Old Bailey Proceedings, 1st November 1809.
Reference Number: 18091101
Reference Number: f18091101-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS. On the KING's Commission of the PEACE OYER AND TERMINER, AND GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND ALSO THE GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, HELD AT Justice-Hall, in the Old Bailey, On WEDNESDAY the 1st of NOVEMBER, 1809, and following Days;

BEING THE EIGHTH SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF The Right Honourable CHARLES FLOWER , LORD-MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY JOB SIBLY, FOR R. BUTTERS, No. 117, ALDERSGATE-STREET.

LONDON:

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED (BY THE AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON) By R. BUTTERS, No. 22, Fetter Lane, Fleet Street.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON.

Before the Right-honourable CHARLES FLOWER , Lord Mayor of the City of London; The Right honourable Edward Lord Ellenborough , Chief Justices of His Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir Alexander Thompson , one of the Barons of His Majesty's Court of Exchequer, Sir Soulden Lawrence, One of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir William Curtis , bart. Sir John Eamer . knt. Aldermen of the said City; John Silvester , esq. Recorder of the said City; Sir William Leighton , knt. Mathew Wood esq. Aldermen of the said City; and Newman Knowlys , esq. Common Serjeant of the said City; His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of Goal Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

London Jury.

Robert Webster ,

Charles Hacket ,

John Austin ,

Conway Joyce ,

Thomas Watkins ,

Thomas Morris ,

Richard Newbury ,

Robert Hoare ,

William Matthew ,

Benjamin Stevens ,

Henry Pritchard ,

Frederick Cole ,

First Middlesex Jury.

William Slade ,

Thomas Neale ,

Thomas Leonard ,

Thomas Seymour ,

George Stevens ,

George Craig ,

Jonathan Gale ,

Thomas Burnham ,

Thomas Parker ,

Andrew Shaw ,

Thomas Wilson ,

James Blick .

Second Middlesex Jury.

John King ,

Charles Diamond ,

Thomas Payne ,

Stephen Stanswell ,

John Holland ,

Richard Burridge ,

John Hornby ,

Walter Smith ,

Alexander Barron ,

John Griffiths ,

John Coward ,

John Gibson .

Reference Number: t18091101-1

816. WILLIAM JONAS was indicted for that he on the 4th of January , upon Robert Nixon , feloniously did make an assault, and with a certain sharp instrument did stab and cut the said Robert Nixon , in and upon his right side, with intent to kill and murder him .

And TWO OTHER COUNTS for like offence only varying the manner of charging them.

ROBERT NIXON . On the 4th of January, between eight and nine o'clock in the evening, as I and Mr. Clements were returning home, the prisoner and Hyam Julian came up behind me, the prisoner on my right side and Julian on the left, they began shoving me about with their elbows, I asked them what they were going to do, one of them said you b - r. Mr. Clements was rather before me, he came back, he said gentlemen make use of better words, Julian then struck me in the face, the prisoner hustled me away from him and struck me, I had got a stick in my hand, I knocked him down with it, I knocked him down a second time, and while he was laying I heard Julian say draw your knife, I walked away from them, Jonas followed and struck the knife in my right side then he walked away, I said to Mr. Clements I am wounded, I can feel the blood run from me, we went to a barbers shop and examined the wound, from there we went home and rubbed the place with brandy.

Q. That is the whole of the injury that you received on your person - A. Yes, they did not attempt to rob me. This happened at the turnpike just below Islington .

Mr. Gurney. Before you had been hurt with the knife, the man had been knocked down twice. - A. Yes.

Q. At the time that this man was knocked down did not he call out watch. - A. He did call out watch. I do not know whether he was laying or standing up.

WILLIAM CLEMENTS . On the 4th of January Nixon and me went to a sale at Pentonville, after the sale was over we went to a public house, there were five of us coming home together; when we came into the main road two separated from us, Mr. Nixon me and my son were going home together, I heard these two men calling Mr. Nixon a b - r, I went back and told them to use better words, Julian hit me over the nose and face three times, I knocked him down three times following, I left him sprawling on the ground, but when he was down the second time he said to Jonas draw your knife; then Nixon came to me and said he was wounded, I took him away, I did not see the blow given.

Prisoners Defence. I was coming home from Islington with my friend in the evening; five of these men were together, they tripped me up; I was in the foot path, I would not let them have it so they tripped us up and beat us with sticks directly, I called out for the watchman he came and took one of them in custody, he detained us and let that gentleman go because he put money down for his bail.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18091101-2

817. THOMAS HUMPHREYS and GEORGE BAMBER , alias JAMES BISHOP , were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of John Stockdale , about the hour of nine at night, on the 22nd of September , and stealing therein two carpets, value 6 l. his property .

The case was stated by Mr. Alley.

JAMES IRELAMD . I am a hatter and hosier, the corner of King-street, Bloomsbury . On the night of the 22nd of September, a little after nine o'clock, I saw two men at the door of the house Mr. Stockdale formerly lived in, I saw them open the door in a curious way, they first looked about to see if any body noticed them; I saw them go in and shut the door very gently, I immediately went to Mr. Stockdale at the next door and gave information, after I had alarmed Mr. Stockdale, I got several people, the porter unlocked the door for us, we went in, Mr. Stockdale remained outside and several others, I was about the fourth man that went up stairs, on my going up the stairs I heard a running in the first floor, we immediately holloed out take care of the windows; I ran down stairs, and before I could get into the street these two men were secured.

JOHN STOCKDALE . I am a bookseller in Picadilly; I formerly resided in the house which was broken open. I now live at the next house.

Q. Had you at the time this offence was committed any intention of returning there - A. No. My son sleeps in the house below. I went to the house with the last witness, I was in the act of going in, Mrs. Stockdale called out the thieves are coming from the windows; I observed Bishop in the act of dropping from the drawing room, as I was in the act of seizing him Humphreys jumped out of the window, he was hanging by the leads or the lamp iron rails, I laid hold of the bottom of his coat; as soon as he had let go I seized him with my right hand and Bishop with my left hand, we forced them into the passage of my shop. I placed them on two chairs, I searched them to see if they had any fire arms, they had none. I left them in custody of my friends, and returned to the house.

Q. The carpets in your house were your property. - A. Yes.

JOHN WEBB . Q. Were you one of the party that went into the house. - A. I was the first that went up stairs; as I was agoing up stairs I heard a scuffling, I opened the drawing room door, I saw a man going out of the window, and before I got out to the window he was out. I had a candle in my hand; his back was towards me; I cannot swear to either of the prisoners. On the second step of the second floor I found these seven skeleton keys and this stick.

JAMES PAGE . I was coming past Mr. Stockdale's house at the time, I saw Humphreys come out of the window, as soon as he came down on the ground I catched him by the collar; I assisted in taking him into Mr. Stockdale's house.

HENRY WHITE . Q. At the time these people were apprehended, did you see any one come out of the window. - A. Yes, Bishop, I seized him by the collar. I kept him in custody till Mr. Stockdale came up.

WILLIAM HILLMAN . I am a porter to Mr. Stockdale.

Q. Were you in the house of Mr. Stockdale on that evening before any of the people were there - A. Yes; at half past six o'clock; I saw the two carpets on a chair in a small room adjoining the drawing room; they were folded up.

Q. After the prisoners were apprehended did you see were the carpets were - A. I found them in separate directions, they were on the floor, the furthest carpet was about three yards from the chair, and the other about a foot and a half; one laid to the right and the other to the left, and the chairs were in the same places.

JOHN HEDGER . I am a servant of Mr. Stockdale's; I was in the house about half past seven, I saw the carpets were on the chairs; about nine o'clock I unlocked the door for Mr. Ireland, the carpets were then on the floor.

Q. Could they have been removed by accident - A. No, they could not be thrown off by any body by accident, in different directions as they were.

ROBERT TOWNSEND . I was constable of the night. I searched the prisoners at the watchhouse; I found upon Humphreys a bottle of phosphorus and matches, I found a knife and two common keys on Bishop.

The prisoners left their defence to their counsel.

HUMPHREYS GUILTY , aged 27.

BAMBER, GUILTY , aged 33,

Of stealing, but not of the burglary.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson .

Reference Number: t18091101-3

818 CHARLES SLATER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 18th of October , twelve books, value 5 l. the property of William Henry Lunn , in his dwelling house .

WILLIAM HENRY LUNN . I am a bookseller , I live in Soho square , the prisoner had been my shopman . On the 14th of October, Mr. Gosling came to me, I purchased several books, among others I purchased Plinys epistles.

Q. Between the 14th and the 19th did you see the prisoner - Yes, he called upon me for the letter that Joseph Parker sent to me from Oxford, relative to his character.

Q. In which part of your shop was Pliny's epistles - A. In the front of my shop; I returned into the front of the shop, with the Oxford file, where I expected to find the letter, I found the prisoner there, he observed to me do not give yourself any further trouble now, I will call again, on that he went away. Mr. Gosling called on Thursday the 19th, I believe he produced to me the book that I have in my hand, Plinys epistles, this was the same book that I purchased on the 14th, I am sure of that, from it having the name and arms of Fullarton of Castares, in Scotland; I went to Mr. Gosling's house and there I found several other books, part of them are in my custody, the others were found by Rivett.

Q.What may be the value of Pliny's epistles - A. I gave seven shillings for it.

WILLIAM GOSLING . I live in Castle-street, Leicester-square.

Q. Do you know that Pliny's epistles produced by the prosecutor - A. Yes, I know it by the coat of arms, Fullarton of Castares, in Scotland, I recollect selling that book to Mr. Lunn about three weeks ago; Mr. Lunn came to me on the Thursday morning following of the Saturday; I know the prisoner was at my house the last time on the Wednesday evening before the Thursday that Mr. Lunn came.

Q. Did you purchase this book of him - A. I bought this book of him on the Wednesday evening previous to my going to Mr. Lunn's. I am quite certain the book in my hand was purchased of the prisoner.

COURT. You purchased it on the Wednesday after the Saturday you sold it - A. Yes.

Prisoner's Defence. I had the book some time in my possession.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Of stealing to the value of seven shillings.

Fined 1 s . Confined Two Years in the House of Correction, and there kept to Hard Labour .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18091101-4

819. JOSEPH HANSEL was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Robert Sheddon , esq. about the hour of twelve at night, of the 18th of October , and stealing therein, two gowns, value 20 s. and three dusters, value 6 d. his property; three gowns, value 30 s. a cloak, value 5 s. the property of Agnes Sheddon , spinster ; a gown, value 5 s. two handkerchiefs, value 3 s. two caps, value 1 s. and an apron, value 6 d. the property of Fanny Williams ; and a shift, value 5 s. the property of Mary Kemp .

ROBERT SHEDDON , ESQ. On Wednesday the 18th of October, the laundry belonging to my house, at the foot of the garden was robbed of a large wash, soon after I was informed of it; on Thursday morning, the 19th, I went to Bow-street, I took with me a list of the articles; they told me they had the goods; I fancy there was one basket which they had not recovered.

Q. It is your dwelling house - A. Yes.

Q. How is the laundry connected to your dwelling house - A. A wall goes down on each side, to the foot of the garden from my house in Gower-street .

Q. Are they in the same enclosure - A. Yes, I go down the garden between two walls.

Q. There is no intermediate passage to it - A. No, there is an outlet; there is a door to the laundry, and there is a door that goes into the fields.

Q. Was that door in the fields open - A. No, it was seldom used the lock was rusty, we had no communication with the fields; it was barricadoed with old boxes and trunks because we had no occasion to open it.

FANNY WILLIAMS . You are servant to Mr. Sheddon - A. Yes.

Q. Were you employed in his laundry - A. Yes.

Q. Did you on the evening of the 18th of October miss any thing - A. Yes, we had a very large wash, we left all the cloaths in the laundry and we missed them in the morning, they were all gone.

Q. And you have since seen several of these things that you have missed - A. Yes.

Q. How was the laundry secured - A. The window was shut, but not fastened.

Q. Could you perceive where the persons had entered who had taken the things away - A. No, unless they came in at the window, when we first saw it the window was shut.

Q. You found the window in the same state you had left it - A. Yes.

Q. Are you quite sure when you went out, you had

left these things in - A. Yes.

Q. At what time did you go out - A. At half past ten.

Q.Have you any reason to know whether any other part of the family went in after you - A. No. I locked the door after me and the window was shut down but not fastened.

Q. If any body had come in they must have opened the window and shut it down again - A. We found the back door open.

Q. How had the door been shut - A. The back door had been bolted and we found it not bolted.

Q. Was the back of the door forced - A. No; it was bolted when I left it. The lock was very bad but it was locked.

Q.When you came back was the lock forced - A. No. The bolt had been drawn back and the door opened.

Q. You are quite sure the window was shut down - A. Yes. I am sure it was not open.

Q.These things are in the possession of Smith now - A. Yes.

Q. And these things that you saw produced by Smith, and that he has now, were the things that were left the night before in the laundry - A. Yes, I saw them at Bow street.

MARY KEMP . Q. Are you a servant of Mr. Sheddon's - A. Yes.

Q.You heard the last witness what she had to say - A. Yes, I do not know any thing else.

MRS. PALMER. Q. Did you see the condition of the back door the night before - A. No. I saw it in the morning after the robbery had been.

Q. Were the boxes which were placed before the back door removed - A. Yes.

Q.These boxes and trunks I suppose were placed there to prevent the door being opened - A. Yes. In the morning after the robbery the door had been unbolted.

Q. Does the laundry consist of more rooms than one - A. No.

JOHN TOWNSHEND . On the 19th of October, between the hours of twelve and one, I was going along Belton-street, I saw two men going along, they went past me, each had a large bundle apiece; Smith being before me he called out and asked me if I saw them, I told him to come back, which he did, we followed them down Belton-street, and on our coming up to them the two bundles were dropped and the men ran away.

Q. Do you know whether the prisoner at the bar was one of these men - A. I could not take upon me to swear he was the man that I passed.

Q. Before they ran away are you certain that the prisoner at the bar was one of them - A. I could not get a sight of him so as to know him again.

Q. Did you say any thing to the men before they ran away - A. I said holloa, we are officers and the bundles dropped from them directly, I picked up one of the bundles and Smith the other, I have had part of them ever since and part was given up at the office.

Q.Such part as Mr. Sheddon wanted for his family use were given up at the office - A. Yes.

Q.How soon after was this man taken - A. I gave up my bundle to Smith, I pursued after the man, I saw Lines bringing this man back.

Q. Was Lines with you at the time the bundles were dropped - A.Pretty near.

Q. Was Lines sufficiently near when you said you were officers, to see the man - A. Yes he saw him drop the bundle.

Q. When the man was brought back by Lines was any charge made to him - A. I asked him if he owned the things he said he had got no things, we found nothing upon him. I produce the things.

Q. to Ann Williams and Mary Kemp . Both of you look at these things and say whether these are the articles that were in Mr. Sheddon's laundry on the night before - A. Yes.

ANN WILLIAMS . Here is a duster that is Mr. Sheddon's, a gown, a muslin cloak, and a silk gown, them are Mrs. Sheddon's, three gowns are Miss Sheddon's and one gown of mine.

Q. These things were produced to you at Bow-street - A. Yes, on the 19th the day after the robbery.

Q. to Prosecutor. These were produced to you - A. Yes.

JOHN LINES . On Thursday morning I was along with Smith and Townsend, he asked me if I saw two persons pass with bundles, I said I did not; Townsend called Smith, Smith came up and I followed pretty close after.

Q. Did you see the bundle here in the possession of of that man before you took him - A. I saw him drop it.

Q. Are you clear of the person of the man - A. I saw him drop the bundle.

Q. I want to know if it was the prisoner at the bar - A. He is the only person that I saw, I pursued him all the way down Brownlow-street and called out stop thief. I never lost sight of him.

Q. The bundle had been taken up by your companions - A. Yes.

Smith. I picked up the bundle.

Q. to Lines, you overtook and never lost sight of him - A. Yes. I run him into the arms of John Moiler , I brought him back to Smith and Townshend.

Q. Was there any other person you saw in the course of your pursuit - A. No person whatever; when I ran after him no other person was by, I pursued him and took him.

Q. So that you have no doubt but that the person you took, was the person that dropped the bundle - A. No.

Q. You saw him go into Moiler's arms - A. Yes; I was pursuing him about three yards after him, I had no conversation with him.

JOHN SMITH. Q. You were by when these men dropped the bundles, were not you - A. Yes. Townshend said we are officers, they ran away up Brownlow street.

Q. Did you make sufficient observation of the person of the prisoner, to say that he is one - A. I have no doubt of him, he had a brown coat on when he was brought back, he appeared to me to be the same person who had dropped the bundle; I have had the custody of the things ever since, except the articles that were delivered up.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been at the public house drinking two or three pints of beer, going down Drury-lane I was stopped by Moiler, he said he had some suspicion I was the person that broke into his house

during the time two officers came up and said I was the person that they wanted; they took me to Bow-street.

Q. to Prosecutor. Your house is in St. Giles's in the the fields - A. Yes, it is in Gower-street, part of Gower street is in St. Giles's, and part in St. Pancras.

Q. Are you sure your house and laundry is in the parish of St. Giles' - A. I pay my taxes in the parish of St. Giles's, I have no connection whatever with St. Pancras.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 19.

First Middlesex jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18091101-5

820 STEPHEN BUCKNEL was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 17th of September , thirty six yards of linen cloth, value 5 l. a pair of breeches, value 1 l. two pair of pantaloons, value 1 l. and a pair of boots, value 10 s. the property of John Pallister , in the dwelling house of John Pallister , Thomas Simonds , and Daniel Wilkinson .

SECOND COUNT for the like offence in the dwelling house of John Simonds .

The case was stated by Mr. Gurney.

JOHN PALLISTER . Q. I believe you are a wholesale haberdasher in St. Pauls Church-yard - A. Yes, my partners names are Thomas Simonds and Daniel Wilkinson, Mr. Simonds only resides in the house; the prisoner lived in our service as porter ; in consequence of information he was searched on the 18th of September, in my presence, and a dozen or fourteen duplicates were found upon him; I have seen the things since in the possession of the pawnbrokers; the things were kept in the warehouse, it is part of the house, I always kept the trunk locked. After I had found the things at the pawnbrokers, I examined the trunk, I found the things were gone: all the things in that trunk belonged to me only.

Mr. Knapp. Is not the room in which the trunk was detached from the dwelling house - A. It is attached to the house; we have two warehouses, it was in the back warehouse, there is an internal communication, a door that opens from one house to the other, there is a way from the house into the warehouse by going up steps.

DANIEL WILKINSON . Q. You are one of the partners, what ward is your house in - A.Castle Baynard; the warehouse communicates to the house two ways, one is an internal communication, the other is not, the yard encloses the whole.

Q. There are two keys that the constable produced does these keys open any part of the house - A. This key opens the warehouse door, and the other key opens the wine cellar, I never saw these keys untill they were found by the constable upon the prisoner.

THOMAS MARTIN . I am a servant to Mr. Cardy pawnbroker, Snow-hill. On the 31st of August two pair of pantaloons were pawned at our shop, on the 1st of July, a pair of buckskin breeches pawned for 10 s. in the name of Bucknell, I have no recollection of the person; twenty one yards of Irish cloth on the 18th of July, pawned for one guinea, and thirteen yards of cloth on the 15th of July.

CHARLES TAYLOR. I am a servant to Mr. Pearl, pawnbroker in Knight Rider-street, I have a pair of boots pawned on the 2d of August for 6 s pair the name of Bucknell, I have no recollection of the prisoner.

SAMUEL SHEPHARD . I am a constable, I searched the prisoner on the 18th of August I found the duplicates that led to this property.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. It was not in the dwelling house, there is a chaise house below and a warehouse above.

Q. to Prosecutor. Was not this warehouse a place above the chaise house - A. Yes. There is a way to it by opening a door up stairs and going up steps to it; and by going out in the yard and going into it.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling house.

Confined Six Months in Newgate , and fined 1 s .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18091101-6

821. STEPHEN BUCKNEL was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 17th of September , twelve yards of woollen cloth, value 5 l. 6 s. fourteen yards of cambric, value 3 l. 2 s. twelve yards of cambric muslin, value 1 l. 10 s. and thirteen yards of lace, value 1 l. the property of John Pallister in the dwelling house of Thomas Simonds , John Pallister , and Daniel Wilkinson .

SECOND COUNT for like offence in the dwelling house of Thomas Simonds .

Mr. Gurney, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18091101-7

822. THOMAS STRATTON and JOHN TURTLE , were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 27th of September , four pounds weight of cotton, value 6 s. one pound six ounces weight of peruvian bark, value 4 s. the property of John Scandret Harford , Thomas Daniel , John Daniel , Thomas Payne , and Joseph Bally .

THOMAS PAYNE . I am an ironmonger , my partners are John Scandret Harford , Thomas Daniel , John Daniel , and Joseph Bally. On the 27th of September, at seven o'clock in the evening, the men left work, they had to pass through the accompting house; I observed Stratton was very much padded across his shoulders, and appeared very different to what he did at other times; the moment he left the premises I laid hold of him and told him I heard he had got what was not his own; he was confused and said it was of no use making words, I certainly have that which does not belong to me, I have cotton upon me; I then desired that he would return into the accompting house, and Turtle with him, knowing they were employed together, one could not be guilty of such conduct without the other being privy to it. I sent for a constable, Stratton produced a quantity of cotton; Turtle said he had no property about him but what was his own; on searching him he produced the Peruvian bark.

THOMAS HUGHES . I am a constable. I took this cotton from different parts of Stratton, some was in his hat and in his breeches and waistcoat; it was collected together, it weighed four pound. On Turtle we found the Peruvian bank.

Stratton said nothing in his defence.

Turtle's Defence. I never offended against the laws of my country until this unfortunate transaction.

Turtle called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

STRATTON, GUILTY , aged 58.

TURTLE, GUILTY , aged 39.

Confined Fourteen Days in Newgate , and fined 1 s .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18091101-8

823. JAMES CALLAN was indicted for that he on the 15th of October , being in the dwelling house of Dennis Mahony , feloniously did steal, three glass bottles, value 6 d. and five pints of wine, value 12 s. his property; - and that he, about the hour of two at night, on the same day, the same dwelling house, burglariously did break to get out of the same .

THOMAS IRRONS . I was going along Tottenham-court-road , about half past two on Sunday morning.

Q. When - A. I do not exactly recollect the day of the month.

Q. Was it the 15th or somewhere thereabouts - A. I believe it was. I saw this man with his head and shoulders out of the flap of a cellar.

Q. That is a cellar that is closed with a flap - A. Yes; he had his head and shoulders out of the cellar, and with three bottles of wine down on the flap. There was a large flap that lies down and a small one that lifts up to let light in; this small one he was coming out of; the large flap is to let the beer down, and the small one is to let the light in, it is against the house.

Q. You saw the head and shoulders of a man out of this flap - A. Yes.

Q.Whose house was it - A. Mr. Mahony's, the Cock, in Tottenham-court-road.

Q. That is his dwelling house is it - A. Yes.

Q. This cellar is a part of the dwelling house - A. Yes. I immediately laid hold of the man, he made a spring and got out of my hands. He was in the cellar when I laid hold of him.

Q. What became of the three bottles of wine - A. I picked up two and carried them with me, I left the third there; I pursued; I was never more than five yards behind him, I never lost sight of him.

Q. Did you afterwards secure him - A. Yes, by the assistance of the watchmen in Percy-street, their names are Smith and Sykes. Upon that we returned to Mr. Mahony's with the prisoner and found the other bottle that I had left on the flap; he had opened that small flap; it is about eighteen inches wide.

Q. When you returned you found one bottle standing as it was when you had left it - A. Yes.

Q. You delivered that wine I suppose to Mr. Baker - A. Yes, he is here, he is a watchman.

COURT. If a man got in did you observe enough to know if the flap would close after him - A. Yes, it would.

Q. Supposing he had opened the flap and had got in whether it is necessary to do any thing to raise the flap in order to come out - A. He must raise it again, for when he was in it naturally would fall down.

Q. He must have fastened it after he went in, and then open it to come out again - A. He must so; I saw no more than his head and shoulders.

Q.When he came out that flap was kept up by his head and shoulders - A. Yes, it was.

Q. What sort of a flap was it - when it fell down did it lock itself into any thing - A. No; there is a bolt inside to bolt it; it falls on the large flap where the foot passengers pass, there is no grove at all to receive it.

THOMAS SYKES . Q. You heard the cry of stop thief - A. Yes; that young man that pursued him cried out stop thief, he was pursuing him; I bid him to stop, he struck me on the lip and knocked me down, and cut my lip on the inside; this witness was about six yards behind him, I told him to pursue him. I got up as soon as I could and saw him taken.

JOHN SMITH . I heard the cry of stop thief; I was calling half past two in the morning.

Q. Did you see the prisoner running - A. Yes; I stopped him with the assistance of this man with the two bottles of wine; the first witness, Irrons, and I secured him. I am sure it is the prisoner, I did not lose him until I took him to the watchhouse.

DENNIS MAHONY . Q. This was your cellar, was it - A. Yes.

Q. And part of your house - A. Yes.

Q. You did not see whether the cellar was secured that night by bolts - A. No. There is a large flap that lets the beer down; the little flap falls down upon the large flap and is fastened by two bolts the same flap is used for the purpose of letting air into the cellar; I cannot say whether it was fastened that night.

Q. Was the wine that was produced to you your wine - A. Yes.

Q. Was that wine in your bin on the over night - A. Yes; I generally look over the wine bin every night; I had looked over the wine bin that night.

Q. It must have been removed from the place where it originally was left to be upon this flap where Irrons found it - A. I suppose so.

Q. Did you miss that quantity of bottles from the bin - A. Yes. As soon as I was alarmed I came down stairs.

Q. What quantity had been removed from your bin - A. I missed eight bottles, I found three.

Q. Where were the others - A. That I cannot tell. This wine had been four years in the cellar, I never took any out of that bin.

Q. There were three found - A. Yes.

Q. And the other five you did not find about the cellar - A. No; they must have been conveyed off.

Q. Were there sufficient circumstances about these bottles for you to know them to be yours - A. Yes; there is a passage over this cellar where there was a rat hole, the wet came down; I stopped that rat hole; the dirt was dry on the bottles, I believe the bottles came out of that bin. The cellar door that parts the wine cellar from the beer cellar was broken open, it was locked before; I locked that door myself that night; he must have been concealed in the porter cellar to have broken into the wine cellar; he must have broken the door to get in there.

Cross-examined by Mr. Reynolds. What time did you go to bed - A. At half past twelve. I was the last person up in the house.

Q. You went into all your cellars that night, did not you - A. Yes.

Q. It was dark and you had a candle with you - A. Of course it is dark at twelve o'clock at night.

Q. When you awaked in the morning you found this inner cellar door open - A. Yes.

Q. A person that entered into your wine cellar must have broken the door open on that side - A. He must be in the beer cellar, and have broken the door open to get into the wine cellar.

Q. Supposing him to have come from the street -

COURT. What door was it was broken open - A. The liquor and wine cellar door.

Prisoner's Defence. On Saturday night I had received my wages, I stopped a little at my pay-table; it was about half past twelve o'clock at night when I had done settling for my labour in the house; I was very much in liquor, I did not know rightly which was my best way to go home; I was walking about, I did not know where I went to.

The prisoner called one witness who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Judgment respited.

First Middlesex jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18091101-9

824. MICHAEL GREEN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 26th of October , three dozen files, value 5 s. the property of Jonathan Sparrow and Thomas Wright .

THOMAS WRIGHT . I live in Smithfield, my partner's name is Jonathan Sparrow . In consequence of an anonymous letter sent to me on the 26th of October I obtained a warrant and found these things, with the officer at the prisoner's lodgings, No. 2, Crown and Cushion-court, Cow-lane; the prisoner was my porter , I sent for him and told him to unlock his box, he did, we found a variety of ironmongery articles, among which we found three dozen of files, which proved to be my property; the prisoner told me he bought them.

JAMES SMITH. I am an officer. I went with a search warrant to the prisoner's lodgings, then I went to the ware-house to fetch the prisoner; he opened his box, I found three dozen of files, which the prosecutor swore to be his; there were several other articles the prosecutor had no doubt were his.

Prisoner's Defence. I own I had taken the property.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Confined Fourteen Days in Newgate , and fined 1 s .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18091101-10

825. THOMAS GREEN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 17th of October , a silver tea spoon, value 1 s. and two ounces weight of silver, value 10 s. the property of Stephen Adams .

STEPHEN ADAMS . I am a working silversmith . About the 10th of October last three of my workmen informed me that I was robbed. They laid some silver in order to detect the man on the benches, and on the 17th one of the men saw him take them away. In consequence of that, on the 17th, in the morning, I went with one of the constables to his lodging; I challenged the prisoner with robbing me he denied it. There was nothing but one silver spoon tea spoon found at that time in his apartment, which had my mark upon it. I gave him into the custody of the constable, and afterwards some of my workmen went with another constable. The prisoner was one of my journeymen.

WILLIAM BOND. I am a journeyman to Mr. Adams. On the 16th of September, in the evening, after all the men had done work, me and two more of Mr. Adams' men made a hole in the cieling, where we could see over the work benches; Mr. Adams requested some of us to come down, two of us did; we left one in the loft and the others went to work. The prisoner came into the shop about a quarter before eight, I bid him good morning; I went down stairs and the other man followed, we staid down some time, the other went up; Arnold, the witness, told him he had seen him take the silver, he came down and informed me of it; I saw they were informing Mr. Adams. I went up stairs and at breakfast time I went out, leaving the prisoner and the witness in the shop. I met the prisoner and the other two witnesses in Noble-street; I procured an officer. When Hawkins the officer found the silver I immediately said that was the silver that we had marked.

JAMES ARNOLD . I work for Mr. Adams. I was upon the watch. The silver was put on the benches; the prisoner was the man who took it, I am confident of it; I informed Mr. Adams of it, he desired me to go for an officer, which I did; we followed him home; when we came into the apartment where the prisoner was, he said you will recollect gentlemen this is not my apartment, it is my daughter's. Mr. Adams asked him if he was willing to be searched, he said he was. The apartment was searched, nothing was found but a spoon which Mr. Adams believed to be his property. We afterwards went to his own apartment in the attic, the daughter's was the two pair, we found nothing there. Mr. Adams gave charge of the prisoner for that spoon; we left the apartment and came away. On our return we met Mr. Hawkins the marshalman, he searched the apartment again, he found on the second search the pieces of silver which I saw the prisoner take.

JOHN LACEY HAWKINS . I am a marshalman. I heard of it promiscuously; I went out of curiosity, knowing the prisoner and Mr. Adams. I found the silver in the two pair of stairs room; the daughter's room. I thought the constable might have overlooked it. The pieces of silver I found in the second drawer from the top, in a cup covered over with a saucers there was a seven shilling piece and two or three shillings along with the silver.

Prisoner's Defence. I hope you will take it into consideration that it is all false; they no more about it than I do.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 52.

Confined Six Months in Newgate , and fined 1 s .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18091101-11

826. HENRY SAMUEL was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 25th of October , two handkerchiefs, value 1 s. the property of James Barnes , from his person .

JAMES BARNES . I live in Copthall-court; I am an insurance broker . On Wednesday evening last, the 25th of October, I took a servant and two children to see the illumination at the India house, I returned home by the Exchange and the bank, I found I was two pocket handkerchiefs short to what I had when I set out.

GEORGE GROVES. I am an officer; I was stationed in Leadenhall-street , opposite St. Mary Axe. About half past ten o'clock gentleman told me he saw the prisoner picking pockets: upon that information I took the prisoner in custody. On searching him I found seven handkerchiefs upon him, some of them were in his pocket and some were in his hat; the prisoner said that he picked them up, and afterwards he

said a person gave them to him in the mob.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming along, and turning down Bishopgate-street I picked up these handkerchiefs in a bundle, I opened them when I came to the India house and put them in my pocket, a gentleman saw me, he went and told the officer I had them; I told the officer I picked them up. I go about buying vials and broken glass .

GUILTY , aged 19.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18091101-12

827. MARY MACKBEAN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 17th of August , two caps, value 5 s. the property of Ann Hughbank Abraham , spinster .

MRS. RYLAND. I have the management of Miss Abraham's business, a ready made linen warehouse in High Holborn ; the prisoner was one of the work women. On the 23rd of August, in consequence of suspicion, I accompanied the officer in searching her lodgings, I found two caps between some blankets, she exclaimed with great surprize, good God, have you found them caps.

Q. Did you know them caps as belonging to your shop - A. I cannot say I did, but Miss Abrahams was there, she did.

Mr. Knapp. I believe suspicion fell upon a servant in your house - A. Yes.

Q. I believe the prisoner has been indicted at Clerkenwell for receiving stolen goods, did not you go before the grand jury - A. I did.

Q. To which she put in bail - A. I understood so.

Q. Is not the prisoner a relation to you or Miss Abrahams - A. I believe she is.

ELLEN WARE. Q. You are a relation of Miss Abrahams - A. Yes, a niece; I was a servant of Miss Abrahams'.

Q. Did the prisoner ever receive this cap of you - A. No.

Q. Were you present when this cap was found - A. No.

Prisoner's Defence. Suffer me to implore your lordship not to consider me guilty; I declare solemnly before that Being who knows all secrets that the bare thought of such an act makes me shudder. Pray do not condemn me upon the evidence of Ellen Ware , she has been known to be a thief. My prosecutrix has preferred two indictments against me; when they made the search I never saw the caps till they were in the hand of the prosecutrix; I believe Ellen Ware brought them when she ran away. This is my first examination for these caps; my only fault was not being suspicious enough to watch her actions.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave her a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18091101-13

828. JOHN WILLIAMS and DANIEL BRACKEN was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Robert Wilks , about the hour of twelve at night, on the 6th of September , and burglariously stealing therein, nineteen reams of paper, value 50 l. his property .

ROBERT WILKS . On the morning of the 7th of September, about three o'clock, I was called up by the watchman, who told me that my warehouse and printing office doors were both open. The property was missing both from my warehouse and the printing office.

Q. How are they connected with the house, be so good as to describe the situation of your dwelling house - A. The dwelling house is connected with the printing office; the back door goes into the yard, and then you ascend a small flight of steps into the printing office; they are distinct buildings, but in the same yard, we go from one to the other without going into the street. On searching the premises with the watchman I discovered that the robbers, by removing a pane of glass in the warehouse window, where the paper was, had opened a window and got in; they forced the warehouse door open and got into the printing office. I did not at the moment discover what was gone. On the next day I received information that some paper had been stopped in a coach and the property taken to St. James's watchhouse. On my going to the watch-house I found that it was part of the property that had been stolen from me.

Q. Had you, prior to your going to the watchhouse, discovered what paper you had lost - A. Yes. The robbery was on Thursday morning; on Monday I had forty reams of royal printing paper from Messrs. Fourdrinier, nineteen of which I discovered were stolen; it was not paper much in use; it was of particular quality and make; Messrs. Fourdrinier have a patent for it; it is made by a machine; the marks of the wrapper are F Y R. On looking at the paper at the watch-house I compared it with the paper left behind, it is completely the same.

Q. What were the quantity of reams shewed you - A. Six reams. Since which I learned that the remaining part were sold to Mr. Denham in Broad-street, the day after the robbery; I lost nineteen reams, and we have recovered above eighteen reams.

Q. What means have you of knowing that paper was there the night before - when had you the last view of the paper or any body else, so as to know the paper was there - A. I had no view of the paper. On the Monday the prisoner Bracken was the warehouseman, he had the key of the warehouse; I knew the paper was there, it came in late on the Monday evening; I saw Bracken bringing it up from the cart to be put into the warehouse; I certainly saw it in the warehouse the day after, or else I asked him. Out of these forty there were nineteen taken away and twenty one were left behind in that warehouse.

ANDREW FISHER . I was a watchman that night. On the morning of the 7th of September, a coach, No. 177, came up to me where I stood in Hopkins-street, the coachman turned short into another street, he jammed his coach against a post; he alighted from his coach box and called to me; the lamplighter stood along with me; while we were endeavouring to get the coach off the post there came two watchmen from Wardour-street, one of them told the coachman he believed he was the man that was lurking about his beat. Some of the watchmen opened the coach door, the lamp lighter having the light with him perceived the paper, upon which they said he and the coach should go to the watchhouse; I called the coachman to assist in getting off the coach from the post, he went as if to go round to do it, and made his escape, I led the horses to the

watchhouse door of St. James's, and deposited the paper in the watchhouse; there were eight reams of paper. six of one kind and two of another.

Q. to prosecutor. Had you lost two sorts of paper - A. I lost more than nineteen reams, the magistrate thought it enough to register the nineteen reams

THOMAS APPLEFORD . I am a lamplighter; I am the person who held the light to the coach.

Q. Is the prisoner, Williams, the coachman - A. He is, to the best of my knowledge. The coach was No. 177.

Q. Do you remember being desired by the prisoner to assist in getting the coach off, together with Fisher - A. Yes; and we desired him to go round to the back part of the coach, he went as if to do it and run away, and left the coach and paper to our care; I went with the coach to the watchhouse. There were six reams of one and two of the other. After the paper was delivered at the watchhouse, we were going to take the coach to the Greenyard, going along Piccadilly two coachmen halloed out where are you going with that coach, 177, it belongs to Mrs. Storey. We took the coach to Mrs. Storey, in Coal-yard, Drury-lane; we called Mrs. Storey, she was up and dressed; she said good God, my coach is come home; my man has been here and said he had lost the coach. When we came back to the watchhouse this man had been enquiring for his coach, they told him to come in, and kept him till we came back; then they asked us whether we knew him; I said I thought he was the man. He was very much in liquor.

Q. Did he appear to be in liquor at the time you were searching his coach - A. No; whether he made himself appear so I cannot say, but he appeared very drunk when we came back.

WILLIAM CHAPMAN . I am a watchman. At half past one o'clock I saw a hackney coach standing at the end of Tyler's court, one end of Tyler's court comes into Wardour-street and the other end into Berwick-street; I did not observe the number; I went my round, the coach was there when I returned; I made a stop opposite of the coach, I saw one or two persons come into the coach; the coachman said is all in, all right, I shall drive to St. Ann's watering house and have some gin; five shillings you say you will give me; I want money.

Q. Did you observe the countenance of the coachman so as to know it was the prisoner at the bar - A Not at that time. I did not observe the number of the coach.

Q. You did not afterwards know it was the same person as you saw before - A. I was not certain it was the same person, his dress was like it; I did not observe his face. The coachman mounted his box, he said five shillings three times; I shall drive to St. Ann's watering house and have some gin; he drove off. About three quarters of an hour afterwards I heard the coach coming up Princess-street the same way it went down it came very gently up; I thought it might be the same coach returning again; I went into the gateway opposite of Tyler's-court; the coach got opposite of the court; he cried wo'ee very softly; he said make haste, look sharp, in a very low tone of voice.

Q. Who did he appear to be speaking to - A. I could not see any body; I imagined him to be speaking to somebody up the court; I went and took the number of the coach, 177.

Q. Upon your view of the coach and coachman at that time, did it appear to you to be the same coach and coachman that you had seen before in the same place - A. It did, and when he spoke it appeared to me to be the same voice; when I took the number he said to his horses, it is time for us to go home my boy; he drove off then. I went to Calahan, another watchman, I said come out, here is something going on that should not be, on your beat; he went up Wardour-street and I round Berwick-street, to see it we could meet any body in Tyler's-court, I heard a rumbling of a coach by Hopkins-street, we went there, and there was the coach, No. 177, upon a post; we saw the watchman, Fisher, and the lamplighter, and this coachman.

Q. Did you see there that the coachman of No. 177 was the same coachman that you saw before - A. I was not certain that it was the coachman before that time; I had no doubt but it was the same person I had before seen with the coach; I seized the coachman by the collar; I am sure the prisoner Williams is the person I seized by the collar; the lamplighter held up his burner at the time. When I loosened his collar for him to endeavour to get his coach off the post he made his escape unperceived. I am quite sure the prisoner Williams is the man, and whom I had seen on the two former occasions.

JOHN CALAHAN . I am a watchman in Wardour-street; Chapman came to me and said there was something not right.

Q. You afterwards heard a noise and came up to Hopkins-street - A. Yes; I saw the coach upon a post.

Q. Was the person that was with the coach the prisoner Williams - A. I am not positive that he is.

Q. Was the coachman, whoever he was, collared by the last witness, Chapman - A. He was, and when he was loosened by Chapman to assist in getting the coach off he run away.

Q. to Mr. Wilks. The prisoner Bracken was your warehouseman - A. Yes; he had been with me nine or ten days; he came to me on the Tuesday as the robbery took place on the Thursday week; the robbery was on the morning of the 7th; he did not sleep in my house. He went off on the evening of the 6th, about seven o'clock, the usual hour; he did not come the next day till about six o'clock in the evening; I asked why he had not attended to his business; he said that he went to Bartholomew fair and drank too much; he stopped there till four o'clock and then he went to the public house, and the reason he did not come to work on the morning of Thursday, he said he was very ill. He told me he lodged with Mrs. Goodman in Water-lane; I sent to Mrs. Goodman, I found that he did not lodge there.

WILLIAM COOK . I am an apprentice to Mr. Wilks. I had a letter written by Mr. Wilks to take to Mrs. Goodman; I enquired of Mrs. Goodman for this man, she said he boarded there but did not lodge there.

Prosecutor. At the examination I mentioned the circumstance that he had told me a wrong place; the prisoner said it was a mistake, or that he did it in an hurry. And when he came back on the Thursday I openly told him I suspected he had been concerned in stealing the paper; I asked him where he placed the forty reams of paper that came from Fourdrinier's, he said in the long warehouse; I told him to shew it me;

he unlocked the warehouse door and said there is the paper; he counted it and said there is only twenty one; I said where is the remainder; he said they must have wetted it, that is, used it, while he was absent. I had told him when that paper came in that the work for which that paper was to be used had not come in. We always wet the over night, and then we wet two or three reams; never so many as nineteen.

MR. DENHAM. I am a printer and stationer. On the 7th of September I purchased twelve reams of royal paper of a stranger, between the hours of one and two o'clock; he left one quire with me; he called on the day following about the same hour, to know whether I would purchase it; he brought the paper on the evening of the 7th in a cart; I agreed to give six guineas for eleven good reams.

Q. What would eleven good reams be worth - A. Twenty six or twenty seven guineas.

Q. Could you think he came honestly by it - A. I did not know the worth of it then.

Prosecutor. I gave fifty-five shillings a ream for the paper.

Williams's Defence. On that night I lost the coach and horses in Temple bar rank about eleven o'clock at night; in the mean while I went into the wine vaults the coach was taken away. I went in search of the coach all over the city, and at Smithfield, I came there about twelve, and searched there; from there I went up Holborn, then it was going on for one o'clock in the morning, then I went up to my employer, Mrs. Storey; I told her I had lost the coach, that was about one, she said I must find it; another man went out with me to look for it again; we went to St. Giles's, and up Tottenham-court road, up Oxford-road, and made enquiry, and up one of the little streets by Wardour-street; one of the watchmen told me that he heard of a coach being taken to the watchhouse with goods in it; that is the first I heard of it; when I went to the watchhouse the coach was taken home. From eleven o'clock at night I never was in possession of the coach, not have I seen it since. When I went to the watch-house they asked me who I was, I told them I was the coachman; they asked me whether I was the driver of that coach, I said I was; then they detained me; they said they thought I was the coachman by the colour of my coat.

Bracken's Defence. My lord, the night the paper was taken out when I had done my work in the evening I resigned up the keys at Mr. Wilks's dwelling house into the possession of the servant maid, which I always was in the habit of doing when I was in his house, at dinner time and at night. I delivered my keys that night before the robbery, then I went to Mrs. Goodman's, where I generally have my victuals, and went along with a young man to the fair, the young man is here; we stopped at the fair till nigh four o'clock in the morning, and that young man with me; then I went with a girl in George-alley, she kept me along with her. Mr. Wilks said I denied where I lodged; I did not; I told him I lodged at No. 7. Change-court, in the Strand. I have lodged with Mrs. Goodman many years, but I did not at that time, I did some time before that.

JOHN BRINKMAN . On Thursday evening, the last day of Bartholomew fair; I returned home about two o'clock in the morning, my brother was along with me, Williams was under the gateway, he said I have lost my coach and horses. I lodge with Williams in the gallery over the stables, let out by Mrs. Storey. He went up directly to Mrs. Storey and told her that he had lost the coach and horses; Mrs. Storey said how long have you lost the coach; he said about four hours; Mrs. Storey said it is about two o'clock now.

JAMES STORGIS. I am a hackney coachman, I drive a coach of my own. I saw John Williams between eleven and twelve o'clock at Bartholomew fair, and drank some porter in his company; I left him there. That is all I know; he said nothing of having lost his coach.

NEHEMIAH BRICKNELL. I saw the prisoner Williams at bartholomew fair at one o'clock in the morning; I did not speak to him.

WILLIAM MEAD . I saw the prisoner Williams at Bartholomew fair between twelve and one o'clock; I left him there; where his coach was I do not know.

ELIZABETH STOREY . The coachman came down to me a little after two o'clock and said he had lost his coach; I was angry with him for losing the coach, I sent him off, and two young men with him to look for it.

Q.Did he tell you he had been at Bartholomew fair - A. No; not a word of that.

JOHN RIVERS . I am a printer. The prisoner Bracken was with me at Bartholomew fair on Wednesday night; he was all the time with me till about four o'clock in the morning.

Williams called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Bracken called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18091101-14

829. PATRICK CANE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 15th of October , a gold watch, value 5 l. a gold chain, value 2 l. and five gold seals, value 2 l. the property of Henry Blake , in the dwelling house of George Newton .

HENRY BLAKE . I lodge in the house of George Newton , 35, St. James's place . On the 15th of October, about four o'clock, we went out, I saw Mrs. Blake's watch was hanging in the drawing room, over the chimney piece; I looked at it just before I went out.

Q. It was a gold watch, was it - A. Yes, it was; with a gold chain and seals.

Q. You and Mrs. Blake went out together - A. Yes; we returned about a quarter past five, we missed the watch directly we came in; upon missing the watch we enquired of all the servants in the house, Mrs. Blake and I did, and after minutely examining my servant, John Fitzgerald , I employed a servant who had lived with me in Ireland, Matthew Welldon .

Q. In consequence of your employing him did you see your watch again - A. I did; about eight or nine o'clock the next morning I was called up and Matthew Welldon gave me the watch, chain and seals.

Q. Had he come with you from Ireland - A.No. He is living with Admiral Nugent ; he left me in the latter part of last spring. Matthew Welldon gave me the watch, chain, and seals, saying, I have got the man; Cane.

Q. Did you know Cane before - A. I cannot say I

did; Cane said he knew me. I saw him on the Sunday walk up to the hall door; I spoke to my servant out of the window and he walked off.

Q. You say you saw the prisoner, where did you see him - A. I saw him walking up St. James's-street, with Fitzgerald.

Q. That was before you went out - A. Yes.

Q. You do not know of your own knowledge where Welldon got that watch - A. No, I do not.

Q. What became of the watch after Welldon gave it you - A. I have got it in my pocket; I had it in my hand two or three minutes, he said it would be better for him to have it to produce before the magistrate, as he was the man who took it from the prisoner. I received the watch from the magistrate; I have it in my possession now.

Q. It was produced there by Welldon - A. It was. The magistrate sealed the watch up and gave it to me.

JOHN FITZGERALD . Q. You are a servant of Mr. Blake - A. Yes.

Q. What have you to say respecting the prisoner and this watch - A. I met the prisoner on the day the watch was missed in Spanish place, as I came from prayers

Q. Did you know him before - A. No, I had no acquaintance with him; I saw him once before; he was acquainted with a servant I knew; I desired the prisoner to call upon me any time that day, as I thought he was in distress, I would give him some meat; he knew where I lived.

Q. And you thought he was in distress, you would give him something - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see any thing of him after this time - A. My master sent me out to order the curricle to come.

Q. What time did you set out - A. A little before four; I happened to meet him at the corner of St. James's place as I came back, I desired him to call upon me when he saw my master and mistress were gone out.

Q. Did your master and mistress go out - A. Yes; and that very instant they were gone the prisoner came into the hall to me, he seemed to be rather shivering with the cold, in consequence of that, I knew there was a fine fire in the drawing room, I brought him up to warm himself by the drawing room fire, I desired him to stop there a bit, 'till I brought him up some meat, and put it in paper for him. I left him sitting at the drawing room fire while I went down.

Q. Did you observe the watch hanging there - A. To the best of my knowledge it was there; I had seen it there that morning; I believe it was there at that time, after he was gone I missed it.

Q. How long were you down stairs before you missed it - A. Not five minutes; I returned with some meat in paper to him, and the prisoner seemed to be in a great hurry.

Q. He was sitting by the fire when you returned, was not he - A. No, he was not; I left him sitting by the fire, when I returned he was near the drawing room door almost.

Q. What, was he appearing to be coming out of the room - A. No; he did not appear to be coming out of the room; I asked him what made him in a hurry; he said he did not like to stop, he was in a hurry, he had four miles to go from Whitechapel somewhere. Then he pulled out one halfpence, he said if he had some more he would give me share of a pot; I told him I would not take it, but I would give him share of a pot. Then I saw him down stairs; as soon as I had put some coals on the fire I went along with him to the public house.

Q. I suppose in the neighbourhood - A. Yes; I did not stay with him there more than ten minutes.

Q. Did you leave him there in the public house - A. No; he came out along with me; we parted at the corner of King-street, in St. James's-street.

Q. When you parted did you go back again immediately; I went into the drawing room to lay the cloth for dinner.

Q. That was before your master and mistress came home - A. Yes. It occured to me that the watch was there, but I could not swear that it was there; it usually hung there and I did miss it; I did not know but my mistress might have taken it out with her.

Q. How long had you say it was after the prisoner and you went out together to your returning to the drawing room - A. He was not in the house five minutes.

Q. How long had you been absent from the house - - A. Not ten minutes all together.

Q. Did you say any thing about the watch to your master and mistress when they returned - A. Not till they spoke to me.

Q. You said you did not know but your mistress might have taken it with her - A. I thought she might have taken it with her.

Q. When it was mentioned to you did you tell your master and mistress who had been in the drawing room - A. Not at that moment.

Q. You were conscious you had done wrong - A. Yes; I thought so.

Q. You thought very right - when was it mentioned it first to your master and mistress that the prisoner was brought up by you into the drawing room - A. In a very short time after; I thought it right to acknowledge that I brought such a person up there.

Q. When did you see the prisoner again, or the watch after this - A. Not till about nine o'clock the next morning.

Q. Had you seen any thing of the prisoner again befor you saw the watch - A. No.

MATTHEW WELLDON . Q. You formerly lived with Mr. Blake - A. Yes.

Q. How came you to know any thing about the watch - A. The prisoner called upon me at eleven o'clock.

Q. What, did you know him before - A. I knew him to be a servant out of place.

Q. What day was it he called upon you - A. The 15th; the day the watch was stolen; while I was standing at my master's door, I spoke to him.

Q. How long before this time had you seen any thing of him - A. The Sunday before; I asked him if he had got into any place, or any employment, he told me he had not; he had no money about him, I gave him fourpence. In the afternoon colonel Blake came to enquire for me, I was out.

Q. When was it you saw colonel Blake - A. The same night.

Q. He came to your house, did he - A. Yes.

Q. In consequence of any information that you received from Mr. Blake what did you do - A. Hearing

that colonel Blake called I went to his house, I asked him to give me a coloured coat and a hat, and I would go in search of the prisoner. On Monday morning I went to a house in Church-street, St. Giles's, I went up stairs and saw the prisoner in bed, I told the prisoner to come down stairs, I wanted to speak to him; while he was dressing himself I came down and enquired for a constable, and on my bringing Cullom the prisoner was gone; I went to the Black Horse in the neighbourhood, there I found Cullom. The people where the prisoner lodged told me that he followed me out; I stopped about five minutes, the prisoner came to me, I desired him to follow me to the Black Horse.

Q. Was Cullom with you at that time - A. Yes, he was; we went to the Black Horse. The prisoner, before I mentioned any thing, said he knew what I came about; he gave me the watch and said he was very sorry.

Q. Did you observe where he took it from - A. Yes, out of his waistcoat pocket.

Q. Of course the chain and seals were with it - A. Yes; I told him I was very sorry I must take him with me to the colonel, who lost the watch, for fear I should be thought concerned with it.

Q. Did you take him - A. Yes. I gave the watch to colonel Blake.

Q. Do you mean to say that you gave up the watch to colonel Blake - A. Yes; I took it back to take to the office. I produced the watch before the magistrate.

Q. What became of it after - A. The magistrate sealed it up and put my name on it; he delivered the watch to Mr. Blake.

Q. That watch which you produced to Mr. Blake was the watch which you received of the prisoner and which you took back again, and you produced it at the office - A. Yes.

GEORGE CULLOM . Q. You are a patrol - A. Yes. I went to the lodging of the prisoner in Church-street.

Q. When you came you understood the prisoner was gone - A. Yes; when I was at the street door I saw the prisoner coming along the street up to Welldon; Welldon asked the prisoner to walk along with him down to the Black Horse.

Q. Did he go with Welldon and you - A. Yes; he went between Welldon and me. When we came to the Black Horse I heard the prisoner say he knew what Welldon came for, and what he wanted; he put his hand into his waistcoat pocket and took the watch out, and gave it to Welldon; when we got out of the Black Horse we were going on to the watchhouse, the prisoner wished to go to the colonel, we then took him to the colonel, the colonel took the watch.

Q. We understand he was afterwards left in your care - A. Yes; I took him from there to the watchhouse and afterwards to the office.

Q. The watch was produced at the office, we understand, by Welldon - A. Yes; and the magistrate sealed it up at the office.

Q. to prosecutor. Do you know that watch to be Mrs. Blake's - A. Yes; I bought the watch myself in Dublin, it was made by one Warriner, and I believe I bought every seal that is on it; they are gold seals, and the chain is gold.

Q. And you looked at the watch a short time before you went out - A. I did.

Q. Do you know St. James's place to be in St. James's parish - A. Yes; it leads out of St. James's-street.

Q. What is the value of the watch - A. I cannot say; the watch costme 40 guineas, the chain twelve or thirteen.

Q. Mr. Blake, you told us the persons name of whom you took the lodgings is George Newton - A. Yes.

Q. Does he live in the house - A. He does; his wife lives there; she occupies the lower part of the house.

Q. He sleeps there of a night, does he not - A. He does.

Prisoner's Defence. I was drunk at the time that I took the watch.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 26.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson .

Reference Number: t18091101-15

830 SAMUEL DAVIS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 26th of September , ten pounds weight of sugar, value 6 s. the property of Thomas Conway , John Phelps , and Joseph Raw .

JOSEPH RAW. Thomas Conway and John Phelps are my partners, we are wholesale grocer s and tea-dealers , Maiden-lane, Queen-street, Cheapside . The prisoner was my porter . On the 26th of September I left the warehouse to go to tea; my dwelling house is in Cheapside; when I returned to the warehouse it was about eight o'clock in the evening a waggon drew up with five barrels of raisins, I ordered the prisoner to assist in taking them in; he did so; I observed that he was bulky in his belly, his apron was tied loose about him; I stood by him until he had unloaded the waggon, with a lighted candle in my hand, and as he saw I took particular notice of him he ran up one pair of stairs, I ran up after him; he immediately turned about and came down again; I pursued him and desired him to go into the accompting house, I wanted to speak to him; he said, yes, I will, presently; he immediately ran out of the door, I pursued him and cried out stop thief; we run along Maiden-lane, down Garlick-hill, along Queen street; he was stopped in Cloak-lane; I came up to him as soon as he was stopped, I perceived he was not so bulky then. A person of the name of Cousens stopped him; Cousens and I brought him into Queen street; Cousins said he saw him drop a bag of sugar there; we went to the house of Mrs. Lambert, Cousens received the bag of sugar in my presence. The prisoner and the sugar were taken back to my warehouse; the bag was opened, it contained ten pounds weight of sugar; it was the same kind of sugar as that in the hogshead. The prisoner said he begged I would overlook it.

MRS. LAMBERT. I live at 61, Queen-street. On the night of 26th of September I heard something like a knock at my door, I went to the door, I saw a bag of sugar lay on the step, Mr. Raw and Mr. Cousens came, I gave them the bag of sugar.

FRANCIS COUSENS . I am porter to a cheesemonger in the Borough. On the evening of the 26th of September I was in Queen-street, I saw the prisoner drop something from his arm into the door of a house; I followed him and stopped him in Cloak-lane; I then went and knocked at the door where the sugar was dropped; Mrs. Lambert gave me the bag of sugar.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I do not know any thing at all about it, I never saw it.

GUILTY , aged 38.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18091101-16

831. THOMAS TAVERNER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 2nd of October , an iron axle-tree, value 50 s. the property of John Lane , in his dwelling house .

JOHN LANE . I am a coachmaker , I live at 38, Harding-street, in the parish of Mary-le-bone . My dwelling house is over the shop; there is a communication with the shop and house. On Saturday the 3d of September, about five o'clock, I missed the iron axle tree from under the stairs, I had seen it there a few days before. The prisoner is a smith , he lived a little way off me. On Monday morning, one Thomas, he keeps an iron shop, brought it to me; I knew it to be mine as soon as I saw it.

- THOMAS. On the 30th of September, in the evening, the prisoner came and asked me if I would buy an axletree; I told him I did not know, untill I saw it; he went and fetched it; I examined it, I said it was a good one; he asked half a guinea for it; I told the prisoner the axletree was worth more; if he would call upon me on Monday morning there was not the least doubt I could get him a pound for it; he left it. I made enquiries; Mr. Lane came to my house, he saw the axletree and claimed it. The prisoner came on the Monday morning, he asked me if I had sold it, I told him it was all right; I told him we would go and have something to drink. The constable was behind my counter ready to take him when he went out. On going into the public house the constable took him. I have had the axletree ever since.

Prisoner's Defence. The box and the axletree cost fifty shillings, Common boxes are worth fourteen shillings; that is a patent one, I should think they are worth more.

Q. to prosecutor. Do you mean that the axletree in that state cost fifty shillings - A. No; with the boxes. I suppose it is worth forty shillings as it is without the boxes.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Of stealing to the value of thirty-nine shillings only.

Confined Six Weeks in Newgate , and fined 1 s .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson .

Reference Number: t18091101-17

832. ELIZABETH FLINN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 12th of October , two pound eight ounces weight of Ostrich feathers, value 10 l. the property of Samuel Butler , in his dwelling house .

SAMUEL BUTLER . I live in London wall , in the parish of St. Alphage; I am a feather manufacturer .

Q. You keep the house, do you - A. Yes. I have no partner.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. No; I know nothing of her. On Thursday, the 12th of October, about six in the evening, some person, or persons, entered my shop and stole six bundles of ostrich feathers; I printed hand bills and offered five guineas reward; I delivered the handbills to the different feather makers.

Q. How could a person get into your house - A. By opening the latch.

SARAH THOMPSON . My husband name is John Thompson , he is a feather maker. The prisoner brought three bundles of feathers to our house and offered them for sale on the Wednesday after they were lost; I asked the prisoner if she had any more: she said no. I think she asked ten shillings, or ten shillings and sixpence for the three bundles. I took them up to my husband; he ordered me to stop her and to send for an officer. I stopped her and sent for an officer, he came and detained her. I told her I suspected the feathers were stolen; I was ordered to stop the person that brought them; she said she bought them; I asked her how she bought them, as she was able to sell them so cheap; she answered she bought them in a lot of things. I said, good woman, if you leave them with me, and leave your address, you shall have double that, they are worth a great deal more; she said she would; she waited till my husband came down, and, as I said before, the officer came and took her in custody.

Q. Was she taken in custody at your house - A. Yes.

Q. And from that time to this she has been in prison - A. Yes. She told me at last that she found them.

Q. to prosecutor. Was not Hewitt taken up on a charge of stealing these goods - A. No. There was no other person taken up but this woman.

Q. Do you mean to tell me there was no other person taken up before the alderman - A. No. There were three bundles of feathers found in the possession of Mr. Hewitt.

Q. Mr. Hewitt lives no great way off from where you were robbed - he lives in Wilson-street - A. He does. The very next day I found three bundles in Hewitt's possession; Mr. Hewitt told me he gave eight shillings for them, to induce them to leave it; he having nobody in the shop to detain them.

COURT. Was Hewitt before the lord mayor - A. No. I wished to take Hewitt up; I applied at Worship-street office, there was not an officer to be found; then I applied to a city constable, he said he could not take Hewitt up without a warrant, but he could take the feathers. The feathers were returned to me.

Q. You having found three bundles of feathers at Hewitt's, how came Hewitt not to be taken up - A. On that account, because I could not get an officer; and I was told after the lord mayor gave me back my property I could not take him up.

COURT. Yes you could.

JOHN THOMPSON . On the morning that the prisoner came into my house I was in bed, my wife came up and told me that the feathers were offered for sale for ten shillings; I bid her go down stairs and keep the woman in conversation while my son went for an officer. When I came down I told her she had no business to attempt to go away, if the goods were come honestly by; she gave a written direction where she lived; she first gave the wrong name, and then she gave the right; the officer took her up in my dining room and searched her. The feathers I have kept, they are here; these are the feathers she offered me.

Prosecutor. They are my feathers; I can swear to all the three bundles; they are worth ten pound.

The prisoner left her defence to her counsel; called four witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 49.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18091101-18

833. CHARLES WALKER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 25th of October , a watch, value 3 l. a watch key value 6 d. and a piece of ribbon, value 2 d. the property of James Lenan , from his person .

JAMES LENAN . I am a taylor .

Q. When did you lose your watch - A. On Wednesday the 25th of last month, on the Jubilee day, in St. Paul's church yard , between twelve and one at noon, I lost my watch; I did not see it taken. A gentleman behind me held up the watch; when I saw it I knew it to be my property; the gentleman had hold of the prisoner.

WILLIAM PAYNE . Curiosity led me to St. Paul's church-yard, I had not been there five minutes before I saw two men of suspicious appearance, and from seeing the appearance of these men and their conduct towards me, I watched their motions some considerable time; I saw them attempt some gentlemen's pockets, and told them of; I believed I saved many gentleman's property by that means; I saw the prisoner and another go to several gentlemen and after about a quarter of an hour there was a third joined them; soon after he had joined them they went behind this young man and another gentleman, they pressed them very close. In the course of two or three minutes I saw the prisoner turn round as though he was coming from those persons they were pressing; I saw him draw his hand from the side of one of the others, with the watch in it immediately; as I perceived the string hanging from his hand I seized his hand with the watch in it. The moment I had secured the watch I held it up, and called out, which of you gentlemen have lost a watch. The prosecutor turned round and said it is my watch; instantly upon that I took the prisoner by the collar and secured him; soon after I had secured him there was a bustle among the people, some constables came and wanted me to offer him up; I refused. One of the constables took hold of the other side of him, and we went with the prisoner to Giltspur-street compter. I told them every man was a constable to take a thief; I wanted them to take notice of the people around me than they might not rescue him; I refused to give him up to any man. When we got to the compter I took the watch out and asked the young man whether he was certain it was his; he said he was, his mother gave it him. I gave it to the constable to take care of.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going to see the procession go to St. Pauls, I stopped by St. Paul's gate; I saw a hustle among a great many people, a man said to me, take this; he put a watch into my hands and made off. There was an outcry about an handkerchief; I said I have no handkerchief, I have got a watch in my hand, I do not know who it belongs to.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18091101-19

834. JOSEPH ROGERS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 20th of October , twenty three yards of Jean, value 2 l. the property of Elizabeth Caldicott , widow , privately in her shop .

ELIZABETH CALDICOTT . I am a widow, I live at 73, Sun-street , I keep a mercer's shop and sell things for shoemakers . On the 20th of October, between four and five in the afternoon, the prisoner came in the shop with a young woman to buy a bit of jean; she was to chuse the colour; I put them down several pieces, but none of them would please them; the prisoner said to the woman, you had better have velvet for your shoes; it was but for one pair. I turned round to look for the velvet and when I came back I missed a piece of jean; I looked and saw it under his coat; I should have charged him with it directly, but being alone I was afraid; I rang the bell; my servant came down directly; I followed him to the door, I said you have a piece of jean; then he ran off as fast as he could, the young woman went after him; he ran up Sun-court and down Dunnings-alley. He was brought back in about ten minutes. I am sure he is the same person.

SARAH ADAMS . I am servant to Mrs. Caldicott.

Q. She rang the bell for you and you came down - A. Yes. When I same to the parlour door I saw the prisoner at the shop door; I heard my mistress say you have got a piece of jean; he ran off and I ran after him through Sun-court into Dunning's-alley; there he dropped the jean, and there he was stopped by Mr. Taylor. Isaac Wells picked up the jean. The prisoner was brought back to the shop.

ISAAC WELLS . On the 25th of October I was in Sun-street, I heard the cry of stop thief, I ran after the mob; I picked up a piece of jean; I went on further, I saw they were bringing the prisoner back; I went with the prisoner and Mr. Taylor to Mrs. Caldicott with the jean; she said it was her's, and what the prisoner had taken out of the shop.

MR. TAYLOR. I live in Sun-street. On the 25th of October, near my house I heard the cry of stop thief, I observed the prisoner running away from the young woman; observing that he crossed the way to come at the back of the houses in Sun-street I run to my own house, and went through and got out of my back door; the moment I opened the back door I saw the prisoner pass, as hard as he could run; I immediately followed him and knocked him down; the servant came up and said he had robbed her mistress of the jean; I took him back to Mrs. Caldicott; she said he was the man that took her jean.

Prisoners Defence. I was going to my dinner about one o'clock, I met my fellow apprentice, we had a pint of beer together; this woman was with him, she said she wanted a pair of shoes; I took her to Mrs. Caldicott to buy the stuff. I know nothing of that stuff, I came out of the shop before the woman.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Of stealing, but not privately in the shop.

Confined Six Months in Newgate , and whipped in Goal .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18091101-20

835. WILLIAM WITHERS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 28th of September , a wheelbarrow, value 1 l. and thirty six pots, value 2 l. the property of Robert Walduck .

ROBERT WALDUCK . I keep the King's Arms in Wood-street, Spa-fields . On the 28th of September, about three o'clock in the afternoon, I sent my boy out with the wheelbarrow to collect the pots, about five o'clock I was informed that the boy had lost the pots.

EDWARD JONES . I am a servant to Mr. Walduck. I lost my barrow in Coppice-row , there were upwards of three dozen pots in it. I had information that a boy with sore eyes had wheeled it away.

ELIZABETH WILLIAMS . On Thursday the 28th of

September I was standing at my window talking to my landlord, I saw a boy come with a barrow full of pots, he was trying to wheel the barrow against the posts; I told him he need not to ryt get the barrow through without you take the pots out and hold it sideways; he took the pots out, got the barrow through, and put the pots in again, and he wheeled them down the court; I saw he had sore eyes; that is all I remarked of him. The boy came down about an hour afterwards, he was crying very much, he said he had lost the barrow with the pots; I said what sort of a boy was it that took your barrow away; he said he had sore eyes.

ANN SIMONDS . I sell things in Holborn. This boy asked me to give an eye to the barrow while he went to the scowerer; he took two or three pots out, he left the barrow up Plow-court. I did not see him again till the next day; I said to him, what did you leave the barrow there for. I took him up to the constables house; he said he took the pots to the scourers in Chicklane. I am sure this is the boy that left the barrow and told me to give an eye to it.

WILLIAM GREEN . I am a constable of St. Andrews. On the 28th of September I was informed there was a barrow left in the passage of Plow-court; I found from Mrs. Simonds that a boy had left it there between four and five; I took it to my own house. I got a description of the boy that had left it there. I found out that Mr. Walduck had lost the barrow; and during my absence Mrs. Simonds brought the boy into my house the back way, he took the advantage and run out of the front door. I took the prisoner the next day in Smithfield market, I asked him if he would tell me what he had done with the pots it would be greatly in his favour; he said they were done; he was willing to go to sea.

Q. to prosecutor. Have you seen the barrow - A. Yes; I know it to be mine.

Prisoner's Defence. Since I have been in trouble my father has been obliged to put my mother and two children in the workhouse.

GUILTY , aged 15.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18091101-21

836. GEORGE CLARK was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 24th of October , a watch, value 26 l. and a key, value 5 s. the property of William Broad .

WILLIAM BROAD . I am a watchmaker in Leadenhall-street . On the 24th of October, in the evening, the prisoner called upon me, he represented himself as a lieutenant in the navy; he was genteely dressed, apparently as an officer; he said he had lately returned from the coast of France, from a successful voyage; his captain and him had taken lodgings at the Saracen's Head inn, Aldgate, for a few days; his captain was there, and he wanted a gold watch; my young man and myself were in the shop; we shewed him a very good watch; after he looked at the watch he gave it me to wind up; I wound it up and set it, and after winding it up and setting it I put it down on the counter, he took it up and put it into his pocket; my young man was to accompany him to the Saracens Head inn, and there he would pay him for the watch. I did not see him afterwards till I assisted in apprehending of him.

Q. How long was that afterwards - A. On the Saturday morning following. This was on the 24th and Saturday was the 28th. Immediately after we found the person had defrauded me out of the watch we went to Bow-street, and bills were circulated about the trade. When we took him in custody he said he had injured me most exceedingly, and he lay at my mercy; I made no reply.

Q. How much was he to give you for the watch - A. Twenty six pound five shillings.

Q. Did you deliver it to him - A. He took it off the counter. I laid the watch down after I had set it and he took it up.

Q. He talked to you about this captain - A. He said the captain wanted a very good watch.

Q. Was the captain to see it - A. We made out a bill of parcels in the name of lieutenant Pierce, that was the name he assumed.

Q. Oh then you sold it to lieutenant Pierce and not to the captain - A. Yes, to the prisoner, who assumed the name of lieutenant Pierce. He said he and the captain had taken lodgings at the Saracen's Head for three or four days; he said my young man should accompany him to the Saracens Head, He had engaged two rooms prior to this at the Saracens Head.

Q. How do you know that - A. From the waiter and master of the inn.

Q. Then you did not deliver the watch to him - A. No; I put it on the counter and he took it up.

Prisoner. Did not you put the watch into a leather bag and put it into my hands - A. No; I put it on the counter after having set it; I delivered the bill of parcels into your hand.

COURT. Then you trusted him with it - A. Yes. The prisoner had possession of the watch, but he went with my young man arm in arm; he was in charge of my young man.

CHRISTOPHER ROWLAND . I am an apprentice to Mr. Broad. On the 24th of October the prisoner came into the shop and said he had been recently in the East India service, but now he was removed to the navy, and he wanted a very good gold watch; we shewed him a very good one, which was twenty five guineas; he said him and his governor, which he called him at that time, had taken lodgings at the Saracens Head for three or four days; he liked the watch very well, putting it in his pocket; he had not got money enough to pay for it, but if I would go with him to the Saracen's Head, there I should receive the money for it. Previous to that he said that he had taken the York frigate; going along with him I asked him where he took it; he said off Bolougne. He went in at the back door, went up there very familiar, and called the waiter, told him to light two candles, which were on the table, and then ordered him to bring up two glasses of negus; it was brought, and then he asked me if I had a receipt, I told him I had a stamp and I would write a receipt; he drank one glass of negus, then asked me if I had change for three tens, I told him I had not; he told me he would go and get the exact money, leaving me writing the receipt. Previous to his going out he said his luggage was in the next room, and he had change; he went out, asked me how much, I answered, twenty six pounds five shillings. He had not been gone five minutes when I rang for the waiter, a strange waiter came up; I desired him to send up the waiter that brought up the wine and water. When

he came up. I said you know that gentleman, that I came up with, a few minutes ago; he replied I know no more of him, than he took these lodgings about a quarter of an hour ago, the mistress of the house came up, and there was some confusion, she reproved the waiter, for not looking after persons that came with no baggage; I ran home and got some hand bills and circulated them at the east end of the town; on Saturday a person came and told us they had seen a watch that was advertised with the name of William Broad, describing it. The prisoner went away with the watch, I never saw him till Saturday morning, I am sure he is the man.

GEORGE FONDALL . I am a waiter at the Saracens Head Inn, Aldgate, on the 24th of August, the young man came to our house and took a sitting room and a bed chamber said he was going to stop three or four days, he came to our house between six and seven in the evening he called me up into his room, he said if a young man a midshipman called upon him to say that he should be back in a few minutes, I asked him what name the gentleman would enquire for, he said lieutenant Pierce; he went out and I suppose in a quarter of an hour he returned with Mr. Broads young man, they both went up into the room, I lighted candles for them.

Q. He had never laid at your house at all - A. No he called for two glasses of port wine negus. I took it up to him, I came down stairs in about five minutes he came down stairs he was going out of the back door, I told him to go out of the other back door, there are two back doors in the yard; In a few minutes the young man came down and asked whether the prisoner had any baggage.

WILLIAM PLAISTOW. I am an officer of the ward of Aldgate. I was applied to by Mr. Broad, I went with him and his young man to a house in Houndsditch. I immediately went through the shop into the parlour and there saw the prisoner sitting by the fire with a watch coat on, endeavouring to hide his face he was buttening himself up, Mr. Broad followed me in, I asked him it this was the person that he wanted, he said yes; how do you do lieutenant Pierce, I am glad to see you you are my prisoner. The prisoner said he hoped Mr. Broad would not do any thing, he would pay him for the watch, and make this gentleman a handsome present, meaning me. He asked to dress himself, he had trowsers on only and this great coat; I said certainly dress yourself, he put his jacket on, he turned into the cupboard, by the fire side; Mr. Broad said we must not lose sight of him. I said I did not intend, we opened the cupboard door, he was not there, I found that cupboard led into the yard we ran out of the front door to the next house he was coming out of that house, we then secured him, as he went along; I put some questions to him, I had very great reason to think that he had the property upon him, I said so he gave it me.

Prisoner's Defence. My lord and gentlemen of the jury I went to the prosecutors shop, and made a purchase of a watch of twenty-six pounds five shillings, it is true for which I offered a thirty pound note, the prosecutor not having change; I told him if he would send a person to the Saracens Head Aldgate, I would get change, the prosecutor gave me the watch his man came to me, at the Saracens Head I could not get change at this place, I went out to get change, I saw a press gang coming, as I had not a protection, I ran from them I mean'd to pay Mr. Broad as soon as I could with safety come to my lodgings.

GUILTY , aged 16

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18091101-22

837. JOHN MUNCASTER , was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 17th of October a pair of leather boot legs value 7 s. a pair of back straps, value 1 s. the property of Luke Thomas Flood , and Henry Bond .

LUKE THOMAS FLOOD . My partners name is Henry Bond , we live in Leicester-place Leicester-square , we are leather sellers . On Saturday the 14th of October I received information which led me to secrete myself and watch on Sunday morning the 15th between nine and ten, I saw him unlock the door and enter the warehouse, he remained there about six minutes he then came out double locked the door as he found it; opened the street door very cautiously and shut it softly; I communicated what I had seen to my partner, and on the following morning which was the Monday, I locked my partner in this warehouse, I saw him secrete himself, I remained on the stairs as before, and saw him enter, my partner will tell you that he stole velvit that morning, I saw him come out after being there about six minutes, he went out of the street door in a cautious way. I immediately opened the warehouse door my partner told me he had stolen about five or six yards of velveteen; which he put in his breeches; we suffered him to escape with this also; on the next morning I saw him enter the warehouse in the same cautionary way, my partner being situated under the table as before, he came out after being there about five minutes I lost no time, opened the door and asked my partner what he had taken, he said boot legs and straps, I immediately opened the street door and pursued him, I collared him, and said your hour is come at last, and delivered him up to Mr. Atkins, the officer who was waiting with his brother in the neighbourhood, we took him to a public house, and searched him, found the boot legs, and some canvas, in his breeches, and the back straps in his coat pocket, and some candles, which he took out of the accounting house, in his other pocket.

Q. What situation was he with you. - A. Porter , we asked him what he had done with the velveteen, he had taken on the former morning, he said it would do him no good he would say nothing.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence; called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 63.

Fined 1 s . Confined two Years in the House of Correction, and there kept to hard Labour .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18091101-23

838. JANE WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 28th of September , twenty-six yards of linen cloth, value 3 l. the property of Samuel Clark , privately in his shop .

DAVID GRIFFITHS . On the 28th of September, the prisoner accompanied by another woman, came to our house about a quarter after six in the evening to match a pattern of silk. I was alone in the shop, one of the women came to me, and asked me, if I could match the pattern; I told her we had not the colour and if we had I could not match it by candle light, being purple and green, to the best of my knowledge on my reply she kept close to me my, back being to the window,

while I was looking at the pattern by the candle, the prisoner went out, and I thought she went out rather suspicious; I cast my eye to the window, I found that a piece of linen cloth was gone, I immediately ran after her, and took her about two yards, from the door.

Q. It was a piece that you had in your recollection being in the window before. - A. Yes, I dressed the window myself and I knew I had placed it there on which we placed some lustres in the day, to show to the best advantage; I pursued her I took hold of her hand, and she had the piece of cloth in her right hand, she made some remark, pleading for mercy; I took her back to the shop, called my employer down; I told him the affair, and then he sent for a constable and gave her into custody.

BARNES. I am a constable, who took the charge of the prisoner and the cloth.

GRIFFITHS. It is my masters property, it is the piece of cloth that the prisoner took.

GUILTY - DEATH . aged 36.

First Middlesex jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18091101-24

839. JOHN COLE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 29th of September , from the person of Hester Randall , widow a 30 l. five 20 l. two 10 l. six 5 l. one 2 l. and two 1 l. bank of England notes, and a promissory note, for the payment of 2 l. her property .

HESTER RANDELL. Q. You are a widow - A. Yes I live at No. 26 Dean-street, Shadwell; on the evening of the 29th of September, I went to the Royalty theatre , with four of my children, I went into the pit.

Q. Did you carry any property with you - A. Yes 186 l. I carried it in my left hand pocket they were, pinned in a paper I had them some time in my pocket; a man who was a stranger to me, sat on my left hand, my children sat on my right; I am quite certain I had the notes in my pocket; I felt them five minutes before I lost them.

Q. Do you mean that you put your hand into your pocket - A. No, I felt on the outside, about half after nine; I sent two of my children out to get some pastry when they returned, I opened the handkerchief, the prisoner looked very hard into the bundle; I said will you partake he said he thanked me, and I gave him a rasberry tart, a little time after; the man got up, I felt a something several times, just at my back.

Q. On which side was he - A, On my left side in a little time, the prisoner turned round, stepped over the seat side ways, he went towards the pit door; I thought it very strange, that he did not bid me good night on account of my giving him the tart, I felt my pocket immediately I could not get my hand into my pocket it was, as if it was twisted, I felt outside of my pocket and missed the paper, containing the notes, upon my missing the notes; I reached out to my daughter who sat near the pit door; I said Mary, I am robbed and the man that has gone over there, has robbed me; my children called out stop thief. I saw no more of the prisoner till my daughter came, and said mother do not be frightened, I have got your money, I did not see the prisoner go out, I saw him near the pit door, the prisoner was then in charge of Mr. Davis the check taker, my daughter gave me the notes. they were not in the paper, when I went home, I found the paper in the back part of my gown; the paper was pinned, the notes were drawn out.

Q. You had no means of knowing these notes had you - A. Yes, one note was wrote upon it, Captain Theter , a 20 l. note. I had that note near a twelve month in my pocket it was never out of my pocket but once and a 2 l. Gravesend note I could identify.

Q. Does the notes that were delivered back to you by your daughter agree with the number, and value of those you had lost - A. Yes, I told the officer the notes amounted to 136 l. Mr. Beely counted them.

HENRY DAVIS . I am the check taker. I heard the cry in the pit of stop thief, at the time the prisoner came out of the pit, he said I do not want a check, I do not think I shall return, after the prisoner passed me I thought I heard a voice say I will go by, which proceeded from the pit door, the prisoner was at a pair of green folding doors, I nearer the street; he was endeavouring to open it, he was about five yards from me, I considered that the pit doors were stopped up, by some accomplice; I steped through my door, and took the prisoner by the collar with my right hand, that moment he put his hand up his waistcoat, I put my left hand round his back and pinioned his left arm by the elbow; I told him whatever he had got it should be brought to light; I did it to prevent him chucking it away. I pulled him into a square place adjoining the pit door, that admits the half pay, Mrs. Peterson, the prosecutrix's daughter, came up, she said to the prisoner, you have robbed my mother, and I will have the money or notes. In the act of pulling him he gained his arm of me; it was partly at liberty; he put it farther up his waistcoat and I saw some paper drop from it; the daughter picked it up; the mother came up, and the daughter gave her this roll of paper which dropped. I called Britt the officer, he came and took him in custody; Mr. Beeley came up, they conveyed him into my room; I requested Mrs. Randell to be as correct in the sum as possible, before this roll of paper was opened; Mrs. Randell said it is one hundred and eighty-eight pound, immediately correcting herself, said, it is only one hundred and eighty-six pound; Beebey counted the notes and I took down the sums; they amounted to one hundred and eighty-six pounds. The notes were given to Beeby to take care of. We then went to the Star public house, she there said one note was marked captain Theter for twenty pound, it turned out to be so; a Gravesend note; two pound, and a thirty pound note nearly torn, it turned out to be so.

MARY PETERSON. I and my husband were with my mother, Mrs. Randell, I sat on her right hand side, on the outside of all; I did not see who sat on her left hand. I saw my mother get up and put her hand to her left hand pocket, she cried out, Mary, I am robbed, and that man that is going out of the pit has robbed me.

Q. Did you see any person going out of the pit - A. I saw the back of a man, I ran out of the pit, and my brother called out stop thief. When I came out Mr. Davis had the prisoner in custody, I ran to him and took hold of each side of his waistcoat; I said you villain, you have robbed my mother, and I will have the money; he said I have got nothing; he put his hand to the waistband of his small clothes, and he threw down a paper parcel; he tried to put his foot upon it, I immediately moved his foot with my knuckles, and picked up the parcel.

Q. You are sure you saw it drop from him, are you - A. I am quite sure, and I gave it to my mother; she was then standing within the wicket; I was not present when the notes were examined.

Q. Did you find any interruption in getting out of the pit - A. Somebody struck me; I saw the hand; I said I will go past. I did get out.

MR. BEEBY. Q. You are the officer that was called upon this occasion - A. Yes. The prisoner was in the custody of Mr. Britt, another officer; I was in the boxes; I ran down and saw the prisoner in custody; Mrs. Randell delivered me up some paper that was in her hand. I searched the prisoner in Mr. Davis's room, I found nothing upon him but a watch in his watch pocket. Mrs. Randell told me there was one hundred and eighty six pound; I counted it, and found it to be the exact amount.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not mean to quit the playhouse; I meaned to return again; I am innocent.

GUILTY , aged 41.

Transported for Life .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson .

Reference Number: t18091101-25

840. JOHN GEORGE was indicted for that he on the 10th of September , about the hour of nine at night, being in the dwelling house of William Strangeways , feloniously did steal a gold watch, value 5 l. the property of Sarah Strangeways ; - two silver table spoons, value 20 s. six silver tea spoons, value 20 s. a pair of gloves, value 2 s. a snuff box, value 6 d. three guineas, a 5 l. bank note, two 2 l. bank notes, and sixteen one pound bank notes, the property of William Strangeways ; - and that he about the said hour, at night, on the same day, burglariously did break to get out of the said dwelling house .

WILLIAM STRANGEWAYS. I am a butcher , I live in Edward-street, Stepney ; the prisoner was my journeyman , he lived in my house.

Q. Do you remember on the 10th of September putting any notes in your desk - A. Yes; I put in my desk a five pound, two two-pound, and sixteen one pound bank notes, and three guineas; the prisoner stood by me, saw me count them, put them in, and lock my desk. About five o'clock in the afternoon I and the prisoner went to the Ben Johnson , we had tea there; we went away together about six o'clock; I went home with him; I went into my parlour, I saw my desk and opened it, the prisoner stood by. I looked at my notes they were just as I had left them; I locked the desk. I went out, leaving the girl in the care of the house. We then went to the Green Dragon in Stepney, we had there some brandy and water, and wine and water; the prisoner said he must leave me, he must go to get his coat and apron, he was going to get a bullock out of the drove, to hunt him; I told him he had better stop where he was; he said he must go, and away he went; he returned to me in half an hour, with his coat and apron, he had them tied up in an handkerchief; then we left the Green Dragon together; he said he was going into the city about particular business. When we got to Whitechapel church he left me; we was to meet again at Stratton's, the corner of Newgate market. I got to Stratton's public house about half after ten at night; the prisoner came to me in a very great heat, and very uneasy, and said he wanted to be off. We both went home from there.

Q. What had become of his apron and great coat - A. He took it with him, and I took it at Whitechapel church; when he parted with me he desired me to carry them till he met me at Stratton's. We got home about half past eleven, I was going into the parlour, he laid hold of my shoulder and said, come up to bed, sir. I was just then by the parlour door, he said you can see nothing there.

Q. Did he sleep in the room with you - A.Yes; in the same bed.

Q. Was the servant maid at home when you came home - A. Yes, she had just gone up to bed.

Q. What time did you get up in the morning - A. Rather before eight o'clock; he had just got the shop opened when I came down. I then went into my parlour, I observed the desk broken open, it appeared to have been broken open with a chopper; I found the chopper in my shop; I looked in my desk, and I missed all the notes, and the three guineas, and a gold watch which hung by the desk. I went into the shop and told the prisoner my loss; he shook his head and said, d - n it, you are born to be unlucky; he then said, never mind, I will work for you for nothing; then we went out together out of the house; we walked down Whitechapel; he left me to go to Smithfield, and I went to my brother's to tell him what had happened. In the course of the afternoon I met him in Smithfield market, I spoke to him, but did not tell him I suspected him. In about two hours afterwards I was in the Lock and Key, Smithfield; I told him I thought he was the person that had done it; he denied it; he said he had no objection to be searched, he was, and nothing was found. Then he said I suppose you have done with me, I made no answer.

Q. How soon did you see him again - A. It might be three or four days; he came to my house in about a fortnight afterwards, and saw him once in Smithfield market between that he; he came up to me and said he had been down for his box, and he could not find it, he asked me whether I would let him have it; I said, yes. He came the next day and asked me if he might have the box, I said yes, I should like to see what he had in it. There was a pair of gloves, a waistcoat, and a snuff box in it, they were mine; I had lent him the waistcoat, but not the gloves nor the snuff box; he took the box and went away, leaving my things.

MARIA CLAFTON. Q. You were a servant on the 10th of September to Mr. Strangeways - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember Mr. Strangeways and the prisoner going out on the 10th of September - A. Yes, between five and six o'clock, and they came home together about half past six, they did not stay ten minutes.

Q. Did you fasten the sash down before they came home - A. No, George came home. I left the sash up on my hearing him knock at the door, he came into the parlour, he asked me to go up stairs for his coat, I asked him where it was, he said he did not know. I must look for it; I fetched it, when I brought him down the coat, he asked me to go up for his apron. I was to bring him the biggest apron I could find; he wrapped his coat in the apron and tied it up in a handkerchief, he said he would go in the shop and see if the block was against the shop door; he said yes it was.

Q. During the time that you went up stairs, at either time; or both did you hear any noise in the parlour

- A. I heard him walk across the room, and push the bolt of the shutter back.

COURT. Where were you at that time - A. Up stairs over the parlour.

Mr. Knapp. Did you hear any thing else - A. No.

Q. After he had been in the shop, how soon did he go away - A. He staid about five minutes in the shop, he said I must be sure to go to bed, at ten o'clock, he then went away.

Q. Did you go into the parlour after he was gone, A. Yes.

Q. You told me that you left the sash up; when you went into the parlour after he was gone; was the sash up or down - A. Down, sir.

Q. Untill your master came home during the time that they were out, was there any body else in the house but you - A. No, not till my master and he came home. I went to bed a little after eleven, I was awake when my master came home, I heard them come in.

Q. How did they get in - A. My master had the key.

Q. Do you know any thing of any watch being in the parlour - A. Yes, I looked at it at six o'clock, to see what o'clock it was, that was between the time that they both went out together, and the time that they came home together, and I saw it again just before George came in by himself; I did not see it afterwards, I never looked for it; I never examined the bolts, till the next morning, and then I observed the middle bolt, was pulled not quite back.

JOHN MATTHEWS . I am an officer, I apprehended the prisoner in Cow cross street. On the 13th of October, I apprehended him for the robbery of his master, he asked me if I would go with him, to his fathers, I told him no; then he asked me if I would go with him into the Blue Post, I told him I would; he then sent to his father, his father was not at home, I took him to the office; at seven o'clock I took him before the magistrate, on the Tuesday following the prosecutor had notice to attend the magistrate, let the prisoner at liberty till the Tuesday following, on my being answerable for him; I went on the Monday to examine Mr. Strangeway's premises, I examined the outside of the house the fastenings and every thing of that sort, there appeared no force to have been used to the shutters; I went into the parlour, I examined the desk, I found the moulding was broken off, by a purchase that had got under it, I fitted the chopper to the marks on it and there is a bit broke out of the chopper, the print on the chopper was in the desk and where the notch in the chopper, was there was no mark; I tried it underneath the desk where the purchase had been made, it had forced the screws out; I took the chopper and appeared with it before the Magistrate, and the prisoner appeared according to the word I had given for him, on the Tuesday, and the magistrate committed him.

Prisoner's Defence. I am intirely innocent of the charge. On the Sunday, the prosecutor and me went out together he sent me for a young woman, I fetched her, he said he would go to the Ben Johnsons Head to tea, from there he went to the Green Dragon, and had four or five shillings worth of brandy and water, and wine and water, after being there about an hour, he sent me for my coat and apron, he said he meaned to have some fun that night, he did not mean to go home, till one or two o'clock. I returned with my coat and apron, and we went from the Green Dragon to a house in Whitechapel-road, we both went, him and me; I believe to a house by the London infirmary, and had a bottle of mulled wine, and from there, he said he would go to Smithfield; going along by the mansion-house he said that he wished that I would give him a chance with the young woman that he had with him, and to meet him at Mr. Strattons, in half an hour or an hour; I met him there, it was past one o'clock in the morning after being there half an hour, we returned home and went to bed, it was then past two o'clock in the morning; I got up in the morning, he said he had been robbed, I said it was a very bad job of his being robbed, he sent me to Smithfield, he said he would meet me in half an hour, or an hour, he never came till past two o'clock in the afternoon, and after being with him an hour or two we had tea, he said he had a suspicion that I had robbed him and he had me searched, nothing was found, I asked him if he would want me any more, he said no, his shop being shut up I had no business to do, I did not go home that night, I went the next morning, he discharged me.

Q. to prosecutor. It is true that you employed the prisoner any thing about that young woman - A. It is all false, I had nothing of that in my head.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson.

Reference Number: t18091101-26

841. EDWARD POWELL was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 10th of October , two pair of stockings, value 16 s. sixteen handkerchiefs, value 29 s. the property of John Ibbettson , in his dwelling house .

SECOND COUNT for like offence laying them to be the property of Edmund Bowen .

JOHN IBBETTSON . I keep an hotel in Vere-street . On the evening of the 10th of October, between seven and eight o'clock, in consequence of an alarm, I went forward, I found the prisoner at the bottom of the stairs, he was in custody of one of my waiters.

Q. Does Mr. Bowen sleep in your house - A. The reverend Mr. Bowen sleeps in the room, No. 6, up three pair of stairs.

SUSAN MADELL . I live with Mr. Ibbettson. On the evening of the 10th of October I found the prisoner behind the door of No. 6, Mr. Bowen's room, I asked him what he wanted, he said he believed he made a mistake, he wanted Mr. Smith, I told him that was not Mr. Smith's room, his mistake must be rectifed; I believed Mr. Smith was in the coffee room; I went down stairs and one of the waiters secured him.

Q. Did you go up into the room after that - A. Yes; about an hour after that I saw Mr. Smith's handkerchiefs, and two pair of silk stockings laying on the drawers. I had been in the room at half past six, and every drawer was shut, and nothing was on the drawers.

CHRISTIAN BARKER . I am a waiter; I was in the coffee room. In consequence of an alarm by the last witness came into the passage, she asked me if I sent that man up stairs, I said by no means. I asked him what he came there for, he said he was Mr. Smith's servant. Mr. Smith has been in the house two years, he never had a servant. I took him in custody.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18091101-27

836. MARY HUGHES was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Thomas Briggs , about the hour of ten at night, on the 2nd of October , and stealing therein, four silver tea spoons, value 6 s. a silver table spoon, value 5 s. a silver pepper box, value 5 s. and a two pound bank note, his property .

RICHARD GOSS . I am a watchman of Acton. On the night of the 2nd of October, after crying the hour of twelve, I sat down upon Mr. Pierce's step, a linen draper's shop about fourteen or fifteen yards from Mr. Briggs' house, I heard a rattling of a door; I walked towards Mr. Briggs' door, I saw the prisoner opening his glass door; she said, what, Goss, you are our watchman. She had been a servant there, but was not then. I asked her what made her open the door, and told her I would call Mr. Briggs; I left another watchmen with her. I went down a passage and called him, I did not make him hear; she said she would call master; she called out, she seemed very much in liquor. The housekeeper came down in her shift; she said, for God's sake what is the matter; how came you here. When Mr. Briggs came down, he said, take her about her business; then he said search her; Mr. Briggs put his hand into her pocket and took some tea spoons out; he put in his hand the second time and took out a pepper box; he told me to lock her up in the round house; then he said he would not wish her to go to the round house; he then said, take her to a woman of the name of Clarke, where she had slept before, and when I had taken her to this woman's house, Mr. Briggs came down; he said he had lost more property. I saw something in her bosom; I took out of her bosom a two pound note. Mr. Briggs took the spoons and the pepper box, I have kept the note ever since.

THOMAS BRIGGS . I live at Acton , I am a tallow chandler .

Q. Who lives in the house with you - A. Only a housekeeper and a little boy.

Q. You know this night the watchman has been speaking of; what time did you go to bed - A. About half past nine; I left my housekeeper to shut my shop door before I went to bed; I followed her up about five minutes afterwards. I saw the back door bolted; the kitchen window was secured with a wooden pin. About twelve o'clock I was alarmed, I heard a noise below in the shop like people quarrelling; it awaked me. I went to the chamber door and called what noise was that; the watchman answered, come down. I put my clothes on, went down, and saw the watchman and the prisoner there; she was scolding, raving, and quarrelling like a person deranged; she is subject to a deranged mind at times. I then asked her what she did there, and how she came there; she said she was going by about ten o'clock, found the street door open, she came to lay there, that was her place, and there she would be; I have great reason to believe that her intention was to be there all night, because she had made up a fire in the kitchen. When I went to bed I saw the fire out myself. We searched her pockets and took out four silver spoons and a pepper box; I have got them. She was taken to Mrs. Clarke's by my directions, where she had slept before; she made so much noise Mrs. Clarke was afraid to sleep in the house with her; she was searched; I think the watchman said he took the two pound note out of her bosom. She was afterwards taken to the round house, after a great deal of trouble and violence made use of to get her out of the house.

Q. Did she appear to be in liquor - A. I think she did rather.

Q. Where had these silver spoons and the pepper box been put on the over night. - A. They were on the tea-board on the dresser in the kitchen, the two pound note was in the cupboard in the parlour, I believe I locked the cupboard when I went to bed, the cupboard had folding doors, there appeared to be two nails drawn from the bottom, that is the way how it was opened, the lock was not hurt, the shutter of the kitchen window was open, and there were two squares of glass broken, on the next day she said she broke them in opening the windows; she had lived with me five or six years and she had only left me about five or six weeks.

Q. Then her account how she got into this house was, that she found the street door open, that she came in to lay there, that was her place and there she would be. - A. Yes.

Q. What is it you say, you supposed her to be deranged. - A. Yes; I supposed her at times to be deranged, her head was disordered, she used to apply to spirituous liquors, and say it would make her head better, and it always made her head worse, and when she was so I turned her away, not for dishonesty, when her head was bad she would drink, that made her quarrelsome, then I turned her away, and when she got into a sound-mind, then I took her again, the last time I sent her away she went to her friends in the country; she was under the doctor's hands, he advised them to put her into the private madhouse; however she got the better of it.

Prisoner's Defence. On that night I came from London in the stage coach to the George at Acton, between nine and ten o'clock at night, and going by Mr. Briggs' door I saw the door was not fast; before I went into the house I saw there was a light in the housekeeper's room, I thought Mr. Briggs was making of candles; I went into the kitchen, and as I came to the back door I thought I heard somebody come in at the street door, then I went up stairs and the light was not in the housekeeper's room. At the same time I heard Mr. Briggs sleeping in his bed; I came down and fastened all the doors; it was very dark in the kitchen, I opened the window to look for the tinder box; I thought there had been somebody in the house by the doors being left open; in opening the window I struck it by accident; I struck a light, and the first thing that I looked after was the plate, and as I found it I put it into my pocket. I looked in the china closet in the parlour, where there was a deal of plate; I saw it all safe; then I went up into my own room, where my own clothes were I found my box as I left it. I then came down stairs made a fire, and made some tea, and drank it. I intended to sit down there till the morning, untill Mr. Briggs got up; I had sat down in the chair some time, and then I thought I heard somebody at the street door; I went to speak to the watchman; when I came to the door it was the watchman; I said, well watchman, what is it you want; he directly took me in custody; he alarmed me very much, saying, I was his prisoner, and that he would take me away; I said I would not go out of the house till Mr. Briggs came; I went to call Mr. Briggs, in my flurry I fell down; Mr. Briggs came down; the watchman said he would have me searched, I told the watchman not to search me, what I had in my pocket Mr. Briggs was very wellcome to take out. The watchman alarmed me, else I should not have left my umbrella, my bonnet, and my bundle in the kitchen, and a fire was in the kitchen as I was going in again.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Thompson .

Reference Number: t18091101-28

837. ANN TOOTING , otherwise COOPER , was indicted for that she on the 3rd of October , being in the dwelling house of James Chapman , feloniously did steal a watch, value 50 s. four gowns, value 2 l. 8 s. three petticoats, value 15 s. two shawls, value 4 s. a bonnet, value 5 s. a cloak, value 30 s. a silver coral, value 10 s. three pair of stockings, value 3 s. an umbrella, value 5 s. a pair of shoes, value 3 s. and two shifts, value 6 s. the property of James Chapman ; - and having committed the said felony, about the hour of nine at night, on the same day, in the said dwelling house, burglariously did break to get out of the same .

JAMES CHAPMAN . I live in Pelham-street, Mile End New Town ; Mr. Dabbs is the housekeeper; I have two rooms in the house, on the ground floor: Mr. Dabbs has all the other apartments; he lives in the same house. On the third of October the prisoner lodged and worked in one of the rooms that I hired, she was to wind at a silk engine for my wife, she took her in; she came on the 3d. of October she went away in about seven days, I found her on the 10th. of October down at Spithead, she was on board the Christian the VII. an 80 gun ship, I found a gown of my wife's upon her back, and a pair of my wife's velvet shoes on her feet, and a cap of my wife's she had on; the boatswain brought a bundle up containing three gowns and other things, the woman and the bundle were put in a boat, the officer and I brought her on shore, she went before a magistrate, and the things were delivered to me by the magistrate, she kept the shoes that she had on her feet, and the cap she had on till she came to London.

ANN CHAPMAN . Q. You are the wife of the last last witness. - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember Ann Tooting coming to your house on the 3d. of October. - A. She came in September; she went away on the 3d. of October about half past eight or nine in the evening, I and my husband and family were all in bed, she was in another room on the same floor, it was near half past eight when I went to bed, I awoke before nine and then she was gone, I missed my husband's watch that hung over my head where I slept, I got out of bed and missed all I had; all the articles mentioned in the indictment. My husband brought her from Spithead, I met my husband coming up with her in Bishopsgate-street, she then had my shoes on her feet, the things she had in the bundle are all mine, they were all in my drawers before she went away.

RICHARD PHILLIP CLYAMS , I am a servant to Mr. Perkins, Pawnbroker, 52, Bishopsgate-without, I have a watch pawned on the 4th of October, by a woman, I cannot say by whom.

DANIEL BISHOP , I am an Officer of Worship-street Office, on the 19th of October, the prisoner was brought to me at the office by the prosecutor at the time Vickery took a gown off her back and a bonnet, the prosecutor told me that the watch was pawned at Mr. Perkins's by the prisoner. I went there and told them to produce it.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence, called three witnesses who gave her a good character.

GUILTY, aged 23, of stealing only .

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18091101-29

838. JOHN DODSON was indicted for feloniously assaulting John Kendrick in the kings highway, on the 22d of October , putting him in fear and taking from his person and against his will, a watch value 4 l. and a pocket book value 1 d. his property .

JOHN KENDRICK . On the 22d of October as I was coming down to the bottom of the court to come into Golden Lane , there were two persons laid hold of me the prisoner was one of them, he caught hold of me by the arm, they both laid hold of me, and while the prisoner held me in conversation, I felt a sudden jerk at my pocket, at that time the other held me, I saw the prisoner unbutton his coat, I did not see him take out my watch, I saw the chain hanging out of his waistcoat pocket when his coat was open, it is a gilt watch chain, with two keys and one seal, he put his other hand into my waistcoat, to an inside breast pocket nearly under my arm, he took my pocket book out, and put it into his pocket; I was challenging him with having my watch in the mean time Cullen came up.

Q. Had you made any noise to call any body before Cullen came up A. No; I was only challenging the prisoner, Cullen told me that he saw the prisoner put the watch in his pocket, in the prisoner's presence, I had hold of the prisoner by his coat, he immediately gave me a blow which knocked me down, he ran away, and I and Cullen pursued him, he run up a court, there was no passage through the court, and as I went to the bottom of the court I saw him coming down with a knife in his hand; stop thief! was cried out by me and the witness repeatedly, and Prince the officer came up and stopped him, and took him in custody; the other man ran away immediately. The pocket book was found near the place where he was searched.

Q. What time of the day was this. A. Between twelve and one.

Q. Were you in liquor. A. I had been drinking, but I was sober. No other person run up the court but the prisoner when I was pursuing him.

Mr. CULLEN. I live at No. 13, Great Arthur-street.

Q. That is near where this robbery took place. A. Yes; I was standing looking out of my window, I saw this Kendrick between two men, towards the bottom of Great Arthur-street, they were holding him by the coat, I saw soon after a watch in the prisoner's right hand, which I saw him put into his right hand waistcoat pocket.

Q. The first time you saw him the watch was not in his hand, was it. A. I did not perceive it in his hand.

Q. What did he do with that watch? A. He put it into his right hand waistcoat pocket, I still kept looking at him; I saw Kendrick put his hand down to his breeches, as if to feel for something; I judged then there was something amiss, I opened the front door, I heard Kendrick say he had lost his watch, I supposed they were acquaintances, I said your friend has got your watch in his right hand waistcoat pocket. Then he made his escape and ran away, and I followed after, by my following of him and the alarm of stop thief, he ran into a court in Golden Lane, where there was no thoroughfare; he returned, and I followed him with Mr. Kenrick up Golden Lane, I saw Prince the officer standing in the middle of the street he stopped him and took him into his house and searched him, I said you will find the watch in his right hand waistcoat pocket; I came away and a man a stranger that followed him as well as myself, we went up the court to search for the watch, we could find none, I returned and went home, I heard the watch was found, that is all know of my own knowledge except what I have heard.

JOSEPH PRINCE . I am an headborough of St. Luke

Q. Did you see the prisoner in Golden-lane on the 22d of October - A. Yes, the prisoner was running up Golden-lane towards Old-street; I saw a great mob, I heard the cry of stop thief, as I was in Golden-lane, I went to stop him, he up with his fist, he said you b - r I will knock you down if you offer to stop me; I collared him with my left hand and seized him with my other hand, we had a bit of a scuffle, I took him into my own house and searched him, I found nothing upon him but his knife. This pocket-book was just at my back door. I stopped him a great way from Arthur-street, where he started. The watch was found by Mr. Walden.

MR. WALDEN. I am a corn-chandler, 64, Golden-lane; I heard the alarm of stop thief on the 22d of October; I believe, about one o'clock, I saw the prisoner running down Turks-head court, he crossed Golden-lane, and went into Bannister-court where there was no thoroughfare, he returned in a very short time. I turned down that court to make a search, there we found nothing in the court; I afterwards went through my own house into my back yard. In Bannister court there is a wall about five feet high, and the paling about three feet; at the top of the wall the paling is not close, a person might put his hand through between the paling and the wall. I looked out of my own yard, and saw the watch lay behind the wall of Bannister-court; I went over my yard into that yard and picked it up, and went through my neighbour's house into the street again. I took the watch to Mr. Prince's house, the prosecutor Kendrick was there, I desired him to explain what kind of a watch it was, before I gave it to the officer; he described the name and the number, and the chain and seal answered to his description

Q. to Prince. Have you got the watch - A. Yes, and the pocket-book.

Court. Shew it to the Prosecutor.

Prosecutor. This is my watch, and the chain and seal is mine, and the pocket book is mine; I believe it is in the same situation now as when I lost it.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 27.

First Middlesex Jury before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18091101-30

839. SARAH WARDLY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 19th of September , a napkin, value 1 s. a piece of bobbin wire, value 10 s. and 12 yards of lace, value 1 l. 18 s. the property of George Blundell .

GEORGE BLUNDELL . I am a haberdasher in Bishopsgate-street , the prisoner was my cook , she lived with me about three months the last time, and three months upon a former occasion. On the 18th of September in consequence of suspicion, I sent for a constable to search her box, which was in the attic story, the box was locked, she gave the key; we found in her box a yard and a quarter of lace, and several articles besides, which I knew to be mine.

Q. What is the value of the lace. A. About 10 shillings a yard. I have a card of lace here that it was cut off, nothing but the scissars parted it. She had been out, I asked her when she came in where she had been, she said she would not tell me.

ANN SEAMAN . I live at 26, Chappel-street, Curtain-road, Shoreditch.

Q. I believe the prisoner while out of place, had lodged at your house - A. She had, and she left a box in my care.

Q. On the 18th of September did she come to your house. A. She did; between ten and eleven o'clock in the forenoon, she brought some things, put them on my bed, and desired me to put them in her box, which I did; she desired me to break the box open, as it was locked and she had not got the key.

Q. Did you send your husband with that box the next day to Mr. Blundell - A. Yes, and it contained those things that she brought.

JOHN SEAMAN . Q. You are the husband of the last witness - A. Yes.

Q. Did you convey a box from your house to Mr. Blundell - A. I did, exactly in the same state as I received it from my wife.

MR. BLUNDELL. I was present when the box was opened; upon examining the box, I found a napkin which belonged to the family, there is a letter B with a figure of four upon it, a block of bobbin-wire with my hand-writing upon it, and a remnant of lace I think they are worth 30 or 40 shillings; and different articles, I had never sold any of them to the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of what Mr. Blundell accuses me of.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Confined three months in Newgate , and fined 1 s .

London Jury before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18091101-31

840. ELIZABETH JOHNSON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 23d of October , a watch, value 2 l the property of John Cokely , in his dwelling house .

JOHN COKELY . I live in the parish of Whitechapel - I am a housekeeper - the prisoner is my next door neighbour. On the 23d of October, about half-past eight, the prisoner came to my house to light a candle, the candle was alight when she came, I was in bed, she had a light of my little girl, she put the two lights out; I asked my little girl for the tinder-box; she had no opportunity of taking the watch, but while I was striking a light. I had seen the watch not ten minutes before she came in; I had placed it over the bed when I went to bed.

Q. How soon did you miss it. A. When I returned from work the next morning, I found it was gone.

HENRY VICKERS . I am a pawnbroker, I live in Cannon-street Road. On the 24th of October, between eight and nine in the morning, the prisoner pawned this watch for twenty four shillings.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Of stealing to the value of twenty-four shillings only.

Confined one year in the House of Correction , and fined one shilling .

Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18091101-32

841. MARTHA NAGLE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 17th of October , in the dwelling house of Mary Pamplin , widow , a wooden box, value 3 s. five guineas, a half a guinea, nineteen dollars, five pieces of foreign coin, value 2 s. 6 d. eleven sixpences, a banknote, value 30 l. a bank note, value 10 l. two bank notes, value 5 l. each, two bank notes, value 2 l each, and 27 bank notes, value 1 l. each, her property .

MARY PAMPLIN . Q. You are a widow - A. Yes, I keep the Angel and Trumpet public-house, Stepney-green . The prisoner was my servant. My sister, Catharine Dewdney , went up to make my bed, and she left the door open, and this girl went into my bed room and took this box out.

Q. That is what you suppose, you did not see her take it - A. No.

Q. When had the girl left your house - A. On Tuesday, the 17th of October, about five o'clock.

Q. How do you know that she left your house at that time - A. A neighbour came and informed me that my servant was gone. Her name is Goodey, I gave her warning on the Saturday.

Q. Had you given her warning so early as that - A. No, she was not to go till the end of the month, from the Saturday.

Q. Then she went away of her own accord, without your knowing she was a going, your neighbour Goodey informed you she was gone - A. Yes, I did not believe it, I went down into the kitchen to look for her things, then I found she was gone; I suspected from her going so, that she had robbed me. I sent George Groomby , a young man, after her, he brought her back with the box; he was obligated to charge an officer with her, she would not come back; she came with the officer, Mr. Langley.

Q. When she came back did you see your box. - A. Yes.

Q. What did your box contain - A. Notes and guineas, a 30 l. note, I know it to be the same, it was in my box when it was brought back, it was locked; I opened it with my key afterwards, in the presence of the officer. It was a new note, one that I changed for a neighbour a fortnight before, I have no recollection of the number; the box contained nineteen crown-pieces.

Q. Were they dollars or crown-pieces, they are called dollars in the indictment - A. I am positive they were crown-pieces, and a ten pound note was in the box.

Q. How many two pound notes - A. I cannot particularly say, there were 27 ones, and some curious small pieces of money; the contents of the box was, as I expected to find it.

Q. Now how long before it was taken away had you seen it - A. The day before she went away, about five o'clock, and I saw the box underneath the head of my bed, I put it there myself when I went to bed; in the morning I am positive I left it there. There was nobody in the room but me and my sister, I was the last in the room, the money and the notes were altogether in the box.

GEORGE GROOMBY . Q. You lodge with Mrs. Pamplin do you - A. Yes.

Q. Did you by her desire follow the prisoner - A. Yes, I set off about five o'clock, I overtook her by Mr. Charrington's brewhouse, in Mile-end road, I asked her to go back again, because her mistress had suspicion that she had robbed her, she said she had not got nothing belonging to her mistress, nor I should not take her back; I took her by the shoulders to the officer's house, and charged the officer with her.

Q. When did you first see the box - A. As I went down the passage in the officers house, she threw down the bundle and told me to look over it; I bid her lift the things, she did, then I observed the box with J. P. upon it, for Mrs. Pamplins husbands name; I asked her how she came by it, she said she had bought it a fortnight; I then saw J. P. for John Pamplin; I knew it to be Mrs. Pamplin's box, I gave charge of her to the officer.

Q. You are sure that she said the box was hers, and that she had brought it - I am quite sure of that.

Q. Did you see the box opened - A. Yes, it contained money, I saw the bank notes, a thirty, a ten, two five's, twenty-seven one's, two two's, and nineteen crown pieces.

ROBERT LANGLEY . I am an officer of Mile End Town.

Q. Were you applied to by the last witness to take charge of the prisoner - A. I was. I took her to her mistress's house the Angel and Trumpet, Stepney Green.

Q. Did you see the box - A. I did.

Q. Did you see the box before she carried it there - A. No; the box was in her apron. This is the box with the cash and notes.

Q. to Mr. Shelton. You will see that there are these things in the box - A. One thirty, a ten, 2 five's, 2 two's, 27 one's, and five guineas and a half in gold, and nineteen crown pieces.

Q. to Prosecutrix. Is that your box - A. It is mine, I have had it between seven and eight years, It was my husband's.

Prisoner's Defence. I went up in the afternoon to clean myself, I went into my mistress's room to put my cap on, and I carried my clothes on my arm, I folded them and laid them on her bed room table, and when I had put my cap on I took and put them into my lap, and whether the box was on the table I do not know.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 19,

Second Middlesex Jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18091101-33

842. ESTHER SIMPSON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 10th of October , six yards of cotton, value 9 s. a sheet, value 8 s. 4 gowns, value 1 l. 10 s. and a silver table spoon, value 10 s. and half a crown , the property of Elizabeth Wolfe , spinster .

ELIZABETH WOLFE . I live in Salters Hall Almshouses , I lost six yards of cotton, five gowns, a sheet, a table spoon, and half a crown, they were taken from my box.

Q. Where were these things of yours - A. A person died in my room; I took my box of clothes up into the prisoners room, and when I wanted to go to my box she always denied me, and when I went to fetch my box away my things were taken out. I found the duplicates of my things in my box, I gave them to Mrs. Thomas.

JANE THOMAS, Mrs. Wolfe found the duplicates in her box in the Prisoners room she gave them to me, I gave them to Mr. Geary, the prisoner had left the room and locked the door up.

JAMES GEARY . I am an officer. On Thursday the 10th of October, the prosecutor made application to me, I went in search of the Prisoner, I found her at Wakefield-place Bunhill-row; I had the duplicates of the property in my hand, they were given me by Jane Thomas , I shewed the Prisoner the duplicates, I asked her if she knew any thing of them? she replied, Yes I do, I asked her how she came to absent herself from the place so long? she replied, I had not got money to get them out, and I did not like to go near the place.

Q. How long had she absented herself - A. It is rather better than a month that the things have been pledged, they were pledged on the 7th of September. I never found her till the 10th of October, she throwed

herself into great confusion and said, I hope you will not hurt me, I told her I had nothing at all to do with it, I must take her before a magistrate, I examined Mrs. Wolfe's box, I found the hinges were taken off the lid.

CHARLES TAYLOR. I am a pawnbroker, three gowns on the 8th of September, and a table spoon on the 23d of August were pawned at my shop; I know the prisoner came to the shop, but I cannot say she pawned them.

Prisoner's Defence. The reason that I told her she could not go the box she well knew, there were two trunks of Gentlemen's linen upon the box, and that is the reason I gave her at the time. I unfortunately took in a person that had been backwards and forwards for nine months, she came out of the hospital and asked me to let her abide there till she got a place, she was the only person in the place that could have taken them out, there was a pair of candlesticks she took away from me. I gave her the money to take them out. I was away from home three weeks and a day, although they say it was a month.

Q. How came you to tell the officer that you knew about the duplicates. - A.Because she told me that she had pledged the things. She said, she would give me a couple of guineas to replace the things; she did not give it me, and that was the reason of my going away.

Q. To Prosecutrix. How long had she absconded from the place. - A. About a month.

Q.Was there any other person in the room. - A. No, not when I put my box there. When I went for my things there was another woman there once, she had only come to see her she was not going to stay; she never had any body to lodge with her.

Jury. Did the prisoner ever tell you that there was any boxes on the top of your's. - A. There was a box at one time; when I went to look at my box she refused me. I said I would take hold of one side and she of the other, she would not do it; I offered to take it down many times, she would not let me.

The prisoner called two witnesses who gave her a good character.

GUILTY , aged 29.

Transported for seven years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18091101-34

343. DENNIS SHIELD was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 29th of September , 56 yards of printed callico, value 5 l. the property of George Bateman and Francis Todd ; in the dwelling-house of Francis Todd .

FRANCIS TODD . I am partner to George Bateman , No. 4, Bread-street .

Q. Is the ware-house part of the dwelling-house. - A. Yes. The dwelling-house is above the ware-house; I live in the house only; we occupy the ware-house for our business, and the upper part for my dwelling-house.

Q. For some time back has the prisoner been your porter . - A. For a couple of months.

Q. On the 29th of September, had you directed the prisoner to take any goods out of the ware-house to serve customers. - A. Yes.

Q. Are these the three invoices that you gave him. - A. These are the three invoices that were given to me by the boy who made them out. I gave them to him and read them over to him; I gave the sheet and he laid the sheet. I gave him the goods myself corresponding to that invoice, previous to my giving him the goods. I told him to lay the wrapper or sheet.

Q. Did you and he call over the goods together to see that they corresponded to that invoice. - A. I counted over the goods. I gave him the invoice, he looked them over, and said, it was quite right; after he said, the goods were quite right; he looked over the invoice again, he observed, that one part of the goods were for Miss Abraham's, in Holborn; he said, Miss Abraham's did not like to receive her invoice unless it was sealed up. The boy took and sealed it and gave it to the prisoner; upon that the prisoner turned up the ends of the wrapper. And I mentioned to the boy that I should go up stairs. I left him in the act of folding up the wrapper; I then went up stairs to my lunch, leaving this boy, whom I had received a fortnight before from Christ's Hospital, and the prisoner together. I came down I should suppose in two minutes, I usually come down in ten minutes, but, I then came down in two minutes, and when I came down I saw the prisoner confused; from his manner alone, I was convinced that he was in the act of doing something he ought not. I went backwards into the accounting-house, I watched him through a square of glass from that place. Previous to that he had changed the wrapper, and these two pieces he had placed upon a hole in the wrapper. I observed that as I passed to the accompting-house, with respect to the wrapper I observed a hole in the wrapper; I observed it the moment I came down stairs, and I observed goods in the wrapper that ought not to be; that I did not place in the wrapper.

Q. You looked through the pane of glass in the accompting-house. - A. Yes, I observed the man looked confused; I let him tie up the wrapper with the two pieces that ought not to be in; when he had tied it up I went forward and stopped him. I pointed to the hole and said, that he must be going to rob me, and that he must have turned round from the counter to take them down; this was another wrapper to what he had when I went up stairs. I opened it I found two pieces of printed callico in the wrapper, these are the two pieces: they are stamped fifty-six, they are paid for stamp duty fifty-six, and they are of the value of twenty-two-pence a yard; they would be worth 5 l. altogether.

Q. Are these the patterns of the goods in the wrapper that you sent to your customers. - A. These are the precise style of the things that he was to take out; that is the pattern of the furniture; these prints were of scarlet ground; and the others were two pieces the colour of brown holland.

Q. You say you charged him then, and said he was robbing of you. - A. I did, I took these two pieces out.

Q. I believe you did not immediately apprehend him. - A. I was hurt at the time because I had no reason to suspect him till that morning. I took these two pieces out. I went into the accompting-house and reflected upon it. He went out of doors, and again he came back I provided an officer and apprehended him.

JAMES JOLLY . Q. Are you in the service of Messrs. Todd and Bateman. - A. I am.

Q. Do you remember being present with Mr. Todd and making out this invoice which he has spoken to. - A. Yes I do.

Q. Were you in the ware-house with the prisoner at the time Mr. Todd went up stairs. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you remain in the ware-house with the prisoner

after Mr. Todd had gone up. - A. No, I was not after Mr. Todd had gone up stairs. I said, I must go up. The prisoner said, he would wait for me. I went up leaving the prisoner alone; I came down the minute after Mr. Todd.

MR. WILLIS. I am a constable. These things were given to me by Mr. Todd, they have been in my care ever since.

Mr. Gurney. Q. To Prosecutor. After you had taken the things from the prisoner in the parcel did you deliver them to the constable. - A. I did.

Mr. Knapp. Q. To Prosecutors. I ask you whether he had taken it up before you stopped him. - A. I will not swear whether he had or not; I waited till he was in the net of taking it up.

Mr. Gurney. How far were these things from him, supposing he was at the counter. - A. He must have turned round and taken them from a pile of goods.

Prisoner's Defence. I was not three feet from the place; nor neither had I the wrapper tied up; nor he never went into his accompting-house from the time he came down until I went out of the place.

Court. That is not the charge. The charge is, you having taken these pieces of goods from the pile and putting them in the wrapper, in order to take them away.

The prisoner called seven witnesses who gave him a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 29.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18091101-35

844. EDWARD EDWARDS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 23d of October , two rings, value 25 s. a broach, value 15 s. and six chains, value 15 s. the property of John Endall Wilson , privately in his shop .

JOHN ENDALL WILSON . I am a jeweller . I live in Houndsdith . On Monday morning, the 23d of October, the prisoner came into my warehouse, when he saw me disengaged, he said, he had a few pounds to lay out in jewellery. The person that he had hitherto dealt with having offended him, and if I would serve him on the same terms he had been accustomed to buy he would give me the preference. In consequence of this I showed him such articles as he wished to buy; he looked out goods to the amount of 14 l. he then looked up to the clock, and said it is my breakfast hour, but observed, that business must be attended to in preference to eating and drinking. I then told him that my breakfast was ready and much at his service.

Q. What time in the morning was it. - A. About eight o'clock in the morning he breakfasted with me; we then returned to business; we had not been at business five minutes together before I observed one corner of this paper parcel under his coat. I immediately laid hold of him, desired him to walk up stairs, which he did; and immediately pulled from his breeches-pocket, the rings and the broach: he fell down upon his knees begging forgiveness; he then told me who he was. I sent for his father; an officer was sent for and he was taken into custody.

JEREMIAH THRUBSHALL . I am an officer. I was sent for on the morning of the 23d. The prisoner was up in one of Mr. Wilson's rooms, he begged hard of Mr. Wilson to be sent on board a tender. I informed Mr. Wilson. I could not do it without an order from a magistrate. I searched him, there was no property on him; the property was taken before I came.

Prosecutor. This is the property, I have had it ever since. There is six gold neck chains, two gold rings, and a gold broach; I took nothing from him, he put his hand into his pocket and gave them to me before I asked; this paper I found under his coat, it contains the neck chains; the other things he had in his breeches-pocket.

Prisoner's Defence. I went to purchase these goods; when he turned back I had two rings and a broach in my hand, I wanted a neck-chain, the chains were not under my coat; I asked him how he sold them; he squeezed my hands together and took me up stairs, he asked me what I had there. I told him it was a neck-chain; he said, he would send me on board a tender.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 16.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18091101-36

845. THOMAS MASLIN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 16th of October , twelve ounces weight of tea, value 2 s. the property of the united merchants of England, trading to the East Indies .

JOSEPH TAYLOR . I am a labourer in the East India company's warehouse, and the prisoner was a labourer also. On the 16th of October last, I was working in the warehouse, in Cutler-street, Houndsditch , the prisoner was there before me; when I came in I saw him at work, and I saw a chest which we had been at work on the Saturday; a piece was fastened on the side of the chest, I found the piece to be loose; the prisoner said, he believed it would do; I told him it would do but it wanted better security. I saw him several times take out tea from that chest and put it under his apron. I observed the prisoner take tea from the top and side of that chest; he tasted and smelled it, kept his thumb and finger close and put it in his apron; I gave information of it. I saw the prisoner searched in the accompting-house. I saw a quantity of tea taken from the knees of his breeches.

GEORGE PERRY. I saw a bag of tea taken from the prisoner by Mr. Clement's on the stair-case. I unbuttoned the knees of his breeches, and from underneath of his right thigh I took out a quantity of tea it is the same sort of black tea as was in the bag.

Mr. CLODGES. I belong to the customs. I was present when the prisoner was searched I unbuttoned the left knee of his breeches, I found tea there, there is twelve ounces of tea altogether.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence; called three witnesses who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 48.

Confined three months in Newgate and whipped in jai l.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18091101-37

846. MATEN PARQUIRICH was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 11th of Sept. seven yards of corderoy, value 17 s. 6 d. two gown pieces, value 1 l. 6 s. and six handkerchief, value 8 s. the property of Robert Fordyce , in the dwelling-house of Christopher Back .

ROBERT FORDYCE. I live at No. 20, Old Gravel-lane . I work in the London docks .

Q. What is the prisoner.

A. An Italian; a seafaringman . The prisoner lodged in the same house with me. On the 11th of September, I went out at eight o'clock in the morning, I returned at four o'clock; when I returned these things were taken out of my trunk. I had suspicion of the prisoner because he did not return to his lodging.

THOMAS ALDER. I am an officer. On the 26th of September, I was going up Nightingale-lane, a woman said, that tall man going yonder had made his escape.

I pursued the prisoner and took him in Nightingale-lane, I secured him. I found these things on board a ship; he delivered them up.

Prisoner's Defence. When I was apprehended I was promised to be forgiven, if I would give the goods up.

GUILTY , aged 32.

Publicly whipped and discharged .

The prisoner being a foreigner was tried by a jury of half English and half foreigners,

Before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18091101-38

847. ELIZABETH FLAMSTON was indicted for that she on the 12th of Septs feloniously, knowingly, and without lawful excuse, had in her custody and possession divers forged and counterfeited bank notes for the payment of one pound: she well-knowing the said bank notes to be forged and counterfeited .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded GUILTY .

Transported for 14 years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18091101-39

848. ELIZABETH FLAMSTON was indicted for that she on the 12th of September , in the 49th year of his Majesty's reign, feloniously did forge and counterfeit a bank note for the payment of one pound; with intention to defraud the government and company of the bank of England ; and several other counts for like offence, only, varying the manner of charging them.

Mr. Knapp, counsel for the prosecution declining to offer and evidence, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18091101-40

849. JOHN SLY was indicted for that he on the 9th of September , in the 49th year of his Majesty's reign, feloniously and without any authority in writing for the purpose from the governor of the bank of England, did engrave and cut and knowingly aiding and assisting in engraving and cutting in and upon a certain plate of copper, a certain note purporting to be a bank note for the payment of one pound .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded GUILTY .

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18091101-41

850. SAMUEL TAVERNER was indicted for that he on the 27th of September , feloniously did forge and counterfeit a certain bank note for the payment of one pound, with intention to defraud the governor and company of the bank of England .

Second count for feloniously disposing and putting away a like forged bank note with the same intention; and several other counts for like offence, with intention to defraud Job Coles .

JOB COLES. Q. You are a salesman . - A. I am; on the 27th of September, I sold the prisoner an ox, the price of it was 17 l. 10 s. he paid me ten guineas in cash, and seven pound in note.

Q. What did the notes consist of. - A. Two two's and three one's, apparently bank of England notes. I put the cash into the notes and wrapped it up together to give to my book-keeper; on the next day I gave them to Mr Skinner, my book-keeper.

Q. Are you sure the cash and notes you gave to Mr. Skinner were the same cash and notes you received of the prisoner. - A. I took out two half guineas and gave him a one pound note and a shilling for it. I am sure it was the same money; I am sure the five notes that I took of the prisoner I gave them to Skinner on the next day. I bid him put Taverner upon them, I gave him the five first, I saw him mark the outside one. I gave him the money and the five notes.

WALTER SKINNER. Q. You are an agent to a salesman in Smithfield market. - A. I am.

Q. Do you know the last witness Mr. Job Coles. - A. Perfectly well.

Q. Do you remember receiving any notes of him. A. Yes; there were seven pounds put together which Mr. Cole gave me in the name of Taverner; and while I was making the entry he told me that he took two half guineas away from the guineas, he said, here is a one pound note and a shilling. I believe I wrote Mr. Cole's name upon it.

Q. What were the notes that you received of Mr. Cole's independant of that one pound note.

A. Two two pound notes, and three single one pound notes. I mark the outside of the five with the name of Taverner upon it; this is the outside note, I put twenty-eight upon it because I received it on the 28th; the next day I put nine on it. I marked the other four, upon the front Taverner and the day, the 29th being the day I marked them, these are the identical notes. I doubled them up and put them in a book which I keep for the business of Smithfield Market, which book was put in a small drawer and remained there till the next day.

Q. Are you sure these are the five notes. - A. I am.

Q. Do you remember seeing the prisoner in Smithfield Market, on the 6th of October. - A. Yes, he came to enquire for Mr. Coles. Mr. Coles was just gone, he went to seek for him at the inn where the coach was going off into the country, he was in great anxiety to see him. He did not see him he came back; he told me he came about these notes which he understood Mr. Cole's had received of him. I recommended him to go to the bank, and told him that the notes were at the bank; he had nothing to apprehend if he could prove who he received them of. I told him they were forged notes; he told me that he had heard it in Smithfield Market; and that the clerks of the bank were after him. He declined going to the bank; he said, he could not say of whom he received them, if he was to die for it. He said, it would hurt his credit in the country; and people would talk a great deal about it in the country to his prejudice. I think he said, he had been arrested three times in a short period, he did not tell me upon what account. He said, he might have received them at Windsor Market, but, he did not know that he did received them there.

Q. What did you do with the notes after you received them. - A. I sent them to a banker's by a young man with other articles that I had received in payment.

Q. However, you sent no other with the mark of Taverner upon it. - A. No.

JOHN LEE . Q. You are one of the inspecters of bank notes at the bank. - A. I am.

Q. Be so good as to take this note in your hand, and tell me whether this is a forged note. - A. It is a forged one: the signatures are forged, it is not upon bank paper, it is a forgery throughout, there is no water mark.

Q. Look at the other two one pound notes. - A. They are from the same plate as the first, they are also forged throughout; they have the same artificial hand-writing. And these two one pound notes are also forged throughout, they are also from one plate, and are fitted up with the same hand-writing as the one pound.

Q. Is there any thing wanting to compleat the two two pound notes. - A. Certainly one of the date are wanting in both the two's, the left hand date is left out in both

of them.

Q. Did you hear the prisoner give you any account in what manner he came by them. - A. He said, he received them at different times, these five notes; he said, he received his money in small sums; and in consequence of a banker failing in town he had hoarded up bank notes to carry to market; he could not give any account of having received them at different times.

Q. Did you serve that notice to the prisoner. - A. I did, it is a copy of a notice I sent him.

Mr. Gurney. I think the prisoner was first of all examined by the magistrate down in the country. - A. He was.

Q.He came and surrendered himself to the magistrate did not he. - A. No, he did not, he was taken by Dowsett the officer, at Windsor Market.

Q. You have stated that in these notes there is no watermarks. - Q. I have.

Q. You mean the paper-mark. - A. Yes.

Q. You do not mean that there is no water-mark of the Bank of England. - A. No, I know that is there.

MR. NICHOLL. Q. You are a servant to Mr. Hebsworth. - A. I am.

Q. Do you remember receiving any notes of the prisoner at the bar. - A. Yes, at the Horseshoe, near Warvil, in Berkshire. It is a month ago last Monday, I received a bank note of him for my master for two sheep I had sold him. I delivered that note to my master.

JAMES HEBSWORTH . Q. Do you remember receiving any note from the last witness in the beginning of October, last. - A. I do, he told me he received it from Taverner. I received the note on the 4th of October.

Mr. Gurney. I object to this.

Court. It strikes me it is not admissable. I cannot couple crimes in this way: if the note had been produced and it proved to be of the same fabrication, then it might infer a dealing with the same machine that they were made of then there would have been a circumstance to couple it with this; if there had been any evidence to couple it with this, then I should have suffered it to have.

PLATT KNIGHT. Q. You are a shoe-maker. - A. Yes, I lived at Alliport, at the time. I sold the horse to the prisoner and an orchard of grass; the poney was sold for four guineas, and the grass for three guineas and a half. He paid me a five pound note and a one pound note down in notes; this was in July, the day of the month I cannot say; I had no other note in my pocket, I carried them to Mr. Bovington, a currier, at Eaton, in Buckingham.

Q. Did you ever apply to the prisoner for the amount of that note. - A. I did for the amount of the five pound note. Mr. Bovington sent to me that it was a bad note, I paid the amount of it. The prisoner went with me to Mr. Bovington; the prisoner said, he did not know where he took it; he promised to make it good, and he did so.

Q. Was the note shewn him. - A. No, it was stopped at the bank; he was told the note was stopped at the bank.

MR. BOVINGTON. Q. You are a currier, living at Eaton. - A. Yes.

Q. Did you receive a five pound note any time in July last, of the last witness Mr. Knight. - A. I did I made an entry of it in my book, the book is here; 17th of July, No. 1676, taken of Mr. Knight, signed by Budd, drawn on the bank of England, dated August 13, 1808; the sum 5 l. paid to Messrs. Hull and Smith, bankers, Uxbridge Bank, on the 29th of July.

Q. Did you make any mark on it. - A. None.

Q. Did you afterwards say any thing to the prisoner respecting that note. - A. Yes, the prisoner said, he knew nothing at all of whom he took it; it was very hard for him to return the money, every body knew he was poor; when he could return the money he would.

Q. Look at that note, do you believe that to be the note that you received. - A. I have no knowledge whatever of the note; it corresponds in all respects with my entry. The person to whom I paid it is a quaker.

Q. To Mr. LEE. Look at the five pound note, is that a genuine bank note. - A. It is a forged one. The one pound note real.

Prisoner's Defence. I am not guilty of what I am accused; I can only say, I took them in my trade as good notes, and so I passed them.

The prisoner called eleven witnesses who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18091101-42

SAMUEL TAVERNER was indicted for that he on the 27th of September , feloniously did forge and counterfiet a certain bank note, for the payment of two pounds, with intention to defraud the company of the Bank of England .

Second count for disposing of and putting away the said forged bank note, well-knowing it to be forged, with like intention; and several other counts for like offence, only varying the manner of charging them.

Mr. KNAPP, counsel for the prosecution declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex jury, before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18091101-43

851. CHARLES RUTHERFORD was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Henry Davidson , about the hour of two at night, on the 20th of October , with intent to steal, and stealing therein two quart bottles filled with wine, value 10 s. and 36 quart bottles filled with other wines, value 9 l. his property .

JAMES MARSHALL . I am a watchman in Great Wild-street, Lincoln's-Inn-fields.

Q. On the night of the 20th of October was your attention drawn to Mr. Davidson's premises - A. Yes; I found the bars of the cellar window were disturbed out of their places. It was about two o'clock in the morning after crying the hour of two, I came round where these bars were disturbed; I saw three men, one made towards me, the other crossed the street, and the other made up Queen-street, I went up Wild Passage into Drury-Lane, and came down Princes Court into Wild-street; I heard them talking and whispering together, with that I went into Drury Lane, where Tooney the watchman was; I gave him the alarm, and we both went together.

Q. When you got with the watchman did you see any body in the cellar. - A. I heard them talk in the cellar; we sprang our rattles, that alarmed Mr. Davidson and others.

Q. Did you go into the cellar. A. No.

Mr. Gurney. Q. How long had you seen the cellar opened before you made the alarm. A. I did not see it open, I saw the bars raised about half an hour before I raised an alarm.

Q. By being in that state any one might fall through, it was in a dangerous state. A. It was ready for them to get in.

DAVID TOONY. After your partner had given you the alarm did you search Mr. Davidson's cellar. - A. I did; I found the prisoner and another man, who made his escape.

Court. Did you find him in the cellar. - A. I did; I never parted from him; I saw the bars wrenched.

Q.From the state of the cellar bars do you think he tumbled in by accident. - A. No.

HENRY DAVIDSON . Q. You live in Great Wild-street . - A. Yes; I keep the Red Lion .

Q. Did you see the cellar flap that night. - A. I cannot say that I saw it shut, the flap of the cellar was fastened, I found the three bars wrenched off when I was alarmed.

Q. Was any thing in your cellar. - A. Yes, a great deal of wine.

Q. Had the wine been carried off. - A. Yes; there were three bottles they had left just close to the iron bars ready to be taken off; they were in the beer cellar.

Q. Then they had been removed from the wine cellar to the beer cellar. - A. Yes. There was one bottle the watchman found by the other watchman out of the cellar.

Q. You did not see the watchman find it. - A. No; he is here.

Q. Were there any others removed. - A. No; this lamp was burning among some straw in my wine cellar.

Q. That is a common burner from somewhere out of the street. - A. Yes.

Q. These bars, where were they the night before. - A. They were nailed at both ends, they were placed close to the left hand side of the foredoor to let light in the cellar, that is the way they got in the cellar, by wrenching the bars off, the flap was remaining where it ought to be, only these three bars were wrenched up by which means persons could get down the cellar.

Q. Was this cellar part of your dwelling house. - A. Yes, made under the parlour of my dwelling house.

Q. What parish is it in. - A. St. Giles's ; I am the housekeeper.

Mr. Gurney. How lately before had you seen these bars secured. - A. I can swear that I had seen them secure at half after nine o'clock that night.

Mr. Curwood. Q. to Tooney. Did you find the bottles; I found them at the door of oneside, one broke, and one sound just at the corner of the door, they had just been handed out of the street, we gave the bottle that was full to Mr. Davison, I saw my partner give it him. I do not know what became of the other that was broke.

Prosecutor. This is the bottle the watchman gave me.

Q. Can you swear to that bottle being yours. - A. No, I cannot. It is white wine, I have not tasted it, I missed white wine from my cellar, such a bottle as that is.

Mr. Gurney. Whether that is wine or vinegar you cannot tell. - A. No.

Court. Open the bottle and taste it. - A. It is mountain wine. There were four bottles of mountain wine in the cellar, they were all gone.

Prisoners Defence. I was very much intoxicated in liquor, going up Wild-street, Lincoln's-Inn-fields, I tumbled through a hole, I fell upon my head which took my senses away, I did not know where I was till a parcel or people came round me, they told me I got into the place to rob it. If there was another man there I did not know it, he must be there before me, he might have broken into the cellar, he made his escape, if I had not known myself innocent I might have made my escape.

The prisoner called four witnesses who gave him a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 28.

Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18091101-44

852. MARY TOONEY was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Henry M'Donald , he and others being in the same dwelling-house, about the hour of six in the afternoon on the 21st of Oct. and stealing eight yards of diaper, value 4 l. 4 s. the property of Mary Hanlom . MARY HANLOM and JAMES HANLOM were called, and not appearing in court, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron Thompson .

Reference Number: t18091101-45

853. HENRY HOSKINS was indicted for feloniously assaulting Richard Squirrel in the Kings' highway, putting him in fear, and feloniously taking from his person and against his will, a stick, value 6 d. two half crown pieces and a sixpence, his property .

- WALKER. I am a watch cap maker, I live at 39, Noble-street. On last Tuesday week, between eight and nine in the evening I was in Drury Lane; Mr. Squirrel the prosecutor, the prisoner and I were standing hearing a song, and while the woman was singing, Squirrel asked me to go and have something to drink, he asked the prisoner at the same time. I had never seen Squirrel or the prisoner before; we all walked on to Fleet-street; Mr. Squirrel took us to a house up a court, near Fetter-Lane, I do not know the sign, we went in the tap-room, had two pots of beer, sixpenny worth of gin and water, and four pipes of tobacco; Mr. Squirrel paid the reckoning. We all went away from that public house about a quarter after eleven; then we went into another public house in Chancery Lane, we had two glasses of gin each of us at the bar; we then crossed Holborn, and went to the Lamb, in Lamb's Conduit-street; we had a pot of beer there and half a pint of gin between four of us, it was about 12 o'clock when we got to the Lamb, we staid about half an hour there, from there we went towards Russel-Square, the prisoner asked the watchman the way to Somerstown. I said in the first part of the evening, I would see Mr. Squirrel, whom I understood to be a doctor home, he said he lived in Somer's-town. We crossed Tavistock-Square by the left, and by the palings the prisoner made a sudden stop, he catched hold of Mr. Squirrel's arm, and said, you old b - r, your life or your money. Mr. Squirrel said you are joking, after treating you in the evening. I said do not rob him, I want to see you home father. The prisoner struck Squirrel with a stick, when he demanded his money, and he threw the stick into the Duke of Bedford's nursery; Squirrel put his hand into his pocket, and gave him two half crowns and a sixpence. I saw that it was moon light as bright as day; he had the change at the Lamb. After the prisoner had got the money, he ran away, and I was alarmed; I went away, I followed the prisoner, he ran away, and I ran away; Mr. Squirrel followed us both, the prisoner was stopped as he was running, and I stopped by another watchman on the other side of the road.

Mr. Curwood. I believe you are under bail, and were charged as a party in that robbery. - A. Yes.

EDWARD COPE . I am a watchman to the same

new buildings near where this happened; I has about thirty yards from them, I was at the Bedford nursery to the right and they were to the left; I saw two or three persons passing, I heard the prisoner say, your life or your money,

Q. How do you know it was the prisoner said these words. - A. I heard somebody say, your life or your money; I then drew near, the old gentleman said, no, no, as you have had the pleasure of drinking all the evening with me, you would hardly do so by me. I saw one of the men rush a stick out of his hand, and he struck him over his hat, he hauled out his money, and gave it to the man. I did not see what money he had in his hand when the money was given, both these young men turned back and ran away together as hard as they could, and the old gentleman ran after them, I said are you robbed, he said you, and he would follow them if they killed him; as soon as I could blow my pistol off, I blew it in the air, and shouted out, stop thief, the patrol stopped him in Russell-Square.

THOMAS WILD . I am a patrol, on this Tuesday night I was in Russell-Square, near half past twelve, it was very near the corner of Russell-Square, near Woburn Place, Hoskins came and asked me what Square that was, I told him Russell-Square. I said where do you want to go to, Squirrel answered to Somer's-town. I pointed down Woborn Place, I said, keep strait on there, that is the street road, the prisoner said, I know my way; in about twenty minutes after that, I heard the voice of a man say, follow them, stop them, and I heard the report of a pistol, it was very light, I could see the men run towards me, I saw the prisoner Hoskins. I stood in the middle of the road with my stick in my hand, Hoskins made a strong push to go by me, I catched him by the collar, I said if he offered to move I would cleave him to the ground, he answered, I have not a farthing of money about me, it is not me, the other lad crossed the road, another watchman was there, I said, lay hold of him, he did, Mr. Squirrel and the watchman came up, Squirrel pointed to the prisoner in his face while I held him, and said, that is the man that robbed me, I took him to the watch-house, they were searched, nothing was found on them. The prosecutor was called, and not appearing in Court, his recognizance was ordered to be estreated.

Prisoner's Defence. On Tuesday evening I was returning home from my work, when I came to Drury-Lane, I stopped to hear a song sung, Mr. Squirrel was talking with Walker. Squirrel asked me if I would go to Covent-Garden Theatre, he asked that young man at the same time; I declined going because his intention was to kick up a row in the house, he said if there should be an harm come of it he would give us bail, he insisted upon our going to have something to drink with him. We went into Fleet-Street, he called for gin and beer, he paid for it in Chancery-Lane, we had two glasses each of us, we went to the Lamb, in Lamb's Conduit-street, there we had more gin and beer; what happened afterwards I cannot tell, I was entirely intoxicated.

The prisoner called four witnesses who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron Thompson .

Reference Number: t18091101-46

854. JOHN STORE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 7th of October , a watch, value 4 l. a gold chain, value 3 l. and two gold seals, value 3 l. the property of Matthew Bonish in his dwelling house .

MATTHEW BONISH . I live in Old Gravel-lane . The prisoner came to my house on the 7th of October, between five and six in the evening; he said he wanted a single room for him and his property. I told him I had no room; I told him I would go out and get him a bed. I went out to the public house, and left him in my parlour with my wife and my sister; I returned, told him I could get no lodging for him. I went out again to get a lodging for him, and when I came back, from information, I seized him and took him to the watchhouse on the charge of stealing my watch. He said in the watchouse that he had not stolen it, he only took it to show it my wife at the door.

MARY BONISH. While my husband went to get a bed for this man, he sat down in my nursing chair; my servant saw him take the watch down; she is not here, she will not come. I sent the servant to fetch my sister, because I thought this man took too much liberty in siting in my nursing chair. There was a piece of work opposite of my door, the prisoner put his hat on and asked me what was the matter; the servant then said what watch is that you took. I pushed him in, and took the watch out of his right hand waistcoat pocket. I asked him what he took my husbands watch for, he said he was coming to shew me what o'clock it was.

Prisoners Defence. My watch did not go right, the persecutor's watch hung up at the fire place, I took his watch down to set my own right.

The prisoner called one witness who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury before Lord Ellenborough.

Reference Number: t18091101-47

855. JOHN GRIFFIN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 26th of September , a watch, value 50 s. and a silver tea spoon, value 2 s. the property of Stephen Scott , in his dwelling house .

STEPHEN SCOTT. I live at number 4, Silver-street, Golden-square , I keep a shoemakers shop . On the 26th of September I went out, I left the prisoner in the parlour sitting with my wife and son, the watch was hanging up in the parlour over the fire-place; I looked at it, it wanted about a quarter to seven in the evening. When I returned home I missed the watch.

ELIZABETH SCOTT . On the 26th of September in the evening, when my husband went out, I was in the back parlour with my son and daughter; the prisoner asked me to give him a bit of leather to tie up his breeches. I went into the shop to get it, and when I returued, the prisoner was gone out of the house, I then missed the watch momently.

Q. The moment you missed the man you missed the watch. Did you at any time miss the tea spoons - A. Yes, I missed one, and a counterpane and pillow.

DAVID HOWSE . On the 13th of October I apprehended the prisoner at Chatham barracks; I brought him to town; I searched him, and found on him the duplicate of the watch and spoon.

JOSEPH THOMPSON. Q. Look at these duplicates and tell me whether either of them is yours - A. The duplicate of a silver watch is mine, it was pawned on the 26th of September for 1 l. 10 s. it was pawned in the

name of John Johnson ; I cannot say whether it was the prisoner or no.

HENRY SHERWOOD. I am servant to Mr. Freer, pawnbroker, No. 5, Little Pulteney-street; this duplicate is mine; it is a spoon 1 s. 6 d.; the prisoner pledged a pillow with me on the 23d of September.

Prisoner's Defence. When I took this watch I was in very great distress; I took it merely to buy some cloaths to go about my own business, and with intention of returning it.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only.

Fined one shilling , confined two years in the House of Correction, and there kept to hard-labour .

Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18091101-48

856. REBECCA GOLSBY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 20th September , four sheets, value 1 l. a table cloth, value 5 s. a breakfast cloth, value 2 s. a napkin, value 1 s. thirty-six quart bottles filled with British wine, value 20 s. nineteen yards of dimity, value 19 s. half a yard of muslin, value 1 s. and a mattrass, value 10 s. the property of John Few , in his dwelling house .

FRANCES FEW . My husband's name is John Few ; we have a house at Tottenham, in West Green Lane the prisoner was my servant . On the 20th of August I went to Brighton.

Q. Did Mr. Few go at that time - A. No, when I went away I left the different articles in the indictment secure; I left a quantity of linen in a drawer. In one of my bed rooms I left a quantity of sheets and table linen; in a closet in the prisoner's room there was a trunk locked up, containing linen of mine, and muslin.

Q. Was there any spotted muslin - A. Yes, I have found two caps since made out of that muslin.

Q. Had you any wine of any particular sort - A. Yes, gooseberry and currant wine in a closet in the breakfast parlour; I left that locked up. I returned from Brighton on the 20th of September. In the evening I found the closet and the side-board broke open; the closet in the parlour where the currant wine was, was broke open, which I had left locked; the brass-work was filed off. I missed a pair of fine sheets marked G. and a Lancashire sheet marked G. Y. I then called the prisoner, and told her I had found the drawers open, and missed the linen; and asked her if she knew any thing of it; she appeared very much confused, and trembled.

Court. Was this the day you came home - A. No, three days afterwards. She said she knew nothing of it, there had no one been in the house since I left home. I told her I had found the closet open in her her room, and the wine closet open in the parlour; she denied any knowledge of there being open. In the closet in her room, there were three whole pieces of dimity on a shelf; I found they had been cut; I measured them over, thirteen yards were cut from one piece, and six yards from another. I desired her to look every where for the linen, as I had left her in care of the house. Then she said she had her sister and a Captain Hamilton to see her in the house, but they took nothing away with them. I told her that she had wine from the closet; she said that she had one bottle from the closet, but she found the closet open. I let it pass then for a week or more, hoping that she would bring the things. On the second of October she was taken up; she denied any knowledge of the things till the last. After she was gone, I found two caps in her box, made of the muslin which was locked up in the closet in her room; I have had them ever since; these are the caps; I missed half a yard of spotted muslin. I know the muslin, and I know these caps are made out of that spotted muslin.

Q. Whereabouts is the value of that muslin - A. About two shillings. I have not recovered any of my other things, excepting a mattrass.

JOHN FEW. I am the husband of the last witness. On the 16th of September I went to Brighton; I had all the keys in the house under one key. I missed about a dozen of currant wine, and two dozen of gooseberry; the back rows were cleared, and without getting up in a chair I could not see. It was either taken from the back-row, or from the front, and the back-rows forwarded; a bottle of cherry-bounce was drawed out and filled up with something else. I examined all the locks before I left town, every one was safe. I know no more than my wife has told you.

HENRY DUNCANEY . Q. You are a servant to Mr. Few - A. Yes, I was left in the house when they went to Brighton. I know nothing about the wine or the linen. The prisoner's friends were there, there was Mr. Hamilton and her two sisters, and two more men, I do not recollect their names; the men were all seafaring men.

Q. Had they any wine - A. I saw wine drank, I do not know where it came from.

Q. Who produced it - A. The prisoner I believe. I did not see her - I do not know - I never heard where it came from.

Q. Did you drink any of the wine - A. Yes; it was currant wine that I drank.

Q. to Prosecutrix. Have you got the caps here - A. Yes, there is some of the prisoner's lace tacked to it; I have no doubt but the muslin is my property; I never gave it to the prisoner or any body else.

Prisoners Defence. The muslin that I made them caps of, I bought before my mistress went to Brighton, and I made the caps, while she was there; when my mistress returned from Brighton, every thing appeared to be very comfortable; she was at home eight or nine days before she called me up stairs, and told me that she had missed some linen. I was very much astonished, and frightened, to hear that she had lost any thing. She said, if I would confess if any body had led me astray, she would let me go about my business. I told her I was innocent, and therefore I could not tell her. My mistress had a good character with me.

GUILTY , aged 29.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron Thompson .

Reference Number: t18091101-49

857. JAMES GRITTEN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 11th of October , eight ounces weight of silk, value 15 s. the property of the United Merchants of England, trading to the East Indies .

SECOND COUNT, for like offence, the property of the persons, to the Jurors unknown.

JOHN LEWIS. I am a labourer in the service of the East India Company; the prisoner was a labourer in the same employ. On the 11th of October last, the prisoner and I were employed in the Bengal warehouse, New-street, in the city of London . I was in the silk-room, the shew-room, &c. when the prisoner came in, he went to the open bails of silk that were for show; I saw him putting his hands to the bails, and from thence to his pocket. He was in the show room a quarter of an hour; he had no business there.

JOHN LLOYD . I work at the East India Company's warehouse, New-street. On the 11th October the prisoner came into the bail room, and asked for Jacob Feathers 's coat; Feathers was at work at the water side; I shewed him where the coat was, he took the coat out of the window and spread the coat on the floor, about three yards from me, between two rows of bales of calico, and then he took out from under his breeches or waistcoat, the silk; and put it in the coat, and rolled it up. After he had wrapped it up in Feathers's coat, he placed the coat between two bales; I communicated it to Thomas Evans .

THOMAS EVANS . I am assistant elder of the Bengal warehouse. In consequence of information from the last witness I went into the bale room, I found a coat deposited between two bales, I opened the coat, there were seven banks of silk in it, the same sort of silk as were in the Bengal warehouse. I called the prisoner into the office after the men were discharged; he was searched, nothing was found on him; I went up stairs to where the coat was deposited; I brought the coat down, and asked him if he knew any thing of the contents of Feathers's coat. He said, he did not. I said, do you mean to tell me you did not ask Lloyd for Feathers's coat. He said, it was at the request of Feathers that he should take care of it.

Prisoner's Defence. I was never in the room by my self, during the time I was employed.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 57.

Confined one month in Newgate , and whipped in jail .

London jury before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18091101-50

858. WILLIAM HANDCOCK was indicted, for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of James Taylor , about the hour of twelve in the forenoon, of the 22d of October , no person being therein, and stealing a bed, value 3 l. his property .

JAMES TAYLOR . I live in Warwick Lane, in Christ's church parish . I am a salesman .

Q. Do you rent the whole house - A. Yes.

Q. On the 22d of October did you leave your house - A. My house has been under repair for four months. On the 22d of October there was nobody in the house.

Q. How long had you been away from your house. A. Four or five months. I had taken a house at Kennington; I intended to come back - I have come back at this present time.

Q. Were there any of your servants living in the house, at the time it was under repair - A. No one.

Q. Did you loose a bed out of the house at any time - A. I have lost a great many things at different times. On the 22d of October, a person came to my house at Kennington, and told me that my house had been robbed. I took a coach and came to town, and coming along Bridge-street, Blackfriars; I saw Mr. Nixon, he is the carpenter that repaired my house. In consequence of what these persons told me, I went to my house; I found the bed in the room that I had locked up on Saturday; the door had been broken open, and the bed was all over dirt; I locked the door myself, and saw the bed in it on the Saturday.

Q. You know nothing of the man do you - A. I have seen him once or twice; I heard that he served his time in the neighbourhood. The bed had been moved, it was in the same position as I left in the two pair of stairs room.

JOHN THRASH . I am a butcher, I work at the next door. I heard the alarm of thieves by Mrs. Hall; I ran up there - she said, thieves are robbing Mr. Taylor's house. I could not get out at Mrs. Hall's house; I went up Mr. Taylor's house, and over the lids. I saw the bed lying in the gutter, over the ridge of the house; I put it in the window, and brought it down one pair of stairs, and left it in the spot where it was found.

Q. Did you see any body near the bed - I saw nobody near the bed; this was between twelve and one o'clock.

THOMAS HALL . I am a butcher, and I live next door to Mr. Taylor's house. About half past twelve, on Sunday the 22d of October, I heard a noise, I looked up, I saw the prisoner upon the house, as I was washing myself on the landing place of the garret; I saw the prisoner opening the garret window of Mr. Taylor's house, he was opening it on the outside, in the gutter. On my seeing him, I was going to rap at him; I recollected what Mr. Taylor said the Friday before, and hearing that Mr. Taylor lost so many things, I did not do it. I pulled off my shoes; I put one leg on the bannister of the stairs, and the other in the chair, and looked through my sky-light; I saw him open the window and get in; he had something in his hand, but what he cannot say. When I saw him get in the window, I ran down stairs and asked a woman in the same house, if her husband was at home; she said not. I said, Mr. Taylor's house is being robbed; she unlocked her garret door, it looks into this gutter. I watched for his coming out as much as ten minutes; then a man of the name of Franks came in. He said, Mr. Hall put your shirt on, you will catch cold; I went to finish washing myself; he holloed out, Mr. Hall, he has a bed on his arm. I directly ran to the window; Franks got out of the window after him.

Q. Could you see at any place where he was, whether he had any bed with him - A. I could not see; I saw a bed there afterwards lay in the gutter, close by Taylor's window, opposite of my own sky-light. I tried to get out of my door, and my wife cried out, he has got in his brother-in-law's window; the next house in Warwick Square. His brother-in-laws name is Crosley.

Q. Could a person get from Crosley's garret window, to Mr. Taylor's garret window - A. Yes, they communicate to each other by the gutter.

Q. Did you know the prisoners person before that day - A. Never before that day, to my knowledge.

Q. Are you quite sure that he was the man that you saw in the gutter, and that went into Mr. Taylor's house - A. I am certain that is the man I saw get into Mr. Taylor's house.

Q. How long do you think he was within your observation - A. About two or three minutes in getting in, and then he looked about him before he went into Mr. Taylor's house.

Q. You had a view of him two or three minutes - A. Yes.

Q. Then he looked about to see if he was observed - A. Yes, and he looked down into Mr. Taylor's room. When we took him he was undressed, we found him under a dresser in the kitchen below.

Q. Had he is coat and waistcoat off - A. Quite undressed. It was about two o'clock when we found him; I gave the alarm; they refused opening the door at Crosley's house.

Q. Did you break the door open - A. No, they opened the door after some time.

Q. Did the dresser conceal him from you - A. Yes, there is a door that opens underneath; he was concealed entirely under the dresser. His brother-in-law denied him very much.

Q. Did his brother-in-law deny him being there in the room where he was - A. Yes; he denied it all through.

Q. What did he say when you laid hold of him - A. I stopped till he was dressed. I said, my friend you have not got the same clothes on now, as you had before; then he bursted out a crying. I asked him whether he saw me through the the sky-light - he made no answer.

MR. GLEED. What window is that the prisoner in it - A. That is a casement window; he was trying to open the window for some time.

Q. This house was under repair - A. Yes.

Q. This was on Sunday. You do not know of your own knowledge about the fastening of the window - A. No.

Court. You say you saw him trying to open the window some time - A. Yes.

Q. Therefore the window was sufficiently closed, to exclude any person from getting in - A. Yes, the window was shut to.

JOHN FRANKS . Q. Do you live in the house with Mr. Hall - A. Yes I do, it is next door to Mr. Taylor's. On Sunday the 22d of October, I came home about twenty minutes to one; when I came up stairs, my brother's wife informed me there were thieves in Mr. Taylor's house; I got out of the garret window.

Q. How far was it from Mr. Taylor's window - A. About eight or ten yards.

Q. Was Mr. Taylor's garret window open at that time - A. Yes, I watched out of the window in the same room where Mr. Hall was. I saw a man coming out with a bed; he got the bed entirely out of window; I got of the window as well as I could.

Q. Did you see who the man was that got out with the bed - A. The prisoner is the man.

Q. Had he hold of the bed at the time that you first got sight of him - A. Yes he had, he was pulling it out of the window, there was no other person with him, he was alone. I got out of the window after him; in the time I was getting out, he ran towards me - I was getting out as fast as I could - he run over the houses - I lost sight of him - he left his shoe behind him.

Q. How long did you lose sight of him - A. Only just as he turned round the chimney and jumped into a window.

Q. Did you see him get into the window - A. No I came back again; I lost sight of him; I heard Mr. Hall sing out that the thief had got in at the window; then I turned back.

Q. Are you quite sure, that the prisoner is the man that you saw come out of Mr. Taylor's window - A. I am quite certain.

Q. Did you ever know him before - A.Never before.

Q. Did you go to that window where Mr. Hall told you he get in - A. No, I went down below.

Q. Whose window was that which Mr. Hall said he went in - A. That is his brother-in-laws, Mr. Crosley's.

Q. Did you go to Crosley's house immediately - A. I did, he refused opening the door; I told him what I wanted; they said they were sure he did not come in there.

Q. How long was it before you got admission to go into Crosby's house - A. I told him I wished to go in then, he did let me in, and I went up to look for the man.

Q. Did you find the prisoner there - A. No I returned, and when he was found, I was fetched to know whether I knew the prisoner, I was sure at that time, that he was the man, he was the very man, I said so - then he was putting on clean linen; when I saw him he was shifting himself, he was secured, and the bed was carried into Mr. Taylor's house.

JOHN GERMAN . I am Mr. Taylor's servant.

Q. Were you in this house on the Sunday - A. No I was not, I was in the neighbourhood. A man came and informed me that Mr. Taylor's house had been robbed, I went to Mr. Taylor's house; when I got there I saw Mr. Thrash and Mr. Hall, they shewed me the bed.

Q. Did you know what part of the house the bed was in before - A. No; they told me that the man had got in Mr. Crosley's window; I went and fetched Peppercorn the constable.

Q. Before you fetched Peppercorn, had you made any application at Crosley's to get in the house - A. Yes, they would not admit me, they said there was no man in the house. When I brought the constable then they admitted us.

Q. Were you present when the man was found - A. I found him under the dresser.

MR. PEPPERCORN. I am a constable; I applied for admission at Crosley's house, they opened the door for me. After we had searched the house more than an hour, I said, certainly he is here. They said he was not. I was looking at his clothes in the yard, that he had on; Jolm German called out master I have found him.

Q. Was he charged with having taken the bed - A. Yes; he said he was not the person. He had nothing on when we dragged him out of this place, but a ragged shirt and a blanket wrapped about him. I took him to the counter, and his brother-in-law for secreting him, the bed is here.

Prosecutor. I have had the bed in my custody.

Q. Do you know that bed. - A. Yes; I believe it is mine.

Q. Is it your bed. - A. Yes it is.

Q. How long before your house was robbed had you seen the bed. - A. I saw it on Saturday, and locked the door myself and locked it up.

Q. When you came home on the Sunday you found the lock had been forced. - A. Yes, and likewise the garret window, I found the hook broken in two that hooked it close.

Q. This bed you say was not kept in the garret. - A. No, in the second floor.

Q. What is the value of your bed. - A. Three pound, it is an old bed, I have had it about a year and half, I bought it second hand.

Q. I am to understand you, that you had not abandoned the house, you meaned to return there as soon as the house had undergone the repair, to make it fit to live in. - A. Yes; It was an external repair, all the goods were in the house, the master carpenter had one key and I the other, and I have returned there again.

The prisoner left his defence to the counsel, called one witness who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , DEATH , aged 21.

London Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant

Reference Number: t18091101-51

859. MARY SMITH and SARAH KING were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 25th of September , a shawl, value 2 l. the property of Henry Batley and George Walsmore , in their dwelling house .

HENRY BATLEY . I am a linen draper , George Walsmore is my partner, we both live at 126, Newgate-Street . On the 25th of September between four and five in the afternoon, the prisoners came into my shop, I knew their persons very well, Sarah King asked for some callico, I shewed them some, after some time they purchased some callico, they were very difficult about the price, they were bargaining with me nearly a quarter of an hour.

Q. Had you any shawls near the place they were. A. The one which Smith took, I saw her take it from off the counter, after looking at the callico some time, Smith drew the shawl towards the callico, King held the callico while Smith drew it over the shawl, with intent as if to hide the shawl from me, but they could not, I saw her take it; I saw her put it under her apron and the moment she had possession of it, King bought the callico and was going out in haste.

Q. How much did the callico cost. - A. Eighteen pence, they bought a yard and a half, they were going out, I stopped them by the door, I told them why I stopped them; I charged them with having stolen the shawl.

Q. Where was it you found the shawl. - A. I faced them going out, taking King in my right hand, and Smith in my left, she had the shawl under her right hand, and at the time I took her to walk back in the shop, she dropped it at the door; I sent for a constable, they were secured, I delivered the shawl to the constable, the shawl cost me fifty shillings.

Q. Have you any doubt about their persons. - A. No.

SMITH. Q. I wish to ask him whether he saw me drop the shawl. - No; I did not see her drop the shawl, it was found at the door where I first stopped her, I am quite sure I saw her lay hold of it while she was at the counter.

GEORGE JACOB WARRALL . I am a constable, on the 25th of September I was sent for to take charge of these women, Mr. Batley charged them with stealing a shawl, Mr. Batley desired me to take them up stairs, and search them; on Smith I found five bad shillings, I found no shawl, when I came down stairs Mr. Batley told me it was found.

Smith's Defence. When the gentleman searched me he found no shawl, I have got an unfortunate father, he is near sighted, he gets his living by music; I had that five shillings of my father, he took it at the fair.

King's Defence. I work at waistcoat making ; I met this young woman; I asked this young woman if she would come in with me, I went in and asked to look at some callico, I had a yard and a half cut off, the gentleman came and squeezed us, as we were going out, and said we had stole a shawl, I said I had done no such thing, he kept us fast by our hands, when the constable came, he searched us, he could not find the shawl, and the prosecutor in walking up and down the shop, he found the shawl. I know nothing about the shawl.

SMITH GUILTY . aged 21.

KING GUILTY , aged 18.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before M. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18091101-52

860. RICHARD RADLEY and MARIA SMITH were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 14th of October one hundred bottles of wine, value 20 l, three shirts, value 30 s. and a quart bottle filled with rum, value 4 s. the property of Anthony Hart , Esq. in his dwelling house .

ANTHONY HART , Esq. I live in Harper-street, Red-Lion-Square , the female prisoner lived in the capacity of a cook with me near nine months.

Q. In the month of September last your family was absent from town. - A. Yes; we returned to town on the second of October, from a visit in the country, the prisoner Maria Smith was the only person left in the care of the house. The man prisoner was entirely a stranger to me, I never saw him till I saw him at Hatton-Garden Office on the second of October; I went into the cellar, I found a considerable quantity of wine had been taken away.

Q. Who has the custody of the key of the cellar. - A. It is always kept by Mrs. Hart or myself; on the second of October I counted the bottles of rum, seventy-four in number; I then locked the cellar door, and locked up the key of the cellar in a cupboard, in my parlour, where it usually had been kept. I placed the key upon the shelf in the closet, with the ring of the key flat on the shelf, and marked the precise spot where the key was with a pen strait line where the ring of the key was, in order to ascertain whether the

cellar was opened by a false key, or the closet, I left town on the third, and returned again on the sixth. On my return, I went to the closet and found the key had been removed from the position. It was out of the marks, I put it in, and the ring of the key laid upwards, It had been moved, I was convinced that the access to the cellar was not by a false key; yesterday on examining it, I found the mahogany slab had been wrenched up, and by inserting a hand into the closet, the key might be taken out.

Q. Did you visit your cellar afterwards. - A. I did, I can speak positively to one bottle of rum being gone.

JONATHAN TROTT , I am an officer, in consequence of information, on the 15th of October, I, in company with Wood went to Mr. Hart's house in Harper-street, Wood went to the house first, I heard Wood enquire of Maria Smith if a young man was not there, I said the man is in the house, I know where to find him, she then said he was at the top of the house, in bed, I went up stairs, she and Wood followed me, when I was up stairs, I saw a man laying in bed, she said Radley get up, you are wanted. I then said it was very strange that a young man should be in her bed, she said it was her bed, but not the bed that she slept in, I said, I am satisfied in this bed two people have slept in, I will search all the beds, Wood searched the man, and I the woman, we went down into the kitchen, and on searching the pantry, we found part of a bottle of rum, I asked the woman how she got that rum, she said she purchased it, it was more than an hour before we had done searching, I found a number of keys, we were trying to see if we could unlock any of the locks in the house, and after I had finished the search, I said, Cook, as you purchased the rum, you can tell me the person you bought it of, Oh! no, said she, it was given me. The man and woman was left there, I took the rum away, and went to Mr. Witton's to get a servant to take care of the house, I returned, and the man I took in custody first, the woman afterwards. The man said, he could have made his exit from the house the week before, for Mrs. Hart had told the cook that there were two officers coming to search the house.

Q. In the bed room where you found the man sleeping did you find any property belonging to him. - A. Mr. Wood found it.

GEORGE WOOD . I am an officer. On the 15th of October I went to Mr. Hart's house, in company with Trott, we went up to the garret, and there Radley was laying in bed, I searched the garret, there were some of his own wearing apparel, there, I searched the drawer in the kitchen, there were two coats, some fiddle strings, and two fiddles laying upon the dresser, which he owned, Mrs. Witton's cook took possession of the house, and was left in care of the woman, the man was taken on that day, Maria Smith was taken on the next day. On the 19th I went into the same room, where I found Radley sleeping, I searched the trunk, it contained mens and womens wearing apparel; Trott got the key of the prisoner, she said it was her trunk, and two shirts I now produce were in that trunk, which Mr. Hart claimed; I received a third shirt from Mr. Hart on the same day.

Q. In consequence of any application made to you, did you attend upon the prisoners - A, I attended upon both the prisoners, in consequence of an application made by the prisoners to Mr. Hart, respecting their clothes; I asked both the prisoners whether I should deliver their clothes to them, or to the person who made application to Mr. Hart for them. Both the prisoners said I was to deliver them to the person that was with me, their friend, he was present at that time; I believe he is here. There were some conversation passed between Radley and me about the two shirts, that were found in the prisoner Smith's box. I asked him if he knew who he had them off. He said that he had them of a gentleman that was dead.

Q. Did you deliver up to them the property that was found in the prisoner Smith's box - A. Yes, all except the two shirts I delivered to the person they called their friend.

MRS. HART. Q. This woman prisoner lived with you as cook - A. Yes.

Q. During your absence from town, did you leave any linen of Mr. Hart's in her care - A. Yes, they were marked with the letter H. and the number of the shirt, they were made in a particular way, with a square frill.

Q. Where did you find that shirt you gave to Wood the officer - A. I found it in a drawer in the kitchen, and some of the pink silk with which it was originally marked was remaining.

Maria Smiths Defence . With respect to Mr. Hart's shirts, I cannot account for it no other way than this, which I solemnly declare to be the truth, this Richard Radley lived with a gentleman of the name of Hayes until he died, and at his death he had several of his shirts given him; on Richard Radley taking them into wear, I took out Mr. Hayes' initials, and put in his own; my having the care of Mr. Harts linen with his own, and giving them both out to wash to the same person; I must have made a mistake, and picked out Mr. Harts name instead of Mr. Hayes. I humbly hope my lord, my case will meet with your feeling.

Radley said nothing in his defence; called six witnesses who gave him a good character.

SMITH GUILTY , aged 35.

RADLY GUILTY , aged 34.

Of stealing the shirts only,

Transported for Seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18091101-53

861. THOMAS LAWSON , alias JOHNSON , was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 7th of October , four silver forks, value 40 s. five silver table spoons, value 50 s. and four silver salt spoons, value 8 s. the property of John Jourdan .

To this indictment the prisoner pleaded GUILTY .

Transported for Seven years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18091101-54

862. ELIZABETH GILL was indicted for feloniously stealing on the third of October , a book, value 7 s. the property of George Leigh and Samuel Sotheby .

ELIZABETH FAIRBURN . I am a servant to George Leigh , his partners name is Samuel Sotheby . The prisoner was employed as washerwoman at Mr. Leighs, On the third of October at half past six

Greek-street; I did not see him for two hours, he was o'clock the prisoner rung the bell, I let her in, she made an excuse to go down to the water closet, and when she came up I saw her have something in her hand. I asked her what she had in her hand under her petticoats; she said it was a piece of wood to light the fire. I immediately took it from her hand and found it was a book. She desired me not to say any thing about it. I went up stairs and gave the book to Benjamin Wheatley , I told him how I got it.

Prisoner's Defence. I leave it to the mercy of you and the gentlemen of the jury.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Confined one year in the House of Correction , and fined one Shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18091101-55

863. WILLIAM JOHNSON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 18th of October , twenty-two yards of carpeting, value 50 s. the property of Edward Loader , jun. in his dwelling house .

EDWARD LOADER , jun. I live in Moorfields . On the 19th of October, the carpet was brought to me by an officer.

JOHN TURNER . I am an officer. On Wednesday the 18th of October, me and Branscomb were coming out of Old Bethlem; I stopped him and asked going down Bishopsgate-street, we met the prisoner him what he had got there; he said some carpeting, he was going to take it to No. 60, Rosemary-lane, to an upholsterer. I told him I did not think there was any upholsterer lived there; I asked him whose it was; he said his master's his master lived in Worship-street; about twenty yards he stopped and said, I might carry it myself; then I said I would take him to the compter; then he said he would carry it. When we got into Worship-street, he wanted to throw it into a place, he would not carry it any further; he would not tell who his master was, he said we might find it out. The next day he told us that he lived along with Mr. Loader; we sent to Mr. Loader, he swore to the property.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only.

Fined one shilling , confined six months in the house of Correction, and there kept to hard labour .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18091101-56

864. SARAH HOWELL was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 30th of September , eight yards of muslin, value 10 s. the property of John Kyle .

JOHN KYLE . I am a linen draper in Ratcliffe highway . On the 30th of September, in consequence of information, I went to Mr. Bennett's, the prisoner was in the back parlour; he produced a piece of muslin, asked me if I knew any thing of it. I told him it was my property. The prisoner had been at my shop before she went to Mr. Bennett's. One of my young men is not here.

THOMAS BENNETT. I am a linen draper, No. 6, Cannon-street road. On the 30th of September, about four o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner came to my shop, she bought half a quarter of muslin; she looked at another sort, and bought half a quarter of that; she paid for them, then she looked at a half shawl, and left sixpence on it, and was going out of the shop; in the mean while she was purchasing these goods out, secreted 26 yards of Callico; I stopped her going she gave up the 26 yards that she stole off the counter. I told her she should be searched; she was, in her pockets we found eight yards of book muslin. I went for Mr. Kyle, he came and saw the muslin, and said it was his own.

Prisoner's Defence. I was a little intoxicated in liquor, I hope you will shew me lenity.

GUILTY , aged 29.

Of stealing but not privately in the shop.

Fined one shilling , confined six months in the House of Correction, and there kept to hard labour .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18091101-57

865. SARAH MURRAY and HENRY SHAFFEN were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 9th of October , a seven shilling piece, half a crown, five shillings, and a sixpence, the property of William Bromley , from his person .

WILLIAM BROMLEY . I am a journeyman coach-maker . On the ninth of October about half past ten o'clock, I was walking along Greek-street , I was accosted by the female prisoner; she said she was very cold, she requested me to give her a glass of spirits; I took her to the wine vaults just by, and gave her a glass of liquor; afterwards we came out together, and at the corner of Compton-street there was a mob assembled, we stood together to hear what was the matter, and it was some people come from the play house intoxicated, they soon dispersed; the man prisoner came up to her, and they both went away together. I was going home, I put my hand into my pocket, I found my money was gone; I thought it was the prisoner that took it from me. I walked up and down Greek-street and different streets, at last I met both the prisoners together; I challenged them with the robbery, they denied it; I gave them in charge of the watchman, they were searched, nothing was found on the woman; on the man was found in his right hand waistcoat pocket, half a crown, five shillings in silver and a sixpence, I can swear to the half crown, the seven shilling piece was lost; he had something in his mouth while we were searching him; we thought he had swallowed the seven shilling piece.

Q. The man was not close to you at all was he - A. The man came up as soon as the mob dispersed, and they both went away directly.

JOHN COMPTON. I live with Mr. Sadler at the wine vaults; I gave the prosecutor change for a pound note on the 9th of October. In the change there was a half crown; I can swear to that I gave him.

JAMES STONE . I was constable of the night, I searched the woman, I found nothing upon her. On the man I found in his right hand waistcoat pocket, half a crown, five shillings and a sixpence; the prosecutor said he could swear to the half crown.

Murray's Defence. My prosecutor met me in Greek street, Soho; he asked me where I was going to. I told him my unfortunate situation. The prosecutor said he would not go to any house with me, he said he had not much silver about him, what he had he would give me, he gave me the half crown out of his pocket, telling me to give him eighteen pence out of it; I gave him sixpence out of it. I left him and went down

In company with several girls after he was with me. This young man, Shaffen, lived in the same house where I was; I had been in company with gentlemen before. I had eight shillings and nine pence in the whole; I gave it to this young man, he said he would take it home for me. The prosecutor went into the wine vaults in Greek street, again to treat me. When he met me again, he then said he had lost all his money.

Shaffen said nothing in his defence.

MURRAY, GUILTY , aged 22.

SHAFFEN, GUILTY , aged 23.

Fined one shilling , confined six months in the House of Correction, and there kept to hard labour .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18091101-58

866. MARY NEWBURY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 25th of October , a watch, value 3 l. the property of Ralph Garrett , from his person .

RALPH GARRETT. I live at 60, Clipstone-street, Marylebone. On the 25th of October, as I was going home, I met the prisoner at the corner of York-street, about 12 o'clock at night. She said, Sir, as it is a jubilee night, will you give me a glass of brandy. I told her on that account I had no objection; I give her a glass of brandy, and had a glass of ale myself; when we came out, she entreated me to walk up into her room, No. 2, York-street ; without hesitation I did walk up, I had no sooner got into the room, than I took my watch in order to wind it up. She took it out of my hand, and said she would wind it up; she went with it into the bed room; I was upon the sofa; she returned in a few minutes; I asked her for my watch, I wished to go home. She said if I made any noise there about my watch, she would bring some people that would settle me. I took the candle in my hand and went down stairs to call the watchman; on my opening the door, a man appeared at the door; I asked him if he was a watchman, he said yes. I told him to take charge of the girl. He said, open the door again, there is a constable behind, let him in, we will do the business more effectually. I opened the door again, and several now came in, and they shoved me out into the street. They were neither of them watchmen. One of them was an hackney coachman, and the other an assistant, or something of the kind; they are on bail for the assault.

Q. Did you ever find the watch - A. No, I went to Marlborough street office in the morning, and went with an officer to the house; the landlady informed me, that she went out immediately after I was gone, and had never came home since.

Q. Are you sure this is the woman - A. Yes, I am sure she was the person, I was sober.

PHENEY PARKER. I keep the house in York-street, where the prisoner lived. I saw this gentleman coming down stairs with the candlestick in his hand. I said, if you please to give me the candlestick I will light you down; he would not give it me. When he called the watch in came four hackney coachmen, I believe they were, two I know were, they pushed him out and shut the door; the prisoner went out soon after. I never saw her again, till I saw her at Marlborough-street; she was taken the night following.

Q. What became of the men - A. They pushed the gentlemen out and then they went out.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of the charge, I never saw any thing of the watch, nor a farthing of his money; he was not in my premises ten minutes.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18091101-59

867. JOSEPH RUDOLL was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 26th of October , from the person of Angelo Majora , two 1 l. bank notes, eight 2 l. notes and a 10 l. note, his property .

ANGELO MAJORA. I am an Italian sailor . The prisoner is the man that got my money, the man that robbed me was cast last sessions; he picked my pocket and gave the money to the prisoner.

Q. Where was it - A. At the bottom of the Minories , in the street. As I came out of the captain's house, I had the money in my hand, I put it in my jacket pocket; Mordecai picked my pocket, and gave the money to the prisoner.

Q. Are you sure this man was one - A. Yes, there was Mordecai, the prisoner, and another.

AUGUSTIN FERNANDEZ . I am a sailor.

Q. What day was it this happened - A. I believe on the 26th of August. Me and my shipmate went to receive our wages of the captain, about half past four in the afternoon; I saw the prisoner and Michael Mordecai , and another man, standing about the captain's house. When my shipmate received the money I asked how much he received; he said 28 l. my shipmate had got the money in his jacket pocket; Michael Mordecai put his hand into his pocket and took the money out, and gave it to the prisoner. Michael Mordecai was tried last sessions, and convicted; I am sure the prisoner is the man.

Prisoner's Defence. About six weeks ago, I understand since I have been in prison, there was a young fellow came into Lambeth Street yard, about the size of me; them two prosecutors picked that young fellow out, and said he was the man; and would have sworn to him, if so be it could not have been proved wrong.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18091101-60

868. JOHN HIGGINS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 17th of October a watch, value 3 l. 10 s. a gold broach, value 8 s. two gilt chains, value 1 s. two gilt seals, value 2 s. a watch key, value 1 s. a silver pencil case, value 3 s. 6 d. a silver tobacco stopper, value 2 s. a tooth pick, value 8 d. two thimbles, value 2 s. a penknife, value 1 s. and a pair of scissars, value 8 d. the property of Jonas Levy , in his dwelling house .

JONAS LEVY . I am a watch manufacturer , I live in Whitechapel . On the 17th of October in the afternoon, on my returning from the Exchange, about five o'clock, I saw the prisoner in the cellar, he was my errand man , which caused me to go down; I there saw my foreman, accusing him of something; my foreman

said he had found some cards with an impression on them, which the prisoner claimed as his; I took the card in my hand, and asked him how he came by them. He said he bought the seals in Holborn that he made the impression with; there were two seals found by the side of his box, which two seals looked like my property. In his box I found two more seals, and a gilt chain, which looked as if they were my property; I sent for an officer, he searched him, I saw a watch found on his person.

Q. How long had he lived with you - A. About a month.

ROBERT COOMBES . I am an officer. On Tuesday the 17th of October, Mr. Levy sent to me, I went into the cellar; in the prisoner's right hand coat pocket, I found this hunting watch, chain and seal to it. I searched his box, there I found a gold broach.

Prisoner's Defence. Master said he would recommend me to mercy. I am very much afflicted both in my legs and arms.

Q. to Prosecuter. What may the value of these things be altogether - A. I value them at 35 shillings.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Of stealing to the value of 35 s. only.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18091101-61

869. ABRAHAM SHEPPARD was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 30th of October , in the dwelling house of John Taylor , a coat, value 2 l. a shirt, value 1 s. a smock frock, value 10 s. two pair of stockings, value 3 s. a hat, value 10 s. two waistcoats, value 10 s. two pair of breeches, value 10 s. two hankerchiefs, value 2 s. and two one pound bank notes, the property of Charles Finch .

CHARLES FINCH . I am a carter , and live at Hadley , and servant to John Taylor , he rents the house. The prisoner slept in the same room with me. On Monday the 30th of October, about eight o'clock at night, I went up to bed, and the prisoner went to bed at the same time; I put my money in the box, and he held the candle, there were two one pound notes, a seven shilling piece, and some silver, I locked my box; the next morning I got up about half past three o'clock; I returned on Tuesday evening about six o'clock; I heard the prisoner was gone; I went up stairs to look at my box, the staple was drawn out, my money, notes, and clothes, were all gone. On Wednesday, I found the prisoner between Hadley and Potters-bar. I laid hold of him, I told him he had robbed me. He said he had. I afterwards found some of my things in a hollow tree, the prisoner shewed me the tree. I have never seen my money or notes since.

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutor said if I would bring the things back again, he would forgive me.

GUILTY .

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only.

Fined one shilling , confined 6 months in the house of Correction, and there kept to hard labour .

First Middlesex Jury before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18091101-62

870. JOHN WHITE was indicted for feloniously assaulting William Nicolls , in the King's highway, on the 3rd of November , putting him in fear, and taking from his person, and against his will, a watch, value 20 s. his property .

WILLIAM NICOLLS . I live at No. 5, Bear-alley, Fleet-market. I am a messenger on the debtor's side of Newgate . On Friday last between six and seven in the evening, I was under the piazza's Lincoln's-Inn-fields , the prisoner ran violently against me, and snatched the watch out of my pocket; he shoved me back, I did not fall down; if I had known what he had been about I should have resisted him, he did not hurt me.

Q. Did you ever lose sight of that person - A. Yes, he was out of my sight; the light of the lamps were upon him, I saw his person; I am certain he is the person that ran against me from the light of the lamps.

Q. How long was it before you saw him again - A. In less than a minute, he was taken about the middle of Lincoln's-Inn-fields, by Holborn Row; I have seen the watch since.

RICHARD PIANER. I live at No. 40, Ellkins-row, Blackfriars-road.

Q. Were you in the neighbourhood when this took place - A. I was in about the middle of Holborn-row, proceeding towards Great Queen-street, I heard the cry of stop thief; I heard the footsteps of some person running, in the course of a minute I looked to my left hand; near the railing which incloses the garden I distinctly perceived a man running as fast as possible; I kept my eyes on him, I saw him stop and sit down on the curb stone by the rails. I approached him together with five or six others. The prisoner then said, what have I done where is the gentleman that said I robbed him. The prosecutor with several others, were calling out stop thief on the pavement of Holborn-row; they came up to the place where we were standing. I with several others, said here is the man; the prosecutor came and charged the prisoner with picking his pocket of his watch, and laid hold of him by the collar; the prisoner denied it, and said they might search him; the prosecutor took him to Bow-street.

WILLIAM SNAP. I am a hatter, I live in South Audley-street. Last Friday evening between six and seven o'clock, I was near to the end of Great Queen-street, near to the piazzas, I heard the cry of stop thief, I ran to where the prosecutor had hold of the prisoner; the prosecutor said he had lost his watch, and that the prisoner had stole it. I returned to Queen-street and transacted my business, and when I came out, I went to where the prosecutor had hold of the prisoner; I looked for this watch, I found it close again the railing upon the curb stone, near to where I first saw the prosecutor; I went to Bow-street, and shewed the watch to Mr. Graham. I have kept the watch ever since.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been to a public house in Long Acre; I was returning home to Golden-lane. I was coming from Queen-street, close by the rails, when I heard the cry of stop thief. One exclaimed, that is the man that robbed that gentleman. I immediately asked who I had robbed, and what I had stole;

the prosecutor immediately came up, and said I had robbed him of his watch.

The prisoner called four witnesses, gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Of stealing but not violently from the person.

Transported for Seven years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18091101-63

871. JOHN LEE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the second of November , a great coat, value 1 l the property of Moses Laport Mirach .

MOSES LAPORT MIRACH. I live at 55, Cannon-street , I am a broker . I only know that I lost my great coat, and that it was in the possession of the constable.

WILLIAM LAW . I live opposite of Mr. Mirach. I saw the prisoner go in Mr. Mirach's house; the door was left open, it was near twelve o'clock. In the course of a few minutes I saw him come out again, he had a great coat in his right hand; he seemed to be in a hurry; he walked as fast as he could, so as to make a run of it. I went over the way and informed Mr. Thomas of it.

WILLIAM THOMAS . I am in Mr. Mirach's accompting house. From Mr. Laws information, I pursued the man, I saw him go up St. Mildred's court; he held the coat with his two hands, looking at it. I went to the compter and asked for a constable, and just as the constable and I were coming out of the Poultry compter, the man was going past, he took him into custody. I am sure this is the man I saw with the coat.

CHARLES ELDRIDGE . I am a constable. I went with Thomas to the bottom of the Poultry court; I met the man with the coat on his arm. I asked him where he was going with that coat; he said it was his own, he had just brought it from his lodgings.

Prisoner's Defence. I am a poor man, I have been ill for these three months; I have not been able to work. I leave myself to the mercy of the court and jury.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Confined one month in Newgate , and whipped in jail .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18091101-64

872. ELIZABETH ROACH was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 12th of October , from the person of William Hudson , a watch, value 3 l. a key, value 6 d. and ten one pound bank notes his property .

WILLIAM HUDSON. I am a bricklayer .

Q. Where did this happen - A. In the Old Jewry . On the 12th of October between eleven and twelve in the evening, I was going home, I slipped off the curb, the prisoner came to assist me up; I was rather intoxicated, I felt, that she had got her hand in my pocket, I immediately took hold of her and accused her of robbing me. I called the watchman and he conveyed her the watch house; the constable searched her; he asked me if I could swear to my property; he found six one pound notes, I lost ten and my watch. I have never found my watch.

Q. You never let go of her did you - A. No, I took hold of her immediately.

Q. Did you know any of the notes - A. I told the constable, I had fourteen notes in my possession from 31 m. 9. to 31 m. 22, I had ten one pound notes.

Q. How lately before this woman came to you had you seen them. - A. I had seen them safe, about a quarter of an hour before, in Charles Street, Hatton-Garden.

LUKE WESTON . I am a watchman of Castle-Baynard Ward; I was going down the Old-Change, Mr. Hudson called, watchman, he said, you take charge of this woman, she has robbed me of ten one pound notes, he said he did not know what he had lost, I conveyed her to the watch-house, the constable searched her, he found a one pound note in her hand, 6 s. 6 d. in her pocket, and on searching further, he found five one pound notes on her person.

Mr. WYAT. I was constable of the night; the prisoner was brought to the watch-house, the prosecutor said she had robbed him of ten one pound notes, I asked her if she had got them, she said she had not, I saw that she had something in her hand, as if she intended to burn it, I caught hold of her hand and took a one pound note out of it I found 6 s. 6 d. in her pocket. I told her to pull off her gown, she did, and flannel round her middle, there was nothing there, she sat herself down again; she said do you think it was concealed before me. I laid her across my lap, and took five one pound notes from her person, the prosecutor said he was robbed of his watch as well as the money. I said the girl has not the watch, I have made a proper search, he said the number of the notes were from 31 m. 9 to 31 m. 22, the one that she had in her hand was 31 m. 9, and the last of the numbers that I looked at was 31 m. 22.

Jury Q. to Prosecutor. You stated that where you were robbed was in the Old Jewry, the watchman states that it was in the Old Change. - A. I know no more than what I understood the watchman to say. I was intoxicated, I find I am wrong: I was going into St. Paul's Church-yard.

Prisoner's Defence. I was just come out of the Borough, as I was crossing over the way, this gentleman was laying down, he holloed out for me to come over, as I came over I picked up the papers, not knowing what they were. I kept them, as any other person might have done; he was in a very indecent manner, he hollowed out for the watchman. I said, what I have picked up, I will not give you. You may rely on that is the truth, if I was to die this moment.

GUILTY . aged 22.

Transported for Seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18091101-65

873. GEORGE MERRYMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 25th of October , a dollar, half a crown, four shillings and a sixpence , the property of Lambert John Titterell .

LAMBERT JOHN TITTERELL . I am a fellowship-porter . On the 25th of October, between eleven and twelve at night, as I was passing along Cornhill , there was a stoppage of carriages, we could not pass along, there was a mob collected, being Jubilee night. The prisoner was close to my elbow. I felt a hand at my right hand trowsers pocket; I turned short round, and perceived his hand drawing from me, I immediately laid hold of him, and missing my money, I felt

in his right hand, there was nothing in it. I immediately laid hold of his left arm, it was held out as if to give the money to his companion, I pulled it towards me and took a dollar from him; and at the same time my wife heard some silver fall. I did not hear it; I took him in custody.

MRS. TITTERELL. Q. You were with your husband that night. - A. I know nothing more than I heard the money drop. I wished to stoop and pick it up, two gentlemen would not let me, they thought the crowd would hurt me.

Q. Whereabouts was it. - A. At the corner of Bishopgate-street, by Cornhill.

GEORGE CUTLER , I am a constable. On Wednesday night, the 25th of October, between eleven and twelve, near the top of Cornhill, I heard the prosecutor challenge the prisoner with picking his pocket. I went to his assistance, the prosecutor took from his left hand a dollar. I took the prisoner with the assistance of my brother officer to the Poultry Compter; we searched him and found nothing on him.

Prosecutor. There is no mark on this dollar, I took it of Mr. Lucas, the commodore of the river fencibles, I being a river fencible myself, it was a very bright one. I am certain I lost a dollar.

Prisoner's Defence. Please you my Lord, I am a man that has three children, I work very hard to maintain them. I have work of my master's at home upwards of twenty pounds worth of property. I went out that evening to shew my wife and family the sight, I shewed them the India-house and the bank; and on my return I was stopped by this man. I had a hole in my pocket, I lost eight-pence worth of half-pence. I took the dollar out it was snatched out of my hand. A publican gave me two crown pieces, and seven shillings worth of half-pence in change.

Q. To CUTLER. Did you search him. - A. Yes, we found no hole in his pockets.

GUILTY , aged 29.

Transported for Seven years .

London jury before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18091101-66

874. JOSEPH BOUCHER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 12th of October , 2 lb. 9 oz. weight of nutmegs, value 3 l. the property of the united company of merchants trading to the East Indies .

JOHN LINES . Q. You are a commodore in the East India companys warehouse in Leadenhall-street . - A. Yes. The prisoner was a labourer in that warehouse. In consequence of information, I went down with the elder Arthur Skeere Lostie . I told Boucher I was sorry but I had reason to believe he had something that he should not have. I unbuttoned his coat and waistcoat, the frill of his shirt was pinned, when it was unpinned then the nutmegs appeared; I found 2 lb. 9 oz. of nutmegs between his shirt and his skin. He said, he was very sorry; it was the first time. I have had the nutmegs ever since.

Q. You had nutmegs in the warehouse where he was at work, had you not. - A. We had. I went to No. 12, Off-Alley, in the Strand, I found a woman there, he said it was his wife; she seemed alarmed and fell down as if in a fit behind the door, and there I found a nutmeg bag, and a bag of cloves. These are the nutmegs I found on his person; they are like those that were in the warehouse.

Prisoner's Defence. It is the first time that ever I was accused of a thing in my life. I sat down behind a chest and fell asleep, when I got up this person followed me, and said you have something that you ought not to have. He opened my bosom and found them there, it was unknown to me, nor was it caused to be done by me; there was an animosity between him and me before. I know nothing of this charge.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 61.

Confined three months in Newgate , and whipped in jail

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18091101-67

875. SAMUEL TAYLOR & WILLIAM BROWN were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 6th of October , a pocket book, value 1 s. the property of Evan Christian from his person .

EVAN CHRISTIAN , not appearing in court was called on his recognizance.

JOHN STEVENS . I am a ticket-porter. On Friday, the 6th of October, I was crossing Bishopsgate-street , in the parish of St. Helens, I saw Samuel Taylor or take from the pocket of Evan Christian a pocket book; I immediately stepped up to Evan Christian and told him that he had been robbed. He said he did not know that he had, he put his hand to his pocket, said yes, I have lost my book. I said if you follow me we will endeavour to catch them. I went into St. Helen's, there we saw the two prisoners, Samuel Taylor and William Brown standing looking at the book. I said here they are, before I got to Samuel Taylor he dropped the book on the ground. I then asked Evan Christian if that was his property, he said it was: we then secured them both, brought them a cross the way, gave them in charge of Shephard the officer.

Q. You are sure you saw Taylor put his hand into his pocket. - A. I did: he took it from the left side of Mr. Christian.

SAMUEL SHEPHARD . I am an officer. The prisoners were given into my custody. The book was given me by Christian in the presence of Stevens.

Q. To STEVENS. Is that the same book that you saw him take out of Christian's pocket. - A. Yes, and this is the same book that was given to Shephard.

Taylor's Defence. As I was coming along Bishopsgate-street, there was a crowd on the pavement by St. Helen's. I saw the book on the pavement I took it up; this gentleman and two more followed me, and accused me of taking the pocket book, in the flurry I dropped it.

Brown's Defence. I was going to the West India Dock, I had a newspaper in my hand reading of it, and when I got into the court I was reading of it. I immediately turned round my head, I saw three men lay hold of this young man; I was fifty yards a head, I turned back with the newspaper in my hand, and when I came to the people that had hold of this man, Steven's laid hold of me, and said I was one of them. He snatched the newspaper out of my hand; he asked the gentleman if it was his newspaper, the gentleman said it was not, he gave it me back again.

Stevens. I did not snatch the newspaper out of his hand, I asked Christian if it was his property. There were three of them together going down St. Helen's, one of them got away.

TAYLOR - GUILTY , aged 16.

BROWN - GUILTY , aged 31.

Transported for seven years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18091101-68

876. ELIZABETH PARKER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 7th of October , six yards and

a half of ribbon, value 2 s. 6 d. the property of John James .

JOHN JAMES. I am an haberdasher , Holborn-bridge . I saw the prisoner come into my shop. I can speak to the property.

ELIZABETH PEACHY. I serve in Mr. James's shop. On Saturday, the 7th of October, Elizabeth Parker came in the shop with a young woman. The young woman asked for a yard of black ribbon, and while the young woman was chosing the ribbon the prisoner conveyed three pieces under her shawl. I told Mr. James of it. A constable came, and the three pieces of ribbon were found on the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I was very much in liquor. I did not know where I was till the next morning.

The prisoner called one witness who gave her a good character.

GUILTY , aged 17.

Confined fourteen days in Newgate and fined one shilling .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18091101-69

877. JOHN HOLT was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 14th of October , a bushel of beans, value 8 s. the property of John Willan .

SAMUEL GOUGH . Q. You are one of the marshalmen of the city of London. - A. Yes. On Saturday, the 14th of October, between six and seven in the evening, I met the prisoner in Aldersgate-street, I asked him what he had got in the sack, he said a few beans, he had brought them from St. John-street, and was going to take them to Wood-street. Hawkins was with me; I told him we were officers and would have the truth; he then said, he hoped we would not hurt him, he had a sick wife and three small children; he had got the beans of Thomas Bradshaw , at the Bull and Mouth Inn ; he was going to meet a man that would buy them of him. We took him in custody.

MR. GREENWOOD. I am foreman to Mr. Willan. I asked the prisoner how he came by the beans; he said that Thomas Bradshaw had given them to him to seed his horses; he had taken them out of the stable and was going to meet a man in Wood-street, who was to purchase them of him. The prisoner is an ostler in the inn.

THOMAS BRADSHAW . I am horse keeper to Mr. Willan. Last Saturday morning the prisoner applied for the key of the granary for some bran to make a marsh for a sick horse. I gave him the key, the bran is in the same room with the beans. I told him not to touch the beans; we have some of the same sort at home as these that were found on the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. As I was going home I met with a man he asked me if I would carry this bag to Wood-street Church, and he would give me a shilling.

GUILTY , aged 48.

Confined three months in Newgate and whipped in jail .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18091101-70

878. WILLIAM CHANDLER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 30th of October , one wrapper, value 6 d. and a trunk, value 5 s. the property of Edward Procter .

MOSES MILLS . I am a dry cooper. On Monday, the the 30th of October, I was going up Holborn , I saw the prisoner go up to a cart belonging to the Bell Savage Inn, he turned over three or four packages, then he took this package out of the cart and was making off down Holborn. I stopped him at the corner of Leather-lane; I asked him where he got that trunk from, he said some man gave it him. The driver came up, I asked him if he knew the package; he said he did, it was in his cart. I secured the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. A man called me, he said he would give me three-pence, to take it to No. 14. I thought the man belonged to the cart.

GUILTY , aged 55.

Confined six months in Newgate and fined one shilling

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18091101-71

879. ELIZABETH CABLE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 16th of October , a watch, value 1 l. 1 s. a gold pin, value 5 s. and a shawl, value 10 s. the property of William Dyer .

JANE DYER. My husbands name is William Dyer , he is a publican , we keep the Mitre, Mitre-court, Duke's-place . The prisoner lived servant with me eight weeks.

Q. When did you lose these things. - A. On the 16th of October, I missed them on the 17th. We had a coachman lodged in our house, he lost all his property in our house; on searching for his property I found out I was robbed. A constable searched the prisoner's box and found my shawls, in it some bread, butter, tea, and candles. The shawl was taken out of my room, I had seen it there. The Sunday before I lost a watch and a gold pin, they have never been found.

CHARLES BLOXAM . I am a constable. On the 18th of October, I went to Mr. Dyer's house, Mr. Dyer told me the coachmen had been robbed to a considerable amount. He gave me charge of his servant, the prisoner refused to give me the key of the door for some time, at last the key was produced. I searched her box and found a shawl in it, which Mrs. Dyer swore to he her property; the watch and pin has not been found.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not know any thing of it. It was very cold, I took an old coat from the stair-case to put on the bed, the shawl was in the coat; my box was open I throwed it into my box, I thought nothing of it.

GUILTY , aged 25,

Of stealing the shawl only.

Transported for seven years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18091101-72

880. JOSEPH FAWCETT was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 19th of October , in the dwelling-house of William Ridley , part of a box, value 6 d. thirty books, value 2 s. seven pounds in monies numbered, and seven-pence, and twenty bank notes, value one pound each, the property of Matthew Butler , William Butcher , and others .

WILLIAM PRIDBY . Q. You are the landlord of the Wheat Sheaf, Red Lion-street, Holborn . - A. Yes.

Q. I understand there is a benefit society held in your house. - A. Yes, of portable desk makers and cabinet small workers, it is called the Amicable Society: the club box was kept in a room adjoining the club room, the prisoner lodged on the same floor in the back room.

Q. How many keys were there to this box. - A.Three, they were kept by the two stewards and the president.

Q. When was the club held for the last time previous to the loss. - A. October the 4th, the club was held. On Monday morning, about ten o'clock, I heard an alarm of the box being broken open. I went to the room where the box was and found this box broken open at the bottom. I informed the members of the society, they came and made a search. They found the box broken open at the bottom,

and twenty-seven pounds, four shillings, and eight-pence half-penny, were taken out, and a quantity of books; upon discovering the loss one of the members had the prisoner taken up. I was present he was taken in his own room. The drawer was found in his room. The prisoner said a man gave him the drawer in the back yard to mend, on Saturday night, and the same man had some books under his arm; and a partition of the box was found in the prisoner's tool chest. On Saturday night I could not get into the room where the club box was, I bursted the door open, about a quarter of an hour after that I went into the room again; I found the key in the door, then nobody else had gone up but one of my maids.

Q. From the situation of the prisoner's room could he have gone into that room. - A. Yes, his door is not half a yard from the door of that room.

Prisoner. Q. Were not there company in the room on Saturday night. - A. Yes, that was after the key was lost.

EDWARD PARE. I am one of the stewards of the Amicable Society of small workers and desk makers. The society was held at Mr. Pridley's, our club box was kept there. On Wednesday the 4th of October, I was officiating for my brother steward, I had two keys and Mr. Gaze, had the other, I locked two of the locks, and he or I locked the other.

Q. Was there any thing the matter with the box at that time. - A. No to the best of my knowledge there was not, if the bottom had been broken open at the bottom, the drawer would have fallen out. The contents of the box was twenty-one pound bank notes, and there were the books of the society, near forty, the notes were placed in one of the drawers on the Wednesday. On the Monday I was called upon by one of the members, the box was broken at the bottom and all the notes were gone.

Q. The money in that box was the property of all you members. - A. Yes, the stewards and president are answerable for it. When I came there on the Monday, I saw some books and bank notes taken out of the privy, the notes we have recovered as far as sixteen of the number of the notes.

WILLIAM GAZE , I am the steward. I left the box safe on the 4th of October, between that and the 9th it was broken open. I assisted in finding the books in the necessary; we got sixteen of the notes out of the twenty, the notes were secreted in the books: not knowing the notes were in them they were throwed down the necessary. The hard cash to the amount of seven pound was all gone except the half-pence, these are the sixteen one pound notes.

MR. DOWDING. I am the president. I had no key of the box on the night before the robbery; the money is left in my care.

THOMAS WARDELL . I am a constable. I searched the prisoner's apartment, I found this drawer; he said a man had given it him in the back yard to repair on the Saturday night before. I fitted it to the box, it corresponded. I took him in custody; he said the man that gave him the box had a number of books in his hand; he said that he would call for the drawer on Monday; the prisoner said he told the man he did not see it wanted any repair. I told him as a workman he must see it wanted repair. I took him to the watch-house and searched him. I found all these pieces they appear to be part of the bottom of the chest, the bottom of this chest was covered with green baize, here is a mark of green baize on this slip.

JOHN HUTT , I am an officer of Hatton-garden. I found a slip of the box in the prisoner's room, and I found this knife in the prisoner's drawer, here is a place in the club box this knife fits the marks here, that he tried to open the led with.

SARAH DAY . I am a servant to Mr. Ridley. On the Wednesday night the box to all appearance was secure; on the Monday, I found the bottom was broken out; and on Monday morning, when I went into the yard I could not get the water down, the books stopped the privy.

Prisoner. A. Did not you sleep in the room every night. A. Yes. I slept in the room every night, but I did not move the box.

PHEBE GIBBS . I am a servant in the house. On Saturday night I went up stairs and found the door locked, the door was obliged to be burst open.

Prisoner's Defence. May it please your Lordship, Gentlemen of the Jury, the evidence that has come before you, I hope you will not think fit to convict a man of felony. On Saturday night, between eight and nine o'clock at night, I went out at the back door to case myself, and on my going up again I met a man, who had a drawer in his hand and some books under his arm; the stair case being so dark I could not see what they were, it is a great misfortune to me gentlemen, as you are not able to see the stair-case; and there are several lodgers in the house as well as me, and the door is always open which makes the stair-case almost public to any one; that person asked me if I was a cabinet maker and lodged in the second floor? I said no, I was a cabinet maker and lodged in the first floor; he asked me to mend the drawer; I took it up in my room and found it did not want mending. My wife informed me on the Monday morning, that the club room box was broken open. They searched my room all over and found nothing there. They took me to the office and searched me, and my wife was at the office, they went and broke open my door and brought out boards, which I am sure were not in the room before

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 26.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18091101-73

881. ANTHONY JURAG was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 29th of October , in the dwelling-house of Arther Pomeroy , a coat value 8 s. a pair of breeches value 7 s. a pair of stockings value 2 s. two handkerchiefs value 2 s. and a pair of gloves value 1 s. 6 d. the property of William Cathanack ; a watch value 5 l. and a seal value 20 s. the property of George Mackey ; and that he being in the same dwelling house, about the hour of twelve on the same night, burglariously did break to get out .

ARTHUR POMEROY . I keep the Duke of Argyle public-house, Hermitage-bridge . The prisoner lodged in my house about three weeks. On Sunday the 29th of October, the prisoner expressed a wish to go to bed? as usual, I offered him a candle to go to bed. A quarter before eleven o'clock he did go up stairs, as I supposed, to his own room. About half past eleven he came down stairs; I was sitting in the kitchen; I asked him what brought him down stairs at that time of the night, he said he had occasion to go the necessary. He unbolted the back door of the house; I had fastened it with three strong bolts. He went into the yard and into the privy; he stopped so long I took the candle to examine, and found he was gone; and he had opened the back-door that was bolted with one bolt. I directly suspected all was not right, his getting out in that clandestine manner. I fastened the door, and went up to the room allotted for him. John Gordon was asleep in that room; he awakened on my going in with the light. I saw Gordon's watch

hanging over the table. Gordon said his coat, breeches, pair of stockings, and handkerchiefs were gone. Gordon alarmed two young men that slept in the next room, told them of his loss; they missed their watches, which they stated laid on the table in their room.

JOHN GORDON . I lodged in the same house; the prisoner lay in the same room with me. On the 29th of October I lost a coat, a pair of breeches, a pair of stockings, two handkerchiefs, and a pair of gloves; they were taken from the room where I slept; when I went to bed I had placed them on a table, and when I was awoke by the landlord they were gone.

JOHN GOUGH . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner on Tuesday morning last, in the county of Surry. I challenged him with stealing two watches and a coat, which he denied; he said the clothes he had on belonged to him. I told him, I thought the coat did not belong to him; he said if it was not his coat, it was one he put on instead of his own; he came away in a ltarry. I had no information of any thing but the coat and the watches. I asked him where he bought the breeches; he said he had not bought them lately, he had them some time. I did not take the breeches nor the stockings away, only the coat. I sent for the prosecutor, he identified the coat, and saw the prisoner with these breeches and stockings on.

Q. Did you find any thing of the watches - A. No.

Q. to Gordon. Is that your coat - A. Yes, and the breeches and stockings are mine.

Q. Did he leave his own coat behind - A. No; he not.

Prisoner's Defence. I do not know whether I left my own coat behind or not. I was in liquor when I left the house, and the next morning I found them things [Text unreadable in original.] went to get a ship to go to sea at the West India Docks, not getting a ship there, I intended to go down to Portsmouth to get one. I know nothing of any watch at all.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 33.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18091101-74

882. GEORGE KING and WILLIAM COLEMAN were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of James Fontaine , about the hour of eight, on the night of the 24th of October , with intent to steal, and stealing therein a brass candlestick, value 5 s. 3 d. a glass lamp, value 6 d. and a brass taper-stand, value 2 s. 4 d. his property ; and THOMAS GRIFFITHS and MARY BUCKTHORPE for feloniously receiving, on the same day, a glass lamp, value 6 d. and a brass taper-stand, value 2 s. 4 d. being part and parcel of the said goods burglariously stolen, they well knowing them to have been stolen .

JOHN COLE . I am shopman to Mr. James Fontaine, tinman and brazier , the corner of Middle-row, Holborn . On the 24th of October, between seven and eight in the evening, as our porter was going out with some goods, he observed a person running very swiftly from the window; he pursued him and brought the prisoner King to me, and informed me that the window was broke, and some things were taken out. I at the same time observed King had something secreted under his jacket. pulled his jacket off one side, and took from him a brass candlestick; this is the candlestick. I took him to the watch-house. I will take upon me to say this candlestick Mr. Fontaine's property, there is the private mark upon it.

THOMAS SALMON. I am a porter to Mr. Fontaine. On the 24th of October I was going out with some goods, it was near eight o'clock. I observed the prisoner King running away from the window. I pursued him, and took him in Brook-street. I brought him back into the shop, and John Cole took the candlestick from his person. He got the candlestick from a hole in the window. I perceived the window was broke before I pursued him.

Q. Was the hole large enough for that candlestick - A. Yes.

Q. Was the window whole before - A. Yes.

JAMES JOHNSON . I live in Leather-lane, Holborn. On Tuesday, about eight o'clock at night, I was playing along Gray's Inn-lane with George King and Bill Coleman; George went up to the window and took a candlestick out.

Q.How did he do it - A. I believe he broke the window. I do not know he did it. He took the candlestick-out, a little glass lamp, and a taper-stand.

Q. What did Coleman do - A. He pulled that candlestick down to the hole; that is all Coleman did.

Q. Which of them broke the window - A. King.

Q. Were they together, King and Coleman - A. No; King was by himself, Coleman was on the other side of the way.

Q. What became of the lamp and taper-stand - A. They sold it to Mrs. Griffiths; the lamp and taper-stand were given to me.

Q. What had Coleman - A. Nothing.

Q. How long had you been acquainted together, you three - A. We knew one another living so close together. I sold the lamp to Mrs. Griffiths for a shilling; she lives in Black Boy-alley, Chick-lane, up one pair of stairs.

Q. Do you know the man - A. I believe it is her husband, they live together.

Q. Do you follow any business - A. Yes, I am a boot-closer; King and Coleman are sweep s.

Q. What did you do with the taper-stand - A. We sold the lamp and the taperstand, both together, for a shilling to Mrs. Griffiths.

Q. Was the man at home - A. Yes, he was in the room.

Q. Who gave you the shilling - A. Mrs. Griffiths.

Q. Did Coleman go with you - A. Coleman went as far as Saffron-hill, and then he left us. Mr. Griffiths gave Mrs. Griffiths half a crown to get change; she changed the half crown at the chandler's shop at the top of the court, and gave me a shillings worth of halfpence.

Q. You are sure of that - A. Yes.

JOHN HERBERT . On the evening before the jubilee I went with Mr. Hancock to Griffiths's house, in Black Boy-alley, and just as we got to Griffiths's door there was something thrown out of the window; Johnson, the evidence, said there is the lamp thrown out of the window.

Q. Who picked it up - A. Mr. Hancock, and the wax taper they threw out. I went up stairs, and saw Griffiths and his wife in the room.

JAMES HANCOCK . On the 24th of October, in the evening, from information I received from the prisoner King, when he was brought to the office, I then went and searched Johnson's father's place in Leather-lane. His father told me the most likely place to find him would be in Fox-court. I went there, and after a little while a woman went to fetch me Coleman. I asked Coleman where Johnson was, he told me he saw him

awhile before near Chick-lane. On my way to Chick-lane I met Johnson; Coleman said, that is your man. I took Johnson into custody and searched him, and found upon him near a shillingsworth of halfpence. I took Johnson and Coleman to the Royal Oak, and then I went to Griffiths; he lives in Black Boy alley.

Q. Do they both go by the name of Griffiths - A. So far as I know: I fancy they both lived together. It is a dark alley, and the woman was sitting at the window. When I asked Johnson which was the house, Johnson told me that I should find the man with her. I run up stairs, and they were at supper together. I asked her where the lamp was that the lad had sold her. I asked Johnson who was the person, he pointed out the woman; she denied any knowledge of him, she had not bought any thing of him. At that time the man also denied any knowledge of him. After searching the room, I sent the last witness for a large candle. Opposite to the prisoner Griffiths's house there is a large yard that, I believe a slaughter-man keeps, and a number of sheep were there. There is only a small paling parts the house, and the yard and a low paling parts the yard from the alley. On my searching there, I found the lamp I now produce, and this taper-stand; it was opposite the window where this woman sat in this yard. I suppose the lamp falling on the sheep's back broke the fall, because only part of the foot was broken off.

Q. to Cole. Look at that wax taper-stand - A. I will take upon me to swear that this is Mr. Fontaine's, it is of the value of 2 s. 4 d. The glass lamp has no mark; I must decline swearing to it; we lost such a one; I believe it is his. At six o'clock there were two in the window, I missed one, it is worth 6 d.

King's Defence. I was coming past the window on Tuesday; Johnson was standing at the stationer's window, next door. I picked the candlestick up; he said, make haste, follow me. When I got to the corner of Middle-row I lost him. The shopman laid hold of me

Coleman was not put on his defence.

Griffiths and Buckthorpe left their defence to their counsel; called six witness, who gave them a good character.

KING, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 15.

COLEMAN, NOT GUILTY .

GRIFFITHS, GUILTY , aged 43,

Transported for seven years .

BUCKTHORPE, GUILTY , aged 24,

Confined one year in the House of Correction .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18091101-75

883. FRANCES BYAS was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of October , from the person of John Chapman , a pocket-book value 6 d. and a promissory note for the payment of 5 l. his property .

JOHN CHAPMAN . I am a hatter and army cap maker . I live in Chelsea. On the night of the 17th of October I was returning home at half past twelve o'clock: I was accosted by the prisoner; she took some unbecoming liberties with me, and then ran away. I immediately missed my pocket-book; I pursued her, she instantly dropped the pocket-book.

Prisoner's Defence. I happened to be out late that night; he laid hold of me, and behaved in an indecent manner. I never saw the pocket-book till I saw it in the watchhouse, and then he took it out of his pocket.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18091101-76

884. SUSANNAH STREET was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 28th of October , four drifts, value 12 s. the property of William Chambers .

WILLIAM CHAMBERS I live in Charles Court in the Strand .

A. Did you at any time lose four drifts. - A. Yes, these are the drifts; they are used in the Ordnance service; they were taken from the top of my house; this woman was char ing for me. I found them exposed to sale on the 30th of October at an iron stall in church passage, St. Martins; they are quite new, they are worth twelve shillings.

HARRIET BACON . I live at No. 5, Church-passage. On last Saturday was a week the prisoner brought me these four drifts, she told me she picked them up in the Strand; I bought them as old iron. Mr. Chambers took them off my stall; I told him I had them of the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked them up as I was crossing the Strand.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY , aged 48.

Fined 1 s. and discharged .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18091101-77

885. JAMES STEPHENTON was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 12th of October , forty-eight halfpence the property of Samuel Leigh .

SAMUEL LEIGH . I lodge at the Elephant and Castle, Holborn . On the 12th of October I was sitting in the tap room, breakfasting; I placed two five shilling papers of halfpence on the seat, and covered them over. The prisoner came in and set by my side.

Q. Did you miss any part of your halfpence - A.One of the papers were broke into, and three shillings and sixpence were taken out, after I had finished my breakfast I removed two or three yards to look at a newspaper. A constable was sent for, and eighty four halfpence were taken out of the prisoner's pocket.

- HUTCHINS. I am a constable. I searched the prisoner and took eighty-four halfpence from him. He denied having them.

Prisoner's Defence. I was a little in liquor; I do not remember the circumstance.

GUILTY .

Whipped in Jail and discharged .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18091101-78

886. MARGARET WHALING was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 30th of September , a pewter quart pot, value 1 s. 6 d. and two pewter pint pots, value 1 s. the property of Thomas Smith .

RICHARD PERRY . On the 30th of September I passed the prisoner, my hand struck against the side of her pocket, I heard something rattle like pots; I stopped her; she took out a quart and two pint pots. I took her to Mr. Smith's house, Bagnidge-wells.

Prisoner's Defence. I got the pots in a field almost opposite of the house; I was bringing them home.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s .

GUILTY , aged 43.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18091101-79

887. JOHN BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 13th of October , 4 pair of shoes, value 2 l. and one boot value 18 s. the property of John Kirkland .

JOHN KIRKLAND . I am a shoemaker , I live in New-Street, Covent garden . On the 13th of October, about 8 o'clock in the evening, the prisoner came to be measured for a pair of shoes; he said he came from Mr. Patterson's, at the corner of St. Martin's Lane, that he wished to look at some shoes, and I had better send him some strong ones, and some light ones, then he could take his choice; I looked out four pair and sent the boy along with him. In about five minutes, he returned and said two pair of the shoes fitted, and Mr. Patterson wished to look at a pair of boots; I gave him one boot and told him if that fitted Mr. Patterson he should have the other in a few minutes; he went away, and I saw no more of him till I saw him in the watch-house; this was on the Friday. On the Saturday week following he was taken to the watch-house on some other business. I am sure he is the man, he sent to me that he would pay me for the value of what I lost if I would not prosecute him.

JAMES MYERS . I am a servant to Mr. Kirkland; my master sent me out with 4 pair of shoes, I was to take them to Mr. Patterson's, and just as I got out of the door the prisoner said he would give me two or three halfpence, he told me he was to go to Mr. Patterson's private house, then he told me to stop, that he must go back for some boots; he went back; I had the shoes then, he returned, and we went on to Bedford Street; he told me to leave the shoes with him and go back for a bill, I did so, and when I came back I never found him. I am sure the prisoner is the man.

Prisoner's Defence. I am not the person.

GUILTY , aged 17.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18091101-80

888. GEORGE LANE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 21st of October 3 bags, value 3 s. the property of William Minier and William Nash .

JAMES FARNES . I am foreman to Messrs. Minier and Nash. On Saturday the 21st of October, I saw the prisoner take from a shelf one or more bags and put them into his pocket; I saw him the second time on the same day repeat the same as before, he soon afterwards went to work with the rest of the porters in landing goods; after searching I found his jacket upon some clover seed, I took the jacket up and saw three bags in it; an officer was procured, I asked the prisoner where his jacket was, he pointed out his jacket, the officer took out of the jacket pocket three bags.

The property produced and indentified.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, called three witnesses who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Confined six months in the house of correction and whipped in gaol .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18091101-81

889. ROBERT CARTER and JOHN FURNEAUX , were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 10th. of October , ten pair of shoes value 3 s. the property of John Reid and Thomas Hayward Mark Reid , and ROBERT SHIPLEY , senior , and ROBERT SHIPLEY , junior , for feloniously receiving on the same day the said goods well knowing them to have been stolen .

THOMAS HAYWARD MARK REID . I am a shoemaker in partnership with John Reid , I live in Red Lion Street, Holborn . On my going up Back Hill, at Mr. Page's shop, I discovered some shoes for sale, I fetched my father to ascertain whether they were our goods, we went into Mr. Page's shop, and by the advice of Mr. Page we waited a little while, he said the man had been there before, and most likely would come again. On the 14th of October Mr. Page came to me between eight and nine in the evening, he informed me, that the man was at his shop, pledging or selling a pair of shoes; I immediately went with Mr. Page to his house, where I discovered old Shipley. I took him in custody, and by the assistance of a watchman he was taken to the watch-house. On Sunday morning I, accompanied with Mr. Adkins, went to Shipley's lodgings, there I found two pair of my shoes, we took up young Shipley and asked him where he got the shoes, he said he got them from Robert Carter , our apprentice. We went and apprehended Carter at his uncle's at Peckham; we told him we should search his father's lodgings; we asked him if there was any property there, he said there was in his box and some of it had been stolen for two years ago, and that he had been in the habit of stealing from that time through the instigation of old Shipley and young Shipley; they were continually pleading poverty, saying he had got a good opportunity, if he would bring them they would dispose of them. In the evening Furneaux, the other apprentice, came home, we asked him about it; he denied it at first, he afterwards said he had frequently seen Carter give the shoes to the Shipley's, and that he once about three months ago took two or three pair of shoes and gave them Shipleys.

Q. Does Shipley the father and son live together - A. Yes.

Mr. PAGE. On Saturday the 14th of October, the elder Shipley came to my shop, and offered to sell this pair of shoes; I saw Mr. Reid before, I had every reason to believe they were Mr. Reid's property, I asked him if he had made them, he said yes, I advised my man to keep in conversation; I went to Mr. Reid, he came; Mr. Reid said they were his shoes.

JOHN ADKINS . On Sunday morning I went to the prisoner, Shipley's lodgings, I found two-pair of shoes, the son came in; I asked him how he came by them, he said from the apprentice at Mr. Reid's shop, that he had frequently received them and sometimes in the street, his father waited for him, for upwards of two years. I went to Carter at his uncle's house, Peckham; Carter said he had robbed his master. Young Shipley came to him with a bag of a morning, he had twelve pair of a morning almost every day in the week, both the father and son had the shoes of him; I searched his box, there I found eighteen pair of shoes and a great many things, all of which he said had been stolen from his master in the course of two years, I found leather and cloth; he said he frequently wished to leave it off, but they pleaded poverty, and the old

man got him into connexion with his daughter; that he slept with her and old Shipley, all together, the son accused the father, and the father the son. Furneaux said he had taken none lately, but what he took he gave to young Shipley.

Carter's Defence. I do most solemnly declare that I have at all times acted honest until this late unhappy affair, and I am confident I should not have been in this unhappy situation had I not been acquainted with Shipley. I hope this court will consider my young days and restore me to an unhappy father and mother, and my respectable friends and relations, and in the midst of judgment to remember mercy, and it shall be my future study to become a just and honest member of society.

Shipley, senior's Defence. I know nothing at all how they were come by, I never understood but what my son made them himself, my son employed me to dispose of them, I gave him the money.

Shipley, junior's Defence. I am a weak and debilitated constitution with a young family of children, and my wife is now pregnant. I met Robert Carter , he gave me three pair of shoes; I gave my father one pair and kept two pair with intention of returning them. Mr. Reid and the officer came to my house and took me into custody, they well know there was no property in my house, and hardly any thing but poverty of my own.

Furneaux was not put on his defence

CARTER, GUILTY - aged 20.

Confined 6 months in the house of correction , and whipped in jail .

FURNEAUX, NOT GUILTY .

SHIPLEY, Senior, GUILTY , aged 58.

Fined one shilling confined two years in the house of correction, and there kept to hard labour .

SHIPLEY, Junior, GUILTY , aged 25.

Fined one shilling , confined 6 months in the house of correction, and there kept to hard labour .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18091101-82

890. JAMES DIGNUM was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 10th of October . a saw, value 8 s. the property of Edward Loader , junior .

JAMES SANDEMAN . I am apprentice to Mr. Loader, a cabinet maker , Moorfields ; I missed the saw on the 10th of October, in the morning; the prisoner was discharged by Mr. Loader on the 9th, we traced the saw to the pawn-broker's.

JOHN WRIGHT . I am a pawn-broker in Whitecross Street; on the 9th of October the prisoner pledged this saw with me for 3 s.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I got intoxicated; I had the saw of a man of the name of Newman.

GUILTY , aged 35.

Fined one shilling confined 6 months in the house of correction, and there kept to hard labour .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18091101-83

891. GEORGE PRICE , was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 8th of October , a dollar, value 5 s. a half crown, 20 shillings, and 3 sixpences , the property of Mary Mills .

Second count, laying it to be the property of Richard Longley .

MARY MILLS . I live at Mr. Longley's, he keeps an eating house in Drury Lane . On Sunday, about 3 o'clock, the prisoner came in to dine, he saw me put 29 shillings into a cup in the buffet, then I went to my mistress in the shop, I left nobody in the parlour but the prisoner, on my returning he got up and went out, he dropped one shilling on the mat, and 5 shillings at the door; I immediately went to the cupboard and missed my money. He had his dinner and paid for it; I and my mistress followed him; my mistress collared him and brought him back, he turned the corner, and hid himself in a privy. I am sure he is the man, there was no one else in the room.

SARAH LONGLEY . I live at 720, Drury Lane, this man dined at my house: I recollect him on his leaving the shop, he dropped one shilling on the mat and 5 shillings more in the shop. I asked him if he had picked up all his money, he said he had, a person by the counter picked up two shillings and gave it me, the maid came in the shop and said he has taken 29 s. all the money I put in the cupboard. I followed him immediately and saw him turn the corner of Nag's-head court and found him in a privy; the girl came immediately and said that is the man that took my money, when I got him back I said if you will deliver the money you may go, he would not; I sent for an officer.

EDWARD TREADWAY . I searched the prisoner, I found upon him a half crown piece, 18 shillings, and 3 sixpences; he said he was a housekeeper, he lived in the Strand, his master was in the King's bench prison, he had 2 guineas a week, I found a good many duplicates, some pawned the day before, for 4 shillings. I asked him where he lodged, he said, any where; I searched the privy for the cup and the dollar, I could not find it.

Prisoner's defence. I had a handful of money that morning, on Saturday a person paid me a one pound note.

GUILTY , aged 49.

Fined one shilling , confined 6 months in the house of correction, and there kept to hard labour .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18091101-84

892. JOHN SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 9th of October , a sheet, value 10 s. the property of George Ball , in a lodging room .

GEORGE BALL, Jun. My father is a publican in Whitechapel Road , on the 8th of October, the prisoner came to our house to lodge, he came down in the morning, he asked for a glass of gin; he could not drink it his hands shook so; my mother suspected him, she looked behind his coat, and saw a sheet in his breeches; my mother let him go out, and sent me up stairs, he had doubled one sheet to make it look like two; I went after him, and brought him back, he pulled the sheet out of his breeches himself.

The property produced and identified.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

GUILTY , aged 67.

Fined one shilling , and confined six months in the house of Correction, and there kept to hard labour .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18091101-85

893. RUTH BLUNDELL . was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 28th of September , a great coat, value 7 s. the property of Eleanor Miller widow .

ELEANOR MILLER . I am a widow, I live at No. 5, Change-Court in the Strand . The prisoner lodged with me. The prisoner took the coat out of my drawer; about a week after she was gone, she was brought to my room with the coat on her; she took the coat off, and throwed it across my table. I never lent it her.

Prisoner's Defence. She lent me the coat to go to Gravesend to see my husband.

GUILTY , aged 27.

Fined one shilling , confined 6 months in the house of correction, and there kept to hard labour .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18091101-86

894. ISABELLA COPELAND was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 11th of October , 6 silver tea-spoons, value 24 s., 2 silver table spoons, value 2 l. 2 s., a pair of silver sugar tongs, value 10 s., a shift, value 5 s., 2 frocks, value 1 s., a gown, value 5 s., a pocket book, value 5 s., a pair of shoes, value 5 s., an apron, value 6 d., 2 lb. wt. of sugar, value 1 s. and a bottle of brandy, value 3 s. , the property of Ann Walter .

ANN WALTER . On Tuesday the 10th of October, I left two boxes at Mrs. Robinson's, in Cloth Fair. I asked her to send it to Mrs. Cave's Cow cross; in these boxes were contained all the articles in the indictment. On the 12th of October I went to Mrs. Robinson's, to know why they had not sent them, the porter had taken them to Mr. Cave's in Smithfield in a mistake; I went to Mr. Cave, I found the box there, and all the things were taken out, the box had been broken open.

JOSEPH WRIGHT . I am a pawnbroker, I live in Whitecross-street. On Wednesday evening, the 11th of October, the prisoner pledged a gown for 5 s., after that she offered to pledge a pair of silver table spoons, half a dozen tea spoons, and a pair of sugar tongs; I had suspicion they were stolen, I sent for an officer, he came and took charge of her.

EDWARD TRING . I am a constable. On the 11th of October I was sent for to Mrs. Wright's, I asked the prisoner where she lived, she told me, No. 6, Banner-street. I was going there to see whether she lived there, she begged me not to take her there, and offered me a crown piece to let her go; this is the crown piece; I told her. I could do no such thing, I took her back to Mr. Wright's shop, and searched her; I found this pocket book, she said it was hers; on my taking her to the watch-house, she offered me the whole of the silver things if I would let her go.

CHARLES SALE. I am apprentice to Mr. Cave, coppersmith, Smithfield. On Friday the 13th of October, Mrs. Cave said there was a new servant coming, she told me to give the copper things a scower. I took the copper things, I found this bottle of brandy in an apron in the coal skuttle; the prisoner was a servant there, when she went away, she left the bottle of brandy behind her; I gave the bottle of brandy to my mistress.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I asked the boy to fetch my trunk, and coming by the door, I saw them things; I came by them honestly.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Confined one year in the house of correction and fined one shilling .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18091101-87

895. CHARLES FREWIN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 22d of September , 2 pair of stockings, value 6 s. , the property of Ann Death , widow .

ANN DEATH . I am an haberdasher in St. John street, Wapping .

Q. You lost two pair of stockings - A. I lost a vast many more. I found two pair in the prisoner's box. I employed him in assisting in the shop . On the 2d of October I was putting my eldest boy to bed; I looked in the prisoner's box; I found two pair of black stockings that I had missed. I came down, and accused the prisoner; Mr. Butcher was there. I requested him to take him in charge, he took him to the watch-house. I found a quantity of lace behind the door, of the value of five pounds.

MR. BUTCHER. I am a bricklayer. I was at Mrs. Death's that evening that she lost the stockings, she called me up. I saw the prisoner's box, there were two pair of stockings secreted in the prisoner's pantaloons; she said she could swear to them; I came down stairs, and told the prisoner he had done a wrong thing; I said, you have robbed Mrs. Death, I took him in custody, and at the watch-house, this pair of gloves was found; coming back, I kicked against these skains of silk; I called for a light; I picked up this piece of Mrs. Death's gown.

Mr. Alley. Where do you live - A. No. 4, Chicksand street. I am in business for myself in the Borough, I am working for John Butcher my brother.

Q. Do you mean to say that you have been getting your livelihood by working with your own hands for your brother. Did you work for him yesterday - A. No.

Q. All that you found was this pair of stockings - A. Yes, and the lace was found behind the door.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel, called one witness who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18091101-88

896. ESTHER MARY GAMBLE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 11th of September , 4 curtains, value 5 s. , the property of John Ritchie .

JOHN RITCHIE . I am a dyer and a scowerer ; on the 11th of September. I locked my shop door, and went into one of my work shops; I returned and saw the prisoner run tip-toe along my passage with a large scarlet cloak on; I called out to her, she made no reply. I ran to the pavement, I called her again, she then returned, I saw the furniture under her cloak; I said it is a pity a young girl like you should do these tricks, who sent you, she said a match woman. I sent two of my men to see for the match woman; she gave me the bundle and said no woman sent her in for it.

These are the curtains, I had them to scower.

Prisoner's Defence. I beg for mercy.

GUILTY , aged 13.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Fined one shilling , confined six months in the house of correction, and there kept to hard labour .

Reference Number: t18091101-89

897. MARY SCOLLY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 18th of October , 15 yards of printed callico, value 25 s. , the property of Charles Fisher Bell and Richard Fisher Bell .

JAMES PERCEVAL . I am an apprentice to Charles Fisher Bell and Richard Fisher Bell , they are linen-draper s in Oxford Street . On the 18th of October, from information, I followed the prisoner, and found this print in her possession. It is my master's, it hung outside of the door.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Confined 14 days in Newgate , and fined one shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18091101-90

898 EDWARD SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 8th of August , a truss of hay, value 3 s , the property of John Nicholl .

The prosecutor and witnesses were called and not appearing in Court, their recognizances were ordered to be estreated.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18091101-91

899. JAMES WOOD and EDMUND CHINNERY were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 11th of October , a bell, value 5 s , the property of John Riste .

WILLIAM BLACKMAN . I am an headborough; on the 11th of October. I saw the two prisoners loitering about Clarke's place , and while the dustmen were taking the dust out of a shop, the little one took this bell and gave it to the great one; they ran away, I stopped them and took them in custody.

JAMES RISTE . I am a dustman , I was taking the dust out of a back place when this happened; the bell belongs to the parish; it is in my care.

Wood's defence. The bell fell and hit my head, I took up the bell, to try it, that gentleman took hold of me.

Chinnery's Defence. I leave myself to the mercy of the Jury.

WOOD, GUILTY , aged 15.

CHINNERY, GUILTY , aged 14.

Whipped in gaol .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18091101-92

900. THOMAS CARTER and JOSEPH WOOD were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 6th of October one pound weight of tea, value 4 s. the property of the United company of Merchants trading to the East Indies .

The indictment was read by Mr. Gleed, and the case was stated by Mr. Knapp.

THOMAS BROOK . Q. I understand you have the management of the East India company's warehouses at the docks, the two prisoners were employed there. - A. Yes, on the 6th of October the prisoners were loading the caravans from the ship named Winchelsea, my suspicion was excited by seeing both the prisoners go from the caravan several times that day to the privy; suspecting they had something about them I desired they might be brought into the office, they were searched in my presence, upon Carter was found tea in a bag made as a truss to wear between his legs, upon Wood was also found tea concealed in the same way; upon examining the chests in the caravan, one of the lids had been broken open and tea had been taken out. The tea found on the prisoners corresponded with the tea in that chest.

ROBERT CHEESELY . I saw the chest weighed No. 1334; it weighed three quarters of an hundred weight; the prisoners took it to the caravan immediately I weighed it, and they were the only loaders; the caravan was locked up under the company's and the King's lock.

THOMAS WALKER . I examined the goods conveyed by the caravan; I found the weight of the chest 1334 deficient of upwards of a pound, I had suspicion of this chest from the lid being broken open.

The property produced and identified.

The prisoners said nothing in their defence; Wood called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

CARTER, GUILTY , aged 35.

WOOD, GUILTY , aged 31.

Whipped one hundred yards near the East India docks , and confined 6 Months in the house of correction .

Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18091101-93

901. JOHN GURNEY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 28th of October 15 pound weight of beef, value 10 s. 6 d. the property of Robert Rigg .

BENJAMIN JOYCE . I am 15. On last Saturday evening in the evening my master sent me with a piece of beef, I put my tray down with the meat in Finsbury-Square, to rest myself; the prisoner offered to help me up with it; a baker that I knew coming by, seeing I was loaded, he offered to put it on his tray, and going up Providence-Row the prisoner took a piece of beef off and ran away with it, I pursued him and never lost sight of him, he was stopped, I am sure he is the man, he threw the beef under him.

- BROUGHTON. On this evening near seven o'clock I saw the boy in Finsbury-Square, seeing he was overloaded I said put your meat on my board and I will help you carry them, I took part on my board, the lad went first he crossed the road rather too soon for me; as soon as ever the prisoner passed the lad, the lad cried out stop thief, I turned round and saw the prisoner in hold, I picked up the beef, the lad charged him with having stolen it.

JAMES HOOLE I was at the bottom of Finsbury-Square, I heard the cry of stop thief repeatedly, the prisoner came running up to me he had something bulky I seized him by the collar, they were some loose stones, I perceived I was falling, I threw the prisoner under me, the beef lay on the stones where I threw the prisoner down.

ROBERT RIGG . I am a butcher in Newgate market the beef is my property.

Prisoner's Defence I have a wife and three children.

GUILTY , aged 33.

Judgment respited.

Second Middlesex jury before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18091101-94

902. JOHN DAVIES was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 26th of October , a gown value 4 s. , the property of John Winfield .

The prosecutor was called and not appearing in court, his recognizance was ordered to be estreated.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18091101-95

903. SAMUEL HARVEY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 10th of October , three pecks of oats, value 3 s. , the property of Armand Dyson .

ARMAND DYSON . I am a horse dealer . On the 10th of October I had ten quarter of oats brought in a waggon from Bear key, the prisoner was the carman . After the waggon was unloaded, my man came to me, I came back with him, and went into the waggon, there I saw a bushel measure nearly full of oats, I accused the prisoner of stealing the oats.

Mr. Andrews. Q. Your place is in Park lane , do you carry on business on your own account. - A. My brothers Richard and Charles, and my father, James Dyson , are all equally interested in the business as well as myself.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18091101-96

904. ANN HOWARD was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 11th of October , a stove value 10 s. the property of Thomas Rome .

THOMAS ROME . I live in Cock lane, Shoreditch . I lost the stove on the 10th of October, about three in the afternoon, it was placed under my window for sale.

HANNAH ANDREWS . I keep a broker's shop at Bethnal Green. On the 11th of October, between three and four o'clock, I bought a stove of the prisoner, I gave her five shillings for it, and I sold it on the same day for seven shillings, the second bar was loose of the stove.

HANNAH COVERLY . About ten o'clock in the morning I enquired the price of Mr. Rome's stove, it was marked ten shillings; the second bar was loose; between two and three o'clock, I had occasion to go by, I saw the prisoner with the stove about five or six doors from Mr. Rome's, she took it into a passage, I thought she had bought it, I am sure it was Mr. Rome's stove.

JOHN RAY . I am an officer, I know no more than taking the woman in custody, she said she was sorry for what she had done, she was drunk at the time.

Prisoner's Defence. I met a woman going along, she put the stove down and rested, she said, good woman, can you tell me where there is a broker, she was going to sell this stove to pay her rent, I recommended her to go to this woman, she sold the stove for five shillings, gave two boys three pence each for carrying it, and me a shilling.

GUILTY , aged 51.

Fined one shilling, and discharged .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18091101-97

905. THOMAS LIVESEY and JAMES WILEY were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 29th of October , a cheese, value 18 s. , the property of James Maitland .

JAMES MAITLAND . I am a cheesemonger in Drury lane . On Sunday the 29th of October, in consequence of information between nine and ten in the morning, I saw a cheese wrapped up in a coat among the coals in the coal-box; Livesey was my servant , it was his Sunday to mind the house, I set a person to watch, Mr. Corey, the cheese was worth about eighteen shillings. On Monday I saw the two prisoners in custody, and the cheese and coat, the coat was an old coat of mine, and when I saw the cheese, I knew it to be the same cheese that I saw in the coat.

GEORGE COREY . I was desired by Mr. Maitland to watch. About half-past eleven o'clock Wiley knocked at the door, he was let in. I crossed over the street, and when he was let out, I crossed over the street again, met him, and took the cheese from him, it was tied up in an apron and coat, I took him to the watch-house.

MARY DODSON . I am servant to Mr. Maitland. On Sunday I opened the door to Wiley after he knocked, he asked for Thomas, I immediately called Thomas, he came, and Livesey desired him to walk in, and he would give him his dirty clothes to carry away, I left them to themselves.

MR. WARREN. I am one of the beadles. On the 29th of October, I and my fellow servant were in Drury lane, we were called to take Wiley in custody, we took him to the watchhouse, there we found the cheese wrapped up in a coat, and a dirty apron, Livesey was brought by Mr. Vaughan.

The property produced and identified.

Livesey's Defence. I found the bundle in the coal box, I did not know it was a cheese, there were a number of old shoes there, I thought it was old shoes; this man is innocent.

Wiley's Defence. This young man is my wife's brother, he came to my wife on the night of the jubilee, and said he had got something in the cellar, I took him his clean things on the Sunday morning, and I took the bag that I generally take my work home in, I was let in by that young woman, he put the bundle in the bag with the cheese in it, when I came to the door, that gentleman stopped me, I did not know what the contents of the bag was, no more than he said it was an old coat for me.

LIVESEY - GUILTY , aged 20.

WILEY - GUILTY , aged 36.

Confined six months in the house of correction , and publickly whipped .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18091101-98

906. SARAH SIMPKIN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 30th of September , two pair of stockings, value 2 s. 6 d. the property of Susannah Ives .

SUSANNAH IVES . I am a milliner , I live at 43, Kingsland Road . I lost one pair of stockings and an odd one, one pair were taken from the line where they were hung to dry.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. Yes, we both worked in the same house.

PETER MASON. I am an officer. I found the stockings at Mr. Pope's, the pawnbroker's, at Hoxton.

BARNARD GLEED . I took charge of the prisoner she gave me her pocket book at the watchhouse, I found fifty-two duplicates in it.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. One pair of the stockings that is alledged against me, I bought of Mrs. Davis, the odd stocking belongs to Miss Ives.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Confined one year in the house of correction , and fined 1 s .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18091101-99

907. SARAH SIMPKIN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 30th of September a silver spoon, value 2 s. four pair of stockings, value 4 s. and a shawl, value 1 s. the property of William Davis .

MR. DAVIS. This young woman worked for me; I lost all the articles enumerated in the indictment, two pair of stockings and a silver spoon I have since seen.

PETER MASON . I went to Mr. Pope's at Hoxton with a search warrant, he produced the spoon and a pair of worsted stockings.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's defence. My husband was in distress, I did not mean to defraud Mr. Davis, or else I should not have gone to that shop where I was so well known.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Confined one year in the house of correction and fined 1 s .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18091101-100

908. WILLIAM TOGWELL was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 28th of September one hundred and twenty half pence , the property of Sarah Reynolds , Joseph Reynolds , and John Reynolds .

JOSEPH REYNOLDS . I am a wire worker , I live in Pulteney Street, my partners are my mother, Sarah Reynolds , and John Reynolds ; the prisoner was my errand-boy . On Thursday the 28th of September I missed a five shilling parcel of halfpence, they were tied up in blue paper; suspicion fell on the prisoner, when he returned from breakfast I called him into the warehouse and charged him with taking the money; at first he denied it; I said you naughty boy, here is the money, putting my hand to his breeches pocket; I emptied his breeches pocket, there was three shillings and sevenpence halfpenny and the very blue paper; he had spent one shilling and four pence halfpenny. I sent for an officer, he was taken to Marlborough street office.

Prisoner's defence. I hope you will not be very severe with me, my poor father is on his death bed, and my poor mother is broken hearted. I am very sorry for what I have done, I will never do the like again.

GUILTY , aged 13.

Fined one shilling and discharged .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18091101-101

909. THOMAS BUTTON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 4th of October a shirt, value 2 s. a waistcoat, value 1 s. a handkerchief, value 9 d. and a pair of stockings, value 9 d. the property of John Webb .

JOHN WEBB . I live in Holywell Row ; I am a broker , the prisoner had been three days in my employ, I missed the clothes on the 4th of October, on the next morning I saw him at the office in Worship street.

ELIZABETH JOLLY. I am a pawnbroker, Union Street, Spitalfields, on the 4th of October in the evening the prisoner pledged a shirt, waistcoat, and a handkerchief; I lent him five shillings upon them.

FRANCIS COTTON . I am a pawnbroker in Shoreditch; on the 3d of October the prisoner pawned a pair of stockings for ninepence.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's defence. I know nothing at all of it.

GUILTY , aged 16.

Whipped in jail and discharged .

Second Middlesex jury before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18091101-102

910. JAMES HARRISON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 8th of October , a basket, value 2 d., two chissels, value 2 s. a saw, value 4 s, a saw set and file, value 10 l., the property of Thomas Robson ; a plane, value 13 s., and a saw, value 3 s. , the property of John Lock .

JOHN ROBINSON . I am a carpenter. I was at work at a new house in Cumberland street , I left four chissels, a sawset, and a file in my basket, and went to dinner; I returned from an alarm that something was missed, and found the prisoner in custody.

WILLIAM SMITH . I am a mason. I was at work at this house on the 8th of October. I saw the prisoner go into the house; I went into the next building, and told Thomas Thatchett ; he came with me, and went into the house, he took hold of the prisoner in the area.

THOMAS THATCHETT. In consequence of what Smith told me, I went to this house in pursuit of the prisoner, I saw him drop the basket of tools in the back kitchen; I took him in the front area, he was making his way out.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's defence. I am subject to a complaint in the bowels; I was going to Edgware Road, I was taken short by the way, I jumped into the area.

GUILTY , aged 38.

Confined six months in the house of correction , and whipped in gaol .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18091101-103

911. JOHN JACOB was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 7th of October a pearl ring, value 27 s. the property of Thomas Pugh .

THOMAS PUGH . I keep a jeweller's shop on the Pavement, Moorfields . On the 6th of October last the prisoner came into my shop, he said he was a mate of a West Indiaman, he wanted to look out some rings to take to the West Indies, my wife shewed him several, while I was putting down he things that he said he would have, he pointed to a back glass-case, said he wished to have some silk purses; Mrs. Pugh went to get some purses, and while I was writing with my head down he slipped out of the shop. Mrs. Pugh looked round, and said the man was gone; he had taken two gold seals, a pearl ring, and a gold chain. I pursued after him and could not see him, he had got quite away, it was about eleven o'clock.

Q. How long was it after you saw him in custody - A. This was on the Friday; I saw him on the Monday at Whitechapel office. I have seen the ring since, I am quite sure he is the man.

Q. Are you quite sure that that ring was in your shop at the time you were shewing him these things - A. Yes, I am quite sure of that.

THOMAS BERRY . I am a servant to Mr. Murray, pawnbroker, in Nightingale-lane. On Saturday the 7th of October the prisoner pledged a pearl ring; I lent him 10 s. on it in the name of John Jacob .

The property produced and identified.

JOHN GRIFITHS. I am an officer, I searched the prisoner, and found the duplicate of the ring.

Prisoner's Defence. I am a stranger in this country.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18091101-104

912. GEORGE GOODSON and HENRY WILLIAMS were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 11th of October , 12 lb. weight of coffee, value 6 s. the property of John Drinkald , senior , and John Drinkald, junior , and two other counts for like offence, only varying the manner of charging them.

The case was stated by Mr. Gurney.

ANTHONY FARENZES . Q. Are you a watchman employed by Messrs. Drinkalds to watch their craft. - A. Yes, on the 11th of October I was watching a lighter of theirs in the basin in the docks; at nine o'clock, I left the lighter, it was a cold night, I went on shore to warm myself, when I left the lighter all was safe.

- BOYCE. I am a custom house watchman, on the 11th of October, in consequence of suspicion, James Sknis , and I went on board the lighter, about a quarter before eleven at night, I had a pistol in one hand and a dark lanthorn in the other, I observed the two prisoners down in the hold of the lighter, on a cask I saw laying a black bag, and the cask over it was bored a hole, about an inch in diameter, and by the side of the cask lay this coat with two bags in it, I went close to them, and told them to come up out of the lighter, Goodson came first, I called to Skuis to secure him on shore, instead of his going on shore he got into the lighter again on the other side, Williams came up, he got on the gunnel of the lighter. I cocked the pistol in his face, I told him I would shoot him if he attempted to get away, I conveyed him on shore, and delivered him to Skuis, I went on board to seek for Goodson, I heard something plunge, I looked over and found something in a sinking state, I stooped down, and catched this bag, I believe this bag to be the same that I had seen before with the coffee running in it, Goodson was not on board that lighter, I found him on board another lighter.

Q. Are you quite sure he is the same man that you had seen in the hold of the lighter - A. Yes, I had seen him in the afternoon, I am quite sure he is the man. We found three casks bored, the deficiency of coffee is an hundred and a half and two pound out of one cask.

JAMES SKUIS . Williams was delivered into my custody, I took him by the collar, and saw some coffee falling from under his hat, when I called to my partner, he took his hat off, and threw the coffee away.

Goodson's Defence. I was crossing the craft to get over to a ship to see whether the people had come that I might have a run down to Gravesend, I could not get nigh the ship by two or three yards; I said I shall sit down in this craft to see whether the people came there or no; Williams said he should walk about till he saw the mate or somebody in the ship; at that time the skirmish began. It is a rule in the river to go into one craft to go on board of another.

Williams's Defence. We were never in the lighter's hold at all.

GOODSON, GUILTY , aged 45.

WILLIAMS, GUILTY , aged 46.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18091101-105

913. THOMAS EATON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 19th of October , a beaver hat, value 9 s. the property of Benjamin Ruddell .

THOMAS DAVIS . I am servant to Benjamin Ruddell , hatter , Tottenham-court road . On the 19th of October the prisoner came in and asked to look at a hat, and when he had got the hat on his head he ran off; I pursued him and took the hat from him; he appeared like an ideot; he ran away with the hat with the paper on. He has been discharged from the ship for being an ideot.

NOT GUILTY .

On the ground of Lunacy.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18091101-106

914. ANN BOULTON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 7th of September , half a bushel of barley, value 2 s. the property of William Batt and Matthew Batt .

WILLIAM BATT . I am a farmer at West Drayton . I caught the prisoner stealing of barley from the barley cocks.

Q. She was gleaning - A. What they call gleaning. I saw her several times plucking the ears from the straw and putting it in her apron.

GUILTY , aged 14.

Fined One Shilling and discharged .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18091101-107

915. ELIZABETH AVIS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 21st of October , twenty five bags, value 25 s. the property of William Minier , and William Nash .

JAMES FARNIS . I am warehouseman to Mr. Minier, in the Strand . On the 18th of October I counted sixty-four bushel bags; on the 19th I counted them again and missed fifteen, and on the same day I missed four more; I then marked twelve bags and put them on the heap; on the next morning I missed four bags, three out of the four were marked bags. On the 21st, about nine o'clock, I concealed myself I saw the prisoner go into the accompting house, I saw her put her hand to the bushel bags, one or more, sold them up, and put them into her pocket; in a minute after I saw her do so again; she repeated the same a third time; she left the accompting house; she returned the fourth time, put her hand up, and took one or more bags, and put them in her pocket; an officer was procured, he searched her and took six bags from her, five of which were marked bags.

Q. What is the prisoner - A. She is one of the work women to William Minier and William Nash .

GEORGE DONALDSON . I am a constable. I searched the prisoner and found six bags upon her person; in her room I found nineteen more of these sort of bags, and some seed; I asked her how she came to do it, she said it was to make a pair of sheets, she was going to lye-in.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I took them to make a pair of sheets, through my distrest situation; I hope you will have mercy on me.

GUILTY , aged 34.

Fined One Shilling and discharged .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18091101-108

916. ANN SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 3rd of October , a watch, value 3 l. the property of John Simpson , from his person .

JOHN SIMPSON. On the 3rd of October at five o'clock in the evening, I met the prisoner, she wished me to go home with her, I said I should not, I had no money, still I was weak enough to go with her to her lodgings in Chandois-street ; I was not in her company two minutes before I felt her draw my watch and seals from my pocket, the instant she did it she ran out of the room and slammed the door in my face; in consequence of her slamming the door in my face I lost sight of her, it being dark. On the next morning I went to Bow-street, I took two officers to the house. I found the prisoner in bed, much intoxicated; the officer look her after a little time; she said she was very sorry for what she had done, and cried; she said she would take us to a fence; the two officers and the prisoner went to the place where she said she had sold it, in Coventry-court; the prisoner said she had sold it to the woman of the house; the servants were in the house, the mistress was out; the officers asked the servants if they saw that woman on the preceding evening; they said, yes. We waited till the mistress came home; the mistress said she never saw her.

SAMUEL LACK . I am an officer of Bow-street. I went with the prosecutor to the house where the prisoner lodged, I found the prisoner there in bed, she was very much in liquor, I told her she must go along with me to Bow-street, she said, what for, I have done nothing; I asked her what she had done with the watch; she told me she did not know any thing about it. In going up to the office she bursted out crying; she said she was sorry she had robbed him; he was such a nice fellow. I went to the office, and when I came back she told me she had sold it so a fence; she did not know the name of the place, but she would shew me; she took me to Coventry-court; when I came there I knew what sort of a house it was; I took her only to see if they knew her, and if she was there last night; the mistress was not at home; the servants said she was there, her mistress and her went into the parlour in private; they did not know what past. I sent the prisoner to the office. When the mistress came home she denied seeing her.

Prisoner's Defence. When I met this gentleman I asked him to take a walk home with me, he said, yes; he sat several minutes on the side of the bed, I asked him what compliment he meaned to give me, as being an unfortunate woman, I did not wish to stay in his company without; he said he had no property about him. I saw somebody come by that I knew, I ran out; I never saw him till the next morning. I was up all night; I was very much intoxicated with liquor; he and two constables took me out of bed. I was very incapable of knowing any thing I was saying, being so intoxicated, till the last examination, they brought a person to me who I had said I had left some property with; I never saw the woman. I am innocent.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Lawrence.

Reference Number: t18091101-109

917. ANN MARTIN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 23d of September , twelve yards of lace, value 24 s. a shirt, value 5 s. a tablecloth, value 3 s. a handkerchief, value 1 s. a shawl, value 2 s. a silver tea spoon, value 2 s. two waistcoats, value 3 s. three pair of stockings, value 3 s. and an iron key, value 6 d. the property of William Horner .

The case was stated by Mr. Alley.

WILLIAM HORNER . I live in Goswell-street road , I keep an haberdasher's shop , the prisoner had been in my service about four or five months. I missed the different articles stated in the indictment; I missed the key of the till about six or seven weeks before she was apprehended; I made enquiry of every one in the house about the key of the till and could find nothing of it. On the 23rd of September I called the prisoner up into the parlour, I asked where my things were, she said they were in the clothes bag, I asked her why she said so, she said she could not tell; she seemed very much confused, then said she hoped it was no harm, she had taken them to the washerwoman; she said she would fetch them home in half an hour, if I would allow her to do it.

Q. In consequence of what passed you at last sent for an officer - A. I did; she was searched, I saw thirty-five duplicates found, they were fixed in her bosom by a hook on each side; these duplicates led me to dicover some part of my property. The key of the till was found in her pocket; she prayed to be forgiven, she had not done any thing of the kind before.

Mr. Knapp. Have you any partner - A. No.

JAMES HANCOCK . I am an officer. I searched the prisoner by force, I found the key of the till, and under her breasts I found these two little hooks, one under each breast; they supported the breasts.

THOMAS COLLIS STEVENS . I produce a tea spoon pledged in the name of Ann Martin , 15th of August, a tablecloth for three shillings in the name of Ann Jones , two waistcoats on the 12th of August, in the name of Ann Jones ; I believe the prisoner pawned them; there were three sisters who were in the habit of using the shop; it is impossible for me to say from whom I took them in.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. The key that they took out of my pocket I have had above three years. I never heard of a key being lost while I was at my master's house.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18091101-110

918. THOMAS SPURRIER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 6th of October , three hens, value 7 s. 6 d. the property of James Calloway .

JAMES CALLOWAY . I live in Tindall-place, Islington ; I keep poultry in my yard. I lost three hens on the morning of the 6th of October, I had seen them safe a roosting on the evening before.

Q. How is your yard fenced off - A. With a wall about nine foot high.

Q. Then these hens must have been taken by some person getting over the wall - Do you know the prisoner - A. No. I saw my poultry again on the morning of the 6th, at the watchhouse; they were dead when I saw them, and the prisoner was in custody. I am quite sure they were mine, they are worth three half crowns.

JOHN HAYDON . I am a watchman on the morning of the 6th of October, about half past five o'clock, I

perceived a man standing at the bottom of Cross-street, I perceived that he noticed me and drew himself of one side, I immediately went to him, I saw he had a bag on his back, I asked him what he had got, he said he had a bag of fowls, he brought them from Holloway, he was going to Newgate market with them. I took him to the watchhouse on suspicion. I left him in the care of Stratton, the watchhouse keeper.

- STRATTON. I am watchhouse keeper. The prisoner was brought in custody by Haydon the watchman; he had a bag with him, and in the bag were nine hens and a cock; they were all in their feathers.

Prisoner's Defence. I was walking in the fields, my business is so confining, I am a watchmaker; it was near six oc'lock when I fell in conversation with a man, he said where are you going, I said for a walk; he asked me to carry this bag for him. I walked to where the watchman spoke of, and at the end of there I missed the man; he went away from me; the watchman said where are you going; I fell back, so the watchman said what have you got; I let him look in the bag, he said, I do not think you came honestly by them, come along with me; which I did. I am totally innocent of the crime.

Haydon. I saw but one man as I know of.

GUILTY , aged 17.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18091101-111

919. THOMAS WALLER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 19th of October , two knives, value 6 d. a fork, value 2 d. and four pound weight of cheese, value 2 s. the property of Joseph Brown , and George Brown .

JOSEPH BROWN . I am a cheesemonger , my brother, George, is my partner, we live at 35, Cannon-street . On the 19th of October the dust cart called as usual, the prisoner was employed in taking the dust away . The magistrate sent to me, I went to the office and saw the property. I have no doubt the knives are mine.

JOHN RAY. I am an officer of Worship-street. I apprehended the prisoner on the 19th of October in Raven-row, near an old iron shop; he had got a basket on his shoulder, and in the basket was this cheese, two knives, and a fork; he said he got them out of a dust bin in the Steel-yard, Thames-street.

Prosecutor. I have brought a knife and fork which corresponds with these.

JURY. They do not correspond, the handles are not the same, and the name is not the same.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18091101-112

920. REBECCA KILBY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 1st of November , twenty-six yards of cotton, value 30 s. the property of John Thwaites , senior , and John Thwaites , junior .

JOHN LING . I am servant to Messrs. Thwaites, linen-draper s, 306, High Holborn .

Q. Where was this cotton - A. It was hanging by the side of the door post upon an iron rail. I received information and found the cotton gone; I pursued the prisoner and came up to her in the middle of the highway, nearly opposite of the door; she had the cotton concealed in her apron, I took it from her; I know the cotton to be my employers. The prisoner said she did not take it from the door, a woman put into her apron, and she did not know what it was.

The property produced and identified.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

GUILTY , aged 33.

Confined One Week in Newgate .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18091101-113

921. MARY JOHNSON was indicted for that she on the 3d of October , a piece of false and counterfeited money, made to the likeness and similitude of a good seven shilling piece, as and for a piece of good and lawful current coin of this realm, unlawfully and unjustly did utter to one Martha Sales , she well knowing the same to be false and counterfeit .

The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.

MARTHA SALES. I live at the King's Head coffee house, Smithfield . On the 3d of October, between nine and ten in the evening, the prisoner and a person of the name of Tomlinson came together, they had a glass of rum and a glass of shrub, which came to sixpence, the prisoner tendered a guinea; I went into the coffee room to Mr. Crouch, I asked him if he could give me change, he said he could give me three seven shilling pieces; he ringed them all; I gave him the guinea, and I ringed them afterwards, they appeared to me to be good; I asked Ann Erskine to see me give the prisoner the change; I gave the prisoner two seven shilling pieces and six shillings and sixpence, I put them all down on the counter; she pushed two shillings towards me, saying they were bad; I went to change the two shillings and she pushed all the change to me, she said she would not have any, she would have the guinea back again; I ringed the seven shilling pieces, I said they were not the seven shilling pieces that I gave to her, that I was sure of. I asked Ann Erskine to ask Mr. Crouch whether they were the same, she went and returned. I kept the two seven shilling pieces and gave them to George Worrall .

Q. What became of the other woman - A. She stood very close to her, and said that she had a child at the door, and how very obstinate the child was, that she would not come in; Mr. Crouch ran out of the coffee room door and told me to give charge of her.

ANN ERSKINE . I was desired by Miss Sales to look at what the prisoner did; the prisoner refused two of the shillings, and while she was refusing them she laid her hand over the two seven shilling pieces that Miss Sales had given her, I observed her fingers move, and I heard the seven shilling pieces drop on the plate of the counter; she immediately refused the whole of the change, Martha Sales took up the silver; I took up the two seven shilling pieces; I went to Mr. Crouch and returned with the two seven shilling pieces When I came back I told her she had changed the two seven shilling pieces, she told me I was a false woman for saying so; I gave the two seven shilling pieces to Martha Sales . Mrs. Tomlinson was with the prisoner, she sidled up to Mary Johnson sufficient for any thing to pass between them.

JOHN CROUCH . I am a silversmith. I was in the

coffee room, Martha Sales came and asked me to give her change for a guinea; I gave her three seven shilling pieces, I rung them, they were very good; the two seven shilling pieces that Miss Erskine brought to me; I am certain they were not what I gave to Miss Sales, those that I gave were dull, having been in circulation, those brought back were new.

GEORGE WORRALL . Q. You are an officer; Miss Sales delivered you two seven shilling pieces - A. Yes; I have had them ever since. I searched the women, upon the prisoner I found six penny worth of halfpence, on Tomlinson I found three shillings and some halfpence, all good money. These are the two seven shilling pieces.

CALEB EDWARD POWELL . The seven shilling pieces are both counterfeits, and both of the same dye.

Mr. Alley addressed the jury on behalf of the defendant, and called two witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Confined Six Months in Newgate , and at the expiration of that time to find sureties for her good behaviour for six months .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: o18091101-1

MARY JORDAN , convicted in September sessions of Manslaughter,

Fined 1 s. and Confined One Year in Newgate, from the 20th of September last .

Reference Number: o18091101-2

CATHERINE CLANCY , ELIZABETH POWELL , and SUSANNAH WELLING , convicted in September sessions,

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s .

Reference Number: o18091101-3

MARY WILLIAMS , convicted in September sessions,

GUILTY - DEATH .


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