet-street ; I keep the house and live in it.

Mr. Gurney. Have you any partners - A. None.

ANN KEMPTON . Q. You are servant to Mr. Jenkins - A. Yes. On the 1st of March, between seven and eight o'clock in the evening, I was coming down stairs, I saw the prisoner come in and steal a piece of kerseymere, I pursued him and cried stop thief; in a few minutes he was brought back, I knew him to be the person that took it.

Mr. Gurney. Where was this piece of goods - A. It was on the counter near the door; I saw the prisoner come in and take the piece of goods from off the counter. There was a piece of goods on it, as he went towards the door it tumbled off, and he almost stumbled over it, and by that time I almost came up to him; I am sure it was the prisoner by his dress, and by his face.

Q. You knew him rather by his dress than by his face - A. Yes, sir.

JOHN ELMLEY . I am a clerk. I saw the prisoner run out of Mr. Jenkins's shop with a large roll of cloth, hearing the words shop thief, I pursued him, and when I was within a few yards of him he dropped the cloth; I still pursued him, and caught him; I took him back to Mr. Jenkins's shop.

Q. What became of the kerseymere - A. I saw the kerseymere in the shop sometime afterwards.

Q. When you saw him come out of the shop you never lost sight of him, did you - A. No.

THOMAS SMITH . I am an officer. I took charge of the prisoner; the cloth was delivered to me; I have had it ever since.

Q. Mr. Jenkins - Look at that kerseymere - A. I have no hesitation in saying that it is mine.

Q. How lately had you seen that kerseymere before it was taken - A. In the course of the day. It was near the door, on the counter; I can swear it is my property. The person is not here that brought it into my shop; I saw it brought in.

Q. What may be the value of it - A. Seven pounds;

I have undervalued it considerably.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel, called four witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 20.

[ The prisoner was recommended to his Majesty's mercy on account of his good character .]

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100411-19

280. JOHN GRIFFITHS was indicted for that he on the 24th of March , was servant to John Nicholson , and was employed and entrusted to receive money for him, and being such servant and so employed, did receive and take into his possession, a one pound bank note, for and on account of his said master , and that he afterwards did embezzle, secrete, and steal the same .

JOHN NICHOLSON . I am an hosier ; I live in Fleet-street ; the prisoner was my shopman

Q. Did you use to employ him to receive your money - A. He used to receive money behind the counter.

Q. When was this - A. On the 24th of March. He has lived with me about eight months in the capacity of a shopman; for some time I had reason to suspect that he had robbed me, having missed money several times. On Saturday morning, the 24th of March, I took two one pound notes to Mr. Gay, a friend of mine, in Chancery-lane, and desired him to give them to Mrs. Gay to lay them out at my shop, which she did.

JAMES GAY . I am a master baker.

Q. What did you do with the notes Mr. Nicholson gave you - A. I gave them to Mrs. Gay about nine o'clock in the morning, or a little after.

ELIZABETH GAY. I am the wife of the last witness.

Q. What you do with the notes your husband gave you - A. I laid them out at Mr. Nicholson's shop with the prisoner; I bought six pair of cotton stockings and a pair of silk ones, they came to one pound sixteen shillings; the two one pound notes that I received of my husband I gave to the prisoner and he gave me four shillings change.

Q. What time of the day was it - A. It was directly after breakfast.

Mr. Nicholson. About half after eleven o'clock I returned home, I referred to the till book to see if the money had been set down for goods sold.

Q. Is the till book here - A. No; I was not aware that it was necessary to bring the book.

Q. Yes, it is, if you are talking about a book - A. I asked him if there was any thing to set down, he said there was nothing. I then returned to Mrs. Gay to ascertain if she had laid out the money, she told me she had, and shewed me the goods that she had purchased. I then examined the till and found that one of the notes was not in the till that she had paid; there was one note in the till, the other was not. The prisoner told me the till was right with the goods that were sold, that the money in the book did correspond to what he had sold, but he had omitted putting in the guinea for the six pair of cotton stockings.

COURT. Why did not you bring the book with you - A. I did not think that book had any reference to the transaction.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100411-20

281. JAMES Mc'DONAUGH was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 25th of March , two dollars, value 10 s. the property of Edward Tyce , from his person.

EDWARD TYCE . I am a taylor ; I live at 45, King-street, Soho.

Q. What is the prisoner - A. I understand he is a dyer . On the 25th of March, about four o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner and I went into the Ship, Duck-lane , we called for a pot of beer and sat down in the box to drink it; I put my hand into my pocket to look for some small change to pay the reckoning, and took my money out; at that time I had three dollars in my pocket, which the prisoner saw; I left the box and went and stood up in the tap-room, the prisoner followed me out of the box, and directly I discovered his hand in my pocket, I prevented him at that time from taking any thing out, I thought no more of it than as a joke; I did not mention it to him. In the course of ten minutes afterwards I found his hand in my pocket again.

Q. Were you sober - A. I was a little fresh, not intoxicated. He took out of my pocket two dollars, I immediately accused him of it, and saw him at the same time deliver something to a woman of the name of Ann Phillips ; he instantly struck me, and endeavoured to make his escape; I stepped to the door and asked the landlord to fetch me a constable, which he did. A friend of the prisoner called upon me after the first examination and asked me what I meaned to do, he thought he was a very honest young man; I told him I should go to the office and appear against him. When he was going away he put down ten shillings; I took it to the office and gave it to Mr. Bly.

ROBERT WARD . I am the landlord of the public house I heard the prosecutor say he was robbed of two dollars, he asked me to fetch a constable which I did.

ELIZABETH MADGEWAY. I am a chairwoman. I happened to be in the place at the time, I saw the prosecutor stop the prisoner for robbing him of two dollars, but the money I did not see; I saw the prisoner have something in his hand, he gave it to a young woman; I cannot say what she did with it.

JAMES BLY . I am an officer. I was sent for to take this man in custody; there was a great confusion in the tap-room, and a great many girls of the town, and the prisoner in the midst of them. The woman was examined, but nothing was found upon her.

Prisoner's Defence. I am a dyer by name; I worked seven years in one shop. I am innocent of the crime.

GUILTY, aged 22.

Judgment respited

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100411-21

282. JOHN COOPER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 11th of December , a gun, value 15 l. a pair of pistols, value 24 l. one pound weight of gunpowder, value 4 s. 6 d. and three pounds weight of shot, value 15 s. the property of Samuel Knott .

Mr. Gurney, (counsel for the prosecution) declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100411-22

282. THOMAS KEMP was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of April , a pocket handkerchief, value 3 s. the property of John Cadogan , from his person .

JOHN CADOGAN. I am a carpenter . On the 9th of April I was going to Doctor's Commons, about one o'clock in the day: I was near the end of Water-lane, Fleet-street, on the north side of Fleet-street . There were a number of persons assembled, so as to oblige me to go off the foot-way; there was a girl crying in the midst of these persons, which induced me to stop. I asked what she was crying for. On my turning round to make the enquiry, I perceived my handkerchief passing from my pocket. I caught hold of the prisoner, he threw the handkerchief down.

Q. Are you sure that you saw it in his hand - A. I saw it in his hand: with one hand I caught hold of the prisoner, and with the other I stooped down and picked up the handkerchief. The prisoner then immediately got away from me; I pursued the prisoner across the street and caught him, and with assistance we secured him; he was taken to Guildhall.

RICHARD WILLIAM KING . I am a bookbinder. I happened to be going up Fleet-street, on Water-lane side of the way, I saw a mob opposite, which took my attention; and while I was looking they cried out, stop thief; this man ran across the way, I catched him by the collar, and Mr. Cadogan secured him.

Mr. VERNON. I am beadle of St. Bride's parish. I took the prisoner in custody. This handkerchief was given to me.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going up Fleet-street with my wife; seeing a mob I stopped to see what was the matter. I put my hands against this gentleman. I deny taking the handkerchief; the gentleman never saw the handkerchief in my hand.

GUILTY , aged 44.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100411-23

283. ELIZABETH BOONE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of March , a lamp, burner, and reflector, value 1 l. the property of Apsley Pellatt , James Green , and William Leader .

CHARLES TAYLOR . I am a pawnbroker. I live in Little Knight-rider-street, Doctors'-Commons. On the 3d of March the prisoner brought a lamp to pledge I had received information from Mr. Pellatt. I took the lamp to Mr. Pellatt and Green, in St. Paul's Churchyard ; they came to our shop, and took her in custody. She then said, that she had found it.

APSLEY PELLATT, Jun. On the 3d of March, at seven o'clock in the morning, on my coming down to let the men in to work as usual, I perceived both the burners of the street lanthorn gone, and there was a ladder there on the outside of the shop, and one of the panes of glass of the lanthorn was broken. I immediately went to the pawnbrokers round about, and informed them of the circumstance, and described the lamps. About ten o'clock the same morning Mr. Taylor, servant to Mr. Lock, brought the lamp, which I thought to be ours. I immediately called the man who trimmed it, and he swore to it.

Q. Do you know any thing of the woman - A. I never saw her before; she seemed very much intoxicated when she was taken. The ladder that was left on the right side of our shop was not marked; we could not ascertain whose ladder it was; we have it still in our possession.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going up Paul's-chain, about six o'clock in the morning, I found the lamp there by one of the pillars in St. Paul's Church-yard. I am a chairwoman ; I was going out to work that morning.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100411-24

284. WILLIAM POTTER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of March , two cruets, value 1 s. 6 d. a candlestick, value 2 s. 6 d. four goblets, value 6 s. six wine glasses, value 4 s. a decanter, value 3 s. 6 d. and two basons, value 2 s. 6 d. the property of Apsley Pellatt , James Green , and William Leader .

JAMES GREEN . I am in partnership with Apsley Pellatt and William Leader . We are glass-sellers in St. Paul's Church-yard.

JOHN FORRESTER . I am an officer. On the 7th of March, between eight and nine in the evening, I stopped the prisoner with a basket on his shoulder in Petticoat-lane. I asked him what he had got; he told me glass, he had brought it from Mr. Green's, the other side of the water; he was going to take it to Mr. Hart's, Petticoat-lane. I told him, I did not like the firm of Mr. Hart's house, I must investigate the business a little further; he said, Mr. Hart was his master, begged me not to detain him, but he would go with me any where; he walked with me to about one hundred yards of the watch-house, and then he threw the basket on the pavement and ran away; he was stopped, and I took him to the watch-house. I searched him; I found his pockets full, and the inside of his hat full, of tumblers and wine glasses. I asked him who he worked for; he said, for Mr. Pellatt and Green. He informed me where his lodging was; I went to his lodging, and found more articles of the same description. I informed Mr. Pellatt and Green; they claimed the property.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence; called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Whipped in Jail , and confined fourteen days in Newgate .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100411-25

285. MARY TAYLOR was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of March , two silver table spoons, value 30 s. the property of John Robinson .

JOHN EARL . I am a waiter at the Angel Inn, Angel-street, St. Martin's-le-Grand . On the night of the 3d of March, I found that there was one of the spoons deficient; on Monday, the 5th, I found there were two spoons deficient; on Tuesday I had thorough search all over the house, and could not find them; on Wednesday I found one of the spoons in pledge at Mr. Flemmings, in Fleet-market. I then went home and told Mrs. Robinson.

Q. What is Mr. Robinson's name - A. John Robinson. The prisoner was cook there. We sent for an officer; the officer and I went into the kitchen, and told the cook, that she was the person that pledged the spoon in Fleet-market. At first she denied it; at last she confessed, that she had pledged in Aldersgate-street one, and the other in the City.

JAMES DWERRY . I am a pawnbroker. On Monday, the 5th of March, the prisoner brought this spoon to Mr. Flemmings, Fleet-market, and pleadged it for eight shillings. I am quite sure it was the prisoner.

JOSEPH BRANCH. I am a constable. On the 7th of March I took this woman in custody; she confessed that she had pawned the spoons, one at Mr. Flemmings's, and the other at Mr. Essex's, in Aldersgate-street. This is the spoon that was at Mr. Essex's, in Aldersgate-street.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence; called two witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY , aged 39.

Confined One Month in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100411-26

286. MARTIN PERRY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of March , fifteen yards of baize, value 18 s. the property of John Richards .

JOHN CALLAGHAN. I work for Mr. Richards, a stone-mason. On the 21st of March I was coming into his shop about two o'clock in the afternoon, I met the prisoner with the baize on his arm. I asked him where he was going with it; he told me, that he was going to get it scoured. I told him he should not go till he told me who authorized him to get it scoured; he turned round in the shop, and wanted to go away; I would not let him; a scuffle ensued, he hit me two blows on the face, he got out in the street, I called for assistance, a gentleman came up, and he was secured.

THOMAS SAPWELL . I am an officer. I took the prisoner in custody, the property was delivered to me.

Prisoner's Defence. I was walking in Union-street, I saw three men, I asked them where I could get a job, they said at Mr. Richards's. I went there, walked down the yard, not seeing any body I returned, and coming back I picked up this cloth. This man met me and said, where are you going. I said, to take it in; he struck me and I knocked him down.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Transported for seven years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100411-27

287. DANIEL BEDFORD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of February , two hundred and sixty-four pieces of copper money, value 11 s. the property of Thomas Garrett .

THOMAS GARRETT . I am a tea-dealer and grocer in Bishopsgate-street . The prisoner was my porter . On Saturday evening, the 24th of February, after the prisoner was gone home I told the halfpence which were in the till, and left there thirty shillings. On Sunday morning the prisoner came as usual to take in a temporary watch-box which is at the door; I gave him the key of the shop for that purpose. After he had taken in the watch-box, I went into the shop and found a deficiency of the halfpence. I sent for a constable, the prisoner was searched, and there was found on him eleven shillings worth of halfpence. There was only eighteen shillings and eleven-pence remaining in the till; the money found on the prisoner and the money remaining in the till was all right but the deficiency of a penny. I do not account for the deficiency of the penny.

- FERNLEY. I am a servant to Mr. Garret, I assisted in counting up the half-pence on Saturday evening, the 24th of February, on Sunday morning I counted them again, there was a deficiency of eleven shillings and a penny: some of the half-pence I should know again which appear to be burnt, they are very black indeed.

CHARLES EMERY . I am a constable. On Sunday morning the 25th of February, I searched the prisoner in Mr. Garrets' parlour; his waistcoat pockets were nearly full of half-pence, and in his breeches pockets were the remainder. I laid the half-pence on the table, Mr. Garret was present: he said the deficiency was about eleven shillings. Mr. Garret asked the prisoner how he came to do it, he went down upon his knees and begged for mercy, and said it was the first time he had ever robbed him; he begged of me to intercede with Mr. Garret to send him to sea.

Q. to Mr. Garret, Is there any of the halfpence that you know - A. I do not know any of them myself, my servant knows them.

FERNLEY. I know these two half-pence, they were counted on the Saturday, they are black and appear to have been much burnt.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 29

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100411-28

288. CORNELIUS FULLER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of April , a shilling and three half-pence , the property of John Stirtevant .

JOHN STIRTEVANT. I live in Bishopsgate-street , I am a hosier . The prisoner was my porter , and occasionally served in the shop; on my having frequently missed money out of the till, I strongly suspected the prisoner, and on Saturday evening last I marked some money to the amount of two guineas. When the business of the day was closed I put this money into the till, to the amount of two guineas. On Sunday morning I examined the cash in the till, I found thirteen pence half-penny deficient. I immediately fetched Mr. Sapwell the officer, the prisoner was searched, and the thirteen pence half-penny was found upon him.

Prisoner's Defence. The money I took was to defray a small debt. I offered to serve his majesty, my prosecutor and the magistrate denied it.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Ordered to be sent to Sea .

London jury before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100411-29

289. JOHN POPE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of March , a shutter value 5 s. the property of Gilpin Warner and William Leymore .

THOMAS KELLY . I am an officer of the ward of Cornhill. On the 2nd of March I was on the evening duty, I saw a man with a shutter on his shoulders; I came up to him, I asked him where he got that shutter; he replied, from Drury-lane, he had bought it there. it was his property, he was going to carry it to Rosemary-lane. I told him I thought he would not carry it there to night, immediately he broke away from me and ran down Finch-lane; he threw the shutter down; I pursued him and catched him just as he was turning into Spread-eagle-court. I never lost sight of him; my fellow servant had possession of the shutter at the time.

JOHN ROBSON . I am one of the constables of Cornhill ward. I was on duty with Kelly, he was on one side of the way and I on the other. I went over the way

to him, he had got hold of the prisoner with the shutter, he desired me to lay hold of the shutter, we conveyed him to the Counter, it is a door shutter. It was taken from Kings Arms Passage leading into Change-alley.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming through this passage, I had like to have fell over it; it was an old board, I thought it was fit for the top of a table. I am fifty-five years of age, and never was before a magistrate before.

GUILTY , aged 55.

Confined Two Months in Newgate , and publickly whipped .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100411-30

290. WILLIAM STOTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2nd of April , 2 trusses of straw, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of William Mellish , esq.

JONATHAN DRAYTON, I am a servant to Mr. Mellish. On the 2d of April I missed some tare straw; I could not tell how much was gone, I had seen it there the night before. When Mr. Hewittson came down I told him, I missed it about half after six o'clock in the morning, it was tied up with hay-bands.

Q. Where was the prisoner at work. - A. At Mr. Cobbett's. On Thursday I missed the straw, and on the Monday I saw it at Mr. Mons's the magistrate; the prisoner was then in custody; It was Mr. Mellish's straw.

Jury. How do you know that be Mr. Mellish's straw - A. Because it was like the other, and tied up with hay-bands. We lost some straw from Mr. Mellish's barn, and the straw I found I believe it to be Mr. Mellish's

JOHN HEWITTSON . I am Bailiff to Mr. Mellish. On Monday the 2nd of April I went to the barn. I saw there had been some straw tumbled about, I traced the straw across the yard over some hurdles, and across the next field adjoining the yard, and across the next field into the foot-path; I traced it into Enfield Town to the prisoner's door, and I found the straw in the back part of the prisoner's house.

Q. Was the prisoner at home - A. No, his wife was. I examined the straw, I believe it to be that taken from Mr. Mellish's barn. I saw the prisoner after he was taken; he said he found it under an elm tree, and he took it home, I went to the elm tree, and there was no appearance of straw having been there.

JOHN PHIPLEY . I apprehended the prisoner. I found him at work at the plough for Mr. Corbett of Berry-street Enfield. As soon as he saw me he left the plough and ran off; I pursued him, a gentleman, on a horse stopped him and I took him into custody he said d - n them I shall fling them now.

Q. Had you told him what you had taken him up for - A. No, he said he found it under the great elm tree.

Prisoner's Defence. I found the straw going to my work.

GUILTY aged, 46

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100411-31

291. SAMUEL LOVETRUE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2nd of April , 7 pieces of foreign gold coin called louis'd'ors, value 7 l. 3 guineas, 2 dollars, and 2 shillings , the property of Peter Strihben .

PETER STRIHBEN . Q. What countryman are you - A. I come from Riga, last Sunday week the ship arrived here, and then I came on shore.

Q. Did you come from Riga, or from what other place - A. I came from Heligoland; I was in an accompting-house there. I came from there to London, thinking of finding some of my relations here, and then to go home to Riga.

Q. What place did you come on shore - A. I landed at a bridge that took me to Wapping. I wanted to go to Mr. Warren's a publican in St. Catharine's. I enquired the way to that publican; on my going along the prisoner stood at a shop door I asked him to give me change for a guinea; I wanted to buy something if I could have got change.

Q. What language did the prisoner speak to you in - A. English, I understood enough of English to know what he said. I took the louis'd'ors out of my pocket and picked out a guinea and gave it to the prisoner; the prisoner gave my guinea to a little girl in the shop where we stood; the girl brought it to me again and said they could not change it. I put it in my pocket and went away.

Q. Had you pulled out any more than that guinea - A. I took them all out of my pocket, and knowing that the louis-d'ors would not go here. I picked out the guinea from the louis-d'ors which I had in my hand. I was walking away, the prisoner followed me, and after a good bit he took me by the hand and questioned me how I came by so much money. I told him the money was mine, what need he trouble himself about it. The prisoner told me that there was a million of guineas stolen from the crown (from the king), that he was an officer in search of it. I said I had not stolen the money, he could go with me to the ship and enquire of the captain whether I did not bring this money from Heligoland. He replied, if you have stolen the money tell me, and it shall be secreted. The prisoner took me by the hand and took me into a public-house; the prisoner questioned me whether I wanted change or no. I said yes, and gave him a guinea. The prisoner ordered a shillings worth of rum, he paid for it out of the guinea, and gave me four crown-pieces. We both went out of this public-house together. I told the prisoner that I intended to go on board again, and that the prisoner might go on board with me, to see whether I had stolen the money or brought it with me. The prisoner then took me by the hand, and said I should go with him to his lodging.

Q. Did he shew you where his lodging was. - A. The prisoner told me he lodged where I first produced the guinea, it was his shop. He went with me to the said shop, and ordered the girl to put the tea-kettle on the fire, and invited me to drink tea with him. I staid with him till about seven o'clock in the evening. I then said to the prisoner, I wish you would recommend me to a decent lodging, it is too late for me to go on board again, I shall go in the morning; the prisoner said I could remain with him that night. I was agreeable to that, and before I went to bed it was near nine o'clock. I gave the landlady of the house seven louis-d'ors and three guineas to save for me for my own security. I had in my pocket when I went to bed three crowns, two shillings, and some halfpence. The prisoner shewed me the room where I was to sleep; I went to bed very near nine o'clock.

Q. Did the prisoner afterwards come to bed. - A. When I went to bed I took the three crowns and two shillings, and put them in my trowser's pocket.

Q. By crowns do you mean dollars. - A. English crowns, this is one.

Q. That is a dollar, were they what you had received in change of the prisoner at the other house. - A. Yes, I received four dollars of the prisoner at the other house, but one of the crowns I paid to the landlady for victuals and drink where I slept, and gave her my gold to keep for me. I had tea, bread and butter, and more things to eat, for which I paid two shillings and eight-pence. When I went to bed I folded my trowsers, and laid them on the chest in the same room where I slept. In the morning at two o'clock the prisoner came to bed; I do not know it myself, the prisoner himself said it was two o'clock, and the mistress of the house likewise. I did not hear any disturbance in the night. I got up in the morning at seven o'clock, my trowsers were on the chest where I laid them, in my jacket pocket; there were four pennyworth of coppers, but in my trowsers the silver was all gone. The prisoner slept in a pair of nankeen trowsers, he asked me, if I was going to get up: I said, I did not like to lay late of a morning. I got up first, and the prisoner immediately followed, the prisoner put his coat half on, and went down before he was dressed; I did not miss my money before the prisoner went down. I went down stairs to wash myself, and saw the prisoner in a little apartment backwards in the house. I spoke to the prisoner, I said, I had three crowns and two shillings in my pocket, and I did not know which way they had gone out of my pocket. The prisoner gave me no answer, he went up stairs, came down again, and gave me three crowns; he said, that he had took them to save them for me; I then did not say any thing about the two shillings any more. The prisoner asked me to go out; I told the prisoner I did not like to go out, I wanted a dish of tea, and then go on board again. The prisoner said, he had ordered breakfast, it would be ready in half an hour, and to go and take a little walk because the mistress of the house had to clean the place up. I went with him, he took me by the arm, and took me to a public-house; he ordered some brandy, and let me pay for it; the prisoner only drank of it.

Q. Why were you to pay for the brandy - A. The prisoner said he had nothing but Bank notes. I asked the prisoner to take me to a hairdresser to have my hair cut; I paid for that; he took me to another public house, after the liquor was brought he desired me to pay for it, which I did. I did not drink of that liquor, he took me by the arm again, and said he would take me to a pretty girl, and went into another public house and called again for some rum; I paid for it, I did not partake of that. After I had paid for the liquor I said, this is the last liquor I shall pay for, I want my money to buy a hat, neither do I want a pretty girl, I wanted to buy something and to go home, I said to him, shew me where I can buy a hat, and let us go home again; the prisoner said, we shall go home and take out breakfast, and after that we will go and buy a hat. The prisoner ordered a coach immediately and got into the coach; he put his hand out to help me in, I thought he was going to ride home to where I had slept, but he did not; the coach stopped in a street. I do not know the place; we got out of the coach, the prisoner took me by the arm and desired me to lend him a shilling; which I did; he then took me to a house where one Serjeant King lived, the breakfast things were on the table, Serjeant King was in bed, the prisoner told the mistress of the house to call him up; when Serjeant King came down he desired me to stand against the door to see what size I was. The prisoner had spoken to Serjeant King before that, but I did not pay attention to it. After some time I said to the prisoner I wish you would go home with me, I want to go on board; the prisoner than told me to stop there a little while, he was going of an errand. I said, I will not wait here, I will go with you, and Serjeant King and his wife; I went out with the prisoner, Serjeant King and his wife to a shop; the prisoner desired me to stop outside, I remained at the door untill they came out, the prisoner had a handkerchief with clothes in it; I then desired the prisoner to go home with me, or to direct me my way to the place; the prisoner said, you shall first go with me to Serjeant King's, I will dress myself and then we shall go home together. We went together to Serjeant King's again, and after the prisoner had dressed himself, he went away for about an hour and then came back. I then said, I want to go home; he replied, I must first go and get married to a person with an hundred pound, he could not go home till four o'clock. I said, I cannot stop, I desired him to tell me the name of the street where the house was where I slept. The prisoner told me it was St. Thomas's-street, that I was to lend him a crown, he would give it me when he came home. I lent him the crown; I then went in search of St. Thomas's-street, I could not find the house in Thomas's-street. I desired a boy whom I met in the road to shew me back to Serjeant Kings; the boy brought me to Serjeant King's again, he was not at home at the time; I got a direction at Serjeant King's, and Serjeant King's son went with me, and I found out the house where I had slept.

Q. Was that in St. Thomas's-street. - A. No, it was in Wapping-street, I knew the house, I went into it, I saw the mistress of the house, but not the prisoner; her name is Mrs. Perry; I asked Mrs. Perry for my money.

Q. What Mrs. Perry told you you are not to tell - A. By the desire of Mrs. Perry I concealed myself in a corner of the shop, that if the prisoner came in he might not see me. It was about four o'clock when I got back to Mr. Perry's.

Q. Did the prisoner come into the shop while you were so concealed. - A. No, I slept that night at Mrs. Perry's, and the next morning I got up and went to Serjeant King. I left a messuage with him, that if the prisoner came there, for him to tell the prisoner that I was gone on board my own ship, because I could not find the house. I returned to Mrs. Perry's about twelve o'clock, I had the same boy with me, we went to several public-houses in search of the prisoner.

Q. Did he receive any information of the prisoner being at any public-house. - A. When he had returned to Mrs. Perry about an hour, a woman called Mrs. Perry, and she ran out; Mrs. Perry sent a messuage from a public-house that I must come immediately; he went with the woman to the second public house from his lodging. I saw the prisoner there Mrs. Perry held him fast, I desired Mr. Wood to assist and hold him. Mrs. Perry went for an officer, the officer came and secured the prisoner. I never saw any of my louis-d'ors or guineas again.

MARY PERRY . I live at No. 10, Wapping-street; I keep a chandler's-shop. The prisoner lodged in my house about three or four weeks; he is a labourer in the London Docks.

Q. Do you remember Sunday, the first of this month, seeing that boy, the prosecutor - A. The boy came to

my shop and wanted to buy something, and wanted change for a guinea. I was up stairs, the girl brought the guinea up to me, I had not change, I did not see the boy then, I sent it down by the girl. In about half an hour they came in together, the prisoner and the boy; I was down stairs then. The boy said, he wanted some tea if it was agreeable; the boy and the prisoner drank tea. Then the boy asked for a lodging; the prisoner said, he might sleep with him if it was agreeable. About nine o'clock the boy went up stairs to bed, and the prisoner went to bed about ten o'clock. In the morning the boy got up about seven o'clock; the prisoner had been out before I got up. When the boy went to bed he left with me seven louis-d'ors and three guineas: I was to take care of them for him till the morning. In the morning the prisoner said that in the night the boy had told him that he had taken the money he had left with me out of the captain's writing desk, and the boy was afraid of going to the captain without the prisoner going with him; with that I gave the prisoner the money to go with him to the captain.

Q. Did the prisoner say any thing to you about giving him the money - A. Yes; he asked me to give it him to go with him to the captain with the boy. I gave the prisoner the seven louis-d'ors and three guineas.

Q. The boy was not there then - A. Not

Q. How soon after did you see the prisoner and the boy together - A. Directly; they were down stairs then. The prisoner took the boy out between seven and eight; he said, he was going to take the boy to the captain.

Q. How soon after this did you see the boy again - A. About four in the evening; he enquired for the money that he had left with me, I told him, that I had given it to the prisoner.

Q. Did you tell him what the prisoner said, of his having confessed that he had stolen it from the captain - A. Yes, and that he was going with it with him to the captain's.

Q. Of course, the boy denied that - A. Yes.

Q. He has told us, that he concealed himself by your desire in the shop - A. Yes, he did.

Q. Before that, I want to know whether, in the course of the day, the prisoner had been to your shop before you saw the boy - A. No, he had not; he did not come home that night.

Q. The boy has told us, that he slept in your house that night - A. Yes On the next day, about seven o'clock, I was fetched to the Duke of Argyle public-house, it is two doors from my house; I there saw the prisoner; I sent for my husband, and sent a woman for the boy, and went for an officer; the boy came before the officer came. I got Mr. Wood, our next door neighbour, to assist in detaining him till Mr. Gotty the officer came, then he was apprehended.

Prisoner. As I have the misfortune to be hard of hearing, I will give my defence in writing.

Q. to Mrs. Perry. Is he so deaf that he could not hear what is said here - A. No, he is not.

Prisoner. I wish to know what money I am indicted for.

Court. Your indictment was read to you; you are indicted for stealing seven louis-d'ors and three guineas, two dollars and two shillings.

Prisoner. It is a false indictment.

Court. That is for the jury to say.

Q. to Prosecutor. Did you tell the prisoner in the night, that you had taken the money left with Mrs. Perry out of the captain's desk - A. I did not say it, nor did I steal it, therefore I could not say it.

Q. Did you tell him, that you was afraid of going back to the captain without the prisoner going with you - A. No.

Q. Had you given him any authority to ask Mrs. Perry for the money - A. No, not a word.

JOHN GOTTY . Q. You belong to the Thames Police - A. I do. On Tuesday evening, the 3d of April, a little after seven o'clock, I was sent for; I went to the Duke of Argyle public-house, near Hermitage-bridge. I apprehended the prisoner, and took him to the Thames Police Office; he was searched, nothing relating to this indictment was found upon him. After we got out of the public-house he told me, he had sold the louis-d'ors for fifteen shillings a piece to a jew in the street.

Prisoner's Defence, (read). The defence of Samuel Lovetrue sheweth, that on the 5th day of March 1810, I took a lodging of Edward Perry , the husband of the evidence Mary Perry , where I found every thing agreeable to my wishes until Sunday, the 1st April last, standing at the door of the said house, between the hour of three and four o'clock in the afternoon, the evidence Peter came and asked me for change of a guinea; I told him, I could not give him change, but would send the girl up stairs to the landlady for change; she could not change it. The evidence Peter then asked me to go with him and get change: I took him to a public-house in the neighbourhood, and called for the liquor; he paid the guinea; I received four five shilling pieces, and gave them to him. He asked me for a bed; I said, if he would go with me I would ask the landlady of the house; he went with me, and he there gave a number of gold pieces to a young girl in the house, with which the girl went up stairs and shewed them to Mary Perry . In a short time she returned some of the gold pieces to the evidence Peter, who complained of the deficiency of two guineas. I went up stairs and found Mrs. Perry and Mr. Perry, I asked them what money they had kept back; they said, two guineas. Mary Perry gave me one guinea, and the girl gave me another; I returned them to the boy, he thanked me very kindly. He asked for a bed; previous to his undressing he gave me three five-shilling pieces. In the morning he asked me for the silver that he gave me; on his coming down stairs, I delivered them to him before Mary Perry . I then put on my great coat to go to my labour at the London Docks, when Mary Perry came to me and said, that she had not experienced an, moment's of conjugal felicity that she had a right to expect, that scarcely a night had passed but only with sighs and tears; and as I had been out of employ, and had a quantity of clothes at the pawnbrokers, she would take them out and elope with me, and for us to go into the country. Immediately she counted ten gold pieces into my hands, seven pieces of foreign coin and three guineas; she took one of the guineas out of my hand and said, she would have it for her own use. I went out with the boy, and took him to a house in the Borough, and on the next day I returned. I sent for Mary Perry ; she asked me, how much money I had left, I had a suit of clothes that I had taken out by her desire, I told her. On my answer, she flew into a great rage, and instantly sent for an officer, and I was taken in custody; she said, as I had deceived her she had every thing in her power to get me hanged. Such are

the facts as they occurred, that I received the money of Mary Perry for the sole purpose before stated. This is the first time that my character has been attacked. I have honourably served his Majesty twenty-seven years, as the letter annexed will prove. I sincerely hope the verdict of the jury will answer my most anxious expectations.

Q. Now Mrs. Perry you have heard what has been read by that letter, did you deliver this money to him for any such consideration as that expressed there. - A. No, I gave it him merely upon his representing to me, that he was to take this money, with the boy, to the captain.

Q. And all that, you swear is a fiction. - A. Yes.

GUILTY , aged 43.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18100411-32

292. JOSEPH PEARCE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22nd of March , a pocket-book, value 5 s. a handkerchief, value 2 s. and a pair of gloves, value 1 s. the property of Charles Thomson , from his person .

CHARLES THOMSON. On the 22nd of March, between eleven and twelve o'clock at night, I was in Old Bond-street . The prisoner reeled up against me as if he was intoxicated, and by that means he got me up against some pallisades.

Q. Did it appear to you that he purposed to do it, or that he was actually intoxicated. - A. He did it on purpose; four men then came up, two of them stood before me, and the other two were behind me, and picked my pocket of a pocket-book, a silk handkerchief, and a pair of gloves.

Q. Did you know them things to be in your pocket recently before. - A. I had my hand in my pocket upon them not two minutes before.

Q. And you felt their hand in your pocket, and you suppose they took them articles away. - A. Yes, I was so alarmed at the time that they picked my pocket, I let the men that picked my pocket run away; I let them leave me as if I took no notice. I then saw the other three. I went up to a watchman and related the case to him, and insisted upon him taking charge of the three; he said, yes, and acquainted them with the charge that I had made; they said, they were innocent of the crime and they would go without force; they then turned round as if to go to the watchhouse, and went down Stafford-street. I was behind them, and expected the watchman was following of me, instead of which, he had gone a hundred yards, to take the trouble to shut his watch-box door. The prisoner turned round, and finding me only behind, they run off, and separated different ways; I kept the prisoner in sight from first to last; he run; I pursued him and never lost sight of him; I came up to him and collared him; three gentlemen were by; I took him up to Mount-street watchhouse, there I gave charge of him to the constable of the night, Mr. Watson. I am positive the prisoner is the person that reeled up against me, and he is one of the three men that I gave charge to the watchman, who went back to his box, and he is the man that I seized when the three gentleman came up.

Q. Did it appear to you that his shoving of you in apparent drunkenness, was real or affected. - A. He was perfectly sober when I collared him the second time, and so he was at the watchhouse.

Q. Did you collar him the first time. - A. Yes, I collared him the first time, when he reeled against me; and the second time when the gentlemen came up. It was a moonlight night; I saw him when I collared him the first time, I never lost sight of him before I collared him the second time.

MR. WATSON. I was constable of the night in the watchhouse; I received charge of the prisoner, as being one of the five that had robbed the prosecutor of his pocket book.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, called one witness who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18100411-33

293. SAMUEL SOLOMON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the third of March , a watch, value 6 l. a steel chain, value 1 s. and a gold seal, value 1 l. the property of Richard Higley , from his person .

RICHARD HIGLEY. On Saturday evening, the 3rd of March, I was in the New Inn, Shoreditch; about ten o'clock at night, I was walking along, I saw the prisoner before me, he passed on the right hand side of me and drew the watch of my pocket; he met me; I had my hand in my waistcoat pocket. He snatched the watch out of my fob; I felt the watch coming away; I took my hand out of my pocket and catched the watch as he was coming by me; I kept my hold, he broke the ring of the chain as he pulled, and turned round; I slipped down; I immediately called out stop thief.

Q. What became of the watch. - A. The watch I had in my hand; the steel chain was never found, nor the gold seal and key. The prisoner took to his heels and run away.

Q. How soon did you see him again. - A. Not two minutes; I got up and saw him down a turning, John Gray had got hold of him, I seized him; we called the watchman and took him to the watchhouse. I am very sure he is the same man, I saw him by the light of the Bishop Blaze public-house as he was coming by, I saw him before he came to me.

JOHN GRAY . On Saturday evening, the 3d of March, I was returning out of Shoreditch, through New Inn yard, about a quarter past ten o'clock; I had nearly arrived at this turning that had no thoroughfare. I observed, by the light of this public-house, the prisoner and the last witness; I am sure it was the prisoner; I perceived a kind of a bustle between them; I was looking forward; the prisoner left the last witness; he cried, stop thief; I sprang forward; I rather think the prisoner perceived me coming: he turned up this turning; I came up to him and collared him; about the distance of two or three yards he struck me several severe blows in the face. I kept my hold till the last witness came up, we took him to the watchhouse; he resisted the whole of the way, and with great difficulty we conveyed him there.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of what is laid to my charge; I was very much in liquor.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18100411-34

294. JAMES TOWNSHEND was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of March , in the dwelling house of Francis Richards , a knapsack, value 7 s. three

shirts, value 21 s. three pair of stockings, value 3 s. two boots, value 2 s. and two one pound bank notes , the property of Adam Aspin .

ADAM ASPIN . I am a serjeant in the 1st. Royal Regiment of Foot . I had been stationed in Kennington near two years, I was ordered to go to Whitechapel. I met the prisoner at the Green man, in Westminster, being late in the evening he said he would conduct me there and get me a decent lodging. We had something to drink at the bar, I never saw the prisoner before, we proceeded from there to Charing-cross, but we agreed to have a pint of half and half at this said public house, he paid for the beer he represented to me that my knapsack was unbuckled, it was very full of things, I pulled my knapsack off, he pretended to buckle it he then hung the straps on his arm as being a friend to me as I thought. A young man spoke to me about our regiment, I turned myself round and talked with this young man, my back was to the prisoner and in about three or four minutes I missed the prisoner and my knapsack, my knapsack contained all the things mentioned in the indictment. William Gibson the waiter made oath that he saw him walk off with the knapsack, he is not here.

Mr. Walford. After the prisoner was apprehended did you go to see him - A. I did.

Q. You then said you did not think he was the man - A. I did; I was sure he was the man but I wanted to see if there was any change in his countenance, I told him he should be out to-morrow, I knew he would be taken up to Queen-square on the next day. If he would have brought any things forward I would have had nothing more to do with it.

SARAH DAVIS . Q. On Monday night the 26th of March did you see the prisoner - A. Another young woman and me were coming down the Strand, the prisoner is something like the man.

Q. Look at the man at the bar and say whether that is the man that you saw come down St. Martin's-lane - A. It was dark, I spoke to him but I did not look him full in the face he is like him; I said to him the serjeant is looking for you, he said, he was looking for the serjeant; he had a knapsack on his left arm.

Q. Look at him again and tell the truth - A. He had his back towards me.

Q. Were you examined before the justice - A. Yes, I then said he was the man, so far as I now can say I believe he is the man I cannot swear to it.

MARY FEARN. I am a servant at the Green man.

Q. Did you see the prisoner and the serjeant at your house - A. Yes; I brought him a pint of beer on Monday evening, the 26th of March between six and seven o'clock; I know the prisoner he uses our house constantly.

EDWARD Mc'CARDEN. On the 28th of March I was in the house with the serjeant, he ordered me if the prisoner came in the place to take him. On the 31st, I was coming by the Green man, the girl told me he was there, the landlord told me he was the man that was with the serjeant, I fetched a constable and got him apprehended.

Prisoner's Defence. I have a witness to come forward to prove that I am innocent of the charge who can prove every hour where I was that night.

MARY CRIMNER. I live at 87, Jermyn-street, St. James's. I am a servant there.

Q. Do you know where the prisoner lodges - A. Yes.

Q. Did you at the time we have been speaking of lodge in the same house with him - A. Yes; No. 38, Strutton ground, near the Broadway, Westminster, he drank tea with me the same evening, he came home to his tea about seven o'clock, he remained in the house till near eight, he went out then, I believe to take a little beer, I saw him again some minutes before nine he continued in my company till ten.

Q. How do you know that the time he came home to his tea was about seven - A. We had a clock just by, I believe he came in before the clock struck; I was going to my place on the next day, I always put it down when I go to a place, I put down the 27th.

SAMUEL THOMPSON . I live at the George and Bell, Oxford-street On the 26th of March the prisoner came into my house near upon eight o'clock, I rather think the clock had struck eight, he remained near an hour and drank three pints of stout, he said, he should go home to his supper as he was to work all night.

Q. What led you to observe the particular time when he came in - A. When he came in I had been carrying out my eight o'clock beer and when he went out I was drawing my nine o'clock beer.

The prisoner called three witnesses who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18100411-35

295. JOHN TAYLOR was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of February , thirty bank notes, value one pound each, the property of Samuel Grogan from his person .

SAMUEL GROGAN . On the 17th of February I came to town in a fish cart, I got off the cart in Grace church-street, nigh seven o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came up to me he said, you are very heavy loaded, I said, I was not heavy loaded I was cold hungry and dry; he said, I will get you into a house, I was going into a passage into Leadenhall-market.

Q. Did you ever see him before - A. No; we went into a house and he picked up a woman by the way, I called for a pot of beer and some bread and cheese, I had a glass of rum and so had they; I said, I would shift myself, after I had shifted myself I said, I would buy goose to take home with me.

Q. Did you shift yourself in the tap room - A. I put on a shirt and another pair of trowsers; I differed about the goose I bought a leg of pork, he went with me to buy the leg of pork and the woman went and bought this pocket book for me. The prisoner seemed to be a friend of mine as I thought.

Q. Were you sober to do all this - A. I was as sober as I am now, having bought this leg of pork I went back to drink at this same house. I had my money in a belt that went twice round me in what they call a comforter, I had thirty five one pound notes, I received them at Portsmouth, on the 16th, they were all one pound bank of England notes. I was discharged from the Haughty, gun-brig.

Q. Having come back to this public house this comforter had these notes in it - A. Yes; it was over my shirt and my waistcoat over that. The prisoner saw I had the notes in it at the public house, I took one out on purpose to pay for what I wanted, I had another pot of beer I said, I will go now, I was going to my sister in Jane Shore-alley, Shoreditch. I called a coach and he went

along with me in it. The woman did not go in the coach with us she came out of the public house with us. The coach put me down at the corner of Union-street, the woman was there, she followed us in to buy a handkerchief there, I bought her a pair of gloves at the same time; the prisoner went into the shop with me, I made fast the belt in the linen drapers shop myself; I had the money then, I am sure, and I went along Norton Falgate to go to Shoreditch; I went past the turnpike between New Inn-yard, and Plumb-pudding-row; I missed the belt off me, I said, to the prisoner you have got my money; I got your money said he, and he run away from me directly; I sung out stop thief, and run after him, I could not get up to him. He was stopped and taken into the Jane Shore , public house, and searched and nothing was found upon him. When I came up to him he said, Bill what a fool you must be, go along with me you shall have every farthing again. I lost my belt and all the notes; the belt went round my body twice, and I fastened it with two knots.

Q. Now let me understand how he could get at this belt which you describe went twice round your body and was tied - A. It was worsted, it was always slipping, it was made to put round the neck, there was a little hole in the middle you could put a sixpence in it, it could not come out easy.

RICHARD MERCHANT. I am a watchman at New Inn, Shoreditch. On the 17th of Feb. last when I was on my beat I heard the cry of stop thief, I came up, I saw the sailor with a leg of pork, he said he had been robbed of 35 one pound Bank notes. The prisoner was taken and brought to me by Ashton. The prisoner said to the sailor, what are you making this piece of fuss about, come along with me, and you shall have every farthing of your money back.

Q. Tell me how the prosecutor's dress was at that time. - A. He had a short jacket on and trowsers, one side of the flap of his trowsers was unbuttoned, and his shirt was hanging out.

JAMES ASHTON. I was coming home on Saturday the 17th of February, near 10 o'clock at night. I live in William-street, Curtain Road, and just as I had rung the bell I heard the cry of stop thief. I saw the prisoner running, he seemed to be a great distance from any body that was pursuing him. I sprang from the door, and seized him by the collar with both hands; he made resistance, and said, let me pass, I have done nothing amiss; I said, if you have done nothing amiss, you shall go when they come up: several people came up, and said that is the man, he has robbed the sailor of 50 pounds; a young man laid hold of him by the collar, and took hold of his right hand; I took him by the left hand, and held his collar with the other; we took him to the Jane Shore public house in Shoreditch. The sailor came in afterwards with his shirt hanging out behind. The prisoner says to him, have I robbed you, and took out one or two dollars and a few shillings from his breeches pocket, and said, that is all the money I have; he said, if you have lost your money you know who it is with, and if she has got it you will have it again, it is very safe. He was conveyed to the watch-house. I told the officer of the night what he had said; I said, officer, if you like, I and you will go and see if we can get the money for the poor man. The prisoner then said, no, he would not go, he would see us all b - r, we might do as we pleased.

Q. to Prosecutor. When you came out of this linen draper's shop, and went along Norton Falgate, who was with you. - A. The man, I never saw the woman after I came out of the shop.

Prisoner's Defence. On Wednesday last he came to me in Newgate; he said he had found no bill against me, if I would give him 2 l. he would make it up.

Prosecutor. I went to see Bradford, he was in the same ward; it is no such thing.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Confined Two Years in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18100411-36

296. ANN SMITH , alias WEBB , was indicted for feloniously making an assault in the King's highway upon James Dunckley , on the 19th of February , putting him in fear, and feloniously taking from his person and against his will, a watch, value 4 l. his property.

JAMES DUNCKLEY. I live with Sir James Gardiner in Hampshire. At the time this happened I had just come to town. I had been down after the place, and then returned to town.

Q. What day of the month was it. - A. On the 19th, of February, about one o'clock in the morning, I was going to my lodgings in Portman Mews.

Q. Where had you been till that time in the morning. - A. I had taken the carriage to Mr. Naples, I was going home; I was in David-street, Oxford Road; I looked at my watch at the time, it was a little after one; I crossed Oxford-street opposite of Gee's court; I was going along Oxford-street to Portman Mews; I met the prisoner, she stopped me, she wanted me to go with her, she pushed up against me two or three times.

Q. Did you go with her. - A. No, I did not, I went about ten yards further before I lost my watch. I never was with her at all only when she pushed up against me. Immediately I missed my watch I called the watchman, and directly she went up Gee's court.

Q. Was she with you when you missed the watch - A. No, she had left me then, she did not walk with me at all, she pushed up against me and then I passed on. I refused going with her; directly I called the watchman she went up Gee's court; the watchman and I went up Gee's court; we could not hear any thing of her; I did not see her afterwards till the 26th of February. I then saw her in North-audley-street about ten o'clock at night.

Q. You had never seen her before that first night, had you - A. No, I knew her by her speech and by her face. My brother took her; she was pointed out by the two girls that told us she had pawned the watch for 2 l. My brother and the prisoner went into the public-house together; I went in directly after; I knew the prisoner directly. The prisoner told me she never saw me in her life before. I told her I had seen her before, and I was very well satisfied I had seen her again. I charged the watch with her, and sent her to the watch-house. The next morning I saw my watch at the pawnbroker's in Berwick-street.

JOHN DUCKLEY . Q. You are the brother of the last witness - A. Yes, on the 26th of February, in consequence of information we went into North Audley-street, we understood this girl walked there, we found the prisoner in North Audley-street, near ten o'clock at night.

Q. How did you know who the woman was. - A. By

the information that the girls gave me. One of these girls went with me, and a friend of mine was with me, she loosed my friends arm, and then he took hold of the prisoner, he took her into the public-house, I followed and called my brother in, I asked him if he would swear to the person

Q. Pointing her out. - A. Yes, he told me, he could swear to her person and features, he gave in charge to the watchman, he took her to the watchhouse.

- DELBROY I am a watchman. On the night of the 18th of February, near one o'clock in the morning, I was at the corner of James-street, Grovesnor-square, facing of Gee's-court, I saw the prosecutor crossing Oxford-street, he went near Gee's-court, there was a woman standing at the corner of Gee's-court, she came before the prosecutor, what words passed I do not know.

Q. Did he stand to talk with her. - A. No, he went one way and she the other, the prosecutor passed on, and near ten or eleven paces beyond Gee's-court, he called out watch; I ran across the street, he said, he was robbed by the woman that stopped him by Gee's-court; I went in search of her, he went with me, we could not find her.

Q. Did you know who that woman was. - A. Yes, by sight, I have not seen her since,

Q. Look round and see whether you know her. - A. That is the woman at the bar.

WILLIAM BALFLOUR . I am a servant to James Alders , 67, Berwick-street; a watch was pledged with me on Monday the 18th of February, for two pound by a woman, I cannot say that I know the woman, it was pledged in the name of Ann Webb .

Prisoner's Defence. On the night I was taken to the watchhouse I was in North Audley-street, two grooms came to me and asked me to have something to drink, they took me into the public-house and charged me with the watch, I never was in that pawnbrokers shop in my life, nor did I ever see that young man that charged me before in my life. They charged another woman with this before.

Prosecutor. The watchman took up another woman on suspicion. I did not charge any other woman.

GUILTY, aged 37,

of stealing, but not violently from the person .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson .

Reference Number: t18100411-37

297. WILLIAM CROUCH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of February , a mare, value 5 l. 5 s. the property of James Grove .

JAMES GROVE . I lost the mare on the 13th of February, I lost her out of an orchard at Shepperton , about half past ten.

Q. When had you last seen her before - A. About half past six.

Q. Does the prisoner live near you - A. Yes, I know his person very well, he lived about a mile off me.

Q. Had you seen him any where near the orchard where the mare was lost from - A. Yes, about eight o'clock I saw him pass me, it was quite moon-light.

Q. Are you sure it was him - A. Yes, I bid him good night, but the answer he gave me I could not understand.

Q. Had you ever any talk with him about the mare. - A. Yes, on the 12th of February he asked me if I was obliged to blindfold her because she was shy, I said, she is the better for it.

Q. What did the mare cost you - A. Eight pound, I had her about a twelve-month.

Q. Then upon losing her upon that evening about half-past ten o'clock, did you make any enquiries immediately about her - A. No, after I missed the mare out of the orchard, I suspected that this man had stolen her.

Q. What is he - A. A labouring man, he lives in lodgings. I went to his lodgings that night. I saw his wife. I asked whether Mr. Crouch was at home, she told me he was not. I went the next morning about seven, he was not there then, his wife told me he had not been at home all night.

Q. Where next did you see the mare - A. On the 16th I saw the mare in Smithfield. John Edwards offered her for sale. I claimed my mare, then John Judge came forward, he said he had sold her at Bromley fair. I got my mare again.

Q. You have no doubt that this mare that you got from this Edwards was your own mare - A. I am sure it is my own mare.

Q. Now look at the prisoner, is that the person who was at your orchard - A. He is the man that pass'd me about eight o'clock in the evening; I have known him for a twelve month; he once kept Walton-bridge-house, about a mile and a half from me, I am quite sure of his person.

Q. What marks had the mare - A. She had a star in her forehead, and blind in the off eye, and broken on the off knee before, two white feet behind and a sand crack in one of the hoofs; I am certain it is my mare.

JOHN JUDGE. I am a currier. I live at No. 6, Market-street St. George's.

Q. Were you at Bromley fair on Wednesday the 14th of February - A. I was, I got in there about half-past nine, I saw the mare between ten and eleven, I bought the mare, I gave 4 l. 3 s. for her.

Q. How was the person dress'd from whom you bought it - A. He looked like a farmer's servant.

Q. Look at the prisoner's person, what do you think about him - A. There is some resemblance, and more I cannot say; he had a snuff-colour'd coat on, he said he brought the mare from Chersey.

Q. What distance is it from Bromley to Chersey - A. They tell me it is twenty-two miles.

Q. Was the horse hot - A. No, there was not a hair sweating about it when I bought it, it seemed as if he had been somewhere to have refreshment.

Q. You sold it again to one Newman I think - A. Yes, he stood by, he wanted to have it, I thought it was rather a broken-back'd one. Mr. Newman gave me 4 l. 10 s. I sold it for that.

Q. Had you much talk with the prisoner - A. About five or six minutes.

Q. Have you had any talk with him since - A. No more than when we went down to the magistrate, we went in the public-house along with the officer before we went before the justice.

Q. Did you recollect the voice as the voice of the person that sold the horse - A. When I bought the mare I had about twenty people round me.

- NEWMAN. Q. You were by when Judge bought this horse - A. I was. I bought it again and gave him seven shillings for buying it. I saw the man that sold it.

Q. Did you observe his countenance - A. I did.

Q. Look at the prisoner, is that the man - A. I have not a doubt of it, he has had his whiskers shaved off.

Q. Did you observe his countenance so as to say he is the same man - A. Yes, I did, I said he was the same man at Hatton-garden office. I observed his voice, and after Judge bought the horse he gave Lloyd a shilling to get some gin and I had part of the gin at the public-house at Bromley.

Q. Did you observe his voice enough so as to recollect him before the magistrate - A. Yes, I am sure it is the same person. Thornton and Lloyd were both by, I have no doubt of him.

JAMES HALFORD . Q. You, I believe are a drover - A. Yes.

Q. You were at Bromley fair - A. Yes.

Q. You saw the mare sold - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see her sold by the prisoner at the bar - A. I cannot say that is the man, he is like him; that man that sold the horse to Judge had long whiskers on, and he was a fresh-coloured man.

Q. Exclusive of the whiskers does he appear like the man - A. No, I do not think he is.

Q. You said before the magistrate by the features he resembled the man very much - A. He had a red silk handkerchief on and a red waistcoat.

Q. Now look at the features independent of the clothes, because any man might shift his clothes; do you believe him to be the man - A. I can say no further, I think it is the man by the features.

Q. to Groves. Do you recollect at the time you saw the prisoner whether he had whiskers on - A. Yes, he had.

Q. to Newman. Have you any doubt about it - A. I have not in the least.

Prisoner. When I went back to Clerkenwell the people said, that man that swore to me, and one Rogers in particular said, that man that swore to me would swear any thing for the price of my blood.

Q. Have you any of them people here - A. No, they were all in custody at the time I was.

Prisoner's Defence. I know no more of the man, I never saw Mr. Judge with my eyes before he came in the country to take me before a Justice. I am as innocent of the crime as you are, I know no more of it. I was at Mr. Hensley's that night the mare was lost.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 23.

First Middlesex jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18100411-38

298. JAMES POPE was indicted for feloniously making an assault in the kings high-way, on the 28th of March , upon James Hodgson , putting him in fear, and feloniously taking from his person and against his will a watch, value 5 l. 10 s., a gold chain value 2 l. 12 s. 6 d., and a gold seal value 1 l. 11 s. 6 d., and a watch-key value 5 s. his property.

JAMES HODGSON. I live in Ship Alley, Well-close-square.

Q. What part of the town were you in when this happened - A. Near to Somerset-house . I was going home; it was between twelve and one o'clock on Wednesday morning, the 28th of March last. I was alone, and when I got near Somerset-house I was attacked by the prisoner he was in the front of me when I first saw him, it was a star-light night and the lamps were a light; he took hold of my great coat and opened it; he laid hold of my under coat with one hand, and pulled at my watch with the other he did not get my watch out at this time. I then looked him in the face and said, you rascal, what do you want to rob me of my watch. He gave me no kind of answer whatever, but made a second pull at my watch, and gave me a blow which knocked me down.

Q. Do you know what he struck you with - A. I believe with his hand.

Q. And you fell to the ground, did you - A. Yes, and I felt the watch go at the same moment; I felt him pull it out, he ran across the way towards the church, towards Drury-lane way; I immediately got up, crossed the way, and cried out stop thief, and pursued him; the watchman came up and ask'd me who had robbed me, I pointed the prisoner out to him.

Q. Where was the prisoner when you pointed him out A. Somewhere on the opposite side of the way where he had ran to.

Q. Was he standing still then or running - A. He was standing still, I believe.

Q. Were you near him when you pointed him out to the watchman - A. Yes, I was; I said, that is the man that robbed me.

Q. Was the prisoner near enough to hear you say that - A. Yes, he was; the watchman that I had pointed him out to took hold of him by the arm, upon which he gave him a push and ran away, the watchman pursued him and a number of other people.

Q. Which way did he run. - A. Up into Little Drury-lane; I did not see him stopped until he was brought back again, it was not more than five minutes before he was brought back.

Q. Where was he when you saw him - A. At the bottom of Little Drury-lane, coming back to the watch-house, one of the witnesses bringing him back; he then went to the watch-house; I identified the prisoner at the bar, I have not the least doubt but the prisoner was the man.

Q. Did you ever see your watch again. - A. The outside case was found about half an hour afterwards, I did not see it found, I saw it brought in the watch-house by one of the watchmen.

Q. Did you know it again. - A. I described it before ever I saw it; it was a silver gilt watch, horizontal, capped, jewelled, and seconds.

Q. The watch itself you never saw again, did you. - A. Never.

Q. I suppose he was searched at the watchhouse. - A. Yes, and nothing found upon him.

Q. Who has got the watch-case. - A. The watchman that picked it up.

JULIAN ROLINET . I am a watchman in the parish of St. Mary in the Strand.

Q. On the morning that the other witness has spoken of, between twelve and one where were you. - A. I was on duty.

Q. Whereabouts did you receive any alarm. - A. I was opposite Somerset-house, I saw the prosecutor there, he was on the pavement, and several other people were there.

Q. Did you see him come over. - A. No.

Q. Where was this, near any place. - A. Near to the end of Little Drury-lane.

Q. Among these other persons that were there, look about and see whether there is any person here that you saw there. - A. Yes, the prisoner is the man that Mr. Hodgson pointed out to me; he said, he was the man that robbed him of his watch.

Q. Was the prisoner near him when he said so. - A. He was not far off.

Q. Did he look about before he fixed upon the prisoner. - A. Yes, upon his pointing the prisoner out I laid hold of him; the prisoner pushed me off the pavement and run away.

Q. Then he broke from your hold. - A. He did, and ran up Little Drury-lane; I sprang the rattle and pursued him; I never lost sight of him; I saw him stopped: there were several people coming down as he run up, and some people stopped him; I took him to the watch-house.

Q. Are you sure that the person that the people brought back, was the same man that Mr. Hodgson pointed out to you as having robbed him. - A. I am.

Q. And whom you had laid hold off, and he had broke from your hold and ran away. - A. Yes; he was searched at the watchhouse, nothing was found on him. I was not in the watchhouse when the watch case was brought in.

GEORGE HILL . I live at 79 Sloane-street.

Q. Upon this night, between twelve and one o'clock, where did you happen to be. - A. I was going out of the Strand up Drury-lane; when I had passed what is called Little Drury-lane, I then heard a watchman's rattle; I did not notice it, it was behind me; I did not notice it till I heard it violent and incessant, and then I turned round, I saw a person advancing out of the Strand up Little Drury-lane, running very fast; I stood still for a moment when he was coming near where I was I made a slant crossing the way, he altered his pace, when I was within half a dozen yards, and walked; I sprang forward and laid hold of him; he told me that he had not done any thing, then I said I'll see justice done you, you must go with me, you shall not stir away. In a short time the watchman came up and a number of people behind him, I did not loose him till we got in the watch-house.

Q. Did you see Mr. Hodgson in the watch-house - A. Yes.

Q. I suppose he charged the prisoner with having robbed him of his watch - A. He did, and shewed the marks in his face where the man knocked him down; his face was all dirt and his head was scarr'd, I left him in the watch-house.

Mr. Knapp. Did you consider Mr. Hodgson as drunk or sober - A. He was very correct in what he said he did not appear as sober as he would be in a morning, he said he had been drinking a glass, he gave as clear a statement as he now has done.

JAMES FLETCHER . Q. Were you at the watch-house when the prisoner was brought in - A. Yes, Mr. Hodgson came in with his face all over dirt, and his forehead seemed to be hurt; he gave charge of the prisoner having robbed him.

EDMOND LINDER . Q. You are a watchman - A. Yes of St. Mary-le-strand. I heard the rattle spring, I was at the end of Catharine-street in the Strand; I ran to this side of the Church, and the prisoner ran up little Drury-lane; I saw nothing of the prisoner till he was brought to the watch-house. After Mr. Hodgson said he was knocked down I went to look if there was any thing there.

Q. Where did Mr. Hodgson say he was knocked down A. At the lower part of Somerset-house gateway.

Q. Did you at the spot that he mentioned, or thereabouts, find any thing - A. As near as possible it could be mentioned I found this watch-case; it was just outside of the kennel in the coach road.

Q. to Prosecutor. Look at that watch-case, and see if you know any thing about it - A. This is the outside case that was on my watch at the time.

Q. You was not aware of its falling on the ground at all - A. No, I was not.

Q. Is there any thing particular that you know it by - A. Yes, there is a satrin paper at the bottom of it.

Q. Had you that little Landscape in it - A. Yes, that was inside of it.

Mr. Knapp. Q. to Linder. How long after the rattle sprang the first time did you find this - A. About half an hour, just upon the stroke of one o'clock.

Q. Now upon the spring of the rattle there was a good many people about, was there not - A. I did not take notice of any more than another time.

Q. to Mr. Hodgson. You admitted you had been drinking that evening - A. I had.

Q. Had you your senses about you at that time - A. I believe I had as well as I have just at this moment.

Prisoner's Defence. My prosecutor was drunk at the time he had me taken to the watch-house. That gentleman stopped me; my prosecutor said he was one of my companions, he thought he knew as much about it as I did; and when my prosecutor had me taken to the watch-house, I said, sir, if you are in liquor I am not, I was going home.

MR. HILL. I said to this poor man I will have justice done, and so Mr. Hodgson concluded from that I was one of the party.

Prosecutor. It was nothing more than Mr. Hill saying that he would have justice done him, I conjectured that he might belong to him.

Q. What sort of a chain was it - A. A gold chain, a gold seal and a gold key.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 20

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson .

Reference Number: t18100411-39

299. THOMAS HAMP alias HEMP was indicted for that he on the 10th of March feloniously did make an assault in and upon George Harris , a subject of our Lord the King; and that he with both his hands did strike and beat him, the said George Harris in and upon his head, and to and against the ground feloniously did cast and threw him down, giving him by the striking and beating, as well as by the casting to and against the ground, one mortal blow and bruise in and upon his head, of which said mortal bruise the said George Harris from the 10th of March did languish, and languishing did live untill the 12th, on which said 12th of March he died, and so the jurors say, that he the said Thomas Hamp , the said George Harris did kill and slay .

ELIZABETH REDWORTH . Q. You are a servant at Brentford - A. Yes.

Q. Were you in company with the deceased on the 10th of March - A. Yes, his name was George Harris, I was walking with him, we met the prisoner in the street in Brentford about half-past eight o'clock, when we met the prisoner he pushed me off the pavement, whether he did it by accident or design I cannot tell; George Harris , the deceased, asked him what he did it for, the prisoner replied, do you know who you are talking to, you are talking to a gentleman and not to a blackgaurd like yourself; the prisoner then struck the deceased in the face I believe, the deceased fell down backwards on the pavement, the deceased got up and said he would fight; I left them and then went home.

ROBERT SMITH . Q. Did you see the commencement

of the dispute - A. No, The first thing I saw was Harris knocked down. I did not see the girl, the deceased fell upon his back, when he got up I lent him a handkerchief to wipe his mouth, his mouth was cut then, he said he would fight, they fought, Harris was knocked down several times, and the prisoner was knocked down two or three times, they fought about half an hour, the prisoner give in, they then shook hands with one another, the deceased walked to a public-house just by and he had part of a pint of mild beer. I believe the prisoner did not suspect any mischief. I helped carry him to his burial afterwards.

JAMES HARRIS . Q. I believe you are the brother to the unfortunate young man - A. I am.

Q. Did you see your brother in company with the girl passing through Brentford - A. No, I saw my brother knocked down backwards in the street by the prisoner.

Q. Did you observe whether your brother did or said any thing to the prisoner before he struck him - A. No. I was ten or twelve yards off him.

DANIEL STENSON. I am a surgeon and man-midwife.

Q. Were you called in on this Saturday night - A. Yes, about nine o'clock at night, I found the deceased in a state of total insensibility.

Q. What did it originate from - A. I cannot say.

Q. Had you observed any appearance of liquor upon him at all - A. None at all. I found him in a state of insensibility, with symptoms denoting concussion on the brain, the sensation of the pupils of the eye, sickness at the stomach, involuntary discharge of faces in the urine; notwithstanding the employment of every means he continued in a state of insensibility all Monday afternoon about four o'clock, when he expired. Upon examination of the head on Tuesday morning I found a considerable extraversation of blood on the left side of the brain, between the membrane of the brain, the dura pia mater, evidently arising from the rupture of the vessels at the back part of the brain; the brain was perfectly sound in every respect.

Q. Did you form you opinion what caused those consequences - A. From a fall or falls.

Q. I will now ask you whether, if it had originated from any defect of the brain itself, would the brain have had that appearance - A. No, certainly the substance of the brain would have been alter'd, it would have been coagulated blood from the artery of the brain.

Q. Did you see any external wound - A. The lip was cut through, and there was also a cut in the right eye-brow

Mr. Gurney. Mr. Cooke, another surgeon, opened the brain with you - A. Yes, he is a medical man in the town.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel.

WILLIAM COOKE . Q. You are a surgeon, I believe, at Brentford - A. I am.

Q. Did you attend and examine the deceased - A. Yes, I attended at the request of Mr. Stenson, the surgeon who opened the body. The appearance was extraversation of blood on the left side of the brain, and a preternatural distension of the membrane of the right side of the brain; that is all the unusual appearance that I observed; there was no external marks of violence on the scalp of the back of the head, no fracture of the scull, to the best of my recollection whatever. There was a lacerated wound over the eye-brow, and one on the lip without much contusion.

Q. They could not have produced that effect upon the brain. - A. Upon my oath I could not declare that they would.

Q. From the appearances that you have described upon the brain, can you take upon yourself to say from what cause it could proceed. - A. Certainly not. I have opened a head, and I have seen others opened, in which blood has been extravasated upon the membrane of the brain as here, as well as in the substance of the brain, without any external violence, and for these reasons I would not positively say that a fall or blow occasioned it. My opinion is, in consequence of the knowledge I have acquired both from opening heads myself, seeing them opened, and from what I have read, that such appearances might have arisen from some particular internal cause as well as from an external cause.

Q. If this rupture had taken place from any act during the fight, could the person have walked away from the place after the fight, in the manner as described, without any symptom of concussion of the brain. - A. I believe not.

Mr. Alley. I will ask you whether if you thought the injury the boy received at that time, had caused his head to be in the state as you found on examination, whether if the vessel was ruptured at the time, he could have walked home without a symptom of concussion of the brain. - A. I do not think he could have walked home without a symptom.

Q. Whether the sickness at the public house was not a symptom.

Mr. Gurney. The sickness has not been proved at the public house.

Court. Q. to Smith. You accompanied the deceased to the public house. - A. Yes; he was very well at the public house; he drank beer with me there, then he walked home, about three hundred yards from the house.

Q. Had that beer any effect upon the deceased, did it cause any sickness. - A. I cannot tell.

Q. Did you see him sick. - A. Yes; I asked him what it was; he said, he believed it was the beer.

Q. By sickness do you mean that he vomited. - A. Yes, against the chemist's place; that was about ten minutes after he was gone from the public house.

Mr. Alley. Q. to Mr. Gooke. Was not that symptom that you have just heard, almost a certain symptom of concussion of the brain. - A. Certainly, it is a usual symptom of concussion, but it might arise from another cause.

Court. Might or might not such appearance as you have described about the brain, arise from a fall on the ground. - A. It might arise from that, I merely accompanied Mr. Stenson to examine the brain. I did not see him till he was opened.

Q. to Mr. Stenson. Have you the means of knowing how long the lad had been home, before you saw him. - A. About ten minutes, I am not certain; one of the family came for me; when I saw him he was totally insensible, and I saw what he had vomited on the ground; he was in the act of vomiting when I came in; that was on the Saturday evening.

Q. to Smith. How came you to accompany him to the public-house, instead of going home with him. - A. I asked him whether he would have any thing to drink, he said he would; he walked without help to the public-house, and also to his own home, and when he came out again he was taken to bed.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson .

Reference Number: t18100411-40

300. MANASSEH BOOTH was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 7th of March , in the dwelling house of James Stokes , a pocket book, value 2 d. and a bank note, value 5 l. the property of William Buswell .

WILLIAM BUSWELL . Q. You are a farmer and grazier , living in Northamptonshire - A. Yes. On the 7th of March I first saw the prisoner at the Half Moon in Smithfield, he was sitting in the tap-room; a neighbour of mine asked him where he came from; the prisoner said he came from Wellington, he came away from there on account of a girl that his father would not let him marry; I asked him whether he would wish to go home; he replied, he had a great desire to do it, but he had no money; I told him if he would go home I would pay the coach-hire, which I did, and I told Mrs. Stokes, the landlady, that if there was any thing to pay I would see that it was paid.

Q. On what day were you to go - A. I was not going with him; he was to go the next morning by ten o'clock.

Q. Where did the prisoner sleep - A. At the Half Moon; he did not sleep there that night.

Q. What time did you retire to bed on the night of the 7th - A. Between eight and nine, I think.

Q. Had you at the time that you went to bed, any money about you - A. Yes, a pocket book containing near three hundred pound bank of England notes. In all there was an hundred pound check, and two hundred and fifty nine pounds besides the check.

Q. Was there a five pound note amongst them besides the check - A. Yes.

Q. When you went to bed where did you put that pocket book containing that note, and the other notes - A. In my breeches pocket. I am sure I had it in my breeches pocket when I went to bed. I put my breeches under my pillow and went to bed

Q. Did you see the prisoner again that night before you were called up - A. No, not after I went to bed, until I was called up; I was called up by Mr. Donn, near eleven o'clock; I saw the prisoner some time afterwards at the watchhouse. When Mr. Donn called me I looked for my breeches; on my examining them my pocket book and notes were gone.

Q. How soon after did you see your pocket book any where - A. In about half an hour after that I saw my pocket book at Mr. Donn's; it had got all the notes in it. Mr. Donn has that pocket book now.

Q. From whom had you received that five pound note - A. From Mr. Cole in Smithfield. I can swear that I took it there, and I have no doubt it is my pocket book.

MR. DONN. I am a butcher; I live in St. John-street.

Q. Do you know the prosecutor, Mr. Buswell - A. Yes; I had been in company with him about two or three hours before it happened.

Q. Did you on that night, on any occasion, see Mr. Buswell's pocket book - A I did; I saw his pocket book at the Half Moon. On that night the prisoner came to my house near nine o'clock, as I was shutting up my house, he came for some mutton chops; he had with him a pocket book, and a great deal of money in it; he was very tipsey; he paid for the mutton chops in silver; he asked me for something to drink, I told him he was not in a place to have any thing to drink. I I saw some companions with him, I did not think them of good character, I asked him in, and said I would send for some porter; he came in with me; I gave the mutton chops to the people that were with him, and told them to get them dressed, I would send him bye and bye. When he was in the parlour he took out the pocket book again, and began to pull out the notes; he asked whether one of the notes (a thirty pound note) was not a ten, which gave me suspicion; at last he gave me that bit of paper with Mr. Buswell's address on it. Then I questioned him about Mr. Buswell, and seeing that paper, and he having so much money, and hardly knowing what it was, it struck me that it was Mr. Buswell's. I slipped out and told our folks to see that he did not go out, and went to the Half Moon and spoke to Mr. Buswell, and when I came back, I said, young man, give me that pocket book, I know whose it is; he gave it me with the notes and every thing in it, just as it is. I saw Mr. Buswell's name in the pocket book: I sent for a constable, he was taken in custody.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Transported or Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100411-41

301. JOHN BRIANT was indicted for that he on the 26th of March , in and upon Edward Grove , a subject of our Lord the King, feloniously, wilfully, maliciously, and unlawfully, did make an assault; and with a certain sharp instrument did stab and cut the said Edward Grove , in and upon his head, with intent in so doing, to kill and murder him .

SECOND COUNT for like offence, with intention to disable him; - And

THIRD COUNT, to do him some grivous bodily harm.

EDWARD GROVE . I am a publican ; I live in King-street, Wapping . On the evening of the 20th of March, between ten and eleven o'clock, I had just done supper, I had no company in the house, except one person that was at supper with me, and my wife; I heard a riot in the street, I went out and endeavoured to put my shutters up; there were a party of men fighting in the street, and before I could get the shutters up some of them pushed the tap-room door open and went in.

Q. How many came into your house - A. About eight or ten, the prisoner was one of them. On their coming in I left the shutters and returned into the house to endeavour to get them out; they were quarreling and fighting together; the prisoner was one that was fighting.

Q. Had the party been in your house that night - A. No, not one of them. In about five or ten minutes, by my persuading them not to fight, the prisoner and all his party, except the prisoner's wife, left my house; they were in two parties; three or four of the other party staid in the house, and the prisoner's wife. On Briant and his party, leaving the house I missed my hat, I went to the door and saw it on one of the men's head's, not the prisoner; they were on the threshold or the door just going out; I told the man it was my hat, and I took it off his head and gave it my wife, she put it in the bar; my wife put on the spring lock door and put it to; at this time the prisoner's wife was in the tap room, with three or four more; I persuaded her to go out of the house, she asked me to draw her a pint of beer; I told her I could not, if she would go home I would

send her some.

Q. You knew her before - A. Yes, and him; they live within ten yards of my house. While I was talking to her, and persuading her to go out. I heard a pane of glass break in the tap-room, I opened the door to see who was breaking it; I saw the prisoner at the window, immediately I got out (the same instant) he turned from the window and struck me upon the head.

Q. Had you your hat on then - A. No.

Q. Did you see what he struck you with - A. No; I judged it to be some iron instrument; I could not see what it was. I turned into the house immediately; I found myself very badly wounded indeed in the head.

Q. Describe in what manner you found yourself wounded - A. I felt the cut in my head, and the blood run very fast.

Q. Are you sure it was the prisoner that gave you that blow - A. Yes.

Q. Was not there other people with him at the time - A. I saw no other; there was none near. When I got into the house, his wife then seeing me wounded, threw up one of the sashes and got out, and the other party that were left when Briant went out, went out at the back door. I then sent for a surgeon, Mr. Jackson,

Q. Did you see any thing more of the prisoner that night - A. He continued twenty minutes or half an hour at the window, and broke the windows all to pieces; I saw him and spoke to him at the window; he said, through the window, he would massacre the first person that came out of the door. This was after I received the cut on my head, and after his wife got out of the window.

Q. Did he then go away, or was he taken in custody - A. He went away.

Q. You say he lived near you - what is he - A. A coal-heaver.

Q. How soon did the surgeon come - A. In half an hour, or thereabouts.

Q. When did you ever see any thing of the prisoner afterwards - A. The police officer brought him in my bed room about three o'clock in the morning, and the magistrate was with them. When the surgeon came to look at my wound he said it was dangerous, he wished to have further advice called in; he wished to have sir William Blissard , and by the advice of sir William Blissard the magistrate was sent for to take my evidence.

Q. You gave your evidence about it - A. Yes. The prisoner denied it, and said it was not him.

Q. You did not see what instrument he had in his hand when he struck you - A. No.

Q. Had you seen any instrument in his hand while he was in your house - A. No, none at all.

Mr. Jackson. Was it not before you received the injury that the woman attempted to get out of the window - A. After I received the injury, it was. I persuaded her to go out of the door before, and she would not.

Q. I think you said it was only one blow that you received - A. Only one blow.

MR. JACKSON. Q. You are a surgeon - A. Yes; on Wapping-wall. On the night of the 26th of March, between ten and eleven o'clock, I was called upon to go to the prosecutor's house; I went there, he was bleeding when I saw him; he appeared to have lost a great deal of blood; the blood was proceeding from the side of his head; upon examining the wound I found a large wound through the bone; it had gone through the bone on the side of the head.

Q. What breadth might it be - A. Very near a quarter of an inch, and it separated the membrane over the brain, not the one underneath that lines the scull.

Q. Now, sir, could you form a judgment what sort of an instrument it had been inflicted with - A. It appeared to have been done with an edged instrument.

Q. Could you form any judgment what sort of an edged instrument - A. It appeared to have been done with a piece of iron that had been blunt.

Q. You mean a broad piece of iron - A. It diverged from the edge to the back of it, whatever it had been.

Q. Then it was not very deep this wound - A. It went through the bone; the membrane underneath it was not divided.

Q. Can you say it was inflicted with an instrument contrived for cutting - A. That I cannot exactly say; there was no contusion; it was an incised wound.

Q. Was there any appearance of a fracture of the scull at all - A. No, none.

Q. What is your reason for saying it must have been an instrument with a blunt edge - A. Because the membrane underneath it, not being divided, must have been separated from the bone.

Q. What is your distinction between not being divided, and its being separated - A. Because if the instrument had been sharp it would have cut through it, and, not being divided, but separated from the bone from being pressed down.

Q. Then am I to understand you from being pressed down, a blunt bar of iron might have created such an appearance - A. If there had been an edge to it.

Q. The edge of a blunt bar of iron might have done it - A. Yes.

Q. You have told us the breadth of it was near a quarter of an inch, what was the length of it - A. About an inch and a half.

Q. Would a cutlass produce a wound of that sort - I think it might if it was blunt.

Q. But would there have been such an appearance, the breadth and length of it by a proper cutting instrument - A. No; I think it must have gone deeper, and and not have been so broad,

Q. How long did you attend him - A. He is still under my care now.

Q. What was your opinion of the state of the wound at first - A. I considered it of great danger at first.

Q. You called in for farther assistance, we learn - A. Yes, I did.

JOHN SMITH . I am an officer.

Q. What time of the night was it when you went to the house of the prisoner - A. Between two and three o'clock in the morning. I accompanied the magistrate to the prosecutor's house; I saw the magistrate at the house first, and then I went to apprehend the prisoner.

Q. When you found him, was he in bed. - A. Yes, I got into the house the back way; I broke into his room, and found him and his wife in bed; I apprehended him. I found by his bed side this rusty old cutlass; it is in the same state now as when I found it. I could not see any appearance of blood upon it; I took him to the prosecutor's house, where the magistrate took the information. I have part of a window-frame

from the prosecutor's house; it appears to have been cut with the same sort of instrument; it is a part of a window-frame; it laid inside of the house, under the settle; there was a number of pieces; but none appeared to have any cut in it except that.

Prisoner's Defence. My Lord, as I was coming home, I was surrounded by a parcel of men; I did not know who they were; they knocked me, and kicked me in the mud. I was taken home afterwards by some friends that came up and interfered; I know nothing further; I was speechless.

The prisoner called seven witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18100411-42

302. JOHN INGRAM was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of December , a gelding, value 5 l. 5 s. the property of James Curtis .

JAMES CURTIS . I live at Highgate.

Q. Did you at any time lose a house. - A. Yes, on the 19th of December; I locked after him, and could not find him. I had turned him out on Highgate Common .

Q. How soon afterwards did you find him. - A. About a month after Christmas, he was in the possession of James Peck at Hackney Wick.

Q. What is he. - A. A jobber in cows and calves.

Q. What coloured horse was it - A. An old dark brown horse, about 14 or 15 hands high.

Q. How did you know the horse - A. By the marks on his shoulders by the collar, and on the footlock the hair was all rubbed off.

Q. Was the hair rubbed off the footlocks when you lost him - A. Yes, he had a swish tail, and a long rough mane.

Q. It was a gelding, was it not - A. Yes.

JAMES PECK . I live in Kingsland-road.

Q. What is your business - A. I buy pigs, calves, or any thing else.

Q. Do you know any thing of this horse that was lost by Curtis - A. Yes, I bought it of the prisoner at the bar on the Wednesday before Christmas; I gave him a guinea and a half for it. He was very poor when I bought him; I thought he might get a little better; I lit on him just at the corner of Worship-street; I asked him if he was going to sell this horse; he said, yes; he asked three guineas and a half; I bid him twenty-shillings five, and when he came to Sun-street, I gave him a guinea and a half.

Q. What became of the horse you bought of Ingram the prisoner - A. I kept the horse about a week, and sold it to Mr. Mash for a guinea and a half again. Mr. Mash had it, and I had it again soon afterwards; he could not do any thing with it; he was going to knock it on the head; I bought it again; I had the horse at home about a week, and then I had it owned by Mr. Tomkins; he met me in the road; he said the horse belonged to Curtis; he would bring him down in the morning.

Q. Did you deliver the horse to Curtis. - A. Yes, they took me to Worship-street, and there they identified the horse to be Mr. Curtis.

Q. to Curtis. That horse that the last witness delivered back to you was the same that you lost on the common - A. Yes.

Q. How long had you had him - A. From about the 11th of September.

Q. Who did you buy it off - A. John Upton .

Q. Has John Upton seen the horse since it has been delivered back to you by Peck - A. No.

Q. Has Low seen the horse since it has been delivered back. - A. Yes.

Mr. UPTON. I sold Curtis a kind of rusty mouse-coloured brown horse; it was quite an old horse, and worn-out; he was about 14 hands high, between a cart horse and a nag; I have not seen it since.

Mr. LOW. Q. Do you remember the horse that formerly belonged to Upton that afterwards belonged to Curtis - A. Yes, a rusty brown horse.

Q. You have seen Curtis have it - A. Yes, a little before Christmas I saw it at Worship-street; it was then in Mr. Peck's possession; Curtis was there; he delivered it to Curtis.

Prisoner's Defence. I met a man on the road; I bought it for twenty-five shillings; I brought it on the road till that gentleman bought it of me; and when I lit on him again, he said he had lost the horse, and if I would give him the money again, he would not hurt me.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 60.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18100411-43

303. JOHN GRIFFITHS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of March , a one-pound bank-note , the property of John Nicholson .

JOHN NICHOLSON . I am an hosier ; I live in Fleet-street . I keep a shop there; the prisoner was my servant ; he had lived with me about eight months. For some time I had reason to suspect his honesty. On the 24th of March, about nine o'clock in the morning, I went to Mr. Gay, in Chancery-lane, and gave him two one-pound notes. I took the number and date of them, and requested him to give them to Mrs. Gay, and for Mrs. Gay to go and lay them out at my shop. I returned home at about half past eleven in the morning. When I came in, I asked the prisoner what he had sold. He gave me an account of different articles which I set down in this book, as we always do of the money that we put in the till. He gave me an account of one pair of silk stockings, having sold them for fifteen shillings, and several articles that I cannot enumerate, to the amount of about five pound; he told me there was nothing else to set down. I returned to Mrs. Gay, to know what articles she had bought with the two one-pound notes, and then I returned home, and sent for an officer. The officer went into the back-room. I then came out into the shop, and stated to the prisoner that there was money short in the till; he referred me to the book, and told me that the till and the book would correspond, if I examined them. I told him there was money short, and I missed it. I desired the prisoner to walk into the back-room, where the constable was; he did so; I desired the constable to search him.

Q. Before you searched him, what did you conceive that there was too short - A. A one-pound note, not accompted for. Upon searching him, there was found three guinea, a few shillings, and that one-pound note; before the constable examined the note, I told what number it ought to be, and the date. When the note was examined, it was the same number and date I had

mentioned. The prisoner acknowledged that he had stolen it: I desired the constable to walk into the shop; I then told the prisoner I had strong reasons to suspect his conduct for some time; now I could prove it so; as he could not deny if, I should be glad if he could tell me to what amount he had robbed me at various times. His answer was, that he had never robbed me but of a five-shilling and a seven shilling-piece before that one-pound note, and that he meant to return that one-pound note on the following Monday.

JAMES GAY. I am a baker; I live in Chancery-lane. On the morning of the 24th of March, Mr. Nicholson called on me; he delivered me two one-pound notes, with directions for Mrs. Gay to lay them out at his shop; I gave the two same notes to my wife.

ELIZABETH GAY. On the morning of the 24th of March, my husband gave me two one-pound notes; I went to Mr. Nicholson's, and laid them out. I bought of the prisoner with these two one-pound notes six pair of cotton stockings and one pair of silk; they came to 1 l. 16 s.; he gave me four shillings change.

Q. to Nicholson When you asked the prisoner for the account of what he had sold, did he give you any account of six pair of cotton stockings - A. No, he did not account for them. I entered the account that he gave me; the six pair of cotton stockings are not entered in the book; they came to a guinea; here is one pair of silk entered.

JOSEPH BROWN . On Saturday, the 24th of March, I took charge of the prisoner, I searched him, I found a one pound bank note, three guineas, and one shilling and six-pence in silver. Mr. Nicholson described the number and date of the note; I examined it, and it corresponded exactly.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel; called five witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Fined 1 s. and discharged.

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100411-44

304. RICHARD JONES , alias, COOLING , was indicted for that he on the 20th of December , feloniously did make, forge, and counterfeit, and caused to be forged and counterfeited, and willingly acted in assisting in forging and counterfeiting a certain acquittance and receipt for the payment of 34 l. 4 s. 4 s. with intent to defraud the united company of merchants, trading to the East Indies .

SECOND COUNT, for uttering and publishing as true, a like forged receipt for the payment of money, with the same intention. And

FOUR OTHER COUNTS for the same offences, only varying the manner of charging them.

The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.

SOLOMON HYAMS . Q. You are a shipper of seamen for the East Indies - A. I am, and I keep a house for the reception of seamen.

Q. In the month of December last had you any seamen in your house belonging so the ship called the Warley - A. I had three seamen belonging to the Warley, and one of the Exeter.

Q. Do you know the person of the prisoner at the bar - A. Yes.

Q. Did he visit the seamen at your house - A. Yes; he came to my my house by the name of William Bains .

Q. Did your business lead you to the India house in December - A. Yes; I think it was on the 20th of December.

Q. Did you see the prisoner there - A. Yes, he gave me a certificate to receive his wages. I knew the signature of Captain Meriton .

Q. Whatever it was that he gave to you, to whom did you give it to - A. To Mr. Churchill, one of the clerks in the East India pay-office.

Q. In consequence of that were you called upon for the purpose of identifying the person of the name of Bains - A. Mr. Churchhill asked me if I knew the prisoner to be the man of the name of Bains; he said he came over in the Warley.

COURT. The name mentioned in the paper - A. Yes; the name mentioned in the certificate - Bains.

Mr. Gleed. Did you see the prisoner sign any paper - A. I signed the receipt first myself.

COURT. What did you sign - A. The receipt for another seaman, that I received the wages for.

Q. Did you sign this receipt which was the receipt of wages of Bains - A. I witnessed it by the desire of Mr. Churchill. I signed a receipt as a witness of another person, a seaman, and I signed this receipt as a witness that the money was paid.

Mr. Gleed. Is that the receipt signed by you - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see the prisoner put his name, William Bains - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see the money paid and received, which this is a receipt for, thirty-four pounds four shillings and four pence - A. I do not know the exact sum; I saw the money received.

COURT. You understood it to be a payment; you saw a payment made of a sum which you supposed to correspond with the sum in the receipt of thirty-four pounds and a fraction - A. Yes.

Q. It was taken without objection as to the amount - A. Yes, as to the amount, by the prisoner.

Mr. Gleed. Is this the certificate - A. Yes, this is the certificate tendered at the pay office, and upon which the money was paid.

Q. In consequence of some suspicion that was entertained did you go to the house in which the prisoner lodged, when he was taken - A. I did. I think it was in the latter end of January, or the beginning of February; I found him at a bonnet shop in Whitechapel-road, opposite of Union-street. The prisoner was in bed; I told him he had been doing wrong, he must go with me to the India House; he said he was not afraid of going, he had not been doing any thing wrong.

Q. What name did you call him by - A. William Bains. He went immediately with me and the officer.

Q. By what name did you address him - A. By the name of Bains; I knew him by no other name at that time.

Mr. Reynolds. You only knew him by the name of Bains at the time that you called upon him - A. Yes.

Q. How often had you seen him at your house - A. He was there near three weeks, backwards and forwards.

Q. He visited you, I understood you - A. He boarded there near three weeks.

Q. You never heard him called Cooling when he was there - A. Never.

Q. Were you with him the whole of that day at the

East India house - A. Yes; I received the money for a man of the name of Gunnal Lawson.

Q. The prisoner signed nothing but that receipt that day at the pay-office - did you look over him all the while he was signing and receiving - A I was standing next to him: I was called away to receive the money for Gunnal Lawson.

Q. Have you heard him called Cooling - A. No; I can prove it by the people at the house, otherwise I should not have taken him there to receive the money.

Q. Were you acquainted with Mr. Meriton - A. I have had notes of his hand-writing for money advanced for seamen to a large amount; I have seen him write.

Q. Do you mean to say that you are acquainted with his hand-writing - A. I can swear to his handwriting.

Q. Before the Exeter sailed did you know any of the seamen - A No.

Q. Pray, after this money was received did he come back to your house - A. He was there near three weeks afterwards; I never knew him by any other name than Bains.

Q. Nobody in the house addressed him by any other name than Bains; am I to understand you to say - A. I never heard him called by any other name than Bains; I never knew he had any other name than Bains till after he was taken up.

Q. Look at that signature, did he make that signature the T and the N altogether - A. That is the way he signed; I observed that is the way he wrote his name at that time.

Q. You particularly looked at it and saw that he wrote in that manner - A. I did not particularly look at it, but I saw that is the way he wrote.

Q. You are in that line of business which people commonly call cri - A. Yes.

Q. They come and get money and spend it at your house - A. They spend it out sometimes.

Q. This man spent his money at your house, he was there three weeks - where did you first see the prisoner - A. I saw this man on board the Warley the night that he came up.

Q. That his name was Bains you only knew by the production of this piece of paper - A. Lawson called him Bains, and the other people of the ship.

Mr. Gleed. You had been on board the ship Warley - A. Yes, in order to get the seamen that I had put on board the ship outward bound.

Q. You have been asked about being a crimp you are a person providing seamen for these ships - A. Yes.

Q. Did you look at the receipt after it was signed so as to have a recollection that he signed it in the form it is now exhibited - A. Yes; I looked at it several times afterwards.

Q. Had you ever seen him write his name before - A. No.

Q. So that you do not know how he spelt his name while at your house - A. No; only that he was always called Bains.

Q. And he signed it thus - A. Yes.

Q. Who produced this certificate to Mr. Churchill - A. I did.

Q. He did not sign any other paper - A. He did not in my presence.

Q. You saw him write it - A. Yes.

WILLIAM STEWART. Q. I understand you are a clerk in the pay office - A. Yes.

Q. Is it part of your duty to witness all receipts for the payment of wages - A. It is chiefly my duty to witness them.

Q. Is that your hand-writing - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember the person of the prisoner - A. No, I do not, but that is a receipt belonging to the East India company; I witnessed that receipt; that is my hand-writing.

Q. You saw that superscription after it was made - A. Yes; I complained to William Bains that he had wrote his name wrong, and I got him to alter it; he altered it in that way

Q. You complained to the man that called himself William Bains - A. Yes, and I desired him him to alter it, and he altered it in that way, I am certain of it.

COURT. Did it not strike you, his writing it wrong - A. Sometimes they only put their marks.

Mr. Knapp. Where they write their names, is it altogether frequent for them to spell their names wrong - A That I cannot say.

COURT. Then how was this name before the alteration - A. It looked like Bait, I thought. I told him he spelt it wrong.

Mr. Knapp. The receipt is here - Look at the letter t, did he alter that into n - A. Yes; that is the alteration.

Mr. Reynolds. Was this filled up before he signed it - A. Yes; I am sure of that It is handed over to me as soon as it is filled up.

Q. Are none of these upon stamps - A. I believe that.

MR. COGGELL. Q. What is your office - A. I am pay-master.

Q. How are the stamps paid at the East India office - A. I have not got the license here.

CHARLES WILLIAM CHURCHILL. Q. I believe you are a clerk in the pay-office at the India house - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember, on the 20th of December last, the prisoner coming to the India house - A. I do. The certificate was handed over to me by Hyams, in the name of Bains; that person was standing by the side of Hyams. That is the certificate that was handed over to me.

COURT. Did you hear him mention himself as the person called William Bains in that certificate - A. He gave in his name as William Bains .

Q. Did any body ask him his name, or do you believe he was asked by any body his name - A. Yes.

Q. Do you believe so, or is that the usual mode of proceeding - A. I cannot recollect; I suppose it to be done because it is the usual mode of proceeding.

Q. However this is the certificate that was handed over to you, the person standing next to Hyams - A. Yes. I was not satisfied with the certificate; I desired some person to identify the man.

Q. That is, you were not satisfied with the mere production of this certificate - A. No; I desired somebody to identify him, which was done; I wrote, paid, in the Ledger, and filled up the receipt.

Q. Look at that receipt and tell me whether that is the receipt so filled up - A. Yes; filed up by me.

Mr. Knapp. And the name in the Ledger tallied with the name in the receipt - A. Yes, to the best of my recollection.

Q. Look at the Ledger, is that your hand-writing -

Yes; the name is not spelt the same; it is a y in the Ledger, and an i in the receipt. The sum received is twenty-four pounds three shillings; that book shews pursurage. nine pounds, and hospital. Twenty-four pounds three shillings was the money that was due.

Q. Did you pay the money - A. I wrote, paid himself, in the Ledger, and filled up the receipt.

Q. Whenever you pay wages to a man himself, coming personally for it, you write, paid himself - A. I do.

Q. You say you required somebody to identify him - A. I did, and Solomon Hyams identified him, I did not see him sign it.

Q. How soon did you see the prisoner at the bar again - A. I saw him in custody in February. He received wages himself on the 5th of January, as executor in the name of Richard Cooling , I wrote it off in the book in the same way as I have described.

Q. You recollect him, do you - A. I cannot say that. I wrote it off in the book, and on the 2nd of February I saw him again, he was then in custody, Hyams was with him; I asked him then what name he went by in the ship Exeter; he said, William Bains ; I asked him how old he was; he said, thirty, or about thirty, and that he was an American, which agreed with the description I had in a book called the surveyors account. He said that was the name he went by in the Exeter, but his real name was Richard Cooling.

Q. Did you ask him whether there was a Richard Cooling in the ship - A I did, he said there was, and that he was left sick at St. Helena, and was not returned to England.

COURT. I understood you to say that he said his real name was Richard Cooling - A. Yes.

Q. Was there another Richard Cooling on the books besides him - A. Not on the books.

Q. Did you understand him to say there was a Richard Cooling on board the ship - A. Yes; that he was left sick at St. Helena, and not returned to England.

Q. There was a person of the name of Cooling, so called in the ship - did he give you any reason for his assuming the name of Cooling - A. No. He mentioned the name of Cooling first.

Q. What induced him to use the name of Bains, and what made him say his real name was Cooling - A. He said that he had ran away from on board a man-of-war and had taken the name of William Bains .

Q. As the time that he had conversation, or at a prior time that you had this conversation, did you know in fact that his name was Cooling - A. No; I did not know that his name was Cooling till be mentioned it.

Q. Had you known that his name was Richard Cooling before the 2d of February - A. He had received money as executor, in the name of Richard Cooling .

Q. And in consequence of his taking the name of Richard Cooling you put these questions to him on the 2d of February - A. Yes; I said that it was an odd coincidence that his name should be Richard Cooling, and not the Richard Cooling stated on the Ledger. He said his real name was Richard Cooling , that he was an American, and had an American protection.

Q. Did he ever tell you how old that Richard Cooling was tha was left at St. Helena - A. More than thirty, and that he was an Englishman.

Mr. Reynolds. Who was present at this conversation on the 2nd of February - A. Mr. Adams, Mr. Collins, Mr. Mitchell, Alexander Clarke , and Solomon Hyams.

Q. Did he come in custody on the 2nd of February - A. Yes.

Q. How came Hyams with him - A. He went with the constable

Q. He told you that his real name was Cooling - that Cooling was an American - A. No, Bains was an American.

Q. Did he say any thing about Bains being left at St. Helena - A. No.

Q. Have the goodness to recollect whether it was Bains or Cooling that he said was left at St. Helena - A. Cooling.

Q. Did not you make any observations about the name in the certificate being spelt with a y in the Ledger and in the certificate with an i - A. No; I conceive a mistake often of that sort may often happen from the mode of entering the name in the Ledger, which is made up by the minor clerk.

Q. The certificate was handed to you by Hyams, and not by this man - A. Yes; by Hyams;

Q. You said you was not satisfied, you must have him witness it - A. Yes.

Q. And then Hyams said he was the man, and witnessed it - A. Yes.

Q. Hyams put his name to it to authenticate it as much as he could - A. Yes.

Mr. Knapp. With respect to the description that he gave of Bains, and being an American, did you find that correspond with the name that you had of a man on board the ship, in the Ledger - A. Yes; it corresponded with the surveyor's account. Before the ship sails the surveyor has the ships crew mustered, he asks the names and puts them down, the station, age, and country.

JAMES SHELDON was called, and not appearing in court, his recognizance was ordered to be estreated.

JAMES SYMONS Q . You were steward on board the East India ship called the Exeter - A. I was so, on her outward and homeward bound voyage.

Q. Had you a person on board that ship called William Bains - A. Yes; he was an able seaman.

Q. Do you know the person of the prisoner at the bar - A. Yes, he was a seaman on board the ship Exeter; he went by the name of Richard Cooling .

Q. Were there any resemblance in respect of person between Richard Cooling (the prisoner) and William Bains - A. No, not the least.

Q. Perhaps you can tell me whether, on board this ship, they were in one and the same mess - A. No, they did not mess together, nor did they appear to be on friendly terms.

Q. Were you on board the ship when the ship left St. Helena to come to England - A. Yes; the prisoner and William Bains , and twelve more, were left at St. Helena sick.

Mr. Reynolds. How long did you continue at St. Helena - A. We sailed the next day, I believe.

Q. Do you know whether Bains is returned A. No.

COURT. You are quite clear that this man is not Bains but Cooling - A. Yes.

Q. And that Bains and Cooling were both left sick at St. Helena - A. Yes.

Q. Were there any wages due to Bains - A. I do not know; no doubt but there was some pay due to him.

RICHARD BROWN . Q. I believe you were ship

steward to the Warley East Indiaman - A. I was.

Q. On the homeward bound voyage of the Warley do you remember touching at St. Helena - A. Yes.

Q. That was some time after the Exeter had touched there - A. On the 10th of October I received a person of the name of Richard Cooling, Gunnal Lawson, Noel Matthews, and Christopher Lowton .

Q. These seamen that you so received on board the Warley, as having been left by the Exeter - A. They were received on board, as having been left by the Exeter; they were brought on board, and were received as such, I received them by the commanding officer to victual them.

Q. Now look at the man at the bar, do you know him - A. That is the man that came on board by the name of Richard Cooling .

Q. Do you remember, a few days after he had been on board, receiving any letter from him - A. Yes.

Q. Have you got that letter - A. That is the letter. The letter was brought to me by a man in the ship; I never spoke to the prisoner upon the subject.

Q. In consequence of conversation that passed between you and that man, did you recognise the prisoner as having known him before - A. So soon as I knew part of the town he came from, I recollected his family, and that he came from Whitechapel-road, and his father and mother lived in Whitechapel, and went by the name of Jones.

Q. I do not know whether you know the hand-writing of Jones - A. No.

COURT. You are speaking of the prisoner at the bar - Yes.

Q. The prisoner at the bar by some means sent a letter to you, and you recollected his father and mother, did you recollect him - A. I recollected him being in the Blue Coat School; he was brought up there.

Mr. Reynolds. Did you see any thing of Bains when you were at St. Helena - A. No.

Q. You do not know any thing about his hand-writing - A. No.

Q. And some other person brought a letter to you - A. Yes.

Q. And you afterwards recollected some persons living at Whitechapel by the name of Jones; how long is that ago - A. It must be fifteen years ago.

Q. The appearance of a person very much alters in fifteen years - A. His appearance is altered very much since last October; but I have not the least doubt that he is the person that was in the Blue Coat School, and was brought up with his father.

EDWARD COLLINS . Q. You are a messenger in the Pay Office belonging to the East India House - A. Yes.

Q. In consequence of some directions that you received, did you go to Whitechapel in January last - A. I did.

Q. Did you find the prisoner there - A. I did; Solomon Hyams called him Bains, when he first went into the room, to which he answered. Then I asked him how his arm was, having seen him the day before, and knowing him; to which he replied, that it was a little better. I asked him why he had received money at the India House in the name of Cooling, after Hyams called him by the name of Bains, and to which he answered; he said his real name was Richard Cooling , but that he went in the ship Exeter by the name of William Bains . I came down stairs, and he was conveyed to the India House.

Q. Was there any conversation between you and the prisoner in the way to the India House - A I asked him why he had taken money in the name of Cooling, if his name was William Bains; he said he had a will left him on board the ship Exeter; that he had his proper name put in the will, and that he wrote the will himself.

Q. Did he say as executor - A. I do not recollect; he said he had his proper name put in the will; he wrote it himself. After we got to the India House, Mr. Churchill asked him what countryman William Bains was; he said he was an American.

Q. Who was an American - A. William Bains, meaning himself; that he was about thirty years of age. Mr. Churchill then asked him what became of Richard Cooling that was in the ship; he said he left him at St. Helena hospital when he came away;

Q. Do you know a gentleman of the name of Capt. Meriton - A. I do personally; I accompanied Mr. Meriton, the purser of the Exeter, the brother to Captain Meriton of that ship, to the Poultry Compter.

Q. The prisoner at the bar at that time was in the Poultry Compter - A. He was at that time; the prisoner was called out; I asked Mr. Meriton if he knew the prisoner; he said he did; that his name was Richard Cooling an ordinary seaman on board the Exeter, and was left sick by the Exeter at St. Helena hospital. Mr. Meriton described Bains to be a man with a shock head, a very sailor-like appearance, and an American. I asked the prisoner, in the presence of Mr. Meriton, why he went in the name of Bains, which he acknowledged to have done at the India House, when he knew his name was Cooling; he said that he went by both names in the ship, by the name of Bains and Cooling.

Mr. Reynolds. Q. Where is Mr. Meriton now - A. In the Saloon, on a voyage to India.

CORNELIUS WHITTINGHAM . Q. You are a clerk in the Pay Office at the India House - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember the prisoner being brought in custody to the India House - A. Yes.

Q. Had you the receipt book of the Exeter when he was brought there - A. Yes; it was then shewn to the prisoner, and the receipt of William Bains ; he was asked if that was his hand-writing; he said it was; he was shewn another receipt signed Richard Cooling , as the executor of John Green; he acknowledged that to be his hand-writing; he was then asked how he came to sign in two different names; he answered that Bains was the name that he went by on board the ship Exeter, but his real name was Richard Cooling , and that Richard Cooling of the ship Exeter was another distinct person.

Mr. Reynolds. Are these the exact words that he made use of - A. Not exactly, but words to that effect.

The receipt read.

Received this twentieth day of December, 1809, the sum of thirty-four pounds four shillings and four pence, for wages and service done on board the Exeter during her last voyage.

WM. BAINS.

34. 4 s. 4 d.

Witness Solomon Hyams , William Stewart .

THOMAS CANEY SMITH. Q. You have the register. - A. Yes.

Q. Read the owners' names of the Exeter. - A. Kennard

Smith, Ambrose Timbrel, William Sims , senr. William Sims , junr. John Perry , junr. Philip Perry , John Wells, William Wells , George Green, John Mills , James Mills , Robert Mills , Robert Buck , and Thomas Bilep. I bring this register from the owners' office, Cornhill.

Q. Do you know any thing of these persons who are severally mentioned in the register, that they are interested in the ship, and are the owners - A. I do.

Mr. COGGELL. Q. This is a copy of the register of the ship; without the register, the ship cannot sail, under a penalty - A. No; it is the only document that we can bring.

Mr. COLTSTON. I believe you are a clerk in the Paymaster's office of the East India Company - Yes.

Q. Does the Company advance the wages for the owners - Yes, and they are allowed for it in the freight; the firm of the company is the Honourable United Company of Merchants of England trading to the East Indies.

JOHN WAUGH . I live in Whitechapel-road.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar - A. Yes, I have known him five years and a half; I always found him to be an honest man till the present.

Q. Do you know his father and mother - A. His mother I knew, but not his father.

Q. Where does the mother live - A. I cannot say now; she did reside with me in Whitechapel-road.

Q. What name did the prisoner go by - A. Cooling, and his mother went by the name of Jones; he was taken in my house; I have sometimes heard him called Jones, when he first came home, and sometimes Cooling. When people used to come and ask for him, they generally asked for Mrs. Jones's son.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 34.

London Jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18100411-45

305. JOZA SPONZA was indicted for that he on the 17th of March , in and upon Mary Burton , spinster , feloniously did make an assault, and with a certain sharp instrument did stab and cut the said Mary Burton , in and upon her neck and face, with intent, in so doing, to kill and murder her .

SECOND COUNT for like offence, with intent to disable her.

THIRD COUNT for feloniously stabbing the said Mary Burton with a fork, with intent to do her some grievous bodily harm.

MARY BURTON. Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. Yes, he is a sailor , an Italian ; I lived with him about a fortnight in Nightingale-lane. On the 17th of March, between two and three o'clock, we went to bed together, he bit my ear; he said something, but I did not understand his language; after having bit my ear, he bit my lip, and then he stabbed me several times in my neck with a fork. This happened in my own room.

Q. Were you in bed all the time - A. In bed, and out of bed, and on the ground; when he stabbed me with the fork I was then on the ground. The patrol came in and took him up.

Mr. Curwood. You said you lived with this man about a fortnight - you are a girl in an unfortunate situation of life, are not you - A. Yes.

Q. Where had you been before you went to bed - A. In three public house; the Sun was the last public house we were at that night. We went to bed about two o'clock.

Q. Were not you both drunk when you went to bed - A. I drank several glasses of liquor, I did not find myself intoxicated; I cannot tell whether the prisoner was drunk or no; I cannot say that I was right sober.

Q. Do not you know that you wounded this man in a very tender part before he took the fork from you - A. I cannot recollect; I will not swear that I did not.

JOHN WILSON . I am a patrol. On the 17th of March, about three o'clock, I was going down Greenwood-court, Nightingale-lane; I thought I heard a voice; I went to Mary Burton's door, and being dark, I was dubious of going in; I ran to the end of the court, and called the watchman to bring me his light and directly I entered the door I saw Mary Burton all over blood, she was just coming out; I said, what is the matter, who has done this? I saw the prisoner, I asked her if that was the man, she said, yes, take him away, he will murder me; I took him in custody after he had dressed himself. The prisoner was meared with blood partly, as much as she was; I had no opportunity of seeing whether he was wounded or not. This is the fork, as it is supposed, this is the corner of her mouth, and this is the corner of her ear; I took it off the bed; it is in spirits.

ANN THOMPSON . Q. Do you live in the same house with Mary Burton - A. I did then, I don't now. On the 17th of March I was with the prisoner and Mary Burton at Mr. Brown's, the Sun, in Sun-yard: we all came home together about two o'clock in the morning. The prisoner told me he was very hungry, I got him something to eat, he ate a hearty supper in Mary Burton 's apartment, then I bid him good morning and went up to my own apartment; my apartment was in the two pair, and her's was on the ground floor. I laid about three quarters of an hour, and then I heard a great noise below, I went down and said, what is the matter; the patrol replied, the woman is almost murdered; I saw Mary Burton lying on the bed all over blood. I found a fork on the bed, and a piece of flesh.

THOMAS ROBINSON . I am a surgeon and man-midwife. About three o'clock in the morning, in the middle of last month, I was called to attend Mary Burton; I went to her house, I saw her all over blood; I found she had received several wounds on the face, and on the side of her neck they were most of them superficial wounds.

Q. Describe the wounds upon her face first of all - A. Both the lips, the right side of the mouth was partly gone, it appeared to have been torn off, the cheek was very much lacerated and, confused, the integument on the left there were marks of teeth; on the right it had not penetrated at all. The margin of the left ear had been very much torn. On the right side of the neck she seemed to have a wound made, I judged from a fork, one of the prongs had penetrated a little better than an inch; there were no wounds of any importance on the right side; there was a wound which might have been done with a fork, or it might have been done with a pointed instrument, it had penetrated about an inch.

Q. Were there two punctures or only one - A. There were two punctures, they were so near together they appeared to have been done with a fork. She was scratched as if he had been using his nails. There were two or three other punctures, the depth of them were

about the tenth part of an inch.

Q. Then the worst wound that I understand from you was this wound that had penetrated about an inch - A. Yes. It was in a mascular part of the neck; I did not perceive it of any great danger.

Q. You say there were two punctures there, were they of equal depth - A. No, one was very trifling; I found a difficulty in introducing the probe.

Q. Then none of the wounds arising from this pointed instrument were dangerous - A. No, not at that time; I could not foresee what inflammation might arise.

Q. From where did this hemorrage arise - A. From the lip, I think.

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutrix had lived with me fourteen days, and on this night we were both half intoxicated, we went home together, and afterwards went out again to other public houses, and had more drink; I was very much intoxicated; we went to bed together; she bit my finger, here is the mark; she catched hold of me in a tender part, and I, feeling great pain, did bite her; she scratched me, and we fought together. I do not know any thing about the fork. I, being intoxicated, did not know what I was about.

MARY ROE . I keep the Seven Stars. On the 17th of March the prisoner and the prosecutrix were together in my house the best part of the evening, they were neither of them sober; she came in again at twelve o'clock, she was very much intoxicated, she fell down in the tap-room; and last Saturday she said she could not tell whether she took the fork first or he, or how it happened.

MR. GARSTONEY. I am an Italian I went to see the prisoner in Newgate, the prosecutrix was there, they ate and drank together, both of them seemed very sorry, and they kissed each other.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18100411-46

306. ELIZABETH GRAY and HARRIET STEADMAN were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 15th of March , three quarters of a yard of velvet, value 18 s. the property of John Dowling , privately in his shop .

ELIZABETH DOWLING . My husband's name is John Dowling , I am a straw bonnet-maker, and I sell millenery goods, No 1, Albemarle-street.

Q. What day was it this happened - A. I cannot tell the day of the month, nor the day of the week; it was last month, the constable has got the day down. It was near six o'clock in the afternoon, Steadman came in and asked to look at some lace that I had in the window, Gray came in while I was shewing Steadman the lace, she asked for a pennyworth of shirt buttons; Steadman said that she would not take the lace then, she would ask her sister first; I told her that it was half a crown a yard. As I was putting the lace in the window again I saw Elizabeth Gray lift up a velvet bonnet that was on the counter and take something that was under it; Steadman then said she would have the lace; I took it out of the window, and went round the counter to look for what was gone, and missed the velvet that was under the bonnet. The velvet belonged to a lady, and the velvet bonnet was for a pattern, it was to be made like it. Steadman went away without the lace; I stopped Gray and sent for a constable.

Q. Did you see her do any thing to the other prisoner - A. I saw her bustle close up to her before Steadman went out of the shop.

Q. Did you ever see the velvet - A. No.

Q. What quantity was it - A. I cannot exactly say.

Q. Did you ever see the prisoners before - A. Yes; on the evening before they were both in my shop, Gray had a pennyworth of shirt buttons, and Steadman had a halfpennyworth. I know Elizabeth Gray well, I could not swear so well to the other. I am sure it was Elizabeth Gray and another woman.

Q. After the constable came and took Gray, how soon after that did you see Steadman - A. On the Friday following, and I rather think it was the Friday before that this happened, and about a fortnight before that, Gray called and asked for work.

HENRY BLY . I am a constable. I was sent for to Mrs. Dowling's on Friday the 15th of March, I apprehended Gray, I searched her and found nothing on her; Mrs. Dowling said there was another woman with her, she went away; I took Gray to the office, and on the 23d I went with Read to a court in Whitecross-street, there we apprehended Steadman; she said first, her name was Williams; we told her we knew her name was Steadman; then she owned her name was Steadman.

WILLIAM READ . On the evening of the 15th of March Bly brought Gray to the office. From information, a week afterwards, we apprehended Steadman in a court in Whitecross-street, she at first denied her name was Steadman, I told her I was not satisfied, she then said it was Steadman. I searched her house and found nothing. I told her Gray said she was the woman that went with her to the shop in Albemarle-street, where there was some velvet lost,

"Oh, said she, she has told of me, has she, now I'll tell how she lives, and all her family, they live by smashing," that is, passing of bad money. I took her to the office.

Gray's Defence. I am in the bonnet making way, and having lost my place of work I went to seek another, and coming up Albemarle-street I saw a bonnet shop, I went in and asked the prosecutrix for work; I told her who I worked for, and the length of time, she approved of it. On the next Monday I went in again, there were several people in the shop, I waited for an opportunity to speak to the lady, and when these people were gone out of the shop, she asked me if I had taken a piece of velvet, or a piece of ribbon, I told her I had not taken either.

Q. Do you mean to say that this was on the Monday - A. Yes, on the blessed ensuing Monday; she insisted upon searching me; I told her she was wellcome, I did not come in with intent to rob her. I was searched, and what halfpence I had they took away; I was taken to Clerkenwell. I sent my friends to her, she said, if I would pay for the velvet, and the expences, she would not appear against me; I said, why should I pay for a thing that I am innocent of, I would rather stand my trial.

Steadman's Defence. I am totally innocent; I never saw the prosecutrix nor the shop before this gentleman took me.

Prosecutrix. She did not call on the Monday, and when she came on the Friday she never mentioned any thing about work. She sent her father frequently to me, I sent word that I had put it in the law, I could not do any thing in it.

Gray called three witnesses, who gave her a good character.

Steadman called one witness, who gave her a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson .

Reference Number: t18100411-47

307. DONALD FORSYTH and JAMES DORAN were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of John Miers , the elder , the said John Miers , and others, being therein, about the hour of one at noon, on the 7th of March , and stealing therein, a pair of gold enamelled ear-rings, value 1 l. 4 s. 6 d. and one ear-ring, value 10 s. the property of John Miers, Senior.

JOHN MIERS, JUN. My father's name is John Miers , he lives at 111, in the Strand , he keeps the house, he is a jeweller . The house is in the precinct of the Savoy ; it is called the precinct of St. John the Baptist . I believe it is annexed to the parish of St. Mary-le-Strand .

Q. Are your taxes levied by the parish of St. Mary-le-Strand - A. I believe they are levied by the churchwardens of the precinct of St. John.

Q. What makes you suppose that it is annexed to St. Mary-le-Strand - A. We have some of the charity children of the parish of St. Mary-le-Strand come to the church in the Savoy; my father's house is on the south side of the Strand, nearly facing Exeter change . On Wednesday, the 7th of March, I saw Donald Forsyth in the act of pulling out ear-rings.

Q. Had you seen him before that - A. Yes, on the 6th of March. I saw Donald Forsyth endeavouring to push out a piece of glass in the shop window, he could not do it on account of the putty being so hard; the pane of glass had been cracked before, there was no hole in it; upon my seeing him attempting to do this he was followed down the Strand, he was by himself; that is all I saw then. On the 7th of March, about one o'clock, I saw Donald Forsyth in the act of taking out the ear-rings; the other prisoner was standing by him at the time; he had a hook wire. The glass had been previously pushed out, I did not see it pushed out.

Q. Did you see him move any thing - A. One earring. I had observed the window half an hour before, the piece of glass was not pushed out then. We were watching the window every half hour, expecting he would come.

Q. You say you observed him take out an ear-ring with an hooked wire - A. He drew the ear-ring to the front of the tray in which it was laying, there was no glass in the front of the tray, and when he drew the ear-ring to the front of the tray he put his finger within the window and took it out; the two other rings that were found on him were previously taken out; Mr. Field went out of doors, took them both, and brought them into the shop.

Q. At the time that Forsyth was doing this, what did Doran do - A. He appeared to be covering him, he was dressed in a soldiers great coat, standing close to him. I saw the prisoners searched when the officer came, three ear-rings were found upon Forsyth.

Q. Was that ear-ring found upon him that you saw him take out of the shop - A. It was. Doran had his forefinger cut, it appeared to have been recently done.

Q. Where was your father at this time - A. He was in the shop.

LEWIS FIELD . I am an assistant to Mr. Miers. On the 6th of March I saw Forsyth leave the window, and after he had gone five or six paces I saw Doran join him: I followed them along the Strand, they went up Southampton-street. On the 7th, about one o'clock, I saw Forsyth at the window; I had observed the window about a quarter of an hour before that time, there was only a simple crack in the glass, no hole whatever.

Q. After you observed the boy Forsyth there what further did you observe - A. I observed that they were both very close to the window, I called to young Mr. Miers to come to observe what they were doing, while I went to the door, and when I went to the door I laid hold of them both and brought them in; I stepped in between them and took them one in each hand. I took this hooked wire from Forsyth.

Q. What parish is Mr. Miers's house in - A. In the precinct of the Savoy, that is connected with St. Mary-le-Strand; the poor rates are collected by the officers in the Savoy parish.

STEPHEN LAVENDER . I am a officer belonging to Bow-street. On the 7th of March, between one and two o'clock, I went to Mr. Miers's, when I got there the prisoners were in the shop. I searched Forsyth, in his right hand breeches pocket were these two earrings, and at the bottom of his trowsers, between the lining and the outside, I found this larger one; nothing was found on Doran; he had a cut on his finger, which appeared to have been recently done.

The property produced and identified.

Forsyth said nothing in his defence.

Doran's Defence. I am innocent of the charge.

FORSYTH - GUILTY, aged 12.

DORAN - GUILTY, aged 17.

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling-house, nor of breaking and entering the dwelling-house .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18100411-48

308. JAMES PINE was indicted for feloniously assaulting Alexander William Knight , in the king's highway, on the 4th of March , putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, a gold chain, value 1 l. three gold seals, value 1 l. 10 s. and a gold watch key, value 2 s. his property.

ALEXANDER WILLIAM KNIGHT . I am a wine agent and broker , I live in Store-street, Bedford-square. My accompting house is in the city.

Q. Did you lose a gold chain, three gold seals, and a gold watch key, at any time - A. I did. On the 4th of March, about three o'clock in the morning, (I had been spending the evening with some friends in Fleet-street) I was going up Drury-lane , in my direct way home.

Q. Were you sober - A. I was perfectly sober. On my going up Drury-lane I observed three or four men walking singly down a lane on the right hand of Drury-lane, towards Holborn.

Q. Were they going from you, or coming towards you - A. They were crossing Drury-lane, James Pine was the last of them; I was alone, he came up by the side of me, I felt a blow on my side; the other persons had passed me.

Q. Could any other person, in the situation in which

he was to you, give you that blow but the prisoner - A. No; no other person was near enough to give me that blow but the prisoner; I immediately perceived my watch-chain, seals, and key, were gone; I called to the watchman.

Q. A gold watch key - A. Yes; the seals were gold and the chain was gold.

Q. You say you perceived a blow on your side - A. It was a blow, I supposed, merely to draw of my attention.

Q. It was a blow, not a mere push - A. No.

Q. Was it a blow to hurt you - A. It gave me pain for the moment; it rather stunned me.

Q. Had you a watch - A. I had; the watch held in my pocket; I imagine the chain gave way, in attempting to draw out the watch; it did not remove the watch from my fob. I called out to the watchman; I followed the prisoner; he ran very hard for 50 yards; I never lost sight of him; I was never more than two or three yards off him; he was stopped at the end of the lane by the watchman; he was met in the lane by the watchman; he turned back, and ran up a yard, where, in consequence of his falling, he was taken. I came up to him while he was on the ground, and assisted the watchman in securing him. The chain, key, and seals were never found.

Q. At the time that he struck you, when the persons were coming up the lane with him, were they near enough for him to have any communication with them. - A. I should have thought not.

Q. Have you ever seen your chain and seal since - A. No.

Q. Was it a dark or light night - A. It was directly under a lamp.

Q. How was the atmosphere - A. It was neither very dark or light.

Q. Now you are quite sure that you never lost sight of him from the time that you felt him snatch the chain. - A. He was never more than two or three yards before me; I am sure the man I secured is the man who struck me.

Q. And snatched the chain - A. Yes; I supposed he snatched the chain; there was nobody but him near me to do it.

Q. Did you at all see whether the other persons who came up the lane at the same time joined company afterwards with him - A. They did not afterwards; I went one way, and they the other.

THOMAS BELLAMY . I am a patrol of St. Giles's. About half past one, me and another patrol was in Drury-lane; we heard the alarm of Stop thief! I have lost my watch. The alarm came from the corner of the coal-yard in Drury-lane; the prisoner ran down the coal-yard; me and my partner pursued him; we saw him instantly the alarm was given; the prosecutor was following of him; the prisoner turned down a short turning in the coal-yard, where there was no thoroughfare; he was running; we secured him, and took him to the watch-house.

Q. What charge did the prosecutor make against him then - A. He laid his charge of the seal, key, and chain; he thought he had lost his watch, but he had not; when he put his hand to his waistband, he found his watch remaining.

Q. Did he describe in what way, he had lost it - A. Yes; he said the prisoner came and gave him a blow on the side; and he lost the chain at the same moment. This was in the prisoner's hearing; the prisoner said he knew nothing of it; he was innocent. I searched for the chain and seal; I could not find it.

Q. This was rather an unseasonable hour; from what you saw of the prosecutor, and the manner of his behaviour, did he appear to you to be sober - A. Perfectly.

- BAKER. I am a patrol; I was in company with Bellamy.

Q. Did you hear the cry of stop thief - A. I did; I was almost close to the prisoner; I saw him when the alarm was given; he was running, and the prosecutor close to him; I pursued him.

Q. Was the prisoner ever out of your sight before you secured him - A. Yes, about two minutes. The prosecutor and the prisoner were running; I could not mistake him for another person; the prosecutor said he had robbed him of his chain and seal, and at the watch-house he said he gave him a blow on the side before he took the watch-chain from him; the prisoner denied the charge in toto; we looked for the watch-chain and seals; we could not find it.

SAMUEL ROBERTS. I am the keeper of the watch-house; when the prisoner was brought in; I searched him nothing was found upon him.

Prisoner's Defence. On Saturday the 3d of March I left work, about seven o'clock in the evening; I went to Mr. Knight's, an ironmonger in Foster-lane, to purchase a bit of copper to finish my work the next week, and coming up Holborn. I called in a strange public house that I never was in before; I had a pint of porter, and hearing a few songs sung caused me to stop till between twelve and one o'clock. When I left the public house I lit with a couple of young women that I never saw before, they asked me to give them a glass of something to drink, I did so, they took me to a public house facing of Hatton Garden; I stood outside of the door, where there were several more people standing; I took a walk a little way with these two young women and after I left them I went down a turning which brought me into a coal-yard, a man came running towards me. I heard the cry of stop thief, I went to run towards him, he knocked me down, and when I got up the watchman stopped me, and the gentleman accused me of robbing him. I was all over mud, and no one was nigh me till I got up, and then the watchman came and stopped me.

Q. to prosecutor. Can you be certain that there was no person near him when you were pursuing him, could any person be running to knock him down - A. No; I deny it upon my oath.

Q. to Baker. Did the prosecutor appear to you to be at all intoxicated - A. Not in the least.

Q. How was the prisoner - A. I could not discover any thing in him; he acted very consistent, he appeared to be sober.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 23.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100411-49

309. MARY BROWNING was indicted for feloniously assaulting Michael Myers , in the kings highway, on the 10th of March , putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, a watch, value 5 l. his property.

MICHAEL MYERS. I live at No. 9, James-street, in the Haymarket; I am a glass cutter ; I work for Mr. Wheeler, No. 8, Leather-lane. On Friday night, the 16th of March, I had spent my evening at a public house in Leather-lane, I was rather the worse for liquor: and at twelve o'clock I was returning home through Long Acre, I was met by the prisoner and another, she was very different in habit then; I did not speak to them; I was walking along as fast as I could, the prisoner came before me and asked me where I was going, I told her, home; she laid hold of my arm and walked three or four paces with me, the other woman staid behind. The prisoner got me on the opposite side of the way in Long Acre, she asked me to go with her, I refused; she there pulled me on a step of a door.

Q. I suppose half lovingly and half violently - A. I suppose that was the case on her side. She sat herself by the side of me; I walked on to the former side of the street to perform my former course, I did not perceive her following me till I reached the pathway; we came near to the corner of James-street, leading to Covent Garden, she till trying to persuade me to go with her, she caught hold of my arm by the side of her and drew me half towards her, near to an area railing, then I instantly missed something; I clapped my hand upon my side and missed my watch; the prisoner immediately ran away across Long Acre, and the first house she came to she put the watch down the area. I was close to her, pursuing her, I caught hold of her by her upper garment, she tore away and left her handkerchief in my hand; I pursued her, she was taken in custody by a watchman that came up; by that time the other woman came up, I gave charge of her. My watch is in charge of the watchhouse keeper, the watchman and watchhouse-keeper got it out of the area.

JONATHAN M'DOWELL. I am a watchman. About the hour of twelve I heard a scuffle, when I got up to it I saw the prosecutor and the prisoner, the prosecutor charged the prisoner with robbing him of his watch, he said, she had put it down an area. I afterwards found the watch by his directions. I took charge of the women. Mr. Roberts has the watch.

- ROBERTS. Q. Was this woman brought to in charge by the prosecutor - A. Yes; and by his directions I found the watch; I have had it ever since.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming up Long Acre, this man took me by the arm, he said he should wish to go home with me, I told him I was not fit; he was quite intoxicated; he asked me to have something to drink; I told him I could not drink any thing, and as we were coming up Belton-street he staggered and let the watch fall, I picked it up; he got hold of me and tore me all to pieces; he drew his knife out and cut me after he knocked me down; I got up and ran away. When the watchman catched hold of me, I said, do not hold me, he pulled out the watch, and I will tell you where it is.

M'Dowell. The prisoner was not cut; she had cut her hand by a fall on the stones.

GUILTY, aged 31.

Of stealing, but not violently from the person .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100411-50

310. HENRY, alias STEPHEN, AVEN , was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 2nd of April , a watch, value 2 l. the property of Mark Israel , and Isaac Israel , privately in their shop .

MARK ISRAEL . I live in Lower East Smithfield ; my partner's name is Isaac Israel, we are slop sellers . On the 2nd of April, about eight o'clock in the evening, two sailor boys came to my house, one of them asked me if I had got any waistcoat pieces, I told them I had. He asked me if I had any watches, I shewed them some; they bargained for a watch, there was a dispute who should pay for it, and in half an hour after they were gone I missed a watch.

Q. Did you know the two boys - A. No; they told me they were going to away in the morning. The prisoner is a German . On the next morning, at seven o'clock, I took the officer with me and went to the Black Boy, St. Catherine's, and there I gave charge of the prisoner. The officer found the watch in his pocket, he offered to pay for it.

Prisoner's Defence. The other boy that was with me took the watch and gave it to me.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100411-51

311. MARY ATCLIFT was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 10th of March , a watch, value 20 s. the property of Edward Plant , from his person .

EDWARD PLANT . I am a shopman to Mr. Newberry, linen-draper , 88, Aldgate. On Saturday, the 10th of March, between nine and ten o'clock, I went to the hair dresser in Essex-street, Whitechapel, with intent of having my hair cut, and finding the house full, I went to the Catherine Wheel public-house and called for a pint of beer; the prisoner brought me a pint of beer; I thought her to be a servant in the house, but she did not prove to be so; she sat down by the side of me; we had a little conversation together. She then persuaded me to go over the way with her, I told her if she went out first I would follow her; she went out and in about five minutes I followed her out, she stood opposite of the house; we went up the court into a house, we were together in the house about ten minutes and then I missed my watch; I charged her with taking it, she denied it; she stripped, and nothing was found. Two watchmen came in, and the watch was found up the chimney. There was no one in the room to take the watch but her.

ROBERT PENDRED . I found the watch in the chimney.

Prisoner's Defence. I do not know how the watch got up the chimney.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100411-52

312. THOMAS CROTHALL was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Hooker , about the hour of nine in the forenoon, of the 1st of March , the said William Hooker , and others of his family, then and there being, and stealing therein, three pound and a half weight of cheese, value 2 s. 6 d. his property.

The prosecutor was called and not appearing in court, his recognizance was ordered to be estreated.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100411-53

313. GEORGE HUMPHRIES was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Thomas Attwood , about the hour of one in the afternoon, on the 8th of March , and stealing therein twenty-two yards of woollen cloth value 32 l. his property.

THOMAS ATTWOOD . Q. Where is your dwelling-house - A. No. 21, Henrietta-street, in the parish of St. Paul, Covent-garden , I rent the whole house, I am a linen draper .

Q. Were you at home when your house was broken open and the property stolen - A. I was, my son was at home, my wife and servant. On Thursday the 8th of March, between the hours of twelve and one in the day time, I was in my accompting-house adjoining my shop backwards; I was there writing; there is a glass door between the shop and the accompting house with a curtain, the curtain was half drawn; my son had just come in before and shut the shop door after him, my wife had been sitting in the shop untill about two minutes before this business happened; I thought I heard a noise in the shop, I turned my head, I saw the prisoner at the bar.

Q. Are you quite sure the man you saw was the prisoner at the bar - A. Yes, I saw him in the act of folding up the goods as they lay on the counter. I was surprized within myself, thinking whether I had sent for the cloth-worker to come and dress them, I recollect and had not; the prisoner left the shop, I followed him into the street, he walked very deliberatly up the street, I do not think he saw me; I did not speak to him untill I got up to him he had not got more than fifteen yards, he was just going to turn into the gate of the Church-yard when I came up to him; my intention was to knock him down; he just saw me, and dropped the goods in the street and ran off; I gave the alarm, he got a little the head of me; he escaped across the Church-yard, and ran into Rose street: he there came in contact with a man and was throwed down, he got up and went up Bird-in-hand-court, there he was stopped; I was not in sight, I came up about three minutes after he was taken. I laid hold of him, and insisted upon his going to Bow-street; he said, do not hurt me, Sir, he was secured; my son picked up the cloth.

Q. When you went back did you find any of your premises broken - A. No, the latch had been lifted up, it is a common latch, he must have opened the door and came in.

Q. However you were not in the shop to see it was actually closed - A. No, nor do I know the latch was actually closed, none of the windows were broken.

Q. What quantity of cloth was it - A. Twenty-two yards of superfine blue cloth, I value it at 35 l. I set it down 32 l. It cost me that.

Q. Did you see the prisoner carry away the cloth from the shop - A. I did, and I knew it was blue cloth, it come in the shop only the day before. I am positive the prisoner is the man.

JOHN BAILEY . I am a porter, I live at 126, Wood-street, Cheapside.

Q. Did you see the prisoner on the 6th of March. - A. I was standing at the corner of Rose-street at a bookseller's shop, I heard the cry of stop thief, I saw the prisoner running as fast as he could, he was the foremost man; he passed me and ran up Rose-street; I pursued him and never lost sight of him.

Q. Where did you stop him. - A. I think it is Bird-in-hand-court. I stopped him; when I caught hold of him he said, do not hurt me, I have only broke a window. Mr. Attwood and several people came up, he was secured and taken to Bow-street.

JAMES ATTWOOD . I am the son of Thomas Attwood .

Q. Did you see any blue cloth on the counter when you came into the shop. - A. Yes, I was in the accompting house when the prisoner came into the shop, I saw him going out of the shop with the cloth in his hand: I am sure the prisoner is the man; my father walked gently after him, when my father came up to him the prisoner turned round and looked at my father, and his countenance changed, he dropped the goods and ran off; I picked up the cloth and took it home; I went out again and saw him in custody, I knew the cloth to be my father's.

RICHARD SMITH. I am shopman to Mr. Roberts, a linen-draper opposite of Mr. Attwood's house. On the morning mentioned in the indictment I was with Mr. Roberts in our shop, we noticed the piece of blue cloth in the prisoner's arms; Mr. Attwood followed him, we thought all was not right; I heard him cry out stop thief; I immediately ran out, and pursued the prisoner until he was stopped, and when I came up to him I took charge of him; I lost sight of him in the court, and at the turning of Rose-street; I am certain he is the man, I saw him come out of Mr. Attwood's shop with the cloth.

Prosecutor. This is the cloth, it is mine, I have had it ever since, I have no partner.

Prisoner's Defence. The cloth has grown, has got four yards bigger since I came from Bow-street.

Court. That is very impertinent of you, you are tried upon a capital charge; the question is whether you stole it all. - A. No, Sir, I did not.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 20,

Of Stealing in the Dwelling-house, not of breaking and entering .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100411-54

314. EDWARD POWELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of January , a watch, value 8 l. the property of Robert Weston , in the dwelling house of Elizabeth Kinnard , widow.

ROBERT WESTON. I live at Shipnell in Shropshire. I came to London on the 12th of December 1809.

Q. What stay did you make. - A. Near a fortnight. On the evening I came to town I applied at the old Hummums Covent-garden , for a lodging, and continued there during my stay in London.

Q. What part of the house had you apartments - A. In one of the first rooms on the first floor

Q. Of course your trunk or portmanteau was there - A. Yes. On Monday night, January the 8th, returning to my lodgings, I was as usual lighted up into my room by the chamberlain; I immediately missed my trunk, I had left it on a hair in that room.

Q. You had not left your door locked I suppose - A. I had not; I had a coat and a pair of pantaloons hanging over the same chair that the trunk stood on.

Q. Did you at any time see any part of your property that you had lost - A. Yes, I did it might be the second day after this happened; this happened before I left town; I was upon the eve of leaving London, and after I had left I received notice from the Hummums that my watch had been stopped at a pawnbroker at Charing-cross.

Q. Had you left your watch hanging up - A. It was

in my trunk, it was a silver hunting watch, my trunk was locked and I had the key in my pocket, my watch was out of repair I brought it up with me, my intention was to have it put in repair.

Q. What was the value of that watch - A. It cost me eight guineas and a half at Wigg and Moss's, Lombard-street.

Q. Who had possession of your watch when you saw it again - A. I saw it at Bow-street.

Q. Of course you knew it - A. I knew it because I had been to the watch-makers to get the number, and it corresponded with the number; the watch is here, I have it in my possession. There was a coat and a pair of pantaloons were brought to Bow-street, I was confident they were mine; I could not swear to them, the buttons had been taken off, and coloured buttons put on, and having no private mark I could not swear to them.

WILLIAM BATES . I am porter at the old Hummums, Mrs. Kinnard keeps that house.

Q. Do you remember the evening in January when Mr. Weston's trunk and things were missed from his room - A. Yes.

Q. Now about what time of the day or evening did you see any body about there - A. To the best of my recollection, about eight o'clock in the evening I saw the prisoner.

Q. Did you know him before - A. I never saw him before.

Q. What light was there to see him by - A. There was a light in a four-burner lamp, I saw him below stairs.

Q. Is the outer door kept open - A. It is; the prisoner was standing still.

Q. Did you say any thing to him. - A. No, he was standing near to my mistress's bed-room door, her bedroom is below.

Q. You did not ask him who or what he wanted. - A. No, he was standing without his hat, I thought he was waiting for some person, I never spoke to him, I passed him, I was coming in from the street, I went into the hall and I returned in about a minute afterwards, the prisoner was gone.

Q. Did you see him walk off. - A. I did not, I saw no more of him that night.

Q. Had he any thing to do about the house as you know of. - A. Not as I know of, he had nothing but his hat in his hand that I saw.

Q. to Mr. Weston. What time was it when you came home that night. - A. Between ten and eleven o'clock.

Q. to Bates. Do you remember Mr. Weston coming home. - A. Yes.

Q. How long was it before Mr. Weston came home that you saw the prisoner. - A. To the best of my recollection about two hours and a half.

Q. I suppose as soon as Mr. Weston came home there was an alarm of his having lost his things. - A. Yes.

Q. When did you see the prisoner again. - A. When he was brought to Bow-street.

Q. How long was that after. - A. I am not positive of the time.

Q. Had you an opportunity of viewing the man whom you saw in the house, so as to be certain of knowing him again. - A. Yes, I knew him again as soon as I saw him, there was a light of a four burner, I was within half a yard of him; I am positive I saw him.

Prisoner. I never was in the Old Hummums in my life.

JAMES HEWITT. I am son to Mrs. Kinnard, she is a widow; I live in the house, the house is in the parish of St. Paul, Covent Garden.

Q. Who keeps the house. - A. Mrs. Elizabeth Kinnard ; I know nothing more than the trunk was lost, and Mr. Weston was paid for the contents of it.

ABRAHAM MYERS . I live at 123, Swallow-street: I am a salesman, on the 10th of January, about four o'clock, the prisoner came into my shop with a coat and a pair of pantaloons, they were tied up in a handkerchief, and the watch he took out of his pocket.

Q. Did you know him before this time. - A. Oh yes, perfectly; he asked me five pound for the coat, pantaloons, and the watch altogether; first of all he said he wanted to sell the coat and the pantaloons, then he said I want a little money, I think I shall sell the watch, I do not fancy it. I gave him four pound for them all.

Q. You asked him no questions about them - A. No, because I knew him before.

Q. Did you ask him his name, or did you know it. - A. I did not ask him his name; it is not usual to ask a persons name that buy cloaths of us, it might affront them, I never asked him his name. He shewed me the duplicate of a watch pawned for two guineas and a half; he said, he liked that better then that one, and that was the reason that he was going to part with it.

Q. What became of that watch after you bought it. - A. I just happened to want a little cash a day or two afterwards; I went into Mr. Dobree's shop that I knew I am in the habit of pledging things when I want money, he shewed me a bill that it had been stolen.

Q. You went to pledge it then. - A. Exactly so, I told him that I had bought it with a coat and a pair of pantaloons; I was taken to Bow-street, and the next day I was liberated. I described the prisoner at Bow-street; I had dealings with him before in selling him clothes, but never bought of him before.

Q. When was the prisoner taken up. - A. About a fortnight after, that I believe; the officer came and let me know that they had a man of the description I had given of the prisoner.

Q. What became of the watch. - A. The magistrate made me give it over to the prosecutor.

Q. The prisoner was apprehended in about a fortnight, you had notice given you from the office, you went there. - A. I did.

Q. And the prisoner is the man from whom you had the watch in the way you have described. - A. He is.

Q. What became of the other articles, the coat and pantaloons. - A. The other articles I had given me back again.

Q. Had you altered them. - A. They were not altered by me, I only beat and brushed them and smoothed them with an iron, that is all I did.

WILLIAM SALMON . I am an officer of Bow-street; from information, I went to the Dolphin public-house in the Haymarket, there I apprehended the prisoner in February, he lodged there; I searched him and found nothing upon him; I took him to Bow-street.

Q. to Prosecutor. Have you got that watch. - A. Yes, this is it.

Q. How long have you had it. - A. Between five and six years.

Q. The maker told you what number it was, independant of that did you know the watch. - A. Yes, independant of that I could swear to the watch, it cost me eight guineas and a half.

Q. You never saw the trunk again, I suppose. - A. No.

Q. Were there a great many other things in the trunk. A. Yes, there were.

Prisoner's Defence. The watch that I sold to Myers in Swallow-street, I had it of captain Graham, of St. James's coffee house, and the pantaloons and the great coat belonged to him, they were his old ones that were thrown off; the watch I had in my possession a twelvemonth or better; I was short of money, I went and sold them; the watch I sold him was not a hunting watch. I asked him five pound for the coat, pantaloons, and the watch, he bid me three guineas; I said I would not take it; he afterwards said he would give me four pound; I took the money and left the watch, coat, and pantaloons; it was better than two months before I heard of this; I dressed my master and went to the Talbot Inn to dine, dinner was there always ready at two o'clock. After dinner was over the officers came in, I went to Bow-street with them, they said they had a detainer against me; I went before the magistrate, Myers without looking at me swore I sold the watch to him, and the person at the Hummums swore he saw me in the house; the magistrate asked if the gentleman was in town, this man said he was not, I was detained till Saturday, on Saturday I saw the gentleman, he swore the watch was his; I was turned over at the next sessions and remained till now.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 17.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson .

Reference Number: t18100411-55

315. JAMES ANDERSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of March , 2 silver table spoons, value 1 l. 4 s. nine yards of Irish linen, value 1 l. 16 s. and 10 muslin handkerchiefs, value 1 l. 10 s. the property of Charles Fisher Bell , and Richard Fisher Bell , in their dwelling-house .

CHARLES FISHER BELL . I live at 39 Oxford-street ; my partner's name is Richard Fisher Bell , we rent the whole house together, we are linen drapers , the house is in the parish of St. Marylebone . The prisoner was our porter, he was with me altogether about three weeks. We missed the spoons after the third day he came into the house, we never missed the linen or the handkerchiefs at all. In consequence of information from the servant maid I went up stairs, the prisoner's box stood on the landing-place, the prisoner went up stairs, and Mr. Percival with me, I opened his box in his presence, I immediately discovered nine yards of Irish linen, it was cut in a very aukward manner, the outside shop mark was cut off; I found a number of pieces of muslin cut into square handkerchiefs, I think there were ten, there were no marks upon them; I also found a silver table spoon broke in two, the other spoon was not found till after the prisoner was taken in custody, the broken spoon I found in the prisoner's box, it was an old family spoon with my father and mother's initials upon it; I have not the smallest doubt of it being my spoon. The prisoner used to clean the plate, he had been repeatedly asked whether he had taken them down with the knives, he always protested that he never had; I asked him how he came by the Irish cloth, he said that he had purchased it of Mr. Stary, his late employer; Mr. Stary is a wholesale linen draper. I told him it was too fine for his wear, and in the next place I did not believe he sold any article of that kind; he repeated that he got it from Mr. Stary, and the muslin handkerchiefs he brought out of the country.

Q. Did they appear to have been worn - A. Never, it was quite new. The broken spoon he was at a loss to account for. I asked him about the other spoon that was missing, he said he never saw it. I told him I meant to be lenient.

Q. Then you must not say any more what he said. You do not take servants without a good character. - A. Never, I had a good character with him.

ANN PUGH . Q. Did you live in the service of Mr. Bell at this time - A. Yes.

Q. You recollect the time when the prisoner's box was searched - A. Yes.

Q. How long before that had there been any spoon missing. - A. Near three weeks, I asked the prisoner whether he had taken them by a mistake of any kind, he said he had not.

Q. The box stood on the landing-place, all the servants had access to it. - A. No one had been there but me from the time that he left the key in the shop, that was about an hour before it was discovered; I knew it by going up to the sink; I looked in the prisoner's box before he came up, the first thing I saw was the table spoon broken in two with my master's father's name on it; I knew the spoon from using it, the spoon was in a bit of paper on the top part of the box, I saw the linen and muslin there, I informed my master.

MR. ALLEY. You had the curiosity to look in the box, you expected to find a Valentine there. - A. Yes.

Mr. Percival. Q. You are in the employment of Messrs. Bells - Yes.

Q. Did you go up when the prisoner was charged with this - A. Yes, I went up stairs, the prisoner's box was opened; on opening the box we first discovered the spoon, the prisoner was present; in turning up his clothes in his box we found nine yards of Irish linen, the outside mark was cut off. When we have got a whole piece of cloth, and a person does not take the whole piece, we put a pencil mark.

Q. Did you then find on any part of these pieces of cloth your own mark - A. I did, at one end of it. It was cut into a yard, two yards, and two yards and a half, to elude detection; I know my own mark.

WILLIAM CRAIG . I am a constable. When I apprehended the prisoner nothing passed on my opening the box, only he denying that it was his master's property. He was questioned about the spoon, he said he hoped his master would forgive him.

Prisoner's Defence. I found the spoon.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY, aged 22.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100411-56

316. JOHN BENNETT was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 28th of February , a watch, value 3 l. a seal, value 1 l. a watch chain, value 1 s. and a watch key, value 1 d. the property of Jonathan Jackson , in the dwelling-house of Ralph Austin .

JONATHAN JACKSON . I am a brazier , I work for Mr. Ralph Austin , No. 8, Great Saffron-hill, St. Andrew's . On the 28th of February, about eleven o'clock, I hung my watch up in Mr. Austin's accompting-house; I missed it between three and four in the afternoon. The prisoner was an errand boy . On missing my watch, I immediately

went into the manufactory, no one being in the shop, and asked one of the boys if he had been in the accompting house; there was no one that knew any thing of it. I immediately sent for a constable, knowing no one but our own work people had been on the premises; they were all searched, and the prisoner among the rest, and nothing found.

JOHN BARNES. Q. Were you the constable on this occasion. - A. Yes, I searched all the people, nothing was found. On the next day I saw the watch. Mr. Austin had occasion to send for some toe, and the prisoner brought short weight. I searched him again, this watch was in the lower part of his trowsers; he said he found it, I have kept it ever since.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not say I found it; I said I took it off the nail, I told my prosecutor I am guilty.

GUILTY, aged 16.

Of stealing only .

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and whipped in jail .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100411-57

317. SARAH ROSE was indicted, for that she on the 9th of March , being in the dwelling-house of Archiball Campbell, feloniously did steal a cloak, value 16 s. a pair of shoes, value 2 s. an apron, value 2 s. 6 d. his property; and that she about the hour of twelve on the same night, burglariously did break to get out of the said house .

ARCHIBALD CAMPBELL . I live at 15, Little Barlow-street, St. Mary-le-bone . I rent one room, the two pair back room, the house is let out in tenements. On Friday the 9th of March, about half after ten in the evening, I and my wife were going home. We met the prisoner; she asked us to let her have a lodging for that night; we permitted her to come for that night; we got home about twenty minutes before eleven. I went to bed first, and did not awake till the morning, and then the prisoner was gone. On the Thursday following I found her, I charged her with taking away a cloak, apron and a pair of shoes, she had the shoes on her feet.

MARY CAMPBELL . Q. You had known this young woman before this matter happened, had not you. - A. Yes, I consented to her staying in our apartment on Friday night, the 9th of March. We all of us went to bed as soon as we went home; the prisoner laid down in her cloaths; I locked the door myself; between twelve and one she begged to go down to the privy, she went down and left my room door open; I expected her coming up again, she did not return. I went out in the morning before it was light, she was not in the room, then I missed my cloak apron and shoes. On the Thursday following my husband found her; I was fetched, she had my shoes on her feet, I knew they were mine, I had only bought them the day before; the cloak and apron had been pawned. I saw the duplicates of them, the cloak was worth sixteen shillings.

Q. I suppose the prisoner bore a good character, or else you would not have taken her in. - A. I had not seen her for three or four years, her husband is at sea.

ROBERT ARMSTRONG . I am a pawnbroker in Baldwin's Gardens, Leather-lane; I took in a cloak and apron on Saturday the 10th of March of the prisoner.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I was very much distressed, when I met with these two people she gave me them two things to pledge. I told her when I received my husband's half pay I would return her the things and something in the bargain.

WILLIAM CHESTERMAN . I am a constable; when I apprehended the prisoner she did not relate a thing of this kind. These are the duplicates I found upon her; one is pawned in the name of Sarah Rose , and the other Ann Rose ; she was intoxicated.

GUILTY aged, 30

Of stealing not of breaking out of the dwelling-house .

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100411-58

318. MARY BROWN and MARY SMITH were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of March , 24 yards of printed cotton value 30 s. the property of John Davis , privately in his shop .

JOHN DAVIS . I live at 156, Ratcliffe-highway, St. George's in the East . I am a linen draper ; I rent the whole house. On the 14th of March, between three and four o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoners came into my shop both together. I was waiting upon another customer in the shop. Henry Hopwood and Williams, they are both my servants, were in the shop; Williams I believe, served them, he is not here. After the prisoners left my shop, I received information from Solomon who lives on the other side of the way. I directed Hopwood to follow them, he brought them both back; I sent for an officer, Mr. Brown came, he searched them.

Q. Were there any goods produced by Brown which you knew to be yours - A. Yes, 24 yards of printed cotton; I knew it to be mine, it was in my hand when they came into the shop.

HENRY HOPWOOD . Q. Did you serve these women. - A. No, I was close to them, I saw them come in in company together, Williams served them. After they left the shop Solomon's boy came in, I followed them and overtook them in Denmark-street, about fifty yards from the shop. They were together standing against a wall; they both were holding some print in their hands, Smith was assisting Brown to put it under her gown. I took the print from them, and told them it was my master's property. I told them to walk back. I laid hold of Brown, and the other followed after. When the constable came my master gave charge of them for having stolen that print, then they begged to be let off.

JOHN SOLOMON . I live opposite of Mr. Davis.

Q. Did you see the prisoners come out of Mr. Davis's shop - A. Yes, after they had gone three or four yards from the shop I saw the cotton drop from under Brown's cloak. I had some suspicion; I could not leave my shop I sent over to Mr. Davis, and gave him information.

ROBERT BROWN. Q. Were you sent for to take charge of these two women - A. Yes, Mrs. Davis accused them of stealing this piece of print; they said they had been into the shop to buy half a yard of calico, they said they had not taken it, and that they were much in liquor, they appeared sober; Mr. Davis told me I should take them away, they cried and ask'd forgiveness.

The property produced and identified.

Brown's Defence. The cotton was in my hand, the prisoner by the side of me knew nothing of it; she was persuading me to go back with it, and I was persuading her, I was intoxicated.

Smith's Defence. I went into the shop, and while I was there the other prisoner secreted it; I knew nothing of it; I went up Denmark-street I thought Brown was following of me. I looked back, she was standing up against the wall, and while I was talking to her the young man came up; I am quite innocent of it.

BROWN GUILTY, aged 26,

SMITH GUILTY, aged 32,

Of stealing, but not privately in the shop .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100411-59

319. ROBERT REEVES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of March , 50 lb. weight of lead value 10 s. the property of Thomas Lynn , affixed to a house of his .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100411-60

320. ELIZABETH SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of March , a pair of earrings, value 3 s. the property of Francis Steele .

The case was stated by Mr. Adolphus.

FRANCIS STEELE . Q. You are a goldsmith and jeweller , No. 36, Oxford-street - A. Yes.

Q. The person at the bar was your servant - A. Yes.

Q. At that time had you any particular ear rings - A. Yes, twelve pair that I bought, and never shewed them to any one. I put them in a drawer underneath the window; nobody in the shop knew any thing of them but myself and wife. I never had any ear-rings of that pattern before nor since. I missed a pair of these ear-rings on the 7th of March. I accused the prisoner of taking them. I asked her to let me look in her boxes, she has two boxes; she brought forth a box with a broken lock upon it, and the things were all turned out, there was nothing there, she unlocked the other box and the first thing that she bid her hand upon was a bit of paper in the middle of the box, she turned the things out with her left hand, I asked her what she held so tight in her right hand, she said, they are my own, I have had them some time, with that, one of the ear-rings fell on the floor I picked it up, I said, these are the ear-rings that I am looking for, they are mine, she then turned round and cried and said she would fetch her father.

Mr. Gurney. I believe her father came and was too warm, and that induced you to prosecute - A. No, not at all.

Q. There had been some difference between you and her father - A. No.

Q. He did some work for you, you thought he charged too much - A. I told him if he would go to any shopkeeper, and the price they would charge I would give him; he had charged me a great price.

Q. She went home to her father and came back with her father; no officer was fetched until her father had been - A. No.

Q. She was taken before the magistrate and was bailed and appears here this morning - A. Yes.

Court. At the time that you charged the girl with this had you settled with him - A. I had not, but he came to me afterwards to settle her wages and I settled it with him.

ANN STEELE . I am the wife of the last witness. I was present when the prisoner's boxes were searched; we found nothing in her first box, in the second I observed her take out a piece of paper which she kept in her hand. I asked her what she had in her hand, she said they are not yours, I have had them some time; one of the earrings fell on the floor, Mr. Steele picked it up, and it proved to be the pair of ear-rings that we had missed. She began to cry and said she knew nothing of them, and never saw the ear-rings before, she said Mr. Steele must have broke open her box and put them in to make her out a thief; she would go and fetch her father, which she did; her father came and abused Mr. Steele very much, and said he must have put them in the box; the constable has got the ear-rings

Mr. Gurney. The constable was not fetched till after the father came - A. No, he was not.

JAMES BUDGE. I am an officer; I took charge of the prisoner; Mr. Steele put a pair of ear-rings in my hand, I have kept them ever since.

The property produced and identified.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave her a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100411-61

321. ABRAHAM HART was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of February a handkerchief value 1 s. 6 d. the property of a certain person to the jurors unknown.

SAMUEL LACK . I am a Bow-street patrol. On the 12th of February between ten and eleven o'clock at night, just as the people was coming out of Covent-garden Theatre, I apprehended Hart at the office door. I followed him about an hour and a half before that and saw him in the act of picking pockets, I saw him take this handkerchief out of a gentleman's pocket, I think it is this because it was damp at one corner, the name appeared to have been bit out by the damp at the corner as though it had been put in the mouth to bite the name out. I did not take the prisoner in custody when I saw him take the handkerchief out of the gentleman's pocket, I let him be till the mob was almost dispersed, I am sure the prisoner is the man, I followed him different nights from the 5th to the 10th, I found two handkerchiefs upon him, I cannot swear positively that this is the handkerchief, he was apprehended on the 6th for picking a gentleman's pocket, he was discharged; when I first saw him in the evening he was standing at the entrance of the play-house going into the pit.

Q. What became of the gentleman whose pocket he picked - A. I do not know, there was no gentleman came forward to own the handkerchief.

Mr. Knapp. Do you know the gentleman that you described having his pocket picked - A. No, I tapped the gentleman on the shoulder and asked him if he had not had his pocket picked, he said he had he lost a yellow handkerchief out of his pocket, he said he would come to the office to-morrow at eleven o'clock, he did not give his name or address. It was a yellow handkerchief that I saw him take.

Prisoner's Defence. When Mr. Lack the officer took me into Bow-street he said that White took that handkerchief, that handkerchief is worn out, it is not bitten out in the corner, he told me in Bow-street office he would endeavour to transport me because I was a jew .

Court. Q. to Lack. Did you say that you saw White pick the gentleman's pocket - A. No, White was taken

up by a gentleman and given to me, the prisoner said both these handkerchiefs were his own.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100411-62

322. MARY CAVAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of February , two sheets, value 4 s. a shift, value 2 s. and a gown, value 6 d. the property of William Brown .

MARY BROWN . I am the wife of William Brown , he belongs to the Coldstream Guards ; I live at No. 14, Gardener's-lane, King-street . On the 24th. of February in the evening a young woman of my acquaintance knocked at my door, I opened the door, my acquaintance and this woman came in; she asked me to let the prisoner lodge with me that night and the next; she slept that night with me and my husband; she told me the next morning that she had a little business at the war office about her husband; she went out, and when she returned she said she could not get the business finished till the next day, and that a boot maker at Charing-cross would give her a job of boot strapping, that she could get nine shillings the next day, and begged me to call her in the morning at six o'clock, and when the work was done she would pay me for her lodging and breakfast. I called her at six, she said it was too early; about seven she got up, had her breakfast and went away; she came back in half an hour for me to lend her twopence to buy some hemp, I gave her the twopence, she went away and I went out to work; on my coming home I saw her by the Admiralty, I stopped to see whether she was going into the place where she said she worked at, she passed by it; I went up to her and asked her the reason of her telling me such a falsehood, I found my gown wrapped up in a sheet under her arm; I asked her how she came to take it, she said she could not get work at the shop unless she paid her footing; I took them from her, I forced her home with me, and then I found another sheet and a shift upon her. On the Friday she had sold the shift to me for two shillings, and on the Saturday she took it.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. She gave me the things to pawn; her husband came in and asked her where I was going with the things, she said I had stole them, the shift I got from St. Giles's Workhouse.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100411-63

323. DIANA THORP was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of April , a watch, value 50 s. a watch chain, value 3 l. a gold seal, value 1 l. a dollar, and 14 s. the property of Charles Stewart , from his person .

CHARLES STEWART . I am a smith . On the 2d of April, about half past eleven o'clock at night, I met the prisoner in Drury-lane, whether I accosted her or she me I cannot say.

Q. Were you sober - A. I was, the prisoner asked me if I would give her some gin, which I did in a gin shop in Drury-lane, she asked me if I would go to her lodgings, which I did, to No. 6, George-street, Drury-lane , I there gave her another glass of spirits, I made an agreement to stop with her all night, I paid her four shillings for it. I then sat down on the chair and she sat on my knee; she pulled my watch out of my pocket, I had no suspicion of her absconding, with that I took off my clothes and was going to bed, and at that time she took the opportunity of leaving the room. I did not see her again till ten o'clock the next day.

Q. There was some money besides, how came that to be taken - A. I cannot tell at what period I lost that money, I had it in my pocket when I went into the room, and when I came out I had it not.

Q. When she took that you do not know - A. No.

Q. Were you sober - A. I was capable of transacting any thing that came in my way, I am sure this is the woman, I had not been in company with any other woman that night. I have never found my watch since.

CHARLES TRAY . I am a constable of St. Giles's. I apprehended the prisoner on the next morning about ten o'clock, the prosecutor pointed her out to me, she was sitting below stairs at breakfast with a man and four women; he said this prisoner robbed him of his watch and money, she said she had never saw him, he said he could positively swear to her, there was another girl he said came up into the room and turned him out, I took them both to the watch-house, I searched their pockets, there was nothing found upon them.

Prisoner's Defence. I am perfectly innocent of it.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100411-64

324. WILLIAM HAMILTON was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Sir William Beechey about the hour of seven in the forenoon on the 15th of April , Sir William Beechey and others being therein, and feloniously stealing therein three silver table spoons, value 30 s. a silver desert spoon, value 5 s. and six silver forks, value 3 l. the property of the said Sir William Beechey.

WILLIAM SAUNDERS. I am a servant to Sir William Beechey, No. 13, Harley-street, Cavendish-square . On Sunday morning the 15th of April, about a quarter before seven o'clock, the prisoner came down the area steps, slipped up the sash, pushed open the shutters, and took the silver spoons and the silver forks out of the window as they laid upon the water cistern in my pantry.

Q. Could he reach them when he opened the window - A. Yes, he took three table spoons, two desert spoons, and half a dozen silver forks.

Q. I suppose they can see when they go along the things laying there - A. When the window shutters are open in the day time.

Q. Did you see him do this - A. Yes. I was in the pantry, it was done momentary, I directly hollowed out stop thief, and followed the man naked as I was; I lost sight of him by reason I had to go round to the door; one of the witnesses here pursued him and collared him

Q. Where did you overtake him - A. Just by Portland chapel.

Q. When you got out of the house did you see him again - A. Yes, after he threw the property away, one of the witnesses saw him throw the property away.

Q. Are you sure this is the man - A. Yes.

PETER KELLEY . I am a gentleman's servant, I saw the man run out of the area, I took no notice of it, I turned into the Mews into my own stable, I heard the cry of stop thief; I ran out of the Mews again, and I saw the prosecutor in his shirt, I could not see the prisoner;

then I ran out of the short Mews across the street, the prisoner came in my sight then in Dutchey-street; I cried stop thief, and within a few yards of me he laid down the property on the pavement; I picked the property up, and still pursued the prisoner till I came to Portland-chapel, Chapel-street. I seized him and held him till more assistance came, and then brought him back to Sir William Beechey 's house with the property in my hand, I delivered it to Sir William's Servant.

JAMES VICE. I am a sawyer. As I came along Harley-street I saw the prisoner come up the area steps with the property in his hands, and directly Mr. Saunders sang out stop thief, and I followed him up Portland-street there I got hold of him along with the gentleman's servant, and brought him back to the house, I never lost sight of him.

Q. Did you observe him put the spoons down - A. Yes, I saw him lay them down on the pavement, they were picked up before I came up. I kept on after him.

WILLIAM CHESTERMAN. I am a constable, I was on duty about seven o'clock, the prisoner was delivered to me, I found a key on the prisoner; the young man at the house kept the spoons.

Saunders. These are the spoons that he took and the forks, they are my masters property.

Q. Was the area gate open - A. No, it was locked.

Q. How he got the area door open you do not know A. No, I am sure it was locked the over night, and none of the family were up.

Q. What are the value of these things, they are worth more than forty shillings are not they - A. A great deal more than that.

Q. What parish is your house in - A. Mary-le-bone.

Prisoner's Defence. On Sunday morning about a quarter before seven, as I was coming up Harley-street I heard a cry of stop thief; I saw a man go by me; at the corner of Portland-chapel there were a number of people pursuing of him, some were riding and some on foot; one of the men came up and said, you are the man; some said I was not the man, and some said I was the man; that gentleman came up and said he was almost sure I was the man; directly I said, if you are sure I am the man I will go back with you. The key that I had found on me was the key of my lodging, every lodger in the house gives the landlady a shilling for the key to open the door themselves if they stay out late.

Jury. Q. to Saunders. Had none of your servants been out - A. None at all, all the doors were on the lock.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 21.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100411-65

325. JAMES BARCLAY was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Fox , about the hour of three in the night on the 18th of March , and stealing therein a coat value 7 s. a hat value 3 s. and a pair of shoes value 1 s. 6 d. the property of William Evans .

WILLIAM EVANS. I am a coach-joiner , I lodge at 38 Stanhope-street, Clare-market , William Fox is my landlord , he lives in the parlour, the house is in the parish of St. Clement's Danes . On Monday the 19th of March about three o'clock in the night, I was alarmed by seeing a man in my room. I got up and sat in the bed about ten minutes, taking particular notice of the man, I never saw his face.

Q. How did he get into the house - A. I do not know how he got into the lower part of the house, but in my room he had broken the lath and plaster partion to get his arm in to undo the lock of my door. When I had observed him about ten minutes as I sat up in the bed, I then called to him to know what he was about, he had then got a tea-chest in his hand; on my jumping out of bed and calling to him he dropped the tea-chest and flew out of the door, I found myself not able to follow him, I threw up the window and gave the alarm.

Q. What part of the house was your apartment in - A. The two pair of stairs front room; by my giving the alarm he was taken in the street. On my looking about the room there was nothing taken out of the room; this hat was taken off the place where I left it and put by the door: this coat that I have on was on the bed, he put it close to the door and the tea-chest was moved, in fact I did not lose any thing.

Q. Had you seen him take the coat off the bed - A. No, my wife waked me, we heard a noise like the rats making a noise, I suppose that was the time of his breaking the laths, we supposed that he got in on the evening, the door had been left on the latch for a lodger that was gone out.

FRANCIS MINNS . I am a shoemaker, I was just going into Stanhope-street, I saw the prisoner come out of the house, and the alarm came out of the window stop thief, then I attacked him and pursued him.

Q. What time of the morning was it - A. About three o'clock.

RICHARD BAKER . I am a patrol, I was standing at the end of Stanhope-street when Minns ask'd me the way to Clare-market; just at that moment there was an alarm out of the window, stop that man, Minns went before me and the prisoner passed by me; I tried to stop him, I could not, I called to Colman the watchman to stop him, he came out of the box and knocked him down.

JOHN HASKINS . I live at 38, Stanhope-street, in the first floor in the same house that Mr. Fox keeps, I came home about one o'clock, or a few minutes after, I put to the street-door and went to bed. I am confident I latched the street-door. There are four lodgers in the house. I was awoke by the alarm of stop thief, I heard the watchman's rattle spring, I heard the man brought back to the door; I heard Minns cry out why do not you come down, this is the house he came out of; the next morning I saw the hole in the lath and plaster that the prisoner had made, I never saw the prisoner in the house.

Q. to Prosecutor. You did not see the man's face, you said - A. I did not.

Q. Did you not observe his person at all - A. Yes, he had a brown coat on and a yellow blue-striped waistcoat on, that is the same man that was brought back to me in less than five minutes; I was certain to his person when he was brought back; I never saw his face before.

Prisoner's Defence. The reason I was out so late, I had been having a little drop of drink along with a couzen of mine close to where this gentleman lives, and I was making the best of my way home.

GUILTY, aged 31.

Of stealing, but not of breaking and entering the dwelling-house .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100411-66

326. JOHN CROSBY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of March , a gown value 5 s. a handkerchief, value 1 s. and a pinafore, value 6 d. the property of Edward Chalkley .

MARY CHALKLEY. I live at Tottenham , my husband's name is Edward Chalkley , he is a day-labouring man . On the 26th of March, about ten o'clock, I went with my children to school; I locked my door, and going out in a hurry I left my window open. I was gone about an hour and a half. When I returned I saw John Crosby coming from the house, he was about ten yards from my door; I never saw him in the house; I saw my gown sleeve hanging below his jacket. I told him he had got my property. I called to Mr. Piper, who was behind me to stop him; Piper stopped him. This gown, handkerchief, and pinafore were all found about him; they are mine.

JOSEPH PIPER . I am a labouring man of Tottenham. Mrs. Chalkley desired me to stop the prisoner. I did; he delivered the things up, except the handkerchief, and that I took out of his pocket.

Prisoner's Defence. I was eighteen years in the forty-fourth regiment, and I lost my sight at Egypt.

GUILTY , aged 50.

Fined 1 s. and passed to his parish.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100411-67

327. ELEANOR AIKMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of February , a pellise, value 16 s. the property of Mary Benham , widow .

MARY BENHAM . Q. Are you a widow woman - A. Yes, I live at the Duchess of York, Kingsland . I am house-keeper there. The prisoner was servant in the house.

Q. When did you lose your pellise - A. On the 17th of February. On Friday the 16th I left it in the room. I did not look for it till Saturday afternoon; and on that Saturday afternoon, about half-past two o'clock, she went to fetch the pots in as I thought; she never returned. I went up stairs and missed my pellise.

Q. When did you see the prisoner again - A. On the 27th. A young man met her opposite of the monument, and he brought her to the Duchess of York.

THOMAS THOMAS. I am a servant to Mr. Flemming Fleet-market. On the 17th of February between twelve and four the prisoner pledged this pellise. I lent her 17 s. on it.

PETER MASON. I am an officer of Worship-street. On the 27th of February I was sent for to the Duchess of York; the prisoner was there crying, she was charged with stealing this pellise; she acknowledged that she had pledged it at a shop in Fleet-market, and she had destroyed the duplicate on the step of the door as she came out. I took her with me to shew me the shop, she found the pellise by the apron it was in, and Mrs. Benham claimed it.

Prisoner's Defence. When I went out I asked her to lend me a pellise, I went out and pledged it. I asked her for some money, she denied me, I was ashamed to return. When I met this young man, I said I would go home with him, as he said they would not hurt me if I would own it.

GUILTY aged 19.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100411-68

328. THOMAS WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 8th of March , a cloak, value 1 s. and a handkerchief, value 6 d. the property of Thomas Berwick .

ELIZABETH BERWICK . I live at No. 8, Charlotte-street, Battle Bridge .

Q. Did you lose a cloak and handkerchief any time on the 8th of March - A. Yes, out of my front parlour, I hung the cloak up there about ten in the morning, and the handkerchief I had in my hand about ten minutes before. I had been cleaning my passage and the room door was open, that is the way the prisoner walked in, I was in the back wash house. Mr. Bull came over to me and gave me information. He stopped the prisoner. I went out, and saw my cloak and handkerchief taken out of his apron.

ROBERT BULL . I live at Battle-Bridge. On the 8th of March, about half after three o'clock, I saw the prisoner pass by the prosecutrix's house several times backwards and forwards. At last he went into the prosecutrix's house; he had nothing with him then, and when he came out he had a parcel under his arm. I immediately ran over to Mrs. Berwick. I followed after the prisoner in consequence of what Mrs. Berwick told me, and when I overtook him he had got these things in his apron.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of the crime that is alledged against me.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and publicly whipped .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100411-69

329. WILLIAM WINCK was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of April , a table, value 30 s. the property of Henry Tolner .

HENRY TOLNER. I keep a broker's shop , the corner of Broker Row, Drury-lane .

Q. Did you lose your table on the 9th of April, or thereabouts. - A. Yes, it was standing in my shop when I went out between three and four o'clock. In about half an hour I was sent for, and when I came home the prisoner and the table were in my shop, my man had brought him back. I know the table to be mine, it is worth thirty shillings.

ANN CHAPMAN . I live at 48, Charles-street Drury-lane. I keep a fruit stand near to Mr. Tolner's shop. About four o'clock on the 9th of April I saw the prisoner take the table from out of Mr. Tolner's shop, he put it underneath the next door, he went into another door, he returned and took the table away. I went and gave information at Mr. Tolner's.

GEORGE SEDGWICK . I am porter to Mr. Tolner. From information I pursued the prisoner, and found him with the table on his shoulder. I stopped him. He said a gentleman employed him to carry this table. When I stopped him there was nobody with him. I brought him and the table back to my master's.

Prisoner's Defence. On last Monday week I had been out in the fore part of the day. Going home at the end of Drury-lane there was a gentleman buying nuts of a basket-woman. I passed by; he said, young man, could you tell me of a porter. I said I could not. He said it was only a light table to carry into Oxford road. I took the table on my shoulder. He said, you had better drink first. I put the table down and went and drank with him,

and then I took the table, and the person that employed me was a few steps before me. When the man stopped me he would not let me call him back, the gentleman told me he would walk forward, I should see him at the White Lion opposite of St. Giles's.

Q. to Ann Chapman . Was there any body with him when he went into the shop and took the table - A. I saw no person with him.

JANE MOSS . I live at No. 4, Bembridge-street St. Giles's. I sell nuts for my living, my husband is a labouring man.

Q. How long have you known this man - A. I never saw him before the day he was taken prisoner. I was at the Drury-lane corner of Long-acre. When I first saw this man, a gentleman asked me for a pennyworth of nuts, and after I served him with the nuts he asked me if I know of a porter. I told him, No. The prisoner was coming along, the gentleman asked him if he knew of a porter; he said, no, what was it he wanted carried; he said a small card-table into Oxford-road.

Q. Did you follow this gentleman and this porter - A. Yes, a little distance behind, they walked nearly together.

Q. Who walked first - A. The gentleman. I went into the public-house to sell my gingerbread-nuts, and when I came out of the public-house the prisoner was stopped with the table, I did not see the gentleman then.

Q. Was Sedgwick the man that stopped him with the table - A. I do not know.

Q. Then you stepped up to speak to him - A. No, I did not, I followed the mob, and he was taken to Bow-street.

Q. Then at Bow-street you went in and told them what you had seen - A. No, I knew the young woman, that the prisoner sent for his wife the same evening. I stopped in Bow-street; it concerned me, I thought he was innocent. I told several people in the mob I thought he was innocent.

Q. Did you step up to the man that had taken him, and say that you thought this man was innocent - A. No, I staid in Bow-street about a couple of hours.

Q. Why did not you go in and tell the justice - A. A young woman told me he was fully committed to Newgate for trial. I went to the prisoner, and asked him if I could be of any service. She told me his name, I found him in Newgate.

Q. Did you ever enquire after the gentleman that met him - A. No, I should know him if I were to see him.

GUILTY , aged 52

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction and publicly whipped .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100411-70

330. EBENEZER TAPP was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of March , two ounces of silk value 8 s. four ounces of thread value 1 s. twenty-two bobbins value 2 s. forty-two quills value 5 s. and two pounds weight of worsted value 10 s. the property of Matthew Davis .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded,

GUILTY , aged 35

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and whipped in jail .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100411-71

331. WILLIAM SHORTING was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of March , one hundred and twenty half-pence value 5 s. the property of George Suter .

GEORGE SUTER. I am a publican , I keep the George and Crown , Broad-street, St. Giles's . On the 5th of March, about six o'clock, Mrs. Gorden was paying me some money. She laid down four five-shilling papers of halfpence as part of the money. While I was settling with her the prisoner and two others came in and called for a quartern of gin; the halfpence laid on the counter, and the moment they called for the gin the prisoner catched a five-shilling paper of halfpence off the counter in an instant, and throwed them to a short man behind him and he ran out of the door. I directly challenged the prisoner. I said you have stole five-shillings, worth of halfpence from me. He said he did not know any thing about it. I detained him and sent for a constable. Ann Gorden was paying me. I stood at the loss of the five shillings; I considered it as paid; it was not her neglect in any part.

Q. It was parted from her and laid before you - A. Yes, I drew it towards me; she came to pay me some pounds. She said, I must pay you four five-shillings in halfpence; I was counting it with the rest.

Mr. Gurney. Do you mean to say that you saw it taken by the prisoner - A. Yes, I saw it as clear as I see you now.

ANN GORDON . I lodge at Mr. Suter's.

Q. On the 5th of March were you paying Mr. Suter any money - A. Yes, I cannot say how much I was to pay him; there were two one-pound notes, four five-shilling papers. I had put these papers out of my hand on the counter. Three men came to the bar the prisoner was one of them, they called for some gin, the prisoner stood opposite of the counter; Mr. Suter was settling my account in the book. On a sudden he ran out into the lobby and took hold of the prisoner, saying, you have taken five-shillings of halfpence and given them to that man that ran out of the door.

Q. Did one of the three run away - A. Yes, instantly. Mr. Suter then said to me, did not you see that. I said, what Sir, he replied, why this villain has handed off five-shillings to that fellow that ran out of the door. I did not see it, and so I told him.

Q. Did Mr. Suter stand by the loss - A. He did.

Prisoner's Defence. I met two men, I was intoxicated, and when I came into this house I called for a quartern of gin. I never touched a halfpenny belonging to him.

GUILTY , aged 19

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction and publicly whipped .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100411-72

332. ALEXANDER MIGNOT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of March , twenty-six pounds weight of English pink, value 5 s. sixty pounds weight of white lead, value 21 s. nine pounds weight of patent verdigrease, value 1 l. seven pounds weight of verdigrease ground in oil, value 1 l. two pound weight of rosin, value 6 d. two pounds weight and a half of green paint, value 5 s. two pounds weight of ground Venetian red, value 6 d. and an earthen bottle, value 1 s. the property of Francis Albert Leonard Strick Van Linschoten .

DANIEL BISHOP . Q. You are a Police officer of Worship-street office. - A. I am.

Q. On the 21st of March did you go with Mr. Linschoten and a search warran to the house of the prisoner - A. I did, I found the prisoner near his master's manufactory. I read the warrant to him in the presence of Mr. Linschoten and Joshua Armstrong. I then said, have you any oil or colour at your house. He answered, he had

not. I told him I must search his house. We went with him to his house in Wilmott-street, Bethnal-green, and searching under the cellar stairs under some old wood we found a hamper containing fifty or sixty pounds of white lead, and in a corner cupboard of that cellar we found white lead, vedigrease and other colours that I do not know the name of; they were in paper tied up, and some of them clean, having the appearance of recently been put there. I asked him how he came by these things. He said, some of them were given him by his master, and some of them he had ten or twelve years; he had once kept a shop, and that was part of the stock. In the same cellar we found some rape oil. We then took him and the goods to the public office. The place under the stairs was damp, the bottom of the hamper was rotted out.

JOSHUA ARMSTRONG . Q. You are another office of Worship-street - A. I am, I was with Bishop when he read the warrant to the prisoner. After he read the warrant he asked him if he had any articles described in that warrant; he said he had not. We then proceeded to search, the things were found as Bishop has described.

FRANCIS LINSCHOTEN . Q. I believe you are a manufacturer of verdigrease and colour - A. Yes, in Bethnal-green road, the prisoner has been in my employ for five years past.

Q. Have you lately from your manufactory lost colours of this description - A. Great quantities.

Q. We understand that you accompanied the officers on their search - A. I did; and these things were found

Q. Were these things such colours as you manufacture - A. Some of them, and all the articles found I deal in: the patent verdigrease I believe it to be of my manufacturing; there is 9 lb. of it, we sell it for 3 s. 6 d. a pound, and the 7 lb. of verdigrease ground in oil I believe it to be of my manufacturing. There is 60 lb. weight of White lead I deal in that, and from the appearance of it I do not think it could have been there ten or twelve years. I am the only manufacturer of patent verdigrease.

Prisoner's Defence. I asked my master for a bit of colour; he said, what colour would you wish to have; I said, beggars are not to be choosers. He then said to the foreman, suppose we give him some green; no, I said, green is too dear if you will be kind enough to give me this yellow; he gave orders to the foreman to give me as much as I wanted; the foreman acted according to his orders; he gave it me.

JOHN GRENNON . I am a Weaver.

Q. Do you recollect assisting the prisoner removing from some house into that which he now lives - A. I do about thirteen years ago; he lived in Church-street, he moved to 39 in the same street. In that house the business carried on was a colour shop, oil shop and chandlery, that is thirty years ago; there was a large basket with some white lead, black lead and rosin.

The prisoner called three witnesses who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100411-73

333. THOMAS YATES and SAMUEL MANN were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Robert Girdler , about the hour of eight at night, on the 9th of April , and stealing therein sixteen pieces of brass, value 20 s. the property of William Low ; and THOMAS FIELD for feloniously receiving on the same day the said goods, he knowing them to have been stolen .

WILLIAM LOW. I live at 33, Little-earl-street, Seven Dials. The goods were stolen from my shop, No. 20, Queen-street St. Giles's . Mr. Girdler is the housekeeper , I rent the shop of him; he lives in the house; my shop is in the back-yard, you go through the house to it; I stamp brass there. On the morning of the 9th of April I went into the shop, and left the shop under the care of Charles Grove . I can speak to the property. I went with the officer, and found upon Field, sixteen brass plates, they are worth a guinea I know them to be mine.

CHARLES GROVE . On the 9th of April in the morning my master came in the shop, he left me in the care of it while he was away. I left the shop in the evening at seven o'clock, when I could not see to work any longer: I double locked the door when I left the shop, Mr. Girdler's door was open. At seven o'clock on Tuesday morning I returned, I found the lock had been pushed back, it was only single locked, and sixteen brass plates were stolen out of the shop. When I missed them I looked about to see if I could find them, I could not; I went and told my master. I saw the brass plates at Bow-street when Yates and Field were in custody. I knew the plates again when I saw them, I had been at work upon them. They did not take all the brass plates from the shop, they took sixteen and left twenty in the shop. I can take my oath I double locked the door. I had some suspicion of Joseph Robinson , he works for Mr. Peene at Mr. Girdler's; the door of Mr. Peene's shop comes into this passage.

JOSEPH ROBINSON . Q. How old are you - A. Fourteen, I work for Mr. Peene, a last-maker, No. 20, King-street, at Mr. Girdler's house.

Q. Do you recollect leaving there on Monday the 9th of April - A. No, my master was out. I met Thomas Yates and Samuel Mann that night about eight o'clock in Shorts Gardens, Yates asked me if I could get any copper, brass, callico, shawls, or any thing, he said he could sell it for me at Tom Fields, No. 10, Shorts Gardens. I said I could not. He then asked me if there was not a man that lived in our house that did something in the brass way; I said there was. He then said to Samuel Mann, shall we go there.

Q. Did you know at this time where Low lived - A. Yes, I worked in the same house where Mr. Low worked at Mr. Girdler's house; Mann said he would go if I would not tell any one. I said I would not.

Q. Did they know where you worked - A. Yes, I often told them, I had seen Yates and Mann at the public-house where I get my dinner. I did not know where they lived.

Q. Then you promised not to tell - A. Yes.

Q. You knew however that they intended to take some of Low's brass - A. Yes, we all went together a little after eight o'clock to this place; Mr. Girdler's street-door was open, the window was broken of Mr. Low's shop; I put my arm in and shoved the lock back, Yates and I went in, Mann stood outside of the door to see if any body was coming. Yates took sixteen of the brass plates out; we went out and left the door open; Yates put them under his apron. He asked me to go in and get more, I said I would not, I was afraid they would find me out. We all three went to Thomas Field 's, they told me to stop out while they went in; they came out and went over to the chandler's shop facing of Mr. Field's and

weighed them, they said they weighed 7 lb. They went into Field's again with them.

Q. Do you know whether Field was at home at that time - A. I looked through the window, I saw a man looking at them, I could not particularly distinguish Field so as to know him again. It was at No. 10 Shorts-Gardens, where the constable took Field. When they came out they said that Mr. Field gave them five-pence a pound for them, it came to 2 s. 11 d. they gave me a shilling, I then went home. On the next morning Mr. Low came to me about eight o'clock, I was in bed, in Belton-street he said that I had stole some brass plates from the shop, I told him first I had not, and then when he said he would not hurt any of us, I told him that I had, and who was concerned with me, and after that I went with the officer to find out the other lads. I shewed him them; Thomas Yates I pointed out before dinner, and Mann was going to a free and easy club that night.

GRACE FLUSHMAN . Q. Where do you live - A. At 26, Shorts Gardens, I keep a chandler's shop.

Q. Do you know either of the prisoners - A. I do not, I have seen Field at his door, I know his person, that is all, his door is nearly opposite to my door.

Q. Does he carry on any business - A. It has the appearance of a private house.

Q. Do you recollect the day he was taken up - A. No.

Q. Did any persons come to your shop on Monday evening, the 9th of April, for any purpose - A. Two boys came after candles were lighted, that boy I recollect very well.

Q. For what purpose did they come to your shop - A. They were in the shop, my little girl called me to tell the weight, the articles were put in the scale, some brass things were weighed in my scale.

Q. They asked your permission, did not they - A. I was not in the shop, my little girl was. These boys came into the shop and put it into the scale. They asked me where the weights were; I told him they hung over the counter; they weighed them. I recollect that boy that gave evidence very well, he was one of the two, he was standing close to the counter. I heard them say there was another outside.

RICHARD LIMBRICK . I am one of the patrols of Bow-street. On Tuesday the 10th of April Mr. Low came to Bow-street, he said he had been robbed. Joseph Robinson was at a public-house in Queen-street, Seven Dials. I apprehended him between ten and eleven in the morning. Robinson took me to No 10, Shorts Gardens, I found Thomas Field there in the parlour. When I went in I knew his person, and I saw these things. I went to the dresser where these sixteen pieces of brass were which I produce now. I said to him, how came you by them: he said two boys left them there on the over night, and they were to fetch them the next morning.

Q. Did he say Robinson was one of them - A. No, Robinson went with me, he pointed out the house. I sent him back to the public-house. Field could not see him. I asked him who the boys were, he said he did not know. Mr. Low said they were his property. I took them to the office; I have kept them ever since. I returned back to the public-house in Queen-street, and sent Robinson into the Three Tuns, the corner of Shorts Gardens. Robinson came out and told me Yates was there, playing at shove-halfpenny. I went in, found him there, and took him in custody, and just before I got him to the office I asked him what he had done with the brass; he said he did not know what I meant. Robinson said Mann was going to be chairman of a free and easy club at the two Brewers in Bembridge-street. I took Robinson with me. I came from the two Brewers, and came to the Turks's head, in Dyot-street, and as I was standing there Robinson pulled me by the coat and said that was the man. I took him in custody. I said nothing to him till I took him to the office.

THOMAS MANTZ. I am a patrol of Bow-street. On the 10th of this month Limbrick took Yates into custody, and delivered-him up to me. Yates said, I know what I am brought here for. He said a boy came to him last night to ask him to sell some copper. I asked him what boy; he replied, a boy that lives with a last-maker; be said that he sold it at Field's.

The property produced and identified.

Yates's Defence. Young Robinson came to me on the night he got the plates. I was in the public-house. He asked me if I knew where to sell them. I said I did not know where to sell them. We saw Mr. Field's door open as we were going along; I asked him if he would be so good as to let them be there till tomorrow morning, I would call for them.

Mann's Defence. I know nothing of what I am brought here for. I never saw Robinson before I saw him at Bow-street.

Field's Defence. The plates were brought to me by two young lads; they said they were going to the club at the next door to me; they asked my leave to let them leave them there. They were put down on the dresser, and left there till the officer came and took them; they were never purchased, I had no use for such things.

NOT GUILTY

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100411-74

334. WILLIAM GUTHERY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of March , from the person of Mary, the wife of James Healey , 3 l. in monies numbered, and a 1 l. Bank note , his property.

MARY HEALEY . I am the wife of James Healey. On the 26th of March I had a one pound Bank note, two guineas and 18 s. in silver in my pocket. I went into the Three Tuns to have half a pint of beer, the prisoner was there, and when I came out he followed me. I went with him to the Crown in Chapel-street, he called for half a pint of gin, it came to eight pence; there were two more men with him. I opened my purse, he took out a shilling, and put the four pence change in his pocket; he called for another half pint of gin, and said I should pay for that, I said I would not.

Q. Did you partake of the last half pint - A. Yes, I drank two glasses in his company; I was wrapping up my money, he took it out of my hand; the landlady came in, took it from him, wrapped it up and gave it into my hand. When I came out of the house the prisoner took it out of my hand; he went into the house again, he said he would return it to my husband the next morning; he sent the one pound note, but did not return the other.

JAMES HEALEY . I am a soldier as well the prisoner. The prisoner sent me the one pound note home. I asked the prisoner what he had done with the money, he said he had lost it.

MRS. PERRY. I am the landlady of the public-house. On the 26th of March the prisoner and the prosecutrix and two women came into my house. When first the

prisoner took the money from her the woman sat down to take out the money for the gin. I said he had no business with the woman's money; I took it from him, counted it, and wrapped it up and gave it the woman; he forced it again out of her hand and dragged her out of doors. I did not see her again till the next morning. He came into the house and said, by G - d I have got her money, she shall never have it any more, I will return it to her husband.

Prisoner's Defence. She followed me out of the house, she said she would not go home to her husband any more.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100411-75

335. THOMAS SEYMOUR was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of March , a pair of shoes, value 7 s. 6 d. the property of Robert Wyman and Joseph Hodges .

JOSEPH HODGES . My partner's name is Robert Wyman . We are shoemakers , 51 Grays-inn-lane . On Saturday the 24th of March, about ten o'clock in the morning, the prisoner came in and said his father was going to fit him with a pair of shoes; he went away, and returned to the door in about tea minutes; he asked if his father had been there, after that he waited about twenty minutes. I had suspicion and watched him, I saw him go to the step of the door and take down a pair of shoes, the shoes were outside of the shop. He went into my passage with the shoes, concealed them under his waistcoat and walked off. I pursued him, and never lost sight of him. I came up to him about forty yards distance from my door, brought him back, and took the shoes from him; these are-the shoes, I know them to be mine.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to his character.

GUILTY, aged 19.

Judgement respited .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100411-76

336. RICHARD GREEN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of March , a saw, value 4 s. the property of Robert Rust .

ROBERT RUST . I am a carpenter . On the 5th of March I was at work at a house in Hadlow-street . I left my saw on the stairs in the passage. I was down in the kitchen at work. The prisoner was brought back and the saw.

JOHN WHRATON . I saw the prisoner come out of the house with the saw under his coat. I stopped him and took it away from him. I took him into the house, and Rust sent for a constable.

WILLIAM READ. The prisoner was brought to the office. I have kept the saw ever since. He said he was a carpenter, he did it out of want.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. There was another man going on before me, it was him that had the saw by all account, it was not me.

GUILTY , aged 74.

To be examined before the magistrate, and sent to his parish .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100411-77

337. JAMES DAVIS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of March , a shawl, value 5 s. the property of Henry Milledge .

ANN MILLEDGE . I live at No. 12, Grafton street, Fitzroy-square . Soon after twelve I was busy down in the kitchen. I heard a man's foot in the passage; I ran up, and I perceived he had a shawl in his hand.

Q. Did you see enough of the man at that time to say whether or no it was the prisoner - A. I was hurried at the time; I am apt to be harried; he surrendered the shawl to me; I could have done what I liked to him. He came in to look at the house, it is to let, it is not finished, I had left the door open.

Q. After he had given you the shawl what became of him, how came he to be stopped - A. It was my hastiness. When my husband came in I said I had been robbed. My husband ran after him, and the man surrendered himself to him.

Mr. Knapp. I understand you were a good deal flurried - A. A good deal.

Q. You were alarmed so much, I should not think that you should be able to speak to the person of that man from another - A. I was so much hurried I cannot pretend what to say in it.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I never stood in such a situation before. I must leave it to the counsel.

The prisoner called three witnesses who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100411-78

338. JOHN COCKRAN was indicted for that he, on the 1st of June, on the 19th year of his Majesty's reign, at the City of Dublin, in the kingdom of Ireland, did take to wife one Margeret Conway , spinster , and to her was married; and that he afterwards on the 11th of July, 1802 , feloniously took to wife one Ann Linckstoffe , widow , his said former wife Margeret being then alive .

GEORGE LINNEY . I am parish clerk of St. Leonard, Shoreditch.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. I cannot say I do. I produce the register book of marriages. John Cockran of this parish by banns, on the 11th of July 1802.

Q. Did you know Ann Linckstoffe - A. No, not when I saw her; she is not here, she is run away.

MARGERET CONWAY. I am the first wife. I was married in Dublin by a priest, and he denies that marriage. I have had eight children by him.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100411-79

339. JOHN COCKRAN was indicted for that he on the 11th of July, 1802, at the parish of St. Leonard, Shoreditch, did take to wife one Ann Linckstoffe , and that he afterwards on the 6th of April, 1806 , at the parish of St. Botolph, Aldgate , feloniously did take to wife one Margeret Conway , spinster , his said former wife Ann being then alive .

MARGERET CONWAY. Q. Were you a single woman in 1806 - A. When I was first married to him, I was only seventeen years of age.

GEORGE LINNEY . I produce the register book of marriges of the parish of St. Leonard's Shoreditch.

Q. to Margeret Conway. Have you ever seen that man write - A. No.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100411-80

340. MARY KITE was indicted for feloniously assaulting Patrick M'Carthy on the 18th of April , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, a watch, value 5 l. his property.

PATRICK M'CARTHY. I sell potatoes and fish ; I live at No. 5, Chick-lane; I lost my watch in Diot-street . On Sunday night, between ten and eleven o'clock, I was walking along; I passed the prisoner; she asked me if I dropped something; I turned back; she took hold of my watch-chain; and wipped my watch out of my fob.

Q. Had you no conversation with her - A. Not the least.

THOMAS BEALE, I am one of the patrols. About eleven o'clock, I was coming up George-street, formerly called Diot-street; when I came up to Phoenix yard, three girls came up to me, and said there was a cry of murder; I went down, and saw the prosecutor and the prisoner together. The prosecutor said he had been robbed of his watch; he looked round, and found the watch without the outer case; he said she throwed the watch over a cart, and it fell on the dung-hill. The outer case was never found.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming along Diot-street; there were three or four women, with the man under the gateway; he knocked me down, and said I was the person that took his watch away.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100411-81

341. WILLIAM MURRAY and JOHN CRAWLEY were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of John Henry , about the hour of twelve on the night of the 20th of March , with intent to steal and burglariously stealing therein, two curtains, value 2 s. and a tea tray, value 1 s. the property of John Henry .

SECOND COUNT, for like offence, the property of Sarah Todd , spinster .

SARAH TODD . I live at No. 3, Little Bell Court, Gray's-inn-lane, in the parish of St. Andrews, Holborn . Mrs. Henry keeps the house; she does not live in the house; her niece sleeps there. I have the lower room. I am an unfortunate girl. On the 20th of March, about half past eleven o'clock at night, I went to the top of the court; there are two ways to come into the court; I was gone about five minutes, and when I returned, I saw a light in my room; I asked them, what they did there.

Q. Who was there - A. There were five men in my room; they made no reply. John Crawley was turning up the bed, to put it in a blanket; the blanket laid alongside; he immediately laid hold of my arms, and dashed me down by the foot of the bed; he said, you b - y w - e, if you make a noise, I will cut your throat; I holloed out murder as loud as I could; Murray in the mean time was taking down the curtains, and somebody took the tea-tray, but I cannot say who it was; they heard a footstep coming; they blowed out the candle; it was Mrs. Henry; she came to the door with a candle in her hand; then four of the men rushed open the door. John Crawley was in the middle of the room, I said, for God's sake, give me my curtains.

Q. How did they get into your room - A. I left the door upon the catch, any body might open it outside.

Q. Did you know these men before - A. John Crawley I have seen several times; I am sure Murray was one of them.

Q. Did they take your curtains away - A. Yes; they were not worth much; in fact they belonged to Mrs. Henry.

Q. What became of these men - A. They went away, and I bolted the street door. The tea-tray is not mine; it is a ready furnished lodging.

Q. Did Crawley visit you - A. Never; I was always frightened at him: I never lived with him, nor had any thing to do with him.

MRS. HENRY. I went into the room when I heard the cry of murder; I live next door; I went with the candle in my hand. I only know John Crawley .

Q. How many persons were there in Mrs. Todd's apartment - A. Five. I saw several men there; Crawley was in the middle of the room; I left them all at the door and ran into my house; I was frightened very much.

JOHN PRICE . I am a constable. Between twelve and one Sarah Harvey came to me and said for God's sake come, there will be murder done, and when I came I saw Murray coming from the house, No. 4, he was obliged to pass No. 4, when he came from No. 3.

Q. Did you see him come out of the house - A. No; I saw him turning the corner of the door; I do not know which house he came out of. After I had taken him to the watchhouse Mrs. Henry delivered to me the curtains.

WILLIAM JUSTICE . I am a patrol. On Tuesday night, the 20th of March, I was informed there, was a a disturbance in Bell-court; I immediately went there, I saw five men coming out of the court; I saw Murray, he had a scratch on the side of his face; Crawley was the last one that went down the steps, they all five went into Fox-court, and then they told me they would rip my b - y guts out; I drew my cutlass and called a watchman to my assistance; I went after them, they all escaped; they said they could beat fifteen or twenty watchmen at any time; Price came to me, we met Weston and Murray at the corner of the court; I secured Murray, we took him to the watchhouse; I am sure Murray is one of the five; I thought Crawley was one of them, but I cannot swear to him. Crawley bears an infamous name; the neighbourhood is all in terror of him.

GEORGE HUTT. I apprehended Crawley last Wednesday night at the Sugur Loaf in King-street, Drury-lane, he made great resistance when I took him; he said he supposed I wanted him for that bawdy house row.

Q. to Mrs. Henry. How did you get these things - A. The men made their escape, and after this was over some men came in the court with a woman, they had the curtains and tea tray, the woman said, I advised these men to bring the curtains back, as they belong to you; the men said they would not deliver them unless I would give them some gin; I told them I had no gin, and made haste in doors, they threw the things in after me.

Crawley's Defence. I had been drinking with this woman all the afternoon; I had lived with her before I went to the East Indies; the first night I came home I

saw her in Holborn, she said she was glad to see me, and we drank together, and on this very afternoon she spoke to me, and we went into the White Hart and drank together.

Sarah Todd. That is not true.

Murray's Defence. I work for Mr. Phipps at Rotherhithe. I was sent to get plaster; I came to Brooks' market to find a young man of the name of Buckel; I went into the White Hart; I saw this man, we went in the Jolly Butchers; I fell asleep in the tap-room. I was in Henry's house, but in this house I was not at all.

JANE TAYLOR . I am an unfortunate girl. I live in Charles-street, Drury-lane. I have seen both the prisoners three times by going to see Stoker in Newgate. On last Friday night, as I was going up Holborn, I met Sarah Todd, I asked her what she meaned to do with the young men, she said if Weston would give her a sum of money she would go over the water into Dover-street and stay there till the trials were over.

Q. Was any body present - A. A young woman; she is in the same line as me.

ANN ROBERTS . I went to Newgate to see Stoker; I was walking down Holborn with this young woman last Friday, I heard the same as she has told you.

Q. to Sarah Todd . Do you know either of these young women - A. I do not. I was at home that night.

MURRAY, GUILTY , aged 23.

CRAWLEY, GUILTY , aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100411-82

342. HENRY LAZURUS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 22nd of March , sixteen yards of carpetting, value 2 l. the property of Archibald Scott , in his dwelling-house .

ARCHIBALD SCOTT . I am a cabinet maker , No. 6, Cambridge-street, Carnaby-market. On the 22nd of March, between seven and eight in the morning, I was informed the prisoner took out this carpetting, I followed the prisoner and took him myself after he had laid the carpet down.

SAMUEL NUNN . I am a servant to Mr. Brown, an upholsterer, just opposite Mr. Scott's; I saw the prisoner come out of the shop with the carpet under his arm; I gave the alarm to Mr. Brown, he ran out and caught him.

GEORGE BROWN. Q. You are an upholsterer - A. Yes. On the 22nd of March I came down a little after seven o'clock, and hear to Mr. Scott's door, I saw two men standing, I told Samuel Nunn , he watched them; he said one of them is gone in, and here he comes with the carpet; I run out of my side door and stopped him; I asked him where he got that carpet, he said, from the next street.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I leave myself entirely to the mercy of the court.

GUILTY, aged 28.

Of stealing to the value of thirty-nine shillings only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100411-83

343. ABRAHAM MENDOZA was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 13th of April , a silk handkerchief, value 2 s. the property of William Hinckston , from his person .

WILLIAM HINCKSTON . I live at 41, Princes-street, Rotherhithe. On the 13th of April last, about a quarter after seven o'clock, at the Hermitage Bridge , I found a hand in my pocket, he pulled the handkerchief partly out of my pocket, but not quite out; I turned round and caught hold of him.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100411-84

344. JAMES PENNY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 4th of April , fifty-one iron umbrella stretchers, value 4 s. and four gross of umbrella tips, value 4 s. the property of John Williams .

JOHN WILLIAMS. I live at 22, Church-street, Bethnall-green , I am an umbrella-maker and wire-coverer .

Q. When did you lose these things - A. On Wednesday the 4th instant. I went up into the shop where the prisoner worked on Tuesday the 3d, in the evening, after he had left work, I saw the goods in question hid under the prisoner's work-bench, I called the witness to see how they were situated, and in the morning, when the prisoner was gone to breakfast, I found four gross of-tips were gone; the remainder were still under the bench; he came back from breakfast, and when he went out to dinner, by enquiry, I found they were gone; I sent the witness after him; he come back; I asked him what he had done with the property, he said he had no property; I felt his pockets and would not feel any thing; the witness saw the prisoner take them out of his bosom up stairs. The part of the property that he took away at breakfast time was found at his lodgings.

FRANCIS MASON . I am a servant to Mr. Mason. On Tuesday evening master called me to take notice of the umbrella stretchers and tips that were under the prisoner's workoened; after breakfast, on the next morning, I saw part of them oe; at inner e I saw the other part were going; I went after him and told him master wanted to speak to; charged him with the property being missing; she went up stairs, I followed, I saw the umbrella stretchers in his hand; he had just taken them from under his waistcoat. I took them out of his hand, and said, are not you a rogue, to rob a man with a family.

JOHN RAY . I searched the prisoner's lodging; I there found this paper which contains umbrella tips.

Prisoner's Defence. I would wish to receive my wages of my master.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100411-85

345. JOSEPH RAWLINSON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 3d of April , a child's chaise, value 12 s. the property of James Hitchcock .

JAMES HITCHCOCK . I live in Hackney-road ; I make children's carriages . On the 3d of April I saw the prisoner go off with one of my chaises, my brother, I, and a neighbour pursued him, and took him with a chaise about three hundred yards off.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in liquor, and wantonly drew this chaise out of a joke, not with intent to steal it, or make any property of it. I hope you will be merciful to me, as you shall see fit.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100411-86

346. HELLIN SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 5th of April , two sheets, value 2 s. an iron boiler, value 4 s. a blanket, value 6 d. a tea-kettle, value 6 d, a pair of tongs, value 6 d. twelve pounds weight of wool, value 1 s. and a flat iron, value 6 d. the property of Dennis Mc'Carty .

DENNIS MC 'CARTY. I live at No. 3, Little Paternoster-row, Spitalfields . On the 2nd of April I left the prisoner the back kitchen ready furnished.

Q. Were there two sheets there - A. Yes; a bed rug, blankets, bolsters, sheets, a boiler, a kettle, and a flat iron; she had all these things in her lodging, she was to pay three shillings and sixpence a week; she came on the 2nd, and on the 5th I discovered all these things were gone. I had her taken in custody.

Q. How did you discover that she had taken the things away. - A. I saw my boiler at an old iron shop door for sale; then I went into the prisoner's room, and found the things gone.

GEORGE WOOD . I keep a broker's shop in Smock-alley; I bought this iron pot of the prisoner; Mr M'Carty came by; he said it was his; I let him take it away.

Mrs. DAVIES. I keep a broker's shop; I brought a tea kettle and a pair of tongs of a woman on the 4th of this month. I cannot say the prisoner is the woman.

ANN CLARK. I keep a broker's shop. On the 3rd of March I gave the prisoner a shilling for a bolster and an old sheet.

RICHARD BERRY . I am a pawnbroker; I took in pledge of the prisoner, on the 3d of April, a sheet and a flat iron.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence, called four witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY , aged 34.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100411-87

347. JOHN SPARROW was indicted, for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of March , a half hundred weight, value 5 s. the property of William Swaine .

The prosecutor was called, and hot appearing in Court, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100411-88

348. MARY WILSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of March , twenty yards of printed cotton, value 30 s. the property of John Davies .

SAMUEL DAVIES . I am shopman to Mr. Davis, linen-draper , Castle-street, Leicester-square . On Monday the 5th of March, between six and seven in the evening, the prisoner came into the shop, and stole twenty yards of print; she drew it up her clothes through the inside of her pocket. As soon as I saw she had secured it under her clothes, I went out and looked through the window until she came out. When she came out, I caught hold of her. and the property dropped from under her clothes; this is the property; it is John Davies's.

Prisoner's Defence. I leave it to the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100411-89

349. EDWARD WHITE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of February , an handkerchief, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of a certain person to the jurors unknown.

SAMUEL LACK. I am one of the patrols of Bow-street. On the 12th of February about twelve o'clock I saw the prisoner in company with a man of the name of Hart that was tried to-day. I watched him night after night from the 5th to the 10th. I saw him attempt to pick a number of gentlemen's pockets, but never saw him pick one till the 12th. A little after eleven o'clock, I saw him go down the street, along with an old gentleman, conversing about the play. I was watching him, suspecting what he was about; the gentleman crossed over at the end of Bow-street; he returned, and came towards the office door. I asked him if there was any thing the matter; he said he had his pocket picked, and lost his handkerchief.

Q. How long was that after the time you had seen the prisoner in his company - A. Not more than six or seven minutes. I told him if he would attend the next morning, probably I would be able to find out the man that had committed the robbery upon him. I had some suspicion that they knew me; I put my great coat on, and tied my handkerchief round my hat, to make myself look like a coachman; and just as the playhouse was over I followed the prisoner. I am quite sure of his person.

Q. At this time how long had he been about the playhouse - A. From a quarter after ten. I saw him pick a gentleman's pocket, and walk away; I followed the gentleman and asked him to return, I wanted his address; he said he had got some ladies with him, he could not return; I said, sir, will you be so good as to see if your pocket has been picked; the gentlemen felt in his pocket and said he had lost his pocket handkerchief; I went round the play-house and came into Bow-street again; I found the prisoner in custody of a gentleman, he said he had picked his pocket; I took him in custody; I found three handkerchiefs in his hat.

Q. Had he a handkerchief for his own use besides the three in his hat - A. I did not see any. He began to abuse me a little, and said they were all his own. I took him to the office. There are twenty-four pawnbrokers duplicates I found in his pocket book; they are duplicates of handkerchiefs, watches, and broaches, and different articles; the amount of money advanced upon them is between six and seven pounds. These are the three handkerchiefs I found in his hat; this is the handkerchief that the gentleman charged him with, by the description he gave; it is a yellow handkerchief, it is worth one shilling and sixpence.

Prisoner's Defence. As I was returning from the theatre the gentleman charged me with picking his pocket; I was in a hurry to go home, I had as far as Bethnal-green to go; the gentleman said, you have got my handkerchief; I said, I have not got your handkerchief, the officer collared me and searched me, and took from me that pocket book and the handkerchiefs; I told him it was all my own. The gentleman never came to identify his handkerchief. In respect to Mr. Hart, I do know the person, I never saw him before to my

knowledge. And the reason I put the handkerchiefs in my hat I had no pockets.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100411-90

350. ELEANOR THOMPSON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 21st of March , a shawl, value 3 s. the property of John Davies .

JOHN DAVIES. I am a linen-draper , No. 9, Castle-street, Leicester-square . On the 21st of March about half past nine in the evening, the prisoner came to the door and drawed a shawl off the line inside of the shop; I told her to walk in, as there was a variety inside; she laid the shawl on an iron bar from under this line, and withdrew from the door; I watched her very close; in about two minutes she came back. I had my back to the door and my head upon my shoulders, so that I could see her; she took the opportunity of taking the shawl away; I suppose she walked off; she had not got above two yards, a man stopped her; I brought her into the shop, she had the shawl under her arm, she wished to pay for it, I refused, She was searched; she had money enough to pay for it.

Mr. Barry. Have you any partner - A. I have, Joseph Craig ; and he was my partner at that time.

NOT GUILTY

First Middlesex jury, before Common Mr. Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100411-91

351 SARAH SHARP was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 2nd of April , a gown, value 7 s. two childrens shirts, value 3 s. a night gown, value 2 s. and a neckcloth, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of Charles Watson .

MRS. WATSON. I am the wife of Charles Watson , we live in South-street, Chelsea ; the prisoner was my servant . I missed some of the things about four months ago; I requested the prisoner to let me look in her box, she opened the box, and in the prisoner's box I found shirts, towels, a gown, and night gown; I asked the prisoner how she came by them, she replied, she took them out of a trunk of mine, when I had left it open; I knew them to be mine. This was on Tuesday; on the Thursday following she took me to a neighbour's, where she had taken a trunk, she opened it herself; in that box I found the handkerchief and two children's shirts.

MARY SPARROW. The prisoner asked me to let her bring her trunk to my house for two or three days; I saw the trunk opened when her mistress was with her and her mistress claimed these things.

Prisoner's Defence. I am guilty of what I am charged.

GUILTY .

Fined 1 s. and discharged at the end of the Sessions.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100411-92

352. MARY REEVES was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 9th of April , eighteen yards of ribbon, value 8 s. the property of James Maycock .

The prosecutor and witnesses not appearing in court, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100411-93

353. JOSEPH PEARSON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 8th of March , a coat, value 4 s. and a handkerchief, value 1 s. the property of Cecil Bond .

CECIL BOND. I am a gardener ; I live in Cross-street, Islington .

Q. Did you lose a coat and a handkerchief on the 8th of March - A. Yes; it was taken out of the house; I was not at home; my father informed me the coat was gone. I pulled the coat and the handkerchief off on the 5th of March, that was the last time I saw it.

Q. Did you know the prisoner before - A. Yes; his father works for me; he used to come backwards and forward to the house.

ELIAS REDPEARN . I am an headborough; I apprehended the prisoner on the 8th of March, I found the duplicate of the coat on him, and this handkerchief; the prisoner said he was very sorry, he would make all the acknowledgment in his power.

JAMES HOBBS. I am a servant to Mr. Chapman, St. John-street. On the 8th of March this coat was pawned by the prisoner, I believe.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked the duplicate and the handkerchief up.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Fined 1 s. and discharged.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100411-94

354. DAVID MUGGERIDGE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 6th of March , twelve hair brushes, called dusters, value 30 s. the property of Matthew Percival , and John Percival .

JOHN PERCIVAL. My partner's name is Matthew Percival. The prisoner lived with us as a carter ; his work was within doors, as well as out of doors.

Q. When was it you missed these dusters - A. On Wednesday evening, the 7th of March, Mr. Kent, a brush maker, called at our house, Mr. Prentis was with him; I received information, which led me to Mr. Prentis, a brush-maker. The prisoner came to Mr. Prentis's and asked for the money for the dusters that he had left the day before. When the prisoner asked for the money I collared him; he said they were his own, he had them in his possession for nine months.

MR. PRENTIS. I am a brush-maker, in Chandois-street.

Q. Did the prisoner apply to you to sell any brushes - A. Yes; that dozen in question. On Tuesday the 6th of March, about half past eight in the evening, the prisoner called at my shop, he had a dozen brushes with him, he asked me twenty-two shillings; the fair value would be about thirty-two.

Q. Did you, at that time, know with whom he lived - A. No. I agreed to buy them, but avoided paying for them, that I might make enquiry; Mr. Kent, the maker's name was upon them. I went to Mr. Percival in consequence of the enquiries I made of Mr. Kent; Mr. Percival suspected his carman. I went into the stable, and there I saw the prisoner, and it not being convenient for Mr. Percival to come down that evening I kept out of the way, and told my servant to tell him to come the next evening.

WILLIAM BELL . Q. Are you in the employment of Mr. Kent, the brush-maker - A. I am.

Q. Was the prisoner a customer of Mr. Kent's - A. No; Mr. Kent made brushes for Mr. Percival.

Q. Look at these brushes, do you know whether he made these brushes for Mr. Percival - A. Yes; Mr. Percival is very particular in the brushes that he orders. These hairs are longer than we make any other brushes for the trade; we charge thirty-six shillings a dozen for them.

The property produced and identified.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel; called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 34.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and Whipped in Jail .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100411-95

355. JOHN MARTIN was indicted to feloniously stealing on the 12th of February , a handkerchief, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of a certain person, to the jurors unknown.

SAMUEL LACK . I am a patrol of Bow-street.

Q. Now look at the prisoner and tell me whether you saw him on the 12th of February - A. Yes; the prisoner passed me two or three times. About a quarter before eleven I saw him in Bow-street, close to the theatre.

Q. Had you seen him before - A. I have seen him here before - A I saw him pick an elderly gentleman's pocket of this handkerchief; he was alone.

Q. This was the same evening that you found the other two men that you have given evidence about - A. Yes; the same evening. I followed the gentleman; after he got through the mob I said, sir, you have had your pocket picked; he said he was very sorry for it; he was in the habit of taking snuff. I let him go on. A little while afterwards there was a rush from the crowd, at the corner of the street. I saw part of a gentleman's handkerchief in his hand, he had not quite drawed it out. I took hold of him directly and told the gentleman to follow me; I searched him, I found a handkerchief in his breeches, one in his hat, and one in his coat pocket.

Q. Where did you find the handkerchief that you saw him take out of the gentleman's pocket - A. That was in his breeches. I secured him.

Q. You do not know who that gentleman was that he picked his pocket - A. No.

Q. How long had you seen him about the playhouse before you laid hold hold of him - A. About three quarters of an hour. I did not watch him so close as I did the others; I am positive of his person.

Prisoner. Which handkerchief was it you took out of my breeches - A. I cannot swear which of the two it was, it was one of these.

COURT. Which was the handkerchief that you saw him take from the gentleman - A. The plaid handkerchief.

Prisoner's Defence. My prosecution being closed I will take the liberty to state the exact case. I was taken in custody at the corner of Bow-street, and charged before the magistrate with picking a gentleman's pocket. Prior to his taking me to a public house he searched me, he found on my person three handkerchiefs, one in my hat, one in my pocket, and one in my breeches. Before the magistrate the officer stated that he saw me in the act of picking a gentleman's pocket; it is false, and had I been so doing, it would have been impossible for him to have seen it; it was a dark night, and the shops being all shut, how is it possible he could have seen it. My handkerchiefs being found in such a situation, I acknowledge it had some suspicion, but the reason of one being found in my breeches, from my infancy I have been afflicted with an incontinency of time, when I have not a convenience to go to a proper place. I do declare, solemnly, my innocence, and have no doubt but I shall find that justice from your lordship that my case merits. At the last Sessions I had several friends to speak to my character, who now are incapable of coming; one of them, by reason of sickness.

GUILTY , aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100411-96

356. SAMUEL GARDNER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 24th of March , a gown, value 8 s. the property of John Ball .

ANN BALL . I live at Bethnal-green ; my husband is a weaver ; his name is John Ball.

Q. Did you lose a gown from your house at any time - A. Yes; out of our garden. My daughter washed. three and hung them out on a paing in the garden. The prisoner lived at the lower part of the house with his mother, they had lived there about nine years. I saw my gowns in the garden at four o'clock on the 24th of March; my daughter called me before six, and asked me if I had taken in the best gown; I told her I had not; I found it was gone. My daughter brought the sleeves to me, and I went to Mr. Pearson's the pawnbroker about six o'clock, he denied that he had got the gown.

Q. When did you see your gown again - A. On the Monday following I saw it at Mr. Pearson's. The boy owned to it on the Saturday night; my husband had information that the boy had some money; I suspected the boy's mother had taken it. The boy went with me to Mr. Pearson's; Mr. Pearson did not bring the gown forward till the Monday morning.

Q. Did the boy say, in the hearing of Pearson, that he pledged the gown there - A Yes; they said, the gowns laid all in a heap, they could not think of looking for it at that time. The boy pawned it in the name of Matthews, and destroyed the duplicate.

ROBERT PEARSON . I am the son of Thomas Pearson . I took the gown in near upon five o'clock.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I took the gown off the ground.

Q. What time did you carry it to Pearson - A. I do not know what time it was.

GUILTY, aged 11.

Judgment respited .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100411-97

357. THOMAS HATCHER and ANN HATCHER were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 17th of February , a sheet, value 5 s. two pair of stockings, value 10 s. eleven napkins, value 1 s. a gown, value 10 s. a piece of cotton, value 2 d. and a piece of muslin, value 2 d. the property of Lady Ann Louisa Stuart , widow , and a gown, value 2 s. the property of Maria Dawson .

SECOND COUNT for like offence, the property of Dame Ann Louisa Stuart.

MARIA DAWSON . Q. You live with lady Stuart

at Richmond - A. I do.

Q. On the 17th of February was your laundry robbed - A. Yes; we lost various articles. I only know the things were stolen.

Q. Among these articles were there a sheet, a gown, stockings, a piece of cotton, a piece of muslin and a gown of yours - A. Yes. Lady Ann Louisa Stuart is a widow.

HENRY WELLS . I am butler to lady Stuart.

Q. Were you at home when the laundry was broken open - A. I was not there at the time; I only know that the things were stolen; I was sent for the next day; it was done on the 14th of night or the 15th in the morning of February last; it was done by cutting a hole in the laundry wall, and opening the window. I went to Bow-street and had some hand-bills distributed. We received information from Mrs. Flint, a pawnbroker, Edgware road.

MARY FLINT . I keep a pawnbroker's shop, 89, Edgware road.

Q. Look at that sheet and stockings - A. Jane Wake pledged them with me on the 17th of February.

Q. Who came to redeem them - A. Both the prisoners; and in consequence of a handbill that I received I had the prisoners taken in custody, on the 12th of March, when they came to redeem them; they said they purchased the ticket of Jane Wake , the person that pawned them.

JANE WAKE . Q. Do you know the prisoners at the bar - A. I have seen the man; I succeeded the woman in service.

Q. Look at that sheet and these stockings, we have heard you pawned them at Mr. Flint's - A. Yes; I got them from the prisoners; I had been ill for three weeks; I went out for the air on the 17th of February, I was going up the Edgware-road, in the afternoon to the best of my recollection.

COURT. Do they live in Edgware-road - A. No; they live in Williams's brick fields, down Bayswater. The woman asked me if I would pledge what was in the basket; her husband was with her; I refused pledging them; afterwards I said I would take them to Mr. Moore, Burr-street, Oxford-street; she told me she would not have them taken there; I was to take them to Mrs. Flint's, Edgware-road, and to pledge them in my own name; I did so. I pledged them for ten shillings; her husband was in the shop at the same time, he pledged his watch for five shillings; he went out, and when I came out I went to them; I gave them the basket, the ticket, and the two five shilling pieces.

Q. Then you did not sell her the ticket as she has stated - A. I never did.

Mr. Alley. You were taken up - A. Yes.

Q. You said then that they had employed you to pawn the things - A. Yes; I said the same then as I do now.

Q. The consequence was, you were discharged and they were taken in custody - A. Yes.

Q. Had not you a brother in trouble some time ago at the assizes - A. Yes.

Q. Was he transported - A. I do not know where he is.

Q. I ask you upon your oath, did not you apply to these poor people and beg of them to purchase this duplicate of you, you saying that your brother was in distress, and you wanted a shilling to send him down in the country - A. Upon my oath, I did not. This man was with my brother, and I have no doubt he was the man that drawed my brother in; I was very much hurt, thinking that this man should abscond and my brother suffer for it.

Q. Then you supposing your brother was suffering on the hulks, having been drawn in by this man, you would have us suppose that he prevailed upon you to pawn the things in your own name - A. That is the way.

Q. Then I am to understand you, you supposed that man was a dishonest character, you believed that he led your brother into the misfortune, and after that you were prevailed upon by him to pawn these things in your own name - A. I was. I did not know what was in the basket till I opened it at Mrs. Flint's.

Q. What do you get your living by - A. Needle work. I work for any body.

Q. Where you brought up a mantua-maker or millener - A. No; but I know so far of it I can get my living by it.

Q. Where was your last service - A. It is not two years ago since I was in service; I chose to be out of place, then I can do as I like; an accident took me from my service, by being scalded.

Mr. Curwood. You say you have a brother unfortunately in trouble - A. Yes.

Q. Notwithstanding that you assisted him - A. Yes.

Q. How long is that ago - A. The 2nd of August, I think.

Q. Then your brother was not at large in February - A. No.

Q. You were immediately to be found by the description that you gave when you pawned these things - A. Yes; I gave my true address.

COURT. What service had you - A. A cook's place; the woman prisoner was a cook, I succeeded her.

SAMUEL LACK. I am an officer of Bow-street. In consequence of a search warrant, on the 13th of March, I searched the prisoners house; the house is in a brick field at the back of Bayswater. The prisoners were in custody then. I found there a piece of a gown buried under a hearth stone, and two other pieces of muslin I found in the room, and a cambric pocket handkerchief; these I found in the prisoners house. I found two tickets at Jane Wake 's house, wrapped up in the prisoners pocket handkerchief; amongst these doileys, on the pocket handkerchief, was the prisoners name in full length; she lives at No 5, Adam-street, West. When I took her in custody she gave me these doileys, and the ticket together in the handkerchief.

Q. to Wake. When you were taken in custody you gave the officer the ticket, the handkerchief, and doileys - A. Yes; I had from the prisoners the two gowns, eleven doileys, and the handkerchief. They were to give me some money for my brother; they said they had no money, but wished me to pawn them; I did pawn them; she said if I could get the sum of seven shillings not to pledge the doileys; I might get more on the gowns if I could; I got seven shillings and sixpence upon the gowns, that money was for my brother. I went down to her with the ticket, she was not at home, and it was very wet after that.

- SEARLE. I am a servant to Mr. Moore. A person of the name of Wake pledged two morning dressing gowns with me; I lent her three half crowns on them.

Thomas Hatcher 's Defence. I know nothing of the transaction.

Ann Hatcher 's Defence. The same.

THOMAS HATCHER - GUILTY , aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

ANN HATCHER - NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100411-98

358 JAMES EASTWOOD was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 12th of March , three quarters of a pound weight of Cochineal, value 10 s. the property of the London Dock company .

JAMES SLATER . I am a constable at the London docks; the prisoner was a labourer there.

Q. Do you remember the prisoner leaving work on the 12th of March - A. I remember him coming up to the gate about a quarter after four; I searched him and found this cochineal loose, some in each of his breeches pockets; he said he had taken it off the floor, in the warehouse, where there were a quantity of cochineal. It is in bags, and they were sifting it.

Q. Whereabouts is the value of that cochineal - A. Ten shillings.

RICHARD PAYNE . I am a gangsman in the London docks.

Q. They have cochineal in their warehouse - A. Yes; the prisoner was a labourer employed in the room from whence this cochineal was taken; it is the property of the London dock company.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence; called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 27.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and Whipped in Jail .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100411-99

359. SUSANNAH TAYLOR was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 20th of March two sheets, value 10 s. two blankets, value 1 l. 2 s. and a bolster, value 12 s. the property of Mary Deamer , widow , in a lodging-room .

MARY DEAMER . I live at No. 14, Featherstone-street . I keep the house, and let lodgings . About five months ago, I let the prisoner a back one-pair of stairs room furnished, at five shillings and sixpence per week.

Q. Were these things let to her, two sheets, two blankets, and a bolster - A. Yes; I went into the prisoner's room, and missed the things; I asked her about them; she told me they were pawned, and gave me the duplicates; I have found the things.

Q. How much rent did she owe you - A. She owed a fortnight, but she sold me some duplicates of her own things, to pay me the rent.

Q. Was she a married woman - A. There was a man came; I believe she is a married woman; I cannot tell.

WILLIAM ANNIS . I am a pawnbroker; I live in Whitecross-street; I have got two sheets, one pawned on the 1st of January, and the other on the 2d; one for three shillings, and the other for four shillings; I believe the prisoner pawned one of them.

WILLIAM MOTT . I am a pawnbroker, 104, Whitecross-street; a blanket was pawned with me on the 1st of March, in the name of Taylor; I lent four shillings on it. I cannot identify the prisoner.

ROBERT TAYLOR . I am a pawnbroker; I live in Old-street. I have a bolster pawned for three shillings by a man in the same name.

HENRY EDWARDS . I am a pawnbroker; I live in Aldersgate-street; a blanket was pawned with me for five shillings by the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. Kind Gentlemen of the Jury, I hope you will take my sad misfortune, which I now labour under, into your consideration, as I am left alone in the wide world, and I am the mother of ten children, and brought here to answer the faults of my deceased husband. My husband in his life-time rented an apartment in Mrs. Deamer's house; after living there some time, he was out of work; he made use of these things, and meant to return them when he got work again. Mrs. Deamer received of me a variety of duplicates for the rent; and as soon as she found he was buried, she sent me here, and threatened to transport me. I beg for mercy, as my husband made me pledge them.

Prosecutrix. It is almost all false.

Q. You knew she had a husband - A. There was a man there sick; he got his illness through her taking the things off the bed; he said so; she is a shocking drunken woman.

GUILTY , aged 56.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100411-100

360. ANN PRATT was indicted for feloniously stealing. on the 13th of March , three pewter pints, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of Martin Charlton .

MARTIN CHARLTON . I keep the Argyle Arms , Argyle-street . All I know, I lost my pots.

THOMAS TUDOR . I am a victualler. I live in King-street, Drury-lane. On Sunday the 11th of March, in the afternoon, the prisoner came for a pint of porter; I served her, and on Monday, when I collected my pots in, she was not at home, neither in the morning or afternoon. On Tuesday morning, I went again to her lodging in King-street, Drury-lane; she gave me this pint pot, belonging to the King's Arms in Vere-street; I told her it was not my pint pot; she declared it was the pint pot I gave her on the Sunday afternoon. I put it on my strap, and collected the rest of my pots in; and after coming home, I took the pot, and returned to her lodgings. I asked her for my pint pot; her answer was, that she had not got it; there was a small basket standing in the middle of the room. I desired to see the contents; she said they were coals; I insisted upon seeing; she took up the basket, and turned out the contents into a closet; she brought to me the basket empty, and observed, you see there was nothing but coals in it. I went to the closet, and brought these three pints out belonging to Mr. Charlton. On looking further in the room, I found a quart pot belonging to another publican; I never found my pint pot.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence, nor called any witnesses to her character.

GUILTY , aged 56.

Confined Two Years in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100411-101

361. ELEANOR REYNOLDS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of February , three frocks,

value 7 s. 6 d. a silk handkerchief, value 5 s. a shawl, value 1 s. an apron, value 9 d. and a pinafore, value 6 d. the property of John James Ellen .

JOHN JAMES ELLEN. I am a publican ; I live at the Angel in Warwick-street, Golden-square . The prisoner came into my service on the 29th of January, and between that and the 13th of February I missed the things which are in the indictment. The duplicate of the things was brought to me by a lodger; it was dropt in the house by some accident.

JOHN TUCK . I am a pawnbroker in York-street, Westminster. I took in three frocks, apron, shawl, pincloth, and a silk handkerchief for seven shillings; the prisoner pawned them.

JOSEPH GREGORY . I took the prisoner into custody; I asked her how she came to do it; she said she wanted to buy a new shift.

Prisoner's Defence. I leave it to the mercy of the court.

GUILTY . aged 17.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100411-102

362. ALEXANDER MACKINTOSH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of March , four pewter quart pots, value 5 s. and one pewter pint pot, value 6 d. the property of James Torsbell .

JAMES TORSBELL. I am a publican at the sign of Mother Red Cap , Holloway . On Monday the 19th of March, I was out collecting my pots. I collected four quarts and a pint; I set them at Mr. Phillips's gate, to go and collect some others. I saw the prisoner; he crossed over to where the pots were; I saw him stoop; I did not see him rise up again, which gave me suspicion; I returned to see where he was; I missed the pots; I pursued him, and when I came near to him, I perceived the pots under his great coat; I collared him, and took the pots from him; I asked him what he did with the pots; I could not understand his answer; I took him back to my house; he was taken in custody.

Prisoner's Defence. I was not guilty of such a thing in my life

JAMES KENNEDY . The prisoner told me he was a discharged marine; he has got a bad leg; I searched him; he had two one-pound notes in his pocket.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Fined 1 s. and passed to his parish.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100411-103

363. JAMES GREENWOOD was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 3d of April , two beaver hats, value 10 s. the property of Richard Bowden .

RICHARD BOWDEN . I am a hatter , 65, Hollywell-street, Shoreditch . On the 3d of April, between nine and ten o'clock in the morning, the prisoner came into my shop and took two hats off the stand, and gave them to a man behind him, outside of the door, and then he ran away; I was behind a partition, looking into the shop; I pursued him and took him within twenty yards of my house.

Q. What became of the other man - A. He ran off. I am sure the prisoner is the same person that took the hats.

Prisoner's Defence. As I was coming from my work the gentleman said I took the hats out of the shop, instead of that I was running home.

GUILTY , aged 17.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and Whipped in Jail .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100411-104

364. PETER FLAHERTY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 9th of March , fourteen penny pieces, and nineteen halfpence , the property of John Wright .

JOHN WRIGHT . I am a grocer in Well-close-square ; the prisoner was my servant . On the 8th of March he asked me if I wanted any change, I told him I did, and gave him a pound note, and received of him the change, I returned him a bad shilling he gave me; he put his hand into his pocket and pulled out two half crowns, and five or six shillings; he gave me another shilling for the bad one. Upon seeing him have so much money it struck me it could not be all his own. At night I counted all the copper in the till, I did not lock the till that night. In the morning I gave him the key out of my bed room to open the shop, and light the fire; I came down sometime afterwards and missed ten-pence. On Thursday night I marked all the copper money that was in the till; fifteen shillings of new penny pieces and halfpence, and eight shillings of old copper, and left the till not locked. On Friday morning I gave him the key, as I did the other morning, I came down in about a quarter of an hour; I sent him up stairs for something while I counted the money; I missed one shilling and eleven-pence halfpenny of new copper, and seven-pence halfpenny of old copper; I called him down stairs, told him to bring forward the money that he had taken out of the till that morning, I had missed two shillings and seven-pence; he hesitated, and pulled out a canvas bag containing two shillings and eleven-pence of new and old copper; he told me that was the money he had taken, and a few loose halfpence he had taken out of his pocket, and put into the bag. I then told him to take out what he had got in his pocket, he took out a one pound note and eleven shillings and six-pence in silver, and a small red leather purse, he said he had bought it with my money, and the money he took that morning he was going to buy a pair of stockings with it.

Q. Had you any character with this boy - A. No; he came out of the country; it was the first place he had.

Prisoner's Defence. He asked me when I came down stairs to give him all the money, and he would have no more to do with me; I gave him the money, and he knocked me down. I sold a watch that I bought myself for one pound eighteen shillings; he took that money from me.

GUILTY, aged 15.

Judgment respited .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100411-105

365. CATHERINE KEITH was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 24th of February , four handkerchiefs, value 1 s. two window curtains, value 6 d. a pillow case, value 9 d. two yards of cotton, value 6 d. two aprons, value 3 s. an oil cruet, value 1 d. a salt ciller, value 1 d. a china bason, value 1 d. a wine glass, value 2 d. a knife, value one halfpenny, a fork, value one halfpenny, a shawl, value 6 d. a candlestick, value 4 d. and two napkins, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of Thomas Swan .

THOMAS SWAN . I live at 14, Cable-street, Wellclose-square .

On the 9th of January the prisoner came to live with me; on the 19th of February I had reason to suspect that she was not honest. On the 24th I meaned to discharge her; I asked her to let me look in her trunk; she reluctantly let me look in her trunk; I found the articles in the indictment, and a number of others, and a duplicate of two napkins pledged at Thomas Williams , Cable-street.

SARAH WILLIAMS . I live with my brother, Thomas Williams . I produce two napkins, pawned for fifteen pence on the 22nd of February, in the name of Mary Smith ; I do not know the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. In the cold weather I had not half clothes enough on the bed; one of these window curtains were on the bed; the sister of Mr. Swan used to take all the things in the shop, and I used to put them in the bed out of the way.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100411-106

366. WILLIAM MACKEY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 21st of December , a silver teaspoon, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of Francis Drummond , esq.

FRANCIS DRUMMOND , ESQ. I live in Sloane-street ; the prisoner was my footman ; he came into my service about the end of September. On the 4th of January a man came to my house with an officer of Bow-street, he told me that my servant had stolen some things from Mr. Harrison of Covent Garden, long before he was my servant; the officer took him away that night.

Q. He was apprehended in your house for a felony committed somewhere else - A. Yes. On the Bow-street officer searching him they found a number of duplicates, one of them led to the production of the spoon that he is charged with in this indictment; I immediately desired them to look over my plate, and I found an old tea-spoon was missing, and some other things, Mr. Barry, the councellor, gave him a character, said he had seen him while in the actual service of a gentleman that was gone to India, and who had desired him to give the character what he knew of him; I likewise got a character of him from a lodger of mine.

Prisoner. I acknowledge pledging the spoon.

JOHN WOOD . I am a pawnbroker. This spoon was pledged with me on the 21st of December for one shilling and six-pence by the prisoner in the name of John Brown.

Prisoner's Defence. At the time I pledged the spoon I was in want of a pair of shoes; I changed a ten pound note in the morning to give the charwoman the bill, and as I had changed the captain's ten pound I asked the captain for my quarter's wages, seven pounds ten shillings; he replied, I will pay you in two or three days; I was barefoot. I, unfortunately, knowing captain Drummond to be a passionate man, I was afraid to ask him; I said to myself, I'll get one shilling and six-pence on this spoon till he pays me my wages, and then I will bring it in again. As to the affair of Mr. Harrison's, I was acquitted.

Q. to prosecutor. Is the account of his wages being due correct - A. That very day that he was taken up was the first time that he asked for money. It is all false. I owed him eight guineas, I meaned to pay him when I got change.

GUILTY , aged 56.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100411-107

367. JOHN COOPER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 23d of March , twenty six silver spoons, value 20 l. 2 s. twenty silver forks, value 11 l. 19 s. a silver fish knife, value 2 l. 19 s. and a silver ladle, value 6 l. 15 s. the property of - Bevan.

MR. BEVAN . I am a silver smith , I live in Marybone-street, Golden-squre. On the 23d of last March, about three in the afternoon, the prisoner came to my shop, he said he was recommended by Mr. William Brendon , and produced a list of different articles; and said his name was James Chinnery , Upper Eaton-street, and directed that every thing should be sent by five o'clock; I sent them soon after five o'clock.

Q. Was any thing said about paying - A. He said that he should pay immediately upon delivery. I lookout all the articles that he had ordered, to the amount of forty-one pounds fifteen shillings, with instructions to my servant to bring back my goods or bring me the money, because his appearance was very much against him. When my servant came back he brought me that check.

Q. Did you present that check the next morning to Messrs. Drummonds - A. I did, and found that no such person as Mr. Cooper kept cash there. In the evening, about eight o'clock. I went to Upper Eaton-street, and found the prisoner was not there. I found nothing but the paper that the goods were wrapped up with throwed all about the room.

THOMAS JONES . I am a servant to Mr. Bevan. I was sent by him with this plate to Upper Eaton-street; I saw the prisoner; he told me I was after my time; I told him we had not got all the things in the house, that was the reason I was after the time; he said that he had got a check of fifty-three pounds nine shillings; he asked me for change. This is the check he produced to me; he inclosed the check in this note. I saw him write the note; he kept the check in his left hand while he wrote the note.

Q. He told you the amount, and enclosed this check in this note to your master - A. He did.

(The check read.)

"London, 22nd of March, 1810.

Messrs. Drummond and Co. pay to myself or bearer fifty-three pounds nine shillings, for John Cooper ."

L 53 9 s.

(The note read)

"London, 22nd of March, 1810.

SIR, Enclosed have sent you a check to demand fifty-three pounds nine shillings, which place to my account. I shall want in addition four wine stands."

Q. Did he ask you for any change for this check - A. I told him I had not change to the amount, I had some silver; he said he wanted some silver very bad, he was going out that afternoon to dinner; I gave him thirteen shillings and six-pence.

Q. Did he say any thing who he was or his connections - A. He put down on the back of the card, to go to Sir John Seabright 's, No. 19, Kersey-street, May Fair, for some old plate to take to Mr. Bevan in exchange for this, according to what it come to; he told me to ask for the butler; I did. I went there and asked

for the plate; the prisoner said lady Seabright was his sister; I got no plate there; they said they knew nothing of any such name. The prisoner told me he would call on Mr. Bevan and settle with him for some more plate, according to what he had written down in the note.

Mr. Alley. You went with these goods, and he practised this imposition on you. - A. Yes.

Q. Do not think I approve of his conduct; I do not; I think he is a great rogue; he told you he was brother to Mrs. Seabright. - A. He did.

Q. In consequence of that, you took the draft, and left the property. - A. Yes, I did not intend to do it, unless he had told me about Lady Seabright; that certainly induced me to leave the property, and take the draft.

Q. When you went to Lady Seabright, you found it was a farce. - A. Exactly so.

Q. He is no brother to Lady Seabright; the butler, not knowing of him, would not give you the plate, and by that false pretence he induced you to leave the property with him. - A. Yes.

Mr. Gurney. You were ordered by your master to bring back the money or the plate. - A. Yes.

Q. By his giving you the check, and sending you to Lady Seabright's, you were induced to leave this property. - A. I was.

LUCY BAINE . Q. Do you keep the house, No. 10, Eaton-street, Pimlico - A. I do.

Q. Did the prisoner at any time lodge in your house - A. Never a night; I never saw him till the 22d of March; the day the plate came in; at eleven o'clock that day; he told me he wanted my first floor for a month; he would give me a guinea a week; he went away, and returned about a quarter before five, and then he stopped about half an hour; he did not stay five minutes after the young man who brought the plate was gone.

Q. Did he leave the plate behind him - A. No, I never saw one article; he left nothing behind him; he told me, as he was going away, if the young man brought the change, the 13 l. 14 s. 6 d. I was to take care of it. I only saw him that day; he did not take the lodging.

THOMAS VISE. I am a pawnbroker in Westminster-bridge-road. On Saturday the 24th of March, a woman of the name of Maria Gibbs came, and sold me six silver desert forks.

THOMAS MELTON . I am a pawnbroker in Black-friars road. On Saturday the 24th of March, a soup-ladle, a fish knife, six table spoons, six forks, six desert spoons, and one dozen of tea spoons, were pledged with me for twenty-six pounds by Mary Evans ; there was another young woman with her.

MARY EVANS . Q. On Saturday the 24th of March were you at the shop of Mr. Melton, a pawnbroker in Westminster-road - A. I was; a lady was with me; I knew her by the name of Robart; she and I pawned the plate there. I saw the prisoner that morning.

Q. Did you receive the plate from him - A. I did not.

Q. Did any thing pass respecting the plate in his presence, or did she say any thing respecting the plate in his presence - A. I don't think she did.

Q. Had you seen them so as to appear as to be together - A. I had. I knew the prisoner by the name of Cooper and the same day she and I sold to Mr. Vyse some plate.

COURT. How long have you known the prisoner - A. About ten months; I do not know much of him. Mrs. Robart lived opposite of my house in Union-street, Lambeth-walk. I had not often seen the prisoner and her together; she was under the protection of Mr. Robart.

WILLIAM ANTHONY . I am an officer of Bow-street. On Sunday the 5th of March I apprehended the prisoner in Berkeley-street, Lambeth; I found two duplicates in his writing-desk in the room where he slept; they apply to the plate pledged at Mr. Melton's. I also found two salt spoons.

ROBERT LUMLEY . I am clerk to Messrs. Drummonds.

Q. Look at that check; have you any person of the name of Cooper keeping cash at your house - A. No person keeping cash in that name.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100411-108

368. THOMAS MAYS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of March , 14 lb. wt. of hay, value 9 d. and one peck of chaff, value 6 d. the property of Thomas Shirley .

THOMAS SHIRLEY . I am a farmer ; I reside at Shenley, Herts; the prisoner was my carter .

Q. Had you occasion to send him to London with hay several times; in his way would he come over Finchley Common through Holloway - A. Yes.

Q. When did you discharge him - A. This day fortnight; and on this day week he came to me; he told me that he had heard that I had said that he had sold seven trusses of hay. I told him I had not said any considerable quantity; I said he had sold hay a variety of times, or else I had reason to suspect that he had; he said he was to come to own he was in fault; he was very sorry for it; and if I pleased, he would work it out. No, I told him, it was a matter that I ought not to settle; if he chose to go before a Magistrate, they would settle it; he did go before the Magistrate, and made the confession; it was read over to him, and I saw him sign it.

The Confession read.

Q. Have you lost hay - A. I can only say by information; I had reason to complain of the state my horses were getting in; the prisoner had four horses under his care. I found my horses were getting in a bad condition; I was fearful that they did not keep in the stable, while the horses were feeding, and that the ostler took it away.

SAMUEL GROOME . Q. Were you the boy attending the hay cart - A. Yes; on the 24th of March I came to town with the prisoner, when he brought the load of hay.

Q. When you came to the Bald Face Stag, Finchley Common, did the prisoner do any thing with the hay - A. I did not see him.

Q. Was the hay given away at Holloway - A. Yes, to the ostler, half a truss.

Q. How much did the ostler give him for it - A. I cannot say; I only missed the hay off the waggon, while I was at the Bull at Holloway. It was there when I went to the Bull; and when we went away, it

was gone.

Q. Could that half truss have been given to the horses - A. No.

Q. How long was this that the half truss of hay was taken away at the Bull - A. A week or a fortnight before he was discharged; I told my master's shepherd of it.

Prisoner's Defence. There was a bit of loose hay; the ostler took it off the waggon; I said you must not have that; he said why? I said I shall have a piece of work with master; he said, here is sixpence for you. I said that will not do. The ostler said, if I give you any more, I shall not make my money of it. I told him not to take it.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Fined 1 s. and discharged.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100411-109

369. SAMUEL WHITELOCK and HANNAH WHITELOCK , alias HANNAH SMITH , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of April , three lb. wt. of lead, value 1 s. 3 d. the property of Patrick Mulcahy .

PATRICK MULCAHY . I am a milkman , No. 30, East Smithfield . The prisoners lodged with me in the garret. On the 3d of April, both the prisoners came down stairs, and said they were floating with water. I went up stairs to their room, and saw the room was floating with water; I saw the lead was gone from the top of the house; I told them one or the other of them must have taken it; I saw the lead was fresh cut; I went to the Magistrate, got an officer who searched their room, and part of the lead was found in the bed before the Magistrate. The woman prisoner said she stole the lead; she told where she sold it at different times; she got 5 s. 9 d. at one time, and 1 s. 3 d. the other time. Nobody could go up to take it without their knowing it.

JOHN GILLMAN . On the 3d of this month, I searched the prisoners' room. In the bed clothes, this piece of gutter lead, I fitted it to the gutter, it tallied exactly; I took both the prisoners into custody before the Magistrate; the woman prisoner confessed that she and a soldier that lived in the next room cut the lead off, and that Samuel Whitelock knew nothing of it.

Samuel Whitelock was not put on his defence.

Hannah Whitelocke 's Defence. On the 21st of March the soldier that lived in the next room to me, he said he saw a bit of lead that was loose: he went and borrowed a chopper, and cut it off. I own to selling it, not to cutting it off. Samuel knew nothing of it; he was at work at the time.

SAMUEL WHITELOCK - NOT GUILTY .

HANNAH WHITELOCK - GUILTY , aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100411-110

370. THOMAS SHIPPEN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of March , sixteen lb. wt. of pork, value 12 s. the property of Alexander Pitts .

ALEXANDER PITTS . I keep a pork-shop in South-street, Manchester-square ; on Friday the 2d of March, from information, I pursued the prisoner, and when I got near him, he throwed the meat down on the stones. I caught him, and brought him back; I then took up the meat; he was taken to Marlborough-street. I am sure it was my spring of pork; it weighed 16 lb. I asked the prisoner how he could think of taking the meat; he said he did not want it, he had two fat pigs of his own in the sty.

JAMES ATTENBURY. On the 2d of March, I met the prisoner in South-street. He was carrying the pork before him. I gave Mr. Pitts information; Mr. Pitts pursued him; I saw Mr. Pitts take him first, and then he took up the pork that he had dropped.

HENRY HOWARD. I took the man in custody, he was rather in liquor.

Prisoner's Defence. I was very much in liquor, and do not remember any thing about it.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and Publicly Whipped One Hundred Yards at the top of Winchester-row, Paddington .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100411-111

371. HENRY OSBORNE , alias MOSS , was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 6th of April , three pigs, value 8 l. the property of William Gerrard .

WILLIAM GERRARD . I am a victualler , I live at Upper Clapton. On the 6th of April I lost the pigs out of the sty. I had fed them and seen them safe in the sty on the over night.

GEORGE GROVES . I am an officer; I went to Smithfield-market. In consequence of information I found Thomas Eldridge, I asked him if he had bought two pigs of the prisoner; he said, yes, and the sow, Oliffe had bought; he said he had sold the two pigs to Mr. Briant of Battle-bridge, and there I saw the two pigs. We went to Worship-street and obtained two warrants, and took away the two pigs, and the little sow. As I was driving the pigs home I apprehended the prisoner, at the Cock at Hackney; he begged of me to take him to Mr. Gerrard's; going along he owned he sold the two pigs for six pounds, and the little sow for two pounds seven shillings and six pence; he said he was very glad he was apprehended, or else he should do something to come to be hanged. I searched him, and found a two pound note, a five shilling piece, and half a crown.

WILLIAM OLIFFE . I am a butcher, I live upon Saffron Hill. I bough the little sow of the prisoner on Friday the 6th of April, in Smithfield-market, I gave him two pounds seven shillings and six-pence. It is the same that Mr. Gerrard claimed afterwards.

THOMAS ELDRIDGE. I am a foreman to Mr. Cotterill, Bacon merchant. I bought two pigs of the prisoner in Smithfield on the 6th of April, I gave six pound for them; I sold them to Mr. Briant for six pound ten shillings.

MR. BRIANT. I bought two pigs of Eldridge on Friday the 6th of April, the prosecutor saw them afterwards and claimed them.

Q to Gerrard. The two pigs that you saw at Mr. Briant's, and the sow that you saw at Mr. Oliffe's, were taken out of your sty, were they not - A. Yes; they are my property.

Prisoner's Defence. On Friday the 6th of April, at the corner of Robinhood-lane, I was accosted by a well-dressed man, he asked me whether I would drive the said pigs to Smithfield-market, he would give me five shillings; on our way he was desirous of knowing my residence, and when he got to Shoreditch church he desired me to go off, and if he did not see me till I got

to Smithfield, to go into the Brown Bear-yard; I might ask nine pounds, but not to take less than eight pound eight shillings for the pigs; I did not see my employer at nine o'clock, I sold them for eight pounds seven shillings and six-pence; I, wishing to get home, would rather lose sixpence than stay any longer. As my employer did not come I supposed he would call on me for the money. In the evening I was taken in custody. I am sorry I did not tell the truth to the magistrate. I resign myself to your lordship.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100411-112

372. MARGARET SHIPLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 19th of March , a watch, value 2 l. 10. the property of John Glazebrook .

JOHN GLAZEBROOK . I am a carpenter . On the 19th of March I was going down Wentworth-street, I was accosted by the prisoner, she asked me where I was going; I told her, I should not tell her; she said, go with me; I went up a court with her, into a room, she then asked me to give her some gin; I told her I never drank any; I pulled out my watch and six-pence; she came round the table, snatched up the watch and the sixpence, and put them into her pocket. In about a minute or two she went to the stairhead and went down stairs.

Q. You meaned to make her a present did not you - A. I suppose so; I had money in my pocket. I staid in the room about twenty minutes, or a quarter of an hour; I found she did not return; I left the room and went to the office, and informed Miller the officer that I had been robbed; he persuaded me to go home, because he said she would not come home that night. This day fortnight Mr. Freeman came to me, and said he had got the person that robbed me of my watch. I went up and identified the prisoner at the bar.

Q. Did you ever find your watch - A. No; I am sure of the person of the prisoner. She owned to the magistrate of taking the sixpence, but not the watch.

Q. Were you sober - A. Yes.

Q. You had not made any agreement to give her any money, had you - A. No, I had not.

WILLIAM MILLER . I am an officer. Glazebrook came to me on Monday the 19th of March, he gave me information that he had lost his watch in Wentworth-street. The prisoner was taken in Houndsditch on the 4th of April. The watch was never found.

Prisoner's Defence. On the 19th of March I was standing at the end of the court where I live, the prisoner was with another girl, he returned and asked me where I lived; he followed me up into my room; I asked him if he was going to give me any thing to drink, he put down sixpence; I went for a pot of porter; he said he did not drink any gin, and when I returned the prisoner and the other girl were gone. I am innocent of the crime I am accused of.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100411-113

373. WILLIAM SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 12th of April , an earth rug, value 30 s. the property of Samuel Keene and John Derley .

SAMUEL KEENE. Me and my partner John Derley keeps an Upholsterers shop , No. 5, Upper Marybone-street . On Last Thursday morning, a little after nine o'clock, I saw the prisoner take the earth rug from where it hung at the door for show, he gave it to his companion, who carelessly folded it up and put it under his left arm. I made after them and the prisoner mended his pace, and the person that had got the rug threw it down, I took the rug up, and after that laid hold of the prisoner, and took him to my door, he suddenly jumped off the pavement, kicked off his shoes, and run as fast as possible; I pursued him and laid hold of him again, brought him back to my shop, and sent for a constable. This is the rug, it is mine.

Prisoner's Defence. As I was going down Noble-street to work; this man came up and challenged me with thieving a rug from his door; I told him I did not steal it; he told me he would transport me; I ran away from him, I was stopped again and taken.

GUILTY, aged 19.

Judgment respited .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100411-114

374. JOHN MATTHEW was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 28th of February , fifteen pounds weight of flour, value 2 s. 6 d. the property of James White .

JAMES WHITE . I am a baker and flour factor at Shadwell. On the 28th of February I had an order to take ten sacks of flour to Mr. Brockson Bethnal-green-road. The prisoner proceeded on his journey. That is all I know.

GEORGE HEARNE . I am a baker in Dog-row, Bethnal-green. On the 28th of February, a little after three in the afternoon, I perceived a cart standing still in Red Cow-lane, there was a man upon the cart, and another man by the side of him; the cart stood there. In about ten minutes I saw the cart coming past my door, the carman was with his horses proceeding towards Bethnal-green, and the prisoner was going towards Mile-end turnpike, he appeared to have a bulk under his coat; I stopped him; I said, you have flour about you; he threw a bag he had under his coat on the ground; I gave him and the flour in the charge of an officer. We overtook the cart where the flour was taken from, it stood unloading at Mr. Brockson's; the carman was challenged of taking the flour, he went down upon his knees; I gave him in custody of a man, the mob coming round, he run away. This is the bag and the flour.

MR. BROCKSON. On the 28th of February I re- received ten sacks of flour from Mr. White; I weighed them and found twelve pounds weight deficient; that flour and the bag and all weighed fifteen pounds.

Prisoner's Defence. I am as innocent of robbing the cart as a child unborn.

GUILTY , aged 59.

Whipped in jail , and discharged.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100411-115

375. JAMES KELLY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 14th of April , a jacket, value 1 s. and a waistcoat, value 1 s. the property of Thomas Ayres .

The prosecutor was called and not appearing in court the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100411-116

376. MARGERET CASEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of February , a box, value 6 d. a regimental coat, value 1 l. a jacket, value 5 s. a shirt, value 2 s. and a pair of stockings, value 2 s. the property of James Stewart .

JAMES STEWART . I belong to the third regiment of foot guards . On the 26th of February we changed barracks from Knightsbridge; we were going to the Savoy barracks. I gave a man of the name of Glaney three pints of beer to carry my box to the Savoy; my box contained a regimental coat, a shirt, jacket, and a pair of stockings. About two in the afternoon he put my box down at the White-hart public-house door, Drury-lane. I went in to drink with him. Upon my coming out I missed the box. My box was found the next morning.

ROBERT CHATTIRLEY . I belong to the Lyceum theatre. I live in Crown-court, Russell-street. On the 26th of February, a little after eleven o'clock at night, I was going home in this court; I saw a box at the door of a house; I took it home, and gave information to the watchman. On the next day in Brydges-street I saw the owner. I took him to my lodgings and gave him the box.

THOMAS JONES . I am a Fishmonger in White-hart-yard, Drury-lane. On the 26th of February, between five and six in the afternoon, I returned home; I was informed that the drummer had lost all his clothes. From information I ran down the street, and saw the prisoner with two drummers jackets in her apron; she was so intoxicated I could get no answer from her. I took the jackets out of her apron, and took them to the public-house in White-hart-yard. I knew the woman by being about the neighbourhood. When I left the woman the drummer boy came up.

The property produced and indentified.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of the crime I am charged with. I met a woman, she gave me a glass of gin, and I happened to be in liquor. This woman said, take these things in your lap and I will be after you. I fell down, and was not able to get up again till Mr. Jones came up to me. As for the box, I never saw it.

The prisoner called two witnesses who gave her a good character.

GUILTY .

Fined 1 s , and discharged.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100411-117

377. THOMAS FIELD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of March , three seals, value 2 l. and a watch-key value 1 s. the property of James William Darnford .

JAMES WILLIAM DARNFORD. I live in Tavistock-street, Tavistock-square. I am a solicitor . I lost my watch on the 16th of March between eleven and twelve. I was returning home. I missed it in Broad-street, St. Giles's . On the next morning I went to Bow-street and gave information.

Q. You do not know how you lost it - A. No, only that my pocket must have been picked of it. On Wednesday Limbrick produced to me the watch key and seals.

RICHARD LIMBRICK . I am an officer of Bow-street. On the 10th of this month I apprehended the prisoner upon another charge. I found these three watch seals and a key in his possession; the prisoner said they were his property.

Q. What is the prisoner - A. He is a thief, he is no business at all as I know of; he lived at No. 10, Short's Gardens.

Mr. Alley. You apprehended him for something that an honest jury acquitted him to day - A. Yes.

Q. You found these things in his possession a month after the time the prosecutor said he lost them from his watch - A. Yes.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I am in the habit of travelling the country. About three months ago I kept a clothes shop in Shire-lane. I took this place in Shorts' Gardens with intent to make it a shop. I purchased them three seals in Croydon market, and when they were found in my possession I owned them as my own property. I gave 30 s. for them in trade. As for Limbrick saying I was a thief, I never was taken up before in my life.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100411-118

378. JOHN LUERSON was indicted for that he on the 8th of November was servant to Francis Albert Leonard Strick Van Linschoten , and was employed and entrusted to receive money for him; and being such servant , and so employed and entrusted, did take into his possession the sum of 7 s. 9 d. and having received the said sum feloniously did secrete the sum of 4 s. 9 d. part of the said 7 s. 9 d.

The case was stated by Mr. Gurney.

FRANCIS ALBERT LEONARD STRICK VAN LINSCHOTEN . Q. You are a manufacturer of vedigrease and dealer in colours in Bethnal-green-road - A. Yes.

Q. In November last and some time before that had the prisoner been in your employ - A. Yes, two or three years he acted as foreman ; he was entrusted by me to receive money for articles sold in the manufactory, and to account to me for it.

Q. In the month of November last I believe you were in the country at that time It was his business to account to Mrs. Linschoten for the money that he received - A. Yes, and to receive money from her to pay the servants' wages. I came to town on the 16th of January.

ELIZABETH LINSCHOTEN . I am the wife of Mr. Linschoten.

Q. In the month of November last when your husband was out of town, did the prisoner receive of you money for the workmen and also receive money in the manufactory for articles sold for which he was to account to you - A. Yes.

Q. Did the prisoner give that account to you - A. Yes.

Q. On the 11th of November the prisoner gave this account to you, here is three pound of best ground lead 1 s. 9 d and a pint of boiled oil 1 s. 3 d. - A. Them are the articles for which he stated to have received.

Q. 6 l. 16 s. 6 d. was the money he was to have received from you - A. Yes. and he accounted to me no more than three shillings that he had received that week. In consequence of that I gave him 6 l. 13 s. 6 d.

Q. In consequence of what you understood did you tell Martin Benzeigh to mark his conduct - A. I did. He gave me some information.

Court. Q. to Mr. Linschoten. This account that he rendered to Mrs. Linschoten in a week of November, did he afterwards correct this account, or did you call upon him to correct this account - A. Never.

Mr. Knapp. Was there any thing due to him for

wages that you had originally contracted for - A. Yes, I always used to give my servants a premium at the end of the year. I paid him 20 s. a week and kept back 2 s., it was a gratuity that I gave him. I owed him no more than that 2 s. a week for a year and upwards. I paid him 20 s. a week regularly.

MARTIN BENZEIGH . I am a servant to Mr. Linschoten. In consequence of directions that Mrs. Linschoten gave me, I took notice of what things the prisoner sold, and what money he received, and on the 8th of November I made a memorandom of the articles he sold to Mr. Hatch, two pound of black paint, at 1 s. 6 d. a pound, 3 s. three pound of white lead, at 8 d. a pound, 2 s. a pound of turpentine 1 s. 6 d. and a pint of boiled oil 1 s. 3 d. that was altogether 7 s. 9 d. I did not see Hatch pay him the money; the prisoner went out to get change, and when he came back he said he was paid.

THOMAS HATCH . I am a carpenter. I live in Poland-street Bethnal Green-road.

Q. Did you on the 8th of November last purchase any paint and oil at Mr. Linschoten's manufactory - A. Yes, I remember asking him for change of a pound note. I cannot remember the sum of money I laid out, because I pay ready money. He had not change. We went to my house, and my wife got change. I paid him directly.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel, and called four witnesses who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100411-119

379. JOHN LUERSON was indicted for that he on the 7th of November was servant to Francis Albert Leonard Strick Van Linschoten , and was employed and entrusted by him to receive money for him and being such servant and so employed, did receive and take into his possession the sum of 3 s. 9 1/2 d. for on account of his said master and that he feloniously did secrete and steal the same .

FRANCIS ALBERT LEONARD STRICK VAN LINSCHOTEN . Q. You are a manufacturer of verdigrease and dealer in colours - A. Yes.

Q. The prisoner was your foreman , he was entrusted to sell goods for you and to receive the money - A. Yes, in the month of November I was out of town. I did not return till January, he was to account to Mrs. Linschoten.

MRS. LINSCHOTEN. Q. Was the prisoner to account to you for the money he received - A. Yes.

Q. On the 11th of November did he give you this paper of the expences and the receipts of the week - A. Yes, he accounted to me for no more than what is on that paper.

Q. Did he account to you for four pound of white lead and one pint of oil amounting to 3 s. 9 d. - A. He did not.

MARTIN BENZEIGH . On the 11th of November I made this memorandom; white lead four pound 2 s. 8 d. a pint of raw linseed oil 1 s. 1 1/2 d. he sold this to Hatch, I saw Hatch pay him for them.

Court. Q. to Prosecutor. Does the person employed to receive the money keep an account of the article that he sells in a book - A. Yes, this is the book.

Mr. Gurney. Here is nothing entered on the 7th at all.

Mr. Knapp. Does it never occur that a servant brought that to account on a subsequent day which he omitted on a former day - A. Yes, but he never accounted to me.

Q. A few days mistake might happen sometimes - A. I cannot recollect any such thing.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel; called four witnesses who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100411-120

380. JOHN LUERSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of March , two gallons of rape oil value 10 s. a keg value 1 s. and an earthen bottle value 1 s. the property of Francis Albert Leonard Strich Van Linschoten .

The case was stated by Mr. Gurney.

DANIEL BISHOP. I am an officer of Worship-street. On the 21st of March I went to the prisoner at the prosecutor's manufactory. I told the prisoner, in the presence of his master and Joshua Armstrong. I had a warrant to search his house. I asked him if he had any colour or oil in his house; he said he had not. I then told him he must go with me and his master to search his house. I then took him to his house in Hare-street Fields, Bethnal-green; on searching the bed-room we found a bottle containing some rape oil.

Q. What quantity - A. I believe there is something under a gallon now, the bottle if full would contain two gallons; he said that he had taken it from his master's manufactory, that Mr. Ayres the clerk had given him leave to take it. In the lower room I found this keg. I then brought Mr. Ayres to his face, and Mr. Ayres said to him he did not give him leave to take it. When Mr. Ayres said that he had not given him leave to take it, the prisoner made no reply.

Q. to Mr. Linschoten. The prisoner we understand was your foreman, had you a clerk in your service of the name of Ayres - A. Yes, Ambrose Ayres . I have not discharged him, I have not settled with him; the prisoner had the care of the keys and the property in my custody, Ayres never had; Ayres employ was in collecting and keeping the accounts. The prisoner said it was my keg or else I should not have known it, it is worth a shilling.

Q. Is that the kind of oil that you had in the manufactory - A. Yes, it cost me 5 s. 6 d. the wholesale price; the prisoner told me when he took it it had about two gallons and a half in it.

Court. If the prisoner had not told you you would not have known that it was your oil - A. No, I should never have known it.

Prisoner's Defence. My master employed me at night to pack up things when he returned from the country to send away before day-light. I told my master, that when my hands were up to my elbows in oil I could not run to the book.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100411-121

381. JOHN BRYANT was indicted, for that he on the 28th of April was servant to Rivers Dickinson , John Dickinson , and Richard Dickinson , and entrusted by them to receive money on their account, did receive and take into his possession the sum of 25 l. 6 s. on account of his said masters , and did feloniously embezzle, secrete, and steal the same .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY

Reference Number: t18100411-122

382. JOHN BRYANT was indicted for that he on the 28th of April was servant to Rivers Dickinson , John

Dickinson , and Richard Dickinson , did receive and take into his possession the sum of 34 l. 6 s. and having received it for his said masters , did embezzle, secrete, and steal the same .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18100411-123

283. JOHN BRYANT was indicted for having received 38 l. 9 s. 8 d. for his said masters, and feloniously embezzling and stealing the same .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY .

Reference Number: t18100411-124

384. JOHN BRYANT was indicted for having received the sum of 13 l. 8 s. 3 d. for his aforesaid masters, and of embezzling and stealing the same .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100411-125

385. JOHN CRUISE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of March , a shovel value 1 s. 6 d. the property of William March .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY .

Publicly whipped and discharged.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100411-126

386. DIANA JENNINGS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of March , two pewter pint pots, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of Joseph Bennet .

SARAH BENNET . My husband is a publican , at the Globe, in Titchfield-street .

ELLEN TRIBE. On the 6th of March, between four and five in the evening, I saw the prisoner take a pot from the door and go away with it. I pursued her; told her, that she had got pots; she denied it. I told her again; she then produced two pots out of her apron, and two more she threw into the road.

Prisoner's Defence. A woman asked me to hold the pots in my hand while she went down the street; she asked me to take one off the rail.

GUILTY , aged 50.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100411-127

387. ELIZABETH HENSLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of March , two sheets, value 5 s. a counterpane, value 5 s. a looking glass, value 2 s. a tea kettle, value 2 s. and a flat iron, value 6 d. the property of Ambrose Gedge , in a lodging-room .

MARY GEDGE. I lett a three-pair of stairs room furnished to the prisoner; she had lodged with me a month all but a day. I went into her room, and missed the sheets, a counterpane, looking-glass, tea kettle, flat iron, a bolster, and a pair of blankets. I sent for an officer, and the things were produced at Hatton-garden.

THOMAS HILL . I am a pawnbroker. The counterpane, two sheets, a bolster, were pawned at my shop by the prisoner.

WILLIAM ROBERTS . I am a pawnbroker. The tea kettle and looking glass were pledged with me by the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. She took the key out of my hand and went into the room.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100411-128

388. MARY FRENCH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of March , a washing tub, value 2 s. a candlestick, value 1 s. a cocoa nutshell, value 10 s. and a boot jack, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of Andrew Foster .

REBECCA FOSTER . My husband's name is Andrew Foster , 137, Old Gravel-lane . I lost these things from the 4th to the 12th of March. The prisoner's husband was a watchman in the Dock; he lodged with me. He brought his wife into my house; I said, as she had been in trouble she should not sleep in my house; but he begged hard, and I gave leave till she got a room.

SARAH HEMPSTER . About a month ago I bought a tub of the prisoner, I gave her two shillings for it.

OBADIAH COOPER . I am a pawnbroker. On the 6th of March the prisoner pledged a flat iron with me.

GEORGE PARTRIDGE. I am an officer. On the 13th of March Mrs. Foster came to me. I went to her house, and took the prisoner in custody. I found the duplicate of a flat iron upon her. There was a boot jack and other things sold at the old iron shop. The people at the iron shop said, they had got nothing; afterwards they came before the Magistrate, and gave them up.

SARAH LEVI . I live at 109, Old Gravel-lane.

Q. Of whom did you buy that boot jack and the other things - A. Mrs. Foster came to me; she said, she had lost a candlestick; she said, good God, that is my boot jack out at your door. I said, is that your candlestick; she said, no. She came on the next day, and the same candlestick was on the mantle-piece: dear me, she said, I think that is my candlestick. I said, yesterday you said it was not. I bought it of a man: I believe him to be an honest man. She took the candlestick; she said, she did not mind any thing so much as the cocoa nut-shell. I said, as you are going before the magistrate take it, do not mention my name, it makes such a bother.

GUILTY , aged 33.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100411-129

389. JOHN CALLAGHAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of April , a pair of shoes, value 5 s. the property of Richard Phillips .

RICHARD PHILLIPS . I am a shoemaker , 31, Playhouse-yard, White cross-street . The prisoner has been my journeyman about four years; he worked in my shop, and occasionally acted there in serving. On Saturday, the 7th of this month, for the first time, I suspected the prisoner of robbing me. I missed a pair of shoes that day which I had no doubt were taken by the prisoner. On Tuesday night, the 10th, I searched the place where he was at work, I found a pair of shoes hid under some loose leather, the initials of my name on the bottom were endeavoured to be punched out; having no doubt they were put there for the purpose of taking them away, I took them out and marked them privately in the upper leather, and put them there again; and on the Wednesday, when he went to tea in the afternoon, I looked and found the shoes were gone. I said nothing to him at night on the same Wednesday. I looked in the same place again, and another pair of mens' shoes were secreted there. I marked them the same as I had done the others, and put them in the place where they were hid. The next morning, when the prisoner was to breakfast, I looked for the shoes, they were g went to the Police-office, Worship-street, go

to search his premises. I took the opportunity of going with the officer when he was at dinner, that he might be present when the search was made. I accused him of robbing me; he denied it. I told him, we had a search warrant, he might as well produce it; he said, then, he had a pair up stairs. We went with him up into the second floor, he pulled out this pair of shoes from behind a bonnet-box in the cupboard; this was the last pair; he said then, that he had taken on the day before, and on the Saturday he had sold to a stranger.

- HARPER. I went with Mr. Phillips to execute the warrant. The prisoner went up stairs, and took the shoes out of the cupboard.

Prisoner's Defence. I have been in Mr. Phillips's shop a considerable time. I have done his business duly and truly. I have acquaintances of my own that I recommended to buy shoes of my master; this pair of shoes in question, I sold them to a young man; Mistress Phillips, or the son, took the money; he had one or other in the shop always ready to take the money. This young man never tried the shoes on, he went away with them and brought them back, and I changed them; this pair I took home to bind to change for the man; and before I could bring them back, the officer came and took me

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 45.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100411-130

390. ELIZABETH SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of March , a gown, value 5 s. the property of Christopher Smith .

SECOND COUNT, laying them to be the property of Mary Skell .

MARY SKELL . Q. Who is Christopher Smith - A. The child's father.

Q. Where do you live - A. In St. Martin's-court. I am a servant to Mrs. Cluet, a laundress. When I found the prisoner she had the gown on her back, which she had taken from this child.

ANN ELIZABETH SMITH . Q. How old are you - A. I am going of eight years old; my father is a breeches-maker , he lives in Porter-street; my mother sent me into St. Martin's-court with some things to be mangled, and the woman met me in Castle-street; she took me into Portabella passage , and told me to go over to the men that were painting, and ask them for two shillings worth of penny pieces; they told me to go and tell the woman, to come herself; and when I went back, the woman was gone with the clothes and all; it was my cousin's clothes; I was going with it to the mangler's; there was a gown, shift, and apron in the bundle. When she sent me to the painters, she told me, she would hold my bundle.

Q. Look at the woman, is that the woman - A. Yes, that is the woman.

THOMAS DORE . On the 24th of March, about ten o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner at the end of Portabella-passage, there were two children together; she stooped down and pointed her hand over the way, and took the bundle from the child, and sent the child over the way; she rolled the gown up and walked down the passage; in about five minutes the children came back; the big child cried very much, and told me, the woman had taken her bundle. In about an hour afterwards the mother of this child came, and asked me, if I should know the woman again if I saw her; I said, yes. The child came and said, the woman is taken. I went and saw her, and knew her directly. This is the child that she took the bundle from.

HENRY CRESWELL . I am an officer. I took the prisoner in custody. I took her to Marlborough-street, and took the gown off her back; this is the gown. I told her, if she would tell me where she left her gown, I would go and fetch it. I went to a chandler's shop, and there I found this wrapper, her gown was wrapped up in it.

Prisoner's Defence. That gown I have had two years. She said, it was her gown; I said, it was not. I never saw the child I came from Somersetshire. I have not been five weeks in London.

GUILTY , aged 33.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100411-131

391. DANIEL HANNAGAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 23d of March , a drake, value 5 s. the property of George Potts .

GEORGE POTTS . I live at Old Ford . I lost the drake on the 23d of March. There were six fowls, two common ducks, and this Muscovy drake; they were taken out of the roosting-house between eleven and twelve, I apprehend, at night. They opened the door and took them out. On the morning I went into Leadenhall-market, the prisoner pitched them out of his apron; he said, he had bought these and three more in Newgate-market; he had sold the others.

THOMAS HOOK . I am a poultry salesman in Newgate-market. I saw the prisoner buy two common ducks and a Muscovy drake, to the best of my knowledge; he bought them honestly. I saw no other Muscovy drake in Newgate-market that day. I have known the prisoner for many years; he bears a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100411-132

392. MARY BAKER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of April , sixteen yards of printed cotton, value 29 s. the property of Christopher Hilliard .

CHRISTOPHER HILLIARD . I am a linen-draper , 42, Great Russell-street, Bloomsbury-square . On the 13th of this month, the prisoner came to my shop between two and three in the afternoon, she purchased a yard of print, I was in the shop. I perceived her to be a very knowing young woman. I left the shop, and watched her through the counting-house window: she pointed to some prints on the shelf, and desired my young man to take them down; when his back was turned she pulled a print off the counter, and secreted it under her clothes; in a few minutes after that she bought a yard of print for 3 s. 2 d. and when she gave the young man the money, I went out and informed the young man. I did not say any thing to her then, but let her go out of the shop a short distance in the street; I then took her by the elbow, and asked her to come back. I asked the young man, if he missed any thing; I said, I do; and then she fell a crying. I took the print from her; this is the print, it is mine. I saw her secrete it under her clothes.

Prisoner's Defence. I went in the shop and bought a yard of cotton at 3 s. 2 d. that gentleman followed me out, and told me to step back; he asked the shopman, if he missed any thing from off the counter; he said, no, he did not; the gentleman accused me of taking a piece of print. I never was before a magistrate in my life before.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Confined one year in the house of correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100411-133

389. SARAH DAVIS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 4th of March , a pewter quart pot, value 1 s. 3 d. the property of William Lee .

WILLIAM LEE. I am a publican . I live at the Lord Nelson, Upper Charlton-street, Fitzroy-square .

CHARLES COLLINS . I am a publican's son: my brother went after the pots; he saw the pot in the prisoner's lap; I ran out and took the pot out of her lap.

Prisoner's Defence. I was sent by a woman to fetch some milk with this pot, for whom I was at work.

GUILTY , aged 41.

Whipped in Jail and discharged.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100411-134

393. WILLIAM HOLDSWORTH was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 9th of April , six pounds weight of copper, value 6 s. the property of Ralph John Austin .

RALPH JOHN AUSTIN . I am a brass-founder and brazier , No. 8, Great Saffron-hill . On Monday the 9th of April, from information. I suspected the prisoner, and set my servants to watch him.

WILLIAM BALL. I am a servant to Mr. Austin. On the 9th of April Mr Austin gave me orders to watch the prisoner; about five o'clock the prisoner went out at the back gates, I followed him into Ray-street. Clerkenwell; I saw him come out of an old iron shop; I went in and demanded the metal which he had sold; the woman said she had not bought the metal. that he had it in his hand; I went out of the shop and laid hold of him.

Q. Did you find the metal in his hand - A. Yes, wrapped up in brown paper; I collared him and brought him a few yards off the door, Mortimer throwed him and I took part of the metal from him; he said it was his metal; he did not fear going back to Mr. Austin.

Prisoner's Defence. I took this metal by the pound, whatever was wasted I was to make it good when we came to a settlement.

Prosecutor. He was to account to me for the waste; this is not waste, I know it by the shape of the ingot.

GUILTY , aged 48.

Whipped in Jail and discharged.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100411-135

394. JAMES REORDEN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 7th of March , five pound weight of soap, value 4 s. seven bags, value 14 d. and a pair of clogs, value 1 s. the property of William Moore .

JAMES GILHAM . I am in the employment of Mr. Moore, a soap boiler , Goswell-street . On Wednesday the 7th of March, about seven o'clock at night, I saw the prisoner come down the yard with something rolled up in his apron: when he came to me at the gate I told him that Mr. Cherry wanted to speak to him. I followed him to the accompting-house; I saw him throw a piece of soap down out of his apron; I accused him of it, he fell on his knees and asked for mercy.

THOMAS CHERRY . I am Mr. Moore's clerk. On Saturday evening, the 7th of March, we were desired by Mr. Moore to examine the men that went out of the gate, Mr. Gilham and myself; Mr. Gilham said there was a man throwing down some soap out of his apron; I was directed to the accompting house, there was a piece of soap there which was not there when I went to the gates; I directly accused him of it, he fell down on his knees and asked for mercy; I told him I could say nothing in the case, he must go to Hatton Garden office.

- . I am a constable. In the prisoner's lodging we found seven bags, a pair of clogs, and likewise a piece of paper that soap had been rolled up into, and a small piece of soap of the same sort.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I had no soap; as for the bags, they are not Mr. Moore's; Mr. Cherry gave me them clogs out of the accompting-house.

Q. to Mr. Cherry. Did you give him them clogs - A. No. The clogs are lodged in the accompting-house, the men come occasionally and ask for them to go into the vats.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100411-136

395. EDWARD WATKIN WICKEN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 13th of April , a coat, value 2 s. a waistcoat, value 1 s. and a pair of breeches, value 2 s. the property of William Charles Halsey .

WILLIAM CHARLES HALSEY . I am a clerk in the King's Proctors office ; I live at 44, Evesham buildings . I can only identify the property.

MARY GADEY . I am a servant to Mr. Jutt, he keeps the house, No. 44, Evesham buildings. On the 13th of April, I was down in the kitchen, my mistress called me to mind the door, it was on a jar; I came up stairs to go into the parlour, I saw the prisoner walking across the passage, he had the things under his left arm, and with his right hand tried to pull the street door after him; I called out, stop him; he turned to the right, and went down the street; I ran after him; he throwed down the clothes; I still followed him; he turned the corner, and went into a public house, I went in after him, he was trying to get into one of the boxes in the parlour; I caught hold of him and told him he had been robbing the house; he denied it; I told him he should go to the watchhouse to be searched; he begged me to let him go, he wanted to go and see his uncle in Oxford-road. A neighbour came in, he took him back to our shop; he denied it there, and said he had not been in the house; I never lost sight of him until he was put into the hands of the constable.

FRANCIS WATKINS . I am a constable; I took charge of the prisoner, and these things were given me.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been in Somers Town looking after employ, I was coming along Phoenix-street, I met Mary Smart , she told me to go into the Fox public house, I told her I had no money, she said she would pay when she came back; I was taken out of the public house before Mary Smart came back; I wanted to go after her, she could not have gone an hundred yards when this young woman accused me; I sent to her as soon as possible, she said she would come in my behalf.

Q. to Mary Gudey . Was any body with him - A. Not a creature.

MARY SMART . I take in washing. I have known this young man a little while; last Friday I met him in Somers Town.

Q. Were you present when these goods were taken - A. No.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100411-137

396. WILLIAM LACEY was indicted for unlawfully breaking and entering the dwelling house of Thomas Newbury , with intent the goods and chattels then and there being, feloniously to steal .

COLES BLACKFORD. I am shopman to Mr. Thomas Newbury , linen-draper , in Fleet-street . On the 28th of March, about eight in the morning, I was in the window putting goods in, I saw the prisoner come and stand before the window, and with an instrument which I saw in his hand, he pressed against, one corner of the glass, and broke it; I immediately, left the window, went into the street, and caught him.

Q. Did you find any instrument on him - A. The constable did.

Q. He had not taken any thing, had he - A. No; he turned his back as soon as he had broke the glass, and walked off.

THOMAS - . I am a constable. I searched the prisoner and found this pair of scissars on him; they are separate, the rivet is out.

Prisoner's Defence. I am a lamp lighter; I brought the scissars with me to be rivetted; that gentleman catched hold of me about three doors from the place, he said he could swear to me because I had a white apron on; I was searched, and a pair of scissars was found on me; I was sent on board the tender, I was not fit to serve his Majesty, I came back and had another hearing and was sent here.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Confined One Month in Newgate , and Whipped in Jail .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100411-138

397. THOMAS DAVIS was indicted for that he on the 31st of March , unlawfully, by false pretences, did obtain five gross of satin gard lace, value 14 l. the property of James Burgh , with intent to cheat and defraud him thereof ;

JOHN BURGH . I am clerk to my father, James Burgh , a fring and bed lace manufacturer , in Little Bartholomew-close.

Q. Is Mr. James a customer of yours - A. Yes. The prisoner came on the 31st of March and brought this order which I have in my hand.

"Please to let the bearer have two gross of each of the patterns. Francis James .

D. SMITH."

Q. D. Smith was there shopman - A. Yes; I delivered two gross of satin gard lace, value six pounds, two gross of the other, five pounds six shillings, and one gross of blue, two pounds fourteen shillings, making in the whole fourteen pounds.

Q. Did you know any thing of this man before - A. No. I am sure as to his person.

FRANCIS JAMES . I am a lace and fringe manufacturer in Newgate-street.

Q. You are a customer of Mr. Burgh's, are you - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar - A. No; I never saw him till he was brought to Guildhall.

DENNIS SMITH . I am a servant to Mr. James.

Q. Look at that note - is it your hand-writing - A. No.

Q. Did you send the prisoner to Mr. Burgh for any article - A. No. I never saw the prisoner before he he was taken into custody.

Prisoner's Defence. My lord, and gentlemen of the Jury, I never was in any court of justice before this time charged with any offence inimical to the laws of my country; I am now twenty-one years of age, and the rectitude of my conduct cannot be impeached previous to this; I was led into this crime by a designing and wicked man, whom I never saw before; I saw him in Long-lane, West Smithfield, and the goods I obtained from my prosecutor, I received an order from this man, and only received a remuneration of one shilling and sixpence, and I never had any conception that it was an illicit transaction, therefore, was the same person to ask me to go again of the same errand, was I to see him, I might have so done, without any guilty knowledge, particularly as I am not able to read writing, and being illiterate; I hope the respectable housekeepers with whom I have lived will satisfy this court that this crime is not wilfully done, and as such I expect the word of acquittal in my favour.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100411-139

398. JOHN RAXWORTHY was indicted for a fraud .

WILLIAM BOUSFIELD . My partners names are Samuel Favell and John Richard Bousfield , we are slop-sellers in St. Mary Axe.

Q. Do you know the house of Hollroyd and Jackson - A. Yes; they are in the same line of business, at 38, Leadenhall-street. On the 6th of March, the prisoner came to our house and presented me this note;

"Messrs. Hollroyd and Jackson will consider themselves obliged if Messrs. Favell and Bousfield will let the bearer have three dozen of the same sort of shirts as the last, at 48. When your people call on Mr. Jackson he will pay them, with the exception of five per cent for money. 38, Leadenhall-street."

Q. Did you believe that he was sent by Messrs. Hollroyd and Jackson - A. I did, and I delivered him the three dozen of shirts at the request of that note.

Q. What was the value of them - A. Six pound; and upwards; they were the property of myself and partners. I am quite certain that is the man.

JOHN JACKSON . I am at present in partnership with Betty Hollroyd; my partner is dead; I am in the same line of business with Messrs Favell and Bousfield; I live in Leadenhall-street.

Q. Had you any dealings with them - A. No; no dealings with them.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. No. I never sent him to Messrs. Favell; that paper is not my hand writing or partner, or any person in the house. I never sent the prisoner on the 6th of March to Messrs. Favell and Bousfield, nor authorised any other person to send him.

CHARLES COOTES . I am clerk to Mr. Penton, Brass-founder, New-street-square. I know the prisoner,

he and I lived in the same service for the space of a twelvemonth; I am well acquainted with his handwriting.

Q. Look at that and tell me whether you believe that to be his hand-writing - A. I believe it is.

COURT to Mr. Bousfield. I understand the house of Hollroyd and Jackson are not customers of yours - A. Not at all.

Q. How came you to trust him - A. I reconciled the circumstance to my own mind in consequence of Mr. Jackson having lost his partner, and this being busy shipping time I thought he might want such an assortment of goods, and therefore we were very desirous of accomodating him, and likewise the prisoner represented they were particularly busy, they could not get them made fast enough. I trusted him on account of Messrs. Hollroyd and Jackson; I should not have trusted him if I had not supposed that he had not come from these gentlemen, most assuredly.

Prisoner's Defence. My lord, and gentlemen of the jury - this being the first time that I have been arraigned at the bar of a British court of Justice, I have taken the liberty of confuting the charges brought against me. First, I am charged with obtaining goods under false pretences, I answer, I never did, directly or indirectly, do any such thing; I never saw the evidence till I saw him in the Poultry compter, and to all the charges I am perfectly innocent; but if this assurance of my innocence should be over-ruled, I beg for the lenity of a British court of Justice; and I beg it to be understood that that is my hand-writing that I have just delivered.

GUILTY , aged 32.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100411-140

399. STEPHEN HANFIELD , RICHARD PETHER , and JOSEPH MILLER , were indicted for that they on the 4th of April , about the hour of two in the night, unlawfully did bore, and make certain holes in the window shutter of the dwelling-house of John Styles , with intent burglariously to break and enter the said dwelling-house, the goods and chattels therein, burglariously to steal .

SECOND COUNT for attempting to do the said offence; - and

THIRD COUNT for breaking the window shutters of a certain shop belonging to John Styles, with intent the goods and chattels to take away.

JOHN STYLES . I am a linen-draper ; I live in Bishopgate-street .

Q On the night of the 3d of April at what time did you retire to rest - A. About eleven o'clock; my shop was shut up between ten and eleven; when I went to bed my shop was secure. About three o'clock in the morning I was called up by a violent ringing of the bell, and Mr. Sapwell called out to me; in consequence of what he said I came down stairs and examined my shop window; I found the glass broke on the inside, and the broken glass had fallen on the shawls in the window; I saw ten or a dozen holes in the shutters, they seem to have been made with a large gimblet, rather to represent a of kind half square; the pannel is in court; and provided they had gone on, they could have taken goods out. We had a considerable quantity of goods in the window.

STEPHEN CROMAN. I am a cit patrol. On the morning of 4th of April I was in Bishopgate-street about two o'clock, Horton and Bates were with pie; when we came within a dozen yards of Mr. Styles' house, I saw three men standing at his window, as to drew nearer they split from one another; one went towards Sun-street, and the other two men came towards Bishopgate-church, Horton followed him that went towards Sun-street, the other two, Miller and Pether, came by us; Pether said, what o'clock is it; my partner said, past two; I went up to the shutter and found by feeling it was shagged and tough; Horton called to me that he had got Hanfield; we went up to his assistance and took him to the watchhouse.

Q. Why did not you stop the others - A. We did not know that they had been doing any thing then. When we got Hanfield to the watchhouse we searched him, I found a piece of candle, and this black patch, it is about the colour of the shutters; I judge it was to cover the hole of the shutter.

JOHN HORTON. I am a patrol. I was with the other patrols on the night that we have been speaking of, I saw these three prisoners, I knew Hanfield before; as soon as we got with ten or a dozen yards of them they split; Hanfield went towards Sun-street; when I got to the corner of Sun-street he made a motion as if he was going to ease himself; I took hold of him, I knew him directly; after we had taken him to the watchhouse I went with my partners in search of the other men, and towards Widegate-alley I fell in with Pether and Miller; I am sure they are the same men; I seized hold of Pether by the collar, and stroked him down, and found this gimblet in his pocket; my partner seized the other. I have not the least doubt that this is the gimblet that made the holes in the shutter.

WILLIAM BETTS . I was with the last witness. I saw three men by Mr. Styles's shop; I was with Horton in apprehending Miller and Pether; I am sure they are two of the three men I had seen at Mr. Styles's; there were no other persons in the street; they addressed me by asking what o'clock it was; I could see them by the light of the lamp, they passed me quite close; I could have spoken to them a twelvemonth afterwards if I had seen them.

THOMAS SAPWELL . Q. You were informed of these men immediately after they were taken - A I was. I knew where Hanfield lodged: about three o'clock I went there, I found a candle burning, and another piece of candle not burning, and a pair of scissars.

Hanfield said nothing in his defence.

Pether's Defence. I am a slater by trade; I am in the habit of using these kind of gimblets in my trade; they are not illegal things.

Miller said nothing in his defence.

HANFIELD - GUILTY , aged 28.

PETHER - GUILTY , aged 21.

MILLER - GUILTY , aged 28.

Confined Three Months in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100411-141

400. WILLIAM SEATON was indicted for a fraud .

ELIZABETH SLAYMAKER . I am the sister of John Slaymaker; he is a soap-boiler and tallow-chandler, his house is in Redcross-street, Cripplegate. The prisoner is a bricklayer , he had worked for my brother. On the

27th of January he came to me and produced the half of a ten pound note; he said he came from my brother in Lamb's buildings, Chiswell street. My brother lives in Lamb's-buildings, he was ill at home; I keep the shop in Redcross-street; when he produced the half of a ten pound note he said that would be a sufficient order for me to pay him four pound; I gave him two one pound notes, ten shillings in silver, and one pound ten shillings in copper. I believed that he came from my brother, and had liberty of taking this money. On the Sunday I saw my brother I shewed him the half of the ten pound note, he said he had not ordered him, nor sent him. I did not see the prisoner again till he was apprehended.

JOHN SLAYMAKER . I am a tallow-chandler and soap-boiler.

Q. On the 27th of January last did you send the prisoner with a half ten-pound note to your sister - A. I did not, nor did I desire him on that day, or at any time to call upon my sister for four pounds in money. I did not know that he was in possession of a half ten pound note; I had not seen him for some time before. This four pound was obtained from my sister without any authority or knowledge of mine.

Q. to Mr. Slaymaker. Did you take this half of a ten pound note for security of the money - A. I thought my brother had sent him; I believed he had authority from my brother to receive the money.

Q. Did you ask him to leave it, or did he leave it of his own accord - A. He gave it me before ever I gave him any money.

THOMAS EKELSOE. I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner on the 13th of March; the prisoner said he had taken the half ten pound note of a Mr. Spring, a builder; I went to Mr. Spring; he told me the ten pound note he paid the prisoner, he wrote the day of the month along with the ten; this half ten pound note is not marked in that way.

Prisoner's Defence. I have been in the habit of working for Mr. Slaymaker, and during that period nothing has been missed, nor has he doubted my honesty.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY .

Confined Six Months in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100411-142

401. JOHN HODGSON was indicted for wilful and currupt perjury .

The plaintiff and witnesses, were called and not appearing in court, the defendant was

ACQUITTED .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100411-143

402. ISAAC POLACK was indicted, for that he, on the 18th of January , three books, value 5 l. the property of Thomas Norton Longman , Cosmore Orme , Thomas Hurst , and Owen Rees , which had been by a certain evil-disposed person lately before feloniously stolen, from the said evil-disposed person unjustly did receive and have in his possession, he the said Isaac Polack knowing them to have been stolen .

MR. CARPENTER. I am an engraver in Aldgate High-street.

Q. On or about the 18th of January last, did the defendant call at your shop - A. He did, within two or three days before or after; he called the first time with a book entitled the Worthies of Devon, a quarto volume; he asked me to purchase it; I declined it; a Mr. Bond came in before the defendant had left the shop. Mr. Bond was asked if he would purchase it; Mr. Bond paid thirteen shillings for the book, and the book was left at my house till the evening, when Mr. Bond called for it.

Q. Are you sure the defendant is the man - A. Yes, I have known him for twenty years. The next day the defendant called again with two more copies of the same work; he pressed me to purchase one; I did, for ten shillings and sixpence; this is the one I purchased; I wrote my name on it, when I gave it up; the defendant took the other out of the house.

Q. I believe, in consequence of your seeing an advertisement, you caused information to be given - A. That was the case.

Mr. Knapp. Q. You said you had known the defendant for twenty years - A. Yes; I never knew any harm of him before this time, and this I leave you to judge of him.

CHARLES BOND. Q. Were you at the house of Mr. Carpenter at the time that he stated - A. Yes, I purchased this copy for thirteen shillings; there are my initials.

THOMAS GALE. Q. You are clerk to Mr. Worrall, the attorney - A. I am.

Q. Did you, on the 10th of February last, by the direction of the prosecutor, go to the lodgings of the defendant - A. I did; I told him that I had called on Mr. Carpenter, who had purchased a book entitled the Worthies of Devonshire; that Mr. Carpenter had informed me, that at the time he bought his, he had another undisposed of; he said that he had; I told him I should he very glad to purchase it of him. I agreed to give him twelve shillings for it; he said that he had not the book by him at that time, but if I would call on Monday afternoon at four o'clock, I should have the book, paying him the twelve shillings; I asked him whether he had any more than one; he said no he had not. I then asked him whether he could procure any more; he said that depended upon whether he could see his friend between the time of my calling on Monday afternoon. I said, at any rate you will let me have the copy you have got; he said, at any rate you shall have the copy I have, by my God. On Monday I went again; I was accompanied with Hancock, the officer, Mr. Longman's clerk, and a warehouseman. I first went up alone; I asked him if he had the copy; he said no, he had not got it; I came out of the room, and went into the street, and called Hancock. When Hancock went up, he searched the lodging; the defendant then said he had sold one to Mr. Carpenter, and that was the only one that ever he had; I said, Mr. Polack, you are certainly mistaken; you have already disposed of two, and at the time that you disposed of the second to Mr. Carpenter, you had a third in your possession in Mr. Carpenter's shop; he still denied that he ever had more than one in his possession.

COURT. That could not be, because he told you that he had two.

Mr. Gurney. Mr. Gale, did you enquire how long he had that one or more - A. He said that he had that one in his possession two months; he said he bought it along with a parcel of waste paper.

JAMES HANCOCK . I am a police officer.

Q. On Monday the 12th of February, did you go with Mr. Gale to the lodgings of the prisoner - A. I did.

Q. While you were searching the lodgings of the prisoner, do you remember any thing being said by the prisoner about the Worthies of Devonshire - A. I remember that the prisoner said that he had not more than one or two copies, and he was a dealer in old books; he bought any thing.

Q. Did you hear him say what time he was possessed of the books - A. I believe six weeks or two months, I cannot recollect which.

JOHN M'CREERY. Q. I believe you are a printer - A. I am.

Q. Did you print the whole of that book, or any part for Messrs. Longman and Co - A. I printed the whole of this work for Messrs. Rees and Curtis of Plymouth; I ordered my warehouseman to deliver them to Messrs. Longman and Co. Paternoster-row.

THOMAS BANFIELD. I am foreman to Mr. Wesley, a bookbinder.

Q. Did you, in the month of January last, put up the works, the Worthies of Devon, in boards, for Messrs. Longman and Co. - A. Yes, we received the sheets of letter-press from the printer about the 4th of January, and part of the copper-plates from Messrs. Fox and Barnet, and the other part from Mr. Trepas, Mr. Longman's servant. We were to put them in boards for Messrs. Longman and Co.

Q. Are these two of the copies that you so put in boards - A. They are; they are marked No. 10, by our sewer.

Q. On what day were the copies delivered by you to Messrs. Longman - A. The first copies on the 6th of January; and on the 10th, 11th, and 13th, there were regularly deliveries afterwards.

Mr. TREPAS. Q. Are you in the service of Longman and Co. - A. I am; I delivered out part of the copper plates of this book to the last witness about the 2d or 3d of January.

Q. When did you receive the first copies from him. - A. I think about the 8th; it was a book published by subscription.

Q. When were the first copies delivered out to subscribers - A. On the 12th of January, they were sent to Rees and Curtis for the subscribers at Plymouth. I think I sent them three hundred.

COSMORE ORME. Q. What are the names of your partners - A. Thomas Norton Longman, Thomas Hurst , Owen Rees , and myself.

Q. We understand that this book was printed for Rees and Curtis at Plymouth, and you are the London publishers - A. We are.

Q. You are accountable to them for the copies that you receive - A. Unquestionably so.

Q. Are they partners with you In this book - A. Not at all; we merely sell by commission.

Q. Have you examined to see whether you have missed any of these copies - A. We have found that there were eleven copies short.

COURT. Did you take stock - A. I did not.

Mr. Gurney. Do you know when they were delivered to the subscribers - A. On the 12th of January, we sent three hundred to Rees and Curtis at Plymouth, and on the 24th of January to the subscribers in London. The price to subscribers was three guineas, and to the public three guineas and a half.

Mr. Knapp addressed the jury on behalf of the Defendant.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.


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