Old Bailey Proceedings, 20th September 1809.
Reference Number: 18090920
Reference Number: f18090920-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS. On the KING's Commission of the PEACE OYER AND TERMINER, AND GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND ALSO THE GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, HELD AT Justice-Hall, in the Old Bailey, On WEDNESDAY the 20th of SEPTEMBER, 1809, and following Days;

BEING THE SEVENTH SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF The Right Honourable CHARLES FLOWER , LORD-MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY JOB SIBLY, FOR R. BUTTERS, No. 117, ALDERSGATE-STREET.

LONDON:

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED (BY THE AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON) By R. BUTTERS, No. 22, Fetter Lane, Fleet Street,

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON.

Before the Right-honourable CHARLES FLOWER , Lord Mayor of the City of London; John Heath , esq. One of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir George Wood , knt. One of the Barons of His Majesty's Court of Exchequer; Sir John Bailey , knt. One of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Nathaniel Newnham , esq. Harvey Christian Combe , esq. James Shaw , esq. Aldermen of the said City; John Silvester , esq. Recorder of the said City; John Princep , esq. Samuel Birch , esq. William Plomer , esq. Aldermen of the said City; and Newman Knowlys , esq. Common Serjeant of the said City; His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justice of Goal Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

London Jury.

William Smith ,

James Divett ,

William Pepperall ,

Andrew Anderson ,

Daniel Mackreth ,

Henry Aswell ,

Crispen Fuller ,

George Dowse ,

Charles Nunn ,

John Baldwin ,

William Brewer ,

Robert Romanis .

First Middlesex Jury.

William Wallis ,

John Niron ,

Richard Chedley ,

John Capell ,

William Rigby ,

George Bourne ,

William Brown ,

Andrew Dealey ,

Archibald Richey ,

Richard Gibbs ,

John Cutting ,

William Wilson ,

Second Middlesex Jury.

William Brown ,

James Wilson ,

William Dalby ,

William Butcher ,

John Prebble ,

David Sheane ,

Thomas Pattenden ,

Thomas Lowe ,

Richard Creed ,

John Ellis ,

John Levett ,

Thomas Smithers .

Reference Number: t18090920-1

629. SARAH ENNEVER, alias MORRIS , was indicted for feloniously forging on the 25th of August , a promissory note for the payment of 2 l. with intention to defraud Robert Mackglew .

SECOND COUNT, for uttering and publishing as true a like forged note, she knowing it to be forged, with the same intention.

THIRD COUNT, for feloniously offering a like forged promissory note with intention to defraud Robert Mackglew , she knowing it to be forged and counterfeited.

WILLIAM CULLEN . I live at No. 4, City-road, Finsbury ; with Robert Mackglew , a linen-draper . On the 25th of August last, between the hours of eleven and twelve, the prisoner came to our shop alone, she asked for some calico, she wished them to be remnants, as she lived with a lady that was a benevolent person, she purchased them for the purpose of giving them away to poor people, she did not say who that person was. I sold her two remnants for five shillings, she produced a two pound note. I perceived it to be of Westham, Essex bank; I gave it to John Spring , who has the management of the concern, No. 4, in the City-road; he told the prisoner that we did not take country notes, but if she would wait he would send to a friend of his, meaning to Mr. Mackglew, at his other shop, Pavement, Moorfields, or to the Banking-house where it was made payable; she consented to it, and stopped; he sent Martha Spring , his little girl, to Mr. Mackglew; Martha Spring came back with Mr. Mackglew, he presented the note to the prisoner and asked her if it was her's; she said it was. I went to Worship-street office and brought Mr. Ray, the officer, with me; he searched the prisoner and found no other notes upon her.

Q. Was any thing said in the prisoner's presence whether any body had doubted it before - A. The prisoner said to me that she had endeavoured to negotiate it in the neighbourhood; the person objected to it, being a country note. That was after I had shewed it to Mr. Spring.

Q. Then it was while Mr. Spring had the note, was it - A. Yes.

Mr. Knapp. So this person came to your shop to utter a forged note and told you that it had been objected to before - A. She told me that she had offered it to a neighbour, and they objected to it because it was a country note.

Q. Then you did not like the note, you sent it out by Martha Spring , and desired the prisoner to wait - A. Yes; she waited twenty minutes in the shop.

ROBERT MACKGLEW . I have two shops; the note was brought to me at my house on the Pavement, Moorfields; I went back and saw the prisoner; I addressed her, and said is this the lady that owns the note; she said yes; I asked her where she had got it; she said she had taken it from a lodger of the name of Ipsditch, a shoemaker; and she lived in Old Bethlem, I think she said No. 9. I asked her if she knew whether it was a good note; she said she believed it was. I saw it was directed to Postlewaite, London; I asked her where that Postlewaite resided; she seemed to hesitate; in a little time she said she believed in Tooley-street. There was Westham, Essex, upon the note. On further questioning of her she said she believed the banking house was a large shop. I saw it was a new note, the writing was fresh; It was dated in January.

JOHN RAY . I am an officer of Worship-street office. I took the prisoner into custody. This note was delivered to me; I have had it ever since. I went down to Westham to see whether there was any such firm of Davey, Brathwaite, and co.; there was not. I made enquiries in Tooley-street, there I found in Church-alley a person of the name of Postlewaite. I enquired at No. 9, Old Bethlem, the prisoner did live there.

The prisoner was not put on her defence.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18090920-2

630. JOSEPH GODFREY was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of William Webb , about the hour of twelve at noon, on the 8th of August , no person being in the same house, and feloniously stealing therein, four shirts, value 4 l. the property of William Webb .

HANNAH WEBB . I am the wife of William Webb .

Q. Was your house broken open - A. Yes; the window was.

Q. Who left the house last - A. I left it last, about twelve o'clock in the morning; I secured the doors and windows. I returned about one o'clock, I found the iron peg was out of the window. He got in at the window; the door was shut.

Q. What property did you lose from there - A. Six shirts.

Q. What was the value of them - A. Five pound all but a shilling; they cost more; they were worth that at the time they were taken.

Q. When had you seen the shirts the last time before you left the house - A. I put them in a basket and covered them over with a cloth. I saw them a quarter of an hour before I left the house. I have never seen the shirts since.

ELIZABETH CROSWELL . I am a green-grocer, I live in Hackney-road, about half a mile from Mrs. Webb. I went across the fields with a horse and cart, with my green-grocery, I met the prisoner with something in a cloth in his arms; I did not take particular notice of him. Mrs. Webb enquired if I saw a man; I told her yes.

Mr. Curwood. How far was this from the house of Mrs. Webb - A. About a dozen yards.

Q. Do you know the person of the prisoner - A. When I saw him I never saw him before that day; I think he is the man; he is very much altered; I cannot positively say.

MARY MURPHY . I saw a man pass.

Q. Look at the prisoner - is that the man - A. To the best of my knowledge; he looks much paler now.

Q. Have you any doubt - A. I do not feel any doubt to speak; I saw him pass my window with the shirts on his arm; they were not covered with any thing.

Q. What day was this - A. On Friday, about a quarter before one; the same day as Mrs. Webb's house was broken open. A few minutes before that the prisoner came and asked me if I wanted to buy some beef; he is a soldier, is is usual for them to sell their beef; he told me he was not distressed for the money, he would call in the morning; he left the meat and called the next morning for the money.

MARY GREEN . I was standing at my window, I saw the prisoner pass on the other side of the way. I live six or seven doors from the other witness. The prisoner had the shirts on his arm.

Q. Do you know how many shirts there were - A - A. No; there were a good many very neatly pleated, as they came from the ironers; he was dressed in soldier's clothes; he had wings to his jacket, and a forage cap. I had never seen him before.

Q. to Webb. How soon after was this man taken - A. The next morning. The serjeant told me when he came for the money for the beef, to stop him.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel, and called no witnesses to his character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18090920-3

631. RICHARD OAKDEN was indicted for an unnatural crime .

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 49.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18090920-4

632. STEPHEN IRONMONGER and JOHN GOODWIN, alias, GOODING , were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 26th of August , two oak rails, value 12 s. the property of Francis Gosling , esq .

The case was stated by Mr. Gurney.

JOHN KEYTE . I am a surveyor. I superintend the repairs carrying on at Mr. Francis Gosling 's. On the 26th of August, about eleven o'clock at night. I saw Goodwin near the wall end, at Isleworth , four or five hundred yards from Mr. Gosling's premises, he had two oak rails with him which were prepared for fixing; he was going from the park to his own house; he lived in the parish of Isleworth; I asked him what he had got there; he made no reply. I followed him up the lane, and laid hold of him; I told him he had stolen these rails from Mr. Gosling; he said he did not steal them, he was carrying them for the old man. On my turning round within a few yards I saw some person; that person turned out to be Ironmonger. The prisoner put down the rails; we had a struggle. I took him to a public house about two hundred yards off. I immediately returned to the spot where I left the rails, I found them upon Ironmonger's shoulder, he was going off with them; I charged him with taking them, and desired him to put them down and go along with me; he did. The rails had been prepared under my direction, I know them to be Mr. Gosling's; they are the value of twelve shillings. I had seen them on the evening of the 23rd or 24th; they then were within the park; within a few yards of the lodge.

The property produced and identified.

Ironmonger's Defence. I am innocent.

Goodwin's Defence. I am innocent of the theft which is alledged against me.

The prisoners called one witness each, who gave them a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18090920-5

633. SUSANNAH BEESON was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Henry Dunkin , he being in the same dwelling house, about the hour of four in the afternoon, on the 4th of July , and feloniously, stealing therein, a watch, value 25 s. a silver chain, value 5 s. a watch key, value 1 d. and four pieces of coin, value 10 d. the property of Robert Biggins .

SARAH BIGGINS . I am the wife of Robert Biggins ; I and my husband lodge in Henry Dunkin 's house, in Half-nichol street, Bethnal-green ; we have two rooms on the floor.

Q. Did you leave your room on the 4th of July about four in the afternoon - A. Yes: or about ten minutes after.

Did you leave a watch in your room - A. Yes; my husband's silver watch and a silver chain.

Q. Did you fasten your room up any way - A. Yes; I locked my room door; I hanged my key where I used to hang it for some years. underneath the sink in the entery. When I returned home the key of my door was gone. I was not absent an hour; my landlady lent me a key to get into my room; I then missed my watch.

Q. Have you ever seen the watch since - A. Yes; I saw it the day afterwards.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. Yes, I have known her some time; she lived in the same street as I do; but not in the same house.

Q. Was Henry Dunkin in the house when you went out - A. Yes; I did not see him, I could hear him at work in the shop; he is a weaver ; I could tell by the shuttle; he shoots slow. I will not say whether his son was at work, I heard only one; I am sure it was Henry Dunkin.

Prisoner. I have been acquainted with that woman a little while; she has been in the habit of getting me to pledge her things. I went on that day to ask her for some money; she told me she had got none, I might take the watch and make money on it.

Prosecutrix. It is no such thing; I did not let her have the watch, nor authorise her to take the watch, never may I live any more if I did.

HENRY DUNKIN . Q. You keep a house in Bethnal-green, do you - A. Yes. Robert Biggins and his wife lodged with me; they have lived in my house thirteen years.

Q. Do you remember Sarah Biggins going out of the house on the 4th of July - A. I remember it very well, I was not out of the house all day. On that day the prisoner and Mrs. Biggins went out together; the prisoner saw her lock the door and put the key under the sink.

Q. You saw that did you - A No, I did not.

Q. Then tell me what you saw yourself - did you see the prisoner that day - A. I did, at her father's in Half-nicoll-street, in the same parish, between seven and eight o'clock at night; she could hardly stand she was so much intoxicated in liquor.

Q. Did you say any thing to her about the watch - A. I did; she abused me very much, and said she knew nothing at all about the watch. Her father talked to her, and by her father talking to her, after sometime she pulled out a large piece of paper, he gave it me directly; being very dark I went to the window and opened the paper; I saw the duplicate of the watch pledged for one pound one.

Q. Did she direct her father to give it you. - A. No, the father gave it me voluntary, he never opened it at all; she was present when the father gave It me, and underneath the duplicate was a seven shilling piece, in gold, in that paper. After that, in a few minutes, she put her hand in her pocket again. and pulled out five shillings and five pence halfpenny; she gave that to her father, he never looked at it, but gave it to me directly: I kept the money till I surrendered it before the magistrate.

Q. Did she say any thing about the duplicate. - A. She then swore an oath, have I given you the duplicate; yes, I said, and the seven shilling piece under it. After that she took out the five shillings and five pence halfpenny, then I had had twelve shillings and five pence halfpenny out of the one pound one.

JOHN RICHARDS . I am a pawnbroker, 49, Brick-lane, Spitalfields. On the 4th of July, about five o'clock in the afternoon, I lent her one pound one on this watch.

DANIEL BISHOP . I am an officer of Worship-street-office. On the 4th of July I took the prisoner in custody, she was very much in liquor, at that time I received a duplicate of Mr. Dunkin, of a watch pledged for one pound one, on the 4th of July. This is the duplicate.

Q. Did you tell her what she was charged with. - A. Not that time. On the following morning, when she was sober, I told her that she was charged with breaking the apartments of Mrs. Biggins, and stealing a silver watch; she said she did not break in, she found the key of Mr. Biggins's room in the passage, and she opened the door. She said nothing about the duplicate in my presence.

Q. to prosecutrix. Look at that watch. - A. That is the watch that I left in my room on the 4th of July when I went out, it is my husband's property; it was stolen out of my room.

Prisoner's Defence. I acknowledge I was in a state of intoxication that day, but what drink I had that day I had with my prosecutrix; I was going to do some work for her, and on account of my not going to her place, she was to bring the work to my father, therefore when I pledged the watch I gave the ticket to my father, and the money, in order for him to give it to her.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 42.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18090920-6

634. MARY TYLER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 9th of September , a gelding, value 3 l. and a cart, value 2 l. the property of Elizabeth Thomas , widow .

MARY SKINNER . Q. Are you the daughter of Elizabeth Thomas . - A. Yes, she is a green grocer , living at the corner of White's-yard, Rosemary-lane, she is a widow.

Q. Has she a horse and cart. - A. Yes. On Saturday the 9th of this month I took the horse and cart to Spitalfields market.

Q. Did you bring it home again. - A. No, it was taken away; I went away from it for the space of ten minutes, and left it in Paternoster-row ; when I came back it was gone.

Q. Have you seen the horse since. - A. Yes, I have; I saw the horse on last Saturday morning, I saw the cart the same night, my mother and brother found the cart that same night in Scott's-field; they brought it home; the horse was taken out of the cart. I saw the horse in Whitechapel pound.

ELIZABETH THOMAS . Q. Does the horse and cart that you sent Mary Skinner with belong to you - A. Yes.

Q. Where did you find the cart again. - A. In Scott's-fields the same evening, it was standing on the sharps.

Q. Was the prisoner there. - A. No.

Q. Is Scott's-fields an open place. - A. Yes.

WILLIAM RHODES . Q. Did you see this horse and cart on Saturday the 9th of September. - A. Yes, about nine o'clock, it was in Ducking-pond-lane, stuck in the mud.

Q. How old are you. - A. I am not fourteen.

Q. Who was with it. - A. The girl herself, and some more boys, and a horse-boiling man.

Q. What girl. - A. The prisoner; I never saw her before, I am sure it was that girl.

Q. What was she doing with the horse and cart. - A. It stuck in the mud, and several boys and men helped to push the cart out of the mud, the girl had hold of the horses reins, the girl said the horse belonged to her father, and the cart to a woman.

Q. How came she to say that. - A. A gentleman asked her whose horse and cart it was, she staid there with it till about one o'clock, when she got it out of the mud she went right up to the turnpike, she asked how much the turnpike was, they said sixpence.

Q. Did you hear her. - A. Yes, she said the cart had been paid for before, I was going through the turnpike the same time, they would not let her go through, she returned back into Ducking-pond-lane, she went into Scott's-field, she said she would give it some water, she was going to put the cloth on, the horse kicked up and ran away.

Q. Did you see her. - A. Yes.

Q. How came you not to go on, you said you were going the other way. - A. She asked me to shew her into Dog-row, that was after they refused letting her go through the turnpike, when the horse ran away two more boys and me ran after it and put it into her hands.

Q. You returned it her. - A. Yes, she said she would not put it in the cart again; she would go home and get the mother of it because it was stronger, then she took the horse down Dog-row, and took it right away, she left the cart with carrots, cabbages, and turnips in it. I left her.

GEORGE BOONE . My father keeps a fruiterers in Whitechapel parish

Q. Did you see the prisoner on the 9th of September. - A. Yes, I saw her opposite of my father's shop about a quarter before nine. I had known her for six years.

Q. Had she any thing with her. - A. Yes, the horse and cart, and goods in it, greens and vegetables, she had hold of the horse's head, and kept beating of it, she was endeavouring to make it go on.

Q. Did she take it away. - A. Yes.

Q. Had she any body with her. - A. No.

Q. Did you know the last witness, William Rhodes . - A. No more than living about the quarter.

Q. Was he with her. - A. No.

Q. What street is your shop in. - A. Whitechapel-road, opposite of the London Hospital.

Q. How far is that from Spitalfields-market. - A. It may be half a mile, she was going towards Whitechapel-turnpike.

Q. Did you see which way she came, - A. From Whitechapel church.

Q. Did you speak to her or not. - A. No.

Q. Are you sure that that was the girl. - A. Yes.

Q. How far is your house from Scott's-fields. - A. It is not a quarter of a mile.

RICHARD PERRY . I am a constable. The prisoner was delivered into my hands, that is all I know.

Q. to Rhodes. What turnpike was it she was going towards. - A. Mile End turnpike .

Q. That is Whitechapel turnpike. - A. Yes.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not take the horse away from Spitalfields-market, I did not take it all, that little boy had hold of the horse, he said, I will hold the horse if you will shove behind, I do not know how to drive a horse.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 13.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18090920-7

635. MARTHA LESTLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 18th of August , two shawls, value 26 s. the property of William Saunders , privately in his shop .

WILLIAM SAUNDERS . I am a linen-draper , I live in Norton Faldgate , I can only swear to my property.

Mr. TITFORD. I am a linen-draper at the corner of Finsbury-square. On the 18th of August I went out of my house, I returned home, I found the prisoner and another woman in company with her in my shop, they had been extremely abusive to Mrs. Titford; when I came in I said I would send for a constable, I sent for a constable, I told them that they had what was not their own, the other person said I should not see it, it was in the other woman's possession before, the prisoner took the parcel from the other woman, and said I should not see what was there. I sent for a constable; on searching the bundle I found a six quarter imitation shawl, on the other woman I found the other shawl, in my endeavouring to take them to the office she escaped.

JONES. I am a shopman to Mr. Saunders, I was in the shop at the time that the prisoner took the shawls.

Q. Did you see the prisoner take the shawls - A. I saw the prisoner come in the shop along with an old woman; she asked to look at some prints, we shewed her some prints, there was none that would do for her, I was at the time shewing two ladies some shawls, they were laying on the counter, I turned my back, and went to the far end of the shop to look at the invoice of them, and left the boy along with these two women, shewing them some prints. Before I returned they both went out, I missed nothing at that time. On the next morning I missed two shawls, I had seen them on the evening before when the two women came there, about twelve minutes before they came in.

Q. How near was the prisoner to the shawls. - A. The prisoner was at the counter close by the shawls, which were on the counter, the prisoner and the other woman were both standing together.

Mr. Curwood. You say that there were two ladies and a boy that were in the shop at the time, are they here. - A. No.

Q. You did not miss the shawls till the next day. - A. Not till the next morning, the shawls were not put strait that night, they were left in a drawer throwed altogether. The prime cost of these shawls was twenty-six shillings.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. The young woman that I met gave me the bundle into my hand in that gentleman's shop, I held it for her, the gentleman asked me for it, I gave it to him, I said it did not belong to me.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18090920-8

636. JOHN TAYLOR was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 2d of July , a copper artificial leg, value 2 l. 15 s. an artificial arm, value 8 s. a steel collar, value 10 s. 6 d. a pair of steel spring stocks, value 10 s. 6 d. two screw plates and taps, value 10 s. three braces, value 9 s. 9 d. two truss springs, value 3 s. twelve dumb bell caps, value 4 s. and twenty-seven cushions for trusses, value 4 s. 6 d. the property of John Edy , in his dwelling-house .

JOHN EDY . I am a house-keeper in Dean-street, Soho , I am a truss-maker ; the prisoner worked for me at the time I lost the property; he had care of the shop . I sleep in the country always, and sometimes I was absent for a fortnight, they might have been taken at different times.

Q. He had an apartment that he himself hired. - A. Yes. I searched that apartment, I found the copper artificial leg and the other things there.

Q. Had you missed them. - A. Yes, I asked him about some braces that had been in the drawer, he said he had missed them, they were taken out of the drawer.

Q. How long had the prisoner lived with you. - A. About a year and a half.

Q. He did your smith's business did he. - A. Yes, he left me after he had behaved in a bad way.

Mr. Knapp. And you settled with him. - A. It was time to do it.

Q. He set up a smith's shop did not he in Great St. Andrew's-street, did he work for you there. - A. No.

Q. Can you say that he never did any job for you there. - A. I think I did employ him once.

Q. He was carrying on that business there. - A. He was very welcome.

Q. They say that when two people are parted they do not agree very well, you never once published any account of it. - A. I drew up a hand-bill of the case how he served me.

Q. You never published it. - A. No, I printed it for the purpose of a memorandum, I never circulated it.

Q. Should you know if you were to see it. - A. Yes, certainly I know all about it, it was my business; he carried on this business, took the money, and charged me for the time, I never had any of the monies when he was with me.

Q. You had no agreement or partnership with him at all had you. - A. No, none at all; no, never in my life.

Q. Was there any note of hand given in the name of the partnership between you and Taylor in your own hand writing. Should you know it if you were to see it. - A. You may shew me what you please, I know the writing, but I had never nothing to do with it.

Q. Now these things that you found, I should like

to know whereabouts they were found in his shop. - A. The copper leg he had painted it, and put it in the window for a sign, and then afterwards it was put down.

Q. For any body to see it, you saw it when you went into the shop. - A. Yes, there we found it, I told him it was mine.

Q. Just look at the bill of exchange, and tell me whether you know that - A. I do not know how he come by this, this was never executed, it was a matter once we were going upon.

Q. Is that your hand writing, I will read it to you, please to pay me or my order twenty pounds one shilling and seven pence, value received, being the first payment on account of partnership, as advised by me, John Edy , directed to Mr. Abraham Taylor . - A. That is my own writing, but it never was executed.

The prisoner left his balance to his counsel, called six witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18090920-9

637. CHARLES LAWRENCE and ROBERT JEFFERSON were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 31st of July , twenty-six yards of velveteen, value 5 l. the property of Richard Smith and John Ash .

JOHN ASH . I am in partnership with Richard Smith , we are wollen-draper s, Prince's-street, Soho, St. Ann's, Westminster , the dwelling-house belongs to both of us, the shop is part of our dwelling-house.

Q. Did you lose any velveteen out of your shop. - A. Yes, on Monday morning the 31st of July last, about nine o'clock in the morning, I lost twenty-six yards of velveteen.

Q. What is it worth. - A. It cost me five pound four shillings, it was the property of me and my partner.

Q. How was it lost from your shop. - A. I do not know, I had seen it about ten minutes before.

JAMES DALTON . I am shopman to Messrs. Ash and Smith. On the 31st of July last, about nine o'clock in the morning, as I was stooping behind the counter to get a brush out of the drawer, on getting up I saw the prisoner Lawrence standing in the shop, he wanted to know the price of a waistcoat piece in the window, I told him the price, he said it was too dear for him. he could get it cheaper in the City, he then went out of the shop.

Q. Was there any body with him then. - A. No, he went out and returned with the prisoner Jefferson, we having lost a piece of kerseymere the week before the same time in the morning, I returned to the accompting house, at the bottom of the shop I saw the prisoners pointing to different things in the shop window, they then got very near the door, Jefferson came very softly in the shop, he proceeded about half way up the shop, stooped down and took up the piece of velveteen, it was laying down by the side of the counter along with some more; he put it under his arm and proceeded towards the door again, I then ran out of the counting-house, and called out stop thief, the prisoner dropped the piece of velveteen on the threshold of the door and ran away.

Q. Was he stopped. - A. Yes, they got hold of him in the street, he got away, and Mr. Anderson stopped him and brought him back to the shop, I never lost sight of him.

Q. That was Jefferson. - A. Yes.

Q. What became of Lawrence, do you know. - A. I did not see him go away.

Q. Did you see him at the shop window when Lawrence took this piece. - A. No, I missed him then.

Q. Do you know the value of this piece of velveteen. - A. Yes, five pound.

HENRY CRESWELL . I am a constable, I apprehended him, this is the piece of velveteen, it was delivered to me by Mr. Ash.

WILLIAM ANDERSON . I stopped the prisoner in consequence of hearing the cry of stop thief, I took him down to the prosecutor's house till the constable took charge of him.

Q. Is the prisoner Jefferson the man that you apprehended. - A. Yes, I am sure of it.

JAMES LANE . I am a constable. I was called to take Lawrence, he was at the door of the watchhouse, I took him by the direction of the boy signifying he was one of the parties in the robbery.

Q. to Dalton. Is that the piece that you saw the prisoner Jefferson take. - A. Yes, I delivered it to my master.

Q. to Mr. Ash. Look at it, is that the property of you and your master. - A. Yes; I delivered it to the constable.

The prisoners said nothing in their defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

LAWRENCE, NOT GUILTY .

JEFFERSON, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 25.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18090920-10

638. MARY WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 24th of August , a pair of Hessian boots, value 30 s. the property of Jonathan Dodd , privately in his shop .

JONATHAN DODD . I live in South Moulton-street, Cavendish-square , I keep a shoe-makers shop there.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar. - A. On Thursday the 24th of August, between five and six o'clock, the prisoner asked me to let her stand up in my shop, when she came in the boots hung up at the door, one on each side, within the door there were a pair of Hessian boots, she did not stop above four minutes, she went away when it gave over raining, after she was gone I missed the boots.

Q. How much was the value of them. - A. Thirty shillings.

Q. You did not see her take them did you. - A. No, I saw the goods hanging up when she was there.

Q. Who was the man that went after her. - A. Thomas Tibbott .

THOMAS TIBBOTT . I work for Mr. Dodd, I saw the prisoner come in the shop, she asked to stand up out of the wet, I saw the boots hanging up when she came in, she staid about four or five minutes, when she went away the boots were gone, my master pursued her one way and I the other. I found the property upon her.

Q. How far might she be off. - A. About two hundred yards, she had got them wrapped up in a pair of pantaloons in her apron. As I was going out of the door I saw her drop some potatoes out of her apron, and one of the boots. I picked the boot up, I saw that she had got the other wrapped up in a pair of pantaloons; I took her to the shop and sent for a constable.

Q. Were these boots inside of the shop - A. Yes; I am sure they were inside, within the door.

CHARLES PARRY . I am a constable. These are the boots I received from Mr. Dodd's man.

Q. to Mr. Dodd. Look at these boots - A. These are my boots; there is my name in them; these are the same that hung at the door within side of the shop.

Tibbott. These are the boots that I took from the prisoner; I am sure they are the same boots that hung up; I delivered them to the constable.

Prisoner's Defence. It rained; I happened to go into a public house and called for a pint of beer, a woman came in and brought a bundle with some potatoas, four lemons, and a small mutton kidney; she said she was not able to wait; she asked me to stop till she came in again; I thought her long, I went out in the street; I happened to slip the potatoes, and one boot dropped from me, somebody came up to me, they said the boots belonged to them. They took me to the house; I do not know where it was.

GUILTY, aged 35.

Judgment respited .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18090920-11

639. ANN GAMBLE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 10th of August , a watch, value 18 l. and a chain, value 2 l. the property of John Hutchins , in his dwelling house .

MRS. HUTCHINS. I am the wife of John Hutchins , he lives in St. James's-street.

Q. Did you lose your watch any time - A. Yes; on the 10th of August, about one o'clock in the day; I missed it in a house that I have in Mather Hill, Paddington .

Q. What part of the house was it in - A. On the mantle piece in the back parlour.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. No.

Q. Have you seen your watch since - A. Yes; I saw it at Bow-street on the Thursday following.

BENJAMIN HANTS . I am a pawnbroker, 135, High Holborn. On the 10th of August, between two and three in the afternoon, the prisoner came to pledge a gold watch.

Q. What did she say - A. She asked two pound; I lent her that sum upon it.

Q. Have you any doubt about the prisoner being the person - A. No. I saw her again on the Monday following, at 28, Cato-street, at her lodgings.

Q. Did she tell you where she lived - A. Yes; St. Mary Devises, in Wiltshire; she pledged it in the name of Ann Sweetman , No. 9, Virginia-row; I have had the watch ever since; I produce it.

Q. How came you to go to her house, 28, Cato-street - A. Because I disputed her pledging the watch. I went No. 9, Virginia-row, to enquire for Mrs. Gamble; I was told that Mrs. Gamble did not live there; I went there to enquire whether I could hear any thing of her; she gave that address; I was told that Mrs. Gamble did not lodge there, but Mrs Sweetman did. I was directed to Cato-street; I told her of the circumstance of the handbill coming round of the watch; that she must go with me; she came without any hesitation.

Q. She did not deny having pledged the watch with you, did she - A. No.

Q. What is the value of the watch - A. About ten pound.

Q. to prosecutor. Look at that watch and tell me whether you know that watch - A. Yes; it is mine; I know it by the form of it; the name inside is Vivan, No. 19. I have no doubt of it being my watch.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going down Holborn talking to the child; a gentlewoman tapped me on the shoulder, she said I believe you are a countrywoman of mine; she asked me if I was not a Wiltshire woman; I said my husband was a Wiltshire man; she said she was going down into the country, she would give me a shilling to do a favour for her; she gave me the watch to pawn for two pound; she told me her name. Through the gentlemen disputing about the watch I forgot her name; I pawned it in my own name; I thought she came honestly by it; she was a creditable person. I gave the gentleman my true direction.

Q. to prosecutrix. What other person was in the house at the time - A. There were two servants, a gentleman that lodges in the first floor, an a servant of his.

Q. Was the door fast or not - A. No; and that is how I supposed she got in; it was a very sultry hot day, the door was left on a jar for the purpose of air coming in.

JURY. I wonder how she could escape the notice of so many in the house - did any of the servants abscond from the house at that time - A. No; nor did the gentleman; he is a man of respectability.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 58.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18090920-12

640. MARY HOLMES was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 13th of July , a watch, value 3 l. the property of Joseph Beddows .

JOSEPH BEDDOWS . I am a carrier , I live in Long-lane, Bermondsey. On the 13th of July, between one and three in the morning, I met with the prisoner in in Wych-street, near the Strand.

Q. I suppose at that time you was not very sober - A. I was not tipsey; very little. I had been to see some friends home in Oxford-street.

Q. At what house had you been drinking - A. At the Red Lion and Still; I had not been there any length of time; I cannot say how long.

Q. When you met with the prisoner what happened then - A. She came into my company in the street; I said I was tired, I should sit down; I sat down at the door in Holywell-street, in the Strand , and she sat down by me; I was rather inclined to sleep at that time; she got up and went away, I looked round, I saw she was running; I clapped my hand upon my fob, I found my watch was gone; I am sure I had it when I was in company with her; I had felt it about ten minutes before. I ran after her and overtook her, I told her that she had got my watch; she said she had not. A watchman came up, she was secured and searched; the watchman took the watch from her.

PETER LEVER . I am a watchman. The prisoner told me to come of one side she would give me the watch one of the Bow-street officers took it from her.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming home at a very unseasonable hour in the morning, this person was sitting at the step of the door; he followed me; he asked me to go with him; he sat down at the step of another door, where the watch was; I came on towards the New Church; I was going home, he came after

me and said you have got my watch; I said I have a watch that I took from a step of a door, if it is yours you shall have it.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18090920-13

641. WILLIAM GOODMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 26th of June , a metal watch, value 2 l. the property of Edward Hartley .

EDWARE HARTLEY . I live in Primrose-street. Bishopgate-street. On the 26th of June, about six o'clock in the evening, I went up the City-road , in company with Mr. Page; I observed a mob of people, I was informed there was going to be a fight; I said to the man that was with me, Joe, we may as well go and see this fight. I followed the mob into the Shepherd and Shepherdess field; after the fight was over, the croud divided into two columns; after that I went up to see the man who was bruised, a soldier that had been fighting. In about a minute the prisoner and another worked in on each side of me between the mob, and one, by that means, I thought I felt the watch go out of my pocket; I tried to get my hand down between them to feel whether it was gone or not, they pushed against me so that I had not room, at last I gave a little back, I got my hands down, I found it was gone. I took one of them with one hand and the other with the other hand, I pulled them both five or six yards from the ring; I then said one of you two have robbed me of my watch, the men in the ring all came round me in one minute, and left the man that had been fighting; I kept my hold, and a gentleman popped his head over my shoulder; he said, young man you have got more than you can do, have not you a friend that can take one in custody while you keep the other, I answered yes, and delivered one out of my hands to my friend, and bid him keep him; he being rather afraid of the mob, did not touch him; I kept fast hold of the other. It was Goodman that I let go; he then stripped his coat off, and said, search me all over whether I have got the watch or no. Some person said, d - n you, put on your coat and go off, he put on his coat. The prisoner pulled a watch out of his pocket, and asked me if that was my watch, I told him no; my friend, said Hartley, make him prove where he has got that watch. He cried out, father, come and take my watch, they have robbed me of my watch. A man came up, pretending to be his father, took the watch out of his hands. They went away, I I saw no more of him, I still kept my hold of the other, and the mob began to hustle one person against me, and then another, they said I wanted to steal watches. I saw the mob all round was against me; I let him go.

Q. Did you find your watch. - A. No.

Q. Did you ever see Goodman afterwards. - A. Not till he was taken in custody the next day.

Q. Were there a great number of people around you when the watch was gone. - A. There were, but their backs were towards me, they never touched me at all, Goodman and the other were nearest to me.

Q. Did you never find your watch again. - A. I never saw the watch again.

JOSEPH PAGE . Q. Were you with Edward Hartley at this fight. - A. Yes, I missed Hartley during the fight, after the fight was over I saw Hartley, he had hold of the prisoner and another, he challenged them with having his watch. He did not know which had it, the prisoner pulled off his coat, and offered to be searched, he let him go.

The prisoner left his defence to the counsel, and called no witnesses to his character.

NOT GUILTY

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18090920-14

642. JAMES HOBSON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 9th of August , eleven shillings in monies, numbered, and three bank notes, value 1 l. each , the property of Richard Greenwood .

RICHARD GREENWOOD . I am clerk in Mr. William's office, Bull and Mouth inn, Bull and Mouth street .

Q. On the 8th of August, in the course of the day, had you any occasion to put any notes and penny pieces in your desk in the accompting house. - A. I did in the forepart of the day, I locked them up in the desk, and left them safe.

Q. When did you see your desk again. - A. Not till past twelve at night, I then went again to my desk and found the desk was broken.

Q. Had you seen any body in the warehouse at the time the desk was broken open. - Q. Yes, the prisoner Hobson, he was horse-keeper, employed by Mr. Willan, he was discharged the day before. On seeing my desk broken open, and seeing the prisoner there, I asked him how he came there, he said he came through the hole in the warehouse, and that another person of the name of Craddock had come in before him. I observed the hole in the warehouse, it communicated to the stable, it was large enough for a person to come through; he said he came through the hole in the wall, he went to the desk, and took the halfpence and the penny pieces himself. I saw them found upon his person, among which was a twopenny piece. They are common coin, I could not swear to them, I lost them, and the twopenny piece was battered very much.

JOSEPH BLANCH . I am an officer. I have had the money ever since, there is three shillings in silver, and the rest in copper, eleven shillings altogether. The prisoner acknowledged that he took them out of the desk, I found the desk broken open, and this end of the candlestick fitted the place were the desk was wrenched open, the hole in the desk appeared quite fresh, the wood laid on the ground; this is the knife that I took from Cradock, and this is the knife that I took from Hobson, this is a candlestick that they stick in the wall that they used in the warehouse.

Prisoner's Defence. It was not me th had the notes, I saw Cradock break the desk open, he came and told me he had some halfpence, and three one pound notes; he wanted me to have them, I told him I would have nothing to do with them.

GUILTY , aged 32.

Of stealing the copper.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090920-15

643. MICHAEL MURPHY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 8th of August , a leaden chimney pot, value 8 s. and fifty-two pound weight of lead,

value 8 s. the property of our Lord the King, affixed to a dwelling house of our Lord the King .

And THREE OTHER COUNTS for like offence, only varying the manner of charging them.

JAMES DONKINS . I am porter of the gate at Somerset House . On the 8th of August, between twelve and one. I saw the prisoner, he was wheeling out a wheelbarrow of rubbish, I perceived some lead, it struck me that he had got something that was not proper.

Q. The prisoner was a labourer then employed, I believe, upon the top of the building - A. I believe he was; he was in the dress of a workman. He wheeled the barrow across the Strand into Swan-yard, I there asked him what he had got; he said nothing of consequence. I put my hand in the barrow, moved the rubbish, and saw the lead. I said you have got some lead here, you must take it back again; he was very loth to do that; he said you shall have part; I said no; take it back. He took it back to the commissioners side, by Mr. Goslen's; Mr. Bensfield stopped him; I went to the pay office and brought a constable. He told Mr. Bensfield that he got the lead from the gutter. It appeared to have been a chimney pot; it has been knocked up, there are marks of the bricklayers hammer upon it.

MR. BOLLING. Q. You are assistant architect to Somerset House - A. Yes.

Q. Were there workmen on the top of Mr. Bobery's house - A. Yes.

Q. Are there leaden chimney pots upon the top of Mr. Bobery's house - A. Yes; there were a considerable number of chimney pots missing. The prisoner was a person employed on the top of Mr. Bobery's house. I consider the whole of the property his Majesty's.

Q. Whether it was unfixed or fixed you cannot tell - A. No.

Prisoner's Defence. I always got my bread by the sea; after the loss of my wife I went to work with the bricklayers to maintain my children. The lead was in the gutter, I never took it away from the chimney.

GUILTY , aged 44.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090920-16

644. RICHARD WILSON and THOMAS SIMPSON were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 18th of July , one hundred and ninety-two yards of printed cambric, value 20 l. and one hundred and ninety-two yards of printed cotton cambric, value 20 l. the property of James Churchill and John Bloomfield , in their dwelling house .

JOHN BLOOMFIELD . I am a wholesale warehouseman , I live at 36, King-street, Cheapside ; my partner's name is James Churchill . On the morning of the 18th of July I came down stairs a little before eight o'clock, and not finding my breakfast ready I walked out as far as Blackfriers bridge. and returned soon after eight; as I was coming down King-street to my own house I saw my young man, who was left in charge of the warehouse, pass me very swiftly, returning home; I hastened my pace in order to see what was the matter, as I found he was ringing the bell very hard before I could come to the door to ask him the question; he came towards me and told me that we had been robbed: I asked him who, and where; he said come along. I have just now left the two thieves in Cheapside; I went with him into Cheapside, he told me he had left them under Bow church clock; he said come along; I hastened with him up Cheapside, and on looking down Bow-lane the young man pointed out the two prisoners at the bar as the men. We followed them from Bow-lane into Basing-lane; seeing the two prisoners go into a public house called the Red Lion, the corner of Red Lion-court, Basing-lane, I immediately sent the young man to get a constable; he did so, and we went in and apprehended the two prisoners drinking together out of one glass. We found no goods upon them; the goods were dropped at our own door.

Mr. Knapp. Is there no other partner - A. No, none.

JAMES BENNETT . On Tuesday morning, the 18th of July, at the house, 36, King-street, Cheapside; it is the corner house of Trump-street; that warehouse has two doors in it, one in Trump-street and one in King-street; I took the shutters down in the morning; I always make it a rule to secure the Trump-street door. On my sweeping the dirt out of King-street warehouse door, when I had swept the dirt off the pavement, I came in the warehouse, I heard a person rustling at Trump-street door, I went immediately and opened the door, leaving the King-street door open. On opening the door the prisoner Thomas Simpson asked me for a person of the name of Corbett; I then said that I knew no such person thereabouts; he then said the firm was Corbett and co.; I still said that I knew no such person thereabouts; then he said he had got a direction in his pocket, he wanted me to read it for him, but he made an excuse, said he could not find it. In the mean time I heard a rustling noise at King-street warehouse door, which I had left open, I turned myself round and saw the prisoner Wilson conveying some printed cottons out of the warehouse, from off the pile which lay on the counter in the warehouse; I called out to him, who is there? and before I could leave the Trump-street door I saw the prisoner Wilson come round the Trump-street door to go into the market, from the King-street door, without the goods; by seeing him and knowing him to be the same person I saw conveying the cottons out of King-street warehouse door, I asked him what he wanted there, he turned himself round and said he wanted a person of the name of Smith; they then both were at the Trump-street door, I immediately secured the Trump-street door and went to seek for the property I was left in care of. On my going out of King-street warehouse door I saw the eight pieces of cotton lay by the King-street door, on the pavement, with two or three ends lodging against the threshold of the door; I picked up the goods, brought them in, and laid them on the counter; I secured both the doors of the warehouse and put the key into my own pocket, I then went and stood in the private doorway and saw the prisoner Wilson standing at the bottom of the street; in the Crossway of Cateaton street, looking up the street, with his back to Guildhall, I went up stairs to get my hat, I came down stairs, went down the street, I saw neither of them; I then went into Cateaton-street, and made my way into Cheapside; I saw Wilson and Simpson nearly under the clock of Bow church, in company with a Jew, with a bag under his arm; they were all talking together; I then hastened into King-street as quick as possible; I was ringing the bell very violently, finding no

person in the warehouse I turned myself round I met Mr. Bloomfield close to the door, I told him that we had been robbed, and wished him to hasten with me, that I had left the two men in Cheapside; we pursued after them and found the two men in Basing-lane; they stood there about a minute or two, they went into the Red Lion public house in Basing-lane. I went and got a constable; we went into the public house, I gave charge of them both, they were taken to the Compter.

Q. The goods that were taken out, were they your master's goods - A. Yes; I can swear to the goods; they were all of one pile laying on the counter. I did not see them taken from the pile. but I saw the prints in the prisoner Wilson's possession, hanging down before him as a woman carries a muff. I can swear that he is the man, Richard Wilson is the man that I saw with the goods.

Q. Now look at the other man - A. In my opinion he came to keep me in conversation. He is the man that came to ask me after a man of the name of Corbett.

Mr. Knapp. The goods were not entirely off the pile, were they - A. Yes; there were forty pieces in the pile together. They were taken clearly from the pile.

Mr. Andrews. Did you ever see these men before - A. I do not know that ever I did.

Q. What time in the morning was it - A. Near a quarter after eight, as near as I can say.

Q. How long might it be after this that you saw them in Basing lane - A. Seven or eight minutes, it may be ten minutes.

Q. How was Simpson dressed that morning - A. To the best of my recollection the same as he is now; the other young man had a chocolate coat on that morning

SAMUEL - . I took these men in custody on the 18th of July, at the Red Lion public house, Basing-lane; these are the goods.

Bennett. I have had them in my possession ever since; these are the some goods, they are my master's; there is the name in full, Churchill and Bloomfield, and after I came from Guildhall I wrote my own initials on it. There are eight pieces; they are printed cotton cambrics.

Q. What is the value of them - A. Twenty pounds. They are printed cotton cambrics.

Wilson's Defence. I never saw this man in my life before.

Simpson left his defence to his counsel.

Q. to Bennett. Do both the partners live there - A. Yes. It is in the parish of St. Lawrence Jury; it is the dwelling house of both the partners.

Prosecutor. We both live in the house; it is a joint partnership in the house and the trade.

WILSON, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 24.

SIMSON, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 22.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090920-17

645. PETER HUNT was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 24th of August , a dollar, value 5 s. and 1 l. 16 s. in monies, numbered, and a bank note, value 1 l. the property of Frederic Sparrow , in his dwelling house .

FREDERIC SPARROW . Q. You are a tea dealer , living on Ludgate-hill - A. Yes. The prisoner has been in my employ from the 1st of February last down to the 24th of August, as my porter , he slept in my house. On the 23rd of August, about half past nine at night, I saw my marked money was all in my till; I had marked a dollar, fourteen shillings, and three sixpences; the shop then was shut up; I left them safe in my till and all business in the shop had ceased.

Q. You had inside shutters in your shop to secure the shop - A. Yes, the last shutter that was shut up was locked, that secures the whole. On the morning of the 24th I looked at them again, I found there were about twelve or fourteen shillings, the dollar was missing. Upon this I went out for a constable, I assembled my servants together, and the prisoner among them, I stated the circumstance that I had been robbed for some time past, and that it must be some of them that had got it; they all denied it, the prisoner among the rest; the officer searched two of the young men, I looked over the money that they had got in their pockets, and while he was searching the other porter the prisoner said you need not proceed any further, it is me who has robbed my master, and fell upon his knees and begged for mercy; he produced a part of it, the officer searched his pockets and found the remainder.

- BOLLAND. I produce the money; I have had it ever since; there is nine shillings and a dollar, making in the whole fourteen shillings; the rest of the money is here.

The property produced and identified.

Prosecutor. I turned round to the prisoner and expressed my surprise that he had robbed me; he said he had done it by taking out the small shutter from under the flap of the counter, that is what we call a trap door; I tried the trap door the night before, I could not open it; he said he had done it that morning and the morning before; he said the other porter was down stairs cleaning his shoes when he did it.

Prisoner's Defence. The prosecutor has not left it in my power to make my defence, by taking my money away, I cannot employ attorney or counsel.

GUILTY, aged 25.

Of stealing to the value of fourteen shillings only .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090920-18

646. PETER HUNT was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 5th of August , in the dwelling house of Frederick Sparrow , four guineas, eighteen half guineas, and fourteen seven shilling pieces, the property of Frederick Sparrow .

Mr. Gurney, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner from this charge was

ACQUITTED .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090920-19

647. RICHARD MASHITER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 4th of September , a spoon, value 10 s. the property of Alexander Harper .

CHARLES RICHARDSON . I am waiter at the Jerusalem coffee house , Mr. Harper is the proprietor . On the 4th of September, about a quarter past three, I saw the prisoner take the spoon out of the coffee cup, on the table in the coffee room.

Q. Had he any coffee - A. No. I followed him out of the coffee house into White Lion-court, Birchin-lane,

there I accused him of taking the spoon. I was bringing him back again to the coffee house, my fellow servant came up at the time and saw him throw the spoon away down the area.

Q. You did not see him - A. No.

Q. Are you sure that it was the same man that you saw take the spoon up - A. I am certain of it. He called for nothing whatever.

JOHN CROCKER . Q. Are you the other waiter - A. Yes. I saw the prisoner throw the spoon away in White Lion-court, it fell on the area.

The property produced and identified.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel, and called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Confined One Month in Newgate , and whipped in Goal .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090920-20

648. JOHN RYAN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 7th of August , three yards of carpet, value 18 s. the property of Paul Mullett .

PAUL MULLETT . I am an upholsterer , I live in Moorfields , the prisoner was my porter , he had lived with me about twelve months. On the morning of the 7th of August, I sent him with several patterns of carpets to Duncan-terrace, near the new river, city road, for the approbation of a customer; I was surprized at his making so long a stay; about three o'clock in the afternoon the officer came to me with part of the carpet to know if I recollected it, which I immediately did, and mentioned that I had sent my porter out with a roll of that pattern of carpet that morning. He took me to the compter, there I saw him. We found the remaining part of the carpet in the city road.

RICHARD WILLIAMSON . I am a pawnbroker, I live at No. 30, Barbican. On the 7th of August, about a quarter before two, the prisoner came and offered to pledge a remnant of carpet for half a guinea, he stated that it was worth seven or eight shillings a yard; I asked him what he gave for it, and not seeing it cut like a workman, I then asked him again how he came by it; he said Lord, Lord, what do you ask me that question for. I sent my young man to shut the side door, an officer passing at the same time I called him in; in the mean time I went to the door, he jumped over the counter, from the box, of my side. When the officer came into the shop he told him he worked with a Mr. Cross in Aldersgate-street, an upholsterer; I sent for Mr. Cross; he came; he said it was none of his, nor did he know the man. The carpet I gave into the hands of Leadbetter.

DANIEL LEADBETTER . I am an officer. On Monday the 7th of August, a little before two o'clock, I was passing along Barbican, the pawnbroker came to the door and called me in, he said there was a man there had a piece of carpet, he believed he had not come honestly by it. I asked him how he came by it he said he bought it of a man in the street, he gave either five or nine shillings for it, I am not sure which I took him to the compter in company with Mr. Richardson, we enquired at the different brokers in broker-row we came to Mr. Mullett; he said he had sent his porter out with different patterns of carpet, he had not returned; I told him we had put him in the Compter; he went with me to the Compter, and said he was his porter; we found the other carpets with a barrowwoman in Featherstone-street.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought that piece of carpet of a man with a one horse cart, going along the street. I do not know him.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 45.

Whipped in Jail , and discharged.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090920-21

649. PETER DUNN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 9th of September , one pound weight of sponge, value 8 s. 6 d. six whetstones, value 10 s. three parasols, value 1 l. 1 s. and a inkhorn, value 3 d. the property of Henry Oppenheim .

HENRY OPPENHEIM . I am a toy-merchant , I live in the Commercial road; the prisoner was my porter . On the 9th of September I sent the prisoner out with a load in a truck to East Smithfield; on account of suspicion I followed him at some distance, and from information that he deposited things at the Marquis of Granby public house in the city, kept by one Crouch, I went into a house, up one pair of stairs, that overlooked the public house, I waited five or six minutes and at last I saw the prisoner at the bar come into the yard rather hastily, and go to a kind of a stone bench, he unbuttoned his breeches and took out several things that he threw under the bench, I could not see what it was; I desired a man to watch his motions, and went to my truck. This man came up hastily to the truck with a woman and went to the different wharfs; I saw him carefully and diligently deliver every parcel, many of them were of considerable value. I followed him and saw him come out of of the Marquis of Granby. I went home and desired him to be sent to me when he came home, and when the prisoner came I desired the officer to take him in charge; he denied robbing me; I said give me the key of the cupboard that you have at the Marquis of Granby, upon which he produced the key; I said is the sponge that you have taken to day in that cupboard; he said yes, and a few more things, he hoped I would have mercy on him, and said that he wished a pistol was put to his head that minute, or that he might be sent on board a man war; I told him I could do neither, I wished to bring the person to punishment that was guilty, if there was any person that he knew that was more guilty than he, I will do every thing in his favour; he said he he knew of nobody, and made no confession, upon which the officer took him to the watchhouse. He willingly gave up the key of his trunk. We proceeded to the Marquis of Granby, and the cupboard there stated to belong to Dunn, the officer opened it, we found several articles which I believed to be mine.

The property produced and identified.

MR. ROBINSON. On Saturday the 9th of September I was sent for, Mr. Oppenheim gave me charge of the prisoner, I searched him, I took a bit of sponge out of his smallclothes, he said it was his master's; he took out two keys, one of his lodgings, the other he said belonged to the Marquis of Granby, he said he had some property there belonging to his master; he said he had sold four pounds six ounces of sponge to

some person he would not mention. I saw the things taken out of the cupboard at the Marquis of Granby.

MR. CROUCH. I am the keeper of the Marquis of Granby in the Minories . About six months ago this man came to my house to breakfast and dine there; after using my house some time he asked me if I could let him have a lock-up place, I said there was a cupboard backwards he might have, there was no lock on it; he put a lock on it himself and used it some time.

Q. Was that the same locker that you saw the things taken out - A. Yes, I gave the officer every information I could.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel, and called no witnesses to character.

GUILTY , aged 35.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090920-22

650. ROBERT TUCKER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 6th of September , a handkerchief, value 5 s. the property of Joshua Doubleday from his person .

JOSHUA DOUBLEDAY . I am a lace manufacturer , I was passing through Bartholomew fair , and the officer tapped me on the shoulder, saying that I had been robbed, he held out a pocket handkerchief and asked if that was not my property. It was my property.

JOSEPH HUNT . I am a constable, about 5 o'clock in the afternoon I was going through the fair I saw this prisoner after Mr. Doubleday; I looked at him I saw him with a handkerchief in his hand he was putting it in his breeches part in and part out, I tapped Mr. Doubleday on the shoulder and told him he had been robbed.

Q. How long had you followed him - A. Not half a minute, but I could see he was picking the gentleman's pocket; I saw him in the act of doing it.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner. I was going through the fair and some person threw this handkerchief on me, the officer came and spoke to this gentleman after I had carried it in my hand I put it in my breeches pocket.

The prisoner called two witnesses who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090920-23

651. JOHN SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 10th of August , 24 lb. weight of metal, value 18 s. the property of William Pontifex .

JOHN LAWRENCE WHEELER . I am foreman to William Pontifex, a founder and coppersmith , 48, Shoe Lane , the prisoner was a labourer in his employ. On Thursday morning at five o'clock this man was let in to work; on account of suspicion, I and the apprentice watched him: about half past five he went out, I followed him, I said hallo Smith, you have got metal; I collared him and brought him back into the shop, and desired him to take it out of his breeches which he did with a cord round it; I sent for a constable. That is the metal, it weighs 24 pound, the prisoner said he was sorry for it, he hoped we would forgive him; he believed it was the devil that set him to do it. I am sure it is my master's property.

Prisoner said nothing in his defence nor called any witnesses to character.

GUILTY , aged 47.

Confined one month in Newgate , and whipped in Gaol .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090920-24

652. HUGH THOMAS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 15th of August , 17 ounces weight of tobacco, value 3 s. the property of Proctor Ryder .

PROCTOR RYDER . I am a tobacconist , 70. West Smithfield . The prisoner was in my employ; on the 15th of August, from information, I got up early before the men came to work; my wife locked me up in the shop, I concealed myself. The key of the shop was given as usual to the boy to open the shop, the bell rung, the boy let the prisoner in, he engaged my boy's attention with talking about Bonaparte, shortly afterwards a woman came in for some snuff, he still continued his discourse, the woman said if you do not serve me I shall go, I shall not wait while you are talking your nonsense, he immediately took two handfulls of tobacco from the cask and put it in his pocket; took a white handkerchief out of his pocket wiped his mouth and put it on the top of the tobacco in his left hand pocket, took off his coat and hung it in the passage: shortly after my wife came down and let me out of this place that I was concealed in, I went and procured an officer; presently the prisoner put on his coat and went to breakfast, I permitted him to go 12 or 13 yards from the door I ran after him and collared him he dragged me back from my own shop. In the middle of the shop there was a cover-head of Shag-tobacco cut the day before, put there for the purpose of cooling, he went into the back warehouse, pulled off his hat and out fell about a pound and a half of unfinished tobacco that he had cut that morning; the constable searched him and found very near 8 ounces of shag tobacco in his left hand coat pocket; the prisoner said he never sold any, he took it merely to give to his friends. I asked him what he did with that in his hat, he replied he did not take that.

MR. WALFORD. You were occasionally in the habit of giving this man tobacco? - A. No, I told him that if he asked me for some I would give him some, I had been robbed; he was never to take any.

THOMAS JARVIS . I am a constable, I searched the prisoner and took this tobacco out of his pocket. I saw this tobacco fall out of his hat.

Prisoner's Defence. The constable was not in the house at the time when Mr. Hardy says he saw it fall out of my hat.

The prisoner called three witnesses who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 34.

Transported for seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090920-25

653. ELIZABETH BARTRAM was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 2d of July a Bank note, value 1 l. the property of John Swift .

JOHN SWIFT , I am a Shoemaker , 212, High Street Shoreditch , on the 2d of July last I lost a one pound note out of a box in the corner cupboard, the

prisoner was a lodger in my house, about half after 4 on the Sunday I had suspicion of the Prisoner. I sent for Ray the officer, he searched her pockets and could not find it. My wife was called in to undo her things, the prisoner sat down on a box by the bedside, and untied them herself, and just by where she sat there was a piece of rag laid which Ray the officer opened, it was a hussiff the note was in it.

Q. What was the number of the note, did you know it before - A. Yes, 19889. 27th of May, I had taken the number down because I had lost one before.

MRS. SWIFT. On the 2nd of July I was called in to search the prisoner, after she had untied her petticoats this note was found in a hussiff by the bedside.

JOHN RAY . I am an officer, I was sent for to the shoemaker's on Sunday the 2nd of July. I went up in the prisoner's room in company with Mr. Swift. I found the prisoner and her husband there, I asked them if they had got any bank notes whatever in their apartment, the husband said he had got a one pound note which he had taken for his labour, he produced it. Mr. Swift looked at that note, and said that was not the note which he had lost, I then saw the woman was flurried, I searched her as far as decency would let me, she put her hand under her stays and sat down on a box by the side of the bed, Mrs. Swift was called in, on the bed was this hussiff containing this one pound note, Mr. Swift said it was his.

The property produced and identified.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence, called two witnesses who gave her a good character.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Confined fourteen days in Newgate and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090920-26

654. MARY CLARKE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 2d of September , two shifts, value 4 s. two pair of stockings, value 1 s. a napkin, value 6 d. and a handkerchief, value 3 d. the property of Edward Abbott .

MARY ABBOTT . My husband's name is Edward Abbott , I hung my things on a line in the yard. I get my living in the street. I went out in the morning between 9 and 10 and returned about five in the afternoon.

JAMES SMITH . I am a shoemaker, my wife deals in clothes, on the 2d of September, the prisoner brought the articles into my shop, she said she wanted to sell them; my wife examined them she said, I believe you have taken these things off some person's line; she would have nothing to do with them, they were rough dry, she went out of the shop and went about eighty or ninety yards from my shop stood in a confused state, my wife thought it a pity that we had not stopped her, I went out and passed her, she did not observe me, she then came back to my door, I tapped her on the shoulder and asked her what she wanted for the articles to induce her to go into the shop, she said 5 s. 6 d. she gave fourteen or fifteen pence for them, she lived at 4, Catherine Wheel Alley and she bought them of two women in the street, Jews. I told her being Saturday there were no Jews about, I stopped her, she offered to give me the things to let her go, then I questioned her again how she came by them, she said she had them of a woman in the Curtain Road, I said I dare say the poor creature that sold them to you is wanting them again. I got her out of my shop under pretence of looking for the woman, she did not know where she was. I live in Long Alley, I decoyed her into the office.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I bought them in the Street.

GUILTY , aged 33.

Transported for seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090920-27

655. ANN GOODMAN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 30th of June , a gown, value 15 s. a counterpane, value 6 s. a sheet, value 5 s. a shift, value 4 s. 2 petticoats, value 11 s. 3 frocks, value 6 s. a pinafore, value 6 d. and one apron, value 1 s. the property of Rees Jones in his dwelling house .

REES JONES . I keep a mangle , No. 46, Swan Yard in St. Mary-le-Strand .

Q. You have a dwelling house there have you - A. Yes. At the time this happened my wife was not at home. I went out about 12 o'clock to the barn for milk on the 30th of June, I returned about three, I left my little girl and the aunt only in the house, I mangled the linen before I went and left in the house ready to go home, it belonged to Mrs. Cook. It was a gown, counterpane, a shift, a sheet, 2 petticoats, 3 frocks, a pinafore, and an apron, I have paid for them, they charged me 2 l. 8 s.

Q. Were the things ever found - A. No never.

CATHARINE JONES . Q. Were you left in the shop when your father went out - A. Yes and my aunt. Q. Was there any linen in the house - A. A good many bundles of linen, there was one bundle belonged to Mrs. Cook. The prisoner came to our house on Friday afternoon and asked for a bundle of linen, I told her I did not know which bundle she wanted, she said she would shew me the bundle, she put her hand on the mangle upon the biggest bundle that was there, I told her I did not know how much they were, let me count it over; she said that she paid my mother last night when she brought them.

Q. Have you a mother living - A. Yes, she was in the country then, I told her that my mother was not at home then, she said she paid the woman in a blue gown, that was my aunt, she was down in the cellar, I called my aunt, she did not come-up, the prisoner said I need not call my aunt up she paid her last night, she took the things away.

Q. When did you see this prisoner again - A. About a fortnight after in Wild Street at a public house where she came to receive her money her husband had left her. I knew her again directly, a young man was with me that lodges in our house, I pointed her out to him, I said to the prisoner did not you come to our house last Friday week for a bundle of linen, she said where do you live; I said in Swan Yard, she replied she did not know where Swan Yard was, then she said she would stop there while I went to fetch my father, and as soon as I got to the bottom of Wild Street she said she would show this young man where she lived she took this young man to Bembridge-Street where there were a pack of town girls.

Q. Do you know the prisoner, are you sure of her - A. I am sure of her, I never saw her before she came for the linen, but then then I took very much

notice of her - Q. Who did this bundle of linen belong to - A. Mrs. Cook my aunt told me.

EVAN EVANS . Q. Were you with that young girl at the public house - A. Yes, I went to the public house with her, I saw the prisoner come in, the girl pointed her out, and said she was the person that came to her house, the little girl said to the prisoner did not you come to our house in Swan Yard for some linen the prisoner said she did not know where Swan Yard was; she went out of the door and promised to come with us to Swan Yard; after she came out of the door she said she would stop there till the little girl brought her father, she wanted to go away from me, I told her I would not let her and took hold of her; she then said that she would take me home with her, she took me into the public house and went out of the other door, I catched hold of her and took her into the house, told the landlord to send for a constable, the constable did come but did not take her, some of the people persuaded him that I came there to kick up a row, the prisoner was suffered to go out, I went out after her, a great many girls of the town came round me and throwed dirt in my face so that I could not see out of my eyes; the prisoner went into a yard and got away, I did not see her any more till five weeks afterwards when she was taken.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of the charge; I was a different way on the day that these people were robbed, I know nothing of the people at all.

GUILTY, aged 39.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Transported for seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18090920-28

656. ANN KENNINGTON and MATILDA DYER were indicted for feloniously making an assault upon Benjamin Burd in the king's highway, putting him in fear and feloniously taking from his person and against his will, a bank note, value 50. 2 bank notes, value 40 l. a bank note, value 10 l. and a bank note, value 5 l. his property .

Second count for like offence only stating it to be committed on the fourth.

BENJAMIN BURD . I am a Purser in the Navy . Q. Did you on the 3rd of August receive any bank notes, I did of Messrs. Praed and Company, 189, Fleet-street near Temple-bar, 105 l. in bank notes. On the evening of the same night between eleven and half past twelve, between Surry-street and Templebar , I was knocked down and hustled, my notes were taken from me.

COURT. What notes - A. One 50 l. two 20 l. one ten and one 5 l. I was so much stunned at the time that I did not know the parties.

Q. Do you know whether it was men or women - A. I do not know but I rather believe it was women.

Q. What induces you to think it was women - A. Because I saw women at the time, but I cannot say particularly.

Mr. Knox. Have you seen the notes since - A. Yes. I know the numbers of them, I went to the bank and ordered them to be stopped.

Q. Can you state the number of them - A. I can from the information that I received from the banker's clerk.

Mr. Reynolds. What time of the day was it you received these notes - A. About 4 o'clock.

Q. Where had you been on that morning till 4 o'clock - A. I had been on the town on business.

Q. Where did you dine - A. At my brother's at 5 o'clock, then I went to this coffee-house in Norfolk court, Surry-street.

Q. Were you sober - A. Not perfectly sober, but I was recollective enough.

Q. How lately before had you seen these notes - A. At 11 o'clock I counted them over.

Q. You were sober enough to recollect what numbers you had - A. Perfectly sober for that.

Q. Were you not desired to attend before the magistrate when a person of the name of Pike was examined - A. No.

Q. Do not you know that Mrs. Pike was taken up - A. I heard so the next morning. I received this letter from the bank to inform me that there was a twenty pound note stopped.

Mr. Reynolds. When you were at this private coffee-house did you recollect what numbers you had - A. Yes. I took them out of my pocket, I had them at the time.

JAMES HEBBER . I am clerk to Praeds and Co.

Q. Do you recollect paying any notes to Mr. Burd - A. I paid no notes, it appears from the books of our house that some notes were paid to him, the person that paid him, James Thomas, is here.

JAMES THOMAS . Q. You are clerk in the house of Messrs. Praed and Co. did you pay Mr. Burd on the 3d. of August any notes - A. I did a 50 l. 6,599, dated 14th July 1809, a 20 l. 6,802, 8th of March 1809, a 10 l. 8,169, 21st July 1809, a 5 l. 8,789 12th June 1809, making 105 l. and some odd money besides.

Mr. Reynolds. Do you recollect the person of Mr. Burd - A. I do.

JOHN POLLARD . I am a Publican.

Q. Do you know the prisoner Dyer - A. Yes, I saw her on the 4th of August, I gave her change for a 10 l. note dated 21st July 1809, No. 8,169.

Mr. Reynolds. Do you know these women - A. I know them both very well, they are both neighbours.

Q. You had no hesitation in taking this 10 l. note - A. None whatever. I never knew a dishonest act of them ever since I knew them.

WILLIAM ALDERS . I am a painter and glazier.

Q. Do you know the Prisoner Kennington - A. Yes. I saw her on the 4th of August: she gave me a 50 l. bank note, asked me if I could change it; I told her no; she told me if I could change it she would give me a shilling, I took it to the bank and gave it to one of the cashiers, they asked if it was mine.

COURT. Did you know the prisoner Kennington - A. I knew her perfectly well, she got her living by selling fish and fruit.

Q. Did she carry on a great trade so as to get a 50 l. note - A. I asked her how she got it she said by honesty. I wrote my name upon it, this is the same note.

ROBERT FISH . I am a clerk in the bank of England. I produce a 50 l. note 14th July 1809, 6,599, it has the name of, Mr. Alders upon it.

The prisoners left their defence to their counsel.

JOHN VICKREY . I am an officer of Worship-street.

Q. Do you remember a woman of the name of

Pike being taken up on this charge - A. I remember a woman being brought to the office in consequence of a 10 l. note that had been paid to Mr. Pollard; she was discharged that night in consequence of Mr. Pollard stating that he did not believe she committed the felony, Kennington appeared as a witness that night against Pike, Pike acknowledged to the magistrate that she had given a 50 l. note. I have been every where I could to find out Pike, I cannot find her.

Kennington called three witnesses who gave her a good character.

Dyer called one witness who gave her a good character.

KENNINGTON, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 37.

DYER, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 33.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18090920-29

657. ROBERT ARNETT was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Henry Scott about the hour of three in the afternoon on the 11th of September , Elizabeth his wife and others at the same time therein being, and stealing therein 5 tea-spoons, value 10 s. a milk-pot, value 15 s. a coat, value 2 l. 3 gowns, value 1 l. 3 shirts, value 12 s. 3 shifts, value 9 s. 3 shawls, value 1 l. 2 cloaks, value 25 s. 2 pillow cases, value 5 s. a tablecloth, value 27 s. and a pair of silver buckles, value 6 s. the property of Abraham Wright .

ELIZABETH WRIGHT . I am the wife of Abraham Wright , we live in Henry Scott 's house, No. 3, New Exchange court Strand in the parish of St. Martin's in the Fields . I keep a day school; on the 11th of September, I was at home and Ann Caton was in the adjoining room to my bed room, somebody entered my bed room, not the room where I was sitting, between the hours of 2 and 5. I was not out of my front room during that time.

Q. When had you been in your bed room - A. At 2 o'clock, I left the door locked, the window was open.

Q. When was any alarm given - A. About 5 I went into my bed room, I found my drawers open and my things were gone, I had not left my drawers locked but the door I locked myself, I found it then hardly locked, I lost all the articles mentioned in the indictment, I have seen a pair of sleeves since belonging to a gown.

ANN CATON . I live at No. 3, New Exchange court in the Strand, between 3 and 4 o'clock, I heard a noise in Mrs. Wright's room. About 4 o'clock, I saw a man go from Mrs. Wright's door, I saw him go down stairs and go along the court.

Q. When you saw the man did you give any alarm - A. No.

ELIZABETH HICKS . I live at No. 3, New Exchange court; about a quarter before 4 o'clock I was coming down stairs to get the milk, I saw a man coming down stairs, he had got his foot on the first pair of stairs; as soon as he saw me he went into the corner of the passage. I did not see any more of him.

Q. Had he any thing with him - A. Not as I saw, I only saw him, for a moment.

Q. Did you observe him sufficient so as to know him again - A. No not his face.

JAMES DANGERFORD . On Tuesday the 12th of September the prisoner robbed my house He apprehended him, he entered my sister's apartment with this bag, he took 7 sheets, and at the bottom of this bag, under the sheets were a pair of sleeves.

Q. Have you got the sleeves here - A. No, I went to Clerkenwell to get my bill preferred, I knew mine stood third, I ran off here.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18090920-30

658. ANN NEWMAN , MARGARET PAYNE and MARY HILL , were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 22nd of July , 2 half pieces of ribbon value 15 s. the property of Catharine Blenkin and Elizabeth Bell privately in their shop .

CATHARINE BLENKIN . I keep a Haberdasher's shop in Goswell Street Elizabeth Bell is my partner. On the 22nd of July between 7 and 8 in the evening Ann Newman and Mary Hill came into the shop, there were three women came into the shop, I am not certain of Margaret Payne , they asked to look at some ribbons; they looked at several pieces, bought a small quantity of ribbon, and went out immediately; after they went out I missed two pieces of ribbon value upwards of one pound prime cost. Mrs. Cook came into the shop I directed her she followed them, they were brought back I did not see them take the ribbons, they were searched and nothing found on either of them.

HANNAH COOK . I came into the shop after the women were gone out, I overtook the women, they very willingly came back to be searched, I asked them if they had been in the shop to buy ribbon, they told me they had not, Margaret Payne denied having been in the shop, she was searched and nothing was found on her, I was backwards when it was found, I know no more.

WILLIAM BURTON . I am an officer, I was coming by, I was called into the shop, they had been searched before I came in, this property was found on the floor and put into my hands by Catharine Blenkin .

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18090920-31

659. THOMAS MACKNAMARA was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 13th of July , a watch, value 3 l. 3 s. the property of William Peake in the dwelling house of William Fowler .

WILLIAM PEAKE . On the night of the 12th of July, I slept at Mr. Fowler's, he is a publican, in the course of the night my watch was taken, I missed it on the 13th, a bricklayer slept in the same bed with me, there were two others beside me and the prisoner slept in that room.

Q. How many were in the room - A. Four, the prisoner and another man slept in another bed, and me and the bricklayer slept together; three of us went to bed together between 11 and 12 the prisoner was one of the three and the other man came afterwards; when I went to bed my watch was in my breeches, I twisted my breeches round, tied my braces round them, and put them on the top of the bureau bedstead.

Q. Are you sure that you had the watch when you went to bed - A. Yes, I am quite certain of that.

I was looking for my breeches, the prisoner went down stairs, the other two stopped and were searched; Mr. Fowler's maid servant found the small clothes but the watch was gone; the prisoner was taken on the 13th, at night, the watch was pledged.

Q. What was the value of the watch - A. 3 l. 3 s.

WILLIAM FOWLER . Q. You are the occupier of this house in the parish of St. Sepulchre . - A. Yes, on the 13th of July in the morning the young man that lost his watch, and two others searched for the watch, and the small clothes of the two young men were searched, I saw the prisoner go out about half after six, I saw him carrying out nothing; I made the servant Phoebe Harrison look round to see if it was hid under any place, she found the small clothes, she brought them forward, the young man William Peake was over at Mr. Cooper's stables he went out with his overalls without his breeches, he was sent for, I searched the small clothes there was no watch in them. In the course of the day we got two officers to attend in the evening against he came home from his work, they searched him in my presence, they found the duplicate of the watch.

PHOEBE HARRISON . I am servant to Mr. Fowler, I searched for the small clothes, and found them under the stairs, there was no watch in them.

JAMES BLAND . I am a pawnbroker, I live in Holborn, on the 14th of July in the morning the prisoner pledged this watch for 1 l. 3 s. I gave him a duplicate.

Q. What do you think the value of it is - A. Two guineas to a wearer, and about a guinea and a half to the trade.

JAMES HANCOCK . I am an officer of Hatton Garden; after my brother officer Stanton searched the prisoner, I searched his hat which lay on the table, and found this duplicate of the watch pledged for 1 l. 3 s. 14th July.

Q. To Peake. What day was it you missed this watch - A. I am not sure about the day of the month, it was on Friday.

Court. That was Friday the 14th.

HANCOCK. On the same night I found the duplicate, I said, here is the ticket for a silver watch; the prisoner said in the hearing of the rest of the witnesses, No that is not for a silver watch.

ROBERT STANTON . I searched the prisoner on the night of the 14th. I found two duplicates in his small clothes pocket, in his right hand coat pocket I found this one pound note, the duplicate of the watch was found in his hat by my brother officer.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. On the morning as I went out to work, I heard of his missing his small clothes and his watch. I went out to work, when I came home at night two officers were in the little parlour, the man that lost his watch, and two or three more were sitting in the tap-room he said, Thomas we have had two men searched, we should like you to be searched, I said I had no objection; Stanton took off my hat, and put my things by, that I could not get at them, he found two duplicates and a one pound note in my pocket, he said you must come along with me, I said I had no mind of going as I had nothing to do with it my hands were tied. I was cock found the piece of paper in my hat, the landlord and the men were there. The pawnbroker thinks fit to swear to me, I know nothing of the watch. I sent to the prosecutor he came to me in my imprisonment. I offered him four guineas for the watch although I was innocent of it, he said the officers would not let him do any thing of the kind.

GUILTY, aged 23.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only .

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18090920-32

659. ANN CHAMBERLAIN was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 24th of August , a watch, value 3 l. the property of Joseph Moxon from his person .

JOSEPH MOXON . I live at No. 8, North alley, Cumberland-street. On Thursday night the 24th of August, I was going home through the Strand , I met the prisoner on the pavement, she seized me round the middle, she got one hand in my breeches pocket and the other in my small clothes, in a moment I asked her what she did with her hand in my pocket, did she mean to rob me. I pushed her away, she begged my pardon, and said she did not mean to put it into my pocket, she meant to put it into my breeches; I found my watch was safe, I said, go along, are you not ashamed, if you want any thing go to a proper place; I had then got my watch and money, she then drew me by main force from the Strand down Beaufort buildings.

Q. Were you sober - A. Yes, as I am at this minute.

Q. How far down the buildings did she draw you. - A. About fifteen yards, I then pushed her away, and found I missed the watch, I took her to the watchhouse there she was searched, I could not find the watch upon her.

Q. Had any body passed you - A. Yes, two men one went between her and the houses, and one behind me, there was none nigh me but her by three feet, the moment that man passed I said, watchman, this woman has robbed me, that man run away, he was a soldier, the other man was in the middle of the street, the soldier was nighest.

Court. Q. How long were you with her from first to last. - A. Put it all together, I do not suppose it was five minutes; neither of the men was near enough to take the watch, they passed me twice, once in the Strand, and once in Beaufort buildings, when I missed the watch, the soldier ran away; I told the watchmen the soldier must be the man that had got the watch, he said, hold her hands.

The prisoner left her defence to her counsel, called one witness who gave her a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18090920-33

MARTHA HEWSON and MARY WILBY , were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 2nd of August , a watch, value 5 l. the property of Richard Thomas from his person .

RICHARD THOMAS . On the 2nd of August I met with the prisoners in Drury Lane, I had never seen them before that time, it was between three and four o'clock in the morning, I had been down in the

I was in liquor a little not being accustomed to drinking, and by being persuaded I went down Charles street , and up stairs with them, they wished us to stop all night, I wished to go away.

Q. Did you stop - A. No, I only laid down with my clothes on; in two or three minutes I went to sleep, I had the watch in my pocket, when I laid down I am confident of that. The man that awaked me, called and asked if I had got the watch, his name is James Lines , I had not the watch then.

Q. Then I suppose the women were gone - A. One of them Mary Wilby was gone, Hewson remained, as soon as he alarmed me, I went down stairs and called the watchman, Margaret Hewson was taken that night, and Wilby was taken a week afterwards.

JAMES LINES . I am a shoemaker, I had been in the city with this man.

Q. Did you go with him to this house, - A. Yes, up stairs after Hewson had been in the room a little while he laid down with her upon the top of the bed, and after some time they both fell asleep, they both snored; Wilby said to me, they are fast asleep, after that I saw Mary Wilby go to the bed side to her, Hewson took the watch out of his pocket and gave it to Wilby, as soon as I saw that, I made after her, my having a wooden leg she got down stairs before I could get to her, I awaked him, he went down and brought the watchman up. I am sure as to the prisoners, I was sober, the watch has not been seen since.

Q. (to Thomas.) Are you sure as to the prisoners - A. I am.

Hewson's Defence. This young woman knows no more about it than any gentleman here; I saw these two gentlemen in Drury Lane.

Wilby said nothing in her defence.

HEWSON, GUILTY , aged 26.

WILBY, GUILTY , aged 22.

Transported for 14 years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18090920-34

661. JOSEPH SURETIES was indicted for, that he on the 4th of July was servant to Mary Ann Parsons , and was employed and entrusted by her to receive money, and being such servant and so employed did receive and take into his possession the sum of 93 l. 12 s. for and on her account .

MARY ANN PARSONS . I live in Hackney road, when the prisoner lived with me I lived in the Borough ; I am a seller of hay and straw in the Borough and Whitechapel market.

Q. Was the prisoner your servant - A. He was not, he sold by commission, he received half the commission and I the other.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18090920-35

662. WILLIAM BOSTON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 9th of September , 3 blankets, value 2 s. a saddle girth, value 3 d. a table-cover, value 3 d. and 2 pieces of baize, value 6 d. the property of Elizabeth Walker and John Walker .

JOHN WALKER . I live in Shoreditch, I am in partner ship with my mother Elizabeth Walker . On the ninth of this month I in company with the officers went to search the prisoner's house, he was at home. We found two blankets in his bed-room on the bed, and one on the box, they being government blankets I was certain he could not have bought them, we found a saddle-girth in his drawer, which I have no doubt was taken from the house, in the cellar we found a table cover under a garden light, the table cover we had used for domestic purposes, we also found 2 pieces of green baize these are the blankets, I know them to be mine, they are decayed government stores, they are manufactured on purpose for Chelsea College, the family has had the contract for forty years and no one has had them ever since. We never sell blankets in that state, we always boil them before they are sold, this is a saddle girth, we could not miss them because we never take stock. I know the table-cover, it was made on purpose for a table, it is worth sixpence, and the piece of baize, we had baize of that description. I was in the cellar when the officer found it, the prisoner gave us the key of the cellar when we asked him for it.

Q. Did any body else live in the house besides the prisoner. - A. Yes, several other persons.

Mr. Reynolds. None of this property you can swear to in any other mode than it is like the property which you had. - A. Yes there is no doubt about the property.

Q. As the green baize was in your domestic use, you had servants in the house had not you. - A. Yes.

Q. Whether any of them might have taken it away you do not know. - A. I suppose they would not, it might be so.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I have been in the habit of working in the first respectable houses in the city, and for my prosecutor and have received bills for them, I defy my prosecutor to say, or any person that ever I injured any person of a farthing.

The Prisoner called eight witnesses who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18090920-36

663. ELIZABETH BIGGS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 20th of July , 2 pair of pantaloons, value 2 l. the property of Henry Brown .

HENRY BROWN . I am a labourer in the East India Company service, I know nothing of the transaction.

JOHN BROWN . Q. Are you the son of Henry Brown . - A. Yes, I was sent by my mother to the Virginia coffee house with some things, I was returning home from there with the pantaloons, I met the prisoner in Sun-street, she asked me if I had seen any cakes coming along, she said she wanted some for a little child that she had in her arms. When she came to White-Lion street she gave me three halfpence to buy half a pound of cherries, she said she would hold my bundle the while. I gave her the bundle. I went, I looked back she nodded her head, and when I looked back again, I could not see her, I run and could not see her any where, then I went home. I saw her at Worship-street a great many days afterwards, I am sure that is the woman.

HENRY BROWN . The pantaloons were never found.

Prisoner's Defence. My Lord, and Gentlemen of the Jury, the agitation and distress of mind under which I stand before your lordship and the jury, renders me totally unable to speak in my defence, I humbly beg permission to have this paper read, assuring you that I can only rely upon the consciousness of my innocence for my acquittal; his her to through life, I have maintained a character unimpeached for honesty. I am innocent of the crime I am charged with, at the time I am charged with this offence I was in the house with my children, and was not out for two hours afterwards.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave her a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18090920-37

664. ELIZABETH BIGGS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 5th of September , four boy's shirts, value 8 s. two mens' shirts, value 10 s. a shift, value 4 s. and a handkerchief, value 1 s. the property of Thomas Smith .

HANNAH SMITH . I live in Luke-street, near Paul-street. Last Tuesday fortnight I lost all the articles enumerated in the indictment; I sent them to a washerwoman by a child of mine, his name is Thomas Smith .

JOSEPH SMITH . Q. What age are you - Seven next month.

Q. Have you learned your catechism. - A. No.

Q. Do you know whether it is a wicked thing if you speak falsely - A. No.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18090920-38

665. GEORGE COOPER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 12th of August four papers of types for printing, value 20 s., the property of Joseph Harding and Edward Wright ; second count for like offence only charging them to be four pages of types for printing.

JOSEPH HARDING . I am a printer in St. John Square . Edward Wright is my partner, the prisoner was a journeyman compositor in our service.

Q. In consequence of something passing in your mind, did you watch the prisoner on the 12th of August, did you observe him going away from his employ that morning - A. Yes, I followed him about an hundred yards, when I came up to him, I said Mr. Cooper you must come back, when he came back I asked him what he had in his parcel, he said a pair of pantaloons, I took the parcel in my hand, and found it was very heavy. I desired him to untie it, he did so, and the pantaloons appeared; I opened the pantaloons, and it contained two or three parcels of these types, they were tied up in paper, the writing on the paper described what type they were, the writing was my overseer's.

What did the prisoner say to you - A. Oh God! Mr. Harding it is all over with me, and added that it had been a very unlucky week to him.

Court. What was the value of these types - A. They are worth fifteen pence a pound as old metal, the value of the whole found upon him was between

Q. What makes you call them papers of types -

A. Because after printing they are separated in sixteen parts of a sheet, and tied up in paper.

Q. Has the trade any particular name for them when they are tied up - A. I believe not except in the manner which has been used.

Q. Would any body know by a paper of types what they mean - A. Yes, as I have stated as many letters as compose a page.

Q. That in the trade would be called a paper of types - A. I do not know that there is any specific term for it.

John Parkes . Q. You are apprentice to Mr. Harding, I believe - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see Mr. Cooper on the 12th of August in the printing office in the morning - A. Yes, I saw him go into the front composing room to the type closet and take up several papers of types, and then he went towards the stairs.

Q. Had Cooper any business in that closet at that time - A. No.

Court. Did he see you when you saw him - A. Yes, when he returned from the closet, he did not see me when he went to the closet, he said nothing to me.

JOHN HEARNE . Q. You are overseer to Messrs. Wright and Harding - A. Yes.

Q. You know this closet where these types were - A. Yes that was a closet where we put in old type, there was another closet where we put in type that we use.

Q. Had any compositor any business to take out anything from that closet - A. Not without they had put any thing in there, the prisoner had not a right to go there, and take out any types; if he wanted any thing he should have applied to me.

John Davis . I assisted in apprehending the prisoner, when I was in the room with him, he said he hoped his master would have mercy on him because he could not be in his senses.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. My Lord and Gentlemen of the jury, I commit myself to your mercy, and trust that as it is the first felonious offence that I have been charged with, I shall not solicit in vain, particularly on account of my family and relations who are of respectability. I might have had several citizens to my character, who could have spoken to my honesty, but I have preferred the danger of not having the best of witnesses, rather than plunge the best of parents into the greatest wretchedness; to the best of my knowledge there are but two or three persons except my wife in possession of my reputed crime, and the lenity I may obtain in consequence thereof shall not be ill-bestowed. I will by my future conduct make atonement for the lenity shewn me, and the distress that will fall on all belonging to me, by my appearance at this bar.

GUILTY , aged 32.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18090920-39

666. JOHN DENNIS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 24th of July , a pig, value 12 s. the property of James Bryant .

JAMES BRYANT . Q. You lost a pig in July last,

where was the pig kept - A. In Red-cross-street, Lower East Smithfield , it was lost out of the stye.

Q. When did you see the pig last before it was stolen - A. On Saturday, it was a sow-pig, I missed her on Sunday afternoon.

Q. How long had you had the pig - A. I bred it, it was about two months old, it was a spotted pig; I found her down on Bow Common, about two miles from my house.

Q. Are you sure that is your pig - A. Yes.

ROBERT FOLKES . On Monday morning, the 24th of July, Dennis came into my yard and took this pig up. Q. Did you see him - A. Yes, I said nothing to him, I did not know but what Mr. Bryant might have sold it, he has soldpigs about the neighbourhood.

Q. to Mr. Bryant. Do you know how this pig came on Bow Common, of your own knowledge - A. No.

Prisoner's Defence. I keep a little poney and cart in White's yard, where this stable was, about half past 8 o'clock Flowers said I had let the pig out, I said I had not, the pig got into my stable.

FOLKES. The sow used often to come into my yard, the prisoner took her up in his arms out of my yard, and carried it into Flowers's stable.

The prisoner called two witnesses who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18090920-40

667. HENRY EDWARDS, alias Taylor , was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 20th of August , a counterpane, value 2 s. a blanket, value 2 s. and a sheet, value 1 s. the property of Ann Large , spinster , in a lodging room .

ANN LARGE . Q. Do you keep a lodging-house in St. Leonard, Shoreditch - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know the prisoner Henry Edwards - A. Yes. On Saturday evening, about five weeks ago, he agreed for my one pair of stairs room, furnished, he took it by the week, and was to pay 15 s. a week for the apartment, his breakfast, and my waiting on him. He came that night and went away on the Sunday morning, when he was gone, I missed a sheet, a counterpane, and a blanket, I found him on the Monday, he had nothing upon him.

Q. Did you ever find your things again - A. No, I met him in the street on the Monday, he had a bundle with him, but it was not mine, he was taken to Worship-street.

PETER MASON , I am an officer of Worship-street, the prisoner at the office acknowledged to taking the things.

MR. KNAPP. Was it not told him it would be better for him to confess.

PROSECUTRIX. We all persuaded him to confess.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel, and called no witness to character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18090920-41

668. JOHN CODEY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 19th of September , eight brushes, value 5 s., a bottle, value 1 d., and one pint of blacking, value 3 d. , the property of Henry Matthews , John Matthews , and Christopher Morgan .

JOHN MATTHEWS . I am a brush-manufacturer, and warehouseman , 106, Upper Thames street . On the evening of the 19th, about 8, our foreman gave me information of twelve brushes, and two pots of blacking being under the cellar stairs. About nine o'clock, when the workmen were going out, I desired every man to go up stairs in the parlour; Codey was the first man, he went up two pair of stairs, instead of going into the parlour; he was called down, he then went into the parlour, all the men were there together, I observed I knew one of them to be dishonest, no honest man could have any objection to be searched. I searched Codey, and found a bottle of blacking in his pocket, I then desired him to go into the kitchen on the same floor. A constable came afterwards and produced four or five brushes, he said they had been thrown out of the window.

Mr. Gurney. Q. Have you got any partners - A. Yes, Henry Matthews , and Christopher Morgan .

JOHN TURF . I am porter to Mr. Matthews; on Tuesday evening, about a quarter before nine, master desired us all to step up stairs into the parlour, the prisoner went before me, instead of going into the parlour, he proceeded up two pair of stairs, I followed him half way up; I told him that I supposed we had come by the room that we were to go into; the prisoner said nothing to that. I returned down again, my master asked the prisoner what he went up there for, the prisoner made him no reply; we all went into the parlour, master searched the prisoner, he took out of his pocket a bottle of blacking; he then asked the prisoner where the brushes were, the prisoner denied any knowledge of the brushes, and said that he had not taken any; the prisoner then was ordered into the kitchen, and me and my fellow servant was likewise, we were to take care of him. When the prisoner had seated himself, he began to be very busy under his apron, observing to me and my fellow servant at the same time, that his life laid in our hands, he drew from his small clothes six or seven brushes, and put them under the sink, he also put two brushes over the cupboard; he sat himself down, in two or three minutes he rose up, took all the brushes, and threw them out of the window into a court at the back of my master's premises.

JAMES HULL . I am a constable. On Tuesday evening, in a court or alley adjoining Mr. Matthews I found something falling nearly upon me; I took them up, they were brushes, I took them to Mr. Matthews, he said he believed they were his property.

The property produced and identified.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel, called one witness who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Confined three months in Newgate , and whipped in gaol .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090920-42

669. JAMES WILKINSON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 8th of September , 2 shoulders of mutton, value 10 s. the property of Samuel Cox .

Second count for stealing the same goods the property of James Harvey .

SAMUEL COX . I am a watchman in Newgate market . On the 8th of this month about ten minutes after one; I was walking round my goods

which I watch, I saw three sheep swinging, went up and saw the prisoner take away two shoulders of mutton, they were cut from the sheep at that time; I halloed out, stop thief, in Paternoster-row, the prisoner dropped the two shoulders of mutton, the watchman secured him, I never lost sight of him at all.

HENRY KING . I am a watchman; last Saturday week, about ten minutes after one in the morning, I heard the cry of stop thief, I saw this prisoner run past with the property on him, I pursued him; I saw him drop the property in Paternoster-row. I matched the shoulders to the sheep at Guildhall before the alderman.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in liquor coming down Paternoster-row, at the time when the cry of stop thief was, there was a man passed me, he throwed down the shoulders of mutton, Samuel Cox said I was the man.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Confined one month in Newgate , and whipped in jail .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090920-43

670. DOMINICK CONNOLLY was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 9th of September , 7 lb. weight of sponge, value 3 l. 10 s. eleven pieces of whetstone, value 2 l. 2 s. five glass shades, value 1 s. 3 d. six toys, value 1 s. two pieces of gingham, value 6 d. a piece of silk, value 6 d. and nine brushes, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of Michael Oppenheim .

The case was stated by Mr. Alley.

MICHAEL OPPENHEIM . I am a merchant in Mansell-street, Goodman's-fields , the prisoner was a servant of mine. In consequence of suspicion, on Saturday night, the 9th of September, I went to the Marquis of Granby in the Minories, I found in a closet there a quantity of sponge, whetstones, glass shades to reflect light, a piece of gingham, some painting brushes, and some pieces of silk, I knew them to be mine, they are articles in which I dealt, and the prisoner had access to the place where I deposited them, the prisoner was apprehended and brought in, he denied knowing any thing of the closet where these things were found, he was searched in my presence, a key was found on him which opened the lock of that cupboard.

EDWARD DAVIES . I am a constable, I searched the prisoner at the Marquis of Granby, I asked him for the key of the closet, he seemed to make some hesitation, I told him it was of no use, I must have it, he put his hand in his pocket and gave me the key, I then put the key into the lock of one of the closets of the Marquis of Granby, the landlord pointed it out to be the prisoner's locker, I had broke open the door before, I found that key fitted the lock, I found in that cupboard all the things mentioned in the indictment.

Q. When the property was produced to the prisoner what did he say - A. He said he knew nothing about it, he had no closet there at all.

WM. HENRY CROUCH . Q. Do you keep the Marquis of Granby in the Minories - A. Yes.

Q. By what means did the prisoner obtain the closet of you - A. By using the house and having his meals there, he had the key of it, it was intirely under his controul, nobody but himself had access to it. I had no opportunity of knowing what he brought there, I saw the constable break open the cupboard, and examine the contents of it, he took out sponge and several articles.

Court. Was the prisoner every day at your house - A. Yes, at his meals.

MR. GLAND. You are the gentleman that we saw last night, how many closets have you in this house - A. Two that they had by themselves, the key belonged to them.

Q. Were not you taken up for this - A. I was taken before the Lord Mayor, I was in custody for it.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I am intirely ignorant and innocent of it.

The prisoner called five witnesses who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 58.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090920-44

671. JOSEPH WHITE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 5th of September , a pocketbook, value 2 s. 6 d. the property of Georgas Lowther Crofton , from his person .

GEORGAS LOWTHER CROFTON . I am an officer in the army . On the 5th of September, between the hours of two and three o'clock, I was walking through Smithfield , I got to about the centre of the fair, when a gentleman tapped me on the shoulder, and told me I had lost a pocket-book, I immediately put my hand to the side of my pocket, I missed it, on my turning about, the gentleman said, that man has got it, pointing to the prisoner, thinking that I had a better right to the book than him I seized the man by the collar and demanded my pocket-book of him, the man put his hand into his right-hand pocket and said let me clear myself, bending his body, he dropped the book from him between his legs, and I picked it up, with assistance, I gave him in charge of the constable.

MR. SPARKS. I live at Chelsea. On Tuesday between two and three o'clock, I was in the fair, I followed the prisoner and another man behind Mr. Crofton, suspecting what they were at, I kept close to them, finding they had a difficult job, they changed sides, so that each of them had an attempt to get it out, the prisoner was on the left side of the gentleman, and the other man on the right hand, with their arms closed in together, they instantly separated from each other, and I saw the pocket-book in the prisoner's hand, I told the prosecutor that he had lost his pocket-book, he immediately collared the prisoner, the other man got off. I did not see him drop it, I saw it on the ground, Mr. Crofton picked it up.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going through the fair in the mob, they came and took hold of me, they took me to a public house, and found 1 s. 6 d. on me, my own.

GUILTY , aged 46.

Confined one month in Newgate , and whipped in jail .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090920-45

672. ELEANOR BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 9th of August , 70 yards of ribbon, value 30 s. the property of Peter Kerrison .

ALEXANDER THOMAS . I live with Mr. Kerrison, 37, Poultry , he is an haberdasher . On the 9th of August, about ten minutes after seven, I was taking the shutters down, no one in the shop besides myself, the prisoner asked to see some ribbons, I went round the counter, and put the drawer of ribbons before her, upon the counter, in the mean time another woman came in, and wished to see some silk handkerchiefs, I did not take down the handkerchiefs to show her, I attended upon the prisoner Brown, she asked me several times to shew her the handkerchiefs, because, she said, she should be too late for market, I took down the handkerchief-drawer to show her some handkerchiefs. In the mean time, I observed the prisoner take out several pieces of ribbon out of the drawer, she put them into a large pocket which she had under her apron, I desired the other woman to ring the bell, two or three times, she did not, then the prisoner asked the price of a ribbon' I told her sevenpence, she told me to cut her on a yard of that, I cut off a yard, and wound it round my hand, to put it up for her, and went for to ring the bell, when she perceived that I was coming round the counter, Brown laid down the sevenpence without taking the yard of ribbon that was cut off for her, and went out of the shop, when I perceived the prisoner go out of the shop, I asked the other person to stop in the shop while I went after her.

Q. Did she do so - A. No. While I went after the prisoner, this woman went out of the shop, I did not see the other woman go out, I went after the prisoner, the prisoner had got three doors from the shop, I told the prisoner to walk back, as she had got property that did not belong to her, she asked me what, I told her ribbon, she denied having any, and refused to come back, I took hold of her coat, and puller her back, she called me a d - nd little b - r, I got her in the shop, she put the ribbon in the drawer again, nobody had come down stairs, she took out a great many pieces from her pocket, and put them in the drawer.

Q. What did she say when she returned - A. She sat down, and said any body might search her.

MR. HICKES. I am a servant of Mr. Kerrison, the prisoner was in the shop when I came down, as I came down stairs, my fellow servant stood opposite to me, he said Mr. Hickes this woman has been stealing all these ribbons upon the top of the drawer, she took them away, and when I brought her in, she returned them into the drawer, the prisoner said any body might search her.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I only came out of the door to look after the person that carried the basket for me, I laid the sevenpence on the counter, I had nothing to do with the ribbon at all.

GUILTY , aged 37.

Transported for seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090920-46

673. MARY JORDAN was indicted for that she not having the fear of God before her eyes, being moved and seduced by the instigation of the devil on the 16th of July upon Walter Flaherty , feloniously, wilfully, and with malice afore-thought, did make an assault, that she, with a certain flat iron, which she then, and there held, in her right hand, in and upon his forehead, did strike, penetrate, and wound, thereby giving to him one mortal wound, of the length of one inch, and the depth of half an inch, and also a mortal bruise, of which said mortal wound and bruise from the said 16th of July, untill the 1st. of August he did languish, and languishing did live until the said 1st of August, and upon the said 1st of August he died; and so the jurors say, that she, the said Mary Jordan , the said Walter Flaherty , did kill and murder. And that William Jordan , together with one David Duffey , not yet taken, on the said 16th of July, was there present, feloniously helping, and comforting the said Mary Jordan , to do and commit the said felony and murder .

William Jordan , and Mary Jordan , stood charged upon the coroner's inquisition.

The case was stated by Mr. Gurney.

HANNAH FLAHERTY . Q. Are you the widow of Walter Flaherty - A. Yes.

Q. Did you and he live in Wright's buildings Chick-lane - A. Yes.

Q. On the afternoon of Sunday the 16th of July were you and your husband at home - A. Not the whole of the afternoon, my husband and me had been out in the fields, we came home between nine and ten o'clock, it was dark.

Q. At what time was it your husband received the blow - A. Between ten and eleven at night.

Q. Do you lodge up stairs - A. No. In an under ground kitchen.

Q. When you came home was the place quiet, or was the place noisy - A. Mary Jordan and her acquaintances were fighting and jawing, there were a great many people assembled, I cannot say how many, they had handles of pitchforks, shovels, and pokers.

Q. Did you and your husband go through the court to your lodgings - A. Yes. He went to Harry Jordan and this man, and told them to have nothing to do with it, upon which David Duffey gave my husband, the deceased, the first blow, with the handle of a pitch fork.

Q. Before Duffey gave him the blow, had your husband struck him - A. No. Nor did he mean it.

Q. Where did Duffey strike him - A. Across the head, from which he bled very much, my husband said to him, you did give me this blow, but you did not knock me down. He was making his way home, when Mary Jordan came with the flat iron, she said if he did not knock him down, she would, she gave him a blow with the flat iron on his forehead, it cut him so deep I cannot tell how deep, it was bleeding so.

Q. When he received the blow did he stand or fall - A. He fell, they all gathered round him then and he hung by me.

Q. Did you see the prisoner Jordan then - Yes. He had the handle of a pitchfork in his hand.

Q. And when the people gathered round your husband after the blow, where was William Jordan - A. He was in the croud, he gave him a blow with

the handle of the pitch-fork, he struck him on the shoulder, after Jordan had given him the blow, there were ever so many struck him, I put up my hand to save part of the blows and Jordan struck me on the fingers.

Q. Did you at last get your husband into the house - A. Yes, I got him into the door, I was afraid of taking him into the kitchen.

Q. In what condition was he when you got him in, - A. He was bleeding so, I thought there was not a drop of blood remaining in him, in the course of the night he was taken to Bartholomew's hospital, he died about 2 o'clock in the morning on the first of August in the hospital.

Mr. Alley. You are the wife of the deceased - A. Yes.

Q. What countryman was your husband - A. He came from the county of Golvin.

Q. The poor man at the bar he came from the county of Mayo. Do you recollect your husband challenging the Mayo men to come out and fight, he would fight them for five guineas - A. No such thing.

Q. Take care, although your husband is dead, you must speak the truth. You and your husband had been out in the country - A. Yes.

Q. Did he walk with a stick - A. No, he never walked with a stick. In Ireland he might, he had not a stick in his hand that night.

Q. Had not you and your husband been at the public house where this disturbance happened - A. No.

Q. Am I to understand you that the disturbance had been going on when you and your husband returned - A. Yes.

Q. Were any brick bats throwing about when you and your husband returned - A. No.

Q. Did not your husband shortly after he came home cry out that he and an even number of his countymen, would fight an even number of the other countymen - A. No.

Q. Do you know Jerry Rian - A. Yes, he lodges in the same house that I do.

Q. Who was it desired Jerry Rian to knock down Mrs. Jordan - A. I cannot tell. I did not, he did not knock her down. I did not see her knocked down nor any blow given to her.

Q. I dare say you did not see any bricks throwed into the man's place - A. I did, after I got into my own house.

Q. Did you see any bricks throwed into the prisoner's house - A. No, I had trouble enough with my husband, I was putting clean cloths to my husband to stop the blood.

Q. Did you not see a knife in your husband's hand and that knife taken from his hand by the prisoner - A. I did not nor by any body in the world.

MARY O'BRIAN . Q. Do you live in Wright's Buildings - A. Yes.

Q. Were you there on Sunday evening the 16th of July when this misfortune took place - A. Yes, I was in my own place, No. 2, Wright's Buildings.

Q. How many houses is there there - A. Ten or twelve, it is not a very large place. My husband and me came in between 8 and 9 in the evening, there was a disturbance then between Molly Jordan and Edward Foy , Mary Jordan said that she would not go to bed that night till she had seen blood, and have revenge for what had passed with Edward Foy , she went out and soon after she and her husband came in, he took off his clothes, and said he came in for fighting; who began first, I cannot say, some men of his party began to throw bricks and tiles at the next court, the Castlebar men threw bricks and tiles, the Golvin men came out and asked what they meant to do, they offered four men to four men, or six to six, they had sticks, the Castlebar men came out with hay forks. I cannot say how many, Jordan was with them, the Castlebar men drove the other men in the court, and broke their hay forks against the corner of the soap house, they huzzaed and said they had driven them in. After this Jerry Rian , a lodger of the deceased, came out he said as they were neighbours it was a shame for them to be against each other, Molly Jordan desired him to go in or he would suffer, Jerry Rian came up to Molly Jordan , they had an argument, what passed between them I cannot say, she fell, he put his hand to her breast. Molly Jordan went in and undressed herself, she came out again in the court with nothing but her petticoat and her shift on. Mrs. Molloy desired the wife of the deceased to go and take the flat iron from Molly Jordan 's hand.

Q. Did you see the woman prisoner have the flat iron in her hand - A. No. I cannot swear that it was a flat iron, Jerry Rian went into his own house with his head cut. The deceased came out, and said, for God Almighty's sake what spite had they against his house to do so, to knock it down.

Q. Had any bricks been thrown into his house - A. Yes, I saw William and Harry Jordan come up to the deceased, they had some words between them, the deceased desired Harry Jordan to go from him, he did not like him with that sneering laugh, he was afraid of himself between the two Jordans. I saw Flaherty the deceased and the two Jordans grasping each other, they were at my window, I told my husband I was very much frightened.

Q. Did you see Mary Jordan while this was going on - A. No, I did not see Mary Jordan do any thing.

JAMES BIRMINGHAM . Q. Were you in Wright's Buildings on the day we have been mentioning - A. Yes.

Q. Are you an inhabitant of it - A. No, I am very glad of it. I am an Irishman, when I went into the buildings, Flaherty and the prisoner Jordan were talking in Irish, Flaherty spoke in Irish, he said that the blow had not taken effect, Mary Jordan came over, she was in her smock and petticoat, and without a cap, she pulled out a flat iron, she said if that will not do this will do, she knocked him down and Harry Jordan struck him with a fork, the deceased fell down when she struck him, that is all I saw of it, I know of this here Jordan killing a man before.

CHARLES WAKEFIELD . Q. You are one of the house surgeons of Bartholomew's Hospital - A. Yes, The deceased was brought into the hospital on a Monday morning, he lived a fortnight and two days. I opened his head, the skull was fractured, the wound in his forehead was the cause of his death.

WILLIAM JORDAN , GUILTY, aged 33.

MARY JORDAN , GUILTY, aged 32.

Of Manslaughter not of the murder .

Confined one year in Newgate , and fined one shilling .

London jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18090920-47

674. KEZIA PATTERSON , ELEANOR HUNTER , and EMILY HUNTER , were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 11th of August , a shirt, value 3 s. and 2 handkerchiefs, value 1 s. the property of George Jeffreys .

Second count for like offence, the property of Francis Atkins .

ANN ATKINS . Q. You employed Patterson to wash for you - A. I did.

Q. Did you loose a shirt and two handkerchiefs - A. I did, I was employed to wash for Mr. Jeffreys.

JAMES GILLMORE . I found the articles at Elizabeth Parr 's, Patterson said she was the person that took them.

ELIZABETH PARR . I had the duplicates of Mrs. Stroud, I went over Westminster Bridge, and took them out of pawn.

MARY STROUD . I bought the duplicates of Eleanor Hunter , and I went with my sister to the pawnbroker's and took them out.

The property produced and identified.

Patterson's Defence. I have little to say in my own defence, I can clear my sister and daughter, they saw none of the property.

Eleanor and Emily Hunter were not put on their defence.

PATTERSON, GUILTY .

Confined one year in the house of Correction and fined 1 s.

ELEANOR and EMILY HUNTER , NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18090920-48

675. KEZIA PATTERSON , ELEANOR HUNTER , and EMILY HUNTER , were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 11th of August , 11 sheets, value 4 l. 2 tablecloths, value 1 l. 2 napkins, value 2 s. 3 pillow-cases, value 3 s. 2 towels, value 1 s. and a pair of stockings, value 1 s. the property of Stephen Shensey .

Second count the property of Francis Atkins .

ANN ATKINS . Q. I must ask you the same question, did you employ the prisoner Kezia Patterson - A. Yes.

JAMES GILLMORE . On the 11th of August, I found in the possession of Mrs. Stroud, 8 sheets, on the 14th, I found one sheet, I found a tablecloth, 2 napkins, 3 pillow-cases, 2 towels, and a pair of stockings, she said she purchased the duplicates of Eleanor Hunter .

MARY STROUD . I had the duplicates of Eleanor Hunter at different times, she lodged in my house for four months.

Q. to Gillmore. Did Patterson make the same declaration in this - A. She did.

The property produced and identified.

Patterson's Defence. I own myself guilty in every thing that is laid to my charge, I wish to clear my sister and child, they are innocent of it, I throw myself on you and God for mercy.

PATTERSON, GUILTY , aged 49.

Confined one year in the house of Correction , and fined 1 s.

ELEANOR and EMILY HUNTER NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18090920-49

676. JOHN SOMERS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 18th of August , a hat, value 2 s. 6 d. and a handkerchief, value 6 d. the property of Samuel Dutton .

Second count for stealing the hat, the property of John Bailey .

SAMUEL DUTTON . Q. Did you lose a hat on the 18th of August - A. I did, I sent my little boy Samuel Dutton to the liner and binder, Mrs. Edmonds, for the hat, it was tied up in a handkerchief.

SAMUEL DUTTON , jun. My father lives at the corner of Albemarle Street. On the 18th of August, I was coming home from the liner and binder with a hat tied up in a handkerchief, a man took it away from me at the corner of Wilderness Row ; there were two men together, they gave me a penny.

Q. Was the prisoner either of the men - A. I do not know I am sure.

HENRY BLIGH . I am a constable, I took the prisoner in charge, Mr. Dutton found the property on him in Wilderness Row.

Q. to Prosecutor. What did you find upon the prisoner in Wilderness Row - A. The hat and the handkerchief.

Q. Can you swear that the hat and the handkerchief is your property - A. I can swear that the hat is my manufacturing, the handkerchief is like mine I cannot swear that that is the hat that was taken, from my little boy.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18090920-50

677. JOHN SULLIVAN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 10th of July , 18 cups and saucers, value 9 s. 6 coffee cups, value 2 s., 13 plates, value 5 s. 3 basons, value 1 s. 6 d. and a cream jug, value 6 d. the property of Edward Dyson .

WILLIAM GROVE . I am carter to Edward Dyson inn-keeper in the Old Change, Cheapside. On the 10th of July, I received a box at the King's Head in the Old Change, I did not know what it contained till it was opened at Bow street, the same day it was stolen out of my cart, and then I saw it contained cups, saucers, coffee cups, and plates. About the middle of the day I left my cart about four doors from Somerset-house , the box was in the cart when I left it. It was directed to Mr. Brett, Esq. Berkley Square; I apprehended the prisoner about an hundred yards from the cart with the box on his shoulder.

EDWARD DYSON . I am an inn-keeper, I received the box from the waggon, it was in my warehouse; I sent it by my carter to be delivered, I conceive it to be my property while in my possession.

Q. What inn do you keep - A. The King's Head, in the Old Change.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I was employed by a gentleman to take it over the way.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Transported for seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18090920-51

678. JOHN WILLIAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 29th of July , 2 saws, value 10 s, 4 planes, value 8 s., and an axe, value 2 s. , the property of Samuel Mansfield .

SAMUEL MANSFIELD . I am a carpenter , I live at 58, Paddington Street. I lost my saws, planes, and an axe, out of 49, Baker-Street , on the 29th of July.

Q. Had you been at work at a house there - A. Yes, I left them there in the evening, and missed them in the morning.

Mr. Gurney. Q. Did you leave these things in an unfinished house - A. Yes.

JOSEPH HORN . I am a patrol. On the 30th of July, about 4 o'clock in the morning, I stopped the prisoner in High Street, St. Giles's, he had got these 2 baskets of tools on his shoulder.

The property produced and identified.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel, and called no witnesses to character.

GUILTY , aged 27.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18090920-52

679. HENRY WESTERMAN was indicted for that he, on the 26th of September, in the 48th year of his Majesty's reign, at the parish of Portsea, in the county of Southampton, was married to Jannett Baldwin , widow, and that he afterwards, on the 7th of November last, did marry and take to wife , one Elizabeth Redman , spinster , his former wife being then alive .

WILLIAM JOHNSON . I produce a certificate of the marriage of the prisoner, and Jannett Baldwin; I examined it with the parish register. It is a true copy, (the certificate read.) Parish of Portsea, in the county of Southampton, Henry Westerman, Batchelor, and Jannet Baldwin, Widow, were married on the 26th of September, 1808, William Russel , Curate, the mark + of Henry Westerman , Jannet Baldwin.

CHARLOTTE STILL . Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know Jannett Baldwin, widow - A. Yes, I was present at their marriage, they were married at Kingston, in the parish of Portsea, on the 26th of September, 1808, she is living now, she is here present.

ELIZABETH REDMAN . Q. Were you married to Henry Westerman - A. Yes, I was a single woman, I was married to him at St. Mary-le-bone church , on the 7th of November last.

Prisoner. Did not you know that I was a married man - A. No.

Q. Had you any fortune - A. No further than my money I had saved up in service, 22 l., he got that from me.

Prisoner. Did not you give me that before marriage, can you deny giving me that money, knowing I was a married man, telling me that my business was as good any where as in London.

Prosecutrix. A. That is false, he had 22 l. of me, and spent it.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wod.

Reference Number: t18090920-53

680. JOHN LANE , and JAMES CASEY were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 24th of July , 9 lbs. wt. of lead, value 18 d. the property of David Buckler , affixed to a house of his .

DAVID BUCKLER . I have a house in town, and a house in Hackney; I lost the lead from my premises in Play-house yard in the parish of St. Luke's , on the 24th of July. It is a house that has been pulled down, and the other remains not pulled down, the lead was stolen from a gutter of the buildings, I had seen the lead safe on the gutter a month or three weeks ago. On the 24th of July, I went in the gutter, and saw the lead was missing.

Q. Did you see whether any of the lead which covered your building was cut away. - A. Yes.

JOHN LUCAS . I am a bricklayer. On the 24th of July, as I was going in at the gate these two men were coming out of the gate of Mr. Buckler's premises, Casey had got Lane's jacket under his arm, I asked him what he had got, he said he did not know; I asked him to turn it out of the jacket, he did, it was lead. The two prisoners were both coming out together; there was a knife belonging to Casey with it. I discharged them both from the ground, and locked the door. I examined upon the top of the building, the lead did not fit, the middle piece had been taken away. The lead was fresh cut, and the lead found upon Casey was fresh cut. The lead was cut away from the house belonging to Mr. Buckler.

JAMES GUERY . I am an officer of St. Luke's. On Monday the 24th of July, I was coming up Golden-lane, I saw a woman touch Lane upon the shoulder; she told him to run away, he run up Angel-court; I met my brother officer; we pursued him, and found him on a garret stairs; he said it was Monday, he only took this lead to get some beer with.

EDWARD KING . I am a headborough. On the 24th of July I was sent for to take charge of the prisoner Lane. I met Lucas, he gave me charge of the lead. I took charge of Casey; he said, the first part of the lead was sold and gone. I afterwards assisted in taking Lane.

The prisoners said nothing in their defence.

Lane called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Casey called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

LANE - GUILTY , aged 52.

CASEY - GUILTY , aged 54.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18090920-54

681. JOHN DEVINE was indicted for feloniously stealing, on the 4th of August , a gelding, value 25 l. the property of Richard Whittington .

The case was stated by Mr. Gurney.

RICHARD WHITTINGTON . Q. You reside in Stevenage in Hertfordshire - A. Yes. On the

forenoon of the 26th of July the prisoner applied to me for work. I took him into my employ, he worked with me part of that day, and the three following days. On Saturday night I paid him his wages, I do not recollect seeing him come to work after that.

Q. How soon after that did you lose a horse - A. On the night of the 1st of August, or early in the morning of the 2d of August I lost a black gelding, about 15 hands high. I had him more than three years. I knew him perfectly well. I lost the horse from a stable in a yard behind my house.

WILLIAM OUTRIDGE . Q. I believe you are a ploughman, in the employ of Mr. Whittington - A. Yes.

Q. Did you work with the prisoner the few days he was in Mr. Whittington's service - A. Yes, the prisoner came to me; he said, you have got a pretty little horse in your plough, how old is he; I told, him he was seven years old; he looked in his mouth he said he was eight, he was turning away from the horse, he asked me if he was sound; I said so far as I know, I had been with him two years, he ailed nothing. On the morning of the 2d of August, about five o'clock, I missed the horse.

Q. Had you seen the horse the night before - A. Yes. about half past eight or nine o'clock, he was safe in the stable.

Q. In consequence of your missing him did you come up to Smithfield - A. Yes, on the 4th of August, about half past twelve o'clock, I came to Smithfield market, I met the prisoner in the Ram Inn yard, I told him he was the man that I was looking for.

Q. Did you find he had a horse there - A. The ostler said to me, do not stop the man before you know whether it is your horse or no; the ostler asked me whether that was my master's horse, I went to the stable, and said it was; the prisoner never spoke a word to me.

Q Was there any head-stall lost - A. Yes. there was. It hung in the stable behind the horse.

Q. Are you quite sure that was your master's horse - A. Yes, I have been with him two years or thereabouts and the head-stall was my master's.

WILLIAM QURREY . Q. Are you ostler at the Ram inn - A. Yes.

Q. On the 4th of August last do you remember the last witness coming there, and apprehending the prisoner - A. Yes, and he claimed a horse.

Q. Who had brought that horse there - A. The man that is now standing at the bar, he brought it on the 2d of August for sale. When he brought it I asked him whose it was; he said his master's, his name was Smith, he lived at Rochester. The horse was there for sale when the last witness claimed it.

Q. to Prosecutor. Have you seen the horse - A. Yes, it is my horse, it is now in my possession.

Prisoner's Defence. As I was coming up to London I met a gentleman on the road, he asked me if I was coming up to London, he rode on one horse and led this in his hand; I told him I was going to London to look for work, he said come along with me, he would give me a ride on the way. When we came to London we came to a public house, he gave me some drink, he asked me if I would take this horse to the Ram Inn, Smithfield, and to get any victuals and drink I wanted, and he would be there on the Friday.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 27.

The prisoner was recommended to his Majesty's mercy by the jury, on account of believing it to be his first offence .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090920-55

682. SAMUEL SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 25th of August , sixty penny pieces, and one hundred and twenty half pence , the property of Thomas Osborne .

MARTHA OSBORNE . I live at 84, Snow-hill ; my husband, Thomas Osborne , is a baker . On the 25th of August I was tying up of copper in five shilling parcels on the counter; I left about two pounds ten shillings on the counter; I went to the end of the counter, I stooped to speak to my husband through a trap-door in the Bakehouse, I heard some person come into the shop, I arose up, I saw the prisoner grasping two five shilling papers from off the counter, and run out of the shop; I ran out after him; he was stopped and brought back with the copper in his hand.

JOHN HUDSON . On the 25th of August, as I was coming by, Mrs. Osborne came out of the shop crying,

'stop thief;' she pointed out the prisoner to me; I pursued him, and caught him at the top of the hill; I asked him to deliver up the halfpence to me; he said they were none of mine, he had taken them where he had been at work. I delivered him up to the officer; he had the papers of halfpence, one in each hand.

JONATHAN TROTT . I am an officer; I happened to be near the spot; I saw the prisoner brought back by the last witness, and another person; he struggled very much; I observed the papers of halfpence, one in each hand.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. The money belonged to myself. It is what I worked for.

GUILTY - aged 27.

Confined three months in Newgate , and whipped in gaol .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090920-56

683. WILLIAM CARTER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 23d of July , 2 lb. weight of tobacco, value 6 s. the property of John Lloyd .

DAVID DAVIES . I am shopman to John Lloyd , 77, Snow-hill ; the prisoner worked for Mr. Lloyd; on the 23d of July, about eight o'clock in the morning the prisoner came in and spoke to me, from thence he went into the yard, in a short time he returned to the warehouse again, and went to a privy, and then went to the yard and stable again; in the mean time I secreted myself. In a few minutes after the prisoner came into the warehouse, and went towards the privy, from thence he went towards a cask of tobacco, looked round and listened, then took the cover off the cask, and took a towell, and spread it on the floor; he then took two handsfull out of the cask, and put it in the towel, and took the tobacco and the towel up in the yard. In a few minutes

a cask where he took it from, and went out in the street. I called him back, and told him he had some tobacco about him; he said I know I have done wrong. I have taken some tobacco out of the cask, some I have concealed, and some I have got in my pocket; I hope you will not be severe with me. He was searched, two or three ounces were found on his person, the rest I found secreted in the back part of the warehouse in a tub. This is the tobacco.

Prisoner's Defence. I worked for Mr. Lloyd ten years. I always was a faithful servant , I must confess my taking the tobacco was not a just thing, I took a bit for my own use, and no more.

The prisoner called three witnesses who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 43.

Confined one month in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090920-57

684. JOSEPH SEXTON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 2d of September , 4 yards of woollen cloth, value 40 l. a bottle, value 3 d. and a quart of brandy, value 5 s. the property of John Sommers , Robert Milton , and Joseph Braithwaite .

The case was stated by Mr. Bolland.

ROBERT MILTON . I live in Grocer's Hall Court, in the parish of St. Mildred's Poultry , my partners names are Joseph Braithwaite and John Sommers . I live in this house.

JOSEPH BRAITHWAITE . Q. I believe you are clerk and warehouseman, what are the partners - A. clothiers they are called in Lynn, and merchants in Leeds .

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. I never saw him before the 2d of September, he came into the house with wine and spirits. I saw him come into the house with wine and spirits in hampers from White and Proctor's.

Q. How many - A. I think 5, I am certain 4. I was called up to dinner about 4 o'clock, and when I had nearly finished my dinner, I heard the warehouse door open, I came down and saw the prisoner in the warehouse with the hampers close to the door, I saw the pieces of cloth in one of the hampers. I examined the hamper, I found the end of a piece of cloth 20 yards and a half marked with our private mark in my own hand writing. I searched further, and looking into another hamper, I found a second piece of cloth, and in another hamper, a bottle of brandy; there was our private mark in my own hand writing on the second piece of cloth.

Q. What was the value of these two pieces of cloth - A. Forty pounds in the whole, I looked at the bottle of brandy. I saw the seal of White and Proctor on the cork.

Mr. Andrews. Q. What share have you in the business - A. None.

Q. Were you there when the prisoner came a second time - A. I was.

Q. What did he do with the wine he brought last - A. He left it I think in the cellar.

Q. Did you accompany him in the cellar - A. I did.

Q. Can you recollect whether the goods that first came in were in hampers or flat baskets - A. What I call hampers perhaps you may call flat baskets, two of the hampers that I found the cloth in had partitions.

Q. Did not he leave a hamper or more while you went down in the cellar with him - A. I assisted him down with the first baskets, I was in ill health, I called in a porter from next door.

Q. After he had come down in your cellar did not he leave the hampers in your warehouse - A. I was in the warehouse.

Q. The whole of the time in his absence - A. I do not know that I was in any other place, I cannot swear that I was there the whole time.

Q. How many persons might have access to that warehouse besides the prisoner and yourself - A. No more than Mr. Milton and the maid servant.

Mr. Bolland. Whether they were hampers or flat baskets, were there two pieces of cloth when he brought them A. No.

Q. Had you sold this cloth to White and Proctor - A. No, nor to the prisoner.

Q. Was the prisoner alone - A. I saw nobody with him.

WILLIAM PHENEY . Q. You are in the house of White and Proctor - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. I know no more of him than seeing him in the street, he on that day worked for White and Proctor, they sent him to Messrs. Sommers and Milton's, in Grocer's court they sent him with nine dozen of wine and six gallons of spirits, the wine and spirits were in bottles.

Q. How did he take it - A. I cannot say, I was not there, I saw him pack up one hamper.

Q. Did any body go with him - A. No, he conveyed it in a truck.

Q. Does your master deal in cloth - A. No.

Mr. Andrews. How do you know that he went there - A. Because he staid so long my master sent me to see for him; I saw the two pieces of cloth, and the bottle of brandy. The prisoner is a soldier.

JOHN GROVES . Q. You are a constable of the city of London - A. Yes, I apprehended the prisoner.

Q. to Prosecutor. Can you speak to that property - A. I swear to the mark. It never was entered in our books as sold.

Q. Did you sell it to the soldier - A. No.

Court. I will ask you whether you sold it to any body, and sent it by the soldier as his servant - Q. No, I did not.

Q. to Braithwaite. You look at that private mark - A. This private mark is my own handwriting.

Q. Did you ever sell it to any body. - A. No, nor I never sent it by the man at the bar. I have no doubt it is my master's property.

Q. to Pheney. Look at that bottle of brandy at the mark outside, is that Proctor and White's mark - A. I cannot swear to it because the seal is broken.

Q. to Mr. Milton. This house of your's, who lives in it - A. I do, I am the only partner that resides in it.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel, and called three witnesses who gave him a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 34.

The prisoner was recommended to his Majesty's mercy by the jury and the prosecutor, on account of his long service, and his family .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090920-58

685. JAMES SIMPSON and GEORGE GEE were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 23d of July a watch, value 3 l. a ribbon, value 1 d. a seal, value 1 s. and two keys, value 1 s. the property of Joseph Dearlove , from his person .

JOSEPH DEARLOVE . I am a journeyman baker . I live in St. Agnes-street, Old-street road. On July the 23d I was coming down Holborn about one o'clock in the morning, I stopped at a watering-house, the corner of Bartlett's-buildings, Holborn , to have a quartern and a half of gin. I was in company with Mr. Hughes and his wife. We stood there a considerable time waiting for it, there came one of the watermen that watered the horses, and pushed me in right between two men. One of the men took my watch out of my pocket, his name is Simpson; he ran a little way down Holborn, and I after him; I got hold of him by the coat-tail. Gee followed after me and struck me on the knee with a stick, and then he struck me on the side of the hand, which caused me to fall; then Simpson delivered the watch into Gee's hands.

Q. Did you see him - A. Yes, Simpson returned back again up Holborn, then he was taken in custody by the watchman. George Gee run down Holborn, after that I was informed at the watering house where Gee used, I found him on the 5th of August.

Q. Are you sure he is the man - A. Yes, I stood ten minutes at the door of the public house, I saw them there all that time, I have no doubt of his person.

Q. Did you ever recover your watch again - A. No.

WILLIAM GREENFIELD . I am a watchman in Holborn. On the 23d of July, about one in the morning, I heard a cry of watch and thieves; I saw Simpson run as if to go up Holborn, and then he made a turn as if to go down Holborn. I jumped off the pavement, and seized him; the prosecutor came and declared he was the man that snatched the watch out of his pocket. I took him to the watchhouse.

WILLIAM BORAM . I am a constable of St. Andrews, the man was brought in by the watch-man between the hours of one and two, we searched him and found nothing.

JOHN BARNES . I apprehended Gee on the 5th of August at the public house, the prosecutor said he was one of the men that robbed him.

GEORGE BISSETT . I am a tallow chandler and oilman, King's head court, Holborn-hill. On the night of this robbery, I was going up Holborn-hill, seeing a good many people at the corner of Bartlett's buildings, I had the curiosity to stop to see what was the matter, I heard a man call out he had lost his watch, he pointed to a man that was just walking off the curb into the middle of the street, he said that man has got his watch, he gave some foul language, and said how could he think so, he called out watch, the watchman laid hold of him; I believe, I am not certain, he knocked the watchman down on the curb-stone, and made his escape down. hill, as fast as he could; the man that lost his watch he pursued him, and through running I do not know which way he fell down likewise, I think he fell because he never came up to him, therefore he made a great oration.

Q. What when he was down - A. Yes, he said he was robbed, he made an oration while he lay on the ground; he sung out in that kind of way as if he was dead, he complained that he was bruised, and he had hurt himself, I saw the man go past the church and the watchhouse, I returned back again, he laid hold of another man, he said that was the man that had taken his watch.

Q. Then the first man that run past the watch-house, made his escape - A. He did, I am perfectly satisfied he had a short jacket, I think he had an apron on likewise, I am not certain of that, he laid hold of another man just at the same place where he had challenged this man facing of the public-house, they dragged him to the watch-house; out of curiosity I stepped into the watch-house, and heard the examination, the man said he had been robbed of his watch, and that was the man that had taken it. I made an observation to the officer of the night, that he had challenged another man with taking the watch. I believe I did say why did not he lay hold of me.

Q. I wonder he did not do so - A. He was cut about the mouth, and very much intoxicated.

Q. They did not lay hold of you - A. They did not.

Q. I wonder they did not. Did you know these men before - A. No I knew none of the party, the officer of the night knew me, he made it known to the party.

Q. How came you to be out at that time of the night - I am often out late of a Saturday night.

Q. Now, how much of what you said is true - A. I did not expect what I had got to say was to be doubted, I came forward out of humanity, his sister came to me last Monday or Tuesday.

Q. to Prosecutor. Do you remember seeing Bisset there - A. No, I never lost sight of Simpson before he was taken.

Q. Was the watchman knocked down - A. Yes, there was an old watchman knocked down in the kennel I think by Gee; I had just got hold of Simpson by the tail, and the watchman fell down behind him. Gee ran down Holborn.

Q. Can you take upon you to say that man Bissett was not one of them - A. I cannot say whether he was or not, there was about half a dozen of them at first round the place.

Q. to Boram. Do you know Bissett - A. I have some slight knowledge of him, he came to the watch-house, he made an observation that the prosecutor accused another man that passed the watchhouse. I was not satisfied; I committed Simpson. The prisoner abused me when I took him up to the alderman; he said I knew Bissett; I said I knew where he lived, and through that information they found him out.

Q. What is Bissett - A. He serves some of the butchers in Fleet Market with candles.

Q. to Greenfield. When you heard the cry of stop thief first, was there another man running

ran down Holborn and pushed down a watchman at the corner of Bartlett's buildings.

Simpson to prosecutor. Who gave charge of me - A. The young man that is here.

MR. HUGHES. I was in company with the prosecutor on the night this happened; we had been up Holborn, we were coming home, we stopped at the corner of Bartlett's buildings, Dearlove wanted to get something to drink, they would not serve him, the door was shut; some person pushed him away; my wife was with me, we walked towards Thavies inn; I heard Dearlove call out; I gave charge of Simpson when I saw him running.

Simpson said nothing in his defence.

Gee's Defence. I was not there at the time; I was in bed.

SIMPSON, GUILTY , aged 24.

GEE, GUILTY , aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090920-59

686 JOSEPH BELLAMY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 26th of August , twelve pounds weight of sugar, value 8 s. the property of Ann Greaves John Greaves , William Colling , and Thomas Hogg ,

THOMAS HOGG . I am a grocer ; my partners are Ann Greaves , John Greaves , and William Colling . The prisoner is a soldier belonging to the guards ; we are in the habit of employing soldiers. On the 26th of August we employed the prisoner. About half after two I told the people they might go to dinner; a little while after I saw the prisoner in a particular situation, I asked the prisoner what he had got under his apron; he said nothing. I called the men up; we made him pull from under his apron a bag, containing twelve pounds of sugar. This is the bag of sugar; he had tied it round his waist.

Prisoner's Defence. I met a person, he sold the sugar to me in the street; he was a sailor.

GUILTY , aged 33.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090920-60

687. GEORGE READING was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 13th of September , two pair of boots, value 2 l. the property of Richard Wilkinson .

RICHARD WILKINSON . I am a boot and shoemaker in St. Swithin's-lane . On the 13th of this month, between eight and nine in the evening, the prisoner came into my shop and took out two pair of boots; he ran out of the shop with them and I pursued him, he dropped the boots but I still followed him and brought him back into the shop, he was without his shoes, I sent for a constable and sent him to the Compter.

Q. You never lost sight of him did you - A. No; when I brought him back, he asked me to forgive him.

Prisoner's Defence. I am sure he never saw me in the shop; I was coming along, there was a mob, I lost my shoes in the mob.

The property produced and identified.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090920-61

688. JOHN CORBIN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 24th of August , one pound five ounces weight of isinglass, value 9 s. the property of William Hiscox , John Ellis , and James Metcalf .

WILLIAM CRANE . I am clerk to William Hiscox , John Ellis , and James Metcalf, they are chemists and druggists , 24, Upper Thames-street ; the prisoner was in their employ as porter . On the 24th of August, between seven and eight o'clock, the prisoner was called in the accompting house, I was present, he was asked if he had not got something in his pockets not belonging to himself, after some hesitation he confessed, and took out of his pocket one pound five ounces of isinglass, it is worth nine shillings. The prisoner said if they would not take him up he would tell them who bought it.

Mr. Alley. Who was in the accompting house besides yourself - A. The three partners.

Q. Was not mercy held out to the prisoner to induce him to disclose the fact - A. They asked the prisoner who he sold it to; no mercy was held out to him.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel, and called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 61.

Confined One Month in Newgate , and whipped in Goal .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090920-62

689. JOHN DRUMMOND was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 13th of June , a coat, value 1 l. 10 s. the property of John Robinson .

JAMES CLARKSON . I am the waiter of the Angel inn, St. Martin's-le-grand . On the 13th of June, Mr. Blackwell, of Sheffield, gave a coat into my care, I hung it upon a nail over a large glass in the coffee room. When the gentleman wanted the coat to go away I went to give the gentlemen the coat, it was gone.

Q. Why do you accuse the prisoner of it - A. Because when he stole the silver spoon his lodgings were searched the duplicate of this coat was found in his possession.

Mr. Alley. Were you answerable for the coat - A. John Robinson was the master of the house.

JAMES JOSEPH JONES . I live with Chandler and Benton, pawnbrokers, Holborn. This is the coat, I took in, it was pawned by a man, I do not know whether it was him or not.

THOMAS PEPPERCORN . I am an officer. In consequence of taking this man in custody I got a search warrant; I was present at the time the Bow-street officer found the duplicate in the prisoner's bureau.

Q. Whose bureau was it - A. His own; the prisoner told me so himself. The prisoner was not in the house; it was at No. 3, Lower Brook-street where we found this duplicate.

Jones. That is the duplicate I gave to the man that pawned the coat. It was pawned on the 13th of June.

Mr. Alley to Peppercorn When was it you went to Lower Brook-street - A. On the 4th of July.

Q. Where was the prisoner when you found the duplicate - A. In the Compter.

Q. I should be glad to know by what magic you knew this was the prisoner's room, and that the bureau was the prisoner's - A. By a person that told me.

Q. Did you ever see the prisoner unlock the bureau - A. No. The woman below stairs told me it was the prisoner's bureau. The prisoner afterwards in the

Compter said I hope you have not broken open my bureau, I told him yes, and what I had found; then he said he hoped his books was safe; I told him I had found the duplicate, he said he was very sorry for it.

The property produced and identified.

BENJAMIN ROBINSON . Q. Who is the owner of the house - A. John Robinson , my father; he is not at home, I do the business for him; I have no share in the business.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel, and called no witnesses to character.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090920-63

690. ANN SOUTHALL was indicted for feloniously stealing from the person of Francis Brown , two bank notes, value 1 l. each .

FRANCIS BROWN . I am a paper hanger , I live in Fleet-street. On the 10th of this month, near twelve o'clock at night, I was coming from the west end of the town, I was accosted by the prisoner in company with another, she wished me to go home with her, I went as far as Chancery-lane , I would not go any further; I missed some money from my pocket, I had suspicion that she had it.

Q. You did not go into any house with her, did you - A. I did not.

Q. Did you feel her take the money from you - A. I did not.

Q. Did you stop talking with her - A. I stopped some time, she wished me to persuade me to go home with her, I did not wish to go any farther; the watchman was coming by at the time, I gave her in charge.

Q. What did you lose - A. I lost two one pound notes, they were loose in my breeches pocket, in Chancery-lane; I went with her as far as fifty yards, perhaps; if you were to go from here it is on the left hand side.

Q. That is in the county. The other young woman was with you - A. She left me instantaneously when I accosted the prisoner.

Mr. Curwood. Were you sober - A. I do not think I was inebriated; I had taken one glass of brandy and water.

Q. Do you know the number of the notes that you lost - A. No; I knew I lost two one pound notes, I am sure that I had them there, I felt them about a quarter of an hour before.

THOMAS SMITH . I am a constable. On the 10th of this month I was going round with another constable to see that the watchmen were doing their duty, I saw a mob in Chancery-lane, Mr. Brown said he had been robbed by the prisoner; I took the prisoner of one side, I told her she had better give them up, she then gave up two one pound notes; I told the prosecutor I believed I had the notes.

Mr. Curwood. Look at that pawnbrokers ticket, perhaps you know that - A. I saw no ticket, I had only two notes.

Q. to prosecutor. Look at them notes and tell me which of them is my note - A. I do not know the number of them.

Prisoner's Defence. I pledged my clothes for that money through distress; that money belongs to me. My husband has gone to sea.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090920-64

691. HENRY EDWARDS, alias, TAYLOR . was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 21st of August , a counterpane, value 2 s. a sheet, value 1 s. 6 d. a pillow case value 1 s. and a towel, value 1 s. the property of Francis Page , in a lodging room .

ANN PAGE . I live in Paul-street, Finsbury-square ; my husband's name is Francis Page .

Q. Do you let lodgings - A. The prisoner came with intent to take the lodgings, but his mother was to come and take them for him; he slept at my house on Sunday night, the 20th of October, he went away on Monday morning the 21st.

Q. Did the mother ever come there - A. No; his mother was to come to agree with me; she never came.

Q. Then in fact it was not let to any body - A. No. This man slept there one night only; he came late, I did not like to turn him out.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090920-65

692. SAMUEL GILBERT was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 13th of August , an earthen jug, value one halfpenny, a piece of foreign coin, value 1 d. two penny pieces, fifty-two halfpence, and one hundred and three farthings , the property of Edward Thorogood .

EDWARD THOROGOOD . I am a victualler , I live at the Bell and Horn, Shoreditch . On the 12th of August, at half past eleven, I was gone to bed, and on the 13th, a quarter past twelve on the same night. I heard a noise in the passage, my wife was up below, I ran down stairs to get the trouble some people out of my house, something struck me all in a moment that I heard something in my bar, I flew from the people in the passage and entered my bar, the prisoner was then standing in my bar with the till half open, I collared him and said does this money belong to you that you are taking; from his coat pocket he drawed this cup with the farthings and sixpences in it, it dropped on the floor, the cup broke; I called for the officer, he was at the door, the officer came and secured him.

Mr. Alley. You have enquired his character - A. Yes; I find he is of an undeniable character.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I was very much intoxicated in liquor.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Fined One Shilling and discharged.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090920-66

693. ROBERT ARNETT was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of James Dangerfield , the said James Dangerfield being therein, about the hour of five in the afternoon of the 12th of September , and stealing therein, two sheets, value 2 l. a watch, value 2 l. and two tea-spoons, value 4 s. the property of Mary Earl .

JAMES DANGERFIELD . I live at 37, Dean-street, Soho, in the parish of St. Ann's, Westminster .

Q. You have a dwelling house there; does your sister, Mary Earl , lodge with you - A. She has the first

floor, she rents it of me. On Tuesday the 12th of September, about five in the afternoon, hearing that there was a man in my sister's room I immediately run down stairs to see if my sister was in the kitchen, I asked her if there was any man in her room; she said no; I replied there is, come along; I immediately run up stairs; I met the man near to my sister's room door.

Q. Was it that man, the prisoner - A. Yes; he had this bag with him; I asked him what he had got there; he said it was his own property, that he had been up to the top of the house, to a shoemaker there; wishing to be satisfied I sprang a few stairs and threw open my sister's room door, to be convinced; my sister said in the mean time, he is run away; he dropped the bag in the presence of my sister, on the outside of the street door against the rails in the street; I pursued him and never lost sight of him till I apprehended him. I brought him to the watchhouse, he was searched by the watchhouse keeper, a watch and two spoons were found on him; the bag was taken back to my house, I have kept it ever since in the same state it is now; it contains seven sheets; it is the prisoner's bag, and a sleeves belonging to some body else; the sheets were property entrusted to my sister to wash

Q. Did you examine the door to see how the door was broken open - A. When we searched the prisoner at the watchhouse he had picklock keys and an iron crow; one of the drawers in my sisters room appeared to have been broken open by an iron crow.

MARY EARL . Q. You have an apartment in your brother's house, have you - A. Yes.

Q. Did you go from your apartment on Tuesday the 12th of September - A. I did; I went down in the kitchen about five o'clock.

Q. Did you lock your door - A. I did, and had the key in my pocket. I left seven sheets in the room, two tea spoons, and a watch was there when I went out of the room.

Q. What is the value of all the things - A. The sheets forty shillings, the tea-spoons four shillings, the watch forty shillings; the watch hung at the head of my bed, the spoons were along with the tea things on the table, the sheets laid on the floor; I followed my brother up stairs immediately, I met the prisoner within three or four steps of my door, he had a bag with him, my brother asked him what he had got in his bag; he said it was his own property, he had been up in the garret to the shoemaker. I followed the prisoner down stairs, he dropped the bag at the street door: I took it up and carried it into the house, I found in it seven sheets.

Q. Were these the sheets that were taken out of your room - A. Yes.

Q. Had any of your drawers in the room been broken open - A. Yes, one appeared to have been broken open with an iron crow; nothing had been taken from that drawer.

Q. Did you examine the apartment to find how the person got in - A. Yes; by means of a picklock key.

GEORGE SULLIVAN . I am watchhouse keeper of St. Ann's. The prisoner was brought to the watch-house, I searched him, I found three double picklock keys and three single one's; I found two watches, one he said was his own.

Q. Did he say any thing to the other - A. He said that was his. I found three one pound notes, three guineas, five half guineas, two seven shilling pieces and some silver, and two table spoons I found on him.

Q. Did you go to Earl's apartment - A. Yes; this is the key that opened her apartment.

Q. Did you see any drawer broken open - A. Yes; this crow fitted it exactly.

Q. to Mary Earl . Look at these sheets - A. These are the sheets that were taken from my room, they are all marked; the spoons are silver, they are mine, and the watch is mine.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 65.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18090920-67

694. ELIZABETH COLLINGWOOD was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 1st of April , two gowns, value 29 s. four cloaks, value 4 l. ten yards of lace, value 20 s. a petticoat, value 5 s. and a handkerchief, value 1 s. the property of John Francis , in his dwelling house .

SARAH FRANCIS . I am the wife of John Francis , we live at St. Pancras .

Q. Did you lose any thing in April last - A. Yes. The prisoner has worked for me several years as charwoman .

THOMAS NELSON . I am a pawnbroker, 178, Drury-lane.

Q. Did the prisoner at any time call upon you - A. Yes; on the 4th of May she pawned a black silk gown for twelve shillings. I had known her several months, I have no doubt of her person.

ABRAHAM REYNOLDS . I am a pawnbroker, 65, High-street, St. Giles.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. Yes; I have known her several months; she pawned a silk cloak for one shilling and sixpence on the 10th of April, a gown and petticoat on the 25th of April, for six shillings, and on the 3rd of June two shifts and a tablecloth.

WILLIAM BAMFORD . I am a pawnbroker, I live at 67, Berwick-street; I have known the prisoner about eight months; she pledged a silk cloak and a remnant of lace for ten shillings on the 3rd of April.

SAMUEL HAMILTON . I am an officer; I searched the prisoner's lodgings on the 7th of last month.

Q. How do you know they were the prisoners lodgings - A. It was at the house of one Steward; the landlord had caused a search; there I found the counter part of these duplicates, that led to these goods.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I worked for Mrs. Francis; I have been in the habit of pledging things for her several times, and these thing were pledged by Mrs. Francis's desire.

Prosecutrix. I never authorised her to pledge these things.

GUILTY.

Of stealing to the value of twenty-five shillings .

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18090920-68

695. JOHN EDWARDS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 15th of July , six shirts, value 3 l. 3 s. the property of Richard Blunt , in his dwelling

house .

HENRY MOORE . I am clerk to Mr. Blunt, a linen-draper , Charing-cross . On the 15th of July the prisoner came into the shop and took out a bundle of six shirts.

Q. Did you see the prisoner - A. Yes.

Q. Did you know him before - A. No. I was at my desk writing, there was a man came in before him and asked to look at some handkerchiefs; the young woman in the shop went to the window to get the handkerchiefs out, the prisoner came in the mean time; I pursued him and took him by the King's-mews, with the shirts upon him. They are the prosecutor's shirts.

Prisoner's Defence. I trust to the mercy of God, and this honourable court.

GUILTY , aged 27.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18090920-69

696 WILLIAM EAKINS DYER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 18th of September, a handkerchief, value 2 s. 6 d. the property of John Goodyear , from his person .

JOHN GOODYEAR . I live at 86, London-wall, I am a jeweller . On the 18th of September, about half past nine in the evening, I was trying to get into the boxes of Covent-garden theatre ; not being able to get in the boxes I went to the pit door with a friend of mine; a gentleman tapped me on the shoulder and asked me if I had lost my handkerchief; I put my hand to my pocket and felt it was gone; I said yes; the gentlemen then pointed out the prisoner, he said that was the man that picked my pocket; I laid hold of the prisoner, he said I might search, he had not got it; my friend that was with me pulled the handkerchief out of the waistband of the prisoner's small clothes. This is the handkerchief, it is mine; I had the handkerchief in my hand only two minutes before; I am certain I put it in my pocket again.

WILLIAM ALDERS . I had hold of Mr. Goodyear's arm, I saw the prisoner putting the handkerchief in the waistband of his breeches; I drew the handkerchief from him.

Prisoner's Defence. I found a handkerchief or something similar to it, under my feet, I picked it up, not knowing what it was, I tucked it in this part of my waistcoat; I was accosted by the prosecutor; he said it was his handkerchief; it proved to be his before the justice.

GUILTY , aged 52.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18090920-70

697. ANN BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 13th of September , a pewter quart pot, value 15 d. and two pewter pint pots, value 1 s. the property of William Gillman .

WILLIAM GILLMAN . I am a victualler , 17, Berkley-square . I saw my boy take the pots from the prisoner.

SARAH BOWMAN . On the 13th of September I was in David-street, I saw the prisoner take from a door two pint pots and a quart pot, she concealed them in her apron; I gave information to Mr. Gillman.

JOHN PITFIELD . I am servant to the prosecutor; I pursued the prisoner, I took the pots from her in Adam's Mews; she had two pints and a quart pot in her apron.

The property produced and identified.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence, nor called any witnesses, to her character.

GUILTY , aged 43.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18090920-71

698. JUDITH BRADFORD was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 17th of July , a watch, value 20 s. the property of John Sharman .

MARY SHARMAN . I am the daughter of John Sharman . On the 17th of July, when my father lost the watch, there was nobody at home but myself, I was in the first floor, and the watch was hanging up by the fire place. The prisoner asked me to fetch her a pint of beer.

Q. Had you known the prisoner before - A. Yes; she came to take furnished lodgings up stairs. I am sure the watch was there when I went for the beer.

Q. Was the prisoner there when you returned - A. Yes; I never saw her after till she was taken into custody.

RICHARD PARRY . I am a pawnbroker, 243, Bermondsey-street, in the Borough.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. Yes, I have seen her before; she did not pledge the watch, a lad of the name of Daniel Watts pledged the watch, on the 17th of July; he said he pledged it for Mary Smith . In two or three days afterwards the prisoner came to sell the ticket, I told her I would not buy it.

Q. Are you sure that she had the ticket that you gave to Watts - A. Yes; she went away with the ticket when I refused to buy it.

The property produced and identified.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence, nor called any witnesses to character.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction, and there kept to Hard Labour .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18090920-72

699. ANN GOODLAKE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 2nd of July , one shilling and four pence the property of Robina Marchant , and Martha Barton .

MARTHA BARTON . I live in Bond-street , I am in partner ship with Robina Marchant. The prisoner lived with us three or four months.

Q. What do you know about her stealing money of yours - A. We have at various times given her different, sums of money to fetch articles of housekeeping.

Q. To what amount - A. Between eight and nine pounds. She brought in the articles but did not pay for them.

Q. How do you know that she did not pay for them - A. Because we have had bills brought in to the amount of the money.

Q. Then that is all that you have to say against her - A. Yes.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18090920-73

700. MARGARET DOWNING was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 2nd of September , two blankets,

value 10. and one bolster and case, value 5 s. the property of Joseph Atkinson .

MARGARET ATKINSON . I am the wife of Joseph Atkinson; the prisoner was my servant . I can only speak to my property.

ELIZABETH DIGNAM . I live with Mr. Thompson. 27, Litchfield-street ; Mr. Thompson is Mrs. Atkinson's father. I answered the door to the prisoner last Saturday fortnight, she said Eliza, if you please, I am come for Mrs. Atkinson's blankets, bolster and case; we both went up stairs; I delivered them into her hands.

Q. Had you seen her while she had been in Mrs. Atkinson's house - A. Yes.

ALEXANDER FITCH . I am a pawnbroker, No. 4, Rider's-court. On the 13th of September the prisoner came and took out of pledge a bolster and two blankets; she said she had lost the duplicate; they were pledged on the 2nd of September. The person that made out that duplicate is in the country.

JANE WHARTON . I keep a lodging house; I advanced the money to the prisoner, she brought the bolster and the blankets to me.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. When I went to live with Mrs. Atkinson I was in great dissress; I went for these blankets with intention of fetching them out again; on the Monday after, Elizabeth, the servant, can testify the same, I told Mrs. Wharton my trouble on my mind to get the things home; she lent me the money to fetch them out that day; I took them out, I was going to return them to Mrs. Atkinson, she came with the constable and took me up.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Confined Fourteen Days in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18090920-74

701. JAMES HILL was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 11th of August , two hundred and seventy-six halfpence , the property of George Lorame .

GEORGE LORAME . I am a timber merchant , I live in Store-street, Tottenham-court-road .

Q. Was the prisoner in your employ - A. Not at that time. On the 11th of August, between four and five o'clock in the morning, I saw the prisoner coming out of my counting house window, I called to him, upon which he ran away, I pursued him and took him; we afterwards brought him back into the yard, we searched him and found two five shilling papers of halfpence, and some loose ones; he said they were his own.

JOHN LADFORD . I am clerk to the prosecutor. On the morning of the 11th of of August I was sent for by the prosecutor; when I came to the yard I found the prisoner in custody; the halfpence that were found on the prisoner I had them the evening before in my possession; I found the two locks in the desk broken open, and the halfpence gone.

Prisoner's Defence. On Thursday evening I went up to the Adam and Eve public house, Tottenham-court-road, I changed a one pound note, they gave me ten shillings in halfpence. I was locked out, I went and slept in a cart; in the morning I was going down Cheney Mews, two men came and stopped me.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18090920-75

702. JOSEPH LEVY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 20th of July , a watch, value 2 l. 2 s. the property of Thomas Kerwood , from his person .

THOMAS KERWOOD . I live at No. 42, Long-alley, Moorfields. On Tuesday evening, the 20th of July, a little before nine, I was crossing the end of White Lion-street to come to Dorset-street, the prisoner, when I was halfway over the road, came out my right side and snatched the watch out of my fob pocket; I know it was the prisoner; I can swear to his face; I felt him snatch it out, and in coming out of my pocket it struck the buttons of my waistcoat, I thought the glass was broken; I followed him and called out stop thief, he ran down White's row, I did not overtake him; I met a woman, I gave way for her, my toe hit against a stone, I fell down and the prisoner got off.

Q. Did you take particular notice of him so as to know that is the man - A. Yes. I have never seen the watch again.

Q. When did you see the prisoner again - A. On Saturday. I saw the prisoner by a public house door in Wentworth-street, I knew him immediately; I acquainted Hart the officer, he went and apprehended him.

JOHN LAWSON . Q. Do you know the prisoner Joseph Levy - A. Yes; I saw him on the 20th of July; in the evening. I was sitting at my own door in White's-row, he came running by with his coat tucked up, he was running as fast as he could, the prosecutor was following him close behind; the prosecutor struck against the steps, he fell down; the prisoner got away. The prisoner is the man; I have seen him before.

Q. When did you see the prisoner again - A. On the Saturday following, in Red-lion-street Spital-field; I found him afterwards at a public house door; that was the time when the officer apprehended him.

THOMAS HART . I am an Headborough; I apprehended the prisoner; the prosecutrix pointed him out to me.

Prisoner's Defence. At the time the robbery was committed I was at work.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 16.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18090920-76

703. SAMUEL JOBBINGS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 15th of July , a bank note, value 20 l. the property of George Cole .

WILLIAM WOOD . I am servant to George Cole . The prisoner assisted me at times in the stable. On Saturday the 20th of July, the prisoner was entrusted with a twenty pound draft, which he was to pay in the Royal Exchange Assurance office; it was drawn upon Robarts in Lombard-street, he went there and got the money.

Q. He received a twenty pound bank note - A. Yes.

Q. Was that twenty pound bank note ever in the possession of Mr. Cole - A. No.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18090920-77

704. CATHERINE LINES was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 5th of August , a watch, value 3 l.

the property of Lemuel Lewellin .

LEMUEL LEWELLIN . I am a carpenter ; I lived then in Change-court, in the Strand. On the 5th of August, about half past eleven at night. I met the prisoner just by the court in the Strand, we had a little conversation together; I agreed to pass the night with her at No. 3, Angel-court, Charing-cross .

Q. Did you go to bed to her - A. I did; I wound my watch up in her presence and put it in my small clothes pocket; we went to bed; she would not take her clothes off; in the course of a few minutes she said she was very dry, she went down to get some gin and beer; when she went out for the gin she said take care of your smallclothes; she put them on the bed and I put them under my head, under the sacking; in the morning when I awoke the watch and the prisoner was gone. I have seen the watch since.

- HUMPHRIES. I am an officer of Bow-street. I apprehended the prisoner; I found the watch in her pocket.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. He took me to this court, I did not like to stop there; he said take care of that watch; I know your landlandy and her daughter. He came up in the morning and brought an officer; I said have you come after the property, I have got it for you.

Humphries. When I got round the bed I told her I should pull her out if she did not get out quick; I asked her where her pockets were; she said she had none; I said I should find them. She took the pockets out, I took the watch out with my left hand; I said, slow that then; she said he gave her the watch last night to take care of; I asked him, he said not.

GUILTY , aged 47.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18090920-78

705. WILLIAM LANE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 3rd of July , sixty penny pieces , the property of Thomas Chandler and Thomas Newsom .

THOMAS CHANDLER . I am in partnership with Thomas Newson, we keep a grocer's shop , Norton Falgate . On the 3rd of July the prisoner came into our shop to buy some pearl ash, I was called to stay in the shop while the young man got it; I staid in the shop with the prisoner, and knowing he was a bad character, I watched him; he had what he wanted, he went out of the shop and came in afterwards; I desired Mr. Hems, who lived on the other side of the way, to look after him; I saw the prisoner take a five shilling paper of penny pieces, he put them either in his apron or in his pocket.

Q. Where did he take them from - A. From the counter; I was upon the stairs watching him at the time; I seized him the moment he had taken them; he put them back then on the counter. I sent for an officer, he was apprehended. This is the parcel he took; the officer has had them ever since.

JOHN HEMS . I saw the prisoner draw up towards where the penny pieces stood, and attempt to take them, but whether he took them or no I cannot say; I went into the shop after that; Mr. Chandler attacked him before I got in.

JAMES KENNEDY . I am an officer. I apprehended the prisoner; Mr. Chandler gave me the penny pieces. When I went in the shop the prisoner was crying and asking forgiveness.

The property produced and identified.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18090920-79

706. WILLIAM POTTER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 1st of August , a wooden spout, value 10 s. the property of Jane Boyd .

JANE BOYD . I live at No. 27, Upper East Smithfield .

Q. Did you lose a wooden spout - A. Yes; it goes between my house and the next house. The spout was affixed to the wall, but they had been loosened by a waggon. On the 21st of July I found the spout was gone.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18090920-80

707. KEZIA PATTERSON , ELEANOR HUNTER , and EMILY HUNTER , was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 11th of August , three tablecloths, value 1 l. four napkins. value 4 s. a shift, value 4 s. a petticoat, value 3 s. a pair of stockings, value 2 s. and two handkerchiefs, value 1 s. the property of Francis Sitwell , esq .

SECOND COUNT for like offence, only stating it to be the property of Francis Atkins .

ANN ATKINS . My husband's name is Thomas Atkins , I am a laundress. The prisoner, Kezia Patterson, washed for me, she was entrusted to fetch and carry property to and from my customers.

Q. That property was missing - A. Yes; some of it.

JAMES GILLMORE . I am an officer of Queen-square. On the 11th of August I was sent for to take Eleanor Hunter into custody, I heard that she had been selling duplicates to Mrs. Stroud; I requested Mrs. Stroud to let me see the duplicates; she said she could direct me where to see the property. I had the property from Mrs. Parr. I also found a duplicate in the lodgings of the prisoners; they all three lodged in one room; the pawnbroker is here with the property.

ELIZABETH PARR . I had some of the duplicates of my sister, Mrs. Stroud; she bought them of one of these women.

MARY STROUD . Q. Did you give your sister any duplicates - A. Yes; I had the duplicates of Eleanor Hunter .

Q. Were they the duplicates of that property - A. Yes; I went with my sister to take them out from a pawnbroker over Westminster bridge.

JOHN DICKERS . I am a pawnbroker. On the 25th of March Emily Hunter pawned with me a gown, shirt, and napkin.

The property produced and identified.

Gillmore. Patterson absconded for three or four days; when I found her she said she was very glad she was found, for she had stolen the articles, and she had given them to the other prisoners to make away with.

Patterson's Defence. Both my sister and daughter are innocent, they never saw any of the property at all, I never took it to my own home; I got it pledged by a person of the name of Simmons, she has altered her situation and gone out of town; she gave the duplicates

to my sister; she said they were her own, and told them to dispose of them.

Eleanor Hunter 's Defence. The tickets were given me by Mrs. Simmons; I never saw any of the property.

Emily Hunter 's Defence. I am innocent of the crime.

PATTERSON, GUILTY , aged 49.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

ELEANOR HUNTER , NOT GUILTY .

EMILY HUNTER , NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18090920-81

708. THOMAS ROLES was indicted for that he at the time of committing the felony was employed in certain business relating to the Post office, that is to say, in sorting and delivering letters and packets, sent by the post to Paddington, in the county of Middlesex , he on the 11th of August , at Paddington, aforesaid, had a certain letter then lately before sent by the post from Altringham; in the county of Cheshire, to be delivered to John George Green, then containing two bank notes, value 5 l. each, which came into his possession, he being so employed, as aforesaid, and that he on the same day, feloniously did secrete the said letter, containing the said bank notes, the property of Isaac Worthington , Isaac Harriott , and Hugo Worthington .

SECOND COUNT for like offence, only stating it to be a packet instead of a letter; - and

SEVERAL OTHER COUNTS, in like manner, only varying the manner of charging them.

The case was stated by Mr. Solicitor General.

WILLIAM CHEWNEY . Q. Are you a clerk in the banking house of Messrs. Worthingtons and co. Altringham - A. Yes. The names of the partner s are Isaac Worthington , Isaac Harriott , and Hugo Worthington .

Q. Did you in August last make up any letter to go to Mr. Green - A. Yes; I put two five pound bank notes in the letter to Mr. John George Green .

Q. What was the number of the notes you sent to Mr. John George Green - A. No. 967, dated 21st of February, 1809, five pound; the number of the other was 4352, dated 29th of October, 1808, five pound.

Q. You put them into a letter for Mr. John George Green - A. Yes; it was directed John George Green, No. 35, Virgil-place, Bowling-Green-buildings, New-road, London.

Q. Did you seal the letter - A. Yes, and when I had made it up and sealed it I put it in a box in our accompting house where we generally put letters.

Q. Altringham is in Cheshire - A. Yes.

Mr. Bolland. Did you seal this letter yourself - A. Yes.

Q. And you threw it into a letter box among other letters which were to go by the mail from that place - - A. Yes.

Q. All the clerks have access to that box - A. Yes. The box is fixed in the corner of the fire place.

Q. Is it possible for strangers that come into the house to have access to that box - A. Yes, if they thought proper; there are other clerks in the house, they must see it; I put it in the box about three, the mail goes away between three and four.

THOMAS POTTER . Q. You are also a clerk with Messrs. Worthingtons at Altringham - A. Yes.

Q. Were you at home on the 9th of August last - A. Yes.

Q. Who took the letters from your receiving box on that day - A. I took them; I put them into the post office, I gave them to Mr. Burgess the post-master, all the letters that were in the box; if I had left any they would have been found, there were none found.

JOHN BURGESS . Q. You keep the receiving house at Altringham in Cheshire - A. Yes; I did on the 9th of August last.

Q. Were the letters put in your office that day duly forwarded - A. Yes; in a lock bag.

Q. What time of the day were they forwarded - A. A little after four o'clock they go from me.

Q. Who keeps the keys of this bag which is locked - A. I keep one key, and the other is kept by the postmaster of Knotsford.

Q. All the letters were duly forwarded that day - A. They were.

Mr. Bolland. Were you there in the office - A. Yes.

JOHN BESWICK . Q. You are in the post office at Knotsford - A. Yes.

Q. Did you receive the Altringham bag on the 9th of August - A. Yes; I undid them and put them in the box to London.

Q. All that were intended for London were forwarded by the mail for London - A. Yes.

Q. What day would they arrive in London in the regular course - A. On the morning of the 11th of August.

Q. I need hardly ask you whether you do not make mistakes often; I do not mean your house letters are often wrong sent - A. Yes.

JOHN LANGSTAFFE . Q. Do you belong to the General Post office - A. Yes; I am clerk to the General post office in London.

Q. Were you on duly on the morning of the 11th of August - A. Yes.

Q. Did you receive the Knotsford bag - A. Yes; it came sealed in the usual way.

Q. Is Bowling Green-buildings, New-road, in the delivery of the General post carrier or the two-penny - A. The two-penny post.

Q. What did you do with the bag - A. I opened it and forwarded it in the usual way to the two-penny post office.

WILLIAM HOLCATE . I am a clerk in the post office.

Q. Were you upon duly on the morning of the 11th of August - A. I was.

Q. Did you examine the number and amount of the letters that came from Knotsford to see that they agreed with the charge - A. I examined the letters to see that they were right charged, I found them right.

Q. What were done with those that were to be delivered by the two-penny post - A. They went from me to the stampers, Mr. Humphries; I delivered them all over regularly. I have looked over the books, it does not appear there were any mistake that morning.

THOMAS HUMPHRIES Q. Are you a stamper of letters at the general-post office - A. Yes.

Q. Were you on duty on the morning of the 11th of August - A. Yes; I received the letters from Mr. Holgate; I stamped them and delivered them to the sorters.

WILLIAM HARRISON . Q. Are you a sorter of

letters in the general post office - A. Yes.

Q. Were you on duty on the morning of the 11th of August - A. I was.

Q. What was your duty that morning - A. To sort the letters after they were stamped.

Q. Were you to sort them for the two-penny post or general - A. For both; Jacob Youngman was the other sorter.

JACOB YOUNGMAN . Q. Were you one of the sorters at the general post office on the morning of the 11th of August - A. Yes; I was at the same table with Harrison.

Q. Did you do your duty in sorting the letter - A. To the best of my knowledge.

Q. What is done with those for the two-penny-post - A. They are put into a division by themselves, they go from us to the telling clerk, his name is Phython.

LEWIN GIMBER. Q. Were you upon duty at the general post office on the morning of the 11th of August - A. I was, I was messenger; I took the letters that morning to the two-penny post table, from the E table, where Harrison and Youngman were.

JAMES LAVTHORN . Q. Were your upon duty on the morning of the 11th of August - A. Yes; my duty was to tell all the letters up, the twopenny post and others.

Q. Did you that morning tell the two-penny post letters up - A. I did.

Q. After you had told them up who would be the person to take them from you to take them to the twopenny post office - A. Thomas Garber. It would be his duty to take them to Cromer.

HENRY CROMER . Q. Were you upon duty on the morning of the 11th of August at the general post office - A. Yes; it is my duty to tell the two-penny post charges from the general.

Q. Did you receive the letters that morning from Garber - A. I received the letters that morning from one of the messengers, I am not sure which; I told them up in the regular course.

THOMAS GARBER . Q. Were you on duty at the post-office on the 11th of August - A. I was.

Q. In what did your duty consist - A. To carry a box from the inland office to our office, the two-penny post office from Mr. Cromer.

Q. Did you perform your duty that day - A. I did.

Q. Did you deliver all the letters which you received from the inland office into the two-penny post office - A. Yes; they were all locked up in a box.

Q. To whom did you deliver the box - A. I cannot say; there are two stampers, John Mackandrew and and John Ellis .

JOHN MACKANDREW . Q. Are you a stamper in the two-penny post office, Lombard-street - A. Yes.

Q. Did you receive the box of letters from the last witness, Garber - A. I did, and stamped them; Ellis was with me. After I had stamped them I delivered them to the check clerk, Mr. Butts.

JOHN ELLIS . Q. You belong to the two-penny post office, Lombard-street - A. Yes, I do; I am in the same capacity with the last witness.

Q. Having stamped the letters with him you delivered them to Mr. Butts - A. Yes.

THOMAS BUTTS . Q. You belong to the two-penny post office, Lombard-street - A. I do; my duty is to check the letters; I checked the letters on the morning of the 11th of August, they were taken away by the sorters.

JOHN TYRELL . Q. You are a sorter in the twopenny post office, Lombard-street - A. Yes; Robert Smith and Samuel Birt assisted me; I was on duty on the 11th of August I sorted the two-penny post letters that morning in the usual manner; I sorted them into eight divisions; they were taken by Mr. Ellmore.

ROBERT SMITH . Q. You are a sorter in the twopenny post office, with Tyrell and Birt - A. Yes; I sorted the letters in the regular course that morning.

SAMUEL BIRT . I was a sorter with the last witness on the 11th of August.

JOHN HENRY ELLMORE . I am clerk in the twopenny post office.

Q. Do you remember receiving the package for the Paddington Division that morning on the 11th of August - A. I received it among others.

Q. Is Bowling Green-lane in that division - A. It is. I put them into the Paddington box; I told the number and the amount, then they were checked by Mr. Smith, put into the bag and tied, and sealed by Mr. Thirley.

WILLIAM THIRLEY . I am sealer of the bag in the two-penny post office; I received the bag from the last witness, I sealed it and delivered it to the Brentford rider for the purpose of being taken to Gerrard street.

Q. Do you know the riders name - A. I cannot say I know his name; he has been there upwards of a twelvemonth on the ride.

EDWARD JOHNSON . I am a comptroller in the twopenny post office.

Q. The bag that is to go from the post office in Lombard-street we have heard it is taken by the post boy and taken to Gerrard-street, is it to be opened there - A. It is not; it is to be delivered to another post boy and taken to Paddington, there to be delivered to the person that is to open it at the White Lion, Paddington.

WILLIAM CALF . I am a letter carrier; I was on duty on the 11th of August at Paddington; I received the letters on that day at the White Lion, Paddington, about half after ten in the forenoon; they were sealed.

Q. What is the name of the person that keeps the receiving office - A. William Lloyd . I received the letters from the Paddington rider.

Q. Did you open the bag - A. I cannot tell.

Q. If you did not open it who would open it - A. Edward Reeves ; he is an assistant.

Q. How many attend at the time when the bag is opened - A. Three besides myself, Thomas Roles , Edward Reeves , and Robert Fozard .

Q. Do you know Thomas Roles - A. Yes; he is the prisoner.

Q. Was it opened in your presence - A. It was; the regular course is for all to be present.

Q. And though you are not certain whether you opened it, it was opened in your presence - A. Yes; and Edward Reeves , Thomas Roles the prisoner, and Robert Fozard , were present.

Q. What was the duty of these persons to do with it when it was opened - A. To see if they were charged sufficient from the office, that the money was right that they amounted to; I make the bag up to be returned to London, while they do that, and as soon as I had done the bag up I assist in

sorting, and each of them take the letters to their respective places.

Q. Do you know Virgil Place - A. I do.

Q. To whose delivery were the letters to Virgil Place - A. Thomas Roles 's.

Q. The letters in his delivery ought they all to be given to him - A. They ought.

COURT. Were they so - A. They were.

Mr. Myers. What was to be done with them then - A. To be delivered there directly.

Mr. Bolland. You received the bag from the Gerrard-street rider, the boy - A. Yes.

Q. It was tied and sealed - A. Yes, and stamped with a crown.

Q. But whether that crown was put on in Gerrard-street or the Post office you cannot say - A. I cannot, these letters were divided according to the respective places.

Q. That is provided there is no mistake - A. If we do that we rectify it before we part.

Q. That is if you find it out; does it not often happen that there are mistakes - A. Very frequently.

Q. You do not mean to say that the letter in question was given to the prisoner - A. I cannot say.

EDWARD REEVES . I am a two penny post letter carrier for Paddington division.

Q. Were you upon duty on the 11th of August - A. I was.

Q. The letters were received from the Gerrard-street office - A. Yes, and they were sorted in the receiving house at the White Lion, Paddington, the bag was sealed to the best of my recollection.

Q. In whose presence was the bag opened - A. In the presence of myself, William Calf , Robert Fozard and Thomas Roles , the prisoner. It is generally my business to sort them, but I am not certain whether I did it that day, they were sorted in my presence, when they are sorted they are divided for the different walks, each taking their respective walk.

Q. Virgil place is in the walk of which person - A. In the walk of the prisoner.

Q. Then he took the letter for that place - A. Yes, we all assist in sorting.

Q. Did the prisoner take his letters that morning as usual - A. Yes.

ROBERT FOZARD . I am a twopenny post letter carrier for Paddington division.

Q. Were you on duty on the 11th of August - A. I was; I assisted in sorting the letters with Calf, Reeves, and the prisoner, the bag came tied and sealed that morning I believe, we each took the letters for our respective walks.

Q. And Roles took the letters for his walk - A. Yes.

JOHN HENRY GREEN . Q. Where did you live in the month of August last - A. No. 35, Virgil place, Bowling Green lane.

Q. Did you on the morning of the 11th, receive any letter from Messrs. Worthington and Co. - A. I did not.

Q. Either before or after did you receive any letter containing 2 bank notes - A. No, I did not.

WILLIAM BONE . I live at the Horse-shoe, George-street, Westminster.

Q. Is that near the residence of the prisoner - A.

Q. Do you know a young woman of the name of Sarah Roles - A. I did not know her at the time the note was brought.

Q. Do you now know a young woman of the name of Sarah Roles - A. Yes.

Q. Did that young woman bring you a note to change - A. Yes, according to the endorsement on the note it was on the 11th of August. I made the endorsement at the time it was given into my hands.

Q. Look at that note, and tell me whether that is the note that you received from her - A. Yes it is, it has my own hand writing upon it.

Q. For what purpose did she bring the note to you - A. To get change for it.

Q. Did you give her change for it - A. It was given at the house. I do not know whether it was me or my wife.

Q. Is that Sarah Roles a sister of the prisoner - A. I believe so. She lives in Brewer's Row, I cannot say what time of the day she brought it me.

Mr. Bolland. The post office traced this note back to you - A. They traced it to the distiller and then to me. At first, I did not recollect who I took it of until I saw the writing, I knew her personally then but not her name. I have been told since that she is a sister of the prisoner. That is the young woman.

SARAH ROLES . Q. Did you deliver any note to the last witness William Bone - A. Yes.

Q. Where did you receive that note - A. From my brother.

Q. What brother do you mean, the prisoner at the bar - A. Yes.

Q. Was it the same day that you gave it to Mr. Bone - A. Yes.

Mr. Bolland. How old are you - A. Sixteen.

Q. You can neither read nor write - A. No.

Q. How do you know it is the same note - A. By a piece of paper pasted at the back of it.

Q. Then there are many notes with a piece of paper pasted at the back of them; you only know it by that - A. No.

Mr. Abbott. The same note that you received from your brother you gave to Mr. Bone - A. Yes.

ROBERT SPARKE . Q. I believe you are clerk to Mr. Parkin - A. I am.

Q. In consequence of the note being brought forward did you go with an officer to apprehend the prisoner - A. Yes, with William Adkins ; he was apprehended at Paddington, near the White Lion; he was taken to the White Lion; I asked him where he got the five pound note which he had given to his sister to get changed, he denied that ever he had given her one, she was afterwards called into the room in the prisoner's presence, she was asked where she got the five pound note that she changed at Mr. Bone's; she replied of her brother the prisoner, he then said he had given it her, he was then asked where he got it, he said he could not tell.

Mr. Bolland. Q. Were you with Adkins when lie applied to the girl - A. Yes.

Q. I believe when the girl was first applied to it was represented to her that her brother had passed a forged note and you duly wanted to trace it - A.

They said they supposed it was a bad one, the mother did, we let it pass we did not want to alarm them.

Q. I ask you whether Adkins did not convey to her that you only wanted to trace the note because you thought it was a forgery - A. I do firmly believe Adkins did not.

Q. However the impression on the poor girl's mind was that it was to get her brother out of trouble, supposing it was a bad note, and you only wanted to trace it - A. Perhaps it might.

Mr. Abbott. The mother suggested it and you let that pass - A. Yes.

Q. Had she told you that she received it from her brother, before that suggestion of it being a bad note arose - A. Yes.

WILLIAM ADKINS . Q. You are a Police officer of Bow-street - A. Yes.

Q. Did you apprehend the prisoner - A. Yes, on Tuesday the 5th of September at Paddington near the White Lion public-house, I told him that I was an officer of Bow-street. I was come to apprehend him on suspicion of stealing two five pound notes, he said he did not know any thing about it, I then asked him where he got the five pound note that he had given to his sister to get changed at the public-house, he said that he had never gave her a five pound note. I asked him two or three times at the place where I apprehended him, and then I took him to the White Lion, and then he was asked by Mr. Sparke the last witness, he denied it then. The sister was then brought into the room, she was asked where she got the five pound note that she changed at the public house, she said that she had it of her brother in his presence, he said then that he did give it to her, but he did not know where he got it: there were many questions put to him where he got it, he positively denied knowing where. I took him down to the office, and then went with Mr. Sparke to search his father's house, we searched the father's house and found nothing. The next morning I went with Mr. Sparke to a Brewhouse, there we traced the other five pound note, it was taken from Mr. Lloyd at the White Lion. When I went back I asked the prisoner if he had his breakfast, he said he had, I told him that the other five pound note was was traced to Lloyd, he began to cry and said he was sorry he had told me a story when I apprehended him, he did give the five pound note to his sister and the other five pound note he gave to Mrs. Lloyd. I asked him what he had done with the letter that he had taken out the note, he said he had tore the letter, I then asked him what he had done with the money, the ten pound; he said he had lost a great deal of money when he was first employed in the post-office by not knowing the marks of the letters, he had made use of that money for the purpose of what he had borrowed to make up the deficiency that he was behind; he cried very much. I asked him if he would like to see his father, he said No, he was ashamed to see him.

Q. Was all this said voluntary - A. Yes.

DOUGLAS JOHNSON . Q. You are clerk to Messrs. Barclay and Perkins, brewers - A. I am.

Q. Look at this note, had you that note any time in your possession - A. Yes, I had it of Mr. Lloyd at Paddington. I received it for porter along with other money to make up the sum of eighty pounds. I receive money of him every month.

WILLIAM LLOYD . Q. You keep the White Lion at Paddington - A. I do.

Q. You also have a receiving house there for twopenny post letters - A. Yes.

Q. Did you pay that note to Douglass Johnson - A. I paid him several notes about the 18th of August, no doubt I paid him that if my name is on it.

Q. to Clewney. Look at these two notes that you sent on the 9th of August - A. The first note I received on the 23d of May. No. 967 of Richard Spencer , bank 21st February 1809, U. S. 5 l. I made the entry at the time on the 9th of August, I remitted to John George Green two notes, No. 4325. Bank 29th October, 1809, 5 l. paid 9th of August to John George Green.

Q. From reading the entry of these notes are you able to say you sent these notes on the 9th of August to John George Green - A. Yes.

Q. Looking at the notes, do you believe they correspond - A. I believe these to be the two notes, they correspond in number, date and sum.

Mr. Bolland. I take it, you know nothing at all of the notes from your recollection - A. No. I put the number of the two notes that I sent Mr. Green in the letter.

The Prisoner left his defence to his counsel, called two witnesses who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , DEATH , aged 22.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18090920-82

709. JANE FISHER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 11th of August , ten bank notes value one pound each, the property of William Starling from his person .

WILLIAM STARLING . I am a master baker . I live in Narrow Wall, Lambeth. On the 11th of August, about nine at night. I was going out of Holborn into Fleet Market, I met the prisoner on the right hand of Fleet Market , she laid hold of my right arm and asked me where I was going, I replied home, in the mean time she put her left hand into my right hand breeches pocket, and took the notes, my pocket was open, the notes were all rolled up together.

Q. How many were there - A. Ten one pound notes, she run away directly, I followed her up an alley close by and catched her in the middle of the alley, I laid hold of her left arm, she had the notes in her right hand, she threw them down in the kennel and trampled on them, some person came behind and picked up what they could, mud and all, it was very dirty, and gave them into my hand. In bringing her down the alley, I got a blow upon the back part of my head by an Irishman; he used very rough language to me because I would not let her go. I took her to the watchhouse, she was sent to the Compter after she was searched. I lost all my notes, I have only one number perfect, that is all I have got left of them.

MR. ROGERS. I was the constable of the night, I searched the prisoner. I found two pence halfpenny upon her, the notes were delivered to me, they were quite a lump of mud, there was only one number to be found upon them.

Prisoner's Defence. I am an unfortunate person, I was coming out of Shoe Lane. I came down George Alley, there were a number of girls and other people men and women laughing. I said in the name of peace what are you laughing about, that gentleman said I have catched you, give me my money, I said I have no money about me. I have no pocket on, I will shew you all the money I have, and that is twopence halfpenny that the night constable took from me out of my bosom.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090920-83

710. WILLIAM SHEPPARD was indicted for feloniously forging and counterfeiting on the first of February a receipt for the payment of 20 l. with intention to defraud the governors and company of the Bank of England . Second count for feloniously uttering and publishing as true a like forged receipt for payment of money with the same intention, and

Two other counts for like offence, only stating his intention to defraud Richard Mordy .

The indictment was read by Mr. Bolland and the case was stated by Mr. Knapp.

RICHARD MORDY . Q. What are you - A. I am a servant to Mr. Mordy.

Q. Have you a brother of the name of Thomas - A. Yes.

Q. Did you at any time give a sum of money to your brother - A. Yes, a 10 l. and a 20 l.

Q. Confine yourself to the 20 l. - A. Yes, I gave him twenty pound to buy in the navy stock, I cannot recollect what part of the year it was.

Q. Do you recollect the young man at the bar - A. Yes, I have seen him before.

Q. Did you ever see him about purchasing any navy stock, about laying out this 20 l. - A. No.

THOMAS MORDY . Q. You are brother to the last witness - A. Yes.

Q. Did your brother at any time give you any money - A. Yes, he gave me 20 l. which I gave to Sheppard to purchase in the navy five per cent. I received the money of him, I gave Sheppard order to buy in the navy for my brother, I received that money in January, I cannot say the day.

Q. When did you take it to Sheppard - A. In February, I found him in the Rotunda at the Bank. I requested him to buy stock in the navy five per cent. in the name of my brother.

Q. Did you give him the money - A. Not till I received the paper.

Q. He then left you, I suppose, how long was it before he returned, and what did he say when he returned - A. It was some time, he said he had some difficulty in buying the stock.

Q. He returned, however, and gave you a paper - A. Yes.

Q. Look at that paper and tell me whether that is it - A. I think this is the paper, I have not had it in my possession for a week. I gave it to the clerk of the transfer books.

Q. Did he say any thing to you at the time he gave you the paper - A. No. He did not say any thing, I left the bank, I gave him the money, whether I took the paper in my hand before I gave him the money I cannot say.

Q. Look at that paper and tell me whether you have any doubt that is the paper that he gave you.

Court. Q. Did you take particular notice of it at the time he gave it you - A. I did not.

Q. Have you taken any notice of it since - A. I have not.

Mr. Bolland. Q. Had you any other paper from Sheppard at any other time in your brother's name - A. No.

Q. When did you see the prisoner again - A. Not before April, I believe.

Q. Did you ever see him in the parlour of the bank of England - A. Yes.

Q. Did you ever say any thing to the prisoner before you saw him in the parlour of the bank of England - A. No, I saw the prisoner in the parlour of the bank of England in July.

Q. Had you seen the prisoner in any of the stock offices before you came into the bank - A. Yes, on the same day, almost as soon as I saw him he went out, he did not say above a word or two to me, he said that he would give me the money.

Q. You saw him afterwards in the parlour of the bank of England - A. Yes. He stated in the parlour of the bank of England that there was an account between him and me.

Q. What was that account between him and you - A. I do not know, he mentioned it more particularly before I went in; when I went in, he said there was an account between him and me, that I owed him some money.

JOSEPH KAYE . Q. I believe you attended at the parlour of the bank on the day the prisoner was brought forward - A. I did, on the 1st of July last.

Q. State what the prisoner said, it was taken by you in writing, as minutes at that time - A. Yes, it was, I produced to him this stock receipt and another of Richard Mordy , the receipt which was shewn for 20 l. and another. That Richard Mordy had claimed the stock mentioned in that receipt, and that no such stock appeared to be in his name, and that receipt appeared to be made out by him, Sheppard, as the broker; and I desired to know what explanation he had to give upon the subject. Then he stated that Richard Mordy had paid him 10 l. on the 1st of February, the date of the receipt.

Court. Confine yourself to the 20 l. - A. And that 20 l. five per cent. was to be transferred into his name, and that Richard Mordy was to have brought him the remainder of the money as soon as he could, but did not specify any time, that he, Sheppard, gave Mordy this receipt. This receipt was on the table before him, I shewed him the receipt, and then the prisoner said he gave Mordy this receipt as a memorandum; I then asked him who the name of W. S. West was, which was subscribed to it as the person transferring the stock, he said there was no such person as West, whose name purported to be subscribed to it, that he put the name of West to it as making a memorandum, that there was no such person stockholder which he knew; that he had an acquaintance of the name of West whom he often saw, and that put him in mind of the

name, at this time neither of the Mordys were in the room, I then desired both Richard and Thomas Mordy to be called in, I then asked Richard Mordy what he had to say about the 20 l. stock, in the presence of the prisoner. He said that he gave his brother Thomas Mordy the 20 l. to purchase the stock in January; I then asked Thomas Mordy what he had to say upon the subject; he said that he saw the prisoner on the day that he gave him this receipt, that he paid him the 20 l. and desired him to buy the 20 l. in the navy 5 per cent, that he waited about two hours in the Rotunda, and that he came to him and said it was all right, and gave him the receipt, and that he had bought the stock, I then said to the prisoner you hear what these two men say, what have you to say more upon the subject, he then said that he had received the money upon both occasions, (I examined upon the 10 l. as well as the 20 l.) but want of money for purposes of his own, being very much pressed for some rent, he filled up and gave Mordy the receipts to induce him to suppose that he had bought the stock, and that he intended to have bought it in after the opening, the stock was then shut at the time of this examination.

Mr. Knapp. The stock was not shut when he gave him the money - A. No.

Q. To induce the prisoner to say this was there any promise of favour to him, or any threat used to him - A. No. Neither one nor the other, at the time I asked him these questions, I was not aware that it was of that serious nature. He was delivered into the hands of a constable, and taken before the sitting alderman directly, I have had the receipt ever since.

NATHAN SILLCOCK . Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar - A. Yes. Very well, for nine or ten years I believe.

Q. What line of business was he in - A. He used to assist me to write receipts and purchase stock for me.

Court. Are you a stock-broker - A. I am.

Mr. Knapp. Have you seen him write very often - A. I have.

Q. Look at the whole of that writing on that receipt and tell me whether you believe that is the prisoners hand writing - A. It resembles his handwriting, I have no doubt but what it might be, I do not know.

Mr. Gurney. This young man had assisted you, and you had known him very well - A. Yes, his character had been always very good for what I have heard, I never found any thing but honesty by him.

The receipt read.

Navy 5 per cent. annuity.

20. Received this 1st day of February of Mr. Richard Mordy , nineteen pounds six, being the consideration of twenty pounds, interest or share, in the capital, or joint stock, in the five per cent. annuity, by an act made, in the reign of his Majesty, King George, entitled an act to grant annuities to satisfy navy and transport bills, and by other subsequent acts, transferrable at the bank of England, by bank this day transferred to Richard Mordy , witness my hand.

W. SHEPPARD.

19 6 W. S. WEST.

WILLIAM NORRIS . Q. You are the transferring clerk in the five per cent. office in the Bank of England - A. I am.

Q. Have you looked in the bank book to see whether any such stock of Richard Mordy 1st of February, is there - A. There is no such transaction in the Bank book in the least corresponding with that.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel, and called eight witnesses who gave him a good character.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 22.

London jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18090920-84

711. MARY FISHER and ELIZABETH ARCHER were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 9th of June , 6 lb. weight of flour, value 2 s. 2 biscuits, value 2 d. 5 rolls value 10 d. the property of Henry Hutchins .

HENRY HUTCHINS . I am a baker , 58, High Holborn . Mary Fisher was my servant ; I was informed that Elizabeth Archer frequently came on Sunday morning, she had been seen to go out with something they did not know what, but they were sure Fisher and Archer were robbing me. On Sunday morning the 9th of June about 6 o'clock, I went on the top of the accompting house, which is in the shop, it commands a view of my shop, after I had been there about a quarter of an hour, Mary Fisher got up, she could not see me because I put some baskets there, Mary Fisher came into the shop, she opened the private door and let in Archer, I saw them come into the shop together. Archer produced a cloth and laid it on the counter, Fisher went to the flour bin and took out a shovel full of flour, that is about 6 lb. she put it into the table-cloth, then she went to the shop-window and took out the rolls and biscuits, the woman took them in her hand, she wrapped the flour up in the cloth and gave it to Archer, and she went out, Fisher went as far as the door with her, and shut the door after her. I took, hold of the prisoner and told her what she had been doing, she began to cry, and said it was her aunt that had led her into it, I left Fisher in the shop and went after Archer.

Q. What age is Fisher - A. Seventeen. I went after the aunt and laid hold of her before she had gone three doors from the house. I found the flour, biscuits, and rolls with her.

Q. How long had Fisher live with you - A. Near 12 months.

Q. What is the value of this - A. About 3 shillings altogether.

The prisoners said nothing in their defence.

Archer called two witnesses who gave her a good character.

FISHER, GUILTY , aged 14.

Whipped and discharged.

ARCHER, GUILTY , aged 28.

Confined six months in the house of Correction, and there kept to hard labour , and fined one shilling .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090920-85

712. FRANCIS SHEPHERD WHEELER , was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 19th of

August , 9 brass cocks, value 4 s. 6 d. the property of Zachary Allnutt .

ZACHARY ALLNUTT . I am a plumber , I live at Twickenham .

Q. When did you lost these things - A. I cannot say, I have lost a great number of brass cocks, the prisoner was my journeyman .

WILLIAM MARSHALL . I am an ironmonger, I live at Brentford. These cocks were offered at my shop for sale, by the prisoner's wife. Not knowing the price, I asked Mr. Bevan, he asked me who the woman was, he came and looked at her, he asked the woman her name, she refused to tell, she was stopped, he knew her to be the prisoner's wife.

Q. to Prosecutor. Did you see the prisoner with these things - A. No, they were not taken upon him.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090920-86

713. JOHN WOOD was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 8th of September , 5 lb. and a half of wax candles, value 15 s , the property of Robert Burton .

ROBERT BURTON , jun. Q. Are you son to Mr. Burton - A. Yes, he is a tallow-chandler , 47, Swallow-street . The prisoner came into my father's shop and asked for a quarter of a pound of soap, while the young man was serving the soap, he took a bundle of wax-candles and put it under the soap, when the young man gave him the soap, he throwed down six pence, the woman servant pursued him and collared him. I pursued him and lost sight of him, at the corner of Chapel court, the corner of King-street. In King-street, I got sight of him again, when the servant stopped him, the candles laid down by his feet.

JAMES UNDERWOOD . On September the 8th, about a quarter after six, the prisoner came into the shop, he asked for half-a-quartern of soap, he threw down six-pence, and when I gave him the change he ran away, I am sure he is the man.

JAMES LISTER . I am a fishmonger, I live in Golden Square, I was sitting in my own shop, I heard the cry of stop thief, I hastened to the door, I saw the prisoner laying in the kennel, he got up before I got to him and ran away, I saw the candles underneath him in the kennel. I pursued him and never lost sight of him.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I was running in Golden Square as well as the rest, they stopped me and said I was the person.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090920-87

714. THOMAS MAIN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 7th of September , a gelding, value 40 l. the property of Mary Hinton , Sarah Hinton , and Hannah Hinton .

STEPHEN KING . I live at Hayes, I am a day labouring man.

Q. Do you know any thing of the Hintons having a gelding - A. Yes.

Q. Did they lose it - A. Yes, on the 7th of this month, it was in the field in the parish of Hayes in this county.

Q. To whom did that gelding belong - A. To Mary, Sarah, and Hannah Hinton , the gelding was the joint property of these three ladies.

Q. When did you see it in the field - A. I saw Thomas Main bringing it out of the field.

Q. Did you take him to apprehend him - A. No, he led him out with an halter, I said, Master are you fetching up the horse, he said, no; it is not your master's, I stopped till he came to the gate then I asked him where he was going to take it, he told me he was going to take it to Norvil.

Q. You let him go - A. Yes.

Q. Are you sure the prisoner is the same person - A. Yes, I saw him in about an hour and a half afterwards, when he was taken, he was then in custody against Mrs. Hinton's gate.

JOHN WATTS . I am a servant to Mrs. Hinton.

Q. Does this Gelding belong to these three ladies - A. It was their joint property, when the alarm was given I immediately went into my mistress's stable and got a bridle and saddle, I went into this field and catched a saddle horse and went after this person, I apprehended him at a place called Yewsley in the parish of Hillingdon.

Q. Had he the horse at the time - A. Yes, he was sitting on the horse.

Q. You knew the horse when you took him - A. Yes, perfectly well, I brought him back to my mistress.

Q. Had you known the prisoner before - A. No, I never knew him before.

Q. Then he was not in the employ of Mrs. Hinton - A. No, not at all.

WILLIAM JUDD . Q. You were with Watts, were you - A. Yes, I took the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I was in liquor when I did it.

Judd. I think he was a little in liquor.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 22.

Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18090920-88

715. THOMAS SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing in the dwelling house of Benjamin Pritchett on the 22d of August , a bank-note, value 5 l. his property .

MARY PRITCHETT . I am the wife of Benjamin Pritchett , we live in Southampton buildings, St. Andrews, we keep a public house , the sign of the Grotto . Thomas Smith came and asked me for change of a ten pound note on the 22d of August, he had run up a bill of 5 l. 4 s. he told me if I would give him a 5 l. note he would give me a 10 l. note and the rest of the money. I fetched the 5 l. note, I laid it down on the bar he took out his pocketbook to give me a 10 l. note, he took up my 5 l. note, he did not give me the 10 l. note.

Q. What became of him - A. He went to speak to a gentleman at the door, I saw no more of him.

Q. He said he wanted to speak to a gentleman at the door, did he - A. Yes.

Q. Did you object - A. I had not time to object to his going. I told my husband he was gone.

Q. You are sure he did not give you a 10 l. note - A. I never saw it.

Q. Can you say with certainty that he never took it out of his pocket-book - A. I never saw him take it out.

Q. You did not pursue him or give any alarm - A. Not till I told my husband, that was almost directly.

Q. Was he pursued - A. He was pursued in about three hours or sooner than that.

Q. Your husband was at home at the time - A. Yes.

Q. When he went out did he say he would return - A. No, before that he had ordered a dinner for himself and two friends, my husband went down stairs and cut a loin of lamb into chops.

Q. What time of the day was this - A. Between twelve and one, he said he would be ready for his dinner between twelve and one.

Q. Did you see him again that day - A. No he did not come to dinner, I did not see him till I saw him at Hatton Garden office on the Thursday following, I believe.

Mr. Knapp. Q. How long had this man used your public house - A. A week or a fortnight, I cannot say. We went into the house on the 11th, and this was on the 22d, he did not sleep at our house, he only had some meals.

Q. Had he never been acquainted with your husband - A. Never.

Q. You say he asked you to give him change for a 10 l. note - A. He told me he would settle the bill.

Q. You were to give 5 l. and that would make up the amount of ten pound, at that very moment he took the note he said there was a gentleman, did you see whether there was a gentleman - A. There was a gentleman, I did not see him go to him. I did not expect that I had a moment to wait for the change.

Q. Then after he spoke to the gentleman he went away directly - A. I do not know that he spoke to him, he went away.

BENJAMIN PRITCHETT . Q. What do you know of your own knowledge of this transaction - A. He came to me on the Monday, I asked him for the 3 l. that my wife had lent him to pay his men, and the twelve shillings, he damned me and told me to go down stairs. On Tuesday morning he came again, I asked him for the money he told me he would pay my wife, he told me to go down stairs and cook him a dinner for himself and two friends, he ordered the dinner in half an hour. I went down stairs and as soon as I cut the chops I put them on the fire. I asked my wife whether Smith had paid her, she said no.

Q. You must not tell what your wife said - A. I found him that same day about 3 o'clock. I took him in the open street in Leather Lane. He told me he lodged at Mr. Lock's, a butcher in Fulwood's rents.

Q. Do you know whether that was true - A. - Yes, he had lodged there, but he had no box or trunk there, he had desired me to fetch them. When I caught him in Leather Lane he tried to get away from me. I told him he was my prisoner, I should not loose him till I went before a magistrate, he told me to be quiet and hold my tongue he would settle it. I took him into Mr. Neptune's public-house by force, he pretended to take out his pocket book to give me the 10 l. note; he had only five one pound notes which I supposed he had taken for the change of the five pound note that he had taken off my bar, he was taken to Hatton-garden office.

Mr. Knapp. He produced the pocket-book, and in the pocket-book were five one pound notes - A. Yes, he offered them to me for the debt that he owed me, it is in the possession of the officer. I took them five one pound notes by the consent of the gentlemen present for the satisfaction of the debt.

JOHN OWEN . I lodge at Mr. Pritchett's, I stood at the bar at the time that Mr. Smith asked for a 5 l. note to pay his bill, she went up stairs and brought down a note but I do not know the colour of it. Smith took his pocket book out, and put the note in it and went, he told Mrs. Pritchett there was a gentleman waiting, but I paid no attention.

JAMES HANCOCK . I am an officer. On the day stated in the indictment, I was sent for to take the prisoner in custody, he was then in the parlour at Mr. Neptune's public house. Mr. Pritchett desired me to take him in custody, the prisoner said he would settle it with him, the landlord and he had some words, he put down the five one pound notes, and the landlord took them and went out to get a stamp receipt to give him. I searched him, I could not find any other money about him than the five one pound notes, the landlord then insisted upon me taking him in custody. I took him to the office, and in conveying him to the house that we use called the Royal Oak, he said he would give me and my brother officer a guinea, if we could do it away for him, this is the pocket book that I took away from him, four of the notes were given to me, the other he said he had sent out to get a stamp receipt.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel, and called two witnesses who gave him a good character.

GUILTY, aged 25.

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling house .

Transported for seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18090920-89

716. MARY ANN GOLDSMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 20th of August , a watch, value 3 l. the property of John Christian from his person .

JOHN CHRISTIAN . I am a sailor . I am a Swede.

Q. Did you lose a watch in August last - A. Yes, I was coming out of a public house in Ratcliffe Highway , the prisoner met me in the street, she asked me where I go, I said I go home. She asked me where was my lodgings, I told her at the Three Fox public house Limehouse, she said cannot you stop with me all night. I said I got no money.

Q. Did you go with her - A. Yes, it was about ten o'clock at night.

Q. Had you been drinking - A. No, I was very sober, I went with her to her lodgings. I do not know the street, there was nobody but me and her, she desired me to stop while she went after a light, she went down the street, she came up again in a couple of minutes, she had no light at all. I sat on the bed when she came back again, she pulled the watch out of my pocket, I sung out you have taken the watch from me, she said no, she laid hold of my

arm and told me my watch was outside of the door, so we went together to the door, she shoved me out and locked the door, she was inside and I was outside. I went home, the next morning I got a constable.

ROBERT BROWN . I am a constable. On the 25th of August, I received information of the prosecutor that he was robbed of his watch, he took me to the house and shewed me the girl, she said she knew nothing of the watch. I searched the room and her, I found nothing. I went out into the street, a girl called to me and told me that the woman had got the watch. I took the girl up stairs, I said is this the woman that you say has the man's watch, she said yes, then she confessed that she had the watch, she told me if I would go to Mr. Mordant's I should get it. I went to Mr. Mordant's he keeps houses there, he told me to keep in the parlour, however, I followed him into the room, he took something out of the desk gave it to the prisoner, she said I have got it. I went back to the prosecutor where I had left him, she took down an old chair and turned the key out of the chair, she said here is the key.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. This man and woman came to me, I was sitting at my own door, the woman said can you accommodate me with a bed. I told them I had no objection, I let them into the room, the woman came and said my man has no money he has given me the watch, she gave me the watch. I was to keep it till 9 o'clock the next morning, he did not come till past 2 o'clock, he wanted his watch and not to pay me for the room. I would not give him the watch without he paid me for the trouble, he went for a constable, when I saw the constable I gave him the watch, he discharged me and gave me some liquor, he went away and likewise the constable. I saw no more of them till 6 o'clock at night, then they came and took me away, I have been in custody ever since.

GUILTY , aged 26.

Transported for fourteen years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18090920-90

717. CORNELIUS SULLIVAN was indicted for a rape, and Dennis Fitzgerald for aiding and assisting him the said offence to do and commit .

SULLIVAN, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 26.

FITZGERALD, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 43.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18090920-91

718. ROBERT EVANS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 1st of July , 70 sheets of paper, value 8 s. 6 d. ten bank notes, value 10 l. each, a bank note, value 2 l. and two bank notes, value 1 l. each, the property of the Royal Exchange Assurance from fire , and five other counts for like offence, only varying the manner of charging them.

The indictment was read by Mr. Pooley and the case was stated by Mr. Knapp.

JOHN BURFORD . Q. I believe you are cashier of the Royal Exchange Assurance office of goods and houses from fire - A. I am.

Q. They are called by three names, the one I have mentioned, and the Royal Exchange assurance for goods, and the other the Royal Exchange Assurance of annuities. Do they insure lives under that denomination - A. Yes.

Q. On the 23d of June last were you acquainted with the prisoner - A. Yes, he was a porter belonging to the Assurance. In June last, I had an order for the purpose of giving him 103 l. 8 s. 6 d. the 103 l. was composed in the shortest way I could. I do not know the numbers.

Q. Could you make up the number of the notes without a one pound note or a two - A. There were a one and a two undoubtedly.

Q. Did you, Sir, in pursuance of an order take to Mr. Bowra 103 pounds, 8 shillings and 6 pence - A. I did, I took this money from the place where I had the money in custody for the Royal Exchange assurance company, the money belonged to them, I am answerable for it.

Mr. Alley. The complaint against the man at the bar is for obtaining a sum of money and converting it to his own use, which belonged to the office for assurance for lives - A. Yes, they are incorporated by Charter, the Charter is here.

Q. Are you the officer belonging to that incorporated society which insures for lives - A. Yes.

Q. What situation did this man hold in this office - A. What they call a messenger.

Q. You tell us, and no doubt you tell us very true, that you gave him 103 l. in notes and money - A. My deputy gave it him, 103 l. 8 s. 6 d.

HENRY BOWRA . Q. You are the deputy of the last witness - A. I am.

Q. Did you on the 23d of June last receive any sum of money from Mr. Burford to give to the prisoner. - A. I received 103 l. 8 s. 6 d. in bank notes, the eight shillings and sixpence was in cash. When I received it, I paid it to the prisoner in the Cashier's office. I desired him to count it, he did and there was 103 l. 8 s. 6 d.

JOHN GRAY . I am clerk in the life assurance office. I am answerable to the company for the policies. On the 23d of June I delivered 70 blank policies to the prisoner to take them to the stamp office to be stamped. They are bound until they are used, and then they are torn off. In a week or ten days, I enquired if he had left them at the stationer's to be bound he replied he had left them. After they are stamped they are left at the stationer's to be bound.

Q. I believe you afterwards did not receive them - A. I did not.

Q. Did he after he said he had left them at the Stationer's absent himself - A. He did absent himself one day after I had discovered that he had not left the stamps.

Q. to Mr. Burford. Were you present at any time when any question was put to the prisoner as to what had been done by him with the policies - A. Yes it was on a Wednesday, he then positively said that they were at the stamp office.

WILLIAM LEWIS . I am a porter applying at Fleet Market.

Q. Do you remember being applied to about two months ago by any person, to take any policies a small parcel - A. I took a small parcel to Mr. Dunn

a stationer in Fleet Street. The prisoner resembles the person that gave me the parcel, I believe him to be the man, but I do not know, I took that parcel as he directed, and gave it to a man in the shop; I waited till it was opened, the contents were policies, I believe the prisoner is the man; he said, will you drink, where shall we go; I said, there is a shop at the corner of Fleet market, he went there, changed half a crown, gave me a shilling, he told me to give it to them, and for them to bind it, and send it home, they would know where.

FRANCIS GALPIN . Q. I believe you are a person employed by Messrs. Coles and Dunn, in their business - A. I am, they are stationers to the Royal Exchange assurance.

Q. Do you recollect receiving a parcel of policies - A. I do, from the last witness, I opened the parcel in his presence, I said there were no stamps to them, in a low voice, because I did not want to inform him they were such as these.

Q. After they are delivered to you they are put in books - A. Yes, but these not having the stamps, were not put in books, they were returned to the office.

MR. PORTER. On the 19th of July, I received a warrant to apprehend the prisoner, I could not find him, his wife said, she had not seen him; I went again in the same evening, and watched till a late hour, and on the day after, I went again, I could not find him.

Mr. Alley. Q. The short fact is on the 25th, he surrendered at the Mansion house, and came here for trial - A. Yes.

Mr. HOBLER. Q. I believe you are clerk to the Lord Mayor - A. Yes, I attended at the examination of the prisoner, before the Lord Mayor, on the 27th of July.

Q. Before you read that, which was taken down by you, what the prisoner said, was any promise or threat made use of - A. No. He said that he made use of a part, and was robbed of the other part, that is all that he said to the charge that was made by Mr. Bowra. He said he paid him 103 l. 8 s. 6 d. for stamps at the stamp office.

Mr. Alley. Q. Are you sure he did not say, it is very true, I was robbed of a part, and for the recovery of it I spent the other part, that would make all the difference - A. If he had said so, I should have taken it down.

GUILTY , aged 41.

Transported for seven years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090920-92

719. JOHN BRIANT was indicted for, that he on the 21st of August , in and upon John Smith , a subject of our lord the king, feloniously did make an assault, and with a certain knife, did cut and stab the said John Smith in and upon his throat, with intent to kill and murder him . Second count for like offence, with an intent to disable him. Third count, to do him some grievous bodily harm.

JOHN SMITH . I am a cork cutter , I live at No. 5, Crown and Cushion court, Cow lane, West Smithfield. On Monday evening, the 21st of August, I happened to be at the sign of the Crown, Chick lane , between 20 minutes and half past ten at night. The prisoner came into the house.

Q. What is the prisoner. - A. He is what they call an hawking cutler . When he came in, he stood at the front of the mantle piece, with one hand on the mantlepiece; I asked him civilly how he did, he came and shook hands with me, and sat down on the opposite side of the table, the servant of the house came and asked him what he had ordered, and whether he wanted any thing; he said, bring me a pint of beer, during the time that she went to fetch the beer he put his hand into his pocket, and took out a knife; when she brought the beer, he tendered this knife until he paid the money the next day; she immediately refused the knife, and took the beer back to the bar, her master told her she did very right, he sat two or three minutes, then he went to the bar, and got the pint of beer on credit, he brought the beer, and asked me to drink, I told him I did not wish to drink, but he forced me to drink out of the pint of porter; he forced me to drink the second time. Then three young men came into the house, they came to the box that we were sitting in, and asked him to sit higher up the seat, he moved higher up the seat, came round, and sit at my right hand. One of these young men, I had a slight knowledge of, and I was in conversation with them; these three young men had a pot of beer, they asked me to drink two or three times, for which reason I passed the pot, after I drank to these people that gave it me, then the prisoner at the bar got held of my right hand, and squeezed it very much, as I thought in friendship, I turned my head, and desired him not to squeeze my hand so, that it was not agreeable. The pot passed again after that; after he squeezed my hand, and while I was leaning across the table conversing with these young men, the prisoner took out a knife, and passed it upon my throat, and said, b - r your eyes, I will kill you.

Q. You were leaning across the table - A. Yes.

Q. He put the knife to your throat while you were leaning across the table - A. Yes, I immediately started up, and put my hand to my throat, and ran out of the box for fear of the second attempt, he had cut me, but I ran out of the box for fear he should attempt it the second time. I went to the bar, and said to the landlord, that old villain has cut my throat, and I do not know for what, I was immediately taken to the watch-house, by two men, bleeding very fast; from the watch-house I was conveyed to the hospital by two patrols, as an accident, and there I remained three weeks and two days in the house, and last Thursday week, I was made an outpatient.

Q. Had you given him any offence - A. No more than what you see now.

Q. Can you account for it - A. No other way than my passing the pot to the people that gave it me.

Prisoner. Q. What employment do you follow - A. A cork-cutter.

Q. You remember you laid with me about ten days - A. I did.

Q. I asked you why you laid abed so long - A. You did, I said that did not belong to you.

A. You picked my knives out of my pocket, four out of this, and some out of the other, and if I did cut you

intoxication, I should have been murdered if I had not; if I did do it I did it at the risque of my own life.

CHARLOTTE CHAPMAN . Q. What are you - A. I work at the slop work.

Q. Were you at this public house in Chick-lane - A. I was having a pint of beer with this young man that had his throat cut, I sat by the side of him. This old man sat at the far end of the box, there were three young men came, they sat opposite of me, they called for a pot of beer, and gave it to John Smith , they passed by the old man two or three times, John Smith was leaning over the table discoursing with these three men, I saw this old man draw three or four knives out of his pocket out of some paper, he put one knife into his left hand, and put the rest into his right hand pocket again; he held the knife in his left hand about two minutes, he drawed it, jumped up, and cut the man's throat, he said d - mn you, you rascal, I will be the death of you.

Q. He did cut him - A. Yes, very much indeed, John Smith made his escape, passed me as fast as he could, he clapped his hand to his throat. Oh dear, he said, take care, my throat is cut, it spouted out with blood very much, the old man tried to make his escape, two of the young men laid hold of him, a watchman came in, and took him to the watch-house, I followed him, and never lost sight of him, that is the very same man.

THOMAS WILLIAM MATTHEWS . I am a cutler, I happened to go in the public house at the time, I called for a pint of beer, I walked to the table, I saw the prisoner move one hand, John Smith jumped up, and said my throat is cut; I catched hold of John Smith for fear he should drop, and I looked at the wound; I took him to the watchhouse; and There were two patrols who took him to the hospital. Then I waited at the watchhouse while they brought the prisoner in at the watchhouse; he said, if he had a bayonet he would skewer us all.

- I am the constable of the night, I found the man laying on the floor, he had two stitches put in his throat at the hospital, he bled profusely, this is the knife that it was done with. The prisoner did not attempt to deny the fact.

Prisoner's Defence. I will tell the matter as nigh as I do recollect, first of all, I wish to address your Lordship and the jury and the hearers; I was in a state of intoxication at the time this matter happened; I had 9 knifes in this pocket and 4 in this; I had known that young man only 10 or 12 days before this happened by sleeping in a room with him. On the day this happened I sold 2 knifes to some women in Smithfield; I went down Chick Lane to find a lodging for a man and a woman I did get them a lodging. I went into the public house; I do remember seeing that young fellow; I called for a pint of beer to put the time over for the horse fair. I dropped to sleep and got into a doze; to the best of my recollection this young man sat on the side of me and that young woman on the opposite side of the box, they sung some scamping songs. I wore a surtout coat over my body coat, I missed my knives, I said, young fellow give me the knives, he called me an old b - r, there were some people on the other side of the box, who I believe were his companions, they slipped into the other box; however, I had a knock of my nose, they took all the knives away from that pocket, and some from this; I am an old man, excessive lame, and very weak; I was seven weeks in the hospital, for the rheumatism, I was obliged to drink laudanum and rhubarb, and upon my word, eleven shillings and a halfpenny was the last money I had after I had pledged all my clothes, and if I did wound the man, it was in my own defence. I was an entire stranger in the place; I was an helpless old man among a parcel of people who had robbed me, and whom I considered as dangerous, afterwards I was taken to prison, they were obliged to wash me in the yard, and dress me in these clothes, I have had nothing but the prison allowance, bread and water, for five weeks.

GUILTY , DEATH - aged 61.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090920-93

720. HANNAH LAWS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 24th of August , 2 sheets, value 4 s., 2 shirts, value 7 s. 6 d., 3 frocks, value 5 s., a coat value 6 s., and a petticoat, value 1 s. , the property of Jacob Marks .

HANNAH MARKS . My husband's name is Jacob Marks , we live in Houndsditch , my husband was a pastry-cook , he has been blind two years. I go out to seek a livelihood for my four children with cakes and things. Hannah Laws lived with me six months. On the 24th of August, I went to the west end of the town with my husband, I left Hannah Laws with my children, and to wash the clothes; when I came home, at half past four o'clock, she said she was very ill; I said then finish the washing to-morrow, when you are well, I went out with my husband to the synagogue, and when I came home, I found her laying on the stairs in a fit; I went to her husband on Tower-hill, I told him to come to his wife, and went to a doctor in Whitechapel, he said, he could do her no good. When I came home, she was still in a fit; I got a man to hold her while I went up to make the bed; I found the sheets were gone off the bed, I called down to my husband, and said, do you know any thing of the sheets; he said, no, the man that was with her, said, what have you done with the sheets; she said, that she had laid them on the window bench; she came up stairs; my husband said, look round, and see what is become of the children's things; I then missed all the articles in the indictment.

Q. Why do you accuse her of taking all these things - A. Because I put them into her hands, as I do of every Thursday, a neighbour called a watchman, and I gave charge of her; she said she knew nothing about them; my husband said, if you have made away with them I will take them out.

FRANCIS KINNERSLEY . I am a constable; between ten and eleven o'clock, the watchman brought the prisoner up, in charge, I searched her, I found in this hussiff a number of duplicates, containing the property that this woman had lost, it led me to Mr. Matthews, and Mr. Parker, pawnbroker, and there I found the things.

CHARLES STEBBING . I live with Mr. Matthews, pawnbroker, 135, Minories. I took in a sheet on

the 18th of August, the child's petticoat on the 22nd of the prisoner, the shirt and petticoat was on the 19th. I have no recollection who I took them of.

JOHN WILLIAMS . I live with Mr. Parker, pawnbroker, 115, Houndsditch, a shirt, three frocks, a shift, and a sheet were pledged at our shop by the prisoner.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. They left me at home with nothing else but a bit of bread to eat, I pawned the sheets to buy victuals for the children, I did not know that they got their living by begging in the street, or else I should not have gone to live with them the second time.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Transported for seven years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090920-94

721. THOMAS BAGNELL was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 2nd of August , four books, value 7 s. the property of William Simmons .

WILLIAM SIMMONS . I am a bookseller , my residence is 67, Paternoster-row .

Q. What is the prisoner - A I believe he is a copper-plate printer . On the 2nd of August, or thereabouts, I was at my desk, writing; I saw some person reaching into the shop, and taking some books, he took four books into his right hand, I expected him to put them down again, but he walked off, I came down from my desk, I saw him between a kind of a half run and a walk, I called stop thief, and ran after him; when he got into the Old Change, he threw the books out of his hand into a building, where some carpenters were at work near the corner of the Old Change; he continued to run forward, and I pursued him, a gentleman from some warehouse stopped him, I never lost sight of him until I had hold of him myself; I brought him into my shop, and when I came into my shop, I believe the street keeper was there, I gave him in charge.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's defence. I reside in Paul's chain, I was going home at the time this circumstance happened, there was an alarm of stop thief, I like other people ran; Mr. Simmons came up, when some people stopped me, and supposed I was the thief, no person came forward and said I was the thief, no property was found upon me, now I leave it. I have a wife and five children at home, my wife is very far pregnant; I am very sorry that Mr. Simmons should come here to bring a charge against a man, when no property was found upon me, and nobody saw me.

GUILTY , aged 52.

Transported for seven years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090920-95

722. WILLIAM BIRD and GEORGE WALKER were indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of William Borman , James Bird and others being therein about the hour of four on the afternoon of the 17th of July , and stealing therein a bag, value 1 s., a clarinet, value 12 s., a violin, and case, value 15 s., 2 coats, value 5 l. a waistcoat, value 10 s., a pair of breeches, value 15 s. and a handkerchief, value 1 s., the property of William Borman ; thirty-eight pounds, and a bank note value 1 l - the property of Sarah Borman .

WILLIAM BORMAN I live at No 23 Thrawl street, Spitalfields the house is let out in tenements: I had the one pair front and back room; on the 17th of July about half past 7 in the morning, I went to work in the London docks, I returned about a quarter before 5 in the afternoon.

Q. Is Sarah Borman your sister - A. Yes, she lived in the same apartment with me, I left her at home when I went away.

Q. Does she pay the rent or you - A. The apartment was let to my mother, but she dying my sister took it upon her, I never pay the rent.

Q. Your sister is the tenant - A. Yes, when I left the apartment in the morning all the articles were safe, and coming home from my employ, I met William Bird with my Clarinet under his arm, the other prisoner was with him at the time, Bird lived with his father in the lower part of the house, I went home and missed my things and found the door had been broken open, the staple had been forced out, my sister had been home about half an hour before me, I fetched an officer, shewed him the state of the apartment.

Q. How soon after were they taken - A. In about 20 minutes I was present when they were laid hold of, each of the prisoners had a joint of the Clarinet with them, I directly said that was my instrument, I told the officer to do his duty, they made answer they had found it, first they said in the street, and next behind the door.

Q. Did you know Walker's person as well as Bird - A. Yes he lived opposite, I never found my violin or my cloaths nor my sister her money I am sure the Clarinet and case is mine.

SARAH BORMAN . I live at No. 23, Thrawl-street, my brother lives in the same apartments with me.

Q. Were you at home on the morning of the 17th. of July when he went to work at the docks - A. Yes, I went out that morning a chairing at a Gentleman's house.

Q. What rooms do you rent in the house - A. The first floor, I sleep in one room and he in the other; I left my room door locked, my drawers, and my boxes, they were all broken open when I came back, I was very particular in locking the door no one could go into my brothers room without first going through mine, when I returned between 4 and 5 I found my room door was open the staple of the padlock was drawn.

Q. Had you in the room any money - A. I had thirty-eight pounds in money, and a one pound bank note in a box.

Q. How did you come by this property - A. It was saved up by my father and mother, I did not save it; after my mother's death, it was not in my power to save it. It was in the box, the box was broken open.

Q. Had you ever acquainted persons in the house that you were possessed of money - A. They knew that I had they robbed me before; they well knew that my mother left it.

Q. Did you lose any thing but the money - A. Yes, wearing apparel, but I cannot tell what. I returned home a little while before my brother did.

Q. Do you know whether your brother's cloathes were safe in the room when you went away - A. Yes; it was Monday, they were not put away, when I found the door broken open, I missed all his cloaths directly.

Q. Do you know the two prisoners at the bar, or either of them - A. Bird lived with his father and mother in the house. Walker visited him, they were together at all opportunities; one woman lives above me, I called to her, she said she did not hear my door broken open, I asked her again, then she said she heard my door broken open about four o'clock.

Mr. Alley. The prisoner's habitation was searched, and nothing found - A. Yes, nothing but the clarinet.

Q. What situation of life are you in - A. I work for my living, washing and chairing.

Q. I should have thought it a hard task for a woman in possession of forty pounds to go out a chairing. Why did you not give your brother a part of it - A. My brother knew I would not wrong him.

Q. How long is it since you have been in prison - A. I have not been in prison.

Q. Now be cautious, were you never in custody - A. No. never.

Q. Now that you tell me upon your oath - A. I was taken up by a constable, but I was not guilty of any thing, I have never been in custody since.

Q. How long were you in custody - A. I was five days in Clerkenwell prison.

Court. You say you were taken up by a constable, you had done nothing, were you brought in court, and tried by a jury - A. No. I only went before the justice, I was discharged without being tried by a jury.

JOHN WRIGHT . I am a constable of the Thames police. On Monday, the 17th of July, Wm. Borman applied to me, he related the case, that his room had been broken open, and his box, and drawers; I went to his premises, the staple had been drawed off the door, and the box and drawers had been forced open, his sister stated that she had lost thirty-nine pounds, and the brother stated he lost all the articles in the indictment; shortly after I had been to the premises, I met Bird and Walker in Lemon-Street, Goodman's-fields, Bird had the bell part of the clarinet, and Walker the other, he came blowing it up the street; I immediately seized Bird and Walker, they said they found it in the street Walker threw this part Mr. Daniel's shop, and ran away possession of Borman and two or three gentleman Whitechapel choir; I pursued Walker, passage in Colchester Street, jumped over a and secreted himself; I found him and secured him, he said he would come quietly if I would not hurt him, I asked him why he run, if he was not guilty; Borman said the clarinet was his property. I never found any more of the property, I searched the prisoners and several places, I found nothing.

The clarinet produced and identified.

The prisoners left their defence to their counsel.

Walker called two witnesses who gave him a good character.

BIRD, GUILTY - aged 21.

Of stealing, but not of breaking; and entering the dwelling house .

Transported for seven years.

WALKER, GUILTY - aged 17.

Confined one year in the house of correction , and fined one shilling .

Second Middlesex jury before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090920-96

723. JAMES ROGERS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 15th of July , a mare, value 12 l. 12 s. the property of James Kenzie .

JAMES KENZIE . I am a private in the first regiment of guards , I live in the barracks now. The mare belonged to my brother Daniel Kenzie 's man, I lost the mare from Essex street, Whitechapel , down in Mr. Copley's yard. On Saturday the 15th of July, about half-past nine in the morning, the prisoner came to me at my brother's, No. 6, Smith's buildings, Aldgate, he said to me you are a pretty fellow to keep stables, as you do not attend to them, there has been a gentleman two hours at your stable to look at this mare, I replied I have not been away from the stable five minutes, I am sure it is no such thing.

Q. Did you know him before - A. Only the night before I had the key of my brother's stable, I went back to the stable with him, the mare was safe then, then he told me there was a gentleman in Brick lane wanted to see her. I went with him, and the gentleman did not want to buy, he only wanted her for four days, the prisoner was driving the mare in a chaise at the time, as the gentleman wanted to see her in harness, I told the gentleman my brother would not let the mare, and told Rogers to take her out of harness, and bring her home to the stable; when I went back, I stopped some minutes, the prisoner did not come with the mare.

Q. How came you to leave him in possession of the mare - A. I did not think but that the man was honest enough to bring back the mare to the stable himself. I waited ten minutes in the stable, I went into Whitechapel, I saw the prisoner with the mare, I said Rogers you bring back the mare directly, he replied, I will, I am only going to speak to a gentleman.

Q. Why did not you bring back the mare yourself - A. It was wrong of me I did not, I saw the mare three days after in the possession of William Prest .

Q. What was the worth of the mare - A. Twelve guineas, I saw the prisoner on the 17th, he was in prison then.

Prisoner. Q. Did not you employ me to sell the mare for you - A. I never did.

- HESLENTINE. I am servant to Daniel Kenzie , the brother of James Kenzie ; I know no further than James Kenzie took the mare home on Friday afternoon, I told him not to sell her for less than twelve guineas, I never knew the prisoner.

WILLIAM PREST . I am a carman, I live in Castle-street, Whitechapel. I only keep one cart.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. Yes, he gets his living by selling a horse now and then , I bought the mare of him for eight guineas and a crown, he said he must have a guinea earnest, and a note of hand, to take to Daniel Kenzie that he had sold the

mare to me, I certified that he had sold the mare to me for eight guineas and a crown, he was to come the next morning with Daniel Kenzie to take the rest of the money. I have had the same mare since offered for the same money by Daniel Kenzie , she proved both a lame one, and a kicker, I delivered up the mare to Heslentine, as he was the proprietor of it.

Q. Did Daniel Kenzie ever call upon you for the remainder of the money - A. No, the prisoner called on me on the Sunday, I went to Daniel Kenzie , he then gave me the note back again, he said he had given no authority to Rogers to sell the mare, he told me to stop the prisoner, I did, this is the note.

Q. How long have you known the prisoner - A. Some time, I have seen him in Smithfield, he has been in the habit of dealing in horses ever since I knew him.

Q. to Heslentine. Did you learn that the prisoner had left the note with Daniel Kenzie - A. Yes, I heard he called, and left the note when he was not at home.

Prisoner's Defence. I have no further to say than this, when James Kenzie came to me, he said, Rogers, what do you mean by this, have you sold the mare to do good for me or for yourself, I said I have sold the mare for eight guineas for you, and a crown for myself, he employed me to sell the mare, they took me to the watchhouse, and never gave me leave to speak, they since know that the mare was well sold, she was not worth the money, I think the mare well sold, every person that has any knowledge of me, knows that I have a knowledge in horses, I sold the horse well to do my duty to my employer, and for myself.

ROBERT KEW . I live at No 5, Thomas's Street, Commercial Road. I saw the Prisoner sell that horse to Prest.

Q. Did you witness that note - A. Yes, the prisoner requested that note to satisfy Mr. Kenzie. that he had sold the horse for that money; he asked a guinea deposit, and Mr. Kenzie was to come on Sunday morning to take the rest of the money.

The Prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090920-97

724. THOMAS RICHARDSON was indicted for that he being employed as a sorter of letters at the General Post Office , on the 5th of August feloniously, knowingly, and wilfully did secrete a certain letter brought to the General Post Office, to be sent from thence by the post to Godstone in the county of Surry to John Hatsell , esq . containing ten bank post bills value 10 l. each, his property , and several other counts for like offence only varying the manner of charging them.

The indictment was read by Mr. Roe and the case was stated by Mr. Solicitor general.

THOMAS LAW . Q. Are you clerk at the banking-house of Messrs. Hoare, Fleet street - A. I am.

Q. what are the names of the gentleman that compose that house - A. Henry Hoare , Henry Hugh Hoare , Charles Hoare and Henry Merrick Hoare .

Q. Had your house any occasion on the 5th of August last to send to Mr. Hatsell any money - A. They had, they sent 100 l in bank post bills.

Q. Did you obtain the bank post bills - A. No, I entered the notes from 3874 up to 3884 each of the 5th of August payable to John Hatsell , esq. or his order Mr. Chapman made up the other order.

Q. Did you deliver these bank post bills to him - A. I rather think I left them before him.

WILLIAM CHAPMAN Q . You are a clerk with Messrs Hoare I believe - A. I am, I was in their house on the 5th of August last.

Q. Do you recollect sending any letter or any bill to a person of the name of Mr. Hatsell - A. I did I enclosed 100 l. in bank post bills in a letter addressed to John Hatsell, esq. Godstone, Surry.

Q. How many in number and what value the number were. - A. Ten of the value of 100 l. altogether.

Court. Ten of 10 l. each. - A. I took that letter when they were so enclosed to the receiving house in the Temple, Middle Temple Lane, very near five o'clock.

Q. Do you know to whom those notes were made payable - A. To John Hatsell , Esq.

JOHN ABRAHAM . Q. You keep the receiving house in Middle Temple Lane - A. I do, I did so on the 5th of August last. The letters that were put in that day were forwarded to the general post-office at 5 o'clock, in the usual and regular way.

JOHN HATSELL , ESQ. Q. We understand this letter was addressed to you, did you receive this letter - A. No.

Q. You would have received on the 5th of August at night - A. I should, I did not receive it on that evening, nor on the next morning.

THOMAS HUMPHRIES . Q. Are you the messenger belonging to the post office - A. Yes.

Q. Did you on the 5th of August receive the bag of letters from Mr. Abraham's receiving house, Temple Lane - A. Yes, I received it, and took it to the General Post Office , tied and sealed, I delivered it the same as I received it.

WILLIAM HENRY AUSTIN . Q. I believe you were on duty at the general post office on the fifth of August - A. I was.

Q. Did you on that evening make up the bag for Godstone - A. I did in the same manner as I usually do.

Mr. Gurney. That is to say whatever letters were brought you, you made up - A. Yes.

Q. What letters and what number were brought you you do not know only, that you made up a bag for Godstone - A. Yes.

JOHN COLES . Q. You are postmaster of Godstone - A. Yes.

Q. Did the bag arrive duly and in proper time on the 5th of August - A. Yes, the letters for Mr. Hatsell were forwarded regularly for him.

JOHN AUSTIN . I am the president of the inland office.

Q. The prisoner was employed on the evening of the 5th of August in sorting of letters - A. He was.

Q. Of course all the letters that were issuing that night going to Godstone or elsewhere, he would be one of the persons employed - A. Yes.

Mr. Gurney. He would be one of how many - A. Sixteen.

Q. The letters are brought in by the various messengers, and they are received by porters or messengers - A. Yes.

Q. The bag is examined to see if it is perfect, the seal is broken and the contents, I presume, are poured out on a table - A. Yes.

Q. They then have to go through the operation of facing, stamping and sorting - A. Yes.

Q. How many persons were there employed as facers, stampers, and sorters that night - A. Between sixty and seventy altogether in the office.

Q. We have just now heard that there are a great many divisions, there must be a great many tables, for the clerks to be employed - A. Yes.

Q. They must be divided and subdivided - A. Yes.

Q. How many thousand letters go out of a night - A. Between twenty and thirty thousand on an average, sometimes it exceeds thirty thousand.

Q. How many mistakes might happen - A. We have very few indeed, sometimes not half a dozen; when a letter is mis-sent it is returned to the office, and then it is sent the next day, the bags are all sealed that belong to the different offices.

ANN OWEN . I live at No 13, Sea-coal lane.

Q. Did the prisoner at any time lodge in your house - A. Yes, he took the lodgings and came there to his meals, I suppose about eight months. A person came with him as his wife. We had a reference from him to the post office.

Q. Can you recollect when he went away from the lodgings - A. About two months.

Q. Do you recollect him coming to you on the 5th of August - A. I cannot recollect the day, it was on a Saturday in the early part of August, he then wished to have a lodging for his wife, he came again on the Tuesday, he asked me how I did, he said you will excuse Mrs. Richardson calling upon you, she has not had time.

Q. How soon after was any enquiry made at your house respecting a note - A. I believe it was the next week, I cannot recollect. I have seen the person since that passed for his wife at Bow-street, but not to speak to her.

Mr. Myers. Bring in Mary Canning .

Q. Can you tell me whether that is the person that lodged at your house - A. Yes.

Q. Have you any doubt about it - A. No.

MARGARET AGER . Q. You know the prisoner at the bar - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know the other person also who is sitting - A. She goes by the name of Mary Canning . I saw them both at my house on Sunday the 6th of August, in Kent-street, in the Borough. I have seen her since at Bow-street.

JOHN MOORE. Q. You are a shoemaker, I believe - A. Yes, I lodge at Mrs. Owen's house, Seacoal-lane.

Q. Were you lodging there on the 9th of August last - A. I was.

Q. Some enquiry was made respecting a ten pound bank note, was not there - A. As to the day I cannot perfectly recollect; a lady of the name of Brown and a gentleman came; they were talking to Mr. and Mrs. Owen.

Q. You went to the prisoner that evening - A. Yes, to the Post-office, between six and seven o'clock, it was on a Wednesday in the early part of August, I saw the note in agitation. I went to the prisoner at the Post office, it was near eight o'clock when I found the prisoner, he came to the door, I believe the bag was for the last mail, I told him I wanted to speak to him, he said he would be with me in a few minutes, I told him I had business of rather an unpleasant nature from Mr. and Mrs. Owen, that a lady and gentleman were there, with a ten pound post bill; that the lady and gentleman gave the description of the gentlewoman that passed the note to be Mrs. Richardson that had lodged in the house, the said Mary Canning .

Q. The woman that you mean is that Mary Canning - A. Yes, who passed for Mrs. Richardson. I told Mr. Richardson that they identified her to be Mrs. Richardson, and had indorsed the note in Mrs. Owen's name, and that she was very much displeased. I told him if he came to Mr. Owen, he would inform him the particulars, he said he would go to the Swan public house, Snow-hill. I proposed to go to the Brown Bear, opposite of Mrs. Owen's, as being more private; we went to the Brown Bear into the parlour, he told me to call for a pint of beer, I said shall I call for Mrs. Owen, he said no, he would not stop there, he would go to the Swan. Before we got to the Brown Bear , he said he would give me ten pound to take up the bill, I asked him if he would see the gentleman, he said no; I told him it would get me in a hobble if he would not see the gentleman; we did not stop a minute at the Brown Bear, he proposed to go to the Swan, I was to go to Mr. Owen for him to bring the particulars, and to tell him that he was at the Swan. Mr. Richardson went with me to the Swan, I went to Mr. Owen's, and returned to the Swan.

Q. Did you see Richardson at the Swan - A. I did not.

Q. When they lodged there did you ever know the prisoner to sleep there - A. Never to my knowledge.

Q. What interval of time had elapsed when you left him at this public house, and when you saw him at Bow street - A. I do not know.

Q. How soon after was he advertised after he quitted the public house - A. I cannot say, this happened on the Wednesday afternoon, and some gentlemen of the post office came to Mr. Owen's when the business came to light on Thursday or Friday.

Mr. Gurney. You conveyed to him that there was some enquiry about some note that his wife had uttered - A. Yes.

Q. And then he exclaimed that he would give you ten pound, and take it up - A. Yes, he wanted me to go.

Court. Had you told him it was a ten pound bill - A. Yes.

GEORGE READ . Q. What situation are you in at the Post-office - A. I am a clerk in the Post-office.

Q. Do you know the hand-writing of the prisoner, have you seen him write - A. Yes.

Q. Be so good as to tell me whether that is his hand-writing - A. Yes, it is.

[The letter read.]

Dear Sir, I have been taken ill in the course of the night, I am obliged to stop from my duty; please to have the goodness to provide for the same.

Thomas Richardson .

No post mark on it, directed to the president at the Post-office.

Q. to Mr. Read. Did you know the prisoner at the bar some time before this - A. Yes, I knew him ever since he has been in the office.

Q. Do you know of any thing particular in his mouth - A. Yes he had lost part of a tooth in the front and the part left was quite black.

Q. Did you see him just before he went away - A. I saw him on the night before.

Q. Did you observe any difference then to what you had seen before about his countenance or mouth - A. No none at all; I have known that deficiency for about nine or ten years before.

Q. Was he there on the morning of the 10th of August - A. No, he has not attended his duty afterwards.

Mr. Gurney. You do not mean to say that you looked at his mouth every time you saw him - A. No.

Q. Therefore whether he had it altered for the last two or three days, you cannot say - A. No.

MR. PARKIN. Q. I believe you prove the advertisement of this man in consequence of his not appearing at the office - A. On the 11th of August I drew up an advertisement describing him; this is the advertisement that I drew up; I described him as a person that had lost a tooth in the centre of his upper jaw, part of which remains, and is quite black.

WILLIAM ELLIS . I live at Hessenden in Hertfordshire.

Q. How far from Hatfield - A. Three miles.

Q. Are you a married man - A. Yes.

Q. Has your wife a sister - A. Yes, her name is Mary Canning .

Q. Did she come down to your house last summer to stay there - A. Yes, in hay-time, the prisoner came to see her.

Q. From your house she went to London, in August it was on a Saturday you know - A. Yes, I do not know the day of the month, on the Tuesday following she came back again.

Q. How did she come from Hatfield to your house when she returned - A. Walked, I fetched her trunk.

Q. Then she staid at your house - A. Yes.

Q. How soon did Richardson come down there again - A. On Thursday morning about two o'clock when I was in bed; he went away about ten in the day I went with him, Mary Canning and he went in a cart to Hertford.

Q. Who desired you to get the cart - A. My wife came to me when I was at work I took the two trunks, with me.

Q. Have you ever seen those trunks again - A. I cannot say, I cannot swear to any trunk.

Q. Did Richardson tell you the reason that he went away - A. He told us that his mother was dead, and that he was going a journey of an hundred miles. I left him at Hertford, the prisoner and Mary Canning went away from Hertford in a post chaise, they talked of going to Waltham and through London.

MICHAEL BARNES . Q. You are brother in law to the prisoner - A. Yes, I live at Hessenden in Sussex. On Friday, I believe, the 16th of August the prisoner came to my house to see his sister and me, I asked if he had got any body with him, he said his wife's sister, I went with him to the public house to see her, I have never seen her since till now, they both went home with me, my wife made them some tea, they had two trunks with them, he slept at my house along with my boy, and she at the public house that night.

Q. Did he ask you to get him change for any note the next day - A. He asked me whether I could give him cash for two five pound notes. He wanted to know how I could convey him to Dover; I told him I did not know of any conveyance then, I saw a man in the evening going to Dover with fish, I asked him if he could take a friend of mine, I did not hire the conveyance for him, they went in a boat from my house to Dover to the best of my knowledge.

TIMOTHY THOMAS . Q. You are shopman to Mr. William Philpot , linen draper, Holborn, I believe - A. Yes.

Q. On the 7th of August do you recollect any person purchasing any thing at your shop - A. The woman that is sitting behind the prisoner between ten and eleven o'clock, she bought six silk hankerchiefs she gave a 10 l. bank post bill, No 3877, 5th of August, 1809, this is the note.

Q. Has this been in your possession ever since - A. No, it was not in my possession one minute; I gave it the maid to take up to my mistress, for the purpose of it being changed; I saw it again in the afternoon of the same day, I took notice of the number and date so as to know it again.

JULIA ROWLING . Q. Did you live at Mr. Philpot's on the 7th of August last - A. Yes.

Q. Do you recollect Mr. Thomas giving you a note to take up to your mistress - A. Yes, I took it up, she told me to go and get cash for it, I went to Mr. Starkes, the opposite neighbour, got change for the note and brought it over.

WILLIAM STARKES . Q. Do you recollect on 7th of August giving change for a bank post bill to the last witness - A. I believe I did, there is my hand writing on the note, this is the note.

ELIZ ABETH BROWN . I am the wife of Richard Brown , he is a hosier, 92, Whitechapel.

Q. You have seen the person of Mary Canning who is now in court - A. Yes.

Q. Have you ever seen her before - A. Yes, on the 7th of August.

Q. On the 7th of August did she buy any thing of you - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember in what manner she paid for the articles she bought of you - A. In a bank post bill; I gave her change for the bank post bill, I wrote the name on the note that she gave me. Mrs. Owen, No. 30, Sea coal lane, Fleet market, I asked her to

write it, she said she could not write if I could write it she would give it me; on the 9th of August, I called in Sea-coal lane, according to the direction which she gave me.

JOHN PERKS . I am an officer, I brought the prisoner from Dover to London.

Q. Did you see the packages - A. Yes, I took from the man prisoner, three handkerchiefs, and from the woman one, Richardson had one round his neck, they were all three at times on Richardson's person.

Q. (to Thomas). Look at these handkerchiefs - A. These are of the same pattern of them I sold, there is our private mark on three of them.

Mr. Fitzpatrick. Q. Prisoner, do you wish to withdraw your plea of not guilty, and confess yourself guilty of the larceny. - A. Yes.

Not guilty of stealing the notes, but of having them in his possession .

Transported for seven years .

Mr. Fitzpatrick. The prisoner stands charged with five other indictments, to which he has pleaded not guilty. Is he guilty of them or not.

NOT GUILTY.

London Jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18090920-98

725. HANNAH HILL was indicted for that she on the 31st of July , in and upon Richard Hawkerd , a subject of our lord the king, unlawfully did make an assault with a certain sharp instrument, and feloniously, wilfully, and maliciously did stab and cut the said Richard Hawkerd , with intent in so doing to kill and murder him , and two other counts for like offence, only varying the manner of charging them.

RICHARD HAWKERD . I live at Hoxton; I am a brickmaker ; I work for Mr. Rhodes.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. I have seen her before, she sells eels . On Monday the 31st of July, about six o'clock in the evening, I saw her at the Hare public house, Hoxton ; she came in about half an hour after me, she called for a pint of beer, she had some bread and cheese in her hand, she asked me to have some; I said no, thankey; she was sitting in the same box with me and my wife; she asked my wife if she wanted any eels, she had five pounds and a half to dispose of; my wife said no, we did not want any, we had meat enough to eat at home, while it was good. At last she and my wife began to quarrel about what had passed in old times, we all three got up, and were going out of doors, and as we were going out of the taproom into the entry, Hannah Hill took my wife by the hair and pulled her down on the floor.

Q. Is your wife here - A. No, I did not think she was of any use here. I took my wife away from her and turned my wife towards the front door to go home they laid on the floor, both one by the side of the other.

Q. Were you quite sober - A. Yes and my wife too, I believe the prisoner had drank a little, when the prisoner was eating her bread and cheese, she had the knife with her then, I saw her put it in her pocket.

Q. When you took your wife away, I suppose you pushed the woman away - A. No, I left her on the ground, my wife and she had been changing a blow or two. When I took my wife away, she came up to me, drew the knife, and put it into my back.

Q. Did you see her open the knife - A. No, my back was towards her.

Q. Did it make you ill at all - A. Yes, I have not done a stroke of work since, I kept my bed about three weeks. In a day or two afterwards she called upon me to see how I did, she asked me to drink, I did.

Q. Did you see her give you the wound - A. No, I know she did it, there were no one besides me, and her, and my wife. When she had hold of my wife's hair, I laid hold of her hand and took it away.

Q. You had a great deal of trouble to get it away had not you - A. Yes.

Q. Perhaps you hurt her at the time - A. I do not know, I did not stand for that at the time.

Q. No, your thoughts were to get your wife away - A. Yes.

Q. This was quite a sudden quarrel between your wife and her - A. Yes, I had no ill-will to her. It arose in the heat of the moment at that time. I did not imagine that she had any ill-will to me; I have drank with her several times afterwards.

Prisoner. I had no such thing as a knife in my hands; his wife called me a many bad names, and told me to get shaved.

Mr. Brown. I am a surgeon and apothecary, in Shoreditch. On Tuesday morning Richard Hawkerd came to my shop with a wound on the lower part of the back upon the hip, the wound was better than two inches in length, and about half an inch deep.

Q. Did it appear to be done with some cutting instrument - A. It was such a wound as a knife would occasion. I dressed the wound; he used to come in two or three days to have dressings to dress it himself; I did not consider it a dangerous wound, I did not advise him to keep his bed. He could not work; it would not allow of him stooping; he could not sit down well, he must either stand or lie.

Prisoner's Defence. I went to this good man's house afterwards; I said if I have done any damage I am sorry for it, I will make you any recompence. I sold my barrow for half-a-guinea; I gave it him.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090920-99

726. THOMAS REYNOLDS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 8th of August , two books value 12 s. the property of Peter Wright .

PETER WRIGHT . I live at 45, Broad St. Giles's . On the 2d of August I lost one book, and on the 8th of August I lost another book. The books are both found.

Q. Which of the two books can you speak to with the greatest certainty - A. On the 8th of August the book was taken from my shop door; it was Perry's Pronouncing Dictionary, I saw it there about five minutes before I missed it, I missed it about 11 o'clock, I received information soon after that the book was

stopped I went to Mr. Winfield's shop and saw the Prisoner and the book, I knew the book again directly, I charged the prisoner with having stolen the book, he said nothing.

THOMAS NELSON Q. Are you a servant to Mr. Winfield, pawnbroker, Drury Lane - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see the prisoner - A. Yes, on the 8th of August he offered this book to me between the hours of 12 and 2; having had information that it was stolen I did not ask him any questions, he produced the book, the prisoner is the man, there was a man in company with him, I immediately went on the other side of the counter and kept them in custody, and sent for Mr. Wright.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I cohabited with a woman that gave me the book to pawn; going down the street I met a young man, I asked him to go with me, he was discharged from Bow Street.

GUILTY - aged 32.

Publickly whipped and discharged.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090920-100

727. HENRY STEVENS and THOMAS RAFFERTY were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 2nd of August a great coat, value 2 l. 2 s. , the property of George Rutherford , esq .

Second count for like offence, the property of Edward Eaves .

EDWARD EAVES . I am a livery-stable keeper in Carolina Mews, Bedford Square , Mr. Rutherford's carriage stands there.

Q. What do you know of the loss of this great coat - A. I employed Henry Stevens on Wednesday the 2d of August, Colonel George Rutherford came in with his gig about three o'clock in the afternoon, he brought the coat to the stable, and left it with the gig in the coachhouse. I believe the coat was stolen about three o'clock in the afternoon. It was not missed till Friday morning about seven o'clock.

Q. What was the prisoner Rafferty - A. I never saw him to my knowledge, I did not see the coat till Saturday, and then I saw it in the box belonging to Rafferty in his own lodgings, Rafferty was present, he had the key in his pocket, I had information first from Stevens, I suspected Stevens, I could not find him, he left me on the day I hired him. Stevens hearing that he was suspected came to me to clear up the point threatening to punish me for accusing him. I got him into the stable, and locked him in.

Q. Did you tell him it would be better for him to tell - A. Yes, I detained him.

Q. Did you see ever Rafferty on the premises that day - A. No, the coat found in Rafferty's box was the same coat that belonged to Colonel Rutherford, I watched Rafferty into a stable in Cheney Mews on Saturday morning, I followed him in, locked the door, and put the key in my pocket, I said good morning to him, he said good morning, I had the advantage of him, I told him no, he had the advantage of me, I wanted the coat that he pawned in St. Martin's lane, and fetched it out again that he received of Harry Stevens on the Wednesday afternoon, then he changed countenance, said he had a knowledge of the coat, he received it from Stevens, he told him that he brought it from on board a ship, I asked him if it looked like a sea-faring coat, and how he came to have half of the thirty shillings, the money it was pawned for, I took this coat out of Rafferty's box in his lodgings.

Stevens's Defence. He said upon the honor of a man, if I would say what I had done with the coat, he would forgive me.

Rafferty's Defence. When he told me the coat was lost, he said I will do you no harm, only deliver me up the coat, I did not know that the coat was stolen, I took it out the evening before, to return it to the man, I told him what a distressed state I was in, my wife died, and left me with three young children.

STEVENS, NOT GUILTY .

RAFFERTY, GUILTY - aged 40.

Fined one shilling , confined six months in the house of correction, and there kept to hard labour .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090920-101

728. WILLIAM HEADGE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 22d of August , three shillings , the property of James Clark and John Gyles .

ANN ROSKILL . Q. On the 22d of August did you receive of Mr. Gyles, three marked shillings to send your servant to go to his shop, and lay it out. - A. Yes, I gave it to my servant.

FRANCES FOXON . I am servant to Mrs. Roskill, she gave me three marked shillings. I went with them to Mr. Gyles's shop, and purchased articles that come to three shillings, I gave the money to the prisoner.

JOHN GYLES . I have a partner James Clarke , we keep an oil-shop , the prisoner has been my servant ten or eleven years; previous to the 22d of August, I found that my till had been robbed, and in order to discover the thief, I gave Mrs. Roskill three marked shillings, and left half a crown marked in the till, that was before I had taken my tea, after I had taken my tea I went immediately to my till, I found no other money, I got a constable, the prisoner was searched, the three marked shillings were found upon him, they were marked with the letter Y, this is the punch that stamped them, upon my finding them, the prisoner said he was sorry for it, it was the first time.

Q. to Frances Foxon . Did you see what the prisoner did with the money you gave him - A. No.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090920-102

729. ANN DOBSON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 18th of August , a pair of salts, value 3 s. the property of Thomas Ware .

JANE WARE . I am the wife of Thomas Ware , we keep a broker's shop in Mutton Lane . On the 18th of August about half after 2 o'clock, I saw the prisoner standing. I saw her take a salt. I walked after, I saw Hutt I told him to stop her, he did he searched her and found a pair of salts on her. I only saw her take one the prisoner said she was very sorry she never would do the like again.

JOHN HUTT . The prosecutor told me the prisoner had stole one salt, I took two out of her apron.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not mean to take them away from the shop without paying for them, but seeing nobody I intended to call again and pay for them; I had plenty of money in my pocket to pay for them. I hope you will restore me to my family and you shall never see me again.

GUILTY , aged 59.

Fined 1 s. Confined Six Months in the House of Correction, and there kept to Hard Labour .

Second Middlesex jury. before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090920-103

730. JAMES RAFFERTY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 25th of July , three gowns, value 30 s. a watch, value 1 l. a tea chest, value 7 s. the property of Charles Megeran , in his dwelling house .

SARAH MEGERAN : I live at No. 14, Great Shire-lane ; my husband's name is Charles Megeran , he is in the India House; his house is in the liberty of the Rolls. I lost the first part of the property on the 12th of July, the second was on the next week, and the third on the 25th.

Q. Why do you accuse the prisoner of stealing these things - A. The prisoner came to one of my lodgers, and his wife came into the pawnbroker's; they sent to me, and that is the way they were taken; the watch was never found.

JOHN BLUNDELL . I am a constable of the liberty of the Rolls. On the 28th of July I was sent for to apprehend the prisoner; I searched his person, I found a number of duplicates, one for a gown pledged for six shillings, in the name of James Rafferty; I found that in a drawer in his own apartment; I went to the pawnbroker and saw the gown; this is the duplicate. After that I went to Mr. Bliss, facing St. Clement's church, I found a gown there that was not pledged in the name of Rafferty.

SARAH ROBINSON . I live at No. 5, Shire-lane. On the 25th of July James Rafferty came home very much in liquor indeed, he left a watch and a bundle of clothes in my possession, in a few minutes afterwards he came and demanded the watch again, which I gave him. It was a metal watch; and his wife I gave the clothes to.

HENRY OVERTON . I am a pawnbroker, I live at 202, Fleet-street. On the 13th a gown was pledged, and on the 15th, in the name of J. Rafferty; I think I took them in of that man, but I am not positive.

Mr. Alley. I suppose neither of the gowns are worth forty-shillings - A. No.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. The ticket that was found in my possession was the ticket of my wife's gown, and if the pawnbroker chosed it would produce my wife's gown; I know nothing of that gown.

GUILTY, aged 23.

Of stealing to the value of thirty-nine shillings only .

Fined 1 s. Confined Six Months in the House of Correction, and there kept to Hard Labour .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090920-104

731. PETER SIMMONS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 30th of August , a feather bed, value 4 l. a bolster, value 12 s. a pillow, value 5 s. a pair of sheets, value 12 s. a pillow case, value 1 s. and two blankets, value 10 s. the property of Mary Peters , widow , in a lodging room .

MARY PETERS . I live at 157, Swan-street ; I keep a lodging house .

Q. Did you let lodgings to this man - A. Yes; near a twelvemonth back; he continued in my lodgings near a twelvemonth; I let him a two pair of stairs back room for four shillings a week, he had the use of a feather bed, bolster, pillows, sheets, and blankets; he did not leave the lodgings; he had pawned the things and sold them; I had the room searched, I then found the things gone.

JOSEPH GREGORY . I am a constable; I went in company with Slade to the prisoner's room, he and his wife were laying on a mattrass; I took him in custody; he said the bed was in pawn; I went to the pawnbroker's, the bed was sold to Benjamin.

MR. BENJAMIN. I bought the bed of the prisoner; the duplicate and the bed stood me in about forty-four shillings.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I lodged with Mrs. Peters a twelvemonth. On the 2nd of last February I was discharged from the 1st regiment of guards; from that time I was employed at Drury-lane till the house was burnt down; I was in distress, Mrs. Peters lent me a pillow case to pledge. When I had the duplicate of this bed I went to this Jew, I asked him to lend me seven shillings on the ticket; he said let me look at it, and call again in a quarter of an hour; I went; he then put nine shillings in my hand, and said we will say I bought it, and when you come for it again it is all the same, you must buy it again. He was to have a loan for the money; this was on the Tuesday; I called on the Friday, he was out; I went on the Saturday, after his sabbath was over, to give him the money, before the time was over; then he told me it was sold; I said I shall have you before a magistrate, I being poor I could not do it; I was taken up by my landlady on Sunday morning; she said now we will come to an agreement concerning these things, you must pay part of the rent this week, likewise take out the things I lent you to pledge. I was then put in prison; after that they had me out of prison, they brought me into the marines to pay the seven pounds; I was with them two days; I was taken to the doctor, he found I had a fault in my lungs, as such they could not take me into the band again, so they put me back to prison.

GUILTY , aged 43.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction, and there kept to Hard Labour , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090920-105

732. SAMUEL COLE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 23rd of September , two feather beds, value 2 l. a bolster, value 30 s. a pillow, value 30 s. six blankets, value 4 l. a counterpane, value 2 l. a coverlid, value 5 s. a mattrass, value 5 s. a field bedstead furniture, value 5 l. twenty-two chairs, value 5 l. a glass, value 8 s. a bed side carpet, value 7 s. the property of Frederic Norris .

The prosecutor being called, and not appearing in court, his recognizance was ordered to be estreated .

NOT GUILTY.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18090920-106

733. THOMAS PARSONS was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of George Wiggens , about the hour of twelve, on the

night of the 24th of July , and burglariously stealing therein, a coat, value 10 s. a jacket, value 8 s. and a whip. value 2 s. the property of James Oliver .

JAMES OLIVER . I live in Mr. Wiggen's house, in Bowl-yard, Swallow-street . I secured the house; I was the last in the yard; it was the stable that was broken open; Mr. Wiggen rents the house and the stable.

Q. Can he go out of his house into the stable without going into the yard - A. No; it is under the same roof.

Q. Was the stable secured - A. Yes; I locked it myself about half after twelve.

Q. What time did you see it in the morning - A. A quarter before five; it was light then. I lost a coat a jacket, and a whip.

WILLIAM NETTLETON . I am a constable. This property was brought to me at the watchhouse by James.

- JAMES. Q. How came you by that property which you gave to the last witness - A. It laid about a yard and half from the prisoner when he was taken.

EDWARD JONKINS . On the 25th of July, about five o'clock, I was coming from my house to the king's stables to work; I took the prisoner attempting to force open one of his Majesty's stables: I asked the prisoner what he was doing, he said nothing at all; I took him by the collar and secured him; he tried to get away from me; in our scuffle this crow fell from his clothes; I picked it up.

The property produced and identified.

GUILTY, aged 30.

Of stealing, but not of the burglary .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18090920-107

734. MARTHA NEWMAN was indicted for feloniously assaulting Charles Thompson , on the 16th of September , putting him in fear and feloniously taking from his person and against his will, three one pound notes .

CHARLES THOMPSON . I am a Swede; I am a seaman . On the 16th of September last I was at Mrs. Newman's house, she lives somewhere in Ratcliffe-Highway ; I never knew her before that day; she keeps a lodging house for seamen ; she fetched me from the the ship on last Friday week.

Q. Had you any money of her when you came from the ship - A. Half a guinea.

Q. Had you any money on the Saturday - A. I and Cornelius Omas went to a man's house and left our note, we got five pound each.

Q. Was your five pound in cash or in notes - A. In one pound notes. I had five of them. I went home to Mrs. Newman with them, I asked her to tell me what I owed her, I wanted to go to my lodgings, where I meaned to lodge; she asked me where I got my money, I told her at Mr. Phipps; she got me into a room, locked the door, the fastened it some way; I could not get out; she and her daughter, and us two were in the room.

Q. How long did you stay in the room - A. Five or six hours; the other man was with me, and she and her daughter.

Q. What age is the daughter.

Mr. Alley. She is about fourteen.

Prosecutor. She is taller than I am.

Q. Was it a front room - A. Yes.

Q. What was she doing. - A. She was walloping us.

Q. What for five or six hours - A. No; only while she got the money from us; she beat us both with her hands; she took hold of me with one hand, my money was in my right hand waistcoat pocket; she took it out; she then went to the other man, gave him a black eye and bloody nose, and got his money.

Q. What time of day was this - A. Before twelve o'clock.

Q. How long did you stay in the room after she got your money - A. Three hours; she staid in the room all the time, and her daughter; after she got the money from me she made me sign a bill of sale to her; I signed one before at Mr. Phipps.

Q. Did you sign the bill of sale in consequence of her beating you - A. Yes; she threatened to put me in Newgate, or on board a man-of-war; when I had signed the bill of sale I staid in the house two or three hours; we asked her to let us out, she did; this other man was very ill he went back, I was afraid to go back. I walked up and down the street for two days, till I met with a gentleman; I told the gentleman how I was served.

Q. You do not mean that you walked up and down the street for two days - A. Yes, and nights. I was a stranger in the town; I begged from one shipmate and another.

Q. You did not go to her house again - A. No.

Q. What time of day was it when she let you out - A. Between three and four o'clock; she kept my money, she did not say what for.

Mr. Gurney. You have been in England before - A. Yes, several times.

Q. You speak English very well - you had lodged in that house before - A. No.

Q. She brought you up on the 15th from Greenhithe, you had a little money from her - A. Yes.

Q. You had clothes of her - A. Yes; afterwards on Sunday I had the clothes of her.

COURT. You told me you never went there again after the Saturday - A. I went in the house on the Sunday; she asked me whether I wanted any clothes, then I took a pair of shoes, a pair of stockings, trowsers, a jacket, and a shirt.

Q. Now what day was it the money was taken from you - A. Last Saturday week.

Q. Down to that time you had no clothes, but you had some money of her - A. Yes; half a guinea of her.

Q. She had brought you up from Greenhithe, you had boarded and lodged with her one day - A. Yes; I did not mean to lodge there; I told her I meaned to pay her for a week if I only stopped one day.

Q. And her mode of you paying her was she locked you up in a room and beat you as much as she could did you beat her - A. No; I defended myself and pushed her away from me; then she was the worse; she catched hold of me with one hand and put her other hand in my pocket and took the money out; her daughter kept charge of the door while the mother took the money out.

Q. Then you went away and walked about two days and went into no house - A. No; I could not go into

no house because I had no money.

Q. Did not you go into her house on the Sunday - A. Yes.

Q. How came you before to tell his lordship that you walked about two nights and two days - A. I walked about a long time, and then I came back to her again on the next day, and had some things of her.

Q. How long after was it you met with a gentleman who told you to charge her with a robbery - A. Two or three days.

Q. These are the clothes you had of her that you have got on - A. Yes.

Q. What did she charge you for them - A. She told me the price when she gave them me; she charged two pounds eight shillings for the jacket and trowsers, seven shillings and six-pence for the shoes, three shillings and sixpence the stockings, six shillings the shirt, one shilling and sixpence the handkerchief, and four pence for strings.

Q. How much money did she take from you - A. Three pound.

Q. When she gave you the things you did not pay her any more money, did you - A. No.

CORNELIUS OMAS . Q. Did Mrs. Newman bring you from the ship at Greenhithe - A. A man of the house did; her man brought me up to her house from the ship. I went with Thompson to get some money from the company, and then we went back to Mrs. Newman; as soon as we came into the house she asked me where the note was.

Q. You had left it at the public house, had you promised her your note - A. No; she gave me a black eye and a bloody nose; she took four pound, half a guinea, and six shillings, from out of my pocket.

Q. What did she take it for - A. I cannot tell.

Q. Did you owe her any thing - A. Yes, for the former day. She took me in the room on the ground floor, next the street, and locked the door.

Q. You owed her some money, did not you - A. Yes, for these trowsers.

Q. And you owed he some money upon an absent bond - A. Yes; she had the bond for it, and I owed her for this handkerchief.

Q. How much did you owe her for all - A. I cannot tell you. I staid nine days in her house afterwards, I was so bad I was obliged to have a doctor.

Mr. Alley. With respect to the five pound that she had of you - did not she pay over that five pound to the man that had advanced five pound upon your note - A. Yes.

Q. That was for the purpose of entitling her to the possession of your absent note - A. Yes. She paid the five pound before she was taken to the justice.

Q. Her man did accompany you up to town, and paid your expences up to town - A. Yes. I had these blue trowsers of her, and different sums of money.

Q. And there was an old debt that she claimed of six pounds ten shillings; when you left the country you left in her debt - A. Yes; but not so much as that.

Prisoner's Defence. This man swears that I brought him from the ship, it is no such thing, my husband brought him to the house; he owed me some outward bound money; when I asked him for the money I got part of it, then when he came to the house he got clothes; he went to Mr. Phipps and got clothes and money, and signed a power of attorney or bill of sale; they came home and told one of the men, as I understand; I asked them what they meaned to do, if Cornelius Omas meaned to cheat me, as he had done before; he said he was led into it by some people; he gave me four one pound notes. I asked Thompson if he had done the same; he said yes, if I would go and pay the advance, what they had got, they were willing I should have the note; they were sorry for what they had done; he gave me three one pound notes, and said, do not let us be angry; he drank a deal of liquor, dined among twenty two boarders in the house, and staid till Monday; he got clothes and money of me. On the Monday they said mother, get ready, we are going to take the notes; they went to the house of Phipps and co. to take the money. Thompson came home to my house and dined on the Monday evening, I staid in the city till he returned; he then fell in an officers hands. I knew nothing of this till the Thursday this Omas came home to my house, had wine. and a doctor, and every thing he had need of. I know nothing of the transaction of the robbery.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18090920-108

735. MARTHA NEWMAN was indicted for feloniously assaulting Cornelius Omas , on the 16th of September , putting him in fear, and taking from his person and against his will, half a guinea, four shillings, and four one pound bank notes his property .

The witnesses being the same in this case as the former, the court declined hearing their evidence.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18090920-109

736. MARGARET HERRING was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 24th of July , a sheet, value 13 s. a curtain, value 1 s. three shifts, value 7 s. a shirt, value 3 s. two pair of stays, value 2 s. 6 d. three handkerchiefs, value 2 s. 2 d. a sampler, value 2 s. a night cap, value 3 d. one pair of stockings, value 2 s. three pieces of cloth, value 6 d. four pints of brandy, value 12 s. a quart of cherry brandy, value 5 s. eleven half crowns, twenty four sixpences, a silver three penny piece, four penny pieces, forty halfpence, and two bank notes, value 2 l. the property of Richard Gascoigne ; a piece of foreign coin, value 1 s. a shilling, a sixpence, and a silver three penny piece, the property of George Gascoigne .

RICHARD GASCOIGNE . I keep a public house in King-street, Bloomsbury , the prisoner was my servant . On the 24th of July, in the afternoon, I found she was in liquor; from information of my daughter I watched her, she was in the kitchen; I observed her stooping by a pail in the sink; I observed her stooping by a pail in the sink; I observed something red on her stocking; the pail was covered over with a tin cann; I found, underneath, a bottle with a piece broken out of the side; there was some remains of cherry brandy in it; I asked her what she had been doing; she said nothing at all; she said one of the children had broken the bottle in the morning; I told her to go about her business, she had robbed me long enough; she packed up her things and brought down one bundle, she asked me if I chose to look at them; I told her no, to get out of the house, that was all I wanted.

She came back again and went up stairs: I saw her afterwards go out with two large bundles; she was afterwards brought back by Mr. Bell, with the Bundle.

Q. How soon was she brought back - A. In the course of half an hour.

Q. Did you see any thing that belonged to you - A. Yes, a sheet, a pair of stays, a sampler of the little girl, some part of a bed furniture, and a curtain; as to the sheet I am sure it is my property.

Mr. Knapp. These things we have understood from my learned friend were found at one time; when they were taken it is impossible to know, they might be taken at different times for what you know - A. They might; she had lived with me nine months, and she had not done any thing amiss before as I know of, excepting I detected her in liquor two or three times.

MARY GASCOIGNE . On the 24th of July the prisoner kept your father's house - A. Yes.

Q. After the woman came back did you go up stairs with her to take them bundles - A. Yes; I saw her pack up the things and go out of the house; she was brought back by the officer; in the bundle was a sheet and a pair of stays that I knew.

Mr. Knapp. You have a sister, have not you - A. Yes; she is in the country now.

Q. Do not you know that this sister of yours gave the prisoner these things - A. Not that I know of; the sampler was my own.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. These things that he accuses me of is his property. His daughter took six napkins; she said she would return the value of them; she gave me the sheet and the curtain; I said Betsey, I would rather have my own, she said she could not give me my own. When I was going away I said sir, will you be so kind to examine these things for fear he should say after I was gone I had got things that were not my own; I asked him three times to examine them; he would not.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave her a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18090920-110

737. THOMAS DANIELS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 21st of July , a watch, value 3 l. 3 s. the property of James Tester , in his dwelling house .

JAMES TESTER . I am a pipe maker , Crown-court, Rosemary-lane . On the 21st of July, about three o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner came into my house, I had laid my watch down on the table; I was putting on my breeches; I stood against the window on the side of the door, he did not see me; my street door was open, when he came in I said what do you want friend, he said he had come to thank me for giving him some short pipes; I told him that I never saw him, and I did not know that ever I gave him any pipes; I turned myself and thought he was gone in the road. I went to speak to one of my boys in the burning room I heard this man's voice immediately; I turned and said to him what do you want; he said I will treat you for giving me some short pipes; I told him I was going out, I could not be treated, but I thought he was a thief. I said where are you going; he said he would go to the Two Brewers, I sent him there. Then he went away and I missed my watch, I ran down directly to the public house, he was not there, but from information I went again to the public house, and there he sat; I told him if he would come to my house I would give him some more short pipes, if I had ever given him any. He came to my house, I gave him in charge of an officer; the officer found the watch.

Q. What parish is this house in - A. In the parish of St. Mary, Whitechapel; I rent the house.

FRANCIS FREEMAN . I am an officer. On the 21st of July, about half past three, the prosecutor sent for me, he gave me charge of the prisoner for stealing his watch; the prisoner told me that he met a woman in the street that gave him the watch, and that he had left it with Mr. Lowther; he went with me and pointed out Mr. Lowther's house. Mr. Lowther delivered me the watch.

RICHARD LOWTHER . On the 21st of July, between three and four o'clock, the prisoner came to me with a watch; he told me to take care of it till he called for it; the watch is in possession of the officer.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I was very much intoxicated; I do not know any thing about it.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY, aged 38.

Of stealing to the value of thirty-nine shillings only .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090920-111

738. MARY THOMAS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 16th of August , twenty yards of gingham, value 20 s. the property of John Russell , privately in his shop .

JOHN RUSSEL . I live at 193, Ratcliffe Highway , I am a linen-draper . On the 16th of August the prisoner and her sister came into the shop, she asked to look at some printed cotton for a gown, my young man shewed her two or three pieces, he is not here. I saw she was rather troublesome in serving, I told him to go to his dinner, I would wait upon her myself. She came a little after twelve and staid almost till two; I shewed her near forty pieces. The sister was in the shop all the time, sometimes close by her and sometimes walking about the shop; at last the prisoner fixed upon a piece of printed cotton cotton, six yards were cut off for her; the sister left one shilling and five pence in halfpence upon it; I was to keep the goods till she paid the rest; the goods came to nine shillings and sixpence. When her sister held out the money her hands trembled very much, which gave me suspicion; they both went out together, and when the prisoner had gone about five yards from my door I took hold of her and brought her into the shop, the sister ran away; I asked her what she had of mine, she said nothing; I removed her apron and saw the property; about twenty-five yards of gingham.

Q. Are you quite sure that that gingham was in the shop at the time the prisoner came in - A. Yes; I shewed it to her with the other things. She was searched in my presence at the watchhouse; she had no money.

Q. What was the gingham worth - A. Twenty shillings.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I went into this gentleman's shop with a woman, we bought a gown, she had no more to

Pay off than one shilling and five pence; the gentleman found the gingham on the floor; he never took it from me at all.

GUILTY, aged 19.

Of stealing, but not privately in the shop .

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090920-112

739. ELIZABETH ELLIS , ELIZABETH BUTLER , and ELIZABETH SULLIVAN , were indicted for feloniously stealing from the person of Edward Chidley , a watch, value 4 l. and thirteen shillings in monies, numbered, and a bank note, his property .

EDWARD CHIDLEY . I am a smith , I live at Lime-house. On Sunday the 30th of July, in the morning, I came to town. I stopped at Mr. Dixon's in Holborn to dine; from there I went to the King's Head public house, Haymarket, and from there to Coventry-court; I said there till eleven o'clock in the evening; coming from the Haymarket to go to Limehouse I was insulted by two women.

Q. Were you sober - A. I knew what I was about.

Q. Where did you meet with any body - A. Near Dyot-street ; they dragged me against my will; Elizabeth Butler got me up a turning, and she dragged me by the skirts of my coat; it was against my inclination to go there.

Q. You must not expect to be believed - was she alone - A. Elizabeth Ellis was with her when she laid hold of me; Sullivan was in the same house where they went to; Ellis and Butler were the only persons that laid hold of me.

Q. How far did they take you - A. Not above ten yards.

Q. So then they dragged you, a poor helpless creature, such a young man as you, ten yards up Dyot-street - why do not you, when you tell the story, tell the truth - did not you go with them - A. I went along with Butler up stairs into a little room; this was about twelve o'clock; we went up stairs together, there were two beds in the room, and Butler and Ellis were in the room, Sullivan was in a room close by; I had my watch in my pocket, and my money; I asked Sullivan if I could be safe.

Q. How long did you stay with the women - A. I had not been there ten minutes before I missed my watch and my money; when I missed my money I alarmed the watch; I accused Butler with having my money she said she had not got it, nor the watch. Ellis was gone out; I gave charge of Butler to the patrol, he searched her, he found Ellis at a cook's shop just by. Butler stopped with me; he brought Ellis to me and searched her; we found some money, but not the watch or note; there was a shilling found which I had given me in change at the King's Head; it was a remarkable shilling.

Q. What watch was it - A. A silver watch.

Q. How much money had you about you when you came out of Coventry-court - A. I had a good deal of silver, to the amount of a dozen shillings, and halfpence, and a one pound bank note.

Q. What have you to say against Sullivan - A. No further than she was the person that said I might be safe in the place.

Q. Who was the woman that laid hold of you - A. Elizabeth Butler was the first that drawed me by the coat; Ellis and Butler were the persons that went up into the room with me.

Q. You did not go there by force - when you come into a court of justice speak the truth; you have told a gross falsehood; you are sworn by your oath to tell the whole truth - are either of the publicans here whose house you went to - A. No.

JOHN BREWER . I am a patrol.

Q. What time did you see the prosecutor that morning - A. Past one. When I first saw him he was in an eating house in Dyot-street; he was talking to a man who was eating his supper.

Q. Was he drunk or sober - A. He had been drinking; he seemed collected. He told me he had been robbed; he had lost his watch and two pound in money; he took me to a house in Phoenix-yard, it is a shocking place; I went up stairs with him into a room where there were two beds; he pointed out the bed which he had been sitting upon; I turned down the clothes, I picked up a one pound note, I gave it him; I found Ellis some time after, I took her in custody; I left her in custody with him; I found Butler two hours afterwards in a room at another part of the house. The prosecutor claimed a shilling that I had of Mrs. Leonard, at the cook's shop.

Butler's Defence. Between eleven and twelve o'clock, I met this man by the Maidenhead public house, he asked me to have a glass of liquor, I said if he liked; he treated me. He said it was very late, could I get him a bed; I told him I could not get him a decent bed, he said he did not care what bed it was, he was tired, he said he would give me two shillings to sleep with me, he would give me more money in the morning, I said I could not sleep with him for that. I came down stairs.

Ellis's Defence. I was not near the place since nine o'clock that night.

Sullivan was not put on her defence.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090920-113

740. ELEANOR WILLIAMS , MARY BROWN , and CATHERINE TALLON , were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 6th of September , four handkerchiefs, value 2 s. and a hat, value 2 s. the property of Isaac Tetlow .

ISAAC TETLOW . My wife deals in old clothes. The things stolen had been pinned up in the passage, by the door.

SARAH CONNER . I live in the same house; I missed these things about ten minutes before twelve, I had seen them safe in the passage about ten minutes before, they were pinned in the door way. A girl came in and gave me information, I went out and saw the three women together; I took the hat from Catherine Tallon 's head, the handkerchiefs were found afterwards in William's pocket.

- BAYLESS. I live at 23, Saffron-hill. I came up when Mr. Tetlow was engaged with these three women, I laid hold of Williams, she laid down in the road, I got her up, I saw one of the handkerchiefs hanging out of her pocket hole, I took it out, Mr. Tetlow claimed it. The rest of the handkerchiefs were picked up from off the pavement close to where they stood.

The property produced and identified.

Tallon's Defence. I know nothing at all about it; I had no hat nor any such thing; I saw a mob of people in Peter-street, I followed the mob; the young woman has spoken every thing false. I do not know the other two prisoners.

Williams's Defence. I was going down Peter-street, (I never saw these two women before) I saw a dog with something in its mouth, I looked on the ground, I saw a handkerchief, I chucked it carelessly in my apron, a gentleman ran after me and asked me what it was; I said I did not know, I saw it in a dog's mouth.

Brown's Defence. That young man tapped me on the shoulder, he brought me in. I have been kept here ever since.

WILLIAMS, GUILTY , aged 35.

BROWN, GUILTY , aged 23.

TALLON, GUILTY , aged 22.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction, and there kept to Hard Labour , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090920-114

741. REBECCA MERRIN was indicted for the wilful murder of her own child .

JOHN ROSS . I am an officer of the parish of Bow, Middlesex.

Q. Did you at any time go to the prisoner's lodgings - A. On the 11th of this month we went to a mangling house at Bow ; I found the child secreted in a closet in a room in the possession of Mrs. Hoskins; the prisoner opened the door to me, I went in; it was in the evening; in the closet I found some linen covered with blood, and going near I saw a child's leg uncovered half way; I took the child and the mother to the workhouse.

JOHN WALLIS . I am a surgeon and man-midwife.

Q. Have you known the prisoner any time - A. Four months prior to this business. I understood she was a single woman .

Q. Did you ever attend her before the 11th of September - A. Yes; I attended her about four months ago; she came to me and complained of the dropsy. On the 10th of September, about eleven o'clock in the morning, I taxed her with being pregnant, she said she was not, she never knew a man from a woman.

Q. Could you form a judgment whether the child was born alive - A Alive, I should suppose, from the appearance - from the loss of blood, the navel string not being tied.

Q. Could you form a judgment what was the cause of its death - A. Not at that time.

Q. What is your judgment now - A. The loss of blood from the navel string.

Q. Did you examine the neck - A. There were no marks of violence about the neck.

Q. Of course there would have been if it had been strangled - A. No doubt.

Q. Then your judgment is, it died of neglect from not tying the navil string, not from strangling - A. Being rolled up in linen might still tend to increase the death of the child. The child was rolled up at the time I saw it; whether it was rolled up in linen at the time it was alive that I cannot say, except that blood was found in the linen, which I suppose came from the navil string.

Q. Upon the whole your judgment is that it died on account of the navil string not being tied - A. Yes.

MARY HOSKINS . Q. Did you sleep in the same room in which the prisoner was - A There was only a wainscoat between her bed and mine; she used to come through my room to go to hers. I had lodged with her about three years.

Q. Do you know whether she was with child or not - A. I thought she had some other complaint; I never taxed her with it till the morning after she was delivered.

Q. Did you ever see the child after it was born - A. No; the officer came into my room after I was in bed. The prisoner came into my room with the child in her hands while they were at my door; I said what have you got there Beckey; she said a child; I said take it away, I will have nothing to do with it; she made answer, I will put it in the closet.

Q. Did she want to hide it - A. Why, she wanted to put it into my bed; I do not know what the meaned, I was frightened; I do not know whether it was alive or dead.

MARY HUNTLEY . I am searcher of Bow parish. I viewed the body of the child at the workhouse, and found no marks of violence upon it at all; its head was bruised very much; she told me it was from the fall at the time; she should have had help.

Q. Did it appear to you to be a bruise from that cause - A. Certainly.

ELIZABETH SMITH . I saw the prisoner on Sunday morning after Mr. Wallis had been there, the person that fetched me told me she was in strong labour, she strongly denied it; she then said Mr. Wallis attended her for the dropsy, and that she never knew no man; I then told her if it was so to own it, and if she had not things for the baby I would lend her some; she then said she never knew a man. I left the room.

ANN JOHNSON . I was at the prisoner's house about four months ago; she told me that she was censured by all the neighbours for being with child, but she was not so; she asked me how I felt when I had a child, whether of a morning I was sick, and whether I had milk before I was delivered. She told me Dr. Wallis attended her for the dropsy, and a water doctor in town. She denied to me being with child two or three times, she said it was the dropsy, with wind on her stomach. I was there on Friday before she was delivered, and on Saturday when she was in strong labour. I did not see her again till the Monday after, then she was in the street; I thought then she was a different woman to what she used to be.

RICHARD PAYNE. Q. Do you know whether the prisoner had prepared any linen - A. I have heard so. She is a person that has borne an undeniable character.

GUILTY.

Of concealing the birth of the child, not of the Murder .

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18090920-115

742. ANN BRUCE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 15th of September , two pewter quart pots, value 3 s. the property of James Greaves .

SARAH EVANS . I saw the woman take the pots from the corner of Seymour's Mews on Friday, between four and five in the evening, I went up to the woman,

told her that she had got the pots, she denied it; I informed Mr. Greaves of it, and that she had placed them under her petticoats.

JAMES ROWE . I am Mr. Greaves's servant. The quart pots were laying on the stones in Seymour's mews; I was collecting in the pots; I ran after the prisoner and took her; one pot sell from her, and one I took out of her pocket.

GUILTY , aged 52.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction, there kept to Hard Labour , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090920-116

743. ANN HUMPHRIES was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 8th of August , a watch, value 1 l. the property of Nils Lundgrend .

NILS LUNDGREND . I am a Swede and a sailor . This woman met me and wanted me to go along with her, she took me into Wapping , I went to bed with her, I paid what she asked for; I slept with her, and in the night I found the other woman was gone; I looked for my watch and silver, it was gone. The officer found the duplicate of my watch in her bosom. When I went to bed I put the watch under my pillow under my head.

ROBERT BROWN . I am an officer of Shadwell office. The prosecutor came and informed me he had lost his watch, he shewed me the house where this girl lodged. The watch was pledged for one pound five shillings; the prisoner gave me the ticket, she said the old woman with her pawned it.

HENRY TURNER . I live with Mr. Windsor in the Minories, a pawnbroker; I took the watch in pawn of the prisoner and another woman.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not know it was his watch till the young fellow came back.

GUILTY , aged 34.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090920-117

744. JOHN SQUIRES and RICHARD HANSON were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 28th of August , a sack, value 1 s. and a keg of butter, value 20 s. the property of John Ivory .

JOHN IVORY . I am a broker ; I live at 18, Crutched Friers; I lost the butter out of my warehouse, Mark-lane .

EDWARD SMITH . I am a officer of Lambeth-street office. On the 28th of August, about half past six in the morning, I received information that the two prisoners had gone into Squires' house; I went to Squires' house with Griffiths, and in the lower room were the two prisoners; a bag was in the middle of the room which contained two hams and two kegs of butter, I asked the prisoner Hanson what he had got there, he said it was of no consequence to me, it was a couple of stinking hams. We secured the prisoners and the property, and took them to the office.

GEORGE CLEMENTS . I am clerk and warehouse-man to Mr. Ivory. On the 16th of last month I secured the doors of Mr. Ivory's warehouse, and on the morning of the 28th I found them broken open, we missed two kegs of butter, two sacks, and three hams.

The property produced and identified.

Squires' Defence. I went out on Monday morning about half after six; when I came home these sacks were in the room, I asked my wife who left it, she said a man came in and left it there; he said he would call for it in the morning.

Hanson's Defence. I went into Squires' house, Squires and another man were looking in the bag, Squires said a man had left it there, he hoped he would not call for it; I had not sat down half a minute when the officers came and took me in custody.

Squires called one witness, who gave him a good character.

Hanson called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

SQUIRES, GUILTY , aged 31.

HANSON, GUILTY , aged 32.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090920-118

745. BENJAMIN WOLFE, alias, BROWN , was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 6th of September , nine pair of stockings, value 40 s. the property of Samuel West .

SAMUEL WEST . I am a hosier opposite Whitechapel church . On the 6th of September the prisoner came to my shop, he asked to look at some stockings; he looked out six pair of men's plain, at five shillings and six pence, one pair of ribbed, four shillings and sixpence, one pair of narrow, four shillings, a pair of broad laced clocks, six shillings; all together came to two pounds seven shillings and sixpence; he then said that he had taken a baker's shop in Red Lion-street, and was going to open it a butcher's shop; his name was Brown; he desired me to send them there; my wife called the servant girl to take them, and to see that she had nine pair of stockings put up in the paper, and particular charge not to leave them with any, one without the money. In a short time after she followed and had only time to say follow me, I followed her, she went into Mr. Kemps, the Red Lion, the corner of Red Lion-street; Mr. Kemp, the landlord, met me in the passage, and told me how near I had been of losing my property, that the prisoner had enclosed in a paper a hand bill, and had given it to my servant as a bank note; I asked where the man was, Mr. Kemp told me in his back parlour; I found him there and sent for an officer and gave charge of him.

ELIZABETH MORLAND . I am a servant to Mr. West, I was sent with these stockings, I met with the prisoner about midway from our house to Red Lion-street; the prisoner said, my dear, your mistress has given you a wrong direction; I said yes, she has, I have been seeking for you some time; he said, I will direct you right. At Red Lion-street he took the stockings out of my hand, put his hand on my shoulder, said you stop there, I will bring the money directly. He went in the Red Lion public house and shut the door after him; I stopped out half a minute, I then advanced into Mr. Kemps passage, he was about four or five yards off, he instantly called for pen and ink; he brought me a little note wafered up, he said there my dear, give that to your mistress, there is a two pound note; I said they came to two pound seven shillings and sixpence; he said then, I mean there is a three pound note in there; I said very well, and out I came. I went into the next door, the hair dressers, I said see if I am right, and shewed the paper; he said it

was not worth a farthing, it was nothing but a lottery bill; I told him to come with me, if not I should lose all my master's property. The hair dresser came with me; I went into Mr. Kemp's front door, I met the prisoner coming out with the stockings in a handkerchief, I asked him what he meaned by giving me nothing but a lottery bill for them stockings; he directly snatched the paper out of my hand, tore the cover, and throwed it down in the room, and put the contents in his pocket.

GEORGE BROOK . I am an hair dresser. The young woman came to me and opened a paper, it contained a lottery bill, she asked me to see whether it contained three pound, I told her it was not worth a farthing. I went with her to Mr. Kemps, we went in at the front door, the prisoner was coming out, I asked him where he was going; he said to Mrs. West to pay for the stockings; the servant held the paper in her hand which she had of him, he took the paper from her hand and put the contents in his pocket. Mr. Kemp, the landlord, heard the disturbance, and came to know what was the matter, I told him; then I told the prisoner if he wished to save himself any further trouble, if he chose to pay for the stockings well and good; he said he had not sufficient money for that purpose; he was going to pay for seven pair and return two; I told him that he had better now pay for the seven pair and return the two to the girl; he then said he had not the money; I then asked how he could say he was going to pay Mrs. West and had not sufficient money to pay for them.

Prisoner. This man came into Mr. Kemps, he seized me immediately, he applied to Mr. Kemp to seize me likewise; he asked me if I meaned to pay for the stockings, I said I did.

EDWARD KEMP . I keep the Red Lion public house in Whitechapel. The prisoner came in my house about five o'clock and ordered a pint of ale; Mr. West's maid servant came in and asked if a man was there; he was in the kitchen; he came out immediately to her; he asked for pen and ink, he wrote, or pretended to write, and then sealed the lottery bill in a piece of paper, gave it to the servant, said it was a two pound note, and then afterwards it was a three pound note, and that he would call upon the mistress for change. In a few minutes after I heard the maid servant and the last witness in the tap room talking to the prisoner, I was in the bar; thinking that he was going to swindle the young woman I came out of the bar and sent for an officer; I ordered the front door to be shut by reason of the mob; he tried to make his escape from me at the side door; he could not. I took him into the back parlour soon after Mr. West came, he identified the stockings; Mr. Griffiths the officer came and searched him, he found a dozen duplicates on him which proved to be property that he had taken this way. This is the paper that he put in his pocket.

JOHN GRIFFITHS . I searched the prisoner in the parlour, these witnesses were all with me; in his pocket were three or four shillings, I gave it him, it was all the money he had about him. I found twelve duplicates which led to other property; these stockings were produced to me there in the parlour.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I called at Mrs. West's this day three weeks on purpose to buy some stockings for my wife and myself; I requested Mrs. West to send them to Mrs. Kemp's and I would pay for them; Mrs. West sent the servant, I took the stockings from her into Mr. Kemp's house, I told the servant there was one pair that Mrs. West charged six shillings and sixpence I should not have; I should take a few of them and call and pay for the same and return that one pair; a little time after the servant came in the room with one of the witnesses; he called Mr. Kemp to aid and assist him; they dragged me into the back room and sent for an officer, he searched me and took away duplicates of my own private property. I did not intend to defraud or rob them out of the money, my whole and sole intention was to return to Mrs. West and pay her for the stockings I had purchased of her.

GUILTY , aged 33.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090920-119

746. JOHN PHILLIPS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 31st of August , two yards and a half of printed cotton, value 3 s. the property of Henry Francis .

ANDREW HUDE RICHARDSON . I am shopman to Henry Francis , linen draper , Holborn-hill . On the 31st of August, about four o'clock in the afternoon, a young woman informed me that a man had taken a piece of cotton, I found the piece of cotton missing, I saw the prisoner before the window, I seized him and took him into the shop, I took the piece of cotton that was missing from under his coat; this is it, it is Mr. Francis's property, I know it by his mark.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming down Holborn, two young women came by at the same time, a young woman went in and said I had a piece of print that belonged to their shop; he came out and took me in custody. I know no more about the property than you do.

GUILTY , aged 42.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090920-120

747. ROBERT SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 3d of September , a pint of brandy, value 2 s. the property of the London Dock Company .

SECOND COUNT for like offence, the property of persons to the jurors unknown.

The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.

RICHARD BRAY . I am a watchman to the London dock company. On the 3rd of September last, in the morning, between the hours of six and seven, I went over the casks of brandy, I could not see through the casks of brandy, the heads were so close; I got upon the casks of brandy, and I saw the prisoner's head of one side; he arose from under the boodge of the cask and ran away. I saw the man distinctly and knew him well; the prisoner is the man.

Q. Did you go from that part of the cask where you saw him rise from - A. I did; I saw two bladders, one had a quill in it, it was in the cask; I dispatched a person to give our officer notice of it; one of the officers came, I shewed him where he had been, and gave him the bladders with the brandy in them; one was partly full and the other was filling from the cask.

Q. Was there brandy in the cask - A. There was, and there was brandy in both the bladders.

Q. On the 15th of September, about twelve days afterwards, do you remember seeing the prisoner - A. The watchman on that station cried out for help, I ran with two watchmen to assist him, when I came within a little distance of him, I said that is the man that robbed my station of the brandy, I am positive that the man I saw apprehended on the 15th of September, was the same man that was taking the brandy on the 3d. I gave the bladders to Watkins.

WATKINS. I am constable of the London docks. I received these two bladders from the last witness, they contained brandy, about 3 gallons in the two bladders.

Q. Did you examine the cask - A. Yes, there was brandy in the cask.

JOHN COX . I am an excise officer attending the London docks. I helped to apprehend the prisoner on the 15th of September, Bray was called to my assistance, when I saw him he was at the head of a wine cask, it had been bored with a gimblet, and the wine was running out.

JOHN ARNOTT . The prisoner's shirt was stained with wine, there were two bladders close by him where he stood and a gimblet. All this brandy is the property of the London dock company, it was on their ground and in the care of the revenue.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of the charge, when this gentleman accused me I was lying up my shoe, he said what do you want here, I said I am doing no harm they searched me and found nothing.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Transported for seven Years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090920-121

748. JANE BROWN and MARY SMITH , were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 3d of August , 36 yards of ribbon, value 12 s., the property of George Gibbs , privately in his shop .

GEORGE GIBBS . I am an haberdasher , 141, Whitechapel, in the parish of St. Mary M'Felon . On the 3d of August, both the prisoners came into my shop.

Q. Did you see them do any thing - A. No, I was in the back room at the time, and my wife desired me to come in the shop, as my daughter had missed a piece of ribbon; I went into the shop, I saw the prisoners there; my daughter informed me in their presence, that she had missed some ribbon; she thought the prisoners must have got it. I ordered them to produce it; they both declared they had no ribbon at all, I told them then, that we would search them, we took them into a back room for that purpose, and searched them; the prisoner Brown took off her beaver hat which she had on, and laid it down on a seat, I examined her hat, and in the inside of the hat I found this ribbon.

Q. What is its worth - A. Twelve shillings, the prisoner then said, it must have rolled into the hat, that is all she said.

ELIZABETH GIBBS . Q. You were serving in your father's shop, when the prisoners came in, were not you - A. They came in together, Mary Smith said she wanted to look at some green ribbons, I shewed them some of various descriptions, they picked out two, they were wavering which they would have. The prisoner Brown asked to look at some bonnets, I shewed; her several, they said they would not suit, she then said if she left a crown at any future time whether we would make her one.

Q. Was that all that passed on the ribbon - A. Yes, I left the two pieces of ribbon on the counter and shut the drawer that we keep the ribbons in. They were then proceeding to leave the shop, saying they would call again about the bonnets. The ribbons would not do, I then missed one of the pieces of ribbon and enquired of them after it, they both said they saw me put it in the drawer, I was certain that I had not put it in the drawer, but immediately looked, having not a piece of the same colour in the house. I looked and could not find it. I said I was certain that one of them must have it. Then my mother called my father into the shop, and I served some other customer.

Q. You were not present when they were searched - A. No.

Q. Are you sure that you shall know the ribbon again - A. Yes.

Mr. Gibbs. I have the piece of ribbon, I have had ever since.

Q. to Elizabeth Gibbs . Are you sure that is your father's property - A. Yes, I left it on the counter, I know it by being a whole piece of ribbon, and by not being blocked.

Mr. Gibbs. There was an handkerchief in the hat, it was under hat, it was as though the handkerchief should cover it, part of the handkerchief covered it but I saw the ribbon.

Q. Might it not have rolled in - A. Impossible.

SAMUEL MILLER . Q. You are the officer that was sent for to apprehend the prisoners, did you search them - A. I did I took them to the office and searched them, I found three pennyworth of halfpence upon them no more money.

BROWN, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 16.

SMITH, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 18.

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18090920-122

749. JAMES HANCOCK was indicted for that he on the 8th of August upon Samuel Edmonds feloniously with both his hands did strike and beat him upon the breast, back, and sides, and feloniously casting him to the ground, thereby giving him divers mortal wounds and bruises of which he died, and so the jurors say that he the said James Hancock the said Samuel Edmonds did kill and slay .

The prisoner stood charged upon the coroner's inquisition for killing and slaying Samuel Edmonds .

RICHARD WALKER . I am a brickmaker.

Q. Did you know Edmonds - A. I knew him about eight months.

Q. What is the prisoner - A. He is a brickmaker .

Q. Did you see the prisoner and Edmonds together in August last - A. I did, on Tuesday, at the sign of the Skinner's Arms , they were both in liquor. They were sparring together in the house and in doing that, they touched one another too hard, the deceased said d - mn you, if that is your will let us go out and have it out, instantly they went into the field and shook hands together and fought together about 20 minutes.

Q. Did they fight what you call fair - A. They fought as fair as two men could fight.

Q. How did it end - A. It ended by the last knock down blow, the man did not die on the spot. I suppose he lived an hour and a quarter after.

Q. Edmonds received a knock down blow did he - A. Yes.

Q. Where was he struck - A. I cannot be accountable for that; after he received that blow he was insensible, I never heard him speak after.

Q. How did the prisoner conduct himself after he found the man was deceased - A. He lamented a great deal indeed, he was beat almost as much as the deceased was.

JAMES HUMPHRIES . Q. Did you see this fight - A. Yes, they were both in liquor. When I was at work Samuel Edmonds came and said, my brother is going to fight, I went and endeavoured to persuade the deceased all I could from fighting, he said get out of my way, it is nobody belonging to you let me have a good bellyful, and then I shall be satisfied, he went into the field and fought, I saw about three rounds and the last round.

Q. Did you see the blow that put an end to it - A. I cannot exactly say whether it was by a blow or a slip that he fell down.

Q. to Walker. You say you saw Edmonds fall down at last, was it from a slip or a blow - A. I believe he fell from a slip, the last was a knock down blow.

JOHN FAYTHORN . Q. Are you a Surgeon - A. Yes, On Tuesday evening about ten o'clock, when I arrived at the Skinner's Arms public house, Skinner's fields, I found the deceased on the steps supported by men, I requested him to be brought into an inner room, finding his pulse to be quicker than I wished it should, I drew blood about a pint, he was in liquor and that is the reason I bled him, when I had bled him I found his pulse amended from that motion. I requested him to be taken to Somer's town in an arm chair his head to be kept uppermost, he died I understand that evening. On Thursday, I opened the head a vessel had burst itself on the brain.

Q. Can you form a judgment what had occasioned the breaking of that vessel - A. Violence of any kind, his own exertion, intoxication, vomiting or falls, it might have proceeded from any thing that made the vessel to be in extortion. I consider the cause of his death being occasioned by the pressure of extravasated blood on the brain, and that was occasioned by some violence, what violence I cannot say.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18090920-123

750. SARAH GOULD was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 25th of July , 10 Bank notes, value 50 l. the property of Tobias Solomon in the dwelling house of John Stevens .

TOBIAS SOLOMON . Q. Are you a Jew - A. Yes, I am a salesman .

Q. Did you lose any bank notes in July last - A. I did in John Stevens 's dwelling house, he keeps a Wine Vaults, I went there about half after two in the day.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. Yes, I was not in company with the prisoner, I went there to order some liquor. I did not see her there, I had the notes in my side pocket.

Q. How long before you lost them had you seen them - A. I saw them before I went out of my house, when I came back from the Wine Vaults, I missed them. I went back to the Wine Vaults and said Mr. Stevens I have lost 50 pound coming to your house.

Q. You must not say what he said to you, had you the number of the notes - A. Yes, we found some of the notes on the prisoner.

MOSES SOLOMON . Q. You searched the prisoner - A. Yes, On the 25th of July, I went to the prisoner's lodgings between twelve and one in the morning. I knocked at her door, she said she was in bed, I said I want some notes you picked up, she said she had none, and if any body opened the door she would stick a knife in their guts. About 4 o'clock in the morning she opened the door, I then said if you will give me up the 50 l. notes I will give you 10 l. she said she had none, we searched her and found 3 five pound notes in a coffee-pot, in her pocket we found a seven shilling piece, a one pound note, half a guinea and 1 s. 6 d. we then took her to the prosecutor's house, about 6 o'clock in the morning we pulled her cap off, in the hair of her head we found a five pound note and three one pound notes.

JOHN HALL . I saw this woman pick up something from the side of Solomon, I did not know what it was.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I sell fruit at Mr. Stevens's door, about three o'clock I went into the wine vaults and asked to light my pipe; as I went in Clare market way I saw some paper I put it in my pocket I stepped to the other door in Hollis Street, I did not hear that any one had lost any thing; I went home at eleven o'clock they knocked at my door, I asked who was at my door, they said four beadles, I said I did not want them, if I did I knew where to find them, they stopped in my house till four o'clock I opened my door to go to market, they told me they had lost the notes I knew not whose they were I put them into my coffee pot, there was a 5 l. note of my own in my pocket and other money, they took all and broke the things in the room, they took me to Solomon's house the ladies there stripped me naked, a gentleman standing there said he fell in love with my nightcap, he took my cap off; I found only 4 five pound notes, the rest was my own the man at the wine vaults was at Bow Street, he was bound over to come here; when I picked them up he said they were notes, he did not say whose they were, I was taken at 4'oclock, I had no time to advertise them.

GUILTY, aged 61.

Of stealing but not in the dwelling house .

Fined one shilling , confined 6 months in the house of correction, and there kept to hard labour .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18090920-124

751. MICHAEL MORDECAI , was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 26th of August , from the person of Angelo Majora , 8 bank notes value 16 l. and 2 bank notes value 2 l. his property .

Angelo Majora . I am a seaman , I live at No. 12, Wapping Dock Street. On the 26th of August last, I was in the Minories , I came out of my captain's house. I had the notes in my pocket and my discharge. I had in my right hand jacket pocket 22 l. in Bank notes,

Q. Where did you get all this money - A. From my Captain for my voyage on board the Mary Ann. The notes were taken out of my pocket in the street, about 4 o'clock in the afternoon by the prisoner, there were

two more with him, I felt the prisoner take them and I saw the money in his hand Augustus Fernandez was with me. When the prisoner had taken the money out of my pocket he began to run. I saw him hand the money to one of the others, I laid hold of the prisoner, he slipped his coat off and left it behind him, I ran after him and catched him again, I held him fast.

Q. For what sum were these bank notes - A. One a ten, an eight, a two and two ones.

Q. Did the man take the Captain's discharge as well as the notes - A. He did not that was at the bottom of the pocket, he took the notes. I took him, to the magistrate.

AUGUSTUS FERNANDEZ . I was with Majora on the 26th of August last, directly he came out of the Captain's house he put the notes in his pocket, three men came and this man, the prisoner put his hand in Majora's pocket and took them out, I saw him take them out, I am sure it was the prisoner he ran away immediately, and I ran after him.

Q. Did you see the prisoner do any thing with the notes - A. He had them in his hand he gave them to one of the other men. We took hold of him by the coat and he slipped his coat off. We took him after that, I am sure that is the man that took the notes out of Majora's pocket.

THOMAS GRIFFITHS . I am an officer, on Saturday the 26th of August, about half after four in the afternoon, I saw the prosecutor and the other man come up Lambeth Street, with the prisoner; I took the prisoner, and searched him, he was without a coat in his shirt sleeves, I found upon him four one pound notes.

Q. You did not find upon him the property that Majora said he had lost - A. No, they turned out to be his own property, I then took him before the magistrate and he was committed.

Prisoner's Defence. On the Saturday I was taken I was coming from Rag-fair going down the Minories towards Aldgate where I live, I saw that man crossing the road skipping, he ran down one of the turnings, I happened to run behind him another man came and laid hold of me and tore the jacket off my back, he called to the other that was running before me, they took me up to that gentleman.

The prisoner called six witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Transported for seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18090920-125

752. MARY BRISTOW was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 29th of August , a watch, value 2 l. and a handkerchief, value 2 s. the property of Robert Ingram in his dwelling house .

ROBERT INGRAM . I live in Shakespeare's Walk, St. Paul's, Shadwell . I rent the whole house, on the 29th of August I was not at home, I was on board a ship, I left my watch hanging on a glass in my room, and my handkerchief on the drawers.

ELEANOR BACON . I am daughter in law to Robert Ingram , on the 29th of August, I saw the prisoner coming out of the house with the handkerchief in her hand, I asked her where she had got that handkerchief from, she said there, pointing towards the room, I missed the watch, and challenged her with it, she gave it me out of her pocket, and asked forgiveness, I the constable came.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I am a woman given to fits, I do not remember going into these people's house. I am an unfortunate woman.

GUILTY - aged 28.

Of stealing to the value of 39 s. only ,

Confined one month in Newgate , and fined one shilling .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18090920-126

753. JOHN WOOD was indicted for that he on the 10th of January , was a servant to William Smith , and was employed to receive money for him, and being such servant so employed and entrusted did receive and take into his possession the sum of 16 l. 10 s. and that he afterwards feloniously did embezzle, secrete, and steal the same .

The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.

WILLIAM SMITH . I am a livery stable keeper, and jobber of horses , Kersel-street, May-fair , the prisoner was my clerk , he was accustomed to receive money for me, it was his duty to accompt to me.

Q. Had you for one of your customers a gentleman of the name of Angelo - A. Yes.

Q. In consequence of finding the bills not paid, did you question him about it - A. Yes, as for me he said I was rich enough, I did not want the money, he could not get it in, I was very much dissatisfied not getting my money in, I frequently spoke to him why he did not collect it in, he said he was pressed for time, I said I would give him four or five days, I charged him with Mr. Miles's fifteen pound. On Monday morning when I came to town he was not in the way, he was gone to Gloucester-place to wait upon a customer. I did not see him any more till Townshend the officer took him, then I saw him.

Q. What passed then - A. On the Friday or Saturday he sent me a list of the debts that he had collected in, this is the list, it is his own hand-writing, in this list there is no account of Mr. Angelo, it is a list of sixty-nine pound, I told him that could not go on with him any more. I was sure that he did not give me the money that he had collected in.

Q. In consequence of this you had occasion to look in your books - A. I had; on searching my books, I discovered that he must have received from a thousand to thirteen hundred pounds that he has not accompted for, he has taken money of the gentleman, I have got the receipts in my pocket, I know it by the ostler, he is here, he received the money, and gave it to him.

JOHN WHITE . Q. You are ostler are you - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know of any payment you have given to the prisoner - A. I know of the payment of Mr. Waring sixty odd pounds, Mr. Chulmley 60 l. 4 s., Mr. Joliffe, 12 l 16 s.; Mr. Davey, 4 l. 8 s.; Captain Dudley, 2 l. 6 s.; Mr. Taylor, 1 l. 8 s.; Mr. Hinchley, 1 l. 16 s. 6 d.; the Rev. Mr. Mellish, I cannot say what the draft was, and Sir William Wake , I cannot exactly say, he had the draft of me, the receipt will tell.

Mr. Curwood. These were drafts upon these gentlemen's bankers - A. Yes, they came into my hands, I gave them into the hands of the prisoner.

Q. Did you take them to the banker's - A. No, I gave them to him.

HENRY ANGELO , ESQ. Q. We understand that Mr. Smith had a bill upon you - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember on the 10th of January, paying any sum to the prisoner - A. Yes.

Q. Look at this receipt and bill, and tell me whether that is the bill and receipt that you paid - A. Yes the bill was 16 l. 13 s. the receipt was for 16 l. 10 s. there was a mistake in the bill, what makes me remember it is, the receipt is for less than the bill, my having pointed out the mistake to him, I paid it in notes myself.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel, and called no witnesses to character.

GUILTY - aged 39.

Transported for fourteen years .

Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18090920-127

754. WILLIAM WARREN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 21st of September , a snuff box, value 5 s. the property of Jacob Batteer .

JACOB BATTEER . On Thursday evening last, between eight and nine, I had my snuff box taken out of my pocket, I was walking in the Strand , I felt somebody at my pocket, I felt in my pocket and missed my snuff box.

Q. What was the value of your box - A. Five shillings; I turned round and saw the prisoner making away, I said you rogue you have taken my box; I called stop thief, he was stopped near the New Church, when I first saw him I was near Essex Street in the Strand, he was stopped by a hackney coachman first and then Mr. Harris took him, I never lost sight of him, I went up to him, I charged him with having stolen the box, he said he had not got it, I told him if he did not give me the box, I would take him to Bow Street, he said I should find the box he dare say in the church-yard, he begged that I would not take him to Bow Street, he wanted to get over the railings of the church-yard for the box, I did not like to let him go, several persons got over to see whether the box was there or no, I took him to Bow Street, and while I was in the office the box was brought in by a boy, George Dudfield , who said he found it in the church-yard.

Q. Can you say you felt his hand in your pocket - A. I cannot say I felt his hand in my pocket.

Q. Had you felt your snuff box safe in your pocket some time before - A. Yes a few minutes before.

Q. Was there any body in company with the prisoner - A. I rather think there was, I am not confident.

ISAAC HARRIS , On Thursday evening I was going along the Strand, I was about ten yards past Essex Street, I heard the cry of stop thief, I ran across the road, and catched hold of the prisoner, at the New Church in the Strand, the gentleman came up and said give me my snuff-box, the prisoner said he had not got it, if you will give me liberty to go over the rails of the church-yard I will look for it, they would not let him go over, they took him to Bow Street office, in the mean time we were having our hearing before the magistrate, two boys came in and produced the box.

Prisoner's Defence. I was walking down the Strand and crossing, some people ran past me, and the cry of stop thief was called out, I made out of the road, and stood against the church yard, I heard something fall; the gentleman came up, and collared me, he said, you rascal, you have got my box, I said, I heard something fall in the church on the stones, perhaps it was thrown over.

GUILTY - aged 20.

Transported for fourteen years .

Second Middlesex jury before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18090920-128

755. MARY PRESTON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 22d of July a counterpane, value 1 l., 2 sheets, value 14 s., the property of Thomas Williamson in a lodging-room .

Second count for stealing three pieces of muslin, value 4 s., his property, not stating it to be in a lodging room.

ELIZABETH WILLIAMSON . Q. Are you the wife of Thomas Williamson - A. Yes, we live in Perrin's court, High-street, Hampstead , we let lodgings , my husband let the prisoner the lodging, he was at the public house at the time she was.

Q. Do you know any thing of her taking away any of your property - A. Yes. my bed-quilt and sheets; she came in about half after nine o'clock at night, to sleep.

Q. Were there a bed-quilt and sheets on the bed when she went into the bed-room - A. Yes, I saw them on after she came into the house, she went away the next morning about ten o'clock, I was at home, I missed my bed-quilt and sheets about ten minutes after she went out.

Q. Did she take any body with her - A. Not that I saw, the quilt and things were brought back by the constable, I saw the prisoner after my husband took her, I asked her for my bed quilt and sheets then she said the bundle was gone on in the coach.

Q. Do you know any thing of any pieces of muslin - A. Yes, she took them out of the work-bag.

Q. When had you seen them - A. About three or four days before; I had not missed them; she was searched, they were found in her bosom, I am certain they are mine they are worth about four shillings.

THOMAS WILLIAMSON . I am the husband of the last witness, the prisoner came to the Black Boy and Still, Hampstead, where I am ostler, she wanted a bed, they could not make her a bed, I took her home to my wife, she made her up a bed, she was to pay for the night's lodging.

Q. Did you pursue her afterwards - A. I did, I found her in one of the Hampstead stages coming to town, I overtook the coach, I asked the coachman if he saw that woman he brought up the over night, he said he had her in the coach, I took her back to Hampstead.

Q. Were you there when the muslin was found upon her - A. No, when I took her out of the coach she denied the bundle, I told her I would take her to the Bird-in-hand, where she had been before, then she said if I would not take her she would tell me where the bundle was, she then said it was in the coach going to town.

Q. Did you get the bundle afterwards - A. Yes, it was brought to the Black Boy and Still by William Worrall .

WILLIAM WORRALL . I am a coachman, I brought the bundle back from town to Hampstead, James Lane the coachman that she went with, delivered it to me.

JAMES LANE . I am a coachman, I carried the prisoner to Hampstead, I brought her back the next day.

Q. Had she any bundle with her - A. I did not see any bundle with her, the bundle that I delivered to Worrall, I found in the coach when I got to Tottenham-Court-Road,

it was not owned by any of the other passengers, I asked them, they said it was not theirs, I delivered it to Worrall.

MARY BLACKBURN . I searched the prisoner, I found four door keys in her gown sleeve under her arm, they were tied with a string and put in paper, I found the muslin in her bosom, and some duplicates in the other gown-sleeve.

REBECCA BROOKER . I received the bundle from the coachman at my own house, the Black Boy and Still, at Hampstead, from Worrall, Mr. Adams took it.

JOHN ADAMS . Q. Did you get the bundle from Mrs. Brooker - A. Yes, I took it from the bar, I carried it to Mrs. Williamson.

WM. READ. I went to the house of Mrs. Williamson where the prisoner was, I took her in custody to the watch-house. I asked her how she came to do if, she said the devil possessed her.

The property produced and identified.

GUILTY , aged 22.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18090920-129

756. CATHERINE CONNER and NICHLESS DILL were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 18th of August , 5 sheets, value 18 s., 6 aprons, value 8 s., 4 shifts, value 7 s., a child's coat, value 3 s., 4 frocks, value 10 s., a bed-gown, value 1 s. 6 d., 2 pillow-cases, value 2 s., a gown, value 6 s., 2 petticoats, value 6 s., 2 pinafores, value 1 s., and a table-cloth, value 3 s. , the property of James Parr , and

MARY SULLIVAN for feloniously receiving 3 sheets, value 10 s. 6 d. an apron, value 1 s. 2 shifts, value 3 s. 6 d. a child's coat, value 1 s. 6 d., 4 frocks, value 10 s., a bed-gown, value 1 s. 6 d., 2 pillow cases, value 2 s., a gown, value 6 s. a petticoat, value 3 s., 2 pinafores, value 1 s., and a table-cloth. value 3 s., being part and parcel of the before mentioned goods, she knowing them to have been stolen .

ABIGAIL PEARL . I am the wife of Wm. Pearl , my husband is a publican, we live at the Robin-hood, Church lane, St. Giles's, Catherine Conner was my servant , I sent a basket of linen by Catherine Conner to be mangled on the 12th of August, she staid in my service and remained at work till Friday the 18th.

MRS. FLETCHER. I received a basket of linen containing three dozen pieces, Catherine Conner brought it for her mistress, on Saturday, August 12th; on the evening of the same day she came and desired a shawl for her mistress, she had it, she came to me on the Monday morning and said, by her mistress's desire, I was not to send the linen home until they were sent for; on the Thursday following she came to my house again and desired a dark gown and a table-cloth, I let her have them, and put them up in an apron of Mrs. Pearl's, she desired me to bring the basket in on Friday morning by her mistress's desire. On Friday morning, Conner was with me before nine o'clock for the basket of linen, and paid me for mangling of it. In about an hour after, Mrs. Pearl sent a person to me to say that I must bring home the basket of linen.

Prosecutrix. I never sent Conner for the things.

WILLIAM GIBSON . I am shopman to Mr. Page, Liquorpond Street, I had part of the property from Conner one apron only, I am positive of Conner and confident of Sullivan, I had from Sullivan a shift, a gown, 4 frocks, a bed-gown, two pillow-cases, a petticoat, 2 pinafores, and 2 table-cloths, I am not positive, they are all down, there are 19 articles in the whole. Nichless Dill came and claimed some of the property as hers.

The property produced and identified.

Conner's Defence. I know nothing about the things.

Dill said nothing in her defence.

Sullivan's Defence. I was coming from my day's washing, Conner asked me if I would do an errand for her, she asked me to pawn a sheet, when I went in the pawnbroker said, I stopped such a sheet, I said the sheet does not belong to me, they stopped me and the property too.

CONNER - GUILTY , aged 20.

Transported for seven years .

DILL - NOT GUILTY .

SULLIVAN - GUILTY , aged 31.

Transported for fourteen years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18090920-130

757. ELIZABETH HARVEY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 7th of September , five yards of oil-cloth, value 12 s. the property of John Warlters and William Warlters .

JOHN WARLTERS . I live in Clare-Street, Clare-market , I have a house there, it belongs to my brother William Warlters and me.

Q. Did you lose an oil-cloth at any time - A. I did from outside of the door, it is my brother's property and mine, I did not see it taken; in consequence of information I went after the prisoner, I found her in Houghton-Street, about a hundred and fifty yards from my house with the carpet under arm, I then told her that she and I would take a walk to Bow-street with it. I took her to my own home and sent for a constable.

Q. Did she say how she came by it - A. I told her it was my property, she said another woman gave it her. This is the piece of oil-cloth, I believe it is mine, I cannot positively swear to it having no mark on it, I had seen it about a quarter of an hour before, it is worth fifteen shillings.

MARGERET M'GEE . Q. Did you see the prisoner on the 7th of this month - A. Yes, that is the woman, I saw her take the piece of oil-cloth from Messrs. Warlter's door, there was another woman along with her.

Q. Are you sure it was the prisoner that did it - A. Yes, it was rolled up as it is now, she unrolled some of it and then she rolled it up again, she took it before her until she got into Clare market, I told Mr. Warlters of it, he brought her back with the oil-cloth.

Prisoner's Defence. The woman that gave me the oil-cloth was head and shoulders taller than me, I was not in Clare-street that day, the woman that gave it me I knew some time ago, she said you take this, she was going to New Inn, I was going up Houghton-street, when the gentleman stopped me, instead of looking after the woman, he took me to his shop. I have three small children to provide for, my husband is at sea. I get my living by going out a chairing.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Fined one shilling , confined six months in the house of Correction, and there kept to hard labour .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Baron Wood.

Reference Number: t18090920-131

758. JOHN CLARKE was indicted for feloniously

stealing on the 21st of July , 3 chickens, value 4 s. 6 d. the property of Thomas Butcher .

HANNAH BUTCHER . I am the wife of Thomas Butcher , we live at Church Hill in the parish of Hendon . On the 21st of July, about half past seven in the morning I let the chickens out, I saw them again at half after ten, I never saw them altogether afterwards till I came to Hatton Garden, there I saw the three that I lost, they were dead.

Q. Did you know them again - A. Yes, I swore to them, I knew them by the colour of their feathers, I saw the prisoner on the morning I lost the chickens about 20 or 30 yards from my house he was at the top of the garden with a green bag in his hand, I did not see him take them, I missed them about half an hour after I saw the prisoner.

JOHN BISHOP . I live at Hampstead, I saw the prisoner on the 21st of July about a quarter before ten in the morning, he went over the heath towards Hendon.

Q. Had you known him before - A. Yes.

Q. Had he any thing with him - A. Nothing then, I am sure it was him. About 12 o'clock I saw him coming from Church Hill where Butcher lives, I was at a distance when I saw him first, whether, he had any thing I cannot rightly tell. I saw him lay down behind the furse-bushes on the horse-course, he laid there about five minutes, he got up again and came towards Hampstead. I followed him down Hampstead into Shepherd's field at a distance. I never lost sight of him above a minute.

Q. Did you overtake him - A. I did not; he got over the stile out of one field and into another. I run down to the stile when he got over he got half way down the field, he stopped and looked back, he had no chickens with him at that time; Mrs. Hartley met him she said she saw him put down a bag, we afterwards found the bag.

Q. Did you follow the prisoner after he laid down among the furse bushes and get up again - A. Yes, he did not see me as I know of.

Q. What was your reason for following him - A. I had suspicion of him before, there were three chickens in the bag two dead, and the other lived near two hours after.

Q. Was the prisoner there when the bag was taken up - A. No, he was gone down the field he was taken in custody that night and taken to Hampstead watchhouse, he was afterwards taken to Hatton Garden office.

Q. What became of the chickens - A. Mr. Adams kept the chickens, they were produced at Hatton Garden.

Mr. ADAMS. I am the beadle of Hampstead, on the 21st of July, I was going over Hampstead Heath by Jack Straw 's castle, I saw Bishop, it was about 12 o'clock. I waited with Bishop, he pointing to where the man lay behind the horse course. I kept the prisoner in sight, he came from the horse-course towards Hampstead. I followed him into Hampstead near the trees, I lost sight of him twice and saw him again in Shepherd's field.

Q. Are you sure that the man you saw in Shepherd's field is the man that you saw squatting down in the horse course behind the furze bushes - A. Yes, because I had him in custody before, I knew his person well.

Q. Could you see whether he had any thing about him or not - A. No, I afterwards found this green bag by the information of Mrs. Hartley in a corner of the field where he had passed, it contained three chickens I also found in the green bag this little bag with some wheat in it.

Q. That bag does not belong to Butcher - A. No, I kept these chickens till they were produced at Hatton Garden. Mrs. Butcher saw them, I saw the prisoner at 12 o'clock, we took him about four, we lost him in Hampstead town after he had been in Shepherd's field, I found the bag about half after twelve.

ELIZABETH HARTLEY . I live in Church Lane, Hampstead.

Q. Did you see the prisoner on the 21st of July - A. Yes, I had been home with some linen, I saw him just as he came off Shepherd's field stile, he went over another and went into a corner with a bag in his hand at half after 12 o'clock. I know he is the same man, he is dressed now as he was then, he had this greasy bag of corn, I did not know what was in it then.

Q. Did you see him with the green bag - A. No, I saw him go up into a corner in the field, I saw the green bag afterwards, it was found in the corner where I saw him go.

Prisoner's Defence. It is all false what they say, I am innocent of the charge that is laid against me.

The property produced and identified.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18090920-132

759. BENJAMIN RUHSALL was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 4th of August , 3 shirts, value 5 s. a pair of stockings, value 1 s. a waistcoat, value 1 s. and a handkerchief, value 1 s. the property of Stephen Maple .

STEPHEN MAPLE . I am a servant to Mr. Potter, Dean-street, Soho, he keeps the sign of the Rose and Crown. On the 4th of August between two and three o'clock, I took the coach the prisoner drove, to go to the Bull in Kent-street , when I got out of the coach I forgot to take out the parcel, the number of the coach was 194.

DAVID SMITH . I went along with Miller to the prisoner's lodgings in Great Ormond yard, Great Ormond-street, the prisoner was with us. When we entered the apartment, I found he lived with his brother and sister, he drove the coach for his brother, the sister brought these things forward, I have had them ever since.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Heath.

Reference Number: t18090920-133

760. THOMAS CROTHALL was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 28th of June , a child's chaise, value 1 l. the property of Aaron Watkiss

AARON WATKISS . I live at the Adam and Eve, Hoxton , I saw my chaise in the alm's house yard on the night of the 27th safe where I put it; about 11 o'clock on the 28th, I saw the chaise and the prisoner at the watchhouse.

JOHN SIMS . On the morning of the 28th of June, between three and four o'clock, I saw the prisoner with something on his back, he went down a turning

where there was no thoroughfare, when I got up to him he was standing by the side of the chaise, I asked what he had got, he said, what is that to you, I asked him where he was going to take it, he said somewhere in Spitalfields. I told him I should take him to the watchhouse, he then said he found it in Charles Square. I took him to the watchhouse, I found the owner that day.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. At Worship-street, he valued the chaise at two shillings.

GUILTY , aged 48.

Fined one shilling , confined six months in the house of correction, and there kept to hard labour .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18090920-134

761. WILLIAM BLAND was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 15th of July , a handkerchief, value 2 s. and 31 books, value 7 s. the property of Luke Lane .

LUKE LANE . I live at Kingston in Hampshire, I am a shopkeeper .

Q. When did you lose your handkerchief and books - A. About half past nine o'clock in the evening, I delivered them in charge to Thomas Ling a porter at the Star in Aldersgate-state. I gave an order for him to dispose of them.

ANN DENT . I live in Aldersgate-street, I keep a public house the sign of the Star . On the 15th of of July, at half past nine o'clock, William Bland came into my house with a basket of cakes, stopped a few minutes went out and came in again, and took out a bundle that did not belong to him. It was a bundle of books tied up in a red and yellow handkerchief, I saw him take the bundle, I knew it did not belong to him, I told the man in the tap-room.

Prisoner. This was done about seventy years ago.

MRS. DENT. I told them to whom it belonged, they pursued him but could not find him, they found him on the Monday following.

Q. Now the person to whom they belonged who was that - A. Luke Lane.

Q. Are you sure that you saw the prisoner take out that bundle that belonged to Luke Lane - A. I am positive.

Prisoner. I have been in confinement about seventy years, I am now an hundred and six years of age.

JOHN PHIPPS . I live in Beech-street. The prisoner brought the books to my house on Monday morning the 17th of July.

Q. Had he any thing strange in the manner of his conduct - A. No.

- BRAY. I am a constable, I took the prisoner in custody by enquiry, I found the books at the last witness's house.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. They did not find any property on me, they found them at a cheesemonger's shop.

Q. What are you - A. I am a pastry-cook, I go a stag-hunting.

Q. How old are you - A. One hundred and six years of age.

Q. to Mrs. Dent. He used to come to your house did he - A. I have seen him several times, he appeared like a man that went about the street with a basket of cakes.

GUILTY - aged 35.

Transported for seven years .

London Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090920-135

762. JOHN EVANS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 24th of July , 18 yards of ribbon, value 7 s. , the property of Benjamin Preece .

The prosecutor and witnesses being called and not appearing in court, their recognizances were ordered to be estreated .

NOT GUILTY.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090920-136

763. ELIZABETH BIGGS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 7th of September , 2 pair of shoes, value 10 s., and two lasts, value 6 d. , the property of Jonas Marks .

JONAS MARKS . I am a shoemaker , No. 5, Willow Street, Paul Street, Finsbury Square. On Thursday, the 7th of September I sent my little boy, Wm. Marks to Mr. Miller in the City Road, with two pair of shoes.

Q. Where is Wm. Marks - A. He is not here.

THOMAS MORRIS . I live with Mr. Alders, pawn-broker, Chiswell Street, the prisoner brought a pair of shoes to pawn, I think it was the 7th of this month.

WILLIAM WIZARD . I live in Providence Row, Finsbury Square, on the 7th of September, about 11 o'clock, the prisoner came to our house, and offered these shoes to pledge.

The property produced and identified.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence, called one witness who gave her a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090920-137

764. PETER NEWBERRY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 3d of August , 2 saddles, value 1 l., 2 pair of stirrups, value 10 s., and a bridle, value 5 s. , the property of Jacob Sims .

The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.

WILLIAM BIRD . I am groom to Jacob Sims , Sun tavern fields, St. George's in the East ; his stable is behind his house, there is a harness-room in the stable; about half past 8 at night, I left the bridle and saddles safe in the room, I left the key on the bin in the stable.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. Yes, he was employed by Mr. Sims in levelling the ground.

PETER FARLEY . I am the headborough of Mile End Old Town. On the morning of August the third, I met the prisoner between 2 and 3 o'clock, by Whitechapel turnpike, he asked me in a faultering kind of a way, which was the way to Limehouse; he had two saddles, a bridle, two pair of stirrups, and one pair of stirrup-irons with him, he said his name was John Hall , he lived near the Five Bells, Limehouse, I asked him his trade, he said then he was a farmer at Poplar, I took him in custody, locked him up, and took possession of the property; about ten or eleven o'clock in the day I went to the watch-house again, I asked him then what his name was, he said Peter Newberry , and that his father had given him these things.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's defence. I have nothing to say for myself, I leave myself to you, my Lord, Judge, and the Jury.

GUILTY , aged 33

Fined one shilling , confined 6 months in the house of correction, and there kept to hard labour .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090920-138

765. MARY CROCKETT was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 8th of September , a pillow, value 3 s., and a pillow case, value 1 s., the property of John Cooper in a lodging room .

ELIZABETH COOPER . My husband's name is John Cooper , I live at No. 6, New Compton Street , we let lodgings .

Q. Did the prisoner lodge with you in March last - A. She had a one pair back room furnished, she was with me only three weeks, she took it by the week, paid two, and left me. On Monday in the afternoon, she told me she was going out, she never returned. I opened the door the next day, I found a pillow and a pillow case missing, she had taken the key of the door, I never saw her till I met her in Holborn on the 8th of this month.

JOHN SIMMONDS . I am a pawnbroker in Monmouth Street, I produce a pillow, I lent a shilling on it, on the 30th of March; I have no recollection of the prisoner.

WILLIAM READ . I am an officer, the prisoner told me it was pawned in the name of Wilson, she said she was very sorry that she pawned the pillow and the pillow case.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I do not know what to say.

GUILTY , aged 38.

fined one shilling and discharged.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090920-139

766. ALEXANDER PEACOCK was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 10th of July , 2 l. 10 s. , the property of Edward Ledsham .

EDWARD LEDSHAM . I am a baker , No 2, Wilmott Street, St. Luke's , the prisoner was a journeyman to me. On the 10th of July, I gave him 10 l. 1 s. 6 d. to carry to a pawnbroker. After all the change was counted on the counter, I asked the prisoner to count it, he did, after he had counted it, I shewed him a paper that I had entered it on, the prisoner said it was all right, I put the money and the paper in a handkerchief, he went out with it to carry it to the pawnbroker, after he returned I asked him if it was all right, he said yes, only four shillings that were bad. In half an hour after that, Mr. Walker's young man came to know what change I had sent, I told him ten pounds one shilling and sixpence, he said Mr. Walker had not received so much, when the prisoner came in, I told him Mr. Walker's young man had been, and he said the change was not all right, I told him he must go to Mr. Walker's, he said he would go in the morning. In the morning he told me had been, in a few minutes Mr. Walker's young man came in, and asked about the prisoner, I found he had not been, I told him then he must go with me to Mr. Walker; he did, and there I found he had only given 7 l. 11 s. 6 d.

MR. WALKER. On the 10th of July the prisoner came to me, it was the first time I saw him, he said he came from Mr. Ledsham, he had brought 7 l. 11 s. 6 d. I said here is only 7 l. 4 s. good, take these, and tell your master I only keep 7 l. 4 s.

Mr. Alley. Q. to Ledsham. This boy had lived with you how long - A. About three weeks.

Q. Notwithstanding that there were some wages due to him - A. There were.

Q. You had given him this money to carry to this gentleman, who is a witness - A. Yes.

Q. Do you recollect speaking to his brother upon the subject, and that the boy said if the money was not right, he must have lost it, his brother would pay it - A. I remember the prisoner would not own to his taking the money.

Q. And the brother has promised to pay you the money - A. Yes.

Q. At that time what balance had you in your hands - A. I owed him for a week and three days, that was a guinea.

Q. When he left your service he went to a Mrs. Francis Baker - A. Yes, I knew where he was living.

Q. After he had been some time in her service he foolishly called upon you for his wages - A. Yes, about three weeks after he left my service, I then gave him in charge for embezzling this money.

Prisoner's Defence. The money that my master gave me, I carried it safe to him.

The prisoner called one witness who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 16.

fined one shilling and discharged.

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090920-140

767. MARGARET PEW was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 18th of July , 6 yards of cloth, value 13 s. , the property of Barbary Solomon .

BARBARY SOLOMON . I live in Charlton Street, Mary-le-bone , I lost this cloth about 3 months, the prisoner and I lodged in a room, I put it in a box, I went to look for it, I missed it, I asked the prisoner what had become of the cloth, she told me that she took it in a mistake, I told her I should be glad if she would bring it back again, I waited three weeks, she never came to me, she went to an acquaintance of her own in the neighbourhood, I got information, I went and asked her for the cloth, she said she would bring it the next day; I told her I would not trust her any more, I would go with her, and when we got half way, she said she would go to the justice, I went with her, I never had the cloth again.

Prisoner's Defence. Mrs. Solomon told me that she had dreamed that I lost it, no said I, I have got it, she threw mud about me in the street, I never meaned to make away with it, she would not go with me without ever so many people with her, she said she thought her daughter had taken it, I was to make her aprons for sixpence a piece.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090920-141

768. WILLIAM SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 31st of August , a coat, value 1 l. , the property of George Hazel .

GEORGE HAZEL . I am a carrier , James Woodey drives the Compton waggon for me. I am answerable for the property in the waggon. On the 31st of August the prisoner overtook the waggon between Kensington and Hammersmith, he asked me whether mine was the Reading waggon, or not, I told him I was going fifteen miles lower than that, if he had any thing to send up, I could send it up for

him, he said he had two pointer dogs to go ten miles below Reading; they were at Slough, the dogs were to go to Streakly, I left him with my man.

Q. Are you quite sure, that he is the man - A. Yes.

Q. Whose great coat was it - A. My own, I have since seen it; he took stockings, and there were as many things stolen as came to eighteen shillings and ninepence besides the coat.

JAMES WOODEY . I am the waggoner, my master left me in Hammersmith, the prisoner got into the waggon, just at the other end of Hammersmith, he asked me whether I would get up and ride, and then he would take a turn, he rode till he got to Brentford, and then he got out, he walked by the side of me as far as Hounslow ; he said he had got a sister, he would go and see her for about half an hour, and then he would come back to me, he never came back at all, in about ten minutes I discovered I had lost the property, I found a bale of silk stockings cut open, there was no one in the waggon besides the prisoner from the time I loaded it till I took the horses out. The prisoner is the same man, he was taken up about a week afterwards.

JOHN TUCKWOOD . I am a pawnbroker, York Street, Westminster; on the 2nd of September, I took the coat in pledge of the prisoner.

ABRAHAM LAMBETH . Q. Where did you find the prisoner - A. The conductor of the horse patrole gave me charge of him, I searched him and found six duplicates, one of these led to the coat, he was taken up for being in another waggon, and conducting himself improperly.

Prisoner's Defence. I came by the coat honourable, I bought the coat at the half way house between Hyde Park and Kensington, of a man in the house.

GUILTY , aged 31.

Transported for seven years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090920-142

769. ELIZABETH SULLIVAN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 8th of September , a copper bowl, value 4 s. , the property of Henry Hutchins .

HENRY HUTCHINS . I am a baker , No. 58, High Holborn , one of my men was cleaning the windows on the 8th of this month, from information I pursued the prisoner and took the bowl from her.

JOHN BAILEY . I saw the woman take the bowl, put it into her basket, and go down Holborn with it, I informed Mr. Hutchins.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming by this gentleman's house, I picked it up; it was in the open street, I thought it might be thrown out, I put it in my basket.

GUILTY , aged 55.

Confined one month in Newgate , and fined one shilling .

First Middlesex jury before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090920-143

770. ELIZABETH WOOD was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 14th of July , a gown, value 5 s. , the property of Thomas Lane .

THOMAS HEDGES was called and not appearing in court, his recognizance was ordered to be estreated.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090920-144

771. JOHN SALMON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 30th of July , 21 bank notes value 1 l. each, 3 bank notes, value 10 l. each, and a bank note value 5 l. , the property of John Capel .

JOHN CAPEL . I am a stock-broker , on the 28th of July I went in a coach from the Angel inn at the back of St. Clement's to to go down to Cheltenham which coach went as far as Oxford, when I came to Oxford about four o'clock in the morning, I missed the notes, I searched the coach, the prisoner assisted me in searching the coach, we could not find any thing of them, when I got to Cheltenham I wrote up to town stating my loss, and desired them to be advertised with a reward of ten pounds.

Q. Do you know the numbers of them - A. Yes, I do, and I ordered them to be stopped at the Bank, four of them. About the 8th of August, I received notice from the bank of a five pound note coming in that was one of the notes.

Q. Were there any other passengers in the coach - A. Three others.

Q. Of course there was a guard - A. Yes, the prisoner was coachman, I never missed the notes till I got to Oxford, I went through four counties.

Q. You do not know which county you lost it in - A. No, I cannot tell you.

Q. The prisoner drove the coach you sat inside - A. I do not believe that he robbed me of it.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090920-145

772. JOSEPH BEACH and GEORGE TRIBE were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 26th of June 60 lb. weight of lead, value 13 s. and a copper, value 30 s. the property of John Winter , affixed to a building of his .

The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.

WILLIAM TOWERS I am a gardener to Mr. John Winter in the parish of Acton .

Q. Did you on the night of the 25th of June, fasten the outhouse - A. I did, I observed the two coppers safe that were in the outhouse, between 8 and 9 o'clock; at that time I fastened up the house and I observed the leaden cistern in the yard, I missed the copper and the lead on Monday morning. The lead and the copper was brought back on Monday morning, I saw it fitted to the place, it fitted exactly.

WILLIAM HIGGENS . I am a watchman my beat is in Oxford Road, the corner of Portland-street. On the 27th of July, about 3 o'clock in the morning I was standing in my box, I saw the prisoners loaded, I stopped them and took them to Marylebone watch-house, I found upon them lead and copper, the copper was in a basket and the lead in a bag, I asked them how they came by it, they said it was nothing to me.

The property produced and identified.

The prisoners said nothing in their defence.

Beach called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Tribe called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

BEACH - GUILTY , aged 22.

TRIBE - GUILTY , aged 21.

Transported for seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090920-146

773. WILLIAM HEADGE was indicted for that he on the 22d of August was servant to James Clark

and John Gyles , and was employed to receive money for them, and being such servant did receive the sum of three shillings on account of his said masters, and did secrete, embezzle and steal the same .

ANN ROSKILL . Q. On the 22d of August last did you receive any money from Mr. Gyles - A. Yes, three shillings they were marked, I gave them to my servant to go to the prosecutor's shop, I sent her about half after five in the afternoon.

FRANCES MOXON . I am servant to Mrs. Roskill. On the 22d of August in the afternoon, I received three shillings from my mistress, I went to the prosecutor's shop; an oil shop, I went about half past five, I laid out the three shillings that my mistress gave me, the prisoner served me, I gave the prisoner the same three shillings that my mistress gave me.

JOHN GYLES . Q. Are you in partner ship with James Clark - A. I am. The prisoner was warehouseman and shopman , he was intrusted to receive money in the shop. On the 22d of August, I deposited in my till a half-a-crown and a shilling marked with the letter Y, I stamped it, I took also three shillings to Mrs. Roskill marked with the letter Y and gave it to her. About 20 minutes before five before. I went up to my tea, I looked in my till there then was a half-a-crown and a shilling no other money, I came down stairs ten minutes before six, I examined the till, I found the half-crown and the shilling which I left when I went up to tea and no more, I then went to Mrs. Roskill to know whether she had been, and then I went for an officer. I took the prisoner up stairs, I told him I was afraid he had robbed me, he said he had not, the officer might search him; the officer searched him, he found 13 shillings in silver and a seven shilling piece, three of the shillings were marked with the letter Y, he said he hoped we would forgive him, it was the first time.

Mr. Alley. How long had he lived with you - A. Eleven years.

- KENNEDY. I searched him, I found three marked shillings, he said it was the first time he hoped his master would forgive him, he meant to replace the money.

Prosecutor. These are the three shillings that I gave to Mrs. Roskill this is the stamp that we made the impression with.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel and called no witnesses to character.

GUILTY, aged 41.

Judgment respited .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18090920-147

774. JOHN MORRIS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 28th of April , 20 bushels of flour, value 18 l. the property of Luke Allum , and JOHN BURTON for feloniously receiving the same knowing it to be stolen .

LUKE ALLUM . I am a carrier .

Q. Had you any load of flour to deliver to be sent by Chamber your waggoner - A. Yes, 20 sacks of flour, ten to be delivered in Cavendish-square and ten in Princes-street , my man loaded them at the mill to be delivered on the 28th of April.

JOHN CHAMBER . I took the 20 sacks in question, I delivered 10 sacks in Princes-street to a Baker. I delivered 10 sacks to the prisoner, for him to deliver to Mr. Hill, I am sure there were 10 sacks in the load when I delivered them to the prisoner.

Prisoner. The note that he gave me was altered when I had it.

Mr. Hill. This is the note.

Mr. Allum. The miller gave the note, I never saw it till after it was altered.

WILLIAM HILL . Q. Did Allums waggon bring you any sacks of flour - A. Yes, on the 8th of April, 6 sacks of flour, the prisoner came with them, he delivered this note in the state it now is, it was ten when it was wrote the ten is scratched out, and a six is put underneath. I asked him why the ten sacks did not come, his answer was that they were overloaded.

Q. to Chambers. How many horses had you to the waggon - A. Four horses, twenty sacks is a Weybridge load.

Q. to Mr. Allum. Were you present at the magistrate's when the prisoner was examined - A. Yes.

Q. Was what he said taken in writing - A. I think it was, I saw the prisoner sign it, I did not see the magistrate sign it.

MR. HUMPHRIES. Q. Is that Mr. Nares's handwriting - A. Yes.

Q. to Mr. Allum. Was there any promise made to the prisoner that it would be better for him to tell the truth or worse for him if he did not - A. Nothing of the kind.

"The voluntary confession of John Morris brought before me John Nares , esq. one of his Majesty's justices of the peace for the county of Middlesex, 28th of July 1809, which saith that he was sent by John Chandler on the 28th of April last to Mr. Hill's, Southampton-row, that before he went to Mr. Hill's he went to his own yard in St. Giles's, he took out of the load four sacks of flour, he then took the six sacks to Mr. Hill, he took the four sacks to the shop of Mr. Burton who agreed to take it at sixty-five shillings per sack, he went in and delivered the four sacks at Mr. Burton's house who paid him 13 l. for them: the mark + of John Morris .

J. Nares, esq."

Q. to Mr. Hill. What was the price of flour at that time - A. Ninety shillings a sack.

Prisoner's Defence. It is the first offence, my lord, I hope you will have mercy.

MORRIS - GUILTY , aged 45.

Confined six months in the house of correction, and there kept to hard labour , and during that time to be whipped one hundred yards as near as possible to his receiver's door .

BURTON, - NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18090920-148

775. THOMAS BELL was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 3d of August , sixty doxen rows of French trimming beads, value 15 l. and 6 Ostrich feathers, value 36 s. the property of George Bristow and William Hughes in their dwelling house .

Second count for like offence, only stating it to be the dwelling house of George Bristow only.

WILLIAM HUGHES . My partner's name is George Bristow . We are warehousemen in Golden-square St. James , we deal largely in beads and ostrich feathers.

Q. When did Mr. Bristow come into partnership

with you - A. On the 26th of June. On the 25th we took our stock.

Q. Had the prisoner been employed with you at any time - A. Yes, about four years ago.

Q. You took stock on the 25th - A. Yes, some time after a customer, Mrs. Goodall sent for a certain size of black beads which we were positive we had, upon our looking for these beads and not finding them, and Mr. Bristow knowing that there were such a stock in our shop, he ordered the stock to be retaken, that was about three weeks after the 25th of July, upon our retaking the stock we missed 348 dozen of French beads and a paper of white ostrich feathers, containing from 20 to 30, and a quantity of straw plat, some garnet and a variety of other things to the amount of two hundred pounds. We sent hand bills round to the different pawnbrokers and we had bills stuck about the street with the reward of 50 guineas, Mr. Hackleman came to my solicitor, and my solicitor came with him to my house, and there I saw the beads, I went to Mr. Hackleman's house in the beginning of August and saw these beads there I saw 60 dozen of beads; they were part of the articles that we missed, these are some that I have still in my possession, and the article that I found at Mr. Hackleman's exactly correspond with these.

Court. Is there any thing in these beads that you saw at Mr. Hackleman's that you can swear that they are yours. The jury cannot be positive if you are not - A. They were in short rows and we had them all threadled in long rows after we took stock, I have no doubt they are my beads.

Mr. Knapp. Q. How many of them that were found at Mr. Hackleman's that you would swear to - A. I would swear to 40 dozen; they were pledged at Mr. Hackleman's in the name of Thomas Bell . In consequence of finding these at Mr. Hackleman's, I immediately went to the office to obtain a warrant to have Bell taken up, I went to Kensington, we apprehended the prisoner, we searched his lodgings but found nothing, this was about the ninth or tenth of August, we brought him to the watchhouse in a coach, on his road with us in the coach, with one of my warehousemen and the officer, he made an observation which was to know if I should like to have my feathers back again, I answered I should certainly be happy to have back my property, he told me that he had destroyed them, I told him if he was not the thief I would do every thing to clear his character.

Mr. Gurney. And that you would not hurt an hair of his head if he told you - A. I believe I did.

Court. Had you promised him any thing before you got him in the coach - A. I conceive I did.

Mr. Knapp. Before he said any thing you made that promise in his own apartment - A. Yes.

Q. After this you must not tell us any thing he said - A. I had Paddington Canal searched. I discovered no feathers whatever. Mr. Barlow of Berwick-street, had purchased some feathers, I there saw six, they are here, I cannot swear to the feathers, some of my warehousemen know the feathers.

Mr. Gurney. Did you assist in taking stock in June in that part respecting the beads - A. I did.

Q. I take it for granted there are many dealers in beads besides yourself - A. Certainly there are, I do not think that any house imports half the quantity I do.

Q. And importing a large quantity you sell a large quantity - A. Yes.

Q. Did you yourself superintend taking the stock the second time - A. I assisted.

Q. Do you mean, Mr. Hughes, to swear that these are your beads. - A. To the best of my knowledge they answer to the colour.

Q. You lost 348 dozen, and the whole quantity found that you supposed to be yours is 60 dozen - A. Yes.

Q. You have no knowledge of your house being broken open - A. No.

Q. You have no knowledge of any person having access to your drawers - A. If they could get possession of the key of the warehouse they could have access to the drawers. The prisoner knew where the key was.

Q. That is four years ago - A. They are in the same place now.

Q. How long had he lived with you - A. Six or seven years, I had a good opinion of him.

Q. The prisoner living with you must also know your customers - A. He might know some.

Q. He knew Mr. Barlow as a customer - A. No doubt he did.

Court. You cannot take upon yourself with certainty to say that they are your beads - A. I cannot take upon me to say point bank that they are my beads, although I am most sure that they are my beads. There is one circumstance that I would wish to mention, the circumstance I allude to is this, they were pledged in paper with the hand-writing of George Bristow upon the paper.

Q. Who lives in the house at Golden-square. - A. George Bristow , it is my house but the business is carried on there, I live in the country, he lives in Golden-square. The dwelling house is in the front, the side door is in John-street. The warehouse has an internal connection with the other part of the house.

WILLIAM SHEPHARD . Q. You are employed by the prosecutors - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember on the 14th of July seeing any feathers which were afterwards missed out of the drawers - A. Yes, I put them by themselves, I had them from the lad who had been previously out and sold one, I put them in the press where they are usually kept.

Q. Were they part of the feathers that were missed upon the retaking stock in July - A. The whole was gone as I understood, I was out of town when it was retaken.

Q. to Mr. Hughes. Did you see these identical feathers before you had retaken stock - A. I saw them when we took stock, and when we took stock again they were all gone, I might have seen them within a week before it was retaken.

SAMUEL BARLOW . Q. I believe you live in Jermyn-street - A. I do.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. I do. He came to my house in the latter part of July, I believe the 21st, he offered me a lot of feathers both black and white, I told him I was not in want of either of them, I knew him many years as a servant in houses that I had dealt with, he said he had got into business for himself, he gave me a aper of ostrich feathers, I do not

know the quantity, out of which paper I purchased six or seven at six shillings each, there is one I can swear to, they were put into my stock unguardedly, I did not know how he came by them, I asked him how he came by them, he stated that his friends lived at Dover, that he had frequently an opportunity of getting these goods under the market price, he got them dressed by a man in the city, I asked him where he lived, he said his wife was unwell, he had lodgings in the country, he told me he had some beads, I told him I did not deal in that article. This feather I am sure I bought of him, it has a defect here, I pointed it out to Bell when I bought it; here is another I believe to be one of them. it was mixed with the stock, I have no doubt of it, with respect to the other I can swear almost positively.

THOMAS PARKHURST . Q. You are a servant of the prosecutors - A. I am.

Q. Do you know any of these feathers - A. I know these two feathers as forming a part of Mr. Hughes's property.

Q. When had you seen these two feathers at Mr. Hughes's - A. I cannot positively say the day.

Q. Had you seen them after you had taken stock in June - A. I do not recollect that I had.

GEORGE BRISTOW . Q. You are in partnership with Mr. Hughes - A. I am, I selected the whole of these feathers from the stock of Mr. Barlow, I recollected that we had a feather exactly as this is, I should think myself justified in taking my oath that this is our feather. I have not the least doubt of it, I believe I have seen it half a dozen times since we have taken stock, Mr. Barlow never bought the feather of us.

Q. Are you sure that you have seen it three or four times since you have taken stock - A. It is most likely I have.

Court. Can you swear that you had ever seen it after you took stock - A. I cannot, it is very likely, I rather think I did not count the feathers when we took stock.

Mr. Hackleman. Q. Do you know the prisoner - A Yes, on the 4th of August I took in these beads, of the prisoner, they were in the paper that is here, there is No. 2 written on the brown paper, that is all that is written upon it.

Q. At the time that he brought them to you, did any conversation take place between you and the prisoner - A. He wanted more money than I liked to lend him upon them, I did not wish to take them in, they were things that I did not understand, he said that he had a bill to take up which would be due in a few days.

Q. Did you ask him how he came by them - A. No.

Court to Mr. Hughes. How many rows of beads are there that you will take upon you to swear to - A. About twenty dozen, ten dozen in each of them rows, they are stringed as those I had, we had them threadled upon these long threads, all our sky-blues.

Q. to Mr. Bristow. Look at that No. 2, upon that paper, do you know that - A. Yes, it is my own handwriting.

Q. Do you know when you put that - A. It might have been done two months before we took stock, it is my hand-writing, and it was made for a feather paper. I made one, two, and three, afterwards it was entirely spoiled and dirty from being used, consequently it was put aside as waste paper. It was in our possession on the 25th of June, our goods require nicety, we never send goods out in paper like that, we burn them.

Q. Have you ever searched to see whether the other two parts of the paper were in your possession - A. No I have not.

Q. to Parkhurst. Look at these beads, whose property are they - A. I have no doubt but they are Mr. Hughes's property.

Court. What do you say to the blues - A. There is a dozen that I can speak more positive to than the others. I was looking for a bit of paper that I had let fall behind the counter, I took a stick and raked out a dozen of beads, I said there is a dozen of beads, we could have sold them five hundred times over, we had no beads of that size. I have no doubt of them beads whatever.

SAMUEL HAMILTON . I apprehended the prisoner on the 8th of last month at Kensington, I searched him, I found upon him a small row of beads which Mr. Hughes looked at, and believed them to be his.

Q. to Mr. Hughes. Look at that small row of beads - A. I think I can challenge any house of having any of these beads, they are a sample row, I believe them to be mine.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel, called four witnesses who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Justice Bailey.

Reference Number: t18090920-149

776. JAMES GRINDLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 15th of August , 83 glass tumblers, value 7 s. 2 goblets, value 2 s. 3 liquor bottles, value 12 s. 2 decanters, value 7 s., 11 wine glasses, value 6 s., a cut goblet, value 1 s., 6 glass salts, value 9 s. a glass mustard pot, value 1 s., a glass pepper castor, value 2 s., and 2 cruets, value 2 s. , the property of Joseph Phillips and Lyon Phillips .

JOSEPH PHILLIPS . I live at No. 33, Exeter Street in the Strand . I am a glass merchant , the prisoner was one of my workmen; on the 14th of August I had occasion to go down stairs with a workman , and on moving a door I found concealed twenty-four tumblers upon which I informed my father; towards the evening I went to Bow-street, and obtained an officer, when the officer came to my warehouse, I gave a description of what we had seen, and of the prisoner, my father discharged the prisoner from his labour, the officer watched him out, and brought him back again, and searched him, and found upon him nine tumblers and two goblets; he had lived with me near two years, and he had been an uncommon good servant.

Q. I see there are a great many things in the indictment - A. Yes, part were found at his house.

CHARLES HUMPHRIES . I belong to Bow-street office, I watched the prisoner out, I let him go about twenty yards, I went after him and brought him into the house, I found nine tumblers in his breeches pockets and 2 goblets, I went to his lodgings and found all these in his apartment.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Fined one shilling and discharged.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090920-150

777. MARY ANN BATTENBY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 20th of July , 2 sheets, value 10 s., and a pillow, value 2 s, the property of John Hall in a lodging room .

SARAH HALL . I live in Baldwin's gardens , I let lodgings , I let the prisoner a two pair of stairs furnished room for six shillings a week, she stayed with me a fortnight and two days, paid no rent, and went away with the key of the room; my property was gone, but she left the tickets of the articles in the room: they were pledged for twelve shillings.

GEORGE LEE . On the 20th of June, I received a sheet in pledge of the prisoner, and on the 21st of July I received another sheet; I lent her five shillings on each of them, and on the 23d, I received of her a pillow for two shillings.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence, called one witness who gave her a good character.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Fined one shilling and discharged.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090920-151

778. JOHN GILL was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 21st of June , 300 lb. weight of lead, value 7 l. the property of Anthony Scott affixed to his house .

The prosecutor and witnesses not appearing in court their recognizances were ordered to be estreated .

NOT GUILTY.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090920-152

779. DANIEL RICHARDSON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 8th of August , 2 mahogany boards, value 2 l. the property of George Oakley and Benjamin Oakley .

THOMAS ATKINSON . I am foreman to George and Benjamin Oakley. I can only swear to the property.

WILLIAM JACKSON . I am a butcher, I live in Old Bond street , on the 8th of September I saw the prisoner bring two mahogany boards from the passage that leads to Mr. Oakley's workshop, I sent my man over to inform Mr. Oakley, I followed the prisoner with the boards on his shoulder, he carried them into Jermyn street, to the corner of Perry street, which was a public house, he pitched the boards there against the side of the public-house, he left the boards, went in and came out with a pint of beer; by this time Mr. Oakley's people had got information, Mr. Robinson came and laid hold of the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. Them are not the boards I had, them were standing at the public house, mine were standing round the corner. I was drinking a pint of beer.

GUILTY , aged 35.

Transported for seven years .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090920-153

780. GEORGE WORSTER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 10th of June , 3 lbs. weight of flour, value 1 s. , the property of Justitia Wergman .

JUSTITIA WERGMAN . I am a baker , I live in the Commercial Road , the prisoner was my servant ; on last Monday week, I had four twopenny loaves in my drawer, I sent the prisoner with two half-peck loaves, when he went out I looked in the drawer, I found one of them was gone, then after he put in his bread, he ran down stairs, my servant looked through the crack of the door, and saw him fill a peck of flour, he came up stairs and went out, I called after him, and asked him what he wanted with a twopenny loaf each time he went out, he said may not I have a bit of bread to eat, I said certainly, you have as much bread as you can eat, you have two quartern loaves to take home every week, and as much bread here as you can eat, I took off his hat, and found a peck of flour in his hat.

MARY - . I am servant to Mr. Wergman, I saw the prisoner take some flour, and put it into a bag.

Q. Do you know what quantity - A. No.

Prisoner's defence. I can take my oath she did not see me.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Whipped in jail , confined six months in the House of correction and there kept to hard labour .

Second Middlesex Jury before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090920-154

781. JOSEPH HITCH and MARIA HITCH were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 13th of August , 8 lb. weight of feathers, value 12 s., the property of Thomas Bland , in a lodging room .

THOMAS BLAND . On the 12th of August the prisoners came to the Bath Hotel , Joseph Hitch bespoke a bed for himself and wife, and he having slept there before, it was his particular request that he might sleep in another room where he might have a larger bed, he being a large man. He had slept there three nights before within a fortnight, it was discovered that he had robbed all the three beds that he had slept in in the nights before; in order to detect him, and to bring him to justice, I ordered that he might have a bed, and when he was gone to bed I directed that an officer might be fetched from Bow-street, saying that I had a thief in the house. On the morning following, two officers came, they waited for this gentleman and wife coming down stairs, which was about 8 o'clock.

- BURTON. I am an officer of Bow-street, on the 13th of August I attended at the Bath Hotel, Piccadilly; about half after eight o'clock, I took the prisoners in custody, Joseph Hitch was carrying this box, I took him into the parlour and searched him, in his pocket I found this key, which opened the box, it contained two bags of feathers, I went up into the room where they slept, along with the chamber-maid and Mr. Bland, they discovered that the bed had been opened and sewed up again, Salmon went to the lodging of the prisoner in consequence of a letter I found upon Hitch.

Prosecutor. Each bed that this man had layed in he had ripped open and sewed it up with a different thread to what the bed had been originally sewed with.

WILLIAM SALMON . I am an officer of Bow-street, I was at the apprehending of the prisoner, afterwards I went and searched his lodgings in Golden square, I found a shirt sewed up at the bottom full of feathers, and several bags which had feathers in them.

Joseph Hitch 's defence. It was my own property which I took in the Hotel, which I took out of my own beds, I was in his majesty's service twelve years.

Maria Hitch was not put on her defence.

JOSEPH HITCH , GUILTY - aged 47.

Confined two years in the house of correction and fined one shilling .

MARIA HITCH, NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090920-155

782. WILLIAM HORNSEY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 24th of August , 2 copper bolts, value 12 s. , the property of Henry Palmer and James Shears .

THOMAS PALMER . I am a coppersmith , 69, Cable street, Whitechapel , I am manager for Messrs. Henry Palmer and James Shears .

JAMES PARTIDGRE . I live with Mr. Palmer, I saw the prisoner at breakfast time take two pieces of copper bolt which is here, he took them from under my master's counting house, he sent me into the cellar to fetch a block up, and while I was gone down, I happened to look through a crack of the door, I saw him take the two copper bolts, he put them under his jacket, after that he went to breakfast, as soon as he went out of door master went after him, and took them from him.

MR. PALMER. I followed the man immediately, I did not like to stop him immediately on account of injuring his character, I followed him till he came to White-lion street, I saw the top of the bolts, I called him to me, he said he would rather go home to his breakfast, I took hold of the bolts, he said he knew what was the matter, he had been a thief to me some time. These are the bolts, they are my master's property.

GUILTY , aged 27.

Confined six months in the house of correction, and there kept to hard labour .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090920-156

783. CATHERINE FLAGART was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 23d of August , a shirt, value 2 s. a frock, value 1 s. 6 d. 2 aprons, value 2 s. and a pair of stockings, value 2 s., the property of Christian Stevens , widow ; an apron, value 1 s., the property of Jane Cunningham .

CHRISTIAN STEVENS . I am a widow, I keep a school in Star place, Commercial Road , I employed the prisoner in needle work; on the 23d of August when I came in at nine o'clock they told me that the prisoner had been waiting for work, she went away as I was not at home, one of the ladies missed a frock out of the work bag, I missed two aprons and a pair of stockings.

ELIZABETH CHIPPERFEILD . On the 23d of August in the morning, I was going out of the door, I saw the prisoner, and some part of the property was hanging out of her pocket.

JOHN SAUNDERS . I am an headborough, I took the prisoner in custody, I took two duplicates of two shirts from her.

THOMAS WILLIAMS . I am a pawnbroker, I live in Cable Street, I took in the shirt for two shillings of the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not pawn the shirt.

GUILTY , aged 32.

Fined one shilling , confined six months in the house of correction, and there kept to hard labour .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090920-157

784. JAMES LAYTON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 1st of September , 6 silver tea-spoons, value 20 s. and a silver sugar tongs , the property of George Swalton .

GEORGE SWALTON . I keep the King's Head, Cumberland street . On the 1st of September my wife thought she heard somebody up stairs on the second floor, I went up stairs with her, and found the prisoner in the bed room, the bed clothes were very much disordered, the pillows and blankets were laying about the room, and likewise in the adjoining room; my wife saw him first lay under the bed in the second room; we found him three parts of the way out of the second floor window, so that the whole of his body was hanging out, his legs only appeared, I pulled him back.

Q. What is he - A. He gave me to understand that he had a share in an hackney coach.

JOHN BAKER , I searched the prisoner, I found the duplicate of a watch which this gentleman pledged for a friend, the prisoner said he had pawned the spoons in Norfolk street.

MR. RAY. I am a pawnbroker, I live in Norfolk Street, Middlesex Hospital. On the 1st of August, I took in 2 spoons of the prisoner, on the 2d, I took a pair of sugar tongs and four spoons for one pound.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, called three witnesses who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 16.

Fined one shilling , confined six months in the house of correction, and there kept to hard labour .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090920-158

785. PHILIP SPALDING was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 22d of September , 2 brushes, value 2 s. 9 d. the property of John Allen .

WILLIAM SAVAGE . I am foreman to Mr. Allen, brush-maker , Whitechapel , the prisoner was his servant . On yesterday week I saw two brushes, in the cellar, they were hid behind some brush handles; I took the two brushes, and stamped them, and put them in that place again, on the morning following the prisoner went down stairs, I missed one of them, some time after he went down again, and then went out, I went down stairs, and found the other brush gone, I waited till he came in the shop, then I asked him what he had done with the brushes, he said he knew nothing about it; we sent for a constable, the prisoner confessed the brushes were in his lodgings, the constable went to his lodgings the prisoner gave him the key of his box, and brought the box to the constable, the constable found the brushes that were taken that morning and several more.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's defence. I never was brought in this place before in my life, I hope you will take it into your consideration.

GUILTY , aged 60.

Fined one shilling and discharged.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090920-159

786. BENJAMIN HALL was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 11th of August , 500 bricks, value 30 s. , the property of Wm. Green .

WILLIAM EARLE . I am foreman to Mr. Green, he is a brick-master , the prisoner was Mr. Green's carter . On Friday the 11th of August, the prisoner took from Whitechapel mount, five hundred bricks to go to Wentworth Street, after that he came and had five hundred to go to the Swan in Bethnal Green , he left his horse and cart, and went away.

Q. How many did he confess to take to the Swan - A. Two loads.

JAMES ADAMS . I work for Mr. Green.

Q. On the 11th of August do you remember the prisoner taking any bricks - A. Yes, he went for a load of malms for the Swan between ten and eleven o'clock, he came back between twelve and one, he told me he had a load of malms for Hanbury's brewhouse; at three

o'clock in the afternoon he came for five hundred stocks he said he was going to take them to the Swan.

LAWRENCE SWAIN . Q. Were you in Mr. Green's employ at the Swan - A. Yes, on the 11th of August, the prisoner delivered one load of malms, no stocks whatever, he delivered them between 11 and 12 o'clock, he delivered no stocks, only one load of malms.

WILLIAM GREEN . Q. I believe, in consequence of information, you caused the prisoner to be apprehended - A. I did; when I asked him what he had done with the bricks, he told me he took two loads to the Swan, and one to Hanbury's brewhouse.

JOHN GRIFFITHS . I apprehended the prisoner, he said, he had delivered two loads to the Swan, and one at Hanbury's brewhouse.

JOHN BOWCROFT . Q. You superintended the works going on at Hanbury's brewhouse on the 11th of August - A. Yes, the prisoner came and asked us what we wanted, I told him we wanted none, he might bring five hundred in the course of the next day.

Prisoner's Defence. I left two loads at the Swan; I went to Hanbury's brewhouse with a load, I left the horse and cart in the street while I went for my beer in the care of a boy, and when I returned, the horse, cart, and bricks, and boy were gone, where I do not know.

GUILTY , aged 33.

Publickly whipped 100 yards in Whitechapel , and confined six months in the house of correction, and there kept to hard labour .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090920-160

787. WILLIAM SEWELL and THOMAS MURRELL were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 9th of July , a pelisse, value 5 l. 2 pair of shoes, value 4 s. and a handkerchief, value 1 s. , the property of Thomas Lupton .

MRS. LUPTON. My husband's name is Thomas Lupton , we live in Perry's fields, Poplar. I lost these things on the 9th of July at the Cobham's head, Cold Bath fields , the prisoner Murrell drove the coach, I told him to put the things in the coach, he did; I went into the house, and when I came out again, the things were gone, I asked him where my bundles were, he replied, gone to hell, you go and look for it; Sewell was the waterman, he put the bundle in the coach.

MR. ARABIN. Q. Are you married, it is stated in the indictment, the property of Thomas Lupton , is it Thomas Lupton 's property - A. It is not, it is my property,

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090920-161

788. RICHARD HEMMINGS was indicted for, that he on the 6th of January, in the 34th year of his present Majesty's reign, was married to Betty Paget , and that he afterwards on the 1st of August, in the 48th year of his Majesty's reign , feloniously did take to wife Ann Bridges , his former wife being then alive .

SARAH PAGET . Q. Are you the sister of Betty Paget. - A. Yes.

Q. Were you present when she was married - A. Yes, in 1794, my sister was married to Richard Hemmings , the prisoner, my sister is here, they lived eleven years together.

ANN BRIDGES . Q. When did you marry this man - A. In 1808, at Cheltenham in Glocestershire , when he married me, he told me he had 250 l. I was a servant , I thought I might be comfortable; he took all my money, and pawned my clothes, I left him, I found he was a loose character.

EDWARD CROCKER . I produce the register of the first marriage.

Prisoner's Defence. I should not have left my first wife, if she had not been great with another man that she is married to since, I had not seen her for seven or eight years, when I married again.

GUILTY , aged 42.

Transported for seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090920-162

789. RICHARD ORRILL was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 30th of June , a silver table spoon, value 10 s., 120 penny pieces, and 120 halfpence , the property of John Banks .

JOHN BANKS . I live in Crispin street. Spitalfields . I lost the copper on the 30th of June, I had suspicion of the prisoner, knowing that he had no money, he lodged in the house, he got drunk that evening, and bought ham and beef, on the next morning I missed a silver spoon, he owned taking the table spoon before the magistrate.

Q. What is the prisoner - A. A butcher , he had lodged with me about eight or nine months.

THOMAS HART . I took the prisoner in custody on the next morning, he told me he had sold the silver spoon to Smouchee, in Petticoat-lane, for five shillings.

Prisoner's Defence. There were seven or eight young men in the house, I had half a guinea, I spent it, and got drunk in his house, on the next day he said I had robbed him; I know nothing about it.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090920-163

790. WILLIAM ROBINSON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 30th of August , 3 books, value 4 s. the property of Joseph Palmer .

JOSEPH PALMER . I am a bookseller and stationer , I live at 34, South-street, Manchester-square . On Wednesday the 30th of August, I had my books out under the window, there came a shower of rain, about 3 o'clock, I put a shutter over the books, a little while after I received information that a person had robbed me of some books, I pursued him and saw him coming out of Manchester-square, I went up to him and apprehended him, a lad was with him; he made off as fast as he could, the prisoner was searched, he had no books about him.

Q. And you are not sure that he did take them - A. I did not see him take them.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090920-164

791. JOHN SHEEN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 3d of August , a box, value 6 d., 2 waistcoats, value 7 s., a pair of pantaloons, value 2 s., 2 pillow cases, value 1 s., and 4 pair of stockings, value 1 s. , the property of William Robinson .

WILLIAM ROBINSON . On the 2nd of August, I saw my trunk safe on board a ship, in the bason of the West India docks , and on the 3d, I saw it, in the possession of a constable. On the 2d between 6 and 7 o'clock I left the ship.

JOSHUA FURNISH . I keep a horse and cart, I attend at the West India docks for the purpose of being employed. On the third of August, Mrs. White applied to me to take up a trunk and different luggage and to carry them in a cart to her house. I received the trunk and luggage from Mrs. White at the Docks into my cart on that day.

Q. How do you know the trunk and luggage belonged to Mr. Robinson - A. He lives with Mrs. White at Poplar, I called at her house and delivered the luggage with another man, he said he believed that was all that belonged to Mrs. White. I drove to another place and unloaded my cart, I found I had a trunk left I did not know who it belonged to, I left the trunk in my cart and went to the docks to enquire. I left the cart in the care of a boy. The prisoner helped me load the cart.

Q. The prisoner is an Irishman, did you know him - A. No, he asked me to let him help me load the cart. The prisoner came up to my cart and required of me the payment that Mrs. White had promised him, I took him to the public house and treated him with the share of two pots of beer and bread and cheese, as a reward for his having assisted me. I then came back to my cart, and said, by some means or other I have made a mistake, I have a trunk, I do not know who it belongs to, I got up into the cart threw some hay over the trunk, and then I fell asleep, the trunk was on the side of me and when I awoke I missed the trunk; I received some information, the prisoner came up to me in the course of half an hour, I walked with him up to Mr. Randell, I asked him if that was the person that he saw with the trunk on his shoulder, Randell said yes, the prisoner denied it, I then told the prisoner if he did not tell me where the trunk was or produce it, I would give him in charge of an officer, I sent for an officer he went with the officer and brought back the same trunk that I had in the cart.

- DAVIS. I am constable, I took charge of the prisoner for stealing a trunk out of Furnish's cart, he denied it, in consequence of my putting him in the watchhouse at last he confessed it, and went with me to a house in the neighbourhood, he went up stairs and fetched the trunk.

WILLIAM RANDELL . I belong to the East India docks. On the 3d of August, about ten minutes past four, I saw the prisoner pass me, he had this trunk on his shoulder, when Furnish enquired, I told him what I had seen in the hearing of the prisoner, the prisoner denied it.

Prisoner's Defence. I was employed to carry the trunk, I slipped down, and that is the way the trunk got open, I was told that I should be liberated when the owner of the trunk came and saw there was all the property.

GUILTY , aged 38.

Confined fourteen days in Newgate , and publicly whipped 100 yards near the West India docks .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090920-165

792. ANN PERKINS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 20th of September , 2 sheets, value 5 s. a blanket, value 2 s. and a piece of curtain, value 6 d. the property of David Lamb .

DAVID LAMB . I live at the Crown, Seven Dials . On the 20th of September, between nine and ten o'clock my boy was going to bed with a candle in his hand, he said, there was a woman coming down stairs, I went up stairs and found the woman in a room with the bundle tied up, the bundle contained sheets, blankets, and the curtain, upon looking at them I knew them to be mine, the woman said if I would let her go, she would leave the things and the handkerchief they were tied up in in the bargain, I gave her in charge of the watchman. I never saw the woman before.

- PRICE. I am a watchman, I took charge of the woman and the property.

The prisoner said nothing in her defence.

GUILTY , aged 38.

Fined one shilling , confined 6 months in the house of correction, and there kept to hard labour .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090920-166

793. SARAH PLUMER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 15th of August , a gown, value 2 s. a petticoat, value 1 s. a shawl, value 3 s. an apron, value 6 s. 2 handkerchiefs, value 1 s. a piece of cloth, value 1 s. a pair of shoes, value 10 s. and a flat iron, value 6 d. the property of Mary Shepherd , widow .

MARY SHEPHERD . I am a widow woman, I live in Vineyard Gardens . The prisoner lodged with me in the same room as I did.

Q. At what time of the day had you seen these things safe in your lodgings - A. About 5 o'clock in the afternoon I was ill in bed all the morning, in the afternoon I went out for a walk, the prisoner went part of the way with me and then returned, I returned in less than an hour after her; when I went home I missed the shawl directly that induced me to look about and then I missed the articles enumerated in the indictment. When I came home the prisoner was gone, this was on the Thursday, I took her on the Monday following.

JACOB FOSTER . I apprehended the prisoner on Monday; Mrs. Shepherd took me to a court in Bedfordbury. I went up to speak to her, I asked her if her name was not Plumer she said it was not. I called Mrs. Shepherd up stairs she identified her, I took her to Mrs. Shepherd's house, then I went to speak to her husband along with Mrs. Shepherd, she ran away, I took her afterwards at her own house, I told her what I took her for I asked for the duplicates, she gave me a handful.

THOMAS CHAPMAN . I am a pawnbroker, Chandos-street, Covent Garden. I took in of Sarah Cooper , the woman that the prisoner lodged with, a petticoat and a piece of cloth, I advanced half a crown.

SARAH COOPER . Do you know the prisoner - A. Yes, I pawned the things, Mr. Chapman has produced for the prisoner.

The prisoner left her defence to her counsel called two witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY , aged 42.

Fined one shilling , and confined six months in the house of Correction .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090920-167

794. JOSEPH DOLPHIN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 13th of September , a pair of stockings, value 2 s. the property of George Rawlinson .

GEORGE RAWLINSON . I am a hosier , No. 49, in Oxford-street . I saw the prisoner about five minutes before he was brought into my shop, he was lurking about

Q. You did not see him do any thing yourself. - A. No, he was brought by Mr. Wiley, he charged him with stealing a pair of stockings, the stockings were brought in by Mr. Howell, I examined and found a pair of stockings were missing which were placed by the side of the window, they were pinned on a string with a ticket attached to them.

MR. WILEY. Q. Are you an opposite neighbour to Mr. Rawlinson. - A. Yes. I saw two persons running across the way, I was standing at my own door, I saw the prisoner throw down a pair of stockings with a ticket to them, I picked them up; I gave them to Mr. Howell he stopped the prisoner; we took him across to the shop, he hit me three times on the head.

MR. HOWELL. I saw the prisoner walking in the street, he stopped about five minutes at Mr. Rawlinson's window, he went to the door, I saw him take the stockings, I pursued him and took him.

GUILTY .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090920-168

705. MARY WHITBY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 19th of August , two cruets, value 6 d. a saucer, value 4 d. a glass tumbler, value 6 d. an apron, value 6 d. a petticoat, value 6 d. and a bag, value 2 d. the property of Mary Cromarty .

MARY CROMARTY . I live at No. 105, Rosemary-lane , I work at the Tower at cleaning of barrels . I lost, these things on the 19th of August.

MRS. ROWE. I live in the same house with Mrs. Cromarty. I came home about a quarter before one, I met the prisoner coming down stairs, she said she had come for these things for Mrs. Cromarty, as she owed the landlady three weeks rent. I asked the landlady, the landlady said she owed no money till night.

Prisoner. That woman asked me if I would go and fetch her things from her room, as she owed the landlady three weeks rent.

Prosecutor. I never saw the woman before in my life.

GUILTY , aged 34.

Fined 1 s. Confined Six Months in the House of Correction, and there kept to Hard Labour .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090920-169

796. WILLIAM SANDERLAND was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 15th of August , a piece of thread lace, value 16 s. 2 remnants of lace, value 3 s. and one lace cap piece, value 2 s. the property of Thomas Lewis .

HENRY MARKS . I am a salesman, High-street, Bloomsbury. On the 15th of August, about nine in the morning, the prisoner came to my shop and offered this piece of lace for sale, he asked half a guinea for it, and then he produced the other pieces and asked a guinea for the three, I asked him whose property it was, he told me it was his own, he lived in Sidneys-alley, I told him I did not think he came honestly by it, I must take him in custody, I sent for a constable and gave him in charge.

The property produced and identified.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel, and called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 18.

Whipped in jail and discharged.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090920-170

797. BENJAMIN JOHNSON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 19th of September , a hat, value 2 s. and a waistcoat, value 6 d. the property of Thomas Lawson .

THOMAS LAWSON . I lost my hat from a high shelf in my Aunts passage, the corner of Short-street. Manchester-square , my waistcoat was in the hat. I saw the prisoner, I asked him to give me my hat, he said no it was his hat; I then asked him to show it me, he said no it was his son's hat, I asked a gentlemen to stop him, he had my hat, the gentleman asked him why he did not give the boy the hat, he said it was his own, he would not give it, and then afterwards he said he did it out of a bit of a joke.

MR. RIVETT. I am a musician belonging to the guards. On the evening of the 19th of September, the boy came running up to me and asked me to stop the prisoner he had taken his hat out of the house, I asked the prisoner why he did not give the boy his hat, he would not; he said he was going to Portman-street, as he was going along I asked him twice to open the handkerchief to satisfy the boy and me, when he came a little further he said he only took it out of a joke, he told us to go in the public house and order a pot of beer, I said no, then you will walk off. I took him into the public house the watch-house keeper was sent for, when he came in he said, oh, Mr. Johnson you will not leave off your old tricks; he told me he was the greatest rogue that lay under the sun.

Prisoner's Defence. When I came by there were a parcel of boys playing. I kicked the hat with my foot, I picked it up, the boy walked after and said master give me my hat. I said it is not your hat, when I met with that soldier he told me to give the boy the hat, I told him I did it out of a joke; I went back and returned the boy the hat.

GUILTY , aged 62.

Fined 1 s. Confined Two Years in the House of Correction, and there kept to Hard Labour .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090920-171

798. SARAH PRITCHARD was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 27th of July a shilling and a sixpence , the property of William Hodgetts .

WILLIAM HODGETTS . I am a baker , I live in Redmans-row, Mile-end , the prisoner was my servant , she stole the shilling and sixpence on the 27th of July, I thought she had robbed me before, I marked five shillings and gave it to Hannah Haslop .

HANNAH HASLOP . Q. You had five shillings given you - A. Not five shillings, I had two shillings three sixpences and two penny pieces, I went to Mr. Hodgetts shop on the 27th of July, I bought a peck of flour, and half a quartern loaf, I paid two shillings and sixpence, and two penny pieces, I paid the money to Sarah Pritchard.

WILLIAM BRAGG . The prosecutor is my son in law, he brought the stamp and marked the money, I sent the money by Mrs. Haslop.

THOMAS BRIDGEMORE . I am a constable, I took the prisoner in custody, I asked her for her box that kept her money, she gave it me very freely, they pointed out the marked money in the box.

The property produced and identified.

The prisoner left her defence to her counsel, and called no witnesses to her character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090920-172

799. SARAH LEVER and MARY SAVERY were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 10th of August , two bank notes, value 10 l. the property of Gregario Penatich .

GREGARIO PENATICH . When I went to sleep with Sarah Lever , I had three five pound notes in my waistcoat pocket, I put my waistcoat under my pillow; the next morning I missed two five pound notes, I had only one left, the woman that stole the two five pound notes gave them to the other girl.

Q. Have they ever been found. - A. No.

MOSES JOSEPH . Eleanor Kirby and Catherine Kirby came to my house, they told me that Sarah Lever stole the two pound notes and gave them to Mary Savery ; Mary Savery told me that she did receive the two five pound notes, and bought a pair of shoes with part of the money.

JOHN PARTRIDGE . I apprehended Lever on the 11th of August, it appeared on her examination that after the prosecutor had hold of her she gave the money to a girl of the name of Kirby. I apprehended Savery in Nightingale-court. Saran Lever said before the Magistrate that she took the two five pound notes and gave them to Kirby.

Q. What did Savery say. - A. She said the girls had robbed her, they had the money but they were kept out of the way.

Catherine Kirby and Eleanor Kirby were called, and not appearing in court, their recognizances were ordered to be estreated.

Levers Defence. I found the notes by the bed side, I gave them to Kirby.

Savery said nothing in her defence.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090920-173

800. SARAH MARTIN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 8th of August , twenty yards of printed callico, value 20 s. the property of Thomas Blowers .

THOMAS BLOWERS . I am a linnen draper , 108, Tottenham-court road . On the 8th of August the prisoner was brought into my shop by Joseph Bennet , he requested me to search her, I pulled her cloak of one side, I saw there was nothing, I saw the piece of print was laying by the door, it was taken from a pile of goods at the door, she had dropped it coming in.

Q. You did not see it drop. - A. No.

JOSEPH BENNET . I am a cabinet maker, I live immediately opposite Mr. Blowers. On the 8th of August I saw the prisoner standing by Mr. Blowers door and another woman, I watched her a quarter of an hour, the woman that was with her held some handkerchiefs that was hanging out side of the door so as to hide the pile of goods, and the prisoner held up her cloak so as to hide her from the people of the other side, I saw her take the piece of printed cotton from off the pile at the step of the door, I went across the road and took her into Mr. Blower. The other woman ran away.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I hope you will consider my old age, distress drove me to it.

GUILTY , aged 63.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090920-174

801. JOHN HARRINGTON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 28th of July , two planes, value 3 s. and a guage, value 3 s. the property of Ann Fairs , widow .

ANN FAIRS . I am a widow. When my husband was at the point of death he was robbed of several tools.

Q. Can you speak to any of them tools as having been your husband's property - A. No.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090920-175

802. MARGARET HYAMS , CATHERINE CLANCY , ELIZABETH POWELL , and SUSANNAH WELLING , were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 9th of August , four rows of necklace beads, value 5 s. and a bead bracelet, value 6 d. the property of Robert Powell .

ROBERT POWELL . I am a dealer in beads . On the 9th of August I had occasion to go up stairs, I left the shop in the care of Mrs. Leadbetter; when I came down she informed me there were some girls loitering about, she did not like the look of them.

Q. Are you sure that they were all four near your shop - A. Yes; there were five, but these four prisoners were four out of the five. Catherine Clancy was nearest the window; I lifted up my finger and said my girl, if you do not go away I will have you taken up; upon which I looked round to a frame of beads in the front of the shop, I perceived that several were taken away; they were hung in a glass frame, enclosed in wood; I had put them up there within an hour. I pursued the prisoners, I overtook them at the distance of about fifty or sixty yards; they were walking along as it in company together.

Q. How could any person outside of the shop come at these beads - A. They were in a frame hanging upon brass wire; they were locked on the brass rod.

Q. Did the row of beads appear to have been broken - A. No; the beads were unlocked in their snaps; there were two rows which had not snaps attached to them, they were tied on with blue galloon, they were gone also. Four rows were gone.

Q. Now tell what passed when you overtook them - A. I seized hold of Clancy and Powell and said where are these beads that you have stolen, upon which they said the other girls have got your necklace, pointing to these that ran off; I then left them and pursued Hyams down Little Furnstile, into the passage of Mrs. Skeppington, a chandler's shop; I seized hold of her arm, I said where are the beads you have been stealing, she said she had not stole any thing; Mrs. Skeppington said whatever she has stolen from you she has dropped by her side; on my looking down I found a row of beads by her side, they are necklace beads; I knew them to be mine, they are the beads that I had in my shop, they are worth sixteen pence. I found nothing more upon her; I gave her into the charge of Hodges the constable, he took her to the watchhouse. From her information we went after the others in Newtoner's-lane, they were standing by the side of a passage; upon the prisoner Clancy we found this bracelet, this was the same that we lost from our shop. We took them to the watchhouse; the prisoner Clancy said if you will forgive me, and go along with me, I will find you more. We went to her mother's house in a court in Newtoners-lane and found two

other rows, they are my property also.

- HODGES. I am a constable.

Q. The account that Mr. Powell has given us is a true account, is it not - A. Yes.

MRS. SKEPPINGTON. Q. Did you see this girl come into the passage of your shop - A. Yes; Mr. Powell asked her what she had got, she said nothing; I heard something fall, I told him whatever she had I believed she had dropped. The beads were found in the passage.

Q. to Hodge's. Do you live in this neighbourhood - A. I live in Holborn; I had seen Welling about for half an hour, I saw them altogether, I cautioned them.

Hyams and Clancy said nothing in their defence.

Powell's Defence. I am quite innocent of it; I met the girls coming down Holborn, I was going of an errand for my mother.

Welling's Defence, the same.

Hyams called three witnesses, who gave her a good character.

Clancy called no witnesses to character.

Powell called two witnesses, who gave her a good character.

Welling called one witness, who gave her a good character.

HYAMS, GUILTY, aged 15.

Fined One Shilling and discharged.

CLANCY, GUILTY, aged 12.

POWELL, GUILTY, aged 13

WELLING, GUILTY, aged 14.

Judgment respited .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090920-176

803. CATHERINE BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 27th of July , an umbrella, value 8 s. and a waistcoat, value 5 s. the property of John Roffey .

JOHN ROFFEY . I am a baker , No 16, Great Wild-street . On the 27th of July I was coming in at my door, I met the prisoner coming through the shop with the umbrella and waistcoat in her possession; she said she was very much distressed, I said why do not you take bread if you are very much distressed. I took her to Bow-street office. This is the waistcoat and umbrella, they are mine, she had taken them out of the back parlour.

Prisoner's Defence. I had not the umbrella nor waistcoat in my hand; the umbrella was standing in the shop, and the waistcoat was afterwards found in the passage.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Fined One Shilling and discharged.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090920-177

804. WILLIAM RUMMINGS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 21st of September , a leather cloak case, value 5 s. a great coat, value 15 s. two shirts, value 2 s. a waistcoat, value 1 s. two razors and case, value 3 s. and two neck handkerchiefs, value 2 s. the property of Thomas Moulden .

THOMAS MOULDEN . On Thursday last I came from Riverhead in Kent in a post chaise, the post boy put my leather cloak case in the chaise; it contained all the articles in the indictment. The chaise brought me from Riverhead to Bromley .

Q. Did you see the prisoner there - A. No. At Bromley the chaise stopped, at the reverend Mr. Baker's door, I got out of the chaise and desired the post boy would take care of the parcel, I was going to the Bell inn; I waited in the Bell inn about forty minutes, not finding the parcel brought in I sent out the waiter for it; he said the postboy had delivered it; I went into the yard, the post boy said he had delivered it. I saw the cloak case the following day at Mr. Despard Rummings , I know it to be mine.

GEORGE PEARCE . Q. Are you the post boy who drove this gentleman from Riverhead to Bromley - A. Yes; I set him down at Mr. Baker's; I brought three gentlemen inside, and one on the bar; the prisoner is the person I brought on the bar; I set them at down together at Mr. Baker's, I drove the chaise to the Bell, the prisoner left a small parcel at the reverend Mr. Baker's for a young gentleman.

Q. Did the prisoner go to the Bell when the chaise returned to the Bell - A. No; I did not see him afterwards; directly I got in the yard a person came for the portmanteau; I took it to the gentleman that it belonged to; I cannot say whether it was the prisoner or not, it was dark at that time; the same portmanteau that I put into the chaise when I took up Mr. Moulden I gave to the person that asked for it. I took up the prisoner at Malmsbury hill. When the gentleman enquired for it I told him I had delivered it.

JAMES HANCOCK . I am an officer of Hatton Garden. I went to the house of Mr. Despard Rummings in company with the post boy and the prosecutor; I found this leather case there, it laid upon a chair, Mr. Moulden know it as soon as he saw it; he has seen the contents.

DESPARD RUMMINGS . The prisoner brought the leather case to my house; he called me up on the Thursday night and asked me to let him sleep there; he had the leather case with him.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not ask the post boy for the parcel.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 52.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction, and there kept to Hard Labour , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090920-178

805. ELIZABETH SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 20th of September , a time piece, value 4 l. 4 s, two silver tea spoons, value 7 s. and a cloak, value 2 l. 2 s. the property of Jonathan Hardy , in his dwelling house .

SARAH HARDY . My husband's name is Jonathan Hardy , we live in Bowling-green-lane ; I am a watch gilder. The prisoner has lodged in our house for eight or nine months. I came down on Monday morning and went into the parlour, and saw the window open and the shutters down; I saw the time piece on the mantle piece was gone; I went to the drawer and felt for my cloak, I found that gone, and two tea spoons which were in the drawer; I called out to my husband, I told him the place was robbed. The shutter was cut on the inside.

JOAN ARCHBUTT . I am a servant to Mr. Lowther, pawnbroker, Fox-court, Gray's-inn-lane. On Monday the 25th of December I took in a time piece and a cloak and two tea spoons of the prisoner; she said it was her husband's.

DANIEL MARSHALL . I was alarmed by the prisoner

on the next morning, she came to my bed side and said the house was robbed.

Q. You live together as man and wife, do you - A. Yes, I do.

JOHN HUTT . I am an officer. I went to Mr. Hardy's house and examined the shutters, it appeared to me the house was broken on the inside; I told him somebody must have done it in the house; I went up stairs to Mr. Marshall's room, Elizabeth Smith was in the room dressing some steaks; she lived with Marshall. I told her that there had been a curious robbery in the house, and that the landlady suspected somebody in the house; I told her I had information that she had pawned some things at Mr. Hills in Turnmill-street, she said she had; she gave me this ticket; I said what is this, she said a ticket for a shawl, is it not? I did not satisfy her; it was for a time piece; I searched her, I could not find the ticket for the cloak and the tea spoons; I went to Mr. Lowther with the prosecutor, there I saw the time piece, it was pawned for a guinea and a half. When Mr. Marshall came home then I took them both to the magistrate, after that I went to Mr. Lowther's and saw the property.

Prisoner's Defence. I was never here before; I hope you will have mercy upon me for the sake of my two children.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY, aged 29.

Of stealing to the value of thirty-nine shillings only .

Confined Fourteen Days in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090920-179

806. THOMAS PRICE was indicted by the name of JOHN PRICE for feloniously stealing on the 23rd of July , a pewter quart pot, value 1 s. a pewter pint pot, value 6 d. and a glass rummer, value 8 d. the property of Thomas Stalkington .

The prosecutor was called, and not appearing in court, his recognizance was ordered to be estreated .

NOT GUILTY.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090920-180

807. JAMES HAUGHTON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 15th of September , twenty five pound weight of iron, value 5 s. the property of Jeremiah Sinderby .

JEREMIAH SINDERBY . I am a smith , I live in Brook's market . The prisoner was a servant of mine.

Q. What reason have you to charge the prisoner with stealing twenty five pound of iron - A. I lost a deal of property.

Q. In consequence of information that you had from your boy did you go to this place and see these pieces of iron where they ought not to be - A. I did. On last Friday week the prisoner and his partner were out in Holborn fixing some bars; he and his partner were came home in the evening, I was sitting up stairs in my room, my boy informed me that he had taken away the iron under his coat; I pursued him as far as Saffron hill, I could not catch him.

Q. Did you find your iron - A. No. I went to Hatton Garden office and got an officer; when the officer arrived at his lodgings the prisoner had just got home; I charged him with stealing a bar of iron, he denied it; I told the officer to take him in custody. I have never found the bar again. When I looked under the stairs at my own house the large bar was gone and the small one left.

THOMAS HEDGES . Q Did you find any bars of iron out of their proper place - A. Yes; that was on Friday; they had been removed to under the stairs; I told my master. On the same evening one of them was taken away, I saw James Haughton take it, and I saw his hand under his coat with it; I happened to go into the shop at the same time he was going out of the door, I went directly to the stairs and saw the largest piece was gone, and the smallest piece was left. I told my master immediately of it, and he and I pursued the prisoner; he got out of sight. At Hatton Garden office I told him I saw him take it, he denied it.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of the iron; my place was searched by the officer and nothing found.

Q. to Hedges. When had you last seen the bars of iron - A. About five minutes before he came home I had seen both; I looked after he was gone, the large one was gone.

GUILTY , aged 29.

Publickly Whipped , and Confined Six Months in the House of Correction .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090920-181

808. ELIZABETH CAMPION was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 17th of September , three silver watch chains, value 3 s. the property of Edward Marshall .

EDWARD MARSHALL . I live at 61, Cannon-street, St. George's in the East . On the 17th of September, about half past eight in the morning, the prisoner came into the shop under pretence to dispose of a bit of silver, I was called down to her, the girl left her in the shop when she came up to call me; I bought the silver of the prisoner. About twenty minutes after I found that there were three silver watch chains missing out of the window, I suspected that the prisoner had taken them; I applied to an officer and went with him to the Highway, we found the prisoner; I took her with one of the chains in her hand, she was shewing it to another woman. I never found the other two.

Q. How could she get at the chains - A. By sliding the glass case any person might get at it. The chain is worth three shillings.

- TODD. Q. Were you with Mr. Marshall when the prisoner was laid hold of - A. I was. When I laid hold of her she had this watch chain in her hand. I have had it ever since.

The property produced and identified.

GUILTY , aged 33.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction, there kept to Hard Labour , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090920-182

809. GEORGE BURNE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 20th of July , five pounds weight of beef, value 3 s. the property of John Bishop .

JOHN BISHOP . I am a butcher in Westminster-street, Mary-le-bone . I was not at home when the beef was taken; about one or two o'clock I was sent for. The officer pursued the prisoner with the beef, and took it upon him. I knew the beef, it belonged to me, I cut it for a customer, and left it on the shop board to be sent home.

ROBERT FLOWERDEW . I am a constable. I was at dinner at two o'clock, I heard the cry of stop thief,

I saw the prisoner with the beef under his arm, and several children running after him; I took him in custody. The prisoner told me that he had bought the beef and paid for it, he would bring an action against me for taking him in custody. He had something else in his pocket that he had got in the same way.

Prisoner's Defence. I had nothing but a bit of bread for three days, I wanted a bit of meat, I told him I would pay him the next day.

GUILTY , aged 35.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and Publicly Whipped .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090920-183

810. MARY ALICE HEDGE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 21st of September , two table spoons, value 20 s. two salt spoons, value 5 s. a habit shirt and frill, value 1 s. the property of Henry Wassell ; - a parasol, value 1 s. and a handkerchief, value 1 s. the property of Sarah Reeve , spinster .

HENRY WASSELL . I live at 39, Vere-street, Clare-market .

Q. On the 21st of September did you lose any silver spoons - A. Yes, two table spoons and two salt spoons; the parasol and handkerchief belonged to Sarah Reeve . The prisoner came to my house under a false pretence, and said the premises belonged to her, that the house had been set on fire, and that I had been the instigation of it; she said she came from Fulham. I took her up stairs and shewed her the damage I had received from the fire in Bear-yard; she said she was perfectly satisfied I was innocent of it. I came down stairs and left her with my wife in the passage; she went up with my wife after that.

JANE WASSELL . Q. Did you see this woman when she came to your house on the 21st of September - A. Yes. After she had the conversation with my husband she asked me to go up stairs with her to shew her my bed room, which I did; she begged me to leave the room a minute; I left her alone for a minute.

Q. Had you any silver table spoons in the room where you left her alone - A. Yes; silver table spoons and silver salt spoons; she took all the property from that room.

Q. How long did she remain in that room - A. Not more than a minute. I went into the room to her, I found her shutting the drawer, which made me suspect her; I came down stairs with her; I did not tell her what I suspected; I desired her to walk into the parlour where my niece was. I went up stairs as quick as I could to look for my spoons; I perceived the spoons were gone from that room; I came down and informed my husband; she was searched by the constable; my niece will tell you of that. I never saw her before.

SARAH REEVE . Q. Now tell me whether you had left the handkerchief and the umbrella up in that room - A. Yes; and the silver spoons were up stairs in that room. I was in the parlour when my aunt shewed the prisoner up stairs; when she came down stairs I heard the spoons rattle, she laid them down by the side of her, or in the chair; I called my aunt she did not come into the room immediately. I saw the salt spoons in her hand, she was trying to pull her glove over them; my aunt came in, and then I charged her with taking these things, then I went for a constable, after the constable came I found the umbrella under her clothes.

GEORGE HOLLEY . I am a constable; I took charge of this woman, I told Sarah Reeve to search her; she poked this umbrella from under her clothes, the handkerchief was found about the room; the spoons were given to me by the prosecutor.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I have nothing more to say than I am extremely ill used by that young woman, she has falsesworn herself; she told me if she could hang me she would. It is not in my power to say any thing against a person that chooses to swear; if they choose to swear a persons life away they may. I should be happy to have persons come forward for me, but I was told by persons in the jail that I should not be tried till next sessions.

GUILTY , aged 39.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090920-184

811. JAMES BROWN was indicted for that he on the 12th of August , unlawfully, and against the will of Hyde Parker , did take hold of a certain handkerchief, with intent to steal the same .

HYDE PARKER . I am a merchant ; my accompting house is 12, Pancrass-lane, my residence is in the Temple. On the 12th of August I was passing down Bridge-street about half after ten o'clock at night, I felt something pull at my pocket, I turned round and saw the prisoner with my handkerchief in his hand, endeavouring to pull it out of my pocket; I struck at him and called the watchman, and gave him in charge.

Q. He had not taken it out of your pocket, had he - A. No, not quite, only in past.

Q. You never lost sight of him - A. No; he was close to me.

Prisoner's Defence. He was along with a girl of the town in Bridge-street, he was pulling her about; he turned round and said I was picking his pocket.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Confined One Month in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090920-185

812. JOHN SCURREY was indicted for a misdemeanor .

ROBERT SWAN . I am an apprentice to Mr. Battley. he is a chemist and druggist. St. Paul's church yard . On the 29th of July the prisoner came for an ounce of cream of tarter, it came to two pence; he gave me a sixpence, it looked suspicious, I passed it on to Mr. Battley, he told the prisoner it was not a good one; the prisoner then offered another sixpence, Mr. Battley refused that also, then the prisoner produced money to the amount of six and sixpence; Mr. Battley desired me to seal the sixpences, I did; he desired the prisoner to go about his business and call again on Monday morning; the prisoner was insolent, and desired Mr. Battley to give him his property; Mr. Battley desired me to send for a constable; he then took out twelve shillings; Mr. Battley desired me to seal the whole up together.

RICHARD BATTLEY , The prisoner came into the

shop for an ounce of cream of tartar, and offered sixpence for it to Swan my apprentice, he put it up to me, I said it was a had one; he put up another and then another, all three which were counterfeits, and afterwards he put up as many as six shillings and sixpence, all counterfeit; I desired Swan to seal it up, and for him to call again on Monday, which he would not do; he had the cream of tartar in his hand; he pulled out twelve shillings. I told Swan to seal the whole up together, as I supposed the whole to be bad; he then was insolent, and appeared as if he was drunk, fell among some bottles of value; I was afraid of their being broken, and when he saw I was determined to send for a constable he attempted to run away.

- KELLIDGE. I found the prisoner trying to make his escape when I came to Mr. Battley's, I took him to the watchhouse; Mr. Battley followed me and produced eighteen shillings and sixpence, that he believed was all bad.

CALES EDWARD POWELL . I am assistant to the soliciter of the mint.

Q. Look at these seven sixpences and tell me whether you can find one good one - A. All the sixpences are counterfeit, these fifteen shillings are all counterfeits.

Kellidge I searched the prisoner, I found upon him at the watchhouse eighteen good sixpences in his left hand waistcoat pocket, in his left hand breeches pocket I found three shillings and two sixpences, all base; in his right hand pocket I found fifty-two shillings, there appeared to me to be two good shillings among them; they are wrapped up in paper.

GUILTY , aged 50.

Confined One Year in Newgate , and at the expiration of that time to find sureties for two years good behaviour .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090920-186

813. ROBERT STREETER was indicted for that be on the 23rd of January , unlawfully, knowingly, and designedly, by false pretence to Richard Charnock , did obtain an ox, value 25 l. the property of Jeremiah Healey , with intent to defraud him thereof .

RICHARD CHARNOCK . I am a drover under Jeremiah Healey . On Monday the 23d of January we had some beasts up against the rails in Smithfield , Robert Streeter came for one in the name of Turner, a butcher; Streeter is a drover; I asked him if it was paid for, he said yes. If it was not paid for it would be all right; we have been in the habit of delivering bullocks to him at different times; I let the bullock go.

Q. How came you to let it go so long from January to now - A. I told my master that I had delivered the bullock to Streeter, and told him the colour of it. Mr. Buzzell is the salesman.

THOMAS TURNER . A great while ago this bullock was lost; this drover came to me in the latter end of February or beginning of March, and said, when will you pay for this bullock.

Q. to Charnock. Did he ever tell what Turner - A. No. When a man comes for a bullock in a name that we know we deliver them.

Q. And you look to him for the money - A. No; my master looks to me for the money.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090920-187

814. JAMES HEWITT was indicted for a misdemeanour .

WILLIAM SAMUEL LOMAIZE . I am clerk to the vestry board of the parish of St. Martin's. I produce the indentures of Thomas Hutchinson from the parish chest, it bears date the 30th of December, 1787. The body of the writing is mine, my father witnessed it, he is in the country.

MARY ROSE . I was born in Wales, but I worked at the cotton manufactory in Manchester; I was employed by Mr. Douglas at a place called Pendleton Pow, about a mile from Manchester.

Q. While you were working at Mr. Douglas's do you remember a person of the name of Thomas Hutchinson - A. Yes; he was employed in the card work in the cotton manufactory; I lived with him very near five years in the employ of Mr. Douglas.

THOMAS HUGHES . I am a dyer, my partner's name is William Lewis ; we live in Bunhill-row.

Q. Have you a person in your employ of the name of Thomas Hutchinson - A. Yes; he was a helper in my dyehouse; the first time he worked for me was about ten years ago; then he lived with me three years; then he left me, he went to Manchester and was drawn for a soldier; I think he returned to us about a twelvemonth ago, then he was to serve with us three years. On Wednesday the 30th of August I sent for the prisoner, hearing that he had enticed Hutchinson to go to America; he came; I charged him with the act of seducing Hutchinson to go to America with him; I told him our contract was for a term of years not expired, and that he was an artificer in the cotton line, I believed it to be an illegal act, and that if he continued in doing it I would prosecute him; he told me that he had agreed to pay his passage, and was to pay it that day, but from my information of his being an artificer, and also being my contract servant, he would not do it. On the 1st of September I went before the magistrate, Hewitt told the justice that he had paid the passage that day, and produced the mates receipt for the money, and also a note from Hutchinson to him for the passage, and money advanced to him. The receipt and note read.

"London, August 30, 1809.

Received of James Hewitt , one hundred and twenty one dollars, and a one pound note.

Francis Cockin."

"London, August 31, 1809.

I promise to pay James Hewitt twenty two pound ten shillings, on demand for value received.

X the mark of Thomas Hutchinson .

Witness, Samuel Hill, William Blissard .

Mr. Hughes. He said our man was to pay him when he got to America; he had paid that money, and he was to get him work in Cooper's Town, New York, in America; Hutchinson was to repay him out of his earnings at a cotton manufactory, within two miles of where Hewitt lived.

JAMES BLACKHURST . I am a dyer, I work for Mr. Hughes.

Q. Did you ever hear Hewitt say any thing respecting Hutchinson - A. Yes; about a week before he was taken before the magistrate he said if he had a mind to go to America he would pay his passage over, and his expences, and when he got there he was to go to the cotton manufactory, and if he could not get employ Hewitt was to take him himself and keep him.

Q. Did you yourself work at Manchester - A. Yes; seven years ago; I knew Hutchinson at Manchester,

he worked for one Jacob, a cotton dyer. The conversation between Hewitt and Hutchinson passed at the Yorkminster, public house, Bunhill-row; I did not hear Hutchinson say any thing.

JOHN HOWSLER . I am clerk to Messrs Hughes and Lewis.

Q. Do you recollect the defendant coming to Mr. Hughes's premises at any time - A. Yes; by the request of Mr. Hughes. I heard Mr. Hughes tell him that he had heard that Hutchinson and he was going to America, Hewitt said it was so, that he had agreed to pay his passage, which was to be repaid in America by his labour; Mr. Hughes told him that he had agreed to serve him three years; Hewitt then said he would not go on with the bargain he had made with him.

WILLIAM HAMPTON . I am a journeyman dyer, I work for Messrs. Hughes and Lewis. I was at the Yorkminster public house about seven or eight days before Hewitt and Hutchinson was taken up. Hewitt and Hutchinson were there; I heard Hutchinson say that if Hewitt would pay his passage to America he would go, he was tired of his situation; I am a journeyman, Hewitt is a labourer; I asked Hewitt what motive he had in it; he said he was only taking him in a friendly way; Hewitt said he would pay if he would trust to his honour in paying him back again.

Q. Did the conversation originate with Hewitt - A. I believe Hutchinson began it to get Hewitt's consent to pay the passage. About two days after that I heard Hutchinson say he would stick to Hewitt as long as he had a button to his coat. I thought Hutchinson was imposing upon the old man; I am positive that he was no workman; I told the old man it was of no use to take such a man; I knew he was no tradesman in our line; I told the old man so because he might not be robbed of his property.

Q. Then I have only to tell you that you are full as bad as that man is, and ought to be indicted; you wished he would take an able manufacturer out of the country - A. No; I did not make use of any such word.

SAMUEL HILL . I am a stationer and rag merchant, No. 23, Featherstone-street.

Q. Were you present at any conversation between Hewitt and Hutchinson respecting going to America - A. Both of the prisoners called on me the night before they paid the money, the asked me to count up how many dollars it would take to make twenty seven guineas, I cast it up for them. I told Hutchinson his master was not willing for him to go, (Hewitt and he were both together) Hutchinson said that was settled and done, he was with his master last night, and shook hands with him, he wished him well.

Q. Can you tell me what the money for the passage to America is - A. Twenty seven guineas for the two.

GUILTY.

Judgment respited .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090920-188

815. THOMAS HUTCHINSON was indicted for a misdemeanour .

MARY ROSE . Q. Do you recollect the prisoner Hutchinson - A. Yes, very well; he was an apprentice to Mr. Douglas, a cotton manufacturer at Manchester; I worked there at the time he was an apprentice; he was employed chiefly in carding cotton; I was there five years during the time.

THOMAS HUGHES . Q. You are in partnership with William Lewis - A. Yes, we are cotton dyers living in Bunhill-row; Hutchinson was in our employ, he had been with us three years; first of all he went away and returned, and entered into a fresh agreement for another three years. This last time he had been in our employ a year.

Q. Was he in your employ on the 30th of August - A. Certainly. On the Wednesday morning I sent for Hewitt, and in the evening of the same day I had some conversation with Hutchinson, I told him it was very improper of him breaking his engagement with us by going to America; I told him I would stop him or punish him, I do not know which; he then said he would come to work the next morning, I believe; he did not come; I applied to a magistrate and he was brought before him.

SAMUEL HILL . I am a stationer and rag merchant. On the evening of the 31st of August Hewitt and the defendant came into my warehouse and asked me to count up how many dollars for twenty-seven guineas; I did it for the purpose of paying the passage to America; he meaned to pay for this man's passage and his own; thirteen pound for Hutchinson, and fourteen pound for his own.

Q. You are witness to that note - A. Yes; I told Hutchinson that Mr. Hughes was very unwilling for him to go, he would not let him; he said he shook hands with his master; he consented to his going, and wished him well.

Q. Did you go on board with this man - A. No.

Defendant. At the first of this you went with us - Did not you go down with me to the captain and leave a one pound note for the earnest - A. When Hewitt paid the money I went down to the docks, curiosity led me to walk about the docks; I did not go down with you.

Q. The captain asked Hewitt if he was a mind to go, he said yes: you asked the captain about me - A. That is not true.

Q. The captain said I take none but farmers, I did not twig the captain; you said yes, farmers; Hewit said he was a farmer, and I was going to help him - I was going to say I was a cotton manufacturer - A. I did go on board with the defendant, I cannot say the captain's name; I heard say the ship was going to New York.

WILLIAM BLISSARD . I am a victualler, I live in Bunhill-row. I was on board the ship when the money was paid for their passage out to America; I think it was on the Tuesday prior to the Friday they were taken up; this is the mates receipt for their passage to America.

GUILTY.

Judgment respited .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.


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