Old Bailey Proceedings, 10th January 1810.
Reference Number: 18100110
Reference Number: f18100110-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE OYER AND TERMINER, AND GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND ALSO THE GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, HELD AT Justice-Hall, in the Old Bailey, On WEDNESDAY the 10th of JANUARY, 1810 and following Days;

BEING THE SECOND SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF The Right Honourable THOMAS SMITH , LORD-MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY JOB SIBLY, FOR R. BUTTERS, No. 117, ALDERSGATE-STREET.

LONDON:

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED (BY THE AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON By R. BUTTERS, No. 22, Fetter Lane, Fleet Street.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON.

Before the Right-honourable THOMAS SMITH , Lord Mayor of the City of London; Sir Archibald Macdonald , Lord Chief Baron of his Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir Simon Le Blanc , knt. one of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir Alan Chambre , knt. one of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir Watkin Lewes , knt. Sir Richard Carr Glyn , bart. Sir John Perring , bart. Aldermen of the said City; John Silvester , esq. Recorder of the said City; Joshua Jonathan Smith , esq. William Domville , esq. Samuel Goodbehere , esq. Aldermen of the said City; and Newman Knowlys , esq. Common-serjeant of the said City; His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of Goal Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

London Jury.

James Jones ,

Joseph Varley ,

John Everard ,

Richard Samuel Berry ,

Thomas Bennet ,

George Brownger ,

John Thompson ,

John Knight ,

John Frederick Elliott ,

John James Bartlett ,

Henry Tyler ,

John Brown .

First Middlesex Jury.

James Herbert ,

Jonathan Thompson ,

James Powell ,

William Cook ,

Thomas King ,

George Dobson ,

John Williams ,

James Driver ,

John Green ,

Ralph Webb ,

William Whittle Johnson ,

Walter Thwaites .

Second Middlesex Jury.

Thomas Wheatly ,

Thomas Horne ,

Robert Kennedy Dickman ,

William Counden ,

Chase Craddock ,

Thomas Boone ,

John Mander ,

Thomas Skerrard ,

Thomas King ,

Joseph Styles ,

Thomas Ellsworth ,

John Toms .

Reference Number: t18100110-1

73. SAMUEL WALKER was indicted for that he, feloniously, wilfully, maliciously, and unlawfully, on the 23rd of December , did present a pistol loaded with gunpowder and divers leaden shots, at Thomas Boswell , a subject of our lord the king, and did attempt, by drawing the trigger thereof, to shoot and fire at him ; - and

THREE OTHER COUNTS for like offence, only varying the manner of charging them.

THOMAS BOSWELL . I live at Enfield chase, near Cattle-gate , in the county of Middlesex, about four miles from Enfield, on the border of the county of Hertford.

Q. On the evening of the 23d of December last did the prisoner come to your cottage - A. Yes; about half past five in the evening; it was dark; he knocked at the door and called me by name, and on my opening the door he asked me if I sold potatoes; I told him I had none; he afterwards asked for a drink of water, which I gave him; my wife was broiling some sprats for the children's supper, he said you have got sprats. Boswell; my wife said, would you like to have any, and I joined in the invitation; after some solicitation he came in, and on further solicitation he sat down, while my wife was dressing the sprats; he are about a couple of sprats; he then enquired what was o'clock, I told him I thought it was near six o'clock; he then stood up and made a bow; I thank you for my sprats; he then said I thank you mistress for my sprats, and made another bow; I said they are not worth the thanks; he then stepped up to a young child of mine about two years old, he said, I will give the child a halfpenny; the child, said I, do not need any money, nor does he know the use of it, do not give him any; he turned round to the child to give him a halfpenny, as I thought; his back was towards me; he turned round again and presented a pistol at my face, it was about nine inches from my face; he said your money or your life; what do you mean, said I? - your money or your life, he again repeated; - damn you, said I, where do you think a man like me gets money; I took the chair by the back that Walker had sat on and dashed it full length at him; the pistol flashed.

COURT. You dashed the chair at him to hit him I suppose - A. Yes; I struck him, and he pointed the pistol at me with his two hands.

Q. How soon after you had hit him with the chair was it that the pistol flashed - A. Almost instantly.

Q. Did it appear to you that the flashing of the pistol was owing to your striking him, or was it any act of him - A. I imagine it was his purpose.

Q. That you believe, do you - A. Yes; and not with my striking him.

Q. Where did the chair strike him - A. In his face.

Mr. Gurney. Was the chair above the pistol - A. Just at the point of the pistol; I hit his face just above it; he seized the chair with his right hand, and immediately flashed another pistol with his left.

Q. At the time that he so flashed the pistol with his left hand was it presented to you - A. It was presented at my right eye. I think he dashed or threw the chair at me in the same manner as I did at him; he then struck me with his stick at the back of my head, and made the blood flow; he struck me another blow on the temple and another on the eye; I then collared him with the left hand, I struck him some blows in the face with my right hand, and his stick dropped; I called several times for a stick, my wife and children were in the room; my eldest boy put his stick into my hand, he then strove to wrest the stick from me; the scuffle increased, and he strove to overpower me; he kicked me, and bit my thumb; he got on the bed, I dragged him down, and he fell on my wife.

Q. Did you and your wife at last overpower him - A. Yes; I overpowered him; my wife tied his hands behind his back, and I ordered him to be tied to the legs of the bedstead; I put a chair across his breast and some cords round his body and legs and kept him in that all night. Mine is an alone house, about a quarter of a mile from any other house. In the morning I sent my son for assistance; he was conveyed to a justice, and he was taken from there to the office in Hatton Garden, and the pistols were taken to the same office.

Q. Were they, when taken to the office, in the same condition which they were when you took them away from the prisoner - A. They were; I gave them to Mr. Hale in my house, and he took them to Hatton Garden office.

Q. When you delivered them to Mr. Hale had you put any shots in them - A. No.

Q. At the time that you gave them to Mr. Hale did you and he examine them to see whether they were loaded - A. I look at them and observed the muzzles full, within about three quarters of an inch of both of them.

Q. At the time that he flashed the second pistol, was there any thing but his purpose to occasion that - A. There was nothing. It was then presented to my face.

COURT. There was nothing could make it go off but his purpose - A. Yes; I am sure it was intended by him, and the first also.

Prisoner. Did I ever offer to fire a pistol at you - A. Yes, you did, two pistols.

Q. Did I tell you that I had a partner on the road with a horse - A. You did.

HANNAH BOSWELL. Q. You are the wife of the last witness, Thomas Boswell - A. Yes.

Q. On the 23d of December last did the prisoner come to your house - A. He did; he asked my husband if any potatoes were to be sold there; he said no; he then asked for a drink of water, which my husband gave him, and said he was sorry he had nothing better to offer him. I was getting my children's supper ready, he said you have some sprats, mistress; I said yes; I asked him if he wished to have any, and that he was very welcome to have them; he said he was very fond of sprats, he had not had any this year; I asked him to sit down, he did; he seemed loth to sit down.

Q. He required pressing - A. Yes. He sat down at the lower end of the table, I set some sprats before him, he ate a few of them; he said, you need not dress any more, he had more than he should eat; he

said he would give my child an halfpenny; he stood up; instead of giving the child an halfpenny he drawed out a pistol and turned round upon his heel and presented it at arms length at my husband's face, and said your money or your life; my husband said what do you mean; he said, I mean your money or your life; my husband took the chair that he sat upon and pushed it at him, straight foremost, and said, where should I get money, and instantly the pistol flashed.

Q. Could you judge at the time it flashed whether it was presented to your husband, or in any other direction - A. It was presented to his face.

Q. Did it appear to you that the going off of the pistol was occasioned by the shock of the chair, or was it done by the prisoner - A. I believe it was done before the chair reached him; I saw the pistol go off before the chair reached him.

COURT. Did you see the direction of the prisoner's arm before the chair was presented - A. It was presented strait forward at him; I do believe that his arm went straight to his face before the chair was put.

Mr. Gurney. So that there was no difference in the direction of the arm when the chair was put - A. No difference; it was straight at his face. The prisoner let the pistol drop and seized the chair with his right hand and then flashed another pistol in my husband's face with his left hand; I had the baby at my breast, when I saw him present the pistol I stood up and gave the baby into the hands of another child, to hold; my husband closed in upon him; he struck my husband with the stick on the back of his head; that is the stick that my husband has produced in court. I ran over to my husband that he should not get him down; I thought I would hang on the fellows arm; he saw me coming; he kicked me at the bottom of my back.

Q. At last he was conquered and secured - A. Yes; I received a blow in my face, on the side of my head, and on my shoulders; I was bruised all over.

Q. At last he was confined and kept there till the morning - A. Yes; 'till Mr. Hale come.

Prisoner. Did I offer to pull out any pistol and fire at your husband - A. You did.

Q. Did I tell you that there was a man at the gate with the horse - A. You did.

STEPHEN HALE . I am a farmer.

Q. Do you live near Boswell - A. Yes.

Q. On the morning of the 24th of December were you sent for by his little boy - A. Yes; I went to his house and there I saw the prisoner, his legs were tied together, and his thighs, and a chain round on his body, and several cords. I searched him, I found upon him some gunpowder. The pistols I found in the house, the pistol cases were found out of doors in a bundle; there were two coats and waistcoats. As soon as I brought him out of the house, as he was coming out of the gate, he said let me have my clothes; in that bundle of clothes I saw my man take the cases out; these are the cases, they are woollen cases; and these are the pistols, and here is a pistol screw; they were delivered to me by Mr. Boswell; I examined the pistols at the time they were nearly full; I took them to the police office.

Q. Did you there see the charges taken out - A. I did; they were both loaded with powder and snot. The pan of that pistol is broken, it could not go off; through the fall or the blow afterwards some injury must have been done to it; it must have flashed first before the fall; the injury seems to have been done by the fall. Here is some gunpowder in this pistol case, and in the great coat pocket there is some loose shot. I conveyed him to the office and he was committed.

JAMES HANCOCK. I am an officer of Hatton Garden office.

Q. When these pistols were produced by Mr. Hale at Hatton Garden office, did you, by the direction of the magistrate, unload them - A. I did. I have the charges here separate.

Q.How many shots were there in each - A. I did not count them; I suppose there is pretty near an hundred, and about the same in the other.

COURT. About a common charge was it not - A. Yes, about a common charge.

Prisoner's Defence. I never offered to fire any pistols at him. I went to this man's house, I was informed that he wanted to buy pistols; I went there on purpose to ask him; I knocked at the door, they opened it; I went in, they asked me to have a bit of supper; I got one of these pistols out of my pocket to shew him, meaning to ask him to buy it; he took one of the chairs up; I never offered to fire at all, nor held my arms out; this man put the chair and struck at me; I dropped the pistol out of my hands; I took hold of the chair, I said, what do you want by this; he said, d - n you, I will kill you; I struck at him with the chair. I stood in my own defence: his wife ran and locked the door; they swore they would kill me among them, so therefore I hit them again with the stick; he got a fork and swore he would run it through me; then he knocked me down and overpowered me; I only stood in my own defence all the while.

COURT to Mr. Hale. When you took hold of the prisoner in the morning did he mention any thing of his being in danger himself - A. No; he said nothing of that; I asked him his name, he told me he did not know his name.

Q. He told you nothing of this that he has said now - A. No.

Jury to prosecutor. Which pocket did he take the pistol from - A. I could not tell; he turned his back towards me to give the child a halfpenny.

Q. Did you observe where he took the second pistol from - A. No; I did not see it till he presented it and flashed it at me.

Prisoner. It is a thing quite impossible.

Jury. I have seen such a thing done.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 20.

First Middlesex jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

Reference Number: t18100110-2

74. ROBERT FRANCIS was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Francis Steele , about the hour of seven at night, on the 22nd of December , and stealing therein, a gold chain, value 16 l. 10 s. and two gold broaches, value 30 s. his property .

FRANCIS STEELE. I live at 86, Oxford-street , in the parish of Marybone. On the 22d of December, it was near seven in the evening.

Q. Had you candles lighted in your shop at the time - A. Yes. There were three of us in the shop at the time; it was not a minute before the chain was taken; I was shewing the gold chain to the young woman at the next door, and I had only walked across the shop when the chain was gone.

Q. Had you returned in again into the window. - A. I had, it was upon two cards. The glass of the window was quite whole when I put it back again.

Q. What did you hear, and what happened then, after you put it back again into the shop window. - A. I walked to the shop window, I heard nothing to alarm me; I observed the cotton rumpled, and the chain was gone, and the board on which the broaches lay, was turned over; I looked, and the chain and two broaches were gone; they were of the best gold; they lay close to the chain; and they were close to the glass of the window. The corner of the pane of glass, was cut as if by a diamond, and the piece of glass was taken away, and the hole in the glass was large enough to admit a lady's hand. On the next morning I went to the refiner's, I saw part of the chain.

JOHN BLAKE . I live at No. 16 in Long-acre: I am a refiner. On Friday evening, the 22d of December, about seven o'clock in the evening, a man brought me part of a gold chain for sale; I purchased it of him; the next morning Mr. Steele came and claimed it; I gave it him. I gave two pound four shillings for it; I bought it of a person resembling the prisoner, I cannot undertake to swear whether it was the prisoner or no.

WILLIAM GARDINER . I live next door to Mr. Steele. On Friday, the 22d of December, about seven o'clock in the evening, I observed the prisoner looking in at Mrs. Johnson's window, next door to Mr. Steele's; I did not see him do any thing; he went down the road, and he was in a butcher's dress, with a dark apron on. I saw nothing more of him till the next night; I gave Mr. Steele a description of him, Mr. Steele took him.

Q. to Prosecutrix. You took the prisoner upon the information that was given you by William Gardiner . - A. When I took the prisoner he never said a word; there was a man with him, he ran away as hard as he could; the prisoner was searched at Marlborough-street, nothing was found on him.

THOMAS COWIE . I live at 84 Long-acre: I am a refiner. On the 23d of December, about nine o'clock in the morning, a piece of gold chain was brought to me by a man; I bought it of him, it was ten or eleven penny weights. The prisoner is like the man, but I cannot say positively.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing at all about it.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18100110-3

75. JOHN ANDERSON was indicted for that he, on the 6th of January , being in the dwelling house of John Ward , feloniously did steal two pair of trowsers, unmade, value 10 s. two waistcoats, value 5 s. half a yard of calico, value 1 d. and two pair of scissars, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of John Ward ; and that he, at about the hour of twelve at night, on the same day, burglariously did break, to get out of the said dwelling house .

JOHN WARD . I am a taylor : I live at No. 2, Charles-court, Old Gravel-lane, St. Georges, Middlesex . The prisoner is a taylor , he worked for me three weeks, I let him sleep in the shop. I did not get up till eight o'clock on the 7th of January. I went into the shop, and missed these goods from out of the shop; I missed two trowsers cut out, but not made, two waistcoats, two pair of scissars, and a pair of cloth pantaloons, made up.

Q. Was the prisoner in the house at the time you missed these articles. - A. No; he had slept there all night for what I know, till the morning; I traced him to a jew dealer in East Smithfield; the jew owned to having bought the articles of him, and produced them all, except the scissars. After making the discovery, I met with the prisoner in a public-house, and took him to the office, the officer searched him, and found two pair of scissars upon him. I saw all the articles on the evening before in my shop, and I saw the prisoner about five o'clock that evening. I do not know, of my own knowledge, at what time the prisoner broke out.

FRANCIS NORDEN . I am shopman to my father, he is a dealer in clothes, No. 70, Upper East Smithfield. On Sunday, the 7th instant. between eight and nine in the morning, he came into the shop, and asked, whether I would buy the goods; he told me he was a taylor, he worked with a man; he died, and these goods were given to him for the money that he owed him; upon that, I bought them, I gave twelve shillings for them; in about five minutes, John Ward came in, I produced the articles; he said, they were his. I was present when the scissars were taken from the prisoner's pockets. The waistcoats and trowsers were given to the prosecutor by my father.

The property produced and identified.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to his character.

GUILTY , aged 62.

Of stealing but not in the dwelling-house.

Confined One Month in Newgate , and publicly whipped .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18100110-4

76. GEORGE HAND was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of Mary Cawthorn , about the hour of six, on the night of the 8th of December , and stealing therein twelve yards of ribbon, value 10 s. and a silk handkerchief, value 6 d. her property ,

MARY CAWTHORN . I am a haberdasher , No. 27. Chiswell-street, Saint Luke's . On the 8th of December I lost a silk handkerchief and a piece of ribbon he attempted to take away. I missed the handkerchief about six o'clock, after the prisoner was taken between five and six. I was sitting in the parlour with a lady and gentleman, I heard the glass of the shop window break, I and the lady and gentleman went into the shop, I found a pane of glass with the corner broke out. The gentleman went out, and said he would watch. In about a minute the prisoner and another passed by the window; he looked earnestly at the window, and returned back again; he then pushed the remainder of the broken pane of glass in. It was not so dark but I could distinguish him; he put his hand into the window, he was dragging the ribbon out with his hand. I went out and collared him, he resisted, pulled me out in the road, and got from me. I pursued him, and cried out

"stop thief;" he threw me down in the middle of the road; he was taken and brought back.

Q. Was it day-light enough for you to distinguish the prisoner - A. Quite day-light enough for me to distinguish him.

CHARLES GREVILLE. On the 8th of December I dined with Mrs. Cawthorn: Miss Emery was with me. We heard a noise like breaking of glass; we discovered a square of glass that appeared to be cut designedly, of sufficient length to admit a person's hand. I went out to watch, and stationed myself about twenty yards from the house. I noticed the prisoner pass several times, fixing his eye on the window; the last time I saw him pass he put his arm in the window. I could not see what he had in his hand. Mrs. Cawthorn came out and seized the prisoner by the collar, upon which the prisoner threw her violently down in the road. I pursued the prisoner, and took him in a court in Grub-street, Immediately I pursued the prisoner I was surrounded by four or five others, who tried to extricate him; they cut my coat with a knife in two or three places. I secured him, and brought him back to Mrs. Cawthorn.

Q.(to Prosecutrix.) Was the ribbon and handkerchief ever found - A. Upon my taking hold of him he let the ribbon go, there were about two yards of it hanging out of the window. I never saw the handkerchief again; the value of the handkerchief was seven shillings.

DANIEL BISHOP . I went to Mrs. Cawthorn's house, the ribbon was given into my custody. There was nothing found on the prisoner that belonged to the prosecutrix.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going by the place, I heard the cry of

"stop thief." I ran, and this gentleman came and took me.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Of stealing, but not of breaking and entering the house in the night time.

Confined twelve calendar months in the House of Correction , and fined one shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

Reference Number: t18100110-5

77. CHARLES CADMAN was indicted, for that he, on the 14th of December , in and upon Martha Gale , spinster , violently and feloniously did make an assault; and her the said Martha Gale , against her will, did ravish and carnally know .

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18100110-6

78. JAMES NORTON was indicted, for that he, on the 20th of October , in and upon Jane Duncan , spinster , violently and feloniously did make and assault; and her the said Jane Duncan , against her will, did ravish and carnally know .

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18100110-7

79. ANN COTTERELL was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 29th of December , part of a bed furniture, value 4 s. a sheet, value 5 s. a petticoat, value 2 s. and an apron, value 1 s. the property of Elizabeth Williams , widow .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100110-8

80. SAMUEL BUNDY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 15th of December , six pounds four ounces weight of pewter, value 5 s. the property of Richard Joseph .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded GUILTY .

Confined one month in Newgate , and whipped in jail .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100110-9

81. WILLIAM BATEMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of January , a bank note, value 1 l. the property of Frederick Sparrow .

FREDERICK SPARROW . I am a grocer . I live in Ludgate-hill . The prisoner was my shopman . On Saturday, the 6th of January, suspecting that I was robbed, I took a note to my neighbour, John Bollard , and requested that he would cause that note to be laid out at my shop at about a quarter past eleven o'clock that night. About eleven o'clock I took all the notes out of the till, and went up stairs, as is generally my custom. About twelve o'clock, after the shop was shut up, I went down to examine the till; that note was not to be found in the till that I had given to Mr. Bollard. The next morning I said to my young men, that I entertained a suspicion that I was robbed: I had caused a one pound note to be laid out on the evening before, which was not in the till. They all denied any knowledge of it. I told them the note was marked, I had sent it after eleven o'clock, and it would be found on some of them. I sent for an officer. On his proceeding to search, the prisoner stepped forward and said, unfortunately he was the person who had taken the note; and he produced it at the same time. He said, he had took it to make up a payment of a bill of about forty shillings that he owed his washerwoman. He begged hard for forgiveness.

JOHN BOLLARD . Q. You have got the note. - A. Yes; I received this note on a Saturday afternoon of Mr. Sparrow, he requested that I would cause the greatest part of it to be laid out in his shop; I caused it to be laid out that evening. I gave the note to my daughter, and told her to go over to Mr. Sparrows: on the next morning, when I went to Mr. Sparrows, the prisoner produced the note; I took it of him, and saw it was the same which Mr. Sparrow brought to me.

ANN BOLLARD . Q. On Saturday night, about a quarter past eleven o'clock, my father gave me a one pound note, and desired me to fetch a pound of eleven shilling hyson tea, and two pound of twelvepenny loaf sugar, at Mr. Sparrows, which I did; I paid the one pound note to the prisoner, I gave to the prisoner the same note that my father gave me. The prisoner put the note in the till, and gave me seven shillings change.

The note produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. That young person said, I put the note in the till, which I deny; and after I had given her the change, I wrote the direction on the note, which she gave me, and put the note in my pocket, there being another man serving at the till; I intended to put it in the till, when an opportunity offered, it slipped my memory.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 27.

Confined Three Months in Newgate , and fined 1 s .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100110-10

82. JOHN ALLEN and JOHN DITCH were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of December , a cask, value 6 d. and 56 lb. weight of butter, value 1 l. the property of William Liddard , and John Aylwin .

JOHN AYLWIN . My partners name is William Liddard , we are wharfinger 's, at Ralph's and Young's Quay, Lower Thames-street . On Tuesday the 12th of December, a lighter came to the wharf, marked M, with one hundred and ninety-nine firkins of butter; It came under my direction as wharfinger, when the porters landed them, I took charge of them; I counted them twice, and found them to be exactly agreeable to the lighter bill, one hundred and ninety-nine. I put my watchman to take care of them, and when they were put in the warehouse, I counted them again, and found there was a deficiency of two, the parcel was two hundred, one was left on board the ship. I missed No. 41 and 94: on the next day, the witness came and asked me if I had lost it.

ISAAC REGIS . I am beadle of the Portuguese Synagogue. In going through Cutler's-street, Woolpack-alley, on the 12th of December about two o'clock in the day, I saw the two prisoners, Allen had the load on his shoulder. I heard Ditch say to Allen. go on. I had suspicion that the property did not belong to them; I catched hold of Allen and Ditch, and insisted upon knowing what they had got; Allen replied, dirty butter. I took them to the Compter, by information, I found that Mr. Aylwin was the owner. It was concealed in this bag: Allen said, if I would let him go, he would give me the property.

The property produced and identified.

Allen's Defence. I was coming along Houndsditch, a man asked me to take that bag into Winfield-street, he would give me a shilling; and going along Petticoat-square, this man took hold of me; asked me what I had got; I said a firkin of butter, I put it down, he said, he must take me to the Compter: I said, I am willing to go with you; that is all that passed between us; I never said, I would give him the firkin of butter.

Ditch's Defence. I know nothing of it; I was going to buy an old pair of shoes for myself; he took hold of me, and said, I must go to the Compter.

ALLEN GUILTY , aged 35.

DITCH GUILTY , aged 37.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100110-11

82. THOMAS PIGOTT was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 7th of December , two dollars, and two half-pence , the property of Richard Shaw .

RICHARD SHAW . I am a publican ; I live at the Bull's-head, Leadenhall-street . On the 7th of December, between six and seven in the evening, I was up stairs at tea, my boy came up stairs to me, for change of half a guinea, he said, he was to take it over to Mr. Jackson, the shoemaker, with a pot of beer; I gave him two new dollars; in the space of two or three minutes, I was called down stairs, my boy said, a man had taken the two dollars from him, he said, he would leave the half guinea at the bar. The prisoner returned into the house again; after he had got the change, and drank some gin along with a woman and a soldier, he was going out, I asked the boy whom he gave the change to, the boy said, that man; I told him he must not go, I should send for a constable, he said, he had no money in his pocket; while the constable was gone for, he took a dollar out of his pocket, he said, is this yours; I said, I believe it is, he said, take it. No, I said, this will not do, I must have another. The constable came, and searched the woman. and found a dollar upon her. The woman had said, she had no such thing upon her. On the woman was found a great quantity of loose halfpence, besides the dollar.

SARAH PEYton. I live with Mr. Shaw; the first time the prisoner came in, he had a man, and a woman along with him: they went in the parlour; he went out, and came in the passage, as far as the last pane of glass of the bar; he called for a pot of beer, to go over to Mr. Jacksons, and change for half a guinea, I asked him if it was Mr. Jackson's the boot-maker, he said, yes, I told the boy to go up stairs to his master, and get ten shillings, the boy came down with two dollars, gave them to me, they were two new dollars, I gave him the two new dollars again, and two old halfpence, and told him to take it over to Mr. Jackson, and he was to bring back half a guinea. In the mean time the boy was gone out, the prisoner came in, and went into the parlour. When the boy came in, he said, that he had given the man the change, and the man was to come in to give me the half guinea, and he gave me no such thing.

Q. Did you ask him. - A. I did, he came out of the parlour, and said, that his wife paid for the gin, he said, that he had ordered no beer at all, nor any change. Then the boy came in, I asked him, he said, that was the man, I told him to stop, I rang the bell for my master, he came down, I told him, that I had sent over a pot of beer, and change for half a guinea to Mr. Jackson's.

Q. Did you see him when he ordered the beer, - A. Yes; I was in the bar at the time; I am sure that is the man that ordered the beer to be sent to Mr. Jacksons.

Q. Did you hear him order any change. - A. Yes; I am perfectly sure it is the man, he ordered the beer and change in the passage, at the glass window.

JAMES ARTHUR. I was down in the cellar doing my work, Sarah Peyton called me up stairs, and told me to get two dollars; I got them, I gave the two dollars to Sarah, she gave them again to me, with a penny with it, and a pot of beer, she told me to go to Mr. Jackson's; the prisoner stopped me crossing the road, he asked me if that was going to Mr. Jackson's; I said, yes, he asked me for the change; I took out the two dollars, and the penny, he took them, he said, he would give the half-guinea at the bar. I took the beer to Mr. Jackson's, they told me, they never ordered any beer, they never drank any. I am sure the prisoner is the same man that stopped me in the road, about two minutes after that, I saw him in the house, he was coming out of the passage door, I said, he was the same man that met me going across the road; he put the two dollars, and the two halfpence into his waistcoat pocket.

Prisoner. It was in the dark, was it not. - A. It was between six and seven o'clock, the candles were lit up.

Court. Was it light enough to see the man. - A. Yes; he had a light waistcoat on.

- I was a ward officer at that time; I searched the prisoner, and found nothing on him. I understood they had taken a dollar from him. I requested the woman in company with him, to turn out her pockets, she took out a number of halfpence and a dollar. I produce the two dollars, one was given me by Mr. Shaw, and the other I took from the woman.

Prosecutor. I had no mark on the dollar; they had

the appearance of new dollars. I cannot swear to them, having no mark on them.

Prisoner's Defence. I belong to the Tower-Hamlet militia. I had been to Deptford. on my return, I went into the Bull's-head, Leadenhall-street, with my wife and the corporal, on my going out, I was stopped by the landlord, who told me, that there had been a pot of beer ordered to the shoemaker's over the way, and I was the man that ordered it, they sent for a constable, and searched me, my chief witness, the corporal, who was with me, has got a furlough. I questioned the boy when I was going out of the house, he said, I give it to some man, I believe you are the man.

Arthur. The prisoner asked me if he was the man; I said he was the man that took the money away from me; he asked me if I was sure of it; I said, yes, I am quite sure of it.

GUILTY , aged 27.

Transported for seven years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100110-12

83. THOMAS SIMMONS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of December , one pound seven ounces weight of wool, value 8 s. the property of William Hall , John Edward Holmes , Thomas Chapman , and John William Chapman .

WILLIAM HALL . I am a wharfinger at Porter's Quay : my partner's names are, John Edward Holmes , Thomas Chapman , and John William Chapman . I can only speak to the property.

WILLIAM FARMAGE . I am porter to Mr. Hall; on the 22d of December last, I was loading of wool; I saw the prisoner take wool out of the bag, and put it into his breeches, and into his waistcoat; we let him take what he wished, and then I followed him up the gateway, and told him he had got some wool; he said, no, he had none. I pulled the wool out of his breeches, and from his waistcoat; I then took the prisoner to the compting house, and our clerk sent for a constable.

- WOODLAND. I am a constable; I have got the wool, there is one pound seven ounces; I had it weighed.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, not called any witnesses to character.

GUILTY , aged 45.

Confined One Month in Newgate , and whipped in jail .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100110-13

84. WILLIAM CONNOR and WILLIAM STEPHENS were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 21st of December , 10 lb. weight of salt-petre, value 8 s. the property of John Maud .

The indictment was read by Mr. Arabin, and the case was stated by Mr. Gurney.

ROBERT BIGGAR . I am clerk to John Maud , he is a chemist in Aldersgate-street . The two prisoner's were in the employ of Mr. Maud; their constant employ was in the salt-petre room . On the 21st of December, about four o'clock, the two prisoners were coming out together to get their beer; I saw them; I staid away from the Exchange, in consequence of suspicion, to watch them; they went out of the laboratory, I stopped them in Mr. Maud's premises, and told them I had something to say to them; they followed me; when I got them up stairs, I sent for Cartwright the officer. Mr. Maud was present; he told them he suspected they had robbed the premises; they hung their heads and said nothing. Cartright came; they were searched; he found a piece of saltpetre in each of their hats. Connor said, he was sorry he had done it; and Stephens expressed sorrow; I do not particularly remember what he said.

DANIEL CARTWRIGHT . Q. You are a marshal-man of the city. - A. Yes; I was sent for; I went up into the room, the two prisoners were present; I took Stephens's hat out of his hand; I felt his hat very heavy. I said, Mr. Maud, there is something in it; I searched further and took out this salt-petre; and in Connor's hat, which he had put on the table, was this piece of salt-petre; I weighed them, one piece is five pound weight; and the other is five pound and a half. Connor and Stephens begged for mercy; Mr. Maud said, he had lost so much, he could think nothing at all of it. I handcuffed them and took them to the counter.

Q. to Biggar. What quantity is there of this. - A. About five pound weight in each, worth about ten shillings. Stephens's sole employ was in cutting the salt-petre out of the crystals.

Connor's Defence. I lived eighteen years with Mr. Maud, and during them eighteen years, he gave me a very good character; I have been away from him, and only lived with him two years this last time. I superintended the laboratory for Mr. Biggar, for twelve years; and I have had the care of some thousand pounds; I behaved as an honest man all the time. I asked my mate to give me a piece of salt-petre, it was to give to a friend. Mr. Biggar knows me, he can give me a good character.

Stephens said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

Conner called six witnesses, who gave him a good character.

CONNER GUILTY , aged 48.

STEPHENS GUILTY , aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100110-14

85. EDWARD SHORTLIN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22d of December , fourteen pair of stockings, value 2 l. 10 s. the property of Robert Rofmanis.

ROBERT ROMANIS . I am an hosier , I live in Cheapside: and I have a shop also in Cornhill . I can only speak to the stockings.

JOHN KELLET . I am shopman to Mr. Romanis in Cornhill. On the 22d of December, about four o'clock in the afternoon, I was standing in the shop; I saw the stockings were shaking; they were hung at the door, part in and part out; I heard a noise as if some of them had been snatched; I went to the door, and saw the prisoner crossing the road with the stockings over his shoulder; I ran after him, and called, stop thief; he dropped the stockings and attempted to ran away; some persons hearing me call stop thief, stopped him; I never lost sight of him. I picked up the stockings. He was brought back to the shop, and I gave him in charge of the constable.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I was crossing along Cornhill,

a young man crossed over the way and accused me of dropping some stockings. I was twenty yards from the door behind a coach. I knowing myself innocent, went back. It was the 23d when I was stopped; he said, the 22d.

KELLETT. It was Friday preceding Christmas. day.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Transported for seven years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100110-15

86. WILLIAM MAYNARD was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 23d of December , a looking-glass, value 2 l. 8 s. the property of Matthew Taylor .

MATTHEW TAYLOR . I am a cabinet maker , No. 8, Sun-street : I was not at home when the glass was taken, I can only speak to the property.

JAMES BROOKS . I am a servant to Mr. Taylor. On the 23d of December, about twelve o'clock, I was in Sun-street about two doors from my master's shop; I saw the prisoner go out of the shop, with the glass. There was not a soul in the shop: I made enquiry of my mistress, whether she had sold the glass; she said, she had not: I ran after the man, and came up to him in Sun-street. I asked him, where he was going with that glass, he told me, that he was going in the fields with it; I desired him to bring the glass back to where he took it from, he said he would not; I said, he should, and collared him with one hand, and took hold of the glass with the other, and brought him back.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming towards his master's house, a man met me that I know perfectly well, but I cannot find him out since, he asked me to take the glass to Mr. Wilkes's house, Moorfield's, and when I received it out of his hands, I had not gone two doors before that gentleman came to me; and as to my being in the shop that day, I was not.

GUILTY , aged 60.

Confined One Year in Newgate , and publicly whipped .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100110-16

87. ANTHONY EVERETT was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of December , a copper chocolate pot, value 4 s. a copper warming pot, value 3 s. and two copper pans, value 4 s. the property of James Peter Oriel , Esq .

ELIZABETH ROBINS . I am servant to Mr. Oriel, in Park-street . The prisoner was a carpenter , who was at work at our house: on the 18th of December, the prisoner was doing some repairs to the larder; at the dusk of the evening, I went to him, and said, I was going to get my tea; he said, he was going to get half a pint of porter, instead of tea; the room that I sat in, was just opposite of the kitchen door; I could see every thing that passed there; I saw him put something in his coat pockets, he ran up stairs; I said, stop, I'll light you; he ran out, and left the street door open; I shut the street door, and ran down in the kitchen immediately; I looked after the four articles of copper, they were gone, I had them in my hand at twelve o'clock, there had been nobody in the house but he and I. I went to the public-house, where he said, he was going to have half a pint of beer, he was not there; then I went to Mr. Watson's, he brought a constable, and when the prisoner returned, he had got a new piece of board in his hand; I asked him whether he had been to the shop for it, he said, he had not; he said, this board I took out with me, and I brought it back again, because he thought I suspected he had taken something out. His master came, and said, he had been to his shop for the board. Then he was taken in custody.

Mr. Alley. Q. Were these things ever found afterwards. - A. No.

Q. He returned back to his work, and was taken from his work. - A. Yes. He was gone an hour and a half.

- FALCONER. I am a beadle; I was sent for. This young woman informed me that the carpenter had robbed them; the prisoner said, he took nothing but this board, and he brought it back to shew her.

- ROYCE. I am foreman to Mr. Charles Royce ; his shop is in Brewer-street. On the 17th of December, about half past five or six o'clock, the prisoner came to the shop for the board. It belongs to a sash in the larder.

Prisoner's Defence. I am quite innocent.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100110-17

88. ROBERT NORTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of November , a gelding, value 10 l. the property of Joshua Vevers .

JOSHUA VEVERS . Q. Did you lose a horse any time in November last. - A. I was not at home, my ostler lent the horse; I know nothing but the horse being my own.

JOHN MALING . Q. You are ostler to Mr. Vevers. - A. Yes, he lives at the Swan and Hoop, Moorgate . The prisoner came to me, and hired the horse on Monday, the 13th of November last, about nine o'clock in the morning. He did not return again that day; I never saw him, until I apprehended him myself on the other side of Blackfriars-bridge, on the Thursday following.

Q. What space of time was the horse hired for. - A. For a few hours; to go to Hampstead, he said. I believe he was going to see his brother-in-law, and he wanted the horse for a ride.

Q. You say you apprehended him. - A. I and another man, a hackney coachman. When I apprehended him, he said, how do you do, I am glad to see you; I said, how do you do, walk over the bridge and we will have something to drink; he said, I would as soon drink with you as any man. We walked over the bridge, I had hold of one arm, and the hackney coachman the other, and when we got over the bridge, he refused going any further; he said, what business had we to lead him that way. The coachman said, I am an officer, I will take you for horse stealing; I said, do not make words here; the prisoner said, show your authority. He could not show any authority; a mob gathered round, I had hold of him; I said, it is of no use your refusing going with me, for go you shall; I insist upon knowing where my horse is. Charles Humphries was coming past, and by some means came up at the same time; he tapped me on the shoulder; I said, is that you Humphries, have you any authority about you that you can shew; he shewed his authority, he went very quietly then; I gave him in charge of the officer. When we came to a public-house, we went in and had something to drink; we came out and called the coach, and he was taken to Bow-street that evening; and then the prisoner told me to whom he had sold the horse. He said, he sold the horse to Robert Boradil , he lived near Hyde Park corner. I went there, and had an order from Robert Boradil , to fetch

the horse from Mr. Westall's livery stables, Black Horse yard, Curtain-road. I fetched him home on the 17th of November; I delivered the order to Mr. Westall, and he delivered the horse to me.

Q. What was to be the hire of it for the day - A. I never told him, nor he did not ask the question.

Q. Had you ever seen him before - A. It might be a week. He came into the yard, and put his horse up to bait; he paid for the corn, and asked me to direct him to Mr. Mitchell, a linen-draper, in Leadenhall-street; he said his brother-in-law lived there.

Q. What became of the horse after you had brought him back - A. I sent him off a journey about three or four hours afterwards.

Q. Did you bring him home to your master's stables - A. I brought him home to my master's stables.

Q. Have you any doubt that he is the same horse - A. I am sure he is the same horse; he was a chesnut gelding, with a bald face and four white legs; we had him about four or five months.

Mr. Arabin. Did your master permit you to let the horse out to hire - A. Yes.

Q. I take it to be your business, when this man hired the horse, for you to enquire how long he wanted it - A. Yes.

Q. I do not know whether you recollect of his saying, if he liked the horse he should keep it longer - A. No.

Q. It does sometimes happen - A. It never happened with me.

Q. When you took hold of him, he went very quietly with you till you pinched his arm holding him fast, then he wanted to see your authority - A. No man behaved more like a gentleman than he did: he is a gentleman all over him.

ROBERT BORADIL. I live at a livery-stable, Grosvenor-place, near Hyde-park-corner. The prisoner came to me on the 13th of November, about twelve o'clock; he asked me to take care of his horse; he brought him to bait at our stables; he went out of the yard, and returned in five minutes, and said, he wished the horse to be cleaned, as he had got two or three gentlemen coming from Tattersall's to look at the horse; he wished me to make haste. I asked him, if he was going to sell the horse? he said, he was. I asked him, where he brought the horse from? he said, Bourn, in Lincolnshire. He said, he rode him all the way up from Bourn, in Lincolnshire; he had no further use for the horse, and he wished to sell him. I asked him, what the horse was used to do, whether it would draw; he said, it had been generally used in the country to carry double. I asked him, if he warranted the horse sound? he said, no, he did not; he did not want to have further trouble with him. I had the horse turned up and down the yard, to see if he was sound. I bought the horse for fourteen guineas. I asked him for his address; he gave me his address, George Thompson , Greyhound, Smithfield.

Q. Have you got the receipt there - A. Yes; here is the receipt, and that is the address he gave me after I bought the horse.

Q. The receipt is subscribed, George Thompson , Bourn, in Lincolnshire. What became of the horse afterward - A. He was owned afterwards by Mr. Vevers's ostler. He enquired if I had not bought the horse; I told him I had bought a horse exactly the same that he described the marks: it was a chesnut horse, a white face, and four white legs. I sent the horse to Mr. Westall's stables, in the Curtain-road, to be sent down in the country. I delivered the horse up as soon as they claimed the horse. I gave an order to get him from there.

Mr. Arabin. You had never seen the prisoner before that morning - A. No.

Court. Look at him, and see if you are certain that is the man - A. That is the man.

CHARLES HUMPHRIES . Q. We understand this man was giving into your charge - A. Yes, for horse stealing. I took charge of him.

Q. What passed going along - A. Nothing particular. I took him to Bow-street, from there I went to the man that bought the horse.

Q.(to Mr. Vevers.) Have you seen this horse since he was brought home - A. Yes; it is the same horse that I had in the stable before he was let to the prisoner. I have had him six or seven months.

Prisoner's Defence. I have nothing to say. I leave myself to the mercy of the Court.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 26.

Second Middlesex jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

Reference Number: t18100110-18

89. WALTER WATKINS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of December , twenty-four pair of shoes, value 2 l. 3 s. a pair of scissars, value 2 s. and ten pounds weight of leather, value 5 s. the property of William Wood , in his dwelling-house ; and HANNAH WATKINS , for feloniously receiving the same goods, on the same day, knowing them to have been stolen .

WILLIAM WOOD . I am a boot and shoemaker , No. 13, City-road, Finsbury-square . Walter Watkins was my errand boy ; he boarded and lodged with his father and mother.

Q. Who is the prisoner Hannah Watkins - A. That is his mother ; she lived in White Horse-court, White Cross-street. On the 4th of December last, my son had occasion to go in the City on business; he came home and told me, that he had seen a pair of shoes of mine in Mr. Atterbury's window; he is a pawnbroker, in Crown-street, Finsbury-square. I went there and saw eight pair of my shoes. On the 6th, I found two pair at Mr. Wright's, a pawnbroker, in White Cross-street, and two pair at Mr. Williams's, pawnbroker, Barbican. On Tuesday the 4th, I went to the house of the female prisoner, she was at home; there were two young women at home, and I think another of her sons was at home; her husband was not at home. The officer searched her, he took four duplicates out of her pocket, one of which was for a pair of shoes. He afterwards searched the room, and found a quantity of leather, some whole skins and some in pieces. Her other son, who was a shoemaker, was at work in his father's house; he separated his from mine. I found there twelve pair of shoes. The female prisoner said, she was very sorry for what had happened. She fell on her knees and said, what happened I am the cause of this; she asked, if I would forgive her; I told her I did not wish to hurt the hair of her head, but I wished to have my property back again. I told her my daughter had lost a pair of scissars; she gave me the silver part of a pair of scissars. The boy prisoner was at my shop when the officer took the female prisoner; he came to my house. I said to the boy Walter, put on your hat and go with that gentleman: he went with the officer. I never found any thing upon the boy. I had the most unbounded confidence in him, nor do I know of any thing done by him.

Q. Then, as to the boy, you know nothing about him, except he was in the shop, you suppose he took them - A. That is exactly the case. I never found any thing upon him, nor had I ever any conversation with him upon the subject.

RICHARD ATTERBURY . I am a pawnbroker. I bought eight pair of shoes of the woman prisoner at different times. I gave her from three to four shillings a pair for the womens' shoes, and six shillings for the pair of mens' shoes.

MR. WRIGHT. I am a pawnbroker, in White Cross-street. I bought two pair of shoes of a woman; I believe it to be the prisoner, but am not positive.

JAMES HENRY WILLIAMS. I am a pawnbroker, No. 30, Barbican. The woman prisoner sold me these two pair of shoes.

JOHN RAY . I am an officer. After I had been to the house of the woman prisoner, and had taken her in custody, I went to Mr. Wood's house; the lad was there, and he gave charge of him to me. In going to the office, I told him his mother was in custody; he asked me for what; I told him, for stealing some shoes: and I shewed him a pair of silver bows belonging to a pair of scissars. I asked him, if he knew any thing about them; he said, he found them in his master's yard. He was very much alarmed when he found his mother was in custody.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18100110-19

90. WILLIAM CURRIE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2nd of December , a watch, value 9 l. and a gold chain, value 1 l. the property of Daniel Mackey , from his person .

DANIEL MACKEY . I live at No. 3, Princes-court, Duke-street , St. James's. On the 2nd of December, I think it was, I went out to spend the evening with a friend; it was on a Friday. I stopped till two or three o'clock on Saturday morning. I had drank rather freely. I was coming home from Dyot-street to Duke-street, St. James's. I had been in Berry-street. I was not at home, I dare say, before five or six o'clock in the morning. I do not recollect any thing that happened. My landlady came up and called me at two o'clock, and enquired if I had lost any thing, because I was tipsey when I came home. I searched and missed my watch. About a fortnight afterwards I was told it was advertized from Bow-street, and that it was at Mr. Wigley's shop. I went to Bow-street, and swore to my watch.

MR. WIGLEY. I live in Chandois-street. On the 11th of December, about two o'clock, the prisoner came to pledge this watch. I was not in the shop at the time, but my young man came to me. I went into the shop, and asked, what he wanted on the watch; he told me, he wanted three pounds. I asked him, if he knew what the watch was; yes, he said, he knew it was a gold watch. I asked him if he knew any thing further, because it was a repeater; he only said, he knew it was a gold watch, a gentleman had given it him to pledge to pay his rent. I told him, that was something extraordinary. I desired my lad to go for an officer. He asked me whether I meaned to give it him; I said, certainly. I did not; he immediately made off as fast as he could; the officer came; he was pursued and stopped, and taken to Bow-street. At the office he said, he found it on his beat; he is a watchman. On the last examination, the prisoner delivered up the seal to the prosecutor. There was no seal to the watch when he offered to pledge it.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going my round at half past three on Saturday morning, I found this watch by the corner of Duke-street; it was laying on the pavement. I kept it in my possession for nine days, to see if I could find an owner for the watch. I carried it always with me on my beat: I heard no enquiries. I happened to go into this pawnbroker's to get the particulars of the watch for the purpose of getting it advertized the next day. I asked the pawnbroker's man to tell me, whether it was gold or not; he said, yes. I said, could I pawn it; he said, yes. I said, for three guineas; he said, yes. The master came in the shop and asked me many questions, and then told me to go away, he would keep the watch. I went out to get an officer. They took me. I was in Clerkenwell four days; and when I went up to the office, there was no owner to this watch: they let me go. I told them where I lived; and when they sent for me, I went to the office.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18100110-20

91. HENRY CASTLE LARGE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 27th of December , in the dwelling-house of Joseph Sparrow , a coat, value 12 s. four waistcoats, value 14 s. three pair of shoes, value 8 s. four pair of stockings, value 3 s. two pair of gaiters, value 4 s. four knives, value 1 s. a razor and box, value 1 s. a pair of scissars, value 1 s. a pocket book, value 6 d. and a bank note, value 5 l. the property of David Walker .

DAVID WALKER . I slept four nights at Joseph Sparrow 's house; the 24th of December was the last night I lodged there. I went to Stamford-hill. I left all the articles mentioned in the indictment at Sparrow's, and returned on the 27th, at night; and then I missed all my clothes and the 5 l. Bank note and other things. I left them all in a bag.

JOSEPH SPARROW . Q. Did David Walker lodge with you, in December last - A. Yes, four days; it was towards the latter end of December. When he went away he left a bag in the room; when he came again, on the 27th, it was missing. I had seen the bag in the room on the 25th. The prisoner and Walker both lodged in one room. The prisoner went away on the morning of the 27th, between seven and eight o'clock, before the family was up. He owed two shillings for a week's lodging.

Q. Had he given you any notice of going away - A. No, I was out on the Wednesday. On the Thursday morning I was informed the bag was gone. I went into the room, and saw the bag was gone. I suspected the prisoner, and went in pursuit of him. I apprehended him about five o'clock, at the Yorkshire Grey, White Lion-street. I found him there; he called me out into the street; he asked me, what I wanted of him; I told him to go in and have a pint of beer, I wanted to have some talk with him concerning the things that were taken out of the room; he said, he should go where he pleased for me, and he went down Queen-street. I followed him, and seeing a public-house open, the Black Horse, I forced him in there by main strength, and sent for an officer, and gave him in charge. At the Black Horse, there was

a man there that said, the bag was opened in his shop; his name is Newman. I went to Newman's house afterwards, and saw certain things which are now in court.

- NEWMAN. I am an hair-dresser, No. 17, White Lion-street. On the 27th of December, about the middle of the day, the prisoner called at my shop.

Q. Were you acquainted with him before - A. Yes, he used my shop the whole of the Summer. He had a bag, which he told me he had just purchased; he said, that the man that he bought it of told him, there were four pair of stockings in it, and he wished to see the contents of it; he then untied the bag, and throwed the contents on the floor; he said, he thought he had not given too much for it. He found four pair of stockings there.

Q. You saw, of course, what there were in the bag - A. I cannot recollect all the things that were in the bag: there was a black waistcoat, nearly new; two flannel waistcoats, which he observed would suit him, as he always wore sleeves to his waistcoats when he was at work; there was a pair of new braces. He said he was going to Northampton, he would not be troubled with all these things; he put the black waistcoat on, and selected what part he would take with him, and put them in the bag again; and these things he left for me. He called the next morning and said, the chocolate coat which he had on, was at the top of the bag when he brought them. On the evening of the 27th, I happened to be at the Yorkshire Grey public-house, White Lion-street, I there mentioned the circumstance to a neighbour, of the prisoner bringing a bag and emptying it in my shop, and that I conceived he did not come honestly by it, or had bought it of somebody that came dishonestly by it. My neighbour was in the same house that Mr. Sparrow put the prisoner in; he informed Mr. Sparrow of the circumstance. My neighbour and Mr. Sparrow came to me, and desired me to go to Bow-street; I immediately produced the articles and went to Bow-street.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I got up, and went out in the morning, at day-light; I took nothing with me but the clothes that I had on my back; I owed no rent till the Thursday. I was going along the road, about ten o'clock in the day, I lit with a man with a bundle in his hand; he said, he came from Bristol; he asked me to buy it; he said, he wanted some money; I asked him to let me look at them; there was a coat and some stockings, I saw but three waistcoats; I gave him seventeen shillings for them, I thought it was the value of them. I went to this man's house, and let him look at them; I afterwards happened to go into a public-house, where I lost the things; I never made a farthing of them. I left with that gentleman, a tea caddie, three waistcoats, and a pair of old shoes, and what things else I do not know, I told him he was welcome to them.

GUILTY , aged 64.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only.

Confined Twelve Calendar Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s .

Second Middlesex jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

Reference Number: t18100110-21

92. ELIZABETH TILBROOK , alias PRICE , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of November , three gowns, value 21 s. a petticoat, value 6 s. twenty three handkerchiefs, value 23 s. a cloak, value 1 l. eight pair of silk stockings, value 8 s. a cap, value 6 d. two veils, value 5 s. a bonnet, value 6 s. two pinafores, value 2 s. three shifts, value 12 s. three shawls, value 20 s. two waistcoats, value 8 s. a pair of cotton stockings, value 1 s. a hat, value 6 s. and a scarf, value 6 s. the property of Alexander Stratton , in the dwelling house of Eleanor Price , widow .

AMELIA STRATTON . My husband's name is Alexander Stratton ; I have left my husband two years; I am a poor unfortunate woman.

Q. Is your husband alive or dead. - A. He is alive, on board the Monarch.

Q. Where do you live. - A. I have been living in London a good while; when I lost these things, I lived in the house of the mother of the prisoner, No. 90, Norfolk-street, in the parish of Marybone , her name is Eleanor Price .

Q. Were you at home at your lodgings. - A. No, I was not; it was on Tuesday, the 28th of November, I went out about eight o'clock in the evening, I came home again about twelve o'clock.

Q. Did you leave any thing at your lodging. - A. Yes, I gave part of the property to the landlady, Mrs. Price, to wash; and the other things, I left part in the dining-room, and the other part in the bed-room. When I came home, I did not miss them that night. In the morning the mother and the other sister called me up, and told me of it; I then looked for the articles, and missed a great number of things.

Q. Did you ever see any of your things again. - A. Not till last week, when she was taken up, I saw them in the possession of one of the witnesses.

MARY ANN PRICE. Q. Are you a daughter of Eleanor Price . - A. I am; Eleanor Price keeps the house in which Mrs. Priestly, the last witness lodged.

Q. That is the last witness that was examined. - A. Yes.

Q. She goes by the name of Stratton, does not she. - A. I do not know, she came to our house by the name of Priestly.

Q. Is your mother a widow. - A. Yes.

Q. Had you any clothes belonging to your lodger, Mrs. Priestly, that had been delivered to you to wash. - A. Yes, we had them under our care to wash, we were washing them on the Wednesday, some were wet in the house, and some were not, we missed them on the next morning. On the 29th of November I had seen them; on the 28th they were in the kitchen, in the wash house.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. Yes, she is my own sister, she was helping me to wash them, she took very few things out of the washhouse.

Q. But she was assisting you in washing on the night of the 28th. - A. Yes, she lived with us, she was always with her mother.

Q. Did she leave the house that night. - A. Yes; Mrs. Priestly was gone to the theatre, then the prisoner left the house, and did not come home until five weeks afterwards.

Q. How soon did you see any of the articles that were under your care for washing. - A. The next morning, we missed one gown, fourteen handkerchiefs,

six pair of silk stockings, and one pair of cotton, two cotton shawls, two habit waistcoats, one pinafore, and one small apron, that was all that we lost, that was delivered to us to wash.

Q.You did not miss any thing from the apartment of Priestly, your lodger. - A. No, I informed Mrs. Priestly of what we had lost of the wash.

Q. For five weeks after you did not see her. - A. No.

Q. Did she come home at the end of five weeks. - A. Yes, she came and knocked at the door, then my mother thought proper to get Mrs. Priestly's property back, and she was taken in custody.

Q. Did you see at the time that she was taken up, whether she had any of the property about her. - A. No, she had not, another person that was with her had pawned the things, and sold the tickets.

Q. That you know nothing of; that is what they told you. - A. Yes.

MARY BRANT . Q. Do you know the prisoner. - I knew her about nineteen years back, but I did not know her when she accosted me on the Tuesday evening.

Q. How long ago is that Tuesday evening that she accosted you. - A. About five weeks ago, I cannot tell the day of the month; it was by the coffee house in Covent Garden; she had something in her lap, what it was I did not know at the time. She asked me if I could recommend her to a lodging; I told her I did not know any. I took her home to where I lodged; when she went home with me, she asked my landlady if she could lend her two shillings, she told her, no; I went and pledged a handkerchief for her that evening for eightpence; I left it at a public-house for her; I got no money, she wanted something to drink. In the morning I pledged the lace for a pound at Mr. Flemmings, in Fetter-lane, and there were three gowns, a petticoat, a shift, and handkerchiefs; she went with me when I pledged them at Mr. Flemmings; I got one pound fourteen shillings upon them. There were two pair of stockings, and two handkerchiefs, I pledged for seven shillings at the same place; and one pair of stockings, and three handkerchiefs, for five shillings, at Turner's, in Brydges-street. I offered her the duplicates with the money; she desired me to put them in my pocket, as she had no pockets to take care of them.

Q. These are all the things that you pledged. - A. Yes. She requested me on the Saturday evening, that I would give her the duplicates; she came to where I lodge. I put them on the table, she said she was going to sell them to a woman in Covent Garden; she asked me if I knew a person that would buy them; I told her of Mrs. Beaumont; we went together to Mrs. Beaumont and sold them for thirteen shillings.

MRS. BEAUMONT. Q. Do you know the prisoner at all. - A. I never saw her in my life. I know the last witness, Mary Brant .

Q. Did you ever buy any duplicates of Mary Brant . - A. Yes; on Saturday night, about five or six weeks ago, I cannot say the day of the month, Mary Brant delivered the duplicates to me at my shop.

Q. What shop do you keep. - A. I deal in many articles, and green grocery. There was nobody there but Mary Brant ; I did not see the prisoner.

Q. What did you give for them. - A. Thirteen shillings.

Q. What became of these duplicates. - A. I went to the pawnbrokers and got all the articles out.

Q. Did you get the things from the place she mentioned. - A. There were three articles at Mr. Clements, one at Mr. Edwards, and at Mr. Flemming's, and one at Mr. Turner's. I had sold some of them, and the rest I produced to them when they asked me for them; I delivered them to Mr. Lumley.

Q. Now these things that you sold, how much did you get for them. - A. There was a shawl for half a guinea, a gown for nine shillings, two handkerchiefs, seven shillings, and one for five shillings.

MR. LUMLEY. Q. You have some things that you produce there, from whom did you produce them. - A. From Mary Beaumont , all that is here; Mary Brant and the prisoner, confessed to me what they had done with the property.

Q. to Prosecutrix. Have you seen all them articles that Mr. Lumley has produced. - A. Yes; all is my property but this cotton gown.

Q. Be so good to mention what things there are there. - A. There are three pair of silk stockings, one cotton gown, a muslin gown, two shifts, eight handkerchiefs, a black lace cloak, and a shawl. The black lace cloak cost me eighteen pounds at first, I have had it two years; I cannot say what it is worth now; my shifts cost me sixteen shillings each. The black lace cloak was in my apartment, the handkerchiefs and shawl were in the wash, I know they are all mine.

Prisoner's Defence. I was very much intoxicated when I took these things. Mrs. Priestly persuaded me to leave my home, and live with her upon the town, and she would take a lodging for her and me: she has got a girl now in the hospital that lived with her. That woman that took me to her place, she took a shawl and brought in some gin and victuals; she pledged all the things herself, and when the money was gone she turned me out. I was in the watch-house two nights. She went to this woman and sold the tickets; she said, if the tickets were found I should be prosecuted.

The prisoner called one witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 26.

The prisoner was recommended to his Majesty's mercy by the jury.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18100110-22

93. JAMES BRITAIN and SAMUEL SOLOMONS were indicted for feloniously assaulting John Cotton in the King's highway, on the 26th of December , putting him to fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, a dollar and three shillings his property .

JOHN COTTON . I am a journeyman painter and glazier , I live at No. 5, Angel-court, St. James's; on the 26th of December, between nine and ten o'clock in the evening I went into the Harlequin public-house in Drury-lane .

Q. Did you go alone. - A. No; I went with two

young lads, John Harrison and Nicholas Francko ; we went into the tap-room, and called for a pot of porter, then Solomons came up to me, and asked me if I would have a shilling; I said, I did not want one, he then asked these two young lads if they would have a shilling, I bid them not to take it; Solomons then called for a pot of porter, and asked us to drink, when we had tasted the porter, Britain said, we were his recruits, then Britain and William Quick, put the lights out in the tap-room; I suspected they wanted to rob me, I made to go out; Solomons said to Britain, do you know this young man, he is your recruit, Britain replied, yes; then Britain and and Solomon followed me outside of the door.

Q. What became of your companions at that time. - A. I left them in the house; when I got outside of the house, they laid hold of me, and said, they would lodge me in the watchhouse; I forceably got out of their arms, and stood there about a minute about two yards from the door, to see what they were going to do with me; Britain came up and gave me a blow, knocked me down.

Q. Where was Solomons then. - A. Solomons stood close by, I arose, they both hustled round me, and then I felt one of their hands go into my waistcoat pocket; I then missed the dollar, and the three shillings.

Q. Had they left you then. - A. Yes; I missed it directly they were gone.

Q. They had not demanded any money of you. - A. No; they went into the public-house again, and I directly went to the Police-office.

Q. Did you not go into the public-house again. - A. No; I directly went to the Police-office.

Q. When you were in the house, and suspected that their intention was to rob you, why did not you desire your companions to come out. - A. The lights were out and I could not see where they were.

Q. They could have heard you. - A. Yes; they could, but I did not mention it.

Q. Was there any other company there. - A. About seven besides.

Q. You mentioned nothing to any of them. - A. No.

Q. How was the prisoners dressed, as soldiers. - A. No; neither of them were dressed as soldiers.

Q. Did the rest of the company say any thing when the lights were put out. - A. They all cried out it was a shame.

Q. You did not communicate your suspicion to any of these. - A. No.

Q. Nor even when you was knocked down, you did not go into the house to alarm the company of what had happened. - A. No; I went to the Police-office, and got assistance; I went back to the public-house, and found them there; the prisoners were searched, and there was three shillings found between the two.

Q. No dollar was found. - A. No.

Mr. Gurney. Q. How often have you ever been in custody. - A. Never.

Q. Will you swear that. - A. Yes; I never was in custody for a felony in my life; I have been twice in custody for being disorderly.

Q. You went to this public-house between nine and ten in the evening - A. Yes.

Q. You found Quick there, you knew Quick before. - A. Yes; I did not drink with him.

Q. How long had you that dollar and three shillings that day. - A. I received it in the public-house, of John Woodward , it was paid to me in the house by him.

Q. Do not you remember being asked, how you could make a charge of their stealing a dollar and three shillings, when you had not a shilling in your pocket. - A. Yes; Mr. Adkins knows I had a shilling in my pocket when I went to the office,

Q. If any body would say that you asked for a shilling to pay for your liquor at that house, that is not true. - A. No.

Q. What was paid to you in the house. - A. A dollar and two shillings, and I had two shillings and five-pence halfpenny before I went into the house.

Q. So then, these two men followed you out of the house after they had put the lights out, knocked you down and robbed you, and went into the house again; you have heard of persons having forty pounds reward for a highway robbery. - A. I have heard of officers having forty pounds reward to apprehend thieves; I never heard of persons having forty pounds, that I swear.

Q. Did you not say that the person from whom you had the dollar and two shillings, his name was Wood. - A. No.

Q. Did any body see you receive the dollar, and the two shillings. - A. Here is a lad here, saw me have the dollar in my hand. And the prisoners saw me receive it, before they offered me the shilling.

Q. Is Woodward here. - No.

JOHN ADKINS . I am an officer of Bow-street.

Q. Were you at the public-office when the last witness came and made his complaint. - A. Yes: I went with him to the public-house, I saw Britain standing at the bar, he said, that is one of them. I took one of the patroles with me; I put him into his custody; I went into the tap-room, he pointed out Solomons, and said, that he was the other that had robbed him; I took him into custody; I searched them both, I found two shillings on one, and one shilling on the other, there were a great many people in the house, I suppose, ten or twelve. I took the candle up when I went into the house, because it should not be put out. It is a house of a bad description.

Q. Do you know whether the two friends of the prosecutor remained in the tap-room. A. When I got to the office, I asked him whether his two young lads were there, he said, no, they were gone.

JOHN HARRISON . I am an apprentice to a painter and glazier; I was in company with Cotton at this public-house; I saw the two prisoners at the bar there, they offered me a shilling to enlist.

Q. Did you hear them make the same offer to Cotton. A. I did; he refused, and persuaded me not to take it.

Q. Did you stay there till the lights were put out. - A. I did; I saw Cotton go out, I saw no more of him that night.

Q. Had he made any complaints before he went. - A. No; he did not.

Q. Did you see him receive any money. - A. No; I did not.

Solomons' Defence. I am totally innocent of the crime alledged to me, nor have I any knowledge of the person alongside of me, I never saw him in my life before.

Britain's Defence. I am entirely innocent, I know nothing about it.

WILLIAM QUICK. (Mr. Gurney.) Were you at the Harlequin on this night - A. Yes, I drank with the prosecutor; he asked, if I would lend him a shilling; I told him, I had got but two shillings, but if a pint of beer would be any service to him, I would lend him that; he

said, he had but one shilling in his pocket, and that did not belong to him, he did not wish to change it.

Q. Have you known him some time - A. I have known him about nine months; he told me, he was in custody with William Arthur , in Tothill-fields, for felony; he told me, that he has been in custody two or three times, and that he and a young girl saw a large piece of beef hanging on a hook, he snatched it off and ran away, and the girl was taken to Tothill-fields, and kept there for two days.

Court. What are you - A. I am a journeyman printer. I work for Mr. Alexander, 40, Whitechapel-road.

ROBERT WOOD . I am a cooper. I work for John Pearce , Narrow-wall, Lambeth.

Q. Have you known Cotton for any time - A. I have, for six months. I was slightly acquainted with him. He has told me, that he was in custody with William Arthur , and made a kind of bravado of it; and one time he told me how the irons were knocked on his legs.

Court. How came he to lead you into this secret - A. I met him in Westminster; he was going to Queen-square office, to hear the young woman's examination.

Solomons called seven witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Britain called one witness, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18100110-23

94. JACOB FLACK was indicted for feloniously stealing, in the dwelling-house of Timothy Conner , a warrant for the payment of 5 l. 10 s. and a bank note for the payment of 1 l. the property of Timothy Conner .

TIMOTHY CONNER. I live in Leather-lane . On Sunday morning, the 7th of January, I went to shift my clothes before the family was up.

Q. Where did you go for that purpose - A. I keep the Windmill public-house ; I went into the tap-room. The prisoner at the bar came down stairs, he was a lodger of mine, he had lodged with me about two months. He asked me for half a pint of beer. My small clothes were lying on the tap-room table; they were those that I had taken off, my apron was lying over them. I delivered the half pint of beer.

Q. Was the prisoner the only person in the room at that present time - A. He was. I had another lodger come down stairs; he brought the half pint of beer back from the prisoner, and desired me to make a pint of it; I made it a pint. They then called for a quartern of gin. I left my breeches on the table in the room during this time.

Q. Did you go and fetch the gin - A. I was in the bar, and they came for the liquor; the bar is on the other side of the passage.

Q. Which of them came for it - A. Not the prisoner. The prisoner remained in the tap-room during this time the man came for the gin. After they had drank this, they got up and went out together. My wife went into the tap-room, and found my things laying on the tap-room table, she brought them in the bar to me, and said, how simple I must be to leave my small clothes there; I said, there were no men there but our own lodgers, and a man that worked for Mr. Cotterell. She took my money out of my watch pocket, I immediately missed the check which the Bank of England notes were rolled in it.

Q. How many Bank notes had you - A. There were nineteen pounds altogether, with the money and the check. The check was for five pounds ten shillings, drawn by Mr. Hobbs on Manwaring. At that present time I did not miss any Bank of England notes. I was rather flurried. Afterwards I missed a one pound Bank note. My wife said, our lodgess must have taken them, and desired me to run after them. I did run after them, and took them in King's-road. I stopped them, and told them they had been playing the rogue with my pockets, and desired, if they had to return me my money; they denied having any money of mine. The prisoner asked me how much I had lost; I told him, I supposed he knew better than I did: I could not exactly tell. I said, you must go back, and I will have you all three searched. They did come back; and coming down Liquor-pond-street, as I walked after the prisoner, I perceived him breaking paper and dropping it. I catched up a piece of it, and seized his hand, where there was the remains of the check. I then seized him and brought him to my house, and I sent for Mr. Hancock, the officer, to take charge of him. The other men were searched, but nothing was found on them.

Q. When had you seen this check and the one pound note in your pocket before - A. On that morning; before I had undressed myself I had looked at them, and folded them up in this check; that was, when I was first up in the morning. The officer has the two pieces of the check.

Mr. Arabin. How long had you worn the breeches that morning - A. From six o'clock, I dare say; it was when I first got up.

Q. You counted your money when you got up - A. I did. There was nobody about the house till these men got up. It could not have gone out of my pocket without it was taken out. I put them in my fob; they were tight breeches.

Court. What parish is your house in - A. Saint Andrew's.

JAMES HANCOCK. I was sent for on the morning of the robbery. I went to the house of Mr. Conner; he told me had been robbed; he pointed out three men; I searched the other men, then I searched this man. This note was given to me by Mr. Conner. I took the prisoner off to the New Prison. I asked for the one pound note; he had put it in the other notes, he told me.

Prosecutor. The prisoner delivered to me a one pound note; he said, that was all the money he had got. I put it into my pocket and mixed it with the others. I could not pick it out again.

Q. Had you a note of one pound - A. Yes, they were all one pound notes but the check.

Q. Upon your asking him to deliver up the one pound note, he gave you a one pound note - A. He did.

JOHN HOBBS, Senior. Q. Did you at any time draw a check upon Manwaring and Co. - A. I did, on Saturday last.

Q. Look at that check; is there any thing there that you know - A. This is my hand-writing; this is the check that I left with my son.

ROBERT HOBBS , Junior. Q. Did your father leave a check with you on Saturday last - A. He did.

Q. Can you describe it - A. Yes; the sum was five pounds ten shillings, drawn on Manwaring.

Q. Look at the note, is that the note that was left with you - A. It is. I paid it in part of payment for ten pounds to one of the sawyers that worked for us. I sent it to be cashed by Daniel Page .

DANIEL PAGE . Q. Did Robert Hobbs give you a check to get cashed - A. Yes, I got it cashed for his use.

GEORGE BEALE . Last Sunday morning I was in Mr. Conner's house, between seven and eight o'clock I called for a pint of beer. I sat down by the fire, on the stool. The prisoner was on the right hand of the tap-room fire; he removed to the left. On the table there was something with a white cloth or apron over it. When she prisoner removed from the right to the left of the fire I heard something move; I looked of one side.

Q. What was there on the table - A. I thought it was rolls, it was under a white cloth; what it was I did not know. The prisoner's hand was underneath; I saw it move; I drank part of my beer. I looked over my left shoulder, his hand was very busy for the space of two minutes and upwards. I drank my beer, and came out.

Q. Did you see where Mr. Conner was at the time - A. He drawed my beer, brought it to me, put it on the stove, and went into the bar again.

Prisoner. The note and check I picked up under the tap-room table in the morning after that gentleman was gone out.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 22.

Second Middlesex jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

Reference Number: t18100110-24

95. NICHOLAS SPELLMAN was indicted for feloniously forging and counterfeiting, on the 12th of December , a certain false order for the payment of 140 l. 10 s. with intention to defraud Mr. Solomons .

SECOND COUNT, for feloniously uttering as true, a like forged order, for the payment of money with like intention. And

TWO OTHER COUNTS for like offences, only varying the manner of charging them.

Mr. Gurney, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence. The prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100110-25

96. ROBERT HENCH was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 5th of October , a chest, value 1 s. and fifty-nine pounds weight of tea, value 20 l. the property of John James Leighton and William James Thompson . And

SEVERAL OTHER COUNTS, for like offence, only varying the manner of charging them

The case was stated by Mr. Gurney.

JOHN JAMES LEIGHTON . Q. Have you any partners - A. Yes, William James Thompson ; we are tea brokers .

Q. Did you purchase any chest of tea at the East India Company's sale - A. I purchased the chest 7m100 at the desire of John Hepwell , for Thomas Norris , at Ramsgate.

Q. Had you a clerk in your employ of the name of Murray - A. Yes.

Q. Did you, on the 5th of October last, direct him to carry a request note for a permit at the East India Company's warehouse - A. I did; it is the usual method to deliver a request note for a permit.

Q. Was Mr. Murray examined before the magistrate - A. He was: he has since died.

CHARLES HUMPHRIES . Q. Did you attend the examination of the prisoner before the Lord Mayor - A. I did, on the 11th of October.

Q. Was that which the witnesses said taken down in writing by the Lord Mayor's clerk - A. It was.

Q. Did you see the examination of Mr. Murray signed - A. I did: he was examined upon oath.

Mr. Alley. to Mr. Leighton. When did Mr. Murray die - I do not know the day; I was present at his funeral last Sunday week.

Q. Do you mean to tell me that Mr. Murray, from the time of his illness up to his decease, was not able to attend here - A. I certainly do not think he was. I brought him up here. He fainted away when he came here.

Q. My question is, whether you had any medical man to ascertain the fact, that he was not able to give parol evidence against the prisoner at the bar. - A. He was under the care of his parents; I have not a medical man here that could tell, he was brought in a coach, over the way, he was there about half an hour. I have no medical man here in court, to say, that he was not able to attend and give evidence against the prisoner.

The examination of Murray read.

The informant, John Murray , says, upon his oath, that on Thursday last, he left a request paper, for a chest of tea, 7m100, in the name of Thomas Norris , Ramsgate, and gave directions to the next witness, to take the same from the warehouse, signed, John Murray , and signed John Martin .

Mr. Alley. to Mr. Leighton. You had never yourselves the actual possession of the tea. - A. We had in our possession, the East-India Company's warrant, by which the tea would be granted.

JOHN MARTIN . Q. Were you sent by Mr. Murray to the East-India Company's warehouse, for this chest 7m100. - A. I was in the yard in Fenchurch-street, when Mr. Murray was there; I went to the box to look for the request paper, it was gone: I went to the Permit office, and found the permit gone.

MR. COLLINS. Q. What are you. - A. I am a labourer, in the employ of the East-India Company.

Q. Do you know the prisoner. - A. I do, by sight. On Thursday the 5th of August, I saw him come in the yard, and go to the exsise-box, he took out a handful of request papers and he selected one of them, the chest was kept in the yard; he went to look for a chest of that number, to match the request note. I went up to him, and said, what do you want, if you want any thing, why do not you speak. My place was to see that every one had his own; I took the paper out of his hand, and looked about to see for the chest; I pointed out, and said, that is the chest that you want.

Q. Is that the paper that you took of his hand - A. It is the paper, the number was 7m100. I returned him the paper after I found the chest for him to go to the Permit office, to get a permit.

Q. Did you ask him whose porter he was. - A. No; he went to the Permit office, he brought the permit into the yard, he was going to take the chest up; I said, my friend, I have not done with you yet: I took the permit out of his hand, and said, whose porter are you, I understood Mr. Roton's; I entered it in my book Roton, I asked him again, did you say you are Roton's porter, no; he said, Noton. I run my pen through Roton, and interlined it Noton.

Court. Then you have no doubt as to his person. - A. None in the least, that entary was done in his presence; he then took away the chest.

Mr. Alley. You are sure the prisoner was the man that came to you. - A. I am.

Q. Did he bring you a paper blue or black. - A. The request note was printed in red ink, and wrote in black.

Q. Then the person who carries it to you, if the note is not a forgery, is the person who has a right to take the tea. - A. Of course.

Q. There is no pretence to say this note is a forgery. - A. Not in the least, when he produced that note, I had no right to ask any questions, if you had brought it, I should have delivered it to you, for Noton.

Mr. Gurney. Q. to Mr. Leighton. Is that request note filled up with the hand writing of Mr. Murray. - A. It is.

MATTHEW WHITE . Q. I believe you are King's locker in the yard. - A. I am.

Q. Were you by, when the prisoner came for this chest of tea. - A. The request note was delivered to me to call it over, I cannot say who delivered it to me:

JONATHAN POPE . Q. On the 5th of October last, were you one of the gatekeepers to this warehouse of the East India Company. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember seeing the prisoner there. - A. Yes; he came in the yard, I was at the gate, near Fenchurch-street, by the box; he came up to me going out of the gate, he had a chest of tea, he stooped, and presented me the permit to look; I looked at the chest upon his knot, I thought it was 7m160; the first O had a small stroke came down, which I thought was a 6, I made him pitch it on a post; I looked at the chest again, and was not satisfied, I called Collins, he said, it was the right number; he said, the stroke was not intentionally cut with the hammer, for a mark, it passed for 7m100, I called Mr. White, the Excise officer; he was sufficiently satisfied to let it pass. I think the prisoner said, if it was not the right chest, he would take it back.

Q. This is the East India Company's warehouse in Fenchurch-street . - A. Yes.

Q. All the tea there is in the East India Company's keeping. - A. It is.

Prisoner's Defence. I have been in London about seven years, I have lived in as respectable houses as any in London, and never was at the bar of justice before in my life.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Judgment respited.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100110-26

97. SARAH SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 9th of January , four handkerchiefs, value 1 l. 8 s. the property of William Cummins , and Joseph Cummins .

WILLIAM JOSEPH CUMMINS . I am son to William Cummins , his partner's name is Joseph Cummins ; they live at 72, Cheapside . On the 9th instant, the prisoner came into the shop, she asked to look at some silk handkerchiefs; she looked at several, and at last, said, she would take one, and agreed to pay seven shillings and sixpence for it, a person came into the shop, and drew my eyes off her, and when I turned my eyes to her, I observed her countenance change; I saw her shuffling in her pocket, or under her gown, which excited my suspicion: I went to my father, and told him that we had a thief, we both advanced to her, I said, I had strong suspicion that she had some property about her, that did not belong to her, she replied, God forbid; you may search me. I saw four handkerchiefs suspending at the bottom of her coats: my father drew the handkerchiefs down, and said, how wrong she had acted; she said, have mercy on me, and pray forgive me; and while we sent for an officer, she pulled out a box, containing several bank notes, she offered them all to me to liberate her, for she had six children. I told her, an officer was sent for, and she must take the consequence.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of the charge alledged against me; I have six children.

GUILTY , aged 34.

Confined Fourteen Days in Newgate , and fined One Shilling .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100110-27

98. SARAH JAMES was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 26th of December , five handkerchiefs, value two shillings and sixpence , the property of John Styles .

RICHARD GOODWIN was called, and not appearing in court, his recognizance was ordered to be estreated.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100110-28

99. EDWARD PHEBY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 29th of December , sixty squares of glass, value twenty shillings , the property of Andrew John Nash , and George Augustus Nash .

The case was stated by Mr. Arabin.

EVERARD DENTON. I keep a public house, next door to Messrs. Nash; my cellar is separated from the next door by a partition. On the 19th of December between eight and nine in the evening, the prisoner came, and said, he wanted two parcels, I told him, I did not know any thing of any parcels, he said, he gave them to my man John; John came in, I asked him if he had received any parcel, he said, no, I called three more, they all denied receiving any parcel; he then said, if you will let me have a candle, I can tell you where they are in the cellar. Daniel, the boy that is here, lit a candle, and went down in the cellar along with the prisoner; the prisoner returned, and they brought up two parcels with them from off the butthead.

Q. Did you open these two parcels. - A. No; I said, go to Mr. Nash, the officer went with him. I had been in the cellar, about six or seven o'clock in the morning; and after that I had been in the cellar fining the beer down.

Q. Did you observe any hole cut in the partition of that cellar. - A. None at all, I went down into the cellar again, when Mr. Nash came, I found a hole cut in the partition that was not there in the morning.

DANIEL AYEY . Q. You live with the last witness. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you recollect the prisoner coming to your master's house on the 29th. - A. I heard him talking with my young mistress, about some parcels.

Q. Had he entrusted you with any parcels. - A. No; I am certain of that, I went into the cellar with him, he shewed me where the parcels were; they were upon the head of a butt, close to a hole in the partition, the hole was large enough to admit these parcels to pass through it. I could get through the hole myself. He brought the parcels up himself; I saw them opened when Mr. Nash came, they contained glass, I went down in the cellar again, when Mr. Nash came I perceived a hole cut in the partition that was not there in the morning.

JOHN HALEY , I live with Mr. Denton.

Q. Did the prisoner entrust in your care any parcels - A. No, he never did.

ANDREW JOHN NASH . Q. Who is your partner - A. My brother George Augustus Nash , we are glass seller s and reside in Cornhill ; the prisoner was in our employ on the 29th of December last he was in the habit of cutting glass out of tables into such sizes as that.

Prisoner's Defence. Some of that glass I had from glazing a large sky light at Barnet, and some I bought some of it was broke. I cut it into squares and put it into the cellar.

Prosecutor. The whole of that is new glass there is a sort of sulpher upon it, it is impossible it could have been cut out of old glass from a skylight it would not have that sulpher upon it.

Prisoner. It was a new skylight that I glazed entirely new.

GUILTY , aged 35.

Transported for seven years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100110-29

100. JAMES CLARK and CHARLES JOHNSON were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 6th of December , three boots, value 3 l. and four pair of pattens, value 5 s. the property of William Archer .

WILLIAM ARCHER . I am a bootmaker , 17, Wormwood-street . On the 6th of December between six and seven in the evening, I lost the boots; the prisoner Johnson came into the shop, he asked for a pair of leather boot laces, I said to my young man cut him a pair; I was busily employed, and while he was turning his head to get the leather to cut out the boot laces, he turned himself round to me and said have you moved the boots, I said I had not; he said, they were here just this minute, and when I turned my head they were gone; Mr. Walker came in, I said you have not been playing any tricks with these boots have you; I saw the boy Johnson with a ring on his finger, I said who are you; he appeared small but he is above twenty years of age, I said who are you; you litle rascal you are a thief, I said where do you live; he said, in Sun-street, his father was a shoemaker and kept a room; I said that will not do, if your father was a shoemaker you would not come here to buy boot laces, you would know better how to get them. Johnson came in before Clarke, I asked him about the boots; he said, he knew nothing about them, I said Joe you go for an officer; I made the prisoners sit down in the shop. All in a minute the shop door bursted open, in came a great fellow; he said, Johnson come out, I said what do you do here you rascal; I took him by the collar put him out in the street, Johnson came after me I put him back: the prisoner Clark seized me by the collar and another by the left and pulled me right out on the pavement, as soon as I got out at the next door I saw a man standing, I said, Sir, will you be so good to assist me, these are three thieves; he hit me on the temple and Johnson hit me with his hands both sides of my head; I still held the man, the man said d - n your eyes let me go, I said I will never let you go while I have strength; they then said serve the b - r out. They all hit me as hard as they could, one hit me under the ribs, I struck the man on the head, and whether they struck me at the same time I cannot say; however three of us went down in the mud, I jumped up in a moment, I saw Clark go up Camomile-street, the two others ran another away, I said I will run after you if you go to the devil; I overtook Clark against the Coachmakers Arms in Camomile-street. Johnson was taken up on another indictment, I am sure he is the same man he was in the shop some time, he said his name was Johnson. We never found the boots, we made three more to match them.

JOSEPH BALL . I am a servant to Mr. Archer, I was present at the time that Johnson came in the shop; he said, he wanted a pair of boot laces, and while I was going to get a piece of leather to cut these boot laces, I turned myself round and missed three boots and four pair of pattens. I directly said to master, have you taken these boots away; he denied it, my master suspected the boy of the theft; he told me to fetch an officer, I did; and when I came back, Johnson was gone, and Clark the other man was in custody.

JOSEPH WALKER . I called upon Mr. Archer to ask him about a pair of boots, the prisoner Johnson was in the shop; the boy immediately missed the boots, Mr. Archer accused Johnson; the door was burst open by a man, he called out Johnson, Mr. Archer pushed him out of the shop, a scuffle ensued; Johnson made his escape, and Mr. Archer brought back Clark.

MR. BARR. I am a cheesemonger in Bishopgate-street. Mr. Archer gave Clark into my custody, I searched him and took three handkerchiefs from him.

Johnson's Defence. I went into Mr. Archers shop for a pair of boot laces, the young man was going to cut the boot laces he said, master have you taken away the boots from here; he said, no, he said they were here when this lad came in, I said I was sure they were not, they sent for an officer; somebody pulled Mr. Archer out of the shop, Mr. Archer pulled hold of me, I went to the door, there was a great skirmish I walked away.

Clarke's Defence. I was on the opposite side of the way when this affray happened, and directly I crossed over, I was struck in the neck, I ran away to avoid being struck and Mr. Archer pursued me.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100110-30

101. THOMAS WETHERALL was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 3d of January , 28 yards of printed cotton, value 2 l. 10 s. the property of Dionisius Trott .

JOHN PITNEY . I am porter to Dionisius Trott in the Old Change , he is a calico printer . On Wednesday the 3d of January, about five or ten minutes after five, as I was in discourse with the warehouseman I heard the warehouse door shut, I saw a man going out whom I followed to the top of the Old Change, and I discovered a piece of print under his left arm, I instantly made to him; he attempted to escape and ran across Cheapside, I followed him with the cry of stop thief, before I seized him he dropped the print, a lady passing at the time picked it up and gave it to me, she said, there is the cotton; I had hold of the prisoner, a witness came up and secured him.

JOSEPH LEVY COHEN. On the 3d of January, going through Cheapside, there was a cry of stop thief, I turned round, I saw the prisoner running, he came up to me, I stopped him directly; the prosecutor came up, I said I have got him, a woman came up and brought the cotton, I found no cotton on him, we brought him up to the Old Change; Mr. Trot said the cotton was was his.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I have been in his Majesty's service and in the Merchants service a long while, I happened to come up the Old Change a coach was coming, I ran upon the pavement these two men catched hold of me, a man came up and said I had been robbing the warehouse, I had only been in England five or six weeks.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100110-31

102. ANDREW LOADER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 16th of December , a coat, value 4 s. five waiscoats, value 40 s. a pair of breeches, value 8 s. two shirts, value 10 s. a handkerchief, value 2 s. a pair of boots value 15 s a hat, value 4 s. 2 pair of drawers, value 5 s. a neck handkerchief, value 3 s. and a pair of stockings, value 1 s. the property of John Venner , in his dwelling house .

SARAH VENNER . I am the wife of John Venner , he is a cook of a ship , we live at No. 11, Martha-street St. Georges in the East ; the prisoner is a taylor , he told me he came from Jamaica and had learned to dress hair and to shave, I gave him leave to put a bill in my window, I left him in the house on the 16th about half past three o'clock he was sitting by the fire making a waiscoat, I came home at half past four; I knocked at the door, nobody answered; I was obliged to get in at the window, and then I missed his razors and things, I went up stairs and missed all the articles in the indictment he had taken them out of my drawers. On the next day I found out where he had moved to.

Q. Some of your things was afterwards found was it not - A. Yes, when I went to Worship-street he had on my husbands waiscoat and great coat that he took out of my house.

Q. Did he seem unwell when he was at your house. - A. Yes; I told him he was in a consumption; he lodged with me about nine days. He has got my husband's coat on now.

JOHN VENHAM . I am a pawnbroker at Mr. Barker's 115, Hounsditch. On the 27th of December, the prisoner brought a shirt and a pair of stockings for seven shillings; I am sure he is the man.

CHARLES WILLIAMS . I am in the employ of Mr. Parker, Bishopsgate-street. I received in pledge, of the prisoner, a pair of boots, a pair of pantaloons, and a pair of breeches, a sheet, three waistcoats, and a pair of drawers; I lent him one pound sixteen upon them

WILLIAM SMELLIE . I am a pawnbroker. On the 30th of December, I received an umbrella of the prisoner; I lent him three shillings upon it.

JOHN ARMSTRONG . I am an officer. On the first of January, I apprehended the prisoner in Charlotte-street, Shoreditch; he produced this pocket-book to me; in it where these duplicates, where the goods were found at the pawnbrokers.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I never touched any thing but a trifling thing.

GUILTY , aged 27.

Of stealing, to the value of 39 s. only.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction and fined 1 s .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100110-32

103. SUSANNAH GERAIN was indicted for feloniously forging and counterfeiting, on the 2nd of December , a bank note for the payment of one pound, with intention to defraud the governor and company of the bank of England .

SECOND COUNT, for feloniously disposing off, and putting away a like forged note with the same intention.

AND SEVERAL OTHER COUNTS for like offence, only varying the manner of charging them.

JOHN CROCKER . Q. You are shopman to Mrs. Clarke. - A. Yes; her name is Mary Clarke , she keeps an oil shop, and lives at 74, St. John's-street. On Saturday, the 2nd of December, the prisoner at the bar came to Mrs. Clarke's shop to buy something, I cannot exactly state what articles she asked for, she bought something, I cannot speak to the amount precisely.

Q. What did she offer to pay for it. - A. She offered a one pound bank of England note, apparently I asked her what name I was to place on it; she replied, she did not know from whom she received it, she had taken it from a new married couple, living some where in the neighbourhood, she did not know their names. She went out of the shop taking the note with her; and returned in perhaps six or seven minutes, gave me the address, which I put on the back of the note, Gerain, New-court, 2d of December, 1809, she gave me that address. I am sure it is my own handwriting, and I am sure the prisoner is the person that offered it to me.

Q. When next did you see the prisoner after having passed the note on the Saturday - A. I think on the Thursday following she came to Mrs. Clarke's shop to take the note that she had paid me on the Saturday night.

Q. Did she ask for it - A. Yes, Mrs. Clark was in the shop, I was present, I heard her say that she had come for the note and had brought eighteen shillings; I think she gave Mrs. Clarke the money that she brought and she hoped Mrs. Clarke would not mind trusting her for the remainder to make up the one pound note, Mrs. Clarke took it.

Court. Did you serve her the things when she first came - A. I did; I do not recollect what it was, it was two or three shillings worth of something.

Mr. Bosanquet. Q. Did she get back the note - A. No.

Q. Do you happen to know whether since the first time that she came and rendered the note that any enquiries had been made after her - A. Yes.

Q, Do you know whether she called and paid Mrs. Clarke the remainder - A. Yes; she called the same morning and paid the remainder, I saw her give some

money; I believe it was two shillings to make up one pound.

JAMES HENDERSON DOWE. Q. You are book-keeper to Mrs. Clarke, she keeps an oil shop in St. John-street. A. I am.

Q. In consequence of any intelligence that you received from the bank, did you go for the purpose of finding the prisoner. - A. I did; I went on Wednesday the 6th of December, I went to New-court; I afterwards saw the prisoner in the street in the evening; I heard that she was an old woman; she was turning into the place where she lived; I asked her, if her name was Gerain, she told me, yes. I asked her, if she recollected changing a one pound note at Mrs. Clarke's on the Saturday, she replied, she did; I asked her, if she knew who she took the note of; she said, yes; she took it of a gentleman. I asked her, to give me his name; she said, she could not; she said, she would make enquiry, and call the next morning at Mrs. Clarke's; she said, that she knew the gentleman that she took it off, but she, did not know his name; I left her.

Q. I take it for granted, that she has never given you the gentleman's name. - A. No; she never has, nor any body else to my knowledge.

WILLIAM HALL . Q. I believe you are shopman to Mr. Osborne. - A. Yes; he is a cheesemonger, No. 16, Smithfield Bars.

Q. Do you know the prisoner. - A. Yes; perfectly well, she came to my master's shop about the end of November, or the beginning of December, she purchased some trifling thing, I cannot exactly tell the amount, she paid it in a one pound note, I gave her the change; I I asked her for her name and address, she gave me the name of Gerain, 2, New-court; I said, Cow-cross; she said, yes.

Q. Look at that note, is that the note that she tendered. - A. Yes, I wrote upon it, Gerain, 2, New-court, Cow-cross. The prisoner is the person that gave me that note, and gave me the address when she paid me the note; I gave her the change, she took the change and the articles, and away she went.

THOMAS GLOVER . I believe you are inspector at the bank. - A. I am.

Q.In consequence, sir, of two notes having been traced to the bank, did you proceed with Foy the officer on the 16th of December any where. - A. I did; I went to number 2, New-court, Peter's-lane, leading one part to Cow-cross.

Q. That was the house where you found the prisoner. A. Yes; I found the prisoner in the house when I came there, both of them were present; I questioned her, respecting a one pound note, that she passed at Mrs. Clarke's shop; she told me, that she found it near the Horns, public-house as she was crossing St. John-street.

Q. Did you confine the enquiry to Mrs. Clarke's note at that time only. - A. To Mrs. Clarke's note only; I asked her what time of the day she found it; she said, it was after dark; I then asked her, if there were any other note with it, she said, no there was not; I asked her, if any person was present and saw her pick it up; she said, there was not, she found it wrapped up in a bit of paper. Foy the officer searched her, he found six or seven seven shilling pieces; I asked her again, where it was she found Mrs. Clarke's note; she then said, she found several; I asked her, how many, she said, she believed there might be five or six; I asked if she had any of them by her; she said, she paid them all away; I asked her to whom she had paid them; she said, to different shops; I asked her then, if she had paid one at Mr. Osborne's shop; she said, she had.

Q. Did she say any thing at that time about her husband. - A. As to the first note, her husband knowed nothing at all of. I asked him likewise, do you know any thing of these notes: he said, no; I do not, I asked the husband if he knew any thing about Mrs. Clarke's note; he said, he did not.

Q. Now go to Osborne's note. - A. She said, she did pay a note at Osborne's, that was the note that she had found. Then her husband said, my wife is very wrong; she is telling you stories, I gave them to her.

Court. Speaking both of Clarke's and Osborne's. - A. Clarke's and Osborne's both, I asked him then, where he got them, they were both present; he told me, he found them on his beat, he is a watchman.

JOHN FOY . Q. You are a police officer, belonging to Marlborough-street. - A. I am.

Q. Did you accompany the last witness to the prisoner's lodgings. - A. I did; I searched her; I found on her person seven seven shilling pieces, upwards of a pound in silver, in shillings and sixpences; about three and twenty or four and twenty shillings, and nearly two shillings of copper money. She said, she had found the note near the public house, called, the Horns, at St. John-street; she found it at night, there was no other note with it, she said, at that time.

Court. There was none other with it. - A. There was none other with it. After we had found the change, and Mr. Glover questioned her more, she then said, she found several, there were five or six.

Mr. Bosanquet. After the conversation had ended between Mr. Glover and her, which has been stated, did you apprehend her. - A I did, and the husband also, and took them to the office in Marlborough-street.

Q. When you took them away, did you secure the room. - A. I did; I locked the door, and took the key with me.

Q. In what part of the house was this room situated. - A. There are but three rooms to the house, this was the upper one, the two pair of stairs.

Q. Then after the examination had taken place, did you return to the lodgings. - A. I did; leaving the prisoners at Marlborough-street. I searched the lodgings, I saw my brother find some more change, it was in my presence, he found fifteen or sixten dollars put under a pan on the floor covered over with some cloths; in another part of the room under some bricks, we found upwards of a pound in copper money, they were covered over with more things: they were all halfpence, I believe they seemed to have been packed up in five shilling papers, some of them were packed up. I searched up the chimney, after having searched all the other part of the room, there I saw hanging upon a nail up the chimney, a small black parcel, tied up with some twine, on taking it down and opening it, it contained eleven one pound notes, and four two pound notes.

Q. Take these notes in your hand, and see whether these are notes that you found, and which were wrapped up. - A. These are all the notes I found, and these are the papers that they were tied up in.

Court. When you returned with your brother, did you find the door in the same state which you left it. - A. I did; there appeared no alteration in the room whatever.

Mr. Knapp to Mr. Glover. You have told us before that you are an inspector of the bank - A. I am.

Q.Of course perfectly acquainted with their paper - I am now putting into your hand the one tendered to Mrs. Clarke - Look at that note and see whether it is a genuine bank note, or whether it is forged - A. It is a forged bank note; the whole of it is forged; it is not the paper used by the bank, and the signature is not the signature of persons in the bank; it has not the water mark used at the bank. (The note read.)

Q. That one pound note, the one uttered to Mrs. Osborne, is that a genuine one or forgery - A. It is a forgery; it is not the paper of the bank, nor from a plate used in the bank; they appear to be from the same plate, and filled up with the same hand-writing, the same date and the same signature.

Q. I now put into your hand the eleven one's and the four two's which were found in the chimney, are they all a forgery - A. They are throughout a forgery, they appear to be from the same impression and from one plate, all the one's, and filled up by the same hand, the same kind of figures throughout; the two's are from another plate, and they appear to be filled by the same hands as the one's. They are all a forgery throughout.

MRS. BENNETT. Q.Does the house in which the prisoner lived belong to you - A. Yes; I live in the middle room myself, Sarah Pearce and Joseph Pearce lodged below stairs, the prisoner and her husband lived in the top room.

Q. Could any person have access to the prisoner's room without the knowledge of the prisoner or her husband - A. No.

Q. Had you any key of the prisoner's room - A. No.

Q. Do you know any thing of these notes found in the prisoner's room - A. No, I do not.

Q. Do you remember the time when the prisoner was taken up - A. I remember it being done; I was in the house at the time; it was on a Saturday.

Q.Did any person go into her room during the time of her absence, when the officer took her up till the officer returned - A. No; the officer had the key. I had two children in the house of the age of ten, and the other twelve; they are both here.

JOSEPH PEARCE. Q. You lodge in the same house where the prisoner lodged - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember when the prisoner was taken up - A. I heard of it; I was not in the house at the time, I was at work.

Q. Do you know any thing of the notes that were found in her lodgings - A. I know nothing of them at all.

Q. Had you any means of putting them there if you had been so disposed - A. No; I never was in the room in my life.

SARAH PEARCE . Q. You are the wife of the last witness - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know the prisoners lodgings - A. Yes; I was twice in the room; I was in her room on the morning she went to Mrs. Clarke's.

Q. Do you know any thing of the notes that were found in her room - A. No.

Q. Did you put them there - A. No; I know nothing about them.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent. My husband found the notes.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 77.

Of disposing off, and putting away a forged one pound note.

First Middlesex jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

Reference Number: t18100110-33

104. MARY BROWNING was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 8th of December , a hat, value 5 s. 6 d. the property of John Spibey , privately in his shop .

JOHN SPIBEY. I am a hatter , No. 9, Broad-street, Bloomsbury . On the 8th of December I received information that a woman had run out of my shop with a hat; I looked and missed the hat; in consequence of that I went to the public house next door but one, and behind the door of that house I found the ticket of my hat on the ground; it was marked eight shillings and sixpence.

MARY PERRY . I was at Mr. Snuters public house on the 8th of December, I saw the prisoner behind the back door, she appeared to have something under her great coat.

SAMUEL ROBERTS . I am the watchhouse keeper. Mr. Spibey came and told me he had lost a hat, and from the description of the woman I knew her. I apprehended her in Broad-street, St. Giles's. In one of her hands, which was very hard clenched, I found a duplicate of a hat; I informed Mr. Spibey; we went to the pawnbroker's and the hat had just been pawned.

WILLIAM SIMPSON . I am a pawnbroker. I took in a hat on the 8th of December of a woman, I cannot say who the woman is.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I never took the hat nor saw the hat.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

Reference Number: t18100110-34

105. WILLIAM HAMILTON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 9th of January , a mahogany chest, value 21 s. and a set of carpenters tools, value 2 l. the property of John Moseley , in his dwelling house .

ISAAC FORDHAM . I am clerk to John Moseley , he is a mechanical tool manufacturer , No. 16, New-street, Covent Garden , in the parish of St. Martin's in the Fields. On the 9th of January, between five and six in the evening, I was in the accounting house, I saw the prisoner in the shop, walking towards the door with a tool chest from off the counter; I went into the shop; he asked the price of it; he had almost got out of the door before I came up to him; I told him by his appearance he did not want to purchase it, he meaned to convey it out of the shop; he then begged my pardon, I secured him.

Q. What is the value of the chest of tools - A.Above three guineas.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I went into that gentleman's shop and knocked three times, and when he looked up I took up the chest; as soon as he came to me I asked him the price of it; he said I wanted to thieve it.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18100110-35

106. MICHAEL GERAIN was indicted for feloniously, knowingly, and without lawful excuse, having in his custody and possession, divers forged bank notes for the payment of two pounds, he well knowing them to be forged and counterfeited .

And SEVERAL OTHER COUNTS for like offence, only varying the manner of charging them.

THOMAS GLOVER Q. You are one of the inspectors of the bank - A. I am.

Q. In consequence of any information that you received did you in December last go to the lodgings of the prisoner at the bar - A. I did; on the 16th of December; to No. 2, New-court, Peter's-lane , in the parish of St. Sepulchre's; I found him and his wife there.

JOHN FOY. Q. You are an officer of Marlborough-street - A. I am.

Q. Did you in December last, and on what day, go to the lodgings of the prisoner - A. On the 16th of December last, to No. 2, New-court, Peter's-lane, Cow Cross. I searched the lodgings, there I found eleven one pound notes, and four two's, I wrote my name on them; I found them up the chimney, they were wrapped up in a piece of paper, and outside of that a piece of black oilskin; these are the same wrappers; and there I found a quantity of good money of different descriptions, dollars, shillings, sixpences, and halfpence.

Q. In what situation did you find them - A. I found fifteen or sixteen dollars under a pan with some old clothes over them; and the halfpence underneath pieces of bricks and broken pans.

Q. What is the situation of the prisoner at the bar in life - A. He stated himself to be a watchman in the parish of St. James, Clerkenwell.

Q. I believe before you searched these lodgings and found the notes, you had apprehended the prisoner - A.I had; when I apprehended him I locked the door and took the key with me; on my return I opened the door with the same key; the room was apparently in the same situation in which I had left it.

COURT. This was the room in which the prisoner lodged - A. Yes.

Q. Who lived in the room - A. In the morning I found him and his wife in bed; I found them together when I apprehended them.

Q. At the time that you found these articles there was nobody but you and the persons that you took with you - A. No.

Q. There was neither the prisoner nor his wife - A. No.

Mr. Knapp to Mr. Glover. You went to the prisoner's lodgings on the 16th of December in company with John Foy and his brother - A. I did.

Q. What passed when you came there - this was before they were apprehended, on the 16th of December. You found the prisoner and his wife there - A. I did.

Q.Did you make it known to them for what purpose you had come there - A.I mentioned it to her in the presence of the prisoner; I asked her respecting the note that she paid to Mrs. Clarke; I asked her where she got that note, she told me she found it near the Horns public house, crossing St. John-street; I asked her what time of the day it was when she found it; the husband and wife were both together there the whole time; she told me it was after dark; I asked her if she had any person with her at the time she found it; she said there was not, I asked her how she found it, she said it was wrapped up in a bit of paper; I then asked her if there was any other note with it; she said no, there was not; I then asked the prisoner if he knew of his wife finding the note; he said he knew nothing at all about it; after this Foy was proceeding to search her, he found a number of seven shilling pieces, I did not count them, there appeared to be six or seven upon her; I then questioned her again respecting this note; she then said that she found several notes in the same parcel; I asked her how many, she said, about six. I then asked her if she had any of them by her, she said she paid them all away. I asked her if she paid a note to Mr. Osborne, she said she had. The prisoner then said, my wife is telling you stories, I found them, and I gave the notes to her; he said he found them on his beat. He had before described himself to be a watchman. That is all the conversation I had; they were then taken in custody to Marlborough-street.

Q. Did you afterwards return with Foy the officer - A. I did, about four hours afterwards, to the same house; I saw the officer lock the door before he went away; when we returned we went up to the same room; I saw the officer unlock the door.

Q. Were you present when the notes were found in the way which Foy has described - A. I was; I was close to him. I received the notes from the officer, Foy, after he had marked them.

Q. Look at these two's, are these part of the notes which were found as he has described in the chimney - A. These are two of the notes, and they are a forgery throughout; they are not the impression from bank plates; they are not the paper used by the bank, nor are they the signatures of persons at the bank, nor the water mark.

Q. Now look at the others and tell me whether they form a part of those found in the chimney; there are two two's, are they from the same plate with the first I handed to you - A. The two's appear to be from the same plate, and filled up by the same hand, and the same figures. The eleven ones appear to be from the same plate, and filled up with the same hand; they are all of them forged. (The note read.)

CHARLES KAY . Q. Were you present at the examination of the prisoner at Marlborough-street office - A. I was.

Q. Did you take down what the prisoner then stated before the magistrate - A. I did.

Q. Was any promise made to him, or any threat held out to him before he was examined - A. None whatever.

COURT. Did the magistrate take down, or his clerk take down in writing his examination - A. No.

Mr. Bosanquet. State to the court what the prisoner then said - A. I committed it to writing what he said.

COURT. You cannot read it, you may look at it to refresh your memory - A. He was asked by the magistrate if he knew why he was brought there, if he knew the charge; he said he was brought there upon a charge of forged notes that he had found.

COURT. Was this before Foy and Glover had been back and found the notes - A. Yes.

Q. That was respecting the notes that were put off by the wife - A. Yes. There was no distinct charge

against the prisoner. The magistrate asked him where he had found the notes; he said he had found them on his beat in St. James's church-yard; the magistrate asked him what part of the church-yard; he answered that he had found them by the rails in a tin case in the church-yard, that it was early in the morning, before it was light, that he saw the tin case by the light of his lanthorn against the rails; that he had counted the number of the notes, but he did not how many there were, but they consisted of one and two pound notes; that he had found them about a fortnight ago, kept them four or five days, and delivered them to his wife; the magistrate asked him if he had received any change of any of the notes; he said that he had received some of the change; he was then asked whether he had mentioned it to any body; he said, no, but to his wife; he was desirous of mentioning the circumstance to the vestry clerk, but his wife desired him not.

Q. Did he say whether he or his wife had passed some of the notes he so found - A. Yes; he said his wife had passed some of the notes he so found, and he had received the change.

MRS. BENNETT. Q. The house, No. 2, is your house - A. Yes; I keep it.

Q. The prisoner occupies the top room up two pair of stairs - A. He and his wife occupied that room together, nobody else had any business with that room; they were the only persons that had access to that room.

Q. You remember the officers coming to your house - A. Yes; it was on a Saturday, and they returned again; I was not in the house at the time they went in, I was down stairs sifting cinders, I saw them go in.

Q. Who was in the house during the time the officers had the key - A. Sarah Pearce .

Q. The officers had the key of the room, therefore you could not go in the room - A. No, sir, I never attempted it.

SARAH PEARCE . Q. You live at No. 2 - A. Yes.

Q. During the time the officers were gone, and the prisoners were taken away, and before the officers returned, did you go into that room - A. No; I did not go into that room that time.

Prisoner's Defence. I found the notes upon my beat as I before said.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 60.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18100110-36

107. GEORGE WARNER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 21st of October , in the dwelling house of John Clark , a handkerchief, value 1 s. fifteen pound four shillings in monies numbered, and nine one pound bank notes, the property of Thomas O'Brian .

THOMAS O'BRIAN. I am a blacksmith ; I live at No. 2, Sadler's-court, Milford-lane ; I live in the house of John Clark , I am a lodger. John Clark is the occupier of the house; I had the two pair room. the prisoner, George Warner , lodged in the same room.

Q. On the 21st of October do you know at what time you left the room - A. At six o'clock in the morning, him and me both.

Q. Where did you keep the articles that belonged to you - A. In my box in the same room.

Q. What had you in the box - A. Twenty four pounds, and four shillings in silver, and I had a handkerchief that was not in the box, it laid on one side of the bed. There were fourteen guineas in gold, six shillings in silver, and four new shillings.

Q. Then you had fifteen pounds four shillings in money - A. Yes, and nine one pound bank notes.

Q. All this you say was in your box except the handkerchief - A. Yes.

Q. When had you seen them in the box before that morning - A. The night before.

Q. Did you usually keep the box locked - A. Not always; I left the key in the box this time, and I had before and lost nothing.

Q. But you had a lock and key to this box - A. I had.

Q. You had not locked the box that night - A. No, I had not; the key was in the box.

Q. You are sure all these things were there, you had seen them the over night - A Yes, I had.

Q. Did the prisoner lodge there the same night - A. Yes. He got up at six o'clock and went to work with me. I was at work, and a friend called upon me; about a quarter before twelve the friend and me went out together; I had a pint or two of beer with him until the hour of one o'clock, then the prisoner at the bar came to me in the public house about five minutes after one, he asked me whether I should have any bread and cheese, he would bring it me; I said, no, I have a friend, I shall stop a few minutes longer.

Q. When did you come home - A. At the hour of six o'clock; I went up into my room where my box was.

Q. Did you find the prisoner at home when you came back - A. No; I went to get a few shillings out of my box, and my money was gone.

Q. What did you lose besides money - A. Only a handkerchief.

Q. When you say money you mean the notes as well as the gold - A. Yes, I do.

Q. Did the prisoner come home at all that day - A. I never saw the prisoner from that day until the Monday he went to Greenwich to receive his pension, then he was apprehended.

Q. Is he a pensioner - A. Yes.

Q. When was that - A. Monday last.

Q. How long had he been working and lodging where you did - A. About three weeks, more or less, he had been at the lodging; and going on a month or two months he had been in my master's employ.

Q. Had you learned of him that he was going to leave the lodging or your master's employ - A. No, he said nothing about it.

Q. Had he any clothes that he left behind him - A. He had only two shirts, one of them he left behind; he had no more clothes than what he had got on, except a shirt.

Q. Have you discovered any of the money or notes since - A. No, I have not found any part of it.

JOHN CLARK . I live at No. 2, Sadler's-court, Milford-lane; the last witness was my lodger.

Q. You are the sole occupier of the house - A. Yes; there are three small rooms in the house; the prisoner and prosecutor lodged in the two pair, in a seperate bed each; I work in the one pair room, and sleep there; the lower room is for my wife to do any thing. There were no more than me and my wife and them two lodgers in the house.

Q. Do you remember seeing the prisoner at the bar

in the house on the 21st of October - A. Yes; there was no one else there; I was at work in the one pair and called him; I worked there with the room door open the whole day, it was impossible for any body to go up or down stairs without my seeing them; I spoke to him going up and coming down.

Q. When was it you saw the prisoner go up - A.It might be a quarter after one, or twenty minutes, near upon that time I saw him go up and come down.

Q. How long did he stay there - A. I am certain not more than three or four minutes in his own room. I never saw him after that till he was taken. The prosecutor, O'Brian, came home at six o'clock in the evening, when he had done his work; he went up stairs into his own room.

Q. Between the time that the prisoner was there and the time that O'Brian came home and went up stairs did you see any person go up stairs - A. No soul whatever went up stairs.

Q. Had any body else gone up before - A. No one had gone into that room but that man, except my wife; in the early part of the morning she went into the room to clean the room and to make the beds.

Q. When did you next see the prisoner - A. Never till I found the prisoner detained at Bow-street; I went there and saw him.

Q. Had he given you any intimation that he intended to go away - A. No; he was to pay weekly for his lodging, he paid me one week and went off in our debt.

Q. Do you know whether he left any thing behind him - A. He had got nothing but one shirt that my wife had to wash for him for the Sunday.

MARIA CLARK . Q. You are the wife of the last witness - A. I am.

Q. You were living there on the 21st of October last - A. Yes.

Q. You know the bed chamber where the prisoner and O'Brian lodged - A. Yes.

Q. Were you up in the room any time in the day - A. Yes; I made the bed and cleaned the room between nine and ten in the morning.

Q. Did you observe O'Brian's box - A. Yes; I saw the key in it.

Q. Did you look into it to see whether the things were safe or no - A. No; I never saw the inside of the box in my life.

Q. Do you know any thing of the prisoner going into that room in the course of the day - A. The prisoner came in a little after one, he told me he would go up stairs for an onion; he came down in about five minutes and cut an onion, he said it was so hot he would put it in the fire; I stopped him; then he said he would get some bread and cheese, and go to O'Brian at the public house and have a pint of beer.

Q. Did he ever return again - A. No.

Q. Do you know what his stock of linen was - A. One shirt, besides what he had on.

Q. Had you the custody of the other shirt - A. Yes; I had the care of it to wash, it is at home at my own house.

Q. Did he go away without asking for the shirt - A. Yes; he has never asked for it.

Q. Did he ever mention to you any intention of leaving his lodgings - A. No; he did not say a word about it. I was very much surprised about his not returning home.

ROBERT NICHOLLS . The young man, O'Brian' worked for me, I am employed by Mr. Brodie, I have piece work. Before I went to Scotland I gave this lad twenty-one pounds which I held in my hand a twelve-month or more, he earned it; he gave it me for safety. When I came back I was informed that he was robbed; I was down at Greenwich when the prisoner was taken on Monday last; I saw him in the cage, I knew him immediately; I asked the prisoner for O'Brian's handkerchief, he said he had given him the handkerchief; I accused the prisoner of taking O'Brian's handkerchief and money; Tom was standing behind me looking over my shoulder; he said, George, did I give you the money too? - no, said he, I do not know any thing about the money. After that the constable came and took him from the watchhouse; on the way home I asked him where the handkerchief was now; he said the handkerchief was worn out. He would not own to the money or notes.

Q. Were you the person that paid him his wages - A. Yes; if I had been at home I should have paid him his wages, but Tom did it in my place.

Q. How much wages were due to him - A. I believe six or seven shillings, I cannot be positive. When the prisoner disappeared I was in Scotland.

Q. to prosecutor. You were the person that paid him his wages - A. Yes; there were seven shillings and two pence due to him; he worked all the week; he dealt at the chandler's shop, his bill was sent into the accompting house to be paid; the remainder of his money was seven shillings and two pence.

Prisoner. He lent me an old handkerchief.

Prosecutor. I never lent nor gave him an handkerchief.

Prisoner's Defence. On the Saturday morning I went into the chandler's shop, I asked them how much I owed them, she said she could not tell till her husband came in; I told the young man to pay the woman; he said, George, you did not pay me all last week, I want my money; I said I shall pay my landlady and you as far as my money goes.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 21.

[The prisoner was recommended to his Majesty's mercy by the jury on account of his youth.]

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18100110-37

108. ELEANOR WALTERS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 9th of January , fourteen yards of printed cotton, value 18 s. 6 d. the property of Benjamin Marshall , privately in his shop .

BENJAMIN MARSHALL . I am a linen-draper , 316, Holborn . I can only identify the property.

WILLIAM ROSS . I am a butcher, I live with Mr. Finch in the Minories. On the 9th of January, between one and two in the afternoon, I went into the Grotto, public house, Southampton-buildings, Holborn, I saw the prisoner come in with two men, they had some printed cotton rolled up, they called for a pint of porter; they sat opposite of me and my brother in the same box; Eleanor Walter's had a pipe or tobacco, she went to the fire several times to light her pipe, and two men strove to hide the linen with their coats; the two men sat close together, and in the mean time the prisoner went to the fire one of the men put a piece of print under his coat and said he would go. He went out.

Q. Then there were more pieces than one, were there - A. Yes; I do not know how many pieces there were. They each had a piece of print under their coats, and the woman had a piece of print. Mr. Osbourne called me out, he said, he thought they had been thieving, he would call on Mr. Marshall to enquire; in the mean time he was gone, the other man went away. Mr. Osbourne returned, and in about five minutes Mr. Marshall came. I went to fetch Rogers, the constable, and when I came back she tried to make away with the linen; she dropped it between her legs, and shoved it under the bench with her feet.

MR. OSBOURNE. On Tuesday last I went into the Grotto; the prisoner and two men came in together, they sat down on the bench, and called for something to drink. I saw this piece of print hanging down between the prisoner and one of the men; the two men appeared to be adjusting something up under their coats; they saw me look at them very hard, one of them got up and went out. I beckoned Ross out, told him my suspicion, if he would stop there I would go to Mr. Marshall's to see if he had lost any thing. When I returned, the other man went out, the prisoner was sitting in the same corner, and this piece of print was hanging down under her; she got up, it dropped, and she kicked it under the settle; she was going away, I stopped her; by some means she got out of the door and went up Southampton-buildings. I went after her and brought her back; she had left the printed cotton behind her, I picked it up under the bench; then Mr. Marshall owned it.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. When I went into this house I had nobody with me. I had no cotton. I called for a glass of gin and a pipe of tobacco. I went out, they brought me back again. I told them I brought nothing in with me. I am a poor woman that works very hard; my husband has been on board a man of war fifteen years.

GUILTY , aged 43,

Of stealing, but not privately.

Confined one year , and fined 1 s .

First Middlesex jury, before the Lord Chief Baron.

Reference Number: t18100110-38

109. JOHN EVANS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 6th of January , one hundred and twenty yards of ribbon, value 3 l. the property of Ann Smith , spinster , privately in her shop .

DIANA SMITH . I live with my sister Ann Smith ; she keeps a haberdasher's shop . On Saturday last, about four o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner came in the shop, he asked to look at some ribbons. I was the only person in the shop. I shewed him the drawer of ribbons, he bought a yard of black ribbon at five-pence, and a yard of red ribbon at eight-pence, he paid me for them and went out of the shop. The moment he was gone I missed a piece of blue ribbon. I immediately went out and followed him, he was not out of sight; he went into a public-house in Orange-street, I followed him into the house; as he was going into the tap-room, I said you have taken some ribbons from me, he immediately threw two pieces at me; I caught them in my hand. He went out of the house into King's-gate-street, some gentlemen in the tap-room ran after him, he was brought back, a constable was sent for, he searched the prisoner, there were three more pieces belonging to my sister found on him.

CHARLES TURNWELL . I was sent for to this public-house in Orange-street. I found the prisoner in custody of two or three persons in the parlour. I searched him, and found upon him three pieces of ribbon, one inside the lining of his breeches, and the other two in the lining of his hat. I found seven other pieces, which were not claimed by Miss Smith.

Prisoner's Defence. I am an hundred miles from home. I have no friends here.

GUILTY , aged 71,

Of stealing, but not privately in the shop.

Confined two years , and fined 1 s .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18100110-39

110. RICHARD CONNORS and MARGARET CONNORS, alias SALTER , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of October, two gowns, value 10 s. a pelisse, value 4 s. a coverlid, value 3 s. a pillow, value 3 s. two sheets, value 10 s. five pair of stockings, value 5 s. a pair of gloves, value 1 s. nine handkerchiefs, value 5 s. five habit shirts, value 5 s. five caps, value 3 s. three pair of pockets, value 2 s. four books, value 4 s. a tea caddie, value 6 d. a fender, value 2 s. a poker, value 1 s. a pair of tongs, value 1 s. a lamp, value 1 s. and eight cloths, value 1 s. the property of Mary Anderson , spinster , in the dwelling-house of Joseph Iredale .

MARY ANDERSON . At the time the offence was committed I lodged in the house of Joseph Iredale . I had a room, and kept a mangle ; the woman prisoner lived with me.

Q. What happened on the 3d of October - A. On the 3d of October I found myself robbed of all that I had.

Q. When did you lose these things which you now charge the prisoners with stealing from you - A.On the 17th of July, Margaret Salter helped me to remove to Mr. Iredale's house. Soon after we got into bed she told me, she was going to try something, and she laid the poker and tongs and things across under the bed; this she continued for several nights. She cut out rings, and different things, out of white cloth, which she placed in the fire-place, then she filled a tea-cup with sand and put a sprig of Southernwood in the middle, and cut figures out of paper and placed them round them. She placed the cup on the shelf, it remained all night; she made a cake, and gave me some to eat; she made some broth, put some powder in it, which she gave me to eat, and afterwards told me what she put in it. About the 9th of August, in the evening, as she and I were sitting at the table, a knife was thrown at me from the other part of the room. It was not thrown by her, she was sitting at the table with me. She then told me, the spirit of the man she now is married to threw it, because what I had done I had not done quick enough. I believe it was the same night, being in the dark, she stood by the window, she talked as if she was talking to a person, but I could not see any thing. She cut bread; and cheese, and butter, and different things that were on the table; she held it as if to give to some person, which she said, was the person of the man; and she told me, to look up against the wall, which I did, and I saw the figure of a lamb, about the size of a large cat. After we were in bed, she told me to look at the other part of the room; I looked, and I saw faintly the figure of a man with something white over his shoulders; he was sitting on a chair. She told me, he wanted something out of my box; I asked her, what? She said, [Text unreadable in original.]

clothes out, and when he came to what he wanted he would claim the same, I took a great many things out of my box being very much frightened; and in the morning I found them all gone.

Q. Where was this box from whence you took them - A. By the side of the bed; I got out of bed to get them out.

Q. Did you go to the side of the room where the spirit was - A. No.

Q. What became of Mrs. Salter - A. She remained in the room and did not go out to my knowledge; Mrs. Salter made a great noise about the same time as if somebody was strangling her.

Q. Was that while you were taking the things out - A. It was both before and after a great many times.

Q. What were the articles that you lost this night, let us have the particulars - A. A sprigged muslin gown, and a cotton gown, petticoat, stays, a spencer, I gave her four shillings for them back again; I missed four habit shirts and five caps.

Q. Have you ever since seen any of these articles after that night - A. She told me that some of them went down to a Castle in Devonshire; I saw her with some of them on a few days or a week afterwards.

Q. Did she continue to lodge with you - A. She continued for eleven weeks; she told me that these apparitions told her that she must wear my clothes or else I should be tortured.

Q. Did you agree to this - A. No; she told me if I said any thing about it I was to be turned into a different shape and be tortured that kept me quiet, I dreaded the consequences; she so deluded me that I believed it was in her power to do every thing she said.

Q. Are these all the circumstances that you know of the woman prisoner that was transacted that night. - A. Yes.

Q. What do you know of Richard Conners - A. He used to come to my apartments pretending to see me, they were always together, I did not wish him to come but she always asked him, he was there that evening he worked for Mr. Iredale, he was always coming to and fro.

Q. Did you ever see him in possession of the things that you lost that night - A. He said that he helped to take my goods away on the 2d of October, he said nothing about my clothes, I do not know any thing that he did at that time.

Q. What were the articles that you saw her wear - A. Handkerchiefs, caps, and stockings.

Mr. Knapp. You seem to have been affected a good deal by a spirit that night - A. I never heard of any such things before, I was very much alarmed.

Q. You knew this man before did not you - A. Yes;

Q. He paid his addresses to you, did not he - A. He pretended so.

Q. Then afterwards he married this woman - A. I understand so.

Q. That was enough to make you angry - A. No, it did not.

Q. These things that you have described you produced for the apparition or any body else to take, you laid them out - A. I laid them out.

Q. And part of the things the woman wore and continued with you eleven weeks afterwards; wearing them when she thought fit - A. Yes.

Q. How long was it before you took these people before a magistrate - A. As soon as I found them out about two months ago.

Court. What was it that induced you to suspect this fraud at first, you went on with her eleven weeks. - A. I did; under the terror of this apparation, when she went away from me she said, she was going down to where my clothes were to be tortured all her life, because she made use of this magic. I was told by several friends that they had seen her in the streets.

Q. How did you learn that there was no reality in all this magic - A. I found that she was living in a shop; and was not gone to where she told me, I heard where she lived, I applied to Mr. Bly the officer to take her up.

JAMES BLY . Q. You were applied to by the prosecutrix to apprehend the prisoner - A. I was; she told me the same story as she has you. In consequence of her telling me where the property laid I brought it all away with another officer. The woman prisoner told me to hush it up, and she would make me any recompence; and she hoped I would not take her before a magistrate.

JAMES NOBLE . Q. Were you along with Bly, when the woman was taken up - A. Yes; she kept a chandler's shop, she wished us to hush it up, and not to take her before a magistrate; and she would make it all good to the prosecutrix.

Richard Connors was not put on his defence.

Margaret Connors Defence . I know myself perfectly innocent.

RICHARD CONNORS , NOT GUILTY

MARGARET CONNORS , GUILTY , aged 25,

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling house.

Confined Twelve Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18100110-40

111. WILLIAM WILLINGTON was indicted for feloniously stealing from the person of Joseph Gray , a pocket book, value 1 s. two bank notes, value 5 l. each, a bank note, value 2 l. and ten one-pound bank notes, a bill of exchange for 485 l. 9 s. 6 d. a bill of exchange, value 15 l. a bill of exchange, value 10 l. and a warrant for the payment of 8 l. 4 s. 6 d. his property .

JOSEPH GRAY . I am a coal merchant : I live in the City-road. On the 2d of January at ten o'clock at night, from Charterhouse-wall and my own house I lost the pocket book; I had dined at the Dog tavern in Holywell-street in the Strand, and expecting to see a gentleman, I took out my pocket book and examined every paper I had in it; it contained all these notes, I went from there to the Bell Savage, Ludgate Hill, and at about half after eight o'clock I set off home. A person came up to me by the Charterhouse-wall , and said, Mr. Gray how do you do; I told him he had the advantage of me, he said, he knew me; he lived at Islington, and he knew my two sons who were at sea. At the top of Goswell-street I asked him if he would take a glass of porter with me.

Q. Were you sober - A. I had drank a pint of wine and no more. We went into a house and had a pint of porter together, from the public house called the prisoners bars, we walked to the door of my house then I parted with him. After I had been in the house a few minutes I missed my pocket book, it was in my left hand inner

pocket of my coat. On the next day my pocket book was brought to me by a woman, I was not at home; she said, she would deliver it to nobody but me, the next day the husband brought the pocket book to me, I went to Hatton-garden, and had a warrant for the prisoner; on Friday morning, I saw him at a public-house in Somer's-town, he then said, he did not know me nor my family.

Q. Did you know this man before. - A. No; I could not swear to him.

Q. Has any of the notes been found. - A. No; I found the bills and memorandums in the pocket book, all right, except the notes.

WILLIAM MORGAN ABBOTT. I am a plaisterer. On Wednesday week, the prisoner gave me a pocket book, which he said, he found between Goswell-street, and the City-road; I searched the book, I found there were bills in it to a great amount; he said, when he found it there were two one pound notes in it, there were no notes in it when he gave it me; I took the book to Mr. Gray.

JAMES SMITH . I am a plaisterer . I employ these two men; Abbott observed to me, that William had found a pocket book; I asked him if there was any money in it; he said, no, I immediately called William; he he said, master, I have found a pocket book in Old-street Road. I asked him if there was any money in it; he said, no, I asked him, if there was any paper like money, he said, yes. I never heard a word mentioned about bank notes.

Prisoner's Defence. When I brought the pocket-book to him, I shewed it him. I told him, when I picked it up it was open.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100110-41

112. CHARLES BAILEY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 29th of December , two dressed deer skins, value 20 s. the property of Samuel Savage and Richard Savage .

RICHARD SAVAGE . I am a leather seller , 63, Chiswell-street , my partner's name is Samuel Savage . A few days previous to the 29th of December, I looked out seventy skins for an order, these skins being of a bad colour, I directed them to be brimstoned, to make them of equal colour, pale. On the 29th in the afternoon, I saw them all smooth on a horse. A few hours afterwards, they appeared very much tumbled, and one was thrown into the yard and dirtied; I caused them to be brought in the warehouse, and counted, there was two gone. Our foreman went to Worship-street, and brought Armstrong and Vickrey. They searched, and found this skin in the prisoner's breeches, and the other skin was found in the workshop.

- CARTER. I am foreman to Samuel and Richard Savage . The seventy skins I was with Mr. Savage, looking them out. I took them out of the stove, and counted them on the horse, and on Friday I counted them three times over, there were no more than sixty-eight, instead of seventy; I went to Worship-street, brought Mr. Armstrong and Vickery with me, they waited till the men left work, and when they came down they were searched, and on the prisoner, one skin was found.

JOHN ARMSTRONG . I went to this gentleman's house, after the men came down, Vickrey and I were searching, in one minute, Vickrey called me, I received this skin from him, it was taken out of the prisoner's breeches; I have had it ever since.

JOHN VICKREY . Q. You were with Armstrong. - A. Yes, while I was searching another man, I saw the prisoner very uneasy, and his breeches were unbuttoned; I put my hand in, and took that skin out. He said, he could not tell how it came there.

The property produced and identified.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 27.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and Fined 1 s .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100110-42

113. JOHN ELWES and THOMAS WILLIAMS were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 30th of December , a wooden till, value 1 s. three hundred penny-pieces, two hundred halfpence and fifty farthings , the property of James Lewis .

JAMES LEWIS. I am a victuallar ; I live in New Nicoll-street, Bethnall Green . On the 30th of December I lost my till, that is all I know.

THOMAS FACILLIAN . As I was going in, I saw James Elwes run out with a till, he chucked it into another man's apron.

Q. Who the other man was that had the apron on, you do not know. - A. No.

MRS. MOSELY. On the 30th of December, about ten minutes past seven, I went into Mr. Lewis's house, and returning out of the door, I saw James Elwes standing at the door, that was about a minute before this happened; I am sure he is the man, he had a belcher handkerchief on that night.

JOHN WOOD . I am an officer. I went to Mr. Lewis's house, the two prisoner's were there, I searched them; I found three halfpence between them both; Elwes had this belcher handkerchief on when I took him in custody.

Elwes's Defence. I know nothing at all of it, I was coming part the house; I asked what was the matter, they asked me to come in the tap-room to have something to drink, then they accused me of the robbery, and gave me in custody.

Lewis was not put on his defence.

Elwes called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100110-43

114. ISAAC GREEN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 28th of December , a pair of shoes, value five shillings , the property of John Lindsey .

JOHN LINDSEY. I am a boot and shoe maker , 115, Wapping . On the 28th of December, about six o'clock in the evening I was drinking my tea, my lodger was with me, and Sarah Banks , my chairwoman. I saw some people look in my window, I immediately ran out, I saw four or five men pass my window and go down the street about an hundred yards, and there they stopped, the prisoner parted from them, and came up three doors beyond me, and stood with his back towards my house; I took the opportunity, and ran in doors. I called John Thompson , one of my journeymen down stairs, and placed him in one part of the shop, my sailor lodger in another, and myself in another, one in each corner of the shop; we were in the shop watching in this manner till nine o'clock.

Q. Do you know the prisoner. - A. Yes; he is a plaisterer by trade. About nine o'clock, they all surrounded

the window, they were scarce five minutes at a time from the window all the three hours. The prisoner then came upon the step of the door three times, and retired back, at last he came into the shop, stretched his hand to one of the pair of shoes, and took them, he was stretching out his hand to take more, and this man flew out, and caught hold of him, we all sprang out; I had an empty pistol in my hand, we secured him; he was taken to the police office, when he was about half way, he called out for Mr. Webb and Mr. Whitnell, and Mr. Whitnell came, he is a boot and shoe maker. Mr. Webb is master of Wapping watchhouse; he came, I gave him into his custody. These are the shoes, the prisoner immediately threw them down when he was caught hold off.

Mr. Alley. You are a shopkeeper you say; did not you serve your time to Mr. Whitnell. - A. Yes; I knew the prisoner ten years, he ordered shoes of me the Wednesday before he robbed me. He is a plaisterer.

Q. Who is Mr Webb, is not he a respectable man. - A. No doubt of it, and Mr. Whitnell is a respectable man so far as I know.

Q. When you took the prisoner in custody, he called out to these men. - A. Yes.

Q How many persons were in the shop. - A. Three besides myself.

Q. Which of you gentlemen was it that the bailiff was after. - A. Martin Hollincrest .

Q. Do not you know that the person charged at the bar by you was the person appointed to point out Hollincrest to the bailiff. - A. No; upon my oath, I never heard it, if it had been so, he had no business to take my goods.

Q. Did Hollincrest leave the magistrates the same time as you did. - A. He did.

Q. Which way did he go off home, in a boat or by land. - A. He came which way he pleased.

Court Give an answer. - A. He went in a boat, to avoid the bailiff.

Q. How came you to tell me this moment, when I desired the short hand writer to take down your answer to my question, that you never heard of it. - A. I knew it last August.

Q. Who was the man against whom the writ was. A. Hollincrest, my lodger.

Q. Upon your oath, did not the man at the bar, say at the time you charged him coming to rob you; I came to point out Hollingcrest, and not to rob you of a pair of shoes. - A. I declare he never mentioned a word of a pair of shoes.

Q. I am talking about a writ; which part of the shop was Hollincrest concealed and Thompson. - A. Almost the further part of the shop.

Q. And about three hours, the men had been lurking about your door. - A. They had.

Court. They gave you plenty of notice to be three hours about your shop. - A. Twenty pound would not excuse what I lost last year.

Court. You know that is not evidence.

Mr. Alley. Did not Hollincrest tell you, that he came to your house to be protected from the bailiff. - A. No.

Q. How long has he lodged with you. - A. He came in December some time.

Q. There had been a writ out against him ever since the month of August, and it is not till December, the honest creditor is able to find him out. Who took the shoes from the prisoner. - A. He dropped them.

Q. Have you not said, that you were sorry he did not carry the shoes away. - A. I did; because if he had taken the shoes away, I thought it would be the worser for him; I have been so much robbed.

Court. When men harp upon that, I always suspect them.

Mr. Alley. In the month of December, the prisoner ordered a pair of shoes of you. - A. He came to me on the Wednesday, as I was robbed on the Saturday; he said, will you make me a pair of shoes; I said, I would, he said, what will be the price; I said, half a guinea; I was to get them done by Saturday night; as he passed on the Friday night, he said, will you be sure to make my shoes again to-morrow night.

Court. Then you knew him perfectly well. - A. Yes.

Mr. Alley. Did not you know the reason of his going backwards and forwards before your shop, was for the purpose of ascertaining whether that man was in your house. - A. I declare to God, I did not.

MARTIN HOLLINGCREST . I am a sailor, a Swede; I live with Mr. Lindsey, a shoemaker.

Q. You were afraid of being arrested. - A. Yes.

Q. How long had the bailiff's been after you, were they after you that night. - A. I did not know at the time, I heard the day afterwards.

Q. When you came from the police-office that night, you got a boat, did not you. - A. Yes; I went in a boat afterwards.

Q. How came you not to go home by land, was not you afraid of the bailiff. - A. Yes; something like it.

Q. What past this night when the shoes were taken. A. About six o'clock, I sat along with the chairwoman drinking tea, the woman said to master, there is somebody looking in the window, the master ran out, and told us, there were three or four men looking in at the window; he placed me in one corner of the shop, John Thompson and the woman in another, and himself in corner, I stood in the corner from six till nine, and then I saw this prisoner eight or nine times at the window, I saw his face very plain, he could not see me, I was in a dark corner; he came in, turned to the left, and catched hold of the shoes, they were hanging up behind the door, he took them with his left hand, and attempting to take another pair with his right hand, I ran and catched hold of him, the master came and snapped a pistol, there was nothing in it; he did not touch the second pair of shoes.

Q. What became of the shoes. - A. The prisoner dropped them. I did not see who picked them up, when he got out, he called Webb and Whitenell, Webb came up.

Mr. Alley. How long had you been concealed in that man's house. - A. About three weeks and a half.

JOHN THOMPSON . I lodge in Lindsey's house. I was called down, they told me, there were some men that wanted to rob the shop, I was stationed at the stairs from six till nine. I did not see the prisoner when he first entered the door; I did not see him take or drop the shoes; as soon as this man jumped to lay hold of him, I sprang to him, and catched hold of him. I saw the shoes were taken from the place where they hung, who took them, I do not know.

ELIZABETH BANKS . On this day I was charing at Mr. Lindsey's, I saw at six o'clock three or four men at the window, I told master of it, he went and looked, the men rushed over the way; I sat on the stairs. They came to the window different times, the prisoner attempted to come in three times.

Q. What was there to prevent him. - A. I understood that he was upon the watch for some man that owed him some money in our house, the prisoner came in the shop, went forward to the window, took a pair of shoes, he attempted to take the second pair, the man that owed the money catched him by the collar: the prisoner dropped the shoes.

Q. Then the man stood between you and the person that was seized. - A. Yes; I was behind the man.

Prisoner's Defence. I was employed by Mr. Whitnell to look after Hollincrest, with the sheriff's officer.

WILLIAM WHLTNELL . I am a shoemaker: the prosecutor served his time to me; I would not believe him upon oath, he was always guilty of falcities. The prisoner is a young man I thought I could put confidence in, I employed him to seek after Hollincrest, I sent him to get a pair of shoes, to get information; I did not mind the shoes, I would have taken them myself; he went to Lindsey's according to my order, and told me the man was there.

Q. Did you walk backwards and forwards before this man's shop. - A. Yes; Mr. Adams, the sheriff's officer was to meet me at the Gun, he did. I sent the prisoner first, because I thought if they saw me, they would suspect it. The prisoner went several times while we waited at the Gun. Mr. Adams was tired of waiting about.

Q. In point of fact, did the prisoner go there to point out Hollincrest to the Sheriff's officer for you. - A. He did, he went there for me to give the information

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100110-44

115. MATTHEW THOMPSON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of December , a coat, value 3 s. the property of Thomas Boast .

THOMAS BOAST . I am a helper to a coachman in Mr. Gibbs's Yard, in Mount-street . On the 12th of December, I missed the coat from the stable. I had suspicion of the prisoner. I apprehended him in the yard the next morning.

SOLOMON SOLOMONS . On the 13th of December, I was in Coventry-street, in the Haymarket; the prisoner was on the opposite side of the way, with some clothes on his arm, he beckoned me to come over to him. I bought the clothes of him; for two pound twelve shillings. I am certain that is the man.

JOHN COBHAM. I am a constable; I apprehended the prisoner on the 13th, and I received this coat of the jew.

The property produced and identified.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witness to character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100110-45

116. MATTHEW THOMPSON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 12th of December , a great coat, value 3 l. and a jacket, value 2 s. the property of John Baldock .

JOHN BALDOCK . I am coachman to Mr. Lad, in Chapel-street, May-fair . My coat was on the box, in the coach-house, locked up in the same stable yard; I lost my coat on the same day, about half past five. The prisoner knew the premises as well as I did, he had been helper to me formerly, he had been about the yard all the day before; I went out, he had nothing to do in the yard; I found my things afterwards in Monmouth-street, afterwards at Mr. Maley's shop.

JOHN SOLOMONS . I met the prisoner in Coventry-street, I gave him two one pound notes, a seven shilling-piece, and two half crowns for the clothes, the great coat I afterwards sold to Mr. Maley.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of it.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100110-46

117. JOHN BURN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 7th of December , nineteen pound weight of copper, value 10 s. the property of the London Dock company . And,

TWO OTHER COUNTS for like offence, only varying the manner of charging them.

The indictment was read by Mr. Bosanquet, and the cast was stated by Mr. Knapp.

ALEXANDER DURHAM . I am one of the gatekeeper's of the London Dock . On the 7th of December last, I saw the prisoner at the spirit quay gate, he came for an empty bushel measure, he had a pass to allow him to carry it out of the Dock. Mr. Frost laid hold of him by the arm; I took hold of the bushel measure, the copper slipped down from under his frock, I took the prisoner in custody, and sent for a constable, Mr. Frost kept the copper in his possession; Mackdonald the constable came, the prisoner ran away, Mackdonald and I ran after him, he ran about three hundred yards, and then jumped out of the back part of a warehouse into the bed of the River-Thames: he was pursued in our sight, and apprehended.

MARTIN FROST . I am gatekeeper to the Customs. On the 7th of December, between the hours of nine and ten, I and Mr. Durham were a few peces from the gate, I met the prisoner with an empty bushel measure, and a pass, he presented the pass when he came to the gate; I asked him whether he had any thing in the bushel measure; he said, no; I told him I must see; I laid hold of the measure, and underneath his smock frock, I saw this cake of copper, that was in the London Dock, Mr. Durham took the bushel measure; I took the copper from him, and took it to my box; the prisoner ran away, he was pursued and brought back. I produce the copper.

ARCHIBALD MACDONALD. Q. Do you know of any copper being within the London Docks. - A. There is plenty, some of the same marks, and some of the same quality: it lies on the west side of the dock.

Prisoner's Defence. My Lord, and Gentlemen of the jury, I have never been before a court of justice before The copper taken from me, I had no intention of stealing the same being given to me by a person in the dock, alledging, he wanted it for a sample, unconscious that

I was doing wrong; I acceeded to his wish when I came to the gate, although I had a pass I was stopped with the property, I informed them I was not carrying it for myself, I was carrying it for another person coming out of the Dock before me, who on my apprehension absconded. I was advised to run away, I therefore beg my crime may be considered to arise from ignorance.

Q. to Durham. Did the prisoner say to you that he was employed to carry this out - A. He did not to me, he did before the Justice.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined Six months in the House of Correction and publickly whipped one hundred yards at, or near the London Docks .

Second Middlesex Jury before the Lord Chief Baron.

Reference Number: t18100110-47

118. ELIZABETH FRITTON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 10th of January , seven silk handkerchiefs, value 25 s. the property of Thomas Appleby , privately in his shop .

THOMAS APPLEBY. I am a silk mercer . I live at 23, Cranbourn-street, Leicester-square . On Wednesday last, near two o'clock, two women came into the shop to look at some silk handkerchiefs, the prisoner followed, and asked to look at other goods; I told her to walk into the other part of the shop, and the young man would shew her. She went and returned to me, and said, the young man and she could not agree for the price of the article she was looking at. She went back in the shop again, and the other women were going away. I looked over the handkerchiefs, and missed a piece.

Q. The other women were dealing with you for the handkerchiefs - A. Yes; I charged them with having them. The prisoner was in the further part of the shop; she came towards them, and let the handkerchiefs drop from her person: I saw it drop on the floor; the other women were not nigh by a yard or two. I picked up the piece of handkerchiefs. I asked her how she came to take the handkerchiefs; she said, she did not. I told her, I saw her drop them. I said, I would take her to Marlborough-street; she said, she hoped I would not, she would give me the price of the handkerchiefs.

Q. Are you sure that you did not see her take them - A. She took some of the handkerchiefs up to look at, that is all I saw.

Q. How many people were there of you serving in the shop - A. I am not certain, whether two or three, with myself. The young man that was serving her is not here.

MARIA GARRETT . I am servant to Mr. Appleby. I saw the prisoner in the shop, looking at some calimanco. After Mr. Appleby had charged the other women with taking the handkerchiefs, I saw the prisoner drop them.

THOMAS SIMMONS. I live with Mr. Appleby.

Q. Did you see the prisoner there - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see her take any thing from the counter - A. No; I saw a piece of handkerchiefs drop from her person.

Prisoner's Defence. I went into the shop to buy some calimanco, he had only two pieces to shew me, at fifteen-pence a yard. I told him, I could only afford to pay a shilling a yard. The gentleman told me to stop, he had plenty. I stopped a minute, he took the pieces of silk handkerchiefs off the counter; he said, he had lost a piece of silk handkerchiefs between the three. I stood still: whether the handkerchiefs fell from the women, I do not know; the gentlemen said, they fell from me.

GUILTY , aged 25,

Of stealing, but not privately.

Confined six months , and fined one shilling .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18100110-48

119. RICHARD CONNORS and MARGARET CONNORS , alias SALTER , were indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 3d of August , a gown, value 5 s. two pillow-case, value 4 s. two bags, value 2 s. two towels, value 1 s. a petticoat, value 3 s. a bed-gown, value 2 s. and a piece of patch-work, value 4 s. the property of Mary Anderson , spinster .

MARY ADERSON . Q. Do you know any thing more to alledge against the prisoner Connor, than what you related last night - A. I saw him take sheets and different things out of her hand in the street; when he saw me, he run and hid himself. I do not know of his being present when any thing was stolen by the other prisoner.

Q. Whatever articles she took she possessed herself of some time before, did not she - A. Yes; but those things which he took from her, she had taken that evening some few minutes before.

Q. What were the articles that you are speaking of now - A. A petticoat, a frock trimmed with lace; they were the property of other persons, in my care to be mangled. She had them in her possession when she was taken.

Q. He was not in company with her when she took them, was he - A. No.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18100110-49

120. MARGARET CONNORS , alias SALTER , was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of July , one petticoat, value 2 s. two frocks, value 7 s. and a shift, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of Mary Anderson , spinster .

There being no evidence adduced, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18100110-50

121. MARY ANN FIELD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 22nd of December , eighteen yards of ribbon, value 7 s. the property of John Simonds , privately in his shop .

JOHN SIMONDS . I am a haberdasher , 18, Coventry-street, St. James's . On the 22nd of December, in the evening, I saw the prisoner in my shop, she was looking at some purple ribbon; and suspecting, from her appearance, that she was a shop-lifter, I asked her, what she wanted; she replied, some ribbon to match the pattern he shewed me; I answered, that it was impossible to match that colour by candle light. She selected a piece, and had a yard and a half cut off, which she paid for, and went out of the shop. I instantly went out of doors, and got sight of her. At Rupert-street I pushed her into Mr. Pitts shop an hosier's, I said, to her in Mr. Pitts shop, you have robbed me, and sent for a constable; and before the constable came, half a piece of ribbon dropped from underneath her, I said, to her, what is that, she said, I do not know sir; it does not belong to me, I took it up, it had my private mark on it; she said, she had kicked it along the street, I observed it was impossible, it was a very dirty night, and the ribbon was clean.

MR. PITTS. I live at No. 6, Coventry-street, the corner

of Rupert-street, and Coventry-street. Mr. Simonds and the prisoner came into my shop, he informed me she had robbed him, I sent our boy for a constable; and while he was gone for a constable the woman dropped a piece of ribbon.

JOHN KNIGHT . I am a constable, I was sent for, I took charge of the prisoner; the ribbon has been in my possession ever since.

Prisoner's Defence. I went into Mr. Simonds shop, I bought a yard and a half of ribbon; I came out of the shop and was going towards my home, I saw a woman drop this piece of ribbon, I picked it up, this gentleman asked me what I picked up, I said, a piece of ribbon; he said, it was his, he pushed me into a shop; I refused letting him have the ribbon because I saw it drop, he saw a woman run away.

Q.(to Prosecutrix). Did you see any other woman running away - . A. No; she denied having the ribbon at first.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Of stealing, but not privately in the shop.

Confined Twelve months and fined 1 s .

Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18100110-51

122. WILLIAM MACKEY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 31st. of July , a lamp, value 4 s. the property of Thomas Harrison .

THOMAS HARRISON . I keep the Tavistock Hotel, Covent Garden .

Q. Did you in July lose a lamp - A. I am not certain of the time, I believe it was in July, 1808.

Q. Where was your lamp - A. In the passage within the house; the porter told me it was stolen, I looked and saw it was gone. About a fortnight afterwards, I was coming through Old Round Court in the Strand, I saw my lamp on a table in a broker's shop; I went into the shop, told Mr. Bradley the broker, it was my lamp; he described the man he bought it of, he said, he gave two shillings for it. I gave him the two shillings for it, and took the lamp home, and I never heard any more of it till yesterday was a week. The broker came to me.

JOHN BRADLEY. To the best of my recollection, it is about eighteen or twenty months since the prisoner came to my shop with this lamp; I bought it of him for two shillings and sixpence, it was afterwards claimed by Mr. Harrison, he desired me to point out the man; I told him I would, if the man ever came again. Accordingly, last Friday but one, the prisoner brought two sugar glasses, I got information from him where he was to be heard off, I let Mr. Harrison know, I have no doubt about the identity of his person.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in the House of Correction at the time this lamp was taken away.

THOMAS AMES. I am principal assistant to Mr. Ayres, at the House of Correction, Cold-bath Fields. The prisoner was sentenced from this court in June, 1808, for six months, he continued till the 31st. of December. I believe the books of Mr. Newman will prove that he was in custody on the 31st. of May.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury before the Lord Chief Baron.

Reference Number: t18100110-52

123. WILLIAM SKINN and JOSHUA BROWN were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of George Felix Gilbert , and Henry Mobsbey , about the hour of twelve at night, on the 31st. of December , and stealing therein, a silver tobacco stopper, value 6 d. an eye glass, value 1 s. two keys, value 2 d. a watch chain, value 2 d. an epaulet bullion, value 2 d. two pieces of foreign coin, value 2 d. the property of George Felix Gilbert : a tin box, value 2 d. a wooden pocket book, value 2 d. seven pounds, in monies numbered, twelve bank notes, value one pound each, and a warrant, for the payment of 8 l. 15 s. 6 d. the property of George Felix Gilbert and Henry Mobsbey .

HENRY MOBSBEY . My dwelling house is No. 6, Fieldgate-street, Whitechapel.

Q. Where do you carry out any business - A. No. 70, Chiswell-street, St. Luke's . I am in partnership with George Felix Gilbert , he sleeps there; the rent of the house and the taxes are paid jointly, George Felix Gilbert keeps the house; we are tea dealers and grocer s. When I came to the shop on the morning of the first of January, my partner's uncle William Gilbert , on my entering the house, informed me we were robbed; I went into the accompting house, I found the cupboard where we deposit the cash was broken open, I likewise found one flap of a desk on the left hand side was broken open; I found the cash box and the copper money which I had left on the Saturday night gone from the cup board of the accompting house, I found six shillings and eleven pence, left in copper money in the cupboard.

Court. Had the cupboard been left locked on the Saturday night. - A. I left it locked between twelve and one o'clock at night, on the 30th of December, the money was all safe, then I proceeded into the shop, and found the shop had been entered by forcing in a thin pannel, it had been entered from the cellar, a thin pannel had been broken open from the cellar into the shop, it was large enough for a man to come through; I likewise found the division between our cellar and Mrs. Stafford's cellar, the next door, had been broken down, part of the division was broken down large enough to admit any man. The head of the cellar stairs leading into Mrs. Stafford's passage had been broken down, her cellar door had been forced open, and her street door was open in the morning.

Q. Describe the door at the head of the stairs of her cellar where that went to - A. That door led into the passage of Mrs. Stafford's house leading to the street door.

Q. Did you observe any thing with respect to her street door - A. After I did.

Q.This account of yours does not shew how any person got in originally - A. At that moment I could not say. I wrote to Newnham and Co. to stop the check of 8 l. 15 s. 6 d. this check was on Newnham and Co. it was in the cash box on the Saturday, and twelve one pound notes, and one pound ten shillings in silver. I proceeded to Bow-street, from Bow-street they sent an officer belonging to Worship-street, his name is Vickrey.

Mr. Knapp. What time did Vickrey come - A. I think about three o'clock, on the Monday afternoon, we went over the premises with him.

Q. Did you discover when Vickrey was there, the external means how any body got in - A. We could not then; we afterwards discovered they must have got in at the cellar flap, or over it.

Q. Did you discover any of your property - A. No.

Q. How much did you lose altogether - A. Twenty seven pound fifteen shillings and sixpence.

GEORGE FELIX GILBERT . Q. You are partner with the other gentleman. - Q. I am. I reside at No. 70, Chiswell-street; I occupy the house.

Q. How soon did you learn that your house had been entered. - A. I learned it on Monday about twelve o'clock, on Tuesday morning I returned, I had left the house on the Sunday morning, it was all safe then. When I came home, I found my desk in the accompting-house had been forced open; I missed a silver quizzing-glass, an eyeglass, a tobacco stopper, and a metal watch-chain, two pieces of foreign coin and two small keys. I then understood that some suspicion fell upon William Skinn ; I knew him before, he formerly lived porter with my grandfather, in the same house about two years ago. I went accompanied with my partner, with Vickery and Armstrong, to William Skinn 's apartments in North-street, City-road, I found him at home; when we went in, Vickrey informed Skinn of the robbery, and that we had some reason to suspect he knew something about it. Skinn affected great surprise and sorrow upon the occasion; Vickrey observed that he supposed that he would have no objection to a search, we searched, and could find nothing, except two pieces of paper, in which copper had been tied up by its appearance, however, these were things that we could not swear to. My partner and I agreed that if Skinn would come up to the magistrate at twelve o'clock the next day, we would not take him up that night. The officer asked him how he spent his time on the Sunday night, he said, he was with some friends, playing at dominoes at the Ivey house, till three o'clock in the morning; Vickrey then said, he should make a point of going there, and enquiring if any such person had been; nothing else passed at that time. I had not been home above ten minutes, before a person came that lodged in Skin's house, told me, they were packing up their things, and going off. Immediately I ran, and in my way I got a watchman, and when I got to Skinn's house, I found Skinn was gone; I saw a bundle tied up in the shop; I then enquired if his wife was there, I saw his wife, I gave her in charge of the watchman. I saw a little girl that had been calling out to Skinn's wife, he took hold of her.

Q. When did you see Skinn again. - A. On the next day, at his father-in-law's house, in Type-street, Grub-street. I had information, and me and Vickrey went to the father-in-law's house in Type-street, there we found Skinn. I asked Skinn, what was his reason for running away, and not coming down to Worship-street according to his promise, he observed, that as his wife had been taken, he was unhappy, and protested his innocence: upon which we took him before the magistrate in Worship-street, he was then examined.

Q. You have never recovered any of your property again. - A. No.

JOHN GIFFORD Esq. Q. I believe you are a magistrate in the County of Middlesex. - A. I am.

Q. Was the prisoner Skinn brought before you. - A. Yes.

Q. It that your hand writing. - A. Yes; it is.

Q. On what day was he before you. - A. On the Thursday, the 4th of January 1810, the prisoner signed that paper in my presence.

Q. Before this was signed by the prisoner, or before the prisoner said any thing on the subject of this charge, did you tell him, that he had no occasion to say any thing without he pleased. - A. When I asked the prisoner if he had any thing to say, he immediately said, I will tell the whole truth, I was prevailed upon, or over persuaded to do this with three or four others. I then stopped him short, and told him, that any thing he then should say would be afterwards produced against him on his trial. It was perfectly optional with him, and if he did say any thing, he would say it with his eyes open, and before he signed, I gave him the same caution

The voluntary information and confession of WILLIAM SKINN, who saith, that about five week ago, Joshua Brown , who worked with him in the London Docks, asked him, if he knew any body that kept money by them, where he or any body belonging to him could come at it; he told him, he knew many people that kept money by them, but he should not try to get it himself; he said, never mind, if you will tell me, I will bring men who will fetch it out; he told of the men. They met at the Brown Bear , East Smithfield, where it was planned to break open Messrs. Gilbert and Mobsbey's premises on Sunday evening. The informant, Jones, Gould, and a man of the name of Old Tom, met at a public-house in Petticoat-lane, the house is a corner house of a street, the left handside coming to Whitechapel, about an hundred yards from Whitechapel; on James Cook was with informant, and Cook hearing the said four men were to meet, agreed to meet them at the Star-round-about public-house, in the City-road; that they all met, except Cook, at the appointed time, but did not go into the public-house; that the said Gould and informant proceeded to Messrs. Gilbert and Mobsbey's, to examine the premises, to see if any body was about, which took them half an hour; that they went back and joined the other three, in the City-road; they all returned into Chiswell-street, and walked about, backwards and forwards, in the neighbourhood till the watch had gone twelve, and then Gould forced open the trap-door of Mr. Gilbert's cellar; they then staid till the watch went one, the informant Skinn and Gould went into Mr. Gilbert's cellar, struck a light and lighted the dark lanthorn; he went to the partition between the two cellars and broke into Mrs. Stafford's cellar, forced open a door at the head of the stairs which opened into Mrs. Stafford's passage, and then drew back the bolts of the street-door, took the alarm bell down, and laid it on the stairs, in order to escape if any alarm was given; they took down the partition of the passage, Gould went into the shop and into the accompting-house, and broke open the furthermost desk on the left hand side; the other two desks being open, they searched the desks but found nothing, except a little wooden box, which contained two small bits of coin, two small keys, a silver quizzing glass, a silver tobacco stopper, an old watch chain, a tassel or bullion of an epaulet, which Gould put into his left hand jacket pocket; the informant and Gould then broke open a cupboard, and took out five pound ten shillings in copper money, wrapped up in brown paper; a tin box with fifteen or sixteen one pound bank notes, a seven shilling piece, and some silver, a bankers check, and a pawnbrokers ticket. After they got these things, which was about two o'clock in the morning, they went out at the street door, the door stuck a little; they drew the bottom bolt which was not quite drawn out. Jones, who was on the outside, pushed the door open, the two others were waiting for them on the other side of the way, at the corner of Grub-street. Jones took them to a house in a narrow street, which runs into Petticoat-lane; they went into the house and divided the money between them; they had each of them four guineas, and ten shillings in copper, which was left; Jones gave to the women all the papers in the pocket-book, and in the box which kept the money, were burnt in the informants presence.

Brown took the wooden box, and wrenched it to pieces, one of the women took the pieces into her lap. They then all went into Whitechapel, where Jones took the tin box, which contained the money, and laid it down in the kennel.

The informant further saith, that he and Jones went to the City of Chester, public-house in Bunhill-row, a man came in named Jack, and to him the informant sold the two pieces of foreign coin, the watch chain, the tobacco stopper, the quizzing-glass, and two small keys, for three and sixpence; the man borrowed the three and sixpence of the landlady to pay this informant.

JOHN VICKREY . Q. You are an officer belonging to Worship-street. - A. I am: on the first of this month, I received information that Mr. Gilbert's warehouse had been broken open; I went there about half after two o'clock on the same day. I saw Mr. Mobsbey, one of the partners, he led me to a place where he supposed the entry was made, but I soon discovered it was not made that way; I then went down in the cellar of their house, I discovered, that part of the partition to another cellar had been taken down, by which they could get through there, I went through that place, and found a flight of stairs which led up to the passage of the same house, only it is separated by the passage; at the top of these stairs, I discovered a pannel had been taken out, which parts the cellar stairs from Mr. Gilbert's shop, that was likewise big enough for me to go through, the door on the top of these stairs likewise had been forced open, it had been fastened with a large brass button, that button had been forced out of its place, and fell on the ground, the hole in the partition went into Mr. Mobsbey's shop. I went back the same way I came up, not being satisfied how the entery was made; I went into Mr. Mobsbey's cellar; I saw that there was a way down into the cellar from the street; I examined it, I found by putting a small instrument in, they might raise the cellar flap; I had no doubt the entery was made that way, there were no fastening to it; and from the nature of going from one cellar to another, I was satisfied that it was somebody that was, or had been about the premises. I went into the accompting-house, I discovered a desk had been broken open by an iron crow; the marks were there, I then went to the cupboard, where I was informed the money box was kept, I could see that was opened by an instrument, the same as the other, but not with so much force. I then left the place, desiring Mr. Mobsbey to make enquiry where Skinn could be found. I went on the Wednesday evening to Skinn's lodging, Mr. Gilbert makes a mistake in saying Tuesday, I went there on the Wednesday evening, I think between seven and eight o'clock, we waited a considerable time in the street before he came home; we watched him into his house, and went up stairs soon after him, we went into Skinn's room on the second floor, he and his wife were both in the room, I told him that Mr. Gilbert's house had been robbed, and there was some reason to think he knew something about it. I have heard Mr. Gilbert's account; it is quite correct as to that part; I left the prisoner, with his own promise to come to the magistrate on the next day, and told him I should make some enquiries where he was on the night the robbery was committed; I then with the other people, left the prisoner's room, it was half after eleven o'clock at night. On the next morning, I went to the Ivey-house in Goswell-street: I returned to the office, I found Skinn's wife in custody; this was on Thursday, Skinn was not then in custody. I waited at the office expecting that Skinn would come, he did not come; I learned where a relation of his lived, I went there, and at last I got to Type-street, at seven o'clock in the evening; I went into the house I received information he was there, but I did not see him. There were two old women there, there was a room at the back of this place, I went into that room, and there I saw the prisoner standing; I asked him why he did not come down to the magistrate according to his promise, he said, that he knew he told us an untruth; that he was out all that night with some girls and did not wish his wife to know it; I then brought him to the magistrate; it was after the prisoner Skinn made the confession that Brown was apprehended, Armstrong apprehended him. I apprehended Jones on the Saturday night following, in New Gravel-lane, Ratcliffe Highway, when he was brought to the office, he begged of me to get him an interview with the magistrate.

JOHN ARMSTRONG . Q. Did you apprehend Brown - A. I did; on Friday the 5th. nothing passed at the time of his apprehension.

WILLIAM TAYLOR . I am a watchman.

Q. Is Mr. Gilbert's house on your beat - A. No. On the morning of the first of January, about four o'clock, a brewers servant came by with a lanthorn on the other side of the way. The man told me the door was open, I said, it did not belong to my beat but I will go over; it was at the next door to Mr. Gilbert's, that was the door that was open; it was quite dark. I went on Monday morning to enquire if every thing was safe, because, somebody I thought, had left it open.

JOHN JONES . Q. You are admitted an evidence be fore the magistrate, you must mind and speak the truth- and nothing but the truth - A. Yes. On Sunday night week, I believe it was the last day of the year, between seven and eight o'clock, Bob Gould said, if you will come along with me I will put you into some money to night. Meet me at the Black Horse, in Petticoat-lane, at nine o'clock, you will see me there, and Joshua Brown . Accordingly, I came there, I will not be sure whether it was ten minutes before or after nine o'clock, when I got there neither Gould or Brown was there; I called for a pint of beer and sat down in the box by myself, in about a quarter of an hour, Brown and Gould came in, we stopped there till after ten o'clock, and as we were going up Petticoat-lane, I said, to Brown where is this place we are going to; Gould says, in Chiswell-street; we came along till we came to Old-street-road, to a public house, there we saw Skinn, Skinn and Gould said, we will go and see if the place is all right.

Q. Had you any conversation with Skinn at all - A. I do not know; Gould and Skinn went along, Brown and I went into the house and had a pint of beer, Brown and I went out and met Gould and Skinn within twenty yards of the house, then we came up to this house in Chiswell-street, the grocers shop, we could not get in then, because the watchmen were upon their beat crying the hour, then we walked about till the watchmen were off.

Q. What time was this - A. This was after one o'clock, Skinn and Gould opened the cellar flap.

Court. That was after one - A. It was after one I know, but I cannot say how long; when Gould and Skinn opened the cellar flap, I was standing at the corner of Grub-street.

Mr. Knapp. Q. Did you see what they lifted it up

with - A. They had a crow with them, it was very dark I could not see what they lifted it up with. They were three quarters of an hour after that they came to the front door, they were some time before they came out, Brown met me with some halfpence and gave them me, I cannot say how many there were.

Q. Brown had gone over to them had he - A. Yes; Brown went over and came to me with the halfpence, we all came down Grubb-street together.

Q. What were the halfpence in - A. In paper.

Q. Had any of the others any thing as well as you - A. Yes; but I did not know how much, we went to Moorfields, and then we divided the halfpence and put them into one anothers pockets, and then we went altogether to Catherine Wheel-alley, Whitechapel; I went to Kitty Brown 's the girl's mother that is here.

Q. Did you see Mary Jones there and Kitty Brown . - A. Yes; we knocked at Kitty Brown 's house, the girl came down in her smock, and let us in; the rush light was burning, then she jumped into bed, we all stood against the table, with our backs to them.

Q. What did you do at the table - A. We shared the notes, I had two one pound notes, and I believe I had a poundsworth of halfpence and a poundsworth of silver to my share. Brown I and Skinn went away together, we went as far as Whitechapel church, Skinn went up Osborn-street, Brown and Gould went up the street, we parted there.

Q. Mary Jones stand up. Do you mean that is the girl that was at Kitty Browns - A. Yes.

Mr. Arabin. I observed you have been merry, is this the first time you have accused another to save your own neck - A. Yes.

Q. Perhaps this is the first time you were in a Court of Justice - A. No; it is not.

Q. Then I have not been misinformed, and the jury were cruel and found you guilty - A. Yes.

Q. How long is it since the law took its course - A. I do not follow thieving.

Q. How long is it ago since you stood at that bar - A. eleven years.

Q. How long is it since the law took its course and you suffered your punishment - A. Three years ago.

Q. And since then you have gone on very honest have you not - A. I have.

Q. Then mere sorrow alone induced you to come forward - A. I did not want to charge him particular, I was brought into it innocently.

Q. Then I take it for granted that a man that comes forward for public justice thinks it a very bad thing to go about committing a burglary - A. It is a bad thing.

Q. And you did all you could to prevent it - A. No.

Q. You stood outside of the door - A. I did.

Q. You would not go in the house - A. No.

MARY JONES . Q. Where do you live - A. No. 5, Essex-street, Whitechapel, formerly called Catherine Wheel-alley.

Q. Do you live with Kitty Brown - A. she is lately deceased.

Q. Do you remember Jones and some men coming to your house - A. Yes. On the first of this month in the morning, to the best of my recollection there were four besides himself.

Q. About what time in the morning was it - A. It was very dark I cannot tell what hour it was, I was awoke out of my sleep by my deceased mother, my mother was very bad, she was sitting up in bed, we had a rushlight burning, she was awake, I was awoke by her, she informed me that somebody was tapping at the window, I had no clothes on; I went down stairs, Jones spoke to me, I knew him before, but none of the others, I let him in, and as soon as I saw the others I ran up stairs and got into bed before any of them got into the room.

Q. Was there a table in the room - A. Yes; I put the rushlight on the table just before I got into bed.

Q, When they came into the room what did they do - A. They all stood round the table, I could not see much it was only a rushlight, they enclosed the table; I heard the sound of money on the table, I heard one of them say, what shall we do with it, another said, throw it down the privy; and another swore a great oath that it should not be left in that quarter. Some of them were pulling some halfpence out of their pockets, one of the papers broke and part of the halfpence flew about the room, they left the remainder of the halfpence that were broke on the table, and one of the papers they put into the bed. In the morning I counted them, there wanted a few halfpence of ten shillings worth of halfpence.

Q. You knew Jones before - A. I did.

Q. Did you know either of the other persons that were there - A. No; I never saw them before in my life.

Skinn's Defence. I have very little to say.

Brown's Defence. I am innocent that witness here is well known to be a common thief. A person came to me in prison she asked for Jones, there was a man with her he said, that Jones and four more committed a burglary last Friday night was a week.

SKINN GUILTY - DEATH , aged 26.

BROWN NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18100110-53

124. MARIA FULLER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 20th of October , two jackets, value 2 l. 3 s. 6 d. three pair of trowsers, value 1 l. 16 s. two waiscoats, value 11 s. 9 d. seven shirts, value 1 l. 12 s. 6 d. three pair of shoes, value 15 s. 6 d. eleven pair of stockings, value 1 l. 8 s. 11 d. six ruffs, value 9 s. 6 d. three night caps, value 3 s. 4 d. a cotton gown, value 3 s. an apron, value 1 s. 6 d. six yards of print, value 15 s. a yard of lawn, value 2 s. two table cloths, value 7 s. a sheet, value 9 s. twenty-three handkerchiefs, value 2 l. 4 s. 1 d. seven knives, value 4 s. 8 d. three pocket books, value 5 s 3 d. nine purses, value 5 s. 7 1/2 d. twelve pencils, value 3 s. 6 d. nine watch keys, value 2 l. 13 s. 6 d. eleven rings, value 3 l. 0 s. 6 d. nine watch chains, value 12 s. one hundred and nine pair of ear rings, value 5 l. 4 s. 6 d. two pair of wires, value 4 s. 6 d. fourteen broaches, value 1 l. 1 s. 6 d. and eight shillings and six pence in monies numbered, the property of Henry Hains , in his dwelling house .

HENRY HAINS . Q. Where is your dwelling house - A. No. 60, Anchor and Hope-alley , in the parish of St. George's in the East; I rent the whole house, I am a taylor and keep a clothes shop , I sell hardware, jewellery, and trinkets.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. Yes; she was in my service, she came on Thursday the 18th of October, to live with me, and on Friday the 19th, me and my family went to bed at ten o'clock, I left her up in the shop, she slept in a small press bedstead with one of my children in the shop; on the morning of Saturday the 20th, about nine o'clock, I got up in consequence of hearing

my child cry, and when I came down I found my shop door open, the child crying, the shutters were not down and the street door was open; I have lodgers in the house, I opened one of the shutters went into the shop and looked about and saw all these things missing, and the goods were scattered about in the shop.

Q. Had you left them in order when you went to bed - A. Yes; and I had left her in possession of these articles when I went to bed.

Q. Did you miss two jackets - A. I did, three pair of trowsers, two waiscoats, five shirts, and two flannel shirts, three pair of shoes, eleven pair of stockings, six ruffs, three night caps, a cotton gown, an apron, six yards of printed cotton, a yard of lawn, two table cloths, a sheet, twenty-three handkerchiefs, seven knives, nine purses, three pocket books, twelve pencils, nine watch keys, eleven rings, three watch chains, one hundred and nine pair of ear rings, two pair of wires, fourteen broaches, and eight shillings and sixpence in copper, which I received the over night for things I sold, that was left on the mantle piece, that was all gone.

Q. What was the value of the whole together - A. Twenty seven pounds and fourpence halfpenny.

Q. Then all these things to the amount of twenty seven pounds fourpence halfpenny were gone - A. Yes; the prisoner never returned again. As soon as I missed her I went to the Thames police.

Q. How long was it after this that you saw the prisoner - A, Not till the 20th of December. I did not find her myself, the person that recommended her to me gave information; I did not see her till she was in custody.

Q. Had she given you the least intimation that she intended to leave your service - A. No; she only came about three o'clock on the Thursday.

Q. You say she slept in the shop which opened in the passage, was the door secured when you went to bed. - A. Yes; she had the key to lock herself in.

Q. When she went to bed she was entrusted with the key, so that none of the lodgers could have communication to the shop without her permission - No; I had only one lodger, he is with me still; a man and wife and three children, one family.

Q. Did you ever see any of these goods again that you lost - A. When she was apprehended she had nothing but a bonnet on which was made of the six yards of print she took away; she said, that she had made away with them.

Q. Is there any part of that print that you had any mark to it. A. No; I have only a frock of one of my children that was made out of the same piece, it was not a bonnet when she took it away; I cannot swear to the bonnet, I firmly believe it to be mine but cannot swear to it having no mark on it; nothing but the bonnet is here.

Q. Was there any appearance of force about the shop door - A. No; there was no occasion of force, she had the key

JOHN SMITH . I am an officer of the Thames police. I went to Mr. Hains premises immediately after he had given information, to see if there had been any violence used, there was no appearance of violence whatever on the shop door.

Q. Then the shop must have been plundered by some person in the inside - A. It appeared so to me. On the 20th of December, from information, I found the prisoner in Rosemary-lane, she had just taken lodgings, I asked her if her name was not Maria Fuller, she told me her name was Maria but said nothing as to the surname; I asked her if she knew Mr. Hains, I described his residence and business, she denied all knowledge of him and Anchor and Hope-alley. I was confident by the description that see was Mr. Hains's servant, I took her in custody, I told her for robbing Mr. Hains, I searched her but found nothing relevant to this case but a bonnet, she had a bundle of wet linen but nothing to apply to this charge except the bonnet; I took her before the magistrate. In the office without any promise or threat, she told me that she had given the trinkets away, she had been to Exeter and from there she came to Titchfield in Hampshire where she had disposed of the other articles in question to whom she did not say.

Prisoner's Defence. I have no friend in the world. I am blamed innocently in what my master is laying me in blame of; and in regard of the ear rings you could not find a gold ear ring in his shop if you were to search it.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 17

The prisoner was recommended to his Majesty's mercy by the prosecutor on account of her youth.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100110-54

125. JOHN HOWARD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 2d of January , one hundred and twenty halfpence , the property of John Wilkinson , jun .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded guilty .

Publicly whipped and discharged

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100110-55

126. ROBERT JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 25th of November , a ten pound bank note and a five pound note , the property of Thomas Davis .

THOMAS DAVIS . I am a publican ; I live at the Golden Lion, King-street, St. James ; the prisoner was my servant , On the 25th of November, I gave him a 10 l. and a five pound note, I said, Robert, go to Ransom's and Morland's, and get me small change, the ten pound note was a bank note, and the five pound was a country note, Messrs. Ransom and Co. were my banker's; I sent him there to get change, I gave him the note in the presence of Mr. Thomas Marks .

Q. Did he bring back the change. - A. No; by his staying so long I went and found he had changed the ten pound note. The next time I saw him was about three weeks afterwards, I met him in Lombard-street, and took him to the Poultry Compter. I have entrusted him with larger sums of money before this, he always behaved honest in them.

Q. Did you ever get the produce of these notes again. - A. No; I never got any part of them, nor he never gave me any account what he had done with the money.

Q. Have you ever seen the notes again. - A. No; I gave them to him in the presence of a gentleman who is here, he was to get change ar Ransom's and Morland's.

Q. Is there any body here from Ramsom's and Morland's - A. No; he got the ten pound in notes and the five pound in cash; I firmly believe at Messrs. Ransom's and Co.

THOMAS MARK . I saw the notes delivered to the prisoner by his master.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100110-56

127. WILLIAM HOWARD was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of December , three iron

swing handles, value 3 s. three swing bolts, value 10 s. three files, value 1 s. two screw drivers, value 1 s. and two turning tools, value 3 s. the property of Alexander Galloway .

ALEXANDER GALLOWAY. I am an engineer , 69, High-Holborn , the prisoner was my apprentice . I can only speak to the property.

CARRINTON MORLINGTON. I am foreman to Mr. Galloway, I went with Mr. Hancock, and found all these articles in the prisoner's lodgings, he resided with his mother.

JAMES HANCOCK . I know no more than finding these things in his mother's house.

The property produced and identified.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, called six witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Fined 1 s. and discharged .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100110-57

128. ELIZABETH SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 18th of December , a gown, value 10 s. the property of John Edwards .

JOSEPH PAUL . I am shopman to Mr. Edwards, pawnbroker , Clare-street . On the 18th of December, in consequence of information from the next witness, I pursued the prisoner four doors off, and took this gown from her; I pushed her into the shop, Mr. Edwards charged a constable with her. The gown was worth ten shillings.

THOMAS FARROWS . I saw the prisoner take the gown off the hooks at Mr. Edwards's door, I told Mr. Paul of it, he took it from her.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not go away with the gown, I took it down, and went into his own place to ask the price of it, he took it away from me.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Fined 1 s and discharged .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100110-58

129. MARY MASON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 6th of January , a sheet, value 5 s. and an apron, value 6 d , the property of William Hicks .

CLEMENTINA HICKS. I live at No. 4, jews-row, Chelsea ; I take in washing, my husband's name is William Hicks , I lost these things on Friday week. I was not at home at the time it happened.

ELIZABETH HICKS. I saw the prisoner going out of my mother's door, with something white in her apron; I looked in the garden, and missed a sheet. I screamed out, and Mrs. Sutherland ran after her.

JANE SUTHERLAND . I lodge in the same house, between one and two o'clock, I heard Elizabeth Hicks screaming, I ran out, and took the sheet from the prisoner's lap; I secured her, and she was taken to the office.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in liquor at the time.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100110-59

130. HAMDEN FAULKNER was indicted for feloniously stealing, a saw, value 3 s. the property of William Little .

WILLIAM LITTLE. I am a carpenter . I only know I lost a saw from the building.

JOHN DAY . I am a bricklayer's labourer; I was at work at this building, John Webb , a lad called out to me, that a man had taken a saw; I turned my head, and saw the prisoner with the saw under his coat, I went up to him, and said, old blade, have you got a saw to sell; he said, no; I said, I will thank you to give it me, he told me, he should not; I said, it was a carpenter's in the building; he said, he was at work at a job, and I might follow him, and see where it was; going along, I asked him how much farther it was; he said, about a mile; I kept close to him all that way, and then I got out of patience, he took into the fields, and made off; I called out, and he was stopped by a young fellow. I took him back and the saw, and the officer took him in custody and the saw.

JOHN WEEB . My father is a bricklayer, I saw the prisoner take the saw up. I told Day, he went after him.

JAMES KENNEDY . I am an officer. That is the saw I got when I took charge of the prisoner. The prisoner begged they would forgive him, and not to take him before the mhgistrate.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. My Lord, and Gentlemen of the Jury. It is with extreme concern I now appear before you, it is the first time in my life; I have only to offer in extenuation of my conduct, I have been confined three months with sickness, during which time I was obliged to make away with all my tools. I beg my offence may be considered to arise from necessity, and not from depravity, and should I be considered an object to experience the lenity of the court, the most grateful sensations of heart will be ever acknowledged, by your most penitent servant.

HAMDEN FAULKNER.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 36.

Confined Fourteen Days in Newgate , and fined 1 s .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100110-60

131. CHARLOTTE DRAKE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 20th of December , a pelleise, value 20 s. the property of Richard Bradbury .

THOMAS BRADBURY . I am shopman to my brother Richard Bradbury , 158, Ratcliffe Highway , he is a haberdasher . On the 20th of December last, I was informed by a girl that a woman had taken something from the door, I immediately ran out overtook the prisoner with the pellise and brought her back to the shop; Brown the officer was coming past, he came in and took her to Shadwell office. I took the pellise, from the prisoner, I have had it ever since.

MARY LACKMISH. On the 20th of December, about four o'clock, I saw the woman take the pellise from the side of Mr. Bradbury's shop door.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I throw myself on the mercy of the court.

The prisoner called three witnesses who gave her a good character.

GUILTY aged 37.

Confined Fourteen Days in Newgate and fined 1 s .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100110-61

132. THOMAS BEEBY , alias ROBINSON , was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 5th of January , a watch, value 1 l. and a great coat, value 15 s. the property of Matthew Need .

MATTHEW NEED . I am a watch-case maker , 22, Featherstone-street, St. Luke's . On the 5th of January, about two o'clock in the day, the prisoner came to be my errand boy , he staid till past eight o'clock and then went home; I left him in the work shop when I bid him go home, and I went down stairs; in about five minutes I heard the door go; he went home. At about eleven o'clock at night I went up into my workshop, I then missed a silver watch.

Q. When did you see the watch there before - A At a quarter past eight I had the watch in my hand, I placed it on a small scale board at the back of my lathe, where I work; my suspicion fell on the prisoner; I went to put my great coat on, which I had left in the passage, to go to where he told me he lodged. No. 15, Little Britain, my great coat was gone; I went to where he told me he lodged, there was no such person lived there. On Sunday morning I found him in Angel-court in Grub-street, I sent for an officer and he was apprehended. When the prisoner was apprehended, he then said a man of the name of Worthy had the watch, he gave it him; and the great coat was pawned in Houndsditch.

Q. Have you seen the watch since - A. No; I have found the case, but not the watch. The case and the coat were pawned at Mr. Barker's in Houndsditch.

CHARLES FREDERICK PRIDDEN. I live with Mr. Barker in Houndsditch. On the 6th of January last the prisoner pledged this coat with me for seven shillings; and he left a watch key with me to put a pin in the joint. I am sure the prisoner is the person.

JOHN RAY I am an officer On Monday last I went with the prosecutor to Mr. Barker's in Houndsditch, I received this watch case; the pawnbroker put his mark on it before he gave it me; I asked the pawnbroker about the coat; he said the person that pledged the coat, left a case to have a pin put in.

Prisoner's Defence. I am very sorry for the offence I have committed; I hope you will have a little mercy on me, I will never do so any more.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 14.

Judgment respited.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18100110-62

133. MARTHA CHESHIRE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 28th of December , a silver tea spoon, value 2 s. three handkerchiefs, value 1 s. a towel, value 4 d. the property of John Catlin ; and an apron, value 1 s. the property of Daniel Scott .

MARTHA CATLIN . I am the wife of John Catlin , I live at No. 1, Richardson's-buildings, St. Luke's , I am a lodger; Elizabeth Scott keeps the house, her husband's name is Daniel Scott . On the 27th of December the prisoner came to work for me at the army clothing work, on the 28th I missed the spoon. I gave her in charge of the constable. I found the spoon at a silversmith's in Barbican, by the prisoner's direction. After she was in the watchhouse I looked about and missed three handkerchiefs and a towel; I have seen them since.

SARAH COLE. Q. Are you the wife of Mr. Cole - A. Yes; he is a silversmith, 54, Barbican. On the 28th of December, about five o'clock in the evening, I bought a silver tea-spoon, I think the prisoner is the person I bought it of, I could not swear to her; I gave her two shillings and two-pence for the spoon, it was broken. I produced the spoon to Mrs. Catlin when she came and enquired.

Q. to Mrs. Catlin. Was the spoon broken when it was taken away from you - A. No.

MARY ROBBINS . I sell fish; I have a little shop in Arthur-street. On the 28th of December the prisoner came and had two pair of soals for a shilling, she left me a handkerchief for the shilling; the same handkerchief that she left with me I gave to the constable.

FREDERICK EDWARDS. I am servant to Mrs. Fothergill, pawnbroker, Aldersgate-street. On the 28th of December I took in pledge a cotton handkerchief and a check apron of the prisoner; I am sure of her person.

MARY RANSONS . I keep a chandler's shop in Golden-lane. The prisoner left a towel and a pocket handkerchief at my shop. On the 28th of December I delivered them up to the constable.

WILLIAM SPICER . I am a constable. I found one handerchief at Mrs. Robins's, and the others at Mrs. Ranson's.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I had worked for a person three years; Mrs. Catlin persuaded me to leave that woman and work for her, which I did. I found the apron in the passage, and pledged it, and when I came home my prosecutrix and I spent the money in liquor; then I found it was this poor woman's apron, I said I was very sorry, if she could lend me fifteen pence I would take it out and work it out; she told me she had not the money to lend me, but I might have the spoon. I had the spoon and sold it to Mrs. Coles, and then the pawnbroker's were shut up, I could not get the apron.

GUILTY , aged 51.

Confined Two Years in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100110-63

134. ELIZABETH STENT was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 26th of December , a coat, value 5 s. a handkerchief, value 1 s. a frock, value 1 s. 6 d. and a shawl, value 1 s. the property of James Mc'Guire .

JULIET MC'GUIRE My husband's name is James Mc'Guire, I live at No. 5, Caroline-court, Saffron Hill ; I am a lodger. On the 26th of December I sent the prisoner out for the milk; (I am in the milk business; the prisoner was my servant ) I sent her out about six o'clock, she did not return. I went to look for my silk handkerchief to put on, I could not find it; I missed one of my children's frocks and a shawl. I saw no more of the prisoner till New Years Day, I found her in Rosemary-lane, I sent for an officer and had her taken in custody, and some duplicates were found upon her.

JOSEPH PRINCE . I am a constable, I apprehended the prisoner on New Years Day; she said she did take a frock and a shawl, but the great coat and handkerchief her mistress lent her; I searched her, I found four duplicates; she told me of another duplicate at Mrs. Eversall's in Rosemary-lane, that is the

duplicate of the great coat; I have got all the duplicates. The prisoner had this pint pot knocked up in her pocket.

JOSEPH CHRISTIE . I am a pawnbroker, East Smithfield; a frock was pledged with me for one shilling and six-pence; I have no recollection of the prisoner.

JOHN GODDEN . I am an apprentice to Mr. Hill, pawnbroker, 81, Cable-street, Wellclose-square. On the 26th of December the prisoner pledged a shawl with me for one shilling.

CHARLES STEBBINGS . I am a pawnbroker, 105, in the Minories. I produce a silk handkerchief that was pawned with me on the morning of the 26th of December; I do not know enough of the prisoner so as to swear to her person.

GEORGE HEDGE . I am a pawnbroker, 5, Ship-alley, Wellclose-square; I took in pawn a woman's great coat of a girl; not the prisoner.

ESTHER EVERSALL . The prisoner came to my mother on the 1st of January and asked her if she would have the duplicate of a great coat; my mother said she did not like to buy it without seeing it; I took it out of pledge; my mother did not think it worth the money she asked, I went and pledged it again; the constable came and had the duplicate.

Prisoner's Defence. I used to get up at four o'clock and work hard for my living.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Confined One Week in Newgate , and fined 1 s .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100110-64

135. MARGARET WALKER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 25th of December , a pair of stockings, value 1 s. and a bank note, value 1 l. the property of John William Trout .

SARAH ELIZABETH TROUT . My husband's name is John William Trout , he is a gunner on board a ship ; I live in Checquer-court, St. Catherine's-lane .

Q. Did you lose a pair of stockings and a one pound note from your house - A. Yes; I missed the pound note on Christmas day, the note was in my chest. The prisoner was my servant , she lived three months with me. I gave her the key of my chest to put my silver milk pot in the chest.

Q. Did you miss any stockings - A. No. When the prisoner was taken up some duplicates were found on her, among which was a pair of stockings of mine.

Q. Did you ever find your one pound note again - A. No.

Q. When you took her up did not you tell her it would be better for her to own it - A. I did.

COURT. Then I must not hear a word of what she said.

JAMES TEGG . I am shopman to Mr. Watts, pawnbroker, 89, Upper East Smithfield. I know the prisoner as a customer using the shop, but not as the person that pledged the stockings; I took the stockings in on the 1st of December, I gave the party that pawned them that duplicate.

JOSEPH PRINCE . I apprehended the prisoner; I found on her a duplicate of a pair of stockings pawned in the name of Jane Smith . The prisoner owned she took the one pound note.

Prisoner's Defence. When she took me up she told me if I would own to the note and pay her five shillings a week she would not hurt me. I am a poor unfortunate woman.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100110-65

136. JACOB LAW was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 23rd of December , a one pound bank note , the property of John Snelson .

JOHN SNELSON . I live at 154, Shoreditch ; I am apprentice to John Williams , a paper stainer in Chiswell-street, his manufactory is in Coleman-street, Bunhill-row. On Saturday the 23rd of December I received two one pound notes of my master, I was to pay myself and another of the servants; I went home to my mother directly in Shoreditch, my father keeps a shoe shop; I asked my mother to give me change, she said she could give me change for one; I wrote my master's name on both the notes; I gave the other note to my sister to get changed, and as she was going out for that purpose she was met by a man.

Q. Was that man the prisoner - A. I believe the prisoner to be the man; the shop was dark, I do not speak with certainty; she met this man just by the doorway; the prisoner said he wanted to buy a pair of shoes; my sister turned back to serve, the prisoner followed her behind the counter; he was in the shop for near ten minutes, he then went out; my sister said she had lost the note and she thought the prisoner had taken it.

Q. Did the prisoner buy any thing - A. I believe not. I ran out of the shop, I could not see him; it was quite dark.

Q. Has the one pound note ever been found since - I saw it in Mrs. North's hands in Holywell-lane, about an hour and a half afterwards. Before the prisoner went out of the shop a little girl came in, she informed me where he lived, I went there and waited at a small distance till he came home; I saw the prisoner come to that door, I went in the house about a minute after him; my sister was in the house, she and I taxed him with taking the note; he said he did not know what we were talking about; I told him I saw him in my father's shop, but did not go behind the counter.

Q. Was that true - A. No; I saw him behind the counter; I told him he had taken the note from the window behind the counter, he denied it; I sent for Mr. Armstrong the officer and gave charge of him, he was taken to the watchhouse; Mr. Armstrong and I went with a pair of shoes that the prisoner had bought somewhere, he would not tell where; we found he had bought the shoes of Mrs. North in Holywell-lane; on our taking the shoes Mrs. North produced the one pound note; I knew it again, it had my master's name in my own hand writing; Mr. Armstrong has kept the note ever since.

JANE SNELSON . Q. You live at this shoe shop in Shoreditch - A. Yes. The prosecutor is my brother.

Q. Did you receive from your brother on the 23d of December a one pound bank note - A. Yes; I was going to get it changed; the prisoner met me at the door way, he said he wanted a pair of shoes; I turned back; I had the one pound note in my hand, and as I was going round the counter I laid the note in the window.

Q. Is the window behind the counter - A. Yes; the

prisoner followed me directly and passed the window where the note was put down.

Q. Did the prisoner buy any shoes - A. No; he was about ten minutes behind the counter looking at the shoes to see if any would suit him; as he was turning to go I cast my eyes in the window, I said that man has taken the note. The prisoner was only at the door, he must have heard me, I halloaed it out, my mother and all heard me.

Q. Did the prisoner stop - A. No. Just as the prisoner was going out a little girl was coming in; she met him, she told him where he lived; my brother and I went to where the prisoner lived in Crossby's-buildings, Curtain-road; I went into the house to wait for his coming home, my brother and brother in law were waiting out of doors a little way off; when the prisoner came in my brother followed him and taxed him about the note, he replied, nonsense, don't talk to me about any such thing; he denied having possession of the note; my brother sent for Mr. Armstrong, he was taken in custody. I saw the note at the watchhouse; Mr. Armstrong brought it and I knew it again.

ESTHER NORTH . I live at 68, Holywell-lane; I keep a shoe shop.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. Yes; I believe he is the same man that bought two pair of shoes at my shop and changed a one pound note.

Q. At about what time was it that man, whoever he was, bought a pair of shoes at your shop - A. Between seven and eight on the 23d of December to the best of my recollection.

Q. Were the same shoes brought by Armstrong and another man to your shop - A. They were, by Armstrong and Snelson; they were the same shoes, they came to eight shillings and three-pence; he gave me a pound note and I gave him the change; the prisoner was in my shop on the Thursday, my foreman saw him, he can give a better account of him. I believe the same note that the prisoner gave me I gave to Armstrong; I have no doubt of it.

JOSEPH COOK . Q. Do you remember a pair of shoes being bought at your mistress's shop - A. Yes; I sold them to the prisoner, Jacob Law ; he was in the shop on the Thursday; he bought two pair of shoes on the Saturday; he came in after dark; I cannot speak particular to the time; he delivered the note into my hand; I looked only to see if it had the water mark, and then I gave it my mistress. When Armstrong and Snelon came in Armstrong produced to me a shoe and asked me if I knew it; I told him I did, I have no doubt they are the shoes brought by the prisoner that night at our shop.

JOHN ARMSTRONG . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner on Saturday the 23d of December; there were these pair of shoes in the house; I took up the shoes; I asked the prisoner where he bought the shoes, he said in Shoreditch. I put him in the watchhouse and took these shoes with me and Snelson; I went to Mrs. North the shoes were owned there; I received a one pound note of North, Cook wrote his name on it.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel; called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 45.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and Publicly Whipped .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100110-66

137. JOHN HODSDEN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 7th of December , a pair of candlesticks, value 5 s. a japan tea pot, value 4 s. a tea caddie, value 4 s. nineteen brass knobs, value 4 s. a pair of scissars, value 1 s. 6 d. a large digester, value 10 s. a key, value 1 d. forty-eight candles, value 4 s. eleven pieces of wood, value 6 d. two onions, value an halfpenny, and a parsnip, value 1 d. the property of Roger Moser .

ROGER MOSER . I am an ironmonger and brazier , 47, Frith-street, Soho . The prisoner has been in my service sixteen years; I have been in the habit of losing my articles for some time; I may say some hundreds, and I knew of these things going; I placed a servant below to watch him, as he had the range of all my premises; I marked several potatoes, parsnips, and onions, I kept them below in an hamper; the servant that watched him gave me information; I then called the prisoner into the accompting house, I desired him to take out what he had got in his pockets, and put it on the desk; he said he had got nothing.

Q. Did you search him - A. No; he took out a parsnip marked R, and two onions marked R, that is the mark I had put on them; he then took out eleven pieces of wood.

Q. Were they fire wood - A. Yes; he said he had bought the onions and the parsnips in Clare-market; I told him he had brought them from below.

Q. Was this all that was found upon him - A. I did not search him, he took them out himself; he came at seven o'clock, his business was to light the fires below. This was all that was found on him. I saw the wood, the onions and parsnip all safe at eleven o'clock the night before; the pieces of wood are worth about a penny. The other articles were taken at some other time.

GEORGE HALL . Q. Are you in the prosecutor's service - A. Yes. I was desired by Mr. Moser to watch; on the 6th, in the evening, I was concealed in a cupboard in the cellar, I saw the prsoner come there.

Q. Did you tell the clerk of the indictments the different times, you saw the prisoner - A. I did not.

Q. What did you see on the 7th, in the morning - A. I did not see him do any thing. I looked in the basket, I found a parsnip and an onion missing; I told Mr. Moser of it.

THOMAS NEWBURY . I am a constable; I searched the prisoner's lodgings, I found all these articles I have got here.

Q. to prosecutor. Did the prisoner say any thing to this charge of having taken the onions and parsnip - A. He begged I would forgive him; I told him he had made very free with my property, there was more would come out; the law should take its course.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence; called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 53.

Of stealing to the value of one penny.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100110-67

138. ANN BIRD was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 10th of September , a snuff box, value 1 s. a silver salt spoon, value 1 s. 6 d a pair of nut crackers, value 6 d. two handkerchiefs, value 1 s. two keys, value 1 d. and two candles, value 4 d. the property of John

Lemay .

JOHN LEMAY . I keep the Commercial coffee house in the parish of Stepney . The prisoner had been my servant about nine months. On Sunday the 10th of December I brought Mr. Gotty home to my house, and when the prisoner came home Mr. Gotty told her that her mistress had lost several articles, suspicion fell on her; he begged to know of her whether she knew any thing of a salt spoon and a snuff box, she denied any knowledge of them; he said I shall search your box; oh! said she, then I know, there are some articles in my box of my mistress's, but I do not know how they came there. We then went up and searched her box, there was a pair of nut crackers, a silver salt spoon, a snuff box two mould candles, and the key of my drawer, in which I keep my copper money, and a pocket handkerchief of mine. We enquired generally through the house about the key of the copper drawer, and she must have heard of it. She said the candles she put in the chest, having found them in the cupboard in her room, for fear if her mistress saw them might think she had done something improper with them. We found more than five shillings worth of halfpence in her box; the key was in her box. She was then taken in custody.

JOHN GOTTY . I am a surveyor of the Thames police. I was in the house when the prisoner came in, I told her that the mistress had lost several articles, particularly a silver salt spoon; I asked her if she knew any thing of them, she said she did not; I said I must look in your box; she said, oh! then I know there are some things of my mistress's in my box, but I do not know how they came there, my box is always open. I went up stairs, the key was in her box; I found in the box a silver salt spoon, a japan tin snuff box, a pair of nut crackers, and a pocket handkerchief; Mrs. Lemay was standing by, she said, that handkerchief is mine; the prisoner said, I know it is, but it came with my things from the manglers; I then found two mould candles, she said that she had put them in the box herself, she had found them in the cupboard, and fearing her mistress should suspect her, she put them in the box; the were also four wine glasses, but Mr. Lemay not being certain of them I have not brought them; there were two keys, I particularly asked her where they belonged to; she declared she did not know nothing of them. After the first examination I shewed the key to Mr. Lemay, he said that was the key of his cupboard; I went and fetched the box to the magistrate and unlocked it in her presence, and took out five shillings and five pence in copper; that key I found fitted the lock of the copper drawer, and the other key fitted the till drawer.

Prosecutor. The second key I received from Sarah Reeves , that belonged to my desk.

SARAH REEVES . I am servant to Mr. Lemay. On the night that Gotty took the prisoner into custody I made the bed, I found the key in her pocket under the pillow, and there was a pocket handkerchief also.

Prisoner's Defence. In the first place, my box was open, Mrs. Lemay had been to my box before the officer had been to it. In the next place, after they searched the room, I said to them, would you like to look under the bed, Mrs. Lemay said, no, there is no occasion for that, Sarah has made the bed, there is nothing there. After I went away I left the key in my box; on the following day my master brought me the key of my box. On Wednesday Sarah Reeves was brought up, she then said she had found a key and a pocket handkerchief in my pockets, under the bolster, on the Sunday evening; when it had been said there was nothing there, and now she says she found it there. Concerning the salt spoon, we had two young women lived in the house before I came, one of them young women lost the salt spoon, she was willing to pay for it. With respect to the snuff box I saw in my mistress's mother's hands, her name is Page; and as to the keys I never heard they were lost, nor do I know where they came from; they were laying about for two months before this; I never knew where they belonged to. The candles I acknowledge putting them in my box, but I did not know how they came in the cupboard, but seeing them there I put them in my box, for fear my mistress should think it was my doings. The key that my master alludes to, of the copper drawer, is in a room that is never left alone; if master or mistress goes out of it they always turn the key of the door, which my master will say as well as myself.

HARRIET BOWSIER . I lived with Mr. Lemay three or four months. The salt spoon I dropped out of the tablecloth in the kitchen about three weeks or a month before I left my place.

Q. You never put it in the prisoner's box, did you - A. No.

Q. Did she ever tell you that she had the salt spoon in her box - A. No. If I had known it had been in her box I should have asked her for it.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100110-68

139. THOMAS MARTIN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 20th of December , fourteen pound weight of lead, value 3 s. and five pound weight of solder, value 4 s. the property of Francis Hickers .

JOHN BLENNIEL . I am a coppersmith in the employ of Mr. Oats in Houndsditch; I was working at Mr. Hickers', Old Ford. On the 20th of December I was melting solder, it was on the fire; the prisoner was a plumber working there at the time; I saw the prisoner dip the metal out while it was on the fire, he put it into water to cool it, it was left there; I informed Mr. Hickers's clerk.

FRANCIS HICKERS . I live at Old Ford , I am employing workmen there, and the prisoner among the rest, he was foreman to the plumbers. On the 20th of December, about four o'clock, from information, I stopped him, in his waistcoat pocket I found these two parcels of solder; it weighed five pounds and a quarter, it is worth a shilling a pound; I found this quantity of lead in his jacket pocket; there is fourteen pound weight of lead; after I had taken the property from the prisoner he attempted to run away, I ran after him and took him.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence; called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 27.

Confined Fourteen Days in Newgate , and fined 1 s .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100110-69

140. WILLIAM JONES was indicted for feloniously

stealing on the 9th of January , seven yards of printed cotton, value 8 s. and a yard and a half of calimanco, value 1 s. the property of Benjamin Marshall .

WILLIAM IRASEBOURN . I am shopman to Benjamin Marshall, linen-draper , 316, High Holborn . On the 9th of January the prisoner came into the shop, he asked for a quarter of a yard of callico, I served him; he went out and came in again in about ten minutes, and asked for a quarter of a yard of finer callico; I was serving a customer, I perceived him getting some print under his waistcoat; I was going to speak to Mr. Marshall about it, and before I got to him the prisoner ran out of the shop; I pursued him and stopped him in Southampton-court; he went down in a cellar; I said hold him, I never lost sight of him. He pulled the print from under his waistcoat and threw it behind a screen; I brought him back to the shop, Mr. Marshall pulled off his hat, these was a yard and a half of callico in it; I knew the print; I would not swear to the caliico; I supposed it was ours. I picked up the print and delivered it to the constable.

Prisoner's Defence. If you please to forgive me this time I will never be guilty of the like again.

GUILTY , aged 13.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and Publicly Whipped .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18100110-70

141. WILLIAM NAY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 29th of December , four pound weight and a half of starch, value 3 s. 3 d. the property of Mary Rothery , widow .

MARY ROTHERY. I am a widow; I keep a chandler's shop , No. 6, Brick-lane, Whitechapel . I was not at home the time it happened.

JOSEPH ROTHERY. I am son to the last witness. On Friday the 29th of December the prisoner came in for an ounce of tea, as I was taking down the cannister I saw him take the paper of starch from off the window and run out, I ran after him and halloaed out, stop thief; he was stopped; I picked up the starch.

Q. What became of the man - A. Somebody threw him down. When I came up to him I found him down and the starch fell on the ground; I took up the starch and gave it to the constable.

SAMPSON LOT. I am a baker. On Friday the 29th of December I heard the cry of stop thief, I ran to the door, I saw a porter trip the prisoner up, he fell with the paper of starch under him; young Rothery picked the paper of starch up; I secured him.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent; I never had the paper of starch. I was running along, I heard somebody call out, I turned round to see and somebody knocked me down directly.

The prisoner called seven witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Confined One Month in Newgate , and fined 1 s .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100110-71

142. THOMAS BRYAN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 18th of December , an ounce and three quarters of an ounce of silver, value 8 s. the property of William Cartlidge .

WILLIAM CARTLIDGE . I am a silver spoon maker ; I had the prisoner upon liking.

Q. What age is he - A Fifteen. On Monday the 18th of December I missed a piece of silver, about an ounce and an half, I told him I had missed a piece of silver and set him to look for it; he could not find it In the evening I taxed him with it, he said he had taken a little lump, he had throwed it away; afterwards he acknowledged to taking the piece that I missed; he said he sold it to Grimshaw, 17, Gee-street, for two shillings; I went to Gee-street, there was no such person lived there; and then afterwards he denied having taken any, only these three bits that we found hid under a board in the washhouse.

Q. You told him it would be better to confess - A. I did. I never missed the three pieces hid under the board in the washhouse.

Q. I suppose you cannot swear to these three pieces - A. No, I cannot.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100110-72

143. JANE CRAFTS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 11th of August , two quilts, value 10 s. two sheets, value 10 s. and two gowns, value 10 s. the property of Thomas Patterson .

LYDIA PATTERSON . My husband's name is Thomas Patterson .

Q. When did you lose these things - A.I cannot say; I was out from home; I am in the habit of going out a nursing. They were pledged in August, in December I found they had been pledged. The prisoner had lodged in the house; she was in the poor house; I went and accused her of taking them; she said she had taken them and pledged them at Mr. Hills; she had destroyed the duplicates.

JOHN JONES . I am servant to Mr. Hill, a pawnbroker. A sheet, two quilts, and a bed gown were pawned at our shop on the 11th of August; the young man is gone away that took them in.

Prisoner's Defence. I did do it; I was in great distress; I took no more than what is laid before you.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Confined Fourteen Days in Newgate , and fined 1 s .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100110-73

144. JOHN RAY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 10th of January , a copper, value 20 s. the property of the directors of the poor of the parish of St. Pancras ; - and

TWO OTHER COUNTS for like offence, only varying the manner of charging them.

THOMAS WYAT . I am master of St. Paneras workhouse; the prisoner was a pauper in the house. On the 10th of this month, rather after six o'clock, I saw the prisoner about three hundred yards from the old workhouse going towards London, he had on his head a washing copper, after he had gone on some little way he took the copper off his head, and sat on it, he took the copper on his head again, and after he had gone about thirty yards I tapped the copper on the bottom, I asked him whose it was, he replied, not mine; then I asked him what he had, his answer was, that is no matter; I was behind him, I took him in custody; I told the prisoner to go along before me and put it where he took it from; he went without further direction and put it in its place.

JOHN READ . I am an officer. The prisoner told me he was going to an old iron shop with it.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called

any witnesses to character.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100110-74

145. JANE WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 9th of December , eleven shawls, value 27 s. 6 d. the property of John Thwaites .

EDWARD FLAHERTY . I am an apprentice to John Thwaites , linen-draper , 306. Holborn ; I saw the prisoner come into the shop, snatch the shawls off the place and run away, I immediately went after her, I asked what she had taken, she said nothing; I brought her back and took the shawls from under her coat. These are the shawls, I know them to be my master's.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going by, there was a man and a woman standing at the door where they had dropped down, he asked me what I had taken, I said I did not know; I told him I picked this up, if they were his I would give them him; I gave them him and he dragged me in the shop.

Flaherty. They were in the shop, she stepped in and snatched them off the iron.

GUILTY , aged 53.

Confined Twelve Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100110-75

146. ELIZABETH GOMERSALL was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 29th of December , a shirt, value 3 s. a waistcoat, value 3 s. and a pair of breeches, value 7 s. the property of John Gomersall .

MARY GOMERSALL . I am the sister of John Gomersall ; the prisoner is my mother-in-law, she does not live with my father, they are parted; I live with my father and my brother. On Friday morning I missed the shirt, I went to her and asked her for it, she said she had pawned it; she told me to take the things out and stop it out of her money. On Saturday morning I looked for my brother's flannel waistcoat, I could not find them; I looked for his best breeches, I could not find them. The prisoner was with us all day on Christmas day; she came on purpose to have the child baptized, and on the next day she packed up all her things, and these things along with them.

Q. Why does not your mother live with your father - A. She has stripped four furnished lodgings.

- BANKES. I produce a waistcoat pawned for nine pence; I cannot swear to the person of the prisoner, but she confirmed it by her own confession.

JAMES ABSALOM. The prisoner pawned a pair of breeches with me on the 27th of December for one shilling.

- WALTERS. I produce a shirt pawned for two shillings on the 27th of December by the prisoner

Q. to Mary Gomersall . Might not your mother take these things in a mistake - A. I do not think she did.

Prisoner's Defence. I am away from my husband, his son and daughter; I have not been used very well by them, they did not use my child very well; the prosecutor advised me to come and have the child baptized on Christmas day; I was short of money; I asked my husband for money, he would not give me any; I thought I might make free with these things, I took them; I said Mary, take them out on Saturday night, that is three shillings and nine pence, and bring me one shilling and three halfpence; I told her to take the three shillings and ninepence out of my money; I bought herrings and potatoes with the money. I hope you will pardon me this time for my baby's sake; I thought it was no harm.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100110-76

147. MARY DONNOVAN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 21st of December , seven pound weight of lead, value 2 s. the property of William Whitman , affixed to his dwelling house .

WILLIAM WHITMAN . I live at No. 19, Wellclose street, Wellclose-square , I am a watchman and labourer , at the London Docks. On the 21st of December, about nine in the evening, I heard my daughter call out father several times, I went into the passage and caught the prisoner, she was just going out of the door, my daughter said she had stolen the leaden pipe; the prisoner appeared to be in liquor. The leaden pipe was affixed to the house.

ELIZABETH WHITMAN . I am daughter to the last witness. Just as I came from work my mother bid me to go in the washhouse for some things that were there, and on my hearing the water run I opened the yard door and saw the prisoner, she bid me let her out; I said to her, you have got the pipe, she said, I have not; I caught hold of her by the gown, followed her into the passage, and called out father; I called my father the second time, then she laid the pipe down, she tried to get away from me, but I held her gown, and by the time she got to the street door my father came and took her. She had broken the pipe off.

JOHN ELLMEK. I am a constable. I took the woman in custody and the pipe was given to me by Mr. Whitman.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going by, and seeing the door open I went in, I saw the child, she told me I was doing wrong, I did not know any thing of it, I told her; no more I did not. I went in there to hide myself from the boys throwing mud at me.

GUILTY , aged 55.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100110-77

148. JAMES BROOKES and MARY SHIPLEY were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 9th of January , a pair of breeches, value 10 s. two handkerchiefs, value 6 d. a pair of gaiters, value 4 d. and three dollars, value 5 s. the property of John Garwood .

JOHN GARWOOD . I am a labourer , I live at St. Austins in Norwich. On Tuesday night, at eleven o'clock, I lost these things out of a room where I lodged; Mary Shipley shewed me a light to bed.

Q. Is she a servant in the house - A. No; she said the room was her own. I met her in a public house, I went home with her and went to bed.

Q. How long had you been in bed before you lost the things - A. After I had been in bed a few minutes she got out of bed and made her escape out of the room, my money was in my tobacco box, she took that with her; it was about twenty-five shillings more or less. I heard money rattle in the box as she went out of the door; I missed the breeches that I had pulled off, two old handkerchiefs, and my gaiters; there were three dollars among the money. A few minutes after she

was gone this man came up and asked me what business I had there, the room was his, he swore I should not be there; he pulled me out of bed; I begged of him to let me stay, for I was robbed; with a deal of persuasion he let me stop. The next morning before day light he wanted me to get up, for there I should be no longer; he pulled me out of bed, opened the window, and swore I should go out one way or the other; he pulled me out of the room and hurled my clothes after me; I put my clothes on and went into the street; I went to the police office, they told me to come down at night; I did, and they had taken the prisoners.

Q. Did you ever find your things - A. No, none of them.

Q. You had never seen the woman before, had you - A. No; not till I saw her in the public house; I took notice of the woman; I am sure it is her, and I am sure as to the man.

SAMUEL MILLER . I am an officer of Lambeth-street office. I took the prisoners in custody, I searched them. I found nothing on them.

Shipley's Defence. Between eleven and twelve o'clock I went home to my apartment, I found that gentleman very much in liquor on my bed, I asked him several times to get up, he threatened to ill use me if I spoke any more; I left him in my own bed till the morning; I went down to Whitechapel, and at ten o'clock the next morning I met Brookes, I told him to get the man out of my room. I saw no more of him till the evening when I was in custody.

Q. to prosecutor. Were you sober or drunk - A. I was not drunk nor sober, I knew what I had been doing; I drank gin in beer, but not to excess. I was a little merry.

Brookes was not put on his defence.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18100110-78

149. JOHN MARTIN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 22nd of December , a goose, value 5 s. the property of Stephen Buck .

STEPHEN BUCK . I am a poulterer , No. 6, Old-street-road, near Shoreditch ; I was not at home at the time it happened.

WILLIAM GEORGE HOW . I am a poulterer. I live opposite of Mr. Buck. I was in my own shop, I saw the prisoner at Mr. Buck's door; he went away about ten yards, he came back again, looked in the shop, he put his hand in the door to where the goose laid; he took the goose away from the shop; I ran after him; there was a woman waiting for the goose, whom I saw him give the goose to, the woman ran off; I came up to him, told him he had taken a goose out of the shop and given it to the woman; I called out stop her, she has got a goose; she dropped the goose. The prisoner turned down a gateway where there was no thoroughfare; I picked up the goose, took it into Mr. Buck's shop, laid it on the counter, and told Mrs. Buck this man had stole the goose; I went down this yard and there I found the prisoner in a privy belonging to a private house; I took him back to Mr. Buck's, he took him in custody. The woman ran away.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going past that way, I happened to go into this privy, this gentleman came and took me out, he said I was the person that stole the goose, because I had a brown coat on.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Confined Fourteen Days in Newgate , and fined 1 s .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.


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