Old Bailey Proceedings, 21st February 1810.
Reference Number: 18100221
Reference Number: f18100221-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE OYER AND TERMINER, AND GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND ALSO THE GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, HELD AT Justice-Hall, in the Old Bailey, On WEDNESDAY the 21st of FEBRUARY, 1810, and following Days;

BEING THE THIRD SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF The Right Honourable THOMAS SMITH , LORD-MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY JOB SIBLY , FOR R. BUTTERS, No. 117, ALDERSGATE-STREET.

LONDON:

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED (BY THE AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON BY R. BUTTERS, No. 22, Fetter Lane, Fleet Street,

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON.

Before the Right-honourable THOMAS SMITH , Lord Mayor of the City of London; Sir George Wood , knt. one of the Barons of his Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir John Bailey , knt. one of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Harvey Christian Combe , esq. Sir James Shaw , bart. Aldermen of the said City; John Silvester , esq. Recorder of the said City; Sir Matthew Bloxham , knt. Samuel Birch , esq. Aldermen of the said City; and Newman Knowlys , esq. Common-serjeant of the said City; His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of Goal Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

London Jury.

William Packman ,

Francis Mills ,

James Gaskill ,

John Gundey Renshaw ,

Edmund Dalby ,

John Finley ,

John Lutwich ,

Thomas Merry ,

John Wells ,

John Hunt ,

John Parkinson ,

Arthur Keate .

First Middlesex Jury.

Richard Blunt ,

Joseph Dean ,

John Brown ,

Thomas Wright ,

William Newcombe ,

William Clarke ,

John Chadwick ,

William Walsham ,

William Bartlett ,

John Trott ,

John Owen ,

John Reynolds .

Second Middlesex Jury.

Robert Pearce ,

Richard Ellsworthy ,

Henry Kent ,

William Binley ,

Peter Bodkin ,

William Slade ,

John Todd ,

John Sturgis ,

Charles Young ,

Robert Read ,

William Hunt ,

John Snade .

Reference Number: t18100221-1

150. JAMES DUNBAR was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 8th of January , two gallons of hollands gin, value 10 s. two gallons of shrub, value 10 s. a tea caddie, value 3 s. six cups and saucers, value 6 d. six wine glasses, value 6 d. two decanters and stands, value 5 s. two goblets, value 6 d. two baskets, value 6 d. a teapot, value 2 s. a spirit stand, value 5 s. and three books, value 2 s. the property of George Ross .

GEORGE ROSS . Q. Were you in trade - A. Yes, as a merchant ; I lived in New Basinghall-street ; the prisoner was my clerk .

Q. Towards the close of the last year did you leave London and proceed to Lisbon - A. I did, in October; I returned within a fortnight after, but not to my own house; the prisoner knew where I was in town, and daily communicated with me.

Q. When did you come to your house and miss these things - A. In December I missed these things.

Q. I believe when you quitted London to go to Lisbon you gave this man a power of attorney - A. I did. I revoked that power of attorney on the 18th of December.

Q. After you had revoked that power of attorney could you find the prisoner - A. No, I did not find him until the 18th of January; at last I found out where he lodged, I applied to the office and got a search warrant; I went to his lodgings in Bunhill-row, and there I found the articles mentioned in the indictment. The prisoner was not then at home, he was brought to the office the same evening by Ray and Kennedy.

Q. Had these things been left in your house when you left London - A. They were.

Q. Had you given him any permission to take them away - A. None in the world.

COURT. You were absent I suppose from your affairs being deranged - A. Yes.

Mr. Alley. I suppose he having a power of attorney from you, you placed a perfect confidence in this gentlemen - A. I did.

Q. I suppose if you had been at home you would, if he had asked you, lent him the loan of these things - A. I do not think I should have objected to it.

Q. Is the servant maid forth coming - A. No.

Q. There was an extent commission taken out against you, and government had a right to seize that property if he had returned them - A. Yes.

JOHN RAY . I went to the prisoner's lodgings and found these things; I afterwards apprehended the prisoner in his own apartment.

Prisoner's Defence. I borrowed these things of the servant, having a general power of attorney; I thought I was not doing a dishonourable act; I meaned to return them. The power of attorney was not revoked at the time. It is a malicious act.

COURT to prosecutor. I suppose he might have taken things of a larger value - A. Yes.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100221-2

151. DANIEL GRANT was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 11th of January , a gelding, value 20 l. the property of George Powell .

DANIEL MONK . Q. You are a servant of the prosecutor, Mr. Powell - A. Yes; Mr. Powell is a hot presser , living in Wilson-street, Finsbury-square. On Thursday the 11th of January, between five and six in the evening. I was sent with Mr. Powell's horse and cart to Coleman-street buildings.

Q. It was a gelding was it - A. Yes; I went to Mr. Adams, a packer in Coleman-street-buildings, and took up fifteen pieces of flannel into my cart; it is an enclosed cart; I shut the door and made fast the cart, and then I went to Coleman-street ; I had occasion to leave my cart about five or six minutes, it might be more, I left the cart and horse by a butchers shop, while I went up a court for a certain purpose; when I returned I found the horse and cart gone.

COURT. You left nobody with it I suppose - A. No. I looked very diligently about and could not find it. I went and informed my master what had happened.

HENRY MASON . I am a journeyman to Mr. Powell. I received directions from my master to go in pursuit of this horse and cart, I did, immediately; it was about a quarter after six in the evening, I went with James Day , and two or three servants who are not here; we went to the green-yard, and to many places; we came up to the horse and cart in Dorset-street; Spitalfields, in the county of Middlesex.

Q. When you came up to the horse and cart was that the same horse and cart that was your master's - A. Yes. I did not know it till my young master came up, his name is George William Powell , he said that is my father's cart; I saw the prisoner sitting on the seat of the cart, he was driving the cart; I instantly went round the horses head to lay hold of him, he jumped off the cart and instantly tripped my heels up, I tumbled; he ran away; I instantly got up, pursued him, I never lost sight of him, I catched hold of him, and apprehended him.

Q. Did he say any thing - A. Yes, he made some kind of excuse about a child being run over that day, but what it was, I cannot recollect; I took him by the assistance of Mathews to the watchhouse; afterwards he was taken to the magistrate and was committed.

COURT. Did he give any reason why he took the cart - A. No, I did not ask him. When I catched hold of him I said you are the man that tripped me up, and was sitting on the cart, for that reason I shall hold you.

GEORGE WILLIAM POWELL , JUNIOR. I was with Mason. I saw the prisoner on the seat of the cart, driving of it, that horse and cart was my father's; the prisoner jumped off the cart and knocked me down in the mud; I got up again and the pursuit was made; I drove the horse and cart home; I am sure the horse and cart is my father's property.

Q. You knew of the horse and cart being sent for the flannel - A. Yes, Monk was the driver.

Q. to Monk. Did you see the horse and cart after it was brought home - A. I did. It was the horse and cart I was sent with after the flannel; it was my master's property.

Prisoner to Mason. How far was it from where

you saw that man on the cart to the place where the man was taken - A. One hundred and fifty yards probably.

Q. It was in Union-street where the man was taken, how many turnings did you take - A. Two or three.

Q. It was dark, can you take upon you to say it was me - A. I can.

Q. You said you was knocked down in the mud, how can you say you never lost sight of me - A. I never lost sight of you.

Mr. Knapp. Upon the solemn oath you have taken, have you any doubt at all that he is the person - A. No doubt at all.

JAMES DAY . Q. You were with Mr. Powell - did you see the prisoner in the cart - A. I did; I saw him jump off the cart, I was on the other side of the cart; the prisoner is the same person; I pursued him and never lost sight of him till he was taken.

Q. Have you any doubt that the person that was taken was the person you saw in that cart - A. No doubt whatever, and that person is the prisoner.

Q. And that horse and cart is your masters - A. Yes.

Q. to Mr. Powell. Whereabouts is the value of the horse - A. I suppose about twenty pounds.

Prisoner's Defence. I met this cart; I was going to take this cart home, one of them hit me with a stick, and then I ran away for fear. If they had not met me I was going to make a man a recompence for running over a child.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 24.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18100221-3

152. THOMAS SCOTT was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Mary Smith , widow , about the hour of twelve at night, on the 10th of January , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, a copper, value 4 l. her property, affixed to the said dwelling house .

SARAH ALLEN . Q. Do you live with Mary Smith - A. Yes, she is a widow, her house is situated on a lawn, in the parish of Shepperton .

Q. Is the house surrounded by a wall - A. Three sides of it has a wall, and at the front a high paling. The washhouse is built up against the wall, and is a little distance from the house; the door of the wash-house opens into the yard.

Q. How late in the evening of the 10th of January did you go into the washhouse - A. Between eight and nine, I saw the copper there, it was affixed; when I came out I shut the door and latched it; on the next morning, between seven and eight, I went into the washhouse again, I found the bricks all down and the copper was gone; it was then day light.

SARAH ADDIS . I keep the Fox and Hounds, public house, at Brentford. On the 11th of January, about nine o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came into my house with a copper, the copper had a sack covered over it in the middle, he asked to have a lodging at my house; in consequence of suspicion I sent for a constable.

WILLIAM GOWER . I am a constable of Brentford. I went to the Fox and Hounds, I saw the prisoner there, I took him out of the tap-room to where the copper was; I asked him whose property that was, he said, mine, he had bought it of a stranger on the road, he gave twenty five shillings for it; I took him in custody. I have had the copper ever since.

Prisoner's Defence. I am a poor man, I have a wife and four children. I was never here before.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18100221-4

153. WILLIAM HENLEY was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of William Kendall , about the hour of eleven, on the night of the 16th of February , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, three handkerchiefs, value 6 s. two coats, value 1 l. a waistcoat, value 5 s. a pair of stockings, value 3 s. the property of Joshua Davidson ; a coat, value 1 l. 5 s. a waistcoat, value 10 s. and a pair of stockings, value 2 s. the property of George Hodgson .

GEORGE HODGSON . I am an ostler to Mr. William Kendall , George-yard, Long Acre, in the parish of St. Martin's in the Fields .

Q. Did you sleep at home on the night of the 16th of February last - A. Yes; on the Friday night; I slept in a room over the accompting house.

Q. Does Mr. Kendall live there too - A. Yes, in an adjoining room.

Q. Did any body sleep with you - A. Yes, Joshua Davidson .

Q. Was there any alarm in the night - A. About ten minutes before we found him in the room with the light I thought I heard somebody in the room; when I first thought I heard somebody in the room it might be a quarter past eleven. We both went to bed at the same time; there were nobody up in our premises; the house door was hasped but not locked.

Q. How many doors are there to the house - A. Two. I hasped the doors myself.

Q. Were the windows fastened - A. They were shut down; we do not fasten the windows at all. About a quarter past eleven I thought I heard somebody in the room, I got out of bed and looked and went into bed again and got half asleep; Davidson and I saw a glimmering light in the room, Davidson got out of bed and struck the man, I saw he had clothes on his arm, I got out of bed and got hold of his collar.

Q. You saw the prisoner with a light, did you - A. Yes; he had got a black coat and waistcoat and this handkerchief, and one pair of stockings belonging to me; he had another handkerchief, two coats, a pair of stockings, and a waistcoat of Davidson's, and some handkerchiefs he had got in his pocket; I seized him by the collar and the watchman searched him; we got him down in the yard.

Q. What was found in his pocket when you searched him - A. Three handkerchiefs; they are Davidson's.

Q. Had you known the prisoner before - A. Yes; he was tried this time twelvemonth for robbing this same room.

Q. No, no - had he worked about the premises - A. Yes; about a year and a half ago.

Q. Did you examine to see how he got in - A. He had opened the doors and left them open. When I seized him we both fell down stairs, and then I observed both the doors open.

Q. Do both of the doors lead into the yard - A. Yes:

Q. Was the prisoner taken into custody - A. Yes; I kept him till the watchman came, and Donaldson the officer; then I delivered him up to them.

Q. You say you had hasped the doors, did you try them after you had hasped them to see whether they were fast - A. No, I did as I always do, I put them to close.

Q. So, that if the hasp had missed, if any body pushed, they might open them - A. Yes.

Q. By a hasp, I suppose, you mean a common latch - A. Yes.

Q. Now look at your own clothes, the black coat and waistcoat, and pair of stockings - A. I know them to be mine, they were made for me, there are no marks to them; the handkerchief was in my coat pocket, that is marked.

Q. From what part of the room were they taken - A. Just by the foot of the bed, upon a box; they were the clothes that I had worn the day before. I had taken them off about an hour and a half before.

Q. You say there were two doors, were they both outward doors - A. One door leads into the accompting-house, the other is the landing to the stairs.

Q. Then there is only one outward door, and the outer door was only upon the hasp - A. No.

Q. Were they shut-to, both - A. Yes.

Prisoner. I have been in trouble, I came out, I had no where to go to; the two handkerchiefs I had on my arm, that is the only thing I had.

Court. Q. (to Hodgson.) You say he had upon his arm your coat, waistcoat, and stockings - A. Yes; he had got two of Davidson's handkerchiefs putting into his pocket.

Q. Did he endeavour to get away - A. Yes. He got my two fingers into his mouth; he almost bit one off.

Jury. Did the clothes, when he and you fell down, fall down with you - A. Yes, about three yards down the stairs.

JOSHUA DAVIDSON . I am a breaker of horses to gentlemen . I live at Penworth, in Cumberland.

Q. Were you at Mr. Kendall's on Friday last - A. Yes; I slept there with Hodgson. I went to bed about half past nine o'clock, as near as I can tell.

Q. Were you alarmed in the course of the night - A. Hodgson jumped out of bed about ten minutes or a quarter of an hour before I saw this man, he looked about, then he thought it was only the carriages going about; he got into bed again. I was afterwards alarmed by a light. I saw a man standing with a candle in his hand, he had both these coats, this waistcoat, and a pair of stockings, that I have in my hand, over his arm, and three handkerchiefs that I had taken off my neck. I saw him reach them, put his hand under his coat, and put them into his pocket. I just looked a moment, I stepped out of bed, he never saw me, his back was towards me. I took my fist and knocked him down, I fell into the other room, about three steps. I came back again, and Hodgson had hold of his collar; he fell down with him. I went to them, and shut this man and Hodgson in the staircase. I got outside.

Q. When you got down you found the door open, did you not - A. Yes. I got down and shut them in. I gave the alarm, the watchman came up. I kept the door shut till two or three men came; we then took hold of him, brought him into the yard, then the watchman came; he was taken to Bow-street; he was never out of my sight until he came to Bow-street.

Q. Are you sure that the clothes that he had on his arm were your's - A. Yes; they were the clothes that I had worn the day before.

Prisoner. I was going into the bed-room to sleep.

- CALLIGAN. I am a watchman. When I came into Mr. Kendall's yard I took the prisoner into custody. I searched him, he resisted me; these handkerchiefs I took out of his pocket. I have had these handkerchiefs ever since; they were in his right hand coat pocket.

Q. (to Davidson.) Look at these handkerchiefs - A. They are my handkerchiefs; this stuffer was too broad, I cut it off. They were all rolled together.

Prisoner. I know nothing at all of the handkerchiefs: I was going to bed.

Jury. Q. (to Hodgson.) Were there any other bed in the room besides that you and Davidson were sleeping in - A. No, there was another bed in the room adjoining. One of the post-boys slept there, his name is John Read . I did not know but the prisoner was in prison.

Prisoner's Defence. They had both of them their clothes in their hands: they said, they would hang me if they could. I am quite as innocent as a child unborn. I was going into bed, he knocked the light out of my hand. I took nothing out of the room but my handkerchief, which I put into my pocket.

Court. Q. (to Calligan.) Where was it you searched him - A. In the yard, outside of the door.

Q. Had he any other handkerchief in his pocket - A. No.

Prisoner. I had a yellow one.

Calligan. You had a yellow one round your neck.

Q. (to Davidson.) What is the value of your clothes - A. Twenty-nine shillings; they would sell for that.

Q. (to Hodgson.) What is your clothes worth - A. One pound fifteen shillings; they would sell for that.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 21,

Of stealing Goods in the Dwelling-house to the value of forty shillings, but not of breaking and entering the Dwelling-house.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18100221-5

153. THOMAS PASSMORE was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of William Williams and James Charles , the said James Charles then being in the said dwelling-house, about the hour of eleven in the forenoon of the 16th of January , and feloniously stealing a watch, value 2 l. two Bank notes, value 10 l. each, a Bank note, value 5 l. a Bank note, value 2 l. and seven 1 l. Bank notes, the property of the said William Williams .

SECOND COUNT, for like offence, stating it to be the dwelling-house of William Winter .

WILLIAM WILLIAMS . I am a master plaisterer . I was employed by a gentleman of the name of William Winter , at his house, No. 18, Cumberland-street, Portman-square, in the parish of Marybone .

Q. Had Mr. Winter ever resided in that house - A. No; the house was in an unfinished state. I slept in the house, and James Charles , a joiner that worked in the building; we slept in the back garret. Mr. Winter put us in there to take care of the house. I kept my trunk there, it was locked, I kept the key in my pocket. I had seen the contents of the trunk on the Sunday morning before. I lost the property on Tuesday morning. The trunk contained the bank notes that are mentioned in the indictment. I lost my silver watch from another trunk, that was not locked, it was in the same room. The prisoner was a labourer employed by me in that house about five months; he was at work on the Tuesday

that I lost my property. I left the house on the Tuesday at nine o'clock in the morning; the joiner and the prisoner were then in the house. I left my trunk that contained the notes and the room door locked. The prisoner I left working down below in one of the vaults, his business did not call him to be up stairs at all, and the joiner was at work in the kitchen. I left the key of the room on a shelf in the front garret, where we both put it, and I found it there when I returned.

Q. Did the prisoner know that you used to put it there - A. Not to my knowledge. I returned home about five o'clock in the afternoon, I found the garret door broken open, the trunk lock was broken open, and the contents were gone, and I missed my watch from the other trunk.

Q. Upon your discovering this, did you see the prisoner - A. No, he was gone; the joiner was in the house. I told the joiner that I had been robbed, I went to Bow-street, and gave information. The prisoner came to his work the next morning, I asked him, if he had seen any stranger in the house, or go up the staircase on Tuesday; he said, he had not. I asked him, if he was in the garret, or went up the garret stairs that day; he told me he had not. From suspicion, I had him taken up on the 24th of January. I have never recovered any of the property. There has been one note come in to the Bank; I have not got it here.

WILLIAM WINTER . I am building this house. I do not mean to reside there. I came to the house on the Tuesday, to look after my men, between the hours of ten and eleven. I went up stairs to go into the two-pair, I met Passmore coming down the garret stairs; I asked him, if Dudley, another workman, was in the two-pair; he seemed very much confused, which made me take notice of him, and in a faultering voice he stammered out, I do not know. I asked him, if Elijah, another workman, was upstairs; he recovered himself a little by that time, he answered me, No; then he went down. The prisoner had nothing to do at that time upstairs, nor for a great while before: he ought to have been at work below in the vault. The next morning Mr. Williams acquainted me of the robbery.

Q. (to Mr. Williams.) I forgot to ask you, whether the prisoner had the day before borrowed any money of you - A. Yes, a one pound note; he told me, that he was low in circumstances, that his wife had wrote to him for two guineas, he could not make it up, he should be obliged to me for a one pound note towards it, he would work it out. I lent him the one pound note.

WILLIAM GRANT . I am a taylor. On the 20th of January the prisoner came to my shop, No. 300, Oxford-street. He bought a coat, two waistcoats, and a pair of breeches; they came to three pounds four shillings. I gave him change for a five pound Bank note, I put the name he gave me upon the note. I believe it was Thomas Passmore . I gave him a one pound note, and the rest in silver. He asked me, if I could accommodate him with twenty pounds worth of gold for notes; I told him no. I am quite sure the prisoner is the person.

DAVID NEALE . I am a bricklayer. I have known the prisoner eighteen months. On the 20th of January, he came into my mother's room, where I was, No. 17, Oxford-buildings. He brought a coat, two waistcoats, and a pair of breeches. He asked my mother's leave to let them be there while he went and fetched a trunk, she gave him leave, he went and brought in a leathern trunk; he said, I will put the things into the trunk, and I will leave them here awhile, by your leave; he took the key, and went away. The trunk had his initials, T. P. upon it. He came again on the Monday, about five o'clock in the evening, and brought some more clothes: I believe, they were women's clothes. He put them into the trunk, he locked the trunk, and took the key, and away he went. On the next evening I saw him again, he had a bundle with him; he put it in the trunk, and went away. I produced the things to Mr. Williams on the same evening that the prisoner was in custody.

EDWARD TREDWAY . I apprehended the prisoner on the 24th of January, in Oxford-buildings, within a door or two of the witness mother's house. I told him what I apprehended him for; he said, he knew nothing about it. I found upon him this watch. It is not the prosecutor's watch; it is a silver watch. He said, he gave fifteen shillings for the duplicate; the watch had been in pawn for two pounds. In his box were six seven-shilling pieces, thirty-six shillings in silver, and about ten shillings in halfpence. On the next day, we went with a search warrant to No. 17, where Neale lived; there we found this trunk (it has T. P. upon it), and all the articles described by the last witness; the articles consists of new mens' and womens' apparel; the whole together are worth between fifteen and twenty pounds. When I had found the things, the prisoner said to me, you old file, what can you do, there is nothing there that you can swear to.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY, aged 23.

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling-house .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18100221-6

154. JOHN WALSH was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Richard Pennington , about the hour of seven, in the night of the 9th of February , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, a table-cloth, value 30 s. his property .

HENRY PORTINGTON . I am shopman to Richard Pennington , 62, Oxford-street, in the parish of Marybone .

Q. He has a shop there, has he - A. Yes, he has; his shop is part of his dwelling-house. On Friday, the 9th of January, about ten minutes past seven in the evening, (it was dark), in consequence of information, I went out of the shop and saw the prisoner taking out this diaper table-cloth with his right hand, and he was holding his coat with his left hand, to hinder people from seeing him, as I suppose.

Q. Where was it taken out - A. Out of a pane of glass in the shop window, which he had cut.

Q. Did you see him cut that pane of glass - A. I did not. I saw him taking out this cloth; I seized him by the collar, he had not got it quite out. I dragged him into the shop. When I laid hold of him he let go the cloth. When I got him into the shop, I gave him into the care of Mr. Young, an attorney, until I went and fetched Mr. Foy, the officer.

Q. Where was the diaper table-cloth - A. It was laid against the window, not against the square that he cut, the square next to it; it was on the railing of the window, to shew it.

Q. Had he removed it from the place where it was -

A. He had entirely removed it from the place, and about one quarter of it was out of the window.

Q. Had you observed that pane of glass before this - A. The same pane of glass had been cut four nights before, there was no hole, there was a crack in it before. I walked round the window, which I usually do; there were lamps suspended to the window, in order to shew the goods. About half an hour or an hour before it was whole, except the crack; the piece was not out.

Q. Are you sure there was no piece out - A. There was not.

Q. After the window had been cut, then there was part of the pane of glass left in, was it not - A. There was.

Q. What became of the other part - A. The other part could not be found, it was taken clear away. This is the table-cloth, it is the property of Richard Pennington , it is worth thirty shillings. I delivered it to Foy, the officer, the same evening. The prisoner was drawing it out of the window, and with his left hand he was holding his coat; the hole in the window was large enough to let it out.

REBECCA SIGGS . On the 9th of February I was sent into Oxford-street, to match some ribbon, I could not get it. When I came to this shop, I was looking at some print. I saw the prisoner standing at the window close to it.

Q. What did he appear to be doing - A. He was pressing himself against the window, and spreading his great coat I suspected he was at no good. I walked backwards and forwards near the shop, and saw him cutting the glass; I could not see what he was cutting it with. I saw the glass going as he pressed. I could not see any thing in his hand. When I first looked at the window, I saw the glass quite whole, I walked back the other way, I saw him cutting the glass, I saw him pressing against it, and the glass I saw it quite out.

Q. The whole pane was not quite out, was it - A. No, only part of it. I went in the shop and informed the last witness Portington, he came out immediately, I saw him drag the prisoner in.

Q. You did not see the prisoner take any thing out, did you - A. No, I went into the shop immediately I saw him put his hand in; and I saw his hand moving as if cutting the glass.

Prisoner. At the magistrate's she said it was eight o'clock, the gentleman said now it was seven o'clock; she said, that she looked me in the face; I will now ask her, whether I would stand there stealing cloth and let her go in and tell the gentleman.

Witness. I did see you.

Court (to Witness). What a clock was it - A. It might be after seven.

THOMAS FOY . I belong to Marlborough-street Office. I was sent for by the first witness to take the prisoner in custody. I searched him and found a knife; I afterwards matched this knife with the putty, the putty was very soft, it matched with one place exactly.

Q. How had the glass been taken out - A. It is a common thing to star the glass with it. I have kept the table-cloth in my custody ever since.

Prisoner's Defence. I went to this window, two men were standing there, they went away, I was looking at the window. I stood there about five minutes, and this piece of cloth was standing against the window, I was thinking to go in and let the gentleman know the cloth was standing there, and I thought he would give me sixpence. He came out and said, you rascal, what do you do here. I really think I saved the house from being robbed, instead of robbing it.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 28.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18100221-7

155. THOMAS ACKERMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of February , thirty-three yards of linen cloth, value 7 l. the property of John Richards in his dwelling house .

THOMAS CLARKSON . I am shopman to John Richards , 37, Oxford-street, in the parish of Marybone . On the 5th of February about five o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner came into the shop and took away a piece of sheeting.

Q. Did you see him. - A. Yes, I did, I was placing a lamp in the window. I pursued him about three hundred yards, I never missed sight of him; he dropped the sheeting about three or four yards from the door. He was stopped, I gave the alarm, stop thief. He dropped the sheeting in consequence of my holloeing out, what do you want with it, when he came and took it away.

Q. Whereabout was the sheeting laying. - A. It was placed near the door, within the door. This is the sheeting, the person that picked it up in the street has brought it here; it has Mr. Richards private mark, it is his property, it is valued at seven pounds. I am sure the prisoner is the person that took it out of the shop. He was stopped and taken to Marlborough-street office. Thomas Hodgkins is the person that picked it up.

THOMAS HODGKINS . I live with Mr. Richards.

Q. Were you in the the shop on the 5th of February. - A. Yes, I heard Clarkson give an alarm, I ran to the door and missed a piece of sheeting; a gentleman that was passing by, said, step this way, I went and picked up a piece of sheeting.

Q. Did you pursue the prisoner. - A. No, I picked up the sheeting, it has been in my custody ever since. I have seen the private mark on it before, frequently. I know it is the same piece.

Prisoner's Defence. I have no more to say in my defence, I know nothing at all about it, I am innocent of it.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 29.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18100221-8

156. MARGARET FOULKES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of January , a pair of sheets, value 5 s. a pair of stockings, value 5 s. five yards of muslin, value 5 s. six coffee cups, value 10 s. six tea cups, value 10 s. and six saucers, value 10 s. the property of James Henderson in his dwelling house .

ELIZABETH HENDERSON . I am the wife of James Henderson ; I live at 37, Harlington-street, Camden-town, Pancras ; the prisoner was in my service, she left me on the 27th of January. In consequence of suspicion, I sent for a constable and had a search made.

ALEXANDER UPTON . I am a constable. On the 27th of January I went to Mrs. Henderson's, she was in the parlour, she told me that she had missed some china.

Q. to Mrs. Henderson. Have you any thing to say against the prisoner. - A. Yes, she robbed me of china, six coffee cups and six saucers, a pair of silk stockings, and a pair of sheets, five yards of India muslin, and a great many articles that is not in the indictment; part of the china she had hid in the garden, and part of them

were on the kitchen dresser covered over with a shawl; she fetched them out of the garden herself; the silk stockings I found in a work basket of hers, hanging up in the kitchen; the sheets I found at No. 14, Southampton-place, Camden Town.

Q. How came you to look for them there. - A. She asked my errand boy to carry them there, I went there; she was in confinement then.

Q. You have nobody here that knows that she ordered them to be carried there. - A. No; I found the India muslin concealed between the sacking of her bed, and the bed; it was new muslin; I did not miss it until I found it; I had seen it about a week before, I kept it locked up in a trunk in the two pair of stairs bed-room. The china had never been used, I kept it in a store closet. The whole of the articles are worth forty shillings.

Q. Can you tell when they were taken - A. No, they might have been taken at different times.

The property produced and identified.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence, called six witnesses who gave her a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18100221-9

157. SARAH BOND was indicted, for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of February , a pellise, value 16 s. three pair of stockings, value 3 s. two tippets, value 5 s. a bonnet value 3 s. three petticoats, value 6 s. a lace tucker, value 1 s. four gowns, value 1 l. a waistcoat, value 1 s. three shirts, value 3 s. three shifts, value 3 s. four caps, value 6 s. six hankerchiefs, value 3 s. two aprons, value 1 s. a hat and feather, value 1 s. and a straw hat, value 3 s. the property of Sarah Anderson , spinster , in her dwelling house .

SARAH ANDERSON . I live at the bottom of Butcher-row, at a place they call the dark entry, Wapping ; I keep a house there, I do not know the name of the parish. The prisoner was with me as a servant about a fortnight. On the 12th of February, about seven o'clock in the evening, I went out, and left the prisoner at home to mind the house; I returned about half an hour afterwards.

Q. When you returned did you find your door open. - A. No, it was locked and bolted, I knocked at the door a long time, I thought she was asleep. I went to a neighbour's house and borrowed a key and unlocked it. I found it was bolted, I got a man to put a young man over the door, he got inside and unbolted the door; there is an opening over the door, so that any person could get in; he opened the door, and I went in, I found the key in the drawer where I had left it, and the prisoner was gone, the fire was out, and there was a light on the table. I went up stairs and took the man and the boy with me, and several more people. I found some pieces belonging to my gowns, and an apron that were at the bottom of my chest on the bed. I searched the chest, I found there was nothing left in it, the chest had been broken open; I missed all the things in the indictment; they were all taken out of the house.

Q. How soon before this had you seen them. - A. I believe it was the day before that I went up stairs, I went to get something out, I saw them all safe in the chest. From information, I went over Tower-hill in search of the prisoner, and in Barking church-yard I found her, she was standing against a door, she pulled a girl upon her to hide herself from me; I knew her by my pellise that she had on, and a gown, cap, and tippet; I catched hold of her and holloed out, watch, he came directly; she had got a large bundle with her. Follingwood, the watchman, took her to the watchhouse and the bundle with her; the things are all here.

JOHN FOLLINGWOOD . Q. You apprehended the prisoner in Barking church-yard. - A. Yes; she had a large bundle with her, it is here; the bundle was brought to the watchhouse by a man that stood by. The constable of the night took the property, it is the same bundle that the prisoner had in Barking church-yard. Sarah Anderson identified it to be her property.

SAMUEL WRIGHT . Q. You were the constable of the night - A. I was, the property was delivered to me.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I hope you will be as lenient as you can, my Prosecutrix is a very bad character, she lives entirely by prostitution and debauching young women.

GUILTY, aged 33.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Fined 1 s. and confined One Year in the House of Correction .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18100221-10

158. JOHN COOPER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of January , a gun called a fowling piece, value 38 l. a case, value 2 l. 18 s. a powder flask, value 9 s. a shot belt, value 7 s. a screw driver, value 3 s. a flint case, value 3 s. an iron ramrod, value 9 s. 6 d. an extra ramrod, value 4 s. 6 d. and a card cutter, value 6 s. the property of Harvey Walklate Mortimer the elder , and Harvey Walklate Mortimer the younger .

HARVEY WALKLATE MORTIMER. I am a gun maker , 89, Fleet-street; I am in partnership with my father, Harvey Walklate Mortimer. On Saturday, the 13th of January, about two in the afternoon, the prisoner at the bar called at our house, in Fleet-street; after examining several guns he fixed upon one, which he ordered me to send it to his address in Greenfield-street, Commercial-road; the gun was sent at the time fixed, and not knowing of the prisoner, I gave the man, who took the gun, a particular order to bring back the money or the gun.

THOMAS DOUBLEDAY . I am journeyman to Mr. Mortimer: I was sent with the gun to John Cooper , No. 70, Greenfield-street, Commercial-road . I waited about ten minutes before Mr. Cooper came in; he gave me a check when he came in, and I delivered him the gun. I returned home with the check and gave it to my master; the check was refused at the banking house; my master sent me back to Mr. Cooper's. The woman of the house informed me he was gone, he only took the lodging that morning; on my coming home I met Mr. Cooper in Aldgate, I told him the check was refused at the banking house; he said, no, it must be a mistake; I said, he must return back with me or give me the money; he said, he was booked at the coach, he was going into the country, I must go with him to a friend of his, he would borrow the money; he took me to a coffee house, told me to stop at the door while he went in; I told him I should not leave him; he said, I was an impertinent fellow, he would not go in, the porter was with me, I sent the porter for a constable, and afterwards he walked very pleasantly with me; the porter lost sight of me. At last the prisoner went into the Commercial-road, there I charged

the watch with him, and he gave charge with me; he threw the gun on my toes, he got out of the watchman's hands; he was pursued and taken to the watchhouse, and from there to Lambeth-street office.

The property produced and identified.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100221-11

159. SUSANNAH DAY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of February , a gown, value 2 l. and a shawl, value 6 s. the property of Joseph Irons .

JOSEPH IRONS . I am a butcher , I live at No. 27, Half-Moon Street, Bishopsgate-street Without . On the 14th of this month, about six o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner come out of Mr. Parker's, a pawnbroker's shop in Houndsditch; I went home and apprized my wife of it. The gown and shawl in the indictment, my wife did not miss till the next morning; my suspicion then arose that she must have pawned it.

ANN IRONS . I am the wife of the last witness, the prisoner was a lodger in the house, her husband is a shoemaker, they lived together in the attic chamber. On the 15th of February, when I missed my gown and shawl, I went with Mr. Sapwell, the officer, to Mr. Barker, a pawnbroker, and there my gown was produced; my shawl was pawned at London Wall.

THOMAS SAPWELL . Q. You are an officer - A. Yes; I went with Mrs. Irons to the pawnbroker's in Houndsditch; the gown was produced.

JOHN VENNELL . I live at Mr. Barker's, 115, Houndsditch; on Wednesday evening the 14th of February, between five and six o'clock, the prisoner brought a silk gown to pledge; I lent her fourteen shillings on it.

DAVID WATSON . I am a pawnbroker; I live with Mr. Pearce, London Wall. On the 14th of February in the evening, I took in a shawl of the prisoner, I lent her four shillings on it.

The property produced and identified.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

GUILTY , aged 52.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Fined 1 s. and confined three Months in Newgate .

Reference Number: t18100221-12

160. EDWARD NOWLAND was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of February , a carcase of mutton, value 2 l. 2 s. the property of Daniel Keene .

JOHN ALLEN . Mr. Keene's man bought six carcases of mutton at Newgate-market ; I took two of them down to the cart, and ran back for two more; when I returned with them, there was one missing, a man coming by, told me, he saw a man run up Giltspur-street, with a sheep on his shoulder. I immediately ran after him, and got sight of him in Giltspur-street; I followed him through the Blue-coat School, and catched him in Little Britain with the carcase of mutton on his shoulder. I said, my friend, that is my mutton; he looked at me, and chucked it from his shoulder in the dirt, I brought him back to the market. I left the sheep at Mr. Starkey's, in Little Britain. I gave him in charge of the constable.

JAMES WOODMAN . I am an officer; on Monday morning, the prisoner was delivered into my custody; the sheep is here.

The property produced and identified.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnessess to character.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100221-13

161. RICHARD SKINNER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of February , three wrappers, value 1 l. 15 s. eighty yards of calico, value 3 l. and six boards, value 6 s. the property of George Bailey and William Bailey .

THOMAS CLARK . I am carman to George and William Bailey ; they are leather sellers, and dealers in velvet and cottons , Nos. 48 and 49, Long-Acre. On the 17th of February about six in the evening, I was going with my cart to the Axe-Inn, Aldermanbury , with several parcels; I stopped the cart about twenty yards from the gateway, and went to see if I could get up the gateway, and seeing a cart stand up the gateway, I returned back to my cart immediately, and before I could well turn myself round, I heard the cry of stop thief; I ran to my cart directly; the Prisoner Skinner and the patrol were just opposite, about five yards from my cart, and the patrol had got hold of him by the collar, and they had got this truss off the cart, which lay about five yards distance from the cart.

JOHN VAUGHAN . I am a patrol; about six o'clock on Saturday evening, I had been to the ward beadle, for the key of the watchhouse: going from there to the watch-house, I saw three men that I knew perfectly well to frequent the Ward; I saw them go up a court opposite the watchhouse; I unlocked the watchhouse door. I saw the carman stop his cart, then I pushed the watch-house door open, and run backwards and got the cutlass down, and coming to the door again, I saw three men nearly close to the cart; one of them was on the pavement, and the other two, the prisoner was one of them, pulled the truss of goods off the cart. I immediately threw the cutlass down in the watchhouse on a bench, ran out and seized the prisoner by the skirts of his coat, or the collar, I cannot be sure which now, and he dropped the goods. I immediately called out, a thief, a thief, in case the others should come and rescue him from me; by that time the carman came up; he was the next man that laid hold of him. The prisoner then pleaded that he did not know any thing of it, nor was he the man that dropped it when I catched hold of him; he had it in his arms, and would have got it on his shoulder, if I had left him a minute. I then sent for an officer, I never let him go until I took him to the officer's house, and searched him, which was near to the spot; I gave the goods into the possession of Samuel Preston .

Prisoner. I can only say I was coming by; the patrol never saw me in any company.

Witness. There were two more in the gang with you, and if I had had any one with me, we might have taken the other men.

SAMUEL PRESTON . I searched the prisoner, I found nothing on him, I have had the property ever since.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I am a coachman , I did not leave my employment till past five o'clock. I had taken a bad seven shilling piece of a lady on the Saturday before; I had been to Cheapside to see the Battersea coachman; I asked him if the lady had came to town from Mr. Ridgeway's at Battersea; he said, he would enquire for me,

from there I was going to Moorgate to get a pint of beer. I am innocent of it.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100221-14

162. THOMAS TURNER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 1st of February , a cask value 7 s. and five gallons of brandy, value 6 l. the property of Robert Burnett , Jun. Charles Fassett Burnett , and John Fassett Burnett .

GEORGE WHICKER . I am a carman to Messrs. Burnett's at Vauxhall, they are distiller s.

Q. What are the names of the partners. - A. Sir Robert Burnett , Robert Burnett , Jun. Charles Fassett Burnett , and John Fassett Burnett .

Q. Is Sir Robert in the firm. - A. I believe he is.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100221-15

163. ISSAC PETTITT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 8th of February , one thousand sheets of printed paper, value 1 l. 10 s. the property of John M'Creery .

JOHN M'CREERY . I am a printer ; I carry on business in Black-horse Court, Fleet-street : my dwelling house is in Surry. On the 8th of February, about eight o'clock in the evening, I had occasion to wait upon a barrister in Lincoln's Inn. On return a quarter before nine, I found the people in my house in a state of consternation, on account of a robbery that had been committed. I found, by my foreman, that the house had been robbed of a quantity of unfinished work which was going from my press. It is a new work I am printing for Mr. Longman, called the Scottish Chiefs, to be published in five volumes; it has never been out of my hands; there was no other person could be in possession of it; I lost, as near as I can guess, a thousand sheets. On the morning after, I went out in search of the property; I went to Mr. Jones, a cheesemonger in Fleet-market; at the far end of the shop I saw a bundle tied up; I discovered it to be a part of this property; and my suspicion fell upon the prisoner.

Q. What is the prisoner. - A. He is a journeyman printer ; he was engaged, but he did not come to work. My suspicion fell upon him in consequence of his having frequently applied for work, and generally on an evening. I got a search warrant, and the officer Hawkins found out where he worked; we searched his lodgings and found nothing; we took the prisoner from his work, and then requested him to come to Mr. Jones's, the cheesemonger; and when we took him into Mr. Jones's parlour, Mr. Jones recognised him to be the person.

Mr. Walford. In what part of your printing shop had this paper been placed. - A. In my wareroom; I did not place it there, I knew it was stored there. They were missed by my foreman; when I came in, he pointed out the sheet, and said, we are robbed again, this sheet is gone.

HUGH JONES . I am a cheesemonger, No. 5, Fleet-market. On the 8th of this month, about half past eight in the evening, the prisoner came in, and asked the shop-man whether I could buy any waste paper; I was called out; I told him to wait, as I was busy telling some silver; they told me the gentleman was in a hurry; I said, then send him in; the prisoner came in to me, I asked him what he wanted a pound for the paper; he said, five-pence; I looked at it; I said, these are regular sheets; he answered, they had been misprinted; I said, it was not the paper that exactly suited my trade, it would not hold the brine; he replied, perhaps you wish to have some old ledgers or bill books; I said, that is the paper that is suitable to me; I said, I would give him fourpence halfpenny, he took it; it weighed eighteen pound, I told him to take it in the shop; my son weighed it, and paid him six shillings and ninepence for it. I am sure the prisoner is the man, and that is the paper; he told me he had sold a great deal to Mr. Skinner, the tobacconist. Mr. M'Creery called on me on the next morning; I told him I would be at home about two o'clock. He brought the prisoner in, and another man very much like him; I pointed out the prisoner, I am positive the prisoner is the man.

JOHN JONES . I am the son of the last witness; I know the prisoner, he came into our accompting house while my father was counting some silver; he came with paper; my father told me to weigh it, I did, and gave him six shillings and nine pence for it. I am sure the prisoner is the man.

Prisoner's Defence. I am entirely innocent of it; at the time that Mr. M'Creery was robbed, I was at home; when the officer came to take me in custody, he said, take no notice to your fellow workmen, I have a warrant against you. There was nothing found in my possession at all, I had nothing but a five shilling piece. When Mr. M'Creery took me down to Mr. Jones, there was another person that looked like me; Mr. Jones did not know which of us it was; he took my hat out of my hand; he said, he knew me by the silk hat, and he observed, that I was genteelly dressed when I brought it. My earnings is thirty-six shillings a week; I have had several situations. I did not go to Mr. M'Creery's to work, because I was told he was a particular man, and that I should be like a negro there. No man has stood more to his work than I have done; every body, that knows me is surprized that such a thing should have happened.

GUILTY , aged 33.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100221-16

164. DONALD FORSYTH was indicted for feloniously breaking, and entering the dwelling house of John Gould , the said John Gould and others of the family then and there being, about the hour of eleven of the forenoon, on the first of February , and stealing therein, six gold rings, value 2 l. 2 s. his property .

JOHN GOULD . I am a silversmith and jeweller , 118, Fleet-street . On the first of February, about eleven o'clock in the forenoon, my shop window was broken, and the rings were taken away; I did not know it till the prisoner was taken.

THOMAS SMITH . I am an officer of St. Dunstan's. On the first of February, about eleven o'clock in the forenoon, I was sent for to Mrs. Pettit's, a haberdasher; she said, she saw the prisoner cutting her shop window, with two more boys with him; she ran out of the shop and took the prisoner and another boy, the other ran away. I searched the prisoner and found six gold rings upon him and this knife, that he said he cut the window with.

Q. Did the prisoner say, that he cut the window - A. Yes, the boy said he cut the window with this knife.

Q. Was any thing said to induce him to say this -

A. I asked him, what the use of this knife was; he said, it was what they cut the window with.

Q. Did you see the window cut at Mr. Gould's - A. Yes, a small bit was cut out, a child might get his hand in.

Q. (to Mr. Gould.) This window of yours, when had you seen it whole - A. It was cut on the over night, but not broken; it was as sound as the other part, I had it fastened with putty. They came the next morning, and forced another part out.

Q. Do you mean to say, that the window was whole - A. It was whole, though it was cut on the overnight.

Q. How large was the hole - A. About two inches square; and the tray where the rings were for shew, came against the edge of the window.

Q. Are you sure they were taken out that day - A. I am certain they were taken out that day, I had not missed them above a quarter of an hour. I had sent for a glazier, and they were bringing the boy by before the glazier could put the square in.

Q. Whose shop was this that he was endeavouring to break open - A. Mrs. Pettits, No. 150.

Q. You had not observed him before your shop, had you - A. I did not take notice.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100221-17

165. JOHN DAVIS was indicted for feloniously making an assault, in the King's highway, upon John Isbister , on the 6th of February , putting him in fear, and feloniously taking from his person, and against his will, a gold watch chain, value 2 l. a gold watch key, value 5 s. and a gold seal, value 2 l. his property .

JOHN ISBISTER . Q. You live in Bloomsbury-square - A. I do, I keep a house there, I am a merchant .

Q. Were you returning home from dining with some friends on the day laid in the indictment - A. Yes, between ten and eleven o'clock at night.

Q. Where had you been dining - A. At the Virginia Coffee-house, Cornhill. I had drank rather more wine than I usually take. Between Holborn-hill and Middle-row, near Middle-row, the prisoner addressed himself to me; he said, that he had got boots to sell to gentlemen, he could supply gentlemen with superior boots much under the usual prices. I said, if he was a good workman and would give me his address, I would call and look at them; he mentioned something about Tottenham-court-road; I do not think that he mentioned any street or place; he continued walking by the side of me towards my own house, and going through a passage, I think it is called Red Lion-passage, leading into Red Lion-square; he said something about the particular mode of cutting boots at the present time, and proposed to call at a coffee-house that is in the passage, to have something to drink. I do not recollect what particular we had to drink, nor do I recollect that I went into the house, but I went near the bar. We left there, and proceeded up Red Lion-square and up King-street, until we came near the end of Bloomsbury-place , where I found the prisoner's hand attempting to get into my pocket; his hand was partly in.

Court. What pocket was it - A. My right hand breeches pocket. Having discovered his intention, I resolved to be more watchful of him; it made me more collected. I then, opposite the end of Bloomsbury-place, crossed the way and bid him good night, expecting by that means to get rid of him; he crossed over after me, and not wishing that he should follow me up to my own door, seeing what sort of a character he was, I went up Southampton-row, and then along the south side of Russell-square, till I came to the end of Bedford-place; I there told him I could say nothing more to him upon the subject of boots and shoes, bid him good night, to go home; I turned down Bedford-place towards Bloomsbury-square; he still kept importuning me about the boots and shoes till I came to the end of Bedford-place, next Bloomsbury-square, near to my own house; I turned round to him and desired him to go away. I looked over my shoulder to see if I could see a watchman.

Mr. Knapp. By this time perhaps you got quite sober - A. Yes, at that instant I was collected; he made a dash at me, got hold of the seal and chain, and snatched it away; he did it with considerable force, he broke the seal and chain off, the ring gave way, I thought he had got watch and all at first. I called out watch, and followed him, he ran towards Russell-street; I collared him at No. 21, he collared me, a scuffle ensued, I never lost sight of him, he never was above four yards from me; I threw him down, I saw the seal and chain in his hand, and finding himself overpowered he resigned it up, and wished to get away; I laid hold of his hand and took the seal and chain out. The watchman came up at that instant, and he was secured.

Mr. Alley. When he snatched the watch, did not you both fall down together - A. No, I threw him down.

Q. It was very frosty weather at that time - A. No it was very wet.

Q. I wish to know whether you can undertake to say it was not an accidental occurrence of him endeavouring to snatch it from you, to save himself from falling - A. No, it was quite the contrary; he continued wrestling with me when he was down, he was undermost.

Q. Did not he charge the watchman with you - A. No, I did not hear him.

- BAXTER. I am the watch-house keeper. I produce the seal, key and chain; it was given to me by this gentleman at the time the prisoner was brought.

JOHN HOLLY . At that time I kept the Three Cups in Bedford-street; the prisoner and the prosecutor came into my house together, each of them had a glass of gin at the bar. I knew the man at the bar, I believe I saw him about three years ago.

Prosecutor. It is my chain, seal and key.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 28;

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100221-18

166. ELIZABETH LICKSTEAD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of February , 30 yards of flannel, value 20 s. the property of Charles Bell and Richard Bell , privately in their shop .

WILLIAM PERCIVAL . I am shopman to Richard Bell and Charles Bell , 39, Oxford-street, in the parish of Marybone . On the 17th of February, about two o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner came in and purchased a small quantity of print; she paid for it; she went away and took the print with her. On being informed by a lady that a woman was going up the street with a piece of flannel in her arms, I immediately pursued the prisoner, I came up with her about four hundred yards distance,

she had hid herself in a court, she had the flannel with her, I apprehended her and took the flannel from her. I gave the flannel to one of our people, they mixed it with the others, it was impossible for me to pick it out; I knew it to be my employer's property, it had our private mark on it, I kept it in my possession till I went to Marlborough-street; I then identified it, and then I gave it to the boy; he put it among other flannels. I had seen it half an hour before it was taken away; I am certain it was our flannel, it had our private mark which I had made myself; it was placed about eight feet from our door; there are twelve pieces of flannel placed at the end of the counter. At the time the prisoner took the flannel, there were no other customers in the shop besides three or four young men that belong to the shop and me. At the time that I took the flannel from the prisoner, she was in the utmost distress of mind; she has a husband and four children. I am confident in my own mind, that nothing but the utmost distress could have drove her to it.

Q. Are any of these young men here that were in the shop with you. - A. No, I am the only witness in this case, I value the flannel at twenty shillings.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

GUILTY, aged 30,

Of stealing, but not privately in the shop .

Fined 1 s. and confined one month in Newgate .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18100221-19

167. JAMES MORLEY was indicted for feloniously making an assault upon James Bagley , on the 7th of February , in the King's highway, putting him in fear, and feloniously taking from his person and against his will a watch, value 5 l. his property .

JAMES BAGLEY . Q. Did you lose your watch on the 7th of February last - A. I did, in Strand-lane , between four and five o'clock in the afternoon; I was going to my lodgings, the Clements Inn tap-house.

Q. Tell us what happened to you - A. A soldier knocked me down and took the watch out of my pocket. I was walking on at the time. I was a little in liquor, and as soon as I could get up I made a noise about losing my watch, and some of the people in the neighbourhood pursued him.

Q. Did you see the soldier before he knocked you down, or did he take you by surprise - A. He took and led me by the arm into this by-place, as I suppose; I do not know how long he was with me.

Q. Then I should think you were a good deal in liquor - A. I was not so much in liquor but I knew I was knocked down and my watch was taken from me, I was pretty well in liquor; I felt my watch as I was going into Strand-lane. I am sure of it.

Q. Did he take the watch from you as soon as he had knocked you down - A. He did.

Q. Had you observed his person sufficiently so as to know him again - A. All I can say he had a soldier's dress on, and he had a great coat over his red clothes.

Q. Has your watch been got again - A. Yes, the same evening.

ISAAC COOMBE . I am a lamp-lighter. On Wednesday in the afternoon about a quarter before five, I was crossing down Strand-lane, I saw the prisoner leading the prosecutor. I passed him about thirty yards. I heard the cry of stop-thief. I ran up the lane again. I saw the prosecutor lying on the ground; I picked him up, and he being intoxicated in liquor, I put him against a house. He said he was robbed of his watch; the soldier was gone. I pursued the soldier across the Strand into Windsor-court; when I came there he had been down stairs, and came up again into the passage of the house, No. 6, Windsor-court.

Q. While you were pursuing him, was he out of your sight at all - A. He was; I am certain he is the same man, I took notice of him as he was leading the man down the lane. The officer searched him; he found nothing; another officer came, he told him that he had secreted the watch in the dust-hole, he went and got it. I went down stairs and saw the watch found; the prisoner was taken to Bow-street.

JOHN LIMBRICK . I am one of the Bow-street patroles. I was sent for. I went to Windsor-court. I re-searched the prisoner, he shewed me where the watch was in a dust-hole, at No. 6, Windsor-court. I have had the watch in my custody ever since.

- DAVIS. I am a chimney-sweeper, I live in Strand-lane. I saw the soldier rise from the prosecutor as he was lying down, out of my window, it is right fronting where he got up from him.

Q. Had the prisoner got any thing with him. - A. Not as I saw. When I saw him rise he ran away and I ran after him, by a woman saying he had robbed him of his watch. I seized him as he was coming out of No. 6, Windsor-court. I held him until Read the officer came up; I then gave him into the charge of Read. I charged him with stealing the watch, he denied it, the officer searched him and found nothing.

Q. How came you afterwards to find the watch. - A. Some person or other said, you had better tell and you shall go about your business. He took Limbrick the officer, and shewed him where the watch was.

Jury. He did not acknowledge that he knocked the man down. - A. No.

WILLIAM READ . I am a patrol belonging to Bow-street.

Q. Were you there before Limbrick. - A. Yes, I was informed by Davis, that a man was knocked down, and his watch was taken away; Davis had got him in custody; I searched him and found nothing; about a minute afterwards he owned where it was to Limbrick; he went to the dust hole, and raked the watch out with his hands.

The property produced and identified.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, called five witnesses who gave him a good character.

GUILTY, aged 20,

Of stealing, but not violently from the person .

Fined 1 s. and confined six Months in the House of Correction .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18100221-20

168. ROBERT LEWIS was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Peter Carrol about the hour of twelve at night on the 25th of November , and stealing therein two sheets, value 10 s. a great coat, value 30 s. and a candlestick, value 9 d. the property of Peter Carrol .

MARGARET CARROL . I am the wife of Peter Carrol . I live at No. 1, Scott's-yard, White-Cross-street, St. Luke's . I keep a lodging-house there. On the 26th of November there was a row in the street. One of my lodgers happened to be out in the street

about twelve o'clock at night; they began to fight, the lodger came in, and after that three or four watchmen came; they broke open my door, and followed my lodger up stairs. The name of my lodger that ran up stairs is Thomas Maine ; they took him away, and two other lodgers with him. About half an hour after they had taken them to the watchhouse, the prisoner came back into the room where me and my child was sitting; he took the candle and candlestick off the table. I asked him where he was going with it. He twirled round with a stick that he had in his hand, and said that if I said a word he would knock off my bloody head. The prisoner went out of my room with the candle. I thought I heard a noise as if he was going up and down stairs, but I heard nothing more of him.

Q. Was there any thing taken out of your house that night - A. A great coat and a pair of sheets. I did not miss them till next morning; they were in the room where the men broke in up stairs, in the lodger's room.

Q. Then the watchmen had been in that room - A. Yes, and a great mob of people after the watchmen went into that room.

Q. How lately had you seen these things before this happened - A. On the day before this happened.

Q. Did you ever see the things again - A. No, only the candlestick.

EDWARD KING . I am an headborough of St. Luke's. I searched the prisoner's lodgings on the 22d of January; the prisoner's wife was in the room. I found the candlestick there; the prosecutrix took it off the mantlepiece, and said it was her property. The prisoner was down at Greenwich at that time. The prisoner came to town, and gave himself up to go before the magistrate. I told him I had been to his lodging and found the candlestick; he said he had heard of it before.

The candlestick produced and identified.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence.

JOSEPH LOCKWOOD . I am a watchman of St. Luke's parish. Lewis the prisoner came and informed me that he had found a candlestick; he desired me to make enquiries about the parish if any one had lost it. I made enquiries for that day and a week afterwards at different times by his desire.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18100221-21

169. CATHERINE BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of January , four pieces of galloon, value 20 s. the property of James Etches , privately in his shop .

LOUISA BARRETT . Q. Do you live with Mr. James Etches - A. Yes; he is an haberdasher , 286, Holborn, in the parish of St. Andrew's . On the 25th of January last between two and three o'clock the prisoner came into the shop, and asked for some galloon; she bought two yards, I was measuring the third yard, and then I missed a piece of galloon out of the drawer on the counter; I removed the drawer and saw that she had three pieces in her hand concealed under her handkerchief.

Q. Were they part of what she had been buying - A. No; they were not like what she had been buying.

Q. Had your back been turned at all after the drawer had been put on the counter - A. No; when I took the pieces out of her hand I asked her what she mean't with taking the pieces out of the drawer; she immediately begged my pardon, I severely reprimanded her and sent another young lady to call Mr. Etches. Mr. Etches came and sent for a constable and she was taken into custody.

Q. If your back was never turned what opportunity had she of taking them out of the drawer - A. While I was measuring the last yard of ribbon that she was purchasing. I kept the pieces of galloon till I delivered them to Hutchins the constable; they had Mr. Etches private mark on them.

Q. Had you known the prisoner before - A. I have seen her in the shop before.

JAMES ETCHES . Q. Look at these galloons; have they your private mark upon them - A. Yes; they were made by myself.

Q. Did any thing particular pass when you came into the shop - A. Miss Barrett told me that the prisoner had taken three pieces of galloon out of the drawer; I immediately called the servant maid and sent for a constable; Mr. Hutchins came over, I gave her into his charge.

Q. Then the prisoner did not say that she took them for the purpose of buying them - A. No, after the prisoner was gone, a lady in the shop picked up this piece of galloon where she stood.

Q. What is the value of the three other pieces of galloon - A. They cost me fifteen shillings.

HENRY HUTCHINS . I am a constable; I took charge of the prisoner; I received of Louisa Barrett these three pieces of galloon, and when I came to Hatton Garden, I delivered them to Hancock.

JAMES HANCOCK . I have had these three pieces in my own possession ever since Hutchins gave them me.

Q. (to Louisa Barrett ) Did you see her take the things - A. I did not.

Q. Were there any of your own people in the shop besides. - A. There was one other person in the shop, she is not here; it was merely from my missing them out of the drawer that I suspected the prisoner.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 43.

The prisoner was recommended to his Majesty's mercy by the jury, on account of the other person being in the shop at the time; and not being present in court, to satisfy them whether she saw it taken .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bayley.

Reference Number: t18100221-22

170. NEEDLER CHAMBERLAIN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 26th of January , a sapphire broach, value 20 l. and a diamond ring, value 10 l. the property of David Davis , in his dwelling-house

DENNIS DAVIS . Q. Did the prisoner ever come to your shop - A. Yes. On Wednesday, the 24th of January, he came to look at some diamond rings and other diamond articles; he looked at a pair of diamond earrings at six guineas; he said, he would take them with

him; I declined, not knowing him. He looked out things to the amount of about 250 l. He said, he would call the next day, my uncle not being in the way; he went away, he told me that his name was Harvey, of Wimpole-street. He came again on Friday, and looked over some articles, my uncle was present at that time; he said, he wished we would get him a diamond necklace to the value of about two hundred and fifty pounds; my uncle said, he would do that. He desired my uncle to wait upon him, in Wimpole-street, on the Monday. He said he would take a ring and a broach with him as part of the articles, and if he did not keep them we would not feel ourselves hurt, and he would let us know on the Monday if he meant to keep them. He was to give forty pounds for the broach and ring if he kept them.

Q. Did he agree for the other articles - A. Yes: there was a diamond watch and chain for one hundred guineas, a diamond ring at eight guineas and a half, and several other articles that I cannot recollect. I think the amount altogether, including the broach and ring, is two hundred and fifty pounds. We were to send these things on Monday next, between the hours of eleven and two, to No. 11, Wimpole-street, and to deliver them to himself, Mr. Harvey, he said his name was. He went away with the broach and ring.

Q. Did you go on the Monday - A. No; my uncle went. I went and made enquiries on the Saturday at the house, if Mr. Harvey lived there; a woman servant informed me, No; they did not know such a person; Dr. Heath kept the house.

DAVID DAVIS . On Tuesday, the 23d, there was a sale at Mr. Phillips's, in Bond-street; it consisted of plate, diamonds, watches, and various jewellery; which sale I attended. Mr. Chamberlain was at the sale, I never saw him before, he stood the next person to me. A Mrs. Williams, of Wimpole-street, said to me, Mr. Davis, have you got one of your cards in your pocket, I presented her with one, and Mr. Chamberlain said, I will thank you for one of your cards; I gave him one. He then informed me, that he was partial to diamonds, and a great buyer of them, and that he should be a good customer, and he should come to my house on the next day. On Friday he came to my shop, some things were shewn to him which he had looked out, and the price agreed for two hundred and fifty pounds odd, and two hundred pounds before. After that Mr. Chamberlain told me, if I would come on Monday to No. 11, Wimpole-street, he would pay me for these: I was to bring the articles myself. He said his name was Harvey. I shewed him a diamond ring and a sapphire broach, set round with diamonds, he liked them very much; he said, Mr. Davis, I will not buy these, but on Monday I will determine whether I will keep them or not, but do not feel yourself hurt if I do not purchase them. Twenty-six pounds was to be the price of the sapphire broach, and fourteen pounds for the ring, if he had paid for them. He then said, Mr. Davis, you will permit me to put these in my pocket till Monday when you come; I said, certainly, and I presented them to him. He did not say that he would pay me for them, only that on Monday he would determine. Mr. Chamberlain went then away, and had possession of the broach and ring. On the Monday, I went to No. 11, Wimpole-street, according to his appointment; I found that no such person lived there. I then returned to Mr. Phillips's, Bond-street, as Mr. Chamberlain purchased some things there on the day I was at the sale, to see what address he left; he had left there, Mr. Harvey, No. 12, Wimpole-street.

JOSEPH BALLAD . I live at Mr. Barker's, pawnbroker, Princes-street, Soho. On Friday, the 20th of January, I received in pledge of the prisoner, a diamond ring and a sapphire broach for twenty pounds. I am positive he is the person; he gave me the name of Smith, Wimpole-street.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I feel the greatest contrition for my offence that I stand here committed. I was reduced from the sphere of life from which I was removed by this, and necessity compelled me to act contrary to what was my inclination. I had no resource left but that, and I was compelled to act contrary to the dictates of my heart. I throw myself on the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY, aged 28,

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling-house .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18100221-23

171. HENRY CHAMBERS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of January , a handkerchief, value 2 s. the property of James Etches from his person .

JAMES ETCHES . I live in Holborn ; on the 25th of January last, I was shewing a servant boy how to shut up the shutters, between the hours of nine and ten in the evening, I felt something pull at my pocket, I turned myself round, put my hand in my pocket, and found my silk hankerchief was gone. I looked about, I saw this youth, and another boy about ten or twelve yards distance; the prisoner looked back and threw the hankerchief from him; I immediately took the hankerchief up, followed the prisoner, seized him, and brought him back. This is the handkerchief; I have had it ever since; it has no mark on it; it corresponds, in appearance, with the handkerchief I lost.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going down Holborn about half past nine o'clock; some young man ran against me, the prosecutor picked up something, I could not tell what it was, he immediately challenged me with picking his pocket.

The prisoner called two witnesses who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18100221-24

172. DAVID JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 10th of January , a pair of leather breeches, value 40 s. the property of Zachariah Thomas , in his dwelling house .

ZACHARIAH THOMAS . I live at No. 2, Ryder's-court, St. Ann's, Westminster : I am a breeches maker . On the 10th of January, about seven in the evening, the prisoner came into my shop, and enquired for Mr. Marshall a breeches maker; and while I was telling him where he might be found, another person, not in custody, rushed into the shop and stole a pair of leather breeches that were hung on a rail in the shop window; I heard a noise, the buttons of the knees hit against the cutting board, as I supposed; I looked round, the prisoner was in the shop, he said nothing at the time. I did not see the person that took the breeches away; the prisoner prevented me from seeing him.

Q. Then all you know is the breeches were gone. - A. Yes; Charlotte Valentine called out, Mr. Thomas, you

are robbed; I got up and went to the door, the thief was gone out of sight; the prisoner was following him; I laid hold of the prisoner; I said, I would detain him as an accomplice; when I brought him into the shop, I asked him what he wanted with Mr. Marshall; he said, he had a message for him from one Murray; I told him I would send for Mr. Marshall; if he could give a good account of him, I would let him go; he then said, he knew nothing of Mr. Marshall. I sent for a constable, and in conveying him to the watchhouse, the constable and I were knocked down twice, and the prisoner tried to get away.

Q. Then you saw him do nothing at all in the shop, did you. - A. No.

CHARLOTTE VALENTINE . As I was going through Ryder's-court, I saw the prisoner in Mr. Thomas's shop, and two lads were standing at the door, one of them went in and took a pair of breeches out of the window; I immediately told Mr. Thomas of it.

Q. Did you see the prisoner do any thing. - A. No, I did not.

Q. Nor you did not see the prisoner in company with these lads, did you - A. No, I did not.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18100221-25

173. WILLIAM WARNER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of January a watch value 40 s., the property of Rosetta Knight , widow , in her dwelling-house .

ROSETTA KNIGHT . I live at No. 15, Drury-lane, St. Giles's ; I am a widow.

Q. Were you at home on the twelth of January - A. Yes, I was when the prisoner came into my front parlour, and my watch was hanging up under my mantle-piece. I saw it there while the prisoner was in the room, he lodged in my house about four months, paid me three months, and left me one month in debt; that was about a year and a half ago.

Q. Did you see the prisoner come in - A. Yes, he said, how do you do, old woman? I owe you a little money, I am come to settle with you. He asked me what it was, I said fourteen shillings. He said he would call and pay me on the next Wednesday, this was on a Friday; then he asked me how a gentleman in my house did up stairs. I said, very poorly, go up and see him He did, he came down into my room again. I saw him take a Jew's harp that my child played with; he said, good bye, took hold of my hand, and went, out of the room, saying he would call and pay me next Thursday. I turned my head to see what o'clock it was to put on my tea-kettle, the watch was gone, that was the very minute he was gone. I went to the street door directly to see which way he had gone, I could not see him. I made enquiries; the watch I found at Mr. Lane's, about an hour and a half afterwards.

WILLIAM FORREST . I am a pawnbroker, I live at Mr. Lane's. On the 12th of January, between three and four o'clock, the prisoner came and pledged a watch for fifteen shillings, the watch has been in my possession ever since. I am sure he is the person who pledged it.

Q. Can you give me the value of the watch - A. Yes, it is worth about twenty shillings.

CHARLES HUMPHRIES . I am one of the Officers of Bow-street. I apprehended the prisoner. I told him to keep his hands out of his pockets. I took the duplicate of the watch out of his hand, the Jew's harp I found in his pocket. I apprehended him the same evening about six o'clock.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming from the city, and passing by Mrs. Knight's door, she asked me to come in, and after I had been in her room some time, she asked me if I had any money to get her some gin. She desired me to pawn the watch and bring in a pint of gin. I went and pawned the watch. After I came out of there, I met a friend, and spent fifteen pence of Mrs. Knight's money. Not being willing to go back to Mrs. Knight's, I went to my lodgings to make the money up, and before I could get back again, an Officer came and took me at a Bookseller's in Piccadilly. Mrs. Knight knew that I had the Jew's harp likewise.

Q. to Mrs. Knight. Upon the oath that you have taken, did you give him the watch, and desire him to pledge it - A. I never did, nor did I see him take it down; not a word was said about gin.

Q. to Humphries. Did he say that he had the watch to pledge for Mrs. Knight - A. No, I charged him with taking the watch, he denied it.

GUILTY, aged 30,

Of stealing to the value of twenty shillings .

Confined one month in Newgate , and whipped in jail .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18100221-26

174. BARNET LEVI was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of January , sixteen crown pieces, two dollars, value 9 s. three rupees, value 6 s. a quarter dollar, value 1 s. a cap, value 7 s. four yards of lace, value 1 l. 14 s. two table spoons, value 2 l. two yards and a half of muslin, value 10 s. and 1 l. 13 s. in monies numbered , the property of Joseph Woodroffe .

MARY WOODROFFE . Q. You are the wife of Joseph Woodroffe - A. Yes, we live at Old Ford . On the 25th of January the prisoner called at our house, he had got a broach of mine to mend.

Q. What is he - A. A Jew, a goldsmith , I believe. I have known him this five or six months, he was in the habit of visiting our house when we kept a public house, I have bought several things of him. The prisoner called at our house about eleven o'clock in the forenoon. Mr. Woodroffe was arrested for one hundred pounds, and the people were all in confusion, expecting to be seized upon for ground rent. I put my plate in a trunk, and locked it up. Mr. Levi came in, and asked what I was crying for. I told him that my husband was arrested. He asked me whether I had any private property that I wished to take care of. I told him I had none, except a small trunk. He said he would take it with him for me; he said, seal it with a guinea. I wished to seal it with my husband's watch seal; he said, no, seal it with a guinea; I said, I could not seal it with a guinea, I had not got one; he put his hands in his pocket, and pulled out a guinea, and he sealed it with a guinea; that is all I know. When the trunk came home, the seal was not in the same place, and there were sixteen crown pieces taken out of the trunk.

Q. Tell me what was in the trunk. - A. Eight silver table spoons, and a milk pot, two pair of silver sugar tongs, two pair of salt spoons, a bundle of muslin and lace, six babie's caps, two muslin gowns; and a sarsnett pellise, and some babie's bed gowns, sixteen crowns were in a small white box, four yards of lace, and two yards

and a half of muslin, and other things that I do not recollect; the box was brought home by my servant girl, on Monday the 29th, about six o'clock in the evening; when she brought home the box, the seal was broken, and it was not sealed in the same place.

Q. What was missing from the box when it was brought home. - A. Two yards and a half of muslin, four yards of lace, sixteen crown pieces, two old dollars and about one pound fifteen shillings in other monies; a pair of table spoons were changed, and a child's cap, these things were missing from the box; he desired me to send the servant for the things; I did.

Mr. Gurney. With your servant you sent a written order from your husband to give up the box. - A. I did; this is the written order, when the servant went for the box, she told Mr. Levi, that the seal was not in the same place; she saw it sealed.

Q. Now Mrs. Woodroffe, where was the seal placed - A. On one of the corners, I cannot say which, and when it was brought back, it was sealed almost in the middle.

Q. What was the value of all the things in the trunk. - A, About forty or fifty pounds.

JOSEPH WOODROOFFE . Q. On the Wednesday you went to Levi's house. - A. I did; I went again on the Friday, I then saw Mr. Levi, I then told him that there was something deficient in the trunk. - A. I did; he told me that if it was so, it was not owing to him, and if I had any questions to ask him, he was willing to go before the magistrate, he walked to the Mansion-House with me.

HENRIETTA MARTIN . - Q. You are servant to Mr. Woodroffe, are you. - A. Yes; I have lived with him three months.

Q. On the 25th of January, about ten o'clock in the morning Mr. Levi came in.

Q. Where was your master. - A. He was in trouble; he was arrested on that day. On that day Mr. Levi came to our house, and seeing my mistress in trouble, she gave him this box; I saw what was put in, it was corded, and sealed at the left hand of the lock with a guinea. I fetched the box on the 29th of January from his house, his wife delivered it to me; she said, you see it is corded and sealed; I said, yes, but not where it was when it went from our house; she made me no answer. I took the box and came away.

Q. How far is your house from the prisoner's house. - A. We live in Old Ford, and he lives in Ebenezer-square, by Houndsditch. I came home with the box in the Bow stage, and when I brought it home my mistress opened the box perceiving the seal being moved.

Q. Who spoke first of the seal being moved. - A. That I cannot say, she opened it herself, and found several things missing.

Q. What time of day was it you went from Levi's house. - A. I suppose about four o'clock; I came home by the five o'clock stage, I stopped at the biscuit shop till the stage came in.

Q. Where was the biscuit shop. - A. Adjoining the Black Boy and Camel in Leadenhall-street.

Q. Then you had to wait pretty near an hour, had you. A. I did; Sir, I stopped in the biscuit shop near an hour, I had a shillings worth of biscuit, and waited till the stage came in.

Q. Did you observe the box before it was delivered to you - A. I did.

Q. How came you to take the box away in that state. A. It was sealed, I supposed that the seal might have given way in carrying it, and he had sealed it afresh, and that the cord had slipped; I had no other idea.

Q. You knew this place in Leadenhall-street was no great distance from Levi's house. - A. No; the box was heavy, I could not carry it without resting. I was to go by the four o'clock stage, and when I came there it was gone.

Mr. Gurney. What time did you leave Old Ford. - A. It might be a few minutes before two, or a few minutes after. I walked to town from Old Ford, it could not be above half past three when I came to Mr. Levi's; it was only half past four when I got to Leadenhall-street.

Q. Might not you have walked from Levi's house to Leadenhall-street in five minutes. - A. No; the box was heavy, I was obliged to stop at every door; I dare say it took me half an hour.

Q. When you went home with the box, your master and mistress said, the seal was not in the right place. - A. Yes.

Q. So then you must understand, that if that took place, and any thing was taken out, it must be either Levi or you. - A. I had no keys with me; I did not think any thing about it till it was opened.

Q. Then when it was opened, and the things were missing, did not you think that one of you should be laid in fault for it. - A. Certainly.

Q. When the trunk was delivered to you, did you say one single word about the seal being in the wrong place. - A. I did, and that I stand to, were I going out of the world now.

Court. Does Levi live at the end of Houndsditch. - A. No; you go up Gravel-lane to his house, and the Black Boy and Camel; is by the India-house.

Q. The stage must have passed the end of Houndsditch if you came away from Levi's house at half past three, the stage must have passed you. - A. You cannot get a place first always, without you take it first.

DANIEL LEADBETTER . I am a masshalman: on the 5th of this month Levi came to the Mansion-house, not in custody as I understood; the box I received at the Mansion-house.

Q. to Mrs. Woodroffe. Is that box your property. - A. Yes.

HENRY HARRIS . I am a watch-maker; I live in Ebenezer Square, Gravel-lane, Houndsditch. On 29th of January, Mrs. Levi sent for me to read a letter, that the servant brought, that came for this trunk; I told her, I could not read; before the trunk was delivered, Mrs. Levi desired the young woman to look and see the trunk was right; the girl looked at the lock and seal, and said, it is all right; then she had the trunk, and took it away.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel, called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100221-27

175. AMELIA BELLARS was indicted, for that she on the 13th of January , feloniously, knowingly, and without lawful excuse, had divers forged and counterfeit bank notes in her possession; to wit, one forged and counterfeit Bank note, No. 31m316, for the payment of one pound; one other forged and counterfeit Bank-note.

No. 14m612, for the payment of one pound, with intention to defraud the governor and company of the bank of England , she well knowing the said bank notes to be forged and counterfeited ; - and

ANOTHER COUNT for having other forged and counterfeit bank notes with the same intention.

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY .

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100221-28

176. THOMAS COX and BARNET KEELING were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 5th of February , a carpet, value 8 l. the property of Benjamin Merryman Nias .

BENJAMIN MERRYMAN NIAS . I am a carpet dealer . I live in Charles-street, Middlesex Hospital. On the 5th of February I sent this carpet in a cart with my man; he was to take it to one of the inns in Bishopgate-street, to be conveyed to Mr. Fedders, at a village near Croydon.

CHARLES WRIGHT . I am porter to Mr. Nias. On Monday the 5th of February, I was sent out with the horse and cart, and two trusses to Bishopsgate-street, and to call at Mr. Allen's in Size-lane with a message; I left my cart in Bow-lane about seven o'clock in the evening; there was a town cart in the way; I could not get past, I spoke to the carman, I asked the carman if he was going on, he said, no; I said, will this cart and horse be in your way while I go to Size-lane with a message; he said, no. I went and delivered the message, and when I returned to the horse and cart the small truss was gone; I spoke to the man with the cart, he said he knew nothing of it; I got up into the cart and saw it was not there; I went with my cart to Bishopgate street and delivered my other truss. I never saw either of the prisoners to my knowledge.

CHARLES EMBERY . I am an officer of Bishopsgate. As the bell struck eight on the 5th of February, in the evening, Haslam the witness went into the Ben Johnson to take a glass of liquor; I was in company with him at the time; as we came out of the door a coach drew up to the window; the prisoner Keeling and another got out of the coach and left the prisoner Cox in the coach; I stepped up to the coach and got upon the step; the prisoner Cox shoved the carpet up against me, knocked me off the step, and got out of the other door of the coach; Haslam immediately followed him, and I carried the carpet into the Ben Johnson ; Keeling made his escape and was not taken till the next day: Haslam took Cox. This is the carpet. I knew Keeling before, I am certain he is the same man, and I am certain of Cox.

JAMES HASLAM . I was in company with Embery. I was going to my club. I went in and had a glass of gin and came out again; this coach stopped at the door; two men came out of the coach; Cox stood stagnated in the coach; he shoved the carpet at Embery, opened the off side of the coach door, jumped out, and ran towards Aldgate church; he found that I was pursuing him close, he gave me a dodge, then he ran towards Bishopgate church; Thrubshall and I laid hold of him in Houndsditch, by the worm-makers, towards Bishopgate church; we took him to the Ben Johnson 's Head and searched him; we found no property on him.

Q. Are you sure that he is the same person that jumped out of the coach - A. I never had my eyes off him; I am certain he is the same person.

JEREMIAH THRUBSALL . I am an officer. On Monday evening, the 5th of February, I was going on duty by the East India company's warehouse; a coach stopped at the Ben Johnson , I heard the word of stop thief, I saw the man. I and Haslam catched hold of him. I went to the Gould House and there I apprehended the other prisoner. Mr. Embery said he was the person.

Cox's Defence. Please you, my lord, as I was coming along Barbican I met two men; they asked me if I would carry this parcel for them, they would give me eighteen pence; I carried it to Aldersgate-street; I found it too heavy for me; they said if I would go with it they would take a coach; I went with the coach. They stopped at the Ben Johnson ; the two men ran away, and as I had some suspicion of it being stolen property, I chucked the carpet down and jumped outside of the coach.

Keeling left his defence to his counsel, and called no witnesses to character.

Cox called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

COX - GUILTY , aged 16.

KEELING - GUILTY , aged 11.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100221-29

177. THOMAS TURNER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 1st of February , a cask, value 5 s. and five gallons of brandy, value 6 l. the property of Sir Robert Burnett , knt. Robert Burnett , junior , Charles Fassett Burnett , and John Fassett Burnett .

GEORGE WHICHER . I am carman to Sir Robert Burnett , Robert Burnett , junior, Charles Fassett Burnett , and John Fassett Burnett; these gentlemen are distiller s at Vauxhall.

Q. When did this happen - A. On the 1st of February, about six o'clock in the evening, I was going to the Swan inn, Holborn-hill.

Q. What had you in the cart - A. I had twenty-four casks of different sizes in the waggon, all containing spirits and vinegar. I missed the cask in Fleet-market ; it must be taken out going along. I only stopped just coming down the bridge, which we must do when we are heavy loaded to unchain the wheel; the cask I missed contained five gallons of brandy. It was afterwards found.

THOMAS BRANSCOMB . I am an officer. On the 1st of February, between the hours of six and seven in the evening, I was standing, in company with Eldridge. under a gateway going into Union-court, Holborn-hill; the prisoner passed us with a cask on his shoulder; we followed him a little way up the court and asked him what he had got; he said he had a cask of vinegar, he brought it from the Borough, he was going to take it to Tottenham-court-road to his master; we told him he was going the wrong direction to Tottenham-court-road, we must look at it; I took the cask off his shoulder and Eldridge took hold of him; I looked upon the head of the cask and found there was a permit on it; I then said he must go along with us, I was sure he had not come by it honestly; I took it into a public house in Fleet market, and found it contained brandy; we took him to the Poultry compter, I found out by the permit that it belonged to Messrs. Burnett and Co; I went to them the next morning. The cask is here.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming from Westminster

bridge, and when I came to the foot of Blackfriars bridge there was a person said he would give me two shillings to carry it to Charles-street, Hatton Garden; I never said I was going to Tottenham-court-road.

GUILTY , aged 27.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100221-30

178. WILLIAM BUNNEY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 2nd of February , a cask, value 6 d and forty-nine pound weight of butter, value 2 l. 10 s. the property of Matthew Goodenough and John Hems .

JOHN HEMS . I am a cheesemonger , 9l, Bishopsgate without , Matthew Goodenough is my partner. On Friday evening, I think it was the 2nd of February, between seven and eight, I was in the accompting house, I saw the prisoner standing over a tub of butter, his back was towards me, I saw him take up the tub of butter, put it on his shoulder, and run off with it, I run through the shop as fast as I could; immediately I got to the door I called out stop thief in several directions, he ran down Skinner-street with it.

Q. Did not you follow him - A. No. I turned back for fear another should go.

Q. Are you sure he is the man - A. I did not see the man's face. I have no doubt that he is the man by his back appearance.

THOMAS ELLSMORE . I am a brush maker by trade. I was standing at Mr. Hems's window, I saw this man hoist up a firkin of butter on his shoulder, he immediately crossed the road and ran up Skinner-street; I pursued him; when he found he was closely pursued he threw down the tub of butter; a man knocked him down and stopped him; I did not see him stopped; he was brought back. I am sure the prisoner is the man that had the tub of butter.

Mr. Alley. You are a new witness, you were not before the Lord Mayor - A. No, I was not. I was coming by last night and Mr. Hems asked me if I saw this man.

JOHN WEBB . I am a servant to Mr. Studd, oilman, in Bishopsgate-street. I was coming out of my master's house when Mr. Hems cried out stop thief. I asked Mr. Hems which way the man was gone; Mr. Hems being confused did not tell which way the man was gone, and I being confused, and having a cask stole the night before; I ran up Skinner-street, I saw the man running with something like a trunk on his shoulder, I did not know what it was till I came close to him, then I saw it was a tub, and just as I got to the side of him I heard the tub fall on the road, I turned round and saw the cask rolling from the middle of the road into the kennel; I still kept my eyes on the prisoner and pursued him; he was stopped by two men coming down the street.

Q. Are you sure the prisoner is the man who dropped the tub - A. Yes; because there was no other man near.

Mr. Alley. It is very odd - you say you were confused, and all of you were so confused you took a cask for a trunk - A. When I came to it I found it was a cask.

Q. You lost sight of him - A. Only while I turned my head to look at the cask.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. Please you, my lord, I had been into Red Lion-street, Spitalfields, and after that I came from Union-street into Bishopsgate-street; my wife was with me; she said she would go to buy some things to bring home for tea, she asked me to get the kettle to boil, I said I would; I crossed the way and went on to Skinner-street, which is my nearest way home; when I got four or five hundred yards down Skinner-street I heard the cry of stop thief; I had not gone far before a man rushed by me and ran down Angel-alley, in a few minutes after I was laid hold of, and knocked down; my eye was swelled up with the blow, I thought I should have lost it; I was never in the gentleman's shop nor on the side the shop was, after I came out of Sun-street.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100221-31

179. JOSEPH PERKINS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 25th of January , a quart pewter pot, value 1 s. 10 d. the property of Henry Ellanor ; - a quart pewter pot, value 1 s. 2 d. the property of George Wise ; - and a pint pewter pot, value 1 s. the property of Thomas Holmes .

HENRY ELLANOR . I am a publican ; I keep the Carpenter's Arms, Lambeth . All I know is that I lost a pewter quart pot.

THOMAS HEDGER . I am an officer. On the 25th of January last, in consequence of a robbery, I searched Thomas Wild 's premises in Bridgwater-gardens; he keeps an old iron shop, he is a receiver of stolen goods, I found there a new pint pot secreted; I went over to the person that lost it, and when I returned the prisoner came in with a bag; he said to Wild, I have brought you your bag; Wild wanted him to go away, I stopped him and asked him what he had got in the bag; I searched the bag there were two quart pots concealed in it; I asked him if he had got any more, he said, no; I searched him and found a pint pot in his pocket, I took Perkins and Wild both to the compter; in three days afterwards the owners of the pots came forward and he was committed.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I found the pots in the last arch of London-bridge, in the evening, when it was dark; there was but one in the bag, one in my pocket, and one in my hand; I never offered them to sell, I had no such thought.

GUILTY , aged 50.

Confined One Year in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100221-32

180. FREDERICK MIER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 8th of February , six pounds weight of sugar, value 4 s. the property of Thomas Sumner and William Osborn .

THOMAS SUMNER . My partner's name is William Osborne ; we are sugar refiner s; the sugar house is in Whitechapel .

Q. Do you know that you lost any sugar, and what quantity - A. Yes, I lost from four to six pound; it was unmanufactured sugar.

DENNIS CARLEY . I work for Mr. Sumner and Osborn. We had suspicion of this man. On Thursday I and another was in the sugar-house; we found about eight or nine pound of sugar concealed under a blanket; I shewed it to the other man, and put it there

again. I told my master of it. It was about six o'clock when we saw it; and at half after eight we went there again; it was gone; it was raw sugar. The prisoner was a servant in the sugar-house, like myself.

EDWARD SMITH . I am an officer. I had a search warrant; I searched the prisoner's lodgings on Thursday the 8th of this month; and in a closet up stairs, I found this jar of sugar; after that I went and apprehended the prisoner in the sugar-house. I challenged him with having stolen the sugar; he denied it; I asked him how he could tell such a falsity. When I had got his wife and the sugar in custody, he then begged that he might see his master; he hoped he would forgive him; he only took it for his own use. I weighed it; it was six pounds and three quarters.

PROSECUTOR. This is the kind of sugar that we use, and that we lost; it is unmanufactured sugar.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnesses in character.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Whipped in jail , and discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100221-33

181. CHARLOTTE ADAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of February , five books, value 10 s. the property of John Maynard .

JOHN MAYNARD I am a bookseller ; I live in Panton-street, in the Haymarket . About the 9th of this month, between five and seven in the evening, a pane of glass in my shop window was cut, and part of Knox's Essays were taken out; I missed them in the morning, when I took the shutters down; I made it known to the booksellers in general that I had lost the books. I received information that some were offered at a shop in Drury-lane that corresponded with mine. I went and found that they were mine.

Q. Did you find all that you lost - A. No; I lost twenty-six volumes of Knox's British Essays out of five-and-forty; I signified to the party, that if any body brought the remaining part to stop them; so he did on Friday last.

Q. You do not know who took him - A. No.

WILLIAM REYNOLDS . I am a bookseller. On the 9th or 10th of this month, the prisoner offered me three or four books for sale; I asked whose they were; she said they belonged to a gentleman that was gone abroad; he had mispacked his things, and what few things were left were theirs. I bought the books, and placed them in the window.

Q. What did you give for them - A. Three shillings. Mr. Laycock, a bookseller, came in and informed me, that I had three or four books in my windows that were stolen from a bookseller in Panton-street in the evening. Mr. Maynard came in and brought the books that corresponded with them four books I bought, and the other the prisoner brought on the Friday following. I was not at home. The witness Latham took the book in. I came in soon after; he told me the prisoner had left the book, and was to call in half an hour. I went to Mr. Maynard, and informed him. These are the volumes she brought to me the first time.

Q. Are you sure that is the woman that brought them the first time - A. Yes.

Mr. LATHAM. This day week the prisoner came to our house with an odd volume; Mr. Reynolds and the prosecutor took her to the watch-house.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I had them of my son; he was to pay so much a week for them. I was distressed; I sold them.

GUILTY , aged 42.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100221-34

182. MARY LARKIN and ELIZABETH BARNETT were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 15th of February , twenty-five yards of printed cotton, value 30 s. the property of George Kenning and Alice Kenning .

GEORGE KENNING . Q. Have you any partner - A. Yes; my sister Alice Kenning ; I am a linen-draper , 28, Tothill-street, St. Margaret, Westminster . On the 15th of this month, the two prisoners came into my shop together; they asked to look at some prints. We shewed different patterns to Barnett; the other was standing in the middle of the shop. Barnett bought three yards and a half of printed cotton; she was to give eighteen-pence a yard for it; she had it put by for her, and gave one shilling in part of payment. There was one pattern in particular shewed her she said she would not have it a gift. The prisoner Larkin was looking at some buttons, and asking the price of them; she said she would call the next morning; then they went away together. After they were gone, we missed the same pattern that Barnett said she would not have it a gift.

Q. How soon did you miss it after they were gone - A. About an hour, there were twenty-five yards of it; it was lying on the counter while Barnett was there; she pushed it of one side with her hand. About an hour after they were gone, we wanted that same piece to shew to a customer; then we found it was gone. I have not found the whole twenty-five yards; it was cut in pieces; I can only swear it is exactly the same pattern.

- HARRIS. I am an apprentice to Mr. Hill, pawnbroker. On Thursday evening the prisoner Larkin pawned about seven yards of print for 7 s.

JAMES GIDDMORE . I am an officer; I apprehended both the prisoners on Friday evening last at the Crown public house, Pie-street, Westminster. Larkin and her husband were sitting together; Larkin asked me if I was looking after him; I told him no, I was looking for the woman sitting by the side of him; I did not know it was his wife at the time. Barnett came in; I said here they are both. They both asked me what I wanted with them; I said if they would go to their lodgings, I would tell them; they both lodged in one house, about three doors off. We went to their lodgings. I asked Larkin, if she did not recollect being at a linen-draper's shop the night before in Tothil-street; she said she had never been in any linen-draper's shop in Tothill-street; I then said, yes you were: and you, Barnet, bought a piece of cotton for which you paid a shilling off; and Larkin had pawned it at Mr. Hill's; she said no, she had not; I said I should take her to Mr. Hill's, and if they did not know her, I should give her no further trouble. She then said she pawned a bit of cotton at Mr. Hill's that the other young woman had given her; I searched Larkin's apartment, and found nothing. Larkin lived in the parlour below, and Barnett up stairs over the parlour, and as soon as Barnett got into her room, I saw her catch this piece of cotton

up; she endeavoured to push it under the bed; I told her this was what I wanted, and I should detain them both. I took it from her; I have had it ever since the next morning; I discovered a piece of the same pattern at Graham and Stocks, pawnbrokers in Stratton-ground. The piece of cotton I took from Barnett was about a yard.

JOHN HUGHES . I live with Graham and Stock, Stratton-ground. On Thursday evening, between six and seven yards of cotton were pledged at our shop by Barnett for six shillings.

Prosecutor. I can only say it is the same pattern.

The prisoners said nothing in their defence.

Larking called two witnesses who gave her a good character.

Barnett called one witnesses, who gave her a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18100221-35

183. THOMAS COOPER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 20th of January , one hundred and nineteen newter skins, value 5 l. the property of John Dyster and Daniel Dyster .

JOHN DYSTER . I live in Leadenhall-street , I am a hide and skin broker ; my partner's name is Daniel Dyster . On the 20th of January, about half past four in the afternoon, Kinnersley the officer called at my accompting house to enquire if I employed a man of the name of Cooper; he had stopped him on the 18th of January with some skins; I requested the officer to leave the accompting house and I would send for Cooper; I did, the prisoner came; I asked him how long he had been a dealer in Newtery, that is, skins, from South America, he told me that he never had any; I told him I was informed that he had some in his possession on Thursday, which he denied; I then sent for the officer, he came into the accompting house and challenged him with the fact.

FRANCIS KINNERSLEY . I am an officer. Me and my partner, Forrester, were coming away from Petticoat-lane on Thursday the 18th of January, about seven in the evening; he noticed a man going past us; he said, Kinnersley, that man has got something secreted under his coat; I pursued him and stopped him in Petticoat-lane; I asked him what he had got there, he said some monkeys skins; he bought them in East Smithfield of a jew; my partner came up; I enquired what he was going to do with them, he said, do not you know me, my name is Cooper, I used to watch for you. He was a watchman in our ward. I asked him what he was going to do with these skins, he said he was going to make money of them; I let him go; he being a poor man, and knowing him, I thought what he said was true. After I left him I was rather sorry I had not stopped him and made some further enquiries into it, and on the Saturday following I was going to the watchhouse, I said to a person that recommended him for a watchman that I had met him with some skins; he replied he knew all about it, he had sold two dozen to a jew for twenty-four shillings, and he advised the jew not to buy any more of him, as he worked for a respectable gentleman in Leadenhall-street, and he must have stolen them; I went to Mr. Dyster, and when I was called into the accompting house, I said, Cooper, do not you recollect me stopping you with these skins; yes, he said, I do - how came you by them? he said a jew sent for him at the warehouse down to the waterside to purchase these skins. One of the gentlemen said, how could he tell such a story; he was very much agitated, and then he said he only stole two half dozens. The master then gave me charge of him, I lodged him in the Compter, and then I went to his house in Little Middlesex-street, Petticoat-lane; I went up two pair of stairs, I searched the room and found these skins; there are ten dozen all but one. Some were under the bed.

Prisoner's Defence. I beg for mercy; I have a wife and three children.

Prosecutor. It is impossible for me to swear them to be my property; they are like the skins that we have lost. We missed fifteen dozen.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100221-36

184 JAMES YOUNG was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of January , a violin, value 1 l. 11 s. 6 d. and a case, value 1 s. the property of William Stickwood .

WILLIAM STICKWOOD - Q . When did you lose this violin. - A. I did not miss it till the 8th. I traced it to the pawnbrokers; the prisoner owned that he took it.

Q. Did the prisoner lodge in the house. - A. No, he was a poor man that belonged to the watch-house.

WILLIAM GRAY . The prisoner pledged this violin with me as his own.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100221-37

185. WILLIAM HOW and JAMES LANDER were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Edmund Sinclair , about the hour of three on the night of the 13th of January , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, twenty-seven boots, value 10 l. twenty-eight shoes, value 8 l. fourteen gowns, value 3 l. 17 s. 6 d. thirty-three petticoats, value 4 l. 15 s. twenty-one shirts, value 5 l. 3 s. 6 d. twelve shirts, value 1 l. 16 s. ten frocks, value 21 s. ten aprons, value 16 s. ten pair of sheets, value 8 l. twelve pair stockings, value 18 s. fourteen handkerchiefs, value 14 s. ten caps, value 10 s. seven pockets, value 2 s. 6 d. fourteen handkerchiefs, value 12 s. two curtains, value 2 l. 30 yards of printed cottons, value 3 l. nine yards of callimanco, value 18 s. and 480 halfpence, the property of Daniel Sinclair .

Edmund Sinclair was called, and not appearing in court, his recognizance was ordered to be estreated.

ELIZA SINCLAIR . Q. You are a married woman - A. Yes, my husband's name is Edmund Sinclair . We live at 172, White-Cross-street, St. Luke's .

Q. Was your house broken open at any time - A. Yes, on the night between the 13th and 14th of January.

Q. What time did you go to bed - A. About a quarter before two in the morning, my husband and me went to bed together.

Q. Was the house shut up, and secured when you went to bed - A. Yes, there were three or four excise officers in the house when we went to bed.

Q. Do they sleep there - A. No; there is always one or other of them there all night.

Q. Do you remember your back parlour window - A. Yes; the back parlour window, I fastened myself.

Q. Were you disturbed in the night after you went to bed by any noise - A. Yes, my husband told me of it.

Q. How did you fasten the back parlour window. - A. I fastened the parlour window with Iron bolts, I shut the parlour window myself; the staircase window was bolted inside.

Q. What time was it that you was awoke by your husband, and he said, there was a noise. - A. He awoke me, and said, there was a noise; I said, I dare say it was the excisemen.

Mr. Arabin. Did you hear it. - A. No; my husband heard the noise, I did not, we went to sleep, we were disturbed by Mr. Fox, the exciseman, at six o'clock we got some information that the house was broken open.

Mr. Knapp. Was it dark then. - A. Yes; it was dark, we got up immediately; we found the back door with the pully cut off, and thrown into the yard adjoining, that is White-Lion yard, the cell of the back parlour window, where the shutters slide in, was pulled entirely down; it is a very large window, one of the sashes were open, and the other shut.

Q. Do you know what you lost. - A. We lost a great many things; boots, shoes, and gowns.

Q. You have seen a great quantity of goods that have been produced to you. - A. I believe them to be the same.

Q. Do you know how many boots and shoes you lost. A. I cannot speak to them, my husband can better speak to that.

Mr. Arabin. You did not go to bed till a quarter to two. - A. Yes.

Q. And when you went to bed, there were three or four excisemen up - A. I spoke to one when I went up.

Court. Were they all to stay there all night, or to go away. - A. One stopped so long, and went away, and then another came; they have all a key of the back door.

Q. Could you in the morning perceive how they got in. - A. We thought they got in at the back door; we did not know till we heard the evidence.

Q. Had the excisemen any business to do in the shop. A. No; the shop is fastened, and then we go through a parlour to go where the excisemen are. The excisemen could not go into the shop without breaking the lock; we had the key; no locks were broke. The staircase window comes into the passage. They took the shutters down, and went into the parlour, and then they could go into the shop.

Q. The excisemen could not go into the shop. - A. No; not without they had done as these men had; what I mean is, there is a lock on the door where the excisemen passes. A person getting in at the back parlour window might get into the shop, without breaking the lock, but they could not get into the shop without they got in that way.

Q. Did you yourself lock the door which leads into the back parlour - A. No; I never lock the door myself my husband always locked it; when I got up in the morning, I found that door locked.

OSBORNE KETERINGHAM . Q. You are a watchman. - A. I am.

Q. Were you in January in White-cross street; do you know Mr. Sinclair's house. - A. Yes; it was in my beat.

Q. On the night of Saturday, or rather the morning of Sunday, had you occasion to go by that house. - A. Yes; I remember it very well. On Sunday morning about four o'clock, I found the back door open, I shut it to; the door was often open; there were excisemen lodged in the house.

JOHN ARMSTRONG . Q. You are one of the officers belonging to Worship-street office. - A. I am; in consequence of information, I went to Mr. Sinclair's house on Sunday, between one and two o'clock in the day. I went into the back yard, where there is a parlour that communicates to the shop, and joins it by a door and partition, and under that parlour window, the cell was broken down in crumbs, whether by decay, or by force, I could not say; I saw no marks of instruments; I then was taken into the shop, and saw where the goods were taken from. I came away after that, and on the Monday, I received information, in consequence of that, I and other officers went and apprehended the two prisoners at the Gold-house in Golden-lane, about six or seven o'clock in the evening, on the Monday night they were secured; and on that very night I went in company with Vickery and Bishop to Stanton's house in Providence-place, Bridgewater-gardens, there I found this pair of half boots, a pair of childrens pumps, six clouts, and two habit shirts. That is what I had from there; I took Stanton, and put him in the watchhouse that night. And these are the things that I found at Crutchington's house in Essex-street, on Friday, the 2d of February: here is a pair of sheets, a number of child's skirts, calimanco or stuff, these two silk gowns, a petticoat, a child's frock and a shirt; all these goods were shewed to Mrs. Sinclair.

Court. You produce another parcel. - A. These are a pair of Hessian boots, three pair of shoes and a piece of cotton, they were found at the same time; that is all I found. I went with Cartwright, and searched Wheeler's house, Cartwright has that property.

Court. Q. to Mrs. Sinclair. Look at any part of that property and tell me whether you know it.

Mr. Knapp. This a part found at Crutchinton's.

Mrs. Sinclair. These are very much like my things; I do not see any marks.

Court. Is there any of your work upon it; look at the other things that you are likely to know. - A. There are some child's things. There is no mark on the sheet; that gown is like what I had in my shop; I had such a thing in the shop I know, but I might have sold it.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Look at that sheet again, whose initials is that. - A. There is T. D. on it; I generally mark my sheets in the middle. This is a pelisse; it is like what I had in the shop, but I might have sold it.

Q. What shop do you keep. - A. A clothes shop on one side. That petticoat I think I have had in the shop; I do not see any mark upon it: I cannot say whether it was in the shop at that present time.

Q. There is another sheet, look at that. - A. I cannot see any mark upon which I could swear. This is a child's morning gown; I have had this in my shop, there is some of my work about it; I cannot say whether I have sold it or not.

Q. Do you know when you had last seen it - A. No, I cannot say. This is a petticoat that I never missed until I saw them; all the seven were together. I know I have had them in my shop. I cannot say whether I had sold them or not. I remember they were all in one parcel, over a vinegar cask.

Q. How long before the house was broken open, had you seen them - A. I do not recollect of seeing them a week before; but when I saw them, I knew they had been in the shop. This gown, I know I had this in my shop, because there is some of my work about it. I had

seen it on the Thursday that my house was broken open on the Saturday.

Q. Is that your own - A. It was one in the shop. This is a child's petticoat. There are so many things alike of this kind, without it was marked, I cannot say I think I have had it; but I cannot swear to it. This is a boy's shirt; I think I have had this in my shop, but I cannot swear to it. This child's frock was along with the stuff petticoats the last time I saw them. I bought it with the petticoats. I had them about three weeks. I drawed the tape out of it. I know I had it in the shop. I have no doubt it was mine once; and this other frock was in a piece with the petticoats. I made it a frock at the same time I bought the petticoats. I had seen that a fortnight or three weeks before. These two habit shirts, I might have had them, but I could not swear to them; they have not my mark, nor is there any of my work on them. There were two dozen of these clouts together, I had in the shop the Saturday night before these were taken out; they were very much like these.

Q. How many are there now - A. Half a dozen. I bought them only on the Saturday; they are clouts or napkins.

Q. Look at the shoes and see, whether you see your husband's stamp upon them - A. There is his stamp upon them.

Q. These boots were found in Essex-street, at Crutchington's - A. They are stamped; these boys shoes, there are no stamp upon them.

Mr. Arabin. With respect to these napkins, there are no marks upon them - A. No.

Q. You know you are upon your oath; your husband and you keep a shop, he sells shoes - A. Yes, and I keep a clothes shop.

Q. Do not you purchase hundreds of them articles - A. Yes; we buy at auctions some of them things.

Q. Might not your husband have disposed of these things in your absence, he does sometimes serve in the shop - A. Yes, and sometimes I serve of his side when he is not in the way.

Q. Are not they common napkins - A. Oh, yes, they are. I have sold many of them.

Q. Can you pretend to say, that these half dozen were half a dozen of the two dozen that you had in the shop - A. I have not much doubt but they were, but I cannot swear that they are.

Mr. Knapp. What time on the Saturday did you buy them - A. About ten o'clock in the forenoon.

Q. How late did you see them afterwards - A. I do not remember seeing them after ten o'clock in the morning. I recollect buying some. I do not pretend to say they are them.

Mr. Arabin. Q. (to Armstrong.) You forgot to state to his Lordship and the jury, that you searched Landers's lodgings - A. I did, I found nothing there.

JOHN VICKREY . I am an officer of Worship-street office. On Monday, the 15th of January, I went to Mr. Sinclair's house, in company with Armstrong and Bishop I saw the situation of the premises, and after that we went and took the two prisoners at the Gold-house in Golden-lane; we brought them to the office; we found Stanton at home, and I found these two odd boots; these were up in the place where he kept pigeons.

Q. (to Prosecutrix.) Look at these boots and tell me, whether they have your husband's stamp upon them - A. Yes; that is a stamp that we generally stamp them all with, because the men should not change the stuff; they are two odd boots.

Q. Have you examined them with two odd boots that you had at home - A. I have not examined them, we often have odd boots. I never saw them matched.

Q. Were not you present at the time the officers matched them with two odd boots that you had at your house after the robbery - A. No, I was not present.

Q. (to Vickrey.) Stanton is a lame man, is not he - A. He is, he could only wear one of them in the state they are now. The moment we came in the house Stanton took us up stairs, and shewed us the two odd boots.

JOSHUA ARMSTRONG . I am an officer of Worship-street. I found these two black silk handkerchiefs Stanton's house, in company with the other officers.

Mr. Knapp. Now, Mrs. Sinclair, have the goodness to look at them - A. I lost two black handkerchiefs, one of them was quite a new one, it had never been worn, there was no mark upon it, I had it a month, I bought it for my own wearing, I saw it on Saturday night, I took it out to shew to a sister of mine.

Q. You say, that you had shewn the handkerchief to your sister on the Saturday night, do you mean by that the night of the robbery - A. Yes, and I lost a crimson one, wrapped up with this.

Q. When had you seen that - A. I cannot say; this was in the shop as rubbish.

Mr. Arabin. You said you lost two black handkerchiefs, one of which was a new black handkerchief, and never worn - A. Yes.

Q. Have not they both been worn - A. Yes, and very much.

Q. Then, from the appearance of them, do you believe them to be yours - A. I cannot pretend to say, whether they are, or are not; these were not found till a fortnight afterwards at Stanton's house. It is much the same size and quality, and the old one is like the one I lost; but it is impossible for any body to say.

Q. (to Joshua Armstrong.) On what day did you find the two black handkerchiefs at Stanton's house - A. On the 2nd of February.

DANIEL CARTWRIGHT . Q. I see you are one of the marshalmen of the City of London - A. Yes.

Q. You produce something - A. Yes, some shoes and sheets; I took them from a house in Long-lane, No. 31, kept by a person of the name of Wheeler, in consequence of a search warrant. Wheeler was at home; one pair of shoes were upon Wheeler's feet, which the prosecutor owned to directly, and another pair of shoes in a box in the garret; then we sent for the prosecutor's wife, and shewed her a bundle of dirty clothes in the room; she picked them up herself, and said she could swear to them; they were shifts and sheets, and two pair of shoes.

Q. (to Prosecutrix) Look at these sheets - A. I do not see any mark. I do not doubt but I have had them both in the shop.

Q. Were they in your own use, or articles in the shop - A. In the shop to sell.

Q. Do you know how lately you had seen them before the robbery - A. I cannot say.

Q. Do you remember being desired by the officers; and did you go to Wheeler's house - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see the sheets as found at Wheeler's there - A. Yes.

Q. Who picked them out - A. The officers picked

them out. I said I knowed that I had had them in the shop; there is a shift, I have had this in the shop; how long I cannot say. I bought a great many shifts of this description on the Thursday. I saw it at Wheeler's when the officers pulled the things out.

Q. Did you there identify it as your sheet - A. Yes.

Q. Look at these shoes and see whether there is your husband's stamp upon them - A. Yes, there is on these; the new ones have not, they have the stamp of a man that worked in the house, his name is Howard; he is gone from us.

Mr. Arabin. Have you not sold shoes with Howard - A. Yes, more than once, he worked for us a good while.

Q. When the officers picked these things out for you, you recognised them, might they not have been sold - A. They might, I should not like to swear they were not, without I could with propriety.

PETER MASON . I am an officer of Worship-street office. I have a pair of boots that were found at Wheeler's house. Armstrong found them and put them into my hands. I have had them ever since.

JOHN ARMSTRONG . That is so. I took them, and from a drawer or dresser they were taken by Wheler's wife; I gave them to Mason.

Q. (to Prosecutrix) Have they your husband's stamp - A. There is a stamp on them, but it is a stamp I never noticed; I do not know whether they are or not.

Q. You do not mean to swear to them - A. No, I do not.

Q. Not even to the stamp - A. No; we have eight or nine men work for us out of doors; that is a stamp I do not at all know.

Mr. Arabin Q. (to Mason) There are so many of you officers in this case, do you know whether there is any reward - A. Most assuredly.

Mr. Knapp. You know there is a reward, or else you are not fit to be an officer - A. Certainly, Sir.

JOHN WILLIAM BALLAD . Court. Take care that every thing you say is the truth.

Mr. Knapp. Do you know the prisoners at the bar - A. Yes.

Q. How long have you known them - A. About two or three weeks.

Q. Do you mean from the time that they were taken up, or from this time that you are now speaking; is it not above two or three weeks; you know they were taken in January, how long before they were taken up were you acquainted with them - A. It might be five or six weeks.

Q. Do you know White-cross-street - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember being in company with the prisoners at the bar at any time in January last - A. Yes.

Q. Where did you meet them - A. At the Gold-house public-house door, in Golden-lane.

Q. What day of the month was it - A. It was on a Saturday night, I think it was the 13th. I met the prisoners there; we might be there, in and out of the house, two or three hours in the course of the night; we drank together, and just by the time of the public house being shut up, that might be between eleven and twelve o'clock, we all agreed to go together, to go to Mr. Sinclair's house.

Q. Had you ever known Sinclair's house before - A. No further than seeing the house in the street, not to live in it.

Q. Who was it that proposed that you should go to Sinclair's - A. I cannot say rightly, whether it was myself or either of them: it was agreed to go there. We walked about some time, and I think it was between two and three o'clock when we first went; then we got upon the wall, they two lifted me upon the wall at the back part of the house; when I got upon the wall, then Lander came up upon the wall after me, then we opened the stair-case window, I cannot say whether it was me or him, one of us opened it. How was waiting in the court on the other side of the wall. When the stair-case window was opened I got in, and Lander staid at the window while I went down stairs. I could not open the back parlour door, it was locked; I opened the back door on the inside and went into the yard.

Q. How did you open the door - A. I forgot whether there was a bolt or a latch; I do not think there was any bolt, only a latch. I unlatched it and went into the yard, and I opened the back door that leads into the court, that door is in the wall; then How and Lander came in, we then contrived to get the back shutters down in the yard of the parlour window.

Q. How did you manage to get the shutters down - A. We had a small piece of iron, and the ridge was all rotten, and then the shutters came down.

Q. Did you use the piece of iron then - A. Yes, by me and Lander, How standing by. When we got the shutters down, we opened the window and got in, it was a sash window that slides up and down; I got into the window, the other two staid at the window while I went in; when I got in I brought them out some things that I got out of the shop, a quantity of shoes, boots, and linen; I gave them to the prisoners at the window, and then we all went away together; then we took them to a house in Red Lion-market, Mrs. Jennings's, and left them there.

Q. Where is Red Lion-market - A. In White Cross-street; we left them there, and came back again to the house of Sinclair. All of us went in at the back door into the yard, then I got in at the same window, and went into the shop and gave them more things, shoes, boots, and linen, some of all sorts; we went away to Mrs. Jennings's again, and when we went in Mrs. Jennings would not have them.

Q. Had you seen her there the first time - A. No, I did not go in; the second time I saw Mrs. Jennings and Mr. Jennings too, they would not have them. We then brought them all out, the first parcel and the second. We went to try another house, we did not succeed in getting them up; we went to a house in Bridgewater-gardens, and there we left them. I do not know their names. We went back to Mr. Sinclair's again, we went in the same way at the back door, I got in the window again, I went into the shop and gave the things out of the window to them again, a quantity of shoes and boots, and a quantity of half-pence out of the till. I cannot say how many, perhaps there might be seven or eight shillings worth, and perhaps there might be more. I put some into my pocket. We then went into the house in Bridgewater-gardens again, and the people said, they did not deal in these things, they would not have them. Lander went out to see if he could get a place to put them in, or to see if his own place was open.

Q. Did you after this return to Sinclair's house - A. No.

Q. About what time did you leave the house of Sinclair

the last time - A. Between four and five o'clock, I believe, it was not day light, it might be peep of day, it was not so dark but you could see. I cannot say whether there was any moon.

Q. You say, that Lander went out to look for a place to put these things in - A. Yes, he did not return for some time. I went out to look after him, I met him; me and Lander went down Long-lane, we went to knock a person up, we did not succeed, we came back and went to Stanton's.

Q. Did you go for these things that you had lodged in Bridgewater-gardens - A. Lander went first and spoke, and then me and Lander carried the things.

Q. Do you mean to say, that you and Lander only carried the things, or was How with you - A. I went with the first parcel with Lander and staid with them, and then Lander brought them up stairs, who helped him I do not know; How was not there till the afternoon. We left the whole of the things at Stanton's, in Providence-place, Bridgewater-gardens; we took them up into the pigeon loft and looked over them; we put a few things of one side; some old things were given for the woman's children, and the rest we kept for our own use.

Q. What woman's children do you mean - A. Stanton's children. After that we left the things there, and went to the Catherine Wheel, in Bridgewater-gardens, and found How there, that might be between nine and ten o'clock in the morning; then we had some rum and water and beer; and there we were in company with a man of the name of Banbury. Then me, and Lander, and Banbury, went to Long-lane to speak to this gentleman; I believe his name is Wheeler, he keeps a green-stall. We spoke to him; he said, he would come to us at the Catherine Wheel after he had his breakfast; we went back to the Catherine Wheel, Wheeler came about twelve o'clock; then I and Lander went to Stanton's and shewed him the goods that we had deposited there, he looked at them, we asked him nine pounds for them; he said, he must consider about it; he had two hours to consider about it; he did not come in the two hours. Me and Lander, and How, went down to his house, he was not at home; we went to a public-house and staid till he did come home, and when he came he would not give above five pounds.

Q. What time was it - A. It might be between three and four o'clock in the afternoon. Then he came to five pounds ten shillings, and a crown to be spent, we agreed. We left the things till dark to take to his house; they took the things in a coach, and we went to Mr. Wheeler's with them.

Q. Did you take all the thinks - A. All the things, as far as I know. I missed of them, and when I came back to them they had the things in the coach. We got in there with the things. Mr. Wheeler then said, that he had but three pounds to give then; we were to call for the other the next day; we then came away and went to the Gold-house, and divided the three pounds among us; that is all I know.

Q. How soon were you taken up - A. Between eight and nine o'clock that night, on the Sunday night.

Q. When did you tell this story that you have been telling to-day - A. On Monday morning I informed Mr. Armstrong of it, and then I went in and acquainted the magistrate.

Q. Is there any thing that you forgot to state, recollect yourself - A. There was an old pair of shoes that were given to Banbury; whether he had them I do not know.

Mr. Arabin. My honest lad, this Saturday night you had received your wages, had not you - A. Yes.

Q. A hard working lad, what business may you be - A. A watch-gilder.

Q. You work regularly at watch-gilding, and you had received your wages - A. Yes.

Q. Who is your master - A. Messrs. Holloway and Gildi; they paid me my wages, one pound twelve shillings and two-pence.

Q. Perhaps you work of a Sunday - A. No; I never did any thing of my business of a Sunday.

Q. You went to this public-house in Golden-lane - A. Yes.

Q. You know nothing about Mr. Sinclair's house before this night - A. No more than it has been mentioned by a good many, of going to the house.

Q. How many - A. Five or six might.

Q. And they were hard working young men like yourself, were not they - A. I do not know whether they followed any business.

Q. How long was it, a month, that you heard talking about this house - A. It might be three weeks.

Q. And you do not know whether you yourself proposed it this night - A. I cannot say, I was mentioning it as much as them.

Q. You just received your wages, mentioned this as a good thing; speak out, you know you are a good honest, industrious lad - A. I might have proposed it, and I do not know whether they mentioned it to me: it had been proposed by several of my companions.

Q. This must be a new thing to you - A. Quite.

Q. You did not seem to know any thing about it: you used, when you came to the house, a small piece of iron, you do not know the name of it, was it a jemmy - A. Something of that kind.

Q. But you thought it to be a small piece of iron; upon your oath, had you never seen such a thing before in your life - A. Not of that sort; it was made of iron.

Q. And yet you had never seen one before in your life - A. Not of that kind.

Q. You agreed to do this on the Saturday night - A. Yes.

Q. On Sunday you went to church and spent the day as you ought - A. Not on that Sunday, I did not go to church.

Q. Then you were not sorry for what you had done - A. Yes.

Q. Then you were very sorry for what you had done - A. I have been very uneasy ever since.

Q. You were very sorry, and determined never to do so again - A. Never, sir.

Q. Were not you taken up that very Sunday for robbing a man of a bundle in the street.

Court. You cannot ask that.

Witness. I was taken up for an offence.

Mr. Arabin. Q. Were not you taken on the Sunday, and taken before the magistrate.

Court. That is not right.

Mr. Arabin. You gave this account before the magistrate - A. Yes.

Q. Then you told this of your own free will. - A. Yes.

Q. It was mere sorrow that made you do it. - A. Yes.

Q. Determined never to do the like again. - A. I never was convicted before.

Q. No hope by telling this story you might not be convicted yourself. - A. No; I wanted to retrieve my character again, I did not think of myself, I was wishing to get clear of the company, and go to my work.

Q. Then do you mean to say, you had no hope of escaping yourself by convicting these men. - A. I was accused of it.

Q. Then you keep very good company, do you mean to say that. - A. I have been drawn into company before.

Q. Have you ever given evidence in any court before. - A. No; Sir, not before this here.

Q. Have you never been in a court of justice before. - A. Yes; when I was an apprentice, for running away from my master.

Mr. Knapp. You have learned from five or six persons that you were acquainted with, that their intention was to rob Mr. Sinclair's house. - A. Yes.

Q. Who were these five or six composed off. - A. I know them very well by sight.

Q. Was the prisoners at the bar either of these five or six persons that told you, that they were going to break open Mr. Sinclair's house. - A. I cannot be positive that they were in company then. Lander had heard it I was told.

JAMES STANTON . I am a shoemaker; I live at No. 9, Providence-place, Bridgewater-gardens.

Q. Do you know the two prisoners at the bar. - A. Yes; I have known Lander about eleven months, he worked for me: the other one I cannot say exactly how long I have known him; I have seen him about three or four times, never more.

Q. Do you remember seeing them on Sunday morning, the 14th of January. - A. I do; James Lander came to my house about a quarter before eight in the morning, I was a bed, he knocked, and called out, master; I answered, and said, what do you want; he said, would I get up; I got up, he asked me whether I would let him leave a bundle a quarter of an hour or so. I always found him an honest and just man in my business. I gave him leave to bring them into my place; he did bring the bundle up in a bag.

Q. Do you know what it contained. - A. No; not exactly.

Q. Was it a long while before he brought the bag. A. No; he went down stairs, and directly brought the bag up stairs. I saw a great quantity of shoes; there were some boots, I do not know how many; when he brought the first bag up, he went down and brought another, and John Ballad came after him.

Q. Did you know Ballad before. - A. No; I never saw him before; Ballad brought one, there were three bags in all; I do not know what the other contained. As soon as I saw Ballad; I said, I thought they were not Lander's own, and begged him to take them away; he told me, he would; he said, they were his own, he would not leave them there long.

Court. Who said that. - A. Lander. Lander and Ballad went down, and fetched up another man, and what passed between them I do not know.

Mr. Knapp. Did you know that man. - A. No.

Q. Did you know a person of the name of Banbury. A. No.

Q. Do you know a person of the name of Wheeler. A. I saw him at the office.

Q. Did they give you to understand either of them, when they would call for the bag. - A. Yes; I went down to the public-house, and desired them to take them away.

Court. What public-house was it. - A. It is now called Bridgewater Arms, it formerly was the Catherine Wheel. James Lander , William How , and John Ballad were all at the Bridgewater Arms. They all promised to come and take them away directly. James Lander and John Ballad came in the afternoon, and told me, they would come and fetch them away directly; but they did not come till the evening; Lander and How came in the evening about five o'clock, and took the bundles away.

Q. Had the bundles that were brought there in the morning, and you kept them there till five o'clock, been at all altered. - A. Yes; they had put them into two. I did not touch them, only I intimated I wished them to take them away.

Q. What time was it you went to the Catherine-Wheel. - A. About a quarter before eleven, in church time.

Q. You do not know the person of Wheeler. - A. No; I have seen him at the magistrate's.

Q. Was he the person that came to your house. - A. He might have been, but I do not know.

Q. How did they take the things away. - A. In two sheets; Lander and How took them down stairs; I did not see how they conveyed them away, I was so frightened; I was glad when they took them out of the house.

Q. Did they leave any thing behind. - A. Yes; two or three pair of shoes, and a pair of boots, for their own use; James Lander asked me to take care of them; he said, they were for his own use, and John Ballad .

Q. Do you know where they left them. - A. Down in the room.

Q. Have you a pigeon loft in the house. - A. Yes; that is where they took them first of all. I had not room for them below.

Q. Do you remember the officers coming to your house. - A. Perfectly well; on Monday the 15th, I went up with them, and gave them the things in the pigeon-loft.

Q. And these things were part of the things that were brought by How and Lander. - A. I believe so.

Q. Had you received any such things of any body else. - A. No.

Mr. Arabin. Where do you come from now. - A. From Bridgewater-garden's, where I live.

Q. Were you taken in custody. - A. Yes; I was, and detained all night: I was in custody on Monday, the 15th.

Q. Then I take it for granted, when you had suspicion, you went to the officers, and told them. - A. Not till I was asked; I was very glad when they were out of my house, I did not trouble my head about it.

Q. Were not some of these things left below, instead

of being in the pigeon-house. - A. No; when they took them away, Lander gave my wife half a dozen clouts.

Q. Was any thing else left at your house. - A. Yes; there were two odd boots.

Q. I want to know whether you did not take a fancy to these boots. - A. No; they would not suit me. I did not know then whether they were any body's else besides their own; no further, than I had a suspicion.

Q. Were there not other things left there. - A. There were a pair of little shoes, and a pair of old ones, and a pair of half boots; them I gave to the officer.

Q. Do you know Mr. Crutchington. - A. Yes; that is my brother in law. When they apprehended these men, I was fearful these things were not their own; I sent them down to my brother-in-law, because I would have no further piece of work about them.

Q. Did you tell the magistrate that you had sent the things to him. - A. I forgot it then; my wife sent the things to my brother-in-law; it is all the same.

Q. You had seen these bundles at your house. - A. Yes; but I did not see what was in it; I was feeding my pigeons.

Q. You saw it contained boots and shoes. - A. No; I heard them say, there was a pair of boots.

Q. Were not you so frightened, that you directed your wife to send the things to Crutchington's, your brother-in-law. - A. Not at first, I did not direct her at all; after she had taken them, I was very glad they were out of the house; I meant to give them to the person they belonged, and John Ballad desired me not; he sent me a letter, and desired me to keep them, they were for his own use; I said, I do not think they are, I thought they belonged to that property. They were half a dozen clouts given to my wife, she had lain in about three weeks.

Mr. Knapp. In the first place, we understand you were taken up having possession of these things. - A. Yes; I was taken before the magistrate; I remained in custody that day, and was then out on bail.

Q. When the officers came, you shewed the officers these things. - A. I gave them to them directly.

Q. Did you ever meet Ballad. - A. Only in consequence of that letter; I never saw him in my life before that Sunday morning.

Court. What day was it that these things were carried to Crutchington's. - A. On the Monday evening before I was taken into custody; I was taken between nine and ten at night, I had just come home from doing my business.

Q. What time of the day were they sent to Crutchington's. - A. I do not knew exactly; I believe it was in the evening part; it was directly as my wife heard the men were apprehended; she sent them away without my knowledge, though I thought it best to have them out of the house.

MARY ANN HALL . I am a servant to Mr. Stanton.

Q. Look at the prisoner's, do you know them. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know Ballad. - A. Yes; I remember their coming to my master's house about eight o'clock in the morning, on Sunday James Lander and John How came, it was the day before the officers came. They knocked at the door, and asked my master to let them in.

Q. Did you hear them. - A. No.

Q. Did you see Lander come to your master's house. A. I did; and John Ballad ; when they came in the back room, they took the things up in the pigeon loft; I did not see what, they took them all up, and went down again, they were in three bags. They brought up a man in the course of the day, I do not know what it was for, Lander and Ballad brought the man with them. And James Lander and William How came just about dusk, before we went to tea, they took the things away.

Q. How many bundles did they take away. - A. Two.

Q. They brought three, and took away two. - Yes; they did.

Q. Had you ever seen Ballad before that Sunday morning. - A. No.

Q. Had you over seen Lander. - A. Yes; he worked for us; I had never seen How before.

Q. Are you sure that How is one of them men that came in the afternoon. - A. Yes.

How's Defence. I know nothing of Ballad; every thing he has asserted is a falsity; this is not the first time I believe that he has been admitted an evidence before, and his right name is Arnold; I believe it is only his own interest to get out of trouble, that has made him act as he has; I never was in the public-house at all; I never was in trouble before, nor never was taken up on any occasion before; I never was before a justice in my life.

Lander's Defence. I know nothing of Ballad at all; I never saw the man before in my life, till I saw him in Worship-street office.

Lander called one witness, who gave him a good character.

HOW, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 23.

LANDER, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 23.

The prisoner's were recommended to his Majesty's mercy by the jury, on account of their master's giving them a good character .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18100221-38

186. GEORGE UPTON and EDWARD DUFTY were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Thomas Duncan , about the hour of three on the night of the 17th of October , and burglariously stealing therein, four china images, value 2 s. a cloak, value 5 s. a skirt, value 6 s. two aprons, value 1 s. three tablecloths, value 10 s. eight pillow-cases, value 8 s. a blanket, value 1 s. three handkerchiefs, value 3 s. a curtain, value 1 s. three hats, value 3 s. five towels, value 2 s. 6 d. a counterpaane, value 2 s. a cover, value 2 s. a looking glass, value 5 s. seven napkins, value 3 s. a quilt, value 2 s. a pair of stockings, value 6 d. and a candlestick, value 6 d. the property of Thomas Duncan .

The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.

ELIZABETH DUNCAN . My husband's name is Thomas Duncan , he is the master of a ship in the transport service ; I live at No. 12, Sir William Warren's Square, in the parish of St. John Wapping .

Q. Had you occasion, in October, to go with your husband from your house to the Downs - A. Yes; he was under sailing orders.

Q. What day did you leave town - A. On Tuesday evening, the 17th of October, between five and six o'clock. I went with my husband. I made all the fastenings of the house perfectly sure, I took the key with me, I locked the house up myself, and I am sure I made all the fastenings safe. It was rather dark when the tide swelled, I locked the door, me and my husband went together, leaving no person in the house. I returned in about a week, we were detained in the Downs by contrary winds. I received a letter on the Sunday, I returned on the Monday, I think the 30th. When I returned to my house, every door and every lock of my house had been broken open, and every part of my property was taken away. They broke in at the cellar window, the street door was locked; it appeared as if a crow had been put in, and the cellar flap wrenched up, there was the mark in the wood work; there are stairs come down into the cellar from the street, and go up into the passage.

Q. You say, every door in the house had been broken open - A. Yes, the doors had been locked, all of them; and the part of my goods that were left were in the cellar, packed up ready to be removed. I went into the house at the street door with my own key; I unlocked the door.

Q. You lost a great deal of wearing apparel and household furniture - A. Yes; I lost all the articles in the indictment, and a great many more; it is not a third part of them.

Q. Did you lose four China images, a glass, two aprons, three table cloths, eight pillow cases, a blanket, three handkerchiefs, a counterpane, a table cover, a looking glass, seven napkins, a quilt, a pair of stockings and a candlestick - A. Yes, and a great deal more.

EVAN JONES . I am a ship joiner. I live at No. 1, Charles-street, Old Gravel-lane.

Q. Do you know the house of Mrs. Duncan - A. Yes, I was the first that found it open, between eleven and twelve in the forenoon. I was ordered to move some goods out of the warehouse adjoining, I saw the cellar had been broken open; the cellar flap next the street was lifted up. I found a small instrument that they had forced it with, and a chissel.

Court. What day was it - A. On a Saturday in October, the 20th or the 21st; I think the 21st.

MARY PEETRE . Q. I understand you live next door to Mrs. Duncan - A. I do.

Q. Do you remember the day in which Mrs. Duncan's house was broken open - A. I cannot recollect the exact day.

Q. What day did you go to Sadler's Wells - A. On Tuesday, the 17th of October, I went to Sadler's Wells, and I returned about two oclock. I retired to bed about two o'clock. On the morning of the 18th I heard a slight noise, it was like the scuffling and putting on a pair of heavy shoes in Mrs. Duncan's house; I paid attention to it; immediately afterwards the watchman called past four o'clock.

Q. I need not ask you, whether it was light or not - A. It was not light. On Saturday the 21st, I found the house had been broken open. I did not know of it before.

JOSEPH COLEBROOK . I am an officer belonging to Shadwell Office. On the the 12th of January, I went to Murry's house, in Queen-street, Wapping; he is a coal-heaver. It was about two o'clock in the day time; I found Mrs. Murry there. I went in company with Mrs. Duncan and Hope, another officer. I acquainted Mrs. Murry, that I had a search warrant to search the house for things that Mrs. Duncan had been robbed of. As soon as I went into the house, Mrs. Duncan pointed out a pair of China images on the mantle piece, (there are them.) We searched the house, and found out this property, which Mrs. Duncan pointed out to be her property: here is two hats, two aprons, a black silk skirt, a gauze cloak, three silk handkerchiefs, a table cloth, a table cover, a quantity of thread, three towels, a pair of pillow cases, a curtain, a counterpane, a piece of old bed furniture, and a looking glass; these are all the things that I found.

Mr. Arabin. Neither of the prisoners lodged in the house. - A. No.

RALPH HOPE . I am an officer. I assisted in searching Murray's house; I found fifteen duplicates, they apply to the goods that have been found.

ROBERT WALKER . Q. You are apprentice to Mr. Mount, are not you - A. Yes; he is a pawnbroker, 15, Old Gravel-lane.

Q. Do you know Mrs. Murry - A. Yes.

Q. Look at these duplicates, and see whether they correspond - A. The 10th of October, a red cloak, the cloak is not identified; the cloak and sheet were pawned at one time. October 31st, a sheet; that duplicate corresponds, it was pawned for five shillings, by Elizabeth Murry . The 28th of October, a sheet, five shillings, Betsy Murry ; 9th of December, a quilt, seven shillings, Elizabeth Murry ; the 18th of December, a napkin, nine-pence, in the name of Eleanor Hurley ; a man's frock and two childrens frocks, 11th January, by Elizabeth Murry ; 28th of December, a child's pocket, nine-pence, Elizabeth Murry ; and a watch in the name of Elizabeth Murry , 17th of November, one pound and two-pence; 5th of January, a sheet, seven shillings, Elizabeth Murry ; 4th of January, a frock and petticoat, one shilling and sixpence, Betsy Murry ; and here is a napkin and handkerchief that was wrapped round the parcels.

OBADIAH COOPER . I am shopman to Mr. Cordy, pawnbroker, 163, Ratcliffe-highway. On the 13th of December, a silk gown and two pieces of cotton were pledged by Mrs. Murry; on the 1st of January, a shift, for half a crown, by Mary Murry .

JOHN HULME . I am shopman to Mr. Burton, 83, Whitechapel. I produce three sheets, pawned on the 31st of October last, by Mary Donnival .

Q. Do you know the person that pawned them - A. No.

WILLIAM HEWITT . I am an officer of Shadwell. On the 14th of January, about twelve o'clock at night, in company with Partridge, I went to Lambeth Marsh to apprehend the prisoners; the house is situated in a field by itself. I knocked at the door, I could not get any admittance; I heard a scuffling up stairs; I broke open the bottom shutter.

Court. Did not any body answer you when you knocked - A. Yes; a woman answered me below. They seemed alarmed, I jumped in at the window, and Partridge followed. I secured Upton, he was secreting himself in the coal-hole: we searched the house, Dufty was not in the same place. I found two images standing on

the mantle-piece, a small table cloth, two pillow cases, a quilt, a pair of stockings, a pair of pillow cases, and two caps. I found them in the room in which Upton slept, in the drawer. I apprehended Upton, and he was left in my custody; he said, he had been doing nothing, he did not know what he was apprehended for.

RALPH HOPE . Q. You were with Partridge - A. Yes; I afterwards went to Dufty's house and apprehended him, about one hundred and fifty yards from Upton's house. I found Dufty in bed, I secured him, and on searching the room I found this property: this is a piece of cotton bed furniture, this is part of a gown piece, this is a piece of cambric muslin, a pair of pillow cases, a table cloth, three towels, a white neck handkerchief, and a cap.

Q. Did you communicate to Dufty what you apprehended him for - A. Not at that time.

Q. (to Prosecutrix.) Look at that property, have you seen it before - A. Yes, they are part of the property that I lost and missed from the house. All the linen found in Dufty's house is mine, and all the things that were found in Upton's possession are mine; they were in my house when I left it, and the images are mine.

- BROWNING. I am a shopman to Thomas Parker , Ship-alley, Well-close-square. I produce two sheets, pledged with me on the 6th of November, in the name of Mary Bryan ; to the best of my knowledge, Mrs. Murry is the woman that pledged them.

ELIZABETH MURRY . Q. Now, mind and give us the whole truth, and nothing but the truth; you are the wife of Thomas Murry - A. Yes, he is a coal-heaver. I live at No. 6, Queen-street, St. George's in the East. I have known both the prisoners some time.

Q. Do you remember their coming to you at any time with any goods - A. Yes, I do; it was in the night.

Q. How long ago - A. More than a month before Christmas. They came together, and brought these things that Mrs. Duncan speaks of: there was a looking-glass and some sheets, and some baby's clothes; that is the looking-glass they brought. All the things that I pledged, George Upton said they belonged to himself. I asked my husband where the things came from, my husband struck me in my bed; my husband made me pawn them. I pawned them in my own name at Mr. Mounts and Mr. Cordy's. I was taken up for this.

Q. What time of the night was it when they came - A. I cannot tell, I was in bed; I generally go to bed about ten o'clock; I was awoke out of my sleep when they came. It was night, and dark when they came. I have never seen my husband since I was taken up.

Upton's Defence. All that I know of this good woman and her husband is, I had a writ out against me for money that I owed, I went to a townsman of mine that lived at Shadwell to get me a lodging till I could pay the money; he said, he could not; if I would go to his house of call, he would ask that woman's husband to let me have a bed; he said, yes, if I would give him one shilling and six-pence a week for the bed. I was there about three weeks; that is all I know of this woman. I never see any thing amiss of him, nor he of me; and what things were taken out of my premises, I can give a good account of.

Dufty's Defence. I never was in Murry's house but twice in my life, that was two afternoons; I was going past. I am perfectly innocent of what I am charged, and what is more, I was on hospital duty that night.

Dufty called five witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Upton called no witnesses to character.

UPTON, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 33.

DUFTY, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 34.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18100221-39

187. ELEANOR COLLINS and MARY FRENCH were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of January , two gowns, value 25 s. two shifts, value 15 s. a cloak, value 30 s. three petticoats, value 10 s. an apron, value 2 s. the property of Reuben Ingram , in the dwelling-house of Margaret Thomas , widow .

MARGARET INGRAM . I am the wife of Reuben Ingram ; he lives at 121, Gravel-lane, Shadwell . I rent a room of Margaret Thomas , she lives in the house. On the 12th of January I went out in the morning and double locked the door of my room. I came home at five in the evening, I missed all the property mentioned in the indictment from out of my chest, my chest was broken open. I did not see any of my things till the 26th of last month. I received information from Mary French ; Collins was taken up; then I found two petticoats and a shift of mine on Collins's back, and the other articles I found at the pawnbrokers.

ROBERT WALKER . I am a pawnbroker. I live with Mr. Mount in Old Gravel-lane. On the 12th of January a shift and apron were pledged in the name of Mary French ; and on the 20th of January, she brought a gown.

GEORGE PARTRIDGE . I am a constable. On the 26th of January I took Collins into custody; this shift was upon her.

Q. (to Prosecutrix). How came Mary French to tell you where the things were - A. By Eleanor Collins and she falling out.

Collins's Defence. Mrs. Ingram lived facing where I lived; she used to bring her work into my room, and sit with me; she wanted me to put in the lottery with her; she brought a gown into my room, and asked me to pawn it. I told her I could not, my husband was coming home. I told her to go up to Mrs. French, perhaps she would. She then asked me to buy it, I bid her four shillings for it. I gave her a shilling in part, and the remainder the next morning. She offered me half a guinea to take a false oath against this woman, that she did not bid her take this gown to pawn.

French's Defence. The prosecutrix came up to me, she said, she had a frying-pan to sell, I bought it of her; she brought the gingham gown up to me, I pawned it for five shillings. I went out in the morning into the Highway, and in the afternoon I went out with her again, pawning for her. After I came home, she called me down; she said, my key opens Mrs. Collins's door. Collins and I fell out, she owed me two shillings, and I out of spite said, if any body has robbed you, it is Mrs. Collins.

Q. (to Prosecutrix.) Did you go out with her in the afternoon - A. I did; I did not give her the gown and shift to pawn.

Jury. Did you sell her the frying-pan - A. I did.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18100221-40

187. WILLIAM TRISTAM was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 24th of January , a silver watch, value 20 l. the property of John Grant , privately in his shop .

JAMES MOOR FRENCH . I am a watchmaker, I live at Mr. Grant's, 75, Fleet-street . I have seen the prisoner frequent at Mr. Grant's; about six months ago he was there getting a watch repaired, he said it was his fellow servant's watch; he then expressed a wish to have a watch made of Mr. Grant's make, and looked at some watches; I shewed him one in particular which he recollected on the 24th of last month when he called again; he said then he was come to buy the gold watch which he saw before; Mr. Grant shewed him the watch that he had before seen, about six months ago. On learning that the price of the watch was twenty eight guineas he said it was too much, and wished to have one at about twenty guineas price; Mr. Grant then shewed him two or three others; one of them was a particular watch which he objected to; Mr. Grant hung it up in the usual place, and Mr. Grant referred it to me to execute the prisoner's commands, and as I understood he wanted a twenty guinea one, I handed him down a watch, as he wished me to recommend him one, of the price of twenty three guineas; the prisoner objected to it, it being rather too much, and not of the kind he wished for; I left the watch on the counter with others, while I went to get one at rather less price, and the shape he wished for; on turning round I found that the prisoner had changed his mind, and he told me he would call in eight or ten days and bargain for the watch, he did not wish to take it now; I then observed to him that he might as well take it now as then, that I could recommend to him the one that I had in my hand. After this conversation he choosed the one that I had in my hand for eighteen guineas; he said he could pay ten pound of the money, the remainder he could pay in two or three months.

Q. Did you agree he should have it - A. I agreed so far that I would mention it to Mr. Grant, and if he chose to consent to it; Mr. Grant was busy, he could not be spoke to; he left that watch behind him, I was to regulate it, he was to call for it in eight days. In the course of three hours, in the same day, the watch of twenty three guineas, that I mentioned before, was missed; the watch which I first took down to him, it is of particular dimensions; the watches were there hung up, and had not been shewed to any one person until the watch was missed, therefore I was clear in my own mind that it must be the prisoner that had stolen the watch. I went to Bow-street and returned again. The prisoner came back again according to his promise in the course of eight days; when he came into the shop Mr. Grant said to him in my presence, one of the watches that were shewn to you on such a day is missing, we missed it immediately after you were gone; perhaps you may have put it in your pocket in a mistake; if you have, it will be well to return it without farther trouble. The prisoner denied knowing any thing of the watch; he said he recollected all the other watches but that particular watch; I then turned round to the prisoner, and told him the watch must be between him and I, there was none but him and I upon it, and if it had been left in the shop it would have been there; at this instant I observed his face change three different colours, from a light red to a dark red, and then to a dead pale; it still made my mind stronger that he had the watch. The prisoner said that he had a good character, that he lived with Mr. Richard Shipley , esq. 33, York-place, Baker-street. Mr. Grant said that if his master would sign a note for the remainder (the eight guineas) he would let him have the watch. It was then agreed that I should call on the Saturday following to know whether the master would sign it or not. I did not call on the Saturday, but I called on the Monday or Tuesday following, I saw the prisoner, I enquired of him if his master had signed the note, or if he would do so; he told me that he did not wish to trouble his master with it, that he had not signed it, he said, as he had a friend coming from Brighton, from whom he could get the remainder of the money, and he would call and pay Mr. Grant in a fortnight altogether for it; I then observed to him the strange and unaccountable circumstance of the other watch, and again told him it was between him and me; I remonstrated with him of the extreme difficulty it left me in in Mr. Grant's house; he said he knew it must, but he knew nothing of it; I then left him. He called on the 8th instant at Mr. Grant's shop, he changed his mind with respect to the eighteen guinea watch which he had before chose, and he chose one of twenty-five guineas or pounds, he left ten pound on account in part of payment and went away. We saw nothing more of him untill the night of the 14th; an officer and two men came to our house, they said they had apprehended a man with a watch which was suspicious. On this information Mr. Grant and I went to Mr. Morrat, a pawnbroker, No. 6, High-street, Marybone; we found the watch before mentioned, that was lost at Mr. Grant's; I had a description of the watch, name and number; I compared it to the watch. I have since sworn to the watch.

ROBERT FLOWERDEAU . I am a constable of Marybone. On the 14th of this month I was sent for to Mr. Morrat's shop. I took the prisoner in custody to Marlborough-street; the watch was produced before the magistrate. I, and another officer, and the pawnbroker, by desire of the magistrate, went to Mr. Grant and informed him of it.

JAMES HOLDSWORTH . I am a servant to Mr. Morrat, pawnbroker, High-street, Marybone. On the 14th instant, about twelve o'clock in the forenoon, the prisoner came to pledge a watch, but having suspicion of his person I detained the watch and sent for an officer. By order of the magistrate I went to Mr. Grant's, and there I found he had lost a watch of the same description. This is the watch.

Q. to Mr. French. Look at that watch - A. I have in my pocket book, Grant, Fleet-street, London, 3206, and the same on the watch. That is the watch I gave into the prisoner's hand, and Mr. Grant lost it.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 33.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100221-41

188. HANNAH FAWKES, alias, FOX , was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 13th of January , in the dwelling house of Sarah Barnes , a pellise, value 1 l. four silver table spoons, value 3 l. three gowns, value 10 s. a sheet, value 5 s. a shift, value 5 s. three petticoats, value 3 s. a tablecloth, value 2 s. two pair of stockings, value 3 s. three caps, value 3 s. two shawls, value

10 s. two bonnets, value 20 s. a pocket book, value 6 d. and two bank notes, value 4 l. and four one pound bank notes, the property of Sarah Barnes .

SARAH BARNES . I live in Queen-square, Westminster ; it is my dwelling house. The prisoner lived servant with me near three months; she left my service on the 13th of January. In the morning a soldier alarmed us; he came in and knocked at the door, and said the street door was open; there was no one up in the house

Q. What time was that - A. About nine in the morning Sarah Adams (the other servant) got up, and myself; I found the prisoner gone. I immediately looked in a work box for my pocket book; the pocket book containing the notes was gone; I missed four silver table spoons and the other articles. I had seen the pocket-book on the night before; I put a two pound note in it, and gave it to the prisoner to lay it down.

JAMES GILLMORE . I am an officer. On the 17th of January I apprehended the prisoner on board a barge in Paddington canal; I searched her; I found this pocket book in her pocket, containing two two-pound notes and two one-pound notes; these two shawls I found in a locker of the barge, where the prisoner was sitting; the prisoner said they were Mrs. Barnes's; she had no more of them. I took her to the office. I went back to the barge; the prisoner's brother belonged to the barge; he shewed me a private locker which I could not see before, and in that locker I found these four table spoons and three gowns. I have had the things in my custody ever since.

Prisoner's Defence. My mistress promised to forgive me. That is all I have to say.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY, aged 30.

Of stealing to the value of thirty-nine shillings only .

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18100221-42

189. JAMES CASEY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of February , forty pound weight of paper, value 7 s. the property of Thomas Divett , Edward Price , Richard Jackson , and Isaac Coburn .

RICHARD JACKSON . I am a woollen-draper in West Smithfield. The prisoner lived porter with us three or four years. I know the property stolen to belong to our firm, Thomas Divett , Edward Price , Richard Jackson , and Isaac Coburn .

WILLIAM HIGGINTON . I am keeper of the Bear and Ragged Staff Inn-yard, Smithfield . On Monday the 5th of February, when I came down stairs between seven and eight, I saw a truss lay at the warehouse-door in the yard. I examined the truss; I found it contained a quantity of paper; my ostler told me that some man, about an hour before, had pitched it there. I suspected that it might be taken from some Inn-yard. I sent to the Bell Inn yard to know if they had lost any thing; the ostler of the Bell came, and said he believed he knew who it belonged to; a person of the description of the prisoner was in the habit of leaving a parcel there for two hours of a morning. About nine o'clock the prisoner came in, and said that he wanted his parcel. I asked him where he had it from; he said he had bought it, and paid for it; it did not matter from whom; I told him, I should detain him and the parcel till such time he told me who he bought it off, or where he had it from. Accordingly, he told me the truth that he lived at Mr. Divett's, in Smithfield; and these things were his perquisites. I told him, if so, he would not have brought them away so soon in the morning; but if that was the case, I would go with him to Mr. Divett's; and if they approved of it being his perquisites, I should have no objection. I went with him to Mr. Divett; they said they never suffered him to have any perquisites from their house; as such, he was taken before the Alderman.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's defence. I never was in any trouble before; there is my master, if he can say ever I wronged him, I leave myself to him for my character.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Confined Three Months in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100221-43

190. MARY TWOHY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of February , twenty-six yards of linen cloth, value 3 l. the property of William Gillman and Thomas Clay .

WILLIAM PITT . I am shopman to William Gillman and Thomas Clay , linen-draper s, Barbican . On the 21st of February, the prisoner in company with another person came into the shop, and the other woman asked for an article. I shewed it to her, during which time I observed the prisoner to be shuffling something under her pelisse, which raised my suspicion. I paused to see what was gone; I discovered a piece of Irish linen missing; the prisoner appeared to be in a very great hurry to be gone, and went out. I immediately followed her, and overtook her some considerable way down the street. I laid hold of her arm, and asked her to walk back; she took the property from under her pelisse, requested me to take it, and said she did not wish to wrong me of it. I told her that I should not take the property; that she should come back, which she did, within one door, at the same time bringing the property; she then set the property down, and refused to come any further. I took hold of her, and took the property up, and told he she should go in, and sent for a constable, to whom I delivered her.

The property produced and identified.

GUILTY , aged 29.

Confined One Month in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100221-44

191. MARTIN COSTELLO was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of January , eighteen pound weight of copper, value 1 l. 4 s. the property of William Pontifex and Russell Pontifex .

JOHN WOOD . I am foreman to William and Russell Pontifex , coppersmith s in Shoe-lane .

Q. Did you lose any copper at any time. - A. Yes, on the 19th of January; when I saw the property at Guildhall, I knew it to my master's property.

MICHAEL NEALE . I am a patrol of St. Sepulchre's. On the 19th of January, about twenty minutes before nine, my partner and I came out of Smithfield, and came down West-street. The prisoner passed me with some property under his coat, which appeared to be heavy. I followed him down West-street, and catched him. I said, what have you got here; he

said, what is that to you; I demanded he should tell me; he said it was some copper. I asked him who he worked for: he said, a man in the middle of Thames-street. He had forgot the partners names. I took him in custody; he dropped it directly. My partner picked it up; we took him and the property to the watch-house.

THOMAS WILLSMORE . I am a patrol. I picked up the property; there is eighteen pound of copper.

The property produced and identified.

JOHN WOOD . The prisoner used to fetch up coals for the factory, and we have found many of the nails since he has been taken up among the coals.

Prisoner's defence. I went to wash my hands at the well; that copper was in that small bag by the well; I picked it up, and went along with it to where I owed a man some money for tea and sugar to Mr. Brown's, Cow-cross, in Sharp's-alley. The patrol came, and took me in custody.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100221-45

192. MARY MACDONALD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of January , a brass cock, value 2 s. the property of John Rice .

JAMES GORDON . I am a lodger to Mr. Rice. I rent the shop and parlour. On Sunday last, about a quarter after eight in the evening, I was sitting in my room. I heard several wrenches, as if some person was attempting to take the pipe. I took the candle, and went to the top of the kitchen stairs; I called out, but nobody answered. I heard a footstep; I went to the door, and saw Mr. Crook that lives in the same house; he was coming from chapel; I told him I thought there was somebody in the kitchen; he took the candle, and went down into the kitchen; I followed him; I saw the prisoner up in the corner; she said she was intoxicated, and came there to get herself sober; we sent for a constable; the watchhouse keeper and a watchman came, and upon their searching her, the cock of the water-butt was found upon her, and we found that the water-pipe had been wrenched.

MR. CROOK. I am a bricklayer, I lodge in the same house. I came home about a quarter past eight on the Sunday evening. Mr. Gordon met me in the passage, he said there was somebody in the kitchen; I took the candle out of his hand and went into the kitchen, and up in the corner I found the prisoner, with her nose and her knees together to conceal herself; I asked her what business she had there; she told me that she had a drop too much, and she came there to get herself sober before she went home. I then looked up to the pipe; I saw eighteen inches of the pipe almost off; it had been wrenched; and I missed the cock out of the water butt; I asked her what she had done with the cock; she fell upon her knees and wished heavy judgments from heaven if she knew any thing about it. When the watchhouse-keeper came, he searched the prisoner and found the cock upon her.

Prisoner's Defence. I was very much in liquor, and very much reduced; I went out picking up rags and bones; I picked up that cock among some ashes. I have two fatherless children.

GUILTY , aged 37.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100221-46

193. JOHN GARNHAM was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 11th of January , a box coat, value 8 l. the property of Edward Ellis , esq .

EDWARD BELL . I am coachman to Edward Ellis , esq. No. 19, Upper Grosvenor-street. On the 11th of January, about half past twelve at night, I lost the coat off the box or foot-board, I cannot say which; I had backed the coach into the coach-house in King-street mews ; I did not miss the coat till the next morning. The prisoner was watchman to the mews. I asked the prisoner if he knew any thing about the coat, he said, no.

EDWARD MIERS . I am a salesman, 123, Swallow-street. On the 1st of this month the prisoner came to my house, he asked me to buy a coat; I looked at it; he asked me three pound for it; he said it was his own; he found it near Bellfound. I asked him where he lodged; he said, at the Ship in Swallow-street; I told him I would go there and ask if he lodged there; he said it was of no use my going there, they would not take any account of it. I asked him what he had taken the buttons off the coat for; he said for a particular use. I would not buy it; he went out of the shop, and took the coat with him. I followed him as far as Grosvenor-street; I said to a person of my acquaintance, there is a man going with a box coat; I suspect he has stolen it. He went and fetched a constable. I am sure the prisoner is the man.

JOHN COBHAM . I am a constable. From information I came up to the prisoner in King-street; I asked him where he was going with that coat; he said, home; he lived just by. I took him in custody. This is the coat.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

GUILTY , aged 45.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100221-47

194. WILLIAM MADDOX was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of William Gustard , about the hour of two, on the night of the 5th of January , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, one thousand two hundred and thirty-six yards of woollen cloth, value 1433 l. his property .

The case was stated by Mr. Gurney.

WILLIAM GUSTARD . I live in Bedford-street, St. Paul's, Covent Garden ; I am a woollen-draper ; my shop is part of my dwelling-house. On the night of the 5th of February, at eleven o'clock, I examined all the fastenings of my shop, and saw it was all perfectly secure, and I and my family went to bed. In the morning, about half past seven, I was informed that my house was broken open. When I came down I found that the shutter of the shop door window had been broken open; the shutter had been wrenched off, and the iron bar had been taken down. One of them was fastened by a padlock: the padlock was broken.

Q. Did it appear to you by what means this violence had been done - A. It appeared as if it had been done by two iron crows; the marks of the crows were remaining in the wood; a pane of glass was taken out; I think they must have put some person in through the place where the pain of glass was taken out; it was large enough for a man or a boy to be put in. I suppose the shop door had been opened in that way. The

fastenings were all off when I came down, and the bar laid upon the floor.

COURT. The outer door next the street - A. Yes.

Mr. Gurney. Was any of your property stolen - A. Yes; all that property mentioned in the indictment. Fourteen hundred pounds worth of cloth.

COURT. That, I suppose, was almost all the stock in the shop - A. No; there was a good deal left.

Mr. Gurney. What sort of cloth was it - A. It was mostly superfine cloth, and part of it milled kerseymere.

Q. I do not know, sir, whether you were with the officers when they apprehended the prisoner - A. I was. He was apprehended in Bottle-hay-yard, St. John-street, three or four days after the robbery was committed. On searching the prisoner's room we found two iron crows; the officers took these crows and fitted them to the impressions on my door, in my presence; they exactly fitted. I have no doubt at all but the impressions had been made by these crows.

Q. Among other things did you find any cloth there which you knew to be your property - A. Yes.

WILLIAM MOULS . Q. I believe you are shopman to Mr. Gustard - A. I was, at the time.

Q. On the morning of the 6th of January at what time did you come down stairs - A. At a quarter, or half past seven.

Q. Was there then light enough from the heavens to see the face of a man - A. Yes, there was.

Q. How long had it been in that state - A. It had not been long; it is dark at seven o'clock at that time.

Q. Then it was not light half an hour - A. No; it could not have been.

Q. When you came down in what condition did you find the shop - A. There is a door in the passage that leads into the shop, which I usually go in of a morning, I found it fastened on the inside, which led me to suspect that there had been somebody inside had fastened it. I went to the shop door and found that the shutter had been taken down and replaced; the shop door I opened, which I found only on the latch; the iron bar was laying in the shop; there were marks of crows underneath the shutters. I found a pane of glass had been taken out. The shop was in confusion, and cloth was laying all over the shop.

JOHN HUTT . I am an officer of Hatton Garden.

Q. Did you, Stanton, and Mr. Gustard, go, on the 10th of January, to the lodgings of the prisoner - A. I did; at two o'clock in the day; his lodgings were at No. 4, Bottle-hay-yard, St. John-street; I knocked at the door, the prisoner's wife opened it; I asked if Mr. Maddox was at home; she said, yes. I went in the room; I found the prisoner in bed; his room was down stairs. I told Mrs. Maddox that I had a search warrant to search the same room, in the prisoner's hearing. I searched the room; I found in a drawer fifteen skeleton keys, and under the stairs, by the bed's head, ten bales of cloth.

Q. You mean ten pieces - A. Yes. Some whole pieces and some parts of pieces. I went out to Mr. Gustard and informed him that we had found his property; he then came in. I told the prisoner to get up and dress himself; I then took him in custody. Stanton found the pistols and crows in my presence, in the same drawer I found the skeleton keys; he found two loaded pistols, one of them loaded with slugs, and two iron crows. I have the charge of the pistols.

Q. Did you accompany Stanton to Mr. Gustard's to fit these iron crows. - A. I did. I found the impression made on the door to correspond with them crows; I have no doubt that these crows had been used for that purpose; one is broader than the other; one fitted the impression to the right and the other to the left. One of the crows is jagged, I found the impression jagged.

Q. How many places did you find the crows to correspond - A. Three; two on the outside, and one on the inside.

Q. Did you find any duplicates - A. Stratton found the duplicate concerning the cloth.

COURT. Had he a house to himself - A. No; an apartment only; his wife and he lived in the room; she ran away.

ROBERT STANTON . I am an officer. I accompanied Hutt in searching the prisoner's lodgings; I found two crows in the drawer in his room, and these brace of pistols; they were loaded. I found a duplicate which led me to Mr. Chapman the pawnbroker in St. John-street.

Q. Did Mr. Chapman attend the police office - A. He did, at the examination of the prisoner.

Q. Was the prisoner's wife present at the time - A. She was.

JOSEPH CHAPMAN . Q. Are you a pawnbroker in St. John-street - A. Yes.

Q. On the 6th of January was any cloth pawned with you - A. Two remnants were pawned by a female.

Q. Did you see that female at the office - A. I did; I could not identify her person; I believe she was the person. They were pawned on the 6th of January, in the name of Maddox.

Q. Did you point her out to the officer as being the person that you believed pawned it - A. I could not point her out.

Q. to Stanton. Was that the prisoner's wife that Mr. Chapman spoke to as to the best of his belief - A. It was.

JOHN EMBLIN . Q. I believe you are a tripeman in Leather-lane - A. Yes.

Q. In the beginning of January last was the prisoner in your service - A. He was.

Q. On the morning of Saturday the 6th of January at what time was he to come to work - A. At three o'clock.

Q. At what time did he in fact come - A. That I cannot speak to; he was there before I was up; I was up at eight o'clock.

Q. Was Southall in your employ - A. Yes, he was. If they do not come to their time there is a forfeit; he did not come to his time and he paid the forfeit. If they tell me those that do the work I pay the forfeit and deduct it out of the wages of the person that did not come.

WILLIAM SOUTHALL . Q. On the morning of Saturday the 6th of January what time did the prisoner come to work - A. Between six and seven; before it was light.

JOHN PRENTIS I am a cabinet maker; I live in Wild-street, Lincoln's Inn fields.

Q. On the night of the 5th of February, or the morning of the 6th, did you come through Bedford-street - A. I did; at two o'clock in the morning. I passed Mr. Gustard's house; I observed two men at the

door, they appeared to me to be attempting to force the lock of the door; on my approaching one of them turned down Henrietta-street, and the other up Bedford-street. I followed one of them, and, in doing so, I passed a watchman; I turned round and spoke to the watchman; then I went home.

Q. What sort of men were they - A. One of them was like the prisoner in size; not having seen his face, I do not swear positively.

Q. to prosecutor. Look at the dark blue cloth - that corresponds with that found at the pawnbroker's - A. They were examined, both, at the office by me and Mouls. I know the cloth produced by Mr. Chapman perfectly well.

Q. First look at that piece of blue cloth found at the prisoner's lodgings; what is the quantity there - A. There were eighteen yards stolen.

Q. Did you find the quantity at the prisoner's lodgings, and the quantity pawned, to make up that quantity - A. No; there were two yards deficient. The quantity pawned is two yards and a quarter, and fourteen yards were found at the prisoner's lodgings.

Q. Does it appear that that remnant, pawned at Mr. Chapman's, was torn off that very piece - A. Yes; we have matched it; it agrees exactly. I am quite sure it was torn off that piece.

Q. What is the value of that cloth found at the prisoner's lodgings - A. About one hundred and twenty pounds.

Q. The other piece produced by the pawnbroker is light blue - A. Yes; that corresponds with that piece. The quantity stolen was seven yards and a quarter; we found five yards at the prisoner's lodgings, and Chapman produces two yards and a quarter; it is my property. The dark grey is my property; there is six yards and a half; there were damages in it; and the list is very particular. I have examined it all; I believe all that is here is my property.

Prisoner's Defence. I am entirely innocent of the theft. It was brought to my place on the 6th of January, about half after five in the morning. There was a person that worked fellow servant with me, and lodged in the same yard with myself, he was in the habit of calling me in the morning when he was up first, and I was in the habit of calling him if I was up first. I gave the watchman orders on the over night to call me between two and three o'clock, he came and called me in the morning between two and three o'clock; I had been very ill about a fortnight before with the pain in my bowels; I told my wife not to go to sleep. I had a good deal of work to do; I expected this man to call me when he went to work; I went to sleep and my wife went to sleep. About half after five I heard a knock at the shutters, I called out loud; I did not know but what it was this young man, William Strangeways , that worked fellow servant with me; I said, Bill, stop a bit, I'll go along with you to work. I got up and opened the door, and these things were lodged in my place directly; as soon as I opened the door. I instantly dressed myself and went to work immediately. They told me that it was the property of a person failing in business, they would be much obliged to me to let them be there till the evening; I said I did not know but I might be at work very late in the evening, but my wife with be at home all day, she will give them you. I have never seen the parties since, from that day to this. I am entirely innocent of it. I told Mr. Stanton the officer how they came there the first night they took me in custody. They took me to the house of Correction, I was three weeks there; I could not see any person so that I could not make any defence. I told him so on the first night; he came and said, Maddox, if you mean to do any good, if you know any thing, tell me; I told him; he said he was very sorry for it; if they were living he would have them; he said, that would clear me of my trouble.

COURT to Stanton. The prisoner says that he told you when he was first taken that some person brought them to his house - A. He did. As I had known him four or five years I gave him a pint of beer and some money to get a little tobacco. I never knew any harm of him to the present time.

Q. Did he tell you who the persons were - A. Yes; he told me one was Bill Cook , and two other persons. I know a person of the name of Bill Cook , he is called a broker; I do not know how he gets his livelihood. He keeps a house of ill lame, if it is the same man; I believe there is not one in the police but what knows him.

RICHARD COURT . Q. You are a watchman - A. Yes.

Q. You know Bottle-hay-yard, St. John-street - A. Yes; that was in my beat on the 6th of January last.

Q. Did you know the prisoner before that time - A. Yes; I have known him this six months by calling him up to go to his work every morning.

Q. Did you call him up on the 6th of January - A. I did, about two o'clock, within a few minutes of it; he answered me; I did not see him. I knew his voice; it was his voice that morning, I should suppose, and no other but his. I am sure he answered.

COURT. Whom did you receive your orders from - A. His wife.

Mr. Gurney. When was you first applied to to come here - A. About ten days ago I went to the New Prison to see him; it was Wednesday, last week.

Q. I dare say if I was to ask you what time you called him on the 5th of January you could tell me - A. No; I do not always call him at one time.

Q. Do you know what time you called him on the 4th of January - A. No. I never think any thing at all about it unless I am asked.

Q. You cannot tell me of any other morning before or since, only just that day - A. No, I cannot.

MARY ELDRIDGE . Q. I believe the prisoner lodged at your house - A. Yes.

Q. You remember his being apprehended - A. I do; it was on the 10th of January.

Q. Do you remember on the 5th of January what time you went to bed - A. At eleven o'clock, I believe. The prisoner was in the house, and I believe he went to bed at that time; I did not see him; I heard him in his own room. His room is under mine.

Q. Who fastened the door (that night) of your house - A. Mr. Maddox. He asked me if I was going out any more, I told him, no; he fastened the door. About one o'clock I heard him cough; I was very ill that night and could not rest, and I heard him cough at past five in the morning, before he went out; he went out after five, but how much I cannot tell. I heard him answer the watchman at two o'clock, when the watchman called him.

Q. How many times do you think you heard him coughing. - A. I cannot say; he coughed very much; he coughed at 3 o'clock, and his own child cried. I thought he was going to get up.

Q. If he had gone out at the time that you supposed he was up stairs, must not you have heard him go out. - A. He very seldom went out but what I heard him.

Q. If he had gone out before five o'clock, must not you have heard him. - A. I must.

Q. Do you believe that he went out before five o'clock. - A. Not till after five o'clock, that I solemnly pledge myself that night.

Mr. Gurney. You were very wakeful that night and the morning too. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you sleep with a light in your room - A. No.

Q. A clock in your room. - A. No; Clerkenwell church-clock is near me; I counted the clock every hour from twelve.

Q. This was a very wakeful night to you indeed. - A. Yes, I was very ill; I had a bad cough.

Q. When were you first asked to come here, and give evidence for him - A. Mr. Bennett, the attorney, was the first person that asked me; I believe, last Monday.

A. Are you quite sure that no person made application to you to come here before last Monday - A. When Mr. Maddox was in Clerkenwell prison; he spoke to me about it, that is a fortnight ago to-morrow.

Q. If I was to ask you of the night of the 4th and the morning of the 5th, could you give me the history of that as particular as you have of this night of the 6th that you have been speaking of. - A. On the night of the 4th, he helped me with a tub, and then wished me good night; I went to bed nigh ten o'clock.

Q. And you were all night laying and counting the clock on the 4th. - A. Yes, I was

Q. And the same on the night of the 3d. - I can't recollect.

Q. Now you say you mostly heard the prisoner go out of a morning. - A. Very seldom that he went out but what I heard him.

Q. If he chose to go out softly, I suppose he could. - A. I do not think he could; the door makes such a noise.

Q. How long after five was it on the morning of the 6th. - A. A quarter after five, or half after five; I got up before Maddox went out, and staid in my own apartment till seven o'clock.

Q. Was the house quiet all the time, except Maddox's going out. - A. Yes; I never heard any thing but Maddox go out; I heard the spring latch catch.

Q. If there had been any man come that morning, you must have heard him. - A. I did not hear any such thing.

Q. If any body had come, and knocked at the door at hall after five, you must have heard him. - A. I should.

Q. Did any persons knock at the door at half past five. - A. I did not hear any; I never missed of hearing the watchman call Maddox.

Q. And at five you were up, if any persons had knocked, you must have heard them. - A. I must; I never heard any body knock at the door.

Q. If three men came, and knocked at the door, and brought great bundles, you must have heard them. - A. I must, I should have thought. I am very quick of hearing.

The prisoner called seven witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 30.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18100221-48

195. CHARLES BRANDON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 20th of February , a watch, value 30 s. the property of Joseph Miers , from his person .

JOSEPH MIERS . I am a turner and carpenter ; I live in Church-street, Bethnal Green. On the 20th of February, I met a few friends; I went into the Adam and Eve to have part of a pint of beer; the prisoner came in with a man; he called master: I happened to go out to water; this lad followed me; he asked me what o'clock it was; I told him five minutes after ten; he told me I was wrong; I pulled it out again to tell him; he snatched the watch from me.

Q. How long had you been at the public house - A. Not an hour.

Q. Were you in liquor - A. No, not at all. He ran away when he got the watch; I ran after him and lost him; in about two or three minutes I saw him again; I stopped him; he threw the watch down. This is the watch; he broke the chain when he snatched the watch.

Prisoner's Defence. This young man and his acquaintances were in the Adam and Eve together; he was very much intoxicated. I took the watch in a joke.

Prosecutor. I was not drunk the prisoner might suppose I was drunk, because I was full of my sun.

GUILTY , aged 16.

Whipped in jail , and discharged.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18100221-49

196. THOMAS SHEEN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 11th of February , a pocket book, value 6 d. and a pencil case, value 2 s. the property of Robert Lyons , from his person .

ROBERT LYONS . I am an apothecary ; I live in Great Titchfield-street. I lost a pocket book in the chapel, Lincoln's-inn-fields ; the pocket book contained a silver pencil case.

Q. Do you know that you had it - A. I know that I had it that morning; I lost it at about twelve o'clock, when I was at chapel.

Q. When did you see it - A. That evening; it was then in the possession of William Pitt .

WILLIAM PITT . I am a beadle. I was going down Wild-street; I saw the prisoner looking at this pocket book; I passed him. In a minute I saw a quantity of people coming; they said, there is a man has stolen a pocket book; I immediately went and seized him; he threw the pocket book down an area; I picked it up; I have had it ever since.

PATRICK MC'CARTHY . I act as beadle to the chapel. My fellow servant gave me notice that this man came in drunk and very dirty. As soon as he went into the crowd, I cried out, take care of your pockets; he went out, and a young man came and told me he had dropped a pocket book. I enquired, and Mr. Lyons said he had lost his pocket book. I pursued him, and when Mr. Pitt laid hold of him I saw him throw the pocket book away.

Prisoner's Defence. I went into the chapel to hear

the prayers, I picked up the pocket-book as I came out.

GUILTY, aged 40.

Of stealing to the value of nine-pence .

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and Whipped in Jail .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18100221-50

197. THOMAS BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 13th of February , a pair of shoes, value 2 s. 6 d. the property of William Collier .

JOHN DUFFIELD . I am a servant to Mr. Collier, shoemaker , Middle-row, St. Giles's . On the 13th of February, about eleven o'clock, I saw the prisoner take one shoe and put it under his coat, I laid hold of him and found the property on him; one shoe was in his breeches.

The property produced and identified.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

GUILTY, aged 12.

Judgment respited.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100221-51

198. THOMAS WHEELER was indicted for feloniously receiving, on the 17th of January , twenty boots, value 7 l. fourteen shoes, value 2 l. eight gowns, value 1 l. 12 s. twenty petticoats, value 1 l. fifteen shirts, value 3 l. ten shifts, value 2 l. six frocks, value 9 s. nine sheets, value 1 l. ten aprons, value 10 s. twelve pair of stockings, value 18 s. nine pair of sheets, value 7 l. fourteen handkerchiefs, value 14 s. ten caps, value 10 s. seven pockets, value 2 s. 6 d. two silk handkerchiefs, value 6 s. two curtains, value 2 l. thirty yards of printed cotton, value 3 l. and nine yards of calico, value 18 s. the property of Edmund Sinclair , being part and parcel of the goods and chattels burglariously stolen by William How and James Lander , whereof they have been convicted; he well knowing them to have been feloniously stolen .

THOMAS CLARK . Q. You produce the record of the conviction of William How and James Lander . - A. Yes.

The record read.

Mr. Knapp. Put How and Lander to the bar.

JOHN ARMSTRONG . Q. Do you know the two prisoners, How and Lander. - A. I do. I was in Court yesterday at the time these prisoners were convicted for the burglary of Mr. Sinclair's house; them are the people.

Edmund Sinclair was called, and not appearing in Court his recognizance was ordered to be estreated.

ELIZA SINCLAIR . Q. You are the wife of Edmund Sinclair. - A. I am. We lived at 172, Whitecross-street, St. Lukes.

Q. On the 13th of January, was your house broken open. - A. Yes; my husband and me went to bed together about a quarter before two; we were the last persons up belonging to the family, and to the best of my knowledge we left every thing safe and secure. In the morning, at six o'clock, we were alarmed by an exciseman; that was before it was day light. We went into the shop (my husband keeps a shop for boots and shoes, and we deal in clothes besides); the shop was quite distressed; the things were taken away chiefly.

Q. Did these things consist of boots, shoes, gowns. - A. Yes, and a variety of articles; there was also between twenty or thirty yards of printed cotton, and about three pound's-worth of halfpence.

Q. Have you seen produced to you since any property that you knew to be part of the property that was taken from your house. - A. I have seen some; but I cannot take upon me to swear to them.

Court. - These things will be produced to you; recollect you are upon your oath; you must speak the whole truth, whether it is for or against the person accused.

JOHN BALLAD . Q. You know Mr. Wheeler, the prisoner. - A. Yes; I did not know him before the Sunday he purchased the things.

Q. Do you know How and Lander. - A. Yes, them are the two men. I have known How and Lander about five weeks before the house was broken open. On Saturday night, the 13th of July, I was in company with How and Lander at the Gold-house, Golden-lane. I went there after I had done my work, it might be near nine o'clock at night; they were in the house. I sat and drank with other company that were there, and I might drink with them, but I did not go into their company before it got late. I sat there till the house was shutting up about twelve o'clock. I, Lander, and How, agreed to go to Mr. Sinclair's house, with intention to do this robbery. We went there between two and three o'clock in the morning. When we got there, Lander and How lifted me upon Mr. Sinclair's back wall; there was a yard between the wall and the house. When I was put upon the wall, Lander followed me; he got upon the wall too; me and Lander then went to the staircase window, leaving How on the outside; one of us lifted the staircase window up, I am not sure which; it was not fastened; I got into the house, and went down stairs. Lander waited at the window. I could not get in at the parlour window, it was fast; I opened the back-door, got into the yard, and opened the yard door that adjoins to the court. We all three men came in the yard; we got the shutter down, chucked up the parlour window, I got in the window, and went into the shop. Lander and How were waiting at the window. I brought out a quantity of boots, shoes, and linen; I handed them out to How and Lander, a quantity of articles, a good many halfpence, and sheets, shirts, shifts, frocks, handkerchiefs, and printed cotton. I handed them over to them in the yard. We then went away with the articles that I have mentioned to Mrs. Jenning's, in Red Lion market, in the same street. Lander and How went in to Mrs. Jennings; I did not; they left the things that we took; they came out; we went to Mr. Sinclair's house again for more property; I got in to the window again, and handed the same kind of articles out that we had each of us as much as we could carry. They were taken to the same place; we went in, and saw Mr. and Mrs Jennings; they refused keeping them; we took all the things to a house in Bridgewater-gardens; I cannot tell the people's names; I saw a woman there; we left them, and went to Sinclair's again, and when he had got a quantity of things, each of us, we came away; that was the third and last time. We went to this woman's in Bridgewater-gardens with these things. She then said that she did not deal in them kind of things; she would not have them there. Lander went out to see for a place to put them in; he did not return for some time; I went after him, and met him; then me, Lander, and a man called Banbury, went to

Long-lane; How was left in the house at Bridgewater gardens.

Q. Whose house was it in Long-lane - A. I do'nt know; it was up a gateway; we could not get admittance; Lander got admittance at Stanton's, in Providence-place, Bridgewater-gardens; we then went to the house, where How was left with the things, and brought them all away to Stanton's. How was upon the look out; Stanton gave leave to let them be for a little while up in the pigeon loft; we went up into the pigeon loft with three bundles, and left them at Stanton's. We overhauled them, kept some of the things for his own use, and two or three things, such as clouts, were given to Stanton's wife for his children. Lander and I went away; we saw How at the Catherine Wheel; it was then about half past nine in the morning; then I and Banbury went down to Mr. Wheeler's in Long-lane, No. 31, I believe; I saw Mr. Wheeler there, about ten o'clock on Sunday morning; we told him that we had got a quantity of things, if he would come and look at them; we told him where; he said he had not had his breakfast, he would come in half an hour; we went back to the Catherine Wheel, to Lander and How; Wheeler came in a little more than half an hour to the Catherine Wheel; me and Lander went to Stanton's and shewed him the goods in the loft; Wheeler looked at them; Lander asked him nine pound for them; he wanted some time to consider about it; he was to come in two hours; he did not come; Lander, How, and myself went down to Wheeler's house in Long-lane, he was not at home. We went to a public house over the way and waited for him; about three o'clock we saw him, and then he offered five pound, and at last agreed to give five pound ten shillings, and a crown to be spent.

Q. Were you present - A. No; I did not see Wheeler till the evening; we went with the things on the same Sunday, at dusk; we took all these things to Wheeler's in a coach; we then saw Wheeler, between five and six o'clock; what passed between Lander and him I cannot say.

Q. Did you see Wheeler when the goods were delivered in the house - A. Yes. We put the goods in the house, and then Wheeler paid three pound; I am not certain whether he paid it to Lander or How; I had my share, one pound, and each of them a pound a piece.

Q. Now you are sure that Wheeler is the person that you left these things with, and from whom you received that three pound - A. I am.

JAMES STANTON . I live at No. 9, Providence-place, Bridgewater-gardens.

Q. Do you know How and Lander - A. I know Lander very well; he worked for me; I have seen How two or three times. I never saw Ballad before the Sunday morning.

Q. On Sunday morning, the 14th, about what time did you see Lander - A. I was in bed; Lander knocked at my door, near to eight o'clock, he asked me to get up; I did; he said he wanted to leave a little bundle for a little while; I gave him leave; knowing him, I had no suspicion of any thing of the kind; he had nothing with him then; it was light. He went down stairs, and instead of a little bundle he brought a large one up stairs; he went and brought another, and Ballad came up after him with another bundle as large as them; there were three bundles in all. As soon as he brought them up stairs, I said, James, I don't think they are your own; I will not have them here; he said they were all his own; he would not leave them there long, and he would come and take them away; Lander and Ballad took them up into my pigeon loft, and before they went away they made two bundles of them, and said they would come directly and take them away; then they went away. About ten o'clock they brought a man up; I have every reason to believe the prisoner is the man; he was rather pock marked in the face; I was at the other end of my loft, feeding my pigeons. I do really believe he is the man; he came along with Lander and Ballad; I don't know what for; I heard no conversation pass between them. As soon as Wheeler came into the loft he stooped and looked at the property, and went down directly; they all three went away; I heard the prisoner talking with them, but what it was I don't know. I began to be frightened; I went down stairs; I asked a person, and I went to the Catherine Wheel ; I saw Lander, How, and Ballad there; Wheeler was not there; I asked them to take them away, I did not like to have them in my place. How and Lander came and took them away in sheets between five and six o'clock in the evening. I do not know whether they had a cart or a coach; I was up stairs, and very glad they took them away.

MRS. STANTON. Q. Are you the wife of the last witness - A. Yes. I live in Bridgewater-gardens, with my husband.

Q. Do you know How and Lander - A. Yes; them are the men.

Q. Do you know Ballad - the man that has been examined - A. Yes; that is Ballad.

Q. Do you know the person of the prisoner at the bar - A. Yes; that is the gentleman; he came to my house the day after the robbery, on the Sunday, with How and Ballad, between eleven and twelve o'clock in the morning; they all went up into the pigeon loft; they hardly staid a minute there, and then they came down again and went away. About five o'clock in the evening How and Lander came to our house and took away two bundles.

COURT. Do you know how they took these bundles away - A. I think I heard Lander say there was a coach. We live up an alley; we could not hear the coach.

Q. Did you see Lander come there in the morning - A. Yes; I heard him; I was in bed; I covered my head over in the bed. I knew Lander before; he had worked for my husband; I knew him by his voice.

Q. And the next time that Lander and Ballad came was the time that Wheeler came - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember at the time that Lander and Ballad came first, whether they brought any thing with them - A. Yes; they took them up in the pigeon loft. I heard them go from one room to the other.

MARY ANN HALL . I am servant to Mr. Stanton.

Q. Look round and tell me whether you know the prisoner - A. I do not. I know How and Lander. On the Sunday morning after the robbery, Lander and Ballad came, at eight o'clock; I was in the back room when they came and knocked at the door; my master got up; and then I saw James Lander and John Ballad ; they took three bags up into the pigeon loft and went away.

Q. How soon did you see Lander again - A. About

eleven o'clock. I was gone out of an errand, and when I came back I saw Lander, Ballad, and another gentleman. come down the ladder from the pigeon loft, and went away; and about five o'clock in the evening, just before we went to tea, I saw Lander and How come and take two bundles away in two sheets. I never saw them afterwards.

DANIEL CARTWRIGHT . I am one of the marshalmen of the city of London. On Wednesday, the 17th of January, I, in company with Mr. Armstrong, and other officers, went to Wheeler's house; he keeps a green-stall, No. 31, Long-lane; Mr. Sinclair was with us; Wheeler was at home. We went through the shop into the back parlour; Armstrong was before me; Mrs. Wheeler had a pair of boots and was going to get up, Armstrong made to her; he said, them are what I want; he took the boots out of her hand and gave them to Mason. We told Wheeler what we had come for, and shewed him the warrant; we read the warrant to him; he said nothing; he seemed very much flurried. I put a pair of handcuffs on him; we took him with us to every part of the house that we searched. In the room below we found a quantity of dirty linen, and as Mr. Sinclair could not speak to it we left it and went up stairs. We perceived Wheeler to have a new pair of shoes on, we told him to take them off; he took them off, and Mr. Sinclair said, they are my shoes, they have my stamp upon them; Wheeler said he had bought them and given a crown for them. We gave him another pair of old shoes, he put them on These boots were found in the presence of Sinclair; he said they were his boots, in the prisoner's hearing; he gave no account how he came by them. Sinclair claimed them by the stamp; they are new boots. We found another pair of shoes on a landing place in a box; Mr. Sinclair claimed them by the stamp. We went into the back parlour again; Mrs. Sinclair was fetched, and among the linen she picked out two sheets and a shift; she said, these are mine; Mrs. Wheeler said they were her's, and Mrs. Sinclair said, that is wrong, that is mine. I can swear to them. I brought them away.

JOHN ARMSTRONG . I was with Cartwright. I saw the things that were found, and I heard the expressions that were made. The house was pointed out to us by Ballad, on the Monday night, and so was Stanton's, before we had the search warrant.

Q. Whereabouts is the amount of all the property taken by this burglary - A. Forty or fifty pounds, I believe.

COURT to Mrs. Sinclair. Your husband is not here - A. No.

Q. You went to the house of Wheeler, you were shewn some linen there - A. Yes. Mr. Cartwright drawed them all out from among a fold of linen, and laid them upon the table.

Q. By your directions, woman - Upon your oath did not you point them out to him. It is of great consequence that you should speak the truth here; if you dare to exceed the truth, as against the man, you will most certainly be punished; if you speak less than the truth you are liable to be punished. Your oath is, to speak the truth, the whose truth, and nothing but the truth and neither more or less and that you appeal to God to do; by the solemn oath you have taken, and by your appeal to God, and you draw out the linen that was in Wheeler's house, or did Cartwright draw them out by your direction - A. I could not draw them out; I said then I believed them to be mine. The sheets that we found the mark is off; it had my hand writing in the middle with common ink, the selling price; I turned the sides of one of them into the middle; there is no mark on them now.

Q. Have you any doubt that is your property - A. I have not any doubt that I had it in my shop.

Q. Do not you believe it was part of the property that was stolen - A. I cannot say that it was.

Q. You are quite sure that you mended it - A. Yes; and this shift, I have not a doubt it is one that I have had.

Q. Do not you believe that was one of the sheets that your house was robbed off - A. I cannot say it was or it was not.

Q. Did not you pick that sheet out and deliver it to the officer - A. I said I knew the sheet; I had seen the sheet.

Q. Did not you understand the reason of the officers taking you to Wheeler's house - A. Yes.

Q. Did you then truly state to them that you believed that was one of the sheets you lost - A. I have no doubt of that. I should be sorry to say it was if I thought it was not

Mr. Knapp. Take these shoes into your hand and tell me whether you know them - A. I know that there is my husband's stamp upon them.

Q. Look at the new shoes - A. There is the stamp of a man that did work for us upon them; and the boots have a stamp I do not know

Q. Do you mean to swear that at the time you was sent for to look at the sheets they had a mark upon them - A. No; if they had then they must now; I think there was a mark; I know I owned one of them; I know I have had the sheets in my shop.

Q. Have you any doubt that that is the same sheet that the officers shewed you at Wheeler's house - A. No; that is the same sheet.

COURT. When was you examined before the justice - A. I don't know what day it was.

Armstrong. It was the 18th of January.

COURT. Was your husband examined at the same time - A. Yes.

Q. Can you tell me where he is - A. No; I have not seen him since Tuesday night; I dare say he is gone into his own country, into Norfolk, to the best of my knowledge.

Prisoner's Defence. The sheets and shifts I had in my possession a long while; the shift is worked by my own little girl at school, and the other is my wife's work; and there is two others at home to match with it, and I can bring the school mistress.

GUILTY , aged 37.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100221-52

199. ANN KOLP and SARAH MAY were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 11th of January , twenty eight yards of printed cotton, value 30 s. and seven yards of other printed cotton, value 0 s. the property of John Thwaites , privately in his shop .

JOHN THWAITES . I am a linen-draper in Upper Holborn , I keep a shop there. On the 11th of January, about three in the afternoon, I saw the prisoners both together in my shop, one of my shopwoman came

to me and desired me to take fourpence halfpenny out of a shilling. In consequence of information from my shopwoman I went up to the two prisoners, they eyed me as I went along; they both had their hands in their pocket holes; the moment I got up to them Ann Kolp let go a whole piece of printed cotton, she had under her petticoats, and it fell upon her shoes; she stepped backwards about two paces; I stooped to pick it up, and in stooping to pick it up I saw another print under the other girls petticoats, laying upon her shoes; and to prevent any interruption in our business I put them into a back room, and as soon as I was at liberty I went into this place to see how they were behaving themselves; Ann Kolp said, sir, indeed it was not me that stole the print, it was the other girl; I said where is she; she said she is gone into the yard; I went into the yard, I could not see her: I went in again and said I could not see her; she said she is gone out into the yard; I went out again and there I saw her sitting upon a high wall, that parts my neighbour's premises from mine; my neighbours young man was on the other side of the wall, he would not let her get over; she was secured; it was some time after that before we could get an officer; they refused going; we got a second officer; they could not take them away; they resisted; I believe a third constable came; we got them in a coach at last, and passing along the counter, where this young woman that served them was folding some goods, Ann Kolp struck her a violent blow on the breast with her patten, and as they were going out of the door, I was passing along with the officers the same girl turned and kicked me at a certain part, which caused such pain, I was not able to rise for two hours; and when we were at Hatton Garden office, she repeated that she would do for me if she had an opportunity, and desired me to take care of myself.

ANN MASON . Q. Were you serving in Mr. Thwaites's shop - A. Yes. The prisoners came in together between three and four, they asked for some muslin, I shewed them several sorts; after some time May bought a quarter of a yard at one shilling and sixpence a yard, that was fourpence halfpenny.

Q. Were there any printed cottons on the counter where they were - A. A great many.

Q. Did you afterwards see the pieces that were picked up nae them - A. After they were picked up I did.

Q. Were they upon the counter by them - A. I cannot say that.

Q. How did they pay you - A. They gave me a shilling, I took it to Mr. Thwaites and told him I suspected the prisoners, and got the change of him.

Q. Had the prisoners done any thing that made you suspect them - A. Their manner was very much confused.

Q. Had you seen them do any thing which made you suspect them - A. The prisoner Kolp stooped down several times, I looked over the counter, and she gave me a piece of printed cotton, which she said had fell down.

Q. Did that induce you to look over to see if there was any more on the ground - A. No. I then went with the shilling for the change, when I returned I saw Kolp with one hand in her pocket hole, and her side stuck out very much, which made me suspect that she had taken something. I saw Mr. Thwaites pick the print up; I did not see it drop; I believe Kolp dropped it; Mr. Thwaites picked it up from the place where she was standing.

Q. Did you see him pick up the other piece - A. I saw him stoop, and then when he got up he had it in his hand; I was not on that side. He picked up the second piece from where May had been standing. Kolp struck me with a patten; I did not see her strike me; I received a blow as they were going out of the shop; when the officer was attempting to take them out of the shop.

WILLIAM BARBER . I am a headborough. I took the prisoners into custody and took them to Hatton Garden; I delivered them to Ekelsoe.

THOMAS EKELSOE . I am an officer of Hatton Garden. I have got two pieces of cotton; I received them from Mr. Thwaites and his son.

Prosecutor. The small piece is what May dropped; it has my private mark upon it. The other piece, I picked it up at the same time, it has my private mark; the value of the smaller piece is ten shillings, and the value of the large one, it cost fifteen pence halfpenny a yard; it is near forty shillings.

Q. When you saw the cotton fall did you say any thing to either of the prisoners - A. I charged them with having dropped the cotton; Kolp did not deny it.

Q. Did you charge May with dropping the other piece - A. I cannot say I did. I could not be certain that May did drop the other piece; I only saw it lay at her feet. I saw Kolp distinctly drop one piece; I was within three feet of her at the time it fell.

Kolp's Defence. I went to this gentleman's shop with this young woman; we went to buy some muslin for caps; there were a great many pieces on the counter; I never touched them at all; after I had the change the gentleman came and challenged me with taking a piece of print, and at Hatton Garden he only challenged us with taking one piece. He locked us in a room for two or three hours; when he came round the counter and challenged us; I told him I did not know what he meaned; I knew nothing of it. He searched me; I had nothing. I was outside of the door; he brought me in again and said he had lost some print; he told the young woman at the time he did not see any thing; somebody said there was a piece of print laying on the ground; I was never nigh it.

May's Defence. I cannot say any thing more than what she has said.

Prosecutor. When I challenged her she was at the further part of the shop; fifty-five feet from the door. I picked up the two pieces at one time.

KOLP, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 18.

MAY, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 20.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18100221-53

200. THOMAS HICKS was indicted for that he on the 9th of January was servant to William Deakin and Daniel Deakin , and was employed and entrusted by them to receive money for them, and being such servant and so employed, did receive and take into his possession the sum of 3 l. 9 s. 3 d. on their account, and afterwards feloniously did secret and steal the same .

JOHN BUTLER . I am clerk to William and Daniel Deakin; they are carriers at the Commercial Inn, London Wall, and the White Horse, Cripplegate. I deliver to the porters the goods that come out of the

country to deliver in town. I have got their book; here is my own hand-writing, a parcel directed for William Lawton 's, to be left at Mr. Birmingham's, Angel and Crown, Wood-street, either on the 9th or the 10th. I have omitted the date; they were two large packages; they came to the White Horse, Cripplegate, by Mr. Deakin's waggon. The prisoner went out with the carman to receive the money, and carry the book; I am certain that he went out of the yard with the cart that day.

Q. What was to be paid for Mr. Lawton's packages. - A. 3 l. 9 s. 3 d. The prisoner never accounted for them. This is my hand-writing, and it is the book the prisoner took that day. I know that the things went out in the cart.

JOHN BIRMINGHAM . I live at the Angel and Crown, in Wood-street . On the 9th of January, two packages were delivered to me for Mr. Lawton; my wife paid in my presence 3 l. 9 s. 3 d. for the carriage, to the prisoner, to the best of my recollection; but I cannot say. When Mr. Lawton paid me, I gave him the ticket that accompanied the parcel.

Mr. Gurney. You do not mean to swear to the identity of the prisoner. - A. By no means.

THOMAS MICHELL . I was clerk to Mr. Deakin on the 9th of January.

Q. Did the prisoner ever account to you for 3 l. 9 s. 3 d. that he received at Mr. Birmingham. - A. He never accounted for it to me.

WILLIAM DEAKIN . My partner's name is Daniel Deakin. This money, if it was received, was for carriage to myself and brother; these came from Yorkshire. We are not sole proprietors of the waggon; there is part debtor in London, and part debtor in Yorkshire. If I suffer my man to run away with five shillings, I must account for it.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel, and called five witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100221-54

201. THOMAS HICKS was indicted, for that he, on the 27th of January , was servant to William Deakin and Daniel Deakin , and was employed and entrusted by them to receive money for them, and by virtue of such employment, did receive and take into his possession on their account 1 l. 1 s. 8 d. and that afterwards he did embezzle, secret, and steal the same .

The case was stated by Mr. Alley.

JOHN BUTLER . On the 27th of January, I was clerk to Mr. Deakin. On the 18th of January, two parcels were delivered to the care of the prisoner for C. Pocock, Bouverie-street, Fleet-street . The carriages came to 1 l. 1 s. 8 d. that is the ticket I gave to the prisoner, which was to be delivered to the person that paid the money for them. The prisoner never accounted to me for the money.

COURT. How did you get the ticket again. - A. I just now received it of Mr. Pocock. When the porter goes out, I commit the ticket to his care; he is to receive the money, and to account for it to the other clerk. This is the book which he has, and is marked off with the receiving clerk's initials, Thomas Vincent, if paid.

JOHN POCOCK . Q You live in Bouverie-street. - A. I do; my father is a merchant. On the 18th of January, the prisoner brought two parcels; I paid him the money on the 27th of January, 1 l. 1 s. 8 d.

THOMAS VINCENT . Q. I have only to ask you whether the prisoner ever accounted to you for that 1 l. 1 s. 8 d - A. He did not.

Court. Q. You are the person he ought to account to. - A. Yes.

Mr. Gurney. Q. Is there any other book that he accounts to. - A. None.

Q. Does not the entry in that book import that he had delivered the parcel, and received the money. - A. No; it does not. The entry is C. Pocock, two articles, 1 l. 1 s. 8 d. to receive - signed, received M. N. That is Mr. Pocock's clerk; I had nothing to do with that but to settle with him.

Q. (To Mr. Pocock) Whose writing is received M. N. - A. Our clerk's.

Q. (To Vincent) When he pays you the money, do you call over the articles to him. - A. He calls them over himself out of the delivery that book, and I copy them into that book afterwards; he takes that book, and calls the numbers over, and I mark them off, which I have received in his own delivery book.

Q. When was this man taken up on this charge. - A. I do not know.

Q. When did you find out that this sum had been omitted to be accounted for. - A. I left Mr. Deakin on the 5th of February. Before I went away, I brought it forward as not paid; I was present at the latter part of the time before he was taken up.

Q. Did the prisoner ever accompt to you for the omission of this sum. - A. No; he said they were not paid.

DANIEL DEAKIN . Q. When this man was apprehended, did you speak to him about this sum of money that had been paid. - A. I told him that sums of money had been paid that had not been accounted for; he said he knew it; he kept the money; he would pay me by instalments; he offered to pay it weekly, I think two shillings a week.

Prisoner's Defence. When I went into Mr. Deakin's service, I understood I was going to be bookkeeper in a short time. I expected, by a person that recommended me, that I was to have twenty-five shillings a week; instead of that, I only got a guinea. I sent to Mr. Deakin to have my wages raised; in consequence of that I was discharged. I wished to pay Mr. Deakin; I had not money enough; I got a place at Mr. Savage's; I wished to make the account right, If Mr. Deakin would have given me time; he wished to have it immediately; it was out of my power.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Imprisoned in Newgate One Year .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100221-55

202. JOHN DOMINGO was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 3d of February , an umbrella, value 4 s. a counterpane, value 1 l. two sheets, value 1 l. and a blanket, value 10 s. the property of John Joseph , in his dwelling house

JOHN JOSEPH . I live at No. 10, in Christian-street, St. George's in the East ; I rent the whole house, and lodge and board sailor s ; the prisoner lodged in my house fifteen weeks. On the 1st of February I went to Gravesend, and when I returned on the Sunday I missed a counterpane, two sheets, and a blanket, from my bed, and an umbrella.

Q. Have you ever seen the articles again - A. Yes; I found them on the Monday; the prisoner told me where to find them.

WILLIAM THOMPSON . I keep a shop; 112, Rosemary-lane. On Sunday evening, the 2d of February, about nine o'clock, I purchased an umbrella of the prisoner, I gave him two shillings for it; about half an hour afterwards I bought a counterpane and a pair of sheets; I gave him twelve shillings and sixpence for the sheets. He said he lodged on board a ship

Q. Could he speak English - A. Yes; quite intelligible for me to understand him. They were all claimed by Joseph; I gave them up.

WILLIAM CORNWALL . I live at 51, Rosemary-lane, I keep a clothes shop. I bought a pair of blankets of the prisoner on the 1st of February, I gave him six shillings for it.

Prisoner's Defence. He said he would get me a ship this day and that day. He left me starving in the house.

GUILTY, aged 25.

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling-house .

Fined One Shilling and discharged.

Tried by a Jury of half English and half Foreigners,

Before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100221-56

203. ROBERT JONES was indicted for that he on the 25th of November , was servant to Thomas Davis , and was employed and entrusted by him to receive money for him, and being such servant, and so employed, and entrusted, did receive and take into his possession the sum of 15 l. for and on account of his said master, and that he afterwards, fraudulently did secrete and steal the same .

THOMAS DAVIS . I am a publican in King-street, St. James's ; the prisoner was my potman . On the 25th of November I gave him a ten pound bank note and a five pound country note, I directed him to go to my bankers, Morland and Co. in Pall Mall, and get them changed. I had at various times sent him with small sums. I never saw him afterwards till I met him in Lombard street, I then took him by the collar and took him to the Compter. I never got any part of the money from him.

FRANCIS HASLOP . I am in the house of Ransom, Morland, and Co. Mr. Davis keeps money at our house. On the 25th of November the prisoner came to our office to get change; I find there is an entry in the book of a ten pound bank note, and a country note, five pound, for Mr. Davis.

Q. Do you recollect whether the prisoner was the man that brought it - A, Yes; I think he was.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

GUILTY , aged 32.

Whipped in Jail , and Confined Six Months in the House of Correction .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100221-57

204. CHARLES LONG was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 31st of January , a saw, value 2 s. the property of Thomas Porter .

THOMAS PORTER . I am a carpenter . I was at work in Limehouse fields finishing some houses; at twelve o'clock I left the tools in the house and went into the next house to dinner with my shopmates; while we sat at dinner we heard somebody in the house, my shopmate said, go and see who is in the house; I said it is my master. In a few minutes he went out and returned; he asked me to go and see if all my tools was right; I went and missed a saw; he pursued the prisoner and took him with my saw under his coat.

JAMES DOUGWORTH . I am a carpenter; I worked in the same building with the last witness. On the last day in January, I heard a noise in the building; in four or five minutes I went out to see; I found the back door put of oneside, I saw the prisoner two hundred yards off walking under a fence in the field; I ran after him; I looked under his coat, there I saw two saws; my partner came up directly. The prisoner begged us to let him go; we had been served so before, we would not let him go.

Prisoner's Defence. When they demanded them I gave them up; I did not go into the building.

GUILTY , aged 57.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and Whipped One Hundred Yards near Limehouse Church .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100221-58

205. ANN COHEN and FRANCES SIBLEY were indicted for feloniously assaulting Solomon Abrahams , in the king's highway, on the 28th of January , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, a pocket book, value 6 d. three bank notes, value 10 l. each, two bank notes, value 2 l. each, and a bank note, value 1 l. the property of Solomon Abrahams .

SOLOMON ABRAHAMS . I am a seaman ; I live in Angel-court; Whitechapel. On the 28th of January, about half past ten at night, I was in High-street, Whitechapel , I met with the two prisoners, I took them into a liquor shop and treated them, we had a glass of rum each; then they treated me again with a glass of peppermint; then we went to another liquor shop up a turning; Ann Cohen asked me if I would go and speak to her up the turning, and while I was speaking to Ann Cohen , Francis Sibley came unawares and catched me by the throat with one hand and with her other hand she unbuttoned my breeches pocket, and took out my pocket book; I had not power to stop her. My pocket book contained three ten pound notes, two two's, and a one, and my pension ticket, and a certificate from captain Gordon. As soon as I got clear of them I ran to the patrol; he said he would look after them; I told him their names.

Q. You knew their names before - A. Yes. I knew Sibley four months; I knew the other by living with her.

SAMUEL MILLER . I am an officer of Whitechapel office. On Monday I received information that a man had been robbed on Sunday of thirty-five pound. I went to the prisoners lodgings in company with Freeman and found a padlock on their door; I searched after them three weeks, at last I found Sibley in Red-Lion-court, and Cohen in Checquer-alley, Bunhill-row.

Sibley's Defence. The reason that I left my place I was in debt with my landlady, she put a padlock on my door. He has no reason to accuse me; he has known me many times; he wanted me to live with him; he kept a bagnio down Swan-court.

Cohen's Defence. He drank five or six glasses of liquor. I never saw him before nor since till I saw him with the officers.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100221-59

206. WILLIAM JONES was indicted for feloniously making an assault upon John Vurley , on the king's highway, putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, a watch, value 30 s. his property .

JOHN VURLEY . I am a tailor ; I live at 63, London Wall. On Wednesday evening, near twelve o'clock, the 7th of February , I was in Whitechapel , returning home I was accosted by a woman of the town; I extricated myself from the woman and told her I was in haste to go home; immediately afterwards the prisoner gave me a blow, and took from me my watch.

Q. Was the key hanging out - A. It had a small gold chain, with a key affixed to it, hanging out. It was just under a lamp; I had a very clear view of his person. He ran down George-yard, I pursued him about seventy or eighty yards; my pain being so exceeding bad I lost him. I then returned into Whitechapel, I communicated my case to a person, that I had been robbed of my watch; they told me it was well I did not pursue him any further, I should have been in danger of my life. On the Friday I went to the office, and went with Miller near to this George-yard, I staid outside while he went in and fetched the prisoner out. I then recognized him to be the man. I am sure he is the man; I described him to the officer before.

Q. Now, the blow that he struck you - was it violent - A. It was sharp. I do not know that he intended me any injury, no further than stealing my watch; my watch was instantly taken from me; my pantaloons being easy, it was soon taken from my fob.

Prisoner. I should wish to know from what the prosecutor could swear to me - A. Your person appeared clear to my view; you had a dirty coloured waistcoat on; I could almost say that is the waistcoat you have got on now.

SAMUEL MILLER . I am an officer. On Thursday the 8th, I received information that the prisoner, in company with another man, robbed some person of his watch; I went in search of him and could not find him. On the Friday the prosecutor came to the office and gave information; I told him to wait a little while, I would bring one of them to see if he knew them; I went and took one and brought him to the lock-up-room; he said he really believed he was one, but he could not speak positively to him; he was discharged. I then took the prosecutor with me and went into Wentworth-street, and by the description that he gave of the prisoner I apprehended him at the Prince of Wales; I brought him out a little distance from the public house, to the prosecutor; he then said, that is the man; I'll swear to him. He then began to whine or cry, he said I was always pulling him in innocently. I had apprehended him before for a robbery, he was discharged; there was nothing proved against him.

Q. Did you ever find the watch - A. No; I searched him and found nothing on him.

Prisoner's Defence. The officer on Thursday morning came into the house while I was having my breakfast, he never said a word to me. On the 9th of February he came in again and never said a word to me; in about an hour after he came and took me out. I am an innocent young man. I was a bed at the very time the robbery was committed.

Q. to prosecutor. You mentioned but one - A. There was another man that ran away; I could not swear to him.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100221-60

207. ROBERT WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously assaulting John Perry , in the king's highway, on the 18th of February , putting him in fear, and feloniously taking from his person and against his will, three pound weight of beef, value 3 s. three dollars, value 15 s. half a crown, and six shillings, his property .

JOHN PERRY . I am a carpenter ; I live at No. 3, Ely-court Holborn. Between Saturday night and Sunday morning, about three quarters past twelve, on the 18th, I was coming from Fleet-market, going up the steps of Ely-court three men came up to me, they surrounded me; one of them in a great coat knocked me down, which hit the back part of my head against the steps; I was senseless. I have a witness that came by at the same time and took care of me.

JOHN COOK . I was coming from Fore-street about three quarters past twelve o'clock; the moon shone very bright; I saw three men at a little distance from me, they appeared to be wrestling; I came up and looked, and saw that they had got hold of this young man; I heard them say, do you mean to give it, he said, no; they then said, we'll give it you; with that the man in the great coat knocked him down. The man that was behind was dressed like a butcher: I saw him pull his hand out of the young man's breeches pocket.

Q. Who was that - A. The butcher. The prisoner tapped this butcher on the shoulder, and said, come along; they both ran up Holborn.

Q. You spoke of three - A. Yes. One stopped in the great coat. I saw a watchman at a distance, I ran and told him; the prisoner and a butcher ran away, leaving the man in the great coat behind; the man in the great coat was then coming towards us, I told the watchman to stop him, as he had knocked the young man down, below, and robbed him; the watchman said he had no charge of him, he would not stop him. I then returned to the young man that was laying bleeding; the watchman went with me; I helped to gather the young man's onions up, that had rolled about, and while we were talking the prisoner returned; I then said to the watchman, catch hold of him; he did; we got the young man up, and asked him if he knew him; he said, yes, that was the man that had knocked him down; he would give charge of him. We went to Hatton Garden watchhouse; the constable of the night being busy we went to the fire backwards, the young man sat down and went to sleep, quite senseless; the prisoner then pulled three shillings and sixpence out of his pocket; he said that was all that he had got, and that he would give it me if I would say he was not the man; I told him he must make it up with the young man. The constable of the night then came, I stated the case to him.

Q. Now, my boy - I thought you said it was the man in the great coat that knocked him down - A. Yes, it was, but this man was of the party; I had a perfect view of him by the moon shine; I am sure of his person.

Q. to Perry. Do you remember the last witness coming

up to you - A. No, I do not.

Q. What did you lose - A. Twenty-three shillings and sixpence, a piece of beef, and some onions; my money was in my right hand breeches pocket; my pocket was buttoned.

Q. Did they say any thing to you before they knocked you down - A. I do not remember any thing; it was done in an hurry. They came up the passage as I was going in.

Q. Look at the prisoner - do you know him - A. I cannot safely say that was one of the men that was with the three.

Q. Had you an opportunity of seeing him - A. I remember seeing him, but I cannot swear positively; I believe he is one of them; I remember the face; when they took me up, owing to the blow, I was quite senseless; my backpart of my head fell on the edge of the stone step. I did not know where I was till I came to myself in the watchhouse.

JAMES MARTIN . I am a watchman. On the night this happened I was calling half after twelve on Sunday morning; I was coming back from Ely-court to where my stand is, I met that lad, the witness, Cook, he told me there was a young man knocked down and robbed, close to Ely-court, I hastened to him and saw seven or eight men altogether, and some onions laying upon the pavement; Cook pointed out the prisoner and told me that he was one of the three men that knocked the young man down; I asked him whether he was sure, and whether he would give charge of him or not; he said, yes, and then I took charge of him; I took him to the watchhouse, and from thence to Clerkenwell prison.

Q. Why did not you stop the first man - A. The man was a great distance from him; he was going along solidly, and fast asleep almost; and I saw a great number of people standing at my stand, I hastened to them.

COURT. All I can say, you are a very bad fellow.

THOMAS MOODEY . I am constable of the night. I know no further than taking the charge and sending the prisoner from the watchhouse to prison.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going up Holborn at half after twelve; I was walking up to my lodgings in Grays-inn-lane, I saw a mob just by Hatton Garden, I went to look, and this young man said this man is a butcher, he is one of them; he gave charge of me; I went with this good man to the watchhouse.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 17.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100221-61

208. HENRY CLARK was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 2nd of January , one hundred and thirty five promissory notes for the payment of 1 l. each, one hundred and eighty-four promissory notes for the payment of 5 l. each, and seventy-seven promissory notes for the payment of 10 l. each , the property of James Large , Joseph Large , and Abbott Large ; - and

SEVERAL OTHER COUNTS for like offence, only varying the manner of charging them.

JOHN BALLAD . Q. You are a clerk in the house of Cobb, Brown, and company, they are bankers - A. Yes, I am.

Q. Does your house correspond with the house of Large and Company at Wotton Bassett, who are bankers there - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know the firm of Brown, Cobb and Co. - A. Timothy Brown , George Cobb , and Thomas Cobb .

Q. Does the house of Large and Co. issue notes payable at your house - A. Yes.

Q. Had any notes been received on the preceding week in the house of Cobb, Brown and Co - A. Yes. I have the entry of the notes so received in my own hand writing.

Q. How many one pound notes were paid - A. One hundred and thirty-five one pound notes, one hundred and eighty-four five pound notes, and seventy-seven ten pound notes.

Q. Look into the list of the ten pound notes and see whether these occur; 978, 1m210, 1m94, 759 - A. Yes.

Q. Was any thing done with these notes on the 2nd of January - A. Yes; I labelled them and handed them over to Mr. Seddons.

Q. Did you; before you labelled them, check them with that account - A. No; I made this accompt from the notes themselves.

Q. Then according to the notes themselves that accompt is correct, and you say you handed over all these notes to Mr. Seddon - A. Yes.

Q. Did Mr. Seddon call them over to you - A. No.

Mr. Knapp. You took the number of the notes and put them in the book; you did not call them over again to see whether you were correct - A. No.

Mr. Bolland. That is, you did not check them twice - A. No.

JAMES SEDDON . Q. You are clerk to Cobb, Brown and Co. who are bankers - A. I am.

Q. Did you, on the 2nd of January, receive any notes from the last witness, Ballad - A. I did.

Q. How many did you receive, and what was their respective value - A. One hundred and thirty five ones, (I am speaking from the book on the 2nd of January) one hundred and eighty-four five pound notes, and seventy-seven tens; I put them up in a parcel, and gave them to William Wood , a ticket porter, to take them to the Swan and Two Necks, Lad-lane, to have them forwarded per mail. The direction on the parcel was Messrs. Large and son, Bath, per mail. I know that I received these numbers; I checked them with the book.

Q. Have you any notes to produce - A. Here are three; 1m94, 1210, and 978.

Q. Were these three notes that you hold in your hand in the parcel, that you so made up and sent - A. They were; they were paid at the Bank, and came in in the course of business; they were sent to Bath.

Mr. Knapp. When you said that you checked the notes, did you check the amount of the notes or the numbers - A. Not the numbers, only the amount of the notes.

WILLIAM WOOD . - Q. You are ticket porter. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you, on the 2d of January, receive any parcel from Mr. Seddon, the last witness. - A. I did; I took the parcel to the Swan and Two Necks, Lad-lane ; I delivered it to the book-keeper, Mr. Allcock.

JOSEPH ALLCOCK . - Q. You are book-keeper at the Swan and Two Necks. - A. I am.

Q. Did you receive a parcel from the last witness on the 2d of last January. - A. I did; I entered it down

in the Bath mail book; it was entered in the way-bill, and put among the other parcels; I cannot say any thing further about it; I laid it down on the desk in the regular way of our business.

ROBERT CROUCH . - Q. You are porter at the Swan and Two Necks. - A. Yes; on the 2d of January I was in the coach office; I loaded the Bath mail; I took every parcel from the hole; there was not one left that night.

Q. Is it the course of your office to call them over to check them. - A. Not at all times; they are counted according to the book; they agreed with the book, and all those parcels that agreed with the book I put in the mail.

Mr. Knapp. - Q. to Allcock. I dare say no accident ever happened that there was any parcel not put in. - A. Not that night; they were all put in; I have known such an accident.

Q. That is the book that they are called over. - A. Yes; in this book it is entered, large, a paper parcel, No. 27; it is Mr. Perry's writing, another clerk; I am the person who received the parcel, and it was called over.

JAMES LARGE . I believe you are a banker at Wotton Basset. - A. I am; I have a partner; his name is Joseph Large ; no other partner.

Q. Upon whom do you draw in town. - A. On Brown, Cobb, and Company. Mr. Abbot Large has an interest in the business; he has a share of the profit and loss.

Q. You say Mr. Cobb and Co. pays your notes in town - A. Yes; they consist of ten, five, and one pound; we issue them from Wotton Basset.

Q. They are paid either by you at Wotton Basset, or by Brown, Cobb, and Co. in town; what is done with these notes that are paid by Brown and Company - A. They are returned to me at Bath; I convey them to Wotton Basset to be re-issued by our bank.

Q. Have you any marks upon these that are re-issued. - A. Not a private mark.

Q. At what time would the Bath mail that sets out on the 2d, in a regular course, arrive at Bath - A. On the 3d, at half past ten in the morning.

Q. Did you receive any parcel on the 3d from Brown and Co. - A. I did not; I sent to make enquiry, and afterwards I went myself; I never found the parcel.

Q. Was there an entry of a parcel in the way bill to your house. - A. There was; I did not get that parcel; I have never since received it.

Mr. Knapp. I believe, by the Act of Parliament, you are permitted to re-issue these notes for three years. - A. Yes.

Q. In consequence of the loss of these notes, shall you be compelled to issue others. - A. Yes, by other stamps

Q. Should you have re-issued them. - A. Certainly.

Q. These notes had found their way to Cobb, Brown, and Co. and there they have been paid; that we have from the evidence; in order to make them notes, which would be after to be paid again, a re-issue must take place; you must do some act of your house to issue them; they must get back to your house at Wotton Basset to be re-issued - A. Certainly.

Q. Then if they were taken in London, and the parcel had never got down to you, they were discharged from that payment, until you did the act of re-issuing them - A. Certainly.

EEWARD WATSON . - Q. You are book-keeper to the Bath mail at Bath - A. Yes.

Q. What time did the mail arrive on the 3d of January - A. Exactly at half past ten; I found in that waybill a parcel to Mr. Large, No. 27; that parcel never arrived.

THOMAS STROUD . - Q. I believe you are a linen-draper in High Holborn - A. Yes; on the 6th of January last, between eight and nine o'clock, the prisoner came to my shop; he purchased four yards of damask, seven yards of Irish cloth, and a pair of cotton stockings. He laid down a ten-pound Wotton Basset note on the counter. This is the note that he offered; my young man marked it; the numbes is 978; he said his name was Charles Smith , he lived at No. 5, Charles-street, Westminster; he said he was a farmer's son, his father lived two or three furlongs from Wotton Bassett, his father's name was John Smith , he had just come up from the country, and his father had given him the notes before he came away; he shewed me another note; he said I might take either of the notes; I told him it made no difference; I did not know any thing about them, I went into the house next door but one, I came back again, told him I did not like to take the note, if he would leave it till Monday I would send to the bankers, then he might have the change; he said he was very poor, he had no other money to support him on the Sunday; I told him I would let him have a guinea upon it; I gave him a guinea, and if he would come on the Monday, I would give him the change. I stood by my young man, while he put the name upon it; I packed up the goods, and put them by. On Monday morning, at half past seven in the morning, he came to the door. He had a one pound note and a shilling in his hand; he asked for the ten-pound note he had left at my house. I asked him if he had money for the pay for the parcel; he said no; I told him he had better call again, and I would send to the bankers'; he went away, and came again at nine o'clock; I told him I had not sent to the bankers; he went away; I sent my boy and my brother to the bankers'; he called again at half past ten; I was expecting my brother would return from the bankers'; he had not returned; there was a soldier with him; I saw the soldier again at the office. I asked the prisoner to sit down; he did not; he went away, and never called again at my house.

REES REES . - I am servant to Mr. Stroud; I was there when the prisoner tendered the note; I wrote the name that he gave on the note, he gave the name of Charles Smith . This is my hand writing. The prisoner is the same person, I am almost certain.

WILLIAM MARSHALL . - I am clerk at Branscomb and Co's lottery-office in the Hay-market.

Q. Have you a Wotton Basset note, 759 - A Yes, for 10 l. received it from the prisoner near about the 18th of January, about the middle of the day; he came to buy the sixteenth of a lottery ticket. I told him I had received a bill to caution me against receiving any Wotton Basset notes; he said that he had it from his brother at Oxford; I told him I could not take the note; if he would call the next day, I would send to the bankers; and if it was a good one, he should receive the sixteenth and the change; I gave it to Mr. Marrs, and he gave the prisoner a memorandum that he held it. I never saw the prisoner after till I saw him in custody.

MR. MARRS. Q. We understand you are the manager

of this office in the Haymarket - A. I am. I received the note of the last witness; that is the note; I gave the prisoner a memorandum that I had received it.

EDWARD GORDON . I am a private in the West London militia.

Q. Do you know the prisoner, Clark - A. Yes; I have known him about sixteen or seventeen months; he is a shoemaker .

Q. Where did he live - A. I cannot tell you. I saw him on the 5th of January, about eleven, in Dover-street, in the Borough-road, he stopped me and said he had got two or three Wotton Bassett ten pound notes; he said he would give me a pound a piece if I would pass them for him; he said they were as good as could be; his brother had come from Wotton Basset, and had brought them with him; he said he would bring me one by four o'clock, and shew me; I saw no more of him on that day. On Sunday afternoon I met him at a house near Turnstile; he said he had passed two or three of the notes, he had passed one at a linen-drapers in Blackfriers-road for a tablecloth, another at a linen-drapers shop in the Borough, where he bought three pair of stockings, and he went to a linen-drapers shop in Holborn and bought some shirt cloth; he gave them a note, they did not give him the change until they sent to the bankers; they gave him a guinea to support him until Monday morning; they were as good notes as could be; and then he said he would give no more than half a guinea to pass them; he said he had got fourteen or fifteen hundred of them. On Monday morning I met him again, he took me to a linen-drapers shop through Temple bar, he bought a shawl and gave a pound for it; he paid for it with a Wotton Basset ten pound note, he got in change eight one pound bank notes, and a country one pound note; he then went to a linen-drapers shop in Holborn, where he had left the note on the Saturday evening, at Mr. Stroud's; he said he was going in for his change; he went in, I did not go in with him; he came out again; he said that the gentleman had sent his boy to the bankers, and that if he would call in half an hour he might have the change. He went again, I went with him and stood at the door; the gentleman said his lad had not come yet, if he would go and sit down till he came back. He came away; he told me he was going to his brother, he would go no more after the note; I left him in Middle-row. I went into a public house, he came back and said his brother's house had been searched on suspicion of stealing these notes; he said he would go in search of his brother and tell him to keep out of the way. Then he went to a public house in Shire-lane, he could not find him; they denied him; he said he would go and buy some clothes and disguise himself. I saw him on the next day, and then he said his brother had been taken up on suspicion of stealing the notes. I did not see him after until he was in custody.

DANIEL LEADBETTER . Q. You are one of the marshalmen - A. Yes. The prisoner was brought to me by the soldier and Cartwrights's brother, on Monday the 22nd of January, I searched him, I found a little purse with some duplicate, and about four or five shillings; I told him he was in custody for some Wotton Basset notes; he said he had better tell me all he knew of it; I told him I could promise him nothing, nor threaten him, if he told me perhaps it would appear against him; I took it down and read it over to him.

Mr. Gurney. Put that in your pocket.

Q. to Allcock. Who are the parties concerned in the Bath mail - A. William Waterhouse , Thomas Bolton , William Hanton , and Richard Banks .

Q. to Mr. Large. That is your hand-writing, and that is your brothers, is it not - A. Yes.

GUILTY, aged 21.

Judgment respited .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100221-62

209. JOHN MARTIN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 13th of February , a handkerchief, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of certain persons to the jurors unknown .

SAMUEL LACK . I was stationed on the 12th, the same night; there is a mistake of the day in the indictment. I saw this handkerchief taken from a gentleman's pocket by the prisoner; I believe this is the handkerchief. I went and asked the gentleman if he did not take snuff; he said, yes. It was marked with snuff.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100221-63

210. JAMES WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of December , eighteen shilling and three one-pound bank notes , the property of John Townsend and John Sellars .

JOHN TOWNSEND . - I am a grocer and cheesemonger ; my partner's name is John Sellars . The prisoner lived with us. I live in Poplar ; I gave the prisoner four one-pound notes, a seven shilling piece, and sixpence. I sent him to town to lay out nine shillings and sixpence in butter on the 30th of December; the notes he was to bring small change for them; he sent the butter home by the errand cart, and never returned. On the 18th of January, I met the prisoner in Hatton Garden. I took him to the office. The notes have never been found.

EDWARD LONG . - I am a cheesemonger, Charles-street, Hatton Garden. On the 30th of December the prisoner came to my shop, and bought three lumps of butter; it came to nine shillings and sixpence. I gave him ten shillings in change for a one pound note.

THOMAS EKELSOE . I am an officer. The prisoner said to me before he was examined, the same that he said before the magistrate, voluntarily, he had lost half a guinea of the money; he did not like to go back with the rest. I searched him; he had no notes about him, only a few coppers.

Prisoner's Defence. When I met Mr. Townshend I told him I was in a service; I lived at a watering house facing Hatton Garden; if he would give me time I would pay him.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Fined 1 s. and discharged.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100221-64

211. EDWARD KING was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 24th of February , a copper can, value 10 s. the property of Timothy Sirr .

MRS. SIRR. On the 24th of February, the prisoner came into the shop and stole a copper can.

JOHN BALL . I saw the prisoner come out of the door with the can, he threw the can down; I brought him back.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Publicly Whipped and discharged.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100221-65

212. RICHARD PICKETT and WILLIAM PICKETT were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of John Herbert , about the hour of three in the afternoon of the 12th of February , Charles Newman and others, then and there being, and stealing therein six skins of leather, value 3 l. two pieces of leather, value 1 l. and four calf skins, value 36 s. the property of John Herbert .

The case was stated by Mr. Barry.

CHARLES NEWMAN . I am in the silk mercery line, and I am a taylor, not in the sitting line of business, it does not agree with me.

Court. How do you get your livelihood now - A. I am with Mr. Herbert, a shoemaker , in St. John's-street .

Q. Then you are now a servant to Mr. Herbert - A. Yes.

Mr. Barry. Were you in his house on the 12th of this month - A. Yes. On the 12th of this month, between two and three in the afternoon, the first thing I saw Richard Pickett . I went down stairs, and asked him what he wanted; he said, he wanted to see Mr. Herbert; I told him Mrs. Herbert was down stairs. I heard him talking to her; he went away, and called again; the child was sitting on the stairs, she called out Mr. Newman; I came down stairs, I met Richard Pickett on the stairs, he said he wanted Mr. Herbert; I told him he was not at home, and at that time I saw a man put his hand up behind Richard Pickett and take away some leather.

Q. Who was that man - A. I do not know, I did not see his face.

Mr. Barry. Q. Did you follow him - A. I could not, on account of Richard Pickett stopping of me with his umbrella; he held his umbrella across, I holloaed out, there is somebody robbing the shop; Richard Pickett said, you had better say that I am robbing the shop, it is all nothing.

Q. In point of fact, the person, whoever it was that had taken the property, completely escaped - A. Yes.

Mr. Gurney. It appears a mighty odd thing, you are a taylor, but you do not taylor - A. No, not sit to the work.

Q. Do you stand to the work - A. Yes, when I have business to cut out.

Q. When was that - A. Two years past.

Q. You first of all said, you was in the silk mercery line, then a taylor, and you now are in the shop way; that is to say, you serve in the shop of Mr. Herbert - A. Yes; he is a shoemaker, in St. John's-street.

Q. How long have you served in Mr. Herbert's shop - A. About a month.

Q. You seem to be a steady man, are you hired by the year or the week - A. No; no terms.

Court. You have not agreed for any wages - A. No.

Mr. Gurney. Where did you live in February last year - A. At Mr. Williams's, I believe.

Q. I do not wonder that you are puzzled in answering me - A. I do not know that I am exactly puzzled, I fancy I was living at Mr. Shakespeare's, Covent-garden, or at Portsmouth, I will not be sure. I lived with Mr. Shakespeare about a week.

Q. You do improve upon it. I see you lived this year a month at a place and last year a week, where were you before that - A. In the Fleet.

Q. What business did you carry on - A. A silk mercer, in Whitechapel; I cannot say the number. Mr. Herbert served me with shoes when I was in business.

Q. You never accepted any bills for him - A. I accepted one when I was in business in Whitechapel.

Q. Look at that signature - A. That is not mine.

Q. Look at that, is not that the signature of your friend Herbert - A. I have not a doubt it is.

Q. You did not accept any bills of Mr. Herbert payable at Mr. Pickett's, and when the bill became due you were not forthcoming - A. Never.

Q. Mr. Pickett was rather a troublesome visitor of Mr. Herbert's for money - A. I do not know; I never saw him before that day. I know now Mr. Herbert owes him money.

Q. You say, that Mr. Pickett's umbrella was before you when the man took the leather, why did not you push him down stairs and go by - A. I did not.

Q. Mr. Pickett was alone, was not he - A. Yes: as soon as I could I ran after the person, and I found nobody.

Q. Mr. Pickett was taken before the magistrate this day fortnight - A. Yes, and his brother; the examination was adjourned till the Thursday, and then adjourned till the Monday.

Q. On the Thursday they were set at liberty, and came on the Monday - A. Yes.

Q. On the Monday the magistrate examined all the witnesses you had, and you were managing the prosecution, and suggesting every thing to the counsel that attended, the magistrate told you, you might indict if you pleased; they were set at liberty - A. It is impossible for me to tell whether they were set at liberty, or on bail.

Q. Was there any recognizance either for you or any body else - A. I did not enter into any.

Q. They were set at liberty, and then last Friday you indicted them for breaking and entering, and stealing all this leather - A. I attended according to his order.

WILLIAM GARDNER . I live at Mr. Jones's, a rag merchant and stationer, in St. John's-street. On the 12th of this month, about three o'clock in the afternoon, I saw William Pickett come out of Mr. Herbert's shop as I was coming up the street; he had some leather under his arm. When he came out of the shop he turned to the right hand a little way, then he looked back; he went further, and went up Hat and Mitre Court, there was no thoroughfare; he came back, and ran up wilderness-row.

Q. Look at him again, are you sure he is the man - A. Yes.

Q. Did he look confused - A. I looked at him, I could not think he was a thief.

Mr. Gurney. When was you applied to about this business - A. Two or three days afterwards; the officer found me out.

JOSEPH BROCK . I am a China enameller and gilder; I live at No. 111, Goswell-street.

Q. Do you know Mr. Herbert's shop in St. John's-street - A. Yes. On the 12th of February, about three o'clock, I saw Richard Pickett standing at the right hand of Mr. Herbert's shop door with Mr. Newman; and William Pickett , to the best of my knowledge, I believe I saw him in St. John's-street with leather, he was rather in a trot.

Q. Look at the prisoner William, was he the man - A. I believe he was the man; I do not take an oath positively that he is the man.

Q. I believe you went to oblige the constable to his lodgings - A. I did; I saw the prisoner there.

Q. Had you any doubt upon your mind then that he was the identical man that you saw in St. John-street A. I was not positive until I came out of the shop; and then, when I saw him at the distance I did in St. John's-street, then my idea was stronger. I was coming down St. John's-street, he was going towards Islington; I thought he seemed rather confused. I saw him turn up a court. When I came level with the court he came back again, passed me, and went towards Islington. I lost sight of him. I was going to Mingays, the bankers, in Smithfield. When I came level with Mr. Herbert's shop, I saw Mr. Newman and Richard Pickett at the door of the shop, and it struck me by seeing the man so confused, I said you have not lost any leather; Mr. Newman said, I don't know yet, did you see any one with leather; I said, I did, he went up towards Islington. I went with him soon afterwards; he said, he saw a man put his arm up and take leather.

WILLIAM FORMAN . I am a publican. I live at the Westmoreland Arms, City-road.

Q. Look at the two persons at the bar, did you ever see them before - A. I have seen the lusty gentleman before bring shoes to a person near me; and the other gentleman I have seen before, he had not the same coat on; he came into my house, he had some leather rolled up; I thought it was paper, I touched it; he was not a minute with me, he asked for a glass of liquor, I served him, he went away.

Mr. Gurney. You were with Mr. Herbert when he was prefering the bill, last Friday - A. I was.

Q. And while you were waiting outside of the door, you saw Mr. Pickett coming with the attorney - A. I did.

Q. And you said, Mr. Pickett this is a painful piece of business, had not you better compromise it - A. I said, you are both tradesmen, had not you better make it up.

Q. Did not you know that Mr. Herbert owed him some money - A. So he told me.

Q. Did not Mr. Pickett say, compromise it he would not, I have by the side of me the attorney now that heard him say, he never would, he would indict him for a conspiracy - A. The attorney said, go and get this bill and I will have him cross-indicted.

HRNRY BLIGH . I am a constable. I went to the defendant's house for the purpose of apprehending William Pickett , accompanied by Brock, the witness. Mrs. Herbert went first; I apprehended William Pickett in Richard Pickett 's house; Brock pointed him out to me.

JOHN HERBERT . I am a shoemaker. I live in St. John's-street; I have lived there ever since the 8th of May; before that I lived in London-road, St. George's-fields.

Mr. Gurney. While you lived in London-road you got acquainted with Mr. Pickett - A. He solicited me for trade; he sold me shoes to the amount of sixty-three or sixty-four pounds.

Q. For which you gave him bills, about twelve months ago, in payment for these shoes - A. I did, upon Mr. Newman.

Q. And two acceptances of your own. These are the bills, are they not - A. They are all three; and that acceptance is Charles Newman .

Mr. Barry. What Charles Newman is it; is it the Charles Newman that is here to-day - A. No.

Mr. Gurney. When the bills became due, you and Newman went off - A. I only removed from George's-fields into St. John-street. Mr. Pickett found me out in July. The bills became due on the 17th of May.

Q. He found you out in July, and the moment he found you out, you paid the bills - A. I paid him fifteen pounds in part; at last I was to pay him by instalments, one pound a month.

Q. Was not he come for the instalment of one pound at the time he came, a fortnight ago.

Court. Was not one pound due to him - A. Yes.

Mr. Gurney. Pray, Sir, who is Charles Newman - A. He is a taylor; he lived at the obelisk; I don't know where he is now.

Q. Did he run away first, or you. Is not he the father of the other witness - A. I believe he is.

Court. Do not you know that he is the father of this Charles Newman - A. He passes for the father of Charles Newman .

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100221-66

213. JOHN CRAKE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of January , a great coat, value 30 s. the property of John Nash , Esq .

JOSEPH COTTERILL . I am coachman to John Nash , Esq. 29, Ogle-street, Piccadilly. On the 27th of January, I left my coat in the carriage; it was locked up in the coach-house, in Bruton-Mews . I missed the coat on Sunday morning, between seven and eight.

ROBERT HEPSWORTH . I am hackney coachman. On the 28th of January, about one in the morning, I was at the watering house in St. Martin's-street; the prisoner came in the house and offered this coat for thirty shillings. I gave it him.

The property produced and identified.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence; called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100221-67

214. MARGARET VENEBLE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of February , two sheets, value 8 s. a blanket, value 3 s. a gown, value 10 s. a gown piece, value 16 s. a shift, value 4 s. a shirt, value 1 s. 6 d. and an apron, value 1 s. the property of Edward Lord , in his dwelling-house .

EDWARD LORD . I keep a house in Cradle-court, Charing-cross . I lost the sheets and blankets on the 2nd of this month; the gown and gown-piece I lost on the 31st of January, and a shirt and a shift. The prisoner had been in my service about three weeks before: she had lived with me about five weeks. On the 3d of February, I found the prisoner in a public-house in Market-lane, St. James's-market; she had my wife's apron on. I challenged her with taking the other things, and she directed me to where I found them.

ELIZABETH BARTRUM . I keep a clothes-shop. On the 31st of January, I bought a shift and shirt of the prisoner for four shillings and sixpence, a gown for seven shillings; on the 2nd of February, I bought a duplicate of a gown-piece for one shilling, and a pair of sheets for four shillings; the next day the constable came; I delivered up these things.

- AUSTIN. I am shopman to Mr. Turner, pawnbroker, Brewer-street. On the 31st of January, the prisoner pledged a piece of cotton for eight shillings; she said her name was Catharine Lenney .

THOMAS NEALE . I am apprentice to Mr. Brown, Panton-street. On the 2nd of February, Mrs. Bartrum pawned a gown.

ROBERT BOONE . I am a constable. I went to Mrs. Bartrum, and found all these things.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I know I took some things; I did not take so much as I am charged.

GUILTY, aged 28,

Of stealing to the value of thirty-nine shillings only .

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100221-68

215. CRISTOPHER KELLEY was indicted for that he, on the 19th of February , in and upon Thomas Martin , a subject of our Lord the King, feloniously, wilfully, and unlawfully did make an assault, and with a certain sharp instrument did stab and cut the said Thomas Martin , in and upon his back, with intent in so doing to kill and murder him .

And Two other COUNTS for like offence, only stating the intention to be to disable him and to do him some bodily harm.

THOMAS MARTIN . I live at No. 5, Monmouth-street. I am a stuff-maker . I have known the prisoner about a year. On the 19th of February, about twelve o'clock at noon, the prisoner and I had been having a pot of beer; after that, we were going down Queen-steet together, I met two young lads, George Bell and another; they told me that Kelley had said, I was a dishonest chap, I did not get my living by work. I gave the prisoner a punch of the head as hard as I could; he laid down and cried, with his hand to his head; I walked away. In about five or six minutes the prisoner came and throwed a handful of mud in my face; he drew a case knife, and cut me between my back and my loins; I bled a good deal, and laid by for two days. I went to a surgeon. The prisoner was taken up about an hour afterwards; he has been in jail ever since.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100221-69

216. THOMAS BOWES was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of James Grainger , about the hour of six at night, on the 15th of February , and stealing therein ten yards of kerseymere, value 6 l. his property .

JAMES GRAINGER . I live at 389, in the Strand, in the parish of St. Martin's-in-the-Fields . On the 15th of February, near six o'clock in the evening, I stepped to the street-door in haste; I found the prisoner standing against the window, the window was cut, and two pieces of kerseymere had been taken out; I saw the prisoner's arm in the window, higher than the cuff of his coat; the glass had been cut and taken out.

Q. Are you quite sure that the window was entire a short time before this - A. Yes; I passed the window twenty minutes prior to this, and every thing was safe.

Q. I suppose, his arm being through the window, the goods were within the reach of his hand - A. Yes; when I saw him, just as he drew his arm out of the window, there was a blue piece of kerseymere that had the appearance of his hand being upon it. I had the pane of glass put in the week before; there was the mark of putty on the kerseymere. I ran in haste and cried out, what are you about; he took to his heels, crossed the way, and ran into Cecil-street; as he turned round to get into Cecil-street he fell down. It was light sufficient for me to see him fall down and run into Cecil-street. He was brought back in about five minutes; I firmly believe him to be the man I saw standing against the window.

Q. Have you ever recovered these two pieces of kerseymere - A. I have not. When the prisoner was brought back, I charged him with the theft; he said, he was not the man. I detained him. An officer came and took him to Bow-street.

Q. How far do you think the blue piece of kerseymere had been removed from the place where it was - A. About four or five inches. I cannot swear that the prisoner moved it.

Q. What was the value of the two pieces of kerseymere stolen - A. Six pounds, and the blue piece four pounds.

JAMES GRAINGER , Jun. When my father called me, I ran down Cecil-street. The prisoner got behind some stones; he got from behind the stones, and ran in the direction to the Strand; he was stopped by Leach.

CORNELIUS LEACH . I am a currier. I live in Essex-street, in the Strand. As I was coming from my tea I passed Mr. Grainger's shop, I heard a cry of, stop thief. I saw some people standing at the top of Cecil-street, I crossed the way; I saw the prisoner running from the bottom of the street towards the Strand; young Mr. Grainger was running after him; I laid hold of him; the prisoner said, he was not the man. I took him to the shop.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been in the Strand to take some work home for my master; on my coming back I was taken short; I went behind the stones, and while I was there, I heard some people running down the street; there were two or three people ran past me; I went up the street to see what was the matter, and three or four people catched hold of me. The gentleman searched me, and found nothing.

Grainger, jun. I saw the prisoner behind the stones; he was by no means in the position that he has described.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100221-70

217. JAMES SMITH was indicted for, that he, at the delivery of the King's gaol of Newgate, holden for the county of Middlesex, on Wednesday, the 15th of February, 1809, was tried and convicted of grand larceny, and was thereupon ordered and adjudged by the Court to be transported for the term of seven years; and that he afterwards, to wit, on the 4th of January , without any lawful excuse, was at large in this kingdom before the expiration of the said term of seven years, for which he was ordered to be transported .

RICHARD LIMBRICK . I am one of the officers of Bow-street. I produce a copy of the record of the conviction of the prisoner. I got it from Mr. Shelton's office, the officer of this Court.

(The copy of the record read.)

Q. (to Limbrick.) When did you see this prisoner - A. On the 4th of January; I took him up, in company

with William Salmon , at the White Bear public-house, the corner of Little Newport-street .

Q. Did he surrender peaceably - A. Yes, very quite.

Q. Did you tell him why you apprehended him - A. Not in the house, because there were other people in it.

Q. Did the prisoner know you - A. There were other people in the room that did know us. I do not know that he knew us; he surrendered very quietly. After we had got him to the watch-house, I told him, that we had taken him for returning from transportation.

Q. The man was not doing any thing wrong at the time you took him - A. No; he was sitting in the public-house along with some others.

WILLIAM HANSON . I am servant to Mr. Newman, the keeper of Newgate.

Q. Do you know the person of the prisoner at the bar - A. Yes.

Q. Was he in Mr. Newman's custody any time - A. In February Sessions he came in on the removing day. I had frequent opportunities of observing his person.

Q. Were you present when James Smith and Richard Cole were tried in this Court in this month twelvemonth - A. Yes, I put them to the bar myself.

Q. Is that man, who is indicted now by the name of James Smith , the same man who was tried with Richard Cole - A. I was present at the trial; I brought them in Court for trial and for sentence; the prisoner is one of those two.

Q. Were you present when the jury gave them their verdict - A. I was; they were convicted; I was present when they were sentenced; the prisoner was sentenced for seven years transportation.

Q. When was this man removed from Newgate for the execution of his sentence - A. On the 25th of August, 1809. The prisoner, James Smith , had a conditional pardon to go for a soldier ; he was delivered to a serjeant's party of the Guards, to be taken to the Isle of Wight. On the 26th of last month I was sent for to Bow-street to identify his person.

Prisoner's Defence. I had a pardon to go for a soldier in the York Rangers, laying in the West Indies. When I went from Newgate I went to the Isle of Wight, and there I went on board the prison ship, from there I was drafted on board the ship with troops to go to the West Indies, and from the Isle of Wight I went to the Motherbank, and laid on board this ship five weeks. During the time I laid there, I was picked out three or four times on board the launch to fetch beef and sometimes water; and the last evening we went the water was very rough, we could not come off. During the time we staid on shore we got very much intoxicated; the whole six of us, these men that were with me, made an agreement to go away, and I being intoxicated went with them. It was not my intention to leave the regiment by no means.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 35.

The prisoner was recommended to his Majesty's mercy, on account of his peaceable demeanour when apprehended .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100221-71

218. JOSEPH MANUEL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of January , a shawl, value 5 s. the property of Lazarus Joel , privately from his shop .

LAZARUS JOEL . I keep a slop shop in Well-street, Goodman's-fields . On the 16th of January, about eight in the morning, my servant called me down stairs; and when I came down, I saw the prisoner standing there; he said, he wanted a ship; I told him, I would get him one; I asked him, if he had had any breakfast; he said, no; I said, I will get you a ship, and give you a breakfast. He sat down, and presently started up and said, I have two Americans that wants a ship, and they will go where I go. He went away. I had no idea that he had taken any thing at that time; he went into no other place than my shop.

Q. Did you know that there was any shawl in the shop - A. I saw the shawl the night before in the shop; about eleven o'clock my wife pulled it off. I cannot take upon me to say, that the shawl was in the shop when the prisoner came in. About two o'clock the prisoner returned, and was in the shop; my wife accused him then of taking a shawl out of the shop; he said, he knew nothing at all about it. I told him, if he had made away with it anywhere to tell me, I would fetch it out, and he might go about his business: he persevered in denying it.

HENRY MIERS . I am barker to Mr. Nathan. Between eight and nine o'clock in the morning, I forgot what day it was, the prisoner came to our shop; he said, he could sell me a shawl; he asked me half a guinea, I gave him five shillings for it. I am pretty sure he is the man: I cannot swear to him.

JUDITH MARTIN . I am servant to Mr. Joel. On the 16th of January, about eight o'clock, the prisoner came into our shop; I called Mr. Nathan.

Q. Before he came in, did you see any shawl in your shop - A. Yes, my mistress's shawl was there. The man went away, and about nine o'clock, when my mistress got up, and we missed the shawl. About two o'clock the prisoner came again; I asked him, if he had not been there in the morning; he said, no. I charged him with having taken the shawl; he said, he knew nothing about it.

- WALLIS. I took the man in custody, and put him in the watch-house. Miers came in the watch-house, and looked at him; he said to him, you are the fellow that I bought the shawl of this morning. I sent for the shawl; this is the shawl.

Joel. I could almost swear to it; my wife gave half a guinea for it in Whitechapel.

The Prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100221-72

219. CHRISTOPHER HARPER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of February , a looking glass, value 5 s. the property of Mary Grace , widow .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded,

GUILTY .

Confined Fourteen Days in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100221-73

220. SAMUEL WARNER and WILLIAM FINAUGHTY were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of February , a pound weight of opium, value 8 s. two pounds weight of cheese, value 1 s. two ounces of bees-wax, value 1 s. the property of the London Dock Company .

SECOND COUNT for like offence, only varying the manner of charging it.

ALEXANDER LOW . I am foreman of the warehouse, No. 4, in the London Docks ; Warner was a labourer in the warehouse , Nos. 3 and 4; Finaughty was a carman . There was opium and cheese on the quays, and in the warehouse, No. 3, there was bees wax. On the 19th of February last, I saw Warner come round the back of the warehouse and give Finaughty a mat in his hand; he throwed it in his cart. I asked Finaughty, what he had got in his cart; he said, it was nothing to me. I called Latter, the watchman, and then Finaughty throwed it out of the cart. The watchman opened the mat; this bag was rolled up in the mat; the bag contained this cheese, opium, and bees wax. There was bees wax in both the warehouses, and cheese and opium were on the quays.

MICHAEL LATTER . I am a watchman in the London Docks. I apprehended both the prisoners. I examined the mat when Finaughty put it out of the cart, and found the contents were opium, bees wax, and cheese. I have had it ever since.

Warner's Defence. This man asked me for an old mat; I saw two pieces of old mats behind the wine casks, I chucked them up in the cart. What was in them, I did not know.

Finaughty's Defence. I saw Warner coming along, I asked him if he had got a bit of old mat to give me; he fetched this, and I throwed it into the cart. Mr. Low asked me, what it was; I told him, it was an old mat. I did not know any thing was in it.

WARNER, GUILTY , aged 48.

FINAUGHTY, GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and whipped one hundred yards near the London Docks .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100221-74

221. JOHN NEWTON and GEORGE JONES were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of February , two books, value 10 s. the property of Thomas Norton Longman , Thomas Hurst , Owen Rees , and Cosmore Orme .

MR. TURNER. I reside at Rochester. On the 12th of this month I had passed the New Church, in the Strand, I saw two boys; one Newton had this book in his hand. I said, my lad, how came you by this book; he said, he found it in the street: it is the Italian Master. I then took hold of the other boy , Newton then said, I did not find it, Jones found it; Jones owned he found it; I said, so dirty a day, is it possible that you found it in the street; the book being so clean and it was a remarkable dirty day; Jones said, it had a cover on, which cover he had torn off. I took them both to Mr. Wingrave's shop; one of the prisoners said, there is another boy, Morgan; I looked and saw Morgan getting away. I told the prisoners they must have stolen the book; I found they contradicted each other, each accusing the other. At last I catched the name of Longman, in Paternoster-row; I think first of all from Jones. Newton said, he stood at the door while Morgan and Jones went into the shop in a morning early, and took the books from the counter when there was a number of people there; they said, they had done so three or four mornings. At Bow-street the prisoners were searched; Jones had a book taken from the inside of his waistcoat, and three in his hat.

THOMAS HURST . Q. You are a bookseller in Paternoster-row - A. Yes; my partners names are Thomas Norton Longman , Owen Rees , and Cosmore Orme .

The prisoners said nothing in their defence.

Jones called one witness, who gave him a good character.

NEWTON, GUILTY, aged 14.

JONES, GUILTY, aged 13.

Judgement respited .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100221-75

222. FRANCIS MORGAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 14th of February , three books, value 5 s. the property of Thomas Norton Longman , Thomas Hurst , Owen Rees , and Cosmore Orme .

JOHN LIMBRICK . Q. In consequence of information, did you go to Baldwin's-gardens - A. Yes, I found the prisoner at his grandmother's. I took him in custody; as we were going along he asked me, if the other two boys were in custody; I told him, they were. He told me then, that he had stolen the books from Mr. Longman, and had sold them in Hollywell-street, in the Strand; and some he had sold to gentlemen in the streets.

Q. Did you see at the grandfather's a number of books - A. Yes, they appeared to be all new. I did not take them away the first time, and when I went the second time, they were all gone. I went to Hollywell-street, and found the books he had sold there.

ELIZABETH GEER . Q. Does your father keep a shop in Hollywell-street - A. Yes. On this day three weeks I bought of the prisoner three books; these are them; the first is Sketches of Human Nature, by Mrs. Wakefield, and two copies of Rural Scenes. I gave the prisoner a shilling for them.

Prisoner's Defence. The runner told me to tell him every thing, and he would do the best for me he could. I did not want to tell.

GUILTY, aged 15.

Judgment respited .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100221-76

223. ELIZABETH MACKLIN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of January , two pieces of carpeting, value 13 s. the property of James King .

JAMES KING . I keep an academy in Chapel-street, Soho . I only know the carpet was taken from the stairs; the prisoner was brought back by my servant, and the carpet was found on her.

SARAH JONES . I am servant to Mr. King. I had seen the carpet safe on the stairs about ten o'clock. About five minutes after I was going up stairs, I met the prisoner coming down; I perceived something under her arm. I asked her what business she had there; she answered, to see Mrs. Dudley; I told her, there was no such person there. I missed the carpet immediately after she went out; I ran after her, and catched her in Portland-street; she said, the carpet was hers. I know the carpet to be my master's; it was on the stairs about five minutes before.

Prisoner's Defence. Real necessity made me do it. I had no lodging, nor any thing to get me a bit of bread.

GUILTY , aged 35.

>Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100221-77

224. JOHN DEAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of January , twenty-six yards of linen, value 7 l. two yards of cambric, value 1 l. a shawl, value 10 s. six yards of muslin, value 24 s. and two handkerchiefs, value 10 s. the property of Edward Bright , in his dwelling-house .

EDWARD BRIGHT . I am a linen-draper at Brentford . The prisoner was my shopman .

Q. How long had you been in business - A. On the 17th or 18th of December I commenced business at Brentford. On the 12th of January, Mr. Thwaites's son produced a shawl to me; on Monday week. Mr. Thwaites's son was with me the first fortnight; he marked the goods. I then took down the linens from the shelf and examined my stock-book, and found one piece of linen missing. I found the shelf filled up with this piece of cotton; the shelf had the appearance of the same number, but when I examined it, I found cotton instead of linen; that was on the Wednesday. I came to Bow-street, there I saw the linen. The prisoner was in custody. A piece of cambric and a shawl was likewise produced.

Q. At the time that you received your business from Mr. Steele, did you examine the stock-book, and see that it all corresponded - A. Yes; I saw that the stock and the book corresponded. These linens were called over, and they filled up the shelf compleatly; and this piece of cotton came in the house a fortnight afterwards.

JOHN THWAITES , Jun. Q. I believe you are the son of a linen-draper, in Holborn - A. I am. In consequence of suspicion, I obtained of Mrs. Green, the prisoner's washer-woman, a shawl; she lived in Brick-street, Piccadilly. I asked her, if she had any shirts or handkerchiefs; she produced a length of linen from a Mrs. Geary, and cambric; there is my own mark to that shawl which I had put on it at Mr. Bright's. I marked most of the goods for him. When Mrs. Green produced this length of linen, she said, there was more at Mrs. Geary's. I afterwards went with Mrs. Green to Mrs. Geary, in a court in Brick-street; I found three squares of French cambric. On Monday, I took a piece with me to Mr. Bright, at Brentford; he claimed the cambric. On the Tuesday afternoon I went with Perkes, the officer, and took the prisoner into custody. We afterwards went to Mrs. Geary's, and brought away a piece of linen with the maker's mark upon it, and the cambric also.

DOROTHY GREEN . I live in Brick-street, Piccadilly. I am a washer-woman. I produce a shawl and a length of linen; I got them of the prisoner. The linen was brought by a carrier, I believe; but the shawl he brought himself. I saw the prisoner on the Sunday after; the prisoner said, they were to make him some shirts. I recommended Mrs. Geary to make the shirts for him.

ANN GEARY . I am a seamstress. I received the linen at Mrs. Green's house to make some shirts for the prisoner.

Q. Who gave you that linen - A. Mrs. Green's daughter gave me the linen out of the drawer; the prisoner was present in the room; the prisoner said, the linen was to be made into seven shirts. That linen was afterwards taken away by young Mr. Thwaites: there was some cambric and handkerchiefs brought at the same time.

Prisoner's Defence. That handkerchief and shawl that is there, I took out of Mr. Bright's shop this day week; I wrapped it up in paper when Mr. Bright was at the opposite counter; I put a seven-shilling piece and three shillings into the till. Previous to my going to Mr. Bright's, I was at my brother's in the country; and this Irish I bought of my brother.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY, aged 21,

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling-house .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100221-78

225. THOMAS TAVERNER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of February , one pair of leather pole-pieces, value 10 s. the property of Thomas Williams , James Legg , and William Masters .

THOMAS WILLIAMS . I am a coach-maker . I live in Oxford-road . On Saturday, the 17th, I was informed, while the men were gone to dinner, that the shop was robbed; the prisoner was described to me as the person that robbed the shop. The prisoner came again on the 19th, when the men were gone to dinner. I apprehended him. The pole-pieces were worth ten shillings.

JOSEPH HOLLIER . I am a workman to these gentlemen. On Saturday week I was coming from dinner, between the hours of one and two, I observed the prisoner standing in the shop; he had a pair of pole-pieces in his hand; he went out of the back way from the premises. I saw him take the pole-pieces off the steps of the carriage. There was a pair of pole-pieces missing a few minutes afterwards. I saw him on the Monday again. I am sure he is the man.

JOHN OLIVER . On the 17th, between one and two, I was in the shop at work, the prisoner came into the shop; he said, he wanted a man of the name of Trimming, a smith, he was putting on stays to the springs of a carriage. I went up into the shop and enquired; my master said, there was no such person. I returned to the lower shop, the prisoner was standing there; I told him, there was no such person; he seemed to be in great agitation, and wished to go the back way. I spoke sharp to him, you cannot go that way; he said, this way will do for me the same. In a few minutes afterwards the report came, that the pole-pieces were gone, and a man had been seen to go out of the shop with them. I am certain it is the same man. I knew him when a boy; he is a smith by trade.

THOMAS HAZEL . I am a harness-maker. On Saturday week I came from my dinner, I saw the prisoner coming out of the back gates with some leather work on his arm. I could not see whether it was pole-pieces or not; he went into a court, and went into Green street with them.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100221-79

226. RICHARD DAVIS was indicted for, that he, on the 26th of January , was servant to Daniel Allen , and was employed and entrusted to receive money for and on his account; and that he, being such servant so employed and entrusted, did receive 6 s. 8 d. on account for his said master; and afterwards did embezzle, secrete, and steal the same .

DANIEL ALLEN . I am a master carman . On Saturday, the 6th of January, the prisoner drove a waggon for me. When he came home in the evening, he said, he had done a job of wood, from Copthall-court to Brown's-lane,

Spitalfields. About a week afterwards I made a bill out, and sent for the money; I charged them four shillings and six-pence; in consequence of that I understood, that he was paid on delivery, and he received six shillings and eight-pence. The prisoner gave me no money at all. I applied to him to go along with me and vindicate his own cause; he put it off from time to time.

GEORGE COOMBE . I live at No. 9, Susannah-row, Curtain-road . I am a carpenter, in the employ of Mr. Hall. I was informed, that there was a load of wood came from Copthall-court. Mr. Butler asked me, to lend him six-pence to make up the money for the load of wood. The prisoner had six shillings and eight-pence for the load of wood, and a pint of beer.

MR. BUTLER. I heard the agreement between Mr. Hall and the prisoner. I borrowed six-pence to pay him the six shillings and eight-pence.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in liquor. I was not quite sure that I had taken the money, and therefore I booked the work.

GUILTY.

Judgement respited .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100221-80

227. DAVID HOLLY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of February , a great coat, value 20 s. the property of James Brown .

ROBERT BROOKES . I am shopman to James Brown , a slop-seller , No. 11, Cock-hill, Ratcliffe . On the 5th of February, I was informed the prisoner had run up the street with a coat on his arm; I looked at the door and missed a coat. I pursued the prisoner, and took him in Foxes-lane, with the coat upon him. I told him it was my coat; he said, he had bought it. I took him to Shadwell-office.

Prisoner's Defence. I got the coat innocently. I was to have two shillings for carrying it.

GUILTY , aged 31.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100221-81

228. THOMAS BANKES and MARGARET HUGHES were indicted for feloniously stealing, from the person of Joseph Flemming , a watch, value 8 l. a pocket-book, value 1 d. two dollars, value 10 s. seven shillings, and three Bank notes, value 1 l. each, his property .

JOSEPH FLEMING . On the 12th of January last, I was going home to Lamp-street, in the Borough; I had a friend with me; we went to the Goose and Gridiron, St. Paul's, and had a glass a piece. It was then about half after eleven; we staid there till half after twelve. After this I started to go home, as I suppose. I cannot recollect any thing more till half after five in the morning.

Q. You was drunk then - A. I suppose so. At half after five I found myself at No. 2, George-yard, Whitechapel; and the reason of my coming to recollect myself then, there was a kind of riot in George-yard. I found myself sitting on a chair before the fire, and a young woman at my right hand; I laid my hand upon her shoulder, she put it away again; she d - nd me, and said, what did I want, I had got no money. I laid my hand on my breeches pocket, which contained three one pound Bank notes, they were gone; I laid my hand upon my left pocket, which had two dollars and seven shillings in silver, that was gone; I laid my hand where my watch was, it was gone; the next thing, I clapped my hand to my side, my pocket-book was gone; this alarmed me very much. How I lost all this, I cannot tell.

JOHN CROKEE . I am a patrol. On the 13th of January, a woman of the name of Flint, she is not here, she came and said, she was in danger of her life. I went up stairs, the prisoner Hughes was sitting in her room; the next door was open, where the woman sent for me. I asked the woman, how that gentleman came there; she said, she supposed he must have come in while she came to fetch me. In our conversation this gentleman said, you have robbed me of all my property; she then went up stairs and called Maria Marks , she is gone away. I then went into the prisoner Hughes's room; she said, she had called Bankes to turn the man out. On Monday morning I apprehended Maria Marks ; she was examined on suspicion; no account was to be got out of her, only that the two prisoners were in the house with the prosecutor. The watch has been found, but none of the other property. Margaret Hughes is No. 1, and No. 2, is where the robbery was done. I know nothing of the robbery.

CHARLES STUBBING . I live with Mr. Matthews, pawnbroker, 105, in the Minories. On the 5th of January, between four and five in the evening, a man, that I think is the prisoner, came accompanied with two Jews, for the purpose of redeeming a watch to sell them, upon which they offered him three pounds; he refused to take it. Mr. Matthews looked at the watch; and shewed it to me. I thought they had not offered a fair price for it, I offered three guineas and a half; he refused, and said, he would ask his wife. He then went to the door, and brought in a woman, which I am certain is the prisoner Hughes; she likewise refused to take three guineas and a half; she rather wished him to pledge than to sell it; the man made answer, you know if I pledge it I shall not have money to redeem it in time; on that he agreed to take three guineas and a half for it.

Q. Is that the man - A. I have but little doubt upon my mind about it; I should not like to swear positively to the man. Mr. Matthews paid them the money, and they went away. The watch I now produce is the watch that was bought.

Q. Who was it that pawned the watch with you - A. A man.

WILLIAM MATTHEWS . I am a pawnbroker. All I know, after the prisoner Bankes came, I really believe him to be the man, and he could not agree with the Jews; he asked me to buy it for four guineas and a half. I turned round to Stubbings and asked, what it was worth; he said, three guineas and a half. He called in this woman, and then they agreed to take the three guineas and a half.

FRANCIS FREEMAN . I am an officer. On the 20th of January, the Saturday after the robbery, the woman prisoner came to me about eleven o'clock, she was rather intoxicated with liquor; she said, she wanted to speak to me. I took her of oneside, she said, there was another watch lost in our court last night; and she said, I have every reason to believe that the devil that lives with me had it.

Q. Did you know who lived with her - A. Yes; the prisoner Bankes; she said, he went out this morning without any money with him, he has come home to-night full of money and drunk; she said, if I could come up

and pull him, no doubt but he would come it, and if he would not come at that, she would tell me where the capped and jewelled watch was, and shew me the door in the Minories where it was lumbered, that is pawned. I did not pay any attention to her that night. On the Monday morning I called upon her, she then was very much confused, and begged I would not take any notice what she said when she was drunk; she begged that I would not tell it to Bankes, he would murder her, and seemed very anxious for me to go away; she asked me to drink. I had not time on that day, nor on the Tuesday. On Wednesday I went to Mr. Matthews, they told me they had bought the watch; they shewed it me, it is capped and jewelled; a very valuable watch it is.

Hughes. How can you tell them lies. What he has told is as false as God is true; I never told him that.

Banker's Defence. I am innocent. I know nothing of it.

Hughes said nothing in her defence. Neither of the prisoners called any witnesses to character.

BANKES, GUILTY , aged 37.

HUGHES, GUILTY , aged 29.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100221-82

229. JANE FLYN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of February , four pounds weight of mutton, value 2 s. 6 d. the property of William Smith .

THOMAS WILLIAMS . I am a servant to William Smith , a butcher , White Cross-street, St. Luke's . I was at the door, the prisoner came into the shop; she asked Mrs. Smith to buy a lump of butter, and she would buy a bit of meat; Mrs. Smith answered, she did not want any. She left her basket in the middle of the shop, went outside of the door, and took two breasts of mutton in the shop. Mrs. Smith went out of the door to speak to some person; she put one of the breasts of mutton into the basket under the cloth, and asked me the price of the other; I told her, it was seven-pence halfpenny a pound; she offered me sixpence. I told her, no; she went out. I brought her back, and bid her put the basket down. I found the breast of mutton in the basket.

WILLIAM SMITH . The constable was ordered by the magistrate to salt the mutton, and produce it here; instead of that, he has dressed it and eat it.

Prisoner's Defence. My husband has been ill five weeks before Christmas. I did it through distress. I have been ten days in prison. I have suffered enough. I have friends, but I did not let them know. It is the first offence that ever I was guilty of; my poor husband is perishing.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Fined one shilling and discharged.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100221-83

230. JOHN KENT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of January , a mahogany board, value 30 s. the property of James Nash .

JAMES NASH . I am a mahogany seller . I live at 60, Wapping-wall, Shadwell . I missed the plank of mahogany on the 25th of January, out of one of my rooms.

WILLIAM BULLOCK . I am a sawyer. I stopped the prisoner, on the 26th, with the plank; he offered to sell it to me in Long-alley; he asked me fourteen shillings for it. I took him to a public-house and detained him, and sent to the office.

Prisoner's Defence. The piece of mahogany I am charged with stealing, I acknowledge having it in my possession; it was not taken from the prosecutor with any intention of stealing it. I had done work for the prosecutor; and on the evening I had done work for the prosecutor, he paid me part of the same, and the board was given for the rest.

Q. (to prosecutor.) Did he work for you - A. Yes; about a year ago he used to saw for me; I did not owe him any thing. The plank is worth thirty shillings.

GUILTY , aged 37.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100221-84

231. MARY ROBINSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of January , twelve pounds weight of beef, value 4 s. the property of Walter Vaugh .

The prosecutor was called, and not appearing in Court, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100221-85

232. DANIEL BURNE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of January , a hat, value 1 s. and an apron, value 6 d. the property of James Collier .

JAMES COLLIER . I am a pot-boy to Mr. Arnold, the Angel, 37, Clare-street, Marybone . I pulled my hat off, my apron was in it; I left it in the tap-room while I answered the bell, when I came back, the hat was gone. A man saw the prisoner go out of the house with something.

JEFFRIES. The prisoner owned to me, that he sold the hat and apron for a shilling, at No. 1, Henrietta-street, and there we found it.

Prisoner's Defence. I went four days without victuals.

GUILTY , aged 35.

Fined one shilling and discharged.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100221-86

233. JAMES CLARKE alias SMITH , and ELIZABETH CLARKE alias SMITH , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of January , three blankets, value 10 s. two sheets, value 5 s. a set of fire-irons, value 3 s. two pillows, value 7 s. a bolster, value 4 s. a looking glass, value 12 s. a tea caddie, value 1 s. two iron pots, value 1 s. a candlestick, value 1 s. a saucepan, value 6 d. a curtain, value 1 s. and a flat-iron, value 6 d. the property of John Grix , in a lodging room .

MARY GRIX . My husband's name is John Grix . We live at No. 10, James-street, Featherstone-street, City-road .

Q. Do you let lodgings - A. Yes; I let lodgings to this man and woman about four months ago. The woman came in the afternoon, and the man in the evening, as I supposed, when he came from work. They had the kitchen at three shillings a week; it was furnished; it contained all the articles mentioned in the indictment; they were to have the use of them. Some weeks after they had been in my house they were quarrelling; I went and begged they would be quiet. The man said, he had great reason for doing what he had done, and if I knew I would be as angry as he was, she had been pawning my bed clothes. I begged them to be quiet, and in the morning I would see about it. On Monday morning I went and found there were some things missing; he promised he would get them again, and leave my house

quietly. They were brought back that time, I saw them; some weeks passed, and they were there, I begged of them to leave my place, they would not; I could not get rid of them, then by way of seeing whether my things were safe, I said, I was afraid my bed tick wanted mending, if she would let me see it, I would place some pieces on it, and send my children to sew it, I saw the blankets and sheets were all gone, except the bed, an under blanket and a rug; she told me, that her husband had not minded his work in a proper manner, and through this they were made away with, but not without his knowledge. The man went regular to his work, in the evening when he returned from his work I spoke to Mr. Clarke, he told me, that his misfortunes were much worse than mine, I should not be injured by it, if I would wait till Saturday night he would restore me all my things again, and he would leave my house quietly. On the Saturday night following, they returned in the evening, my husband did not return till twelve o'clock, they quarrelled and abused each other, and were fighting, I was afraid to go near them, on the Sunday morning they got up and went out together, in the evening they came home together, and laid down the three shillings for the last weeks rent. On the Monday morning the door was shut, I could not go in to see what they had done with the things. On the Wednesday or the Thursday about six o'clock I saw the man coming out of the kitchen; I said, Mr. Clarke, I have been looking for you, I want to see if my things are safe; he said, it was through the misconduct of his wife, if I could let it be till the Saturday night, he had a considerable sum of money to receive. On the Friday evening I went down; I said, Mr. Clarke, I understand you have got your wife with you, she had been shut out three days; I said, open the door; he said, excuse me opening the door, she is not here; I was convinced she was there; I went out to Worship-street, the magistrate did not sit. On Saturday morning, I went to the kitchen, I said, Mr. Clarke, are not you up; he said, no; I went out, and he sent his wife out before him; he went out, and I followed them into George-yard, Whitechapel, they separated to look, they saw me, they got out of my reach, I could not find them; they never returned. I found the duplicates in my kitchen.

WILLIAM MACKIE . I live in Tabernacle Walk, I took in of the female prisoner, a blanket and a bolster.

MR. SHORTER. I am a pawnbroker; I produce a blanket, I took it in of a son of the prisoner's; he said, his mother sent him.

JOHN OSBORNE . I am a broker; I have an iron pot, a tea-kettle, and a brass candlestick; I and my wife bought them of Mrs. Clarke.

James Clarke 's Defence. I faithfully promised the woman that I would recover the things again, which I meaned to do. Mrs. Grix denied my wife coming in at all.

Elizabeth Clarke 's Defence. I own I did this on account of my two brother's going to sea, which made me drink more than I ought to have done; my poor husband is innocent.

JAMES CLARKE , NOT GUILTY .

ELIZABETH CLARKE , GUILTY , aged 38.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100221-87

234. WILLIAM ENTWREZLE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 31st of January , a wrapper, value 1 s. and four blankets, value 5 l. the property of Samuel Hill .

SECOND COUNT FOR LIKE OFFENCE, only stating the property to belong to Samuel Hill, and William Horton Coleman .

WILLIAM HORTON COLEMAN . I am a slop-seller in Wapping; on Wednesday, the 31st of January, I sent the porter to Mr. Morton, Goswell-street, for two blankets, and desired him to call as he came home at Mr. Mays, Chiswell-street.

BENJAMIN CATTERWALL . I am porter to Mr. Coleman; on Wednesday the 31st of January, I went to Mr. Morton for some blankets, they were in a wrapper; in my return home, I had occasion to call at No. 61, Chiswell-street ; I took them into the passage with me, and set them close to the shop door; I was in the shop some time; I kept looking at the glass door, and while I was receiving an answer from the man of the house, they were taken away; it being a large parcel, I could see it very plain through the shop door.

SAMUEL SHEPHERD . I am an officer; on Wednesday, the 31st of January, I stopped the prisoner in Bishopsgat street, with these blankets; I asked him, what he had got there; he told me, he had found it; I asked him where he was going with it; he said, to Petticoat-lane, to see if he could sell them; I took him in custody and the blankets. These are the blankets.

SAMUEL MORTON . I am agent to the Witney company; William Horton Coleman bought them blankets, here is my private mark to them; I can swear to them.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going towards Moorfield's quarters at half past eight o'clock, I saw this bundle lay, I stopped a quarter of an hour, and saw no one coming, I took them on my back; this gentleman stopped me.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100221-88

235. ANN JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of January , a pewter quart wine measure, value 2 s. 6 d. the property of Phillip Bond .

PHILLIP BOND. I live at the King of Prussia, Wych-street : on the 13th of January, the prisoner came into my house, and went into the back yard, I desired the girl to follow her. I saw the prisoner throw this quart wine measure out of her pocket. It is mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I leave myself to the mercy of the court.

GUILTY , aged 43.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100221-89

236. WILLIAM SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of January , a pair of boots, value 6 s. the property of Thomas Postan , a half boot, value 3 s. the property of John Morris , jun. and a half boot, value 3 s. the property of Thomas John Parker .

THOMAS POSTAN . I am a porter at Mr. John Morris 's hotel, Oxford-street ; on the 16th of January, William Smith was going along the passage, towards the door, with a pair of boots that belonged to me, and one that belonged to Thomas John Parker , and the other belonged to my young master. I followed him out of door, and catched hold of him. I had never seen him before. I took the boots from him.

Prisoner's Defence. At the bottom of Woodstock-street, a coachman of the name of Jem asked me to go

to the Hotel, and get a pair of hessian boots, and a pair with tops to them; I went there, I saw a man at the bottom of the stairs; I asked him to give me a pair of hessian boots, and a pair of top boots; he gave me the boots, I walked up stairs with the boots; the porter stopped me, I told him, I was going to take them to one Jem, at Mr. Elvin's stables in Woodstock-street.

GUILTY , aged 32.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and whipped in jail .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100221-90

237. HENRY SAGGERS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of January , four bushels of malt, value 40 s. the property of John Cobham and William Cobham . AND THREE OTHER COUNTS the same as the former, only varying the manner of charging them.

THOMAS WAUGH . I am clerk to Mr. Christian, the barrister. On Monday the 29th of January, I was going down Portpool-lane, Gray's Inn-lane , I saw the prisoner go up to the tail of a cart, and take a sack of malt on his back; I followed him into Gray's Inn-lane; he crossed the way, and then he crossed the road again, and went on towards Holborn, untill he came to Bell-court, there he fell down with the sack of malt on his back; I went up to him, and asked him how far he had brought that malt; he said, he had brought it two or three doors from where he had fell down, and that he was going to take it into Holborn; I directly said, I dont think the malt belongs to you; he directly said, what malt; I was only passing by, I said, that which you have just now fell down with: he directly got up, and said, he knew nothing at all about it, he had been on the club six months, he could not carry a sack of malt if any body would give him ten guineas. A constable was sent for, and he was secured.

- STEVENS. I am a carman to James Doggett . The sack of malt was taken out of my cart, I had the care of it.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, called five witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 46.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100221-91

238. WILLIAM BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 13th of February , eleven loaves of bread, value 12 s. and 8 d. the property of William Brydges .

ROBERT GIBSON . I am a baker ; my master's name is William Brydges , he lives in Hatton-wall On the 13th of February, I put my basket of bread down at Mr. Norris's door, Holborn , I went to serve two or three customers in the neighbourhood, when I came back, my basket was gone, and the prisoner was in custody.

CHARLES MACKOBT . I am a journeyman baker; on the 13th of February, I observed the prisoner take the basket on his shoulder, I pursued him, and stopped him; Oh! said he, Sir, I was ordered to bring it by the man; I said, the young man will be here soon, and then you will see whether you are right. Gibson came, and then he was taken in custody.

Prisoner's Defence. I had it on my arm, it was not on my shoulder; I am charged with stealing some bread, the property of Mr. Brydges: I was some time out of employment, and my family was ready to perish. I am charged with taking it in the County of Middlesex, whereas I took it in the City of London, which I submit to your lordship's consideration.

GUILTY , aged 32.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and whipped in jail .

Second Middlesex jury before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100221-92

239. JOHN MOREN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 17th of January , a butt rope, with iron chain and hook, value 20 s. the property of Samuel Whitbread , Timothy Brown , Robert Sangster , Benjamin Hobhouse , and Joseph Goodman .

NATHANIEL HASWORTH . I am clerk in the house of Whitbread and Co.

Q. What are the partner 's names. - A. Samuel Whitbread , Timothy Brown , Robert Sangster , Benjamin Hobhouse , and Joseph Goodman .

BENJAMIN VALENTINE . I am a patrol; on the 17th of January I was on my duty at six o'clock in the evening, in company with Barnard Gleed , in Baker's-row, Whitechapel, we met the prisoner carrying a rope on his shoulder, I stopped him, and asked him, what he was carrying of, he said, a rope it was given to him by the mate of a vessel laying at Blackwall for a day's work, I took him into a public house, examined it, it appeared to me to be a brewer's rope.

JAMES ANDERSON . I am a drayman; my dray was standing at Mile-End , we had done our job, we went in the house to get a little refreshment.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100221-93

240. ELIZABETH WILSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 19th of February , a table-cloth, value 3 s. a flat iron, value 6 d. a silver teaspoon, value 1 s. and a sheet, value 4 s. the property of John Butler Saunders .

SARAH SAUNDERS. Q. What is your husband's name. A. John Butler Saunders , I live at No. 7, Wilderness-Row, Clerkenwell , the prisoner was my servant , she has been my servant twice this last time only one week, she came to live with me on the 12th of this month, and on the 19th I discovered she had robbed me. The constable found the duplicates in her pocket, and by that means I found my things.

HENRY BLIGH . I am a constable; on the 19th of this month, I was sent for, to take the prisoner in custody, on searching her, I found a number of duplicates in her pocket, I shewed them to Mrs. Saunders, she thought they were hers.

JOHN BURGIS . I am a pawnbroker; I took in a tablecloth; I believe the prisoner to be the woman that I gave the duplicate to.

GEORGE GILLETT . This is my duplicate. I took in pawn a tea-spoon, a sheet and flat iron of the prisoner.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence, called one witness, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY , aged 32.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100221-94

241. JOHN BIRKETT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of February , a coat, value 5 s. the property of William Bennet .

WILLIAM BENNET . I am a salesman , No. 8, Brick-lane, Whitechapel . On Monday the 5th of February, about four o'clock in the afternoon, from information, I missed a coat from the door, and saw two men walking down the street, I followed them; I saw the

prisoner with a drab-coloured coat in his apron; I collared him, and said, you are my prisoner, this is my property you have got in your lap; he then said, he had found the coat.

Prisoner's Defence. That man will swear my life away innocently; I bought the coat of two men in Brick-lane, I was going home; this gentleman told me, that I had robbed him. I work hard for my living; I know nothing of the man I bought it off, nor of the robbery.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 32.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100221-95

242. WILLIAM COVE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of January , 30 lb. weight of hemp, value 20 s. the property of Samuel Dawson .

SAMUEL DAWSON . I am a rope and cord manufacturer , Mile-End, Old Town . The prisoner was in my service.

BARNARD GLEED . On Saturday evening the 13th of January between seven and eight o'clock, being in company with Valentine in Dog-row, Bethnal-green, we saw the prisoner with a bundle under his arm, we stopped him, and asked him what he was carrying; he said, it was nothing, we took him into a shoemaker's shop, and examined what it was; it was withinside of his great rough coat, buttoned up round the body, tied up round the collar and bottom with rope yarn, so as to conceal the contents; he said, it was hemp that a man of the name of Freeman working for Mr. Tierney in the Commercial Road had given him. There is such a rope-maker there, close to Mr. Dawson, we told him that we did not believe his story, that we must take him before the magistrate, he then said, he would tell us the truth, he worked for Mr. Dawson in the Commercial Road, and that it was hemp that he had been to work on that day, and that he had stolen it from his master, we went to Mr. Dawson, and asked him if he worked for him, he said, he did.

Prosecutor. It is worth twenty shillings; it is very much the appearance of the hemp that we were making use of at the time, it is a thing that is impossible for any person to swear to.

Prisoner's Defence. Them officers told me, if I would tell them where I took it, they would let me go about my business.

- GLEED. He said there were only us two, he offered us money to settle it with him, we told him it must be settled before a magistrate.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 33.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100221-96

243. ROBERT LOFTS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of February , a great coat, value 14 s. the property of James Crooks .

JAMES CROOKS . I am a hackney coachman ; on the 12th of February I had a fare to Clapton, on my coming home near one o'clock in the morning, I had the misfortune to overturn my coach, it was dark, I got out of the road into a ditch by the side of a brick field, I got the prisoner to assist me, he could not help me himself, he went and got another man, he came with another watchman and helped me with the horses; I was obliged to leave the coach till day light, I left the great coat on the coach, it was a bye road, I thought it would be safe till morning, the prisoner went with me, and helped put the horses into the stable. I went to the coach again as it was day light in the morning, and the coat was gone, I did not see the coat again untill I saw it at Worship street on the Wednesday.

Q. What is your coat worth. - A. Fourteen shillings.

Q. Was the prisoner a watchman . - A. Yes; he was the first watchman that I called to my assistance.

JAMES GRIFFITH . I am a constable of Hackney; the prisoner was a labouring man and a watchman occasionally, he was on duty that night; I was informed by the other watchman, that the man had lost his coat, he was suspicious that the prisoner had got it, I apprehended him about two o'clock on the Monday, he told me, he had got the coat at home in the closet, I sent the other watchman for the coat.

JOHN SMITH . I am a watchman; I went to the prisoner's house, the wife took the coat out of the closet, and gave it to me.

Prisoner's Defence. On the night mentioned in the indictment, John Crook my prosecutor came along with the coach very much intoxicated; he asked me the way to Balls-pond, I directed him, instead of which he drove towards Robin-Hood Ferry, his coach was plunged into a pit, and from my feeble strength and old age, I could not relieve or ease the horses, therefore I went for another watchman for assistance; we extricated the horses who was lodged for the night at an adjoining house, the coach was obliged to be left till the next morning. The great coat I did not find for two hours afterwards, and I did not imagine that it belonged to the prosecutor, as he never mentioned its loss, the coat was wet and dirty, I found is a great way off the coach, I took it home, and to prevent the wet and dirt from communicating any damp or dirt to me, I wrapped it up in some hay, when I came home I thrust it into a hole under the stairs, in which place it remained till it was fetched away, when I was in custody, I instantly told I had it, I meaned to return it when I found an owner for it, I have lived all my life by my industry, I am very comfortable in my family, I never stole any thing for myself or them: I hope to be acquitted by the court.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100221-97

244. JAMES PORTER was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 16th of January , 100 lb. weight of lead, value 2 l. the property of William Scothrup , affixed to a house of his .

WILLIAM SCOTHRUP . Q. Had you any house in the parish of St. Pancrass. - A. Yes; No. 10, in Upper-Grafton-street, East, by Fitzroy Square ; I am the owner of it, the house is not quite finished, the gutters were covered with lead. On the 17th of January, I had information that the lead had been taken off, I had seen the lead all safe on the gutters about three or four days before.

WILLIAM CHERSLEY . I am a carpenter; I know the house belongs to Mr. Scorthrup; on the 16th of January,

I was at work two doors off; about twenty minutes before seven in the evening a man came to me; he said, he thought he saw a person on the top of the building, I went out and looked, and saw a man look over the parapet wall, he was in the gutter of Scothrup's house; I holloaed to him, he put his head down, in about three minutes he put his head over the wall again; I holloaed out to him again, he made no answer, I heard a ratling on the slates, he came on the back roof, he spoke to me, and I to him, there was no window in the house, nor no floors, I asked him if he had any business there; he said, he had; I told him to come down and tell me, or else I would come up after him; he said, he would not, Mr. Williams sprang a rattle two or three times to frighten him down; it was a moon-light night, I could see him, I am confident of his person and of his voice; he had worked in the same row. I went up through the joists into the garret floor, he was there concealed between the joists and the roof; I asked him civilly then to come down, he said, no, he would not, he said, d - n you, if you come nigh me I will blow your brains out, he said, he had got a pistol, and put his hand to his breast as if he had a pistol there, two more persons came up, we tied a ladder from floor to floor, and forced him down; we then took him to a public-house; I said, I think you have been cutting the lead, or else taking some of the lead away, he replied, if the lead is cut or gone away, you have found none upon me; I know you cannot hurt me. I don't think there were any other person on the roof but the prisoner, there was no other man standing behind.

Q. Did you find any knife upon him. - A. No; he was put in the watch-house. We could not go upon the roof that night, we went up the next morning, we found three parts of the lead gone, and a bit left; we found a carpenter's chisel on the parapet wall, and a sack and rope was down below, and by the edge of the chisel it appeared to have been cutting lead. When we apprehended him, I said, here is your sack and cord; he replied, I will take my oath it is not my cord.

HENRY WILLIAMS . I live at No. 12, in the same street, I came upon the alarm, and said, I am glad you have taken some person, because I have been very much disturbed, I had heard something two or three nights previous, I sprang a rattle and got assistance. The moment I entered the house where the prisoner was, I perceived him at the back garret window, he threatened to destruction, any man if he come up; I told him, I would fire if he resisted, and when they got him down, I seized him, and I knew him. I sent to Mr. Scothrup, and to the prisoner's employer, the prisoner had been working next door to me, he was a plaisterer's labourer, he had been discharged about a fortnight, when his master came he asked him, how he came in the situation that he was apprehended, he pretended that he had lost tools, he went up there to watch to detect them.

JOHN BAKER . I am a constable of St. Pancras. This is the chisel, the sack and the rope that was found.

Prisoner's Defence. I was at work next door to Mr. Scothrup's house, I lost my shovel, and a great coat from the next house, I have frequently seen people go in and out of the house, I thought they were after no good. It is all spite, that man and I happened not to be good friends, he used me very ill when he got me out in the street.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100221-98

245. WILLIAM KINGSLAND was indicted, for that he on the 14th of October was servant to David Davis , and employed and entrusted by him to receive money for him, and being such servant so employed, did receive and take into his possession, the sum of 12 s. for and on account of his said master, and that he afterwards feloniously did secrete and steal the same .

DAVID DAVIS . I am a carman and milkman , I keep cows; the prisoner lived with me four or five months, he drove my cart. In the month of October, the prisoner carted some loads of stuff for Mr. Masterman, he paid the prisoner twelve shillings, he never accounted to me for it.

CHARLES STANLEY MASTERMAN . I am a master bricklayer.

Q. Did you employ Mr. Davis to bring any road stuff to you in October last in his cart. - A. I did, the cartage came to sixteen shillings. The prisoner drove the cart, I paid him seven shillings, and five shillings afterwards on account to his master; he called on me about a fortnight afterwards, on a Saturday evening, he said, if I would pay his master the four shillings, he would give me the twelve shillings, and I might pay it all to him; he said, his master was at the door at the time.

Prisoner's Defence. The money that I received, I laid it out for his own expences for road stuff and turnpikes.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100221-99

246. WILLIAM KINGSLAND was indicted, for that he, on the 21st of November , was servant to David Davis , and was employed and entrusted by him to receive money for and on his account, and being such servant, and so employed and entrusted, did receive and take into his possession the sum of fourteen shillings on account of his master, and that he afterwards did secrete and steal the same .

JOSEPH MEAD . I live at No. 90, Bethnal Green Road . I am a builder. I hired the prisoner for one day. I bought some tiles; I asked him if he could remove them. I saw him at his master's stable. I saw the master in the course of the day; he worked one day for me. I paid him 14 s. for the cartage of that day, and since Christmas Mr. Davis called upon me, and asked me if ever I paid William Kingsland. I told him I had.

Prisoner. I agreed to draw three loads of tiles for Mr. Mead. I told Mr. Mead I was to draw them as soon as I could. I had potatoes to get.

Mr. MEAD. That is true.

DAVID DAVIS . Did you know that your servant had done this work for Mr. Mead. - A. Yes; the prisoner said Mr. Mead had not paid.

Prisoner's Defence. During the five months of my being employed with the prosecutor, I was in the constant habit of paying and receiving money, and during the absence of my master I settled with my mistress. In January last the prosecutor informed me he had no occasion for me. I replied, I was sorry for it. I demanded a settlement for the last week; he said he should not give me any. He said, William, how am I to procure the money from Mr. Masterman? I told him if he would give me a bill and receipt, I would give him the money immediately. I never had a bill and receipt; I thought it proper as I had left him; and I having bought a horse and cart to maintain my wife and family, he has taken these steps against me.

Q. to Prosecutor. Had he a horse and cart. - A. I

believe so; I saw a horse and cart. He has set up the carting business after he left me, and every time he comes by the place he abuses my men, and said, he should see me without a cow; he has abused me ever since he has left me.

Q. And then you took him up upon Mr. Mead's business - A. Yes.

Q. You did not take him up before - A. No; I thought it was hardly worth while.

Q. When he had set up a horse and cart, and told you he should see you without a cow, you took him up - A. Yes.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100221-100

247. EDWARD GREGORY was indicted for that he on the 1st of February , was servant to Richard Botheroyd , the elder, and was employed and entrusted to receive money for him, and being such servant, so employed and entrusted, did receive and take into his possession, the sum of 13 s. 6 d. for and on account of his said master, and that he afterwards feloniously did secrete and steal the same .

RICHARD BOTHEROYD, JUNIOR. I am servant to my father, Richard Botheroyd , a publican , the corner of Golden-lane, the prisoner was his servant , he went out with a horse and cart to deliver barrels of beer, and to receive money for them; I sent him with a cask of beer to Mr. Cordell in Leather-lane , the price of that cask of beer was thirteen shillings and sixpence; he gave an account in the evening of what money he had received; a list is made out to him, and he should bring the sums that he receives.

Q. Where is the list - A. I have not brought it; I have brought the delivery book.

Q. Is it his course to mark down in the delivery book what money he receives - A. No; the customer is to do that, which Mr. Cordell generally did.

Q. Did he ever account to you for this 13 s. 6 d. - A. A few days afterwards I charged him with having received this money; he said, he had; he had made use of it on account of his father.

MR. CORDELL. Q. Did you make any entry in this book - A. Yes; thirteen shillings and sixpence, that is what I entered.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100221-101

248. WILLIAM BAKER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 13th of February , a one pound bank note , the property of Daniel Turner .

DANIEL TURNER . I live at No. 14, Whitechapel-road ; I am a chair and bedstead-maker . The prisoner lives in my house, and works at making children's chaises ; I gave him liberty in the cold weather to work in my shop, because I had a stove there. On the 13th of February I told him to take his things down stairs, because I wanted the shop myself; at different times, since he has been there, I have lost seven one pound notes. I had my one pound note safe in my pocket at eight o'clock in the morning; I marked the note, I put it in my pocket book, and the pocket book in my coat pocket; the prisoner was present in the shop; I told him I would wash myself; my business called me out; I threw my coat on a table in the shop, with intention to wash myself, I was called down stairs. The prisoner was going up and down with his tools. A man that was at work with me, I told him to come down stairs with me, or else, if I had lost it, I could not tell who took it. I was engaged with a customer down stairs about five minutes, and upon seeing the prisoner come down stairs, I hurried up stairs to see if all was safe in my coat; my coat, I thought, was not in the posture that I left it, and in looking in the pocket book I found the one pound bank note gone.

Q. Have you ever found your note again - A. Yes. the officer found it on the prisoner. I made a blotch on the back part of it, and took the number of it.

THOMAS GRIFFITHS . On the 13th of February I was sent for to take the prisoner and his wife in custody. I searched the prisoner and found a one pound note on him; I asked him where he got it; he said he picked it up in the shop as he was coming through. I found the note to correspond to what Mr. Turner had described.

The property produced and identified.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence; called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY .

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and Whipped in Jail .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100221-102

249. WILLIAM RANN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 15th of January , a watch, value 2 l. the property of John Ragan .

MRS. RAGAN. I live in Eastham, Essex . On the 5th of January, in the morning, the prisoner told me that my husband sent him for the watch; I gave him the watch, supposing my husband had sent him.

JOHN RAGAN . I employed the prisoner in driving pigs to market on the 5th of January; he went on with the pigs, and I followed him in a cart; when I came up to him by the Three Pigeons, I said, Bill, you have lost the large hog; he said he would go back and find it; I sent him back to find these pigs, he had lost three or four; he came to me in Smithfield market and delivered the hogs; he never told me that he had been back for the watch, nor did I send him for it. When I went home my wife asked me if I had sent him for the watch; no, said I, I hope you have not been such a fool as to let have it.

THOMAS CHAPMAN . On the 5th of January the prisoner pawned a watch with me for one pound five shillings. I live in Chandois-street.

The property produced and identified.

Q. to Mrs. Ragan. Would you have sent this watch by this man if he had not told you that your husband sent him for it - A. I would not. I believed he did come for the watch for my husband.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100221-103

250. CHARLES ERNSTROM was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 15th of January , half a guinea, four seven shilling pieces, eleven dollars, eleven two pound bank notes, and eighteen one pound bank notes , the property of Johan Gustaf Lindblom .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded

GUILTY.

Judgment respited .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100221-104

251. SAMUEL FOOT was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 20th of February , three pound weight of indigo, value 12 s. the property of the united company of merchants, trading to the East Indies .

ROBERT STARLING . Q. You are an assistant elder in the East India company's warehouse - A. Yes. On the 20th of February I was employed in their warehouse in Old Gravel-lane, Ratcliffe Highway ; the prisoner was a servant in the same warehouse, I understand, for thirteen years. At two o'clock, when the prisoner was quitting the warehouse I rubbed him down; I took him by the collar; he said, Oh, Lord, I am done; I took him to the accompting house; he unbuttoned his trowsers and took out the indigo, and gave it into my hands. It has been weighed; it is three pound, worth twelve shillings.

Q. In the warehouse where he worked was there indigo - A. Entirely. At the time that he was sitting in the counting house he said he had not got any thing for his family without taking that. He had lost his hammer.

Prisoner's Defence. Mr. Stirling said I had got something; I gave it him before I went out of the warehouse. I have seven children; I am half starved; and so is my children; they have not got bread to eat.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 47.

Confined One Month in Newgate , and Whipped in Goal .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100221-105

252. THOMAS JOHNSON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 11th of February , a bushel of coals, value 2 s. the property of Archibald Bryson .

RICHARD HOPKINS . I live with Mr. Archibald Bryson , he is a dyer in Rose-lane ; the prisoner was employed as watchman . On the 11th of this month, about seven o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner come out of the mill-house with an apron full of coals, he passed me, it was dark, and while he was gone I went into the mill-house, I found a quantity of large coals laying together; he returned in about half an hour, he went into the mill house; he came out again with another apron full and went home.

COURT. You did not stop him with the second load - A. No.

Q. Are you quite sure that he had coals in his apron both times - A. Yes, I could see it.

Q. What quantity do you think he carried away - A. Near two bushels.

Prisoner. When you came up to me did you open my apron to see what it was - A. No.

JURY. It was dark - A. Yes.

COURT. Do you mean to say that you actually saw coal, or that you only saw the apron jet out - A. It appeared to be coals to me.

ARCHIBALD BRYSON . In consequence of information that I received from the last witness, I went to the prisoner's house on Monday, I found a quantity of coals descriptive of my sort, named field-coals, a kind of glossy coal, different to what is sold in coal shops.

JURY. You could not swear to these coals - A. No; that would be too close.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not carry any away; I deny that.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100221-106

253. ELIZA IREDALE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 4th of November , eight coats, value 3 l. 6 s. twelve handkerchiefs, value 1 l. 4 s. eight shirts, value 1 l. 16 s. sixteen pair of breeches, value 5 l. four pair of trowsers, value 1 l. 10 s. six waistcoats, value 1 l. 10 s. two pair of shoes, value 10 s. four silver forks, value 2 l. 4 s. three silver table spoons, value 1 l. 10 s. a counterpane, value 6 s. four yards of woollen cloth, value 1 l. a cream bason, value 1 l. 10 s. three pair of silk stockings, value 15 s. a set of bed furniture, value 12 s. a sugar ladle, value 5 s. a gravy ladle, value 1 l. 10 s. three silver cups, value 8 l. a sugar bason, value 1 l. 11 s. 6 d. a tea pot, value 3 l. 3 s. a tea-pot stand, value 17 s. a liquor ladle, value 2 s. a watch, value 2 l. 2 s. two pieces of nankeen, value 12 s. a candlestick, value 12 s. a punch ladle, value 2 s. a cheese knife, value 5 s. and a piece of calico, value 5 s. the property of Samuel Emden , in his dwelling house .

SAMUEL EMDEN . I live in Furnivals Inn ; I have resided there about nine years; the prisoner has been in my service about two years.

COURT. What are you - A. I am in the habit of purchasing of, and disposing of estates.

Mr. Alley. Did you ever authorise the prisoner to pawn any of your articles in your house - A. Never; I had never any occasion to do it. In the month of November last I was going in the country, I wished to take linen, waistcoats, and smallclothes to last me while I was out of town. I never went to the drawers myself, the prisoner always brought my things to me. I observed she put up certain things for me, and was rather confused; I asked her for the breeches, she said some of them were at the scowerers, and others were at the tailors, and the linen was at the washerwoman's; I said, the breeches that I wanted had not been worn for some months; she said she would go and look for them; I said I could not wait, I would go to the drawers and look myself; on searching my drawers I found they were completely stripped, I had not a second pair of small clothes left, and I saw no shirts; I then taxed her with having made away with my property; she cried and confessed it, and told me that I should not lose my things, they should all be forthcoming; I told her that she was walking about my chambers with a halter round her neck; she said she knew it; I told her that she was an extreme bad woman; to give me my property or tell me where they were; I supposed they were pawned; she promised to do that, but a great length of time elapsed before she would do that. She promised to do that.

Q. And you took no steps against her - A. I did not.

Q. Do you know a girl of the name of Mary Summer - A. Yes.

Q. Did you receive any letter from her - A. Yes.

Q. She has confessed the fact to you - A. She has twice.

Mr. Gurney. Pray, sir, what are you by religion - by persuasion - A. A jew. I was sworn on the Old Testament.

Q. When you were sworn at the office you were sworn by the New Testament - A. Yes, and then I was sworn by the Old Testament. (A letter read,

directed to S. Emden, signed, Eliza Iredale .)

HONOURED SIR. What can I do to atone in some degree for the crime I am guilty of in injuring you, my tender-hearted master. You have shewn mercy to others that have been in your service; I trust to God and your mercy. Oh, sir, did you know the torture that I feel, you would pity me; consider, for mercy sake, I am now far advanced in pregnancy; having been helping those that turn their backs, upon me, so much so I have a thing to put on my child when it comes; I do not think it possible to survive without you could be merciful for my unpardonable crime to you, and pray let me see the person at whose house your property is at, to convince them that it was not by your knowledge that they were put in. When, sir, can I make you amends for injuring your character; I do assure you, as I hope for mercy of God, I never meaned to wrong you, or any one; I would go all my life as I am at this moment, without a thing on my back; I pray you, sir, for God's sake forgive me; I know not what to say, but trust to you and my mistress for mercy, and own myself your greatest penitent.

ELIZA IREDALE .

I know, sir, I have not given you all the duplicates; the watch I have not got out, but will get it. I hope, sir, you will have some regard to my humble petition; pray do not think the worse of me. You have been merciful to others that robbed you, but I never did. You know I am the only servant that has left you poor, so many have left you with fine clothes, and God, that knows the secrets of all hearts, knows I only left you with two shillings, and had not you been so good to me as you have been, I could not have gone to any one's house. I have not tasted one morsel of meat since I left your house. For God's sake let me inform you I am doing well, and next Saturday I shall go into business, and with the money I get I will pay you honestly. For God's sake; my dear sir, consider my wretched situation; my own mind is more adverse than the most dreadful punishment you can inflict upon me, which God forbid. I hope you will be merciful; I have many friends, although I am starving for want of assistance. I saw York on Saturday, he gave me two pence, that is all I had. I hope my good friends will be rewarded as they deserve. The night I left you my mistress gave me her hand.

ELIZA IREDALE .

COURT, to prosecutor. Are you a married man - A. Yes.

Mr. Gurney. Where is your wife - A. A little way out of town.

Q. Had not you notice at the office that her attendance would be required here, and you engaged that she would come - A. No; upon my oath.

Q. Did not Mr. Humphries tell you so - A. Mr. Humphries told me that he should want twenty other persons; he told me that he should want her; I said, very well.

Q. Do not you know that she was subpoened, and that some person threw the subpoene out - A. She went out of town on Saturday afternoon, I think, to her mother's.

Q. Did not Mrs. Emden dictate this letter to that poor woman - A. She could not.

COURT. Did your wife or not dictate this letter - answer yes, or no - A. I believe she did not; and as a proof, the second letter was given me by the coachman as he was driving the carriage.

Mr. Gurney. You deny that your wife dictated that letter - A. Yes; to the best of my belief. I did not.

Q. You were sworn at the office upon the New Testament - A. I was.

Q. You being a Jew do not like the New Testament - A. That I deny.

Q. My question is, whether you believe the New Testament - A. I believe it so much; I believe that a great part of the New Testament is made out of the Old Testament, and that I am bound upon oath to the Supreme God to speak the truth.

Q. Are you a Christian or a Jew - A. I am of the Jewish persuasion.

Q. You think it the same thing to swear by the Holy Gospels as by the Old Testament - A. I answer, I swear by the Supreme Being, if I swear by either, or both the books, my oath is binding to me.

COURT. You know the nature of an oath - if you swear by the New Testament, you swear believing the contents of that book, and that Christ is God; now as a Jew (if you are a Jew) that is inconsistent. - You are not a Christian - a man that does not believe the Godhead of Christ is not a Christian - A. If I have been in an error, I believe that in swearing, so help me God, I swear by the Supreme Being, my oath is binding to me.

Q. If you are a Jew, do you believe it to be the same thing to swear upon the five books of Moses, as upon the Evangelists - A. I did answer that. I certainly do believe I am bound to speak the truth on one book as well as the other. I believe Jesus Christ to be a prophet.

Q. You believe Jesus Christ to be a prophet, then you are a Mahometan; he believed in the New Testament; he did not believe Jesus Christ to be God - A. I believe him to be a great man - a very great prophet.

Mr. Common Serjeant. You ought to recollect that this is not the first time you have been admonished upon that subject; when I was counsel you indicted for an assault, you were sworn upon the New Testament, and the answer that you gave to sir John Rose on that respect; he told you you were totally unworthy of belief, as a Jew you could not be believed.

Mr. Gurney. The things that you call stolen were pawned at Mr. Meachams, are not these things altogether of considerable value - A. They are of value, but they are not pledged to a large value.

COURT. Why do not you get out of your old habits and answer the question pertinent; you are asked whether the things that are pawned are not of large value - A. They are; but it is necessary for me to say they are not pledged to a large value.

Q. That is not necessary for you to answer - I know what you want - When were the things pawned - A. In November.

Q. When did you get the duplicates - A. In the middle of December. I took her up in January: I got the duplicates in November.

Mr. Gurney. You did not take her up till January. You live at Furnival's Inn, Mr. Meacham lives near you - A. Perhaps about five hundred yards from me; by Brook-street, Holborn.

Q. What office did you select to go to - A. To Worship-street office; I went to Bow-street first, they told me there, it was regular to go to the office nearest where the prisoner lived; she lived in Brick-lane, Spitalfields.

COURT. In January you took the prisoner up; there was one sessions in December and another in January - what day in November did you get the duplicates - A. I rather think I did not get the duplicates then, but in December. The reason I did not take her up, I had some business in Chancery; I did not mean to prosecute her, I meaned to pass it entirely over, but she went about the neighbourhood and said I was perfectly aware of her having pledged the goods.

Q. Then if she had held he tongue you would not have prosecuted her - A. I should not.

Mr. Gurney. So far from consenting to her pawning your things, you did not know it, you never consented to it - A. No.

Q. You have never pawned your things in your life - A. There were some things that I pawned for a gentleman going in the country.

Q. The things pawned, that you charge the prisoner with stealing, are worth fifty pound - A. More than that.

Q. Two hundred pound - A. I do not really know. They are worth from one hundred and fifty to two hundred and fifty pound; I can get them back for five and thirty pounds.

Q. It would be an easy thing to get them back by prosecuting the prisoner - A. I did not do it for that.

Q. You know if you convict the prisoner you can get it back for nothing - A. I believe it is generally known.

Q. His lordship asked you what you were, you answered that you bought and sold estates - Is that your only mode of getting a livelyhood - A Yes.

Q. You keep a chariot and four horses - A. Yes, and two out-riders; I have two extra horses for that; I have race-horses besides, and a country-house.

Q. How many servants have you altogether - A. Sometimes three and sometimes four, only one maid servant.

Q. Do not you owe this woman fifty pound - A. No, I do not.

Q. Have not you acknowledged that you would not have prosecuted this woman if she had not asked you for the fifty pound - A. No.

MARY SUMMERS . Q. What is your mother's name - A. Susannah Summers .

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar - A. Yes; I have often called on her at Mr. Emden's; I have taken things to pawn for her, and I have fetched things into the house for the use of the house with the money; bread, and butter, and coals.

Q. Was Mr. Emden at home when you have done this - A. Sometimes, and sometimes out.

Q. Did he know that you pawned these things - A. No, I don't think he did; she always charged me not to let the things fall for fear Mr. Goodey or Mr. Emden should see them.

SUSANNAH SUMMERS . Q. You are the mother of the last witness - A. I am.

Q. Have you been employed by the prisoner to pawn any things - A. Many times, at Mr. Meachams; I laid the money out under the direction of the prisoner. Mr. Emden certainly must know it, because he did not leave sufficient money in the house to support it. The prisoner told me so. I bought with the money, bread butter, cheese, eggs, candles, half a peck of coals, frequently, half an ounce of tea, a quartern of sugar.

Q. Do you know the lady they call Mrs. Emden - A. There is many Mrs. Emden's there. I have known things pawned many mornings, when otherwise there was nothing to eat; even when Mr. Emden has been there, and a-bed with the lady. And I have met Mr. Emden when I have been carrying the things to pawn, he must have seen it, and frequenty I have seen him when I have come back with the things I have redeemed; and when they have not had coals I have lent them a shovel full of coals. I never shewed him the things when I met him, that I had in my lap for decency sake; he must know it, he could see the bulk, and I have left the duplicates at different parts of the kitchen; and I have pawned the prisoner's cloak to make a shilling to pay the postman.

DANIEL BISHOP . I have sixty duplicates, which I received from Mr. Emden.

MR. MEACHAM. I have brought some of the things.

Q. Why did not you bring them all - A. There is a coach load. I have brought a couple of spoon.

Q. Mr. Humphries told you to bring them all - These things were pawned with you - A. Yes. I made enquiries of the persons that brought them whose they were. I had no doubt but Mr. Emden knew of it.

Mr. Gurney. Did not Mr. Emden tell you that he had the duplicates in his possession before he took her up - A. Yes.

Q. Did he not tell you that he did not think of prosecuting the prisoner, but she had claimed a large debt as due from him - A. Yes. He told me more than that. In conversation he told me that he should not have taken her up if she had not stained his character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100221-107

254. JAMES GROVES was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 5th of February , two stone sinks, value 30 s. the property of Thomas Mullen .

THOMAS MULLEN . I live at Brill-row, Somers-Town; I am a mason . On the 5th of February I lost two stone sinks, they were taken from the corner of Church-street ; there was fourteen laying there; from information I went to where the stones lay, and found two missing. On the same day I got a search warrant and went to the prisoner's house, No 8, Field-street, Battle-bridge; we found the two stone sinks by the side of his bed; these are them; I have no doubt they are mine.

JOHN WILLSMORE . I am a servant to Mr. Mullen. On the 4th of February I called upon the prisoner; I saw the two stone sinks in one corner of the room, by the side of his bed; I told my master.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

GUILTY , aged 36.

Whipped in jail , and discharged.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100221-108

255. ABRAHAM HART and EDWARD WHITE were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 12th of February , a silk handkerchief, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of certain persons to the jurors unknown .

SAMUEL LACK . I am an officer of Bow-street. On the 12th of February I was on duty at the theatre, Covent Garden.

Q. Do you know the persons of these two men - A. Yes; I have seen them in the street from the 5th to the 12th; they were walking to and fro Bow-street , in

company with each other, near the entrance of the pit. On the 12th, about half past ten, I saw each of them at different times, in the course of the time that I followed them, with their hands in different gentlemen's pockets; I saw Hart draw a handkerchief; White was behind; I think it was this handkerchief, I am not positive, because it was wet when I had it of him. I saw it drawed just at the end of Bow-street. When Hart drawed it from the gentleman's pocket he rolled it up in his hands.

Q. Are you quite sure it was one of those that you now produce - A. No, I cannot be sure of that, because he had gone away from me sometime before I apprehended him; I believe it was this. It is a silk handkerchief; the corner was wet, it appeared as if the name had been bit out with the teeth, that made me suppose that was the handkerchief that he had drawed out. He was a tall gentleman, leading a lady through the mob. Seeing him pick this gentleman's pocket I wanted to get as much against them as I could. I followed White, he was talking to a gentleman about the play; he took, I believe, this handkerchief. I apprehended White, and found upon him three handkerchiefs, and twenty-four duplicates of different articles; White was charged afterwards by a gentleman of picking his pocket, and when he came to see the handkerchiefs he said neither of these were his; there was a man behind that received it. I apprehended Hart nigh a quarter to twelve, he was coming about the house again; it was a few minutes after I apprehended White. I searched Hart, I found two handkerchiefs upon him. I was rather short. There was an hackney coachman went into a public house and made his brag that he had got a hatfull of handkerchiefs. The gentleman, whose pocket Hart picked, told me he would attend, he did not.

Q. What do you think the value of that handkerchief is that the mark is picked out - A. About one shilling and sixpence.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100221-109

255. WILLIAM UNITE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 17th of February , a bedstead, value 1 l. 5 s. the property of Robert Priest .

ROBERT PRIEST . I am a broker ; I live in Castle-street, Long Acre . On the 17th of February, from information, I pursued the prisoner, he was just turning into Long Acre; I stopped him with the bedstead upon him. I had seen it ten minutes before; it was placed outside of my shop. This is the bedstead; it is mine.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence; called one witness, who said he was deranged.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Fined 1 s. and discharged.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100221-110

256. CATHERINE BYRNE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 2nd of February , six yards of muslin, value 10 s. the property of William Brown , and Jonathan Ingham .

WILLIAM BROWN . I am a linen-draper ; 96, St. John-street ; Jonathan Ingham is my partner. On the 2nd of February, about half after five o'clock, I saw the prisoner in my shop; Johnson, my shopman, served her.

ISAAC JOHNSON . Q. You serve in the shop of Brown and Ingham - A. Yes. The prisoner came in alone, she asked to look at some black muslins for handkerchiefs; she bought one for one shilling and nine-pence. After she had paid for this she asked to look at another sort of black muslin, rather larger, I opened her another piece, she took hold of it with one hand, and put her other hand under it, and pulled out another piece from under it, and put it up her petticoats, between her knees; she then sat down on a stool and ordered me to cut another handkerchief off, it came to three shillings and a penny halfpenny; she paid two shillings and a halfpenny; it was to be put bye, she was to bring the rest of the money the next day. She then spread her handkerchief over her knee, and put the handkerchief that she had paid for in it, it was wrapped up in paper; she folded all together. I took the handkerchief out of her hand, and the other piece of black muslin was in it, it contained six yards, just ten shillings the prime cost. When I asked her what she had in her handkerchief, she said nothing but what she had bought, and when I took the handkerchief out of her hand, and discovered the piece of black muslin in it; she then said she did not know it.

Prisoner's Defence. I was very much troubled in mind; I had an affectionate brother laid dead at home. When the young man said, what have you got in the handkerchief, I said nothing but what I bought; he said you did not buy this; I said, I beg your pardon, I did not intend to thieve it. It has almost broke my honest husband's heart.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY , aged 31.

Confined Twelve Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100221-111

257. ANN CARRICK was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 11th of February , seventy-two pounds weight of lead, value 12 s. the property of Thomas Allen , and George Cropley Allen .

GEORGE CROPLEY ALLEN . This lead was taken from a shop in Old-street ; it belongs to Thomas Allen , (my father) and me; it was quite a new shop; the lead was laid on the 3rd of February; I missed it on Monday, the 12th. When I went to let the men in to work I saw the tiles had been replaced and put on the parapet wall; I went up and saw that part of the lead was taken from the gutter. I weighed the lead that was found, it weighed seventy-two pounds. I knew the lead as soon as I saw it; I matched it, it completely matched the lead that was left.

Q. How high is the wall from the ground - A. Twenty feet.

Q. Could a person get up without assistance - A. Not well.

BENJAMIN MOORE . I am inspector of the lamps and watch for the liberty of Golden-lane, St. Luke's. About half past three on Sunday morning, the 11th of February, I saw two people pass at the back of the Toll-house, at the top of Golden-lane, about three hundred yards from Mr. Allen's shop; I followed them into Golden-lane, when I got into Golden-lane I lost sight of them, the lamps were out; I went up to the end of Honduras-street, and then stopped; I thought I heard a voice, I called the watchman to bring me a light; it is

a dark place. They then went from that spot into Old-street, and then I saw the prisoner with a large bundle on her shoulder.

Q. She had no child with her then, had she - A. She had not; and the man that was with her had no bundle at all; I told them to stop, I must examine to see what they had got; the man made off immediately the woman stopped, I asked her what she had got; she said, a little bit of lead. I took her to the watch-house. The lead was tied up in a rug. On Monday morning the lead was owned by Mr. Allen.

Prisoner's Defence. I am a native of Ireland; my husband has lately died, leaving me with two children. I was coming along Old-street, I met a man with the lead in question; he requested me to carry the lead; I took it, and when I was charged he ran away and left me.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100221-112

258. JOHN COMPTON was indicted for that he on the 12th of February , was servant to Lawrence Crew Bevan , and was employed and entrusted to receive money for him, and that being such servant , and so employed, did receive and take into his possession the sum of 1 s. 3 1/2 d. for, and on account of his said master; that he afterwards feloniously did embezzle, secrete, and steal the same .

LAWRENCE CREW BEVAN . I am a baker in St. Martin's-lane. On the 12th of February the prisoner took a loaf to Mr. Fell in High Holborn . When he came home he entered it in the book as unpaid.

GEORGE SPILSBURY . I am servant to Mr. Fell, 60, High Holborn. On the 12th of February the prisoner brought a loaf to our house, I paid him fifteen-pence halfpenny.

Prisoner's Defence. It was not my intention to embezzle my master's money; I should have paid it, but I could not that day, therefore I beg the mercy of the court; I must suffer the laws of my country.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Imprisoned One Day and then discharged.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100221-113

259. THOMAS WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 5th of June , a coat, value 10 s. a waistcoat, value 2 s. and a pair of breeches, value 5 s. the property of James Wigmore .

JAMES WIGMORE . I work for his Majesty at Richmond park. On the 4th of June I lodged at the Black Horse, Marsgate, near Richmond ; the prisoner lodged and slept in the same room. I looked in my box on Thursday morning and found my things gone, and the prisoner was gone; he never returned to the lodging I found my clothes on the Friday following at Mr. Carter's, at Hammersmith; the pawnbroker gave them up to me. These are the clothes, I am certain they are mine.

WILLIAM WRIGHT . I am a driver of a waggon. The prisoner pawned the clothes; he sold the duplicate to me for one pound, on a Thursday in July; I gave him one pound for it. He promised to go with me and take the things out, they were pawned for a guinea; on the Saturday he ran away with the money; I went to the pawnbroker, he told me he had delivered up the things to Wigmore, and I lost my money. I took the prisoner on the 12th of January, he then told me he would pay me the money again as soon as he could.

Prisoner's Defence. I am a poor man; I have got no home to go to nor no friends.

GUILTY .

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and Publicly Whipped .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100221-114

260. JOHN MITCHELL was indicted for a misdemeanor .

The case was stated by Mr Knapp

MARY DAVIS . I am the wife of Benjamin Davis , a cheesemonger , living in Lime-street . On the 3rd of February, between ten and eleven at night, the prisoner came in our shop for a pound of bacon; it came to eleven pence; he laid down a dollar; I gave him four shillings and a penny; I took up the dollar and said I did not think it was a good one; I gave it to Mr. Davis, he gave it to the prisoner immediately, and said it was a bad one; the prisoner offered another, and while I was looking at the dollar he walked out of the shop; he had got the change and the bacon. I have the 2nd dollar to Mr. Davis; he ran after him. When the prisoner presented the second dollar he said he had taken two of his pay serjeant; he said they were both good ones, they had been weighed, and they both weighed the same weight; then the prisoner went away and my husband went after him with the dollar that I had given him; they returned in about a quarter of an hour or twenty minutes, my husband with the prisoner. After they returned Ebenezer Boggis gave me a dollar, I gave it to Dayley the watchman; I received a third dollar from Mrs. Bye; she was in the shop, standing near the place where the prisoner was; she picked up the dollar and gave it to me; I gave it to John Burge.

BENJAMIN DAVIS . Q. You are the husband of the last witness - A. I am.

Q. You were shewn a dollar, and you returned it to the prisoner - A. I did; and another dollar was given me by my wife, that was bad also. I chinked the second dollar, and immediately ran after the prisoner; I saw the prisoner at the top of Lime-street, close to the India house, I said, my friend, you have given me another bad dollar; he replied, his dollars were both good; I told him he must walk back with me to my shop, then you'll see whether they are good or not; going down Lime-street, opposite of Cahum-street, he made a sudden stop, and swore he would be d - d if he would go back any further, and struck me with a large stick over the crown of my hat; I received no injury. I took him back to the shop, there was an officer waiting, and he wanted to strip; he shuffled his clothes; he said, they should search him; I said not; he should go to the watchhouse. I gave the dollar that I had in my hand to Dayley, the watchman. I saw three dollars in his hand when he came to buy the bacon.

EBENEZER BOGGIS . I live at 33, Lime-street. On the night the prisoner was taken up I saw a man with a great coat run from Mr. Davis's shop, I thought he had stolen something, I afterwards found it was the tail of

his coat under his arm; Mr. Davis ran after him; I saw them coming back; the prisoner swore he would not go any further; he struck Mr. Davis, Mr. Davis took the stick out of his hand; he threw a collar away; I picked it up and gave it to Mrs. Davis.

MRS BYE. Q. You are the wife of Mr. Bye - A. Yes. On the 3d of this month I was in Mr. Davis's shop; the prisoner was there. After he was taken to the watchhouse I picked up a dollar off the place where he stood, and gave it to Mrs. Davis.

DANIEL DAYLEY . I am a watchman in Lime-street. I received two dollars of Mrs. Davis; I gave them to the night constable.

JOHN BURGE I am shopman to Mr. Davis. I received a dollar from Mrs. Davis, I took it to the watch-house and gave it to Mr. Wood the constable.

MR. WOOD Q. At the watchhouse did you receive two dollars from Dayley and one from Burge - A. I did. I marked them.

MR HOMERSON. Q. You are the teller of the bank - Look at them dollars and tell me whether they are the genuine dollars of the bank, or whether they are counterfeits - A They are counterfeits, all of them.

Prisoner's Defence. Mrs. Davis said the first dollar was not a good one; I gave her another, it was given to Mr. Burge, he said it was a good one, and when I got to the bottom of Lime-street, Mr. Davis came and said this is another bad dollar you have given me; I said I took it of serjeant Renshaw. He will be here to prove that he gave me two dollars.

JOHN RENSHAW . I am a serjeant in the Royal East London militia. I know nothing of these dollars. On a Friday night, this day four weeks, I gave him two dollars, good or bad I am sure I don't know; to the best of my knowledge they were good. I saw them dollars before the Lord Mayor; I could not recollect them.

GUILTY , aged 27.

Confined Six Months in Newgate , and at the expiration of that time to find Sureties for Good Behaviour for Six Months .

London jury, before Mr Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100221-115

261. SOLOMON LEVI was indicted for a misdemeanor .

There being no evidence adduced, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: o18100221-1

ROBERT HENCH , convicted in January sessions, 1810, of Felony,

Transported for Seven Years .


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