Old Bailey Proceedings, 26th June 1809.
Reference Number: 18090626
Reference Number: f18090626-1

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS. On the KING's Commission of the PEACE OYER AND TERMINER, AND GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON, AND ALSO THE GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, HELD AT Justice-Hall, in the Old Bailey, On WEDNESDAY the 26th of JUNE, 1809, and following Days;

BEING THE SIXTH SESSION IN THE MAYORALTY OF The Right Honourable CHARLES FLOWER , LORD-MAYOR OF THE CITY OF LONDON.

TAKEN IN SHORT-HAND BY JOB SIBLY, FOR R. BUTTERS, No. 117, ALDERSGATE-STREET.

LONDON:

PRINTED AND PUBLISHED (BY THE AUTHORITY OF THE CORPORATION OF THE CITY OF LONDON) By R. BUTTERS, No. 22, Fetter Lane, Fleet Street.

THE WHOLE PROCEEDINGS On the KING's Commission of the PEACE, OYER AND TERMINER, AND GOAL DELIVERY FOR THE CITY OF LONDON.

Before the Right-honourable CHARLES FLOWER , Lord Mayor of the City of London; Sir Simon Le Blanc , knt. One of the Justices of His Majesty's Court of King's Bench; Sir Alan Chambre , knt. One of the Justice of His Majesty's Court of Common Pleas; Sir Watkin Lewis , knt. Sir Richard Carr-Glyn , bart. Sir John Perring , bart. Aldermen of the said City; John Silvester , esq. Recorder of the said City; Sir Matthew Bloxam , knt. William Domville , esq. John Atkins , esq. Aldermen of the said City; and Newman Knowlys , esq. Common Serjeant of the said City; His Majesty's Justices of Oyer and Terminer of the City of London, and Justices of Goal Delivery of Newgate, holden for the said City and County of Middlesex.

London Jury.

William Warriner ,

William Norvill ,

Thomas Simpson ,

James Smith ,

John Howse ,

William Pedlyman ,

John Crichton ,

William Bentley ,

Edward Jones ,

Richard Pugh ,

Henry Owen ,

John Lloyed .

First Middlesex Jury.

Samuel Bolding ,

Alexander Weddel ,

John Coleman ,

Thomas Coleman ,

John Jutsom

Thomas Jagger ,

Thomas Gardener ,

Gregory Page ,

Nicolas Tipper ,

James Milner ,

James Shirley ,

Thomas Hallert .

Second Middlesex Jury.

Benjamin Deshon ,

Alexander Forsight ,

Thomas Waring ,

John Deacon ,

Samuel Platt ,

James Hawkes ,

William Williams ,

Richard Meredith ,

Richard Yend ,

Thomas Clunes ,

Thomas Hawkins .

John Sizeland .

Reference Number: t18090626-1

525. THOMAS EDWARDS was indicted for an unnatural crime .

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18090626-2

526. BRYAN CONNER , and JOHN DRISCOLL , were indicted for feloniously making an assault on the 1st of June , in the King's highway, upon John Kain , putting him in fear, and feloniously taking from his person, and against his will, a half guinea, a half crown, and a bank note, value 1 l. his property .

JOHN KAIN . I live in Blue Anchor-yard, Rosemary-lane . I am a watchman of Tower Ward, in the city of London .

Q. Did any thing happen to you on the beginning of this month - A. On the 1st of June, about a quarter before ten o'clock at night, I was coming out of my own house, Bryan Conner stopped me, he took hold of my stick.

Q. Did you know Bryan Conner before - A. Yes, I knew him before; he is a plumber , and lived in the neighbourhood about half a year, I lived there about three years.

Q. You knew him and he knew you - A. Yes.

Q. Was any body with him when you came out of the door - A. I did not see Driscoll then; when Bryan Conner came and knocked me down, he came and kicked me.

Q. Did you see him knock you down - A. I had a blow on the side of my head, it knocked me down.

Q. Was any thing said to you before that - A. No, after I was knocked down John Driscoll came and kicked me.

Q. You knew Driscoll before, did not you - A. Yes, I had a slight acquaintance with him.

Q. Did he say any thing to you before he kicked you - A. Yes, he said d - n his eyes, and old b - r, let us all three have at him; John Driscoll run and took hold of my foot, he put his hand into my breeches pocket, and when he pulled his hand out, he halloed out murder, thieves; the watch was not set at that time, I could not get assistance; he walked away from me directly he pulled his hand out of my pocket.

Q. That is Driscoll - A. Yes, I strove to get away from Conner in spite of him, I was afraid of my life, I went into my own place. I lost a one pound note, a half guinea in gold, and a half crown.

Q. Where was the money - A. In my breeches pocket; the place having such a bad character, I thought it was safer in my pocket than leaving it in my place.

Q. How long had you lived in this house - A. About three years; I am a poor man, and the rent is low.

Q. How long had you the money - A. Ever since the 1st of May

Q. At the time you went out of the house, was the money all in one pocket - A. All in one pocket.

Q. When you went into you house, do you know whether the money was gone - A. I knew it was gone before I went in, my pocket was turned inside out.

Q. Had you any quarrel with these people, either of them - A. I never had an angry word with either of them in my life.

Q. You say that Driscoll walked away - A. Yes.

Q. What did Conner do - A. He laid upon me until I forced him away; then I walked into my own house.

Q. This was close to your own door - A. It was within two yards of my own door.

Q. Did you go out of your house and go upon duty - A. I went out again, it was half past ten o'clock, another man was put in my place when I got to the watchhouse; then I came back again.

Q. When did you see Conner or Driscoll again - A. I saw Driscoll the next day, when he came home to his dinner, he lives in another court near me, and Conner lives within four or five doors. We got an officer to take him up; that morning Conner got a warrant against me and my wife.

Q. Was you wife with you this night - A. Yes, she came out of the house to save me.

Q. You never found the note or the money - A. They were never found.

Mr. Alley. Had you not struck Conner before he touched you - A. No; when I was down in the kennel I cried out murder, thieves, a great many people collected about me; I was afraid of my life.

ELEANOR KAIN . I am the wife of John Kain , the last witness.

Q. Do you remember on the night of the 1st of June any thing happening to your husband - A. Yes; when he first got out Bryan Conner got hold of his watch-stick, I stood at the door when my husband went out; he insisted upon my husband's stick, my husband told him he must be on his duty at ten o'clock; he would not let go the stick, he threw my husband down in the kennel.

Q. You are telling me when your husband came out, you saw Conner take hold of your husband and say he wanted his stick - A. Yes.

Q. And upon your husband not letting him gain it, saying he wanted to go upon the watch at ten o'clock what happened then - A. He pulled him down.

Q. You have said each one had hold of the stick and would not let go so he pulled him down - I do not hear of any striking - A. He said he would have the stick, he threw my husband down; he struck my husband on the head to the best of my opinion.

Q. I want to know what you saw, not your opinion; you say he pulled the stick, and pulled your husband down, did you see a blow given - A. He pulled him down, Conner lay over my husband.

Q. Did Conner fall down at the same time as your husband fell down - A. Not to my knowledge.

Q. Did you see Conner fall down - A. No; my husband was all over mud, and he was clean; he was lying upon him.

Q. Did you come out of your house at that time - A. Yes; I screamed out and got hold of Bryan Conner , I said Oh, for God's sake, do not kill my husband, do not hurt him; Bryan Conner 's wife got hold of me by the hair of my head, I was thrown down by her; she leaned upon me; Driscoll then came up, he said he

would have fair play; I knew Driscoll before by sight. He laid hold of my husband's feet when he lay in the kennel and said get the stick from the b - r; I saw Driscoll put his hand into my husband's pocket; I did not see him take any money out; my husband cried out thieves, he had been robbed; I got up when Conner's wife let go the hair of my head; she let go when a woman came up on my behalf; I went into my own door and my husband came into me; when he got up out of the kennel, Driscoll and Conner walked away.

Q. How many people where there about the door when this happened - A. There might be ten or twenty, they were chiefly women; that is all that I saw.

Q. How long did your husband stay in the house before he went to go on the watch - A. He went and lost his duty; he came back and said there was a man in his place; I think it was about twelve o'clock when he came home, he then went to bed; the next morning he went to Lambeth-street office and laid an information against the man that had robbed him.

Q. Did he lay an information against one man or two - A. He laid an information against two, to the best of my knowledge.

Q. Do you know whether your husband had any money in his pocket - A. Yes, he had a one pound note, a half crown, and half a guinea, to the best of my opinion.

Q. You knew Mrs. Conner very well, did not you - A. She has lived nigh us very near a year and a half.

Q. Had you been good neighbours together - A. We quarrelled once before.

Q. What was the occasion of Conner wanting your husbands stick and abusing him, do you know - A. My husband and I had a few words when he was going on duty that night.

Q. You had a few words, was that at the door - A. No, in my own house, and when my husband was going out of the door Conner was whistling and singing; I said Bryan Conner you should not try to make words between man and wife; I told him if he could not make peace he should not try to irritate; he called me what is not proper to express; I said nothing; my husband came out, he said good night Ann, and he got hold of my husband's stick.

Q. At the time that Conner came to your door whistling and singing you thought he was interfering between man and wife - A. Yes.

Q. Where was Driscoll - A. He was standing at his own door, he did not come up with Conner at that moment, but he did soon after; Conner told my husband that I had been doing clandestinely; I said nothing; after my husband got up out of the kennel, he said he was sorry that he had not killed him, and after my husband came home and said he could not get upon the watch Conner came up and put his fist in my husband's face.

Mr. Alley. You told my lord that there were a number of women, there were some men were there not - A. No, none except what were belonging to the party.

Q. Why did not you leave your own door and tell your neighbours that your husband had been robbed - A. The inhabitants are very poor people, and they were all in bed.

Q. Your husband was robbed about ten then he went to his watch - you knew he had been robbed why did not you call some of your neighbours or the watchman - A. There was no watchman then; when my husband got up the next morning, he went to Lambeth-street office in our parish; and Conner, when he got up, he went to Shadwell office and took my husbands stick there. As I was going along with my husband an officer met me; he told me he had a warrant against me, he took me in custody.

COURT. You were taken up I suppose upon the charge of Conner - A. Yes, and Conner and Driscoll were taken up.

Q. Was there any charge against Mrs. Conner - A. Yes, for pulling me by the hair.

FRANCIS FREEMAN . I am an officer of Whitechapel office. On the 2nd of June, in the morning Kain came down to the office and complained that he had been robbed of a one pound note, a half guinea and a half crown; about one o'clock in the day I apprehended Driscoll and his wife; I took them to the office; I searched him, I found half a guinea. On my return from the office I took up the other prisoner.

Q. The other party did not come to your office to make a charge - A. No, they went to Shadwell office.

Mr. Alley. You found Driscoll at his house - A. Yes, he was with his wife at dinner; Conner we found at a public house a little distance from the house.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18090626-3

527. MARGARET POITON was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Kitty Shepherd , no person being therein, about the hour of three in the afternoon on the 25th of May , and stealing therein, two pillows, value 4 s. two sheets, value 3 s. a blanket, value 2 s. a half blanket, value 1 s. a gown, value 4 s. and a looking glass, value 2 s. her property .

KITTY SHEPHERD . I am a single woman . I live at No. 2, Catherine Wheel-yard, Bishopgate-street . I lodge with Mr. Rust, he keeps the public house at the corner, and I live at No. 2, round the corner.

Q. Then Mr. Rust does not live in the house where you live - A. No, nor none of his family; it is occupied by lodgers. I have one room entirely to myself.

Q. Was any of your goods missing from your lodgings at any time - A. Yes on the 25th of May, the first day of Bow-fair.

Q. Were you at home when the things were missing - A. No, I was at my sisters; about three o'clock my nephew called in and found the room door broken open. In consequence of what he said I went home, I found the door of my apartment broken open.

Q. When had you left it - A. About nine in the morning.

Q. Had you left any body in your apartment when you went out - A. No, I double locked the door when I went out; and when I came home I found it open; the catch of the lock had been broken off. When I went in I missed all the articles mentioned in the indictment. I have seen the things since in the possession of the constable.

ANN HOLTON . I live at No. 13, Thomas's-rents, Half Moon-alley. I sell fish. On Thursday the 25th of May, the prisoner stopped me in Devonshire-street, she asked me if I would buy a shirt for my husband, I told

her yes, if it was worth buying; she took me down Devonshire-court, she would not shew it me in the open street; the first thing that she presented to me was a wet shift, I told her it was not a shirt, she said she had a shirt, and pulled out a wet shirt; she asked me two shillings for them; she produced other things. I went to take her to an officer, she ran away from me. I gave information to Kitty Shepherd .

LAZURUS JACOBS . I am constable of Spitalfields.

Q. Did you happen to meet the prisoner at any time with a bundle - A. Yes, on the 25th of May, about four o'clock in the evening, I met her in Bell-lane, Spitalfields; I stopped her on suspicion of having stolen goods, she told me they were hers; I asked her where she lived, she told me two or three different places; I took the bundle from her, and put her in the watch-house. I have had the property ever since.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I was going along the street, she asked me if I would sell them things, I said I would. I do not know any thing of the woman or the things.

GUILTY, aged 46.

Of stealing to the value of four shillings only .

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18090626-4

528. JOHN WATERS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 14th of June , a bugle horn, value 3 l. the property of our sovereign lord the King ; and a handkerchief, value 1 d. the property of Edmund Green .

SECOND COUNT for like offence, only varying the manner of charging it.

JAMES BLY . I an officer of Queen-square office.

Q. What have you got there - A. A bugle horn, and a pocket handkerchief; I discovered the bugle horn at Mr. Stock's pawnbroker, Strutton-ground; the handkerchief I found in the prisoner's pocket, on Wednes- the 14th of June. When he was apprehended the prisoner denied knowing any thing of the bugle horn when he was committed. I found it the next day.

JOHN STOCK . Q. Look at that bugle horn, from whom did you get it. - A. From the prisoner on the 14th of June.

Mr. Alley. It is not worth two shillings, is it - A. It may be worth more, it would not fetch a guinea in the trade.

WILLIAM PONDER . I am a drummer in the first regiment of foot Guards; I had that bugle horn in my possession about three weeks; I practised on it; I received it from Edward Jones . The horn belongs to the regiment, it was in my care; I kept it at my lodgings, at James Phillips', the Castle, in Chapel-street, Westminster . On the 14th of June, I went to parade a quarter before nine and left the bugle horn in my box at my quarter; I returned about twenty five minutes before twelve; I went up stairs to undress myself and put my clothes in the box, I missed the bugle horn out of my box; if I had not found the bugle horn it would have cost me four guineas to buy a new one. That is the same bugle horn; the prisoner is a drummer in the St. Margaret volunteers ; he slept in the same room where I did.

Q. Was your box locked in which you left it - A. It was not locked.

Q. Did you leave him at home when you went out on the parade - A. No; he had not been at home all night.

Q. Did any body else lodge in the same room with you - A. Yes, Edward Green; he is an horner to the rifle-men in the same regiment.

EDWARD GREEN . Q. You are quartered in the same house with the last witness - A. Yes; I am a bugle horner in the same regiment ; I had that bugle in my possession for two years; I used to play it in the Light infantry company; then Edward Jones had it; it was afterwards ordered to be given to Edward Ponder for him to learn to play on it. I saw it in his possession that same morning it was lost; it is worth about a guinea and a half; the handkerchief is mine, I value it at ten-pence.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel, called five witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY, aged 17.

Of stealing to the value of nineteen shillings only.

Judgement respited .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18090626-5

529. MARY EVANS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 12th of May . two yards and a half of linen cloth, value 5 s. seven pair of stockings, value 7 s. a pair of trowsers, value 10 s. 6 d. a bed gown, value 1 s. 6 d. two pinafores, value 1 s. three towels, value 1 s. 3 d. a sheet, value 3 s. a pair of pockets, value 1 s. and a shift, value 7 s. the property of William Lovegrove , in his dwelling house .

SECOND COUNT for like offence, only stating it to be the property of Edward Blackwell .

ELIZABETH LOVEGROVE . I am the wife of William Lovegrove. I live at No. 8, St. Ann's-court, Soho, in the parish of St. Ann's .

Q. Is you husband the housekeeper - A. No, he is not, we have the kitchen, we are only lodgers; Edward Blackwell is the owner of the house; neither he nor none of his family lives there, he lives at No. 6. I kept a mangle. On Friday the 12th of May, between the hour of three and four in the afternoon, I missed the property; I went out with a woman that came for me to go and fetch a basket of linen.

Q. Who is that person - A. I do not know her person.

Q. Did you leave any body in your room when you went out to go with her - A. Only a child about two years and a half old. I was absent about half an hour, I returned, I missed a bundle that I had to mangle; I knew the contents of the bundle, I had mangled them, and pinned them up ready to go home. I had left the articles on the table behind the kitchen door.

Q. Where were you taken to afterwards - A. The woman that took my things, took me out to go to a house, No. 30, in King-street, Soho, after a basket of linen; and in part of the way to the house she left me, she said she was going to get an errand, she would be there as soon as me. I never saw any more of her that day; we took her on the 21st of the same month. I saw her immediately after she was taken, but I did not know her.

Q. You were mentioning of her taking you to some house, No. 30, King-street, Soho - A. Yes, that was the day she robbed me; I went to No. 30, I found there was none; I came home and found the things missing. I have seen some of the things that were found in her room on the 21st.

Q. But the person of the prisoner you do not recollect - A. She was an entire stranger to me before.

WILLIAM LOVEGROVE . I am the husband of the

last witness; I only know the prisoner by tracing her to where she lived and taking the property from her lodgings.

Q. You assisted in taking her up - A. Yes; Mr. and Mrs. Wilson, me and my wife were out together on the 21st of May; the prisoner was just coming out of Tothill-fields prison, from seeing a person that was in there.

Q. Who took charge of the property you found there - A. Mr. Skinner; I know nothing of the articles; I was not at home at the time; the prisoner was taken to Tothill-fields prison.

MARTHA WILSON . Q. Were you one of those that were at the apprehending of the prisoner - A. Yes, I keep a broker's shop in the same house where the prosecutrix lived; the prisoner on the day mentioned came into the yard to me and asked me if I was the person belonging to the mangle; I told her no, the person belonging to the mangle was in the kitchen; she went down into the kitchen; I know that person was the prisoner perfectly well, I never saw her before. They came up together; Mrs. Lovegrove asked me if I would give an eye to the kitchen; while they went for a basket of linen; the prisoner came back again in about five minutes, after leaving Mrs. Lovegrove; she told me that they had forgot half their errand, they had not took with them the mangling things; she said Mrs. Lovegrove told her she was to go down stairs and I was to give her the things, but I did not give them her; she went down stairs and took them before I could get into the kitchen; she told me that she must make haste and overtake her or else she should not be able to give her the rest of the mangling things.

Q. What other mangling things - A. There were none, that was only her false pretence. Mrs. Lovegrove came back and told me there were no mangling things at No. 30; I saw no more of the prisoner; I told Mrs. Lovegrove that I had given her the things. We found the prisoner eight days after at Tothill fields

THOMAS SKINNER . I am an officer. On the 21st of May, I apprehended the prisoner very near Tothill-fields-bridewell; I was informed her apartment was in Orange-court, Drury-lane; I went and searched it, and found some articles that Mrs. Lovegrove identified. I have had them ever since.

Prosecutor. I found her in the room on the 13th of May, about seven o'clock in the morning, she was dressing herself; I had a suspicion of the woman that lodged with her, and they put her down in the dust hole.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. On the day that person lost the things her husband came down to where I lodge in Orange-court, Drury-lane; I was sitting at the window at work, he then enquired for a woman with a cast in her eye, of the name of Goodwin; in the evening I was in a public house in Drury-lane, he saw me there and took no notice of me. On the Sunday morning the woman that I lodged with said there is somebody lifting the latch of the door; I said it is the same man that came before. On the Monday I went to Constitution-hill, I saw him, he took no notice of me. On the Sunday week following I went with the woman I lodged with to see a man in Tothill-fields-prison for quarrelling; these two women stopped me and said I was the woman that took the bundle and ran away.

GUILTY, aged 26.

Of stealing to the value of thirty-nine shillings only .

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18090626-6

530. JAMES BROWN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 19th of June , a mare, value 35 l. the property of John Lomas .

JOHN LOMAS . I am a butcher , I live in the High-street, Kensington.

Q. Had you a horse or a mare - A. A black mare; in this month I rented some land adjoining to Holland Park . I kept my mare there.

Q. When did you see her there - A. On Monday the 19th of this month, at nine o'clock in the evening, I saw her secure then, and the gates were locked up; about half after eleven o'clock I was called up by the watchmen; I came down to the door, I found the prisoner in custody of the watchman and the mare.

Q. Did you know the mare when you saw it to be your own - A. Yes.

Q. Who had it in his possession - A. The watchman and some of the people with him, I do not know who had hold of the mare.

Q. Was she bridled or saddled at that time - A. She had an altar and a bridle on, and a great coat and a bag strapped on her back.

Q. Did the prisoner say any thing - A. He asked me to give him the coat and the bag which was on the mare.

Q. Did he say who they belonged to - A. He called them his; I gave him the coat, he put it on; I gave the bag to the watchman, and desired him to take care of it.

Q. You are sure the mare was that which you lost - A. Yes; I took possession of the mare immediately; and the prisoner I sent to the watchhouse. The mare was a black mare, with white legs and white face.

JAMES LEMMING . Q. I believe you are watchman to lord Holland - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know a field near Holland Park that was in possession of Mr. Lomas - A. Yes. On the evening of the 19th of this month I was on duty, it is a regular rule to fire a piece off at eleven o'clock; I got there a few minutes before the time; when I got out of Holland house, I heard something crushing like wood a breaking; I fired the piece off at eleven o'clock as usual; I went nearer and nearer to where I heard the noise, to the gate that leads out of Mr. Lomas's field; I was on the other side, I heard a person or persons talking to a horse or mare; there was an hedge and a gate to it that leads to Mr. Lomas's field, I found that gate unlocked; I went on forward, where I knew there was another gate, that gate I locked on the 19th of this month, there I found the lock as I put it on; there was another gate that leads into the Hammersmith or Bath road, that gate I saw shut, I live just at the point of it. I went into my own yard, I had not been there a few minutes before I heard the chain of this gate unloosed; I heard a horse coming along, I did not see it; I shut my own gate and rather hid myself behind the paling, I expected the horse would be brought through the gate by my house; instead of that it turned off to Kensington, I expected that gate to be locked; I heard

the gate shut after the horse went through; then I went after it as quick as possibly I could do, and when I met the gentleman with the horse it had an halter and a bridle on, and a coat and bag strapped on his back.

Q. At last you found the person with the horse - A. Yes, about twenty or thirty yards off the gate that leads into the Hammersmith road.

Q. It was a lane that led from the place where you found the gate open - A. Yes; I went up to him, I asked him where he was going that way, he said he had lost his way, he wanted to go to Uxbridge; he made a stop, I asked him whose horse he had got there, he said it was his own; I told him I thought it was Mr. Lomas's, therefore I could not let him go until I knew whether it was Mr. Lomas's or not. The gentleman said he was very agreeable to go with me to Mr. Lomas, and he led the horse or mare down the road very quietly. I hollaoed out to the watchman, I could not make him hear; I hollaoed out again as hard as I could, two men came to me; I told them what I thought. One of the men took the mare out of the gentleman's hands, and I took hold of the gentleman by the collar.

Q. Do you know who it was took hold of the mare - A. No; two men came up, I could not see which of them it was, the person led the mare; I had hold of the man and followed; the man and the mare were taken to Mr. Lomas. I had the mare in sight all the time before we came to Mr. Lomas's; in Kensington-street we met the watchman, I told him, he went with us to Mr. Lomas's.

Q. Who was the man that had the mare when you first saw her - A. This James Brown .

Q. Do you know his person now, look at him - A. That is the gentleman, the prisoner at the bar; I am sure he is the person, and I am quite sure it was the mare that was claimed by Mr. Lomas, that he had. It was never out of my sight,

Q. Had you known the mare before - A. Yes; I saw her on the evening before go into the field.

Q. Did you observe what the mare had on her back - A. I saw something on her back, I did not take notice then; I heard the prisoner say it was his coat and his bag. Mr. Lomas when he owned the mare, he ordered the watchman to take him to the watchhouse.

THOMAS DEARMER . Q. Did you see the prisoner and the mare just after the mare was seized and the prisoner was taken up - A. Yes.

Q. You have heard what he has said, do you know any thing else that he has not related - A. I know that the prisoner owned the bag and the coat that were taken off the mare's back; I went with him to Mr. Lomas's and rang the bell; I was asked by a person if I knew the mare, I said yes; the prisoner said it was his own property, that passed as I was going to call Mr. Lomas up.

Prisoner's Defence. On Monday June the 19th, 1809, I was coming from Kensington road to Uxbridge road, in the way to Camden Town about ten o'clock; in the common path for travellers, and at the time people were passing and repassing, I met with a horse with an haltar on his head, and the other end entangled about his legs; I foolishly took the halter from under his feet, and led him towards the houses at Kensington, some man behind me told me to stop, I did, and gave him the horse without a word. It was in a common road, and many people were passing at the time; I had no thought of stealing the horse. I am a native of Plymouth; the time I have been here is so short, I have no friends in this part of the county.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 49.

[ The prisoner was recommended to his majesty's mercy by the jury and the prosecutor, on account of his demeanour when he was apprehended .]

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18090626-7

531. JAMES GORTEN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 12th of April , in the dwelling house of John Gore , a bill of exchange, value 170 l. his property .

Mr. Gurney, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090626-8

532. MARY BATES was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 20th of June , three candlesticks, value 4 s. 6 d. a curtain, value 7 s. four tablecloths, value 8 s. two napkins, value 2 s. and two handkerchiefs, value 2 s. the property of James Griffiths .

JAMES GRIFFITHS . I keep the Horn tavern by St. Paul's ; the prisoner was in my service, she was with me about four months; the things are all in court, when they are produced, I shall swear to them. On the 20th of June I got a constable and searched all the servant's boxes, among the rest I searched hers; the prisoner acknowledged the box to be hers; she unlocked it in the presence of the constable.

Q. Before you sent for the constable, had you any suspicion of her stealing these things - A. Not any; my charge was generally against all the servants, I did not know particularly who had committed the fact.

Q. What was it you found in her box - A. Nothing of my property; something like a duplicate; that strengthened my suspicion; I enquired of her what induced her to leave my house that morning, she said she had gone into Little Brittain to a particular acquaintance of hers, Mrs. Cox, the White Swan; I went with the constable and enquired, I found by the mistress of the house that she had not been there; she then said that she had been down Ludgate-hill; I sent the constable to the pawnbrokers, and other people to different pawnbrokers; the first thing that was found was a curtain at Mr. Flemings; it was pawned there for seven shillings.

Q. When that curtain was produced, did you know it to be yours - A. I did, I had others of the same pattern; I had only missed it that morning, they were going to be washed and calendered, and he put up again; that was the first thing that caused my suspicion. On it being brought before her she owned that she had pawned it that morning. The three candlesticks were sent in to me by a pawnbroker very near to me, his name is Robert Peart , he lives in Little Knight Rider-street; them were shewn to the prisoner, she acknowledged the theft. I know the other things all to be mine, by the marks.

PETER CARY . I am beadle of the ward; Mr. Griffiths gave charge of her on suspicion of stealing the curtain; she denied knowing any thing of the curtain till she saw it, and then she acknowledged to pawning it. I took her to the compter.

CHARLES TAYLOR . I am servant to Mr. Peart, pawnbroker.

Q. Do you know the person of the woman at the

bar - A. Yes; she has been in the habit of using our shop about a month; the three candlesticks were pawned by the prisoner in the name of Mary Smith ; she pawned them for one shilling each; one on the 14th of May, one on the 30th, and one on the 14th of June; the constable took them away; there is a pillow case and two handkerchiefs pawned on the 10th of May, I took them in; I cannot say who was the person that pawned them.

THOMAS THOMAS . I am servant to Mr. Fleming pawnbroker, Fleet-market. I took two table clothes and two napkins in pledge, in the name of Gregory.

Q. Can you say that the prisoner was the person that pledged them - A. I cannot.

Q. Did you take in a curtain - A. I did, on the 20th of June of the prisoner; she pledged it between nine and ten o'clock for seven shillings.

JAMES LAWSON . I am servant to Thomas Cotterill pawnbroker, Shoe-lane. I took in these two tableclothes, one on the 15th of May, and the other on the 25th; I took it in of the prisoner, in the name of Gregory; I have seen her frequently, I know her person well; I advanced four shillings on the 15th, and the next five shillings, in the name of Smith.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I never pawned any tableclothes at Mr. Flemings in my life. It is the first crime ever I committed, I hope it will be the last. I hope the gentlemen will have mercy on me.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090626-9

533. ANN BROWN , and ANN COOPER , were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 26th of May , fourteen yards of muslin, value 1 l. 15 s. the property of John Styles , privately in his shop .

JOHN STYLES . I live at 149, Bishopgate-street, in the parish of Bishopgate-without , I am a linen draper , I have no partner. On the 26th of May, between one and three o'clock, I saw the prisoners together in the shop, I was at the distance of between eight and ten yards; I did not hear what they asked for, they left the shop; a man came up to the door, and said we had been robbed. I pursued them; they crossed Bishopgate-street, and were a little way up Union-street before I got up to them; my shop is opposite of Union-street.

Q. Did they appear to be in company - A. They did; one was stopped when I went up, and the other was coming up to her; I pulled Cooper's cloak of one side in Union-street, and saw the muslin under her arm; she dropped it, I picked it up, and desired her to walk in with me, she did; and the other was brought after her by Baldero. I sent for an officer; we examined them, nothing else belonging to me was found.

Q. Upon examining that piece of muslin, did you know it to be yours - A. I did, it had my shop mark.

Q. You served them with nothing that day, did you - A. I did not.

Q. Did you ask them how they came by it - A. No.

Q. Did they pretend that they had bought it - A. No.

Q. Who had you serving in the shop that day - A. Mr. Baldero and two others; I could not be certain that my boy was in the shop, the other young man was I know.

Q. And Baldero is the only person of the three who is here - A. Yes.

Q. What was the prime cost of that muslin - A. Half a crown a yard; there is fourteen yards of it.

- BALDERO. Q. Are you a servant of Mr. Styles - A. Yes. On the 26th of May, I was serving in the shop, I saw the two prisoners come in as if they came in together; they immediately followed each other, they took no notice, nor did they speak to each other during the time they were in the shop. Ann Cooper asked for a common shawl; I was at that time engaged with serving a man customer; I turned my back upon the prisoner Cooper to reach down a piece of print for the man.

Q. At the time that Cooper asked for the shawl did the other prisoner Brown ask for any thing - A. Nothing.

Q. How far did she stand from the other prisoner - A. Close by her. When I returned again she asked me for half a shawl; on my telling her that we did not halve them, she left the shop immediately followed by Ann Brown .

Q. Was there any other person serving in the shop close by you - A. No.

Q. Then Brown could not be bargaining with any other person - A. She did not.

Q. Were there any pieces of muslin on the counter near where Cooper stood - A. There were several, and this amongst the rest; I saw it about a quarter of an hour before; in a few minutes after they left the shop from information I followed them, and when I first got sight of them they were near Union-street; they both took up Union-street; I detained Cooper, requested her to go back; she hesitated and appeared not willing to go back; Mr. Styles came up, took hold of Cooper's cloak I saw the muslin under her; I took hold of Brown, requested her to go back with me; she did, I followed her; they both came back to the shop. Sapwell was sent for, he examined them; Mr. Styles charged him with both of them, as they were together at the time of stealing it; they said they had no knowledge of each other. I am quite sure the muslin is my master's property.

- SAPWELL. I was sent for to take charge of these young women; Mr. Styles charged them with stealing this muslin; they told me they knew nothing about it; I searched Cooper and found nothing at all on her; on Brown I found nineteen bad shillings.

The property produced and identified.

Brown's Defence. I am innocent of the affair I am accused of; I never ser eyes on the woman before. When the gentleman asked me to come back I went back immediately.

Cooper's Defence. This woman I never saw before; I was very much in liquor; I do not remember seeing the muslin till I saw it before the lord Mayor.

Sapwell. Both of the prisoners were as sober as they are now.

Brown called five witnesses, who gave her a good character.

BROWN, NOT GUILTY .

COOPER, GUILTY, aged 30.

Of stealing, but not privately in the shop .

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090626-10

534. ANN BROWN , and ANN COOPER , were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 26th of May , eight yards of lace, value 4 s. 6 d. the property of John Cooper .

JOHN COOPER . I am a laceman , 21, Sun-street, Bishopgate-street . On the 26th of May, between two and three o'clock, a young man going by stepped in the shop, I was at the back part of the shop; he asked me whether I had lost any lace from the door, I had lace pinned to some stuff at the door of the shop; upon my looking at the door, I missed the lace; I had seen the lace there ten minutes before; I had cut some off for a customer, and had pinned it up again. I followed Cooper immediately; she was alone when she took it, but she joined Brown in an alley at the back of my house.

Q. When you got out of your shop, how far was Ann Cooper up the alley - A. She was out of my sight in the alley; I went to the top of Sun-street, and met the two prisoners coming out of the top of the alley; they were together in company with a man; the young man that gave me the information, followed them up the alley, and pointed out the one that took it; the two prisoners and the man that they were in company with were all talking together, they all three went into the liquor shop together; I left the young man to watch them while I went for Sapwell, and when I came back the prisoners had come out of the liquor shop; they were all going into Mr. Styles's, the man went in first, I went further on for Sapwell, he not being at home, and when they came out of Mr. Styles's the young man that gave me the information went in and told Mr. Styles. George Cox picked up the lace in the street.

GEORGE COX . I live in Mitchell-street; I am an apprentice to Mr. Sherfleet, a cabinet maker. As I was coming down Sun-street, I saw a great many people going into Mr. Styles's shop; when I got to the pavement by Mr. Styles's door, I kicked my foot against something, which afterwards turned out to be lace; I took it into Mr. Styles's shop, and asked them if it was their lace, I gave it into Mr. Cooper's hands, he was in Mr. Styles's shop; he claimed the lace. The women were in Mr. Styles's shop when I went in; I know nothing of their taking it. Mr. Sapwell had the lace.

ANN BARRY . I am a servant, I live near the Halfway house, Cottage-lane, I saw a mob of people. A young man took hold of Brown in Union-street, I followed her; I saw her drop the lace down, Mr. Baldero laid hold of the tall woman, Brown; he took her into Mr. Styles's shop, Brown had her hands in the pocket hole of her gown, I saw it drop from her clothes; this young man, Cox, was coming by, he picked it up just at Mr. Styles's door; I followed the young man into the shop. I saw Cox give that which he picked up to Mr. Cooper.

The property produced and identified.

Brown's Defence. I never saw the lace if I was to die before I go down the steps, before I saw it in the gentleman's hands, then it was all in a whisp, it was not as it is now.

Cox. At the time I picked up the lace, it was all in a lump.

Prosecutor. It was delivered to me in a ball, it was squeezed up, I could hardly get it out again.

Cooper's Defence. I was going down Sun-street the same day I picked up this bit of lace, in the same manner is the boy said, when this gentleman to his shop I let it drop; I went into the wine vaults, I had a glass of peppermint; ever so many people followed me in. I never saw this woman to my knowledge before that day.

BROWN, GUILTY , aged 33.

COOPER, GUILTY , aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090626-11

535. THOMAS HUTCHINSON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 19th of June , from the person of Elizabeth Gifford , widow , a box, value 1 halfpenny, thirteen shillings, a piece of base coin, value 1 Farthing, and a piece of copper coin, value 1 farthing, and a bank note, value 1 l. her property .

ELIZABETH GIFFORD . I am a widow. On Monday morning the 19th of June, between seven and eight in the morning, I was in Newgate market , I had the box and money safe in my pocket; I felt the prisoner's hand in my pocket; I clapped my hand to my pocket, and found that I missed my box; I laid hold of his collar, I said you villain, you have robbed me, he said me, I said yes, you, and if you do not give it me, I will lose my life before I will lose my property; he slipped it out of his hand on the top of a basket.

Q. Was there any body close by you at the time you felt his hand in your pocket - A. Nobody but him when I catched hold of him.

Q. Had you observed him near you before that time - A. I cannot say I had.

Q. What were you doing at the time you thought you felt his hand in your pocket - A. I was under Mr. Cope's shop, a fruiterer's shop; I was bargaining for some cucumbers at the time he put his hand in my pocket.

Q. Was he secured then - A. There was some little tustle till I got my property from him. Immediately the clerk of the market took him, I did not wish to prosecute him on account of his family; I have since heard that he has a family.

Q. It was not upon that account that you let him go at that instant - A. No.

Q. Are you quite sure that he is the same person, though you parted with him - A. Yes, he is the same man that I laid hold off.

Q. You did not know the man before, did you - A. No.

Q. Therefore you did not know any thing about his family at that time - A. No, only what I have heard since.

Q. What was the contents of your box - A. A one pound note, thirteen shillings in silver, a bad shilling, and a foreign farthing; I have the box, the money I was obliged to make use of. I saw him slip the box out of his hand on the basket.

Mr. Reynolds. Do you mean to say that you saw him distinctly put it out of his hand on the basket - A. Yes, I clasped my arms around him, and when I turned round I saw it on the basket.

Q. You had got him in front, you could not see through him - A. I turned round and saw the box that he put on the basket, I said you dropped it; a woman said she saw him put it out of his hand. The prisoner and I fell down in struggling; that was after I had my box.

Q. How many persons were there when this happened

- A. A great number; but there were no person by when I felt his hand in my pocket.

Q. I do not believe the clerk of the market interfered till this man was pretty well mauled about - A. Yes; a whole mob set about him, and then he run till he got him.

Prisoner's Defence. Please you, my lord, I am taken at a nonplus for character; I have nobody here at present; if it was referred till tomorrow I could have many.

GUILTY , aged 42.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090626-12

536. JOHN REED was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 12th of June , a watch, value 2 l. a watch key, value 3 d. and a pair of shoes, value 10 s. the property of Robert Davey , in his dwelling house .

ROBERT DAVEY . I live at No. 4, New-court, Fore-street, Cripplegate ; I rent the whole house.

Q. Did you at any time lose a watch and a key and a pair of shoes - A. Yes. On the 12th of this month; I was not at home at the time they were taken. The shoes was in the room where he slept, and the watch was in the room where my wife slept.

Q. Did the prisoner lodge in your house - A. Yes; he took the lodging on Saturday the 10th in the morning, and came in the evening, about half after eleven o'clock. He took it by the week.

Q. When was the last time that you had seen the watch - A. I wound the watch up before his face, and lay it on the mantle piece.

Q. Did you both use the same sitting room - A. Yes; at the time I wound up the watch.

Q. What time did you leave the house on the Monday morning - A. I told him I should leave the house about three o'clock; when I got up I heard the chimes go a quarter after three; he was awake, he asked the time; I said a little after three. I went down stairs and called my wife up; she let me in; I told her not to lock the door, I should be back in about an hour and a half; I returned about a quarter before five; I went to feed my birds before I went to the warehouse. In consequence of what my wife said I found my watch was gone.

Q. Was the prisoner gone too - A. He was gone.

Q. When had you seen the shoes - A. I had seen them on the Sunday morning. He said have you a shoemaker here; I said no, they have been hanging there three months; he took them off the nail and said they would fit him.

Q. Perhaps he might have taken them away on the Sunday - A. No; they were in the room on Sunday morning; on Monday morning they were taken away, I had seen them on Sunday afternoon at four o'clock, I did not notice them when I went to bed.

Q. When did you see the prisoner again - A. On Wednesday, about seven o'clock, I then said to him, Reed, you thief, you are the man that I have been looking for ever since Monday morning. He never returned, nor had I sight of him till I took him, and then he turned as white as ashes; he did not say a word. I told him what he had stole; he did not deny it.

Q. Did you ever get your watch or your shoes - A. No. I had another lodger that slept in the room where I did, he has been with me two years; I never lost a halfpennyworth by him; he lives with me now.

ANN DAVEY . I am the wife of Robert Davey .

Q. How lately had you seen the shoes - A. On Sunday afternoon, when I went up to make the bed, it was later than four o'clock. They were new shoes.

Q. Do you know whether the watch was safe when your husband left the house on Monday morning - A. Yes; I heard it tick; the watch was kept in the room where I slept; it lay on the mantle piece. My husband went out about three, he left my door open; John Reed came down stairs in about five minutes after my husband went out; he opened the door and came in; he asked me if I was asleep, I answered him, no, I was not; he asked me for the bottle that he had left there the over night; he had left a bottle of gin and peppermint there the over night; I told him where it was, and the glass was close by the watch; then he went out and shut the door after him; I missed the watch directly Reed went out of the room. I did not hear it tick.

Q. Did you know that he was going out any where that day - A. He said he was going out at five o'clock to get his box, he asked me what time I should get the breakfast ready; I told him at nine o'clock. I never saw him till Wednesday morning when he was taken up.

Q. What sort of a watch was it - A. A silver watch.

- PAGE. I appprehended this man upon Davey's charge; I searched him, I found no property about him.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing at all what they accuse me about; I am as innocent as a child unborn.

GUILTY, aged 50.

Of stealing to the value of thirty nine shillings only .

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090626-13

537. MARGARET BIRD was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 23d of May , a silver watch, value 7 l. the property of Morgan Sweeney .

MORGAN SWEENEY . I am a journeyman printer . On the 23rd of May, about half after one in the morning. I was coming to my lodgings in Great Earl-street, Seven Dials; going through the piazzas, Covent Garden , I was stopped by this girl, she clapped her hands round my waist, and held me in such a manner so that I could not extricate myself unless I was to knock her down by a blow; I desired her to let me go, that I did not mean to be stopped by any person, I was going to my lodgings and would not go with her; I felt her hand in the situation that she pulled the watch from my pocket; I instantly demanded my watch of her; I seized her by the right arm, she pushed me forward; she halloaed out what watch, and kept her left hand behind her. I endeavoured to seize the hand that kept the watch, I was afraid that she was going to drop it on the flags; I had not a moment to spare. By her halloaing out a man came up, I was hussled about by him. I secured her. I said my good girl you shall not part with me till I give you into custody. I took her to the corner of Hart-street, there I saw a watchman coming towards me, I gave her in custody; she struggled, but it was useless; I brought her to the watchhouse in Covent-garden along with the watchman; he had one arm and I the other. When she

came into the watchhouse; the constable of the night searched both her pockets and her bosom. I told him I suspected that she had not my watch, I thought the accomplice took it from her because I was dashed against a pile of bricks against the box door of the theatre, under the piazzas. The constable found no watch.

Q. What became of the man - A. He vanished from me. I never let the prisoner go till I gave her into the charge of the watchman.

Mr. Alley. This was at one o'clock at night - A. It wanted twenty five minutes to two o'clock.

Q. Were you drunk or sober - A. I drank a little; I was hearty and perfectly sensible.

Q. There were a great many women under the piazzas, were there not - A. I did not see one; I was not with her two minutes.

Q. You said that she held you in a manner that you could not extricate yourself - A. No; not till she pulled my watch out with her left hand, and slung it behind her.

Q. Then at the time she took your watch she had only one arm on you - A. When I was first seized she had both her arms round me; she disengaged one of her arms to take the watch from me; I secured her when I missed the watch.

Q. At the time when you first spoke to her was there a man in company with her - A. No; nor woman neither.

Q. When the watchman came up, I ask you upon your oath, did you say one word to him about any man assisting her. Did not you mention it first at Bow-street, and not at the watchhouse - A. Her accomplice came up and hustled me, and then it was he look the watch from her.

Q. You say that after the officer took her in custody she was searched for the purpose of examining whether she had the watch or no - A. Truly.

Q. Why, what was that done for, if you knew at the time that the man took the watch from her - A. I was quite sensible after the hustle she had lost the watch.

Q. Were it not at Bow-street the next day you stated that the man assisted her and took away the watch - A. I stated at Bow-street that her accomplice came up, and I suspected that the accomplice had taken the watch from her.

Q. Then it was at Bow-street and not at the watch-house, the first time you mentioned it - A. Certainly.

Q. Where had you been spending the evening - A. I had been on a party of pleasure; we had two pots of beer; we went up in a boat to Wandsworth.

Q. You have never seen the watch from that time to this - A. Never.

WILLIAM ASHMAN . I am a watchman of Covent-garden. I was calling the hour of half past one, I saw the prosecutor with the prisoner, he called for assistance; I went; he gave the prisoner in custody to me; he said she had stole his watch; I took hold of one arm and he the other; we took her to the watchhouse; she was searched and nothing was found on her; two men followed her; I told them to keep off.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of the charge you may depend on it. This man was speaking to three women under the piazzas; he left them and came to me; I had not been with him three minutes before he said you have my watch. There were some people followed us, but I did not know them; he never mentioned at the watchhouse that I had an accomplice.

GUILTY , aged 33.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090626-14

538. JONAS LEVY was indicted for feloniously making an assault on the king's highway, upon Frederic Coleman , on the 21st of May , putting him in fear, and feloniously taking from his person, and against his will, a watch, value 4 l. 4 s. a metal chain, value 1 s. a metal seal, value 1 s. and a metal hook, value 2 d. his property .

FREDERIC COLEMAN. I live in Wentworth-street, Whitechapel ; I am a labourer .

Q. Do you recollect at any time seeing the prisoner - A. Yes; I saw him on Whitsunday night, between ten and eleven o'clock; I was going home; I had been to Stepney.

Q. How near were you to your own door - A. I was just upon the steps, I was going to open the latch of the door to walk in; this man pushed me and took the watch out of my pocket.

Q. How did he push you - was he walking along - A. That I do not know. I was just going in doors; he gave me a push and took the watch out of my pocket.

Q. Did you see where he came from - A. He came of my side with one hand and pushed me on the left breast; I take it to be his hand.

Q. You do not know what it was, only that there was something pushed you - A. Yes; and then took the watch out of my pocket.

Q. Did you feel your watch go - A. Yes; it was in my watch pocket; he got hold of the chain, turned round and began to run.

Q. Did he say any thing to you - A. No, he did not. I halloaed out stop thief, and ran behind him. The watchman as he came along fell down; he got away. Mr. Griffiths, the officer, took him.

Q. Did you know the prisoner before - A. Yes; he has walked about my door many times in the day; I know him by sight. I have never seen my watch since. It was a silver watch; I had it three years; I gave four guineas and a half for it; there was a chain, seal, and a little hook to it.

- GRIFFTHS. On Monday the 22nd of May, I received information of the prosecutor being robbed of his watch, and by the description I found the prisoner at the Star, in Mount-street, where he lodged; I told him I took him in custody for robbing a man in Wentworth-street. I took him to the office, and the prosecutor came and swore to him.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of the crime. I was at Epsom races; I was not in town that night till half after twelve; Mr. Griffiths took me out of the public house, he said for a highway robbery; I said I would go immediately, I was innocent of the robbery; the gentlemen has sworn falsely.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18090626-15

539. EVAN JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 11th of May , six bound books, value 30 s. the property of Joseph Foster .

JOSEPH FOSTER . I live at 34, Bow-street, Bloomsbury ; I am a bookseller .

Q. Did you miss any books from your shop, and when - A. On the 12th of May, a book called Walton's Angler; that is the only book that I missed till I went to the pawnbroker's, then I found five others.

Q. Where had that book been kept - A. It was on the counter in the shop for sale among others; I had seen it three days previous; I gave fifty shillings for the book; I do not mean to say that is the value; I saw the prisoner in my shop on the same day, and on the 19th there were nobody there but him and my mother; the moment I came in he went out. On the 22nd of May, two persons called on me late in the evening and gave me some information; in the morning of the 23rd I went to Mr. Gordon's, the pawnbroker in St. Martin's-lane; he shewed me Walton's angler and others; I knew them when I saw them.

Mr. Reynolds. Pray Mr. Foster have you any partner in your shop - A. No.

Q. Who attends your shop when you are not there - A. Sometimes my mother; she is not here.

Q. Whoever took them books from your shop if they were not sold might not they take them at separate times - A. I cannot answer that they were all taken at one time; I have often been robbed.

WILLIAM FOSTER . Q. You are a pawnbroker - A. Yes; I am in partnership with Mr. Gordon.

Q. Do you know any thing of the prisoner at the bar - A. Yes, I do. On the 11th of May, he brought four books; on the 22nd two books; on the 17th and 18th he brought some books; I have them all. These four are the books he brought the first time, Walter's angler, annals of Honour, the Platonic song of the soul, and a companion for a surgeon. There are two others one is on Nursing and Child-birth, on the 22nd; and the other is the Irish absentee, and life of the duke of Ormond; I have had them in my care ever since.

The property produced and identified.

ELIZABETH LEWIS . Q. Where do you live - A. In Westminster.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar - A. I do.

Q. Were you in his company at the Coach and Horses, Clipstone-street - A. Yes. On the 7th or 8th of May, to the best of my knowledge a young man was with him that I did not know; they young man brought out a book and offered it for sale to Jones. I think it was entitled Angler; the other man said he had five more, he gave him one pound two shillings for them.

COURT. What had you to do at the Coach and Horses in Clipstone-street - A. I met him in the street, he asked me to go along with him to have something to drink

Q. Was the young man with him at that time - A. Yes, they were both together in the street.

Q. You went to the public house with them, did they tell you it was for to make an agreement - A. No.

Q. How came you to look particularly at the book to know that it was something about angling - A. Why I saw a fish on it.

Q. Do you know what the prisoner is - A. He is a painter and glazier.

Q. Where had the young man these books - A. In his pockets

Q. Did he say where he was carrying them to - A. No; he was a gentleman's servant.

Q. Then he was not an acquaintance of the prisoner - A. Not to the best of my knowledge.

Q. They did not seem to be acquainted did they - A. No, they did not.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel, called five witnesses, who gave him a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18090626-16

540. WILLIAM HIGGENS was indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of John Warner , about the hour of two, on the night of the 31st of May , with intent to steal, and burglariously stealing therein, three silver table spoons, value 30 s. four silver tea spoons, value 10 s. a pair of sugar tongs, value 5 s. a silver salt, value, 10 s. a silver wine strainer, value 8 s. a silver cream jug, value 1 l. a writing desk, value 10 s. a caster stand, value 1 s. a pair of snuffers, value 6 d. and a table cloth, value 2 s. the property of John Warner .

JANE BAILEY . I live servant with John Warner at Hackney .

Q. Do you remember the night when your master's house was robbed - A. I do, on the night of the 31st of May.

Q. What time did you go to bed that night - A. Between ten and eleven o'clock at night.

Q. Were you the last person that was up - A. No, I was not; the two children went to bed first, I went next; I secured the doors before I went to bed.

Q. How many doors to the house - A. One front and one back, and one back and one front in the area. I fastened the front area with a key, and bolted the door.

Q. How was the front door fastened - A. The key turned, and the bell put up, and the two bolts bolted; the back doors were both bolted and barred.

Q. You were not aware of any person going out - A. No, I was not.

Q. How many persons were there in the house - A. My master and two sisters, no other servant but me. I went to bed before them.

Q. Were you alarmed in the night - A. I was not; I got up between four and five, my master called, it was quite day light then; I went down stairs, the first I observed was, the bar was down; I saw the watchman holding the prisoner in the parlour; I went and called somebody else a few doors off; I came in again and turned into the parlour the second time; I saw four silver tea spoons and the sugar tongs, which I know to be my master's property in the watchman's hands.

Q. Did you observe the door or the house when you first came down - A. When I went out I saw the door open.

JOHN HARRIS . Q. Where do you watch - A. In Kingsland Cresent.

Q. That is where Mr. Warner's house is - A. Yes; his house is No. 7. On the 31st of May I entered my duty, and as half past four o'clock in the morning on the 1st of June, I was calling the hour of half past four, I perceived Mr. Warner's gate, No. 7, open; it is a fore court; I suppose it is about twenty yards distance from the house; I shut the gate again, I thought it was left by accident, it was day light. I went from there and called the half hour up to the end of my beat; I then called a gentleman at No. 21, I returned to my bar,

I then stripped off my coat, my cutlass, and pistols, and left them; I locked up my box, I went up the beat, and called the hour of five o'clock; it wanted then a quarter to five. I came to Mr. Warner's, I found the gate open, which I had shut at half past four, and I found some spots of ink on the pavement, which caused some suspicion in me. I then entered the gate; I went up to the area, I saw the shutters cut to pieces; the chips were on the floor.

Q. Were they inside shutters - A. Inside shutters; the windows were thrown up, and some chips laying on the outside pavement, and the bell was on the pavement, it was taken out of the window. Then I tried the door, I put my hand to the door, I found the street door open; I could not get in the area, it is a very deep place; I pushed the door open; I found a coffee urn, or a tea urn laying in the passage ready to take out; I went in, I holloaed out who is here, nobody answered; I went on to the parlour door, I then saw the prisoner packing up linen in a gentleman's shirt; I said, sir, what are you doing, he stepped up to me, and said he had a brother that lodged in the house; I said you are a thief, you are robbing the house; I at the moment catched him by the collar; he struggled a little, not much; I then rung the bell which lay opposite of the parlour door, in the street, and Mr. Warner came down; I begged of him to look in the kitchen to see who was there, he looked and said nobody was there; I said you may go up and dress yourself, I can take care of this man; he came down again; we searched the prisoner, we found a pen knife, and some trifling things; Mr. Warner searched his breeches pocket; found four tea spoons, and a pair of sugar tongs, I saw him take them out; he delivered them into my hands; I searched his other pocket, I found a large knife, I took it from him; Mr. Warner picked up his hat, and took out a dozen of doyles from the crown of his hat; Mr. Warner took up an instrument which can be produced by Mr. Armstrong; I asked the prisoner whether it was his or not, he said nothing, he did not deny it; after we had searched him, I had every thing in my possession. I took him to Worship-street, there was no magistrate sitting; I took him to a young man, he put irons on his hands. I took him down to Mr. Armstrong the officer.

Q. You did not examine the house more particular to see whether there were any other things in the kitchen - A. There was a quantity of damask table linen packed up in a shirt to a great amount; I catched him in the fact; he then said I have got a brother in the house, I am doing no harm.

JOHN ARMSTRONG . I am an officer of Worship-street office; the prisoner was delivered into my custody by Harris, the watchman; he delivered four tea spoons, a pair of silver tea tongs, twelve doyles, and this centerbit. I put the prisoner in the watchhouse. I called up two other officers, and we went to Mr. Warner's house that morning. In the kitchen this centerbit had made the impression; I fitted the centerbit to the hole, it fitted the hole, there was a hole in each shutter; we went over the fields, we could find nothing else of the property. I found three duplicates on the prisoner, it did not concern Mr. Warner. I took the prisoner before the magistrate, he was committed. I searched his lodging, I found nothing.

Q. Is Mr. Warner here - A. No, he is a quaker.

Q. to Jane Bailey . The tea spoons and the tea tongs, do you know them - A. I do, I know them to be my master's by the mark, and by cleaning them; there is I. W. upon them. I have no doubt they are his.

Q. Do you know were they were that evening - A. They were in the kitchen cupboad; they were safe there when I went to bed.

Q. Can you say any thing to the value of the sugar tongs - A. The sugar tongs and the spoons are worth twelve shillings.

Q. Look at the doyles - A. There were a dozen of them, they are my master's to the best of my knowledge, they are not marked, they were bought new three or four days before; they are worth three shillings, or three shillings and six-pence.

Q. Did you see any thing else that was moved at all in the house - A. There was a number of things taken out of the kitchen drawers and put on the dresser. In a few minutes afterwards, I went into the kitchen, I saw the table cloths and course cloths that we used to wipe hands with, and two tea cloths, and two of my gowns taken out.

Q. When you came down in the parlour, when the watchman had the man did you see any thing packed up - A. Yes.

Q. Did you know what the linen was - A. No, I did not examine it; I cannot speak to what it was.

Q. Were there any other things that you missed from any place that you knew to be in the house the night before, you went to bed and that you missed the next morning - A. Nothing more than the writing desk, that was in the parlour on the sideboard the night before; that was gone; I should value it at about ten shillings,

Q. What else was there - A. Three table-spoons; I believe one was in the kitchen and the other two in the parlour to the best of my knowledge, but I cannot say; the day before I had cleaned them; I believe I had washed two of them among the dishes and put them in the kitchen cupboard. I know they are my master's; I cannot exactly say what is the value of them; there was a salt spoon that was taken off the sideboard in the parlour, I value that at about sixpence, there was a castor stand worth about three shillings and sixpence I should think, a damask tablecloth taken out of the parlour about two shillings, a cream pot about one pound; I am no judge of these things; a silver wine strainer about eighteen shillings; the tea urn I saw at the front door when I came down, that had been left on the sideboard in the parlour; I cannot say what it is worth, I am no judge in these things.

ELIZABETH MARSH . Q. You were not in the house of your master at that time - A. No; I came to the house about two o'clock at noon; I know nothing further than seeing the shutters cut when I came the next day, they had been whole the day before; I know the silver spoons to be my master's property.

Prisoner's Defence. I having nothing to say in my defence; all my friends and relations live at Birmingham.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 20.

Of stealing in the dwelling house to the value in the indictment, but not guilty of the burglary.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18090626-17

541. SARAH COURTNEY was indicted for that

she on the 5th of November, in the 26th year of his Majesty's reign, at the parish of St. George, Westminster, was married to John Courtney - and that she afterwards on the 23d of November, in the 47th year of his Majesty's reign , did marry Thomas Watson , the said John Courtney , her former husband, being then alive .

The case was stated by Mr. Walford.

JOHN STANLEY . Q. You are parish clerk of St. George's, Hanover-square - A. I am; I produce the register book of marriages of 1785; I find an entry of

" John Courtney and Sarah Child , both of this parish, were married by banns, 5th of November 1785, by me Samuel Markham curate, John Courtney and Sarah Childs ".

Q. Who are the witnesses to the marriage - A. John Atkins , and Eleanor Britten .

JOHN THOMAS WATSON . Q. Look at that book and look at the signature of Sarah Child , whose hand writing is that - A. Hers.

Q. Do you know the signature of these parties - A. I knew John Atkins very well, he is dead; I enquired of the first husband for Eleanor Britten ; he informed me she was dead.

Q. How old was Watson when he died - A. He was eighty five.

Q. Do you know the first husband John Courtney - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember his coming to you at your grandfathers - A. Yes, fourteen years ago come Michaelmas day, was the first day he came to my grandfather's house in Chapel-street; they lived together about three years at our house; she went by the name of Courtney, and they passed for husband and wife; after that she stayed with my grandfather as servant for eight years; she was there till he died.

Q. When did you first know that they were married - A. Never till about six weeks after he was dead, she declared that she was his widow; she put in the widow will against me.

Q. Do you know where Courtney went to live after he left his wife - A. In Princes-street, just by my grandfather; Courtney is alive now, I saw him not an hour ago.

EDWARD COURTNEY . Q. Are you the brother of John Courtney - A. I am.

Q. Do you recollect the prisoner living with your brother - A. Perfectly well; they passed as man and wife; I have heard her call him husband frequently; I saw my brother to day.

THOMAS GARNER . Q. Do you know John Courtney and his wife - A. Eighteen years ago; he and I worked for twelve years together. She went by his name for eight years to my knowledge, and called him husband.

GEORGE LIMMING . I am parish clerk of St. Leonard, Shoreditch . This is the marriage register book,

" Thomas Watson , widower, of this parish, and Sarah Child , (it is without the s here,) of this parish, widow, was married in this church by banns, this 23d of November 1806, by me A. R. Broome curate; this marriage was solemnized between us Thomas Watson and Sarah Child in the presence of Thomas Boys and George Lilly .

THOMAS BOYS . I am a custom house officer.

Q. Look at that book and see whether that is your signature - A. Yes; the prisoner was the person that was then married.

Q. Did you know Mr. Watson to whom she was married - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know John Courtney - A. I have seen him since the business occurred.

JAMES GILLMORE . I am an officer belonging to Queen-square office; I apprehended the prisoner on the 16th of June, in the Bird-cage-walk, St. James-park. There had been a warrant out against her ever since January; I could not meet with her before.

Q. to Watson. You prove the signature of the first marriage - A. Yes, and the second marriage is her signature; I lived fourteen years with her at my grandfather's; I have seen her write many times.

Prisoner's Defence. I hope you will consider the character of my prosecutor; I brought him up from ten years old, gave him education, and put him out apprentice; I paid a person two pounds ten shillings; he made the person pay the penalty of the law because the receipt was not on a stamp.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave her a good character.

GUILTY , aged 46.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18090626-18

542. JOHN COWARD was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Robert Powell , Tabitha, his wife, being therein, about the hour of ten in the forenoon, on the 14th of June , and stealing therein five silver thimbles, value 10 s. and a silver shield value 2 s. the property of Robert Powell .

TABITHA POWELL . I am the wife of Robert Powell , a jeweller , No. 88, High Holborn, in the parish of St. Andrews Holborn ; we keep a shop, the shop is the lower part of the dwelling house. On the 14th of June I was in the house, about ten o'clock in the forenoon. I observed the prisoner, he was standing about the window looking into the street; he was first looking one way and then another; I was going up stairs to fetch some clothes for my baby, I looked to the shop to see all was right, on my looking towards the shop door I observed the prisoner looking to see if any body was looking, I did not observe that the window was broke; in two or three minutes I observed his hand within the window, I saw him moving some silver thimbles with his forefinger; the silver thimbles were in a drawer close to the window. I went out and took hold of him by the collar; he pushed me back against my left breast; I let go my hold, he ran away across the road; when he got of the opposite side he attempted to go down Feathers-court, a woman sat there with a fruit-stall he could not get down; he turned back, ran a bit and then walked slowly: I holloaed out stop thief all the time; a gentleman in a chaise or gig jumped out and ran after him; he was never out of my sight till the gentleman took him; I was standing at the corner of the pavement opposite of my own house; in a few minutes he was brought back again; then I looked at my window there was a piece of glass entirely out. It was cracked a few days before, it was broken about five inches in length and two inches in width.

Q. How long before you saw the man standing at the corner of the shop was it that you had observed this

pane of glass, so as to know whether it was whole or any broken out - A. A very little while before; the shop was not open till near nine o'clock; I put the jewellery between nine and ten in the window, there was no hole then only a crack; the thimbles were not half an inch from that window; if the window had been broken I should not have put the jewellery there. I am certain there was six silver thimbles and a silver shield gone out of the tray, they were laid upon pink cotton wool. When the prisoner was brought back he was taken into the middle room; he was searched, not one of the articles were found.

Q. Did you take any notice of his pockets - A. Not till after he was searched, I observed the lining of his left pocket sticking out, I saw a little of the of the pink cotton wool sticking to the lining of his pocket.

Q. Was there any pink cotton laying about your shop - A. None, except behind the counter, no one could get at it except myself.

MR. HOPKINSON. Q. Were you in Holborn on this day that the last witness spoke of - A. Yes, I was coming down Holborn along with my friend; I saw the prisoner struggling with the last witness, he broke away from her and ran across the street; I kept my eye upon him and seeing nobody stop him I jumped out of the gig and stopped him; I am sure the person that I saw struggling with the last witness is the person that I stopped; I brought him back to her shop. I got away as soon as I could; I just observed the pane of glass was broken as I passed the shop.

FANNY DABINETTER . I live next door to Mrs. Powell. I heard the alarm at ten o'clock, I went into Mrs. Powell's shop; the prisoner was brought back into the middle room; the lining of his coat pocket was turned inside out; this little piece of pink cotton wool stuck upon the lining of his pocket; Mrs. Powell saw it first; I took it off; Mrs. Powell found some afterwards in the area.

PETER GULLEY . I assisted in bringing the prisoner back; I found upon him two knives; after that the lady found the cotton on the lining of his pocket.

- HUTCHINS. I am a constable. I was sent for after the prisoner was in the shop; I searched him, I found nothing but these two knives, they were in his waistcoat pocket.

Q. Did you at all observe the window - A. I saw it was broke and some of the things appeared to have been moved; I turned the prisoner's pockets inside out, I saw this lady take off the cotton.

Q. Had you any cotton about you - A. No.

Q. Had you touched any pink cotton - A. No.

Q. to prosecutrix. What are the value of these silver thimbles and shield - A. They are about seventeen shillings a dozen.

Prisoner's Defence, I belong to a ship ; I have been at sea ever since the American war; I came on shore I was in liquor; no doubt what they say is all true; I might fall against the window, but I did not take any thing out.

GUILTY, aged 29.

Of stealing only .

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury; before Mr. justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18090626-19

543. WILLIAM LOWE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 22nd of June , a silver watch, value 40 s. and a mahogany case, value 1 s. the property of Thomas Joseph Ryder , in the dwelling house of Robert Drake .

MARY RYDER . My husband's name is Joseph Ryder; I live at No. 5, St. Martin's-lane; I believe it is in the parish of St. Martin's in the Fields , I do not rightly know.

Q. Is your husband a housekeeper - A. He is a lodger to Robert Drake .

Q. Does Robert Drake live in the house - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. Yes; my husband is acquainted with him.

Q. Do you remember his coming to your lodgings at any time and when - A. On Thursday evening last, between seven and eight o'clock, he came to my lodgings, my husband was not at home; he did not stay more than five or ten minutes to the outside; I asked him to come up thinking my husband might be at home; they were going to spend the evening together, but he was not at home; he stopped about ten minutes then he went away, and I went down stairs with him; when I returned I missed the watch and the mahogany case; when the prisoner entered the room I saw it there; it was a silver watch capped and jewelled in a mahogany case on the mantle shelf.

Q. How long might the case be - A. About four or five inches square; the watch was in the case between seven and eight o'clock; when the prisoner was in the apartment I saw it.

Q. You did not miss it while the prisoner staid with you - A. No.

Q. You went down with him - A. Yes; I did not return till my husband and I came home together from the public house, between eleven and twelve o'clock. the prisoner and I went to the public house together.

Q. You went immediately to this public house then - A. Yes.

Q. You came home back from thence with your husband between eleven and twelve - A. Yes.

Q. I want to know whether you went together to the public house from your lodgings - A. Yes, to see if my husband was there; we did not find my husband there.

Q. What time was it when the prisoner and you parted - A. Between seven and eight the prisoner left the public house; he said he had particular business to settle.

Q. How did you leave your lodgings - A. I double locked the door when I went down.

Q. Was any other person in the room while the prisoner was there - A. No, I went out of the room to speak to a man on the stairs; he came out of the room and said he was in a great hurry; I said I would go with him to seek for my husband.

Q. When you returned from the public house did you find the room door locked as you had left it, or was it open - A. No, it was as I left it.

Q. Had any body else a key of the room as you know of - A. No, not as I know of, nor no one could pass without the landlady knowing of it.

Q. Did you ever find your case and your watch upon your return - A. No, I missed it immediately when I returned.

Q. Was the case so open that the prisoner could see the watch was there when it was upon the mantle shelf - A. Yes, you could see the watch in the case.

Prisoner. Did not you bid me to go and take the watch to pledge - A. No.

Q. Did not you ask me to pledge the watch, and afterwards to bring the duplicate and money to you - A. No, I am sure of that upon my oath; I had no conversation with you at all about pledging the watch.

Q. Did not you complain of your husband and call him a vagabond, and that you would send him to jail - A. No.

COURT. What business is your husband - A. A waterman and lighterman .

Q. Did you express any dislike of your husband, or that you would send him to jail - A. No.

Prisoner. She said she would swear her husband's life away if ever he did so again - and I will ask her whether her husband has not complained of her pledging articles - A. My husband in time of necessity has sent me to pledge articles when his business has been slack; I do not know that ever he complained.

COURT. Did you ever employ any body else to pledge articles for you - A. Not as I know of.

Prisoner. Has not your husband and you parted at different times upon account of your extravagancy - A. I have been out nursing many times since he has been my husband; I have been in service in private families and public houses.

GEORGE DONALDSON . I am a constable of St. Martins in Fields. On Friday night last, about nine o'clock, I took the prisoner in custody at the Lemon Tree, out of the pretended custody of a man that pretended he had a bastard child; he had this bundle of things and going away from his lodging with them. On Saturday morning I made enquiry about the pawnbrokers; I went to Mr. Cordy's, I found that the watch had been pledged and taken out from there; I went to Mr. Solomon's I found that he had bought it out and out; Solomon lives in Vinegar-yard, he is a clothes salesman; I got the watch from Solomon, I have had it ever since.

Prisoner. Mr. Donaldson, was not I in charge of another constable - A. You were in charge of a pretended constable, who let you go away with me; I told him he was no constable; I put him of one side directly and took you.

Q. Was I going to take my clothes away - A. I took you with the bundle; I asked you what you were going to do with the things; you said you were going to your washerwoman; I said are you going to have your shoes washed; they were all the things that you had in the lodging, you were taking them away. I delivered you the things up before the magistrate.

COURT. How soon afterwards did you examine his lodging - A. In half an hour afterwards, and then I only found a phial.

Prisoner. Was I taking my clothes out of the house, or not - A. Yes, you were; an old shirt, a pair of shoes, a parcel of cuttings and shears, all the moveables that you had in the lodgings; you were going out with them when I stopped you.

WILLIAM MOXON . I am shopman to Mr. Cordy pawnbroker, 29, King-street, Covent-garden. Last Thursday evening, between eight and nine the prisoner offered me a watch and case, he asked three pounds upon it; I gave him two pounds, he told me his name was William Robertson , he lodged in Oxford-road; the next day he came and wanted me to buy it; he came again with Mr. Solomon who took it out of pledge.

Q. Have you any doubt of his person - A. None at all.

- SOLOMON. I live in Little Russell-court, Drury-lane; I am a salesman.

Q. Have you seen the prisoner before - A. I saw him last Friday, about four or five o'clock, he came to my shop and told me he had a watch in pledge for two pounds, and asked me if I would buy the duplicate; I told him I never bought duplicates; I bought the property, I could not buy it without seeing it; he said he would sell me the watch if I would go with him to the pawnbroker's and pay the interest; I asked him how much he paid for the watch; he said six pounds. We went to the pawnbroker's between four and five in the afternoon; I asked him the watchmaker's name, he said I should see the watchmaker's name when I saw the watch; he lived over Blackfriers-road, and he bought the watch over Blackfriers-road. We went into the pawnbroker's; I paid the pawnbroker two pounds for the principal, and eight pence for the interest, and took the watch out. When I came home I asked him what he asked for the watch; he said three pounds ten shillings; I told him I would give him no more than three pound. We bargained for it; I gave him one pound, he gave me sixpence for the interest. Three pounds and two-pence I paid for that watch: when I brought the watch home the box was open; I asked him where the key was belonging to that box; he told me he lost it; then he took the money and went away; the watch case, if you examine it, is broken open.

Q. Now, Mrs. Ryder, look at the watch and the case - A. This is the watch and case; I know it.

Q. Was it locked or open when it was in your room - A. It was locked; my husband has the key.

JOSEPH RYDER . Q. Do you know that watch, and have you the key of the case - A. Yes; it is my watch, and here is the key; I bought that watch seven or eight years ago.

Prisoner. Mr. Ryder, have you not complained of your wife's extravagancy very much; have you not said your wife was a very extravagant woman - A. I have complained that she used to take a drop of liquor; my expences have always been subordinate to my wages; I do not know that she was extravagant; she has been to service in the course of the time she has been my wife, not upon any quarrel, but through necessity; we have been separated when work has been slack.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 25.

[ The prisoner was recommended to his Majesty's mercy by the jury, supposing him not to be an old offender .]

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18090626-20

544. THOMAS BONE was indicted for feloniously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Richard Oakden , no person being therein, about the hour of six in the afternoon, on the 11th of June , and feloniously stealing therein, a tablecloth, value 20 s. a tea caddie, value 5 s. a shirt, value 2 s. a glass bottle, value 3 d. half a pint of rum, value 1 s. a key, value 2 d. and a tablecloth, value 1 s. the property of Richard Oakden .

JAMES MINS . I belong to the New Inn, St. Clement's Danes ; I am porter.

Q. Do you remember seeing the prisoner about the New inn any day - A. Yes. On Sunday the 11th of this month I was sitting in the lodge, I was looking out of the window; I took notice of the prisoner and two men; I saw the prisoner in company with two others, as I was in the lodge at the entrance.

Q. Are you sure the prisoner was one of the men - - A. The prisoner was one; the other men I did not take particular notice of; they seemed as if they came to some gentleman; the prisoner passed the lodge window and returned, the others went further up.

Q. Did he appear to have any thing with him - A. He did not appear to have any thing with him at all as I saw. The window stands in the inn.

Q. You do not know that he was going out, do you - A. There was no passage that way that he was going.

Q. After that, in consequence of one of the laundresses speaking to you, you pursued the prisoner - A. She called me from the lodge; I went up stairs to No. 5, there I perceived the door of the chamber had been broken open, and some mischief had been done to these chambers; I went in pursuit, and I overtook these men in Chancery-lane.

Q. That was soon after you first saw a chamber that had been broken open - A. Yes.

Q. And from that you followed these men - A. Yes; I overtook the prisoner in Chancery-lane, he was one of the three; they were going towards Holborn; they were walking; the prisoner had a bundle in his right hand.

Q. Did you stop him - A. I did.

Q. Did you say any thing to him at the time - A. No; I did not take the bundle from him; he surrendered it to me.

Q. You did not perhaps open the bundle at that time - A. No, I did not; I held him there till I got a constable.

Q. Did you go with him and the constable any where - A. I did; to the Roll's watchhouse in Carey-street.

Q. What became of the other two men - A. They went away.

Q. Did they say any thing - A. Nothing.

Q. At the Roll's watchhouse did you open the bundle - A. It was opened; I saw it opened; there was a time piece, and tea chest rolled up in a dirty table cloth. These are the things.

Mr. - . Q. The New inn is a public thoroughfare - A. I do not know how far that is to be described a public thoroughfare. We are in the habit of locking up the New inn.

Q. A number of people pass through, do not they - A. Just so.

Q. Did you observe any thing particular in the three men - A. No.

Q. Do you take particular notice of people coming in - A. Not particularly; I was sitting in the inside of the lodge, looking out of the window.

Q. Can you positively swear that the prisoner at the bar was one of the men passing by - A. I can.

Q. Did you watch him - A. No.

Q. Pray whereabouts is the chamber that was broken open - A. On the left side.

Q. You did not see him go towards that place - A. No, I did not.

Q. How long was it afterwards when you seized the prisoner with the bundle - A. About half an hour, on three quarters of an hour.

COURT. Was it within an hour - A. I dare say it was.

MARY PARRY . Q. Are you a laundress to any gentleman at the New inn - A. To Mr. Neale; I look after them chambers.

Q. Do you recollect Sunday the 11th of June in the afternoon - A. I do.

Q. How near are they to Mr. Oakden's chambers - A. In the same passage; one is on the left and the other to the right; up one pair of stairs.

Q. Do you recollect that afternoon seeing any person in the passage, or stair case - A. I was going there; it was about six o'clock, or a few minutes after I saw them people; I heard some voices, I could not distinguish what they said; I am rather hard of hearing; I was terrified; I saw the back of the men; there were a great many people passing; I could not swear to any of them; I saw one man with a bundle.

Q. Did you see him come out of the passage - A. I saw three going; I could not tell who they were.

Q. Did you see any man come out of No. 5 - A. I saw one man in particular with a bundle.

Q. Were there any people that came out with him - A. The others came out before him; I did not distinguish how many.

Q. When you saw this man come out of No. 5, did you go yourself any where - A. I went up one pair of stairs, to my master's door; I saw the door safe; what alarmed me I saw some stones at the door, in the passage, between the two chambers, and some lime and dirt.

Q. Did you look at the door of the other chamber - A. I did; I called for Stapleford very loud; I went down to the porter and told him. That is all I know.

FRANCES STAPLEFORD . Q. Are you a laundress to any gentleman at the New inn - A. I am, to Mr. Oakden, No. 5, in the one pair of stairs; I left the chambers about one o'clock at noon.

Q. Did you leave any one in the chambers - A. Not any one; I locked the outward door three times; I did not return to the chambers again till between eight and nine o'clock.

Q. Was the window shut - A. That I do not know.

Q. There is only one outward door to go out of the chambers - A. Only one outward door.

Q. How long have you been laundress, and had the care of these chambers - A. Seven months.

Q. During these seven months you have lived in these chambers; whose chambers are they - A. Mr. Richard Oakden 's.

Q. Did he lodge there - sleep there - A. Yes.

Q. And they were his chambers, resided in, and kept by him - A. Yes.

Q. And he had been there lately - a short time before - A. Yes; he had been there a short time before.

Q. He had not been there that day, had he - A. He had not been there from the 6th of June.

Q. And this was the 11th, so that for five days before he had not been there; but before that he lived there always - A. Always.

Q. And his furniture was in the chamber - A. It was.

Q. Do you recollect when you were in that chamber that day that clock or time piece - A. Yes; it stood upon the card table, on the right hand of the

fire place, it stood there ever since; I looked after the chambers.

Q. And when you went out and shut the door, you left it there - A. I left it upon the card table.

Q. There is a tea caddie there, do you know that - A. Yes, it stood in the window when I left it, and another by the side of it.

Q. Do you know any thing of that table cloth - A. Yes, it was in the chambers, it laid dirty about; I am sure it is Richard Oakden 's, that cloth had been there ever since I knew the chambers.

Q. Had the tea chest too been there - A. Yes.

Q. When did you return again to the chambers - A. That Sunday evening, between eight and nine o'clock.

Q. How did you find the chambers between eight and nine when you came home - A. I found the door open, my husband went there before I came there; my husband came out and told me to come up immediately; I found the things in confusion to what I left them.

Q. Did you miss the clock and the tea chest - A. I missed them so far, my husband told me they had taken the clock and the tea chest. There was a large tea caddie broken open, and a writing desk.

Q. You do not know the prisoner, I suppose - A. No, I do not.

Q. Your husband is not here, is he - A. No.

Q. Did you examine the door at all - A. I looked at the door, I left it locked, and the bolt of the lock was still out.

Q. Then the lock must have been forced - A. Yes.

JOSEPH NEWSOM Q. Were you in these chambers of Richard Oakdens , on Sunday the eleventh of this month - A. I was, from eleven till near one.

Q. Do you know whether that clock was there - A. I saw a clock there, I can say nothing to that clock; I went out with the laundress and the door was fastened.

Q. Did you come back again with the laundress - A. I did not; when I went out we left the tea caddie and the writing desk both locked; I did not go back again that evening. I went back on the Monday.

Mr. - . What o'clock was it when you went out that day - A. We went to the apartment at ten o'clock, and we left them a little before one. We went to look for some papers.

Q. Do you know whether Mr. Oakden had been there lately - A. He went out of there on Tuesday the 6th, that was the last time he was there.

JOHN MASEMORE . I live at No. 11, Wych-street, I am in a Manchester warehouse.

Q. Do you know that clock - A. I do.

Q. Do you know whose property it was - A. It is the property of Richard Oakden ; I know it by going to and fro to his chambers. I have seen it for three years past in Mr. Oakden's chambers.

Q. Do you know that tea chest - A. I do, I have seen it in his chamber for three years, I am sure it is his, I know it by the top; I have been in the habit of seeing it often.

Q. Do you know any thing of the tablecloth - A. I do, by seeing it lay about at various times, there is a S. in the corner.

Q. Are you a judge of the value of these things, what may the clock be worth - A. The clock may be worth five pounds.

JOHN BLUNDILL , I am a constable of the Liberty of the Rolls.

Q. You were called upon to take the prisoner into custody - A. Yes, between six and a quarter after six on Sunday the 11th day of June.

Q. Who had the charge of the prisoner at that time - A. Mr. Mins, untill I came to him.

Q. Was there a bundle - A. There was a bundle, Mr. Mins delivered it to me at the watchhouse, I opened it in the watchhouse; a table cloth, a tea caddie, were wrapped up in this table cloth; I searched the prisoner's person, I found this shirt on his person, and this bottle in his jacket pocket; I found a key, this is the key which opens the dining room door of the chambers. I tried it on Monday the next day, it opened the inner door of these chambers, No. 5; what they call the dining room. In the ham of his small clothes I found another key; this key it did not open any door of them chambers. The shirt and the bottle have been sworn to by the nephew.

Q. to Masemore. Are you a nephew of Mr. Oakden's - A. I am.

Q. Do you know that shirt - A. I do, I know it to be Mr. Oakden's.

Q. You do not know where that was there on the Sunday - A. I do not; the last time I was there was on the Friday night previous to the robbery.

Q. to Newsom. When you left the chambers with the laundress, do you know whether the dining room door was locked or no - A. (Mrs. Stapleford.) It was not locked.

JOHN MATTHEWS . I am a constable of Hatton Garden office. The prisoner was brought to our office on Monday the 12th; I went to the chambers, No. 5, I searched the premises, I found the place had been very much mauled about, and nine different places of the door bad been tried with the crow.

Q. Did you find the marks of the crow - A. I did, apparently they could not get the door open; I saw this stone lay down, this stone was placed to the lock, where they got the purchase; that broke the jam off the door way. I found the desk had been opened.

Mr. - . to Blundell. When you took the prisoner you found no implements for housebreaking upon him - A. I did not.

COURT. to Newsom. You said you went out of the chambers with the laundress, you had been looking over some papers, was there a bottle - A. There was a bottle like that; I saw it when I went out, I mentioned it to Mr. Bundell at the office, he told me that he had got a bottle of rum, and that was a bottle of rum that I saw at the chambers.

Prisoner's Defence. I was passing through the passage, I picked it up.

CHARLES ARCHER . Mr. - . What are you - A. I am a taylor. I live in Charles-street, Bridgewater-square.

Q. Were you near Chancery-lane on the 11th of June last - A. I was there last Sunday was a fortnight, I cannot remember the day of the month; it was near six o'clock in the afternoon.

COURT. Where were you going, or where were you coming from - A. I had been to Covent Garden to see the play house, and from there to see Drury-lane play house that was burned down.

Q. Where did you come to from thence - A. Into Drury-lane, to Wych-street, out of Wych-street, into some square, I cannot exactly tell the name of it. Then

I went along two or three courts, and just before I got out of the court, I saw a man pick up a bundle just by the passage by a dead wall; it was a white parcel, what was in it I do not know.

Mr. - . Did you take notice of that man - A. I did.

Q. Do you think you should know him again if you saw him - A. Yes, I think I should.

Q. Look at the prisoner at the bar - A. That is the man, I saw that man pick up the bundle, he stooped once, and then he stooped again; he turned round, looked me hard in the face, and I looked at him hard in the face, and then he went along.

Q. Was this man in company with any body - A. I did not see any body with him at all.

COURT. Which way did he go - A. He went along the next street, after he got out of this court to where Gulley lives.

Q. Who is Gulley - A. Why the fighting man, he keeps the public house, the sign of the Plough; he went along that street, I turned to the left, and went the other way from him; I did not see him any more after that.

Q. Had you ever seen the man before that you saw pick up that bundle - A. Never.

Q. You did not know who he was at all, did you - A. No.

Q. Did he stop to look at the bundle, to see what it was - A. No, he did not, he went on with it, he was walking alone.

Q. Are you sure of this, what time did you say - A. Near six o'clock.

Q. How came you to know it was near six - A. Because I had been at a public house; I took notice of the clock before I went from there.

Q. How near six was it then - A. I do not know to a few minutes.

Q. Where did you go from thence - A. I went home then to where I live, to Charles-street, Bridgewater-square, by Barbican.

Q. Did you take particular notice of these things that you saw laying on the pavement - was it on the foot pavement, or the horse pavement - A. On the foot pavement, it laid by a dead wall.

Q. Were many people passing - A. No, I do not recollect I saw any person passing.

Q. Was it in a street or in an alley - A. In an alley by a dead wall.

Q. But you do not know what street or alley - A. No; I am not used to that part of the town.

Q. But you know this house where Gulley lives - A. Yes.

Q. What is the name of that street - A. I forgot it.

Q. You do not know the name of that street - A. Yes, I know it, I cannot think of it just now.

Q. Perhaps you have not seen that man since that time he picked up the bundle, till you now come in court - A. Yes, I saw him down Mutton Hill on Monday morning.

Q. Where were you going down Mutton Hill on the Monday morning - A. I was going to a lady's house, that keeps a broker's shop. I saw him going along with the officer, he was in custody.

Q. Did he speak to you - A. No, not then, he did not.

Q. Did not he nod or bow to you, or any thing - A. No, I was standing looking at him.

Q. Did he see you - A. I do not know, he would not know me most likely.

Q. Why should not he know you as well as you know him - you said he turned round and looked at you, when he stooped and picked up the parcel - where was he taken to - A. He was taken to Hatton-garden office.

Q. Did you go into the office - A. No, I did not, I followed him into the yard, into a place where they put them.

Q. Did not you hear what he was charged with - A. No, not before I asked him; I asked him what his name was and what he had done in the yard of Hatton garden office; I was told that he picked up a bundle at such a place.

Q. Who told you - A. The prisoner told me.

Q. What by accident, not knowing that you were the man that saw him - A. No.

Q. Was that as soon as he was taken into the yard - A. It was not long after.

Q. Who was he with in the yard at that time, was he loose walking about, or was there an officer with him - A. There were two or three people with him.

Q. He was not at large - A. No.

Q. You asked him what he was there for - A. Yes; he told me for picking up a bundle; I told him I saw him pick it up, if I could do him any service at any time, I would come forward on his behalf.

Q. And that was all that passed - A. Yes, and then I went away.

Q. He was then in the yard of the office at Hatton-garden to which you had followed him - A. Yes.

Q. Did not he ask you to go to the magistrate that was sitting then - A. No, he did not.

Q. Nor call the constable - A. No, he did not.

Q. What is the prisoner's business - A. I do not know nothing at all about the prisoner.

Q. You do not know what his business is - A. No, I do not.

Q. You had been to the New-inn perhaps that day - A. That was the place I went to.

Q. You went through the New-inn - A. Yes.

Q. What time did you go through the New-inn - A. It was very near to six o'clock; I cannot tell to minute or two.

Q. Who was walking along with you - A. A lady, a couzen of mine.

Q. Any gentleman - A. No.

Q. Did you see many people about the New-inn - A. No.

Q. Did you stop any time in the New-inn - A. No.

Q. Do you mean to swear that you never saw the prisoner before that day - A. I never saw him before.

Q. And you saw him pick up that bundle, now do you mean to swear that - A. Yes.

Q. to Mins. Do you know that man - A. This man is very much like one of the men that was with him, but I cannot swear to him.

Q. Did you take any notice of either of them that was walking with him in Chancery-lane - A. There was one man walking with him, much about his size.

Q. to Matthews. Were you with him when he was brought to Hatton-garden office - A. I was, along with the jailer.

Q. Look at that person, the last witness - A. He

was never in the yard at all; I saw him about the door of the office in the street, and four others; I saw him on the Monday while the examination was going on.

Q. Had you the prisoner in custody - A. I had; it was outside where the prisoner was kept.

Q. Are you sure that the prisoner and he could not speak together - A. I am certain of that, because I was outside of the door during the time the prisoner was locked up; we never suffer any prisoner to be in the yard at all.

Q. Were you in the room when the prisoner was examined before the magistrate - A. I was there all the time.

Q. Was the prisoner taken from the office to the prison - A. He was delivered to the jailer at our office, I went with him when he was committed to the jailer of the office.

Q. Did the prisoner ever tell you that he saw a person that saw him pick it up - A. No, he never mentioned a thing of that kind at all.

Q. Did he give any account of himself - A. None at all; there was a person that attended for him, told him to stop his tongue; I took notice of the persons about the door; they are persons that used the Catherine Wheel in Bridgewater-gardens, and the Mitre in Goswell-street; I am certain the witness was not in the office while the prisoner was there.

Q. Are you sure the prisoner and the witness could not be in the yard together - A. I am sure of that; the prisoners are locked up backwards and they cannot be together without some of us knowing it.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 40.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18090626-21

545. CHARLES VARNHAM was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 15th of June , two sticks of distilled verdigrease, value 50 s. the property of Lewis Berger , John Berger , Samuel Berger , and Daniel Watson Berger .

JOHN BERGER . My private residence is in Broad-street. These things were stole from Well-court, Queen-street, Cheapside ; we are colour manufacturers ; my partners names are Lewis Berger , Samuel Berger , and Daniel Watson Berger . The prisoner had been a servant with us about eight months. On the 15th of June our warehouseman reported, as is usual when we are nearly out of any article, that we had only nine sticks of verdigrease remaining. On the evening of the same day they had occasion to put up a further quantity, when there appeared but seven sticks remaining; suspicion arose, in consequence of that, that we had been robbed, and I ordered the whole of our men, three in number, to be called into the accompting house; I informed them what we had missed; they all denied any knowledge of it; I immediately ordered their persons to be searched; the prisoner was the last person searched; he had on a smock frock at the time, which he was desired to take off, in the act of doing which, I evidently perceived him shifting something that appeared not to be perfectly easy in his small clothes; being satisfied that he had something about him that did not belong to him; I did not proceed to search him any further, but directly sent for an officer; that officer searched him and the two sticks of distilled verdigrease, in question, were taken out of his breeches.

WILLIAM SHERRIN . I am an officer. On Thursday the 15th of June, Mr. Berger gave me charge of the prisoner; on searching of him, I took out of his breeches these two sticks of distilled verdigrease, suspended by this string round his waist, they have been in my possession ever since.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I do not deny taking it; but not with intent to make money of it; I took it with intent to paint a room with it.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 29.

Confined Three Months in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090626-22

546. ROBERT DAVIS , QUINTON WHETSTONE , and PATRICK KILBRATH , was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 23d of May , three bushels of coals, value 5 s. the property of William Clark .

WILLIAM CLARK . I am a bone boiler ; I live at Battle Bridge, Islington. On the 23d of May last I had a barge of coals, at Mr. Stapleton's dock, Whitefriers; I engaged with Mr. Stapleton, and he engaged with certain men to cart the coals to my house; it turned out to be these men. That is all I know.

GEORGE STAPLETON . I am a clerk to my brother, William Stapleton , he is a coal merchant, his wharf is at Whitefriers dock . On the 23rd of May, about nine o'clock in the morning. I saw Whetstone take three bushels of coals out of the barge lying at the wharf; I watched him part of the way, I could not see where he took them to; I came down stairs, went out, and ran after him; he had shot the coals, and was coming out of the door with the empty sack, where he had taken them to was in Hancock-yard, at Mrs. Shambrook's; that was the second time; he went twice; I did not see him come out of the door the first time; I saw him take them twice out of the barge; there was two bushels first, and one bushel the last time; I saw the other men lift them on his back both times; I was up stairs, I could see all over the barge.

Q. Who filled the sack - A. Kilbrath and Davis.

THOMAS FEWKES . I am a wheeler, I live at No. 2, St. Bride's wharf. As I was at work at the waggon one man came behind the waggon and said it is all right, and then Whetstone came with a sack on his back; he took the sack out of the barge, who was in the barge besides I cannot pretend to say; I followed Whetstone, he went into Mrs. Shambrook's, and shot the coals down; he came down and went to the barge; I spoke to my father, he went and spoke to Mr. Stapleton about it; then I was called to the accompting house. I and Mr. Stapleton went to the place where I saw him go into; when we got there he came out with the empty sack, being the second time.

WILLIAM STAPLETON . I am a coal merchant. Mr. Clark, of Battle Bridge, employed me to cart twenty chaldren of coals in the morning; while they were carting Thomas Fewkes gave me some information; I went to Mrs. Shambrooks's and saw Whetstone coming out of her house with an empty sack; I asked what he had been doing with the coals that he had taken up there, and what part of the house he had taken them to; he evaded giving me an answer; I

went up stairs to Mrs. Shambrook's room; I asked her whether any coals had been brought into her room by this man; she said, yes; she shewed them me, the major part of them were large coals; she had given four shillings for them. I then asked Whetstone whether he had taken them; he acknowledged it, begged my pardon, and wished to return me the money.

REBECCA SHAMBROOK . I live at No. 3, Hancock-yard, Whitefriers; my husband is a town carman. On the 23rd of May, about nine o'clock in the morning, Whetstone came and asked me if I wanted any more sweepings; I told him no, I had not half burned those I had bought a fortnight ago; and my husband said I had given more than they were worth; they were so small I could not burn them; he replied these were a great deal better than the others; I should have a better bargain; he had picked the chief of these up on the wharf, and he had the sweepings of the barge; he brought three bushels, he shot them in the back kitchen; I asked him what I was to pay, he said five shillings; I gave him four, I was to give him the other shilling when my husband came home; he said, very well, mistress, I will call again between this and the evening; he was gone down stairs about a minute; Mr. Stapleton came and said has the man brought you any coals; I said yes.

Q. Are those the coals that Mr. Stapleton saw - A. Yes; I looked out of the window and saw Whetstone was in custody; I called to him to come up and answer for himself; I asked him how he could tell me that he picked the coals up, and that he had the sweepings of the barge; he asked my pardon. Mr. Stapleton sent a man to take the coals away.

Davis said nothing in his defence.

Whetstone's Defence. I swept the barge up; it is a a rule, and what they all do in the trade; I did not know but what I might have them.

Kilbrath's Defence. After we had filled the sacks we cleaned up the barge, they were in the barge after we cleaned it up.

Mr. Stapleton. They were part of the bulk; the sweepings are dust.

DAVIS, NOT GUILTY .

WHETSTONE, GUILTY aged 35.

Confined Three Months in Newgate , and publicly whipped .

KILBRATH, NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090626-23

547. SARAH WISE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 16th of May , a pocket book, value 1 d. a seven shilling piece, and two shillings, a bank note, value 5 l. and four one pound bank notes , the property of John O'Bryan .

JOHN O'BRYAN . I am a discharged marine, having been wounded in his majesty's service .

Q. When was it you lost your money and book - A. On the 16th of May, in Angel-alley , about half past ten at night, as near as I can guess, I came into London at that hour of the night; I met a boy, I asked him to introduce me to a place where I could have a lodging in an honest house for the night, I gave him three pence, as I was a stranger, he introduced me into this house; I asked for a lodging, this girl said I was to have one; I set down, there was only one chair in the room and a bed; I wanted to lye down, there were two girls in the room, they wanted me to give them something to drink; I took out half a guinea, and told them to get a pint of gin and peppermint, I put the change into my pocket; these girls went out, I went to bed; I put my money in my pocket book, and my pocket book into my knapsack, and laid it under my bed; these two girls came in; this girl went out of the room, I knew it was done when the candle was put out; the knapsack was laying by the side of the bed; this girl ran away with the stocking, and the pocket book with the money in it; the other girl was in the room.

Q. Are you sure that is the girl who took the stocking with the pocket book, and money out of the knapsack - A. Yes, I am sure of it; I gave the description of her to the officer, who took her at the girl's room; the other girl had two letters on her arm; this girl gave her name of Suckey and the other Ann.

Q. You did not know what manner of a house this was - A. No. The pocket book was found afterwards with my discharge in it, and nothing else in it; the money was all gone; when I lost it a five pound bank note, four one pound bank notes, and the change of half a guinea was in it.

Q. How soon did you see this girl - A. I did not see her till I went to Woolwich to get a copy of my discharge.

Mr. Alley. I have no doubt that you lost your money. I am very sorry for it; you employed a boy to get a lodging for you, it turned out not to be what you thought it was; it was late at night when you cast anchor in this place - A. About half past ten.

Q. It seems you liked to have something to drink among you - A. I never had a drop.

Q. That was very unsocial indeed - A. I cannot drink liquor, it does not agree with me.

Q. I suppose you mean by that, a little liquor soon makes you drunk - A. I cannot drink liquor since I have been hurt; I was quite sober that night, I was advised not to get drunk for fear I should lose my money; they advised me for my good.

Q. Notwithstanding that you came to town, you attempted to drink a glass more than you ought - A. No, I did not take a drop.

Q. At half after ten we all know it is is very dark - A. Yes.

Q. This boy took you to a lodging were there were two women - A. Yes.

Q. And there turned out to be two men there also - A. Yes.

Q. You gave a description of the person having T. H. on her arm - A. No, I did not; I told them the girl that took my pocket book was a smallish girl; I told them the girl marked T. H. on her arm was united with her.

Q. You were tired after your journey, when you went to bed you soon fell asleep, did not you - A. No, they did not give me time to go to sleep; it was done in a moment.

Q. If it was done in a moment, you had not much opportunity of knowing the person again - A. Yes I had, by her being in the room before; and I wanted the key of the door, they told me there was no key to the door.

Q. I dare say you will not take upon you to say that poor girl was one that you were in company with that night - A. Yes, I will.

Q. It is a very hard thing for you to swear to that poor girl whom you never saw before - A. Sir, you must think it is a very hard thing for me to lose every farthing I had in the world.

COURT. You described the other girl that had the letters on her arm to have remained in the room - A. Yes, but she was not the girl that robbed me.

Q. Did you remain there all night - A. No, a person for safety took me to the watchhouse.

Q. Had you been to sleep before you went to the watchhouse - A. I went to bed, but I never closed my eyes.

JEREMIAH THRUESHALL . On the morning after the robbery I received information; the prosecutor described two girls, he said one had got T. H. to the best of my recollection on her arm, the other he said was a little girl. I took the prisoner on the 20th, in Ann Forecast 's room; the prisoner asserted her innocence. After it spread about, a man said he picked up the pocket book in the place, with his discharge; but no prize ticket nor money in it; here is the pocket book.

Prosecutor. This is my pocket book. I wrote General Moor 's name in it.

Prisoner's Defence. What that gentleman alledges against me, I know nothing at all about it.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090626-24

548. SARAH YATES , and MARY PARKER , were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 26th of June , a purse, value 6 d. a piece of amber, value 5 s. three half guineas, two seven shilling pieces, twenty-nine shillings, and four six-pences, the property of Charles Henry Malpas , from his person .

CHARLES HENRY MALPAS . I am clerk to Mr. Cummins, a barrister .

Q. When did this happen - A. It was on Monday last, it was near Tuesday, two o'clock in the morning; I was passing down Ludgate-hill , I was accosted by the two women at the bar, by some common place observation; how do you do, or something to that purpose; they were at that time on the side of me, and presently they were in the front of me; it was a late hour, I wished to get away from them; at the same time I was rather anxious for the safety of my watch and purse; I put my hand to the chain and held it. I had on a pair of trowsers which had no pockets except the fob; in consequence of that, I put my pocket book into my inside coat pocket; I put my hand to my coat to ascertain that I had my purse about me, which I know I had, by feeling the bulk of it; the next motion I made was when I put my hand down again I missed it, they were then going away: I said before you go away, be so good as to return me my money; one of them drew me as it were towards her, and then I think it was that my purse was taken away.

Mr. Bolland. What do you mean as it were - A. She drew me towards her.

COURT. At that moment you think you lost your purse - A. I think I did; because I put my hand down afterwards and missed my purse.

Q. Then they wanted to go - A. Yes, I said before you go give me my purse, you have robbed me of my purse, they said we have got no purse; I immediately called the watch, and raised an alarm, the watchman came up, and they were taken in custody; they were not searched on the spot; there was nothing found on them at the watchhouse.

Q. Which of them was it that drew you towards her - A. Yates, she pulled me towards her; she stood on my left side, the side that my purse was in.

Q. Then she saw you feel your pocket - A. Most undoubtedly she did.

Q. You had better told her of it - A. Perhaps I had better made her a present of it. I never saw the purse again. I did not see them searched.

Mr. Bolland. Mr. Malpas, where had you been till two o'clock, it was not term time - A. No, it was vocation, as we call it.

Q. Vocation as it were, can you tell me in fact, what time it was you left Mr. Cummins's office - A. Half past ten; a young man came to me, and we went to the Castle in Portugal-street.

Q. What time did you get in Portugal-street - A. I cannot say, I did not draw my watch; it could not be eleven o'clock, I think.

Q. What did you drink when you got there - A. I think we drank three pints of porter between two of us.

Q. What did you consume the whole of the time there in the house in Portugal-street, and drink no more than three pints of porter between you - what time did you leave the house - A. More than half past one.

Q. Which way were you going to get on Ludgate-hill - A. I walked with the young man down Ludgate-hill, I lived in Serjeant's-inn.

Q. Why did not you go to Mr. Cummins's, it was a late hour in the night - A. It was an early hour in the morning.

Q. What had you to do on Ludgate-hill at that time in the morning, you should have gone home if you had been my clerk, I should have thought - A. I did ring at Serjeant's-inn gate.

Q. If you had rung at the gate the porter who attends the gate would have opened it - what had you to do on Ludgate-hill - A. I walked up there with no intention.

Q. You having alarmed Serjeant's-inn by ringing the bell, walked up to Ludgate-hill with no intention - A. I pulled the bell, I will not swear that I made the bell ring; I took a stroll up Ludgate-hill.

Q. Had you drank nothing else but the three pints of porter - A. I drank a glass of rum shrub, besides the beer.

SAMUEL CLARK . I am a watchman; I saw the women when I called the hour of two o'clock, they were coming down Ludgate-hill; after I had done calling the hour, it was not above five or six minutes before this gentleman called out watchman; when I came down he gave me charge of these two women, he said they had robbed him; I took them in charge; there were three or four men behind the women, as close as possible to them. I looked on the ground with my lanthorn, I could not see any purse; the men pretended to look, after that I took them to the watchhouse, and the men followed us; and on going up Paternoster-row, into the court where our watchhouse is, the men were missing; the constable of the night and the superintendant of the watch searched them, nothing was found.

WILLIAM GABLE . I am the officer of the night. I know no more than searching the prisoner. I found nothing.

Yates's Defence. When I met this man on Ludgate-hill; he accosted me and this lady; he asked me to go under the first court I came to, which I did; I was not a minute with him before he said he had lost his purse or watch; with that he called watch; the watch came immediately to his assistance, we were taken to the watchhouse and searched, and nothing found.

Parker's Defence. This gentlemen accosted us both together: we were not with him five minutes before he said he had lost his purse or his money; he took hold of our four hands and held us together, and called to the watch at the watchhouse; he said he was a seafaring man; he laid upon the table and talked about starboard and larboard. He was intoxicated in liquor.

YATES, GUILTY , aged 29.

PARKER, GUILTY , aged 33.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090626-25

549. ROBERT DENNIS and GEORGE DUNNING was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 3rd of June , ten yards of quilting, value 1 l. 5 s. the property of John Wells .

JOHN WELLS . I am a man's mercer , I live on Holborn bridge .

Q. When was it you lost this - A. On the 3rd of June. I only know it is my property.

JOSEPH MUMFORD . I am a soldier. On Saturday the 3rd of June me and my comrade were walking up Fleet-market, just before we got to Turnagain-lane, my comrade said, look there: I saw the two prisoners, one of them had a blue coat on, he had a piece of quilting waistcoating under his arm, his name is George Dunning ; the piece was sticking out at the end of his coat; the other was not walking far distant behind him; my comrade and I proceeded up the lane after them; they turned their eyes upon us and hastened; we followed them up the lane into Skinner-street, and they went down Snow-hill; I halloaed out halloa; he threw down the piece and made his escape; Dennis, that was walking behind him, went immediately and picked it up; I ran up to Dennis, who had picked it up, and collared him; he immediately struck me and dropped it; I called for assistance; my comrade picked up the piece and followed me on the other side; some person standing by said do not let him go; there was a constable fetched in a minute; the constable came and took him to his house; he asked me to put my name to the piece, which I did; he then took him to the Poultry compter. After we took the prisoner to the compter the constable went to a place with an anchor over the door, at the bottom of Fleet-market; I believe it belonged to them; we were going home; we met Dunning that had the piece first in Cloth-fair; we followed him till he halted at the Catherine Wheel, Bridgewater-gardens; my comrade kept sight of him while I went for a constable.

Q. Are you sure he is the man that you first saw with the piece under his arm - A. Yes.

JOHN EASTERBY . I am a drummer in the royal East London militia.

Q. You were with Mumford - A. Yes; we were both together. I can only state what my comrade has stated; I know that to be truth.

Q. What time of the day was it - A. Between five and six o'clock, on the 3rd of this month; as we were coming down Fleet-market, I saw these two men coming across the green market; the prisoner Dunning, in the blue coat, had the piece under his arm, he was making towards Turnagain-lane; I said to my comrade, look here; we followed them up Turnagain-lane.

Q. You suspected them - A. Yes.

Q. Are you sure they are the men - A. Yes, I am certain these are the men.

Q. Did you see the property drop - A. Yes, and I saw the other pick it up; my comrade ran towards him that picked the quilting up and collared him; he dropped the quilting, and struck my comrade in the face; my comrade called for assistance; some gentleman called do not let him go; I picked up the piece of quilting; a constable came up immediately. We afterwards met Dunning in Long-lane, we followed him till he went into the tap-room of the Catherine Wheel, Bridgewater-gardens; I kept him in sight while my comrade fetched a constable; I am positive that is the man that threw the piece of quilting down, and the other man picked it up.

THOMAS GARDNER . I am an officer. On the 3rd of June I received this piece of quilting from Easterby. I took Dennis into my house, and then I lodged him in the compter; I went to Mr. Wells; the shopman came to my house and owned the property.

BARTHOLOMEW WOOD . I am a constable of Cripplegate ward, without; I was applied to by the witness Mumford to take Dunning in custody; he was at the Catherine Wheel , Bridgewater-gardens.

The property produced and identified.

Dennis's Defence. I was coming down Snow-hill, I had been to Covent-garden after a job, I am a carpenter , I saw that piece of quilting lay at a door way in Snow-hill, the shop appeared to be shut up; as soon as I picked it up that man laid hold of me.

Dunning's Defence. I had been to Field-lane to see if my shoes were done, the man was not at home; on my returning back I went into Bridgewater-gardens to see if the man had left my shoes there for me; these men came, they said I was like the man, they knew me by the coat I had on.

Dennis called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

DENNIS, GUILTY , aged 21.

DUNNING, GUILTY , aged 20.

Confined Fourteen Days in Newgate , and whipped in Goal .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090626-26

First Middlesex Jury.

Charles Turner ,

George Arnaud ,

William Hitchcock ,

Edward Baylis ,

Isaac Briant ,

Francis Paget ,

John Linney ,

Edward Trott ,

John Drane ,

William Messey ,

Harry Tottenham ,

Robert Hillier ,

Second Middlesex Jury.

William Moore ,

William Murdock ,

Richard Payne ,

Edward Farey ,

Robert Talkington ,

William Jones ,

Richard Skirrer ,

Edward Abbott ,

William Smart ,

Thomas Watson ,

William Huntley ,

James Coombes ,

550. WILLIAM ADAMS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 12th of May , a silver pepper castor, value 20 s. the property of Thomas Clark .

The case was stated by Mr. Alley.

THOMAS CLARK . Q. You live at the Hungerford coffee house, in the Strand - A. Yes.

Q. That coffee house is pretty much frequented by gentlemen in the navy and in the army - A. Very much so.

Q. On the 12th of May did you lose any thing from your house - A. I did, I lost a silver pepper caster, and seven silver table spoons.

Q. Had the prisoner been to your house - A. He had; he was in the habit of frequenting the coffee house, I cannot say precisely whether he was there on that day, he appeared as a gentleman, I thought he was a clergyman; I sent cards to different pawnbroker's. Mr. Parker shewed me the caster in question.

JOSEPH DISMORE . I am servant to Mr. Parker, a pawnbroker.

Q. Did you purchase any thing of the prisoner on the 12th of May - A. I did; I bought that pepper caster of the prisoner, I am certain of it. In consequence of a card, Mr. Parker went to the prosecutor. I gave the prisoner one pound and three-pence for it.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I buy silver; I have been in the habit of buying light gold and silver; I buy a great many casters and spoons; I have tried that gentleman many times, he gave me more money than any body else many times; I buy in Rosemary-lane, or any where else in the open market; one caster may be like another, I buy any thing that I can get money by; they did not find it upon me; I never meddled with any thing in Mr. Clark's house; I never was in the habit of going to the cupboards, I only had what the waiter brought me; I never thought of any thing of the kind. I am so innocent that I never wrote to my friends to come near me. I have been out of the mad house but three weeks.

GUILTY , aged 69.

Fined One Shilling and discharged.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090626-27

551. SAMUEL DAVEY was indicted for the wilful murder of Sarah his wife .

The case was stated by Mr. Adolphus.

ELIZABETH BLACKBURN . Q. You are the mother of Mrs. Davey , the wife of that man at the bar - A. Yes.

Q. You lived in the house with him and his wife and children - A. Yes, in Skinner-street, Somers-town .

Q. Do you remember on the 4th of June, of his desiring any thing with respect to moving your bed - A. Yes; he desired me to bring the bed up stairs; I had removed it down on account of the bugs, he desired me to bring it up again.

Q. On Monday the 5th of June, did you take the bed up stairs - A. At ten o'clock in the evening he said there was no occasion unless I had a mind to it, nevertheless I said I would; we supped together in the bed room, the prisoner, his wife, and all the children; two boys besides the sucking child; we all supped together, and went to bed in the same room. About four o'clock the next morning I awoke, they were all asleep; I got up and looked out of the window, and as the prisoner had no sleep for a week past, I thought I would not disturb him.

COURT. How do you know that he had no sleep - A. Because he was laying and talking all night long; I went to bed again and I went to sleep; when I awoke again, I think as nigh as I can recollect, it was about a quarter after six; I lifted up my eyes, I saw he stood up by the bed side, I do not know whether he was dressed or not; the first thing that I saw was the infant's head all bloody.

Q. Was that the infant that was in bed with his wife - A. Yes; then I looked and saw that his wife was bloody; in my fright I turned the two other children down stairs, and told them to call somebody; he told me to go out of the way, he did not want to hurt me.

Mr. Adolphus. What age are the children - A. One is turned eleven, and the other about six.

Q. Had he any thing in his hand - A. I believe the hatchet was in his hand; I had a struggle with him, and got the handle of the hatchet out of his hand, leaving the other part of the hatchet in his hand; then he pulled up his wife in bed, and said let me put this poor creature out of her misery; then directly upon that I went down stairs.

Q. Did you see your daughter then, when he pulled her up - A. Yes, I saw her then, but she had her head wounded before I awoke.

COURT. That you cannot tell - A. I saw her blood on her head, I left the room, I saw she was bloody and wounded; I saw him give her one blow just before I took the hatchet out of his hand, I think with the head of the hatchet on the side of her head.

Q. Did you come into the room again - A. No, not till after she was dead.

Mr. Adolphus. Did Davey say any thing after you came in again - A. He was taken away then.

Q. For some time before this, in what state of mind had this man been in - A. Why sir, he has not been right since last May five year; he has been twice in St. Luke's.

Q. Had he been particularly low spirited or uneasy just about or before this time - A. Very low sir.

Q. Had you any reason to observe that his insanity was returning upon him - A. Yes.

Q. Did your daughter make any observation of the same effect - A. Yes.

Q. Did you see any thing particular in him about the month of June - A. He was always worse in that month.

Q. Was he in general a kind and affectionate husband before - A. A very kind husband, and a very good father, ever since he has been out of St. Luke's this last time, he never offered to insult any of us.

COURT. You say that he has not been in his right mind for near these five years last May - A. Yes.

Q. What happened to him then, had he any blow or accident - A. No.

Q. Was he ill at that time, five years ago - A. Yes.

Q. What was the occasion of his illness - A. I think it was rather a family disorder.

Q. Had he any fever - A. No; he was apprenticed to the sea, when he came home he went to live with his sister, who is in the same way now; she lives in Kentish-town now, she has some property; she is in her own house, and she is taken care of.

Q. You say he became in the same way five years ago - was he in confinement any time - A. It was five years ago the first time, then he was very bad, he was in confinement in St. Luke's; there is a paper that gives an account; as soon as we could get a letter to get him in; we got him in, there he was for four months; afterwards he came out of St. Luke's.

Q. How long did he continue before he came bad again - A. He was never right after he was taken out the first time; he was always talking or singing, but did not do any mischief.

Q. He followed his business and did no mischief - A. No.

Q. You say he became ill again so as to occasion him to be confined again - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know how long after that was - A. No; there is a certificate of that; he was twice in St. Luke's. It was four years ago.

Q. You spoke just now of a week that he could not rest - A. Yes; he was talking all night, and could not rest; he was complaining of his head.

Q. You say there was no quarrel whatever between him and his wife - A. No.

JAMES DAVIS . Q. You are a butcher in Skinner-street - A. Yes. On the morning of the 6th of June the two boys were crying about; my daughter came and told me. As I went up stairs Mrs. Blackburn bursted the door, and forced the door in the wrong way; I instantly ran up stairs; she kept the door from him hurting her; the door had a chair against it. As I went in the first thing I saw was Mrs. Davey sitting up in bed with her head and face all over blood.

Q. That was when you looked in - A. Yes. I could not get into the room then. Instantly I put my head in, I saw him standing by the bed side, the bed was lying on the ground; I said Davey, Davey, what have you done; he had a lapstone in his hand, what he used in his trade; he said immediately, Mr. Davis, you go down stairs, or else I shall kill and murder you; I instantly pulled my head back, thinking he might throw the stone at me, or cause him to do his wife further mischief; there was a crack, I looked through; he hit his wife over the head; she cried, oh! down she fell immediately; as she fell down with her head on the side of the pillow, he hit her over the head with the stone; I could see the blood go all over the room; he instantly turned himself round by her head; by the bed side was a razor case; he took it up sharpish; he opened the case and took the razor out, looked at me, and put his head out; he took the razor and did so as though to cut his own throat; I ran down stairs and gave the alarm; he put the razor down.

COURT. He did not touch it - A. No, he did not touch it; it was within two or three inches of his throat. That is all I saw of the murder being committed; he was secured instantly; I got into the room, the infant lye as if it had been suckling; the mother was groaning; at the same time the brains came out of the hair of the child. The child, when I took it up, did just make one gasp.

Q. How long had you known the prisoner before this - A. I had lived there very near sixteen months, I lived next door then. Instantly I laid the child on the pillow I put my arm under the wife, lifted her up, and asked a person to give me some water; she drank a little water down her throat; she made a terrible noise; I kept her so till the doctor came.

Q. You stated that you had known the prisoner sixteen months - A. Yes. I have no doubt but he was out of his mind, but he was not mischevious; he gave incoherent answers; I never heard an angry word between him and his mother or his wife.

Q. Were you present when the prisoner was secured - A. Yes; I got into the room just at the time they secured him.

Q. Did he make any resistance - A. I did not see any.

Q. Did you see the wife after she was dead - A. I did.

EDWARD HALEY . Q. Were you called in on the the 6th of June to see Mrs. Davey - A. I was; it was near seven o'clock in the morning; the child was dead; I found the woman with a large wound extending from the near corner of the right eye to the back of the head, over the ear; I did what appeared necessary to be done at that time. It had penetrated the scull, I felt the brain, it was protruding at the back part of the head; there were two wounds in the back, between the shoulders, which apparently had been done by a knife, like stabs; I was not there at the time of her death; I was there a few minutes after her death.

Q. Have you any doubt what was the cause of her death - A. No; the wound in her head was the cause of her death.

Verdict of the Jury - NOT GUILTY.

Being of opinion, at the time he committed the act he was Insane .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18090626-28

548. SAMUEL DAVEY was indicted for the murder of Henry Davey , an infant about the age of six months .

Verdict of the Jury - NOT GUILTY.

Being of opinion at the time he committed the act he was Insane .

To remain in prison until his Majesty's pleasure be known.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18090626-29

549. JAMES AYRES was indicted for that he on the 4th of June , upon William Dormer , a subject of our lord the king, feloniously and wilfully did make an assault, and that he the said James Ayres , with both his hands, the said William Dormer , in and upon his head, did then and there, with malice aforethought, at divers times, strike and beat, thereby giving him, the said William Dormer , divers mortal wounds and bruises, of which he instantly died, and that he, WILLIAM ROBINSON , at the time of committing the felony, and murder aforesaid, then and there was present, aiding, abetting, assisting, and comforting the said James Ayres , the aforesaid felony and murder, to do perpetrate and commit, and so the jurors say, that he the said James Ayres, the said William Dormer , feloniously and with malice aforethought did kill and murder .

James Ayres stood charged upon the coroner's in inquisition for killing and slaying the said William Dormer .

JAMES DORMER . Q. Where do you live - A. In Virginia-row.

Q. You are brother to William Dormer, the deceased - A. Yes.

Q. When did you see your brother and James Ayres together in some ground behind your father's house - A. Yes, it was in the garden; I have got no father.

Q. Where is that ground, behind your house - A. Yes; these two houses belong to a different landlord to what the rest do; he had the fence put up to keep them from the rest.

Q. Where did the prisoner live - A. He lived four doors from us with his father.

Q. What part of the ground was your brother in - A. He was in his own yard, in that part behind our house.

Q. In what part of the ground was the prisoner in - A. He was on the other side of the fence.

Q. Was the fence compleated then, or were they at work upon it - A. It was not compleated, the gate wanted to be put up.

Q. On what day was this - A. It was on Friday three weeks; before the accident happened upon the Sunday, I cannot tell the date,

Q. Had any conversation passed between them, and what - A. My brother went down the yard, he took his dinner with him, he said to the carpenter, when will this fence be done; the carpenter said it would be done at four o'clock, he believed; my brother said, sir, I shall be glad when it is done, we shall be able to have a bit of a garden then.

Q. Was the prisoner within hearing then - A. Oh yes, he was on the other side of the fence; my brother said he should leave off work tomorrow very soon, please God, he should have a bit of garden; Ayres said, you have a bit of garden, I shall come over when I like and nothing shall hinder me; my brother said what makes you say so, he said it does not matter why I say so, if you set any thing in the garden, I will tear it up by the roots; the carpenter said to Ayres, you are saying that which you cannot stand by, what makes you so saucy and impertinent; my brother said if you come over, fists and bricks shall go to work; Ayres jumped over the pales directly, pulled off his coal, and said to my brother, come on you b - y b - r, I am your man at any time; Ayres called him a thieving b - r; told him he was a coward, he would not fight; my brother said did you ever know me a thief, I know you are a thief, I can prove it; my brother said he did not want to fight nor nothing of the kind, he had got his work to do; then Ayres said he was a cowardly b - r, after he had challenged him he wanted to go to work; Ayres then went home. Every night after that when they could get sight of him any where, they were calling my brother a coward.

Q. Who do you mean by they - A. Ayres, sir. On Wednesday night before they fought on the Sunday morning, William Robinson called my brother and challenged him then, when he would fight, and called him a great many names; I was not with him, the young man is here that was with him.

Q. You tell us what you saw - A. He was at the Gibralter then. Ayres's mother died at three o'clock on Saturday morning; my brother heard that Ayres was at the Gibralter playing at skittles; my brother went to him, and said, I suppose you will not fight at all as your poor mother lies dead, I suppose you do not to fight; Ayres said to him, what you want to off as you have all along, we will have it out to morrow morning, to know who is the master; my brother said if you are determined we will have it out to morrow morning. About half after three on Sunday morning Ayres came with all his mob, about thirty of them; he called my brother a cowardly b - r, and a great many names; why did not he come and fight; and at half after five they came again, with a great many more with them; they throwed up mud and stones at the windows a great many times, while me and my brother were in bed; my brother jumped out of bed to see who they were; he saw Ayres, then my brother dressed himself, and went down to my mother, and told her that he could not stand it, go he would and face them; he went and left word with my mother not for me to come, but my mother would make me go; I went into the yard to wash myself, and when I came up my brother was gone; I put on my coat and went after him directly; I overtook my brother going to the field. When we came there there was Ayres and Robinson and all their companions, upwards of an hundred of them; they were all three before we were; Ayres as soon as he saw my brother, went into the field and chucked off his coat and hat; my brother went into the field too, they both shook hands together before they began to fight. When they had four rounds my brother wanted to leave off, he said he would not fight any more. A brick maker that was at work in the field, snatched a bottle away from a little boy, went and got some water and washed my brother's face, and said my brother should fight; he drove my brother in the ring, he fought ten rounds; after that the brick maker said he should fight, for he was just getting the better of the battle; he washed my brother's face and the other's too. The last round that they had, my brother missed his blow, Ayres struck him at the back part of his ear, they both fell together; they were both picked up; Ayres put on his coat and went away; my brother went to pull off his waistcoat that he fought in, he fell with the waistcoat in his hand; he said oh, his head, he never felt such a pain in all his life; he fell backwards with the waistcoat in his hand; he began to alter very much, and stretched himself out. We went and fetched the surgeon as soon as we could; I and another lad fetched the surgeon, the surgeon came and bled him in three places; he said he could do no good for him, he was a dead person. He did not live five minutes from the time he was struck, till he was dead.

Mr. Knapp. I understood you to have said that your brother said if he did come over, fists and bricks should go to work - A. Yes, he did.

Q. So then afterwards when they met to fight the fist fight, they shook hands and to it they went - A. Yes.

Q. They both fought the best they could - A. I dare say they did.

Q. Your brother said he would not fight any more, but the brick maker made him; they were both of them willing to leave off - A. No. Ayres would fight, he did not want to leave of.

Q. It was fair fighting altogether - A. Yes.

- BANNER. I live in High-street, Mile-end, New-town.

Q. Did you know the deceased, William Dormer - A. Yes, I saw him on the Saturday night before he fought on the Sunday; he was passing by, he spoke to me.

Mr. Knapp. What are you - A. I am a weaver; he

called me by my name, he said it is going to be to morrow, will you come and see it; I told him I did not think I could make it convenient to come, because I was going out to dine. In the morning, about twenty minutes before six, James Burnham came and called me up; I got up. We proceeded to go and see the fight in Brick-lane; we met the deceased, he said I am glad you are come; we proceeded on till we came to Haggerstone field ; there was Ayres and Robinson, and a vast quantity of young fellows with them. Ayres went into the field, stripped off his clothes, and they had several rounds together. James Burnham and me persuaded him to leave off, but the brick maker said no; he urged him on, gave him water, and washed his face to refresh him; then afterwards he fought several rounds, he struck him under the right ear; they fell, he was picked up; he put his hand to the back part of his head, he said oh, how bad my head is; I said make haste, put your clothes on for fear of catching cold; he had recovered a bit, then he slipped down and fell.

Q. During this time what was Robinson doing - A. He picked up the prisoner several times.

Q. Did you hear him say any thing - A. Nothing further than to show him how to spar the other with his fists.

Q. Did any thing pass between the deceased and the prisoner at the close of the battle - A. They shook hands after they fought; the prisoner Ayres went away and Robinson with him.

Mr. Knapp. The first information you had of these boys fighting, you got from the deceased - A. Yes.

Q. You understood from the deceased he was to be there, he desired you to be there - A. Yes.

Q. Before they began to fight they shook hands, and after they had done they shook hands, and just before they began to fight and after they fought, they were just as good tempered as any body else - A. Yes.

JAMES BURNHAM . Q. You know the deceased, William Dormer - A. Yes.

Q. Were you in company with him and the two prisoners on Wednesday before this happened - A. Yes; me and William Dormer were talking together, and William Robinson came along and said, why do not you fight. Ayres, after he has challenged you; William Dormer said, I'll fight him any morning that he likes, on Sunday morning if he likes; then William Robinson called Ayres, and said Jem, he'll take you on Sunday morning; Ayres said I'll take him now if he is a mind, no, the deceased said, I have got my work to do, I am not going to fight you to day, to lose my day's work to morrow; James Ayres called his companion of one side, and said he would have it out on Sunday morning in London field; the deceased said so we will, and will see who is master.

MR. BRADEWELL. Q. You are a surgeon, are you - A. Yes, I was present upon this occasion; he was apparently dead when I saw him; I opened his jugular vein, and did every thing I thought needful.

Q. You examined the body after his death - A. Yes; he died of an injury that had been offered to the head from some blow, the effect of that blow was a quantity of extraversated blood upon the membrane of the brain.

Q. Have you any doubt from what you observed, that that was the real cause of his death - A. I have no doubt whatever.

The prisoners left their defence to their counsel.

THOMAS BLACKHALL . Q. Were you at the fight - A. Yes, I was. I am a weaver.

Q. Were you there before they began - A. I was.

Q. Did you observe them shake hands before they began - A. I did.

Q. Was it a fair fight - A. It was a fair fight, except two blows which the deceased gave Ayres.

Q. When it was over did you see them shake hands - A. Yes; they came as friends, and parted as friends.

Q. We understand there was a brick maker there, a meddling fellow, who chosed to persuade them to go on again - A. He wiped them and refreshed them, I did not see him persuade them to fight.

Q. And to it they went again - A. Yes.

COURT. Neither of the the parties knew much about fighting, did they - A. No.

AYRES, GUILTY, aged 16.

Of Manslaughter .

Confined Six Months in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

ROBINSON, GUILTY, aged 19.

Of Manslaughter .

Confined Four Months in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18090626-30

550. MURPHY CONNER was indicted for feloniously making an assault upon Edward Gogan , on the 21st of June , in the King's Highway, putting him in fear, and taking from his person, a doller, value 5 s. six shillings, and twelve half-pence, his property .

The prosecutor being called, and not appearing in court, his recognizances were ordered to be estreated .

NOT GUILTY.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18090626-31

551. THOMAS COX was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 31st of May , thirteen pieces of chintz borders, value 10 l. the property of Edward Bar Dudding , and Thomas Nelson , in their dwelling house .

SECOND COUNT for like offence, stating it to be the dwelling house of Thomas Nelson .

SUSANNAH RUSSELL . I live in Holywell-street, I keep a clothes shop. The prisoner brought me the chintz borders to sell, at different times; he brought two pieces at a time; I believe to the amount of a dozen or thirteen.

Q. When was it he brought you two pieces, within this last month or two - A. No; I think it was near a twelvemonth ago last May. I suppose I gave sixteen shillings, or eighteen shillings for them. Donaldson, the officer, took them away.

GEORGE DONALDSON . I am a constable. I had the pieces of chintz borders given me by Mrs. Russell. They are altogether. She took five out of the window and eight out of the drawer.

Q. to Mrs. Russell. You say you bought these thirteen pieces of the prisoner - A. I did.

Q. Now pick out these two pices that you bought last May twelvemonth - A. I do not know which piece I received last of him.

MARY HARLAND . I live with Mrs. Russell; I am her neice.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. I have seen him several times in my aunt's shop, he came to sell them

borders; I saw him sell them to my aunt, never more than two at a time.

EDWARD BAR DUDDING . I am a furniture printer , in partnership with Thomas Nelson in Bond-street , he lives in the house. My private house is in Henrietta-street, Cavendish-square. The prisoner was my head warehouseman about three years. In consequence of some enquiry I went to Mrs. Russell's shop in Holywell-street; I found five of these pieces of borders in the window, exposed to sale; afterwards she produced eight more; they are private patterns, all my own.

Q. Was the prisoner living with you at the time you found them in Holywell-street - A. Yes; he was in full confidence of the house; they were under his care.

Q. At what price do you sell these things - A. At two shillings, some half a crown, a shilling and sixpence a yard; some more than twenty-one yards in a piece, and some less.

The property produced and identified.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel; called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY, aged 30.

Of stealing to the value of thirty nine shillings only .

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18090626-32

552. MATTHEW POWELL was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 16th of June , eighteen pieces of gingham, value 12 l. the property of Jonathan Ingham and William Brown , in their dwelling house .

JONATHAN INGHAM . I live in St. John-street , I am a linen draper , in partnership with William Brown . On the 15th of this month, about eight o'clock in the evening, I was at the bottom of my shop; I saw the prisoner stop at the door, he came inside of the shop and took out a bundle of ginghams, which are described in the indictment, and took them away. I do not think he observed me, I was some distance from him.

Q. Was there any body else in the shop between him and you - A. There was nobody else between him and me; I was in sight of him at the door; he took them out of the shop; I followed him and stopped him at Smithfield bars.

Q. Did he run or walk off - A. He walked off, and when I overtook him he threw me down in the scuffle, and the goods too; he ran away, I pursued him across Smithfield into Duke-street, he was stopped there by a gentleman coming along.

Q. What became of the goods - A. A person in the street picked them up; he was a young man that lived in the neighbourhood; he knew me personally; I do not know his name.

Q. What quantity of these ginghams were there - A. There were upwards of three hundred and forty yards.

Q. You have a partner - A. Yes; William Brown . It was our joint property.

Q. Your shop, I suppose, is part of your dwelling house - A. Yes; the dwelling house belongs to me and William Brown , and also inhabited by us.

Q. What was done with the prisoner at the bar after he was stopped - A. He was taken to the Ram, in Smithfield, and from there to the compter.

Q. What was the value of them goods - A. Twelve pounds.

Q. There is a communication between the dwelling house and the shop, is there not - A. Yes.

JAMES BROWN . Q. You are not the partner - A. No; I am only of the same name. On Friday evening I was passing down St. John-street in my way to Paternoster-row, I saw the bundle drop, and the prosecutor stumbled over it; he called out stop thief; I immediately pursued him across Smithfield, near to the corner of Duke-street, calling out stop thief; a gentleman of the name of Duffell got hold of him by the collar; he begged him to let him go, it was a press gang after him; the gentleman said it was no such thing, the press gang was not in the city; I came up and said it was for robbing a linen drapers shop in St. John-street. We brought him down to the Ram.

Q. Are you sure the prisoner is the same person - A. Yes; I never lost sight of him till a number of people came round, before I got up to Mr. Duffell.

Q. Are you the person that took up the things - A. No; I left the bundle and proceeded after the prisoner.

WILLIAM PEARMAN . I am an officer of the city. On Friday the 16th I was in Smithfield market; I searched the prisoner, I found nothing on him but an old handkerchief and a piece of waste paper; he was given in my charge; I took him to the compter.

GEORGE DUFFELL . Q. Did you stop the prisoner in Duke-street - A. Yes; I only know that he was pursued by a hue and cry; I gave him the coach way. I begged him to stop; he begged, me to let him go on, he was only pursued by a press gang. I took him to the marshalman.

Prisoner's Defence. As I was coming from Islington on Friday the 16th, a gentleman came up to me and put this in my arms, and told me to carry it to the Swan and Two Necks, he no sooner gave them to me then he left me; that gentleman came up and laid hold of me and ran away.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 19.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18090626-33

553. SARAH HAZLEY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 10th of June , five yards of printed cotton, value 12 s. the property of Thomas Lloyd , privately in his shop .

THOMAS SMITH . I live with Thomas Lloyd , linen-draper in Oxford-street .

Q. Look at the prisoner, do you know her person - A. Yes; I know her to be the same person that came in our shop on June the 10th, about twelve at noon, she came to purchase two caps, they were hanging at the door; she bought the caps, paid for them, and look them away. In the course of five minutes she came in the shop again and said the caps were not the same as were hanging at the door; I convinced her that they were the same; she then took several muslins in her hand and asked the price, which I told her; she bid me within a shilling or eighteen pence a yard of what I asked her; I told her I could not deal with her in that way. There were other customers in the shop; she desired me to attend them, and she would wait. In the course of five minutes I had served the other customers, I told her we had got some remnants cheaper; I took her to another part of the shop and shewed her the remnants, which I sold to her for four

shillings; I then told her we had some cheap stockings and very good at two shillings; she looked at them, said they were too coarse, if I could shew her some very good for three shillings; I looked down, I saw her folding something under her gown; I said what is that; she said nothing; I said you have stole something; I looked over the counter, I saw the five yards of printed cotton come from some part of her clothes; it dropped from under her clothes on the ground; I saw it two minutes before on the counter close by her.

Mr. Gurney. You were of the other side of the counter - A. Yes.

Q. So that whatever view you had was from looking over the counter - A. Yes; I was not of the same side of the counter with her.

Q. Therefore whether you are correct in saying you saw it fall from her, depends upon whether you were correct in your view - A. I saw it drop from her.

ROBERT FLOWERDEAU . I did not go into the shop till the prisoner called me, she was standing by the side of the counter; she had a long train to her gown, she took it up in the train of her gown; she did not know it was there.

Q. Did Smith hear it - A. Yes.

Smith. I did not.

The property produced and identified.

The prisoner left her defence to her counsel; called four witnesses, who gave her a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18090626-34

558. MARY FARRALL was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 28th of May , a watch, value 2 l. the property of Henry Tyrer , from his person .

HENRY TYRER . I am a porter .

Q. Where were you on the evening of the 28th of May last - A. I had been in the city to see an acquaintance of mine; I was going to Paddington; I met with this girl in Holborn about ten o'clock in the evening; I was intoxicated. I went into a house with her, No. 4, Dyot-street . We went into the room together and went to bed; I soon fell asleep.

Q. Was there a bed in the room - A. Yes.

Q. Was there any body in the room with you but the prisoner - A. Not when we went in. I suppose we laid down on the bed both together.

Q. How long did you continue asleep - A. Perhaps an hour.

Q. Before you fell asleep did any body else come in the room - A. No; she was with me when I fell asleep. when I awoke she was gone.

Q. Then was there any body else in the room - A. Yes; there was a girl that belonged to the house; I was awoke by the person that kept the house. I had lain down in my clothes; when I awoke I missed my watch, and the prisoner was gone.

Q. When had you last seen the watch - A. I felt it in my pocket when I went into the house.

Q. On what occasion did you happen to feel it in your pocket - A. I saw the watch hanging down when I went into the room.

Q. What passed after you awoke - A. I asked them if they knew what had became of it; they said no, I never had one.

Q. Are you certain that you never took the watch out before you went to bed - A. Yes; I am certain that I never took it out. They took me to the watch-house that night; I told the landlady I was not willing to go. I told them at the watchhouse that I had lost my watch, they let me go then.

SAMUEL ROBERTS . I keep the Round-house, I have the charge of all the prisoners; when the last witness was brought to the watchhouse, he said he had been robbed of his watch at the house; he described the woman that he had been with as a tall woman that spoke hoarse. We knew the woman, we went out but could not find her that night. On the next morning, about eleven o'clock, a person came and told me where she was: I went to the place and found her, I asked her for the watch; she delivered it up to me directly; she said she was very tipsey, or else she never would have taken it; I took her and the watch to the watchhouse.

Q. How did the prosecutor appear to you, as to sobriety - A. He did not appear to be very sober, but the woman of the house, and her brother had ill used him, which rather made him more flurried than he would have been.

Q. From his description of the woman you knew her - A. Yes.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. When I went to make the bed I found the watch on the bed; I desired my landlady's brother to go and fetch the watchhouse keeper; he went and brought him forward; I know nothing more of the watch than picking it up on the bed.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Of stealing, but not from the person.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18090626-35

559. WILLIAM JONES, alias WILLIAM SINCLAIR, alias, WILLIAM SELL , was indicted for that he on the 9th of May , feloniously did falsely make and caused to be falsely made and counterfeited, and willingly acted and assisted in feloniously forging a certain order for the payment of money, that is to say, for the payment of 47 l. 3 s. 6 d. with intention to defraud Thomas Fairfax .

SECOND COUNT, for feloniously uttering a like forged order for the payment of money, with the same intention; - and

TWO OTHER COUNTS for like offence, with intention to defraud William Morgan ; - and

TWO OTHER COUNTS for like offence, with intention to defraud Alexander Anderson , Alexander Wilson , and George Wilson .

THOMAS FAIRFAX . I live in Strutton ground , I am a publican .

Q. Did the prisoner lodge in your house any time - A. Yes; about three weeks.

Q. During the time he lodged there had you any transaction about a draft or bill - A. He ran up a bit of a score, about fifteen or sixteen shillings; he wanted to run more on, I told him I could not think of letting it run on any longer. In consequence of that he told me he would pay me in the course of a few days. On the 9th of May be brought me a bill, while he was lodging at my house; he gave me the bill, and told me that I could see that he did not wish to defraud me out of the money, for the property that he had. I took

the bill, he wanted to have seven or eight pound on it.

Q. Did he say so - A. Yes, he gave it me for that purpose; I told him I could not let him have it; I had paid my brewer that day, I had not a farthing in my house except a few shillings; in consequence of that he begged for ten or twelve shillings in silver of me; he had ten shillings in silver of me, and three shillings in halfpence, he called for a pot of ale, he told me he would be with me on the next morning, to go with me to the bankers to receive the money of the bill; I kept the bill, he left it with me.

Q. Did he say you should keep the bill - A. He gave it me, and told me to keep it, he would go with me in the morning to the bankers.

Q. What did he give it to you for - A. He said as a security for the money I had lent him. He never came the next morning.

Q. Had he lodged with you up to that time - A. Yes.

Q. He did not sleep with you that night - A. No.

Q. Had he any property or clothes at your house - A. I never saw any property that he had. On the next morning as he never came, I was rather dubious of the bill; I went to the bankers with the bill, it was not paid. The officer has the bill, he had it at the magistrates.

Q. Who did you give the bill to - A. I gave it to the officer at Union-hall.

Q. When did you see the prisoner after that, he did not come on the next morning - A. No, I never saw him till he came up to Queen-square; he was taken up on the 10th, I think this was the 9th.

Q. Then you took him the day after he gave you the bill - A. No, it was the 9th.

Q. You do not know what you are talking of - A. On the 9th of May he gave me the bill, he said he was to come the next morning to go to the bankers; he did not.

Q. Where did you find him - A. At the Crown and Cushion, at the foot of Westminster bridge, in the afternoon of the same day.

Q. Did you say any thing to him - A. Yes; I told him I thought he had used me very ill, and that he was my prisoner; I sent to Mr. Astley's immediately for two officers, from that he was taken to the office.

Mr. Knapp. I understand you lent him some triffle of money - A. Thirteen shillings altogether.

Q. He left the bill as a security with you - A. Yes, he would leave it with me for the money that he had of me.

JAMES GILLMORE . I am an officer belonging to Queen-square; I received the bill of Mr. Gough, in the presence of Mr. Fairfax; he delivered it over to me in the presence of the prisoner, before the magistrate. I marked the bill, I am sure it is she same bill.

Q. to Mr. Fairfax. Did you see the bill given to Mr. Gillmore - A. Yes.

Q. Was that the same bill that the prisoner gave you - A. Yes, I know it by the cross, and by my own name being upon it, which I put before the magistrate.

Q. Before you went before the magistrate, who did you part with that bill to - A. To Mr. Gough, the officer at Union-hall.

Q. Before you gave it to Mr. Gough, did you put any mark on it - A. I put a cross, and he put another on it at the public house.

Mr. Knapp. You said just now that you put a cross on it before the magistrate - A. No, my name I put on it at the magistrates, and a cross I put on it at the public house. This is the bill that the prisoner gave me.

MR. HALL. I am clerk to Messrs. Anderson and Wilson, No. 17, Philpot-lane.

Q. Who are the partners in that house - A. Alexander Anderson , Alexander Wilson , and George Wilson , the firm of the house is John Alexander Anderson , and co.

Q. Have you a person of the name of Morgan at Portsmouth, that keeps cash at your house - A. William Morgan of Portsmouth keeps an account with us.

Q. Is he the only person of the name of William Morgan that keeps an account with you - A. We have no other William Morgan .

Q. Look at that bill - A. This bill was shewn me at Queen-square, Westminster; it was not presented to me at Philpot-lane.

Q. Are you acquainted with the hand writing of William Morgan that keeps cash at your house - A. I am; this is not the hand writing of William Morgan that keeps cash at our house.

Q. Does it bear any resemblance to it - A. Not in any part of it.

Q. Is it in part a printed check - A. Yes, one of our copper plate checks,

Mr. Knapp. You say you know Mr. Morgan's hand writing, it is not in the least like it - A. I would not have paid it; it is not at all signed in the way he signs them. (The bill read.)

"No. 17, Philpot-lane, 10th of May, 1809. Messrs. John Alexander Anderson and Co. Pay Mr. Haupins or Bearer, the Sum of Forty-seven Pounds, Three Shillings and Six-pence.

WILLIAM MORGAN ".

Q. to Fairfax. You said that the prisoner lodged at your house some time - A. About three weeks.

Q. What name did he go by - A. By the name of Sinclair.

Q. Do you know what christian name he went by - A. No.

Q. But he went by the name of Sinclair - A. Yes.

Q. You never saw him write perhaps - A. No.

Q. You do not know his writing - A. No.

Q. Did you talk with him at all when the bill was given you - A. No, no great deal; there was no conversation at all, only he said he would come in the morning, he did not wish to defraud me out of the money; nothing else, only called for a pot of ale; he said he had just received it at the pay office.

Q. Are you sure he said that - A. Yes; he said he had just received it at the pay office; he did not say any more, nor did I ask him any more about it.

Mr. Knapp. There was no more conversation with him on that bill, than there would be with any other bill - A. No.

Q. And he said he had just received it at the pay office - A. Yes.

Prisoner's Defence. My lord, I have but lately returned to England; I have been employed in the naval service of his majesty . I was coming home late to this man's house in the evening, I found the bill; I did not offer it to him in payment, I asked him to lend me a few

shillings on it; he said he was very sorry I had not asked sooner, he would have given me the full amount; I told him I only wanted a few shillings; had I known this to be a forged check; I certainly would not have tendered it to any man that knew me. In the second place, I would wish to state, since I wish to make myself the amienable victim of the laws of my country. When Mr. Fairfax came to me at the public house, I wanted then to have paid him the money; I was anxious to pay him, it was in my power but he would not accept of it. Instead of his stating what he has to your lordship, that I wanted seven or eight pounds, I asked for seven shillings, he said I might have seven or eight pounds. My lord, I have been to all parts of the world. I have been a number of years at sea; it may seem rather strange that I have not brought some person or persons to my character; at such a time as this, it is a very pleasing circumstance to have some person forward; but having been in the major part of my life at sea; I am only known by the officers, and I was about returning to my ship when I was apprehended; that ship has since sailed. Had that been in England, the officers would have come forward and have given me a character. If I had been the culprit that my prosecutor has represented me to be, I am amienable to the law. What he has stated does shew the ungenerous disposition of that man; it was over the water where he first saw me. He has stated that he first saw me in Queen-square; he first met me over the water, I was going to the theatre that night; a young man whom I did not know, asked me to go to the theatre, I agreed to go, as I was about in a few days going to return to my ship. On that evening I was going over Westminster bridge, I met a soldier, he knew Fairfax, I had seen him at his house; I asked him if he would have any thing to drink; we went into a public house, I told him my intention was to go to the theatre, that I would wait till eight o'clock to go in at half price. That man was employed by Mr. Fairfax to look after me, or I do not know why Mr. Fairfax should know I was going there; this soldier went out and brought Mr. Fairfax. When he came in he wished me good evening, I returned him the compliment, I told him I was very sorry I had promised to have called on that day to have paid him the thirteen shillings and had not, he must certainly doubt my veracity in coming to pay him; I would then pay him; as such I put my hand into my breeches pocket, took out the money to pay the debt that I owed him; he for a moment paused, and at length he said, I shall not take the money, I would rather drink your blood than have the money; I said if you must be so, and you are determined to send me to jail, this money will be of service to me, because if I pay you it will strip me of every farthing I have. My lord, I am guiltless; I am bound to plead I am guiltles from the natural impulse of my nature. I am doubly bound to plead that I am not guilty, because I am not guilty; and if I was guilty I should rather have gone to a stranger, and not to a person I knew.

GUILTY- DEATH , aged 28.

[ The prisoner was recommended to his Majesty's mercy by the jury, on account of his youth .]

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18090626-36

560. JOHN LONKES was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 1st of May , a pair of breeches, value 5 s. a shirt, value 6 s. and a handkercheif, value 7 s. the property of James Stannard.

JAMES STANNARD . The prisoner lodged in the same room with me, at the Barlow Mow in Park-street . On the 1st of May he left his lodging; on the 2nd of May I missed the things; a pair of breeches, a shirt, and a silk handkercheif. When the prisoner was taken he had my breeches on; he said the shirt he had pawned, and the handkercheif he had lost. I know they are my breeches, I have had them ever since. I value them at five shillings.

THOMAS COPELAND . I keep a public house.

Q. Did the witness and the prisoner lodge with you - A. Yes, in the same room. On the 5th of June Stannard saw the prisoner in Park-street, he came and called me; I pursued the prisoner, and overtook him in Blackburn-mews; this young man came and said he had got his breeches on. I took the prisoner down to my house; he pulled the breeches off, and wished to make it up.

Prisoner's Defence. On the 24th of April I went to Colonel Jackson; I had not decent things of my own, these things lay in the room, I took them; I meaned to make some recompence with the young man for them. Colonel Jackson was going to Ireland, I had not decent things to go with him; I was obliged to leave him. I never did any such thing before in my life.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 25.

Publickly Whipped and Discharged.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18090626-37

561. HARRIET Mc'GINNIS , and ANN GIBBON , was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 22nd of June , two gowns, value 10 s. four petticoats, value 5 s. six handkercheifs, value 1 s. a habit shirt, value 6 d. two bonnets, value 2 s. 6 d. two pair of stockings, value 1 s. and a shift, value 1 s. the property of Thomas Tee .

ANN TEE . I am a married woman, my husband's name is Thomas Tee . Ann Gibbons lived servant with me. I live at No. 23, Old Pye-street, Westminster ; we keep a shop, and sell dogs meat, and go out with it . On the 22nd of June, about a quarter before one at noon, I left the prisoner Gibbon at my place with my children, I went out on my business; I was fetched home at a quarter after two. I found three drawers open, and the property taken out; the drawers were left unlocked, and a box was left unlocked; the things were taken out that are enumerated in the indictment. I had seen the articles safe when I went out.

THOMAS TEE . Where you informed that your place had been robbed, and did you go in search of the prisoners - A. I did. At four o'clock in the afternoon I found them in a boat with the property; they were both dressed in my wife's clothes; the waterman had put them on shore of this side Westminster bridge, they had two bundles with them. I took them and the bundles to my house.

JAMES GILLMORE . Q. Where did you get that bundle that you produce - A. These I took from the back of the prisoner Gibbon she was dressed in them at his house.

The property produced and identified.

The prisoners said nothing in their defence, nor called

any witnesses to character.

Mc'GINNIS, NOT GUILTY .

GIBBON, GUILTY , aged 15.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction, there kept to Hard Labour , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18090626-38

562. WILLIAM LEVY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 29th of December , nineteen dozen of kid skins, value 35 l. the property of William Draper .

SECOND COUNT, laying them to be the property of Samuel Harlow .

Mr. Gurney, counsel for the prosecution, declining to offer any evidence, the prisoner was

ACQUITTED .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090626-39

563. GEORGE JEWETT was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 9th of June , a saddle of mutton, value 18 s. the property of Samuel Corp .

SAMUEL CORP . I am a butcher , I live at No. 31, Warwick-lane.

Q. When was it you lost this saddle of mutton - A. On the 9th of this month, about three o'clock in the morning. The prisoner came and looked in Mr. Rutter's shop.

Q. Who is Mr. Rutter - A. He is a wholesale butcher in Newgate-market . He walked about a yard from the door; he turned round and went into the shop; he went of the other side of the shop, to where I was, there were three saddles of mutton hung up, he took one of the three, brought it to the window with him; and was coming out of the window the same way he went in, and as he was coming out of the window he hit his head against the rails, where the lambs hung, and dropped the saddle of mutton on the window. When he got out of the shop he made a stagger and walked away round the corner; I called him, he would not come.

Q. What had he done with the saddle of mutton - A. The mutton laid on the window. I called him again; I said, George, if you go to Hell I will have you: I collared him; he said let us make it up; he offered me a seven shilling piece; I said I would not take it. I knew him before, he had worked for Cornick, in Newgate-market.

Q. Where were you when he came in at the window - A. I was watching the shop; I stood behind the shop; he could not see me.

Q. Then if he could not see you how came he to leave the saddle of mutton on the window - A. When he hit himself against the rail, he espied me then.

Q. How came you to watch him - A. I had reason to watch him; he came in so soon in the morning.

Q. You had no quarrel with him - A. No; none at all.

Mr. Gurney. Do you not remember that Mr. Wright used to say that you lost things, and that this man was wicked enough to surmise that you had taken them - A. He has said, Sam, I have lost such things out of the shop; I said I know nothing of them.

Q. When you took him to the watchhouse did you charge him with stealing a saddle of mutton - A. I gave charge of him for getting into Mr. Rutter's shop; I did not say a word about the saddle of mutton at the watchhouse.

Q. Did you see him take the mutton down - A. I did; I saw him take it off the hook.

JAMES MOORE . I am a fruit salesman, I saw Corp, the private watchman, lay hold of the prisoner; he charged me to aid and assist him; I did; he was delivered to the watchman.

Q. What did he say when he laid hold of him - A. I was not near enough to hear.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel; called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Fined One Shilling and discharged.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090626-40

564. THOMAS THATCHER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 7th of June , six yards of gingham, value 4 s. the property of William Trye .

JOHN GIBSON . I am shopman to William Trye; linen-draper , 23, Sun-street, Bishopgate-without . On the 7th of June, about two o'clock in the afternoon, I was standing behind the shop door, I saw the prisoner looking at some handkerchiefs at the door; in about five minutes a little girl came in the shop and told me a man had taken a piece of print. In consequence of what she said I immediately went out; she pointed out the prisoner; I went to him and collared him, and asked him what he had there; he immediately turned round; I saw a piece of gingham concealed under his coat; I desired him to walk back to the shop; he came back, and in the act of bringing him back he let the gingam fall.

WILLIAM FITCHETT . I am a shoemaker. On the 7th of June I was in Sun-street, I saw the young man seize the prisoner by the right shoulder; as he was going back I saw him put his hand under his coat, and dropped it from behind; I picked it up and and took it to the shop.

Prisoner. Did you see me drop it - A. Yes.

WILLIAM CAWLEY . I am a servant to the East India company. On the 7th of June I was coming along Sun-street, I stopped to look at some second hand books; there was an elderly woman on my right hand; she was muttering he will have something soon; when I lifted up my head she spoke in a louder voice, and pointed the prisoner out to me; I kept my eye upon him till he went into the shop.

Q. Where did the man come from - A. He was loitering about the window when she first saw him; after a little time he began to go slowly from the window; he was looking in the window; he went away as if nothing was the matter; I saw him take nothing, it appears he must have took it before. The young man came out of the shop and laid hold of him; he was willing to get back as soon as he could, as the shop was exposed to every body. I saw the prisoner drop it in the street. The prisoner went down upon his knees in the shop and prayed to God to strike him dead if he knew any thing of it.

Prisoner's Defence. I know nothing of it; I never meddled with it.

GUILTY, aged 33.

Judgement respited .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090626-41

565. WILLIAM SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 16th of June , nineteen pounds weight of bacon, value 10 s. the property of Robert Pargetter .

SARAH PARGETTER . My husband's name is Robert Pargetter ; he is a man cook .

Q. When did you lose this bacon - A. Sometime in this month; it was at the door; we keep a shop and sell bacon, poultry, and greens.

SAMUEL SHEPHARD . I am an officer. On the 16th of June I was in Skinner-street , I saw the prisoners in company with two others, standing against the prosecutrix's door; I watched them a few minutes; I saw the prisoner turn from the door with the bacon in his hand, running down the street; I pursued him, and when I came near him, he dropped it at my feet; I called to a man that was just by to take him. I took him and the bacon to the prosecutrix, she said it was her bacon.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I picked the bacon up down in the buildings; I ran because I heard the alarm of stop thief.

GUILTY , aged 19.

Confined Fourteen Days in Newgate , and whipped in Goal .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090626-42

566. WILLIAM SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 24th of June , a pocket book, value 1 s. a two-penny receipt stamp, value 2 d. a four-penny receipt stamp, value 4 d. a six-penny receipt stamp, value 6 d. and a shilling receipt stamp, value 1 s. the property of William Richards .

WILLIAM RICHARDS . I am clerk to Mr. George Kilbore and co. dry salters , Cross-lane, Cannon-street . On the 24th of June I was sent out to collect money, and in passing along Lombard-street, about one o'clock at noon, I felt a jerk at my pocket; I turned round and saw the prisoner several yards from me, he might be twelve yards from me; he had the pocket book under his coat, endeavouring to make his escape; my witness, John Pearce , saw the whole of the transaction, immediately rushed out of the shop, previously the prisoner had dropped the pocket book; Pearce picked it up with one hand, and seized the prisoner with the other; I immediately collared the prisoner also, and took him to the witnesses's shop till a constable could be procured. I took him to the compter.

Mr. Gleed. You say this was at the hour of one, in Lombard-street - A. Yes.

Q. Lombard-street we all know is an amazing throughfare - A. Yes.

Q. What pocket was the pocket book in - A. I cannot positively say; I believe it was on the right hand side.

Q. Perhaps you do not recollect that you had any pocket book at all - A. Yes, I saw it half an hour before in Mincing-lane.

JOHN PEARCE . I am shopman to a button maker, 23, Lombard-street. On Saturday the 24th of June, a little past one o'clock, I saw the prisoner take a black leather pocket book from the pocket of the prosecutor; directly I ran after him, seized him by the collar; I told him he had picked a gentleman's pocket of a pocket book; at the instant the pocket book fell on the ground, I lowered my hand, and with my left hand I picked up the pocket book from the ground; a crowd of people came round, I kept hold of the prisoner all the while till I got the pocket book. I took the prisoner into the shop; some person in the crowd desired me to give him the book; I requested some person to collar him, who knowing they never went alone.

Q. Who was the person that you ordered to be collared - A. The prosecutor, I thought it to be an accomplice.

EDWARD LEWIS . I am a constable, The prisoner and the pocket book was delivered to me. I took him to the Compter.

GUILTY , aged 29.

Transported for Life .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090626-43

567. JOHN CLARK was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 8th of June , two jackets, value 1 l, the property of Ann Nash , widow .

ANN NASH . I am a widow, and work at slop work . I live at No. 5, New-court, Duke's-place On Thursday night, the 8th of June, past ten o'clock at night, I was packing up my work, this man ran through the entry, came into the door; my work was just by the door in the lower room, I was counting it; he put his hand in the door, shoved all the rest down; snatched two jackets and ran out of the door with them. There was a woman that worked with me, she ran out and called stop thief, and the prisoner called stop thief. I locked my door and ran out; there was a mob gathered in a minute, the constable had then got hold of him. The jackets were picked up out of the mud, they were given to me in the mob.

CHARLES BLOXHAM . I am a constable. A little after ten at night, on the 8th of this month, I heard the cry of stop thief; I was in Bury-street, close to Duke's-place. I ran out of the door and saw the prisoner wrestling with two or three men; they charged him with the robbery. I seized him and took him back to the place where they said he had robbed; Mrs. Nash said the man had robbed her of two jackets; she produced the jackets before him.

Mrs. Nash. The woman that followed him, is taken out of the way by bribery. That is the man that put his hand into my door. I am sure of it.

Q. Are you certain that he is the man that came into your passage, and took your jackets away - A. Yes, I am sure of it.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I have been fifteen years at sea; ten years I have served his majesty; I have sailed with sir James Saumerez ; in 99 I was on board with Admiral Cochrane. I never wronged a person in my life. I never was before a court in my life. I was on board the Beslisle, captain Darby; I had just come home in the Demourier, West India man.

GUILTY , aged 29.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090626-44

568. WILLIAM DAVIS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 14th of June , a coat, value 6 d. the property of George Arnold ; and four lobsters, value 10 s. the property of William Twiss .

The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.

WILLIAM HARRIS . I am an apprentice to Mr. Turner, he is the owner of the Gravesend boat called the Orange.

Q. Do you know the King of Prussia - A. Yes; that is another boat, it belongs to Mr. Twiss. They

were both laying at Billingsgate in this month. The prisoner is a waterman ; I saw him go down the cabin of the King of Prussia ; he came up the hatchway with a blue coat under his arm; I thought it was his coat. John Gammon stopped him about two boats over; I saw a lobster's claw through a hole in the coat.

JOHN GAMMON . I am a shorer at Billingsgate; I work for Mr. Creswell. I was at work in this month, I cannot recollect the day of the month; there was an alarm that there were some lobsters taken out of the boat; I was ordered to stop the prisoner, he was coming from the King of Prussia; I stopped him, and seeing the lobster's claw through the hole of the coat; I told him that he had got something that did not belong to him; he said it was nothing to me, they did belong to him; I told him he should not have the property. I knew there were no other lobsters there but my master's. He made a great deal of altercation, said that he should keep them; he knew a great deal more about it than I did; he got on the ladder; I hove my basket of lobsters on my head and followed him; I laid hold of him at the top of the ladder, told him he should not have the property, otherwise he must go up to Mr. Creswell and explain how he came by them; he said he would do so. I went on with the load on my head, our house is No. 3, and just as I got to No. 4, somebody halloaed out he is run away. I put the basket of lobsters down in the middle of the market and pursued him into the Darkhouse, Darkhouse-lane; I there told him to give me the property and go about his business; he would not. He put the coat with the lobsters in it on the seat and set on it; he told me I should not have it. I took the coat and lobsters from him by force, told him if he followed me it should be the worse for him; however he followed me to Mr. Creswell's house; he was then given into the hands of the constable.

The coat produced and identified.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel; called six witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 33.

Confined Fourteen Days in Newgate , and whipped in Goal .

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090626-45

569. JOSEPH MINAL was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 20th of May , a printed book, value 1 s. 6 d. a plated skewer, value 10 d. five numbers of the Repository of Arts, value 20 s. two needle books, value 5 s. a picture, value 3 s. a half crown piece, four shillings, two sixpences, a penny-piece, and twenty halfpence , the property of Rudolph Akerman .

The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.

RUDOLPH AKERMAN . I am a bookseller ; I live in the Strand . The prisoner has been my servant ten years. In consequence of my till being robbed, I marked the money in the till on the 19th of May in the presence of Henry Waldron , one of my clerks. The prisoner slept out of my house. On the next morning I placed myself in a situation that he should not observe me where I had a full view of the counter and the till.

Q. At what time did the prisoner come the next morning - A. About seven o'clock. When he came in he immediately went to the till; he took a key out of his pocket and opened the till; I saw him take out some money; he then shut it. In about half a minute he came to it the second time and took some more money. I sent for an officer of Bow-street. When the officer came I charged the prisoner with having robbed me; he first denied it, but when I gave Mr. Bacon an order to search him he confessed it; he said he had robbed the till but once, and begged I would forgive him; I told him it was too late now, the law must take its course. I charged him with having robbed the till twice; he said he only opened it once; he begged pardon, said he would not do it again; he pretended to be very ill, and fainting, and very much agitated.

Q. I believe you afterwards went to his lodgings - A. Yes; in White Hart-yard, Drury-lane; we took the prisoner with us; there I found a variety of articles that had come from my house.

Q. Did you find among other things a picture - A. Yes; which belonged to me.

- BACON. I am an officer. On the 20th of May, in the morning. I went to Mr. Akerman's, when I got there the prisoner was sent for from below. When he came up Mr. Akerman said he had lost some money, together with a key which opened Mr. Akerman's till. He begged for mercy; I took the prisoner to his lodgings; Mr. Akerman followed. In his lodgings I found these things.

The property produced and identified.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence; called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 36.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090626-46

570. CHARLES HENRY RAVENSCROFT was indicted for that he on the 24th of April , feloniously did falsely make, forge, and counterfeit, and caused and procured to be made, and willingly acted and assisted in feloniously forging and counterfeiting a certain order for the payment of 15 l. with intention to defraud Richard Wilson .

SECOND COUNT, for uttering and publishing as true a certain order for the payment of 15 l. with like intention; - and

TEN OTHER COUNTS for like offence, only varying the manner of charging them.

The case was stated by Mr. Knapp.

WILLIAM MC'INERKERRY . I am a navy agent; I am in partnership with Francis Wilson ; I reside in James-street, in the Adelphia.

Q. Your bankers are Messrs. Masterman and co - A. Yes; White Hart-court, Lombard-street.

Q. Do you remember seeing the prisoner at the bar - A. Yes; I have seen him; I first saw him, I think, in the month of December last, at our accompting house; he represented himself as an assistant surgeon in the navy, and said he wanted an agent; I told him that we never took any gentleman unless he was recommended - unless we were recommended to him. I asked him if he knew any surgeon in the navy; I asked him if he knew Mr. Duncan, a surgeon in the navy; he said he knew him perfectly well. On the 7th of March he called again, I was not in the office when he came in, I came in afterwards, when Mr. Wilson, my partner, shewed me a letter which was

brought by him.

Q. Was the prisoner present at the time the letter was given to you by Mr. Wilson - A. Yes.

Q. Have you got that letter - A. Yes; I have.

Q. What past upon that - A. Mr. Wilson went out, and this person represented himself to me as an assistant surgeon in the navy; he said he required an advance of twenty pounds, and that he had pay due for the Wrangler, gun-brig, from the 17th of November last; he said there were no blank bills on board; he could not draw for his pay.

Q. These bills are usually printed bills - A. They are government bills. I then filled up a power of attorney; and filled up a bill for three months pay; he took the power of attorney with him, and the bill, having first signed it, before I gave him the draft on Messrs. Masterman and co. for twenty pounds.

Q. Look at that draft, and tell me whether that is the draft - A. Yes; this is the draft.

Q. Is it usual for you to draw drafts on paper, to write on it with red ink, payable at Messrs. Master-man and co - A. Yes, it is an universal practice. He represented himself to be of respectable connections, that he was the son of colonel Wells; he introduced himself by the name of Thomas Wells , said there were two assistant surgeons in the navy of the name of Thomas Wells , but he was the first Thomas Wells ; he described himself as Thomas Wells , the first, - the first on the list. I believe that was near the whole of the conversation that passed, and then he went away.

COURT. You have a paper in your hand - A. Yes.

Q. Who is it signed by - A. By Thomas Wells , the prisoner at the bar. Our clerk drew the bill and gave it to him to sign; he signed it in the name of Thomas Wells . We drew the bill upon ourselves and gave it to him to sign in that way. I did not see him afterwards till I saw him at Bow-street.

Q. After you had written that in red ink you gave him the bill - A. Yes.

Mr. Knapp. With respect to that letter, it was produced to you by Mr. Wilson - A. Yes.

Q. When it was in the prisoner's presence was any thing said about that letter - A. No; Mr. Wilson referred it over to me. He only referred it over to me whether we would take him as a client.

Q. Was it in the hearing of the prisoner that Mr. Wilson asked you whether you should take him as a client - A. He said here is the letter, shall we take this person as a client upon this letter. We were very busy at the time.

Q. You say the prisoner signed this bill and you wrote the red ink upon it - A. I did.

Mr. Knapp. I now propose it to be read.

"London, March 7th, 1809. Gentlemen, pay the bearer the sum of twenty pounds, and place to account of your humble servant Thomas Wells ; Messrs. Wilson and Mc'Inerkerry, 1, James-street, Adelphia." And above it in red ink.

"Payable at Messrs. Masterman and co. W. Mc'Inerkerry, 7th March, 1809."

COURT. Now point out that part of writing which you directed your clerk to write before he wrote his name - A. I told him to draw a bill for our bankers for twenty pounds, after that was done, and the prisoner signed his name I wrote that which made it payable at the bankers.

Mr. Alley. This is not the bill upon which the indictment is drawn - A. No.

Q. This is in your own name singular - A. Yes.

Q. Pray have you a private account in that bank - A. No. I believe the account is kept at the banking-house in the name of Francis Wilson and co. either of us draws.

JOHN LENT . Q. Are you clerk to Messrs. Mc'Inerkerry and Wilson - A. Yes.

Q. Look at that draft and tell me whether you wrote the body of it - A. Yes, I did, by the direction of my master.

COURT. What do you call the body of it - A. That which is black ink, except the name at the bottom, and what is written in red ink, I wrote.

RICHARD WILSON . Q. You are a publican, and keep the Swan, public house, in Portland-street - A. Yes, I do.

Q. Do you know the prisoner at the bar - A. Yes perfectly well. I suppose the first time I saw him, as near as I can say is about four or five months ago, three months before the bill was drawn; he was introduced to me by the name of sir Henry Ravenscroft , by his friend, who brought him to my house, who had frequented my house before.

Q. How long was he at your house - A. I suppose about five months; perhaps three months before this bill was drawn.

Q. You say he frequented your house near four or five months - A. Yes.

Q. Did he ever go by any other name - A. No; except when he was told his name was not sir Henry Ravenscroft ; he said his name was Charles Henry Ravenscroft . That was at the last part of his frequenting my house.

COURT. Did he say Charles Henry Ravenscroft was his real name - A. I never asked him at all his name; he went by that name with his acquaintances currently; I never knew him by any other name.

Mr. Knapp. Did he make any application to you on the 24th of April - A. On the 24th of April he spent the evening at my house; he wanted the loan of seven shillings, he said at first; he then consulted himself, he said that was not sufficient; he applied for more, he asked me if I would give him the discount of a fifteen pound note, drawn upon Messrs. Masterman and co. He had spent his evening down stairs, it was past eleven o'clock at night. Then he produced that bill, he asked me to give him the money for it; I should be sure of getting the money for it; they were his bankers.

COURT. Did he say on whom - A. Messrs Masterman, Peters, and co. I went to my almanack, the Commercial almanack, I there proved there was such a bankers. He gave me the draft; this is the draft. I held the ink stand in my left hand when he signed it.

Q. You saw him sign it - A. Yes, he wrote his name on the back of it in my presence; I should never take a bill of this description without seeing a person write his name on it in that manner.

Mr. Knapp. You have no doubt at all that this is the bill that he presented to you - A. I have no doubt of it in the least; I told him that I had paid away my money that day, as I do on a Monday; I said if he was a mind to have two pound he might have it, and the

rest if he would call the next day. Indeed I had no doubt of the goodness of it. I let him have two pounds; on my keeping the bill he seemed satisfied; I told him if he would come on the next day he should have the remainder, as he was in the habit of coming mostly every day.

Q. You let him have two pounds - A. I did, and he went away. I sent the bill to Messrs. Masterman's by a person of the name of Fisher; I told him to go to Masterman's, and tell them to give the money for that bill; he went and brought me a fifteen pound bank of England note.

Q. Did the prisoner tell you, or did you understand from him that he was to call the next day - A. I left it to his option to call when he liked, when I had the money there it was for him. He did not call the next day; I sent after him frequently, and had heard of him; he did not come for near a month.

Q. When did he come - A. That I cannot be positive. He came on a Wednesday, about one o'clock, I must not be positive whether it was in May or June, I think it was in the latter end of May; thinking every thing was just I did not notice it. When he came in again I asked him why he had not called for the money of the bill; he with an oath said he did not know that he gave me the bill, having many of them in circulation about, perhaps I dreamed of it, or he had drank too much that night, and did not recollect it. Very little passed more than that; I said I had sent to him by various people; he said they had told him of it, they came to him the night before, and he had then come for the money.

Q. You say upon a former occasion you advanced him two pounds - A. Yes, and on the Wednesday I paid him the remainder thirteen pounds in bank notes - in two bank notes.

ANTHONY FISHER . Q. Do you remember receiving a bill of Mr. Wilson - A. Yes; I was employed by Mr. Wilson.

Q. Was that the bill that you took to Messrs. Masterman's - A. I do not know; I only took one; I did not look at the bill.

Q. Did you receive at Messrs. Masterman's a fifteen pound bank of England note - A. Yes.

Q. Did you go immediately from your master to the banker's, and from the banker's to your master - A. Yes.

Q. And you are quite sure that you never received but one of your master - A. I am sure I never received but one.

Q. to Lent. Look at this bill - do you know Mr. Mc'Inerkerry's hand writing - A. Yes; and Mr. Wilson's.

Q. Have you seen them write often - A. Yes.

Q. Is that Mr. Mc'Inerkery's hand writing - A. No.

Mr. Alley. Do you form your opinion from any thing you have heard expressed since the bill has been paid - A. I form my opinion from the bill itself.

Q. If you had met that bill without ever having heard that forgery was imputed to the prisoner, could you have ventured to have said that - A. Yes; instantly.

(The bill read.)

"London, April 24, 1809. Gentlemen, please to pay the bearer on demand fifteen pounds, and accompt it to your humble servant C. H. Ravenscroft. Payable at Messrs. Masterman's and co. White Hart-court, W. Mc'Inerkerry." The letters,

"Payable at Messrs. Masterman's and co." appear to be in red ink.

LEWIS MILLER . Q. I believe you are clerk to Messrs. Masterman and co. - A. I am.

Q. You can tell us the names of the partners in that house - A. William Masterman , Henry Peters , Thomas Walker , Daniel Mildred Gerard Scorrer , and James Maud ; they are the only partners; they are bankers in White Hart-court, Lombard-street.

Q. Do you remember that check being presented to you for payment - A. Yes, very well, on the 25th of April.

Q. Do you recollect the person that presented it - A. The person that was last called, Fisher, he was not so clean dressed as now, I think I recollect his eyes; I took notice of him before he got out of the house, on account of my suspicion; we were particularly busy at that time, and I dare say the man will recollect that I looked particularly at him when he went out of the door.

Q. to Fisher. Do you recollect that person looking at you - A. Yes, very well.

Miller. I paid the check in a fifteen pounds bank of England note, 7637.

Mr. Bolland. I see this note is not directed to your house - A. It is made payable at our house.

Mr. Knapp. Though it is not directed to your house. Is that your usual mode - A. We are accustomed to pay such pieces of paper as these; the seamen bring such as they can get, when they are directed in red ink we always pay them, knowing it to be Mr. Mc'Inerkerry's hand writing. When I looked at if the second time I had suspicion of it immediately. I have had hundreds of Mr. Mc'Inerkerry's drafts.

WILLIAM BLACKMAN . I am an officer of Bow-street. Limbrick and I apprehended the prisoner on Friday the 16th of June in Belton-street, Long Acre. We told him that we had got a warrant against him. When we got to the watchhouse we told him it was for a forgery; he made a little reply. I searched him and I found this piece of paper in his right hand waistcoat pocket. On Saturday, the next morning, as we were going up the coal yard, in our way to the office; he requested me not to produce the paper, he said it would hang him; he said no more; I made no answer to it. (The paper read.)

"Payable at Masterman's and co. W. Mc'Inerkerry.

Payable at Masterman's and co. W. Mc'Inerkerry.

Payable at Masterman's and co. W. Mc'Inerkerry.

Payable at Masterman's and co. W. Mc'Inerkerry.

Please to pay the bearer on demand for your humble servant.

Please to pay the bearer on demand, you will oblige your humble servant.

London, June 14th, 1809. Gentlemen, please to pay the bearer one hundred pounds on demand, you will oblige your humble servant.

Payable at Masterman's and co. W. Mc'Inerkerry.

Payable at Masterman's and co. W. Mc'Inerkerry.

Payable at Masterman's and co. W. Mc'Inerkerry.

Payable at Masterman's and co. W. Mc'Inerkerry."

Prisoner's Defence. I am perfectly aware of the situation I now stand in; I am of a respectable family and connections, I have had a liberal education given me. With respect to the witnesses, they have taken an oath to speak the truth, and nothing but the truth. I shall make a few observations with regard to Mr.

Wilson; I do not know what Mr. Wilson means to insinuate, that I forgot to call, or did not call upon him for a month after I tendered him the bill; I mean to say when that bill was given to him; it was given to him for him to keep it till the two pounds was paid, not to after it upon his peril. He said I have been every day at his house, I have not; he keeps an Odd-fellow's lodge; as he kept an Odd-fellow's lodge, I went there on the Monday. I am well aware of his inviduous temper; if I shall lose my life, I shall not merit it at his hands, though I shall not be the first life that he has lost. My lord, I beg pardon, I hope that you will not think that my disagreeable situation makes me have any antipathy against him as a man; no, but as a man, he ought to have said nothing more than the truth. What could he mean by saying I had more in circulation, but that it might prejudice the jury against me. I did not intend to make another observation; Mr. Mc'Inerkery made an observation, to say that I called on him in December, I beg his pardon. I was cast away with captain Bartan, in the Crescent, on the 14th of September. On the 8th of January, I was appointed gunner of the Wrangler, gun brig; I could not be there in December. With regard to Blackman, the laws of the country requires that witnesses should speak the truth; why not he speak the truth, as well as any other man. He said when he took the paper from me, I said I was afraid I should be hanged; why should I be afraid I should be hanged; when I am tried by a liberal and impartial jury. I have been ten years in the navy, and three years in the light dragoons. I have always conducted myself as a gentleman.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 23.

Of uttering it, knowing it to be forged.

[ The prisoner was recommended to his Majesty's mercy by the jury, on account of his youth .]

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18090626-47

571. BRIDGET ANDREWS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 10th of June , a cloak, value 20 s. the property of David Cameron , privately in his shop .

JOSEPH PLIMPTON . I am shopman to David Cameron , 383, Strand . pawnbroker . On the 10th of June the prisoner came to redeem a gown at our house; I had seen her before; she pledged in the name of Bridget Mahony . Just as she went out of the door I received information, I followed her, I over took her and brought her back; I sent for a constable, and she delivered this cloak to me. It is a net cloak, she denied having it at first, the second time I charged her with taking it, she took it out of her pocket. The cloak is worth twenty shillings.

Q. You received some information - A. Yes, from a woman; she said the woman that I had just served, had taken a cloak from the door.

Prisoner's Defence. I went in there to take my gown out of pledge; I took it in my apron, and just as I was going out of the threshold of the door, I took up the cloak, I laid it along side of my gown; there was a woman within said I picked up something; I was a good way from the door, he followed me; he asked me to give him a guinea and a half for the cloak; no, says I, my poor man is a hard working man, I have no such money; I said if you have any demand for it, I will let you have it; I picked it up on the pavement. I throw myself upon you sir, and the gentleman of the jury. I am innocent.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18090626-48

572. JOHN THURSTON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 25th of April , a mare, value 2 l. 7 s. the property of Richard Pierce .

The case was stated by Mr. Alley.

RICHARD PIERCE . I reside in Hertfordshire, in the parish of Aldenham .

Q. In the month of April had you a mare on the common - A. On the 16th of April I turned the mare out on the common; on the evening of that day I saw it, I never saw it afterwards, nor heard of it on the common. On the 5th of May I came up to London; I went to Smithfield, I found her in possession of a lad, he was on another horse, the mare was by the side of it; the lad brought a man to me as the master of the horse; he offered the horse to sell.

Q. Did the man go with you ultimately to Dixon's repository - A. Yes; and at Dickon's repository I found that was my mare; she was blind in the off eye.

JOHN OBEE . Q. What are you - A. I am a clerk at Mr. Dixon's respository.

Q. Do you recollect the mare being brought - A. I do; on the 25th of April, by a woman that told me her name was Elizabeth Harding . - I am sure it is the same mare.

HENRY GREEN . I am a victualler. I live at Bethnal Green.

Q. Did you ever see the prisoner - A. Yes; in the month of April last, about the latter end of April, or beginning of May, I cannot tell the day of the month; I saw him at my house, he had three horses with him; I do not recollect what horses they were, I did not look at them.

JOHN HARDING . I work at Mr. Rhode's and Hale's feather warehouse, Maiden-lane, Battle-bridge. I have lodged for three months back in Weller-place. Elizabeth Harding and I lived together as man and wife.

Q. The prisoner had a room in the house - A. Yes, he lived with his wife and three sons; his sons came backwards and forwards, I cannot say whether they all slept there.

Q. Was the prisoner and Elizabeth Harding acquaintances - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know of any transaction between them - A. They never let me know any thing about it.

WILLIAM TAYLOR . I live in the parish of Aldenham, in Hertfordshire.

Q. Do you recollect when Mr. Pierce's mare was lost - A. No, I do not.

Q. Do you recollect seeing any body with her in the month of April - A. I cannot recollect the day of the month, I met a poney about the size of Mr. Pierce's; it was dark.

Q. Then you do not know whether it was Mr. Pierce's mare or not - A. I do not; a boy was with her, the boy said good night; after that I saw a man walking close behind.

Q. Was it at the time that Mr. Pierce lost his mare - A. It was at the time if ever it was; because when I went home I told my wife; and on the next day or the day after, they lost the mare.

ELIZABETH HARDING . Q. Do you know the prisoner

at the bar - A. Yes, I lodge in the same house with him.

Q. In the month of April last, did he give you any animal to sell - A. Yes, two horses; I cannot tell the date of the month; it was on a Tuesday, almost three months ago; they were delivered to me at Bethnal-green; I was not in the house, the prisoner took the poney out of the public house at Bethnal-green; the gentleman's name that keeps it is Green. It was in the forenoon I took them to Mr. Dixon's in Barbican; and I received one of his son; that third horse I was stopped with.

Q. You received two horses of the prisoner, and one of his son - A. Yes, this last horse, there is no owner for it.

Q. What did you do with the two that you received of the prisoner, that you took to Mr. Dixon's - A. I was to do nothing, but to put down my name. A boy rode them up there.

Q. What boy is that - A. I do not know, some boy in the street.

Q. You cannot describe these two horses by colour or any thing else - A. No.

COURT. Was the one that you received of the son carried to Dixon's too - A. Yes; that was the last one that I was stopped with, that happened about a week afterwards.

Mr. Pollock. When you took the horse that the son had given you, you was stopped - A. Yes.

Q. But the horse that belonged to Mr. Pierce was not that horse - A. No, it was one of the other two; they were both brought out of Mr. Green's house in Bethnal-green. I took one to Mr. Dixon's, the other horse a man rode it there; they both went in Mr. Dixon's about the same time.

Q. Then they were both left, one by you and one by the man the same day, are you certain of it - A. Yes; I only booked one, I know nothing about the other; I received the money for the one I had booked in my own name on the next sale day. I received two pounds one shilling; I gave the money to Mr. Thurston in Barbican; he and his son came up to me there; and Thurston went to Barbican at the time I took the horse there, and his son was with him. I received the money for another horse, not the horse that the man rode the same day, it was another about ten days afterwards; I received for that eleven pounds two shillings.

Q. to Obee. Elizabeth Harding brought one horse in her own name - A. She brought three; that is the woman; she brought one on the 25th of April, which belonged to Mr. Pierce, that sold for two pounds seven shillings; I paid her two pounds one shilling on the following Thursday.

Q. Have you such a recollection of that horse, so as to know it is the same horse that Mr. Pierce came back to your repository in the manner stated, some little time after - A. Yes, I can say I am sure it was.

COURT. Was there any other horse put in her name for which you tendered her any money - A. On the 28th of April she brought another, which was sold for twelve guineas, for which she received eleven pounds two shillings.

Q. That is not the horse that Mr. Pierce came with - A. That I am sure not. On the 9th of May she brought another when she was stopped.

Prisoner. I should wish the witness to tell me the reason that she came to deny me in her examination, as I lodged in the same house; she told the gentleman that if I was to come into the same room, she should not know me again.

COURT. to Elizabeth Harding . You have stated that he delivered the horse to you, did you say before the magistrate, that if you was to see the man, you should not know him again - A. I never said such a thing; I told Mr. Matthews, the constable, the man that gave me the horse, he said he knew him very well. I cannot remember whether I was asked or no before the magistrate.

Prisoner. Will your lordship ask Mr. Dixon's clerk what she said upon her examination.

Mr. Obee. Before the alderman she said she was innocent, she was employed by a man; she should not know him again.

WILLIAM READ . I am an officer. I found the prisoner in a public house in Somers-town, he was in custody of a supposed constable, who is since gone away; he was very resolute, he said you shall have nothing but the man he was in custody of; he should have something, he would buy Jack Ketch a new suit of clothes for the day he was hanging him; he called me all the b - rs, and said no b - y runner should apprehend him; he abused me all the way coming along to Hatton-garden. I took a pair of spurs out of his pocket.

Prisoner. And a pair of gloves.

JOHN MATTHEWS . On the 5th of May I went with Mr. Pierce to Dixon's repository, and there I saw the horse that was detained by Mr. Pierce. On the following Saturday morning I went to No. 15, Montague-street, White Chapel, by the direction in Mr. Dixon's book; I could find no person there of the name of Harding. On Tuesday following, I attended at Mr. Dixon's repository; the woman came in, I apprehended her the moment I saw her I told her I knew the rest of the parties. This saddle and bridle were left at Bethnal-green by the prisoner.

Q. You know nothing of that yourself - A. No.

Prisoner's Defence. I am entirely innocent of the charge alledged against me; I never trusted a horse in her hands; I never received a halfpenny of her in my life. I leave myself in the hands of the jury.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18090626-49

573. MARY YORK was indicted for that she on the 14th of May , with a certain gun, which she then and there loaded with gunpowder, and diveres leaden shots, and held in both her hands, which she, the said Mary York , feloniously, wilfully, and unlawfully did shoot at Robert Coombes , a subject of our Lord the King, with intent in so doing, to kill and murder him ; - and

FOUR OTHER COUNTS for like offence, only varying the manner of charging them.

ROBERT COOMBES . I am a fishmonger at Sunbury. On the 14th of May, about six o'clock in the afternoon, I was in Kempton Park ; I was going to take a walk with William Parker , William Stapleton , and Joseph Constable . After we had been in the park some time, looking at some men playing at skittles, I heard a gun go off; I went up to the place from whence I thought it came; I saw the place where the ball came through the pales. I then went up to Mary York , she was upon

on Mr. Rolfe's premises; I asked her if she knew what she had been doing; she had the gun in her hand; she said yes, she knew perfectly well; I told her she had been doing very wrong, and that if she shot the gun off again in such a careless way. I should get over the paling and take the gun away from her. She then asked the servant what fellow that was; the servant who was with her said she did not know; she then said she would take the liberty of firing at me; I said she might if she liked, I should not move. I did not move, she presented the gun towards me in a direct line, and snapped it three times; it did not go off; she then took the gun from off her shoulder, she had forgot to prime it; she asked the female servant for the powder horn, the servant gave it her, she poured out of the powder horn into the pan of the gun some gunpowder, and shut the pan down again. William Parker was at the side of me, he begged me to get behind a tree, or else she would shoot me: I got behind the tree, and after I had been there a few minutes she held the gun towards me in a direct line, I poked my head out and looked; she discharged the gun as soon as she saw me.

Q. All the time you were in Kempton park - A. Yes.

Q. Who is Mr. Rolfe - A. I understand he is her uncle. I got over the poles then, we went up to her and took the gun from her; we then went to the place where the ball came through, and she followed us.

Q. You went back to the place where you thought the ball had come through the paling - A. I am positive the ball came through the paling, because there was a hole in the paling.

Q. That might be made before - A. I do not know; I did not see the ball come through. I told her that I should go and get a warrant: she said I might go if I liked; if she had the gun she would as leave shoot me as not; I went down to Mr. Cowey, he was not at home. On the Monday morning I came down to Bow-street to get a warrant.

Q. Did the gun go off when she pointed it at you when you stood behind the tree - A. Yes; it did go off.

Q. Did you examine the tree afterwards - A. No.

Q. You only saw her put the powder into the pan to prime it - A. There were shot in the gun; I saw her put them in; she asked her servant for the shot belt; she poured them in without measuring them. That was when I was talking to her, before the gun was fired.

Q. Have you had any conversation with the prisoner since she has been apprehended with this warrant - A. No, none. I never saw the prisoner before nor since. (A model of the spot produced.)

Mr. Gurney. Now Mr. Coombes, you are a fishmonger, are you - A. I am. My father is a housekeeper.

Q. You carry fish about to sell with a horse and cart - A. Yes; every day.

Q. I thought you played more than you worked - A. No, sir; I have to work to support my aged father.

Q. So you were taking a walk in Kempton park - in Kempton park there is a fence like this, is there not - A. Yes, there is.

Q. That fence is five foot six, is it not - A. It is not so much. I never measured it.

Q. I will prove that it is four foot nine inches; the close part of it, and the other railed part is five foot six - were there any trees - A. Yes.

Q. When you went up to miss York was not she in Mr. Rolfe's premises - A. Yes. I was on the other side, where there are large trees.

Q. The place where you say the ball went through was three hundred feet off - A. No; I think it was about ten yards round the corner.

Q. I will prove that it was two hundred and forty feet off; she was on Mr. Rolfe's side of the pales, and Mr. Rolfe's servant with her - A. Yes.

Q. She put the powder in the gun - A. I did not see her put the powder in; I saw her put the shot in.

Q. And up she put it to you - A. She said she would shoot me; I said she might if she liked.

Q. And then you got behind the tree - A. Yes; after she snapped the gun three times at me.

Q. You did not offer to run away - A. No.

Q. How far was that tree from the place - A. Which I stood behind.

Q. Yes - A. I never measured it. About three yards and a half from the pales; she was about six yards from the pales; I think I was about fifteen yards distance from her.

Q. Now you are quite sure that you saw her take a powder horn and put powder in the pan - A. I am sure I did.

Q. You are as correct in that as you are in the rest of your evidence - A. Yes, I am.

Q. Well, the next day you went to Bow-street - A. Yes.

Q. And the next morning you sent Parker to her - A. No, I did not.

Q. Where did you and Parker meet on Monday morning - A. Parker and I went to Bow-street together; we met at the George, public house to come together to Bow-street.

Q. Before you came to Bow-street did not you send Parker to her to tell her that if she did not give you some money you would go to Bow-street - A. No, I did not.

Q. Nor you do not know that he went - A. No; if he went he never told me of it.

Q. That same evening after this was passed you got over and took the gun from her and struck her - A. No, I did not strike her; I took the gun from her, and went away with the gun to Mr. Cowey's.

Q. You took the gun to the George public house and sat there drinking and smoking, and Parker with you - A. Yes; I came back and took the pale down which the ball came through and put a fresh one in its place.

Q. That is the pale where you said the ball came through - A. Yes.

Q. I dare say you used no bad language - A. No.

Q. Nor you did not throw something at her - A. I believe I took down a piece of the paling and threw at her; in order to prevent her from loading the gun.

Q. You went to Bow-street the next day, Monday - A. Yes.

Q. What day was she taken to Bow-street - A. Tuesday morning. We were to appear afterwards on the Friday.

Q. On Friday you came to town - A. Yes.

Q. And I understand that something passed, you went away - A. Yes.

COURT. Then you did not go before the magistrate on the Friday - A. No, I did not.

Mr. Gurney. You got some money of somebody not to go - A. No, I did not; I never received a halfpenny.

Q. Your companion, Parker, got none, I suppose - A. I do not know; I am sure he never received any while he was in my company.

Q. Which way did you go home - A. Through Hammersmith, and Hounslow Heath.

Q. In your going home, did you quarrel about the money - A. No, we had a quarrel; I did not want any money; I did strip to fight, but not about the money.

Q. Pray do you ever lay wagers - A. Sometimes.

Q. How much have you laid about hanging Miss York - A. I did not know that ever I laid any thing to my knowledge.

Q. That is an odd sort of an answer, I should know if I had or had not - A. I laid a wager with Mr. Harmer, the shoe maker, I have laid a pot of six-penny with him, that if Miss York was found guilty of the capital, that she would be cast for death.

Q. Oh, you laid a wager that if she was cast for a capital offence, she would be guilty of a capital offence - A. I laid a pot of six-penny that if she was found guilty, she would be east for death.

Q. How long was the interval from her loading the gun and firing it off - A. As quick as she could, after her priming of it.

COURT. When she presented to you three times, how came you to stand exposed to her as you did; why did not you seek for some shelter, after she had snapped it once - A. I do not know, I was not frightened at the time particularly; I would sooner lose my life than be frightened by a woman.

Q. Why it makes no difference to you, whether you are shot by a man or a woman - A. I would be sooner shot, than run away from a woman firing at me.

Q. Then what made you run behind the tree - A. I did.

HENRY PARKER . I live at Sunbury. I am a carpenter.

Q. Were you in Kempton Park along with the last witness - A. I was in Kempton Park at the time this transaction happened.

Q. Did you see the prisoner, Miss York - A. Yes; when I saw her first, she was holding a gun to her shoulder; she took the gun from her shoulder afterwards; her servant maid then came up to her with something in her hand, I did not know at the time what it was; she then seemed to be priming the piece; she then put the gun to her shoulder again. I went to walk down by the side of the road, to see what the lady was at, and the piece went off; the ball came through the pales about two or three spaces before me. I then saw the ball strike the gravel road, at least the dust flew from the ball falling on the gravel road. I went up to the boys that were standing at the pales, I asked them who the lady was, they told me it was Miss York, that she was firing at them. I asked Miss York who she was firing at civily, she told me it was no business of mine; I told her she had like to have shot me on passing the road. She was loading the piece again, I saw her put the powder in; she said if I interrupted her in her private walks, she would fire at me. A great many people were coming up after the alarm of the first fire; I holloaed out for them to go back; she catched the piece up in her hand. I directly left the lady, and went behind the tree; she put the gun down again, and asked for the shot belt; upon which the maid came to her again with the shot belt; she poured the shot out of the shot belt into the muzzle of the piece; I still stood behind the tree, she seemed to be in a great passion. Robert Coombes came up, and told her that if she fired off in that careless way again, he would get over and take the piece from her. She asked her maid who Robert Coombes was, her servant replied that she did not know. She then said that she would take the liberty of firing at him however; he told her to fire if she liked; she took up the piece, and snapped it at him three times; the piece did not go off. She took it from her shoulder, and asked her servant for some powder. She primed the piece and put it up at him again; and levelled it at him again. I said, for God Almighty's sake Robert move, she will certainly blow your brains out; he then moved to the next tree to me; he was in a great rage on seeing the gun pointed at him; he made a bit of a move, she then presented and fired at him directly; upon that he went and got over the pales, and took the piece from her. In his getting over the pales, a piece broke off; he took it up and threw it at her. I asked him for the piece, he gave it me. I asked her why she fired the gun at people, she told me she fired the gun at him for tresspassing. I would have given the lady her piece back again, but she still threatened that she would do it again, if I gave her the piece back again; when I found her so rash, I kept the gun, and left the lady. I then went and applied to Mr. Cowey, the magistrate of Sunbury.

Q. You have seen her two or three times since - A. I have seen her twice at Bow-street. Mr. Saunders came to me to see about making the business up; I went to her, she asked me what I would do in it, I told her I could not say any thing.

Q. Where did she come to you - A. At the Nag's Head, Covent-garden. We went to an inn at the top of Bow-street, by the theatre, I did not observe the sign; we went into a back room; she asked me if I would make it up, I told her she should have done that before; she said, do not tell me of before, tell me what you will do now; I said I could not give any answer at all, she must apply to Coombes, the prosecutor. Mr. Saunders called Coombes into the room; I did not hear what passed; I went and stood at the door.

Mr. Bolland. Then after you and Miss York at this house in Bow-street, could not come to any accomodation, Coombes was fetched - A. He was fetched in the room while I was there; I leaving the room while he and Mr. Saunders was there.

Q. When this happened, were you walking with Coombes - A. No, I was not; I was on Mr. Hill's side, where the trees were; she was putting the shot in before Coombes came up.

Q. You are a carpenter, you can pretty well tell me what is the height of this paling - A. About four feet five inches from the ground.

Q. What is the dimension of the trees, are they not three feet diameter - A. I cannot say; they are large trees, large enough to protect a man of the size of

Coombes, if he stook behind it. She was about twelve yards from the paling, and Coombes three yards from the paling on the other side; the shot went above a man's height to a tree, it may be forty yards off. I had the bows that were shot off in my hand, the people were there and saw them fall.

Q. Do you recollect pointing out to Mr. Rolfe, the tree were Coombes stood - A. I did; I have examined it since, not with Mr. Rolfe; I did not see any shot in it.

Q. Did you examine the paling - A. I did, with Mr. Rolfe. I found no shot in that part of the paling.

Q. Did not this young lady say that she would not have fired if it had not been for his expressions - do you recollect Coombes calling her any bad names - A. Certainly there were such things passed, that was after the piece was fired.

Q. You went there on the Monday morning to Mr. Rolfe's house - A. I did; I saw Elizabeth Tuoy , she asked me to see Miss York; I went in after by her invitation. Miss York asked me what I wanted, I told her I understood from her servant, that she accused me last night of robbing her fish pond; she begged my pardon, and said if I was not the person she was very sorry for it. I went to her to take the piece, thinking it was a rash action; thinking she would take the piece, and think no more of it. I told her that Coombes had taken a chaise to come to town.

Q. Did not you say, and unless they would give a sum of money, he would come to London - A. No; I went to Bow-street; I told Coombes on the road that I had seen Miss York.

Q. And you went on Friday, were you examined on the Friday - A. We went to Bow-street on the Friday; I was not examined, Mr. Saunders sent a person to baulk us. I will swear that I took no money at the time, nor no other time; the money was sent to my wife; I would not take it.

Q. Did not you receive a sum of fifteen pounds - A. I did not; I refused a note.

Q. You and Coombes did not go before the magistrate that day - A. I did not go because of this business, I would not agree with what they would give us. Mr. Saunders wanted to give a draft upon Mr. Rolfe, to pay our expences; our expences were calculated by a person that pretended to be a friend, and who was not a friend.

COURT. Who stood upon the highest ground when this piece was fired off - A: Coombes.

Q. And the tree that was struck was forty yards off you - A. I think it was, I did not see the shot strike it.

Q. Could you distinguish where the tree had been hit, supposing it to be hit by the shot - A. Sixteen or eighteen feet up the tree. The tree stood upon rather higher ground than where Coombes stood.

STEPHEN LAVENDAR . I know nothing more than the gun having been left in my possession on the 15th of May, and my taking Miss York in custody. This is the gun.

Mr. Bolland. Was the ram rod in this state when it was delivered to you, as it is now, with respect to the ram rod being broken - A. It was.

WILLIAM STAPLETON . I live at Sunbury. I was in Kempton Park at the time this happened; the first that I saw was the report of a gun; I ran up and saw Miss York, with the gun in her hand; Coombes asked her if she was going to fire again, she said she should take the liberty of firing at him if he insulted her; several words passed; she loaded the gun, Coombes made his escape behind the tree; she put the gun up to her shoulder, it would not go off; she put it down by her side, whether she primed it or no, I do not know; Coombes looked from behind the tree, she fired at him. He went to jump over the pales, it came down. Coombes took the gun from her.

JOSEPH CONSTABLE . Q. Were you one of the parties that were in Kempton Park - A. Yes; I heard a gun go off; Parker and Coombes went to the pales; I saw Miss York present the gun, it did not go off the first time; the gun was presented again towards Coombes, and went off Coombes and Parker went to the pales, in getting over it broke, Coombes threw it at Miss York; Parker and Coombes got over and took the gun away from Miss York.

HENRY HANSELL . Q. Were you in Kempton-park on this day - A. Yes; I heard the report of a gun. I stood my ground till I heard the report of a second gun; I ran up, I saw Coombes pull part of a paling off, and threw it at Miss York. I was about an hundred and fifty yards off; he and Parker jumped over and took the gun from her.

Q. Did you go home with Coombes and Parker from London - A. I did; on the Friday. Coombes stripped to fight; I saw him strike Parker; they both accused each other of having sworn falsely. Their conversation was, there were ten pounds given to Parker's wife, and Coombes wanted half.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not point the gun at Coombes, nor did I intend to hurt them; they had used very gross and insulting language to me; I did it with intent to frighten them.

ELIZABETH TUOY . Q. I believe you are a servant in the family of Mr. Rolfe - A. Yes.

Q. Miss York, we understand is his neice - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember being out with her on Sunday the 14th of May, the evening of the firing - A. I was out with her on the Sunday, but I cannot tell the day of the month.

Q. Before the firing of the gun the first time, had she any powder and shot - A. No, she asked me, I fetched it; the shot was in a belt; I brought the powder out in a bit of paper. She put the powder in the gun with her fingers, and she poured the shot out of the belt. I never saw her put any paper in, nor did I see her use the ram rod to ram it down. Coombes popped out from the tree, and said she could not fire, it had nothing in it; she said if he would stand she would show him; she pointed towards the tree; I was a little distance of one side, I could not see so well as though I had been level with her. I saw Coombes getting over, I went away then.

MR. ROLFE. Q. You are uncle to the young lady at the bar - A. I am.

Q. What is the height of the lower close paling - A. Four feet nine, and the upper part, including the rail, is five foot six; the beech trees are three feet six, and some of them four feet in diameter.

Q. What is the distance between the trees - A. Thirty-three feet; the branches very near meet.

Q. Did you at any time, with Parker, examines the pales - A. I did.

Q. Did Parker point out the spot to you - A. He did. I examined the two trees, I examined the tree that Coombes stood behind; I found no shot marks in the trees nor in the pales.

COURT. Was any trees shewn you beyond where they stood that received the shot - A. No; nor is there any tree near that any shot could have reached.

Q. Did you ever hear that by Parker or any body else at the time when they were examined before this day - A. Never.

MR. ROLFE, JUNIOR. I do not think there is any tree near this part, less than an hundred and fifty yards.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave her a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18090626-50

574. CATHERINE MURPHY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 13th of June , twenty-six plates, value 1 s. four dishes, value 4 s. four basons, value 1 s. three cups, value 6 d. three butter boats, value 1 s. four mugs, value 6 d. four decanters, value 1 s. five goblets, value 1 s. 6 d. a wine glass, value 6 d. twenty-five knives, value 10 s. and eleven forks, value 5 s. the property of Samuel Hale , Thomas Holdsworth , and Charles Blizard .

SAMUEL HALE . Q. You are one of the partner s that carry on the business of the London tavern - A. I am; Thomas Holdsworth and Charles Blizard and myself are the only partners. The prisoner washed the wearing apparel of the servants; she used to come to the house. I can only say that I lost some property, and when it is produced I can speak to it.

CHARLES BLIZARD . Q. You are one of the partners in the house - A. I am. I went with two officers and searched the prisoner's house; with Tipper and Bray.

Q. Did the prisoner rent the whole house - A. So she informed me.

Q. What day was it you searched her house - A. The 13th of June, about two o'clock in the day.

Q. Was the husband at home at that time - A. I saw a man there at dinner, I asked her if that was her husband, she said no, her husband had gone in the country to work at the harvest, he was a labouring man; she told me this person I saw there was a lodger, in the man's hearing; the man said he was a lodger, he worked for a stationer. On the right hand side of her kitchen I found the plates that are stated in the indictment; I took down twenty six plates with the name of Hale and co. stamped on the back of them, we have them manufactured for us. In that room we found some butter boats, they are marked; under the bedstead, in this room, the kitchen, was an old drawer containing a number of knives and forks, they are marked as before; and up stairs we found in a box that was broken a parcel of our knives and forks; the decanters and glasses were found in the kitchen; I asked her how she came by these things; she told me she purchased them when she took the house and furniture; she said she could not exactly recollect the person's name; she had the house about twelve months, and that she had given twenty two pounds for them things.

Q. What might be the worth of the things that were marked with your name that you could swear to - A. Rather think the knives and forks cost two guineas a dozen, the plates about five shillings a dozen.

Q. How long has this woman been in the habit of coming backwards to your house - A. About five months; she has been in the habit of coming for the servants clothes.

RICHARD TIPPER . I am one of the city constables; I went with Mr. Blizard to search the prisoner's house.

Q. I suppose, as to the things that you found, you agree to what he has stated - A. Yes. The things I have kept ever since; the prisoner said she bought them, when she took the house.

JOSHUA BRAY . I am a constable; I went with Tipper and Blizard on the 13th of June.

Q. I suppose the things that you produce you give the same account as they do - A. Yes. The man that was there was eating with one of these knives; she poked the tablecloth over it; we searched and found the knives as has been stated.

ANN HOLMES . Q. Are you a servant in the London Tavern - A. Yes. The prisoner was in the habit of coming for the female servants clothes before I lived there.

Q. How long have you lived there - A. About seven months.

Q. Then all the time you lived there she was the person that came for the maids clothes to wash - A. Yes. Ann Field and Mary Parker gave her these things; I saw her put them in a parcel of dirty linen. They were servants in the London tavern, They gave her knives, forks, plates, decanters, butter boats, and basons.

Q. How often have you seen that, more than once - A. Yes; when they gave her these things she folded them up among the foul linen, and took them away with the foul linen.

Q. How long had you lived in the family before you observed this conduct of Field and Parker - A. About five days.

Q. When did you first inform your master of what you had seen - A. I did not inform my master until he received a letter; it is not a month ago that he received the letter.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I took this house about nine months ago of one Mrs. Holland; I paid twenty-two pounds for these things and the furniture in the house. I have a witness that I paid my money for them.

Q. to Mr. Hale. Had you a person of the name of Holland that came to your house - A. Yes; she washed for the men.

ELIZABETH TRAILE . I live in Bowling-alley, White-cross-street; I am a married woman, my husband is a sailor; before this woman came into the house I was a lodger of the man and his wife that she took the house on.

Q. How long is it ago since you lodged there - A. Six months ago.

Q. Who was the man that kept the house when you lived there - A. One Collins.

Q. Not Holland - A. It was Collins; he was a labouring man; the prisoner was a sober, honest woman, and always bore a responsible good character. When she took this house she bought every thing that

was in the house, and some of these things were in the house when she took it; the plates and glasses, I have seen a great many of them there, they were a kind of china plates. She paid twenty two pounds for the beds and all the things that were in the house. I lodged there six months when Collins kept it; I have left it about six months.

Q. That makes a twelve month altogether - did you ever go with this woman to the London tavern - A. No.

Q. Did Collins do any thing at the London tavern - A. His wife had washing from some tavern, I never enquired into what tavern.

Q. How many plates were there with Hale and co. on them - A. Not above half a dozen.

Q. What was there particular that should draw your attention to the name being on the plates - A. Why I was looking at them one day I came down there; I asked her what these plates were a piece; Mrs. Murphy said she could not tell.

Q. How many days was that before you went away - A. I went away that Friday night that Christmas was; this was on Thursday, the day before I left the house; it was that I remarked the plates, I had seen these blue ones when Collins lived in the house; it must be upwards of a twelvemonth ago when I saw them in the house.

Q. Were Collins and you intimate - A. No; I had no dealings with him, no further than going through up into my own apartment; I never visited her, nor dined with her, nor drank tea with her.

Q. It was rather taking a liberty, you taking these plates down - A. I did not take them down. I saw them on the mantle piece; they were facing of me just as I went in the door; the front of the plates were towards me.

Q. Then you saw the name of Hale and co. upon the fronts - A. Yes, I did; the letters were large enough for any one to read.

COURT. Let me see one of the plates, were they coloured letters or plain - A. They were coloured letters.

Q. to Tipper. Are there any such plates there - A. No; we found no plates with coloured letters in the house.

Q. to Traile. When was you called upon to give evidence upon this occasion - A. Mrs. Murphy sent for me this morning. And what I saw in the house, I speak to no more. The plates were larger than them.

Q. Look at these plates and tell me whether there are any with coloured letters - A. No.

GUILTY , aged 30.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090626-51

575. ANN FIELD was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 14th of June , a napkin value 6 d. a plate, value 2 d. two decanters, value 2 s. seven cups, value 7 d. a saucer, value 1 d. two dishes, value 6 d. a glass, value 1 d. two coffee mugs, value 2 d. three basons, value 6 d. a poker, value 3 d. and a set of fire irons, value 1 s. a jug, value 2 d. and a cruet, value 2 d. the property of Samuel Hale , Thomas Holdsworth , and Charles Blizard .

SAMUEL HALE . I went to search this house with the officers on the 14th of June. The prisoner had lived in my service.

Q. How long had she left your service - A. About a fortnight or three weeks. She had lived with me about eight or ten months; she had got into another service, she lived at the White Horse, Fetter-lane. I took with me Bray, Tipper, and Sherrin, I went to search a house, No. 13, Bowling-alley, next door to the other house, we found none of my property there.

Q. What occasion have you to charge her with stealing the things mentioned in the indictment - A. We found them in the house of Mrs. Holland.

Q. Then your search at this No. 13 produced no property - A. No, none at all. I afterwards found these articles at Mrs. Holland's, except the napkin.

Mr. Alley. Did not the poor woman tell you that Mrs. Parker had given her that napkin instead of a towel, which is now at your house, and which was her property - A. She might have said so at the Mansion house, but I did not hear it. She conducted herself extremely well at my house.

ANN HOLMES . I lived at the London tavern at the time this young woman lived there.

Q. Do you know of her having stolen the things mentioned in the indictment - A. Yes; Ann Field brought cups and saucers out of the bar into her bed room; I saw her put them into her pockets and take them away.

Q. How long ago is it - A. Six months ago.

Q. How long had you lived at the London tavern when you saw this - A. About five days. She put them in her pocket and carried them away.

Q. I suppose you did not say any thing of this till your master received a letter and made enquiry - A. No.

Q. Can you say that these caps and saucers are the same cups and saucers that you saw her put in he pocket and go away with - A. They are the same pattern, I cannot swear to them.

Q. Is there any thing produced that you can speak positive to - A. Yes, there is one plate marked Hale and co. upon it; I cannot say whether it was Ann Field or Mary Parker which took them; they were both concerned in taking the things out of the house.

Q. Can you say whether Ann Field took the plate - A. I am quite sure Ann Field took the plate out of the dining room, she brought it away in the bed room, and took it away in the afternoon along with some cut glass.

Q. Do you know of her taking any thing else - A. Yes; basons and black milk pots, and fire irons; Mary Parker and Ann Field brought them out of the rooms into the bed room; they concealed them between their petticoats and gown and carried them out of the house. When Ann Field went away Mary Parker was two or three days after her in the house. Ann Field came to the back gate two or three days after she left the service, Mary Parker took a pile of china plates and gave them to her, which Ann Field received.

Q. Do you live as the London tavern still - A. Yes.

Mr. Alley. You seem to have the epoch - you count all your transaction on the 5th day - A. No.

Q. You and Mrs. Parker were old cronies together - A. No.

Q. It were you and Mrs. Holland that were old

cronies - A. No, I have not known her above a month or six weeks.

Q. How long have you been in the service - A. Seven months.

Q. Mrs. Holland, you only know her five or six weeks - A. I do not know any thing of the woman's dishonesty.

Q. In your opinion, she is one of the honestest women in the world; it was in her house the property was found that was stolen - A. Yes.

Q. You have known Mrs. Murphy a long time - A. No, I have seen her about a twelve-month.

Q. You knew her before she washed for the servants of these gentlemen - what situation are you in - A. House maid.

Q. Is your master a married man - A. Yes.

Q. Why did not you tell your mistress, or some of the people about the house, that you saw all the robbery - A. I did inform the housekeeper about a pillow that Ann Field was about to take.

Q. You told my lord that you never informed them till an anonymous letter came to inform them; pray was there any threat to prosecute you, if you had not come-forward to prosecute these people - A. No.

Q. You have been privy to every thing that was done - A. I do not know that.

Q. I have a right to ask you whether you had any share - A. I had neither act or part, it did not concern me.

Q. What, not concern you, you were eating your master's bread; it did not concern you his being robbed, that is your morality, is it - upon your oath did you ever see her take one of these articles - A. Yes, I saw her take the fire irons into the room, she and Mary Parker between them, concealed them under her petticoats, and took them out of the house. I was not long there when that happened.

Q. Did that happen on the 5th day, you never had the honesty to tell your mistress untill this anonymous letter came - A. No.

SARAH HOLLAND . I live at No. 11, Camden-court, Grub-street.

Q. Do you know the prisoner, Ann Field - A. Yes, she had a furnished room some where in Cloth-fair; she came in the evening late; she said her husband was gone, she could not afford to pay six-shillings a week for an apartment; if I could make it convenient for her to stay with me till she could get a situation; I gave her leave. She brought her box and clothes; some time after I saw a set of fire irons, wrapped up in an old cloth; she told me that she bought her own crockery ware, and her own linen.

Q. Did you know her husband - A. I saw him once. She lived with me a few weeks, then she went to the Bath-hotel; she lived four weeks there, she returned home to me; she left what she had with me; one box the constable searched, that box she told me she had purchased the articles that were in it.

JOSHUA BRAY . I took the prisoner at the White-horse, Fetter-lane. I found a napkin in her box. I brought it to the Mansion-house; it has A. H. upon it.

Mr. Alley. This is but half a napkin - A. Yes, it is not a whole one, certainly.

- SHERRIN. I am a constable. In consequence of a search warrant, I went to Mrs. Holland's house, in Camden-court, Grub-street; I searched the prisoner's box, there I found a set of fire irons; a plate marked Hale, and co.; and seven cups and saucers.

MR. BLIZARD. I can speak to the plate, it has our name on it; and the napkin is marked in full length; it has been attempted to be taken out.

Prisoner's Defence. These fire irons my husband bought me, and the day I left Mrs. Holland, I sold them to her for six shillings; and this napkin that Mr. Hale claimed, Mary Parker gave me instead of the towel that I left in the house. I never took a thing from Mr. Hale's house in my life.

The prisoner called two witnesses, who gave her a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090626-52

576. MARY ANN BERRY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 24th of June , a gold watch, value 20 l. a gold chain, value 10 l. a gold seal, value 1 l. a gold key, value 1 s. a half crown, five shillings, three six-pences, and seven bank notes, value 1 l. each , the property of Charles Thomas Raiment .

CHARLES THOMAS RAIMENT . I live in Marchmont-place, Bloomsbury. I am an accomptant .

Q. On the 24th of June did you lose a watch, chain, and seal, and money, and bank notes - A. Yes, something about two in the morning; I suppose it might be half after two; I lost the watch, chain, seal, half a crown, five shillings, three six-pences, and seven one pound notes. I lost it out a room of a house in Dyot-street .

Q. When had you this property safe about you - A. I know it was safe about me at the moment of my partly undressing myself, and going into bed in that room.

Q. Were you sober - A. That is a point that no man says he is drunk, you know; I believe I was sober, from my recollection of every circumstance.

Q. When did you begin to spend your evening, and where was it - A. I spent my evening with a friend, at the Coach and Horses, opposite of Southampton-street, in Holborn.

Q. What time did you meet this friend of yours - A. Oh, it could not be more than eleven o'clock.

Q. Where had you been on the former part of the day, before you came to the Coach and Horses - A. I do not recollect.

Q. Who were you employed by to work at that time - A. By the London water work company; I had been there merely iniating a young gentleman.

Q. What time did you go out that evening - A. I believe about the middle of the day.

Q. Where had you been from between the middle of the day, and eleven o'clock at night - A. I had been over the water on different business till nine o'clock, it was near ten I think; then I went to Mr. Hobson's in Bloomsbury-place; I drank beer there, I believe.

Q. At eleven o'clock you went to the Coach and Horses - who was this friend of yours - A. Mr. Walker, the printer.

Q. Is he here - A. I rather think he is gone out of town.

Q. What had you been drinking from eleven till two - A. Beer.

Q. You live in Marchmont-place - A. Yes.

Q. Dyot-street was not in your way home - A. No. Persons often wals this way or that way, without any

specific reason.

Q. Were you not drunk - A. I do not feel that I was.

Q. I ask you were you not drunk - A. I do not think that I was.

Q. How did you get to Dyot-street, and when did you get there - A. I got to Dyot-street partly by being accosted by the prisoner.

Q. How do you know it was two o'clock when you arrived at this house in Dyot-street - what time did you leave this public house - A. I judge from the period of time that had elapsed, from my leaving that house; I judged the prisoner being with me could not be more than an hour.

Q. Why did not you look at your watch - A. I did not upon that occasion.

Q. Where did you meet with the prisoner - A. In Holborn, I do not recollect the spot; she accosted me, the tenor of which was to go home; I refused. Her manners were civilised; in her appearance she was different from that sort of persons about the street; she continued to solicit in a manner that excited my curiosity.

Q. Do you recollect you are upon your oath - A. Yes.

Q. And did your curiosity lead you up into a garret in Dyot-street - A. Yes, I went up into a terrible place.

Q. So then if this was a terrible place, you were determined to undress yourself - A. Yes; in part it was my curiosity.

Q. Do you swear that you undressed yourself in part from a motive of curiosity - A. Yes, I do.

Q. No mortal being can believe that which you have sworn to - that a man goes into a terrible place with a common prostitute, and proceeds to undress himself out of curiosity, that you have sworn, and therefore you are totally unworthy of belief - did you get into bed, sir - A. Yes.

Q. Was that out of curiosity - A. That was part of the thing that was in my mind.

Q. Wicked enough! And you went into bed with a common prostitute, out of curiosity - A. Not with her.

Q. Then you undressed yourself, got into bed in a most terrible place, along with a common prostitute - did you go to bed out of curiosity - A. I did.

Q. What do you say you had about you when you went into this room - A. I had my watch, and its appurtenances.

Q. Was it gold or silver - A. Gold; a gold chain, seal, and key; seven one pound notes, and eight or nine shillings in silver.

Q. How long did you stay in this room - A. It must be a short time.

Q. Was the woman undressed - A. No, sir.

Q. You undressed and got into bed there - A. There was more than one bed.

Q. Was there any other respectable lodger of that house in the bed - A. I saw no other person there.

Q. Well, you got into bed, where did you put the watch - A. I put the chain into the fob pocket; the woman took my breeches and put it under my head; that is to say where I was to lay my head. I never solicited for her to come to bed.

Q. What did you go to bed there for - A, Curiosity,

Q. Did you go to sleep - A. No.

Q. Did the woman stay with you - A. She staid a very short period.

Q. What happened when she left you - A. The act of plunder took place; then previous to her leaving the room, she made a small stir, passed towards the door, and went out; the instant she was gone, I started up, and put my left hand under my head for my clothes, they were gone. I immediately passed into the street with my drawers and under stockings on; I saw one of the patrols. I told him I was robbed.

Q. Where you sober enough to know that was the woman that was with you - A. Yes.

Q. Was there any light in the room - A. There was a glimmer, a poor kind of light from a candle, during part of the time; the candle was withdrawn when she left the room.

Q. How long afterwards was the woman laid hold of - A. Almost instantaneously.

Q. Was your watch found - A. It was found; I have seen it since. I went back and found my clothes scattered about the room.

JOHN BREWER . I am patrol in the parish of Bloomsbury. I know the prisoner, she lives in Phoenix-yard, Dyot-street. About three in the morning I saw the prosecutor in the street, in his night-cap.

Q. to prosecutor. How came you with a night-cap, did you take the night-cap in your pocket - A. I found it in the place, it was furnished by the establishment.

Brewer. I found him in the street, in his night cap and drawers; he appeared to me has if he had been drinking. There was another patrol standing at the gate when he came out; he asked him if had seen a woman come by, he had been robbed of his breeches. I apprehended the woman immediately; she was within sight of him all the time. When I laid hold of her, I found the gold watch, seal, key, and chain, in her right hand; and nine shillings in her other hand. I took her to the other patrol; he found five one pound notes, and I afterwards found this old purse, and two one pound notes. The prisoner said she picked this gentleman up, that he said he was short of money, he could not afford to give her any more than a shilling; he was to pay for the use of the bed; he gave her the property for fear of being robbed; and when he got up in the morning, she was to give it him. She was going to get some gin.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. When I met this gentleman at the corner of Plumb-tree-street, Bloomsbury, he told me if I would take him to any place, he would pay my lodging; we went to No. 14, Dyot-street, they had no beds; from there we went to Church-lane, they were shut up; we went to Phoenix-yard, there we got a bed; he began to pull off his things; I said, you had better not pull off your clothes, he said he had some property about him, he would trust me with it; he gave me seven one pound notes, and the watch; he went to sleep, and when he awoke he was thirsty; he asked me to get something to drink, I told him I thought there were no houses open; I went to Church-lane to see if the house was open; the gentleman ran down and said I had robbed him; the patrol asked me what I had robbed him off, I said nothing but what the gentleman had given me; I gave them up immediately.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090626-53

577. ANN OWEN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 23d of August , two cloaks, value 3 l. and twenty-six yards of lace, value 26 s. the property of John Curtis , in his dwelling house .

JOHN CURTIS . I live at the Court of Request House, Osborne-street, Whitechapel ; I sleep there; the house is in my occupation; I am the cryer .

Q. Do you recollect seeing the prisoner there any time - A. Several times; but particularly on the 23rd of August; I turned her out of the passage of the house, that passage goes to the court; a box stood in the passage.

Q. Did you see her come in again - A. I do not recollect; it was the busy time of the day, I was so much engaged crying the nonsuits; I saw the woman going out of the passage, that is all the notice I took of her.

Q. You say the box was in that passage - A. It always stood there. It stands there now for sheets and sundry necessaries. It happened that day not to be looked, only hasped.

ELIZABETH CURTIS . I am the wife of the last witness; I live in this court house with him.

Q. Had you any box in the passage of that house - A. There were three boxes always stood there, we usually put in these boxes our clothes.

Q. Do not you keep these boxes locked - A. Generally. We have but four rooms, and therefore we keep the boxes there; no person has a right to go through that passage but those that come to us, and the court.

Q. Do you know of any cloak being in that box - A. I put the cloak in the box myself that morning; one was a tabbinett cloak, and the other was a black gauze. There was eighteen yards of lace on the tabbinett cloak, I paid six guineas and a half for it, I only wore it a few times. At six o'clock on the same day I went to the box for my cloak, I found they were both gone; I never saw the cloaks afterwards; I got a part of the lace from a person at Poplar.

SARAH ROBERTS . I lived at Poplar last summer, at that time Mrs. Owen lodged with me in a furnished room.

Q. Did you ever see a cloak that she had - A. I was put to bed on the 11th of August; near a month after that, on a Sunday morning the prisoner said she owed me three weeks rent.

Q. How much was that - A. It was three shillings and six-pence a week. She said she had a bit of lace to sell for half a crown; I said I would give two shillings; she said I must stop till she ripped it off a made cloak. I saw it ripped off. There is five yards and a half of lace of different patterns; she said she bought the cloak in Rosemary-lane to make her some black bonnets; I saw no other cloak whatever.

Q. What did she do with the cloak - A. I do not know; I fancy she made a bonnet for her child; I saw her rip it to pieces.

Q. What did you do with the five yards and a half of lace - A. I gave the lace to my mother on the next Monday; Mrs. Curtis has it in her possession.

Prosecutors. I did not lose a mode cloak. This is my lace; I know it by my own work in the joining of it.

Prisoner's Defence. This cloak that I took the lace off I bought in Rosemary-lane; I sold the lace for two shillings to my landlady.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18090626-54

578. JOHN WARNER was indicted for that he on the 30th of May , about the hour of twelve at night, in the dwelling house of Barnard Hollywood , feloniously did steal a watch, value 7 l. a silk hat, value 30 s. twenty shirts, value 5 l. two shifts, value 5 s. twenty neckcloths, value 20 s. ten handkerchiefs, value 10 s. eighteen pair of stockings, value 18 s. two waistcoats, value 10 s. and a pair of shoes, value 5 s. his property; - and that he being in the said dwelling house, and having committed the said felony aforesaid, at the said hour and day aforesaid, feloniously and burglariously did break to get out of the same, and burglariously stole the said goods .

BARNARD HOLLYWOOD . I live at No. 8, East Smithfield , I am a tailor ; I let lodgings for single men. The prisoner was a lodger of mine from the hour of six in the afternoon of the 30th of May, till the hour of the night, or the morning he went off.

Q. What time did he come - A. Between the hours of five and six; I was not there when he came; I saw him there about nine o'clock, when I came home.

Q. Had you any conversation with him about the lodging - A. My wife gave him no final answer till I came home; he said he had come from a long voyage. He was to bring his things from out of the dock.

Q. He proposed to lodge with you - A. Yes.

Q. Did he propose to go up to any room for his lodging - A. No; for the first night, as there was no room up stairs, he slept in the kitchen, down stairs, for that night only, as there was no bed ready.

Q. What time did you get up in the morning - A. Before four o'clock. I perceived the door open from between the curtains at the bed foot; then I got up: I said to my wife, both the doors are open; I went and shut the door, I looked in the bed where he slept; I found he had left the bed, and his shoes and stockings.

Q. Did the bed shew that somebody had slept in it that night - A. Yes; it laid open, and he was gone, and his old shoes and stockings lay on the floor by the bed.

Q. Had he brought any of his things with him at the time that he took possession - A. No. He accosted a porter, he told him he would give him five shillings to bring his things the next morning. He had nothing with him but what he had on him. When I found he was gone I took hold of my breeches which I had left on the table, I found my watch was gone, and my hat from off the same table; my wife got out of bed and missed the pile of clean linen that had been ironed on that day, they were on a table in the kitchen, where he slept, and the shoes and two waistcoats, a pocket handkerchief, and neckcloth; they were clean and ironed; also there was a bundle in a handkerchief that belonged to an Italian, that handkerchief was gone.

Q. Had they been delivered by the Italian to your wife to wash - A. Yes; in the afternoon of the over day, when he came. Among the other things which were in the kitchen four of my shirts lay there, and several other things besides; the rest belonged to other

people; the two waistcoats and the shoes belonged to a lodger in the house, I was accountable for them.

Q. Did you miss any shoes - A. One pair which hung on a nail, close by where he slept, and the silk hat was on the top of my clothes, the first thing by the bed-side.

Q. What was the value of your watch - A. The watch cost seven guineas.

Q. To you - A. Not to me; it cost me five.

Q. In what manner was the house secured when you went to bed - A. The door was locked; I locked the door, and took the key out of the back door that he passed through, and it was bolted.

Q. How was the rest of the house with respect to the fastenings - A. There were no fastenings on the glass door, between the kitchen and the parlour; the outer doors were both locked; the front door was locked and barred; by that reason I suppose he went out of of the back door.

Q. Did you see any fastenings broken - A. No. The first thing I did I applied the key to the lock; the key traversed the lock the same as usual.

Q. When you locked the door the night before are you sure that you applied the bolt - A. I locked the door as I did nights before, as I always do, and took the key out, and then the bolts went in easy; I hung the key up in its place on the mantle shelf.

Q. You did not find the prisoner any where in the house - A. No; he was gone. The rest of the lodgers were within. I enquired after him at the Kettle Drum, in Ratcliffe Highway, there I heard his character in full length.

Q. Did you meet with him there - A. No.

Q. I do not want to hear his character - A. About seven o'clock in the morning I heard of his being seen in Tooley-street with two white bundles.

Q. Did you see him yourself - A. No; I had been after him every day. On the Saturday following, about nine o'clock at night, I met him by Salt-petre-bank, in Rosemary-lane.

Q. What day was the robbery on - A. The Wednesday morning I missed him; this was Saturday evening, June the 3d, I met him in Rosemary-lane; I knew him; he passed by; I turned round and he turned round, he crossed the lane three time, I following of him, that I might be sure he was the same man; he had the same hand in his pocket: I saw my hat on his head; he made a stand by a public house door, I came up to him, spoke to him, and collared him, and took my hat from off his head; he said he would go along with me any where, where I pleased very well, said I, step into here; he went into the public house, the first man I saw there was Densy, I asked his assistance; he knew I had been robbed; I asked him to go for an officer for me, he told me, no. Upon that the prisoner got obstreperous, Densy said let him go, and get a proper officer and take him. Between the prisoner and the landlord of the house I was turned out of the house, he bit me here in the hand, here is the incision of his teeth now in my hand; by him and by the mob I was like to be torn in pieces; in the hustle I lost the hat off my head, but kept hold of the hat I took off the prisoner's head. He made his escape from me then; the next morning I called at Mr. Buston's to know whether I could get any account of my hat; I got no information; he said he would charge me with an officer for disturbing his house. I called again in the afternoon, the landlord very politely gave me the hat out of a closet by the bar. On the 8th of June, in the morning, I got fresh scent of the prisoner; he was apprehended.

Q. Have you any doubt that the prisoner at the bar is the same man that came to lodge with you, and served you so as you have stated - A. No.

Q. Have you ever recovered any of the linen - A. No; he had one of the shirts on on Saturday; as I had hold of him by the collar, the shirt was open behind in the collar, and he had on a pair of grey stockings when I had him in my possession until he was rescued from me.

Q. Did you know them stockings - A. I had not much time to observe them, I was all in a hurly burley; I got my leg cut in two places.

JOHN FOX. Q. You are the beadle of St. George's, you are the person that apprehended the prisoner at the bar - A. Yes; on Thursday the 8th of June I received the silk hat from Mr. Hollywood; I have had it ever since.

Q. to prosecutor. Look at this hat - A. I know it to be my hat, it always pinched me when I put it on; it is too little, there is the maker's name in the hat; I mentioned the maker's name before I examined the hat; in the felling of the lining there was a knot, I cut that knot off that it should not hurt me; here is the end of the thread where it has been cut.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of the crime; I know nothing of the hat. This man took another black man one night. He took me up in Carey-street, Ratcliffe; I was charged with the robbery; I would not go to the office with the officer because I did not know what I had done.

Q. to prosecutor. Did you take up any other black man - A. No.

Q. Did you ever take up any other man upon that charge - A. Never.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 33.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18090626-55

579. JAMES MARSDEN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 28th of May , one link of a diamond bandeau, value 7 l. the property of John Cathery , in the dwelling house of James Thomas .

JOHN CATHERY . I live in Princes-street, St. Ann's, Westminster ; I lodge in the house of James Thomas ; Thomas lives in the house himself, and I have a room in that house; I am a diamond setter .

Q. Do you recollect in May last the prisoner coming to your room - A. Yes; it was the 28th of May; he came and asked me to go out and spend the evening.

Q. Was any body in company with him - A. Yes.

Q. Was there any thing laying on the table or board when he came - A. Yes; the diamond bandeau.

Q. It was not your own, I suppose, you were working for some shop - A. Yes; I was answerable for it.

Q. Did you go out with the prisoner - A. No; he went away, and his companion at the same time; about half an hour after he was gone I missed a link of a diamond bandeau; it was an entire one link; I believe it was worth about ten pounds; I do not know the value of it. I saw it again on the Tuesday morning, at the pawnbroker's; I missed it on the Sunday night.

Q. On Sunday he called upon you - A. Yes.

Q. And this was on your board on Sunday, was it - A. Yes.

DAVID FARRER . I am shopman to Mr. Dobree, pawnbroker, Charlton-place, Rathbone-place.

Q. Have you part of a diamond bandeau - A. It has been delivered; I marked it before I delivered it. The lady has got it, she is in Scotland. At the time it was delivered to Cathery's master; this young man was not taken up at that time.

Q. However you had a part of a diamond bandeau brought to you - A. Yes; it was offered on the 29th of May, by a servant of a lady of the name of Berresford. I know her to be so.

Q. What part of a bandeau was it - A. One entire link; consisting of twenty five stones, there might be more; I lent him five pounds upon it. She said it belonged to a gentleman of the name of Hazelhurst, I gave a duplicate; that was on the 29th, in the morning. Marsden brought the ticket the same night.

Q. Did you know Marsden before - A. I had seen him in that neighbourhood before, I did not know him by name; he acknowledged that the woman pledged it with his consent; he said he would wish to prevent them from getting it out, he would have two pounds more on it. He brought the duplicate and had two pounds more on it; and had the duplicate in the name he gave me, Hazelhurst, not in his own name. I gave him the other two pounds. We received the duplicate the next day of the master of this young man.

Q. Was the young man present - A. I believe he was; I delivered up the link the next day to Cathery's master.

Q. I take it for granted, that the link was worth more than seven pounds, as you lent that upon it - A. It was worth three or four and twenty pounds.

Q. When was the prisoner apprehended - A. On the Friday following he was apprehended, at No. 8, Suffolk-street, nothing was found upon him; he is the same man. He and the woman that sent it in the first instance; Mrs. Berresford and he were found together.

Q. Which Berresford you knew - A. Yes.

Q. She pledged at your house, and you knew the person that pledged it for her - A. Yes; because I was in the habit of taking things in pledge of her.

Q. You were not present when the duplicate was found - A. I believe it was sent to Cathery.

Q. to Cathery. Were you present at Mr. Dobree's, the pawnbroker, and saw the same link - A. Yes; I went with my master; I saw it in my master's hands. I was in the shop, when it was given up to my master.

Q. to Farrer. Do you recollect whether you produced that link to his master - A. I saw it produced.

Q. Can you undertake to say that is the same link, that was produced to his master, that was received from Berresford's servant, and afterwards was claimed by the prisoner - A. I am confident of it.

Q. And that young man was in the shop at the time his master had it - A. Yes; I was present. I am sure that is the same we received from Berresford's servant; and afterwards was claimed by the prisoner. We had but that one pattern in the shop.

Q. to Cathery. Did your master take with him a duplicate at the time you went to the pawnbroker's - A. Yes.

Q. Do you know of your own knowledge, where he got that duplicate - A. Yes; it was sent home to me.

Q. Do you know who brought it home to you - A. No, I was out at the time.

Q. Was that the first information you received where it was - A. Yes.

Prisoner. Did you see your master looking at the link, at the time you were in the pawnbroker's shop - A. I saw him look at it.

Q. Why is not this property produced - A. It is returned to the owner.

COURT. Have they applied for it - A. Yes, my master has applied for it, he cannot get it; my master told me he had applied.

Prisoner. Did you see me take this - A. No.

Q. When did you say was the first time you missed it after I was gone - A. About half an hour; I believe it was nine o'clock.

Q. What time did I call upon you - A. About eight in the evening.

Q. I called upon you at eleven o'clock in the morning; I drank some ale with you, and then went away - A. You did call at eleven o'clock in the morning, I went out with you, and had some ale, and afterwards you went away.

COURT. Did he come to you again in the course of the day - A. Yes; about eight o'clock in the evening.

Q. Had you seen that link of the bandeau after he called upon you in the morning - A. It was a link that I was not at work at.

Q. When had you last seen it in your possession - A. I do not know exactly.

Q. Are you sure it was in your lodgings - A. Yes; I saw it on the Sunday morning.

Q. Do you know whether you had seen it in the morning, after the time that you went out to drink with the prisoner - A. I cannot say, now.

Q. Are you sure you saw it that Sunday morning at all - A. Yes, it lay on my work board.

Q. Do not you recollect whether you saw it on the work board, after coming home from going out with him - A. No.

Q. Had any body called on you afterwards in your room that day - A. No.

Q. Did any body come with him in the morning at eleven o'clock, when he came and asked you to go out and drink with him - A. Yes; it was the same person that called with him in the evening.

Q. You do not know whether any body else had called after you came home, till eight in the evening - A. No, nobody else, while I was at home.

Q. But you had been out, had you not, who did you leave in the room - A. Nobody; I left my room door locked, and the key in the door; when I came back I found the key in the door, and the door locked.

Prisoner. Who did you first issue out this warrant against - A. I had it for you, and that other young man; I do not know his name, nor nobody else.

Prisoner's Defence. I have been in a course of intimacy with Cathery for seven or eight months back; I was unfortunately arrested for debt, he came to see me in Newgate; he gave me an invitation to come to his place when I came out, if I had no other place to go to; I told him I should be out on Friday, I wanted some money to supercede my action; he sent me one pound ten shillings. I went to live in Vinegar-yard,

at the back of Astley's theatre. On Sunday morning I called upon him, I told him I wanted some money, to go and see my friends; he lent me some shillings; I called again in the evening, he told me that he had no money by him, he would call upon me in half an hour, tell him any place I would meet him; I told him I should be in Vinegar-yard; he there came to me, told me he had no money; he lent me the diamond bandeau. I was to bring it him on Tuesday morning; he called on me on Tuesday, he asked me whether I could take it out, I said no; he said I must send him the duplicate, he must take it out. I sent it to him in a two-penny post letter.

Q. to Cathery. Did you know this prisoner any time - A. Yes; I have known him about half a year.

Q. Have you lent him any money - A. Yes, I have often lent him money.

Q. Had he asked you to lend him any money about this time - A. He asked me to lend him some on Sunday morning, at eleven o'clock.

Q. Had you lent him any - A. Yes.

Q. Did he want you to lend him some more money - A. No.

Q. Had you any more money to lend him, if he had wanted it - A. No; only a few shillings.

Q. Now, mind you are upon your oath - did you give him the link of this bandeau, for the purpose of him raising some money upon it; and that afterwards he should return it to you - A. No.

Q. For him to pledge it, and to take it out in the course of a day or two, if it should be wanted - you are upon your oath. - Are you certain that you never lent him that link of a bandeau, to go and raise money upon it - A. I am certain I never did.

Q. Did you go to him to a house in Vinegar-yard at the back of the play-house - A. Yes; I went after him there, after I missed it. I found him there after I missed the link. I asked him if he had the link, he said he had not; and if I would go home, he said I should find it on my board. I went home; I looked for it. I could not find it. On Monday evening I received the duplicate, it was enclosed in a letter; I have the letter here; there was nothing written in it.

Prisoner. He offered before the magistrate, that if I would pay the expences, he would let me off.

Cathery. I said if I had my property, it was all I wanted of his friends.

Prisoner. Here is Mr. Johnson that heard the same.

JOHN JOHNSON . I formerly was clerk to Messrs. Bennett and Greaves. I have chambers at present at Staple's Inn. I am assisting a friend of mine, who is an attorney.

Q. Are you acquainted with the prisoner - A. I have seen him while he was a debtor in Newgate; I was requested to attend before the magistrate at Marlborough-street, by some friend of the prisoner's; I attended there, that if I could assist the prisoner, I would. I heard the prosecutor say there, that he did not wish to prosecute if he could have his expences paid, that he had been put to; and the expences of the office. In fact, I saw the prosecutor yesterday; I asked him if he was of the same opinion to let the prisoner off, if it was possible, he said yes, if he had the money, he did not wish to prosecute; a bill of exchange of ten pound, to pay the expences, and the taking out the diamond bandeau, is put in some person's hand to know the event of the trial.

Q. to Cathery. Has a bill been put into your hands in order to pay the expences - A. There is a bill, it was given to Mr. Magnes, a surgeon; that if the prisoner was acquitted, I was to be paid.

Q. Who proposed to give such a bill - A. The prisoner's friends. I always said that if I had my property, I did not wish to hurt him.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 31.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18090626-56

580. JOHN BOWLES was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 14th of June , twenty two books, value 40 s. the property of William George , in his dwelling house .

EMANUEL MERCURY . I am a police constable, I live in Upper East Smithfield, I keep a stationer's shop. On the 14th of June, a man of the name of Thomas Taylor , he keeps an iron shop; a neighbour of mine; he brought one of these books as a sample, wishing me to buy them as cheap as I could, and give him five shillings brokerage; he said he had them to sell for a person; I told him I must see them all, to tell what they are worth. Taylor went out, and sent the prisoner with the books; he had twenty one tied up in a handkerchief, and one Taylor brought is twenty two. The prisoner pulled this bit of paper out of his pocket, and said this will show how many there is; I told him the paper did not tell the number of them, it only mentioned what they are. On the paper was Whitfield's life, in boards, three shillings; he asked a pound for them. I kept the label and the books, they have been in my possession ever since. I took the prisoner before the magistrate,

WILLIAM GEORGE . I am a bookseller , No. 29, Brick-lane, Spital-fields, in the parish of Christ-church, Middlesex . I have seen the books, they are mine. On Wednesday morning, the 14th, I wrote that label; I saw them on the counter, they were tied up, ready to go up stairs. I did not miss them till the officer came, I thought the servant had taken them up stairs. I value them at eighteen pence a book.

Prisoner's Defence. It was between nine and ten o'clock that I received these books; I was coming across Tower-hill, a man asked me to carry the parcel for him; I told him I had no objection, he gave me the parcel in the handkerchief; took me to Old Gravel-lane; he said he would give me six-pence, and something to drink. We had something to drink at the White Hart, the corner of Well-street; he put the question to me - did I know any body that I could sell them to; I told him I did not know, I would go and see; I took them to a person facing of Mr. Mercury, he went over with one book to him, he came back and said he could do nothing with them; I went over to him, he took me up.

GUILTY , aged 42.

Confined Three Months in Newgate , and whipped in Goal .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18090626-57

581. HUFTON WHITE , and JAMES SMITH , were indicted for burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling house of Francis Sitwell , esq . about the hour of two at night, on the 18th of May , with intent the goods and chattels, then and there being, burglariously and feloniously to steal .

The case was stated by Mr. Const.

JOHN LAMB . I am a watchman in Mary-le-bone parish.

Q. On the morning of the 13th of May, between two and three o'clock, you went your round in Durweston-street; Mr. Sitwell's house is No. 12 - A. Yes; it was exactly twenty minutes after two when I heard the crush.

Q. When you were in Durweston-street, you heard a crush - A. Yes; I thought the carriage steps were let down suddenly. When I was coming nigh the door, I saw the tall man, White; I was about eight or nine yards off; I saw him come from Mr. Sitwell's door, he was just off the door, getting on the foot path; I told him to stop, I said, my friend, I see what you have been about. As soon as I spoke, he ran away.

Q. Whereabouts is Clay-street - A. Opposite of Mr. Sitwell's house; he went into Clay-street,

Q. Dorset-street is at the end of Clay-street - A. Exactly; it runs parallel with Durweston-street; he turned out of Clay-street, into Dorset-street.

Q. Did he go into Baker-street from Dorset-street-A. He did; from Baker-street into Blandford-street; he went down Kendall-mews, and turned into George-street. I saw him apprehended by another watchman, at the end of George-street.

Q. What distance was he from you during this period - A. About thirty yards; till he got to Kendall-mews, there I lost sight of him.

Q. Did you lose sight of him at all, from the time he left Mr. Sitwell's door, to Kendall-mews - A. I lost sight of him when he turned the corner, when he got into Kendall-mews.

Q. When he was running down Baker-street, before he arrived at Blandford-street, did any thing occur - A. The street was silent; I saw nobody in the street but him and me; when he turned out of Clay-street into Dorset-street, I heard something fall; it had a hollow sound.

Q. Did you afterwards hear any thing else - A. No, that was the only noise that caused my attention, till he was taken into custody at the end of George-street, when he was apprehended. I took him back again to Mr. Sitwell's house; I went up to the very same door and took him in.

Q. On your road to the prosecutor's house, did you find any thing - A. Not at that time; in about a quarter of an hour afterwards, I went back the same way that I ran after him. I found a knife in Baker-street.

Q. Was that in the line that you followed him - A. Yes, as near as I could judge. That is the knife, there is White upon it; I picked up the dark lanthorn, I opened it in his presence; there was a wax candle in it, nothing else.

Q. You are sure it was White - A. I am positive of it; he had a long body coat on, I took him for a coachman when he came out.

Q. At the instant when you came up to him, did you recognize him, or had you any doubt - A. I told them it was the same man that came out of No. 12 or 13, I could not say which.

Mr. Knapp. Was it a light or a dark night - A. Dark.

Q. You never saw the lace of the person, I take it for granted - A. No, I did not.

Q. How many turnings might there be before you saw him apprehended by another person - A. Five turnings.

Q. And when you did see him, he had been apprehended before you came up to him - A. Exactly so.

Q. Were you called to by the watchman to see him after he had taken him - A. Yes; he told me he had taken him.

Q. And when you came up, you said he was the person - A. Yes.

Q. Then there was nothing particular about him then, excepting he had on a loose long coat, like a coachman - what sort of a coach was it - A. It was a long body coat.

Q. You could not see the colour of his coat - A. No.

Q. You have produced a knife - did you take any notice of the name on it - A. I did not look to see if there was any name.

Q. How long had the officer this knife in his possession - A. From the Tuesday till the Monday. I am positive it is the knife.

Q. Was there the same appearance of writing upon it when you found it, as there was when Foy produced it - A. I cannot say.

COURT. You say it was a dark night - A. Quite dark at this time.

Q. You said you saw him before you came up to the house - A. Yes.

Q. At what distance - A. About ten or twelve yards.

Q. Was the night so dark that you could but just see him - A. It was just break of day, but it was so dark I could not see the colour of his clothes.

Q. Then how could you see it was the same man - was it from the observation of his person or his face - A. His face I could not see, nor the colour of his coat I could not see.

Q. In the course of his running, could you distinguish him while he was running by the length of his coat - A. Nothing else.

DANIEL SULLIVAN . I am a watchman.

Q. Were you stationed at the end of Dorset-street and Manchester-street - A. Yes.

Q. Do you remember hearing any rattle that night - A. Yes, I did; I heard the rattle much about a quarter past two in the morning, and the word going about stop thief; on hearing the rattle, I came out of East-street, Manchester-square. I went into Kendall-mews, the man got into Kendall-mews, out of Blandford-street. I followed him through the mews, and when he got out of the mews, he turned into George-street, he turned to the left; I lost sight of him for the length of time he might have got across the street; I perceived him that instant I got out of the mews; another watchman who stood in the middle of the street, cried out, I have got him; I came and assisted him; his name is Jeffreys. I went along with them from there to No. 12, the house that was broken open.

COURT. You went back with them to Mr. Sitwell's house - A. Yes, and there I left him.

HENRY JEFFREYS . I am a watchman belonging to Mary-le-bone parish.

Q. Were you stationed at the corner of George-street - A. Yes; between two and three o'clock in the morning I saw a man come out of Kendall-mews.

Q. Who is that man - A. White; I saw a man running out of the mews, he came down to meet me as I stood at the corner. I took that man into custody; that tall man. White is the man.

Q. After you had taken him in custody did you take him to the prosecutor's house - A. Yes. On returning I saw the watchman that pursued him pick up a lanthorn. I did not see him pick up any thing else.

PETER FLANAGHAN . I am a watchman of Marybone.

Q. Where were you situated on the morning of the 18th - A. In Blandford-street and Baker-street.

Q. Did you hear a rattle and an alarm - A. Yes, I heard the cry of stop thief from the other side of the way; I found Smith running on the other side of the way, in Baker-street, he was running as hard as he could, I crossed over as fast as I could go; I saw him throw something out of his hands, it made a noise like iron. I pursued him until he went to Portman-square, he told me if I followed him a foot farther he would blow my brains out; I was about twenty or thirty yards off him; he made a bit of a turn towards me. I followed him till he was taken; he took up King-street, turned into George-street, and then into Gloucester-street; I lost sight of him, still I continued, and got sight of him in Gloucester-street, and then I saw him go into Portman-square, where he was taken by John Gorman . As I returned back to my station, very near to the box where I saw him pitch these things out of his hand, I found two keys, and within twenty yards; I found a crow bar, I delivered it up to the constable.

Mr. Andrews. It was in Baker-street where you first saw the prisoner Smith - A. Yes; he was on the other side of the street when I first saw him.

Q. Was it a light night or a dark night - A. It was between day and dark.

Q. What number of yards might the prisoner be from you - A. About thirty or forty.

Q. Was there light enough to see his face at that distance - A. I got closer to him before he turned the corner of King-street; I saw his face when I crossed over to King-street; I was within five yards of him.

Q. How was he dressed - A. In black, as he is now. I cannot say whether he might not have altered his clothes; the coat was such another coat as he has on now.

Q. Pray did you ever lose sight of him - A. Once.

Q. How many turnings had he to make - A. Two or three.

Q. Do you mean to say that at these turnings you never lost sight of him - A. No, only once; I kept close to him.

Q. Did you ever see Smith before that night - A. Never.

Q. Whereabouts was it you heard the noise of some thing falling from him - A. In Baker-street.

Q. Were you near enough to tell what it was - A. I heard it fall, as if it was iron; I think I might be twenty yards from him.

Q. And you swear that there was light enough to see him at that distance - A. There was.

Q. Did you say any thing to Gorman in the presence of the prisoner - A. Nothing, never.

Q. Did you tell Gorman that you had been pursuing of him - A. I did.

Q. Did you tell Gorman what you observed fall from prisoner - A. No, I did not; I went to the watch-house and gave up the things.

Q. You know there is a reward - do not you - A. No.

Q. Then you do not know there is a reward for a burglary - A. No.

Q. Do you know where Mr. Sitwell's house is - A. I do.

Q. How far might it be from Mr. Sitwell's house to the place in Baker-street where you saw the prisoner - A. Near a quarter of a mile.

Mr. Const. You are asked whether it was light enough to see the figure of the man - A. Yes; when I came down to King-street I was quite close to him.

Q. You saw him throw something out of his hands - A. Yes.

Q. Was there any body else in the street that you could observe at all - A. I heard the word stop thief as he came down.

Q. And when he was apprehended you left him in the custody of Gorman, and with respect to your not telling him of the things that you had found you had not found them till you returned back - A. No; I had not.

JOHN GORMAN . I am a watchman of the parish of Marybone.

Q. Were you stationed at the corner of Portman-square on that morning about two o'clock - A. Yes; leading into Oxford-street. I observed the noise of a rattle, I ran immediately into the square, and down the square near Orchard-street, I met the prisoner Smith, he was coming running right against me, nearly opposite No. 35, in the square; I ordered him to stop, he had his coat in this manner in his left hand, and his hat and his stick in his right hand; when I ordered him to stop; he said, d - n you, i'll knock your life out, or some such words; then he struck me on the hat with the stick.

Q. Which man was it - A. James Smith . I laid hold of his collar; got him down; a watchman came up.

Q. Did he at that time say where he had been - A. When I let him get up I asked him what he had been about; he said nothing; what had I to do with it. Sometime after he said it was a girl, she and he had some dispute; she called the watchman, he sprung the rattle, and he ran away.

HENRY THORNTON . Q. You are a coachman - A. Yes.

Q. After this man was in custody were you in Baker-street - A. Yes; I was going up Baker-street, a little after two o'clock, I do not know to a quarter of an hour; the first thing that I took up were two silk handkerchiefs; I carried them in my hand a little way, there was another handkerchief with keys in it, I picked these up; it might be half a dozen doors from Dorset-street, nearer Portman-square.

Q. You did not hear any alarm at that time - A. No, not a word; one person went before me, he walked on and I followed him; I heard no rattle. I took them into Durweston-street; I called the watch, I was told the watchmen were up at No. 12; I took them to the house, but I did not deliver them to any one; I saw a quantity of people in the passage but I did not not see their faces; I kept the keys. At five o'clock in the morning the constable knocked at the door and demanded the keys, I gave them up.

WILLIAM PRENTICE . I was the constable on duty on Thursday the 18th of May.

Q. Do you recollect the prisoners being brought into your custody - A. Yes. The keys and iron crow were delivered up by the watchman. When the prisoners were brought, Smith told me that he had been to his brother, at Paddington; I asked him who his brother was, he said he was a working man; I asked him what part of Paddington his brother lived, he told me he kept no house. I asked him what his reasons were for running; he said he had been with a girl of the town in East-street; she called the watch and gave charge of him, and so he ran away from him.

COURT. What time were they brought to the watch-house - A. Smith was brought about two, While about half past two.

Q. Did you observe how light it was when they were brought in - A. No; I did not go to see whether it was day or not.

JAMES WAUGH . Q. You are servant to Mr. Sitwell - A. Yes; his house is No. 12, Durweston-street ; his name is Francis Sitwell .

Q. Did you fasten up the house there that night - A. Yes.

Q. At that time was there any damage done to the door - A. No; I fastened it up about eleven o'clock at night; a little after two o'clock I heard a noise which awoke me, I was in bed, it appeared like some person rattleing a cane upon the rails; I put some of my things on, went to the door, and the door was standing wide open, and no person at the door at all.

COURT. How soon did any body come to you - A. About half past two. I had not been there a few minutes before the watchmen came back with one prisoner only. I then saw there was a hole made in the door, large enough that I could put my hand into it.

Q. Mr. Francis Sitwell is the master of this house - A. Yes; he is living there. His goods were in the house.

Mr. Knapp. You are quite sure it was past two when you heard the noise - it was day light, was it not - A. I cannot say; I did not go out till the man was brought back, then I went out, it was break of day then; it was not quite day light.

Q. Was it light enough supposing I had been at the distance from you that I am now, for you to see my face - A. If you were facing of me I might.

Q. You know there was one of the prisoners brought back to your house - you had been alarmed by the noise - A. Yes.

Q. How long was it after you heard the noise on the rail before the prisoner was brought back to your house - A. Half an hour.

Q. Had you looked out of the window - A. No.

Q. Then whether it was light or dark you could not tell - A. No.

COURT. When you got up had you any light - A. No, no light at all.

Q. Were there any window shutters to where you were - A. Yes; and there was no fire light, or candle light in the house, It was not light enough in the house to distinguish one thing from another.

Q. When you got out of door how was it then - A. It was light enough to see the face of a person if I was near enough to him, but not at the distance of six or seven yards.

THOMAS FOY . I am an officer belonging to Marlborough-street office.

Q. In consequence of the discovery having been made of this transaction did you go with that crow, and when, to Mr. Sitwell's house - A. I went on the same day that the people brought the crow to our office, about five or or six o'clock in the evening, I took the crow along with me, when I went I found a hole had been bored under the lock large enough to admit the arm of any man. it appeared to have been made with a center bit, so that any person putting his arm in could either unlock the door or turn a small chain off, and likewise unbolt the bottom bolt; it appeared by several marks that were made at the top bolt, that they had been trying to force that bolt back, to which marks I fitted this crow.

Q. Is that crow perfect at the end - A. There is a piece out of the end of it, and it exactly fitted.

Mr. Knapp. I understood you to say it must be a large center bit - A. Yes.

Q. No center bit is to be produced here by any one - A. No.

Q. You know there is a forty pounds reward - A. I know that.

Q. Did you examine the fastenings of the door - A. I did; the top bolt had been forced back, and here is the thing that was forced off, all the other fastenings could be reached without: they were obliged to force that, or else they must have cut another hole.

Q. to Waugh. Did you look at the door at all - A. I saw a place was cut out, and I saw the top bolt had been forced.

Q. You say you fastened the door that night, was it locked, and the chain put up - A. Yes; and the top and the bottom bolts were bolted.

WHITE, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 31.

SMITH, GUILTY - DEATH , aged 26.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Le Blanc.

Reference Number: t18090626-58

782. WILLIAM LOWE was indicted for that he on the 29th of May last, feloniously was at large in this kingdom, to wit, at the parish of St. James's, Clerkenwell, before the expiration of seven years, for which he had been ordered to be transported .

RICHARD LIMBRICK . Q. You are an officer - A. Yes. On the 29th of May I found the prisoner at the Pickled Egg, Crawford-passage, St. James's, Clerkenwell ; Blackman was with me.

Q. Was the prisoner in any custody at that time - A. No, he was not; he was in a skettle ground.

Q. What time of the day was it - A. About the middle of the day.

Q. You knew his person before - A. Yes, I did; I knew that he had been convicted. When I found him in this skittle ground I took him in custody; with Blackman; we took him to Bow-street, he was ordered to the watchhouse, till we could get Mr. Hanson, one of the jailors to identify his person; he was committed then, and here is the certificate of his former conviction, I got that from Mr. Shelton; I saw Mr. Shelton sign it.

WILLIAM BLACKMAN . Q. Were you with Limbrick at any time, that he took the prisoner in custody - A. Yes.

Q. You heard what he has said, and that is all you know of the matter - A. Yes. (The certificate of the record of the conviction of the prisoner read.)

WILLIAM HANSON . I am servant to Mr. Newman;

I am turnkey of Newgate.

Q. Do you know the person of the prisoner at the bar - A. Perfectly well; he was tried in June sessions, 1808.

Q. Were you in court when he was tried - A. I was, it was for stealing a trunk of Mr. Macknamara; I was present in court when he was tried, and when he was sentenced.

Q. Can you swear that the prisoner was the same person who was tried in 1808 - A. Yes.

Q. How long did he continue in Newgate - A. On the 4th of October he went away from Newgate; he was to be sent to the Isle of Wight; a serjeant of the guards took him.

Prisoner's Defence. My lord and gentlemen of the jury, impressed with deep respect to this honourable court and jury, before whom I am tried; I accepted of his majesty's most gracious pardon in admitting me to go for a soldier. I do solemnly declare that had I been dealt with in that kind of way which I was at first, I never should have thought of returning until my time was out. When I consented to go for a soldier I understood it to be for seven years; when I came to the prison ship of the Isle of Wight I was told that I was to be a soldier for life; I had no idea that his Majesty exercised his prerogative to make me a soldier for life. I never was sworn in for a soldier, that part was omitted in my case, and is with most unfortunate men in my situation. Finding I was to be a soldier for life I resolved upon coming to London again; I was not taken in any felonious act, nor did I intend to shun the laws of my country. If unfortunate transports are to be made soldiers for life, why are they not told that they are to be soldiers for life. I humbly implore the mercy and tenderness of the court in my favour, that if I am sent for a soldier, to have no longer period to serve than I was led to believe at first, and I will ever pray, William Lowe .

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 34.

[ The prisoner was recommended to his Majesty's mercy by the jury, believing he did not like to be subject to martial laws .]

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. justice Chambre.

Reference Number: t18090626-59

583. MICHAEL BURKE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 20th of June , two pounds weight of sugar, value 1 s. 6 d. two pounds weight of other sugar, value 1 s. 6 d. and two pounds weight of refined sugar, value 1 s. 6 d. the property of Thomas Fenn .

The case was stated by Mr. Gurney.

- SHUTER. I am in the employ of Mr. Thomas Fenn , he is a sugar baker in Thames-street ; the prisoner is in his employ; we lodged in the house.

Q. On the night of Monday the 19th of June, were you in bed when the prisoner came up to his room - A. Yes; I observed he had his hand under his coat, and he sat down on the bed, the up stairs man told him to go down and mind the door, as it was his turn that night to mind the door; he went down and came up again in an hour and a half, as soon as he came in the room he blowed the candle out, I heard him open his box, shut it, and locked it. On the next day, after I had seen him in the bed room, he came down in the kitchen when I was there, he had a bundle in a handkerchief; he said he had done his work in the sugar-house; I told him to leave his bundle and come with me, I would show him something he had not done; he would not put the bundle down, I took the bundle from him, I opened it, it contained a dirty shirt, and sugar wrapped up inside of it; he said he meaned to use it with his tea; the foreman told him he was allowed sugar as well as the other men, he had no occasion to take it. We never use that sugar, we always use the best sugar. I delivered the sugar to Mr. Wiedner, the foreman.

THOMAS FENN . On Tuesday, the 20th of June, Wiedner brought me this sugar, I went into the men's kitchen, there I found Burke, I upbraided him for his conduct, he said it was the first time he ever had done so. He asked me to forgive him, and seemed affected.

Q. What description of sugar is it - A. It is the heading of the lump sugar, it is never sold; it is worth about nine pence a pound.

Prisoner's Defence. After I had done my work I had occasion to take my clothes to be washed. I tied them in a handkerchief and went into the kitchen to get some refreshment, I returned to the bundle, and was stopped at the door; on searching the bundle, to my great surprize, the sugar in the indictment was found; it must have been put in by some of the people in the sugar-house.

GUILTY , aged 20.

Confined Fourteen Days in Newgate , and whipped in Goal .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090626-60

584. JOSEPH LEE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 29th of May , two bushels of canary seed, value 1 l. 5 s. the property of William Reynolds ,

The case was stated by Mr. Gurney.

DANIEL CARTWRIGHT . Q. You are one of the marshalmen of the city - A. Yes. On Monday morning, at half past four, on the 29th of May, by the desire of Mr. Reynolds I went to the King's Arms, St. John-street ; I watched till between eight and nine at night, the prisoner came into the public house, and said, do you want a porter, he said no. The king's Arms is not in the city. He then took the bag of canary seed out of the corner, put it on the table, tied the mouth up afresh, took it on his back, and went out; I followed him into Long-lane, that is in the city; he went into Davis's, a little seed shop, he pitched the bag among others on the left hand side of the shop; I was looking through the window; he talked with Davis about three minutes, he came out in the street, I took him in custody, and took him into Davis's shop again; I said where did you come from with this; Davis was then in the shop, behind the counter; he said I live with Mr. Reynolds, I was to bring it here; I told him that was wrong, he had robbed his master of it, and I should take him to the Compter; he then begged his master to be sent for, upon which I sent for Mr. Reynolds. When Mr. Reynolds came, he said. I have found you out at last, you have been robbing me for nigh ten years; he said it was the first time; consider me and my family master. I delivered the seed to Eldridge.

WILLIAM ELDRIDGE . The seed has been in my custody ever since.

WILLIAM REYNOLDS . Q. You are a corn merchant , living in St. John-street - A. Yes. The prisoner was in my employ somewhere about ten years. On Sunday, the 28th of May, in consequence of information; I went to the King's Arms public house, that

Cartwright has spoken of, I saw this bag of canary seed; I examined the bag, and the seed; the bag belongs to Mr. Jones a lighterman, who had left it in my house with a quantity of malt, about three weeks ago. I afterwards looked in my house and found this individual bag missing. I have examined the canary seed, I have no doubt it is mine. I saw the prisoner in custody in Davis's house; I said I have got you at last, I have been looking for you a great while; he begged I would forgive him; he could not conceive what possessed him to do it; it was the first time, and if I would permit him to take the seed back, I should not be the poorer; he would never do the like again.

Mr. Alley. This person has been a soldier a long time, he has been serving abroad, he has a wife and children, you did not prosecute Davis - A. No, the magistrate discharged him.

Q. You had better made this man a witness against Davis, and prosecuted him - A. That was what I meaned to do.

The prisoner left his defence to his counsel, called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY, aged 34.

Judgement respited .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090626-61

585. JOHN READ was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 24th of April , a watch, value 3 l. a watch ribbon, value 3 d. and a key, value 3 d. the property of Thomas Geeson , in his dwelling house .

HANNAH GEESON . My husband's name is Thomas Geeson .

Q. Where is your husband's house - A. Green Harbour-court, Little-morefields ; my husband rents the whole house, and we let out a part in lodging. On the 24th of April the prisoner came to take a lodging, he wanted a bed to himself; I took him up stairs to shew him a bed, he came down and said he liked it very well; he was to give me two shillings a week for a bed, there were three beds in the room; this was about half past nine in the morning, he went away. In the afternoon he came again; he then told me he wanted to go to Moorfields, to purchase a box to put a hat in; I told him I thought we had a box to suit him; I asked him three shillings for it, he said he liked it very well, he would go and see whether his hat was done at Mr. Hudson's; he asked me if I could give him some tea; he said he could not get change for a pound note without taking so many halfpence; he told me to bring the box down; I told him he need not fear, the box would suit his hat. He sent me up stairs to get the box, when I came down he was gone.

Q. The room which you left him in, was it the bottom part of the house - A. No, the one pair of stairs; I left him in my room, when I went up to get this box which he said he would buy of me.

Q. Was there a watch there - A. Yes, I had observed it when I went up stairs, it was hanging in a buffet; I looked at it, it was exactly half after three. When I came down in the room, I said there is the box; I turned my head, and found the prisoner was gone. I looked in the buffet, and the watch was gone. The watch has never been found. I never saw the prisoner again till he was taken up. It was a silver watch, my husband had it about fourteen years. I am sure he is the same man.

Prisoner's Defence. I never saw the woman to my knowledge in my life.

GUILTY, aged 50.

Of stealing to the value of thirty nine shillings only.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090626-62

586. ELIZABETH DENCH was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 1st of June , two broom heads, value 5 s. a scrubbing brush, value 1 s. 6 d. and a dozen of combs, value 3 s. 6 d. the property of Peter Ashmore , and Joseph Ashmore ; - an handkerchief, value 1 s. the property of Joseph Ashmore .

JOSEPH ASHMORE . I live in Newgate-street , I am a brush maker ; I am in partnership with my father, Peter Ashmore ; the prisoner lived servant with me about four months. On June the Ist, in consequence suspicion, I called the prisoner into my parlour; I told her I was convinced that I had a thief in the house, she must be searched; she said she had no objection; she turned out her pockets, and the other servant did so likewise; nothing was found in their pockets; I told them I must search their boxes. We went up stairs, the prisoner turned out the things that were in her box, on the bed; the articles that I indicted her for. When she took them out, I asked her whose property they were; she then pleaded for mercy.

Mr. Knapp. I take it for granted, you did not take her without a character - A. We received a good character with her, she tells me she has three children.

JAMES WOODMAN . I am a constable, these things were taken out of the box before I came; they were delivered to me. I have kept them ever since.

Prosecutor. The broom heads are both my property; the brushes and combs, I will not swear to.

The prisoner left her defence to her councel, called three witnesses, who gave her a good character.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

Reference Number: t18090626-63

587. MARY NEWMAN . was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 26th of June , from the person of Francis Jones , one pound ten shillings, and a five pound bank note, his property .

FRANCIS JONES . I live at No. 15, Hatfield-street, Black-friers-road. On Monday the 26th of June, about halfpast eleven at night, I came from a benefit society, held at the Goose and Grid-iron, St. Paul's-church-yard; I was in company with Robert Lilly. At the corner of Creed-lane I was accosted by this woman, and Robert Lilly was accosted by two others. The first question they asked, was whether we would give them something to drink; we asked them where, they said down the lane; pointing down Creed-lane . We retired a few steps down the lane, he in company of the two, and I with this woman. We had not gone above half a dozen steps down the lane, nor I had not been more than two minutes in their company, before I felt a hand in my breeches pocket. I felt her hand, I supposed come out of my breeches pocket, which induced me to put my hand in immediately, where I keep my money. I found it was gone, and my pocket unbuttoned. Before I was accosted by these women, my money was safe, and my pocket buttoned. I found all my money was gone, except one piece, which from the smoothness of it, I supposed was a shilling.

Q. Were the other women near you at the time - A.

They were; I suppose about four yards across the road, not within the reach of me with the hand.

Q. How much money had you when you went into the Goose and Grid-iron - A. I had seven pounds twelve shillings and six-pence; but there I paid twenty-six shillings.

Q. How was it made up - A. A five pound note, two guineas, a seven shilling piece, and two or three shillings and six-pences. I paid away a guinea, and a seven shilling piece; I had the change out of the seven shilling piece. Upon my finding the money was gone out of my pocket, I accused her of robbing me, and instantly seized her hand; in which she had got the property; she not having time to convey it away. I found it was in her hand; I asked her whether she was not ashamed of herself, she said she was exceeding sorry, she did not know it; she turned it out into my hand, I said I would charge the watch with her, to see whether I had got all my money; I called my friend, who was about four yards off; I told him I had been robbed by this woman, he advised me to call the watch; I called the watch. The constable has the five pound note; the other money I have made use of.

JOSEPH COWARD . I was constable of the night.

Q. Did you receive charge of this woman by the last witness - A. Yes: when he came in he said he had been robbed of between six and seven pounds; he put a five pound note down and the other money; he was willing for me to discharge the woman, but I was not willing. I have had the five pound note ever since.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. On Monday evening I had been to Bunhill-row to my business; I am a case maker , I make scissars, razors, and spectacle cases. I lived in Prince's-street, Lemond's Pond. I was passing the end of the street, I met this gentleman and three or four women; he seemed to be in a great heat of passion, he took hold of me and charged the watchman with me. I am quite innocent of what he charges me with.

GUILTY , aged 34.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090626-64

588. MARY COHEN was indicted for feloniously stealing on 1st of June , from the person of Charles Elder , a shilling, and four six-pences, and two bank notes, value 1 l. each, his property .

CHARLES ELDER . I live at 34, Aylesbury-street, Clerkenwell. I am in the service of Mr. Dawson, ship broker, Tower Hill. On the 1st of June, about half past eleven at night, I was going to Mr. Dawson's, to see if a box of linen had come there that afternoon. I was three parts down the Minories, between George-street and the Crescent.

Q. Were you sober - A. Quite sober.

Q. Do you know that you had this money about you in the Minories - A. I was at that moment putting the half crown out of my right hand pocket into my left pocket; I felt the money in my pocket. The prisoner accosted me at the time I was putting the money in my pocket; she met me right in the face, she was alone.

Q. Are you quite sure that she is the woman - A. I am quite certain.

Q. Had she a child in her arms at that time - A. No, she asked me where I was going, I told her I was going straight home, she said I had better go home with her.

Q. Did you go with her - A. No; she met me, turned back, and went in the direction I was going; she laid hold of my arm, I believe.

Q. Did you attempt to shove her off - A. No, she was not five minutes with me, I did not stop with her at all; she suddenly started from me. I was then close by the Crescent when she started the other side of the way; no familiarity passed between us. By her suddenly starting from me, I thought she had taken my pocket handkerchief; I found the left hand pocket of my pantaloons, turned inside out. She was at my left side when she started from me.

Q. Were your notes and silver all there - A. Yes, in my purse; I pursued her, and called out stop thief.

Q. When she asked you to go home, did she tell you where her home was - A. No; I was very near her when I followed her, and the watchman stopped her; she was searched in the watchhouse, and the money was found in her mouth; the notes on one side of her mouth, and the silver in the other. The constable has kept it ever since.

WILLIAM MABERLEY . I am a watchman, my beat is at Sparrow-corner, at the end of the Minories. On the 1st of June, about half past eleven at night, I heard the cry of stop thief; the prisoner was running, and the prosecutor after her. I stopped the prisoner, the prosecutor came up directly; he charged the prisoner with having robbed him of his purse, containing cash and notes. I took the prisoner to the watchhouse, there I searched her; I found upon her two one pound notes, and four shillings in silver in her mouth. I never found the purse. I delivered over the notes and the money to Kinnersley.

Q. Do you know the person of the woman - A. No, I never saw her before to my knowledge.

Kinnersley. The money and the notes were delivered over to me; they were taken out before I came.

Q. to prosecutor. I suppose you had no marks about your notes or money - A. I know the numbers.

Prisoner's Defence. I did not rob this gentleman of his money; I went to look after my husband, he stopped out later than usual; coming back I met with this gentleman, he asked me to have something to drink; he intruded upon me to take six-pence to get something to drink, I told him I dare not go to any house with him, for fear my husband should come home; I happened to stoop down to tie my pocket up, I saw something white, I picked it up; the notes and money were wrapped up in paper. The gentleman came to me in Rosemary-lane, he struck me; I did not know the gentleman again; he did not say he had lost any thing, he called out stop thief, I called out murder. The money was found upon me. When I was in the Compter, he said he would not hurt me if I would make up the money; he had lost two guineas, and a guinea for his loss of time; I told him my husband was out of work, I could not raise above two guineas; he told me I should pay for Kinnersley's loss of time, and the watchman's loss of time. Mr. Kinnersley told Mr. Elder that he should not take the money, without paying for his time.

Q. to prosecutor. Is there any truth in what she has said - A. I begged the lord mayor not to prosecute this woman, upon account of the child; the husband wanted my address, I gave it him; I never went to the Compter to take any money of her. I never made any proposal

that she should pay the watchman and Kinnersley.

Jury Q. to Maberley. Did the prosecutor describe to you the number of the notes - A. He said he had lost two notes, he said they were both running numbers; he did not make out the number of the notes; before he saw them he described the quantity of silver, he mentioned one foreign piece, or pocket piece, which there was amongst it.

COURT. to Kinnersley. Do you know the person of the woman - A. Yes.

GUILTY , aged 21.

Transported for Seven Years .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090626-65

589. WILLIAM TAYLOR was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 10th of June , a sack, value 3 s. the property of James King .

JAMES KING . I am a farmer and malt man , at Barkway, in Hertfordshire .

Q. Was the prisoner a servant of yours - A. No; I have seen the prisoner between the road of Ware and Barkway, but not to know him by name; I have seen the sack. I know it to be mine.

DANIEL BISHOP . I am a police officer of Worship-street. On Saturday, the 10th of June, I in company with Vickrey and other officers, apprehended the prisoner at the White Hart, Stoke Newington, upon some other charge. We went in company with Mr. Pratt, a miller at Tottenham, to search for something else; on searching the bed room, we found this sack at the head of the bed; it has the mark of King, Ware, Herts. The prisoner said he had found this with five-others, six years ago.

MR. PRATT. I believe you are a miller at Tottenham - A. I am; the prisoner lived in a house near me; on account of my being robbed, we suspected him to be of the party. I and the officers went to his house, we there found the sack as described by the officer.

JOHN VICKREY . I am an officer of Worship-street office; before the second examination of the prisoner, early in the morning the prisoner said that he had found this sack with three others, two years ago.

The prisoner was not put on his defence.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Commen Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090626-66

590. JOSEPH HEADY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 22nd of May , eighty yards of printed callico, value 9 l. the property of William Charles Titford , in his dwelling house .

WILLIAM CHARLES TITFORD . I am a linen draper , No. 1, Finsbury-place .

Q. Do you rent the whole house - A. Yes.

Q. On the 22nd of May did you lose any printed callico from your shop - A. About half an hour after eight o'clock in the evening, I was standing a little within the door, with my arm upon a pile of goods; this pile consisted of several bundles, containing from ten to twenty pieces, each tied round with a string. A gentleman came to the door, I went round to the desk with him; I had not been there two minutes.

Q. Was this printed linen within the shop - A. Yes, just within the door; every part of the goods was within nine inches of the threshold of the door. The next witness, Roffey, ran in and asked me if I had lost any goods.

Q. On turning your eye to the pile of goods, did you percieve the pile was diminished - A. Certainly, it was diminished one bundle. I ran to where the prisoner was reported to have gone. and found the goods at Mr. Dobson's.

Q. Did you ever see the goods in the personal possession of the prisoner - A. No.

Q. Did you ever see the prisoner while they were pursuing of him - A. No; I did not see him till after he was apprehended; after I left Mr. Dobson's. Such part of the goods that were found, are here. The goods were delivered over to me at Mr. Dobson's. I took them to Worship-street office myself.

Q. Where is Mr. Dobson's - A. About fifteen doors from my house.

Q. Are you quite sure it was your parcel of goods - A. Quite sure; I have not the least doubt in the world.

Q. What were the goods - A. A bundle of printed callico.

Q. Was he in soldier's clothes when he was apprehended - A. No.

GEORGE ROFFEY . I am a stone mason, I work for Mr. Porter, Finsbury-square.

Q. Were you near Mr. Titford's shop about half past eight, on the evening of the 22nd of May - A. Yes; I saw the prisoner at the bar take from the pile of cottons at the door, a bundle; he reached within the shop to get at them; the cottons were within the door; I believe he did not put his foot in.

Q. You saw him do it, did you - A. Yes; he walked gently off the pavement with the cottons; then he began to run gently about ten yards.

Q. Did you enquire in the shop whether he had any right to take them - A. No; I holloaed out stop thief, then he began to run as fast as he could.

Q. Still keeping this bundle - A. Yes, I pursued him with the cry of stop thief; he turned down Finsbury-street; as he was running down there, he was knocked down by some man.

Q. Did you see him knocked down - A. Yes; he dropped the bundle of linen there; the prisoner got up, and ran again; I pursued after him, I never lost sight of him at all; he ran down Finsbury-street, then he ran through a court; I do not think it was altogether five hundred yards before he was taken.

Q. Was there any thoroughfare in the court - A. Yes; he crossed the other street, and went into a kind of a stable place; he was taken there.

Q. From the time that he laid hold of the goods, to the time he was taken, had you ever lost sight of him - A. No; immediately he was secured, I went and gave information at Mr. Titford's shop.

GEORGE AVIS . I am a private in the Tower Hamlet-militia. I was about five or six doors from Mr. Titford's house, I saw this man pass with this bundle under his arm.

Q. You are sure it was the prisoner that you saw pass you - A. Yes; he got about two yards before me, When I heard the cry of stop thief, I pursued after him, and knocked him down; he ran half way down Finsbury-street; a pawnbroker's boy went to stop him, he struck him on the eye; I cast my foot before him, he dropped down with the bundle, and I dropped with him.

Q. You tripped him up then - A. Yes, and fell with him; then he dropped the bundle; he got up and ran away, I ran after him. I left the bundle on the ground.

Q. Did you ever lose sight of him from the time that you saw him with the bundle under his arm, till the time he was taken - A. No; I secured him myself; he ran into a kind of a privy, backwards in the stable.

JOHN RAY . The bundle was given me in charge; I produce it as it was given me.

Q. to prosecutor. Have you any partner in your business - A. None.

Q. Is the bundle in the same package as when it was taken - A. No; the strings were across each end; there were as many again of them when taken, packed up; there are nearly half of them gone. I am sure it is the same bundle. These are the whole that I recovered; there were a part of them lost, I look upon it; there were half as many again; I value these at eight pounds; they could not be bought for eight pounds.

Prisoner's Defence. On the same evening I happened to get intoxicated, I went into this place to sleep, this man hauled me about, and I awoke. I know no more of it than a child unborn.

Q. to Roffey. Was he in soldier's clothes when you pursued him - A. No.

Q. Was any body with the prisoner - A. I observed two; when I followed the prisoner one of them laid hold of my coat, he said stop, let him go.

GUILTY - DEATH , aged 23.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090626-67

591. ANN BUTLER, alias, ELIZABETH BUTLER , was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 10th of June , a watch, value 4 l. the property of Benjamin Wyatt , from his person .

BENJAMIN WYATT . I am servant to Mr. Donaldson, Bloomsbury-square.

Q. When did you lose your watch - A. On the 8th of May, between eleven and twelve at night, in Church-lane, St. Giles's . I had been to Fisher-street in the day, I gave the men some beer for finishing the job, the plaisterers and I were going home together in Dyot-street; I think it was two girls followed us; I went into a house that belonged to my master, and asked them how they got on there; we had a pint of half ale and half porter; this girl asked me to go with her, I refused; it was quite against my will; I am a married man and have got four children. We came out of that house, and this girl followed me; she asked me to go with her, she unbuttoned my pantaloons, I buttoned them up again; then she went to kiss me; she took my watch out and ran away. This was in the street.

Q. Were you sober - A. I was never drunk in my life, but whatever I had to do I could do. When she had got my watch she ran away.

Q. You have never recovered your watch - A. No.

Q. How long had you been in company with her - A. About an hour.

GEORGE CULLON . I am a patrol. On the night following Benjamin Wyatt came and told me he had lost his watch; he described the girl; I said I knew the girl very well; my beat is in Dyot-street; I found her in bed at her lodgings; I apprehended her.

Prisoner's Defence. As I was standing at George-street with another young woman, that man and another asked me to have something to drink, they took me to the mulled wine-house, we had two half pints of mulled wine; then they took us to the Black Horse, we had two half pints of gin and beer; we sat there an hour and a half, and then we went out, and left this young man, and two young women together. They came and took me; I never saw the watch with my eyes.

JURY to prosecutor. Are you confident that you were in a state of sobriety, as you are now - A. Yes; I think I was.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090626-68

592. GEORGE TAYLOR was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 10th of June , five bushel of flour, value 3 l. and a sack, value 3 s. the property of Charles Pratt ; - and

JOHN CROSS BLAIN for feloniously receiving the same goods, knowing them to have been stolen .

The case was stated by Mr. Pollock.

CHARLES PRATT . Q. You are proprietor of the mill at Tottenham - A. I am. On Saturday morning I received information, I came to town and applied to some of the officers in Worship-street, and went with them to the Leg of Mutton and Trimmings, in Kingsland-road ; Blain was ostler there. Just before I came to the door the officers desired me to stop; the officers went on with Blain up the stable yard; as soon as Blain turned his head round and saw me, he said he had got a sack of flour belonging to Mr. Pratt; I went to the officers and Blain into the stable, on the right hand side stood a corn bin, and at the end of the corn bin stood a sack of flour on its bottom, a basket was upon it, turned downwards, and adjoining it was a truss of loose straw, for the purpose of concealing it. One of the officers took the sack of flour, and the other took Blain; I went to Shoreditch church and got a coach; we took Blain with us; before we came to the White Hart, this side of Newington-green; George Taylor was there with his cart; he was my carman at this time; and Blain I had discharged from my service about three years ago; Blain looked out of the coach window and said that is the man that left the sack of flour, and Taylor being charged with it, acknowledged it, said that he had loaded one more than he ought to have done, and that he intended to take it home again. Within thirty yards where they turned up to take the sack of flour there is a warehouse that I pay four guineas a year for to leave any thing that come from London, or from the mill on my account, it is directly in the road, and the place where the sack was deposited is up a gateway, out of the road.

Q. You do not authorise your servant to leave any thing at any public house they please - A. I do not.

Q. How long have you had the warehouse - A. Ten years.

MR. CURTOIS. I am an assistant, living with Mr. Pratt. On Friday morning, when I went out, I left a written order for fifteen sacks to come to London, to be sent to Bow-lane, to Mr. Lott; I did not see the cart loaded; it was the only load that came to town that day; in the evening, between six and seven o'clock, I saw Taylor, I had some conversation with him respecting what past on the day before; he had been summonsed

for riding in his cart, and made to pay sixteen shillings.

Q. Did he mention the sack of flour - A. No; he mentioned on the Friday night that he should not stop any longer than Saturday week, or if I pleased to get a man, he would go the next day.

Q. What is the price of a sack of flour - A. Seventy five shillings.

WLLIAM BRISCOE . I am a servant to Mr. Arnold, a grocer, Kingsland-road. On Friday, the 9th of June, about three o'clock, I saw a cart drawed down the Leg of Mutton and Trimmings gateway, to the stable door; the man who drove it took off the tarpaulin, and took out a sack of flour and carried it into the stable; he covered up the cart and drove it away. I supposed it to be Mr. Pratt's cart, from knowing it going up and down the road; I did not take notice of the man who drove the cart.

JOHN BROOKS . Q. Do you live with Mr. Pratt - A. Yes; I am a weekly man; I am a flour dresser.

Q. Did you assist in loading this cart on the 9th of June - A. Yes; I put fifteen sacks in the cart, George Taylor drove it.

Mr. Alley. If there were sixteen it was by mistake - A. If there were sixteen it was by mistake.

COURT. Were there sixteen sacks in the cart - A. Not when I left it.

SAMUEL COOK . Q. You live with Mr. Pratt, do not you - A. Yes; I and the last witness assisted in loading this cart; I loaded fifteen, what I set down in the book.

THOMAS LOTT . I am a baker. On the 9th of June last I received fifteen sacks of flour; the cart holds fifteen sacks at the bottom; I took particular notice one sack laid across on the top of them.

Q. Was the flour wet - A. No. There was a vacancy at the tail of the cart for one sack; the prisoner had a little dog there.

MARY LAWRENCE . Q. I believe you keep a house where Mr. Pratt has a warehouse, in Kingsland-road - A. Yes.

Q. Do you recollect on Friday the 9th of June, whether you were at home in the afternoon of that day - A. Yes.

Q. Did the prisoner Taylor apply to leave a sack of flour at that warehouse - A. He did not.

JOHN VICKREY . I am an officer of Worship-street. On Saturday the 10th of June, I, in company with Bishop and Armstrong, went with Mr. Pratt to the Leg of Mutton and Trimmings, Kingsland-road, I went into the house and asked the landlord for his ostler, he pointed out the prisoner Blain, who was standing in the yard; I told Blain we had come to look over the stable for a sack of flour that had been stolen; Mr. Pratt came up, the prisoner Blain addressed himself to Mr. Pratt, said I have a sack of flour that was left here yesterday by your man. We went into the stable, and on the right hand side of the stable, by the corn bin, stood the sack of flour, covered over with a matted basket, and by the side of it was a truss of straw; I told the prisoner Blain that we must take the sack of flour and him before the magistrate, we got a cart, and sent the sack of flour with Armstong. Mr. Pratt got a coach for the purpose of finding Taylor; Mr. Pratt had two men of the same name. We went to the White Hart, Newington; at the door stood Mr. Pratt's cart, loaded; we saw Taylor, Blain pointed him out, at the public house door; I told Taylor he must come to his master, who was waiting in the coach for him; he came along with me to the coach, Blain then said that is the man that left it with me; I then said we have found the sack of flour in the Leg of Mutton and Trimmings stable belonging to Mr. Pratt, where did you get it from; he replied, I brought it from my master's mill in a mistake.

Taylor's Defence. When I loaded the flour it rained, I drawed the tarpaulin over them as I laid them; I laid one sack on the top, as I always did, to keep the horse from hanging. When I was four miles from home I found I had one sack too many I asked this man to let me leave it; he said I might if I liked; I drawed down the yard and pitched it in the stable.

Blain's Defence. I stood against the door way when this man came by, he asked me to let him leave a sack of flour, he had one too many; I told him he might leave it till he came back.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090626-69

593. JOSEPH PARKER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 22nd of June , in the dwelling house of William Screen , a bank note, value 20 l. and a bank note, value 5 l. the property of Henry Chappel .

HENRY CHAPPEL . I am a calender ; I live at No. 3, Duke-street, Long-alley.

Q. What do you accuse the prisoner of - A. Of stealing a twenty pound note, and a five pound note, on last Thursday fortnight.

Q. How did you lose it - A. By having it in brown paper, and pulling it out, in company with this boy , at the Prince of Wales public house; I pulled them out to look at them, this lad asked me to let him look at them; he returned me the brown paper without the notes; he folded the brown paper up; he said take care father, put them in your pocket. He went out and did not return again; I thought he was an honest boy.

Q. Did you know him before - A. I saw him the day before at the Robin Hood in Skinner-street. I had lost a silk handkerchief the day before, he told me he could inform me where my handkerchief was; that is the reason he was along with me.

Q. When he went away how soon afterwards did you find the notes were gone - A. In about twenty minutes. Nobody sat along side of me but him; I had shewed them to nobody else but him.

JOHN EASTFIELD . I was in the house with Mr. Edwards on the 22nd of June; I saw Mr. Edwards give Chappel a twenty pound note, a five pound note, and half a guinea, he wrapped the notes up in a bit of brown paper, and put them in his inside breeches pocket; he asked me to accompany him to the Robin Hood, in Skinner-street, in search of a silk handkerchief he had lost the night before; we went into the tap-room, called for a pot of porter; the prisoner was in the taproom; he came to Chappel and said, I can inform you how you can find your handkerchief; Chappel and I went out, we went to Merchant Taylors Hall; the prisoner followed us. I left Chappel and the prisoner together.

EDWARD HOLDITCH . I am a soldier. On Wednesday afternoon I was passing through Bishopgate-street, I saw Chappel; a person came up and persuaded

him to go to the Robin Hood; we went there; he took out a paper containing notes, the notes fell out of the paper, he picked up the notes; I said you had better leave the notes in the landlord's hands; the landlord read them, he said there was a twenty pound, and a five pound note. We had two pots of porter; Chappel's hat fell off his head, I picked it up; I said you have lost your handkerchief, he said no, it is in my hat; I said it is not, he turned his pockets inside out; I said you are in a house that is not safe, quit the house and let that be the first loss; with that he got up and drank a glass of gin, and gave me one. At the time I was telling the landlord of his losing the handkerchief, this lad came in and went out again; I persuaded Chappel to go to the sign of the Buffalo. I told his wife where he had left his money; this lad abused me for saying that his handkerchief had been lost; he said he should see me another time, he would close my eyes. This man's wife, and Chappel, returned to the Robin Hood, and received the notes; the prisoner saw them receive the notes; they were left in the hands of Mr. Edwards, at the Buffalo, till the next morning.

Q. to prosecutor. At what public house did you lose the notes - A. The Prince of Wales, in Wentworh-street, Spitalfields.

Prisoner's Defence. I had been helping my father to move till four o'clock in the afternoon; I went down to the Robin Hood, Skinner-street, that gentleman and that one were standing at the bar drinking; that gentleman was very much intoxicated, he challenged a soldier with taking his silk handkerchief; I said, if I were you, I would go and clear myself; he said he would. I went out of doors; that gentleman in Skinner-street, said, what are you following of me for; he said, you rascally villain, if you follow me, I will charge a constable with you. When he had abused me, I went down Skinner-street, into the Buffalo, and had a pint of beer; from there I went into the Robin Hood. Mr. Chappel and that gentleman and his wife came in and received the money. The next morning I went to the Robin Hood, in came Mr. Chappel and that gentleman; I asked Mr. Chappel if he had heard any thing of his handkerchief, he said no; I said if I could get any thing out of the girl that was in the house, I would tell him. I went down Threadneedle-street; he went into Merchant Taylor's Hall; me and this gentleman went into a public house; when Mr. Chappel came, he asked him to lend him five shillings; he said he had lost twenty pounds, he would not lend any more; they parted. I went with Mr. Chappel into the Prince of Wales, Wentworth-street , we had two pots of beer there; I said I cannot drink any more, you do not drink any thing yourself; he drank that pot of beer before he took it away from his mouth; he said he could drink as much again. They all came round and shoved me away; he said, let me see if my money is safe; he could not find it, I said, let me feel; I put my hand into his fob, took out the notes, and put them into his hand; he told me to put it into the fob, I did. I said if you do not come out of this place, I shall bid you good bye. I immediately came out, and the servant of the house is witness that he saw me put it into his fob.

JOHN ARMSTRONG . The prosecutor described the prisoner to me. I know nothing more than apprehending him.

GUILTY, aged 17.

Of stealing, but not in the dwelling house .

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction , and Whipped in Goal .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090626-70

594. WILLIAM SMITH was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 22nd of May , twenty pound weight of netting, value 20 s. the property of Thomas Wells .

WALTER RUTHERFORD . I am a gardener. On the 22nd of May, in the pleasure ground of Mrs. Fisher; behind the shrubs I found a bag. I opened it; it contained a quantity of netting; supposing it to be stolen I set a man to watch it, to see who came to fetch it away. The man went at five, and watched till seven in the evening; at seven o'clock I went to see whether the man was where I wished him to be. During the time I was there, the prisoner came and tried to reach the bag over the pales with a hook stick; not being able to draw it, he got over the paling and picked up the bag; I asked him what he did there, he said he had come for that bag, he thought he could make a shilling of it; I told him he must go with me; he begged that I would look over it, and let him go, he was very sorry for what he had done, it was the first offence; he was a poor man, and had been out of work all the winter. When he was before the magistrate, he said the net belonged to Mr. Wells, and hoped they would be merciful to him. We tracked him from our paling, across the grass, to Mr. Wells's shed.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I saw the bag lay there, I went to see what was in it.

GUILTY, aged 27.

Judgment respited .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090626-71

595. THOMAS CANNON was indicted for feloniously stealing on 20th of June , a silk handkerchief, value 8 s. the property of David Morley .

SUSANNAH MORLEY . My husband's name is David Morley ; we live at No. 1, Turnham-place, Curtain Road, Shoreditch ; we keep a chandler's shop, and sell linen drapery articles . On the 20th of June, a quarter after nine o'clock, the prisoner came into my shop, he said you have a handkerchief there, how much is it, I said eight shillings; I took it out of the window and shewed it him; he took it out of my hand, and ran away with it; I ran after him and called out stop thief. He was stopped with the handkerchief in his hand, by Mr. Dowset.

JOHN DOWSET . I am a bricklayer and plasterer. On the 20th of June, I heard the cry of stop thief; I was in a street, opposite of the prosecutrix's, where I live. I turned round to the voice, I saw the prisoner running towards me. I laid hold of him, he threw down the handkerchief; I kept hold of him and took up the handkerchief, and took him back to the prosecutrix's house.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I went into the shop with intent to buy the handkerchief; the woman let me have it to look at it; directly I went to the door to look at it, she holloaed out stop thief.

The prisoner called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY, aged 16.

Judgment respited .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090626-72

596. MARGERET Mc'GUIRE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 9th of June , two chairs, value 6 s. the property of William Harvey .

JANE HARVEY . I am the niece of William Harvey . On the 9th of June, between ten and eleven o'clock in the morning, I was in the little room adjoining the shop; I heard a noise in the shop, I turned my head, and saw the prisoner going out of the shop with two chairs; I went after her, and brought her back and the chairs; then we applied to Mr. James, to take her to Hatton Garden office.

WALTER JAMES . I am a constable of St. Andrews, Holborn. On the 9th of June, between ten and eleven o'clock in the morning, I was sent for to Mr. Harvey's. I took the prisoner in custody.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I am innocent of taking the chairs; I went in to buy these chairs and a small table. I looked at them, and went towards the door; that young woman said I wanted to steal them; she called her uncle down. I was taken to the office and committed.

Jane Harvey . She said when she went three or four doors off with the chairs, that she never touched them at all.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Transported for Seven Years .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090626-73

597. ELIZABETH SANDERSON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 4th of June, a washing tub, value 4 s. and a tin pot, value 6 d. the property of Amos Pittard .

SARAH PITTARD . I am a married woman, my husband's name is Amos Pittard : he is a porter to Mr. Sahmuda, in Bury-street. We live at No. 2, Swan Gardens, Hoxton . I lost the tub and the tin pot out of the washhouse, on the 4th of June.

WILLIAM MORTON . I am inspector of the watch of Shoreditch parish. On the morning of the 4th of June, about a quarter before four, I was going my last round, I met this woman with the tub upon her head; I asked her where she got it from; she said she had been to fetch it home from where she had lent it. She was going to take it to Armstrong's-rents, where she lived. I asked her where she brought it from, she said from 42, in Hoxton; she could not tell the street; not believing her, I took her and the tub to the watchhouse. She had a tin pot also.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. That gentleman has taken a false oath; he says that I had the washing tub on my head, he told me to take it off. I went about two streets, and then he came and took me.

GUILTY , aged 44.

Fined 1 s. Confined Six Months in the House of Correction, and there kept to Hard Labour .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090626-74

598. SOLOMON HARRIS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 21st of June , three brass kettles, value 15 s. the property of William Augustus Cotton .

WILLIAM AUGUSTUS COTTON . I am a tin plate worker , I live in Norton Faldgate High-street . I did not see the prisoner take the goods.

THOMAS HOARE . I am a turner, I live opposite Mr. Cotton. On the 21st of June, about two o'clock in the afternoon, I saw the other one that was with the prisoner take the kettles from Mr. Cotton's door; he gave them to the prisoner, and the prisoner ran away with them; I followed the prisoner, he dropped them in Spital square; I did not see the prisoner stopped. I am sure he is the man that dropped the kettles, and he is the person to whom the other one gave the kettles to.

ANDREW PRIDEAUX . On Wednesday the 21st of June, about two o'clock, I was coming along Spital-square. I heard the sound of some kettles drop, I did not see them. The prisoner and his accomplice turned the corner opposite of me, he was pursued by the cry of stop thief; the prisoner desired me not to stop him. I pursued him through Spital-square, into Elder-street; I went to catch hold of his accomplice, he said I am not the man, and cried stop thief; the prisoner was foremost; he was going to turn the corner of Flower-de-luce-court, a man was close to him, I desired him to stop him; he did, and delivered him into my custody; I brought him back to Mr. Cotton's; the other made his escape.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I was walking up Bishopgate-street, I met this boy with the kettles in his arms; he put the kettles into my arms; I would not take them, so he dropped them in the square; they began to holloa out stop thief; he holloaed out stop thief; I was running; a gentleman stopped me.

GUILTY, aged 15.

Judgment respited .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090626-75

599. WILLIAM COLLEAU was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 13th of June , a jacket, value 7 s. a knife, value 6 d. and handkerchief, value 2 d. the property of Thomas Wilding .

THOMAS WILDING . I work for Mr. Scott and Crowder, in the brick-fields. On the 13th of June I was laying out some ground for building, between the Whitmores Head and the Rosemary Branch ; I laid my line from stake to stake, pulled off my jacket, and laid it close to the line, and when I had done cutting that line out my clothes were gone.

MARY WILDING . I am the wife of Thomas Wilding . My husband missed his jacket; I went into a pawnbroker's in Old-street, I asked them whether any body had been to pawn a jacket; he said is that the jacket; I said yes, I will swear to it; the prisoner turned off; I went to him and said he should not go, by God, until I got an officer; however he broke my hold and got from me; every man that tried to stop him, he knocked them one way or the other; a lamplighter stopped him and brought him back to the pawnbrokers; I am very confident he is the man that I saw at the pawnbroker's shop.

JOSEPH - . I am a pawnbroker. On the 13th June, about ten minutes past four, the prisoner came into my shop and offered to pledge a velveteen jacket, he asked seven shillings upon it; I agreed to lend him the money, and began to write the duplicate, in came the prosecutrix, she asked me whether I had taken in a velveteen jacket; I told her that I had now taken one in.

Q. Is that the man - A. Yes.

The property produced and identified.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence; called five

witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 37.

Confined Fourteen Days in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090626-76

600. JANE ELIZABETH STRETCH was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 10th of June , thirteen pounds weight of bacon, value 3 s. the property of John Hawley .

JOHN HAWLEY . I am a cheesemonger , I live at Ratcliffe . On Saturday evening, the 10th of June, the prisoner came in my shop and bought some sausages, changed a shilling, and went out, my servant informed me that she had stolen some bacon; I followed her into the Pewter Platter public house, I found the bacon upon her; I found a knuckle of ham in the bar which she had left there; she owned that to be my property; she came back again and stole the bacon.

MARY BROWN . I am a servant to Mr. Hawley. On the 10th of June the prisoner came in my master's shop, looked at the bacon, and laid it down; then she took it up again and went towards the counter, as if she was going to ask the price of it; she slipped it under her apron, then she bought some sausages; she had change for a shilling, and went out; he went after her.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. It was distress. I had nothing but a few potatoes all the week.

GUILTY , aged 29.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction, and there kept to Hard Labour , and fined 1 s.

London jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090626-77

601. JOHN WILSON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 10th of June , two metal candlesticks, value 2 s. the property of James Torsbell .

JAMES TORSBELL . I am a victualler . I keep the sign of Mother Red Cap, going up Highgate-hill . On the 10th of June, about three o'clock in the afternoon, the prisoner went into the parlour, he called for a glass of ale, my daughter served him with it; he had a second glass of ale, and stopped as long as he thought proper; the girl, as he was going out, went into the parlour and found the candlesticks missing; I followed him up the hill, and said to him, I presume you have something about you that is not your own; he looked very stedfastly, and said, sir; I have? I took hold of him by the collar and said, you must go back with me. I took him back, and took him into the same room from whence he took the property; I said, deliver what you have, or else I shall be under the necessity of searching you; he took one candlestick out of his coat pocket, and another out of his hat, and gave them me. I took him to Hatton Garden. He said it was distress that made him do it; that could not be the case; the officer searched him and found five shillings and sixpence in his pocket.

The property produced and identified.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence; called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 39.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction, and there kept to Hard Labour , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090626-78

602. WILLIAM REMMINGTON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 25th of May , six pounds weight of lead, value 1 s. 3 d. the property of Joseph Thompson , William Munsey , and Edward Muncton , affixed to a certain building of theirs .

JOHN HALL . I am master of Mile-end, New-town workhouse ; the prisoner was a pauper in the house .

Q. Is not he capable of getting his bread - A. No. He was sent to us as a person incapable of getting his bread; he has lost the pallet of his mouth. Being a bricklayer I sent him on the top of the house to do some repairs; I was at the door of the workhouse, I saw him turn down an alley which is at one end of the workhouse, and perceived a bundle under his coat; I sent one of my people to order him back again, in order that I might see what he had got; she returned and said she had missed him. When he returned I asked him where he had been; he told me next door; that I knew to be false; I asked him if he had taken any thing; he said nothing. There was one of my people that I saw him more intimate with than others; I suspected that he knew something of what he had been about; he came to me and said I understand you are angry with me; I said I am; you know what he was about; he said he did not, I had better go up on the top of the house, there was something in the blue pigeon way.

Q. What did you understand by the blue pigeon - A. Something of lead. I charged the prisoner with stealing the lead off the top of the back of the workhouse; he denied it. I threatened to take him to the watchhouse; then he took me into his room, unlocked his box, and shewed me the lead, which I have here. That lead I took out of his box.

Q. Where had he taken that lead from before it was in his box - A. I cannot say.

Q. Did you not match it - A. No. When I took it out of the box, I said Remmington, this is not all, what have you done with the rest; he said he had sold it in Brick-lane; I said come along and shew me; we went to an iron shop in Brick-lane; I asked the man if he knew the prisoner, he said, yes; he had bought a little old lead of him; I then said, can I see it; he said it laid behind the counter; he removed a sack from off it, he said that was the lead that he bought of the prisoner; he asked me if it was my property; I said no, it belonged to a house that I had the care of. The iron shopman then begged me to hush it up, I told him I could make no promise of that kind; I had seen the lead, that was all I wanted to see. I then came home and acquainted the churchwardens, they ordered him to be taken in charge; he was taken before the magistrate the officers told me I had done wrong. When they went with a search warrant to the iron shop the man and the lead were both out of the way.

Q. Are Joseph Thompson , William Munsey , and Edward Munckton , churchwarden s - A. Yes.

SAMUEL SHORE . I am a weaver. I saw the prisoner go up several times to the top of house; I had suspicion of his cutting the lead; I made it known to one of Mr. Hall's men, that was in the garden; he made it known to Mr. Hall, and when Mr. Hall went up to the top of the house; he found it was so.

Q. to Hall. Did you find that there was lead taken off the top of the house - A. Yes, from the gutter; I saw it had been recently cut off.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence; called one

witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 35.

Fined 1 s. Confined Six Months in the House of Correction, and there kept to Hard Labour .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090626-79

603. ELIZABETH SAGE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 26th of June , a pair of stockings, value 3 s. 6 d. the property of John Nicholson .

WILLIAM EDWARDS . I am shopman to John Nicholson , hosier , 137, Fleet-street . On Monday the 26th of June, about half past eight in the evening, the prisoner came in the shop, and requested me to show her some men's broad ribbed cotton stockings; I reached about five or six pair of of the window, which I shewed her; a gentleman came in for a pair of dressed gloves, I left the prisoner to attend the gentleman; after the gentleman was gone, I went to the prisoner. I thought there was a deficiency in the number, though I did not know positively the number, whether it was five or six. She requested me to put up one pair in a piece of paper, as she was going to call at a shoe maker's shop, she would call for them as she came back; I told her that we were about to close the shop, and she had better take them with her; she said she should not be long, and if she did not call for them in the evening, she would send a little girl for them in the morning. I I went round to the window to replace the stockings, she dropped her pocket handkerchief on the ground; it appeared very large; she took it up and put it into her pocket; she went out of the shop; the porter came in just at the time. I went out immediately after the prisoner; instead of her going into a shoe maker's shop, she went into a public house in a court in Shoe-lane; when the prisoner came out of the public house, she asked me whether I suspected her guilty of stealing stockings; I hesitated, and said her conduct seemed strange; she left me, I followed her into New-street-square; I then told her I should be glad if she would go back with me to the shop; we went immediately back to the shop. I told her I suspected her of stealing stockings; she pulled a handkerchief out of her pocket, then another handkerchief, and then she took the stockings out.

Q. Did you know them to be your master's - A. I could not swear to them, there was no private mark; they corresponded with the pattern of the stockings that I had shewn her, and she offered to pay for them.

Q. Can you say with certainty, that there was a pair of stockings missing - A, I cannot say that there was a pair of stockings missing.

NOT GUILTY .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090626-80

604. JOHN SHEE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 9th of June , a pair of boots, value 1 l. 10 s. the property of William Heath .

WILLIAM HEATH . I am a boot and shoe maker , 158, in the Minories . On the 9th of last month, between six and seven o'clock in the evening, I was informed that the prisoner had taken a pair of boots away, that hung outside of my shop window. I pursued the prier, and came up to him in Little George-street, in the Minories; he was walking pretty sharp; the man informed me that he put the boots under his smock frock. I seized a boot from under his smock frock; he then drew up, as if he was going to strike me, but ran off; and he either threw another boot from him or dropped it. Several people laid hold of him, but he got from them. I saw him turn round the corner, into Mitre-court. I was anxious to go home; I picked up the boot and went to the shop; I saw the prisoner the next morning at the Mansion-house. I believe he is the person; the boots are worth thirty-shillings.

FRANCIS KINNERSLEY . I am constable. I apprehended the prisoner just going in Leadenhall-street.

Q. Do you know Mitre-court - A. Yes; I pursued him just to the corner of Mitre-court. I saw Mr. Heath tustling with him in Little George-street; Mr. Heath had taken one boot from him; he got from Mr. Heath, and ran across the way; I pursued him, and never lost sight of him. I then saw him drop or throw one boot away from him in the street. When I laid hold of him, he said nothing; he was quite in confusion; bringing him to the watchhouse, an elderly gentleman said, I saw him cut the boots down with a knife. I searched him at the watchhouse, and found this knife.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming from my work, they took me, for what reason I do not know.

GUILTY , aged 28.

Publickly Whipped and Discharged.

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090626-81

605. JOSEPH GANSEY was indicted for that he on the 30th of April , feloniously did break open a certain building, called a shop, belonging to Stephen Cullom , with intent the goods therein being, feloniously to steal, and carry away .

THOMAS PEPPERCORN . I am a beadle of the parish of St. Faith. I am a butcher in Newgate market. On Sunday the 30th of April, about seven o'clock in the evening, I saw the prisoner at Stephen Cullom 's butter shop; he took down a shutter; the shop is enclosed by shutters only. I followed him, and found him try the lock of Mrs. Taylor's, another butter shop.

Q. Did he perceive you, so as to leave this shop of Mr. Cullom's - A. He never saw me.

Q. Did he take down the shutter entirely - A. Yes, he never attempted to get in; he went to Mr. Jones's, there he attempted to pick the locks, they were all in Newgate market, and butter shops; having seen him at these three, I thought it my duty to take him in custody. I was forced to have a great deal of assistance, he drew a knife upon me. I never saw him before.

Q. At the time that you took him, had you any reason to suppose that the man had not his senses about him - A. I had not the least reason at all; I have taken him backwards and forwards four times. I had no reason to suspect that he was out of his senses.

MR. HODSON. You are a medical professor - you attend the Compter - A. Yes; I saw this man on Tuesday morning, I saw him again with Peppercorn; I thought he was in a state of insanity, but I wished for another day to be more satisfied of his conduct; I had that opportunity. I reported to Mr. Alderman Smith, that he was under the influence of insanity. I asked Mr. Tegg, the keeper of the Compter; he informed me this man had been there on former occasions, as an insane man. I had him remanded for one day, because I would make up my mind.

Jury. We are of opinion, that he was insane at the

time he committed the offence.

[ To be detained, and to be taken proper care off .]

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090626-82

606. CHARLOTTE ROBERTS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 28th of May , a watch, value 30 s. a seal, value 2 d. a watch key, value 1 d. one guinea, and two shillings , the property of Richard Lonsdale .

RICHARD LONSDALE . I am groom to Mr. Solman. On Sunday the 28th of May, I met the prisoner in the broad part of Holborn, about eleven o'clock at night; she ran after me, took hold of my arm, and asked me if I would go home with her; she had a nice room to accommodate me; through her persuasions I went with her, to No, 4, Charles-street, Drury-lane ; as soon as I saw what accommodation there was, I wanted to be out again; she persuaded me to stop. I gave her seven shillings to stop with her.

Q. How long did you stay with her - A. I staid in the room all night; she left the room in about three quarters of an hour; she went out and locked the door, she said she should be back directly, she was going in the yard; I said very well, make haste back.

Q. Were you sober - A. Yes, quite sober.

Q. What reason have you to suppose that your watch was safe when you first saw that woman - A. When I first went into the room, I felt the watch and chain in my pocket; I put my hand into my pocket to give her the seven shilling piece, I pulled out the guinea with the seven shilling piece; I gave her the seven shilling piece, and put the guinea safe into my pocket again.

Q. At the time that she left you, had you undressed yourself - A. No, nothing but my breeches were off.

Q. At the time that she left the room, had you any suspicion that your watch and the guinea was gone - A. No, not till she double locked the door; I then looked in my breeches; the watch and guinea was gone. It was a metal hunting watch.

Q. Did you try to get out - A Not then; I thought she might come back again. I staid till four o'clock, and then I drew the staple off the door, and went out to my stable, and did my horses up. I made no alarm that morning, I thought it was better to come and catch her in the room.

Q. Are you quite sure that this is the woman that you was with then - A. Yes; on two o'clock the same day, I went in company of a young man, of the name of Templeman, to this room; she was lying upon the bed; I charged her with having stolen my watch; she denied it. I told her she had better give it me, or else I would fetch an officer; she said she did not care for the officer nor me, Templeman went for an officer; and while I staid with her, she got a poker, and said she would strike me on the head; she did strike, but I kept the blow off with my hand; then the landlord came up, and asked me what was the matter; I told him this woman had robbed me of my watch; he took the poker from her, and directly she took a pewter pot and attempted to strike me; the landlord made her put it down. Before the officer came, the landlord said that if I would call again the next day at twelve o'clock, and leave him five shillings, he would take care and find the watch, and restore it to me.

Q. Then you were not to prosecute her - A. Not by that, but still as I had been robbed, I wished to have the law as far as I could. I went down stairs to see if I could see Templeman, I met him with an officer; he went up stairs, and then the landlord produced the watch; he said he found it in her cupboard, under a dish.

Q. Had you looked in that cupboard while she was out - A. Yes, I searched the room, and the cupboard, and turned every thing up that was in it. The watch is in the landlord's custody now.

JOSIAH YARDLEY . I sold the watch to the young man, I know the watch perfectly.

JOHN HORTON . I live at No. 40, Charles-street, Drury-lane, the prisoner lodged in my house.

Q. How many more of that description - A. There were two woman, they were both married woman, they said when they came to me; this woman's husband worked in Woolwich Dock-yard. I found the watch in the next room to this woman's room, in Mrs. Clark's room.

Q. You were present when this young man came and laid hold of this young woman, were you not - A. I was present at two o'clock the next day; he asked me if I was the landlord of the house, I said yes; instead of his going into the room that he asked for, he went into the other room where this woman was; they began a bustle; he said he had been robbed, and he had slept with the woman. I searched the woman I found nothing; I opened the next room door, there were two children in it, one of the children told me that her mother put it in the cupboard. This is the watch I found in the cupboard.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. It was not me at all.

GUILTY , aged 23.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090626-83

607. CHARLES EWERS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 24th of June , four sheets, value 1 l. three blankets, value 15 s. a liquor machine, value 4 l. twenty brass cocks, value 20 s. and three blankets, value 2 s. the property of James Coleman .

JAMES COLEMAN . I live at the Cock and Bell, Whitecross-street . I am the landlord of the house .

Q. Did you lose any sheets, any blankets, a liquor machine, brass cocks, and three handkerchiefs - A. Yes, I missed them in the morning, about a quarter after six.

Q. Did you find any property on this man - A. My son found three handkerchiefs on him.

MRS. COLEMAN. I am the wife of the last witness. We thought of leaving the Cock and Bell; I moved some of the things into Gloucester-court; that is the house that was broken open.

Q. Among the things that you had moved to the house in Glocester-court, were the things that you charge this man with having stolen in Gloucester-court - A. Yes, I had lodgers there.

Q. This man was no lodger, was he - A. No.

Q. When did you see these things in the house in Gloucester-court - A. About eleven o'clock; after we had shut up the public house on the 23rd, I went to this other house and looked over the things, I found they were all right then; and coming home I met Townshend, Moggy Williams, and Mrs. Williams; they were lodgers in Gloucester-court, I saw them in the street,

they were making their way home.

Q. When had you any information - A. A quarter after six in the morning Mrs. Townsend, and Mrs. Williams came and knocked at my door, and said Coleman, are you moving, no I said, we have nothing to move; she said your house is broken open, but I do not think any thing is gone. I went immediately to the house.

Q. On your going there were four sheets gone - A. Yes; three blankets, a liquor machine, more than twenty brass cocks, and more than three handkerchiefs were taken away; and a vast quantity of other things. The liquor machine cost ten pound.

Q. Do you know this man - A. He used to come in and out with Mrs. Townsend and Mrs. Williams, they were lodgers in the one pair; he used to come every evening and have a pint of beer.

Q. After the prisoner was taken up, did you see any of these things that you had lost - A. Nothing but the three handkerchiefs; when the officer produced them I knew them to be mine.

EDWARD TRING . I am constable of St. Luke's. On the 24th of June, about half past eight o'clock in the morning, I apprehended the prisoner, at a public house in Grub-street; I do not know the sign. I told him I took him for robbing Mr. Coleman, at his house in Gloucester-court; he said he had not; I searched him at the public house, and found upon him, three handkerchiefs; one in his pocket, and two in his hat; they were claimed by young Coleman. Mrs. Coleman claimed them afterwards.

JOHN NEWLAND . I am son-in-law to James Coleman .

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. I know him by coming frequently into my father's house.

Q. Do you know whether he was a companion with the lodgers in Gloucester-court - A. He was very often with them.

Q. Did you go to Gloucester-court in the morning of the 4th of June - A. Yes; I found the house had been broken open.

Q. What lodgers did you see in it - A. Moggy Williams, Mrs. Williams, and Townsend.

Q. Did you desire the constable to look after this man - A. Yes, I went with him, I apprehended him; and then I called him in. I charged him with robbing my father, and breaking open the house; he said he had not done it; he was searched, and these handkerchiefs were found on him; two in his hat, and one in his pocket.

The property produced and identified.

Q. to Mrs. Coleman. Are these three handkerchiefs worth two shillings - A. Yes.

Prisoner's Defence. Last Saturday morning was a week, as I was walking up Beech-street, I picked them up off the steps of a wine vaults door; I was going to Wheeler-street, Spitalfields, to fetch a pair of shoes that had been to be mended, my shoes were not done; on my return, coming down Chiswell-street, I met a young man, a ostler, I went into a public house to have a pint of beer, that man came and took charge of me; the neck handkerchief I put in my pocket, and the pocket handkerchiefs in my hat.

GUILTY, aged 29.

Judgment respited .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090626-84

608. WILLIAM ROGERS was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 24th of May , eleven ounces of tobacco, value 2 s. the property of Robert Lain .

CHARLES CORNELIUS . I work at Mr. Lain's, tobacco manufactory, No. 56, Princes-street, St. James's . The prisoner was a man that was employed that day.

GEORGE WORCESTER . I am employed in the manufactory. I employed the prisoner that day; I saw the prisoner put the tobacco in his breeches; when he was going to dinner; I searched his breeches, and made him pull it out; then I detained him till the constable came.

JAMES STONE . I am an officer; me and my brother officer was fetched; we searched between his breeches and his shirt, we took out another parcel of tobacco.

Q. to Cornelius. Look at that tobacco - do you know it - A. I believe it to be Mr. Lain's.

Prisoner's Defence. I met the gentleman in the street, he asked me whether I wanted a job, I said I did not mind if I had a job; he asked me whether I used any tobacco, I said no, without I am drinking a pint of beer, then I smoke a pipe of tobacco; he said he had no objection of my taking a pipe of tobacco.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY, aged 36.

Judgement respited .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090626-85

609. JOHN HULLOCK was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 26th of June , one hundred and twenty halfpence, value 5 s. the property of Thomas Newsom , and Thomas Chandler .

THOMAS NEWSOM . I am a grocer , No. 3, Norton Falgate ; my partner's name is Thomas Chandler . On Monday the 26th of June, between three and four in the afternoon the prisoner came into our shop, he asked for some pearlash, for which the person that was serving him had to go down stairs; knowing him as a bad character, I watched him; as soon as the person had gone down stairs for the article he asked for, he looked across the counter to see if any body was noticing him; he stood with his back towards the street, put his hand over the counter and took up a five shilling paper of halfpence that was tied up; he was not dressed as he is now; he had not that long coat on, his jacket was lose; he put them in his waistcoat pocket. I then came from where I was, at the back part of the shop, and pulled him a yard from the counter. I said to him, I was glad we had got him at last; he took the halfpence out of his pocket and gave them into my hands. I directed another young man in my shop to go out, in order to prevent his making his escape; he saw him take it likewise, he went out for that purpose.

JAMES GUST . I am shopman to these gentlemen.

Q. When he was in the shop you went out - A. Yes, I saw him take the five shilling paper off the counter, and put them into his waistcoat pocket. I saw Mr. Newsom pull him away from the counter, and take the five shilling paper out of his hand.

PETER MASON . I am an officer. I produce the five shilling paper of halfpence.

Prosecutor. I know the paper, it is my tieing up.

Prisoner's Defence. I went in between eight and nine o'clock in the morning; I got some tea, sugar, and some soap; I went home and got my breakfast; I went into Whitechapel; I got a bit of meat to make a drop

of broth; I went to Mr. Tilby and changed half a guinea, I left two shillings with my landlady; he gave me five shillings in copper. I told the prosecutor to ask the gentlemen whether he did not change me a half guinea; I went into that shop, I called for a quarter of a pound of Scotch barley; my wife was going to washing, she told me to bring some pearlash; the other shopman went to get the pearlash for me; that gentleman ran up stairs; he came down and said he had got me. I put the five shilling paper of halfpence on the counter; he took it up and marked it. I was going to pay for what I called for out of the five shilling paper. There were a good many five shilling papers on the counter; I do not say but what the gentleman might think it was his, but I took it out of my pocket.

GUILTY , aged 36.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090626-86

610. CHARLOTTE OSBORNE was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 23rd of May , two sheets, value 10 s. the property of Joseph Wheeler .

SARAH WHEELER . My husbands's name is Joseph Wheeler , we keep a public house in George-yard, Whitechapel . On the 22nd of May last, I lost a pair of sheets and a white gown from off the bed; I went to make enquiry at the pawnbrokers, and as I was going to Mr. Burton's the pawnbroker, I met this woman coming out. This was on the 22nd. The prisoner lived in my neighbourhood, and used my house; I said to her have you been pawning, she said yes.

Q. You did not suspect her, did you - A. No; I went home. My daughter went up stairs and come down to me, and said mother, the sheets are gone off the other bed.

Q. Did you go up and see that the sheets were gone - A. Yes. It then struck me that this woman had taken them, she was drinking a pot of beer in the house at the said time, I asked her what she had been pawning at the time I saw her coming out of Mr. Burton's shop; she said it was a shirt belonging to Mr. Dyson; that is a man that lives in the neighbourhood. I sent to Mr. Dyson to know if he had sent her on such an errant; he said no. Then she said it was for Hannah Coleman ; she said she had not seen her that day. Then I sent for an officer. I went down with him and asked the shopman what she had pawned when she was there. The sheets were there with my own marks upon them; she had pawned them for five shillings; I lost a pair of sheets on the 22nd, and a pair on the 23rd.

Q. How came you not to go to Mr. Burton's on the 22nd - A. I did; I had not missed the other pair then, not till I returned from the pawnbroker's.

BENJAMIN MATTHEWS . I live with Mr. Burton, pawnbroker, in Whitechapel. On the 23rd of May the prisoner brought me them two sheets to pledge; she gave the name of Charlotte Cooper , but said that she brought them for Sarah Martin ; I am positive the prisoner is the woman.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. The sheets were given me by another woman to pawn; she has been out of the way ever since I have been committed; I am friendless and unprovided; I commit myself to your mercy.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Fined 1 s. Confined Six Months in the House of Correction, and there kept to Hard Labour .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090626-87

611. JOHN DISTON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 4th of June , seventeen pounds weight of leather, value 15 s. the property of Alexander Rinton and David Fraser .

ALEXANDER RINTON . I am an army accoutrement maker . The things were stolen from the manufactury in Great Poulteney-street ; my partner's name is David Fraser ; I have a partner whose name is not in the firm.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090626-88

612. LUKE HOLMES was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 29th of May , sixteen pounds weight of lead, value 4 s. the property of Margeret Beckford , spinster, affixed to her dwelling house .

SECOND COUNT, for ripping, with intent to cut the said lead the property of Matthew Wyatt , belonging to a building of his.

JOHN PERCIVAL . I am servant to Mrs. Margaret Beckford , she live in Henrietta-street, Cavendish-square, No. 19 . I was down in the kitchen when the watchman sprang his rattle, I came up, I was informed the watchman had taken a man to the watchhouse; I looked to see what he had been doing of, and he had almost broken off the leaden pipe of the house. It hung by this piece.

Q. Was it cut - A. No. I broke it off; the pipe was hanging when I saw it.

PATRICK CALAGHAN . I am a watchman. On the 29th of May, I was crying half past nine in the evening, I saw two men lurking at No. 19, in Henrietta-street, I made over to them; one was outside the railing, and the other withinside, close up against the house; the prisoner was the man that was inside the railing, I saw him busy at the wall; as soon as the man outside espied me, he made off. I thought I could make sure of one. The prisoner had hold of the lead.

Q. Did you take him - A. Yes. When I came within three or four yards, he came out from under the rail, I seized hold of him by the collar with my left hand, and sprung my rattle; I took him to the watch-house, one of my fellow watchmen followed so close that he could not get away. The lead has been twisted off, not cut.

NOT GUILTY .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090626-89

613. WILLIAM HANSON, alias, TUFFNELL , was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 10th of June , two candlesticks, value 8 s. a copper saucepan, value 7 s. and a tin pot, value 1 s. the property of Owen Withers Humphreys .

OWEN WITHERS HUMPHREYS . Q. You keep a public house in Gate-street, Lincoln's-inn-fields - A. I do. The prisoner lodged with me; he went home to his own house at Old Ford, near Bow every Saturday night; he is a labourer at Day and Martin's blacking manufactory. On Sunday the 11th of June Adkins and I searched his house; I found a copper saucepan, two candlesticks, and a warming pot; they were my property.

Q. Had you ever authorised the prisoner to take

these things - A. No; I have enquired after these candlesticks in his hearing, and many other things.

The property produced and identified.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence; called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY, aged 17.

Judgment respited .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090626-90

614. JOSEPH HANSON, alias, TUFFNELL , was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 11th of June , a looking glass, value 5 s. a glass goblet, value 1 s. 6 d. and a clothes brush, value 1 s. the property of Owen Withers Humphreys .

OWEN WITHERS HUMPHREYS . Q. Did this lad at the bar lodge at your house - A. Yes. He worked at Day and Martin's manufactory I missed a number of things, in my house. On the Sunday morning, I said I would search his box, he said I was welcome to search his box, he had nothing but what was his own. He ran up first, he opened his box and took out articles of linen, and said is this yours, and when he came to the bottom of the box there happened to be a drinking glass, a looking glass, and the clothes brush; they belonged to me; the looking glass was in his own room, but the last time I saw the clothes brush was in the bar. He never asked me for the clothes brush; the drinking glass I did not miss, I had so many.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I lost a whole suit of clothes of my own out of the house; I put the things in my box for my own use, to take care of them, that they might not be lost.

The prisoner called one witness, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY, aged 17.

Judgment respited .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090626-91

615. THOMAS JONES was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 27th of June , two pigs, value 9 l. the property of William Dewer .

WILLIAM DEWER . I am a butcher , I live in Chandois-street, Covent-garden.

Q. When did you lose these pigs - A. On the 27th of June, from the stable-yard, Lemon Tree-yard, Bedfordbury . The prisoner was in the habit of coming backwards and forwards to my yard.

JOHN ROWLEY . I am a rat destroyer and vermin-killer, I live in Mill bank, Westminster. On the 27th of June Jones, the prisoner, brought me two fat hogs, he asked me if I would be so good as to put them in my place; he said they belonged to some gentleman; I thought they did. Sometimes gentlemen give me a dog to keep.

Q. A hog is not a dog, you know - A. I asked him who the gentleman was; he said he had lost the direction, I gave him leave. I never had any before in my life. I immediately gave the hogs some clean water and some corn; he told me he would come again presently. After that he came again, he brought two large knives, and a thing that they scratch the hair off, he asked me to let him kill the pigs; I told him I was afraid these pigs were stolen; he offered me a guinea if I would let him kill them in the place; I told him I would not let him do it. I went to Gillmore, I told him I had two hogs, I suspected they were stolen.

JAMES GILLMORE . I am an officer belonging to Queen-square. On Tuesday, the 27th of June, Rowley came to me and related to me what he has related to your lordship, that he had two pigs, he suspected they were stolen; in consequence of which my brother officer and me went up to the place and saw the two pigs. As soon as we saw the pigs we saw the prosecutor in search of them, he said they had been stolen from his premises that morning. Rowley gave the description of the prisoner; he lived in Church-lane, Dyot-street, just by Rats Castle. In the evening we apprehended him. When I got him in a coach bringing him to Tothill-fields, I told him I apprehended him in consequence of two pigs he had taken to Rowley that morning; he then said he did not know Rowley, nor Mill-bank neither; he had not taken any pigs from any one; he would make me pay for his loss of time in taking him up; he had not seen any pigs of any body's.

Q. What is he - A. He is a man that goes about with a boar. The next morning Rowley brought me these things, which were brought to his house; I asked him if he knew these things; he said yes; and he recollected Rowley; then he said these things were his the two knives, the skuttle, steel, and three or four hooks; the prosecutor saw the pigs and identied them to be his property. They were the same pigs that I took away from Rowley.

Prosecutor. They were my pigs; I am sure of it.

Prisoner's Defence. Between the hours of six and seven o'clock I was going to a gentleman's house in Sun-yard, a man at Charing-cross met me, Appleby was coming past, he said, Jones, I wish you would drive these two pigs for me: he gave me the whip, told me to drive them to Mill-bank, Westminster, he would overtake me; he did, by Pit-street, he told me to go to Rowley's with these pigs, and to tell him I was come from Appleby; Rowley asked me three times over did Appleby send me with these pigs. When Appleby came he went and had some gin with him; he told him he would bring the tubs; he did; he said to the publican can you let me heat your copper; he said I cannot. Rowley said if you want a good joint of pork we can let you have it. I went to the Two Brewers with my hog; when I came back I went to Rowley's, I took my two knives, the scuttle, and two gambles; I said to Rowley, where is the man, he said he is gone; I said if the man is gone I shall not haul these pigs about myself, I am not able, and he may get somebody else, or I will come in the morning. Mr. Rowley saw him last.

Rowley. He had nobody with them but himself.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090626-92

616. THOMAS JOHNSON and ELIZABETH DAVIS were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 20th of May , three yards and three quarters of a yard of printed cotton, value 4 s. the property of Joseph Craig .

JAMES HASLOP . I am porter to Mr. Craig, he is a linen-draper , 316, Holborn . On Saturday evening, May the 20th, I saw the remnant of print hanging inside of the shop, at the window, but the glass had been taken out; it was hanging there about half an hour

before the prisoner took it.

Q. During that half hour, where were you - A. I was in the shop. The prisoner was brought in by Adkins, the officer.

HARRY ADKINS . I am an officer of Bow-street. On May the 20th, a little before nine o'clock at night, Crocker, another patrol, and me were on duty; going up Middle-row, Holborn, we met the two prisoners in company together, in the narrow way, they passed us; we watched them to Mr. Craig's shop; Davis stopped at the window, looked at a remnant, and pulled it off the rail inside of the window; she then walked away from the window; there were several people standing close to her; she joined the prisoner Johnson, they were about a minute in conversation; and Johnson came up to the window, he took hold of the piece of printed cotton.

Q. Then she only pulled it down from the rail - A. Only pulled it down from the rail, and left it on the window frame; he took hold of the printed cotton, but a person coming up he was prevented from taking it. He then went to the place where he had been standing before; the prisoner Davis crossed the street to near where I was, in order to see whether any one was near the window in the inside of the shop, and then went to the window; stooped down and took up the printed cotton, put it in her apron, and walked away. I then crossed the street; I saw Johnson run down Southampton-buildings; I secured the prisoner Davis, and took her back to Mr. Craig's shop; she had the property in her apron; I am sure she is the person, I knew her before. Johnson was taken the next morning.

The property produced and identified.

Johnson's Defence. What that man has sworn is false, he is a perjured man. I know nothing of the prisoner. I was taken up on Whit Sunday, and accused of taking this. I am innocent of the crime. I never was down Holborn for nine days, I had the rheumatism so bad.

Davis's Defence. I know nothing of the prisoner; there was not a creature along with me on the morning of the day that I was going down Holborn; in the evening when they took me up, I received a letter of the death of my father. I had a child bad of the smallpox; I had a letter to go down in the country; I was going to the Bull and Mouth Inn. I had a petticoat of my mother's, which I could not match. I stopped at the shop to look at a pattern that was like it. I never went in the door, nor never had the cotton in my hand.

JOHNSON, GUILTY , aged 33.

DAVIS, GUILTY , aged 32.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090626-93

617. ANN CARTWRIGHT , MARY KITE , and JUDITH BARRATT were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 18th of June , a watch, value 2 l. the property of John Johnson .

JOHN JOHNSON . I am a chimney sweeper .

Q. How old are you - A. About twenty years old. On Saturday the 18th of June, about half after eleven o'clock, I was coming by the King's Head, St. Giles's , these three girls stopped me, and asked me to give them something to drink, I refused it, they insisted upon it; at last I was persuaded to go in and give them something to drink.

Q. Did you sit down in the room - A. No, it was just by the door; I stood by the side of them. I gave each of them a glass of gin, and I had one; they asked me what o'clock it was, I told them it wanted about a quarter to twelve; Cartwright asked me to let her look at it, I told her I would not; she put my thumb back and forced it out of my hand herself; I asked her for the watch, she would not give it me; she put it down her bosom, and said she had it not; I said if you do not give it me, I will charge the watch with you. This happened just inside the door; the door was bolted when we were inside, because they shut up a little after eleven. Kite and Barrett unbolted the door and ran away. I had hold of Cartwright's hand; when the watchman came, I took her to the watchhouse. When I went to Marlbourough-street, Kite and Barrett were there. I told the constable to put them in; one of them struck me and gave me a black eye; the other would have struck me, but the people prevented her. I knew them all three before. I am sure of their persons.

Q. Has not the watch been found - A. No; because these two other girls ran away directly. I gave two pound for the watch.

THOMAS BUTLER . I am a watchman, I was crying the hour of twelve o'clock; the prosecutor gave me charge of Cartwright for robbing him of his watch; the others were not there, when I came up the watchhouse keeper searched her; nothing was found on her.

Cartwright's Defence. I know no further of the women than living in the neighbourhood. I am an unfortunate woman. I told Johnson he had better go home, he said he would go home; he said if you do not go home, I will charge the watchman with you, for being out in disorderly hours; he caught hold of me, put his hand in my bosom. I was searched in a most clandestine manner, on account of that they could not find the property on me. He never asserted that any person was with me at office the first time, no person was drinking with me but him. I was outside of the door when he said I had got his watch; lord, says I, do not say that, the watchman will take me to the watchhouse. The justice asked him if there was any accomplice, he said no; I put the watch in my bosom. The moment he accused me of it, he gave charge of me to the watch directly.

Q. to Johnson. Did you say before the justice that there was no more than that woman - A. No, I said there was three in company.

Kite's Defence. I never saw that man to my knowledge in my life before. I saw him that Monday morning.

Barrett's Defence. I never saw the man till I saw him on the Monday morning.

CARTWRIGHT, GUILTY aged 32.

KITE, GUILTY , aged 23.

BARRETT, GUILTY , aged 24.

Fined 1 s. Confined Six Months in the House of Correction, and there kept to Hard Labour .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090626-94

618. RICHARD PATEFIELD was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 12th of June , two glass bottles, value 6 d. and three pints of wine, value 8 s. the property of John Beckett .

JOHN BECKET , I live in Mount-street, Grovesnor-square .

I am victualler .

Q. Was this man quartered at your house - A. He was.

Q. Did you lose two bottles of wine - A. I did, on Monday the 12th of June; being quartered with us, he assisted us, and we treated him as one of the family. In the evening he was there drinking; he went down to the privy, I supposed, he could have no other purpose of going down there, he was gone some time; we went down, he was not in the privy; we concluded he was gone. Some little time afterwards the cellar door opened; it goes with a pulley, it made a noise; my wife heard the jink of the bottles, she called to me; I was sitting in the parlour adjoining. I immediately jumped up with two others, and secured the prisoner with the two bottles of wine in the street,

Q. Had you any marks on your bottles or your corks - A. No, not then; I have marked them since. They were in a hamper of wine. I happened to send for half a dozen of sherry wine, it was in the cellar; I looked at the hamper, it was deficient three bottles; I cannot account for the other bottle; he acknowledged that he had robbed me of the other bottle three weeks before. I said when I caught him, Dick you are the last person that I should have thought would have robbed me; he said he hoped I would forgive him, he had never robbed me but once before; he and his comrade that has gone off with the expedition; he confessed it upon his knees: afterwards he ran away; he was taken by the people that are here.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence, called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 24.

Fined One Shilling and discharged.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090626-95

619. HENRY MARTIN STREDDER was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 16th of June , six crank winders for register stoves, value 3 s. 9 d. the property of William Bound ; and

RICHARD BREWER for feloniously receiving on the same day, the said goods, he well knowing them to have been stolen .

FRANCIS RENDALL . Q. I believe you are clerk to Mr. Bound - A. Yes, he is an iron founder and stove grate manufacturer ; Ray-street, Clerkenwell . Stredder has been in his employ for some time past; and Brewer made winders, and brought them to us, and sold them.

Q. In the month of May last, in consequence of finding a deficiency, did you mark the crank winders for register stoves - A. I did; I began to mark them on the 2nd of May. On the 17th of June I missed six. After Stredder was gone to dinner, I examined them; on the Friday and on the Saturday I missed them. I counted them every night after I marked them.

COURT. You had marked all you had in the manufactory, had you - A. Yes.

Q. In whose keeping were they - A. In Stredder's, they were kept in a drawer in the warehouse.

Q. Was that drawer near the spot where Stredder worked - A. Yes; he was mostly in sight of the drawer, except when he was sent out of an errand, which was not often.

Q. Was that drawer kept locked - A. No.

Mr. Gurney. Were there any other persons working in this room where the drawer was - A. No; Stredder was the time keeper, he was not a labourer; he had to keep the men's time, and to take care of many articles; and among other these crank winders; the workmen had no business there unless they come to Stredder. I examined on that day and missed six. In the course of that evening Brewer came, he brought three dozen and a half of crank winders; I examined them, they were brought as new goods; I paid him seven seven shillings and six-pence a dozen for them. On my examining of them, I found half a dozen of them with marks, which I myself had put. These are them, it is a little nick with a file.

COURT. Did this man used to be paid upon delivery - A. Always.

Q. Upon your discovering that these were half a dozen that you had marked, what did you say to him - A. I said nothing to him, I went for an officer; I left him with Mr. Bound, and when the officer came, Mr. Bound gave him in charge.

ROBERT FORD . Q. You are one of the clerks of Hatton Garden police office - A. I am.

Q. Were you present at the examination of the two prisoners - A. I was.

Q. Was what either of them said taken down in writing - A. We take no examination of the prisoner, only only of the witnesses.

Q. to Mr. Rendall. Did you also take Stredder to the office - A. They were both taken to the office, and after the examination, Stredder said that he had lent Brewer half a dozen winders for a particular customer.

Q. These winders had been all made by Brewer - had not they - A. Yes.

Q. Had Stredder any authority to lend them to Brewer - A. Not that I know off.

Q. Are you perfectly sure that these half dozen winders are the six that you yourself marked - A. Yes; and which had been in the drawer of Mr. Bound.

WILLIAM BOUND . Q. Have you any partner - A. None.

Q. Did you ever give Stredder leave to lend winders to Brewer - A. No, I forbid him to lend them to Brewer or to any other person; the reason was that Brewer two or three years back was in the habit of borrowing; when I had a partner he might have the liberty of my partner; he used to say they were returned; probably they were not returned; consequently I forbid to lend to Brewer for two years back.

Q. Did he make any application recently before this happened to lend to Brewer - A. He did not.

Q. to Rendall. At the time that Stredder said he had lent these half dozen to Brewer for a particular customer - did Brewer say any thing - A. The magistrate asked him why he brought them in again; he said he wanted to make up a bill, and that was the reason he brought them.

Stredder's Defence. My lord and gentlemen, I have been a servant to Mr. Bound about five years, as warehouseman , Richard Brewer was register winder maker for Mr. Bound many years, he generally used to borrow winders of Mr. Bound. Mr. Bound gave me orders to lend winders to Brewer, and never discharged me for so doing; and likewise Mr. Greensmith has lent Brewer winders, three and four dozen at a time, and has given me orders to lend them, and he has always returned them; I lent Brewer half a dozen winders

last Saturday was a fortnight, and he was to return them the next week; a brush I bought six weeks ago, of a man in the street; Mr. Bound's brushmaker says it is one of his make.

Q. to prosecutor. What is the name of your former partner - A. Isaac Greensmith .

Brewer's Defence. Mr. Bound has frequently lent me winders; I have worked for him twenty years. I never asked but he always granted my request. Mr. Bound says he refused me two years ago, he has only dissolved partnership since the 1st of January last, since then I have borrowed of him, I always returned them. I asked Stredder to lend me half a dozen; he lent them me; I told him I would return them the next week Mr. Bound cannot say that ever he heard the least slur upon my character.

Q. to prosecutor. Did you know of this transaction, or was any application made to you by Stredder or Brewer - A. None at all. The partnership has been dissolved since January last; in Mr. Greensmith's time I gave positive orders not to lend.

Prisoner. Mr. Bound, you have lent me within this six or seven months yourself - A. That is not so; I have forbid Brewer myself of having any lent.

Stredder called two witnesses, who gave him a good character.

Brewer called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

STREDDER, GUILTY , aged 42.

Transported for Seven Years .

BREWER, GUILTY , aged 58.

Transported for Fourteen Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090626-96

620. ROBERT SPAIN was indicted for that he on the 22nd of May was servant to James Horwood , and was employed and entrusted by him to receive money for him, and being such servant, so employed and entrusted, did receive and take into his possession, the sum of seven shillings and nine-pence, for and on account of his said master, and that he afterwards feloniously did embezzle, secrete, and steal the same .

The case was stated by Mr. Gurney.

JOHN WALLIS . Q. What are you - A. I am an upholsterer in Great Portland-street, Cavendish-square .

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. I do. About the 20th or 22nd of May, I paid him seven shillings and nine-pence, on account of Mr. Horwood; he presented that bill; I knew that he came from the workhouse, and I knew that I owed money to the workhouse; I supposed it was all right.

JAMES HORWOOD . Q. Are you a master of St. James's workhouse - A. I am.

Q. You are appointed to be governor of the poor - A. I am.

Q. And you employ the poor according to your discretion how are you renumerated - A. I have five per cent upon all they earn. The prisoner was a pauper in that workhouse, I employed him as a petty servant to look after the work, and to carry out bills, and receive the money; I always wrote the bills myself and sent him with them.

Q. Did you in May last deliver him that bill for the purpose of receiving seven shillings and nine-pence of Mr. Wallis - A. I did; on Saturday the 20th of May, I delivered him that bill along with others.

COURT. This bill you receipted it, he was to bring you the money or return the bill - A. Yes.

Q. Had you authorised him to make out any bill - A. No; I never suffer any one.

Q. Did you permit him to write, paid, and substitute his own name instead of your bill and receipt - A. No.

Q. Did he bring you back that bill among others on the Saturday - A. He did; that led me to believe the money was not received.

Mr. Gurney. Did he ever pay you the seven shillings and nine-pence, as the money he had received of Mr. Wallis - A. He never accompted for the seven shillings and nine pence he received of Mr. Wallis, I made some enquiries and he absconded.

Q. Do you know the prisoner's hand-writing - A. Yes; it is his hand-writing.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming home on the Saturday night and all the money I received I put in this coat pocket, and coming along Poland-street my pocket burst, and all the money I received fell out; I gathered up what money I could, but I could not gather up all; the people came around me; I was deficient; I made that bill thinking I could get the money.

GUILTY , aged 56.

Confined Six Months in the House of Correction, and there kept to Hard Labour , and fined 1 s.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090626-97

621. JOHN BEADNELL was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 3rd of June , one ounce and fifteen penny weights of silver cuttings, value 9 s. the property of Robert Gerrard .

SECOND COUNT, the property of James Crespall .

The case was stated by Mr. Gurney.

JASPER CRESPALL . Q. Are you in the employ of Robert Gerrard - A. Yes; and the prisoner was one of his journeymen .

Q. In consequence of any suspicion you had did you on the 3rd of June mark any silver that you delivered out to the prisoner - A. Yes, I did.

Q. What work was he to do - A. To finish a teapot; for that purpose I delivered him a piece of silver plate; I marked it with a diamond punch, in that part that was to be cut off; at six o'clock he left his work, then I looked in his apron, I found materially less cuttings than I expected, the piece that I had marked was not there; I went to the accompting house, where he then was being paid by my father, I went in and shut the door, and told him he had in his pocket what he had no right to; I told him it was not the first time; he said it was the first time, and then produced the silver cuttings, an ounce and fifteen pennyweights. The silver is the property of Mr. Gerrard; here is the marked piece; the cuttings are the produce of that day's work.

The prisoner said nothing in his defence; called three witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 40.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090626-98

622. WILLIAM KENNEY was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 3rd of June , five pounds weight of bacon, value 2 s. the property of Joseph Beal .

JOSEPH BEAL . I am a cheesemonger , No. 9, Henrietta-street, Manchester-square , I sell bacon. On the

3rd of June a person came in my shop, I missed a piece of bacon, I called out stop thief, my wife and maid went out of door; some people opposite brought him back. In five minutes the man and the bacon were brought back together; I was not able to identify the man when he was brought back.

JOHN JONES . I live in Henrietta-street; I am a carpenter. On the evening of the 3rd of June I was standing opposite of Mr. Beal's shop, I heard the cry of stop thief, I saw this man about ten or fifteen yards from Mr. Beal's shop, he was running as fast as he could; I joined in the pursuit; he crossed Oxford-street, ran into Gee's-court, he was stopped by Mr. Hotty's man; directly he threw the bacon down behind him, I picked the bacon up and gave it Mr. Beal's maid; I told the prisoner he was the man who had taken the bacon; he asked if any body saw him drop it; I said, I did.

HENRY CORRALL . I am shopman to Mr. Hotty, No. 9, Gee's-court, he is a ragman, and keeps an old iron shop. On the 3rd of June I heard the cry of stop thief; the prisoner would have run by me if I had not stopped him; Jones came up after the prisoner was down, and said the prisoner had stole that bacon from Mr. Beal; Jones said the prisoner threw the bacon down, and he picked it up.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I never had any thing to do with the bacon, I was taken at my own door, No. 11. I am told that the thief went into No. 13, the first door in Gee's-court. I live in Marybone. I never did any thing till this day.

The prisoner called four witnesses, who gave him a good character.

GUILTY , aged 45.

Whipped in Jail and discharged.

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090626-99

623. THOMAS WILSON was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 2nd of June , a watch, value 30 s. the property of James Marston .

SARAH MARSTON . I am the wife of James Marston , we keep the the Plough in Beaufort's buildings ; the watch was lost from No. 12, Cecil-court, St. Martin's-lane . On the 2nd of June.

Q. When had you last seen it before you missed it - A. Not above two or three minutes before, because I had just looked at it, it was on the mantle piece, by the side of a medal, in my sister's apartment; it was my sister's watch, she was gone out; she had nothing to do with it; she worked at a shop in Cranbourn-alley, and her husband lived with the Prince of Wales.

Q. Did you sleep in the apartment - A. No; we were there because we had taken a room on purpose to sleep in, and we used to go there of a day to get our breakfast, and every thing in her apartment was left in my care.

Q. The watch did not belong to you or to your husband - A. No. I had gone into the next room on purpose to get air, I had not been gone above two minutes to the most, when I came to the door I saw the prisoner turning round from the mantle piece, he was coming towards the door; I thought he might be one of the lodgers; he then got to the stairs; I cast my eye to the mantle piece.

Q. I suppose, as this house is let out in lodgings, the street door is generally left open - A. Yes. When I cast my eye to the mantle piece, and missed the watch, the man was got to the top of the stairs; I said to him you have got a watch; I instantly called out stop thief, the lodgers all then came about; he got down all but three stairs; I was close to him; he said d - n you, I have got no watch; he attempted to throttle me. He threw the watch over the bannisters of the stairs, and broke it, ran out, and shut the door; I went out, I catched sight of him in the court; I called out stop thief, I did not see him stopped; I thought I had better go back, as I had left the property in the passage. He was brought back; then he said he never had been up stairs; I charged him with being the thief. He was secured; my husband and a young man took him to Bow-street.

JOHN LEWIS . I am a plane maker, I live in Mercer-street, Long Acre. I was in St. Martin's-court when two boys cried out stop thief; that man has stole a watch; I turned round and followed the prisoner, he was stopped by several people besides me; I took care that he should not go away; he said I have not got a watch; I did not steal the watch; the boys said you did steal the watch.

Q. Did they say from what place he had stolen it - A. Yes; I said if you have not stolen the watch, why need you be afraid of going down with me to the woman; he hesitated, and at last he said he would; I took him down; she was in a great passion with him; she immediately declared that he was the man that stole the watch; he said she was mistaken.

Q. At the time the boys were calling after him was he running or walking - A. He was running; I took charge of him, and took him to Bow-street with the woman's husband.

Prosecutrix. I have had the watch ever since; it is my sister's watch; it has the marks of violence upon it, the inside is quite beat down; I valued it at thirty shillings.

Prisoner's Defence. I was coming along, I think it was in Bear-street, leading to the King's-mews, a person stopped me and told me I had stole a woman's watch, in some court; I said I had not stolen a watch. I am innocent of the crime. I declare to God I have not the least knowledge, nor was I ever nigh the court to my knowledge; the prosecutrix swore that if I had an hundred necks she would hang me; she struck me. I never did any thing of the kind in my life. I have a situation in the Custom house, and at this time on the eve of promotion; I should be very sorry to be guilty of any thing of the kind.

GUILTY , aged 50.

Transported for Seven Years .

First Middlesex jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090626-100

624. SARAH ALLEN was indicted for feloniously stealing on the 3d of June , six aprons, value 6 s. a shirt, value 5 s. a shift, value 1 s. a pair of stockings, value 6 d. and two frocks, value 1 s. the property of John Rodgers .

MARY RODGERS . I am the wife of John Rodgers , we live in Brook-street, Ratcliffe , I rent a kitchen under ground. On the 3d of June I saw these things safe in my room, about ten minutes before it happened I had occasion to go out in the garden belonging to the house, to hang out a few clothes; I was in the garden

about ten minutes; when I returned I met her in the cellar with these things in her apron; she went into the yard. I stepped up to her, took her by the hand; I saw her put these things behind the door; she said she never saw the things, it was a woman and a sailor that came down, and they had gone up stairs again. The constable on searching of her, found a glass of mine in her pocket; I looked and missed it off the mantle-piece. The linen belonged to me, and the people that I took them in to wash for.

GEORGE PATRICK . I am a constable. I was sent for to take charge of this woman; the prosecutrix charged her with robbing her of some linen; the prisoner said she did not know any thing of it; she was only going through into the yard; on searching of her I found this glass belonging to the prosecutrix.

The property produced and identified.

Prisoner's Defence. I asked leave to go backwards into the yard; I had a handkerchief in my hand and a piece of bread; the gentlewoman was going to shew me in the yard; when she opened the door she saw these things behind the door. I never saw the things before.

GUILTY , aged 37.

Confined One Year in the House of Correction , and fined 1 s.

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090626-101

625. BENJAMIN TOWNSEND , and MOGGY WILLIAMS , were indicted for feloniously stealing on the 23rd of June , a pair of sheets, value 6 s. and a bolster, value 5 s. the property of James Coleman , in a lodging room ,

JAMES COLEMAM . I keep the Cock and Bell, in Whitecross-street . These people took a room of me in another house in Gloucester-court; they had the one pair of stairs ready furnished; I let it to them both, they came as man and wife; they never quitted the house. I had them taken up on suspicion, my house being broken open; on searching the room with the constable, I missed the sheets, a blanket, and bolster off the bed.

EDWARD TRING . I am a constable. I apprehended the prisoners. When we went into the apartment we found the property was gone off the bed; the man said at Worship-street, that he had pawned them.

Q. Did you find they were pawned - A. No.

NOT GUILTY .

Second Middlesex jury, before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090626-102

626. MARGERET COLLINS was indicted for that she on the 13th of June , a piece of false counterfeit money, made to the likeness and similitude of good and lawful current money of this realm, called a shilling, as and for a good shilling, unlawfully and deceitfully did utter to Griffiths Jones , she well knowing it to be false and counterfeit .

The indictment was read by Mr. Reynolds and the case was stated by Mr. Knapp.

GRIFFITHS JONES . I keep the sign of the Marlborough's Head, Bishopgate-street . On the 13th of June last, about half past ten in the morning the prisoner came in and asked for half a pint of porter, it was drawn for her; she put down a penny piece, and then put her hand into her pocket to look for a halfpenny or a farthing as I supposed. I knew the prisoner for some years past; she has offered me base coin frequently before. I have taken three altogether of her, two before this. The half pint of porter came to one penny farthing; instead of her putting down a farthing, she put down a shilling; that was not the first time nor the sixth time that she had served me so; she took up the penny piece, I took up the shilling and walked out of the bar to a better light; I looked at the shilling, I saw it to be a bad one, such as she had offered me before. I sent for a constable and had her taken up; she was searched in my presence. I had the shilling in my hand, and the two shillings that I had taken of her before, I had spoiled by making a hole through them.

Q. What did you do with the shilling she gave you on the 13th - A. I kept it and delivered it to the constable; when she was searched she had seven-pence halfpenny and a farthing in copper money, penny pieces and halfpence; she had a farthing.

JOHN WILLIAMS . I am constable, I was sent for to apprehend the prisoner. Mr. Jones delivered me the shillings, the one in question and the two he had nailed down; I have had them ever since.

COURT. Which of the shillings did he charge her with having uttered that morning - A. That which had not been nailed down, that is it; and the two others I have got here; and these halfpence I found in her pocket; six-pence halfpenny I found in her pocket, and a penny farthing the landlord delivered to me; she said she had taken the shilling that morning.

Q. to Jones. How came you possession of that penny farthing - A. She delivered over the penny farthing after the constable was sent for.

Q. Did she ask for the shilling again - A. No.

CALEB EDWARD POWELL . Q. You are assistant we know to the soliciter of the mint - A. Yes.

Q. You are acquainted of course with counterfeit money - is that a counterfeit - A. It does not appear to have been much in circulation, it appears fresh, it is merely coloured on the surface; it is not worth a farthing. The other two are countefeits; they are coloured likewise.

Prisoner's Defence. May it please your honour, I work at Spitalfields-market. I went from there to Billingsgate; I went to the Bull-tap with a hundred of mackerel; the man that employed me he was going off in the country with the coach; I asked him eight-pence for carrying them, he told me he could afford no more than six-pence; the man gave me a shilling and I gave him six-pence; the load being heavy I went into this man's place, I asked for half a pint of beer; I had a penny piece in my hand, he said had I not a farthing, I said I did not know; I gave him the shilling, he looked at it, he said he did not think it was a good one; I said sir, you should have looked at the shilling before the man went away; the man was on the top of the coach in Bishopgate-street; then he said I know it is a bad one, I think I nailed a shilling of yours down six months ago. I said it did not stand to reason, that if I had a bad one I should offer it to him. I can assure you, since the hour I was born, I never entered his door before. He said he would make an example of my country he would hang every man and woman of the

contry. He took the five farthings, and then he sent for a constable.

GUILTY , aged 42.

Confined Six Months in Newgate , and to find security for her good behaviour for six months afterwards .

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.

Reference Number: t18090626-103

627. JOHN WADE was indicted for a misdemeanour .

The case was stated by Mr. Gurney.

CHARLES SACCARS . Do you know the firm of the proprietors of the Lynn and Norwich coach - A. Yes. Robert Marsh , Isaac Lawton Marsh, Samuel Clark Marsh , Isaac Marsh , and James Marsh , no others; they are the person in town that employ me.

CHARLES MACKERILL . Q. Are you the book keeper at the Bull Inn, Bishopgate-street , in the employ of Messrs. Marsh's - A. Yes. On Thursday the 13th of April, a quarter after eleven in the morning, I received a parcel brought by Satchell; addressed to John Pickering , esq. to be left at the coach office Lynn, with a ticket attached to it of the charge of five shillings and eight-pence; that is carriage five shillings and two-pence, and porterage six-pence; and the direction says

"by the Newcastle coach, to the Angel Inn, St. Martins-le-grand, London". This was brought to me by Satchell; I paid Satchell the five shillings and eight-pence.

Q. Is that the way in which parcels are brought to you daily - A. It is the usual custom of business, where parcels go through London, to pay the carriage of the coach that comes to London; then we charge the parcel in the country that carriage and our carriage. As soon as Satchell had left the office, I opened the parcel, and found nothing else than two sheets of brown paper covered with cartridge paper; as soon as I found the parcel contained nothing but two sheets of brown paper, I sent my porter up the yard to bring Satchell back, he did so. On Satchell's return, he laid the five shillings and eight-pence down; I said you are a pretty fellow, Satchell put the money in his pocket again by my desire. I sent for Sapwell the constable. Satchell, and Sapwell, and I, went to the Magpie, in Newgate-street. I went into the house.

Q. How long did you wait before you saw the defendant - A. I waited I suppose twenty minutes, and then I left Satchell and Sapwell; having to go to Somerset-house upon some business, I left the Magpie about one o'clock, and returned about two o'clock. Wade then was there in company with Satchell and Sapwell; the moment I came in, Sapwell desired me to call a coach, and take the defendant before the lord mayor; I took a coach and took the defendant before the lord mayor. Sapwell informed me on my return, that Satchell had paid the five shillings and eight-pence into the hands of John Wade .

WILLIAM SATCHELL . I am porter at the Oxford Arms in Warwick-lane, and the King's Arms in Leadenhall-street; I was at the time.

Q. Do you remember on the 13th of April last, taking a parcel to the Bull Inn, Bishopgate-street, to go by the Lynn coach - A. Yes; I took it between ten and eleven o'clock. I received that parcel from John Wade , at the Magpie, in Newgate-street. I went from there directly to the Bull in Bishopgate-street.

Q. What passed when Wade gave it to you - A. He said he had got a couple of parcels, he said take them one for the Gloucester and the other for Lynn; I took them. I had known him three years.

Q. What were you to do with the money - A. He was to meet me at the same house at twelve o'clock, to receive the money; I asked him where I should see him to give him the money. He was to meet me at the Magpie at twelve o'clock.

COURT. Were you to receive any money for these two parcels, or either of them - A. Yes; five shillings and eight pence, I think; I am sure of five shillings and eight pence for the Lynn. I carried the parcel for Lynn, first to the Bull; I delivered the parcel and received the five shillings and eight pence; I came out of the office, the bookkeeper sent a porter after me to call me back again, I came back, I laid the five shillings and eight pence on the bookkeeper's desk; on the gentlemen saying this is all I have got for my five shillings and eight-pence, he shewing me the parcel. I saw it contained two sheets of brown paper with cartridge paper. I then told him who I had it of, and where I was to meet the person I had it off.

Mr. Gurney. Then did Sapwell and the bookkeeper go with you to the Magpie - A. Yes. We waited at the Magpie some time, Wade did not come in, we had information that he was at Warwick-lane, we went to Warwick-lane, and there we met him; Mr. Sapwell was on one side of the way and I on the other; I said to him, John, here is your money; I gave him five shillings and eight-pence for the Lynn parcel; he said where is the other, I said you must ask that man for it, pointing to Mr. Sapwell. Mr. Sapwell took the money from him, Mr. Sapwell then took him; he has the other parcel.

Q. At the time he gave you the parcel and you took it, did you believe it to be a parcel going to a gentleman, or did you know it to be those two pieces of paper - A. I knew no more of it than a child unborn. I thought it to be a regular parcel; I knew where he did live, and I had known him three years.

THOMAS SAPWELL . Q. You are a city constable. On the 13th of April were you sent for to the Bull inn - A. Yes. I went there and found Satchell, I went with him to the Magpie in Newgate-street, and afterwards into Warwick-lane; I saw Satchell go up to Wade, I was on one side of the way and he on the other; Satchell spoke to Wade, and gave him this paper into his hand; this paper contains the five shilling and eight-pence. I took Wade by the hand.

Q. Did you hear any words that passed between them - A. I did not.

Q. Did you see whether Wade gave him any thing - A. He did not. I came up immediately upon seeing that, and I took the five shillings and eight-pence out of his hand; I asked Wade if he had sent this man to the Bull inn with a parcel, he said he had. I took him in custody; I took him to the Magpie, and from there to the Mansion house. This money has been in my possession ever since.

Q. Did Satchell give you the other parcel that was to go to Gloucester - A. He did. I believe it has been opened, it is in the same state now as when I received it; it is directed to Gloucester; it is exactly the same form of a parcel and part of the same quire of brown paper. (The direction of the Lynn parcel read.)

" John Pickering , esq. to be left at the coach office

Lynn, by the Newcastle coach;" then there is a ticket stating it to come from the Angel inn; porterage sixpence, carriage five shillings and two-pence, making altogether five shillings and eight-pence.

Q. to Sapwell. Did Wade account for his having the possession of these parcels - A. I understood that he received them from some mail guard, but what mail guard I do not know.

BENJAMIN ROBINSON . Q. I believe your father was the proprietor of the Angel inn - A. Yes; he is now.

Q. On the 13th of April last was the defendant in your employ - A. He was not then, nor had not been for three months before. Prior to these three months he had been there about a year and a half.

Q. I will thank you to look at these tickets, are these the sort of tickets which he used to use when he was there as porter - A. Yes, they are, and I think they are a part of what he must have concealed when he was porter to my father.

COURT. Do you know the hand-writing - A. The figures are similar to his hand-writing, I believe it to be his hand-writing; the direction of the parcel purports to come from Newcastle.

Q. Does any Newcastle coach come to the Angel now - A. Not since he left it; the Newcastle coach ceased to come in December much about the time he left. The direction of the Gloucester parcel; I believe to be his hand writing; I have not the least doubt of it.

GUILTY .

Confined One Year in Newgate .

London jury , before Mr. Recorder.

Reference Number: t18090626-104

628. JAMES PRINGLE was indicted for a misdemeanour .

SARAH MILLER . I live at No. 24, Harp-alley, Fleet-market . I am a widow .

Q. Is your son a soldier in one of his Majesty's regiments - A. Yes; in the West Indies.

Q. Was he at any time at home and absent from his regiment - A. Yes; he deserted from his regiment; he was at home with me in last December.

Q. Were you at all desirous that he should be released from being a soldier - A. No; otherwise than this man said he could do something for him. I never saw him before he called upon me on the 1st of December; my son was in prison for desertion, and the defendant found me out, he told me he had heard that I had a son in trouble, and that if I would give him a little money he would stop my son from going back to his regiment; he told me thirty shillings would be as much as he should want; at that time I gave him one pound note, I told him I had no more change then; I believe he said he would call on the next day for the remainder. When he went away I said sir, I hope you will not deceive me, as you are a stranger; no, he said, he would not; he called again on the next day at an earlier hour than he did the day before, he told me he was short of money, he should be glad of the other ten shillings; I told him I hoped he had done something that would be of use to the lad; he said, oh, yes, he had, and that Mr. Trott had got a detainer to lay against the lad; I advanced him the other ten shillings in silver; he said he could got my son discharged. I never saw him after that.

Q. Did your son go back to the regiment, notwithstanding all these promises of his - A. He was taken to the Savoy; Mr. Pringle did nothing for me, he was sent to the regiment.

Q. When did you see this man next - A. I seeked after Mr. Trott, the officer of Hatton-garden; he said he knew nothing about it. Mr. Trott took him up by my description.

JOHN COOPER . I am Mrs. Miller's man, she is a fruit saleswoman in Fleet Market. On the 1st of December the prisoner came to Mrs. Miller's house, 24, Harp-alley; he said I hear you have a son in a little trouble, and for a little money I will hinder him from going back to his regiment; she asked how much money, he said thirty shillings; my mistress gave him a one pound note, and said she had no more change at present; and then she said, I hope you will not deceive me, as you are a stranger; he said no, he was well known by some creditable people. He came again on the 2nd, on the next day; and said I am come for the other ten shillings, he was rather short of money; my mistress said have you done any thing towards being of use to the lad, he said yes; that Mr. Trott of Hatton Garden had got a warrant or detainer, and at three o'clock the business will be settled; my mistress then gave him the other ten shillings; the prisoner came alone. I never saw the prisoner afterwards till he was taken up.

Q. Was the young man prevented from going back to the regiment - A. He went back to the regiment.

JONATHAN TROTT . I am an officer of Hatton-garden office.

Q. Do you know the prisoner - A. I never knew him till the night I took him.

Q. Had you a warrant against the son of Mrs. Miller - A. No, nor never heard of such a thing, till Mrs. Miller told me of it.

Prisoner's Defence. My lord and gentlemen, I was applied to by Mr. Brooks, who desired me to call upon Mr. Smith, a pauper in Newgate, to do some business; I called upon Smith, who introduced me to Miller, who was sentenced to go in the condemned regiment; he desired me to go to his mother, said she would not mind what money she paid. I said in that case we must get a copy of the commitment, and afterwards a copy of the conviction; humbly hoping that his Majesty would be pleased to let him go in the regular regiment instead of the condemned regiment. I went with a messenger who introduced me into his mother's company; she said how much money, I said about thirty shillings for the copy of his commitment and the certificate of his conviction, and the preparing the petition. She gave me one pound; I called the next day and received the ten shillings. I immediately applied at the clerks office for a certificate to prepare the petition; when I was informed that the prisoner Miller was to be sent to the Savoy. I called upon Miller, said to him, that I found his crime was worse than he represented; he having deserted from the condemned regiment; and as that was the case, I must decline having any thing more to do in the business; as the time would not permit the result of a petition; I would return the thirty shillings to his mother; notwithstanding the trouble I had been at. A few days afterwards I sprained my ancle; was confined in my room, and attended by a surgeon.

GUILTY .

Confined Six Months in Newgate , and fined 1 s.

London jury, before Mr. Common Serjeant.


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